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Sample records for growth factor ii

  1. CrkII signals from epidermal growth factor receptor to Ras.

    PubMed Central

    Kizaka-Kondoh, S; Matsuda, M; Okayama, H

    1996-01-01

    A rat fibroblast mutant defective in oncogenic transformation and signaling from epidermal growth factor receptor to Ras has been isolated. The mutant contains dominant negative-type point mutations in the C-terminal SH3 domain of one crkII gene. Among the adapters tested, the mutant is complemented only by crkII cDNA. Expression of the mutated crkII in parent cells generates the phenotype indistinguishable from the mutant cell. Yet overexpression or reduced expression of Grb2 in the mutant before and after complementation with crkII have little effect on its phenotype. We conclude that adapter molecules are highly specific and that the oncogenic growth signal from epidermal growth factor receptor to Ras is predominantly mediated by CrkII in rat fibroblast. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8901553

  2. Determination of circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) in swine.

    PubMed

    Buonomo, F C; Grohs, D L; Baile, C A; Campion, D R

    1988-10-01

    A heterologous radioimmunoassay system was developed for the determination of circulating IGF-II concentrations in swine. The assay utilized a monoclonal antibody against human IGF-II (Amano Intl. Ez, VA) and bovine IGF-II (Monsanto Co., MO) as the cold standard and iodinated ligand. Serial dilutions of acid-ethanol extracted normal swine sera resulted in a curve which was parallel to the bovine IGF-II standard curve. Recovery of unlabeled standard added to extracted swine sera was 101%. Neither IGF-I nor insulin were capable of cross-reacting in this assay at levels up to 100-fold excess. Using this assay, serum IGF-II levels were determined to be significantly lower when subnormal growth hormone (GH) levels existed such as in hypophysectomized swine. However, in contrast to serum IGF-I concentrations, supranormal levels of porcine GH (pGH) did not elevate serum IGF-II concentrations after 13 wk of treatment in 25 kg hogs (initial body wt). In addition, serum IGF-II levels were reduced in fasted swine, despite a significant increase in circulating GH concentrations. Thus, although normal concentrations of GH are required for maintenance of physiological levels of IGF-II in swine, the mechanism for stimulation of IGF-II secretion is less GH-dependent than IGF-I.

  3. Purification and characterization of an insulin-like growth factor II variant from human plasma.

    PubMed

    Hampton, B; Burgess, W H; Marshak, D R; Cullen, K J; Perdue, J F

    1989-11-15

    An insulin-like growth factor II variant (IGF-II variant) was purified from Cohn fraction IV1 of human plasma by ion exchange, gel filtration, and reversed-phase high pressure liquid chromatography. The amino-terminal sequence of the first 35 amino acid residues showed a replacement of Ser-29 of IGF-II with the tetrapeptide Arg-Leu-Pro-Gly of IGF-II variant. Peptides isolated and sequenced after digestion with endoproteinase Asp-N and endoproteinase Glu-C disclosed no differences with the sequence predicted from an IGF-II variant cDNA clone isolated by Jansen, M., van Shaik, F. M. A., van Tol, H., Van den Brande, J. L., and Sussenbach, J. S. (1985) FEBS Lett., 179, 243-246. The molecular ion of intact IGF-II variant was 7809.4 mass units, as measured by plasma desorption mass spectrometry. This is in close agreement with the molecular ion of 7812.8 mass units calculated from the determined sequence and indicates the entire amino acid sequence had been accounted for. Binding of IGF-II variant to purified insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptors demonstrated a 2-3-fold lower affinity for this receptor compared with IGF-I or IGF-II. The dissociation constants for IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGF-II variant are 0.23, 0.38, and 0.80 nM, respectively. In a growth assay, the concentration of IGF-II and IGF-II variant required to stimulate the half-maximal growth of MCF-7 cells was 4 and 13 nM, respectively. Finally, the amount of IGF-II variant that can be purified by this method constitutes approximately 25% of the total IGF-II isolated from Cohn fraction IV1 of human plasma.

  4. Mapping of the insulin-like growth factor II binding site of the Type I insulin-like growth factor receptor by alanine scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Heidi; Whittaker, Linda; Hinrichsen, Jane; Groth, Andreas; Whittaker, Jonathan

    2004-05-07

    The Type I insulin-like growth factor receptor is a physiological receptor for insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). To characterize the molecular basis of the receptor's ligand binding properties, we have examined the effects of alanine mutations of residues in the ligand binding site of the receptor on its affinity for IGF-II. The functional epitope for IGF-II comprises residues in the N-terminal L1 domain and residues at the C-terminus of the alpha subunit. Cysteine rich domain residues do not appear to be critical for IGF-II binding.

  5. Enhancement of Memories by Systemic Administration of Insulin-Like Growth Factor II

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Sarah A; Kohtz, Amy S; Pollonini, Gabriella; Alberini, Cristina M

    2014-01-01

    To treat cognitive disorders in humans, new effective therapies that can be easily delivered systemically are needed. Previous studies showed that a bilateral injection of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) into the dorsal hippocampus of rats or mice enhances fear memories and facilitates fear extinction. Here, we report that, in mice, systemic treatments with IGF-II given before training significantly enhance the retention and persistence of several types of working, short-term and long-term memories, including fear conditioning, object recognition, object placement, social recognition, and spatial reference memory. IGF-II-mediated memory enhancement does not alter memory flexibility or the ability for new learning and also occurs when IGF-II treatment is given in concert with memory retrieval. Thus IGF-II may represent a potentially important and effective treatment for enhancing human cognitive and executive functions. PMID:24642597

  6. Effect of hepatocyte growth factor and angiotensin II on rat cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ai-Lan; Ou, Cai-Wen; He, Zhao-Chu; Liu, Qi-Cai; Dong, Qi; Chen, Min-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays an important role in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. The combined effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and Ang II on cardiomyocytes is unknown. The present study was designed to determine the effect of HGF on cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and to explore the combined effect of HGF and Ang II on cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Primary cardiomyocytes were isolated from neonatal rat hearts and cultured in vitro. Cells were treated with Ang II (1 µM) alone, HGF (10 ng/mL) alone, and Ang II (1 µM) plus HGF (10 ng/mL) for 24, 48, and 72 h. The amount of [3H]-leucine incorporation was then measured to evaluate protein synthesis. The mRNA levels of β-myosin heavy chain and atrial natriuretic factor were determined by real-time PCR to evaluate the presence of fetal phenotypes of gene expression. The cell size of cardiomyocytes was also studied. Ang II (1 µM) increased cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Similar to Ang II, treatment with 1 µM HGF promoted cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Moreover, the combination of 1 µM Ang II and 10 ng/mL HGF clearly induced a combined pro-hypertrophy effect on cardiomyocytes. The present study demonstrates for the first time a novel, combined effect of HGF and Ang II in promoting cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. PMID:23044624

  7. Insulin-like growth factor-II regulates bone sialoprotein gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Choe, Jin; Sasaki, Yoko; Zhou, Liming; Takai, Hideki; Nakayama, Yohei; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2016-09-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I and -II (IGF-I and IGF-II) have been found in bone extracts of several different species, and IGF-II is the most abundant growth factor stored in bone. Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is a noncollagenous extracellular matrix glycoprotein associated with mineralized connective tissues. In this study, we have investigated the regulation of BSP transcription by IGF-II in rat osteoblast-like ROS17/2.8 cells. IGF-II (50 ng/ml) increased BSP mRNA and protein levels after 6-h stimulation, and enhanced luciferase activities of the constructs pLUC3 (-116 to +60), pLUC4 (-425 to +60), pLUC5 (-801 to +60) and pLUC6 (-938 to +60). Effects of IGF-II were inhibited by tyrosine kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors, and abrogated by 2-bp mutations in cAMP response element (CRE), FGF2 response element (FRE) and homeodomain protein-binding site (HOX). The results of gel shift assays showed that nuclear proteins binding to CRE, FRE and HOX sites were increased by IGF-II (50 ng/ml) at 3 and 6 h. CREB1, phospho-CREB1, c-Fos and c-Jun antibodies disrupted the formation of the CRE-protein complexes. Dlx5 and Runx2 antibodies disrupted the FRE- and HOX-protein complex formations. These studies therefore demonstrated that IGF-II increased BSP transcription by targeting CRE, FRE and HOX elements in the proximal promoter of the rat BSP gene. Moreover, phospho-CREB1, c-Fos, c-Jun, Dlx5 and Runx2 transcription factors appear to be key regulators of IGF-II effects on BSP transcription.

  8. The transforming growth factor beta type II receptor can replace the activin type II receptor in inducing mesoderm.

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, A; Lin, H Y; Lodish, H F; Kintner, C R

    1994-01-01

    The type II receptors for the polypeptide growth factors transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) and activin belong to a new family of predicted serine/threonine protein kinases. In Xenopus embryos, the biological effects of activin and TGF-beta 1 are strikingly different; activin induces a full range of mesodermal cell types in the animal cap assay, while TGF-beta 1 has no effects, presumably because of the lack of functional TGF-beta receptors. In order to assess the biological activities of exogenously added TGF-beta 1, RNA encoding the TGF-beta type II receptor was introduced into Xenopus embryos. In animal caps from these embryos, TGF-beta 1 and activin show similar potencies for induction of mesoderm-specific mRNAs, and both elicit the same types of mesodermal tissues. In addition, the response of animal caps to TGF-beta 1, as well as to activin, is blocked by a dominant inhibitory ras mutant, p21(Asn-17)Ha-ras. These results indicate that the activin and TGF-beta type II receptors can couple to similar signalling pathways and that the biological specificities of these growth factors lie in their different ligand-binding domains and in different competences of the responding cells. Images PMID:8196664

  9. Prenatal cocaine exposure impairs cognitive function of progeny via insulin growth factor II epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qian; Hou, Jing; Chen, Bo; Shao, Xue; Zhu, Ruiming; Bu, Qian; Gu, Hui; Li, Yan; Zhang, Baolai; Du, Changman; Fu, Dengqi; Kong, Jueying; Luo, Li; Long, Hailei; Li, Hongyu; Deng, Yi; Zhao, Yinglan; Cen, Xiaobo

    2015-10-01

    Studies have showed that prenatal cocaine exposure (PCOC) can impair cognitive function and social behavior of the offspring; however, the mechanism underlying such effect is poorly understood. Insulin-like growth factor II (Igf-II), an imprinted gene, has a critical role in memory consolidation and enhancement. We hypothesized that epigenetic regulation of hippocampal Igf-II may attribute to the cognitive deficits of PCOC offspring. We used Morris water maze and open-field task to test the cognitive function in PCOC offspring. The epigenetic alteration involved in hippocampal Igf-II expression deficit in PCOC offspring was studied by determining Igf-II methylation status, DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) expressions and L-methionine level. Moreover, IGF-II rescue experiments were performed and the downstream signalings were investigated in PCOC offspring. In behavioral tests, we observed impaired spatial learning and memory and increased anxiety in PCOC offspring; moreover, hippocampal IGF-II mRNA and protein expressions were significantly decreased. Hippocampal methylation of cytosine-phospho-guanine (CpG) dinucleotides in differentially methylated region (DMR) 2 of Igf-II was elevated in PCOC offspring, which may be driven by the upregulation of L-methionine and DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 1. Importantly, intra-hippocampal injection of recombinant IGF-II reactivated the repressed calcium calmodulin kinase II α (CaMKIIα) and reversed cognitive deficits in PCOC offspring. Collectively, our findings suggest that cocaine exposure during pregnancy impairs cognitive function of offspring through epigenetic modification of Igf-II gene. Enhancing IGF-II signaling may represent a novel therapeutical strategy for cocaine-induced cognitive impairment.

  10. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor II receptors by growth hormone and insulin in rat adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Loennroth, P.; Assmundsson, K.; Eden, S.; Enberg, G.; Gause, I.; Hall, K.; Smith, U.

    1987-06-01

    The acute and long-term effects of growth hormone (GH) on the binding of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) were evaluated in adipose cells from hypophysectomized rats given replacement therapy with thyroxine and hydrocortisone and in cells from their sham-operated littermates. After the cells were incubated with insulin and/or GH, the recycling of /sup 125/I-labeled IGF-II receptors was metabolically inhibited by treating the cells with KCN. IGF-II binding was 100 +/- 20% higher in cells from GH-deficient animals when compared with sham-operated controls. These GH-deficient cells also showed an increased sensitivity for insulin as compared with control cells (the EC/sub 50/ for insulin was 0.06 ng/ml in GH-deficient cells and 0.3 ng/ml in control cells.). However, the maximal incremental effect of insulin on IGH-II binding was reduced approx. = 27% by hypophysectomy. GH added to the incubation medium increased the number of IGF-II binding sites by 100 +/- 18% in cells from hypophysectomized animals. This increase was rapidly induced, but the time course was slower than that for the stimulatory effect of insulin. Half-maximal effect of GH on IGF-II binding was obtained at approx. = 30 ng/ml. Thus, GH added in vitro exerted a rapid insulin-like effect on the number of IGH-II receptors. GH also appears to play a regulating role for maintaining the cellular number of IGH-II receptors and, in addition, modulates the stimulatory effect of insulin on IGF-II binding.

  11. Acetylation of RNA polymerase II regulates growth-factor-induced gene transcription in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Sebastian; Herker, Eva; Itzen, Friederike; He, Daniel; Thomas, Sean; Gilchrist, Daniel A; Kaehlcke, Katrin; Cho, Sungyoo; Pollard, Katherine S; Capra, John A; Schnölzer, Martina; Cole, Philip A; Geyer, Matthias; Bruneau, Benoit G; Adelman, Karen; Ott, Melanie

    2013-11-07

    Lysine acetylation regulates transcription by targeting histones and nonhistone proteins. Here we report that the central regulator of transcription, RNA polymerase II, is subject to acetylation in mammalian cells. Acetylation occurs at eight lysines within the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest polymerase subunit and is mediated by p300/KAT3B. CTD acetylation is specifically enriched downstream of the transcription start sites of polymerase-occupied genes genome-wide, indicating a role in early stages of transcription initiation or elongation. Mutation of lysines or p300 inhibitor treatment causes the loss of epidermal growth-factor-induced expression of c-Fos and Egr2, immediate-early genes with promoter-proximally paused polymerases, but does not affect expression or polymerase occupancy at housekeeping genes. Our studies identify acetylation as a new modification of the mammalian RNA polymerase II required for the induction of growth factor response genes.

  12. Free insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II) in human serum.

    PubMed

    Frystyk, J; Skjaerbaek, C; Dinesen, B; Orskov, H

    1994-07-11

    Using ultrafiltration by centrifugation we have isolated the free, unbound fractions of insulin-like growth factor I and II (free IGF-I and IGF-II) in human serum. In this way near in vivo conditions could be maintained before and during isolation. The recovery was 80 to 100% in the ultrafiltrates, which contained no detectable amounts of IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs) as measured by Western ligand blotting and IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-3 immunoassays. The concentration of free peptides was measured in two ultrasensitive non-competitive IGF-I and IGF-II time-resolved fluoroimmunoassays. We found that (i) equilibrium between free and protein-complexed IGF was strongly dependent on re-establishment of in vivo conditions (temperature, pH, ionic milieu and dilution); (ii) metabolic events (glucose load and fasting) caused significant changes in free IGF-I and IGF-II levels without concomitant changes in total circulating levels of IGFs; (iii) in 49 healthy adult subjects (20 to above 60 years) free IGF-I was inversely related to age and ranged from 950 +/- 150 ng/l (mean +/- S.E.M.) (20-30 years) to 410 +/- 70 ng/l (> 60 years). The relative percentage was, however, unchanged, being 0.38 +/- 0.02% of total IGF-I. In contrast, free IGF-II was independent of age, being 1,480 +/- 80 ng/l (approximately 0.20 +/- 0.01% of total IGF-II).

  13. Overexpression of insulin-like growth factor-II induces accelerated myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Stewart, C E; James, P L; Fant, M E; Rotwein, P

    1996-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that exogenous insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) can stimulate the terminal differentiation of skeletal myoblasts in culture and have established a correlation between the rate and the extent of IGF-II secretion by muscle cell lines and the rate of biochemical and morphological differentiation. To investigate the hypothesis that autocrine secretion of IGF-II plays a critical role in stimulating spontaneous myogenic differentiation in vitro, we have established C2 muscle cell lines that stably express a mouse IGF-II cDNA under control of the strong, constitutively active Moloney sarcoma virus promoter, enabling us to study directly the effects of IGF-II overproduction. Similar to observations with other muscle cell lines, IGF-II overexpressing myoblasts proliferated normally in growth medium containing 20% fetal serum, but they underwent enhanced differentiation compared with controls when incubated in low-serum differentiation medium. Accelerated differentiation of IGF-II overexpressing C2 cells was preceded by the rapid induction of myogenin mRNA and protein expression (within 1 h, compared with 24-48 h in controls) and was accompanied by an enhanced proportion of the retinoblastoma protein in an underphosphrylated and potentially active form, by a marked increase in activity of the muscle-specific enzyme, creatine phosphokinase, by extensive myotube formation by 48 h, and by elevated secretion of IGF binding protein-5 when compared with controls. These results confirm a role for IGF-II as an autocrine/paracrine differentiation factor for skeletal myoblasts, and they define a model cell system that will be useful in determining the biochemical mechanisms of IGF action in cellular differentiation.

  14. Insulin-like growth factor-II stimulates steroidogenesis in cultured bovine thecal cells.

    PubMed

    Spicer, L J; Voge, J L; Allen, D T

    2004-11-30

    The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) on luteinizing hormone (LH)-induced progesterone and androstenedione production by bovine thecal cells and compare it to that of insulin and IGF-I. Cells from large (>7.9 mm) bovine follicles were collected and cultured for 2 days in the presence of 10% fetal calf serum. Then cells were cultured for an additional 1 or 2 days in serum-free medium with various doses of recombinant human IGF-II, bovine LH (30 ng/ml), IGF-I, and(or) insulin. Cell numbers were determined at the end of treatments via Coulter counting and used to correct steroid production data. In the presence of LH, 1-day treatment with 3-300 ng/ml of IGF-II had no significant effect on progesterone or androstenedione production, whereas 2-day treatment with 30, 100 and 300 ng/ml of IGF-II increased (P < 0.05) both progesterone and androstenedione production by 2-3-fold. The estimated effective dose of IGF-II stimulating 50% of the maximal steroidogenic response was calculated to be 25 ng/ml. In the absence of LH, 2-day treatment of IGF-I or -II had no effect on thecal androstenedione production but increased (P < 0.05) thecal progesterone production. In the presence of LH, 100 ng/ml of IGF-I increased progesterone and androstenedione production to a greater degree than did 100 ng/ml of IGF-II. Maximal effects of IGF-I and insulin on thecal steroidogenesis were similar and were not additive. Anti-IGF type I receptor antibodies attenuated (P < 0.05) the stimulatory effect of both IGF-I and IGF-II on thecal cell steroidogenesis. Use of radioligand assays demonstrated that specific receptors for (125)I-IGF-II existed in thecal cells with a 25 ng/well of IGF-II causing 50% inhibition of binding. IGF-I cross-reactivity with (125)I-IGF-II receptors averaged 3% whereas cross-reactivity of IGF-II with (125)I-IGF-I receptors averaged 114%. These results indicate that the stimulatory effects of IGF-II on

  15. Insulin-like growth factor II-producing metastatic colon cancer with recurrent hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Teramae, Satoshi; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Muguruma, Naoki; Okada, Yasuyuki; Goji, Takahiro; Kitamura, Shinji; Kimura, Tetsuo; Kimura, Masako; Bando, Yoshimi; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2015-02-01

    A 45-year-old man was referred to our hospital and found to have a tubular adenocarcinoma of the descending colon with multiple liver metastases. During hospitalization, the patient suffered recurrent hypoglycemic attacks that required intravenous 50% glucose infusion. He was diagnosed with non-islet cell tumor hypoglycemia (NICTH) because the colon cancer tissue obtained by biopsy was strongly stained for insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) by immunohistochemistry. He received chemotherapy with oxaliplatin, 5-FU and leucovorin (FOLFOX) plus bevacizumab (Bmab), and showed a partial response. As the metastatic lesions decreased in size, the hypoglycemic attacks gradually disappeared. Subsequently, he received outpatient chemotherapy and maintained a high quality of life for about 10 months. Western blot analysis of IGF-II in serum at the time of admission showed a high-molecular-weight form of IGF-II, which was considered to have caused hypoglycemia. This patient presents a very rare case of colorectal cancer associated with NICTH syndrome due to production of high-molecular-weight IGF-II by cancer cells. It is important to investigate IGF-II expression in cancer tissues for establishing the diagnosis of NICTH in cases with intractable hypoglycemia complicated by advanced cancer.

  16. Direct demonstration of rapid insulin-like growth factor II receptor internalization and recycling in rat adipocytes. Insulin stimulates SVI-insulin-like growth factor II degradation by modulating the IGF-II receptor recycling process

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Y.; Rozek, L.M.; Czech, M.P.

    1985-08-05

    The photoactive insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II analogue 4-azidobenzoyl- SVI-IGF-II was synthesized and used to label specifically and covalently the Mr = 250,000 Type II IGF receptor. When rat adipocytes are irradiated after a 10-min incubation with 4-azidobenzoyl- SVI-IGF-II at 10 degrees C and immediately homogenized, most of the labeled IGF-II receptors are associated with the plasma membrane fraction, indicating that receptors accessible to the labeling reagent at low temperature are on the cell surface. However, when the photolabeled cells are incubated at 37 degrees C for various times before homogenization, labeled IGF-II receptors are rapidly internalized with a half-time of 3.5 min as evidenced by a loss from the plasma membrane fraction and a concomitant appearance in the low density microsome fraction. The steady state level of cell surface IGF-II receptors in the presence or absence of IGF-II remains constant under these conditions, demonstrating that IGF-II receptors rapidly recycle back to the cell surface at the same rate as receptor internalization. Using the above methodology, it is shown that acute insulin action: 1) increases the steady state number of cell surface IGF-II receptors; 2) increases the number of ligand-bound IGF-II receptors that are internalized per unit of time; and 3) increases the rate of cellular SVI-IGF-II degradation by a process that is blocked by anti-IGF-II receptor antibody.

  17. Receptors for insulin-like growth factors I and II in rat gastrointestinal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Laburthe, M.; Rouyer-Ressard, C.; Gammeltoft, S. Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen )

    1988-03-01

    Distinct receptors for insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) have been characterized in rat intestinal epithelium using {sup 125}I-labeled IGF-I and {sup 125}I-labeled IGF-II. In jejunal epithelial plasma membranes, IGF-I receptors were observed with a dissociation constant (K{sub d}) of 7.2 nM and a binding capacity of 0.56 pmol/mg protein. Distinct IGF-II receptors were also found with a K{sub d} of 9.5 nM and a binding capacity of 2.61 pmol/mg protein. For IGF-I receptors the following order of affinity was observed: IGF-I > IGF-II > insulin > proinsulin. IGF-II receptors recognize IGF-II with a 20-fold higher affinity than IGF-I and display no cross-reactivity with insulin and proinsulin. Affinity labeling of intestinal membranes also discriminates between the two types of receptors, revealing a radioligand-receptor complex of relative molecular weight (M{sub r}) 130,000 using {sup 125}I-IGF-I and 250,000 for {sup 125}I-IGF-II under reducing conditions. Separation of proliferative crypt cells from mature villus cells in the small intestine makes it possible to show that a gradient of IGF receptors is present along the crypt-villus axis. {sup 125}I-IGF-I and {sup 125}I-IGF-II binding is 4.0- and 1.8-fold higher in crypt cells than in villus cells, respectively. Specific {sup 125}I-IGF binding is detectable throughout the gastrointestinal tract. The level of IGF binding is similar in stomach, small intestine, and cecum, but higher values are observed in colon.

  18. [Gene expression of transforming growth factor beta receptor II in the epidermis of pathological scar].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Rui; An, Gang; Liu, Shun-Li; Wei, Feng-Cai

    2012-08-01

    To study the gene expression of transforming growth factor beta receptor II (TbetaR II) in pathological scar. Twenty samples of pathological scar were collected from 20 burn or trauma patients hospitalized in the General Hospital of Ji'nan Military Command from 2007 to 2009. Twenty specimens of epidermal layer were obtained from the middle portion and the edge of pathological scars. Twenty normal skin specimens which were located more than 10 cm away from the lesion sites of 20 patients were collected as self-controls. Serum from 1-2 mL whole blood were obtained from each of the 20 patients for second self-control. Eight normal skin specimens from 8 patients without pathological scar, discarded from un-related operations, were also collected as negative-control. Positive expressions of TbetaR II in three different skin specimens were determined with biotin-streptavidin-peroxidase staining. Gene expressions of TbetaR II in all specimens were compared with PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and gene sequencing. Data were processed with Fisher's exact test. Positive expression of TbetaR II in pathological scar epidermis was lower than that in normal skin specimen of patients with pathological scar or normal skin specimen of patients without pathological scar, and TbetaR II was mainly located in the basal layer of epidermis. Positive expressions of TbetaR II were seldom found in acanthocytes, granular cells, and cuticle or even non-existing. No abnormality of TbetaR II was found in normal skin epidermis or serum samples of pathological scar patients or normal skin epidermis of patients without pathological scar. TbetaR II expressing in 8 specimens of epidermis of pathological scar showed abnormal electrophoresis pattern at poly A fragments hand and loss of one A base in DNA fragment (P = 0.044). There may he abnormal gene expression of TbetaR II in pathological scar epidermis. Replantation of epidermis of scar may increase the risk of scar recurrence

  19. Regulation of rat mesangial cell migration by platelet-derived growth factor, angiotensin II, and adrenomedullin.

    PubMed

    Kohno, M; Yasunari, K; Minami, M; Kano, H; Maeda, K; Mandal, A K; Inoki, K; Haneda, M; Yoshikawa, J

    1999-12-01

    This study sought to determine whether platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and angiotensin II (AngII) stimulate migration of cultured rat glomerular mesangial cells. After finding that this was so, the effects of adrenomedullin (ADM) and cAMP-elevating agents on basal and stimulated mesangial cell migration were examined. Two isoforms of PDGF, AB and BB, stimulated migration in a concentration-dependent manner between 1 and 50 ng/ml, while the AA isoform lacked significant effect. AngII modestly but significantly stimulated migration in a concentration-dependent manner between 10(-7) and 10(-6) mol/L. Rat ADM significantly inhibited the PDGF BB- and AngII-stimulated migration in a concentration-dependent manner between 10(-8) and 10(-7) mol/L. Inhibition by rat ADM was accompanied by an increase in cellular cAMP. cAMP agonists or inducers such as 8-bromo cAMP, forskolin, and prostaglandin I2 also significantly reduced the stimulated migration. H 89, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, attenuated the inhibitory effect of ADM, and a calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, human CGRP (8-37), abolished the inhibitory effects of rat ADM. These results suggest that PDGF AB and BB as well as AngII stimulate rat mesangial cell migration and that ADM can inhibit PDGF BB- and AngII-stimulated migration, at least in part through cAMP-dependent mechanisms likely to involve specific ADM receptors with which CGRP interacts. The adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA system may be involved in the migration-inhibitory effect of ADM in these cells.

  20. Solution structure of human insulin-like growth factor II; recognition sites for receptors and binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Terasawa, H; Kohda, D; Hatanaka, H; Nagata, K; Higashihashi, N; Fujiwara, H; Sakano, K; Inagaki, F

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of human insulin-like growth factor II was determined at high resolution in aqueous solution by NMR and simulated annealing based calculations. The structure is quite similar to those of insulin and insulin-like growth factor I, which consists of an alpha-helix followed by a turn and a strand in the B-region and two antiparallel alpha-helices in the A-region. However, the regions of Ala1-Glu6, Pro31-Arg40 and Thr62-Glu67 are not well-defined for lack of distance constraints, possibly due to motional flexibility. Based on the resultant structure and the results of structure-activity relationships, we propose the interaction sites of insulin-like growth factor II with the type 2 insulin-like growth factor receptor and the insulin-like growth factor binding proteins. These sites partially overlap with each other at the opposite side of the putative binding surface to the insulin receptor and the type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor. We also discuss the interaction modes of insulin-like growth factor II with the insulin receptor and the type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor. Images PMID:7527339

  1. Somatomedin-C/insulin-like growth factor-I and Insulin-like growth factor-II mRNAs in rate fetal and adult tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, P.K.; Moats-Staats, B.M.; Hynes, M.A.; Simmons, J.G.; Jansen, M.; D'ercole, A.J.; Van Wyk, J.J.

    1986-11-05

    Somatomedin-C or insulin-like growth factor I (Sm-C/IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) have been implicated in the regulation of fetal growth and development. In the present study /sup 32/P-labeled complementary DNA probes encoding human and mouse Sm-C/IGF-I and human IGF-II were used in Northern blot hybridizations to analyze rat Sm-C/IGF-I and IGF-II mRNAs in poly(A/sup +/) RNAs from intestine, liver, lung, and brain of adult rats and fetal rats between day 14 and 17 of gestation. In fetal rats, all four tissues contained a major mRNA of 1.7 kilobase (kb) that hybridized with the human Sm-C/IGF-I cDNA and mRNAs of 7.5, 4.7, 1.7, and 1.2 kb that hybridized with the mouse Sm-C/IGF-I cDNA. Adult rat intestine, liver, and lung also contained these mRNAs but Sm-C/IGF-I mRNAs were not detected in adult rat brain. These findings provide direct support for prior observations that multiple tissues in the fetus synthesize immunoreactive Sm-C/IGF-I and imply a role for Sm-C/IGF-I in fetal development as well as postnatally. Multiple IGF-II mRNAs of estimated sizes 4.7, 3.9, 2.2, 1.75, and 1.2 kb were observed in fetal rat intestine, liver, lung, and brain. The 4.7- and 3.9-kb mRNAs were the major hybridizing IGF-II mRNAs in all fetal tissues. Higher abundance of IGF-II mRNAs in rat fetal tissues compared with adult tissues supports prior hypotheses, based on serum IGF-II concentrations, that IGF-II is predominantly a fetal somatomedin. IGF-II mRNAs are present, however, in some poly(A/sup +/) RNAs from adult rat tissues. The brain was the only tissue in the adult rat where the 4.7- and 3.9-kb IGF-II mRNAs were consistently detected. These findings suggest that a role for IGF-II in the adult rat, particularly in the central nervous system, cannot be excluded.

  2. Insulin-like growth factor I and II preserve myocardial structure in postinfarct swine

    PubMed Central

    Kotlyar, A; Vered, Z; Goldberg, I; Chouraqui, P; Nas, D; Fridman, E; Chen-Levy, Z; Fytlovich, S; Sangiorgi, G; Spagnoli, L; Orlandi, A; Savion, N; Eldar, M; Scheinowitz, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Insulin-like growth factors (IGF) I and II improve myocardial function after coronary occlusion in different animal models.
OBJECTIVES—To investigate the mechanism of improved myocardial function after administration of IGF-I or IGF-II in acute myocardial infarction.
METHODS—Female pigs (mean (SD) weight 25 (5) kg) were subjected to acute myocardial infarction by microembolisation with 75-150 µm affigel blue beads. The beads contained and slowly released 150 µg/pig of IGF-I (n = 6), IGF-II (n = 6), or pig albumin (n = 6). Echocardiography, perfusion imaging, and haemodynamic measurements were performed before infarction and during four weeks after infarction. Regional wall motion of different left ventricular segments was scored semiquantitatively on the basis of a three point scoring system, from normal = 0 to dyskinesia = 3. Serum cardiac troponin I concentration was measured before, immediately after, and three hours after the infarct. Excised hearts were analysed for actin, desmin, blood vessel density, and DNA laddering within the infarct, border, and normal myocardial areas.
RESULTS—Myocardial function of the infarct related area improved significantly during the four weeks of follow up in both the IGF groups (p = 0.01). Myocardial perfusion, heart rate, and blood pressure were similar in all the animals during the study. Treated animals had lower serum cardiac troponin I concentration (p = 0.001), more actin in the border area (p = 0.01) and infarct area (p = 0.0001), and reduced DNA laddering in the infarct area compared with the controls (p < 0.05). IGF groups had more blood vessels in the border area (p = 0.04) and the infarct area (p = 0.003).
CONCLUSIONS—Both types of IGF improved myocardial function and the improvement was associated with preservation of myocardial structure. IGF-I was more effective than IGF-II.


Keywords: myocardial infarction; growth factors; ventricular function

  3. Insulin-like growth factor-II and heparin are anti-apoptotic survival factors in human villous cytotrophoblast.

    PubMed

    Hills, Frank A; Mehmet, Huseyin; Sullivan, Mark H

    2012-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II), heparin, aspirin and vitamin C on the proliferation and apoptosis of human villous cytotrophoblast from first trimester and term placentae. Villous cytotrophoblast cells were isolated from uncomplicated first trimester (n=12) and term placental tissues (n=12) using negative immunoselection with an antibody to HLA class I antigens. Cells were incubated with IGF-I, IGF-II, heparin, aspirin and vitamin C either alone, or in combination with either TNF-α/IFN-γ or staurosporine. Proliferation was determined by measurement of Ki67 expression using immunocytochemistry. Trophoblast apoptosis was determined by TUNEL staining. Finally RT-PCR was carried out to identify IGF-binding insulin receptor isoforms. Data were expressed as means±SEM. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni correction was used to determine if differences between groups were statistically significant. Following negative immunoselection >98% of cells were positively stained for cytokeratin 7, a marker for cytotrophoblasts, and <1% were vimentin positive. First trimester and term trophoblasts underwent spontaneous apoptosis which was inhibited by approximately 50% in the presence of IGF-II or heparin. Apoptosis was significantly increased following incubation with a combination of TNF-α and IFN-γ or staurosporine. Apoptosis was decreased to basal levels following coincubation with IGF-II or heparin. Incubation with IGFs or heparin resulted in a small, but significant increase in Ki67 expression. Insulin receptor isoform A, which binds IGF-II with high affinity, was present in all trophoblast samples tested. These results suggest that heparin and IGF-II, but not IGF-I are important regulators of villous cytotrophoblast survival in early and late pregnancy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A Family of Insulin-Like Growth Factor II mRNA-Binding Proteins Represses Translation in Late Development

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Jacob; Christiansen, Jan; Lykke-Andersen, Jens; Johnsen, Anders H.; Wewer, Ulla M.; Nielsen, Finn C.

    1999-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is a major fetal growth factor. The IGF-II gene generates multiple mRNAs with different 5′ untranslated regions (5′ UTRs) that are translated in a differential manner during development. We have identified a human family of three IGF-II mRNA-binding proteins (IMPs) that exhibit multiple attachments to the 5′ UTR from the translationally regulated IGF-II leader 3 mRNA but are unable to bind to the 5′ UTR from the constitutively translated IGF-II leader 4 mRNA. IMPs contain the unique combination of two RNA recognition motifs and four hnRNP K homology domains and are homologous to the Xenopus Vera and chicken zipcode-binding proteins. IMP localizes to subcytoplasmic domains in a growth-dependent and cell-specific manner and causes a dose-dependent translational repression of IGF-II leader 3 –luciferase mRNA. Mouse IMPs are produced in a burst at embryonic day 12.5 followed by a decline towards birth, and, similar to IGF-II, IMPs are especially expressed in developing epithelia, muscle, and placenta in both mouse and human embryos. The results imply that cytoplasmic 5′ UTR-binding proteins control IGF-II biosynthesis during late mammalian development. PMID:9891060

  5. Inactivation of Smad-Transforming Growth Factor β Signaling by Ca2+-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II

    PubMed Central

    Wicks, Stephen J.; Lui, Stephen; Abdel-Wahab, Nadia; Mason, Roger M.; Chantry, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    Members of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) family transduce signals through Smad proteins. Smad signaling can be regulated by the Ras/Erk/mitogen-activated protein pathway in response to receptor tyrosine kinase activation and the gamma interferon pathway and also by the functional interaction of Smad2 with Ca2+-calmodulin. Here we report that Smad–TGF-β-dependent transcriptional responses are prevented by expression of a constitutively activated Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (Cam kinase II). Smad2 is a target substrate for Cam kinase II in vitro at serine-110, -240, and -260. Cam kinase II induces in vivo phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad4 and, to a lesser extent, Smad3. A phosphopeptide antiserum raised against Smad2 phosphoserine-240 reacted with Smad2 in vivo when coexpressed with Cam kinase II and by activation of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor, the epidermal growth factor receptor, HER2 (c-erbB2), and the TGF-β receptor. Furthermore, Cam kinase II blocked nuclear accumulation of a Smad2 and induced Smad2-Smad4 hetero-oligomerization independently of TGF-β receptor activation, while preventing TGF-β-dependent Smad2-Smad3 interactions. These findings provide a novel cross-talk mechanism by which Ca2+-dependent kinases activated downstream of multiple growth factor receptors antagonize cell responses to TGF-β. PMID:11027280

  6. Dysfunctional Transforming Growth Factor-β Receptor II Accelerates Prostate Tumorigenesis in the TRAMP Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Hong; Collazo, Joanne; Jones, Elisabeth; Gayheart, Dustin; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Vogt, Adam; Mitchell, Bonnie; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2009-01-01

    The contribution of a dysfunctional TGF-β type II receptor (TGFβRII) to prostate cancer initiation and progression was investigated in an in vivo mouse model. Transgenic mice harboring the dominant-negative mutant TGF-β type II receptor (DNTGFβRII) in mouse epithelial cell were crossed with the TRAMP prostate cancer transgenic mouse to characterize the in vivo consequences of inactivated TGF-β signaling on prostate tumor initiation and progression. Histopathological diagnosis of prostate specimens from the TRAMP+/DNTGFβRII double transgenic mice, revealed the appearance of early malignant changes and subsequently highly aggressive prostate tumors at a younger age, compared to littermates TRAMP+/Wt TGFβRII mice. Immunohistochemical and western blotting analysis revealed significantly increased proliferative and apoptotic activities, as well as vascularity and macrophage infiltration that correlated with an elevated VEGF and MCP-1 protein levels in prostates from TRAMP+/DNTGFβRII+ mice. An epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-effect was also detected in prostates of TRAMP+/DNTGFβRII mice, as documented by the loss of epithelial markers (E-cadherin and β-catenin) and upregulation of mesenchymal markers (N-cadherin) and EMT-transcription factor Snail. A significant increase in the androgen receptor (AR) mRNA and protein levels was associated with the early onset of prostate tumorigenesis in TRAMP+/DNTGFβRII mice. Our results indicate that in vivo disruption of TGF-β signaling accelerates the pathological malignant changes in the prostate by altering the kinetics of prostate growth and inducing EMT. The study also suggests that a dysfunctional TGFβRII augments AR expression and promotes inflammation in early stage tumor growth thus conferring a significant contribution by TGF-β to prostate cancer progression. PMID:19738062

  7. Human pituitary and placental hormones control human insulin-like growth factor II secretion in human granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasharma, K.; Li, C.H.

    1987-05-01

    Human granulosa cells cultured with calf serum actively proliferated for 18-20 generations and secreted progesterone into the medium; progesterone levels appeared to decline with increase in generation number. Cells cultured under serum-free conditions secreted significant amounts of progesterone and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). The progesterone secretion was enhanced by the addition of human follitropin, lutropin, and chorionic gonadotropin but not by growth hormone. These cells, when challenged to varying concentrations of human growth hormone, human chorionic somatomammotropin, human prolactin, chorionic gonadotropin, follitropin, and lutropin, secreted IGF-II into the medium as measured by specific IGF-II RIA. Among these human hormones, chorionic gonadotropin, follitropin, and lutropin were most effective in inducing IGF-II secretion from these cells. When synthetic lutropin-releasing hormone and ..cap alpha..-inhibin-92 were tested, only lutropin-releasing hormone was effective in releasing IGF-II. The results described suggest that cultured human granulosa cells can proliferate and actively secrete progesterone and IGF-II into the medium. IGF-II production in human granulosa cells was influenced by a multi-hormonal complex including human growth hormone, human chorionic somatomammotropin, and prolactin.

  8. Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF II) in human brain: regional distribution of IGF II and of higher molecular mass forms

    SciTech Connect

    Haselbacher, G.K.; Schwab, M.E.; Pasi, A.; Humbel, R.E.

    1985-04-01

    Twenty-four distinct areas of human brain were analyzed for the presence of insulin-like growth factor (IGF). As reported for cerebrospinal fluid, only IGF II-like immunoreactivity, but no significant amounts of IGF I-like immunoreactivity, could be found. Upon gel permeation chromatography, two to five distinct size classes were separated on the basis of their immunoreactivity. Radioimmunoassays and a bioassay also gave results indistinguishable from those of serum IGF II. The highest amounts of IGF II-like immunoreactivity occur in the anterior pituitary. This is up to 100 times more than in most other brain regions analyzed. The higher molecular mass immunoreactive species were partially characterized. After immunoaffinity purification, the 38- and 26-kDa species are active in a bioassay. Specific IGF-binding protein activity could be shown after purification of the 38- and 26-kDa species on an IGF-affinity column. The 13-kDa species released significant amounts of 7.5-kDa material. The results are interpreted as evidence for the presence of IGF II synthesized locally in human brain.

  9. METABOLIC FUNCTION OF BRANCHED-CHAIN VOLATILE FATTY ACIDS, GROWTH FACTORS FOR RUMINOCOCCI II.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, M. J.; Bryant, M. P.; Katz, I.; Keeney, M.

    1962-01-01

    Allison, M. J. (Dairy Cattle Research Branch, USDA, Beltsville, Md.), M. P. Bryant, I. Katz, and M. Keeney. Metabolic function of branched-chain volatile fatty acids, growth factors for ruminococci. II. Biosynthesis of higher branched-chain fatty acids and aldehydes. J. Bacteriol. 83:1084–1093. 1962.—A number of strains of rumen bacteria require branched-chain volatile fatty acids for growth. A strain of Ruminococcus flavefaciens that requires either isovalerate or isobutyrate incorporates radioactive carbon from isovalerate-1-C14 and isovalerate-3-C14 into leucine and into the lipid fraction of the cells. Evidence obtained by both paper and gas chromatography indicated that most of the label in the lipid of cells grown in isovalerate-1-C14 was in a branched-chain 15-carbon fatty acid, with some in a 17-carbon acid; about 7.5% of the C14 was recovered in a branched-chain 15-carbon aldehyde. The aldehydes were in the phospholipid fraction and were presumably present as plasmalogen. A strain of R. albus was shown to require isobutyrate, 2-methyl-n-butyrate, or 2-ketoisovalerate for growth. This strain did not incorporate appreciable C14 from isovalerate-1-C14 or isovalerate-3-C14. When grown in a medium containing isobutyrate-1-C14, most of the cellular C14 was found in the lipid fraction. Analysis of the lipid demonstrated that the label was present mainly as branched-chain 14-carbon and 16-carbon fatty acids, with 11% of the C14 present in 14- and 16-carbon carbonyl compounds, presumably branched-chain aldehydes. Branched-chain 14-, 15-, and 16-carbon fatty acids are major components of the lipids of these rumen bacteria. The possibility that these acids and aldehydes, which are found in ruminant body and milk lipids, may be of microbial origin is discussed. PMID:13860622

  10. Serum insulin-like growth factors I and II, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 and risk of breast cancer in the Japan Collaborative Cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sakauchi, Fumio; Nojima, Masanori; Mori, Mitsuru; Wakai, Kenji; Suzuki, Sadao; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Ito, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Inaba, Yutaka; Tajima, Kazuo; Nakachi, Kei

    2009-12-01

    The Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risk (JACC Study) was planned in the late 1980s as a large-scale cohort study of persons in various areas of Japan. In the present study, we conducted a nested case-control study and examined associations of breast cancer risk with serum levels of insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I, IGF-II), as well as insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), among women who participated in the JACC Study and donated blood at the baseline. Sixty-three women who died or suffered from breast cancer were examined. Two or three controls were selected to match each case for age at recruitment and the study area. Controls were alive and not diagnosed as having breast cancer at the diagnosis date of the cases. Associations between the serum IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3 and breast cancer risk were evaluated using a conditional logistic regression model. In premenopausal Japanese women, IGF-I showed a marginal negative dose-dependent association with the breast cancer risk (trend P= 0.08), but any link disappeared on taking into account IGFBP-3 (trend P= 0.47), which was likely to be inversely associated with the risk. In postmenopausal women, IGFBP-3 showed a marginal dose-dependent association with the risk (trend P= 0.06). Further studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  11. Phase II trial of epidermal growth factor ointment for patients with Erlotinib-related skin effects.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In Gyu; Kang, Jung Hun; Oh, Sung Yong; Lee, Suee; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Song, Ki-Hoon; Son, Choonhee; Park, Min Jae; Kang, Myung Hee; Kim, Hoon Gu; Lee, Jeeyun; Park, Young Suk; Sun, Jong Mu; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Chan Kyu; Yi, Seong Yoon; Jang, Joung-Soon; Park, Keunchil; Kim, Hyo-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of erlotinib, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has been demonstrated in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and pancreatic cancer (PC). In the present study, we evaluated the effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) ointment on erlotinib-related skin effects (ERSEs). This was an open-label, non-comparative, multicenter, phase II trial. The patients included those diagnosed with NSCLC or PC who were treated with erlotinib. The effectiveness of the ointment was defined as follows: (1) grade 2, 3, or 4 ERSEs downgraded to ≤ grade 1 or (2) grade 3 or 4 ERSEs downgraded to grade 2 and persisted for at least 2 weeks. Fifty-two patients from seven institutes in Korea were enrolled with informed consent. The final assessment included 46 patients (30 males, 16 females). According to the definition of effectiveness, the EGF ointment was effective in 36 (69.2%) intention to treat patients. There were no statistically significant differences in the effectiveness of the EGF ointment by gender (p = 0.465), age (p = 0.547), tumor type (p = 0.085), erlotinib dosage (p = 0.117), and number of prior chemotherapy sessions (p = 0.547). The grading for the average National Cancer Institute's Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI-CTCAE) rating of rash/acne and itching improved from 2.02 ± 0.83 to 1.13 ± 0.89 and 1.52 ± 0.84 to 0.67 ± 0.90, respectively (p < 0.001). The most common reason for discontinuing the study was progression of cancer (37%). Based on the results, the EGF ointment is effective for ERSEs, regardless of gender, age, type of tumor, and dosage of erlotinib. The EGF ointment evenly improved all kinds of symptoms of ERSEs. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01593995.

  12. Biochemical Characterization of Individual Human Glycosylated pro-Insulin-like Growth Factor (IGF)-II and big-IGF-II Isoforms Associated with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Greenall, Sameer A.; Bentley, John D.; Pearce, Lesley A.; Scoble, Judith A.; Sparrow, Lindsay G.; Bartone, Nicola A.; Xiao, Xiaowen; Baxter, Robert C.; Cosgrove, Leah J.; Adams, Timothy E.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is a major embryonic growth factor belonging to the insulin-like growth factor family, which includes insulin and IGF-I. Its expression in humans is tightly controlled by maternal imprinting, a genetic restraint that is lost in many cancers, resulting in up-regulation of both mature IGF-II mRNA and protein expression. Additionally, increased expression of several longer isoforms of IGF-II, termed “pro” and “big” IGF-II, has been observed. To date, it is ambiguous as to what role these IGF-II isoforms have in initiating and sustaining tumorigenesis and whether they are bioavailable. We have expressed each individual IGF-II isoform in their proper O-glycosylated format and established that all bind to the IGF-I receptor and both insulin receptors A and B, resulting in their activation and subsequent stimulation of fibroblast proliferation. We also confirmed that all isoforms are able to be sequestered into binary complexes with several IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP-2, IGFBP-3, and IGFBP-5). In contrast to this, ternary complex formation with IGFBP-3 or IGFBP-5 and the auxillary protein, acid labile subunit, was severely diminished. Furthermore, big-IGF-II isoforms bound much more weakly to purified ectodomain of the natural IGF-II scavenging receptor, IGF-IIR. IGF-II isoforms thus possess unique biological properties that may enable them to escape normal sequestration avenues and remain bioavailable in vivo to sustain oncogenic signaling. PMID:23166326

  13. EFFECT OF GROWTH FACTOR-FIBRONECTIN MATRIX INTERACTION ON RAT TYPE II CELL ADHESION AND DNA SYTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Type II cells attach, migrate and proliferate on a provisional fibronectin-rich matrix during alveolar wall repair after lung injury. The combination of cell-substratum interactions via integrin receptors and exposure to local growth factors are likely to initiat...

  14. The use of insulin like-growth factor II messenger RNA binding protein-3 in diagnostic pathology.

    PubMed

    Findeis-Hosey, Jennifer J; Xu, Haodong

    2011-03-01

    The histologic distinction between reactive processes and malignant neoplasms and between low-grade and high-grade tumors is not always straightforward and is sometimes extremely challenging. This is especially the case when the diagnostic material is a small biopsy specimen or a cytology specimen with scant cellularity. In addition, suboptimal processing and crush artifact may limit accurate diagnosis. A reliable diagnostic biomarker that preferentially highlights malignant processes and high-grade tumors would be very valuable in segregating these entities from reactive processes and low-grade lesions. Recent extensive studies have shown that an oncoprotein, insulin like-growth factor II messenger RNA binding protein-3, is not only a prognostic biomarker but also a diagnostic molecule. This review focuses on discussing the value of insulin like-growth factor II messenger RNA binding protein-3 in diagnostic pathology, with a focus on utilization of insulin like-growth factor II messenger RNA binding protein-3 in the discrimination of benign effusions from malignant effusions, malignant mesothelioma from mesothelial hyperplasia, carcinoids from high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas, low-grade dysplasia from high-grade dysplasia, hepatocellular carcinoma from hepatic adenoma, cholangiocarcinoma and metastatic pancreatic ductal carcinoma from benign bile duct lesions, melanoma from nevi, and follicular thyroid carcinoma from follicular adenoma of the thyroid, as well as examining insulin like-growth factor II messenger RNA binding protein-3 expression in lymphomas of germinal center origin.

  15. EFFECT OF GROWTH FACTOR-FIBRONECTIN MATRIX INTERACTION ON RAT TYPE II CELL ADHESION AND DNA SYTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Type II cells attach, migrate and proliferate on a provisional fibronectin-rich matrix during alveolar wall repair after lung injury. The combination of cell-substratum interactions via integrin receptors and exposure to local growth factors are likely to initiat...

  16. Vertebral Artery Aneurysm Mimicking as Left Subclavian Artery Aneurysm in a Patient with Transforming Growth Factor Beta Receptor II Mutation.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Rana O; Dhillon, Baltej Singh; Sandhu, Harleen K; Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M; Estrera, Anthony L; Azizzadeh, Ali

    2015-10-01

    We report successful endovascular repair of a left vertebral artery aneurysm in a patient with transforming growth factor beta receptor II mutation. The patient was initially diagnosed with a left subclavian artery aneurysm on computed tomography angiography. The patient consented to publication of this report.

  17. Probing Receptor Specificity by Sampling the Conformational Space of the Insulin-like Growth Factor II C-domain*

    PubMed Central

    Hexnerová, Rozálie; Křížková, Květoslava; Fábry, Milan; Sieglová, Irena; Kedrová, Kateřina; Collinsová, Michaela; Ullrichová, Pavlína; Srb, Pavel; Williams, Christopher; Crump, Matthew P.; Tošner, Zdeněk; Jiráček, Jiří; Veverka, Václav; Žáková, Lenka

    2016-01-01

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factors I and II are closely related protein hormones. Their distinct evolution has resulted in different yet overlapping biological functions with insulin becoming a key regulator of metabolism, whereas insulin-like growth factors (IGF)-I/II are major growth factors. Insulin and IGFs cross-bind with different affinities to closely related insulin receptor isoforms A and B (IR-A and IR-B) and insulin-like growth factor type I receptor (IGF-1R). Identification of structural determinants in IGFs and insulin that trigger their specific signaling pathways is of increasing importance in designing receptor-specific analogs with potential therapeutic applications. Here, we developed a straightforward protocol for production of recombinant IGF-II and prepared six IGF-II analogs with IGF-I-like mutations. All modified molecules exhibit significantly reduced affinity toward IR-A, particularly the analogs with a Pro-Gln insertion in the C-domain. Moreover, one of the analogs has enhanced binding affinity for IGF-1R due to a synergistic effect of the Pro-Gln insertion and S29N point mutation. Consequently, this analog has almost a 10-fold higher IGF-1R/IR-A binding specificity in comparison with native IGF-II. The established IGF-II purification protocol allowed for cost-effective isotope labeling required for a detailed NMR structural characterization of IGF-II analogs that revealed a link between the altered binding behavior of selected analogs and conformational rearrangement of their C-domains. PMID:27510031

  18. Insulin-like growth factor II receptor is phosphorylated by a tyrosine kinase in adipocyte plasma membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Corvera, S.; Whitehead, R.E.; Mottola, C.; Czech, M.P.

    1986-06-15

    Incorporation of /sup 32/P from (gamma-32P)ATP into tyrosine residues of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II receptor was observed in a Triton X-100-insoluble fraction of rat adipocyte plasma membranes. IGF-II receptor phosphorylation proceeded to a stoichiometry of approximately 0.5 mol of phosphate/IGF-II binding site after 10 min of incubation at 4 degrees C. A Km for ATP of 6 microM was calculated for this phosphorylation reaction. Addition of IGF-II caused an approximately 2-fold increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of the IGF-II receptor in this preparation. In contrast, phosphorylation of angiotensin II by the Triton X-100 washed membranes was not stimulated by IGF-II. Incubation of purified receptor immobilized on IGF-II agarose or of receptor-enriched low density microsomal membranes with (gamma-32P)ATP did not result in appreciable incorporation of (/sup 32/P)phosphate into the IGF-II receptor nor into exogenous substrates. These data suggest that the IGF-II receptor is not a tyrosine protein kinase capable of autophosphorylation but that it is a substrate for a tyrosine protein kinase endogenous to the adipocyte plasma membrane. The stimulatory effect of IGF-II on the tyrosine phosphorylation of its receptor may be due to a conformational change which converts the receptor to a better substrate for this tyrosine kinase.

  19. The role of insulin-like growth factor II in the malignant transformation of rat liver oval cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, N; Siegel, K; Odenthal, M; Becker, R; Oesch, F; Dienes, H P; Schirmacher, P; Steinberg, P

    1997-04-01

    Oval cells are small nonparenchymal epithelial cells that first appear in the periportal areas of the liver and thereafter invade the whole parenchyma when mice or rats are exposed to a variety of chemical carcinogens. In the present study we have analyzed the expression of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF II) in the recently established oval cell line OC/CDE 22 and its malignantly transformed counterpart (the M22 cells) and the biological consequences of the constitutive expression of IGF II in oval cells. OC/CDE 22 cells do not express the above-mentioned growth factor, whereas the M22 cells do and addition of a neutralizing anti-IGF II antibody to M22 cells resulted in an almost complete proliferation stop. The presence of type 1 as well as type 2 insulin-like growth factor receptors in OC/CDE 22 and M22 cells was revealed by Northern blotting; however, only neutralizing antibodies directed against the type 1 IGF receptor were able to inhibit the proliferation of the cultured oval cells. Finally, transfection of an IGF II complementary DNA (cDNA) into OC/CDE 22 cells resulted in the release of active IGF II into the extracellular medium but not in the concomitant malignant transformation of the cells. Taken together these results show that: 1) upon transformation oval cells start producing IGF II and 2) IGF II acts on oval cells as a pure mitogen (without being per se oncogenic) via an autocrine loop involving the activation of the type 1 IGF receptor.

  20. Radioimmunological determination of insulinlike growth factors I and II in normal subjects and in patients with growth disorders and extrapancreatic tumor hypoglycemia.

    PubMed Central

    Zapf, J; Walter, H; Froesch, E R

    1981-01-01

    Serum levels of immunoreactive insulinlike growth factors (IGF) I and II were determined by a modified IGF I and a new IGF II radioimmunoassay in normal children and adults, and in patients with acromegaly, isolated growth hormone deficiency, and extrapancreatic tumor hypoglycemia. Serum samples were gel filtered by a simple routine procedure at acidic pH to dissociate and separate IGF from the IGF carrier protein. Mean immunoreactive IGF I levels (+/- SD; corrected for crossreactivity of IGF II) were 193 +/- 58 ng/ml in normal adult subjects, 712 +/- 245 ng/ml in acromegalic patients and 24 +/- 14 ng/ml in patients with isolated growth hormone deficiency. The lack of growth hormone alone, irrespective of an otherwise normal hormonal status, appears to be responsible for the drastic decrease of IGF I levels. Oversecretion of growth hormone does not increase the levels of immunoreactive IGF II: mean levels (+/- SD; corrected for crossreactivity of IGF I) in normal and acromegalic subjects are virtually identical (647 +/- 126 and 641 +/- 189 ng/ml, respectively). Apparently, normal growth hormone levels stimulate IGF II production already maximally. However in growth hormone deficiency immunoreactive IGF II is significantly decreased (252 +/- 99 ng/ml). Thus, IGF II, like IGF I, is growth hormone dependent. But in contrast to IGF I, the growth hormone dependence of IGF II seems to become apparent only at subnormal growth hormone levels. In normal children IGF I is age dependent: it is low in newborn cord sera (51 +/- 20 ng/ml) and gradually rises into the adult range with increasing age. At the onset of and during puberty mean IGF I levels lie above prepubertal values. In contrast, IGF II levels in normal children are independent of age and pubertal stage beyond the first year of life, whereas newborns have significantly lower IGF II values. Hypoglycemia resulting from extrapancreatic tumors is not associated with increased immunoreactive IGF I or II levels. IGF I is

  1. Factor II deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should. Factor II is one such coagulation factor. Factor II deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents must ...

  2. Functional cross-talk between angiotensin II and epidermal growth factor receptors in NIH3T3 fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    De Paolis, Paola; Porcellini, Antonio; Savoia, Carmine; Lombardi, Alessia; Gigante, Bruna; Frati, Giacomo; Rubattu, Speranza; Musumeci, Beatrice; Volpe, Massimo

    2002-04-01

    The main angiotensin (Ang) II subtype receptors (AT1R and AT2R) are involved in cellular growth processes and exert functionally antagonistic effects. To characterize the mechanisms by which Ang II receptors influence growth, by investigating the interactions between Ang II subtype receptors and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation. The experiments were performed using a mouse fibroblast cell line, NIH3T3, by transient co-transfection with rat AT1R or AT2R expression vectors, or both. Extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 phosphorylation was analysed by western blot and the ERK activity was evaluated using PathDetect, an in-vivo signal transduction pathway trans-reporting system. Selective Ang II receptor antagonists (losartan for AT1R and PD123319 for AT2R) were used to investigate the contributions of each receptor to the response observed. Our data show that, in this cellular model, both Ang II receptors phosphorylate ERK1/2. However, in the cells expressing AT1R, the EGF-induced MAPK pathway was enhanced in the presence of Ang II in a synergistic fashion. In contrast, a reduction of EGF-induced MAPK activation was observed in the cells expressing AT2R. In cells expressing both Ang II subtype receptors, Ang II promoted an enhancement of EGF-induced MAPK activation. However, in the presence of the AT1R antagonist, losartan, the effect of EGF was reduced. These data indicate the existence of an opposite cross-talk of AT1R and AT2R with EGF receptors, and suggest a complex functional interaction between these pathways in the regulation of cellular growth processes.

  3. Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF II) receptor from rat brain is of lower apparent molecular weight than the IGF II receptor from rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    McElduff, A.; Poronnik, P.; Baxter, R.C.

    1987-10-01

    The binding subunits of the insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF I) receptors from rat brain are of lower molecular weight than the corresponding receptor in rat liver, possibly due to variations in sialic acid content. We have compared the IGF II receptor from rat brain and rat liver. The brain receptor is of smaller apparent mol wt (about 10 K) on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This size difference is independent of ligand binding as it persists in iodinated and specifically immunoprecipitated receptors. From studies of wheat germ agglutinin binding and the effect of neuraminidase on receptor mobility, we conclude that this difference is not simply due to variations in sialic acid content. Treatment with endoglycosidase F results in reduction in the molecular size of both liver and brain receptors and after this treatment the aglycoreceptors are of similar size. We conclude that in rat brain tissue the IGF II receptor like the binding subunits of the insulin and IGF I receptors is of lower molecular size than the corresponding receptors in rat liver. This difference is due to differences in N-linked glycosylation.

  4. Insulin-like growth factor II messenger ribonucleic acids are synthesized in the choroid plexus of the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, M.A.; Brooks, P.J.; Van Wyk, J.J.; Lund, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrating the presence of immunoreactive insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their receptors in the brain suggest a role of the IGFs in the central nervous system. IGF-II has been implicated as the predominant IGF in brain of mature animals based on studies of immunoreactive peptide and of IGF-II mRNAs. To obtain information about the sites of synthesis of IGF-II in adult rat brain, a /sup 32/P-labeled 31 base long synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotide complementary in sequence to trailer peptide coding sequences in rat IGF-II mRNA (IGF-II 31 mer) was hybridized with coronal sections of fixed rat brain. The IGF-II 31 mer showed specific hybridization with the choroid plexus throughout rat brain, whereas in other brain regions, structures or cells, hybridization was not discernibly above background. These findings suggest that the choroid plexus is a primary site of synthesis of IGF-II, a probable source of IGF-II in cerebrospinal fluid, and a potential source of IGF-II for actions on target cells within the adult rat brain.

  5. Characterization of the growth of murine fibroblasts that express human insulin receptors. II. Interaction of insulin with other growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Randazzo, P.A.; Jarett, L. )

    1990-09-01

    The effects of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and insulin on DNA synthesis were studied in murine fibroblasts transfected with an expression vector containing human insulin receptor cDNA (NIH 3T3/HIR) and the parental NIH 3T3 cells. In NIH 3T3/HIR cells, individual growth factors in serum-free medium stimulated DNA synthesis with the following relative efficacies: insulin greater than or equal to 10% fetal calf serum greater than PDGF greater than IGF-1 much greater than EGF. In comparison, the relative efficacies of these factors in stimulating DNA synthesis by NIH 3T3 cells were 10% fetal calf serum greater than PDGF greater than EGF much greater than IGF-1 = insulin. In NIH 3T3/HIR cells, EGF was synergistic with 1-10 ng/ml insulin but not with 100 ng/ml insulin or more. Synergy of PDGF or IGF-1 with insulin was not detected. In the parental NIH 3T3 cells, insulin and IGF-1 were found to be synergistic with EGF (1 ng/ml), PDGF (100 ng/ml), and PDGF plus EGF. In NIH 3T3/HIR cells, the lack of interaction of insulin with other growth factors was also observed when the percentage of cells synthesizing DNA was examined. Despite insulin's inducing only 60% of NIH 3T3/HIR cells to incorporate thymidine, addition of PDGF, EGF, or PDGF plus EGF had no further effect. In contrast, combinations of growth factors resulted in 95% of the parental NIH 3T3 cells synthesizing DNA. The independence of insulin-stimulated DNA synthesis from other mitogens in the NIH 3T3/HIR cells is atypical for progression factor-stimulated DNA synthesis and is thought to be partly the result of insulin receptor expression in an inappropriate context or quantity.

  6. Placental insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) and its relation to litter size in the common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Julienne N; Eklund, Amy; Tardif, Suzette

    2009-12-01

    The primate placenta produces a wide variety of hormones throughout gestation that regulate placental function and fetal growth. One such hormone is insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II), a peptide implicated in cell division, differentiation, and amino acid transport. IGF-II concentrations were measured in 23 common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) term placentas from twin and triplet litters in order to determine whether previously described differences in fetoplacental phenotype such as placental and litter mass and placental surface area were related to differences in endocrine function. IGF-II was extracted from frozen tissue samples and measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit designed for human tissue, which was validated for marmoset placenta. IGF-II concentrations were not related to placental or litter mass, and twin and triplet placentas did not differ in total concentration. However, per individual fetus, triplets were associated with a significant 42% reduction in IGF-II concentration (P = 0.03), and IGF-II concentration per gram of fetal mass was a third lower in triplet litters. The triplet placenta exhibits a global expansion of the surface area which was contrasted by a per unit area reduction in IGF-II concentration (r = -0.75, P = 0.01), a pattern that explains why twin and triplet placentas overall did not differ in concentration. Per fetus, triplet pregnancies are associated with relatively less maternal mass, placental mass and microscopic surface area suggesting that the intrauterine growth of triplets is supported by systems that increase the efficiency of nutrient transfer. The finding that individual triplet fetuses are also associated with significantly lower IGF-II concentrations is consistent with the view that the marmoset fetoplacental unit exhibits a flexible pattern of placental allocation and metabolism. Plasticity in placental endocrine and metabolic function is likely to play an important role in the ability of the

  7. Inhibition of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II)-dependent cell growth by multidentate pentamannosyl 6-phosphate-based ligands targeting the mannose 6-phosphate/IGF-II receptor

    PubMed Central

    Grosely, Rosslyn; MacDonald, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    The mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor (M6P/IGF2R) binds M6P-capped ligands and IGF-II at different binding sites within the ectodomain and mediates ligand internalization and trafficking to the lysosome. Multivalent M6P-based ligands can cross-bridge the M6P/IGF2R, which increases the rate of receptor internalization, permitting IGF-II binding as a passenger ligand and subsequent trafficking to the lysosome, where the IGF-II is degraded. This unique feature of the receptor may be exploited to design novel therapeutic agents against IGF-II-dependent cancers that will lead to decreased bioavailable IGF-II within the tumor microenvironment. We have designed a panel of M6P-based ligands that bind to the M6P/IGF2R with high affinity in a bivalent manner and cause decreased cell viability. We present evidence that our ligands bind through the M6P-binding sites of the receptor and facilitate internalization and degradation of IGF-II from conditioned medium to mediate this cellular response. To our knowledge, this is the first panel of synthetic bivalent ligands for the M6P/IGF2R that can take advantage of the ligand-receptor interactions of the M6P/IGF2R to provide proof-of-principle evidence for the feasibility of novel chemotherapeutic agents that decrease IGF-II-dependent growth of cancer cells. PMID:27694692

  8. Truncated forms of the insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II)/mannose 6-phosphate receptor encompassing the IGF-II binding site: characterization of a point mutation that abolishes IGF-II binding.

    PubMed

    Garmroudi, F; Devi, G; Slentz, D H; Schaffer, B S; MacDonald, R G

    1996-06-01

    Complete understanding of the functional significance of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) binding by the IGF-II/mannose-6-phosphate (Man-6-P) receptor requires mapping and ultimately mutational analysis of the receptor's IGF-II binding domain. Recent advances have localized the IGF-II binding site to extracytoplasmic repeats 10-11. To improve resolution of the binding site map, a nested set of epitope-tagged, truncated forms of the human IGF-II/Man-6-P receptor were transiently expressed in COS-7 cells. The IGF-II binding properties of truncated receptors immunoprecipitated from cell lysates and conditioned media were determined by affinity cross-linking. From the largest truncated receptor, encompassing extracytoplasmic repeats 8-11 (M(r) 68 K), through the smallest, comprised primarily of repeat 11 (M(r) 23 K), all were able to bind and cross-link to IGF-II. As a group, the truncated receptors had similar affinities for IGF-II, but with relative binding affinities 5-to 10-fold lower than those of full-length receptors. A point mutation substituting threonine for isoleucine at residue 1572, located in the NH2-terminal half of repeat 11, completely abolished IGF-II binding. We conclude that repeat 11 of the IGF-II/Man-6-P receptor's extracytoplasmic domain contains the minimal elements required for binding and cross-linking to IGF-II, and that lle1572 and other residues within the NH2-terminal half of repeat 11 are particularly important for IGF-II interaction.

