Science.gov

Sample records for growth cone regulates

  1. Autonomous regulation of growth cone filopodia.

    PubMed

    Rehder, V; Cheng, S

    1998-02-05

    The fan-shaped array of filopodia is the first site of contact of a neuronal growth cone with molecules encountered during neuronal pathfinding. Filopodia are highly dynamic structures, and the "action radius" of a growth cone is strongly determined by the length and number of its filopodia. Since interactions of filopodia with instructive cues in the vicinity of the growth cone can have effects on growth cone morphology within minutes, it has to be assumed that a large part of the signaling underlying such morphological changes resides locally within the growth cone proper. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that two important growth cone parameters-namely, the length and number of its filopodia-are regulated autonomously in the growth cone. We previously demonstrated in identified neurons from the snail Helisoma trivolvis that filopodial length and number are regulated by intracellular calcium. Here, we investigated filopodial dynamics and their regulation by the second-messenger calcium in growth cones which were physically isolated from their parent neuron by neurite transection. Our results show that isolated growth cones have longer but fewer filopodia than growth cones attached to their parent cell. These isolated growth cones, however, are fully capable of undergoing calcium-induced cytoskeletal changes, suggesting that the machinery necessary to perform changes in filopodial length and number is fully intrinsic to the growth cone proper.

  2. Mechanochemical regulation of growth cone motility

    PubMed Central

    Kerstein, Patrick C.; Nichol, Robert H.; Gomez, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal growth cones are exquisite sensory-motor machines capable of transducing features contacted in their local extracellular environment into guided process extension during development. Extensive research has shown that chemical ligands activate cell surface receptors on growth cones leading to intracellular signals that direct cytoskeletal changes. However, the environment also provides mechanical support for growth cone adhesion and traction forces that stabilize leading edge protrusions. Interestingly, recent work suggests that both the mechanical properties of the environment and mechanical forces generated within growth cones influence axon guidance. In this review we discuss novel molecular mechanisms involved in growth cone force production and detection, and speculate how these processes may be necessary for the development of proper neuronal morphogenesis. PMID:26217175

  3. Local calcium changes regulate the length of growth cone filopodia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Su; Geddis, Matthew S; Rehder, Vincent

    2002-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the free intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in growth cones can act as an important regulator of growth cone behavior. Here we investigated whether there is a spatial and temporal correlation between [Ca(2+)](i) and one particular aspect of growth cone behavior, namely the regulation of growth cone filopodia. Calcium was released from the caged compound NP-EGTA (o-nitrophenyl EGTA tetrapotassium salt) to simulate a signaling event in the form of a transient increase in [Ca(2+)](i). In three different experimental paradigms, we released calcium either globally (within an entire growth cone), regionally (within a small area of the lamellipodium), or locally (within a single filopodium). We demonstrate that global photolysis of NP-EGTA in growth cones caused a transient increase in [Ca(2+)](i) throughout the growth cone and elicited subsequent filopodial elongation that was restricted to the stimulated growth cone. Pharmacological blockage of either calmodulin or the Ca(2+)-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin, inhibited the effect of uncaging calcium, suggesting that these enzymes are acting downstream of calcium. Regional uncaging of calcium in the lamellipodium caused a regional increase in [Ca(2+)](i), but induced filopodial elongation on the entire growth cone. Elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) locally within an individual filopodium resulted in the elongation of only the stimulated filopodium. These findings suggest that the effect of an elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) on filopodial behavior depends on the spatial distribution of the calcium signal. In particular, calcium signals within filopodia can cause filopodial length changes that are likely a first step towards directed filopodial steering events seen during pathfinding in vivo.

  4. Local translation of RhoA regulates growth cone collapse

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Llewellyn J.; Macosko, Evan Z.; Jeromin, Andreas; Urquhart, Erica R.; Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2005-01-01

    Neuronal development requires highly coordinated regulation of the cytoskeleton within the developing axon. This dynamic regulation manifests itself in axonal branching, turning, and pathfinding, presynaptic differentiation, and growth cone collapse and extension. Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A), a secreted guidance cue that primarily acts to repel axons from inappropriate targets, induces cytoskeletal rearrangements that results in growth cone collapse 1. These effects require intra-axonal mRNA translation. Here we show that transcripts for RhoA, a small GTPase that regulates the actin cytoskeleton, are localized to developing axons and growth cones, and this localization is mediated by an axonal targeting element located in the RhoA 3’UTR. Sema3A induces intra-axonal translation of RhoA mRNA and this local translation of RhoA is necessary and sufficient for Sema3A-mediated growth cone collapse. These studies indicate that local RhoA translation regulates the neuronal cytoskeleton and identify a novel mechanism for the regulation of RhoA signaling. PMID:16107849

  5. Regulation of neuronal growth cone filopodia by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Van Wagenen, S; Rehder, V

    1999-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed to play an important role during neuronal development. Since many of its effects occur during the time of growth cone pathfinding and target interaction, we here test the hypothesis that part of NO's effects might be exerted at the growth cone. We found that low concentrations of the NO-donors DEA/NO, SIN-1, and SNP caused a rapid and transient elongation of filopodia as well as a reduction in filopodial number. These effects resulted from distinct changes in filopodial extension and retraction rates. Our novel findings suggest that NO could play a physiological role by temporarily changing a growth cone's morphology and switching its behavior from a close-range to a long-range exploratory mode. We subsequently dissected the pathway by which NO acted on growth cones. The effect of NO donors on filopodial length could be blocked by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, an inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), indicating that NO acted via sGC. Supporting this idea, injection of cyclic GMP (cGMP) mimicked the effect of NO donors on growth cone filopodia. Moreover, application of NO-donors as well as injection of cGMP elicited a rapid and transient rise in intracellular calcium in growth cones, indicating that NO acted via cGMP to elevate calcium. This calcium rise, as well as the morphological effects of SIN-1 on filopodia, were blocked by preventing calcium entry. Given the role of filopodia in axonal guidance, our new data suggest that NO could function at the neuronal growth cone as an intracellular and/or intercellular signaling molecule by affecting steering decisions during neuronal pathfinding.

  6. NCS-1 differentially regulates growth cone and somata calcium channels in Lymnaea neurons.

    PubMed

    Hui, Kwokyin; Feng, Zhong-Ping

    2008-02-01

    Local voltage-gated calcium channels, which regulate intracellular Ca2+ levels by allowing Ca2+ influx, play an important role in guiding and shaping growth cones, and in regulating the outgrowth and branching of neurites. Therefore, elucidating the mechanisms that regulate the biophysical properties of whole-cell calcium currents in the growth cones and somata of growing neurons is important to improving our understanding of neuronal development and regeneration. In this study, taking advantage of the large size of the pedal A (PeA) neurons in Lymnaea stagnalis, we compared the biophysical properties of somata and growth cone whole-cell calcium channel currents using Ba2+ and Ca2+ as current carriers. We found that somata and growth cone currents exhibit similar high-voltage activation properties. However, Ba2+ and Ca2+ currents in growth cones and somata are differentially affected by a dominant-negative peptide containing the C-terminal amino acid sequence of neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1). The peptide selectively reduces the peak and sustained components of current densities and the slope conductance in growth cones, and shifts the reversal potential of the growth cone currents to more hyperpolarized voltages. In contrast, the peptide had no significant effect on the somata calcium channels. Thus, we conclude that NCS-1 differentially modulates Ca2+ currents in the somata and growth cones of regenerating neurons, and may serve as a key regulator to facilitate the growth cone calcium channel activity.

  7. Regulation of neuronal growth cone filopodia by nitric oxide depends on soluble guanylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Van Wagenen, S; Rehder, V

    2001-02-15

    Nitric oxide has been proposed to play an important role in neuronal development. We have previously shown that growth cones from an identified neuron, B5, in the snail Helisoma trivolvis, respond to nitric oxide (NO) donors by increasing the length of their filopodia within minutes of application (Van Wagenen and Rehder, 1999). This effect was mediated through a cGMP-induced increase in [Ca2+]i and resulted in an enlargement of the growth cone's action radius, suggesting that NO could function as a signaling molecule during neuronal pathfinding. We show here that NO functions as a specific rather than a general regulator of growth cone filopodia, because another identified neuron from the same ganglion, B19, failed to respond to NO with an increase in filopodial length. We found that, contrary to B5 neurons, B19 growth cones contained little or no soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) immunoreactivity, presumably preventing their response to NO. This hypothesis was supported by the finding that the sGC activator YC-1 (10 microM) had no effect on B19 filopodia but induced elongation of B5 filopodia. These results indicate that the effects of NO can be quite specific, and raise the interesting possibility that neurons could selectively tune in to NO by differentially expressing the target enzyme sGC in the appropriate cellular location during critical developmental stages. In addition, our NADPH-diaphorase staining and anti-NOS immunohistochemisty suggest that growth cones of B5 neurons, but not of B19 neurons, could be a source of NO, making NO a potential intra- and transcellular messenger.

  8. Ect2, an ortholog of Drosophila Pebble, regulates formation of growth cones in primary cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Takahiro; Higashida, Chiharu; Aoki, Yoshihiko; Islam, Mohammad Saharul; Dohmoto, Mitsuko; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2016-01-01

    In collaboration with Marshall Nirenberg, we performed in vivo RNA interference (RNAi) genome-wide screening in Drosophila embryos. Pebble has been shown to be involved in Drosophila neuronal development. We have also reported that depletion of Ect2, a mammalian ortholog of Pebble, induces differentiation in NG108-15 neuronal cells. However, the precise role of Ect2 in neuronal development has yet to be studied. Here, we confirmed in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells that inhibition of Ect2 expression by RNAi stimulated neurite outgrowth, and in the mouse embryonic cortex that Ect2 was accumulated throughout the ventricular and subventricular zones with neuronal progenitor cells. Next, the effects of Ect2 depletion were studied in primary cultures of mouse embryonic cortical neurons: Loss of Ect2 did not affect the differentiation stages of neuritogenesis, the number of neurites, or axon length, while the numbers of growth cones and growth cone-like structures were increased. Taken together, our results suggest that Ect2 contributes to neuronal morphological differentiation through regulation of growth cone dynamics. PMID:22366651

  9. Ect2, an ortholog of Drosophila Pebble, regulates formation of growth cones in primary cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Takahiro; Higashida, Chiharu; Aoki, Yoshihiko; Islam, Mohammad Saharul; Dohmoto, Mitsuko; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2012-11-01

    In collaboration with Marshall Nirenberg, we performed in vivo RNA interference (RNAi) genome-wide screening in Drosophila embryos. Pebble has been shown to be involved in Drosophila neuronal development. We have also reported that depletion of Ect2, a mammalian ortholog of Pebble, induces differentiation in NG108-15 neuronal cells. However, the precise role of Ect2 in neuronal development has yet to be studied. Here, we confirmed in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells that inhibition of Ect2 expression by RNAi stimulated neurite outgrowth, and in the mouse embryonic cortex that Ect2 was accumulated throughout the ventricular and subventricular zones with neuronal progenitor cells. Next, the effects of Ect2 depletion were studied in primary cultures of mouse embryonic cortical neurons: Loss of Ect2 did not affect the differentiation stages of neuritogenesis, the number of neurites, or axon length, while the numbers of growth cones and growth cone-like structures were increased. Taken together, our results suggest that Ect2 contributes to neuronal morphological differentiation through regulation of growth cone dynamics.

  10. L1/Laminin modulation of growth cone response to EphB triggers growth pauses and regulates the microtubule destabilizing protein SCG10.

    PubMed

    Suh, Leejee H; Oster, Stephen F; Soehrman, Sophia S; Grenningloh, Gabriele; Sretavan, David W

    2004-02-25

    During development, EphB proteins serve as axon guidance molecules for retinal ganglion cell axon pathfinding toward the optic nerve head and in midbrain targets. To better understand the mechanisms by which EphB proteins influence retinal growth cone behavior, we investigated how axon responses to EphB were modulated by laminin and L1, two guidance molecules that retinal axons encounter during in vivo pathfinding. Unlike EphB stimulation in the presence of laminin, which triggers typical growth cone collapse, growth cones co-stimulated by L1 did not respond to EphB. Moreover, EphB exposure in the presence of both laminin and L1 resulted in a novel growth cone inhibition manifested as a pause in axon elongation with maintenance of normal growth cone morphology and filopodial activity. Pauses were not associated with loss of growth cone actin but were accompanied by a redistribution of the microtubule cytoskeleton with increased numbers of microtubules extending into filopodia and to the peripheral edge of the growth cone. This phenomenon was accompanied by reduced levels of the growth cone microtubule destabilizing protein SCG10. Antibody blockade of SCG10 function in growth cones resulted in both changes in microtubule distribution and pause responses mirroring those elicited by EphB in the presence of laminin and L1. These results demonstrate that retinal growth cone responsiveness to EphB is regulated by co-impinging signals from other axon guidance molecules. Furthermore, the results are consistent with EphB-mediated axon guidance mechanisms that involve the SCG10-mediated regulation of the growth cone microtubule cytoskeleton.

  11. α-Synuclein regulates the partitioning between tubulin dimers and microtubules at neuronal growth cone

    PubMed Central

    Cartelli, Daniele; Cappelletti, Graziella

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The partitioning between tubulin dimers and microtubules is fundamental for the regulation of several neuronal activities, from neuronal polarization and processes extension to growth cone remodelling. This phenomenon is modulated by several proteins, including the well-known microtubule destabilizer Stathmin. We recently demonstrated that α-Synuclein, a presynaptic protein associated to Parkinson's disease, shares structural and functional properties with Stathmin, and we showed that α-Synuclein acts as a foldable dynamase. Here, we pinpoint the impact of wild type α-Synuclein on the partitioning between tubulin dimers and microtubules and show that Parkinson's disease-linked mutants lose this capability. Thus, our results indicate a new role for α-Synuclein in regulating microtubule system and support the concept that microtubules and α-Synuclein are partners in the modulation of neuronal health and degenerative processes. Furthermore, these data strengthen our hypothesis of the existence of a functional redundancy between α-Synuclein and Stathmin.

  12. Regulated release of serotonin from axonal growth cones isolated from the fetal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Mercado, R; Floran, B; Hernandez, J

    1998-01-01

    In the present work we propose an hypothetical model related to a molecular recognizing system for serotonin in isolated growth cone particles. This model is supported by previous results from our laboratory plus new ones which show that growth cones release serotonin tonically and such release can be stimulated by potassium in a calcium-dependent manner. The present results, together with other author's data, suggest a physiological basis for the putative role of serotonin as a trophic factor during nervous system development.

  13. A novel role for doublecortin and doublecortin-like kinase in regulating growth cone microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Daphney C.; Baas, Peter W.; Black, Mark M.

    2012-01-01

    Doublecortin (DCX) and doublecortin-like kinase (DCLK), closely related family members, are microtubule-associated proteins with overlapping functions in both neuronal migration and axonal outgrowth. In growing axons, these proteins appear to have their primary functions in the growth cone. Here, we used siRNA to deplete these proteins from cultured rat sympathetic neurons. Normally, microtubules in the growth cone exhibit a gently curved contour as they extend from the base of the cone toward its periphery. However, following depletion of DCX and DCLK, microtubules throughout the growth cone become much more curvy, with many microtubules exhibiting multiple prominent bends over relatively short distances, creating a configuration that we termed wave-like folds. Microtubules with these folds appeared as if they were buckling in response to powerful forces. Indeed, inhibition of myosin-II, which generates forces on the actin cytoskeleton to push microtubules in the growth cone back toward the axonal shaft, significantly decreases the frequency of these wave-like folds. In addition, in the absence of DCX and DCLK, the depth of microtubule invasion into filopodia is reduced compared with controls, and at a functional level, growth cone responses to substrate guidance cues are altered. Conversely, overexpression of DCX results in microtubules that are straighter than usual, suggesting that higher levels of these proteins can enable an even greater resistance to folding. These findings support a role for DCX and DCLK in enabling microtubules to overcome retrograde actin-based forces, thereby facilitating the ability of the growth cone to carry out its crucial path-finding functions. PMID:23001563

  14. A novel role for doublecortin and doublecortin-like kinase in regulating growth cone microtubules.

    PubMed

    Jean, Daphney C; Baas, Peter W; Black, Mark M

    2012-12-15

    Doublecortin (DCX) and doublecortin-like kinase (DCLK), closely related family members, are microtubule-associated proteins with overlapping functions in both neuronal migration and axonal outgrowth. In growing axons, these proteins appear to have their primary functions in the growth cone. Here, we used siRNA to deplete these proteins from cultured rat sympathetic neurons. Normally, microtubules in the growth cone exhibit a gently curved contour as they extend from the base of the cone toward its periphery. However, following depletion of DCX and DCLK, microtubules throughout the growth cone become much more curvy, with many microtubules exhibiting multiple prominent bends over relatively short distances, creating a configuration that we termed wave-like folds. Microtubules with these folds appeared as if they were buckling in response to powerful forces. Indeed, inhibition of myosin-II, which generates forces on the actin cytoskeleton to push microtubules in the growth cone back toward the axonal shaft, significantly decreases the frequency of these wave-like folds. In addition, in the absence of DCX and DCLK, the depth of microtubule invasion into filopodia is reduced compared with controls, and at a functional level, growth cone responses to substrate guidance cues are altered. Conversely, overexpression of DCX results in microtubules that are straighter than usual, suggesting that higher levels of these proteins can enable an even greater resistance to folding. These findings support a role for DCX and DCLK in enabling microtubules to overcome retrograde actin-based forces, thereby facilitating the ability of the growth cone to carry out its crucial path-finding functions.

  15. CRMP4 and CRMP2 Interact to Coordinate Cytoskeleton Dynamics, Regulating Growth Cone Development and Axon Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Minghui; Cha, Caihui; Ye, Yongheng; Zhang, Jifeng; Li, Sumei; Wu, Fengming; Gong, Sitang; Guo, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    Cytoskeleton dynamics are critical phenomena that underpin many fundamental cellular processes. Collapsin response mediator proteins (CRMPs) are highly expressed in the developing nervous system, mediating growth cone guidance, neuronal polarity, and axonal elongation. However, whether and how CRMPs associate with microtubules and actin coordinated cytoskeletal dynamics remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that CRMP2 and CRMP4 interacted with tubulin and actin in vitro and colocalized with the cytoskeleton in the transition-zone in developing growth cones. CRMP2 and CRMP4 also interacted with one another coordinately to promote growth cone development and axonal elongation. Genetic silencing of CRMP2 enhanced, whereas overexpression of CRMP2 suppressed, the inhibitory effects of CRMP4 knockdown on axonal development. In addition, knockdown of CRMP2 or overexpression of truncated CRMP2 reversed the promoting effect of CRMP4. With the overexpression of truncated CRMP2 or CRMP4 lacking the cytoskeleton interaction domain, the promoting effect of CRMP was suppressed. These data suggest a model in which CRMP2 and CRMP4 form complexes to bridge microtubules and actin and thus work cooperatively to regulate growth cone development and axonal elongation. PMID:26064693

  16. Arginyltransferase ATE1 is targeted to the neuronal growth cones and regulates neurite outgrowth during brain development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junling; Pavlyk, Iuliia; Vedula, Pavan; Sterling, Stephanie; Leu, N Adrian; Dong, Dawei W; Kashina, Anna

    2017-10-01

    Arginylation is an emerging protein modification mediated by arginyltransferase ATE1, shown to regulate embryogenesis and actin cytoskeleton, however its functions in different physiological systems are not well understood. Here we analyzed the role of ATE1 in brain development and neuronal growth by producing a conditional mouse knockout with Ate1 deletion in the nervous system driven by Nestin promoter (Nes-Ate1 mice). These mice were weaker than wild type, resulting in low postnatal survival rates, and had abnormalities in the brain that suggested defects in neuronal migration. Cultured Ate1 knockout neurons showed a reduction in the neurite outgrowth and the levels of doublecortin and F-actin in the growth cones. In wild type, ATE1 prominently localized to the growth cones, in addition to the cell bodies. Examination of the Ate1 mRNA sequence reveals the existence of putative zipcode-binding sequences involved in mRNA targeting to the cell periphery and local translation at the growth cones. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that Ate1 mRNA localized to the tips of the growth cones, likely due to zipcode-mediated targeting, and this localization coincided with spots of localization of arginylated β-actin, which disappeared in the presence of protein synthesis inhibitors. We propose that zipcode-mediated co-targeting of Ate1 and β-actin mRNA leads to localized co-translational arginylation of β-actin that drives the growth cone migration and neurite outgrowth. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Membrane proteins of the nerve growth cone and their developmental regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Simkowitz, P.; Ellis, L.; Pfenninger, K.H.

    1989-03-01

    The membrane polypeptides of growth cone fragments (growth cone particles, GCPs) isolated from fetal rat brain by subcellular fractionation have been analyzed in further detail. The major polypeptides of salt-washed GCP membranes detected by 1-dimensional gel electrophoresis resolve in 2-dimensional gels as a spot of 52 kDa that comigrates with beta-tubulin and reacts with anti-beta-tubulin; a 46 kDa, pl 4.3, polypeptide (pp46) that has no equivalent in the soluble fraction and is identical to one of the GCP's major phosphoproteins and to GAP43; a spot of 42 kDa that comigrates with actin; and a species of 34 kDa (p34) without soluble equivalent. The prominent 38 kDa doublet identified in 1-dimensional gels is difficult to resolve in 2-dimensional gels. The major phosphoproteins pp80ac, pp46, and pp40, as well as p34 partition into the oil phase of Triton X-114 extracts, suggesting that they are integral membrane proteins, at least in our experimental conditions. The properties of pp46 reported here are in conflict with the highly hydrophilic amino acid sequence predicted for GAP43/B50/F1. Growth-cone and presynaptic membrane proteins are compared as follows. After eye injection of 35S-methionine, GCPs and synaptosomes are isolated from the target areas of optic nerve of fetal and adult rats, respectively. Polypeptides are separated by 1- and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and the radiolabeled species identified fluorographically. The comparison of labeled GCP and synaptosome polypeptides shows that all 5 major Coomassie blue-stained polypeptides of GCP membranes (52, 46, 42, 38, 34 kDa) are intensely labeled after eye injection. However, in synaptosomes, these polypeptides are weakly labeled if at all; instead, an intensely labeled polypeptide of 28 kDa, and several additional species not seen in GCPs, have appeared.

  18. Regulation of neurite outgrowth mediated by neuronal calcium sensor-1 and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor in nerve growth cones.

    PubMed

    Iketani, M; Imaizumi, C; Nakamura, F; Jeromin, A; Mikoshiba, K; Goshima, Y; Takei, K

    2009-07-07

    Calcium acts as an important second messenger in the intracellular signal pathways in a variety of cell functions. Strictly controlled intracellular calcium is required for proper neurite outgrowth of developing neurons. However, the molecular mechanisms of this process are still largely unknown. Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1) is a high-affinity and low-capacity calcium binding protein, which is specifically expressed in the nervous system. NCS-1 was distributed throughout the entire region of growth cones located at a distal tip of neurite in cultured chick dorsal root ganglion neurons. In the central domain of the growth cone, however, NCS-1 was distributed in a clustered specific pattern and co-localized with the type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP(3)R1). The pharmacological inhibition of InsP(3) receptors decreased the clustered specific distribution of NCS-1 in the growth cones and inhibited neurite outgrowth but did not change the growth cone morphology. The acute and localized loss of NCS-1 function in the growth cone induced by chromophore-assisted laser inactivation (CALI) resulted in the growth arrest of neurites and lamellipodial and filopodial retractions. These findings suggest that NCS-1 is involved in the regulation of both neurite outgrowth and growth cone morphology. In addition, NCS-1 is functionally linked to InsP(3)R1, which may play an important role in the regulation of neurite outgrowth.

  19. Substrate Deformation Predicts Neuronal Growth Cone Advance

    PubMed Central

    Athamneh, Ahmad I.M.; Cartagena-Rivera, Alexander X.; Raman, Arvind; Suter, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Although pulling forces have been observed in axonal growth for several decades, their underlying mechanisms, absolute magnitudes, and exact roles are not well understood. In this study, using two different experimental approaches, we quantified retrograde traction force in Aplysia californica neuronal growth cones as they develop over time in response to a new adhesion substrate. In the first approach, we developed a novel method, to our knowledge, for measuring traction forces using an atomic force microscope (AFM) with a cantilever that was modified with an Aplysia cell adhesion molecule (apCAM)-coated microbead. In the second approach, we used force-calibrated glass microneedles coated with apCAM ligands to guide growth cone advance. The traction force exerted by the growth cone was measured by monitoring the microneedle deflection using an optical microscope. Both approaches showed that Aplysia growth cones can develop traction forces in the 100–102 nN range during adhesion-mediated advance. Moreover, our results suggest that the level of traction force is directly correlated to the stiffness of the microneedle, which is consistent with a reinforcement mechanism previously observed in other cell types. Interestingly, the absolute level of traction force did not correlate with growth cone advance toward the adhesion site, but the amount of microneedle deflection did. In cases of adhesion-mediated growth cone advance, the mean needle deflection was 1.05 ± 0.07 μm. By contrast, the mean deflection was significantly lower (0.48 ± 0.06 μm) when the growth cones did not advance. Our data support a hypothesis that adhesion complexes, which can undergo micron-scale elastic deformation, regulate the coupling between the retrogradely flowing actin cytoskeleton and apCAM substrates, stimulating growth cone advance if sufficiently abundant. PMID:26445437

  20. WAVE2-Abi2 complex controls growth cone activity and regulates the multipolar-bipolar transition as well as the initiation of glia-guided migration.

    PubMed

    Xie, Min-Jue; Yagi, Hideshi; Kuroda, Kazuki; Wang, Chen-Chi; Komada, Munekazu; Zhao, Hong; Sakakibara, Akira; Miyata, Takaki; Nagata, Koh-Ichi; Oka, Yuichiro; Iguchi, Tokuichi; Sato, Makoto

    2013-06-01

    Glia-guided migration (glia-guided locomotion) during radial migration is a characteristic yet unique mode of migration. In this process, the directionality of migration is predetermined by glial processes and not by growth cones. Prior to the initiation of glia-guided migration, migrating neurons transform from multipolar to bipolar, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this multipolar-bipolar transition and the commencement of glia-guided migration are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that the multipolar-bipolar transition is not solely a cell autonomous event; instead, the interaction of growth cones with glial processes plays an essential role. Time-lapse imaging with lattice assays reveals the importance of vigorously active growth cones in searching for appropriate glial scaffolds, completing the transition, and initiating glia-guided migration. These growth cone activities are regulated by Abl kinase and Cdk5 via WAVE2-Abi2 through the phosphorylation of tyrosine 150 and serine 137 of WAVE2. Neurons that do not display such growth cone activities are mispositioned in a more superficial location in the neocortex, suggesting the significance of growth cones for the final location of the neurons. This process occurs in spite of the "inside-out" principle in which later-born neurons are situated more superficially.

  1. RNA-binding proteins and translational regulation in axons and growth cones

    PubMed Central

    Hörnberg, Hanna; Holt, Christine

    2013-01-01

    RNA localization and regulation play an important role in the developing and adult nervous system. In navigating axons, extrinsic cues can elicit rapid local protein synthesis that mediates directional or morphological responses. The mRNA repertoire in axons is large and dynamically changing, yet studies suggest that only a subset of these mRNAs are translated after cue stimulation, suggesting the need for a high level of translational regulation. Here, we review the role of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) as local regulators of translation in developing axons. We focus on their role in growth, guidance, and synapse formation, and discuss the mechanisms by which they regulate translation in axons. PMID:23734093

  2. The trip of the tip: understanding the growth cone machinery

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, Laura Anne; Van Vactor, David

    2009-01-01

    Preface The central player in the road trip of axon guidance is the growth cone, a dynamic structure located at the tip of the growing axon. During its journey, the growth cone comprises both `vehicle' and `navigator'. Whereas the `vehicle' maintains growth cone movement and provides the cytoskeletal structural elements of its framework, a motor to move forward, and a mechanism to provide traction on the road, the `navigator' aspect guides this system in a spatially-biased way to translate environmental signals into directional movement. Understanding the functions and regulation of the vehicle and navigator provides new insights into the cell biology of growth cone guidance. PMID:19373241

  3. EMA: a developmentally regulated cell-surface glycoprotein of CNS neurons that is concentrated at the leading edge of growth cones.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, N L; Parkinson, D; Wayne, D B; Heuser, J E; Pearlman, A L

    1992-08-01

    To identify cell-surface molecules that mediate interactions between neurons and their environment during neural development, we used monoclonal antibody techniques to define a developmentally regulated antigen in the central nervous system of the mouse. The antibody we produced (2A1) immunolabels cells throughout the central nervous system; we analyzed its distribution in the developing cerebral cortex, where it is expressed on cells very soon after they complete mitosis and leave the periventricular proliferative zone. Expression continues into adult life. The antibody also labels the epithelium of the choroid plexus and the renal proximal tubules, but does not label neurons of the peripheral nervous system in the dorsal root ganglia. In dissociated cell culture of embryonic cerebral cortex, 2A1 labels the surface of neurons but not glia. Immunolabeling of neurons in tissue culture is particularly prominent on the edge of growth cones, including filopodia and the leading edge of lamellipodia, when observed with either immunofluorescence or freeze-etch immunoelectron microscopy. Immunopurification with 2A1 of a CHAPS-extracted membrane preparation from brains of neonatal mice produces a broad (32-36 kD) electrophoretic band and a less prominent 70 kD band that are sensitive to N-glycosidase but not endoglycosidase H. Thus the 2A1 antibody recognizes a developmentally regulated, neuronal cell surface glycoprotein (or glycoproteins) with complex N-linked oligosaccharide side chains. We have termed the glycoprotein antigen EMA because of its prominence on the edge membrane of growth cones. EMA is similar to the M6 antigen (Lagenaur et al: J. Neurobiol. 23:71-88, 1992) in apparent molecular weight, distribution in tissue sections, and immunoreactivity on Western blots, suggesting that the two antigens are similar or identical. Expression of EMA is a very early manifestation of neuronal differentiation; its distribution on growth cones suggests a role in mediating the

  4. Actin-binding proteins take the reins in growth cones.

    PubMed

    Pak, Chi W; Flynn, Kevin C; Bamburg, James R

    2008-02-01

    Higher-order actin-based networks (actin superstructures) are important for growth-cone motility and guidance. Principles for generating, organizing and remodelling actin superstructures have emerged from recent findings in cell-free systems, non-neuronal cells and growth cones. This Review examines how actin superstructures are initiated de novo at the leading-edge membrane and how the spontaneous organization of actin superstructures is driven by ensembles of actin-binding proteins. How the regulation of actin-binding proteins can affect growth-cone turning and axonal regeneration is also discussed.

  5. Syndecan promotes axon regeneration by stabilizing growth cone migration

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Tyson J.; Hammarlund, Marc

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Growth cones facilitate the repair of nervous system damage by providing the driving force for axon regeneration. Using single-neuron laser axotomy and in vivo time-lapse imaging, we show that syndecan, a heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycan, is required for growth cone function during axon regeneration in C. elegans. In the absence of syndecan, regenerating growth cones form but are unstable and collapse, decreasing the effective growth rate and impeding regrowth to target cells. We provide evidence that syndecan has two distinct functions during axon regeneration: 1) a canonical function in axon guidance that requires expression outside the nervous system and depends on HS chains, and 2) a novel intrinsic function in growth cone stabilization that is mediated by the syndecan core protein, independently of HS. Thus, syndecan is a novel regulator of a critical choke point in nervous system repair. PMID:25001284

  6. Growth cones as soft and weak force generators

    PubMed Central

    Betz, Timo; Koch, Daniel; Lu, Yun-Bi; Franze, Kristian; Käs, Josef A.

    2011-01-01

    Many biochemical processes in the growth cone finally target its biomechanical properties, such as stiffness and force generation, and thus permit and control growth cone movement. Despite the immense progress in our understanding of biochemical processes regulating neuronal growth, growth cone biomechanics remains poorly understood. Here, we combine different experimental approaches to measure the structural and mechanical properties of a growth cone and to simultaneously determine its actin dynamics and traction force generation. Using fundamental physical relations, we exploited these measurements to determine the internal forces generated by the actin cytoskeleton in the lamellipodium. We found that, at timescales longer than the viscoelastic relaxation time of τ = 8.5 ± 0.5 sec, growth cones show liquid-like characteristics, whereas at shorter time scales they behaved elastically with a surprisingly low elastic modulus of E = 106 ± 21 Pa. Considering the growth cone’s mechanical properties and retrograde actin flow, we determined the internal stress to be on the order of 30 pN per μm2. Traction force measurements confirmed these values. Hence, our results indicate that growth cones are particularly soft and weak structures that may be very sensitive to the mechanical properties of their environment. PMID:21813757

  7. Kinematics of Cone-In-Cone Growth, with Implications for Timing and Formation Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooker, J. N.; Cartwright, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Cone-in-cone is an enigmatic structure. Similar to many fibrous calcite veins, cone-in-cone is generally formed of calcite and present in bedding-parallel vein-like accumulations within fine-grained rocks. Unlike most fibrous veins, cone-in-cone contains conical inclusions of host-rock material, creating nested, parallel cones throughout. A long-debated aspect of cone-in-cone structures is whether the calcite precipitated with its conical form (primary cone-in-cone), or whether the cones formed afterwards (secondary cone-in-cone). Trace dolomite within a calcite cone-in-cone structure from the Cretaceous of Jordan supports the primary hypothesis. The host sediment is a siliceous mud containing abundant rhombohedral dolomite grains. Dolomite rhombohedra are also distributed throughout the cone-in-cone. The rhombohedra within the cones are randomly oriented yet locally have dolomite overgrowths having boundaries that are aligned with calcite fibers. Evidence that dolomite co-precipitated with calcite, and did not replace calcite, includes (i) preferential downward extension of dolomite overgrowths, in the presumed growth-direction of the cone-in-cone, and (ii) planar, vertical borders between dolomite crystals and calcite fibers. Because dolomite overgrows host-sediment rhombohedra and forms fibers within the cones, it follows that the host-sediment was included within the growing cone-in-cone as the calcite precipitated, and not afterward. The host-sediment was not injected into the cone-in-cone along fractures, as the secondary-origin hypothesis suggests. This finding implies that cone-in-cone in general does not form over multiple stages, and thus has greater potential to preserve the chemical signature of its original precipitation. Because cone-in-cone likely forms before complete lithification of the host, and because the calcite displaces the host material against gravity, this chemical signature can preserve information about early overpressures in fine

  8. Growth cone morphology and spreading are regulated by a dynamin–cortactin complex at point contacts in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kurklinsky, Svetlana; Chen, Jing; McNiven, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal growth cone (GC) migration and targeting are essential processes for the formation of a neural network during embryonic development. Currently, the mechanisms that support directed motility of GCs are not fully defined. The large GTPase dynamin and an interacting actin-binding protein, cortactin, have been localized to GCs, although the function performed by this complex is unclear. We have found that cortactin and the ubiquitous form of dynamin (Dyn) 2 exhibit a striking co-localization at the base of the transition zone of advancing GCs of embryonic hippocampal neurons. Confocal and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopies demonstrate that this basal localization represents point contacts. Exogenous expression of wild-type Dyn2 and cortactin leads to large, exceptionally flat, and static GCs, whereas disrupting this complex has no such effect. We find that excessive GC spreading is induced by Dyn2 and cortactin over-expression and substantial recruitment of the point contact-associated, actin-binding protein α-actinin1 to the ventral GC membrane. The distributions of other point contact proteins such as vinculin or paxillin appear unchanged. Immunoprecipitation experiments show that both Dyn2 and cortactin reside in a complex with α-actinin1. These findings provide new insights into the role of Dyn2 and the actin cytoskeleton in GC adhesion and motility. PMID:21210813

  9. Growth cone morphology and spreading are regulated by a dynamin-cortactin complex at point contacts in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kurklinsky, Svetlana; Chen, Jing; McNiven, Mark A

    2011-04-01

    Neuronal growth cone (GC) migration and targeting are essential processes for the formation of a neural network during embryonic development. Currently, the mechanisms that support directed motility of GCs are not fully defined. The large GTPase dynamin and an interacting actin-binding protein, cortactin, have been localized to GCs, although the function performed by this complex is unclear. We have found that cortactin and the ubiquitous form of dynamin (Dyn) 2 exhibit a striking co-localization at the base of the transition zone of advancing GCs of embryonic hippocampal neurons. Confocal and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopies demonstrate that this basal localization represents point contacts. Exogenous expression of wild-type Dyn2 and cortactin leads to large, exceptionally flat, and static GCs, whereas disrupting this complex has no such effect. We find that excessive GC spreading is induced by Dyn2 and cortactin over-expression and substantial recruitment of the point contact-associated, actin-binding protein α-actinin1 to the ventral GC membrane. The distributions of other point contact proteins such as vinculin or paxillin appear unchanged. Immunoprecipitation experiments show that both Dyn2 and cortactin reside in a complex with α-actinin1. These findings provide new insights into the role of Dyn2 and the actin cytoskeleton in GC adhesion and motility. © 2011 Mayo Clinic. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  10. Actin Dynamics in Growth Cone Motility and Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Timothy M.; Letourneau, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Motile growth cones lead growing axons through developing tissues to synaptic targets. These behaviors depend on the organization and dynamics of actin filaments that fill the growth cone leading margin (peripheral (P-) domain). Actin filament organization in growth cones is regulated by actin-binding proteins that control all aspects of filament assembly, turnover, interactions with other filaments and cytoplasmic components, and participation in producing mechanical forces. Actin filament polymerization drives protrusion of sensory filopodia and lamellipodia, and actin filament connections to the plasma membrane link the filament network to adhesive contacts of filopodia and lamellipodia with other surfaces. These contacts stabilize protrusions and transduce mechanical forces generated by actomyosin activity into traction that pulls an elongating axon along the path towards its target. Adhesive ligands and extrinsic guidance cues bind growth cone receptors and trigger signaling activities involving Rho GTPases, kinases, phosphatases, cyclic nucleotides and [Ca++] fluxes. These signals regulate actin binding proteins to locally modulate actin polymerization, interactions and force transduction to steer the growth cone leading margin towards the sources of attractive cues and away from repellent guidance cues. PMID:24164353

  11. EphrinA/EphA-induced ectodomain shedding of neural cell adhesion molecule regulates growth cone repulsion through ADAM10 metalloprotease.

    PubMed

    Brennaman, Leann H; Moss, Marcia L; Maness, Patricia F

    2014-01-01

    EphrinA/EphA-dependent axon repulsion is crucial for synaptic targeting in developing neurons but downstream molecular mechanisms remain obscure. Here, it is shown that ephrinA5/EphA3 triggers proteolysis of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) by the metalloprotease a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM)10 to promote growth cone collapse in neurons from mouse neocortex. EphrinA5 induced ADAM10 activity to promote ectodomain shedding of polysialic acid-NCAM in cortical neuron cultures, releasing a ~ 250 kDa soluble fragment consisting of most of its extracellular region. NCAM shedding was dependent on ADAM10 and EphA3 kinase activity as shown in HEK293T cells transfected with dominant negative ADAM10 and kinase-inactive EphA3 (K653R) mutants. Purified ADAM10 cleaved NCAM at a sequence within the E-F loop of the second fibronectin type III domain (Leu(671) -Lys(672) /Ser(673) -Leu(674) ) identified by mass spectrometry. Mutations of NCAM within the ADAM10 cleavage sequence prevented EphA3-induced shedding of NCAM in HEK293T cells. EphrinA5-induced growth cone collapse was dependent on ADAM10 activity, was inhibited in cortical cultures from NCAM null mice, and was rescued by WT but not ADAM10 cleavage site mutants of NCAM. Regulated proteolysis of NCAM through the ephrin5/EphA3/ADAM10 mechanism likely impacts synapse development, and may lead to excess NCAM shedding when disrupted, as implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia. PSA-NCAM and ephrinA/EphA3 coordinately regulate inhibitory synapse development. Here, we have found that ephrinA5 stimulates EphA3 kinase and ADAM10 activity to promote PSA-NCAM cleavage at a site in its second FNIII repeat, which regulates ephrinA5-induced growth cone collapse in GABAergic and non-GABAergic neurons. These findings identify a new regulatory mechanism which may contribute to inhibitory connectivity.

  12. DSCR1 is required for both axonal growth cone extension and steering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Rai, Asit; Hur, Eun-Mi; Smilansky, Zeev; Chang, Karen T.

    2016-01-01

    Local information processing in the growth cone is essential for correct wiring of the nervous system. As an axon navigates through the developing nervous system, the growth cone responds to extrinsic guidance cues by coordinating axon outgrowth with growth cone steering. It has become increasingly clear that axon extension requires proper actin polymerization dynamics, whereas growth cone steering involves local protein synthesis. However, molecular components integrating these two processes have not been identified. Here, we show that Down syndrome critical region 1 protein (DSCR1) controls axon outgrowth by modulating growth cone actin dynamics through regulation of cofilin activity (phospho/dephospho-cofilin). Additionally, DSCR1 mediates brain-derived neurotrophic factor–induced local protein synthesis and growth cone turning. Our study identifies DSCR1 as a key protein that couples axon growth and pathfinding by dually regulating actin dynamics and local protein synthesis. PMID:27185837

  13. New Light on Growth Cone Navigation.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Thomas D

    2015-12-21

    Growth cones on neuronal process navigate over long distances to their targets in the developing nervous system. New work by Menon et al., 2015 in the current issue of Developmental Cell reveals that reversible ubiquitination of the actin filament polymerase called VASP is part of the guidance system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Vesicular movements in the growth cone.

    PubMed

    Nozumi, Motohiro; Igarashi, Michihiro

    2017-09-27

    Growth cones, which are the highly motile tips of extending neuronal processes in developing neurons, have many vesicles. These vesicles are likely essential for the membrane expansion that is required for nerve growth, and probably coordinate with rearrangement of the cytoskeletons. Such mechanisms are poorly understood from molecular and cell biological aspects. Recently, we used superresolution microscopic approaches and described new mechanisms that are involved in the interaction between the vesicles and F-actin in the leading edge of the peripheral domain. Vesicles mainly accumulate in the central domain of growth cones. However, the dynamics of vesicles in each domain, for example, clathrin dependency, are totally distinct from each other. Here, we discuss the diversity of the dynamics of vesicular and related proteins that play different roles in nerve growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The dynein inhibitor Ciliobrevin D inhibits the bidirectional transport of organelles along sensory axons and impairs NGF-mediated regulation of growth cones and axon branches.

    PubMed

    Sainath, Rajiv; Gallo, Gianluca

    2015-07-01

    The axonal transport of organelles is critical for the development, maintenance, and survival of neurons, and its dysfunction has been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases. Retrograde axon transport is mediated by the motor protein dynein. In this study, using embryonic chicken dorsal root ganglion neurons, we investigate the effects of Ciliobrevin D, a pharmacological dynein inhibitor, on the transport of axonal organelles, axon extension, nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced branching and growth cone expansion, and axon thinning in response to actin filament depolymerization. Live imaging of mitochondria, lysosomes, and Golgi-derived vesicles in axons revealed that both the retrograde and anterograde transport of these organelles was inhibited by treatment with Ciliobrevin D. Treatment with Ciliobrevin D reversibly inhibits axon extension and transport, with effects detectable within the first 20 min of treatment. NGF induces growth cone expansion, axonal filopodia formation and branching. Ciliobrevin D prevented NGF-induced formation of axonal filopodia and branching but not growth cone expansion. Finally, we report that the retrograde reorganization of the axonal cytoplasm which occurs on actin filament depolymerization is inhibited by treatment with Ciliobrevin D, indicating a role for microtubule based transport in this process, as well as Ciliobrevin D accelerating Wallerian degeneration. This study identifies Ciliobrevin D as an inhibitor of the bidirectional transport of multiple axonal organelles, indicating this drug may be a valuable tool for both the study of dynein function and a first pass analysis of the role of axonal transport.

  16. Labeling F-actin barbed ends with rhodamine-actin in permeabilized neuronal growth cones.

    PubMed

    Marsick, Bonnie M; Letourneau, Paul C

    2011-03-17

    The motile tips of growing axons are called growth cones. Growth cones lead navigating axons through developing tissues by interacting with locally expressed molecular guidance cues that bind growth cone receptors and regulate the dynamics and organization of the growth cone cytoskeleton. The main target of these navigational signals is the actin filament meshwork that fills the growth cone periphery and that drives growth cone motility through continual actin polymerization and dynamic remodeling. Positive or attractive guidance cues induce growth cone turning by stimulating actin filament (F-actin) polymerization in the region of the growth cone periphery that is nearer the source of the attractant cue. This actin polymerization drives local growth cone protrusion, adhesion of the leading margin and axonal elongation toward the attractant. Actin filament polymerization depends on the availability of sufficient actin monomer and on polymerization nuclei or actin filament barbed ends for the addition of monomer. Actin monomer is abundantly available in chick retinal and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) growth cones. Consequently, polymerization increases rapidly when free F-actin barbed ends become available for monomer addition. This occurs in chick DRG and retinal growth cones via the local activation of the F-actin severing protein actin depolymerizing factor (ADF/cofilin) in the growth cone region closer to an attractant. This heightened ADF/cofilin activity severs actin filaments to create new F-actin barbed ends for polymerization. The following method demonstrates this mechanism. Total content of F-actin is visualized by staining with fluorescent phalloidin. F-actin barbed ends are visualized by the incorporation of rhodamine-actin within growth cones that are permeabilized with the procedure described in the following, which is adapted from previous studies of other motile cells. When rhodamine-actin is added at a concentration above the critical concentration

  17. ETHANOL ALTERS CALCIUM SIGNALING IN AXONAL GROWTH CONES

    PubMed Central

    Mah, Stephanie J.; Fleck, Mark W.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) channels are sensitive to ethanol and Ca2+ signaling is a critical regulator of axonal growth and guidance. Effects of acute and chronic exposure to ethanol (22, 43, or 87 mM) on voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) in whole cells, and KCl-induced Ca2+ transients in axonal growth cones, were examined using dissociated hippocampal cultures. Whole-cell patch-clamp analysis in neurons with newly-formed axons (Stage 3) revealed that rapidly inactivating, low-voltage activated (LVA) and non-inactivating, high-voltage activated (HVA) currents were both inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by acute ethanol, with relatively greater inhibition of HVA currents. When assessed by Fluo-4-AM imaging, baseline fluorescence and Ca2+ response to ethanol in Stage 3 neurons was similar compared to neurons without axons, but peak Ca2+ transient amplitudes in response to bath-applied KCl were greater in Stage 3 neurons and were decreased by acute ethanol. The amplitude of Ca2+ transients elicited specifically in axonal growth cones by focal application of KCl was also inhibited by acute exposure to moderate-to-high concentrations of ethanol (43 or 87 mM), whereas a lower concentration (22 mM) had no effect. When 43 or 87 mM ethanol was present continuously in the medium, KCl-evoked Ca2+ transient amplitudes were also reduced in growth cones. In contrast, Ca2+ transients were increased by continuous exposure to 22 mM ethanol. Visualization using a fluorescent dihydropyridine analog revealed that neurons continuously exposed to ethanol expressed increased amounts of L-type Ca2+ channels, with greater increases in axonal growth cones than cell bodies. Thus, acute ethanol reduces Ca2+ current and KCl-induced Ca2+ responses in whole cells and axonal growth cones, respectively, and chronic exposure is also generally inhibitory despite apparent up-regulation of L-type channel expression. These results are consistent with a role for altered growth cone Ca2+ signaling in abnormal

  18. Role of the actin bundling protein fascin in growth cone morphogenesis: localization in filopodia and lamellipodia.

    PubMed

    Cohan, C S; Welnhofer, E A; Zhao, L; Matsumura, F; Yamashiro, S

    2001-02-01

    Growth cones at the distal tips of growing nerve axons contain bundles of actin filaments distributed throughout the lamellipodium and that project into filopodia. The regulation of actin bundling by specific actin binding proteins is likely to play an important role in many growth cone behaviors. Although the actin binding protein, fascin, has been localized in growth cones, little information is available on its functional significance. We used the large growth cones of the snail Helisoma to determine whether fascin was involved in temporal changes in actin filaments during growth cone morphogenesis. Fascin localized to radially oriented actin bundles in lamellipodia (ribs) and filopodia. Using a fascin antibody and a GFP fascin construct, we found that fascin incorporated into actin bundles from the beginning of growth cone formation at the cut end of axons. Fascin associated with most of the actin bundle except the proximal 6--12% adjacent to the central domain, which is the region associated with actin disassembly. Later, during growth cone morphogenesis when actin ribs shortened, the proximal fascin-free zone of bundles increased, but fascin was retained in the distal, filopodial portion of bundles. Treatment with tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), which phosphorylates fascin and decreases its affinity for actin, resulted in loss of all actin bundles from growth cones. Our findings suggest that fascin may be particularly important for the linear structure and dynamics of filopodia and for lamellipodial rib dynamics by regulating filament organization in bundles.

  19. Growth cone behavior and production of traction force

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The growth cone must push its substrate rearward via some traction force in order to propel itself forward. To determine which growth cone behaviors produce traction force, we observed chick sensory growth cones under conditions in which force production was accommodated by movement of obstacles in the environment, namely, neurites of other sensory neurons or glass fibers. The movements of these obstacles occurred via three, different, stereotyped growth cone behaviors: (a) filopodial contractions, (b) smooth rearward movement on the dorsal surface of the growth cone, and (c) interactions with ruffling lamellipodia. More than 70% of the obstacle movements were caused by filopodial contractions in which the obstacle attached at the extreme distal end of a filopodium and moved only as the filopodium changed its extension. Filopodial contractions were characterized by frequent changes of obstacle velocity and direction. Contraction of a single filopodium is estimated to exert 50-90 microdyn of force, which can account for the pull exerted by chick sensory growth cones. Importantly, all five cases of growth cones growing over the top of obstacle neurites (i.e., geometry that mimics the usual growth cone/substrate interaction), were of the filopodial contraction type. Some 25% of obstacle movements occurred by a smooth backward movement along the top surface of growth cones. Both the appearance and rate of movements were similar to that reported for retrograde flow of cortical actin near the dorsal growth cone surface. Although these retrograde flow movements also exerted enough force to account for growth cone pulling, we did not observe such movements on ventral growth cone surfaces. Occasionally obstacles were moved by interaction with ruffling lamellipodia. However, we obtained no evidence for attachment of the obstacles to ruffling lamellipodia or for directed obstacle movements by this mechanism. These data suggest that chick sensory growth cones move forward by

  20. The ratio of 'deleted in colorectal cancer' to 'uncoordinated-5A' netrin-1 receptors on the growth cone regulates mossy fibre directionality.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Rieko; Nakahara, Soichiro; Ichikawa, Junya; Watanabe, Keisuke; Matsuki, Norio; Koyama, Ryuta

    2010-01-01

    Proper axonal targeting is fundamental to the establishment of functional neural circuits. The hippocampal mossy fibres normally project towards the CA3 region. In the hippocampi of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and related animal models, however, mossy fibres project towards the molecular layer and produce the hyperexcitable recurrent networks. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this aberrant axonal targeting, known as mossy fibre sprouting, remain unclear. Netrin-1 attracts or repels axons depending on the composition of its attraction-mediating receptor, deleted in colorectal cancer, and its repulsion-mediating receptor, uncoordinated-5, on the growth cone; but the roles of netrin-1-dependent guidance in pathological conditions are largely unknown. In this study, we examined the role of netrin-1 and its receptors in mossy fibre guidance and report that enhanced neuronal activity changes netrin-1-mediated cell targeting by the axons under hyperexcitable conditions. Netrin-1 antibody or Dcc ribonucleic acid interference attenuated mossy fibre growth towards CA3 in slice overlay assays. The axons were repelled from CA3 and ultimately innervated the molecular layer when hyperactivity was pharmacologically introduced. We first hypothesized that a reduction in netrin-1 expression in CA3 underlies the phenomenon, but found that its expression was increased. We then examined two possible activity-dependent changes in netrin-1 receptor expression: a reduction in the deleted in colorectal cancer receptor and induction of uncoordinated-5 receptor. Hyperactivity did not affect the surface expression of the deleted in colorectal cancer receptor on the growth cone, but it increased that of uncoordinated-5A, which was suppressed by blocking cyclic adenosine monophosphate signalling. In addition, Dcc knockdown did not affect hyperactivity-induced mossy fibre sprouting in the slice cultures, whereas Unc5a knockdown rescued the mistargeting. Thus, netrin-1

  1. Domain requirements for the Dock adapter protein in growth- cone signaling.

    PubMed

    Rao, Y; Zipursky, S L

    1998-03-03

    Tyrosine phosphorylation has been implicated in growth-cone guidance through genetic, biochemical, and pharmacological studies. Adapter proteins containing src homology 2 (SH2) domains and src homology 3 (SH3) domains provide a means of linking guidance signaling through phosphotyrosine to downstream effectors regulating growth-cone motility. The Drosophila adapter, Dreadlocks (Dock), the homolog of mammalian Nck containing three N-terminal SH3 domains and a single SH2 domain, is highly specialized for growth-cone guidance. In this paper, we demonstrate that Dock can couple signals in either an SH2-dependent or an SH2-independent fashion in photoreceptor (R cell) growth cones, and that Dock displays different domain requirements in different neurons.

  2. Domain requirements for the Dock adapter protein in growth- cone signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Yong; Zipursky, S. Lawrence

    1998-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation has been implicated in growth-cone guidance through genetic, biochemical, and pharmacological studies. Adapter proteins containing src homology 2 (SH2) domains and src homology 3 (SH3) domains provide a means of linking guidance signaling through phosphotyrosine to downstream effectors regulating growth-cone motility. The Drosophila adapter, Dreadlocks (Dock), the homolog of mammalian Nck containing three N-terminal SH3 domains and a single SH2 domain, is highly specialized for growth-cone guidance. In this paper, we demonstrate that Dock can couple signals in either an SH2-dependent or an SH2-independent fashion in photoreceptor (R cell) growth cones, and that Dock displays different domain requirements in different neurons. PMID:9482841

  3. Microtubule and Cell Contact Dependency of ER-bound PTP1B Localization in Growth Cones

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Federico

    2009-01-01

    PTP1B is an ER-bound protein tyrosine phosphatase implied in the regulation of cell adhesion. Here we investigated mechanisms involved in the positioning and dynamics of PTP1B in axonal growth cones and evaluated the role of this enzyme in axons. In growth cones, PTP1B consistently localizes in the central domain, and occasionally at the peripheral region and filopodia. Live imaging of GFP-PTP1B reveals dynamic excursions of fingerlike processes within the peripheral region and filopodia. PTP1B and GFP-PTP1B colocalize with ER markers and coalign with microtubules at the peripheral region and redistribute to the base of the growth cone after treatment with nocodazole, a condition that is reversible. Growth cone contact with cellular targets is accompanied by invasion of PTP1B and stable microtubules in the peripheral region aligned with the contact axis. Functional impairment of PTP1B causes retardation of axon elongation, as well as reduction of growth cone filopodia lifetime and Src activity. Our results highlight the role of microtubules and cell contacts in the positioning of ER-bound PTP1B to the peripheral region of growth cones, which may be required for the positive role of PTP1B in axon elongation, filopodia stabilization, and Src activity. PMID:19158394

  4. Microtubule redistribution in growth cones elicited by focal inactivation of kinesin-5.

    PubMed

    Nadar, Vidya C; Lin, Shen; Baas, Peter W

    2012-04-25

    In order for growth cones to turn, microtubules from the central domain must preferentially invade the peripheral domain in the direction of the turn. Recent studies suggest that kinesin-5 (also called Eg5 or kif11) suppresses the invasion of microtubules into the peripheral domain on the side of the growth cone opposite the direction of turning. In theory, kinesin-5 could elicit these effects by acting on the microtubules within the peripheral domain itself, by acting on microtubules in the central domain, or in the transition zone between these two domains. In rat neurons expressing kinesin-5, we documented the presence of kinesin-5 in both domains of the growth cone and especially enriched in the transition zone. We then focally inactivated kinesin-5 in various regions of the growth cone, using micro-chromophore-assisted laser inactivation. We found that a greater invasion of microtubules into the peripheral domain occurred when kinesin-5 was inactivated specifically in the transition zone. However, there was no effect on microtubule invasion into the peripheral domain when kinesin-5 was inactivated in the peripheral domain itself or in the central domain. In other experiments, frog growth cones were observed to turn toward a gradient of a drug that inhibits kinesin-5, confirming that asymmetric inactivation of kinesin-5 can cause the growth cone to turn. Finally, expression of a phospho-mutant of kinesin-5 resulted in greater microtubule invasion throughout the peripheral domain and an inhibition of growth cone turning, implicating phosphorylation as a means by which kinesin-5 is regulated in the growth cone.

  5. Functional Complexity of the Axonal Growth Cone: A Proteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Bernal, Adriana; Sanford, Staci D.; Sosa, Lucas J.; Simon, Glenn C.; Hansen, Kirk C.; Pfenninger, Karl H.

    2012-01-01

    The growth cone, the tip of the emerging neurite, plays a crucial role in establishing the wiring of the developing nervous system. We performed an extensive proteomic analysis of axonal growth cones isolated from the brains of fetal Sprague-Dawley rats. Approximately 2000 proteins were identified at ≥99% confidence level. Using informatics, including functional annotation cluster and KEGG pathway analysis, we found great diversity of proteins involved in axonal pathfinding, cytoskeletal remodeling, vesicular traffic and carbohydrate metabolism, as expected. We also found a large and complex array of proteins involved in translation, protein folding, posttranslational processing, and proteasome/ubiquitination-dependent degradation. Immunofluorescence studies performed on hippocampal neurons in culture confirmed the presence in the axonal growth cone of proteins representative of these processes. These analyses also provide evidence for rough endoplasmic reticulum and reveal a reticular structure equipped with Golgi-like functions in the axonal growth cone. Furthermore, Western blot revealed the growth cone enrichment, relative to fetal brain homogenate, of some of the proteins involved in protein synthesis, folding and catabolism. Our study provides a resource for further research and amplifies the relatively recently developed concept that the axonal growth cone is equipped with proteins capable of performing a highly diverse range of functions. PMID:22384089

  6. Steering neuronal growth cones by shifting the imbalance between exocytosis and endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Tojima, Takuro; Itofusa, Rurika; Kamiguchi, Hiroyuki

    2014-05-21

    Extracellular molecular cues guide migrating growth cones along specific routes during development of axon tracts. Such processes rely on asymmetric elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations across the growth cone that mediates its attractive or repulsive turning toward or away from the side with Ca(2+) elevation, respectively. Downstream of these Ca(2+) signals, localized activation of membrane trafficking steers the growth cone bidirectionally, with endocytosis driving repulsion and exocytosis causing attraction. However, it remains unclear how Ca(2+) can differentially regulate these opposite membrane-trafficking events. Here, we show that growth cone turning depends on localized imbalance between exocytosis and endocytosis and identify Ca(2+)-dependent signaling pathways mediating such imbalance. In embryonic chicken dorsal root ganglion neurons, repulsive Ca(2+) signals promote clathrin-mediated endocytosis through a 90 kDa splice variant of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase type-1γ (PIPKIγ90). In contrast, attractive Ca(2+) signals facilitate exocytosis but suppress endocytosis via Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) that can inactivate PIPKIγ90. Blocking CaMKII or Cdk5 leads to balanced activation of both exocytosis and endocytosis that causes straight growth cone migration even in the presence of guidance signals, whereas experimentally perturbing the balance restores the growth cone's turning response. Remarkably, the direction of this resumed turning depends on relative activities of exocytosis and endocytosis, but not on the type of guidance signals. Our results suggest that navigating growth cones can be redirected by shifting the imbalance between exocytosis and endocytosis, highlighting the importance of membrane-trafficking imbalance for axon guidance and, possibly, for polarized cell migration in general.

  7. Ultra-short pulses to signal neuronal growth cone machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Manoj; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Andres, Rosa; Cormack, Iain G.; Artigas, David; Soriano, Eduardo; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2007-02-01

    Measurable change in the sensory motor machinery of growth cones are induced by non contact femtosecond laser. The focused laser beam with an average power of 3 mW was positioned at some distance away from the closest fillopodia of cortical neurons from primary cell cultures (mice E15). By identifying a set of preliminary parameters we were able to statistically analyze the phenomenological behavior of the fillopodia and classify the effects different conditions of laser light has on the growth cone. Results show that fillopodia become significantly biased towards the focused femtosecond laser light. The same experiment performed with continuous wave (CW) produced results which were indistinguishable from the case where there is no laser light present (placebo condition) indicating no clear effects of the CW laser light on the fillopodia at a distance. These findings show the potential for ultrashort pulsed light to become a new type of pathfinding cue for neuronal growth cones.

  8. Birth order dependent growth cone segregation determines synaptic layer identity in the Drosophila visual system.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Abhishek; Ertekin, Deniz; Lee, Chi-Hon; Hummel, Thomas

    2016-03-17

    The precise recognition of appropriate synaptic partner neurons is a critical step during neural circuit assembly. However, little is known about the developmental context in which recognition specificity is important to establish synaptic contacts. We show that in the Drosophila visual system, sequential segregation of photoreceptor afferents, reflecting their birth order, lead to differential positioning of their growth cones in the early target region. By combining loss- and gain-of-function analyses we demonstrate that relative differences in the expression of the transcription factor Sequoia regulate R cell growth cone segregation. This initial growth cone positioning is consolidated via cell-adhesion molecule Capricious in R8 axons. Further, we show that the initial growth cone positioning determines synaptic layer selection through proximity-based axon-target interactions. Taken together, we demonstrate that birth order dependent pre-patterning of afferent growth cones is an essential pre-requisite for the identification of synaptic partner neurons during visual map formation in Drosophila.

  9. Birth order dependent growth cone segregation determines synaptic layer identity in the Drosophila visual system

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Abhishek; Ertekin, Deniz; Lee, Chi-Hon; Hummel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The precise recognition of appropriate synaptic partner neurons is a critical step during neural circuit assembly. However, little is known about the developmental context in which recognition specificity is important to establish synaptic contacts. We show that in the Drosophila visual system, sequential segregation of photoreceptor afferents, reflecting their birth order, lead to differential positioning of their growth cones in the early target region. By combining loss- and gain-of-function analyses we demonstrate that relative differences in the expression of the transcription factor Sequoia regulate R cell growth cone segregation. This initial growth cone positioning is consolidated via cell-adhesion molecule Capricious in R8 axons. Further, we show that the initial growth cone positioning determines synaptic layer selection through proximity-based axon-target interactions. Taken together, we demonstrate that birth order dependent pre-patterning of afferent growth cones is an essential pre-requisite for the identification of synaptic partner neurons during visual map formation in Drosophila. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13715.001 PMID:26987017

  10. Variability and Reliabiltiy in Axon Growth Cone Navigation Decision Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnelo, Marta; Ricoult, Sébastien G.; Juncker, David; Kennedy, Timothy E.; Faisal, Aldo A.

    2015-03-01

    The nervous system's wiring is a result of axon growth cones navigating through specific molecular environments during development. In order to reach their target, growth cones need to make decisions under uncertainty as they are faced with stochastic sensory information and probabilistic movements. The overall system therefore exhibits features of whole organisms (perception, decision making, action) in the subset of a single cell. We aim to characterise growth cone navigation in defined nano-dot guidance cue environments, by using the tools of computational neuroscience to conduct ``molecular psychophysics.'' We start with a generative model of growth cone behaviour and we 1. characterise sensory and internal sources of noise contributing to behavioural variables, by combining knowledge of the underlying stochastic dynamics in cue sensing and the growth of the cytoskeleton. This enables us to 2. produce bottom-up lower limit estimates of behavioural response reliability and visualise it as probability distributions over axon growth trajectories. Given this information we can match our in silico model's ``psychometric'' decision curves with empirical data. Finally we use a Monte-Carlo approach to predict response distributions of axon trajectories from our model.

  11. Circadian regulation of teleost retinal cone movements in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    In the retinas of many species of lower vertebrates, retinal photoreceptors and pigment epithelium pigment granules undergo daily movements in response to both diurnal, and in the case of teleost cone photoreceptors, endogenous circadian signals. Typically, these cone movements take place at dawn and at dusk when teleosts are maintained on a cyclic light (LD) regime, and at expected dawn and expected dusk when animals are maintained in continuous darkness (DD). Because these movements are so strictly controlled, they provide an overt indicator of the stage of the underlying clock mechanism. In this study we report that both light-induced and circadian-driven cone myoid movements in the Midas cichlid (Cichlasoma citrinellum), occur normally in vitro. Many of the features of retinomotor movements found in vivo also occur in our culture conditions, including responses to light and circadian stimuli and dopamine. Circadian induced predawn contraction and maintenance of expected day position in response to circadian modulation, are also normal. Our studies suggest that circadian regulation of cone myoid movement in vitro is mediated locally by dopamine, acting via a D2 receptor. Cone myoid contraction can be induced at midnight and expected mid-day by dark culture with dopamine or the D2 receptor agonist LY171555. Further, circadian induced predawn contraction can be increased with either dopamine or LY171555, or may be reversed with the dopamine D2 antagonist, sulpiride. Sulpiride will also induce cone myoid elongation in retinal cultures at expected mid- day, but will not induce cone myoid elongation at dusk. In contrast, circadian cone myoid movements in vitro were unaffected by the D1 receptor agonist SCH23390, or the D1 receptor antagonist SKF38393. Our short-term culture experiments indicate that circadian regulation of immediate cone myoid movement does not require humoral control but is regulated locally within the retina. The inclusion of dopamine, or dopamine

  12. Src and cortactin promote lamellipodia protrusion and filopodia formation and stability in growth cones

    PubMed Central

    He, Yingpei; Ren, Yuan; Wu, Bingbing; Decourt, Boris; Lee, Aih Cheun; Taylor, Aaron; Suter, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Src tyrosine kinases have been implicated in axonal growth and guidance; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms are not well understood. Specifically, it is unclear which aspects of actin organization and dynamics are regulated by Src in neuronal growth cones. Here, we investigated the function of Src2 and one of its substrates, cortactin, in lamellipodia and filopodia of Aplysia growth cones. We found that up-regulation of Src2 activation state or cortactin increased lamellipodial length, protrusion time, and actin network density, whereas down-regulation had opposite effects. Furthermore, Src2 or cortactin up-regulation increased filopodial density, length, and protrusion time, whereas down-regulation promoted lateral movements of filopodia. Fluorescent speckle microscopy revealed that rates of actin assembly and retrograde flow were not affected in either case. In summary, our results support a model in which Src and cortactin regulate growth cone motility by increasing actin network density and protrusion persistence of lamellipodia by controlling the state of actin-driven protrusion versus retraction. In addition, both proteins promote the formation and stability of actin bundles in filopodia. PMID:26224308

  13. Filopodial dynamics and growth cone stabilization in Drosophila visual circuit development.

    PubMed

    Özel, Mehmet Neset; Langen, Marion; Hassan, Bassem A; Hiesinger, P Robin

    2015-10-29

    Filopodial dynamics are thought to control growth cone guidance, but the types and roles of growth cone dynamics underlying neural circuit assembly in a living brain are largely unknown. To address this issue, we have developed long-term, continuous, fast and high-resolution imaging of growth cone dynamics from axon growth to synapse formation in cultured Drosophila brains. Using R7 photoreceptor neurons as a model we show that >90% of the growth cone filopodia exhibit fast, stochastic dynamics that persist despite ongoing stepwise layer formation. Correspondingly, R7 growth cones stabilize early and change their final position by passive dislocation. N-Cadherin controls both fast filopodial dynamics and growth cone stabilization. Surprisingly, loss of N-Cadherin causes no primary targeting defects, but destabilizes R7 growth cones to jump between correct and incorrect layers. Hence, growth cone dynamics can influence wiring specificity without a direct role in target recognition and implement simple rules during circuit assembly.

  14. Lipoprotein Uptake by Neuronal Growth Cones in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatius, Michael J.; Shooter, Eric M.; Pitas, Robert E.; Mahley, Robert W.

    1987-05-01

    Macrophages that rapidly enter injured peripheral nerve synthesize and secrete large quantities of apolipoprotein E. This protein may be involved in the redistribution of lipid, including cholesterol released during degeneration, to the regenerating axons. To test this postulate, apolipoprotein E-associated lipid particles released from segments of injured rat sciatic nerve and apolipoprotein E-containing lipoproteins from plasma were used to determine whether sprouting neurites, specifically their growth cones, possessed lipoprotein receptors. Pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells, which can be stimulated to produce neurites in vitro, were used as a model system. Apolipoprotein E-containing lipid particles and lipoproteins, which had been labeled with fluorescent dye, were internalized by the neurites and their growth cones; the unmetabolized dye appeared to be localized to the lysosomes. The rapid rate of accumulation in the growth cones precludes the possibility of orthograde transport of the fluorescent particles from the PC12 cell bodies. Thus, receptor-mediated lipoprotein uptake is performed by the apolipoprotein B,E(LDL) (low density lipoprotein) receptors, and in the regenerating peripheral nerve apolipoprotein E may deliver lipids to the neurites and their growth cones for membrane biosynthesis.

