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Sample records for growth factor release

  1. Sulodexide induces hepatocyte growth factor release in humans.

    PubMed

    Borawski, Jacek; Dubowski, Miroslaw; Pawlak, Krystyna; Mysliwiec, Michal

    2007-03-08

    Heparin influences numerous pleiotropic growth factors, including hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), partially by their release from endothelial and extracellular matrix stores. The effects of sulodexide, a heparin-like glycosaminoglycan medication of growing importance in medicine, on HGF liberation are not known. We performed a 2-week open-label sulodexide trial in healthy male volunteers. The drug was initially administered intravenously (i.v.) in a single dose of 1200 Lipoprotein Lipase Releasing Units (LRU), then -- orally for 12 days (500 LRU twice a day), and -- again by i.v. route (1200 LRU) on day 14. Intravenous sulodexide injections were repeatedly found to induce marked and reproducible increases in immunoreactive plasma HGF levels (more than 3500% vs baseline after 10 min, and more than 1200% after 120 min), and remained unchanged when measured 120 min following oral sulodexide administration. The percentage increments in plasma HGF evoked by i.v. sulodexide at both time points and on both days inversely correlated with baseline levels of the growth factor. On day 14, the HGF levels after 120 min and their percentage increase vs baseline were strongly and directly dependent on i.v. sulodexide dose per kg of body weight. This study shows that sulodexide has a novel, remarkable and plausibly biologically important stimulating effect on the release of pleiotropic hepatocyte growth factor in humans.

  2. Release characteristics of encapsulated formulations incorporating plant growth factors.

    PubMed

    Wybraniec, Slawomir; Schwartz, Liliana; Wiesman, Zeev; Markus, Arie; Wolf, David

    2002-05-01

    The release characteristics of encapsulated formulations containing a combination of plant growth factors (PGF)--plant hormones (IBA, paclobutrazol), nutrients (fertilizers, microelements), and fungicide (prochloraz)--were studied. The formulations were prepared by encapsulating the active ingredients in a polyethylene matrix and, in some cases, subsequently coating the product with polyurethane. Dissolution experiments were carried out with both coated and non-coated formulations to determine the sustained release patterns of the active ingredients. The PGF controlled-release systems obtained have been shown to promote development of root systems, vegetative growth, and reproductive development in cuttings, potted plants, or garden plants of various plant species. These beneficial effects are attributable to the lasting and balanced PGF availability provided by these systems.

  3. Gelatin Methacrylate Microspheres for Growth Factor Controlled Release

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Anh H.; McKinney, Jay; Miller, Tobias; Bongiorno, Tom; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2014-01-01

    Gelatin has been commonly used as a delivery vehicle for various biomolecules for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications due to its simple fabrication methods, inherent electrostatic binding properties, and proteolytic degradability. Compared to traditional chemical cross-linking methods, such as the use of glutaraldehyde (GA), methacrylate modification of gelatin offers an alternative method to better control the extent of hydrogel cross-linking. Here we examined the physical properties and growth factor delivery of gelatin methacrylate (GMA) microparticles formulated with a wide range of different cross-linking densities (15–90%). Less methacrylated MPs had decreased elastic moduli and larger mesh sizes compared to GA MPs, with increasing methacrylation correlating to greater moduli and smaller mesh sizes. As expected, an inverse correlation between microparticle cross-linking density and degradation was observed, with the lowest cross-linked GMA MPs degrading at the fastest rate, comparable to GA MPs. Interestingly, GMA MPs at lower cross-linking densities could be loaded with up to a 10-fold higher relative amount of growth factor over conventional GA cross-linked MPs, despite an order of magnitude greater gelatin content of GA MPs. Moreover, a reduced GMA cross-linking density resulted in more complete release of bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and accelerated release rate with collagenase treatment. These studies demonstrate that GMA MPs provide a more flexible platform for growth factor delivery by enhancing the relative binding capacity and permitting proteolytic degradation tunability, thereby offering a more potent controlled release system for growth factor delivery. PMID:25463489

  4. Controlled growth factor release from synthetic extracellular matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kuen Yong; Peters, Martin C.; Anderson, Kenneth W.; Mooney, David J.

    2000-12-01

    Polymeric matrices can be used to grow new tissues and organs, and the delivery of growth factors from these matrices is one method to regenerate tissues. A problem with engineering tissues that exist in a mechanically dynamic environment, such as bone, muscle and blood vessels, is that most drug delivery systems have been designed to operate under static conditions. We thought that polymeric matrices, which release growth factors in response to mechanical signals, might provide a new approach to guide tissue formation in mechanically stressed environments. Critical design features for this type of system include the ability to undergo repeated deformation, and a reversible binding of the protein growth factors to polymeric matrices to allow for responses to repeated stimuli. Here we report a model delivery system that can respond to mechanical signalling and upregulate the release of a growth factor to promote blood vessel formation. This approach may find a number of applications, including regeneration and engineering of new tissues and more general drug-delivery applications.

  5. Polyelectrolyte complexes stabilize and controllably release vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Vitharana, Samadhi N; Peek, Laura J; Coop, Tina; Berkland, Cory

    2007-05-01

    Angiogenesis has long been a desired therapeutic approach to improve clinical outcomes of conditions typified by ischemia. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has demonstrated the ability to generate new blood vessels in vivo, but trials using intravenous delivery have not yet produced clinical success. Localized, sustained delivery of VEGF has been proven necessary to generate blood vessels as demonstrated by implantable, controlled release devices. Ultimately, nanoparticles delivered by intravenous injection may be designed to accumulate in target tissues and sustain the local VEGF concentration; however, injectable nanosuspensions that control the release of stabilized VEGF must first be developed. In this study, we utilize the heparin binding domain of VEGF to bind the polyanion dextran sulfate, resulting in an enhanced thermal stability of VEGF. Coacervation of the VEGF-bound dextran sulfate with selected polycations (chitosan, polyethylenimine, or poly-L-lysine) produced nanoparticles approximately 250 nm in diameter with high VEGF encapsulation efficiency (50-85%). Release of VEGF from these formulations persisted for >10 days and maintained high VEGF activity as determined by ELISA and a mitogenic bioassay. Chitosan-dextran sulfate complexes were preferred because of their biodegradability, desirable particle size ( approximately 250 nm), entrapment efficiency ( approximately 85%), controlled release (near linear for 10 days), and mitogenic activity.

  6. Distribution and release of epidermal growth factor in man.

    PubMed Central

    Konturek, J W; Bielanski, W; Konturek, S J; Bogdal, J; Oleksy, J

    1989-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is localised in man to salivary and Brunner's glands. It is present in large concentrations in saliva and duodenal contents but the mechanisms of its release have been little studied. This study carried out on four groups of healthy subjects was designed to determine the distribution and the release of immunoreactive EGF (IR-EGF) in salivary, gastric, duodenal, and pancreatic secretions. Under basal conditions, the concentrations of IR-EGF in salivary, gastric, duodenal and pancreatic secretions were; 2.7 (0.4), 0.42 (0.12), 21 (5) and 8.5 (1.2) ng/ml, respectively. Chewing of Parafilm* significantly increased salivary but not gastric or duodenal EGF output while atropinisation led to the reduction in basal salivary and duodenal EGF output without affecting the increment in EGF release induced by chewing. Cigarette smoking caused a marked reduction in basal salivary and duodenal EGF output. Infusion of pentagastrin increased salivary and duodenal EGF output and this was blocked by the addition of somatostatin. Injection of secretin lead to an increase in pancreatic output of EGF. We conclude that in man the major sources of EGF are salivary glands, duodenum, and pancreas and that the release of EGF remains under neurohormonal control. PMID:2806986

  7. Effect of growth hormone-releasing factor on growth hormone release in children with radiation-induced growth hormone deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Lustig, R.H.; Schriock, E.A.; Kaplan, S.L.; Grumbach, M.M.

    1985-08-01

    Five male children who received cranial irradiation for extrahypothalamic intracranial neoplasms or leukemia and subsequently developed severe growth hormone (GH) deficiency were challenged with synthetic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF-44), in an attempt to distinguish hypothalamic from pituitary dysfunction as a cause of their GH deficiency, and to assess the readily releasable GH reserve in the pituitary. In response to a pulse of GRF-44 (5 micrograms/kg intravenously), mean peak GH levels rose to values higher than those evoked by the pharmacologic agents L-dopa or arginine (6.4 +/- 1.3 ng/mL v 1.5 +/- 0.4 ng/mL, P less than .05). The peak GH value occurred at a mean of 26.0 minutes after administration of GRF-44. These responses were similar to those obtained in children with severe GH deficiency due to other etiologies (peak GH 6.3 +/- 1.7 ng/mL, mean 28.0 minutes). In addition, there was a trend toward an inverse relationship between peak GH response to GRF-44 and the postirradiation interval. Prolactin and somatomedin-C levels did not change significantly after the administration of a single dose of GRF-44. The results of this study support the hypothesis that cranial irradiation in children can lead to hypothalamic GRF deficiency secondary to radiation injury of hypothalamic GRF-secreting neurons. This study also lends support to the potential therapeutic usefulness of GRF-44 or an analog for GH deficiency secondary to cranial irradiation.

  8. Nerve growth factor released from a novel PLGA nerve conduit can improve axon growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Keng-Min; Shea, Jill; Gale, Bruce K.; Sant, Himanshu; Larrabee, Patti; Agarwal, Jay

    2016-04-01

    Nerve injury can occur due to penetrating wounds, compression, traumatic stretch, and cold exposure. Despite prompt repair, outcomes are dismal. In an attempt to help resolve this challenge, in this work, a poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nerve conduit with associated biodegradable drug reservoir was designed, fabricated, and tested. Unlike current nerve conduits, this device is capable of fitting various clinical scenarios by delivering different drugs without reengineering the whole system. To demonstrate the potential of this device for nerve repair, a series of experiments were performed using nerve growth factor (NGF). First, an NGF dosage curve was developed to determine the minimum NGF concentration for optimal axonal outgrowth on chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells. Next, PLGA devices loaded with NGF were evaluated for sustained drug release and axon growth enhancement with the released drug. A 20 d in vitro release test was conducted and the nerve conduit showed the ability to meet and maintain the minimum NGF requirement determined previously. Bioactivity assays of the released NGF showed that drug released from the device between the 15th and 20th day could still promote axon growth (76.6-95.7 μm) in chick DRG cells, which is in the range of maximum growth. These novel drug delivery conduits show the ability to deliver NGF at a dosage that efficiently promotes ex vivo axon growth and have the potential for in vivo application to help bridge peripheral nerve gaps.

  9. Research Advances in Tissue Engineering Materials for Sustained Release of Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hai-yang; Wu, Jiang; Zhu, Jing-jing; Xiao, Ze-cong; He, Chao-chao; Shi, Hong-xue; Li, Xiao-kun; Yang, Shu-lin; Xiao, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Growth factors are a class of cytokines that stimulate cell growth and are widely used in clinical practice, such as wound healing, revascularization, bone repair, and nervous system disease. However, free growth factors have a short half-life and are instable in vivo. Therefore, the search of excellent carriers to enhance sustained release of growth factors in vivo has become an area of intense research interest. The development of controlled-release systems that protect the recombinant growth factors from enzymatic degradation and provide sustained delivery at the injury site during healing should enhance the growth factor's application in tissue regeneration. Thus, this study reviews current research on commonly used carriers for sustained release of growth factors and their sustained release effects for preservation of their bioactivity and their accomplishment in tissue engineering approaches. PMID:26347885

  10. Research Advances in Tissue Engineering Materials for Sustained Release of Growth Factors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hai-yang; Wu, Jiang; Zhu, Jing-jing; Xiao, Ze-cong; He, Chao-chao; Shi, Hong-xue; Li, Xiao-kun; Yang, Shu-lin; Xiao, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Growth factors are a class of cytokines that stimulate cell growth and are widely used in clinical practice, such as wound healing, revascularization, bone repair, and nervous system disease. However, free growth factors have a short half-life and are instable in vivo. Therefore, the search of excellent carriers to enhance sustained release of growth factors in vivo has become an area of intense research interest. The development of controlled-release systems that protect the recombinant growth factors from enzymatic degradation and provide sustained delivery at the injury site during healing should enhance the growth factor's application in tissue regeneration. Thus, this study reviews current research on commonly used carriers for sustained release of growth factors and their sustained release effects for preservation of their bioactivity and their accomplishment in tissue engineering approaches.

  11. Growth-Factor Nanocapsules That Enable Tunable Controlled Release for Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tian, Haijun; Du, Juanjuan; Wen, Jing; Liu, Yang; Montgomery, Scott R; Scott, Trevor P; Aghdasi, Bayan; Xiong, Chengjie; Suzuki, Akinobu; Hayashi, Tetsuo; Ruangchainikom, Monchai; Phan, Kevin; Weintraub, Gil; Raed, Alobaidaan; Murray, Samuel S; Daubs, Michael D; Yang, Xianjin; Yuan, Xu-Bo; Wang, Jeffrey C; Lu, Yunfeng

    2016-08-23

    Growth factors are of great potential in regenerative medicine. However, their clinical applications are largely limited by the short in vivo half-lives and the narrow therapeutic window. Thus, a robust controlled release system remains an unmet medical need for growth-factor-based therapies. In this research, a nanoscale controlled release system (degradable protein nanocapsule) is established via in situ polymerization on growth factor. The release rate can be finely tuned by engineering the surface polymer composition. Improved therapeutic outcomes can be achieved with growth factor nanocapsules, as illustrated in spinal cord fusion mediated by bone morphogenetic protein-2 nanocapsules.

  12. Growth factor delivery: How surface interactions modulate release in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    King, William J.; Krebsbach, Paul H.

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterial scaffolds have been extensively used to deliver growth factors to induce new bone formation. The pharmacokinetics of growth factor delivery has been a critical regulator of their clinical success. This review will focus on the surface interactions that control the non-covalent incorporation of growth factors into scaffolds and the mechanisms that control growth factor release from clinically relevant biomaterials. We will focus on the delivery of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 from materials currently used in the clinical practice, but also suggest how general mechanisms that control growth factor incorporation and release delineated with this growth factor could extend to other systems. A better understanding of the changing mechanisms that control growth factor release during the different stages of preclinical development could instruct the development of future scaffolds for currently untreatable injuries and diseases. PMID:22433783

  13. Release kinetics of platelet-derived and plasma-derived growth factors from autologous plasma rich in growth factors.

    PubMed

    Anitua, Eduardo; Zalduendo, Mari Mar; Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Orive, Gorka

    2013-10-01

    Many studies have evaluated the biological effects of platelet rich plasma reporting the final outcomes on cell and tissues. However, few studies have dealt with the kinetics of growth factor delivery by plasma rich in growth factors. Venous blood was obtained from three healthy volunteers and processed with PRGF-Endoret technology to prepare autologous plasma rich in growth factors. The gel-like fibrin scaffolds were then incubated in triplicate, in a cell culture medium to monitor the release of PDGF-AB, VEGF, HGF and IGF-I during 8 days of incubation. A leukocyte-platelet rich plasma was prepared employing the same technology and the concentrations of growth factors and interleukin-1β were determined after 24h of incubation. After each period, the medium was collected, fibrin clot was destroyed and the supernatants were stored at -80°C until analysis. The growth factor delivery is diffusion controlled with a rapid initial release by 30% of the bioactive content after 1h of incubation and a steady state release when almost 70% of the growth factor content has been delivered. Autologous fibrin matrix retained almost 30% of the amount of the growth factors after 8 days of incubation. The addition of leukocytes to the formula of platelet rich plasma did not increase the concentration of the growth factors, while it drastically increased the presence of pro-inflammatory IL-1β. Further studies employing an in vitro inflammatory model would be interesting to study the difference in growth factors and pro-inflammatory cytokines between leukocyte-free and leukocyte-rich platelet rich plasma.

  14. Promoted growth of murine hair follicles through controlled release of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Makoto; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2002-06-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate whether or not the controlled release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is effective in promoting the hair follicle growth of mice in second anagen of hair cycle. VEGF was incorporated into a biodegradable collagen hydrogel for its controlled release. Following implantation of the collagen hydrogel incorporating 0 or 2 microg of VEGF and injection of 0 or 2 microg of VEGF in the solution form into the back subcutis of mice, the hair follicle growth was evaluated photometrically and histologically in terms of the skin color of reverse side of the implanted or injected site, the skin thickness, and the area occupied by hair follicle tissue. Ten days later, the skin color of mice implanted with the collagen hydrogel incorporating 2 microg of VEGF was significantly darker than that injected with 2 pg of VEGF. The collagen hydrogel incorporating VEGF increased the hair follicle area at the implanted site to a significantly greater extent than other agents while significant angiogenetic effect in the skin tissue was observed. VEGF-free, empty collagen hydrogels did not affect the skin darkness, hair follicle growth, and the angiogenesis. Moreover, the hair shaft length was significantly elongated by the collagen hydrogel incorporating VEGF, in marked contrast to other agents. Immunohistolchemicalstaining with proliferating cell nuclear antigen revealed that the collagen hydrogel incorporating VEGF promoted the proliferation of cells around the hair follicle more frequently than free VEGF. We concluded that the controlled release of VEGF more positively acted on the hair growth cycle of mice for hair growth than the injection of free VEGF.

  15. In situ formation of poly(vinyl alcohol)–heparin hydrogels for mild encapsulation and prolonged release of basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Justine J; Farrugia, Brooke L; Green, Rylie A; Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Martens, Penny J

    2016-01-01

    Heparin-based hydrogels are attractive for controlled growth factor delivery, due to the native ability of heparin to bind and stabilize growth factors. Basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor are heparin-binding growth factors that synergistically enhance angiogenesis. Mild, in situ encapsulation of both basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor and subsequent bioactive dual release has not been demonstrated from heparin-crosslinked hydrogels, and the combined long-term delivery of both growth factors from biomaterials is still a major challenge. Both basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor were encapsulated in poly(vinyl alcohol)-heparin hydrogels and demonstrated controlled release. A model cell line, BaF32, was used to show bioactivity of heparin and basic fibroblast growth factor released from the gels over multiple days. Released basic fibroblast growth factor promoted higher human umbilical vein endothelial cell outgrowth over 24 h and proliferation for 3 days than the poly(vinyl alcohol)-heparin hydrogels alone. The release of vascular endothelial growth factor from poly(vinyl alcohol)-heparin hydrogels promoted human umbilical vein endothelial cell outgrowth but not significant proliferation. Dual-growth factor release of basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor from poly(vinyl alcohol)-heparin hydrogels resulted in a synergistic effect with significantly higher human umbilical vein endothelial cell outgrowth compared to basic fibroblast growth factor or vascular endothelial growth factor alone. Poly(vinyl alcohol)-heparin hydrogels allowed bioactive growth factor encapsulation and provided controlled release of multiple growth factors which is beneficial toward tissue regeneration applications. PMID:27895888

  16. In situ formation of poly(vinyl alcohol)-heparin hydrogels for mild encapsulation and prolonged release of basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Justine J; Farrugia, Brooke L; Green, Rylie A; Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Martens, Penny J

    2016-01-01

    Heparin-based hydrogels are attractive for controlled growth factor delivery, due to the native ability of heparin to bind and stabilize growth factors. Basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor are heparin-binding growth factors that synergistically enhance angiogenesis. Mild, in situ encapsulation of both basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor and subsequent bioactive dual release has not been demonstrated from heparin-crosslinked hydrogels, and the combined long-term delivery of both growth factors from biomaterials is still a major challenge. Both basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor were encapsulated in poly(vinyl alcohol)-heparin hydrogels and demonstrated controlled release. A model cell line, BaF32, was used to show bioactivity of heparin and basic fibroblast growth factor released from the gels over multiple days. Released basic fibroblast growth factor promoted higher human umbilical vein endothelial cell outgrowth over 24 h and proliferation for 3 days than the poly(vinyl alcohol)-heparin hydrogels alone. The release of vascular endothelial growth factor from poly(vinyl alcohol)-heparin hydrogels promoted human umbilical vein endothelial cell outgrowth but not significant proliferation. Dual-growth factor release of basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor from poly(vinyl alcohol)-heparin hydrogels resulted in a synergistic effect with significantly higher human umbilical vein endothelial cell outgrowth compared to basic fibroblast growth factor or vascular endothelial growth factor alone. Poly(vinyl alcohol)-heparin hydrogels allowed bioactive growth factor encapsulation and provided controlled release of multiple growth factors which is beneficial toward tissue regeneration applications.

  17. Temporally controlled release of multiple growth factors from a self-assembling peptide hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Kiara F.; Rodriguez, Alexandra L.; Parish, Clare L.; Williams, Richard J.; Nisbet, David R.

    2016-09-01

    Protein growth factors have demonstrated great potential for tissue repair, but their inherent instability and large size prevents meaningful presentation to biologically protected nervous tissue. Here, we create a nanofibrous network from a self-assembling peptide (SAP) hydrogel to carry and stabilize the growth factors. We significantly reduced growth factor degradation to increase their lifespan by over 40 times. To control the temporal release profile we covalently attached polysaccharide chitosan molecules to the growth factor to increase its interactions with the hydrogel nanofibers and achieved a 4 h delay, demonstrating the potential of this method to provide temporally controlled growth factor delivery. We also describe release rate based analysis to examine the growth factor delivery in more detail than standard cumulative release profiles allow and show that the chitosan attachment method provided a more consistent release profile with a 60% reduction in fluctuations. To prove the potential of this system as a complex growth factor delivery platform we demonstrate for the first time temporally distinct release of multiple growth factors from a single tissue specific SAP hydrogel: a significant goal in regenerative medicine.

  18. Controllable mineral coatings on scaffolds as carriers for growth factor release for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saurez-Gonzalez, Darilis

    The work presented in this document, focused on the development and characterization of mineral coatings on scaffold materials to serve as templates for growth factor binding and release. Mineral coatings were formed using a biomimetic approach that consisted in the incubation of scaffolds in modified simulated body fluids (mSBF). To modulate the properties of the mineral coating, which we hypothesized would dictate growth factor release, we used carbonate (HCO3) concentration in mSBF of 4.2 mM, 25mM, and 100mM. Analysis of the mineral coatings formed using scanning electron microscopy indicated growth of a continuous layer of mineral with different morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis showed peaks associated with hydroxyapatite. FTIR data confirmed the substitution of HCO3 in the mineral. As the extent of HCO3 substitution increased, the coating exhibited more rapid dissolution kinetics in an environment deficient in calcium and phosphate. The mineral coatings provided an effective mechanism for bioactive growth factor binding and release. Peptide versions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) were bound with efficiencies up to 90% to mineral-coated PCL scaffolds. Recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor (rhVEGF) also bound to mineral coated scaffolds with lower efficiency (20%) and released with faster release kinetics compared to peptides growth factor. Released rhVEGF induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation in vitro and enhanced blood vessel formation in vivo in an intramuscular sheep model. In addition to the use the mineral coatings for single growth factor release, we expanded the concept and bound both an angiogenic (rhVEGF) and osteogenic (mBMP2) growth factor by a simple double dipping process. Sustained release of both growth factors was demonstrated for over 60 days. Released rhVEGF enhanced blood vessel formation in vivo in sheep and its biological activity was

  19. Fluorescence-based retention assays reveals sustained release of vascular endothelial growth factor from bone grafts.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wonmo; Yun, Ye-Rang; Lee, Dong-Sung; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Joong-Hyun; Kim, Hae-Won; Jang, Jun-Hyeog

    2016-01-01

    The sustained release of growth factors following their implantation in vivo is essential for successful outcomes in bone tissue engineering. In this study, we evaluated the release kinetics and delivery efficacies of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a potent angiogenic growth factor, incorporated into calcium phosphate bone grafts (BGs). We evaluated the release profile of VEGF from BGs using a novel fluorescence-based retention assay, which revealed that VEGF loaded on BGs can be released in a sustained manner without an initial burst (near zero-order cumulative release) with a controlled release rate of 13.6% per week for up to 7 weeks. In contrast, an ELISA-based release assay showed VEGF to have an early burst-release profile for the first week. However, the biological activity of VEGF released from the BGs was preserved over the 7-week release period, which is consistent with the sustained-release profile observed in the fluorescence-based retention assay. Furthermore, the in vivo bone-forming action of the VEGF-loaded BGs was well demonstrated in a rat subcutaneous model. Taken together, the sustained release of VEGF loaded onto BGs was effective in stimulating proliferation, angiogenesis and osteogenesis, suggesting the ultimate value of VEGF-engineered BGs for bone tissue engineering.

  20. Mast Cells Synthesize, Store, and Release Nerve Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, A.; Buriani, A.; dal Toso, R.; Fabris, M.; Romanello, S.; Aloe, L.; Levi-Montalcini, R.

    1994-04-01

    Mast cells and nerve growth factor (NGF) have both been reported to be involved in neuroimmune interactions and tissue inflammation. In many peripheral tissues, mast cells interact with the innervating fibers. Changes in the behaviors of both of these elements occur after tissue injury/inflammation. As such conditions are typically associated with rapid mast cell activation and NGF accumulation in inflammatory exudates, we hypothesized that mast cells may be capable of producing NGF. Here we report that (i) NGF mRNA is expressed in adult rat peritoneal mast cells; (ii) anti-NGF antibodies clearly stain vesicular compartments of purified mast cells and mast cells in histological sections of adult rodent mesenchymal tissues; and (iii) medium conditioned by peritoneal mast cells contains biologically active NGF. Mast cells thus represent a newly recognized source of NGF. The known actions of NGF on peripheral nerve fibers and immune cells suggest that mast cell-derived NGF may control adaptive/reactive responses of the nervous and immune systems toward noxious tissue perturbations. Conversely, alterations in normal mast cell behaviors may provoke maladaptive neuroimmune tissue responses whose consequences could have profound implications in inflammatory disease states, including those of an autoimmune nature.

  1. Release of Growth Factors into Root Canal by Irrigations in Regenerative Endodontics.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qian; Nguyen, Sean; Zhang, Hongming; Chebrolu, Hari Priya; Alzebdeh, Dalia; Badi, Mustafa A; Kim, Jong Ryul; Ling, Junqi; Yang, Maobin

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the release of growth factors into root canal space after the irrigation procedure of regenerative endodontic procedure. Sixty standardized root segments were prepared from extracted single-root teeth. Nail varnish was applied to all surfaces except the root canal surface. Root segments were irrigated with 1.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA, 2.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA, 17% EDTA, or deionized water. The profile of growth factors that were released after irrigation was studied by growth factor array. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to validate the release of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) at 4 hours, 1 day, and 3 days after irrigation. The final concentrations were calculated on the basis of the root canal volume measured by cone-beam computed tomography. Dental pulp stem cell migration on growth factors released from root segments was measured by using Transwell assay. Total of 11 of 41 growth factors were detected by growth factors array. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that TGF-β1 was released in all irrigation groups. Compared with the group with 17% EDTA (6.92 ± 4.49 ng/mL), the groups with 1.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA and 2.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA had significantly higher release of TGF-β1 (69.04 ± 30.41 ng/mL and 59.26 ± 3.37 ng/mL, respectively), with a peak release at day 1. The release of bFGF was detected at a low level in all groups (0 ng/mL to 0.43 ± 0.22 ng/mL). Migration assay showed the growth factors released from root segments induced dental pulp stem cell migration. The root segment model in present study simulated clinical scenario and indicated that the current irrigation protocol released a significant amount of TGF-β1 but not bFGF. The growth factors released into root canal space induced dental pulp stem cell migration. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative release of growth factors from PRP, PRF, and advanced-PRF.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Eizaburo; Flückiger, Laura; Fujioka-Kobayashi, Masako; Sawada, Kosaku; Sculean, Anton; Schaller, Benoit; Miron, Richard J

    2016-12-01

    The use of platelet concentrates has gained increasing awareness in recent years for regenerative procedures in modern dentistry. The aim of the present study was to compare growth factor release over time from platelet-rich plasma (PRP), platelet-rich fibrin (PRF), and a modernized protocol for PRF, advanced-PRF (A-PRF). Eighteen blood samples were collected from six donors (3 samples each for PRP, PRF, and A-PRF). Following preparation, samples were incubated in a plate shaker and assessed for growth factor release at 15 min, 60 min, 8 h, 1 day, 3 days, and 10 days. Thereafter, growth factor release of PDGF-AA, PDGF-AB, PDGF-BB, TGFB1, VEGF, EGF, and IGF was quantified using ELISA. The highest reported growth factor released from platelet concentrates was PDGF-AA followed by PDGF-BB, TGFB1, VEGF, and PDGF-AB. In general, following 15-60 min incubation, PRP released significantly higher growth factors when compared to PRF and A-PRF. At later time points up to 10 days, it was routinely found that A-PRF released the highest total growth factors. Furthermore, A-PRF released significantly higher total protein accumulated over a 10-day period when compared to PRP or PRF. The results from the present study indicate that the various platelet concentrates have quite different release kinetics. The advantage of PRP is the release of significantly higher proteins at earlier time points whereas PRF displayed a continual and steady release of growth factors over a 10-day period. Furthermore, in general, it was observed that the new formulation of PRF (A-PRF) released significantly higher total quantities of growth factors when compared to traditional PRF. Based on these findings, PRP can be recommended for fast delivery of growth factors whereas A-PRF is better-suited for long-term release.

  3. Epidermal growth factor acts as a corticotropin-releasing factor in chronically catheterized fetal lambs.

    PubMed Central

    Polk, D H; Ervin, M G; Padbury, J F; Lam, R W; Reviczky, A L; Fisher, D A

    1987-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been reported to stimulate adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH), growth hormone and prolactin secretion from pituitary tissue in vitro, and in large doses evokes ACTH secretion in adult sheep in vivo. In order to assess a possible role for EGF in the pituitary hyperfunction characteristic of the in utero fetus, we measured changes in plasma immunoreactive ACTH concentrations after acute administration of saline, purified mouse EGF or synthetic ovine corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) to chronically catheterized fetal sheep. Both CRF and EGF were associated with increases in plasma immunoreactive ACTH concentrations. Peak values 60 min after 10-micrograms injections of either EGF or CRF increased from baseline ACTH values of 61 +/- 11 pg/ml to 191 +/- 37 and 178 +/- 25 pg/ml, respectively. Dose-response studies indicate that at low doses (less than 20 micrograms) EGF is as potent a stimulus for ACTH release as CRF. EGF infusion was not associated with detectable changes in circulating CRF, catecholamines, arginine vasopressin levels, or plasma growth hormone concentrations. We speculate that EGF may be important in the regulation of pituitary function in the developing mammalian fetus. PMID:3029180

  4. Tumor necrosis factor-mediated release of platelet-derived growth factor from cultured endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a 30,000-Mr glycoprotein that is chemotactic and mitogenic for vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). It is also a potent vasoconstrictor. In the present study, we found that the macrophage-derived polypeptide, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), releases a factor from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EC) that is mitogenic for SMC. Postculture medium from TNF-stimulated EC induced a 90% increase in mitogenesis is compared with controls. This effect was half-maximal at a TNF dose of 114 pM, reflected a 2.5-fold increase in PDGF-specific mRNA synthesis, and peaked at 15 h of TNF stimulation. Mitogenic activity was completely abrogated by preincubation of postculture medium with antibody to platelet PDGF. Stimulation of EC with IL-1 (60-240 pM) led to the release of similar mitogenic activity. Thus, in addition to its effects on the hemostatic and adhesive properties of EC, TNF also promotes release of PDGF, which may serve to modulate proliferation of vascular SMC during wound healing, inflammation, and atherogenesis. PMID:3598461

  5. Controllable mineral coatings on PCL scaffolds as carriers for growth factor release

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-González, Darilis; Barnhart, Kara; Migneco, Francesco; Flanagan, Colleen; Hollister, Scott J.; Murphy, William L.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we have developed mineral coatings on polycaprolactone scaffolds to serve as templates for growth factor binding and release. Mineral coatings were formed using a biomimetic approach that consisted in the incubation of scaffolds in modified simulated body fluids (mSBF). To modulate the properties of the mineral coating, which we hypothesized would dictate growth factor release, we used carbonate (HCO3) concentration in mSBF of 4.2 mM, 25mM, and 100mM. Analysis of the mineral coatings formed using scanning electron microscopy indicated growth of a continuous layer of mineral with different morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis showed peaks associated with hydroxyapatite, the major inorganic constituent of human bone tissue in coatings formed in all HCO3 concentrations. Mineral coatings with increased HCO3 substitution showed more rapid dissolution kinetics in an environment deficient in calcium and phosphate but showed re-precipitation in an environment with the aforementioned ions. The mineral coating provided an effective mechanism for growth factor binding and release. Peptide versions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) were bound with efficiencies up to 90% to mineral mineral-coated PCL scaffolds. We also demonstrated sustained release of all growth factors with release kinetics that were strongly dependent in the solubility of the mineral coating. PMID:22014948

  6. Insulin-like growth factor I modulates hypothalamic somatostatin through a growth hormone releasing factor increased somatostatin release and messenger ribonucleic acid levels.

    PubMed

    Aguila, M C; Boggaram, V; McCann, S M

    1993-10-22

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) has been shown to participate in feedback inhibition of growth hormone (GH) secretion at the level of both the pituitary and hypothalamus. Therefore, we tested the possible involvement of IGF-I on somatostatin (SRIF) and GH-releasing factor (GRF) release in median eminence (ME) fragments and periventricular nucleus (PeN) of male rats. The levels of SRIF messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) were also determined in PeN incubated in vitro with IGF-I. The ME's were incubated in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate glucose buffer in the presence of various concentrations of IGF-I (10(-7) to 10(-11) M) for 30 min. SRIF and GRF released into the medium were quantitated by RIA. The release of SRIF and GRF from the ME's was stimulated significantly (P < 0.025 and P < 0.05, respectively) by 10(-9) M IGF-I. To determine whether the effect of IGF-I on SRIF release is mediated by GRF release in the ME, a specific GRF antibody (ab) (1:500) was used concomitantly with IGF-I (10(-9) M). The release of SRIF induced by IGF-I was blocked by the GRF ab (P < 0.001), but not by normal rabbit serum used at the same dilution. To determine the effect of IGF-I on the regulation of SRIF mRNA levels, SRIF mRNA was determined in PeN explants incubated in the presence of IGF-I (10(-8) to 10(-10) M) for 2 to 6 h. Levels of SRIF mRNA were determined by a S1 nuclease protection assay using a 32P-labelled rat SRIF riboprobe.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Hepatocyte Growth Factor/Scatter Factor Released during Peritonitis Is Active on Mesothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rampino, Teresa; Cancarini, Giovanni; Gregorini, Marilena; Guallini, Paola; Maggio, Milena; Ranghino, Andrea; Soccio, Grazia; Dal Canton, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Peritonitis causes mesothelial detachment that may result in persistent peritoneal denudation and fibrosis. We investigated whether hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a scatter factor that induces detachment from substrate and fibroblastic transformation of several cell types, is produced during peritonitis and is active on mesothelial cells. We studied 18 patients on peritoneal dialysis, 9 uncomplicated, 9 with peritonitis. HGF was measured in serum, peritoneal fluid, and supernatant of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and peritoneal mononuclear cells. Primary culture of human peritoneal mesothelial cells and the human mesothelial cell line MeT-5A were conditioned with recombinant HGF, serum, and peritoneal fluid. HGF levels were significantly higher in serum and peritoneal fluid of peritonitic than uncomplicated patients. Mononuclear cells of peritonitic patients produced more HGF than cells of uncomplicated patients. Recombinant HGF, serum, and peritoneal fluid of peritonitic patients caused mesothelial cell growth, detachment, transformation from epithelial to fibroblast-like shape, overexpression of vimentin, and synthesis of type I and III collagen. In conclusion, HGF released during peritonitis causes a change in mesothelial cell phenotype and function. HGF may affect the healing process facilitating repair through mesothelial cell growth, but may contribute to peritoneal fibrosis inducing cell detachment with mesothelial denudation and collagen synthesis. PMID:11583955

  8. Epidermal growth factor and growth hormone-releasing peptide-6: combined therapeutic approach in experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    García Del Barco-Herrera, Diana; Martínez, Nelvys Subirós; Coro-Antich, Rosa María; Machado, Jorge Martín; Alba, José Suárez; Salgueiro, Sandra Rodríguez; Acosta, Jorge Berlanga

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is the second cause of mortality worldwide, with a high incidence of disability in survivors. Promising candidate drugs have failed in stroke trials. Combined therapies are attractive strategies that simultaneously target different points of stroke pathophysiology. The aim of this work is to determine whether the combined effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and growth hormone-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP6) can attenuate clinical signs and pathology in an experimental stroke model. Brain global ischemia was generated in Mongolian gerbils by 15 minutes of carotid occlusion. After reperfusion, EGF, GHRP6 or EGF+GHRP6 were intraperitoneally administered. Clinical manifestations were monitored daily. Three days after reperfusion, animals were anesthetized and perfused with an ink solution. The anatomy of the Circle of Willis was characterized. Infarct volume and neuronal density were analyzed. EGF+GHRP6 co-administration reduced clinical manifestations and infarct volume and preserved neuronal density. No correlation was observed between the grade of anastomosis of the Circle of Willis and clinical manifestations in the animals receiving EGF+GHRP6, as opposed to the vehicle-treated gerbils. Co-treatment with EGF and GHRP6 affects both the clinical and pathological outcomes in a global brain ischemia model, suggesting a suitable therapeutic approach for the acute management of stroke.

  9. Effect of Cellulose Acetate Beads on the Release of Transforming Growth Factor-β.

    PubMed

    Nishise, Shoichi; Abe, Yasuhiko; Nomura, Eiki; Sato, Takeshi; Sasaki, Yu; Iwano, Daisuke; Yagi, Makoto; Sakuta, Kazuhiro; Shibuya, Rika; Mizumoto, Naoko; Kanno, Nana; Ueno, Yoshiyuki

    2015-08-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is released by activated platelets and induces the differentiation of T-helper 17 from naïve T cells. Contact between blood and cellulose acetate (CA) beads induces cytokine release, although their inflammatory effects on TGF-β release are unclear. We aimed to clarify the effect of CA beads on the release of TGF-β in vitro. We incubated peripheral blood with and without CA beads and measured platelets and TGF-β. Compared with blood samples incubated without beads, the platelet count and amount of TGF-β significantly decreased in blood samples incubated with CA beads. In conclusion, CA beads inhibited the release of TGF-β from adsorbed platelets. The biological effects of this reduction of TGF-β release during platelet adsorption to CA beads need further clarification.

  10. Growth hormone secretion from chicken adenohypophyseal cells in primary culture: effects of human pancreatic growth hormone-releasing factor, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, and somatostatin on growth hormone release.

    PubMed

    Perez, F M; Malamed, S; Scanes, C G

    1987-03-01

    A primary culture of chicken adenohypophyseal cells has been developed to study the regulation of growth hormone (GH) secretion. Following collagenase dispersion, cells were exposed for 2 hr to vehicle (control) or test agents. Human pancreatic (tumor) growth hormone-releasing factor (hpGRF) and rat hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing factor stimulated GH release to similar levels. GH release was increased by the presence of dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) alone did not influence GH release; however, TRH plus hpGRF together exerted a synergistic (greater than additive) effect, increasing GH release by 100 to 300% over the sum of the values for each secretagogue acting alone. These relationships between TRH and hpGRF were further examined in cultured cells exposed to secretagogues for two consecutive 2-hr incubations. TRH pretreatment enhanced subsequent hpGRF-stimulated GH release by about 80% over that obtained if no secretagogue was present during the first incubation. In other experiments, somatostatin (SRIF) alone did not alter GH secretion. However, SRIF reduced hpGRF-stimulated GH release to levels found in controls. Furthermore, GH release stimulated by the presence of both TRH and hpGRF was lowered to control values by SRIF. The results of these studies demonstrate that a primary culture of chicken adenohypophyseal cells is a useful model for the study of GH secretion. Indeed, these results suggest that TRH and hpGRF regulate GH secretion by mechanisms which are not identical.

  11. Platelet-rich concentrates differentially release growth factors and induce cell migration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schär, Michael O; Diaz-Romero, Jose; Kohl, Sandro; Zumstein, Matthias A; Nesic, Dobrila

    2015-05-01

    Platelet-rich concentrates are used as a source of growth factors to improve the healing process. The diverse preparation protocols and the gaps in knowledge of their biological properties complicate the interpretation of clinical results. In this study we aimed to (1) analyze the concentration and kinetics of growth factors released from leukocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF), leukocyte- and platelet-rich plasma (L-PRP), and natural blood clot during in vitro culture; (2) investigate the migration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as a functional response to the factors released; and (3) uncover correlations between individual growth factors with the initial platelet/leukocyte counts or the induced cell migration. L-PRF, L-PRP, and natural blood clot prepared from 11 donors were cultured in vitro for 28 days and media supernatants collected after 8 hours and 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days. Released transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin growth factor (IGF-1), platelet-derived growth factor AB (PDGF-AB), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were measured in the supernatants with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Migration of MSC and HUVEC induced by the supernatants was evaluated in Boyden chambers. More TGF-ß1 was released (mean ± SD in pg/mL of blood) from L-PRF (37,796 ± 5492) compared with L-PRP (23,738 ± 6848; p < 0.001) and blood clot (3739 ± 4690; p < 0.001), whereas more VEGF and IL-1ß were released from blood clot (1933 ± 704 and 2053 ± 908, respectively) compared with both L-PRP (642 ± 208; p < 0.001 and 273 ± 386; p < 0.001, respectively) and L-PRF (852 ± 376; p < 0.001 and 65 ± 56, p < 0.001, respectively). No differences were observed in IGF-1 and PDGF-AB released from any of the concentrates. TGF-β1 release peaked at Day 7 in L-PRF and at 8 hours and Day 7 in L-PRP and 8 hours and Day 14 in blood clot. In all concentrates, main release of VEGF

  12. Mineral coatings modulate β-TCP stability and enable growth factor binding and release.

    PubMed

    Suárez-González, Darilis; Lee, Jae Sung; Lan Levengood, Sheeny K; Vanderby, Ray; Murphy, William L

    2012-03-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an attractive ceramic for bone tissue repair because of its similar composition to bone mineral and its osteoconductivity. However, compared with other ceramics β-TCP has a rapid and uncontrolled rate of degradation. In the current study β-TCP granules were mineral coated with the aim of influencing the dissolution rate of β-TCP, and also to use the coating as a carrier for controlled release of the growth factors recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor (rhVEGF), modular VEGF peptide (mVEGF), and modular bone morphogenetic protein 2 peptide (mBMP2). The biomineral coatings were formed by heterogeneous nucleation in aqueous solution using simulated body fluid solutions with varying concentrations of bicarbonate (HCO(3)). Our results demonstrate that we could coat β-TCP granules with mineral layers possessing different dissolution properties. The presence of a biomineral coating delays the dissolution rate of the β-TCP granules. As the carbonate (CO(3)(2-)) content in the coating was increased the dissolution rate of the coated β-TCP also increased, but remained slower than the dissolution of uncoated β-TCP. In addition, we showed sustained release of multiple growth factors, with release kinetics that were controllable by varying the identity of the growth factor or the CO(3)(2-) content in the mineral coating. Released rhVEGF induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation, and mVEGF enhanced migration of mouse embryonic endothelial cells in a scratch wound healing assay, indicating that each released growth factor was biologically active.

  13. Gelatin-based hydrogel for vascular endothelial growth factor release in peripheral nerve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Gnavi, S; di Blasio, L; Tonda-Turo, C; Mancardi, A; Primo, L; Ciardelli, G; Gambarotta, G; Geuna, S; Perroteau, I

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogels are promising materials in regenerative medicine applications, due to their hydrophilicity, biocompatibility and capacity to release drugs and growth factors in a controlled manner. In this study, biocompatible and biodegradable hydrogels based on blends of natural polymers were used in in vitro and ex vivo experiments as a tool for VEGF-controlled release to accelerate the nerve regeneration process. Among different candidates, the angiogenic factor VEGF was selected, since angiogenesis has been long recognized as an important and necessary step during tissue repair. Recent studies have pointed out that VEGF has a beneficial effect on motor neuron survival and Schwann cell vitality and proliferation. Moreover, VEGF administration can sustain and enhance the growth of regenerating peripheral nerve fibres. The hydrogel preparation process was optimized to allow functional incorporation of VEGF, while preventing its degradation and denaturation. VEGF release was quantified through ELISA assay, whereas released VEGF bioactivity was validated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and in a Schwann cell line (RT4-D6P2T) by assessing VEGFR-2 and downstream effectors Akt and Erk1/2 phosphorylation. Moreover, dorsal root ganglia explants cultured on VEGF-releasing hydrogels displayed increased neurite outgrowth, providing confirmation that released VEGF maintained its effect, as also confirmed in a tubulogenesis assay. In conclusion, a gelatin-based hydrogel system for bioactive VEGF delivery was developed and characterized for its applicability in neural tissue engineering. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Silk fibroin matrices for the controlled release of nerve growth factor (NGF).

    PubMed

    Uebersax, Lorenz; Mattotti, Marta; Papaloïzos, Michaël; Merkle, Hans P; Gander, Bruno; Meinel, Lorenz

    2007-10-01

    Nerve conduits (NC) for peripheral nerve repair should guide the sprouting axons and physically protect the axonal cone from any damage. The NC should also degrade after completion of its function to obviate the need of subsequent explanation and should optionally be suitable for controlled drug release of embedded growth factors to enhance nerve regeneration. Silk fibroin (SF) is a biocompatible and slowly biodegradable biomaterial with excellent mechanical properties that could meet the above stated requirements. SF material (films) supported the adherence and metabolic activity of PC12 cells, and, in combination with nerve growth factor (NGF), supported neurite outgrowth during PC12 cell differentiation. NGF-loaded SF-NC were prepared from aqueous solutions of NGF and SF (20%, w/w), which were air-dried or freeze-dried (freezing at -20 or -196 degrees C) in suitable molds. NGF release from the three differently prepared SF-NC was prolonged over at least 3 weeks, but the total amount released depended on the drying procedure of the NC. The potency of released NGF was retained within all formulations. Control experiments with differently dried NGF-lactose solutions did not evidence marked protein aggregation (SEC, HPLC), loss of ELISA-reactivity or PC12 cell bioactivity. This study encourages the further exploitation of SF-NC for growth factor delivery and evaluation in peripheral nerve repair.

  15. Study of the biological effectiveness of a nanosilver-epidermal growth factor sustained-release carrier.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian-DA; Wang, Shao-Hua; Liu, Rui; Zhou, Chun-Jiao; Cao, Ke; Liu, Jin-Yan; Chen, Yao; Chen, Feng-Hua

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate the biological effectiveness and character of a nanosilver-epidermal growth factor (EGF) sustained-release carrier. This was synthesized using the self-assembly method and then characterized by transmission electron microscopy and UV spectrophotometry. The biological activity of the sustained release carrier was determined through cytological, bacteriological and wound-healing experiments. The results showed that the nanosilver-EGF sustained-release carrier was well dispersed with uniform particle size and that it had good antibacterial properties similar to those of nanosilver. The nanosilver-EGF sustained-release carrier is superior to EGFs in effectively promoting cell division and proliferation. The results of the wound-healing experiments provide evidence of its curative effects.

  16. Growth factor and co-receptor release by structural regulation of substrate metalloprotease accessibility

    PubMed Central

    Parra, Liseth M.; Hartmann, Monika; Schubach, Salome; Ma, Junzhi; Herrlich, Peter; Herrlich, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Release of cytokines, growth factors and other life-essential molecules from precursors by a-disintegrin-and-metalloproteases (ADAMs) is regulated with high substrate-specificity. We hypothesized that this is achieved by cleavage-regulatory intracellular-domain (ICD)-modifications of the precursors. We show here that cleavage-stimuli-induced specific ICD-modifications cause structural substrate changes that enhance ectodomain sensitivity of neuregulin-1 (NRG1; epidermal-growth-factor) or CD44 (receptor-tyrosine-kinase (RTK) co-receptor) to chymotrypsin/trypsin or soluble ADAM. This inside-out signal transfer required substrate homodimerization and was prevented by cleavage-inhibitory ICD-mutations. In chimeras, regulation could be conferred to a foreign ectodomain, suggesting a common higher-order structure. We predict that substrate-specific protease-accessibility-regulation controls release of numerous ADAM substrates. PMID:27876763

  17. Elongation factor 1-alpha is released into the culture medium during growth of Giardia intestinalis trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Skarin, Hanna; Ringqvist, Emma; Hellman, Ulf; Svärd, Staffan G

    2011-04-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of the intestinal parasite Giardia intestinalis is still not fully understood but excretory-secretory products have been suggested to be important during host-parasite interactions. Here we used SDS-PAGE gels and MALDI-TOF analysis to identify proteins released by Giardia trophozoites during in vitro growth. Serum proteins (mainly bovine serum albumin) in the growth medium, bind to the parasite surface and they are continuously released, which interfere with parasite secretome characterization. However, we identified two released Giardia proteins: elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1α) and a 58 kDa protein, identified as arginine deiminase (ADI). This is the first description of EF-1α as a released/secreted Giardia protein, whereas ADI has been identified in an earlier secretome study. Two genes encoding EF-1α were detected in the Giardia WB genome 35 kbp apart with almost identical coding sequences but with different promoter and 3' regions. Promoter luciferase-fusions showed that both genes are transcribed in trophozoites. The EF-1α protein localizes to the nuclear region in trophozoites but it relocalizes to the cytoplasm during host-cell interaction. Recombinant EF-1α is recognized by serum from giardiasis patients. Our results suggest that released EF-1α protein can be important during Giardia infections.

  18. Epidermal growth factor released in human dental pulp following orthodontic force.

    PubMed

    Derringer, Kathryn; Linden, Roger

    2007-02-01

    This study investigated the role of human epidermal growth factor (EGF) in the angiogenic response of the dental pulp to orthodontic force. The release of angiogenic growth factor EGF in human dental pulp following orthodontic force application was examined using neutralizing antibody anti-human (anti-h) EGF to block its effects. The dental pulps from 10 premolar teeth from 10 patients (equal numbers of males and females aged 11-14 years), treated with a straightwire fixed appliance for 2 weeks and extracted for orthodontic reasons, were divided vertically, and sections from each half-pulp were individually co-cultured with a section of rat aorta in collagen surrounded by growth media. Anti-h EGF was added to the media of the co-cultures from one-half of each pulp from each tooth from each patient; the remaining co-cultures from the other half of each pulp without anti-h EGF were used as the controls. Cultures were examined daily by light microscopy for angiogenic growth and number of microvessels. The addition of anti-h EGF to the growth media in the co-cultures resulted in a significant reduction (P < 0.05, Wilcoxon signed rank test) in pulpal and rat aorta microvessel numbers, compared with the control co-cultures. The results indicate that EGF released following orthodontic force application plays a part in the angiogenic response of the pulp.

  19. Dual growth factor releasing multi-functional nanofibers for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhiwei; Paras, Christian B; Weng, Hong; Punnakitikashem, Primana; Su, Lee-Chun; Vu, Khanh; Tang, Liping; Yang, Jian; Nguyen, Kytai T

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a dual growth factor-releasing nanoparticle-in-nanofiber system for wound healing applications. In order to mimic and promote the natural healing procedure, chitosan and poly(ethylene oxide) were electrospun into nanofibrous meshes as mimics of extracellular matrix. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was loaded within nanofibers to promote angiogenesis in the short term. In addition, platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) encapsulated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles were embedded inside nanofibers to generate a sustained release of PDGF-BB for accelerated tissue regeneration and remodeling. In vitro studies revealed that our nanofibrous composites delivered VEGF quickly and PDGF-BB in a relayed manner, supported fibroblast growth and exhibited anti-bacterial activities. A preliminary in vivo study performed on normal full thickness rat skin wound models demonstrated that nanofiber/nanoparticle scaffolds significantly accelerated the wound healing process by promoting angiogenesis, increasing re-epithelialization and controlling granulation tissue formation. For later stages of healing, evidence also showed quicker collagen deposition and earlier remodeling of the injured site to achieve a faster full regeneration of skin compared to the commercial Hydrofera Blue® wound dressing. These results suggest that our nanoparticle-in-nanofiber system could provide a promising treatment for normal and chronic wound healing.

  20. In vitro characterization of hepatocyte growth factor release from PHBV/PLGA microsphere scaffold.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xin Hao; Wang, Chi-Hwa; Tong, Yen Wah

    2009-05-01

    Polymer scaffolds which can support cells to grow as well as deliver growth factors to the cells simultaneously have great potential for the successful regeneration of failed tissues. As popularly used vehicles to deliver anti-cancer drugs and growth factors, microspheres also show many advantages as substrates to guide the growth of cells. Therefore, we aimed to examine the feasibility of using microspheres as ideal scaffolds for liver tissue engineering. To determine the capabilities of previously used microsphere scaffold to deliver growth factors simultaneously, this work investigated a long-term (about three months) release of bovine serum albumin (BSA) from microsphere scaffolds fabricated by using two different polymers, poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV, 8% PHV), poly(lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA, 5050) and a blend of PLGA and PHBV. BSA served as a model for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) since both proteins have similar molecular weights and hydrophilicity. Furthermore, HGF was encapsulated into the PLGA/PHBV composite microsphere with a core-shell structure, and sustained delivery of HGF with maintained bioactivity was achieved for at least 40 days. The moderate degradation rate (about 55% loss of the initial mass) and well-preserved structure after three months of incubation indicated that the PLGA/PHBV composite microspheres would therefore be more suitable than the pure PHBV or PLGA microspheres as a scaffold for engineering liver tissue.

  1. A novel collagen/platelet-rich plasma (COL/PRP) scaffold: preparation and growth factor release analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiujie; Wang, Jingwei; Ren, Mingguang; Li, Lifeng; Wang, Qingwen; Hou, Xiaohua

    2016-06-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been widely used in clinical practice for more than 20 years because it causes the release of many growth factors. However, the burst release pattern and short release period of PRP have become obstacles to its application. An optimal controllable release system is an urgent need for researchers. This study investigated whether collagen/PRP (COL/PRP) scaffolds can serve as a vehicle for the controllable release of growth factors. We fabricated a novel scaffold that integrates PRP activated by thrombin or collagen into type I collagen. The mechanical properties, cytotoxicity, and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) content were evaluated. Our results demonstrate that the COL/PRP scaffolds were not cytotoxic to L-929 fibroblasts. The PDGF and FGF content in the thrombin group was at a higher level and lasted for a long period of time. Collagen and thrombin played the same role in the release of TGF-β1 and VEGF. These data suggest that the novel COL/PRP scaffolds provide a carrier for the controllable release of growth factors and may be used in tissue- regenerative therapies.

  2. Effect of laser phototherapy on the release of fibroblast growth factors by human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Damante, Carla Andreotti; De Micheli, Giorgio; Miyagi, Sueli Patrícia Harumi; Feist, Ilíria Salomão; Marques, Márcia Martins

    2009-11-01

    The effects of laser phototherapy on the release of growth factors by human gingival fibroblasts were studied in vitro. Cells from a primary culture were irradiated twice (6 h interval), with continuous diode laser [gallium-aluminum-arsenium (GaAlAs), 780 nm, or indium-gallium-aluminum-phosphide (InGaAlP),_660 nm] in punctual and contact mode, 40 mW, spot size 0.042 cm(2), 3 J/cm(2) and 5 J/cm(2) (3 s and 5 s, respectively). Positive [10% fetal bovine serum (FBS)] and negative (1%FBS) controls were not irradiated. Production of keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The data were statistically compared by analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey's test (P release was similar in all groups, while that of bFGF was significantly greater (1.49-times) in groups treated with infra-red laser. It was concluded that increased production of bFGF could be one of the mechanisms by which infra-red laser stimulates wound healing.

  3. Injectable gelatin derivative hydrogels with sustained vascular endothelial growth factor release for induced angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhe; Qu, Tiejun; Ding, Chen; Ma, Chi; Sun, Hongchen; Li, Shirong; Liu, Xiaohua

    2014-01-01

    Injectable biomaterials are attractive for soft tissue regeneration because they are handled in a minimally invasive manner and can easily adapt to complex defects. However, inadequate vascularization of the injectable constructs has long been a barrier, leading to necrosis or volume reduction after implantation. In this work, we developed a three-step process to synthesize injectable gelatin-derived hydrogels that are capable of controlling growth factor delivery to induce angiogenesis. In our approach, tyramine was first introduced into gelatin chains to provide enzymatical crosslinking points for gel formation after injection. Next, heparin, a polysaccharide with binding domains to many growth factors, was covalently linked to the tyramine-modified gelatin. Finally, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was incorporated into the gelatin derivative by binding with the heparin in the gelatin derivative, and an injectable gel with controlled VEGF release was formed by an enzymatic catalytic reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The gelation time, mechanical properties and degradation of the gel was readily tailored by the gelatin concentration and the ratio of H2O2/HRP. Binding VEGF to heparin stabilizes this growth factor, protects it from denaturation and proteolytic degradation, and subsequently prolongs the sustained release. An in vitro release study and bioactivity assay indicated that the VEGF was released in a sustained manner with high bioactivity for over 3 weeks. Furthermore, a chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay and animal experiments were performed to evaluate in vivo bioactivity of the VEGF released from the hydrogels. After 5 days of incubation on CAM, the number of blood vessels surrounding the heparin-modified hydrogels was 2.4-fold increase than that of the control group. Deeper and denser cell infiltration and angiogenesis in the heparin-modified gelatin/VEGF gels were observed than in the controls

  4. Injectable gelatin derivative hydrogels with sustained vascular endothelial growth factor release for induced angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Qu, Tiejun; Ding, Chen; Ma, Chi; Sun, Hongchen; Li, Shirong; Liu, Xiaohua

    2015-02-01

    Injectable biomaterials are attractive for soft tissue regeneration because they are handled in a minimally invasive manner and can easily adapt to complex defects. However, inadequate vascularization of the injectable constructs has long been a barrier, leading to necrosis or volume reduction after implantation. In this work, we developed a three-step process to synthesize injectable gelatin-derived hydrogels that are capable of controlling growth factor delivery to induce angiogenesis. In our approach, tyramine was first introduced into gelatin chains to provide enzymatic crosslinking points for gel formation after injection. Next, heparin, a polysaccharide with binding domains to many growth factors, was covalently linked to the tyramine-modified gelatin. Finally, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was incorporated into the gelatin derivative by binding with the heparin in the gelatin derivative, and an injectable gel with controlled VEGF release was formed by an enzymatic catalytic reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The gelation time, mechanical properties and degradation of the gel was readily tailored by the gelatin concentration and the ratio of H2O2/HRP. Binding VEGF to heparin stabilizes this growth factor, protects it from denaturation and proteolytic degradation and subsequently prolongs the sustained release. An in vitro release study and bioactivity assay indicated that the VEGF was released in a sustained manner with high bioactivity for over 3 weeks. Furthermore, a chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay and animal experiments were performed to evaluate in vivo bioactivity of the VEGF released from the hydrogels. After 5 days of incubation on CAM, the number of blood vessels surrounding the heparin-modified hydrogels was increased by 2.4-fold compared with that of the control group. Deeper and denser cell infiltration and angiogenesis in the heparin-modified gelatin/VEGF gels were observed compared to

  5. Dual-stage growth factor release within 3D protein-engineered hydrogel niches promotes adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood-Goodwin, Midori; Teasley, Eric S.; Heilshorn, Sarah C.

    2014-01-01

    Engineered biomimetic microenvironments from hydrogels are an emerging strategy to achieve lineage-specific differentiation in vitro. In addition to recapitulating critical matrix cues found in the native three-dimensional (3D) niche, the hydrogel can also be designed to deliver soluble factors that are present within the native inductive microenvironment. We demonstrate a versatile materials approach for the dual-stage delivery of multiple soluble factors within a 3D hydrogel to induce adipogenesis. We use a Mixing-Induced Two-Component Hydrogel (MITCH) embedded with alginate microgels to deliver two pro-adipogenic soluble factors, fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF-1) and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) with two distinct delivery profiles. We show that dual-stage delivery of FGF-1 and BMP-4 to human adipose-derived stromal cells (hADSCs) significantly increases lipid accumulation compared with the simultaneous delivery of both growth factors together. Furthermore, dual-stage growth factor delivery within a 3D hydrogel resulted in substantially more lipid accumulation compared to identical delivery profiles in 2D cultures. Gene expression analysis shows upregulation of key adipogenic markers indicative of brown-like adipocytes. These data suggest that dual-stage release of FGF-1 and BMP-4 within 3D microenvironments can promote the in vitro development of mature adipocytes. PMID:25309741

  6. The Effect of Vitamin D Treatment On Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) Release From Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    GEZEN-AK, Duygu; DURSUN, Erdinç; YILMAZER, Selma

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Vitamin D, the main function of which is thought to be the maintenance of calcium and phosphate homeostasis and bone structure, has been shown in recent studies to have important roles in brain development as well. A certain vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene haplotype was reported, for the first time by our group, to increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Our studies also showed that vitamin D prevents beta amyloid-induced calcium elevation and toxicity that target nerve growth factor (NGF) release in cortical neurons; beta amyloid suppresses VDR expression and the disruption of vitamin D-VDR pathway mimics beta amyloid-induced neurodegeneration. In this study, our aim was to investigate the effects of vitamin D on the NGF release from hippocampal neurons. Method Primary hippocampal neuron cultures that were prepared from 18-day-old Sprague-Dawley rat embryos were treated with vitamin D for 48 hours. The alteration in the NGF release was determined with ELISA. Cytotoxicity tests were also performed for all groups. Results The NGF release in vitamin D-treated group was significantly higher than in untreated control group. The protective effect of vitamin D against cytotoxicity was also observed. Conclusion Our results indicated that vitamin D regulates the release of NGF, a very important molecule for neuronal survival of hippocampal neurons as well as cortical neurons.

  7. Synthesis of multilayered alginate microcapsules for the sustained release of fibroblast growth factor-1

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Omaditya; Moya, Monica L; Opara, Emmanuel C; Brey, Eric M

    2010-01-01

    Alginate microcapsules coated with a permselective poly-L-ornithine (PLO) membrane have been investigated for the encapsulation and transplantation of islets as a treatment for type 1 diabetes. The therapeutic potential of this approach could be improved through local stimulation of microvascular networks in order to meet mass transport demands of the encapsulated cells. Fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF-1) is a potent angiogenic factor with optimal effect occurring when it is delivered in a sustained manner. In this paper, a technique is described for the generation of multilayered alginate microcapsules with an outer alginate layer that can be used for the delivery of FGF-1. The influence of alginate concentration and composition (high mannuronic acid (M) or guluronic acid (G) content) on outer layer size and stability, protein encapsulation efficiency, and release kinetics was investigated. The technique results in a stable outer layer of alginate with a mean thickness between 113–164 µm, increasing with alginate concentration and G-content. The outer layer was able to encapsulate and release FGF-1 for up to thirty days, with 1.25% of high G alginate displaying the most sustained release. The released FGF-1 retained its biologic activity in the presence of heparin, and the addition of the outer layer did not alter the permselectivity of the PLO coat. This technique could be used to generate encapsulation systems that deliver proteins to stimulate local neovascularization around encapsulated islets. PMID:20725969

  8. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (P<0.01). A 50% increase in FGF-2 content versus control (P<0.01) was found in the pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment). Furthermore, a significant decrease in FGF-2 was detected in the cell lysate, indicating that FGF-2 was released from inside the cell. Cell permeability studies with fluorescent dextran were performed to examine whether transient membrane disruption caused FGF-2 release. Flow cytometry detected a 50% increase in mean fluorescence of cells exposed to 25 dyne/cm(2) versus control cells. This indicates that the observed FGF-2 release from human aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  9. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (P<0.01). A 50% increase in FGF-2 content versus control (P<0.01) was found in the pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment). Furthermore, a significant decrease in FGF-2 was detected in the cell lysate, indicating that FGF-2 was released from inside the cell. Cell permeability studies with fluorescent dextran were performed to examine whether transient membrane disruption caused FGF-2 release. Flow cytometry detected a 50% increase in mean fluorescence of cells exposed to 25 dyne/cm(2) versus control cells. This indicates that the observed FGF-2 release from human aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  10. Calcium-Alginate Hydrogel-Encapsulated Fibroblasts Provide Sustained Release of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Nicola C.; Shelton, Richard M.; Henderson, Deborah J.

    2013-01-01

    Vascularization of engineered or damaged tissues is essential to maintain cell viability and proper tissue function. Revascularization of the left ventricle (LV) of the heart after myocardial infarction is particularly important, since hypoxia can give rise to chronic heart failure due to inappropriate remodeling of the LV after death of cardiomyocytes (CMs). Fibroblasts can express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which plays a major role in angiogenesis and also acts as a chemoattractant and survival factor for CMs and cardiac progenitors. In this in vitro model study, mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts encapsulated in 2% w/v Ca-alginate were shown to remain viable for 150 days. Semiquantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that over 21 days of encapsulation, fibroblasts continued to express VEGF, while enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that there was sustained release of VEGF from the Ca-alginate during this period. The scaffold degraded gradually over the 21 days, without reduction in volume. Cells released from the Ca-alginate at 7 and 21 days as a result of scaffold degradation were shown to retain viability, to adhere to fibronectin in a normal manner, and continue to express VEGF, demonstrating their potential to further contribute to maintenance of cardiac function after scaffold degradation. This model in vitro study therefore demonstrates that fibroblasts encapsulated in Ca-alginate provide sustained release of VEGF. PMID:23082964

  11. Injectable Biodegradable Polyurethane Scaffolds with Release of Platelet-derived Growth Factor for Tissue Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hafeman, Andrea E.; Li, Bing; Yoshii, Toshitaka; Zienkiewicz, Katarzyna; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this work was to investigate the effects of triisocyanate composition on the biological and mechanical properties of biodegradable, injectable polyurethane scaffolds for bone and soft tissue engineering. Methods Scaffolds were synthesized using reactive liquid molding techniques, and were characterized in vivo in a rat subcutaneous model. Porosity, dynamic mechanical properties, degradation rate, and release of growth factors were also measured. Results Polyurethane scaffolds were elastomers with tunable damping properties and degradation rates, and they supported cellular infiltration and generation of new tissue. The scaffolds showed a two-stage release profile of platelet-derived growth factor, characterized by a 75% burst release within the first 24 h and slower release thereafter. Conclusions Biodegradable polyurethanes synthesized from triisocyanates exhibited tunable and superior mechanical properties compared to materials synthesized from lysine diisocyanates. Due to their injectability, biocompatibility, tunable degradation, and potential for release of growth factors, these materials are potentially promising therapies for tissue engineering. PMID:18516665

  12. Purification of a high-molecular-weight somatoliberin (growth-hormone-releasing factor) from pig hypothalami.

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, J E; Lowry, P J

    1983-01-01

    Preliminary observations [Sykes & Lowry (1980) J. Endocrinol. 85, 42P-43P] had suggested that the major hypothalamic somatoliberin (growth-hormone-releasing factor) was a larger peptide than the other characterized hypothalamic factors, with an elution position on Sephadex G-50 between those of neurophysin and corticotropin. The present paper reports the isolation and preliminary characterization of pig hypothalamic somatoliberin. Acid extracts of pig stalk median eminence were purified by gel filtration and preparative and analytical high-pressure liquid chromatography to yield a preparation that was specific in the release of somatotropin (growth hormone) in vitro, giving a steep dose--response curve at doses in the range 0.20-3.0 ng. Amino acid analysis revealed a non-cysteine-containing peptide with a high number of glutamate (or glutamine) and aspartate (or asparagine) residues. The peptide had about 56-57 amino acid residues and an apparent molecular weight of 6400, in keeping with its elution position on a column of Sephadex G-50. PMID:6409074

  13. In Situ Loading of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Within Porous Silica Nanoparticles for a Prolonged Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Postovit, Lynne-Marie; Wang, Dashan; Gardiner, Richard B.; Harris, Richard; Abdul, Mumin Md; Thomas, Anu Alice

    2009-11-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), a protein, plays a key role in wound healing and blood vessel regeneration. However, bFGF is easily degraded in biologic systems. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with well-tailored porous structure have been used for hosting guest molecules for drug delivery. Here, we report an in situ route to load bFGF in MSNs for a prolonged release. The average diameter ( d) of bFGF-loaded MSNs is 57 ± 8 nm produced by a water-in-oil microemulsion method. The in vitro releasing profile of bFGF from MSNs in phosphate buffer saline has been monitored for 20 days through a colorimetric enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The loading efficiency of bFGF in MSNs is estimated at 72.5 ± 3%. In addition, the cytotoxicity test indicates that the MSNs are not toxic, even at a concentration of 50 μg/mL. It is expected that the in situ loading method makes the MSNs a new delivery system to deliver protein drugs, e.g. growth factors, to help blood vessel regeneration and potentiate greater angiogenesis.