  9. Insulin-like Growth Factor-II (IGF-II) and IGF-II Analogs with Enhanced Insulin Receptor-a Binding Affinity Promote Neural Stem Cell Expansion*

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Amber N.; Chidambaram, Shravanthi; Forbes, Briony E.; Wood, Teresa L.; Levison, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to employ genetically engineered IGF-II analogs to establish which receptor(s) mediate the stemness promoting actions of IGF-II on mouse subventricular zone neural precursors. Neural precursors from the subventricular zone were propagated in vitro in culture medium supplemented with IGF-II analogs. Cell growth and identity were analyzed using sphere generation and further analyzed by flow cytometry. F19A, an analog of IGF-II that does not bind the IGF-2R, stimulated an increase in the proportion of neural stem cells (NSCs) while decreasing the proportion of the later stage progenitors at a lower concentration than IGF-II. V43M, which binds to the IGF-2R with high affinity but which has low binding affinity to the IGF-1R and to the A isoform of the insulin receptor (IR-A) failed to promote NSC growth. The positive effects of F19A on NSC growth were unaltered by the addition of a functional blocking antibody to the IGF-1R. Altogether, these data lead to the conclusion that IGF-II promotes stemness of NSCs via the IR-A and not through activation of either the IGF-1R or the IGF-2R. PMID:24398690

  10. Role of epidermal growth factor receptor and endoplasmic reticulum stress in vascular remodeling induced by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Takehiko; Kawai, Tatsuo; Forrester, Steven J; Obama, Takashi; Tsuji, Toshiyuki; Fukuda, Yamato; Elliott, Katherine J; Tilley, Douglas G; Davisson, Robin L; Park, Joon-Young; Eguchi, Satoru

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms by which angiotensin II (AngII) elevates blood pressure and enhances end-organ damage seem to be distinct. However, the signal transduction cascade by which AngII specifically mediates vascular remodeling such as medial hypertrophy and perivascular fibrosis remains incomplete. We have previously shown that AngII-induced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation is mediated by disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain 17 (ADAM17), and that this signaling is required for vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy but not for contractile signaling in response to AngII. Recent studies have implicated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in hypertension. Interestingly, EGFR is capable of inducing ER stress. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that activation of EGFR and ER stress are critical components required for vascular remodeling but not hypertension induced by AngII. Mice were infused with AngII for 2 weeks with or without treatment of EGFR inhibitor, erlotinib, or ER chaperone, 4-phenylbutyrate. AngII infusion induced vascular medial hypertrophy in the heart, kidney and aorta, and perivascular fibrosis in heart and kidney, cardiac hypertrophy, and hypertension. Treatment with erlotinib as well as 4-phenylbutyrate attenuated vascular remodeling and cardiac hypertrophy but not hypertension. In addition, AngII infusion enhanced ADAM17 expression, EGFR activation, and ER/oxidative stress in the vasculature, which were diminished in both erlotinib-treated and 4-phenylbutyrate-treated mice. ADAM17 induction and EGFR activation by AngII in vascular cells were also prevented by inhibition of EGFR or ER stress. In conclusion, AngII induces vascular remodeling by EGFR activation and ER stress via a signaling mechanism involving ADAM17 induction independent of hypertension. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Add-on angiotensin II receptor blockade lowers urinary transforming growth factor-beta levels.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rajiv; Siva, Senthuran; Dunn, Stephen R; Sharma, Kumar

    2002-03-01

    Progression of renal failure, despite renoprotection with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors in patients with proteinuric nephropathies, may be caused by persistent renal production of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) through the angiotensin II subtype 1 (AT1) receptors. We tested the hypothesis that AT1-receptor blocker therapy added to a background of chronic maximal ACE inhibitor therapy will result in a reduction in urinary TGF-beta1 levels in such patients. Sixteen patients completed a two-period, crossover, randomized, controlled trial, details of which have been previously reported. All patients were administered lisinopril, 40 mg/d, with either losartan, 50 mg/d, or placebo. Blood pressure (BP) was measured using a 24-hour ambulatory BP monitor. Overnight specimens of urine were analyzed for urine TGF-beta1, protein, and creatinine concentrations. Mean age of the study population was 53 +/- 9 (SD) years; body mass index, 38 +/- 5.7 kg/m2; seated BP, 156 +/- 18/88 +/- 12 mm Hg; and urine protein excretion, 3.6 +/- 0.71 g/g of creatinine. Twelve patients had diabetic nephropathy, and the remainder had chronic glomerulonephritis. At baseline, urinary TGF-beta1 levels were significantly increased in the study population compared with healthy controls (13.2 +/- 1.2 versus 1.7 +/- 1.1 ng/g creatinine; P < 0.001). There was a strong correlation between baseline urine protein excretion and urinary TGF-beta1 level (r2 = 0.53; P = 0.001), as well as systolic BP and urinary TGF-beta1 level (r2 = 0.57; P < 0.001). After 4 weeks of add-on losartan therapy, there was a 38% (95% confidence interval [CI], 16% to 55%) decline in urinary TGF-beta1 levels (13.3 [95% CI, 11.4 to 15.5] to 8.2 pg/mg creatinine [95% CI, 6.2 to 10.7]). The reduction in urinary TGF-beta1 levels occurred independent of changes in mean urinary protein excretion or BP. Thus, proteinuric patients with renal failure, despite maximal ACE inhibition, had increased urinary levels of

  12. The mouse insulin-like growth factor II/cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate (IGF-II/MPR) receptor gene: Molecular cloning and genomic organization

    SciTech Connect

    Szebenyi, G.; Rotwein, P. )

    1994-01-01

    The mammalian insulin-like growth factor III/cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (IGF-II/MPR) is a multifunctional protein that binds both IGF-II and ligands containing a mannose 6-phosphate recognition marker through distinct high-affinity sites. This receptor plays an integral part in lysosomal enzyme transport, has a potential role in growth factor maturation and clearance, and may mediate IGF-II-activated signal transduction through a G-protein-coupled mechanism. Recent studies have shown that production of IGF-II/MPR mRNA and protein begins in the mouse embryo soon after fertilization and have demonstrated that the receptor gene is on mouse chromosome 17 and is maternally imprinted. In this paper, the authors report the cloning and characterization of the mouse IGF-II/MPR gene. The gene is 93 kb long, is composed of 48 exons, and codes for a predicted protein of 2482 amino acids. The extracellular part of the receptor is encoded by exons 1-46, with each of 15 related repeating motifs being determined by parts of 3-5 exons. A single fibronectin type II-like element is found in exon 39. The transmembrane portion of the receptor also is encoded by exon 46, and the cytoplasmic region by exons 46-48. The positions of exon-intron splice junctions are conserved between several of the repeats in the IGF-II/MPR and the homologous extracellular region of the gene for the other known lysosomal sorting receptor, the cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate receptor. The gene duplications that gave rise to the modern IGF-II/MPR probably occurred before the divergence of mammals, since there is more extensive protein sequence conservation between receptors from different species than between any pair of repeating motifs within a single receptor. 55 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Understanding the Mechanism of Insulin and Insulin-Like Growth Factor (IGF) Receptor Activation by IGF-II

    PubMed Central

    Alvino, Clair L.; Ong, Shee Chee; McNeil, Kerrie A.; Delaine, Carlie; Booker, Grant W.; Wallace, John C.; Forbes, Briony E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) promotes cell proliferation and survival and plays an important role in normal fetal development and placental function. IGF-II binds both the insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) and insulin receptor isoform A (IR-A) with high affinity. Interestingly both IGF-II and the IR-A are often upregulated in cancer and IGF-II acts via both receptors to promote cancer proliferation. There is relatively little known about the mechanism of ligand induced activation of the insulin (IR) and IGF-1R. The recently solved IR structure reveals a folded over dimer with two potential ligand binding pockets arising from residues on each receptor half. Site-directed mutagenesis has mapped receptor residues important for ligand binding to two separate sites within the ligand binding pocket and we have recently shown that the IGFs have two separate binding surfaces which interact with the receptor sites 1 and 2. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we describe a series of partial IGF-1R and IR agonists generated by mutating Glu12 of IGF-II. By comparing receptor binding affinities, abilities to induce negative cooperativity and potencies in receptor activation, we provide evidence that residue Glu12 bridges the two receptor halves leading to receptor activation. Conclusions/Significance This study provides novel insight into the mechanism of receptor binding and activation by IGF-II, which may be important for the future development of inhibitors of its action for the treatment of cancer. PMID:22140443

  14. The kangaroo cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor binds insulin-like growth factor II with low affinity.

    PubMed

    Yandell, C A; Dunbar, A J; Wheldrake, J F; Upton, Z

    1999-09-17

    The mammalian cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR) binds mannose 6-phosphate-bearing glycoproteins and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II. However, the CI-MPR from the opossum has been reported to bind bovine IGF-II with low affinity (Dahms, N. M., Brzycki-Wessell, M. A., Ramanujam, K. S., and Seetharam, B. (1993) Endocrinology 133, 440-446). This may reflect the use of a heterologous ligand, or it may represent the intrinsic binding affinity of this receptor. To examine the binding of IGF-II to a marsupial CI-MPR in a homologous system, we have previously purified kangaroo IGF-II (Yandell, C. A., Francis, G. L., Wheldrake, J. F., and Upton, Z. (1998) J. Endocrinol. 156, 195-204), and we now report the purification and characterization of the CI-MPR from kangaroo liver. The interaction of the kangaroo CI-MPR with IGF-II has been examined by ligand blotting, radioreceptor assay, and real-time biomolecular interaction analysis. Using both a heterologous and homologous approach, we have demonstrated that the kangaroo CI-MPR has a lower binding affinity for IGF-II than its eutherian (placental mammal) counterparts. Furthermore, real-time biomolecular interaction analysis revealed that the kangaroo CI-MPR has a higher affinity for kangaroo IGF-II than for human IGF-II. The cDNA sequence of the kangaroo CI-MPR indicates that there is considerable divergence in the area corresponding to the IGF-II binding site of the eutherian receptor. Thus, the acquisition of a high-affinity binding site for regulating IGF-II appears to be a recent event specific to the eutherian lineage.

  15. Fibulin-2 is Essential for Angiotensin II-Induced Myocardial Fibrosis Mediated by Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shaukat A.; Dong, Hailong; Joyce, Jennifer; Sasaki, Takako; Chu, Mon-Li; Tsuda, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis is an ominous pathological process in failing myocardium, but its pathogenesis is poorly understood. We recently reported that loss of an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein, fibulin-2, protected against ventricular dysfunction after myocardial infarction (MI) in association with absence of activation of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling and suppressed up-regulation of ECM protein expression during myocardial remodeling. Here, we investigated a role of fibulin-2 in the development of myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis induced by continuous pressor-dosage of Ang II infusion. Both wild type (WT) and fibulin-2 null (Fbln2KO) mice developed comparable hypertension and myocardial hypertrophy by Ang II infusion. However, myocardial fibrosis with significant up-regulation of collagen type I and III mRNA was only seen in WT but not in Fbln2KO mice.Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 mRNA and its downstream signal, Smad2, were significantly up-regulated in WT by Ang II, whereas there were no Ang II-induced changes in Flbn2KO, suggesting fibulin-2 is necessary for Ang II-induced TGF-β signaling that induces myocardial fibrosis. To test whether fibulin-2 is sufficient for Ang II-induced TGF-β up-regulation, isolated Flbn2KO cardiac fibroblasts were treated with Ang II after transfecting with fibulin-2 expression vector or pretreating with recombinant fibulin-2 protein. Ang II-induced TGF-β signaling in Fbln2KO cells was partially rescued by exogenous fibulin-2, suggesting that fibulin-2 is required and probably sufficient for Ang II-induced TGF-β activation. Smad2 phosphorylation was induced just by adding recombinant fibulin-2 to KO cells, suggesting that extracellular interaction between fibulin-2 and latent TGF-β triggered initial TGF-β activation. Our study indicates that Ang II cannot induce TGF-β activation without fibulin-2 and that fibulin-2 plays an essential role in Ang II-induced TGF-β signaling and subsequent myocardial fibrosis

  16. Insulin-like growth factor-II is produced by, signals to and is an important survival factor for the mature podocyte in man and mouse.

    PubMed

    Hale, L J; Welsh, G I; Perks, C M; Hurcombe, J A; Moore, S; Hers, I; Saleem, M A; Mathieson, P W; Murphy, A J; Jeansson, M; Holly, J M; Hardouin, S N; Coward, R J

    2013-05-01

    Podocytes are crucial for preventing the passage of albumin into the urine and, when lost, are associated with the development of albuminuria, renal failure and cardiovascular disease. Podocytes have limited capacity to regenerate, therefore pro-survival mechanisms are critically important. Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) is a potent survival and growth factor; however, its major function is thought to be in prenatal development, when circulating levels are high. IGF-II has only previously been reported to continue to be expressed in discrete regions of the brain into adulthood in rodents, with systemic levels being undetectable. Using conditionally immortalized human and ex vivo adult mouse cells of the glomerulus, we demonstrated the podocyte to be the major glomerular source and target of IGF-II; it signals to this cell via the IGF-I receptor via the PI3 kinase and MAPK pathways. Functionally, a reduction in IGF signalling causes podocyte cell death in vitro and glomerular disease in vivo in an aged IGF-II transgenic mouse that produces approximately 60% of IGF-II due to a lack of the P2 promoter of this gene. Collectively, this work reveals the fundamental importance of IGF-II in the mature podocyte for glomerular health across mammalian species.

  17. Messenger RNA stockpile of cyclin B, insulin-like growth factor I, insulin-like growth factor II, insulin-like growth factor receptor Ib, and p53 in the rainbow trout oocyte in relation with developmental competence.

    PubMed

    Aegerter, Sandrine; Jalabert, Bernard; Bobe, Julien

    2004-02-01

    In the present study, correlations between the oocyte messenger RNA (mRNA) stockpile of Cyclin B, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), insulin-like growth factor (IGF-II), insulin-like growth factor receptor Ib (IGFR Ib), and p53 transcripts and the developmental competence of the oocyte were studied. For this purpose, post-ovulatory ageing was used as a tool to generate oocytes of varying developmental competence. Mature female rainbow trout were held at 12 degrees C and periodically checked for ovulation. Oocytes were collected from each female at ovulation and 5, 14, 21 days later. For each collected egg batch, the abundance of several mRNAs in the oocyte was analyzed by real-time PCR and embryo development was monitored after fertilization. Egg quality was estimated not only through embryonic survival but also by studying the occurrence of specific morphological abnormalities. The present study showed that oocyte post-ovulatory ageing was associated with variations of the relative abundance of several studied transcripts within the oocyte. In addition, the abundance of specific mRNAs could be correlated with either the embryonic survival or the occurrence of malformations. Thus, the abundance of IGFR Ib and Cyclin B transcripts in the oocyte was correlated with the occurrence of morphological abnormalities observed at yolk-sac resorption (negatively for IGFR Ib and positively for Cyclin B), while the maternal stockpile of IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGFR Ib mRNAs was positively correlated with embryonic survival. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Fibulin-2 deficiency attenuates angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy by reducing transforming growth factor-β signalling

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Hangxiang; Wu, Jing; DONG, Hailong; KHAN, Shaukat A.; CHU, Mon-Li; TSUDA, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    AngII (angiotensin II) is a potent neurohormone responsible for cardiac hypertrophy, in which TGF (transforming growth factor)-β serves as a principal downstream mediator. We recently found that ablation of fibulin-2 in mice attenuated TGF-β signalling, protected mice against progressive ventricular dysfunction, and significantly reduced the mortality after experimental MI (myocardial infarction). In the present study, we investigated the role of fibulin-2 in AngII-induced TGF-β signalling and subsequent cardiac hypertrophy. We performed chronic subcutaneous infusion of AngII in fibulin-2 null (Fbln2−/− ), heterozygous (Fbln2+/− ) and WT (wild-type) mice by a mini-osmotic pump. After 4 weeks of subpressor dosage of AngII infusion (0.2 μg/kg of body weight per min), WT mice developed significant hypertrophy, whereas the Fbln2−/− showed no response. In WT, AngII treatment significantly up-regulated mRNAs for fibulin-2, ANP (atrial natriuretic peptide), TGF-β1, Col I (collagen type I), Col III (collagen type III), MMP (matrix metalloproteinase)-2 and MMP-9, and increased the phosphorylation of TGF-β-downstream signalling markers, Smad2, TAK1 (TGF-β-activated kinase 1) and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase), which were all unchanged in AngII-treated Fbln2−/− mice. The Fbln2+/− mice consistently displayed AngII-induced effects intermediate between WT and Fbln2−/− . Pressor dosage of AngII (2 mg/kg of body weight per min) induced significant fibrosis in WT but not in Fbln2−/− mice with comparable hypertension and hypertrophy in both groups. Isolated CFs (cardiac fibroblasts) were treated with AngII, in which direct AngII effects and TGF-β-mediated autocrine effects was observed in WT. The latter effects were totally abolished in Fbln2−/− cells, suggesting that fibulin-2 is essential for AngII-induced TGF-β activation. In conclusion our data indicate that fibulin-2 is essential for AngII-induced TGF-β-mediated cardiac

  19. Insulin and Insulin-like Growth Factor II Differentially Regulate Endocytic Sorting and Stability of Insulin Receptor Isoform A*

    PubMed Central

    Morcavallo, Alaide; Genua, Marco; Palummo, Angela; Kletvikova, Emilia; Jiracek, Jiri; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Belfiore, Antonino; Morrione, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The insulin receptor isoform A (IR-A) binds both insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II, although the affinity for IGF-II is 3–10-fold lower than insulin depending on a cell and tissue context. Notably, in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking the IGF-IR and expressing solely the IR-A (R−/IR-A), IGF-II is a more potent mitogen than insulin. As receptor endocytosis and degradation provide spatial and temporal regulation of signaling events, we hypothesized that insulin and IGF-II could affect IR-A biological responses by differentially regulating IR-A trafficking. Using R−/IR-A cells, we discovered that insulin evoked significant IR-A internalization, a process modestly affected by IGF-II. However, the differential internalization was not due to IR-A ubiquitination. Notably, prolonged stimulation of R−/IR-A cells with insulin, but not with IGF-II, targeted the receptor to a degradative pathway. Similarly, the docking protein insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) was down-regulated after prolonged insulin but not IGF-II exposure. Similar results were also obtained in experiments using [NMeTyrB26]-insulin, an insulin analog with IR-A binding affinity similar to IGF-II. Finally, we discovered that IR-A was internalized through clathrin-dependent and -independent pathways, which differentially regulated the activation of downstream effectors. Collectively, our results suggest that a lower affinity of IGF-II for the IR-A promotes lower IR-A phosphorylation and activation of early downstream effectors vis à vis insulin but may protect IR-A and IRS-1 from down-regulation thereby evoking sustained and robust mitogenic stimuli. PMID:22318726

  20. Activation of peripheral blood neutrophils and lymphocytes by human procathepsin D and insulin-like growth factor II.

    PubMed

    Vĕtvicka, V; Fusek, M

    1994-07-01

    Cathepsin D, a lysosomal aspartic proteinase, is well known to be overexpressed and secreted in the form of its zymogen by many types of human breast cancer tissues. In the cell lines derived from these tissues, cathepsin D functions as an autocrine mitogen, and it was suggested that its secretion might pose some physiological functions. Recently we have identified the presence of procathepsin D in human breast milk and similar findings were reported for bovine milk which imply also some physiological function. Thus, we have tested the influence of procathepsin D and insulin-like growth factor II on the expression of CD11a, CD11b, FcRI, CD62L, and HLA-DR surface determinants on neutrophils and lymphocytes. We have used procathepsin D purified from the secretions of breast cancer cell line ZR-75-1 and commercially available IGF II. Our results showed that both studied factors significantly influence the expression of tested surface molecules.

  1. MYH11 mutations result in a distinct vascular pathology driven by insulin-like growth factor 1 and angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Tran-Fadulu, Van; Papke, Christina L.; Scherer, Steve; Liu, Yaozhong; Presley, Caroline; Guo, Dongchuan; Estrera, Anthony L.; Safi, Hazim J.; Brasier, Allan R.; Vick, G. Wesley; Marian, A.J.; Raman, C.S.; Buja, L. Maximilian; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2010-01-01

    Non-syndromic thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAADs) are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner in ~20% of cases. Familial TAAD is genetically heterogeneous and four loci have been mapped for this disease to date, including a locus at 16p for TAAD associated with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). The defective gene at the 16p locus has recently been identified as the smooth muscle cell (SMC)-specific myosin heavy chain gene (MYH11). On sequencing MYH11 in 93 families with TAAD alone and three families with TAAD/PDA, we identified novel mutations in two families with TAAD/PDA, but none in families with TAAD alone. Histopathological analysis of aortic sections from two individuals with MYH11 mutations revealed SMC disarray and focal hyperplasia of SMCs in the aortic media. SMC hyperplasia leading to significant lumen narrowing in some of the vessels of the adventitia was also observed. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) was upregulated in mutant aortas as well as explanted SMCs, but no increase in transforming growth factor-β expression or downstream targets was observed. Enhanced expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme and markers of Angiotensin II (Ang II) vascular inflammation (macrophage inflammatory protein-1α and β) were also found. These data suggest that MYH11 mutations are likely to be specific to the phenotype of TAAD/PDA and result in a distinct aortic and occlusive vascular pathology potentially driven by IGF-1 and Ang II. PMID:17666408

  2. A Novel Approach to Identify Two Distinct Receptor Binding Surfaces of Insulin-like Growth Factor II*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Alvino, Clair L.; McNeil, Kerrie A.; Ong, Shee Chee; Delaine, Carlie; Booker, Grant W.; Wallace, John C.; Whittaker, Jonathan; Forbes, Briony E.

    2009-01-01

    Very little is known about the residues important for the interaction of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) with the type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R) and the insulin receptor (IR). Insulin, to which IGF-II is homologous, is proposed to cross-link opposite halves of the IR dimer through two receptor binding surfaces, site 1 and site 2. In the present study we have analyzed the contribution of IGF-II residues equivalent to insulin's two binding surfaces toward the interaction of IGF-II with the IGF-1R and IR. Four “site 1” and six “site 2” analogues were produced and analyzed in terms of IGF-1R and IR binding and activation. The results show that Val43, Phe28, and Val14 (equivalent to site 1) are critical to IGF-1R and IR binding, whereas mutation to alanine of Gln18 affects only IGF-1R and not IR binding. Alanine substitutions at Glu12, Asp15, Phe19, Leu53, and Glu57 analogues resulted in significant (>2-fold) decreases in affinity for both the IGF-1R and IR. Furthermore, taking a novel approach using a monomeric, single-chain minimized IGF-1R we have defined a distinct second binding surface formed by Glu12, Phe19, Leu53, and Glu57 that potentially engages the IGF-1R at one or more of the FnIII domains. PMID:19139090

  3. Tissue-specific expression of insulin-like growth factor II mRNAs with distinct 5' untranslated regions

    SciTech Connect

    Irminger, J.C.; Rosen, K.M.; Humble, R.E.; Villa-Komaroff, L.

    1987-09-01

    The authors have used RNA from human hypothalamus as template for the production of cDNAs encoding insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). The prohormone coding sequence of brain IGF-II RNA is identical to that found in liver; however, the 5' untranslated sequence of the brain cDNA has no homology to the 5' untranslated sequence of the previously reported liver cDNAs. By using hybridization to specific probes as well as a method based on the properties of RNase H, they found that the human IGF-II gene has at least three exons that encode alternative 5' untranslated regions and that are expressed in a tissue-specific manner. A probe specific to the brain cDNA 5' untranslated region hybridizes to a 6.0-kilobase transcript present in placenta, hypothalamus, adrenal gland, kidney, Wilms tumor, and a pheochromocytoma. The 5' untranslated sequence of the brain cDNA does not hybridize to a 5.3-kilobase transcript found in liver or to a 5.0-kb transcript found in pheochromocytoma. By using RNase H to specifically fragment the IGF-II transcripts into 3' and 5' fragments, they found that the RNAs vary in size due to differences in the 5' end but not the 3' end.

  4. The genomic structure of the gene encoding the human transforming growth factor {beta} type II receptor (TGF-{beta} RII)

    SciTech Connect

    Takenoshita, Seiichi; Hagiwara, Koichi; Nagashima, Makoto; Gemma, Akihiko

    1996-09-01

    The genomic structure of the human transforming growth factor-{beta} type II receptor gene (TGF-{beta} RII) was determined by two PCR-based methods, the {open_quotes}long distance sequencer{close_quotes} method and the {open_quotes}promoter finder{close_quotes} method. Genomic fragments containing exons and adjacent introns were amplified by PCR, and the nucleotide sequences were determined by direct sequencing and subcloning sequencing. The TGF-{beta} RII protein is encoded by 567 codons in 7 exons. This is the first report about the genomic structure of a gene that belongs to the serine/threonine kinase type II receptor subfamily. Knowledge of the genomic structure of the TGF-{beta} RII gene will facilitate investigation of the TGF-{beta} RII gene will facilitate investigation of the TGF-{beta} signaling pathway in normal human cells and of the aberrations occurring during carcinogenesis. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Signaling activity of transforming growth factor beta type II receptors lacking specific domains in the cytoplasmic region.

    PubMed Central

    Wieser, R; Attisano, L; Wrana, J L; Massagué, J

    1993-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) type II receptor (T beta R-II) is a transmembrane serine/threonine kinase that contains two inserts in the kinase region and a serine/threonine-rich C-terminal extension. T beta R-II is required for TGF-beta binding to the type I receptor, with which it forms a heteromeric receptor complex, and its kinase activity is required for signaling by this complex. We investigated the role of various cytoplasmic regions in T beta R-II by altering or deleting these regions and determining the signaling activity of the resulting products in cell lines made resistant to TGF-beta by inactivation of the endogenous T beta R-II. TGF-beta binding to receptor I and responsiveness to TGF-beta in these cells can be restored by transfection of wild-type T beta R-II. Using this system, we show that the kinase insert 1 and the C-terminal tail of T beta R-II, in contrast to the corresponding regions in most tyrosine kinase receptors, are not essential to specify ligand-induced responses. Insert 2 is necessary to support the catalytic activity of the receptor kinase, and its deletion yields a receptor that is unable to mediate any of the responses tested. However, substitution of this insert with insert 2 from the activin receptor, ActR-IIB, does not diminish the ability of T beta R-II to elicit these responses. A truncated T beta R-II lacking the cytoplasmic domain still binds TGF-beta, supports ligand binding to receptor I, and forms a complex with this receptor. However, TGF-beta binding to receptor I facilitated by this truncated T beta R-II fails to inhibit cell proliferation, activate extracellular matrix protein production, or activate transcription from a promoter containing TGF-beta-responsive elements. We conclude that the transcriptional and antiproliferative responses to TGF-beta require both components of a heteromeric receptor complex that differs from tyrosine kinase receptors in its mode of signaling. Images PMID:8246946

  6. Role of connective tissue growth factor in vascular and renal damage associated with hypertension in rats. Interactions with angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    de las Heras, Natalia; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Rupérez, Mónica; Sanz-Rosa, David; Miana, María; Aragoncillo, Paloma; Mezzano, Sergio; Lahera, Vicente; Egido, Jesus; Cachofeiro, Victoria

    2006-12-01

    We have evaluated the role of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in vascular and renal damage associated with hypertension and possible interactions with angiotensin II (Ang II). Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were treated with either the Ang II receptor antagonist candesartan (C;2 mg/Kg(-1)/day(-1)) or antihypertensive triple therapy (TT; in mg/Kg(-1)/day(-1);20 hydralazine +7 hydrochlorothiazide +0.15 reserpine) for 10 weeks. Wistar Kyoto rats were used as a normotensive control group. Hypertension was associated with an increase in aortic media area, media-to-lumen ratio and collagen density. Kidneys from SHR showed minimum renal alterations. Aorta and renal gene expression and immunostaining of CTGF were higher in SHR. Candesartan decreased arterial pressure, aortic media area, media-to-lumen ratio and collagen density. However, although arterial pressure decrease was comparable for both treatments, TT partially reduced these parameters. Candesartan-treated rats showed lower levels of vascular CTGF expression, aortic media area, media-to-lumen ratio and collagen density than TT-treated animals. Treatments improve renal damage and reduce renal gene expression and CTGF immunostaining in SHR in a similar manner. The results show that vascular and renal damage is associated with stimulation of CTGF gene and protein content. These results also might suggest that CTGF could be one downstream mediator of Ang II in hypertension-associated organ damage in SHR.

  7. Targeted gene transfer of hepatocyte growth factor to alveolar type II epithelial cells reduces lung fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Gazdhar, Amiq; Temuri, Almas; Knudsen, Lars; Gugger, Mathias; Schmid, Ralph A; Ochs, Matthias; Geiser, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Inefficient alveolar wound repair contributes to the development of pulmonary fibrosis. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a potent growth factor for alveolar type II epithelial cells (AECII) and may improve repair and reduce fibrosis. We studied whether targeted gene transfer of HGF specifically to AECII improves lung fibrosis in bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis. A plasmid encoding human HGF expressed from the human surfactant protein C promoter (pSpC-hHGF) was designed, and extracorporeal electroporation-mediated gene transfer of HGF specifically to AECII was performed 7 days after bleomycin-induced lung injury in the rat. Animals were killed 7 days after hHGF gene transfer. Electroporation-mediated HGF gene transfer resulted in HGF expression specifically in AECII at biologically relevant levels. HGF gene transfer reduced pulmonary fibrosis as assessed by histology, hydroxyproline determination, and design-based stereology compared with controls. Our results indicate that the antifibrotic effect of HGF is due in part to a reduction of transforming growth factor-β(1), modulation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and reduction of extravascular fibrin deposition. We conclude that targeted HGF gene transfer specifically to AECII decreases bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis and may therefore represent a novel cell-specific gene transfer technology to treat pulmonary fibrosis.

  8. An insulin-like growth factor-II intronic variant affects local DNA conformation and ovarian cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lingeng; Risch, Evan; Deng, Qian; Biglia, Nicoletta; Picardo, Elisa; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Yu, Herbert

    2013-09-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) may be a prognostic marker in ovarian cancer, and its intronic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs4320932 has been associated with risk of the disease. We determined whether rs4320932 is associated with IGF-II expression and patient survival in ovarian cancer, and explored whether the SNP variation affects DNA conformation both in the absence of and presence of carboplatin. IGF-II genotype (rs4320932) and phenotype were analyzed in 212 primary invasive epithelial ovarian cancer tissue samples with Taqman® SNP genotyping assays, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. DNA conformation was evaluated by circular dichroism (CD) spectra. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to analyze the SNP associations with patient survival. The C allele of rs4320932, previously associated with decreased risk of ovarian cancer development, was here associated with significantly elevated risks of relapse (Ptrend = 0.0002) and death (Ptrend = 0.0006), remaining significant in multivariate analyses. The adjusted hazard ratios were 3.05 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.47-6.37) for relapse and 3.28 (95% CI: 1.64-6.57) for death, respectively. The variant was also significantly associated with chemotherapy response, but not with other clinicopathologic variables or with IGF-II expression. DNA with genotypes TT and CC had distinct CD spectra in both the absence of and presence of carboplatin. These findings suggest that the intronic SNP rs4320932 affects patient survival and chemotherapy response via alteration of DNA conformation, but not through regulation of IGF-II expression. This novel finding may have implications in individualized medicine for the design of specific molecules targeting DNA of specific conformations.

  9. Immunohistochemical localization of insulin-like growth factor I and II in the endocrine pancreas of birds, reptiles, and amphibia.

    PubMed

    Reinecke, M; Broger, I; Brun, R; Zapf, J; Maake, C

    1995-12-01

    Immunoreactive insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I, IGF-II) were sought in the endocrine pancreas of representative birds, reptiles, and amphibia using antisera specific for mammalian IGF-I and IGF-II and the classical islet hormones insulin (INS), glucagon (GLUC), somatostatin (SOM), and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) in double immunofluorescence. Both IGF-I and IGF-II immunoreactivities were present in the endocrine pancreas of all species. IGF-II immunoreactivity was exclusively found in INS-immunoreactive (-IR) cells, indicating evolutionary conservation of the islet IGF-II system. In contrast, IGF-I immunoreactivity was distributed differently among the species and never occurred in INS-IR cells. In the anuran Xenopus laevis, IGF-I immunoreactivity was present in islet cells showing coexistence of GLUC and PP immunoreactivities. In reptiles, the lizards (Lacerta viridis, Scincus officinalis) exhibited IGF-I immunoreactivity in PP-IR and SOM-IR cells and the snakes (Psamophis leniolatum, Coluber ravergieri) in SOM-IR and GLUC-IR cells. In birds, IGF-I immunoreactivity was located either in SOM-IR cells only (Gallus g. domesticus, Streptopelia roseogrisea) or in PP-IR and SOM-IR cells (Coturnix c. japonica). Thus, the distribution patterns of islet IGF-I immunoreactivities in birds, reptiles, and amphibia are equivalent to those in mammals and most bony fish. They differ, however, from those found in cartilaginous fish, cyclostomes, and protochordates, where a total or partial coexistence of IGF-I and INS immunoreactivities has been obtained. Therefore, the divergence of IGF-I and INS seems to have occurred early in vertebrate phylogeny. Furthermore, the existence of IGF-I immunoreactivity likely is common in the islets of all vertebrates. Finally, no phylogenetic trend to concentrate IGF-I immunoreactivity in a particular islet cell type is apparent.

  10. Epidermal growth factor stimulates mouse placental lactogen I but inhibits mouse placental lactogen II secretion in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, M; Ogren, L; Endo, H; Thordarson, G; Kensinger, R; Talamantes, F

    1992-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether epidermal growth factor (EGF) regulates the secretion of mouse placental lactogen (mPL)-I and mPL-II. Primary cell cultures were prepared from placentas from days 7, 9, and 11 of pregnancy and cultured for up to 5 days. Addition of EGF (20 ng/ml) to the medium resulted in significant stimulation of mPL-I secretion by the second day of culture in cells from days 7 and 9 of pregnancy and significant inhibition of mPL-II secretion by the third or fourth day of culture in cells from days 7, 9, and 11. Dose-response studies carried out with cells from day 7 of pregnancy demonstrated that the minimum concentration of EGF that stimulated mPL-I secretion and inhibited mPL-II secretion was 1.0 ng/ml. EGF did not affect the DNA content of the cells or cell viability, assessed by trypan blue exclusion, nor did it have a general effect on protein synthesis. There are three types of PL-containing giant cells in mouse placental cell cultures: cells that contain either mPL-I or mPL-II and cells that contain both hormones. Immunocytochemical analysis and the reverse hemolytic plaque assay indicated that EGF treatment was accompanied by a significant increase in the number of cells that produce mPL-I, but among the PL cells that contained mPL-I, there was no change in the fraction of cells that contained only mPL-I or the fraction that contained both mPL-I and mPL-II. In contrast, EGF treatment did affect the distribution of mPL-II among PL cells. In control cultures, about 75% of the cells that contained mPL-II also contained mPL-I, but in EGF-treated cultures, all of the cells that contained mPL-II also contained mPL-I. These data suggest that EGF regulates mPL-I and mPL-II secretion at least partly by regulating PL cell differentiation. PMID:1454826

  11. Effects of insulin and insulin-like growth factors I and II on the growth of equine fetal and neonatal chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Henson, F M; Davenport, C; Butler, L; Moran, I; Shingleton, W D; Jeffcott, L B; Schofield, P N

    1997-11-01

    The effects of insulin and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) I and II on fetal and foal chondrocytes were investigated in vitro. Chondrocytes from the lateral trochlear ridge of the distal femur were obtained from 2 fetuses (280 and 320 days gestation) and one 4-day-old foal and cultured. Membrane proteins consistent with type 1 and type 2 IGF receptors were demonstrated by radioligand cross linking and equilibrium binding analysis. It was demonstrated that both IGF-I and IGF-II acted as mitogens for isolated equine chondrocytes when present as the sole mitogenic factor in monolayer culture. It was further shown that whereas insulin was able to promote the survival and expansion of cell populations of chondrocytes in culture there was significantly reduced mitogenic stimulation compared to the IGFs. These results suggest that the role of insulin in growth cartilage may be to promote chondrocyte survival, or to suppress differentiation/apoptosis. This supports the hypothesis that relative hyperinsulinaemia may be a contributory factor to equine dyschondroplasia (osteochondrosis). Understanding of contributory, and possibly triggering factors such as this may allow the development of modified methods of husbandry which minimise the risk of disease in populations with a known predisposition.

  12. Transforming growth factor-beta, transforming growth factor-beta receptor II, and p27Kip1 expression in nontumorous and neoplastic human pituitaries.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, L.; Qian, X.; Kulig, E.; Sanno, N.; Scheithauer, B. W.; Kovacs, K.; Young, W. F.; Lloyd, R. V.

    1997-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta has been implicated in the regulation of normal and neoplastic anterior pituitary cell function. TGF-beta regulates the expression of various proteins, including p27Kip1 (p27), a cell cycle inhibitory protein. We examined TGF-beta, TGF-beta type II receptor (TGF-beta-RII), and p27 expression in normal pituitaries, pituitary adenomas, and carcinomas to analyze the possible roles of these proteins in pituitary tumorigenesis. Normal pituitary, pituitary adenomas, and pituitary carcinomas all expressed TGF-beta and TGF-beta-RII immunoreactivity. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis showed TGF-beta 1, -beta 2, and -beta 3 isoforms and TGF-beta-RII in normal pituitaries and pituitary adenomas. Pituitary adenomas cells cultured for 7 days in defined media showed a biphasic response to TGF-beta with significant inhibition of follicle-stimulating hormone secretion at higher concentrations (10(-9) mol/L) and stimulation of follicle-stimulating hormone secretion at lower concentrations (10(-13) mol/L) of TGF-beta 1 in gonadotroph adenomas. Immunohistochemical analysis for p27 protein expression showed the highest levels in nontumorous pituitaries with decreased immunoreactivity in adenomas and carcinomas. When nontumorous pituitaries and various adenomas were analyzed for p27 and specific hormone production, growth hormone, luteinizing hormone, and thyroid-stimulating hormone cells and tumors had the highest percentages of cells expressing p27, whereas adrenocorticotrophic hormone cells and tumors had the lowest percentages. Immunoblotting analysis showed that adrenocorticotrophic hormone adenomas also had the lowest levels of p27 protein. Semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Northern hybridization analysis did not show significant differences in p27 mRNA expression in the various types of adenomas or in nontumorous pituitaries. In situ hybridization for p27 mRNA showed similar

  13. Autoradiographic visualization of insulin-like growth factor-II receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, L.G.; Kerchner, G.A.; Clemens, J.A.; Smith, M.C.

    1986-03-01

    The documented presence of IGF-II in brain and CSF prompted us to investigate the distribution of receptors for IGF-II in rat brain slices. Human /sup 125/-I-IGF-II (10 pM) was incubated for 16 hrs at 4/sup 0/C with slide-mounted rat brain slices in the absence and presence of unlabeled human IGF-II (67 nM) or human insulin (86 nM). Slides were washed, dried, and exposed to X-ray film for 4-7 days. The results showed dense labeling in the granular layers of the olfactory bulbs, deep layers of the cerebral cortex, pineal gland, anterior pituitary, hippocampus (pyramidal cells CA/sub 1/-CA/sub 2/ and dentate gyrus), and the granule cell layers of the cerebellum. Unlabeled IGF-II eliminated most of the binding of these brain regions while insulin produced only a minimal reduction in the amount of /sup 125/I-IGF-II bound. These results indicate that a specific neural receptor for IGS-II is uniquely distributed in rat brain tissue and supports the notion that this peptide might play an important role in normal neuronal functioning.

  14. [Effect of phosgene on apoptosis of alveolar type II cells and vascular endothelial growth factor in exposed mice].

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-li; Hai, Chun-xu; Qin, Xu-jun; Liang, Xin; Chen, Hong-li

    2004-06-01

    To study the apoptosis of alveolar type II cells, alterations of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor (Flt1) in serum and lung and expression of VEGF mRNA in lung in pulmonary edema mice induced by phosgene. Twenty-six BALB/C mice were randomly divided into 2 groups: control group, exposed group (13 mice in each group). Mice of exposed group were intoxicated by inhalation of phosgene 11.9 mg/L for 5 minutes. Mice of control group were treated as the same way by inhalation of air. Isolation of mice alveolus type II cells 4 h after intoxication was carried out to observe their apoptosis under electron microscope. Contents of VEGF and Flt1 in lung and serum by ELISA, and expression of VEGF mRNA were determined. Alveolar type II cells were identified by tannic acid staining and electron microscopy. After exposed to 11.9 mg/L of phosgene for 5 minutes, the apoptotic body in alveolus type II cells was found in exposed group. The contents of VEGF in serum and lung and Flt1 in lung of exposed mice [(134.07 +/- 120.26), (477.76 +/- 98.06), (1,2818.48 +/- 2,304.15) pg/ml] were significantly lower than those of control group [(445.57 +/- 173.30), (1,026.87 +/- 474.56), (21,976.51 +/- 7,421.01) pg/ml, P < 0.05] but the content of Flt1 in serum [(2,369.56 +/- 381.70) pg/ml] was higher than that in control group [(1,898.00 +/- 453.69) pg/ml, P < 0.05]. The expression of VEGF mRNA in pulmonary edema mice was decreased. Phosgene can induce apoptosis of alveolar type II cells, and decrease in the content of VEGF and Flt1, and expression of VEGF mRNA in lung.

  15. Solution structure of human insulin-like growth factor II. Relationship to receptor and binding protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Torres, A M; Forbes, B E; Aplin, S E; Wallace, J C; Francis, G L; Norton, R S

    1995-04-28

    The three-dimensional structure of human insulin-like growth factor (IGF) II in aqueous solution at pH 3.1 and 300 K has been determined from nuclear magnetic resonance data and restrained molecular dynamics calculations. Structural constraints consisting of 502 NOE-derived distance constraints, 11 dihedral angle restraints, and three disulfide bridges were used as input for distance geometry calculations in DIANA and X-PLOR, followed by simulated annealing refinement and energy minimization in X-PLOR. The resulting family of 20 structures was well defined in the regions of residues 5 to 28 and 41 to 62, with an average pairwise root-mean-square deviation of 1.24 A for the backbone heavy-atoms (N, C2, C) and 1.90 A for all heavy atoms. The poorly defined regions consist of the N and C termini, part of the B-domain, and the C-domain loop. Resonances from these regions of the protein gave stronger cross peaks in two dimensional NMR spectra, consistent with significant motional averaging. The main secondary structure elements in IGF-II are alpha-helices encompassing residues 11 to 21, 42 to 49 and 53 to 59. A small anti-parallel beta-sheet is formed by residues 59 to 61 and 25 to 27, while residues 26 to 28 appear to participate in intermolecular beta-sheet formation. The structure of IGF-II in the well-defined regions is very similar to those of the corresponding regions of insulin and IGF-I. Significant differences between IGF-II and IGF-I occur near the start of the third helix, in a region known to modulate affinity for the type 2 IGF receptor, and at the C terminus. The IGF II structure is discussed in relation to its binding sites for the insulin and IGF receptors and the IGF binding proteins.

  16. Serum factors alter the extent of dephosphorylation of ligands endocytosed via the mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Mouse L-cells that contain the cation-independent (CI) mannose 6- phosphate (Man 6-P)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) II receptor endocytose acid hydrolases and deliver these enzymes to lysosomes. The postendocytic loss of the Man 6-P recognition marker from the cell- associated acid hydrolases was assessed by CI-Man 6-P receptor affinity chromatography. 125I-labeled acid hydrolases internalized by L-cells grown at high density were delivered to lysosomes but were not dephosphorylated. In contrast, the same 125I-labeled hydrolases internalized by L-cells maintained at low density were delivered to lysosomes and were extensively dephosphorylated. The dephosphorylation at low density required 5 h for completion suggesting that the phosphatase responsible for the dephosphorylation is located within the lysosomal compartment. Transition from the high to low density state was rapid and was not inhibited by cycloheximide. Medium substitution experiments indicated that serum factors were necessary to maintain the L-cells in the dephosphorylation-competent (low density) state, and that serum-free conditions led to a dephosphorylation-incompetent (high density) state. Addition of IGF II to cells in serum-free medium allowed acid hydrolases subsequently introduced by endocytosis to be dephosphorylated. The results indicate that the removal of the Man 6-P recognition marker from endocytosed acid hydrolases is regulated by serum factors in the growth medium, including IGF II. PMID:2549075

  17. Experimental diabetes increases insulin-like growth factor I and II receptor concentration and gene expression in kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, H.; Shen-Orr, Z.; Stannard, B.; Burguera, B.; Roberts, C.T. Jr.; LeRoith, D. )

    1990-12-01

    Insulinlike growth factor I (IGF-I) is a mitogenic hormone with important regulatory roles in growth and development. One of the target organs for IGF-I action is the kidney, which synthesizes abundant IGF-I receptors and IGF-I itself. To study the involvement of IGF-I and the IGF-I receptor in the development of nephropathy, one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus, we measured the expression of these genes in the kidney and in other tissues of the streptozocin-induced diabetic rat. The binding of 125I-labeled IGF-I to crude membranes was measured in the same tissues. We observed a 2.5-fold increase in the steady-state level of IGF-I-receptor mRNA in the diabetic kidney, which was accompanied by a 2.3-fold increase in IGF-I binding. In addition to this increase in IGF-I binding to the IGF-I receptor, there was also binding to a lower-molecular-weight material that may represent an IGF-binding protein. No change was detected in the level of IGF-I-peptide mRNA. Similarly, IGF-II-receptor mRNA levels and IGF-II binding were significantly increased in the diabetic kidney. IGF-I- and IGF-II-receptor mRNA levels and IGF-I and IGF-II binding returned to control values after insulin treatment. Because the IGF-I receptor is able to transduce mitogenic signals on activation of its tyrosine kinase domain, we hypothesize that, among other factors, high levels of receptor in the diabetic kidney may also be involved in the development of diabetic nephropathy. Increased IGF-II-receptor expression in the diabetic kidney may be important for the intracellular transport and packaging of lysosomal enzymes, although a role for this receptor in signal transduction cannot be excluded. Finally, the possible role of IGF-binding proteins requires further study.

  18. Periodontal Tissue Regeneration Using Fibroblast Growth Factor -2: Randomized Controlled Phase II Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Masahiro; Nakashima, Keisuke; Kowashi, Yusuke; Fujii, Takeo; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi; Sasano, Takashi; Furuuchi, Toshi; Fukuda, Mitsuo; Noguchi, Toshihide; Shibutani, Toshiaki; Iwayama, Yukio; Takashiba, Shogo; Kurihara, Hidemi; Ninomiya, Masami; Kido, Jun-ichi; Nagata, Toshihiko; Hamachi, Takafumi; Maeda, Katsumasa; Hara, Yoshitaka; Izumi, Yuichi; Hirofuji, Takao; Imai, Enyu; Omae, Masatoshi; Watanuki, Mitsuru; Murakami, Shinya

    2008-01-01

    Background The options for medical use of signaling molecules as stimulators of tissue regeneration are currently limited. Preclinical evidence suggests that fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 can promote periodontal regeneration. This study aimed to clarify the activity of FGF-2 in stimulating regeneration of periodontal tissue lost by periodontitis and to evaluate the safety of such stimulation. Methodology/Principal Findings We used recombinant human FGF-2 with 3% hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) as vehicle and conducted a randomized double-blinded controlled trial involving 13 facilities. Subjects comprised 74 patients displaying a 2- or 3-walled vertical bone defect as measured ≥3 mm apical to the bone crest. Patients were randomly assigned to 4 groups: Group P, given HPC with no FGF-2; Group L, given HPC containing 0.03% FGF-2; Group M, given HPC containing 0.1% FGF-2; and Group H, given HPC containing 0.3% FGF-2. Each patient underwent flap operation during which we administered 200 µL of the appropriate investigational drug to the bone defect. Before and for 36 weeks following administration, patients underwent periodontal tissue inspections and standardized radiography of the region under investigation. As a result, a significant difference (p = 0.021) in rate of increase in alveolar bone height was identified between Group P (23.92%) and Group H (58.62%) at 36 weeks. The linear increase in alveolar bone height at 36 weeks in Group P and H was 0.95 mm and 1.85 mm, respectively (p = 0.132). No serious adverse events attributable to the investigational drug were identified. Conclusions Although no statistically significant differences were noted for gains in clinical attachment level and alveolar bone gain for FGF-2 groups versus Group P, the significant difference in rate of increase in alveolar bone height (p = 0.021) between Groups P and H at 36 weeks suggests that some efficacy could be expected from FGF-2 in stimulating regeneration of

  19. Transforming Growth Factor-β Family Ligands Can Function as Antagonists by Competing for Type II Receptor Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Aykul, Senem; Martinez-Hackert, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family ligands are pleiotropic cytokines. Their physiological activities are not determined by a simple coupling of stimulus and response, but depend critically on context, i.e. the interplay of receptors, ligands, and regulators that form the TGF-β signal transduction system of a cell or tissue. How these different components combine to regulate signaling activities remains poorly understood. Here, we describe a ligand-mediated mechanism of signaling regulation. Based on the observation that the type II TGF-β family receptors ActRIIA, ActRIIB, and BMPRII interact with a large group of overlapping ligands at overlapping epitopes, we hypothesized high affinity ligands compete with low affinity ligands for receptor binding and signaling. We show activin A and other high affinity ligands directly inhibited signaling by the low affinity ligands BMP-2, BMP-7, and BMP-9. We demonstrate activin A functions as a competitive inhibitor that blocks the ligand binding epitope on type II receptors. We propose binding competition and signaling antagonism are integral functions of the TGF-β signal transduction system. These functions could help explain how activin A modulates physiological signaling during extraordinary cellular responses, such as injury and wound healing, and how activin A could elicit disease phenotypes such as cancer-related muscle wasting and fibrosis. PMID:26961869

  20. Transforming Growth Factor-β Family Ligands Can Function as Antagonists by Competing for Type II Receptor Binding.

    PubMed

    Aykul, Senem; Martinez-Hackert, Erik

    2016-05-13

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family ligands are pleiotropic cytokines. Their physiological activities are not determined by a simple coupling of stimulus and response, but depend critically on context, i.e. the interplay of receptors, ligands, and regulators that form the TGF-β signal transduction system of a cell or tissue. How these different components combine to regulate signaling activities remains poorly understood. Here, we describe a ligand-mediated mechanism of signaling regulation. Based on the observation that the type II TGF-β family receptors ActRIIA, ActRIIB, and BMPRII interact with a large group of overlapping ligands at overlapping epitopes, we hypothesized high affinity ligands compete with low affinity ligands for receptor binding and signaling. We show activin A and other high affinity ligands directly inhibited signaling by the low affinity ligands BMP-2, BMP-7, and BMP-9. We demonstrate activin A functions as a competitive inhibitor that blocks the ligand binding epitope on type II receptors. We propose binding competition and signaling antagonism are integral functions of the TGF-β signal transduction system. These functions could help explain how activin A modulates physiological signaling during extraordinary cellular responses, such as injury and wound healing, and how activin A could elicit disease phenotypes such as cancer-related muscle wasting and fibrosis. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Epidermal growth factor regulation in adult rat alveolar type II cells of amiloride-sensitive cation channels.

    PubMed

    Kemp, P J; Borok, Z; Kim, K J; Lubman, R L; Danto, S I; Crandall, E D

    1999-12-01

    Using the patch-clamp technique, we studied the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on whole cell and single channel currents in adult rat alveolar epithelial type II cells in primary culture in the presence or absence of EGF for 48 h. In symmetrical sodium isethionate solutions, EGF exposure caused a significant increase in the type II cell whole cell conductance. Amiloride (10 microM) produced approximately 20-30% inhibition of the whole cell conductance in both the presence and absence of EGF, such that EGF caused the magnitude of the amiloride-sensitive component to more than double. Northern analysis showed that alpha-, beta- and gamma-subunits of rat epithelial Na(+) channel (rENaC) steady-state mRNA levels were all significantly decreased by EGF. At the single channel level, all active inside-out patches demonstrated only 25-pS channels that were amiloride sensitive and relatively nonselective for cations (P(Na(+))/P(K(+)) approximately 1.0:0.48). Although the biophysical characteristics (conductance, open-state probability, and selectivity) of the channels from EGF-treated and untreated cells were essentially identical, channel density was increased by EGF; the modal channel per patch was increased from 1 to 2. These findings indicate that EGF increases expression of nonselective, amiloride-sensitive cation channels in adult alveolar epithelial type II cells. The contribution of rENaC to the total EGF-dependent cation current under these conditions is quantitatively less important than that of the nonselective cation channels in these cells.

  2. Keratinocyte growth factor and the transcription factors C/EBPα, C/EBPδ, and SREBP-1c regulate fatty acid synthesis in alveolar type II cells

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Robert J.; Pan, Tianli; Edeen, Karen E.; Nielsen, Larry D.; Zhang, Feijie; Longphre, Malinda; Eckart, Michael R.; Neben, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Strategies to stimulate endogenous surfactant production require a detailed understanding of the regulation of lipogenesis in alveolar type II cells. We developed culture conditions in which keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) stimulates fatty acid and phospholipid synthesis. KGF stimulated acetate incorporation into phosphatidylcholine, disaturated phosphatidylcholin, and phosphatidylglycerol more than 5% rat serum alone. To determine the mRNA levels of lipogenic enzymes and transport proteins, we analyzed gene expression by oligonucleotide microarrays. KGF increased the mRNA levels for fatty acid synthase, stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1), and epidermal fatty acid–binding protein more than rat serum alone. In addition, KGF increased the mRNA levels of the transcription factors CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) and C/EBPδ as well as SREBP-1c (ADD-1), but not PPARγ. These changes in C/EBPα and C/EBPδ were confirmed by in situ hybridization. SCD-1 was also found to be highly expressed in alveolar type II cells in vivo. Furthermore, KGF increased protein levels of fatty acid synthase, C/EBPα, C/EBPδ, SREBP-1, epidermal fatty acid–binding protein, and SCD. Finally, the liver X receptor agonist T0901317 increased acetate incorporation and SREBP-1 but not SREBP-2 protein levels. In summary, KGF stimulates lipogenesis in type II cells by a coordinated expression of lipogenic enzymes and transport proteins regulated by C/EBP isoforms and SREBP-1c. PMID:12865412

  3. Endothelial thrombomodulin induces Ca2+ signals and nitric oxide synthesis through epidermal growth factor receptor kinase and calmodulin kinase II.

    PubMed

    David-Dufilho, Monique; Millanvoye-Van Brussel, Elisabeth; Topal, Gokce; Walch, Laurence; Brunet, Annie; Rendu, Francine

    2005-10-28

    Endothelial membrane-bound thrombomodulin is a high affinity receptor for thrombin to inhibit coagulation. We previously demonstrated that the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex restrains cell proliferation mediated through protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1. We have now tested the hypothesis that thrombomodulin transduces a signal to activate the endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (NOS3) and to modulate G protein-coupled receptor signaling. Cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells were stimulated with thrombin or a mutant of thrombin that binds to thrombomodulin and has no catalytic activity on PAR-1. Thrombin and its mutant dose dependently activated NO release at cell surface. Pretreatment with anti-thrombomodulin antibody suppressed NO response to the mutant and to low thrombin concentration and reduced by half response to high concentration. Thrombin receptor-activating peptide that only activates PAR-1 and high thrombin concentration induced marked biphasic Ca2+ signals with rapid phosphorylation of PLC(beta3) and NOS3 at both serine 1177 and threonine 495. The mutant thrombin evoked a Ca2+ spark and progressive phosphorylation of Src family kinases at tyrosine 416 and NOS3 only at threonine 495. It activated rapid phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase-dependent NO synthesis and phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor and calmodulin kinase II. Complete epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition only partly reduced the activation of phospholipase Cgamma1 and NOS3. Prestimulation of thrombomodulin did not affect NO release but reduced Ca2+ responses to thrombin and histamine, suggesting cross-talks between thrombomodulin and G protein-coupled receptors. This is the first demonstration of an outside-in signal mediated by the cell surface thrombomodulin receptor to activate NOS3 through tyrosine kinase-dependent pathway. This signaling may contribute to thrombomodulin function in thrombosis, inflammation, and atherosclerosis.

  4. Epidermal Growth Factor Signalling Controls Myosin II Planar Polarity to Orchestrate Convergent Extension Movements during Drosophila Tubulogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bunt, Stephanie; Bischoff, Marcus; VijayRaghavan, Krishnaswamy; Skaer, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Most epithelial tubes arise as small buds and elongate by regulated morphogenetic processes including oriented cell division, cell rearrangements, and changes in cell shape. Through live analysis of Drosophila renal tubule morphogenesis we show that tissue elongation results from polarised cell intercalations around the tubule circumference, producing convergent-extension tissue movements. Using genetic techniques, we demonstrate that the vector of cell movement is regulated by localised epidermal growth factor (EGF) signalling from the distally placed tip cell lineage, which sets up a distal-to-proximal gradient of pathway activation to planar polarise cells, without the involvement for PCP gene activity. Time-lapse imaging at subcellular resolution shows that the acquisition of planar polarity leads to asymmetric pulsatile Myosin II accumulation in the basal, proximal cortex of tubule cells, resulting in repeated, transient shortening of their circumferential length. This repeated bias in the polarity of cell contraction allows cells to move relative to each other, leading to a reduction in cell number around the lumen and an increase in tubule length. Physiological analysis demonstrates that animals whose tubules fail to elongate exhibit abnormal excretory function, defective osmoregulation, and lethality. PMID:25460353

  5. Collagen Hydrogel Scaffold and Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Accelerate Periodontal Healing of Class II Furcation Defects in Dog

    PubMed Central

    Momose, Takehito; Miyaji, Hirofumi; Kato, Akihito; Ogawa, Kosuke; Yoshida, Takashi; Nishida, Erika; Murakami, Syusuke; Kosen, Yuta; Sugaya, Tsutomu; Kawanami, Masamitsu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Collagen hydrogel scaffold exhibits bio-safe properties and facilitates periodontal wound healing. However, regenerated tissue volume is insufficient. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) up-regulates cell behaviors and subsequent wound healing. We evaluated whether periodontal wound healing is promoted by application of collagen hydrogel scaffold in combination with FGF2 in furcation defects in beagle dogs. Methods: Collagen hydrogel was fabricated from bovine type I collagen with an ascorbate-copper ion cross-linking system. Collagen hydrogel was mingled with FGF2 and injected into sponge-form collagen. Subsequently, FGF2 (50 µg)/collagen hydrogel scaffold and collagen hydrogel scaffold alone were implanted into class II furcation defects in dogs. In addition, no implantation was performed as a control. Histometric parameters were assessed at 10 days and 4 weeks after surgery. Result: FGF2 application to scaffold promoted considerable cell and tissue ingrowth containing numerous cells and blood vessel-like structure at day 10. At 4 weeks, reconstruction of alveolar bone was stimulated by implantation of scaffold loaded with FGF2. Furthermore, periodontal attachment, consisting of cementum-like tissue, periodontal ligament-like tissue and Sharpey’s fibers, was also repaired, indicating that FGF2-loaded scaffold guided self-assembly and then re-established the function of periodontal organs. Aberrant healing, such as ankylosis and root resorption, was not observed. Conclusion: FGF2-loaded collagen hydrogel scaffold possessed excellent biocompatibility and strongly promoted periodontal tissue engineering, including periodontal attachment re-organization. PMID:27583044

  6. Evidence for modulation of pericryptal sheath myofibroblasts in rat descending colon by Transforming Growth Factor β and Angiotensin II.

    PubMed Central

    Thiagarajah, Jay R; Griffiths, Nina M; Pedley, Kevin C; Naftalin, Richard J

    2002-01-01

    Background Absorption of water and Na+ in descending colonic crypts is dependent on the barrier function of the surrounding myofibroblastic pericryptal sheath. Here the effects of high and low Na+ diets and exposure to whole body ionising radiation on the growth and activation of the descending colonic pericryptal myofibroblasts are evaluated. In addition the effect of a post-irradiation treatment with the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor Captopril was investigated. Methods The levels of Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1), ACE, collagen type IV, transforming growth factor-β type 1 receptor (TGF-βR1), OB cadherin and α-smooth muscle actin in both descending colon and caecum were evaluated, using immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy, in rats fed on high and low Na+ diets (LS). These parameters were also determined during 3 months post-irradiation with 8Gy from a 60Co source in the presence and absence of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, Captopril. Results Increases in AT1 receptor (135.6% ± 18.3, P < 0.001); ACE (70.1% ± 13.1, P < 0.001); collagen type IV (49.6% ± 15.3, P < 0.001); TGF-β1 receptors (291.0% ± 26.5, P < 0.001); OB-cadherin (26.3% ± 13.8, P < 0.05) and α-smooth muscle actin (82.5% ± 12.4, P < 0.001) were observed in the pericryptal myofibroblasts of the descending colon after LS diet. There are also increases in AT1 receptor and TGF-β1 receptor, smooth muscle actin and collagen type IV after irradiation. Captopril reduced all these effects of irradiation on the pericryptal sheath and also decreased the amount of collagen and smooth muscle actin in control rats (P < 0.001). Conclusions These results demonstrate an activation of descending colonic myofibroblasts to trophic stimuli, or irradiation, which can be attenuated by Captopril, indicative of local trophic control by angiotensin II and TGF-β release. PMID:11872151

  7. Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor Decreases Transforming Growth Factor-β Type II Receptor Expression and Function in Human Renal Proximal Tubule Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui-Lin; Liao, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), via its receptors, induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and plays an important role in the development of renal tubulointersitial fibrosis. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R), which mediates beneficial renal physiological functions, has received attention as a prospective therapeutic target for renoprotection. In this study, we investigated the effect and underlying mechanism of AT2R on the TGF-β receptor II (TGF-βRII) expression and function in human proximal tubular cells (HK-2). Here, we show that the AT2R agonist CGP42112A decreased TGF-βRII protein expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in HK-2 cells. The inhibitory effect of the AT2R on TGF-βRII expression was blocked by the AT2R antagonists PD123319 or PD123177. Stimulation with TGF-β1 enhanced EMT in HK-2 cells, which was prevented by pre-treatment with CGP42112A. One of mechanisms in this regulation is associated with the increased TGF-βRII degradation after activation of AT2R. Furthermore, laser confocal immunofluorescence microscopy showed that AT2R and TGF-βRII colocalized in HK-2 cells. AT2R and TGF-βRII coimmunoprecipitated and this interaction was increased after AT2R agonist stimulation for 30 min. The inhibitory effect of the AT2R on TGF-βRII expression was also blocked by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME, indicating that nitric oxide is involved in the signaling pathway. Taken together, our study indicates that the renal AT2R regulates TGF-βRII expression and function via the nitric oxide pathway, which may be important in the control of renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis.

  8. Growth hormone concentration and disappearance rate, insulin-like growth factors I and II and insulin levels in iron-deficient veal calves.

    PubMed

    Ceppi, A; Mullis, P E; Eggenberger, E; Blum, J W

    1994-01-01

    In calves with severe iron (Fe) deficiency, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I levels and IGF-I responses to exogenous growth hormone (GH) are reduced, while insulin-dependent glucose utilization is enhanced. Blood plasma concentrations of immunoreactive insulin (IRI), IGF-I, IGF-II and GH, and the half-life of blood plasma GH [after an i.v. injection of recombinant bovine GH (rbGH; 100 micrograms rbGH/kg body weight)] were measured in 20 calves at body weights between 160 and 190 kg. Calves were fed milk replacers containing 50 or 10 mg Fe/kg (groups Fe50 and Fe10, respectively). Daily weight gain and feed utilization were similar in both groups. Group Fe10 developed mild Fe deficiency anemia and blood plasma urea-nitrogen concentrations were higher (p < 0.05) than in group Fe50. IGF-I and IGF-II concentrations did not vary consistently over a 10-hour period and were not significantly influenced by different Fe intakes. The IRI concentration increased transiently (p < 0.05) after feed intake, but the total response was (not significantly) smaller in Fe-deficient calves. Plasma GH concentration changed episodically and was similar in both groups. Loss of GH from the circulation after i.v. rbGH injection, estimated by biexponential analysis, during the distribution or alpha phase (first 16 min) was similar in both groups, but during the beta phase was shorter (p < 0.05) in group Fe10 than in group Fe50 (29.9 and 34.2 min, respectively). The increased disappearance rate of GH, seen even in mild Fe deficiency, may contribute to reduced GH levels and IGF-I responses to GH in severe Fe deficiency.

  9. Treatment of transsphincteric fistula-in-ano with growth factors from autologous platelets: results of a phase II clinical trial.

    PubMed

    de la Portilla, F; Segura-Sampedro, J J; Reyes-Díaz, M L; Maestre, M V; Cabrera, A M; Jimenez-Rodríguez, R M; Vázquez-Monchul, J M; Diaz-Pavón, J M; Padillo-Ruiz, F J

    2017-07-29

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate to the safety, feasibility and efficacy of a novel treatment for transsphincteric cryptoglandular fistula: injection of autologous plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) into the fistula tract accompanied by sealing using a fibrin plug created from the activated platelet-poor fraction of the same plasma. This article is a prospective, phase II clinical trial. The procedure was externally audited. Thirty-six patients diagnosed with transsphincteric fistula-in-ano were included. All patients underwent follow-up examinations at 1 week and again at 3, 6 and 12 months after discharge. Main outcome measures safety (number of adverse events), feasibility and effectiveness of the treatment. A total of 36 patients received the study treatment, with the procedure found to be feasible in all patients. A total of seven adverse events (AE) related to the injected product or surgical procedure were identified in 4 of 36 patients. At the end of the follow-up period (12 months), 33.3% of patients (12/36) had achieved complete fistula healing and 11.1% of patients (4/36) had achieved partial healing. In total, this amounted to 44.4% of patients (16/36) being asymptomatic at final follow-up. In successfully healed patients, a gradual reduction in pain was observed, as measured using a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) (p = 0.0278). Compared to baseline, a significant improvement in Wexner score was seen in patients achieving total or partial healing of the fistula (p = 0.0195). The study treatment was safe and feasible, with apparently modest efficacy rates. Continence and pain improvement following treatment may be considered predictive factors for healing.

  10. High-Affinity Ligand Binding by Wild-Type:Mutant Heteromeric Complexes of the Mannose 6-Phosphate/Insulin-like Growth Factor II Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Michelle A.; Kreiling, Jodi L.; Byrd, James C.; MacDonald, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor (M6P/IGF2R) has diverse ligand-binding properties contributing to its roles in lysosome biogenesis and growth suppression. Optimal receptor binding and internalization of mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P)-bearing ligands requires a dimeric structure leading to bivalent high-affinity binding, presumably mediated by cooperation between sites on both subunits. Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) binds to a single site on each monomer. It is hypothesized that IGF-II binding to cognate sites on each monomer occurs independently, but bivalent Man-6-P ligand binding requires cooperative contributions from sites on both monomers. To test this hypothesis, we co-immunoprecipitated differentially epitope-tagged soluble mini-receptors and assessed ligand binding. Pairing of wild-type and point-mutated IGF-II binding sites between two dimerized mini-receptors had no effect on the function of the contralateral binding site, indicating IGF-II binding to each side of the dimer is independent and manifests no intersubunit effects. As expected, heterodimeric receptors composed of a wild-type monomer and a mutant bearing two Man-6-P-binding knockout mutations form functional IGF-II binding sites. In contrast to prediction, such heterodimeric receptors also bind Man-6-P–based ligands with high affinity, and the amount of binding can be attributed entirely to the immunoprecipitated wild-type receptors. Anchoring of both C-terminal ends of the heterodimer produces optimal binding of both IGF-II and Man-6-P ligands. Thus, IGF-II binds independently to both subunits of the dimeric M6P/IGF2R. Although wild-type/mutant heterooligomers from readily when mixed, it appears that multivalent Man-6-P ligands bind preferentially to wild-type sites, possibly by cross-bridging receptors within clusters of immobilized receptors. PMID:19236480

  11. The Chaperone Activity of GRP94 Toward Insulin-like Growth Factor II Is Necessary for the Stress Response to Serum Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Ostrovsky, Olga; Ahmed, Noreen T.

    2009-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II is a hormone with mitogenic activity for many cell types and tissues. We demonstrate that its intracellular processing and secretion strictly depend on the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone glucose-regulated protein (GRP) 94. GRP94 interacts physically and transiently with pro-IGF-II intermediates, and its activity is essential for secretion of active IGF-II, thus establishing IGF-II as a client of GRP94. Embryonic stem (ES) cells that lack GRP94 are hypersensitive to stress conditions such as serum deprivation and die by apoptosis because they cannot respond to the stress by producing active IGF-II. This chaperone–client interaction may explain the previously documented antiapoptotic activity of GRP94 in a number of stress responses. PMID:19158397

  12. Heat shock protein 90 inhibitor attenuates renal fibrosis through degradation of transforming growth factor-β type II receptor.

    PubMed

    Noh, Hyunjin; Kim, Hyun J; Yu, Mi R; Kim, Wan-Young; Kim, Jin; Ryu, Jung H; Kwon, Soon H; Jeon, Jin S; Han, Dong C; Ziyadeh, Fuad

    2012-11-01

    The accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins in the interstitial area is the final common feature of chronic kidney diseases. Accumulating evidence suggests that transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 promotes the development of renal fibrosis. Heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 inhibitors have been shown to repress TGF-β1 signaling, but whether they inhibit renal fibrosis is unknown. The purpose of this study is to determine the therapeutic efficacy of Hsp90 inhibitor on renal fibrosis. In TGF-β1-treated HK2 cells and unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) kidneys, we found that 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17AAG), an Hsp90 inhibitor, decreased the expression of α-smooth muscle actin, fibronectin, and collagen I and largely restored the expression of E-cadherin. 17AAG inhibited TGF-β1-mediated phosphorylation of Smad2, Akt, glycogen synthase kinase-3β, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase in HK2 cells. Inhibition of Hsp90 also blocked TGF-β1-mediated induction of snail1. This 17AAG-induced reduction was completely restored by simultaneous treatment with proteasome inhibitor MG132. Furthermore, 17AAG blocked the interaction between Hsp90 and TGF-β type II receptor (TβRII) and promoted ubiquitination of TβRII, leading to the decreased availability of TβRII. Smurf2-specific siRNA reversed the ability of 17AAG to inhibit TGF-β1 signaling. The effect of 17AAG on TβRII expression and renal fibrosis was confirmed in UUO kidneys. These findings suggest that Hsp90 inhibitor prevents the development of renal fibrosis via a mechanism dependent on Smurf2-mediated degradation of TβRII.

  13. Astrocyte transforming growth factor beta 1 promotes inhibitory synapse formation via CaM kinase II signaling.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Luan Pereira; Tortelli, Vanessa; Garcia, Matheus Nunes; Araújo, Ana Paula Bérgamo; Melo, Helen M; Silva, Gisele S Seixas da; Felice, Fernanda G De; Alves-Leon, Soniza Vieira; Souza, Jorge Marcondes de; Romão, Luciana Ferreira; Castro, Newton Gonçalves; Gomes, Flávia Carvalho Alcantara

    2014-12-01

    The balance between excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs is critical for the control of brain function. Astrocytes play important role in the development and maintenance of neuronal circuitry. Whereas astrocytes-derived molecules involved in excitatory synapses are recognized, molecules and molecular mechanisms underlying astrocyte-induced inhibitory synapses remain unknown. Here, we identified transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), derived from human and murine astrocytes, as regulator of inhibitory synapse in vitro and in vivo. Conditioned media derived from human and murine astrocytes induce inhibitory synapse formation in cerebral cortex neurons, an event inhibited by pharmacologic and genetic manipulation of the TGF-β pathway. TGF-β1-induction of inhibitory synapse depends on glutamatergic activity and activation of CaM kinase II, which thus induces localization and cluster formation of the synaptic adhesion protein, Neuroligin 2, in inhibitory postsynaptic terminals. Additionally, intraventricular injection of TGF-β1 enhanced inhibitory synapse number in the cerebral cortex. Our results identify TGF-β1/CaMKII pathway as a novel molecular mechanism underlying astrocyte control of inhibitory synapse formation. We propose here that the balance between excitatory and inhibitory inputs might be provided by astrocyte signals, at least partly achieved via TGF-β1 downstream pathways. Our work contributes to the understanding of the GABAergic synapse formation and may be of relevance to further the current knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the development of various neurological disorders, which commonly involve impairment of inhibitory synapse transmission. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Angiotensin II-induced pro-fibrotic effects require p38MAPK activity and transforming growth factor beta 1 expression in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Morales, María Gabriela; Vazquez, Yaneisi; Acuña, María José; Rivera, Juan Carlos; Simon, Felipe; Salas, José Diego; Alvarez Ruf, Joel; Brandan, Enrique; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2012-11-01

    Fibrotic disorders are typically characterised by excessive connective tissue and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition that preclude the normal healing of different tissues. Several skeletal muscle dystrophies are characterised by extensive fibrosis. Among the factors involved in skeletal muscle fibrosis is angiotensin II (Ang-II), a key protein of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). We previously demonstrated that myoblasts responded to Ang-II by increasing the ECM protein levels mediated by AT-1 receptors, implicating an Ang-II-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) by a NAD(P)H oxidase-dependent mechanism. In this paper, we show that in myoblasts, Ang-II induced the increase of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression through its AT-1 receptor. This effect is dependent of the NAD(P)H oxidase (NOX)-induced ROS, as indicated by a decrease of the expression of both pro-fibrotic factors when the ROS production was inhibited via the NOX inhibitor apocynin. The increase in pro-fibrotic factors levels was paralleled by enhanced p38MAPK and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in response to Ang-II. However, only the p38MAPK activity was critical for the Ang-II-induced fibrotic effects, as indicated by the decrease in the Ang-II-induced TGF-β1 and CTGF expression and fibronectin levels by SB-203580, an inhibitor of the p38MAPK, but not by U0126, an inhibitor of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Furthermore, we showed that the Ang-II-dependent p38MAPK activation, but not the ERK1/2 phosphorylation, was necessary for the NOX-derived ROS. In addition, we demonstrated that TGF-β1 expression was required for the Ang-II-induced pro-fibrotic effects evaluated by using SB-431542, an inhibitor of TGF-βRI kinase activity, and by knocking down TGF-β1 levels by shRNA technique. These results strongly suggest that the fibrotic response to Ang-II is mediated by the AT-1 receptor and requires the p38MAPK phosphorylation, NOX-induced ROS, and TGF

  15. Significance of abnormal serum binding of insulin-like growth factor II in the development of hypoglycemia in patients with non-islet-cell tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Daughaday, W.H.; Kapadia, M. )

    1989-09-01

    The authors reported that serum and tumor from a hypoglycemic patient with a fibrosarcoma contained insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II), mostly in a large molecular form designated big IGF-II. They now describe two additional patients with non-islet-cell tumor with hypoglycemia (NICTH) whose sera contained big IGF-II. Removal of the tumor eliminated most of the big IGF-II from the sera of two patients. Because specific IGF-binding proteins modify the bioactivity of IGFs, the sizes of the endogenous IGF-binding protein complexes were determined after neutral gel filtration through Sephadex G-200. Normally about 75% of IGFs are carried as a ternary complex of 150 kDa consisting of IGF, a growth hormone (GH)-dependent IGF-binding protein, and an acid-labile complexing component. The three patients with NICTH completely lacked the 150-kDa complex. IGF-II was present as a 60-kDa complex with variable contributions of smaller complexes. In the immediate postoperative period, a 110-kDa complex appeared rather than the expected 150-kDa complex. Abnormal IGF-II binding may be important in NICTH because the 150-kDa complexes cross the capillary membrane poorly. The smaller complexes present in our patients' sera would be expected to enter interstitial fluid readily, and a 4- to 5-fold increase in the fraction of IGFs reaching the target cells would result.