  15. Growth Cone Biomechanics in Peripheral and Central Nervous System Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, Jeffrey; Koch, Daniel; Rosoff, Will; Geller, Herbert

    2012-02-01

    The growth cone, a highly motile structure at the tip of an axon, integrates information about the local environment and modulates outgrowth and guidance, but little is known about effects of external mechanical cues and internal mechanical forces on growth-cone mediated guidance. We have investigated neurite outgrowth, traction forces and cytoskeletal substrate coupling on soft elastic substrates for dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons (from the peripheral nervous system) and hippocampal neurons (from the central) to see how the mechanics of the microenvironment affect different populations. We find that the biomechanics of DRG neurons are dramatically different from hippocampal, with DRG neurons displaying relatively large, steady traction forces and maximal outgrowth and forces on substrates of intermediate stiffness, while hippocampal neurons display weak, intermittent forces and limited dependence of outgrowth and forces on substrate stiffness. DRG growth cones have slower rates of retrograde actin flow and higher density of localized paxillin (a protein associated with substrate adhesion complexes) compared to hippocampal neurons, suggesting that the difference in force generation is due to stronger adhesions and therefore stronger substrate coupling in DRG growth cones.

  16. The role of microtubule dynamics in growth cone motility and axonal growth

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The growth cone contains dynamic and relatively stable microtubule populations, whose function in motility and axonal growth is uncharacterized. We have used vinblastine at low doses to inhibit microtubule dynamics without appreciable depolymerization to probe the role of these dynamics in growth cone behavior. At doses of vinblastine that interfere only with dynamics, the forward and persistent movement of the growth cone is inhibited and the growth cone wanders without appreciable forward translocation; it quickly resumes forward growth after the vinblastine is washed out. Direct visualization of fluorescently tagged microtubules in these neurons shows that in the absence of dynamic microtubules, the remaining mass of polymer does not invade the peripheral lamella and does not undergo the usual cycle of bundling and splaying and the growth cone stops forward movement. These experiments argue for a role for dynamic microtubules in allowing microtubule rearrangements in the growth cone. These rearrangements seem to be necessary for microtubule bundling, the subsequent coalescence of the cortex around the bundle to form new axon, and forward translocation of the growth cone. PMID:7822411

  17. Effects of roundabout on growth cone dynamics, filopodial length, and growth cone morphology at the midline and throughout the neuropile.

    PubMed

    Murray, M J; Whitington, P M

    1999-09-15

    roundabout (robo) encodes an axon guidance receptor that controls midline crossing in the Drosophila CNS. In robo mutants, axons that normally project ipsilaterally can cross and recross the midline. Growth cones expressing Robo are believed to be repelled from the midline by the interaction of Robo and its ligand Slit, an extracellular protein expressed by the midline glia. To help understand the cellular basis for the midline repulsion mediated by Robo, we used time-lapse observations to compare the growth cone behavior of the ipsilaterally projecting motorneuron RP2 in robo and wild-type embyros. In wild-type embryos, filopodia can project across the midline but are quickly retracted. In robo mutants, medial filopodia can remain extended for longer periods and can develop into contralateral branches. In many cases RP2 produces both ipsilateral and contralateral branches, both of which can extend into the periphery. The growth cone also exhibits longer filopodia and more extensive branching both at the midline and throughout the neuropile. Cell injections in fixed stage 13 embryos confirmed and quantified these results for both RP2 and the interneuron pCC. The results suggest that Robo both repels growth cones at the midline and inhibits branching throughout the neuropile by promoting filopodial retraction.

  18. Protein synthesis dependence of growth cone collapse induced by different Nogo-A-domains.

    PubMed

    Manns, Richard; Schmandke, Andre; Schmandke, Antonio; Jareonsettasin, Prem; Cook, Geoffrey; Schwab, Martin E; Holt, Christine; Keynes, Roger

    2014-01-01

    The protein Nogo-A regulates axon growth in the developing and mature nervous system, and this is carried out by two distinct domains in the protein, Nogo-A-Δ20 and Nogo-66. The differences in the signalling pathways engaged in axon growth cones by these domains are not well characterized, and have been investigated in this study. We analyzed growth cone collapse induced by the Nogo-A domains Nogo-A-Δ20 and Nogo-66 using explanted chick dorsal root ganglion neurons growing on laminin/poly-lysine substratum. Collapse induced by purified Nogo-A-Δ20 peptide is dependent on protein synthesis whereas that induced by Nogo-66 peptide is not. Nogo-A-Δ20-induced collapse is accompanied by a protein synthesis-dependent rise in RhoA expression in the growth cone, but is unaffected by proteasomal catalytic site inhibition. Conversely Nogo-66-induced collapse is inhibited ∼ 50% by proteasomal catalytic site inhibition. Growth cone collapse induced by the Nogo-A domains Nogo-A-Δ20 and Nogo-66 is mediated by signalling pathways with distinguishable characteristics concerning their dependence on protein synthesis and proteasomal function.

  19. Identification of axon-enriched microRNAs localized to growth cones of cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yukio; Gross, Christina; Xing, Lei; Goshima, Yoshio; Bassell, Gary J

    2014-03-01

    There is increasing evidence that localized mRNAs in axons and growth cones play an important role in axon extension and pathfinding via local translation. A few studies have revealed the presence of microRNAs (miRNAs) in axons, which may control local protein synthesis during axon development. However, so far, there has been no attempt to screen for axon-enriched miRNAs and to validate their possible localization to growth cones of developing axons from neurons of the central nervous system. In this study, the localization of miRNAs in axons and growth cones in cortical neurons was examined using a "neuron ball" culture method that is suitable to prepare axonal miRNAs with high yield and purity. Axonal miRNAs prepared from the neuron ball cultures of mouse cortical neurons were analyzed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Among 375 miRNAs that were analyzed, 105 miRNAs were detected in axons, and six miRNAs were significantly enriched in axonal fractions when compared with cell body fractions. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that two axon-enriched miRNAs, miR-181a-1* and miR-532, localized as distinct granules in distal axons and growth cones. The association of these miRNAs with the RNA-induced silencing complex further supported their function to regulate mRNA levels or translation in the brain. These results suggest a mechanism to localize specific miRNAs to distal axons and growth cones, where they could be involved in local mRNA regulation. These findings provide new insight into the presence of axonal miRNAs and motivate further analysis of their function in local protein synthesis underlying axon guidance.

  20. Multi-phasic bi-directional chemotactic responses of the growth cone

    PubMed Central

    Naoki, Honda; Nishiyama, Makoto; Togashi, Kazunobu; Igarashi, Yasunobu; Hong, Kyonsoo; Ishii, Shin

    2016-01-01

    The nerve growth cone is bi-directionally attracted and repelled by the same cue molecules depending on the situations, while other non-neural chemotactic cells usually show uni-directional attraction or repulsion toward their specific cue molecules. However, how the growth cone differs from other non-neural cells remains unclear. Toward this question, we developed a theory for describing chemotactic response based on a mathematical model of intracellular signaling of activator and inhibitor. Our theory was first able to clarify the conditions of attraction and repulsion, which are determined by balance between activator and inhibitor, and the conditions of uni- and bi-directional responses, which are determined by dose-response profiles of activator and inhibitor to the guidance cue. With biologically realistic sigmoidal dose-responses, our model predicted tri-phasic turning response depending on intracellular Ca2+ level, which was then experimentally confirmed by growth cone turning assays and Ca2+ imaging. Furthermore, we took a reverse-engineering analysis to identify balanced regulation between CaMKII (activator) and PP1 (inhibitor) and then the model performance was validated by reproducing turning assays with inhibitions of CaMKII and PP1. Thus, our study implies that the balance between activator and inhibitor underlies the multi-phasic bi-directional turning response of the growth cone. PMID:27808115

  1. Membrane potential shifts caused by diffusible guidance signals direct growth-cone turning.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Makoto; von Schimmelmann, Melanie J; Togashi, Kazunobu; Findley, William M; Hong, Kyonsoo

    2008-07-01

    Plasma membrane potentials gate the ion channel conductance that controls external signal-induced neuronal functions. We found that diffusible guidance molecules caused membrane potential shifts that resulted in repulsion or attraction of Xenopus laevis spinal neuron growth cones. The repellents Sema3A and Slit2 caused hyperpolarization, and the attractants netrin-1 and BDNF caused depolarization. Clamping the growth-cone potential at the resting state prevented Sema3A-induced repulsion; depolarizing potentials converted the repulsion to attraction, whereas hyperpolarizing potentials had no effect. Sema3A increased the intracellular concentration of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate ([cGMP]i) by soluble guanylyl cyclase, resulting in fast onset and long-lasting hyperpolarization. Pharmacological increase of [cGMP](i) caused protein kinase G (PKG)-mediated depolarization, switching Sema3A-induced repulsion to attraction. This bimodal switch required activation of either Cl(-) or Na+ channels, which, in turn, regulated the differential intracellular Ca2+ concentration increase across the growth cone. Thus, the polarity of growth-cone potential shifts imposes either attraction or repulsion, and Sema3A achieves this through cGMP signaling.

  2. Multi-phasic bi-directional chemotactic responses of the growth cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoki, Honda; Nishiyama, Makoto; Togashi, Kazunobu; Igarashi, Yasunobu; Hong, Kyonsoo; Ishii, Shin

    2016-11-01

    The nerve growth cone is bi-directionally attracted and repelled by the same cue molecules depending on the situations, while other non-neural chemotactic cells usually show uni-directional attraction or repulsion toward their specific cue molecules. However, how the growth cone differs from other non-neural cells remains unclear. Toward this question, we developed a theory for describing chemotactic response based on a mathematical model of intracellular signaling of activator and inhibitor. Our theory was first able to clarify the conditions of attraction and repulsion, which are determined by balance between activator and inhibitor, and the conditions of uni- and bi-directional responses, which are determined by dose-response profiles of activator and inhibitor to the guidance cue. With biologically realistic sigmoidal dose-responses, our model predicted tri-phasic turning response depending on intracellular Ca2+ level, which was then experimentally confirmed by growth cone turning assays and Ca2+ imaging. Furthermore, we took a reverse-engineering analysis to identify balanced regulation between CaMKII (activator) and PP1 (inhibitor) and then the model performance was validated by reproducing turning assays with inhibitions of CaMKII and PP1. Thus, our study implies that the balance between activator and inhibitor underlies the multi-phasic bi-directional turning response of the growth cone.

  3. A pioneering growth cone in the embryonic zebrafish brain.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, S W; Easter, S S

    1991-01-01

    During development of the nervous system, growth cones navigate very precisely to their appropriate, often distant, targets. In insects, the task of establishing the earliest pathways is accomplished by a small number of neurons, termed pioneers. These neurons have axons that lay down an early scaffold, which provides a substrate for many later-developing axons. Here we show that a similar type of cell exists in the embryonic vertebrate brain. Using light- and electron-microscopic techniques we have examined the formation of one of the earliest tracts in the zebrafish brain. We find that it is pioneered at a precise time by the growth cone of a single neuron present in a predictable location. These observations show a fundamental similarity in the establishment of axonal pathways in the central nervous systems of both invertebrates and vertebrates. Images PMID:2006169

  4. Calcium regulates vesicle replenishment at the cone ribbon synapse.

    PubMed

    Babai, Norbert; Bartoletti, Theodore M; Thoreson, Wallace B

    2010-11-24

    Cones release glutamate-filled vesicles continuously in darkness, and changing illumination modulates this release. Because sustained release in darkness is governed by vesicle replenishment rates, we analyzed how cone membrane potential regulates replenishment. Synaptic release from cones was measured by recording postsynaptic currents in Ambystoma tigrinum horizontal or OFF bipolar cells evoked by depolarization of simultaneously voltage-clamped cones. We measured replenishment after attaining a steady state between vesicle release and replenishment using trains of test pulses. Increasing Ca(2+) currents (I(Ca)) by changing the test step from -30 to -10 mV increased replenishment. Lengthening -30 mV test pulses to match the Ca(2+) influx during 25 ms test pulses to -10 mV produced similar replenishment rates. Reducing Ca(2+) driving force by using test steps to +30 mV slowed replenishment. Using UV flashes to reverse inhibition of I(Ca) by nifedipine accelerated replenishment. Increasing [Ca(2+)](i) by flash photolysis of caged Ca(2+) also accelerated replenishment. Replenishment, but not the initial burst of release, was enhanced by using an intracellular Ca(2+) buffer of 0.5 mm EGTA rather than 5 mm EGTA, and diminished by 1 mm BAPTA. This suggests that although release and replenishment exhibited similar Ca(2+) dependencies, release sites are <200 nm from Ca(2+) channels but replenishment sites are >200 nm away. Membrane potential thus regulates replenishment by controlling Ca(2+) influx, principally by effects on replenishment mechanisms but also by altering releasable pool size. This in turn provides a mechanism for converting changes in light intensity into changes in sustained release at the cone ribbon synapse.

  5. Tubulin Tyrosination Is Required for the Proper Organization and Pathfinding of the Growth Cone

    PubMed Central

    Marcos, Séverine; Job, Didier; Andrieux, Annie; Bloch-Gallego, Evelyne

    2009-01-01

    Background During development, neuronal growth cones integrate diffusible and contact guidance cues that are conveyed to both actin and microtubule (MT) cytoskeletons and ensure axon outgrowth and pathfinding. Although several post-translational modifications of tubulin have been identified and despite their strong conservation among species, their physiological roles during development, especially in the nervous sytem, are still poorly understood. Methodology/Findings Here, we have dissected the role of a post-translational modification of the last amino acid of the α-tubulin on axonal growth by analyzing the phenotype of precerebellar neurons in Tubulin tyrosin ligase knock-out mice (TTL−/−) through in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro analyses. TTL−/− neurons are devoid of tyrosinated tubulin. Their pathway shows defects in vivo, ex vivo, in hindbrains open-book preparations or in vitro, in a collagen matrix. Their axons still orient toward tropic cues, but they emit supernumerary branches and their growth cones are enlarged and exhibit an emission of mis-oriented filopodia. Further analysis of the TTL−/− growth cone intracellular organization also reveals that the respective localization of actin and MT filaments is disturbed, with a decrease in the distal accumulation of Myosin IIB, as well as a concomitant Rac1 over-activation in the hindbrain. Pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 over-activation in TTL−/− neurons can rescue Myosin IIB localization. Conclusions/Significance In the growth cone, we propose that tubulin tyrosination takes part in the relative arrangement of actin and MT cytoskeletons, in the regulation of small GTPases activity, and consequently, in the proper morphogenesis, organization and pathfinding of the growth cone during development. PMID:19404406

  6. Tubulin tyrosination is required for the proper organization and pathfinding of the growth cone.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Séverine; Moreau, Julie; Backer, Stéphanie; Job, Didier; Andrieux, Annie; Bloch-Gallego, Evelyne

    2009-01-01

    During development, neuronal growth cones integrate diffusible and contact guidance cues that are conveyed to both actin and microtubule (MT) cytoskeletons and ensure axon outgrowth and pathfinding. Although several post-translational modifications of tubulin have been identified and despite their strong conservation among species, their physiological roles during development, especially in the nervous sytem, are still poorly understood. Here, we have dissected the role of a post-translational modification of the last amino acid of the alpha-tubulin on axonal growth by analyzing the phenotype of precerebellar neurons in Tubulin tyrosin ligase knock-out mice (TTL(-/-)) through in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro analyses. TTL(-/-) neurons are devoid of tyrosinated tubulin. Their pathway shows defects in vivo, ex vivo, in hindbrains open-book preparations or in vitro, in a collagen matrix. Their axons still orient toward tropic cues, but they emit supernumerary branches and their growth cones are enlarged and exhibit an emission of mis-oriented filopodia. Further analysis of the TTL(-/-) growth cone intracellular organization also reveals that the respective localization of actin and MT filaments is disturbed, with a decrease in the distal accumulation of Myosin IIB, as well as a concomitant Rac1 over-activation in the hindbrain. Pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 over-activation in TTL(-/-) neurons can rescue Myosin IIB localization. In the growth cone, we propose that tubulin tyrosination takes part in the relative arrangement of actin and MT cytoskeletons, in the regulation of small GTPases activity, and consequently, in the proper morphogenesis, organization and pathfinding of the growth cone during development.

  7. Akt1-Inhibitor of DNA binding2 is essential for growth cone formation and axon growth and promotes central nervous system axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Hyo Rim; Kwon, Il-Sun; Hwang, Inwoo; Jin, Eun-Ju; Shin, Joo-Ho; Brennan-Minnella, Angela M; Swanson, Raymond; Cho, Sung-Woo; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Ahn, Jee-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Mechanistic studies of axon growth during development are beneficial to the search for neuron-intrinsic regulators of axon regeneration. Here, we discovered that, in the developing neuron from rat, Akt signaling regulates axon growth and growth cone formation through phosphorylation of serine 14 (S14) on Inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (Id2). This enhances Id2 protein stability by means of escape from proteasomal degradation, and steers its localization to the growth cone, where Id2 interacts with radixin that is critical for growth cone formation. Knockdown of Id2, or abrogation of Id2 phosphorylation at S14, greatly impairs axon growth and the architecture of growth cone. Intriguingly, reinstatement of Akt/Id2 signaling after injury in mouse hippocampal slices redeemed growth promoting ability, leading to obvious axon regeneration. Our results suggest that Akt/Id2 signaling is a key module for growth cone formation and axon growth, and its augmentation plays a potential role in CNS axonal regeneration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20799.001 PMID:27938661

  8. Akt1-Inhibitor of DNA binding2 is essential for growth cone formation and axon growth and promotes central nervous system axon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hyo Rim; Kwon, Il-Sun; Hwang, Inwoo; Jin, Eun-Ju; Shin, Joo-Ho; Brennan-Minnella, Angela M; Swanson, Raymond; Cho, Sung-Woo; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Ahn, Jee-Yin

    2016-12-12

    Mechanistic studies of axon growth during development are beneficial to the search for neuron-intrinsic regulators of axon regeneration. Here, we discovered that, in the developing neuron from rat, Akt signaling regulates axon growth and growth cone formation through phosphorylation of serine 14 (S14) on Inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (Id2). This enhances Id2 protein stability by means of escape from proteasomal degradation, and steers its localization to the growth cone, where Id2 interacts with radixin that is critical for growth cone formation. Knockdown of Id2, or abrogation of Id2 phosphorylation at S14, greatly impairs axon growth and the architecture of growth cone. Intriguingly, reinstatement of Akt/Id2 signaling after injury in mouse hippocampal slices redeemed growth promoting ability, leading to obvious axon regeneration. Our results suggest that Akt/Id2 signaling is a key module for growth cone formation and axon growth, and its augmentation plays a potential role in CNS axonal regeneration.

  9. Frizzled receptors in neurons: from growth cones to the synapse.

    PubMed

    Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Ramirez, Valerie T; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2012-07-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway has been implicated in several different aspects of neural development and function, including dendrite morphogenesis, axonal growth and guidance, synaptogenesis and synaptic plasticity. Here, we studied several Frizzled Wnt receptors and determined their differential expression during hippocampal development. In cultured hippocampal neurons, the cellular distributions of Frizzleds vary greatly, some of them being localized at neurites, growth cones or synaptic sites. These findings suggest that the Wnt signaling pathway might be temporally and spatially fine tuned during the development of neuronal circuits through specific Frizzled receptors. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Growth of multicrystalline silicon in a cone-shaped crucible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, E.; Poklad, A.; Heinze, V.; Meier, D.; Pätzold, O.; Stelter, M.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a novel, vertical Bridgman-type technique for growing multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) ingots in an induction furnace is described. In contrast to conventional growth, a modified setup with a cone-shaped crucible and susceptor is used for the first time. The temperature field and melt flow in the modified setup are calculated numerically and compared with the situation in a cylindrical standard setup. A cone-shaped mc-Si ingot is presented and analyzed with focus on the microstructure (inclusions, dislocations, grains) and the minority carrier lifetime, which are compared with the properties of a cylindrical ingot grown under similar conditions. Results of numerical simulations and growth experiments are discussed with respect to the influence of the cone-shaped setup on the temperature and flow fields in the melt, as well as on the microstructure and the minority carrier lifetime in the crystal. They indicate the potential of the novel technology to produce mc-Si ingots with a globular grain structure, low dislocation density, and high carrier lifetime.

  11. Growth cones stall and collapse during axon outgrowth in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Knobel, K M; Jorgensen, E M; Bastiani, M J

    1999-10-01

    During nervous system development, neurons form synaptic contacts with distant target cells. These connections are formed by the extension of axonal processes along predetermined pathways. Axon outgrowth is directed by growth cones located at the tips of these neuronal processes. Although the behavior of growth cones has been well-characterized in vitro, it is difficult to observe growth cones in vivo. We have observed motor neuron growth cones migrating in living Caenorhabditis elegans larvae using time-lapse confocal microscopy. Specifically, we observed the VD motor neurons extend axons from the ventral to dorsal nerve cord during the L2 stage. The growth cones of these neurons are round and migrate rapidly across the epidermis if they are unobstructed. When they contact axons of the lateral nerve fascicles, growth cones stall and spread out along the fascicle to form anvil-shaped structures. After pausing for a few minutes, they extend lamellipodia beyond the fascicle and resume migration toward the dorsal nerve cord. Growth cones stall again when they contact the body wall muscles. These muscles are tightly attached to the epidermis by narrowly spaced circumferential attachment structures. Stalled growth cones extend fingers dorsally between these hypodermal attachment structures. When a single finger has projected through the body wall muscle quadrant, the growth cone located on the ventral side of the muscle collapses and a new growth cone forms at the dorsal tip of the predominating finger. Thus, we observe that complete growth cone collapse occurs in vivo and not just in culture assays. In contrast to studies indicating that collapse occurs upon contact with repulsive substrata, collapse of the VD growth cones may result from an intrinsic signal that serves to maintain growth cone primacy and conserve cellular material.

  12. The SH2/SH3 adaptor protein dock interacts with the Ste20-like kinase misshapen in controlling growth cone motility.

    PubMed

    Ruan, W; Pang, P; Rao, Y

    1999-11-01

    Recent studies suggest that the SH2/SH3 adaptor Dock/Nck transduces tyrosine phosphorylation signals to the actin cytoskeleton in regulating growth cone motility. The signaling cascade linking the action of Dock/Nck to the reorganization of cytoskeleton is poorly understood. We now demonstrate that Dock interacts with the Ste20-like kinase Misshapen (Msn) in the Drosophila photoreceptor (R cell) growth cones. Loss of msn causes a failure of growth cones to stop at the target, a phenotype similar to loss of dock, whereas overexpression of msn induces pretarget growth cone termination. Physical and genetic interactions between Msn and Dock indicate a role for Msn in the Dock signaling pathway. We propose that Msn functions as a key controller of growth cone cytoskeleton in response to Dock-mediated signals.

  13. MIG-15 and ERM-1 promote growth cone directional migration in parallel to UNC-116 and WVE-1

    PubMed Central

    Teulière, Jérôme; Gally, Christelle; Garriga, Gian; Labouesse, Michel; Georges-Labouesse, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Neurons require precise targeting of their axons to form a connected network and a functional nervous system. Although many guidance receptors have been identified, much less is known about how these receptors signal to direct growth cone migration. We used Caenorhabditis elegans motoneurons to study growth cone directional migration in response to a repellent UNC-6 (netrin homolog) guidance cue. The evolutionarily conserved kinase MIG-15 [homolog of Nck-interacting kinase (NIK)] regulates motoneuron UNC-6-dependent repulsion through unknown mechanisms. Using genetics and live imaging techniques, we show that motoneuron commissural axon morphology defects in mig-15 mutants result from impaired growth cone motility and subsequent failure to migrate across longitudinal obstacles or retract extra processes. To identify new genes acting with mig-15, we screened for genetic enhancers of the mig-15 commissural phenotype and identified the ezrin/radixin/moesin ortholog ERM-1, the kinesin-1 motor UNC-116 and the actin regulator WVE-1 complex. Genetic analysis indicates that mig-15 and erm-1 act in the same genetic pathway to regulate growth cone migration and that this pathway functions in parallel to the UNC-116/WVE-1 pathway. Further, time-lapse imaging of growth cones in mutants suggests that UNC-116 might be required to stimulate protrusive activity at the leading edge, whereas MIG-15 and ERM-1 maintain low activity at the rear edge. Together, these results support a model in which the MIG-15 kinase and the UNC-116–WVE-1 complex act on opposite sides of the growth cone to promote robust directional migration. PMID:21937599

  14. MIG-15 and ERM-1 promote growth cone directional migration in parallel to UNC-116 and WVE-1.

    PubMed

    Teulière, Jérôme; Gally, Christelle; Garriga, Gian; Labouesse, Michel; Georges-Labouesse, Elisabeth

    2011-10-01

    Neurons require precise targeting of their axons to form a connected network and a functional nervous system. Although many guidance receptors have been identified, much less is known about how these receptors signal to direct growth cone migration. We used Caenorhabditis elegans motoneurons to study growth cone directional migration in response to a repellent UNC-6 (netrin homolog) guidance cue. The evolutionarily conserved kinase MIG-15 [homolog of Nck-interacting kinase (NIK)] regulates motoneuron UNC-6-dependent repulsion through unknown mechanisms. Using genetics and live imaging techniques, we show that motoneuron commissural axon morphology defects in mig-15 mutants result from impaired growth cone motility and subsequent failure to migrate across longitudinal obstacles or retract extra processes. To identify new genes acting with mig-15, we screened for genetic enhancers of the mig-15 commissural phenotype and identified the ezrin/radixin/moesin ortholog ERM-1, the kinesin-1 motor UNC-116 and the actin regulator WVE-1 complex. Genetic analysis indicates that mig-15 and erm-1 act in the same genetic pathway to regulate growth cone migration and that this pathway functions in parallel to the UNC-116/WVE-1 pathway. Further, time-lapse imaging of growth cones in mutants suggests that UNC-116 might be required to stimulate protrusive activity at the leading edge, whereas MIG-15 and ERM-1 maintain low activity at the rear edge. Together, these results support a model in which the MIG-15 kinase and the UNC-116-WVE-1 complex act on opposite sides of the growth cone to promote robust directional migration.

  15. The Growth Cone Cytoskeleton in Axon Outgrowth and Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Dent, Erik W.; Gupton, Stephanie L.; Gertler, Frank B.

    2011-01-01

    Axon outgrowth and guidance to the proper target requires the coordination of filamentous (F)-actin and microtubules (MTs), the dynamic cytoskeletal polymers that promote shape change and locomotion. Over the past two decades, our knowledge of the many guidance cues, receptors, and downstream signaling cascades involved in neuronal outgrowth and guidance has increased dramatically. Less is known, however, about how those cascades of information converge and direct appropriate remodeling and interaction of cytoskeletal polymers, the ultimate effectors of movement and guidance. During development, much of the communication that occurs between environmental guidance cues and the cytoskeleton takes place at the growing tip of the axon, the neuronal growth cone. Several articles on this topic focus on the “input” to the growth cone, the myriad of receptor types, and their corresponding cognate ligands. Others investigate the signaling cascades initiated by receptors and propagated by second messenger pathways (i.e., kinases, phosphatases, GTPases). Ultimately, this plethora of information converges on proteins that associate directly with the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. The role of these cytoskeletal-associated proteins, as well as the cytoskeleton itself in axon outgrowth and guidance, is the subject of this article. PMID:21106647

  16. Using plusTipTracker software to measure microtubule dynamics in Xenopus laevis growth cones.

    PubMed

    Stout, Alina; D'Amico, Salvatore; Enzenbacher, Tiffany; Ebbert, Patrick; Lowery, Laura Anne

    2014-09-07

    Microtubule (MT) plus-end-tracking proteins (+TIPs) localize to the growing plus-ends of MTs and regulate MT dynamics(1,2). One of the most well-known and widely-utilized +TIPs for analyzing MT dynamics is the End-Binding protein, EB1, which binds all growing MT plus-ends, and thus, is a marker for MT polymerization(1). Many studies of EB1 behavior within growth cones have used time-consuming and biased computer-assisted, hand-tracking methods to analyze individual MTs(1-3). Our approach is to quantify global parameters of MT dynamics using the software package, plusTipTracker(4), following the acquisition of high-resolution, live images of tagged EB1 in cultured embryonic growth cones(5). This software is a MATLAB-based, open-source, user-friendly package that combines automated detection, tracking, visualization, and analysis for movies of fluorescently-labeled +TIPs. Here, we present the protocol for using plusTipTracker for the analysis of fluorescently-labeled +TIP comets in cultured Xenopus laevis growth cones. However, this software can also be used to characterize MT dynamics in various cell types(6-8).

  17. Plant Growth Regulators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickell, Louis G.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the effect of "plant growth regulators" on plants, such as controlling the flowering, fruit development, plant size, and increasing crop yields. Provides a list of plant growth regulators which includes their chemical, common, and trade names, as well as their different use(s). (GA)

  18. Plant Growth Regulators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickell, Louis G.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the effect of "plant growth regulators" on plants, such as controlling the flowering, fruit development, plant size, and increasing crop yields. Provides a list of plant growth regulators which includes their chemical, common, and trade names, as well as their different use(s). (GA)

  19. Protein Kinase C Activation Promotes Microtubule Advance in Neuronal Growth Cones by Increasing Average Microtubule Growth Lifetimes

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Nurul; Schaefer, Andrew W.; Nakhost, Arash; Sossin, Wayne S.; Forscher, Paul

    2001-01-01

    We describe a novel mechanism for protein kinase C regulation of axonal microtubule invasion of growth cones. Activation of PKC by phorbol esters resulted in a rapid, robust advance of distal microtubules (MTs) into the F-actin rich peripheral domain of growth cones, where they are normally excluded. In contrast, inhibition of PKC activity by bisindolylmaleimide and related compounds had no perceptible effect on growth cone motility, but completely blocked phorbol ester effects. Significantly, MT advance occurred despite continued retrograde F-actin flow—a process that normally inhibits MT advance. Polymer assembly was necessary for PKC-mediated MT advance since it was highly sensitive to a range of antagonists at concentrations that specifically interfere with microtubule dynamics. Biochemical evidence is presented that PKC activation promotes formation of a highly dynamic MT pool. Direct assessment of microtubule dynamics and translocation using the fluorescent speckle microscopy microtubule marking technique indicates PKC activation results in a nearly twofold increase in the typical lifetime of a MT growth episode, accompanied by a 1.7-fold increase and twofold decrease in rescue and catastrophe frequencies, respectively. No significant effects on instantaneous microtubule growth, shortening, or sliding rates (in either anterograde or retrograde directions) were observed. MTs also spent a greater percentage of time undergoing retrograde transport after PKC activation, despite overall MT advance. These results suggest that regulation of MT assembly by PKC may be an important factor in determining neurite outgrowth and regrowth rates and may play a role in other cellular processes dependent on directed MT advance. PMID:11238458

  20. The phosphorylation state of neuronal processes determines growth cone formation after neuronal injury.

    PubMed

    Geddis, Matthew S; Rehder, Vincent

    2003-10-15

    Growth cones are essential for neuronal pathfinding during embryonic development and again after injury, when they aid in neuronal regeneration. This study was aimed at investigating the role of kinases in the earliest events in neuronal regeneration, namely, the formation of new growth cones from injured neuronal processes. Neurites of identified snail neurons grown in vitro were severed, and the formation of growth cones was observed from the ends of such transected processes. Under control conditions, all neurites formed a new growth cone within 45 min of transection. In contrast, growth cone formation in the presence of a general kinase inhibitor, K252a, was significantly inhibited. Moreover, decreasing the phosphorylation state of neurites by activating protein phosphatases with C2-ceramide also reduced growth cone formation. Pharmacological analysis with specific kinase inhibitors suggested that targets of protein kinase C (PKC) and tyrosine kinase (PTK) phosphorylation control growth cone formation. Inhibition of PKC with calphostin C and cerebroside completely blocked growth cone formation, whereas the inhibition of PTK with erbstatin analog significantly reduced growth cone formation. In contrast, inhibitors of protein kinase A, protein kinase G, CaM-kinase II, myosin light-chain kinase, Rho kinase, and PI-3 kinase had little or no effect 45 min after transection. These results suggest that the transformation underlying the formation of a growth cone from an injured (transected) neurite stump is highly sensitive to the phosphorylation state of key target proteins. Therefore, injury-induced signaling events will determine the outcome of neuronal regeneration through their action on kinase and phosphatase activities.

  1. Actin disruption alters the localization of tau in the growth cones of cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Zmuda, J F; Rivas, R J

    2000-08-01

    Cultured cerebellar granule neurons initially extend a single axon, followed by the extension of a second axon to attain a bipolar morphology. Differentiation culminates with the extension of several short dendrites from the cell body. In the present study, we determined the location of the dephosphorylated form of the microtubule-associated protein tau (dtau) within the growth cones of newly forming axons and examined whether this localization was influenced by the actin cytoskeleton. Following elongation of the initial axon at 2-3 days in vitro, dtau immunoreactivity was present along the entire length of the axon, becoming most intense just proximal to the growth cone. Dtau labeling dropped off dramatically along the microtubules of the growth cone and was undetectable along the most distal tips of these microtubules. As the initial axon continued to elongate at 3-4 days in vitro, the actin-rich growth cone peripheral domain characteristically underwent a dramatic reduction in size. Dtau immunoreactivity extended all the way to the most distal tips of the microtubules in the growth cones of these cells. Cytochalasin D and latrunculin A mimicked the effects of this characteristic reduction in growth cone size with regard to dtau localization in the growth cone. Depolymerization of filamentous actin caused the collapse of the peripheral domain and allowed dtau to bind all the way to the most distal tips of microtubules in the axon. Upon removal of the drugs, the peripheral domain of the growth cone rapidly re-formed and dtau was once again excluded from the most distal regions of growth cone microtubules. These findings suggest a novel role for actin in determining the localization of the microtubule-associated protein &tgr; within the growth cones of neurons.

  2. Live cell imaging of neuronal growth cone motility and guidance in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The neuronal growth cone, a highly motile structure at the tip of neuronal processes, is an excellent model system for studying directional cell movements. While biochemical and genetic approaches unveiled molecular interactions between ligand, receptor, signaling and cytoskeleton-associated proteins controlling axonal growth and guidance, in vitro live cell imaging has emerged as a crucial approach for dissecting cellular mechanisms of growth cone motility and guidance. Important insights into these mechanisms have been gained from studies using the large growth cones elaborated by Aplysia californica neurons, an outstanding model system for live cell imaging for a number of reasons. Identified neurons can be isolated and imaged at room temperature. Aplysia growth cones are 5–10 times larger than growth cones from other species, making them suitable for quantitative high-resolution imaging of cytoskeletal protein dynamics and biophysical approaches. Lastly, protein, RNA, fluorescent probes and small molecules can be microinjected into the neuronal cell body for localization and functional studies. The following chapter describes culturing of Aplysia bag cell neurons, live cell imaging of neuronal growth cones using differential interference contrast and fluorescent speckle microscopy as well as the restrained bead interaction assay to induce adhesion-mediated growth cone guidance in vitro. PMID:21748670

  3. Substrate Availability of Mutant SPT Alters Neuronal Branching and Growth Cone Dynamics in Dorsal Root Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Byung Kyu; Chandra, Ankush; Kuljis, Dika; Schmidt, Brian P.

    2015-01-01

    Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) is a key enzyme in the first step of sphingolipid biosynthesis. Mutations in the SPTLC1 gene that encodes for SPT subunits cause hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1. However, little is understood about how mutant SPT regulates mechanisms of sensory neuron and axonal growth. Using transgenic mice overexpressing the C133W SPT mutant, we found that mutant dorsal root ganglia (DRG) during growth in vitro exhibit increased neurite length and branching, coinciding with elevated expression of actin-cross-linking proteins at the neuronal growth cone, namely phosphorylated Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin. In addition, inhibition of SPT was able to reverse the mutant phenotype. Because mutant SPT preferentially uses l-alanine over its canonical substrate l-serine, we also investigated the effects of substrate availability on DRG neurons. Supplementation with l-serine or removal of l-alanine independently restored normal growth patterns in mutant SPTLC1C133W DRG. Therefore, we report that substrate availability and selectivity of SPT influence the regulation of neurite growth in DRG neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1 is an autosomal-dominant disorder that leads to a sensory neuropathy due to mutations in the serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) enzyme. We investigated how mutant SPT and substrate levels regulate neurite growth. Because SPT is an important enzyme in the synthesis of sphingolipids, our data are of broader significance to other peripheral and metabolic disorders. PMID:26446223

  4. Cone production, seed dispersal, germination in...old-growth redwood cut and uncut stands

    Treesearch

    Kenneth N. Boe

    1968-01-01

    Records of 5 and 6 years' cone crops in old-growth redwood (Sequoia sempervirens [D. Don Endl.] stands in northern California were studied for silvical facts. They show that (a) the principal trees in both cut and uncut stands bore fair to good cone crops for 5 consecutive years, (b) maximum seed dispersal of both total and sound seed occurred in winter, (c)...

  5. Second messengers and membrane trafficking direct and organize growth cone steering

    PubMed Central

    Tojima, Takuro; Hines, Jacob H.; Henley, John R.; Kamiguchi, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    Graded distributions of extracellular cues guide developing axons toward their targets. A network of second messengers, Ca2+ and cyclic nucleotides, shapes cue-derived information into either attractive or repulsive signals that steer growth cones bidirectionally. Emerging evidence suggests that such guidance signals create a localized imbalance between exocytosis and endocytosis, which in turn redirects membrane, adhesion and cytoskeletal components asymmetrically across the growth cone to bias the direction of axon extension. These recent advances allow us to propose a unifying model of how the growth cone translates shallow gradients of environmental information into polarized activity of the steering machinery for axon guidance. PMID:21386859

  6. Can hippocampal neurites and growth cones climb over obstacles?

    PubMed

    Lien, Thuy Linh; Ban, Jelena; Tormen, Massimo; Migliorini, Elisa; Grenci, Gianluca; Pozzato, Alessandro; Torre, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Guidance molecules, such as Sema3A or Netrin-1, can induce growth cone (GC) repulsion or attraction in the presence of a flat surface, but very little is known of the action of guidance molecules in the presence of obstacles. Therefore we combined chemical and mechanical cues by applying a steady Netrin-1 stream to the GCs of dissociated hippocampal neurons plated on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces patterned with lines 2 µm wide, with 4 µm period and with a height varying from 100 to 600 nm. GC turning experiments performed 24 hours after plating showed that filopodia crawl over these lines within minutes. These filopodia do not show staining for the adhesion marker Paxillin. GCs and neurites crawl over lines 100 nm high, but less frequently and on a longer time scale over lines higher than 300 nm; neurites never crawl over lines 600 nm high. When neurons are grown for 3 days over patterned surfaces, also neurites can cross lines 300 nm and 600 nm high, grow parallel to and on top of these lines and express Paxillin. Axons - selectively stained with SMI 312 - do not differ from dendrites in their ability to cross these lines. Our results show that highly motile structures such as filopodia climb over high obstacle in response to chemical cues, but larger neuronal structures are less prompt and require hours or days to climb similar obstacles.

  7. Thinning and fertilizing red pine to increase growth and cone production.

    Treesearch

    John H. Cooley

    1970-01-01

    Cone production and growth were increased more by heavy thinning than by fertilizing in 53- and 55-year-old natural red pine stands growing on medium sites, and in a 20-year-old plantation on a good site.

  8. Concentration of membrane antigens by forward transport and trapping in neuronal growth cones.

    PubMed

    Sheetz, M P; Baumrind, N L; Wayne, D B; Pearlman, A L

    1990-04-20

    Formation of the nervous system requires that neuronal growth cones follow specific paths and then stop at recognition signals, sensed at the growth cone's leading edge. We used antibody-coated gold particles viewed by video-enhanced differential interference contrast microscopy to observe the distribution and movement of two cell surface molecules, N-CAM and the 2A1 antigen, on growth cones of cultured cortical neurons. Gold particles are occasionally transported forward at 1-2 microns/s to the leading edge where they are trapped but continue to move. Concentration at the edge persists after cytochalasin D treatment or ATP depletion, but active movements to and along edges cease. We also observed a novel outward movement of small cytoplasmic aggregates at 1.8 microns/s in filopodia. We suggest that active forward transport and trapping involve reversible attachment of antigens to and transport along cytoskeletal elements localized to edges of growth cones.

  9. Growth cone travel in space and time: the cellular ensemble of cytoskeleton, adhesion, and membrane.

    PubMed

    Vitriol, Eric A; Zheng, James Q

    2012-03-22

    Growth cones, found at the tip of axonal projections, are the sensory and motile organelles of developing neurons that enable axon pathfinding and target recognition for precise wiring of the neural circuitry. To date, many families of conserved guidance molecules and their corresponding receptors have been identified that work in space and time to ensure billions of axons to reach their targets. Research in the past two decades has also gained significant insight into the ways in which growth cones translate extracellular signals into directional migration. This review aims to examine new progress toward understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying directional motility of the growth cone and to discuss questions that remain to be addressed. Specifically, we will focus on the cellular ensemble of cytoskeleton, adhesion, and membrane and examine how the intricate interplay between these processes orchestrates the directed movement of growth cones.

  10. Focal loss of actin bundles causes microtubule redistribution and growth cone turning.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feng-Quan; Waterman-Storer, Clare M; Cohan, Christopher S

    2002-05-27

    It is commonly believed that growth cone turning during pathfinding is initiated by reorganization of actin filaments in response to guidance cues, which then affects microtubule structure to complete the turning process. However, a major unanswered question is how changes in actin cytoskeleton are induced by guidance cues and how these changes are then translated into microtubule rearrangement. Here, we report that local and specific disruption of actin bundles from the growth cone peripheral domain induced repulsive growth cone turning. Meanwhile, dynamic microtubules within the peripheral domain were oriented into areas where actin bundles remained and were lost from areas where actin bundles disappeared. This resulted in directional microtubule extension leading to axon bending and growth cone turning. In addition, this local actin bundle loss coincided with localized growth cone collapse, as well as asymmetrical lamellipodial protrusion. Our results provide direct evidence, for the first time, that regional actin bundle reorganization can steer the growth cone by coordinating actin reorganization with microtubule dynamics. This suggests that actin bundles can be potential targets of signaling pathways downstream of guidance cues, providing a mechanism for coupling changes in leading edge actin with microtubules at the central domain during turning.

  11. The B3 Subunit of the Cone Cyclic Nucleotide-gated Channel Regulates the Light Responses of Cones and Contributes to the Channel Structural Flexibility*

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xi-Qin; Thapa, Arjun; Ma, Hongwei; Xu, Jianhua; Elliott, Michael H.; Rodgers, Karla K.; Smith, Marci L.; Wang, Jin-Shan; Pittler, Steven J.; Kefalov, Vladimir J.

    2016-01-01

    Cone photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels play a pivotal role in cone phototransduction, which is a process essential for daylight vision, color vision, and visual acuity. Mutations in the cone channel subunits CNGA3 and CNGB3 are associated with human cone diseases, including achromatopsia, cone dystrophies, and early onset macular degeneration. Mutations in CNGB3 alone account for 50% of reported cases of achromatopsia. This work investigated the role of CNGB3 in cone light response and cone channel structural stability. As cones comprise only 2–3% of the total photoreceptor population in the wild-type mouse retina, we used Cngb3−/−/Nrl−/− mice with CNGB3 deficiency on a cone-dominant background in our study. We found that, in the absence of CNGB3, CNGA3 was able to travel to the outer segments, co-localize with cone opsin, and form tetrameric complexes. Electroretinogram analyses revealed reduced cone light response amplitude/sensitivity and slower response recovery in Cngb3−/−/Nrl−/− mice compared with Nrl−/− mice. Absence of CNGB3 expression altered the adaptation capacity of cones and severely compromised function in bright light. Biochemical analysis demonstrated that CNGA3 channels lacking CNGB3 were more resilient to proteolysis than CNGA3/CNGB3 channels, suggesting a hindered structural flexibility. Thus, CNGB3 regulates cone light response kinetics and the channel structural flexibility. This work advances our understanding of the biochemical and functional role of CNGB3 in cone photoreceptors. PMID:26893377

  12. Redistribution of GAP-43 during growth cone development in vitro; immunocytochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Burry, R W; Lah, J J; Hayes, D M

    1991-02-01

    The growth-associated protein GAP-43 (B-50, F1, pp46), has been found in elongating axons during development and regeneration, and has also been associated with synaptic plasticity in mature neurons. We have examined the loss of GAP-43 labelling from cerebellar granule cells with immunocytochemical localization of a polyclonal antibody to GAP-43. One day after plating, the plasma membrane of cell bodies, neurites and growth cones were all labelled with anti-GAP-43. By 10 days, most of the cell body labelling was lost, and by 20 days the neuritic and growth cone labelling was greatly reduced. Beginning at six days, anti-GAP-43 labelling of growth cones, which was initially uniform, became clustered. When growth cones were double-labelled with antibodies to GAP-43 and the synaptic vesicle protein, p65, inverse changes in the distribution of label was observed. While growth cone labelling with anti-p65 increased from three to 20 days in culture, GAP-43 label began to be lost from some growth cones by six days and showed continuing decline through 20 days. For individual growth cones, the loss of GAP-43 appeared to parallel the accumulation of p65, and first growth cones to lose GAP-43 appeared to be the first to accumulate p65 label. When cultures were grown on a substrate of basement membrane material, the time frames of neuritic outgrowth, loss of GAP-43 labelling, and increase in p65 labelling were all accelerated. At five days, labelling for GAP-43 was weak and labelling for p65 was strong, in a pattern comparable to that seen in older cultures on a polylysine substrate. These results suggest several conclusions concerning the expression and loss of GAP-43 in cultured cerebellar granule neurons. First, GAP-43 label is initially distributed in all parts of these cells. With increasing time in culture the label is first lost from cell bodies and later from neurites and growth cones. Second, the loss of GAP-43 label from growth cones is correlated with the appearance

  13. Acetylcholine elongates neuronal growth cone filopodia via activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Lei Ray; Estes, Stephen; Artinian, Liana; Rehder, Vincent

    2013-07-01

    In addition to acting as a classical neurotransmitter in synaptic transmission, acetylcholine (ACh) has been shown to play a role in axonal growth and growth cone guidance. What is not well understood is how ACh acts on growth cones to affect growth cone filopodia, structures known to be important for neuronal pathfinding. We addressed this question using an identified neuron (B5) from the buccal ganglion of the pond snail Helisoma trivolvis in cell culture. ACh treatment caused pronounced filopodial elongation within minutes, an effect that required calcium influx and resulted in the elevation of the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca]i ). Whole-cell patch clamp recordings showed that ACh caused a reduction in input resistance, a depolarization of the membrane potential, and an increase in firing frequency in B5 neurons. These effects were mediated via the activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), as the nAChR agonist dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) mimicked the effects of ACh on filopodial elongation, [Ca]i elevation, and changes in electrical activity. Moreover, the nAChR antagonist tubucurarine blocked all DMPP-induced effects. Lastly, ACh acted locally at the growth cone, because growth cones that were physically isolated from their parent neuron responded to ACh by filopodial elongation with a similar time course as growth cones that remained connected to their parent neuron. Our data revealed a critical role for ACh as a modulator of growth cone filopodial dynamics. ACh signaling was mediated via nAChRs and resulted in Ca influx, which, in turn, caused filopodial elongation.

  14. Axon Growth and Guidance: Receptor Regulation and Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Michael; Chance, Rebecca K.; Bashaw, Greg J.

    2016-01-01

    The development of precise connectivity patterns during the establishment of the nervous system depends on the regulated action of diverse, conserved families of guidance cues and their neuronal receptors. Determining how these signaling pathways function to regulate axon growth and guidance is fundamentally important to understanding wiring specificity in the nervous system and will undoubtedly shed light on many neural developmental disorders. Considerable progress has been made in defining the mechanisms that regulate the correct spatial and temporal distribution of guidance receptors and how these receptors in turn signal to the growth cone cytoskeleton to control steering decisions. This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms mediating growth cone guidance with a particular emphasis on the control of guidance receptor regulation and signaling. PMID:19400716

  15. Axon growth and guidance: receptor regulation and signal transduction.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Michael; Chance, Rebecca K; Bashaw, Greg J

    2009-01-01

    The development of precise connectivity patterns during the establishment of the nervous system depends on the regulated action of diverse, conserved families of guidance cues and their neuronal receptors. Determining how these signaling pathways function to regulate axon growth and guidance is fundamentally important to understanding wiring specificity in the nervous system and will undoubtedly shed light on many neural developmental disorders. Considerable progress has been made in defining the mechanisms that regulate the correct spatial and temporal distribution of guidance receptors and how these receptors in turn signal to the growth cone cytoskeleton to control steering decisions. This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms mediating growth cone guidance with a particular emphasis on the control of guidance receptor regulation and signaling.

  16. Ganglioside GD3 monoclonal antibody-induced paxillin tyrosine phosphorylation and filamentous actin assembly in cerebellar growth cones.

    PubMed

    Yuyama, Kohei; Sekino-Suzuki, Naoko; Yamamoto, Naomasa; Kasahara, Kohji

    2011-03-01

    We have demonstrated that antibody to ganglioside GD3 (R24) immunoprecipitates src-family tyrosine kinase Lyn from primary cerebellar granule cells and R24 treatment of the intact cells induces Lyn activation and rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of several substrates, suggesting the functional association of ganglioside GD3 with Lyn. In this study, R24 treatment of primary cerebellar granule cells enhances phosphorylation of paxillin at tyrosine residue 118 and induces filamentous actin assembly and neurite outgrowth. R24 treatment of cerebellar growth cone membrane fraction induces prominent tyrosine phosphorylation of 68 kDa protein which comigrates with phosphopaxillin at tyrosine residue 118. Tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin is known to regulate actin cytoskeleton-dependent changes in cell morphology. Signal transduction by ganglioside GD3 is involved in growth cone morphology via tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  17. The growth and erosion of cinder cones in Guatemala and El Salvador: Models and statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemis, Karen; Walker, Jim; Borgia, Andrea; Turrin, Brent; Neri, Marco; Swisher, Carl, III

    2011-04-01

    Morphologic data for 147 cinder cones in southern Guatemala and western El Salvador are compared with data from the San Francisco volcanic field, Arizona (USA), Cima volcanic field, California (USA), Michoácan-Guanajuato volcanic field, Mexico, and the Lamongan volcanic field, East Java. The Guatemala cones have an average height of 110 +/- 50 m, an average basal diameter of 660 +/- 230 m and an average top diameter of 180 +/- 150 m. The general morphology of these cones can be described by their average cone angle of slope (24 +/- 7), average height-to-radius ratio (0.33 +/- 0.09) and their flatness (0.24 +/- 0.18). Although the mean values for the Guatemalan cones are similar to those for other volcanic fields (e.g., San Francisco volcanic field, Arizona; Cima volcanic field, California; Michoácan-Guanajuato volcanic field, Mexico; and Lamongan volcanic field, East Java), the range of morphologies encompasses almost all of those observed worldwide for cinder cones. Three new 40Ar/ 39Ar age dates are combined with 19 previously published dates for cones in Guatemala and El Salvador. There is no indication that the morphologies of these cones have changed over the last 500-1000 ka. Furthermore, a re-analysis of published data for other volcanic fields suggests that only in the Cima volcanic field (of those studied) is there clear evidence of degradation with age. Preliminary results of a numerical model of cinder cone growth are used to show that the range of morphologies observed in the Guatemalan cinder cones could all be primary, that is, due to processes occurring at the time of eruption.

  18. Evaluation of the effects of propylisopropylacetic acid (PIA) on neuronal growth cone morphology.

    PubMed

    Shimshoni, Jakob A; Dalton, Emma C; Watson, Peter; Boris, Yagen; Bialer, Meir; Harwood, Adrian J

    2009-03-01

    Propylisopropylacetic acid (PIA) is a constitutional isomer of valproic acid (VPA). It has previously been found to be a weak antiepileptic, but in common with mood stabilizers, causes inositol depletion and growth cone spreading, suggesting the basis of a new series of mood stabilizers. To assess this possibility, we have compared the effects of racemic (R,S)-PIA and its individual enantiomers to those of the mood stabilizers lithium (Li+), VPA and carbamazepine (CBZ). Unlike Li+ and VPA, but in common with CBZ and (R,S)-PIA, neither (R)-PIA nor (S)-PIA enantiomer induces T-cell factor (TCF)-mediated gene expression. However, as seen for other mood stabilizers, both enantiomers are potent inducers of growth cone spreading. To investigate the mechanism for these effects, we examined changes in the actin cytoskeleton following drug treatment with Li+, VPA, CBZ, (R,S)-PIA or its individual enantiomers. All exhibit a redistribution of F-actin to the growth cone periphery, a feature of spread growth cones. (R,S)-PIA has the strongest effect as it also elevates F-actin polymerization at the cell periphery. This change in the actin cytoskeleton is associated with a substantial increase in F-actin-rich protrusions on the surface of the growth cone and in its close vicinity. These results demonstrate an effect of (R,S)-PIA on the neuronal actin cytoskeleton shared in common with other mood stabilizers, and suggest a potential to induce structural changes within the CNS.

  19. LRRK2 guides the actin cytoskeleton at growth cones together with ARHGEF7 and Tropomyosin 4.

    PubMed

    Häbig, Karina; Gellhaar, Sandra; Heim, Birgit; Djuric, Verena; Giesert, Florian; Wurst, Wolfgang; Walter, Carolin; Hentrich, Thomas; Riess, Olaf; Bonin, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene represent the most common genetic cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, LRRK2 function and molecular mechanisms causing the parkinsonian phenotype remain widely unknown. Most of LRRK2 knockdown and overexpression models strengthen the relevance of LRRK2 in regulating neurite outgrowth. We have recently identified ARHGEF7 as the first guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) of LRRK2. This GEF is influencing neurite outgrowth through regulation of actin polymerization. Here, we examined the expression profile of neuroblastoma cells with reduced LRRK2 and ARHGEF7 levels to identify additional partners of LRRK2 in this process. Tropomyosins (TPMs), and in particular TPM4, were the most interesting candidates next to other actin cytoskeleton regulating transcripts in this dataset. Subsequently, enhanced neurite branching was shown using primary hippocampal neurons of LRRK2 knockdown animals. Furthermore, we observed an enhanced number of growth cones per neuron and a mislocalization and dysregulation of ARHGEF7 and TPM4 in these neuronal compartments. Our results reveal a fascinating connection between the neurite outgrowth phenotype of LRRK2 models and the regulation of actin polymerization directing further investigations of LRRK2-related pathogenesis.

  20. The effects of collapsing factors on F-actin content and microtubule distribution of Helisoma growth cones.

    PubMed

    Torreano, Paul J; Waterman-Storer, Clare M; Cohan, Christopher S

    2005-03-01

    Growth cone collapsing factors induce growth cone collapse or repulsive growth cone turning by interacting with membrane receptors that induce alterations in the growth cone cytoskeleton. A common change induced by collapsing factors in the cytoskeleton of the peripheral domain, the thin lamellopodial area of growth cones, is a decline in the number of radially aligned F-actin bundles that form the core of filopodia. The present study examined whether ML-7, a myosin light chain kinase inhibitor, serotonin, a neurotransmitter and TPA, an activator of protein kinase C, which induce growth cone collapse of Helisoma growth cones, depolymerized or debundled F-actin. We report that these collapsing factors had different effects. ML-7 induced F-actin reorganization consistent with debundling whereas serotonin and TPA predominately depolymerized and possibly debundled F-actin. Additionally, these collapsing factors induced the formation of a dense actin-ring around the central domain, the thicker proximal area of growth cones [Zhou and Cohan, 2001: J. Cell Biol. 153:1071-1083]. The formation of the actin-ring occurred subsequent to the loss of actin bundles. The ML-7-induced actin-ring was found to inhibit microtubule extension into the P-domain. Thus, ML-7, serotonin, and TPA induce growth cone collapse associated with a decline in radially aligned F-actin bundles through at least two mechanisms involving debundling of actin filaments and/or actin depolymerization.

  1. Neurotrophins enhance electric field-directed growth cone guidance and directed nerve branching.

    PubMed

    McCaig, C D; Sangster, L; Stewart, R

    2000-03-01

    Neurotrophins play major roles in the developing nervous system in controlling neuronal differentiation, neurite outgrowth, guidance and branching, synapse formation and maturation, and neuronal survival or death. There is increasing evidence that nervous system construction takes place in the presence of dc electric fields, which fluctuate dynamically in space and time during embryonic development. These have their origins in the neural tube itself, as well as in surrounding skin and gut. Early disruption of these endogenous electric fields causes failure of the nervous system to form, or else it forms aberrantly. Nerve growth, guidance, and branching are controlled tightly during pathway construction and in vitro dc electric fields have profound effects on each of these behaviours. We have used cultured neurones to ask whether neurotrophins and dc electric fields might interact in shaping neuronal growth, given their coexistence in vivo. Electric field-directed nerve growth generally was enhanced by the simultaneous presentation of several neurotrophins to the growth cone. Under certain circumstances, more nerves turned cathodally, they turned faster, further, and in lower field strengths. Intriguingly, other combinations of dc electric field and neurotrophins (low field strength and neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) switched the direction of growth cone turning. Additionally, cathodally directed nerve growth was faster and directed branching was much more common when electric fields and neurotrophins interacted with neuronal growth cones. Given such profound changes in growth cone behaviour in vitro, neurotrophins and endogenous electric fields are likely to interact in vivo.

  2. Structural Mechanism of Allosteric Activity Regulation in a Ribonucleotide Reductase with Double ATP Cones.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Renzo; Jonna, Venkateswara Rao; Kumar, Rohit; Nayeri, Niloofar; Lundin, Daniel; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie; Hofer, Anders; Logan, Derek T

    2016-06-07

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) reduce ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides. Their overall activity is stimulated by ATP and downregulated by dATP via a genetically mobile ATP cone domain mediating the formation of oligomeric complexes with varying quaternary structures. The crystal structure and solution X-ray scattering data of a novel dATP-induced homotetramer of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa class I RNR reveal the structural bases for its unique properties, namely one ATP cone that binds two dATP molecules and a second one that is non-functional, binding no nucleotides. Mutations in the observed tetramer interface ablate oligomerization and dATP-induced inhibition but not the ability to bind dATP. Sequence analysis shows that the novel type of ATP cone may be widespread in RNRs. The present study supports a scenario in which diverse mechanisms for allosteric activity regulation are gained and lost through acquisition and evolutionary erosion of different types of ATP cone.

  3. Forces from the rear: deformed microtubules in neuronal growth cones influence retrograde flow and advancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, Philipp; Heine, Paul; Goettgens, Barbara; Käs, Josef A.

    2013-01-01

    The directed motility of growth cones at the tip of neuronal processes is a key function in neuronal path-finding and relies on a complex system of interacting cytoskeletal components. Despite intensive research in this field, many aspects of the mechanical roles of actin structures and, in particular, of microtubules throughout this process remain unclear. Mostly, force generation is ascribed to actin-myosin-based structures such as filopodia bundles and the dynamic polymer gel within the lamellipodium. Our analysis of microtubule buckling and deformation in motile growth cones reveals that extending microtubule filaments contribute significantly to the overall protrusion force. In this study, we establish a relationship of the local variations in stored bending energy and deformation characteristics to growth cone morphology and retrograde actin flow. This implies the relevance of microtubule pushing and deformation for general neurite advancement as well as steering processes.

  4. A novel, nongenomic mechanism underlies retinoic acid-induced growth cone turning.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Nathan R; Dmetrichuk, Jennifer M; Carlone, Robert L; Spencer, Gaynor E

    2009-11-11

    The vitamin A metabolite, retinoic acid (RA), is well known for its roles in neural development and regeneration. We have previously shown that RA can induce positive growth cone turning in regenerating neurons in vitro. In this study, we address the subcellular mechanisms underlying this chemo-attractive response, using identified central neurons from the adult mollusc, Lymnaea stagnalis. We show that the RA-induced positive growth cone turning was maintained in the presence of the transcriptional inhibitor, actinomycin D. We also physically transected the neurites from the cell body and showed that isolated growth cones retain the capacity to turn toward a gradient of RA. Moreover, this attractive turning is dependent on de novo local protein synthesis and Ca(2+) influx. Most of RA's actions during neurite outgrowth and regeneration require gene transcription, although these data show for the first time in any species, that the chemotropic action of RA in guiding neurite outgrowth, involves a novel, nongenomic mechanism.

  5. Growth cone-like waves transport actin and promote axonogenesis and neurite branching

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Kevin C.; Pak, Chi W.; Shaw, Alisa E.; Bradke, Frank; Bamburg, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Axonogenesis involves a shift from uniform delivery of materials to all neurites to preferential delivery to the putative axon, supporting its more rapid extension. Waves, growth cone-like structures that propagate down the length of neurites, were shown previously to correlate with neurite growth in dissociated cultured hippocampal neurons. Waves are similar to growth cones in their structure, composition and dynamics. Here, we report that waves form in all undifferentiated neurites, but occur more frequently in the future axon during initial neuronal polarization. Moreover, wave frequency and their impact on neurite growth are altered in neurons treated with stimuli that enhance axonogenesis. Coincident with wave arrival, growth cones enlarge and undergo a marked increase in dynamics. Through their engorgement of filopodia along the neurite shaft, waves can induce de novo neurite branching. Actin in waves maintains much of its cohesiveness during transport whereas actin in non-wave regions of the neurite rapidly diffuses as measured by live cell imaging of photoactivated GFP-actin and photoconversion of Dendra-actin. Thus, waves represent an alternative axonal transport mechanism for actin. Waves also occur in neurons in organotypic hippocampal slices where they propagate along neurites in the dentate gyrus and the CA regions and induce branching. Taken together, our results indicate that waves are physiologically relevant and contribute to axon growth and branching via the transport of actin and by increasing growth cone dynamics. PMID:19513994

  6. Using Computer Simulations to Model Scoria Cone Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemis, K. G.; Mehta, R. D.

    2016-12-01

    Scoria cones form from the accumulation of scoria delivered by either bursting lava bubbles (Strombolian style eruptions) or the gas thrust of an eruption column (Hawaiian to sub-Plinian style eruption). In this study, we focus on connecting the distribution of scoria delivery to the eventual cone shape rather than the specifics of the mechanism of delivery. For simplicity, we choose to model ballistic paths, that follow the scoria from ejection from crater to landing on the surface and then avalanching down slope. The first stage corresponds to Strombolian-like bursts of the bubble. The second stage only occurs if the angle of repose is greater than 30 degrees. After this condition is met, the scoria particles grain flow downwards until a stable slope is formed. These two stages of the volcanic eruption repeat themselves in the number of phases. We hypothesize that the horizontal travel distance of the ballistic paths, and as a result the width of the volcano, is primarily dependent of the velocity of the particles bursting from the bubble in the crater. Other parameters that may affect the shape of cinder cones are air resistance on ballistic paths, ranges in particle size, ballistic ejection angles, and the total number of particles. Ejection velocity, ejection angle, particle size and air resistance control the delivery distribution of scoria; a similar distribution of scoria can be obtained by sedimentation from columns and the controlling parameters of such (gas thrust velocity, particle density, etc.) can be related to the ballistic delivery in terms of eruption energy and particle characteristics. We present a series of numerical experiments that test our hypotheses by varying different parameters one or more at a time in sets each designed to test a specific hypothesis. Volcano width increases as ejection velocity, ejection angle (measured from surface), or the total number of scoria particles increases. Ongoing investigations seek the controls on crater

  7. Cdc42 and actin control polarized expression of TI-VAMP vesicles to neuronal growth cones and their fusion with the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Philipp; Rudge, Rachel; Irinopoulou, Theano; Danglot, Lydia; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile; Galli, Thierry

    2006-03-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP)-mediated fusion of intracellular vesicles with the plasma membrane is crucial for neurite outgrowth, a pathway not requiring synaptobrevin-dependent exocytosis. Yet, it is not known how the TI-VAMP membrane trafficking pathway is regulated or how it is coordinated with cytoskeletal dynamics within the growth cone that guide neurite outgrowth. Here, we demonstrate that TI-VAMP, but not synaptobrevin 2, concentrates in the peripheral, F-actin-rich region of the growth cones of hippocampal neurons in primary culture. Its accumulation correlates with and depends upon the presence of F-actin. Moreover, acute stimulation of actin remodeling by homophilic activation of the adhesion molecule L1 induces a site-directed, actin-dependent recruitment of the TI-VAMP compartment. Expression of a dominant-positive mutant of Cdc42, a key regulator of cell polarity, stimulates formation of F-actin- and TI-VAMP-rich filopodia outside the growth cone. Furthermore, we report that Cdc42 activates exocytosis of pHLuorin tagged TI-VAMP in an actin-dependent manner. Collectively, our data suggest that Cdc42 and regulated assembly of the F-actin network control the accumulation and exocytosis of TI-VAMP-containing membrane vesicles in growth cones to coordinate membrane trafficking and actin remodeling during neurite outgrowth.

  8. Cdc42 and Actin Control Polarized Expression of TI-VAMP Vesicles to Neuronal Growth Cones and Their Fusion with the Plasma MembraneV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, Philipp; Rudge, Rachel; Irinopoulou, Theano; Danglot, Lydia; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile; Galli, Thierry

    2006-01-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP)-mediated fusion of intracellular vesicles with the plasma membrane is crucial for neurite outgrowth, a pathway not requiring synaptobrevin-dependent exocytosis. Yet, it is not known how the TI-VAMP membrane trafficking pathway is regulated or how it is coordinated with cytoskeletal dynamics within the growth cone that guide neurite outgrowth. Here, we demonstrate that TI-VAMP, but not synaptobrevin 2, concentrates in the peripheral, F-actin-rich region of the growth cones of hippocampal neurons in primary culture. Its accumulation correlates with and depends upon the presence of F-actin. Moreover, acute stimulation of actin remodeling by homophilic activation of the adhesion molecule L1 induces a site-directed, actin-dependent recruitment of the TI-VAMP compartment. Expression of a dominant-positive mutant of Cdc42, a key regulator of cell polarity, stimulates formation of F-actin- and TI-VAMP-rich filopodia outside the growth cone. Furthermore, we report that Cdc42 activates exocytosis of pHLuorin tagged TI-VAMP in an actin-dependent manner. Collectively, our data suggest that Cdc42 and regulated assembly of the F-actin network control the accumulation and exocytosis of TI-VAMP-containing membrane vesicles in growth cones to coordinate membrane trafficking and actin remodeling during neurite outgrowth. PMID:16381811

  9. Differing Semaphorin 3A concentrations trigger distinct signaling mechanisms in growth cone collapse

    PubMed Central

    Manns, Richard P.C.; Cook, Geoffrey M.W.; Holt, Christine E.; Keynes, Roger J.

    2012-01-01

    Semaphorin-3A (Sema3A) is a major guidance cue in the developing nervous system. Previous studies have revealed a dependence of responses to Sema3A on local protein synthesis (PS) in axonal growth cones, but a recent study has called this dependence into question. To understand the basis of this discrepancy we used the growth cone collapse assay on chick dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We show that the dependence of growth cone collapse on protein synthesis varies according to Sema3A concentration, from near-total at low concentration (<100ng/ml) to minimal at high concentration (>625ng/ml). Further, we show that neuropilin-1 (NP-1) mediates both PS-dependent and PS–independent collapse. Our findings are consistent with the operation of at least two distinct Sema3A signaling pathways: one that is PS-dependent, involving mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and one that is PS-independent, involving GSK-3β activation and operative at all concentrations of Sema3A examined. The results provide a plausible explanation for the discrepancy in PS-dependence reported in the literature, and indicate that different signaling pathways activated within growth cones can be modulated by changing the concentration of the same guidance cue. PMID:22723695

  10. The growth cone as seen through Cajal's original histological preparations and publications.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Marin, Virginia; Garcia-Lopez, Pablo; Freire, Miguel

    2009-01-01

    During the development of the nervous system, each neuron must contact its appropriate target cell in order to establish its specific connections. More than a century ago, Ramon y Cajal discovered an amoeboid-like structure at the end of the axon of developing nerve cells. He called this structure the growth cone [cono de crecimiento] and he proposed that this structure was guided towards its target tissue by chemical substances secreted by the different cells that line its course. We have reviewed the discovery of the growth cone by Cajal using his original publications, his original scientific drawings, and by studying his histological preparations conserved at the "Instituto Cajal" (Madrid, Spain).(1) We found a very good correlation between the structure of the growth cone in the Golgi-impregnated and reduced silver-nitrate-stained material used by Cajal, and that which is revealed with present-day methods. Finally, Cajal's view of the function of the growth cone and his chemotactic hypothesis will also be considered in the light of present-day knowledge.

  11. A microfluidics-based turning assay reveals complex growth cone responses to integrated gradients of substrate-bound ECM molecules and diffusible guidance cues.

    PubMed

    Joanne Wang, C; Li, Xiong; Lin, Benjamin; Shim, Sangwoo; Ming, Guo-Li; Levchenko, Andre

    2008-02-01

    Neuronal growth cones contain sophisticated molecular machinery precisely regulating their migration in response to complex combinatorial gradients of diverse external cues. The details of this regulation are still largely unknown, in part due to limitations of the currently available experimental techniques. Microfluidic devices have been shown to be capable of generating complex, stable and precisely controlled chemical gradients, but their use in studying growth cone migration has been limited in part due to the effects of shear stress. Here we describe a microfluidics-based turning-assay chip designed to overcome this issue. In addition to generating precise gradients of soluble guidance cues, the chip can also fabricate complex composite gradients of diffusible and surface-bound guidance cues that mimic the conditions the growth cones realistically counter in vivo. Applying this assay to Xenopus embryonic spinal neurons, we demonstrate that the presence of a surface-bound laminin gradient can finely tune the polarity of growth cone responses (repulsion or attraction) to gradients of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), with the guidance outcome dependent on the mean BDNF concentration. The flexibility inherent in this assay holds significant potential for refinement of our understanding of nervous system development and regeneration, and can be extended to elucidate other cellular processes involving chemotaxis of shear sensitive cells.