  14. Sustaining neovascularization of a scaffold through staged release of vascular endothelial growth factor-A and platelet-derived growth factor-BB.

    PubMed

    Davies, Neil H; Schmidt, Christian; Bezuidenhout, Deon; Zilla, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Tissue regeneration into a three-dimensional scaffold requires the stimulation of blood vessel ingrowth. We have employed a freely interconnecting porous scaffold developed by us to determine the utility of a covalently bound heparin surface coating for the delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) in vivo. The heparin surface was shown to release VEGF far more rapidly than PDGF-BB in vitro (VEGF: 75 ng/h for 24 h; PDGF-BB: 86 pg/h for >7 days). In rat subcutaneous implants, at 10 days the heparin surface alone increased vessel ingrowth substantially (p<0.05 vs. unmodified scaffold), release of VEGF resulted in a further increase (p<0.05 vs. heparinized scaffold), whereas PDGF-BB had no additional effect. The increase induced by the combination of growth factors was similar to VEGF alone. After 2 months, PDGF-BB, but not VEGF delivery, resulted in a substantial increase in vascularization above that induced by heparin (p<0.05). At the longer time point the combination of growth factors was similar to PDGF-BB. However, only the combination of growth factors significantly elevated the number of ingrowing arterioles (p<0.05 vs. heparinized scaffold). Thus, the covalent modification of a porous scaffold with heparin allows for the differential release of VEGF and PDGF-BB that results in both a rapid and sustained increase in scaffold vascularization.

  15. Effect of trehalose coating on basic fibroblast growth factor release from tailor-made bone implants.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungjin; Lee, Jongil; Igawa, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Shigeki; Mochizuki, Manabu; Nishimura, Ryohei; Chung, Ung-il; Sasaki, Nobuo

    2011-12-01

    Artificial bone implants are often incorporated with osteoinductive factors to facilitate early bone regeneration. Calcium phosphate, the main component in artificial bone implants, strongly binds these factors, and in a few cases, the incorporated proteins are not released from the implant under conditions of physiological pH, thereby leading to reduction in their osteoinductivity. In this study, we coated tailor-made bone implants with trehalose to facilitate the release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). In an in vitro study, mouse osteoblastic cells were separately cultured for 48 hr in a medium with a untreated implant (T-), trehalose-coated implant (T+), bFGF-incorporated implant (FT-), and bFGF-incorporated implant with trehalose coating (FT+). In the FT+ group, cell viability was significantly higher than that in the other groups (P<0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed that trehalose effectively covered the surface of the artificial bone implant without affecting the crystallinity or the mechanical strength of the artificial bone implant. These results suggest that coating artificial bone implants with trehalose could limit the binding of bFGF to calcium phosphate.

  16. Rapid release of growth factors regenerates force output in volumetric muscle loss injuries

    PubMed Central

    Grasman, Jonathan M.; Do, Duc M.; Page, Raymond L.; Pins, George D.

    2015-01-01

    A significant challenge in the design and development of biomaterial scaffolds is to incorporate mechanical and biochemical cues to direct organized tissue growth. In this study, we investigated the effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) loaded, crosslinked fibrin (EDCn-HGF) microthread scaffolds on skeletal muscle regeneration in a mouse model of volumetric muscle loss (VML). The rapid, sustained release of HGF significantly enhanced the force production of muscle tissue 60 days after injury, recovering more than 200% of the force output relative to measurements recorded immediately after injury. HGF delivery increased the number of differentiating myoblasts 14 days after injury, and supported an enhanced angiogenic response. The architectural morphology of microthread scaffolds supported the ingrowth of nascent myofibers into the wound site, in contrast to fibrin gel implants which did not support functional regeneration. Together, these data suggest that EDCn-HGF microthreads recapitulate several of the regenerative cues lost in VML injuries, promote remodeling of functional muscle tissue, and enhance the functional regeneration of skeletal muscle. Further, by strategically incorporating specific biochemical factors and precisely tuning the structural and mechanical properties of fibrin microthreads, we have developed a powerful platform technology that may enhance regeneration in other axially aligned tissues. PMID:26344363

  17. Basic fibroblast growth factor priming increases the responsiveness of immortalized hypothalamic luteinizing hormone releasing hormone neurones to neurotrophic factors.

    PubMed

    Gallo, F; Morale, M C; Tirolo, C; Testa, N; Farinella, Z; Avola, R; Beaudet, A; Marchetti, B

    2000-10-01

    The participation of growth factors (GFs) in the regulation of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) neuronal function has recently been proposed, but little is known about the role played by GFs during early LHRH neurone differentiation. In the present study, we have used combined biochemical and morphological approaches to study the ability of a number of GFs normally expressed during brain development, including basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), insulin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) to induce survival, differentiation, proliferation, and phenotypic expression of immortalized (GT1-1) LHRH neurones in vitro, at early (3-days in vitro, 3-DIV) and late (8-DIV) stages of neuronal differentiation. Comparison of GF-treated vs untreated neurones grown in serum-deprived (SD) medium demonstrated bFGF to be the most potent, and insulin the least active in promoting neuronal differentiation. Thus, at both 3-DIV and 8-DIV, but especially at 8-DIV, bFGF induced the greatest increase in the total length and number of LHRH processes/cell and in growth cone surface area. bFGF was also the most active at 3-DIV, and IGF-I at 8-DIV, in counteracting SD-induced cell death, whereas EGF was the most potent in increasing [3H]thymidine incorporation. All GFs studied decreased the spontaneous release of LHRH from GT1-1 cells when applied at 3-DIV or 8-DIV, except for insulin which was inactive at both time-points and bFGF which was inactive at 8-DIV. Pre-treatment of GT1-1 cells with a suboptimal ('priming') dose of bFGF for 12 h followed by application of the different GFs induced a sharp potentiation of the neurotrophic and proliferative effects of the latter and particularly of those of IGF-I. Moreover, bFGF priming counteracted EGF-induced decrease in LHRH release and significantly stimulated LHRH secretion following IGF-I or insulin application, suggesting that bFGF may sensitize LHRH neurones to differentiating effects of

  18. In situ injury-induced release of basic-fibroblast growth factor from corneal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Adamis, A. P.; Meklir, B.; Joyce, N. C.

    1991-01-01

    Basic-fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF) binds to heparan sulfate proteoglycan in Bowman's layer of the cornea. The mechanism by which the molecule is deposited in Bowman's layer is the subject of controversy since b-FGF lacks a signal peptide sequence for extracellular secretion. Using immunofluorescence, the authors studied the presence and distribution of b-FGF in the bovine cornea and the conditions under which it could be released and bound to Bowman's layer. The results indicate that corneal epithelium contains b-FGF but that uninjured corneas do not contain detectable levels of b-FGF in Bowman's layer. Injury to the corneal epithelium results in the binding of b-FGF to Bowman's layer. Removal of the intact corneal epithelium without cell injury does not result in the binding of b-FGF to Bowman's layer. These findings suggest that one mechanism for the release of b-FGF from corneal epithelial cells is passive leakage after cell injury with secondary binding to Bowman's layer. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1951634

  19. Bradykinin modulates spontaneous nerve growth factor production and stretch-induced ATP release in human urothelium.

    PubMed

    Ochodnický, Peter; Michel, Martina B; Butter, Jan J; Seth, Jai; Panicker, Jalesh N; Michel, Martin C

    2013-04-01

    The urothelium plays a crucial role in integrating urinary bladder sensory outputs, responding to mechanical stress and chemical stimulation by producing several diffusible mediators, including ATP and, possibly, neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF). Such urothelial mediators activate underlying afferents and thus may contribute to normal bladder sensation and possibly to the development of bladder overactivity. The muscle-contracting and pain-inducing peptide bradykinin is produced in various inflammatory and non-inflammatory pathologies associated with bladder overactivity, but the effect of bradykinin on human urothelial function has not yet been characterized. The human urothelial cell line UROtsa expresses mRNA for both B1 and B2 subtypes of bradykinin receptors, as determined by real-time PCR. Bradykinin concentration-dependently (pEC50=8.3, Emax 4434±277nM) increased urothelial intracellular calcium levels and induced phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) ERK1/2. Activation of both bradykinin-induced signaling pathways was completely abolished by the B2 antagonist icatibant (1μM), but not the B1 antagonist R715 (1μM). Bradykinin-induced (100nM) B2 receptor activation markedly increased (192±13% of control levels) stretch-induced ATP release from UROtsa in hypotonic medium, the effect being dependent on intracellular calcium elevations. UROtsa cells also expressed mRNA and protein for NGF and spontaneously released NGF to the medium in the course of hours (11.5±1.4pgNGF/mgprotein/h). Bradykinin increased NGF mRNA expression and accelerated urothelial NGF release to 127±5% in a protein kinase C- and ERK1/2-dependent manner. Finally, bradykinin up-regulated mRNA for transient-receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV1) sensory ion channel in UROtsa. In conclusion, we show that bradykinin represents a versatile modulator of human urothelial phenotype, accelerating stretch-induced ATP release, spontaneous release of NGF, as well as

  20. Tailored design of electrospun composite nanofibers with staged release of multiple angiogenic growth factors for chronic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Lai, Huan-Ju; Kuan, Chen-Hsiang; Wu, Hsi-Chin; Tsai, Jui-Che; Chen, Tim-Mo; Hsieh, Dar-Jen; Wang, Tzu-Wei

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this research study is to develop a collagen (Col) and hyaluronic acid (HA) inter-stacking nanofibrous skin equivalent substitute with the programmable release of multiple angiogenic growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and endothelial growth factor (EGF)) either directly embedded in the nanofibers or encapsulated in the gelatin nanoparticles (GNs) by electrospinning technology. The delivery of EGF and bFGF in the early stage is expected to accelerate epithelialization and vasculature sprouting, while the release of PDGF and VEGF in the late stage is with the aim of inducing blood vessels maturation. The physiochemical characterizations indicate that the Col-HA-GN nanofibrous membrane possesses mechanical properties similar to human native skin. The design of a particle-in-fiber structure allows growth factors for slow controlled release up to 1month. Cultured on biodegradable Col-HA membrane with four kinds of growth factors (Col-HA w/4GF), endothelial cells not only increase in growth rate but also form a better network with a thread-like tubular structure. The therapeutic effect of Col-HA w/4GF membrane on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats reveals an accelerated wound closure rate, together with elevated collagen deposition and enhanced maturation of vessels, as revealed by Masson's trichrome stain and immunohistochemical analysis, respectively. From the above, the electrospun Col-HA-GN composite nanofibrous skin substitute with a stage-wise release pattern of multiple angiogenic factors could be a promising bioengineered construct for chronic wound healing in skin tissue regeneration.

  1. Enhanced skin wound healing by a sustained release of growth factors contained in platelet-rich plasma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hee Seok; Shin, Jaehoon; Bhang, Suk Ho; Shin, Jung Youn; Park, Jooyeon; Im, Gun Il; Kim, Chang Sung; Kim, Byung Soo

    2011-11-30

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contains growth factors that promote tissue regeneration. Previously, we showed that heparin-conjugated fibrin (HCF) exerts the sustained release of growth factors with affinity for heparin. Here, we hypothesize that treatment of skin wound with a mixture of PRP and HCF exerts sustained release of several growth factors contained in PRP and promotes skin wound healing. The release of fibroblast growth factor 2, platelet-derived growth factor-BB, and vascular endothelial growth factor contained in PRP from HCF was sustained for a longer period than those from PRP, calcium-activated PRP (C-PRP), or a mixture of fibrin and PRP (F-PRP). Treatment of full-thickness skin wounds in mice with HCF-PRP resulted in much faster wound closure as well as dermal and epidermal regeneration at day 12 compared to treatment with either C-PRP or F-PRP. Enhanced skin regeneration observed in HCF-PRP group may have been at least partially due to enhanced angiogenesis in the wound beds. Therefore, this method could be useful for skin wound treatment.

  2. Neuroprotection elicited by nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor released from astrocytes in response to methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Takuya; Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Yamazaki, Takeshi

    2015-07-01

    The protective roles of astrocytes in neurotoxicity induced by environmental chemicals, such as methylmercury (MeHg), are largely unknown. We found that conditioned medium of MeHg-treated astrocytes (MCM) attenuated neuronal cell death induced by MeHg, suggesting that astrocytes-released factors can protect neuronal cells. The increased expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was observed in MeHg-treated astrocytes. NGF and BDNF were detected in culture media as homodimers, which are able to bind specific tyrosine kinase receptors, tropomyosin related kinase (Trk) A and TrkB, respectively. The TrkA antagonist and TrkB antagonist abolished the protective effects of MCM in neuronal cell death induced by MeHg. Taken together, astrocytes synthesize and release NGF and BDNF in response to MeHg to protect neurons from MeHg toxicity. This study is considered to show a novel defense mechanism against MeHg-induced neurotoxicity.

  3. The portal-drained viscera release fibroblast growth factor 19 in humans.

    PubMed

    Koelfat, Kiran V K; Bloemen, Johanne G; Jansen, Peter L M; Dejong, Cornelis H C; Schaap, Frank G; Olde Damink, Steven W M

    2016-12-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is an ileum-derived endrocrine factor that is produced in response to transepithelial bile salt flux. FGF19 represses bile salt synthesis in the liver. Despite the general assumption that FGF19 signals to the liver via portal blood, no human data are available to support this notion. The aim was to study portal FGF19 levels, and determined bile salt and FGF19 fluxes across visceral organs in humans. Bile salt and FGF19 levels were assessed in arterial, portal, and hepatic venous blood collected from fasted patients who underwent partial liver resection for colorectal liver metastases (n = 30). Fluxes across the portal-drained viscera (PDV), liver, and splanchnic area were calculated. Portal bile salt levels (7.8 [5.0-12.4] μmol/L) were higher than levels in arterial (2.7 [1.7-5.5] μmol/L, P < 0.0001) and hepatic venous blood (3.4 [2.5-6.5] μmol/L, P < 0.0001). Bile salts released by the PDV (+1.2 [+0.7-+2.0] mmol kg(-1) h(-1), P < 0.0001) were largely taken up by the liver (-1.0 [-1.8 to -0.4] mmol kg(-1) h(-1), P < 0.0001). Portal levels of FGF19 (161 ± 78 pg/mL) were higher than arterial levels (135 ± 65 pg/mL, P = 0.046). A net release of FGF19 by the PDV (+4.0 [+2.1 to +9.9] ng kg(-1) h(-1), P < 0.0001) was calculated. There was no significant flux of FGF19 across the liver (-0.2 [-3.7 to +7.4] ng kg(-1) h(-1), P = 0.93). In conclusion, FGF19 levels in human portal blood are higher than in arterial blood. FGF19 is released by the portal-drained viscera under fasted steady state conditions.

  4. Detecting transforming growth factorrelease from liver cells using an aptasensor integrated with microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Matharu, Zimple; Patel, Dipali; Gao, Yandong; Haque, Amranul; Zhou, Qing; Revzin, Alexander

    2014-09-02

    We developed a cell-culture/biosensor platform consisting of aptamer-modified Au electrodes integrated with reconfigurable microfluidics for monitoring of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1), an important inflammatory and pro-fibrotic cytokine. Aptamers were thiolated, labeled with redox reporters, and self-assembled on gold surfaces. The biosensor was determined to be specific for TGF-β1 with an experimental detection limit of 1 ng/mL and linear range extending to 250 ng/mL. Upon determining figures of merit, aptasensor was miniaturized and integrated with human hepatic stellate cells inside microfluidic devices. Reconfigurable microfluidics were developed to ensure that seeding of "sticky" stromal cells did not foul the electrode and compromise sensor performance. This microsystem with integrated aptasensors was used to monitor TGF-β1 release from activated stellate cells over the course of 20 h. The electrochemical response went down upon infusing anti-TGF-β1 antibodies into the microfluidic devices containing activated stellate cells. To further validate aptasensor responses, stellate cells were stained for markers of activation (e.g., alpha smooth muscle actin) and were also tested for presence of TGF-β1 using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Given the importance of TGF-β1 as a fibrogenic signal, a microsystem with integrated biosensors for local and continuous detection of TGF-β1 may prove to be an important tool to study fibrosis of the liver and other organs.

  5. Structural study of human growth hormone-releasing factor fragment (1?29) by vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, P.; Molina, M.; Lasagabaster, A.

    1995-05-01

    The conformational structure of fragment 1-29 of human growth hormone releasing factor, hGHRF (1-29), in aqueous solution and in the solid state is investigated by infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The polypeptide backbone is found to be unordered in the solid state. However, the spectra of the peptide prepared as 5% (w/w) aqueous solutions show that approximately 28% of the peptide is involved in intermolecular β-sheet aggregation. The remainder of the peptide exists largely as disordered and β-sheet conformations with a small portion of α-helices. Tyrosine residues are found to be exposed to the solvent. The secondary structures are quantitatively examined through infrared spectroscopy, the conformational percentages being near those obtained by HONDAet al. [ Biopolymers31, 869 (1991)] using circular dichroism. The fast hydrogen/deuterium exchange in peptide groups and the absence of any NMR sign indicative of ordered structure [ G. M. CLOREet al., J. Molec. Biol.191, 553 (1986)] support that the solution conformations of the non-aggregated peptide interconvert in dynamic equilibrium. Some physiological advantages that may derive from this conformational flexibility are also discussed

  6. Spectroscopic studies on the conformational transitions of a bovine growth hormone releasing factor analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarver, Ronald W.; Friedman, Alan R.; Thamann, Thomas J.

    1997-10-01

    The secondary structure of the bovine growth hormone releasing factor analog, [Ile 2, Ser 8,28, Ala 15, Leu 27, Hse 30] bGRF(1-30)-NH-Ethyl, acetate salt (U-90699F) was studied in solution by Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopies. Spectroscopic studies revealed that concentrated aqueous solutions of U-90699F (100 mg ml -1) undergo a secondary structure transition from disordered coil/α-helix to intermolecular β-sheet. Disordered coil and α-helical structure were grouped together in the infrared and Raman studies since the amide I vibrations are close in frequency and overlap in assignments was possible. Before the conformational transition, the facile exchange of the peptide's amide hydrogens for deuterium indicated that the majority of amide hydrogens were readily accessible to solvent. The kinetics of the conformational transition coincided with an increase in solution viscosity and turbidity. An initiation phase preceded the conformational transition during which only minor spectral changes were observed by infrared spectroscopy. The initiation phase and reaction kinetics were consistent with a highly cooperative nucleation ultimately leading to a network of intermolecular β-sheet structure and gel formation. Increased temperature accelerated the conformational transition. The conformational transition was thermally irreversible but the β-sheet structure of aggregated or gelled peptide could be disrupted by dilution and agitation.

  7. Platelet-rich plasma stimulated by pulse electric fields: Platelet activation, procoagulant markers, growth factor release and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, A L; Torres, A S; Caiafa, A; Morton, C A; Berny-Lang, M A; Gerrits, A J; Carmichael, S L; Neculaes, V B; Michelson, A D

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic use of activated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been explored for wound healing, hemostasis and antimicrobial wound applications. Pulse electric field (PEF) stimulation may provide more consistent platelet activation and avoid complications associated with the addition of bovine thrombin, the current state of the art ex vivo activator of therapeutic PRP. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of PEF, bovine thrombin and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) to activate human PRP, release growth factors and induce cell proliferation in vitro. Human PRP was prepared in the Harvest SmartPreP2 System and treated with vehicle, PEF, bovine thrombin, TRAP or Triton X-100. Platelet activation and procoagulant markers and microparticle generation were measured by flow cytometry. Released growth factors were measured by ELISA. The releasates were tested for their ability to stimulate proliferation of human epithelial cells in culture. PEF produced more platelet-derived microparticles, P-selectin-positive particles and procoagulant annexin V-positive particles than bovine thrombin or TRAP. These differences were associated with higher levels of released epidermal growth factor after PEF than after bovine thrombin or TRAP but similar levels of platelet-derived, vascular-endothelial, and basic fibroblast growth factors, and platelet factor 4. Supernatant from PEF-treated platelets significantly increased cell proliferation compared to plasma. In conclusion, PEF treatment of fresh PRP results in generation of microparticles, exposure of prothrombotic platelet surfaces, differential release of growth factors compared to bovine thrombin and TRAP and significant cell proliferation. These results, together with PEF's inherent advantages, suggest that PEF may be a superior alternative to bovine thrombin activation of PRP for therapeutic applications.

  8. Effect of centrifugation time on growth factor and MMP release of an experimental platelet-rich fibrin-type product.

    PubMed

    Eren, Gülnihal; Gürkan, Ali; Atmaca, Harika; Dönmez, Ayhan; Atilla, Gül

    2016-07-01

    Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) has a controlled release of growth factors due to the fibrin matrix structure. Different centrifugation protocols were suggested for PRF preparation. Since the derivation method of PRF can alter its contents, in the present study it is aimed to investigate the cell contents and transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-AB), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and-8 release from experimental PRF-type membranes obtained with different centrifugation times at 400 gravity. Three blood samples were collected from 20 healthy non-smoker volunteers. One tube was used for whole blood analyses. The other two tubes were centrifuged at 400 g for 10 minutes (group A) or 12 minutes (group B). Each experimental PRF-type membrane was placed in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM)and at 1, 24 and 72 hours, TGF-β1, PDGF-AB, VEGF, MMP-1 and -8 release amounts were analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The blood cell count of membranes was determined by subtracting plasma supernatant and red blood cell (RBC) mixture from the whole blood cell counts. At 72 hours, the VEGF level of group B was statistically higher than that of group A (p = 0.040). The centrifugation time was not found to influence the release of other growth factors, enzymes and cell counts. Within the limits of the present study, it might be suggested that centrifugation time at a constant gravity has a significant effect on the VEGF levels released from experimental PRF-type membrane. It can be concluded that due to the importance of VEGF in the tissue healing process, membranes obtained at 12-minute centrifugation time may show a superior potential in wound healing.

  9. Influence of calcium salts and bovine thrombin on growth factor release from equine platelet-rich gel supernatants.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, Carlos E; Álvarez, María E; Carmona, Jorge U

    2017-01-16

    To compare five activation methods in equine platelet-rich plasma (PRP) by determination of platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) concentrations in platelet-rich gel (PRG) supernatants. Platelet-rich plasma from 20 horses was activated by calcium chloride (CC), calcium gluconate (CG), bovine thrombin (BT), and their combinations, BTCC and BTCG. Both growth factor concentrations in PRG supernatants were measured by ELISA and compared with plasma and platelet lysates (PL) over time. Growth factor concentrations were significantly lower in plasma and higher for all PRG supernatants. Platelet lysates contained a significantly lower concentration of PDGF-BB than PRG supernatants and a significantly higher concentration of TGF-β1 than PRG supernatants. Clots from PRP activated with sodium salts were more stable over time and had significant growth factor release, whereas CC produced gross salt deposition. Significant correlations were noticed for platelet with leukocyte concentrations in PRP (rs: 0.76), platelet counts in PRP with TGF-β1 concentrations in PRG supernatants (rs: 0.86), platelet counts in PRP with PDGF-BB concentrations in PRG supernatants (rs: 0.78), leukocyte counts in PRP with TGF-β1 concentrations in PRG supernatants (rs: 0.76), and PDGF-BB concentrations with activating substances (rs: 0.72). Calcium gluconate was the better substance to induce PRP activation. It induced growth factor release free from calcium precipitates in the clots. Use of BT alone or combined with calcium salts was not advantageous for growth factor release.

  10. Conformational origin of a difficult coupling in a human growth hormone releasing factor analog.

    PubMed

    Deber, C M; Lutek, M K; Heimer, E P; Felix, A M

    1989-01-01

    During the solid-phase synthesis of the human growth hormone releasing factor (GRF) analog [Ala15, Leu27, Asn28] -GRF(1-32)-OH, incorporation of Boc-Gln16 was determined to be incomplete. While aggregation of growing resin-bound peptide chains with concomitant beta-sheet formation and "precipitation" has been proposed to account in general for such "difficult coupling," no feature of sequence in the Gln16 region of this GRF analog provided an immediate rationale for this result. We now report 500 MHz 1H NMR spectra of a series of resin-bound GRF segments surrounding the Gln16 position (19-32 through 14-32), swelled in dimethylsulfoxide-d6 solutions [GRF(14-32) = Leu14-Ala-Gln-Leu-Ser(Bzl)-Ala-Arg(Tos)-Lys(CIZ)-Leu- Leu-Gln-Asp(OcHex)-Ile-Leu-Asn-Arg(Tos)-Gln-Gln-Gly32-PAM resin]. While relatively sharp spectra are observed for GRF(19-32), components with resonances broadened by an order-of-magnitude appear in spectra of the 18-32 and 17-32 peptide-resin, and the entire spectrum of 16-32 is ill-resolved and highly broadened. Subsequent spectra sharpen again (15-32, 14-32). These combined synthesis/spectroscopic experimental results, in conjunction with predictive analyses using standard Chou-Fasman 2 degrees structure parameters, suggest that the completeness of the Gln16 coupling is hindered by formation of a specific, folded beta-sheet/beta-turn structure in GRF(16-32) (with the turn located at 18-21, "upstream" of the difficult coupling site), and accompanying aggregation of peptide chains. This analysis suggests that awareness of such potential beta-sheet/beta-turn sequences can guide analog choices, and/or facilitate pre-programming of synthesis steps in anticipation of problem couplings.

  11. Tenocytes of chronic rotator cuff tendon tears can be stimulated by platelet-released growth factors.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Sven; Alini, Mauro; Benneker, Lorin M; Milz, Stefan; Boileau, Pascal; Zumstein, Matthias A

    2013-03-01

    Bone-to-tendon healing after rotator cuff repairs is mainly impaired by poor tissue quality. The tenocytes of chronic rotator cuff tendon tears are not able to synthesize normal fibrocartilaginous extracellular matrix (ECM). We hypothesized that in the presence of platelet-released growth factors (PRGF), tenocytes from chronically retracted rotator cuff tendons proliferate and synthesize the appropriate ECM proteins. Tenocytes from 8 patients with chronic rotator cuff tears were cultured for 4 weeks in 2 different media: standard medium (Iscove's Modified Dulbecco's Media + 10% fetal calf serum + 1% nonessential amino acids + 0.5 μg/mL ascorbic acid) and media with an additional 10% PRGF. Cell proliferation was assessed at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. Messenger (m)RNA levels of collagens I, II, and X, decorin, biglycan, and aggrecan were analyzed using real time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Immunocytochemistry was also performed. The proliferation rate of tenocytes was significantly higher at all time points when cultured with PRGF. At 21 days, the mRNA levels for collagens I, II, and X, decorin, aggrecan, and biglycan were significantly higher in the PRGF group. The mRNA data were confirmed at protein level by immunocytochemistry. PRGFs enhance tenocyte proliferation in vitro and promote synthesis of ECM to levels similar to those found with insertion of the normal human rotator cuffs. Biologic augmentation of repaired rotator cuffs with PRGF may enhance the properties of the repair tissue. However, further studies are needed to determine if application of PRGF remains safe and effective in long-term clinical studies. Basic Science Study, Cell Biology. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Neuroprotective effect of epidermal growth factor plus growth hormone-releasing peptide-6 resembles hypothermia in experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Subirós, N; Pérez-Saad, H; Aldana, L; Gibson, C L; Borgnakke, W S; Garcia-Del-Barco, D

    2016-11-01

    Combined therapy with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and growth hormone-releasing peptide 6 (GHRP-6) in stroke models has accumulated evidence of neuroprotective effects from several studies, but needs further support before clinical translation. Comparing EGF + GHRP-6 to hypothermia, a gold neuroprotection standard, may contribute to this purpose. The aims of this study were to compare the neuroprotective effects of a combined therapy based on EGF + GHRP-6 with hypothermia in animal models of (a) global ischemia representing myocardial infarction and (b) focal brain ischemia representing ischemic stroke. (a) Global ischemia was induced in Mongolian gerbils by a 15-min occlusion of both carotid arteries, followed by reperfusion. (b) Focal brain ischemia was achieved by intracerebral injection of endothelin 1 in Wistar rats. In each experiment, three ischemic treatment groups - vehicle, EGF + GHRP-6, and hypothermia - were compared to each other and to a sham-operated control group. End points were survival, neurological scores, and infarct volume. (a) In global ischemia, neurological score at 48-72 h, infarct volume, and neuronal density of hippocampal CA1 zone in gerbils treated with EGF + GHRP-6 were similar to the hypothermia-treated group. (b) In focal ischemia, the neurologic score and infarct volume of rats receiving EGF + GHRP-6 were also similar to animals in the hypothermia group. With hypothermia being a good standard neuroprotectant reference, these results provide additional proof of principle for EGF and GHRP-6 co-administration as a potentially neuroprotective stroke therapy.

  13. Prospects of chitosan-based scaffolds for growth factor release in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sivashankari, P R; Prabaharan, M

    2016-12-01

    Tissue engineering is concerned about the rejuvenation and restoration of diseased and damages tissues/organs using man-made scaffolds that mimic the native environment of the cells. In recent years, a variety of biocompatible and biodegradable natural materials is employed for the fabrication of such scaffolds. Of these natural materials, chitosan is the most preferred one as it imitates the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the cells. Moreover, chitosan-based materials are pro-angiogenic and have antibacterial activity. These materials can be easily fabricated into the desired shape of the scaffolds that are suitable for tissue support and regeneration. Growth factors are small proteins/peptides that support and enhance the growth and differentiation of cells into a specific lineage. It has been observed that scaffolds capable of delivering growth factor promote tissue repair and regeneration at a faster rate when compared to scaffolds without growth factor. The present review focuses on the recent developments on chitosan-based scaffolds for the delivery of growth factors thereby improving and enhancing tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Activity-dependent release of precursor nerve growth factor, conversion to mature nerve growth factor, and its degradation by a protease cascade.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Martin A; Cuello, A Claudio

    2006-04-25

    In this report, we provide direct demonstration that the neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF) is released in the extracellular space in an activity-dependent manner in its precursor form (proNGF) and that it is in this compartment that its maturation and degradation takes place because of the coordinated release and the action of proenzymes and enzyme regulators. This converting protease cascade and its endogenous regulators (including tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen, neuroserpin, precursor matrix metalloproteinase 9, and tissue inhibitor metalloproteinase 1) are colocalized in neurons of the cerebral cortex and released upon neuronal stimulation. We also provide evidence that this mechanism operates in in vivo conditions, as the CNS application of inhibitors of converting and degrading enzymes lead to dramatic alterations in the tissue levels of either precursor NGF or mature NGF. Pathological alterations of this cascade in the CNS might cause or contribute to a lack of proper neuronal trophic support in conditions such as cerebral ischemia, seizure and Alzheimer's disease or, conversely, to excessive local production of neurotrophins as reported in inflammatory arthritis pain.

  15. Activity-dependent release of precursor nerve growth factor, conversion to mature nerve growth factor, and its degradation by a protease cascade

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Martin A.; Cuello, A. Claudio

    2006-01-01

    In this report, we provide direct demonstration that the neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF) is released in the extracellular space in an activity-dependent manner in its precursor form (proNGF) and that it is in this compartment that its maturation and degradation takes place because of the coordinated release and the action of proenzymes and enzyme regulators. This converting protease cascade and its endogenous regulators (including tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen, neuroserpin, precursor matrix metalloproteinase 9, and tissue inhibitor metalloproteinase 1) are colocalized in neurons of the cerebral cortex and released upon neuronal stimulation. We also provide evidence that this mechanism operates in in vivo conditions, as the CNS application of inhibitors of converting and degrading enzymes lead to dramatic alterations in the tissue levels of either precursor NGF or mature NGF. Pathological alterations of this cascade in the CNS might cause or contribute to a lack of proper neuronal trophic support in conditions such as cerebral ischemia, seizure and Alzheimer’s disease or, conversely, to excessive local production of neurotrophins as reported in inflammatory arthritis pain. PMID:16618925

  16. The characterization of protein release from sericin film in the presence of an enzyme: towards fibroblast growth factor-2 delivery.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Ayumu; Naganuma, Tsuyoshi; Kanazawa, Takanori; Takashima, Yuuki; Yamada, Masaki; Okada, Hiroaki

    2011-07-29

    Aqueous preparations of silk protein (sericin) films were prepared to evaluate their biodegradation properties. In the absence of trypsin, sericin film swelled rapidly, kept its shape, and remained unaltered for 28 days or longer due to form β-sheet structures. In the presence of trypsin, sericin film gradually degraded; since the rate depended on the concentration of trypsin, the films likely underwent enzymatic hydrolysis. Sericin film incorporating the model protein drug fluorescein isothiocyanate-albumin (FA) also gradually degraded in the presence of trypsin and resulted in the sustained release of FA for 2 weeks or longer; in contrast, FA release was quite slow in the absence of trypsin. It is expected that sericin film has potential as a biodegradable and drug-releasing carrier. To evaluate the practical applicability of sericin film for the repair of defective tissues, fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) was incorporated into sericin films and the films were implanted on skull defects in rats. Whereas FGF-2 release was suppressed in the absence of trypsin in vitro, it appears that FGF-2, immobilized by ionic interactions between sericin and FGF-2, can be sustained-released in vivo from films incorporating 2500 or 250 ng of FGF-2 to support the growth of tissue around wounds.

  17. Biodegradable-co-bioresponsive Hydrogels for Controlled Release of Growth Factor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The systems are three-dimensional crosslinked copolymers composed of a thermo...multi-functional hydrogels systems with thermo-responsive and biodegradable properties. The novel hydrogels are crosslinked copolymers composed of...N,N’-methylene-bis- acrylamide as a crosslinker, and N,N,N,N’-tetramethylethylenediamine as an accele- rator. Their compositions are summarized in

  18. Synergistic effect of sustained release of growth factors and dynamic culture on osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Della Porta, Giovanna; Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc B; Campardelli, R; Reverchon, Ernesto; Fisher, John P

    2015-06-01

    Microparticles have been utilized as delivery vehicles of soluble factors to modify cellular behavior and therefore enhance tissue engineering regeneration. When incorporated into three-dimensional systems, microparticles can provide geometrical and temporal controlled release of bioactive agents, such as growth factors (GFs) to surrounding cells. This study investigates the effect of GFs release from biopolymer microparticles on osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) encapsulated in calcium (Ca)-alginate scaffolds while cultured in a tubular perfusion system bioreactor system. Empirical and deterministic models were used to demonstrate that poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)-encapsulated GFs would result in a delayed release profile compared to GFs encapsulated into scaffolds directly. We hypothesized that the dual delivery of human bone-morphogenetic protein 2 (hBMP2) and human vascular endothelial growth factor to cells in dynamic culture would provide molecular and physical cues to promote differentiation. Results indicated that the exposures of hBMP2 and dynamic flow are sufficient in enhancing the osteoblastic differentiation pathway compared to no GF addition and static culture. The GF delivery system in a dynamic flow environment resulted in a synergistic effect on osteoblastic differentiation of hMSCs.

  19. Release of growth factors after mechanical and chemical pleurodesis for treatment of malignant pleural effusion: a randomized control study

    PubMed Central

    Hojski, Aljaz; Leitgeb, Maja; Crnjac, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Background Growth factors are key inducers of fibrosis but can also mediate inflammatory responses resulting in increasing pleural effusion and acute respiratory distress syndrome. The primary aim of the study was to analyse growth factors release after performing chemical and mechanical pleurodesis in the first 48 hours at the patients with malignant pleural effusion. The secondary endpoints were to evaluate the effectiveness of the both pleurodeses, symptoms release and the quality of life of patients after the treatment. Patients and methods. A prospective randomized study included 36 consecutive female patients with breast carcinoma and malignant pleural effusion in an intention-to-treat analysis. We treated 18 patients by means of thoracoscopic mechanical pleurodesis and 18 patients by chemical pleurodesis with talcum applied over a chest tube. We gathered the pleural fluid and serum samples in the following 48 hours under a dedicated protocol and tested them for growth factors levels. A quality of life and visual analogue pain score surveys were also performed. Results Median measured serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) level after chemical pleurodesis was 930.68 pg/ml (95% CI: 388.22–4656.65) and after mechanical pleurodesis 808.54 pg/ml. (95% CI: 463.20-1235.13) (p = 0.103). Median pleural levels of transforming growth factor (TGF) β1 were higher after performing mechanical pleurodesis (4814.00 pg/ml [95% CI: 2726.51–7292.94]) when compared to those after performing chemical pleurodesis (1976.50 pg/ml [95% CI: 1659.82–5136.26]) (p = 0.078). We observed similar results for fibroblast growth factor (FGF) β; the serum level was higher after mechanical pleurodesis (30.45 pg/ml [95% CI: 20.40–59.42]), compared to those after chemical pleurodesis (13.39 pg/ml [95% CI: 5.04 – 74.60]) (p = 0.076). Mechanical pleurodesis was equally effective as chemical pleurodesis in terms of hospital stay, pleural effusion re-accumulation, requiring of

  20. Efficacy of engineered FVIII-producing skeletal muscle enhanced by growth factor-releasing co-axial electrospun fibers.

    PubMed

    Liao, I-Chien; Leong, Kam W

    2011-02-01

    Co-axial electrospun fibers can offer both topographical and biochemical cues for tissue engineering applications. In this study, we demonstrate the sustained treatment of hemophilia through a non-viral, tissue engineering approach facilitated by growth factor-releasing co-axial electrospun fibers. FVIII-producing skeletal myotubes were first engineered on aligned electrospun fibers in vitro, followed by implantation in hemophilic mice with or without a layer of core-shell electrospun fibers designed to provide sustained delivery of angiogenic or lymphangiogenic growth factors, which serves to stimulate the lymphatic or vascular systems to enhance the FVIII transport from the implant site into systemic circulation. Upon subcutaneous implantation into hemophilic mice, the construct seamlessly integrated with the host tissue within one month, and specifically induced either vascular or lymphatic network infiltration in accordance with the growth factors released from the electrospun fibers. Engineered constructs that induced angiogenesis resulted in sustained elevation of plasma FVIII and significantly reduced blood coagulation time for at least 2-months. Biomaterials-assisted functional tissue engineering was shown in this study to offer protein replacement therapy for a genetic disorder such as hemophilia.

  1. A tubular gelatin scaffold capable of the time-dependent controlled release of epidermal growth factor and mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jixiang; Yang, Fanwen; He, Fupo; Tian, Xiumei; Tang, Shuo; Chen, Xiaoming

    2015-11-01

    A tubular gelatin scaffold for the time-dependent controlled release of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and mitomycin C (MMC) was fabricated. EGF was incorporated using silk fibroin carriers, and MMC was planted using polylactide (PLA) microspheres. The relationship between scaffold properties and crosslinking degrees was evaluated. As the crosslinking degree was increased from 23.7% to 65.3%, the mechanical properties of the scaffold obviously improved, and the compressive modulus increased to approximately 65kPa. The mass degradation of the scaffold was also controlled from 9 days to approximately 1 month. In vitro release tests indicated that the scaffold mainly released EGF in the early period and MMC in the later period. Urethral epithelial cells (UECs) and urethral scar derived fibroblast cells (UFCs) were coseeded in the scaffold at a ratio of 1:1. After 9 days of coculture, immunostaining results displayed that the proportion of UECs continuously increased to approximately 71%. These changes in cell proportion were confirmed by the results of Western blot analysis. Therefore, the scaffold promoted the growth but inhibited the regeneration of UFCs. This scaffold for time-dependent controlled release of multiple biofactors may be potentially useful in urethral reconstruction and other tissue engineering studies.

  2. HB-EGF release mediates glucose-induced activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor in mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Uttarwar, L; Peng, F; Wu, D; Kumar, S; Gao, B; Ingram, A J; Krepinsky, J C

    2011-04-01

    Glomerular matrix accumulation is a hallmark of diabetic nephropathy. We showed that transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is an important mediator of matrix upregulation in mesangial cells (MC) in response to high glucose (HG). Here, we study the mechanism of EGFR transactivation. In primary MC, EGFR transactivation by 1 h of HG (30 mM) was unaffected by inhibitors of protein kinase C, reactive oxygen species, or the angiotensin II AT1 receptor. However, general metalloprotease inhibition, as well as specific inhibitors of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF), prevented both EGFR and downstream Akt activation. HB-EGF was released into the medium by 30 min of HG, and this depended on metalloprotease activity. One of the metalloproteases shown to cleave proHB-EGF is ADAM17 (TACE). HG, but not an osmotic control, activated ADAM17, and its inhibition prevented EGFR and Akt activation and HB-EGF release into the medium. siRNA to either ADAM17 or HB-EGF prevented HG-induced EGFR transactivation. We previously showed that EGFR/Akt signaling increases transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 transcription through the transcription factor activator protein (AP)-1. HG-induced AP-1 activation, as assessed by EMSA, was abrogated by inhibitors of metalloproteases, HB-EGF and ADAM17. HB-EGF and ADAM17 siRNA also prevented AP-1 activation. Finally, these inhibitors and siRNA prevented TGF-β1 upregulation by HG. Thus, HG-induced EGFR transactivation in MC is mediated by the release of HB-EGF, which requires activity of the metalloprotease ADAM17. The mechanism of ADAM17 activation awaits identification. Targeting upstream mediators of EGFR transactivation including HB-EGF or ADAM17 provides novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  3. Basic fibroblast growth factor binds to subendothelial extracellular matrix and is released by heparitinase and heparin-like molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkin, P.; Doctrow, S.; Klagsbrun, M.; Svahn, C.M.; Folkman, J.; Vlodavsky, I. )

    1989-02-21

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) exhibits specific binding to the extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by cultured endothelial cells. Binding was saturable as a function both of time and of concentration of {sup 125}I-bFGF. Scatchard analysis of FGF binding revealed the presence of about 1.5 x 10{sup 12} binding sites/mm{sup 2} ECM with an apparent k{sub D} of 610 nM. FGF binds to heparan sulfate (HS) in ECM as evidenced by (i) inhibition of binding in the presence of heparin or HS at 0.1-1 {mu}g/mL, but not by chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate, or hyaluronic acid at 10 {mu}g/mL, (ii) lack of binding to ECM pretreated with heparitinase, but not with chondroitinase ABC, and (iii) rapid release of up to 90% of ECM-bound FGF by exposure to heparin, HS, or heparitinase, but not to chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate, hyaluronic acid, or chondroitinase ABC. Oligosaccharides derived from depolymerized heparin, and as small as the tetrasaccharide, released the ECM-bound FGF, but there was little or no release of FGF by modified nonanticoagulant heparins such as totally desulfated heparin, N-desulfated heparin, and N-acetylated heparin. FGF released from ECM was biologically active, as indicated by its stimulation of cell proliferation and DNA synthesis in vascular endothelial cells and 3T3 fibroblasts. Similar results were obtained in studies on release of endogenous FGF-like mitogenic activity from Descement's membranes of bovine corneas. It is suggested that ECM storage and release of bFGF provide a novel mechanism for regulation of capillary blood vessel growth. Whereas ECM-bound FGF may be prevented from acting on endothelial cells, its displacement by heparin-like molecules and/or HS-degrading enzymes may elicit a neovascular response.

  4. Sequential antibiotic and growth factor releasing chitosan-PAAm semi-IPN hydrogel as a novel wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Pulat, Mehlika; Kahraman, Anıl Sera; Tan, Nur; Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare a novel wound dressing material which provides burst release of an antibiotic in combination with sustained release of growth factor delivery. This might be beneficial for the prevention of infections and to stimulate wound healing. As a wound dressing material, the semi-interpenetrating network (semi-IPN) hydrogel based on polyacrylamide (PAAm) and chitosan (CS) was synthesized via free radical polymerization. Ethylene glycol dimethacrylate was used for cross-linking of PAAm to form semi-IPN hydrogel. The hydrogel shows high water content (∼1800%, in dry basis) and stable swelling characteristics in the pH range of the wound media (∼4.0-7.4). The antibiotic, piperacillin-tazobactam, which belongs to the penicillin group was loaded into the hydrogel. The therapeutic serum dose of piperacillin-tazobactam for topic introduction was reached at 1st hour of the release. Additionally, in order to increase the mitogenic activity of hydrogel, epidermal growth factor (EGF) was embedded into the CS-PAAm in different amounts. Cell culture studies were performed with L929 mouse fibroblasts and the simulated cell growth was investigated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The successful sustained release behavior of CS-PAAm hydrogel for EGF maintained the presence of EGF in the culture up to 5 days and the highest mitochondrial activities were recorded for the 0.4 μg EGF-loaded/mg of hydrogel group. In conclusion, CS-PAAm semi-IPN hydrogel loaded with piperacillin-tazobactam and EGF could be proposed for an effective system in wound-healing management.

  5. Biomimetic supramolecular designs for the controlled release of growth factors in bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Helena S; Pashkuleva, Iva

    2015-11-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of tissues is an assembly of insoluble macromolecules that specifically interact with soluble bioactive molecules and regulate their distribution and availability to cells. Recapitulating this ability has been an important target in controlled growth factor delivery strategies for tissue regeneration and requires the design of multifunctional carriers. This review describes the integration of supramolecular interactions on the design of delivery strategies that encompass self-assembling and engineered affinity components to construct advanced biomimetic carriers for growth factor delivery. Several glycan- and peptide-based self-assemblies reported in the literature are highlighted and commented upon. These examples demonstrate how molecular design and chemistry are successfully employed to create versatile multifunctional molecules which self-assemble/disassemble in a precisely predicted manner, thus controlling compartmentalization, transport and delivery. Finally, we discuss whether recent advances in the design and preparation of supramolecular delivery systems have been sufficient to drive real translation towards a clinical impact. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Specific Adsorption via Peptide Tags: Oriented Grafting and Release of Growth Factors for Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Murschel, Frederic; Zaimi, Aldo; Noel, Samantha; Jolicoeur, Mario; De Crescenzo, Gregory

    2015-11-09

    Numerous strategies have been proposed to decorate biomaterials with growth factors (GFs) for tissue engineering applications; their practicability as clinical tools, however, remains uncertain. We previously presented two complementary amphipathic peptides, namely, E5 and K5, which could be utilized as tags to direct GF capture onto organic materials via E5/K5 coiled-coil interactions. We here investigated their potential as mediators of GF physical adsorption. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays highlighted that both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions could contribute to the adsorption process, without interfering with the peptides propensity for coiled-coil interactions. E5-tagged vascular endothelial growth factor, in particular, was efficiently adsorbed to poly(allylamine)-functionalized polystyrene, was maintained in a bioactive state and was steadily liberated over several days with little initial burst. This simple immobilization procedure was successfully applied to poly(ethylene terephthalate) films. Altogether, our data demonstrated that coil-tag-directed adsorption is a tunable, versatile and straightforward strategy to decorate biomaterials with GFs.

  7. Corticotropin-releasing hormone and extracellular mitochondria augment IgE-stimulated human mast-cell vascular endothelial growth factor release, which is inhibited by luteolin

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by varying degrees of dysfunctional social abilities, learning deficits, and stereotypic behaviors. Many patients with ASDs have ‘allergy-like’ symptoms and respond disproportionally to stress. We have previously shown that the peptide neurotensin (NT) is increased in the serum of young children with autism and that can stimulate extracellular secretion of mitochondrial (mt)DNA which was also increased in the serum of these children. Methods Human mast cells were stimulated by corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), mitochondrial DNA, IgE/anti-IgE, either for 24 hours to measure vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release by ELISA or for 6 hours or quantitative PCR. Results CRH augmented IgE/anti-IgE-induced human mast-cell release of VEGF and it also induced the expression of IgE receptor (FcεRI) on mast cells. Moreover, sonicated mitochondria also augmented VEGF release, and this effect was blocked by the natural flavone luteolin. Conclusion These results indicate that stress and infection-mimicking extracellular mitochondrial components augment allergic inflammation that may be involved in the early pathogenesis of ASDs. Moreover, luteolin inhibits these processes and may be helpful in the treatment of ASDs. PMID:22559745

  8. Direct effects of growth hormone (GH)-releasing hexapeptide (GHRP-6) and GH-releasing factor (GRF) on GH secretion from cultured porcine somatotropes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hormigo, A; Castaño, J P; Torronteras, R; Malagón, M M; Ramírez, J L; Gracia-Navarro, F

    1998-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-releasing hexapeptide (GHRP-6) belongs to the expanding family of synthetic GH secretagogues (GHSs). Previous studies have shown that non-peptidyl GHRP-6 analogues stimulate GH release in vivo in pigs, and interact synergistically with GH-releasing factor (GRF), but its direct effects on porcine somatotropes have not been addressed hitherto. In the present study, we have evaluated the response of cultured porcine pituitary cells to GHRP-6, and its interaction with GRF and somatostatin (SRIF). Secretory response of somatotropes was assessed by using two distinct techniques. GH released by monolayer cell cultures was evaluated by enzyme immunoassay, whereas that secreted by individual somatotropes was measured by immunodensitometry using a cell blotting assay. Our results demonstrate that both GHRP-6 and GRF stimulated GH release from monolayer cultures at doses equal to or above 10(-9) M. Use of cell immunoblot assay demonstrated that, like GRF, the hexapeptide acts directly upon porcine somatotropes to exert its action. Moreover, regardless of the technique applied, combined administration of GHRP-6 (10(-6) or 10(-9) M) and GRF (10(-8) M) resulted in an additive, but not synergistic, stimulatory GH response. Finally, SRIF (10(-7) M) inhibited the stimulatory effect of GHRP-6 alone or in combination with GRF. These results indicate that GHRP-6 directly and effectively stimulates GH secretion from porcine somatotropes in vitro, and acts additively when coadministered with GRF. Therefore, the synergistic stimulatory effect of GHSs and GRF reported in vivo in this species might require additional factors that are lacking in the in vitro situation.

  9. Transforming growth factor Beta-releasing scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Madry, Henning; Rey-Rico, Ana; Venkatesan, Jagadeesh K; Johnstone, Brian; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2014-04-01

    The maintenance of a critical threshold concentration of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) for a given period of time is crucial for the onset and maintenance of chondrogenesis. Thus, the development of scaffolds that provide temporal and/or spatial control of TGF-β bioavailability has appeal as a mechanism to induce the chondrogenesis of stem cells in vitro and in vivo for articular cartilage repair. In the past decade, many types of scaffolds have been designed to advance this goal: hydrogels based on polysaccharides, hyaluronic acid, and alginate; protein-based hydrogels such as fibrin, gelatin, and collagens; biopolymeric gels and synthetic polymers; and solid and hybrid composite (hydrogel/solid) scaffolds. In this study, we review the progress in developing strategies to deliver TGF-β from scaffolds with the aim of enhancing chondrogenesis. In the future, such scaffolds could prove critical for tissue engineering cartilage, both in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Encapsulation of basic fibroblast growth factor by polyelectrolyte multilayer microcapsules and its controlled release for enhancing cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    She, Zhen; Wang, Chunxia; Li, Jun; Sukhorukov, Gleb B; Antipina, Maria N

    2012-07-09

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) is an important protein for cellular activity and highly vulnerable to environmental conditions. FGF2 protected by heparin and bovine serum albumin was loaded into the microcapsules by a coprecipitation-based layer-by-layer encapsulation method. Low cytotoxic and biodegradable polyelectrolytes dextran sulfate and poly-L-arginine were used for capsule shell assembly. The shell thickness-dependent encapsulation efficiency was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A maximum encapsulation efficiency of 42% could be achieved by microcapsules with a shell thickness of 14 layers. The effects of microcapsule concentration and shell thickness on cytotoxicity, FGF2 release kinetics, and L929 cell proliferation were evaluated in vitro. The advantage of using microcapsules as the carrier for FGF2 controlled release for enhancing L929 cell proliferation was analyzed.

  11. Chitosan scaffold enhances growth factor release in wound healing in von Willebrand disease

    PubMed Central

    Periayah, Mercy Halleluyah; Halim, Ahmad Sukari; Saad, Arman Zaharil Mat; Yaacob, Nik Soriani; Hussein, Abdul Rahim; Karim, Faraizah Abdul; Rashid, Ahmad Hazri Abdul; Ujang, Zanariah

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan-derived biomaterials have been reported to adhere when in contact with blood by encouraging platelets to adhere, activate and aggregate at the sites of vascular injury, thus enhanced wound healing capacity. This study investigated platelet morphology changes and the expression level of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and platelet-derived growth factor-AB (PDGF-AB) in the adherence of two different types of chitosans in von Willebrand disease (vWD): N,O-carboxymethylchitosan (NO-CMC) and oligo-chitosan (O-C). Fourteen vWD voluntary subjects were recruited, and they provided written informed consent. Scanning electron microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test procedures were employed to achieve the objective of the study. The results suggest that the O-C group showed dramatic changes in the platelet’s behaviors. Platelets extended filopodia and generated lamellipodia, leading to the formation of grape-like shaped aggregation. The platelet aggregation occurred depending on the severity of vWD. O-C was bound to platelets on approximately 90% of the surface membrane in vWD type 1; there was 70% and 50% coverage in vWD type II and III, respectively. The O-C chitosan group showed an elevated expression level of TGF-β1 and PDGF-AB. This finding suggests that O-C stimulates these mediators from the activated platelets to the early stage of restoring the damaged cells and tissues. This study demonstrated that the greater expression level of O-C assists in mediating the cytokine complex networks of TGF-β1 and PDGF-AB and induces platelet activities towards wound healing in vWD. With a better understanding of chitosan’s mechanisms of action, researchers are able to accurately develop novel therapies to prevent hemorrhage. PMID:26629055

  12. Cell Injury-Induced Release of Fibroblast Growth Factor 2: Relevance to Intracerebral Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Transplantations

    PubMed Central

    Vinodkumar, Deepti; McGrogan, Michael; Bates, Damien

    2015-01-01

    Beneficial effects of intracerebral transplantation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and their derivatives are believed to be mediated mostly by factors produced by engrafted cells. However, the mesenchymal cell engraftment rate is low, and the majority of grafted cells disappear within a short post-transplantation period. Here, we hypothesize that dying transplanted cells can affect surrounding tissues by releasing their active intracellular components. To elucidate the type, amounts, and potency of these putative intracellular factors, freeze/thaw extracts of MSC or their derivatives were tested in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and bioassays. We found that fibroblast growth factor (FGF)2 and FGF1, but not vascular endothelial growth factor and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 levels were high in extracts despite being low in conditioned media. Extracts induced concentration-dependent proliferation of rat cortical neural progenitor cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells; these proliferative responses were specifically blocked by FGF2-neutralizing antibody. In the neuropoiesis assay with rat cortical cells, both MSC extracts and killed cells induced expression of nestin, but not astrocyte differentiation. However, suspensions of killed cells strongly potentiated the astrogenic effects of live MSC. In transplantation-relevant MSC injury models (peripheral blood cell-mediated cytotoxicity and high cell density plating), MSC death coincided with the release of intracellular FGF2. The data showed that MSC contain a major depot of active FGF2 that is released upon cell injury and is capable of acutely stimulating neuropoiesis and angiogenesis. We therefore propose that both dying and surviving grafted MSC contribute to tissue regeneration. PMID:25873141

  13. Coadministration of adipose-derived stem cells and control-released basic fibroblast growth factor facilitates angiogenesis in a murine ischemic hind limb model.

    PubMed

    Horikoshi-Ishihara, Hisako; Tobita, Morikuni; Tajima, Satoshi; Tanaka, Rica; Oshita, Takashi; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have angiogenic potential owing to their differentiation into endothelial cells and their release of angiogenic growth factors to elicit paracrine effects. In addition, control-released basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) sustained with a gelatin hydrogel also supports effective angiogenesis. We sought to determine if coadministration of ASCs and control-released bFGF into murine ischemic limbs facilitates angiogenesis. Levels of growth factors in the conditioned media of ASCs cultured with or without control-released bFGF were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. A murine ischemic hind limb model was generated and intramuscularly injected with the following: gelatin hydrogel (group 1), a high number of ASCs (group 2), control-released bFGF (group 3), a small number of ASCs and control-released bFGF (group 4), and a high number of ASCs and control-released bFGF (group 5). Macroscopic and microscopic vascular changes were evaluated until day 7 by laser Doppler perfusion imaging and histologic analyses, respectively. Secretion of hepatocyte growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, and transforming growth factor-β1 was enhanced by control-released bFGF. Vascular improvement was achieved in groups 4 and 5 according to laser Doppler perfusion imaging. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and CD31 immunohistochemical staining demonstrated an increase in the vascular density, vessel diameter, and thickness of vessel walls in groups 4 and 5. Cells positively stained for CD146, α-smooth muscle actin, and transforming growth factor-β1 were observed around vessel walls in groups 4 and 5. These findings suggest that coadministration of ASCs and control-released bFGF facilitates angiogenesis in terms of vessel maturation in a murine ischemic hind limb model. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Live Staphylococcus aureus Induces Expression and Release of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Terminally Differentiated Mouse Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Johnzon, Carl-Fredrik; Rönnberg, Elin; Guss, Bengt; Pejler, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells have been shown to express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), thereby implicating mast cells in pro-angiogenic processes. However, the mechanism of VEGF induction in mast cells and the possible expression of VEGF in fully mature mast cells have not been extensively studied. Here, we report that terminally differentiated peritoneal cell-derived mast cells can be induced to express VEGF in response to challenge with Staphylococcus aureus, thus identifying a mast cell-bacteria axis as a novel mechanism leading to VEGF release. Whereas live bacteria produced a robust upregulation of VEGF in mast cells, heat-inactivated bacteria failed to do so, and bacteria-conditioned media did not induce VEGF expression. The induction of VEGF was not critically dependent on direct cell-cell contact between bacteria and mast cells. Hence, these findings suggest that VEGF can be induced by soluble factors released during the co-culture conditions. Neither of a panel of bacterial cell-wall products known to activate toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling promoted VEGF expression in mast cells. In agreement with the latter, VEGF induction occurred independently of Myd88, an adaptor molecule that mediates the downstream events following TLR engagement. The VEGF induction was insensitive to nuclear factor of activated T-cells inhibition but was partly dependent on the nuclear factor kappa light-chain enhancer of activated B cells signaling pathway. Together, these findings identify bacterial challenge as a novel mechanism by which VEGF is induced in mast cells.

  15. Paracrine effects of bombesin/gastrin-releasing peptide and other growth factors on pulmonary neuroendocrine cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Speirs, V; Bienkowski, E; Wong, V; Cutz, E

    1993-05-01

    Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNEC) are numerous in the fetus where they have been implicated to have a role in fetal lung development. We assessed the effects of putative growth factors, gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), cholecystokinin (CCK), gastrin (GN), serotonin (5-HT), and epidermal growth factor (EGF), some of which are produced by PNEC, either alone or in combination, on cultured fetal rabbit PNEC from 20, 24, and 28 day fetuses. GRP increased the total protein of the cultures over a 7 day period in an age-dependent manner, with greatest effect in cultures from the 24 day fetus, no effect with the 28 day fetus, and an inhibitory effect on 20 day cultures. This was accompanied by an increase in PNEC, which could be blocked by treatment of the cultures with a monoclonal antibody to GRP (2A11). There was no increase in 3H-thymidine labeling of PNEC in GRP treated cultures but an increase in numbers of cells partially stained for 5-HT, suggesting the induction of a precursor cell. Other growth factors had neither an inhibitory nor a stimulatory effect either alone or in combination with GRP. Preliminary studies with 125I-GRP receptor localization suggests that the GRP receptor is mostly expressed on pulmonary fibroblasts, and less on epithelial cells, so that the role for GRP in fetal lung development, at least in the rabbit, is probably indirect, acting via a paracrine mechanism.

  16. Brain changes in Alzheimer's disease patients with implanted encapsulated cells releasing nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Daniel; Westman, Eric; Eyjolfsdottir, Helga; Almqvist, Per; Lind, Göran; Linderoth, Bengt; Seiger, Ake; Blennow, Kaj; Karami, Azadeh; Darreh-Shori, Taher; Wiberg, Maria; Simmons, Andrew; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Wahlberg, Lars; Eriksdotter, Maria

    2015-01-01

    New therapies with disease-modifying effects are urgently needed for treating Alzheimer's disease (AD). Nerve growth factor (NGF) protein has demonstrated regenerative and neuroprotective effects on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in animal studies. In addition, AD patients treated with NGF have previously shown improved cognition, EEG activity, nicotinic binding, and glucose metabolism. However, no study to date has analyzed brain atrophy in patients treated with NGF producing cells. In this study we present MRI results of the first clinical trial in patients with AD using encapsulated NGF biodelivery to the basal forebrain. Six AD patients received the treatment during twelve months. Patients were grouped as responders and non-responders according to their twelve-months change in MMSE. Normative values were created from 131 AD patients from ADNI, selecting 36 age- and MMSE-matched patients for interpreting the longitudinal changes in MMSE and brain atrophy. Results at baseline indicated that responders showed better clinical status and less pathological levels of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ1-42. However, they showed more brain atrophy, and neuronal degeneration as evidenced by higher CSF levels of T-tau and neurofilaments. At follow-up, responders showed less brain shrinkage and better progression in the clinical variables and CSF biomarkers. Noteworthy, two responders showed less brain shrinkage than the normative ADNI group. These results together with previous evidence supports the idea that encapsulated biodelivery of NGF might have the potential to become a new treatment strategy for AD with both symptomatic and disease-modifying effects.

  17. [Effects of PRF and released three growth factors on migration of rat adipose tissue-derived stem cells].

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Wang, Ming-guo; Yang, Shuai; Li, Xiu-mei; Yang, Shi-mao; Li, Xue

    2015-12-01

    To analyze the effects of PRF and released three growth factors on migration of rat adipose tissue-derived stem cells and to investigate the mechanism of migration. The inguinal adipose tissue of rat was excised at aseptic condition to obtain primary ADSCs by enzyme digestion. Multi-directional differentiation was used to identify the ADSCs. PRF membrane was acquired through one time centrifuge. The cell migration was examined by Transwell assay and wound healing assay. The mRNA expression of MMP2 and MT1-MMP was tested by real-time PCR. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 13.0 software package. Cell migration test showed that the migration of rat ADSCs in PRF group were significantly higher than those in the negative group(P<0.05) and inhibitor group(P<0.05). The ADSCs migration effects in three growth factors group at different concentrations showed significant difference(P<0.05). Real-time PCR showed that gene expressions of MMP2 and MT1-MMP were significantly higher in PRF group than control group (P<0.05). PCR showed that gene expressions of MMP2 and MT1-MMP were significantly higher in three growth factors group than control group (P<0.05). PRF and three growth factors consistently enhanced the migration of rat ADSCs in a dose-response manner. The migration increase of rat ADSCs may be associated with the up-regulation of MMP2 and MT1-MMP gene expression.

  18. In Vivo Evidence for Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)-mediated Release of Prolactin from the Pituitary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Dahlhoff, Maik; Blutke, Andreas; Wanke, Rüdiger; Wolf, Eckhard; Schneider, Marlon R.

    2011-01-01

    Members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/ERBB) system are essential local regulators of mammary gland development and function. Emerging evidence suggests that EGFR signaling may also influence mammary gland activity indirectly by promoting the release of prolactin from the pituitary gland in a MAPK and estrogen receptor-α (ERα)-dependent manner. Here, we report that overexpression of the EGFR ligand betacellulin (BTC) causes a lactating-like phenotype in the mammary gland of virgin female mice including the major hallmarks of lactogenesis. BTC transgenic (BTC-tg) females showed reduced levels of prolactin in the pituitary gland and increased levels of the hormone in the circulation. Furthermore, treatment of BTC-tg females with bromocriptine, an inhibitor of prolactin secretion, blocked the development of the lactation-like phenotype, suggesting that it is caused by central release of prolactin rather than by local actions of BTC in the mammary gland. Introduction of the antimorphic Egfr allele Wa5 also blocked the appearance of the mammary gland alterations, revealing that the phenotype is EGFR-dependent. We detected an increase in MAPK activity, but unchanged phosphorylation of ERα in the pituitary gland of BTC-tg females as compared with control mice. These results provide the first functional evidence in vivo for a role of the EGFR system in regulating mammary gland activity by modulating prolactin release from the pituitary gland. PMID:21914800

  19. In vivo evidence for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mediated release of prolactin from the pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Dahlhoff, Maik; Blutke, Andreas; Wanke, Rüdiger; Wolf, Eckhard; Schneider, Marlon R

    2011-11-11

    Members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/ERBB) system are essential local regulators of mammary gland development and function. Emerging evidence suggests that EGFR signaling may also influence mammary gland activity indirectly by promoting the release of prolactin from the pituitary gland in a MAPK and estrogen receptor-α (ERα)-dependent manner. Here, we report that overexpression of the EGFR ligand betacellulin (BTC) causes a lactating-like phenotype in the mammary gland of virgin female mice including the major hallmarks of lactogenesis. BTC transgenic (BTC-tg) females showed reduced levels of prolactin in the pituitary gland and increased levels of the hormone in the circulation. Furthermore, treatment of BTC-tg females with bromocriptine, an inhibitor of prolactin secretion, blocked the development of the lactation-like phenotype, suggesting that it is caused by central release of prolactin rather than by local actions of BTC in the mammary gland. Introduction of the antimorphic Egfr allele Wa5 also blocked the appearance of the mammary gland alterations, revealing that the phenotype is EGFR-dependent. We detected an increase in MAPK activity, but unchanged phosphorylation of ERα in the pituitary gland of BTC-tg females as compared with control mice. These results provide the first functional evidence in vivo for a role of the EGFR system in regulating mammary gland activity by modulating prolactin release from the pituitary gland.