  16. De-ubiquitinating enzyme, USP11, promotes transforming growth factor β-1 signaling through stabilization of transforming growth factor β receptor II

    PubMed Central

    Jacko, A M; Nan, L; Li, S; Tan, J; Zhao, J; Kass, D J; Zhao, Y

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor β-1 (TGFβ-1) signaling pathway plays a central role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Two TGFβ-1 receptors, TβRI and TβRII, mediate this pathway. TβRI protein stability, as mediated by the ubiquitin/de-ubiquitination system, has been well studied; however, the molecular regulation of TβRII still remains unclear. Here we reveal that a de-ubiquitinating enzyme, USP11, promotes TGFβ-1 signaling through de-ubiquitination and stabilization of TβRII. We elucidate the role that mitoxantrone (MTX), an USP11 inhibitor, has in the attenuation of TGFβ-1 signaling. Inhibition or downregulation of USP11 results in increases in TβRII ubiquitination and reduction of TβRII stability. Subsequently, TGFβ-1 signaling is greatly attenuated, as shown by the decreases in phosphorylation of SMAD2/3 levels as well as that of fibronectin (FN) and smooth muscle actin (SMA). Overexpression of USP11 reduces TβRII ubiquitination and increases TβRII stabilization, thereby elevating phosphorylation of SMAD2/3 and the ultimate expression of FN and SMA. Further, elevated expression of USP11 and TβRII were detected in lung tissues from bleomycin-challenged mice and IPF patients. Therefore, USP11 may contribute to the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis by stabilization of TβRII and promotion of TGFβ-1 signaling. This study provides mechanistic evidence for development of USP11 inhibitors as potential antifibrotic drugs for pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:27853171

  17. Factors affecting bone growth.

    PubMed

    Gkiatas, Ioannis; Lykissas, Marios; Kostas-Agnantis, Ioannis; Korompilias, Anastasios; Batistatou, Anna; Beris, Alexandros

    2015-02-01

    Bone growth and development are products of the complex interactions of genetic and environmental factors. Longitudinal bone growth depends on the growth plate. The growth plate has 5 different zones-each with a different functional role-and is the final target organ for longitudinal growth. Bone length is affected by several systemic, local, and mechanical factors. All these regulation systems control the final length of bones in a complicated way. Despite its significance to bone stability, bone growth in width has not been studied as extensively as longitudinal bone growth. Bone growth in width is also controlled by genetic factors, but mechanical loading regulates periosteal apposition. In this article, we review the most recent data regarding bone growth from the embryonic age and analyze the factors that control bone growth. An understanding of this complex system is important in identifying metabolic and developmental bone diseases and fracture risk.

  18. Expression analysis of the insulin-like growth factors I and II during embryonic and early larval development of turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Haishen; Qi, Qian; Hu, Jian; Si, Yufeng; He, Feng; Li, Jifang

    2015-04-01

    The insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I and IGF-II) are important proteins involved in fish growth and development. Here, we report the isolation of IGF-II and expression analysis of IGFs in turbot Scophthalmus maximus, aiming to clarify their function in embryonic and larval development of fish. The deduced IGF-II gene is 808 bp in full length, which encodes a protein of 219 amino acids and is 93% similar with that of Paralichthys olicaceus in amino acid sequence. The tissue abundance and the expression pattern of IGFs in a turbot at early development stages were investigated via reverse transcription-polymer chain reaction. Result showed that the IGF-I and IGF-II genes were widely expressed in tissues of S. maximus. IGF-I was detected in all tissues except intestines with the highest level in liver, while IGF-II transcript presented in all tissues except muscle. At the stages of embryonic and larval development, the mRNA levels of IGFs sharply increased from the stage of unfertilized egg to post larva, followed by a decrease with larval development. However, there was an increase in IGF-I at the embryonic stage and IGF-II at the gastrula stage, respectively. These results suggested that IGFs play important roles in cell growth and division of the turbot. Our study provides reference data for further investigation of growth regulation in turbot, which can guarantee better understanding of the physiological role that IGFs play in fish.

  19. Relationships Between RNA Polymerase II Activity and Spt Elongation Factors to Spt- Phenotype and Growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ping; Jin, Huiyan; Vutukuru, Manjula Ramya; Kaplan, Craig D.

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between adjacent transcription units can result in transcription-dependent alterations in chromatin structure or recruitment of factors that determine transcription outcomes, including the generation of intragenic or other cryptic transcripts derived from cryptic promoters. Mutations in a number of genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae confer both cryptic intragenic transcription and the Suppressor of Ty (Spt-) phenotype for the lys2-128∂ allele of the LYS2 gene. Mutants that suppress lys2-128∂ allow transcription from a normally inactive Ty1 ∂ promoter, conferring a LYS+ phenotype. The arrangement of transcription units at lys2-128∂ is reminiscent of genes containing cryptic promoters within their open reading frames. We set out to examine the relationship between RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) activity, functions of Spt elongation factors, and cryptic transcription because of the previous observation that increased-activity Pol II alleles confer an Spt- phenotype. We identify both cooperating and antagonistic genetic interactions between Pol II alleles and alleles of elongation factors SPT4, SPT5, and SPT6. We find that cryptic transcription at FLO8 and STE11 is distinct from that at lys2-128∂, though all show sensitivity to reduction in Pol II activity, especially the expression of lys2-128∂ found in Spt- mutants. We determine that the lys2-128∂ Spt- phenotypes for spt6-1004 and increased activity rpo21/rpb1 alleles each require transcription from the LYS2 promoter. Furthermore, we identify the Ty1 transcription start site (TSS) within the ∂ element as the position of Spt- transcription in tested Spt- mutants. PMID:27261007

  20. Isolation of an insulin-like growth factor II cDNA with a unique 5 prime untranslated region from human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Shujane; Daimon, Makoto; Wang, Chunyeh; Ilan, J. ); Jansen, M. )

    1988-03-01

    Human insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) cDNA from a placental library was isolated and sequenced. The 5{prime} untranslated region (5{prime}-UTR) sequence of this cDNA differs completely from that of adult human liver and has considerable base sequence identity to the same region of an IGF-II cDNA of a rat liver cell line, BRL-3A. Human placental poly(A){sup +} RNA was probed with either the 5{prime}-UTR of the isolated human placental IGF-II cDNA or the 5{prime}-UTR of the IGF-II cDNA obtained from adult human liver. No transcripts were detected by using the 5{prime}-UTR of the adult liver IGF-II as the probe. In contrast, three transcripts of 6.0, 3.2, and 2.2 kilobases were detected by using the 5{prime}-UTR of the placental IGF-II cDNA as the probe or the probe from the coding sequence. A fourth IGF-II transcript of 4.9 kilobases presumably containing a 5{prime}-UTR consisting of a base sequence dissimilar to that of either IGF-II 5{prime}-UTR was apparent. Therefore, IGF-II transcripts detected may be products of alternative splicing as their 5{prime}-UTR sequence is contained within the human IGF-II gene or they may be a consequence of alternative promoter utilization in placenta.

  1. Effect of topical propranolol gel on plasma renin, angiotensin II and vascular endothelial growth factor in superficial infantile hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yu-juan; Zhang, Zai-zhong; Chen, Shao-quan; Chen, Shu-ming; Li, Cheng-jin; Chen, Jian-wei; Yuan, Bo; Xia, Yin; Wang, Lie

    2015-10-01

    The effect of topical propranolol gel on the levels of plasma renin, angiotensin II (ATII) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in superficial infantile hemangiomas (IHs) was investigated. Thirty-three consecutive children with superficial IHs were observed pre-treatment, 1 and 3 months after application of topical propranolol gel for the levels of plasma renin, ATII and VEGF in Department of General Surgery of Dongfang Hospital from February 2013 to February 2014. The plasma results of IHs were compared with those of 30 healthy infants of the same age from out-patient department. The clinical efficiency of topical propranolol gel at 1st, and 3rd month after application was 45%, and 82% respectively. The levels of plasma renin, ATII and VEGF in patients pre-treatment were higher than those in healthy infants (565.86 ± 49.66 vs. 18.19 ± 3.56, 3.20 ± 0.39 vs 0.30 ± 0.03, and 362.16 ± 27.29 vs. 85.63 ± 8.14, P < 0.05). The concentrations of VEGF and renin at 1st and 3rd month after treatment were decreased obviously as compared with those pre-treatment (271.51 ± 18.59 vs. 362.16 ± 27.29, and 405.18 ± 42.52 vs. 565.86 ± 49.66 P < 0.05; 240.80 ± 19.89 vs. 362.16 ± 27.29, and 325.90 ± 35.78 vs. 565.86 ± 49.66, P < 0.05, respectively), but the levels of plasma ATII declined slightly (2.96 ± 0.37 vs. 3.20 ± 0.39, and 2.47 ± 0.27 vs. 3.20 ± 0.39, P > 0.05). It was indicated that the increased renin, ATII and VEGF might play a role in the onset or development of IHs. Propranolol gel may suppress the proliferation of IHs by reducing VEGF.

  2. Combinatorial compatibility as habit-controlling factor in lysozyme crystallization II. Morphological evidence for tetrameric growth units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, C. S.; Bennema, P.

    1997-03-01

    This work (Part II) explores the relation between units and morphology. It shows the equivalence in behaviour between the attachment energies and the results of Monte Carlo growth kinetics simulations. The energetically optimal combination of the F slices in 1 1 0, 0 1 1 and 1 1 1 in a monomolecular interpretation leads to unsatisfactory agreement with experimentally observed morphology. In a tetrameric (or octameric) interpretation, the unit cell must be subdivided self-consistently in terms of stable molecular clusters. Thus, the presence or absence of the 1 1 1 form functions as a direct experimental criterion for distinguishing between monomolecular growth layers, and tetrameric (or octameric) growth layers of the same composition, but subjected to the condition of combinatorial compatibility, as the F slices combine to produce the growth habit. When that condition is taken into account, the tetrameric (or octameric) theoretical morphology in the broken bond model is in good agreement with experiment over a wide range. Subjectmatter for future study is summarized.

  3. The Drosophila transcription factor Adf-1 (nalyot) regulates dendrite growth by controlling FasII and Staufen expression downstream of CaMKII and neural activity.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, Christina; Suppiah, Somu; Gurudatta, Baraka V; Yang, Jingping; Banerjee, Christopher; Sandstrom, David J; Corces, Victor G; Sanyal, Subhabrata

    2013-07-17

    Memory deficits in Drosophila nalyot mutants suggest that the Myb family transcription factor Adf-1 is an important regulator of developmental plasticity in the brain. However, the cellular functions for this transcription factor in neurons or molecular mechanisms by which it regulates plasticity remain unknown. Here, we use in vivo 3D reconstruction of identifiable larval motor neuron dendrites to show that Adf-1 is required cell autonomously for dendritic development and activity-dependent plasticity of motor neurons downstream of CaMKII. Adf-1 inhibition reduces dendrite growth and neuronal excitability, and results in motor deficits and altered transcriptional profiles. Surprisingly, analysis by comparative chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-Seq) of Adf-1, RNA Polymerase II (Pol II), and histone modifications in Kc cells shows that Adf-1 binding correlates positively with high Pol II-pausing indices and negatively with active chromatin marks such as H3K4me3 and H3K27ac. Consistently, the expression of Adf-1 targets Staufen and Fasciclin II (FasII), identified through larval brain ChIP-Seq for Adf-1, is negatively regulated by Adf-1, and manipulations of these genes predictably modify dendrite growth. Our results imply mechanistic interactions between transcriptional and local translational machinery in neurons as well as conserved neuronal growth mechanisms mediated by cell adhesion molecules, and suggest that CaMKII, Adf-1, FasII, and Staufen influence crucial aspects of dendrite development and plasticity with potential implications for memory formation. Further, our experiments reveal molecular details underlying transcriptional regulation by Adf-1, and indicate active interaction between Adf-1 and epigenetic regulators of gene expression during activity-dependent neuronal plasticity.

  4. Transcriptional mechanism of vascular endothelial growth factor-induced expression of protein kinase CβII in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sanabra, Ola; Duckworth, Andrew D.; Glenn, Mark A.; Brown, Benjamin R. B.; Angelillo, Piera; Lee, Kelvin; Herbert, John; Falciani, Francesco; Kalakonda, Nagesh; Slupsky, Joseph R.

    2017-01-01

    A key feature of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) cells is overexpressed protein kinase CβII (PKCβII), an S/T kinase important in the pathogenesis of this and other B cell malignancies. The mechanisms contributing to enhanced transcription of the gene coding for PKCβII, PRKCB, in CLL cells remain poorly described, but could be important because of potential insight into how the phenotype of these cells is regulated. Here, we show that SP1 is the major driver of PKCβII expression in CLL cells where enhanced association of this transcription factor with the PRKCB promoter is likely because of the presence of histone marks permissive of gene activation. We also show how vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) regulates PRKCB promoter function in CLL cells, stimulating PKCβ gene transcription via increased association of SP1 and decreased association of STAT3. Taken together, these results are the first to demonstrate a clear role for SP1 in the up regulation of PKCβII expression in CLL cells, and the first to link SP1 with the pathogenesis of this and potentially other B cell malignancies where PKCβII is overexpressed. PMID:28233872

  5. Insulin-like growth factor II in human adrenal and pheochromocytomas and Wilms tumors: expression at the mRNA and protein level

    SciTech Connect

    Haselbacher, G.K.; Irminger, J.C.; Zapf, J.; Ziegler, W.H.; Humbel, R.E.

    1987-02-01

    Two forms of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) II with molecular masses of 10 and 7.5 kDa, respectively, were found in tumor tissue from human adrenal pheochromocytomas. The tumors contained 5.3-7.1 ..mu..g of immunoreactive IGF-II per g of tissue, which is about 20 times more than in adrenal medulla. The total bioactive IGF measured by radioimmunoassay in the pheochromocytomas exceeded that in normal liver or kidney, which contained only the 7.5-kDa IGF-II species, by a factor of approx.100. By contrast, the amount of IGF-I was just measurable and did not vary significantly between tumor and normal tissue. The high amounts of IGF-II in the pheochromocytomas were not reflected, however, by a corresponding increase of mRNA. The opposite situations was found in Wilms tumors, where IGF-II content was in the same range as in nontumor tissues despite increased expression of IGF-II mRNA.

  6. Dexamethasone decreases insulin-like growth factor-I and -II via a glucocorticoid receptor dependent mechanism in developing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yangzheng; Famuyide, Mobolaji; Bhatt, Abhay J

    2013-01-01

    Dexamethasone (Dex) causes neurodegeneration in developing brain. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and -II (IGF-II) are potent neurotrophic and differentiation factors and play key roles in the regulation of growth and development of CNS. Current project evaluated the effects of Dex on IGF-I and -II in developing rat brains. Sprague-Dawley rat pups in each litter were divided into vehicle (n=230) or Dex-treated (n=234) groups. Rat pups in the Dex group received one of the 3 different regimens of i.p. Dex: tapering doses (DexTD) on postnatal days (PD) 3 to PD 6 or repeated doses on PD 4 to PD 6 or single dose on PD 6. To quantify the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) blockade effect, rat pups in the DexTD group on PD 3 and 5 received vehicle or RU486 (GR blocker, 60 mg/kg) s.c., twenty minutes prior to Dex treatment. Dex decreased the gain of body and brain weight while RU486 inhibited these effects. RU486 also prevented the DexTD-induced increase in caspase-3 activity and reduction in IGF-I and -II proteins. Compared to the vehicle, the expression of mRNA of IGF-I and -II decreased at 24 h after DexTD treatment, while RU486 prevented this decrease on IGF-II but not IGF-I. Our findings indicate that Dex via GR decreases IGF-I and -II and causes neurodegeneration in the neonatal rat brain.

  7. Changes in insulin-like growth factor-I and -II associated with fat but not lean mass in early old age.

    PubMed

    Bann, David; Holly, Jeff M P; Lashen, Hany; Hardy, Rebecca; Adams, Judith; Kuh, Diana; Ong, Ken K; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav

    2015-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that insulin-like growth factors-I and II (IGF-I and II) decline during late midlife and that greater declines are related to higher fat mass and lower lean mass. A total of 1,542 men and women in a British birth cohort study had IGF-I and II measured by immunoassay of blood samples at age 53 and/or 60-64 years. Fat mass, android:gynoid fat ratio, and appendicular lean mass were measured at 60-64 years using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Associations between changes in IGF-I or II and body composition outcomes were examined using conditional change linear regression models. Mean IGF-I and IGF-II concentrations were lower at 60-64 than at 53 years, by 12.8% for IGF-I and by 12.5% for IGF-II. Larger declines in either IGF-I or II were associated with higher fat mass at 60-64 years. Although higher IGF-I at 53 years was associated with higher lean mass, there was little evidence linking changes in IGF-I or II to lean mass. The findings suggest that IGF-I and II concentrations decline with age, and greater declines are associated with higher fat mass levels. These results provide some evidence for the suggested roles of IGF-I and II in regulating fat mass but not lean mass in older age. © 2015 The Authors Obesity published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Obesity Society (TOS).

  8. Rearrangements at the 11p15 locus and overexpression of insulin-like growth factor-II gene in sporadic adrenocortical tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Gicquel, C.; Schneid, H.; Le Bouc, Y.; Bertagna, X.; Francillard-Leblond, M.; Luton, J.P.; Girard, F.

    1994-06-01

    Little is known about the pathophysiology of sporadic adrenocortical tumors in adults. Because loss of heterozygosity at the 11p15 locus has been described in childhood tumors, particularly in adrenocortical tumors associated with the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, and because insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) is a crucial regulator of fetal adrenal growth, the authors looked for structural analysis at the 11p15 locus and IGF-II gene expression in 23 sporadic adrenocortical adult tumors: 6 carcinomas (5 with Cushing`s syndrome and 1 nonsecreting) and 17 benign adenomas (13 with Cushing`s syndrome, 1 pure androgen secreting, and 3 nonsecreting). Twenty-one patients were informative at the 11p15 locus, and six (four carcinomas and two adenomas) of them (28.5%) exhibited 11p15 structural abnormalities in tumor DNA (five, a uniparental disomy and one, a mosaicism). In a single case that could be further studied, a paternal isodisomy was observed. Very high IGF-II mRNA contents were detected in seven tumors (30%; 5 of the 6 carcinomas and 2 of the 17 adenomas). They were particularly found in tumors with uniparental disomy at the 11p15 locus. Overall, a strong correlation existed between IGF-II mRNA contents and DNA demethylation at the IGF-II locus. These data show that genetic alterations involving the 11p15 locus were highly frequent in malignant tumors, but found only in rare adenomas. These results in combination with evidence for overexpression of IGF-II from the 11p15.5 locus suggest that abnormalities in structure and/or expression of the IGF-II gene play a role as a late event of a multistep process of tumorigenesis. 58 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Insulin-like growth factors I and II in starry flounder (Platichthys stellatus): molecular cloning and differential expression during embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongjiang; Zang, Kun; Liu, Xuezhou; Shi, Bao; Li, Cunyu; Shi, Xueying

    2015-02-01

    In order to elucidate the possible roles of insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I and IGF-II) in the embryonic development of Platichthys stellatus, their cDNAs were isolated and their spatial expression pattern in adult organs and temporal expression pattern throughout embryonic development were examined by quantitative real-time PCR assay. The IGF-I cDNA sequence was 1,268 bp in length and contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 558 bp, which encoded 185 amino acid residues. With respect to IGF-II, the full-length cDNA was 899 bp in length and contained a 648-bp ORF, which encoded 215 amino acid residues. The amino acid sequences of IGF-I and IGF-II exhibited high identities with their fish counterparts. The highest IGF-I mRNA level was found in the liver for both sexes, whereas the IGF-II gene was most abundantly expressed in female liver and male liver, gill, and brain. The sex-specific and spatial expression patterns of IGF-I and IGF-II mRNAs are thought to be related to the sexually dimorphic growth and development of starry flounder. Both IGF-I and IGF-II mRNAs were detected in unfertilized eggs, which indicated that IGF-I and IGF-II were parentally transmitted. Nineteen embryonic development stages were tested. IGF-I mRNA level remained high from unfertilized eggs to low blastula followed by a significant decrease at early gastrula and then maintained a lower level. In contrast, IGF-II mRNA level was low from unfertilized eggs to high blastula and peaked at low blastula followed by a gradual decrease. Moreover, higher levels of IGF-I mRNA than that of IGF-II were found from unfertilized eggs to high blastula, vice versa from low blastula to newly hatched larva, and the different expression pattern verified the differential roles of IGF-I and IGF-II in starry flounder embryonic development. These results could help in understanding the endocrine mechanism involved in the early development and growth of starry flounder.

  10. Angiotensin II-induced Akt activation through the epidermal growth factor receptor in vascular smooth muscle cells is mediated by phospholipid metabolites derived by activation of phospholipase D.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Malik, Kafait U

    2005-03-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) activates cytosolic Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)), phospholipase D (PLD), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Akt in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between Akt activation by Ang II and other signaling molecules in rat VSMC. Ang II-induced Akt phosphorylation was significantly reduced by the PLD inhibitor 1-butanol, but not by its inactive analog 2-butanol, and by brefeldin A, an inhibitor of the PLD cofactor ADP-ribosylation factor, and in cells infected with retrovirus containing PLD(2) siRNA or transfected with PLD(2) antisense but not control LacZ or sense oligonucleotide. Diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor II diminished Ang II-induced and diC8-phosphatidic acid (PA)-increased Akt phosphorylation, suggesting that PLD-dependent Akt activation is mediated by PA. Ang II-induced EGFR phosphorylation was inhibited by 1-butanol and PLD(2) siRNA and also by cPLA(2) siRNA. In addition, the inhibitor of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA) reduced both Ang II- and AA-induced EGFR transactivation. Furthermore, ETYA, cPLA(2) antisense, and cPLA(2) siRNA attenuated Ang II-elicited PLD activation. p38 MAPK inhibitor SB202190 [4-(4-flurophenyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)1H-imidazole] reduced PLD activity and EGFR and Akt phosphorylation elicited by Ang II. Pyrrolidine-1, a cPLA(2) inhibitor, and cPLA(2) siRNA decreased p38 MAPK activity. These data indicate that Ang II-stimulated Akt activity is mediated by cPLA(2)-dependent, p38 MAPK regulated PLD(2) activation and EGFR transactivation. We propose the following scheme of the sequence of events leading to activation of Akt in VSMC by Ang II: Ang II-->cPLA(2)-->AA-->p38 MAPK-->PLD(2)-->PA-->EGFR-->Akt.

  11. Receptors for insulin-like growth factors I and II: autoradiographic localization in rat brain and comparison to receptors for insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Lesniak, M.A.; Hill, J.M.; Kiess, W.; Rojeski, M.; Pert, C.B.; Roth, J.

    1988-10-01

    Receptors for insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in rat brain were visualized using autoradiography with (125I)IGF-I. The binding of the labeled peptide was competed for fully by high concentrations of unlabeled IGF-I. At intermediate concentrations of unlabeled peptide the binding of (125I)IGF-I was competed for by unlabeled IGF-I more effectively than by IGF-II or insulin, which is typical of receptors for IGF-I. Essentially every brain section shows specific binding of IGF-I, and the pattern of binding of IGF-I to its receptors correlated well with the cytoarchitectonic structures. In parallel studies we showed that (125I)IGF-II was bound to tissue sections of rat brain and that the binding was competed for by an excess of unlabeled IGF-II. However, intermediate concentrations of unlabeled peptides gave inconclusive results. To confirm that the binding of (125I)IGF-II was to IGF-II receptors, we showed that antibodies specific for the IGF-II receptor inhibited the binding of labeled IGF-II. Furthermore, the binding of the antibody to regions of the brain section, visualized by the application of (125I)protein-A, gave patterns indistinguishable from those obtained with (125I)IGF-II alone. Again, the binding was very widely distributed throughout the central nervous system, and the patterns of distribution corresponded well to the underlying neural structures. Densitometric analysis of the receptors enabled us to compare the distribution of IGF-I receptors with that of IGF-II receptors as well as retrospectively with that of insulin receptors.

  12. Long-range RNA interaction of two sequence elements required for endonucleolytic cleavage of human insulin-like growth factor II mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Scheper, W; Meinsma, D; Holthuizen, P E; Sussenbach, J S

    1995-01-01

    Human insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) mRNAs are subject to site-specific endonucleolytic cleavage in the 3' untranslated region, leading to an unstable 5' cleavage product containing the IGF-II coding region and a very stable 3' cleavage product of 1.8 kb. This endonucleolytic cleavage is most probably the first and rate-limiting step in degradation of IGF-II mRNAs. Two sequence elements within the 3' untranslated region are required for cleavage: element I, located approximately 2 kb upstream of the cleavage site, and element II, encompassing the cleavage site itself. We have identified a stable double-stranded RNA stem structure (delta G = -100 kcal/mol [418.4 kJ/mol]) that can be formed between element I and a region downstream of the cleavage site in element II. This structure is conserved among human, rat, and mouse mRNAs. Detailed analysis of the requirements for cleavage shows that the relative position of the elements is not essential for cleavage. Furthermore, the distance between the coding region and the cleavage site does not affect the cleavage reaction. Mutational analysis of the long-range RNA-RNA interaction shows that not only the double-stranded character but also the sequence of the stable RNA stem is important for cleavage. PMID:7799930

  13. RNA-binding Protein Insulin-like Growth Factor mRNA-binding Protein 3 (IMP-3) Promotes Cell Survival via Insulin-like Growth Factor II Signaling after Ionizing Radiation*

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Baisong; Hu, Yan; Brewer, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) induces proapoptotic gene expression programs that inhibit cell survival. These programs often involve RNA-binding proteins that associate with their mRNA targets to elicit changes in mRNA stability and/or translation. The RNA-binding protein IMP-3 is an oncofetal protein overexpressed in many human malignancies. IMP-3 abundance correlates with tumor aggressiveness and poor prognosis. As such, IMP-3 is proving to be a highly significant biomarker in surgical pathology. Among its many mRNA targets, IMP-3 binds to and promotes translation of insulin-like growth factor II (IGFII) mRNA. Our earlier studies showed that reducing IMP-3 abundance with siRNAs reduced proliferation of human K562 chronic myeloid leukemia cells because of reduced IGF-II biosynthesis. However, the role of IMP-3 in apoptosis is unknown. Here, we have used IR-induced apoptosis of K562 cells as a model to explore a role for IMP-3 in cell survival. Knockdown of IMP-3 with siRNA increased susceptibility of cells to IR-induced apoptosis and led to reduced IGF-II production. Gene reporter assays revealed that IMP-3 acts through the 5′ UTR of IGFII mRNA during apoptosis to promote translation. Finally, culture of IR-treated cells with recombinant IGF-II partially reversed the effects of IMP-3 knockdown on IR-induced apoptosis. Together, these results indicate that IMP-3 acts in part through the IGF-II pathway to promote cell survival in response to IR. Thus, IMP-3 might serve as a new drug target to increase sensitivity of CML cells or other cancers to IR therapy. PMID:21757716

  14. RNA-binding protein insulin-like growth factor mRNA-binding protein 3 (IMP-3) promotes cell survival via insulin-like growth factor II signaling after ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Baisong; Hu, Yan; Brewer, Gary

    2011-09-09

    Ionizing radiation (IR) induces proapoptotic gene expression programs that inhibit cell survival. These programs often involve RNA-binding proteins that associate with their mRNA targets to elicit changes in mRNA stability and/or translation. The RNA-binding protein IMP-3 is an oncofetal protein overexpressed in many human malignancies. IMP-3 abundance correlates with tumor aggressiveness and poor prognosis. As such, IMP-3 is proving to be a highly significant biomarker in surgical pathology. Among its many mRNA targets, IMP-3 binds to and promotes translation of insulin-like growth factor II (IGFII) mRNA. Our earlier studies showed that reducing IMP-3 abundance with siRNAs reduced proliferation of human K562 chronic myeloid leukemia cells because of reduced IGF-II biosynthesis. However, the role of IMP-3 in apoptosis is unknown. Here, we have used IR-induced apoptosis of K562 cells as a model to explore a role for IMP-3 in cell survival. Knockdown of IMP-3 with siRNA increased susceptibility of cells to IR-induced apoptosis and led to reduced IGF-II production. Gene reporter assays revealed that IMP-3 acts through the 5' UTR of IGFII mRNA during apoptosis to promote translation. Finally, culture of IR-treated cells with recombinant IGF-II partially reversed the effects of IMP-3 knockdown on IR-induced apoptosis. Together, these results indicate that IMP-3 acts in part through the IGF-II pathway to promote cell survival in response to IR. Thus, IMP-3 might serve as a new drug target to increase sensitivity of CML cells or other cancers to IR therapy.

  15. Endocytosis of receptor-bound insulin-like growth factor II is enhanced by mannose-6-phosphate in IM9 cells.

    PubMed

    Polychronakos, C; Piscina, R

    1988-10-01

    The insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II), and glycoproteins containing mannose 6-phosphate (M6P), bind to two different sites of the same receptor molecule (Morgan et al, Nature 329:301, 1987). To study the interactions between the two ligands on their common receptor in intact cells, we examined the effect of free M6P on IGF-II binding and endocytosis in the IM9 human lymphoblastoid cell line. M6P, up to a 3 mM concentration, had no effect on the binding of IGF-II to the cell surface receptor of intact IM9 cells at 4 degrees C. By contrast, when IM9 cells were incubated with 125I-IGF-II at 37 degrees C, 1mM M6P increased cell-associated radioactivity by twofold. The increase was resistant to acid wash at 4 degrees C, and therefore assumed to represent endocytosed IGF-II. Acid-washable radioactivity was no different, confirming that, in intact cells, M6P does not affect IGF-II surface binding. In addition, preincubation of cells with M6P at 37 degrees C for up to 3 hours did not change the abundance of receptor on the cell surface, as measured by a subsequent 4 degrees C binding assay. We conclude that M6P causes a shift of IGF-II-occupied receptors form the cell surface to intracellular locations without affecting surface binding of this ligand in IM9 cells. The effect could be produced by the binding of M6P itself, or by the displacement of endogenous phosphomannosylated ligands.

  16. Endocytosis of receptor-bound insulin-like growth factor II is enhanced by mannose-6-phosphate in IM9 cells.

    PubMed

    Polychronakos, C; Piscina, R

    1988-12-01

    The insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II), and glycoproteins containing mannose 6-phosphate (M6P), bind to two different sites of the same receptor molecule (Morgan et al, Nature 329:301, 1987). To study the interactions between the two ligands on their common receptor in intact cells, we examined the effect of free M6P on IGF-II binding and endocytosis in the IM9 human lymphoblastoid cell line. M6P, up to a 3 mM concentration, had no effect on the binding of IGF-II to the cell surface receptor of intact IM9 cells at 4 degrees C. By contrast, when IM9 cells were incubated with 125I-IGF-II at 37 degrees C, 1 mM M6P increased cell-associated radioactivity by twofold. The increase was resistant to acid wash at 4 degrees C, and therefore assumed to represent endocytosed IGF-II. Acid-washable radioactivity was no different, confirming that, in intact cells, M6P does not affect IGF-II surface binding. In addition, preincubation of cells with M6P at 37 degrees C for up to 3 hours did not change the abundance of receptor on the cell surface, as measured by a subsequent 4 degrees C binding assay. We conclude that M6P causes a shift of IGF-II-occupied receptors form the cell surface to intracellular locations without affecting surface binding of this ligand in IM9 cells. The effect could be produced by the binding of M6P itself, or by the displacement of endogenous phosphomannosylated ligands.

  17. Annexin II binds progastrin and gastrin-like peptides, and mediates growth factor effects of autocrine and exogenous gastrins on colon cancer and intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, P; Wu, H; Clark, C; Owlia, A

    2007-01-18

    We and others have reported the presence of novel progastrin (PG)/gastrin receptors on normal and cancerous intestinal cells. We had earlier reported the presence of 33-36 kDa gastrin-binding proteins on cellular membranes of colon cancer cells. The goal of the current study was to identify the protein(s) in the 33-36 kDa band, and analyse its functional significance. A carbodiimide crosslinker was used for crosslinking radio-labeled gastrins to membrane proteins from gastrin/PG responsive cell lines. Native membrane proteins, crosslinked to the ligand, were solubulized and enriched by >1000-fold, and analysed by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry. The peptide masses were researched against the NCBInr database using the ProFound search engine. Annexin II (ANX II) was identified, and confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry. As HCT-116 cells express autocrine PG, the in situ association of PG with ANX II was demonstrated in pulldown assays. Direct binding of PG with ANX II was confirmed in an in vitro binding assay. In order to confirm a functional importance of these observations, sense and anti-sense (AS) ANX II RNA-expressing clones of intestinal epithelial (IEC-18) and human colon cancer (HCT-116) cell lines were generated. AS clones demonstrated a significant loss in the growth response to exogenous (IEC-18) and autocrine (HCT-116) PG. We have thus discovered that membrane-associated ANX II binds PG/gastrins, and partially mediates growth factor effects of the peptides.

  18. UAP56 is an important mediator of Angiotensin II/platelet derived growth factor induced vascular smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Sahni, Abha; Wang, Nadan; Alexis, Jeffrey

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Knockdown of UAP56 inhibits Angiotensin II/PDGF induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. ► UAP56 is a positive regulator of E2F transcriptional activation. ► UAP56 is present in the vessel wall of low flow carotid arteries. -- Abstract: Angiotensin (Ang) II and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) are important mediators of pathologic vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. Identifying downstream mediators of Ang II and PDGF signaling may provide insights for therapies to improve vascular proliferative diseases. We have previously demonstrated that breakpoint cluster region (Bcr) is an important mediator of Ang II/PDGF signaling in VSMC. We have recently reported that the DExD/H box protein UAP56 is an interacting partner of Bcr in regulating VSMC DNA synthesis. We hypothesized that UAP56 itself is an important regulator of VSMC proliferation. In this report we demonstrate that knockdown of UAP56 inhibits Ang II/PDGF induced VSMC DNA synthesis and proliferation, and inhibits E2F transcriptional activity. In addition, we demonstrate that UAP56 is present in the vessel wall of low-flow carotid arteries. These findings suggest that UAP56 is a regulator of VSMC proliferation and identify UAP56 as a target for preventing vascular proliferative disease.

  19. Type II cGMP-dependent protein kinase inhibits epidermal growth factor-induced phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt signal transduction in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Chen, Yongchang; Jiang, Lu; Li, Yueying; Lan, Ting; Wang, Ying; Qian, Hai

    2013-12-01

    Our previous study revealed that Type II cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG II) inhibits epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced MAPK/ERK and MAPK/JNK-mediated signal transduction through the inhibition of the phosphorylation/activation of the EGF receptor (EGFR). As EGFR also mediates several other signal transduction pathways besides MAPK-mediated pathways, the present study was designed to investigate whether PKG II was able to inhibit EGF/EGFR-induced phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt-mediated signal transduction. The AGS human gastric cancer cell line was infected with adenoviral constructs encoding a cDNA of PKG II (Ad-PKG II) to increase the expression of PKG II, and treated with 8-pCPT-cGMP to activate the enzyme. Western blotting was used to detect the phosphorylation/activation of the key components of the signal transduction pathway, including EGFR, PI3K, Akt, mTOR and NF-κB. The levels of apoptosis-related proteins, including Bax, Bcl-2, caspase 9 and DNA fragment factor (DFF), were also determined by western blotting. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling staining was used to detect the apoptosis of the AGS cells. The results revealed that EGF treatment increased the phosphorylation (activation) of EGFR, PI3K, Akt and mTOR, and increased the nuclear localization (activation) of NF-κB. EGF treatment also reduced the apoptosis of the AGS cells and increased the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2, but had no effect on the expression of the pro-apoptotic protein, Bax, and did not alter the levels of caspase 9 and DFF. Increasing the PKG II activity of AGS cells by infecting them with Ad-PKG II and stimulating them with 8-pCPT-cGMP inhibited the EGF-induced activation of EGFR, PI3K, Akt, mTOR and NF-κB; caused an increase in caspase 9 breakdown (activation) and DFF levels; and reversed the anti-apoptotic effect of EGF. The results suggest that PKG II may also inhibit EGF-induced signal transduction of PI3

  20. Krüppel-like factor KLF10 regulates transforming growth factor receptor II expression and TGF-β signaling in CD8+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Konstantinos A; Krempski, James; Reiter, Jesse; Svingen, Phyllis; Xiong, Yuning; Sarmento, Olga F; Huseby, April; Johnson, Aaron J; Lomberk, Gwen A; Urrutia, Raul A; Faubion, William A

    2015-03-01

    KLF10 has recently elicited significant attention as a transcriptional regulator of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) signaling in CD4(+) T cells. In the current study, we demonstrate a novel role for KLF10 in the regulation of TGF-β receptor II (TGF-βRII) expression with functional relevance in antiviral immune response. Specifically, we show that KLF10-deficient mice have an increased number of effector/memory CD8(+) T cells, display higher levels of the T helper type 1 cell-associated transcription factor T-bet, and produce more IFN-γ following in vitro stimulation. In addition, KLF10(-/-) CD8(+) T cells show enhanced proliferation in vitro and homeostatic proliferation in vivo. Freshly isolated CD8(+) T cells from the spleen of adult mice express lower levels of surface TGF-βRII (TβRII). Congruently, in vitro activation of KLF10-deficient CD8(+) T cells upregulate TGF-βRII to a lesser extent compared with wild-type (WT) CD8(+) T cells, which results in attenuated Smad2 phosphorylation following TGF-β1 stimulation compared with WT CD8(+) T cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that KLF10 directly binds to the TGF-βRII promoter in T cells, leading to enhanced gene expression. In vivo viral infection with Daniel's strain Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) also led to lower expression of TGF-βRII among viral-specific KLF10(-/-) CD8(+) T cells and a higher percentage of IFN-γ-producing CD8(+) T cells in the spleen. Collectively, our data reveal a critical role for KLF10 in the transcriptional activation of TGF-βRII in CD8(+) T cells. Thus, KLF10 regulation of TGF-βRII in this cell subset may likely play a critical role in viral and tumor immune responses for which the integrity of the TGF-β1/TGF-βRII signaling pathway is crucial.

  1. Krüppel-like factor KLF10 regulates transforming growth factor receptor II expression and TGF-β signaling in CD8+ T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Papadakis, Konstantinos A.; Krempski, James; Reiter, Jesse; Svingen, Phyllis; Xiong, Yuning; Sarmento, Olga F.; Huseby, April; Johnson, Aaron J.; Lomberk, Gwen A.; Urrutia, Raul A.

    2014-01-01

    KLF10 has recently elicited significant attention as a transcriptional regulator of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) signaling in CD4+ T cells. In the current study, we demonstrate a novel role for KLF10 in the regulation of TGF-β receptor II (TGF-βRII) expression with functional relevance in antiviral immune response. Specifically, we show that KLF10-deficient mice have an increased number of effector/memory CD8+ T cells, display higher levels of the T helper type 1 cell-associated transcription factor T-bet, and produce more IFN-γ following in vitro stimulation. In addition, KLF10−/− CD8+ T cells show enhanced proliferation in vitro and homeostatic proliferation in vivo. Freshly isolated CD8+ T cells from the spleen of adult mice express lower levels of surface TGF-βRII (TβRII). Congruently, in vitro activation of KLF10-deficient CD8+ T cells upregulate TGF-βRII to a lesser extent compared with wild-type (WT) CD8+ T cells, which results in attenuated Smad2 phosphorylation following TGF-β1 stimulation compared with WT CD8+ T cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that KLF10 directly binds to the TGF-βRII promoter in T cells, leading to enhanced gene expression. In vivo viral infection with Daniel's strain Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) also led to lower expression of TGF-βRII among viral-specific KLF10−/− CD8+ T cells and a higher percentage of IFN-γ-producing CD8+ T cells in the spleen. Collectively, our data reveal a critical role for KLF10 in the transcriptional activation of TGF-βRII in CD8+ T cells. Thus, KLF10 regulation of TGF-βRII in this cell subset may likely play a critical role in viral and tumor immune responses for which the integrity of the TGF-β1/TGF-βRII signaling pathway is crucial. PMID:25472963

  2. FGF growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Zamora, Paul O [Gaithersburg, MD; Pena, Louis A [Poquott, NY; Lin, Xinhua [Plainview, NY; Takahashi, Kazuyuki [Germantown, MD

    2012-07-24

    The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

  3. Hypoglycemia in a dog with a leiomyoma of the gastric wall producing an insulin-like growth factor II-like peptide.

    PubMed

    Boari, A; Barreca, A; Bestetti, G E; Minuto, F; Venturoli, M

    1995-06-01

    A 12-year-old mixed-breed male dog was referred to the Clinica Medica Veterinaria of Bologna University for recurrent episodes of seizures due to hypoglycemia with abnormally low plasma insulin levels (18 pmol/l). Resection of a large leiomyoma (780 g) of the gastric wall resulted in a permanent resolution of the hypoglycemic episodes. Insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I and -II) were measured by RIA in serum before and after surgery and in tumor tissue. Results were compared to the serum concentration of 54 normal and to the tissue concentration observed in eight non-hypoglycemic dog gastric wall extracts. Before surgery, circulating immunoreactive IGF-I was 0.92 nmol/l, which is significantly lower than the control values (16.92 +/- 8.44 nmol/l, range 3.53-35.03), while IGF-II was 152 nmol/l, which is significantly higher than the control values (42.21 +/- 3.75, range 31.99-50.74). After surgery, IGF-I increased to 6.80 nmol/l while IGF-II decreased to 45.52 nmol/l. Tumor tissue IGF-II concentration was higher than normal (5.66 nmol/kg tissue as compared to a range in normal gastric wall tissue of 1.14-3.72 nmol/kg), while IGF-I was 0.08 nmol/kg tissue, which is close to the lowest normal value (range in controls, 0.08-1.18 nmol/kg). Partial characterization of IGF-II immunoreactivity extracted from tissue evidenced a molecular weight similar to that of mature IGF-II, thus excluding that peptide released by the tumor is a precursor molecule.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Effect of iron deficiency on the expression of insulin-like growth factor-II and its receptor in neuronal and glial cells.

    PubMed

    Morales González, E; Contreras, I; Estrada, J A

    2014-09-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that iron deficiency modifies the normal function of the central nervous system and alters cognitive abilities. When cellular damage occurs in the central nervous system, neuroprotective mechanisms, such as the production of neurotrophic factors, are essential in order for nervous tissue to function correctly. Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF- II) is a neurotrophic factor that was recently shown to be involved in the normal functioning of cognitive processes in animal models. However, the impact of iron deficiency on the expression and function of this molecule has not yet been clarified. Mixed primary cell cultures from the central nervous system were collected to simulate iron deficiency using deferoxamine. The expression of IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF-IR, and IGF-IIR was determined with the western blot test. We observed increased expression of IGF-II, along with a corresponding decrease in the expression of IGF-IIR, in iron-deficient mixed primary cell cultures. We did not observe alterations in the expression of these proteins in isolated microglia or neuronal cultures under the same conditions. We did not detect differences in the expression of IGF-I and IGF-IR in iron-deficient cultures. In vitro iron deficiency increases the expression of IGF-II in mixed glial cell cultures, which may have a beneficial effect on brain tissue homeostasis in a situation in which iron availability is decreased. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Growth factors for nanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftcioglu, Neva; Kajander, E. Olavi

    1999-12-01

    Nanobacteria are novel microorganisms recently isolated from fetal bovine serum and blood of cows and humans. These coccoid, gram negative bacteria in alpha-2 subgroup of Proteobacteria grow slowly under mammalian cell culture conditions but not in common media for microbes. Now we have found two different kinds of culture supplement preparations that improve their growth and make them culturable in the classical sense. These are supernatant fractions of conditioned media obtained from 1 - 3 months old nanobacteria cultures and from about a 2 weeks old Bacillus species culture. Both improved multiplication and particle yields and the latter increased their resistance to gentamicin. Nanobacteria cultured with any of the methods shared similar immunological property, structure and protein pattern. The growth supporting factors were heat-stabile and nondialyzable, and dialysis improved the growth promoting action. Nanobacteria formed stony colonies in a bacteriological medium supplemented with the growth factors. This is an implication that nanobacterial growth is influenced by pre-existing bacterial flora.

  6. Peptide growth factors, part A

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.; Sirbasku, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains information on the following topics: Epidermal Growth Factor;Transforming Growth Factors;Bone and Cartilage Growth Factors;Somatomedin/Insulin-Like Growth Factors;Techniques for the Study of Growth Factor Activity;Assays, Phosphorylation, and Surface Membrane Effects.

  7. New microbial growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Bok, S H; Casida, L E

    1977-01-01

    A screening procedure was used to isolate from soil a Penicillium sp., two bacterial isolates, and a Streptomyces sp. that produced a new microbial growth factor. This factor was an absolute growth requirement for three soil bacteria. The Penicillium sp. and one of the bacteria requiring the factor, an Arthrobacter sp., were selected for more extensive study concerning the production and characteristics of the growth factor. It did not seem to be related to the siderochromes. It was not present in soil extract, rumen fluid, or any other medium component tested. It appears to be a glycoprotein of high molecular weight, and it has high specific activity. When added to the diets for a meadow vole mammalian test system, it caused an increased consumption of diet without a concurrent increase in rate of weight gain. PMID:327929

  8. New microbial growth factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bok, S. H.; Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A screening procedure was used to isolate from soil a Penicillium sp., two bacterial isolates, and a Streptomyces sp. that produced a previously unknown microbial growth factor. This factor was an absolute growth requirement for three soil bacteria. The Penicillium sp. and one of the bacteria requiring the factor, an Arthrobacter sp., were selected for more extensive study concerning the production and characteristics of the growth factor. It did not seem to be related to the siderochromes. It was not present in soil extract, rumen fluid, or any other medium component tested. It appears to be a glycoprotein of high molecular weight and has high specific activity. When added to the diets for a meadow-vole mammalian test system, it caused an increased consumption of diet without a concurrent increase in rate of weight gain.

  9. New microbial growth factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bok, S. H.; Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A screening procedure was used to isolate from soil a Penicillium sp., two bacterial isolates, and a Streptomyces sp. that produced a previously unknown microbial growth factor. This factor was an absolute growth requirement for three soil bacteria. The Penicillium sp. and one of the bacteria requiring the factor, an Arthrobacter sp., were selected for more extensive study concerning the production and characteristics of the growth factor. It did not seem to be related to the siderochromes. It was not present in soil extract, rumen fluid, or any other medium component tested. It appears to be a glycoprotein of high molecular weight and has high specific activity. When added to the diets for a meadow-vole mammalian test system, it caused an increased consumption of diet without a concurrent increase in rate of weight gain.

  10. A Case of Transforming Growth Factor-β-Induced Gene-Related Oculorenal Syndrome: Granular Corneal Dystrophy Type II with a Unique Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Iwafuchi, Yoichi; Morioka, Tetsuo; Oyama, Yuko; Nozu, Kandai; Iijima, Kazumoto; Narita, Ichiei

    2016-01-01

    Many types of inherited renal diseases have ocular features that occasionally support a diagnosis. The following study describes an unusual example of a 40-year-old woman with granular corneal dystrophy type II complicated by renal involvement. These two conditions may coincidentally coexist; however, there are some reports that demonstrate an association between renal involvement and granular corneal dystrophy type II. Granular corneal dystrophy type II is caused by a mutation in the transforming growth factor-β-induced (TGFBI) gene. The patient was referred to us because of the presence of mild proteinuria without hematuria that was subsequently suggested to be granular corneal dystrophy type II. A kidney biopsy revealed various glomerular and tubular basement membrane changes and widening of the subendothelial space of the glomerular basement membrane by electron microscopy. However, next-generation sequencing revealed that she had no mutation in a gene that is known to be associated with monogenic kidney diseases. Conversely, real-time polymerase chain reaction, using a simple buccal swab, revealed TGFBI heteromutation (R124H). The TGFBI protein plays an important role in cell-collagen signaling interactions, including extracellular matrix proteins which compose the renal basement membrane. This mutation can present not only as corneal dystrophy but also as renal disease. TGFBI-related oculorenal syndrome may have been unrecognized. It is difficult to diagnose this condition without renal electron microscopic studies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first detailed report of nephropathy associated with a TGFBI mutation. PMID:27781206

  11. Developmental and tissue-specific expression of a family of transcripts related to rat insulin-like growth factor II mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Soares, M B; Ishii, D N; Efstratiadis, A

    1985-01-01

    We have constructed a cDNA library from the mRNA of a rat liver cell line (BRL-3A) and characterized cDNA clones encoding the protein precursor of the rat insulin-like growth factor II (pre-pro-rIGF-II). This precursor, inferred from the nucleotide sequence, consists of a signal peptide, the rIGF-II sequence, and a trailer polypeptide of unknown significance. The characterized cDNA sequence (1016 nt) is part of a 3.4 kb mRNA species. Northern analysis reveals that a probe containing the extreme 5' noncoding region hybridizes to a second RNA (1.6 kb), while a probe corresponding to the 5' noncoding region proximal to the coding region hybridizes to two other RNA species (1.75 and 1.1 kb). All four RNAs are differentially expressed in all of the neonatal tissues that were examined, while the 3.4 kb pre-pro-rIGF-II mRNA and the 1.1 kb transcript are absent from adult tissues. Images PMID:3889836

  12. A highly phosphorylated subpopulation of insulin-like growth factor II/mannose 6-phosphate receptors is concentrated in a clathrin-enriched plasma membrane fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Corvera, S.; Folander, K.; Clairmont, K.B.; Czech, M.P. )

    1988-10-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II)/mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P) receptors immunoprecipitated from purified plasma membranes of {sup 32}P-labeled rat adipocytes are markedly heterogenous in their phosphorylation state. Approximately 80% of the plasma membrane receptors are solubilized in 1% (vol/vol) Triton X-100 and are phosphorylated on serine residues at a stoichiometry of {approx} 0.1-0.2 mol of phosphate per mol of receptor. In contrast, 15-20% of the receptors are Triton X-100-insoluble and are phosphorylated on serine and threonine residues at {approx} 4 or 5 mol of phosphate per mol of receptor. This Triton X-100-insoluble membrane subfraction contains only 5% of the total plasma membrane protein and yet contains all of the clathrin heavy chain associated with plasma membrane. Based on the relative yields of protein in the detergent-insoluble material, IGF-II/Man-6-P receptors are concentrated {approx} 3-fold in this clathrin-enriched subfraction. Taken together, these results indicate that insulin decreases the phosphorylation state of a highly phosphorylated subpopulation of IGF-II/Man-6-P receptors on the plasma membrane. In addition, insulin action may prevent the concentration of these receptors in a clathrin-enriched membrane subfraction.

  13. Transforming growth factor type beta 1 increases the expression of angiotensin II receptor type 2 by a SMAD- and p38 MAPK-dependent mechanism in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Painemal, Paula; Acuña, María José; Riquelme, Cecilia; Brandan, Enrique; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, a condition known as fibrosis, is a hallmark of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Among the factors that trigger muscle fibrosis are transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and angiotensin II (Ang-II). Ang-II belongs to the renin-angiotensin system, and its biological effects are exerted by Ang-II receptors type 1 and type 2 (AT-1 and AT-2, respectively). This study aims to determine the effect of TGF-β1 on the expression of AT-1 and AT-2 receptor in skeletal muscle. C2 C12 myoblasts exposed to TGF-β1 showed a dose-dependent increase in AT-2 expression but with no effect on AT-1 levels. Injection of TGF-β1 in the skeletal muscle of mice increased the levels of AT-2 and ECM protein but unchanged AT-1 levels. We also detected higher expression levels of AT-2 receptor in dystrophic skeletal muscle of mdx mice than in normal mice. The induction of AT-2 was mediated by the canonical TGF-β pathway because under the inhibitory conditions of the kinase activity of TGFβ receptor I or the knockdown of Smad2/3 levels, TGF-β-induced AT-2 receptor increase was strongly inhibited. Furthermore, we demonstrated that p38MAPK activity in response to TGF-β is also required for AT-2 increase as evaluated by a p38MAPK inhibitor. Our results show that the levels of AT-2 but not AT-1 receptor are modulated by the pro-fibrotic factor TGF-β1 in myoblasts and mouse skeletal muscle. This finding suggests that AT-2 might be involved in the physiopathology of fibrosis in dystrophic skeletal muscle.

  14. Interplay between microRNA-17-5p, insulin-like growth factor-II through binding protein-3 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Habashy, Danira Ashraf; El Tayebi, Hend Mohamed; Fawzy, Injie Omar; Hosny, Karim Adel; Esmat, Gamal; Abdelaziz, Ahmed Ihab

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effect of microRNA on insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and hence on insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) bioavailability in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS Bioinformatic analysis was performed using microrna.org, DIANA lab and Segal lab softwares. Total RNA was extracted from 23 HCC and 10 healthy liver tissues using mirVana miRNA Isolation Kit. microRNA-17-5p (miR-17-5p) expression was mimicked and antagonized in HuH-7 cell lines using HiPerFect Transfection Reagent, then total RNA was extracted using Biozol reagent then reverse transcribed into cDNA followed by quantification of miR-17-5p and IGFBP-3 expression using TaqMan real-time quantitative PCR. Luciferase reporter assay was performed to validate the binding of miR-17-5p to the 3’UTR of IGFBP-3. Free IGF-II protein was measured in transfected HuH-7 cells using IGF-II ELISA kit. RESULTS Bioinformatic analysis revealed IGFBP-3 as a potential target for miR-17-5p. Screening of miR-17-5p and IGFBP-3 revealed a moderate negative correlation in HCC patients, where miR-17-5p was extensively underexpressed in HCC tissues (P = 0.0012), while IGFBP-3 showed significant upregulation in the same set of patients (P = 0.0041) compared to healthy donors. Forcing miR-17-5p expression in HuH-7 cell lines showed a significant downregulation of IGFBP-3 mRNA expression (P = 0.0267) and a significant increase in free IGF-II protein (P = 0.0339) compared to mock untransfected cells using unpaired t-test. Luciferase assay validated IGFBP-3 as a direct target of miR-17-5p; luciferase activity was inhibited by 27.5% in cells co-transfected with miR-17-5p mimics and the construct harboring the wild-type binding region 2 of IGFBP-3 compared to cells transfected with this construct alone (P = 0.0474). CONCLUSION These data suggest that regulating IGF-II bioavailability and hence HCC progression can be achieved through targeting IGFBP-3 via manipulating the expression of mi

  15. Impaired angiogenesis in the remnant kidney model: II. Vascular endothelial growth factor administration reduces renal fibrosis and stabilizes renal function.

    PubMed

    Kang, D H; Hughes, J; Mazzali, M; Schreiner, G F; Johnson, R J

    2001-07-01

    Impaired angiogenesis and decreased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression were recently documented in the remnant kidney (RK) model of progressive renal failure. VEGF (50 microg/kg, twice daily) was administered to RK rats between weeks 4 and 8 after surgery, and rats were euthanized at week 8 for histologic study. During the administration of VEGF (n = 7) or vehicle (n = 6), systemic BP was comparable in the two groups. VEGF treatment resulted in improved renal function and lower mortality rates, compared with the vehicle-treated group. Renal histologic analyses confirmed a 3.5-fold increase in glomerular endothelial cell proliferation (0.14 +/- 0.03 versus 0.04 +/- 0.02 proliferating endothelial cells/glomerulus, VEGF versus vehicle, P < 0.05), a twofold increase in peritubular capillary endothelial cell proliferation (1.60 +/- 0.30 versus 0.78 +/- 0.17 cells/mm(2), VEGF versus vehicle, P < 0.01), a threefold decrease in peritubular capillary rarefaction (P < 0.01), and a twofold increase in endothelial nitrix oxide synthase expression (P < 0.05) in the VEGF-treated group; an eightfold increase in urinary nitrate/nitrite levels (P < 0.05) was also noted. Although the difference in glomerulosclerosis scores did not reach statistical significance (0.67 +/- 0.42 versus 1.22 +/- 0.63, VEGF versus vehicle; range, 0 to 4; P = NS), VEGF-treated rats exhibited less interstitial collagen type III deposition (9.32 +/- 3.26 versus 17.45 +/- 7.50%, VEGF versus vehicle, P < 0.01) and reduced tubular epithelial cell injury, as manifested by osteopontin expression (5.57 +/- 1.60 versus 9.58 +/- 3.45%, VEGF versus vehicle, P < 0.01). In conclusion, VEGF treatment reduces fibrosis and stabilizes renal function in the RK model. The use of angiogenic factors may represent a new approach to the treatment of kidney disease.

  16. Hepatocyte growth factor secreted by bone marrow stem cell reduce ER stress and improves repair in alveolar epithelial II cells

    PubMed Central

    Nita, Izabela; Hostettler, Katrin; Tamo, Luca; Medová, Michaela; Bombaci, Giuseppe; Zhong, Jun; Allam, Ramanjaneyulu; Zimmer, Yitzhak; Roth, Michael; Geiser, Thomas; Gazdhar, Amiq

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive, irreversible lung disease with complex pathophysiology. Evidence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been reported in alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) in IPF patients. Secreted mediators from bone marrow stem cells (BMSC-cm) have regenerative properties. In this study we investigate the beneficial effects of BMSC-cm on ER stress response in primary AEC and ER stressed A549 cells. We hypothesize that BMSC-cm reduces ER stress. Primary AEC isolated from IPF patients were treated with BMSC-cm. To induce ER stress A549 cells were incubated with Tunicamycin or Thapsigargin and treated with BMSC-cm, or control media. Primary IPF-AEC had high Grp78 and CHOP gene expression, which was lowered after BMSC-cm treatment. Similar results were observed in ER stressed A549 cells. Alveolar epithelial repair increased in presence of BMSC-cm in ER stressed A549 cells. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) was detected in biologically relevant levels in BMSC-cm. Neutralization of HGF in BMSC-cm attenuated the beneficial effects of BMSC-cm including synthesis of surfactant protein C (SP-C) in primary AEC, indicating a crucial role of HGF in ER homeostasis and alveolar epithelial repair. Our data suggest that BMSC-cm may be a potential therapeutic option for treating pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:28157203

  17. Mouse Genome-Wide Association Study of Preclinical Group II Pulmonary Hypertension Identifies Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Neil J; Radder, Josiah E; Baust, Jeffrey J; Burton, Christine L; Lai, Yen-Chun; Potoka, Karin C; Agostini, Brittani A; Wood, John P; Bachman, Timothy N; Vanderpool, Rebecca R; Dandachi, Nadine; Leme, Adriana S; Gregory, Alyssa D; Morris, Alison; Mora, Ana L; Gladwin, Mark T; Shapiro, Steven D

    2017-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with features of obesity and metabolic syndrome that translate to the induction of PH by chronic high-fat diet (HFD) in some inbred mouse strains. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify candidate genes associated with susceptibility to HFD-induced PH. Mice from 36 inbred and wild-derived strains were fed with regular diet or HFD for 20 weeks beginning at 6-12 weeks of age, after which right ventricular (RV) and left ventricular (LV) end-systolic pressure (ESP) and maximum pressure (MaxP) were measured by cardiac catheterization. We tested for association of RV MaxP and RV ESP and identified genomic regions enriched with nominal associations to both of these phenotypes. We excluded genomic regions if they were also associated with LV MaxP, LV ESP, or body weight. Genes within significant regions were scored based on the shortest-path betweenness centrality, a measure of network connectivity, of their human orthologs in a gene interaction network of human PH-related genes. WSB/EiJ, NON/ShiLtJ, and AKR/J mice had the largest increases in RV MaxP after high-fat feeding. Network-based scoring of GWAS candidates identified epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr) as having the highest shortest-path betweenness centrality of GWAS candidates. Expression studies of lung homogenate showed that EGFR expression is increased in the AKR/J strain, which developed a significant increase in RV MaxP after high-fat feeding as compared with C57BL/6J, which did not. Our combined GWAS and network-based approach adds evidence for a role for Egfr in murine PH.

  18. Bud detachment in hydra requires activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor and a Rho–ROCK–myosin II signaling pathway to ensure formation of a basal constriction

    PubMed Central

    Holz, Oliver; Apel, David; Steinmetz, Patrick; Lange, Ellen; Hopfenmüller, Simon; Ohler, Kerstin; Sudhop, Stefanie

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hydra propagates asexually by exporting tissue into a bud, which detaches 4 days later as a fully differentiated young polyp. Prerequisite for detachment is activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling. The mechanism which enables constriction and tissue separation within the monolayered ecto‐ and endodermal epithelia is unknown. Results: Histological sections and staining of F‐actin by phalloidin revealed conspicuous cell shape changes at the bud detachment site indicating a localized generation of mechanical forces and the potential enhancement of secretory functions in ectodermal cells. By gene expression analysis and pharmacological inhibition, we identified a candidate signaling pathway through Rho, ROCK, and myosin II, which controls bud base constriction and rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. Specific regional myosin phosphorylation suggests a crucial role of ectodermal cells at the detachment site. Inhibition of FGFR, Rho, ROCK, or myosin II kinase activity is permissive for budding, but represses myosin phosphorylation, rearrangement of F‐actin and constriction. The young polyp remains permanently connected to the parent by a broad tissue bridge. Conclusions: Our data suggest an essential role of FGFR and a Rho‐ROCK‐myosin II pathway in the control of cell shape changes required for bud detachment. Developmental Dynamics 246:502–516, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Developmental Dynamics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Anatomists PMID:28411398

  19. Clinical significance of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β gene expression in stage II/III gastric cancer with S-1 adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Akio; Oshima, Takashi; Yoshihara, Kazue; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Aoyama, Toru; Suganuma, Nobuyasu; Yamamoto, Naoto; Sato, Tsutomu; Cho, Haruhiko; Shiozawa, Manabu; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Rino, Yasushi; Kunisaki, Chikara; Imada, Toshio; Masuda, Munetaka

    2017-01-01

    Overall survival remains unsatisfactory in stage II/III gastric cancer, even after curative surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β) is associated with the proliferation of cancer cells. The present study therefore investigated the association of PDGFR-β gene expression with patient outcome in 134 stage II/III gastric cancer patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1. Relative PDGFR-β gene expression was measured in surgical cancer tissue and adjacent normal mucosa specimens by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The PDGFR-β gene expression levels were found to be significantly higher in the cancer tissues compared with the adjacent normal mucosa. A high level of PDGFR-β gene expression was associated with a significantly poorer 5-year overall survival rate compared with a low level of PDGFR-β expression. Upon multivariate analysis, PDGFR-β gene expression was found to be an independent predictor of survival. Overall, the study indicates that PDGFR-β overexpression in gastric cancer tissues is a useful independent predictor of outcome in patients with stage II/III gastric cancer who receive adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1.

  20. Molecular characterization and transcriptional regulation by GH and GnRH of insulin-like growth factors I and II in white seabream (Diplodus sargus).

    PubMed

    Pérez, Laura; Ortiz-Delgado, Juan Bosco; Manchado, Manuel

    2016-03-10

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGF) I and II are key regulators of development, growth and reproduction in fish. In the present study we have cloned and characterized the cDNA and genomic sequences of IGF-I and IGF-II in the white seabream (Diplodus sargus). The igf1 and igf2 genes were encoded putatively by five and four exons, respectively. Moreover, the 5'-flanking upstream region of the igf1 gene contained highly conserved regulatory elements including HNF-1α, HNF-3β, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) and the TATA box. The full-length cDNAs were 1225 and 1666 nucleotides long for igf1 and igf2, respectively. Sequence analysis identified the A-E domains as well as three spliced forms involving the E domain in exons 3-5. ORF identities were higher than 83% with respect to other fish orthologs. Expression analysis demonstrated that igf1 and its spliced forms were mostly expressed in liver, whereas the igf2 was expressed ubiquitously not detecting significant differences among the ten tissues analyzed. Hormonal treatments using the porcine GH demonstrated a sharply increase of both igf1 and igf2 mRNA levels in liver and gills at 30 min and 1h after injection. In the gonads, igf1 mRNA levels increased steadily with testis and ovary maturation. In contrast, igf2 transcript amounts were higher in immature stages (S1-S2). Hormonal treatments using GH and GnRH demonstrated that igf1 and igf2 expression were upregulated in the gonads. Overall, these data demonstrate that IGF-I and IGF-II are locally expressed in several tissues and regulated by key hormones of the somatotropic and gonadotropic axes.

  1. Rat mandibular distraction osteogenesis: II. Molecular analysis of transforming growth factor beta-1 and osteocalcin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Mehrara, B J; Rowe, N M; Steinbrech, D S; Dudziak, M E; Saadeh, P B; McCarthy, J G; Gittes, G K; Longaker, M T

    1999-02-01

    Distraction osteogenesis is a powerful technique capable of generating viable osseous tissue by the gradual separation of osteotomized bone edges. Although the histologic and ultrastructural changes associated with this process have been extensively delineated, the molecular events governing these changes remain essentially unknown. We have devised a rat model of mandibular distraction osteogenesis that facilitates molecular analysis of this process. Such information has significant clinical implications because it may enable targeted therapeutic manipulations designed to accelerate osseous regeneration. In this study, we have evaluated the expression of transforming growth factor beta-1, a major regulator of osteogenesis during endochondral bone formation and development, and osteocalcin, an abundant noncollagenous extracellular matrix protein implicated in the regulation of mineralization and bone turnover. The right hemimandible of 36 adult male rats was osteotomized, and a customized distraction device was applied. Animals were allowed to recover and, after a 3-day latency period, were distracted at a rate of 0.25 mm twice daily for 6 days followed by a 2- or 4-week consolidation period. Distraction regenerate was harvested after the latency period, days 2, 4, or 6 of distraction, and after 2 or 4 weeks of consolidation and processed for Northern analysis (n = 4 at each time point) and immunohistochemical localization of TGF-beta1 (n = 2 at each time point). Six sham-operated animals (i.e., skin incision without osteotomy) were also killed (immediately postoperatively), and the mandibles were harvested and prepared in a similar fashion. Equal loading and transfer of RNA for Northern analysis was ensured by stripping and probing membranes with a probe against GAPDH (a housekeeping gene). Our results demonstrate that the spatial and temporal patterns of TGF-beta1 mRNA expression and protein production coincide with osteoblast migration, differentiation, and

  2. Immunohistochemical localization of transforming growth factor-beta 1 in rats with experimental silicosis, alveolar type II hyperplasia, and lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, A. O.; Flanders, K. C.; Saffiotti, U.

    1993-01-01

    Immunohistochemical localization of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) was studied in the lungs of rats given crystalline silica or ferric oxide by single intratracheal instillation. Ferric oxide elicited no progressive granulomatous reaction, no epithelial hyperplasia, and no lung tumors; no demonstrable reactivity to TGF-beta 1 was observed. Silica induced a granulomatous reaction with progressive fibrosis, adjacent alveolar type II hyperplasia, and alveolar carcinomas. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies to synthetic peptides corresponding to the first 30 amino acids of mature TGF-beta 1, anti-LC (1-30), and anti-CC (1-30) were used for the localization of intracellular and extracellular TGF-beta 1. An antibody to a peptide corresponding to amino acids 266-278 of the TGF-beta 1 precursor sequence, anti-Pre (266-278), was used to detect the TGF-beta precursor and the latency-associated peptide. Intracellular mature TGF-beta (anti-LC) was demonstrated in fibroblasts and macrophages located at the periphery of silicotic granulomas and in fibroblasts adjacent to hyperplastic type II cells. Extracellular mature TGF-beta 1 was localized in the connective tissue matrix of the granulomas and in the stroma of both hyperplastic type II cells and well-differentiated adenocarcinomas. Immunoreactivity to anti-Pre was localized, intracellularly, in hyperplastic alveolar type II cells and their proliferative lesions adjacent to granulomas, in adenomas, but not in adenocarcinomas. The hyperplastic type II cells appear to be the sites of production and secretion of TGF-beta 1, which may regulate their own growth and differentiation and mediate the production of extracellular TGF-beta 1-associated matrix. The lack of reactivity to TGF-beta 1 precursor in the adenocarcinomas is consistent with the loss of normal cellular differentiation and function. TGF-beta 1 appears to have a pathogenetic role in silica-induced mesenchymal and epithelial lesions. The role of TGF-beta 1 and

  3. The bovine mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor. The role of arginine residues in mannose 6-phosphate binding.

    PubMed

    Dahms, N M; Rose, P A; Molkentin, J D; Zhang, Y; Brzycki, M A

    1993-03-15

    The extracytoplasmic region of the bovine cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor (M6P/IGF-II receptor) consists of 15 homologous repeating domains, each of which is approximately 147 residues in length. The receptor contains two high affinity mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P) binding sites and our recent studies (Westlund, B., Dahms, N. M., and Kornfeld, S. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 23233-23239) have localized these two binding sites to domains 1-3 and 7-11. To further define the location of the Man-6-P binding sites and to determine the role of specific arginine residues in Man-6-P binding, site-directed mutagenesis was utilized to create truncated soluble forms of the M6P/IGF-II receptor in conjunction with either conservative (Lys) or nonconservative (Ala) replacement of arginine residues. These mutants were expressed transiently in COS-1 cells and assayed for their ability to bind phosphomannosyl residues by affinity chromatography. Analysis of the ligand binding activity of carboxyl-terminal truncated forms of the receptor's extracytoplasmic region demonstrated that the second Man-6-P binding site is contained within domains 7-9. Substitution of Arg435 in domain 3 of the amino-terminal binding site and Arg1334 in domain 9 of the second binding site results in a dramatic loss of ligand binding activity. However, substitutions at positions 435 and/or 1334 did not affect the secretion, glycosylation, or immunoreactivity of these truncated proteins. Taken together, these results indicate that Arg435 and Arg1334 are essential components of the M6P/IGF-II receptor's high affinity Man-6-P binding sites.