  12. Quantitative genetic parameters for yield, plant growth and cone chemical traits in hop (Humulus lupulus L.)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Most traits targeted in the genetic improvement of hop are quantitative in nature. Improvement based on selection of these traits requires a comprehensive understanding of their inheritance. This study estimated quantitative genetic parameters for 20 traits related to three key objectives for the genetic improvement of hop: cone chemistry, cone yield and agronomic characteristics. Results Significant heritable genetic variation was identified for α-acid and β-acid, as well as their components and relative proportions. Estimates of narrow-sense heritability for these traits (h 2  = 0.15 to 0.29) were lower than those reported in previous hop studies, but were based on a broader suite of families (108 from European, North American and hybrid origins). Narrow-sense heritabilities are reported for hop growth traits for the first time (h 2  = 0.04 to 0.20), relating to important agronomic characteristics such as emergence, height and lateral morphology. Cone chemistry and growth traits were significantly genetically correlated, such that families with more vigorous vegetative growth were associated with lower α-acid and β-acid levels. This trend may reflect the underlying population structure of founder genotypes (European and North American origins) as well as past selection in the Australian environment. Although male and female hop plants are thought to be indistinguishable until flowering, sex was found to influence variation in many growth traits, with male and female plants displaying differences in vegetative morphology from emergence to cone maturity. Conclusions This study reveals important insights into the genetic control of quantitative hop traits. The information gained will provide hop breeders with a greater understanding of the additive genetic factors which affect selection of cone chemistry, yield and agronomic characteristics in hop, aiding in the future development of improved cultivars. PMID:24524684

  13. Rbpj cell autonomous regulation of retinal ganglion cell and cone photoreceptor fates in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Riesenberg, Amy N; Liu, Zhenyi; Kopan, Raphael; Brown, Nadean L

    2009-10-14

    Vertebrate retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) are pluripotent, but pass through competence states that progressively restrict their developmental potential (Cepko et al., 1996; Livesey and Cepko, 2001; Cayouette et al., 2006). In the rodent eye, seven retinal cell classes differentiate in overlapping waves, with RGCs, cone photoreceptors, horizontals, and amacrines forming predominantly before birth, and rod photoreceptors, bipolars, and Müller glia differentiating postnatally. Both intrinsic and extrinsic factors regulate each retinal cell type (for review, see Livesey and Cepko, 2001). Here, we conditionally deleted the transcription factor Rbpj, a critical integrator of multiple Notch signals (Jarriault et al., 1995; Honjo, 1996; Kato et al., 1997; Han et al., 2002), during prenatal mouse retinal neurogenesis. Removal of Rbpj caused reduced proliferation, premature neuronal differentiation, apoptosis, and profound mispatterning. To determine the cell autonomous requirements for Rbpj during RGC and cone formation, we marked Cre-generated retinal lineages with GFP expression, which showed that Rbpj autonomously promotes RPC mitotic activity, and suppresses RGC and cone fates. In addition, the progressive loss of Rbpj-/- RPCs resulted in a diminished progenitor pool available for rod photoreceptor formation. This circumstance, along with the overproduction of Rbpj-/- cones, revealed that photoreceptor development is under homeostatic regulation. Finally, to understand how the Notch pathway regulates the simultaneous formation of multiple cell types, we compared the RGC and cone phenotypes of Rbpj to Notch1 (Jadhav et al., 2006b; Yaron et al., 2006), Notch3, and Hes1 mutants. We found particular combinations of Notch pathway genes regulate the development of each retinal cell type.

  14. Making the gradient: Thyroid hormone regulates cone opsin expression in the developing mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Melanie R.; Srinivas, Maya; Forrest, Douglas; Morreale de Escobar, Gabriella; Reh, Thomas A.

    2006-01-01

    Most mammals have two types of cone photoreceptors, which contain either medium wavelength (M) or short wavelength (S) opsin. The number and spatial organization of cone types varies dramatically among species, presumably to fine-tune the retina for different visual environments. In the mouse, S- and M-opsin are expressed in an opposing dorsal–ventral gradient. We previously reported that cone opsin patterning requires thyroid hormone β2, a nuclear hormone receptor that regulates transcription in conjunction with its ligand, thyroid hormone (TH). Here we show that exogenous TH inhibits S-opsin expression, but activates M-opsin expression. Binding of endogenous TH to TRβ2 is required to inhibit S-opsin and to activate M-opsin. TH is symmetrically distributed in the retina at birth as S-opsin expression begins, but becomes elevated in the dorsal retina at the time of M-opsin onset (postnatal day 10). Our results show that TH is a critical regulator of both S-opsin and M-opsin, and suggest that a TH gradient may play a role in establishing the gradient of M-opsin. These results also suggest that the ratio and patterning of cone types may be determined by TH availability during retinal development. PMID:16606843

  15. Growth of a young, frequently active composite cone: Ngauruhoe volcano, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobden, Barbara J.; Houghton, Bruce F.; Nairn, Ian A.

    2002-09-01

    Ngauruhoe cone, in southern Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand, has grown rapidly over the last 2,500 years in an alternation of effusive, strombolian, vulcanian, and sub-plinian eruptions of andesitic magma. At times growth has been 'staccato' in fashion as evidenced in the historical record. Each historical eruption typically lasted days to months, alternating with repose periods of years to decades. Major historic eruptions occurred in 1870 1949 1954-1955 and 1973-1975, encompassing wide variations in eruptive style over short timescales. The early period of cone building appears to have been dominated by a more continuous form of activity characterised by a series of numerous frequent explosive eruptions, with associated lava flows. The 2.2-km3 cone has grown in a piecemeal sectorial manner reflecting constant modification to the morphology of the summit, which has funnelled eruption products to specific sectors of the cone. Eruption rates can be calculated on several different timescales. Discharge rates averaged over individual eruptive pulses vary by two orders of magnitude (2.7-280 m3 s-1), reflecting variations in high level magma ascent rates and processes such as degassing, which are, in turn, reflected in contrasting eruptive styles. Lower rates (e.g. 0.65 m3 s-1) are obtained by averaging the discharge over an entire eruption lasting several months and may correspond to the ascent rate of magma batch(es) feeding the eruption. The long-term growth rate of Ngauruhoe is 0.9 km3 ky-1. This is an average rate reflecting the long-term deep supply rate of magma to crustal reservoirs. By looking at eruption rates on these different timescales we are better able to constrain processes occurring at various depths within the plumbing system. There are few detailed studies of the growth patterns of young volcanic cones, but such data are essential in understanding the dynamics of andesitic systems. More than 60 lavas and pyroclastic units mapped on different sectors

  16. The growth cones of living neurons probed by the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Davide; Grattarola, Massimo; Tedesco, Mariateresa

    2011-01-01

    A detailed report of experimental findings concerning the use of atomic force microscopy to probe growth cones of chick embryo spinal cord neurons under vital conditions is given.The role played by indentation in the making of images and force-versus-distance curves is critically discussed. As a result, the thickness of growth cone regions is quantitatively estimated. By comparing the obtained images with descriptions given in the literature on the basis of other microscopy techniques, a central (C) region and a peripheral (P) region are identified, characterized by a different thickness and a different structural organization. Moreover, clusters of adhesion molecules are tentatively identified in regions where neuron arborizations were challenged by the atomic force microscope (AFM) tip.

  17. Control of neurite outgrowth and growth cone motility by phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Tornieri, Karine; Welshhans, Kristy; Geddis, Matthew S; Rehder, Vincent

    2006-04-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI-3K) has been reported to affect neurite outgrowth both in vivo and in vitro. Here we investigated the signaling pathways by which PI-3K affects neurite outgrowth and growth cone motility in identified snail neurons in vitro. Inhibition of PI-3K with wortmannin (2 microM) or LY 294002 (25 microM) resulted in a significant elongation of filopodia and in a slow-down of neurite outgrowth. Experiments using cytochalasin and blebbistatin, drugs that interfere with actin polymerization and myosin II activity, respectively, demonstrated that filopodial elongation resulting from PI-3K inhibition was dependent on actin polymerization. Inhibition of strategic kinases located downstream of PI-3K, such as Akt, ROCK, and MEK, also caused significant filopodial elongation and a slow-down in neurite outgrowth. Another growth cone parameter, filopodial number, was not affected by inhibition of PI-3K, Akt, ROCK, or MEK. A detailed study of growth cone behavior showed that the filopodial elongation induced by inhibiting PI-3K, Akt, ROCK, and MEK was achieved by increasing two motility parameters: the rate with which filopodia extend (extension rate) and the time that filopodia spend elongating. Whereas the inhibition of ROCK or Akt (both activated by the lipid kinase activity of PI-3K) and MEK (activated by the protein kinase activity of PI-3K) had additive effects, simultaneous inhibition of Akt and ROCK showed no additive effect. We further demonstrate that the effects on filopodial dynamics investigated were calcium-independent. Taken together, our results suggest that inhibition of PI-3K signaling results in filopodial elongation and a slow-down of neurite advance, reminiscent of growth cone searching behavior.

  18. Organization of cytoskeletal elements and organelles preceding growth cone emergence from an identified neuron in situ

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the arrangement of cytoskeletal elements and organelles in an identified neuron in situ at the site of emergence of its growth cone just before and concurrent with the onset of axonogenesis. The Ti1 pioneer neurons are the first pair of afferent neurons to differentiate in embryonic grasshopper limbs. They arise at the distal tip of the limb bud epithelium, the daughter cells of a single precursor cell, the Pioneer Mother Cell (PMC). Using immunohistochemical markers, we characterized the organization of microtubules, centrosomes, Golgi apparatus, midbody, actin filaments, and chromatin from mitosis in the PMC through axonogenesis in the Tils. Just before and concurrent with the onset of axonogenesis, a characteristic arrangement of tubulin, actin filaments, and Golgi apparatus is localized at the proximal pole of the proximal pioneer neuron. The growth cone of the proximal cell stereotypically arises from this site. Although the distal cell's axon generally grows proximally, occasionally it arises from its distal pole; in such limbs, the axons from the sister cells extend from mirror symmetric locations on their somata. In the presence of cytochalasin D, the PMC undergoes nuclear division but not cytokinesis and although other neuronal phenotypes are expressed, axongenesis is inhibited. Our data suggest that intrinsic information determines the site of growth cone emergence of an identified neuron in situ. PMID:2654140

  19. Different receptors mediate the electrophysiological and growth cone responses of an identified neuron to applied dopamine.

    PubMed

    Dobson, K S; Dmetrichuk, J M; Spencer, G E

    2006-09-15

    Neurotransmitters are among the many cues that may guide developing axons toward appropriate targets in the developing nervous system. We have previously shown in the mollusk Lymnaea stagnalis that dopamine, released from an identified pre-synaptic cell, differentially affects growth cone behavior of its target and non-target cells in vitro. Here, we describe a group of non-target cells that also produce an inhibitory electrophysiological response to applied dopamine. We first determined, using pharmacological blockers, which receptors mediate this physiological response. We demonstrated that the dopaminergic electrophysiological responses of non-target cells were sensitive to a D2 receptor antagonist, as are known target cell responses. However, the non-target cell receptors were linked to different G-proteins and intracellular signaling pathways than the target cell receptors. Despite the presence of a D2-like receptor at the soma, the growth cone collapse of these non-target cells was mediated by D1-like receptors. This study shows that different dopamine receptor sub-types mediated the inhibitory physiological and growth cone responses of an identified cell type. We therefore not only provide further evidence that D2- and D1-like receptors can be present on the same neuron in invertebrates, but also show that these receptors are likely involved in very different cellular functions.

  20. Linear growth rates of types I and II convective modes within the rotating-cone boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, S. J.

    2010-04-01

    Experimental observations have shown that the transition characteristics of the boundary-layer flow over rotating cones depends on the cone half-angle. In particular, pairs of counter-rotating Görtler-type vortices are observed over cones with slender half-angles and co-rotating vortices are observed over broad cones. Garrett et al (2009 J. Fluid Mech. 622 209-32) have hypothesized the existence of a centrifugal instability mode over slender cones that is more dangerous than the types I (crossflow) and II (streamline curvature) modes which dominate over rotating disks and broad cones. Work is currently underway to clarify this alternative mode; however, a clear understanding of the growth rates of types I and II modes is crucial to the ultimate understanding of how the dominant mode changes with half-angle. In this paper, we demonstrate that the maximum growth rate for types I and II modes decreases with reduced half-angle, which clears the way for the dominance of the alternative instability mode. Furthermore, it is suggested that vortices travelling at 75% of the cone surface speed will be selected over smooth, clean rotating cones with half-angle such that the type I mode is dominant. Interestingly, this vortex speed has been experimentally observed by Kobayashi and Arai within the rotating-sphere boundary layer.

  1. Neuronal growth cones and regeneration: gridlock within the extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Diane M.

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is a diverse composition of glycoproteins and proteoglycans found in all cellular systems. The extracellular matrix, abundant in the mammalian central nervous system, is temporally and spatially regulated and is a dynamic “living” entity that is reshaped and redesigned on a continuous basis in response to changing needs. Some modifications are adaptive and some are maladaptive. It is the maladaptive responses that pose a significant threat to successful axonal regeneration and/or sprouting following traumatic and spinal cord injuries, and has been the focus of a myriad of research laboratories for many years. This review focuses largely on the extracellular matrix component, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, with certain comparisons to heparan sulfate proteoglycans, which tend to serve opposite functions in the central nervous system. Although about equally as well characterized as some of the other proteoglycans such as hyaluronan and dermatan sulfate proteoglycan, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans are the most widely researched and discussed proteoglycans in the field of axonal injury and regeneration. Four laboratories discuss various aspects of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and proteoglycans in general with respect to their structure and function (Beller and Snow), the recent discovery of specific chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan receptors and what this may mean for increased advancements in the field (Shen), extracellular matrix degradation by matrix metalloproteinases, which sculpt and resculpt to provide support for outgrowth, synapse formation, and synapse stability (Phillips et al.), and the perilesion microenvironment with respect to immune system function in response to proteoglycans and central nervous system injuries (Jakeman et al.). PMID:25206821

  2. Hormonal regulation of fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Gicquel, C; Le Bouc, Y

    2006-01-01

    Fetal growth is a complex process depending on the genetics of the fetus, the availability of nutrients and oxygen to the fetus, maternal nutrition and various growth factors and hormones of maternal, fetal and placental origin. Hormones play a central role in regulating fetal growth and development. They act as maturational and nutritional signals in utero and control tissue development and differentiation according to the prevailing environmental conditions in the fetus. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system, and IGF-I and IGF-II in particular, plays a critical role in fetal and placental growth throughout gestation. Disruption of the IGF1, IGF2 or IGF1R gene retards fetal growth, whereas disruption of IGF2R or overexpression of IGF2 enhances fetal growth. IGF-I stimulates fetal growth when nutrients are available, thereby ensuring that fetal growth is appropriate for the nutrient supply. The production of IGF-I is particularly sensitive to undernutrition. IGF-II plays a key role in placental growth and nutrient transfer. Several key hormone genes involved in embryonic and fetal growth are imprinted. Disruption of this imprinting causes disorders involving growth defects, such as Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, which is associated with fetal overgrowth, or Silver-Russell syndrome, which is associated with intrauterine growth retardation. Optimal fetal growth is essential for perinatal survival and has long-term consequences extending into adulthood. Given the high incidence of intrauterine growth retardation and the high risk of metabolic and cardiovascular complications in later life, further clinical and basic research is needed to develop accurate early diagnosis of aberrant fetal growth and novel therapeutic strategies.

  3. Light and electron microscopical visualization of anterogradely labelled corticospinal growth cones using a new combination of HRP staining techniques.

    PubMed

    Joosten, E A

    1991-05-01

    Up until now, the ultrastructural visualization of growth cones of developing long fibre tracts could only be achieved by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) application 'en route', resulting in axonal damage, which in turn may affect growth cone morphology. Besides, this technique results in labelling of passing fibres, thus hampering the identification of axon origin as well as the interpretation of growth cone configuration. In the present investigation a new combination of HRP staining and intensification techniques is presented which makes it possible to visualize anterogradely labelled corticospinal growth cones over long distances in developing rat spinal cord at the light as well as the electron microscopical level. HRP was applied to the originating cells of the corticospinal tract, located in the sensorimotor cortex, and after 24 h was visualized using a procedure which essentially consists of 3 subsequent steps: first a tetramethylbenzidine (TMB)/ammoniumheptamolybdate (AHM) reaction; second diaminobenzidine (DAB)/nickel (Ni) stabilization and finally glucose oxidase intensification. As was verified at the EM level, the staining procedure here described reveals a complete intense black staining of HRP-labelled growth cones of outgrowing corticospinal axons. Therefore, the method described here guarantees a correct analysis of growth cone morphology at the light microscopical and the ultrastructural level. The present procedure is especially valuable in studying the development of long central nervous fibre systems.

  4. The discovery of the growth cone and its influence on the study of axon guidance

    PubMed Central

    Tamariz, Elisa; Varela-Echavarría, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    For over a century, there has been a great deal of interest in understanding how neural connectivity is established during development and regeneration. Interest in the latter arises from the possibility that knowledge of this process can be used to re-establish lost connections after lesion or neurodegeneration. At the end of the XIX century, Santiago Ramón y Cajal discovered that the distal tip of growing axons contained a structure that he called the growth cone. He proposed that this structure enabled the axon’s oriented growth in response to attractants, now known as chemotropic molecules. He further proposed that the physical properties of the surrounding tissues could influence the growth cone and the direction of growth. This seminal discovery afforded a plausible explanation for directed axonal growth and has led to the discovery of axon guidance mechanisms that include diffusible attractants and repellants and guidance cues anchored to cell membranes or extracellular matrix. In this review the major events in the development of this field are discussed. PMID:26029056

  5. The metalloproteinase stromelysin-1 (transin) mediates PC12 cell growth cone invasiveness through basal laminae.

    PubMed

    Nordstrom, L A; Lochner, J; Yeung, W; Ciment, G

    1995-02-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases have been implicated in various extracellular matrix remodeling events that occur during normal development and in a number of pathologies. In previous work with PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells, we found that the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1 (ST1) was highly induced by nerve growth factor (NGF), but not by epidermal growth factor (EGF). Here, we show that ST1 immunoreactivity is present in growth cones of NGF-treated PC12 cells, but not EGF-treated or untreated cells. To determine whether ST1 expression confers neurite invasiveness, three lines of PC12 cells were produced that constitutively express ST1 antisense mRNA. These lines expressed and secreted significantly reduced levels of ST1 protein, as determined by immunoblot and immunocytochemical methods, but otherwise responded normally to NGF-treatment by elaborating neurites. We found, however, that the neurites of these ST1 antisense cells showed a significantly reduced ability to penetrate a Matrigel reconstituted basal lamina, as compared to the parental cells, suggesting that ST1 confers neurite invasiveness. Finally, we show that ST1 is also expressed in vivo in sections through Embryonic Day 15 rat embryos, including neurons of both the peripheral and central nervous systems. These data indicate that ST1 may play a role in axonal growth in vivo, including a role in growth cone invasiveness.

  6. Whisker/Cone growth on the thermal control surfaces experiment no. S0069

    SciTech Connect

    Zwiener, J.M.; Coston, J.E. Jr.; Miller, E.R.; Mell, R.J.; Wilkes, D.R.

    1995-02-01

    An unusual surface `growth` was found during scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigations of the Thermal Control Surface Experiment (TCSE) S0069 front thermal cover. This `growth` is similar to the cone type whisker growth phenomena as studied by G. K. Wehner beginning in the 1960`s. Extensive analysis has identified the most probable composition of the whiskers to be a silicate type glass. Sources of the growth material are outgassing products from the experiment and orbital atomic oxygen, which occurs naturally at the orbital altitudes of the LDEF mission in the form of neutral atomic oxygen. The highly ordered symmetry and directionality of the whiskers are attributed to the long term (5.8 year) stable flight orientation of the LDEF.

  7. Automated laser guidance of neuronal growth cones using a spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Carnegie, David J; Cizmár, Tomás; Baumgartl, Jörg; Gunn-Moore, Frank J; Dholakia, Kishan

    2009-11-01

    The growth cone of a developing neuron can be guided using a focused infra-red (IR) laser beam [1]. In previous setups this process has required a significant amount of user intervention to adjust continuously the laser beam to guide the growing neuron. Previously, a system using an acousto-optical deflector (AOD) has been developed to steer the beam [2]. However, to enhance the controllability of this system, here we demonstrate the use of a computer controlled spatial light modulator (SLM) to steer and manipulate the shape of a laser beam for use in guided neuronal growth. This new experimental setup paves the way to enable a comprehensive investigation into beam shaping effects on neuronal growth and we show neuronal growth initiated by a Bessel light mode. This is a robust platform to explore the biochemistry of this novel phenomenon.

  8. Whisker/Cone growth on the thermal control surfaces experiment no. S0069

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwiener, James M.; Coston, James E., Jr.; Miller, Edgar R.; Mell, Richard J.; Wilkes, Donald R.

    1995-01-01

    An unusual surface 'growth' was found during scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigations of the Thermal Control Surface Experiment (TCSE) S0069 front thermal cover. This 'growth' is similar to the cone type whisker growth phenomena as studied by G. K. Wehner beginning in the 1960's. Extensive analysis has identified the most probable composition of the whiskers to be a silicate type glass. Sources of the growth material are outgassing products from the experiment and orbital atomic oxygen, which occurs naturally at the orbital altitudes of the LDEF mission in the form of neutral atomic oxygen. The highly ordered symmetry and directionality of the whiskers are attributed to the long term (5.8 year) stable flight orientation of the LDEF.

  9. Sodium-dependent calcium extrusion and sensitivity regulation in retinal cones of the salamander.

    PubMed Central

    Nakatani, K; Yau, K W

    1989-01-01

    several times higher than in normal Ringer solution. 8. A roughly similar increase in light sensitivity was observed for a rod under the same conditions. 9. We conclude that the Na+-dependent Ca2+ efflux, through lowering intracellular free Ca2+ in the light, has a role in regulating the absolute light sensitivity in cones as it does in rods.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2479741

  10. Mutations in the unfolded protein response regulator ATF6 cause the cone dysfunction disorder achromatopsia

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, Susanne; Zobor, Ditta; Chiang, Wei-Chieh; Weisschuh, Nicole; Staller, Jennifer; Menendez, Irene Gonzalez; Chang, Stanley; Beck, Susanne C; Garrido, Marina Garcia; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Seeliger, Mathias W; Stanzial, Franco; Benedicenti, Francesco; Inzana, Francesca; Héon, Elise; Vincent, Ajoy; Beis, Jill; Strom, Tim M; Rudolph, Günther; Roosing, Susanne; den Hollander, Anneke I; Cremers, Frans P M; Lopez, Irma; Ren, Huanan; Moore, Anthony T; Webster, Andrew R; Michaelides, Michel; Koenekoop, Robert K; Zrenner, Eberhart; Kaufman, Randal J; Tsang, Stephen H; Wissinger, Bernd; Lin, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01

    Achromatopsia (ACHM) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by color blindness, photophobia, nystagmus and severely reduced visual acuity. Using homozygosity mapping and whole-exome and candidate gene sequencing, we identified ten families carrying six homozygous and two compound-heterozygous mutations in the ATF6 gene (encoding activating transcription factor 6A), a key regulator of the unfolded protein response (UPR) and cellular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis. Patients had evidence of foveal hypoplasia and disruption of the cone photoreceptor layer. The ACHM-associated ATF6 mutations attenuate ATF6 transcriptional activity in response to ER stress. Atf6−/− mice have normal retinal morphology and function at a young age but develop rod and cone dysfunction with increasing age. This new ACHM-related gene suggests a crucial and unexpected role for ATF6A in human foveal development and cone function and adds to the list of genes that, despite ubiquitous expression, when mutated can result in an isolated retinal photoreceptor phenotype. PMID:26029869

  11. Ephrin-B2 elicits differential growth cone collapse and axon retraction in retinal ganglion cells from distinct retinal regions

    PubMed Central

    Petros, Timothy J.; Bryson, J. Barney; Mason, Carol

    2010-01-01

    The circuit for binocular vision and stereopsis is established at the optic chiasm, where retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons diverge into the ipsilateral and contralateral optic tracts. In the mouse retina, ventrotemporal (VT) RGCs express the guidance receptor EphB1, which interacts with the repulsive guidance cue ephrin-B2 on radial glia at the optic chiasm to direct VT RGC axons ipsilaterally. RGCs in the ventral retina also express EphB2, which interacts with ephrin-B2, whereas dorsal RGCs express low levels of EphB receptors. To investigate how growth cones of RGCs from different retinal regions respond upon initial contact with ephrin-B2, we utilized time-lapse imaging to characterize the effects of ephrin-B2 on growth cone collapse and axon retraction in real time. We demonstrate that bath application of ephrin-B2 induces rapid and sustained growth cone collapse and axon retraction in VT RGC axons, whereas contralaterally-projecting dorsotemporal RGCs display moderate growth cone collapse and little axon retraction. Dose response curves reveal that contralaterally-projecting ventronasal axons are less sensitive to ephrin-B2 treatment compared to VT axons. Additionally, we uncovered a specific role for Rho kinase signaling in the retraction of VT RGC axons but not in growth cone collapse. The detailed characterization of growth cone behavior in this study comprises an assay for the study of Eph signaling in RGCs, and provides insight into the phenomena of growth cone collapse and axon retraction in general. PMID:20629048

  12. Semaphorin 3A activates the guanosine triphosphatase Rab5 to promote growth cone collapse and organize callosal axon projections

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kong-Yan; He, Miao; Hou, Qiong-Qiong; Sheng, Ai-Li; Yuan, Lei; Liu, Fei; Liu, Wen-Wen; Li, Guangpu; Jiang, Xing-Yu; Luo, Zhen-Ge

    2015-01-01

    Axon guidance (pathfinding) wires the brain during development and is regulated by various attractive and repulsive cues. Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) is a repulsive cue, inducing the collapse of axon growth cones. In the mammalian forebrain, the corpus callosum is the major commissure that transmits information flow between the two hemispheres, and contralateral axons assemble into well-defined tracts. We found that the patterning of callosal axon projections in rodent layer II and III (L2/3) cortical neurons in response to Sema3A was mediated by the activation of Rab5, a small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) that mediates endocytosis, through the membrane fusion protein Rabaptin-5 and the Rab5 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Rabex-5. Rabaptin-5 bound directly to Plexin-A1 in the Sema3A receptor complex [an obligate heterodimer formed by Plexin-A1 and neuropilin 1 (NP1)]; Sema3A enhanced this interaction in cultured neurons. Rabaptin-5 bridged the interaction between Rab5 and Plexin-A1. Sema3A stimulated endocytosis from the cell surface of callosal axon growth cones. In utero electroporation to reduce Rab5 or Rabaptin-5 impaired axon fasciculation or caused mistargeting of L2/3 callosal projections in rats. Over-expression of Rabaptin-5 or Rab5 rescued the defective callosal axon fasciculation or mistargeting of callosal axons caused by the loss of Sema3A–Plexin-A1 signaling in rats expressing dominant-negative Plexin-A1 or in NP1-deficient mice. Thus, our findings suggest that Rab5, its effector Rabaptin-5, and its regulator Rabex-5 mediate Sema3A-induced axon guidance during brain development. PMID:25161316

  13. A signaling mechanism coupling netrin-1/deleted in colorectal cancer chemoattraction to SNARE-mediated exocytosis in axonal growth cones.

    PubMed

    Cotrufo, Tiziana; Pérez-Brangulí, Francesc; Muhaisen, Ashraf; Ros, Oriol; Andrés, Rosa; Baeriswyl, Thomas; Fuschini, Giulia; Tarrago, Teresa; Pascual, Marta; Ureña, Jesús; Blasi, Joan; Giralt, Ernest; Stoeckli, Esther T; Soriano, Eduardo

    2011-10-12

    Directed cell migration and axonal guidance are essential steps in neural development. Both processes are controlled by specific guidance cues that activate the signaling cascades that ultimately control cytoskeletal dynamics. Another essential step in migration and axonal guidance is the regulation of plasmalemma turnover and exocytosis in leading edges and growth cones. However, the cross talk mechanisms linking guidance receptors and membrane exocytosis are not understood. Netrin-1 is a chemoattractive cue required for the formation of commissural pathways. Here, we show that the Netrin-1 receptor deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) forms a protein complex with the t-SNARE (target SNARE) protein Syntaxin-1 (Sytx1). This interaction is Netrin-1 dependent both in vitro and in vivo, and requires specific Sytx1 and DCC domains. Blockade of Sytx1 function by using botulinum toxins abolished Netrin-1-dependent chemoattraction of axons in mouse neuronal cultures. Similar loss-of-function experiments in the chicken spinal cord in vivo using dominant-negative Sytx1 constructs or RNAi led to defects in commissural axon pathfinding reminiscent to those described in Netrin-1 and DCC loss-of-function models. We also show that Netrin-1 elicits exocytosis at growth cones in a Sytx1-dependent manner. Moreover, we demonstrate that the Sytx1/DCC complex associates with the v-SNARE (vesicle SNARE) tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP) and that knockdown of TI-VAMP in the commissural pathway in the spinal cord results in aberrant axonal guidance phenotypes. Our data provide evidence of a new signaling mechanism that couples chemotropic Netrin-1/DCC axonal guidance and Sytx1/TI-VAMP SNARE proteins regulating membrane turnover and exocytosis.

  14. Mechanical properties of neuronal growth cone membranes studied by tether formation with laser optical tweezers.

    PubMed Central

    Dai, J.; Sheetz, M. P.

    1995-01-01

    Many cell phenomena involve major morphological changes, particularly in mitosis and the process of cell migration. For cells or neuronal growth cones to migrate, they must extend the leading edge of the plasma membrane as a lamellipodium or filopodium. During extension of filopodia, membrane must move across the surface creating shear and flow. Intracellular biochemical processes driving extension must work against the membrane mechanical properties, but the forces required to extend growth cones have not been measured. In this paper, laser optical tweezers and a nanometer-level analysis system were used to measure the neuronal growth cone membrane mechanical properties through the extension of filopodia-like tethers with IgG-coated beads. Although the probability of a bead attaching to the membrane was constant irrespective of treatment; the probability of forming a tether with a constant force increased dramatically with cytochalasin B or D and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). These are treatments that alter the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. The force required to hold a tether at zero velocity (F0) was greater than forces generated by single molecular motors, kinesin and myosin; and F0 decreased with cytochalasin B or D and DMSO in correlation with the changes in the probability of tether formation. The force of the tether on the bead increased linearly with the velocity of tether elongation. From the dependency of tether force on velocity of tether formation, we calculated a parameter related to membrane viscosity, which decreased with cytochalasin B or D, ATP depletion, nocodazole, and DMSO. These results indicate that the actin cytoskeleton affects the membrane mechanical properties, including the force required for membrane extension and the viscoelastic behavior. Images FIGURE 4 PMID:7756561

  15. Alternative Splicing Governs Cone Cyclic Nucleotide-gated (CNG) Channel Sensitivity to Regulation by Phosphoinositides*

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Gucan; Sherpa, Tshering; Varnum, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Precursor mRNA encoding CNGA3 subunits of cone photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels undergoes alternative splicing, generating isoforms differing in the N-terminal cytoplasmic region of the protein. In humans, four variants arise from alternative splicing, but the functional significance of these changes has been a persistent mystery. Heterologous expression of the four possible CNGA3 isoforms alone or with CNGB3 subunits did not reveal significant differences in basic channel properties. However, inclusion of optional exon 3, with or without optional exon 5, produced heteromeric CNGA3 + CNGB3 channels exhibiting an ∼2-fold greater shift in K1/2,cGMP after phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate or phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate application compared with channels lacking the sequence encoded by exon 3. We have previously identified two structural features within CNGA3 that support phosphoinositides (PIPn) regulation of cone CNG channels: N- and C-terminal regulatory modules. Specific mutations within these regions eliminated PIPn sensitivity of CNGA3 + CNGB3 channels. The exon 3 variant enhanced the component of PIPn regulation that depends on the C-terminal region rather than the nearby N-terminal region, consistent with an allosteric effect on PIPn sensitivity because of altered N-C coupling. Alternative splicing of CNGA3 occurs in multiple species, although the exact variants are not conserved across CNGA3 orthologs. Optional exon 3 appears to be unique to humans, even compared with other primates. In parallel, we found that a specific splice variant of canine CNGA3 removes a region of the protein that is necessary for high sensitivity to PIPn. CNGA3 alternative splicing may have evolved, in part, to tune the interactions between cone CNG channels and membrane-bound phosphoinositides. PMID:24675082

  16. A hybrid computational model to predict chemotactic guidance of growth cones

    PubMed Central

    Roccasalvo, Iolanda Morana; Micera, Silvestro; Sergi, Pier Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The overall strategy used by growing axons to find their correct paths during the nervous system development is not yet completely understood. Indeed, some emergent and counterintuitive phenomena were recently described during axon pathfinding in presence of chemical gradients. Here, a novel computational model is presented together with its ability to reproduce both regular and counterintuitive axonal behaviours. In this model, the key role of intracellular calcium was phenomenologically modelled through a non standard Gierer-Meinhardt system, as a crucial factor influencing the growth cone behaviour both in regular and complex conditions. This model was able to explicitly reproduce neuritic paths accounting for the complex interplay between extracellular and intracellular environments, through the sensing capability of the growth cone. The reliability of this approach was proven by using quantitative metrics, numerically supporting the similarity between in silico and biological results in regular conditions (control and attraction). Finally, the model was able to qualitatively predict emergent and counterintuitive phenomena resulting from complex boundary conditions. PMID:26086936

  17. Transient Directed Motions of GABAA Receptors in Growth Cones Detected by a Speed Correlation Index

    PubMed Central

    Bouzigues, Cédric; Dahan, Maxime

    2007-01-01

    Single-molecule tracking of membrane proteins has become an important tool for investigating dynamic processes in live cells, such as cell signaling, membrane compartmentation or trafficking. The extraction of relevant parameters, such as interaction times between molecular partners or confinement-zone sizes, from the trajectories of single molecules requires appropriate statistical methods. Here we report a new tool, the speed correlation index, designed to detect transient periods of directed motion within trajectories of diffusing molecules. The ability to detect such events in a wide range of biologically relevant parameter values (speed, diffusion coefficient, and durations of the directed period) was first established on simulated data. The method was next applied to analyze the trajectories of quantum-dot-labeled GABAA receptors in nerve growth cones. The use of the speed correlation index revealed that the receptors had a “conveyor belt” type of motion due to temporary interactions (∼4.0 s) between the receptors and the microtubules, leading to an average directed motion (velocity ∼0.3 μm s−1) in the growth-cone membrane. Our observations point to the possibility of a cytoskeleton-dependent redistribution of the sensing molecules in the membrane, which could play a role in the modulation of the cell response to external signals. PMID:17071660

  18. Retinoic acid induces neurite outgrowth and growth cone turning in invertebrate neurons.

    PubMed

    Dmetrichuk, Jennifer M; Carlone, Robert L; Spencer, Gaynor E

    2006-06-01

    Identification of molecules involved in neurite outgrowth during development and/or regeneration is a major goal in the field of neuroscience. Retinoic acid (RA) is a biologically important metabolite of vitamin A that acts as a trophic factor and has been implicated in neurite outgrowth and regeneration in many vertebrate species. Although abundant in the CNS of many vertebrates, the precise role of RA in neural regeneration has yet to be determined. Moreover, very little information is available regarding the role of RA in invertebrate nervous systems. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that RA induces neurite outgrowth from invertebrate neurons. Using individually identified neurons isolated from the CNS of Lymnaea stagnalis, we demonstrated that a significantly greater proportion of cells produced neurite outgrowth in RA. RA also extended the duration of time that cells remained electrically excitable in vitro, and we showed that exogenously applied RA acted as a chemoattractive factor and induced growth cone turning toward the source of RA. This is the first demonstration that RA can induce turning of an individual growth cone. These data strongly suggest that the actions of RA on neurite outgrowth and cell survival are highly conserved across species.

  19. Retinoic Acid Signaling Regulates Differential Expression of the Tandemly-Duplicated Long Wavelength-Sensitive Cone Opsin Genes in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Diana M; Stevens, Craig B; Frey, Ruth A; Hunter, Samuel S; Ashino, Ryuichi; Kawamura, Shoji; Stenkamp, Deborah L

    2015-08-01

    The signaling molecule retinoic acid (RA) regulates rod and cone photoreceptor fate, differentiation, and survival. Here we elucidate the role of RA in differential regulation of the tandemly-duplicated long wavelength-sensitive (LWS) cone opsin genes. Zebrafish embryos were treated with RA from 48 hours post-fertilization (hpf) to 75 hpf, and RNA was isolated from eyes for microarray analysis. ~170 genes showed significantly altered expression, including several transcription factors and components of cellular signaling pathways. Of interest, the LWS1 opsin gene was strongly upregulated by RA. LWS1 is the upstream member of the tandemly duplicated LWS opsin array and is normally not expressed embryonically. Embryos treated with RA 48 hpf to 100 hpf or beyond showed significant reductions in LWS2-expressing cones in favor of LWS1-expressing cones. The LWS reporter line, LWS-PAC(H) provided evidence that individual LWS cones switched from LWS2 to LWS1 expression in response to RA. The RA signaling reporter line, RARE:YFP indicated that increased RA signaling in cones was associated with this opsin switch, and experimental reduction of RA signaling in larvae at the normal time of onset of LWS1 expression significantly inhibited LWS1 expression. A role for endogenous RA signaling in regulating differential expression of the LWS genes in postmitotic cones was further supported by the presence of an RA signaling domain in ventral retina of juvenile zebrafish that coincided with a ventral zone of LWS1 expression. This is the first evidence that an extracellular signal may regulate differential expression of opsin genes in a tandemly duplicated array.

  20. Retinoic Acid Signaling Regulates Differential Expression of the Tandemly-Duplicated Long Wavelength-Sensitive Cone Opsin Genes in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Ruth A.; Hunter, Samuel S.; Ashino, Ryuichi; Kawamura, Shoji; Stenkamp, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    The signaling molecule retinoic acid (RA) regulates rod and cone photoreceptor fate, differentiation, and survival. Here we elucidate the role of RA in differential regulation of the tandemly-duplicated long wavelength-sensitive (LWS) cone opsin genes. Zebrafish embryos were treated with RA from 48 hours post-fertilization (hpf) to 75 hpf, and RNA was isolated from eyes for microarray analysis. ~170 genes showed significantly altered expression, including several transcription factors and components of cellular signaling pathways. Of interest, the LWS1 opsin gene was strongly upregulated by RA. LWS1 is the upstream member of the tandemly duplicated LWS opsin array and is normally not expressed embryonically. Embryos treated with RA 48 hpf to 100 hpf or beyond showed significant reductions in LWS2-expressing cones in favor of LWS1-expressing cones. The LWS reporter line, LWS-PAC(H) provided evidence that individual LWS cones switched from LWS2 to LWS1 expression in response to RA. The RA signaling reporter line, RARE:YFP indicated that increased RA signaling in cones was associated with this opsin switch, and experimental reduction of RA signaling in larvae at the normal time of onset of LWS1 expression significantly inhibited LWS1 expression. A role for endogenous RA signaling in regulating differential expression of the LWS genes in postmitotic cones was further supported by the presence of an RA signaling domain in ventral retina of juvenile zebrafish that coincided with a ventral zone of LWS1 expression. This is the first evidence that an extracellular signal may regulate differential expression of opsin genes in a tandemly duplicated array. PMID:26296154

  1. The growth cones of Aplysia sensory neurons: Modulation by serotonin of action potential duration and single potassium channel currents.

    PubMed

    Belardetti, F; Schacher, S; Kandel, E R; Siegelbaum, S A

    1986-09-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) closes a specific K channel ("S") in the cell body of Aplysia sensory neurons, resulting in a slow excitatory postsynaptic potential and spike broadening. To determine whether the S channel is present and can be modulated in processes of the neuron other than the cell body, we studied the effects of 5-HT on growth cones of sensory neurons in culture by using the patch-clamp technique. Simultaneous application of 5-HT to the cell body and to the growth cones of sensory neurons produced, in both, a slow depolarization of approximately 5 mV. Also, 5-HT produced a lengthening of the duration of action potential in the growth cone and cell body by 20-30%. Similar effects were observed in isolated growth cones that had been severed from the rest of the neuron, implying that the growth cones contain all the molecular components (i.e., receptors, channels, cAMP cascade) necessary for 5-HT action. Cell-attached patch-clamp recordings demonstrated the presence of S channels in sensory neuron growth cones. Application of serotonin to the bath produced long-lasting all-or-none closures of these channels in a manner identical to the previously characterized action of 5-HT in the cell body. Thus, channel modulation is not restricted to the cell body and probably occurs throughout the sensory neuron. This strengthens the view that S-channel modulation may also occur at the sensory neuron presynaptic terminal, where it could play a role in the presynaptic facilitation produced by 5-HT.

  2. Two structural components in CNGA3 support regulation of cone CNG channels by phosphoinositides

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Gucan; Peng, Changhong; Liu, Chunming

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels in retinal photoreceptors play a crucial role in vertebrate phototransduction. The ligand sensitivity of photoreceptor CNG channels is adjusted during adaptation and in response to paracrine signals, but the mechanisms involved in channel regulation are only partly understood. Heteromeric cone CNGA3 (A3) + CNGB3 (B3) channels are inhibited by membrane phosphoinositides (PIPn), including phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), demonstrating a decrease in apparent affinity for cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). Unlike homomeric A1 or A2 channels, A3-only channels paradoxically did not show a decrease in apparent affinity for cGMP after PIPn application. However, PIPn induced an ∼2.5-fold increase in cAMP efficacy for A3 channels. The PIPn-dependent change in cAMP efficacy was abolished by mutations in the C-terminal region (R643Q/R646Q) or by truncation distal to the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (613X). In addition, A3-613X unmasked a threefold decrease in apparent cGMP affinity with PIPn application to homomeric channels, and this effect was dependent on conserved arginines within the N-terminal region of A3. Together, these results indicate that regulation of A3 subunits by phosphoinositides exhibits two separable components, which depend on structural elements within the N- and C-terminal regions, respectively. Furthermore, both N and C regulatory modules in A3 supported PIPn regulation of heteromeric A3+B3 channels. B3 subunits were not sufficient to confer PIPn sensitivity to heteromeric channels formed with PIPn-insensitive A subunits. Finally, channels formed by mixtures of PIPn-insensitive A3 subunits, having complementary mutations in N- and/or C-terminal regions, restored PIPn regulation, implying that intersubunit N–C interactions help control the phosphoinositide sensitivity of cone CNG channels. PMID:23530136

  3. Retrograde degeneration of neurite membrane structural integrity of nerve growth cones following in vitro exposure to mercury.

    PubMed

    Leong, C C; Syed, N I; Lorscheider, F L

    2001-03-26

    Inhalation of mercury vapor (Hg0) inhibits binding of GTP to rat brain tubulin, thereby inhibiting tubulin polymerization into microtubules. A similar molecular lesion has also been observed in 80% of brains from patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) compared to age-matched controls. However the precise site and mode of action of Hg ions remain illusive. Therefore, the present study examined whether Hg ions could affect membrane dynamics of neurite growth cone morphology and behavior. Since tubulin is a highly conserved cytoskeletal protein in both vertebrates and invertebrates, we hypothesized that growth cones from animal species could be highly susceptible to Hg ions. To test this possibility, the identified, large Pedal A (PeA) neurons from the central ring ganglia of the snail Lymnoea stagnalis were cultured for 48 h in 2 ml brain conditioned medium (CM). Following neurite outgrowth, metal chloride solution (2 microl) of Hg, Al, Pb, Cd, or Mn (10(-7) M) was pressure applied directly onto individual growth cones. Time-lapse images with inverted microscopy were acquired prior to, during, and after the metal ion exposure. We demonstrate that Hg ions markedly disrupted membrane structure and linear growth rates of imaged neurites in 77% of all nerve growth cones. When growth cones were stained with antibodies specific for both tubulin and actin, it was the tubulin/microtubule structure that disintegrated following Hg exposure. Moreover, some denuded neurites were also observed to form neurofibrillary aggregates. In contrast, growth cone exposure to other metal ions did not effect growth cone morphology, nor was their motility rate compromised. To determine the growth suppressive effects of Hg ions on neuronal sprouting, cells were cultured either in the presence or absence of Hg ions. We found that in the presence of Hg ions, neuronal somata failed to sprout, whereas other metalic ions did not effect growth patterns of cultured PeA cells. We conclude that this

  4. Nerve growth cone lamellipodia contain two populations of actin filaments that differ in organization and polarity

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The organization and polarity of actin filaments in neuronal growth cones was studied with negative stain and freeze-etch EM using a permeabilization protocol that caused little detectable change in morphology when cultured nerve growth cones were observed by video- enhanced differential interference contrast microscopy. The lamellipodial actin cytoskeleton was composed of two distinct subpopulations: a population of 40-100-nm-wide filament bundles radiated from the leading edge, and a second population of branching short filaments filled the volume between the dorsal and ventral membrane surfaces. Together, the two populations formed the three- dimensional structural network seen within expanding lamellipodia. Interaction of the actin filaments with the ventral membrane surface occurred along the length of the filaments via membrane associated proteins. The long bundled filament population was primarily involved in these interactions. The filament tips of either population appeared to interact with the membrane only at the leading edge; this interaction was mediated by a globular Triton-insoluble material. Actin filament polarity was determined by decoration with myosin S1 or heavy meromyosin. Previous reports have suggested that the polarity of the actin filaments in motile cells is uniform, with the barbed ends toward the leading edge. We observed that the actin filament polarity within growth cone lamellipodia is not uniform; although the predominant orientation was with the barbed end toward the leading edge (47-56%), 22-25% of the filaments had the opposite orientation with their pointed ends toward the leading edge, and 19-31% ran parallel to the leading edge. The two actin filament populations display distinct polarity profiles: the longer filaments appear to be oriented predominantly with their barbed ends toward the leading edge, whereas the short filaments appear to be randomly oriented. The different length, organization and polarity of the two filament

  5. R-Type Calcium Channels Are Crucial for Semaphorin 3A–Induced DRG Axon Growth Cone Collapse

    PubMed Central

    Jover, Emmanuel; Bagnard, Dominique; Šatkauskas, Saulius

    2014-01-01

    Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) is a secreted protein involved in axon path-finding during nervous system development. Calcium signaling plays an important role during axonal growth in response to different guidance cues; however it remains unclear whether this is also the case for Sema3A. In this study we used intracellular calcium imaging to figure out whether Sema3A-induced growth cone collapse is a Ca2+ dependent process. Intracellular Ca2+ imaging results using Fura-2 AM showed Ca2+ increase in E15 mice dorsal root ganglia neurons upon Sema3A treatment. Consequently we analyzed Sema3A effect on growth cones after blocking or modifying intracellular and extracellular Ca2+ channels that are expressed in E15 mouse embryos. Our results demonstrate that Sema3A increased growth cone collapse rate is blocked by the non-selective R- and T- type Ca2+ channel blocker NiCl2 and by the selective R-type Ca2+ channel blocker SNX482. These Ca2+ channel blockers consistently decreased the Sema3A-induced intracellular Ca2+ concentration elevation. Overall, our results demonstrate that Sema3A-induced growth cone collapses are intimately related with increase in intracellular calcium concentration mediated by R-type calcium channels. PMID:25032951

  6. R-type calcium channels are crucial for semaphorin 3A-induced DRG axon growth cone collapse.

    PubMed

    Treinys, Rimantas; Kaselis, Andrius; Jover, Emmanuel; Bagnard, Dominique; Šatkauskas, Saulius

    2014-01-01

    Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) is a secreted protein involved in axon path-finding during nervous system development. Calcium signaling plays an important role during axonal growth in response to different guidance cues; however it remains unclear whether this is also the case for Sema3A. In this study we used intracellular calcium imaging to figure out whether Sema3A-induced growth cone collapse is a Ca2+ dependent process. Intracellular Ca2+ imaging results using Fura-2 AM showed Ca2+ increase in E15 mice dorsal root ganglia neurons upon Sema3A treatment. Consequently we analyzed Sema3A effect on growth cones after blocking or modifying intracellular and extracellular Ca2+ channels that are expressed in E15 mouse embryos. Our results demonstrate that Sema3A increased growth cone collapse rate is blocked by the non-selective R- and T- type Ca2+ channel blocker NiCl2 and by the selective R-type Ca2+ channel blocker SNX482. These Ca2+ channel blockers consistently decreased the Sema3A-induced intracellular Ca2+ concentration elevation. Overall, our results demonstrate that Sema3A-induced growth cone collapses are intimately related with increase in intracellular calcium concentration mediated by R-type calcium channels.

  7. Deformation and flow of membrane into tethers extracted from neuronal growth cones.

    PubMed Central

    Hochmuth, F M; Shao, J Y; Dai, J; Sheetz, M P

    1996-01-01

    Membrane tethers are extracted at constant velocity from neuronal growth cones using a force generated by a laser tweezers trap. A thermodynamic analysis shows that as the tether is extended, energy is stored in the tether as bending and adhesion energies and in the cell body as "nonlocal" bending. It is postulated that energy is dissipated by three viscous mechanisms including membrane flow, slip between the two monolayers that form the bilayer, and slip between membrane and cytoskeleton. The analysis predicts and the experiments show a linear relation between tether force and tether velocity. Calculations based on the analytical results and the experimental measurements of a tether radius of approximately 0.2 micron and a tether force at zero velocity of approximately 8 pN give a bending modulus for the tether of 2.7 x 10(-19) N.m and an extraordinarily small "apparent surface tension" in the growth cone of 0.003 mN/m, where the apparent surface tension is the sum of the far-field, in-plane tension and the energy of adhesion. Treatments with cytochalasin B and D, ethanol, and nocodazole affect the apparent surface tension but not bending. ATP depletion affects neither, whereas large concentrations of DMSO affect both. Under conditions of flow, data are presented to show that the dominant viscous mechanism comes from the slip that occurs when the membrane flows over the cytoskeleton. ATP depletion and the treatment with DMSO cause a dramatic drop in the effective viscosity. If it is postulated that the slip between membrane and cytoskeleton occurs in a film of water, then this water film has a mean thickness of only approximately 10 A. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:8770212

  8. Differential requirement of F-actin and microtubule cytoskeleton in cue-induced local protein synthesis in axonal growth cones.

    PubMed

    Piper, Michael; Lee, Aih Cheun; van Horck, Francisca P G; McNeilly, Heather; Lu, Trina Bo; Harris, William A; Holt, Christine E

    2015-02-25

    Local protein synthesis (LPS) via receptor-mediated signaling plays a role in the directional responses of axons to extrinsic cues. An intact cytoskeleton is critical to enact these responses, but it is not known whether the two major cytoskeletal elements, F-actin and microtubules, have any roles in regulating axonal protein synthesis. Here, we show that pharmacological disruption of either microtubules or actin filaments in growth cones blocks netrin-1-induced de novo synthesis of proteins, as measured by metabolic incorporation of labeled amino acids, implicating both elements in axonal synthesis. However, comparative analysis of the activated translation initiation regulator, eIF4E-BP1, revealed a striking difference in the point of action of the two elements: actin disruption completely inhibited netrin-1-induced eIF4E-BP1 phosphorylation while microtubule disruption had no effect. An intact F-actin, but not microtubule, cytoskeleton was also required for netrin-1-induced activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway, upstream of translation initiation. Downstream of translation initiation, microtubules were required for netrin-1-induced activation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF2K) and eEF2. Taken together, our results show that while actin and microtubules are both crucial for cue-induced axonal protein synthesis, they serve distinct roles with F-actin being required for the initiation of translation and microtubules acting later at the elongation step.

  9. Corneal sulfated glycosaminoglycans and their effects on trigeminal nerve growth cone behavior in vitro: roles for ECM in cornea innervation.

    PubMed

    Schwend, Tyler; Deaton, Ryan J; Zhang, Yuntao; Caterson, Bruce; Conrad, Gary W

    2012-12-13

    Sensory trigeminal nerve growth cones innervate the cornea in a highly coordinated fashion. The purpose of this study was to determine if extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycans (ECM-GAGs), including keratan sulfate (KS), dermatan sulfate (DS), and chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) and C (CSC), polymerized in developing eyefronts, may provide guidance cues to nerves during cornea innervation. Immunostaining using antineuron-specific-β-tubulin and monoclonal antibodies for KS, DS, and CSA/C was performed on eyefronts from embryonic day (E) 9 to E14 and staining visualized by confocal microscopy. Effects of purified GAGs on trigeminal nerve growth cone behavior were tested using in vitro neuronal explant cultures. At E9 to E10, nerves exiting the pericorneal nerve ring grew as tight fascicles, advancing straight toward the corneal stroma. In contrast, upon entering the stroma, nerves bifurcated repeatedly as they extended anteriorly toward the epithelium. KS was localized in the path of trigeminal nerves, whereas DS and CSA/C-rich areas were avoided by growth cones. When E10 trigeminal neurons were cultured on different substrates comprised of purified GAG molecules, their neurite growth cone behavior varied depending on GAG type, concentration, and mode of presentation (immobilized versus soluble). High concentrations of immobilized KS, DS, and CSA/C inhibited neurite growth to varying degrees. Neurites traversing lower, permissive concentrations of immobilized DS and CSA/C displayed increased fasciculation and decreased branching, whereas KS caused decreased fasciculation and increased branching. Enzymatic digestion of sulfated GAGs canceled their effects on trigeminal neurons. Data herein suggest that GAGs may direct the movement of trigeminal nerve growth cones innervating the cornea.

  10. Corneal Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans and Their Effects on Trigeminal Nerve Growth Cone Behavior In Vitro: Roles for ECM in Cornea Innervation

    PubMed Central

    Schwend, Tyler; Deaton, Ryan J.; Zhang, Yuntao; Caterson, Bruce; Conrad, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Sensory trigeminal nerve growth cones innervate the cornea in a highly coordinated fashion. The purpose of this study was to determine if extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycans (ECM–GAGs), including keratan sulfate (KS), dermatan sulfate (DS), and chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) and C (CSC), polymerized in developing eyefronts, may provide guidance cues to nerves during cornea innervation. Methods. Immunostaining using antineuron-specific-β-tubulin and monoclonal antibodies for KS, DS, and CSA/C was performed on eyefronts from embryonic day (E) 9 to E14 and staining visualized by confocal microscopy. Effects of purified GAGs on trigeminal nerve growth cone behavior were tested using in vitro neuronal explant cultures. Results. At E9 to E10, nerves exiting the pericorneal nerve ring grew as tight fascicles, advancing straight toward the corneal stroma. In contrast, upon entering the stroma, nerves bifurcated repeatedly as they extended anteriorly toward the epithelium. KS was localized in the path of trigeminal nerves, whereas DS and CSA/C–rich areas were avoided by growth cones. When E10 trigeminal neurons were cultured on different substrates comprised of purified GAG molecules, their neurite growth cone behavior varied depending on GAG type, concentration, and mode of presentation (immobilized versus soluble). High concentrations of immobilized KS, DS, and CSA/C inhibited neurite growth to varying degrees. Neurites traversing lower, permissive concentrations of immobilized DS and CSA/C displayed increased fasciculation and decreased branching, whereas KS caused decreased fasciculation and increased branching. Enzymatic digestion of sulfated GAGs canceled their effects on trigeminal neurons. Conclusions. Data herein suggest that GAGs may direct the movement of trigeminal nerve growth cones innervating the cornea. PMID:23132805

  11. Oxygen radicals elicit paralysis and collapse of spinal cord neuron growth cones upon exposure to proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Thomas B

    2014-01-01

    A persistent inflammatory and oxidative stress is a hallmark of most chronic CNS pathologies (Alzheimer's (ALS)) as well as the aging CNS orchestrated by the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β). Loss of the integrity and plasticity of neuronal morphology and connectivity comprises an early step in neuronal degeneration and ultimate decline of cognitive function. We examined in vitro whether TNFα or IL-1β impaired morphology and motility of growth cones in spinal cord neuron cultures. TNFα and IL-1β paralyzed growth cone motility and induced growth cone collapse in a dose-dependent manner reflected by complete attenuation of neurite outgrowth. Scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) or inhibiting NADPH oxidase activity rescued loss of neuronal motility and morphology. TNFα and IL-1β provoked rapid, NOX-mediated generation of ROS in advancing growth cones, which preceded paralysis of motility and collapse of morphology. Increases in ROS intermediates were accompanied by an aberrant, nonproductive reorganization of actin filaments. These findings suggest that NADPH oxidase serves as a pivotal source of oxidative stress in neurons and together with disruption of actin filament reorganization contributes to the progressive degeneration of neuronal morphology in the diseased or aging CNS.

  12. Oxygen Radicals Elicit Paralysis and Collapse of Spinal Cord Neuron Growth Cones upon Exposure to Proinflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    A persistent inflammatory and oxidative stress is a hallmark of most chronic CNS pathologies (Alzheimer's (ALS)) as well as the aging CNS orchestrated by the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β). Loss of the integrity and plasticity of neuronal morphology and connectivity comprises an early step in neuronal degeneration and ultimate decline of cognitive function. We examined in vitro whether TNFα or IL-1β impaired morphology and motility of growth cones in spinal cord neuron cultures. TNFα and IL-1β paralyzed growth cone motility and induced growth cone collapse in a dose-dependent manner reflected by complete attenuation of neurite outgrowth. Scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) or inhibiting NADPH oxidase activity rescued loss of neuronal motility and morphology. TNFα and IL-1β provoked rapid, NOX-mediated generation of ROS in advancing growth cones, which preceded paralysis of motility and collapse of morphology. Increases in ROS intermediates were accompanied by an aberrant, nonproductive reorganization of actin filaments. These findings suggest that NADPH oxidase serves as a pivotal source of oxidative stress in neurons and together with disruption of actin filament reorganization contributes to the progressive degeneration of neuronal morphology in the diseased or aging CNS. PMID:25050325

  13. Involvement of gangliosides in the process of Cbp/PAG phosphorylation by Lyn in developing cerebellar growth cones.

    PubMed

    Sekino-Suzuki, Naoko; Yuyama, Kohei; Miki, Toshiaki; Kaneda, Mizuho; Suzuki, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Naomasa; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Oneyama, Chitose; Okada, Masato; Kasahara, Kohji

    2013-02-01

    The association of gangliosides with specific proteins in the central nervous system was examined by coimmunoprecipitation with an anti-ganglioside antibody. The monoclonal antibody to the ganglioside GD3 (R24) immunoprecipitated the Csk (C-terminal src kinase)-binding protein (Cbp). Sucrose density gradient analysis showed that Cbp of rat cerebellum was detected in detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) raft fractions. R24 treatment of the rat primary cerebellar cultures induced Lyn activation and tyrosine phosphorylation of Cbp. Treatment with anti-ganglioside GD1b antibody also induced tyrosine phosphorylation. Furthermore, over-expressions of Lyn and Cbp in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells resulted in tyrosine 314 phosphorylation of Cbp, which indicates that Cbp is a substrate for Lyn. Immunoblotting analysis showed that the active form of Lyn and the Tyr314-phosphorylated form of Cbp were highly accumulated in the DRM raft fraction prepared from the developing cerebellum compared with the DRM raft fraction of the adult one. In addition, Lyn and the Tyr314-phosphorylated Cbp were highly concentrated in the growth cone fraction prepared from the developing cerebellum. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that Cbp and GAP-43, a growth cone marker, are localized in the same vesicles of the growth cone fraction. These results suggest that Cbp functionally associates with gangliosides on growth cone rafts in developing cerebella. © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  14. [Plant hormones, plant growth regulators].

    PubMed

    Végvári, György; Vidéki, Edina

    2014-06-29

    Plants seem to be rather defenceless, they are unable to do motion, have no nervous system or immune system unlike animals. Besides this, plants do have hormones, though these substances are produced not in glands. In view of their complexity they lagged behind animals, however, plant organisms show large scale integration in their structure and function. In higher plants, such as in animals, the intercellular communication is fulfilled through chemical messengers. These specific compounds in plants are called phytohormones, or in a wide sense, bioregulators. Even a small quantity of these endogenous organic compounds are able to regulate the operation, growth and development of higher plants, and keep the connection between cells, tissues and synergy between organs. Since they do not have nervous and immume systems, phytohormones play essential role in plants' life.

  15. Identification of protein-bound oligosaccharides on the surface of growth cones that bind to muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ambron, R T; Protic, J; Den, H; Gabel, C A

    1989-09-01

    In the accompanying paper (Gabel, Den, and Ambron, in press) it was shown that eight populations of glycopeptides are synthesized by single neurons of Aplysia californica. To see which glycopeptides might mediate interactions with target cells, we first identified glycopeptides that are transported selectively to synapses and growth cones. The giant neuron R2 was injected intrasomatically with 3H-glucosamine. Twenty-four hours later, 3H-glycopeptides in the axon and cell body were isolated and resolved by serial lectin affinity chromatography. Of the eight populations, the biantennary-type glycopeptides (GPbi) and those that bind to WGA (GPwga) were preferentially associated with rapidly transported glycoproteins. In contrast, the glycopeptide that consists of N-acetylglucosamine O-linked to ser/thr was mostly retained in the cell body. GPbi and GPwga were also preferentially transported to growth cones. Analyses of RUQ cells, exposed to 3H-glucosamine in vitro for 36 h showed an enrichment of GPbi and GPwga at the growth cone relative to the cell body. The disposition of the various glycopeptides in growing neurons was also examined using FITC lectins. FITC-coupled WGA, Vicia vellosa, and lentil lectin showed extensive staining of the cell body, but only WGA stained the growth cones. To investigate if GPwga interacts specifically with target cells, these glycopeptides were isolated from the neurons of 180 abdominal ganglia. GPwga, other Aplysia glycopeptides, and glycopeptides prepared from ovalbumin were coupled separately to fluorescent spheres. The spheres were then added to muscle cells isolated from the auricle of the heart, which is innervated by many neurons from the ganglion. While spheres coupled to GPwga bound to the muscle cell surface, the other glycopeptides did not. These results indicate that glycopeptides class GPwga, found among rapidly transported glycoproteins and on the growth cone surface, is able to bind to muscle cells and may therefore play

  16. Growth of microscopic cones on titanium cathodes of sputter-ion pumps driven by sorption of large argon quantities

    SciTech Connect

    Porcelli, Tommaso; Siviero, Fabrizio; Bongiorno, Gero A.; Michelato, Paolo; Pagani, Carlo

    2015-09-15

    Microscopic cones have been observed on titanium cathodes of sputter-ion pumps (SIPs) after pump operation. The cones were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analysis. Size and morphology of these cones are clearly correlated with the nature and the relative amount of each gas species pumped by each SIP during its working life. In particular, their growth was found to be fed by sputtering mechanisms, mostly during Ar pumping, and to be driven by the electromagnetic field applied to the Penning cells of each SIP. Experimental findings suggest that the formation and extent of such conic structures on cathode surfaces might play a leading role in the onset of phenomena typically related to the functioning of SIPs, e.g., the so-called argon instability.

  17. Proteomic analysis of mouse mammary terminal end buds identifies axonal growth cone proteins.

    PubMed

    Morris, Joanna S; Davies, Claire R; Griffiths, Matthew R; Page, Martin J; Bruce, James A; Patel, Thakor; Herath, Athula; Gusterson, Barry A

    2004-06-01

    Ductal morphogenesis in the mouse mammary gland occurs mainly postnatally and is driven by specialized structures at the ends of the developing ducts, the terminal end buds (TEBs), which later regress once ductal growth is complete. To identify proteins that are specifically associated with migration of TEBs we developed a novel method of isolating TEBs, which eliminated the mammary stroma. The protein expression profile of the TEBs was then compared with that of isolates taken from the 4th inguinal mammary gland of adult virgin mice using two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization and quadrupole time of flight). Following construction of an integrated protein expression database, 44 protein features which showed differential expression levels between the two sets were chosen for MS analysis. Of these, 24 gave protein annotations whereas the other 20 produced unidentified peptides. Fourteen unequivocal proteins were identified from these 24, whereas the remaining 10 matched more than one protein within a single 2-D gel feature. Several of the identified proteins were associated with the cytoskeleton and have previously been reported in axonal growth cones, suggesting that they may influence cell shape and motility within the advancing TEBs, in a similar fashion to migrating axons.

  18. Growth hormone regulation of follicular growth.

    PubMed

    Lucy, Matthew C

    2011-01-01

    The somatotropic axis-consisting of growth hormone (GH), the insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2 (IGF1 and IGF2), GH binding protein (GHBP), IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) 1 to 6, and the cell-surface receptors for GH and the IGFs-has major effects on growth, lactation and reproduction. The primary target tissues for GH are involved in growth and metabolism. The functionality of the somatotropic axis depends in part on the expression of liver GH receptor (GHR), which determines the amount of IGF1 released from the liver in response to GH. The IGF1 acts as a pleiotropic growth factor and also serves as the endocrine negative feedback signal controlling pituitary GH secretion. Growth hormone and IGF1 undergo dynamic changes throughout the life cycle, particularly when animals are either growing, early post partum or lactating. Cells within the reproductive tract can respond directly to GH but to a lesser degree than the primary target tissues. The major impact that GH has on reproduction, therefore, may be secondary to its systemic effects on metabolism (including insulin sensitivity) or secondary to the capacity for GH to control IGF1 secretion. Insulin-like growth factor 1 and IGFBP are also synthesised within the ovary and this local synthesis is a component of the collective IGF1 action on the follicle. Future studies of GH should focus on its direct effects on the follicle as well as its indirect effects mediated by shifts in nutrient metabolism, insulin sensitivity, IGF1 and IGFBP.

  19. Distribution of GAP-43, beta-III tubulin and F-actin in developing and regenerating axons and their growth cones in vitro, following neurotrophin treatment.

    PubMed

    Avwenagha, Ovokeloye; Campbell, Gregor; Bird, Margaret M

    2003-11-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) when added to explant cultures of both embryonic and adult retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons exerted a marked effect on their growth cone size and complexity and also on the intensity of GAP-43, beta-III tubulin and F-actin immunoreaction product in their axons. GAP-43 was distributed in axons, lamellipodia, and filopodia whereas beta-III tubulin was distributed along the length of developing and adult regenerating axons and also in the C-domain of their growth cones. BDNF-treated developing RGC growth cones were larger and displayed increased numbers of GAP-43 and microtubule-containing branches. Although filopodia and lamellipodia were lost from both developing and adult RGC growth cones following trkB-IgG treatment, the intensity of the immunoreaction product of all these molecules was reduced and trkB-IgGs had no effect on the axonal distribution of betas-III tubulin and GAP-43. BDNF-treated growth cones also displayed increased numbers of F-actin containing filopodia and axonal protrusions. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that trkB-IgG treatment causes the loss of F-actin in the P-domain of growth cone tips in developing and regenerating RGC axons. Although microtubules and F-actin domains normally remained distinct in cultured growth cones, beta-III tubulin and F-actin overlapped within the growth cone C-domain, and within axonal protrusions of adult RGC axons, under higher concentrations of BDNF. The collapse of RGC growth cones appeared to correlate with the loss of F-actin. In vitro, trkB signalling may therefore be involved in the maintenance and stabilisation of RGC axons, by influencing F-actin polymerisation, stabilisation and distribution.

  20. The kinesin-2 family member KIF3C regulates microtubule dynamics and is required for axon growth and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gumy, Laura F; Chew, Daniel J; Tortosa, Elena; Katrukha, Eugene A; Kapitein, Lukas C; Tolkovsky, Aviva M; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Fawcett, James W

    2013-07-10

    Axon regeneration after injury requires the extensive reconstruction, reorganization, and stabilization of the microtubule cytoskeleton in the growth cones. Here, we identify KIF3C as a key regulator of axonal growth and regeneration by controlling microtubule dynamics and organization in the growth cone. KIF3C is developmentally regulated. Rat embryonic sensory axons and growth cones contain undetectable levels of KIF3C protein that is locally translated immediately after injury. In adult neurons, KIF3C is axonally transported from the cell body and is enriched at the growth cone where it preferentially binds to tyrosinated microtubules. Functionally, the interaction of KIF3C with EB3 is necessary for its localization at the microtubule plus-ends in the growth cone. Depletion of KIF3C in adult neurons leads to an increase in stable, overgrown and looped microtubules because of a strong decrease in the microtubule frequency of catastrophes, suggesting that KIF3C functions as a microtubule-destabilizing factor. Adult axons lacking KIF3C, by RNA interference or KIF3C gene knock-out, display an impaired axonal outgrowth in vitro and a delayed regeneration after injury both in vitro and in vivo. Murine KIF3C knock-out embryonic axons grow normally but do not regenerate after injury because they are unable to locally translate KIF3C. These data show that KIF3C is an injury-specific kinesin that contributes to axon growth and regeneration by regulating and organizing the microtubule cytoskeleton in the growth cone.