  20. In vitro release of growth factors from platelet-rich fibrin (PRF): a proposal to optimize the clinical applications of PRF.

    PubMed

    Su, Chen Yao; Kuo, Ya Po; Tseng, Yu Hong; Su, Ching-Hua; Burnouf, Thierry

    2009-07-01

    Determine the release of growth factors (GF) from platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) and supernatant serum to optimize clinical use. Platelet-derived growth factors-AB (PDGF-AB), transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) were quantified in PRF releasate and in the supernatant serum (N = 8) over 300 minutes after clot formation. Protein profiles were determined by SDS-PAGE. Mean quantity of PDGF-AB, TGF-ss1, VEGF, and EGF in PRF releasate increased significantly to about 52, 72, 1, and 3 ng, respectively, whereas mean IGF-1 content remained at 250 ng. GF was also found in serum supernatant. Protein profiles of the releasates and the supernatant serum were similar. The PRF membrane should be used immediately after formation to maximize release of GF to the surgical site. The remaining fluid can be recovered as an additional source of GF for grafting.

  1. Platelet release of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) in patients undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE) following breast cancer chemotherapy is common. Chemotherapy-induced alterations in markers of haemostasis occur during chemotherapy. In this study we investigated the changes in serum and plasma VEGF, together with platelet release of VEGF and related these to the development of VTE at 3 months. Methods Serum and plasma VEGF, together with platelet release of VEGF were measured prior to chemotherapy and at 24 hours; four-, eight days and three months following commencement of chemotherapy in early and advanced breast cancer patients and in age and sex matched controls. Duplex ultrasound imaging was performed after one month or if symptomatic. Results Of 123 patients 9.8% developed VTE within three months. Serum and plasma VEGF were increased in advanced breast cancer as was platelet release of VEGF. Prior to chemotherapy a 100 μg/ml increase in serum VEGF was associated with a 40% increased risk of VTE, while a 10 μg/ml increase in plasma VEGF was associated with a 20% increased risk of VTE. Serum VEGF showed a different response to chemotherapy in those who developed VTE. Conclusion A group of patients at risk of VTE could be identified, allowing targeted thrombopropylaxis. Whether or not the response in VEGF during chemotherapy has any angiogenic significance remains to be elucidated. PMID:20016693

  2. Release of the angiogenic cytokine vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from platelets: significance for VEGF measurements and cancer biology.

    PubMed

    Banks, R E; Forbes, M A; Kinsey, S E; Stanley, A; Ingham, E; Walters, C; Selby, P J

    1998-03-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent angiogenic factor with a key role in several pathological processes, including tumour vascularization. Our preliminary observations indicated higher VEGF concentrations in serum samples than in matched plasma samples. We have now demonstrated that this difference is due to the presence of VEGF within platelets and its release upon their activation during coagulation. In eight healthy volunteers, serum VEGF concentrations ranged from 76 to 854 pg ml(-1) and were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than the matched citrated plasma VEGF concentrations, which ranged from < 9 to 42 pg ml(-1). Using platelet-rich plasma, mean (s.d.) platelet VEGF contents of 0.56 (0.36) pg of VEGF 10(-6) platelets were found. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated the cytoplasmic presence of VEGF within megakaryocytes and other cell types within the bone marrow. From examination of the effects of blood sample processing on circulating VEGF concentrations, it is apparent that for accurate measurements, citrated plasma processed within 1 h of venepuncture should be used. Serum is completely unsuitable. The presence of VEGF within platelets has implications for processes involving platelet and endothelial cell interactions. e.g. wound healing, and in tumour metastasis, when platelets adhering to circulating tumour cells may release VEGF at points of adhesion to endothelium, leading to hyperpermeability and extravasation of cells.

  3. Endothelial stress induces the release of vitamin D-binding protein, a novel growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Marc-Andre; Desormeaux, Anik; Labelle, Andree; Soulez, Mathilde; Soulez, Gilles; Langelier, Yves; Pshezhetsky, Alexey V.; Hebert, Marie-Josee . E-mail: marie-josee.hebert.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca

    2005-12-23

    Endothelial cells (EC) under stress release paracrine mediators that facilitate accumulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSCM) at sites of vascular injury. We found that medium conditioned by serum-starved EC increase proliferation and migration of VSCM in vitro. Fractionation of the conditioned medium followed by mass spectral analysis identified one bioactive component as vitamin D-binding protein (DBP). DBP induced both proliferation and migration of VSMC in vitro in association with increased phosphorylation of ERK 1/2. PD 98059, a biochemical inhibitor of ERK 1/2, abrogated these proliferative and migratory responses in VSMC. DBP is an important carrier for the vitamin-D sterols, 25-hydroxyvitamin-D, and 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin-D. Both sterols inhibited the activity of DBP on VSMC, suggesting that vitamin D binding sites are important for initiating the activities of DBP on VSMC. Release of DBP at sites of endothelial injury represents a novel pathway favoring accumulation of VSMC at sites of vascular injury.

  4. Generating favorable growth factor and protease release profiles to enable extracellular matrix accumulation within an in vitro tissue engineering environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Battiston, Kyle G; Labow, Rosalind S; Simmons, Craig A; Santerre, J Paul

    2017-05-01

    Tissue engineering (particularly for the case of load-bearing cardiovascular and connective tissues) requires the ability to promote the production and accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) components (e.g., collagen, glycosaminoglycan and elastin). Although different approaches have been attempted in order to enhance ECM accumulation in tissue engineered constructs, studies of underlying signalling mechanisms that influence ECM deposition and degradation during tissue remodelling and regeneration in multi-cellular culture systems have been limited. The current study investigated vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC)-monocyte co-culture systems using different VSMC:monocyte ratios, within a degradable polyurethane scaffold, to assess their influence on ECM generation and degradation processes, and to elucidate relevant signalling molecules involved in this in vitro vascular tissue engineering system. It was found that a desired release profile of growth factors (e.g. insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1)) and hydrolytic proteases (e.g. matrix-metalloproteinases 2, 9, 13 and 14 (MMP2, MMP9, MMP13 and MMP14)), could be achieved in co-culture systems, yielding an accumulation of ECM (specifically for 2:1 and 4:1 VSMC:monocyte culture systems). This study has significant implications for the tissue engineering field (including vascular tissue engineering), not only because it identified important cytokines and proteases that control ECM accumulation/degradation within synthetic tissue engineering scaffolds, but also because the established culture systems could be applied to improve the development of different types of tissue constructs. Sufficient extracellular matrix accumulation within cardiovascular and connective tissue engineered constructs is a prerequisite for their appropriate function in vivo. This study established co-culture systems with tissue specific cells (vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs)) and defined ratios of immune cells (monocytes) to investigate

  5. Thyroid hormone modulation of the hypothalamic growth hormone (GH)-releasing factor-pituitary GH axis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Miki, N; Ono, M; Hizuka, N; Aoki, T; Demura, H

    1992-01-01

    Both thyroid hormone and hypothalamic growth hormone (GH)-releasing factor (GRF) facilitate pituitary somatotroph function. However, the pathophysiological role of thyroid hormone in GRF secretion is less well understood. Thyrotoxicosis, induced by administration of thyroxine (T4) in rats, inhibited both pituitary GH levels and immunoreactive GRF secretion from incubated hypothalamus. At the highest dose of T4 given for 12 d, GRF secretion and pituitary GH decreased by 50 and 39%, respectively. Hypothyroidism induced by thyroidectomy (Tx) enhanced GRF secretion approximately twofold while depleting pituitary GH by greater than 99%. Both of these hypothalamic and pituitary effects were reversed by replacement of T4 but not human GH for 7 or 14 d. Human GH was as potent as T4 in restoring decreased body weight gains or serum insulin-like growth factor-1 levels in Tx rats. These results indicate that at both physiological and pathological concentrations in serum, thyroid hormone acts as an inhibitory modulator of GRF secretion, probably not involving a feedback mechanism through GH. A biphasic effect of thyroid hormone on pituitary GH levels appears to derive from the difference in primary target tissues of hyper- and hypothyroidism, the hypothalamus and the pituitary, respectively. PMID:1634603

  6. Evaluation of skeletal tissue repair, part 2: enhancement of skeletal tissue repair through dual-growth-factor-releasing hydrogels within an ex vivo chick femur defect model.

    PubMed

    Smith, E L; Kanczler, J M; Gothard, D; Roberts, C A; Wells, J A; White, L J; Qutachi, O; Sawkins, M J; Peto, H; Rashidi, H; Rojo, L; Stevens, M M; El Haj, A J; Rose, F R A J; Shakesheff, K M; Oreffo, R O C

    2014-10-01

    There is an unmet need for improved, effective tissue engineering strategies to replace or repair bone damaged through disease or injury. Recent research has focused on developing biomaterial scaffolds capable of spatially and temporally releasing combinations of bioactive growth factors, rather than individual molecules, to recapitulate repair pathways present in vivo. We have developed an ex vivo embryonic chick femur critical size defect model and applied the model in the study of novel extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogel scaffolds containing spatio-temporal combinatorial growth factor-releasing microparticles and skeletal stem cells for bone regeneration. Alginate/bovine bone ECM (bECM) hydrogels combined with poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PDLLGA)/triblock copolymer (10-30% PDLLGA-PEG-PLDLGA) microparticles releasing dual combinations of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), chondrogenic transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGF-β3) and the bone morphogenetic protein BMP2, with human adult Stro-1+bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs), were placed into 2mm central segmental defects in embryonic day 11 chick femurs and organotypically cultured. Hydrogels loaded with VEGF combinations induced host cell migration and type I collagen deposition. Combinations of TGF-β3/BMP2, particularly with Stro-1+HBMSCs, induced significant formation of structured bone matrix, evidenced by increased Sirius red-stained matrix together with collagen expression demonstrating birefringent alignment within hydrogels. This study demonstrates the successful use of the chick femur organotypic culture system as a high-throughput test model for scaffold/cell/growth factor therapies in regenerative medicine. Temporal release of dual growth factors, combined with enriched Stro-1+HBMSCs, improved the formation of a highly structured bone matrix compared to single release modalities. These studies highlight the potential of a unique alginate/bECM hydrogel dual growth factor release

  7. Incorporation of Chitosan Microspheres into Collagen-Chitosan Scaffolds for the Controlled Release of Nerve Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wei; Qi, Fengyu; Huang, Jinghui; Luo, Zhuojing

    2014-01-01

    Background Artifical nerve scaffold can be used as a promising alternative to autologous nerve grafts to enhance the repair of peripheral nerve defects. However, current nerve scaffolds lack efficient microstructure and neurotrophic support. Methods Microsphere–Scaffold composite was developed by incorporating chitosan microspheres loaded with nerve growth factor (NGF–CMSs) into collagen-chitosan scaffolds (CCH) with longitudinally oriented microchannels (NGF–CMSs/CCH). The morphological characterizations, in vitro release kinetics study, neurite outgrowth assay, and bioactivity assay were evaluated. After that, a 15-mm-long sciatic nerve gap in rats was bridged by the NGF–CMSs/CCH, CCH physically absorbed NGF (NGF/CCH), CCH or nerve autograft. 16 weeks after implantation, electrophysiology, fluoro-gold retrograde tracing, and nerve morphometry were performed. Results The NGF–CMSs were evenly distributed throughout the longitudinally oriented microchannels of the scaffold. The NGF–CMSs/CCH was capable of sustained release of bioactive NGF within 28 days as compared with others in vitro. In vivo animal study demonstrated that the outcomes of NGF–CMSs/CCH were better than those of NGF/CCH or CCH. Conclusion Our findings suggest that incorporation of NGF–CMSs into the CCH may be a promising tool in the repair of peripheral nerve defects. PMID:24983464

  8. Release Speeds Growth of Bottomland Hardwoods

    Treesearch

    J. W. Johnson

    1951-01-01

    This article reports early changes in growth rate brought about by partial cutting in two bottomland hardwood stands. Better information will be forthcoming as re-measurements are made over longer periods. Indications are, however, that the acceleration of growth caused by release is large enough to be a vital factor in planning future cuts.

  9. Nitrogen balance and mineral excretion in growing male pigs injected with a human growth hormone-releasing factor analog.

    PubMed Central

    Dubreuil, P; Abribat, T; Brazeau, P; Lapierre, H

    1998-01-01

    A human growth hormone-releasing factor analog ([Desamino-Tyr1,D-Ala2,Ala15] hGRF(1-29) NH2) has been reported to reduce feed intake and increase growth and feed efficiency in a dose-dependent manner in growing pigs. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of this analog on nitrogen (N) balance and mineral excretion. Fifteen castrated male Yorkshire x Landrace pigs (45.9 +/- 1.4 kg) were randomly allotted to 2 groups: control (saline, n = 7) and GRF (6.66 micrograms/kg sc, TID, n = 8). The animals were injected for 20 consecutive days: feces and urine were collected during the last 10 d of injection. The animals had free access to water and food until satiety (approximately 15 min) at 07:00, 11:00, 15:00, 19:00, 23:00 and 07:00 h. The diet consisted of a hog fattening ration (18.0% crude protein). Blood samples were collected on the last day of the study by venipuncture. This analog increased (P < 0.05) insulin-like growth factor-1 and glucose serum concentrations and decreased (P < 0.05) serum urea nitrogen concentration and feed intake. The GRF-treated animals ingested less N, excreted less N in urine and feces to retain a similar amount of N than controls. The apparent coefficient of digestibility of the N has been slightly increased (P < 0.05) by GRF. Urinary excretion of P, K, and Cl decreased (P < 0.01) with GRF treatment. In conclusion, this GRF analog increased N digestibility and retention relative to N ingestion and reduced urinary N, P, K, and Cl excretion. PMID:9442933

  10. Three-dimensional Printed Scaffolds with Gelatin and Platelets Enhance In vitro Preosteoblast Growth Behavior and the Sustained-release Effect of Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Xu, Chi; Ma, Bu-Peng; Zheng, Zhi-Bo; Li, Yu-Long; Ma, Qi; Wu, Guo-Liang; Weng, Xi-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Three-dimensional (3D) printing technology holds great promise for treating diseases or injuries that affect human bones with enhanced performance over traditional techniques. Different patterns of design can lead to various mechanical properties and biocompatibility to various degrees. However, there is still a long way to go before we can fully take advantage of 3D printing technologies. Methods: This study tailored 3D printed scaffolds with gelatin and platelets to maximize bone regeneration. The scaffolds were designed with special internal porous structures that can allow bone tissue and large molecules to infiltrate better into the scaffolds. They were then treated with gelatin and platelets via thermo-crosslinking and freeze-drying, respectively. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 were measured at different time points after the scaffolds had been made. Cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were determined via cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. Results: There was a massive boost in the level of VEGF and TGF-β1 released by the scaffolds with gelatin and platelets compared to that of scaffolds with only gelatin. After 21 days of culture, the CCK-8 cell counts of the control group and treated group were significantly higher than that of the blank group (P < 0.05). The cytotoxicity test also indicated the safety of the scaffolds. Conclusions: Our experiments confirmed that the 3D printed scaffolds we had designed could provide a sustained-release effect for growth factors and improve the proliferation of preosteoblasts with little cytotoxicity in vitro. They may hold promise as bone graft substitute materials in the future. PMID:27779164

  11. Leptin alters the response of the growth hormone releasing factor- growth hormone--insulin-like growth factor-I axis to fasting.

    PubMed

    LaPaglia, N; Steiner, J; Kirsteins, L; Emanuele, M; Emanuele, N

    1998-10-01

    Proper nutritional status is critical for maintaining growth and metabolic function, playing an intimate role in neuroendocrine regulation. Leptin, the recently identified product of the obese gene, may very well be an integral signal which regulates neuroendocrine responses in times of food deprivation. The present study examines leptin's ability to regulate hormonal synthesis and secretion within the GRF-GH-IGF axis in the adult male rat during almost 3 days of fasting. Serum levels of GH and IGF-I were drastically suppressed by fasting. Daily leptin administration was able to fully prevent the fasting-induced fall in serum GH. Leptin failed to restore IGF-I to control levels, however, suggesting possible GH resistance. Fasting caused an insignificant increase in GH mRNA, while leptin injections significantly increased steady-state levels of this message. The GRF receptor (GRFr) message was not altered with fasting or leptin treatment. Leptin also exhibited effects at the hypothalamic level. Fasting induced a sharp fall in GRF mRNA expression and leptin injections partially prevented this fall. However, there were no observed changes in the hypothalamic GRF content. These results provide evidence that leptin may function as a neuromodulator of the GRF-GH-IGF axis communicating to this hormonal system the nutritional status of the animal.

  12. Use of osmotic pumps for subcutaneous infusion of growth hormone-releasing factors in steers and wethers.

    PubMed

    Wheaton, J E; al-Raheem, S N; Godfredson, J A; Dorn, J M; Wong, E A; Vale, W; Rivier, J; Mowles, T F; Heimer, E P; Felix, A M

    1988-11-01

    Osmotic pumps were evaluated for 7-d delivery of growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF). In Exp. 1, 12 steers weighing 253 kg received hGRF(1-29)NH2 in H2O at rates of 0, 3, 30 and 300 pmol.h-1.kg-1. Pumps were implanted s.c. on d 0 and removed at 1200 on d 7. Blood samples were drawn at 20-min intervals from 0800 to 1200 on d -1, 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9. Growth hormone levels were not altered by GRF treatment (P greater than .05). Solubility and volume limitations render hGRF(1-29)NH2 delivery via osmotic pumps problematical. Flow rate and duration of release of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO):H2) (1:1) from osmotic pumps incubated in vivo and in vitro were found to be consistent with manufacturer's specifications. Two hGRF(1-29) analogues, Ro23-7863 and 4SG-29, were dissolved in DMSO:H2O. In Exp. 2, six 222-kg steers had pumps implanted and blood samples were taken as in Exp. 1. Three steers received each analogue at a rate of 300 pmol.h-1.kg-1. Analogues had similar GH-releasing ability and GH levels differed (P less than 0.001) among days, being approximately fourfold higher on d 3, 5 and 7 than on d -1, 1 and 9. Residual analogue solutions retained full bioactivity after 7-d implantation, and in vitro biopotencies of Ro23-7863 and 4SG-29 were similar (Exp. 3). In Exp. 4, 15 wethers (means = 31.3 kg) received osmotic pumps delivering 0, 3, 15, 75 and 300 pmol.h-1.kg-1 Ro23-7863 in DMSO:H2O for 7 d. Lambs were bled at 0800 and 1400 from d -1 to 8. The latter two doses increased (P less than .01) mean GH levels 2.7- and 4.3-fold over those in control animals during the treatment period. Results demonstrate that increased GH secretion can be elicited in steers and wethers for 1 wk by continuous s.c. infusion of GRF analogues utilizing osmotic pumps.

  13. The Regulation and Function of Fibroblast Growth Factor 8 and Its Function during Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Neuron Development

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Wilson C. J.; Linscott, Megan L.; Rodriguez, Karla M.; Stewart, Courtney E.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few years, numerous studies solidified the hypothesis that fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling regulates neuroendocrine progenitor cell proliferation, fate specification, and cell survival and, therefore, is critical for the regulation and maintenance of homeostasis of the body. One important example that underscores the involvement of FGF signaling during neuroendocrine cell development is gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuron ontogenesis. Indeed, transgenic mice with reduced olfactory placode (OP) Fgf8 expression do not have GnRH neurons. This observation indicates the requirement of FGF8 signaling for the emergence of the GnRH neuronal system in the embryonic OP, the putative birth place of GnRH neurons. Mammalian reproductive success depends on the presence of GnRH neurons to stimulate gonadotropin secretion from the anterior pituitary, which activates gonadal steroidogenesis and gametogenesis. Together, these observations are critical for understanding the function of GnRH neurons and their control of the hypothalamus–pituitary–gonadal (HPG) axis to maintain fertility. Taken together, these studies illustrate that GnRH neuron emergence and hence HPG function is vulnerable to genomic and molecular signals that abnormally modify Fgf8 expression in the developing mouse OP. In this short review, we focus on research that is aimed at unraveling how androgen, all-trans retinoic acid, and how epigenetic factors modify control mouse OP Fgf8 transcription in the context of GnRH neuronal development and mammalian reproductive success. PMID:27656162

  14. The protective effect of platelet released growth factors and bone augmentation (Bio-Oss(®)) on ethanol impaired osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Sönmez, Tolga Taha; Bayer, Andreas; Cremer, Tillman; Hock, Jennifer Vanessa Phi; Lethaus, Bernd; Kweider, Nisreen; Wruck, Christoph Jan; Drescher, Wolf; Jahr, Holger; Lippross, Sebastian; Pufe, Thomas; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh

    2017-07-31

    Chronic alcohol consumption is a known limiting factor for bone healing. One promising strategy to improve bone augmentation techniques with Bio-Oss(®) in oral and maxillofacial surgery might be the supportive application of platelet-concentrated biomaterials as platelet-released growth factor (PRGF). To address this matter, we performed an in vitro study investigating the protective effects of PRGF and Bio-Oss(®) in ethanol (EtOH) treated osteoblasts. The SAOS-2 osteosarcoma cell line, with and without EtOH pretreatment was used. The cell viability, proliferation and alkali phosphatase activity (ALP) after application of 0%, 5% and 10% PRGF and Bio-Oss(®) were assessed. The application of PRGF and Bio-Oss(®) in EtOH impaired osteoblasts showed a significant beneficial influence increasing the viability of the osteoblasts in cell culture. The synergistic effect of Bio-Oss(®) and 5% PRGF on the proliferation of osteoblasts was also demonstrated. Bio-Oss(®) only in combination with PRGF increases the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in EtOH pretreated cells. These results indicate that the simultaneous application of PRGF and Bio-Oss(®) inhibits EtOH induced bone healing impairment. Furthermore, in the cells, PRGF induced a protective mechanism which might promote bone regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Spontaneous release of a factor with properties of T cell growth factor from a continuous line of primate tumor T cells.

    PubMed

    Rabin, H; Hopkins, R F; Ruscetti, F W; Neubauer, R H; Brown, R L; Kawakami, T G

    1981-11-01

    A continuous lymphoid cell line had been previously established from a gibbon with spontaneous lymphosarcoma. This cell line, designated as MLA144, when tested after several years in culture was shown to release spontaneously a factor biologically and biochemically similar to human T cell growth factor (TCGF). Conditioned media (CM) from MLA144 cells support growth and DNA synthesis of T cells from humans, several other species of primates, and also from mice and rabbits. The activity in the MLA144 CM is resistant to 60 degrees C and to low and high pH, has a m.w., as determined by gel filtration, of 21,500, elutes from DEAE-cellulose at 0.04 to 0.06 M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 7.6, and has an isoelectric point of about 6.45. Surface-marker analysis of MLA144 cells by rosetting techniques indicates that they are T cells lacking in the receptor for the Fc portion of IgG. The release of TCGF by MLA144 cells should have practical value in terms of ease of TCGF production and should be of great help in the facilitation of studies on the cell biology and molecular biology of TCGF production.

  16. Relationship of adiponectin to endogenous GH pulse secretion parameters in response to stimulation with a growth hormone releasing factor.

    PubMed

    Makimura, H; Stanley, T L; Chen, C Y; Branch, K L; Grinspoon, S K

    2011-06-01

    Obesity is associated with both reduced growth hormone (GH) and adiponectin. However, the relationship between adiponectin and parameters of endogenous GH secretion remains unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between total and high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin and parameters of endogenous pulsatile GH secretion and the effects of tesamorelin, a synthetic GH releasing hormone (GHRH(1-44)), on total and HMW adiponectin. A 2-week interventional study with tesamorelin was conducted at an academic medical center in 13 men with BMI 20-35 kg/m(2). Overnight frequent blood sampling and measurement of total and HMW adiponectin at baseline and after treatment were performed to assess the effects of augmenting endogenous pulsatile GH secretion. Total, but not HMW, adiponectin was positively associated with log(10)Peak GH area (r=+0.73; P=0.005), basal GH secretion (r=+0.67; P=0.01), and total GH production (r=+0.57; P=0.04), but was not associated with the number of secretion events (P=0.85). Two-week treatment with tesamorelin increased endogenous GH release and IGF-1, but neither total (change -0.16±0.64; P=0.40), nor HMW (change +0.03±0.70; P=0.87) adiponectin changed significantly with treatment. Sub-analyses in overweight and obese men yielded similar results. Our study demonstrates a strong relationship between specific parameters of endogenous GH pulsatility and adiponectin. However, short-term augmentation of GH pulsatility over 2-weeks does not change adiponectin. Therefore, the relationship between GH and adiponectin is most likely mediated by specific covariates related to adiposity or other factors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Releasing growth factors from activated human platelets after chitosan stimulation: a possible bio-material for platelet-rich plasma preparation.

    PubMed

    Shen, E-Chin; Chou, Tz-Chong; Gau, Ching-Hwa; Tu, Hsiao-Pei; Chen, Yen-Teen; Fu, Earl

    2006-10-01

    Thrombin is commonly used for activating the platelets and releasing the growth factors on the application of platelet-rich plasma (PRP). We have previously reported that chitosan can enhance rabbit platelet aggregation. In this study, the effects of chitosan on the subsequent growth factors release after human platelets activation were examined to evaluate the possibility of chitosan being used as a substitute for thrombin during PRP preparation. Human platelet activation was determined by aggregation, adhesion and alpha-granule membrane glycoprotein expression. Platelet aggregation was measured by the turbidimetric method, the adhesion was directly examined on chitosan-coated glass plates under light microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the alpha-granule membrane glycoprotein was detected by fluorescent isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated anti-CD61 antibody through flow cytometry. The subsequent epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 release from platelets were assayed by ELISA after mixing with chitosan. The enhancing effects on the platelet adhesion and the aggregation from chitosan were observed. Under both microscopes, the adhesive platelets on the chitosan-coated plates were not only greater in number but also earlier in activation than those on the control plates. With flow cytometry, increased glycoprotein IIIa expression in platelets was detected after chitosan treatment. Greater concentrations of growth factors were measured from PRP after chitosan treatment than after the solvent treatment. Because of the observations of growth factors releasing from activated human platelets after chitosan stimulation, we suggest that chitosan may be an appropriate substitute for thrombin in PRP preparation.

  18. Novel therapeutic approach for pulmonary emphysema using gelatin microspheres releasing basic fibroblast growth factor in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sung Soo; Yokomise, Hiroyasu; Matsuura, Natsumi; Gotoh, Masashi; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2014-08-01

    The prognosis of patients with emphysema is poor as there is no truly effective treatment. Our previous study showed that the alveolar space was smaller and the microvessel density was higher in a canine emphysema model after the intrapulmonary arterial administration of gelatin microspheres slowly releasing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF-GMS). In the present study, we evaluated the functional effect of injecting bFGF-GMS via the pulmonary artery in this canine pulmonary emphysema model. Using the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE)-induced total emphysema model, we approximated the value of lung compliance with a Power Lab System, and performed blood gas analysis in a control group, a total emphysema group, and a bFGF group in which bFGF-GMS were injected toward the whole pulmonary artery via the femoral vein. Each group comprised five dogs. Lung compliance was higher in the total emphysema group than in the control group (p = 0.031), and the bFGF group showed no significant improvement of lung compliance vs. the total emphysema group (p = 0.112). PaO2 (partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood) was improved by administering bFGF-GMS in the total emphysema model (p = 0.027). In the canine total emphysema model, blood gas parameters were improved by the whole pulmonary arterial administration of bFGF-GMS. This method has the potential to be an effective novel therapy for pulmonary emphysema.

  19. Neither bovine somatotropin nor growth hormone-releasing factor alters expression of thyroid hormone receptors in liver and mammary tissues.

    PubMed

    Capuco, A V; Binelli, M; Tucker, H A

    2011-10-01

    Physiological effects of thyroid hormones are mediated primarily by binding of triiodothyronine to specific nuclear receptors. Organ-specific changes in production of triiodothyronine from its prohormone, thyroxine, have been hypothesized to target the action of thyroid hormones on the mammary gland and play a role in mediating or augmenting a galactopoietic response to bovine somatotropin (bST). Additionally, tissue responsiveness to thyroid hormones may be altered by changes in the number or affinity of nuclear receptors for thyroid hormones. In the present study, effects of bST and bovine growth hormone-releasing factor (bGRF) on thyroid hormone receptors in liver and mammary gland were studied. Lactating Holstein cows received continuous infusions of bST or bGRF for 63 d or served as uninfused controls. Nuclei were isolated from harvested mammary and liver tissues and incubated with [(125)I]-triiodothyronine. Treatments did not alter the capacity or affinity of specific binding sites for triiodothyronine in liver or mammary nuclei. Evaluation of transcript abundance for thyroid hormone receptors showed that isoforms of thyroid hormone receptor or retinoid receptor (which may influence thyroid receptor action) expressed in the mammary gland were not altered by bST or bGRF treatment. Data do not support the hypothesis that administration of bST or bGRF alters sensitivity of mammary tissue by changing expression of thyroid hormone receptors.

  20. Controlled release of vascular endothelial growth factor using poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres: In vitro characterization and application in polycaprolactone fumarate nerve conduits

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Jing; Dadsetan, Mahrokh; Runge, M. Brett; Spinner, Robert J.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Windebank, Anthony J.; Wang, Huan

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent angiogenic stimulator. Controlled release of such stimulators may enhance and guide the vascularization process, and when applied in a nerve conduit may play a role in nerve regeneration. We report the fabrication and in vitro characterization of VEGF encapsulating poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microspheres and the in vivo application of nerve conduits supplemented with VEGF-containing microspheres. PLGA microspheres containing VEGF were prepared by the double emulsion-solvent evaporation technique. This yielded 83.16% of the microspheres with a diameter < 53 µm. VEGF content measured by ELISA indicated 93.79 ±10.64% encapsulation efficiency. Release kinetics were characterized by an initial burst release of 67.6±8.25% within the first 24 hours, followed by consistent release of approximately 0.34% per day for 4 weeks. Bioactivity of the released VEGF was tested by human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation assay. VEGF released at all time points enhanced HUVEC proliferation confirming that VEGF retained its bioactivity through the 4-week time period. When the microsphere delivery system was placed in a biosynthetic nerve scaffold, robust nerve regeneration was observed. This study established a novel system for controlled release of growth factors and enables in vivo studies of nerve conduits conditioned with this system. PMID:22019759

  1. Superoxide dismutase abolishes the platelet-derived growth factor-induced release of prostaglandin E2 by blocking induction of nitric oxide synthase: role of superoxide.

    PubMed

    Kelner, M J; Uglik, S F

    1995-09-10

    The ability of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) to induce prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release in fibroblasts is abolished when copper-zinc superoxide dismutase activity is increased by transfection of an expression vector. The effect is specific to copper-zinc superoxide dismutase as glutathione peroxidase-overexpressing NIH3T3 cells, again produced by transfection of an expression vector, retain the ability to release PGE2 in response to growth factor stimulation. The defect in PDGF-induced PGE2 release occurs prior to action of prostaglandin H synthase/cyclooxygenase as release of arachadonic acid (in response to PDGF) does not occur in the superoxide dismutase-overexpressing clones. The defect in PDGF-induced release of PGE2 in superoxide dismutase-overexpressing clones differs from the defect found in pEJ-ras-transformed clones. The parent cells, the glutathione peroxidase-expressing cells, and the superoxide dismutase-overexpressing cells all release PGE2 in response to exogenous nitric oxide, whereas the pEJ-ras-transformed cells do not. The glutathione peroxidase-expressing cells also retained the ability to release nitrite in response to PDGF, whereas the superoxide dismutase-expressing clones do not. PDGF stimulates nitric oxide synthase activity in NIH3T3 cells, but not in the superoxide dismutase-expressing clones. These results indicate that superoxide dismutase overexpression blocks the PDGF-induced release of PGE2 by blocking induction of nitric oxide synthase. This indicates that the increase of nitric oxide synthase induced by PDGF is mediated in part by production of superoxide. These findings link cellular oxygen radical homeostasis to three different classes of messenger molecules (growth factors, nitric oxide, and prostaglandins).

  2. Does growth hormone releasing factor desensitize the somatotroph? Interpretation of responses of growth hormone during and after 10-hour infusion of GRF 1-29 amide in man.

    PubMed

    Davis, J R; Sheppard, M C; Shakespear, R A; Lynch, S S; Clayton, R N

    1986-02-01

    It is unclear whether growth hormone releasing factor (GRF) administration in vivo may desensitize the somatotroph. To investigate this possibility we have examined the effects of 10-h infusion of the equipotent 1-29 amide analogue of hpGRF on serum GH levels and on the subsequent GH response to a bolus dose of GRF (1-29). Four normal adult males received an intravenous infusion of 1-29 GRF (1 microgram/kg/h) from 0800 to 1800 h, with blood samples taken at 10 min intervals. A 100 micrograms intravenous bolus dose of GRF was given at 1800 h, and sampling continued for a further 90 min. GH levels were near or below the limit of detection (0.5 mU/l) throughout the control 10 h period. During GRF infusion there was increased GH release with pulses of irregular frequency and amplitude (up to 80 mU/l) continuing throughout the entire infusion period. There was no apparent reduction in total GH released towards the latter part of the infusion. On the control day, 100 micrograms GRF bolus increased mean (+/- SEM) GH from 0.82 +/- 0.21 mU/l to a peak of 59.0 +/- 44.8 mU/l (P less than 0.002). Following 10-GRF infusion, responses to bolus injection of GRF were reduced, but variable. In two subjects a small rise in GH levels occurred (basal 6.4 and 7.2 rising to peak values of 11.2 and 23.0 mU/l respectively). In the other two subjects, GH levels fell but in these the GRF bolus had coincided with a GH peak. The loss of GRF responsiveness after GRF infusion may be due to 'desensitization'.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Safety and efficacy of sustained release of basic fibroblast growth factor using gelatin hydrogel in patients with critical limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Motoyuki; Marui, Akira; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Takeda, Takahide; Yamamoto, Masaya; Yonezawa, Atsushi; Tanaka, Shiro; Yanagi, Shigeki; Ito-Ihara, Toshiko; Ikeda, Takafumi; Murayama, Toshinori; Teramukai, Satoshi; Katsura, Toshiya; Matsubara, Kazuo; Kawakami, Koji; Yokode, Masayuki; Shimizu, Akira; Sakata, Ryuzo

    2016-05-01

    As a form of therapeutic angiogenesis, we sought to investigate the safety and efficacy of a sustained-release system of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) using biodegradable gelatin hydrogel in patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI). We conducted a phase I-IIa study that analyzed 10 CLI patients following a 200-μg intramuscular injection of bFGF-incorporated gelatin hydrogel microspheres into the ischemic limb. Primary endpoints were safety and transcutaneous oxygen pressure (TcO2) at 4 and 24 weeks after treatment. During the follow-up, there was no death or serious procedure-related adverse event. After 24 weeks, TcO2 (28.4 ± 8.4 vs. 46.2 ± 13.0 mmHg for pretreatment vs after 24 weeks, p < 0.01) showed significant improvement. Regarding secondary endpoints, the distance walked in 6 min (255 ± 105 vs. 318 ± 127 m, p = 0.02), the Rutherford classification (4.4 ± 0.5 vs. 3.1 ± 1.4, p = 0.02), the rest pain scale (1.7 ± 1.0 vs. 1.2 ± 1.3, p = 0.03), and the cyanotic scale (2.0 ± 1.1 vs. 0.9 ± 0.9, p < 0.01) also showed improvement. The blood levels of bFGF were within the normal range in all patients. A subanalysis of patients with arteriosclerosis obliterans (n = 7) or thromboangiitis obliterans (Buerger's disease) (n = 3) revealed that TcO2 had significantly improved in both subgroups. TcO2 did not differ between patients with or without chronic kidney disease. The sustained release of bFGF from biodegradable gelatin hydrogel may offer a safe and effective form of angiogenesis for patients with CLI.

  4. Expression and release of the latent transforming growth factor beta binding protein by hepatocytes from rat liver.

    PubMed

    Roth, S; Schurek, J; Gressner, A M

    1997-06-01

    In very recent studies it was established that transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), likely to be the most relevant fibrogenic cytokine and regulator of cell proliferation, differentiation, and matrix metabolism, is expressed by hepatocytes (parenchymal cell [PC]) and secreted from cultured PC in a latent form incapable of receptor binding. The structural composition of the latent TGF-beta complex secreted by cultured PC is unknown. In some TGF-beta expressing cell types this cytokine is released as a large molecular weight complex containing in addition to the TGF-beta latency associated peptide (LAP) a disulfide bonded latent TGF-beta binding protein (LTBP), of which the existence and function in liver is hitherto unknown. This study is directed to the identification of LTBP expression in rat PC. Cells were isolated from rat liver with the collagenase method and analyzed for LTBP before and during culture under standard conditions using alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase (APAAP) immunostainings, metabolic labeling, messenger RNA (mRNA) detection (reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction [RT-PCR]) and sequencing, and immunoblotting of gel chromatographically separated cell extracts and conditioned media, respectively. APAAP immunostainings applying a specific polyclonal LTBP-antiserum (ab 39) indicated expression of LTBP in PC of liver in situ and freshly isolated PC but a strong expression in cultured PC. Transcripts of LTBP-1 were detected by RT-PCR and confirmed by sequence analyses. Metabolic labeling of PC with [35S]-Met/Cys followed by immunoprecipitation of cell lysates with LTBP antiserum confirmed the synthesis of the high molecular mass complex of 250 kd containing LTBP with a molecular mass of 160 kd. Latent TGF-beta complexes, associated with LTBP related proteins, could be separated from both extracts and conditioned media of PC by gel filtration chromatography. They confirmed the release of the large latent TGF-beta complex

  5. The influence of bovine growth hormone and growth hormone releasing factor on acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase in primiparous Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Beswick, N S; Kennelly, J J

    1998-08-01

    Primiparous Holstein cows received recombinant bovine growth hormone (bGH), bovine growth hormone-releasing factor (bGRF), or no treatment from 118 to 181 +/- 1 d. Milk yield was significantly increased with no change in milk fat percentage or composition. The mRNA and protein abundance of the key lipogenic enzymes acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were measured in the mammary gland and adipose tissue. We hypothesized that bGH and bGRF treatment would increase the mRNA and protein abundance of ACC and FAS in the mammary gland, with an associated decrease in adipose tissue. Analysis of ACC mRNA and protein abundance in the mammary gland revealed that there was no significant influence of either bGH or bGRF treatment. Analysis of FAS mRNA in mammary gland revealed that both bGH and bGRF significantly increased the abundance. However, quantitation of FAS protein in the mammary gland revealed that neither treatment resulted in increased abundance. In adipose tissue, the mRNA and protein abundance of both ACC and FAS were significantly reduced. The increased substrate required for increased milk fatty acid yield may be provided through redirection of nutrients to the mammary gland away from adipose tissue and through overall increased metabolism of the mammary gland.

  6. Growth hormone-releasing peptide-biotin conjugate stimulates myocytes differentiation through insulin-like growth factor-1 and collagen type I.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Jin; Jeon, Jung Eun; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Yoon, Seok Jeong; Kwon, Seon Deok; Lim, Jina; Park, Keedon; Kim, Dae Yong; Ahn, Jeong Keun; Kim, Bong-Woo

    2015-09-01

    Based on the potential beneficial effects of growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP)-6 on muscle functions, a newly synthesized GHRP-6-biotin conjugate was tested on cultured myoblast cells. Increased expression of myogenic marker proteins was observed in GHRP-6-biotin conjugate-treated cells. Additionally, increased expression levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 and collagen type I were observed. Furthermore, GHRP-6-biotin conjugate-treated cells showed increased metabolic activity, as indicated by increased concentrations of energy metabolites, such as ATP and lactate, and increased enzymatic activity of lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase. Finally, binding protein analysis suggested few candidate proteins, including desmin, actin, and zinc finger protein 691 as potential targets for GHRP6-biotin conjugate action. These results suggest that the newly synthesized GHRP-6-biotin conjugate has myogenic stimulating activity through, at least in part, by stimulating collagen type I synthesis and several key proteins. Practical applications of the GHRP-6-biotin conjugate could include improving muscle condition.

  7. Growth hormone-releasing peptide-biotin conjugate stimulates myocytes differentiation through insulin-like growth factor-1 and collagen type I

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chae Jin; Jeon, Jung Eun; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Yoon, Seok Jeong; Kwon, Seon Deok; Lim, Jina; Park, Keedon; Kim, Dae Yong; Ahn, Jeong Keun; Kim, Bong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Based on the potential beneficial effects of growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP)-6 on muscle functions, a newly synthesized GHRP-6-biotin conjugate was tested on cultured myoblast cells. Increased expression of myogenic marker proteins was observed in GHRP-6-biotin conjugate-treated cells. Additionally, increased expression levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 and collagen type I were observed. Furthermore, GHRP-6-biotin conjugate-treated cells showed increased metabolic activity, as indicated by increased concentrations of energy metabolites, such as ATP and lactate, and increased enzymatic activity of lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase. Finally, binding protein analysis suggested few candidate proteins, including desmin, actin, and zinc finger protein 691 as potential targets for GHRP6-biotin conjugate action. These results suggest that the newly synthesized GHRP-6-biotin conjugate has myogenic stimulating activity through, at least in part, by stimulating collagen type I synthesis and several key proteins. Practical applications of the GHRP-6-biotin conjugate could include improving muscle condition. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(9): 501-506] PMID:25644636

  8. Genistein prevents calcium mobilization evoked by platelet-derived growth factor without affecting calcium release by cadmium or bradykinin

    SciTech Connect

    Rong-Ming Lyu; Barnes, S.; Smith, J.B. )

    1991-03-11

    Cadmium (Cd) strikingly increases ({sup 3}H)inositol trisphosphate and evokes a spike in cytosolic free Ca (Ca{sub i}) in human dermal fibroblasts as described previously. Cd apparently activates a membrane receptor by binding to a zinc site in its external domain. Two classes of receptors are known to induce inositol phosphate formation and release stored Ca: those that are coupled to phospholipase C via GTP-binding proteins, e.g., the bradykinin (BK) receptor; and those that are tyrosine kinases, e.g. the receptor for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Cd, 100 nM BK, and 10 ng/ml PDGF increased Ca{sub i} from 142 {plus minus} 24 nM to 809 {plus minus} 36, 964 {plus minus} 74, and 401 {plus minus} 52 nM (n = 5), respectively. Cd and BK immediately increased Ca{sub i}, however, there was a lag between the addition of PDGF compared to 15 {plus minus} 1 sec for Cd and 9 {plus minus} 1 sec for BK (all n = 10). Genistein (40 {mu}M, 40 min), which selectively inhibits tyrosine kinases, had no significant effect on the Ca{sub i} spike evoked by Cd or BK. In the presence of genistein Cd and BK increased Ca{sub i} from 165 {plus minus} 14 nM to 726 {plus minus} 23 and 876 {plus minus} 31 nM (n = 4), respectively. In contrast to Cd and BK, PDGF only slightly increased Ca{sub i} in the presence of 40 {mu}M genistein. The concentration of genistein that inhibited the Ca{sub i} response to PDGF by 50% was 8 {mu}M. These findings suggest that the Cd triggers a G protein-coupled receptor rather than a tyrosine kinase.

  9. Fibroblast growth factor 8 signaling through fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 is required for the emergence of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wilson C J; Moyle, Sarah S; Tsai, Pei-San

    2008-10-01

    GnRH neurons are essential for the onset and maintenance of reproduction. Mutations in both fibroblast growth factor receptor (Fgfr1) and Fgf8 have been shown to cause Kallmann syndrome, a disease characterized by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia, indicating that FGF signaling is indispensable for the formation of a functional GnRH system. Presently it is unclear which stage of GnRH neuronal development is most impacted by FGF signaling deficiency. GnRH neurons express both FGFR1 and -3; thus, it is also unclear whether FGFR1 or FGFR3 contributes directly to GnRH system development. In this study, we examined the developing GnRH system in mice deficient in FGF8, FGFR1, or FGFR3 to elucidate the individual contribution of these FGF signaling components. Our results show that the early emergence of GnRH neurons from the embryonic olfactory placode requires FGF8 signaling, which is mediated through FGFR1, not FGFR3. These data provide compelling evidence that the developing GnRH system is exquisitely sensitive to reduced levels of FGF signaling. Furthermore, Kallmann syndrome stemming from FGF signaling deficiency may be due primarily to defects in early GnRH neuronal development prior to their migration into the forebrain.

  10. The importance of cell density in the interpretation of growth factor effects on collagenase IV activity release and extracellular matrix production from C6 astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, M; McDonald, W; Del Maestro, R F

    1998-09-01

    We have examined the influence of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on the release of collagenase type IV activity and the production of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules using C6 astrocytoma cells in monolayer culture. Collagenase type IV activity was significantly increased in a dose dependent manner in the low cell density group by treatment with FGF-2 and VEGF but significantly decreased in a dose dependent fashion in the high cell density group. These results were corroborated using Western blot technique with an antibody to gelatinase A. Addition of exogenous laminin and fibronectin to the media decreased collagenase type IV activity in a dose dependent fashion with the minimum concentration of 0.1 microgram/ml. Laminin and fibronectin reached a concentration of 0.1 microgram/ml in only the high cell density group after treatment with the growth factors tested. These findings indicate that C6 astrocytoma cells appear to have two regulatory mechanisms for collagenase type IV activity which are dependent on cell density. In a low cell density, C6 astrocytoma cells respond to the dominant effect of FGF-2 and VEGF by increasing the release of collagenase IV activity. In a high cell density collagenase type IV activity is decreased due to it's down regulation by released ECM molecules in response to FGF-2 and VEGF. These regulatory mechanisms may be crucial to the understanding of the coordination of tumor-associated angiogenesis by malignant glial cells.

  11. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 release from oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) hydrogels in conditions that model the cartilage wound healing environment.

    PubMed

    Holland, Theresa A; Tessmar, Joerg K V; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Mikos, Antonios G

    2004-01-08

    This research demonstrates that controlled material degradation and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) release can be achieved by encapsulation of TGF-beta1-loaded gelatin microparticles within the biodegradable polymer oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) (OPF), so that these microparticles function as both a digestible porogen and a delivery vehicle. Release studies performed with non-encapsulated microparticles confirmed that at normal physiological pH, TGF-beta1 complexes with acidic gelatin, resulting in slow release rates. At pH 4.0, this complexation no longer persists, and TGF-beta1 release is enhanced. However, by encapsulating TGF-beta1-loaded microparticles in a network of OPF, release at either pH can be diffusionally controlled. For instance, after 28 days of incubation at pH 4.0, final cumulative release from non-encapsulated microparticles crosslinked in 10 and 40 mM glutaraldehyde (GA) was 75.4+/-1.6% and 76.6+/-1.1%, respectively. However, when either microparticle formulation was encapsulated in an OPF hydrogel (noted as OPF-10 mM and OPF-40 mM, respectively), these values were reduced to 44.7+/-14.6% and 47.4+/-4.7%. More interestingly, release studies, in conditions that model the expected collagenase concentration of injured cartilage, demonstrated that by altering the microparticle crosslinking extent and loading within OPF hydrogels, TGF-beta1 release, composite swelling, and polymer loss could be systematically altered. Composites encapsulating less crosslinked microparticles (OPF-10 mM) exhibited 100% release after only 18 days and were completely degraded by day 24 in collagenase-containing phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Hydrogels encapsulating 40 mM GA microparticles did not exhibit 100% release or polymer loss until day 28. Hydrogels with no microparticle component demonstrated only 79.3+/-9.2% release and 89.2+/-3.4% polymer loss after 28 days in enzyme-containing PBS. Accordingly, these studies confirm that the rate of TGF

  12. Membrane vesicles containing matrix metalloproteinase-9 and fibroblast growth factor-2 are released into the extracellular space from mouse mesoangioblast stem cells.

    PubMed

    Candela, Maria Elena; Geraci, Fabiana; Turturici, Giuseppina; Taverna, Simona; Albanese, Ida; Sconzo, Gabriella

    2010-07-01

    Certain proteins, including fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), have proved very effective in increasing the efficacy of mesoangioblast stem cell therapy in repairing damaged tissue. We provide the first evidence that mouse mesoangioblast stem cells release FGF-2 and MMP-9 in their active form through the production of membrane vesicles. These vesicles are produced and turned over continuously, but are stable for some time in the extracellular milieu. Mesoangioblasts shed membrane vesicles even under oxygen tensions that are lower than those typically used for cell culture and more like those of mouse tissues. These findings suggest that mesoangioblasts may themselves secrete paracrine signals and factors that make damaged tissues more amenable to cell therapy through the release of membrane vesicles. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. In vitro stress effect on degradation and drug release behaviors of basic fibroblast growth factor--poly(lactic-co-glycolic-acid) microsphere.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan; Yu, Zeping; Lang, Yun; Hu, Juanyu; Li, Hong; Yan, Yonggang; Tu, Chongqi; Yang, Tianfu; Song, Yueming; Duan, Hong; Pei, Fuxing

    2016-01-01

    To study the degradation and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) release activity of bFGF - poly(lactic-co-glycolic-acid) microsphere (bFGF-PLGA MS) under stress in vitro, including the static pressure and shearing force-simulating mechanical environment of the joint cavity. First, bFGF-PLGA MSs were created. Meanwhile, two self-made experimental instruments (static pressure and shearing force loading instruments) were initially explored to provide stress-simulating mechanical environment of the joint cavity. Then, bFGF-PLGA MSs were loaded into the two instruments respectively, to study microsphere degradation and drug release experiments. In the static pressure loading experiment, normal atmospheric pressure loading (approximately 0.1 MPa), 0.35 MPa, and 4.0 MPa pressure loading and shaking flask oscillation groups were designed to study bFGF-PLGA MS degradation and bFGF release. In the shearing force loading experiment, a pulsating pump was used to give the experimental group an output of 1,000 mL/min and the control group an output of 10 mL/min to carry out bFGF-PLGA MS degradation and drug release experiments. Changes of bFGF-PLGA MSs, including microsphere morphology, quality, weight-average molecular weight of polymer, and microsphere degradation and bFGF release, were analyzed respectively. In the static pressure loading experiment, bFGF-PLGA MSs at different pressure were stable initially. The trend of molecular weight change, quality loss, and bFGF release was consistent. Meanwhile, microsphere degradation and bFGF release rates in the 4.0 MPa pressure loading group were faster than those in the normal and 0.35 MPa pressure loading groups. It was the fastest in the shaking flask group, showing a statistically significant difference (P<0.0001). In the shearing force loading experiment, there were no distinctive differences in the rates of microsphere degradation and bFGF release between experimental and control group. Meanwhile, microsphere degradation

  14. Evaluation of the effect of calcium gluconate and bovine thrombin on the temporal release of transforming growth factor beta 1 and platelet-derived growth factor isoform BB from feline platelet concentrates.

    PubMed

    Silva, Raul F; Alvarez, María E; Ríos, Diana L; López, Catalina; Carmona, Jorge U; Rezende, Cleuza Mf

    2012-11-06

    There are not reported regarding the protocols for obtaining platelet concentrates (PC) in cats for medical purposes. The objectives of this study were: 1) to describe a manual method for producing two kinds of PC in cats (PC-A and PC-B), 2) to describe the cellular population of the PC, 3) to measure and compare the effect of calcium gluconate (CG) and bovine thrombin (BT) on the temporal release of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) and platelet-derived growth factor type BB (PDGF-BB) at 3 and 12 hours post-activation and 4) to establish correlations between the cellular population of both PCs and the concentration of growth factors (GF). Blood samples were taken from 16 cats for complete blood count, plasma collection and PC preparation. The PC were arbitrarily divided into two fractions, specifically, PC-A (lower fraction) and PC-B (upper fraction). The platelet counts were significantly different (P<0.05) between the PC and whole blood but not between the PC fractions. The TGF-β1 concentration efficiencies for PC-A and PC-B activated with CG were 42.86% and 46.54%, and activated with BT were 42.88% and 54.64%, respectively. The PDGF-BB concentration efficiencies for PC-A and PC-B activated with CG were 61.36% and 60.61%, and activated with BT were 65.64% and 72.12%, respectively. The temporal release of GFs showed no statistically significant difference (P>0.05) between the activating substances at the time or for any PC fraction. Whatever the activation means, these preparations of cat PC provide significant concentrations of platelets and GFs for possible clinical or experimental use.

  15. Evaluation of the effect of calcium gluconate and bovine thrombin on the temporal release of transforming growth factor beta 1 and platelet-derived growth factor isoform BB from feline platelet concentrates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There are not reported regarding the protocols for obtaining platelet concentrates (PC) in cats for medical purposes. The objectives of this study were: 1) to describe a manual method for producing two kinds of PC in cats (PC-A and PC-B), 2) to describe the cellular population of the PC, 3) to measure and compare the effect of calcium gluconate (CG) and bovine thrombin (BT) on the temporal release of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) and platelet-derived growth factor type BB (PDGF-BB) at 3 and 12 hours post-activation and 4) to establish correlations between the cellular population of both PCs and the concentration of growth factors (GF). Blood samples were taken from 16 cats for complete blood count, plasma collection and PC preparation. The PC were arbitrarily divided into two fractions, specifically, PC-A (lower fraction) and PC-B (upper fraction). Results The platelet counts were significantly different (P<0.05) between the PC and whole blood but not between the PC fractions. The TGF-β1 concentration efficiencies for PC-A and PC-B activated with CG were 42.86% and 46.54%, and activated with BT were 42.88% and 54.64%, respectively. The PDGF-BB concentration efficiencies for PC-A and PC-B activated with CG were 61.36% and 60.61%, and activated with BT were 65.64% and 72.12%, respectively. The temporal release of GFs showed no statistically significant difference (P>0.05) between the activating substances at the time or for any PC fraction. Conclusions Whatever the activation means, these preparations of cat PC provide significant concentrations of platelets and GFs for possible clinical or experimental use. PMID:23131192

  16. Fibroblast Growth Factor 2-Mediated Translational Control of IAPs Blocks Mitochondrial Release of Smac/DIABLO and Apoptosis in Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pardo, Olivier E.; Lesay, Adeline; Arcaro, Alexandre; Lopes, Rita; Ng, Bee Ling; Warne, Patricia H.; McNeish, Iain A.; Tetley, Teresa D.; Lemoine, Nicholas R.; Mehmet, Huseyin; Seckl, Michael J.; Downward, Julian

    2003-01-01

    The mitochondrial release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO has been implicated in the activation of apoptosis in response to cell stress. Smac promotes cytochrome c-induced activation of caspases by sequestering the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family of potent caspase suppressors. Differential release from mitochondria of cytochrome c and Smac can occur, but the underlying mechanism and physiological significance of this are unclear. Here we show that the mechanism by which fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) protects small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells from etoposide-induced cell death involves inhibition of Smac release but not of cytochrome c release. This process is MEK dependent and correlates with an increased expression of XIAP and cellular IAP-1, mediated principally through translational regulation. Exogenous expression of XIAP is sufficient to inhibit caspase 9 activation, Smac release, and cell death induced by etoposide. Prevention of the FGF-2-promoted increase in levels of functional IAPs by RNA interference or the cell-permeant Smac amino-terminal peptide blocked FGF-2-induced protection. FGF-2 can thus protect SCLC cells from chemotherapeutic drugs by modulating IAP levels via posttranscriptional regulation, providing a mechanism for postmitochondrial survival signaling by the MEK/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. PMID:14560006

  17. Extracellular Matrix (ECM) Multilayer Membrane as a Sustained Releasing Growth Factor Delivery System for rhTGF-β3 in Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Hyug; Kim, Moon Suk; Kim, Young Jick; Choi, Byung Hyune; Lee, Chun Tek; Park, So Ra; Min, Byoung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant human transforming growth factor beta-3 (rhTGF-β3) is a key regulator of chondrogenesis in stem cells and cartilage formation. We have developed a novel drug delivery system that continuously releases rhTGF-β3 using a multilayered extracellular matrix (ECM) membrane. We hypothesize that the sustained release of rhTGF-β3 could activate stem cells and result in enhanced repair of cartilage defects. The properties and efficacy of the ECM multilayer-based delivery system (EMLDS) are investigated using rhTGF-β3 as a candidate drug. The bioactivity of the released rhTGF-ß3 was evaluated through chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) using western blot and circular dichroism (CD) analyses in vitro. The cartilage reparability was evaluated through implanting EMLDS with endogenous and exogenous MSC in both in vivo and ex vivo models, respectively. In the results, the sustained release of rhTGF-ß3 was clearly observed over a prolonged period of time in vitro and the released rhTGF-β3 maintained its structural stability and biological activity. Successful cartilage repair was also demonstrated when rabbit MSCs were treated with rhTGF-β3-loaded EMLDS ((+) rhTGF-β3 EMLDS) in an in vivo model and when rabbit chondrocytes and MSCs were treated in ex vivo models. Therefore, the multilayer ECM membrane could be a useful drug delivery system for cartilage repair. PMID:27258120

  18. Enhanced bone tissue formation by alginate gel-assisted cell seeding in porous ceramic scaffolds and sustained release of growth factor.

    PubMed

    Florczyk, Stephen J; Leung, Matthew; Jana, Soumen; Li, Zhensheng; Bhattarai, Narayan; Huang, Jerry I; Hopper, Richard A; Zhang, Miqin

    2012-12-01

    Increasing cell seeding efficiency in a tissue engineering construct can enhance cellular activity and tissue formation in vivo. Here, we demonstrate the use of alginate gel as a secondary phase material in 3D porous β-tricalcium phosphate scaffolds to improve cell seeding and provide controlled release of growth factors for bone tissue engineering. Cells were seeded in scaffolds in three ways: conventional seeding (CS), alginate gel-assisted seeding (GS), and alginate GS with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2, GSB). In vitro study with MG-63 cells showed that cell seeding efficiency and cell population 1 week after seeding were significantly elevated in GS and GSB samples compared to CS samples. The GSB system demonstrated a sustained, steady release of BMP-2 over 2 weeks. In vivo, scaffolds seeded with rat mesenchymal stem cells were implanted ectopically into Sprague-Dawley rats for 8 weeks. GS and GSB samples exhibited improved osteogenic activity, with the GSB samples inducing the greatest osteocalcin and osteoid deposition. This study suggests that the alginate gel-assisted cell seeding increases seeding efficiency and allows for sustained release of growth factors. The use of the secondary phase polymer bolsters bone formation in vivo and has the potential for improving outcome in other tissue engineering applications.

  19. Transforming growth factorreleased by apoptotic white blood cells during red blood cell storage promotes transfusion-induced alloimmunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Vallion, Romain; Bonnefoy, Francis; Daoui, Anna; Vieille, Loredane; Tiberghien, Pierre; Saas, Philippe; Perruche, Sylvain

    2015-07-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization is a major immunologic risk of transfusion. However, RBC storage facilitates white blood cell (WBC) apoptosis and apoptotic cells have immunomodulatory properties. We investigated the behavior of WBCs, and apoptosis in particular, in RBC units during storage and then studied the impact of WBC apoptosis on the modulation of posttransfusion alloimmunization in RBC products stored short term. We used a mouse model of alloimmunization to transfused HEL-ovalbumin-Duffy (HOD) surface antigen expressed specifically on RBCs. The presence of circulating anti-HOD immunoglobulin G detected by flow cytometry confirmed immunization to HOD+ RBCs. WBC apoptosis and factors released by apoptotic WBCs during storage were determined and in particular the role of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β was assessed on RBC alloimmunization. In blood stored 72 hours, 30% of WBCs were apoptotic, and transfusion of short-term-stored blood resulted in lesser immunization than did fresh blood or stored leukoreduced (LR) RBCs. WBCs undergoing apoptosis released during short-term storage factors modulating RBC alloimmunization. Indeed apoptotic cell-released factors modulate alloimmunization whereas exogenous apoptotic cells directly transfused with LR RBCs did not. While microparticles released during RBC storage had no immunomodulatory role, TGF-β found in the supernatant of stored blood demonstrated the capacity to favor Treg polarization of naïve CD4+CD25- T cells in vitro and limited RBC alloimmunization in vivo. Indeed, addition of recombinant TGF-β to stored LR RBC transfusion strongly limited posttransfusion RBC alloimmunization. Our findings show that short-term storage of non-LR blood facilitates WBC apoptosis therefore releasing TGF-β that modulates posttransfusion RBC alloimmunization. © 2015 AABB.

  20. Cells transformed by murine herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) release compounds with transforming and transformed phenotype suppressing activity resembling growth factors.

    PubMed

    Šupolíková, M; Staňová, A Vojs; Kúdelová, M; Marák, J; Zelník, V; Golais, F

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the medium of three cell lines transformed with murine herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) in vitro and in vivo, 68/HDF, 68/NIH3T3, and S11E, for the presence of compounds resembling growth factors of some herpesviruses which have displayed transforming and transformed phenotype suppressing activity in normal and tumor cells. When any of spent medium was added to cell culture we observed the onset of transformed phenotype in baby hamster kidney cells (BHK-21) cells and transformed phenotype suppressing activity in tumor human epithelial cells (HeLa). In media tested, we have identified the presence of putative growth factor related to MHV-68 (MHGF-68). Its bivalent properties have been blocked entirely by antisera against MHV-68 and two monoclonal antibodies against glycoprotein B (gB) of MHV-68 suggesting viral origin of MHGF-68. The results of initial efforts to separate MHGF-68 on FPLC Sephadex G15 column in the absence of salts revealed the loss of its transforming activity but transformed phenotype suppressing activity retained. On the other hand, the use of methanol-water mobile phase on RP-HPLC C18 column allowed separation of MHGF-68 to two compounds. Both separated fractions, had only the transforming activity to normal cells. Further experiments exploring the nature and the structure of hitherto unknown MHGF-68 are now in the progress to characterize its molecular and biological properties.

  1. Blockade of GpIIb/IIIa inhibits the release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from tumor cell-activated platelets and experimental metastasis.

    PubMed

    Amirkhosravi, A; Amaya, M; Siddiqui, F; Biggerstaff, J P; Meyer, T V; Francis, J L

    1999-01-01

    Evidence that platelets play a role in tumor metastasis includes the observation of circulating tumor cell-platelet aggregates and the anti-metastatic effect of thrombocytopenia and anti-platelet drugs. Platelets have recently been shown to contain vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) which is released during clotting. We therefore studied the effects of (1) tumor cell-platelet adherence and tumor cell TF activity on platelet VEGF release; and (2) the effects of GpIIb/IIIa blockade on tumor cell-induced platelet VEGF release, tumor cell-induced thrombocytopenia and experimental metastasis. Adherent A375 human melanoma cells (TF+) and KG1 myeloid leukemia (TF-) cells were cultured in RPMI containing 10% fetal bovine serum. Platelet-rich plasma was obtained from normal citrated whole blood and the presence of VEGF (34 and 44 kDa isoforms) confirmed by immunoblotting. Platelet-rich plasma with or without anti-GpIIb/IIIa (Abciximab) was added to A375 monolayers and supernatant VEGF measured by ELISA. Tumor cell-induced platelet activation and release were determined by CD62P expression and serotonin release respectively. In vitro, tumor cell-platelet adherence was evaluated by flow cytometry. In vivo, thrombocytopenia and lung seeding were assessed 30 min and 18 days, respectively, after i.v. injection of Lewis Lung carcinoma (LL2) cells into control or murine 7E3 F(ab')(2) (6 mg/ kg) athymic rats. Maximal in vitro platelet activation (72% serotonin release) occurred 30 min after adding platelets to tumor cells. At this time, 87% of the A375 cells had adhered to platelets. Abciximab significantly (P<0.05) reduced platelet adherence to tumor cells as evidenced by flow cytometry. Incubation of A375 cells with platelets induced VEGF release in a time-dependent manner. This release was significantly inhibited by Abciximab (81% at 30 min; P<0.05). In the presence of fibrinogen and FII, VEGF release induced by A375 (TF+) cells was significantly higher than that induced

  2. Release of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and fibronectin by alveolar macrophages in airway diseases

    PubMed Central

    VIGNOLA, A M; CHANEZ, P; CHIAPPARA, G; MERENDINO, A; ZINNANTI, E; BOUSQUET, J; BELLIA, V; BONSIGNORE, G

    1996-01-01

    Asthma and chronic bronchitis are associated with airway remodelling, and airway macrophages are present in bronchial inflammation. TGF-β and fibronectin released by alveolar macrophages possess a fibrogenic potency. The potential role of alveolar macrophages in airway remodelling was studied in asthma and chronic bronchitis by the release of TGF-β and fibronectin. Alveolar macrophages were isolated by bronchoalveolar lavage in 14 control subjects, 14 asthmatics and 14 chronic bronchitics. The spontaneous and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- or concanavalin A (Con A)-induced release of TGF-β and fibronectin was measured by ELISA. Alveolar macrophages from chronic bronchitics spontaneously release greater amounts of TGF-β and fibronectin than those from asthmatic and control subjects. Alveolar macrophages from asthmatics release greater amounts of TGF-β and fibronectin than those from control subjects. The spontaneous release of TGF-β is significantly correlated with that of fibronectin. Fibronectin release was significantly reduced after LPS stimulation, and TGF-β release was significantly increased after LPS stimulation, except in chronic bronchitis patients. Con A increased the release of TGF-β in cells from normal subjects. This study suggests that activated macrophages play a role in airway remodelling in chronic bronchitis and to a lesser extent in asthma. PMID:8870708

  3. Growth hormone releasing factor (GRF) increases free arachidonate levels in the pituitary: a role for lipoxygenase products

    SciTech Connect

    Canonico, P.L.; Speciale, C.; Sortino, M.A.; Cronin, M.J.; MacLeod, R.M.; Scapagnini, U.