  4. Effect of recombinant insulin-like growth factor-1 treatment on short-term linear growth in a child with Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II and hepatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Faienza, Maria Felicia; Acquafredda, Angelo; D'Aniello, Mariangela; Soldano, Lucia; Marzano, Flaviana; Ventura, Annamaria; Cavallo, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a boy affected by severe intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, microcephaly, facial dysmorphisms and postnecrotic cirrhosis, diagnosed at birth as having Seckel syndrome, and subsequently confirmed as Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) on the basis of clinical and radiological features of skeletal dysplasia. At our observation (6 years 7 months) he presented height -10.3 standard deviation score (SDS), weight -22.1 SDS, head circumference -8 SDS, delayed bone age of 4 years with respect to chronological age. In consideration of the low levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) as well as of hepatic insufficiency, we started the treatment with recombinant human IGF-1 (rhIGF-1) at the dose of 0.04 mg/kg in 2 doses/day, with an increase of 0.04 mg/kg after 1 week until the maximum dose of 0.12 mg/kg. We observed an early response to rhIGF-1 treatment, with a shift of height velocity from 1.8 cm/year (-4.6 SDS) at 4 cm/year (-1.9 SDS), and an increase in bone age of 1.5 years during the first 6 months. rhIGF-1 treatment does not seem to be able to replace the physiological action of IGF-1 in patients with MOPD II and hepatic insufficiency, however, it seems to preserve the typical growth pattern of MOPD II patients, avoiding a further widening of the growth deficiency in these subjects.

  5. Insulin-like growth factor II messenger RNA-binding protein-3 is an indicator of malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Katsumi; Yamamoto, Hidetaka; Taguchi, Kenichi; Ohno, Shinji; Tokunaga, Eriko; Yamashita, Nami; Kubo, Makoto; Nakamura, Masafumi; Oda, Yoshinao

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the clinicopathological and prognostic significance of the expressions of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein-3 (IMP3) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in phyllodes tumors (PTs). Immunohistochemical staining for IMP3 and EGFR was performed in 130 cases of primary PTs (83 benign, 28 borderline, 19 malignant), 34 recurrent/metastatic PTs, and 26 fibroadenomas (FAs). Among the primary tumors, a high expression of IMP3 was significantly more frequently present in malignant PTs (17/19, 89%) than in the FAs (0/26, 0%), benign PTs (0/83, 0%) and borderline PTs (3/28, 11%). The recurrent and metastatic lesions of malignant PTs also showed high IMP3 expression (3/5 [60%] and 6/6 [100%], respectively). Most malignant PTs showed strong IMP3 expression at the interductal area or more diffusely, whereas weak and focal (low) expression of IMP3 was limited to the periductal area in FAs and benign PTs. EGFR overexpression was significantly correlated with tumor grade and high IMP3 expression. Overexpressions of IMP3 and EGFR were significantly associated with shorter periods of metastasis-free and disease-free survival. The results suggest that high expressions of IMP3 and EGFR with a characteristic staining pattern may be helpful for both identifying malignant PT and predicting the prognosis of these tumors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Transforming growth factors type beta 1 and beta 2 suppress rat astrocyte autoantigen presentation and antagonize hyperinduction of class II major histocompatibility complex antigen expression by interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Schluesener, H J

    1990-04-01

    The transforming growth factors (TGF) type beta 1 and beta 2 are regulatory cytokines strongly affecting rat astrocyte immune functions. Both cytokines suppressed presentation of autoantigen by astrocytes: highly encephalitogenic T cells cocultured with TGF-beta-treated astrocytes in the presence of myelin basic protein did not become activated to transfer experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, a central nervous system (CNS) autoimmune disease. Furthermore, TGF-beta 1 and -beta 2 antagonized hyperinduction of astrocyte major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen expression by interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Thus, TGF-beta might be a potential regulator of CNS inflammation.

  7. Insulin-Like Growth Factor II mRNA-Binding Protein 3 Expression Correlates with Poor Prognosis in Acral Lentiginous Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Yi-Shuan; Liao, Yi-Hua; Lin, Ming-Hsien; Chiu, Hsien-Ching; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Liau, Jau-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-II mRNA-binding protein 3 (IMP-3) is an RNA-binding protein expressed in multiple cancers, including melanomas. However, the expression of IMP-3 has not been investigated in acral lentiginous melanoma (ALM). This study sought to elucidate its prognostic value in ALMs. IMP-3 expression was studied in 93 patients diagnosed with ALM via immunohistochemistry. Univariate and multivariate analyses for survival were performed, according to clinical and histologic parameters, using the Cox proportional hazard model. Survival curves were graphed using the Kaplan-Meier method. IMP-3 was over-expressed in 70 out of 93 tumors (75.3%). IMP-3 expression correlated with thick and high-stage tumor and predicted poorer overall, melanoma-specific, recurrence-free and distant metastasis-free survivals (P = 0.002, 0.006, 0.008 and 0.012, respectively). Further analysis showed that patients with tumor thickness ≤ 4.0 mm and positive IMP-3 expression had a significantly worse melanoma-specific survival than those without IMP-3 expression (P = 0.048). IMP-3 (hazard ratio 3.67, 95% confidence intervals 1.35–9.97, P = 0.011) was confirmed to be an independent prognostic factor for melanoma-specific survival in multivariate survival analysis. Positive IMP-3 expression was an important prognostic factor for ALMs. PMID:26796627

  8. [Fibroblast growth factor-2].

    PubMed

    Faitová, J

    2004-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-2 is a member of a large family of proteins that bind heparin and heparan sulfate and modulate the function of a wide range of cell types. FGF-2 occurs in several isoforms resulting from alternative initiations of traslation: an 18 kDa cytoplasmic isoform and four larger molecular weight nuclear isoforms (22, 22.5, 24 and 34 kDa). It acts mainly through a paracrine/autocrine mechanism involving high affinity transmembrane receptors and heparan sulfate proteoglycan low affinity receptors. It is expressed mostly in tissues of mesoderm and neuroectoderm origin, and plays an important role in mesoderm induction, stimulates the growth and development of the new blood vessels (angiogenesis), normal wound healing and tissue development. FGF-2 positively regulates hematopoiesis by acting on various cellular targets: stromal cells, early and committed hematopoietic progenitors and possibly some mature blood cells. FGF-2 is a potent hematopoietic growth factor that is likely to play an important role in physiological and pathological hematopoiesis.

  9. Type III Transforming Growth Factor-β Receptor Drives Cardiac Hypertrophy Through β-Arrestin2-Dependent Activation of Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jie; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Ling-Ling; Song, Shu-Ying; Li, Yan-Chao; Sun, Fei; Ding, Xiao-Qing; Yu, Chang-Jiang; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Mei-Tong; Dong, Chang-Jiang; Ji, Yong; Li, Hongliang; Chu, Wenfeng; Zhang, Zhi-Ren

    2016-09-01

    The role of type III transforming growth factor-β receptor (TβRIII) in the pathogenesis of heart diseases remains largely unclear. Here, we investigated the functional role and molecular mechanisms of TβRIII in the development of myocardial hypertrophy. Western blot and quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that the expression of TβRIII was significantly elevated in human cardiac hypertrophic samples. Consistently, TβRIII expression was substantially increased in transverse aortic constriction (TAC)- and isoproterenol-induced mouse cardiac hypertrophy in vivo and in isoproterenol-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in vitro. Overexpression of TβRIII resulted in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, whereas isoproterenol-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was greatly attenuated by knockdown of TβRIII in vitro. Cardiac-specific transgenic expression of TβRIII independently led to cardiac hypertrophy in mice, which was further aggravated by isoproterenol and TAC treatment. Cardiac contractile function of the mice was not altered in TβRIII transgenic mice; however, TAC led to significantly decreased cardiac contractile function in TβRIII transgenic mice compared with control mice. Conversely, isoproterenol- and TAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy and TAC-induced cardiac contractile function impairment were partially reversed by suppression of TβRIII in vivo. Our data suggest that TβRIII mediates stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy through activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, which requires a physical interaction of β-arrestin2 with both TβRIII and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Our findings indicate that stress-induced increase in TβRIII expression results in cardiac hypertrophy through β-arrestin2-dependent activation of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and that transforming growth factor-β and β-adrenergic receptor signaling are not involved in spontaneous cardiac hypertrophy in cardiac

  10. Transforming growth factor-beta receptor-II up-regulation during wound healing in previously irradiated graft beds in vivo.

    PubMed

    Schultze-Mosgau, Stefan; Wehrhan, Falk; Rödel, Franz; Amann, Kerstin; Radespiel-Tröger, Martin; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G

    2003-01-01

    Wound healing disorders may often present in patients with head and neck cancer after surgical interventions, particularly in preirradiated tissue. Inflammatory changes and the expression of cytokines can lead to induction of fibrosis. The isoforms of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta1-3) play a key role for this process. It has been shown that radiation treatment associated fibrosis is induced by TGFbeta1 and TGFbeta2, although the influence of radiation on the expression of the TGFbeta receptor-II (TGFbetaR-II) involved in the signal transduction of TGFbeta remains elusive. The objective of this in vivo study was to analyze the expression profile of TGFbetaR-II in the graft bed and in the transition area between graft and graft bed after surgery with and without prior radiation treatment to compare with the expression profiles of activated TGFbeta1 and latency-associated peptide. A total of 48 Wistar rats (male, weight 300-500 g) were used in the study. Eighteen rats were irradiated in the neck region (3 x 10 Gy) without transplantation. A free myocutaneous gracilis flap was transplanted in 30 rats, of which 16 animals were preirradiated in the neck region (3 x 10 Gy) and 14 animals were not irradiated at all. Tissue samples were taken postoperatively from the transition area between the graft and the graft bed and from the graft bed itself after 3, 7, 14, and 28 days. Tissue samples were taken from the irradiated neck region and the non-irradiated groin region 0, 4, 7, 11, 14, and 28 days after the end of the exposure. The expression of TGFbetaR-II, activated TGFbeta1 and latency-associated peptide was analyzed immunohistochemically both qualitatively and quantitatively (labeling index). The success rate for graft healing was 75% in the previously irradiated group with 30 Gy, and 86% in the non-irradiated group. Following radiation alone a significantly (p = 0.04) increased TGFbetaR-II expression in the neck was revealed 2-4 weeks following

  11. Metabolic function of branched-chain volatile fatty acids, growth factors for ruminococci. II. Biosynthesis of higher branched-chain fatty acids and aldehydes.

    PubMed

    ALLISON, M J; BRYANT, M P; KATZ, I; KEENEY, M

    1962-05-01

    Allison, M. J. (Dairy Cattle Research Branch, USDA, Beltsville, Md.), M. P. Bryant, I. Katz, and M. Keeney. Metabolic function of branched-chain volatile fatty acids, growth factors for ruminococci. II. Biosynthesis of higher branched-chain fatty acids and aldehydes. J. Bacteriol. 83:1084-1093. 1962.-A number of strains of rumen bacteria require branched-chain volatile fatty acids for growth. A strain of Ruminococcus flavefaciens that requires either isovalerate or isobutyrate incorporates radioactive carbon from isovalerate-1-C(14) and isovalerate-3-C(14) into leucine and into the lipid fraction of the cells. Evidence obtained by both paper and gas chromatography indicated that most of the label in the lipid of cells grown in isovalerate-1-C(14) was in a branched-chain 15-carbon fatty acid, with some in a 17-carbon acid; about 7.5% of the C(14) was recovered in a branched-chain 15-carbon aldehyde. The aldehydes were in the phospholipid fraction and were presumably present as plasmalogen.A strain of R. albus was shown to require isobutyrate, 2-methyl-n-butyrate, or 2-ketoisovalerate for growth. This strain did not incorporate appreciable C(14) from isovalerate-1-C(14) or isovalerate-3-C(14). When grown in a medium containing isobutyrate-1-C(14), most of the cellular C(14) was found in the lipid fraction. Analysis of the lipid demonstrated that the label was present mainly as branched-chain 14-carbon and 16-carbon fatty acids, with 11% of the C(14) present in 14- and 16-carbon carbonyl compounds, presumably branched-chain aldehydes.Branched-chain 14-, 15-, and 16-carbon fatty acids are major components of the lipids of these rumen bacteria. The possibility that these acids and aldehydes, which are found in ruminant body and milk lipids, may be of microbial origin is discussed.

  12. Prognostic value of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA binding protein 3 in patients treated with radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Chromecki, Thomas F; Cha, Eugene K; Pummer, Karl; Scherr, Douglas S; Tewari, Ashutosh K; Sun, Maxine; Fajkovic, Harun; Roehrborn, Claus G; Ashfaq, Raheela; Karakiewicz, Pierre I; Shariat, Shahrokh F

    2012-07-01

    Study Type - Prognosis (case series) Level of Evidence 4 What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA binding protein 3 (IMP3) is associated with poor outcomes in a variety of malignancies. The role of IMP3 in protate cancer remains poorly understood. IMP3 expression was associated with features of aggressive biology and aggressive prostate cancer recurrence after surgery. Although IMP3 is differentially expressed in patients with features of biologically aggressive prostate cancer, it does not have independent prognostic value in patients treated with RP. To evaluate the association of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA binding protein 3 (IMP3) with pathological features and outcomes in patients treated with radical prostatectomy (RP). Immunohistochemical staining for IMP3 was performed on archival tissue microarray specimens from 232 consecutive patients treated with RP for clinically localized disease. None of the patients received neoadjuvant or adjuvant radiation or hormone therapy. IMP3 expression was histologically categorized as normal or abnormal. Disease recurrence was classified as aggressive if metastases were present, post-recurrence prostate-specific antigen (PSA) doubling time was less than 10 months, or if the patients failed to respond to salvage local radiation therapy. The median follow-up was 69.8 months (interquartile range [IQR]: 40.1-99.5). IMP3 expression was abnormal in 42 (18.1%) of 232 patients. IMP3 expression was associated with extracapsular extension (P= 0.020), seminal vesicle invasion (P= 0.024), lymphovascular invasion (P= 0.036) and a high pathological Gleason score (P= 0.009). The 5-year PSA recurrence-free survival for IMP3-negative patients was 83% (standard error [SE]= 3) vs 67% (SE = 8) in IMP3-positive patients (log-rank test, P= 0.015). In a multivariable analysis that adjusted for the effects of surgical margins, extracapsular extension and seminal vesicle invasion, PSA

  13. Targeting hepatic heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) induces anti-hyperlipidemia leading to reduction of angiotensin II-induced aneurysm development.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seonwook; Yang, Lihua; Kim, Seongu; Lee, Richard G; Graham, Mark J; Berliner, Judith A; Lusis, Aldons J; Cai, Lei; Temel, Ryan E; Rateri, Debra L; Lee, Sangderk

    2017-01-01

    The upregulated expression of heparin binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) in the vessel and circulation is associated with risk of cardiovascular disease. In this study, we tested the effects of HB-EGF targeting using HB-EGF-specific antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) on the development of aortic aneurysm in a mouse aneurysm model. Low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) deficient mice (male, 16 weeks of age) were injected with control and HB-EGF ASOs for 10 weeks. To induce aneurysm, the mice were fed a high fat diet (22% fat, 0.2% cholesterol; w/w) at 5 week point of ASO administration and infused with angiotensin II (AngII, 1,000ng/kg/min) for the last 4 weeks of ASO administration. We confirmed that the HB-EGF ASO administration significantly downregulated HB-EGF expression in multiple tissues including the liver. Importantly, the HB-EGF ASO administration significantly suppressed development of aortic aneurysms including thoracic and abdominal types. Interestingly, the HB-EGF ASO administration induced a remarkable anti-hyperlipidemic effect by suppressing very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) level in the blood. Mechanistically, the HB-EGF targeting suppressed hepatic VLDL secretion rate without changing heparin-releasable plasma triglyceride (TG) hydrolytic activity or fecal neutral cholesterol excretion rate. This result suggested that the HB-EGF targeting induced protection against aneurysm development through anti-hyperlipidemic effects. Suppression of hepatic VLDL production process appears to be a key mechanism for the anti-hyperlipidemic effects by the HB-EGF targeting.

  14. Targeting hepatic heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) induces anti-hyperlipidemia leading to reduction of angiotensin II-induced aneurysm development

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seonwook; Yang, Lihua; Kim, Seongu; Lee, Richard G.; Graham, Mark J.; Berliner, Judith A.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Cai, Lei; Temel, Ryan E.; Rateri, Debra L.

    2017-01-01

    Objective The upregulated expression of heparin binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) in the vessel and circulation is associated with risk of cardiovascular disease. In this study, we tested the effects of HB-EGF targeting using HB-EGF-specific antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) on the development of aortic aneurysm in a mouse aneurysm model. Approach and results Low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) deficient mice (male, 16 weeks of age) were injected with control and HB-EGF ASOs for 10 weeks. To induce aneurysm, the mice were fed a high fat diet (22% fat, 0.2% cholesterol; w/w) at 5 week point of ASO administration and infused with angiotensin II (AngII, 1,000ng/kg/min) for the last 4 weeks of ASO administration. We confirmed that the HB-EGF ASO administration significantly downregulated HB-EGF expression in multiple tissues including the liver. Importantly, the HB-EGF ASO administration significantly suppressed development of aortic aneurysms including thoracic and abdominal types. Interestingly, the HB-EGF ASO administration induced a remarkable anti-hyperlipidemic effect by suppressing very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) level in the blood. Mechanistically, the HB-EGF targeting suppressed hepatic VLDL secretion rate without changing heparin-releasable plasma triglyceride (TG) hydrolytic activity or fecal neutral cholesterol excretion rate. Conclusion This result suggested that the HB-EGF targeting induced protection against aneurysm development through anti-hyperlipidemic effects. Suppression of hepatic VLDL production process appears to be a key mechanism for the anti-hyperlipidemic effects by the HB-EGF targeting. PMID:28792970

  15. Fibroblast Growth Factor 2-A Predictor of Outcome for Patients Irradiated for Stage II-III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Setter, Cornelia; Dahl, Olav; Schild, Steven E.; Noack, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The prognostic value of the tumor cell expression of the fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is unclear. The present study investigated the effect of tumor cell expression of FGF-2 on the outcome of 60 patients irradiated for Stage II-III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: The effect of FGF-2 expression and 13 additional factors on locoregional control (LRC), metastasis-free survival (MFS), and overall survival (OS) were retrospectively evaluated. These additional factors included age, gender, Karnofsky performance status, histologic type, histologic grade, T and N category, American Joint Committee on Cancer stage, surgery, chemotherapy, pack-years, smoking during radiotherapy, and hemoglobin during radiotherapy. Locoregional failure was identified by endoscopy or computed tomography. Univariate analyses were performed with the Kaplan-Meier method and the Wilcoxon test and multivariate analyses with the Cox proportional hazard model. Results: On univariate analysis, improved LRC was associated with surgery (p = .017), greater hemoglobin levels (p = .036), and FGF-2 negativity (p <.001). On multivariate analysis of LRC, surgery (relative risk [RR], 2.44; p = .037), and FGF-2 expression (RR, 5.06; p <.001) maintained significance. On univariate analysis, improved MFS was associated with squamous cell carcinoma (p = .020), greater hemoglobin levels (p = .007), and FGF-2 negativity (p = .001). On multivariate analysis of MFS, the hemoglobin levels (RR, 2.65; p = .019) and FGF-2 expression (RR, 3.05; p = .004) were significant. On univariate analysis, improved OS was associated with a lower N category (p = .048), greater hemoglobin levels (p <.001), and FGF-2 negativity (p <.001). On multivariate analysis of OS, greater hemoglobin levels (RR, 4.62; p = .002) and FGF-2 expression (RR, 3.25; p = .002) maintained significance. Conclusions: Tumor cell expression of FGF-2 appeared to be an independent negative predictor

  16. Crosstalk between insulin-like growth factor-1 and angiotensin-II in dopaminergic neurons and glial cells: role in neuroinflammation and aging

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Perez, Ana I.; Borrajo, Ana; Diaz-Ruiz, Carmen; Garrido-Gil, Pablo; Labandeira-Garcia, Jose L.

    2016-01-01

    The local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) have been involved in longevity, neurodegeneration and aging-related dopaminergic degeneration. However, it is not known whether IGF-1 and angiotensin-II (AII) activate each other. In the present study, AII, via type 1 (AT1) receptors, exacerbated neuroinflammation and dopaminergic cell death. AII, via AT1 receptors, also increased the levels of IGF-1 and IGF-1 receptors in microglial cells. IGF-1 inhibited RAS activity in dopaminergic neurons and glial cells, and also inhibited the AII-induced increase in markers of the M1 microglial phenotype. Consistent with this, IGF-1 decreased dopaminergic neuron death induced by the neurotoxin MPP+ both in the presence and in the absence of glia. Intraventricular administration of AII to young rats induced a significant increase in IGF-1 expression in the nigral region. However, aged rats showed decreased levels of IGF-1 relative to young controls, even though RAS activity is known to be enhanced in aged animals. The study findings show that IGF-1 and the local RAS interact to inhibit or activate neuroinflammation (i.e. transition from the M1 to the M2 phenotype), oxidative stress and dopaminergic degeneration. The findings also show that this mechanism is impaired in aged animals. PMID:27167199

  17. Insulin-Like Growth Factor II mRNA-Binding Protein 3 (IMP3) as a Useful Immunohistochemical Marker for the Diagnosis of Adenocarcinoma of Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Daikuhara, Seiichi; Uehara, Takeshi; Higuchi, Kayoko; Hosaka, Noriko; Iwaya, Mai; Maruyama, Yasuhiro; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Arakura, Norikazu; Tanaka, Eiji; Ota, Hiroyoshi

    2015-01-01

    The biological characteristics and roles of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 3 protein (IMP3) expression in small-intestinal adenocarcinoma were investigated. The value of IMP3 immunostaining in the diagnosis of small-intestinal epithelial lesions was also evaluated. Immunohistochemical expression of IMP3 in normal small-intestinal mucosa adjacent to adenoma and adenocarcinoma lesions, and inflamed duodenal and ileal mucosa was analyzed. Samples assessed were: duodenal ulcer (n=6), Crohn’s disease (n=5), low-grade small-intestinal adenoma (n=10), high-grade small-intestinal adenoma (n=13), small-intestinal adenocarcinoma (n=23), lymph node metastases (LNM; n=7), and preoperative biopsies of small-intestinal adenocarcinoma (n=6). Immunohistochemical expression of Ki-67 and p53 was also analyzed in adenoma and adenocarcinoma samples. IMP3 was not expressed in normal epithelium, but weakly expressed in reparative epithelium. Meanwhile, increased IMP3 expression was associated with a higher degree of dysplasia in adenomas, higher T classification, LNM, Ki-67 positivity, histological differentiation, and lower 5-year disease-free survival, but not p53 expression in adenocarcinoma. IMP3 expression appears to be a late event in the small-intestinal carcinogenesis. Assessing the IMP3 staining pattern can be useful in the diagnosis of small-intestinal epithelial lesions when used in conjunction with other histological criteria. PMID:26855452

  18. Phosphorylation of the type II transmembrane serine protease, TMPRSS13, in hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor-1 and -2-mediated cell-surface localization.

    PubMed

    Murray, Andrew S; Varela, Fausto A; Hyland, Thomas E; Schoenbeck, Andrew J; White, Jordan M; Tanabe, Lauren M; Todi, Sokol V; List, Karin

    2017-09-08

    TMPRSS13 is a member of the type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) family. Although various TTSPs have been characterized in detail biochemically and functionally, the basic properties of TMPRSS13 remain unclear. Here, we investigate the activation, inhibition, post-translational modification, and localization of TMPRSS13. We show that TMPRSS13 is a glycosylated, active protease and that its own proteolytic activity mediates zymogen cleavage. Full-length, active TMPRSS13 exhibits impaired cell-surface expression in the absence of the cognate Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitors, hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor (HAI)-1 or HAI-2. Concomitant presence of TMPRSS13 with either HAI-1 or -2 mediates phosphorylation of residues in the intracellular domain of the protease, and it coincides with efficient transport of the protease to the cell surface and its subsequent shedding. Cell-surface labeling experiments indicate that the dominant form of TMPRSS13 on the cell surface is phosphorylated, whereas intracellular TMPRSS13 is predominantly non-phosphorylated. These data provide novel insight into the cellular properties of TMPRSS13 and highlight phosphorylation of TMPRSS13 as a novel post-translational modification of this TTSP family member and potentially other members of this family of proteases. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Acetyl-L-carnitine rescues scopolamine-induced memory deficits by restoring insulin-like growth factor II via decreasing p53 oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Wang, Liang-Ping; Tang, Hui; Shan, Wan-Ying; Wang, Xiong; Liu, Dan; Wu, Yuan-Yuan; Tian, Qing; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Zhu, Ling-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the cholinergic neurons loss and impairments of learning and memory. Scopolamine is common used to imitate AD pathological features and also causes an obvious oxidative stress. In this study, we found that intraperitoneal administration of supplementary acetyl-L-carnitine partially reverses the learning and memory defects induced by scopolamine. We also found that acetyl-L-carnitine reverses the impairment of long-term potentiation, dendritic abnormalities, and the impaired recruitment of synaptic protein. The beneficial effects of acetyl-L-carnitine may occur through amelioration of oxidative stress because it effectively decreases the levels of oxidative products and increases the activity of superoxide dismutase; this leads to a recovery in the suppressed activity of p53 caused oxidative stimuli, which in turn restores levels of insulin-like growth factor II, an important hormone for learning and memory. Our study provides the first evidence of the potential utility of acetyl-L-carnitine in treating the synaptic disorders prevalent in AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Synaptic Basis of Neurodegenerative Disorders'.

  20. Gene expression of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and its type II receptor in giant cell tumors of bone. Possible involvement in osteoclast-like cell migration.

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, M. H.; Fan, Y.; Wysocki, S. J.; Lau, A. T.; Robertson, T.; Beilharz, M.; Wood, D. J.; Papadimitriou, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is a relatively rare skeletal neoplasm characterized by multinuclear giant cells (osteoclast-like cells) scattered in a mass of mononuclear cells. The currently favored hypothesis for the origin of cells within GCT is that the multinuclear giant cells are reactive osteoclasts, whereas the truly neoplastic cells are the major component of the mononuclear population. However, the pathological significance and the precise relationship of tumor cells and osteoclast-like cells in GCT have not been fully established. In this study, we evaluated two GCTs for the presence of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and TGF-beta type II receptor gene transcripts and attempted to establish a possible role for TGF-beta 1 in the interaction between tumor cells and osteoclast-like cells. By using in situ hybridization and Northern blot analysis, we have demonstrated that TGF-beta 1 mRNA transcript is consistently detected in both tumor mononuclear cells and osteoclast-like cells, whereas TGF-beta type II receptor gene transcript is only present in osteoclast-like cells. Moreover, isolated rat osteoclasts were tested for their ability to migrate in response to GCT-conditioned medium (GCTCM) in an in vitro chemotactic assay. Our results showed that GCTCM stimulates the migration of osteoclasts in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, only osteoclasts containing less than three nuclei can migrate through 12-mu pore filters. Addition of monoclonal antibody against TGF-beta significantly reduced but did not abolish the chemotactic activity of GCTCM. Moreover, TGF-beta type II receptor mRNA has been demonstrated in the normal rat osteoclasts and may be involved in the chemotactic action of TGF-beta 1. We concluded that TGF-beta 1, possibly in concert with other cytokines, is involved in the recruitment of osteoclast-like cells in GCT by acting in an autocrine or paracrine fashion. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6

  1. Growth hormone, growth factors, and acromegaly

    SciTech Connect

    Ludecke, D.K.; Tolis, G.T.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains five sections, each consisting of several papers. The section headings are: Biochemistry and Physiology of GH and Growth Factors, Pathology of Acromegaly, Clinical Endocrinology of Acromegaly, Nonsurgical Therapy of Acromegaly, and Surgical Therapy of Acromegaly.

  2. Angiogenic growth factors in preinvasive breast disease.

    PubMed

    Heffelfinger, S C; Miller, M A; Yassin, R; Gear, R

    1999-10-01

    Recently, we showed that preinvasive breast pathologies, such as usual hyperplasia, atypical hyperplasia, and carcinoma in situ, have an increased vascularity when compared with normal breast tissue (S. C. Heffelfinger et al., Clinical Cancer Res., 2: 1873-1878, 1996). To understand the mechanism of this increased vascularity, we examined by immunohistochemistry each of these pathological lesions for the expression of angiogenic growth factors. These studies showed that normal breast tissue contains numerous angiogenic agents, particularly vascular endothelial cell growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor. At the transition from normal epithelium to proliferative breast disease, insulin-like growth factor (IGF) II expression was increased, primarily in the stroma and infiltrating leukocytes. However, among proliferative tissues, IGF I decreased with increasing vascularity. Finally, both epithelial vascular endothelial growth factor and epithelial and leukocytic platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor increased at the transition to carcinoma in situ, whereas stromal and leukocytic basic fibroblast growth factor were elevated only in invasive carcinoma. Therefore, during histological progression there is also a complex progression of angiogenic growth factors. For CIS, two forms of vascularity are found: stromal microvascular density (MVD), and vascularity associated with the epithelial basement membrane (vascular score). There was 35% discordance between these two measurement systems. Among carcinoma in situ cases, decreases in stromal IGF II were associated with increasing vascular scores but not MVD, and increases in platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor were associated with increasing MVD but not the vascular score. The presence of discordance and differential association with specific angiogenic agents suggests that these two forms of vascularity may be differentially regulated.

  3. Activation of Casein Kinase II and Inhibition of Phosphatase and Tensin Homologue Deleted on Chromosome 10 Phosphatase by Nerve Growth Factor/p75NTR Inhibit Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β and Stimulate Axonal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Arevalo, María-Angeles

    2006-01-01

    Axonal elongation and guidance are controlled by extracellular factors such as the neurotrophins. Indeed, nerve growth factor (NGF) seems to promote axon growth through binding to its p75NTR receptor and inactivating RhoA. Furthermore, the local inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β by NGF also favors microtubule polymerization and axon extension. Inactivation of GSK-3β may be due to the NGF/TrkA-mediated activation of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI-3 kinase), which increases the levels of phosphatydilinositol 3-phosphate [PI(3)P]. However, we show here that NGF may inactivate GSK-3β through an alternative mechanism. In cultured hippocampal neurons, the capacity of NGF to promote axon elongation is mostly mediated by p75NTR, and the activation of this pathway leads to the inactivation of GSK-3β. However, the signaling pathway triggered by NGF/p75NTR acts through casein kinase II (CK2). NGF/p75NTR-activated CK2 phosphorylates the phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), thus rendering this phosphatase inactive. Like activation of the PI-3 kinase, PTEN inactivation allows PI(3)P levels to increase, thus favoring GSK-3β inactivation and axon outgrowth. This newly disclosed mechanism may help to extend the repertoire of pharmacological agents that activate CK2 or that inhibit PTEN to stimulate axon regeneration after trauma or disease. PMID:16723502

  4. Angiotensin II causes weight loss and decreases circulating insulin-like growth factor I in rats through a pressor-independent mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Brink, M; Wellen, J; Delafontaine, P

    1996-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system regulates normal cardiovascular homeostasis and is activated in certain forms of hypertension and in heart failure. Angiotensin II has multiple physiological effects and we have shown recently that its growth-promoting effects on vascular smooth muscle require autocrine activation of the IGF I receptor. To study the effect of angiotensin II on circulating IGF I, we infused rats with 500 ng/kg/min angiotensin II for up to 14 d. Angiotensin II markedly reduced plasma IGF I levels (56 and 41% decrease at 1 and 2 wk, respectively) and IGF binding protein-3 levels, and increased IGF binding protein-2 levels, a pattern suggestive of dietary restriction. Compared with sham, angiotensin II-infused hypertensive rats lost 18-26% of body weight by 1 wk, and pair-feeding experiments indicated that 74% of this loss was attributable to a reduction in food intake. The vasodilator hydralazine and the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan had comparable effects to reverse angiotensin II-induced hypertension, but only losartan blocked the changes in body weight and in circulating IGF I and its binding proteins produced by angiotensin II. Moreover, in Dahl rats that were hypertensive in response to a high-salt diet, none of these changes occurred. Thus, angiotensin II produces weight loss through a pressor-independent mechanism that includes a marked anorexigenic effect and an additional (likely metabolic) effect. These findings have profound implications for understanding the pathophysiology of conditions, such as congestive heart failure, in which the renin-angiotensin system is activated. PMID:8647943

  5. Solar Ultraviolet Irradiation Reduces Collagen in Photoaged Human Skin by Blocking Transforming Growth Factor-β Type II Receptor/Smad Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Taihao; He, Tianyuan; Kang, Sewon; Voorhees, John J.; Fisher, Gary J.

    2004-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation from the sun reduces production of type I procollagen (COLI), the major structural protein in human skin. This reduction is a key feature of the pathophysiology of premature skin aging (photoaging). Photoaging is the most common form of skin damage and is associated with skin carcinoma. TGF-β/Smad pathway is the major regulator of type I procollagen synthesis in human skin. We have previously reported that UV irradiation impairs transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad signaling in mink lung epithelial cells. We have investigated the mechanism of UV irradiation impairment of the TGF-β/Smad pathway and the impact of this impairment on type I procollagen production in human skin fibroblasts, the major collagen-producing cells in skin. We report here that UV irradiation impairs TGF-β/Smad pathway in human skin by down-regulation of TGF-β type II receptor (TβRII). This loss of TβRII occurs within 8 hours after UV irradiation and precedes down-regulation of type I procollagen expression in human skin in vivo. In human skin fibroblasts, UV-induced TβRII down-regulation is mediated by transcriptional repression and results in 90% reduction of specific, cell-surface binding of TGF-β. This loss of TβRII prevents downstream activation of Smad2/3 by TGF-β, thereby reducing expression of type I procollagen. Preventing loss of TβRII by overexpression protects against UV inhibition of type I procollagen gene expression in human skin fibroblasts. UV-induced down-regulation of TβRII, with attendant reduction of type I procollagen production, is a critical molecular mechanism in the pathophysiology of photoaging. PMID:15331399

  6. Overexpression of tumor vascular endothelial growth factor A may portend an increased likelihood of progression in a phase II trial of bevacizumab and erlotinib in resistant ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Setsuko K; Clouser, Mary C; Baker, Amanda F; Roe, Denise J; Cui, Haiyan; Brewer, Molly A; Hatch, Kenneth D; Gordon, Michael S; Janicek, Mike F; Isaacs, Jeffrey D; Gordon, Alan N; Nagle, Raymond B; Wright, Heather M; Cohen, Janice L; Alberts, David S

    2010-11-01

    This phase II trial evaluated bevacizumab plus erlotinib in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer; exploratory biomarker analyses, including that of tumor vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), were also done. Forty heavily pretreated patients received erlotinib (150 mg/d orally) and bevacizumab (10 mg/kg i.v.) every 2 weeks until disease progression. Primary end points were objective response rate and response duration; secondary end points included progression-free survival (PFS), toxicity, and correlations between angiogenic protein levels, toxicity, and efficacy. Grade 3 toxicities included skin rash (n = 6), diarrhea (n = 5), fatigue (n = 4), and hypertension (n = 3). Grade 4 toxicities were myocardial infarction (n = 1) and nasal septal perforation (n = 1). Only one grade 3 fistula and one grade 2 bowel perforation were observed. Nine (23.1%) of 39 evaluable patients had a response (median duration, 36.1+ weeks; one complete response), and 10 (25.6%) patients achieved stable disease, for a disease control rate of 49%. Median PFS was 4 months, and 6-month PFS was 30.8%. Biomarker analyses identified an association between tumor cell VEGF-A expression and progression (P = 0.03); for every 100-unit increase in the VEGF-A score, there was a 3.7-fold increase in the odds of progression (95% confidence interval, 1.1-16.6). Bevacizumab plus erlotinib in heavily pretreated ovarian cancer patients was clinically active and well tolerated. Erlotinib did not seem to contribute to efficacy. Our study raises the intriguing possibility that high levels of tumor cell VEGF-A, capable of both autocrine and paracrine interactions, are associated with resistance to bevacizumab, emphasizing the complexity of the tumor microenvironment. ©2010 AACR.

  7. Association of chromosome arm 16q loss with loss of imprinting of insulin-like growth factor-II in Wilms tumor.

    PubMed

    Mummert, Stephanie K; Lobanenkov, Victor A; Feinberg, Andrew P

    2005-06-01

    The most common known molecular defect in Wilms tumor (WT) of the kidney, the most frequent solid tumor of childhood, is loss of imprinting (LOI) of the insulin-like growth factor-II gene (IGF2), which involves activation of the normally silent maternal allele of the gene and hypermethylation of a differentially methylated region upstream of the H19 gene. Hypermethylation impairs binding of the insulator protein CTCF, allowing activation of IGF2 by an enhancer shared between IGF2 and H19. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of 16q22.1 is found in 15% of WTs, and 16q22.1 harbors CTCF, raising the possibility that reduced CTCF could lead to LOI of IGF2 in some cases. We hypothesized that there is an association between LOH of 16q and LOI of IGF2 in WT. In 40 WTs examined, LOH of 16q was found in five, one of which also showed LOH of 11p15. All of the remaining four tumors showed LOI of IGF2, compared to 13 of 32 WTs without LOH of 16q or 11p (P = 0.040). When published data not previously analyzed in this manner were included, 6 of 6 tumors with 16q LOH (and without LOH of 11p) showed LOI of IGF2, compared to 24 of 52 without LOH (P = 0.015). Thus, a genetic (16q LOH) and an epigenetic (LOI of IGF2) alteration in WT are linked, the first such association described. Finally, haploinsufficiency of CTCF may be the basis of this association, given that CTCF expression in tumors with 16q LOH was 48% that of tumors without LOH.

  8. Endogenous interleukin-22 protects against inflammatory bowel disease but not autoimmune cholangitis in dominant negative form of transforming growth factor beta receptor type II mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, G-X; Sun, Y; Tsuneyama, K; Zhang, W; Leung, P S C; He, X-S; Ansari, A A; Bowlus, C; Ridgway, W M; Gershwin, M E

    2016-08-01

    During chronic inflammation, interleukin (IL)-22 expression is up-regulated in both CD4 and CD8 T cells, exerting a protective role in infections. However, in autoimmunity, IL-22 appears to have either a protective or a pathogenic role in a variety of murine models of autoimmunity and, by extrapolation, in humans. It is not clear whether IL-22 itself mediates inflammation or is a by-product of inflammation. We have taken advantage of the dominant negative form of transforming growth factor beta receptor type II (dnTGF-βRII) mice that develop both inflammatory bowel disease and autoimmune cholangitis and studied the role and the biological function of IL-22 by generating IL-22(-/-) dnTGF-βRII mice. Our data suggest that the influence of IL-22 on autoimmunity is determined in part by the local microenvironment. In particular, IL-22 deficiency exacerbates tissue injury in inflammatory bowel disease, but has no influence on either the hepatocytes or cholangiocytes in the same model. These data take on particular significance in the previously defined effects of IL-17A, IL-12p40 and IL-23p19 deficiency and emphasize that, in colitis, there is a dominant role of IL-23/T helper type 17 (Th17) signalling. Furthermore, the levels of IL-22 are IL-23-dependent. The use of cytokine therapy in patients with autoimmune disease has significant potential, but must take into account the overlapping and often promiscuous effects that can theoretically exacerbate inflammation. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  9. Differential Regulation of Smad3 and of the Type II Transforming Growth Factor-β Receptor in Mitosis: Implications for Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hirschhorn, Tal; Barizilay, Lior; Smorodinsky, Nechama I.; Ehrlich, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    The response to transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) depends on cellular context. This context is changed in mitosis through selective inhibition of vesicle trafficking, reduction in cell volume and the activation of mitotic kinases. We hypothesized that these alterations in cell context may induce a differential regulation of Smads and TGF-β receptors. We tested this hypothesis in mesenchymal-like ovarian cancer cells, arrested (or not) in mitosis with 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2). In mitosis, without TGF-β stimulation, Smad3 was phosphorylated at the C-terminus and linker regions and localized to the mitotic spindle. Phosphorylated Smad3 interacted with the negative regulators of Smad signaling, Smurf2 and Ski, and failed to induce a transcriptional response. Moreover, in cells arrested in mitosis, Smad3 levels were progressively reduced. These phosphorylations and reduction in the levels of Smad3 depended on ERK activation and Mps1 kinase activity, and were abrogated by increasing the volume of cells arrested in mitosis with hypotonic medium. Furthermore, an Mps1-dependent phosphorylation of GFP-Smad3 was also observed upon its over-expression in interphase cells, suggesting a mechanism of negative regulation which counters increases in Smad3 concentration. Arrest in mitosis also induced a block in the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of the type II TGF-β receptor (TβRII). Moreover, following the stimulation of mitotic cells with TGF-β, the proteasome-mediated attenuation of TGF-β receptor activity, the degradation and clearance of TβRII from the plasma membrane, and the clearance of the TGF-β ligand from the medium were compromised, and the C-terminus phosphorylation of Smad3 was prolonged. We propose that the reduction in Smad3 levels, its linker phosphorylation, and its association with negative regulators (observed in mitosis prior to ligand stimulation) represent a signal attenuating mechanism. This mechanism is balanced by the retention of active TGF

  10. Differential regulation of Smad3 and of the type II transforming growth factor-β receptor in mitosis: implications for signaling.

    PubMed

    Hirschhorn, Tal; Barizilay, Lior; Smorodinsky, Nechama I; Ehrlich, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    The response to transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) depends on cellular context. This context is changed in mitosis through selective inhibition of vesicle trafficking, reduction in cell volume and the activation of mitotic kinases. We hypothesized that these alterations in cell context may induce a differential regulation of Smads and TGF-β receptors. We tested this hypothesis in mesenchymal-like ovarian cancer cells, arrested (or not) in mitosis with 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2). In mitosis, without TGF-β stimulation, Smad3 was phosphorylated at the C-terminus and linker regions and localized to the mitotic spindle. Phosphorylated Smad3 interacted with the negative regulators of Smad signaling, Smurf2 and Ski, and failed to induce a transcriptional response. Moreover, in cells arrested in mitosis, Smad3 levels were progressively reduced. These phosphorylations and reduction in the levels of Smad3 depended on ERK activation and Mps1 kinase activity, and were abrogated by increasing the volume of cells arrested in mitosis with hypotonic medium. Furthermore, an Mps1-dependent phosphorylation of GFP-Smad3 was also observed upon its over-expression in interphase cells, suggesting a mechanism of negative regulation which counters increases in Smad3 concentration. Arrest in mitosis also induced a block in the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of the type II TGF-β receptor (TβRII). Moreover, following the stimulation of mitotic cells with TGF-β, the proteasome-mediated attenuation of TGF-β receptor activity, the degradation and clearance of TβRII from the plasma membrane, and the clearance of the TGF-β ligand from the medium were compromised, and the C-terminus phosphorylation of Smad3 was prolonged. We propose that the reduction in Smad3 levels, its linker phosphorylation, and its association with negative regulators (observed in mitosis prior to ligand stimulation) represent a signal attenuating mechanism. This mechanism is balanced by the retention of active TGF

  11. Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC) 022: A Phase II Trial of Neratinib for Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Rachel A; Gelman, Rebecca S; Wefel, Jeffrey S; Melisko, Michelle E; Hess, Kenneth R; Connolly, Roisin M; Van Poznak, Catherine H; Niravath, Polly A; Puhalla, Shannon L; Ibrahim, Nuhad; Blackwell, Kimberly L; Moy, Beverly; Herold, Christina; Liu, Minetta C; Lowe, Alarice; Agar, Nathalie Y R; Ryabin, Nicole; Farooq, Sarah; Lawler, Elizabeth; Rimawi, Mothaffar F; Krop, Ian E; Wolff, Antonio C; Winer, Eric P; Lin, Nancy U

    2016-03-20

    Evidence-based treatments for metastatic, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer in the CNS are limited. Neratinib is an irreversible inhibitor of erbB1, HER2, and erbB4, with promising activity in HER2-positive breast cancer; however, its activity in the CNS is unknown. We evaluated the efficacy of treatment with neratinib in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer brain metastases in a multicenter, phase II open-label trial. Eligible patients were those with HER2-positive brain metastases (≥ 1 cm in longest dimension) who experienced progression in the CNS after one or more line of CNS-directed therapy, such as whole-brain radiotherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, and/or surgical resection. Patients received neratinib 240 mg orally once per day, and tumors were assessed every two cycles. The primary endpoint was composite CNS objective response rate (ORR), requiring all of the following: ≥ 50% reduction in volumetric sum of target CNS lesions and no progression of non-target lesions, new lesions, escalating corticosteroids, progressive neurologic signs/symptoms, or non-CNS progression--the threshold for success was five of 40 responders. Forty patients were enrolled between February 2012 and June 2013; 78% of patients had previous whole-brain radiotherapy. Three women achieved a partial response (CNS objective response rate, 8%; 95% CI, 2% to 22%). The median number of cycles received was two (range, one to seven cycles), with a median progression-free survival of 1.9 months. Five women received six or more cycles. The most common grade ≥ 3 event was diarrhea (occurring in 21% of patients taking prespecified loperamide prophylaxis and 28% of those without prophylaxis). Patients in the study experienced a decreased quality of life over time. Although neratinib had low activity and did not meet our threshold for success, 12.5% of patients received six or more cycles. Studies combining neratinib with chemotherapy in patients

  12. Interstitial fibrosis and growth factors.

    PubMed Central

    Lasky, J A; Brody, A R

    2000-01-01

    Interstitial pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is scarring of the lung caused by a variety of inhaled agents including mineral particles, organic dusts, and oxidant gases. The disease afflicts millions of individuals worldwide, and there are no effective therapeutic approaches. A major reason for this lack of useful treatments is that few of the molecular mechanisms of disease have been defined sufficiently to design appropriate targets for therapy. Our laboratory has focused on the molecular mechanisms through which three selected peptide growth factors could play a role in the development of IPF. Hundreds of growth factors and cytokines could be involved in the complex disease process. We are studying platelet-derived growth factor because it is the most potent mesenchymal cell mitogen yet described, transforming growth factor beta because it is a powerful inducer of extracellular matrix (scar tissue) components by mesenchymal cells, and tumor necrosis factor alpha because it is a pleiotropic cytokine that we and others have shown is essential for the development of IPF in animal models. This review describes some of the evidence from studies in humans, in animal models, and in vitro, that supports the growth factor hypothesis. The use of modern molecular and transgenic technologies could elucidate those targets that will allow effective therapeutic approaches. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10931794

  13. Growth factors in synaptic function

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Vivian Y.; Choi, Sojoong; Park, Mikyoung

    2013-01-01

    Synapses are increasingly recognized as key structures that malfunction in disorders like schizophrenia, mental retardation, and neurodegenerative diseases. The importance and complexity of the synapse has fuelled research into the molecular mechanisms underlying synaptogenesis, synaptic transmission, and plasticity. In this regard, neurotrophic factors such as netrin, Wnt, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and others have gained prominence for their ability to regulate synaptic function. Several of these factors were first implicated in neuroprotection, neuronal growth, and axon guidance. However, their roles in synaptic development and function have become increasingly clear, and the downstream signaling pathways employed by these factors have begun to be elucidated. In this review, we will address the role of these factors and their downstream effectors in synaptic function in vivo and in cultured neurons. PMID:24065916

  14. Circulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as predictive factor of progression-free survival in patients with advanced chordoma receiving sorafenib: an analysis from a phase II trial of the french sarcoma group (GSF/GETO)

    PubMed Central

    Lebellec, Loic; Bertucci, François; Tresch-Bruneel, Emmanuelle; Bompas, Emmanuelle; Toiron, Yves; Camoin, Luc; Mir, Olivier; Laurence, Valerie; Clisant, Stephanie; Decoupigny, Emilie; Blay, Jean-Yves; Goncalves, Anthony; Penel, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with advanced chordoma are often treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors without any predictive factor to guide decision. We report herein an ancillary analysis of the the Angionext phase II trial (NCT 00874874). Results From May 2011 to January 2014, 26 were sampled. The 9-month PFS rate was 72.9% (95%-CI: 45.9-87.9). During sorafenib treatment, a significant increase in PlGF (18.4 vs 43.8 pg/mL, p<0.001) was noted along with a non-significant increase in VEGF (0.7 vs 1.0 ng/mL, p=0.07). VEGF at D1 >1.04 ng/mL (HR=12.5, 95%-CI: 1.37-114, p=0.025) and VEGF at D7 >1.36 ng/mL (HR=10.7, 95%-CI: 1.16-98, p=0.037) were associated with shorter PFS. The 9-month PFS rate was 92.3% (95%-CI: 56.6-98.9) when VEGF at D1 was ≤1.04 ng/mL versus 23.3% (95%-CI: 1.0-63.2) when >1.04 ng/mL. Patients and Methods Chordoma patients were treated with sorafenib 800 mg/day for 9 months, unless earlier occurrence of progression or toxicities. Six biomarkers (sE-Selectin, VEGF, VEGF-C, placental growth factor (PlGF), Thrombospondin, Stem Cell Factor (SCF)) were measured at baseline (day 1: D1) and day 7 (D7). Conclusion High levels of VEGF was associated with poor outcome. PMID:27659533

  15. Type I (RI) and type II (RII) receptors for transforming growth factor-beta isoforms are expressed subsequent to transforming growth factor-beta ligands during excisional wound repair.

    PubMed Central

    Gold, L. I.; Sung, J. J.; Siebert, J. W.; Longaker, M. T.

    1997-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta isoforms (TGF-beta 1, -beta 2, and -beta 3) regulate cell growth and differentiation and have critical regulatory roles in the process of tissue repair and remodeling. Signal transduction for TGF-beta function is transmitted by a heteromeric complex of receptors consisting of two serine/threonine kinase transmembrane proteins (RI and RII). We have previously shown that each TGF-beta isoform is widely expressed in a distinct spatial and temporal pattern throughout the processes of excisional and incisional wound repair. As the presence of TGF-beta receptors determines cellular responsiveness, we have currently examined, by immunohistochemistry, the localization of RI (ALK-1, ALK-5) and RII throughout repair of full-thickness excisional wounds up to 21 days after wounding. The expression of RI (ALK-5) and RII co-localized in both the unwounded and wounded skin and was present in the same cell types as TGF-beta ligands. However, immunoreactivity for TGF-beta receptors, throughout repair, occurred 1 to 5 days later than TGF-beta isoform immunostaining. This implies that the presence of TGF-beta ligands may up-regulate TGF-beta receptors for function and/or may reflect a lag due to local processing of latent TGF-beta. As observed for the immunohistochemical localization of TGF-beta isoforms in unwounded skin, RI and RII were expressed throughout the four layers of the epidermis, showing a wavy pattern of slight to moderate immunostaining, and hair follicles, sweat glands, and sebaceous glands were moderately immunoreactive. The extracellular matrix, fibroblasts, and blood vessels in the dermis were not immunoreactive. After injury, as observed for TGF-beta ligands, RI and RII expression was increased in the epidermis adjacent to the wound and the epithelium migrating over the wound was completely devoid of TGF-beta receptor immunoreactivity until re-epithelialization was completed by day 7 after wounding. The dermis was only

  16. Growth factor expression in degenerated intervertebral disc tissue. An immunohistochemical analysis of transforming growth factor beta, fibroblast growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Jukka; Grönblad, Mats; Vanharanta, Heikki; Virri, Johanna; Guyer, Richard D; Rytömaa, Tapio; Karaharju, Erkki O

    2006-05-01

    Degenerated intervertebral disc has lost its normal architecture, and there are changes both in the nuclear and annular parts of the disc. Changes in cell shape, especially in the annulus fibrosus, have been reported. During degeneration the cells become more rounded, chondrocyte-like, whereas in the normal condition annular cells are more spindle shaped. These chondrocyte-like cells, often forming clusters, affect extracellular matrix turnover. In previous studies transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) -1 and -2, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) have been highlighted in herniated intervertebral disc tissue. In the present study the same growth factors are analysed immunohistochemically in degenerated intervertebral disc tissue. Disc material was obtained from 16 discs operated for painful degenerative disc disease. Discs were classified according to the Dallas Discogram Description. Different disc regions were analysed in parallel. As normal control disc tissue material from eight organ donors was used. Polyclonal antibodies against different growth factors and TGFbeta receptor type II were used, and the immunoreaction was detected by the avidin biotin complex method. All studied degenerated discs showed immunoreactivity for TGFbeta receptor type II and bFGF. Fifteen of 16 discs were immunopositive for TGFbeta-1 and -2, respectively, and none showed immunoreaction for PDGF. Immunopositivity was located in blood vessels and in disc cells. In the nucleus pulposus the immunoreaction was located almost exclusively in chondrocyte-like disc cells, whereas in the annular region this reaction was either in chondrocyte-like disc cells, often forming clusters, or in fibroblast-like disc cells. Chondrocyte-like disc cells were especially prevalent in the posterior disrupted area. In the anterior area of the annulus fibrosus the distribution was more even between these two cell types. bFGF was expressed in the anterior annulus

  17. Androgen Receptor and MicroRNA-21 axis down-regulates transforming growth factor beta receptor II (TGFBR2) expression in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sweta; Deng, Janice J.; Gowda, Pramod S.; Rao, Manjeet K.; Lin, Chun-Lin; Chen, Chun Liang; Huang, Tim; Sun, Lu-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer cells escape growth inhibition from TGFβ by down-regulating TGFβ receptors. However, the mechanism by which cancer cells down-regulate TGFβ receptors in prostate is not clear. Here, we showed that coordinated action of miR-21 and androgen receptor (AR) signaling played a critical role in inhibiting TGFβ receptor II (TGFBR2) expression in prostate cancer cells. Our results revealed that miR-21 suppresses TGFBR2 levels by binding to its 3'UTR and AR signaling further potentiates this effect in both untransformed and transformed human prostate epithelial cells as well as in human prostate cancers. Analysis of primary prostate cancers showed that increased miR-21/AR expression parallel a significantly reduced expression of TGFBR2. Manipulation of androgen signaling or the expression levels of AR or miR-21 negatively altered TGFBR2 expression in untransformed and transformed human prostate epithelial cells, human prostate cancer xenografts, and mouse prostate glands. Importantly, we demonstrated that miR-21 and AR regulated each other's expression resulting in a positive feedback loop. Our results indicated that miR-21/AR mediate its tumor promoting function by attenuating TGFβ-mediated Smad2/3 activation, cell growth inhibition, cell migration, and apoptosis. Together, these results suggest that the AR and miR-21 axis exerts its oncogenic effects in prostate tumors by down-regulating TGFBR2, hence inhibiting the tumor suppressive activity of TGFβ pathway. Targeting miR-21 alone or in combination with AR may restore the tumor inhibitory activity of TGFβ in prostate cancer. PMID:24037531

  18. Subcutaneous administration of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II/IGF binding protein-2 complex stimulates bone formation and prevents loss of bone mineral density in a rat model of disuse osteoporosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conover, Cheryl A.; Johnstone, Edward W.; Turner, Russell T.; Evans, Glenda L.; John Ballard, F. John; Doran, Patrick M.; Khosla, Sundeep

    2002-01-01

    Elevated serum levels of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) and a precursor form of IGF-II are associated with marked increases in bone formation and skeletal mass in patients with hepatitis C-associated osteosclerosis. In vitro studies indicate that IGF-II in complex with IGFBP-2 has high affinity for bone matrix and is able to stimulate osteoblast proliferation. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of the IGF-II/IGFBP-2 complex to increase bone mass in vivo. Osteopenia of the femur was induced by unilateral sciatic neurectomy in rats. At the time of surgery, 14-day osmotic minipumps containing vehicle or 2 microg IGF-II+9 microg IGFBP-2/100g body weight/day were implanted subcutaneously in the neck. Bone mineral density (BMD) measurements were taken the day of surgery and 14 days later using a PIXImus small animal densitometer. Neurectomy of the right hindlimb resulted in a 9% decrease in right femur BMD (P<0.05 vs. baseline). This loss in BMD was completely prevented by treatment with IGF-II/IGFBP-2. On the control limb, there was no loss of BMD over the 14 days and IGF-II/IGFBP-2 treatment resulted in a 9% increase in left femur BMD (P<0.05). Bone histomorphometry indicated increases in endocortical and cancellous bone formation rates and in trabecular thickness. These results demonstrate that short-term administration of the IGF-II/IGFBP-2 complex can prevent loss of BMD associated with disuse osteoporosis and stimulate bone formation in adult rats. Furthermore, they provide proof of concept for a novel anabolic approach to increasing bone mass in humans with osteoporosis.

  19. The role of transforming growth factor-beta, insulin-like growth factor I, and basic fibroblast growth factor in distraction osteogenesis of the mandible.

    PubMed

    Farhadieh, R D; Dickinson, R; Yu, Y; Gianoutsos, M P; Walsh, W R

    1999-01-01

    Distraction osteogenesis is a viable method for regenerating large amounts of bone. In contrast to fracture healing, the mode of bone formation in distraction osteogenesis is primarily intramembranous ossification. The basic biology of the process is still not well understood. The growth factor cascade is likely to play an important role in distraction. This study examines the growth factor cascade in a lengthened ovine mandible model. Twenty-four animals were divided into four groups with varying rates of distraction (1, 2, 3, and 4 mm/day). A unilateral distractor at the angle of the mandible was used. The mandibles were lengthened to 24 mm and fixed for a period of 5 weeks, after which the animals were killed. The sections were probed for transforming growth factor-beta, basic fibroblast growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor I. The growth factors studied were present in all four groups. Transforming growth factor-beta, basic fibroblast growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor I were present in both the bony matrix of the sections and the cytoplasm of the cells, osteoblasts, and a small number of mesenchymal cells. The sections obtained from groups distracted at faster rates showed stronger presence of the growth factors examined by more intense staining. In fracture healing, the localization of transforming growth factor-beta in stage I of healing corresponded with the precise region of intramembranous ossification in stage II. Diffuse presence of transforming growth factor-beta throughout the lengthened region corresponded with the process of intramembranous ossification observed in distraction. In fracture healing, insulin-like growth factor I and basic fibroblast growth factor have been shown to promote proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts from precursor cells. The intense presence of insulin-like growth factor I and basic fibroblast growth factor in the distracted region may account for osteoblast proliferation and formation from

  20. A dominant inhibitory mutant of the type II transforming growth factor beta receptor in the malignant progression of a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Knaus, P I; Lindemann, D; DeCoteau, J F; Perlman, R; Yankelev, H; Hille, M; Kadin, M E; Lodish, H F

    1996-01-01

    In many cancers, inactivating mutations in both alleles of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) type 11 receptor (TbetaRII) gene occur and correlate with loss of sensitivity to TGF-beta. Here we describe a novel mechanism for loss of sensitivity to growth inhibition by TGF-beta in tumor development. Mac-1 cells, isolated from the blood of a patient with an indolent form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, express wild-type TbetaRII and are sensitive to TGF-beta. Mac-2A cells, clonally related to Mac-1 and isolated from a skin nodule of the same patient at a later, clinically aggressive stage of lymphoma, are resistant to TGF-beta. They express both the wild-type TbetaRII and a receptor with a single point mutation (Asp-404-Gly [D404G]) in the kinase domain (D404G-->TbetaRII); no TbetaRI or TbetaRII is found on the plasma membrane, suggesting that D404G-TbetaRII dominantly inhibits the function of the wild-type receptor by inhibiting its appearance on the plasma membrane. Indeed, inducible expression, under control of a tetracycline-regulated promoter, of D404G-TbetaRII in TGF-beta- sensitive Mac-1 cells as well as in Hep3B hepatoma cells results in resistance to TGF-beta and disappearance of cell surface TbetaRI and TbetaRII. Overexpression of wild-type TbetaRII in Mac-2A cells restores cell surface TbetaRI and TbetaRH and sensitivity to TGF-beta. The ability of the D404G-TbetaRH to dominantly inhibit function of wild-type TGF-beta receptors represents a new mechanism for loss of sensitivity to the growth-inhibitory functions of TGF-beta in tumor development. PMID:8668164

  1. ECOG Phase II trial of graded-dose peginterferon α-2b in patients with metastatic melanoma over-expressing basic fibroblast growth factor (E2602)

    PubMed Central

    Go, Ronald S.; Lee, Sandra J.; Shin, Donghoon; Callister, Steven M.; Jobe, Dean A.; Conry, Robert M.; Tarhini, Ahmad A.; Kirkwood, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We investigated use of graded-dose peginterferon α-2b (Peg-IFN) in patients with stage IV melanoma overexpressing basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2). The primary objective was suppression of plasma FGF-2 to within normal range (≤7.5 pg/mL). Experimental Design Plasma FGF-2 was measured at baseline (Step 1), and patients with concentrations ≥15 pg/mL were eligible for study treatment (Step 2). Peg-IFN was given weekly at starting dose of 0.5 μg/kg/wk with increment every 3 weeks based on serial FGF-2 concentrations. Results Two hundred seven patients entered Step 1; 45 (22%) overexpressed FGF-2 (median=22 pg/dL). Twenty-nine eligible patients entered Step 2 and received treatment. Patients’ median age was 64 years (range, 29–84 years). Most had >2 prior therapies. FGF-2 decreased in 28 (97%) patients, with suppression to normal range in 10 (35%). Median time to FGF-2 suppression was 30 days. The best clinical responses were partial response (7%) and stable disease (17%). Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 2.0 and 9.7 months, respectively. Patients who achieved FGF-2 suppression were more likely than those who did not to have a response or stable disease (P = 0.03). Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentrations decreased in 27 patients (93%) during treatment and paralleled those of FGF-2 over time. We found no compensatory rise in VEGF among those with FGF-2 suppression. Conclusions Graded-dose Peg-IFN suppresses FGF-2 in patients with metastatic melanoma who overexpress FGF-2. Over a third of patients had complete suppression of plasma FGF-2, which correlated with clinical response to this therapy. PMID:24122792

  2. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, IGF-II, IGF binding protein-3, and risk of colorectal cancer: a nested case-control study in the Japan Collaborative Cohort study.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Sadao; Kojima, Masayo; Tokudome, Shinkan; Suzuki, Koji; Ozasa, Kotaro; Ito, Yoshinori; Inaba, Yutaka; Tajima, Kazuo; Nakachi, Kei; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2009-12-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-II are important mitogen and IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) exerts opposite effects. However, the results of epidemiological studies on cancer influence are somewhat controversial, and mainly from Western countries. In the present study, we therefore examined associations of serum IGF-I, IGF-II and IGFBP-3 with colorectal cancer risk among participants in the JACC Study in Japan. After matching 3 controls to cases by sex, age, and study area, a total 101 risk sets were examined using a conditional logistic regression model adjusted for body mass index, smoking habit, alcohol consumption and family history of colorectal cancer. The odds ratios (and 95% CIs) for colorectal cancer mortality among the highest tertiles of IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGFBP-3, compared to the lowest tertiles were 1.01 (0.49-2.10), 1.02 (0.55- 1.91), and 1.22 (0.63-2.38), respectively. No linear trends were observed. The lack of any association was not altered after additional adjustment for mutual markers of IGF-I/IGF-II or IGFBP-3, 0.76 (0.34-1.71) for IGF-I, 0.66 (0.30-1.45) for IGF-II, and 1.11 (0.47-2.66) for IGFBP-3. Our prospective data thus indicated that there is no association of IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGFBP-3 with colorectal cancer risk in the Japanese population. Although these markers might be etiologically significant in relation to colorectal cancer, we did not obtain evidence supporting this hypothesis.

  3. Transforming growth factor-β1 induces type II collagen and aggrecan expression via activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and Smad2/3 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanhui; Tao, Hairong; Jin, Chen; Liu, Yonzhang; Lu, Xiongwei; Hu, Xiaopeng; Wang, Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β regulates the anabolic metabolism of articular cartilage and prevents cartilage degradation. TGF‑β1 influences cellular proliferation, differentiation and the extracellular matrix through activation of the extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and Smad2/3 signaling pathways. However, it has remained to be fully elucidated precisely how the ERK1/2 and Smad2/3 signaling pathways mediate anabolic processes of articular cartilage. The present study investigated how ERK1/2 and Smad2/3 signaling mediate TGF‑β1‑stimulated type II collagen and aggrecan expression in rat chondrocytes. The results confirmed that TGF‑β1 stimulates type II collagen and aggrecan expression in rat chondrocytes, and furthermore, that the ERK1/2 and Smad2/3 signaling pathways were activated by TGF‑β1. Conversely, the TGF‑β receptor I (ALK5) kinase inhibitor SB525334 significantly impaired TGF‑β1‑induced type II collagen and aggrecan expression, coinciding with a reduction of ERK1/2 and Smad3 phosphorylation. In addition, TGF‑β1‑induced type II collagen and aggrecan expression were significantly suppressed by ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059. Similarly, TGF‑β1‑stimulated type II collagen and aggrecan expression were decreased in the presence of a Smad3 phosphorylation inhibitor SIS3. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that the ERK1/2 and Smad2/3 signaling pathways regulate type II collagen and aggrecan expression in rat chondrocytes.

  4. Late recurrence of a malignant hypoglycemia-inducing pelvic solitary fibrous tumor secreting high-molecular-weight insulin-like growth factor-II: A case report with protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Hiroki; Omae, Kenji; Iizuka, Junpei; Kobayashi, Hirohito; Fukuda, Izumi; Kondo, Tsunenori; Hizuka, Naomi; Nagashima, Yoji; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2016-07-01

    The present study reports a case of recurrent malignant pelvic solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) that induced non-islet cell tumor hypoglycemia via high-molecular-weight insulin-like growth factor-II in a 72-year-old male patient. The tumor recurred ~12 years after the complete resection of the original mass. The recurrent tumor, which had directly invaded the left ureter and perirectal fat tissue, could not be completely excised due to its fragility and adhesiveness. At 13 days post-surgery, the patient presented with rectal perforation, and an urgent rectal resection and colostomy was performed. Neither recurrence of the tumor nor hypoglycemic symptoms were observed 9 months after the surgery. High molecular weight insulin-like growth factor-II was detected in the serum and tumor specimens by western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. The present case report suggests that certain SFTs can relapse even ≥10 years after a presumed complete resection of the primary tumor, and that performing a safe and complete resection of these tumors can be challenging, due to their adhesiveness or physical presentation; therefore, the indications for surgery should be considered with caution.

  5. Attenuation of corneal myofibroblast development through nanoparticle-mediated soluble transforming growth factor-β type II receptor (sTGFβRII) gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ajay; Rodier, Jason T.; Tandon, Ashish; Klibanov, Alexander M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To explore (i) the potential of polyethylenimine (PEI)-DNA nanoparticles as a vector for delivering genes into human corneal fibroblasts, and (ii) whether the nanoparticle-mediated soluble extracellular domain of the transforming growth factor–β type II receptor (sTGFβRII) gene therapy could be used to reduce myofibroblasts and fibrosis in the cornea using an in vitro model. Methods PEI-DNA nanoparticles were prepared at a nitrogen-to-phosphate ratio of 30 by mixing linear PEI and a plasmid encoding sTGFβRII conjugated to the fragment crystallizable (Fc) portion of human immunoglobulin. The PEI-DNA polyplex formation was confirmed through gel retardation assay. Human corneal fibroblasts (HCFs) were generated from donor corneas; myofibroblasts and fibrosis were induced with TGFβ1 (1 ng/ml) stimulation employing serum-free conditions. The sTGFβRII conjugated to the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin gene was introduced into HCF using either PEI-DNA nanoparticles or Lipofectamine. Suitable negative and positive controls to compare selected nanoparticle and therapeutic gene efficiency were included. Delivered gene copies and mRNA (mRNA) expression were quantified with real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and protein with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The changes in fibrosis parameters were quantified by measuring fibrosis marker α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) mRNA and protein levels with qPCR, immunostaining, and immunoblotting. Cytotoxicity was determined using cellular viability, proliferation, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Results PEI readily bound to plasmids to form nanoparticular polyplexes and exhibited much greater transfection efficiency (p<0.01) than the commercial reagent Lipofectamine. The PEI-DNA-treated cultures showed 4.5×104 plasmid copies/µg DNA in real-time qPCR and 7,030±87 pg/ml sTGFβRII protein in ELISA analyses, whereas Lipofectamine-transfected cultures demonstrated 1.9

  6. Decorin inhibits the proliferation of HepG2 cells by elevating the expression of transforming growth factor-β receptor II.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanfeng; Wang, Xuesong; Wang, Zhaohui; Ju, Wenbo; Wang, Dawei

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of decorin (DCN) on the proliferation of human hepatoma HepG2 cells and the involvement of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathway. A vector containing DCN was transfected into HepG2 cells with the use of Lipofectamine 2000. Cell proliferation was assessed with an MTT assay, and western blot analysis was used to detect the protein expression of TGF-β receptor I (TGF-βRI), phosphorylated TGF-βRI, p15 and TGF-βRII. In addition, small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing was performed to knock down the target gene. The results indicated that, compared with the control group, cell proliferation was significantly decreased in HepG2 cells transfected with DCN. In addition, DCN transfection significantly increased the phosphorylation level of TGF-βRI in HepG2 cells. The expression of the downstream factor p15 was also significantly elevated in the DCN-transfected HepG2 cells. Furthermore, DCN transfection significantly elevated the expression level of TGF-βRII in HepG2 cells. By contrast, the silencing of TGF-βRII significantly decreased the phosphorylation of TGF-βRI in DCN-transfected HepG2 cells. In addition, TGF-βRII silencing abolished the effects of DCN on the proliferation of HepG2 cells. In conclusion, DCN elevated the expression level of TGF-βRII, increased the phosphorylation level of TGF-βRI, enhanced the expression of p15, and finally inhibited the proliferation of HepG2 cells. These findings may contribute to the understanding of the role of DCN in the pathogenesis of hepatic carcinoma and assist in the disease treatment.

  7. Physiological factors influencing capillary growth.

    PubMed

    Egginton, S

    2011-07-01

    (1) Angiogenesis (growth of new capillaries from an existing capillary bed) may result from a mismatch in microvascular supply and metabolic demand (metabolic error signal). Krogh examined the distribution and number of capillaries to explore the correlation between O(2) delivery and O(2) consumption. Subsequently, the heterogeneity in angiogenic response within a muscle has been shown to reflect either differences in fibre type composition or mechanical load. However, local control leads to targetted angiogenesis in the vicinity of glycolytic fibre types following muscle stimulation, or oxidative fibres following endurance training, while heterogeneity of capillary spacing is maintained during ontogenetic growth. (2) Despite limited microscopy resolution and lack of specific markers, Krogh's interest in the structure of the capillary wall paved the way for understanding the mechanisms of capillary growth. Angiogenesis may be influenced by the response of perivascular or stromal cells (fibroblasts, macrophages and pericytes) to altered activity, likely acting as a source for chemical signals modulating capillary growth such as vascular endothelial growth factor. In addition, haemodynamic factors such as shear stress and muscle stretch play a significant role in adaptive remodelling of the microcirculation. (3) Most indices of capillarity are highly dependent on fibre size, resulting in possible bias because of scaling. To examine the consequences of capillary distribution, it is therefore helpful to quantify the area of tissue supplied by individual capillaries. This allows the spatial limitations inherent in most models of tissue oxygenation to be overcome generating an alternative approach to Krogh's tissue cylinder, the capillary domain, to improve descriptions of intracellular oxygen diffusion. © 2010 The Author. Acta Physiologica © 2010 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  8. [Neuronal growth factors--neurotrophins].