  1. cis Retinol oxidation regulates photoreceptor access to the retina visual cycle and cone pigment regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shinya; Kefalov, Vladimir J

    2016-11-15

    This study explores the nature of the cis retinol that Müller cells in the retina provide to cones for the regeneration of their visual pigment. We report that the retina visual cycle provides cones exclusively with 11-cis chromophore in both salamander and mouse and show that this selectivity is dependent on the 11-cis-specific cellular retinaldehyde binding protein (CRALBP) present in Müller cells. Even though salamander blue cones and green rods share the same visual pigment, only blue cones but not green rods are able to dark-adapt in the retina following a bleach and to use exogenous 9-cis retinol for pigment regeneration, suggesting that access to the retina visual cycle is cone-specific and pigment-independent. Our results show that the retina produces 11-cis retinol that can be oxidized and used for pigment regeneration and dark adaptation selectively in cones and not in rods. Chromophore supply by the retinal Müller cells (retina visual cycle) supports the efficient pigment regeneration required for cone photoreceptor function in bright light. Surprisingly, a large fraction of the chromophore produced by dihydroceramide desaturase-1, the putative all-trans retinol isomerase in Müller cells, appears to be 9-cis retinol. In contrast, the canonical retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) visual cycle produces exclusively 11-cis retinal. Here, we used the different absorption spectra of 9-cis and 11-cis pigments to identify the isoform of the chromophore produced by the visual cycle of the intact retina. We found that the spectral sensitivity of salamander and mouse cones dark-adapted in the isolated retina (with only the retina visual cycle) was similar to that of cones dark-adapted in the intact eye (with both the RPE and retina visual cycles) and consistent with pure 11-cis pigment composition. However, in mice lacking the cellular retinaldehyde binding protein (CRALBP), cone spectral sensitivity contained a substantial 9-cis component. Thus, the retina visual

  2. Talin and vinculin play distinct roles in filopodial motility in the neuronal growth cone

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Filopodial motility is critical for many biological processes, particularly for axon guidance. This motility is based on altering the F-actin-based cytoskeleton, but the mechanisms of how this occurs and the actin-associated proteins that function in this process remain unclear. We investigated two of these proteins found in filopodia, talin and vinculin, by inactivating them in subregions of chick dorsal root ganglia neuronal growth cones and by observing subsequent behavior by video-enhanced microscopy and quantitative morphometry. Microscale chromophore-assisted laser inactivation of talin resulted in the temporary cessation of filopodial extension and retraction. Inactivation of vinculin caused an increased incidence of filopodial bending and buckling within the laser spot but had no effect on extension or retraction. These findings show that talin acts in filopodial motility and may couple both extension and retraction to actin dynamics. They also suggest that vinculin is not required for filopodial extension and retraction but plays a role in the structural integrity of filopodia. PMID:8794861

  3. The Role of Rac1 in the Growth Cone Dynamics and Force Generation of DRG Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sayyad, Wasim A.; Fabris, Paolo; Torre, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    We used optical tweezers, video imaging, immunocytochemistry and a variety of inhibitors to analyze the role of Rac1 in the motility and force generation of lamellipodia and filopodia from developing growth cones of isolated Dorsal Root Ganglia neurons. When the activity of Rac1 was inhibited by the drug EHop-016, the period of lamellipodia protrusion/retraction cycles increased and the lamellipodia retrograde flow rate decreased; moreover, the axial force exerted by lamellipodia was reduced dramatically. Inhibition of Arp2/3 by a moderate amount of the drug CK-548 caused a transient retraction of lamellipodia followed by a complete recovery of their usual motility. This recovery was abolished by the concomitant inhibition of Rac1. The filopodia length increased upon inhibition of both Rac1 and Arp2/3, but the speed of filopodia protrusion increased when Rac1 was inhibited and decreased instead when Arp2/3 was inhibited. These results suggest that Rac1 acts as a switch that activates upon inhibition of Arp2/3. Rac1 also controls the filopodia dynamics necessary to explore the environment. PMID:26766136

  4. Semaphorin 3A growth cone collapse requires a sequence homologous to tarantula hanatoxin.

    PubMed

    Behar, O; Mizuno, K; Badminton, M; Woolf, C J

    1999-11-09

    Axonal guidance is key to the formation of neuronal circuitry. Semaphorin 3A (Sema 3A; previously known as semaphorin III, semaphorin D, and collapsin-1), a secreted subtype of the semaphorin family, is an important axonal guidance molecule in vitro and in vivo. The molecular mechanisms of the repellent activity of semaphorins are, however, poorly understood. We have now found that the secreted semaphorins contain a short sequence of high homology to hanatoxin, a tarantula K(+) and Ca(2+) ion channel blocker. Point mutations in the hanatoxin-like sequence of Sema 3A reduce its capacity to repel embryonic dorsal root ganglion axons. Sema 3A growth cone collapse activity is inhibited by hanatoxin, general Ca(2+) channel blockers, a reduction in extracellular or intracellular Ca(2+), and a calmodulin inhibitor, but not by K(+) channel blockers. Our data support an important role for Ca(2+) in mediating the Sema 3A response and suggest that Sema 3A may produce its effects by causing the opening of Ca(2+) channels.

  5. Semaphorin 3A growth cone collapse requires a sequence homologous to tarantula hanatoxin

    PubMed Central

    Behar, Oded; Mizuno, Keiko; Badminton, Mike; Woolf, Clifford J.

    1999-01-01

    Axonal guidance is key to the formation of neuronal circuitry. Semaphorin 3A (Sema 3A; previously known as semaphorin III, semaphorin D, and collapsin-1), a secreted subtype of the semaphorin family, is an important axonal guidance molecule in vitro and in vivo. The molecular mechanisms of the repellent activity of semaphorins are, however, poorly understood. We have now found that the secreted semaphorins contain a short sequence of high homology to hanatoxin, a tarantula K+ and Ca2+ ion channel blocker. Point mutations in the hanatoxin-like sequence of Sema 3A reduce its capacity to repel embryonic dorsal root ganglion axons. Sema 3A growth cone collapse activity is inhibited by hanatoxin, general Ca2+ channel blockers, a reduction in extracellular or intracellular Ca2+, and a calmodulin inhibitor, but not by K+ channel blockers. Our data support an important role for Ca2+ in mediating the Sema 3A response and suggest that Sema 3A may produce its effects by causing the opening of Ca2+ channels. PMID:10557350

  6. Val66Met Polymorphism of BDNF Alters Prodomain Structure to Induce Neuronal Growth Cone Retraction

    PubMed Central

    Anastasia, Agustin; Deinhardt, Katrin; Chao, Moses V.; Will, Nathan E.; Irmady, Krithi; Lee, Francis S.; Hempstead, Barbara L.; Bracken, Clay

    2013-01-01

    A common single-nucleotide polymorphism in the human brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene results in a Val66Met substitution in the BDNF prodomain region. This single-nucleotide polymorphism is associated with alterations in memory and with enhanced risk to develop depression and anxiety disorders in humans. Here we show that the isolated BDNF prodomain is detected in the hippocampus and that it can be secreted from neurons in an activity-dependent manner. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and circular dichroism we find that the prodomain is intrinsically disordered, and the Val66Met substitution induces structural changes. Surprisingly, application of Met66 (but not Val66) BDNF prodomain induces acute growth cone retraction and a decrease in Rac activity in hippocampal neurons. Expression of p75NTR and differential engagement of the Met66 prodomain to the SorCS2 receptor are required for this effect. These results identify the Met66 prodomain as a new active ligand which modulates neuronal morphology. PMID:24048383

  7. Amplification and Temporal Filtering during Gradient Sensing by Nerve Growth Cones Probed with a Microfluidic Assay

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Mathieu; Shynkar, Vasyl; Galas, Jean-Christophe; Dupin, Isabelle; Bouzigues, Cedric; Studer, Vincent; Dahan, Maxime

    2012-01-01

    Nerve growth cones (GCs) are chemical sensors that convert graded extracellular cues into oriented axonal motion. To ensure a sensitive and robust response to directional signals in complex and dynamic chemical landscapes, GCs are presumably able to amplify and filter external information. How these processing tasks are performed remains however poorly known. Here, we probe the signal-processing capabilities of single GCs during γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) directional sensing with a shear-free microfluidic assay that enables systematic measurements of the GC output response to variable input gradients. By measuring at the single molecule level the polarization of GABAA chemoreceptors at the GC membrane, as a function of the external GABA gradient, we find that GCs act as i), signal amplifiers over a narrow range of concentrations, and ii), low-pass temporal filters with a cutoff frequency independent of stimuli conditions. With computational modeling, we determine that these systems-level properties arise at a molecular level from the saturable occupancy response and the lateral dynamics of GABAA receptors. PMID:23083707

  8. An Automated Strategy for Unbiased Morphometric Analyses and Classifications of Growth Cones In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chitsaz, Daryan; Morales, Daniel; Law, Chris; Kania, Artur

    2015-01-01

    During neural circuit development, attractive or repulsive guidance cue molecules direct growth cones (GCs) to their targets by eliciting cytoskeletal remodeling, which is reflected in their morphology. The experimental power of in vitro neuronal cultures to assay this process and its molecular mechanisms is well established, however, a method to rapidly find and quantify multiple morphological aspects of GCs is lacking. To this end, we have developed a free, easy to use, and fully automated Fiji macro, Conographer, which accurately identifies and measures many morphological parameters of GCs in 2D explant culture images. These measurements are then subjected to principle component analysis and k-means clustering to mathematically classify the GCs as “collapsed” or “extended”. The morphological parameters measured for each GC are found to be significantly different between collapsed and extended GCs, and are sufficient to classify GCs as such with the same level of accuracy as human observers. Application of a known collapse-inducing ligand results in significant changes in all parameters, resulting in an increase in ‘collapsed’ GCs determined by k-means clustering, as expected. Our strategy provides a powerful tool for exploring the relationship between GC morphology and guidance cue signaling, which in particular will greatly facilitate high-throughput studies of the effects of drugs, gene silencing or overexpression, or any other experimental manipulation in the context of an in vitro axon guidance assay. PMID:26496644

  9. RACK1 is necessary for the formation of point contacts and regulates axon growth.

    PubMed

    Kershner, Leah; Welshhans, Kristy

    2017-02-28

    Receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1) is a multifunctional ribosomal scaffolding protein that can interact with multiple signaling molecules concurrently through its seven WD40 repeats. We recently found that RACK1 is localized to mammalian growth cones, prompting an investigation into its role during neural development. Here, we show for the first time that RACK1 localizes to point contacts within mouse cortical growth cones. Point contacts are adhesion sites that link the actin network within growth cones to the extracellular matrix, and are necessary for appropriate axon guidance. Our experiments show that RACK1 is necessary for point contact formation. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) stimulates an increase in point contact density, which was eliminated by RACK1 shRNA or overexpression of a nonphosphorylatable mutant form of RACK1. We also found that axonal growth requires both RACK1 expression and phosphorylation. We have previously shown that the local translation of β-actin mRNA within growth cones is necessary for appropriate axon guidance and is dependent on RACK1. Thus, we examined the location of members of the local translation complex relative to point contacts. Indeed, both β-actin mRNA and RACK1 colocalize with point contacts, and this colocalization increases following BDNF stimulation. This implies the novel finding that local translation is regulated at point contacts. Taken together, these data suggest that point contacts are a targeted site of local translation within growth cones, and RACK1 is a critical member of the point contact complex and necessary for appropriate neural development. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol, 2017.

  10. A molecular recognizing system of serotonin in rat fetal axonal growth cones: uptake and high affinity binding.

    PubMed

    Mercado, R; Hernández, J

    1992-09-18

    Axonal growth cone particles (AGCP) isolated from prenatal and postnatal rat brain had different high-affinity 5-HT uptake characteristics. In postnatal AGCP the uptake behaves as in the adult rat brain, while in the prenatal AGCP the uptake characteristics seem to be in a transitional stage. Also in prenatal AGCP we observed specific, high-affinity 5-HT binding sites. These results support the idea of an important role for 5-HT during axogenesis.

  11. The Regulation of Filamentous Growth in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Paul J.; Sprague, George F.

    2012-01-01

    Filamentous growth is a nutrient-regulated growth response that occurs in many fungal species. In pathogens, filamentous growth is critical for host–cell attachment, invasion into tissues, and virulence. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes filamentous growth, which provides a genetically tractable system to study the molecular basis of the response. Filamentous growth is regulated by evolutionarily conserved signaling pathways. One of these pathways is a mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. A remarkable feature of the filamentous growth MAPK pathway is that it is composed of factors that also function in other pathways. An intriguing challenge therefore has been to understand how pathways that share components establish and maintain their identity. Other canonical signaling pathways—rat sarcoma/protein kinase A (RAS/PKA), sucrose nonfermentable (SNF), and target of rapamycin (TOR)—also regulate filamentous growth, which raises the question of how signals from multiple pathways become integrated into a coordinated response. Together, these pathways regulate cell differentiation to the filamentous type, which is characterized by changes in cell adhesion, cell polarity, and cell shape. How these changes are accomplished is also discussed. High-throughput genomics approaches have recently uncovered new connections to filamentous growth regulation. These connections suggest that filamentous growth is a more complex and globally regulated behavior than is currently appreciated, which may help to pave the way for future investigations into this eukaryotic cell differentiation behavior. PMID:22219507

  12. Two-tiered coupling between flowing actin and immobilized N-cadherin/catenin complexes in neuronal growth cones

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Mikael; Leduc, Cécile; Lagardère, Matthieu; Argento, Amélie; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Thoumine, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal growth cones move forward by dynamically connecting actin-based motility to substrate adhesion, but the mechanisms at the individual molecular level remain unclear. We cultured primary neurons on N-cadherin–coated micropatterned substrates, and imaged adhesion and cytoskeletal proteins at the ventral surface of growth cones using single particle tracking combined to photoactivated localization microscopy (sptPALM). We demonstrate transient interactions in the second time scale between flowing actin filaments and immobilized N-cadherin/catenin complexes, translating into a local reduction of the actin retrograde flow. Normal actin flow on micropatterns was rescued by expression of a dominant negative N-cadherin construct competing for the coupling between actin and endogenous N-cadherin. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments confirmed the differential kinetics of actin and N-cadherin, and further revealed a 20% actin population confined at N-cadherin micropatterns, contributing to local actin accumulation. Computer simulations with relevant kinetic parameters modeled N-cadherin and actin turnover well, validating this mechanism. Such a combination of short- and long-lived interactions between the motile actin network and spatially restricted adhesive complexes represents a two-tiered clutch mechanism likely to sustain dynamic environment sensing and provide the force necessary for growth cone migration. PMID:26038554

  13. Neuronal deletion of GSK3β increases microtubule speed in the growth cone and enhances axon regeneration via CRMP-2 and independently of MAP1B and CLASP2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the adult central nervous system, axonal regeneration is abortive. Regulators of microtubule dynamics have emerged as attractive targets to promote axonal growth following injury as microtubule organization is pivotal for growth cone formation. In this study, we used conditioned neurons with high regenerative capacity to further dissect cytoskeletal mechanisms that might be involved in the gain of intrinsic axon growth capacity. Results Following a phospho-site broad signaling pathway screen, we found that in conditioned neurons with high regenerative capacity, decreased glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) activity and increased microtubule growth speed in the growth cone were present. To investigate the importance of GSK3β regulation during axonal regeneration in vivo, we used three genetic mouse models with high, intermediate or no GSK3β activity in neurons. Following spinal cord injury, reduced GSK3β levels or complete neuronal deletion of GSK3β led to increased growth cone microtubule growth speed and promoted axon regeneration. While several microtubule-interacting proteins are GSK3β substrates, phospho-mimetic collapsin response mediator protein 2 (T/D-CRMP-2) was sufficient to decrease microtubule growth speed and neurite outgrowth of conditioned neurons and of GSK3β-depleted neurons, prevailing over the effect of decreased levels of phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B) and through a mechanism unrelated to decreased levels of phosphorylated cytoplasmic linker associated protein 2 (CLASP2). In addition, phospho-resistant T/A-CRMP-2 counteracted the inhibitory myelin effect on neurite growth, further supporting the GSK3β-CRMP-2 relevance during axon regeneration. Conclusions Our work shows that increased microtubule growth speed in the growth cone is present in conditions of increased axonal growth, and is achieved following inactivation of the GSK3β-CRMP-2 pathway, enhancing axon regeneration through the glial scar

  14. Rainbow Enhancers Regulate Restrictive Transcription in Teleost Green, Red, and Blue Cones.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wei; Guo, Chuanyu; Wei, Xiangyun

    2017-03-15

    Photoreceptor-specific transcription of individual genes collectively constitutes the transcriptional profile that orchestrates the structural and functional characteristics of each photoreceptor type. It is challenging, however, to study the transcriptional specificity of individual photoreceptor genes because each gene's distinct spatiotemporal transcription patterns are determined by the unique interactions between a specific set of transcription factors and the gene's own cis-regulatory elements (CREs), which remain unknown for most of the genes. For example, it is unknown what CREs underlie the zebrafish mpp5b(ponli) (ponli) and crumbs2b (crb2b) apical polarity genes' restrictive transcription in the red, green, and blue (RGB) cones in the retina, but not in other retinal cell types. Here we show that the intronic enhancers of both the ponli and crb2b genes are conserved among teleost species and that they share sequence motifs that are critical for RGB cone-specific transcription. Given their similarities in sequences and functions, we name the ponli and crb2b enhancers collectively rainbow enhancers. Rainbow enhancers may represent a cis-regulatory mechanism to turn on a group of genes that are commonly and restrictively expressed in RGB cones, which largely define the beginning of the color vision pathway.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Dim-light achromatic vision and bright-light color vision are initiated in rod and several types of cone photoreceptors, respectively; these photoreceptors are structurally distinct from each other. In zebrafish, although quite different from rods and UV cones, RGB cones (red, green, and blue cones) are structurally similar and unite into mirror-symmetric pentamers (G-R-B-R-G) by adhesion. This structural commonality and unity suggest that a set of genes is commonly expressed only in RGB cones but not in other cells. Here, we report that the rainbow enhancers activate RGB cone-specific transcription of the ponli and crb2b genes. This

  15. Novel inhibitory action of tunicamycin homologues suggests a role for dynamic protein fatty acylation in growth cone-mediated neurite extension

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    In neuronal growth cones, the advancing tips of elongating axons and dendrites, specific protein substrates appear to undergo cycles of posttranslational modification by covalent attachment and removal of long-chain fatty acids. We show here that ongoing fatty acylation can be inhibited selectively by long-chain homologues of the antibiotic tunicamycin, a known inhibitor of N-linked glycosylation. Tunicamycin directly inhibits transfer of palmitate to protein in a cell-free system, indicating that tunicamycin inhibition of protein palmitoylation reflects an action of the drug separate from its previously established effects on glycosylation. Tunicamycin treatment of differentiated PC12 cells or dissociated rat sensory neurons, under conditions in which protein palmitoylation is inhibited, produces a prompt cessation of neurite elongation and induces a collapse of neuronal growth cones. These growth cone responses are rapidly reversed by washout of the antibiotic, even in the absence of protein synthesis, or by addition of serum. Two additional lines of evidence suggest that the effects of tunicamycin on growth cones arise from its ability to inhibit protein long-chain acylation, rather than its previously established effects on protein glycosylation and synthesis. (a) The abilities of different tunicamycin homologues to induce growth cone collapse very systematically with the length of the fatty acyl side- chain of tunicamycin, in a manner predicted and observed for the inhibition of protein palmitoylation. Homologues with fatty acyl moieties shorter than palmitic acid (16 hydrocarbons), including potent inhibitors of glycosylation, are poor inhibitors of growth cone function. (b) The tunicamycin-induced impairment of growth cone function can be reversed by the addition of excess exogenous fatty acid, which reverses the inhibition of protein palmitoylation but has no effect on the inhibition of protein glycosylation. These results suggest an important role for

  16. Temporally and spatially coordinated roles for Rho, Rac, Cdc42 and their effectors in growth cone guidance by a physiological electric field.

    PubMed

    Rajnicek, Ann M; Foubister, Louise E; McCaig, Colin D

    2006-05-01

    Although it is known that neuronal growth cones migrate towards the cathode of an applied direct current (DC) electric field (EF), resembling the EF present in the developing nervous system, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate temporally and spatially coordinated roles for the GTPases Rac, Cdc42 and Rho and their effectors. Growth cones of cultured Xenopus embryonic spinal neurons turned towards the cathode but collective inhibition of Rho, Rac and Cdc42 attenuated turning. Selective inhibition of Rho, Cdc42 or Rac signalling revealed temporally distinct roles in steering by an electrical gradient. Rho, Rac and Cdc42 are each essential for turning within the initial 2 hours (early phase). Later, Rho and Cdc42 signals remain important but Rac signalling dominates. The EF increased Rho immunofluorescence anodally. This correlated spatially with collapsed growth cone morphology and reduced anodal migration rates, which were restored by Rho inhibition. These data suggest that anodally increased Rho activity induces local cytoskeletal collapse, biasing growth cone advance cathodally. Collapse might be mediated by the Rho effectors p160 Rho kinase and myosin light chain kinase since their inhibition attenuated early turning. Inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase, MEK1/2 or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) did not affect turning behaviour, eliminating them mechanistically. We propose a mechanism whereby Rac and Cdc42 activities dominate cathodally and Rho activity dominates anodally to steer growth cones towards the cathode. The interaction between Rho GTPases, the cytoskeleton and growth cone dynamics is explored in the companion paper published in this issue. Our results complement studies of growth cone guidance by diffusible chemical gradients and suggest that growth cones might interpret these co-existing guidance cues selectively.

  17. Deficiency of the Survival of Motor Neuron Protein Impairs mRNA Localization and Local Translation in the Growth Cone of Motor Neurons.

    PubMed

    Fallini, Claudia; Donlin-Asp, Paul G; Rouanet, Jeremy P; Bassell, Gary J; Rossoll, Wilfried

    2016-03-30

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disease primarily affecting spinal motor neurons. It is caused by reduced levels of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein, which plays an essential role in the biogenesis of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins in all tissues. The etiology of the specific defects in the motor circuitry in SMA is still unclear, but SMN has also been implicated in mediating the axonal localization of mRNA-protein complexes, which may contribute to the axonal degeneration observed in SMA. Here, we report that SMN deficiency severely disrupts local protein synthesis within neuronal growth cones. We also identify the cytoskeleton-associated growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) mRNA as a new target of SMN and show that motor neurons from SMA mouse models have reduced levels ofGAP43mRNA and protein in axons and growth cones. Importantly, overexpression of two mRNA-binding proteins, HuD and IMP1, restoresGAP43mRNA and protein levels in growth cones and rescues axon outgrowth defects in SMA neurons. These findings demonstrate that SMN plays an important role in the localization and local translation of mRNAs with important axonal functions and suggest that disruption of this function may contribute to the axonal defects observed in SMA. The motor neuron disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by reduced levels of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein, which plays a key role in assembling RNA/protein complexes that are essential for mRNA splicing. It remains unclear whether defects in this well characterized housekeeping function cause the specific degeneration of spinal motor neurons observed in SMA. Here, we describe an additional role of SMN in regulating the axonal localization and local translation of the mRNA encoding growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43). This study supports a model whereby SMN deficiency impedes transport and local translation of mRNAs important for neurite outgrowth and stabilization

  18. Deficiency of the Survival of Motor Neuron Protein Impairs mRNA Localization and Local Translation in the Growth Cone of Motor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Fallini, Claudia; Donlin-Asp, Paul G.; Rouanet, Jeremy P.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disease primarily affecting spinal motor neurons. It is caused by reduced levels of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein, which plays an essential role in the biogenesis of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins in all tissues. The etiology of the specific defects in the motor circuitry in SMA is still unclear, but SMN has also been implicated in mediating the axonal localization of mRNA-protein complexes, which may contribute to the axonal degeneration observed in SMA. Here, we report that SMN deficiency severely disrupts local protein synthesis within neuronal growth cones. We also identify the cytoskeleton-associated growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) mRNA as a new target of SMN and show that motor neurons from SMA mouse models have reduced levels of GAP43 mRNA and protein in axons and growth cones. Importantly, overexpression of two mRNA-binding proteins, HuD and IMP1, restores GAP43 mRNA and protein levels in growth cones and rescues axon outgrowth defects in SMA neurons. These findings demonstrate that SMN plays an important role in the localization and local translation of mRNAs with important axonal functions and suggest that disruption of this function may contribute to the axonal defects observed in SMA. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The motor neuron disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by reduced levels of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein, which plays a key role in assembling RNA/protein complexes that are essential for mRNA splicing. It remains unclear whether defects in this well characterized housekeeping function cause the specific degeneration of spinal motor neurons observed in SMA. Here, we describe an additional role of SMN in regulating the axonal localization and local translation of the mRNA encoding growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43). This study supports a model whereby SMN deficiency impedes transport and local translation of mRNAs important for neurite

  19. Regulation of muscle growth in neonates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This review reports recent findings on the multiple factors that regulate skeletal muscle growth in neonates. Skeletal muscle is the fastest growing protein mass in neonates. The high rate of neonatal muscle growth is due to accelerated rates of protein synthesis accompanied by the rapid accumulatio...

  20. Chemical Growth Regulators for Guayule Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dastoor, M. N.; Schubert, W. W.; Petersen, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    Test Tubes containing Guayule - tissue cultures were used in experiments to test effects of chemical-growth regulators. The shoots grew in response to addition of 2-(3,4-dichlorophenoxy)-triethylamine (triethylamine (TEA) derivative) to agar medium. Preliminary results indicate that a class of compounds that promotes growth in soil may also promote growth in a culture medium. Further experiments are needed to define the effect of the TEA derivative.

  1. Chemical Growth Regulators for Guayule Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dastoor, M. N.; Schubert, W. W.; Petersen, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    Test Tubes containing Guayule - tissue cultures were used in experiments to test effects of chemical-growth regulators. The shoots grew in response to addition of 2-(3,4-dichlorophenoxy)-triethylamine (triethylamine (TEA) derivative) to agar medium. Preliminary results indicate that a class of compounds that promotes growth in soil may also promote growth in a culture medium. Further experiments are needed to define the effect of the TEA derivative.

  2. The Ig Superfamily Cell Adhesion Molecule, apCAM, Mediates Growth Cone Steering by Substrate–Cytoskeletal Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Daniel M.; Errante, Laura D.; Belotserkovsky, Victoria; Forscher, Paul

    1998-01-01

    Dynamic cytoskeletal rearrangements are involved in neuronal growth cone motility and guidance. To investigate how cell surface receptors translate guidance cue recognition into these cytoskeletal changes, we developed a novel in vitro assay where beads, coated with antibodies to the immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion molecule apCAM or with purified native apCAM, replaced cellular substrates. These beads associated with retrograde F-actin flow, but in contrast to previous studies, were then physically restrained with a microneedle to simulate interactions with noncompliant cellular substrates. After a latency period of ∼10 min, we observed an abrupt increase in bead-restraining tension accompanied by direct extension of the microtubule-rich central domain toward sites of apCAM bead binding. Most importantly, we found that retrograde F-actin flow was attenuated only after restraining tension had increased and only in the bead interaction axis where preferential microtubule extension occurred. These cytoskeletal and structural changes are very similar to those reported for growth cone interactions with physiological targets. Immunolocalization using an antibody against the cytoplasmic domain of apCAM revealed accumulation of the transmembrane isoform of apCAM around bead-binding sites. Our results provide direct evidence for a mechanical continuum from apCAM bead substrates through the peripheral domain to the central cytoplasmic domain. By modulating functional linkage to the underlying actin cytoskeleton, cell surface receptors such as apCAM appear to enable the application of tensioning forces to extracellular substrates, providing a mechanism for transducing retrograde flow into guided growth cone movement. PMID:9531561

  3. Transcriptional co-regulation of evolutionarily conserved microRNA/cone opsin gene pairs: implications for photoreceptor subtype specification.

    PubMed

    Daido, Yutaka; Hamanishi, Sakurako; Kusakabe, Takehiro G

    2014-08-01

    The vertebrate retina contains two types of photoreceptor cells, rods and cones, which use distinct types of opsins and phototransduction proteins. Cones can be further divided into several subtypes with differing wavelength sensitivity and morphology. Although photoreceptor development has been extensively studied in a variety of vertebrate species, the mechanism by which photoreceptor subtypes are established is still largely unknown. Here we report two microRNAs (miRNAs), miR-726 and miR-729, which are potentially involved in photoreceptor subtype specification. In the medaka Oryzias latipes, the genes encoding miR-726 and miR-729 are located upstream of the red-sensitive opsin gene LWS-A and the UV-sensitive opsin gene SWS1, respectively, and are transcribed in the opposite direction from the respective opsin genes. The miR-726/LWS pair is conserved between teleosts and tetrapods, and the miR-729/SWS1 pair is conserved among teleosts. in situ hybridization analyses and fluorescence reporter assays suggest that these miRNAs are co-expressed with the respective opsins in specific cone subtypes. Potential targets of miR-726 and miR-729 predicted in silico include several transcription factors that regulate photoreceptor development. Functional analyses of cis-regulatory sequences in vivo suggest that transcription of the paired microRNA and opsin genes is co-regulated by common cis-regulatory modules. We propose an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that controls photoreceptor subtype identity through coupling between transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Faster voltage-dependent activation of Na+ channels in growth cones versus somata of neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J; Loew, L M; Davidson, R M

    1996-01-01

    Kinetics of voltage-gated ionic channels fundamentally reflect the response of the channels to local electric fields. In this report cell-attached patch-clamp studies reveal that the voltage-dependent activation rate of sodium channels residing in the growth cone membrane differs from that of soma sodium channels in differentiating N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells. Because other electrophysiological properties of these channels do not differ, this finding may be a reflection of the difference in intramembrane electric field in these two regions of the cell. This represents a new mechanism for channels to attain a range of activities both within and between cells. PMID:8913589

  5. Modulation of cone horizontal cell activity in the teleost fish retina. II. Role of interplexiform cells and dopamine in regulating light responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Yang, X L; Tornqvist, K; Dowling, J E

    1988-07-01

    Following the destruction of the terminals of the dopaminergic interplexiform cells by intraocular injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), cone horizontal cells exhibited high light responsiveness in prolonged darkness and their responses to moderate and bright full-field flashes were as large as 60 mV. Furthermore, the light responsiveness of these cells in the 6-OHDA-treated retinas was not enhanced by background illumination. The application of dopamine (50 microM) by superfusion to 6-OHDA-treated retinas resulted in a decrease in light responsiveness and changes in response waveform of the cone horizontal cells. Twenty minutes following dopamine application the responses of the cone horizontal cells closely resembled the response of cells recorded in prolonged dark-adapted retinas. Dopamine caused similar changes in cone horizontal cells recorded in light-exposed retinas, but had no obvious effects on rod horizontal cells. The selective dopamine D1 receptor antagonist, Sch 23390, enhanced cone horizontal cell responsiveness when applied to prolonged dark-adapted retinas, mimicking background illumination. The light responsiveness of cone horizontal cells recorded after application of Sch 23390 was less than that for cells in retinas that had been exposed to background lights, but light responsiveness could not be further enhanced by background illumination. Another dopamine antagonist, (+)-butaclamol, was found to have effects similar to Sch 23390 on cone horizontal cells, but (-)-butaclamol, the inactive enantiomer, did not enhance the light responsiveness of these cells. The results suggest that the dopaminergic interplexiform cells play a crucial role in the regulation of cone horizontal cell responsiveness by prolonged darkness and background illumination. These cells may release dopamine tonically in the dark, which suppresses cone horizontal cell responsiveness. Background illumination may decrease dopamine release and liberate cone horizontal cells

  6. Cytoskeletal social networking in the growth cone: how +TIPs mediate microtubule-actin cross-linking to drive axon outgrowth and guidance

    PubMed Central

    Cammarata, Garrett M.; Bearce, Elizabeth A.; Lowery, Laura Anne

    2016-01-01

    The growth cone is a unique structure capable of guiding axons to their proper destinations. Within the growth cone, extracellular guidance cues are interpreted and then transduced into physical changes in the actin filament (F-actin) and microtubule cytoskeletons, providing direction and movement. While both cytoskeletal networks individually possess important growth cone-specific functions, recent data over the past several years point towards a more cooperative role between the two systems. Facilitating this interaction between F-actin and microtubules, microtubule plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs) have been shown to link the two cytoskeletons together. Evidence suggests that many +TIPs can couple microtubules to F-actin dynamics, supporting both microtubule advance and retraction in the growth cone periphery. In addition, growing in vitro and in vivo data support a secondary role for +TIPs in which they may participate as F-actin nucleators, thus directly influencing F-actin dynamics and organization. This review focuses on how +TIPs may link F-actin and microtubules together in the growth cone, and how these interactions may influence axon guidance. PMID:26783725

  7. Frazzled promotes growth cone attachment at the source of a Netrin gradient in the Drosophila visual system

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Orkun; Zipursky, S Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Axon guidance is proposed to act through a combination of long- and short-range attractive and repulsive cues. The ligand-receptor pair, Netrin (Net) and Frazzled (Fra) (DCC, Deleted in Colorectal Cancer, in vertebrates), is recognized as the prototypical effector of chemoattraction, with roles in both long- and short-range guidance. In the Drosophila visual system, R8 photoreceptor growth cones were shown to require Net-Fra to reach their target, the peak of a Net gradient. Using live imaging, we show, however, that R8 growth cones reach and recognize their target without Net, Fra, or Trim9, a conserved binding partner of Fra, but do not remain attached to it. Thus, despite the graded ligand distribution along the guidance path, Net-Fra is not used for chemoattraction. Based on findings in other systems, we propose that adhesion to substrate-bound Net underlies both long- and short-range Net-Fra-dependent guidance in vivo, thereby eroding the distinction between them. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20762.001 PMID:27743477

  8. FGF signalling regulates bone growth through autophagy.

    PubMed

    Cinque, Laura; Forrester, Alison; Bartolomeo, Rosa; Svelto, Maria; Venditti, Rossella; Montefusco, Sandro; Polishchuk, Elena; Nusco, Edoardo; Rossi, Antonio; Medina, Diego L; Polishchuk, Roman; De Matteis, Maria Antonietta; Settembre, Carmine

    2015-12-10

    Skeletal growth relies on both biosynthetic and catabolic processes. While the role of the former is clearly established, how the latter contributes to growth-promoting pathways is less understood. Macroautophagy, hereafter referred to as autophagy, is a catabolic process that plays a fundamental part in tissue homeostasis. We investigated the role of autophagy during bone growth, which is mediated by chondrocyte rate of proliferation, hypertrophic differentiation and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition in growth plates. Here we show that autophagy is induced in growth-plate chondrocytes during post-natal development and regulates the secretion of type II collagen (Col2), the major component of cartilage ECM. Mice lacking the autophagy related gene 7 (Atg7) in chondrocytes experience endoplasmic reticulum storage of type II procollagen (PC2) and defective formation of the Col2 fibrillary network in the ECM. Surprisingly, post-natal induction of chondrocyte autophagy is mediated by the growth factor FGF18 through FGFR4 and JNK-dependent activation of the autophagy initiation complex VPS34-beclin-1. Autophagy is completely suppressed in growth plates from Fgf18(-/-) embryos, while Fgf18(+/-) heterozygous and Fgfr4(-/-) mice fail to induce autophagy during post-natal development and show decreased Col2 levels in the growth plate. Strikingly, the Fgf18(+/-) and Fgfr4(-/-) phenotypes can be rescued in vivo by pharmacological activation of autophagy, pointing to autophagy as a novel effector of FGF signalling in bone. These data demonstrate that autophagy is a developmentally regulated process necessary for bone growth, and identify FGF signalling as a crucial regulator of autophagy in chondrocytes.

  9. The choroid as a sclera growth regulator.

    PubMed

    Summers, Jody A

    2013-09-01

    Emmetropization is a vision dependent mechanism that attempts to minimize refractive error through coordinated growth of the cornea, lens and sclera such that the axial length matches the focal length of the eye. It is generally accepted that this visually guided eye growth is controlled via a cascade of locally generated chemical events that are initiated in the retina and ultimately cause changes in scleral extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling which lead to changes in eye size and refraction. Of much interest, therefore, are the molecular mechanisms that underpin emmetropization and visually guided ocular growth. The choroid, a highly vascularized layer located between the retina and the sclera is uniquely situated to relay retina-derived signals to the sclera to effect changes in ECM synthesis and ocular size. Studies initiated by Josh Wallman clearly demonstrate that the choroid plays an active role in emmetropization, both by modulation of its thickness to adjust the retina to the focal plane of the eye (choroidal accommodation), and well as through the release of growth factors that have the potential to regulate scleral extracellular matrix remodeling. His discoveries prompted numerous investigations on the molecular composition of the choroid and changes in gene expression associated with visually guided ocular growth. This article will review molecular and functional studies of the choroid to provide support for the hypothesis that the choroid is a source of sclera growth regulators that effect changes in ocular growth in response to visual stimuli. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Choroid as a Sclera Growth Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Jody A.

    2013-01-01

    Emmetropization is a vision dependent mechanism that attempts to minimize refractive error through coordinated growth of the cornea, lens and sclera such that the axial length matches the focal length of the eye. It is generally accepted that this visually guided eye growth is controlled via a cascade of locally generated chemical events that are initiated in the retina and ultimately cause changes in scleral extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling which lead to changes in eye size and refraction. Of much interest, therefore, are the molecular mechanisms that underpin emmetropization and visually guided ocular growth. The choroid, a highly vascularized layer located between the retina and the sclera is uniquely situated to relay retina-derived signals to the sclera to effect changes in ECM synthesis and ocular size. Studies initiated by Josh Wallman, Ph.D., clearly demonstrate that the choroid plays an active role in emmetropization, both by modulation of its thickness to adjust the retina to the focal plane of the eye (choroidal accommodation), and well as through the release of growth factors that have the potential to regulate scleral extracellular matrix remodeling. His discoveries prompted numerous investigations on the molecular composition of the choroid and changes in gene expression associated with visually guided ocular growth. This article will review molecular and functional studies of the choroid to provide support for the hypothesis that the choroid is a source of sclera growth regulators that effect changes in ocular growth in response to visual stimuli. PMID:23528534

  11. Regulation of bone mass by growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Olney, Robert C

    2003-09-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is a peptide hormone secreted from the pituitary gland under the control of the hypothalamus. It has a many actions in the body, including regulating a number of metabolic pathways. Some, but not all, of its effects are mediated through insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Both GH and IGF-I play significant roles in the regulation of growth and bone metabolism and hence are regulators of bone mass. Bone mass increases steadily through childhood, peaking in the mid 20s. Subsequently, there is a slow decline that accelerates in late life. During childhood, the accumulation in bone mass is a combination of bone growth and bone remodeling. Bone remodeling is the process of new bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts. GH directly and through IGF-I stimulates osteoblast proliferation and activity, promoting bone formation. It also stimulates osteoclast differentiation and activity, promoting bone resorption. The result is an increase in the overall rate of bone remodeling, with a net effect of bone accumulation. The absence of GH results in a reduced rate of bone remodeling and a gradual loss of bone mineral density. Bone growth primarily occurs at the epiphyseal growth plates and is the result of the proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes. GH has direct effects on these chondrocytes, but primarily regulates this function through IGF-I, which stimulates the proliferation of and matrix production by these cells. GH deficiency severely limits bone growth and hence the accumulation of bone mass. GH deficiency is not an uncommon complication in oncology and has long-term effects on bone health.

  12. Mathematics Coursework Regulates Growth in Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Xin; Wilkins, Jesse L. M.

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the Longitudinal Study of American Youth (LSAY), we examined the extent to which students' mathematics coursework regulates (influences) the rate of growth in mathematics achievement during middle and high school. Graphical analysis showed that students who started middle school with higher achievement took individual mathematics…

  13. Mathematics Coursework Regulates Growth in Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Xin; Wilkins, Jesse L. M.

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the Longitudinal Study of American Youth (LSAY), we examined the extent to which students' mathematics coursework regulates (influences) the rate of growth in mathematics achievement during middle and high school. Graphical analysis showed that students who started middle school with higher achievement took individual mathematics…

  14. Proteolytic Processing Regulates Placental Growth Factor Activities*

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Daniel C.; Willenborg, Sebastian; Koch, Manuel; Zwolanek, Daniela; Müller, Stefan; Becker, Ann-Kathrin A.; Metzger, Stephanie; Ehrbar, Martin; Kurschat, Peter; Hellmich, Martin; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Eming, Sabine A.

    2013-01-01

    Placental growth factor (PlGF) is a critical mediator of blood vessel formation, yet mechanisms of its action and regulation are incompletely understood. Here we demonstrate that proteolytic processing regulates the biological activity of PlGF. Specifically, we show that plasmin processing of PlGF-2 yields a protease-resistant core fragment comprising the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 binding site but lacking the carboxyl-terminal domain encoding the heparin-binding domain and an 8-amino acid peptide encoded by exon 7. We have identified plasmin cleavage sites, generated a truncated PlGF118 isoform mimicking plasmin-processed PlGF, and explored its biological function in comparison with that of PlGF-1 and -2. The angiogenic responses induced by the diverse PlGF forms were distinct. Whereas PlGF-2 increased endothelial cell chemotaxis, vascular sprouting, and granulation tissue formation upon skin injury, these activities were abrogated following plasmin digestion. Investigation of PlGF/Neuropilin-1 binding and function suggests a critical role for heparin-binding domain/Neuropilin-1 interaction and its regulation by plasmin processing. Collectively, here we provide new mechanistic insights into the regulation of PlGF-2/Neuropilin-1-mediated tissue vascularization and growth. PMID:23645683

  15. Cold knife cone biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... biopsy; Pap smear - cone biopsy; HPV - cone biopsy; Human papilloma virus - cone biopsy; Cervix - cone biopsy; Colposcopy - cone biopsy Images Female reproductive anatomy Cold cone biopsy Cold cone removal References American ...

  16. Underground tuning: quantitative regulation of root growth.

    PubMed

    Satbhai, Santosh B; Ristova, Daniela; Busch, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    Plants display a high degree of phenotypic plasticity that allows them to tune their form and function to changing environments. The plant root system has evolved mechanisms to anchor the plant and to efficiently explore soils to forage for soil resources. Key to this is an enormous capacity for plasticity of multiple traits that shape the distribution of roots in the soil. Such root system architecture-related traits are determined by root growth rates, root growth direction, and root branching. In this review, we describe how the root system is constituted, and which mechanisms, pathways, and genes mainly regulate plasticity of the root system in response to environmental variation.

  17. Biochemical properties of Na+/K(+)-ATPase in axonal growth cone particles isolated from fetal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Mercado, R; Hernández, J

    1994-08-01

    Axonal growth cones (AGC) isolated from fetal rat brain have an important specific activity of N+/K(+)-ATPase. Kinetic assays of the enzyme in AGC showed that Km values for ATP or K+ are similar to those reported for the adult brain enzyme. For Na+ the affinity (Km) was lower. Vmax for the three substrates was several times lower in AGC as compared to the adult value. We also observed two apparent inhibition constants of Na+/K(+)-ATPase by ouabain, one of low affinity, possibly corresponding to the alpha 1 isoform and another of high affinity which is different to that described for the alpha 2 isoform of the enzyme. These results support an important role for the sodium pump in the maintainance of volume and cationic balance in neuronal differentiating structures. The functional differences observed also suggest that the enzymatic complex of Na+/K(+)-ATPase in AGC is in a transitional state towards the adult configuration.

  18. Three-dimensional longitudinal changes in craniofacial growth in untreated hemifacial microsomia patients with cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Shibazaki-Yorozuya, Reiko; Yamada, Akira; Nagata, Satoru; Ueda, Kouichi; Miller, Arthur J; Maki, Koutaro

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the concept that the affected and contralateral sides do not grow at the same rate in patients with hemifacial microsomia. Changes in the cranial base, maxilla, mandible, and occlusal plane were evaluated on 3-dimensional images from cone-beam computed tomography data in untreated patients. Six patients were classified as having mandibular Pruzansky/Kaban type I, IIA, or IIB hemifacial microsomia. Cone-beam computed tomography (MercuRay; Hitachi, Tokyo, Japan) scans were taken before orthodontic treatment during both growth and postpuberty periods. The cranial base as defined by the position of the mastoid process was in a different position between the affected and contralateral control sides. The nasomaxillary length or height was shorter on the affected side for all 6 patients with hemifacial microsomia regardless of its severity, and it grew less than on the contralateral control side in 5 of the 6 patients. The occlusal plane angle became more inclined in 4 of the 6 patients. The mandibular ramus was shorter on the affected side in all patients and grew less on the affected side in 5 of the 6 patients. The mandibular body grew slower, the same, or faster than on the control side. The cranial base, position of the condyle, lengths of the condyle and ramus, and positions of the gonial angle and condyle can vary between the affected and contralateral control sides of patients with hemifacial microsomia, with the ramus and nasomaxillary length usually growing slower than they grow on the control side. These results suggest that many factors affect the growth rate of the craniofacial region and, specifically, the mandible in patients with hemifacial microsomia. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Regulation of body growth by microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Lui, Julian C

    2016-10-24

    Regulation of body growth remains a fascinating and unresolved biological mystery. One key component of body growth is skeletal and longitudinal bone growth. Children grow taller because their bones grew longer, and the predominant driver of longitudinal bone growth is a cartilaginous structure found near the ends of long bone named the growth plate. Numerous recent studies have started to unveil the importance of microRNAs in regulation of growth plate functions, therefore contributing to regulation of linear growth. In addition to longitudinal growth, other organs in our body need to increase in size and cell number as we grow, and the regulation of organ growth involves both systemic factors like hormones; and other intrinsic mechanisms, which we are just beginning to understand. This review aims to summarize some recent important findings on how microRNAs are involved in both of these processes: the regulation of longitudinal bone growth, and the regulation of organs and overall body growth.

  20. Nerve growth cones isolated from fetal rat brain. IV. Preparation of a membrane subfraction and identification of a membrane glycoprotein expressed on sprouting neurons

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    This study describes the preparation of a membrane subfraction from isolated nerve growth cone particles (GCPs) (see Pfenninger, K. H., L. Ellis, M. P. Johnson, L. B. Friedman, and S. Somlo, 1983, Cell, 35:573- 584) and the identification in this fraction of a glycoprotein expressed during neurite growth. While approximately 40 major polypeptides are visible in Coomassie Blue-stained SDS polyacrylamide gels of pelleted (partially disrupted) GCPs, a salt-washed membrane fraction prepared from lysed, detergent-permeabilized GCPs contains only 14% of this protein and has an unusually simple polypeptide pattern of seven major bands. Monoclonal antibodies have been generated to GCP membranes isolated from fetal rat brain. These antibodies have been screened differentially with synaptosomes from adult rat brain in order to identify those which recognize antigens expressed selectively during neurite growth. One such antibody (termed 5B4) recognizes a developmentally regulated membrane glycoprotein that is enriched in GCP membranes and expressed in fetal neurons sprouting in vitro. The 5B4 antigen in fetal brain migrates in SDS polyacrylamide gels as a diffuse band of approximately 185-255 kD, is rich in sialic acid, and consists of a small family of isoelectric variants. Freezing-thawing and neuraminidase digestion result in the cleavage of the native antigen into two new species migrating diffusely around 200 and 160 kD. Prolonged neuraminidase digestion sharpens these bands at about 180 and 135 kD, respectively. In the mature brain, antibody 5B4 recognizes a sparse polypeptide migrating at approximately 140 kD. As shown in the following paper (Wallis, I., L. Ellis, K. Suh, and K. H. Pfenninger, 1985, J. Cell Biol., 101:1990-1998), the fetal antigen is specifically associated with regions of neuronal sprouting and, therefore, can be used as a molecular marker of neurite growth. PMID:3902858

  1. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 activation by focal mechanical stimulation requires interaction with the actin cytoskeleton and enhances growth cone motility.

    PubMed

    Sugio, Shouta; Nagasawa, Masami; Kojima, Itaru; Ishizaki, Yasuki; Shibasaki, Koji

    2017-04-01

    We have previously reported that transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) can be activated by mechanical stimulation, which enhances axonal outgrowth in developing neurons; however, the molecular mechanisms that govern the contribution of TRPV2 activation to axonal outgrowth remain unclear. In the present study, we examined this mechanism by using PC12 cells as a neuronal model. Overexpression of TRPV2 enhanced axonal outgrowth in a mechanical stimulus-dependent manner. Accumulation of TRPV2 at the cell surface was 4-fold greater in the growth cone compared with the soma. In the growth cone, TRPV2 is not static, but dynamically accumulates (within ∼100 ms) to the site of mechanical stimulation. The dynamic and acute clustering of TRPV2 can enhance very weak mechanical stimuli via focal accumulation of TRPV2. Focal application of mechanical stimuli dramatically increased growth cone motility and caused actin reorganization via activation of TRPV2. We also found that TRPV2 physically interacts with actin and that changes in the actin cytoskeleton are required for its activation. Here, we demonstrated for the first time to our knowledge that TRPV2 clustering is induced by mechanical stimulation generated by axonal outgrowth and that TRPV2 activation is triggered by actin rearrangements that result from mechanical stimulation. Moreover, TRPV2 activation enhances growth cone motility and actin accumulation to promote axonal outgrowth. Sugio, S., Nagasawa, M., Kojima, I., Ishizaki, Y., Shibasaki, K. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 activation by focal mechanical stimulation requires interaction with the actin cytoskeleton and enhances growth cone motility. © FASEB.

  2. Loss of mTOR signaling affects cone function, cone structure and expression of cone specific proteins without affecting cone survival.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shan; Venkatesh, Aditya; Langellotto, Fernanda; Le, Yun Z; Hall, Michael N; Rüegg, Markus A; Punzo, Claudio

    2015-06-01

    Cones are the primary photoreceptor (PR) cells responsible for vision in humans. They are metabolically highly active requiring phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activity for long-term survival. One of the downstream targets of PI3K is the kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which is a key regulator of cell metabolism and growth, integrating nutrient availability and growth factor signals. Both PI3K and mTOR are part of the insulin/mTOR signaling pathway, however if mTOR is required for long-term PR survival remains unknown. This is of particular interest since deregulation of this pathway in diabetes results in reduced PR function before the onset of any clinical signs of diabetic retinopathy. mTOR is found in two distinct complexes (mTORC1 & mTORC2) that are characterized by their unique accessory proteins RAPTOR and RICTOR respectively. mTORC1 regulates mainly cell metabolism in response to nutrient availability and growth factor signals, while mTORC2 regulates pro-survival mechanisms in response to growth factors. Here we analyze the effect on cones of loss of mTORC1, mTORC2 and simultaneous loss of mTORC1 & mTORC2. Interestingly, neither loss of mTORC1 nor mTORC2 affects cone function or survival at one year of age. However, outer and inner segment morphology is affected upon loss of either complex. In contrast, concurrent loss of mTORC1 and mTORC2 leads to a reduction in cone function without affecting cone viability. The data indicates that PI3K mediated pro-survival signals diverge upstream of both mTOR complexes in cones, suggesting that they are independent of mTOR activity. Furthermore, the data may help explain why PR function is reduced in diabetes, which can lead to deregulation of both mTOR complexes simultaneously. Finally, although mTOR is a key regulator of cell metabolism, and PRs are metabolically highly active, the data suggests that the role of mTOR in regulating the metabolic transcriptome in healthy cones is minimal. Copyright

  3. Regulation of myostatin activity and muscle growth.

    PubMed

    Lee, S J; McPherron, A C

    2001-07-31

    Myostatin is a transforming growth factor-beta family member that acts as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. To identify possible myostatin inhibitors that may have applications for promoting muscle growth, we investigated the regulation of myostatin signaling. Myostatin protein purified from mammalian cells consisted of a noncovalently held complex of the N-terminal propeptide and a disulfide-linked dimer of C-terminal fragments. The purified C-terminal myostatin dimer was capable of binding the activin type II receptors, Act RIIB and, to a lesser extent, Act RIIA. Binding of myostatin to Act RIIB could be inhibited by the activin-binding protein follistatin and, at higher concentrations, by the myostatin propeptide. To determine the functional significance of these interactions in vivo, we generated transgenic mice expressing high levels of the propeptide, follistatin, or a dominant-negative form of Act RIIB by using a skeletal muscle-specific promoter. Independent transgenic mouse lines for each construct exhibited dramatic increases in muscle mass comparable to those seen in myostatin knockout mice. Our findings suggest that the propeptide, follistatin, or other molecules that block signaling through this pathway may be useful agents for enhancing muscle growth for both human therapeutic and agricultural applications.

  4. Brassinosteroids Regulate Root Growth, Development, and Symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhuoyun; Li, Jia

    2016-01-04

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are natural plant hormones critical for growth and development. BR deficient or signaling mutants show significantly shortened root phenotypes. However, for a long time, it was thought that these phenotypes were solely caused by reduced cell elongation in the mutant roots. Functions of BRs in regulating root development have been largely neglected. Nonetheless, recent detailed analyses, revealed that BRs are not only involved in root cell elongation but are also involved in many aspects of root development, such as maintenance of meristem size, root hair formation, lateral root initiation, gravitropic response, mycorrhiza formation, and nodulation in legume species. In this review, current findings on the functions of BRs in mediating root growth, development, and symbiosis are discussed.

  5. [Synthesis and regulation of growth hormone secretion].

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Y; Yakushiji, F; Terazono, T

    1993-10-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) is a single chain, 22 kd-protein with two intramolecular disulfide bonds. The hGH gene is located on chromosome 17 at band q22-q24 and has four introns separating five coding exons. The expression of hGH is restricted to the pituitary and regulated by GHF-1 which binds to the hGH promoter acting in concert with several other more ubiquitous DNA binding proteins. The secretion of hGH is regulated by GH releasing hormone (GRH) and somatostatin. GRH controls GH synthesis by stimulating transcription of GH mRNA while somatostatin determines the timing and amplitude of GH pulses. Pulsatile GH secretion is influenced by a number of neurogenic, metabolic and hormonal factors.

  6. Defective Gpsm2/Gαi3 signalling disrupts stereocilia development and growth cone actin dynamics in Chudley-McCullough syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauriac, Stephanie A.; Hien, Yeri E.; Bird, Jonathan E.; Carvalho, Steve Dos-Santos; Peyroutou, Ronan; Lee, Sze Chim; Moreau, Maite M.; Blanc, Jean-Michel; Geyser, Aysegul; Medina, Chantal; Thoumine, Olivier; Beer-Hammer, Sandra; Friedman, Thomas B.; Rüttiger, Lukas; Forge, Andrew; Nürnberg, Bernd; Sans, Nathalie; Montcouquiol, Mireille

    2017-04-01

    Mutations in GPSM2 cause Chudley-McCullough syndrome (CMCS), an autosomal recessive neurological disorder characterized by early-onset sensorineural deafness and brain anomalies. Here, we show that mutation of the mouse orthologue of GPSM2 affects actin-rich stereocilia elongation in auditory and vestibular hair cells, causing deafness and balance defects. The G-protein subunit Gαi3, a well-documented partner of Gpsm2, participates in the elongation process, and its absence also causes hearing deficits. We show that Gpsm2 defines an ~200 nm nanodomain at the tips of stereocilia and this localization requires the presence of Gαi3, myosin 15 and whirlin. Using single-molecule tracking, we report that loss of Gpsm2 leads to decreased outgrowth and a disruption of actin dynamics in neuronal growth cones. Our results elucidate the aetiology of CMCS and highlight a new molecular role for Gpsm2/Gαi3 in the regulation of actin dynamics in epithelial and neuronal tissues.

  7. Regulation of pancreatic cancer growth by superoxide.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Nelson, Elke S; Simons, Andrean L; Olney, Kristen E; Moser, Justin C; Schrock, Hannah E; Wagner, Brett A; Buettner, Garry R; Smith, Brian J; Teoh, Melissa L T; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Cullen, Joseph J

    2013-07-01

    K-ras mutations have been identified in up to 95% of pancreatic cancers, implying their critical role in the molecular pathogenesis. Expression of K-ras oncogene in an immortalized human pancreatic ductal epithelial cell line, originally derived from normal pancreas (H6c7), induced the formation of carcinoma in mice. We hypothesized that K-ras oncogene correlates with increased non-mitochondrial-generated superoxide (O 2.-), which could be involved in regulating cell growth contributing to tumor progression. In the H6c7 cell line and its derivatives, H6c7er-Kras+ (H6c7 cells expressing K-ras oncogene), and H6c7eR-KrasT (tumorigenic H6c7 cells expressing K-ras oncogene), there was an increase in hydroethidine fluorescence in cell lines that express K-ras. Western blots and activity assays for the antioxidant enzymes that detoxify O 2.- were similar in these cell lines suggesting that the increase in hydroethidine fluorescence was not due to decreased antioxidant capacity. To determine a possible non-mitochondrial source of the increased levels of O 2.-, Western analysis demonstrated the absence of NADPH oxidase-2 (NOX2) in H6c7 cells but present in the H6c7 cell lines expressing K-ras and other pancreatic cancer cell lines. Inhibition of NOX2 decreased hydroethidine fluorescence and clonogenic survival. Furthermore, in the cell lines with the K-ras oncogene, overexpression of superoxide dismutases that detoxify non-mitochondrial sources of O 2.-, and treatment with the small molecule O 2.- scavenger Tempol, also decreased hydroethidine fluorescence, inhibited clonogenic survival and inhibited growth of tumor xenografts. Thus, O 2.- produced by NOX2 in pancreatic cancer cells with K-ras, may regulate pancreatic cancer cell growth. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Cell Guidance on Nanogratings: A Computational Model of the Interplay between PC12 Growth Cones and Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Tonazzini, Ilaria; Cecchini, Marco; Micera, Silvestro

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, the effects of nanogratings have been investigated on PC12 with respect to cell polarity, neuronal differentiation, migration, maturation of focal adhesions and alignment of neurites. Methodology/Principal Findings A synergistic procedure was used to study the mechanism of alignment of PC12 neurites with respect to the main direction of nanogratings. Finite Element simulations were used to qualitatively assess the distribution of stresses at the interface between non-spread growth cones and filopodia, and to study their dependence on filopodial length and orientation. After modelling all adhesions under non-spread growth cone and filopodial protrusions, the values of local stress maxima resulted from the length of filopodia. Since the stress was assumed to be the main triggering cause leading to the increase and stabilization of filopodia, the position of the local maxima was directly related to the orientation of neurites. An analytic closed form equation was then written to quantitatively assess the average ridge width needed to achieve a given neuritic alignment (R2 = 0.96), and the alignment course, when the ridge depth varied (R2 = 0.97). A computational framework was implemented within an improved free Java environment (CX3D) and in silico simulations were carried out to reproduce and predict biological experiments. No significant differences were found between biological experiments and in silico simulations (alignment, p = 0.3571; tortuosity, p = 0.2236) with a standard level of confidence (95%). Conclusions/Significance A mechanism involved in filopodial sensing of nanogratings is proposed and modelled through a synergistic use of FE models, theoretical equations and in silico simulations. This approach shows the importance of the neuritic terminal geometry, and the key role of the distribution of the adhesion constraints for the cell/substrate coupling process. Finally, the effects of the geometry of nanogratings were

  9. Process for producing vegetative and tuber growth regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutte, Gary W. (Inventor); Yorio, Neil C. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A process of making a vegetative and tuber growth regulator. The vegetative and tuber growth regulator is made by growing potato plants in a recirculating hydroponic system for a sufficient time to produce the growth regulator. Also, the use of the vegetative and growth regulator on solanaceous plants, tuber forming plants and ornamental seedlings by contacting the roots or shoots of the plant with a sufficient amount of the growth regulator to regulate the growth of the plant and one more of canopy size, plant height, stem length, internode number and presence of tubers in fresh mass. Finally, a method for regulating the growth of potato plants using a recirculating hydroponic system is described.

  10. Focal adhesion kinase regulates neuronal growth, synaptic plasticity and hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Monje, Francisco J; Kim, Eun-Jung; Pollak, Daniela D; Cabatic, Maureen; Li, Lin; Baston, Arthur; Lubec, Gert

    2012-01-01

    The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase abundantly expressed in the mammalian brain and highly enriched in neuronal growth cones. Inhibitory and facilitatory activities of FAK on neuronal growth have been reported and its role in neuritic outgrowth remains controversial. Unlike other tyrosine kinases, such as the neurotrophin receptors regulating neuronal growth and plasticity, the relevance of FAK for learning and memory in vivo has not been clearly defined yet. A comprehensive study aimed at determining the role of FAK in neuronal growth, neurotransmitter release and synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons and in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory was therefore undertaken using the mouse model. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments indicated that FAK is a critical regulator of hippocampal cell morphology. FAK mediated neurotrophin-induced neuritic outgrowth and FAK inhibition affected both miniature excitatory postsynaptic potentials and activity-dependent hippocampal long-term potentiation prompting us to explore the possible role of FAK in spatial learning and memory in vivo. Our data indicate that FAK has a growth-promoting effect, is importantly involved in the regulation of the synaptic function and mediates in vivo hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory.

  11. The Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM) Promotes Clustering and Activation of EphA3 Receptors in GABAergic Interneurons to Induce Ras Homolog Gene Family, Member A (RhoA)/Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK)-mediated Growth Cone Collapse.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Chelsea S; Kümper, Maike; Temple, Brenda S; Maness, Patricia F

    2016-12-16

    Establishment of a proper balance of excitatory and inhibitory connectivity is achieved during development of cortical networks and adjusted through synaptic plasticity. The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA3 regulate the perisomatic synapse density of inhibitory GABAergic interneurons in the mouse frontal cortex through ephrin-A5-induced growth cone collapse. In this study, it was demonstrated that binding of NCAM and EphA3 occurred between the NCAM Ig2 domain and EphA3 cysteine-rich domain (CRD). The binding interface was further refined through molecular modeling and mutagenesis and shown to be comprised of complementary charged residues in the NCAM Ig2 domain (Arg-156 and Lys-162) and the EphA3 CRD (Glu-248 and Glu-264). Ephrin-A5 induced co-clustering of surface-bound NCAM and EphA3 in GABAergic cortical interneurons in culture. Receptor clustering was impaired by a charge reversal mutation that disrupted NCAM/EphA3 association, emphasizing the importance of the NCAM/EphA3 binding interface for cluster formation. NCAM enhanced ephrin-A5-induced EphA3 autophosphorylation and activation of RhoA GTPase, indicating a role for NCAM in activating EphA3 signaling through clustering. NCAM-mediated clustering of EphA3 was essential for ephrin-A5-induced growth cone collapse in cortical GABAergic interneurons, and RhoA and a principal effector, Rho-associated protein kinase, mediated the collapse response. This study delineates a mechanism in which NCAM promotes ephrin-A5-dependent clustering of EphA3 through interaction of the NCAM Ig2 domain and the EphA3 CRD, stimulating EphA3 autophosphorylation and RhoA signaling necessary for growth cone repulsion in GABAergic interneurons in vitro, which may extend to remodeling of axonal terminals of interneurons in vivo.

  12. Secreted Human Amyloid Precursor Protein Binds Semaphorin 3a and Prevents Semaphorin-Induced Growth Cone Collapse

    PubMed Central

    Guerreiro, Luiz H.; Beltrão, Paulo José I.; Carvalho, Milena M. V. F.; da S. Santos, Luís Eduardo; de Mello, Fernando G.; Reis, Ricardo A. M.; Ferreira, Sérgio T.

    2011-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is well known for giving rise to the amyloid-β peptide and for its role in Alzheimer's disease. Much less is known, however, on the physiological roles of APP in the development and plasticity of the central nervous system. We have used phage display of a peptide library to identify high-affinity ligands of purified recombinant human sAPPα695 (the soluble, secreted ectodomain from the main neuronal APP isoform). Two peptides thus selected exhibited significant homologies with the conserved extracellular domain of several members of the semaphorin (Sema) family of axon guidance proteins. We show that sAPPα695 binds both purified recombinant Sema3A and Sema3A secreted by transfected HEK293 cells. Interestingly, sAPPα695 inhibited the collapse of embryonic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) dorsal root ganglia growth cones promoted by Sema3A (Kd≤8·10−9 M). Two Sema3A-derived peptides homologous to the peptides isolated by phage display blocked sAPPα binding and its inhibitory action on Sema3A function. These two peptides are comprised within a domain previously shown to be involved in binding of Sema3A to its cellular receptor, suggesting a competitive mechanism by which sAPPα modulates the biological action of semaphorins. PMID:21829538

  13. Cone Heads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2005-01-01

    The author, a middle school art teacher, describes a sculpture project lesson involving Cone Heads (sculptures made from cardboard cones). Discussion of caricatures with exaggerated facial features and interesting profiles helped students understand that the more expressive the face, the better. This project took approximately four to five…

  14. Effects of crystallographic plane and co-deposited element on the growth of ion-sputter induced Si nano-cone arrays: a mechanism study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng-Chi; Qiu, Ying; Hao, Hong-Chen; Lu, Ming

    2015-06-01

    Self-organized Si nano-cone arrays induced by Ar+ ion sputtering on different Si crystallographic planes with different co-deposited alien atoms are investigated. The Si planes are (100), (110), and (111) ones, and the alien elements are Ta, Mo, Fe, and C, respectively. It is found that the growth of Si nano-cone arrays is insensitive to the initial crystallographic plane, but depends strongly on the co-deposited element. For the same Ar+ ion dose and sample temperature, the smaller the activation energy between the co-deposited element and Si is, the larger the average cone height and base diameter are. It is found that the preferential sputtering does not play an important role in the nano-cone formation. A model based on the concepts of classical surface-curvature-dependent sputtering yield and the formation of stationary silicide is proposed, which explains the observed results. The results of microstructural and compositional analysis support the proposed model.

  15. The Disruption of the Cytoskeleton during Semaphorin 3A induced Growth Cone Collapse Correlates with Differences in Actin Organization and Associated Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jacquelyn A; Bridgman, Paul C

    2010-01-01

    Repulsive guidance cues induce growth cone collapse or collapse and retraction. Collapse results from disruption and loss of the actin cytoskeleton. Actin rich regions of growth cones contain binding proteins that influence filament organization, such as Arp2/3, cortactin, and fascin, but little is known about the role that these proteins play in collapse. Here we show that Semaphorin 3A (Sema 3A), which is repulsive to mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons, has unequal effects on actin binding proteins and their associated filaments. The immunofluorescence staining intensity of Arp-2 and cortactin decreases relative to total protein, while in unextracted growth cones fascin increases. Fascin and myosin IIB staining redistribute and show increased overlap. The degree of actin filament loss during collapse correlates with filament superstructures detected by rotary shadow electron microscopy. Collapse results in the loss of branched f-actin meshworks, while actin bundles are partially retained to varying degrees. Taken together with the known affects of Sema 3A on actin, this suggests a model for collapse that follows a sequence; depolymerization of actin meshworks followed by partial depolymerization of fascin associated actin bundles and their movement to the neurite to complete collapse. The relocated fascin associated actin bundles may provide the substrate for actomyosin contractions that produce retraction. PMID:19513995

  16. Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling in Metabolic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Nies, Vera J. M.; Sancar, Gencer; Liu, Weilin; van Zutphen, Tim; Struik, Dicky; Yu, Ruth T.; Atkins, Annette R.; Evans, Ronald M.; Jonker, Johan W.; Downes, Michael Robert

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is a growing health problem. Obesity is strongly associated with several comorbidities, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, certain cancers, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, which all reduce life expectancy and life quality. Several drugs have been put forward in order to treat these diseases, but many of them have detrimental side effects. The unexpected role of the family of fibroblast growth factors in the regulation of energy metabolism provides new approaches to the treatment of metabolic diseases and offers a valuable tool to gain more insight into metabolic regulation. The known beneficial effects of FGF19 and FGF21 on metabolism, together with recently discovered similar effects of FGF1 suggest that FGFs and their derivatives carry great potential as novel therapeutics to treat metabolic conditions. To facilitate the development of new therapies with improved targeting and minimal side effects, a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of FGFs is needed. In this review, we will discuss what is currently known about the physiological roles of FGF signaling in tissues important for metabolic homeostasis. In addition, we will discuss current concepts regarding their pharmacological properties and effector tissues in the context of metabolic disease. Also, the recent progress in the development of FGF variants will be reviewed. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current concepts and consensuses regarding FGF signaling in metabolic health and disease and to provide starting points for the development of FGF-based therapies against metabolic conditions. PMID:26834701

  17. Regulation of Pollen Tube Growth by Transglutaminase

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Giampiero; Serafini-Fracassini, Donatella; Del Duca, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    In pollen tubes, cytoskeleton proteins are involved in many aspects of pollen germination and growth, from the transport of sperm cells to the asymmetrical distribution of organelles to the deposition of cell wall material. These activities are based on the dynamics of the cytoskeleton. Changes to both actin filaments and microtubules are triggered by specific proteins, resulting in different organization levels suitable for the different functions of the cytoskeleton. Transglutaminases are enzymes ubiquitous in all plant organs and cell compartments. They catalyze the post-translational conjugation of polyamines to different protein targets, such as the cytoskeleton. Transglutaminases are suggested to have a general role in the interaction between pollen tubes and the extracellular matrix during fertilization and a specific role during the self-incompatibility response. In such processes, the activity of transglutaminases is enhanced, leading to the formation of cross-linked products (including aggregates of tubulin and actin). Consequently, transglutaminases are suggested to act as regulators of cytoskeleton dynamics. The distribution of transglutaminases in pollen tubes is affected by both membrane dynamics and the cytoskeleton. Transglutaminases are also secreted in the extracellular matrix, where they may take part in the assembly and/or strengthening of the pollen tube cell wall. PMID:27137368

  18. Transcriptional regulation of secondary growth and wood formation.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Groover, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Secondary growth and wood formation are products of the vascular cambium, a lateral meristem. Although the mechanisms have only recently begun to be uncovered, transcriptional regulation appears increasingly central to the regulation of secondary growth. The importance of transcriptional regulation is illustrated by the correlation of expression of specific classes of genes with related biological processes occurring at specific stages of secondary growth, including cell division, cell expansion, and cell differentiation. At the same time, transcription factors have been characterized that affect specific aspects of secondary growth, including regulation of the cambium and differentiation of cambial daughter cells. In the present review, we summarize evidence pointing to transcription as a major mechanism for regulation of secondary growth, and outline future approaches for comprehensively describing transcriptional networks underlying secondary growth.