    1986-01-20

    GRF, a specific stimulator of GH release, increased in a concentration- and time-dependent manner pituitary (/sup 3/H)-arachidonate levels in vitro. This effect was antagonized by 100 nM somatostatin. Exogenous arachidonate also stimulated GH release in vitro. Quinacrine, a phospholipase A2 inhibitor, reduced both basal and GRF-stimulated free arachidonate levels as well as GH release. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin was ineffective, while BW755c, which also inhibits the lipoxygenase pathway, produced a further increase in the levels of the fatty acid stimulated by GRF and potently reduced GH release. These results provide additional evidence for the involvement of arachidonate metabolism in the hormone-releasing effect of GRF at the somatotroph. 14 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  4. Botulinum toxin type A targets RhoB to inhibit lysophosphatidic acid-stimulated actin reorganization and acetylcholine release in nerve growth factor-treated PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroshi; Zhang, Xieping; Erickson, Kelly; Ray, Prabhati

    2004-09-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A) produced by Clostridium botulinum inhibits Ca2+-dependent acetylcholine (ACh) release (neuroexocytosis) at peripheral neuromuscular junctions, sometimes causing neuromuscular paralysis. This inhibitory effect is attributed to its metalloprotease activity to cleave the 25-kDa synaptosomal-associated protein, which is essential for the exocytotic machinery. However, deletion of this protein does not result in a complete block of neuroexocytosis, suggesting that botulinum-mediated inhibition may occur via another mechanism. Rho GTPases, a class of small GTP-binding proteins (G proteins), control actin cytoskeletal organization, thereby regulating a variety of cellular functions in various cells, including neuronal cells. We have shown that the G protein activator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) triggered actin reorganization followed by Ca2+-dependent ACh release in nerve growth factor-treated PC12 cells and that BoNT/A blocked both events through degradation of RhoB by the proteasome. Overexpression of wild-type RhoB caused actin reorganization and enhanced the release of ACh by LPA to overcome toxin's inhibitory effect on actin reorganization/exocytosis stimulated by LPA, whereas overexpression of a dominant negative RhoB inhibited ACh release, regardless of LPA and/or toxin treatment. Finally, a knockdown of the RhoB gene via sequence-specific, post-transcriptional gene silencing reduced RhoB expression in PC12 cells, resulting in total inhibition of both actin reorganization and ACh release induced by LPA. We conclude that the RhoB signaling pathway regulates ACh release via actin cytoskeletal reorganization and that botulinum toxin inhibits neuroexocytosis by targeting RhoB pathway.

  5. Sustained release of hepatocyte growth factor by cationic self-assembling peptide/heparin hybrid hydrogel improves β-cell survival and function through modulating inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuyun; Zhang, Lanlan; Cheng, Jingqiu; Lu, Yanrong; Liu, Jingping

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory response is a major cause of grafts dysfunction in islet transplantation. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) had shown anti-inflammatory activity in multiple diseases. In this study, we aim to deliver HGF by self-assembling peptide/heparin (SAP/Hep) hybrid gel to protect β-cell from inflammatory injury. The morphological and slow release properties of SAPs were analyzed. Rat INS-1 β-cell line was treated with tumor necrosis factor α in vitro and transplanted into rat kidney capsule in vivo, and the viability, apoptosis, function, and inflammation of β-cells were evaluated. Cationic KLD1R and KLD2R self-assembled to nanofiber hydrogel, which showed higher binding affinity for Hep and HGF because of electrostatic interaction. Slow release of HGF from cationic SAP/Hep gel is a two-step mechanism involving binding affinity with Hep and molecular diffusion. In vitro and in vivo results showed that HGF-loaded KLD2R/Hep gel promoted β-cell survival and insulin secretion, and inhibited cell apoptosis, cytokine release, T-cell infiltration, and activation of NFκB/p38 MAPK pathways in β-cells. This study suggested that SAP/Hep gel is a promising carrier for local delivery of bioactive proteins in islet transplantation. PMID:27729786

  6. Surface functionalization of microgrooved titanium with dual growth factor-releasing nanoparticles for synergistic osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Suk Won; Lee, Hong Jae; Lee, Jae Won; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Kang, Jong-Ho; Lee, Myung Hyun; Lee, Sang Cheon

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate that dual release of bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) by catechol-functionalized adhesive polymer nanoparticles on microgrooved titanium (Ti) surface enhances in vitro osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The nanoparticles consisted of three distinct domains, surface Ti-adhesive catechol groups, anionic poly(L-aspartic acid) (PAsp) shells, and hydrophobic poly(L-phenylalanine) (PPhe) cores. The immobilization of the adhesive nanoparticles onto microgrooved Ti surface was verified using various surface analytical tools, such as field-emission scanning electron microscopy (Fe-SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle measurement. The nanoparticles were immobilized both on the groove bottom surface and the ridge top surface with a similar anchoring density. A fluorescence microscope visualized that BMP-2 and IGF-1 of positive charges were efficiently loaded onto the negatively charged PAsp shells of immobilized nanoparticles. We confirmed the enhanced osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs by presenting the expression results of major osteoblast marker genes and proteins. In addition, overall significant correlations between the experimental results verified the validity of our study. The proposed combined surface of microgrooves and growth factor-releasing nanoparticles can be used as a strong osteogenic promoter on various biomaterial surfaces. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Novel epidermal growth factor receptor pathway mediates release of human β-defensin 3 from Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Jibran S; Zaidi, Syed F; Zhou, Yue; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2016-04-01

    Persistent Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in hostile gastric mucosa can result in gastric diseases. Helicobacter pylori induces to express antimicrobial peptides from gastric epithelial cells, especially human β-defensin 3 (hBD3), as an innate immune response, and this expression of hBD3 is mediated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation. In this study, we found that phosphorylation of a serine residue of EGFR via transforming growth factor β-activated kinase-1 (TAK1), and subsequent p38α activation is essential for H. pylori-induced hBD3 release from gastric epithelial cells. We showed that this pathway was dependent on H. pylori type IV secretion system and was independent of H. pylori-derived CagA or peptidoglycan. H. pylori infection induced phosphorylation of serine residue of EGFR, and this phosphorylation was followed by internalization of EGFR; consequently, hBD3 was released at an early phase of the infection. In the presence of TAK1 or p38α inhibitors, synthesis of hBD3 was completely inhibited. Similar results were observed in EGFR-, TAK1- or p38α-knockdown cells. However, NOD1 knockdown in gastric epithelial cells did not inhibit hBD3 induction. Our study has firstly demonstrated that this novel EGFR activating pathway functioned to induce hBD3 at an early phase of H. pylori infection.

  8. Chronic pulsatile shear stress alters insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) binding protein release in vitro.

    PubMed

    Elhadj, Selim; Akers, R Michael; Forsten-Williams, Kimberly

    2003-02-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is a potent smooth muscle cell mitogen indicated to have a role in vascular disease. IGF-I stimulates proliferation via receptor activation but its activity is mediated by IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs). Since hemodynamics have been linked to vascular proliferative disorders, we studied how pulsatile low (5 +/- 2 dynes/cm2) and high (23 +/- 8 dynes/cm2) shear stresses impacted IGFBP metabolism in bovine aortic endothelial cells using the Cellmax capillary system. We modeled the pulsatile flow in our system using the Womersley model for flow inside a rigid tube and harmonic analysis revealed that the flow was sinusoidal with a frequency of approximately 0.3 Hz for both shear stress treatments. Laminar flow was confirmed and the phase lag between the pressure and the flow found to be insignificant. Thus, our study provides a necessary characterization of this in vitro system as well as an investigation into how shear impacts the IGF axis. We found a significant difference in IGFBP distribution between treatments and, given that IGFBPs regulate IGF-I activity and that IGF-I-independent activities have been suggested for IGFBP-3, suggest that shear stress may indirectly regulate IGF-I activity, and, by extension, the effect of IGF-I on vascular pathologies.

  9. Reduction of relative centrifugal forces increases growth factor release within solid platelet-rich-fibrin (PRF)-based matrices: a proof of concept of LSCC (low speed centrifugation concept).

    PubMed

    El Bagdadi, K; Kubesch, A; Yu, X; Al-Maawi, S; Orlowska, A; Dias, A; Booms, P; Dohle, E; Sader, R; Kirkpatrick, C J; Choukroun, J; Ghanaati, S

    2017-03-21

    Purpose The present study evaluated the platelet distribution pattern and growth factor release (VEGF, TGF-β1 and EGF) within three PRF (platelet-rich-fibrin) matrices (PRF, A-PRF and A-PRF+) that were prepared using different relative centrifugation forces (RCF) and centrifugation times. Materials and methods immunohistochemistry was conducted to assess the platelet distribution pattern within three PRF matrices. The growth factor release was measured over 10 days using ELISA. Results The VEGF protein content showed the highest release on day 7; A-PRF+ showed a significantly higher rate than A-PRF and PRF. The accumulated release on day 10 was significantly higher in A-PRF+ compared with A-PRF and PRF. TGF-β1 release in A-PRF and A-PRF+ showed significantly higher values on days 7 and 10 compared with PRF. EGF release revealed a maximum at 24 h in all groups. Toward the end of the study, A-PRF+ demonstrated significantly higher EGF release than PRF. The accumulated growth factor releases of TGF-β1 and EGF on day 10 were significantly higher in A-PRF+ and A-PRF than in PRF. Moreover, platelets were located homogenously throughout the matrix in the A-PRF and A-PRF+ groups, whereas platelets in PRF were primarily observed within the lower portion. ​Discussion the present results show an increase growthfactor release by decreased RCF. However, further studies must be conducted to examine the extent to which enhancing the amount and the rate of released growth factors influence wound healing and biomaterial-based tissue regeneration. ​Conclusion These outcomes accentuate the fact that with a reduction of RCF according to the previously LSCC (described low speed centrifugation concept), growth factor release can be increased in leukocytes and platelets within the solid PRF matrices.

  10. Effects of transforming growth factor beta1 released from biodegradable polymer microparticles on marrow stromal osteoblasts cultured on poly(propylene fumarate) substrates.

    PubMed

    Peter, S J; Lu, L; Kim, D J; Stamatas, G N; Miller, M J; Yaszemski, M J; Mikos, A G

    2000-06-05

    Recombinant human transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) was incorporated into microparticles of blends of poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to create a delivery vehicle for the growth factor. The entrapment efficiency of TGF-beta1 in the microparticles containing 5% PEG was 40.3 +/- 1.2% for a TGF-beta1 loading density of 6.0 ng/1 mg of microparticles. For the same loading, 17.9 +/- 0.6 and 32.1 +/- 2.5% of the loaded TGF-beta1 was released after 1 and 8 days, respectively, followed by a plateau for the remaining 3 weeks. Rat marrow stromal cells showed a dose response to TGF-beta1 released from the microparticles similar to that of added TGF-beta1, indicating the activity of TGF-beta1 was retained during microparticle fabrication and after TGF-beta1 release. An optimal TGF-beta1 dosage of 1.0 ng/mL was determined through a 3-day dose response study for maximal alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. The TGF-beta1 released from the microparticles loaded with 6.0 ng TGF-beta1/1 mg of microparticles for the optimal dosage of TGF-beta1 enhanced the proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of marrow stromal cells cultured on poly(propylene fumarate) substrates. The cells showed significantly increased total cell number, ALP activity, and osteocalcin production with values reaching 138,700 +/- 3300 cells/cm(2), 22.8 +/- 1.5 x 10(-7) micromol/min/cell, and 15.9 +/- 1.5 x 10(-6) ng/cell, respectively, after 21 days as compared to cells cultured under control conditions without TGF-beta1. These results suggest that controlled release of TGF-beta1 from the PLGA/PEG blend microparticles may find applications in modulating cellular response during bone healing at a skeletal defect site.

  11. Role of transiently altered sarcolemmal membrane permeability and basic fibroblast growth factor release in the hypertrophic response of adult rat ventricular myocytes to increased mechanical activity in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, D; Pimental, D; Prasad, S; Mäki, T; Berger, H J; McNeil, P L; Smith, T W; Kelly, R A

    1996-01-01

    One of the trophic factors that has been implicated in initiating or facilitating growth in response to increased mechanical stress in several tissues and cell types is basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF; FGF-2). Although mammalian cardiac muscle cells express bFGF, it is not known whether it plays a role in mediating cardiac adaptation to increased load, nor how release of the cytosolic 18-kD isoform of bFGF would be regulated in response to increased mechanical stress. To test the hypothesis that increased mechanical activity induces transient alterations in sarcolemmal permeability that allow cytosolic bFGF to be released and subsequently to act as an autocrine and paracrine growth stimulus, we examined primary isolates of adult rat ventricular myocytes maintained in serum-free, defined medium that were continually paced at 3 Hz for up to 5 d. Paced myocytes, but not nonpaced control cells, exhibited a "hypertrophic" response, which was characterized by increases in the rate of phenylalanine incorporation, total cellular protein content, and cell size. These changes could be mimicked in control cells by exogenous recombinant bFGF and could be blocked in continually paced cells by a specific neutralizing anti-bFGF antibody. In addition, medium conditioned by continually paced myocytes contained significantly more bFGF measured by ELISA and more mitogenic activity for 3T3 cells, activity that could be reduced by a neutralizing anti-bFGF antibody. The hypothesis that transient membrane disruptions sufficient to allow release of cytosolic bFGF occur in paced myocytes was examined by monitoring the rate of uptake into myocytes from the medium of 10-kD dextran linked to fluorescein. Paced myocytes exhibited a significantly higher rate of fluoresceinlabeled dextran uptake. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that nonlethal, transient alterations in sarcolemmal membrane permeability with release of cytosolic bFGF is one mechanism by which increased

  12. Erythropoietin inhibits osmotic swelling of retinal glial cells by Janus kinase- and extracellular signal-regulated kinases1/2-mediated release of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Krügel, K; Wurm, A; Linnertz, R; Pannicke, T; Wiedemann, P; Reichenbach, A; Bringmann, A

    2010-02-17

    The volume homeostasis of retinal glial cells is mediated by an autocrine purinergic mechanism of ion channel opening which is activated in response to a decrease in the extracellular osmolarity. Here, we show that erythropoietin (EPO) prevents the osmotic swelling of glial somata in retinal slices and of isolated glial cells from control and diabetic rats, with a half-maximal effect at approximately 0.01 nM. The downstream signaling evoked by EPO includes a release of vascular endothelial growth factor from the cells which was blocked by Janus kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2 inhibitors. Transactivation of kinase insert domain-containing receptor/fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (KDR/flk-1) evokes a calcium-dependent, exocytotic release of glutamate, followed by activation of group I/II metabotropic glutamate receptors which results in calcium-independent release of ATP and adenosine from the cells. The final step in this cascade is the activation of adenosine A(1) receptors which results in protein kinase A- and phosphoinositide 3-kinase-mediated opening of potassium and chloride channels. EPO receptor protein was immunohistochemically localized to the inner retina and photoreceptor inner segments. In isolated glial cells, EPO receptor protein is selectively localized to fibers which traverse the inner nuclear layer in situ. Inhibition of glial swelling might contribute to the neuroprotective action of EPO in the retina under pathological conditions.

  13. Nerve growth factor release from the urothelium increases via activation of bladder C-fiber in rats with cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Yokokawa, Ryusei; Akino, Hironobu; Ito, Hideaki; Zha, Xinmin; Yokoyama, Osamu

    2017-08-01

    There are some reports that bladder C-fibers are partially involved in detrusor overactivity in patients with brain lesions. We investigated the contribution of bladder C-fiber to decreased bladder capacity in rats with cerebral infarction. Cerebral infarction was induced under halothane anesthesia by left middle cerebral artery occlusion with 4-0 nylon thread in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Intramural amounts of ATP and prostaglandin E2 , in vivo and in vitro ATP, NGF, and prostaglandin E2 release from the distended bladder urothelium, and changes in mRNA expressions of sensor molecules and receptors were monitored 6 h after the occlusion. Cystometry was performed in rats with or without resiniferatoxin pretreatment. Overexpression of sensor molecule, transient receptor potential vanilloid-type channel 1, acid-sensing ion channel 2, purinergic receptors P2X3 , and M2 /M3 muscarinic receptors was found in the bladder. These changes were accompanied by increases in ATP and NGF release from the urothelium. In contrast, when bladder C-fibers were desensitized by resiniferatoxin, no increase in NGF release from the urothelium was found either in vivo or in vitro. There was no difference in the percentage decrease in bladder capacity between cerebral infarction rats pretreated with resiniferatoxin and cerebral infarction rats without pretreatment. Results indicate that expression of sensor molecules in the bladder is altered by distant infarction in the brain. ATP and NGF release from the urothelium also increased. NGF release was related to activation of bladder C-fibers. Bladder C-fibers might not contribute much to decreased bladder capacity caused by cerebral infarction. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Experiment K-7-22: Growth Hormone Regulation Synthesis and Secretion in Microgravity. Part 2; Hypothalamic Growth Hormone-Releasing Factor, Somatostatin Immunoreactivity, and Messenger RNA Levels in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawchenko, P. E.; Arias, C.; Krasnov, I.; Grindeland, R. E.; Vale, W.

    1994-01-01

    Immunohistochemical analyses of hypothalamic hormones carried out on tissue from rats flown on an earlier flight (Cosmos 1887) suggested preferential effects on hypophysiotropic principles involved in the regulation of growth hormone secretion and synthesis. We found that staining in the median eminence for peptides that provide both stimulatory (growth hormone-releasing factor, or GRF) and inhibitory (somatostatin, SS) influences on growth hormone secretion were depressed in flight animals relative to synchronous controls, while staining for other neuroendocrine peptides, cortocotropin-releasing factor and arginine vasopressin, were similar in these two groups. While this suggests some selective impact of weightlessness on the two principal central nervous system regulators of growth hormone dynamics, the fact that both GRF- and SS-immunoreactivity (IR) appeared affected in the same direction is somewhat problematic, and makes tentative any intimation that effects on CNS control mechanisms may be etiologically significant contributors to the sequelae of reduced growth hormone secretion seen in prolonged space flight. To provide an additional, and more penetrating, analysis we attempted in hypothalamic material harvested from animals flown on Cosmos 2044 to complement immunohistochemical analyses of GRF and SS staining with quantitative, in situ assessments of messenger RNAs encoding the precursors for both these hormones.

  15. Experiment K-7-22: Growth Hormone Regulation Synthesis and Secretion in Microgravity. Part 2; Hypothalamic Growth Hormone-Releasing Factor, Somatostatin Immunoreactivity, and Messenger RNA Levels in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawchenko, P. E.; Arias, C.; Krasnov, I.; Grindeland, R. E.; Vale, W.

    1994-01-01

    Immunohistochemical analyses of hypothalamic hormones carried out on tissue from rats flown on an earlier flight (Cosmos 1887) suggested preferential effects on hypophysiotropic principles involved in the regulation of growth hormone secretion and synthesis. We found that staining in the median eminence for peptides that provide both stimulatory (growth hormone-releasing factor, or GRF) and inhibitory (somatostatin, SS) influences on growth hormone secretion were depressed in flight animals relative to synchronous controls, while staining for other neuroendocrine peptides, cortocotropin-releasing factor and arginine vasopressin, were similar in these two groups. While this suggests some selective impact of weightlessness on the two principal central nervous system regulators of growth hormone dynamics, the fact that both GRF- and SS-immunoreactivity (IR) appeared affected in the same direction is somewhat problematic, and makes tentative any intimation that effects on CNS control mechanisms may be etiologically significant contributors to the sequelae of reduced growth hormone secretion seen in prolonged space flight. To provide an additional, and more penetrating, analysis we attempted in hypothalamic material harvested from animals flown on Cosmos 2044 to complement immunohistochemical analyses of GRF and SS staining with quantitative, in situ assessments of messenger RNAs encoding the precursors for both these hormones.

  16. Long-term cytokine and growth factor release from equine platelet-rich fibrin clots obtained with two different centrifugation protocols.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Aristizabal, Román F; López, Catalina; Álvarez, María E; Giraldo, Carlos; Prades, Marta; Carmona, Jorge U

    2017-09-01

    To compare the temporal release (over three weeks) of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 4 (IL-4), IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) and transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1) from two platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) preparations from equine blood obtained at either 240g/8min or 416g/10min. Whole blood from 10 horses was used to obtain PRF clots by two different centrifugation protocols. After 1h of rest, PRF clots were deposited in wells with culture medium, which was changed at 6h, 24h and then every 48h to 21days. Cytokines and GFs were measured by ELISA at 1h (serum supernatants from PRF clots) and all time points of culture medium change. A negative control (plasma) and a positive control (blood lysate) were also included. There were no relevant differences between the two protocols for the temporal release of proteins. However, a significant (p=0.01) effect of time was noted. All cytokines were detected after 6h of PRF clot culture until day 21. GF were detected at 1h until day 21. The concentrations for these proteins diminished gradually over time. A highly significant (p=0.01) correlation was noticed between all the proteins evaluated. Leukocytes enmeshed in PRF clots were able to produce cytokines, TGF-β1 and PDGF-BB. These findings demonstrate a paramount role of leukocytes in wound healing induced or modified by PRF clots in mammals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Regeneration of anterior cruciate ligament by biodegradable scaffold combined with local controlled release of basic fibroblast growth factor and collagen wrapping.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuta; Hokugo, Akishige; Takamoto, Tomoaki; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Kurosawa, Hisashi

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study was to increase the therapeutic efficacy of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery using an artificial ligament material developed through a combination of tissue engineering technologies. A poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) scaffold of plain-woven braid was incorporated with a gelatin hydrogel for controlled release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and wrapped with a collagen membrane to allow space for ligament regeneration. For the ACL reconstruction surgery, the PLLA braid scaffold combined with the gelatin hydrogel incorporating bFGF and the collagen wrapping was applied to a tunnel prepared in the femur and tibia of rabbits. The hydrogel was placed in the bone, whereas the portion of the braid inside the joint cavity was wrapped with the membrane. As controls, the PLLA scaffold was applied with the hydrogel or the membrane, or without either material. Bone regeneration in the tunnel and ACL tissue regeneration in the joint cavity were histologically evaluated, and the mechanical strength and collagen content of the regenerated ACL were assessed. When the PLLA scaffold was integrated with both the hydrogel and the membrane, bone and ACL tissues were regenerated in the corresponding sites, in marked contrast to the control groups. Combination of bFGF-controlled release resulted in enhanced mechanical strength of the regenerated ACL tissue. In the joint cavity, it is possible that the local bFGF release inside the membrane enhanced the cell migration and collagen production, and that the surrounding PLLA scaffold results in the biological regeneration of ligament-like tissue. Additionally, significant bone regeneration around the scaffold was observed in the bone tunnel. It is therefore possible that the local controlled release of bFGF near the PLLA braid induced both osseointegration and intrascaffold cell migration in the bone tunnel and joint cavity, respectively, resulting in an overall increase in the mechanical strength of

  18. BET Bromodomains Regulate Transforming Growth Factor-β-induced Proliferation and Cytokine Release in Asthmatic Airway Smooth Muscle*

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Mark M.; Durham, Andrew L.; Austin, Philip J.; Adcock, Ian M.; Chung, Kian Fan

    2015-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass is increased in asthma, and ASM cells from patients with asthma are hyperproliferative and release more IL-6 and CXCL8. The BET (bromo- and extra-terminal) family of proteins (Brd2, Brd3, and Brd4) govern the assembly of histone acetylation-dependent chromatin complexes. We have examined whether they modulate proliferation and cytokine expression in asthmatic ASM cells by studying the effect of BET bromodomain mimics JQ1/SGCBD01 and I-BET762. ASM cells from healthy individuals and nonsevere and severe asthmatics were pretreated with JQ1/SGCBD01 and I-BET762 prior to stimulation with FCS and TGF-β. Proliferation was measured by BrdU incorporation. IL-6 and CXCL8 release was measured by ELISA, and mRNA expression was measured by quantitative RT-PCR. ChIP using a specific anti-Brd4 antibody and PCR primers directed against the transcriptional start site of IL-6 and CXCL8 gene promoters was performed. Neither JQ1/SGCBD01 nor I-BET762 had any effect on ASM cell viability. JQ1/SGCBD01 and I-BET762 inhibited FCS+TGF-β-induced ASM cell proliferation and IL-6 and CXCL8 release in healthy individuals (≥ 30 nm) and in nonsevere and severe asthma patients (≥100 nm), with the latter requiring higher concentrations of these mimics. JQ1/SGCBD01 reduced Brd4 binding to IL8 and IL6 promoters induced by FCS+TGF-β. Mimics of BET bromodomains inhibit aberrant ASM cell proliferation and inflammation with lesser efficiency in those from asthmatic patients. They may be effective in reducing airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:25697361

  19. Factors affecting bone growth.

    PubMed

    Gkiatas, Ioannis; Lykissas, Marios; Kostas-Agnantis, Ioannis; Korompilias, Anastasios; Batistatou, Anna; Beris, Alexandros

    2015-02-01

    Bone growth and development are products of the complex interactions of genetic and environmental factors. Longitudinal bone growth depends on the growth plate. The growth plate has 5 different zones-each with a different functional role-and is the final target organ for longitudinal growth. Bone length is affected by several systemic, local, and mechanical factors. All these regulation systems control the final length of bones in a complicated way. Despite its significance to bone stability, bone growth in width has not been studied as extensively as longitudinal bone growth. Bone growth in width is also controlled by genetic factors, but mechanical loading regulates periosteal apposition. In this article, we review the most recent data regarding bone growth from the embryonic age and analyze the factors that control bone growth. An understanding of this complex system is important in identifying metabolic and developmental bone diseases and fracture risk.

  20. Transforming growth factor-beta1 incorporation in an alpha-tricalcium phosphate/dicalcium phosphate dihydrate/tetracalcium phosphate monoxide cement: release characteristics and physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Blom, E J; Klein-Nulend, J; Wolke, J G C; Kurashina, K; van Waas, M A J; Burger, E H

    2002-02-01

    The osteoconductive properties of calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) may be improved by the addition of growth factors, such as recombinant human transforming growth factor-beta1 (rhTGF-beta1). Previously we have shown that rhTGF-beta1 was released from cement enriched with rhTGF-beta1 and subsequently stimulated the differentiation of pre-osteoblastic cells from adult rat long bones. It is unknown whether the addition of rhTGF-beta1 changes the material properties of this alpha-tricalcium-phosphate (alpha-TCP)/tetracalcium-phosphate-monoxide (TeCP)/dicalcium-phosphate-dihydrate (DCPD) cement, and what the characteristics of the release of rhTGF-beta1 from this CPC are. Therefore, in the present study we determined the release of rhTGF-beta1 from cement pellets in vitro. The possible intervening effects of the CPC modification for intermixing rhTGF-beta1 on physicochemical properties were studied by assessing the compressive strength and setting time, as well as crystallinity, calcium to phosphorus ratio, porosity and microscopic structure. Most of the previously incorporated rhTGF-beta1 in the cement pellets was released within the first 48 h. For all concentrations of rhTGF-beta1 intermixed (100 ng-2.5 mg/g CPC), approximately 0.5% of the amount of rhTGF-beta1 incorporated initially was released in the first 2 h, increasing to 1.0% after 48 h. The release of rhTGF-beta1 continued hereafter at a rate of about 0.1% up to 1 week, after which no additional release was found. The initial setting time, nor the final setting time was changed in control cement without rhTGF-beta1 (standard CPC) or in cement modified for rhTGF-beta1 (modified CPC) at 20 degrees C and 37 degrees C. Setting times were more than six times decreased at 37 degrees C compared to 20 degrees C. The compressive strength was initially low for both standard CPC and modified CPC, after which it increased between 24 h and 8 weeks. The compressive strength for the modified CPC was significantly higher

  1. Engineered Cartilage via Self-Assembled hMSC Sheets with Incorporated Biodegradable Gelatin Microspheres Releasing Transforming Growth Factor-β1

    PubMed Central

    Solorio, Loran D.; Vieregge, Eran L.; Dhami, Chirag D.; Dang, Phuong N.; Alsberg, Eben

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembling cell sheets have shown great potential for use in cartilage tissue engineering applications, as they provide an advantageous environment for the chondrogenic induction of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). We have engineered a system of self-assembled, microsphere-incorporated hMSC sheets capable of forming cartilage in the presence of exogenous transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) or with TGF-β1 released from incorporated microspheres. Gelatin microspheres with two different degrees of crosslinking were used to enable different cell-mediated microsphere degradation rates. Biochemical assays, histological and immunohistochemical analyses, and biomechanical testing were performed to determine biochemical composition, structure, and equilibrium modulus in unconfined compression after 3 weeks of culture. The inclusion of microspheres with or without loaded TGF-β1 significantly increased sheet thickness and compressive equilibrium modulus, and enabled more uniform matrix deposition by comparison to control sheets without microspheres. Sheets incorporated with fast-degrading microspheres containing TGF-β1 produced significantly more GAG and GAG per DNA than all other groups tested and stained more intensely for type II collagen. These findings demonstrate improved cartilage formation in microsphere-incorporated cell sheets, and describe a tailorable system for the chondrogenic induction of hMSCs without necessitating culture in growth factor-containing medium. PMID:22100386

  2. Temporal growth factor release from platelet-rich plasma, trehalose lyophilized platelets, and bone marrow aspirate and their effect on tendon and ligament gene expression.

    PubMed

    McCarrel, Taralyn; Fortier, Lisa

    2009-08-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has generated substantial interest for tendon and ligament regeneration because of the high concentrations of growth factors in platelet alpha-granules. This study compared the temporal release of growth factors from bone marrow aspirate (BMA), PRP, and lyophilized platelet product (PP), and measured their effects on tendon and ligament gene expression. Blood and BMA were collected and processed to yield PRP and plasma. Flexor digitorum superficialis tendon (FDS) and suspensory ligament (SL) explants were cultured in 10% plasma in DMEM (control), BMA, PRP, or PP. TGF-beta1 and PDGF-BB concentrations were determined at 0, 24, and 96 h of culture using ELISA. Quantitative RT-PCR for collagen types I and III (COL1A1, COL3A1), cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), decorin, and matrix metalloproteinases-3 and 13 (MMP-3, MMP-13) was performed. TGF-beta1 and PDGF-BB concentrations were highest in PRP and PP. Growth factor quantity was unchanged in BMA, increased in PRP, and decreased in PP over 4 days. TGF-beta1 and platelet concentrations were positively correlated. Lyophilized PP and PRP resulted in increased COL1A1:COL3A1 ratio, increased COMP, and decreased MMP-13 expression. BMA resulted in decreased COMP and increased MMP-3 and MMP-13 gene expression. Platelet concentration was positively correlated with COL1A1, ratio of COL1A1:COL3A1, and COMP, and negatively correlated with COL3A1, MMP-13, and MMP-3. White blood cell concentration was positively correlated with COL3A1, MMP3, and MMP13, and negatively correlated with a ratio of COL1A1:COL3A1, COMP, and decorin. These findings support further in vivo investigation of PRP and PP for treatment of tendonitis and desmitis.

  3. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) fragment-guided anticancer theranostic particles for pH-responsive release of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Kang, Myun Koo; Mao, Wei; Lee, Jun Bae; Yoo, Hyuk Sang

    2017-03-15

    EGF fragment (EGFfr) and doxorubicin were chemically co-decorated on single magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for concomitant cancer targeting and treatment. Magnetic nanoparticles were prepared by the precipitation of ferric chloride hydrates in an ammonia solution and subsequent surface-functionalization with amines. The terminal thiol group of the EGF fragment was first conjugated to surface amines of the MNPs using a heterofunctional crosslinker, and doxorubicin was sequentially conjugated to the MNPs via a hydrazone linker, where the degree of subsitution of the surface amines to EGFfr was varied from 1% to 40%. The decorated doxorubicin showed clear pH-dependency in the release profile, and doxorubicin showed fast release at pH 5.0 in comparison to pH 7.4. The EGF-decorated MNPs were tested for differential cellular uptakes against EGF overexpressing cells (A549), and the uptake levels gradually increased to 10% and saturated, which was quantified by ICP-OES. Internalized doxorubicin was also visualized by confocal microscopy, and A549 cells with EGF-decorated MNPs with EGF decoration showed higher fluorescence intensity of doxorubicin than those with non-decorated MNPs. Anti-cancer activity of the MNPs was compared at various concentrations of doxorubicin and EGFfr. Decoration of EGFfr significantly increased the anti-cancer activity of doxorubicin-incorporated MNPs in A549 cells; however, EGFfr alone did not affect the viability of the cells. Thus, we concluded that MNPs with optimized EGFfr and doxorubicin ratios showed higher targeting and drug payload against EGF receptor overexpressing cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Infection of murine macrophages with Toxoplasma gondii is associated with release of transforming growth factor beta and downregulation of expression of tumor necrosis factor receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Bermudez, L E; Covaro, G; Remington, J

    1993-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is capable of invading and multiplying within murine peritoneal macrophages. Previous studies have shown that treatment of macrophage monolayers with recombinant gamma interferon but not tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is associated with intracellular killing of T. gondii by macrophages. Furthermore, infection of macrophages with T. gondii prevents their stimulation for mycobactericidal activity by TNF. Since transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is known to suppress a number of functions in macrophages, we investigated the influence of infection with T. gondii on macrophage TNF receptors and on production of TGF-beta. Infection with T. gondii was associated with increased production of TGF-beta and downregulation of TNF receptors. This effect was observed early after infection and was partially inhibited by anti-TGF-beta 1 antibody. PMID:8406801

  5. Ghrelin and obestatin modulate growth hormone-releasing hormone release and synaptic inputs onto growth hormone-releasing hormone neurons.

    PubMed

    Feng, Dan D; Yang, Seung-Kwon; Loudes, Catherine; Simon, Axelle; Al-Sarraf, Tamara; Culler, Michael; Alvear-Perez, Rodrigo; Llorens-Cortes, Catherine; Chen, Chen; Epelbaum, Jacques; Gardette, Robert

    2011-09-01

    Ghrelin, a natural ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), is synthesized in the stomach but may also be expressed in lesser quantity in the hypothalamus where the GHS-R is located on growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) neurons. Obestatin, a peptide derived from the same precursor as ghrelin, is able to antagonize the ghrelin-induced increase of growth hormone (GH) secretion in vivo but not from pituitary explants in vitro. Thus, the blockade of ghrelin-induced GH release by obestatin could be mediated at the hypothalamic level by the neuronal network that controls pituitary GH secretion. Ghrelin increased GHRH and decreased somatostatin (somatotropin-releasing inhibitory factor) release from hypothalamic explants, whereas obestatin only reduced the ghrelin-induced increase of GHRH release, thus indicating that the effect of ghrelin and obestatin is targeted to GHRH neurons. Patch-clamp recordings on mouse GHRH-enhanced green fluorescent protein neurons indicated that ghrelin and obestatin had no significant effects on glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Ghrelin decreased GABAergic synaptic transmission in 44% of the recorded neurons, an effect blocked in the presence of the GHS-R antagonist BIM28163, and stimulated the firing rate of 78% of GHRH neurons. Obestatin blocked the effects of ghrelin by acting on a receptor different from the GHS-R. These data suggest that: (i) ghrelin increases GHRH neuron excitability by increasing their action potential firing rate and decreasing the strength of GABA inhibitory inputs, thereby leading to an enhanced GHRH release; and (ii) obestatin counteracts ghrelin actions. Such interactions on GHRH neurons probably participate in the control of GH secretion.

  6. The effect of continuous release of recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rh-EGF) in chitosan film on full thickness excisional porcine wounds.

    PubMed

    Hong, Joon Pio; Kim, Yeun Wha; Lee, Sang Kil; Kim, Sun Hee; Min, Kyung Hyun

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate the effect of continuously released recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rh-EGF) in chitosan film in full thickness porcine wounds. A total of 10 domestic pigs (Yorkshire species) weighing 18 to 22 kg between the ages of 50 to 60 days were used. The wounds were divided into 3 groups and treated selectively with rh-EGF in chitosan film (EGF 20 ug/wound/d), chitosan film without rh-EGF, or remained as the control group. One hundred percent healing time was observed, and hematoxylin and eosin and Anti Ki-67 antibody immunohistochemical staining were performed. The 100% healing time and Anti Ki-67 antibody immunohistochemical staining showed statistical significance of the rh-EGF chitosan film-treated group against the control group (P < 0.05). But it did not reveal any statistical significance over the chitosan film-treated group. In this preliminary study, although continuous release of rh-EGF in chitosan film accelerates epithelialization, the benefit of the combination of rh-EGF in chitosan cannot be determined over the use of chitosan alone. Further analysis using complex wound models such as diabetes or infection, which may have different pathology in healing, will be needed to evaluate the potential benefit/synergistic effectiveness.

  7. Evaluation of Autologous Fascia Implantation With Controlled Release of Fibroblast Growth Factor for Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Paralysis Due to Long-term Denervation.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Hiromi; Nishiyama, Koichiro; Seino, Yutomo; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Okamoto, Makito

    2016-06-01

    Paralyzed tissue due to long-term denervation is resistant to many treatments because it induces irreversible histological changes and disorders of deglutition or phonation. We sought to determine the effect of autologous transplantation of fascia into the vocal fold (ATFV) with controlled release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on long-term unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP). Unilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) section was performed on 20 rats. Five rats were implanted with autologous fascia only (fascia group), and 10 rats were implanted with autologous fascia and a gelatin hydrogel sheet with 1 μg (1 μg bFGF + fascia group) or 0.1 μg (0.1 μg bFGF + fascia group) of bFGF 4 months after RLN section. We evaluated the normalized glottal gap and laryngeal volume and histological changes 3 months after implantation. The normalized glottal gap was significantly reduced in the 3 fascia implantation groups. Normalized laryngeal volume, fat volume, and lateral thyroarytenoid muscle volume were significantly increased in the 2 fascia implantation with bFGF groups. The ATFV with controlled release of bFGF repaired the glottal gap and laryngeal volume after RLN section and may reduce the occurrence of aspiration and hoarseness. We speculate that this treatment improves laryngeal function in long-term RLN denervation. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. A novel grapheme oxide-modified collagen-chitosan bio-film for controlled growth factor release in wound healing applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Dan, Weihua; Dan, Nianhua; Liu, Xinhua; Liu, Xuexu; Peng, Xu

    2017-08-01

    Collagen-chitosan composite film modified with grapheme oxide (GO) and 1-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC), termed CC-G-E film, was loaded with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) as the development of an efficacious wound healing device. In this study we report a novel drug delivery system that prevents the initial burst release and loss of bioactivity of drugs in vitro and in vivo applications. The results showed that CC-G-E film possessed improved thermal stability and a higher rate of crosslinking with increased mechanical properties when the dosage of GO was between 0.03% and 0.07%. It was shown that the in vitro release of bFGF from CC-G-E film continued for more than 28d. Furthermore, the CC-G-E films demonstrated excellent in vitro biocompatibility following culture with L929 fibroblasts in terms of cell adhesion and proliferation. CC-G-E films were implanted into Sprague-Dawley rats to characterize their ability to repair full-thickness skin wounds. Results showed that the CC-G-E film accelerated the wound healing process compared with the blank control. Based on all the results, it was concluded that CC-G-E film operates as a novel drug delivery system and due to its performance in wound remodeling, has potential to be developed as a wound dressing material. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A new growth factor controlled drug release system to promote healing of bone fractures: nanospheres of recombinant human bone morphogenetic-2 and polylactic acid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Liu, Lei; Li, Cai; Tan, Yinghui; Zhang, Gang

    2011-04-01

    To prepare a new drug control release system, which can markedly promote the healing of bone fractures. Optimized water-in-oil-in-water multiple emulsion evaporation method, prepared nanospheres of recombinant human bone morphogenetic-2 and polylactic acid (rhBMP-2-PLA-Ns). Its physical character was determined by the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay method. Its bioactivity was measured with the microculture tetrazolium test immunohistochemical analyses, alizarin red staining and western blot analysis. rhBMP-2-PLA-Ns exhibited an even and uniform spherical appearance without adhesion, with a particle size distribution between 35 and 65 nm, and a mean size of 45 nm. The drug loading volume and encapsulation efficiency reached ([124.73 +/- 0.41] x 10(-3))% and (90.54 +/- 1.32)%, respectively. The drug release in vitro persisted for 14 days, with a mean concentration of 73.44 +/- 5.38 ng/ml, and corresponded to the Higuichi equation (r = 0.9962). The microculture tetrazolium test showed that 4 days later, the optical density value ranking was rhBMP-2-PLA-N group > rhBMP-2 group > blank control group. Fluorescence immunocytochemical analysis showed that 10 days later the fluorescent density of the rhBMP-2-PLA-N group was significantly higher than the other two groups. Western blot analysis confirmed that the amount of vascular endothelial growth factor in the rhBMP-2-PLA-N group was the greatest. This study showed that rhBMP-2-PLA-Ns have excellent biological activity, can promote proliferation, differentiation and mineralization of osteoblasts. The drug release time is suitable for fracture healing and is an ideal delivery system for fracture healing.

  10. 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 is an autocrine regulator of extracellular matrix turnover and growth factor release via ERp60 activated matrix vesicle metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Boyan, Barbara D; Wong, Kevin L; Fang, Mimi; Schwartz, Zvi

    2007-03-01

    Growth plate chondrocytes produce proteoglycan-rich type II collagen extracellular matrix (ECM). During cell maturation and hypertrophy, ECM is reorganized via a process regulated by 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) and involving matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including MMP-3 and MMP-2. 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) regulates MMP incorporation into matrix vesicles (MVs), where they are stored until released. Like plasma membranes (PM), MVs contain the 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3)-binding protein ERp60, phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)), and caveolin-1, but appear to lack nuclear Vitamin D receptors (VDRs). Chondrocytes produce 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) (10(-8)M), which binds ERp60, activating PLA(2), and resulting lysophospholipids lead to MV membrane disorganization, releasing active MMPs. MV MMP-3 activates TGF-beta1 stored in the ECM as large latent TGF-beta1 complexes, consisting of latent TGF-beta1 binding protein, latency associated peptide, and latent TGF-beta1. Others have shown that MMP-2 specifically activates TGF-beta2. TGF-beta1 regulates 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3)-production, providing a mechanism for local control of growth factor activation. 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) activates PKCalpha in the PM via ERp60-signaling through PLA(2), lysophospholipid production, and PLCbeta. It also regulates distribution of phospholipids and PKC isoforms between MVs and PMs, enriching the MVs in PKCzeta. Direct activation of MMP-3 in MVs requires ERp60. However, when MVs are treated with 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3), PKCzeta activity is decreased and PKCalpha is unaffected, suggesting a more complex feedback mechanism, potentially involving MV lipid signaling.

  11. Platelet released growth factors boost expansion of bone marrow derived CD34(+) and CD133(+) endothelial progenitor cells for autologous grafting.

    PubMed

    Lippross, Sebastian; Loibl, Markus; Hoppe, Sven; Meury, Thomas; Benneker, Lorin; Alini, Mauro; Verrier, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell based autologous grafting has recently gained mayor interest in various surgical fields for the treatment of extensive tissue defects. CD34(+) and CD133(+) cells that can be isolated from the pool of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMC) are capable of differentiating into mature endothelial cells in vivo. These endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are believed to represent a major portion of the angiogenic regenerative cells that are released from bone marrow when tissue injury has occurred. In recent years tissue engineers increasingly looked at the process of vessel neoformation because of its major importance for successful cell grafting to replace damaged tissue. Up to now one of the greatest problems preventing a clinical application is the large scale of expansion that is required for such purpose. We established a method to effectively enhance the expansion of CD34(+) and CD133(+) cells by the use of platelet-released growth factors (PRGF) as a media supplement. PRGF were prepared from thrombocyte concentrates and used as a media supplement to iscove's modified dulbecco's media (IMDM). EPC were immunomagnetically separated from human bone morrow monocyte cells and cultured in IMDM + 10% fetal calf serum (FCS), IMDM + 5%, FCS + 5% PRGF and IMDM + 10% PRGF. We clearly demonstrate a statistically significant higher and faster cell proliferation rate at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days of culture when both PRGF and FCS were added to the medium as opposed to 10% FCS or 10% PRGF alone. The addition of 10% PRGF to IMDM in the absence of FCS leads to a growth arrest from day 14 on. In histochemical, immunocytochemical, and gene-expression analysis we showed that angiogenic and precursor markers of CD34(+) and CD133(+) cells are maintained during long-term culture. In summary, we established a protocol to boost the expansion of CD34(+) and CD133(+) cells. Thereby we provide a technical step towards the clinical application of autologous stem cell

  12. Recommended for release on recognizance: factors affecting pretrial release recommendations.

    PubMed

    Petee, T A

    1994-06-01

    Researchers have acknowledged the influence of pretrial release agencies in judicial decision making regarding bail; however, few researchers have focused on the process used by the pretrial release agencies to make bail-bond recommendations. In this study I sought to establish which factors were most salient in making the decision to recommend a defendant for release on recognizance. I found that both officially sanctioned release criteria and "extralegal" variables were predictive of this decision.

  13. The Effect of Lupinus albus on Growth Performance, Body Composition and Satiety Hormones of Male Pigs Immunized against Gonadotrophin Releasing Factor

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Karen; Mullan, Bruce; Kim, Jae Cheol; Dunshea, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Simple Summary Pigs immunized against gonadotrophin releasing factor (immunocastrates; IC males) have an increased feed intake, growth rate, back fat and fat deposition compared to entire males. A previous experiment found that Lupinus albus L. (albus lupins) has the potential to reduce feed intake and fat deposition in IC males. The current experiment aimed to develop a dietary management strategy using albus lupins for either 14 or 28 days pre-slaughter to reduce the increase in feed intake and subsequent increase in carcass fatness in IC males. Abstract Two hundred and ninety four pigs were used with the aim to develop a dietary management strategy using Lupinus albus L. (albus lupins) to reduce the increase in feed intake and subsequent increase in carcass fatness in pigs immunized against gonadotrophin releasing factor (immunocastrates; IC males) and entire male pigs in the late finishing stage. From day (d) 0 to 28, IC males fed the control diet grew faster (p = 0.009) than entire males fed the control diet but there was no difference in growth rate between sexes for pigs fed albus lupins for 14 days pre-slaughter (Albus 14) or pigs fed albus lupins for 28 days pre-slaughter (Albus 28). From d 15 to 28, IC males receiving the Albus 14 diet grew more slowly (p < 0.001) than entire males receiving the Albus 14 diet. From d 15 to 28 (p < 0.001), IC males fed the control diet ate more feed than entire males fed the control diet, although there was no difference between sexes in feed intake of the Albus 14 and Albus 28 diet. Immunocastrates had a lower backfat when fed either Albus 14 or Albus 28 compared to the control diet, although there was no difference between diets for entire males. There was also a trend for pigs on the Albus 14 and Albus 28 diets to have a higher lean deposition (p = 0.055) and a lower fat deposition (p = 0.056) compared to the pigs on the control diet. Pigs fed the Albus 28 diet had a lower plasma ghrelin concentration compared to pigs

  14. Time- and dose-dependent responses of brain histamine to intracerebroventricular and intraperitoneal administrations of growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF1-44).

    PubMed

    Cacabelos, R; Yamatodani, A; Fukui, H; Niigawa, H; Miyake, A; Watanabe, T; Nishimura, T; Wada, H

    1987-04-01

    Changes in the level of histamine (HA) in rat brain induced by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) and intraperitoneal (i.p.) administrations of growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF1-44) were studied. HA was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in the anterior hypothalamic region, posterior hypothalamic region, median eminence, adenohypophysis, neurohypophysis, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. GRF1-44 (1-10 micrograms, i.c.v.) induced significant time- and dose-dependent increases in the concentration of HA in the hypothalamo-hypophyseal system and time-dependent decrease of HA in the hippocampus. In contrast, after i.p. administration of GRF1-44 (10 micrograms) the level of HA in the hypothalamus tended to decrease but the total amount of H-1 receptors in the hypothalamo-hypophyseal system did not change. Circadian variations in the GRF-induced HA and growth hormone responses were also observed, responses being lower in the evening than in the morning. It is concluded that GRF interacts with HA at the central level to optimize the function of the somatotropinergic system.

  15. Sustained dual release of placental growth factor-2 and bone morphogenic protein-2 from heparin-based nanocomplexes for direct osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yun; Deng, Li-Zhi; Sun, Hai-Peng; Xu, Jia-Yun; Li, Yi-Ming; Xie, Xin; Zhang, Li-Ming; Deng, Fei-Long

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the direct osteogenic effect between placental growth factor-2 (PlGF-2) and bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2). Methods Three groups of PlGF-2/BMP-2-loaded heparin–N-(2-hydroxyl) propyl-3-trimethyl ammonium chitosan chloride (HTCC) nanocomplexes were prepared: those with 0.5 μg PlGF-2; with 1.0 μg BMP-2; and with 0.5 μg PlGF-2 combined with 1.0 μg BMP-2. The loading efficiencies and release profiles of these growth factors (GFs) in this nanocomplex system were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, their biological activities were evaluated using cell counting kit-8, cell morphology, and cell number counting assays, and their osteogenic activities were quantified using alkaline phosphatase and Alizarin Red S staining assays. Results The loading efficiencies were more than 99% for the nanocomplexes loaded with just PlGF-2 and for those loaded with both PlGF-2 and BMP-2. For the nanocomplex loaded with just BMP-2, the loading efficiency was more than 97%. About 83%–84% of PlGF-2 and 89%–91% of BMP-2 were stably retained on the nanocomplexes for at least 21 days. In in vitro biological assays, PlGF-2 exhibited osteogenic effects comparable to those of BMP-2 despite its dose in the experiments being lower than that of BMP-2. Moreover, the results implied that heparin-based nanocomplexes encapsulating two GFs have enhanced potential in the enhancement of osteoblast function. Conclusion PlGF-2-loaded heparin–HTCC nanocomplexes may constitute a promising system for bone regeneration. Moreover, the dual delivery of PlGF-2 and BMP-2 appears to have greater potential in bone tissue regeneration than the delivery of either GFs alone. PMID:27042064

  16. Regulation of physicochemical properties, osteogenesis activity, and fibroblast growth factor-2 release ability of β-tricalcium phosphate for bone cement by calcium silicate.

    PubMed

    Su, Ching-Chuan; Kao, Chia-Tze; Hung, Chi-Jr; Chen, Yi-Jyun; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Shie, Ming-You

    2014-04-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive material. For this research we have combined it with a low degradation calcium silicate (CS) to enhance its bioactive and osteostimulative properties. To check its effectiveness, a series of β-TCP/CS composites with different ratios were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. Formation of bone-like apatite, the diametral tensile strength, and weight loss of composites were considered before and after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, we also examined the effects of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) released from β-TCP/CS composites and in vitro human dental pulp cell (hDPC) and studied its behavior. The results showed that the apatite deposition ability of the β-TCP/CS composites was enhanced as the CS content was increased. For composites with more than 50% CS contents, the samples were completely covered by a dense bone-like apatite layer. At the end of the immersion point, weight losses of 19%, 24%, 33%, 42%, and 51% were observed for the composites containing 0%, 30%, 50%, 70% and 100% β-TCP cements, respectively. In vitro cell experiments show that the CS-rich composites promote human dental pulp cell (hDPC) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the CS quantity in the composite is less than 70%, the amount of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs was stimulated by FGF-2 released from β-TCP/CS composites. The combination of FGF-2 in degradation of β-TCP and osteogenesis of CS gives a strong reason to believe that these calcium-based composite cements may prove to be promising bone repair materials.

  17. The Effect of Lupinus albus and Calcium Chloride on Growth Performance, Body Composition, Plasma Biochemistry and Meat Quality of Male Pigs Immunized Against Gonadotrophin Releasing Factor

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Karen; Mullan, Bruce; Kim, Jae Cheol; Dunshea, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Pigs immunized against gonadotrophin releasing factor (immunocastrated (IC) males) have an increased feed intake, growth rate, back fat and fat deposition compared to entire males. It is desirable to develop management strategies to limit the increase in feed intake and fat deposition in IC males. This experiment used in-feed ingredients (Lupinus albus (albus lupins) or a combination of calcium chloride and sodium tri-polyphosphate (mineral salts)) to try to suppress the voluntary feed intake of IC male pigs and subsequently fat deposition. Mineral salts decreased feed intake with no effect on fat deposition while albus lupins reduced both feed intake and fat deposition in pigs. Abstract Two hundred and ninety-four pigs were used to assess the effect of two ingredients (Lupinus albus (albus lupins) or a combination of calcium chloride and sodium tri-polyphosphate (mineral salts)) on growth performance, body composition and objective meat quality of pigs immunized against gonadotrophin releasing factor (immunocastrates) and entire male pigs in the late finishing phase. Pigs fed mineral salts ate less feed than those fed the control diet with no effect on growth rate (p > 0.05), backfat (p > 0.05) or fat deposition (p > 0.05). Pigs fed albus lupins had a reduced feed intake (p < 0.001 for all time periods), lower growth rate (p < 0.001 for all time periods), lower backfat (p < 0.005) and decreased fat deposition (p < 0.001 for all time periods) compared to those fed the control diet or mineral salts. From day (d) 0–28 pigs fed mineral salts had a better feed conversion ratio (p = 0.001) than those fed albus lupins who in turn had an improved feed conversion compared to the control diet. Immunocastrates had thicker backfat than entire males at the end of the experiment (p < 0.001), however, feeding albus lupins to immunocastrated males reduced backfat thickness to similar to entire males fed the control diet (p = 0.01). With the exception of the

  18. Set-up of large laboratory-scale chromatographic separations of poly(ethylene glycol) derivatives of the growth hormone-releasing factor 1-29 analogue.

    PubMed

    Piquet, G; Gatti, M; Barbero, L; Traversa, S; Caccia, P; Esposito, P

    2002-01-25

    In this paper we report the scale-up of the purification of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) derivatives of the growth hormone-releasing factor 1-29, from laboratory scale (100 mg of bulk starting material) to larger scale (3 g of bulk), through the use of a cation-exchange TSK-SP-5PW chromatographic column. A one-step purification process capable of purifying large amounts of mono-PEGylated GRF species from the crude reaction mixture was developed. A simple, straightforward stepwise gradient elution separation was developed at laboratory scale and then scaled up with a larger column packed with a chromatographic resin with the same chemistry which maintained the laboratory-scale separation profile. Active material recovery and material purity remained constant through the scale-up from the 13-microm stationary phase to the 25-microm larger column. Overall, the gram GRF equivalent/batch process scale showed to be quite reproducible, and could be considered as a good platform for scale up to production scale.

  19. Transplant of polymer-encapsulated cells genetically engineered to release nerve growth factor allows a normal functional development of the visual cortex in dark-reared rats.

    PubMed

    Pizzorusso, T; Porciatti, V; Tseng, J L; Aebischer, P; Maffei, L

    1997-09-01

    Visual experience is necessary for the normal development of the visual system. Dark-reared mammals show abnormal vision when reintroduced into a normal environment. The absence of visual experience during the critical period results in reduced and/or inappropriate neural responses in visual cortical neurons. The change in electrical activity induced by dark rearing is probably reflected by the modulation of specific unknown molecules. Neurotrophins are present in the developing visual cortex and their production depends on visually driven electrical activity. Recent findings support the possibility that an important link between electrical activity in the visual pathway and correct development of visual properties is represented by neurotrophins. We advance the hypothesis that the visual abnormalities present in dark-reared animals could be due to a decreased production of a neurotrophin secondary to the lack of visual stimulation. We report that some properties of visual cortical response such as receptive field size, orientation selectivity, adaptation to repeated stimulation, response latency and visual acuity are virtually normal in dark-reared rats transplanted with polymer-encapsulated baby hamster kidney cells genetically engineered to release nerve growth factor.

  20. OZONE EXPOSURE INITIATES A SEQUENTIAL SIGNALING CASCADE IN AIRWAYS INVOLVING INTERLEUKIN-1BETA RELEASE, NERVE GROWTH FACTOR SECRETION, AND SUBSTANCE P UPREGULATION

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Joshua S.; Wu, Zhongxin; Hunter, Dawn D.; Dey, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and nerve growth factor (NGF) increase synthesis of substance P (SP) in airway neurons both after ozone (O3) exposure and by direct application. It was postulated that NGF mediates O3-induced IL-1β effects on SP. The current study specifically focused on the influence of O3 on IL-1β, NGF, and SP levels in mice bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and whether these mediators may be linked in an inflammatory-neuronal cascade in vivo. The findings showed that in vivo O3 exposure induced an increase of all three proteins in mouse BALF and that O3-induced elevations in both NGF and SP are mediated by the inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. Further, inhibition of NGF reduced O3 induced increases of SP in both the lung BALF and lung tissue, demonstrating NGF serves as a mediator of IL-1β effects on SP. These data indicate that IL-1β is an early mediator of O3-induced rise in NGF and subsequent SP release in mice in vivo. PMID:25734767

  1. Effects of the breed, sex and age on cellular content and growth factor release from equine pure-platelet rich plasma and pure-platelet rich gel

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is no information on the effects of the breed, gender and age on the cellular content and growth factor (GF) release from equine pure-platelet rich plasma (P-PRP) and pure-platelet rich gel (P-PRG). The objectives of this study were: 1) to compare the cellular composition of P-PRP with whole blood and platelet poor plasma (PPP); 2) to compare the concentration of transforming GF beta 1 (TGF-β1) and platelet derived GF isoform BB (PDGF-BB) between P-PRP treated with non-ionic detergent (P-PRP+NID), P-PRG (activated with calcium gluconate -CG-), PPP+NID, PPP gel (PPG), and plasma and; 3) to evaluate and to correlate the effect of the breed, gender and age on the cellular and GF concentration for each blood component. Forty adult horses, 20 Argentinean Creole Horses (ACH) and, 20 Colombian Creole Horses (CCH) were included. Data were analyzed by parametric (i.e.: t-test, one way ANOVA) and non parametric (Kruskal-Wallis test, Wilcoxon test) tests. Correlation analysis was also performed by using the Spearman and Pearson tests. A p ≤ 0.05 was set as significant for all tests. All the blood components were compared for platelet (PLT), leukocyte (WBC), TGF-β1 and PDGF-BB concentrations. The effect of the breed, gender and age on these variables was analyzed. A P ≤ 0.05 was accepted as significant for all the tests. Results PLT counts were 1.8 and 0.6 times higher in P-PRP than in whole blood and PPP, respectively; WBC counts were 0.5 and 0.1 times lower in P-PRP, in comparison with whole blood and PPP, respectively. TGF-β1 and PDGF-BB concentrations were 2.3 and 262 times higher, respectively, in P-PRG than in plasma, and 0.59 and 0.48 times higher, respectively, in P-PRG than in PPG. P-PRG derived from CCH females or young horses presented significantly (P < 0.001) higher PDGF-BB concentrations than P-PRG derived from ACH males or older horses. Conclusions Our results indicated that P-PRP obtained by a manual method was affected by

  2. Effects of the breed, sex and age on cellular content and growth factor release from equine pure-platelet rich plasma and pure-platelet rich gel.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, Carlos E; López, Catalina; Álvarez, María E; Samudio, Ismael J; Prades, Marta; Carmona, Jorge U

    2013-02-12

    There is no information on the effects of the breed, gender and age on the cellular content and growth factor (GF) release from equine pure-platelet rich plasma (P-PRP) and pure-platelet rich gel (P-PRG). The objectives of this study were: 1) to compare the cellular composition of P-PRP with whole blood and platelet poor plasma (PPP); 2) to compare the concentration of transforming GF beta 1 (TGF-β1) and platelet derived GF isoform BB (PDGF-BB) between P-PRP treated with non-ionic detergent (P-PRP+NID), P-PRG (activated with calcium gluconate -CG-), PPP+NID, PPP gel (PPG), and plasma and; 3) to evaluate and to correlate the effect of the breed, gender and age on the cellular and GF concentration for each blood component. Forty adult horses, 20 Argentinean Creole Horses (ACH) and, 20 Colombian Creole Horses (CCH) were included. Data were analyzed by parametric (i.e.: t-test, one way ANOVA) and non parametric (Kruskal-Wallis test, Wilcoxon test) tests. Correlation analysis was also performed by using the Spearman and Pearson tests. A p ≤ 0.05 was set as significant for all tests. All the blood components were compared for platelet (PLT), leukocyte (WBC), TGF-β1 and PDGF-BB concentrations. The effect of the breed, gender and age on these variables was analyzed. A P ≤ 0.05 was accepted as significant for all the tests. PLT counts were 1.8 and 0.6 times higher in P-PRP than in whole blood and PPP, respectively; WBC counts were 0.5 and 0.1 times lower in P-PRP, in comparison with whole blood and PPP, respectively. TGF-β1 and PDGF-BB concentrations were 2.3 and 262 times higher, respectively, in P-PRG than in plasma, and 0.59 and 0.48 times higher, respectively, in P-PRG than in PPG. P-PRG derived from CCH females or young horses presented significantly (P < 0.001) higher PDGF-BB concentrations than P-PRG derived from ACH males or older horses. Our results indicated that P-PRP obtained by a manual method was affected by intrinsic factors such as the breed

  3. The Effect of Lupinus albus and Calcium Chloride on Growth Performance, Body Composition, Plasma Biochemistry and Meat Quality of Male Pigs Immunized Against Gonadotrophin Releasing Factor.

    PubMed

    Moore, Karen; Mullan, Bruce; Kim, Jae Cheol; Dunshea, Frank

    2016-12-01

    Two hundred and ninety-four pigs were used to assess the effect of two ingredients (Lupinus albus (albus lupins) or a combination of calcium chloride and sodium tri-polyphosphate (mineral salts)) on growth performance, body composition and objective meat quality of pigs immunized against gonadotrophin releasing factor (immunocastrates) and entire male pigs in the late finishing phase. Pigs fed mineral salts ate less feed than those fed the control diet with no effect on growth rate (p > 0.05), backfat (p > 0.05) or fat deposition (p > 0.05). Pigs fed albus lupins had a reduced feed intake (p < 0.001 for all time periods), lower growth rate (p < 0.001 for all time periods), lower backfat (p < 0.005) and decreased fat deposition (p < 0.001 for all time periods) compared to those fed the control diet or mineral salts. From day (d) 0-28 pigs fed mineral salts had a better feed conversion ratio (p = 0.001) than those fed albus lupins who in turn had an improved feed conversion compared to the control diet. Immunocastrates had thicker backfat than entire males at the end of the experiment (p < 0.001), however, feeding albus lupins to immunocastrated males reduced backfat thickness to similar to entire males fed the control diet (p = 0.01). With the exception of the increased muscle pH at 45 minutes post-exsanguination in mineral salts and albus lupins compared with the control diet (p = 0.03) there was no effect of diet on objective pork quality. Pork from IC males had a higher ultimate pH (p < 0.001), was lighter (L*; p = 0.003), more yellow (p = 0.008) and had a higher drip loss (p < 0.001) compared to entire males. Albus lupins show potential in reducing the increase in feed intake and backfat associated with immunocastration. Mineral salts may be useful in situations where a reduction in feed intake and an improvement in feed conversion is desired and reducing fat deposition is not the objective.

  4. FGF growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Zamora, Paul O [Gaithersburg, MD; Pena, Louis A [Poquott, NY; Lin, Xinhua [Plainview, NY; Takahashi, Kazuyuki [Germantown, MD

    2012-07-24

    The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

  5. Association between shear stress and platelet-derived transforming growth factor-β1 release and activation in animal models of aortic valve stenosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Vootukuri, Spandana; Meyer, Alexander; Ahamed, Jasimuddin; Coller, Barry S

    2014-09-01

    Aortic valve stenosis (AS) is characterized by fibrosis and calcification of valves leading to aortic valve narrowing, resulting in high wall shear stress across the valves. We previously demonstrated that high shear stress can activate platelet-derived transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), a cytokine that induces fibrosis and calcification. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of shear-induced platelet release of TGF-β1 and its activation in AS. We studied hypercholesterolemic Ldlr(-/-)Apob(100/100)/Mttp(fl/fl)/Mx1Cre(+/+) (Reversa) mice that develop AS on Western diet and a surgical ascending aortic constriction mouse model that acutely simulates the hemodynamics of AS to study shear-induced platelet TGF-β1 release and activation. Reversa mice on Western diet for 6 months had thickening of the aortic valves, increased wall shear stress, and increased plasma TGF-β1 levels. There were weak and moderate correlations between wall shear stress and TGF-β1 levels in the progression and reversed Reversa groups and a stronger correlation in the ascending aortic constriction model in wild-type mice but not in mice with a targeted deletion of megakaryocyte and platelet TGF-β1 (Tgfb1(flox)). Plasma total TGF-β1 levels correlated with collagen deposition in the stenotic valves in Reversa mice. Although active TGF-β1 levels were too low to be measured directly, we found (1) canonical TGF-β1 (phosphorylated small mothers against decapentaplegic 2/3) signaling in the leukocytes and canonical and noncanonical (phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2) TGF-β1 signaling in aortic valves of Reversa mice on a Western diet, and (2) TGF-β1 signaling of both pathways in the ascending aortic constriction stenotic area in wild-type but not Tgfb1(flox) mice. Shear-induced, platelet-derived TGF-β1 activation may contribute to AS. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. The vascular endothelial growth factor-induced disruption of gap junctions is relayed by an autocrine communication via ATP release in coronary capillary endothelium.

    PubMed

    Thuringer, Dominique

    2004-12-01

    Little is known concerning how the coordination of Ca(2+) signaling aids in capillary endothelial cell (CEC) functions, such as microvascular permeability and angiogenesis. Previous reports support the major involvement of gap junction (GJ) channels. However, the cell-to-cell communication may not be straightforward, especially if we consider the participation of active molecules released by CEC. In this study, short-term effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-165) were compared with those of bradykinin (BK) on gap junction coupling (GJC) and remodeling of connexin-43 (Cx43) and then analyzed for intercellular Ca(2+) signal in primary cultures of coronary CEC. Dye-coupling experiments revealed that BK or VEGF completely blocked GJC. These effects correlated with the rapid internalization of Cx43 and its tyrosine phosphorylation in part via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway. GJC slowly recovered with BK but not with VEGF in the following hour. In control conditions, mechanical stimulation of a single cell within a confluent monolayer triggered an intercellular Ca(2+) wave that was partially inhibited by GJC blockers or purinergic inhibitors. No wave propagation was observed after blockage of both GJC and purinergic receptors. Cell treatment with VEGF also reduced propagation of the Ca(2+) wave, which was totally prevented by applying a purinergic receptor antagonist but not with a GJC blocker. That excludes purine efflux through Cx hemichannels. We conclude that VEGF-induced disruption of GJC via Cx43 remodeling is relayed by an autocrine communication via secretion of ATP to preserve intercellular Ca(2+) signaling in capillary endothelium.