    PubMed

    Meyer, M; Rasmussen, J Z

    1999-04-05

    Neurotrophic factors are polypeptides primarily known to regulate the survival and differentiation of nerve cells during the development of the peripheral and central nervous systems. The neurotrophic factors act via specific receptors after retrograde axonal transport from the nerve fibre target areas back to the cell bodies, and locally through autocrine and paracrine mechanisms linked to nerve cell activity. In the mature nervous system, neurotrophic factors maintain morphological and neurochemical characteristics of nerve cells and promote activity-dependent dynamic/plastic changes in the synaptic contacts between nerve cells by strengthening functionally active synaptic connections. Induction and increased production of neurotrophic factors in relation to neural injuries are thought to serve protective and reparative purposes. Specific neurotrophic factors have thus been shown to protect nerve cells in a number of experimental models for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, just as specific neurotrophic factors have been shown to stimulate regenerative growth of both peripheral and central nerve fibres. Today, problems with continuous and localized delivery of specific neurotrophins or combinations thereof into the nervous system appear to be the most important obstacle for more widespread clinical application.

  9. Gasdermin C Is Upregulated by Inactivation of Transforming Growth Factor β Receptor Type II in the Presence of Mutated Apc, Promoting Colorectal Cancer Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Miguchi, Masashi; Hinoi, Takao; Shimomura, Manabu; Adachi, Tomohiro; Saito, Yasufumi; Niitsu, Hiroaki; Kochi, Masatoshi; Sada, Haruki; Sotomaru, Yusuke; Ikenoue, Tsuneo; Shigeyasu, Kunitoshi; Tanakaya, Kohji; Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Sentani, Kazuhiro; Oue, Naohide; Yasui, Wataru; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in TGFBR2, a component of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling pathway, occur in high-frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H) colorectal cancer (CRC). In mouse models, Tgfbr2 inactivation in the intestinal epithelium accelerates the development of malignant intestinal tumors in combination with disruption of the Wnt-β-catenin pathway. However, no studies have further identified the genes influenced by TGFBR2 inactivation following disruption of the Wnt-β-catenin pathway. We previously described CDX2P-G19Cre;Apcflox/flox mice, which is stochastically null for Apc in the colon epithelium. In this study, we generated CDX2P-G19Cre;Apcflox/flox;Tgfbr2flox/flox mice, with simultaneous loss of Apc and Tgfbr2. These mice developed tumors, including adenocarcinoma in the proximal colon. We compared gene expression profiles between tumors of the two types of mice using microarray analysis. Our results showed that the expression of the murine homolog of GSDMC was significantly upregulated by 9.25-fold in tumors of CDX2P-G19Cre;Apcflox/flox;Tgfbr2flox/flox mice compared with those of CDX2P-G19Cre;Apcflox/flox mice. We then investigated the role of GSDMC in regulating CRC tumorigenesis. The silencing of GSDMC led to a significant reduction in the proliferation and tumorigenesis of CRC cell lines, whereas the overexpression of GSDMC enhanced cell proliferation. These results suggested that GSDMC functioned as an oncogene, promoting cell proliferation in colorectal carcinogenesis. In conclusion, combined inactivation of both Apc and Tgfbr2 in the colon epithelium of a CRC mouse model promoted development of adenocarcinoma in the proximal colon. Moreover, GSDMC was upregulated by TGFBR2 mutation in CRC and promoted tumor cell proliferation in CRC carcinogenesis, suggesting that GSDMC may be a promising therapeutic target.

  10. Customized chemotherapy based on epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status for elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Shiro; Katakami, Nobuyuki; Masago, Katsuhiro; Yoshioka, Hiroshige; Tomii, Keisuke; Kaneda, Toshihiko; Hirabayashi, Masataka; Kunimasa, Kei; Morizane, Toshio; Mio, Tadashi

    2012-05-21

    Elderly patients are more vulnerable to toxicity from chemotherapy. Activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are associated with enhanced response to EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitors. We studied patients with advanced NSCLC for whom treatment was customized based on EGFR mutation status. We screened 57 chemotherapy-naïve patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed NSCLC, stage IIIB or IV, aged 70 years or older, and with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0 or 1, for EGFR exon 19 codon 746-750 deletion and exon 21 L858R mutation. Twenty-two patients with EGFR mutations received gefitinib; 32 patients without mutations received vinorelbine or gemcitabine. The primary endpoint was the response rate. The response rate was 45.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 24.4%, 67.8%) in patients with EGFR mutations and 18.8% (95% CI: 7.2%, 36.4%) in patients without EGFR mutations. The median overall survival was 27.9 months (95%CI: 24.4 months, undeterminable months) in patients with EGFR mutations and 14.9 months (95%CI: 11.0 months, 22.4 months) in patients without EGFR mutations. In the gefitinib group, grade 3/4 hepatic dysfunction and dermatitis occurred in 23% and 5% of patients, respectively. In patients treated with vinorelbine or gemcitabine, the most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were neutropenia (47%; four had febrile neutropenia), anemia (13%), and anorexia (9%). No treatment-related deaths occurred. Treatment customization based on EGFR mutation status deserves consideration, particularly for elderly patients who often cannot receive second-line chemotherapy due to poor organ function or comorbidities. This trial is registered at University hospital Medical Information Network-clinical trial registration (http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index/htm) with the registration identification number C000000436.

  11. Gasdermin C Is Upregulated by Inactivation of Transforming Growth Factor β Receptor Type II in the Presence of Mutated Apc, Promoting Colorectal Cancer Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Miguchi, Masashi; Hinoi, Takao; Shimomura, Manabu; Adachi, Tomohiro; Saito, Yasufumi; Niitsu, Hiroaki; Kochi, Masatoshi; Sada, Haruki; Sotomaru, Yusuke; Ikenoue, Tsuneo; Shigeyasu, Kunitoshi; Tanakaya, Kohji; Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Sentani, Kazuhiro; Oue, Naohide; Yasui, Wataru; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in TGFBR2, a component of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling pathway, occur in high-frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H) colorectal cancer (CRC). In mouse models, Tgfbr2 inactivation in the intestinal epithelium accelerates the development of malignant intestinal tumors in combination with disruption of the Wnt-β-catenin pathway. However, no studies have further identified the genes influenced by TGFBR2 inactivation following disruption of the Wnt-β-catenin pathway. We previously described CDX2P-G19Cre;Apcflox/flox mice, which is stochastically null for Apc in the colon epithelium. In this study, we generated CDX2P-G19Cre;Apcflox/flox;Tgfbr2flox/flox mice, with simultaneous loss of Apc and Tgfbr2. These mice developed tumors, including adenocarcinoma in the proximal colon. We compared gene expression profiles between tumors of the two types of mice using microarray analysis. Our results showed that the expression of the murine homolog of GSDMC was significantly upregulated by 9.25-fold in tumors of CDX2P-G19Cre;Apcflox/flox;Tgfbr2flox/flox mice compared with those of CDX2P-G19Cre;Apcflox/flox mice. We then investigated the role of GSDMC in regulating CRC tumorigenesis. The silencing of GSDMC led to a significant reduction in the proliferation and tumorigenesis of CRC cell lines, whereas the overexpression of GSDMC enhanced cell proliferation. These results suggested that GSDMC functioned as an oncogene, promoting cell proliferation in colorectal carcinogenesis. In conclusion, combined inactivation of both Apc and Tgfbr2 in the colon epithelium of a CRC mouse model promoted development of adenocarcinoma in the proximal colon. Moreover, GSDMC was upregulated by TGFBR2 mutation in CRC and promoted tumor cell proliferation in CRC carcinogenesis, suggesting that GSDMC may be a promising therapeutic target. PMID:27835699

  12. Insulin-like growth factor-I stimulates H{sub 4}II rat hepatoma cell proliferation: Dominant role of PI-3'K/Akt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Alexia, Catherine; Fourmatgeat, Pascal; Delautier, Daniele; Groyer, Andre . E-mail: groyer@bichat.inserm.fr

    2006-04-15

    Although hepatocytes are the primary source of endocrine IGF-I and -II in mammals, their autocrine/paracrine role in the dysregulation of proliferation and apoptosis during hepatocarcinogenesis and in hepatocarcinomas (HCC) remains to be elucidated. Indeed, IGF-II and type-I IGF receptors are overexpressed in HCC cells, and IGF-I is synthesized in adjacent non-tumoral liver tissue. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of type-I IGF receptor signaling on H{sub 4}II rat hepatoma cell proliferation, as estimated by {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation into DNA. IGF-I stimulated the rate of DNA synthesis of serum-deprived H{sub 4}II cells, stimulation being maximal 3 h after the onset of IGF-I treatment and remaining elevated until at least 6 h. The IGF-I-induced increase in DNA replication was abolished by LY294002 and only partially inhibited by PD98059, suggesting that phosphoinositol-3' kinase (PI-3'K) and to a lesser extent MEK/Erk signaling were involved. Furthermore, the 3- to 19-fold activation of the Erks in the presence of LY294002 suggested a down-regulation of the MEK/Erk cascade by PI-3'K signaling. Finally, the effect of IGF-I on DNA replication was almost completely abolished in clones of H{sub 4}II cells expressing a dominant-negative form of Akt but was unaltered by rapamycin treatment of wild-type H{sub 4}II cells. Altogether, these data support the notion that the stimulation of H{sub 4}II rat hepatoma cell proliferation by IGF-I is especially dependent on Akt activation but independent on the Akt/mTOR signal0009i.

  13. Customized chemotherapy based on epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status for elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Elderly patients are more vulnerable to toxicity from chemotherapy. Activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are associated with enhanced response to EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitors. We studied patients with advanced NSCLC for whom treatment was customized based on EGFR mutation status. Methods We screened 57 chemotherapy-naïve patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed NSCLC, stage IIIB or IV, aged 70 years or older, and with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0 or 1, for EGFR exon 19 codon 746–750 deletion and exon 21 L858R mutation. Twenty-two patients with EGFR mutations received gefitinib; 32 patients without mutations received vinorelbine or gemcitabine. The primary endpoint was the response rate. Results The response rate was 45.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 24.4%, 67.8%) in patients with EGFR mutations and 18.8% (95% CI: 7.2%, 36.4%) in patients without EGFR mutations. The median overall survival was 27.9 months (95%CI: 24.4 months, undeterminable months) in patients with EGFR mutations and 14.9 months (95%CI: 11.0 months, 22.4 months) in patients without EGFR mutations. In the gefitinib group, grade 3/4 hepatic dysfunction and dermatitis occurred in 23% and 5% of patients, respectively. In patients treated with vinorelbine or gemcitabine, the most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were neutropenia (47%; four had febrile neutropenia), anemia (13%), and anorexia (9%). No treatment-related deaths occurred. Conclusions Treatment customization based on EGFR mutation status deserves consideration, particularly for elderly patients who often cannot receive second-line chemotherapy due to poor organ function or comorbidities. Trial registration This trial is registered at University hospital Medical Information Network-clinical trial registration (http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index/htm) with the registration identification number C000000436

  14. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  15. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  16. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  17. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  18. Growth and growth factors in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Salardi, S; Tonioli, S; Tassoni, P; Tellarini, M; Mazzanti, L; Cacciari, E

    1987-01-01

    Growth of 79 children with diabetes was analysed at diagnosis and again after one to 10.7 years of treatment with insulin. Both sexes were tall at onset, whereas at the last observation boys alone showed significant growth retardation. Height standard deviation score (SDS), however, showed no significant fall either in 32 subjects reassessed after five years of disease or in 18 subjects examined at full stature. Skeletal maturity was not significantly impaired after treatment. Pubertal growth spurt was reduced, especially in girls and in subjects with onset of disease at or around puberty. We found no significant correlation between height and height velocity SDS and glycosylated haemoglobin values or secretion of growth hormone during the arginine test. Somatomedin C values were correlated with height velocity SDS in prepubertal boys. The results of this study suggest that there are interferences in the growth of children with diabetes but that they do not seem to have a significant influence on adult height. PMID:3813637

  19. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and -II and IGF-binding proteins-1, -2, and -3 in children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus: correlation with metabolic control and height attainment.

    PubMed

    Strasser-Vogel, B; Blum, W F; Past, R; Kessler, U; Hoeflich, A; Meiler, B; Kiess, W

    1995-04-01

    The putative effects of diabetes and metabolic control on circulating levels of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their binding proteins (IGFBPs) remain controversial. In the present study, serum levels of IGF-I and IGF-II and IGFBP-1, -2, and -3 were measured in 58 patients (age, 0.8-17 yr) with treated (51 subjects) or untreated (7 subjects) insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and were compared with the levels in normal subjects. In the untreated patients IGF-I and IGF-II were decreased as compared with the healthy controls. In the treated diabetics IGF-I and IGF-II were reduced; IGFBP-2 (only in prepubertal subjects) and IGFBP-3 were increased. Furthermore, age-adjusted values of IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGFBP-3 were lower in prepubertal than in pubertal patients. Regression analysis revealed a negative correlation between hemoglobin (Hb)A1c and standard deviation scores (SDS) of IGF-I and a positive association between HbA1c and IGFBP-1 SDS or IGFBP-2 SDS. In the treated patients HbA1c was positively related to IGFBP-1 SDS and IGFBP-2 SDS when applying simple regression analysis and to IGFBP-2 SDS when using a multiple regression model. Strong correlations were observed between height SDS and IGF-I SDS, IGF-II SDS, and IGFBP-3 SDS in prepubertal subjects who had had IDDM for at least 2 yr, but not in adolescents. Such correlations have also been found in healthy children and adolescents. In conclusion; 1) IDDM is associated with alterations of the IGF-IGFBP system, which are partially accounted for by differences in metabolic control and pubertal status; 2) the lower plasma concentrations of serum IGF-I may play a role in the pathogenesis of growth impairment of poorly controlled prepubertal, but not pubertal, children and adolescents with IDDM; and 3) in addition, a potential role of the altered IGF-IGFBP system for the development of diabetic late complications is hypothesized.

  20. The growth and development of a level II trauma center.

    PubMed

    Webster, Arvie M

    2007-01-01

    Attaining verification as a Level II Trauma Center requires dedication, flexibility, and continuous education. This article contains the history, birth, and growth of a Level II Trauma Center through a trauma resource clinician's experiences. It is intended to share the thoughts, processes, and technological advances of establishing a Level II Trauma Center.

  1. Expression of transforming growth factor alpha, epidermal growth factor receptor and epidermal growth factor in precursor lesions to gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Filipe, M. I.; Osborn, M.; Linehan, J.; Sanidas, E.; Brito, M. J.; Jankowski, J.

    1995-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), its related peptide transforming growth factor (TGF-alpha) and their common receptor (EGFR) have been implicated in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation in the gastrointestinal epithelium and may play an important role in gastric carcinogenesis. We compared the immunohistochemical expression and topographic distribution of these peptides using Western blot analysis in gastric carcinoma precursor lesions and in non-cancer tissue. We observed: (i) increased and extended expression of TGF-alpha in normal mucosa and hyperplasia in carcinoma fields compared with non-cancer controls; (ii) increased expression of EGFR in intestinal metaplasia (IM) from carcinoma fields compared with controls; (iii) EGF expression was not detected in normal mucosa and only weakly in IM; (iv) coexpression of TGF-alpha/EGFR and EGF/EGFR was higher in intestinal metaplasia in carcinoma fields than in non-cancer controls. We conclude that altered expression of TGF-alpha/EGFR is associated with morphological changes during gastric carcinogenesis. In this regard increased expression of TGF-alpha is a very early event which is subsequently followed by up-regulation of EGFR and this has important biological and clinical implications. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7819044

  2. Isolation from human cerebrospinal fluid of a new insulin-like growth factor-binding protein with a selective affinity for IGF-II.

    PubMed

    Roghani, M; Hossenlopp, P; Lepage, P; Balland, A; Binoux, M

    1989-09-25

    In biological fluids IGF-I and IGF-II are bound to specific, high-affinity binding protein (BPs). Two human BPs have been isolated, one from serum, which is GH-dependent, the other from amniotic fluid (AF BP), and their cDNAs have recently been cloned. We report here the isolation of another, new species from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) where this BP predominates. The protein was purified to homogeneity by a four-step procedure: gel filtration, chromatofocusing, hydrophobic-interaction chromatography and reverse-phase chromatography. Thereafter, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gave an Mr of 34,000 (non-reduced), chromatofocusing gave an isoelectric point of 5.0m and its affinity for IGF-II (3 x 10(10) M-1) was 10 times that for IGF-I. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the first 15 residues determined in a BP preparation from the CSF of children was Leu-Ala-Pro-Gly-(/)-Gly-Gln-Gly-Val-Gln-Ala-Gly-Ala-Pro-Gly. A similar sequence was found for adult CSF, apart from residues 12 and 13 (-Leu-Leu-). These are highly analogous with the sequences starting from residue 69 of the GH-dependent BP, and from residue 61 of the AF BP. The new BP isolated is therefore related to, but distinct from, the other human BPs.

  3. Insulin-like growth factors act synergistically with basic fibroblast growth factor and nerve growth factor to promote chromaffin cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Frödin, M; Gammeltoft, S

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and nerve growth factor (NGF) on DNA synthesis in cultured chromaffin cells from fetal, neonatal, and adult rats by using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdUrd) pulse labeling for 24 or 48 h and immunocytochemical staining of cell nuclei. After 6 days in culture in the absence of growth factors, nuclear BrdUrd incorporation was detected in 30% of fetal chromaffin cells, 1.5% of neonatal cells, and 0.1% of adult cells. Addition of 10 nM IGF-I or IGF-II increased the fraction of BrdUrd-labeled nuclei to 50% of fetal, 20% of neonatal, and 2% of adult chromaffin cells. The ED50 value of IGF-I- and IGF-II-stimulated BrdUrd labeling in neonatal chromaffin cells was 0.3 nM and 0.8 nM, respectively. In neonatal and adult chromaffin cells, addition of 1 nM bFGF or 2 nM NGF stimulated nuclear BrdUrd incorporation to approximately the same level as 10 nM IGF-I or IGF-II. However, the response to bFGF or NGF in combination with either IGF-I or IGF-II was more than additive, indicating that the combined effect of the IGFs and bFGF or NGF is synergistic. The degree of synergism was 2- to 4-fold in neonatal chromaffin cells and 10- to 20-fold in adult chromaffin cells compared with the effect of each growth factor alone. In contrast, the action of bFGF and NGF added together in the absence of IGFs was not synergistic or additive. IGF-II acted also as a survival factor on neonatal chromaffin cells and the cell survival was further improved when bFGF or NGF was added together with IGF-II. In conclusion, we propose that IGF-I and IGF-II act in synergy with bFGF and NGF to stimulate proliferation and survival of chromaffin cells during neonatal growth and adult maintenance of the adrenal medulla. Our findings may have implications for improving the survival of chromaffin cell implants in diseased human brain. PMID:8127879

  4. Cytokines and growth factors which regulate bone cell function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seino, Yoshiki

    Everybody knows that growth factors are most important in making bone. Hormones enhance bone formation from a long distance. Growth factors promote bone formation as an autocrine or paracrine factor in nearby bone. BMP-2 through BMP-8 are in the TGF-β family. BMP makes bone by enchondral ossification. In bone, IGF-II is most abundant, second, TGF-β, and third IGF-I. TGF-β enhances bone formation mainly by intramembranous ossification in vivo. TGF-β affects both cell proliferation and differentiation, however, TGF-β mainly enhances bone formation by intramembranous ossification. Interestingly, TGF-β is increased by estrogen(E 2), androgen, vitamin D, TGF-β and FGF. IGF-I and IGF-II also enhance bone formation. At present it remains unclear why IGF-I is more active in bone formation than IGF-II, although IGF-II is more abundant in bone compared to IGF-I. However, if only type I receptor signal transduction promotes bone formation, the strong activity of IGF-I in bone formation is understandable. GH, PTH and E 2 promotes IGF-I production. Recent data suggest that hormones containing vitamin D or E 2 enhance bone formation through growth factors. Therefore, growth factors are the key to clarifying the mechanism of bone formation.

  5. [Dynamics of local expression of connexin-43 and basic fibroblast growth factor receptors in patients with skin and soft-tissue infections against the background of diabetes mellitus type II].

    PubMed

    Vinnik, Iu S; Salmina, A B; Tepliakova, O V; Drobushevskaia, A I; Malinovskaia, N A; Pozhilenkova, E A; Morgun, A V; Gitlina, A G

    2014-01-01

    Clinical results of wound healing dynamics were studied in 60 patients with soft-tissue infection against the background of diabetes mellitus type II. At the same time the study considered indices of intercellular contacts protein tissue expression such as connexin 43 (Cx43) and basic fibroblast growth factor receptors (bFGFR). The basic therapy of biopsy material of wound borders was applied. The reduction of bFGFR expression and the minor growth of Cx43 expression were observed. The pain syndrome proceeded for a long time and there were signs of perifocal inflammation, retard wound healing with granulation tissue. The application of combined method of ozone therapy which included autohemotherapy with ozone and an external management of wound by ozone-oxygen mixture facilitated to considerable shortening of inflammatory phase and regeneration. It was associated with increased Cx43 expression (in 1.9 times) in comparison with initial level and bFGFR was enlarged in 1.7 times to eighth day of postoperative period.

  6. Growth of group II Clostridium botulinum strains at extreme temperatures.

    PubMed

    Derman, Yağmur; Lindström, Miia; Selby, Katja; Korkeala, Hannu

    2011-11-01

    The minimum and maximum growth temperatures and the maximum growth rates at 10, 30, 37, and 40°C were determined for 24 group II Clostridium botulinum strains. Genetic diversity of the strains was revealed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. The minimum growth temperatures ranged from 6.2 to 8.6°C, and the maximum growth temperatures ranged from 34.7 to 39.9°C. The mean maximum growth temperatures and mean maximum growth rates of type E strains at 37°C were significantly higher than those of type B and type F strains. A significant correlation between maximum growth rates at 37°C and maximum growth temperatures was found for all strains. Some type E strains with a high minimum growth temperature also had a higher maximum growth rate at 37°C than at 30°C, which suggests that some group II C. botulinum strains are more mesophilic in their growth properties than others. We found relatively small differences between AFLP clusters, indicating that diverse genetic background among the strains was not reflected in the growth properties. The growth characteristics of group II C. botulinum and some type E strains with mesophilic growth properties may have an impact on inoculation studies and predictive modeling for assessing the safety of foods.

  7. Transforming growth factor alpha, Shope fibroma growth factor, and vaccinia growth factor can replace myxoma growth factor in the induction of myxomatosis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Opgenorth, A; Nation, N; Graham, K; McFadden, G

    1993-02-01

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) homologues encoded by vaccinia virus, myxoma virus, and malignant rabbit fibroma virus have been shown to contribute to the pathogenicity of virus infection upon inoculation of susceptible hosts. However, since the primary structures of these growth factors and the disease profiles induced by different poxvirus genera vary substantially, the degree to which the various EGF homologues perform similar roles in viral pathogenesis remains unclear. In order to determine whether different EGF-like growth factors can perform qualitatively similar functions in the induction of myxomatosis in rabbits, we created recombinant myxoma virus variants in which the native growth factor, myxoma growth factor (MGF), was disrupted and replaced with either vaccinia virus growth factor, Shope fibroma growth factor, or rat transforming growth factor alpha. Unlike the control virus containing an inactivated MGF gene, which caused marked attenuation of the disease syndrome and substantially less proliferation of the epithelial cell layers in the conjunctiva and respiratory tract, the recombinant myxoma virus strains expressing heterologous growth factors produced infections which were both clinically and histopathologically indistinguishable from wild-type myxomatosis. We conclude that these poxviral and cellular EGF-like growth factors, which are diverse with respect to primary structure and origin, have similar biological functions in the context of myxoma virus pathogenesis and are mitogenic for the same target cells.

  8. Effects of basic fibroblast growth factor and insulin-like growth factor on cultured cartilage cells from skate Raja porasa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Tingjun; Jin, Lingyun; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2003-12-01

    Effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) on cartilage cells from proboscis of skate, Raja porasa Günther, were investigated in this study. The cartilage cells were cultured in 20% FBS-supplemented MEM medium at 24°C. Twelve hours after culture initiation, the cartilage cells were treated with bFGF and IGF-II at different concentration combinations. It was found that 20 ng/ml of bFGF or 80 ng/ml of IGF-II was enough to have obvious stimulating effect on the growth and division of skate cartilage cells. Test of bFGF and IGF-II together, revealed that 20 ng/ml of bFGF and 80 ng/ml of IGF-II together had the best stimulating effect on the growth and division of skate cartilage cells. The cartilage cells cultured could form a monolayer at day 7.

  9. Growth Factors in Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Zia Ali

    2003-01-01

    Many growth factors are implicated in the pathogenesis of proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Alteration of growth factors and their receptors in diabetes has been shown in both experimental and clinical studies. Sustained hyperglycemia resulting from long-standing diabetes leads to several biochemical abnormalities that consequently result in retinal hypoxia. Retinal oxygenation state regulates various growth factors that promote angiogenesis in order to meet the oxygen demands of the tissue. However, unregulated expression of these growth factors and induction of complex cascades leading to augmentation of other proangiogenic factors, which may not be regulated by tissue oxygenation, leads to uncontrolled retinal neovascularization and blindness in diabetic patients. PMID:14668050

  10. Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Phase II Study of Onartuzumab Plus Bevacizumab Versus Placebo Plus Bevacizumab in Patients With Recurrent Glioblastoma: Efficacy, Safety, and Hepatocyte Growth Factor and O(6)-Methylguanine-DNA Methyltransferase Biomarker Analyses.

    PubMed

    Cloughesy, Timothy; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; Recht, Lawrence; Brandes, Alba A; Pineda, Estela; Mikkelsen, Tom; Chinot, Olivier L; Balana, Carmen; Macdonald, David R; Westphal, Manfred; Hopkins, Kirsten; Weller, Michael; Bais, Carlos; Sandmann, Thomas; Bruey, Jean-Marie; Koeppen, Hartmut; Liu, Bo; Verret, Wendy; Phan, See-Chun; Shames, David S

    2017-01-20

    Purpose Bevacizumab regimens are approved for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma in many countries. Aberrant mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (MET) expression has been reported in glioblastoma and may contribute to bevacizumab resistance. The phase II study GO27819 investigated the monovalent MET inhibitor onartuzumab plus bevacizumab (Ona + Bev) versus placebo plus bevacizumab (Pla + Bev) in recurrent glioblastoma. Methods At first recurrence after chemoradiation, bevacizumab-naïve patients with glioblastoma were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive Ona (15 mg/kg, once every 3 weeks) + Bev (15 mg/kg, once every 3 weeks) or Pla + Bev until disease progression. The primary end point was progression-free survival by response assessment in neuro-oncology criteria. Secondary end points were overall survival, objective response rate, duration of response, and safety. Exploratory biomarker analyses correlated efficacy with expression levels of MET ligand hepatocyte growth factor, O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase promoter methylation, and glioblastoma subtype. Results Among 129 patients enrolled (Ona + Bev, n = 64; Pla + Bev, n = 65), baseline characteristics were balanced. The median progression-free survival was 3.9 months for Ona + Bev versus 2.9 months for Pla + Bev (hazard ratio, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.72 to 1.56; P = .7444). The median overall survival was 8.8 months for Ona + Bev and 12.6 months for Pla + Bev (hazard ratio, 1.45; 95% CI, 0.88 to 2.37; P = .1389). Grade ≥ 3 adverse events were reported in 38.5% of patients who received Ona + Bev and 35.9% of patients who received Pla + Bev. Exploratory biomarker analyses suggested that patients with high expression of hepatocyte growth factor or unmethylated O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase may benefit from Ona + Bev. Conclusion There was no evidence of further clinical benefit with the addition of onartuzumab to bevacizumab compared with bevacizumab plus placebo in unselected patients with

  11. Growth factors and acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Hirschberg, R; Ding, H

    1998-03-01

    During acute renal injury, there are alterations in the expression of several growth factors and their receptors in the kidney. The increased expression of several growth factors and/or their receptors at sites of nephron injury suggests important contributions to repair. Exogenous administration of some growth factors, such as IGF-I, EGF and HGF, accelerates recovery of renal function in experimental acute renal failure (ARF). In ARF growth factors act through several mechanisms, which may include altered cell cycle regulation and mitogenesis, differentiation of recovered cells, regulation of apoptosis, improved renal hemodynamics, and others. There is evidence for interactions of growth factors with other growth factors as well as with other genes resulting in complex orchestration of biologic events contributing to recovery from ARF.

  12. Synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2007-01-23

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain that binds a heparin-binding growth factor receptor, covalently bound to a hydrophobic linker, which is in turn covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  13. Insulin-like growth factor-I gene expression in three models of accelerated lung growth.

    PubMed

    Nobuhara, K K; DiFiore, J W; Ibla, J C; Siddiqui, A M; Ferretti, M L; Fauza, D O; Schnitzer, J J; Wilson, J M

    1998-07-01

    We have learned previously that in utero tracheal ligation reverses the structural and physiological effects of surgically created congenital diaphragmatic hernia. In addition, we have discovered that postnatal lung growth similarly can be accelerated using liquid-based airway distension with perfluorocarbon. Another model of accelerated lung growth is that of compensatory growth seen after neonatal pneumonectomy. In all of these models, growth has occurred because of an increase in alveolar number rather than enlargement of preexisting alveoli. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if gene expression could be altered by changes in physical forces in the prenatal and postnatal lung. The three models of accelerated lung growth studied were the following: (1) The prenatal group, consisted of fetal lambs (n = 12) that underwent the surgical creation of a left diaphragmatic hernia at 90 days' gestation. Six of these animals also underwent simultaneous tracheal ligation. (2) The PFC group consisted of five neonatal animals that underwent isolation of the superior segment of the right upper lobe, with intrabronchial distension with perfluorocarbon to 7 to 10 mm Hg pressure for a 3-week period. (3) The postpneumonectomy group consisted of four neonatal animals that underwent left pneumonectomy. In the fetal study, lungs were retrieved at term (130 days), and in the postnatal study, lungs were retrieved 3 weeks after initial intervention. In all cases, RNA was extracted from snap-frozen lung samples and Northern blot analysis performed. Insulinlike growth factor-I, insulinlike growth factor-II, and vascular endothelial growth factor gene expression were analyzed by densitometry. Insulinlike growth factor-I gene expression was found to be decreased in association with experimental diaphragmatic hernia (P = .005), but restored to normal with tracheal ligation. Insulinlike growth factor-I gene

  14. A growth factor phenotype map for ovine preimplantation development.

    PubMed

    Watson, A J; Watson, P H; Arcellana-Panlilio, M; Warnes, D; Walker, S K; Schultz, G A; Armstrong, D T; Seamark, R F

    1994-04-01

    The reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to determine the patterns of expression for several growth factor ligand and receptor genes during ovine preimplantation development. Transcripts for insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, IGF-II, and the receptors for insulin and IGF-I were detected throughout ovine preimplantation development from the 1-cell to the blastocyst stage. Transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) transcripts were also detected throughout ovine preimplantation development. The mRNAs encoding basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) were detected in all stages of the ovine preimplantation embryo, although the relative abundance of this transcript consistently decreased from the 1-cell to the blastocyst stage, suggesting that it may represent a maternal transcript in early sheep embryos. Transcripts encoding ovine trophoblast protein (oTP) were detected only within blastocyst-stage embryos. Primary ovine oviduct cell cultures express the transcripts for IGF-II, IGF-I, TGF alpha, bFGF, TGF beta 1, and the receptors for insulin and IGF-I, suggesting that paracrine growth factor circuits may exist between the oviduct epithelium and the early ovine embryo. Transcripts for insulin, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and nerve growth factor (NGF) were not detected in any stage of the ovine preimplantation embryo or within the oviduct cell preparations. The expression of growth factor transcripts very early in mammalian development would predict that these molecules fulfil a necessary role(s) in supporting the progression of early embryos through the preimplantation interval. Our future efforts will be directed to understanding the nature of these putative regulatory pathways.

  15. Growth factors, nutrient signaling, and cardiovascular aging

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Luigi; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Longo, Valter D.

    2012-01-01

    Growth factors regulated by specific macronutrients have been shown to promote aging and accelerate mortality in the great majority of the organisms studied. In particular, the enzymes activated by growth hormone (GH), insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) in mammals and their orthologs in simple model organisms represent perhaps the best-understood proteins involved in the aging process. Dietary restriction (DR), which reduces the level of IGF-I and of other growth factors, has been associated with protection from diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases and deficiencies in GH signaling and IGF-I are strongly associated with protection from cancer and diabetes in both mice and humans, but their role in cardiac function and cardiovascular diseases is controversial. Here we review the link between growth factors, cardiac function and heart disease with focus on the cardioprotective and sensitizing effect of growth factors in both model organisms and humans. PMID:22499903

  16. Autocrine growth factors and solid tumor malignancy.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, J. H.; Karnes, W. E.; Cuttitta, F.; Walker, A.

    1991-01-01

    The ability of malignant cells to escape the constraint that normally regulate cell growth and differentiation has been a primary focus of attention for investigators of cancer cell biology. An outcome of this attention has been the discovery that the protein products of oncogenes play a role in the activation of growth signal pathways. A second outcome, possibly related to abnormal oncogene expression, has been the discovery that malignant cells frequently show an ability to regulate their own growth by the release of autocrine growth modulatory substances. Most important, the growth of certain malignant cell types has been shown to depend on autocrine growth circuits. A malignant tumor whose continued growth depends on the release of an autocrine growth factor may be vulnerable to treatment with specific receptor antagonists or immunoneutralizing antibodies designed to break the autocrine circuit. Information is rapidly emerging concerning autocrine growth factors in selected human solid tissue malignancy. Images PMID:1926844

  17. Growth factor involvement in tension-induced skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1993-01-01

    Long-term manned space travel will require a better understanding of skeletal muscle atrophy which results from microgravity. Astronaut strength and dexterity must be maintained for normal mission operations and for emergency situations. Although exercise in space slows the rate of muscle loss, it does not prevent it. A biochemical understanding of how gravity/tension/exercise help to maintain muscle size by altering protein synthesis and/or degradation rate should ultimately allow pharmacological intervention to prevent muscle atrophy in microgravity. The overall objective is to examine some of the basic biochemical processes involved in tension-induced muscle growth. With an experimental in vitro system, the role of exogenous and endogenous muscle growth factors in mechanically stimulated muscle growth are examined. Differentiated avian skeletal myofibers can be 'exercised' in tissue culture using a newly developed dynamic mechanical cell stimulator device which simulates different muscle activity patterns. Patterns of mechanical activity which significantly affect muscle growth and metabolic characteristics were found. Both exogenous and endogenous growth factors are essential for tension-induced muscle growth. Exogenous growth factors found in serum, such as insulin, insulin-like growth factors, and steroids, are important regulators of muscle protein turnover rates and mechanically-induced muscle growth. Endogenous growth factors are synthesized and released into the culture medium when muscle cells are mechanically stimulated. At least one family of mechanically induced endogenous factors, the prostaglandins, help to regulate the rates of protein turnover in muscle cells. Endogenously synthesized IGF-1 is another. The interaction of muscle mechanical activity and these growth factors in the regulation of muscle protein turnover rates with our in vitro model system is studied.

  18. Effects of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) and season on plasma and milk insulin-like growth factors I (IGF-I) and II (IGF-II) in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Collier, Robert J; Miller, M A; McLaughlin, C L; Johnson, H D; Baile, C A

    2008-07-01

    During two studies, effects of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) on plasma and milk IGF's in cows adapted to summer (S; 12 cows) or winter (W; 12 cows) conditions were evaluated. Each study consisted of on-farm periods (30 days) followed by climatology chamber periods (CC; 30 days). Cows were given daily injections of rbST, Sometribove, USAN (25mg/day; 6 cows each study) or saline (control; 6 cows each study). During on-farm periods, blood and milk (am and pm) samples were collected once weekly. During CC periods, blood samples were collected every 2 days and milk samples (am and pm) were collected daily. Plasma IGF-I and IGF-II were increased in cows treated with rbST. A pronounced seasonal pattern in basal and rbST-stimulated plasma IGF-I but not IGF-II was detected. Higher basal and rbST-stimulated plasma IGF-I concentrations in S occurred despite large decreases in feed intake and energy balance. Milk IGF-I and IGF-II was not affected by rbST treatment or season. Although milk IGF-I and IGF-II concentrations were unaffected by rbST treatment, total IGF-output increased due to increased milk yield. The observed seasonal patterns in plasma IGF-I may be indicative of seasonal differences in the coupling of the somatotropin-IGF axis. In particular, we failed to detect an uncoupling of the somatotropin-IGF-I axis in S despite an induced negative energy balance during thermal stress.

  19. Roles for Growth Factors in Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Witsch, Esther; Sela, Michael; Yarden, Yosef

    2011-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, cells receive fate-determining signals from their tissue surroundings, primarily in the form of polypeptide growth factors. Integration of these extracellular signals underlies tissue homeostasis. Although departure from homeostasis and tumor initiation are instigated by oncogenic mutations rather than by growth factors, the latter are the major regulators of all subsequent steps of tumor progression, namely clonal expansion, invasion across tissue barriers, angiogenesis, and colonization of distant niches. Here, we discuss the relevant growth factor families, their roles in tumor biology, as well as the respective downstream signaling pathways. Importantly, cancer-associated activating mutations that impinge on these pathways often relieve, in part, the reliance of tumors on growth factors. On the other hand, growth factors are frequently involved in evolvement of resistance to therapeutic regimens, which extends the roles for polypeptide factors to very late phases of tumor progression and offers opportunities for cancer therapy. PMID:20430953

  20. 40 CFR Table II-1 to Subpart II of... - Emission Factors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission Factors II Table II-1 to Subpart II of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment Pt. 98, Subpt. II, Table II-1...

  1. 40 CFR Table II-1 to Subpart II of... - Emission Factors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission Factors II Table II-1 to Subpart II of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment Pt. 98, Subpt. II, Table II-1...

  2. Growth factor gene therapy for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Tuszynski, Mark H; U, Hoi Sang; Alksne, John; Bakay, Roy A; Pay, Mary Margaret; Merrill, David; Thal, Leon J

    2002-11-15

    The capacity to prevent neuronal degeneration and death during the course of progressive neurological disorders such as Alzheimer disease (AD) would represent a significant advance in therapy. Nervous system growth factors are families of naturally produced proteins that, in animal models, exhibit extensive potency in preventing neuronal death due to a variety of causes, reversing age-related atrophy of neurons, and ameliorating functional deficits. The main challenge in translating growth factor therapy to the clinic has been delivery of growth factors to the brain in sufficient concentrations to influence neuronal function. One means of achieving growth factor delivery to the central nervous system in a highly targeted, effective manner may be gene therapy. In this article the authors summarize the development and implementation of nerve growth factor gene delivery as a potential means of reducing cell loss in AD.

  3. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein Beta-2 is involved in growth hormone-regulated insulin-like growth factor-II gene expression in the liver of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previously, we showed that levels of different CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) mRNAs in the liver of rainbow trout were modulated by GH and suggested that C/EBPs might be involved in GH induced IGF-II gene expression. As a step toward further investigation, we have developed monospecific poly...

  4. Growth factors from genes to clinical application

    SciTech Connect

    Sara, V.R. ); Hall, K.; Low, H. )

    1990-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed an explosion in the identification of growth factors and their receptors. This has been greatly facilitated by recombinant DNA technology, which has provided the tools not only to identify these proteins at the gene level but also to produce recombinant proteins for evaluating their biological activities. With the help of such techniques, we are moving toward an understanding of the biosynthesis of growth factors and their receptors, structure-function relationships, as well as mechanisms for intracellular signal transmission. The possibility of modifying these factors has opened new fields of clinical application. In this paper, four major areas of growth factor research are presented: the characterization of growth factor genes and their protein products, growth factor receptors and signal transduction by the receptors to mediate biological action, the biological actions of the various growth factors, and the role of growth factors in health and disease and their possible clinical application. Some of the topics covered include: structure of the IGFs and their variants; isoforms of PDGF receptor types; tyrosine kinase activation; structure of G-proteins in biological membranes; possible therapeutic application of NGF in the treatment of Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases; PDGF's possible role in the development of several fibroproliferative diseases and its therapeutic application in wound healing; and the possible use of angiogenic inhibitors in tumor treatment.

  5. Cyclin D-1, interleukin-6, HER-2/neu, transforming growth factor receptor-II and prediction of relapse in women with early stage, hormone receptor-positive breast cancer treated with tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Muss, Hyman B; Bunn, Janice Yanushka; Crocker, Abigail; Plaut, Karen; Koh, James; Heintz, Nick; Rincon, Mercedes; Weaver, Donald L; Tam, Diane; Beatty, Barbara; Kaufman, Peter; Donovan, Michael; Verbel, David; Weiss, Linda

    2007-01-01

    We hypothesized that amplification or overexpression of HER-2 (c-erbB-2), the Ki-67 antigen (Mib1), cyclin D-1 (CD1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), or the transforming growth factor beta II receptor, (TGFbetaRII), would predict relapse in women with early stage, estrogen (ER) and/or progesterone receptor (PR) positive breast cancer treated with tamoxifen. Conditional logistic regression models and a new novel analytic method - support vector machines (SVM) were used to assess the effect of multiple variables on treatment outcome. All patients had stage I-IIIa breast cancer (AJCC version 5). We paired 63 patients who were disease-free on or after tamoxifen with 63 patients who had relapsed (total 126); both disease-free and relapsed patients were matched by duration of tamoxifen therapy and time to recurrence. These 126 patients also served as the training set for SVM analysis and 18 other patients used as a validation set for SVM. In a multivariate analysis, larger tumor size, increasing extent of lymph node involvement, and poorer tumor grade were significant predictors of relapse. When HER-2 or CD1 were added to the model both were borderline significant predictors of relapse. The SVM model, after including all of the clinical and marker variables in the 126 patients as a training set, correctly predicted relapse in 78% of the 18 patient validation samples. In this trial, HER-2 and CD1 proved of borderline significance as predictive factors for recurrence on tamoxifen. An SVM model that included all clinical and biologic variables correctly predicted relapse in >75% of patients.

  6. Safety and pharmacokinetics of recombinant human hepatocyte growth factor (rh-HGF) in patients with fulminant hepatitis: a phase I/II clinical trial, following preclinical studies to ensure safety.

    PubMed

    Ido, Akio; Moriuchi, Akihiro; Numata, Masatsugu; Murayama, Toshinori; Teramukai, Satoshi; Marusawa, Hiroyuki; Yamaji, Naohisa; Setoyama, Hitoshi; Kim, Il-Deok; Chiba, Tsutomu; Higuchi, Shuji; Yokode, Masayuki; Fukushima, Masanori; Shimizu, Akira; Tsubouchi, Hirohito

    2011-05-08

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) stimulates hepatocyte proliferation, and also acts as an anti-apoptotic factor. Therefore, HGF is a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of fatal liver diseases. We performed a translational medicine protocol with recombinant human HGF (rh-HGF), including a phase I/II study of patients with fulminant hepatitis (FH) or late-onset hepatic failure (LOHF), in order to examine the safety, pharmacokinetics, and clinical efficacy of this molecule. Potential adverse effects identified through preclinical safety tests with rh-HGF include a decrease in blood pressure (BP) and an increase in urinary excretion of albumin. Therefore, we further investigated the effect of rh-HGF on circulatory status and renal toxicity in preclinical animal studies. In a clinical trial, 20 patients with FH or LOHF were evaluated for participation in this clinical trial, and four patients were enrolled. Subjects received rh-HGF (0.6 mg/m2/day) intravenously for 12 to 14 days. We established an infusion method to avoid rapid BP reduction in miniature swine, and confirmed reversibility of renal toxicity in rats. Although administration of rh-HGF moderately decreased BP in the participating subjects, this BP reduction did not require cessation of rh-HGF or any vasopressor therapy; BP returned to resting levels after the completion of rh-HGF infusion. Repeated doses of rh-HGF did not induce renal toxicity, and severe adverse events were not observed. Two patients survived, however, there was no evidence that rh-HGF was effective for the treatment of FH or LOHF. Intravenous rh-HGF at a dose of 0.6 mg/m2 was well tolerated in patients with FH or LOHF; therefore, it is desirable to conduct further investigations to determine the efficacy of rh-HGF at an increased dose.

  7. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta2 is involved in growth hormone-regulated insulin-like growth factor-II gene expression in the liver of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Lo, Jay H; Chen, Thomas T

    2010-05-01

    Previously, we showed that levels of different CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) mRNAs in the liver of rainbow trout were modulated by GH and suggested that C/EBPs might be involved in GH-induced IGF-II gene expression. As a step toward further investigation, we have developed monospecific polyclonal antibodies to detect rainbow trout C/EBPalpha, -beta1, -beta2, and -delta2 isoform proteins. Injection of GH into adult rainbow trout resulted in a significant increase of C/EBPbeta1, C/EBPbeta2, and C/EBPdelta2 proteins in the liver. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that C/EBPbeta2 binds to multiple sites at the 5' promoter/regulatory region, introns, and the 3' untranslated region of the IGF-II gene. GH treatment reduced C/EBPbeta2 binding to several of these regions at 6 h after injection. The decreased occupancy of C/EBPbeta2 coincided well with an increase of histone H4 acetylation at the proximal promoter and elevation of the IGF-II mRNA level. Immunoblotting analysis showed that C/EBPbeta2 existed predominately as a truncated form in the liver, and cotransfection analysis further showed that the truncated C/EBPbeta2 acted as a negative regulator on IGF-II proximal promoter. GH treatment caused deacetylation of C/EBPbeta2 in the liver. In addition, we observed a GH-dependent interaction of C/EBPbeta2 with a complex involving histone H1. All together, these results suggest that C/EBPbeta2 was regulated at multiple levels by GH, and C/EBPbeta2 may play a suppressive role in mediating GH-induced IGF-II expression in the liver of rainbow trout.

  8. [Transforming growth factor of beta-type].

    PubMed

    Stoĭka, R S

    1988-01-01

    Recent data about the structure and properties of the beta-type transforming growth factor as well as evidence about its influence on different target cells are presented. The regulatory action of the factor is shown to depend mainly on the type of tested cells, conditions of their culturing and the presence of other bioregulators of cell proliferation in the medium. The prospects of the beta-type transforming growth factor use in practice are considered.

  9. Growth factors for the treatment of ischemic brain injury (growth factor treatment).

    PubMed

    Larpthaveesarp, Amara; Ferriero, Donna M; Gonzalez, Fernando F

    2015-04-30

    In recent years, growth factor therapy has emerged as a potential treatment for ischemic brain injury. The efficacy of therapies that either directly introduce or stimulate local production of growth factors and their receptors in damaged brain tissue has been tested in a multitude of models for different Central Nervous System (CNS) diseases. These growth factors include erythropoietin (EPO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), among others. Despite the promise shown in animal models, the particular growth factors that should be used to maximize both brain protection and repair, and the therapeutic critical period, are not well defined. We will review current pre-clinical and clinical evidence for growth factor therapies in treating different causes of brain injury, as well as issues to be addressed prior to application in humans.

  10. Growth factor involvement in tension-induced skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, H. H.

    1987-01-01

    Muscle tissue culture techniques were developed to grow skeletal myofibers which differentiate into more adult-like myofibers. Mechanical simulation studies of these muscle cells in a newly developed mechanical cell simulator can now be performed to study growth processes in skeletal muscle. Conditions in the mechanical cell simulator were defined where mechanical activity can either prevent muscle wasting or stimulate muscle growth. The role of endogenous and exogenous growth factors in tension-induced muscle growth is being investigated under the defined conditions of tissue culture.

  11. Relationships of RNA polymerase II genetic interactors to transcription start site usage defects and growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Jin, Huiyan; Kaplan, Craig D

    2014-11-06

    Transcription initiation by RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) is an essential step in gene expression and regulation in all organisms. Initiation requires a great number of factors, and defects in this process can be apparent in the form of altered transcription start site (TSS) selection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast). It has been shown previously that TSS selection in S. cerevisiae is altered in Pol II catalytic mutants defective in a conserved active site feature known as the trigger loop. Pol II trigger loop mutants show growth phenotypes in vivo that correlate with biochemical defects in vitro and exhibit wide-ranging genetic interactions. We assessed how Pol II mutant growth phenotypes and TSS selection in vivo are modified by Pol II genetic interactors to estimate the relationship between altered TSS selection in vivo and organismal fitness of Pol II mutants. We examined whether the magnitude of TSS selection defects could be correlated with Pol II mutant-transcription factor double mutant phenotypes. We observed broad genetic interactions among Pol II trigger loop mutants and General Transcription Factor (GTF) alleles, with reduced-activity Pol II mutants especially sensitive to defects in TFIIB. However, Pol II mutant growth defects could be uncoupled from TSS selection defects in some Pol II allele-GTF allele double mutants, whereas a number of other Pol II genetic interactors did not influence ADH1 start site selection alone or in combination with Pol II mutants. Initiation defects are likely only partially responsible for Pol II allele growth phenotypes, with some Pol II genetic interactors able to exacerbate Pol II mutant growth defects while leaving initiation at a model TSS selection promoter unaffected.

  12. Clinical effects of prior trastuzumab on combination eribulin mesylate plus trastuzumab as first-line treatment for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer: results from a Phase II, single-arm, multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Puhalla, Shannon; Wilks, Sharon; Brufsky, Adam M; O’Shaughnessy, Joyce; Schwartzberg, Lee S; Berrak, Erhan; Song, James; Vahdat, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Eribulin mesylate, a novel nontaxane microtubule dynamics inhibitor in the halichondrin class of antineoplastic drugs, is indicated for the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer who previously received ≥2 chemotherapy regimens in the metastatic setting. Primary data from a Phase II trial for the first-line combination of eribulin plus trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive patients showed a 71% objective response rate and tolerability consistent with the known profile of these agents. Here, we present prespecified analyses of efficacy of this combination based on prior trastuzumab use. Patients received eribulin mesylate 1.4 mg/m2 (equivalent to 1.23 mg/m2 eribulin [expressed as free base]) intravenously on days 1 and 8 plus trastuzumab (8 mg/kg intravenously/cycle 1, then 6 mg/kg) on day 1 of each 21-day cycle. Objective response rates, progression-free survival, and tolerability were assessed in patients who had and had not received prior adjuvant or neoadjuvant (neo/adjuvant) trastuzumab treatment. Fifty-two patients (median age: 59.5 years) received eribulin/trastuzumab for a median treatment duration of ~31 weeks; 40.4% (n=21) had been previously treated with neo/adjuvant trastuzumab prior to treatment with eribulin plus trastuzumab for metastatic disease (median time between neo/adjuvant and study treatment: 23 months). In trastuzumab-naïve patients (n=31) compared with those who had received prior trastuzumab, objective response rate was 77.4% versus 61.9%, respectively; duration of response was 11.8 versus 9.5 months, respectively; clinical benefit rate was 87.1% versus 81.0%, respectively; and median progression-free survival was 12.2 versus 11.5 months, respectively. The most common grade 3/4 treatment-emergent adverse events (occuring in ≥5% of patients) in patients who received prior trastuzumab versus trastuzumab naïve patients, respectively, were neutropenia (47.6% vs 32.3%), peripheral neuropathy (14

  13. Transforming growth factor beta1 and aldosterone

    PubMed Central

    Matsuki, Kota; Hathaway, Catherine K.; Chang, Albert S.; Smithies, Oliver; Kakoki, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review It is well established that blocking renin-angiotensin II-aldosterone system (RAAS) is effective for the treatment of cardiovascular and renal complications in hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Although the induction of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFbeta1) by components of RAAS mediates the hypertrophic and fibrogenic changes in cardiovascular-renal complications, it is still controversial as to whether TGFbeta1 can be a target to prevent such complications. Here we review recent findings on the role of TGFbeta1 in fluid homeostasis, focusing on the relationship with aldosterone. Recent findings TGFbeta1 suppresses adrenal production of aldosterone and renal tubular sodium reabsorption. We have generated mice with TGFbeta1 mRNA expression graded in five steps from 10% to 300% normal, and found that blood pressure and plasma volume are negatively regulated by TGFbeta1. Notably, the 10 % hypomorph exhibits primary aldosteronism and sodium and water retention due to markedly impaired urinary excretion of water and electrolytes. Summary These results identify TGFbeta signaling as an important counterregulatory system against aldosterone. Understanding the molecular mechanisms for the suppressive effects of TGFbeta1 on adrenocortical and renal function may further our understanding of primary aldosteronism as well as assist in the development of novel therapeutic strategies for hypertension. PMID:25587902

  14. Platelet Activating Factor: A Growth Factor for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Factor for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Larry W. Daniel, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Wake Forest University...A Growth Factor for Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0682 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Larry W...Relevance: If PAF is found to be a growth and angiogenic factor for breast cancer cells, these studies can be followed up by in vivo studies in nude

  15. Gene expression profiles of some cytokines, growth factors, receptors, and enzymes (GM-CSF, IFNγ, MMP-2, IGF-II, EGF, TGF-β, IGF-IIR) during pregnancy in the cat uterus.

    PubMed

    Agaoglu, Ozgecan Korkmaz; Agaoglu, Ali Reha; Guzeloglu, Aydin; Aslan, Selim; Kurar, Ercan; Kayis, Seyit Ali; Schäfer-Somi, Sabine

    2016-03-01

    Early pregnancy is one of the most critical periods of pregnancy, and many factors such as cytokines, enzymes, and members of the immune system have to cooperate in a balanced way. In the present study, the gene expression profiles of factors associated with pregnancy such as EGF, transforming growth factor beta, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interferon gamma, insulin-like growth factor 2, insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor, and matrix metalloproteinase 2 were analyzed in uterine tissues of female cats. The cats were assigned to five groups: G1 (embryo positive, n = 7; 7th day after mating), G2 (after implantation, n = 7; 20th day after mating), G3 (midgestation, n = 7; 24-25th day after mating), G4 (late gestation, n = 7; 30-45th day after mating), G5 (oocyte group, n = 7; 7th day after estrus). Tissue samples from the uterus and placenta were collected after ovariohysterectomy. Relative messenger RNA levels were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. All the factors examined were detected in all tissue samples. In the course of pregnancy, significantly higher expression of EGF and matrix metalloproteinase 2 in G2 than in G1 was observed (P < 0.05). Insulin-like growth factor 2 expression was higher in all groups than in G1 (P < 0.05). Upregulation of EGF during implantation was detected. The expression of interferon gamma was significantly higher in G3 than in G1 (P < 0.05). Transforming growth factor beta and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor were constantly expressed in all groups. In conclusion, the expressions of these factors in feline uterine tissue at different stages of pregnancy might indicate that these factors play roles in the development of pregnancy such as trophoblast invasion, vascularization, implantation, and placentation.

  16. The role of fibroblast growth factors in tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Korc, M; Friesel, R E

    2009-08-01

    Biological processes that drive cell growth are exciting targets for cancer therapy. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling network plays a ubiquitous role in normal cell growth, survival, differentiation, and angiogenesis, but has also been implicated in tumor development. Elucidation of the roles and relationships within the diverse FGF family and of their links to tumor growth and progression will be critical in designing new drug therapies to target FGF receptor (FGFR) pathways. Recent studies have shown that FGF can act synergistically with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to amplify tumor angiogenesis, highlighting that targeting of both the FGF and VEGF pathways may be more efficient in suppressing tumor growth and angiogenesis than targeting either factor alone. In addition, through inducing tumor cell survival, FGF has the potential to overcome chemotherapy resistance highlighting that chemotherapy may be more effective when used in combination with FGF inhibitor therapy. Furthermore, FGFRs have variable activity in promoting angiogenesis, with the FGFR-1 subgroup being associated with tumor progression and the FGFR-2 subgroup being associated with either early tumor development or decreased tumor progression. This review highlights the growing knowledge of FGFs in tumor cell growth and survival, including an overview of FGF intracellular signaling pathways, the role of FGFs in angiogenesis, patterns of FGF and FGFR expression in various tumor types, and the role of FGFs in tumor progression.

  17. An unnatural PIP simulates growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Swan, Laura

    2009-11-25

    In this issue of Chemistry & Biology, Laketa et al. describe the synthesis of a membrane permeant phosphoinositide lipid that acts to stimulate PI(3,4,5)P(3)-dependent signaling without the need of growth factor stimulation.

  18. New Clue Found to Growth Factor Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Michelle

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is the discovery which may help to explain epidermal growth factor effects on the cell skeleton. The role of a protein called profilin in the regulation of the microfilament system is described. (CW)

  19. New Clue Found to Growth Factor Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Michelle

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is the discovery which may help to explain epidermal growth factor effects on the cell skeleton. The role of a protein called profilin in the regulation of the microfilament system is described. (CW)

  20. The function of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Bonnie J; D'Amore, Patricia A; Bryan, Brad A

    2009-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is considered the master regulator of angiogenesis during growth and development, as well as in disease states such as cancer, diabetes, and macular degeneration. This review details our current understanding of VEGF signaling and discusses the benefits and unexpected side effects of promising anti-angiogenic therapeutics that are currently being used to inhibit neovacularization in tumors.

  1. A phase II study of trastuzumab emtansine in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive metastatic breast cancer who were previously treated with trastuzumab, lapatinib, an anthracycline, a taxane, and capecitabine.

    PubMed

    Krop, Ian E; LoRusso, Patricia; Miller, Kathy D; Modi, Shanu; Yardley, Denise; Rodriguez, Gladys; Guardino, Ellie; Lu, Michael; Zheng, Maoxia; Girish, Sandhya; Amler, Lukas; Winer, Eric P; Rugo, Hope S

    2012-09-10

    To determine whether the antibody-drug conjugate trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), which combines human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) -targeted delivery of the potent antimicrotubule agent DM1 with the antitumor activity of trastuzumab, is effective in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC) who have previously received all standard HER2-directed therapies. In this single-arm phase II study, T-DM1 3.6 mg/kg was administered intravenously every 3 weeks to patients with HER2-positive MBC who had prior treatment with trastuzumab, lapatinib, an anthracycline, a taxane, and capecitabine. The primary objectives were overall response rate (ORR) by independent review and safety. Among 110 pretreated patients (median, seven prior agents for MBC; median follow-up, 17.4 months), the ORR was 34.5% (95% CI, 26.1% to 43.9%), clinical benefit rate was 48.2% (95% CI, 38.8% to 57.9%), median progression-free survival (PFS) was 6.9 months (95% CI, 4.2 to 8.4 months), and median duration of response was 7.2 months (95% CI, 4.6 months to not estimable). In patients with confirmed HER2-positive tumors (n = 80 by retrospective central testing), the response rate was 41.3% (95% CI, 30.4% to 52.8%), and median PFS was 7.3 months (95% CI, 4.6 to 12.3 months). Most adverse events were grades 1 to 2; the most frequent grade ≥ 3 events were thrombocytopenia (9.1%), fatigue (4.5%), and cellulitis (3.6%). T-DM1 is well tolerated and has single-agent activity in patients with HER2-positive MBC who have previously received both approved HER2-directed therapies and multiple chemotherapy agents. T-DM1 may be an effective new treatment for this patient population.

  2. Placental growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 in human lung development.

    PubMed

    Janér, Joakim; Andersson, Sture; Haglund, Caj; Karikoski, Riitta; Lassus, Patrik

    2008-08-01

    We examined the pulmonary expression of 2 proangiogenic factors, namely, placental growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, during lung development and acute and chronic lung injury in newborn infants. Six groups were included in an immunohistochemical study of placental growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, that is, 9 fetuses, 4 preterm and 8 term infants without lung injury who died soon after birth, 5 preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome of <2 days and 7 with respiratory distress syndrome of >10 days, and 6 with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Placental growth factor concentrations in tracheal aspirate fluid were measured in 70 samples from 20 preterm infants during the first postnatal week. In immunohistochemical analyses, placental growth factor staining was seen in bronchial epithelium and macrophages in all groups. Distal airway epithelium positivity was observed mostly in fetuses and in preterm infants who died soon after birth. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 staining was seen in vascular endothelium in all groups and also in lymphatic endothelium in fetuses. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 staining in arterial endothelium was associated with higher and staining in venous endothelium with lower gestational age. In capillaries, less vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 staining was seen in bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The mean placental growth factor protein concentration in tracheal aspirate fluid during the first postnatal week was 0.64 +/- 0.42 pg/mL per IgA-secretory component unit. Concentrations during the first postnatal week were stable. Lower placental growth factor concentrations correlated with chorioamnionitis and lactosyl ceramide positivity. The vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 staining pattern seems to reflect ongoing differentiation and activity of different endothelia. Lower vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 expression

  3. Cancer cells. 3: Growth factors and transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Feramisco, J.; Ozanne, B.; Stiles, C.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains over 50 papers. Some of the titles are: Structure of Human Epidermal Growth Factor and Expression of Normal and Variant mRNAs in Epdermoid Carcinoma Cells; Tyrosine Kinase Activity Associated with the v-erb-B Gene Product; Cloning and Characterization of Human Epidermal Growth Factor-Receptor Gene Sequences in A431 Carcinoma Cells; Anti-oncogenes and the Suppression of Tumor Formation; and Normal Human sis/PDGF-2 Gene Expression Induces Cellular Transformation.

  4. Growth factors and growth factor receptors in the hippocampus. Role in plasticity and response to injury.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Sampedro, M; Bovolenta, P

    1990-01-01

    Various growth factors are present in the hippocampal formation and appear responsible for the prominent plasticity of this brain area. Although hormone-like growth-promoting polypeptides are the best known, recent studies emphasize the importance in the growth response of molecules such as laminin proteoglycans, neurotransmitters and growth inhibitors. The progress and problems in the study of these substances are reviewed.

  5. Insulin-like growth factor 1 and hair growth.

    PubMed

    Su, H Y; Hickford, J G; Bickerstaffe, R; Palmer, B R

    1999-11-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) has been identified as an important growth factor in many biological systems.[1] It shares considerable structural homology with insulin and exerts insulin-like effects on food intake and glucose metabolism. Recently it has been suggested to play a role in regulating cellular proliferation and migration during the development of hair follicles. [2,3] To exert its biological effects, the IGF-1 is required to activate cells by binding to specific cell-surface receptors. The type I IGF receptor (IGF-1R) is the only IGF receptor to have IGF-mediated signaling functions.[1] In circulation, this growth factor mediates endocrine action of growth hormone (GH) on somatic growth and is bound to specific binding proteins (BPs). The latter control IGF transport, efflux from vascular compartments and association with cell surface receptors.[4] In tissues, IGF-1 is produced by mesenchymal type cells and acts in a paracrine and autocrine fashion by binding to the IGF-1R. This binding activates the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) that triggers the downstream responses and finally stimulates cell division.[5] IGF-1 may therefore be able to stimulate the proliferation of hair follicle cells through cellular signaling pathways of its receptors. Local infusion of IGF-1 into sheep has been reported to be capable of stimulating protein synthesis in the skin.[6] It may also increase the production of wool keratin. Recently, transgenic mice overexpressing IGF-1 in the skin have been shown to have earlier hair follicle development than controls.[7] In addition, this growth factor plays an important role in many cell types as a survival factor to prevent cell death.[8] This anti-apoptotic function of IGF-1 may be important to the development of follicle cells as follicles undergo a growth cycle where the regressive, catagen phase is apoptosis driven. In this review, the effects of IGF-1 on follicle cell proliferation and differentiation are discussed. In

  6. Actions of activin A, connective tissue growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor and teratocarcinoma-derived growth factor 1 on the development of the bovine preimplantation embryo.

    PubMed

    Kannampuzha-Francis, Jasmine; Tribulo, Paula; Hansen, Peter J

    2016-05-17

    The reproductive tract secretes bioactive molecules collectively known as embryokines that can regulate embryonic growth and development. In the present study we tested four growth factors expressed in the endometrium for their ability to modify the development of the bovine embryo to the blastocyst stage and alter the expression of genes found to be upregulated (bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) and keratin 8, type II (KRT8)) or downregulated (NADH dehydrogenase 1 (ND1) and S100 calcium binding protein A10 (S100A10)) in embryos competent to develop to term. Zygotes were treated at Day 5 with 0.01, 0.1 or 1.0 nM growth factor. The highest concentration of activin A increased the percentage of putative zygotes that developed to the blastocyst stage. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) increased the number of cells in the inner cell mass (ICM), decreased the trophectoderm : ICM ratio and increased blastocyst expression of KRT8 and ND1. The lowest concentration of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) reduced the percentage of putative zygotes becoming blastocysts. Teratocarcinoma-derived growth factor 1 increased total cell number at 0.01 nM and expression of S100A10 at 1.0 nM, but otherwise had no effects. Results confirm the prodevelopmental actions of activin A and indicate that CTGF may also function as an embryokine by regulating the number of ICM cells in the blastocyst and altering gene expression. Low concentrations of HGF were inhibitory to development.

  7. Growth rate and associated factors in small abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Vega de Céniga, M; Gómez, R; Estallo, L; Rodríguez, L; Baquer, M; Barba, A

    2006-03-01

    To study the growth rate and factors influencing progression of small infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Observational, longitudinal, prospective study. We followed patients with AAA <5 cm in diameter in two groups. Group I (AAA 3-3.9 cm, n = 246) underwent annual ultrasound scans. Group II (AAA 4-4.9 cm, n = 106) underwent 6-monthly CT scans. We included 352 patients (333 men and 19 women) followed for a mean of 55.2+/-37.4 months (6.3-199.8). The mean growth rate was significantly greater in group II (4.72+/-5.93 vs. 2.07+/-3.23 mm/year; p<0.0001). Group II had a greater percentage of patients with rapid aneurysm expansion (>4 mm/year) (36.8 vs. 13.8%; p<0.0001). The classical cardiovascular risk factors did not influence the AAA growth rate in group I. Chronic limb ischemia was associated with slower expansion (< or = 4 mm/year) (OR 0.47; CI 95% 0.22-0.99; p = 0.045). Diabetic patients in group II had a significantly smaller mean AAA growth rate than non-diabetics (1.69+/-3.51 vs. 5.22+/-6.11 mm/year; p = 0.032). The expansion rate of small AAA increases with the AAA size. AAA with a diameter of 3-3.9 cm expand slowly, and they are very unlikely to require surgical repair in 5 years. Many 4-4.9 cm AAA can be expected to reach a surgical size in the first 2 years of follow-up. Chronic limb ischemia and diabetes are associated with reduced aneurysm growth rates.

  8. Neurodevelopmental effects of insulin-like growth factor signaling

    PubMed Central

    O’Kusky, John; Ye, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling greatly impacts the development and growth of the central nervous system (CNS). IGF-I and IGF-II, two ligands of the IGF system, exert a wide variety of actions both during development and in adulthood, promoting the survival and proliferation of neural cells. The IGFs also influence the growth and maturation of neural cells, augmenting dendritic growth and spine formation, axon outgrowth, synaptogenesis, and myelination. Specific IGF actions, however, likely depend on cell type, developmental stage, and local microenvironmental milieu within the brain. Emerging research also indicates that alterations in IGF signaling likely contribute to the pathogenesis of some neurological disorders. This review summarizes experimental studies and shed light on the critical roles of IGF signaling, as well as its mechanisms, during CNS development. PMID:22710100

  9. Genotypes, haplotypes and diplotypes of IGF-II SNPs and their association with growth traits in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohui; Bai, Junjie; Hu, Yinchang; Ye, Xing; Li, Shengjie; Yu, Lingyun

    2012-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is involved in the regulation of somatic growth and metabolism in many fishes. IGF-II is an important candidate gene for growth traits in fishes and its polymorphisms were associated with the growth traits. The aim of this study is to screen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) IGF-II gene and to analyze potential association between IGF-II gene polymorphisms and growth traits in largemouth bass. Four SNPs (C127T, T1012G, C1836T and C1861T) were detected and verified by DNA sequencing in the largemouth bass IGF-II gene. These SNPs were found to organize into seven haplotypes, which formed 13 diplotypes (haplotype pairs). Association analysis showed that four individual SNPs were not significantly associated with growth traits. Significant associations were, however, noted between diplotypes and growth traits (P < 0.05). The fish with H1H3 (CTCC/CGCC) and H1H5 (CTCC/TTTT) had greater body weight than those with H1H1 (CTCC/CTCC), H1H2 (CTCC/TGTT) and H4H4 (TGCT/TGCT/) did. Our data suggest a significant association between genetic variations in the largemouth bass IGF-II gene and growth traits. IGF-II SNPs could be used as potential genetic markers in future breeding programs of largemouth bass.

  10. Engineering growth factors for regenerative medicine applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Aaron C.; Briquez, Priscilla S.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Cochran, Jennifer R.

    2016-01-15

    Growth factors are important morphogenetic proteins that instruct cell behavior and guide tissue repair and renewal. Although their therapeutic potential holds great promise in regenerative medicine applications, translation of growth factors into clinical treatments has been hindered by limitations including poor protein stability, low recombinant expression yield, and suboptimal efficacy. This review highlights current tools, technologies, and approaches to design integrated and effective growth factor-based therapies for regenerative medicine applications. The first section describes rational and combinatorial protein engineering approaches that have been utilized to improve growth factor stability, expression yield, biodistribution, and serum half-life, or alter their cell trafficking behavior or receptor binding affinity. The second section highlights elegant biomaterial-based systems, inspired by the natural extracellular matrix milieu, that have been developed for effective spatial and temporal delivery of growth factors to cell surface receptors. Although appearing distinct, these two approaches are highly complementary and involve principles of molecular design and engineering to be considered in parallel when developing optimal materials for clinical applications.

  11. Placenta Growth Factor in Diabetic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cianfarani, Francesca; Zambruno, Giovanna; Brogelli, Laura; Sera, Francesco; Lacal, Pedro Miguel; Pesce, Maurizio; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Failla, Cristina Maria; Napolitano, Monica; Odorisio, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    Reduced microcirculation and diminished expression of growth factors contribute to wound healing impairment in diabetes. Placenta growth factor (PlGF), an angiogenic mediator promoting pathophysiological neovascularization, is expressed during cutaneous wound healing and improves wound closure by enhancing angiogenesis. By using streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, we here demonstrate that PlGF induction is strongly reduced in diabetic wounds. Diabetic transgenic mice overexpressing PlGF in the skin displayed accelerated wound closure compared with diabetic wild-type littermates. Moreover, diabetic wound treatment with an adenovirus vector expressing the human PlGF gene (AdCMV.PlGF) significantly accelerated the healing process compared with wounds treated with a control vector. The analysis of treated wounds showed that PlGF gene transfer improved granulation tissue formation, maturation, and vascularization, as well as monocytes/macrophages local recruitment. Platelet-derived growth factor, fibroblast growth factor-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA levels were increased in AdCMV.PlGF-treated wounds, possibly enhancing PlGF-mediated effects. Finally, PlGF treatment stimulated cultured dermal fibroblast migration, pointing to a direct role of PlGF in accelerating granulation tissue maturation. In conclusion, our data indicate that reduced PlGF expression contributes to impaired wound healing in diabetes and that PlGF gene transfer to diabetic wounds exerts therapeutic activity by promoting different aspects of the repair process. PMID:17003476

  12. FACTORS WHICH CONTROL MAXIMAL GROWTH OF BACTERIA

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, N. A.; Stokes, J. L.