  19. A novel rare variant R292H in RTN4R affects growth cone formation and possibly contributes to schizophrenia susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Kimura, H; Fujita, Y; Kawabata, T; Ishizuka, K; Wang, C; Iwayama, Y; Okahisa, Y; Kushima, I; Morikawa, M; Uno, Y; Okada, T; Ikeda, M; Inada, T; Branko, A; Mori, D; Yoshikawa, T; Iwata, N; Nakamura, H; Yamashita, T; Ozaki, N

    2017-08-22

    Reticulon 4 receptor (RTN4R) plays an essential role in regulating axonal regeneration and plasticity in the central nervous system through the activation of rho kinase, and is located within chromosome 22q11.2, a region that is known to be a hotspot for schizophrenia (SCZ) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Recently, rare variants such as copy-number variants and single-nucleotide variants have been a focus of research because of their large effect size associated with increased susceptibility to SCZ and ASD and the possibility of elucidating the pathophysiology of mental disorder through functional analysis of the discovered rare variants. To discover rare variants with large effect size and to evaluate their role in the etiopathophysiology of SCZ and ASD, we sequenced the RTN4R coding exons with a sample comprising 370 SCZ and 192 ASD patients, and association analysis using a large number of unrelated individuals (1716 SCZ, 382 ASD and 4009 controls). Through this mutation screening, we discovered four rare (minor allele frequency <1%) missense mutations (R68H, D259N, R292H and V363M) of RTN4R. Among these discovered rare mutations, R292H was found to be significantly associated with SCZ (P=0.048). Furthermore, in vitro functional assays showed that the R292H mutation affected the formation of growth cones. This study strengthens the evidence for association between rare variants within RTN4R and SCZ, and may shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the neurodevelopmental disorder.

  20. Polar Cone

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-07-10

    This MOC image shows a cone-shaped hill, perhaps a remnant of a material that was once more laterally extensive across the area, on a textured plain in the Hyperboreus Labyrinthus region in the north polar region of Mars

  1. Chronic herbivory negatively impacts cone and seed production, seed quality and seedling growth of susceptible pinyon pines.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Rebecca C; Wade, Brian D; Gehring, Catherine A; Whitham, Thomas G

    2005-05-01

    Although herbivory often reduces the reproduction of attacked trees, few studies have examined how naturally occurring insect-resistant and susceptible trees differ in their reproduction, nor have these effects been experimentally examined through long-term herbivore removals. In addition, few studies have examined the effects of herbivory on the quality of seeds produced and the implications of reduced seed quality on seedling establishment. We evaluated the impact of chronic herbivory by the stem-boring moth, Dioryctria albovittella, on cone and seed production of the pinyon pine (Pinus edulis) during two mast years. Three patterns emerged. First, moth herbivory was associated with reductions in cone production, viable seed production and seed mass. Specifically, pinyons susceptible to moth attack had 93-95% lower cone production, and surviving cones produced 31-37% fewer viable seeds, resulting in a 96-97% reduction in whole tree viable seed production. In addition, surviving seeds from susceptible trees had 18% lower mass than resistant trees. Second, long-term experimental removal of the herbivore resulted in increased rates of cone and seed production and quality, indicating that moth herbivory was the driver of these reductions. Third, seed size was positively associated with seed germination and seedling biomass and height, suggesting that trees suffering chronic herbivory produce poorer quality offspring. Thus, the resistance traits of pinyons can affect the quality of offspring, which in turn may affect subsequent seedling establishment and population dynamics.

  2. Surface orientation affects the direction of cone growth by Leptolyngbya sp. strain C1, a likely architect of coniform structures Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park).

    PubMed

    Reyes, Kristina; Gonzalez, Nicolas I; Stewart, Joshua; Ospino, Frank; Nguyen, Dickie; Cho, David T; Ghahremani, Nahal; Spear, John R; Johnson, Hope A

    2013-02-01

    Laminated, microbially produced stromatolites within the rock record provide some of the earliest evidence for life on Earth. The chemical, physical, and biological factors that lead to the initiation of these organosedimentary structures and shape their morphology are unclear. Modern coniform structures with morphological features similar to stromatolites are found on the surface of cyanobacterial/microbial mats. They display a vertical element of growth, can have lamination, can be lithified, and observably grow with time. To begin to understand the microbial processes and interactions required for cone formation, we determined the phylogenetic composition of the microbial community of a coniform structure from a cyanobacterial mat at Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park, and reconstituted coniform structures in vitro. The 16S rRNA clone library from the coniform structure was dominated by Leptolyngbya sp. Other cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria were present in much lower abundance. The same Leptolyngbya sp. identified in the clone library was also enriched in the laboratory and could produce cones in vitro. When coniform structures were cultivated in the laboratory, the initial incubation conditions were found to influence coniform morphology. In addition, both the angle of illumination and the orientation of the surface affected the angle of cone formation demonstrating how external factors can influence coniform, and likely, stromatolite morphology.

  3. Surface Orientation Affects the Direction of Cone Growth by Leptolyngbya sp. Strain C1, a Likely Architect of Coniform Structures Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park)

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Kristina; Gonzalez, Nicolas I.; Stewart, Joshua; Ospino, Frank; Nguyen, Dickie; Cho, David T.; Ghahremani, Nahal; Spear, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Laminated, microbially produced stromatolites within the rock record provide some of the earliest evidence for life on Earth. The chemical, physical, and biological factors that lead to the initiation of these organosedimentary structures and shape their morphology are unclear. Modern coniform structures with morphological features similar to stromatolites are found on the surface of cyanobacterial/microbial mats. They display a vertical element of growth, can have lamination, can be lithified, and observably grow with time. To begin to understand the microbial processes and interactions required for cone formation, we determined the phylogenetic composition of the microbial community of a coniform structure from a cyanobacterial mat at Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park, and reconstituted coniform structures in vitro. The 16S rRNA clone library from the coniform structure was dominated by Leptolyngbya sp. Other cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria were present in much lower abundance. The same Leptolyngbya sp. identified in the clone library was also enriched in the laboratory and could produce cones in vitro. When coniform structures were cultivated in the laboratory, the initial incubation conditions were found to influence coniform morphology. In addition, both the angle of illumination and the orientation of the surface affected the angle of cone formation demonstrating how external factors can influence coniform, and likely, stromatolite morphology. PMID:23241986

  4. Endocrine Regulation of Compensatory Growth in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Won, Eugene T.; Borski, Russell J.

    2013-01-01

    Compensatory growth (CG) is a period of accelerated growth that occurs following the alleviation of growth-stunting conditions during which an organism can make up for lost growth opportunity and potentially catch up in size with non-stunted cohorts. Fish show a particularly robust capacity for the response and have been the focus of numerous studies that demonstrate their ability to compensate for periods of fasting once food is made available again. CG is characterized by an elevated growth rate resulting from enhanced feed intake, mitogen production, and feed conversion efficiency. Because little is known about the underlying mechanisms that drive the response, this review describes the sequential endocrine adaptations that lead to CG; namely during the precedent catabolic phase (fasting) that taps endogenous energy reserves, and the following hyperanabolic phase (refeeding) when accelerated growth occurs. In order to elicit a CG response, endogenous energy reserves must first be moderately depleted, which alters endocrine profiles that enhance appetite and growth potential. During this catabolic phase, elevated ghrelin and growth hormone (GH) production increase appetite and protein-sparing lipolysis, while insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are suppressed, primarily due to hepatic GH resistance. During refeeding, temporal hyperphagia provides an influx of energy and metabolic substrates that are then allocated to somatic growth by resumed IGF signaling. Under the right conditions, refeeding results in hyperanabolism and a steepened growth trajectory relative to constantly fed controls. The response wanes as energy reserves are re-accumulated and homeostasis is restored. We ascribe possible roles for select appetite and growth-regulatory hormones in the context of the prerequisite of these catabolic and hyperanabolic phases of the CG response in teleosts, with emphasis on GH, IGFs, cortisol, somatostatin, neuropeptide Y, ghrelin, and leptin. PMID:23847591

  5. Distinct roles for the two Rho GDP/GTP exchange factor domains of kalirin in regulation of neurite growth and neuronal morphology.

    PubMed

    Penzes, P; Johnson, R C; Kambampati, V; Mains, R E; Eipper, B A

    2001-11-01

    The actin cytoskeleton, essential for neuronal development, is regulated in part by small GTP binding proteins of the Rho subfamily. Kalirin-9, with two Rho subfamily-specific GDP/GTP exchange factor (GEF) domains, localizes to neurites and growth cones of primary cortical neurons. Kalirin-9 overexpression in cultured cortical neurons induces longer neurites and altered neuronal morphology. Expression of the first GEF domain alone results in drastically shortened axons and excessive growth cones, mediated by Rac1. Expression of the second GEF domain alone induces axonal over-elongation and abundant filopodial neurites, mediated by RhoA. Coordination of the actions of the individual GEF domains through their presence in Kalirin-9, with its Sec14p, spectrin, and Src homology domain 3 motifs, is essential for regulating neurite extension and neuronal morphology.

  6. Fast Turnover of L1 Adhesions in Neuronal Growth Cones Involving Both Surface Diffusion and Exo/Endocytosis of L1 Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Dequidt, Caroline; Danglot, Lydia; Alberts, Philipp; Galli, Thierry; Choquet, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the interplay between surface trafficking and binding dynamics of the immunoglobulin cell adhesion molecule L1 at neuronal growth cones. Primary neurons were transfected with L1 constructs bearing thrombin-cleavable green fluorescent protein (GFP), allowing visualization of newly exocytosed L1 or labeling of membrane L1 molecules by Quantum dots. Intracellular L1–GFP vesicles showed preferential centrifugal motion, whereas surface L1–GFP diffused randomly, revealing two pathways to address L1 to adhesive sites. We triggered L1 adhesions using microspheres coated with L1–Fc protein or anti-L1 antibodies, manipulated by optical tweezers. Microspheres coupled to the actin retrograde flow at the growth cone periphery while recruiting L1–GFP molecules, of which 50% relied on exocytosis. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments revealed a rapid recycling of L1–GFP molecules at L1–Fc (but not anti-L1) bead contacts, attributed to a high lability of L1–L1 bonds at equilibrium. L1–GFP molecules truncated in the intracellular tail as well as neuronal cell adhesion molecules (NrCAMs) missing the clathrin adaptor binding sequence showed both little internalization and reduced turnover rates, indicating a role of endocytosis in the recycling of mature L1 contacts at the base of the growth cone. Thus, unlike for other molecules such as NrCAM or N-cadherin, diffusion/trapping and exo/endocytosis events cooperate to allow the fast renewal of L1 adhesions. PMID:17538021

  7. The regulation of plant growth by the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Farré, E M

    2012-05-01

    Circadian regulated changes in growth rates have been observed in numerous plants as well as in unicellular and multicellular algae. The circadian clock regulates a multitude of factors that affect growth in plants, such as water and carbon availability and light and hormone signalling pathways. The combination of high-resolution growth rate analyses with mutant and biochemical analysis is helping us elucidate the time-dependent interactions between these factors and discover the molecular mechanisms involved. At the molecular level, growth in plants is modulated through a complex regulatory network, in which the circadian clock acts at multiple levels.

  8. Triennial Growth Symposium: Dietary regulation of growth development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The 2010 Triennial Growth Symposium was held immediately before the Joint Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association, Poultry Science Association, Asociación Mexicana de Producción Animal, Canadian Society of Animal Science, Western Section American Society of Animal Science, and Ameri...

  9. Symbiotic regulation of plant growth, development and reproduction

    Treesearch

    Russell J. Rodriguez; D. Carl Freeman; E. Durant McArthur; Yong Ok Kim; Regina S. Redman

    2009-01-01

    The growth and development of rice (Oryzae sativa) seedlings was shown to be regulated epigenetically by a fungal endophyte. In contrast to un-inoculated (nonsymbiotic) plants, endophyte colonized (symbiotic) plants preferentially allocated resources into root growth until root hairs were well established. During that time symbiotic roots expanded at...

  10. Growth Regulator Herbicides Prevent Invasive Annual Grass Seed Production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Auxinic herbicides, such as 2,4-D and dicamba, that act as plant growth regulators are commonly used for broadleaf weed control in cereal crops (e.g. wheat, barley), grasslands, and non-croplands. If applied at later growth stages, while cereals are developing reproductive parts, the herbicides can...

  11. ESCRT-II controls retinal axon growth by regulating DCC receptor levels and local protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Konopacki, Filip A; Wong, Hovy Ho-Wai; Dwivedy, Asha; Bellon, Anaïs; Blower, Michael D; Holt, Christine E

    2016-04-01

    Endocytosis and local protein synthesis (LPS) act coordinately to mediate the chemotropic responses of axons, but the link between these two processes is poorly understood. The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) is a key regulator of cargo sorting in the endocytic pathway, and here we have investigated the role of ESCRT-II, a critical ESCRT component, in Xenopus retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons. We show that ESCRT-II is present in RGC axonal growth cones (GCs) where it co-localizes with endocytic vesicle GTPases and, unexpectedly, with the Netrin-1 receptor, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC). ESCRT-II knockdown (KD) decreases endocytosis and, strikingly, reduces DCC in GCs and leads to axon growth and guidance defects. ESCRT-II-depleted axons fail to turn in response to a Netrin-1 gradient in vitro and many axons fail to exit the eye in vivo These defects, similar to Netrin-1/DCC loss-of-function phenotypes, can be rescued in whole (in vitro) or in part (in vivo) by expressing DCC. In addition, ESCRT-II KD impairs LPS in GCs and live imaging reveals that ESCRT-II transports mRNAs in axons. Collectively, our results show that the ESCRT-II-mediated endocytic pathway regulates both DCC and LPS in the axonal compartment and suggest that ESCRT-II aids gradient sensing in GCs by coupling endocytosis to LPS.

  12. Mechanical regulation of plant growth and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Soybean and eggplant grown and shaken in a greenhouse exhibited decreased internode length, internode diameter, leaf area, and fresh and dry weight of roots and shoots in much the same way as outdoor-exposed plants. Perhaps more important than decreased dimensions of plant parts resulting from periodic seismic treatment is the inhibition of photosynthetic productivity that accompanies this stress. Soybeam plants briefly shaken or rubbed twice daily experienced a decrease in relative as well as absolute growth rate compared to that of undisturbed controls. Growth dynamics analysis revealed that virtually all of the decline in relative growth rate (RGR) was due to a decline in net assimilation rate (NAR), but not in leaf area ratio (LAR). Lower NAR suggests that the stress-induced decrease in dry weight gain is due to a decline in photosynthetic efficiency. Possible effects on stomatal aperture was investigated by measuring rates of whole plant transpiration as a function of seismo-stress, and a transitory decrease followed by a gradual, partial recovery was detected.

  13. Mechanical regulation of plant growth and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Soybean and eggplant grown and shaken in a greenhouse exhibited decreased internode length, internode diameter, leaf area, and fresh and dry weight of roots and shoots in much the same way as outdoor-exposed plants. Perhaps more important than decreased dimensions of plant parts resulting from periodic seismic treatment is the inhibition of photosynthetic productivity that accompanies this stress. Soybeam plants briefly shaken or rubbed twice daily experienced a decrease in relative as well as absolute growth rate compared to that of undisturbed controls. Growth dynamics analysis revealed that virtually all of the decline in relative growth rate (RGR) was due to a decline in net assimilation rate (NAR), but not in leaf area ratio (LAR). Lower NAR suggests that the stress-induced decrease in dry weight gain is due to a decline in photosynthetic efficiency. Possible effects on stomatal aperture was investigated by measuring rates of whole plant transpiration as a function of seismo-stress, and a transitory decrease followed by a gradual, partial recovery was detected.

  14. Developmental mechanisms regulating secondary growth in woody plants.

    PubMed

    Groover, Andrew; Robischon, Marcel

    2006-02-01

    Secondary growth results in the radial expansion of woody stems, and requires the coordination of tissue patterning, cell differentiation, and the maintenance of meristematic stem cells within the vascular cambium. Advances are being made towards describing molecular mechanisms that regulate these developmental processes, thanks in part to the application of new genetic technologies to forest trees, and the extension of knowledge about evolutionarily conserved mechanisms from model annuals. New studies demonstrate a central role for developmental mechanisms that involve transcriptional regulators, phytohormones and the cell wall in regulating secondary growth.

  15. Light signaling and the phytohormonal regulation of shoot growth.

    PubMed

    Kurepin, Leonid V; Pharis, Richard P

    2014-12-01

    Shoot growth of dicot plants is rigorously controlled by the interactions of environmental cues with several groups of phytohormones. The signaling effects of light on shoot growth are of special interest, as both light irradiance and light quality change rapidly throughout the day, causing profound changes in stem elongation and leaf area growth. Among the several dicot species examined, we have focused on sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) because its shoots are robust and their growth is highly plastic. Sunflower shoots thus constitute an ideal tissue for assessing responses to both light irradiance and light quality signals. Herein, we discuss the possible roles of gibberellins, auxin, ethylene, cytokinins and brassinosteroids in mediating the stem elongation and leaf area growth that is induced by shade light. To do this we uncoupled the plant's responses to changes in the red to far-red [R/FR] light ratio from its responses to changes in irradiance of photosynthetically active radiation [PAR]. Reducing each of R/FR light ratio and PAR irradiance results in increased sunflower stem elongation. However, the plant's response for leaf area growth differs considerably, with a low R/FR ratio generally promoting leaf area growth, whereas low irradiance PAR inhibits it. The increased stem elongation that occurs in response to lowering R/FR ratio and PAR irradiance is accomplished at the expense of leaf area growth. In effect, the low PAR irradiance signal overrides the low R/FR ratio signal in shade light's control of leaf growth and development. Three hormone groups, gibberellins, auxin and ethylene are directly involved in regulating these light-mediated shoot growth changes. Gibberellins and auxin function as growth promoters, with auxin likely acting as an up-regulator of gibberellin biosynthesis. Ethylene functions as a growth-inhibitor and probably interacts with gibberellins in regulating both stem and leaf growth of the sunflower shoot. Copyright © 2014

  16. Regulation of plant growth by cytokinin

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Tomáš; Motyka, Václav; Strnad, Miroslav; Schmülling, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    Cytokinins are a class of plant-specific hormones that play a central role during the cell cycle and influence numerous developmental programs. Because of the lack of biosynthetic and signaling mutants, the regulatory roles of cytokinins are not well understood. We genetically engineered cytokinin oxidase expression in transgenic tobacco plants to reduce their endogenous cytokinin content. Cytokinin-deficient plants developed stunted shoots with smaller apical meristems. The plastochrone was prolonged, and leaf cell production was only 3–4% that of wild type, indicating an absolute requirement of cytokinins for leaf growth. In contrast, root meristems of transgenic plants were enlarged and gave rise to faster growing and more branched roots. These results suggest that cytokinins are an important regulatory factor of plant meristem activity and morphogenesis, with opposing roles in shoots and roots. PMID:11504909

  17. Recent research on the growth plate: Recent insights into the regulation of the growth plate.

    PubMed

    Lui, Julian C; Nilsson, Ola; Baron, Jeffrey

    2014-08-01

    For most bones, elongation is driven primarily by chondrogenesis at the growth plates. This process results from chondrocyte proliferation, hypertrophy, and extracellular matrix secretion, and it is carefully orchestrated by complex networks of local paracrine factors and modulated by endocrine factors. We review here recent advances in the understanding of growth plate physiology. These advances include new approaches to study expression patterns of large numbers of genes in the growth plate, using microdissection followed by microarray. This approach has been combined with genome-wide association studies to provide insights into the regulation of the human growth plate. We also review recent studies elucidating the roles of bone morphogenetic proteins, fibroblast growth factors, C-type natriuretic peptide, and suppressor of cytokine signaling in the local regulation of growth plate chondrogenesis and longitudinal bone growth.

  18. The neglected role of insulin-like growth factors in the maternal circulation regulating fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Sferruzzi-Perri, A N; Owens, J A; Pringle, K G; Roberts, C T

    2011-01-01

    Maternal insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) play a pivotal role in modulating fetal growth via their actions on both the mother and the placenta. Circulating IGFs influence maternal tissue growth and metabolism, thereby regulating nutrient availability for the growth of the conceptus. Maternal IGFs also regulate placental morphogenesis, substrate transport and hormone secretion, all of which influence fetal growth either via indirect effects on maternal substrate availability, or through direct effects on the placenta and its capacity to supply nutrients to the fetus. The extent to which IGFs influence the mother and/or placenta are dependent on the species and maternal factors, including age and nutrition. As altered fetal growth is associated with increased perinatal morbidity and mortality and a greater risk of developing degenerative diseases in adult life, understanding the role of maternal IGFs during pregnancy is essential in order to identify mechanisms underlying altered fetal growth and offspring programming.

  19. The neglected role of insulin-like growth factors in the maternal circulation regulating fetal growth

    PubMed Central

    Sferruzzi-Perri, A N; Owens, J A; Pringle, K G; Roberts, C T

    2011-01-01

    Maternal insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) play a pivotal role in modulating fetal growth via their actions on both the mother and the placenta. Circulating IGFs influence maternal tissue growth and metabolism, thereby regulating nutrient availability for the growth of the conceptus. Maternal IGFs also regulate placental morphogenesis, substrate transport and hormone secretion, all of which influence fetal growth either via indirect effects on maternal substrate availability, or through direct effects on the placenta and its capacity to supply nutrients to the fetus. The extent to which IGFs influence the mother and/or placenta are dependent on the species and maternal factors, including age and nutrition. As altered fetal growth is associated with increased perinatal morbidity and mortality and a greater risk of developing degenerative diseases in adult life, understanding the role of maternal IGFs during pregnancy is essential in order to identify mechanisms underlying altered fetal growth and offspring programming. PMID:20921199

  20. Regulation of intrinsic neuronal properties for axon growth and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Ferdinando; Gianola, Sara; Corvetti, Luigi

    2007-01-01

    Regulation of neuritic growth is crucial for neural development, adaptation and repair. The intrinsic growth potential of nerve cells is determined by the activity of specific molecular sets, which sense environmental signals and sustain structural extension of neurites. The expression and function of these molecules are dynamically regulated by multiple mechanisms, which adjust the actual growth properties of each neuron population at different ontogenetic stages or in specific conditions. The neuronal potential for axon elongation and regeneration are restricted at the end of development by the concurrent action of several factors associated with the final maturation of neurons and of the surrounding tissue. In the adult, neuronal growth properties can be significantly modulated by injury, but they are also continuously tuned in everyday life to sustain physiological plasticity. Strict regulation of structural remodelling and neuritic elongation is thought to be required to maintain specific patterns of connectivity in the highly complex mammalian CNS. Accordingly, procedures that neutralize such mechanisms effectively boost axon growth in both intact and injured nervous system. Even in these conditions, however, aberrant connections are only formed in the presence of unusual external stimuli or experience. Therefore, growth regulatory mechanisms play an essentially permissive role by setting the responsiveness of neural circuits to environmental stimuli. The latter exert an instructive action and determine the actual shape of newly formed connections. In the light of this notion, efficient therapeutic interventions in the injured CNS should combine targeted manipulations of growth control mechanisms with task-specific training and rehabilitation paradigms.

  1. Catecholamines promote Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae growth by regulating iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Chen, Zhaohui; Bei, Weicheng; Su, Zhipeng; Huang, Qi; Zhang, Liang; Chen, Huanchun; Zhou, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Catecholamines are host stress hormones that can induce the growth of many bacteria by facilitating iron utilization and/or regulate the expression of virulence genes through specific hormone receptors. Whether these two responsive pathways are interconnected is unknown. In our previous study, it was found that catecholamines can regulate the expression of a great number of genes of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, an important swine respiratory pathogen. However, bacterial growth was not affected by catecholamines in rich medium. In this study, it was discovered that catecholamines affected A. pleuropneumoniae growth in chemically defined medium (CDM). We found that serum inhibited A. pleuropneumoniae growth in CDM, while epinephrine, norepinephrine and dopamine promoted A. pleuropneumoniae growth in the CDM containing serum. The known bacterial hormone receptor QseC didn't play roles in this process. Ion-supplementation and transcriptome analysis indicated that serum addition resulted in iron-restricted conditions which were alleviated by the addition of catecholamines. Transferrin, one of the components in serum, inhibited the growth of A. pleuropneumoniae in CDM, an effect reversed by addition of catecholamines in a TonB2-dependent manner. Our data demonstrate that catecholamines promote A. pleuropneumoniae growth by regulating iron-acquisition and metabolism, which is independent of the adrenergic receptor QseC.

  2. Catecholamines Promote Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Growth by Regulating Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lu; Chen, Zhaohui; Bei, Weicheng; Su, Zhipeng; Huang, Qi; Zhang, Liang; Chen, Huanchun; Zhou, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Catecholamines are host stress hormones that can induce the growth of many bacteria by facilitating iron utilization and/or regulate the expression of virulence genes through specific hormone receptors. Whether these two responsive pathways are interconnected is unknown. In our previous study, it was found that catecholamines can regulate the expression of a great number of genes of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, an important swine respiratory pathogen. However, bacterial growth was not affected by catecholamines in rich medium. In this study, it was discovered that catecholamines affected A. pleuropneumoniae growth in chemically defined medium (CDM). We found that serum inhibited A. pleuropneumoniae growth in CDM, while epinephrine, norepinephrine and dopamine promoted A. pleuropneumoniae growth in the CDM containing serum. The known bacterial hormone receptor QseC didn’t play roles in this process. Ion-supplementation and transcriptome analysis indicated that serum addition resulted in iron-restricted conditions which were alleviated by the addition of catecholamines. Transferrin, one of the components in serum, inhibited the growth of A. pleuropneumoniae in CDM, an effect reversed by addition of catecholamines in a TonB2-dependent manner. Our data demonstrate that catecholamines promote A. pleuropneumoniae growth by regulating iron-acquisition and metabolism, which is independent of the adrenergic receptor QseC. PMID:25849041

  3. The Growth Hormone Secretagogue Receptor: Its Intracellular Signaling and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yue; Li, Yin; Zhang, Weizhen

    2014-01-01

    The growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), also known as the ghrelin receptor, is involved in mediating a wide variety of biological effects of ghrelin, including: stimulation of growth hormone release, increase of food intake and body weight, modulation of glucose and lipid metabolism, regulation of gastrointestinal motility and secretion, protection of neuronal and cardiovascular cells, and regulation of immune function. Dependent on the tissues and cells, activation of GHSR may trigger a diversity of signaling mechanisms and subsequent distinct physiological responses. Distinct regulation of GHSR occurs at levels of transcription, receptor interaction and internalization. Here we review the current understanding on the intracellular signaling pathways of GHSR and its modulation. An overview of the molecular structure of GHSR is presented first, followed by the discussion on its signaling mechanisms. Finally, potential mechanisms regulating GHSR are reviewed. PMID:24651458

  4. Differential methylation during maize leaf growth targets developmentally regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Candaele, Jasper; Demuynck, Kirin; Mosoti, Douglas; Beemster, Gerrit T S; Inzé, Dirk; Nelissen, Hilde

    2014-03-01

    DNA methylation is an important and widespread epigenetic modification in plant genomes, mediated by DNA methyltransferases (DMTs). DNA methylation is known to play a role in genome protection, regulation of gene expression, and splicing and was previously associated with major developmental reprogramming in plants, such as vernalization and transition to flowering. Here, we show that DNA methylation also controls the growth processes of cell division and cell expansion within a growing organ. The maize (Zea mays) leaf offers a great tool to study growth processes, as the cells progressively move through the spatial gradient encompassing the division zone, transition zone, elongation zone, and mature zone. Opposite to de novo DMTs, the maintenance DMTs were transcriptionally regulated throughout the growth zone of the maize leaf, concomitant with differential CCGG methylation levels in the four zones. Surprisingly, the majority of differentially methylated sequences mapped on or close to gene bodies and not to repeat-rich loci. Moreover, especially the 5' and 3' regions of genes, which show overall low methylation levels, underwent differential methylation in a developmental context. Genes involved in processes such as chromatin remodeling, cell cycle progression, and growth regulation, were differentially methylated. The presence of differential methylation located upstream of the gene anticorrelated with transcript expression, while gene body differential methylation was unrelated to the expression level. These data indicate that DNA methylation is correlated with the decision to exit mitotic cell division and to enter cell expansion, which adds a new epigenetic level to the regulation of growth processes.

  5. GENERALIZED CONVEXITY CONES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Introduction The dual cone of C (psi sub 1,..., psi sub n) Extreme rays The cone dual to an intersection of generalized convexity cones... Generalized difference quotients and multivariate convexity Miscellaneous applications of generalized convexity.

  6. Insulin signaling regulates neurite growth during metamorphic neuronal remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Tingting; Zhao, Tao; Hewes, Randall S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Although the growth capacity of mature neurons is often limited, some neurons can shift through largely unknown mechanisms from stable maintenance growth to dynamic, organizational growth (e.g. to repair injury, or during development transitions). During insect metamorphosis, many terminally differentiated larval neurons undergo extensive remodeling, involving elimination of larval neurites and outgrowth and elaboration of adult-specific projections. Here, we show in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen), that a metamorphosis-specific increase in insulin signaling promotes neuronal growth and axon branching after prolonged stability during the larval stages. FOXO, a negative effector in the insulin signaling pathway, blocked metamorphic growth of peptidergic neurons that secrete the neuropeptides CCAP and bursicon. RNA interference and CCAP/bursicon cell-targeted expression of dominant-negative constructs for other components of the insulin signaling pathway (InR, Pi3K92E, Akt1, S6K) also partially suppressed the growth of the CCAP/bursicon neuron somata and neurite arbor. In contrast, expression of wild-type or constitutively active forms of InR, Pi3K92E, Akt1, Rheb, and TOR, as well as RNA interference for negative regulators of insulin signaling (PTEN, FOXO), stimulated overgrowth. Interestingly, InR displayed little effect on larval CCAP/bursicon neuron growth, in contrast to its strong effects during metamorphosis. Manipulations of insulin signaling in many other peptidergic neurons revealed generalized growth stimulation during metamorphosis, but not during larval development. These findings reveal a fundamental shift in growth control mechanisms when mature, differentiated neurons enter a new phase of organizational growth. Moreover, they highlight strong evolutionarily conservation of insulin signaling in neuronal growth regulation. PMID:24357229

  7. N-cadherin regulates primary motor axons growth and branching during zebrafish embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Brusés, Juan L

    2013-01-01

    N-cadherin is a classical type I cadherin that contributes to the formation of neural circuits by regulating growth cone migration and the formation of synaptic contacts. This study analyzed the role of N-cadherin in primary motor axons growth during development of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo. After exiting the spinal cord, primary motor axons migrate ventrally through a common pathway and form the first neuromuscular junction with the muscle pioneer cells located at the horizontal myoseptum, which serves as a choice point for cell-type specific pathway selection. Analysis of N-cadherin mutants (cdh2hi3644Tg) and embryos injected with N-cadherin antisense morpholinos showed primary motor axons extending aberrant axonal branches at the choice point in ~40% of the somitic hemisegments, and an ~150% increase in the number of branches per axon length within the ventral myotome. Analysis of individual axons trajectories showed that the caudal (CaP) and rostral (RoP) motor neurons axons formed aberrant branches at the choice point which abnormally extended in the rostrocaudal axis and ventrally to the horizontal myoseptum. Expression of a dominant-interfering N-cadherin cytoplasmic domain in primary motor neurons caused some axons to abnormally stall at the horizontal myoseptum and to impair their migration into the ventral myotome. However, in N-cadherin depleted embryos the majority of primary motor axons innervated their appropriate myotomal territories indicating that N-cadherin regulates motor axon growth and branching without severely affecting the mechanisms that control axonal target selection. PMID:21452216

  8. Endogenous versus Exogenous Growth Factor Regulation of Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shuiliang; Chan, Albert G.; Mercer, Scott; Eckert, George J.; Trippel, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Anabolic growth factors that regulate the function of articular chondrocytes are candidates for articular cartilage repair. Such factors may be delivered by pharmacotherapy in the form of exogenous proteins, or by gene therapy as endogenous proteins. It is unknown whether delivery method influences growth factor effectiveness in regulating articular chondrocyte reparative functions. We treated adult bovine articular chondrocytes with exogenous recombinant insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1), or with the genes encoding these growth factors for endogenous production. Treatment effects were measured as change in chondrocyte DNA content, glycosaminoglycan production, and aggrecan gene expression. We found that IGF-I stimulated chondrocyte biosynthesis similarly when delivered by either exogenous or endogenous means. In contrast, exogenous TGF-ß1 stimulated these reparative functions, while endogenous TGF-ß1 had little effect. Endogenous TGF-ß1 became more bioactive following activation of the transgene protein product. These data indicate that effective mechanisms of growth factor delivery for articular cartilage repair may differ for different growth factors. In the case of IGF-I, gene therapy or protein therapy appear to be viable options. In contrast, TGF-ß1 gene therapy may be constrained by a limited ability of chondrocytes to convert latent complexes to an active form. PMID:24105960

  9. Substrate and nutrient limitation regulating microbial growth in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bååth, Erland

    2015-04-01

    Microbial activity and growth in soil is regulated by several abiotic factors, including temperature, moisture and pH as the most important ones. At the same time nutrient conditions and substrate availability will also determine microbial growth. Amount of substrate will not only affect overall microbial growth, but also affect the balance of fungal and bacterial growth. The type of substrate will also affect the latter. Furthermore, according to Liebig law of limiting factors, we would expect one nutrient to be the main limiting one for microbial growth in soil. When this nutrient is added, the initial second liming factor will become the main one, adding complexity to the microbial response after adding different substrates. I will initially describe different ways of determining limiting factors for bacterial growth in soil, especially a rapid method estimating bacterial growth, using the leucine incorporation technique, after adding C (as glucose), N (as ammonium nitrate) and P (as phosphate). Scenarios of different limitations will be covered, with the bacterial growth response compared with fungal growth and total activity (respiration). The "degree of limitation", as well as the main limiting nutrient, can be altered by adding substrate of different stoichiometric composition. However, the organism group responding after alleviating the nutrient limitation can differ depending on the type of substrate added. There will also be situations, where fungi and bacteria appear to be limited by different nutrients. Finally, I will describe interactions between abiotic factors and the response of the soil microbiota to alleviation of limiting factors.

  10. Cyp26b1 within the growth plate regulates bone growth in juvenile mice

    SciTech Connect

    Minegishi, Yoshiki; Sakai, Yasuo; Yahara, Yasuhito; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Hosokawa, Ko; Tsumaki, Noriyuki

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Retinoic acid and Cyp26b1 were oppositely localized in growth plate cartilage. • Cyp26b1 deletion in chondrocytes decreased bone growth in juvenile mice. • Cyp26b1 deletion reduced chondrocyte proliferation and growth plate height. • Vitamin A-depletion partially reversed growth plate abnormalities caused by Cyp26b1 deficiency. • Cyp26b1 regulates bone growth by controlling chondrocyte proliferation. - Abstract: Retinoic acid (RA) is an active metabolite of vitamin A and plays important roles in embryonic development. CYP26 enzymes degrade RA and have specific expression patterns that produce a RA gradient, which regulates the patterning of various structures in the embryo. However, it has not been addressed whether a RA gradient also exists and functions in organs after birth. We found localized RA activities in the diaphyseal portion of the growth plate cartilage were associated with the specific expression of Cyp26b1 in the epiphyseal portion in juvenile mice. To disturb the distribution of RA, we generated mice lacking Cyp26b1 specifically in chondrocytes (Cyp26b1{sup Δchon} cKO). These mice showed reduced skeletal growth in the juvenile stage. Additionally, their growth plate cartilage showed decreased proliferation rates of proliferative chondrocytes, which was associated with a reduced height in the zone of proliferative chondrocytes, and closed focally by four weeks of age, while wild-type mouse growth plates never closed. Feeding the Cyp26b1 cKO mice a vitamin A-deficient diet partially reversed these abnormalities of the growth plate cartilage. These results collectively suggest that Cyp26b1 in the growth plate regulates the proliferation rates of chondrocytes and is responsible for the normal function of the growth plate and growing bones in juvenile mice, probably by limiting the RA distribution in the growth plate proliferating zone.

  11. Evaluation of maxillary sinus volume and dimensions in different vertical face growth patterns: a study of cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Okşayan, Rıdvan; Sökücü, Oral; Yeşildal, Seher

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to compare sinus volume and dimensions in patients with high-, low-, and normal-angle vertical growth patterns using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). According to skeletal vertical face growth patterns, 60 adults (31 female, 29 male, average age: 29.90 ± 10.91 years) were divided into three groups equally: high-angle, low-angle, and normal-angle groups. Cephalometric tracings were obtained from CBCT images and SN-GoGn (angle between Sella-Nasion line and Gonion-Gnathion line) cephalometric angular measurements used for the classification of skeletal vertical pattern evaluations. Morphological and dimensional changes in the maxillary sinuses were evaluated on CBCT images. Data were analyzed using the one-way ANOVA, Kruskall-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney U statistical tests. There were no statistically significant differences among the groups in terms of age (p > .05). The low-angle vertical growth pattern group showed significantly better results than the high-angle group in the right maxillary sinus length parameter (p < .05). According to the results, the high-angle subjects showed statistically lower values in terms of maxillary sinus length and width than the low-angle subjects. There were no effects of vertical face development on right and left maxillary sinus volumes. The results of this study may be useful in maxillary sinus evaluation when planning for orthognathic surgery and orthodontic mini screw application in various vertical face patterns.

  12. Developmental mechanisms regulating secondary growth in woody plants

    Treesearch

    Andrew Groover; Marcel Robischon

    2006-01-01

    Secondary growth results in the radial expansion of woody stems, and requires the coordination of tissue patterning, cell differentiation, and the maintenance of meristematic stem cells within the vascular cambium. Advances are being made towards describing molecular mechanisms that regulate these developmental processes, thanks in part to the application of new...

  13. Heparin localization and fine structure regulate Burkitt's lymphoma growth

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, David; Lynn, David M.; Berry, Eric; Sasisekharan, Ram; Langer, Robert . E-mail: rlanger@mit.edu

    2006-09-29

    Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is a B-cell malignancy associated with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Mounting evidence has implicated heparan sulfate proteoglycans and heparan sulfate-like glycosaminoglycans (HSGAGs) in the initiation, severity, and progression of the malignancy. The importance of HSGAGs in regulating BL cell growth was therefore examined. Extracellular exogenous heparin inhibited cell growth >30%, while heparin internalized with poly({beta}-amino ester)s promoted proliferation up to 58%. The growth-modulating effects of heparin and internalized heparin were dependent on cell surface HSGAGs, PI3K, and Erk/Mek. Treatment of cells with protamine sulfate or with heparinases potently inhibited proliferation, with the greatest effects induced by heparinase I. Cell surface HSGAGs therefore play an important role in regulating BL proliferation and may offer a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  14. HMGCR positively regulated the growth and migration of glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhihua; Yuan, Wen; Chen, Tao; Zhou, Chenzhi; Liu, Chao; Huang, Yongkai; Han, Deqing; Huang, Qinghui

    2016-01-15

    The metabolic program of cancer cells is significant different from the normal cells, which makes it possible to develop novel strategies targeting cancer cells. Mevalonate pathway and its rate-limiting enzyme HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR) have shown important roles in the progression of several cancer types. However, their roles in glioblastoma cells remain unknown. In this study, up-regulation of HMGCR in the clinical glioblastoma samples was observed. Forced expression of HMGCR promoted the growth and migration of U251 and U373 cells, while knocking down the expression of HMGCR inhibited the growth, migration and metastasis of glioblastoma cells. Molecular mechanism studies revealed that HMGCR positively regulated the expression of TAZ, an important mediator of Hippo pathway, and the downstream target gene connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), suggesting HMGCR might activate Hippo pathway in glioblastoma cells. Taken together, our study demonstrated the oncogenic roles of HMGCR in glioblastoma cells and HMGCR might be a promising therapeutic target.

  15. Effects of plant growth regulators on the growth and lipid accumulation of Nannochloropsis oculata (droop) Hibberd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Cam Tu; Tran, Thanh Huong; Bui, Trang Viet

    2017-09-01

    Nannochloropsis oculata cells were grown in f/2 modified medium of Chiu et al. (2009) supplemented with the plant growth regulators in different concentrations. Lipid accumulation of N. oculata cells was evaluated by using Nile Red dye and Fiji Image J with Analyze Particles. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) stimulated the increase of cell density in rapid growth phase (day 6) at high concentration (0.75 mg/L) and in slow growth phase (day 10) at lower concentration (0.50 mg/L). IAA, gibberellic acid (GA3) and zeatin increased content of chlorophyll a, in particular, in f/2 modified medium supplemented with 0.5 mg/L zeatin at the 10th day of culture. Roles of plant growth regulators in growth and lipid accumulation of N. oculata were discussed.

  16. Cone calorimeter evaluation of wood products

    Treesearch

    Robert H. White; Mark A. Dietenberger

    2004-01-01

    The Forest Products Laboratory uses the cone calorimeter for the initial evaluation of the flammability of untreated and fire retardant treated wood products. The results of various studies are reviewed using a model presented at the 12th Annual BBC Conference on Flame Retardancy. The model uses data from the cone calorimeter to provide measures of fire growth...

  17. Effects of the plant growth regulator, chlormequat, on mammalian fertility.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Martin T; Danielsen, Viggo

    2006-02-01

    This paper summarizes the consequences of exposure to chlormequat, a plant growth regulator, on reproduction in mammals. Plant growth regulators are chemicals used to manipulate plant growth, flowering and fruit yield. In grain crops, plant growth regulators are applied to promote sturdier growth and reduce the risk of lodging. Chlormequat is the most common plant growth regulator. Maximum residue limits of chlormequat in food products are 10 mg/kg in oat and pear, 3 mg/kg in wheat and rye, and 0.5 mg/kg in milk. In Denmark, results from experiments with pigs in the late 1980s showed sows that display impaired reproduction, mainly impaired oestrus, when fed grain from crop treated with chlormequat. Subsequently, the advisory body to the Danish pig industry recommended limiting the use of grain (maximum 30% of diet energy) from crop treated with chlormequat given to breeding stock due to the risk of reproduction problems. More recently, experiments have been conducted to evaluate the influence of chlormequat-treated wheat crop on reproductive function in male and female mice. These experiments showed that epididymal spermatozoa from mice on feed or water containing chlormequat had compromised fertilizing competence in vitro, while reproduction in female mice was not compromised. The estimated intake of chlormequat in the pig (0.0023 mg/kg bw/day) and the mouse (0.024 mg/kg bw/day) experiments was below the acceptable daily intake of 0.05 mg/kg bw/day. Reports from the industry do not show any effects at these low levels.

  18. Smad4 regulates growth plate matrix production and chondrocyte polarity

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Amanda T.; Berthet, Ellora; Cantu, Andrea; Laird, Diana J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Smad4 is an intracellular effector of the TGFβ family that has been implicated in Myhre syndrome, a skeletal dysplasia characterized by short stature, brachydactyly and stiff joints. The TGFβ pathway also plays a critical role in the development, organization and proliferation of the growth plate, although the exact mechanisms remain unclear. Skeletal phenotypes in Myhre syndrome overlap with processes regulated by the TGFβ pathway, including organization and proliferation of the growth plate and polarity of the chondrocyte. We used in vitro and in vivo models of Smad4 deficiency in chondrocytes to test the hypothesis that deregulated TGFβ signaling leads to aberrant extracellular matrix production and loss of chondrocyte polarity. Specifically, we evaluated growth plate chondrocyte polarity in tibiae of Col2-Cre+/−;Smad4fl/fl mice and in chondrocyte pellet cultures. In vitro and in vivo, Smad4 deficiency decreased aggrecan expression and increased MMP13 expression. Smad4 deficiency disrupted the balance of cartilage matrix synthesis and degradation, even though the sequential expression of growth plate chondrocyte markers was intact. Chondrocytes in Smad4-deficient growth plates also showed evidence of polarity defects, with impaired proliferation and ability to undergo the characteristic changes in shape, size and orientation as they differentiated from resting to hypertrophic chondrocytes. Therefore, we show that Smad4 controls chondrocyte proliferation, orientation, and hypertrophy and is important in regulating the extracellular matrix composition of the growth plate. PMID:28167493

  19. Ethylene signaling and regulation in plant growth and stress responses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feifei; Cui, Xiankui; Sun, Yue; Dong, Chun-Hai

    2013-07-01

    Gaseous phytohormone ethylene affects many aspects of plant growth and development. The ethylene signaling pathway starts when ethylene binds to its receptors. Since the cloning of the first ethylene receptor ETR1 from Arabidopsis, a large number of studies have steadily improved our understanding of the receptors and downstream components in ethylene signal transduction pathway. This article reviews the regulation of ethylene receptors, signal transduction, and the posttranscriptional modulation of downstream components. Functional roles and importance of the ethylene signaling components in plant growth and stress responses are also discussed. Cross-reactions of ethylene with auxin and other phytohormones in plant organ growth will be analyzed. The studies of ethylene signaling in plant growth, development, and stress responses in the past decade greatly advanced our knowledge of how plants respond to endogenous signals and environmental factors.

  20. BMP signaling regulates satellite cell-dependent postnatal muscle growth.

    PubMed

    Stantzou, Amalia; Schirwis, Elija; Swist, Sandra; Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Polydorou, Ioanna; Zarrouki, Faouzi; Mouisel, Etienne; Beley, Cyriaque; Julien, Anaïs; Le Grand, Fabien; Garcia, Luis; Colnot, Céline; Birchmeier, Carmen; Braun, Thomas; Schuelke, Markus; Relaix, Frédéric; Amthor, Helge

    2017-08-01

    Postnatal growth of skeletal muscle largely depends on the expansion and differentiation of resident stem cells, the so-called satellite cells. Here, we demonstrate that postnatal satellite cells express components of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling machinery. Overexpression of noggin in postnatal mice (to antagonize BMP ligands), satellite cell-specific knockout of Alk3 (the gene encoding the BMP transmembrane receptor) or overexpression of inhibitory SMAD6 decreased satellite cell proliferation and accretion during myofiber growth, and ultimately retarded muscle growth. Moreover, reduced BMP signaling diminished the adult satellite cell pool. Abrogation of BMP signaling in satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts strongly diminished cell proliferation and upregulated the expression of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p57 In conclusion, these results show that BMP signaling defines postnatal muscle development by regulating satellite cell-dependent myofiber growth and the generation of the adult muscle stem cell pool. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Whiskers, cones and pyramids created in sputtering by ion bombardment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehner, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    A thorough study of the role which foreign atoms play in cone formation during sputtering of metals revealed many experimental facts. Two types of cone formation were distinquished, deposit cones and seed cones. Twenty-six combinations of metals for seed cone formation were tested. The sputtering yield variations with composition for combinations which form seed cones were measured. It was demonstrated that whisker growth becomes a common occurrence when low melting point material is sputter deposited on a hot nonsputtered high melting point electrode.

  2. Netrin-4 regulates angiogenic responses and tumor cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Nacht, Mariana; St Martin, Thia B.; Byrne, Ann; Klinger, Katherine W.; Teicher, Beverly A.; Madden, Stephen L. Jiang, Yide

    2009-03-10

    Netrin-4 is a 628 amino acid basement membrane component that promotes neurite elongation at low concentrations but inhibits neurite extension at high concentrations. There is a growing body of literature suggesting that several molecules, including netrins, are regulators of both neuronal and vascular growth. It is believed that molecules that guide neural growth and development are also involved in regulating morphogenesis of the vascular tree. Further, netrins have recently been implicated in controlling epithelial cell branching morphogenesis in the breast, lung and pancreas. Characterization of purified netrin-4 in in vitro angiogenesis assays demonstrated that netrin-4 markedly inhibits HMVEC migration and tube formation. Moreover, netrin-4 inhibits proliferation of a variety of human tumor cells in vitro. Netrin-4 has only modest effects on proliferation of endothelial and other non-transformed cells. Netrin-4 treatment results in phosphorylation changes of proteins that are known to control cell growth. Specifically, Phospho-Akt-1, Phospho-Jnk-2, and Phospho-c-Jun are reduced in tumor cells that have been treated with netrin-4. Together, these data suggest a potential role for netrin-4 in regulating tumor growth.

  3. Myostatin regulates cardiomyocyte growth through modulation of Akt signaling.

    PubMed

    Morissette, Michael R; Cook, Stuart A; Foo, ShiYin; McKoy, Godfrina; Ashida, Noboru; Novikov, Mikhail; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Li, Ling; Matsui, Takashi; Brooks, Gavin; Rosenzweig, Anthony

    2006-07-07

    Myostatin is a highly conserved, potent negative regulator of skeletal muscle hypertrophy in many species, from rodents to humans, although its mechanisms of action are incompletely understood. Transcript profiling of hearts from a genetic model of cardiac hypertrophy revealed dramatic upregulation of myostatin, not previously recognized to play a role in the heart. Here we show that myostatin abrogates the cardiomyocyte growth response to phenylephrine in vitro through inhibition of p38 and the serine-threonine kinase Akt, a critical determinant of cell size in many species from drosophila to mammals. Evaluation of male myostatin-null mice revealed that their cardiomyocytes and hearts overall were slightly smaller at baseline than littermate controls but exhibited more exuberant growth in response to chronic phenylephrine infusion. The increased cardiac growth in myostatin-null mice corresponded with increased p38 phosphorylation and Akt activation in vivo after phenylephrine treatment. Together, these data demonstrate that myostatin is dynamically regulated in the heart and acts more broadly than previously appreciated to regulate growth of multiple types of striated muscle.

  4. The Super-Cone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fülöp, Zsolt

    2009-01-01

    Using the concept of exploded and compressed numbers the author constructs the supercone which is able to turn upon the border of three dimensional space and breaks through it. The introduction of super-cone gives a possibility for students to see the properties of traditional cone while the super-cone is not a traditional cone. Moreover we show…

  5. Motility flow and growth-cone navigation analysis during in vitro neuronal development by long-term bright-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Aviv, Maya Shalev; Pesce, Mattia; Tilve, Sharada; Chieregatti, Evelina; Zalevsky, Zeev; Difato, Francesco

    2013-11-01

    A long-term live-imaging workstation to follow the development of cultured neurons during the first few days in vitro (DIV) is developed. In order to monitor neuronal polarization and axonal growth by live imaging, we built a micro-incubator system that provides stable temperature, pH, and osmolarity in the culture dish under the microscope, while preserving environment sterility. We are able to image living neurons at 2 DIVs for 48 h with a temporal resolution of one frame for every 2 min. The main features of this system are its ability to adapt to every cell-culture support, to integrate in any optical microscope, because of the relatively small dimensions (9.5×6.5×2.5  cm) and low weight of the system (<200  g), and to monitor the physiological parameters in situ. Moreover, we developed an image-analysis algorithm to quantify the cell motility, in order to characterize its complex temporal-spatial pattern. The algorithm applies morphological image processing operations on the temporal variations occurring in the inspected region of interest. Here, it is used to automatically detect cellular motility in three distinct morphological regions of the neurons: around the soma, along the neurites, and in the growth cone.

  6. Bacterial gene regulation in diauxic and non-diauxic growth.

    PubMed

    Narang, Atul; Pilyugin, Sergei S

    2007-01-21

    When bacteria are grown in a batch culture containing a mixture of two growth-limiting substrates, they exhibit a rich spectrum of substrate consumption patterns including diauxic growth, simultaneous consumption, and bistable growth. In previous work, we showed that a minimal model accounting only for enzyme induction and dilution captures all the substrate consumption patterns [Narang, A., 1998a. The dynamical analogy between microbial growth on mixtures of substrates and population growth of competing species. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 59, 116-121, Narang, A., 2006. Comparitive analysis of some models of gene regulation in mixed-substrate microbial growth, J. Theor. Biol. 242, 489-501]. In this work, we construct the bifurcation diagram of the minimal model, which shows the substrate consumption pattern at any given set of parameter values. The bifurcation diagram explains several general properties of mixed-substrate growth. (1) In almost all the cases of diauxic growth, the "preferred" substrate is the one that, by itself, supports a higher specific growth rate. In the literature, this property is often attributed to the optimality of regulatory mechanisms. Here, we show that the minimal model, which accounts for induction and growth only, displays the property under fairly general conditions. This suggests that the higher growth rate of the preferred substrate is an intrinsic property of the induction and dilution kinetics. It can be explained mechanistically without appealing to optimality principles. (2) The model explains the phenotypes of various mutants containing lesions in the regions encoding for the operator, repressor, and peripheral enzymes. A particularly striking phenotype is the "reversal of the diauxie" in which the wild-type and mutant strains consume the very same two substrates in opposite order. This phenotype is difficult to explain in terms of molecular mechanisms, such as inducer exclusion or CAP activation, but it turns out to be a natural

  7. Maternal growth factor regulation of human placental development and fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Karen; Westwood, Melissa

    2010-10-01

    Normal development and function of the placenta is critical to achieving a successful pregnancy, as normal fetal growth depends directly on the transfer of nutrients from mother to fetus via this organ. Recently, it has become apparent from both animal and human studies that growth factors within the maternal circulation, for example the IGFs, are important regulators of placental development and function. Although these factors act via distinct receptors to exert their effects, the downstream molecules activated upon ligand/receptor interaction are common to many growth factors. The expression of numerous signaling molecules is altered in the placentas from pregnancies affected by the fetal growth complications, fetal growth restriction, and macrosomia. Thus, targeting these molecules may lead to more effective treatments for complications of pregnancy associated with altered placental development. Here, we review the maternal growth factors required for placental development and discuss their mechanism of action.

  8. Plant growth regulators enhance gold uptake in Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Manoj G; Stirk, Wendy A; Southway, Colin; Papenfus, Heino B; Swart, Pierre A; Lux, Alexander; Vaculík, Marek; Martinka, Michal; Van Staden, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    The use of plant growth regulators is well established and they are used in many fields of plant science for enhancing growth. Brassica juncea plants were treated with 2.5, 5.0 and 7.5 microM auxin indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), which promotes rooting. The IBA-treated plants were also sprayed with 100 microM gibberellic acid (GA3) and kinetin (Kin) to increase leaf-foliage. Gold (I) chloride (AuCl) was added to the growth medium of plants to achieve required gold concentration. The solubilizing agent ammonium thiocyanate (1 g kg(-1)) (commonly used in mining industries to solubilize gold) was added to the nutrient solution after six weeks of growth and, two weeks later, plants were harvested. Plant growth regulators improved shoot and root dry biomass of B. juncea plants. Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry analysis showed the highest Au uptake for plants treated with 5.0 microM IBA. The average recovery of Au with this treatment was significantly greater than the control treatment by 45.8 mg kg(-1) (155.7%). The other IBA concentrations (2.5 and 7.5 microM) also showed a significant increase in Au uptake compared to the control plants by 14.7 mg kg(-1) (50%) and 42.5 mg kg(-1) (144.5%) respectively. A similar trend of Au accumulation was recorded in the roots of B. juncea plants. This study conducted in solution culture suggests that plant growth regulators can play a significant role in improving phytoextraction of Au.

  9. Interactions between fibroblast growth factors and Notch regulate neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Faux, C H; Turnley, A M; Epa, R; Cappai, R; Bartlett, P F

    2001-08-01

    The differentiation of precursor cells into neurons has been shown to be influenced by both the Notch signaling pathway and growth factor stimulation. In this study, the regulation of neuronal differentiation by these mechanisms was examined in the embryonic day 10 neuroepithelial precursor (NEP) population. By downregulating Notch1 expression and by the addition of a Delta1 fusion protein (Delta Fc), it was shown that signaling via the Notch pathway inhibited neuron differentiation in the NEP cells, in vitro. The expression of two of the Notch receptor homologs, Notch1 and Notch3, and the ligand Delta1 in these NEP cells was found to be influenced by a number of different growth factors, indicating a potential interaction between growth factors and Notch signaling. Interestingly, none of the growth factors examined promoted neuron differentiation; however, the fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) 1 and 2 potently inhibited differentiation. FGF1 and FGF2 upregulated the expression of Notch and decreased expression of Delta1 in the NEP cells. In addition, the inhibitory response of the cells to the FGFs could be overcome by downregulating Notch1 expression and by disrupting Notch cleavage and signaling by the ablation of the Presenilin1 gene. These results indicate that FGF1 and FGF2 act via the Notch pathway, either directly or indirectly, to inhibit differentiation. Thus, signaling through the Notch receptor may be a common regulator of neuronal differentiation within the developing forebrain.

  10. Suppression of colorectal tumor growth by regulated survivin targeting.

    PubMed

    Li, Binghua; Fan, Junkai; Liu, Xinran; Qi, Rong; Bo, Linan; Gu, Jinfa; Qian, Cheng; Liu, Xinyuan

    2006-12-01

    A major goal in cancer gene therapy is to develop efficient gene transfer protocols that allow tissue-specific and tightly regulated expression of therapeutic genes. The ideal vector should efficiently transduce cancer cells with minimal toxicity on normal tissues and persistently express foreign genes. One of the most promising regulatory systems is the mifepristone/RU486-regulated system, which has much lower basal transcriptional activity and high inducibility. In this work, we modified this system by incorporating a cancer-specific promoter, the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter. By utilizing hTERT promoter to control the regulator, RU486 could specifically induce the expression of foreign genes in cancer cells but not in normal cells. In the context of this system, a dominant negative mutant of survivin (surDN) was controllably expressed in colorectal tumor cells. The surDN expression induced by RU486 showed a dosage- and time-dependent pattern. Regulated expression of surDN caused caspase-dependent apoptosis in colorectal tumor cells but had little effect on normal cells. Analysis of cell viability showed that RU486-induced expression of surDN suppressed colorectal tumor cell growth and had synergic effect in combination with chemotherapeutic agents. The potential of this system in cancer therapy was evaluated in experimental animals. Tumor xenograft models were established in nude mice with colorectal tumor cells, and RU486 was intraperitoneally administered. The results showed that conditional expression of surDN efficiently inhibited tumor growth in vivo and prolonged the life of tumor-burdened mice. Synergized with the chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin, regulated surDN expression completely suppressed tumor growth. These results indicated that this modified RU486-regulated system could be useful in cancer-targeting therapy.

  11. Ubiquitination-dependent mechanisms regulate synaptic growth and function.

    PubMed

    DiAntonio, A; Haghighi, A P; Portman, S L; Lee, J D; Amaranto, A M; Goodman, C S

    2001-07-26

    The covalent attachment of ubiquitin to cellular proteins is a powerful mechanism for controlling protein activity and localization. Ubiquitination is a reversible modification promoted by ubiquitin ligases and antagonized by deubiquitinating proteases. Ubiquitin-dependent mechanisms regulate many important processes including cell-cycle progression, apoptosis and transcriptional regulation. Here we show that ubiquitin-dependent mechanisms regulate synaptic development at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Neuronal overexpression of the deubiquitinating protease fat facets leads to a profound disruption of synaptic growth control; there is a large increase in the number of synaptic boutons, an elaboration of the synaptic branching pattern, and a disruption of synaptic function. Antagonizing the ubiquitination pathway in neurons by expression of the yeast deubiquitinating protease UBP2 (ref. 5) also produces synaptic overgrowth and dysfunction. Genetic interactions between fat facets and highwire, a negative regulator of synaptic growth that has structural homology to a family of ubiquitin ligases, suggest that synaptic development may be controlled by the balance between positive and negative regulators of ubiquitination.

  12. Mechanical stress regulation of plant growth and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. A.; Myers, P. N.

    1995-01-01

    The authors introduce the chapter with a discussion of lessons from nature, agriculture, and landscapes; terms and definitions; and an historical perspective of mechanical stress regulation of plant growth and development. Topics include developmental responses to mechanical stress; mechanical stress-environment interactions; metabolic, productivity, and compositional changes; hormonal involvement; mechanoperception and early transduction mechanisms; applications in agriculture; and research implications. The discussion of hormonal involvement in mechanical stress physiology includes ethylene, auxin, gibberellins, and other phytohormones. The discussion of applications in agriculture examines windbreaks, nursery practices, height control and conditioning, and enhancement of growth and productivity. Implications for research are related to handling plant materials, space biology, and future research needs.

  13. BRASSINOSTEROIDS: Essential Regulators of Plant Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    Clouse, Steven D.; Sasse, Jenneth M.

    1998-06-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are growth-promoting natural products found at low levels in pollen, seeds, and young vegetative tissues throughout the plant kingdom. Detailed studies of BR biosynthesis and metabolism, coupled with the recent identification of BR-insensitive and BR-deficient mutants, has greatly expanded our view of steroids as signals controlling plant growth and development. This review examines the microchemical and molecular genetic analyses that have provided convincing evidence for an essential role of BRs in diverse developmental programs, including cell expansion, vascular differentiation, etiolation, and reproductive development. Recent advances relevant to the molecular mechanisms of BR-regulated gene expression and BR signal transduction are also discussed.

  14. Mechanical stress regulation of plant growth and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. A.; Myers, P. N.

    1995-01-01

    The authors introduce the chapter with a discussion of lessons from nature, agriculture, and landscapes; terms and definitions; and an historical perspective of mechanical stress regulation of plant growth and development. Topics include developmental responses to mechanical stress; mechanical stress-environment interactions; metabolic, productivity, and compositional changes; hormonal involvement; mechanoperception and early transduction mechanisms; applications in agriculture; and research implications. The discussion of hormonal involvement in mechanical stress physiology includes ethylene, auxin, gibberellins, and other phytohormones. The discussion of applications in agriculture examines windbreaks, nursery practices, height control and conditioning, and enhancement of growth and productivity. Implications for research are related to handling plant materials, space biology, and future research needs.

  15. Cyp26b1 within the growth plate regulates bone growth in juvenile mice.

    PubMed

    Minegishi, Yoshiki; Sakai, Yasuo; Yahara, Yasuhito; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Hosokawa, Ko; Tsumaki, Noriyuki

    2014-11-07

    Retinoic acid (RA) is an active metabolite of vitamin A and plays important roles in embryonic development. CYP26 enzymes degrade RA and have specific expression patterns that produce a RA gradient, which regulates the patterning of various structures in the embryo. However, it has not been addressed whether a RA gradient also exists and functions in organs after birth. We found localized RA activities in the diaphyseal portion of the growth plate cartilage were associated with the specific expression of Cyp26b1 in the epiphyseal portion in juvenile mice. To disturb the distribution of RA, we generated mice lacking Cyp26b1 specifically in chondrocytes (Cyp26b1(Δchon) cKO). These mice showed reduced skeletal growth in the juvenile stage. Additionally, their growth plate cartilage showed decreased proliferation rates of proliferative chondrocytes, which was associated with a reduced height in the zone of proliferative chondrocytes, and closed focally by four weeks of age, while wild-type mouse growth plates never closed. Feeding the Cyp26b1 cKO mice a vitamin A-deficient diet partially reversed these abnormalities of the growth plate cartilage. These results collectively suggest that Cyp26b1 in the growth plate regulates the proliferation rates of chondrocytes and is responsible for the normal function of the growth plate and growing bones in juvenile mice, probably by limiting the RA distribution in the growth plate proliferating zone.

  16. Light-Mediated Hormonal Regulation of Plant Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Mieke; Galvão, Vinicius Costa; Fankhauser, Christian

    2016-04-29

    Light is crucial for plant life, and perception of the light environment dictates plant growth, morphology, and developmental changes. Such adjustments in growth and development in response to light conditions are often established through changes in hormone levels and signaling. This review discusses examples of light-regulated processes throughout a plant's life cycle for which it is known how light signals lead to hormonal regulation. Light acts as an important developmental switch in germination, photomorphogenesis, and transition to flowering, and light cues are essential to ensure light capture through architectural changes during phototropism and the shade avoidance response. In describing well-established links between light perception and hormonal changes, we aim to give insight into the mechanisms that enable plants to thrive in variable light environments.

  17. Aromatic fluorine compounds. VIII. Plant growth regulators and intermediates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finger, G.C.; Gortatowski, M.J.; Shiley, R.H.; White, R.H.

    1959-01-01

    The preparation and properties of 41 fluorophenoxyacetic acids, 4 fluorophenoxypropionic acids, 2 fluorobenzoic acids, several indole derivatives, and a number of miscellaneous compounds are described. Data are given for many intermediates such as new fluorinated phenols, anisoles, anilines and nitrobenzenes. Most of the subject compounds are related to a number of well-known herbicides or plant growth regulators such as 2,4-D, 2,4,5-T and others.

  18. ROS Regulation of Polar Growth in Plant Cells1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Mangano, Silvina; Juárez, Silvina Paola Denita

    2016-01-01

    Root hair cells and pollen tubes, like fungal hyphae, possess a typical tip or polar cell expansion with growth limited to the apical dome. Cell expansion needs to be carefully regulated to produce a correct shape and size. Polar cell growth is sustained by oscillatory feedback loops comprising three main components that together play an important role regulating this process. One of the main components are reactive oxygen species (ROS) that, together with calcium ions (Ca2+) and pH, sustain polar growth over time. Apoplastic ROS homeostasis controlled by NADPH oxidases as well as by secreted type III peroxidases has a great impact on cell wall properties during cell expansion. Polar growth needs to balance a focused secretion of new materials in an extending but still rigid cell wall in order to contain turgor pressure. In this review, we discuss the gaps in our understanding of how ROS impact on the oscillatory Ca2+ and pH signatures that, coordinately, allow root hair cells and pollen tubes to expand in a controlled manner to several hundred times their original size toward specific signals. PMID:27208283

  19. RNAi screens in mice identify physiological regulators of oncogenic growth

    PubMed Central

    Beronja, Slobodan; Janki, Peter; Heller, Evan; Lien, Wen-Hui; Keyes, Brice; Oshimori, Naoki; Fuchs, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Summary Tissue growth is the multifaceted outcome of a cell’s intrinsic capabilities and its interactions with the surrounding environment. Decoding these complexities is essential for understanding human development and tumorigenesis. Here, we tackle this problem by carrying out the first genome-wide RNAi-mediated screens in mice. Focusing on skin development and oncogenic (HrasG12V-induced) hyperplasia, our screens uncover novel as well as anticipated regulators of embryonic epidermal growth. Among top oncogenic screen hits are Mllt6 and the Wnt effector β-catenin; they maintain HrasG12V-dependent hyperproliferation. We also expose β-catenin as an unanticipated antagonist of normal epidermal growth, functioning through Wnt-independent intercellular adhesion. Finally, we document physiological relevance to mouse and human cancers, thereby establishing the feasibility of in vivo mammalian genome-wide investigations to dissect tissue development and tumorigenesis. By documenting some oncogenic growth regulators, we pave the way for future investigations of other hits and raise promise for unearthing new targets for cancer therapies. PMID:23945586

  20. Ihh signaling regulates mandibular symphysis development and growth.

    PubMed

    Sugito, H; Shibukawa, Y; Kinumatsu, T; Yasuda, T; Nagayama, M; Yamada, S; Minugh-Purvis, N; Pacifici, M; Koyama, E

    2011-05-01

    Symphyseal secondary cartilage is important for mandibular development, but the molecular mechanisms underlying its formation remain largely unknown. Here we asked whether Indian hedgehog (Ihh) regulates symphyseal cartilage development and growth. By embryonic days 16.5 to 18.5, Sox9-expressing chondrocytes formed within condensed Tgfβ-1/Runx2-expressing mesenchymal cells at the prospective symphyseal joint site, and established a growth-plate-like structure with distinct Ihh, collagen X, and osteopontin expression patterns. In post-natal life, mesenchymal cells expressing the Ihh receptor Patched1 were present anterior to the Ihh-expressing secondary cartilage, proliferated, differentiated into chondrocytes, and contributed to anterior growth of alveolar bone. In Ihh-null mice, however, symphyseal development was defective, mainly because of enhanced chondrocyte maturation and reduced proliferation of chondroprogenitor cells. Proliferation was partially restored in dual Ihh;Gli3 mutants, suggesting that Gli3 is normally a negative regulator of symphyseal development. Thus, Ihh signaling is essential for symphyseal cartilage development and anterior mandibular growth.