  7. Control-released basic fibroblast growth factor-loaded poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres promote sciatic nerve regeneration in rats

    PubMed Central

    Si, Hai-Bo; Zeng, Yi; Lu, Yan-Rong; Cheng, Jing-Qiu; Shen, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Although peripheral nerve injury may result in a loss of function in innervated areas, the most effective method for nerve regeneration remains to be determined. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of control-released basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-loaded poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microspheres on sciatic nerve regeneration following injury in rats. bFGF-PLGA microspheres were prepared and their characteristics were evaluated. The sciatic nerve was segmentally resected to create a 10 mm defect in 36 Sprague Dawley (SD) rats and, following the anastomosis of the nerve ends with a silicone tube, bFGF-PLGA microspheres, free bFGF or PBS were injected into the tube (n=12 in each group). The outcome of nerve regeneration was evaluated using the sciatic function index (SFI), electrophysiological test and histological staining at 6 weeks and 12 weeks post-surgery. The bFGF-PLGA microspheres were successfully synthesized with an encapsulation efficiency of 66.43%. The recovery of SFI and electrophysiological values were significantly greater (P<0.05), and morphological and histological observations were significantly greater (P<0.05) in bFGF-PLGA microspheres and bFGF groups compared with those in the PBS group, and the quickest recovery was observed in the bFGF-PLGA microspheres group. In conclusion, the bFGF-PLGA microspheres may promote nerve regeneration and functional recovery in the sciatic nerve, and may have potential therapeutic applications in peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:28352311

  8. Development of a recombinant bovine leukemia virus vector for delivery of a synthetic bovine growth hormone-releasing factor gene into bovine cells.

    PubMed

    Mehigh, C S; Elias, V D; Mehigh, R J; Helferich, W G; Tucker, H A

    1993-03-01

    Continuous intravenous infusion of bovine growth hormone-releasing factor (bGRF) increases milk synthesis in dairy cattle by as much as 46%. We have begun to develop a system for delivery and expression of a synthetic bGRF gene in cultured bovine cells using the provirus of the bovine leukemia virus (BLV). The gene encoding synthetic bGRF, constructed from eight overlapping oligonucleotides, was fused to the whey acidic protein promoter (WAP) or the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter (MMTV). These plasmids, termed pWAP.GRF and pMMTV.GRF, were able to induce transcription of bGRF upon transfection into Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells and induction with a lactogenic hormonal milieu (prolactin, hydrocortisone, triiodothyronine, insulin) or dexamethasone. When these constructs were cloned into a BLV vector in place of its oncogenic region, and transfected into MDBK cells, bGRF was expressed. Virus particles were prepared from these cultures and used to deliver the bGRF gene by viral infection into fresh MDBK cells. Northern blot analysis of MDBK total RNA revealed a fivefold higher level of expression of bGRF mRNA in transfected cultures than in virally infected cells, and no expression was detected in control cultures. The bGRF peptide was detected in both cell extracts and media samples from transfected cultures but was not detected in cell extracts or media samples from virally infected cells. This provirus construct may prove useful as a delivery system for peptides into cattle.

  9. Reversal of diabetes in mice with a bioengineered islet implant incorporating a type I collagen hydrogel and sustained release of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Vernon, Robert B; Preisinger, Anton; Gooden, Michel D; D'Amico, Leonard A; Yue, Betty B; Bollyky, Paul L; Kuhr, Christian S; Hefty, Thomas R; Nepom, Gerald T; Gebe, John A

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a bioengineered implant (BI) to evaluate strategies to promote graft survival and function in models of islet transplantation in mice. The BI, sized for implantation within a fold of intestinal mesentery, consists of a disk-shaped, polyvinyl alcohol sponge infused with a type I collagen hydrogel that contains dispersed donor islets. To promote islet vascularization, the BI incorporates a spherical alginate hydrogel for sustained release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). BIs that contained 450-500 islets from syngeneic (C57Bl/6) donors and 20 ng of VEGF reversed streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in 100% of mice (8/8), whereas BIs that contained an equivalent number of islets, but which lacked VEGF, reversed STZ-induced diabetes in only 62.5% of mice (5/8). Between these "+VEGF" and "-VEGF" groups, the time to achieve normoglycemia (8-18 days after implantation) did not differ statistically; however, transitory, postoperative hypoglycemia was markedly reduced in the +VEGF group relative to the -VEGF group. Notably, none of the mice that achieved normoglycemia in these two groups required exogenous insulin therapy once the BIs began to fully regulate levels of blood glucose. Moreover, the transplanted mice responded to glucose challenge in a near-normal manner, as compared to the responses of healthy, nondiabetic (control) mice that had not received STZ. In future studies, the BIs described here will serve as platforms to evaluate the capability of immunomodulatory compounds, delivered locally within the BI, to prevent or reverse diabetes in the setting of autoimmune (type 1) diabetes.

  10. Reversal of Diabetes in Mice With a Bioengineered Islet Implant Incorporating a Type I Collagen Hydrogel and Sustained Release of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, Robert B.; Preisinger, Anton; Gooden, Michel D.; D’Amico, Leonard A.; Yue, Betty B.; Bollyky, Paul L.; Kuhr, Christian S.; Hefty, Thomas R.; Nepom, Gerald T.; Gebe, John A.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a bioengineered implant (BI) to evaluate strategies to promote graft survival and function in models of islet transplantation in mice. The BI, sized for implantation within a fold of intestinal mesentery, consists of a disk-shaped, polyvinyl alcohol sponge infused with a type I collagen hydrogel that contains dispersed donor islets. To promote islet vascularization, the BI incorporates a spherical alginate hydrogel for sustained release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). BIs that contained 450–500 islets from syngeneic (C57Bl/6) donors and 20 ng of VEGF reversed streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in 100% of mice (8/8), whereas BIs that contained an equivalent number of islets, but which lacked VEGF, reversed STZ-induced diabetes in only 62.5% of mice (5/8). Between these “+VEGF” and “−VEGF” groups, the time to achieve normoglycemia (8–18 days after implantation) did not differ statistically; however, transitory, postoperative hypoglycemia was markedly reduced in the +VEGF group relative to the −VEGF group. Notably, none of the mice that achieved normoglycemia in these two groups required exogenous insulin therapy once the BIs began to fully regulate levels of blood glucose. Moreover, the transplanted mice responded to glucose challenge in a near-normal manner, as compared to the responses of healthy, nondiabetic (control) mice that had not received STZ. In future studies, the BIs described here will serve as platforms to evaluate the capability of immunomodulatory compounds, delivered locally within the BI, to prevent or reverse diabetes in the setting of autoimmune (type 1) diabetes. PMID:23231959

  11. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone overcomes follicle-stimulating hormone's inhibition of insulin-like growth factor-5 synthesis and promotion of its degradation in rat granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Onoda, N; Li, D; Mickey, G; Erickson, G; Shimasaki, S

    1995-04-28

    The effect of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone-agonist (GnRH-a) on the synthesis of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5), a physiological marker for atresia, was investigated. Granulosa cells obtained from diethylstilbestrol (DES)-treated immature female rats were cultured in serum-free medium for 72 h with GnRH-a and the conditioned media were subjected to immunoblot analysis using rat IGFBP-5 specific antibody. GnRH-a caused a dose-dependent (ED50 = 8.6 x 10(-11) M) accumulation of IGFBP-5, which migrated as 35 (non-glycosylated) and 36 kDa (glycosylated) bands under reducing conditions. A maximally effective dose of GnRH-a (10(-9) M) caused a 4-fold increase in IGFBP-5 accumulation. In contrast, increasing doses of porcine follicle-stimulating hormone (pFSH) caused a biphasic effect on IGFBP-5 accumulation. A low dose of pFSH (0.25 ng/ml) increased and higher doses of pFSH (22.5 ng/ml) decreased the 35 and 36 kDa IGFBP-5 bands. In the presence of high doses of pFSH (20.75 ng/ml), a 22 kDa band corresponding to a cleaved IGFBP-5 fragment appeared in the media. When the granulosa cells were cultured with a saturating dose of pFSH, co-addition of GnRH-a dose dependently inhibited the FSH effects (ED50 = (2.3-3.7) x 10(-10) M). The GnRH-a effects were completely blocked by co-incubation with GnRH-antagonist. IGFBP-5 mRNA accumulation levels were increased by GnRH-a in a dose dependent manner.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Comparative growth performance of pigs immunised with a gonadotrophin releasing factor vaccine with surgically castrated pigs and entire boars raised under conventionally managed conditions.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Thilo; Nathues, Heiko; Koehrmann, Annika; Andrews, Stuart; Brock, Fiona; Klein, Günter; grosse Beilage, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of using a gonadotrophin releasing factor (GnRF) vaccine on growth performance of male pigs. Vaccinated pigs were compared with surgically castrated pigs and entire males under conventionally managed farm conditions. Male pigs were randomly assigned to three treatment groups: pigs surgically castrated during the first week of life (group "C", n=274), pigs immunised twice during the fattening period with a GnRF vaccine, the first when 13-14 weeks of age and the second when 20-21 weeks of age (group "V" n=280) and entire males (group "E", n=56). Average daily weight gain (ADG) was measured during the study. Additionally, feed conversion ratio (FCR) as defined by feed intake/weight gain and feed consumption was assessed during the fattening period. No difference in the ADG during the fattening period could be determined between "C" and "V". From the start of the study until slaughter at study day 160/173 the ADG in group "E" was lower (625 g/day; P) than in group "C" (681 g/day; P < 0.001) and group "V" (675 g/day; P < 0.01). The FCR during the fattening period until study day 160, three days before the first batch of pigs were slaughtered at 24-25 weeks of age, was higher in group"C" (2.72 kg feed intake/kg weight gain) compared with group "V" (2.44 kg feed intake/kg weight gain; P < 0.001) and group "E" (2.44 kg feed intake/kg weight gain; P <0.01). Pigs in group "V" performed similarly to those in group "E" until the second vaccination (day 135) after which time they showed a substantial increase in feed intake and ADG, while retaining an FCR advantage over group C.

  13. Growth factors for nanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftcioglu, Neva; Kajander, E. Olavi

    1999-12-01

    Nanobacteria are novel microorganisms recently isolated from fetal bovine serum and blood of cows and humans. These coccoid, gram negative bacteria in alpha-2 subgroup of Proteobacteria grow slowly under mammalian cell culture conditions but not in common media for microbes. Now we have found two different kinds of culture supplement preparations that improve their growth and make them culturable in the classical sense. These are supernatant fractions of conditioned media obtained from 1 - 3 months old nanobacteria cultures and from about a 2 weeks old Bacillus species culture. Both improved multiplication and particle yields and the latter increased their resistance to gentamicin. Nanobacteria cultured with any of the methods shared similar immunological property, structure and protein pattern. The growth supporting factors were heat-stabile and nondialyzable, and dialysis improved the growth promoting action. Nanobacteria formed stony colonies in a bacteriological medium supplemented with the growth factors. This is an implication that nanobacterial growth is influenced by pre-existing bacterial flora.

  14. Autocrine growth factors and solid tumor malignancy.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, J. H.; Karnes, W. E.; Cuttitta, F.; Walker, A.

    1991-01-01

    The ability of malignant cells to escape the constraint that normally regulate cell growth and differentiation has been a primary focus of attention for investigators of cancer cell biology. An outcome of this attention has been the discovery that the protein products of oncogenes play a role in the activation of growth signal pathways. A second outcome, possibly related to abnormal oncogene expression, has been the discovery that malignant cells frequently show an ability to regulate their own growth by the release of autocrine growth modulatory substances. Most important, the growth of certain malignant cell types has been shown to depend on autocrine growth circuits. A malignant tumor whose continued growth depends on the release of an autocrine growth factor may be vulnerable to treatment with specific receptor antagonists or immunoneutralizing antibodies designed to break the autocrine circuit. Information is rapidly emerging concerning autocrine growth factors in selected human solid tissue malignancy. Images PMID:1926844

  15. Peptide growth factors, part A

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.; Sirbasku, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains information on the following topics: Epidermal Growth Factor;Transforming Growth Factors;Bone and Cartilage Growth Factors;Somatomedin/Insulin-Like Growth Factors;Techniques for the Study of Growth Factor Activity;Assays, Phosphorylation, and Surface Membrane Effects.

  16. Effect of feed restriction and initial body weight on growth performance, body composition, and hormones in male pigs immunized against gonadotropin-releasing factor.

    PubMed

    Moore, K L; Mullan, B P; Kim, J C; Payne, H G; Dunshea, F R

    2016-09-01

    Pigs immunized against gonadotropin-releasing factor (GnRF) have increased carcass fatness compared to entire males; however, the timing of this increase in fatness after the second immunization against GnRF has not been determined. An experiment was conducted to identify and compare the growth performance, body composition, and physiological changes in immunocastrated males (IC males) at different BW and feeding levels. A total of 64 pigs were used in a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial experiment with the treatments being 1) sex (entire males or IC males), 2) initial BW (45.9 kg [light] or 78.3 kg [heavy]), and 3) feeding regime (2.5 times maintenance [restricted] or ad libitum). The pigs were individually housed, and the diets were fed for 4 wk after the second immunization against GnRF until slaughter at either 68.4 kg BW (light) or 105.8 kg BW (heavy). Immunocastrated males on a restricted feed intake had a lower ADG compared to entire males from d 15 to 28 and d 0 to 28 ( 0.011 and 0.011, respectively). Fat deposition was not affected by sex from d 0 to 14, but from d 15 to 28 IC males deposited 45 g/d more fat than entire males ( = 0.025). Immunocastrated male pigs fed ad libitum deposited 87 g/d more fat from d 15 to 28 than entire males fed ad libitum ( = 0.036). However, there was no difference in fat deposition between IC males and entire males when feed intake was restricted from d 15 to 28. Plasma urea nitrogen levels were greater in IC males compared to entire males from d 7 after the second immunization against GnRF ( 0.05 for d 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28). Plasma concentrations of IGF-1 were lower for IC males compared to entire males on d 3, 7, 10, and 28 ( 0.05 for all days). The following conclusions were made: 1) when pigs are immunized at a light BW (50 kg) and/or are on a restricted feed intake, they have a reduced propensity to deposit fat; however, the restriction in feed intake adversely affects growth rate. 2) The majority of fat deposition for males

  17. New microbial growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Bok, S H; Casida, L E

    1977-01-01

    A screening procedure was used to isolate from soil a Penicillium sp., two bacterial isolates, and a Streptomyces sp. that produced a new microbial growth factor. This factor was an absolute growth requirement for three soil bacteria. The Penicillium sp. and one of the bacteria requiring the factor, an Arthrobacter sp., were selected for more extensive study concerning the production and characteristics of the growth factor. It did not seem to be related to the siderochromes. It was not present in soil extract, rumen fluid, or any other medium component tested. It appears to be a glycoprotein of high molecular weight, and it has high specific activity. When added to the diets for a meadow vole mammalian test system, it caused an increased consumption of diet without a concurrent increase in rate of weight gain. PMID:327929

  18. New microbial growth factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bok, S. H.; Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A screening procedure was used to isolate from soil a Penicillium sp., two bacterial isolates, and a Streptomyces sp. that produced a previously unknown microbial growth factor. This factor was an absolute growth requirement for three soil bacteria. The Penicillium sp. and one of the bacteria requiring the factor, an Arthrobacter sp., were selected for more extensive study concerning the production and characteristics of the growth factor. It did not seem to be related to the siderochromes. It was not present in soil extract, rumen fluid, or any other medium component tested. It appears to be a glycoprotein of high molecular weight and has high specific activity. When added to the diets for a meadow-vole mammalian test system, it caused an increased consumption of diet without a concurrent increase in rate of weight gain.

  19. New microbial growth factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bok, S. H.; Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A screening procedure was used to isolate from soil a Penicillium sp., two bacterial isolates, and a Streptomyces sp. that produced a previously unknown microbial growth factor. This factor was an absolute growth requirement for three soil bacteria. The Penicillium sp. and one of the bacteria requiring the factor, an Arthrobacter sp., were selected for more extensive study concerning the production and characteristics of the growth factor. It did not seem to be related to the siderochromes. It was not present in soil extract, rumen fluid, or any other medium component tested. It appears to be a glycoprotein of high molecular weight and has high specific activity. When added to the diets for a meadow-vole mammalian test system, it caused an increased consumption of diet without a concurrent increase in rate of weight gain.

  20. Predictors of Treatment Response to Tesamorelin, a Growth Hormone-Releasing Factor Analog, in HIV-Infected Patients with Excess Abdominal Fat

    PubMed Central

    Mangili, Alexandra; Falutz, Julian; Mamputu, Jean-Claude; Stepanians, Miganush; Hayward, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    Background Tesamorelin, a synthetic analog of human growth hormone-releasing factor, decreases visceral adipose tissue (VAT) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy. Objectives 1) To evaluate the utility of patient characteristics and validated disease-risk scores, namely indicator variables for the metabolic syndrome defined by the International Diabetes Federation (MetS-IDF) or the National Cholesterol Education Program (MetS-NCEP) and the Framingham Risk Score (FRS), as predictors of VAT reduction during tesamorelin therapy at 3 and 6 months, and 2) To explore the characteristics of patients who reached a threshold of VAT <140 cm2, a level associated with lower risk of adverse health outcomes, after 6 months of treatment with tesamorelin. Methods Data were analyzed from two Phase 3 studies in which HIV-infected patients with excess abdominal fat were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive tesamorelin 2 mg (n = 543) or placebo (n = 263) subcutaneously daily for 6 months, using ANOVA and ANCOVA models. Results Metabolic syndrome (MetS-IDF or MetS-NCEP) and FRS were significantly associated with VAT at baseline. Presence of metabolic syndrome ([MetS-NCEP), triglyceride levels >1.7 mmol/L, and white race had a significant impact on likelihood of response to tesamorelin after 6 months of therapy (interaction p-values 0.054, 0.063, and 0.025, respectively). No predictive factors were identified at 3 months. The odds of a VAT reduction to <140 cm2 for subjects treated with tesamorelin was 3.9 times greater than that of subjects randomized to placebo after controlling for study, gender, baseline body mass index (BMI) and baseline VAT (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.03; 7.44). Conclusions Individuals with baseline MetS-NCEP, elevated triglyceride levels, or white race were most likely to experience reductions in VAT after 6 months of tesamorelin treatment. The odds of response of VAT <140 cm2 was 3.9 times greater for tesamorelin

  1. Predictors of Treatment Response to Tesamorelin, a Growth Hormone-Releasing Factor Analog, in HIV-Infected Patients with Excess Abdominal Fat.

    PubMed

    Mangili, Alexandra; Falutz, Julian; Mamputu, Jean-Claude; Stepanians, Miganush; Hayward, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    Tesamorelin, a synthetic analog of human growth hormone-releasing factor, decreases visceral adipose tissue (VAT) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy. 1) To evaluate the utility of patient characteristics and validated disease-risk scores, namely indicator variables for the metabolic syndrome defined by the International Diabetes Federation (MetS-IDF) or the National Cholesterol Education Program (MetS-NCEP) and the Framingham Risk Score (FRS), as predictors of VAT reduction during tesamorelin therapy at 3 and 6 months, and 2) To explore the characteristics of patients who reached a threshold of VAT <140 cm2, a level associated with lower risk of adverse health outcomes, after 6 months of treatment with tesamorelin. Data were analyzed from two Phase 3 studies in which HIV-infected patients with excess abdominal fat were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive tesamorelin 2 mg (n = 543) or placebo (n = 263) subcutaneously daily for 6 months, using ANOVA and ANCOVA models. Metabolic syndrome (MetS-IDF or MetS-NCEP) and FRS were significantly associated with VAT at baseline. Presence of metabolic syndrome ([MetS-NCEP), triglyceride levels >1.7 mmol/L, and white race had a significant impact on likelihood of response to tesamorelin after 6 months of therapy (interaction p-values 0.054, 0.063, and 0.025, respectively). No predictive factors were identified at 3 months. The odds of a VAT reduction to <140 cm2 for subjects treated with tesamorelin was 3.9 times greater than that of subjects randomized to placebo after controlling for study, gender, baseline body mass index (BMI) and baseline VAT (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.03; 7.44). Individuals with baseline MetS-NCEP, elevated triglyceride levels, or white race were most likely to experience reductions in VAT after 6 months of tesamorelin treatment. The odds of response of VAT <140 cm2 was 3.9 times greater for tesamorelin-treated patients than that of patients receiving placebo.

  2. Central effects of growth hormone-releasing hexapeptide (GHRP-6) on growth hormone release are inhibited by central somatostatin action.

    PubMed

    Fairhall, K M; Mynett, A; Robinson, I C

    1995-03-01

    Growth hormone (GH) release is stimulated by a variety of synthetic secretagogues, of which growth hormone-releasing hexapeptide (GHRP-6) has been most thoroughly studied; it is thought to have actions at both pituitary and hypothalamic sites. To evaluate the central actions of this peptide, we have studied GH release in response to direct i.c.v. injections in anaesthetized guinea pigs. GHRP-6 (0.04-1 microgram) stimulated GH release > 10-fold 30-40 min after i.c.v. injection. The same GH response required > 20-fold more GHRP-6 when given by i.v. injection. GH release could also be elicited by a non-peptide GHRP analogue (L-692,585, 1 microgram i.c.v.), whereas a growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) analogue (human GRF27Nle(1-29)NH2, 2 micrograms, i.c.v.) was ineffective. A long acting somatostatin analogue (Sandostatin, SMS 201-995, 10 micrograms i.c.v.) (SMS) given 20 min before 200 ng GHRP-6 blocked GH release. This was unlikely to be due to a direct effect of SMS leaking out to the pituitary, since central SMS injections did not affect basal GH release, nor did they block GH release in response to i.v. GRF injections. We conclude that the hypothalamus is a major target for GHRP-6 in vivo. Since the GH release induced by central GHRP-6 injections can be inhibited by a central action of somatostatin, and other data indicate that GHRP-6 activates GRF neurones, we suggest that somatostatin may block this activation via receptors known to be located on or near the GRF cells themselves. Somatostatin may therefore be a functional antagonist of GHRP-6 acting centrally, as well as at the pituitary gland.

  3. Nutrient Sensing Overrides Somatostatin and Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone to Control Pulsatile Growth Hormone Release.

    PubMed

    Steyn, F J

    2015-07-01

    Pharmacological studies reveal that interactions between hypothalamic inhibitory somatostatin and stimulatory growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) govern pulsatile GH release. However, in vivo analysis of somatostatin and GHRH release into the pituitary portal vasculature and peripheral GH output demonstrates that the withdrawal of somatostatin or the appearance of GHRH into pituitary portal blood does not reliably dictate GH release. Consequently, additional intermediates acting at the level of the hypothalamus and within the anterior pituitary gland are likely to contribute to the release of GH, entraining GH secretory patterns to meet physiological demand. The identification and validation of the actions of such intermediates is particularly important, given that the pattern of GH release defines several of the physiological actions of GH. This review highlights the actions of neuropeptide Y in regulating GH release. It is acknowledged that pulsatile GH release may not occur selectively in response to hypothalamic control of pituitary function. As such, interactions between somatotroph networks, the median eminence and pituitary microvasculature and blood flow, and the emerging role of tanycytes and pericytes as critical regulators of pulsatility are considered. It is argued that collective interactions between the hypothalamus, the median eminence and pituitary vasculature, and structural components within the pituitary gland dictate somatotroph function and thereby pulsatile GH release. These interactions may override hypothalamic somatostatin and GHRH-mediated GH release, and modify pulsatile GH release relative to the peripheral glucose supply, and thereby physiological demand.

  4. Regulation of growth hormone secretion by the growth hormone releasing hexapeptide (GHRP-6).

    PubMed

    Micic, D; Mallo, F; Peino, R; Cordido, F; Leal-Cerro, A; Garcia-Mayor, R V; Casanueva, F F

    1993-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion is regulated by a complex system of central and peripheral signals. Recently, a new GH-releasing hexapeptide (His-D-Trp-Ala-Trp-D-Phe-Lys-NH2) called GHRP-6 which specifically releases GH has been studied. In the present work the mechanism of action of GHRP-6 has been addressed in experimental animal models as well as in obese subjects. GHRP-6 releases GH independently of the hypothalamic factors GHRH and somatostatin and is a powerful GH releaser in obesity.

  5. GROA AIRBORNE RELEASE DISPERSION FACTOR CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    J. Wang

    2005-03-21

    The purpose of this document is to calculate airborne release dispersion factors ({chi}/Q) for the surface and subsurface facilities at the Geological Repository Operations Area (GROA). The calculated {chi}/Q values may be used to estimate radiological consequences to workers for potential releases from normal operations and event sequences for License Application. The scope of this document is to provide estimates of {chi}/Q values at potential onsite receptors from facility releases, under normal operating conditions and event sequences.

  6. Effects of short- and long-term dexamethasone treatment on growth and growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GRH)-GH-insulin-like growth factor-I axis in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, T; Sato, M; Niimi, M; Hizuka, N; Takahara, J

    1997-12-01

    Although the inhibitory effects of a chronic excess of glucocorticoids (GC) on body growth and GH secretion are well established, the mechanisms involved remain unclear. In this study, we examined the chronic effects of a high dose of dexamethasone (DEX) on spontaneous GH secretion and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I in conscious rats. The animals were given daily i.p. injections of DEX (200 microg/day) for either one or four weeks. Body growth assessed by tibia length and serum IGF-I levels was significantly inhibited 1 week after treatment. By contrast, spontaneous GH secretion was not altered 1 week after the treatment. Neither hypothalamic GRH and somtatostain mRNA levels nor GH responses to GRH from single somatotropes were affected 1 week after the treatment. Four weeks after DEX treatment, body growth of the rats was noticeably suppressed. Interestingly, spontaneous GH secretion, hypothalamic GRH mRNA levels and GH responses to GRH were all inhibited 4 weeks after treatment. Pituitary GRH receptor mRNA levels were not altered 1 week after treatment, but increased after 4 weeks. These results indicate that a high dose of DEX initially impairs IGF-I production and subsequently inhibits spontaneous GH secretion in rats. Inhibition of spontaneous GH secretion resulting from chronic GC excess is due, at least in part, to the impairment of hypothalamic GRH synthesis and pituitary GH responsiveness. An increase in the pituitary GRH receptor may be caused by decreased GRH secretion.

  7. Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fridlyand, Leonid E.; Tamarina, Natalia A.; Schally, Andrew V.; Philipson, Louis H.

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is produced by the hypothalamus and stimulates growth hormone synthesis and release in the anterior pituitary gland. In addition, GHRH is an important regulator of cellular functions in many cells and organs. Expression of GHRH G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GHRHR) has been demonstrated in different peripheral tissues and cell types, including pancreatic islets. Among the peripheral activities, recent studies demonstrate a novel ability of GHRH analogs to increase and preserve insulin secretion by beta-cells in isolated pancreatic islets, which makes them potentially useful for diabetes treatment. This review considers the role of GHRHR in the beta-cell and addresses the unique engineered GHRH agonists and antagonists for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We discuss the similarity of signaling pathways activated by GHRHR in pituitary somatotrophs and in pancreatic beta-cells and possible ways as to how the GHRHR pathway can interact with glucose and other secretagogues to stimulate insulin secretion. We also consider the hypothesis that novel GHRHR agonists can improve glucose metabolism in Type 2 diabetes by preserving the function and survival of pancreatic beta-cells. Wound healing and cardioprotective action with new GHRH agonists suggest that they may prove useful in ameliorating certain diabetic complications. These findings highlight the future potential therapeutic effectiveness of modulators of GHRHR activity for the development of new therapeutic approaches in diabetes and its complications. PMID:27777568

  8. The soluble protease ADAMDEC1 released from activated platelets hydrolyzes platelet membrane pro-epidermal growth factor (EGF) to active high-molecular-weight EGF.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Jin, Ge; McIntyre, Thomas M

    2017-06-16

    Platelets are the sole source of EGF in circulation, yet how EGF is stored or released from stimulated cells is undefined. In fact, we found platelets did not store EGF, synthesized as a single 6-kDa domain in pro-EGF, but rather expressed intact pro-EGF precursor on granular and plasma membranes. Activated platelets released high-molecular-weight (HMW)-EGF, produced by a single cleavage between the EGF and the transmembrane domains of pro-EGF. We synthesized a fluorogenic peptide encompassing residues surrounding the putative sessile arginyl residue and found stimulated platelets released soluble activity that cleaved this pro-EGF1020-1027 peptide. High throughput screening identified chymostatins, bacterial peptides with a central cyclic arginyl structure, as inhibitors of this activity. In contrast, the matrix metalloproteinase/TACE (tumor necrosis factor-α-converting enzyme) inhibitor GM6001 was ineffective. Stimulated platelets released the soluble protease ADAMDEC1, recombinant ADAMDEC1 hydrolyzed pro-EGF1020-1027, and this activity was inhibited by chymostatin and not GM6001. Biotinylating platelet surface proteins showed ADAMDEC1 hydrolyzed surface pro-EGF to HMW-EGF that stimulated HeLa EGF receptor (EGFR) reporter cells and EGFR-dependent tumor cell migration. This proteolysis was inhibited by chymostatin and not GM6001. Metabolizing pro-EGF Arg(1023) to citrulline with recombinant polypeptide arginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) abolished ADAMDEC1-catalyzed pro-EGF1020-1027 peptidolysis, while pretreating intact platelets with PAD4 suppressed ADAMDEC1-, thrombin-, or collagen-induced release of HMW-EGF. We conclude that activated platelets release ADAMDEC1, which hydrolyzes pro-EGF to soluble HMW-EGF, that HMW-EGF is active, that proteolytic cleavage of pro-EGF first occurs at the C-terminal arginyl residue of the EGF domain, and that proteolysis is the regulated and rate-limiting step in generating soluble EGF bioactivity from activated platelets. © 2017 by

  9. Enhanced angiogenesis and osteogenesis in critical bone defects by the controlled release of BMP-2 and VEGF: implantation of electron beam melting-fabricated porous Ti6Al4V scaffolds incorporating growth factor-doped fibrin glue.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jia; Xiu, Peng; Tan, Jie; Jia, Zhaojun; Cai, Hong; Liu, Zhongjun

    2015-06-24

    Electron beam melting (EBM)-fabricated porous titanium implants possessing low elastic moduli and tailored structures are promising biomaterials for orthopedic applications. However, the bio-inert nature of porous titanium makes reinforcement with growth factors (GFs) a promising method to enhance implant in vivo performance. Bone-morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are key factors of angiogenesis and osteogenesis. Therefore, the present study is aimed at evaluating EBM-fabricated porous titanium implants incorporating GF-doped fibrin glue (FG) as composite scaffolds providing GFs for improvement of angiogenesis and osteogenesis in rabbit femoral condyle defects. BMP-2 and VEGF were added into the constituent compounds of FG, and then this GF-doped FG was subsequently injected into the porous scaffolds. In five groups of implants, angiogenesis and osteogenesis were evaluated at 4 weeks post-implantation using Microfil perfusion and histological analysis: eTi (empty scaffolds), cTi (containing undoped FG), BMP/cTi (containing 50 μg rhBMP-2), VEGF/cTi (containing 0.5 μg VEGF) and Dual/cTi (containing 50 μg rhBMP-2 and 0.5 μg VEGF). The results demonstrate that these composite implants are biocompatible and provide the desired gradual release of the bioactive growth factors. Incorporation of GF delivery, whether a single factor or dual factors, significantly enhanced both angiogenesis and osteogenesis inside the porous scaffolds. However, the synergistic effect of the dual factors combination was observable on angiogenesis but absent on osteogenesis. In conclusion, fibrin glue is a biocompatible material that could be employed as a delivery vehicle in EBM-fabricated porous titanium for controlled release of BMP-2 and VEGF. Application of this method for loading a porous titanium scaffold to incorporate growth factors is a convenient and promising strategy for improving osteogenesis of critical-sized bone defects.

  10. Customized Ca–P/PHBV nanocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: design, fabrication, surface modification and sustained release of growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Bin; Wang, Min

    2010-01-01

    Integrating an advanced manufacturing technique, nanocomposite material and controlled delivery of growth factor to form multifunctional tissue engineering scaffolds was investigated in this study. Based on calcium phosphate (Ca–P)/poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) nanocomposite microspheres, three-dimensional Ca–P/PHBV nanocomposite scaffolds with customized architecture, controlled porosity and totally interconnected porous structure were successfully fabricated using selective laser sintering (SLS), one of the rapid prototyping technologies. The cytocompatibility of sintered Ca–P/PHBV nanocomposite scaffolds, as well as PHBV polymer scaffolds, was studied. For surface modification of nanocomposite scaffolds, gelatin was firstly physically entrapped onto the scaffold surface and heparin was subsequently immobilized on entrapped gelatin. The surface-modification improved the wettability of scaffolds and provided specific binding site between conjugated heparin and the growth factor recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). The surface-modified Ca–P/PHBV nanocomposite scaffolds loaded with rhBMP-2 significantly enhanced the alkaline phosphatase activity and osteogenic differentiation markers in gene expression of C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal stem cells. Together with osteoconductive nanocomposite material and controlled growth factor delivery strategies, the use of SLS technique to form complex scaffolds will provide a promising route towards individualized bone tissue regeneration. PMID:20504805

  11. Customized Ca-P/PHBV nanocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: design, fabrication, surface modification and sustained release of growth factor.

    PubMed

    Duan, Bin; Wang, Min

    2010-10-06

    Integrating an advanced manufacturing technique, nanocomposite material and controlled delivery of growth factor to form multifunctional tissue engineering scaffolds was investigated in this study. Based on calcium phosphate (Ca-P)/poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) nanocomposite microspheres, three-dimensional Ca-P/PHBV nanocomposite scaffolds with customized architecture, controlled porosity and totally interconnected porous structure were successfully fabricated using selective laser sintering (SLS), one of the rapid prototyping technologies. The cytocompatibility of sintered Ca-P/PHBV nanocomposite scaffolds, as well as PHBV polymer scaffolds, was studied. For surface modification of nanocomposite scaffolds, gelatin was firstly physically entrapped onto the scaffold surface and heparin was subsequently immobilized on entrapped gelatin. The surface-modification improved the wettability of scaffolds and provided specific binding site between conjugated heparin and the growth factor recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). The surface-modified Ca-P/PHBV nanocomposite scaffolds loaded with rhBMP-2 significantly enhanced the alkaline phosphatase activity and osteogenic differentiation markers in gene expression of C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal stem cells. Together with osteoconductive nanocomposite material and controlled growth factor delivery strategies, the use of SLS technique to form complex scaffolds will provide a promising route towards individualized bone tissue regeneration.

  12. An ex vivo model using human osteoarthritic cartilage demonstrates the release of bioactive insulin-like growth factor-1 from a collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffold.

    PubMed

    Wardale, J; Mullen, L; Howard, D; Ghose, S; Rushton, N

    2015-07-01

    Biomimetic scaffolds hold great promise for therapeutic repair of cartilage, but although most scaffolds are tested with cells in vitro, there are very few ex vivo models (EVMs) where adult cartilage and scaffolds are co-cultured to optimize their interaction prior to in vivo studies. This study describes a simple, non-compressive method that is applicable to mammalian or human cartilage and provides a reasonable throughput of samples. Rings of full-depth articular cartilage slices were derived from human donors undergoing knee replacement for osteoarthritis and a 3 mm core of a collagen/glycosaminoglycan biomimetic scaffold (Tigenix, UK) inserted to create the EVM. Adult osteoarthritis chondrocytes were seeded into the scaffold and cultures maintained for up to 30 days. Ex vivo models were stable throughout experiments, and cells remained viable. Chondrocytes seeded into the EVM attached throughout the scaffold and in contact with the cartilage explants. Cell migration and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins in the scaffold was enhanced by growth factors particularly if the scaffold was preloaded with growth factors. This study demonstrates that the EVM represents a suitable model that has potential for testing a range of therapeutic parameters such as numbers/types of cell, growth factors or therapeutic drugs before progressing to costly pre-clinical trials.

  13. Role of pH Changes on Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Release and on the Fibrin Architecture of Platelet-rich Fibrin When Layered with Biodentine, Glass Ionomer Cement, and Intermediate Restorative Material.

    PubMed

    Mullaguri, Harish; Suresh, Nandini; Surendran, Smitha; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy; Chitra, Selvarajan

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of pH that is due to setting reaction of Biodentine, glass ionomer cement (GIC), and intermediate restorative material (IRM) on transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) release and on the fibrin architecture of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF). PRF was obtained from 8 volunteers and layered over the freshly prepared GIC, IRM, and Biodentine mixtures. TGF-β1 release was estimated by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and fibrin structure of PRF was analyzed by using scanning electron microscope at 1 and 5 hours. Biodentine, GIC, and IRM increased the TGF-β1 release in comparison with that of control group (PRF alone) at both 1 and 5 hours. Biodentine released significantly more TGF-β1 than GIC and IRM at 1 hour. At 5 hours both GIC and Biodentine released significantly more TGF-β1 than IRM. The fibrin architecture of the Biodentine group was similar to that of control group at both 1 and 5 hours. In GIC and IRM groups the fibrillar structure of fibrin was collapsed, ill-defined, and cloudy with very thick fibers and irregularly reduced porosities. Biodentine induces larger amount of TGF-β1 release and also maintains the integrity of fibrin structure when compared with GIC and IRM when layered over PRF. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Photobiomodulation on Transforming Growth Factor-β1, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-BB, and Interleukin-8 Release in Palatal Wounds After Free Gingival Graft Harvesting: A Randomized Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Lutfioğlu, Muge; Aydogdu, Ahmet; Saygun, N. Isil; Serdar, Muhittin A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study evaluated the impact of photobiomodulation (PBM) on the healing of the donor palatal area following free gingival graft (FGG) harvesting by examining changes in transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB, and interleukin (IL)-8 levels in palatal wound fluid (PWF). Material and methods: Thirty patients were selected and randomly assigned to receive PBM (laser group) or PBM sham (sham group) in the palatine area after FGG harvesting. A neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser (1064 nm) was applied to the test sites immediately after surgery and every 24 h thereafter for 4 days. PWF was collected on Days 7 and 12, and PWF TGF-β1, PDGF-BB, and IL-8 levels were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Results: PWF TGF-β1, PDGF-BB, and IL-8 levels were significantly lower on Day 12 than on Day 7 for both groups. PWF TGF-β1, PDGF-BB, and IL-8 levels of the laser group were significantly higher than those of sham group on Day 7 (p < 0.05). PWF TGF-β1 levels were also significantly higher in laser group than in the sham group on Day 12; however, differences in PDGF-BB and IL-8 levels between groups on Day 12 were statistically nonsignificant. Conclusions: Observed increases in PWF TGF-β1, PDGF-BB, and IL-8 levels suggest that PBM may accelerate wound healing by stimulating production of selected mediators. PMID:27088277

  15. Locally released retinoic acid leads to facial clefts in the chick embryo but does not alter the expression of receptors for fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Richman, J M; Delgado, J L

    1995-01-01

    Systemic administration of retinoic acid (RA) affects the growth of the upper beak of chick embryos; however, the mechanism for generating a cleft upper beak is not known. In the present study, we wished to elucidate the molecular basis of the retinoid-induced lip clefting. In order to ensure that facial prominences were locally exposed to levels of retinoid known to affect gene expression, we implanted beads soaked in different concentrations of RA in the right nasal pit or in the centre of the frontonasal mass. Beads soaked in 5 mg/ml RA placed in the right nasal pit caused full clefting of the upper beak with a deviation of the midline toward the right side of the face. The asymmetry was principally due to a decrease in size or total elimination of the right lateral nasal prominence. RA-soaked beads placed in the centre of the frontonasal mass created full bilateral clefts that were more symmetrical than those produced by beads in the nasal pit. Lower concentrations of retinoic acid produced less severe facial abnormalities. Control experiments show that the implanted bead itself has no effect on growth or fusion of the facial prominences. The specific effects of retinoids on facial growth may be due to a localized decrease in responsiveness to growth factors. Gene expression patterns for two fibroblast growth factor receptors (Cek-2, Cek-3, [chicken embryo kinase]) in normal and RA-treated embryos were examined by in situ hybridization. In normal embryos, Cek-2 and Cek-3 transcripts are expressed at very high levels in the mesenchyme directly adjacent to the eye. Cek-3 is additionally expressed in the centre of the frontonasal mass. The application of beads to the right nasal pit did not change the level of expression or distribution of transcripts for Cek-2 or Cek-3. This data suggests that retinoic acid may be affecting other aspects of the FGF receptor-ligand interaction.

  16. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 4 and 7 released by senescent cells promote premature senescence in mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Severino, V; Alessio, N; Farina, A; Sandomenico, A; Cipollaro, M; Peluso, G; Galderisi, U; Chambery, A

    2013-11-07

    Cellular senescence is the permanent arrest of cell cycle, physiologically related to aging and aging-associated diseases. Senescence is also recognized as a mechanism for limiting the regenerative potential of stem cells and to protect cells from cancer development. The senescence program is realized through autocrine/paracrine pathways based on the activation of a peculiar senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). We show here that conditioned media (CM) of senescent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) contain a set of secreted factors that are able to induce a full senescence response in young cells. To delineate a hallmark of stem cells SASP, we have characterized the factors secreted by senescent MSC identifying insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 4 and 7 (IGFBP4 and IGFBP7) as key components needed for triggering senescence in young MSC. The pro-senescent effects of IGFBP4 and IGFBP7 are reversed by single or simultaneous immunodepletion of either proteins from senescent-CM. The blocking of IGFBP4/7 also reduces apoptosis and promotes cell growth, suggesting that they may have a pleiotropic effect on MSC biology. Furthermore, the simultaneous addition of rIGFBP4/7 increased senescence and induced apoptosis in young MSC. Collectively, these results suggest the occurrence of novel-secreted factors regulating MSC cellular senescence of potential importance for regenerative medicine and cancer therapy.

  17. [Fibroblast growth factor-2].

    PubMed

    Faitová, J

    2004-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-2 is a member of a large family of proteins that bind heparin and heparan sulfate and modulate the function of a wide range of cell types. FGF-2 occurs in several isoforms resulting from alternative initiations of traslation: an 18 kDa cytoplasmic isoform and four larger molecular weight nuclear isoforms (22, 22.5, 24 and 34 kDa). It acts mainly through a paracrine/autocrine mechanism involving high affinity transmembrane receptors and heparan sulfate proteoglycan low affinity receptors. It is expressed mostly in tissues of mesoderm and neuroectoderm origin, and plays an important role in mesoderm induction, stimulates the growth and development of the new blood vessels (angiogenesis), normal wound healing and tissue development. FGF-2 positively regulates hematopoiesis by acting on various cellular targets: stromal cells, early and committed hematopoietic progenitors and possibly some mature blood cells. FGF-2 is a potent hematopoietic growth factor that is likely to play an important role in physiological and pathological hematopoiesis.

  18. An ex vivo model using human osteoarthritic cartilage demonstrates the release of bioactive insulin-like growth factor-1 from a collagen–glycosaminoglycan scaffold†

    PubMed Central

    Wardale, J; Mullen, L; Howard, D; Ghose, S; Rushton, N

    2015-01-01

    Biomimetic scaffolds hold great promise for therapeutic repair of cartilage, but although most scaffolds are tested with cells in vitro, there are very few ex vivo models (EVMs) where adult cartilage and scaffolds are co-cultured to optimize their interaction prior to in vivo studies. This study describes a simple, non-compressive method that is applicable to mammalian or human cartilage and provides a reasonable throughput of samples. Rings of full-depth articular cartilage slices were derived from human donors undergoing knee replacement for osteoarthritis and a 3 mm core of a collagen/glycosaminoglycan biomimetic scaffold (Tigenix, UK) inserted to create the EVM. Adult osteoarthritis chondrocytes were seeded into the scaffold and cultures maintained for up to 30 days. Ex vivo models were stable throughout experiments, and cells remained viable. Chondrocytes seeded into the EVM attached throughout the scaffold and in contact with the cartilage explants. Cell migration and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins in the scaffold was enhanced by growth factors particularly if the scaffold was preloaded with growth factors. This study demonstrates that the EVM represents a suitable model that has potential for testing a range of therapeutic parameters such as numbers/types of cell, growth factors or therapeutic drugs before progressing to costly pre-clinical trials. © 2015 The Authors. Cell Biochemistry and Function Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Significance Pre-clinical trials of biomaterials for cartilage repair are very costly, and all too often, studies progress directly from in vitro studies using isolated cells to in vivo studies without investigating the interaction between the target tissue and the scaffold. Our study uses viable cartilage from adult human donors with osteoarthritis and therefore represents the exact scenario that the scaffold is designed for. The system is cheap and simple to set up and is suitable for a 48-well plate format

  19. Dwarf mistletoe-infected red fir: growth after release

    Treesearch

    Robert F. Scharpf

    1979-01-01

    Release cutting, live crown ratio, diameter-at-breast height, and dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium abietinum f. sp. magnificae). acted to affect radial and height growth of red firs (Abies magnifica A. Murr.). Infected and noninfected red firs responded well to release as expressed by increased radial growth: growth...

  20. Growth hormone, growth factors, and acromegaly

    SciTech Connect

    Ludecke, D.K.; Tolis, G.T.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains five sections, each consisting of several papers. The section headings are: Biochemistry and Physiology of GH and Growth Factors, Pathology of Acromegaly, Clinical Endocrinology of Acromegaly, Nonsurgical Therapy of Acromegaly, and Surgical Therapy of Acromegaly.

  1. Growth factor involvement in tension-induced skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1993-01-01

    Long-term manned space travel will require a better understanding of skeletal muscle atrophy which results from microgravity. Astronaut strength and dexterity must be maintained for normal mission operations and for emergency situations. Although exercise in space slows the rate of muscle loss, it does not prevent it. A biochemical understanding of how gravity/tension/exercise help to maintain muscle size by altering protein synthesis and/or degradation rate should ultimately allow pharmacological intervention to prevent muscle atrophy in microgravity. The overall objective is to examine some of the basic biochemical processes involved in tension-induced muscle growth. With an experimental in vitro system, the role of exogenous and endogenous muscle growth factors in mechanically stimulated muscle growth are examined. Differentiated avian skeletal myofibers can be 'exercised' in tissue culture using a newly developed dynamic mechanical cell stimulator device which simulates different muscle activity patterns. Patterns of mechanical activity which significantly affect muscle growth and metabolic characteristics were found. Both exogenous and endogenous growth factors are essential for tension-induced muscle growth. Exogenous growth factors found in serum, such as insulin, insulin-like growth factors, and steroids, are important regulators of muscle protein turnover rates and mechanically-induced muscle growth. Endogenous growth factors are synthesized and released into the culture medium when muscle cells are mechanically stimulated. At least one family of mechanically induced endogenous factors, the prostaglandins, help to regulate the rates of protein turnover in muscle cells. Endogenously synthesized IGF-1 is another. The interaction of muscle mechanical activity and these growth factors in the regulation of muscle protein turnover rates with our in vitro model system is studied.

  2. Effects of artemisinin sustained-release granules on mixed alga growth and microcystins production and release.

    PubMed

    Ni, Lixiao; Li, Danye; Hu, Shuzhen; Wang, Peifang; Li, Shiyin; Li, Yiping; Li, Yong; Acharya, Kumud

    2015-12-01

    To safely and effectively apply artemisinin sustained-release granules to control and prevent algal water-blooms, the effects of artemisinin and its sustained-release granules on freshwater alga (Scenedesmus obliquus (S. obliquus) and Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa)), as well as the production and release of microcystins (MCs) were studied. The results showed that artemisinin sustained-release granules inhibited the growth of M. aeruginosa (above 95% IR) and S. obliquus (about 90% IR), with M. aeruginosa more sensitive. The artemisinin sustained-release granules had a longer inhibition effect on growth of pure algae and algal coexistence than direct artemisinin dosing. The artemisinin sustained-release granules could decrease the production and release of algal toxins due to the continued stress of artemisinin released from artemisinin sustained-release granules. There was no increase in the total amount of MC-LR in the algal cell culture medium.

  3. Cigarette smoke extract induces placental growth factor release from human bronchial epithelial cells via ROS/MAPK (ERK-1/2)/Egr-1 axis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dong; Yuan, Yalian; Lin, Zhixiu; Lai, Tianwen; Chen, Min; Li, Wen; Lv, Quanchao; Yuan, Binfan; Li, Dongmin; Wu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Etiological evidence demonstrates that there is a significant association between cigarette smoking and chronic airway inflammatory disease. Abnormal expression of placental growth factor (PlGF) has been reported in COPD, and its downstream signaling molecules have been reported to contribute to the pathogenesis of airway epithelial cell apoptosis and emphysema. However, the signaling mechanisms underlying cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced PlGF expression in airway microenvironment remain unclear. Herein, we investigated the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) (extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 [ERK-1/2])/early growth response-1 (Egr-1) pathway on CSE-induced PlGF upregulation in human bronchial epithelium (HBE). The data obtained with quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunofluorescence staining analyses showed that CSE-induced Egr-1 activation was mainly mediated through production of ROS and activation of the MAPK (ERK-1/2) cascade. The binding of Egr-1 to the PlGF promoter was corroborated by an ELISA-based DNA binding activity assay. These results demonstrate that ROS activation of the MAPK (ERK-1/2)/Egr-1 pathway is a main player in the regulatory mechanism for CSE-induced PlGF production and that the use of an antioxidant could partly abolish these effects. Understanding the mechanisms of PlGF upregulation by CSE in the airway microenvironment may provide rational therapeutic interventions for cigarette smoking-related airway inflammatory diseases. PMID:27980400

  4. Differential effects of central and peripheral administration of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor on hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone and somatostatin gene expression in GH-deficient dwarf rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Frohman, L A

    1993-08-01

    The roles of GH and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in the regulation of hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone (GRH) and somatostatin (SRIH) gene expression were investigated in the GH-deficient dwarf (dw) rat, in which endogenous feedback signals are lacking. Adult male and female dw rats were treated with GH or IGF-I by systemic (sc) administration or intracerebroventricular (icv) infusion, and hypothalamic GRH and SRIH mRNA were determined by Northern blotting and densitometric analysis. Systemic sc injection of rGH (75 micrograms every 12 h for 3 days) decreased GRH mRNA levels in both sexes. However, systemic sc injection of human IGF-I (150 micrograms every 12 h for 3 days) did not affect GRH mRNA levels in either sex despite significant stimulation of body weight gain. The use of a continuous sc infusion, which normalized serum IGF-I levels, and prolongation of the treatment period to 7 days also failed to change GRH mRNA levels. SRIH mRNA was unaffected by systemic administration of either GH or IGF-I. Continuous icv infusion of GH (1 microgram/h for 7 days) decreased GRH mRNA levels in both sexes, but did not alter SRIH mRNA levels. Continuous icv infusion of IGF-I (100 ng/h for 7 days) decreased GRH mRNA in both sexes. In contrast, SRIH mRNA levels were increased in both sexes. IGF-I decreased GRH mRNA levels at icv infusion rates of 100 and 300 ng/h and stimulated SRIH mRNA levels at infusion rates of 30 and 100 ng/h. Food intake was unaffected at these infusion rates. Changes in GRH and SRIH mRNA levels in response to systemic or central GH and IGF-I administration were similar in both sexes, except that the decrease in GRH mRNA levels produced by the icv infusion of IGF-I was greater in female than in male rats. The results provide evidence for a direct inhibitory feedback effect of GH in the central nervous system on the regulation of hypothalamic GRH gene expression that is independent of peripheral IGF-I. IGF-I feedback, in contrast, appears to

  5. LH release and ovulatory response after intramuscular, intravenous, and intrauterine administration of β-nerve growth factor of seminal plasma origin in female llamas.

    PubMed

    Silva, M; Fernández, A; Ulloa-Leal, C; Adams, G P; Berland, M A; Ratto, M H

    2015-10-15

    The objective of the study was to compare the pituitary and ovarian responses after intramuscular, intravenous, or intrauterine administration of β-nerve growth factor (β-NGF) of seminal plasma origin (SP-NGF) in llamas. In experiment 1, mature female llamas with a growing follicle of 7 mm or greater were assigned randomly to four groups (n = 7/group) and given 2 mg of purified SP-NGF in a volume of 2 mL by (1) intramuscular administration, (2) intravenous administration, and (3) intrauterine infusion, or (4) intrauterine infusion of 2 mL of PBS (negative control). Because ovulations were not detected after intrauterine infusion in experiment 1, a second experiment was done to determine if a higher dose of SP-NGF given by intrauterine infusion, similar to a natural dose during copulation, will elicit an ovulatory response. In experiment 2, llamas with a growing follicle of 7 mm or greater were assigned randomly to three groups (n = 6/per group) given an intrauterine infusion of (1) 4 mL of raw seminal plasma, (2) 4 mL of PBS containing 20 mg of purified llama SP-NGF, or 3) 4 mL of PBS (negative control). In both experiments, the ovaries were examined daily by transrectal ultrasonography using a B-mode scanner and power Doppler mode to detect ovulation and to monitor CL growth, regression, and vascularization. Blood samples were collected to determine plasma LH and progesterone concentrations. In experiment 1, only llamas treated by intramuscular or intravenous administration of SP-NGF ovulated (7 of 7 and 6 of 7, respectively). Plasma LH concentration did not differ between the intramuscular and intravenous SP-NGF-treated groups, nor did CL diameter, CL vascularization, or plasma progesterone concentration profiles. In experiment 2, the ovulation rate was 100% for llamas treated by intrauterine infusion of raw seminal plasma or llama SP-NFG, whereas no ovulations were detected in females treated with PBS. Plasma LH concentrations did not differ between groups

  6. Reducing the length of time between slaughter and the secondary gonadotropin-releasing factor immunization improves growth performance and clears boar taint compounds in male finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Lealiifano, A K; Pluske, J R; Nicholls, R R; Dunshea, F R; Campbell, R G; Hennessy, D P; Miller, D W; Hansen, C F; Mullan, B P

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether altering the timing of the secondary anti-gonadotropin-releasing factor (GnRF) immunization closer to slaughter in male finishing pigs would reduce the increase in P2 fat depth (6.5 cm from the midline over the last rib), while still limiting the incidence of boar taint. Entire male pigs are immunized against GnRF to reduce the concentration of testicular steroids that in turn limits the incidence of boar taint. Additionally, testicle measurements and color measurements were taken to examine whether they could be used to differentiate nonimmunized entire males from immunized male pigs. A total of 175 Large White × Landrace entire male pigs aged 16 wk (59 kg of BW) were used in a completely randomized design with 5 treatment groups based on the time that pigs received the secondary immunization before slaughter. Pigs were housed in groups of 7 and randomly allocated to 1 of 5 treatments with 5 replicates per treatment. The treatment groups were as follows: no secondary immunization before slaughter, and the secondary immunization given at 2, 3, 4, or 6 wk before slaughter. The P2 fat depth levels were reduced (P = 0.054) with the secondary immunization closer to slaughter (11.7, 11.3, 12.8, 12.6, and 13.7 mm for no secondary immunization, secondary immunization at 2, 3, 4, and 6 wk before slaughter, respectively). Androstenone concentration did not exceed the generally accepted industry sensory threshold of 1.0 µg/g of fat, and both androstenone concentration in the adipose tissue and testosterone concentrations in the blood were suppressed (P < 0.001) in all immunized pigs regardless of timing of the secondary immunization compared with pigs that did not receive the secondary immunization. Skatole concentration of all pigs in the experiment did not exceed the generally accepted industry sensory threshold of 0.2 µg/g. Testes weight was reduced (P < 0.001) with increased time between slaughter and the secondary

  7. Comparison of the effect of calcium gluconate and batroxobin on the release of transforming growth factor beta 1 in canine platelet concentrates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The clinical use of autologous platelet concentrates (also known as platelet-rich plasma) on the field of regenerative therapy, in the last decade has been the subject of several studies especially in equine medicine and surgery. The objectives of this study was: 1) to describe and compare the cellular population in whole blood, lower fraction (A) and upper fraction (B) of platelet concentrates, 2) to measure and compare the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) concentration in plasma and both platelet concentrates after be activated with calcium gluconate or batroxobin plus calcium gluconate and, 3) to determine correlations between cell counts in platelet concentrates and concentrations of TGF-β1. Blood samples were taken from 16 dogs for complete blood count, plasma collection and platelet concentrates preparation. The platelet concentrates (PC) were arbitrarily divided into two fractions, specifically, PC-A (lower fraction) and PC-B (upper fraction). The Platelet concentrates were analyzed by hemogram. After activated with calcium gluconate or batroxobin plus calcium gluconate, TGF-β1 concentration was determined in supernatants of platelet concentrates and plasma. Results There were differences statistically significant (P < 0.05) for the platelet count and leukocyte count and TGF-β1 concentration between whole blood, plasma and both platelet concentrates. A significant correlation was found between the number of platelets in both platelet concentrates and TGF-β1 concentration. Platelet collection efficiency was 46.34% and 28.16% for PC-A and PC-B, respectively. TGF-β1 concentration efficiency for PC activated with calcium gluconate was 47.75% and 31.77%, for PC-A and PC-B, respectively. PC activated with batroxobin plus CG showed 46.87% and 32.24% for PC-A and PC-B, respectively. Conclusions The methodology used in this study allows the concentration of a number of platelets and TGF-β1 that might be acceptable for a biological

  8. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Regulates LH Release by Modulation of Kisspeptin and NMDA-Mediated Neurotransmission in Young and Middle-Aged Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Dachun; Shu, Jun; Sun, Yan; Etgen, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated potential mechanisms by which age and IGF-I receptor (IGF-Ir) signaling in the neuroendocrine hypothalamus affect estradiol-positive feedback effects on GnRH neuronal activation and on kisspeptin and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced LH release and on the abundance of NMDA receptor subunits Nr1 and Nr2b and Kiss1r transcript and protein in the hypothalamus of young and middle-aged female rats. We infused vehicle, IGF-I, or JB-1, a selective antagonist of IGF-Ir, into the third ventricle of ovariectomized female rats primed with estradiol or vehicle and injected with vehicle, kisspeptin (3 or 30 nmol/kg), or NMDA (15 or 30 mg/kg). Regardless of dose, NMDA and kisspeptin resulted in significantly more LH release, GnRH/c-Fos colabeling, and c-Fos immunoreative cells in young than in middle-aged females. Estradiol priming significantly increased Kiss1r, Nr1, and Nr2b receptor transcript and protein abundance in young but not middle-aged female hypothalamus. JB-1 attenuated kisspeptin and NMDA-induced LH release, numbers of GnRH/c-Fos and c-Fos cells, and Kiss1r, Nr1, and Nr2b transcript and protein abundance in young females to levels observed in middle-aged females. IGF-I significantly enhanced NMDA and kisspeptin-induced LH release in middle-aged females without increasing numbers of GnRH/c-Fos or c-Fos immunoreactive cells. IGF-I infusion in middle-aged females also increased Kiss1r, Nr1, and Nr2b protein and transcript to levels that were equivalent to young estradiol-primed females. These findings indicate that age-related changes in estradiol-regulated responsiveness to excitatory input from glutamate and kisspeptin reflect reduced IGF-Ir signaling. PMID:24617524

  9. Crown release increases growth of crop trees

    Treesearch

    Neil I. Lamson; H. Clay Smith; Arlyn W. Perkey; Samuel M. Brock; Samuel M. Brock

    1990-01-01

    Two Appalachian hardwood stands in north-central West Virginia were thinned. The principal species were red oak, yellow-poplar, and chestnut oak. For both stands the site index for northern red oak averaged 75 feet. An areawide thinning using "basal-area control" was applied to a 54-yearold stand while specific crop trees were selected and released in a 12-...

  10. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligand release by substrate-specific a disintegrin and metalloproteases (ADAMs) involves different protein kinase C (PKC) isoenzymes depending on the stimulus.

    PubMed

    Dang, Michelle; Dubbin, Karen; D'Aiello, Antonio; Hartmann, Monika; Lodish, Harvey; Herrlich, Andreas

    2011-05-20

    The dysregulation of EGF family ligand cleavage has severe consequences for the developing as well as the adult organism. Therefore, their production is highly regulated. The limiting step is the ectodomain cleavage of membrane-bound precursors by one of several a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) metalloproteases, and understanding the regulation of cleavage is an important goal of current research. We have previously reported that in mouse lung epithelial cells, the pro-EGF ligands TGFα, neuregulin 1β (NRG), and heparin-binding EGF are differentially cleaved depending on the cleavage stimulus (Herrlich, A., Klinman, E., Fu, J., Sadegh, C., and Lodish, H. (2008) FASEB J.). In this study in mouse embryonic fibroblasts that lack different ADAMs, we show that induced cleavage of EGF ligands can involve the same substrate-specific metalloprotease but does require different stimulus-dependent signaling pathways. Cleavage was stimulated by phorbol ester (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a mimic of diacylglycerol and PKC activator), hypertonic stress, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced G protein-coupled receptor activation, or by ionomycin-induced intracellular calcium release. Although ADAMs showed substrate preference (ADAM17, TGFα and heparin-binding EGF; and ADAM9, NRG), substrate cleavage differed substantially with the stimulus, and cleavage of the same substrate depended on the presence of different, sometimes multiple, PKC isoforms. For instance, classical PKC was required for TPA-induced but not hypertonic stress-induced cleavage of all EGF family ligands. Inhibition of PKCζ enhanced NRG release upon TPA stimulation, but it blocked NRG release in response to hypertonic stress. Our results suggest a model in which substantial regulation of ectodomain cleavage occurs not only on the metalloprotease level but also on the level of the substrate or of a third protein.

  11. Impairments in brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced glutamate release in cultured cortical neurons derived from rats with intrauterine growth retardation: possible involvement of suppression of TrkB/phospholipase C-γ activation.

    PubMed

    Numakawa, Tadahiro; Matsumoto, Tomoya; Ooshima, Yoshiko; Chiba, Shuichi; Furuta, Miyako; Izumi, Aiko; Ninomiya-Baba, Midori; Odaka, Haruki; Hashido, Kazuo; Adachi, Naoki; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    Low birth weight due to intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) is suggested to be a risk factor for various psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. It has been reported that developmental cortical dysfunction and neurocognitive deficits are observed in individuals with IUGR, however, the underlying molecular mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor TrkB are associated with schizophrenia and play a role in cortical development. We previously demonstrated that BDNF induced glutamate release through activation of the TrkB/phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ) pathway in developing cultured cortical neurons, and that, using a rat model for IUGR caused by maternal administration of thromboxane A2, cortical levels of TrkB were significantly reduced in IUGR rats at birth. These studies prompted us to hypothesize that TrkB reduction in IUGR cortex led to impairment of BDNF-dependent glutamatergic neurotransmission. In the present study, we found that BDNF-induced glutamate release was strongly impaired in cultured IUGR cortical neurons where TrkB reduction was maintained. Impairment of BDNF-induced glutamate release in IUGR neurons was ameliorated by transfection of human TrkB (hTrkB). Although BDNF-stimulated phosphorylation of TrkB and of PLC-γ was decreased in IUGR neurons, the hTrkB transfection recovered the deficits in their phosphorylation. These results suggest that TrkB reduction causes impairment of BDNF-stimulated glutamatergic function via suppression of TrkB/PLC-γ activation in IUGR cortical neurons. Our findings provide molecular insights into how IUGR links to downregulation of BDNF function in the cortex, which might be involved in the development of IUGR-related diseases such as schizophrenia.

  12. Superoxide radicals increase transforming growth factor-{beta}1 and collagen release from human lung fibroblasts via cellular influx through chloride channels

    SciTech Connect

    Qi Shufan Hartog, Gertjan J.M. den; Bast, Aalt

    2009-05-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of fibrosis. However, it remains unclear which ROS is the major cause. We hypothesize that superoxide elicits specific toxicity to human lung fibroblasts and plays an important role in the development of pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, superoxide generated from xanthine and xanthine oxidase activated lung fibroblasts by increasing the release of TGF-{beta}1 and collagen. This was associated with increased levels of intracellular superoxide. SOD and tempol, by scavenging respectively extracellular and intracellular superoxide, prevented the activation of fibroblasts induced by exposure to exogenous superoxide, whereas catalase did not. Moreover, hydrogen peroxide did not activate fibroblasts. Apparently, superoxide rather than hydrogen peroxide is involved in the regulation of TGF-{beta}1 and collagen release in lung fibroblasts. The chloride channel blocker, DIDS, inhibited the increase of intracellular superoxide levels induced by exogenous superoxide and consequently prevented the activation of fibroblasts. This suggests that the cellular influx of superoxide through chloride channels is essential for superoxide-induced activation of fibroblasts. ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs are involved in the intracellular pathway leading to superoxide-induced fibroblasts activation. Superoxide possesses until now undiscovered specific pro-fibrotic properties in human lung fibroblasts. This takes place via the cellular influx of superoxide through chloride channels rather than via the formation of hydrogen peroxide.

  13. Regulated release of serotonin from axonal growth cones isolated from the fetal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Mercado, R; Floran, B; Hernandez, J

    1998-01-01

    In the present work we propose an hypothetical model related to a molecular recognizing system for serotonin in isolated growth cone particles. This model is supported by previous results from our laboratory plus new ones which show that growth cones release serotonin tonically and such release can be stimulated by potassium in a calcium-dependent manner. The present results, together with other author's data, suggest a physiological basis for the putative role of serotonin as a trophic factor during nervous system development.

  14. Human adipocytes secrete mineralocorticoid-releasing factors.

    PubMed

    Ehrhart-Bornstein, M; Lamounier-Zepter, V; Schraven, A; Langenbach, J; Willenberg, H S; Barthel, A; Hauner, H; McCann, S M; Scherbaum, W A; Bornstein, S R

    2003-11-25

    Obesity has become an epidemic problem in western societies, contributing to metabolic diseases, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. Overweight and obesity are frequently associated with increased plasma levels of aldosterone. Recent evidence suggests that human fat is a highly active endocrine tissue. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that adipocyte secretory products directly stimulate adrenocortical aldosterone secretion. Secretory products from isolated human adipocytes strongly stimulated steroidogenesis in human adrenocortical cells (NCI-H295R) with a predominant effect on mineralocorticoid secretion. Aldosterone secretion increased 7-fold during 24 h of incubation. This stimulation was comparable to maximal stimulation of these cells with forskolin (2 x 10(-5) M). On the molecular level, there was a 10-fold increase in the expression of steroid acute regulatory peptide mRNA. This effect was independent of adipose angiotensin II as revealed by the stimulatory effect of fat cell-conditioned medium even in the presence of the angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonist, valsartan. None of the recently defined adipocytokines accounted for the effect. Mineralocorticoid-stimulating activity was heat sensitive and could be blunted by heating fat cell-conditioned medium to 99 degrees C. Centrifugal filtration based on molecular mass revealed at least two releasing factors: a heat sensitive fraction (molecular mass >50 kDa) representing 60% of total activity, and an inactive fraction (molecular mass <50 kDa). However, the recovery rate increased to 92% when combining these two fractions, indicating the interaction of at least two factors. In conclusion, human adipocytes secrete potent mineralocorticoid-releasing factors, suggesting a direct link between obesity and hypertension.