    1962-01-01

    Sinclair, N. A. (Washington State University, Pullman) and J. L. Stokes. Factors which control maximal growth of bacteria. J. Bacteriol. 83:1147–1154. 1962.—In a chemically defined medium containing 1% glucose and 0.1% (NH4)2SO4, both of these compounds are virtually exhausted by the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens. If these carbon, energy, and nitrogen sources are added back to the culture filtrate, maximal growth to the level of the original culture is obtained. This process can be repeated several times with the same results. Eventually, however, the supply of minerals in the culture limits growth. When the nutrient levels are raised to 3% glucose and 0.3% (NH4)2SO4, lack of oxygen and low pH limit growth before the supply of nutrients is exhausted. There is no evidence that specific autoinhibitory substances are produced either in chemically defined or complex nitrogenous media or that physical crowding of the cells limits growth. The results with Escherichia coli are similar to those with P. fluorescens. However, after a few growth cycles aerobically and after only one growth cycle anaerobically, inhibitory substances, probably organic acids, accumulate and limit growth. PMID:13913264

  13. PROSPECT - GROWTH FACTOR CONTROL OF BONE MASS

    PubMed Central

    Canalis, Ernesto

    2010-01-01

    Bone formation is determined by the number and function of osteoblasts. Cell number is governed by factors that regulate the replication and differentiation of pre-osteoblasts and factors that regulate osteoblastic cell death. Cell function is controlled by signals acting on the mature osteoblast. Platelet derived and fibroblast growth factors are bone cell mitogens. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) and Wnt induce the differentiation of mesenchymal cells toward osteoblasts, and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I stimulates the function of mature osteoblasts and prevents their death. The activity of BMP, Wnt and IGF-I is modulated by extracellular antagonists or binding proteins. Changes in growth factor synthesis and activity may play a role in the pathogenesis of selected forms of osteoporosis, and alterations in the expression or binding of the extracellular antagonists can be associated with changes in bone mass. Current approaches to bone anabolic therapies for osteoporosis include the administration of a growth factor, such as IGF-I, or the neutralization of an antagonist. Ideally, the targeting of an anabolic agent should be specific to bone to preclude non-skeletal unwanted side effects. Clinical trials are needed to determine the long-term effectiveness and safety of novel anabolic agents for the management of osteoporosis. PMID:19718659

  14. Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC) 022: A Phase II Trial of Neratinib for Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2–Positive Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Rebecca S.; Wefel, Jeffrey S.; Melisko, Michelle E.; Hess, Kenneth R.; Connolly, Roisin M.; Van Poznak, Catherine H.; Niravath, Polly A.; Puhalla, Shannon L.; Ibrahim, Nuhad; Blackwell, Kimberly L.; Moy, Beverly; Herold, Christina; Liu, Minetta C.; Lowe, Alarice; Agar, Nathalie Y.R.; Ryabin, Nicole; Farooq, Sarah; Lawler, Elizabeth; Rimawi, Mothaffar F.; Krop, Ian E.; Wolff, Antonio C.; Winer, Eric P.; Lin, Nancy U.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Evidence-based treatments for metastatic, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)–positive breast cancer in the CNS are limited. Neratinib is an irreversible inhibitor of erbB1, HER2, and erbB4, with promising activity in HER2-positive breast cancer; however, its activity in the CNS is unknown. We evaluated the efficacy of treatment with neratinib in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer brain metastases in a multicenter, phase II open-label trial. Patients and Methods Eligible patients were those with HER2-positive brain metastases (≥ 1 cm in longest dimension) who experienced progression in the CNS after one or more line of CNS-directed therapy, such as whole-brain radiotherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, and/or surgical resection. Patients received neratinib 240 mg orally once per day, and tumors were assessed every two cycles. The primary endpoint was composite CNS objective response rate (ORR), requiring all of the following: ≥50% reduction in volumetric sum of target CNS lesions and no progression of non-target lesions, new lesions, escalating corticosteroids, progressive neurologic signs/symptoms, or non-CNS progression—the threshold for success was five of 40 responders. Results Forty patients were enrolled between February 2012 and June 2013; 78% of patients had previous whole-brain radiotherapy. Three women achieved a partial response (CNS objective response rate, 8%; 95% CI, 2% to 22%). The median number of cycles received was two (range, one to seven cycles), with a median progression-free survival of 1.9 months. Five women received six or more cycles. The most common grade ≥ 3 event was diarrhea (occurring in 21% of patients taking prespecified loperamide prophylaxis and 28% of those without prophylaxis). Patients in the study experienced a decreased quality of life over time. Conclusion Although neratinib had low activity and did not meet our threshold for success, 12.5% of patients received six or more cycles. Studies

  15. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer: heat shock protein 90 overexpression, Ki67 proliferative index, and topoisomerase II-α co-amplification as predictors of pathologic complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy with trastuzumab and docetaxel.

    PubMed

    Bria, Emilio; Furlanetto, Jenny; Carbognin, Luisa; Brunelli, Matteo; Caliolo, Chiara; Nortilli, Rolando; Massari, Francesco; Pedron, Serena; Manfrin, Erminia; Pellini, Francesca; Bonetti, Franco; Sperduti, Isabella; Pollini, Giovanni Paolo; Scarpa, Aldo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2015-02-01

    The combination of trastuzumab and chemotherapy is currently considered the standard of care for patients with locally advanced/operable human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer. The potential correlation between the pathologic complete response (pCR) and the overexpression of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), Ki67, and the amplification of topoisomerase II-α (TOPO2A) was investigated in a series of patients who received neoadjuvant treatment. HER2-amplified patients who received neoadjuvant trastuzumab-docetaxel were gathered. Baseline and postsurgical Hsp90 immunoscore, Ki67 proliferation index, and TOPO2A amplification were determined together with classic clinical-pathologic predictors and correlated with pCR and imaging data. A total of 24 patients were evaluated for response; pCR, clinical, and radiologic response were found in 4 patients (16.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7-31.5), 9 patients (37.5%; 95% CI, 18.1-56.8), and 6 patients (25.0%; 95% CI, 7.6-42.3) patients, respectively. pCR was significantly higher in premenopausal (60.0% vs. 5.3%, P = .02) and negative hormonal receptor patients (50.0% vs. 5.6%, P = .03). A trend for patients with high Ki67 and TOPO2A/HER2 co-amplification was found (21.1% vs. none, P = .54; 50.0% vs. 12%, P = .16). pCR was significantly higher in patients with Hsp90 score 3+, in comparison with score 2+ and score 1+ (50.0% vs. 14.3% vs. none, P = .05). After treatment, a statistically significant lower Ki67 staining (30.0% vs. 17.5%, P = .005) and a trend for the decreased expression of high (score 3+) and moderate (score 2+) Hsp90 immunostaining (McNemar P = .25, Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney P = .08) were found. Although underpowered, our data suggest that patients with HER2-positive breast cancer overexpressing Hsp90 should be investigated as a "newer" molecular subtype with a significantly higher chance of pCR when receiving anti-Her2 agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  16. BRCA-mutated Invasive Breast Carcinomas: Immunohistochemical Analysis of Insulin-like Growth Factor II mRNA-binding Protein (IMP3), Cytokeratin 8/18, and Cytokeratin 14.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sambit K; Lai, Jin-Ping; Gordon, Ora K; Pradhan, Dinesh; Bose, Shikha; Dadmanesh, Farnaz

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the expression of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein (IMP3), CK8/18, and CK14 in BRCA mutated and sporadic invasive breast carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry for IMP3, CK8/18, and CK14 was performed on 39 cases of invasive breast carcinomas with BRCA mutation (24 BRCA1, 14 BRCA2, and 1 dual BRCA1/BRCA2) and 54 cases of sporadic invasive breast carcinomas. The relationship between the IMP3, CK8/18, and CK14 and the tumor grade and molecular phenotypes were analyzed. IMP3, CK8/18, and CK14 positivity were present in 20 (51%), 22 (56%), and 14 (36%) of 39 BRCA-mutated breast carcinomas, and 11 (20%), 53 (98%), and 24 (44%) of 54 sporadic breast carcinomas respectively. The rates of IMP3 expression and absence of CK8/18 (44% versus 2%) in BRCA-mutated breast carcinomas was significantly higher than the sporadic breast carcinomas (p = 0.002 and p < 0.001). No significant difference was observed for CK14 among the two groups (p = 0.408). No significant difference was observed among BRCA1-related and BRCA2-related breast carcinomas in the immunoprofile for IMP3, CK8/18, and CK14. No significant correlation was identified between the expression of IMP3 and CK8/18 and the tumor grade in both BRCA-mutated and sporadic breast carcinomas (p > 0.05). In cases with luminal A and B phenotypes, the rates of expression of IMP3 and loss of CK8/18 were significantly higher in BRCA-mutated as compared to sporadic breast carcinoma (p < 0.001). In cases with basal-like phenotype, the absence of CK8/18 expression was significantly higher in BRCA-mutated breast carcinomas (54% versus 0%, p = 0.001), while no difference was observed for IMP3 expression (p = 0.435). Regardless of mutation type, histologic grade, or molecular phenotype, the absence of CK8/18 expression and presence of IMP3 expression are seen at much higher rate in BRCA mutated breast carcinomas.

  17. Cystine knot growth factors and their functionally versatile proregions.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Elisabeth

    2017-09-05

    The cystine knot disulfide pattern has been found to be widespread in nature, since it has been detected in proteins from plants, marine snails, spiders and mammals. Cystine knot proteins are secreted proteins. Their functions range from defense mechanisms as toxins, e.g. ion channel or enzyme inhibitors, to hormones, blood factors and growth factors. Cystine knot proteins can be divided into two superordinate groups. (i) The cystine knot peptides, also referred to - with other non-cystine knot proteins - as knottins, with linear and cyclic polypeptide chains. (ii) The cystine knot growth factor family, which is in the focus of this article. The disulfide ring structure of the cystine knot peptides is made up by the half-cystines 1-4 and 2-5, and the threading disulfide bond is formed by the half-cystines, 3-6. In the growth factor group, the disulfides of half-cystines 1 and 4 pass the ring structure formed by the half-cystines 2-5 and 3-6. In this review, special emphasis will be devoted to the growth factor cystine knot proteins and their proregions. The latter have shifted into the focus of scientific interest as their important biological roles are just to be unravelled.

  18. Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ciardiello, F

    2000-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-driven autocrine growth pathway has been implicated in the development and progression of the majority of the most common human epithelial cancers, making the blockade of this growth pathway a promising anticancer therapeutic strategy. Different approaches have been developed to block EGFR activation and/or function in cancer cells. In the past 15 years, various anti-EGFR blocking monoclonal antibodies (MAb), recombinant proteins containing transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFalpha) or EGF fused to toxins, and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been generated and their biological and potentially therapeutic properties characterised. One of these agents, MAb IMC-C225, a chimeric human-mouse IgG1 MAb, is the first anti-EGFR agent to enter phase II to III clinical trials in patients with cancer. Several small compounds that block the ligand-induced activation of the EGFR tyrosine kinase have been developed. Among these EGFR-TKIs, various quinazoline-derived agents have been synthesised and have shown promising activity as anticancer agents in preclinical models. ZD1839 ('Iressa'), an anilinoquinazoline, is an orally active, selective EGFR-TKI which is currently under clinical evaluation in phase II to III clinical trials in patients with cancer. Preclinical data for ZD1839 strongly support the possibility of potentiating the antitumour activity of conventional chemotherapy with agents that selectively block the EGFR.

  19. Multiple growth factors, cytokines, and neurotrophins rescue photoreceptors from the damaging effects of constant light.

    PubMed Central

    LaVail, M M; Unoki, K; Yasumura, D; Matthes, M T; Yancopoulos, G D; Steinberg, R H

    1992-01-01

    Recent demonstrations of survival-promoting activity by neurotrophic agents in diverse neuronal systems have raised the possibility of pharmacological therapy for inherited and degenerative disorders of the central nervous system. We have shown previously that, in the retina, basic fibroblast growth factor delays photoreceptor degeneration in Royal College of Surgeons rats with inherited retinal dystrophy and that the growth factor reduces or prevents the rapid photoreceptor degeneration produced by constant light in the rat. This light-damage model now provides an efficient way to assess quantitatively the survival-promoting activity in vivo of a number of growth factors and other molecules. We report here that photoreceptors can be significantly protected from the damaging effects of light by intravitreal injection of eight different growth factors, cytokines, and neurotrophins that typically act through several distinct receptor families. In addition to basic fibroblast growth factor, those factors providing a high degree of photoreceptor rescue include brain-derived neurotrophic factor, ciliary neurotrophic factor, interleukin 1 beta, and acidic fibroblast growth factor; those with less activity include neurotrophin 3, insulin-like growth factor II, and tumor necrosis factor alpha; those showing little or no protective effect are nerve growth factor, epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, insulin, insulin-like growth factor I, heparin, and laminin. Although we used at least one relatively high concentration of each agent (the highest available), it is still possible that other concentrations or factor combinations might be more protective. Injecting heparin along with acidic fibroblast growth factor or basic fibroblast growth factor further enhanced the degree of photoreceptor survival and also suppressed the increased incidence of macrophages produced by either factor, especially basic fibroblast growth factor. These results now provide the

  20. Epidermal Growth Factor and Intestinal Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hu; Yang, Shufen; Li, Zuohua; Zhong, Jinfeng

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a 53-amino acid peptide that plays an important role in regulating cell growth, survival, migration, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, EGF has been established to be an effective intestinal regulator helping to protect intestinal barrier integrity, which was essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Several researches have demonstrated that EGF via binding to the EGF receptor and subsequent activation of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC-γ/PKC, and STATS signal pathways regulates intestinal barrier function. In this review, the relationship between epidermal growth factor and intestinal development and intestinal barrier is described, to provide a better understanding of the effects of EGF on intestine development and health. PMID:27524860

  1. Role of hematopoietic growth factors in angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, D; Vacca, A; De Falco, G; Ria, R; Roncali, L; Dammacco, F

    2001-01-01

    In early ontogeny, hematopoiesis is closely associated with angiogenesis. This article reviews recent studies of the effect of hematopoietic growth factors on several endothelial cell functions together with recent findings about angiogenesis and antiangiogenic therapies in hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  2. IFPA Meeting 2012 Workshop Report II: Epigenetics and imprinting in the placenta, growth factors and villous trophoblast differentiation, role of the placenta in regulating fetal exposure to xenobiotics during pregnancy, infection and the placenta

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, M.S.; Aleksunes, L.M.; Boeuf, P.; Chung, M.K.; Daoud, G.; Desoye, G.; Díaz, P.; Golos, T.G.; Illsley, N.P.; Kikuchi, K.; Komatsu, R.; Lao, T.; Morales-Prieto, D.M.; Nanovskaya, T.; Nobuzane, T.; Roberts, C.T.; Saffery, R.; Tamura, I.; Tamura, K.; Than, N.G.; Tomi, M.; Umbers, A.; Wang, B.; Weedon-Fekjaer, M.S.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, K.; Yoshie, M.; Lash, G.E.

    2015-01-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At IFPA meeting 2012 there were twelve themed workshops, four of which are summarized in this report. These workshops related to various aspects of placental biology: 1) epigenetics and imprinting in the placenta; 2) growth factors and villous trophoblast differentiation; 3) role of the placenta in regulating fetal exposure to xenobiotics during pregnancy; 4) infection and the placenta. PMID:23253784

  3. A physiological role for HgII during phototrophic growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grégoire, D. S.; Poulain, A. J.

    2016-02-01

    The bioaccumulation of toxic monomethylmercury is influenced by the redox reactions that determine the amount of mercury (Hg) substrate--HgII or Hg0 (refs ,)--that is available for methylation. Phototrophic microorganisms can reduce HgII to Hg0 (ref. ). This reduction has been linked to a mixotrophic lifestyle, in which microbes gain energy photosynthetically but acquire diverse carbon compounds for biosynthesis from the environment. Photomixotrophs must maintain redox homeostasis to disperse excess reducing power due to the accumulation of reduced enzyme cofactors. Here we report laboratory experiments in which we exposed purple bacteria growing in a bioreactor to HgII and monitored Hg0 concentrations. We show that phototrophs use HgII as an electron sink to maintain redox homeostasis. Hg0 concentrations increased only when bacteria grew phototrophically, and when bacterial enzyme cofactor ratios indicated the presence of an intracellular redox imbalance. Under such conditions, bacterial growth rates increased with increasing HgII concentrations; when alternative electron sinks were added, Hg0 production decreased. We conclude that Hg can fulfil a physiological function in bacteria, and that photomixotrophs can modify the availability of Hg to methylation sites.

  4. Nerve Growth Factor and Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Vinik, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    Neuropathy is one of the most debilitating complications of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, with estimates of prevalence between 50–90% depending on the means of detection. Diabetic neuropathies are heterogeneous and there is variable involvement of large myelinated fibers and small, thinly myelinated fibers. Many of the neuronal abnormalities in diabetes can be duplicated by experimental depletion of specific neurotrophic factors, their receptors or their binding proteins. In experimental models of diabetes there is a reduction in the availability of these growth factors, which may be a consequence of metabolic abnormalities, or may be independent of glycemic control. These neurotrophic factors are required for the maintenance of the neurons, the ability to resist apoptosis and regenerative capacity. The best studied of the neurotrophic factors is nerve growth factor (NGF) and the related members of the neurotrophin family of peptides. There is increasing evidence that there is a deficiency of NGF in diabetes, as well as the dependent neuropeptides substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) that may also contribute to the clinical symptoms resulting from small fiber dysfunction. Similarly, NT3 appears to be important for large fiber and IGFs for autonomic neuropathy. Whether the observed growth factor deficiencies are due to decreased synthesis, or functional, e.g. an inability to bind to their receptor, and/or abnormalities in nerve transport and processing, remains to be established. Although early studies in humans on the role of neurotrophic factors as a therapy for diabetic neuropathy have been unsuccessful, newer agents and the possibilities uncovered by further studies should fuel clinical trials for several generations. It seems reasonable to anticipate that neurotrophic factor therapy, specifically targeted at different nerve fiber populations, might enter the therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:14668049

  5. Transforming growth factor alpha and epidermal growth factor levels in bladder cancer and their relationship to epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, J. K.; Cook, S.; Chambers, P.; Neal, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) in neoplastic and non-neoplastic bladder tissue using a standard radioimmunoassay technique. Tumour samples had much higher TGF-alpha levels compared with EGF and TGF-alpha levels in malignant tissue were significantly higher than in benign bladder samples. There was, in addition, a difference in mean EGF levels from 'normal' bladder samples from non-tumour bearing areas of bladder in patients with bladder cancer compared with 'normal' bladder tissue obtained at the time of organ retrieval surgery. Levels of EGF and TGF-alpha did not correlate with levels of EGF receptor (EGFR) as determined by a radioligand binding method but levels of TGF-alpha > 10 ng gm-1 of tumour tissue did correlate with EGFR positivity defined using immunohistochemistry. These data suggest that TGF-alpha is the likely ligand for EGFR in bladder tumours. PMID:8605103

  6. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor promotes neuroblastoma differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gaviglio, Angela L; Knelson, Erik H; Blobe, Gerard C

    2017-02-07

    High-risk neuroblastoma is characterized by undifferentiated neuroblasts and low Schwannian stroma content. The tumor stroma contributes to the suppression of tumor growth by releasing soluble factors that promote neuroblast differentiation. Here we identify heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HBEGF) as a potent prodifferentiating factor in neuroblastoma. HBEGF mRNA expression is decreased in human neuroblastoma tumors compared with benign tumors, with loss correlating with decreased survival. HBEGF protein is expressed only in stromal compartments of human neuroblastoma specimens, with tissue from high-stage disease containing very little stroma or HBEGF expression. In 3 human neuroblastoma cell lines (SK-N-AS, SK-N-BE2, and SH-SY5Y), soluble HBEGF is sufficient to promote neuroblast differentiation and decrease proliferation. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans and heparin derivatives further enhance HBEGF-induced differentiation by forming a complex with the epidermal growth factor receptor, leading to activation of the ERK1/2 and STAT3 pathways and up-regulation of the inhibitor of DNA binding transcription factor. These data support a role for loss of HBEGF in the neuroblastoma tumor microenvironment in neuroblastoma pathogenesis.-Gaviglio, A. L., Knelson, E. H., Blobe, G. C. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor promotes neuroblastoma differentiation.

  7. Initiation and growth of mode II delamination in toughened composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Alan J.

    The origins of nonlinearity in the mode-II delamination fracture of three organic-matrix carbon-fiber composite materials was investigated. This was accomplished by testing specimens with different types of starter cracks and by loading and unloading these specimens several times so that the change in nonlinearity as the delaminations grew could be measured. The load at which crack growth initiated was determined by acoustic emission. Slow crack growth as found to be the principal cause of nonlinearity in the materials tested. The crack velocity obeyed the same power law dependence on GII as is observed for slow crack growth in viscoelastic polymers. For the first loading from the end of the starter cracks, plastic deformation at the crack tip also contributed to the nonlinearity. Other sources of nonlinearity included an increasing fracture resistance in one of the materials as well as problems associated with producing a clean starter notch with a straight crack front.

  8. Growth Factors and Tension-Induced Skeletal Muscle Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1994-01-01

    The project investigated biochemical mechanisms to enhance skeletal muscle growth, and developed a computer based mechanical cell stimulator system. The biochemicals investigated in this study were insulin/(Insulin like Growth Factor) IGF-1 and Steroids. In order to analyze which growth factors are essential for stretch-induced muscle growth in vitro, we developed a defined, serum-free medium in which the differentiated, cultured avian muscle fibers could be maintained for extended periods of time. The defined medium (muscle maintenance medium, MM medium) maintains the nitrogen balance of the myofibers for 3 to 7 days, based on myofiber diameter measurements and myosin heavy chain content. Insulin and IGF-1, but not IGF-2, induced pronounced myofiber hypertrophy when added to this medium. In 5 to 7 days, muscle fiber diameters increase by 71 % to 98% compared to untreated controls. Mechanical stimulation of the avian muscle fibers in MM medium increased the sensitivity of the cells to insulin and IGF-1, based on a leftward shift of the insulin dose/response curve for protein synthesis rates. (54). We developed a ligand binding assay for IGF-1 binding proteins and found that the avian skeletal muscle cultures produced three major species of 31, 36 and 43 kD molecular weight (54) Stretch of the myofibers was found to have no significant effect on the efflux of IGF-1 binding proteins, but addition of exogenous collagen stimulated IGF-1 binding protein production 1.5 to 5 fold. Steroid hormones have a profound effect on muscle protein turnover rates in vivo, with the stress-related glucocorticoids inducing rapid skeletal muscle atrophy while androgenic steroids induce skeletal muscle growth. Exercise in humans and animals reduces the catabolic effects of glucocorticoids and may enhance the anabolic effects of androgenic steroids on skeletal muscle. In our continuing work on the involvement of exogenrus growth factors in stretch-induced avian skeletal muscle growth, we

  9. Insulin-like growth factors in embryonic and fetal growth and skeletal development (Review)

    PubMed Central

    AGROGIANNIS, GEORGIOS D.; SIFAKIS, STAVROS; PATSOURIS, EFSTRATIOS S.; KONSTANTINIDOU, ANASTASIA E.

    2014-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factors (IGF)-I and -II have a predominant role in fetal growth and development. IGFs are involved in the proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of fetal cells in vitro and the IGF serum concentration has been shown to be closely correlated with fetal growth and length. IGF transcripts and peptides have been detected in almost every fetal tissue from as early in development as pre-implantation to the final maturation stage. Furthermore, IGFs have been demonstrated to be involved in limb morphogenesis. However, although ablation of Igf genes in mice resulted in growth retardation and delay in skeletal maturation, no impact on outgrowth and patterning of embryonic limbs was observed. Additionally, various molecular defects in the Igf1 and Igf1r genes in humans have been associated with severe intrauterine growth retardation and impaired skeletal maturation, but not with truncated limbs or severe skeletal dysplasia. The conflicting data between in vitro and in vivo observations with regard to bone morphogenesis suggests that IGFs may not be the sole trophic factors involved in fetal skeletal growth and that redundant mechanisms may exist in chondro- and osteogenesis. Further investigation is required in order to elucidate the functions of IGFs in skeletal development. PMID:24859417

  10. Insulin-like growth factors in embryonic and fetal growth and skeletal development (Review).

    PubMed

    Agrogiannis, Georgios D; Sifakis, Stavros; Patsouris, Efstratios S; Konstantinidou, Anastasia E

    2014-08-01

    The insulin-like growth factors (IGF)-I and -II have a predominant role in fetal growth and development. IGFs are involved in the proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of fetal cells in vitro and the IGF serum concentration has been shown to be closely correlated with fetal growth and length. IGF transcripts and peptides have been detected in almost every fetal tissue from as early in development as pre‑implantation to the final maturation stage. Furthermore, IGFs have been demonstrated to be involved in limb morphogenesis. However, although ablation of Igf genes in mice resulted in growth retardation and delay in skeletal maturation, no impact on outgrowth and patterning of embryonic limbs was observed. Additionally, various molecular defects in the Igf1 and Igf1r genes in humans have been associated with severe intrauterine growth retardation and impaired skeletal maturation, but not with truncated limbs or severe skeletal dysplasia. The conflicting data between in vitro and in vivo observations with regard to bone morphogenesis suggests that IGFs may not be the sole trophic factors involved in fetal skeletal growth and that redundant mechanisms may exist in chondro- and osteogenesis. Further investigation is required in order to elucidate the functions of IGFs in skeletal development.

  11. Nerve growth factor promotes human hemopoietic colony growth and differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, H; Coughlin, M D; Bienenstock, J; Denburg, J A

    1988-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a neurotropic polypeptide necessary for the survival and growth of some central neurons, as well as sensory afferent and sympathetic neurons. Much is now known of the structural and functional characteristics of NGF, whose gene has recently been cloned. Since it is synthesized in largest amounts by the male mouse submandibular gland, its role exclusively in nerve growth is questionable. NGF also causes histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells in vitro, and we have shown elsewhere that it causes significant, dose-dependent, generalized mast cell proliferation in the rat in vivo when administered neonatally. Our experiments now indicate that NGF causes a significant stimulation of granulocyte colonies grown from human peripheral blood in standard hemopoietic methylcellulose assays. Further, NGF appears to act in a relatively selective fashion to induce the differentiation of eosinophils and basophils/mast cells. Depletion experiments show that the NGF effect may be T-cell dependent and that NGF augments the colony-stimulating effect of supernatants from the leukemic T-cell (Mo) line. The hemopoietic activity of NGF is blocked by polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to NGF. We conclude that NGF may indirectly act as a local growth factor in tissues other than those of the nervous system by causing T cells to synthesize or secrete molecules with colony-stimulating activity. In view of the synthesis of NGF in tissue injury, the involvement of basophils/mast cells and eosinophils in allergic and other inflammatory processes, and the association of mast cells with fibrosis and tissue repair, we postulate that NGF plays an important biological role in a variety of repair processes. PMID:3413109

  12. Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsman, Stanislav; Wiley, H. S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2004-08-01

    Abstract: A peptide purified from the salivary gland of a mouse was shown few years ago to accelerate incisor eruption and eyelid opening in newborn mice, and was named epidermal growth factor (EGF). The members of this family of peptide growth factors had been identified in numerous physiological and pathological contexts. EGF binds to a cell surface EGF receptor, which induces a biochemical modification (phosphorylation) of the receptor's cytoplasmic tail. There is a growing consensus in the research community that, in addition to cellular and molecular studies, the dynamics of the EGFR network and its operation must be examined in tissues. A key challenge is to integrate the existing molecular and cellular information into a system-level description of the EGFR network at the tissue and organism level. In this paper, the two examples of EGFR signaling in tissues are described, and the recent efforts to model EGFR autocrine loops, which is a predominant mode of EGFR activation in vivo, are summarized.

  13. Multilayer Laue Lens Growth at NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect

    Conley R.; Bouet, N.; Lauer, K.; Carlucci-Dayton, M.; Biancarosa, J.; Boas, L.; Drannbauer, J.; Feraca, J.; Rosenbaum, L.

    2012-08-15

    The new NSLS-II deposition laboratory has been commissioned to include a variety of thin-film characterization equipment and a next-generation deposition system. The primary goal for this effort is R&D on the multilayer Laue lens (MLL), which is a new type of x-ray optic with the potential for an unprecedented level of x-ray nano-focusing. This unique deposition system contains many design features in order to facilitate growth of combined depth-graded and laterally graded multilayers with precise thickness control over many thousands of layers, providing total film growth in one run of up to 100 {micro}m thick or greater. A precision in-vacuum linear motor servo system raster scans a substrate over an array of magnetrons with shaped apertures at well-defined velocities to affect a multilayer coating. The design, commissioning, and performance metrics of the NSLS-II deposition system will be discussed. Latest growth results of both MLL and reflective multilayers in this machine will be presented.

  14. Subcritical crack growth under mode I, II, and III loading for Coconino sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Tae Young

    In systems subjected to long-term loading, subcritical crack growth is the principal mechanism causing the time-dependent deformation and failure of rocks. Subcritical crack growth is environmentally-assisted crack growth, which can allow cracks to grow over a long period of time at stresses far smaller than their failure strength and at tectonic strain rates. The characteristics of subcritical crack growth can be described by a relationship between the stress intensity factor and the crack velocity. This study presents the results of studies conducted to validate the constant stress-rate test for determining subcritical crack growth parameters in Coconino sandstone, compared with the conventional testing method, the double torsion test. The results of the constant stress-rate test are in good agreement with the results of double torsion test. More importantly, the stress-rate tests can determine the parameter A with a much smaller standard deviation than the double torsion test. Thus the constant stress-rate test seems to be both a valid and preferred test method for determining the subcritical crack growth parameters in rocks. We investigated statistical aspects of the constant stress-rate test. The effects of the number of tests conducted on the subcritical crack growth parameters were examined and minimum specimen numbers were determined. The mean and standard deviation of the subcritical crack growth parameters were obtained by randomly selecting subsets from the original strength data. In addition, the distribution form of the subcritical crack growth parameters and the relation between the parameter n and A were determined. We extended the constant stress-rate test technique to modes II and III subcritical crack growth in rocks. The experimental results of the modes I, II and III tests show that the values of the subcritical crack growth parameters are similar to each other. The subcritical crack growth parameter n value for Coconino sandstone has the range

  15. IFPA Meeting 2012 Workshop Report II: epigenetics and imprinting in the placenta, growth factors and villous trophoblast differentiation, role of the placenta in regulating fetal exposure to xenobiotics during pregnancy, infection and the placenta.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, M S; Aleksunes, L M; Boeuf, P; Chung, M K; Daoud, G; Desoye, G; Díaz, P; Golos, T G; Illsley, N P; Kikuchi, K; Komatsu, R; Lao, T; Morales-Prieto, D M; Nanovskaya, T; Nobuzane, T; Roberts, C T; Saffery, R; Tamura, I; Tamura, K; Than, N G; Tomi, M; Umbers, A; Wang, B; Weedon-Fekjaer, M S; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, K; Yoshie, M; Lash, G E

    2013-03-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At IFPA meeting 2012 there were twelve themed workshops, four of which are summarized in this report. These workshops related to various aspects of placental biology: 1) epigenetics and imprinting in the placenta; 2) growth factors and villous trophoblast differentiation; 3) role of the placenta in regulating fetal exposure to xenobiotics during pregnancy; 4) infection and the placenta. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Insulin-like growth factor 1: common mediator of multiple enterotrophic hormones and growth factors

    PubMed Central

    Bortvedt, Sarah F.; Lund, P. Kay

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize recent evidence that IGF1 mediates growth effects of multiple trophic factors and discuss clinical relevance. Recent findings Recent reviews and original reports indicate benefits of growth hormone (GH) and long-acting glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP2) analogues in short bowel syndrome and Crohn’s disease. This review highlights evidence that biomarkers of sustained small intestinal growth or mucosal healing and evaluation of intestinal epithelial stem cell biomarkers may improve clinical measures of intestinal growth or response to trophic hormones. Compelling evidence that IGF1 mediates growth effects of GH and GLP2 on intestine or linear growth in preclinical models of resection or Crohn’s disease is presented, along with a concept that these hormones or IGF1 may enhance sustained growth if given early after bowel resection. Evidence that SOCS protein induction by GH or GLP2 in normal or inflamed intestine, may limit IGF1-induced growth, but protect against risk of dysplasia or fibrosis is reviewed. Whether IGF1 receptor mediates IGF1 action and potential roles of insulin receptors are addressed. Summary IGF1 has a central role in mediating trophic hormone action in small intestine. Better understanding of benefits and risks of IGF1, receptors that mediate IGF1 action, and factors that limit undesirable growth are needed. PMID:22241077

  17. Insulin-Like Growth Factor System and Sporadic Malignant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Capoluongo, Ettore

    2011-01-01

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are important regulators of energy metabolism and growth. Several findings have outlined an important role played by this family of molecules in both tumor maintenance and development. Despite the established contribution of the IGF system in carcinogenesis, little and contrasting data have been reported concerning the intertwined relationships between melanoma and this family of molecules. The present minireview aims to summarize the main topics and evidence concerning this malignant skin cancer, with a focus on the following: i) melanoma and cell proliferation effects induced by the IGF system, ii) in vitro and in vivo experimental data, and iii) targeting studies. Because of consistent findings regarding the role of the IGF-1 receptor in the modulation of IGF-1 activity, possible therapeutic strategies combining the use of antisense oligonucleotides against IGF-1 receptor mRNA could be applied in the future. PMID:21224039

  18. Proteolytic Processing Regulates Placental Growth Factor Activities*

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Daniel C.; Willenborg, Sebastian; Koch, Manuel; Zwolanek, Daniela; Müller, Stefan; Becker, Ann-Kathrin A.; Metzger, Stephanie; Ehrbar, Martin; Kurschat, Peter; Hellmich, Martin; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Eming, Sabine A.

    2013-01-01

    Placental growth factor (PlGF) is a critical mediator of blood vessel formation, yet mechanisms of its action and regulation are incompletely understood. Here we demonstrate that proteolytic processing regulates the biological activity of PlGF. Specifically, we show that plasmin processing of PlGF-2 yields a protease-resistant core fragment comprising the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 binding site but lacking the carboxyl-terminal domain encoding the heparin-binding domain and an 8-amino acid peptide encoded by exon 7. We have identified plasmin cleavage sites, generated a truncated PlGF118 isoform mimicking plasmin-processed PlGF, and explored its biological function in comparison with that of PlGF-1 and -2. The angiogenic responses induced by the diverse PlGF forms were distinct. Whereas PlGF-2 increased endothelial cell chemotaxis, vascular sprouting, and granulation tissue formation upon skin injury, these activities were abrogated following plasmin digestion. Investigation of PlGF/Neuropilin-1 binding and function suggests a critical role for heparin-binding domain/Neuropilin-1 interaction and its regulation by plasmin processing. Collectively, here we provide new mechanistic insights into the regulation of PlGF-2/Neuropilin-1-mediated tissue vascularization and growth. PMID:23645683

  19. Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins: A Structural Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Briony E.; McCarthy, Peter; Norton, Raymond S.

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP-1 to -6) bind insulin-like growth factors-I and -II (IGF-I and IGF-II) with high affinity. These binding proteins maintain IGFs in the circulation and direct them to target tissues, where they promote cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and survival via the type 1 IGF receptor. IGFBPs also interact with many other molecules, which not only influence their modulation of IGF action but also mediate IGF-independent activities that regulate processes such as cell migration and apoptosis by modulating gene transcription. IGFBPs-1 to -6 are structurally similar proteins consisting of three distinct domains, N-terminal, linker, and C-terminal. There have been major advances in our understanding of IGFBP structure in the last decade and a half. While there is still no structure of an intact IGFBP, several structures of individual N- and C-domains have been solved. The structure of a complex of N-BP-4:IGF-I:C-BP-4 has also been solved, providing a detailed picture of the structural features of the IGF binding site and the mechanism of binding. Structural studies have also identified features important for interaction with extracellular matrix components and integrins. This review summarizes structural studies reported so far and highlights features important for binding not only IGF but also other partners. We also highlight future directions in which structural studies will add to our knowledge of the role played by the IGFBP family in normal growth and development, as well as in disease. PMID:22654863

  20. The BDI-II factor structure in pregnancy and postpartum: Two or three factors?

    PubMed

    Carvalho Bos, Sandra; Pereira, Ana Telma; Marques, Mariana; Maia, Berta; Soares, Maria João; Valente, José; Gomes, Ana; Macedo, António; Azevedo, Maria Helena

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the factor structure of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) in pregnancy and postpartum. Women were asked to fill in the BDI-II in their last trimester of pregnancy and at 3 months after delivery. A total of 331 pregnant women, with a mean age of 29.7 years (SD=4.6), and 354 mothers, aged 30.6 years (SD=4.6 years), answered the BDI-II. The first group was mainly nulliparas (65.6%) and the second group was mostly primiparas (57.4%). Factor analyses with principal components solution and varimax rotation were performed. Based on the scree test of Cattell a 2-factor solution and a 3-factor solution were explored. The 2-factor solution was identical in pregnancy and postpartum. Items loading in the Cognitive-Affective factor and in the Somatic-Anxiety factor were almost the same, though the Cognitive-Affective factor explained more of the BDI-II total variance in pregnancy, whereas in postpartum both factors explained similar total variances. The 3-factor solution of the BDI-II in pregnancy and postpartum slightly diverged. Besides the Cognitive-Affective and the Somatic-Anxiety factors, a third factor, Fatigue, was obtained in pregnancy while Guilt was the third factor identified in postpartum. This study reveals that the BDI-II 3-factor solution might be more appropriate to assess depressive symptoms in pregnancy and postpartum.

  1. Expression of the genes for insulin-like growth factors and their receptors in bone during skeletal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bikle, D. D.; Harris, J.; Halloran, B. P.; Roberts, C. T.; Leroith, D.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1994-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGF) are important regulators of skeletal growth. To determine whether the capacity to produce and respond to these growth factors changes during skeletal development, we measured the protein and mRNA levels for IGF-I, IGF-II, and their receptors (IGF-IR and IGF-IIR, respectively) in the tibia and femur of rats before and up to 28 mo after birth. The mRNA levels remained high during fetal development but fell after birth, reaching a nadir by 3-6 wk. This fall was most pronounced for IGF-II and IGF-IIR mRNA and least pronounced for IGF-I mRNA. However, after 6 wk, both IGF-I and IGF-IR mRNA levels recovered toward the levels observed at birth. In the prenatal bones, the signals for the mRNAs of IGF-II and IGF-IIR were stronger than the signals for the mRNAs of IGF-I and IGF-IR, although the content of IGF-I was three- to fivefold greater than that of IGF-II. IGF-II levels fell postnatally, whereas the IGF-I content rose after birth such that the ratio IGF-I/IGF-II continued to increase with age. We conclude that, during development, rat bone changes its capacity to produce and respond to IGFs with a progressive trend toward the dominance of IGF-I.

  2. Expression of the genes for insulin-like growth factors and their receptors in bone during skeletal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bikle, D. D.; Harris, J.; Halloran, B. P.; Roberts, C. T.; Leroith, D.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1994-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGF) are important regulators of skeletal growth. To determine whether the capacity to produce and respond to these growth factors changes during skeletal development, we measured the protein and mRNA levels for IGF-I, IGF-II, and their receptors (IGF-IR and IGF-IIR, respectively) in the tibia and femur of rats before and up to 28 mo after birth. The mRNA levels remained high during fetal development but fell after birth, reaching a nadir by 3-6 wk. This fall was most pronounced for IGF-II and IGF-IIR mRNA and least pronounced for IGF-I mRNA. However, after 6 wk, both IGF-I and IGF-IR mRNA levels recovered toward the levels observed at birth. In the prenatal bones, the signals for the mRNAs of IGF-II and IGF-IIR were stronger than the signals for the mRNAs of IGF-I and IGF-IR, although the content of IGF-I was three- to fivefold greater than that of IGF-II. IGF-II levels fell postnatally, whereas the IGF-I content rose after birth such that the ratio IGF-I/IGF-II continued to increase with age. We conclude that, during development, rat bone changes its capacity to produce and respond to IGFs with a progressive trend toward the dominance of IGF-I.

  3. Factoring handedness data: II. Geschwind's multidimensional hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Messinger, H B; Messinger, M I

    1996-06-01

    The challenge in this journal by Peters and Murphy to the validity of two published factor analyses of handedness data because of bimodality was dealt with in Part I by identifying measures to normalize the handedness item distributions. A new survey using Oldfield's questionnaire format had 38 bell-shaped (unimodal) handedness-item distributions and 11 that were only marginally bimodal out of the 55 items used in Geschwind's 1986 study. Yet they were still non-normal and the factor analysis was unsatisfactory; bimodality is not the only problem. By choosing a transformation for each item that was optimal as assessed by D'Agostino's K2 statistic, all but two items could be normalized. Seven factors were derived that showed high congruence between maximum likelihood and principal components extractions before and after varimax rotation. Geschwind's assertion that handedness is not unidimensional is therefore supported.

  4. Transforming growth factor beta in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, C C; Hu, S; Frey, W H; Ala, T A; Tourtellotte, W W; Peterson, P K

    1994-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been hypothesized to be an inflammatory condition. We hypothesized that anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), counteract the inflammatory process. In the present study, we found that TGF-beta levels were elevated in both cerebrospinal fluid and serum samples obtained from AD patients < 6 h after death. Serum TGF-beta levels were also markedly elevated before death. These results suggest that elevated TGF-beta levels in AD may represent a protective host response to immunologically mediated neuronal injury. PMID:7496909

  5. Role of growth factors in the growth of normal and transformed cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lokeshwar, V.B.

    1989-01-01

    Growth factors play an important role in the growth of normal cells. However, their untimely and/or excess production leads to neoplastic transformation. The role of growth factors in the growth of normal cells was studied by investigating the mechanism of transmodulation of the cell surface EGF receptor number by protamine. Protamine increased the EGF stimulated mitogenic response in Swiss mouse 3T3 cells and A431 cells by increasing the number of functionally active EGF receptors. Protamine also increased EGF receptor number in plasma membranes and solubilized membranes. This was evidenced by an increase in both {sup 125}I-EGF-EGF-receptor complex and EGF stimulated phosphorylation of the EGF receptor. The solubilized EGF receptor was retained on a protamine-agarose gel indicating that protamine might increase EGF receptor number by directly activating cryptic EGF receptors in the plasma membranes. The role of growth factors in neoplastic transformation was studied by investigating the role of the oncogene v-sis in the growth of Simian sarcoma virus (SSV) transformed cells. The product of the oncogene v-sis is 94% homologous to the B chain of PDGF. This study found that (i) v-sis gene product is synthesized as a 32 kDa unglycosylated monomer which is glycosylated, dimerized and proteolytically processed into p36, p72, p68, p58, p44 and p27 mol. wt. species respectively. (ii) p36, p72, p68 and p58 are very likely formed in the endoplasmic reticulum and/or Golgi complex. A fraction of newly synthesized p72, p68 and p58 is degraded intracellularly at a fast rate. (iii) p44 is a secretory product which remains tightly associated with the cell surface. p44 is recaptured by the cells through interaction with cell surface PDGF receptors and degraded into p27. (iv) During long term cultures p44 is extracellularly cleaved into a 27 kDa product.

  6. The Insulin-like Growth Factor System: Towards Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Leon A

    2004-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and II) are important endocrine, paracrine and autocrine mediators of physiological growth. They promote cellular proliferation, survival and differentiation. Their effects are mediated mainly through the IGF-I receptor, but IGFs also bind to the IGF-II/mannose 6-phosphate and insulin receptors. IGF activity is modulated by a family of six high-affinity IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs); in most situations, IGFBPs inhibit IGF actions but they may also enhance them. Assays are now available for IGF-I, IGF-II and individual IGFBPs. IGF-I and IGFBP-3 assays have some utility in the diagnosis and management of acromegaly and growth hormone deficiency. There is a large body of in vitro and in vivo evidence supporting a pathogenic role for alterations in the IGF system in many diseases, including diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease and neuromuscular disease. More recently, epidemiological studies have linked high IGF-I levels with some cancers and low IGF-I levels with ischaemic heart disease. Preliminary studies of recombinant IGF-I as a treatment for diabetes, osteoporosis and neuromuscular disease have been performed in humans. In contrast, there is considerable interest in developing IGF inhibitors for the treatment of cancer. This apparent paradox highlights the need to develop therapeutics beyond the natural ligands and inhibitors, with characteristics such as ligand and tissue specificity. This will only become possible as we increase our understanding of this complex system. Additionally, as IGF and IGFBP assays are becoming more readily available, their role in the diagnosis and monitoring of diseases should be more clearly defined in the near future. PMID:18458708

  7. Examining tenets of personal growth initiative using the personal growth initiative scale-II.

    PubMed

    Weigold, Ingrid K; Porfeli, Erik J; Weigold, Arne

    2013-12-01

    One promising antecedent of optimal functioning is personal growth initiative (PGI), which is the active and intentional desire to grow as a person. PGI theory and its measure, the Personal Growth Initiative Scale, have consistently shown positive relations with optimal functioning and growth. Recently, the PGI theory and its measure have been revised to account for theoretical advances. Consequently, testing of the revised theory and measure is needed to assess their capacity to predict psychological functioning and growth. The current study examined 2 tenets of PGI theory in a sample of college students. Results indicated that 3 of the 4 factors of PGI were positively related to psychological well-being and negatively related to aspects of psychological distress. In addition, the same 3 factors were related to growth in a salient domain (vocational identity development) and explained variance beyond that accounted for by more stable personality traits. (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Randomized Phase II Study of Erlotinib in Combination With Placebo or R1507, a Monoclonal Antibody to Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Receptor, for Advanced-Stage Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Spigel, David R.; Chen, David; Steins, Martin B.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Schneider, Claus-Peter; Novello, Silvia; Eberhardt, Wilfried E.E.; Crino, Lucio; Habben, Kai; Liu, Lian; Jänne, Pasi A.; Brownstein, Carrie M.; Reck, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose R1507 is a selective, fully human, recombinant monoclonal antibody (immunoglobulin G1 subclass) against insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R). The strong preclinical evidence supporting coinhibition of IGF-1R and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as anticancer therapy prompted this study. Patients and Methods Patients with advanced-stage non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with progression following one or two prior regimens, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status 0 to 2, and measurable disease were eligible. Patients were randomly assigned to receive erlotinib (150 mg orally once a day) in combination with either placebo, R1507 9 mg/kg weekly, or R1507 16 mg/kg intravenously once every 3 weeks. Treatment cycles were repeated every 3 weeks. The primary end point was comparison of the 12-week progression-free survival (PFS) rate. Results In all, 172 patients were enrolled: median age, 61 years; female, 33%; never-smokers, 12%; and performance status 0 or 1, 88%. The median number of R1507 doses was six for the weekly arm and 3.5 for the every-3-weeks arm. Grades 3 to 4 adverse events occurred in 37%, 44%, and 48% of patients with placebo, R1507 weekly, and R1507 every 3 weeks, respectively. The 12-week PFS rates were 39%, 37%, and 44%, and the median overall survival was 8.1, 8.1, and 12.1 months for the three groups, respectively, with statistically nonsignificant hazard ratios. The 12-week PFS rate in patients with KRAS mutation was 36% with R1507 compared with 0% with placebo. Conclusion The combination of R1507 with erlotinib did not provide PFS or survival advantage over erlotinib alone in an unselected group of patients with advanced NSCLC. Predictive biomarkers are essential for further development of combined inhibition of IGF-1R and EGFR. PMID:22025157

  9. Opposite effects of transforming growth factor alpha and epidermal growth factor on mouse placental lactogen I secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, M; Ogren, L; Kurachi, H; Hirota, K; Imai, T; Talamantes, F

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) regulates the production of mouse placental lactogen I (mPL-I) and mPL-II in a manner that is similar to that of epidermal growth factor (EGF), which was previously shown to stimulate mPL-I secretion and inhibit mPL-II secretion. In contrast to the activity of EGF, human (h) and rat (r) TGF-alpha (each at 100 ng/ml) inhibited secretion of mPL-I by placental cells isolated from mice on day 7 of pregnancy. Maximum inhibition of mPL-I secretion occurred on the third day of a 5-day culture period and ranged between 37% and 56% in multiple trials. Incubation of cells with hTGF-alpha and EGF was not followed by a change in the mPL-I concentration of the medium, suggesting the peptides antagonized each other's effects. hTGF-alpha and rTGF-alpha inhibited secretion of mPL-II; maximum inhibition ranged between 62% and 84% in multiple trials. The lowest concentrations of hTGF-alpha that affected mPL-I and mPL-II secretion were 10 ng/ml and 1 ng/ml, respectively. EGF and hTGF-alpha bound to the same receptors on placental cells, as assessed by cross-linking, and both peptides stimulated receptor phosphorylation, as assessed by Western blot analysis. There are three types of mPL-containing cells in placental cultures: cells that contain only mPL-I, cells that contain only mPL-II, and cells that contain both mPLs. The percentage of each type of mPL-containing cell in the culture was determined by immunostaining. hTGF-alpha affected the differentiation of the subpopulations of PL-containing cells in a manner that differed from that of EGF. The data suggest that TGF-alpha and EGF do not regulate the production of mPL-I and mPL-II in a similar manner. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7535931

  10. Higher Maternal Protein Intake during Pregnancy Is Associated with Lower Cord Blood Concentrations of Insulin-like Growth Factor (IGF)-II, IGF Binding Protein 3, and Insulin, but Not IGF-I, in a Cohort of Women with High Protein Intake.

    PubMed

    Switkowski, Karen M; Jacques, Paul F; Must, Aviva; Hivert, Marie-France; Fleisch, Abby; Gillman, Matthew W; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl; Oken, Emily

    2017-07-01

    Background: Prenatal exposure to dietary protein may program growth-regulating hormones, consequently influencing early-life growth patterns and later risk of associated chronic diseases. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis is of particular interest in this context given its influence on pre- and postnatal growth and its sensitivity to the early nutritional environment.Objective: Our objective was to examine associations of maternal protein intake during pregnancy with cord blood concentrations of IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), and insulin.Methods: We studied 938 mother-child pairs from early pregnancy through delivery in the Project Viva cohort. Using multivariable linear regression models adjusted for maternal race/ethnicity, education, income, smoking, parity, height, and gestational weight gain and for child sex, we examined associations of second-trimester maternal protein intake [grams per kilogram (weight before pregnancy) per day], as reported on a food frequency questionnaire, with IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3, and insulin concentrations in cord blood. We also examined how these associations may differ by child sex and parity.Results: Mothers were predominantly white (71%), college-educated (64%), and nonsmokers (67%). Mean ± SD protein intake was 1.35 ± 0.35 g ⋅ kg(-1) ⋅ d(-1) Each 1-SD increment in second-trimester protein intake corresponded to a change of -0.50 ng/mL (95% CI: -2.26, 1.26 ng/mL) in IGF-I and -0.91 μU/mL (95% CI: -1.45, -0.37 μU/mL) in insulin. Child sex and parity modified associations of maternal protein intake with IGF-II and IGFBP-3: protein intake was inversely associated with IGF-II in girls (P-interaction = 0.04) and multiparous mothers (P-interaction = 0.05), and with IGFBP-3 in multiparous mothers (P-interaction = 0.04).Conclusions: In a cohort of pregnant women with relatively high mean protein intakes, higher intake was associated with lower concentrations of growth-promoting hormones in cord blood

  11. Free insulin-like growth factors in human obesity.

    PubMed

    Frystyk, J; Vestbo, E; Skjaerbaek, C; Mogensen, C E; Orskov, H

    1995-10-01

    It is well established that spontaneous and stimulated growth hormone (GH) secretion is diminished in human obesity. In contrast to classic GH deficiency, obesity is not associated with hypopituitary levels of circulating total (extractable) insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and reduced somatic growth. Thus, the riddle of "normal growth without GH" in obese children and the mechanisms behind the GH suppression have remained unsolved. Insulin reduces hepatic production of IGF-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), an in vitro inhibitor of IGF bioactivity, and it has been suggested that the obesity-related hyperinsulinemia may increase free (bioactive) IGF in vivo by reducing the concentration of IGFBP-1. We have recently developed a method that during near in vivo conditions isolates the free, unbound fractions of IGF-I and IGF-II in human serum. Using this method, we have determined overnight fasting serum levels of free IGFs in obese subjects and compared the results with levels of total (extractable) IGFs, IGFBPs, GH, and insulin. The study included 92 healthy subjects (56 males and 36 females) allocated to three age-matched groups depending on body mass index (BMI): 31 controls (BMI < or = 25), 33 subjects with moderate obesity (25 < BMI < 30), and 28 subjects with severe obesity (BMI > or = 30). Fasting serum insulin correlated positively (r = .61, P < .0001) with BMI and was significantly elevated in moderate and severe obesity (P < .05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Growth of lithium triborate crystals. II. Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parfeniuk, C.; Samarasekera, I. V.; Weinberg, F.; Edel, J.; Fjeldsted, K.; Lent, B.

    1996-02-01

    In Part I [C. Parfeniuk, I.V. Samarasekera and F. Weinberg, J. Crystal Growth 158 (1996) 514], a mathematical model of the flux growth of lithium triborate (LBO) crystals was used to calculate the temperature distribution and fluid flow in the melt during growth. In this report the model results are related to experimental observations. Temperature measurements in the melt, for different crucible rotation rates, are compared to the corresponding temperatures determined from the model. Direct observations of fluid flow in the melt, using a transparent glycerol/water solution as a physical model, are related to the calculated flow paths and velocities. As the LBO crystal grows, the rejected MoO 3 flux concentrates ahead of the interface leading to the formation of eutectic phases. The factors leading to the formation of these phases are examined, using flow velocity values determined from the model. A number of LBO crystals were grown, first using convenient growth parameters, and then using parameters determined from the model results. The size and quality of the crystals obtained are discussed and related to the growth conditions.

  13. Autologous Growth Factor Injections in Chronic Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sandrey, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    Reference: de Vos RJ, van Veldhoven PLJ, Moen MH, Weir A, Tol JL. Autologous growth factor injections in chronic tendinopathy: a systematic review. Br Med Bull. 2010;95:63–77. Clinical Question: The authors of this systematic review evaluated the literature to critically consider the effects of growth factors delivered through autologous whole-blood and platelet-rich–plasma (PRP) injections in managing wrist-flexor and -extensor tendinopathies, plantar fasciopathy, and patellar tendinopathy. The primary question was, according to the published literature, is there sufficient evidence to support the use of growth factors delivered through autologous whole-blood and PRP injections for chronic tendinopathy? Data Sources: The authors performed a comprehensive, systematic literature search in October 2009 using PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane library without time limits. The following key words were used in different combinations: tendinopathy, tendinosis, tendinitis, tendons, tennis elbow, plantar fasciitis, platelet rich plasma, platelet transfusion, and autologous blood or injection. The search was limited to human studies in English. All bibliographies from the initial literature search were also viewed to identify additional relevant studies. Study Selection: Studies were eligible based on the following criteria: (1) Articles were suitable (inclusion criteria) if the participants had been clinically diagnosed as having chronic tendinopathy; (2) the design had to be a prospective clinical study, randomized controlled trial, nonrandomized clinical trial, or prospective case series; (3) a well-described intervention in the form of a growth factor injection with either PRP or autologous whole blood was used; and (4) the outcome was reported in terms of pain or function (or both). Data Extraction: All titles and abstracts were assessed by 2 researchers, and all relevant articles were obtained. Two researchers independently read the full text of

  14. Autologous growth factor injections in chronic tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Sandrey, Michelle A

    2014-01-01

    de Vos RJ, van Veldhoven PLJ, Moen MH, Weir A, Tol JL. Autologous growth factor injections in chronic tendinopathy: a systematic review. Br Med Bull. 2010;95:63-77. The authors of this systematic review evaluated the literature to critically consider the effects of growth factors delivered through autologous whole-blood and platelet-rich-plasma (PRP) injections in managing wrist-flexor and -extensor tendinopathies, plantar fasciopathy, and patellar tendinopathy. The primary question was, according to the published literature, is there sufficient evidence to support the use of growth factors delivered through autologous whole-blood and PRP injections for chronic tendinopathy? The authors performed a comprehensive, systematic literature search in October 2009 using PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane library without time limits. The following key words were used in different combinations: tendinopathy, tendinosis, tendinitis, tendons, tennis elbow, plantar fasciitis, platelet rich plasma, platelet transfusion, and autologous blood or injection. The search was limited to human studies in English. All bibliographies from the initial literature search were also viewed to identify additional relevant studies. Studies were eligible based on the following criteria: (1) Articles were suitable (inclusion criteria) if the participants had been clinically diagnosed as having chronic tendinopathy; (2) the design had to be a prospective clinical study, randomized controlled trial, nonrandomized clinical trial, or prospective case series; (3) a well-described intervention in the form of a growth factor injection with either PRP or autologous whole blood was used; and (4) the outcome was reported in terms of pain or function (or both). All titles and abstracts were assessed by 2 researchers, and all relevant articles were obtained. Two researchers independently read the full text of each article to determine if it met the inclusion criteria. If opinions differed on

  15. Transforming growth factor beta regulates thyroid growth. Role in the pathogenesis of nontoxic goiter.

    PubMed Central

    Grubeck-Loebenstein, B; Buchan, G; Sadeghi, R; Kissonerghis, M; Londei, M; Turner, M; Pirich, K; Roka, R; Niederle, B; Kassal, H

    1989-01-01

    The production and growth regulatory activity of transforming growth factor beta were studied in human thyroid tissue. As estimated by its mRNA expression in fresh tissue samples, transforming growth factor beta was produced in normal and in diseased thyroid glands. Transforming growth factor beta mRNA was mainly produced by thyroid follicular cells and in lesser quantities by thyroid infiltrating mononuclear cells. The concentrations of transforming growth factor beta mRNA were lower in iodine-deficient nontoxic goiter than in Graves' disease and normal thyroid tissue. Transforming growth factor beta protein secretion by cultured thyroid follicular cells was also low in nontoxic goiter, but could be increased by addition of sodium iodide (10 microM) to the culture medium. Recombinant transforming growth factor beta did not affect basal tritiated thymidine incorporation in cultured thyroid follicular cells, but inhibited, at a concentration of 10 ng/ml, the growth stimulatory influence of insulin-like growth factor I, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor alpha, TSH, and partly that of normal human serum on cultured thyroid follicular cells. This inhibition was greater in Graves' disease than in nontoxic goiter. These results suggest that transforming growth factor beta may act as an autocrine growth inhibitor on thyroid follicular cells. Decreased transforming growth factor beta production and decreased responsiveness to transforming growth factor beta may be cofactors in the pathogenesis of iodine-deficient nontoxic goiter. Images PMID:2921318

  16. Down-Modulation of Lung Immune Responses by Interleukin-10 and Transforming Growth Factor β (TGF-β) and Analysis of TGF-β Receptors I and II in Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bonecini-Almeida, M. Glória; Ho, John L.; Boéchat, Neio; Huard, Richard C.; Chitale, Sadhana; Doo, Howard; Geng, Jiayuan; Rego, Lorena; Lazzarini, Luiz Claudio Oliveira; Kritski, AfrÂnio L.; Johnson, Warren D.; McCaffrey, Timothy A.; Silva, José R. Lapa e

    2004-01-01

    Immune factors influencing progression to active tuberculosis (TB) remain poorly defined. In this study, we investigated the expression of immunoregulatory cytokines and receptors by using lung bronchoalveolar lavage cells obtained from patients with pulmonary TB, patients with other lung diseases (OLD patients), and healthy volunteers (VOL) by using reverse transcriptase PCR, a transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) bioactivity assay, and an enzyme immunoassay. TB patients were significantly more likely than OLD patients to coexpress TGF-β receptor I (RI) and RII mRNA, as well as interleukin-10 (IL-10) mRNA (thereby indicating the state of active gene transcription in the alveolar cells at harvest). In contrast, gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and IL-2 mRNA was seen in both TB and OLD patients. Likewise, significantly elevated pulmonary steady-state protein levels of IL-10, IFN-γ, and bioactive TGF-β were found in TB patients versus those in OLD patients and VOL. These data suggest that the combined production of the immunosuppressants IL-10 and TGF-β, as well as coexpression of TGF-β RI and RII (required for cellular response to TGF-β), may act to down-modulate host anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunity and thereby allow uncontrolled bacterial replication and overt disease. Delineating the underlying mechanisms of M. tuberculosis-triggered expression of these immune elements may provide a molecular-level understanding of TB immunopathogenesis. PMID:15102771

  17. Lactoferrin – A Novel Bone Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Naot, Dorit; Grey, Andrew; Reid, Ian R; Cornish, Jillian

    2005-01-01

    Lactoferrin is an iron-binding glycoprotein that belongs to the transferrin family. It is present in breast milk, in epithelial secretions, and in the secondary granules of neutrophils. In healthy subjects lactoferrin circulates at concentrations of 2–7 x 10−6 g/ml. Lactoferrin is a pleiotropic factor with potent antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities. Recently, we have shown that lactoferrin can also promote bone growth. At physiological concentrations, lactoferrin potently stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of primary osteoblasts and also acts as a survival factor inhibiting apoptosis induced by serum withdrawal. Lactoferrin also affects osteoclast formation and, in murine bone marrow culture, lactoferrin potently inhibits osteoclastogenesis. In vivo, local injection of lactoferrin above the hemicalvaria of adult mice results in substantial increases in the dynamic histomorphometric indices of bone formation and bone area. The mitogenic effect of lactoferrin in osteoblast-like cells is mediated mainly through LRP1, a member of the family of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related proteins that are primarily known as endocytic receptors. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy, we demonstrated that fluorescently labeled lactoferrin is endocytosed and can be visualized in the cytoplasm of primary osteoblastic cells. Lactoferrin also induces activation of p42/44 MAPK signaling in primary osteoblasts, but the two pathways seem to operate independently as activation of MAPK signaling, but not endocytosis, is necessary for the mitogenic effect of lactoferrin. We conclude that lactoferrin may have a physiological role in bone growth and healing, and a potential therapeutic role as an anabolic factor in osteoporosis. PMID:16012127

  18. Autocrine growth inhibition by transforming growth factor β-1 (TGFβ-1) in human neuroendocrine tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Wimmel, A; Wiedenmann, B; Rosewicz, S

    2003-01-01

    Background and aim: The role of transforming growth factor β-1 (TGFβ-1) in neuroendocrine tumour biology is currently unknown. We therefore examined the expression and biological significance of TGFβ signalling components in neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) of the gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) tract. Methods: Expression of TGFβ-1 and its receptors, Smads and Smad regulated proteins, was examined in surgically resected NET specimens and human NET cell lines by immunohistochemistry, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and ELISA. Activation of TGFβ-1 dependent promoters was tested by transactivation assays. Growth regulation was evaluated by cell numbers, soft agar assays, and cell cycle analysis using flow cytometry. The role of endogenous TGFβ was assessed by a TGFβ neutralising antibody and stable transfection of a dominant negative TGFβR II receptor construct. Results: Coexpression of TGFβ-1 and its receptors TGFβR I and TGFβR II was detected in 67% of human NETs and in all three NET cell lines examined. NET cell lines expressed the TGFβ signal transducers Smad 2, 3, and 4. In two of the three cell lines, TGFβ-1 treatment resulted in transactivation of a TGFβ responsive reporter construct as well as inhibition of c-myc and induction of p21(WAF1) expression. TGFβ-1 inhibited anchorage dependent and independent growth in a time and dose dependent manner in TGFβ-1 responsive cell lines. TGFβ-1 mediated growth inhibition was due to G1 arrest without evidence of induction of apoptosis. Functional inactivation of endogenous TGFβ revealed the existence of an autocrine antiproliferative loop in NET cells. Conclusions: Neuroendocrine tumour cells of the gastroenteropancreatic tract are subject to paracrine and autocrine growth inhibition by TGFβ-1, which may account in part for the low proliferative index of this tumour entity. PMID:12912863

  19. Violence against radiologists. II: Psychosocial factors.

    PubMed

    Magnavita, N; Fileni, A

    2012-09-01

    Violence against radiologists is a growing problem. This study evaluated the psychosocial factors associated with this phenomenon. A questionnaire was administered to 992 Italian radiologists. Physical violence experienced in the previous 12-month period was associated with the radiologist's poor mental health [odds ratio (OR) 1.11] and overcommitment to work (OR 1.06), whereas radiologists in good physical health (OR 0.64), with job satisfaction (OR 0.96) and with overall happiness (OR 0.67) were less exposed. Nonphysical abuse was equally associated with the radiologist's poor mental health (OR 1.10) and overcommitment (OR 1.14) and negatively associated with physical health (OR 0.54), job satisfaction (OR 0.96), happiness (OR 0.81), organisational justice (OR 0.94) and social support (OR 0.80). Preventive intervention against violence in the workplace should improve workplace organisation and relationships between workers.

  20. [Growth Hormone-Insulin Growth Factor I (GH-IGF-I) axis and growth].

    PubMed

    Castell, A-L; Sadoul, J-L; Bouvattier, C

    2013-10-01

    Normal human linear growth results from an evolutionary process expressing the sum effect of multiple genes. The growth hormone (GH) - insulin like growth factor (IGF)-I axis is one of the main actors in the growth process. Defects in this axis can be responsible for short or tall stature. Short stature is defined as smaller than - 2 standard deviations (SD). It is a very common reason for consultation in pediatrics; indeed, 2.5 % of children are concerned. Multiple causes make diagnosis difficult. In this article, we detail the most common constitutional causes of small size, including those related to a defect in the GH-IGF-I axis. Then, we report, the first results of the clinical and genetic study conducted on 213 patients with gigantism. Tall stature is defined by a height superior to 2 SD. Finally, recent work linking epigenetics and growth - via signaling pathways of GH-IGF-I axis - will be presented.

  1. Insulin-like growth factor and epidermal growth factor signaling in breast cancer cell growth: focus on endocrine resistant disease.

    PubMed

    Voudouri, Kallirroi; Berdiaki, Aikaterini; Tzardi, Maria; Tzanakakis, George N; Nikitovic, Dragana

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer for women worldwide with a lifetime risk amounting to a staggering total of 10%. It is well established that the endogenous synthesis of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) polypeptide growth factors are closely correlated to malignant transformation and all the steps of the breast cancer metastatic cascade. Numerous studies have demonstrated that both estrogens and growth factors stimulate the proliferation of steroid-dependent tumor cells, and that the interaction between these signaling pathways occurs at several levels. Importantly, the majority of breast cancer cases are estrogen receptor- (ER-) positive which have a more favorable prognosis and pattern of recurrence with endocrine therapy being the backbone of treatment. Unfortunately, the majority of patients progress to endocrine therapy resistant disease (acquired resistance) whereas a proportion of patients may fail to respond to initial therapy (de novo resistance). The IGF-I and EGF downstream signaling pathways are closely involved in the process of progression to therapy resistant disease. Modifications in the bioavailability of these growth factors contribute critically to disease progression. In the present review therefore, we will discuss in depth how IGF and EGF signaling participate in breast cancer pathogenesis and progression to endocrine resistant disease.

  2. Basic fibroblast growth factor promotes macaque follicle development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lu, C L; Yan, J; Zhi, X; Xia, X; Wang, T R; Yan, L Y; Yu, Y; Ding, T; Gao, J M; Li, R; Qiao, J

    2015-05-01

    Fertility preservation is an important type of frontier scientific research in the field of reproductive health. The culture of ovarian cortices to i) initiate primordial follicle growth and ii) procure developing follicles for later oocyte maturation is a promising fertility preservation strategy, especially for older women or cancer patients. At present, this goal remains largely unsubstantiated in primates because of the difficulty in attaining relatively large follicles via ovarian cortex culture. To overcome this hurdle, we cultured macaque monkey ovarian cortices with FSH, kit ligand (KL), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and/or epidermal growth factor (EGF). The various factors and factor combinations promoted primordial follicle development to different extents. Notably, both bFF (bFGF, 100 ng/ml and FSH, 50 ng/ml) and KF (KL, 100 ng/ml and FSH, 50 ng/ml) contributed to the activation of primordial follicles at day 12 (D12) of culture, whereas at D18, the proportions of developing follicles were significantly higher in the bFF and KF groups relative to the other treatment groups, particularly in the bFF group. Estradiol and progesterone production were also highest in the bFF group, and primary follicle diameters were the largest. Up until D24, the bFF group still exhibited the highest proportion of developing follicles. In conclusion, the bFGF-FSH combination promotes nonhuman primate primordial follicle development in vitro, with the optimal experimental window within 18 days. These results provide evidence for the future success of human ovarian cortex culture and the eventual acquisition of mature human follicles or oocytes for fertility restoration. © 2015 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  3. Growth factor control of epidermal growth factor receptor kinase activity via an intramolecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Koland, J G; Cerione, R A

    1988-02-15

    The mechanism by which the protein kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is activated by binding of growth factor was investigated. Detergent-solubilized receptor in monomeric form was isolated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation and both its kinase and autophosphorylation activities monitored. In a low ionic strength medium and with MnCl2 as an activator, the activity of the monomeric receptor was EGF-independent. However, with 0.25 M ammonium sulfate present, the MnCl2-stimulated kinase activity was strikingly EGF-dependent. In contrast, the kinase activity expressed in the presence of MgCl2 showed growth factor control in the absence of added salt. Under the conditions of these experiments there was apparently little tendency for growth factor to induce aggregation of the receptor, indicating that the allosteric activation of the receptor kinase by EGF occurred via an intramolecular mechanism. Whereas detergent-solubilized receptor was the subject of these studies, the kinase activity of cell surface receptors might also be controlled by an intramolecular mechanism. These results indicate that an individual receptor molecule has the potential to function as a transmembrane signal transducer.

  4. Differential expression of insulin-like growth factor genes in rat central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Rotwein, P; Burgess, S K; Milbrandt, J D; Krause, J E

    1988-01-01

    A sensitive solution-hybridization assay was used to investigate the expression of genes encoding insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I and -II) in the rat central nervous system (CNS). mRNAs for both IGFs are synthesized throughout the CNS of adult rats but exhibit distinct regional differences for each growth factor. IGF-I mRNA is 8-10 times more abundant in the cervical-thoracic spinal cord and in the olfactory bulb than in whole brain and is enriched 3-fold in the midbrain and cerebellum. IGF-II mRNA is minimally enriched in the medulla-pons and cerebellum but is 3-5 times less abundant in the midbrain and corpus striatum than in total brain. During CNS development the content of IGF-I and IGF-II mRNAs is highest at embryonic day 14 and declines by a factor of 3-4 at birth, to values found in adult brain. Embryonic neurons and glia synthesize IGF-I mRNA during short-term cell culture; only glia produce IGF-II mRNA. These observations show that IGF-I and IGF-II are differentially expressed in the developing and adult CNS and suggest that each growth factor may play a unique role in the mammalian nervous system.