  1. ROS Regulation of Polar Growth in Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Mangano, Silvina; Juárez, Silvina Paola Denita; Estevez, José M

    2016-07-01

    Root hair cells and pollen tubes, like fungal hyphae, possess a typical tip or polar cell expansion with growth limited to the apical dome. Cell expansion needs to be carefully regulated to produce a correct shape and size. Polar cell growth is sustained by oscillatory feedback loops comprising three main components that together play an important role regulating this process. One of the main components are reactive oxygen species (ROS) that, together with calcium ions (Ca(2+)) and pH, sustain polar growth over time. Apoplastic ROS homeostasis controlled by NADPH oxidases as well as by secreted type III peroxidases has a great impact on cell wall properties during cell expansion. Polar growth needs to balance a focused secretion of new materials in an extending but still rigid cell wall in order to contain turgor pressure. In this review, we discuss the gaps in our understanding of how ROS impact on the oscillatory Ca(2+) and pH signatures that, coordinately, allow root hair cells and pollen tubes to expand in a controlled manner to several hundred times their original size toward specific signals. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Thyroid Hormone Signaling and Cone Photoreceptor Viability.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongwei; Ding, Xi-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) signaling regulates cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. In the retina, TH signaling plays a central role in cone opsin expression. TH signaling inhibits S opsin expression, stimulates M opsin expression, and promotes dorsal-ventral opsin patterning. TH signaling has also been associated with cone photoreceptor viability. Treatment with thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3) or induction of high T3 by deleting the hormone-inactivating enzyme type 3 iodothyronine deiodinase (DIO3) causes cone death in mice. This effect is reversed by deletion of the TH receptor (TR) gene. Consistent with the T3 treatment effect, suppressing TH signaling preserves cones in mouse models of retinal degeneration. The regulation of cone survival by TH signaling appears to be independent of its regulatory role in cone opsin expression. The mechanism by which TH signaling regulates cone viability remains to be identified. The current understanding of TH signaling regulation in photoreceptor viability suggests that suppressing TH signaling locally in the retina may represent a novel strategy for retinal degeneration management.

  3. Filopodia and actin arcs guide the assembly and transport of two populations of microtubules with unique dynamic parameters in neuronal growth cones

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Andrew W.; Kabir, Nurul; Forscher, Paul

    2002-01-01

    We have used multimode fluorescent speckle microscopy (FSM) and correlative differential interference contrast imaging to investigate the actin–microtubule (MT) interactions and polymer dynamics known to play a fundamental role in growth cone guidance. We report that MTs explore the peripheral domain (P-domain), exhibiting classical properties of dynamic instability. MT extension occurs preferentially along filopodia, which function as MT polymerization guides. Filopodial bundles undergo retrograde flow and also transport MTs. Thus, distal MT position is determined by the rate of plus-end MT assembly minus the rate of retrograde F-actin flow. Short MT displacements independent of flow are sometimes observed. MTs loop, buckle, and break as they are transported into the T-zone by retrograde flow. MT breakage results in exposure of new plus ends which can regrow, and minus ends which rapidly undergo catastrophes, resulting in efficient MT turnover. We also report a previously undetected presence of F-actin arc structures, which exhibit persistent retrograde movement across the T-zone into the central domain (C-domain) at ∼1/4 the rate of P-domain flow. Actin arcs interact with MTs and transport them into the C-domain. Interestingly, although the MTs associated with arcs are less dynamic than P-domain MTs, they elongate efficiently as a result of markedly lower catastrophe frequencies. PMID:12105186

  4. Regulation of dendrite growth and maintenance by exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yun; Lee, Jiae; Rowland, Kimberly; Wen, Yuhui; Hua, Hope; Carlson, Nicole; Lavania, Shweta; Parrish, Jay Z; Kim, Michael D

    2015-12-01

    Dendrites lengthen by several orders of magnitude during neuronal development, but how membrane is allocated in dendrites to facilitate this growth remains unclear. Here, we report that Ras opposite (Rop), the Drosophila ortholog of the key exocytosis regulator Munc18-1 (also known as STXBP1), is an essential factor mediating dendrite growth. Neurons with depleted Rop function exhibit reduced terminal dendrite outgrowth followed by primary dendrite degeneration, suggestive of differential requirements for exocytosis in the growth and maintenance of different dendritic compartments. Rop promotes dendrite growth together with the exocyst, an octameric protein complex involved in tethering vesicles to the plasma membrane, with Rop-exocyst complexes and exocytosis predominating in primary dendrites over terminal dendrites. By contrast, membrane-associated proteins readily diffuse from primary dendrites into terminals, but not in the reverse direction, suggesting that diffusion, rather than targeted exocytosis, supplies membranous material for terminal dendritic growth, revealing key differences in the distribution of materials to these expanding dendritic compartments.

  5. Regulation of plant growth and development by the GROWTH-REGULATING FACTOR and GRF-INTERACTING FACTOR duo.

    PubMed

    Hoe Kim, Jeong; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2015-10-01

    Transcription factors are key regulators of gene expression and play pivotal roles in all aspects of living organisms. Therefore, identification and functional characterization of transcription factors is a prerequisite step toward understanding life. This article reviews molecular and biological functions of the two transcription regulator families, GROWTH-REGULATING FACTOR (GRF) and GRF-INTERACTING FACTOR (GIF), which have only recently been recognized. A myriad of experimental evidence clearly illustrates that GRF and GIF are bona fide partner proteins and form a plant-specific transcriptional complex. One of the most conspicuous outcomes from this research field is that the GRF-GIF duo endows the primordial cells of vegetative and reproductive organs with a meristematic specification state, guaranteeing the supply of cells for organogenesis and successful reproduction. It has recently been shown that GIF1 proteins, also known as ANGUSTIFOLIA3, recruit chromatin remodelling complexes to target genes, and that AtGRF expression is directly activated by the floral identity factors, APETALA1 and SEPALLATA3, providing an important insight into understanding of the action of GRF-GIF. Moreover, GRF genes are extensively subjected to post-transcriptional control by microRNA396, revealing the presence of a complex regulatory circuit in regulation of plant growth and development by the GRF-GIF duo. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Myogenic regulatory transcription factors regulate growth in rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Tenente, Inês M; Hayes, Madeline N; Ignatius, Myron S; McCarthy, Karin; Yohe, Marielle; Sindiri, Sivasish; Gryder, Berkley; Oliveira, Mariana L; Ramakrishnan, Ashwin; Tang, Qin; Chen, Eleanor Y; Petur Nielsen, G; Khan, Javed; Langenau, David M

    2017-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a pediatric malignacy of muscle with myogenic regulatory transcription factors MYOD and MYF5 being expressed in this disease. Consensus in the field has been that expression of these factors likely reflects the target cell of transformation rather than being required for continued tumor growth. Here, we used a transgenic zebrafish model to show that Myf5 is sufficient to confer tumor-propagating potential to RMS cells and caused tumors to initiate earlier and have higher penetrance. Analysis of human RMS revealed that MYF5 and MYOD are mutually-exclusively expressed and each is required for sustained tumor growth. ChIP-seq and mechanistic studies in human RMS uncovered that MYF5 and MYOD bind common DNA regulatory elements to alter transcription of genes that regulate muscle development and cell cycle progression. Our data support unappreciated and dominant oncogenic roles for MYF5 and MYOD convergence on common transcriptional targets to regulate human RMS growth. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19214.001 PMID:28080960

  7. Hedgehog signaling in prostate epithelial-mesenchymal growth regulation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yu-Ching; Joyner, Alexandra L.

    2015-01-01

    The prostate gland plays an important role in male reproduction, and is also an organ prone to diseases such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. The prostate consists of ducts with an inner layer of epithelium surrounded by stroma. Reciprocal signaling between these two cell compartments is instrumental to normal prostatic development, homeostasis, regeneration, as well as tumor formation. Hedgehog (HH) signaling is a master regulator in numerous developmental processes. In many organs, HH plays a key role in epithelial-mesenchymal signaling that regulates organ growth and tissue differentiation, and abnormal HH signaling has been implicated in the progression of various epithelial carcinomas. In this review, we focus on recent studies exploring the multipotency of endogenous postnatal and adult epithelial and stromal stem cells and studies addressing the role of HH in prostate development and cancer. We discuss the implications of the results for a new understanding of prostate development and disease. Insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying epithelial-mesenchymal growth regulation should provide a basis for devising innovative therapies to combat diseases of the prostate. PMID:25641695

  8. Effects of different plant growth regulators on blueberry fruit quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. C.; Zhu, Y. Q.; Wang, Y. N.; Luo, C.; Wang, X.

    2017-08-01

    In order to understand the effects of different plant growth regulators (PGRs) on blueberry fruit growth, various concentrations of Abscisic acid (ABA), Methyl jasmonate (MJ), Brassinolide (BR), Melatonin (MT) were sprayed on blueberry cv. ‘Brigita’ fruits. The results showed that all the PGRs put into effect on improving the quality of blueberry fruit. Comparing with the control plants no PGR spraying,300 mg/L of MT treatment promoted effectively accumulation of the soluble sugar. ABA 20mg/L treatment in-creased effectively accumulation of anthocyanin, and significantly decreased titratable acid content. The treatment of MJ 10mg/L improved significantly the soluble solid content. The effect of the four PGRs treatments on appearance did not show obvious difference.

  9. Apyrases, extracellular ATP and the regulation of growth.

    PubMed

    Clark, Greg; Roux, Stanley J

    2011-12-01

    Although no definitive receptor for extracellular ATP (eATP) has been identified in plants, there is now stronger physiological evidence that the effects of eATP on plant growth are mediated by a receptor, or, as in animals, by multiple receptors. Recent papers clarify how extracellular nucleotides induce changes in [Ca(2+)](cyt), and the production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species. They document links between eATP signaling and the synthesis or transport of hormones, and they reveal that applied nucleotides can regulate the aperture of stomates, which release ATP when stimulated by light and hormones. Ectoapyrases (ecto-nucleoside triphosphate-diphosphohydrolase) help control both the diverse signaling changes and downstream growth changes induced by extracellular nucleotides by limiting their concentration in the extracellular matrix (ECM). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Model of Chloroplast Growth Regulation in Mesophyll Cells.

    PubMed

    Paton, Kelly M; Anderson, Lisa; Flottat, Pauline; Cytrynbaum, Eric N

    2015-09-01

    Chloroplasts regulate their growth to optimize photosynthesis. Quantitative data show that the ratio of total chloroplast area to mesophyll cell area is constant across different cells within a single species and also across species. Wild-type chloroplasts exhibit little scatter around this trend; highly irregularly shaped mutant chloroplasts exhibit more scatter. Here we propose a model motivated by a bacterial quorum-sensing model consisting of a switch-like signaling network that turns off chloroplast growth. We calculated the dependence of the location of the relevant saddle-node bifurcation on the geometry of the chloroplasts. Our model exhibits a linear trend, with linearly growing scatter dependent on chloroplast shape, consistent with the data. When modeled chloroplasts are of a shape that grows with a constant area-to-volume ratio (disks, cylinders), we find a linear trend with minimal scatter. Chloroplasts with area and volume that do not grow proportionally (spheres) exhibit a linear trend with additional scatter.

  11. Fluoxetine regulates cell growth inhibition of interferon-α.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Min; Yu, Bu-Chin; Chiu, Wen-Tai; Sun, Hung-Yu; Chien, Yu-Chieh; Su, Hui-Chen; Yen, Shu-Yang; Lai, Hsin-Wen; Bai, Chyi-Huey; Young, Kung-Chia; Tsao, Chiung-Wen

    2016-10-01

    Fluoxetine, a well-known anti-depression agent, may act as a chemosensitizer to assist and promote cancer therapy. However, how fluoxetine regulates cellular signaling to enhance cellular responses against tumor cell growth remains unclear. In the present study, addition of fluoxetine promoted growth inhibition of interferon-alpha (IFN-α) in human bladder carcinoma cells but not in normal uroepithelial cells through lessening the IFN-α-induced apoptosis but switching to cause G1 arrest, and maintaining the IFN-α-mediated reduction in G2/M phase. Activations and signal transducer and transactivator (STAT)-1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α) were involved in this process. Chemical inhibitions of STAT-1 or PPAR-α partially rescued bladder carcinoma cells from IFN-α-mediated growth inhibition via blockades of G1 arrest, cyclin D1 reduction, p53 downregulation and p27 upregulation in the presence of fluoxetine. However, the functions of both proteins were not involved in the control of fluoxetine over apoptosis and maintained the declined G2/M phase of IFN-α. These results indicated that activation of PPAR-α and STAT-1 participated, at least in part, in growth inhibition of IFN-α in the presence of fluoxetine.

  12. AMPK Regulation of Cell Growth, Apoptosis, Autophagy, and Bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Paz, Marina Villanueva; Cotán, David; Maraver, Juan Garrido; Oropesa-Ávila, Manuel; de la Mata, Mario; Pavón, Ana Delgado; de Lavera, Isabel; Gómez, Elizabet Alcocer; Córdoba, Mónica Álvarez; Alcázar, José A Sánchez

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) generally promotes catabolic pathways that produce ATP and at the same time inhibits anabolic pathways involved in different processes that consume ATP. As an energy sensor, AMPK is involved in the main cellular functions implicated in cell fate, such as cell growth and autophagy.Recently, AMPK has been connected with apoptosis regulation, although the molecular mechanism by which AMPK induces and/or inhibits cell death is not clear.This chapter reviews the essential role of AMPK in signaling pathways that respond to cellular stress and damage, highlighting the complex and reciprocal regulation between AMPK and their targets and effectors. The therapeutic implications of the role of AMPK in different pathologies such as diabetes, cancer, or mitochondrial dysfunctions are still controversial, and it is necessary to further investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying AMPK activation.

  13. Astrocyte growth is regulated by neuropeptides through Tis 8 and basic fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, R M; Levin, E R

    1994-01-01

    The important intracellular mechanisms of astrocyte growth are not well defined. Using an inhibitor of astrocyte proliferation, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), and the glial mitogen endothelin (ET-3), we sought a common pathway for growth regulation in these neural cells. In cultured fetal rat diencephalic astrocytes, ANP selectively and rapidly inhibited the Tis 8 immediate early gene and protein. After 4 h, ANP selectively inhibited the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) gene and protein. ET-3 significantly stimulated both Tis 8 and bFGF mRNAs and protein, but also stimulated several other immediate early and growth factor/receptor genes. An antisense oligonucleotide to Tis 8 strongly prevented ET-stimulated thymidine incorporation, while the inhibitory action of ANP was enhanced. The Tis 8 antisense oligonucleotide also significantly reversed ET-stimulated bFGF transcription and enhanced the bFGF inhibition caused by ANP. In addition, an antisense oligonucleotide to bFGF significantly reversed the ET-stimulated thymidine incorporation and enhanced the ANP inhibition of DNA synthesis. The sequential modulation of Tis 8, followed by bFGF, provides a novel mechanism for both positive and negative regulation of astrocyte growth by endogenous neuropeptides. Images PMID:8163680

  14. Regulation of skeletal muscle growth in fish by the growth hormone--insulin-like growth factor system.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo N; Valdés, Juan Antonio; Molina, Alfredo; Björnsson, Björn Thrandur

    2013-10-01

    The growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system is the key promoter of growth in vertebrates; however, how this system modulates muscle mass in fish is just recently becoming elucidated. In fish, the GH induces muscle growth by modulating the expression of several genes belonging to the myostatin (MSTN), atrophy, GH, and IGF systems as well as myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs). The GH controls the expression of igf1 via Janus kinase 2 (JAK2)/signal transducers and activators of the transcription 5 (STAT5) signaling pathway, but it seems that it is not the major regulator. These mild effects of the GH on igf1 expression in fish muscle seem to be related with the presence of higher contents of truncated GH receptor1 (tGHR1) than full length GHR (flGHR1). IGFs in fish stimulate myogenic cell proliferation, differentiation, and protein synthesis through the MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT/TOR signaling pathways, concomitant with abolishing protein degradation and atrophy via the PI3K/AKT/FOXO signaling pathway. Besides these signaling pathways control the expression of several genes belonging to the atrophy and IGF systems. Particularly, IGFs and amino acid control the expression of igf1, thus, suggesting other of alternative signaling pathways regulating the transcription of this growth factor. The possible role of IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) and the contribution of muscle-derived versus hepatic-produced IGF1 on fish muscle growth is also addressed. Thus, a comprehensive overview on the GH-IGF system regulating fish skeletal muscle growth is presented, as well as perspectives for future research in this field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Retinal Degeneration Slow (RDS) Glycosylation Plays a Role in Cone Function and in the Regulation of RDS·ROM-1 Protein Complex Formation.

    PubMed

    Stuck, Michael W; Conley, Shannon M; Naash, Muna I

    2015-11-13

    The photoreceptor-specific glycoprotein retinal degeneration slow (RDS, also called PRPH2) is necessary for the formation of rod and cone outer segments. Mutations in RDS cause rod and cone-dominant retinal disease, and it is well established that both cell types have different requirements for RDS. However, the molecular mechanisms for this difference remain unclear. Although RDS glycosylation is highly conserved, previous studies have revealed no apparent function for the glycan in rods. In light of the highly conserved nature of RDS glycosylation, we hypothesized that it is important for RDS function in cones and could underlie part of the differential requirement for RDS in the two photoreceptor subtypes. We generated a knockin mouse expressing RDS without the N-glycosylation site (N229S). Normal levels of RDS and the unglycosylated RDS binding partner rod outer segment membrane protein 1 (ROM-1) were found in N229S retinas. However, cone electroretinogram responses were decreased by 40% at 6 months of age. Because cones make up only 3-5% of photoreceptors in the wild-type background, N229S mice were crossed into the nrl(-/-) background (in which all rods are converted to cone-like cells) for biochemical analysis. In N229S/nrl(-/-) retinas, RDS and ROM-1 levels were decreased by ~60% each. These data suggest that glycosylation of RDS is required for RDS function or stability in cones, a difference that may be due to extracellular versus intradiscal localization of the RDS glycan in cones versus rods. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. New Aspects of Progesterone Interactions with the Actin Cytoskeleton and Neurosteroidogenesis in the Cerebellum and the Neuronal Growth Cone

    PubMed Central

    Wessel, Lisa; Olbrich, Laura; Brand-Saberi, Beate

    2014-01-01

    The impact of progesterone on neuronal tissues in the central (CNS) and peripheral (PNS) nervous system is of significant scientific and therapeutic interest. Glial and neuronal cells of vertebrates express steroidogenic enzymes, and are able to synthesize progesterone de novo from cholesterol. Progesterone is described to have neuroprotective, neuroreparative, anti-degenerative, and anti-apoptotic effects in the CNS and the PNS. Thus, the first clinical studies promise new therapeutic options using progesterone in the treatment of patients with traumatic brain injury. Additionally, experimental data from different animal models suggest further positive effects of progesterone on neurological diseases such as cerebral ischemia, peripheral nerve injury and amyothropic lateral sclerosis. In regard to this future clinical use of progesterone, we discuss in this review the underlying physiological principles of progesterone effects in neuronal tissues. Mechanisms leading to morphological reorganizations of neurons in the CNS and PNS affected by progesterone are addressed, with special focus on the actin cytoskeleton. Furthermore, new aspects of a progesterone-dependent regulation of neurosteroidogenesis mediated by the recently described progesterone binding protein PGRMC1 in the nervous system are discussed. PMID:25141866

  17. Recoverin depletion accelerates cone photoresponse recovery

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Jingjing; Keim, Jennifer; Kastenhuber, Edda; Gesemann, Matthias; Neuhauss, Stephan C. F.

    2015-01-01

    The neuronal Ca2+-binding protein Recoverin has been shown to regulate phototransduction termination in mammalian rods. Here we identify four recoverin genes in the zebrafish genome, rcv1a, rcv1b, rcv2a and rcv2b, and investigate their role in modulating the cone phototransduction cascade. While Recoverin-1b is only found in the adult retina, the other Recoverins are expressed throughout development in all four cone types, except Recoverin-1a, which is expressed only in rods and UV cones. Applying a double flash electroretinogram (ERG) paradigm, downregulation of Recoverin-2a or 2b accelerates cone photoresponse recovery, albeit at different light intensities. Exclusive recording from UV cones via spectral ERG reveals that knockdown of Recoverin-1a alone has no effect, but Recoverin-1a/2a double-knockdowns showed an even shorter recovery time than Recoverin-2a-deficient larvae. We also showed that UV cone photoresponse kinetics depend on Recoverin-2a function via cone-specific kinase Grk7a. This is the first in vivo study demonstrating that cone opsin deactivation kinetics determine overall photoresponse shut off kinetics. PMID:26246494

  18. Plant growth regulation activity of steviol and derivatives.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Brás Heleno; Stiirmer, Júlio César; de Souza Filho, José D; Ayub, Ricardo Antonio

    2008-05-01

    This work describes the preparation of tetracyclic diterpenoids and determination of their plant growth regulator properties. Stevioside (2) was used as starting material and the derivatives 13-hydroxy-ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid (steviol, 3), ent-7alpha,13-dihydroxy-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid (4), 13-hydroxy, ent-kaur-16,17-epoxi-19-oic acid (steviol epoxide, 5), 17-hydroxy-16-ketobayeran-19-oic acid (17-hydroxyisosteviol, 6), 17-hydroxy-16-hydroxyiminobayeran-19-oic acid (7), 16-ketobayeran-19-oic acid (isosteviol, 9), 16,17-dihydroxybeyeran-19-oic acid (8), and 16-hydroxyiminobayeran-19-oic acid (isosteviol oxime, 10) were obtained by simple chemical procedures. Another derivative, ent-7alpha,13-dihydroxycaur-15-en-19-oic acid (4), was obtained by biotransformation of steviol (3) by Penicillium citrinum. In order to determine the plant growth regulator activity the compounds were submitted to the lettuce hypocotyl and barley aleurone bioassays. All compounds showed significant activities in both bioassays. Steviol (3) and isosteviol (9) were also tested in field-grown grapes resulting in an increase in berry weight and size.

  19. Economic growth and energy regulation in the environmental Kuznets curve.

    PubMed

    Lorente, Daniel Balsalobre; Álvarez-Herranz, Agustín

    2016-08-01

    This study establishes the existence of a pattern of behavior, between economic growth and environmental degradation, consistent with the environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) hypothesis for 17 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries between 1990 and 2012. Based on this EKC pattern, it shows that energy regulation measures help reduce per capita greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. To validate this hypothesis, we also add the explanatory variables: renewable energy promotion, energy innovation processes, and the suppression effect of income level on the contribution of renewable energy sources to total energy consumption. It aims to be a tool for decision-making regarding energy policy. This paper provides a two-stage econometric analysis of instrumental variables with the aim of correcting the existence of endogeneity in the variable GDP per capita, verifying that the instrumental variables used in this research are appropriate for our aim. To this end, it first makes a methodological contribution before incorporating additional variables associated with environmental air pollution into the EKC hypothesis and showing how they positively affect the explanation of the correction in the GHG emission levels. This study concludes that air pollution will not disappear on its own as economic growth increases. Therefore, it is necessary to promote energy regulation measures to reduce environmental pollution.

  20. A simple procedure for morphometric analysis of processes and growth cones of neurons in culture using parameters derived from the contour and convex hull of the object.

    PubMed

    Kawa, A; Stahlhut, M; Berezin, A; Bock, E; Berezin, V

    1998-01-31

    Morphometric estimation of neuronal processes is currently laborious and time-consuming, since the individual processes (axons and dendrites) have to be traced manually. In order to facilitate the measurement of cellular processes, we have tested a series of parameters derived from the contour and the convex hull of an object and estimated to which extent they reflect process length and number. The parameters included the area, perimeter and form factor of the object and convex hull, their ratios as well as object length, breadth, width, length/width and spreading index. Some new parameters derived from the contour and convex hull of the object, were also computed: process index (the number of areas contained within the convex hull outside the object contour), process domain (the total area contained within the convex hull outside the object contour), their ratio and the square root of the process domain (SR process domain). In total, 18 parameters were estimated. Populations of motoneurons, growth cones of cerebellar granule cells and N2a neuroblastoma cells were utilized due to their diversity in morphological features. The processes of each object were drawn by hand to establish the actual length and number. Total process length per object correlated strongly with object perimeter, process domain and SR process domain. The number of processes per object correlated well with perimeter ratio, process index and form factor, whereas object length, convex hull perimeter and spreading index correlated acceptably with the average process length. Using these parameters for the evaluation of neurite outgrowth in developing of hippocampal neurons in vitro, variables such as object perimeter, process domain and SR process domain were found to be very well suited for estimation of the total length of neurites. We conclude that based on the contour and convex hull of an object it is possible to calculate a series of parameters which may substitute direct measurements of

  1. Regulation of rat ovarian cell growth and steroid secretion

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, CC; Dawson, WE; Turner, JT; Wyche, JH

    1980-01-01

    A cultured rat ovarian cell line (31 A-F(2)) was used to study the effect of growth factors (epidermal growth factor [EGF] and fibroblast growth factor [FGF]), a survival factor (ovarian growth factor [OGF]), a hormone (insulin), and an iron-binding protein (transferring) on cell proliferation and steroid production under defined culture conditions. EGF and insulin were shown to be mitogenic (half-maximal response at 0.12 nM and 0.11 muM, respectively) for 31A-F(2) cells incubated in serum-free medium. EGF induced up to three doublings in the cell population, whereas insulin induced an average of one cell population doubling. FGF, OGF, and transferrin were found not to have any prominent effect on cell division when incubated individually with 31A-F(2) cells in serum-free medium. However, a combination of EGF, OGF, insulin, and transferrin stimulated cell division to the same approximate extent as cells incubated in the presence of 5 percent fetal calf serum. EGF or insulin did not significantly affect total cell cholesterol levels (relative to cells incubated in serum-free medium) when incubated individually with 31A-F(2) cells. However, cell cholesterol levels were increased by the addition of OGF (250 percent), FGF (370 percent), or a combination of insulin and EGF (320 percent). Progesterone secretion from 31A-F(2) cells was enhanced by EGF (25 percent), FGF (80 percent), and insulin (115 percent). However, the addition of a mitogenic mixture of EGF, OGF, insulin, and transferrin suppressed progesterone secretion 150 percent) below that of control cultures. These studies have permitted us to determine that EGF and insulin are mitogenic factors that are required for the growth of 31A-F(2) cells and that OGF and transferrin are positive cofactors that enhance growth. Also, additional data suggest that cholesterol and progesterone production in 31A-F(2) cells can be regulated by peptide growth factors and the hormone insulin. PMID:6995465

  2. ARNT2 Regulates Tumoral Growth in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yasushi; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Nakashima, Dai; Yamatoji, Masanobu; Minakawa, Yasuyuki; Koike, Kazuyuki; Fushimi, Kazuaki; Higo, Morihiro; Endo-Sakamoto, Yosuke; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki; Uzawa, Katsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) 2 is a transcriptional factor related to adaptive responses against cellular stress from a xenobiotic substance. Recent evidence indicates ARNT is involved in carcinogenesis and cancer progression; however, little is known about the relevance of ARNT2 in the behavior of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In the current study, we evaluated the ARNT2 mRNA and protein expression levels in OSCC in vitro and in vivo and the clinical relationship between ARNT2 expression levels in primary OSCCs and their clinicopathologic status by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. Using ARNT2 overexpression models, we performed functional analyses to investigate the critical roles of ARNT2 in OSCC. ARNT2 mRNA and protein were down-regulated significantly (P < 0.05 for both comparisons) in nine OSCC-derived cells and primary OSCC (n=100 patients) compared with normal counterparts. In addition to the data from exogenous experiments that ARNT2-overexpressed cells showed decreased cellular proliferation, ARNT2-positive OSCC cases were correlated significantly (P < 0.05) with tumoral size. Since von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase, a negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF1)-α, is a downstream molecule of ARNT2, we speculated that HIF1-α and its downstream molecules would have key functions in cellular growth. Consistent with our hypothesis, overexpressed ARNT2 cells showed down-regulation of HIF1-α, which causes hypofunctioning of glucose transporter 1, leading to decreased cellular growth. Our results proposed for the first time that the ARNT2 level is an indicator of cellular proliferation in OSCCs. Therefore, ARNT2 may be a potential therapeutic target against progression of OSCCs. PMID:27076852

  3. Regulation of growth hormone secretion by (pro)renin receptor.

    PubMed

    Tani, Yuji; Yamada, Shozo; Inoshita, Naoko; Hirata, Yukio; Shichiri, Masayoshi

    2015-06-03

    (Pro)renin receptor (PRR) has a single transmembrane domain that co-purifies with the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase). In addition to its role in cellular acidification, V-ATPase has been implicated in membrane fusion and exocytosis via its Vo domain. Results from the present study show that PRR is expressed in pituitary adenoma cells and regulates growth hormone (GH) release via V-ATPase-induced cellular acidification. Positive PRR immunoreactivity was detected more often in surgically resected, growth hormone-producing adenomas (GHomas) than in nonfunctional pituitary adenomas. GHomas strongly expressing PRR showed excess GH secretion, as evidenced by distinctly high plasma GH and insulin-like growth factor-1 levels, as well as an elevated nadir GH in response to the oral glucose tolerance test. Suppression of PRR expression in rat GHoma-derived GH3 cells using PRR siRNA resulted in reduced GH secretion and significantly enhanced intracellular GH accumulation. GH3 treatment with bafilomycin A1, a V-ATPase inhibitor, also blocked GH release, indicating mediation via impaired cellular acidification of V-ATPase. PRR knockdown decreased Atp6l, a subunit of the Vo domain that destabilizes V-ATPase assembly, increased intracellular GH, and decreased GH release. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating a pivotal role for PRR in a pituitary hormone release mechanism.

  4. [Breast hormones--regulators of energy homeostasis: growth of infants].

    PubMed

    Kon', I Ia; Shilina, N M; Gmoshinskaia, M V; Ivanushkina, T A

    2011-01-01

    Studied the possible relationship between the growth rate of children who are breastfed, and the level of protein, fat, insulin-like growth factor- 1 (IGF-1), ghrelin, leptin, adiponectin in breast milk. Examined 71 pair--a mother and a healthy child, who is breastfed. All infants were divided into 3 groups: low, normal and high weight gain. Daily breast milk intake, the level of fat, protein and hormones proteins regulators of energy homeostasis (adiponectin, grelin, IGF-1 and leptin) in breast milk were measured at 1, 2 and 3 months of lactation. It was found that daily breast milk consumption was higher in the group of infants with high weight gain and the content of protein and fat in it did not differ in three groups. Total daily consumption of protein and fat with breast milk was higher in groups of infants with high weight gain. There was significantly higher IGF-1 level and the tendency to higher grelin level in breast milk of mothers of infants with higher weight gain. The possible link of breast milk hormones with growth velocity of breast-fed infants is discussed.

  5. Sulf1A and HGF regulate satellite-cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Roop; Hitchins, Laura; Fletcher, Fenella; Dhoot, Gurtej K.

    2010-01-01

    The role of Sulf1A, sulfation and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in satellite-cell growth was examined in an in vitro model of dissociated whole skeletal muscle fibres. Pax7-positive quiescent satellite cells express little or no Sulf1A but show rapid re-expression in regenerating myoblasts and myotubes, similar to embryonic muscle and in vitro satellite cells preceding asynchronous MyoD activation. Once activated, Sulf1A and MyoD re-expression persists up to 72 hours in most satellite cells under normal culture conditions and following moderate changes in sulfation, whereas Sulf1A neutralisation by antibodies not only enhances satellite-cell proliferation but also downregulates MyoD and Pax7 expression in a large proportion of the satellite cells. The HGF exposure also induces similar but even more pronounced changes characterised by variable sulfation levels and rapid downregulation of MyoD and Pax7 without myogenin activation in a sub-set of cells. This Pax7-MyoD-myogenin-negative sub-population expresses Sulf1A and Myf5. The transfer of all such satellite-cell progenies onto gelatin-coated-substratum re-activates MyoD and Pax7 gene expression in all cells, thus detecting a distinct sub-population of satellite cells. We conclude that HGF and fine-tuned sulfation levels are major contributory factors controlling satellite-cell growth by regulating the relative activities of actively proliferating and differentiating cells. PMID:20442248

  6. CRMP-5 interacts with actin to regulate neurite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    GONG, XIAOBING; TAN, MINGHUI; GAO, YUAN; CHEN, KEEN; GUO, GUOQING

    2016-01-01

    CRMP family proteins (CRMPs) are abundantly expressed in the developing nervous system mediating growth cone guidance, neuronal polarity and axon elongation. CRMP-5 has been indicated to serve a critical role in neurite outgrowth. However, the detailed mechanisms of how CRMP-5 regulates neurite outgrowth remain unclear. In the current study, co-immunoprecipitation was used to identify the fact that CRMP-5 interacted with the actin and tubulin cytoskeleton networks in the growth cones of developing hippocampal neurons. CRMP-5 exhibited increased affinity towards actin when compared with microtubules. Immunocytochemistry was used to identify the fact that CRMP-5 colocalized with actin predominantly in the C-domain and T-zone in growth cones. In addition, genetic inhibition of CRMP-5 by siRNA suppressed the expression of actin, growth cone development and neurite outgrowth. Overexpression of CRMP-5 promoted the interaction with actin, growth cone development and hippocampal neurite outgrowth. Taken together, these data suggest that CRMP-5 is able to interact with the actin cytoskeleton network in the growth cone and affect growth cone development and neurite outgrowth via this interaction in developing hippocampal neurons. PMID:26677106

  7. A Repressor Protein Complex Regulates Leaf Growth in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Nathalie; Pauwels, Laurens; Baekelandt, Alexandra; De Milde, Liesbeth; Van Leene, Jelle; Besbrugge, Nienke; Heyndrickx, Ken S.; Pérez, Amparo Cuéllar; Durand, Astrid Nagels; De Clercq, Rebecca; Van De Slijke, Eveline; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Eeckhout, Dominique; Gevaert, Kris; Vandepoele, Klaas; De Jaeger, Geert; Goossens, Alain; Inzé, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Cell number is an important determinant of final organ size. In the leaf, a large proportion of cells are derived from the stomatal lineage. Meristemoids, which are stem cell-like precursor cells, undergo asymmetric divisions, generating several pavement cells adjacent to the two guard cells. However, the mechanism controlling the asymmetric divisions of these stem cells prior to differentiation is not well understood. Here, we characterized PEAPOD (PPD) proteins, the only transcriptional regulators known to negatively regulate meristemoid division. PPD proteins interact with KIX8 and KIX9, which act as adaptor proteins for the corepressor TOPLESS. D3-type cyclin encoding genes were identified among direct targets of PPD2, being negatively regulated by PPDs and KIX8/9. Accordingly, kix8 kix9 mutants phenocopied PPD loss-of-function producing larger leaves resulting from increased meristemoid amplifying divisions. The identified conserved complex might be specific for leaf growth in the second dimension, since it is not present in Poaceae (grasses), which also lack the developmental program it controls. PMID:26232487

  8. Regulation of the photosynthetic apparatus under fluctuating growth light.

    PubMed

    Tikkanen, Mikko; Grieco, Michele; Nurmi, Markus; Rantala, Marjaana; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2012-12-19

    Safe and efficient conversion of solar energy to metabolic energy by plants is based on tightly inter-regulated transfer of excitation energy, electrons and protons in the photosynthetic machinery according to the availability of light energy, as well as the needs and restrictions of metabolism itself. Plants have mechanisms to enhance the capture of energy when light is limited for growth and development. Also, when energy is in excess, the photosynthetic machinery slows down the electron transfer reactions in order to prevent the production of reactive oxygen species and the consequent damage of the photosynthetic machinery. In this opinion paper, we present a partially hypothetical scheme describing how the photosynthetic machinery controls the flow of energy and electrons in order to enable the maintenance of photosynthetic activity in nature under continual fluctuations in white light intensity. We discuss the roles of light-harvesting II protein phosphorylation, thermal dissipation of excess energy and the control of electron transfer by cytochrome b(6)f, and the role of dynamically regulated turnover of photosystem II in the maintenance of the photosynthetic machinery. We present a new hypothesis suggesting that most of the regulation in the thylakoid membrane occurs in order to prevent oxidative damage of photosystem I.

  9. Regulation of skeletal muscle stem cells by fibroblast growth factors.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowski, Bradley; Vogler, Thomas Orion; Gadek, Katherine; Olwin, Bradley B

    2017-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are essential for self-renewal of skeletal muscle stem cells (satellite cells) and required for maintenance and repair of skeletal muscle. Satellite cells express high levels of FGF receptors 1 and 4, low levels of FGF receptor 3, and little or no detectable FGF receptor 2. Of the multiple FGFs that influence satellite cell function in culture, FGF2 and FGF6 are the only members that regulate satellite cell function in vivo by activating ERK MAPK, p38α/β MAPKs, PI3 kinase, PLCγ and STATs. Regulation of FGF signaling is complex in satellite cells, requiring Syndecan-4, a heparan sulfate proteoglycan, as well as ß1-integrin and fibronectin. During aging, reduced responsiveness to FGF diminishes satellite cell self-renewal, leading to impaired skeletal muscle regeneration and depletion of satellite cells. Mislocalization of ß1-integrin, reductions in fibronectin, and alterations in heparan sulfate content all contribute to reduced FGF responsiveness in satellite cells. How these cell surface proteins regulate satellite cell self-renewal is incompletely understood. Here we summarize the current knowledge, highlighting the role(s) for FGF signaling in skeletal muscle regeneration, satellite cell behavior, and age-induced muscle wasting. Developmental Dynamics, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Juvenile hormone regulates extreme mandible growth in male stag beetles.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Hiroki; Cornette, Richard; Koshikawa, Shigeyuki; Okada, Yasukazu; Lavine, Laura Corley; Emlen, Douglas J; Miura, Toru

    2011-01-01

    The morphological diversity of insects is one of the most striking phenomena in biology. Evolutionary modifications to the relative sizes of body parts, including the evolution of traits with exaggerated proportions, are responsible for a vast range of body forms. Remarkable examples of an insect trait with exaggerated proportions are the mandibular weapons of stag beetles. Male stag beetles possess extremely enlarged mandibles which they use in combat with rival males over females. As with other sexually selected traits, stag beetle mandibles vary widely in size among males, and this variable growth results from differential larval nutrition. However, the mechanisms responsible for coupling nutrition with growth of stag beetle mandibles (or indeed any insect structure) remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that during the development of male stag beetles (Cyclommatus metallifer), juvenile hormone (JH) titers are correlated with the extreme growth of an exaggerated weapon of sexual selection. We then investigate the putative role of JH in the development of the nutritionally-dependent, phenotypically plastic mandibles, by increasing hemolymph titers of JH with application of the JH analog fenoxycarb during larval and prepupal developmental periods. Increased JH signaling during the early prepupal period increased the proportional size of body parts, and this was especially pronounced in male mandibles, enhancing the exaggerated size of this trait. The direction of this response is consistent with the measured JH titers during this same period. Combined, our results support a role for JH in the nutrition-dependent regulation of extreme mandible growth in this species. In addition, they illuminate mechanisms underlying the evolution of trait proportion, the most salient feature of the evolutionary diversification of the insects.

  11. Antagonistic Regulation of Arabidopsis Growth by Brassinosteroids and Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yuhee; Kwon, Soon Il; Choe, Sunghwa

    2014-01-01

    To withstand ever-changing environmental stresses, plants are equipped with phytohormone-mediated stress resistance mechanisms. Salt stress triggers abscisic acid (ABA) signaling, which enhances stress tolerance at the expense of growth. ABA is thought to inhibit the action of growth-promoting hormones, including brassinosteroids (BRs). However, the regulatory mechanisms that coordinate ABA and BR activity remain to be discovered. We noticed that ABA-treated seedlings exhibited small, round leaves and short roots, a phenotype that is characteristic of the BR signaling mutant, brassinosteroid insensitive1-9 (bri1-9). To identify genes that are antagonistically regulated by ABA and BRs, we examined published Arabidopsis microarray data sets. Of the list of genes identified, those upregulated by ABA but downregulated by BRs were enriched with a BRRE motif in their promoter sequences. After validating the microarray data using quantitative RT-PCR, we focused on RD26, which is induced by salt stress. Histochemical analysis of transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing RD26pro:GUS revealed that the induction of GUS expression after NaCl treatment was suppressed by co-treatment with BRs, but enhanced by co-treatment with propiconazole, a BR biosynthetic inhibitor. Similarly, treatment with bikinin, an inhibitor of BIN2 kinase, not only inhibited RD26 expression, but also reduced the survival rate of the plant following exposure to salt stress. Our results suggest that ABA and BRs act antagonistically on their target genes at or after the BIN2 step in BR signaling pathways, and suggest a mechanism by which plants fine-tune their growth, particularly when stress responses and growth compete for resources. PMID:25377253

  12. Antagonistic regulation of Arabidopsis growth by brassinosteroids and abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yuhee; Kwon, Soon Il; Choe, Sunghwa

    2014-11-01

    To withstand ever-changing environmental stresses, plants are equipped with phytohormone-mediated stress resistance mechanisms. Salt stress triggers abscisic acid (ABA) signaling, which enhances stress tolerance at the expense of growth. ABA is thought to inhibit the action of growth-promoting hormones, including brassinosteroids (BRs). However, the regulatory mechanisms that coordinate ABA and BR activity remain to be discovered. We noticed that ABA-treated seedlings exhibited small, round leaves and short roots, a phenotype that is characteristic of the BR signaling mutant, brassinosteroid insensitive1-9 (bri1-9). To identify genes that are antagonistically regulated by ABA and BRs, we examined published Arabidopsis microarray data sets. Of the list of genes identified, those upregulated by ABA but downregulated by BRs were enriched with a BRRE motif in their promoter sequences. After validating the microarray data using quantitative RT-PCR, we focused on RD26, which is induced by salt stress. Histochemical analysis of transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing RD26pro:GUS revealed that the induction of GUS expression after NaCl treatment was suppressed by co-treatment with BRs, but enhanced by co-treatment with propiconazole, a BR biosynthetic inhibitor. Similarly, treatment with bikinin, an inhibitor of BIN2 kinase, not only inhibited RD26 expression, but also reduced the survival rate of the plant following exposure to salt stress. Our results suggest that ABA and BRs act antagonistically on their target genes at or after the BIN2 step in BR signaling pathways, and suggest a mechanism by which plants fine-tune their growth, particularly when stress responses and growth compete for resources.

  13. Proepithelin Regulates Prostate Cancer Cell Biology by Promoting Cell Growth, Migration, and Anchorage-Independent Growth

    PubMed Central

    Monami, Giada; Emiliozzi, Velia; Bitto, Alessandro; Lovat, Francesca; Xu, Shi-Qiong; Goldoni, Silvia; Fassan, Matteo; Serrero, Ginette; Gomella, Leonard G.; Baffa, Raffaele; Iozzo, Renato V.; Morrione, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    The growth factor proepithelin has recently emerged as an important regulator of transformation in several physiological and pathological systems. In this study, we determined the biological roles of proepithelin in prostate cancer cells using purified human recombinant proepithelin as well as proepithelin-depletion strategies. Proepithelin promoted the migration of androgen-dependent and -independent human prostate cancer cells; androgen-independent DU145 cells were the more responsive. In these cells, proepithelin additionally stimulated wound closure, invasion, and promotion of cell growth in vitro. These effects required the activation of both the Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. We have analyzed proepithelin expression levels in different available prostate cancer microarray studies using the Oncomine database and found a statistically significant increase in proepithelin mRNA expression levels in prostate cancers compared with nonneoplastic controls. Notably, depletion of endogenous proepithelin by siRNA and antisense strategies impaired the ability of DU145 cells to grow and migrate after serum withdrawal and inhibited anchorage-independent growth. Our results provide the first evidence for a role of proepithelin in stimulating the migration, invasion, proliferation, and anchorage-independent growth of prostate cancer cells. This study supports the hypothesis that proepithelin may play a critical role as an autocrine growth factor in the establishment and initial progression of prostate cancer. Furthermore, proepithelin may prove to be a useful clinical marker for the diagnosis of prostate tumors. PMID:19179604

  14. Controlled-release systems for the insect growth regulator pyriproxyfen.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Liliana; Wolf, David; Markus, Arie; Wybraniec, Sławomir; Wiesman, Zeev

    2003-09-24

    A simple technique was developed for the production of controlled-release systems (CRSs) for pyriproxyfen, an insect growth regulator active against the larvae of Culex pipiens, the most common species of mosquito found in developed countries. The CRSs consisted of a spongy core material encapsulated in a coating of a polyurethane or polyurea hydrogel, into which the active ingredient had been incorporated. The coating also included a surfactant to improve the low solubility in water of pyriproxyfen. The light core material enabled the CRS to float on the water surface, where the mosquitoe larvae are found. The type and amount of the polymeric coating and the amount of surfactant influenced the release profiles into water of the active ingredient. The release profiles of the CRSs were adjusted to the life cycle of the C. pipiens mosquito in order to obtain their optimal activity on the eighth day, which corresponds to the time of larval maturity.

  15. Regulation of Microtubule Growth and Catastrophe: Unifying Theory and Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Bowne-Anderson, Hugo; Hibbel, Anneke; Howard, Jonathon

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have found that microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) can regulate the dynamical properties of microtubules in unexpected ways. For most MAPs, there is an inverse relationship between their effects on the speed of growth and the frequency of catastrophe, the conversion of a growing microtubule to a shrinking one. Such a negative correlation is predicted by the standard GTP-cap model, which posits that catastrophe is due to loss of a stabilizing cap of GTP-tubulin at the end of a growing microtubule. However, many other MAPs, notably Kinesin-4 and combinations of EB1 with XMAP215, contradict this general rule. In this review, we show that a more nuanced, but still simple, GTP-cap model, can account for the diverse regulatory activities of MAPs. PMID:26616192

  16. Triiodothyronine regulates cell growth and survival in renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Matak, Damian; Szymanski, Lukasz; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Lewicki, Slawomir; Zdanowski, Robert; Brzezianska-Lasota, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-10-01

    Triiodothyronine plays an important role in the regulation of kidney cell growth, differentiation and metabolism. Patients with renal cell cancer who develop hypothyreosis during tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment have statistically longer survival. In this study, we developed cell based model of triiodothyronine (T3) analysis in RCC and we show the different effects of T3 on renal cell cancer (RCC) cell growth response and expression of the thyroid hormone receptor in human renal cell cancer cell lines from primary and metastatic tumors along with human kidney cancer stem cells. Wild-type thyroid hormone receptor is ubiquitously expressed in human renal cancer cell lines, but normalized against healthy renal proximal tube cell expression its level is upregulated in Caki-2, RCC6, SKRC-42, SKRC-45 cell lines. On the contrary the mRNA level in the 769-P, ACHN, HKCSC, and HEK293 cells is significantly decreased. The TRβ protein was abundant in the cytoplasm of the 786-O, Caki-2, RCC6, and SKRC-45 cells and in the nucleus of SKRC-42, ACHN, 769-P and cancer stem cells. T3 has promoting effect on the cell proliferation of HKCSC, Caki-2, ASE, ACHN, SK-RC-42, SMKT-R2, Caki-1, 786-0, and SK-RC-45 cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, directly inhibits proliferation of RCC cells, while thyroid hormone receptor antagonist 1-850 (CAS 251310‑57-3) has less significant inhibitory impact. T3 stimulation does not abrogate inhibitory effect of sunitinib. Renal cancer tumor cells hypostimulated with T3 may be more responsive to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Moreover, some tumors may be considered as T3-independent and present aggressive phenotype with thyroid hormone receptor activated independently from the ligand. On the contrary proliferation induced by deregulated VHL and or c-Met pathways may transgress normal T3 mediated regulation of the cell cycle.

  17. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 directly regulates murine neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Charles-Félix; Fontaine, Romain H.; Soueid, Jihane; Tammela, Tuomas; Makinen, Taija; Alfaro-Cervello, Clara; Bonnaud, Fabien; Miguez, Andres; Benhaim, Lucile; Xu, Yunling; Barallobre, Maria-José; Moutkine, Imane; Lyytikkä, Johannes; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Pytowski, Bronislaw; Zalc, Bernard; Richardson, William; Kessaris, Nicoletta; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Alitalo, Kari; Eichmann, Anne; Thomas, Jean-Léon

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are slowly dividing astrocytes that are intimately associated with capillary endothelial cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the brain. Functionally, members of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family can stimulate neurogenesis as well as angiogenesis, but it has been unclear whether they act directly via VEGF receptors (VEGFRs) expressed by neural cells, or indirectly via the release of growth factors from angiogenic capillaries. Here, we show that VEGFR-3, a receptor required for lymphangiogenesis, is expressed by NSCs and is directly required for neurogenesis. Vegfr3:YFP reporter mice show VEGFR-3 expression in multipotent NSCs, which are capable of self-renewal and are activated by the VEGFR-3 ligand VEGF-C in vitro. Overexpression of VEGF-C stimulates VEGFR-3-expressing NSCs and neurogenesis in the SVZ without affecting angiogenesis. Conversely, conditional deletion of Vegfr3 in neural cells, inducible deletion in subventricular astrocytes, and blocking of VEGFR-3 signaling with antibodies reduce SVZ neurogenesis. Therefore, VEGF-C/VEGFR-3 signaling acts directly on NSCs and regulates adult neurogenesis, opening potential approaches for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21498572

  18. Symbiotic regulation of plant growth, development and reproduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, R.J.; Freeman, D. Carl; McArthur, E.D.; Kim, Y.-O.; Redman, R.S.

    2009-01-01

    The growth and development of rice (Oryzae sativa) seedlings was shown to be regulated epigenetically by a fungal endophyte. In contrast to un-inoculated (nonsymbiotic) plants, endophyte colonized (symbiotic) plants preferentially allocated resources into root growth until root hairs were well established. During that time symbiotic roots expanded at five times the rate observed in nonsymbiotic plants. Endophytes also influenced sexual reproduction of mature big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) plants. Two spatially distinct big sagebrush subspecies and their hybrids were symbiotic with unique fungal endophytes, despite being separated by only 380 m distance and 60 m elevation. A double reciprocal transplant experiment of parental and hybrid plants, and soils across the hybrid zone showed that fungal endophytes interact with the soils and different plant genotypes to confer enhanced plant reproduction in soil native to the endophyte and reduced reproduction in soil alien to the endophyte. Moreover, the most prevalent endophyte of the hybrid zone reduced the fitness of both parental subspecies. Because these endophytes are passed to the next generation of plants on seed coats, this interaction provides a selective advantage, habitat specificity, and the means of restricting gene flow, thereby making the hybrid zone stable, narrow and potentially leading to speciation. ?? 2009 Landes Bioscience.

  19. Computational insight into the chemical space of plant growth regulators.

    PubMed

    Bushkov, Nikolay A; Veselov, Mark S; Chuprov-Netochin, Roman N; Marusich, Elena I; Majouga, Alexander G; Volynchuk, Polina B; Shumilina, Daria V; Leonov, Sergey V; Ivanenkov, Yan A

    2016-02-01

    An enormous technological progress has resulted in an explosive growth in the amount of biological and chemical data that is typically multivariate and tangled in structure. Therefore, several computational approaches have mainly focused on dimensionality reduction and convenient representation of high-dimensional datasets to elucidate the relationships between the observed activity (or effect) and calculated parameters commonly expressed in terms of molecular descriptors. We have collected the experimental data available in patent and scientific publications as well as specific databases for various agrochemicals. The resulting dataset was then thoroughly analyzed using Kohonen-based self-organizing technique. The overall aim of the presented study is to investigate whether the developed in silico model can be applied to predict the agrochemical activity of small molecule compounds and, at the same time, to offer further insights into the distinctive features of different agrochemical categories. The preliminary external validation with several plant growth regulators demonstrated a relatively high prediction power (67%) of the constructed model. This study is, actually, the first example of a large-scale modeling in the field of agrochemistry.

  20. Light regulation of the growth response in corn root gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, M. O.; Leopold, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    Roots of Merit variety corn (Zea mays L.) require red light for orthogravitropic curvature. Experiments were undertaken to identify the step in the pathway from gravity perception to asymmetric growth on which light may act. Red light was effective in inducing gravitropism whether it was supplied concomitant with or as long as 30 minutes after the gravity stimulus (GS). The presentation time was the same whether the GS was supplied in red light or in darkness. Red light given before the GS slightly enhanced the rate of curvature but had little effect on the lag time or on the final curvature. This enhancement was expanded by a delay between the red light pulse and the GS. These results indicate that gravity perception and at least the initial transduction steps proceed in the dark. Light may regulate the final growth (motor) phase of gravitropism. The time required for full expression of the light enhancement of curvature is consistent with its involvement in some light-stimulated biosynthetic event.

  1. Light regulation of the growth response in corn root gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, M. O.; Leopold, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    Roots of Merit variety corn (Zea mays L.) require red light for orthogravitropic curvature. Experiments were undertaken to identify the step in the pathway from gravity perception to asymmetric growth on which light may act. Red light was effective in inducing gravitropism whether it was supplied concomitant with or as long as 30 minutes after the gravity stimulus (GS). The presentation time was the same whether the GS was supplied in red light or in darkness. Red light given before the GS slightly enhanced the rate of curvature but had little effect on the lag time or on the final curvature. This enhancement was expanded by a delay between the red light pulse and the GS. These results indicate that gravity perception and at least the initial transduction steps proceed in the dark. Light may regulate the final growth (motor) phase of gravitropism. The time required for full expression of the light enhancement of curvature is consistent with its involvement in some light-stimulated biosynthetic event.

  2. Mechanisms of growth cone repulsion

    PubMed Central

    Krull, Catherine E

    2010-01-01

    Research conducted in the last century suggested that chemoattractants guide cells or their processes to appropriate locations during development. Today, we know that many of the molecules involved in cellular guidance can act as chemorepellents that prevent migration into inappropriate territories. Here, we review some of the early seminal experiments and our current understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:20711492

  3. Minireview: Mechanisms of Growth Hormone-Mediated Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    GH exerts a diverse array of physiological actions that include prominent roles in growth and metabolism, with a major contribution via stimulating IGF-1 synthesis. GH achieves its effects by influencing gene expression profiles, and Igf1 is a key transcriptional target of GH signaling in liver and other tissues. This review examines the mechanisms of GH-mediated gene regulation that begin with signal transduction pathways activated downstream of the GH receptor and continue with chromatin events at target genes and additionally encompasses the topics of negative regulation and cross talk with other cellular inputs. The transcription factor, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b, is regarded as the major signaling pathway by which GH achieves its physiological effects, including in stimulating Igf1 gene transcription in liver. Recent studies exploring the mechanisms of how activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b accomplishes this are highlighted, which begin to characterize epigenetic features at regulatory domains of the Igf1 locus. Further research in this field offers promise to better understand the GH-IGF-1 axis in normal physiology and disease and to identify strategies to manipulate the axis to improve human health. PMID:24825400

  4. Minireview: mechanisms of growth hormone-mediated gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Chia, Dennis J

    2014-07-01

    GH exerts a diverse array of physiological actions that include prominent roles in growth and metabolism, with a major contribution via stimulating IGF-1 synthesis. GH achieves its effects by influencing gene expression profiles, and Igf1 is a key transcriptional target of GH signaling in liver and other tissues. This review examines the mechanisms of GH-mediated gene regulation that begin with signal transduction pathways activated downstream of the GH receptor and continue with chromatin events at target genes and additionally encompasses the topics of negative regulation and cross talk with other cellular inputs. The transcription factor, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b, is regarded as the major signaling pathway by which GH achieves its physiological effects, including in stimulating Igf1 gene transcription in liver. Recent studies exploring the mechanisms of how activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b accomplishes this are highlighted, which begin to characterize epigenetic features at regulatory domains of the Igf1 locus. Further research in this field offers promise to better understand the GH-IGF-1 axis in normal physiology and disease and to identify strategies to manipulate the axis to improve human health.

  5. Epidermal Growth Factor Regulates Hematopoietic Regeneration Following Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Phuong L.; Himburg, Heather A.; Helms, Katherine; Russell, J. Lauren; Fixsen, Emma; Quarmyne, Mamle; Harris, Jeffrey R.; Deoliviera, Divino; Sullivan, Julie M.; Chao, Nelson J.; Kirsch, David G.; Chute, John P.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms which regulate HSC regeneration following myelosuppressive injury are not well understood. We identified epidermal growth factor (EGF) to be highly enriched in the bone marrow (BM) serum of mice bearing deletion of Bak and Bax in Tie2+ cells (Tie2Cre;Bak1−/−;Baxfl/− mice), which displayed radioprotection of the HSC pool and 100% survival following lethal dose total body irradiation (TBI). BM HSCs from wild type mice expressed functional EGFR and systemic administration of EGF promoted the recovery of the HSC pool in vivo and the improved survival of mice following TBI. Conversely, administration of erlotinib, an EGFR antagonist, significantly decreased both HSC regeneration and mice survival following TBI. VavCre;EGFRfl/+ mice also demonstrated delayed recovery of BM stem/progenitor cells following TBI compared to VavCre;EGFR+/+ mice. Mechanistically, EGF reduced radiation-induced apoptosis of HSCs and mediated this effect via repression of the proapoptotic protein, PUMA. EGFR signaling regulates HSC regeneration following myelosuppressive injury. PMID:23377280

  6. Hepatocyte Growth Factor Regulates Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Day, Regina M.; Thiel, Gerald; Lum, Julie; Chévere, Rubén D.; Yang, Yongzhen; Stevens, Joanne; Sibert, Laura; Fanburg, Barry L.

    2008-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a mitogen, morphogen, and motogen that functions in tissue healing and acts as an anti-fibrotic factor. The mechanism for this is not well understood. Recent studies implicate somatic angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in fibrosis. We examined the effects of HGF on ACE expression in bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (BPAEC). Short term treatment of BPAEC with HGF transiently increased both ACE mRNA (3 h) and activity (24 h), as determined by ACE protease assays and reverse transcription-PCR. Incubation of BPAEC with HGF for longer periods suppressed ACE mRNA (6 h) and activity (72 h). In contrast, phorbol ester (PMA) treatment produced sustained increase in ACE mRNA and activity. We examined the short term molecular effects of HGF on ACE using PMA for comparison. HGF and PMA increased transcription from a luciferase reporter with the core ACE promoter, which contains a composite binding site for SP1/3 and Egr-1. Immunocytochemistry and electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that both HGF and PMA increased Egr-1 binding. HGF also increased SP3 binding, as measured by EMSA. However, HGF and PMA increased the cellular activity of only Egr-1, not SP3, as measured by luciferase reporter assays. Deletion of the Egr-1 site in the reporter construct completely abrogated HGF-induced transcription but only ~50% of PMA-induced activity. Expression of dominant negative Egr-1 and SP3 blocked up-regulation of the ACE promoter by HGF but only reduced up-regulation by PMA. These results show that HGF transiently increases gene transcription of ACE via activation of Egr-1, whereas PMA regulation involves Egr-1 and additional factor(s). PMID:14679188

  7. Expression of Drosophila FOXO regulates growth and can phenocopy starvation

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Jamie M; Davidge, Jason T; Lockyer, Joseph M; Staveley, Brian E

    2003-01-01

    Background Components of the insulin signaling pathway are important regulators of growth. The FOXO (forkhead box, sub-group "O") transcription factors regulate cellular processes under conditions of low levels of insulin signaling. Studies in mammalian cell culture show that activation of FOXO transcription factors causes cell death or cell cycle arrest. The Caenorhabiditis elegans homologue of FOXO, Daf-16, is required for the formation of dauer larvae in response to nutritional stress. In addition, FOXO factors have been implicated in stress resistance and longevity. Results We have identified the Drosophila melanogaster homologue of FOXO (dFOXO), which is conserved in amino acid sequence compared with the mammalian FOXO homologues and Daf-16. Expression of dFOXO during early larval development causes inhibition of larval growth and alterations in feeding behavior. Inhibition of larval growth is reversible upon discontinuation of dFOXO expression. Expression of dFOXO during the third larval instar or at low levels during development leads to the generation of adults that are reduced in size. Analysis of the wings and eyes of these small flies indicates that the reduction in size is due to decreases in cell size and cell number. Overexpression of dFOXO in the developing eye leads to a characteristic phenotype with reductions in cell size and cell number. This phenotype can be rescued by co-expression of upstream insulin signaling components, dPI3K and dAkt, however, this rescue is not seen when FOXO is mutated to a constitutively active form. Conclusions dFOXO is conserved in both sequence and regulatory mechanisms when compared with other FOXO homologues. The establishment of Drosophila as a model for the study of FOXO transcription factors should prove beneficial to determining the biological role of these signaling molecules. The alterations in larval development seen upon overexpression of dFOXO closely mimic the phenotypic effects of starvation, suggesting a

  8. Regulation of growth hormone secretion by the growth hormone releasing hexapeptide (GHRP-6).

    PubMed

    Micic, D; Mallo, F; Peino, R; Cordido, F; Leal-Cerro, A; Garcia-Mayor, R V; Casanueva, F F

    1993-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion is regulated by a complex system of central and peripheral signals. Recently, a new GH-releasing hexapeptide (His-D-Trp-Ala-Trp-D-Phe-Lys-NH2) called GHRP-6 which specifically releases GH has been studied. In the present work the mechanism of action of GHRP-6 has been addressed in experimental animal models as well as in obese subjects. GHRP-6 releases GH independently of the hypothalamic factors GHRH and somatostatin and is a powerful GH releaser in obesity.

  9. The growth factor myostatin, a key regulator in skeletal muscle growth and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Matsakas, A; Diel, P

    2005-03-01

    Skeletal muscle possesses the ability to both respond and adapt to changing environmental stimuli, leading to a set of metabolic and morphological adaptations, which allow it to better meet the energy demands of sustained physical activity. Great progress has been achieved over the past years by means of innovative molecular techniques, which has led to the discovery of new growth factors and the identification of molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of muscle development. These findings provide new starting points to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the adaptation of skeletal muscle to exercise training. One of these new identified growth factors is myostatin, a member of the transforming growth factor-beta family of proteins that has been demonstrated to play a fundamental role in the regulation of skeletal muscle growth during embryogenesis. Blocking of the myostatin signalling transduction pathway by specific inhibitors and genetic manipulations has been shown to result in a dramatic increase of skeletal muscle mass. This review focuses on the importance of myostatin in mediating skeletal muscle homeostasis in response to training as well as during the progress of myogenic disease, like atrophy or dystrophy. Manipulations of myostatin signalling may be useful for agriculture applications, treatment of muscle diseases, inhibition of muscle atrophy and last but not least as life style drugs in antiaging therapies or manipulations of the muscle to fat ratio. Drugs with the ability to modulate myostatin signalling may have the potential to enhance physical performance in athletes and therefore they probably represent a new class of doping substances.

  10. The role of collapsing and cone rafting on eruption style changes and final cone morphology: Los Morados scoria cone, Mendoza, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Karoly; Risso, Corina; Nullo, Francisco; Kereszturi, Gabor

    2011-06-01

    Payún Matru Volcanic Field is a Quaternary monogenetic volcanic field that hosts scoria cones with perfect to breached morphologies. Los Morados complex is a group of at least four closely spaced scoria cones (Los Morados main cone and the older Cones A, B, and C). Los Morados main cone was formed by a long lived eruption of months to years. After an initial Hawaiian-style stage, the eruption changed to a normal Strombolian, conebuilding style, forming a cone over 150 metres high on a northward dipping (˜4°) surface. An initial cone gradually grew until a lava flow breached the cone's base and rafted an estimated 10% of the total volume. A sudden sector collapse initiated a dramatic decompression in the upper part of the feeding conduit and triggered violent a Strombolian style eruptive stage. Subsequently, the eruption became more stable, and changed to a regular Strombolian style that partially rebuilt the cone. A likely increase in magma flux coupled with the gradual growth of a new cone caused another lava flow outbreak at the structurally weakened earlier breach site. For a second time, the unstable flank of the cone was rafted, triggering a second violent Strombolian eruptive stage which was followed by a Hawaiian style lava fountain stage. The lava fountaining was accompanied by a steady outpour of voluminous lava emission accompanied by constant rafting of the cone flank, preventing the healing of the cone. Santa Maria is another scoria cone built on a nearly flat pre-eruption surface. Despite this it went through similar stages as Los Morados main cone, but probably not in as dramatic a manner as Los Morados. In contrast to these examples of large breached cones, volumetrically smaller cones, associated to less extensive lava flows, were able to heal raft/collapse events, due to the smaller magma output and flux rates. Our evidence shows that scoria cone growth is a complex process, and is a consequence of the magma internal parameters (e.g. volatile

  11. Cone visual pigments.

    PubMed

    Imamoto, Yasushi; Shichida, Yoshinori

    2014-05-01

    Cone visual pigments are visual opsins that are present in vertebrate cone photoreceptor cells and act as photoreceptor molecules responsible for photopic vision. Like the rod visual pigment rhodopsin, which is responsible for scotopic vision, cone visual pigments contain the chromophore 11-cis-retinal, which undergoes cis-trans isomerization resulting in the induction of conformational changes of the protein moiety to form a G protein-activating state. There are multiple types of cone visual pigments with different absorption maxima, which are the molecular basis of color discrimination in animals. Cone visual pigments form a phylogenetic sister group with non-visual opsin groups such as pinopsin, VA opsin, parapinopsin and parietopsin groups. Cone visual pigments diverged into four groups with different absorption maxima, and the rhodopsin group diverged from one of the four groups of cone visual pigments. The photochemical behavior of cone visual pigments is similar to that of pinopsin but considerably different from those of other non-visual opsins. G protein activation efficiency of cone visual pigments is also comparable to that of pinopsin but higher than that of the other non-visual opsins. Recent measurements with sufficient time-resolution demonstrated that G protein activation efficiency of cone visual pigments is lower than that of rhodopsin, which is one of the molecular bases for the lower amplification of cones compared to rods. In this review, the uniqueness of cone visual pigments is shown by comparison of their molecular properties with those of non-visual opsins and rhodopsin. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Retinal Proteins - You can teach an old dog new tricks. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Berkeley Lighting Cone

    SciTech Connect

    Lask, Kathleen; Gadgil, Ashok

    2016-10-24

    A lighting cone is a simple metal cone placed on the fuel bed of a stove during ignition to act as a chimney, increasing the draft through the fuel bed. Many stoves tend to be difficult to light due to poor draft through the fuel bed, so lighting cones are used in various parts of the world as an inexpensive accessory to help with ignition.

  13. Turning cones off: the role of the 9-methyl group of retinal in red cones.

    PubMed

    Estevez, Maureen E; Ala-Laurila, Petri; Crouch, Rosalie K; Cornwall, M Carter

    2006-12-01

    Our ability to see in bright light depends critically on the rapid rate at which cone photoreceptors detect and adapt to changes in illumination. This is achieved, in part, by their rapid response termination. In this study, we investigate the hypothesis that this rapid termination of the response in red cones is dependent on interactions between the 9-methyl group of retinal and red cone opsin, which are required for timely metarhodopsin (Meta) II decay. We used single-cell electrical recordings of flash responses to assess the kinetics of response termination and to calculate guanylyl cyclase (GC) rates in salamander red cones containing native visual pigment as well as visual pigment regenerated with 11-cis 9-demethyl retinal, an analogue of retinal in which the 9-methyl group is missing. After exposure to bright light that photoactivated more than approximately 0.2% of the pigment, red cones containing the analogue pigment had a slower recovery of both flash response amplitudes and GC rates (up to 10 times slower at high bleaches) than red cones containing 11-cis retinal. This finding is consistent with previously published biochemical data demonstrating that red cone opsin regenerated in vitro with 11-cis 9-demethyl retinal exhibited prolonged activation as a result of slowed Meta II decay. Our results suggest that two different mechanisms regulate the recovery of responsiveness in red cones after exposure to light. We propose a model in which the response recovery in red cones can be regulated (particularly at high light intensities) by the Meta II decay rate if that rate has been inhibited. In red cones, the interaction of the 9-methyl group of retinal with opsin promotes efficient Meta II decay and, thus, the rapid rate of recovery.

  14. Ligand Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Growth in Plants.

    PubMed

    Haruta, Miyoshi; Sussman, Michael R

    2017-01-01

    Growth and development of multicellular organisms are coordinately regulated by various signaling pathways involving the communication of inter- and intracellular components. To form the appropriate body patterns, cellular growth and development are modulated by either stimulating or inhibiting these pathways. Hormones and second messengers help to mediate the initiation and/or interaction of the various signaling pathways in all complex multicellular eukaryotes. In plants, hormones include small organic molecules, as well as larger peptides and small proteins, which, as in animals, act as ligands and interact with receptor proteins to trigger rapid biochemical changes and induce the intracellular transcriptional and long-term physiological responses. During the past two decades, the availability of genetic and genomic resources in the model plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana, has greatly helped in the discovery of plant hormone receptors and the components of signal transduction pathways and mechanisms used by these immobile but highly complex organisms. Recently, it has been shown that two of the most important plant hormones, auxin and abscisic acid (ABA), act through signaling pathways that have not yet been recognized in animals. For example, auxins stimulate cell elongation by bringing negatively acting transcriptional repressor proteins to the proteasome to be degraded, thus unleashing the gene expression program required for increasing cell size. The "dormancy" inducing hormone, ABA, binds to soluble receptor proteins and inhibits a specific class of protein phosphatases (PP2C), which activates phosphorylation signaling leading to transcriptional changes needed for the desiccation of the seeds prior to entering dormancy. While these two hormone receptors have no known animal counterparts, there are also many similarities between animal and plant signaling pathways. For example, in plants, the largest single gene family in the genome is the protein kinase

  15. Wnt5a Regulates Midbrain Dopaminergic Axon Growth and Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Blakely, Brette D.; Bye, Christopher R.; Fernando, Chathurini V.; Horne, Malcolm K.; Macheda, Maria L.; Stacker, Steven A.; Arenas, Ernest; Parish, Clare L.