  15. Effects of chronic slow release-lanreotide treatment on insulin-like growth factor system and metabolic parameters in acromegalic patients.

    PubMed

    Gasco, V; Beccuti, G; Marotta, F; Prencipe, N; Maccario, M; Janssen, J; van der Lely, A J; Ghigo, E; Grottoli, S

    2012-04-01

    Insulin and IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-1 are linked by negative association. Somatostatin (SS) reduces insulin secretion by acting on pancreatic β-cell and also by decreasing GH secretion. SS analogues in acromegaly reduce total IGF-I levels inhibiting GH hypersecretion, but they also reduce free IGF-I bioactivity increasing IGFBP-1 levels by inducing insulin decrease. In 13 acromegalic patients we studied GH, IGF system, insulin, and glucagon levels at baseline and at 7 days, 1 and 6 months under treatment with slow release (SR)-lanreotide (LAN) (60 mg im monthly). The hormonal and metabolic response to arginine (ARG) (0.5 g/kg iv in 30 min) was also studied at each time point. LAN decreased GH, total IGF-I, and IGFBP-3 levels at each time point. Insulin and glucagon levels were reduced, while IGFBP-1 and free IGF-I levels were increased by LAN at day 7 and after 1 month only. LAN did not modify the GH, insulin, glucagon, glucose, and IGFBP-1 responses to ARG. At each time point ARG-induced insulin increase was coupled to increase in glucagon and IGFBP-1 levels. This study shows that acromegalic patients under chronic treatment with LAN display: a) inhibition of GH and total IGF-I levels, not coupled to persistent decrease in free IGF-I levels; b) persistent decrease in IGFBP- 3 but transient decrease and increase in insulin and IGFBP- 1, respectively; c) unchanged hormonal and metabolic response to ARG. Our findings also show that ARG stimulates IGFBP-1 despite marked increase in insulin secretion; this escape from the negative relationship linking insulin and IGFBP- 1 would likely reflect the ARG-induced glucagon increase.

  16. Effects of sodium citrate and acid citrate dextrose solutions on cell counts and growth factor release from equine pure-platelet rich plasma and pure-platelet rich gel.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, Carlos E; Álvarez, María E; Carmona, Jorge U

    2015-03-14

    There is a lack information on the effects of the most commonly used anticoagulants for equine platelet rich plasmas (PRPs) elaboration on cell counts and growth factor release from platelet rich gels (PRGs). The aims of this study were 1) to compare the effects of the anticoagulants sodium citrate (SC), acid citrate dextrose solution A (ACD-A) and ACD-B on platelet (PLT), leukocyte (WBC) and on some parameters associated to platelet activation including mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width (PDW) between whole blood, pure PRP (P-PRP) and platelet-poor plasma (PPP); 2) to compare transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β(1)) and platelet-derived growth factor isoform BB (PDGF-BB) concentrations in supernatants from pure PRG (P-PRG), platelet-poor gel (PPG), P-PRP lysate (positive control) and plasma (negative control); 3) to establish the possible correlations between all the studied cellular and molecular parameters. In all cases the three anticoagulants produced P-PRPs with significantly higher PLT counts compared with whole blood and PPP. The concentrations of WBCs were similar between P-PRP and whole blood, but significantly lower in PPP. The type of anticoagulant did not significantly affect the cell counts for each blood component. The anticoagulants also did not affect the MPV and PDW parameters. Independently of the anticoagulant used, all blood components presented significantly different concentrations of PDGF-BB and TGF-β(1). The highest growth factor (GF) concentrations were observed from P-PRP lysates, followed by PRG supernatants, PPP lysates, PPG supernatants and plasma. Significant correlations were observed between PLT and WBC counts (ρ = 0.80), PLT count and TGF-β(1) concentration (ρ = 0.85), PLT count and PDGF-BB concentration (ρ = 0.80) and PDGF-BB and TGF-β(1) concentrations (ρ = 0.75). The type of anticoagulant was not correlated with any of the variables evaluated. The anticoagulants did not

  17. Do the fibrin architecture and leukocyte content influence the growth factor release of platelet concentrates? An evidence-based answer comparing a pure platelet-rich plasma (P-PRP) gel and a leukocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF).

    PubMed

    Dohan Ehrenfest, David M; Bielecki, Tomasz; Jimbo, Ryo; Barbé, Giovanni; Del Corso, Marco; Inchingolo, Francesco; Sammartino, Gilberto

    2012-06-01

    Platelet concentrates for surgical use are tools of regenerative medicine designed for the local release of platelet growth factors into a surgical or wounded site, in order to stimulate tissue healing or regeneration. Leukocyte content and fibrin architecture are 2 key characteristics of all platelet concentrates and allow to classify these technologies in 4 families, but very little is known about the impact of these 2 parameters on the intrinsic biology of these products. In this demonstration, we highlight some outstanding differences in the growth factor and matrix protein release between 2 families of platelet concentrate: Pure Platelet-Rich Plasma (P-PRP, here the Anitua's PRGF - Preparation Rich in Growth Factors - technique) and Leukocyte- and Platelet-Rich Fibrin (L-PRF, here the Choukroun's method). These 2 families are the extreme opposites in terms of fibrin architecture and leukocyte content. The slow release of 3 key growth factors (Transforming Growth Factor β1 (TGFβ1), Platelet-Derived Growth Factor AB (PDGF-AB) and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF)) and matrix proteins (fibronectin, vitronectin and thrombospondin-1) from the L-PRF and P-PRP gel membranes in culture medium is described and discussed. During 7 days, the L-PRF membranes slowly release significantly larger amounts of all these molecules than the P-PRP gel membranes, and the 2 products display different release patterns. In both platelet concentrates, vitronectin is the sole molecule to be released almost completely after only 4 hours, suggesting that this molecule is not trapped in the fibrin matrix and not produced by the leukocytes. Moreover the P-PRP gel membranes completely dissolve in the culture medium after less than 5 days only, while the L-PRF membranes are still intact after 7 days. This simple demonstration shows that the polymerization and final architecture of the fibrin matrix considerably influence the strength and the growth factor trapping/release potential

  18. Central corticotropin releasing factor and social stress

    PubMed Central

    Backström, Tobias; Winberg, Svante

    2013-01-01

    Social interactions are a main source of stress in vertebrates. Social stressors, as well as other stressors, activate the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis resulting in glucocorticoid release. One of the main components of the HPA axis is corticotropin releasing factor (CRF). The neuropeptide CRF is part of a peptide family including CRF, urocortin 1–3, urotensin 1–3, and sauvagine. The actions of the CRF family are mediated by at least two different receptors with different anatomical distribution and affinities for the peptides. The CRF peptides affect several behavioral and physiological responses to stress including aggression, feeding, and locomotor activity. This review will summarize recent research in vertebrates concerning how social stress interacts with components of the CRF system. Consideration will be taken to the different models used for social stress ranging from social isolation, dyadic interactions, to group dominance hierarchies. Further, the temporal effect of social stressor from acute, intermittent, to chronic will be considered. Finally, strains selected for specific behavior or physiology linked to social stress will also be discussed. PMID:23847465

  19. Effect of vaccination against gonadotrophin-releasing factor on growth performance, carcass, meat and fat quality of male Duroc pigs for dry-cured ham production.

    PubMed

    Font-I-Furnols, M; Gispert, M; Soler, J; Diaz, M; Garcia-Regueiro, J A; Diaz, I; Pearce, M C

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare production, carcass and meat quality parameters, boar taint compounds and fat composition of green and dry-cured hams, between immunocastrated (IM), surgically castrated (CM) and female (FE) Duroc purebred pigs (n=75, 138.7±8.27kg). Liveweight and fat and muscle thicknesses were measured and average daily gain was calculated during growth. Carcass, meat and fat quality parameters were measured. Immunocastrated grew faster than CM or FE after the second dose of vaccine. IM had the lowest dressing percentage but similar % of ham and carcass lean to FE and CM. The effect of the immunocastration on carcass fatness depended on the location, did not affect fat and meat quality and reduced skatole and androstenone levels. Both in green and dry-cured ham, immunocastration slightly altered FA composition. Thus, Duroc pigs vaccinated with Improvac are suitable for the production of high quality dry-cured ham. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Short- and long-term peripheral nerve regeneration using a poly-lactic-co-glycolic-acid scaffold containing nerve growth factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor releasing microspheres.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Ralph; Borntraeger, Andreas; Knight, Andrew M; Hébert-Blouin, Marie-Noëlle; Spinner, Robert J; Malessy, Martijn J A; Yaszemski, Michael J; Windebank, Anthony J

    2012-08-01

    Addition of neural growth factors to bioengineered scaffolds may improve peripheral nerve regeneration. The aim of this study is to evaluate the short- and long term effect of microsphere delivered nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in the 10 mm rat sciatic nerve gap. Eighty-four rats were assigned to seven groups (n = 6) at two endpoints (6 and 16 weeks): saline, saline NGF, saline NGF-microspheres, saline GDNF, saline GDNF-microspheres, saline blank microspheres, and autologous nerve graft. Total fascicular area and total number of myelinated fibers at mid-tube increased in all conduit groups between 6 and 16 weeks. Autologous, saline NGF-microsphere and saline GDNF-microsphere groups reached maximal histomorphometric values by 6 weeks (p < 0.05). Compound muscle action potentials returned after 6 weeks for the autologous graft and continued to increase to a level of 3.6 ± 1.9 mV at endpoint. No significant differences were found between study groups as measured by ankle angle. These experiments show an initial beneficial effect of incorporation of NGF- or GDNF-microspheres in a PLGA 85/15 nerve conduit, since histomorphometric values reached their maximum by 6 weeks compared to control groups. These results do not yet extrapolate into improved electrophysiological or functional improvement.

  1. Interstitial fibrosis and growth factors.

    PubMed Central

    Lasky, J A; Brody, A R

    2000-01-01

    Interstitial pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is scarring of the lung caused by a variety of inhaled agents including mineral particles, organic dusts, and oxidant gases. The disease afflicts millions of individuals worldwide, and there are no effective therapeutic approaches. A major reason for this lack of useful treatments is that few of the molecular mechanisms of disease have been defined sufficiently to design appropriate targets for therapy. Our laboratory has focused on the molecular mechanisms through which three selected peptide growth factors could play a role in the development of IPF. Hundreds of growth factors and cytokines could be involved in the complex disease process. We are studying platelet-derived growth factor because it is the most potent mesenchymal cell mitogen yet described, transforming growth factor beta because it is a powerful inducer of extracellular matrix (scar tissue) components by mesenchymal cells, and tumor necrosis factor alpha because it is a pleiotropic cytokine that we and others have shown is essential for the development of IPF in animal models. This review describes some of the evidence from studies in humans, in animal models, and in vitro, that supports the growth factor hypothesis. The use of modern molecular and transgenic technologies could elucidate those targets that will allow effective therapeutic approaches. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10931794

  2. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor promotes neuroblastoma differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gaviglio, Angela L; Knelson, Erik H; Blobe, Gerard C

    2017-02-07

    High-risk neuroblastoma is characterized by undifferentiated neuroblasts and low Schwannian stroma content. The tumor stroma contributes to the suppression of tumor growth by releasing soluble factors that promote neuroblast differentiation. Here we identify heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HBEGF) as a potent prodifferentiating factor in neuroblastoma. HBEGF mRNA expression is decreased in human neuroblastoma tumors compared with benign tumors, with loss correlating with decreased survival. HBEGF protein is expressed only in stromal compartments of human neuroblastoma specimens, with tissue from high-stage disease containing very little stroma or HBEGF expression. In 3 human neuroblastoma cell lines (SK-N-AS, SK-N-BE2, and SH-SY5Y), soluble HBEGF is sufficient to promote neuroblast differentiation and decrease proliferation. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans and heparin derivatives further enhance HBEGF-induced differentiation by forming a complex with the epidermal growth factor receptor, leading to activation of the ERK1/2 and STAT3 pathways and up-regulation of the inhibitor of DNA binding transcription factor. These data support a role for loss of HBEGF in the neuroblastoma tumor microenvironment in neuroblastoma pathogenesis.-Gaviglio, A. L., Knelson, E. H., Blobe, G. C. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor promotes neuroblastoma differentiation.

  3. Growth Factor Variation in Two Types of Autologous Platelet Biomaterials: PRP Versus PRF.

    PubMed

    Arora, Satyam; Kotwal, Urvershi; Dogra, Mitu; Doda, Veena

    2017-06-01

    Autologous platelet biomaterials represent a key source of cytokines and growth factors extensively used for clinical and surgical applications involving tissue regeneration; wound healing and tissue repair. In this communication we discuss the growth factors released by activated platelet rich plasma (PRP) and platelet rich fibrin (PRF) releasate. Our study highlights that significantly higher growth factors (TGF-ß1) are released by activated PRP as compared to releasate of PRF. The various growth factors released by both platelet products are significantly higher than the baseline concentration in the whole blood and have different bio-mechanism hence should be individualized as per the clinical indication.

  4. Growth factors in synaptic function

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Vivian Y.; Choi, Sojoong; Park, Mikyoung

    2013-01-01

    Synapses are increasingly recognized as key structures that malfunction in disorders like schizophrenia, mental retardation, and neurodegenerative diseases. The importance and complexity of the synapse has fuelled research into the molecular mechanisms underlying synaptogenesis, synaptic transmission, and plasticity. In this regard, neurotrophic factors such as netrin, Wnt, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and others have gained prominence for their ability to regulate synaptic function. Several of these factors were first implicated in neuroprotection, neuronal growth, and axon guidance. However, their roles in synaptic development and function have become increasingly clear, and the downstream signaling pathways employed by these factors have begun to be elucidated. In this review, we will address the role of these factors and their downstream effectors in synaptic function in vivo and in cultured neurons. PMID:24065916

  5. Effect of long-term infusion with recombinant growth hormone-releasing factor and recombinant bovine somatotropin on development and function of dominant follicles and corpora lutea in Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Krassel, F; Binelli, M; Tucker, H A; Ireland, J J

    1999-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of recombinant bovine growth hormone-releasing factor (rGRF) or recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) on growth and function of the first-wave dominant follicle and corpus luteum. Primiparous Holstein cows (117 d postpartum) were infused with 12 mg/d of rGRF (n = 10) or 29 mg/d of rbST (n = 10) for 63 d, and non-infused cows (n = 10) were controls. At slaughter on d 5 of an estrous cycle, blood and ovaries were collected and data from cows with a corpus luteum were analyzed (control, n = 8; rGRF, n = 5; rbST, n = 6). Treatment with rGRF or rbST increased somatotropin (ST) and IGF-I in serum similarly compared with controls. In contrast, rbST-treated cows had higher concentrations of ST in follicular fluid (FF) compared with rGRF-treated and control cows. In addition, rbST, but not rGRF, increased the number and decreased the size of estrogen-active follicles (EA; estradiol > progesterone concentrations in FF), increased the abundance of IGF binding proteins-2, -3, and -4 in FF from EA follicles, and increased the number but decreased the size of corpora lutea and decreased concentration of progesterone in serum compared with controls. Based on these results, we concluded that long-term infusion of rbST alters growth and function of the first-wave dominant follicle and the corpus luteum in cattle.

  6. Effect of an extract based on the medicinal mushroom Agaricus blazei murill on release of cytokines, chemokines and leukocyte growth factors in human blood ex vivo and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E; Førland, D T; Saetre, L; Bernardshaw, S V; Lyberg, T; Hetland, G

    2009-03-01

    An immunostimulatory extract based on the medicinal mushroom Agaricus blazei Murill (AbM) has been shown to stimulate mononuclear phagocytes in vitro to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines, and to protect against lethal peritonitis in mice. The present aim was to study the effect of AbM on release of several cytokines in human whole blood both after stimulation ex vivo and in vivo after oral intake over several days in healthy volunteers. The 17 signal substances examined were; T helper 1 (Th1) cytokines [interleukin (IL)-2, interferon (IFN)-gamma and IL-12], T helper 2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13), pleiotropic (IL-7, IL-17), pro-inflammatory [IL-1beta, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha (mainly produced by Th1 cells)]--and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines, chemokines [IL-8, macrophage inhibitory protein (MIP)-1beta and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1] and leukocyte growth factors [granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor]. After stimulation of whole blood ex vivo with 0.5-5.0% of a mushroom extract, AndoSan mainly containing AbM, there was a dose-dependent increase in all the cytokines studied, ranging from two to 399-fold (TNF-alpha). However, in vivo in the eight volunteers who completed the daily intake (60 ml) of this AbM extract for 12 days, a significant reduction was observed in levels of IL-1beta (97%), TNF-alpha (84%), IL-17 (50%) and IL-2 (46%). Although not significant, there was a trend towards reduced levels for IL-8, IFN-gamma and G-CSF, whilst those of the remaining nine cytokines tested, were unaltered. The discrepant results on cytokine release ex vivo and in vivo may partly be explained by the antioxidant activity of AbM in vivo and limited absorption of its large, complex and bioactive beta-glucans across the intestinal mucosa to the reticuloendothelial system and blood.

  7. Factors controlling gastric-glucagon release.

    PubMed Central

    Lefèbvre, P J; Luyckx, A S

    1977-01-01

    A system consisting of an isolated dog stomach perfused with whole blood has been designed to study gastric glucagon secretion. Under basal conditions, gastric glucagon release was 0.0-3.1 ng glucagon/100g of stomach per min. Arginine, at an arterial plasma concentration averaging 10 mM, elicited a rapid glucagon release. This gastric glucagon release was almost completely abolished by somatostatin (100 ng/ml). The release of gastric glucagon was not affected by hyperglycemia alone but was reduced by about 40% when hyperglycemia was concomitant with an hyperinsulinemia within the physiological range. These observations support the concept that adequate concentrations of insulin are necessary in order for hyperglycemia to inhibit gastric glucagon secretion. Furthermore, it is suggested that the isolated perfused dog stomach might provide a unique tool permitting investigation of alpha-cell function in the absence of endogenously released insulin. PMID:845258

  8. Site-specific PEGylation for high-yield preparation of Lys(21)-amine PEGylated growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) (1-29) using a GRF(1-29) derivative FMOC-protected at Tyr(1) and Lys(12).

    PubMed

    Youn, Yu Seok; Lee, Kang Choon

    2007-01-01

    PEGylation has been viewed as an effective means of overcoming the therapeutic restriction of growth hormone-releasing factor (1-29) (GRF(1-29)) due to its short biological lifetime caused by severe proteolysis and rapid glomerular filtration. Of three isomers according to the PEGylation sites (Tyr1, Lys12, or Lys21), PEGylated GRF(1-29) at Lys21-amine (Lys21-PEG-GRF(1-29)) was shown to have the highest bioactivity. In this report, we propose a unique two-step site-specific PEGylation method capable of producing only Lys21-PEG-GRF(1-29) with a single composition in high yield using a GRF(1-29) derivative protected at Tyr1 and Lys12 and remained available at Lys21 (FMOC1,12-GRF(1-29)). The first step of this reaction involved the PEG attachment to FMOC1,12-GRF(1-29), and the second step involved the removal of FMOC moieties. This PEGylation process was optimized at the following conditions: 0.2-0.3% (v/v) triethylamine concentration, 5.0-6.0-fold molar amount of PEG, reaction temperature of 25-45 degrees C, and reaction time of 30 min. Under these conditions, the maximum yield of Lys21-PEG-GRF(1-29) produced was ca. approximately 95%, 6.3-fold higher than that by nonspecific PEGylation at pH 8.5. Significantly, this site-specific Lys21-PEG-GRF(1-29) was found to have greatly increased resistance to rat plasma, liver, and kidney homogenates, with 7.0-, 25.4-, and 16.4-fold longer half-lives vs GRF(1-29), respectively. Furthermore, 125I-Lys21-PEG-GRF(1-29) displayed significantly reduced liver and kidney distributions and extended blood presence vs 125I-GRF(1-29) in rats. Due to these benefits, Lys21-PEG-GRF(1-29) displayed an enhanced initial growth hormone release in vivo despite having 15% remaining activity in vitro. This devised PEGylation method using an FMOC-protection/deprotection strategy would provide great usefulness for PEGylating bioactive peptides in terms of improved biological potency, elevated production yield, and a uniform composition.

  9. Mental illness, criminal risk factors and parole release decisions.

    PubMed

    Matejkowski, Jason; Draine, Jeffrey; Solomon, Phyllis; Salzer, Mark S

    2011-01-01

    Research has not examined whether higher rates of parole denial among inmates with mental illness (MI) are the result of the increased presence of criminal risk factors among this population. Employing a representative sample of inmates with (n  =  219) and without (n  =  184) MI receiving parole release decisions in 2007, this study tested whether the central eight risk factors for recidivism considered in parole release decisions intervened in the relationship between MI and parole release. MI was associated with possession of a substance use disorder, antisocial personality disorder and violent charges while incarcerated; however, these factors were not related to release decisions. MI was found to have neither a direct nor an indirect effect on release decisions. While results indicate that release decisions appear, to some extent, to be evidence-based, they also suggest considerable discretion is being implemented by parole board members in release decisions above and beyond consideration of criminal risk factors.

  10. Effects of ghrelin, growth hormone-releasing peptide-6, and growth hormone-releasing hormone on growth hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and cortisol release in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    de Sá, Larissa Bianca Paiva Cunha; Nascif, Sergio Oliva; Correa-Silva, Silvia Regina; Molica, Patricia; Vieira, José Gilberto Henriques; Dib, Sergio Atala; Lengyel, Ana-Maria Judith

    2010-10-01

    In type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), growth hormone (GH) responses to provocative stimuli are normal or exaggerated, whereas the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis has been less studied. Ghrelin is a GH secretagogue that also increases adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol levels, similarly to GH-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6). Ghrelin's effects in patients with T1DM have not been evaluated. We therefore studied GH, ACTH, and cortisol responses to ghrelin and GHRP-6 in 9 patients with T1DM and 9 control subjects. The GH-releasing hormone (GHRH)-induced GH release was also evaluated. Mean fasting GH levels (micrograms per liter) were higher in T1DM (3.5 ± 1.2) than in controls (0.6 ± 0.3). In both groups, ghrelin-induced GH release was higher than that after GHRP-6 and GHRH. When analyzing Δ area under the curve (ΔAUC) GH values after ghrelin, GHRP-6, and GHRH, no significant differences were observed in T1DM compared with controls. There was a trend (P = .055) to higher mean basal cortisol values (micrograms per deciliter) in T1DM (11.7 ± 1.5) compared with controls (8.2 ± 0.8). No significant differences were seen in ΔAUC cortisol values in both groups after ghrelin and GHRP-6. Mean fasting ACTH values were similar in T1DM and controls. No differences were seen in ΔAUC ACTH levels in both groups after ghrelin and GHRP-6. In summary, patients with T1DM have normal GH responsiveness to ghrelin, GHRP-6, and GHRH. The ACTH and cortisol release after ghrelin and GHRP-6 is also similar to controls. Our results suggest that chronic hyperglycemia of T1DM does not interfere with GH-, ACTH-, and cortisol-releasing mechanisms stimulated by these peptides.

  11. Nerve growth factor: neurotrophin or cytokine?

    PubMed

    Bonini, S; Rasi, G; Bracci-Laudiero, M L; Procoli, A; Aloe, L

    2003-06-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a neutrophin exerting an important role in the development and functions of the central and peripheral nervous system. However, it has recently been documented that several immune cells - such as mast cells, lymphocytes and eosinophils - produce, store and release NGF. Moreover, NGF high and low affinity receptors are widely expressed in the immune system, thus indicating the potential of responding to this neurotrophin through an autocrine mechanism. In fact, NGF influences development differentiation, chemotaxis and mediator release of inflammatory cells as well as fibroblast activation through a complex network influenced by other pro-inflammatory cytokines. Finally, NGF is increased in biological fluids of several allergic, immune and inflammatory diseases. Data reviewed suggest, therefore, that NGF might also be viewed as a (Th2?) cytokine with a modulatory role in allergic inflammation and tissue remodeling. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  12. The Physiology of Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone (GHRH) in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    production of growth hormone-releasing factor by carcinoid and pancreatic islet tumors associated with acromegaly . Prog Clin Biol Res 1981; 74:259-271. (16...promotion of apop- cause of acromegaly . More recently, expression has been tosis. These results indicate that disruption of enaog- demonstrated in tumors

  13. In vitro effects of thyrotropin-releasing hormone and somatostatin on prolactin and growth hormone release by the pituitary of Poecilia latipinna. I. An electrophoretic study.

    PubMed

    Wigham, T; Batten, T F

    1984-09-01

    Pituitary glands were removed from Poecilia latipinna which had been maintained in one-third seawater and were incubated for 18 hr in media of either 300 mosmol/kg (OP300) or 340 mosmol/kg (OP340) osmotic pressure for measurement of both total and newly synthesised prolactin (PRL) and growth hormone (GH) release. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) at 100 ng/ml increased release of total and newly synthesised PRL into OP340, but not into OP300, medium. Conversely, 300 ng/ml of somatotropin-release-inhibiting factor (SRIF) inhibited total and newly synthesised PRL release into OP300, but not OP340, medium. At 1000 ng/ml, SRIF inhibited total PRL release into both media, but newly synthesised PRL release was reduced significantly only in OP300 medium. The release of GH was unaffected by 100 ng/ml TRH in OP300 medium, but both total and newly synthesised GH release were enhanced by this dose in OP340 medium. SRIF at 300 ng/ml reduced total GH release into OP300 medium, whereas the release of newly synthesised GH was inhibited in OP340 medium. At 1000 ng/ml, SRIF inhibited total GH release into both media, but release of the newly synthesised hormone was not significantly altered. These results suggest that TRH can stimulate and SRIF inhibit both PRL and GH release by Poecilia pituitaries, but that these effects may be modulated by plasma osmotic pressure.

  14. Growth hormone (GH)-releasing activity of chicken GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) in chickens.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S; Gineste, C; Gaylinn, B D

    2014-08-01

    Two peptides with sequence similarities to growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) have been identified by analysis of the chicken genome. One of these peptides, chicken (c) GHRH-LP (like peptide) was previously found to poorly bind to chicken pituitary membranes or to cloned and expressed chicken GHRH receptors and had little, if any, growth hormone (GH)-releasing activity in vivo or in vitro. In contrast, a second more recently discovered peptide, cGHRH, does bind to cloned and expressed cGHRH receptors and increases cAMP activity in transfected cells. The possibility that this peptide may have in vivo GH-releasing activity was therefore assessed. The intravenous (i.v.) administration of cGHRH to immature chickens, at doses of 3-100 μg/kg, significantly increased circulating GH concentrations within 10 min of injection and the plasma GH levels remained elevated for at least 30 min after the injection of maximally effective doses. The plasma GH responses to cGHRH were comparable with those induced by human (h) or porcine (p) GHRH preparations and to that induced by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH). In marked contrast, the i.v. injection of cGHRH-LP had no significant effect on circulating GH concentrations in immature chicks. GH release was also increased from slaughterhouse chicken pituitary glands perifused for 5 min with cGHRH at doses of 0.1 μg/ml or 1.0 μg/ml, comparable with GH responses to hGHRH1-44. In contrast, the perifusion of chicken pituitary glands with cGHRH-LP had no significant effect on GH release. In summary, these results demonstrate that cGHRH has GH-releasing activity in chickens and support the possibility that it is the endogenous ligand of the cGHRH receptor.

  15. Physiological factors influencing capillary growth.

    PubMed

    Egginton, S

    2011-07-01

    (1) Angiogenesis (growth of new capillaries from an existing capillary bed) may result from a mismatch in microvascular supply and metabolic demand (metabolic error signal). Krogh examined the distribution and number of capillaries to explore the correlation between O(2) delivery and O(2) consumption. Subsequently, the heterogeneity in angiogenic response within a muscle has been shown to reflect either differences in fibre type composition or mechanical load. However, local control leads to targetted angiogenesis in the vicinity of glycolytic fibre types following muscle stimulation, or oxidative fibres following endurance training, while heterogeneity of capillary spacing is maintained during ontogenetic growth. (2) Despite limited microscopy resolution and lack of specific markers, Krogh's interest in the structure of the capillary wall paved the way for understanding the mechanisms of capillary growth. Angiogenesis may be influenced by the response of perivascular or stromal cells (fibroblasts, macrophages and pericytes) to altered activity, likely acting as a source for chemical signals modulating capillary growth such as vascular endothelial growth factor. In addition, haemodynamic factors such as shear stress and muscle stretch play a significant role in adaptive remodelling of the microcirculation. (3) Most indices of capillarity are highly dependent on fibre size, resulting in possible bias because of scaling. To examine the consequences of capillary distribution, it is therefore helpful to quantify the area of tissue supplied by individual capillaries. This allows the spatial limitations inherent in most models of tissue oxygenation to be overcome generating an alternative approach to Krogh's tissue cylinder, the capillary domain, to improve descriptions of intracellular oxygen diffusion. © 2010 The Author. Acta Physiologica © 2010 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  16. Controlled-release systems for the insect growth regulator pyriproxyfen.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Liliana; Wolf, David; Markus, Arie; Wybraniec, Sławomir; Wiesman, Zeev

    2003-09-24

    A simple technique was developed for the production of controlled-release systems (CRSs) for pyriproxyfen, an insect growth regulator active against the larvae of Culex pipiens, the most common species of mosquito found in developed countries. The CRSs consisted of a spongy core material encapsulated in a coating of a polyurethane or polyurea hydrogel, into which the active ingredient had been incorporated. The coating also included a surfactant to improve the low solubility in water of pyriproxyfen. The light core material enabled the CRS to float on the water surface, where the mosquitoe larvae are found. The type and amount of the polymeric coating and the amount of surfactant influenced the release profiles into water of the active ingredient. The release profiles of the CRSs were adjusted to the life cycle of the C. pipiens mosquito in order to obtain their optimal activity on the eighth day, which corresponds to the time of larval maturity.

  17. Understanding the multifactorial control of growth hormone release by somatotropes: lessons from comparative endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Gahete, Manuel D; Durán-Prado, Mario; Luque, Raúl M; Martínez-Fuentes, Antonio J; Quintero, Ana; Gutiérrez-Pascual, Ester; Córdoba-Chacón, José; Malagón, María M; Gracia-Navarro, Francisco; Castaño, Justo P

    2009-04-01

    Control of postnatal growth is the main, but not the only, role for growth hormone (GH) as this hormone also contributes to regulating metabolism, reproduction, immunity, development, and osmoregulation in different species. Likely owing to this variety of group-specific functions, GH production is differentially regulated across vertebrates, with an apparent evolutionary trend to simplification, especially in the number of stimulatory factors governing substantially GH release. Thus, teleosts exhibit a multifactorial regulation of GH secretion, with a number of factors, from the newly discovered fish GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) to pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) but also gonadotropin-releasing hormone, dopamine, corticotropin-releasing hormone, and somatostatin(s) directly controlling somatotropes. In amphibians and reptiles, GH secretion is primarily stimulated by the major hypothalamic peptides GHRH and PACAP and inhibited by somatostatin(s), while other factors (ghrelin, thyrotropin-releasing hormone) also influence GH release. Finally, in birds and mammals, primary control of GH secretion is exerted by a dual interplay between GHRH and somatostatin. In addition, somatotrope function is modulated by additional hypothalamic and peripheral factors (e.g., ghrelin, leptin, insulin-like growth factor-I), which together enable a balanced integration of feedback signals related to processes in which GH plays a relevant regulatory role, such as metabolic and energy status, reproductive, and immune function. Interestingly, in contrast to the high number of stimulatory factors impinging upon somatotropes, somatostatin(s) stand(s) as the main primary inhibitory regulator(s) for this cell type.

  18. [Neuronal growth factors--neurotrophins].

    PubMed

    Meyer, M; Rasmussen, J Z

    1999-04-05

    Neurotrophic factors are polypeptides primarily known to regulate the survival and differentiation of nerve cells during the development of the peripheral and central nervous systems. The neurotrophic factors act via specific receptors after retrograde axonal transport from the nerve fibre target areas back to the cell bodies, and locally through autocrine and paracrine mechanisms linked to nerve cell activity. In the mature nervous system, neurotrophic factors maintain morphological and neurochemical characteristics of nerve cells and promote activity-dependent dynamic/plastic changes in the synaptic contacts between nerve cells by strengthening functionally active synaptic connections. Induction and increased production of neurotrophic factors in relation to neural injuries are thought to serve protective and reparative purposes. Specific neurotrophic factors have thus been shown to protect nerve cells in a number of experimental models for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, just as specific neurotrophic factors have been shown to stimulate regenerative growth of both peripheral and central nerve fibres. Today, problems with continuous and localized delivery of specific neurotrophins or combinations thereof into the nervous system appear to be the most important obstacle for more widespread clinical application.

  19. Algorithmic complexity of growth hormone release in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Prank, K.; Wagner, M.; Brabant, G.

    1996-12-31

    Most hormones are secreted in an pulsatile rather than in a constant manner. This temporal pattern of pulsatile hormone release plays an important role in the regulation of cellular function and structure. In healthy humans growth hormone (GH) secretion is characterized by distinct pulses whereas patients bearing a GH producing tumor accompanied with excessive secretion (acromegaly) exhibit a highly irregular pattern of GH release. It has been hypothesized that this highly disorderly pattern of GH release in acromegaly arises from random events in the GH-producing tumor under decreased normal control of GH secretion. Using a context-free grammar complexity measure (algorithmic complexity) in conjunction with random surrogate data sets we demonstrate that the temporal pattern of GH release in acromegaly is not significantly different from a variety of stochastic processes. In contrast, normal subjects clearly exhibit deterministic structure in their temporal patterns of GH secretion. Our results support the hypothesis that GH release in acromegaly is due to random events in the GH-producing tumorous cells which might become independent from hypothalamic regulation. 17 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  20. Nerve growth factor promotes human hemopoietic colony growth and differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, H; Coughlin, M D; Bienenstock, J; Denburg, J A

    1988-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a neurotropic polypeptide necessary for the survival and growth of some central neurons, as well as sensory afferent and sympathetic neurons. Much is now known of the structural and functional characteristics of NGF, whose gene has recently been cloned. Since it is synthesized in largest amounts by the male mouse submandibular gland, its role exclusively in nerve growth is questionable. NGF also causes histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells in vitro, and we have shown elsewhere that it causes significant, dose-dependent, generalized mast cell proliferation in the rat in vivo when administered neonatally. Our experiments now indicate that NGF causes a significant stimulation of granulocyte colonies grown from human peripheral blood in standard hemopoietic methylcellulose assays. Further, NGF appears to act in a relatively selective fashion to induce the differentiation of eosinophils and basophils/mast cells. Depletion experiments show that the NGF effect may be T-cell dependent and that NGF augments the colony-stimulating effect of supernatants from the leukemic T-cell (Mo) line. The hemopoietic activity of NGF is blocked by polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to NGF. We conclude that NGF may indirectly act as a local growth factor in tissues other than those of the nervous system by causing T cells to synthesize or secrete molecules with colony-stimulating activity. In view of the synthesis of NGF in tissue injury, the involvement of basophils/mast cells and eosinophils in allergic and other inflammatory processes, and the association of mast cells with fibrosis and tissue repair, we postulate that NGF plays an important biological role in a variety of repair processes. PMID:3413109

  1. Platelet-rich growth factor in oral and maxillofacial surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Uma Shanker; Mohammad, Shadab; Singh, Rakesh K.; Das, Somdipto; Singh, Nimisha; Singh, Mayank

    2012-01-01

    Platelet-rich growth factor is an innovative regenerative therapy used to promote hard and soft tissue healing. It involves the application of autologous platelet-leukocyte-rich plasma containing growth factors and thrombin directly to the site of treatment. It is the intrinsic growth factors released by activated platelets which are concentrated in a topical gel formula. Clinically, it is an affordable treatment with potentially broad spectrum of applications in maxillofacial surgery especially in the treatment of complex or refractory wounds. The present article reviews its various applications not only in the specialization of oral and maxillofacial surgery but also in regenerative medicine. PMID:23833484

  2. Administration of porcine somatotropin by a sustained-release implant: effect on follicular growth, concentrations of steroids and insulin-like growth factor I, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein activity in follicular fluid of control, lean, and obese gilts.

    PubMed

    Echternkamp, S E; Spicer, L J; Klindt, J; Vernon, R K; Yen, J T; Buonomo, F C

    1994-09-01

    Prepubertal gilts of control (n = 30), obese (n = 30), or lean (n = 29) genetic lines were implanted with no, one, or two implants of porcine somatotropin (pST, each delivers 2 mg/d) for 6 wk starting at 160 d of age to determine whether pST affects ovarian function. At 4 mg/d, pST increased (P < .01) numbers of 4.0- to 6.9-mm (medium) follicles but not (P > .10) numbers of 1.0- to 3.9-mm (small) follicles per gilt. Both doses of pST increased (P < .01) serum and follicular fluid (FFL) concentrations of IGF-I and activity of IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-3 and 36-kDa IGFBP in all three lines; IGFBP-3 was the predominant IGFBP. In comparison, binding activity of IGFBP-2 was decreased (P < .01) in serum by 4 mg of pST but increased (P < .05) in FFL by 4 mg of pST. Lean gilts had lower (P < .05) serum concentrations of IGF-I and less (P < .05) total binding activity of IGFBP than control and obese gilts. Concentrations of estradiol in FFL of small and medium follicles tended (P < .08) to be increased by 2 mg/d of pST, whereas FFL concentrations of progesterone were unaffected by pST. Obese and control gilts had twofold greater (P < .05) FFL progesterone concentrations than lean gilts. We conclude that sustained-release implants of pST can stimulate follicular growth, increase concentrations of IGF-I in serum and FFL, and increase IGFBP activity in serum of genetically divergent lines of gilts without an adverse effect on ovarian function.

  3. Activin A, corticotropin-releasing factor and prostaglandin F2 alpha increase immunoreactive oxytocin release from cultured human placental cells.

    PubMed

    Florio, P; Lombardo, M; Gallo, R; Di Carlo, C; Sutton, S; Genazzani, A R; Petraglia, F

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of the immunoreactive oxytocin in human placental extracts and putative factors regulating the release of immunoreactive oxytocin from cultured human placental cells. Fresh placental tissue was collected from pregnant women at term and dissected of membranes (n = 5). Presence of immunoreactive oxytocin in trophoblast tissue was evaluated by a specific radio-immunoassay after acidic extraction and high-pressure liquid chromatography. In a second set of experiments, primary cultures of placental cells were performed and, 48-72 h after dissociation, the effect of arginine vasopressin, corticotropin-releasing factor, neuropeptide Y, activin A, inhibin A, noradrenaline or prostaglandins on immunoreactive oxytocin level in culture medium was investigated. The presence of immunoreactive oxytocin was shown in the acidic extract of trophoblast at term, and in the culture medium of human placental cells, and it was identical to the native peptide. The addition of corticotropin-releasing factor or arginine vasopressin, but not of neuropeptide Y, increased the release of immunoreactive oxytocin three- to fourfold from placental cells, with a dose-dependent effect (P < 0.01). A significantly increased release of immunoreactive oxytocin was shown in presence of noradrenaline (P < 0.01), which was reversed by prazosin, an antagonist of alpha-adrenergic receptors. Recombinant human activin A (P < 0.01), but not inhibin A, stimulated the release of immunoreactive oxytocin three- to fourfold from placental cells. Prostaglandin F2 alpha was a potent secretagogue of immunoreactive oxytocin, whereas a partial or no effect was observed when prostaglandin E2 or prostaglandin I2 was added. Thus, the present findings showed that human placenta contains immunoreactive oxytocin, and that its release from cultured placental cells is regulated by neurohormones, growth factors or prostaglandins.

  4. Insulin-like growth factor I acts as an angiogenic agent in rabbit cornea and retina: comparative studies with basic fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Grant, M B; Mames, R N; Fitzgerald, C; Ellis, E A; Aboufriekha, M; Guy, J

    1993-04-01

    The release of growth factors from ischaemic retina has been hypothesized as the central stimulus for retinal neovascularization in proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Two of the growth factors implicated are insulin-like growth factor-I and basic fibroblast growth factor. We examined the effect of insulin-like growth factor-I on in vivo neovascularization using the established angiogenic model of the rabbit cornea (n = 30), and also compared the effects of insulin-like growth factor-I and basic fibroblast growth factor using two new in vivo systems. Either supraphysiologic concentrations of each growth factor (600 micrograms) were injected intravitreally into pigmented rabbits (n = 21) or porous polyfluorotetraethylene chambers filled with an emulsion containing collagen and growth factor (500 ng) were placed on the retina surface (n = 8). Our results demonstrate that when insulin-like growth factor-I was implanted together with a slow release carrier into the pocket of the normally avascular cornea, insulin-like growth factor-I (10 micrograms/pellet) induced angiogenesis in all rabbits. This degree of angiogenesis was comparable to that previously shown for basic fibroblast growth factor. For the intravitreal studies, the fibrotic component was greater in the basic fibroblast growth factor injected eyes, whereas the vascular component was accentuated in the eyes injected with insulin-like growth factor-I. Light and electron microscopy demonstrated areas of vascular proliferation in both groups. Porous polyfluorotetraethylene chamber studies with insulin-like growth factor-I and basic fibroblast growth factor demonstrated vascular proliferation in the vicinity of the chamber similar to the intravitreal injected eyes, but to a lesser degree than the injected eyes. Our experiments overall support the angiogenic potential of both insulin-like growth factor-I and basic fibroblast growth factor and support distinct but complimentary roles for each growth factor in the

  5. Growth hormone increases somatostatin release and messenger ribonucleic acid levels in the rat hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Aguila, M C; McCann, S M

    1993-09-24

    Growth hormone (GH) suppresses its own secretion by stimulating somatostatin (SRIF) release. Thus, the possible regulation of GH-releasing factor (GRF) and SRIF release and SRIF messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) by GH was studied in the hypothalamus of male rats in vitro. The median eminences (ME's) were incubated in buffer containing 10(-7)-10(-11) M GH for 30 min. SRIF and GRF released into the medium were quantitated by RIA. The release of SRIF from ME fragments was significantly increased (P < 0.001) by 10(-9) M GH; however, 10(-9) M GH also inhibited (P < 0.01) GRF release from the ME. To determine the effect of GH on SRIF mRNA levels, periventricular nucleus (PeN) explants were cultured during 6 h in medium with 10(-7)-10(-11) M GH. Levels of SRIF mRNA (determined by an S1 nuclease protection assay) were significantly elevated in the presence of 10(-10)-10(-7) M GH. Likewise, 10(-9) M GH significantly stimulated SRIF release from PeN explants at 30 min and at 6 h. Surprisingly, 10(-9) M GH also significantly increased GRF release from the PeN explants at these times as well. This GRF was not responsible for the increased SRIF release or SRIF mRNA induced by GH since GRF antibody did not modify the GH-induced increases in SRIF release and mRNA levels. These results demonstrate a negative short-loop feedback of GH mediated at the ME by suppression of GRF and stimulation of SRIF release, whereas in the PeN GH increased both SRIF release and SRIF mRNA levels.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Growth and growth factors in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Salardi, S; Tonioli, S; Tassoni, P; Tellarini, M; Mazzanti, L; Cacciari, E

    1987-01-01

    Growth of 79 children with diabetes was analysed at diagnosis and again after one to 10.7 years of treatment with insulin. Both sexes were tall at onset, whereas at the last observation boys alone showed significant growth retardation. Height standard deviation score (SDS), however, showed no significant fall either in 32 subjects reassessed after five years of disease or in 18 subjects examined at full stature. Skeletal maturity was not significantly impaired after treatment. Pubertal growth spurt was reduced, especially in girls and in subjects with onset of disease at or around puberty. We found no significant correlation between height and height velocity SDS and glycosylated haemoglobin values or secretion of growth hormone during the arginine test. Somatomedin C values were correlated with height velocity SDS in prepubertal boys. The results of this study suggest that there are interferences in the growth of children with diabetes but that they do not seem to have a significant influence on adult height. PMID:3813637

  7. Polyethlyene glycol microgels to deliver bioactive nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Stukel, Jessica; Thompson, Susan; Simon, Laurent; Willits, Rebecca

    2015-02-01

    Delivery of bioactive molecules is a critical step in fabricating materials for regenerative medicine, yet, this step is particularly challenging in hydrated scaffolds such as hydrogels. Although bulk photocrosslinked poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels have been used for a variety of tissue engineering applications, their capability as drug delivery scaffolds has been limited due to undesirable release profiles and reduction in bioactivity of molecules. To solve these problems, this article presents the fabrication of degradable PEG microgels, which are micron-sized spherical hydrogels, to deliver bioactive nerve growth factor (NGF). NGF release and activity was measured after encapsulation in microgels formed from either 3 kDa or 6 kDa PEG to determine the role of hydrogel mesh size on release. Microgels formed from 6 kDa PEG were statistically larger and had a higher swelling ratio than 3 kDa PEG. The 6 kDa PEG microgels provided a Fickian release with a reduced burst effect and 3 kDa microgels provided anomalous release over ≥20 days. Regardless of molecular weight of PEG, NGF bioactivity was not significantly reduced compared to unprocessed NGF. These results demonstrate that microgels provide easy mechanisms to control the release while retaining the activity of growth factors. As this microgel-based delivery system can be injected at the site of nerve injury to promote nerve repair, the potential to deliver active growth factors in a controlled manner may reduce healing time for neural tissue engineering applications.

  8. Enhancement of RNA Polymerase Activity by a Factor Released by Auxin from Plasma Membrane*

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, James W.; Cherry, Joe H.; Morré, D. James; Lembi, Carole A.

    1972-01-01

    Using recently developed techniques for solubilization of RNA polymerase from soybean chromatin and isolation of plasma membrane fractions from plants we can show the presence of a transcriptional factor specifically released from the membranes by auxin, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. The nonauxin, 3,5-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, does not release the factor, but subsequent exposure of the membranes to auxin results in its release. Factor activity could not be demonstrated in fractions devoid of plasma membranes. The presence of a regulatory factor for RNA polymerase associated with plant plasma membrane and specifically released by auxin provides a mechanism whereby both rapid growth responses and delayed nuclear changes could be derived from a common auxin receptor site associated with plasma membrane. Images PMID:4508307

  9. Peripheral activities of growth hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Granata, R

    2016-07-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GHRH) is produced by the hypothalamus and stimulates GH synthesis and release in the anterior pituitary gland. In addition to its endocrine role, GHRH exerts a wide range of extrapituitary effects which include stimulation of cell proliferation, survival and differentiation, and inhibition of apoptosis. Accordingly, expression of GHRH, as well as the receptor GHRH-R and its splice variants, has been demonstrated in different peripheral tissues and cell types. Among the direct peripheral activities, GHRH regulates pancreatic islet and β-cell survival and function and endometrial cell proliferation, promotes cardioprotection and wound healing, influences the immune and reproductive systems, reduces inflammation, indirectly increases lifespan and adiposity and acts on skeletal muscle cells to inhibit cell death and atrophy. Therefore, it is becoming increasingly clear that GHRH exerts important extrapituitary functions, suggesting potential therapeutic use of the peptide and its analogs in a wide range of medical settings.

  10. Growth Factors and Tension-Induced Skeletal Muscle Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1994-01-01

    The project investigated biochemical mechanisms to enhance skeletal muscle growth, and developed a computer based mechanical cell stimulator system. The biochemicals investigated in this study were insulin/(Insulin like Growth Factor) IGF-1 and Steroids. In order to analyze which growth factors are essential for stretch-induced muscle growth in vitro, we developed a defined, serum-free medium in which the differentiated, cultured avian muscle fibers could be maintained for extended periods of time. The defined medium (muscle maintenance medium, MM medium) maintains the nitrogen balance of the myofibers for 3 to 7 days, based on myofiber diameter measurements and myosin heavy chain content. Insulin and IGF-1, but not IGF-2, induced pronounced myofiber hypertrophy when added to this medium. In 5 to 7 days, muscle fiber diameters increase by 71 % to 98% compared to untreated controls. Mechanical stimulation of the avian muscle fibers in MM medium increased the sensitivity of the cells to insulin and IGF-1, based on a leftward shift of the insulin dose/response curve for protein synthesis rates. (54). We developed a ligand binding assay for IGF-1 binding proteins and found that the avian skeletal muscle cultures produced three major species of 31, 36 and 43 kD molecular weight (54) Stretch of the myofibers was found to have no significant effect on the efflux of IGF-1 binding proteins, but addition of exogenous collagen stimulated IGF-1 binding protein production 1.5 to 5 fold. Steroid hormones have a profound effect on muscle protein turnover rates in vivo, with the stress-related glucocorticoids inducing rapid skeletal muscle atrophy while androgenic steroids induce skeletal muscle growth. Exercise in humans and animals reduces the catabolic effects of glucocorticoids and may enhance the anabolic effects of androgenic steroids on skeletal muscle. In our continuing work on the involvement of exogenrus growth factors in stretch-induced avian skeletal muscle growth, we

  11. Primary medical therapy for acromegaly: an open, prospective, multicenter study of the effects of subcutaneous and intramuscular slow-release octreotide on growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-I, and tumor size.

    PubMed

    Bevan, J S; Atkin, S L; Atkinson, A B; Bouloux, P-M; Hanna, F; Harris, P E; James, R A; McConnell, M; Roberts, G A; Scanlon, M F; Stewart, P M; Teasdale, E; Turner, H E; Wass, J A H; Wardlaw, J M

    2002-10-01

    Conventional surgery and radiotherapy for acromegaly have limitations. There are few data on the use of the somatostatin analog octreotide (Oct) as primary medical therapy. An open prospective study of 27 patients with newly diagnosed acromegaly was conducted in nine endocrine centers in the United Kingdom. Twenty patients had macroadenomas, and 7 had microadenomas. For the first 24 wk (phase 1), patients received sc Oct in an initial dose of 100 microg, 3 times daily, increased to 200 micro g three times daily after 4 wk in the 13 patients whose mean serum GH remained greater than 5 mU/liter (2 microg/liter). Five-point GH profiles were performed at 0, 4, 12, and 24 wk, and high resolution pituitary imaging using a standard protocol was performed at 0, 12, and 24 wk (magnetic resonance imaging in 25 patients and computed tomography in 2). Tumor dimensions and volumes were calculated by a central, reporting neuroradiologist, and the results were audited by a second, independent neuroradiologist. After 24 wk, 15 patients proceeded to phase 2 of the study with a direct switch to monthly injections of the depot formulation of Oct, Sandostatin long-acting release (Oct-LAR). Further GH profiles were performed at 36 and 48 wk, and pituitary imaging was performed at 48 wk. The median pretreatment serum GH concentration was 30.7 mU/liter (range, 6.7-141.4). During sc Oct, serum GH fell to less than 5 mU/liter in 9 patients (38%), and IGF-I fell to normal in 8 patients (33%). All 27 tumors shrank during sc Oct; for microadenomas the median tumor volume reduction was 49% (range, 12-73), and for macroadenomas it was 43% (range, 6-92). After 24 wk of Oct-LAR (end of phase 2), the GH level was less than 5 mU/liter in 11 of 14 patients (79%), and IGF-I was normal in 8 of 15 patients (53%). In the 15 patients given Oct-LAR (10 macroadenomas), wk 48 scans showed a further overall median tumor volume reduction of 24%. At the end of the study 79% of patients had mean serum GH levels

  12. Induction of growth hormone release by Pueraria thunbergiana BENTH.

    PubMed

    Jung, D Y; Ha, H; Kim, C

    2004-02-01

    Puerariae Radix (PR), Puerariae Flos (PF), and Puerariae Surculus (PS) as well as their constituents were tested for induction of rat growth hormone (rGH) release by both rat pituitary cell culture and in vivo experimentation in order to develop them to novel drugs. Through a calibration curve of the rGH released by addition of rat growth hormone-releasing hormone (rGHRH) to rat pituitary cells, the 70 % ethanol extracts of PR and PS increased rGH release by about 1.6 and 1.7 times as high, respectively, as the control group (264.6 +/- 13.6 pM). However, each puerarin type as a representative constituent of PR in Korea Pharmacopeia (KP) and tectorigenin and an important ingredient of PF were twice as effective as in the control group. The acid hydrolysate of Puerariae Surculus (HPS) increased rGH release concentration-dependently, and its EC (50) was approximately 10.4 microg/ml. The T (max) value for rGH after injection of 20 microg/kg of rGHRH was 10 - 30 min, while the C (max) value was increased by approximately 12-fold compared to the control group (198.2 +/- 25.0 pM) and the AUC (0 - 45) was increased to 10 times the level of the control group (10,840.9 +/- 845.5 min. pM). On the other hand, T (max) for the HPS was 60 min, while C (max) was increased approximately to 5.8 fold compared to control (244.1 +/- 36.4 pM). C (max) for puerarin was 1,028.6 +/- 502.7 pM, that is, approximately 5.2 times as high as the control level. However, tectorigenin (20 microg/kg) was of no statistical significance. Therefore, we suggest that the HPS and puerarin act either on GH secretagogue receptors or on GHRH receptor of somatotrophin as possible agonists or an inhibitor on somatostatin receptor to release rGH, respectively.

  13. Controlled multiple growth factor delivery from bone tissue engineering scaffolds via designed affinity.

    PubMed

    Suárez-González, Darilis; Lee, Jae Sung; Diggs, Alisha; Lu, Yan; Nemke, Brett; Markel, Mark; Hollister, Scott J; Murphy, William L

    2014-08-01

    It is known that angiogenesis plays an important role in bone regeneration and that release of angiogenic and osteogenic growth factors can enhance bone formation. Multiple growth factors play key roles in processes that lead to tissue formation/regeneration during natural tissue development and repair. Therefore, treatments aiming to mimic tissue regeneration can benefit from multiple growth factor release, and there remains a need for simple clinically relevant approaches for dual growth factor release. We hypothesized that mineral coatings could be used as a platform for controlled incorporation and release of multiple growth factors. Specifically, mineral-coated scaffolds were "dip coated" in multiple growth factor solutions, and growth factor binding and release were dictated by the growth factor-mineral binding affinity. Beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds were fabricated using indirect solid-free form fabrication techniques and coated with a thin conformal mineral layer. Mineral-coated β-TCP scaffolds were sequentially dipped in recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor (rhVEGF) and a modular bone morphogenetic peptide, a mineral-binding version of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), solutions to allow for the incorporation of each growth factor. The dual release profile showed sustained release of both growth factors for over more than 60 days. Scaffolds releasing either rhVEGF alone or the combination of growth factors showed an increase in blood vessel ingrowth in a dose-dependent manner in a sheep intramuscular implantation model. This approach demonstrates a "modular design" approach, in which a controllable biologics carrier is integrated into a structural scaffold as a thin surface coating.

  14. Corticotropin Releasing Factor promotes breast cancer cell motility and invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Androulidaki, Ariadne; Dermitzaki, Erini; Venihaki, Maria; Karagianni, Effie; Rassouli, Olga; Andreakou, Erini; Stournaras, Christos; Margioris, Andrew N; Tsatsanis, Christos

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Cancer cells secrete bioactive peptides that act in an autocrine or paracrine fashion affecting tumor growth and metastasis. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a hypothalamic neuropeptide that controls the response to stress, has been detected in breast cancer tissues and cell lines. CRF can affect breast cancer cells in an autocrine or paracrine manner via its production from innervating sympathetic neurons or immune cells. Methods In the present study we report our findings regarding the impact of CRF on breast cancer cell motility and invasiveness. For this purpose we used the MCF7 breast cancer cell line and evaluated the effect of CRF on motility and invasiveness using the wound-healing and boyden-chamber assays. In addition, we measured the effect of CRF on molecules that mediate motility by western blot, immunofluorescence, ELISA and RT-PCR. Results Our findings show that: 1. CRF transiently inhibited the apoptosis of MCF7 cells. 2. CRF enhanced MCF7 cell motility in a wound healing assay and their invasiveness through extracellular matrix. 3. CRF increased actin polymerization, phosphorylation of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK), providing a potential mechanism for the observed induction of MCF7 motility. 4. CRF induced the expression of Cox-1 but not Cox-2 in MCF7 cells as well as the production of prostaglandins, factors known to promote invasiveness and metastasis. Conclusion Overall, our data suggest that CRF stimulates cell motility and invasiveness of MCF7 cells most probably via induction of FAK phosphorylation and actin filament reorganization and production of prostaglandins via Cox1. Based on these findings we postulate that the stress neuropeptide CRF present in the vicinity of tumors (either produced locally by the tumor cells themselves or by nearby normal cells or secreted from the innervations of surrounding tissues) may play an important role on breast tumor growth and metastatic capacity, providing a potential link between stress

  15. Myogenic expression of an injectable protease-resistant growth hormone-releasing hormone augments long-term growth in pigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draghia-Akli, R.; Fiorotto, M. L.; Hill, L. A.; Malone, P. B.; Deaver, D. R.; Schwartz, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    Ectopic expression of a new serum protease-resistant porcine growth hormone-releasing hormone, directed by an injectable muscle-specific synthetic promoter plasmid vector (pSP-HV-GHRH), elicits growth in pigs. A single 10 mg intramuscular injection of pSP-HV-GHRH DNA followed by electroporation in three-week-old piglets elevated serum GHRH levels by twofold to fourfold, enhanced growth hormone secretion, and increased serum insulin-like growth factor-I by threefold to sixfold over control pigs. After 65 days the average body weight of the pigs injected with pSP-HV-GHRH was approximately 37% greater than the placebo-injected controls and resulted in a significant reduction in serum urea concentration, indicating a decrease in amino acid catabolism. Evaluation of body composition indicated a uniform increase in mass, with no organomegaly or associated pathology.

  16. Myogenic expression of an injectable protease-resistant growth hormone-releasing hormone augments long-term growth in pigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draghia-Akli, R.; Fiorotto, M. L.; Hill, L. A.; Malone, P. B.; Deaver, D. R.; Schwartz, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    Ectopic expression of a new serum protease-resistant porcine growth hormone-releasing hormone, directed by an injectable muscle-specific synthetic promoter plasmid vector (pSP-HV-GHRH), elicits growth in pigs. A single 10 mg intramuscular injection of pSP-HV-GHRH DNA followed by electroporation in three-week-old piglets elevated serum GHRH levels by twofold to fourfold, enhanced growth hormone secretion, and increased serum insulin-like growth factor-I by threefold to sixfold over control pigs. After 65 days the average body weight of the pigs injected with pSP-HV-GHRH was approximately 37% greater than the placebo-injected controls and resulted in a significant reduction in serum urea concentration, indicating a decrease in amino acid catabolism. Evaluation of body composition indicated a uniform increase in mass, with no organomegaly or associated pathology.

  17. Transforming growth factor alpha, Shope fibroma growth factor, and vaccinia growth factor can replace myxoma growth factor in the induction of myxomatosis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Opgenorth, A; Nation, N; Graham, K; McFadden, G

    1993-02-01

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) homologues encoded by vaccinia virus, myxoma virus, and malignant rabbit fibroma virus have been shown to contribute to the pathogenicity of virus infection upon inoculation of susceptible hosts. However, since the primary structures of these growth factors and the disease profiles induced by different poxvirus genera vary substantially, the degree to which the various EGF homologues perform similar roles in viral pathogenesis remains unclear. In order to determine whether different EGF-like growth factors can perform qualitatively similar functions in the induction of myxomatosis in rabbits, we created recombinant myxoma virus variants in which the native growth factor, myxoma growth factor (MGF), was disrupted and replaced with either vaccinia virus growth factor, Shope fibroma growth factor, or rat transforming growth factor alpha. Unlike the control virus containing an inactivated MGF gene, which caused marked attenuation of the disease syndrome and substantially less proliferation of the epithelial cell layers in the conjunctiva and respiratory tract, the recombinant myxoma virus strains expressing heterologous growth factors produced infections which were both clinically and histopathologically indistinguishable from wild-type myxomatosis. We conclude that these poxviral and cellular EGF-like growth factors, which are diverse with respect to primary structure and origin, have similar biological functions in the context of myxoma virus pathogenesis and are mitogenic for the same target cells.

  18. Growth Factors in Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Zia Ali

    2003-01-01

    Many growth factors are implicated in the pathogenesis of proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Alteration of growth factors and their receptors in diabetes has been shown in both experimental and clinical studies. Sustained hyperglycemia resulting from long-standing diabetes leads to several biochemical abnormalities that consequently result in retinal hypoxia. Retinal oxygenation state regulates various growth factors that promote angiogenesis in order to meet the oxygen demands of the tissue. However, unregulated expression of these growth factors and induction of complex cascades leading to augmentation of other proangiogenic factors, which may not be regulated by tissue oxygenation, leads to uncontrolled retinal neovascularization and blindness in diabetic patients. PMID:14668050

  19. Vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor 2 delivery from spinal cord bridges to enhance angiogenesis following injury.

    PubMed

    De Laporte, Laura; des Rieux, Anne; Tuinstra, Hannah M; Zelivyanskaya, Marina L; De Clerck, Nora M; Postnov, Andrei A; Préat, Véronique; Shea, Lonnie D

    2011-09-01

    The host response to spinal cord injury can lead to an ischemic environment that can induce cell death and limits cell transplantation approaches to promote spinal cord regeneration. Spinal cord bridges that provide a localized and sustained release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) were investigated for their ability to promote angiogenesis and nerve growth within the injury. Bridges were fabricated by fusion of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres using a gas foaming/particulate leaching technique, and proteins were incorporated by encapsulation into the microspheres and/or mixing with the microspheres before foaming. Compared to the mixing method, encapsulation reduced the losses during leaching and had a slower protein release, while VEGF was released more rapidly than FGF-2. In vivo implantation of bridges loaded with VEGF enhanced the levels of VEGF within the injury at 1 week, and bridges releasing VEGF and FGF-2 increased the infiltration of endothelial cells and the formation of blood vessel at 6 weeks postimplantation. Additionally, substantial neurofilament staining was observed within the bridge; however, no significant difference was observed between bridges with or without protein. Bridges releasing angiogenic factors may provide an approach to overcome an ischemic environment that limits regeneration and cell transplantation-based approaches. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Development and validation of a short-term, serum-free culture system for bovine granulosa cells: evaluation of the effects of somatotropin and growth hormone-releasing factor on estradiol production.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Krassel, F; Ireland, J J

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and validate a short-term, serum-free culture system to determine whether recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) or recombinant bovine growth hormone-releasing factor (rbGRF) altered the estradiol-producing capacity of bovine granulosa cells isolated from dominant or subordinate follicles of the first follicular wave. Thus, ovaries were obtained at an abattoir from cows that were between d 2 to 5 or 6 to 10 of the estrous cycle. Three size classes of follicles were isolated from each cow's ovaries: small (2 to 5 mm in diameter), medium (6 to 14 mm), or the largest (6 to 19 mm). In vivo steroid-producing capacity of follicles was assessed by measuring concentration of estradiol, progesterone, androstenedione and 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone in each follicle. In vitro steroid-producing capacity was assessed by culturing granulosa cells from the different follicle sizes for 48 h in serum-free media with 19-OH androstenedione and measuring the estradiol and progesterone concentrations in media at the end of culture. The effect of different doses of FSH, rbST, or rbGRF on estradiol and progesterone production by granulosa cells from each follicle size class during d 2 to 5 or 6 to 10 was also evaluated. A high percentage (91.7%) of the largest follicles obtained on d 2 to 5 was estrogen-active (estradiol > progesterone) compared with other follicle classifications (d 2 to 5, small = 0%, medium = 13.8%; d 6 to 10, small = 0%, medium = 3.3%, largest = 33.3%). Estradiol was highest (P < 0.05) in the largest follicle on d 2 to 5 and correlated positively with follicle diameter. The pattern of in vitro production of estradiol by granulosa cells from the different follicle size classes reflected the original in vivo capacity of follicles to produce estradiol. However, only granulosa cells from the largest estrogen-active follicle on d 2 to 5 produced more estradiol than progesterone in vitro. Progesterone production by granulosa cells

  1. Growth factors and acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Hirschberg, R; Ding, H

    1998-03-01

    During acute renal injury, there are alterations in the expression of several growth factors and their receptors in the kidney. The increased expression of several growth factors and/or their receptors at sites of nephron injury suggests important contributions to repair. Exogenous administration of some growth factors, such as IGF-I, EGF and HGF, accelerates recovery of renal function in experimental acute renal failure (ARF). In ARF growth factors act through several mechanisms, which may include altered cell cycle regulation and mitogenesis, differentiation of recovered cells, regulation of apoptosis, improved renal hemodynamics, and others. There is evidence for interactions of growth factors with other growth factors as well as with other genes resulting in complex orchestration of biologic events contributing to recovery from ARF.

  2. Synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2007-01-23

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain that binds a heparin-binding growth factor receptor, covalently bound to a hydrophobic linker, which is in turn covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  3. Growth factors, nutrient signaling, and cardiovascular aging

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Luigi; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Longo, Valter D.

    2012-01-01

    Growth factors regulated by specific macronutrients have been shown to promote aging and accelerate mortality in the great majority of the organisms studied. In particular, the enzymes activated by growth hormone (GH), insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) in mammals and their orthologs in simple model organisms represent perhaps the best-understood proteins involved in the aging process. Dietary restriction (DR), which reduces the level of IGF-I and of other growth factors, has been associated with protection from diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases and deficiencies in GH signaling and IGF-I are strongly associated with protection from cancer and diabetes in both mice and humans, but their role in cardiac function and cardiovascular diseases is controversial. Here we review the link between growth factors, cardiac function and heart disease with focus on the cardioprotective and sensitizing effect of growth factors in both model organisms and humans. PMID:22499903

  4. Growth hormone release induced by growth hormone-releasing hexapeptide is not mediated by thyrotropin-releasing hormone in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Kacsóh, B; Kacsóh, G; Guzzardo, M B; Black, A C; Bisat, T

    1997-02-01

    GH-releasing hexapeptide (GHRP-6) and nursing stimulate GH secretion in rat pups via GH-releasing factors (GRFs: distinct from GH-releasing hormone (GHRH). It was determined whether GH secretion induced by GHRP-6 or nursing was mediated by TSH-releasing hormone (TRH) in 2-d-old rats. In vitro. GHRP-6 and TRH stimulated GH secretion of neonatal pituitary glands. At their maximally effective doses, GHRP-6 and TRH evoked approximately equal GH responses. Treatment with a combination of the maximally effective doses of GHRP-6 and TRH resulted in a GH response comparable to that evoked by either treatment alone. GHRP-6 in vivo induced a greater GH response than did TRH. Treatment in vivo with a combination of the maximally effective doses of GHRP-6 and TRH synergistically increased serum GH levels. Unlike GHRP-6 TRH was an effective stimulus of prolactin secretion either in vitro or in vivo. Nursing was an effective stimulus for GH secretion, but only marginally increased serum prolactin levels. The effects of either of the peptides and nursing on GH secretion were additive. These results suggest that GHRP-6 stimulates GH secretion both by acting directly on the pituitary gland and indirectly via a hypothalamic GRF. The indirect effect appears to be greater. The alternative GRFs released by GHRP-6 or nursing are distinct from each other and from TRH. These findings suggest that alternative GRFs play a significant role in the regulation of GH secretion in neonatal rats.