  5. Nerve growth factor: neurotrophin or cytokine?

    PubMed

    Bonini, S; Rasi, G; Bracci-Laudiero, M L; Procoli, A; Aloe, L

    2003-06-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a neutrophin exerting an important role in the development and functions of the central and peripheral nervous system. However, it has recently been documented that several immune cells - such as mast cells, lymphocytes and eosinophils - produce, store and release NGF. Moreover, NGF high and low affinity receptors are widely expressed in the immune system, thus indicating the potential of responding to this neurotrophin through an autocrine mechanism. In fact, NGF influences development differentiation, chemotaxis and mediator release of inflammatory cells as well as fibroblast activation through a complex network influenced by other pro-inflammatory cytokines. Finally, NGF is increased in biological fluids of several allergic, immune and inflammatory diseases. Data reviewed suggest, therefore, that NGF might also be viewed as a (Th2?) cytokine with a modulatory role in allergic inflammation and tissue remodeling. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  6. The Fibroblast Growth Factor signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ornitz, David M; Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The signaling component of the mammalian Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) family is comprised of eighteen secreted proteins that interact with four signaling tyrosine kinase FGF receptors (FGFRs). Interaction of FGF ligands with their signaling receptors is regulated by protein or proteoglycan cofactors and by extracellular binding proteins. Activated FGFRs phosphorylate specific tyrosine residues that mediate interaction with cytosolic adaptor proteins and the RAS-MAPK, PI3K-AKT, PLCγ, and STAT intracellular signaling pathways. Four structurally related intracellular non-signaling FGFs interact with and regulate the family of voltage gated sodium channels. Members of the FGF family function in the earliest stages of embryonic development and during organogenesis to maintain progenitor cells and mediate their growth, differentiation, survival, and patterning. FGFs also have roles in adult tissues where they mediate metabolic functions, tissue repair, and regeneration, often by reactivating developmental signaling pathways. Consistent with the presence of FGFs in almost all tissues and organs, aberrant activity of the pathway is associated with developmental defects that disrupt organogenesis, impair the response to injury, and result in metabolic disorders, and cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25772309

  7. Neuropeptides as lung cancer growth factors.

    PubMed

    Moody, Terry W; Moreno, Paola; Jensen, Robert T

    2015-10-01

    This manuscript is written in honor of the Festschrift for Abba Kastin. I met Abba at a Society for Neuroscience meeting and learned that he was Editor-in-Chief of the Journal Peptides. I submitted manuscripts to the journal on "Neuropeptides as Growth Factors in Cancer" and subsequently was named to the Editorial Advisory Board. Over the past 30 years I have published dozens of manuscripts in Peptides and reviewed hundreds of submitted manuscripts. It was always rewarding to interact with Abba, a consummate professional. When I attended meetings in New Orleans I would sometimes go out to dinner with him at the restaurant "Commanders Palace". When I chaired the Summer Neuropeptide Conference we were honored to have him receive the Fleur Strand Award one year in Israel. I think that his biggest editorial contribution has been the "Handbook of Biologically Active Peptides." I served as a Section Editor on "Cancer/Anticancer Peptides" and again found that it was a pleasure working with him. This review focuses on the mechanisms by which bombesin-like peptides, neurotensin and vasoactive intestinal peptide regulate the growth of lung cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Growth factors and cytokines in acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Harris, R C

    1997-04-01

    The mammalian kidney is susceptible to injury by ischemia/reperfusion and toxins, and regeneration after injury is characterized by hyperplasia and recovery of the damaged epithelial cells that line the tubules. Locally produced growth factors may serve as mediators of nephrogenesis and differentiation during renal development and of renal regeneration after acute injury. In cultured cells, administration of one or a mixture of growth factors to quiescent cells will initiate progression through the cell cycle and cell division. In the adult kidney, cell division normally is very low, but will increase up to 10-fold after acute injury. In addition to proliferation after lethal injury, there also is cellular repair in cells that have undergone sublethal injury. Recent studies indicate that growth factors inhibit programmed cell death in response to acute injury. Growth factors also may initiate or promote protein and lipid biosynthesis and provide an intracellular milieu that promotes cellular repair. In addition to cellular repair, growth factors also may be involved in the re-establishment of cell-extracellular matrix and cell-cell integrity. Finally, growth factors may limit injury by decreasing the factors that induce damage. Increased local renal expression of growth factors in response to acute injury include heparin binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), transforming growth factor-beta, parathyroid hormone-related peptide, and acidic fibroblast growth factor. In a number of experimental models of acute renal injury, administration of exogenous growth factors has been shown to accelerate both structural and functional recovery. Specifically, EGF, IGF-1, and HGF all have been shown to be effective in this regard. These studies are reviewed and potential therapeutic uses of growth factors and cytokines will be discussed.

  9. Combination of ruthenium(II)-arene complex [Ru(η6-p-cymene)Cl2(pta)] (RAPTA-C) and the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor erlotinib results in efficient angiostatic and antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Berndsen, Robert H.; Weiss, Andrea; Abdul, U. Kulsoom; Wong, Tse J.; Meraldi, Patrick; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Dyson, Paul J.; Nowak-Sliwinska, Patrycja

    2017-01-01

    Ruthenium-based compounds show strong potential as anti-cancer drugs and are being investigated as alternatives to other well-established metal-based chemotherapeutics. The organometallic compound [Ru(η6-p-cymene)Cl2(pta)], where pta = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane (RAPTA-C) exhibits broad acting anti-tumor efficacy with intrinsic angiostatic activity. In the search for an optimal anti-angiogenesis drug combination, we identified synergistic potential between RAPTA-C and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor, erlotinib. This drug combination results in strong synergistic inhibition of cell viability in human endothelial (ECRF24 and HUVEC) and human ovarian carcinoma (A2780 and A2780cisR) cells. Additionally, erlotinib significantly enhances the cellular uptake of RAPTA-C relative to treatment with RAPTA-C alone in human ovarian carcinoma cells, but not endothelial cells. Drug combinations induce the formation of chromosome bridges that persist after mitotic exit and delay abscission in A2780 and A2780cisR, therefore suggesting initiation of cellular senescence. The therapeutic potential of these compounds and their combination is further validated in vivo on A2780 tumors grown on the chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model, and in a preclinical model in nude mice. Immunohistochemical analysis confirms effective anti-angiogenic and anti-proliferative activity in vivo, based on a significant reduction of microvascular density and a decrease in proliferating cells. PMID:28223694

  10. [Regulation of uterine cellular proliferation with estrogens and growth factors].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Rodríguez, C; Baiza-Guzmán, L A

    1996-09-01

    In this paper the role of estrogen and growth factors in the uterine cellular proliferation is analyzed. The evidences indicate that the estradiol-stimulate cell division is associated with the induction of expression of a variety of growth factors from the all major uterine cell types (epithelia, stroma and myometrium). These growth factors amplify the estrogen proliferation signal in autocrine and/or paracrin fashion. The best-studied growth factors in the uterine response to estradiol are epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1). Uterine cell proliferation is a complex process that involves interactions of several growth factors, ovarian steroids hormones action and cell to cell signaling.

  11. Epidermal homeostasis: the role of the growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor systems.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Stephanie R; Thumiger, Susan P; Werther, George A; Wraight, Christopher J

    2003-12-01

    GH and IGF-I and -II were first identified by their endocrine activity. Specifically, IGF-I was found to mediate the linear growth-promoting actions of GH. It is now evident that these two growth factor systems also exert widespread activity throughout the body and that their actions are not always interconnected. The literature highlights the importance of the GH and IGF systems in normal skin homeostasis, including dermal/epidermal cross-talk. GH activity, sometimes mediated via IGF-I, is primarily evident in the dermis, particularly affecting collagen synthesis. In contrast, IGF action is an important feature of the dermal and epidermal compartments, predominantly enhancing cell proliferation, survival, and migration. The locally expressed IGF binding proteins play significant and complex roles, primarily via modulation of IGF actions. Disturbances in GH and IGF signaling pathways are implicated in the pathophysiology of several skin perturbations, particularly those exhibiting epidermal hyperplasia (e.g., psoriasis, carcinomas). Additionally, many studies emphasize the potential use of both growth factors in the treatment of skin wounds; for example, burn patients. This overview concerns the role and mechanisms of action of the GH and IGF systems in skin and maintenance of epidermal integrity in both health and disease.

  12. Hepatocyte growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor are differentially affected by early chronic ethanol or red wine intake.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Marco; Mancinelli, Rosanna; Aloe, Luigi; Laviola, Giovanni; Sornelli, Federica; Vitali, Mario; Ceccanti, Mauro

    2009-08-10

    Ethanol intake during pregnancy and lactation induces severe changes in brain and liver throughout mechanisms involving growth factors. These are signaling molecules regulating survival, differentiation, maintenance and connectivity of brain and liver cells. Ethanol is an element of red wine which contains also compounds with antioxidant properties. Aim of the study was to investigate differences in hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) in brain areas and liver by ELISA of 1-month-old male mice exposed perinatally to ethanol at 11 vol.% or to red wine at same ethanol concentration. Ethanol was administered before and during pregnancy up to pups' weaning. Ethanol per se elevated HGF in liver and cortex, potentiated liver VEGF, reduced GDNF in the liver and decreased NGF content in hippocampus and cortex in the offspring. We did not find changes in HGF or NGF due to red wine exposure. However, we revealed elevation in VEGF levels in liver and reduced GDNF in the cortex of animals exposed to red wine but the VEGF liver increase was more marked in animals exposed to ethanol only compared to the red wine group. In conclusion the present findings in the mouse show differences in ethanol-induced toxicity when ethanol is administered alone or in red wine that may be related to compounds with antioxidant properties present in the red wine.

  13. Assessing measurement invariance of the Personal Growth Initiative Scale-II among Hispanics, African Americans, and European Americans.

    PubMed

    Shigemoto, Yuki; Thoen, Megan A; Robitschek, Christine; Ashton, Matthew W

    2015-07-01

    This study tested the cross-cultural validity of scores on the Personal Growth Initiative Scale-II (PGIS-II; Robitschek et al., 2012) with Hispanic, African American, and European American community samples. Multigroup confirmatory factor analyses were performed on data from 218 Hispanics, 129 African Americans, and 552 European Americans to examine measurement equivalence among these groups. Measurement invariance of the PGIS-II was established with the original 4 factors of readiness for change, planfulness, using resources, and intentional behavior. These findings suggest the PGIS-II can be administered across these groups and provide meaningful comparisons and interpretations. All samples yielded good internal consistency estimates. The African American sample reported higher means than Hispanic and European American samples for all subscale and total mean scores, and Hispanics scored higher in planfulness, readiness for change, and total score than European Americans, indicating potential cultural factors influencing the scores. Implications for research and clinical practice are discussed.

  14. Design of Growth Factor Sequestering Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Belair, David G.; Le, Ngoc Nhi; Murphy, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Growth factors (GFs) are major regulatory proteins that can govern cell fate, migration, and organization. Numerous aspects of the cell milieu can modulate cell responses to GFs, and GF regulation is often achieved by the native extracellular matrix (ECM). For example, the ECM can sequester GFs and thereby control GF bioavailability. In addition, GFs can exert distinct effects depending on whether they are sequestered in solution, at two-dimensional interfaces, or within three-dimensional matrices. Understanding how the context of GF sequestering impacts cell function in the native ECM can instruct the design of soluble or insoluble GF sequestering moieties, which can then be used in a variety of bioengineering applications. This Feature Article provides an overview of the natural mechanisms of GF sequestering in the cell milieu, and reviews the recent bioengineering approaches that have sequestered GFs to modulate cell function. Results to date demonstrate that the cell response to GF sequestering depends on the affinity of the sequestering interaction, the spatial proximity of sequestering in relation to cells, the source of the GF (supplemented or endogenous), and the phase of the sequestering moiety (soluble or insoluble). We highlight the importance of context for the future design of biomaterials that can leverage endogenous molecules in the cell milieu and mitigate the need for supplemented factors. PMID:25182455

  15. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 4-6.

    PubMed

    Bach, Leon A

    2015-10-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) 4-6 have important roles as modulators of IGF actions. IGFBP-4 and IGFBP-6 predominantly inhibit IGF actions, whereas IGFBP-5 may enhance these actions under some circumstances. IGFBP-6 is unique among the IGFBPs for its marked IGF-II binding preference. IGFBPs 4-6 are found in the circulation as binary complexes with IGFs that can enter tissues. Additionally, about half of the circulating IGFBP-5 is found in ternary complexes with IGFs and an acid labile subunit; this high molecular complex cannot leave the circulation and acts as an IGF reservoir. IGFBPs 4-6 also have IGF-independent actions. These IGFBPs are regulated in a cell-specific manner and their dysregulation may play a role in a range of diseases including cancer. However, there is no clear clinical indication for measuring serum levels of these IGFBPs at present.

  16. Epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted therapy for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Henry Q; Abbruzzese, James L

    2002-10-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in tumor development and maintenance. It is a cell surface molecule that mediates signal transduction from the cell surface to cytoplasm. Elevated expression of EGFR or its ligand correlates with worse prognosis in a variety of human cancers. Therefore, blockade of EGFR activity would provide a novel strategy for the treatment of cancer. Two classes of EGFR inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, have been described. The preclinical activity of these EGFR inhibitors and phase I clinical data are summarized in this article. A phase II trial of the EGFR inhibitor IMC-C225 in combination with gemcitabine for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer is discussed. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  17. Catch-up growth in autosomal dominant isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD type II).

    PubMed

    Binder, G; Iliev, D I; Mullis, P E; Ranke, M B

    2007-06-01

    Data on the GH-induced catch-up growth of severely GH-deficient children affected by monogenetic defects are missing. Catch-up growth of 21 prepubertal children (6 females, 15 males) affected with IGHD type II was analyzed in a retrospective chart review. At start of therapy, mean age was 6.2 years (range, 1.6-15.0), mean height SDS was -4.7 (-7.6 to -2.2), mean IGF-I SDS was -6.2 (-10.1 to -2.2). GH was substituted using a mean dose of 30.5microg/kg*d. Catch-up growth was characterized by a mean height gain of +0.92, +0.82, and +0.61 SDS after 1, 2, and 3 years of GH therapy, respectively. Mean height velocities were 10.7, 9.2 and 7.7cm/year during the first three years. Mean duration of complete catch-up growth was 6 years (3-9). Mean height SDS reached was -0.97 (-2.3 to +1.1), which was within the range of the estimated target height of -0.60 SDS (-1.20 to -0.15). The younger and shorter the children were at start of therapy the better they grew during the first year independent of the dose. Mean bone age was delayed at start by 2.1 years and progressed by 2.5 years during the first two years of therapy. Incomplete catch-up growth was caused by late initiation or irregular administration of GH in four cases. Our data suggest that GH-treated children with severe IGHD show a sustained catch-up growth over 6 years (mean) and reach their target height range. This response to GH is considered to be characteristic for young children with severe growth retardation due to IGHD.

  18. Growth factor involvement in tension-induced skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman W.

    1987-01-01

    New muscle tissue culture techniques were developed to grow embryonic skeletal myofibers which are able to differentiate into more adultlike myofibers. Studies on mechanical simulation of cultured muscle cell growth will now be more directly applicable to mechanically-induced growth in adult muscle, and lead to better models for understanding muscle tissue atrophy caused by disuse in the microgravity of space.

  19. Growth factors and their relationship to neoplastic and paraneoplastic disease.

    PubMed

    Badawi, R A; Birns, J; Watson, T; Kalra, L

    2005-04-01

    Growth factors are extracellular signaling molecules that act in an autocrine and paracrine fashion to regulate growth, proliferation, differentiation, and survival of cells. Dysregulation of the growth factor networks is intimately related to the molecular pathogenesis of neoplastic and paraneoplastic disease. Increasing knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying growth factors and their actions on cell cycling, cell division, and cell death is shedding light on new therapeutic avenues for molecular targeting of tumors. Epidermal growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor both offer examples of how growth factor biology and its relationship to cancer can be harnessed to create effective clinical therapeutic tools such as monoclonal antibodies. This approach heralds a future in which rational molecular oncological therapy may increasingly become the norm.

  20. Kinetics of epidermal growth factor in saliva.

    PubMed

    Ino, M; Ushiro, K; Ino, C; Yamashita, T; Kumazawa, T

    1993-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) stimulates the growth and differentiation of various tissues. We measured EGF levels in saliva (n = 128), urine (n = 94), and serum (n = 99) with radioimmunoassay in order to study the kinetics of hEGF in saliva of normal subjects and patients with oral disease. Salivary EGF levels showed an apparent diurnal rhythm related to the taking of meals. Urinary and serum EGF levels showed no obvious diurnal rhythm. There was no significant correlation between salivary and urinary EGF levels, nor between salivary and serum EGF levels. Salivary EGF levels were significantly lower in the younger group (0-9 years old, 3.06 +/- 0.32 ng/ml, p < 0.05) than in the elder group (10-79 years old, 4.78 +/- 3.5 ng/ml), but did not correlate with age in the elder group. There was no significant difference between males and females between EGF levels in saliva, urine or serum. The relative proportion of EGF levels in submandibular gland saliva, parotid saliva, and whole saliva was 1:6:4. The positive rate of immunohistochemical EGF showed no significant differences between submandibular gland, parotid gland, sublingual gland or minor salivary gland. Salivary EGF levels were markedly low in patients with oral inflammations (stomatitis aphthosa, or peritonsillar abscess) or head and neck tumors (squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue, oral cavity, hypopharynx or larynx). These findings may be significant pathophysiologically. Low salivary EGF levels may reduce the capacity of oral mucosal defense mechanisms to fight against injury by physiochemical agents.

  1. Endorsement of Growth Factors in Experiential Training Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiweewa, John; Gilbride, Dennis; Luke, Melissa; Seward, Derek

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify student growth factors during a semester long Master's level group counseling class. Results indicated that 12 growth factors accounted for 86% of the total number of critical incidents that participants reported as influencing their personal growth and awareness during the group experience. Two other…

  2. Endorsement of Growth Factors in Experiential Training Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiweewa, John; Gilbride, Dennis; Luke, Melissa; Seward, Derek

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify student growth factors during a semester long Master's level group counseling class. Results indicated that 12 growth factors accounted for 86% of the total number of critical incidents that participants reported as influencing their personal growth and awareness during the group experience. Two other…

  3. Gene expression of growth factors and growth factor receptors for potential targeted therapy of canine hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Iida, Gentoku; Asano, Kazushi; Seki, Mamiko; Sakai, Manabu; Kutara, Kenji; Ishigaki, Kumiko; Kagawa, Yumiko; Yoshida, Orie; Teshima, Kenji; Edamura, Kazuya; Watari, Toshihiro

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gene expression of growth factors and growth factor receptors of primary hepatic masses, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and nodular hyperplasia (NH), in dogs. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was performed to measure the expression of 18 genes in 18 HCCs, 10 NHs, 11 surrounding non-cancerous liver tissues and 4 healthy control liver tissues. Platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B), transforming growth factor-α, epidermal growth factor receptor, epidermal growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor were found to be differentially expressed in HCC compared with NH and the surrounding non-cancerous and healthy control liver tissues. PDGF-B is suggested to have the potential to become a valuable ancillary target for the treatment of canine HCC.

  4. Effective strategies for management of hypertension after vascular endothelial growth factor signaling inhibition therapy: results from a phase II randomized, factorial, double-blind study of Cediranib in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Langenberg, Marlies H G; van Herpen, Carla M L; De Bono, Johann; Schellens, Jan H M; Unger, Clemens; Hoekman, Klaas; Blum, Hubert E; Fiedler, Walter; Drevs, Joachim; Le Maulf, Florence; Fielding, Anitra; Robertson, Jane; Voest, Emile E

    2009-12-20

    PURPOSE Hypertension is a commonly reported adverse effect after administration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors. Cediranib is a highly potent and selective VEGF signaling inhibitor of all three VEGFRs. This study prospectively investigated hypertension management to help minimize dose interruptions/reductions to maximize cediranib dose intensity. PATIENTS AND METHODS Patients (n = 126) with advanced solid tumors were randomly assigned to one of four groups: cediranib 30 or 45 mg/d with or without antihypertensive prophylaxis. All patients developing hypertension on cediranib treatment were treated with a standardized, predefined hypertension management protocol. Results Cediranib was generally well tolerated, and all groups achieved high-dose intensities in the first 12 weeks (> 74% in all groups). Antihypertensive prophylaxis did not result in fewer dose reductions or interruptions. Increases in blood pressure, including moderate and severe readings of hypertension, were seen early in treatment in all groups and successfully managed. Severe hypertension occurred in one patient receiving prophylaxis versus 18 in the nonprophylaxis groups. Overall, there were nine partial responses, and 38 patients experienced stable disease >/= 8 weeks. CONCLUSION To our knowledge, this is the first prospective investigation of hypertension management during administration of a VEGF signaling inhibitor. All four regimens were well tolerated with high-dose intensities and no strategy was clearly superior. The current cediranib hypertension management protocol appears to be effective in managing hypertension compared with previous cediranib studies where no plan was in place, and early recognition and treatment of hypertension is likely to reduce the number of severe hypertension events. This protocol is included in all ongoing cediranib clinical studies.

  5. Phase II Trial of Trastuzumab in Combination With Cytotoxic Chemotherapy for Treatment of Metastatic Osteosarcoma With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Overexpression: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Ebb, David; Meyers, Paul; Grier, Holcombe; Bernstein, Mark; Gorlick, Richard; Lipshultz, Steven E.; Krailo, Mark; Devidas, Meenakshi; Barkauskas, Donald A.; Siegal, Gene P.; Ferguson, William Shay; Letson, George Douglas; Marcus, Karen; Goorin, Allen; Beardsley, Peter; Marina, Neyssa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Despite efforts to intensify chemotherapy, survival for patients with metastatic osteosarcoma remains poor. Overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in osteosarcoma has been shown to predict poor therapeutic response and decreased survival. This study tests the safety and feasibility of delivering biologically targeted therapy by combining trastuzumab with standard chemotherapy in patients with metastatic osteosarcoma and HER2 overexpression. Patients and Methods Among 96 evaluable patients with newly diagnosed metastatic osteosarcoma, 41 had tumors that were HER2-positive by immunohistochemistry. All patients received chemotherapy with cisplatin, doxorubicin, methotrexate, ifosfamide, and etoposide. Dexrazoxane was administered with doxorubicin to minimize the risk of cardiotoxicity from treatment with trastuzumab and anthracycline. Only patients with HER2 overexpression received concurrent therapy with trastuzumab given for 34 consecutive weeks. Results The 30-month event-free and overall survival rates for patients with HER2 overexpression treated with chemotherapy and trastuzumab were 32% and 59%, respectively. For patients without HER2 overexpression, treated with chemotherapy alone, the 30-month event-free and overall survival rates were 32% and 50%, respectively. There was no clinically significant short-term cardiotoxicity in patients treated with trastuzumab and doxorubicin. Conclusion Despite intensive chemotherapy plus trastuzumab for patients with HER2-positive disease, the outcome for all patients was poor, with no significant difference between the HER2-positive and HER2-negative groups. Although our findings suggest that trastuzumab can be safely delivered in combination with anthracycline-based chemotherapy and dexrazoxane, its therapeutic benefit remains uncertain. Definitive assessment of trastuzumab's potential role in treating osteosarcoma would require a randomized study of patients with HER2-positive disease

  6. SphK1 inhibitor II (SKI-II) inhibits acute myelogenous leukemia cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Weng, Wei; Sun, Zhi-Xin; Fu, Xian-Jie; Ma, Jun; Zhuang, Wen-Fang

    2015-05-15

    Previous studies have identified sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) as a potential drug target for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current study, we investigated the potential anti-leukemic activity of a novel and specific SphK1 inhibitor, SKI-II. We demonstrated that SKI-II inhibited growth and survival of human AML cell lines (HL-60 and U937 cells). SKI-II was more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors SK1-I and FTY720 in inhibiting AML cells. Meanwhile, it induced dramatic apoptosis in above AML cells, and the cytotoxicity by SKI-II was almost reversed by the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. SKI-II treatment inhibited SphK1 activation, and concomitantly increased level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) precursor ceramide in AML cells. Conversely, exogenously-added S1P protected against SKI-II-induced cytotoxicity, while cell permeable short-chain ceramide (C6) aggravated SKI-II's lethality against AML cells. Notably, SKI-II induced potent apoptotic death in primary human AML cells, but was generally safe to the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from healthy donors. In vivo, SKI-II administration suppressed growth of U937 leukemic xenograft tumors in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. These results suggest that SKI-II might be further investigated as a promising anti-AML agent.

  7. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Class II α-Isoform PI3K-C2α Is Required for Transforming Growth Factor β-induced Smad Signaling in Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Aki, Sho; Yoshioka, Kazuaki; Okamoto, Yasuo; Takuwa, Noriko; Takuwa, Yoh

    2015-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the PI3K class II-α isoform (PI3K-C2α), which generates phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphates, plays crucial roles in angiogenesis, by analyzing PI3K-C2α knock-out mice. The PI3K-C2α actions are mediated at least in part through its participation in the internalization of VEGF receptor-2 and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor S1P1 and thereby their signaling on endosomes. TGFβ, which is also an essential angiogenic factor, signals via the serine/threonine kinase receptor complex to induce phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3 (Smad2/3). SARA (Smad anchor for receptor activation) protein, which is localized in early endosomes through its FYVE domain, is required for Smad2/3 signaling. In the present study, we showed that PI3K-C2α knockdown nearly completely abolished TGFβ1-induced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Smad2/3 in vascular endothelial cells (ECs). PI3K-C2α was necessary for TGFβ-induced increase in phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphates in the plasma membrane and TGFβ receptor internalization into the SARA-containing early endosomes, but not for phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate enrichment or localization of SARA in the early endosomes. PI3K-C2α was also required for TGFβ receptor-mediated formation of SARA-Smad2/3 complex. Inhibition of dynamin, which is required for the clathrin-dependent receptor endocytosis, suppressed both TGFβ receptor internalization and Smad2/3 phosphorylation. TGFβ1 stimulated Smad-dependent VEGF-A expression, VEGF receptor-mediated EC migration, and capillary-like tube formation, which were all abolished by either PI3K-C2α knockdown or a dynamin inhibitor. Finally, TGFβ1-induced microvessel formation in Matrigel plugs was greatly attenuated in EC-specific PI3K-C2α-deleted mice. These observations indicate that PI3K-C2α plays the pivotal role in TGFβ receptor endocytosis and thereby Smad2/3 signaling, participating in angiogenic

  8. Fruit-juice concentrate of Asian plum inhibits growth signals of vascular smooth muscle cells induced by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Takekoshi, Susumu; Gato, Nobuki; Utatsu, Hisao; Motley, Evangeline D; Eguchi, Kunie; Fitzgerald, Trinita G; Mifune, Mizuo; Frank, Gerald D; Eguchi, Satoru

    2002-12-27

    Bainiku-ekisu, the fruit-juice concentrate of the Oriental plum (Prunus mume) has recently been shown to improve human blood fluidity. We have shown that angiotensin II (AngII) stimulates growth of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) through epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor transactivation that involves reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. To better understanding the possible cardiovascular protective effect of Bainiku-ekisu, we have studied whether Bainiku-ekisu inhibits AngII-induced growth promoting signals in VSMCs. Bainiku-ekisu markedly inhibited AngII-induced EGF receptor transactivation. H(2)O(2)-induced EGF receptor transactivation was also inhibited by Bainiku-ekisu. Thus, Bainiku-ekisu markedly inhibited AngII-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation. However, EGF-induced ERK activation was not affected by Bainiku-ekisu. AngII stimulated leucine uptake in VSMCs that was significantly inhibited by Bainiku-ekisu. Also, Bainiku-ekisu possesses a potent antioxidant activity. Since the activation of EGF receptor, ERK and the production of ROS play central roles in mediating AngII-induced vascular remodeling, these data suggest that Bainiku-ekisu could exert a powerful cardiovascular protective effect with regard to cardiovascular diseases.

  9. Cytokines, matrix metalloproteases, angiogenic and growth factors in tears of normal subjects and vernal keratoconjunctivitis patients.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, A; Sathe, S; Bortolotti, M; Beaton, A; Sack, R

    2009-05-01

    To detect the presence of multiple mediators and growth factors in tears of vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) patients with active disease using stationary phase antibody arrays. Tears were collected from 12 normal subjects (CT) and 24 active VKC patients. Tears were centrifuged and successively probed using three microwell plate arrays specific for: (i) cytokines: interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, interferon-gamma and tumour necrosis factor-alpha; (ii) growth factors: basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), platelet-derived growth factor, thrombopoietin, angiopoietin-2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), keratocyte growth factor, tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease (TIMP)-1 and heparin-binding epithelial growth factor (HB-EGF) and (iii) matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-8, MMP-9, MMP-10, MMP-13, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2. Interleukin-8 signals were detected in all CT and highly detected in all VKC samples. The Th2-type cytokines, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10 were detected only in tears of VKC patients. Signals for bFGF, HB-EGF, VEGF and HGF were detected in 41-87% of VKC samples and in few CT samples. Only TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 were found in all normal and patient tear samples, whereas MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9 and MMP-10 were highly present in all VKC samples. Stationary phase antibody array methodology was useful for the screening of various cytokines, growth factors and MMPs in tears. These analyses identified in tears of VKC patients previously unreported factors including MMP-3 and MMP-10 and multiple proteases, growth factors and cytokines, which may all play an important role in the pathogenesis of conjunctival inflammation.

  10. [Stem cells and growth factors in wound healing].

    PubMed

    Pikuła, Michał; Langa, Paulina; Kosikowska, Paulina; Trzonkowski, Piotr

    2015-01-02

    Wound healing is a complex process which depends on the presence of various types of cells, growth factors, cytokines and the elements of extracellular matrix. A wound is a portal of entry for numerous pathogens, therefore during the evolution wound healing process has formed very early, being critical for the survival of every individual. Stem cells, which give rise to their early descendants progenitor cells and subsequently differentiated cells, play a specific role in the process of wound healing. Among the most important cells which take part in wound healing the following cells need to be distinguished: epidermal stem cells, dermal precursor of fibroblasts, adipose-derived stem cells as well as bone marrow cells. The activity of these cells is strictly regulated by various growth factors, inter alia epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor (TGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Any disorders in functioning of stem cells and biological activity of growth factors may lead to the defects in wound healing, for instance delayed wound healing or creation of hypertrophic scars. Therefore, knowledge concerning the mechanisms of wound healing is extremely essential from clinical point of view. In this review the current state of the knowledge of the role of stem cells and growth factors in the process of wound healing has been presented. Moreover, some clinical aspects of wound healing as well as the possibility of the therapy based on stem cells and growth factors have included.

  11. Transforming growth factor alpha and epidermal growth factor levels in normal human gastrointestinal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Cartlidge, S. A.; Elder, J. B.

    1989-01-01

    Acid soluble proteins from 23 samples of normal human gastrointestinal mucosa derived from four normal adult organ donors were extracted and subjected to specific radiommunoassays for transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) and urogastrone epidermal growth factor (URO-EGF). All tissues were found to contain immunoreactive TGF alpha and levels ranged from 57 to 4,776 pg-1 wet weight of tissue. Although levels varied between tissue donors, the distribution of TGF alpha throughout the gastrointestinal tract appeared similar in all cases. URO-EGF levels were much lower (0-216 pg g-1 wet weight). TGF alpha levels in extracts of gastrointestinal mucosa from a 7-year-old female donor were higher and the observed distribution was markedly different from adult levels. URO-EGF was not detected in mucosal or submucosal tissue extracts from this patient. Further studies in juveniles are indicated. PMID:2803941

  12. Direct binding of hepatocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor to CD44v6.

    PubMed

    Volz, Yvonne; Koschut, David; Matzke-Ogi, Alexandra; Dietz, Marina S; Karathanasis, Christos; Richert, Ludovic; Wagner, Moritz G; Mély, Yves; Heilemann, Mike; Niemann, Hartmut H; Orian-Rousseau, Véronique

    2015-06-29

    CD44v6, a member of the CD44 family of transmembrane glycoproteins is a co-receptor for two receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), Met and VEGFR-2 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2). CD44v6 is not only required for the activation of these RTKs but also for signalling. In order to understand the role of CD44v6 in Met and VEGFR-2 activation and signalling we tested whether CD44v6 binds to their ligands, HGF (hepatocyte growth factor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor), respectively. FACS analysis and cellular ELISA showed binding of HGF and VEGF only to cells expressing CD44v6. Direct binding of CD44v6 to HGF and VEGF was demonstrated in pull-down assays and the binding affinities were determined using MicroScale Thermophoresis, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence anisotropy. The binding affinity of CD44v6 to HGF is in the micromolar range in contrast with the high-affinity binding measured in the case of VEGF and CD44v6, which is in the nanomolar range. These data reveal a heparan sulfate-independent direct binding of CD44v6 to the ligands of Met and VEGFR-2 and suggest different roles of CD44v6 for these RTKs.

  13. [Growth factors in human tooth development].

    PubMed

    Bellone, C; Barni, T; Pagni, L; Balboni, G C; Vannelli, G B

    1990-03-01

    Our research concerns the immunohistochemical localization of EGF and IGF-I receptors in the tooth germ, using monoclonal antibodies. The results show that in the early phases of human tooth development EGF and IGF-I receptors are present. At bud stage both receptors are localized at dental laminae level, in some epithelial cells of the tooth bud and in some mesenchymal cells. At cap stage the receptors are present in the outer and inner enamel epithelium, and in some cells of stellate reticulum. As far as concerns the mesenchymal cells, some cells of dental papilla in contact with enamel organ, are intensely positive. The immunopositivity is present also in some mesenchymal cells at follicular level. At late cap stage and at early bell stage receptors are not present at inner enamel epithelium level but they can be detectable in the mesenchyma of dental papilla and in some cells of the follicle. On the basis of these results it may be hypothesized that EGF and IGF-I can act as growth factors in the modulation of cellular proliferation and differentiation during the human tooth morphogenesis. Moreover, it is possible that these substances can play a role in the mesenchymal-epithelial interaction in the developing human tooth.

  14. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Eye Disease

    PubMed Central

    Penn, J.S.; Madan, A.; Caldwell, R.B.; Bartoli, M.; Caldwell, R.W.; Hartnett, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Collectively, angiogenic ocular conditions represent the leading cause of irreversible vision loss in developed countries. In the U.S., for example, retinopathy of prematurity, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration are the principal causes of blindness in the infant, working age and elderly populations, respectively. Evidence suggests that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a 40 kDa dimeric glycoprotein, promotes angiogenesis in each of these conditions, making it a highly significant therapeutic target. However, VEGF is pleiotropic, affecting a broad spectrum of endothelial, neuronal and glial behaviors, and confounding the validity of anti-VEGF strategies, particularly under chronic disease conditions. In fact, among other functions VEGF can influence cell proliferation, cell migration, proteolysis, cell survival and vessel permeability in a wide variety of biological contexts. This article will describe the roles played by VEGF in the pathogenesis of retinopathy of prematurity, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. The potential disadvantages of inhibiting VEGF will be discussed, as will the rationales for targeting other VEGF-related modulators of angiogenesis. PMID:18653375

  15. Nerve growth factor actions on the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    We examined the effect of the trophic protein, nerve growth factor (NGF), on cultures of fetal rat neostriatum and basal forebrain-medial septal area (BF-MS) to define its role in brain development. Treatment of cultures with NGF resulted in an increase in the specific activity of the cholinergic enzyme choline acetyltransferase (CAT) in both brain areas. CAT was immunocytochemically localized to neurons. In the BF-MS, NGF treatment elicited a marked increase in staining intensity and an apparent increase in the number of CAT-positive neurons. Moreover, treatment of BF-MS cultures with NGF increased the activity of acetylcholinesterase, suggesting that the cholinergic neuron as a whole was affected. To begin defining mechanisms of action of NGF in the BF-MS, we detected NGF receptors by two independent methods. Receptors were localized to two different cellular populations: neuron-like cells, and non-neuron-like cells. Dissociation studies with ({sup 125}I)NGF suggested that high affinity receptors were localized to the neuron-like population. Only low-affinity receptors were localized to the non-neuron-like cells. Moreover, employing combined immunocytochemistry and ({sup 125}I)NGF autoradiography, we detected a subpopulation of CAT-containing neutrons that exhibited high-affinity binding. Unexpectedly, a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing cell group also expressed high affinity binding. However, only subsets of cholinergic or GABA neurons expressed high-affinity biding, suggesting that these transmitter populations are composed of differentially response subpopulations.

  16. Nerve growth factor enhances sleep in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, S; Krueger, J M

    1999-04-02

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) elicits rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) in cats. Removal of NGF receptor-positive cholinergic basal forebrain neurons inhibits REMS in rats. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of NGF on sleep and brain temperature (Tbr) in rabbits. Male rabbits were implanted with electroencephalograph (EEG) electrodes, a brain thermistor and an intraventricular (i.c.v.) guide cannula. Rabbits received human beta-NGF i.c.v. (0.01, 0.1, 1.0 or 10 microg] and on a separate day, 25 microl pyrogen-free saline i.c.v. as control. EEG and Tbr were recorded for 23 h after injections. The highest two doses of NGF increased both non-REMS and REMS across the 23-h recording period. REMS was enhanced dose-dependently. Tbr was not affected by any dose of NGF. These results suggest that NGF is involved in both REMS and non-REMS regulation.

  17. [Epidermal growth factor, innovation and safety].

    PubMed

    Esquirol Caussa, Jordi; Herrero Vila, Elisabeth

    2015-10-05

    Bioidentical recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) is available in concentrations and purity suitable for therapeutic use in long time stable formulations. Beneficial effects in several skin pathologies and lesions have been reported (traumatic and surgical wound healing, laser induced wounds, abnormal scars, keloids, radiation or chemotherapy induced dermatitis, post inflammatory hyperpigmentation or for skin aging damage repairing) and also may be considered for the treatment of several oropharingeal and high gastroesophageal tract mucosa diseases (mouth sores, pharyngeal fistulas, ulcers), and several corneal or conjunctive mucosa lesions. rhEGF has not shown any important side or collateral effects in humans or in laboratory experimentation animals, showing optimal tolerability and safety with continuous use for months. Compounding gives advantages of versatility, individualization, personalization, molecular stability, safety and effectiveness in ideal conditions, showing good tissue penetration, both on intact skin and skin lesions that expose the lower planes to the surface. rhEGF compounds can be considered for prevention or as a treatment of diverse skin and mucosa diseases and conditions through compounding preparations.

  18. Inhibition of endogenous heat shock protein 70 attenuates inducible nitric oxide synthase induction via disruption of heat shock protein 70/Na(+) /H(+) exchanger 1-Ca(2+) -calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II/transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1-nuclear factor-κB signals in BV-2 microglia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Lu, Xu; Wang, Jia; Tong, Lijuan; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) critically contributes to inflammation and host defense. The inhibition of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) prevents iNOS induction in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. However, the role and mechanism of endogenous Hsp70 in iNOS induction in microglia remains unclear. This study addresses this issue in BV-2 microglia, showing that Hsp70 inhibition or knockdown prevents LPS-induced iNOS protein expression and nitric oxide production. Real-time PCR experiments showed that LPS-induced iNOS mRNA transcription was blocked by Hsp70 inhibition. Further studies revealed that the inhibition of Hsp70 attenuated LPS-stimulated nuclear translocation and phosphorylation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB as well as the degradation of inhibitor of κB (IκB)-α and phosphorylation of IκB kinase β (IKKβ). This prevention effect of Hsp70 inhibition on IKKβ-NF-κB activation was found to be dependent on the Ca(2+) /calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)/transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) signals based on the following observations: 1) chelation of intracellular Ca(2+) or inhibition of CaMKII reduced LPS-induced increases in TAK1 phosphorylation and 2) Hsp70 inhibition reduced LPS-induced increases in CaMKII/TAK1 phosphorylation, intracellular pH value, [Ca(2+) ]i , and CaMKII/TAK1 association. Mechanistic studies showed that Hsp70 inhibition disrupted the association between Hsp70 and Na(+) /H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1), which is an important exchanger responsible for Ca(2+) influx in LPS-stimulated cells. These studies demonstrate that the inhibition of endogenous Hsp70 attenuates the induction of iNOS, which likely occurs through the disruption of NHE1/Hsp70-Ca(2+) -CaMKII/TAK1-NF-κB signals in BV-2 microglia, providing further insight into the functions of Hsp70 in the CNS.

  19. Reliability of Growth Indicators and Efficiency of Functional Treatment for Skeletal Class II Malocclusion: Current Evidence and Controversies

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Current evidence on the reliability of growth indicators in the identification of the pubertal growth spurt and efficiency of functional treatment for skeletal Class II malocclusion, the timing of which relies on such indicators, is highly controversial. Regarding growth indicators, the hand and wrist (including the sole middle phalanx of the third finger) maturation method and the standing height recording appear to be most reliable. Other methods are subjected to controversies or were showed to be unreliable. Main sources of controversies include use of single stages instead of ossification events and diagnostic reliability conjecturally based on correlation analyses. Regarding evidence on the efficiency of functional treatment, when treated during the pubertal growth spurt, more favorable response is seen in skeletal Class II patients even though large individual responsiveness remains. Main sources of controversies include design of clinical trials, definition of Class II malocclusion, and lack of inclusion of skeletal maturity among the prognostic factors. While no growth indicator may be considered to have a full diagnostic reliability in the identification of the pubertal growth spurt, their use may still be recommended for increasing efficiency of functional treatment for skeletal Class II malocclusion. PMID:28168195

  20. Reliability of Growth Indicators and Efficiency of Functional Treatment for Skeletal Class II Malocclusion: Current Evidence and Controversies.

    PubMed

    Perinetti, Giuseppe; Contardo, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Current evidence on the reliability of growth indicators in the identification of the pubertal growth spurt and efficiency of functional treatment for skeletal Class II malocclusion, the timing of which relies on such indicators, is highly controversial. Regarding growth indicators, the hand and wrist (including the sole middle phalanx of the third finger) maturation method and the standing height recording appear to be most reliable. Other methods are subjected to controversies or were showed to be unreliable. Main sources of controversies include use of single stages instead of ossification events and diagnostic reliability conjecturally based on correlation analyses. Regarding evidence on the efficiency of functional treatment, when treated during the pubertal growth spurt, more favorable response is seen in skeletal Class II patients even though large individual responsiveness remains. Main sources of controversies include design of clinical trials, definition of Class II malocclusion, and lack of inclusion of skeletal maturity among the prognostic factors. While no growth indicator may be considered to have a full diagnostic reliability in the identification of the pubertal growth spurt, their use may still be recommended for increasing efficiency of functional treatment for skeletal Class II malocclusion.

  1. Serum concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor and depth of trophoblastic invasion in ampullary ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cabar, Fábio Roberto; Teshima, Décio Roberto Kamio; Pereira, Pedro Paulo; Antonangelo, Leila; Schultz, Regina; Francisco, Rossana Pulcineli

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the association between the depth of trophoblastic infiltration and serum vascular endothelial growth factorconcentration in patients with an ampullary pregnancy. This prospective cross-sectionalstudy involved 34 patients with an ampullary ectopic pregnancy who underwent salpingectomy between 2012 and 2013. Maternal serum vascular endothelial growth factor concentrations were measured using Luminex technology. Trophoblastic invasion was classified histologically as follows: stage I, limited to the tubal mucosa; stage II, reaching the muscle layer; and stage III,involving the full thickness. The qualitative data were compared using Fisher's exact test. The nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used to evaluate differences in serum vascular endothelial growth factor among the degrees of trophoblastic invasion. ROC curves were constructed to determine vascular endothelial growth factor cut-off values that predict the degree of tubal invasion based on the best sensitivity and specificity. Eight patients had stage I trophoblastic invasion, seven had stage II, and 19 had stage III. The median serum vascular endothelial growth factorconcentration was 69.88 pg/mL for stage I, 14.53 pg/mL for stage II and 9.08 pg/mL for stage III, with a significant difference between stages I and III. Based on the ROC curve, a serum vascular endothelial growth factor concentration of 25.9 pg/mL best differentiated stage I from stages II and III with asensitivity of 75.0%, specificity of 76.9%, and area under the curve of 0.798. The depth of trophoblastic penetration into the tubal wall isassociated with serum vascular endothelial growth factor concentration in ampullary pregnancies.

  2. Serum concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor and depth of trophoblastic invasion in ampullary ectopic pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Cabar, Fábio Roberto; Kamio Teshima, Décio Roberto; Pereira, Pedro Paulo; Antonangelo, Leila; Schultz, Regina; Francisco, Rossana Pulcineli

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between the depth of trophoblastic infiltration and serum vascular endothelial growth factorconcentration in patients with an ampullary pregnancy. METHODS: This prospective cross-sectionalstudy involved 34 patients with an ampullary ectopic pregnancy who underwent salpingectomy between 2012 and 2013. Maternal serum vascular endothelial growth factor concentrations were measured using Luminex technology. Trophoblastic invasion was classified histologically as follows: stage I, limited to the tubal mucosa; stage II, reaching the muscle layer; and stage III,involving the full thickness. The qualitative data were compared using Fisher's exact test. The nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used to evaluate differences in serum vascular endothelial growth factor among the degrees of trophoblastic invasion. ROC curves were constructed to determine vascular endothelial growth factor cut-off values that predict the degree of tubal invasion based on the best sensitivity and specificity. RESULTS: Eight patients had stage I trophoblastic invasion, seven had stage II, and 19 had stage III. The median serum vascular endothelial growth factorconcentration was 69.88 pg/mL for stage I, 14.53 pg/mL for stage II and 9.08 pg/mL for stage III, with a significant difference between stages I and III. Based on the ROC curve, a serum vascular endothelial growth factor concentration of 25.9 pg/mL best differentiated stage I from stages II and III with asensitivity of 75.0%, specificity of 76.9%, and area under the curve of 0.798. CONCLUSIONS: The depth of trophoblastic penetration into the tubal wall isassociated with serum vascular endothelial growth factor concentration in ampullary pregnancies. PMID:28076513

  3. The haematopoietic effects of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-I.

    PubMed

    Merchav, S

    1998-01-01

    The process of haemopoiesis, occurring primarily within the bone marrow, involves the proliferation and differentiation of pluripotent haemopoietic stem cells into committed, or pathway-restricted progenitors /1/. The latter further proliferate and undergo a process of maturation into circulating blood cells of myeloid and erythroid lineages /2/. Haemopoietic cell growth and differentiation is primarily regulated by the local production of various cytokines within the bone marrow micro-environment /3/, as well as by the circulating hormone, erythropoietin (EPO). The formation as well as functional activation of mature blood cells, are also modulated by a variety of hormones and growth peptides, including growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) /4,5/. Early evidence for the role of GH in modulating haemopoiesis was provided in classical studies in rodents, which showed that removal of the pituitary gland affects blood cell formation and function /6/ and that impairment of the latter can be restored by GH administration /7/. GH exerts its effects on target cells by binding to its own receptor, which belongs to the class I cytokine receptor superfamily /8/. In humans, GH can also bind to and activate the prolactin receptor /9/. Based on the somatomedin hypothesis of Salmon and Daughaday /10/, it is now generally accepted that, in addition to the above, GH exerts many of its effects via autocrine or paracrine IGF-I, as well as via endocrine IGF-I produced in the liver. IGF-I, a small single-chain polypeptide, is one of two highly homologous peptides (IGF-I and IGF-II), that stimulate the proliferation and differentiation of a wide variety of cell types, including bone marrow cells /5,11/. Both IGF-I and IGF-II play an important role in prenatal growth and IGF-I is also essential for postnatal growth and development /12/. Two types of IGF receptors have been described. The type I IGF receptor, a tyrosine kinase receptor highly homologous to the

  4. Development of the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor OSI-774.

    PubMed

    Grünwald, Viktor; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2003-06-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane receptor involved in the regulation of a complex array of essential biological processes such as cell proliferation and survival. Dysregulation of the EGFR signaling network has been frequently reported in multiple human cancers and has been associated with the processes of tumor development, growth, proliferation, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Inhibition of the EGFR was associated with antitumor effects in preclinical models. On the basis of these data, therapeutics targeting the EGFR were explored in clinical trials. OSI-774 is a small-molecule selective inhibitor of the EGFR tyrosine kinase. In preclinical studies, OSI-774 inhibited the phosphorylation of the EGFR in a dose-dependent and concentration-dependent manner resulting in cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. In in vivo studies, this agent caused tumor growth inhibition and showed synergistic effects when combined with conventional chemotherapy. Subsequent single-agent phase I studies and phase I studies in combination with chemotherapy showed that the agent has a good safety profile and induced tumor growth inhibition in a substantial number of patients with a variety of different solid tumors. Preliminary reports from phase II studies confirmed the excellent tolerability of OSI-774 and showed encouraging preliminary activity. Phase III studies have either been completed or are ongoing in several tumor types such as lung cancer and pancreatic cancer. In summary, OSI-774 is a novel inhibitor of the EGFR tyrosine kinase that has shown promising activity in initial studies and is currently undergoing full development as an anticancer drug.

  5. Angiotensin II regulates growth of the developing papillas ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Song, Renfang; Preston, Graeme; Khalili, Ali; El-Dahr, Samir S.

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that lack of angiotensin (ANG) II production in angiotensinogen (AGT)-deficient mice or pharmacologic antagonism of ANG II AT1 receptor (AT1R) impairs growth of the developing papillas ex vivo, thus contributing to the hypoplastic renal medulla phenotype observed in AGT- or AT1R-null mice. Papillas were dissected from Hoxb7GFP+ or AGT+/+, +/−, −/− mouse metanephroi on postnatal day P3 and grown in three-dimentional collagen matrix gels in the presence of media (control), ANG II (10−5 M), or the specific AT1R antagonist candesartan (10−6 M) for 24 h. Percent reduction in papillary length was attenuated in AGT+/+ and in AGT+/− compared with AGT−/− (−18.4 ± 1.3 vs. −32.2 ± 1.6%, P < 0.05, −22.8 ± 1.3 vs. −32.2 ± 1.6%, P < 0.05, respectively). ANG II blunted the decrease in papilla length observed in respective media-treated controls in Hoxb7GFP+ (−1.5 ± 0.3 vs. −10.0 ± 1.4%, P < 0.05) or AGT+/+, +/−, and −/− papillas (−12.8 ± 0.7 vs. −18.4 ± 1.3%, P < 0.05, −16.8 ± 1.1 vs. −23 ± 1.2%, P < 0.05; −26.2 ± 1.6 vs. −32.2 ± 1.6%, P < 0.05, respectively). In contrast, percent decrease in the length of Hoxb7GFP+ papillas in the presence of the AT1R antagonist candesartan was higher compared with control (−24.3 ± 2.1 vs. −10.5 ± 1.8%, P < 0.05). The number of proliferating phospho-histone H3 (pH3)-positive collecting duct cells was lower, whereas the number of caspase 3-positive cells undergoing apoptosis was higher in candesartan- vs. media-treated papillas (pH3: 12 ± 1.4 vs. 21 ± 2.1, P < 0.01; caspase 3: 3.8 ± 0.5 vs. 1.7 ± 0.2, P < 0.01). Using quantitative RT-PCR, we demonstrate that AT1R signaling regulates the expression of genes implicated in morphogenesis of the renal medulla. We conclude that AT1R prevents shrinkage of the developing papillas observed ex vivo via control of Wnt7b, FGF7, β-catenin, calcineurin B1, and α3 integrin gene expression, collecting duct cell

  6. Insulin growth factors regulate the mitotic cycle in cultured rat sympathetic neuroblasts.

    PubMed

    DiCicco-Bloom, E; Black, I B

    1988-06-01

    While neuronal mitosis is uniquely restricted to early development, the underlying regulation remains to be defined. We have now developed a dissociated, embryonic sympathetic neuron culture system that uses fully defined medium in which cells enter the mitotic cycle. The cultured cells expressed two neuronal traits, tyrosine hydroxylase [L-tyrosine, tetrahydropteridine:oxygen oxidoreductase (3-hydroxylating); EC 1.14.16.2] and the neuron-specific 160-kDa neurofilament subunit protein, but were devoid of glial fibrillary acidic protein, a marker for non-myelin-forming Schwann cells in ganglia. Approximately one-third of the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells synthesized DNA in culture, specifically incorporating [3H]thymidine into their nuclei. We used this system to define factors regulating the mitotic cycle in sympathetic neuroblasts. Members of the insulin family of growth factors, including insulin and insulin-like growth factors I and II, regulated DNA synthesis in the presumptive neuroblasts. Insulin more than doubled the proportion of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells entering the mitotic cycle, as indicated by autoradiography of [3H]thymidine incorporation into nuclei. Scintillation spectrometry was an even more sensitive index of DNA synthesis, revealing a 4-fold insulin stimulation with an ED50 of 100 ng/ml. Insulin-like growth factor I was 100-fold more potent than insulin, whereas insulin-like growth factor II was less potent, suggesting that insulin growth factor type I receptors mediated the mitogenic responses. In contrast, the trophic protein nerve growth factor exhibited no mitogenic effect, suggesting that the mitogenic action of insulin growth factors is highly specific. Our observations are discussed in the context of the detection of insulin growth factors and receptors in the developing brain.

  7. Periluminal expression of a secreted transforming growth factor-β type II receptor inhibits in-stent neointima formation following adenovirus-mediated stent-based intracoronary gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Appleby, Clare E; Ranjzad, Parisa; Williams, Paul D; Kakar, Salik J; Driessen, Anita; Tijsma, Edze; Fernandes, Brian; Heagerty, Anthony M; Kingston, Paul A

    2014-05-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) has been shown unequivocally to enhance neointima formation in carotid and ileo-femoral arteries. In our previous studies, however, TGF-β1 expression in coronary arteries actually reduced neointima formation without affecting luminal loss postangioplasty, while expression of a TGF-β1 antagonist (RIIs) in balloon-injured coronary arteries reduced luminal loss without affecting neointima formation. These observed effects may be a consequence of the mode of coronary artery gene transfer employed, but they may also represent differences in the modes of healing of coronary, carotid, and ileo-femoral arteries after endoluminal injury. To help clarify whether a gene therapy strategy to antagonize TGF-β might have application within the coronary vasculature, we have investigated the effect of high-level periluminal expression of RIIs using stent-based adenovirus-mediated intracoronary gene transfer. Porcine coronary arteries were randomized to receive a custom-made CoverStent preloaded with saline only, or with 1×10(9) infectious units of adenovirus expressing RIIs or β-galactosidase (lacZ). Vessels were analyzed 28 days poststenting, at which time angiographic in-stent diameter was significantly greater in RIIs-treated arteries, and in-stent luminal loss significantly reduced. Computerized morphometric minimum in-stent lumen area was ~300% greater in RIIs-exposed vessels than in lacZ or saline-only groups. This was because of significantly reduced neointima formation in the RIIs group. RIIs had no demonstrable effect on cellular proliferation or apoptosis, but greater normalized neointimal/medial collagen content was observed in RIIs-exposed arteries. These data highlight the qualitatively similar effect of TGF-β antagonism on neointima formation in injured coronary and noncoronary arteries, and suggest that since cellular proliferation is unaffected, TGF-β1 antagonism might prevent in-stent restenosis without the delayed

  8. Randomized Phase II Study of Dacomitinib (PF-00299804), an Irreversible Pan–Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitor, Versus Erlotinib in Patients With Advanced Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Blackhall, Fiona; Krzakowski, Maciej; Barrios, Carlos H.; Park, Keunchil; Bover, Isabel; Seog Heo, Dae; Rosell, Rafael; Talbot, Denis C.; Frank, Richard; Letrent, Stephen P.; Ruiz-Garcia, Ana; Taylor, Ian; Liang, Jane Q.; Campbell, Alicyn K.; O'Connell, Joseph; Boyer, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This randomized, open-label trial compared dacomitinib (PF-00299804), an irreversible inhibitor of human epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR)/HER1, HER2, and HER4, with erlotinib, a reversible EGFR inhibitor, in patients with advanced non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods Patients with NSCLC, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0 to 2, no prior HER-directed therapy, and one/two prior chemotherapy regimens received dacomitinib 45 mg or erlotinib 150 mg once daily. Results One hundred eighty-eight patients were randomly assigned. Treatment arms were balanced for most clinical and molecular characteristics. Median progression-free survival (PFS; primary end point) was 2.86 months for patients treated with dacomitinib and 1.91 months for patients treated with erlotinib (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.66; 95% CI, 0.47 to 0.91; two-sided P = .012); in patients with KRAS wild-type tumors, median PFS was 3.71 months for patients treated with dacomitinib and 1.91 months for patients treated with erlotinib (HR = 0.55; 95% CI, 0.35 to 0.85; two-sided P = .006); and in patients with KRAS wild-type/EGFR wild-type tumors, median PFS was 2.21 months for patients treated with dacomitinib and 1.84 months for patients treated with erlotinib (HR = 0.61; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.99; two-sided P = .043). Median overall survival was 9.53 months for patients treated with dacomitinib and 7.44 months for patients treated with erlotinib (HR = 0.80; 95% CI, 0.56 to 1.13; two-sided P = .205). Adverse event-related discontinuations were uncommon in both arms. Common treatment-related adverse events were dermatologic and gastrointestinal, predominantly grade 1 to 2, and more frequent with dacomitinib. Conclusion Dacomitinib demonstrated significantly improved PFS versus erlotinib, with acceptable toxicity. PFS benefit was observed in most clinical and molecular subsets, notably KRAS wild-type/EGFR any status, KRAS wild-type/EGFR wild-type, and EGFR mutants

  9. Targeting fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ann-Lii; Shen, Ying-Chun; Zhu, Andrew X

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the primary type of liver cancer, and both the age-adjusted incidence and mortality of HCC have steadily increased in recent years. Advanced HCC is associated with a very poor survival rate. Despite accumulating data regarding the risk factors for HCC, the mechanisms that contribute to HCC tumorigenesis remain poorly understood. Signaling through the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family is involved in fibrosis and its progression to cirrhosis of the liver, which is a risk factor for the development of HCC. Furthermore, several alterations in FGF/FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling correlate with the outcomes of HCC patients, suggesting that signaling through this family of proteins contributes to the development or progression of HCC tumors. Currently, there are no established systemic treatments for patients with advanced HCC in whom sorafenib treatment has failed or who were unable to tolerate it. Recently, several multikinase inhibitors that target FGFRs have demonstrated some early evidence of antitumor activity in phase I/II trials. Therefore, this review discusses the molecular implications of FGFR-mediated signaling in HCC and summarizes the clinical evidence for novel FGFR-targeted therapies for HCC currently being studied in clinical trials.

  10. [Periodontal regeneration: the use of polypeptide growth factors].

    PubMed

    Di Genio, M; Barone, A; Ramaglia, L; Sbordone, L

    1994-10-01

    Polypeptide growth factors are a class of potent natural biologic mediators which regulate many of the activities of wound healing including cell proliferation, migration and metabolism. Periodontal regeneration is thought to require the migration and proliferation of periodontal ligament cells on the root surface. In fact, repopulation of the detached root surface by cells from periodontal ligament (PDL) is a prerequisite for new attachment formation. Many studies suggested that Polypeptide Growth Factors (PGF) such as Insulin-like Growth Factor I (IGF-I), Platelet Derived Growth Factor (PDGF), Transforming Growth Factor B (TGF-B), Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF), are important mediators of cellular events in wound healing. Studies in vitro analysed the mitogenic effects determined on periodontal ligament cells by growth factors using (3H) Thymidine incorporation during DNA synthesis. The results suggested that recombinant human PDGF and IGF-I stimulate the proliferation of PDL fibroblastic cells and the combination of these growth factors showed a synergistic effect revealing the highest mitogenic effect among all individual growth factors as well as any combination of the growth factors tested. Furthermore these studies demonstrated that rh-PDGF and IGF-I stimulate chemotaxis of PDL fibroblastic cells, and supported a role for TGF-B as a regulator of the mitogenic response to PDGF in these cells. Other studies in vivo showed periodontal tissues regeneration introducing mixtures of recombinant human platelet derived growth factor and insulin-like growth factor into lesions of experimentally induced periodontitis in beagle dogs and monkeys.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Nerve growth factor gene therapy in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Tuszynski, Mark H

    2007-01-01

    Nervous system growth factors potently stimulate cell function and prevent neuronal death. These broad effects on survival and function arise from direct downstream activation of antiapoptotic pathways, inhibition of proapoptotic pathways, and stimulation of functionally important cellular mechanisms including ERK/MAP kinase and CREB. Thus, as a class, growth factors offer the potential to treat neurodegenerative disorders for the first time by preventing neuronal degeneration rather than compensating for cell loss after it has occurred. Different growth factors affect distinct and specific populations of neurons: the first nervous system growth factor identified, nerve growth factor, potentially stimulates the survival and function of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, suggesting that nerve growth factor could be a means for reducing the cholinergic component of cell degeneration in Alzheimer disease. This review will discuss the transition of growth factors from preclinical studies to human clinical trials in Alzheimer disease. The implementation of clinical testing of growth factor therapy for neurologic disease has been constrained by the dual need to achieve adequate concentrations of these proteins in specific brain regions containing degenerating neurons, and preventing growth factor spread to nontargeted regions to avoid adverse effects. Gene therapy is one of a limited number of potential methods for achieving these requirements.

  12. Novel Drosophila receptor that binds multiple growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, M.R.; Thompson, K.L.; Garcia, V.; Decker, S.J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have recently reported the identification of a novel growth factor receptor from Drosophila cell cultures that has dual binding specificity for both insulin and epidermal growth factor (EGF). This 100 kDa protein is also antigenically related to the cytoplasmic region of the mammalian EGF receptor-tyrosine kinase. They now report that this protein binds to mammalian nerve growth factor and human transforming growth factor alpha as well as insulin and EGF with apparent dissociation constants ranging from 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -8/ M. The 100 kDa protein can be affinity-labeled with these /sup 125/I-labeled growth factors after immunoprecipitation with anti-EGF receptor antiserum. These four growth factors appear to share a common binding site, as evidenced by their ability to block affinity labelling by /sup 125/I-insulin. No significant binding to the 100 kDa protein was observed with platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, or glucagon. The 100 kDa Drosophila protein has a unique ligand-binding spectrum with no direct counterpart in mammalian cells and may represent an evolutionary precursor of the mammalian receptors for these growth factors.

  13. Role of tissue growth factors in aqueous humor homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Welge-Lüssen, U; May, C A; Neubauer, A S; Priglinger, S

    2001-04-01

    The aqueous humor supplies nutrients to the nonvascularized cornea, lens, and trabecular meshwork. A number of tissue growth factors have been detected in this fluid. The composition of these proteins changes dramatically with different ocular conditions, such as inflammation and glaucoma. In this review, an overview of new findings regarding effects of aqueous humor growth factors is given. Our main emphasis is on the regulation of the avascular anterior eye compartment, the possible role of growth factors in the pathogenesis of glaucoma, and the importance of growth factors for the special immunosuppressive status of the anterior chamber.

  14. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Independent Effects of Growth Hormone on Growth Plate Chondrogenesis and Longitudinal Bone Growth.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shufang; Yang, Wei; De Luca, Francesco

    2015-07-01

    GH stimulates growth plate chondrogenesis and longitudinal bone growth directly at the growth plate. However, it is not clear yet whether these effects are entirely mediated by the local expression and action of IGF-1 and IGF-2. To determine whether GH has any IGF-independent growth-promoting effects, we generated (TamCart)Igf1r(flox/flox) mice. The systemic injection of tamoxifen in these mice postnatally resulted in the excision of the IGF-1 receptor (Igf1r) gene exclusively in the growth plate. (TamCart)Igf1r(flox/flox) tamoxifen-treated mice [knockout (KO) mice] and their Igf1r(flox/flox) control littermates (C mice) were injected for 4 weeks with GH. At the end of the 4-week period, the tibial growth and growth plate height of GH-treated KO mice were greater than those of untreated C or untreated KO mice. The systemic injection of GH increased the phosphorylation of Janus kinase 2 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5B in the tibial growth plate of the C and KO mice. In addition, GH increased the mRNA expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and the mRNA expression and protein phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB p65 in both C and KO mice. In cultured chondrocytes transfected with Igf1r small interfering RNA, the addition of GH in the culture medium significantly induced thymidine incorporation and collagen X mRNA expression. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that GH can promote growth plate chondrogenesis and longitudinal bone growth directly at the growth plate, even when the local effects of IGF-1 and IGF-2 are prevented. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the intracellular molecular mechanisms mediating the IGF-independent, growth-promoting GH effects.

  15. Transforming growth factor-β and Smads.

    PubMed

    Lan, Hui Yao; Chung, Arthur C K

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a major diabetic complication. Transforming growth factor-β(TGF-β) is a key mediator in the development of diabetic complications. It is well known that TGF-β exerts its biological effects by activating downstream mediators, called Smad2and Smad3, which is negatively regulated by an inhibitory Smad7. Recent studies also demonstrated that under disease conditions Smads act as signal integrators and interact with other signaling pathways such as the MAPK and NF-κB pathways. In addition, Smad2and Smad3 can reciprocally regulate target genes of TGF-β signaling. Novel research into microRNA has revealed the complexity of TGF-β signaling during DN. It has been found that TGF-β and elevated glucose concentration can positively regulate miR-192 and miR-377, but negatively regulate miR-29a in a diabetic milieu. These microRNAs are found to contribute to DN. Although targeting TGF-β may exert adverse effects on immune system, therapeutic approach against TGF-β signaling during DN still draws much attention. Blocking TGF-β signaling by neutralizing antibody, anti-sense oligonucleotides, and soluble receptors have been tested, but effects are limited. Gene transfer of Smad7 into diseased kidneys demonstrates a prominent inhibition on renal fibrosis and amelioration of renal impairment. Alteration of TGF-β-regulated microRNA expression in diseased kidneys may provide an alternative therapeutic approach against DN. In conclusion, TGF-β/Smad signaling plays a critical role in DN. A better understanding of the role of TGF-β/Smad signaling in the development of DN should provide an effective therapeutic strategy to combat DN.

  16. Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling in Metabolic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Nies, Vera J. M.; Sancar, Gencer; Liu, Weilin; van Zutphen, Tim; Struik, Dicky; Yu, Ruth T.; Atkins, Annette R.; Evans, Ronald M.; Jonker, Johan W.; Downes, Michael Robert

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is a growing health problem. Obesity is strongly associated with several comorbidities, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, certain cancers, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, which all reduce life expectancy and life quality. Several drugs have been put forward in order to treat these diseases, but many of them have detrimental side effects. The unexpected role of the family of fibroblast growth factors in the regulation of energy metabolism provides new approaches to the treatment of metabolic diseases and offers a valuable tool to gain more insight into metabolic regulation. The known beneficial effects of FGF19 and FGF21 on metabolism, together with recently discovered similar effects of FGF1 suggest that FGFs and their derivatives carry great potential as novel therapeutics to treat metabolic conditions. To facilitate the development of new therapies with improved targeting and minimal side effects, a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of FGFs is needed. In this review, we will discuss what is currently known about the physiological roles of FGF signaling in tissues important for metabolic homeostasis. In addition, we will discuss current concepts regarding their pharmacological properties and effector tissues in the context of metabolic disease. Also, the recent progress in the development of FGF variants will be reviewed. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current concepts and consensuses regarding FGF signaling in metabolic health and disease and to provide starting points for the development of FGF-based therapies against metabolic conditions. PMID:26834701

  17. Hepatocyte growth factor as a downstream mediator of vascular endothelial growth factor-dependent preservation of growth in the developing lung.

    PubMed

    Seedorf, Gregory; Metoxen, Alexander J; Rock, Robert; Markham, Neil; Ryan, Sharon; Vu, Thiennu; Abman, Steven H

    2016-06-01

    Impaired vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). We hypothesized that the effects of VEGF on lung structure during development may be mediated through its downstream effects on both endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) activity, and that, in the absence of eNOS, trophic effects of VEGF would be mediated through HGF signaling. To test this hypothesis, we performed an integrative series of in vitro (fetal rat lung explants and isolated fetal alveolar and endothelial cells) and in vivo studies with normal rat pups and eNOS(-/-) mice. Compared with controls, fetal lung explants from eNOS(-/-) mice had decreased terminal lung bud formation, which was restored with recombinant human VEGF (rhVEGF) treatment. Neonatal eNOS(-/-) mice were more susceptible to hyperoxia-induced inhibition of lung growth than controls, which was prevented with rhVEGF treatment. Fetal alveolar type II (AT2) cell proliferation was increased with rhVEGF treatment only with mesenchymal cell (MC) coculture, and these effects were attenuated with anti-HGF antibody treatment. Unlike VEGF, HGF directly stimulated isolated AT2 cells even without MC coculture. HGF directly stimulates fetal pulmonary artery endothelial cell growth and tube formation, which is attenuated by treatment with JNJ-38877605, a c-Met inhibitor. rHGF treatment preserves alveolar and vascular growth after postnatal exposure to SU-5416, a VEGF receptor inhibitor. We conclude that the effects of VEGF on AT2 and endothelial cells during lung development are partly mediated through HGF-c-Met signaling and speculate that reciprocal VEGF-HGF signaling between epithelia and endothelia is disrupted in infants who develop BPD. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Class II correction in a growing patient with hyperdivergent growth patterns and severe overjet.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hyun

    2010-01-01

    In general, the success of Class II treatment depends as much on the skill of the orthodontist as it does on a favorable facial-growth pattern. Lack of sufficient favorable growth during treatment will make it difficult to correct the skeletal malrelationship or significantly improve the facial profile. The case report presents the treatment of a patient with a Class II, Division 1 malocclusion with severe overjet and a hyperdivergent growth pattern. © 2011 BY QUINTESSENCE PUBLISHING CO, INC.

  19. In vivo growth of a bioengineered internal anal sphincter: comparison of growth factors for optimization of growth and survival.

    PubMed

    Miyasaka, Eiichi A; Raghavan, Shreya; Gilmont, Robert R; Mittal, Krittika; Somara, Sita; Bitar, Khalil N; Teitelbaum, Daniel H

    2011-02-01

    Our laboratory has developed and implanted a novel bioengineered internal anal sphincter (IAS) to treat anal incontinence. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) has been used in mice; however, the optimal growth factor for successful IAS implantation is unclear. This study compares several growth factors in order to optimize IAS viability and functionality. Bioengineered IAS rings were implanted subcutaneously into the dorsum of wildtype C57Bl/6 mice, with an osmotic pump dispensing FGF-2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), or platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) (n = 4 per group). Control mice received IAS implants but no growth factor. The IAS was harvested approximately 25 days post-implantation. Tissue was subjected to physiologic testing, then histologically analyzed. Muscle phenotype was confirmed by immunofluorescence. All implants supplemented with growth factors maintained smooth muscle phenotype. Histological scores, blood vessel density and muscle fiber thickness were all markedly better with growth factors. Neovascularization was comparable between the three growth factors. Basal tonic force of the constructs was highest with VEGF or PDGF. All growth factors demonstrated excellent performance. As our ultimate goal is clinical implantation, our strong results with PDGF, a drug approved for use in the United States and the European Union, pave the way for translating bioengineered IAS implantation to the clinical realm.