    2011-01-01

    During development, precise temporal and spatial gradients are responsible for guiding axons to their appropriate targets. Within the developing ventral midbrain (VM) the cues that guide dopaminergic (DA) axons to their forebrain targets remain to be fully elucidated. Wnts are morphogens that have been identified as axon guidance molecules. Several Wnts are expressed in the VM where they regulate the birth of DA neurons. Here, we describe that a precise temporo-spatial expression of Wnt5a accompanies the development of nigrostriatal projections by VM DA neurons. In mice at E11.5, Wnt5a is expressed in the VM where it was found to promote DA neurite and axonal growth in VM primary cultures. By E14.5, when DA axons are approaching their striatal target, Wnt5a causes DA neurite retraction in primary cultures. Co-culture of VM explants with Wnt5a-overexpressing cell aggregates revealed that Wnt5a is capable of repelling DA neurites. Antagonism experiments revealed that the effects of Wnt5a are mediated by the Frizzled receptors and by the small GTPase, Rac1 (a component of the non-canonical Wnt planar cell polarity pathway). Moreover, the effects were specific as they could be blocked by Wnt5a antibody, sFRPs and RYK-Fc. The importance of Wnt5a in DA axon morphogenesis was further verified in Wnt5a−/− mice, where fasciculation of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) as well as the density of DA neurites in the MFB and striatal terminals were disrupted. Thus, our results identify a novel role of Wnt5a in DA axon growth and guidance. PMID:21483795

  16. Spontaneous Calcium Oscillations Regulate Human Cardiac Progenitor Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Martins, João; Rondon-Clavo, Carlos; Tugal, Derin; Korn, Justin A; Rizzi, Roberto; Padin-Iruegas, Maria Elena; Ottolenghi, Sergio; De Angelis, Antonella; Urbanek, Konrad; Iwata, Noriko; D’Amario, Domenico; Hosoda, Toru; Leri, Annarosa; Kajstura, Jan; Anversa, Piero; Rota, Marcello

    2009-01-01

    Rationale The adult heart possesses a pool of progenitor cells stored in myocardial niches but the mechanisms involved in the activation of this cell compartment are currently unknown. Objective Ca2+ promotes cell growth raising the possibility that changes in intracellular Ca2+ initiate division of c-kit-positive human cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs) and determine their fate. Methods and Results Ca2+ oscillations were identified in hCPCs and these events occurred independently from coupling with cardiomyocytes or the presence of extracellular Ca2+. These findings were confirmed in the heart of transgenic mice in which EGFP was under the control of the c-kit-promoter. Ca2+ oscillations in hCPCs were regulated by the release of Ca2+ from the ER through activation of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and the re-uptake of Ca2+ by the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump (SERCA). IP3Rs and SERCA were highly expressed in hCPCs while ryanodine receptors were not detected. Although Na+-Ca2+ exchanger, store-operated Ca2+-channels and plasma membrane Ca2+-pump were present and functional in hCPCs, they had no direct effects on Ca2+ oscillations. Conversely, Ca2+ oscillations and their frequency markedly increased with ATP and histamine which activated purinoceptors and histamine-1 receptors highly expressed in hCPCs. Importantly, Ca2+ oscillations in hCPCs were coupled with the entry of cells into the cell cycle and BrdUrd incorporation. Induction of Ca2+ oscillations in hCPCs prior to their intramyocardial delivery to infarcted hearts was associated with enhanced engraftment and expansion of these cells promoting the generation of a large myocyte progeny. Conclusion IP3R-mediated Ca2+ mobilization control hCPC growth and their regenerative potential. PMID:19745162

  17. Black hole evolution - I. Supernova-regulated black hole growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Yohan; Volonteri, Marta; Silk, Joseph; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Teyssier, Romain

    2015-09-01

    The growth of a supermassive black hole (BH) is determined by how much gas the host galaxy is able to feed it, which in turn is controlled by the cosmic environment, through galaxy mergers and accretion of cosmic flows that time how galaxies obtain their gas, and also by internal processes in the galaxy, such as star formation and feedback from stars and the BH itself. In this paper, we study the growth of a 1012 M⊙ halo at z = 2, which is the progenitor of a group of galaxies at z = 0, and of its central BH by means of a high-resolution zoomed cosmological simulation, the Seth simulation. We study the evolution of the BH driven by the accretion of cold gas in the galaxy, and explore the efficiency of the feedback from supernovae (SNe). For a relatively inefficient energy input from SNe, the BH grows at the Eddington rate from early times, and reaches self-regulation once it is massive enough. We find that at early cosmic times z > 3.5, efficient feedback from SNe forbids the formation of a settled disc as well as the accumulation of dense cold gas in the vicinity of the BH and starves the central compact object. As the galaxy and its halo accumulate mass, they become able to confine the nuclear inflows provided by major mergers and the BH grows at a sustained near-to-Eddington accretion rate. We argue that this mechanism should be ubiquitous amongst low-mass galaxies, corresponding to galaxies with a stellar mass below ≲ 109 M⊙ in our simulations.

  18. Growth differentiation factor 5 is a key physiological regulator of dendrite growth during development.

    PubMed

    Osório, Catarina; Chacón, Pedro J; Kisiswa, Lilian; White, Matthew; Wyatt, Sean; Rodríguez-Tébar, Alfredo; Davies, Alun M

    2013-12-01

    Dendrite size and morphology are key determinants of the functional properties of neurons. Here, we show that growth differentiation factor 5 (GDF5), a member of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) subclass of the transforming growth factor β superfamily with a well-characterised role in limb morphogenesis, is a key regulator of the growth and elaboration of pyramidal cell dendrites in the developing hippocampus. Pyramidal cells co-express GDF5 and its preferred receptors, BMP receptor 1B and BMP receptor 2, during development. In culture, GDF5 substantially increased dendrite, but not axon, elongation from these neurons by a mechanism that depends on activation of SMADs 1/5/8 and upregulation of the transcription factor HES5. In vivo, the apical and basal dendritic arbours of pyramidal cells throughout the hippocampus were markedly stunted in both homozygous and heterozygous Gdf5 null mutants, indicating that dendrite size and complexity are exquisitely sensitive to the level of endogenous GDF5 synthesis.

  19. Suppressing thyroid hormone signaling preserves cone photoreceptors in mouse models of retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongwei; Thapa, Arjun; Morris, Lynsie; Redmond, T Michael; Baehr, Wolfgang; Ding, Xi-Qin

    2014-03-04

    Cone phototransduction and survival of cones in the human macula is essential for color vision and for visual acuity. Progressive cone degeneration in age-related macular degeneration, Stargardt disease, and recessive cone dystrophies is a major cause of blindness. Thyroid hormone (TH) signaling, which regulates cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, plays a central role in cone opsin expression and patterning in the retina. Here, we investigated whether TH signaling affects cone viability in inherited retinal degeneration mouse models. Retinol isomerase RPE65-deficient mice [a model of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) with rapid cone loss] and cone photoreceptor function loss type 1 mice (severe recessive achromatopsia) were used to determine whether suppressing TH signaling with antithyroid treatment reduces cone death. Further, cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channel B subunit-deficient mice (moderate achromatopsia) and guanylate cyclase 2e-deficient mice (LCA with slower cone loss) were used to determine whether triiodothyronine (T3) treatment (stimulating TH signaling) causes deterioration of cones. We found that cone density in retinol isomerase RPE65-deficient and cone photoreceptor function loss type 1 mice increased about sixfold following antithyroid treatment. Cone density in cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channel B subunit-deficient and guanylate cyclase 2e-deficient mice decreased about 40% following T3 treatment. The effect of TH signaling on cone viability appears to be independent of its regulation on cone opsin expression. This work demonstrates that suppressing TH signaling in retina dystrophy mouse models is protective of cones, providing insights into cone preservation and therapeutic interventions.

  20. Suppressing thyroid hormone signaling preserves cone photoreceptors in mouse models of retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongwei; Thapa, Arjun; Morris, Lynsie; Redmond, T. Michael; Baehr, Wolfgang; Ding, Xi-Qin

    2014-01-01

    Cone phototransduction and survival of cones in the human macula is essential for color vision and for visual acuity. Progressive cone degeneration in age-related macular degeneration, Stargardt disease, and recessive cone dystrophies is a major cause of blindness. Thyroid hormone (TH) signaling, which regulates cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, plays a central role in cone opsin expression and patterning in the retina. Here, we investigated whether TH signaling affects cone viability in inherited retinal degeneration mouse models. Retinol isomerase RPE65-deficient mice [a model of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) with rapid cone loss] and cone photoreceptor function loss type 1 mice (severe recessive achromatopsia) were used to determine whether suppressing TH signaling with antithyroid treatment reduces cone death. Further, cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channel B subunit-deficient mice (moderate achromatopsia) and guanylate cyclase 2e-deficient mice (LCA with slower cone loss) were used to determine whether triiodothyronine (T3) treatment (stimulating TH signaling) causes deterioration of cones. We found that cone density in retinol isomerase RPE65-deficient and cone photoreceptor function loss type 1 mice increased about sixfold following antithyroid treatment. Cone density in cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channel B subunit-deficient and guanylate cyclase 2e-deficient mice decreased about 40% following T3 treatment. The effect of TH signaling on cone viability appears to be independent of its regulation on cone opsin expression. This work demonstrates that suppressing TH signaling in retina dystrophy mouse models is protective of cones, providing insights into cone preservation and therapeutic interventions. PMID:24550448

  1. Evaluation of the control of mosquitoes with insect growth regulators.

    PubMed

    Ho, C M; Wu, S H; Wu, C C

    1990-07-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of eight insect growth regulators (IGRs) (chlorfluazuron, diflubenzuron, EL-494, flufenoxuron, teflubenzuron, juglone, plumbagin and methoprene) against five mosquito vectors (Armigeres subalbatus, Aedes albopictus, Aedes aegypti, Culex tritaeniorhynchus, and Culex quinquefasciatus) was investigated in the laboratory. The EC50s of chlorfluazuron, diflubenzuron, EL-494, flufenoxuron, teflubenzuron, and methoprene against the five mosquitoes ranged from 0.0001 to 0.3 ppm and those of juglone and plumbagin from 3-25 ppm. The five mosquito species had similar tolerances to the test IGRs. At pH 5 to 9, the effectiveness of the first five chemicals was very stable. After ultraviolet irradiation or heat management (45 degrees C-60 degrees C), diflubenzuron and flufenoxuron were very stable. EL-494 was not stable when exposed to ultraviolet irradiation or heat. Under 0.1 ppm, teflubenzuron was not stable upon exposure to heat and chlorfluazuron and methoprene were not stable when exposed to ultraviolet irradiation. Piperonyl butoxide reduces the effectiveness of the five IGRs. Administration of diflubenzuron (1-5 ppm), flufenoxuron (0.025 ppm), and teflubenzuron (1-5 ppm) reduced Culex quinquefasciatus larvae in ditches by 40-90%. The administration of diflubenzuron (0.5 ppm) to containers reduced 97% of the Aedes albopictus larvae.

  2. Insect growth regulators and insect control: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed Central

    Siddall, J B

    1976-01-01

    Insect growth regulators (IGRs) of the juvenile hormone type alter physiological processes essential to insect development and appear to act specifically on insects. Three natural juvenile hormones have been found in insects but not in other organisms. Future use of antagonists or inhibitors of hormone synthesis may be technically possible as an advantageous extension of pest control by IGRs. A documented survey of the properties, metabolism, toxicology, and uses of the most commercially advanced chemical, methoprene, shows it to be environmentally acceptable and toxicologically innocuous. Derivation of its current use patterns is discussed and limitations on these are noted. Residue levels and their measurement in the ppb region have allowed exemption from the requirement of tolerances in the EPA registered use of methoprene for mosquito control. Tolerances for foods accompany its fully approved use for control of manure breeding flies through a cattle feed supplement. The human health effects of using this chemical appear to be purely beneficial, but further advances through new IGR chemicals appear unlikely without major changes in regulatory and legislative policy. PMID:976222

  3. Regulation and 3 dimensional culture of tertiary follicle growth.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Yong-Pil

    2012-09-01

    It has been revealed that multiple cohorts of tertiary follicles develop during some animal estrous cycle and the human menstrual cycle. To reach developmental competence, oocytes need the support of somatic cells. During embryogenesis, the primordial germ cells appear, travel to the gonadal rudiments, and form follicles. The female germ cells develop within the somatic cells of the ovary, granulosa cells, and theca cells. How the oocyte and follicle cells support each other has been seriously studied. The latest technologies in genes and proteins and genetic engineering have allowed us to collect a great deal of information about folliculogenesis. For example, a few web pages (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov; http://mrg.genetics.washington.edu) provide access to databases of genomes, sequences of transcriptomes, and various tools for analyzing and discovering genes important in ovarian development. Formation of the antrum (tertiary follicle) is the final phase of folliculogenesis and the transition from intraovarian to extraovian regulation. This final step coordinates with the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. On the other hand, currently, follicle physiology is under intense investigation, as little is known about how to overcome women's ovarian problems or how to develop competent oocytes from in vitro follicle culture or transplantation. In this review, some of the known roles of hormones and some of the genes involved in tertiary follicle growth and the general characteristics of tertiary follicles are summarized. In addition, in vitro culture of tertiary follicles is also discussed as a study model and an assisted reproductive technology model.

  4. Dechlorination of chloroacetanilide herbicides by plant growth regulator sodium bisulfite.

    PubMed

    Bian, Haitao; Chen, Jingwen; Cai, Xiyun; Liu, Ping; Wang, Ying; Huang, Liping; Qiao, Xianliang; Hao, Ce

    2009-08-01

    Chloroacetanilide herbicides are frequently detected in groundwater and surface waters, and pose high risks to aquatic biota. In this study, sodium bisulfite (NaHSO(3)), a plant growth regulator used in China, was used to remove three chloroacetanilide herbicides including alachlor, acetochlor and S-metolachlor. These herbicides were rapidly dechlorinated by NaHSO(3) in neutral conditions. The dechlorination was accelerated with increasing pH, temperature and NaHSO(3) concentrations. Kinetic analysis and mass spectrum identification revealed that the reaction followed S(N)2 nucleophilic substitution, in which the chlorine was replaced by the reactive specie sulfite. Alachlor and its isomer acetochlor had similar reaction rates, whereas they were more readily transformed than S-metolachlor that had larger steric hindrance and weaker electrophilicity. The transformation products were chloroacetanilide ethane sulfonic acids (ESAs), which were also encountered as major metabolites of these herbicides in natural environment via common metabolic pathways and were less toxic to green algae compared to the parent herbicides. These results indicate that NaHSO(3) can accelerate transformation of chloroacetanilide herbicides to the less toxic transformation products by nucleophilic substitution and dechlorination in aquatic environment. NaHSO(3) can be potentially used for the removal of chloroacetanilide herbicides from wastewater effluent, spill sites and accidental discharge.

  5. Branching geometry induced by lung self-regulated growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clément, Raphaël; Douady, Stéphane; Mauroy, Benjamin

    2012-12-01

    Branching morphogenesis is a widely spread phenomenon in nature. In organogenesis, it results from the inhomogeneous growth of the epithelial sheet, leading to its repeated branching into surrounding mesoderm. Lung morphogenesis is an emblematic example of tree-like organogenesis common to most mammals. The core signalling network is well identified, notably the Fgf10/Shh couple, required to initiate and maintain branching. In a previous study, we showed that the restriction by SHH of Fgf10 expression domain to distal mesenchyme spontaneously induces differential epithelial proliferation leading to branching. A simple Laplacian model qualitatively reproduced FGF10 dynamics in the mesenchyme and the spontaneous self-avoiding branching morphogenesis. However, early lung geometry has several striking features that remain to be addressed. In this paper, we investigate, through simulations and data analysis, if the FGF10-diffusion scenario accounts for the following aspects of lung morphology: size dispersion, asymmetry of branching events, and distal epithelium-mesothelium equilibrium. We report that they emerge spontaneously in the model, and that most of the underlying mechanisms can be understood as dynamical interactions between gradients and shape. This suggests that specific regulation may not be required for the emergence of these striking geometrical features.

  6. Regulation of scar formation by vascular endothelial growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Wilgus, Traci A.; Ferreira, Ahalia M.; Oberyszyn, Tatiana M.; Bergdall, Valerie K.; DiPietro, Luisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A) is known for its effects on endothelial cells and as a positive mediator of angiogenesis. VEGF is thought to promote the repair of cutaneous wounds due to its pro-angiogenic properties, but its ability to regulate other aspects of wound repair, such as the generation of scar tissue has not been well studied. We examined the role of VEGF in scar tissue production utilizing models of scarless and fibrotic repair. Scarless fetal wounds had lower levels of VEGF and were less vascular than fibrotic fetal wounds, and the scarless phenotype could be converted to a scar-forming phenotype by adding exogenous VEGF. Similarly, neutralization of VEGF reduced vascularity and decreased scar formation in adult wounds. These results show that VEGF levels have a strong influence on scar tissue formation. Our data suggest that VEGF may not simply function as a mediator of wound angiogenesis, but instead may play a more diverse role in the wound repair process. PMID:18427552

  7. Circadian clock regulation of skeletal muscle growth and repair

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Somik; Ma, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the circadian clock, a transcriptional/translational feedback circuit that generates ~24-hour oscillations in behavior and physiology, is a key temporal regulatory mechanism involved in many important aspects of muscle physiology. Given the clock as an evolutionarily-conserved time-keeping mechanism that synchronizes internal physiology to environmental cues, locomotor activities initiated by skeletal muscle enable entrainment to the light-dark cycles on earth, thus ensuring organismal survival and fitness. Despite the current understanding of the role of molecular clock in preventing age-related sarcopenia, investigations into the underlying molecular pathways that transmit clock signals to the maintenance of skeletal muscle growth and function are only emerging. In the current review, the importance of the muscle clock in maintaining muscle mass during development, repair and aging, together with its contribution to muscle metabolism, will be discussed. Based on our current understandings of how tissue-intrinsic muscle clock functions in the key aspects muscle physiology, interventions targeting the myogenic-modulatory activities of the clock circuit may offer new avenues for prevention and treatment of muscular diseases. Studies of mechanisms underlying circadian clock function and regulation in skeletal muscle warrant continued efforts. PMID:27540471

  8. Hedgehog Signaling Regulates Bladder Cancer Growth And Tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Dennis Liang; Sanchez-Mejias, Avencia; Wang, Zhiqiang; Flaveny, Colin; Long, Jun; Singh, Samer; Rodriguez-Blanco, Jezabel; Tokhunts, Robert; Giambelli, Camilla; Briegel, Karoline J.; Schulz, Wolfgang A.; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Karagas, Margaret; Zimmers, Teresa A.; Jorda, Merce; Bejarano, Pablo; Capobianco, Anthony J.; Robbins, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The role of HEDGEHOG (HH) signaling in bladder cancer remains controversial. The gene encoding the HH receptor and negative regulator PATCHED1 (PTCH1) resides on a region of chromosome 9q, one copy of which is frequently lost in bladder cancer. Inconsistent with PTCH1 functioning as a classic tumor suppressor gene, loss-of-function mutations in the remaining copy of PTCH1 are not commonly found. Here, we provide direct evidence for a critical role of HH signaling in bladder carcinogenesis. We show that transformed human urothelial cells and many urothelial carcinoma (UC) cell lines exhibit constitutive HH signaling, which is required for their growth and tumorigenic properties. Surprisingly, rather than originating from loss of PTCH1, the constitutive HH activity observed in UC cell lines was HH ligand-dependent. Consistent with this finding, increased levels of HH and the HH target gene product GLI1 were found in resected human primary bladder tumors. Furthermore, based on the difference in intrinsic HH dependence of UC cell lines, a gene expression signature was identified that correlated with bladder cancer progression. Our findings therefore indicate that therapeutic targeting of the HH signaling pathway may be beneficial in the clinical management of bladder cancer. PMID:22815529

  9. Circadian clock regulation of skeletal muscle growth and repair.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Somik; Ma, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the circadian clock, a transcriptional/translational feedback circuit that generates ~24-hour oscillations in behavior and physiology, is a key temporal regulatory mechanism involved in many important aspects of muscle physiology. Given the clock as an evolutionarily-conserved time-keeping mechanism that synchronizes internal physiology to environmental cues, locomotor activities initiated by skeletal muscle enable entrainment to the light-dark cycles on earth, thus ensuring organismal survival and fitness. Despite the current understanding of the role of molecular clock in preventing age-related sarcopenia, investigations into the underlying molecular pathways that transmit clock signals to the maintenance of skeletal muscle growth and function are only emerging. In the current review, the importance of the muscle clock in maintaining muscle mass during development, repair and aging, together with its contribution to muscle metabolism, will be discussed. Based on our current understandings of how tissue-intrinsic muscle clock functions in the key aspects muscle physiology, interventions targeting the myogenic-modulatory activities of the clock circuit may offer new avenues for prevention and treatment of muscular diseases. Studies of mechanisms underlying circadian clock function and regulation in skeletal muscle warrant continued efforts.

  10. Rab5 and Rab4 Regulate Axon Elongation in the Xenopus Visual System

    PubMed Central

    Konopacki, Filip A.; Zivraj, Krishna H.; Holt, Christine E.

    2014-01-01

    The elongation rate of axons is tightly regulated during development. Recycling of the plasma membrane is known to regulate axon extension; however, the specific molecules involved in recycling within the growth cone have not been fully characterized. Here, we investigated whether the small GTPases Rab4 and Rab5 involved in short-loop recycling regulate the extension of Xenopus retinal axons. We report that, in growth cones, Rab5 and Rab4 proteins localize to endosomes, which accumulate markers that are constitutively recycled. Fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching experiments showed that Rab5 and Rab4 are recruited to endosomes in the growth cone, suggesting that they control recycling locally. Dynamic image analysis revealed that Rab4-positive carriers can bud off from Rab5 endosomes and move to the periphery of the growth cone, suggesting that both Rab5 and Rab4 contribute to recycling within the growth cone. Inhibition of Rab4 function with dominant-negative Rab4 or Rab4 morpholino and constitutive activation of Rab5 decreases the elongation of retinal axons in vitro and in vivo, but, unexpectedly, does not disrupt axon pathfinding. Thus, Rab5- and Rab4-mediated control of endosome trafficking appears to be crucial for axon growth. Collectively, our results suggest that recycling from Rab5-positive endosomes via Rab4 occurs within the growth cone and thereby supports axon elongation. PMID:24403139

  11. Cone sampling array models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Poirson, Allen

    1987-01-01

    A model is described for positioning cones in the retina. Each cone has a circular disk of influence, and the disks are tightly packed outward from the center. This model has three parameters that can vary with eccentricity: the mean radius of the cone disk, the standard deviation of the cone disk radius, and the standard deviation of postpacking jitter. Estimates for these parameters out to 1.6 deg are found by using measurements reported by Hirsch and Hylton (1985) and Hirsch and Miller (1987) of the positions of the cone inner segments of an adult macaque. The estimation is based on fitting measures of variation in local intercone distances, and the fit to these measures is good.

  12. Regulation of senescence in bean leaf discs by light and chemical growth regulators.

    PubMed

    Goldthwaite, J J; Laetsch, W M

    1967-12-01

    The senescence of excised discs of primary leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris, L., var. Red Kidney was followed by measuring the net breakdown of protein and chlorophyll. The chemical growth regulators indoleacetic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxy-acetic acid, gibberellic acid, kinetin, and 6-benzylaminopurine were relatively ineffective in retarding senescence in this tissue. White light, on the other hand, was very effective in senescence retardation. The response to light did not have the characteristics of a low energy (phytochrome) response and was blocked by concentrations of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethylurea which inhibited photosynthesis in the leaf discs. The light-induced retardation of senescence was concluded to be dependent on photosynthesis.

  13. Growth rate regulation of lac operon expression in Escherichia coli is cyclic AMP dependent.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jong-Tar; Chang, Yu-Jen; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2003-10-23

    In contrast to the ribosomal RNA gene expression increasing with growth rate, transcription of the lac operon is downregulated by cell growth rate. In continuous culture, growth rate regulation of lac promoter was independent of carbon substrate used and its location on the chromosome. Since the lac operon is activated by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), which decreases with increasing cell growth rate, expression of plac-lacZ reporter fusion was analyzed in cya mutant under various growth conditions. The results demonstrated that expression of plac-lacZ in cya mutant was both lower and growth rate independent. In addition, ppGpp (guanosine tetraphosphate) was not involved in the mechanism of growth rate regulation of the lac promoter. Thus, the results of this study indicate that cAMP mediates the growth rate-dependent regulation of lac operon expression in Escherichia coli.

  14. Rac regulates vascular endothelial growth factor stimulated motility.

    PubMed

    Soga, N; Connolly, J O; Chellaiah, M; Kawamura, J; Hruska, K A

    2001-01-01

    During angiogenesis endothelial cells migrate towards a chemotactic stimulus. Understanding the mechanism of endothelial cell migration is critical to the therapeutic manipulation of angiogenesis and ultimately cancer prevention. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent chemotactic stimulus of endothelial cells during angiogenesis. The endothelial cell signal transduction pathway of VEGF represents a potential target for cancer therapy, but the mechanisms of post-receptor signal transduction including the roles of rho family GTPases in regulating the cytoskeletal effects of VEGF in endothelial cells are not understood. Here we analyze the mechanisms of cell migration in the mouse brain endothelial cell line (bEND3). Stable transfectants containing a tetracycline repressible expression vector were used to induce expression of Rac mutants. Endothelial cell haptotaxis was stimulated by constitutively active V12Rac on collagen and vitronectin coated supports, and chemotaxis was further stimulated by VEGF. Osteopontin coated supports were the most stimulatory to bEND3 haptotaxis, but VEGF was not effective in further increasing migration on osteopontin coated supports. Haptotaxis on support coated with collagen, vitronectin, and to a lesser degree osteopontin was inhibited by N17 Rac. N17 Rac expression blocked stimulation of endothelial cell chemotaxis by VEGF. As part of the chemotactic stimulation, VEGF caused a loss of actin organization at areas of cell-cell contact and increased stress fiber expression in endothelial cells which were directed towards pores in the transwell membrane. N17 Rac prevented the stimulation of cell-cell contact disruption and the stress fiber stimulation by VEGF. These data demonstrate two pathways of regulating endothelial cell motility, one in which Rac is activated by matrix/integrin stimulation and is a crucial modulator of endothelial cell haptotaxis. The other pathway, in the presence of osteopontin, is Rac independent

  15. Developmental regulation of human truncated nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, P.S.; Clagett-Dame, M.; Chelsea, D.M.; Loy, R. )

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (designated XIF1 and IIIG5) recognizing distinct epitopes of the human truncated nerve growth factor receptor (NGF-Rt) were used in a two-site radiometric immunosorbent assay to monitor levels of NGF-Rt in human urine as a function of age. Urine samples were collected from 70 neurologically normal subjects ranging in age from 1 month to 68 years. By using this sensitive two-site radiometric immunosorbent assay, NGF-Rt levels were found to be highest in urine from 1-month old subjects. By 2.5 months, NGF-Rt values were half of those seen at 1 month and decreased more gradually between 0.5 and 15 years. Between 15 and 68 years, urine NGF-Rt levels were relatively constant at 5% of 1-month values. No evidence for diurnal variation of adult NGF-Rt was apparent. Pregnant women in their third trimester showed significantly elevated urine NGF-Rt values compared with age-matched normals. Affinity labeling of NGF-Rt with 125I-NGF followed by immunoprecipitation with ME20.4-IgG and gel autoradiography indicated that neonatal urine contained high amounts of truncated receptor (Mr = 50 kd); decreasingly lower amounts of NGF-Rt were observed on gel autoradiograms with development, indicating that the two-site radiometric immunosorbent assay correlated well with the affinity labeling technique for measuring NGF-Rt. NGF-Rt in urines from 1-month-old and 36-year-old subjects showed no differences in affinities for NGF or for the monoclonal antibody IIIG5. These data show that NGF-Rt is developmentally regulated in human urine, and are discussed in relation to the development and maturation of the peripheral nervous system.

  16. Rat Prolactinoma cell growth regulation by Epidermal Growth Factor receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Vlotides, George; Siegel, Emily; Donangelo, Ines; Gutman, Shiri; Ren, Song-Guang; Melmed, Shlomo

    2008-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) regulates pituitary development, hormone synthesis and cell proliferation. Although ErbB receptor family members are expressed in pituitary tumors, effects of EGF signaling on pituitary tumors are not known. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot confirmed EGFR and p185c-neu protein expression in GH3 lacto-somatotroph but not in ACTH-secreting AtT20 pituitary tumor cells. EGF (5 nM) selectively enhanced baseline (~ 4-fold) and serum-induced (> 6-fold) PRL mRNA levels, while gefitinib, an EGFR antagonist, suppressed serum-induced cell proliferation and Pttg1 expression, blocked PRL gene expression, and reversed EGF-mediated somatotroph-lactotroph phenotype switching. Downstream EGFR signaling by ERK, but not PI3K or PKC, mediated the gefitinib-response. Tumors in athymic mice implanted sc with GH3 cells resulted in weight gain accompanied by increased serum PRL, GH and IGF-I levels. Gefitinib decreased tumor volumes and peripheral hormone levels by ~ 30% and restored normal mouse body weight patterns. Mice treated with gefitinib exhibited decreased tumor tissue ERK1/2 phosphorylation and downregulated tumor PRL and Pttg1 mRNA abundance. These results show that EGFR inhibition controls tumor growth and PRL secretion in experimental lacto-somatotroph tumors. EGFR inhibitors could therefore be useful for control of PRL secretion and tumor load in prolactinomas resistant to dopaminergic treatment, or for those prolactinomas undergoing rare malignant transformation. PMID:18676863

  17. Abnormal bone growth and selective translational regulation in basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Coffin, J D; Florkiewicz, R Z; Neumann, J; Mort-Hopkins, T; Dorn, G W; Lightfoot, P; German, R; Howles, P N; Kier, A; O'Toole, B A

    1995-01-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) is a pleiotropic growth factor detected in many different cells and tissues. Normally synthesized at low levels, FGF-2 is elevated in various pathologies, most notably in cancer and injury repair. To investigate the effects of elevated FGF-2, the human full-length cDNA was expressed in transgenic mice under control of a phosphoglycerate kinase promoter. Overexpression of FGF-2 caused a variety of skeletal malformations including shortening and flattening of long bones and moderate macrocephaly. Comparison by Western blot of FGF-2 transgenic mice to nontransgenic littermates showed expression of human FGF-2 protein in all major organs and tissues examined including brain, heart, lung, liver, kidney, spleen, and skeletal muscle; however, different molar ratios of FGF-2 protein isoforms were observed between different organs and tissues. Some tissues preferentially synthesize larger isoforms of FGF-2 while other tissues produce predominantly smaller 18-kDa FGF-2. Translation of the high molecular weight isoforms initiates from unconventional CUG codons and translation of the 18-kDa isoform initiates from an AUG codon in the FGF-2 mRNA. Thus the Western blot data from the FGF-2 transgenic mice suggest that tissue-specific expression of FGF-2 isoforms is regulated translationally. Images PMID:8590811

  18. Effects of growth regulator herbicide on downy brome (Bromus tectorum) seed production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previous research showed growth regulator herbicides, such as picloram and aminopyralid, have a sterilizing effect on Japanese brome (Bromus japonicus Thunb.) that can reduce this invasive annual grass’s seed production nearly 100%. This suggests growth regulators might be used to control invasive ...

  19. Investigating Preservice Teachers' Professional Growth in Self-Regulated Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramarski, Bracha; Michalsky, Tova

    2009-01-01

    Educational reforms have suggested that the ability to self-regulate learning is essential for teachers' professional growth during their entire career as well as for their ability to promote these processes among students. This study observed teachers' professional growth along 3 dimensions: self-regulated learning (SRL) in pedagogical context,…

  20. Antioxidative activity and growth regulation of Brassicaceae induced by oxygen radical irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Nobuya; Ono, Reoto; Shiratani, Masaharu; Yonesu, Akira

    2015-06-01

    The growth regulation characteristics of plants are investigated when plant seeds are irradiated with atmospheric discharge plasma. Enhancement of the germination and lengths of the stem and root of plants are observed after seeding. The total length of the stem and root increases approximately 1.6 times after a cultivation period of 72 h. The growth regulation effect is found to be maintained for 80 h of cultivation after seeding. The growth regulation originates from the change in the antioxidative activity of plant cells induced by active oxygen species generated in the oxygen plasma, which leads to the production of growth factor in plants.

  1. ES1 is a mitochondrial enlarging factor contributing to form mega-mitochondria in zebrafish cones.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Takamasa; Wada, Yasutaka; Kawamura, Satoru

    2016-03-01

    Total mass of mitochondria increases during cell proliferation and differentiation through mitochondrial biogenesis, which includes mitochondrial proliferation and growth. During the mitochondrial growth, individual mitochondria have been considered to be enlarged independently of mitochondrial fusion. However, molecular basis for this enlarging process has been poorly understood. Cone photoreceptor cells in the retina possess large mitochondria, so-called mega-mitochondria that have been considered to arise via the enlarging process. Here we show that ES1 is a novel mitochondria-enlarging factor contributing to form mega-mitochondria in cones. ES1 is specifically expressed in cones and localized to mitochondria including mega-mitochondria. Knockdown of ES1 markedly reduced the mitochondrial size in cones. In contrast, ectopic expression of ES1 in rods significantly increased both the size of individual mitochondria and the total mass of the mitochondrial cluster without changing the number of them. RNA-seq analysis showed that ERRα and its downstream mitochondrial genes were significantly up-regulated in the ES1-expressing rods, suggesting facilitation of mitochondrial enlargement via ERRα-dependent processes. Furthermore, higher energy state was detected in the ES1-expressing rods, indicating that the enlarged mitochondria by ES1 are capable of producing high energy. ES1 is the mitochondrial protein that is first found to promote enlargement of individual mitochondria.

  2. The color cone.

    PubMed

    Logvinenko, Alexander D

    2015-02-01

    While the notion of a color cone can be found in writings of Maxwell, Helmholtz, Grassmann, and other scientists of the nineteenth century, it has not been clearly defined as yet. In this paper, the color cone is understood as the set of points in the cone excitation space produced by all possible lights. The spectral curve representing all the monochromatic lights is shown not to entirely belong to the color cone boundary, since its ends turn into the color cone interior. The monochromatic lights represented by the fragment of the spectral curve lying on the color cone boundary make up what is called the effective visible spectrum. The color cone is shown to be a convex hull of the conical surface through the fragment of the spectral curve representing the effective visible spectrum. The effective visible spectrum ends are shown to be determined by the photopigment spectral absorbance being independent of the prereceptor filters (e.g., the spectral transmittance of the lense and macular pigment).

  3. [Regulation of uterine cellular proliferation with estrogens and growth factors].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Rodríguez, C; Baiza-Guzmán, L A

    1996-09-01

    In this paper the role of estrogen and growth factors in the uterine cellular proliferation is analyzed. The evidences indicate that the estradiol-stimulate cell division is associated with the induction of expression of a variety of growth factors from the all major uterine cell types (epithelia, stroma and myometrium). These growth factors amplify the estrogen proliferation signal in autocrine and/or paracrin fashion. The best-studied growth factors in the uterine response to estradiol are epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1). Uterine cell proliferation is a complex process that involves interactions of several growth factors, ovarian steroids hormones action and cell to cell signaling.

  4. Developmental regulation of insulin-like growth factor-I and growth hormone receptor gene expression.

    PubMed

    Shoba, L; An, M R; Frank, S J; Lowe, W L

    1999-06-25

    During development, the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) gene is expressed in a tissue specific manner; however, the molecular mechanisms governing its developmental regulation remain poorly defined. To examine the hypothesis that expression of the growth hormone (GH) receptor accounts, in part, for the tissue specific expression of the IGF-I gene during development, the developmental regulation of IGF-I and GH receptor gene expression in rat tissues was examined. The level of IGF-I and GH receptor mRNA was quantified in RNA prepared from rats between day 17 of gestation (E17) and 17 months of age (17M) using an RNase protection assay. Developmental regulation of IGF-I gene expression was tissue specific with four different patterns of expression seen. In liver, IGF-I mRNA levels increased markedly between E17 and postnatal day 45 (P45) and declined thereafter. In contrast, in brain, skeletal muscle and testis, IGF-I mRNA levels decreased between P5 and 4M but were relatively unchanged thereafter. In heart and kidney, a small increase in IGF-I mRNA levels was observed between the early postnatal period and 4 months, whereas in lung, minimal changes were observed during development. The changes in GH receptor mRNA levels were, in general, coordinate with the changes in IGF-I mRNA levels, except in skeletal muscle. Interestingly, quantification of GH receptor levels by Western blot analysis in skeletal muscle demonstrated changes coordinate with IGF-I mRNA levels. The levels of the proteins which mediate GH receptor signaling (STAT1, -3, and -5, and JAK2) were quantified by Western blot analysis. These proteins also are expressed in a tissue specific manner during development. In some cases, the pattern of expression was coordinate with IGF-I gene expression, whereas in others it was discordant. To further define molecular mechanisms for the developmental regulation of IGF-I gene expression, protein binding to IGFI-FP1, a protein binding site that is in the major

  5. Comparison of growth and metabolic regulation between wild, domesticated and transgenic salmonids.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To gain a better understanding of the aspects underlying normal and growth hormone enhanced growth in salmonids, quantitative expression analysis was performed for a number of genes related to muscle growth, metabolism, immunology and energy regulation. This analysis was performed in liver and musc...

  6. Hormonal regulation of wheat growth during hydroponic culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherell, Donald

    1988-01-01

    Hormonal control of root growth has been explored as one means to alleviate the crowding of plant root systems experienced in prototype hydroponic biomass production chambers being developed by the CELSS Breadboard Project. Four plant hormones, or their chemical analogs, which have been reported to selectively inhibit root growth, were tested by adding them to the nutrient solutions on day 10 of a 25 day growth test using spring wheat in hydroponic cultures. Growth and morphological changes is both shoot and root systems were evaluated. In no case was it possible to inhibit root growth without a comparable inhibition of shoot growth. It was concluded that this approach is unlikely to prove useful for wheat.

  7. Body size regulation and insulin-like growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Seogang

    2013-07-01

    How animals achieve their specific body size is a fundamental, but still largely unresolved, biological question. Over the past decades, studies on the insect model system have provided some important insights into the process of body size determination and highlighted the importance of insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling. Fat body, the Drosophila counterpart of liver and adipose tissue, senses nutrient availability and controls larval growth rate by modulating peripheral insulin signaling. Similarly, insulin-like growth factor I produced from liver and muscle promotes postnatal body growth in mammals. Organismal growth is tightly coupled with the process of sexual maturation wherein the sex steroid hormone attenuates body growth. This review summarizes some important findings from Drosophila and mammalian studies that shed light on the general mechanism of animal size determination.

  8. Carbon dioxide exchange of larch (Larix gmelinii) cones during development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjie; Zu, Yuangang; Cui, Song; Hirano, Takashi; Watanabe, Yoko; Koike, Takayoshi

    2006-10-01

    Larch (Larix gmelinii (Rupr.) Rupr.) cone scales are green, but little is known of their photosynthetic role in cone development or about how they differ in gas exchange characteristics from needle leaves. In contrast to leaf photosynthesis (Pleaf), we found that stomatal regulation of cone photosynthetic rate (Pcone) was marginal because the photosynthetic carbon came from internal recycling of respiratory carbon dioxide (CO2). Photosynthetic recycling of respired CO2 was confirmed by the finding that the intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) in cone scales was much higher than ambient [CO2]; also, there was a positive correlation between Pcone and Ci, whereas Pleaf was almost constant as Ci varied. Low chlorophyll (Chl) concentration was a limiting factor for Pcone, but not for Pleaf, as indicated by the correlation between Pcone and chlorophyll concentration. Moreover, chlorophyll utilization efficiency (Psat/Chl a+b) for cone scales was lower than that for leaves. In both cones and leaves, nitrogen (N) was positively correlated with photosynthetic capacity (P), but the P/N value was much lower for cones than for leaves. For both organs, the ratio of respiration to N was broadly similar. Although mature cones have no photosynthetic capacity, Pcone of young cones was as high as 5.3 micromol m(-2) s(-1), about 1.26 times the value of Pleaf, and accounted for the refixation of 30-40% of the respiratory CO2 produced by cones, equivalent to the photosynthetic capacity of a bundle of short shoots near each cone. Thus, Pcone may be an important additional source of photosynthate for cones, given the weak assimilating capacity of leaves that are not fully expanded during cone development.

  9. Dopamine Regulation of GABAA Receptors Contributes to Light/Dark Modulation of the ON-Cone Bipolar Cell Receptive Field Surround in the Retina.

    PubMed

    Chaffiol, Antoine; Ishii, Masaaki; Cao, Yu; Mangel, Stuart C

    2017-09-11

    Cone bipolar cells are interneurons that receive synaptic input from cone photoreceptor cells and provide the output of the first synaptic layer of the retina. These cells exhibit center-surround receptive fields, a prototype of lateral inhibition between neighboring sensory cells in which stimulation of the receptive field center excites the cell whereas stimulation of the surrounding region laterally inhibits the cell. This fundamental sensory coding mechanism facilitates spatial discrimination and detection of stimulus edges. However, although it is well established that the receptive field surround is strongest when ambient or background illumination is most intense, e.g., at midday, and that the surround is minimal following maintained darkness, the synaptic mechanisms that produce and modulate the surround have not been resolved. Using electrical recording of bipolar cells under experimental conditions in which the cells exhibited surround light responses, and light and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry, we show in the rabbit retina that bright-light-induced activation of dopamine D1 receptors located on ON-center cone bipolar cell dendrites increases the expression and activity of GABAA receptors on the dendrites of the cells and that surround light responses depend on endogenous GABAA receptor activation. We also show that maintained darkness and D1 receptor blockade following maintained illumination and D1 receptor activation result in minimal GABAA receptor expression and activity and greatly diminished surrounds. Modulation of the D1/GABAA receptor signaling pathway of ON-cBC dendrites by the ambient light level facilitates detection of spatial details on bright days and large dim objects on moonless nights. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Boundary genes in regulation and evolution of secondary growth.

    PubMed

    Yordanov, Yordan S; Busov, Victor

    2011-05-01

    Many extant land plants display secondary growth originating in a lateral meristem known as vascular cambium. A conspicuous product of secondary growth is wood which dominates terrestrial ecosystem biomass. Despite the economic and ecological significance of the process the underlying molecular mechanism are still poorly understood. We have recently shown that members of the LBD transcription factor family play function in control of secondary growth. Here we propose a mechanistic model of LBD regulatory roles. We also show how these roles may be linked to evolutionary changes in level and pattern of wood formation that provide structural and functional innovations in wood anatomy in relation to species growth habit and biology. 

  11. [The peculiarities of calcium metabolism regulation in different periods of growth and development].

    PubMed

    Moĭsa, S S; Nozdrachev, A D

    2014-01-01

    The review contains literature data about calcium metabolism regulation in different periods of growth and development. The analyses of retrospective and current sources of information about the regulation of calcium homeostasis under the theory of functional systems, the regulation of calcium metabolism in prenatal and postnatal periods of the development, the significance of calcium metabolism disturbances in the development of pathological conditions were showed.

  12. 2017 Eclipse Shadow Cones

    NASA Image and Video Library

    A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's shadow falls on the Earth. The shadow comprises two concentric cones called the umbra and the penumbra. Within the smaller, central umbra, the Sun is complete...

  13. SIRT1 regulates the mouse gastric emptying and intestinal growth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study addressed physiological significance of SIRT1 gene on mouse gastrointestinal growth and function (gastric emptying and intestinal growth). SIRT1 (a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase) is a key cellular energy sensor, and involved in a wide variety of cellular functions including energy me...

  14. HSURIA Cone Centration.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    laser. b. Interferometer configuration. This configuration (Fig. 4) uses a Twyman -Green interferometer to measure the cone centration for comparison...autocollimator. The interferometer mode, as was explained in Section Ill-l, gave very little information about the alignment of the cone. c. Physical...the camera turning flat (5) must be removed and the centration sensor laser is used. The interferometer laser is turned off. For the interferometer

  15. Signaling pathways regulating cartilage growth plate formation and activity.

    PubMed

    Samsa, William E; Zhou, Xin; Zhou, Guang

    2017-02-01

    The growth plate is a highly specialized and dynamic cartilage structure that serves many essential functions in skeleton patterning, growth and endochondral ossification in developing vertebrates. Major signaling pathways initiated by classical morphogens and by other systemic and tissue-specific factors are intimately involved in key aspects of growth plate development. As a corollary of these essential functions, disturbances in these pathways due to mutations or environmental factors lead to severe skeleton disorders. Here, we review these pathways and the most recent progress made in understanding their roles in chondrocyte differentiation in growth plate development and activity. Furthermore, we discuss newly uncovered pathways involved in growth plate formation, including mTOR, the circadian clock, and the COP9 signalosome.

  16. Microarray and functional analysis of growth phase-dependent gene regulation in Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tracy L; Buboltz, Anne M; Harvill, Eric T; Brockmeier, Susan L

    2009-10-01

    Growth phase-dependent gene regulation has recently been demonstrated to occur in Bordetella pertussis, with many transcripts, including known virulence factors, significantly decreasing during the transition from logarithmic to stationary-phase growth. Given that B. pertussis is thought to have derived from a Bordetella bronchiseptica-like ancestor, we hypothesized that growth phase-dependent gene regulation would also occur in B. bronchiseptica. Microarray analysis revealed and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) confirmed that growth phase-dependent gene regulation occurs in B. bronchiseptica, resulting in prominent temporal shifts in global gene expression. Two virulence phenotypes associated with these gene expression changes were tested. We found that growth-dependent increases in expression of some type III secretion system (TTSS) genes led to a growth phase-dependent increase in a TTSS-dependent function, cytotoxicity. Although the transcription of genes encoding adhesins previously shown to mediate adherence was decreased in late-log and stationary phases, we found that the adherence of B. bronchiseptica did not decrease in these later phases of growth. Microarray analysis revealed and qRT-PCR confirmed that growth phase-dependent gene regulation occurred in both Bvg(+) and Bvg(-) phase-locked mutants, indicating that growth phase-dependent gene regulation in B. bronchiseptica can function independently from the BvgAS regulatory system.

  17. Ecdysone promotes growth of imaginal discs through the regulation of Thor in D. melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Herboso, Leire; Oliveira, Marisa M.; Talamillo, Ana; Pérez, Coralia; González, Monika; Martín, David; Sutherland, James D.; Shingleton, Alexander W.; Mirth, Christen K.; Barrio, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Animals have a determined species-specific body size that results from the combined action of hormones and signaling pathways regulating growth rate and duration. In Drosophila, the steroid hormone ecdysone controls developmental transitions, thereby regulating the duration of the growth period. Here we show that ecdysone promotes the growth of imaginal discs in mid-third instar larvae, since imaginal discs from larvae with reduced or no ecdysone synthesis are smaller than wild type due to smaller and fewer cells. We show that insulin-like peptides are produced and secreted normally in larvae with reduced ecdysone synthesis, and upstream components of insulin/insulin-like signaling are activated in their discs. Instead, ecdysone appears to regulate the growth of imaginal discs via Thor/4E-BP, a negative growth regulator downstream of the insulin/insulin-like growth factor/Tor pathways. Discs from larvae with reduced ecdysone synthesis have elevated levels of Thor, while mutations in Thor partially rescue their growth. The regulation of organ growth by ecdysone is evolutionarily conserved in hemimetabolous insects, as shown by our results obtained using Blattella germanica. In summary, our data provide new insights into the relationship between components of the insulin/insulin-like/Tor and ecdysone pathways in the control of organ growth. PMID:26198204

  18. Antizyme (AZ) regulates intestinal cell growth independently of polyamines

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Ramesh M.; Bhattacharya, Sujoy; Bavaria, Mitul N.; Viar, Mary Jane; Johnson, Leonard R.

    2014-01-01

    Since antizyme (AZ) is known to inhibit cell proliferation and to increase apoptosis, the question arises as to whether these effects occur independently of polyamines. Intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) were grown in control medium and medium containing 5mM difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) to inhibit ODC, DFMO + 5μM spermidine (SPD), DFMO+ 5μM spermine (SPM), or DFMO+ 10 μM putrescine (PUT) for 4 days and various parameters of growth were measured along with AZ levels. Cell counts were significantly decreased and mean doubling times were significantly increased by DFMO. Putrescine restored growth in the presence of DFMO. However, both SPD and SPM when added with DFMO caused a much greater inhibition of growth than did DFMO alone, and both of these polyamines caused a dramatic increase in AZ. The addition of SPD or SPM to media containing DFMO + PUT significantly inhibited growth and caused a significant increase in AZ. IEC-6 cells transfected with AZ-siRNA grew more than twice as rapidly as either control cells or those incubated with DFMO, indicating that removal of AZ increases growth in cells in which polyamine synthesis is inhibited as well as in control cells. In a separate experiment the addition of SPD increased AZ levels and inhibited growth of cells incubated with DFMO by 50%. The addition of 10 mM asparagine (ASN) prevented the increase in AZ and restored growth to control levels. These results show that cell growth in the presence or absence of ODC activity and in the presence or absence of polyamines depends only on the levels of AZ. Therefore, the effects of AZ on cell growth are independent of polyamines. PMID:24930035

  19. Switching responses: spatial and temporal regulators of axon guidance.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Andrew; Kent, Christopher B; Charron, Frédéric; Fournier, Alyson E

    2014-04-01

    The ability of the axonal growth cone to switch between attraction and repulsion in response to guidance cues in the extracellular environment during nervous system development is fundamental to the precise wiring of complex neural circuits. Regulation of cell-surface receptors by means of transcriptional control, local translation, trafficking and proteolytic processing are powerful mechanisms to regulate the response of the growth cone. Important work has also revealed how intracellular signalling pathways, including calcium and cyclic nucleotide signalling, can alter the directional response elicited by a particular cue. Here, we describe how these multiple regulatory mechanisms influence growth cone turning behaviour. We focus on recent evidence that suggests a significant role for 14-3-3 adaptor proteins in modifying growth cone turning behaviour and mediating directional polarity switches during development. Characterizing how 14-3-3 s regulate growth cone signalling will provide invaluable insight into nervous system development and may facilitate the identification of novel targets for promoting nerve regeneration following injury.

  20. [Effect of different plant growth regulators on yield and quality of Angelica dahurica var. formosana development].

    PubMed

    Hou, Kai; Chen, Jun-Wen; Zhai, Juan-Yuan; Shen, Hao; Chen, Li; Wu, Wei

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the effect of plant growth regulators on the growth and quality of Angelica dahurica var. formosana. Five plant growth regulators: chlormequat chloride (CCC), Mepiquat chloride (PIX), Gibberellic acid (GA3), Paclobutrazol (PP333) and Maleic Hydrazide (MH) were sprayed in rosette stage, the effects of these plant growth regulators (PGRs) on the growth, yield and quality of A. dahurica var. formosanaw were observed. The biological traits were first measured and then imperatorin and isoimperatorin contents in roots were determined by HPLC. Low concentration GA3 increased the yield while not influenced the premature bolting rate and the coumarin content. Spraying of GA3 (30 mg x L(-1)) could guarantee the growth and development of A. dahurica var. formosana to have a higher yield and maintain the active ingredients content in the root as well.

  1. Transforming growth factor beta regulates thyroid growth. Role in the pathogenesis of nontoxic goiter.

    PubMed Central

    Grubeck-Loebenstein, B; Buchan, G; Sadeghi, R; Kissonerghis, M; Londei, M; Turner, M; Pirich, K; Roka, R; Niederle, B; Kassal, H

    1989-01-01

    The production and growth regulatory activity of transforming growth factor beta were studied in human thyroid tissue. As estimated by its mRNA expression in fresh tissue samples, transforming growth factor beta was produced in normal and in diseased thyroid glands. Transforming growth factor beta mRNA was mainly produced by thyroid follicular cells and in lesser quantities by thyroid infiltrating mononuclear cells. The concentrations of transforming growth factor beta mRNA were lower in iodine-deficient nontoxic goiter than in Graves' disease and normal thyroid tissue. Transforming growth factor beta protein secretion by cultured thyroid follicular cells was also low in nontoxic goiter, but could be increased by addition of sodium iodide (10 microM) to the culture medium. Recombinant transforming growth factor beta did not affect basal tritiated thymidine incorporation in cultured thyroid follicular cells, but inhibited, at a concentration of 10 ng/ml, the growth stimulatory influence of insulin-like growth factor I, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor alpha, TSH, and partly that of normal human serum on cultured thyroid follicular cells. This inhibition was greater in Graves' disease than in nontoxic goiter. These results suggest that transforming growth factor beta may act as an autocrine growth inhibitor on thyroid follicular cells. Decreased transforming growth factor beta production and decreased responsiveness to transforming growth factor beta may be cofactors in the pathogenesis of iodine-deficient nontoxic goiter. Images PMID:2921318

  2. [Possible use of growth regulators for plant processes in selected grain pod-vegetables].

    PubMed

    Unger, J

    1976-01-01

    The cultivation of beans and peas as grain legumes in large-scale production requires plants with a high yield and suitable for machine harvesting. Growth regulators for plant processes can also be applied to achieve these properties. The effect on the yield by growth regulators, as demonstrated in pot and field trials, seems to enable their application in an established intensive cultivation of beans and peas. Prior to this, however, it has to be demonstrated that these positive effects of growth regulator application can reproduced economically in different locations and with different species.

  3. Growth-rate regulated genes have profound impact on interpretation of transcriptome profiling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Regenberg, Birgitte; Grotkjær, Thomas; Winther, Ole; Fausbøll, Anders; Åkesson, Mats; Bro, Christoffer; Hansen, Lars Kai; Brunak, Søren; Nielsen, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Background Growth rate is central to the development of cells in all organisms. However, little is known about the impact of changing growth rates. We used continuous cultures to control growth rate and studied the transcriptional program of the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with generation times varying between 2 and 35 hours. Results A total of 5930 transcripts were identified at the different growth rates studied. Consensus clustering of these revealed that half of all yeast genes are affected by the specific growth rate, and that the changes are similar to those found when cells are exposed to different types of stress (>80% overlap). Genes with decreased transcript levels in response to faster growth are largely of unknown function (>50%) whereas genes with increased transcript levels are involved in macromolecular biosynthesis such as those that encode ribosomal proteins. This group also covers most targets of the transcriptional activator RAP1, which is also known to be involved in replication. A positive correlation between the location of replication origins and the location of growth-regulated genes suggests a role for replication in growth rate regulation. Conclusion Our data show that the cellular growth rate has great influence on transcriptional regulation. This, in turn, implies that one should be cautious when comparing mutants with different growth rates. Our findings also indicate that much of the regulation is coordinated via the chromosomal location of the affected genes, which may be valuable information for the control of heterologous gene expression in metabolic engineering. PMID:17105650

  4. Microbial Growth at Ultraslow Rates: Regulation and Genetic Stability.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    this taxonomic range of eubacteria , and the understanding we have gained of underlying biochemical and genetic machineries, it is clear that any...to eubacteria and whose effects on mu and Y, in fact, made the Monod-type equations invalid as soon as they were eluci- dated to the level reached by...growth parameters. Thus, we sought specifically: 1) to find if there was a pattern of growth behavior at slow rates common among eubacteria ; 2) to

  5. Angiotensin II regulates growth of the developing papillas ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Song, Renfang; Preston, Graeme; Khalili, Ali; El-Dahr, Samir S.

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that lack of angiotensin (ANG) II production in angiotensinogen (AGT)-deficient mice or pharmacologic antagonism of ANG II AT1 receptor (AT1R) impairs growth of the developing papillas ex vivo, thus contributing to the hypoplastic renal medulla phenotype observed in AGT- or AT1R-null mice. Papillas were dissected from Hoxb7GFP+ or AGT+/+, +/−, −/− mouse metanephroi on postnatal day P3 and grown in three-dimentional collagen matrix gels in the presence of media (control), ANG II (10−5 M), or the specific AT1R antagonist candesartan (10−6 M) for 24 h. Percent reduction in papillary length was attenuated in AGT+/+ and in AGT+/− compared with AGT−/− (−18.4 ± 1.3 vs. −32.2 ± 1.6%, P < 0.05, −22.8 ± 1.3 vs. −32.2 ± 1.6%, P < 0.05, respectively). ANG II blunted the decrease in papilla length observed in respective media-treated controls in Hoxb7GFP+ (−1.5 ± 0.3 vs. −10.0 ± 1.4%, P < 0.05) or AGT+/+, +/−, and −/− papillas (−12.8 ± 0.7 vs. −18.4 ± 1.3%, P < 0.05, −16.8 ± 1.1 vs. −23 ± 1.2%, P < 0.05; −26.2 ± 1.6 vs. −32.2 ± 1.6%, P < 0.05, respectively). In contrast, percent decrease in the length of Hoxb7GFP+ papillas in the presence of the AT1R antagonist candesartan was higher compared with control (−24.3 ± 2.1 vs. −10.5 ± 1.8%, P < 0.05). The number of proliferating phospho-histone H3 (pH3)-positive collecting duct cells was lower, whereas the number of caspase 3-positive cells undergoing apoptosis was higher in candesartan- vs. media-treated papillas (pH3: 12 ± 1.4 vs. 21 ± 2.1, P < 0.01; caspase 3: 3.8 ± 0.5 vs. 1.7 ± 0.2, P < 0.01). Using quantitative RT-PCR, we demonstrate that AT1R signaling regulates the expression of genes implicated in morphogenesis of the renal medulla. We conclude that AT1R prevents shrinkage of the developing papillas observed ex vivo via control of Wnt7b, FGF7, β-catenin, calcineurin B1, and α3 integrin gene expression, collecting duct cell

  6. Plant growth regulation of Bt-cotton through Bacillus species.

    PubMed

    Pindi, Pavan Kumar; Sultana, Tasleem; Vootla, Praveen Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Deccan plateau in India periodically experiences droughts due to irregular rain fall and the soil in many parts of the region is considered to be poor for farming. Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria are originally defined as root-colonizing bacteria, i.e., Bacillus that cause either plant growth promotion or biological control of plant diseases. The study aims at the isolation of novel Bacillus species and to assess the biotechnological potential of the novel species as a biofertilizer, with respect to their plant growth promoting properties as efficient phosphate-solubilizing bacteria. Seven different strains of Bacillus were isolated from cotton rhizosphere soil near boys' hostel of Palamuru University which belongs to Deccan plateau. Among seven isolated strains, Bacillus strain-7 has shown maximum support for good growth of eight cotton cultivars. This bacterial species is named Bacillus sp. PU-7 based on the phenotypic and phylogenetic analysis. Among eight cotton cultivars, Mahyco has shown high levels of IAA, proteins, chlorophyll, sugars and low level of proline. Efficacy of novel Bacillus sp. PU-7 with Mahyco cultivar has been checked experimentally at field level in four different cotton grown agricultural soils. The strains supported plant growth in almost all the cases, especially in the deep black soil, with a clear evidence of maximum plant growth by increased levels of phytohormone production and biochemical analysis, followed by shallow black soil. Hence, it is inferred that the novel isolate can be used as bioinoculant in the cotton fields.

  7. Application of plant growth regulators mitigates chlorotic foliar injury by the black pecan aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chlorotic feeding injury by the black pecan aphid, Melanocallis caryaefoliae (Davis) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), to pecan (Carya illinoinensis [Wangenh.] K. Koch) foliage can result in leaf senescence and abscission. The plant growth regulators chlorforfenuron (CPPU), gibberellic acid (GA3) and aminoet...

  8. Information Integration and Communication in Plant Growth Regulation.

    PubMed

    Chaiwanon, Juthamas; Wang, Wenfei; Zhu, Jia-Ying; Oh, Eunkyoo; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2016-03-10

    Plants are equipped with the capacity to respond to a large number of diverse signals, both internal ones and those emanating from the environment, that are critical to their survival and adaption as sessile organisms. These signals need to be integrated through highly structured intracellular networks to ensure coherent cellular responses, and in addition, spatiotemporal actions of hormones and peptides both orchestrate local cell differentiation and coordinate growth and physiology over long distances. Further, signal interactions and signaling outputs vary significantly with developmental context. This review discusses our current understanding of the integrated intracellular and intercellular signaling networks that control plant growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Information Integration and Communication in Plant Growth Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chaiwanon, Juthamas; Wang, Wenfei; Zhu, Jia-Ying; Oh, Eunkyoo; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Plants are equipped with the capacity to respond to a large number of diverse signals, both internal ones and those emanating from the environment, that are critical to their survival and adaption as sessile organisms. These signals need to be integrated through highly structured intracellular networks to ensure coherent cellular responses, and in addition, spatiotemporal actions of hormones and peptides both orchestrate local cell differentiation and coordinate growth and physiology over long distances. Further, signal interactions and signaling outputs vary significantly with developmental context. This review discusses our current understanding of the integrated intracellular and intercellular signaling networks that control plant growth. PMID:26967291

  10. Signalling of abscisic acid to regulate plant growth.

    PubMed Central

    Himmelbach, A; Iten, M; Grill, E

    1998-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) mediated growth control is a fundamental response of plants to adverse environmental cues. The linkage between ABA perception and growth control is currently being unravelled by using different experimental approaches such as mutant analysis and microinjection experiments. So far, two protein phosphatases, ABI1 and ABI2, cADPR, pH, and Ca2+ have been identified as main components of the ABA signalling pathway. Here, the ABA signal transduction pathway is compared to signalling cascades from yeast and mammalian cells. A model for a bifurcated ABA signal transduction pathway exerting a positive and negative control mechanism is proposed. PMID:9800207

  11. AMPK regulation of the growth of cultured human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Asish K. . E-mail: aksaha@bu.edu; Persons, Kelly; Safer, Joshua D.; Luo Zhijun; Holick, Michael F.; Ruderman, Neil B.

    2006-10-20

    AMP kinase (AMPK) is a fuel sensing enzyme that responds to cellular energy depletion by increasing processes that generate ATP and inhibiting others that require ATP but are not acutely necessary for survival. In the present study, we examined the relationship between AMPK activation and the growth (proliferation) of cultured human keratinocytes and assessed whether the inhibition of keratinocyte growth by vitamin D involves AMPK activation. In addition, we explored whether the inhibition of keratinocyte proliferation as they approach confluence could be AMPK-related. Keratinocytes were incubated for 12 h with the AMPK activator, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-{beta}-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR). At concentrations of 10{sup -4} and 10{sup -3} M, AICAR inhibited keratinocyte growth by 50% and 95%, respectively, based on measurements of thymidine incorporation into DNA. It also increased AMPK and acetyl CoA carboxylase phosphorylation (P-AMPK and P-ACC) and decreased the concentration of malonyl CoA confirming that AMPK activation had occurred. Incubation with the thiazolidinedione, troglitazone (10{sup -6} M) caused similar alterations in P-AMPK, P-ACC, and cell growth. In contrast, the well known inhibition of keratinocyte growth by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (10{sup -7} and 10{sup -6} M) was not associated with changes in P-AMPK or P-ACC. Like most cells, the growth of keratinocytes diminished as they approached confluence. Thus, it was of note that we found a progressive increase in P-AMPK (1.5- to 2-fold, p < 0.05) as keratinocytes grown in control medium went from 25% to 100% confluence. In conclusion, the data are consistent with the hypothesis that activation of AMPK acts as a signal to diminish the proliferation of cultured keratinocytes as they approach confluence. They also suggest that AMPK activators, such as AICAR and troglitazone, inhibit keratinocyte growth and that the inhibition of cell growth by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} is AMPK-independent.

  12. Cellular growth in plants requires regulation of cell wall biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Chebli, Youssef; Geitmann, Anja

    2017-02-01

    Cell and organ morphogenesis in plants are regulated by the chemical structure and mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix, the cell wall. The two primary load bearing components in the plant cell wall, the pectin matrix and the cellulose/xyloglucan network, are constantly remodelled to generate the morphological changes required during plant development. This remodelling is regulated by a plethora of loosening and stiffening agents such as pectin methyl-esterases, calcium ions, expansins, and glucanases. The tight spatio-temporal regulation of the activities of these agents is a sine qua non condition for proper morphogenesis at cell and tissue levels. The pectin matrix and the cellulose-xyloglucan network operate in concert and their behaviour is mutually dependent on their chemical, structural and mechanical modifications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Physical and biological regulation of neuron regenerative growth and network formation on recombinant dragline silks.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Tang-Schomer, Min D; Huang, Wenwen; He, Jiuyang; Jones, Justin A; Lewis, Randolph V; Kaplan, David L

    2015-04-01

    Recombinant spider silks produced in transgenic goat milk were studied as cell culture matrices for neuronal growth. Major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1) supported neuronal growth, axon extension and network connectivity, with cell morphology comparable to the gold standard poly-lysine. In addition, neurons growing on MaSp1 films had increased neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) expression at both mRNA and protein levels. The results indicate that MaSp1 films present useful surface charge and substrate stiffness to support the growth of primary rat cortical neurons. Moreover, a putative neuron-specific surface binding sequence GRGGL within MaSp1 may contribute to the biological regulation of neuron growth. These findings indicate that MaSp1 could regulate neuron growth through its physical and biological features. This dual regulation mode of MaSp1 could provide an alternative strategy for generating functional silk materials for neural tissue engineering.

  14. Genetic Regulation of Phenotypic Plasticity and Canalisation in Yeast Growth

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Anupama; Dhole, Kaustubh

    2016-01-01

    The ability of a genotype to show diverse phenotypes in different environments is called phenotypic plasticity. Phenotypic plasticity helps populations to evade extinctions in novel environments, facilitates adaptation and fuels evolution. However, most studies focus on understanding the genetic basis of phenotypic regulation in specific environments. As a result, while it’s evolutionary relevance is well established, genetic mechanisms regulating phenotypic plasticity and their overlap with the environment specific regulators is not well understood. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is highly sensitive to the environment, which acts as not just external stimulus but also as signalling cue for this unicellular, sessile organism. We used a previously published dataset of a biparental yeast population grown in 34 diverse environments and mapped genetic loci regulating variation in phenotypic plasticity, plasticity QTL, and compared them with environment-specific QTL. Plasticity QTL is one whose one allele exhibits high plasticity whereas the other shows a relatively canalised behaviour. We mapped phenotypic plasticity using two parameters–environmental variance, an environmental order-independent parameter and reaction norm (slope), an environmental order-dependent parameter. Our results show a partial overlap between pleiotropic QTL and plasticity QTL such that while some plasticity QTL are also pleiotropic, others have a significant effect on phenotypic plasticity without being significant in any environment independently. Furthermore, while some plasticity QTL are revealed only in specific environmental orders, we identify large effect plasticity QTL, which are order-independent such that whatever the order of the environments, one allele is always plastic and the other is canalised. Finally, we show that the environments can be divided into two categories based on the phenotypic diversity of the population within them and the two categories have differential

  15. UV-B Inhibits Leaf Growth through Changes in Growth Regulating Factors and Gibberellin Levels1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Fina, Julieta; AbdElgawad, Hamada; Prinsen, Els

    2017-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation affects leaf growth in a wide range of species. In this work, we demonstrate that UV-B levels present in solar radiation inhibit maize (Zea mays) leaf growth without causing any other visible stress symptoms, including the accumulation of DNA damage. We conducted kinematic analyses of cell division and expansion to understand the impact of UV-B radiation on these cellular processes. Our results demonstrate that the decrease in leaf growth in UV-B-irradiated leaves is a consequence of a reduction in cell production and a shortened growth zone (GZ). To determine the molecular pathways involved in UV-B inhibition of leaf growth, we performed RNA sequencing on isolated GZ tissues of control and UV-B-exposed plants. Our results show a link between the observed leaf growth inhibition and the expression of specific cell cycle and developmental genes, including growth-regulating factors (GRFs) and transcripts for proteins participating in different hormone pathways. Interestingly, the decrease in the GZ size correlates with a decrease in the concentration of GA19, the immediate precursor of the active gibberellin, GA1, by UV-B in this zone, which is regulated, at least in part, by the expression of GRF1 and possibly other transcription factors of the GRF family. PMID:28400494

  16. Necdin, a negative growth regulator, is a novel STAT3 target gene down-regulated in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Haviland, Rachel; Eschrich, Steven; Bloom, Gregory; Ma, Yihong; Minton, Susan; Jove, Richard; Cress, W Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Cytokine and growth factor signaling pathways involving STAT3 are frequently constitutively activated in many human primary tumors, and are known for the transcriptional role they play in controlling cell growth and cell cycle progression. However, the extent of STAT3's reach on transcriptional control of the genome as a whole remains an important question. We predicted that this persistent STAT3 signaling affects a wide variety of cellular functions, many of which still remain to be characterized. We took a broad approach to identify novel STAT3 regulated genes by examining changes in the genome-wide gene expression profile by microarray, using cells expressing constitutively-activated STAT3. Using computational analysis, we were able to define the gene expression profiles of cells containing activated STAT3 and identify candidate target genes with a wide range of biological functions. Among these genes we identified Necdin, a negative growth regulator, as a novel STAT3 target gene, whose expression is down-regulated at the mRNA and protein levels when STAT3 is constitutively active. This repression is STAT3 dependent, since inhibition of STAT3 using siRNA restores Necdin expression. A STAT3 DNA-binding site was identified in the Necdin promoter and both EMSA and chromatin immunoprecipitation confirm binding of STAT3 to this region. Necdin expression has previously been shown to be down-regulated in a melanoma and a drug-resistant ovarian cancer cell line. Further analysis of Necdin expression demonstrated repression in a STAT3-dependent manner in human melanoma, prostate and breast cancer cell lines. These results suggest that STAT3 coordinates expression of genes involved in multiple metabolic and biosynthetic pathways, integrating signals that lead to global transcriptional changes and oncogenesis. STAT3 may exert its oncogenic effect by up-regulating transcription of genes involved in promoting growth and proliferation, but also by down-regulating expression

  17. Cytokines and growth factors which regulate bone cell function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seino, Yoshiki

    Everybody knows that growth factors are most important in making bone. Hormones enhance bone formation from a long distance. Growth factors promote bone formation as an autocrine or paracrine factor in nearby bone. BMP-2 through BMP-8 are in the TGF-β family. BMP makes bone by enchondral ossification. In bone, IGF-II is most abundant, second, TGF-β, and third IGF-I. TGF-β enhances bone formation mainly by intramembranous ossification in vivo. TGF-β affects both cell proliferation and differentiation, however, TGF-β mainly enhances bone formation by intramembranous ossification. Interestingly, TGF-β is increased by estrogen(E 2), androgen, vitamin D, TGF-β and FGF. IGF-I and IGF-II also enhance bone formation. At present it remains unclear why IGF-I is more active in bone formation than IGF-II, although IGF-II is more abundant in bone compared to IGF-I. However, if only type I receptor signal transduction promotes bone formation, the strong activity of IGF-I in bone formation is understandable. GH, PTH and E 2 promotes IGF-I production. Recent data suggest that hormones containing vitamin D or E 2 enhance bone formation through growth factors. Therefore, growth factors are the key to clarifying the mechanism of bone formation.