  5. In vitro release study of mono-PEGylated growth hormone-releasing peptide-6 from PLGA microspheres.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Ji; Na, Dong Hee; Lee, Kang Choon

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate in vitro release property of mono-PEGylated growth hormone-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) microspheres. The microspheres encapsulating native GHRP-6 or mono-PEG-GHRP-6 were prepared using the single oil-in-water emulsion solvent evaporation method. In vitro release study was performed in 0.1M phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, containing 0.02% Tween 80 and sodium azide at 37 or 55 degrees C. The mono-PEG-GHRP-6 microspheres showed a lower initial burst compared with native GHRP-6 microspheres and zero-order release profile for a 1-month period. The release period was dependent on the PEG size attached to the GHRP-6 with more rapid drug release being observed with the smaller PEG size. This study suggests that PEGylated peptide has good potential as a source for a sustained release microsphere delivery system.

  6. How does the pathophysiological context influence delivery of bone growth factors?☆

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaohua; Suárez-González, Darilis; Khalil, Andrew S.; Murphy, William L.

    2014-01-01

    “Orthobiologics” represents an important category of therapeutics for the regeneration of bone defects caused by injuries or diseases, and bone growth factors are a particularly rapidly growing sub-category. Clinical application of bone growth factors has accelerated in the last two decades with the introduction of BMPs into clinical bone repair. Optimal use of growth factor-mediated treatments heavily relies on controlled delivery, which can substantially influence the local growth factor dose, release kinetics, and biological activity. The characteristics of the surrounding environment, or “context”, during delivery can dictate growth factor loading efficiency, release and biological activity. This review discusses the influence of the surrounding environment on therapeutic delivery of bone growth factors. We specifically focus on pathophysiological components, including soluble components and cells, and how they can actively influence the therapeutic delivery and perhaps efficacy of bone growth factors. PMID:25453269

  7. Roles for Growth Factors in Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Witsch, Esther; Sela, Michael; Yarden, Yosef

    2011-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, cells receive fate-determining signals from their tissue surroundings, primarily in the form of polypeptide growth factors. Integration of these extracellular signals underlies tissue homeostasis. Although departure from homeostasis and tumor initiation are instigated by oncogenic mutations rather than by growth factors, the latter are the major regulators of all subsequent steps of tumor progression, namely clonal expansion, invasion across tissue barriers, angiogenesis, and colonization of distant niches. Here, we discuss the relevant growth factor families, their roles in tumor biology, as well as the respective downstream signaling pathways. Importantly, cancer-associated activating mutations that impinge on these pathways often relieve, in part, the reliance of tumors on growth factors. On the other hand, growth factors are frequently involved in evolvement of resistance to therapeutic regimens, which extends the roles for polypeptide factors to very late phases of tumor progression and offers opportunities for cancer therapy. PMID:20430953

  8. Factors affecting water quality in the releases from hydropower reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Ruane, R.J.; Hauser, G.E. )

    1990-01-01

    Typical water quality concerns with releases from hydropower reservoirs include low dissolved oxygen, inappropriate temperature for downstream uses, supersaturation of total dissolved gases, and water quality constituents associated with low dissolved oxygen. Except for supersaturation of total dissolved gases, which is usually caused by by-passing turbines and spilling water, all of these concerns are related to the limnology of the upstream reservoir. Various limnological factors affect water quality, particularly dissolved oxygen (DO) in turbine releases. This paper describes three groups of reservoirs, thermal stratification characteristics for each group, DO effects for each group, the main factors that affect DO in TVA turbine releases, and other water quality constituents that are related to low DO.

  9. Heparin-Binding Epidermal Growth Factor-like Growth Factor/Diphtheria Toxin Receptor in Normal and Neoplastic Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Vinante, Fabrizio; Rigo, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) belongs to the EGF family of growth factors. It is biologically active either as a molecule anchored to the membrane or as a soluble form released by proteolytic cleavage of the extracellular domain. HB-EGF is involved in relevant physiological and pathological processes spanning from proliferation and apoptosis to morphogenesis. We outline here the main activities of HB-EGF in connection with normal or neoplastic differentiative or proliferative events taking place primitively in the hematopoietic microenvironment. PMID:23888518

  10. Growth factor gene therapy for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Tuszynski, Mark H; U, Hoi Sang; Alksne, John; Bakay, Roy A; Pay, Mary Margaret; Merrill, David; Thal, Leon J

    2002-11-15

    The capacity to prevent neuronal degeneration and death during the course of progressive neurological disorders such as Alzheimer disease (AD) would represent a significant advance in therapy. Nervous system growth factors are families of naturally produced proteins that, in animal models, exhibit extensive potency in preventing neuronal death due to a variety of causes, reversing age-related atrophy of neurons, and ameliorating functional deficits. The main challenge in translating growth factor therapy to the clinic has been delivery of growth factors to the brain in sufficient concentrations to influence neuronal function. One means of achieving growth factor delivery to the central nervous system in a highly targeted, effective manner may be gene therapy. In this article the authors summarize the development and implementation of nerve growth factor gene delivery as a potential means of reducing cell loss in AD.

  11. Kinetics of Stop Codon Recognition by Release Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Hetrick, Byron; Lee, Kristin; Joseph, Simpson

    2009-01-01

    Recognition of stop codons by class I release factors is a fundamental step in the termination phase of protein synthesis. Since premature termination is costly to the cell, release factors have to efficiently discriminate between stop and sense codons. In order to understand the mechanism of discrimination between stop and sense codons, we developed a new, pre-steady state kinetic assay to monitor the interaction of RF1 with the ribosome. Our results show that RF1 associates with similar association rate constants to ribosomes programmed with a stop or sense codons. However, dissociation of RF1 from sense codons is as much as three orders of magnitude faster than from stop codons. Interestingly, the affinity of RF1 for ribosomes programmed with different sense codons does not correlate with the defects in peptide release. Thus, discrimination against sense codons is achieved, both, by increasing the dissociation rates and by decreasing the rate of peptide release. These results suggest that sense codons inhibit conformational changes necessary for RF1 to stably bind to the ribosome and catalyze peptide release. PMID:19874047

  12. Priming Dental Pulp Stem Cells With Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Increases Angiogenesis of Implanted Tissue-Engineered Constructs Through Hepatocyte Growth Factor and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Gorin, Caroline; Rochefort, Gael Y.; Bascetin, Rumeyza; Ying, Hanru; Lesieur, Julie; Sadoine, Jérémy; Beckouche, Nathan; Berndt, Sarah; Novais, Anita; Lesage, Matthieu; Hosten, Benoit; Vercellino, Laetitia; Merlet, Pascal; Le-Denmat, Dominique; Marchiol, Carmen; Letourneur, Didier; Nicoletti, Antonino; Vital, Sibylle Opsahl; Poliard, Anne; Salmon, Benjamin; Germain, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering strategies based on implanting cellularized biomaterials are promising therapeutic approaches for the reconstruction of large tissue defects. A major hurdle for the reliable establishment of such therapeutic approaches is the lack of rapid blood perfusion of the tissue construct to provide oxygen and nutrients. Numerous sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) displaying angiogenic potential have been characterized in the past years, including the adult dental pulp. Establishment of efficient strategies for improving angiogenesis in tissue constructs is nevertheless still an important challenge. Hypoxia was proposed as a priming treatment owing to its capacity to enhance the angiogenic potential of stem cells through vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release. The present study aimed to characterize additional key factors regulating the angiogenic capacity of such MSCs, namely, dental pulp stem cells derived from deciduous teeth (SHED). We identified fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) as a potent inducer of the release of VEGF and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) by SHED. We found that FGF-2 limited hypoxia-induced downregulation of HGF release. Using three-dimensional culture models of angiogenesis, we demonstrated that VEGF and HGF were both responsible for the high angiogenic potential of SHED through direct targeting of endothelial cells. In addition, FGF-2 treatment increased the fraction of Stro-1+/CD146+ progenitor cells. We then applied in vitro FGF-2 priming to SHED before encapsulation in hydrogels and in vivo subcutaneous implantation. Our results showed that FGF-2 priming is more efficient than hypoxia at increasing SHED-induced vascularization compared with nonprimed controls. Altogether, these data demonstrate that FGF-2 priming enhances the angiogenic potential of SHED through the secretion of both HGF and VEGF. Significance The results from the present study show that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) priming is more

  13. Arteriogenic therapy by intramyocardial sustained delivery of a novel growth factor combination prevents chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Banquet, Sébastien; Gomez, Elodie; Nicol, Lionel; Edwards-Lévy, Florence; Henry, Jean-Paul; Cao, Renhai; Schapman, Damien; Dautreaux, Brigitte; Lallemand, Francoise; Bauer, Fabrice; Cao, Yihai; Thuillez, Christian; Mulder, Paul; Richard, Vincent; Brakenhielm, Ebba

    2011-08-30

    Therapeutic angiogenesis is a promising approach for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction and chronic heart failure. We aimed to improve proangiogenic therapies by identifying novel arteriogenic growth factor combinations, developing injectable delivery systems for spatiotemporally controlled growth factor release, and evaluating functional consequences of targeted intramyocardial growth factor delivery in chronic heart failure. First, we observed that fibroblast growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor synergistically stimulate vascular cell migration and proliferation in vitro. Using 2 in vivo angiogenesis assays (n=5 mice per group), we found that the growth factor combination results in a more potent and durable angiogenic response than either growth factor used alone. Furthermore, we determined that the molecular mechanisms involve potentiation of Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction pathways, as well as upregulation of angiogenic growth factor receptors. Next, we developed crosslinked albumin-alginate microcapsules that sequentially release fibroblast growth factor-2 and hepatocyte growth factor. Finally, in a rat model of chronic heart failure induced by coronary ligation (n=14 to 15 rats per group), we found that intramyocardial slow release of fibroblast growth factor-2 with hepatocyte growth factor potently stimulates angiogenesis and arteriogenesis and prevents cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, as determined by immunohistochemistry, leading to improved cardiac perfusion after 3 months, as shown by magnetic resonance imaging. These multiple beneficial effects resulted in reduced adverse cardiac remodeling and improved left ventricular function, as revealed by echocardiography. Our data showing the selective advantage of using fibroblast growth factor-2 together with hepatocyte growth factor suggest that this growth factor combination may constitute an efficient novel treatment for chronic

  14. Growth factors from genes to clinical application

    SciTech Connect

    Sara, V.R. ); Hall, K.; Low, H. )

    1990-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed an explosion in the identification of growth factors and their receptors. This has been greatly facilitated by recombinant DNA technology, which has provided the tools not only to identify these proteins at the gene level but also to produce recombinant proteins for evaluating their biological activities. With the help of such techniques, we are moving toward an understanding of the biosynthesis of growth factors and their receptors, structure-function relationships, as well as mechanisms for intracellular signal transmission. The possibility of modifying these factors has opened new fields of clinical application. In this paper, four major areas of growth factor research are presented: the characterization of growth factor genes and their protein products, growth factor receptors and signal transduction by the receptors to mediate biological action, the biological actions of the various growth factors, and the role of growth factors in health and disease and their possible clinical application. Some of the topics covered include: structure of the IGFs and their variants; isoforms of PDGF receptor types; tyrosine kinase activation; structure of G-proteins in biological membranes; possible therapeutic application of NGF in the treatment of Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases; PDGF's possible role in the development of several fibroproliferative diseases and its therapeutic application in wound healing; and the possible use of angiogenic inhibitors in tumor treatment.

  15. Control of angiogenesis by galectins involves the release of platelet-derived proangiogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Etulain, Julia; Negrotto, Soledad; Tribulatti, María Virginia; Croci, Diego Omar; Carabelli, Julieta; Campetella, Oscar; Rabinovich, Gabriel Adrián; Schattner, Mirta

    2014-01-01

    Platelets contribute to vessel formation through the release of angiogenesis-modulating factors stored in their α-granules. Galectins, a family of lectins that bind β-galactoside residues, are up-regulated in inflammatory and cancerous tissues, trigger platelet activation and mediate vascularization processes. Here we aimed to elucidate whether the release of platelet-derived proangiogenic molecules could represent an alternative mechanism through which galectins promote neovascularization. We show that different members of the galectin family can selectively regulate the release of angiogenic molecules by human platelets. Whereas Galectin (Gal)-1, -3, and -8 triggered vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release, only Gal-8 induced endostatin secretion. Release of VEGF induced by Gal-8 was partially prevented by COX-1, PKC, p38 and Src kinases inhibitors, whereas Gal-1-induced VEGF secretion was inhibited by PKC and ERK blockade, and Gal-3 triggered VEGF release selectively through a PKC-dependent pathway. Regarding endostatin, Gal-8 failed to stimulate its release in the presence of PKC, Src and ERK inhibitors, whereas aspirin or p38 inhibitor had no effect on endostatin release. Despite VEGF or endostatin secretion, platelet releasates generated by stimulation with each galectin stimulated angiogenic responses in vitro including endothelial cell proliferation and tubulogenesis. The platelet angiogenic activity was independent of VEGF and was attributed to the concerted action of other proangiogenic molecules distinctly released by each galectin. Thus, secretion of platelet-derived angiogenic molecules may represent an alternative mechanism by which galectins promote angiogenic responses and its selective blockade may lead to the development of therapeutic strategies for angiogenesis-related diseases.

  16. Control of Angiogenesis by Galectins Involves the Release of Platelet-Derived Proangiogenic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Etulain, Julia; Negrotto, Soledad; Tribulatti, María Virginia; Croci, Diego Omar; Carabelli, Julieta; Campetella, Oscar; Rabinovich, Gabriel Adrián; Schattner, Mirta

    2014-01-01

    Platelets contribute to vessel formation through the release of angiogenesis-modulating factors stored in their α-granules. Galectins, a family of lectins that bind β-galactoside residues, are up-regulated in inflammatory and cancerous tissues, trigger platelet activation and mediate vascularization processes. Here we aimed to elucidate whether the release of platelet-derived proangiogenic molecules could represent an alternative mechanism through which galectins promote neovascularization. We show that different members of the galectin family can selectively regulate the release of angiogenic molecules by human platelets. Whereas Galectin (Gal)-1, -3, and -8 triggered vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release, only Gal-8 induced endostatin secretion. Release of VEGF induced by Gal-8 was partially prevented by COX-1, PKC, p38 and Src kinases inhibitors, whereas Gal-1-induced VEGF secretion was inhibited by PKC and ERK blockade, and Gal-3 triggered VEGF release selectively through a PKC-dependent pathway. Regarding endostatin, Gal-8 failed to stimulate its release in the presence of PKC, Src and ERK inhibitors, whereas aspirin or p38 inhibitor had no effect on endostatin release. Despite VEGF or endostatin secretion, platelet releasates generated by stimulation with each galectin stimulated angiogenic responses in vitro including endothelial cell proliferation and tubulogenesis. The platelet angiogenic activity was independent of VEGF and was attributed to the concerted action of other proangiogenic molecules distinctly released by each galectin. Thus, secretion of platelet-derived angiogenic molecules may represent an alternative mechanism by which galectins promote angiogenic responses and its selective blockade may lead to the development of therapeutic strategies for angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:24788652

  17. Antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone suppress in vivo tumor growth and gene expression in triple negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Perez, Roberto; Schally, Andrew V; Vidaurre, Irving; Rincon, Ricardo; Block, Norman L; Rick, Ferenc G

    2012-09-01

    This study evaluated the effects of a modern antagonistic analog of GHRH on tumor growth and on expression of inflammatory cytokine genes in two models of human triple negative breast cancers (TNBC). The TNBC subtype is refractory to the treatment options available for other hormone-independent breast cancers. Inflammatory cytokines play a major role in the cellular signaling associated with breast cancer pathogenesis and enhance epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMT), drug resistance, and metastatic potential. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide which regulates the synthesis and release of growth hormone by the pituitary and is an autocrine/paracrine growth factor for multiple human cancers. The effects of analogs of GHRH on tumoral cytokine expression have not been previously investigated. Animals bearing xenografts of the human TNBC cell lines, HCC1806 and MX-1, were treated with MIA-602, an antagonistic analog of GHRH. Treatment with MIA-602 significantly reduced tumor growth. We quantified transcript levels of the genes for several inflammatory cytokines. Expression of INFγ, IL-1α, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNFα, was significantly reduced by treatment with MIA-602. We conclude that treatment of TNBC with GHRH antagonists reduces tumor growth through an action mediated by tumoral GHRH receptors and produces a suppression of inflammatory cytokine signaling. Silencing of GHRH receptors in vitro with siRNA inhibited the expression of GHRH-R genes and inflammatory cytokine genes in HCC1806 and MX-1 cells. Further studies on GHRH antagonists may facilitate the development of new strategies for the treatment of resistant cancers.

  18. [Transforming growth factor of beta-type].

    PubMed

    Stoĭka, R S

    1988-01-01

    Recent data about the structure and properties of the beta-type transforming growth factor as well as evidence about its influence on different target cells are presented. The regulatory action of the factor is shown to depend mainly on the type of tested cells, conditions of their culturing and the presence of other bioregulators of cell proliferation in the medium. The prospects of the beta-type transforming growth factor use in practice are considered.

  19. Growth factors for the treatment of ischemic brain injury (growth factor treatment).

    PubMed

    Larpthaveesarp, Amara; Ferriero, Donna M; Gonzalez, Fernando F

    2015-04-30

    In recent years, growth factor therapy has emerged as a potential treatment for ischemic brain injury. The efficacy of therapies that either directly introduce or stimulate local production of growth factors and their receptors in damaged brain tissue has been tested in a multitude of models for different Central Nervous System (CNS) diseases. These growth factors include erythropoietin (EPO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), among others. Despite the promise shown in animal models, the particular growth factors that should be used to maximize both brain protection and repair, and the therapeutic critical period, are not well defined. We will review current pre-clinical and clinical evidence for growth factor therapies in treating different causes of brain injury, as well as issues to be addressed prior to application in humans.

  20. Growth factor involvement in tension-induced skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, H. H.

    1987-01-01

    Muscle tissue culture techniques were developed to grow skeletal myofibers which differentiate into more adult-like myofibers. Mechanical simulation studies of these muscle cells in a newly developed mechanical cell simulator can now be performed to study growth processes in skeletal muscle. Conditions in the mechanical cell simulator were defined where mechanical activity can either prevent muscle wasting or stimulate muscle growth. The role of endogenous and exogenous growth factors in tension-induced muscle growth is being investigated under the defined conditions of tissue culture.

  1. Beta hairpin peptide hydrogels as an injectable solid vehicle for neurotrophic growth factor delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephan; Piatt, Joseph H.; Worthington, Peter; Sönmez, Cem; Satheye, Sameer; Schneider, Joel P.; Pochan, Darrin J.; Langhans, Sigrid A.

    2016-01-01

    There is intense interest in developing novel methods for the sustained delivery of low levels of clinical therapeutics. MAX8 is a peptide-based beta-hairpin hydrogel that has unique shear thinning properties that allow for immediate rehealing after the removal of shear forces, making MAX8 an excellent candidate for injectable drug delivery at a localized injury site. The current studies examined the feasibility of using MAX8 as a delivery system for Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) and Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), two neurotrophic growth factors currently used in experimental treatments of spinal cord injuries. Experiments determined that encapsulation of NGF and BDNF within MAX8 did not negatively impact gel formation or rehealing and that shear thinning did not result in immediate growth factor release. We found that increased NGF/BDNF dosages increased the amount and rate of growth factor release and that NGF/BDNF release was inversely related to the concentration of MAX8, indicating that growth factor release can be tuned by adjusting MAX8 concentrations. Encapsulation within MAX8 protected NGF and BDNF from in vitro degradation for up to 28 days. Released NGF resulted in the formation of neurite-like extensions in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells, demonstrating that NGF remains biologically active after release from encapsulation. Direct physical contact of PC12 cells with NGF-containing hydrogel did not inhibit neurite-like extension formation. On a molecular level, encapsulated growth factors activated the NGF/BDNF signaling pathways. Taken together, our data show MAX8 acts as a time-release gel, continually releasing low levels of growth factor over 21 days. MAX8 allows for greater dosage control and sustained therapeutic growth factor delivery, potentially alleviating side effects and improving the efficacy of current therapies. PMID:26225909

  2. Angiogenic growth factors in preinvasive breast disease.

    PubMed

    Heffelfinger, S C; Miller, M A; Yassin, R; Gear, R

    1999-10-01

    Recently, we showed that preinvasive breast pathologies, such as usual hyperplasia, atypical hyperplasia, and carcinoma in situ, have an increased vascularity when compared with normal breast tissue (S. C. Heffelfinger et al., Clinical Cancer Res., 2: 1873-1878, 1996). To understand the mechanism of this increased vascularity, we examined by immunohistochemistry each of these pathological lesions for the expression of angiogenic growth factors. These studies showed that normal breast tissue contains numerous angiogenic agents, particularly vascular endothelial cell growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor. At the transition from normal epithelium to proliferative breast disease, insulin-like growth factor (IGF) II expression was increased, primarily in the stroma and infiltrating leukocytes. However, among proliferative tissues, IGF I decreased with increasing vascularity. Finally, both epithelial vascular endothelial growth factor and epithelial and leukocytic platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor increased at the transition to carcinoma in situ, whereas stromal and leukocytic basic fibroblast growth factor were elevated only in invasive carcinoma. Therefore, during histological progression there is also a complex progression of angiogenic growth factors. For CIS, two forms of vascularity are found: stromal microvascular density (MVD), and vascularity associated with the epithelial basement membrane (vascular score). There was 35% discordance between these two measurement systems. Among carcinoma in situ cases, decreases in stromal IGF II were associated with increasing vascular scores but not MVD, and increases in platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor were associated with increasing MVD but not the vascular score. The presence of discordance and differential association with specific angiogenic agents suggests that these two forms of vascularity may be differentially regulated.

  3. Extracellular matrix-inspired growth factor delivery systems for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Martino, Mikaël M; Briquez, Priscilla S; Maruyama, Kenta; Hubbell, Jeffrey A

    2015-11-01

    Growth factors are very promising molecules to enhance bone regeneration. However, their translation to clinical use has been seriously limited, facing issues related to safety and cost-effectiveness. These problems derive from the vastly supra-physiological doses of growth factor used without optimized delivery systems. Therefore, these issues have motivated the development of new delivery systems allowing better control of the spatiotemporal release and signaling of growth factors. Because the extracellular matrix (ECM) naturally plays a fundamental role in coordinating growth factor activity in vivo, a number of novel delivery systems have been inspired by the growth factor regulatory function of the ECM. After introducing the role of growth factors during the bone regeneration process, this review exposes different issues that growth factor-based therapies have encountered in the clinic and highlights recent delivery approaches based on the natural interaction between growth factor and the ECM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Extracellular matrix-inspired growth factor delivery systems for bone regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, Mikaël M.; Briquez, Priscilla S.; Maruyama, Kenta; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-04-17

    Growth factors are very promising molecules to enhance bone regeneration. However, their translation to clinical use has been seriously limited, facing issues related to safety and cost-effectiveness. These problems derive from the vastly supra-physiological doses of growth factor used without optimized delivery systems. Therefore, these issues have motivated the development of new delivery systems allowing better control of the spatio-temporal release and signaling of growth factors. Because the extracellular matrix (ECM) naturally plays a fundamental role in coordinating growth factor activity in vivo, a number of novel delivery systems have been inspired by the growth factor regulatory function of the ECM. After introducing the role of growth factors during the bone regeneration process, this review exposes different issues that growth factor-based therapies have encountered in the clinic and highlights recent delivery approaches based on the natural interaction between growth factor and the ECM.

  5. Histidine 197 in Release Factor 1 is Essential for A Site Binding and Peptide Release

    PubMed Central

    Field, Andrew; Hetrick, Byron; Mathew, Merrill; Joseph, Simpson

    2010-01-01

    Class I peptide release factors 1 and 2 (RF1 and RF2) recognize the stop codons in the ribosomal decoding center and catalyze peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis. High-fidelity stop codon recognition by these release factors is essential for accurate peptide synthesis and ribosome recycling. X-ray crystal structures of RF1 and RF2 bound to the ribosome have identified residues in the mRNA-protein interface that appear critical for stop codon recognition. Especially interesting is a conserved histidine in all bacterial class I release factors that forms a stacking interaction with the second base of the stop codon. Here we analyzed the functional significance of this conserved histidine (197 in E. coli) of RF1 by point mutagenesis to alanine. Equilibrium binding studies and transient-state kinetic analysis have shown that the histidine is essential for binding with high affinity to the ribosome. Furthermore, analysis of the binding data indicates a conformational change within the RF1•ribosome complex that results in a more tightly bound state. The rate of peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis was also reduced significantly, more than the binding data would suggest, implying a defect in the orientation of the GGQ domain without the histidine residue. PMID:20873815

  6. Studies on the biological effects of ozone: 10. Release of factors from ozonated human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Valacchi, G; Bocci, V

    1999-01-01

    In a previous work we have shown that heparin, in the presence of ozone (O3), promotes a dose-dependent platelet aggregation, while after Ca2+ chelation with citrate, platelet aggregation is almost negligible. These results led us to think that aggregation may enhance the release of platelet components. We have here shown that indeed significantly higher amount of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) are released in a dose-dependent manner after ozonation of heparinised platelet-rich plasma samples. These findings may explain the enhanced healing of torpid ulcers in patients with chronic limb ischemia treated with O3 autohaemoteraphy (O3-AHT). PMID:10704074

  7. Studies on the biological effects of ozone: 10. Release of factors from ozonated human platelets.

    PubMed

    Valacchi, G; Bocci, V

    1999-01-01

    In a previous work we have shown that heparin, in the presence of ozone (O3), promotes a dose-dependent platelet aggregation, while after Ca2+ chelation with citrate, platelet aggregation is almost negligible. These results led us to think that aggregation may enhance the release of platelet components. We have here shown that indeed significantly higher amount of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) are released in a dose-dependent manner after ozonation of heparinised platelet-rich plasma samples. These findings may explain the enhanced healing of torpid ulcers in patients with chronic limb ischemia treated with O3 autohaemoteraphy (O3-AHT).

  8. Platelet Activating Factor: A Growth Factor for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Factor for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Larry W. Daniel, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Wake Forest University...A Growth Factor for Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0682 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Larry W...Relevance: If PAF is found to be a growth and angiogenic factor for breast cancer cells, these studies can be followed up by in vivo studies in nude

  9. Control of transforming growth factor-beta activity: latency vs. activation.

    PubMed

    Harpel, J G; Metz, C N; Kojima, S; Rifkin, D B

    1992-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta is a pluripotent regulator of cell growth and differentiation. The growth factor is expressed as a latent complex that must be converted to an active form before interacting with its ubiquitous high affinity receptors. This conversion involves the release of the mature growth factor through disruption of the non-covalent interactions with its pro-peptide or latency associated peptide. The mechanisms for this release in vivo have not been fully characterized but appear to be cell specific and might involve processes such as acidification or proteolysis. Although several factors including transcriptional regulation, receptor modulation and scavenging of the active growth factor have been implicated, the critical step controlling the biological effects of transforming growth factor-beta may be the activation of the latent molecule.

  10. The role of fibroblast growth factors in tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Korc, M; Friesel, R E

    2009-08-01

    Biological processes that drive cell growth are exciting targets for cancer therapy. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling network plays a ubiquitous role in normal cell growth, survival, differentiation, and angiogenesis, but has also been implicated in tumor development. Elucidation of the roles and relationships within the diverse FGF family and of their links to tumor growth and progression will be critical in designing new drug therapies to target FGF receptor (FGFR) pathways. Recent studies have shown that FGF can act synergistically with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to amplify tumor angiogenesis, highlighting that targeting of both the FGF and VEGF pathways may be more efficient in suppressing tumor growth and angiogenesis than targeting either factor alone. In addition, through inducing tumor cell survival, FGF has the potential to overcome chemotherapy resistance highlighting that chemotherapy may be more effective when used in combination with FGF inhibitor therapy. Furthermore, FGFRs have variable activity in promoting angiogenesis, with the FGFR-1 subgroup being associated with tumor progression and the FGFR-2 subgroup being associated with either early tumor development or decreased tumor progression. This review highlights the growing knowledge of FGFs in tumor cell growth and survival, including an overview of FGF intracellular signaling pathways, the role of FGFs in angiogenesis, patterns of FGF and FGFR expression in various tumor types, and the role of FGFs in tumor progression.

  11. An unnatural PIP simulates growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Swan, Laura

    2009-11-25

    In this issue of Chemistry & Biology, Laketa et al. describe the synthesis of a membrane permeant phosphoinositide lipid that acts to stimulate PI(3,4,5)P(3)-dependent signaling without the need of growth factor stimulation.

  12. New Clue Found to Growth Factor Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Michelle

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is the discovery which may help to explain epidermal growth factor effects on the cell skeleton. The role of a protein called profilin in the regulation of the microfilament system is described. (CW)

  13. New Clue Found to Growth Factor Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Michelle

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is the discovery which may help to explain epidermal growth factor effects on the cell skeleton. The role of a protein called profilin in the regulation of the microfilament system is described. (CW)

  14. Interactions of release factor RF3 with the translation machinery.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Michael

    2015-08-01

    The bacterial release factor RF3 is a GTPase that has been implicated in multiple, incompletely understood steps of protein synthesis. This study explores the genetic interaction of RF3 with other components of the translation machinery. RF3 contributes to translation termination by recycling the class I release factors RF1 and RF2 off post-termination ribosomes. RF3 has also been implicated in dissociation of peptidyl-tRNAs from elongating ribosomes and in a post-peptidyltransferase quality control (post-PT QC) mechanism that selectively terminates ribosomes carrying erroneous peptides. A majority of the in vivo studies on RF3 have been carried out in K-12 strains of Escherichia coli which carry a partially defective RF2 protein with an Ala to Thr substitution at position 246. Here, the contribution of the K-12 specific RF2 variant to RF3 activities has been investigated. Strain reconstruction experiments in both E. coli and Salmonella enterica demonstrate that defects in termination and post-PT QC that are associated with RF3 loss, as well as phenotypes uncovered by phenotypic profiling, are all substantially ameliorated when the incompletely active K-12-specific RF2 protein is replaced by a fully active Ala246 RF2. These results indicate that RF3 loss is well tolerated in bacteria with fully active class I release factors, but that many of the previously reported phenotypes for RF3 deletion strains have been compromised by the presence of a partially defective RF2.

  15. The function of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Bonnie J; D'Amore, Patricia A; Bryan, Brad A

    2009-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is considered the master regulator of angiogenesis during growth and development, as well as in disease states such as cancer, diabetes, and macular degeneration. This review details our current understanding of VEGF signaling and discusses the benefits and unexpected side effects of promising anti-angiogenic therapeutics that are currently being used to inhibit neovacularization in tumors.

  16. The course of growth response in released white spruce--10-year results

    Treesearch

    Robert M. Frank; Robert M. Frank

    1973-01-01

    Weekly bole measurements at 4.5 feet in height were made on individual codominant white spruce trees released on one, two, three, and four sides, and on untreated controls. Results showed that after 10 years annual circumference growth was still significantly related to the degree of release. The growth trend was established the first year but significant differences...

  17. Placental growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 in human lung development.

    PubMed

    Janér, Joakim; Andersson, Sture; Haglund, Caj; Karikoski, Riitta; Lassus, Patrik

    2008-08-01

    We examined the pulmonary expression of 2 proangiogenic factors, namely, placental growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, during lung development and acute and chronic lung injury in newborn infants. Six groups were included in an immunohistochemical study of placental growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, that is, 9 fetuses, 4 preterm and 8 term infants without lung injury who died soon after birth, 5 preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome of <2 days and 7 with respiratory distress syndrome of >10 days, and 6 with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Placental growth factor concentrations in tracheal aspirate fluid were measured in 70 samples from 20 preterm infants during the first postnatal week. In immunohistochemical analyses, placental growth factor staining was seen in bronchial epithelium and macrophages in all groups. Distal airway epithelium positivity was observed mostly in fetuses and in preterm infants who died soon after birth. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 staining was seen in vascular endothelium in all groups and also in lymphatic endothelium in fetuses. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 staining in arterial endothelium was associated with higher and staining in venous endothelium with lower gestational age. In capillaries, less vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 staining was seen in bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The mean placental growth factor protein concentration in tracheal aspirate fluid during the first postnatal week was 0.64 +/- 0.42 pg/mL per IgA-secretory component unit. Concentrations during the first postnatal week were stable. Lower placental growth factor concentrations correlated with chorioamnionitis and lactosyl ceramide positivity. The vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 staining pattern seems to reflect ongoing differentiation and activity of different endothelia. Lower vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 expression

  18. Cancer cells. 3: Growth factors and transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Feramisco, J.; Ozanne, B.; Stiles, C.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains over 50 papers. Some of the titles are: Structure of Human Epidermal Growth Factor and Expression of Normal and Variant mRNAs in Epdermoid Carcinoma Cells; Tyrosine Kinase Activity Associated with the v-erb-B Gene Product; Cloning and Characterization of Human Epidermal Growth Factor-Receptor Gene Sequences in A431 Carcinoma Cells; Anti-oncogenes and the Suppression of Tumor Formation; and Normal Human sis/PDGF-2 Gene Expression Induces Cellular Transformation.

  19. Growth factors and growth factor receptors in the hippocampus. Role in plasticity and response to injury.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Sampedro, M; Bovolenta, P

    1990-01-01

    Various growth factors are present in the hippocampal formation and appear responsible for the prominent plasticity of this brain area. Although hormone-like growth-promoting polypeptides are the best known, recent studies emphasize the importance in the growth response of molecules such as laminin proteoglycans, neurotransmitters and growth inhibitors. The progress and problems in the study of these substances are reviewed.

  20. Insulin-like growth factor 1 and hair growth.

    PubMed

    Su, H Y; Hickford, J G; Bickerstaffe, R; Palmer, B R

    1999-11-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) has been identified as an important growth factor in many biological systems.[1] It shares considerable structural homology with insulin and exerts insulin-like effects on food intake and glucose metabolism. Recently it has been suggested to play a role in regulating cellular proliferation and migration during the development of hair follicles. [2,3] To exert its biological effects, the IGF-1 is required to activate cells by binding to specific cell-surface receptors. The type I IGF receptor (IGF-1R) is the only IGF receptor to have IGF-mediated signaling functions.[1] In circulation, this growth factor mediates endocrine action of growth hormone (GH) on somatic growth and is bound to specific binding proteins (BPs). The latter control IGF transport, efflux from vascular compartments and association with cell surface receptors.[4] In tissues, IGF-1 is produced by mesenchymal type cells and acts in a paracrine and autocrine fashion by binding to the IGF-1R. This binding activates the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) that triggers the downstream responses and finally stimulates cell division.[5] IGF-1 may therefore be able to stimulate the proliferation of hair follicle cells through cellular signaling pathways of its receptors. Local infusion of IGF-1 into sheep has been reported to be capable of stimulating protein synthesis in the skin.[6] It may also increase the production of wool keratin. Recently, transgenic mice overexpressing IGF-1 in the skin have been shown to have earlier hair follicle development than controls.[7] In addition, this growth factor plays an important role in many cell types as a survival factor to prevent cell death.[8] This anti-apoptotic function of IGF-1 may be important to the development of follicle cells as follicles undergo a growth cycle where the regressive, catagen phase is apoptosis driven. In this review, the effects of IGF-1 on follicle cell proliferation and differentiation are discussed. In

  1. Steady impact factor growth for MDPI open access journals.

    PubMed

    Thiesen, Alexander

    2012-09-12

    For the past three years MDPI has announced the newly released impact factors for its Open Access journals by the means of an annual editorial [1-3]. In 2012 we are-once again-pleased to report that the growth of the impact factors of MDPI's Open Access journals continues. This year's edition of the Journal Citation Reports (JCR), which is published annually by Thomson Reuters, includes 10 journals published by MDPI, including three that have received their first official Impact Factors- International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH), Materials Nutrients. Table 1 reports the latest Impact Factors for 2011. Figure 1 graphically depicts the evolution of the Impact Factors for four MDPI open access journals that have received Impact Factors in the past. Table 2 reports the ranking of the MDPI journals within the subject categories of the Science Citation Index Expanded.

  2. Material-mediated proangiogenic factor release pattern modulates quality of regenerated blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Rich, Max H; Lee, Min Kyung; Baek, Kwanghyun; Jeong, Jae Hyun; Kim, Dong Hyun; Millet, Larry J; Bashir, Rashid; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2014-12-28

    Hydrogels designed to sustainably release bioactive molecules are extensively used to enhance tissue repair and regenerative therapies. Along this line, numerous efforts are made to control the molecular release rate and amount. In contrast, few efforts are made to control the molecular release pattern, and, subsequently, modulate the spatial organization of newly forming tissues, including blood vessels. Therefore, using a hydrogel printed to release vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) into a pre-defined pattern, this study demonstrates that spatial distribution of VEGF is important in guiding growth direction of new blood vessels, and also in retaining the structural integrity of pre-existing vasculature. Guided by a computational model, we fabricated a patch composed of micro-sized VEGF-releasing poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel cylinders using an ink-jet printer. Interestingly, hydrogel printed with computationally optimized spacing created anisotropically aligned vasculature exclusively when the printed gel pattern was placed parallel to pre-existing blood vessels. In contrast, vascular sprouting from placing the printed gel pattern perpendicular to pre-existing vessels resulted in deformation and structural disintegration of the original vasculature. We envision that this study will be useful to better understand angiogenesis-modulated neovascularization and further improve the treatment quality for various wounds and tissue defects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Deletion of Ghrelin-O-Acyltransferase on the Pulsatile Release of Growth Hormone in Mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, T Y; Ngo, S T; Veldhuis, J D; Jeffery, P L; Chopin, L K; Tschöp, M; Waters, M J; Tolle, V; Epelbaum, J; Chen, C; Steyn, F J

    2015-12-01

    Ghrelin, a gut hormone originating from the post-translational cleavage of preproghrelin, is the endogenous ligand of growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a). Within the growth hormone (GH) axis, the biological activity of ghrelin requires octanoylation by ghrelin-O-acyltransferase (GOAT), conferring selective binding to the GHS-R1a receptor via acylated ghrelin. Complete loss of preproghrelin-derived signalling (through deletion of the Ghrl gene) contributes to a decline in peak GH release; however, the selective contribution of endogenous acyl-ghrelin to pulsatile GH release remains to be established. We assessed the pulsatile release of GH in ad lib. fed male germline goat(-/-) mice, extending measures to include mRNA for key hypothalamic regulators of GH release, and peripheral factors that are modulated relative to GH release. The amount of GH released was reduced in young goat(-/-) mice compared to age-matched wild-type mice, whereas pulse frequency and irregularity increased. Altered GH release did not coincide with alterations in hypothalamic Ghrh, Srif, Npy or Ghsr mRNA expression, or pituitary GH content, suggesting that loss of Goat does not compromise canonical mechanisms that contribute to pituitary GH production and release. Although loss of Goat resulted in an irregular pattern of GH release (characterised by an increase in the number of GH pulses observed during extended secretory events), this did not contribute to a change in the expression of sexually dimorphic GH-dependent liver genes. Of interest, circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 were elevated in goat(-/-) mice. This rise in circulating levels of IGF-1 was correlated with an increase in GH pulse frequency, suggesting that sustained or increased IGF-1 release in goat(-/-) mice may occur in response to altered GH release patterning. Our observations demonstrate that germline loss of Goat alters GH release and patterning. Although the biological relevance of

  4. Puberty, statural growth, and growth hormone release in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kuperminc, Michelle N.; Gurka, Matthew J.; Houlihan, Christine M.; Henderson, Richard C.; Roemmich, James N.; Rogol, Alan D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Children with cerebral palsy (CP) are smaller than normally growing children.. The association between the growth hormone (GH) axis and growth in children with CP during puberty is unknown. We compared growth and markers of the GH axis in pre-pubertal and pubertal children with moderate to severe CP and without CP over a three-year period. Study design Twenty children with CP, ages 6–18, Gross Motor Function Classification System levels III–V, were compared to a group of sixty-three normally growing children of similar age. Anthropometry, Tanner stage, bone age, and laboratory analyses were performed every six months for three years. Laboratory values included spontaneous overnight GH release, fasting IGF-1 and IGFBP-3. Repeated measures models were used to evaluate interactions among Tanner stage and group (children with CP vs. reference children), taking into account gender, age, and nutritional status. Results Children with CP grew more slowly than those without CP at all Tanner stages (p<0.01). Patterns of IGF-1 and GH secretion in children with CP were similar to those of the reference group; however, the concentrations of IGF-1 (p<0.01) and GH (p<0.01) were lower in girls with CP, with a similar trend for boys (p=0.10 and 0.14, respectively). Conclusions Diminished circulating IGF-1 and GH concentrations may explain the differences in growth between the two groups. PMID:20216931

  5. Role of Corticotropin-releasing Factor in Gastrointestinal Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Rodiño-Janeiro, Bruno K; Alonso-Cotoner, Carmen; Pigrau, Marc; Lobo, Beatriz; Vicario, María; Santos, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The interface between the intestinal lumen and the mucosa is the location where the majority of ingested immunogenic particles face the scrutiny of the vast gastrointestinal immune system. Upon regular physiological conditions, the intestinal micro-flora and the epithelial barrier are well prepared to process daily a huge amount of food-derived antigens and non-immunogenic particles. Similarly, they are ready to prevent environmental toxins and microbial antigens to penetrate further and interact with the mucosal-associated immune system. These functions promote the development of proper immune responses and oral tolerance and prevent disease and inflammation. Brain-gut axis structures participate in the processing and execution of response signals to external and internal stimuli. The brain-gut axis integrates local and distant regulatory networks and super-systems that serve key housekeeping physiological functions including the balanced functioning of the intestinal barrier. Disturbance of the brain-gut axis may induce intestinal barrier dysfunction, increasing the risk of uncontrolled immunological reactions, which may indeed trigger transient mucosal inflammation and gut disease. There is a large body of evidence indicating that stress, through the brain-gut axis, may cause intestinal barrier dysfunction, mainly via the systemic and peripheral release of corticotropin-releasing factor. In this review, we describe the role of stress and corticotropin-releasing factor in the regulation of gastrointestinal permeability, and discuss the link to both health and pathological conditions. PMID:25537677

  6. Novel systems for tailored neurotrophic factor release based on hydrogel and resorbable glass hollow fibers.

    PubMed

    Novajra, G; Tonda-Turo, C; Vitale-Brovarone, C; Ciardelli, G; Geuna, S; Raimondo, S

    2014-03-01

    A novel system for the release of neurotrophic factor into a nerve guidance channel (NGC) based on resorbable phosphate glass hollow fibers (50P2O5-30CaO-9Na2O-3SiO2-3MgO-2.5K2O-2.5TiO2 mol%) in combination with a genipin-crosslinked agar/gelatin hydrogel (A/G_GP) is proposed. No negative effect on the growth of neonatal olfactory bulb ensheathing cell line (NOBEC) as well as on the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins was measured in vitro in the presence of fiber dissolution products in the culture medium. For the release studies, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FD-20), taken as growth factor model molecule, was solubilized in different media and introduced into the fiber lumen exploiting the capillary action. The fibers were filled with i) FD-20/phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution, ii) FD-20/hydrogel solution before gelation and iii) hydrogel before gelation, subsequently lyophilized and then filled with the FD-20/PBS solution. The different strategies used for the loading of the FD-20 into the fibers resulted in different release kinetics. A slower release was observed with the use of A/G_GP hydrogel. At last, poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nerve guides containing the hollow fibers and the hydrogel have been fabricated.

  7. Drosophila factor 2, an RNA polymerase II transcript release factor, has DNA-dependent ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Z; Price, D

    1997-12-12

    Drosophila factor 2 has been identified as a component of negative transcription elongation factor (N-TEF) that causes the release of RNA polymerase II transcripts in an ATP-dependent manner (Xie, Z. and Price D. H. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 11043-11046). We show here that the transcript release activity of factor 2 requires ATP or dATP and that adenosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) (ATPgammaS), adenosine 5'-(beta,gamma-imino)triphosphate (AMP-PNP), or other NTPs do not support the activity. Factor 2 demonstrated a strong DNA-dependent ATPase activity that correlated with its transcript release activity. At 20 microg/ml DNA, the ATPase activity of factor 2 had an apparent Km(ATP) of 28 microM and an estimated Kcat of 140 min-1. Factor 2 caused the release of nascent transcripts associated with elongation complexes generated by RNA polymerase II on a dC-tailed template. Therefore, no other protein cofactors are required for the transcript release activity of factor 2. Using the dC-tailed template assay, it was found that renaturation of the template was required for factor 2 function.

  8. Growth hormone-releasing peptide-6 inhibits cerebellar cell death in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Pañeda, Covadonga; Arroba, Ana I; Frago, Laura M; Holm, Anne Mette; Rømer, John; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2003-08-26

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I is essential for cerebellar granule neuron survival and a decline in IGF-I is implicated in various age-dependent processes. Here we show that IGF-I mRNA levels are decreased in the cerebellum of old rats compared with young rats and this was associated with increased cell death and activation of caspases 3 and 9. Growth hormone-releasing peptide (GHRP)-6, a synthetic ligand for the ghrelin receptor, increased IGF-I mRNA levels, decreased cell death and inhibited caspase 3 and 9 activation in the cerebellum of aged rats. These results suggest that increasing IGF-I expression in the cerebellum can decrease cell death in aged rats via inhibition of caspase 3 and 9 activation.

  9. Membrane vesicles released by Avibacterium paragallinarum contain putative virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Ramón Rocha, Marcela O; García-González, Octavio; Pérez-Méndez, Alma; Ibarra-Caballero, Jorge; Pérez-Márquez, Victor M; Vaca, Sergio; Negrete-Abascal, Erasmo

    2006-04-01

    Avibacterium paragallinarum, the causative agent of infectious coryza, releases extracellular membrane vesicles (MVs), containing immunogenic proteins, proteases, putative RTX proteins, haemagglutinin, and nucleic acids, into the medium. MVs ranging 50-300 nm in diameter were observed by electron microscopy. They contained immunogenic proteins in the range of 20-160 kDa, detected using vaccinated or experimentally infected chicken sera raised against Av. paragallinarum, but not in pooled sera from specific pathogen-free chickens. Proteolytic activity was not detected in MVs through zymograms; however, immune recognition of high molecular mass bands was observed by Western blotting using an antiprotease serum against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 purified protease, suggesting its presence. MVs agglutinated glutaraldehyde-fixed chicken red blood cells indicating the presence of haemagglutinating antigens. Nucleic acids were also detected inside MVs. Avibacterium paragallinarum releases MVs containing putative virulence factors, which could be important in the pathogenesis of infectious coryza.

  10. Growth hormone-releasing hormone stimulates GH release while inhibiting ghrelin- and sGnRH-induced LH release from goldfish pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Grey, Caleb L; Chang, John P

    2013-06-01

    Goldfish GH-releasing hormone (gGHRH) has been recently identified and shown to stimulate GH release in goldfish. In goldfish, neuroendocrine regulation of GH release is multifactorial and known stimulators include goldfish ghrelin (gGRLN19) and salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (sGnRH), factors that also enhance LH secretion. To further understand the complex regulation of pituitary hormone release in goldfish, we examined the interactions between gGHRH, gGRLN19, and sGnRH on GH and LH release from primary cultures of goldfish pituitary cells in perifusion. Treatment with 100nM gGHRH for 55min stimulated GH release. A 5-min pulse of either 1nM gGRLN19 or 100nM sGnRH induced GH release in naïve cells, and these were just as effective in cells receiving gGHRH. Interestingly, gGHRH abolished both gGRLN19- and sGnRH-induced LH release and reduced basal LH secretion levels. These results suggest that gGHRH does not interfere with sGnRH or gGRLN19 actions in the goldfish somatotropes and further reveal, for the first time, that GHRH may act as an inhibitor of stimulated and basal LH release by actions at the level of pituitary cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of antidepressants on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) release from platelets in the rats.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kimihiko; Hashimoto, Eri; Ukai, Wataru; Ishii, Takao; Yoshinaga, Toshihiro; Ono, Takafumi; Tateno, Masaru; Watanabe, Ippei; Shirasaka, Tomohiro; Saito, Satoshi; Saito, Toshikazu

    2010-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) belongs to the neurotrophin family, and enhances the growth and maintenance of several neuronal systems. In addition, BDNF may promote neurogenesis and protect against hippocampal volume loss in depressive disorders. Although first detected in brain, BDNF also exists in peripheral tissues and is mainly stored in platelets and circulates in blood. Recent reports indicate that serum BDNF levels in depressive patients are lower than in control subjects, and antidepressant treatment increases serum BDNF levels in responders. A single report suggests that decreased serum BDNF in major depression is related to mechanisms of platelet BDNF release; however, the mechanisms of changes in BDNF blood levels are still poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the direct influence of antidepressants on BDNF release from platelets and their effects on serum levels. We used samples of washed platelets prepared from rat blood, and investigated the platelet BDNF release and serum BDNF concentration changes in response to adding antidepressants. We found that BDNF was dose-dependently released from platelets by direct treatment with various kinds of antidepressants in vitro, and serum BDNF concentration was also increased by intravenous antidepressant treatment. These results confirm that BDNF release from platelets is affected by antidepressants, which may relate to the circulating BDNF level change in peripheral blood. The response of BDNF release differs depending on the type and amount of antidepressants, making BDNF a serious candidate as a predictor of antidepressant treatment response. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Neuropeptide W stimulates adrenocorticotrophic hormone release via corticotrophin-releasing factor but not via arginine vasopressin.

    PubMed

    Yogo, Kosuke; Oki, Yutaka; Iino, Kazumi; Yamashita, Miho; Shibata, Shoko; Hayashi, Chiga; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Suenaga, Toshiko; Nakahara, Daiichiro; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2012-01-01

    Neuropeptide W (NPW) was isolated as an endogenous ligand for NPBWR1, an orphan G protein-coupled receptor localized in the rat brain, including the paraventricular nucleus. It has been reported that central administration of NPW stimulates corticosterone secretion in rats. We hypothesized that NPW activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis via corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and/or arginine vasopressin (AVP). NPW at 1 pM to 10 nM did not affect basal or ACTH-induced corticosterone release from dispersed rat adrenocortical cells, or basal and CRF-induced ACTH release from dispersed rat anterior pituitary cells. In conscious and unrestrained male rats, intravenous administration of 2.5 and 25 nmol NPW did not affect plasma ACTH levels. However, intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of 2.5 and 5.0 nmol NPW increased plasma ACTH levels in a dose-dependent manner at 15 min after stimulation (5.0 vs. 2.5 nmol NPW vs. vehicle: 1802 ± 349 vs. 1170 ± 204 vs. 151 ± 28 pg/mL, respectively, mean ± SEM). Pretreatment with astressin, a CRF receptor antagonist, inhibited the increase in plasma ACTH levels induced by icv administration of 2.5 nmol NPW at 15 min (453 ± 176 vs. 1532 ± 343 pg/mL, p<0.05) and at 30 min (564 ± 147 vs. 1214 ± 139 pg/mL, p<0.05) versus pretreatment with vehicle alone. However, pretreatment with [1-(β-mercapto-β, β-cyclopentamethylenepropionic acid), 2-(Ο-methyl)tyrosine]-arg-vasopressin, a V1a/V1b receptor antagonist, did not affect icv NPW-induced ACTH release at any time (p>0.05). In conclusion, we suggest that central NPW activates the HPA axis by activating hypothalamic CRF but not AVP.

  13. Delivery of Alginate Scaffold Releasing Two Trophic Factors for Spinal Cord Injury Repair

    PubMed Central

    Grulova, I.; Slovinska, L.; Blaško, J.; Devaux, S.; Wisztorski, M.; Salzet, M.; Fournier, I.; Kryukov, O.; Cohen, S.; Cizkova, D.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) has been implicated in neural cell loss and consequently functional motor and sensory impairment. In this study, we propose an alginate -based neurobridge enriched with/without trophic growth factors (GFs) that can be utilized as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord repair. The bioavailability of key GFs, such as Epidermal Growth factor (EGF) and basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF) released from injected alginate biomaterial to the central lesion site significantly enhanced the sparing of spinal cord tissue and increased the number of surviving neurons (choline acetyltransferase positive motoneurons) and sensory fibres. In addition, we document enhanced outgrowth of corticospinal tract axons and presence of blood vessels at the central lesion. Tissue proteomics was performed at 3, 7 and 10 days after SCI in rats indicated the presence of anti-inflammatory factors in segments above the central lesion site, whereas in segments below, neurite outgrowth factors, inflammatory cytokines and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan of the lectican protein family were overexpressed. Collectively, based on our data, we confirm that functional recovery was significantly improved in SCI groups receiving alginate scaffold with affinity-bound growth factors (ALG +GFs), compared to SCI animals without biomaterial treatment. PMID:26348665

  14. Engineering growth factors for regenerative medicine applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Aaron C.; Briquez, Priscilla S.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Cochran, Jennifer R.

    2016-01-15

    Growth factors are important morphogenetic proteins that instruct cell behavior and guide tissue repair and renewal. Although their therapeutic potential holds great promise in regenerative medicine applications, translation of growth factors into clinical treatments has been hindered by limitations including poor protein stability, low recombinant expression yield, and suboptimal efficacy. This review highlights current tools, technologies, and approaches to design integrated and effective growth factor-based therapies for regenerative medicine applications. The first section describes rational and combinatorial protein engineering approaches that have been utilized to improve growth factor stability, expression yield, biodistribution, and serum half-life, or alter their cell trafficking behavior or receptor binding affinity. The second section highlights elegant biomaterial-based systems, inspired by the natural extracellular matrix milieu, that have been developed for effective spatial and temporal delivery of growth factors to cell surface receptors. Although appearing distinct, these two approaches are highly complementary and involve principles of molecular design and engineering to be considered in parallel when developing optimal materials for clinical applications.

  15. Placenta Growth Factor in Diabetic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cianfarani, Francesca; Zambruno, Giovanna; Brogelli, Laura; Sera, Francesco; Lacal, Pedro Miguel; Pesce, Maurizio; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Failla, Cristina Maria; Napolitano, Monica; Odorisio, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    Reduced microcirculation and diminished expression of growth factors contribute to wound healing impairment in diabetes. Placenta growth factor (PlGF), an angiogenic mediator promoting pathophysiological neovascularization, is expressed during cutaneous wound healing and improves wound closure by enhancing angiogenesis. By using streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, we here demonstrate that PlGF induction is strongly reduced in diabetic wounds. Diabetic transgenic mice overexpressing PlGF in the skin displayed accelerated wound closure compared with diabetic wild-type littermates. Moreover, diabetic wound treatment with an adenovirus vector expressing the human PlGF gene (AdCMV.PlGF) significantly accelerated the healing process compared with wounds treated with a control vector. The analysis of treated wounds showed that PlGF gene transfer improved granulation tissue formation, maturation, and vascularization, as well as monocytes/macrophages local recruitment. Platelet-derived growth factor, fibroblast growth factor-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA levels were increased in AdCMV.PlGF-treated wounds, possibly enhancing PlGF-mediated effects. Finally, PlGF treatment stimulated cultured dermal fibroblast migration, pointing to a direct role of PlGF in accelerating granulation tissue maturation. In conclusion, our data indicate that reduced PlGF expression contributes to impaired wound healing in diabetes and that PlGF gene transfer to diabetic wounds exerts therapeutic activity by promoting different aspects of the repair process. PMID:17003476

  16. FACTORS WHICH CONTROL MAXIMAL GROWTH OF BACTERIA

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, N. A.; Stokes, J. L.

    1962-01-01

    Sinclair, N. A. (Washington State University, Pullman) and J. L. Stokes. Factors which control maximal growth of bacteria. J. Bacteriol. 83:1147–1154. 1962.—In a chemically defined medium containing 1% glucose and 0.1% (NH4)2SO4, both of these compounds are virtually exhausted by the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens. If these carbon, energy, and nitrogen sources are added back to the culture filtrate, maximal growth to the level of the original culture is obtained. This process can be repeated several times with the same results. Eventually, however, the supply of minerals in the culture limits growth. When the nutrient levels are raised to 3% glucose and 0.3% (NH4)2SO4, lack of oxygen and low pH limit growth before the supply of nutrients is exhausted. There is no evidence that specific autoinhibitory substances are produced either in chemically defined or complex nitrogenous media or that physical crowding of the cells limits growth. The results with Escherichia coli are similar to those with P. fluorescens. However, after a few growth cycles aerobically and after only one growth cycle anaerobically, inhibitory substances, probably organic acids, accumulate and limit growth. PMID:13913264

  17. PROSPECT - GROWTH FACTOR CONTROL OF BONE MASS

    PubMed Central

    Canalis, Ernesto

    2010-01-01

    Bone formation is determined by the number and function of osteoblasts. Cell number is governed by factors that regulate the replication and differentiation of pre-osteoblasts and factors that regulate osteoblastic cell death. Cell function is controlled by signals acting on the mature osteoblast. Platelet derived and fibroblast growth factors are bone cell mitogens. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) and Wnt induce the differentiation of mesenchymal cells toward osteoblasts, and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I stimulates the function of mature osteoblasts and prevents their death. The activity of BMP, Wnt and IGF-I is modulated by extracellular antagonists or binding proteins. Changes in growth factor synthesis and activity may play a role in the pathogenesis of selected forms of osteoporosis, and alterations in the expression or binding of the extracellular antagonists can be associated with changes in bone mass. Current approaches to bone anabolic therapies for osteoporosis include the administration of a growth factor, such as IGF-I, or the neutralization of an antagonist. Ideally, the targeting of an anabolic agent should be specific to bone to preclude non-skeletal unwanted side effects. Clinical trials are needed to determine the long-term effectiveness and safety of novel anabolic agents for the management of osteoporosis. PMID:19718659

  18. Therapeutic potential of growth factors and their antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Garner, A.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes studies with four peptides, epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha), gastrin-releasing peptide/bombesin (GRP), and gastrin. The mitogenic and anti-secretory activities of EGF/TGF alpha appear to be mediated by a single class of high-affinity membrane receptors but may involve different signal transducing mechanisms. Biological activity of EGF resides in the N-terminal 42 amino acid fragment with the C-terminal undecapeptide determining binding affinity. A parenteral depot formulation of an EGF-related peptide or a small molecule agonist of the EGF receptor could have utility in treating various ulcerative disorders of the gut. Although antagonism of EGF (and thus TGF alpha) receptors and/or transducing mechanisms is frequently cited as a potential therapeutic approach to hyperproliferative diseases, blocking the action of TGF alpha, GRP, or gastrin with neutralizing antibodies or receptor antagonists did not influence the growth of a wide range of solid tumors in nude mice. These findings suggest that, unless tumor growth displays absolute dependency on one particular mitogen, antagonism of a specific growth factor is unlikely to have great effect in cancer therapy. PMID:1341074

  19. Mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds for efficient delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chengtie; Fan, Wei; Chang, Jiang; Xiao, Yin

    2013-09-01

    In this article, we, for the first time, investigated mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds for the delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor. We have found that mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds have significantly higher loading efficiency and more sustained release of vascular endothelial growth factor than non-mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds. In addition, vascular endothelial growth factor delivery from mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds has improved the viability of endothelial cells. The study has suggested that mesopore structures in mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds play an important role in improving the loading efficiency, decreasing the burst release, and maintaining the bioactivity of vascular endothelial growth factor, indicating that mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds are an excellent carrier of vascular endothelial growth factor for potential bone tissue engineering applications.

  20. A Review of Bioactive Release from Nerve Conduits as a Neurotherapeutic Strategy for Neuronal Growth in Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Choonara, Yahya E.; Bijukumar, Divya; du Toit, Lisa C.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration strategies employ the use of polymeric engineered nerve conduits encompassed with components of a delivery system. This allows for the controlled and sustained release of neurotrophic growth factors for the enhancement of the innate regenerative capacity of the injured nerves. This review article focuses on the delivery of neurotrophic factors (NTFs) and the importance of the parameters that control release kinetics in the delivery of optimal quantities of NTFs for improved therapeutic effect and prevention of dose dumping. Studies utilizing various controlled-release strategies, in attempt to obtain ideal release kinetics, have been reviewed in this paper. Release strategies discussed include affinity-based models, crosslinking techniques, and layer-by-layer technologies. Currently available synthetic hollow nerve conduits, an alternative to the nerve autografts, have proven to be successful in the bridging and regeneration of primarily the short transected nerve gaps in several patient cases. However, current research emphasizes on the development of more advanced nerve conduits able to simulate the effectiveness of the autograft which includes, in particular, the ability to deliver growth factors. PMID:25143934

  1. Enhanced basal and disorderly growth hormone secretion distinguish acromegalic from normal pulsatile growth hormone release.

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, M L; Pincus, S M; Johnson, M L; Matthews, D H; Faunt, L M; Vance, M L; Thorner, M O; Veldhuis, J D

    1994-01-01

    Pulses of growth hormone (GH) release in acromegaly may arise from hypothalamic regulation or from random events intrinsic to adenomatous tissue. To distinguish between these possibilities, serum GH concentrations were measured at 5-min intervals for 24 h in acromegalic men and women with active (n = 19) and inactive (n = 9) disease and in normal young adults in the fed (n = 20) and fasted (n = 16) states. Daily GH secretion rates, calculated by deconvolution analysis, were greater in patients with active acromegaly than in fed (P < 0.05) but not fasted normal subjects. Significant basal (nonpulsatile) GH secretion was present in virtually all active acromegalics but not those in remission or in fed and fasted normal subjects. A recently introduced scale- and model-independent statistic, approximate entropy (ApEn), was used to test for regularity (orderliness) in the GH data. All but one acromegalic had ApEn values greater than the absolute range in normal subjects, indicating reduced orderliness of GH release; ApEn distinguished acromegalic from normal GH secretion (fed, P < 10(-12); fasted, P < 10(-7)) with high sensitivity (95%) and specificity (100%). Acromegalics in remission had ApEn scores larger than those of normal subjects (P < 0.0001) but smaller than those of active acromegalics (P < 0.001). The coefficient of variation of successive incremental changes in GH concentrations was significantly lower in acromegalics than in normal subjects (P < 0.001). Fourier analysis in acromegalics revealed reduced fractional amplitudes compared to normal subjects (P < 0.05). We conclude that GH secretion in acromegaly is highly irregular with disorderly release accompanying significant basal secretion. Images PMID:8083369

  2. Placental Growth Factor Administration Abolishes Placental Ischemia-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Spradley, Frank T; Tan, Adelene Y; Joo, Woo S; Daniels, Garrett; Kussie, Paul; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Granger, Joey P

    2016-04-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific disorder of new-onset hypertension. Unfortunately, the most effective treatment is early delivery of the fetus and placenta. Placental ischemia appears central to the pathogenesis of preeclampsia because placental ischemia/hypoxia induced in animals by reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) or in humans stimulates release of hypertensive placental factors into the maternal circulation. The anti-angiogenic factor soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1), which antagonizes and reduces bioavailable vascular endothelial growth factor and placental growth factor (PlGF), is elevated in RUPP rats and preeclampsia. Although PlGF and vascular endothelial growth factor are both natural ligands for sFlt-1, vascular endothelial growth factor also has high affinity to VEGFR2 (Flk-1) causing side effects like edema. PlGF is specific for sFlt-1. We tested the hypothesis that PlGF treatment reduces placental ischemia-induced hypertension by antagonizing sFlt-1 without adverse consequences to the mother or fetus. On gestational day 14, rats were randomized to 4 groups: normal pregnant or RUPP±infusion of recombinant human PlGF (180 μg/kg per day; AG31, a purified, recombinant human form of PlGF) for 5 days via intraperitoneal osmotic minipumps. On day 19, mean arterial blood pressure and plasma sFlt-1 were higher and glomerular filtration rate lower in RUPP than normal pregnant rats. Infusion of recombinant human PlGF abolished these changes seen with RUPP along with reducing oxidative stress. These data indicate that the increased sFlt-1 and reduced PlGF resulting from placental ischemia contribute to maternal hypertension. Our novel finding that recombinant human PlGF abolishes placental ischemia-induced hypertension, without major adverse consequences, suggests a strong therapeutic potential for this growth factor in preeclampsia. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Release of Douglas-fir seedlings: growth and treatment costs

    Treesearch

    Philip M. McDonald; Gary O. Fiddler

    1986-01-01

    Foresters often lack information on growth of woody shrubs and their effect on conifer seedling survival and growth. Deerbrush (Ceanothus integerrimus H. & A.) was treated by several manual and chemical methods at age 3 and again at age 5 in a Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) plantation on a medium-quality...

  4. The effects of control release fertilizer (CRF) on palm growth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nutri-Pak is a slow release fertilizer in a micro-pore polyethylene packet where moisture enters the packet through micro-pores located on both sides of the packet. Water dissolves the fertilizer and it slowly seeps through the same micro-pores as a vapor into the soil gradually providing nutrients ...

  5. Immobilization and Application of Electrospun Nanofiber Scaffold-based Growth Factor in Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guobao; Lv, Yonggang

    2015-01-01

    Electrospun nanofibers have been extensively used in growth factor delivery and regenerative medicine due to many advantages including large surface area to volume ratio, high porosity, excellent loading capacity, ease of access and cost effectiveness. Their relatively large surface area is helpful for cell adhesion and growth factor loading, while storage and release of growth factor are essential to guide cellular behaviors and tissue formation and organization. In bone tissue engineering, growth factors are expected to transmit signals that stimulate cellular proliferation, migration, differentiation, metabolism, apoptosis and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. Bolus administration is not always an effective method for the delivery of growth factors because of their rapid diffusion from the target site and quick deactivation. Therefore, the integration of controlled release strategy within electrospun nanofibers can provide protection for growth factors against in vivo degradation, and can manipulate desired signal at an effective level with extended duration in local microenvironment to support tissue regeneration and repair which normally takes a much longer time. In this review, we provide an overview of growth factor delivery using biomimetic electrospun nanofiber scaffolds in bone tissue engineering. It begins with a brief introduction of different kinds of polymers that were used in electrospinning and their applications in bone tissue engineering. The review further focuses on the nanofiber-based growth factor delivery and summarizes the strategies of growth factors loading on the nanofiber scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications. The perspectives on future challenges in this area are also pointed out.