  20. A heteromeric transcription factor required for mammalian RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, S; Tanaka, Y; Kawaguchi, T; Nagaoka, T; Weissman, S M; Yasukochi, Y

    1990-01-01

    A general transcription factor, FC, essential for specific initiation of in vitro transcription by mammalian RNA polymerase II was identified and a procedure developed to purify it to near homogeneity from HeLa cell nuclei. Purified FC is composed of two polypeptides of apparent molecular masses 80 kDa and 30 kDa, on SDS-PAGE, and has a native size of 280 kDa estimated by gel filtration column. Both polypeptides were shown to be essential for reconstituting in vitro transcription activity. Biochemical analysis showed that the 80 kDa and 30 kDa components were present in a 1:1 molar ratio. FC was also demonstrated to interact directly or indirectly with purified RNA polymerase II. Similarities between FC and transcription factors reported by others from human, rat or Drosophila cells are discussed. Images PMID:2395645

  1. Expression of growth factor and receptor mRNAs in skin epithelial cells following acute cutaneous injury.

    PubMed Central

    Antoniades, H. N.; Galanopoulos, T.; Neville-Golden, J.; Kiritsy, C. P.; Lynch, S. E.

    1993-01-01

    We report that acute injury induces the expression of selective growth factor and growth factor receptors in the epithelial cells of the wounded tissue. In situ hybridization analysis of skin biopsy specimens obtained after cutaneous injury in swine demonstrated the induction of the expression of transforming growth factor-alpha, its receptor, epidermal growth factor-R, acidic fibroblast growth factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor messenger RNAs in the skin epithelial cells of the wounded tissue. There was no significant expression in the epithelial cells of control, uninjured tissues. The expression levels were maximal during the period of active tissue repair (1 to 5 days after injury) and were totally suppressed upon the healing of the wounded tissues. In contrast, insulinlike growth factor-I, (IGF-I), IGF-I receptor, and IGF-II receptor messenger RNAs were expressed in the epithelial cells of both the control, uninjured tissues and in tissue specimens obtained after injury. There was no significant expression of IGF-II messenger RNA in the epithelial cells before or after injury. It seems that injury induces the coordinated expression of selective growth factor and growth factor receptor genes whose products contribute to the regulation of the complex processes involved in tissue repair and remodeling. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8386442

  2. Expression of growth factors and growth factor receptors in human cleft-affected tissue.

    PubMed

    Krivicka, Benita; Pilmane, Mara; Akota, Ilze

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To investigate cleft disordered tissue in children with cleft palate and cleft lip with or without alveolar clefting for detection of local tissue growth factors and growth factor receptors and compare findings. Design. Morphological analysis of human tissue. Patients. Three groups were studied: 14 patients with cleft palate at the age from eight months to 18 years and two months, 12 patients with cleft lip with or without alveolar clefting in the age from four months to 15 years and four months and 11 control patients. RESULTS. In general, cleft palate disordered tissue showed more prominent expression of BMP2/4 (z=3.574; p=0.0004) and TGFβ (z=2.127; p=0.033), while expression of TGFBR3 significantly higher was only in connective tissue (z=3.822; p=0.0001). Cleft lip affected tissue showed significantly pronounced expression of FGFR1 in general as well as separately in epithelium. CONCLUSIONS. The marked and statistically significant expression of BMP 2/4 in cleft palate disordered soft tissue probably is delayed, but still proliferation and differentiation as well as tissue, especially, bone remodeling contributing signal. Cleft palate affected tissue show more prominent expression of TGFβ, still the weak regional expression of TGFβ type III receptors prove the disordered tissue growth and changed TGFβ signalling pathway in postnatal pathogenesis. In general, expression of TGFβ, BMP 2/4 and FGFR1 is significantly different, giving evidence to the involvement of these mentioned factors in the cleft severity morphopathogenesis.

  3. Clinical Application of Growth Factors and Cytokines in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, Stephan; Brem, Harold; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex and dynamic biological process that involves the coordinated efforts of multiple cell types and is executed and regulated by numerous growth factors and cytokines. There has been a drive in the past two decades to study the therapeutic effects of various growth factors in the clinical management of non-healing wounds (e.g. pressure ulcers, chronic venous ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers). For this review, we conducted a nonline search of Medline and Pub Medical and critically analyzed the literature regarding the role of growth factors and cytokines in the management of these wounds. We focused on currently approved therapies, emerging therapies and future research possibilities. In this review we discuss four growth factors and cytokines currently being used on and off label for the healing of wounds. These include: granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). While the clinical results of using growth factors and cytokines are encouraging, many studies involved a small sample size and are disparate in measured endpoints. Therefore, further research is required to provide definitive evidence of efficacy. PMID:24942811

  4. Transforming growth factor-beta as a differentiating factor for cultured smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gawaziuk, J P; X; Sheikh, F; Cheng, Z-Q; Cattini, P A; Stephens, N L

    2007-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether the development of supercontractile smooth muscle cells, contributing to the nonspecific hyperreactivity of airways in asthmatic patients, is due to transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. In cultured smooth muscle cells starved by removal of 10% foetal bovine serum for 7 days, growth arrest was seen; 30% became elongated and demonstrated super contractility. Study of conditioned medium suggested that the differentiating factor was TGF-beta. Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was carried out on conditioned medium from the arrested cells. Two protein bands were identified as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and TGF-beta1. To determine second messenger signalling by SMAD2, Western blotting and confocal microscopy were employed. Conditioned medium from arrested cultures showed the presence of MMP-2 and TGF-beta1, as revealed by SDS-PAGE; 68- and 25-kDa bands were seen. Differentiation was confirmed by upregulation of marker proteins, smooth muscle type myosin heavy chain and myosin light chain kinase. Confirmation was obtained by downregulating these proteins with decorin treatment, which reduces the levels of active TGF-beta and an adenoviral dominant-negative vector coding for a mutated type II TGF-beta-receptor. Activation of second messenger signalling was demonstrated immunocytochemically by the presence of phosphorylated SMAD2 and SMAD4. Transforming growth factor-beta is likely to be the differentiating factor responsible for the development of these supercontractile smooth muscle cells. The development of such cells in vivo after cessation of an asthmatic attack could contribute to the nonspecific hyperreactivity of airways seen in patients.

  5. An Exploratory Study of Factors Differentiating Freshmen Educational Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenning, Oscar T.

    The present study was an exploratory investigation of factors that differentiate students who exhibit "negative educational growth" from a group of equally able students who exhibit marked "positive educational growth." Educational growth was operationally defined as estimated true test-retest change on American College Tests (ACT) composite…

  6. [Inhibitory effect of angiotensin II receptor antagonist on the contraction and growth of hepatic stellate cells].

    PubMed

    Baik, Soon Koo; Jo, Ho Sung; Suk, Ki Tae; Kim, Jung Min; Lee, Byong Jun; Choi, Yeun Jong; Kim, Hyun Soo; Lee, Dong Ki; Kwon, Sang Ok; Lee, Keon Il; Cha, Seung Kyu; Park, Kyu Sang; Kong, In Deok

    2003-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of angiotensin II (ANG II) and its receptor antagonist (losartan) on the contraction and growth of HSCs. HSCs were isolated from Sprague Dawley rat and cultured at various conditions as follows: control, pretreatment of 10(-5) M ANG II, pretreatment of 10(-5) M endothelin, and pretreatment of 10(-5) M ANG II and 10(-6) M losartan. We conducted morphologic analysis with cellular area and length by image analysis system to estimate cell growth in each group. In addition, we measured the change of intracellular calcium currents via electrophysiological methods to evaluate the contractile effect of ANG II and losartan on HSCs. At the fifth day of incubation, the mean cellular area of ANG II-pretreated group and ANG II with losartan-pretreated group were 704.68+/-22.6 micro m2 and 332.90+/-32.6 micro m2, respectively. This difference was statistically significant (p<0.05). ANG II induced an increase in the intracellular calcium current by 22.0+/-3.0% compared with basal current level (p<0.05). However, when losartan was pretreated, ANG II did not cause a significant increase in calcium current (3.1+/-0.8%, p>0.05). ANG II accelerates the contraction and growth of HSCs, while its receptor blocker, losartan, inhibits the contraction and growth of HSCs.

  7. Robust growth of avirulent phase II Coxiella burnetii in bone marrow-derived murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Cockrell, Diane C.; Long, Carrie M.; Robertson, Shelly J.; Shannon, Jeffrey G.; Miller, Heather E.; Myers, Lara; Larson, Charles L.; Starr, Tregei; Beare, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Published data show that murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) restrict growth of avirulent phase II, but not virulent phase I, Coxiella burnetii. Growth restriction of phase II bacteria is thought to result from potentiated recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns, which leads to production of inhibitory effector molecules. Past studies have used conditioned medium from L-929 murine fibroblasts as a source of macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) to promote differentiation of bone marrow-derived myeloid precursors into macrophages. However, uncharacterized components of conditioned medium, such as variable amounts of type I interferons, can affect macrophage activation status and their permissiveness for infection. In the current study, we show that the C. burnetii Nine Mile phase II (NMII) strain grows robustly in primary macrophages from C57BL/6J mice when bone marrow cells are differentiated with recombinant murine M-CSF (rmM-CSF). Bacteria were readily internalized by BMDM, and replicated within degradative, LAMP1-positive vacuoles to achieve roughly 3 logs of growth over 6 days. Uninfected BMDM did not appreciably express CD38 or Egr2, markers of classically (M1) and alternatively (M2) activated macrophages, respectively, nor did infection change the lack of polarization. In accordance with an M0 phenotype, infected BMDM produced moderate amounts of TNF and nitric oxide. Similar NMII growth results were obtained using C57BL/6J myeloid progenitors immortalized with an estrogen-regulated Hoxb8 (ER-Hoxb8) oncogene. To demonstrate the utility of the ER-Hoxb8 system, myeloid progenitors from natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (Nramp1) C57BL/6J knock-in mice were transduced with ER-Hoxb8, and macrophages were derived from immortalized progenitors using rmM-CSF and infected with NMII. No difference in growth was observed when compared to macrophages from wild type mice, indicating depletion of metal ions by the Nramp1

  8. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy and regeneration: interplay between the myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) pathways.

    PubMed

    Zanou, Nadège; Gailly, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    Adult skeletal muscle can regenerate in response to muscle damage. This ability is conferred by the presence of myogenic stem cells called satellite cells. In response to stimuli such as injury or exercise, these cells become activated and express myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs), i.e., transcription factors of the myogenic lineage including Myf5, MyoD, myogenin, and Mrf4 to proliferate and differentiate into myofibers. The MRF family of proteins controls the transcription of important muscle-specific proteins such as myosin heavy chain and muscle creatine kinase. Different growth factors are secreted during muscle repair among which insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are the only ones that promote both muscle cell proliferation and differentiation and that play a key role in muscle regeneration and hypertrophy. Different isoforms of IGFs are expressed during muscle repair: IGF-IEa, IGF-IEb, or IGF-IEc (also known as mechano growth factor, MGF) and IGF-II. MGF is expressed first and is observed in satellite cells and in proliferating myoblasts whereas IGF-Ia and IGF-II expression occurs at the state of muscle fiber formation. Interestingly, several studies report the induction of MRFs in response to IGFs stimulation. Inversely, IGFs expression may also be regulated by MRFs. Various mechanisms are proposed to support these interactions. In this review, we describe the general process of muscle hypertrophy and regeneration and decipher the interactions between the two groups of factors involved in the process.

  9. Examining the structure, reliability, and validity of the Chinese personal growth initiative scale-II: evidence for the importance of intentional self-change among Chinese.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongfei; Chang, Edward C

    2014-01-01

    We examined the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the Chinese version of the Personal Growth Initiative Scale-II (CPGIS-II) using data from a sample of 927 Chinese university students. Consistent with previous findings, confirmatory factor analyses supported a 4-factor model of the CPGIS-II. Reliability analyses indicated that the 4 CPGIS-II subscales, namely Readiness for Change, Planfulness, Using Resources, and Intentional Behavior, demonstrated good internal consistency reliability and adequate test-retest reliability across a 4-week period. In addition, evidence for convergent and incremental validity was found in relation to measures of positive and negative psychological adjustment. Finally, results of hierarchical regression analyses indicated that the 4 personal growth initiative dimensions, especially planfulness, accounted for additional unique variance in psychological adjustment beyond resilience. Some implications for using the CPGIS-II in Chinese are discussed.

  10. Extracellular matrix and growth factors in branching morphogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, P.; Spooner, B. S.

    1993-01-01

    The unifying hypothesis of the NSCORT in gravitational biology postulates that the ECM and growth factors are key interrelated components of a macromolecular regulatory system. The ECM is known to be important in growth and branching morphogenesis of embryonic organs. Growth factors have been detected in the developing embryo, and often the pattern of localization is associated with areas undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Causal relationships between these components may be of fundamental importance in control of branching morphogenesis.

  11. Extracellular matrix and growth factors in branching morphogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, P.; Spooner, B. S.

    1993-01-01

    The unifying hypothesis of the NSCORT in gravitational biology postulates that the ECM and growth factors are key interrelated components of a macromolecular regulatory system. The ECM is known to be important in growth and branching morphogenesis of embryonic organs. Growth factors have been detected in the developing embryo, and often the pattern of localization is associated with areas undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Causal relationships between these components may be of fundamental importance in control of branching morphogenesis.

  12. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor in extramammary Paget disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoyun; Shao, Ning; Qiao, Di; Wang, Zengjun; Song, Ningjing; Song, Ninghong

    2015-01-01

    Extramammary Paget's disease (EMPD) is a special type of cancers. The etiology of the disease is still unclear. We aimed to study the expression differences of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in EMPD tissues and corresponding adjacent normal tissues. The mRNA expression was detected by RT-PCR and the protein expression was explored by immunohistochemistry. Higher immunostaining signal scores of bFGF and VEGF in EMPD tissues had been found (z=-3.827, P<0.001, z=-3.729, P<0.001, respectively). In addition, the mRNA expression of bFGF and VEGF was higher in EMPD tissues, which had been validated by RT-PCR (t=5.771, P<0.001, t=3.304, P=0.004, respectively). The VEGF and bFGF might be the key signaling proteins in angiogenesis of EMPD. How to block the VEGF and bFGF in EMPD and to destroy the blood supply of the tumor cells becomes the focus of our future research.

  13. Nerve growth factor-mediated vascular endothelial growth factor expression of astrocyte in retinal vascular development.

    PubMed

    Kim, You Sun; Jo, Dong Hyun; Lee, Hanjae; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Kim, Kyu-Won; Kim, Jeong Hun

    2013-02-22

    The angiogenic aspect of neurotrophins and their receptors rather than the neuroscientific aspect has been focused. However, their role in retinal vascular development is underdiscovered. The purpose of this study is to understand the role of neurotrophin receptors in retinal vascular development and the mechanisms of their action. To identify the expression of tropomyosin receptor kinase receptor (Trk) in developing retina, tissues of 4, 8, 12, 16 and 26 day-old mice were prepared for experiments. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence double staining against glial fibrillary acidic protein and type IV collagen were performed. TrkA was expressed mainly along the vessel structure in inner part of retina, especially in retinal astrocyte. In cultured primary astrocyte, recombinant nerve growth factor (NGF) was used to activate TrkA. NGF induced the phosphorylation of TrkA, and it also enhanced the level of activated Akt and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA. Inhibition of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) reversed the NGF-induced activation of these two molecules. This study demonstrated that TrkA activation on NGF leads to VEGF elevation by PI3K-Akt pathway and therefore suggested that TrkA could be a stimulator of retinal vascular development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutation enhances expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; Lin, Paul-Yann; Lung, Jr-Hau; Li, Ya-Chin; Lin, Yu-Ching; Yang, Cheng-Ta; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-12-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation has been demonstrated to have a critical role in tumor angiogenesis. In the present study, the correlation between EGFR mutations and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was investigated in lung cancer cell lines and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumor tissues. VEGF levels were significantly increased in culture medium of lung cancer cells and NSCLC tissues with EGFR mutations (H1650 vs. A549, P=0.0399; H1975 vs. A549, P<0.0001). Stable lung cancer cell lines expressing mutant (exon 19 deletion, E746-A750; exon 21 missense mutation, L858R) and wild-type EGFR genes were established. Significantly increased expression of VEGF and stronger inhibitory effects of gefitinib to VEGF expression were observed in exon 19 deletion stable lung cancer cells (exon 19 deletion vs. wild-type EGFR, P=0.0005). The results of the present study may provide an insight into the association of mutant EGFR and VEGF expression in lung cancer, and may assist with further development of targeted therapy for NSCLC in the future.

  15. Cartilage–Specific Over-Expression of CCN Family Member 2/Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CCN2/CTGF) Stimulates Insulin-Like Growth Factor Expression and Bone Growth

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Nao; Hattori, Takako; Itoh, Shinsuke; Aoyama, Eriko; Yao, Mayumi; Yamashiro, Takashi; Takigawa, Masaharu

    2013-01-01

    Previously we showed that CCN family member 2/connective tissue growth factor (CCN2) promotes the proliferation, differentiation, and maturation of growth cartilage cells in vitro. To elucidate the specific role and molecular mechanism of CCN2 in cartilage development in vivo, in the present study we generated transgenic mice overexpressing CCN2 and analyzed them with respect to cartilage and bone development. Transgenic mice were generated expressing a ccn2/lacZ fusion gene in cartilage under the control of the 6 kb-Col2a1-enhancer/promoter. Changes in cartilage and bone development were analyzed histologically and immunohistologically and also by micro CT. Primary chondrocytes as well as limb bud mesenchymal cells were cultured and analyzed for changes in expression of cartilage–related genes, and non-transgenic chondrocytes were treated in culture with recombinant CCN2. Newborn transgenic mice showed extended length of their long bones, increased content of proteoglycans and collagen II accumulation. Micro-CT analysis of transgenic bones indicated increases in bone thickness and mineral density. Chondrocyte proliferation was enhanced in the transgenic cartilage. In in vitro short-term cultures of transgenic chondrocytes, the expression of col2a1, aggrecan and ccn2 genes was substantially enhanced; and in long-term cultures the expression levels of these genes were further enhanced. Also, in vitro chondrogenesis was strongly enhanced. IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA levels were elevated in transgenic chondrocytes, and treatment of non-transgenic chondrocytes with recombinant CCN2 stimulated the expression of these mRNA. The addition of CCN2 to non-transgenic chondrocytes induced the phosphorylation of IGFR, and ccn2-overexpressing chondrocytes showed enhanced phosphorylation of IGFR. Our data indicates that the observed effects of CCN2 may be mediated in part by CCN2-induced overexpression of IGF-I and IGF-II. These findings indicate that CCN2-overexpression in

  16. Cartilage-specific over-expression of CCN family member 2/connective tissue growth factor (CCN2/CTGF) stimulates insulin-like growth factor expression and bone growth.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Nao; Hattori, Takako; Itoh, Shinsuke; Aoyama, Eriko; Yao, Mayumi; Yamashiro, Takashi; Takigawa, Masaharu

    2013-01-01

    Previously we showed that CCN family member 2/connective tissue growth factor (CCN2) promotes the proliferation, differentiation, and maturation of growth cartilage cells in vitro. To elucidate the specific role and molecular mechanism of CCN2 in cartilage development in vivo, in the present study we generated transgenic mice overexpressing CCN2 and analyzed them with respect to cartilage and bone development. Transgenic mice were generated expressing a ccn2/lacZ fusion gene in cartilage under the control of the 6 kb-Col2a1-enhancer/promoter. Changes in cartilage and bone development were analyzed histologically and immunohistologically and also by micro CT. Primary chondrocytes as well as limb bud mesenchymal cells were cultured and analyzed for changes in expression of cartilage-related genes, and non-transgenic chondrocytes were treated in culture with recombinant CCN2. Newborn transgenic mice showed extended length of their long bones, increased content of proteoglycans and collagen II accumulation. Micro-CT analysis of transgenic bones indicated increases in bone thickness and mineral density. Chondrocyte proliferation was enhanced in the transgenic cartilage. In in vitro short-term cultures of transgenic chondrocytes, the expression of col2a1, aggrecan and ccn2 genes was substantially enhanced; and in long-term cultures the expression levels of these genes were further enhanced. Also, in vitro chondrogenesis was strongly enhanced. IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA levels were elevated in transgenic chondrocytes, and treatment of non-transgenic chondrocytes with recombinant CCN2 stimulated the expression of these mRNA. The addition of CCN2 to non-transgenic chondrocytes induced the phosphorylation of IGFR, and ccn2-overexpressing chondrocytes showed enhanced phosphorylation of IGFR. Our data indicates that the observed effects of CCN2 may be mediated in part by CCN2-induced overexpression of IGF-I and IGF-II. These findings indicate that CCN2-overexpression in transgenic

  17. Cardiac lineage protein-1 (CLP-1) regulates cardiac remodeling via transcriptional modulation of diverse hypertrophic and fibrotic responses and angiotensin II-transforming growth factor β (TGF-β1) signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Mascareno, Eduardo; Galatioto, Josephine; Rozenberg, Inna; Salciccioli, Louis; Kamran, Haroon; Lazar, Jason M; Liu, Fang; Pedrazzini, Thierry; Siddiqui, M A Q

    2012-04-13

    It is well known that the renin-angiotensin system contributes to left ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis, a major determinant of myocardial stiffness. TGF-β1 and renin-angiotensin system signaling alters the fibroblast phenotype by promoting its differentiation into morphologically distinct pathological myofibroblasts, which potentiates collagen synthesis and fibrosis and causes enhanced extracellular matrix deposition. However, the atrial natriuretic peptide, which is induced during left ventricular hypertrophy, plays an anti-fibrogenic and anti-hypertrophic role by blocking, among others, the TGF-β-induced nuclear localization of Smads. It is not clear how the hypertrophic and fibrotic responses are transcriptionally regulated. CLP-1, the mouse homolog of human hexamethylene bis-acetamide inducible-1 (HEXIM-1), regulates the pTEFb activity via direct association with pTEFb causing inhibition of the Cdk9-mediated serine 2 phosphorylation in the carboxyl-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II. It was recently reported that the serine kinase activity of Cdk9 not only targets RNA polymerase II but also the conserved serine residues of the polylinker region in Smad3, suggesting that CLP-1-mediated changes in pTEFb activity may trigger Cdk9-dependent Smad3 signaling that can modulate collagen expression and fibrosis. In this study, we evaluated the role of CLP-1 in vivo in induction of left ventricular hypertrophy in angiotensinogen-overexpressing transgenic mice harboring CLP-1 heterozygosity. We observed that introduction of CLP-1 haplodeficiency in the transgenic α-myosin heavy chain-angiotensinogen mice causes prominent changes in hypertrophic and fibrotic responses accompanied by augmentation of Smad3/Stat3 signaling. Together, our findings underscore the critical role of CLP-1 in remodeling of the genetic response during hypertrophy and fibrosis.

  18. Cardiac Lineage Protein-1 (CLP-1) Regulates Cardiac Remodeling via Transcriptional Modulation of Diverse Hypertrophic and Fibrotic Responses and Angiotensin II-transforming Growth Factor β (TGF-β1) Signaling Axis*

    PubMed Central

    Mascareno, Eduardo; Galatioto, Josephine; Rozenberg, Inna; Salciccioli, Louis; Kamran, Haroon; Lazar, Jason M.; Liu, Fang; Pedrazzini, Thierry; Siddiqui, M. A. Q.

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that the renin-angiotensin system contributes to left ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis, a major determinant of myocardial stiffness. TGF-β1 and renin-angiotensin system signaling alters the fibroblast phenotype by promoting its differentiation into morphologically distinct pathological myofibroblasts, which potentiates collagen synthesis and fibrosis and causes enhanced extracellular matrix deposition. However, the atrial natriuretic peptide, which is induced during left ventricular hypertrophy, plays an anti-fibrogenic and anti-hypertrophic role by blocking, among others, the TGF-β-induced nuclear localization of Smads. It is not clear how the hypertrophic and fibrotic responses are transcriptionally regulated. CLP-1, the mouse homolog of human hexamethylene bis-acetamide inducible-1 (HEXIM-1), regulates the pTEFb activity via direct association with pTEFb causing inhibition of the Cdk9-mediated serine 2 phosphorylation in the carboxyl-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II. It was recently reported that the serine kinase activity of Cdk9 not only targets RNA polymerase II but also the conserved serine residues of the polylinker region in Smad3, suggesting that CLP-1-mediated changes in pTEFb activity may trigger Cdk9-dependent Smad3 signaling that can modulate collagen expression and fibrosis. In this study, we evaluated the role of CLP-1 in vivo in induction of left ventricular hypertrophy in angiotensinogen-overexpressing transgenic mice harboring CLP-1 heterozygosity. We observed that introduction of CLP-1 haplodeficiency in the transgenic α-myosin heavy chain-angiotensinogen mice causes prominent changes in hypertrophic and fibrotic responses accompanied by augmentation of Smad3/Stat3 signaling. Together, our findings underscore the critical role of CLP-1 in remodeling of the genetic response during hypertrophy and fibrosis. PMID:22308025

  19. Material factors influencing metallic whisker growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodekohr, Chad L.

    Whiskering refers to the formation of slender, long, metallic filaments, much thinner than a human hair, that grow on a metallic thin film surface. They are readily observed for pure and alloyed zinc (Zn), silver (Ag), cadmium (Cd), indium (In), and tin (Sn) surfaces. The longest reported whisker length is 4.5 mm long but most high-aspect ratio whiskers range from 1-500 mum. The focus of this research is upon Sn whiskers. Sn whiskers pose serious reliability problems for the electronics industry and are known to be the source of failure in a wide range of electronic devices, such as nuclear power facilities, heart pacemakers, commercial satellites, aviation radar, telecommunication equipment, and desktop computers. The problem with whiskering has been recently exacerbated by the worldwide shift to lead (Pb) free electronics and the continuing reduction in electrical contact pitches. A thorough understanding of the growth mechanism of Sn whiskers is urgently needed. Currently, there is no universally accepted model that explains the broad range of observations on whiskering. The goals of this research are: (1) to develop a more detailed understanding of the physical mechanisms leading to the initiation and growth of Sn whiskers and (2) to outline reasonable mitigation strategies that could be followed to reduce or eliminate the problem of Sn whiskers. The major contributions of this work are: (1) A reliable method for growing Sn whiskers with predictable incubation times has been developed and tested. (2) A surface oxide is not necessary for whisker growth. (3) Intermetallic compounds (IMC) are not necessary for whisker growth. (4) Smoother, not rougher, substrate surfaces promote whisker growth. (5) Whiskers grow under both compressive and tensile thin film stress states. (6) Whisker growth increases with externally applied compression and tension forces. (7) Sn whiskers are composed of pure Sn except for the expected thin, native Sn oxide on their surface. (8) For

  20. Free and total insulin-like growth factors and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins during 14 days of growth hormone administration in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Skjaerbaek, C; Frystyk, J; Møller, J; Christiansen, J S; Orskov, H

    1996-12-01

    The objective was to investigate the effect of growth hormone (GH) administration on circulating levels of free insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) in healthy adults. Eight healthy male subjects were given placebo and two doses of GH (3 and 6 IU/m2 per day) for 14 days in a double-blind crossover study. Fasting blood samples were obtained every second day. Free IGF-I and IGF-II were determined by ultrafiltration of serum. Total IGF-I and IGF-II were measured after acid-ethanol extraction. In addition, GH, insulin, IGF binding protein 1 (IGFBP-1) and IGFBP-3 were measured. Serum-free and total IGF-I increased in a dose-dependent manner during the 14 days of GH administration. After 14 days, serum-free IGF-I values were 610 +/- 100 ng/l (mean +/- SEM) (placebo), 2760 +/- 190 ng/l (3 IU/ m2) and 3720 +/- 240 ng/l (6 IU/m2) (p = 0.0001 for 3 and 6 IU/m2 vs placebo; p = 0.004 for 3 IU/m2 vs 6 IU/m2). Total IGF-I values were 190 +/- 10 micrograms/l (placebo), 525 +/- 10 (3 IU/m2), and 655 +/- 40 micrograms/l (6 IU/m2) (p < 0.0001 for 3 and 6 IU/m2 vs placebo; p = 0.04 for 3 IU/m2). There were no differences in the levels of free or total IGF-II during the three study periods. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 was decreased during GH administration (p = 0.04 for placebo vs 3 IU/m2; p = 0.006 for placebo vs 6 IU/m2). In conclusion, fasting serum free IGF-I increased dose dependently during GH administration and free IGF-I increased relatively more than total IGF-I. This may partly be due to the decrease in IGFBP-1.

  1. Nerve growth factor and epidermal growth factor stimulate clusterin gene expression in PC12 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gutacker, C; Klock, G; Diel, P; Koch-Brandt, C

    1999-01-01

    Clusterin (apolipoprotein J) is an extracellular glycoprotein that might exert functions in development, cell death and lipid transport. Clusterin gene expression is elevated at sites of tissue remodelling, such as differentiation and apoptosis; however, the signals responsible for this regulation have not been identified. We use here the clusterin gene as a model system to examine expression in PC12 cells under the control of differentiation and proliferation signals produced by nerve growth factor (NGF) and by epidermal growth factor (EGF) respectively. NGF induced clusterin mRNA, which preceded neurite outgrowth typical of neuronal differentiation. EGF also activated the clusterin mRNA, demonstrating that both proliferation and differentiation signals regulate the gene. To localize NGF- and EGF-responsive elements we isolated the clusterin promoter and tested it in PC12 cell transfections. A 2.5 kb promoter fragment and two 1.5 and 0.3 kb deletion mutants were inducible by NGF and EGF. The contribution to this response of a conserved activator protein 1 (AP-1) motif located in the 0.3 kb fragment was analysed by mutagenesis. The mutant promoter was not inducible by NGF or EGF, which identifies the AP-1 motif as an element responding to both factors. Binding studies with PC12 nuclear extracts showed that AP-1 binds to this sequence in the clusterin promoter. These findings suggest that NGF and EGF, which give differential gene regulation in PC12 cells, resulting in neuronal differentiation and proliferation respectively, use the common Ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase/AP-1 signalling pathway to activate clusterin expression. PMID:10215617

  2. The chemokine CXCL12 mediates the anti-amyloidogenic action of painless human nerve growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Capsoni, Simona; Malerba, Francesca; Carucci, Nicola Maria; Rizzi, Caterina; Criscuolo, Chiara; Origlia, Nicola; Calvello, Mariantonietta; Viegi, Alessandro; Meli, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Nerve growth factor is a therapeutic candidate for Alzheimer’s disease. Due to its pain-inducing activity, in current clinical trials nerve growth factor is delivered locally into the brain by neurosurgery, but data on the efficacy of local nerve growth factor delivery in decreasing amyloid-β deposition are not available. To reduce the nerve growth factor pain-inducing side effects, thus avoiding the need for local brain injection, we developed human painless nerve growth factor (hNGFp), inspired by the human genetic disease hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V. hNGFp has identical neurotrophic potency as wild-type human nerve growth factor, but a 10-fold lower pain sensitizing activity. In this study we first mimicked, in the 5xFAD mouse model, the intraparenchymal delivery of hNGFp used in clinical trials and found it to be ineffective in decreasing amyloid-β plaque load. On the contrary, the same dose of hNGFp delivered intranasally, which was widely biodistributed in the brain and did not induce pain, showed a potent anti-amyloidogenic action and rescued synaptic plasticity and memory deficits. We found that hNGFp acts on glial cells, modulating inflammatory proteins such as the soluble TNFα receptor II and the chemokine CXCL12. We further established that the rescuing effect by hNGFp is mediated by CXCL12, as pharmacological inhibition of CXCL12 receptor CXCR4 occludes most of hNGFp effects. These findings have significant therapeutic implications: (i) we established that a widespread exposure of the brain is required for nerve growth factor to fully exert its neuroprotective actions; and (ii) we have identified a new anti-neurodegenerative pathway as a broad target for new therapeutic opportunities for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28031222

  3. Expression of growth factor ligand and receptor genes in the preimplantation bovine embryo.

    PubMed

    Watson, A J; Hogan, A; Hahnel, A; Wiemer, K E; Schultz, G A

    1992-02-01

    The sensitive technique of mRNA phenotyping with the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was employed to determine the patterns of gene expression for several growth factor ligand and receptor genes during bovine preimplantation development. Several thousand bovine embryos encompassing a developmental series from one-cell zygotes to hatched blastocysts were produced by the application of in vitro maturation, fertilization, and oviductal epithelial cell embryo coculture methods. Transcripts for transforming growth factor (TGF-alpha) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-A) are detectable in all preimplantation bovine stages as observed in the mouse. Transcripts for TGF-beta 2 and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-II) and the receptors for PDGF-alpha, insulin, IGF-I, and IGF-II are also detectable throughout bovine preimplantation development, suggesting that these mRNAs are products of both the maternal and the embryonic genomes in the cow, whereas in the mouse they are present only following the activation of the embryonic genome at the two-cell stage. In contrast to the mouse embryo, IGF-I mRNA was detected within preimplantation bovine embryos. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is a maternal message in the bovine embryo, since it is only detectable up until the eight-cell embryo stage. Bovine trophoblast protein (bTP) mRNA was detectable within day 8 bovine blastocysts. As was observed in the mouse, the transcripts for insulin, epidermal growth factor (EGF), or nerve growth factor (NGF) were not detectable in any bovine embryo stage. Analyses of this type should aid the development of a completely defined culture medium for the more efficient production of preimplantation bovine embryos.

  4. The chemokine CXCL12 mediates the anti-amyloidogenic action of painless human nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Capsoni, Simona; Malerba, Francesca; Carucci, Nicola Maria; Rizzi, Caterina; Criscuolo, Chiara; Origlia, Nicola; Calvello, Mariantonietta; Viegi, Alessandro; Meli, Giovanni; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2017-01-01

    Nerve growth factor is a therapeutic candidate for Alzheimer's disease. Due to its pain-inducing activity, in current clinical trials nerve growth factor is delivered locally into the brain by neurosurgery, but data on the efficacy of local nerve growth factor delivery in decreasing amyloid-β deposition are not available. To reduce the nerve growth factor pain-inducing side effects, thus avoiding the need for local brain injection, we developed human painless nerve growth factor (hNGFp), inspired by the human genetic disease hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V. hNGFp has identical neurotrophic potency as wild-type human nerve growth factor, but a 10-fold lower pain sensitizing activity. In this study we first mimicked, in the 5xFAD mouse model, the intraparenchymal delivery of hNGFp used in clinical trials and found it to be ineffective in decreasing amyloid-β plaque load. On the contrary, the same dose of hNGFp delivered intranasally, which was widely biodistributed in the brain and did not induce pain, showed a potent anti-amyloidogenic action and rescued synaptic plasticity and memory deficits. We found that hNGFp acts on glial cells, modulating inflammatory proteins such as the soluble TNFα receptor II and the chemokine CXCL12. We further established that the rescuing effect by hNGFp is mediated by CXCL12, as pharmacological inhibition of CXCL12 receptor CXCR4 occludes most of hNGFp effects. These findings have significant therapeutic implications: (i) we established that a widespread exposure of the brain is required for nerve growth factor to fully exert its neuroprotective actions; and (ii) we have identified a new anti-neurodegenerative pathway as a broad target for new therapeutic opportunities for neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor inhibit cholestatic liver injury in mice through different mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Kouichi; Khai, Ngin Cin; Wang, Yuqing; Irie, Rie; Takamatsu, Hideo; Matsufuji, Hiroshi; Kosai, Ken-Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), the therapeutic potential and pathophysiologic roles of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) in liver diseases remain relatively unknown. To address the lack of effective pharmacologic treatments for cholestatic liver injuries, as well as to clarify the biologic features of these growth factors, we explored the effects of HB-EGF and HGF in mice with cholestatic liver injury induced by bile duct ligation (BDL). The mice were assessed 3, 5 and/or 14 days after BDL (acute, subacute and/or chronic phases, respectively) and intravenous injection of adenoviral vector expressing LacZ (control), HB-EGF, HGF, or HB-EGF and HGF. HB-EGF, HGF, or a combination of the growth factors exerted potent antioncotic (antinecrotic), antiapoptotic, anticholestatic, and regenerative effects on hepatocytes in vivo, whereas no robust antiapoptotic or regenerative effects were detected in interlobular bile ducts. Based on serum transaminase levels, the acute protective effects of HB-EGF on hepatocytes were greater than those of HGF. On the other hand, liver fibrosis and cholestasis during the chronic phase were more potently inhibited by HGF compared with HB-EGF. Compared with either growth factor alone, combining HB-EGF and HGF produced greater anticholestatic and regenerative effects during the chronic phase. Taken together, these findings suggest that HB-EGF and HGF inhibited BDL-induced cholestatic liver injury, predominantly by exerting acute cytoprotective and chronic antifibrotic effects, respectively; combining the growth factors enhanced the anticholestatic effects and liver regeneration during the chronic phase. Our results contribute to a better understanding of the pathophysiologic roles of HB-EGF and HGF, as well as to the development of novel effective therapies for cholestatic liver injuries. PMID:27779646

  6. TERATOGENIC RESPONSES ARE MODULATED IN MICE LACKING EXPRESSION OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR (EGF) AND TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-ALPHA (TGF)

    EPA Science Inventory

    TITLE:
    TERATOGENIC RESPONSES ARE MODULATED IN MICE LACKING EXPRESSION OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR (EGF) AND TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-ALPHA (TGF). AUTHORS (ALL): Abbott, Barbara D.1; Best, Deborah S.1; Narotsky, Michael G.1. SPONSOR NAME: None INSTITUTIONS (ALL): 1. Repro Tox ...

  7. The discovery of basic fibroblast growth factor/fibroblast growth factor-2 and its role in haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico; Vacca, Angelo; Rusnati, Marco; Presta, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor/fibroblast growth factor-2 is one of the best characterized of the pro-angiogenic cytokines. This review describes its history, as well as its role in tumor angiogenesis associated with haematological malignancies, as traced by the main contributions to the international medical literature.

  8. TERATOGENIC RESPONSES ARE MODULATED IN MICE LACKING EXPRESSION OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR (EGF) AND TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-ALPHA (TGF)

    EPA Science Inventory

    TITLE:
    TERATOGENIC RESPONSES ARE MODULATED IN MICE LACKING EXPRESSION OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR (EGF) AND TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-ALPHA (TGF). AUTHORS (ALL): Abbott, Barbara D.1; Best, Deborah S.1; Narotsky, Michael G.1. SPONSOR NAME: None INSTITUTIONS (ALL): 1. Repro Tox ...

  9. Endogenous versus Exogenous Growth Factor Regulation of Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shuiliang; Chan, Albert G.; Mercer, Scott; Eckert, George J.; Trippel, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Anabolic growth factors that regulate the function of articular chondrocytes are candidates for articular cartilage repair. Such factors may be delivered by pharmacotherapy in the form of exogenous proteins, or by gene therapy as endogenous proteins. It is unknown whether delivery method influences growth factor effectiveness in regulating articular chondrocyte reparative functions. We treated adult bovine articular chondrocytes with exogenous recombinant insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1), or with the genes encoding these growth factors for endogenous production. Treatment effects were measured as change in chondrocyte DNA content, glycosaminoglycan production, and aggrecan gene expression. We found that IGF-I stimulated chondrocyte biosynthesis similarly when delivered by either exogenous or endogenous means. In contrast, exogenous TGF-ß1 stimulated these reparative functions, while endogenous TGF-ß1 had little effect. Endogenous TGF-ß1 became more bioactive following activation of the transgene protein product. These data indicate that effective mechanisms of growth factor delivery for articular cartilage repair may differ for different growth factors. In the case of IGF-I, gene therapy or protein therapy appear to be viable options. In contrast, TGF-ß1 gene therapy may be constrained by a limited ability of chondrocytes to convert latent complexes to an active form. PMID:24105960

  10. Intragenic suppressor mutations restore GTPase and translation functions of a eukaryotic initiation factor 5B switch II mutant.

    PubMed

    Shin, Byung-Sik; Acker, Michael G; Maag, David; Kim, Joo-Ran; Lorsch, Jon R; Dever, Thomas E

    2007-03-01

    Structural studies of GTP-binding proteins identified the Switch I and Switch II elements as contacting the gamma-phosphate of GTP and undergoing marked conformational changes upon GTP versus GDP binding. Movement of a universally conserved Gly at the N terminus of Switch II is thought to trigger the structural rearrangement of this element. Consistently, we found that mutation of this Gly in the Switch II element of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5B (eIF5B) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae impaired cell growth and the guanine nucleotide-binding, GTPase, and ribosomal subunit joining activities of eIF5B. In a screen for mutations that bypassed the critical requirement for this Switch II Gly in eIF5B, intragenic suppressors were identified in the Switch I element and at a residue in domain II of eIF5B that interacts with Switch II. The intragenic suppressors restored yeast cell growth and eIF5B nucleotide-binding, GTP hydrolysis, and subunit joining activities. We propose that the Switch II mutation distorts the geometry of the GTP-binding active site, impairing nucleotide binding and the eIF5B domain movements associated with GTP binding. Accordingly, the Switch I and domain II suppressor mutations induce Switch II to adopt a conformation favorable for nucleotide binding and hydrolysis and thereby reestablish coupling between GTP binding and eIF5B domain movements.

  11. Regulation of transferrin receptor expression at the cell surface by insulin-like growth factors, epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.J.; Kuck, L.; Faucher, M.; Czech, M.P.

    1986-05-01

    Addition of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), recombinant insulin-like growth factor I (rIGF-I) or epidermal growth factor (EGF) to BALB/c 3T3 fibroblasts causes a marked increase in the binding of (/sup 125/I) diferric transferrin to cell surface receptors. This effect is very rapid and is complete within 5 minutes. The effect is transient with (/sup 125/I) diferric transferrin binding returning to control values within 25 minutes. In contrast, PDGF and rIGF-I cause a prolonged stimulation of (/sup 125/I) diferric transferrin binding that could be observed up to 2 hours. The increase in the binding of (/sup 125/I) diferric transferrin caused by growth factors was investigated by analysis of the binding isotherm. EGF, PDGF and rIGF-I were found to increase the cell surface expression of transferrin receptors rather than to alter the affinity of the transferrin receptors. Furthermore, PDGF and rIGF-I stimulated the sustained uptake of (/sup 59/Fe) diferric transferrin by BALB/c 3T3 fibroblasts. Thus, the effect of these growth factors to increase the cell surface expression of the transferrin receptor appears to have an important physiological consequence.

  12. Tracheal cartilage growth by intratracheal injection of basic fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Komura, Makoto; Komura, Hiroko; Komuro, Hiroaki; Ikebukuro, Kenichi; Hikita, Atsuhiko; Hoshi, Kazuto; Takato, Tsuyoshi

    2017-02-01

    We have previously shown that intratracheal injection of slowly released (in gelatin) basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) significantly enlarged the tracheal lumen by a slight margin. This study aimed to investigate differences in tracheal cartilage growth by the intratracheal injection of bFGF doses in a rabbit model. Water (group 1; n=7; control) or 100μg (group 2; n=8) or 200μg (group 3; n=8) of bFGF dissolved in water was injected into the posterior wall of the cervical trachea of New Zealand white rabbits using a tracheoscope. All animals were sacrificed four weeks later. The mean circumferences of cervical tracheas for groups 1, 2, and 3 were 18.8±0.83, 21.1±2.0, and 22.1±1.3mm, respectively. A significant difference was found between groups 1 and 2 (P=0.034) and groups 1 and 3 (P=0.004). The mean luminal areas of cervical tracheas for groups 1, 2, and 3 were 27.0±2.1, 32.2±4.8, and 36.3±4.6mm(2), respectively. A significant difference was found between groups 1 and 3 (P=0.001). Intratracheal injection of bFGF in the dose range used significantly promoted the growth of tracheal cartilage in a rabbit model. Level II at treatment study (animal experiment). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. High-growth-factor implosions (HEP4)

    SciTech Connect

    Landen, O.L.; Keane, C.J.; Hammel, B.A.

    1996-06-01

    In inertial confinement fusion (ICF), the kinetic energy of an ablating, inward-driven, solid spherical shell is used to compressionally heat the low-density fuel inside. For a given drive, the maximum achievable compressed fuel density and temperature - and hence the maximum neutron production rate depend on the degree of shell isentropy and integrity maintained during the compression. Shell integrity will be degraded by hydrodynamic instability growth of areal density imperfections in the capsule. Surface imperfections on the shell grow as a result of the Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities when the shell is accelerated by the ablating lower-density plasma. Perturbations at the outer capsule surface are transferred hydrodynamically to the inner surface, where deceleration of the shell by the lower-density fuel gives rise to further RT growth at the pusher-fuel interface.

  14. Comparative effects of contraction and angiotensin II on growth of adult feline cardiocytes in primary culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, H.; Zile, M. R.; Ivester, C. T.; Cooper, G. 4th; McDermott, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to determine whether angiotensin II causes growth of adult feline cardiocytes in long-term culture, 2) to compare the growth effects of angiotensin II with those resulting from electrically stimulated contraction, and 3) to determine whether the anabolic effects of contraction are exerted via the angiotensin type 1 receptor. Adult feline cardiocytes were cultured on laminin-coated trays in a serum-free medium. Cardiocytes were either electrically stimulated to contract (1 Hz, 5-ms pulse duration, alternating polarity) or were nonstimulated and quiescent. Quiescent cells were studied as controls and after treatment with angiotensin II (10(-8) M), losartan (10(-6) M; an angiotensin type 1-receptor antagonist), or angiotensin II plus losartan. Contracting cells were studied in the presence and absence of angiotensin II or losartan. In quiescent cardiocytes, angiotensin II treatment on day 7 significantly increased protein synthesis rates by 22% and protein content per cell by 17%. The effects of angiotensin II were completely blocked by losartan. Electrically stimulated contraction on days 4 and 7 in culture significantly increased protein synthesis rate by 18 and 38% and protein content per cell by 19 and 46%, respectively. Angiotensin II treatment did not further increase protein synthesis rate or protein content in contracting cardiocytes. Furthermore, losartan did not block the anabolic effects of contraction on protein synthesis rates or protein content. In conclusion, angiotensin II can exert a modest anabolic effect on adult feline cardiocytes in culture. In contracting feline cardiocytes, angiotensin II has no effect on growth. Growth caused by electrically stimulated contraction occurs more rapidly and is greater in magnitude than that caused by angiotensin II. Growth of contracting adult feline cardiocytes is not dependent on activation of the angiotensin receptor.

  15. Comparative effects of contraction and angiotensin II on growth of adult feline cardiocytes in primary culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, H.; Zile, M. R.; Ivester, C. T.; Cooper, G. 4th; McDermott, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to determine whether angiotensin II causes growth of adult feline cardiocytes in long-term culture, 2) to compare the growth effects of angiotensin II with those resulting from electrically stimulated contraction, and 3) to determine whether the anabolic effects of contraction are exerted via the angiotensin type 1 receptor. Adult feline cardiocytes were cultured on laminin-coated trays in a serum-free medium. Cardiocytes were either electrically stimulated to contract (1 Hz, 5-ms pulse duration, alternating polarity) or were nonstimulated and quiescent. Quiescent cells were studied as controls and after treatment with angiotensin II (10(-8) M), losartan (10(-6) M; an angiotensin type 1-receptor antagonist), or angiotensin II plus losartan. Contracting cells were studied in the presence and absence of angiotensin II or losartan. In quiescent cardiocytes, angiotensin II treatment on day 7 significantly increased protein synthesis rates by 22% and protein content per cell by 17%. The effects of angiotensin II were completely blocked by losartan. Electrically stimulated contraction on days 4 and 7 in culture significantly increased protein synthesis rate by 18 and 38% and protein content per cell by 19 and 46%, respectively. Angiotensin II treatment did not further increase protein synthesis rate or protein content in contracting cardiocytes. Furthermore, losartan did not block the anabolic effects of contraction on protein synthesis rates or protein content. In conclusion, angiotensin II can exert a modest anabolic effect on adult feline cardiocytes in culture. In contracting feline cardiocytes, angiotensin II has no effect on growth. Growth caused by electrically stimulated contraction occurs more rapidly and is greater in magnitude than that caused by angiotensin II. Growth of contracting adult feline cardiocytes is not dependent on activation of the angiotensin receptor.

  16. Efficacy of glial growth factor and nerve growth factor on the recovery of traumatic facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Mucahit; Karlidag, Turgut; Yalcin, Sinasi; Ozogul, Candan; Keles, Erol; Alpay, Hayrettin Cengiz; Yanilmaz, Muhammed

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of Glial growth factor (GGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) on nerve regeneration in facial nerve anastomosis. In this study, approximately a 1-mm segment was resected from the facial nerve and the free ends were anastomosed. All animals underwent the same surgical procedure and 30 rabbits were grouped randomly in three groups. Control group, the group without any medications; NGF group, the group receiving 250 ng/0.1 ml NGF in the epineurium at the site of anastomosis; GBF group, the group receiving 500 ng/0.1 ml GGF in the epineurium at the site of anastomosis. Medications were given at the time of surgery, and at 24 and 48 h postoperatively. After 2 months, the sites of anastomosis were excised and examined using the electron microscope. It was found that the best regeneration was in the group receiving GGF as compared to the control group in terms of nerve regeneration. Schwann cell and glial cell proliferation were found to be significantly higher in the group receiving GGF as compared to the group receiving NGF. Besides, the number of myelin debris, an indicator of degeneration, was significantly lower in the group with GGF as compared to NGF and control groups (p < 0.005). Using GGF and NGF in order to increase regeneration after nerve anastomosis in experimental traumatic facial nerve paralysis may be a hopeful alternative treatment option in the future. However, further studies on human studies are required to support these results.

  17. Growth in individuals with Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II caused by pericentrin mutations.

    PubMed

    Bober, Michael B; Niiler, Tim; Duker, Angela L; Murray, Jennie E; Ketterer, Tara; Harley, Margaret E; Alvi, Sabah; Flora, Christina; Rustad, Cecilie; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Bicknell, Louise S; Wise, Carol; Jackson, Andrew P

    2012-11-01

    Microcephalic primordial dwarfism (MPD) is a class of disorders characterized by intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), impaired postnatal growth and microcephaly. Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) is one of the more common conditions within this group. MOPD II is caused by truncating mutations in pericentrin (PCNT) and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Detailed growth curves for length, weight, and OFC are presented here and derived from retrospective data from 26 individuals with MOPD II confirmed by molecular or functional studies. Severe pre- and postnatal growth failure is evident in MOPD II patients. The length, weight, and OFC at term (when corrected for gestational age) were -7.0, -3.9, and -4.6 standard deviation (SD) below the population mean and equivalent to the 50th centile of a 28-29-, 31-32-, and 30-31-week neonate, respectively. While at skeletal maturity, the height, weight, and OFC were -10.3, -14.3, and -8.5 SD below the population mean and equivalent to the size of 3-year 10- to 11-month-old, a 5-year 2- to 3-month-old, and 5- to 6-month-old, respectively. During childhood, MOPD II patients grow with slowed, but fairly constant growth velocities and show no evidence of any pubertal growth spurt. Treatment with human growth hormone (n = 11) did not lead to any significant improvement in final stature. The growth charts presented here will be of assistance with diagnosis and management of MOPD II, and should have particular utility in nutritional management of MOPD II during infancy.

  18. Epidermal growth factor prevents prepartum luteolysis in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, M. L.; Aisemberg, J.; Billi, S.; Farina, M. G.; Meiss, R.; McCann, S.; Rettori, V.; Villalón, M.; Franchi, A. M.

    2005-01-01

    We have previously reported that intrauterine (i/u) administration of epidermal growth factor (EGF 500 ng) on day (d) 21 of pregnancy delayed 19.0 ± 0.6 h the onset of labor. Progesterone (P) is secreted by ovarian corpora lutea (CL) throughout gestation in the rat. Prepartum CL regression due to increased uterine cyclooxygenase I and prostaglandin F2α results in P withdrawal followed by labor. The aims of the present work were (i) to study whether EGF delayed-onset of labor was mediated by a mechanism that prevented CL regression; (ii) to determine amniotic fluid (AF) EGF in pregnant rats. Rats on d21 of pregnancy received i/u EGF (500 ng) and were killed 0, 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 h later. Control AF from rats on d13 and 18–22 of pregnancy was obtained. EGF decreased uterine prostaglandin F2α synthesis 8 h after treatment. Twelve hours after EGF injection, P reached its highest serum level and uterine cyclooxygenase I expression was undetectable. CL from rats killed 8 and 12 h after EGF were similar to those from rats on d13 of pregnancy, when serum P is maximum. EGF in AF increased throughout gestation, reached a maximum on d21, and decreased before the onset of labor. We suggest that the effect of EGF on the onset of labor was mediated by an early effect on the uterus that prevented prepartum CL regression. PMID:15911754

  19. Mast Cells Synthesize, Store, and Release Nerve Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, A.; Buriani, A.; dal Toso, R.; Fabris, M.; Romanello, S.; Aloe, L.; Levi-Montalcini, R.

    1994-04-01

    Mast cells and nerve growth factor (NGF) have both been reported to be involved in neuroimmune interactions and tissue inflammation. In many peripheral tissues, mast cells interact with the innervating fibers. Changes in the behaviors of both of these elements occur after tissue injury/inflammation. As such conditions are typically associated with rapid mast cell activation and NGF accumulation in inflammatory exudates, we hypothesized that mast cells may be capable of producing NGF. Here we report that (i) NGF mRNA is expressed in adult rat peritoneal mast cells; (ii) anti-NGF antibodies clearly stain vesicular compartments of purified mast cells and mast cells in histological sections of adult rodent mesenchymal tissues; and (iii) medium conditioned by peritoneal mast cells contains biologically active NGF. Mast cells thus represent a newly recognized source of NGF. The known actions of NGF on peripheral nerve fibers and immune cells suggest that mast cell-derived NGF may control adaptive/reactive responses of the nervous and immune systems toward noxious tissue perturbations. Conversely, alterations in normal mast cell behaviors may provoke maladaptive neuroimmune tissue responses whose consequences could have profound implications in inflammatory disease states, including those of an autoimmune nature.

  20. Maternal growth factor regulation of human placental development and fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Karen; Westwood, Melissa

    2010-10-01

    Normal development and function of the placenta is critical to achieving a successful pregnancy, as normal fetal growth depends directly on the transfer of nutrients from mother to fetus via this organ. Recently, it has become apparent from both animal and human studies that growth factors within the maternal circulation, for example the IGFs, are important regulators of placental development and function. Although these factors act via distinct receptors to exert their effects, the downstream molecules activated upon ligand/receptor interaction are common to many growth factors. The expression of numerous signaling molecules is altered in the placentas from pregnancies affected by the fetal growth complications, fetal growth restriction, and macrosomia. Thus, targeting these molecules may lead to more effective treatments for complications of pregnancy associated with altered placental development. Here, we review the maternal growth factors required for placental development and discuss their mechanism of action.

  1. Guanine is a growth factor for Legionella species.

    PubMed Central

    Pine, L; Franzus, M J; Malcolm, G B

    1986-01-01

    Evaluation of previously described chemically defined media for the growth of Legionella pneumophila showed that these media supported poor growth of several strains of L. pneumophila and did not support growth of certain of the Legionella species described later. Growth was stimulated by the dialysate from yeast extract but not by the nondialyzable fraction. Further investigations indicated that the active factors from the yeast extract dialysate were purine or pyrimidine derivatives, and certain known purines and pyrimidines were found to stimulate growth. Of these, guanine universally stimulated growth of all Legionella strains and was a growth requirement for several of the species tested. A balanced, N-(2-acetamido)-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid-buffered, chemically defined medium having guanine or a purine-pyrimidine mix is presented for the general growth of Legionella species. PMID:3700600

  2. Rearing Mozambique tilapia in tidally-changing salinities: Effects on growth and the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor I axis.

    PubMed

    Moorman, Benjamin P; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Lerner, Darren T; Grau, E Gordon; Seale, Andre P

    2016-08-01

    The growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis plays a central role in the regulation of growth in teleosts and has been shown to be affected by acclimation salinity. This study was aimed at characterizing the effects of rearing tilapia, Oreochromis mossambicus, in a tidally-changing salinity on the GH/IGF axis and growth. Tilapia were raised in fresh water (FW), seawater (SW), or in a tidally-changing environment, in which salinity is switched between FW (TF) and SW (TS) every 6h, for 4months. Growth was measured over all time points recorded and fish reared in a tidally-changing environment grew significantly faster than other groups. The levels of circulating growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), pituitary GH mRNA, gene expression of IGF-I, IGF-II, and growth hormone receptor 2 (GHR) in the muscle and liver were also determined. Plasma IGF-I was higher in FW and TS than in SW and TF tilapia. Pituitary GH mRNA was higher in TF and TS than in FW and SW tilapia. Gene expression of IGF-I in the liver and of GHR in both the muscle and liver changed between TF and TS fish. Fish growth was positively correlated with GH mRNA expression in the pituitary, and GHR mRNA expression in muscle and liver tissues. Our study indicates that rearing fish under tidally-changing salinities elicits a distinct pattern of endocrine regulation from that observed in fish reared in steady-state conditions, and may provide a new approach to increase tilapia growth rate and study the regulation of growth in euryhaline fish. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Platelet-rich growth factor in oral and maxillofacial surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Uma Shanker; Mohammad, Shadab; Singh, Rakesh K.; Das, Somdipto; Singh, Nimisha; Singh, Mayank

    2012-01-01

    Platelet-rich growth factor is an innovative regenerative therapy used to promote hard and soft tissue healing. It involves the application of autologous platelet-leukocyte-rich plasma containing growth factors and thrombin directly to the site of treatment. It is the intrinsic growth factors released by activated platelets which are concentrated in a topical gel formula. Clinically, it is an affordable treatment with potentially broad spectrum of applications in maxillofacial surgery especially in the treatment of complex or refractory wounds. The present article reviews its various applications not only in the specialization of oral and maxillofacial surgery but also in regenerative medicine. PMID:23833484

  4. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Zamora, Paul O [Gaithersburg, MD; Pena, Louis A [Poquott, NY; Lin, Xinhua [Plainview, NY

    2012-04-24

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  5. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Zamora, Paul O [Gaithersburg, MD; Pena, Louis A [Poquott, NY; Lin, Xinhua [Plainview, NY

    2009-10-06

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  6. Reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling decreases translation in Drosophila and mice

    PubMed Central

    Essers, Paul; Tain, Luke S.; Nespital, Tobias; Goncalves, Joana; Froehlich, Jenny; Partridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Down-regulation of insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) can increase lifespan in C. elegans, Drosophila and mice. In C. elegans, reduced IIS results in down-regulation of translation, which itself can extend lifespan. However, the effect of reduced IIS on translation has yet to be determined in other multicellular organisms. Using two long-lived IIS models, namely Drosophila lacking three insulin-like peptides (dilp2-3,5−/−) and mice lacking insulin receptor substrate 1 (Irs1−/−), and two independent translation assays, polysome profiling and radiolabeled amino acid incorporation, we show that reduced IIS lowers translation in these organisms. In Drosophila, reduced IIS decreased polysome levels in fat body and gut, but reduced the rate of protein synthesis only in the fat body. Reduced IIS in mice decreased protein synthesis rate only in skeletal muscle, without reducing polysomes in any tissue. This lowered translation in muscle was independent of Irs1 loss in the muscle itself, but a secondary effect of Irs1 loss in the liver. In conclusion, down-regulation of translation is an evolutionarily conserved response to reduced IIS, but the tissues in which it occurs can vary between organisms. Furthermore, the mechanisms underlying lowered translation may differ in mice, possibly associated with the complexity of the regulatory processes. PMID:27452396

  7. Body size regulation and insulin-like growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Seogang

    2013-07-01

    How animals achieve their specific body size is a fundamental, but still largely unresolved, biological question. Over the past decades, studies on the insect model system have provided some important insights into the process of body size determination and highlighted the importance of insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling. Fat body, the Drosophila counterpart of liver and adipose tissue, senses nutrient availability and controls larval growth rate by modulating peripheral insulin signaling. Similarly, insulin-like growth factor I produced from liver and muscle promotes postnatal body growth in mammals. Organismal growth is tightly coupled with the process of sexual maturation wherein the sex steroid hormone attenuates body growth. This review summarizes some important findings from Drosophila and mammalian studies that shed light on the general mechanism of animal size determination.

  8. Dual control of cell growth by somatomedins and platelet-derived growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, C D; Capone, G T; Scher, C D; Antoniades, H N; Van Wyk, J J; Pledger, W J

    1979-01-01

    Quiescent BALB/c 3T3 cells exposed briefly to a platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) become "competent" to replicate their DNA but do not "progress" into S phase unless incubated with growth factors contained in platelet-poor plasma. Plasma from hypophysectomized rats is deficient in progression activity; it does not stimulate PDGF-treated competent cells to synthesize DNA, demonstrating that somatomedin C is required for progression. Various growth factors were tested for progression activity and competence activity by using BALB/c 3T3 tissue culture assays. Multiplication stimulating activity and other members of the somatomedin family of growth factors are (like somatomedin C) potent mediators of progression. Other mitogenic agents, such as fibroblast growth factor, are (like PDGF) potent inducers of competence. Growth factors with potent progression activity have little or no competence activity and vice versa. In contrast, simian virus 40 provides both competence and progression activity. Coordinate control of BALB/c 3T3 cell growth in vitro by competence factors and somatomedins may be a specific example of a common pattern of growth regulation in animal tissues. PMID:312500

  9. Release kinetics of platelet-derived and plasma-derived growth factors from autologous plasma rich in growth factors.

    PubMed

    Anitua, Eduardo; Zalduendo, Mari Mar; Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Orive, Gorka

    2013-10-01

    Many studies have evaluated the biological effects of platelet rich plasma reporting the final outcomes on cell and tissues. However, few studies have dealt with the kinetics of growth factor delivery by plasma rich in growth factors. Venous blood was obtained from three healthy volunteers and processed with PRGF-Endoret technology to prepare autologous plasma rich in growth factors. The gel-like fibrin scaffolds were then incubated in triplicate, in a cell culture medium to monitor the release of PDGF-AB, VEGF, HGF and IGF-I during 8 days of incubation. A leukocyte-platelet rich plasma was prepared employing the same technology and the concentrations of growth factors and interleukin-1β were determined after 24h of incubation. After each period, the medium was collected, fibrin clot was destroyed and the supernatants were stored at -80°C until analysis. The growth factor delivery is diffusion controlled with a rapid initial release by 30% of the bioactive content after 1h of incubation and a steady state release when almost 70% of the growth factor content has been delivered. Autologous fibrin matrix retained almost 30% of the amount of the growth factors after 8 days of incubation. The addition of leukocytes to the formula of platelet rich plasma did not increase the concentration of the growth factors, while it drastically increased the presence of pro-inflammatory IL-1β. Further studies employing an in vitro inflammatory model would be interesting to study the difference in growth factors and pro-inflammatory cytokines between leukocyte-free and leukocyte-rich platelet rich plasma.

  10. Class II malocclusion nonextraction treatment with growth control*

    PubMed Central

    Assunção, Zilda Lúcia Valentim

    2014-01-01

    The present study reports a case of Angle Class II malocclusion treatment of a male growing patient with 10-mm overjet, excessive overbite and transverse maxillary deficiency. The case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO), with DI equal to or greater than 10, as a requirement for the title of certified by the BBO. PMID:25628088

  11. Growth factors and cytokines in patients with long bone fractures and associated spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Khallaf, Fathy G; Kehinde, Elijah O; Mostafa, Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to test the effect of acute traumatic spinal cord injury of quadriplegia or paraplegia on bone healing in patients with associated long bone fractures and to investigate the molecular and cellular events of the underlying mechanism for a possible acceleration. Healing indicators of long bone fractures and growth factors, IGF-II, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Activin-A, and cytokine I-L-1, in the patients' blood were calculated and measured for 21 patients with spinal cord injuries and associated long bone fractures in prospective controlled study and compared to 20 patients with only spinal cord injuries, 30 patients with only long bone fractures, and 30 healthy volunteers. The study results showed that long bone fractures in patients with associated acute traumatic spinal cord injury of quadriplegia or paraplegia heal more expectedly, faster, and with exuberant florid union callus (P > 0.001) and show statistically significant higher levels of growth factors like PDGF, VEGF, Activin-A, and cytokine I-L-1, along the 3 weeks of follow-up (P > 0.005). I-IGF-II showed statistically significant subnormal level along the whole follow-up period in the same patients (P > 0.005). We concluded that long bone fractures in spinal cord injury patients heal more expectedly, faster, and with exuberant and florid callus formation; growth factors like IGF-II, PDGF, VEGF, Activin-A, and cytokine I-L-I have roles as mediators, in molecular events and as byproducts of the subtle mechanism of accelerated osteogenesis in these patients and may represent therapeutic potentials to serve as agents to enhance bone repair.

  12. Phase transitions in tumor growth: II prostate cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanos-Pérez, J. A.; Betancourt-Mar, A.; De Miguel, M. P.; Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Royuela-García, M.; Tejera, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a mechanism for prostate cancer cell lines growth, LNCaP and PC3 based on a Gompertz dynamics. This growth exhibits a multifractal behavior and a "second order" phase transition. Finally, it was found that the cellular line PC3 exhibits a higher value of entropy production rate compared to LNCaP, which is indicative of the robustness of PC3, over to LNCaP and may be a quantitative index of metastatic potential tumors.

  13. Cardiac Regeneration using Growth Factors: Advances and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Rebouças, Juliana de Souza; Santos-Magalhães, Nereide Stela; Formiga, Fabio Rocha

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction is the most significant manifestation of ischemic heart disease and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Novel strategies targeting at regenerating the injured myocardium have been investigated, including gene therapy, cell therapy, and the use of growth factors. Growth factor therapy has aroused interest in cardiovascular medicine because of the regeneration mechanisms induced by these biomolecules, including angiogenesis, extracellular matrix remodeling, cardiomyocyte proliferation, stem-cell recruitment, and others. Together, these mechanisms promote myocardial repair and improvement of the cardiac function. This review aims to address the strategic role of growth factor therapy in cardiac regeneration, considering its innovative and multifactorial character in myocardial repair after ischemic injury. Different issues will be discussed, with emphasis on the regeneration mechanisms as a potential therapeutic resource mediated by growth factors, and the challenges to make these proteins therapeutically viable in the field of cardiology and regenerative medicine. PMID:27355588

  14. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor protects against abdominal aortic aneurysm in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Obama, Takashi; Tsuji, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Tomonori; Fukuda, Yamato; Takayanagi, Takehiko; Taro, Yoshinori; Kawai, Tatsuo; Forrester, Steven J; Elliott, Katherine J; Choi, Eric; Daugherty, Alan; Rizzo, Victor; Eguchi, Satoru

    2015-05-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) has been implicated in the development of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). In vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), Ang II activates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mediating growth promotion. We hypothesized that inhibition of EGFR prevents Ang II-dependent AAA. C57BL/6 mice were co-treated with Ang II and β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) to induce AAA with or without treatment with EGFR inhibitor, erlotinib. Without erlotinib, 64.3% of mice were dead due to aortic rupture. All surviving mice had AAA associated with EGFR activation. Erlotinib-treated mice did not die and developed far fewer AAA. The maximum diameters of abdominal aortas were significantly shorter with erlotinib treatment. In contrast, both erlotinib-treated and non-treated mice developed hypertension. The erlotinib treatment of abdominal aorta was associated with lack of EGFR activation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress, interleukin-6 induction and matrix deposition. EGFR activation in AAA was also observed in humans. In conclusion, EGFR inhibition appears to protect mice from AAA formation induced by Ang II plus BAPN. The mechanism seems to involve suppression of vascular EGFR and ER stress.

  15. Polyamines: essential factors for growth and survival.

    PubMed

    Kusano, T; Berberich, T; Tateda, C; Takahashi, Y

    2008-08-01

    Polyamines are low molecular weight, aliphatic polycations found in the cells of all living organisms. Due to their positive charges, polyamines bind to macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, and proteins. They are involved in diverse processes, including regulation of gene expression, translation, cell proliferation, modulation of cell signalling, and membrane stabilization. They also modulate the activities of certain sets of ion channels. Because of these multifaceted functions, the homeostasis of polyamines is crucial and is ensured through regulation of biosynthesis, catabolism, and transport. Through isolation of the genes involved in plant polyamine biosynthesis and loss-of-function experiments on the corresponding genes, their essentiality for growth is reconfirmed. Polyamines are also involved in stress responses and diseases in plants, indicating their importance for plant survival. This review summarizes the recent advances in polyamine research in the field of plant science compared with the knowledge obtained in microorganisms and animal systems.

  16. Insulin growth factors regulate the mitotic cycle in cultured rat sympathetic neuroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    DiCicco-Bloom, E.; Black, I.B. )

    1988-06-01

    While neuronal mitosis is uniquely restricted to early development, the underlying regulation remains to be defined. The authors have now developed a dissociated, embryonic sympathetic neuron culture system that uses fully defined medium in which cells enter the mitotic cycle. The cultured cells expressed two neuronal traits, tyrosine hydroxylase and the neuron-specific 160-kDa neurofilament subunit protein, but were devoid of glial fibrillary acidic protein, a marker for non-myelin-forming Schwann cells in ganglia. Approximately one-third of the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells synthesized DNA in culture, specifically incorporating ({sup 3}H)thymidine into their nuclei. They used this system to define factors regulating the mitotic cycle in sympathetic neuroblasts. Members of the insulin family of growth factors, including insulin and insulin-like growth factors I and II, regulated DNA synthesis in the presumptive neuroblasts. Insulin more than doubled the proportion of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells entering the mitotic cycle, as indicated by autoradiography of ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation into nuclei. Scintillation spectrometry was an even more sensitive index of DNA synthesis. In contrast, the trophic protein nerve growth factor exhibited no mitogenic effect, suggesting that the mitogenic action of insulin growth factors is highly specific. The observations are discussed in the context of the detection of insulin growth factors and receptors in the developing brain.

  17. Effect of sericin on diabetic hippocampal growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 axis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhihong; Yang, Songhe; He, Yaqiang; Song, Chengjun; Liu, Yongping

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that sericin extracted from silk cocoon significantly reduces blood glucose levels and protects the nervous system against diabetes mellitus. In this study, a rat type 2 diabetes mellitus model was established by intraperitoneal injection of 25 mg/kg streptozotocin for 3 successive days, following which the rats were treated with sericin for 35 days. After treatment, the blood glucose levels of the diabetic rats decreased significantly, the growth hormone level in serum and its expression in the hippocampus decreased significantly, while the insulin-like growth factor-1 level in serum and insulin-like growth factor-1 and growth hormone receptor expression in the hippocampus increased significantly. The experimental findings indicate that sericin improves disorders of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 axis to alleviate hippocampal damage in diabetic rats. PMID:25206472

  18. Lifetime growth in wild meerkats: incorporating life history and environmental factors into a standard growth model.

    PubMed

    English, Sinéad; Bateman, Andrew W; Clutton-Brock, Tim H

    2012-05-01

    Lifetime records of changes in individual size or mass in wild animals are scarce and, as such, few studies have attempted to model variation in these traits across the lifespan or to assess the factors that affect them. However, quantifying lifetime growth is essential for understanding trade-offs between growth and other life history parameters, such as reproductive performance or survival. Here, we used model selection based on information theory to measure changes in body mass over the lifespan of wild meerkats, and compared the relative fits of several standard growth models (monomolecular, von Bertalanffy, Gompertz, logistic and Richards). We found that meerkats exhibit monomolecular growth, with the best model incorporating separate growth rates before