  18. Growth Phase dependent gene regulation in Bordetella bronchiseptica

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bordetellae are Gram negative bacterial respiratory pathogens. Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough, is a human-restricted variant of Bordetella bronchiseptica, which infects a broad range of mammals causing chronic and often asymptomatic infections. Growth phase dependent gen...

  19. Regulation of sprout growth in potato tubers during storage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The commercial storage of potato tubers is largely dependent on the natural process of meristem dormancy and the application of growth suppressants or sprout inhibitors. Currently there are a limited number of compounds that can be applied to potato tubers to prevent sprouting. One of the most commo...

  20. Understanding Growth in Self-Regulation: International Contributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Frederick J.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade or so, the importance of self-regulation for academic development and later life success has become increasingly clear (Morrison, Bachman, & Connor, 2005). This article is a commentary regarding the articles in a special issue of "Early Education and Development," which broaden the understanding of the important…

  1. Understanding Growth in Self-Regulation: International Contributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Frederick J.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade or so, the importance of self-regulation for academic development and later life success has become increasingly clear (Morrison, Bachman, & Connor, 2005). This article is a commentary regarding the articles in a special issue of "Early Education and Development," which broaden the understanding of the important…

  2. The cone dysfunction syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Aboshiha, Jonathan; Dubis, Adam M; Hardcastle, Alison J; Michaelides, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The cone dysfunction syndromes are a heterogeneous group of inherited, predominantly stationary retinal disorders characterised by reduced central vision and varying degrees of colour vision abnormalities, nystagmus and photophobia. This review details the following conditions: complete and incomplete achromatopsia, blue-cone monochromatism, oligocone trichromacy, bradyopsia and Bornholm eye disease. We describe the clinical, psychophysical, electrophysiological and imaging findings that are characteristic to each condition in order to aid their accurate diagnosis, as well as highlight some classically held notions about these diseases that have come to be challenged over the recent years. The latest data regarding the genetic aetiology and pathological changes observed in the cone dysfunction syndromes are discussed, and, where relevant, translational avenues of research, including completed and anticipated interventional clinical trials, for some of the diseases described herein will be presented. Finally, we briefly review the current management of these disorders. PMID:25770143

  3. Insulin Receptor Signaling in Cones*

    PubMed Central

    Rajala, Ammaji; Dighe, Radhika; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Anderson, Robert E.; Rajala, Raju V.S.

    2013-01-01

    In humans, age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy are the most common disorders affecting cones. In retinitis pigmentosa (RP), cone cell death precedes rod cell death. Systemic administration of insulin delays the death of cones in RP mouse models lacking rods. To date there are no studies on the insulin receptor signaling in cones; however, mRNA levels of IR signaling proteins are significantly higher in cone-dominant neural retina leucine zipper (Nrl) knock-out mouse retinas compared with wild type rod-dominant retinas. We previously reported that conditional deletion of the p85α subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) in cones resulted in age-related cone degeneration, and the phenotype was not rescued by healthy rods, raising the question of why cones are not protected by the rod-derived cone survival factors. Interestingly, systemic administration of insulin has been shown to delay the death of cones in mouse models of RP lacking rods. These observations led to the hypothesis that cones may have their own endogenous neuroprotective pathway, or rod-derived cone survival factors may be signaled through cone PI3K. To test this hypothesis we generated p85α−/−/Nrl−/− double knock-out mice and also rhodopsin mutant mice lacking p85α and examined the effect of the p85α subunit of PI3K on cone survival. We found that the rate of cone degeneration is significantly faster in both of these models compared with respective mice with competent p85α. These studies suggest that cones may have their own endogenous PI3K-mediated neuroprotective pathway in addition to the cone viability survival signals derived from rods. PMID:23673657

  4. Systems Level Regulation of Rhythmic Growth Rate and Biomass Accumulation in Grasses

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, Steve A.

    2013-05-02

    Several breakthroughs have been recently made in our understanding of plant growth and biomass accumulation. It was found that plant growth is rhythmically controlled throughout the day by the circadian clock through a complex interplay of light and phytohormone signaling pathways. While plants such as the C4 energy crop sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) and possibly the C3 grass (Brachypodium distachyon) also exhibit daily rhythms in growth rate, the molecular details of its regulation remain to be explored. A better understanding of diurnally regulated growth behavior in grasses may lead to species-specific mechanisms highly relevant to future strategies to optimize energy crop biomass yield. Here we propose to devise a systems approach to identify, in parallel, regulatory hubs associated with rhythmic growth in C3 and C4 plants. We propose to use rhythmicity in daily growth patterns to drive the discovery of regulatory network modules controlling biomass accumulation.

  5. Antagonistic growth regulation by Dpp and Fat drives uniform cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Schwank, Gerald; Tauriello, Gerardo; Yagi, Ryohei; Kranz, Elizabeth; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Basler, Konrad

    2011-01-18

    We use the Dpp morphogen gradient in the Drosophila wing disc as a model to address the fundamental question of how a gradient of a growth factor can produce uniform growth. We first show that proper expression and subcellular localization of components in the Fat tumor-suppressor pathway, which have been argued to depend on Dpp activity differences, are not reliant on the Dpp gradient. We next analyzed cell proliferation in discs with uniformly high Dpp or uniformly low Fat signaling activity and found that these pathways regulate growth in a complementary manner. While the Dpp mediator Brinker inhibits growth in the primordium primarily in the lateral regions, Fat represses growth mostly in the medial region. Together, our results indicate that the activities of both signaling pathways are regulated in a parallel rather than sequential manner and that uniform proliferation is achieved by their complementary action on growth.

  6. Microarray and functional analysis of growth-phase dependent gene regulation in Bordetella bronchiseptica

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Growth-phase dependent gene regulation has recently been demonstrated to occur in B. pertussis, with many transcripts, including known virulence factors, significantly decreasing during the transition from logarithmic to stationary-phase growth. Given that B. pertussis is thought to have derived fro...

  7. Growth Regulator Herbicides Prevent Invasive Annual grass Seed Production Under Field Conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Growth regulator herbicides, such as 2,4-D, dicamba, picloram, and aminopyralid, are commonly used to control broadleaf weeds in grasslands, non-croplands and cereal crops (e.g. wheat, barley). If applied to cereals at late growth stages, while the grasses are developing reproductive parts, the her...

  8. Target of rapamycin signaling regulates metabolism, growth, and lifespan in Arabidopsis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    TOR is a major nutrition and energy sensor that regulates growth and lifespan in yeast and animals. In plants growth and lifespan are intertwined with not only nutrient acquisition but also nutrition generation and unique aspects of development and differentiation. How TOR functions in these process...

  9. Emergence of robust growth laws from optimal regulation of ribosome synthesis.

    PubMed

    Scott, Matthew; Klumpp, Stefan; Mateescu, Eduard M; Hwa, Terence

    2014-08-22

    Bacteria must constantly adapt their growth to changes in nutrient availability; yet despite large-scale changes in protein expression associated with sensing, adaptation, and processing different environmental nutrients, simple growth laws connect the ribosome abundance and the growth rate. Here, we investigate the origin of these growth laws by analyzing the features of ribosomal regulation that coordinate proteome-wide expression changes with cell growth in a variety of nutrient conditions in the model organism Escherichia coli. We identify supply-driven feedforward activation of ribosomal protein synthesis as the key regulatory motif maximizing amino acid flux, and autonomously guiding a cell to achieve optimal growth in different environments. The growth laws emerge naturally from the robust regulatory strategy underlying growth rate control, irrespective of the details of the molecular implementation. The study highlights the interplay between phenomenological modeling and molecular mechanisms in uncovering fundamental operating constraints, with implications for endogenous and synthetic design of microorganisms.

  10. Nitric Oxide Synthase Regulates Growth Coordination During Drosophila melanogaster Imaginal Disc Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jaszczak, Jacob S; Wolpe, Jacob B; Dao, Anh Q; Halme, Adrian

    2015-08-01

    Mechanisms that coordinate growth during development are essential for producing animals with proper organ proportion. Here we describe a pathway through which tissues communicate to coordinate growth. During Drosophila melanogaster larval development, damage to imaginal discs activates a regeneration checkpoint through expression of Dilp8. This both produces a delay in developmental timing and slows the growth of undamaged tissues, coordinating regeneration of the damaged tissue with developmental progression and overall growth. Here we demonstrate that Dilp8-dependent growth coordination between regenerating and undamaged tissues, but not developmental delay, requires the activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the prothoracic gland. NOS limits the growth of undamaged tissues by reducing ecdysone biosynthesis, a requirement for imaginal disc growth during both the regenerative checkpoint and normal development. Therefore, NOS activity in the prothoracic gland coordinates tissue growth through regulation of endocrine signals.

  11. PTH Receptor Signaling in Osteoblasts Regulates Endochondral Vascularization in Maintenance of Postnatal Growth Plate

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Tao; Xian, Lingling; Crane, Janet; Wen, Chunyi; Hilton, Matthew; Lu, William; Newman, Peter; Cao, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinal growth of postnatal bone requires precise control of growth plate cartilage chondrocytes and subsequent osteogenesis and bone formation. Little is known about the role of angiogenesis and bone remodeling in maintenance of cartilaginous growth plate. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) stimulates bone remodeling by activating PTH receptor (PTH1R). Mice with conditional deletion of PTH1R in osteoblasts showed disrupted trabecular bone formation. The mice also exhibited postnatal growth retardation with profound defects in growth plate cartilage, ascribable predominantly to a decrease in number of hypertrophic chondrocytes, resulting in premature fusion of the growth plate and shortened long bones. Further characterization of hypertrophic zone and primary spongiosa revealed that endochondral angiogenesis and vascular invasion of the cartilage were impaired, which was associated with aberrant chondrocyte maturation and cartilage development. These studies reveal that PTH1R signaling in osteoblasts regulates cartilaginous growth plate for postnatal growth of bone. PMID:25196529

  12. Emergence of robust growth laws from optimal regulation of ribosome synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Matthew; Klumpp, Stefan; Mateescu, Eduard M; Hwa, Terence

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria must constantly adapt their growth to changes in nutrient availability; yet despite large-scale changes in protein expression associated with sensing, adaptation, and processing different environmental nutrients, simple growth laws connect the ribosome abundance and the growth rate. Here, we investigate the origin of these growth laws by analyzing the features of ribosomal regulation that coordinate proteome-wide expression changes with cell growth in a variety of nutrient conditions in the model organism Escherichia coli. We identify supply-driven feedforward activation of ribosomal protein synthesis as the key regulatory motif maximizing amino acid flux, and autonomously guiding a cell to achieve optimal growth in different environments. The growth laws emerge naturally from the robust regulatory strategy underlying growth rate control, irrespective of the details of the molecular implementation. The study highlights the interplay between phenomenological modeling and molecular mechanisms in uncovering fundamental operating constraints, with implications for endogenous and synthetic design of microorganisms. PMID:25149558

  13. Phospholipase C-epsilon augments epidermal growth factor-dependent cell growth by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sanguk; Hong, Won-Pyo; Choi, Jang Hyun; Yi, Kye Sook; Chae, Suhn-Kee; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2008-01-04

    The down-regulation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is critical for the termination of EGF-dependent signaling, and the dysregulation of this process can lead to oncogenesis. In the present study, we suggest a novel mechanism for the regulation of EGF receptor down-regulation by phospholipase C-epsilon. The overexpression of PLC-epsilon led to an increase in receptor recycling and decreased the down-regulation of the EGF receptor in COS-7 cells. Adaptor protein complex 2 (AP2) was identified as a novel binding protein that associates with the PLC-epsilon RA2 domain independently of Ras. The interaction of PLC-epsilon with AP2 was responsible for the suppression of EGF receptor down-regulation, since a perturbation in this interaction abolished this effect. Enhanced EGF receptor stability by PLC-epsilon led to the potentiation of EGF-dependent growth in COS-7 cells. Finally, the knockdown of PLC-epsilon in mouse embryo fibroblast cells elicited a severe defect in EGF-dependent growth. Our results indicated that PLC-epsilon could promote EGF-dependent cell growth by suppressing receptor down-regulation.

  14. Regional Growth Rate Differences Specified by Apical Notch Activities Regulate Liverwort Thallus Shape.

    PubMed

    Solly, Jeremy E; Cunniffe, Nik J; Harrison, C Jill

    2017-01-09

    Plants have undergone 470 million years of evolution on land and different groups have distinct body shapes. Liverworts are the most ancient land plant lineage and have a flattened, creeping body (the thallus), which grows from apical cells in an invaginated "notch." The genetic mechanisms regulating liverwort shape are almost totally unknown, yet they provide a blueprint for the radiation of land plant forms. We have used a combination of live imaging, growth analyses, and computational modeling to determine what regulates liverwort thallus shape in Marchantia polymorpha. We find that the thallus undergoes a stereotypical sequence of shape transitions during the first 2 weeks of growth and that key aspects of global shape depend on regional growth rate differences generated by the coordinated activities of the apical notches. A "notch-drives-growth" model, in which a diffusible morphogen produced at each notch promotes specified isotropic growth, can reproduce the growth rate distributions that generate thallus shape given growth suppression at the apex. However, in surgical experiments, tissue growth persists following notch excision, showing that this model is insufficient to explain thallus growth. In an alternative "notch-pre-patterns-growth" model, a persistently acting growth regulator whose distribution is pre-patterned by the notches can account for the discrepancies between growth dynamics in the notch-drives-growth model and real plants following excision. Our work shows that growth rate heterogeneity is the primary shape determinant in Marchantia polymorpha and suggests that the thallus is likely to have zones with specialized functions. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Targeting stromal glutamine synthetase in tumors disrupts tumor microenvironment-regulated cancer cell growth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Reactive stromal cells are an integral part of tumor microenvironment (TME) and interact with cancer cells to regulate their growth. Although targeting stromal cells could be a viable therapy to regulate the communication between TME and cancer cells, identification of stromal targets that make canc...

  16. Androgen receptor signaling regulates growth of glioblastoma multiforme in men.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoming; Jiang, Yuhua; Wei, Wei; Cong, Ping; Ding, Yinlu; Xiang, Lei; Wu, Kang

    2015-02-01

    Although glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant primary human brain cancer with surprisingly high incidence rate in adult men than in women, the exact mechanism underlying this pronounced epidemiology is unclear. Here, we showed significant upregulated androgen receptor (AR) expression in the GBM tissue compared to the periphery normal brain tissue in patients. An expression of AR was further detected in all eight examined human GBM cell lines. To figure out whether AR signaling may play a role in GBM, we used high AR-expressing U87-MG GBM line for further study. We found that activation of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) receptor signaling by TGFβ1 in GBM significantly inhibited cell growth and increased apoptosis. Moreover, application of active AR ligand 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) significantly decreased the effect of TGFβ1 on GBM growth and apoptosis, suggesting that AR signaling pathway may contradict the effect of TGFβ receptor signaling in GBM. However, neither total protein nor the phosphorylated protein of SMAD3, a major TGFβ receptor signaling downstream effector in GBM, was affected by DHT, suggesting that AR activation may not affect the SMAD3 protein production or phosphorylation of TGFβ receptor and SMAD3. Finally, immunoprecipitation followed by immunoblot confirmed binding of pAR to pSMAD3, which may prevent the DNA binding of pSMAD3 and subsequently prevent its effect on cell growth in GBM. Taken together, our study suggests that AR signaling may promote tumorigenesis of GBM in adult men by inhibiting TGFβ receptor signaling.

  17. Implications of Stem Cell Growth Regulation for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    with stem/progenitor cells, and find that LRP5-high cells co-purify with the MRU stem cell-enriched fraction (Fig.1C, D). These LRP5-high cells...stem cells that grow in vivo ( MRU ) and double negative (DN). The MRU fraction is highly enriched in LRP5-high cells. A distinct population that...vivo (mammary repopulating units, MRUs , Fig. 5). Mammary progenitor cells are defined as having insignificant growth potential in vivo, but

  18. Effect of Plant Growth Regulators on Phytoremediation of Hexachlorocyclohexane-Contaminated Soil.

    PubMed

    Chouychai, Waraporn; Kruatrachue, Maleeya; Lee, Hung

    2015-01-01

    The influence of three plant growth regulators, indolebutyric acid (IBA), thidiazuron (TDZ) and gibberellic acid (GA3), either individually or in pair-wise combinations, on the ability of waxy corn plant to remove hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) from contaminated soil was studied. Waxy corn seeds were immersed for 3 h in solutions of 1.0 mg/l IBA, 0.01 mg/l TDZ, 0.1 mg/l GA3, or a mixture of two of the growth regulators, and then inoculated in soil contaminated with 46.8 mg/kg HCH for 30 days. Pretreatment of corn seeds with the plant growth regulators did not enhance corn growth when compared with those immersed in distilled water (control), but the pretreatment enhanced HCH removal significantly. On day 30, HCH concentration in the bulk soil planted with corn seeds pretreated with GA3 or TDZ+GA3 decreased by 97.4% and 98.4%, respectively. In comparison, HCH removal in soil planted with non-pretreated control waxy corn seeds was only 35.7%. The effect of several growth regulator application methods was tested with 0.01 mg/l TDZ. The results showed that none of the methods, which ranged from seed immersion, watering in soil, or spraying on shoots, affected HCH removal from soil. However, the method of applying the growth regulators may affect corn growth. Watering the corn plant with TDZ in soil led to higher root fresh weight (2.2 g) and higher root dried weight (0.57 g) than the other treatments (0.2-1.7 g root fresh weight and 0.02-0.43 g root dried weight) on day 30. Varying the concentrations of GA3 did not affect the enhancement of corn growth and HCH removal on day 30. The results showed that plant growth regulators may have potential for use to enhance HCH phytoremediation.

  19. Shatter Cones: (Mis)understood?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinski, G. R.; Ferrière, L.

    2016-08-01

    In this study we provide new observations of shatter cones from several complex impact craters in various target rocks and in different preservation states. We show that shatter cones are present in several stratigraphic settings.

  20. Two-Step Reactivation of Dormant Cones in Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Lee, Sang Joon; Scott, Patrick A.; Lu, Xiaoqin; Emery, Douglas; Liu, Yongqin; Ezashi, Toshihiko; Roberts, Michael R.; Ross, Jason W.; Kaplan, Henry J.; Dean, Douglas C.

    2016-01-01

    Most Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) mutations arise in rod photoreceptor genes, leading to diminished peripheral and nightime vision. Using a pig model of autosomal-dominant RP, we show glucose becomes sequestered in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), and thus is not transported to photoreceptors. The resulting starvation for glucose metabolites impairs synthesis of cone visual pigment -rich outer segments (OS), and then their mitochondrial-rich inner segments dissociate. Loss of these functional structures diminishes cone-dependent high-resolution central vision, which is utilized for most daily tasks. By transplanting wild-type rods, to restore glucose transport, or directly replacing glucose in the subretinal space, to bypass its retention in the RPE, we can regenerate cone functional structures, reactivating the dormant cells. Beyond providing metabolic building blocks for cone functional structures, we show glucose induces thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip) to regulate Akt signaling, thereby shunting metabolites toward aerobic glucose metabolism and regenerating cone OS synthesis. PMID:27050517

  1. Effects of gibberellin A4/7, 6-benzylaminopurine and chlormequat chloride on the number of male and female strobili and immature cones in Chinese pine (Pinus tabuliformis) with foliar sprays

    Treesearch

    Peng Zhao; Jun-feng Fan; Shuo-xin Zhang; Zhong-lian Huang; Pei-hua Yang; Zhen-Hua Ma; Keith W Woeste

    2011-01-01

    Three kinds of plant growth regulators, gibberellinA4/7 (GA4/7), 6-benzylaminopurine (BA), and chlormequat chloride (CCC), were evaluated for their ability to promote strobilus and cone production in a Chinese pine (Pinus tabuliformis Carr.) clonal seed orchard. Treatments (0, 250, 500, or 1000 mg⋅L

  2. Polyamines regulate cell growth and cellular methylglyoxal in high-glucose medium independently of intracellular glutathione.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Min-Kyu; Lee, Mun-Hyoung; Park, Seong-Jun; Shin, Sang-Min; Liu, Rui; Kang, Sa-Ouk

    2016-03-01

    Polyamines can presumably inhibit protein glycation, when associated with the methylglyoxal inevitably produced during glycolysis. Herein, we hypothesized a nonenzymatic interaction between putrescine and methylglyoxal in putrescine-deficient or -overexpressing Dictyostelium cells in high-glucose medium, which can control methylglyoxal production. Putrescine was essentially required for growth rescue accompanying methylglyoxal detoxification when cells underwent growth defect and cell cycle G1-arrest when supplemented with high glucose. Furthermore, methylglyoxal regulation by putrescine seemed to be a parallel pathway independent of the changes in cellular glutathione content in high-glucose medium. Consequently, we suggest that Dictyostelium cells need polyamines for normal growth and cellular methylglyoxal regulation.

  3. Regulation of Long Bone Growth in Vertebrates; It Is Time to Catch Up.

    PubMed

    Roselló-Díez, Alberto; Joyner, Alexandra L

    2015-12-01

    The regulation of organ size is essential to human health and has fascinated biologists for centuries. Key to the growth process is the ability of most organs to integrate organ-extrinsic cues (eg, nutritional status, inflammatory processes) with organ-intrinsic information (eg, genetic programs, local signals) into a growth response that adapts to changing environmental conditions and ensures that the size of an organ is coordinated with the rest of the body. Paired organs such as the vertebrate limbs and the long bones within them are excellent models for studying this type of regulation because it is possible to manipulate one member of the pair and leave the other as an internal control. During development, growth plates at the end of each long bone produce a transient cartilage model that is progressively replaced by bone. Here, we review how proliferation and differentiation of cells within each growth plate are tightly controlled mainly by growth plate-intrinsic mechanisms that are additionally modulated by extrinsic signals. We also discuss the involvement of several signaling hubs in the integration and modulation of growth-related signals and how they could confer remarkable plasticity to the growth plate. Indeed, long bones have a significant ability for "catch-up growth" to attain normal size after a transient growth delay. We propose that the characterization of catch-up growth, in light of recent advances in physiology and cell biology, will provide long sought clues into the molecular mechanisms that underlie organ growth regulation. Importantly, catch-up growth early in life is commonly associated with metabolic disorders in adulthood, and this association is not completely understood. Further elucidation of the molecules and cellular interactions that influence organ size coordination should allow development of novel therapies for human growth disorders that are noninvasive and have minimal side effects.

  4. Follicular growth and atresia in mammalian ovaries: regulation by survival and death of granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Fuko; Inoue, Naoko; Manabe, Noboru; Ohkura, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian ovary is an extremely dynamic organ in which a large majority of follicles are effectively eliminated throughout their reproductive life. Due to the numerous efforts of researchers, mechanisms regulating follicular growth and atresia in mammalian ovaries have been clarified, not only their systemic regulation by hormones (gonadotropins) but also their intraovarian regulation by gonadal steroids, growth factors, cytokines and intracellular proteins. Granulosa cells in particular have been demonstrated to play a major role in deciding the fate of follicles, serving molecules that are essential for follicular growth and maintenance as well as killing themselves by an apoptotic process that results in follicular atresia. In this review, we discuss the factors that govern follicular growth and atresia, with a special focus on their regulation by granulosa cells. First, ovarian folliculogenesis in adult life is outlined. Then, we explain about the regulation of follicular growth and atresia by granulosa cells, in which hormones, growth factors and cytokines, death ligand-receptor system and B cell lymphoma/leukemia 2 (BCL2) family members (mitochondria-mediated apoptosis) are further discussed.

  5. Root growth regulation and gravitropism in maize roots does not require the epidermis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, T.; Cleland, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    We have earlier published observations showing that endogenous alterations in growth rate during gravitropism in maize roots (Zea mays L.) are unaffected by the orientation of cuts which remove epidermal and cortical tissue in the growing zone (Bjorkman and Cleland, 1988, Planta 176, 513-518). We concluded that the epidermis and cortex are not essential for transporting a growth-regulating signal in gravitropism or straight growth, nor for regulating the rate of tissue expansion. This conclusion has been challenged by Yang et al. (1990, Planta 180, 530-536), who contend that a shallow girdle around the entire perimeter of the root blocks gravitropic curvature and that this inhibition is the result of a requirement for epidermal cells to transport the growth-regulating signal. In this paper we demonstrate that the entire epidermis can be removed without blocking gravitropic curvature and show that the position of narrow girdles does not affect the location of curvature. We therefore conclude that the epidermis is not required for transport of a growth-regulating substance from the root cap to the growing zone, nor does it regulate the growth rate of the elongating zone of roots.

  6. Root growth regulation and gravitropism in maize roots does not require the epidermis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, T.; Cleland, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    We have earlier published observations showing that endogenous alterations in growth rate during gravitropism in maize roots (Zea mays L.) are unaffected by the orientation of cuts which remove epidermal and cortical tissue in the growing zone (Bjorkman and Cleland, 1988, Planta 176, 513-518). We concluded that the epidermis and cortex are not essential for transporting a growth-regulating signal in gravitropism or straight growth, nor for regulating the rate of tissue expansion. This conclusion has been challenged by Yang et al. (1990, Planta 180, 530-536), who contend that a shallow girdle around the entire perimeter of the root blocks gravitropic curvature and that this inhibition is the result of a requirement for epidermal cells to transport the growth-regulating signal. In this paper we demonstrate that the entire epidermis can be removed without blocking gravitropic curvature and show that the position of narrow girdles does not affect the location of curvature. We therefore conclude that the epidermis is not required for transport of a growth-regulating substance from the root cap to the growing zone, nor does it regulate the growth rate of the elongating zone of roots.

  7. Circadian dynamics of the cone-rod homeobox (CRX) transcription factor in the rat pineal gland and its role in regulation of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT).

    PubMed

    Rohde, Kristian; Rovsing, Louise; Ho, Anthony K; Møller, Morten; Rath, Martin F

    2014-08-01

    The cone-rod homeobox (Crx) gene encodes a transcription factor in the retina and pineal gland. Crx deficiency influences the pineal transcriptome, including a reduced expression of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (Aanat), a key enzyme in nocturnal pineal melatonin production. However, previous functional studies on pineal Crx have been performed in melatonin-deficient mice. In this study, we have investigated the role of Crx in the melatonin-proficient rat pineal gland. The current study shows that pineal Crx transcript levels exhibit a circadian rhythm with a peak in the middle of the night, which is transferred into daily changes in CRX protein. The study further shows that the sympathetic innervation of the pineal gland controls the Crx rhythm. By use of adenovirus-mediated short hairpin RNA gene knockdown targeting Crx mRNA in primary rat pinealocyte cell culture, we here show that intact levels of Crx mRNA are required to obtain high levels of Aanat expression, whereas overexpression of Crx induces Aanat transcription in vitro. This regulatory function of Crx is further supported by circadian analysis of Aanat in the pineal gland of the Crx-knockout mouse. Our data indicate that the rhythmic nature of pineal CRX protein may directly modulate the daily profile of Aanat expression by inducing nighttime expression of this enzyme, thus facilitating nocturnal melatonin synthesis in addition to its role in ensuring a correct tissue distribution of Aanat expression.

  8. Reconstruction from cone integral transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palamodov, Victor

    2017-10-01

    The paper contains new reconstruction formulas for a function on 3D space from data of its cone integrals with fixed opening and integrable weight. In the case of cone integrals with the (non integrable) weight modelling photometric law, a reconstruction is obtained for the non redundant data of cones with the apex running on a curve.

  9. GABA signalling modulates plant growth by directly regulating the activity of plant-specific anion transporters.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Sunita A; Tyerman, Stephen D; Xu, Bo; Bose, Jayakumar; Kaur, Satwinder; Conn, Vanessa; Domingos, Patricia; Ullah, Sana; Wege, Stefanie; Shabala, Sergey; Feijó, José A; Ryan, Peter R; Gilliham, Matthew; Gillham, Matthew

    2015-07-29

    The non-protein amino acid, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) rapidly accumulates in plant tissues in response to biotic and abiotic stress, and regulates plant growth. Until now it was not known whether GABA exerts its effects in plants through the regulation of carbon metabolism or via an unidentified signalling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that anion flux through plant aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) proteins is activated by anions and negatively regulated by GABA. Site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acids within ALMT proteins abolishes GABA efficacy but does not alter other transport properties. GABA modulation of ALMT activity results in altered root growth and altered root tolerance to alkaline pH, acid pH and aluminium ions. We propose that GABA exerts its multiple physiological effects in plants via ALMT, including the regulation of pollen tube and root growth, and that GABA can finally be considered a legitimate signalling molecule in both the plant and animal kingdoms.

  10. Cone on Olympus Mons

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-10-24

    This image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows just a small part of the eastern flank of Olympus Mons. On the far left side of the image a small volcanic cone can be seen. The shadow helps to identify this feature.

  11. Early growth response 3 (Egr-3) is induced by transforming growth factor-β and regulates fibrogenic responses.

    PubMed

    Fang, Feng; Shangguan, Anna J; Kelly, Kathleen; Wei, Jun; Gruner, Katherine; Ye, Boping; Wang, Wenxia; Bhattacharyya, Swati; Hinchcliff, Monique E; Tourtellotte, Warren G; Varga, John

    2013-10-01

    Members of the early growth response (Egr) gene family of transcription factors have nonredundant biological functions. Although Egr-3 is implicated primarily in neuromuscular development and immunity, its regulation and role in tissue repair and fibrosis has not been studied. We now show that in normal skin fibroblasts, Egr-3 was potently induced by transforming growth factor-β via canonical Smad3. Moreover, transient Egr-3 overexpression was sufficient to stimulate fibrotic gene expression, whereas deletion of Egr-3 resulted in substantially attenuated transforming growth factor-β responses. Genome-wide expression profiling in fibroblasts showed that genes associated with tissue remodeling and wound healing were prominently up-regulated by Egr-3. Notably, <5% of fibroblast genes regulated by Egr-1 or Egr-2 were found to be coregulated by Egr-3, revealing substantial functional divergence among these Egr family members. In a mouse model of scleroderma, development of dermal fibrosis was accompanied by accumulation of Egr-3-positive myofibroblasts in the lesional tissue. Moreover, skin biopsy samples from patients with scleroderma showed elevated Egr-3 levels in the dermis, and Egr-3 mRNA levels correlated with the extent of skin involvement. These results provide the first evidence that Egr-3, a functionally distinct member of the Egr family with potent effects on inflammation and immunity, is up-regulated in scleroderma and is necessary and sufficient for profibrotic responses, suggesting important and distinct roles in the pathogenesis of fibrosis.

  12. Organ-specific regulation of growth-defense tradeoffs by plants.

    PubMed

    Smakowska, Elwira; Kong, Jixiang; Busch, Wolfgang; Belkhadir, Youssef

    2016-02-01

    Plants grow while also defending themselves against phylogenetically unrelated pathogens. Because defense and growth are both costly programs, a plant's success in colonizing resource-scarce environments requires tradeoffs between the two. Here, we summarize efforts aimed at understanding how plants use iterative tradeoffs to modulate differential organ growth when defenses are elicited. First, we focus on shoots to illustrate how light, in conjunction with the growth hormone gibberellin (GA) and the defense hormone jasmonic acid (JA), act to finely regulate defense and growth programs in this organ. Second, we expand on the regulation of growth-defense trade-offs in the root, a less well-studied topic despite the critical role of this organ in acquiring resources in an environment deeply entrenched with disparate populations of microbes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetic and physical analyses of the growth rate-dependent regulation of Escherichia coli zwf expression.

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, D L; Pease, A J; Wolf, R E

    1991-01-01

    Growth rate-dependent regulation of the level of Escherichia coli glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, encoded by zwf, and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, encoded by gnd, is similar during steady-state growth and after nutritional upshifts. To determine whether the mechanism regulating zwf expression is like that of gnd, which involves a site of posttranscriptional control located within the structural gene, we prepared and analyzed a set of zwf-lacZ protein fusions in which the fusion joints are distributed across the glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase coding sequence. Expression of beta-galactosidase from the protein fusions was as growth rate dependent as that of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase itself, indicating that regulation does not involve an internal regulatory region. The level of beta-galactosidase in zwf-lac operon fusion strains and the level of zwf mRNA from a wild-type strain increased with increasing growth rate, which suggests that growth rate control is exerted on the mRNA level. The half-life of the zwf mRNA mass was 3.0 min during growth on glucose and 3.4 min during growth on acetate. Thus, zwf transcription appears to be the target for growth rate control of the glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase level. Images PMID:1906868

  14. New findings in the mechanisms regulating polar growth in root hair cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Root hairs cells are highly polarized cellular structures resulting from tip growth of specific root epidermal cells. Root-hair morphogenesis involves many aspects regulating tip growth such as exocitosis, ion flux, calcium homeostasis, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cytoskeleton. These cells are excellent models for studying polar growth and can be challenged with many extracellular factors affecting the pattern of growth named Nod factors, elicitors, hormones, etc. The general scenery is that the well described tip-high intracellular Ca2+ gradient plays a central role in regulating tip growth. On the other hand, ROS plays a key role in various processes, for example hypersensitive response, root hair development, hormone action, gravitropism and stress responses. However, ROS has recently emerged as a key player together with calcium in regulating polar growth, not only in root hair cells but also in pollen tubes, filamentous fungi and fucoid cells. Furthermore, Ca2+-permeable channel modulation by ROS has been demonstrated in Vicia faba guard cells and Arabidopsis root hairs. Recently, root hair cells were shown to experiment ROS, pH and calcium oscillations coupled to growth oscillation. These recent findings allow considering that root hair cells present a similar pattern of growth as described for pollen tubes. PMID:19568333

  15. New findings in the mechanisms regulating polar growth in root hair cells.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Root hairs cells are highly polarized cellular structures resulting from tip growth of specific root epidermal cells. Root-hair morphogenesis involves many aspects regulating tip growth such as exocytosis, ion flux, calcium homeostasis, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cytoskeleton. These cells are excellent models for studying polar growth and can be challenged with many extracellular factors affecting the pattern of growth named Nod factors, elicitors, hormones, etc. The general scenery is that the well described tip-high intracellular Ca(2+) gradient plays a central role in regulating tip growth. On the other hand, ROS plays a key role in various processes, for example hypersensitive response, root hair development, hormone action, gravitropism and stress responses. However, ROS has recently emerged as a key player together with calcium in regulating polar growth, not only in root hair cells but also in pollen tubes, filamentous fungi and fucoid cells. Furthermore, Ca(2+)-permeable channel modulation by ROS has been demonstrated in Vicia faba guard cells and Arabidopsis root hairs. Recently, root hair cells were shown to experiment ROS, pH and calcium oscillations coupled to growth oscillation. These recent findings allow considering that root hair cells present a similar pattern of growth as described for pollen tubes.

  16. Regulation of Long Bone Growth in Vertebrates; It Is Time to Catch Up

    PubMed Central

    Joyner, Alexandra L.

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of organ size is essential to human health and has fascinated biologists for centuries. Key to the growth process is the ability of most organs to integrate organ-extrinsic cues (eg, nutritional status, inflammatory processes) with organ-intrinsic information (eg, genetic programs, local signals) into a growth response that adapts to changing environmental conditions and ensures that the size of an organ is coordinated with the rest of the body. Paired organs such as the vertebrate limbs and the long bones within them are excellent models for studying this type of regulation because it is possible to manipulate one member of the pair and leave the other as an internal control. During development, growth plates at the end of each long bone produce a transient cartilage model that is progressively replaced by bone. Here, we review how proliferation and differentiation of cells within each growth plate are tightly controlled mainly by growth plate-intrinsic mechanisms that are additionally modulated by extrinsic signals. We also discuss the involvement of several signaling hubs in the integration and modulation of growth-related signals and how they could confer remarkable plasticity to the growth plate. Indeed, long bones have a significant ability for “catch-up growth” to attain normal size after a transient growth delay. We propose that the characterization of catch-up growth, in light of recent advances in physiology and cell biology, will provide long sought clues into the molecular mechanisms that underlie organ growth regulation. Importantly, catch-up growth early in life is commonly associated with metabolic disorders in adulthood, and this association is not completely understood. Further elucidation of the molecules and cellular interactions that influence organ size coordination should allow development of novel therapies for human growth disorders that are noninvasive and have minimal side effects. PMID:26485225

  17. Spatial Phosphoprotein Profiling Reveals a Compartmentalized Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Switch Governing Neurite Growth and Retraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yingchun; Yang, Feng; Fu, Yi; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Xining; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Monroe, Matthew E.; Pertz, Olivier C.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Orton, Daniel J.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2011-05-20

    Abstract - Brain development and spinal cord regeneration require neurite sprouting and growth cone navigation in response to extension and collapsing factors present in the extracellular environment. These external guidance cues control neurite growth cone extension and retraction processes through intracellular protein phosphorylation of numerous cytoskeletal, adhesion, and polarity complex signaling proteins. However, the complex kinase/substrate signaling networks that mediate neuritogenesis have not been investigated. Here, we compare the neurite phosphoproteome under growth and retraction conditions using neurite purification methodology combined with mass spectrometry. More than 4000 non-redundant phosphorylation sites from 1883 proteins have been annotated and mapped to signaling pathways that control kinase/phosphatase networks, cytoskeleton remodeling, and axon/dendrite specification. Comprehensive informatics and functional studies revealed a compartmentalized ERK activation/deactivation cytoskeletal switch that governs neurite growth and retraction, respectively. Our findings provide the first system-wide analysis of the phosphoprotein signaling networks that enable neurite growth and retraction and reveal an important molecular switch that governs neuritogenesis.

  18. Glucocorticoids and the regulation of growth hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Mazziotti, Gherardo; Giustina, Andrea

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoids modulate the secretion of growth hormone (GH) by various and competing effects on the hypothalamus and pituitary gland. The final effects of this modulation depend on hormone concentrations and the duration of exposure. The traditional hypothesis is that chronically raised levels of glucocorticoids suppress the secretion of GH. However, a functional impairment of the GH reserve might also be observed in patients with low levels of glucocorticoids, such as those with secondary hypoadrenalism, which is consistent with the model of biphasic dose-dependent effects of glucocorticoids on the somatotropic axis. This Review updates our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the effects of glucocorticoids on the secretion of GH and the clinical implications of the dual action of glucocorticoids on the GH reserve in humans. This Review will also address the potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications of GH for patients with a deficiency or excess of glucocorticoids.

  19. Density-dependent regulation of growth of BSC-1 cells in cell culture: growth inhibitors formed by the cells.

    PubMed Central

    Holley, R W; Armour, R; Baldwin, J H

    1978-01-01

    Inhibitors formed by a monkey epithelial cell line, BSC-1, play an important role in limiting growth at high cell densities. At least three inhibitors are formed: lactic acid, ammonia, and an unidentified inhibitor that may be an unstable protein. The unidentified inhibitor is destroyed by shaking the conditioned medium, by bubbling gas through the medium, or by heating or storing the medium in the absence of cells. The concentrations of lactic acid and ammonia that accumulate in conditioned medium inhibit growth when added to fresh medium. These results, together with earlier studies, indicate that density-dependent regulation of growth of BSC-1 cells results from the combined effects of (a) inhibitors formed by the cells, (b) decreased availability of receptor sites for serum growth factors as the cells become crowded, and (c) limiting concentrations of low molecular weight nutrients in the medium. In contrast, density-dependent regulation of growth in 3T3 mouse embryo fibroblasts results almost entirely from inactivation of serum factors. PMID:273914

  20. Central IL-1 receptor signaling regulates bone growth and mass

    PubMed Central

    Bajayo, Alon; Goshen, Inbal; Feldman, Sharon; Csernus, Valer; Iverfeldt, Kerstin; Shohami, Esther; Yirmiya, Raz; Bab, Itai

    2005-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine IL-1, acting via the hypothalamic IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1RI), activates pathways known to suppress bone formation such as the hypothalamo pituitary-adrenocortical axis and the sympathetic nervous system. In addition, peripheral IL-1 has been implicated as a mediator of the bone loss induced by sex hormone depletion and TNF. Here, we report an unexpected low bone mass (LBM) phenotype, including impairment of bone growth, in IL-1RI-deficient mice (IL-1rKO mice). Targeted overexpression of human IL-1 receptor antagonist to the central nervous system using the murine glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter (IL-1raTG mice) resulted in a similar phenotype, implying that central IL-1RI silencing is the causative process in the LBM induction. Analysis of bone remodeling indicates that the process leading to the LBM in both IL-1rKO and IL-1raTG is characterized mainly by doubling the osteoclast number. Either genetic modification does not decrease testosterone or increase corticosterone serum levels, suggesting that systems other than the gonads and hypothalamo pituitary-adrenocortical axis mediate the central IL-1RI effect on bone. We further demonstrate that WT mice express mouse IL-1ra in bone but not in the hypothalamus. Because low levels of IL-1 are present in both tissues, it is suggested that skeletal IL-1 activity is normally suppressed, whereas central IL-1 produces a constant physiologic stimulation of IL-1RI signaling. Although the pathway connecting the central IL-1RI signaling to bone remodeling remains unknown, the outburst of osteoclastogenesis in its absence suggests that normally it controls bone growth and mass by tonically restraining bone resorption. PMID:16126903

  1. Notch Signaling Regulates Ovarian Follicle Formation and Coordinates Follicular Growth

    PubMed Central

    Vanorny, Dallas A.; Prasasya, Rexxi D.; Chalpe, Abha J.; Kilen, Signe M.

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian follicles form through a process in which somatic pregranulosa cells encapsulate individual germ cells from germ cell syncytia. Complementary expression of the Notch ligand, Jagged1, in germ cells and the Notch receptor, Notch2, in pregranulosa cells suggests a role for Notch signaling in mediating cellular interactions during follicle assembly. Using a Notch reporter mouse, we demonstrate that Notch signaling is active within somatic cells of the embryonic ovary, and these cells undergo dramatic reorganization during follicle histogenesis. This coincides with a significant increase in the expression of the ligands, Jagged1 and Jagged2; the receptor, Notch2; and the target genes, Hes1 and Hey2. Histological examination of ovaries from mice with conditional deletion of Jagged1 within germ cells (J1 knockout [J1KO]) or Notch2 within granulosa cells (N2 knockout [N2KO]) reveals changes in follicle dynamics, including perturbations in the primordial follicle pool and antral follicle development. J1KO and N2KO ovaries also contain multi-oocytic follicles, which represent a failure to resolve germ cell syncytia, and follicles with enlarged oocytes but lacking somatic cell growth, signifying a potential role of Notch signaling in follicle activation and the coordination of follicle development. We also observed decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in the somatic cells of both conditional knockout lines. As a consequence of these defects, J1KO female mice are subfertile; however, N2KO female mice remain fertile. This study demonstrates important functions for Jagged1 and Notch2 in the resolution of germ cell syncytia and the coordination of somatic and germ cell growth within follicles of the mouse ovary. PMID:24552588

  2. Regulation of the growth of cotton bollworms by metabolites from an entomopathogenic fungus Paecilomyces cateniobliquus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong-Yang; Wang, Yan-Li; Tan, Jian-Lin; Zhu, Chun-Yan; Li, Dong-Xian; Huang, Rong; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Niu, Xue-Mei

    2012-06-06

    Chemical investigation of one entomopathogenic fungus Paecilomyces cateniobliquus YMF1.01799 led to the isolation and identification of six metabolites, which include three new compounds (2-3, and 5) and three known metabolites. Their structures were established by spectroscopic studies such as 1D and 2D NMR and MS analysis. Insect growth experiments suggested that polyketide-derived compound 1 showed significant inhibitory effect on the growth of cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera, while terpenoid-derived metabolite 5 promoted the growth of the larvae. The findings revealed that the entomopathogenic fungus P. cateniobliquus could produce different types of metabolites to regulate growth of the insect.

  3. Androgen regulation of axon growth and neurite extension in motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Fargo, Keith N.; Galbiati, Mariarita; Foecking, Eileen M.; Poletti, Angelo; Jones, Kathryn J.

    2008-01-01

    Androgens act on the CNS to affect motor function through interaction with a widespread distribution of intracellular androgen receptors (AR). This review highlights our work on androgens and process outgrowth in motoneurons, both in vitro and in vivo. The actions of androgens on motoneurons involve the generation of novel neuronal interactions that are mediated by the induction of androgen-dependent neurite or axonal outgrowth. Here, we summarize the experimental evidence for the androgenic regulation of the extension and regeneration of motoneuron neurites in vitro using cultured immortalized motoneurons, and axons in vivo using the hamster facial nerve crush paradigm. We place particular emphasis on the relevance of these effects to SBMA and peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:18387610

  4. Effects of scoria-cone eruptions upon nearby human communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ort, M.H.; Elson, M.D.; Anderson, K.C.; Duffield, W.A.; Hooten, J.A.; Champion, D.E.; Waring, G.

    2008-01-01

    Scoria-cone eruptions are typically low in volume and explosivity compared with eruptions from stratovolcanoes, but they can affect local populations profoundly. Scoria-cone eruption effects vary dramatically due to eruption style, tephra blanket extent, climate, types of land use, the culture and complexity of the affected group, and resulting governmental action. A comparison of a historic eruption (Pari??cutin, Me??xico) with prehistoric eruptions (herein we primarily focus on Sunset Crater in northern Arizona, USA) elucidates the controls on and effects of these variables. Long-term effects of lava flows extend little beyond the flow edges. These flows, however, can be used for defensive purposes, providing refuges from invasion for those who know them well. In arid lands, tephra blankets serve as mulches, decreasing runoff and evaporation, increasing infiltration, and regulating soil temperature. Management and retention of these scoria mulches, which can open new areas for agriculture, become a priority for farming communities. In humid areas, though, the tephra blanket may impede plant growth and increase erosion. Cultural responses to eruptions vary, from cultural collapse, through fragmentation of society, dramatic changes, and development of new technologies, to little apparent change. Eruptions may also be viewed as retribution for poor behavior, and attempts are made to mollify angry gods. ?? 2008 Geological Society of America.

  5. Plant dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase optimizes light-regulated growth and development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Yu; Wu, Yi-Chen; Pu, Hsin-Yi; Wang, Ying; Jang, Geng-Jen; Wu, Shu-Hsing

    2017-09-01

    Light controls vegetative and reproductive development of plants. For a plant, sensing the light input properly ensures coordination with the ever-changing environment. Previously, we found that LIGHT-REGULATED WD1 (LWD1) and LWD2 regulate the circadian clock and photoperiodic flowering. Here, we identified Arabidopsis YET ANOTHER KINASE1 (AtYAK1), an evolutionarily conserved protein and a member of dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinases (DYRKs), as an interacting protein of LWDs. Our study revealed that AtYAK1 is an important regulator for various light responses, including the circadian clock, photomorphogenesis and reproductive development. AtYAK1 could antagonize the function of LWDs in regulating the circadian clock and photoperiodic flowering. By examining phenotypes of atyak1, we found that AtYAK1 regulated light-induced period-length shortening and photomorphogenic development. Moreover, AtYAK1 mediated plant fertility especially under inferior light conditions including low light and short-day length. This study discloses a new regulator connecting environmental light to plant growth. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Nervous Wreck and Cdc42 cooperate to regulate endocytic actin assembly during synaptic growth

    PubMed Central

    Rodal, Avital A.; Motola-Barnes, Rebecca N.; Littleton, J. Troy

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of synaptic morphology depends on endocytosis of activated growth signal receptors, but the mechanisms regulating this membrane trafficking event are unclear. Actin polymerization mediated by WASp (Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein) and the Arp2/3 (Actin related protein 2/3) complex generates forces at multiple stages of endocytosis. F-BAR/SH3 domain proteins play key roles in this process by coordinating membrane deformation with WASp-dependent actin polymerization. However, it is not known how other WASp ligands, such as the small GTPase Cdc42, coordinate with F-BAR/SH3 proteins to regulate actin polymerization at membranes. Nervous Wreck (Nwk) is a conserved neuronal F-BAR/SH3 protein that localizes to periactive zones at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and is required for regulation of synaptic growth via BMP signaling. Here we show that Nwk interacts with the endocytic proteins dynamin and Dap160 and functions together with Cdc42 to promote WASp-mediated actin polymerization in vitro and to regulate synaptic growth in vivo. Cdc42 function is associated with Rab11-dependent recycling endosomes, and we show that Rab11 co-localizes with Nwk at the NMJ. Taken together, our results suggest that synaptic growth activated by growth factor signaling is controlled at an endosomal compartment via coordinated Nwk and Cdc42-dependent actin assembly. PMID:18701694

  7. Long- and short-distance signaling in the regulation of lateral plant growth.

    PubMed

    Brackmann, Klaus; Greb, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Lateral growth of shoot and root axes by the formation of secondary vascular tissues is an instructive example for the plasticity of plant growth processes. Being purely postembryonic, lateral growth strongly depends on environmental input and is tightly regulated by long- and short-distance signaling. In general, plant vasculature represents the main route for long-distance transport of compounds throughout the plant body, thereby providing also a fast and efficient signaling pipeline for the coordination of growth and development. The vasculature consists of three major tissues; the xylem conducts water and nutrients, the phloem transports mainly organic compounds and the vascular cambium is a group of undifferentiated stem cells responsible for the continuous production of secondary vascular tissues. Notably, the close proximity to functional vascular tissues makes the vascular cambium especially accessible for the regulation by long-distance-derived signaling molecules as well as by the physical and physiological properties of transport streams. Thus, the vascular cambium offers unique opportunities for studying the complex regulation of plant growth processes. In this review, we focus on recent findings about long- and short-distance signaling mechanisms regulating cambium activity and, thereby, lateral expansion of plant growth axes by the formation of additional vascular tissues. © 2013 The Authors. Physiologia Plantarum published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  8. Evidence That Up-Regulation of MicroRNA-29 Contributes to Postnatal Body Growth Deceleration

    PubMed Central

    Kamran, Fariha; Andrade, Anenisia C.; Nella, Aikaterini A.; Clokie, Samuel J.; Rezvani, Geoffrey; Nilsson, Ola; Baron, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Body growth is rapid in infancy but subsequently slows and eventually ceases due to a progressive decline in cell proliferation that occurs simultaneously in multiple organs. We previously showed that this decline in proliferation is driven in part by postnatal down-regulation of a large set of growth-promoting genes in multiple organs. We hypothesized that this growth-limiting genetic program is orchestrated by microRNAs (miRNAs). Bioinformatic analysis identified target sequences of the miR-29 family of miRNAs to be overrepresented in age–down-regulated genes. Concomitantly, expression microarray analysis in mouse kidney and lung showed that all members of the miR-29 family, miR-29a, -b, and -c, were strongly up-regulated from 1 to 6 weeks of age. Real-time PCR confirmed that miR-29a, -b, and -c were up-regulated with age in liver, kidney, lung, and heart, and their expression levels were higher in hepatocytes isolated from 5-week-old mice than in hepatocytes from embryonic mouse liver at embryonic day 16.5. We next focused on 3 predicted miR-29 target genes (Igf1, Imp1, and Mest), all of which are growth-promoting. A 3′-untranslated region containing the predicted target sequences from each gene was placed individually in a luciferase reporter construct. Transfection of miR-29 mimics suppressed luciferase gene activity for all 3 genes, and this suppression was diminished by mutating the target sequences, suggesting that these genes are indeed regulated by miR-29. Taken together, the findings suggest that up-regulation of miR-29 during juvenile life drives the down-regulation of multiple growth-promoting genes, thus contributing to physiological slowing and eventual cessation of body growth. PMID:25866874

  9. ABA Suppresses Root Hair Growth via the OBP4 Transcriptional Regulator1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Ayako; Schäfer, Sabine; Breuer, Christian; Shibata, Michitaro; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Matsui, Minami

    2017-01-01

    Plants modify organ growth and tune morphogenesis in response to various endogenous and environmental cues. At the cellular level, organ growth is often adjusted by alterations in cell growth, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this control remain poorly understood. In this study, we identify the DNA BINDING WITH ONE FINGER (DOF)-type transcription regulator OBF BINDING PROTEIN4 (OBP4) as a repressor of cell growth. Ectopic expression of OBP4 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) inhibits cell growth, resulting in severe dwarfism and the repression of genes involved in the regulation of water transport, root hair development, and stress responses. Among the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors known to control root hair growth, OBP4 binds the ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE6-LIKE2 (RSL2) promoter to repress its expression. The accumulation of OBP4 proteins is detected in expanding root epidermal cells, and its expression level is increased by the application of abscisic acid (ABA) at concentrations sufficient to inhibit root hair growth. ABA-dependent induction of OBP4 is associated with the reduced expression of RSL2. Furthermore, ectopic expression of OBP4 or loss of RSL2 function results in ABA-insensitive root hair growth. Taken together, our results suggest that OBP4-mediated transcriptional repression of RSL2 contributes to the ABA-dependent inhibition of root hair growth in Arabidopsis. PMID:28167701

  10. Coordinated regulation of growth genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Matthew G; Heideman, Warren

    2007-05-15

    It is imperative that quiescent Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells respond rapidly to fresh medium: the cell that initiates growth and division soonest has the most progeny. Several laboratories have used DNA microarrays to identify transcripts that are altered when fresh medium is added to quiescent cells. We combined published data with our own to address several questions: Do these experiments taken together identify a core set of genes that is reproducibly affected when quiescent cells are stimulated by nutrient repletion? Is this gene set coregulated in response to other environmental challenges? Does promoter histone occupancy correlate with the mRNA data? Despite diverse experimental designs, the data were highly correlated, generating a set of nutrient repletion transcripts. Glucose addition accounted for the response. These transcripts were also coregulated in response to diverse stresses. Promoters were associated with increased histone acetylation and decreased histone occupancy when induced, and high histone occupancy with low acetylation when repressed. The presence of RRPE and PAC promoter elements correlated with nutrient responsiveness and a dynamic pattern of histone occupancy and acetylation. Correlative evidence supports the idea that some mRNAs may be upregulated by release from sequestration in RNA-protein complexes.

  11. Regulating continent growth and composition by chemical weathering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, C.-T.A.; Morton, D.M.; Little, M.G.; Kistler, R.; Horodyskyj, U.N.; Leeman, W.P.; Agranier, A.

    2008-01-01

    Continents ride high above the ocean floor because they are underlain by thick, low-density, Si-rich, and Mg-poor crust. However, the parental magmas of continents were basaltic, which means they must have lost Mg relative to Si during their maturation into continents. Igneous differentiation followed by lower crustal delamination and chemical weathering followed by subduction recycling are possible solutions, but the relative magnitudes of each process have never been quantitatively constrained because of the lack of appropriate data. Here, we show that the relative contributions of these processes can be obtained by simultaneous examination of Mg and Li (an analog for Mg) on the regional and global scales in arcs, delaminated lower crust, and river waters. At least 20% of Mg is lost from continents by weathering, which translates into >20% of continental mass lost by weathering (40% by delamination). Chemical weathering leaves behind a more Si-rich and Mg-poor crust, which is less dense and hence decreases the probability of crustal recycling by subduction. Net continental growth is thus modulated by chemical weathering and likely influenced by secular changes in weathering mechanisms. ?? 2008 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  12. Regulating continent growth and composition by chemical weathering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus; Morton, Douglas M; Little, Mark G; Kistler, Ronald; Horodyskyj, Ulyana N; Leeman, William P; Agranier, Arnaud

    2008-04-01

    Continents ride high above the ocean floor because they are underlain by thick, low-density, Si-rich, and Mg-poor crust. However, the parental magmas of continents were basaltic, which means they must have lost Mg relative to Si during their maturation into continents. Igneous differentiation followed by lower crustal delamination and chemical weathering followed by subduction recycling are possible solutions, but the relative magnitudes of each process have never been quantitatively constrained because of the lack of appropriate data. Here, we show that the relative contributions of these processes can be obtained by simultaneous examination of Mg and Li (an analog for Mg) on the regional and global scales in arcs, delaminated lower crust, and river waters. At least 20% of Mg is lost from continents by weathering, which translates into >20% of continental mass lost by weathering (40% by delamination). Chemical weathering leaves behind a more Si-rich and Mg-poor crust, which is less dense and hence decreases the probability of crustal recycling by subduction. Net continental growth is thus modulated by chemical weathering and likely influenced by secular changes in weathering mechanisms.

  13. Mechanical Stress Regulation of Plant Growth and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    Growth dynamics analysis was used to determine to what extent the seismic stress induced reduction in photosynthetic productivity in shaken soybeans was due to less photosynthetic surface, and to what extent to lower efficiency of assimulation. Seismic stress reduces shoot transpiration rate 17% and 15% during the first and second 45 minute periods following a given treatment. Shaken plants also had a 36% greater leaf water potential 30 minutes after treatment. Continuous measurement of whole plant photosynthetic rate shows that a decline in CO2 fixation began within seconds after the onset of shaking treatment and continued to decline to 16% less than that of controls 20 minutes after shaking, after which gradual recovery of photosynthesis begins. Photosynthetic assimilation recovered completely before the next treatment 5 hours later. The transitory decrease in photosynthetic rate was due entirely to a two fold increase in stomatal resistance to CO2 by the abaxial leaf surface. Mesophyll resistance was not significantly affected by periodic seismic treatment. Temporary stomatal aperture reduction and decreased CO2 fixation are responsible for the lower dry weight of seismic stressed plants growing in a controlled environment.

  14. Regulating continent growth and composition by chemical weathering

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus; Morton, Douglas M.; Little, Mark G.; Kistler, Ronald; Horodyskyj, Ulyana N.; Leeman, William P.; Agranier, Arnaud

    2008-01-01

    Continents ride high above the ocean floor because they are underlain by thick, low-density, Si-rich, and Mg-poor crust. However, the parental magmas of continents were basaltic, which means they must have lost Mg relative to Si during their maturation into continents. Igneous differentiation followed by lower crustal delamination and chemical weathering followed by subduction recycling are possible solutions, but the relative magnitudes of each process have never been quantitatively constrained because of the lack of appropriate data. Here, we show that the relative contributions of these processes can be obtained by simultaneous examination of Mg and Li (an analog for Mg) on the regional and global scales in arcs, delaminated lower crust, and river waters. At least 20% of Mg is lost from continents by weathering, which translates into >20% of continental mass lost by weathering (40% by delamination). Chemical weathering leaves behind a more Si-rich and Mg-poor crust, which is less dense and hence decreases the probability of crustal recycling by subduction. Net continental growth is thus modulated by chemical weathering and likely influenced by secular changes in weathering mechanisms. PMID:18362343

  15. Host metabolism regulates growth and differentiation of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Weilhammer, Dina R.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Villegas, Eric N.; Brooks, George A.; Sinai, Anthony P.; Sha, William C.

    2012-01-01

    A critical step in the pathogenesis of Toxoplasma gondii is conversion from the fast-replicating tachyzoite form experienced during acute infection to the slow-replicating bradyzoite form that establishes long-lived tissue cysts during chronic infection. Bradyzoite cyst development exhibits a clear tissue tropism in vivo, yet conditions of the host cell environment that influence this tropism remain unclear. Using an in vitro assay of bradyzoite conversion, we have found that cell types differ dramatically in the ability to facilitate differentiation of tachyzoites into bradyzoites. Characterization of cell types that were either resistant or permissive for conversion revealed that resistant cell lines release low molecular weight metabolites that could support tachyzoite growth under metabolic stress conditions and thereby inhibit bradyzoite formation in permissive cells. Biochemical analysis revealed that the glycolytic metabolite lactate is an inhibitory component of supernatants from resistant cells. Furthermore, upregulation of glycolysis in permissive cells through the addition of glucose or by overexpression of the host kinase, Akt, was sufficient to convert cells from a permissive to a resistant phenotype. These results suggest that the metabolic state of the host cell may play a role in determining the predilection of the parasite to switch from the tachyzoite to bradyzoite form. PMID:22940576

  16. Philippine laws, regulations back policy to contain population growth.

    PubMed

    1974-01-01

    A recent compilation of population related decrees promulgated since martial law was declared in the Philippines in 1972 indicates that the government may be designing a legal framework encouraging voluntary limitation of family size. The list which was published in an appendix to the 1974-1977 Population Program, reveals that population influencing policies dealing with taxation, maternity benefits, incentive schemes and provision of family planning services by employers are already in effect. Since 1972 tax relief has been restricted to 4 dependents. Paid maternity leave is limited to the first 4 deliveries. Firms with over 300 employees are required to set up family planning clinics, and smaller firms must have infirmary personnel who are trained and certified in the provision of family planning services. Also, the Department of Labor is encouraging employers to develop incentive programs that will encourage workers to use effective family planning methods. The latest population plan also gives top priority to research, calls for targeting information to labor leaders, engaged couples, and out of school youth, and proposes disseminating population and family planning information through residential cooperatives and grass roots organizations. The aim of the current plan is to reduce the birthrate to 35.9 per 100 and the population growth rate to 2.47% by the end of the 4 year period. It is projected that by 1977 58% of the eligible population will be practicing contraception.

  17. Impact of Growth Hormone on Regulation of Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Troike, Katie M; Henry, Brooke E; Jensen, Elizabeth A; Young, Jonathan A; List, Edward O; Kopchick, John J; Berryman, Darlene E

    2017-06-18

    Increasing prevalence of obesity and obesity-related conditions worldwide has necessitated a more thorough understanding of adipose tissue (AT) and expanded the scope of research in this field. AT is now understood to be far more complex and dynamic than previously thought, which has also fueled research to reevaluate how hormones, such as growth hormone (GH), alter the tissue. In this review, we will introduce properties of AT important for understanding how GH alters the tissue, such as anatomical location of depots and adipokine output. We will provide an overview of GH structure and function and define several human conditions and cognate mouse lines with extremes in GH action that have helped shape our understanding of GH and AT. A detailed discussion of the GH/AT relationship will be included that addresses adipokine production, immune cell populations, lipid metabolism, senescence, differentiation, and fibrosis, as well as brown AT and beiging of white AT. A brief overview of how GH levels are altered in an obese state, and the efficacy of GH as a therapeutic option to manage obesity will be given. As we will reveal, the effects of GH on AT are numerous, dynamic and depot-dependent. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:819-840, 2017. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  18. Mechanical Stress Regulation of Plant Growth and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    Growth dynamics analysis was used to determine to what extent the seismic stress induced reduction in photosynthetic productivity in shaken soybeans was due to less photosynthetic surface, and to what extent to lower efficiency of assimulation. Seismic stress reduces shoot transpiration rate 17% and 15% during the first and second 45 minute periods following a given treatment. Shaken plants also had a 36% greater leaf water potential 30 minutes after treatment. Continuous measurement of whole plant photosynthetic rate shows that a decline in CO2 fixation began within seconds after the onset of shaking treatment and continued to decline to 16% less than that of controls 20 minutes after shaking, after which gradual recovery of photosynthesis begins. Photosynthetic assimilation recovered completely before the next treatment 5 hours later. The transitory decrease in photosynthetic rate was due entirely to a two fold increase in stomatal resistance to CO2 by the abaxial leaf surface. Mesophyll resistance was not significantly affected by periodic seismic treatment. Temporary stomatal aperture reduction and decreased CO2 fixation are responsible for the lower dry weight of seismic stressed plants growing in a controlled environment.

  19. Systemic regulation of soybean nodulation by acidic growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meng-Han; Gresshoff, Peter M; Ferguson, Brett J

    2012-12-01

    Mechanisms inhibiting legume nodulation by low soil pH, although highly prevalent and economically significant, are poorly understood. We addressed this in soybean (Glycine max) using a combination of physiological and genetic approaches. Split-root and grafting studies using an autoregulation-of-nodulation-deficient mutant line, altered in the autoregulation-of-nodulation receptor kinase GmNARK, determined that a systemic, shoot-controlled, and GmNARK-dependent mechanism was critical for facilitating the inhibitory effect. Acid inhibition was independent of aluminum ion concentration and occurred early in nodule development, between 12 and 96 h post inoculation with Bradyrhizobium japonicum. Biological effects were confirmed by measuring transcript numbers of known early nodulation genes. Transcripts decreased on both sides of split-root systems, where only one side was subjected to low-pH conditions. Our findings enhance the present understanding of the innate mechanisms regulating legume nodulation control under acidic conditions, which could benefit future attempts in agriculture to improve nodule development and biological nitrogen fixation in acid-stressed soils.

  20. Circadian clock gene expression regulates cancer cell growth through glutaminase.

    PubMed

    Huang, Aixia; Bao, Bingbo; Gaskins, H Rex; Liu, Haijun; Zhang, Xueli; Lu, Liwen; Gao, Shan; Shi, Yihai; Zhang, Ming; Shan, Yuanzhou; Feng, Jing; Yao, Guoxiang

    2014-05-01

    Glutamine is an essential amino acid for malignant tumor cells. Glutaminase that metabolizes glutamine reaches a maximum expression in tumors immediately before the maximum proliferation rate. Tumor cells grow at different rates during the day. We postulated that the activity of glutaminase in tumor cells is subject to the regulation of circadian clock gene. We measured glutaminase by western blot analysis and circadian clock gene expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction in the liver and tumor cells at six equispaced time points of the day in individual mice of a 12/12 h light/dark schedule. The results showed that the tumor-bearing mice, under normal diurnal conditions, are circadianly entrained, as reflected by the normal host locomotor activity rhythms and rhythmic liver clock gene expression. The tumors within these mice are also circadianly organized, as reflected by circadian clock gene (Bmal1) expression. What is most remarkable is that kidney-type glutaminase also showed circadian rhythms in the same pattern with tumor circadian clock gene expression in liver cancer xenograft model, indicating that conditionally inhibiting glutaminase activity may provide a new target for cancer therapy.

  1. Brown adipose tissue growth and development: significance and nutritional regulation.

    PubMed

    Satterfield, Michael Carey; Wu, Guoyao

    2011-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a profound resurgence in brown adipose tissue (BAT) research. The need for such a dramatic increase stems from the ever-growing trend toward global obesity. Indeed, it is currently estimated that rates of obesity in developed countries such as the United States exceed 35% of the population (1). The higher incidence of obesity is associated with increased prevalence of the metabolic syndrome including diabetes, hypertension, and coronary heart disease, among others (1, 2). BAT holds great promise in combating obesity given its unprecedented metabolic capacity. Leading the way has been recent studies, which conclusively demonstrate significant quantities of functional BAT in adult humans (3-7). These findings have been complimented by elegant studies elucidating the developmental origin of the brown adipocyte and the transcriptional regulation involved in its differentiation. This review will attempt to meld the wealth of new information regarding BAT development with established literature to provide an up to date synopsis of what is known and thus a framework for future research directions.

  2. Spatial Regulation of Root Growth: Placing the Plant TOR Pathway in a Developmental Perspective.

    PubMed

    Barrada, Adam; Montané, Marie-Hélène; Robaglia, Christophe; Menand, Benoît

    2015-08-19

    Plant cells contain specialized structures, such as a cell wall and a large vacuole, which play a major role in cell growth. Roots follow an organized pattern of development, making them the organs of choice for studying the spatio-temporal regulation of cell proliferation and growth in plants. During root growth, cells originate from the initials surrounding the quiescent center, proliferate in the division zone of the meristem, and then increase in length in the elongation zone, reaching their final size and differentiation stage in the mature zone. Phytohormones, especially auxins and cytokinins, control the dynamic balance between cell division and differentiation and therefore organ size. Plant growth is also regulated by metabolites and nutrients, such as the sugars produced by photosynthesis or nitrate assimilated from the soil. Recent literature has shown that the conserved eukaryotic TOR (target of rapamycin) kinase pathway plays an important role in orchestrating plant growth. We will summarize how the regulation of cell proliferation and cell expansion by ph