  6. Epidermal Growth Factor and Intestinal Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hu; Yang, Shufen; Li, Zuohua; Zhong, Jinfeng

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a 53-amino acid peptide that plays an important role in regulating cell growth, survival, migration, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, EGF has been established to be an effective intestinal regulator helping to protect intestinal barrier integrity, which was essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Several researches have demonstrated that EGF via binding to the EGF receptor and subsequent activation of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC-γ/PKC, and STATS signal pathways regulates intestinal barrier function. In this review, the relationship between epidermal growth factor and intestinal development and intestinal barrier is described, to provide a better understanding of the effects of EGF on intestine development and health. PMID:27524860

  7. Effects of crown release on growth and quality of even-aged red maple stands

    Treesearch

    Terry F. Strong; Audra E. Hubbell; Adam H. Weise; Gayne G. Erdmann

    2006-01-01

    The effects of six crown-release treatments on growth and bole quality of 54 dominant, codominant, and intermediate red maples (Acer rubrum L.) were examined in an even-aged stand in upper Michigan. Treatments included an unreleased control, a single-tree and a two-tree crown release, and a full crown-to-crown release of 5, 10, and 15ft. Twenty-two...

  8. Role of hematopoietic growth factors in angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, D; Vacca, A; De Falco, G; Ria, R; Roncali, L; Dammacco, F

    2001-01-01

    In early ontogeny, hematopoiesis is closely associated with angiogenesis. This article reviews recent studies of the effect of hematopoietic growth factors on several endothelial cell functions together with recent findings about angiogenesis and antiangiogenic therapies in hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  9. Conserved motifs in prokaryotic and eukaryotic polypeptide release factors: tRNA-protein mimicry hypothesis.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, K; Ebihara, K; Uno, M; Nakamura, Y

    1996-01-01

    Translation termination requires two codon-specific polypeptide release factors in prokaryotes and one omnipotent factor in eukaryotes. Sequences of 17 different polypeptide release factors from prokaryotes and eukaryotes were compared. The prokaryotic release factors share residues split into seven motifs. Conservation of many discrete, perhaps critical, amino acids is observed in eukaryotic release factors, as well as in the C-terminal portion of elongation factor (EF) G. Given that the C-terminal domains of EF-G interacts with ribosomes by mimicry of a tRNA structure, the pattern of conservation of residues in release factors may reflect requirements for a tRNA-mimicry for binding to the A site of the ribosome. This mimicry would explain why release factors recognize stop codons and suggests that all prokaryotic and eukaryotic release factors evolved from the progenitor of EF-G. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8643594

  10. Arginine vasopressin potentiates adrenocorticotropin release induced by ovine corticotropin-releasing factor.

    PubMed Central

    DeBold, C R; Sheldon, W R; DeCherney, G S; Jackson, R V; Alexander, A N; Vale, W; Rivier, J; Orth, D N

    1984-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) stimulates ACTH release in man and acts synergistically with synthetic ovine corticotropin-releasing factor (oCRF) in vitro. This study was designed to examine in man the combined effects of synthetic AVP (10 U intramuscularly) and oCRF (1 micrograms/kg intravenously) on ACTH release. Five normal male volunteers participated in five separate experiments: (a) AVP alone; (b) oCRF alone; (c) AVP followed by oCRF 15 min later; (d) simultaneous AVP and oCRF; and (e) insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Plasma immunoreactive ACTH (IR-ACTH) and IR-cortisol were measured for 4 h after injection of each hormone; basal levels for all subjects were less than or equal to 9 +/- 1.2 pg/ml and 4.9 +/- 0.4 micrograms/dl (mean +/- SE), respectively. AVP and oCRF, when given individually, caused rapid rises in IR-ACTH to similar peak levels of 25 +/- 6.6 and 33 +/- 4.6 pg/ml, respectively. AVP given 15 min before oCRF caused a 2.6-fold potentiation of the oCRF response, with a peak IR-ACTH of 85 +/- 4.6 pg/ml. AVP given at the same time as oCRF produced a fourfold potentiation of the peak IR-ACTH response to 132 +/- 11 pg/ml. These ACTH responses were far greater than those previously observed after 30-fold greater doses of oCRF alone. By way of comparison, insulin-induced hypoglycemia caused a peak IR-ACTH of 169 +/- 20 pg/ml. IR-ACTH returned to base line at 60-90 min after AVP alone, whereas the prolonged effect of oCRF was apparent whether it was given alone or in combination with AVP. The mean peak IR-cortisol responses to AVP, oCRF, and AVP given 15 min before oCRF were similar (16.5 +/- 0.9, 16.4 +/- 2.3, and 18.5 +/- 0.8 micrograms/dl, respectively), but the peak IR-cortisol responses to AVP and oCRF given simultaneously and to insulin-induced hypoglycemia were 1.5 and 1.7 times greater, respectively. IR-cortisol returned to base line within 2-3 h after AVP alone, but remained elevated for at least 4 h after oCRF alone or in combination with AVP. These

  11. Crown Release Increases Diameter Growth and Bole Sprouting of Pole-Size Yellow Birch

    Treesearch

    Gayne G. Erdmann; Ralph M. Jr. Peterson

    1971-01-01

    During the second and third years after release, dominant, codominant, and intermediate pole-size yellow birch grew nearly twice as fast in diameter as unreleased poles. Growth rates were also related to foliage density. Epicormic sprouting was increased by crown release but most sprouting occured in the second log.

  12. Intrahypothalamic neuroendocrine actions of corticotropin-releasing factor.

    PubMed

    Almeida, O F; Hassan, A H; Holsboer, F

    1993-01-01

    Most studies of the neuroendocrine effects of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) have focused on its role in the regulation of the pituitary-adrenal axis; activation of this axis follows release of the peptide from CRF-containing terminals in the median eminence. However, a sizeable proportion of CRF fibres terminate within the hypothalamus itself, where synaptic contacts with other hypothalamic neuropeptidergic neurons (e.g. gonadotropin-releasing hormone-containing and opioidergic neurons) have been identified. Here, we summarize physiological and pharmacological data which provide insights into the nature and significance of these intrahypothalamic connections. It is now clear that CRF is a potent secretagogue of the three major endogenous opioid peptides (beta-endorphin, Met-enkephalin and dynorphin) and that it stimulates opioidergic neurons tonically. In the case of beta-endorphin, another hypothalamic peptide, arginine vasopressin, appears to be an essential mediator of CRF's effect, suggesting the occurrence of CRF synapses on, or in the vicinity of, vasopressin neurons; morphological support for this assumption is still wanting. Evidence for direct and indirect inhibitory effects of CRF on sexual behaviour and secretion of reproductive hormones is also presented; the indirect pathways include opioidergic neurons. An important conclusion from all these studies is that, in addition to its better known functions in producing adaptive responses during stressful situations, CRF might also contribute to the coordinated functioning of various components of the neuroendocrine system under basal conditions. Although feedback regulation of hypothalamic neuronal activity by peripheral steroids is a well-established tenet of endocrinology, data on modulation of the intrahypothalamic actions of CRF by adrenal and sex steroids are just emerging. Some of these newer findings may be useful in framing questions related to the mechanisms underlying disease states (such as

  13. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-. alpha. in human milk

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Masaki; Wakai, Kae; Shizume, Kazuo ); Iwashita, Mitsutoshi ); Ohmura, Eiji; Kamiya, Yoshinobu; Murakami, Hitomi; Onoda, Noritaka; Tsushima, Toshio

    1991-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-{alpha} and epidermal growth factor (EGF) were measured in human milk by means of homologous radioimmunoassay. As previously reported, EGF concentration in the colostrum was approximately 200 ng/ml and decreased to 50 ng/ml by day 7 postpartum. The value of immunoreactive (IR)-TGF-{alpha} was 2.2-7.2 ng/ml, much lower than that of EGF. In contrast to EGF, the concentration of IR-TGF-{alpha} was fairly stable during the 7 postpartum days. There was no relationship between the concentrations of IR-TGF-{alpha} and IR-EGF, suggesting that the regulatory mechanism in the release of the two growth factors is different. On gel-chromatography using a Sephadex G-50 column, IR-EGF appeared in the fraction corresponding to that of authentic human EGF, while 70%-80% of the IR-TGF-{alpha} was eluted as a species with a molecular weight greater than that of authentic human TGF-{alpha}. Although the physiological role of TGF-{alpha} in milk is not known, it is possible that it is involved in the development of the mammary gland and/or the growth of newborn infants.

  14. Sugarcane transgenics expressing MYB transcription factors show improved glucose release.

    PubMed

    Poovaiah, Charleson R; Bewg, William P; Lan, Wu; Ralph, John; Coleman, Heather D

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane, a tropical C4 perennial crop, is capable of producing 30-100 tons or more of biomass per hectare annually. The lignocellulosic residue remaining after sugar extraction is currently underutilized and can provide a significant source of biomass for the production of second-generation bioethanol. MYB31 and MYB42 were cloned from maize and expressed in sugarcane with and without the UTR sequences. The cloned sequences were 98 and 99 % identical to the published nucleotide sequences. The inclusion of the UTR sequences did not affect any of the parameters tested. There was little difference in plant height and the number of internodes of the MYB-overexpressing sugarcane plants when compared with controls. MYB transgene expression determined by qPCR exhibited continued expression in young and maturing internodes. MYB31 downregulated more genes within the lignin biosynthetic pathway than MYB42. MYB31 and MYB42 expression resulted in decreased lignin content in some lines. All MYB42 plants further analyzed showed significant increases in glucose release by enzymatic hydrolysis in 72 h, whereas only two MYB31 plants released more glucose than control plants. This correlated directly with a significant decrease in acid-insoluble lignin. Soluble sucrose content of the MYB42 transgenic plants did not vary compared to control plants. This study demonstrates the use of MYB transcription factors to improve the production of bioethanol from sugarcane bagasse remaining after sugar extraction.

  15. Sugarcane transgenics expressing MYB transcription factors show improved glucose release

    DOE PAGES

    Poovaiah, Charleson R.; Bewg, William P.; Lan, Wu; ...

    2016-07-15

    In this study, sugarcane, a tropical C4 perennial crop, is capable of producing 30-100 tons or more of biomass per hectare annually. The lignocellulosic residue remaining after sugar extraction is currently underutilized and can provide a significant source of biomass for the production of second-generation bioethanol. As a result, MYB31 and MYB42 were cloned from maize and expressed in sugarcane with and without the UTR sequences. The cloned sequences were 98 and 99 % identical to the published nucleotide sequences. The inclusion of the UTR sequences did not affect any of the parameters tested. There was little difference in plantmore » height and the number of internodes of the MYB-overexpressing sugarcane plants when compared with controls. MYB transgene expression determined by qPCR exhibited continued expression in young and maturing internodes. MYB31 downregulated more genes within the lignin biosynthetic pathway than MYB42. MYB31 and MYB42 expression resulted in decreased lignin content in some lines. All MYB42 plants further analyzed showed significant increases in glucose release by enzymatic hydrolysis in 72 h, whereas only two MYB31 plants released more glucose than control plants. This correlated directly with a significant decrease in acid-insoluble lignin. Soluble sucrose content of the MYB42 transgenic plants did not vary compared to control plants. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the use of MYB transcription factors to improve the production of bioethanol from sugarcane bagasse remaining after sugar extraction.« less

  16. Effects of hypothalamic dopamine on growth hormone-releasing hormone-induced growth hormone secretion and thyrotropin-releasing hormone-induced prolactin secretion in goats.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jin; Hashizume, Tsutomu

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the effects of hypothalamic dopamine (DA) on the secretion of growth hormone (GH) in goats. The GH-releasing response to an intravenous (i.v.) injection of GH-releasing hormone (GHRH, 0.25 μg/kg body weight (BW)) was examined after treatments to augment central DA using carbidopa (carbi, 1 mg/kg BW) and L-dopa (1 mg/kg BW) in male and female goats under a 16-h photoperiod (16 h light, 8 h dark) condition. GHRH significantly and rapidly stimulated the release of GH after its i.v. administration to goats (P < 0.05). The carbi and L-dopa treatments completely suppressed GH-releasing responses to GHRH in both male and female goats (P < 0.05). The prolactin (PRL)-releasing response to an i.v. injection of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH, 1 μg/kg BW) was additionally examined in male goats in this study to confirm modifications to central DA concentrations. The treatments with carbi and L-dopa significantly reduced TRH-induced PRL release in goats (P < 0.05). These results demonstrated that hypothalamic DA was involved in the regulatory mechanisms of GH, as well as PRL secretion in goats.

  17. Progress in corticotropin-releasing factor-1 antagonist development

    PubMed Central

    Zorrilla, Eric P.; Koob, George F.

    2010-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor antagonists have been sought since the stress-secreted peptide was isolated in 1981. Although evidence suggests the limited efficacy of CRF1 antagonists as antidepressants, CRF1 antagonists might be novel pharmacotherapies for anxiety and addiction. Progress in understanding the two-domain model of ligand–receptor interactions for CRF family receptors might yield chemically novel CRF1 receptor antagonists, including peptide CRF1 antagonists, antagonists with signal transduction selectivity and nonpeptide CRF1 antagonists that act via the extracellular (rather than transmembrane) domains. Novel ligands that conform to prevalent pharmacophore and exhibit drug-like pharmacokinetic properties have been identified. The therapeutic utility of CRF1 antagonists should soon be clearer: several small molecules are currently in Phase II/III clinical trials for depression, anxiety and irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:20206287

  18. Nerve Growth Factor and Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Vinik, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    Neuropathy is one of the most debilitating complications of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, with estimates of prevalence between 50–90% depending on the means of detection. Diabetic neuropathies are heterogeneous and there is variable involvement of large myelinated fibers and small, thinly myelinated fibers. Many of the neuronal abnormalities in diabetes can be duplicated by experimental depletion of specific neurotrophic factors, their receptors or their binding proteins. In experimental models of diabetes there is a reduction in the availability of these growth factors, which may be a consequence of metabolic abnormalities, or may be independent of glycemic control. These neurotrophic factors are required for the maintenance of the neurons, the ability to resist apoptosis and regenerative capacity. The best studied of the neurotrophic factors is nerve growth factor (NGF) and the related members of the neurotrophin family of peptides. There is increasing evidence that there is a deficiency of NGF in diabetes, as well as the dependent neuropeptides substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) that may also contribute to the clinical symptoms resulting from small fiber dysfunction. Similarly, NT3 appears to be important for large fiber and IGFs for autonomic neuropathy. Whether the observed growth factor deficiencies are due to decreased synthesis, or functional, e.g. an inability to bind to their receptor, and/or abnormalities in nerve transport and processing, remains to be established. Although early studies in humans on the role of neurotrophic factors as a therapy for diabetic neuropathy have been unsuccessful, newer agents and the possibilities uncovered by further studies should fuel clinical trials for several generations. It seems reasonable to anticipate that neurotrophic factor therapy, specifically targeted at different nerve fiber populations, might enter the therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:14668049

  19. Transforming growth factor alpha and epidermal growth factor levels in bladder cancer and their relationship to epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, J. K.; Cook, S.; Chambers, P.; Neal, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) in neoplastic and non-neoplastic bladder tissue using a standard radioimmunoassay technique. Tumour samples had much higher TGF-alpha levels compared with EGF and TGF-alpha levels in malignant tissue were significantly higher than in benign bladder samples. There was, in addition, a difference in mean EGF levels from 'normal' bladder samples from non-tumour bearing areas of bladder in patients with bladder cancer compared with 'normal' bladder tissue obtained at the time of organ retrieval surgery. Levels of EGF and TGF-alpha did not correlate with levels of EGF receptor (EGFR) as determined by a radioligand binding method but levels of TGF-alpha > 10 ng gm-1 of tumour tissue did correlate with EGFR positivity defined using immunohistochemistry. These data suggest that TGF-alpha is the likely ligand for EGFR in bladder tumours. PMID:8605103

  20. Differential involvement of signaling pathways in the regulation of growth hormone release by somatostatin and growth hormone-releasing hormone in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Qin, Chaobin; Zhang, Cong; Jia, Jirong; Sun, Caiyun; Li, Wensheng

    2014-02-15

    Somatostatin is the most effective inhibitor of GH release, and GHRH was recently identified as one of the primary GH-releasing factors in teleosts. In this study, we analyzed the possible intracellular transduction pathways that are involved in the mechanisms induced by SRIF and GHRH to regulate GH release. Using a pharmacological approach, the blockade of the PLC/IP/PKC pathway reversed the SRIF-induced inhibition of GH release but did not affect the GHRH-induced stimulation of GH release. Furthermore, SRIF reduced the GH release induced by two PKC activators. Inhibitors of the AC/cAMP/PKA pathway reversed both the SRIF- and GHRH-induced effects on GH release. Moreover, the GH release evoked by forskolin and 8-Br-cAMP were completely abolished by SRIF. The blockade of the NOS/NO pathway attenuated the GHRH-induced GH release but had minimal effects on the inhibitory actions of SRIF. In addition, inhibitors of the sGC/cGMP pathway did not modify the SRIF- or GHRH-induced regulation of GH release. Taken together, these findings indicate that the SRIF-induced inhibition of GH release is mediated by both the PLC/IP/PKC and the AC/cAMP/PKA pathways and not by the NOS/NO/sGC/cGMP pathway. In contrast, the GHRH-induced stimulation of GH secretion is mediated by both the AC/cAMP/PKA and the NOS/NO pathways and is independent of the sGC/cGMP pathway and the PLC/IP/PKC system.

  1. E2F1 transcription factor and its impact on growth factor and cytokine signaling.

    PubMed

    Ertosun, Mustafa Gokhan; Hapil, Fatma Zehra; Osman Nidai, Ozes

    2016-10-01

    E2F1 is a transcription factor involved in cell cycle regulation and apoptosis. The transactivation capacity of E2F1 is regulated by pRb. In its hypophosphorylated form, pRb binds and inactivates DNA binding and transactivating functions of E2F1. The growth factor stimulation of cells leads to activation of CDKs (cyclin dependent kinases), which in turn phosphorylate Rb and hyperphosphorylated Rb is released from E2F1 or E2F1/DP complex, and free E2F1 can induce transcription of several genes involved in cell cycle entry, induction or inhibition of apoptosis. Thus, growth factors and cytokines generally utilize E2F1 to direct cells to either fate. Furthermore, E2F1 regulates expressions of various cytokines and growth factor receptors, establishing positive or negative feedback mechanisms. This review focuses on the relationship between E2F1 transcription factor and cytokines (IL-1, IL-2, IL-3, IL-6, TGF-beta, G-CSF, LIF), growth factors (EGF, KGF, VEGF, IGF, FGF, PDGF, HGF, NGF), and interferons (IFN-α, IFN-β and IFN-γ).

  2. Growth hormone-releasing hormone is produced by adipocytes and regulates lipolysis through growth hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pacheco, F; Gutierrez-Repiso, C; García-Serrano, S; Ho-Plagaro, A; Gómez-Zumaquero, J M; Valdes, S; Gonzalo, M; Rivas-Becerra, J; Montiel-Casado, C; Rojo-Martínez, G; García-Escobar, E; García-Fuentes, E

    2017-10-01

    Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) has a crucial role in growth hormone (GH) secretion, but little is known about its production by adipocytes and its involvement in adipocyte metabolism. To determine whether GHRH and its receptor (GHRH-R) are present in human adipocytes and to study their levels in obesity. Also, to analyze the effects of GHRH on human adipocyte differentiation and lipolysis. GHRH/GHRH-R and GH/GH-R mRNA expression levels were analyzed in human mature adipocytes from non-obese and morbidly obese subjects. Human mesenchymal stem cells (HMSC) were differentiated to adipocytes with GHRH (10(-14)-10(-8) M). Adipocyte differentiation, lipolysis and gene expression were measured and the effect of GH-R silencing was determined. Mature adipocytes from morbidly obese subjects showed a higher expression of GHRH and GH-R, and a lower expression of GHRH-R and GH than non-obese subjects (P<0.05). A total of 10(-14)-10(-10) M GHRH induced an inhibition of lipid accumulation and PPAR-γ expression (P<0.05), and an increase in glycerol release and HSL expression (P<0.05) in human differentiated adipocytes. A total of 10(-12)-10(-8) M GHRH decreased GHRH-R expression in human differentiated adipocytes (P<0.05). A total of 10(-10)-10(-8) M GHRH increased GH and GH-R expression in human differentiated adipocytes (P<0.05). The effects of GHRH at 10(-10) M on adipocyte differentiation and lipolysis were blocked when GH-R expression was silenced. GHRH and GHRH-R are expressed in human adipocytes and are negatively associated. GHRH at low doses may exert an anti-obesity effect by inhibiting HMSC differentiation in adipocytes and by increasing adipocyte lipolysis in an autocrine or paracrine pathway. These effects are mediated by GH and GH-R.

  3. Corticotropin releasing factor stimulates cAMP formation in pituitary corticotropic tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Parenti, M.; Cantalamessa, L.; Catania, A.; Reschini, E.; Mueller, E.E.

    1984-01-23

    Addition of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) to membranes from two ACTH-secreting pituitary tumors strikingly increased in a dose-dependent fashion adenylate cyclase (AC) activity. Stimulation of AC activity by CRF in membranes from non-tumoral tissue adjacent to tumoral corticotrophs was considerably lower, and was lacking in membranes from a growth hormone secreting tumor. These data correlated well with in vivo pre-surgery and post-surgery ACTH responsiveness to CRF of the tumor bearing patients. Basal AC activity was higher in pituitary adenomas than in non-tumoral adjacent tissue.

  4. Comprehensive Analysis of Stop Codon Usage in Bacteria and Its Correlation with Release Factor Abundance*

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Gürkan; Holm, Mikael; Wiens, Tobias; Sanyal, Suparna

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of stop codon usage in bacteria by analyzing over eight million coding sequences of 4684 bacterial sequences. Using a newly developed program called “stop codon counter,” the frequencies of the three classical stop codons TAA, TAG, and TGA were analyzed, and a publicly available stop codon database was built. Our analysis shows that with increasing genomic GC content the frequency of the TAA codon decreases and that of the TGA codon increases in a reciprocal manner. Interestingly, the release factor 1-specific codon TAG maintains a more or less uniform frequency (∼20%) irrespective of the GC content. The low abundance of TAG is also valid with respect to expression level of the genes ending with different stop codons. In contrast, the highly expressed genes predominantly end with TAA, ensuring termination with either of the two release factors. Using three model bacteria with different stop codon usage (Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium smegmatis, and Bacillus subtilis), we show that the frequency of TAG and TGA codons correlates well with the relative steady state amount of mRNA and protein for release factors RF1 and RF2 during exponential growth. Furthermore, using available microarray data for gene expression, we show that in both fast growing and contrasting biofilm formation conditions, the relative level of RF1 is nicely correlated with the expression level of the genes ending with TAG. PMID:25217634

  5. Growth factor expression in degenerated intervertebral disc tissue. An immunohistochemical analysis of transforming growth factor beta, fibroblast growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Jukka; Grönblad, Mats; Vanharanta, Heikki; Virri, Johanna; Guyer, Richard D; Rytömaa, Tapio; Karaharju, Erkki O

    2006-05-01

    Degenerated intervertebral disc has lost its normal architecture, and there are changes both in the nuclear and annular parts of the disc. Changes in cell shape, especially in the annulus fibrosus, have been reported. During degeneration the cells become more rounded, chondrocyte-like, whereas in the normal condition annular cells are more spindle shaped. These chondrocyte-like cells, often forming clusters, affect extracellular matrix turnover. In previous studies transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) -1 and -2, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) have been highlighted in herniated intervertebral disc tissue. In the present study the same growth factors are analysed immunohistochemically in degenerated intervertebral disc tissue. Disc material was obtained from 16 discs operated for painful degenerative disc disease. Discs were classified according to the Dallas Discogram Description. Different disc regions were analysed in parallel. As normal control disc tissue material from eight organ donors was used. Polyclonal antibodies against different growth factors and TGFbeta receptor type II were used, and the immunoreaction was detected by the avidin biotin complex method. All studied degenerated discs showed immunoreactivity for TGFbeta receptor type II and bFGF. Fifteen of 16 discs were immunopositive for TGFbeta-1 and -2, respectively, and none showed immunoreaction for PDGF. Immunopositivity was located in blood vessels and in disc cells. In the nucleus pulposus the immunoreaction was located almost exclusively in chondrocyte-like disc cells, whereas in the annular region this reaction was either in chondrocyte-like disc cells, often forming clusters, or in fibroblast-like disc cells. Chondrocyte-like disc cells were especially prevalent in the posterior disrupted area. In the anterior area of the annulus fibrosus the distribution was more even between these two cell types. bFGF was expressed in the anterior annulus

  6. Cancer vaccines for hormone/growth factor immune deprivation: a feasible approach for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    González, G; Lage, A

    2007-05-01

    One of the older and most validated cancer treatments is endocrine therapy. Some tumors are dependent on hormone stimulation for growth, and therefore therapeutic interventions aiming to deprive the cells of the hormone are feasible and have been successful. Tumor growth also depends in some cases on growth factors, so that the concept of hormone-dependence can be extended to growth factors deprivation. Hormone deprivation has been therapeutically achieved up to now by surgical, radiation and chemical means. However, the immune system usually can be manipulated to recognize hormones and growth factors, and in fact some autoimmune diseases exists involving autoantibodies against hormones. The idea of inducing a deprivation of hormones and growth factors by active immunizations is appealing, and initial evidence about the feasibility of this approach is starting to appear in the literature. Clinical trials have been initiated using immunization with human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG), gastrin, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) / gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Preliminary data already show that antibody titers can be elicited, which results in a decrease in the concentration of a given hormone or growth factor. Both the antibody titers and the decrease in the hormone level are related to survival. This immunological approach for hormone and growth factor deprivation creates the possibility of chronic management of advanced cancer patients.

  7. Root growth in response to nitrogen supply in Chinese maize hybrids released between 1973 and 2009.

    PubMed

    Wu, QiuPing; Chen, FanJun; Chen, YanLing; Yuan, LiXing; Zhang, FuSuo; Mi, GuoHua

    2011-07-01

    Root growth has a fundamental role in nitrogen (N) use efficiency. Nevertheless, little is known about how modern breeding progress has affected root growth and its responses to N supply. The root and shoot growth of a core set of 11 representative Chinese maize (Zea mays L.) hybrids released between 1973 and 2009 were investigated under high N (4 mmol L(-1), HN) and low N (0.04 mmol L(-1), LN) levels in a solution culture system. Compared with LN, HN treatment decreased root dry weight (RDW), the root: shoot ratio (R/S), and the relative growth rate for root dry weight (RGR(root)), but increased the total root length (TRL) and the total lateral root length (LRL). The total axial root length (ARL) per plant was reduced under HN, mostly in hybrids released before the 1990s. The number of seminal roots (SRN) was largely unaffected by different N levels. More recently released hybrids showed higher relative growth rates in the shoot under both HN and LN. However, the roots only showed increased RGR under HN treatment. Correspondingly, there was a positive linear relationship with the year of hybrid release for TRL, LRL and ARL under HN treatment. Together, these results suggest that while shoot growth of maize has improved, its root growth has only improved under high N conditions over the last 36 years of selective breeding in China. Improving root growth under LN conditions may be necessary to increase the N use efficiency of maize.

  8. Flavonoids Released Naturally from Alfalfa Seeds Enhance Growth Rate of Rhizobium meliloti1

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Ueli A.; Joseph, Cecillia M.; Phillips, Donald A.

    1991-01-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) releases different flavonoids from seeds and roots. Imbibing seeds discharge 3′,4′,5,7-substituted flavonoids; roots exude 5-deoxy molecules. Many, but not all, of these flavonoids induce nodulation (nod) genes in Rhizobium meliloti. The dominant flavonoid released from alfalfa seeds is identified here as quercetin-3-O-galactoside, a molecule that does not induce nod genes. Low concentrations (1-10 micromolar) of this compound, as well as luteolin-7-O-glucoside, another major flavonoid released from germinating seeds, and the aglycones, quercetin and luteolin, increase growth rate of R. meliloti in a defined minimal medium. Tests show that the 5,7-dihydroxyl substitution pattern on those molecules was primarily responsible for the growth effect, thus explaining how 5-deoxy flavonoids in root exudates fail to enhance growth of R. meliloti. Luteolin increases growth by a mechanism separate from its capacity to induce rhizobial nod genes, because it still enhanced growth rate of R. meliloti lacking functional copies of the three known nodD genes. Quercetin and luteolin also increased growth rate of Pseudomonas putida. They had no effect on growth rate of Bacillus subtilis or Agrobacterium tumefaciens, but they slowed growth of two fungal pathogens of alfalfa. These results suggest that alfalfa can create ecochemical zones for controlling soil microbes by releasing structurally different flavonoids from seeds and roots. PMID:16668056

  9. Epidermal Growth Factor-Like Growth Factors Prevent Apoptosis of Alcohol-Exposed Human Placental Cytotrophoblast Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Garen S.; Chiang, Po Jen; Smith, Susan M.; Romero, Roberto; Armant, D. Randall

    2007-01-01

    Maternal alcohol abuse during pregnancy can produce an array of birth defects comprising fetal alcohol syndrome. A hallmark of fetal alcohol syndrome is intrauterine growth retardation, which is associated with elevated apoptosis of placental cytotrophoblast cells. Using a human first trimester cytotrophoblast cell line, we examined the relationship between exposure to ethanol and cytotrophoblast survival, as well as the ameliorating effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like growth factors produced by human cytotrophoblast cells. After exposure to 0–100 mM ethanol, cell death was quantified by the TUNEL method, and expression of the nuclear proliferation marker, Ki67, was measured by immunohistochemistry. The mode of cell death was determined by assessing annexin V binding, caspase 3 activation, pyknotic nuclear morphology, reduction of TUNEL by caspase inhibition, and cellular release of lactate dehydrogenase. Ethanol significantly reduced proliferation and increased cell death approximately 2.5-fold through the apoptotic pathway within 1–2 h of exposure to 50 mM alcohol. Exposure to 25–50 mM ethanol significantly increased transforming growth factor alpha (TGFA) and heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF), but not EGF or amphiregulin (AREG). When cytotrophoblasts were exposed concurrently to 100 mM ethanol and 1 nM HBEGF or TGFA, the increase in apoptosis was prevented, while EGF ameliorated at 10 nM and AREG was weakly effective. HBEGF survival-promoting activity required ligation of either of its cognate receptors, HER1 or HER4. These findings reveal the potential for ethanol to rapidly induce cytotrophoblast apoptosis. However, survival factor induction could provide cytotrophoblasts with an endogenous cytoprotective mechanism. PMID:17392498

  10. Physicochemical characterization of cytostatic factors released from human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nissen-Meyer, J; Hammerstrøm, J

    1982-01-01

    Cultured human monocytes released cytostatic activity upon in vitro activation with lymphokines and lipopolysaccharide. This activity was mainly due to the presence of two different cytostatic factors, termed CstF I and II, which were separated by ion-exchange chromatography. At neutral pH, CstF I bound to the weak anion exchanger DEAE-Sephacel but not to the weak cation exchanger CM-Sepharose, whereas CstF II bound to CM-Sepharose but not to DEAE-Sephacel. The molecular weights of CstF I and II as determined by gel filtration were 55,000 and 40,000, respectively. Upon chromatofocusing, CstF I behaved as if it had an isoelectric point of 5.3. Neither CstF I nor CstF II bound specifically to concanavalin A-Sepharose, indicating the absence of carbohydrate residues containing alpha-D-mannopyranosyl, alpha-D-glucopyranosyl, or sterically related components. Both factors were susceptible to inactivation by proteinase K, demonstrating their protein nature. CstF II was purified more than 3,000-fold upon chromatography on CM-Sepharose and Sephacryl S-200. Ion-exchange chromatography and chromatofocusing of CstF I removed 97% of the proteins in the monocyte supernatant, but only 15% of the activity was recovered, resulting in a fivefold purification of CstF I. PMID:7141697

  11. Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsman, Stanislav; Wiley, H. S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2004-08-01

    Abstract: A peptide purified from the salivary gland of a mouse was shown few years ago to accelerate incisor eruption and eyelid opening in newborn mice, and was named epidermal growth factor (EGF). The members of this family of peptide growth factors had been identified in numerous physiological and pathological contexts. EGF binds to a cell surface EGF receptor, which induces a biochemical modification (phosphorylation) of the receptor's cytoplasmic tail. There is a growing consensus in the research community that, in addition to cellular and molecular studies, the dynamics of the EGFR network and its operation must be examined in tissues. A key challenge is to integrate the existing molecular and cellular information into a system-level description of the EGFR network at the tissue and organism level. In this paper, the two examples of EGFR signaling in tissues are described, and the recent efforts to model EGFR autocrine loops, which is a predominant mode of EGFR activation in vivo, are summarized.

  12. Porcine Bone Scaffolds Adsorb Growth Factors Secreted by MSCs and Improve Bone Tissue Repair.

    PubMed

    Mijiritsky, Eitan; Ferroni, Letizia; Gardin, Chiara; Bressan, Eriberto; Zanette, Gastone; Piattelli, Adriano; Zavan, Barbara

    2017-09-08

    An ideal tissue-engineered bone graft should have both excellent pro-osteogenesis and pro-angiogenesis properties to rapidly realize the bone regeneration in vivo. To meet this goal, in this work a porcine bone scaffold was successfully used as a Trojan horse to store growth factors produced by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). This new scaffold showed a time-dependent release of bioactive growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), in vitro. The biological effect of the growth factors-adsorbed scaffold on the in vitro commitment of MSCs into osteogenic and endothelial cell phenotypes has been evaluated. In addition, we have investigated the activity of growth factor-impregnated granules in the repair of critical-size defects in rat calvaria by means of histological, immunohistochemical, and molecular biology analyses. Based on the results of our work bone tissue formation and markers for bone and vascularization were significantly increased by the growth factor-enriched bone granules after implantation. This suggests that the controlled release of active growth factors from porcine bone granules can enhance and promote bone regeneration.

  13. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF): immunocytochemical localization and radioimmunoassay (RIA). [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Vigh, S.; Merchenthaler, I.; Torres-Aleman, I.; Sueiras-Diaz, J.; Coy, D.; Carter, W.H.; Petrusz, P.; Schally, A.V.

    1982-11-29

    Two fragments of the amino acid sequence corresponding to ovine corticotropin releasing factor (CRF 37-41 and CRF 22-41), as well as the full sequence of 41 residues (CRF 1-41), synthesized in our laboratories by solid-phase methods, were coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA) with glutaraldehyde. New Zealand white rabbits were immunized with the emulsified mixtures of peptide-BSA conjugates and Freund's adjuvant as immunogens. The specificity of the generated antibodies was studied by agar-gel diffusion, absorption tests in the immunohistochemical system, and with the aid of displacement curves in RIA. /sup 125/I-Tyr(35)-CRF 36-41 and /sup 125/I-Tyr(0)-CRF 1-41 were used as radioligands in the RIA. The minimum detectable dose was 20 pg. The linearity observed in RIA for immunoreactive CRF in extracts of rat hypothalami, together with the immunocytochemical findings in the rat brain, indicate the presence of substance(s) immunologically indistinguishable from CRF. Immunohistochemistry with the peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) technique detected the following CRF-immunoreactive structures in vibratome sections of hypothalami of colchicine-treated rats: CRF-containing cell bodies were observed mainly in smaller neurons of the paraventricular nucleus. CRF-positive nerve fibers and/or terminals were present in the external zone of the median eminence, with some immunoreactive CRF also present in the internal zone. The CRF-positive terminals were localized in the central regions of the median eminence. Data reinforce the view that this polypeptide plays a physiological role in the control of ACTH release.

  14. Sugarcane transgenics expressing MYB transcription factors show improved glucose release

    SciTech Connect

    Poovaiah, Charleson R.; Bewg, William P.; Lan, Wu; Ralph, John; Coleman, Heather D.

    2016-07-15

    In this study, sugarcane, a tropical C4 perennial crop, is capable of producing 30-100 tons or more of biomass per hectare annually. The lignocellulosic residue remaining after sugar extraction is currently underutilized and can provide a significant source of biomass for the production of second-generation bioethanol. As a result, MYB31 and MYB42 were cloned from maize and expressed in sugarcane with and without the UTR sequences. The cloned sequences were 98 and 99 % identical to the published nucleotide sequences. The inclusion of the UTR sequences did not affect any of the parameters tested. There was little difference in plant height and the number of internodes of the MYB-overexpressing sugarcane plants when compared with controls. MYB transgene expression determined by qPCR exhibited continued expression in young and maturing internodes. MYB31 downregulated more genes within the lignin biosynthetic pathway than MYB42. MYB31 and MYB42 expression resulted in decreased lignin content in some lines. All MYB42 plants further analyzed showed significant increases in glucose release by enzymatic hydrolysis in 72 h, whereas only two MYB31 plants released more glucose than control plants. This correlated directly with a significant decrease in acid-insoluble lignin. Soluble sucrose content of the MYB42 transgenic plants did not vary compared to control plants. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the use of MYB transcription factors to improve the production of bioethanol from sugarcane bagasse remaining after sugar extraction.

  15. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor/diphtheria toxin receptor expression by acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Vinante, F; Rigo, A; Papini, E; Cassatella, M A; Pizzolo, G

    1999-03-01

    Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) is an EGF family member expressed by numerous cell types that binds to EGF receptor 1 (HER-1) or 4 (HER-4) inducing mitogenic and/or chemotactic activities. Membrane-bound HB-EGF retains growth activity and adhesion capabilities and the unique property of being the receptor for diphtheria toxin (DT). The interest in studying HB-EGF in acute leukemia stems from these mitogenic, chemotactic, and receptor functions. We analyzed the expression of HB-EGF in L428, Raji, Jurkat, Karpas 299, L540, 2C8, HL-60, U937, THP-1, ML-3, and K562 cell lines and in primary blasts from 12 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases, by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Northern blot and by the evaluation of sensitivity to DT. The release of functional HB-EGF was assessed by evaluation of its proliferative effects on the HB-EGF-sensitive Balb/c 3T3 cell line. HB-EGF was expressed by all myeloid and T, but not B (L428, Raji), lymphoid cell lines tested, as well as by the majority (8 of 12) of ex vivo AML blasts. Cell lines (except for the K562 cell line) and AML blasts expressing HB-EGF mRNA underwent apoptotic death following exposure to DT, thus demonstrating the presence of the HB-EGF molecule on their membrane. Leukemic cells also released a fully functional HB-EGF molecule that was mitogenic for the Balb/c 3T3 cell line. Factors relevant to the biology of leukemic growth, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), 1alpha,25-(OH)2D3, and especially all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), upregulated HB-EGF mRNA in HL-60 or ML-3 cells. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induced HB-EGF mRNA and acquisition of sensitivity to DT in one previously HB-EGF-negative leukemia case. Moreover, the U937 and Karpas 299 cell lines expressed HER-4 mRNA. This work shows that HB-EGF is a growth factor produced by primary leukemic cells and regulated by ATRA, 1alpha, 25-(OH)2D3, and GM-CSF.

  16. Release of extracellular ATP by bacteria during growth

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is used as an intracellular energy source by all living organisms. It plays a central role in the respiration and metabolism, and is the most important energy supplier in many enzymatic reactions. Its critical role as the energy storage molecule makes it extremely valuable to all cells. Results We report here the detection of extracellular ATP in the cultures of a variety of bacterial species. The levels of the extracellular ATP in bacterial cultures peaked around the end of the log phase and decreased in the stationary phase of growth. Extracellular ATP levels were dependent on the cellular respiration as bacterial mutants lacking cytochrome bo oxidase displayed lower extracellular ATP levels. We have also shown that Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Salmonella actively depleted extracellular ATP and an ATP supplement in culture media enhanced the stationary survival of E. coli and Salmonella. In addition to E. coli and Salmonella the presence of the extracellular ATP was observed in a variety of bacterial species that contain human pathogens such as Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella and Staphylococcus. Conclusion Our results indicate that extracellular ATP is produced by many bacterial species during growth and extracellular ATP may serve a role in the bacterial physiology. PMID:24364860

  17. Insulin-like growth factor 1: common mediator of multiple enterotrophic hormones and growth factors

    PubMed Central

    Bortvedt, Sarah F.; Lund, P. Kay

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize recent evidence that IGF1 mediates growth effects of multiple trophic factors and discuss clinical relevance. Recent findings Recent reviews and original reports indicate benefits of growth hormone (GH) and long-acting glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP2) analogues in short bowel syndrome and Crohn’s disease. This review highlights evidence that biomarkers of sustained small intestinal growth or mucosal healing and evaluation of intestinal epithelial stem cell biomarkers may improve clinical measures of intestinal growth or response to trophic hormones. Compelling evidence that IGF1 mediates growth effects of GH and GLP2 on intestine or linear growth in preclinical models of resection or Crohn’s disease is presented, along with a concept that these hormones or IGF1 may enhance sustained growth if given early after bowel resection. Evidence that SOCS protein induction by GH or GLP2 in normal or inflamed intestine, may limit IGF1-induced growth, but protect against risk of dysplasia or fibrosis is reviewed. Whether IGF1 receptor mediates IGF1 action and potential roles of insulin receptors are addressed. Summary IGF1 has a central role in mediating trophic hormone action in small intestine. Better understanding of benefits and risks of IGF1, receptors that mediate IGF1 action, and factors that limit undesirable growth are needed. PMID:22241077

  18. Search for novel therapies for triple negative breast cancers (TNBC): analogs of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) and growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH).

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Stefan; Seitz, Stephan; Engel, Jörg B; Montero, Alberto; Ortmann, Olaf; Perez, Roberto; Block, Norman L; Schally, Andrew V

    2012-04-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive breast cancer subtype that is clinically negative for the expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors (ER/PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2). Patients with TNBC have a worse clinical outcome, as measured by time to metastasis and median overall survival. Chemotherapy has been the mainstay of treatment of TNBC but responses are disappointing. A substantial proportion of TNBC expresses luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH), receptors for LHRH, in addition to receptors for growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH). These receptors represent potential therapeutic targets. Potent antagonists of GHRH and LHRH receptors have been developed in recent years and these antagonists inhibit the growth, tumorigenicity and metastatic potential of various human experimental malignancies. These antagonists could be utilized for the treatment of TNBC. The targeted cytotoxic analog of LHRH, AN-152 (AEZS-108) containing doxorubicin, must also be strongly considered for therapy of TNBC. Experimental studies suggest the merit of clinical trials with LHRH antagonists and AEZS-108 in TNBC patients.

  19. Evaluation of an injectable polymeric delivery system for controlled and localized release of biological factors to promote therapeutic angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocker, Adam John

    Cardiovascular disease remains as the leading cause of death worldwide and is frequently associated with partial or full occlusion of coronary arteries. Currently, angioplasty and bypass surgery are the standard approaches for treating patients with these ischemic heart conditions. However, a large number of patients cannot undergo these procedures. Therapeutic angiogenesis provides a minimally invasive tool for treating cardiovascular diseases by inducing new blood vessel growth from the existing vasculature. Angiogenic growth factors can be delivered locally through gene, cell, and protein therapy. Natural and synthetic polymer growth factor delivery systems are under extensive investigation due their widespread applications and promising therapeutic potential. Although biocompatible, natural polymers often suffer from batch-to-batch variability which can cause unpredictable growth factor release rates. Synthetic polymers offer advantages for growth factor delivery as they can be easily modified to control release kinetics. During the angiogenesis process, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is necessary to initiate neovessel formation while platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is needed later to help stabilize and mature new vessels. In the setting of myocardial infarction, additional anti-inflammatory cytokines like IL-10 are needed to help optimize cardiac repair and limit the damaging effects of inflammation following infarction. To meet these angiogenic and anti-inflammatory needs, an injectable polymer delivery system created from a sulfonated reverse thermal gel encapsulating micelle nanoparticles was designed and evaluated. The sulfonate groups on the thermal gel electrostatically bind to VEGF which controls its release rate, while the micelles are loaded with PDGF and are slowly released as the gel degrades. IL-10 was loaded into the system as well and diffused from the gel over time. An in vitro release study was performed which demonstrated the

  20. Proteolytic Processing Regulates Placental Growth Factor Activities*

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Daniel C.; Willenborg, Sebastian; Koch, Manuel; Zwolanek, Daniela; Müller, Stefan; Becker, Ann-Kathrin A.; Metzger, Stephanie; Ehrbar, Martin; Kurschat, Peter; Hellmich, Martin; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Eming, Sabine A.

    2013-01-01

    Placental growth factor (PlGF) is a critical mediator of blood vessel formation, yet mechanisms of its action and regulation are incompletely understood. Here we demonstrate that proteolytic processing regulates the biological activity of PlGF. Specifically, we show that plasmin processing of PlGF-2 yields a protease-resistant core fragment comprising the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 binding site but lacking the carboxyl-terminal domain encoding the heparin-binding domain and an 8-amino acid peptide encoded by exon 7. We have identified plasmin cleavage sites, generated a truncated PlGF118 isoform mimicking plasmin-processed PlGF, and explored its biological function in comparison with that of PlGF-1 and -2. The angiogenic responses induced by the diverse PlGF forms were distinct. Whereas PlGF-2 increased endothelial cell chemotaxis, vascular sprouting, and granulation tissue formation upon skin injury, these activities were abrogated following plasmin digestion. Investigation of PlGF/Neuropilin-1 binding and function suggests a critical role for heparin-binding domain/Neuropilin-1 interaction and its regulation by plasmin processing. Collectively, here we provide new mechanistic insights into the regulation of PlGF-2/Neuropilin-1-mediated tissue vascularization and growth. PMID:23645683

  1. Skeletal Myogenic Differentiation of Urine-Derived Stem Cells and Angiogenesis Using Microbeads Loaded with Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guihua; Pareta, Rajesh A; Wu, Rongpei; Shi, Yingai; Zhou, Xiaobo; Liu, Hong; Deng, Chunhua; Sun, Xiangzhou; Atala, Anthony; Opara, Emmanuel C; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2012-01-01

    To provide site-specific delivery and targeted release of growth factors to implanted urine-derived stem cells (USCs), we prepared microbeads of alginate containing growth factors. The growth factors included VEGF, IGF-1, FGF-1, PDGF, HGF and NGF. Radiolabeled growth factors were loaded separately and used to access the in vitro release from the microbeads with a gamma counter over 4 weeks. In vitro endothelial differentiation of USCs by the released VEGF from the microbeads in a separate experiment confirmed that the released growth factors from the microbeads were bioactive. USCs and microbeads were mixed with the collagen gel type 1 (2 mg/ml) and used for in vivo studies through subcutaneous injection into nude mice. Four weeks after subcutaneous injection, we found that grafted cell survival was improved and more cells expressed myogenic and endothelial cell transcripts and markers compared to controls. More vessel formation and innervations were observed in USCs combined with six growth factors cocktail incorporated in microbeads compared to controls. In conclusion, a combination of growth factors released locally from the alginate microbeads induced USCs to differentiate into a myogenic lineage, enhanced revascularization and innervation, and stimulated resident cell growth in vivo. This approach could potentially be used for cell therapy in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence. PMID:23137393

  2. Conformational thermostabilisation of corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Kean, James; Bortolato, Andrea; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Marshall, Fiona H.; Jazayeri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Recent technical advances have greatly facilitated G-protein coupled receptors crystallography as evidenced by the number of successful x-ray structures that have been reported recently. These technical advances include novel detergents, specialised crystallography techniques as well as protein engineering solutions such as fusions and conformational thermostabilisation. Using conformational thermostabilisation, it is possible to generate variants of GPCRs that exhibit significantly increased stability in detergent micelles whilst preferentially occupying a single conformation. In this paper we describe for the first time the application of this technique to a member of a class B GPCR, the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R). Mutational screening in the presence of the inverse agonist, CP-376395, resulted in the identification of a construct with twelve point mutations that exhibited significantly increased thermal stability in a range of detergents. We further describe the subsequent construct engineering steps that eventually yielded a crystallisation-ready construct which recently led to the solution of the first x-ray structure of a class B receptor. Finally, we have used molecular dynamic simulation to provide structural insight into CRF1R instability as well as the stabilising effects of the mutants, which may be extended to other class B receptors considering the high degree of structural conservation. PMID:26159865

  3. Class I release factors in ciliates with variant genetic codes

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Yuji; Doolittle, W. Ford

    2001-01-01

    In eukaryotes with the universal genetic code a single class I release factor (eRF1) most probably recognizes all stop codons (UAA, UAG and UGA) and is essential for termination of nascent peptide synthesis. It is well established that stop codons have been reassigned to amino acid codons at least three times among ciliates. The codon specificities of ciliate eRF1s must have been modified to accommodate the variant codes. In this study we have amplified, cloned and sequenced eRF1 genes of two hypotrichous ciliates, Oxytricha trifallax (UAA and UAG for Gln) and Euplotes aediculatus (UGA for Cys). We also sequenced/identified three protist and two archaeal class I RF genes to enlarge the database of eRF1/aRF1s with the universal code. Extensive comparisons between universal code eRF1s and those of Oxytricha, Euplotes and Tetrahymena, which represent three lineages that acquired variant codes independently, provide important clues to identify stop codon-binding regions in eRF1. Domain 1 in the five ciliate eRF1s, particulary the TASNIKS heptapeptide and its adjacent region, differs significantly from domain 1 in universal code eRF1s. This observation suggests that domain 1 contains the codon recognition site, but that the mechanism of eRF1 codon recognition may be more complex than proposed by Nakamura et al. or Knight and Landweber. PMID:11160924

  4. Hypromellose films for the delivery of growth factors for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Braund, Rhiannon; Tucker, Ian G; Medlicott, Natalie J

    2007-03-01

    Hypromellose was investigated as a carrier for extending topical growth factor delivery to wounds. Films of hypromellose (E4M, K4M and E10M) containing a model protein horseradish peroxidase (1% w/w HRP, MW 40 000) were cast from aqueous solutions and dried at 37 degrees C. In-vitro release was determined using Franz-type diffusion cells and films were mounted directly into the Franz cell or cast onto a wound dressing (Melolin) backing. There was an initial burst release then an extended release over 5 h. The Melolin backing significantly reduced the burst but not the extended release rates (P < 0.05). Release of HRP was also determined from 7% w/v hypromellose gels and was significantly lower for E10M than E4M, suggesting that, once hydrated, the E10M hypromellose provides the greatest resistance to HRP release. The release profile of basic fibroblast growth factor from Melolin-backed films made from E4M hypromellose was not significantly different at any time point to that of HRP release from the same formulation. Hypromellose may be incorporated into a wound dressing such as Melolin to provide a prolonged release of an incorporated protein active.

  5. Modeling vascularized bone regeneration within a porous biodegradable CaP scaffold loaded with growth factors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoqiang; Kang, Yunqing; Bao, Jiguang; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yang, Yunzhi; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2013-07-01

    Osteogenetic microenvironment is a complex constitution in which extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, stem cells and growth factors each interact to direct the coordinate regulation of bone tissue development. Importantly, angiogenesis improvement and revascularization are critical for osteogenesis during bone tissue regeneration processes. In this study, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) multi-scale system model to study cell response to growth factors released from a 3D biodegradable porous calcium phosphate (CaP) scaffold. Our model reconstructed the 3D bone regeneration system and examined the effects of pore size and porosity on bone formation and angiogenesis. The results suggested that scaffold porosity played a more dominant role in affecting bone formation and angiogenesis compared with pore size, while the pore size could be controlled to tailor the growth factor release rate and release fraction. Furthermore, a combination of gradient VEGF with BMP2 and Wnt released from the multi-layer scaffold promoted angiogenesis and bone formation more readily than single growth factors. These results demonstrated that the developed model can be potentially applied to predict vascularized bone regeneration with specific scaffold and growth factors.

  6. Oestrogens, via transforming growth factor alpha, modulate basic fibroblast growth factor synthesis in hypothalamic astrocytes: in vitro observations.

    PubMed

    Galbiati, M; Martini, L; Melcangi, R C

    2002-10-01

    The data presented here show that, in cultures of type 1 astrocytes obtained from the hypothalamus of neonatal female rat, 17beta-oestradiol is able to increase both the mRNA and the protein levels of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). In particular, after 24 h of exposure to 17beta-oestradiol (10(-9) and 10(-10) m), an increase of messenger levels of bFGF appears in hypothalamic type 1 astrocytes. Similarly, an induction of bFGF protein is also evident at this time of exposure. The effect on the mRNA and protein levels of bFGF is blocked by the presence in the medium of an antibody raised against the transforming growth factor alpha (TGFalpha) receptor. This observation indicates that, TGFalpha, whose synthesis is modulated by oestrogens in hypothalamic astrocytes and which is able to increase, both the mRNA and the protein levels of bFGF in our experimental model, may act as the mediator of the oestrogenic induction of bFGF. Hypothalamic astrocytes, together with hypothalamic neurones synthesizing and secreting luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH), form the LHRH network in conjunction with other neuronal systems. Gonadal steroids in general, and oestrogens in particular, play an important role in the control of the activity of this network. In addition, bFGF and TGFalpha, two growth factors released from astrocytes, are able to influence the activity of LHRH neurones. The present observations suggest that oestrogens may also act on LHRH neurones in an indirect fashion (i.e. by modulating the expression of bFGF and TGFalpha in glial cells).

  7. Nerve growth factor protects against aluminum-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Ohyashiki, Takao; Satoh, Eiko; Okada, Morihiro; Takadera, Tsuneo; Sahara, Masako

    2002-07-15

    In the present study, we examined the effect of two salts of aluminum (Al), aluminum maltolate (Almal) and aluminum chloride (AlCl(3)), on the cell viability of PC12 cells in the absence and presence of nerve growth factor (NGF). A 72-h exposure of PC12 cells to Almal (300 microM) resulted in a marked increase of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) release from the cells and a decrease of 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) activity. These results indicate that Almal induces a decrease in the cell viability. Under the same conditions, Almal also caused DNA ladder formation and chromatin condensation. In contrast, AlCl(3) did not showed an increased LDH release and a decreased MTT activity in the concentration range of the salt tested (0.1-1 mM). The extent of LDH release and MTT activity decrease induced by Almal treatment closely depended on the amount of Almal incorporated into the cells. An increase in the fluorescence intensity of 6-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, di(acetoxymethyl ester) (C-DCDHF-DA) which was loaded into the cell by Almal treatment and its prevention by pyrrolodine dithiocarbamate, a potent antioxidant, suggested that Almal-induced cell death partly proceeds via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. NGF effectively inhibited the increase of LDH release and the decrease of MTT activity, as well as DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation. However, NGF did not inhibit the increase of C-DCDHF-DA fluorescence in the cells induced by Almal treatment. From these results, it is suggested that ROS production associated with accumulation of Al is one possible important factor in the onset of Al neurotoxicity via apoptotic cell death and that NGF protects against cell degeneration associated with Al accumulation, but independently of ROS production.

  8. The role of transforming growth factor-beta, insulin-like growth factor I, and basic fibroblast growth factor in distraction osteogenesis of the mandible.

    PubMed

    Farhadieh, R D; Dickinson, R; Yu, Y; Gianoutsos, M P; Walsh, W R

    1999-01-01

    Distraction osteogenesis is a viable method for regenerating large amounts of bone. In contrast to fracture healing, the mode of bone formation in distraction osteogenesis is primarily intramembranous ossification. The basic biology of the process is still not well understood. The growth factor cascade is likely to play an important role in distraction. This study examines the growth factor cascade in a lengthened ovine mandible model. Twenty-four animals were divided into four groups with varying rates of distraction (1, 2, 3, and 4 mm/day). A unilateral distractor at the angle of the mandible was used. The mandibles were lengthened to 24 mm and fixed for a period of 5 weeks, after which the animals were killed. The sections were probed for transforming growth factor-beta, basic fibroblast growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor I. The growth factors studied were present in all four groups. Transforming growth factor-beta, basic fibroblast growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor I were present in both the bony matrix of the sections and the cytoplasm of the cells, osteoblasts, and a small number of mesenchymal cells. The sections obtained from groups distracted at faster rates showed stronger presence of the growth factors examined by more intense staining. In fracture healing, the localization of transforming growth factor-beta in stage I of healing corresponded with the precise region of intramembranous ossification in stage II. Diffuse presence of transforming growth factor-beta throughout the lengthened region corresponded with the process of intramembranous ossification observed in distraction. In fracture healing, insulin-like growth factor I and basic fibroblast growth factor have been shown to promote proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts from precursor cells. The intense presence of insulin-like growth factor I and basic fibroblast growth factor in the distracted region may account for osteoblast proliferation and formation from

  9. Expression of transforming growth factor alpha, epidermal growth factor receptor and epidermal growth factor in precursor lesions to gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Filipe, M. I.; Osborn, M.; Linehan, J.; Sanidas, E.; Brito, M. J.; Jankowski, J.

    1995-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), its related peptide transforming growth factor (TGF-alpha) and their common receptor (EGFR) have been implicated in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation in the gastrointestinal epithelium and may play an important role in gastric carcinogenesis. We compared the immunohistochemical expression and topographic distribution of these peptides using Western blot analysis in gastric carcinoma precursor lesions and in non-cancer tissue. We observed: (i) increased and extended expression of TGF-alpha in normal mucosa and hyperplasia in carcinoma fields compared with non-cancer controls; (ii) increased expression of EGFR in intestinal metaplasia (IM) from carcinoma fields compared with controls; (iii) EGF expression was not detected in normal mucosa and only weakly in IM; (iv) coexpression of TGF-alpha/EGFR and EGF/EGFR was higher in intestinal metaplasia in carcinoma fields than in non-cancer controls. We conclude that altered expression of TGF-alpha/EGFR is associated with morphological changes during gastric carcinogenesis. In this regard increased expression of TGF-alpha is a very early event which is subsequently followed by up-regulation of EGFR and this has important biological and clinical implications. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7819044

  10. Effect of Nisin's Controlled Release on Microbial Growth as Modeled for Micrococcus luteus.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Aishwarya; Lee, Dong Sun; Chikindas, Michael L; Yam, Kit L

    2011-06-01

    The need for safe food products has motivated food scientists and industry to find novel technologies for antimicrobial delivery for improving food safety and quality. Controlled release packaging is a novel technology that uses the package to deliver antimicrobials in a controlled manner and sustain antimicrobial stress on the targeted microorganism over the required shelf life. This work studied the effect of controlled release of nisin to inhibit growth of Micrococcus luteus (a model microorganism) using a computerized syringe pump system to mimic the release of nisin from packaging films which was characterized by an initially fast rate and a slower rate as time progressed. The results show that controlled release of nisin was strikingly more effective than instantly added ("formulated") nisin. While instant addition experiments achieved microbial inhibition only at the beginning, controlled release experiments achieved complete microbial inhibition for a longer time, even when as little as 15% of the amount of nisin was used as compared to instant addition.

  11. PLACENTAL GROWTH FACTOR ADMINISTRATION ABOLISHES PLACENTAL ISCHEMIA-INDUCED HYPERTENSION

    PubMed Central

    Spradley, Frank T.; Tan, Adelene Y.; Joo, Woo S.; Daniels, Garrett; Kussie, Paul; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Granger, Joey P.

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific disorder of new-onset hypertension. Unfortunately, the most effective treatment is early delivery of the fetus and placenta. Placental ischemia appears central to the pathogenesis of preeclampsia as placental ischemia/hypoxia induced in animals by reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) or in humans stimulates release of hypertensive placental factors into the maternal circulation. The anti-angiogenic factor soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1), which antagonizes and reduces bioavailable vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and placental growth factor (PlGF), is elevated in RUPP rats and preeclampsia. Although PlGF and VEGF are both natural ligands for sFlt-1, VEGF also has high affinity to VEGFR2 (Flk-1) causing side effects like edema. PlGF is specific for sFlt-1. We tested the hypothesis that PlGF treatment reduces placental ischemia-induced hypertension by antagonizing sFlt-1 without adverse consequences to the mother or fetus. On gestational day 14, rats were randomized to four groups: normal pregnant (NP) or RUPP ± infusion of rhPlGF (180 μg/kg/day; AG31, a purified, recombinant human form of PlGF) for 5 days via intraperitoneal osmotic minipumps. On day 19, mean arterial blood pressure and plasma sFlt-1 were higher and glomerular filtration rate lower in RUPP than NP rats. Infusion of rhPlGF abolished these changes seen with RUPP along with reducing oxidative stress. These data indicate that the increased sFlt-1 and reduced PlGF resulting from placental ischemia contribute to maternal hypertension. Our novel finding that rhPlGF abolishes placental ischemia-induced hypertension, without major adverse consequences, suggests a strong therapeutic potential for this growth factor in preeclampsia. PMID:26831193

  12. alpha-Adrenergic regulation of secretion of mouse saliva rich in nerve growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, L J; Partlow, L M

    1976-01-01

    Nerve growth factor has been quantified by both bioassay and radial immunodiffusion in mouse saliva elicited by several secretagogues. The concentrations by bioassay of nerve growth factor in both epinephrine- and norepinephrine-induced saliva (3400 and 900 mug/ml, respectively) are higher than reported in any other source. In contrast, the concentrations of nerve growth factor in isoproterenol- and pilocarpine-induced saliva are relatively low (17 and 2 mug/ml, respectively). The specific activity of the salivary nerve growth factor was 41, 36, 2, and 0.6 mug/mg of protein in secretions elicited by epinephrine, norepinephrine, pilocarpine, and isoproterenol, respectively. Salivation after administration of either epinephrine or norepinephrine was completely inhibited by the alpha-adrenergic blocker, phenoxybenzamine. These results suggest that the release of saliva rich in nerve growth factor is primarily regulated through alpha-adrenergic receptors. Images PMID:186790

  13. Targeted Delivery of Nanoparticles Bearing Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 by Ultrasonic Microbubble Destruction for Therapeutic Arteriogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, John C.; Song, Ji; Burke, Caitlin W.

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies in which recombinant growth factors are injected to stimulate arteriogenesis in patients suffering from occlusive vascular disease stand to benefit from improved targeting, less invasiveness, better growth-factor stability, and more sustained growth-factor release. A microbubble contrast-agent-based system facilitates nanoparticle deposition in tissues that are targeted by 1-MHz ultrasound. This system can then be used to deliver poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles containing fibroblast growth factor-2 to mouse adductor muscles in a model of hind-limb arterial insufficiency. Two weeks after treatment, significant increases in both the caliber and total number of collateral arterioles are observed, indicating that the delivery of nanoparticles bearing fibroblast growth factor-2 by ultrasonic microbubble destruction may represent an effective and minimally invasive strategy for the targeted stimulation of therapeutic arteriogenesis. PMID:18720443

  14. Transforming growth factor beta in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, C C; Hu, S; Frey, W H; Ala, T A; Tourtellotte, W W; Peterson, P K

    1994-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been hypothesized to be an inflammatory condition. We hypothesized that anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), counteract the inflammatory process. In the present study, we found that TGF-beta levels were elevated in both cerebrospinal fluid and serum samples obtained from AD patients < 6 h after death. Serum TGF-beta levels were also markedly elevated before death. These results suggest that elevated TGF-beta levels in AD may represent a protective host response to immunologically mediated neuronal injury. PMID:7496909

  15. In vivo effects of corticotropin-releasing factor in pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Jain, V; Shi, S Q; Vedernikov, Y P; Saade, G R; Chwalisz, K; Garfield, R E

    1998-01-01

    Our purpose was to study the effects of corticotropin-releasing factor on (1) maternal blood pressure, (2) uterine vasculature, and (3) parturition in pregnant rats. Infusion minipumps containing vehicle, corticotropin-releasing factor, or alpha-helical corticotropin-releasing factor 9-41 (corticotropin-releasing factor receptor antagonist) were inserted subcutaneously in timed pregnant rats on day 16 of gestation. Systolic blood pressure was measured daily by the tail-cuff method. The time of onset of labor was determined and the newborn pups were weighed. Circulating levels of corticotropin-releasing factor were measured in untreated controls by radioimmunoassay. Relaxant responses to corticotropin-releasing factor were studied in isolated segments of uterine artery from late (day 18) and term (day 22) pregnant rats mounted in a wire myograph. The blood pressure was decreased by corticotropin-releasing factor and increased by alpha-helical corticotropin-releasing factor 9-41 (p < 0.05). The time of onset of labor was not affected by either treatment. Pup weight was decreased by corticotropin-releasing factor (p < 0.05). Circulating levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (immunoreactive) were not changed in pregnancy. In vitro, corticotropin-releasing factor caused relaxation of the uterine artery in a concentration-dependent manner and the relaxation was decreased at term compared with late pregnancy (p < 0.05). Endogenously produced corticotropin-releasing factor lowers blood pressure during pregnancy in rats. It is a relaxant of uterine vasculature and this effect is decreased at term. It does not play an essential role in the initiation of labor in rats.

  16. Prolactin, thyrotropin, and growth hormone release during stress associated with parachute jumping.

    PubMed

    Noel, G L; Dimond, R C; Earll, J M; Frantz, A G

    1976-05-01

    Prolactin, growth hormone, and thyrotropin (TSH) release during the stress of parachute jumping has been evaluated in 14 male subjects. Subjects were studied at several times before and immediately after their first military parachute jump. All three hormones had risen significantly 1 to 14 min after the jump, compared to mean levels measured immediately beforehand. Earlier studies of physical exercise by ourselves and others would suggest that emotional stress played a role in producing changes of this magnitude. We conclude that prolactin, TSH, and growth hormone are released in physiologically significant amounts in association with the stress of parachute jumping.

  17. Kisspeptin stimulates growth hormone release by utilizing Neuropeptide Y pathways and is dependent on the presence of ghrelin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although kisspeptin is the primary stimulator of gonadotropin releasing hormone secretion and therefore the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis, new findings suggest kisspeptin can also regulate additional neuroendocrine processes including release of growth hormone (GH). Central delivery of kisspep...

  18. Resin-modified glass ionomer cements: fluoride release and influence on Streptococcus mutans growth.

    PubMed

    Friedl, K H; Schmalz, G; Hiller, K A; Shams, M

    1997-02-01

    The aims of the present study were to measure the fluoride release of 1 glass ionomer cement, 1 cermet, 3 resin-modified glass ionomer cements and 1 compomer, and to determine the influence of each material on bacterial growth. Test specimens were eluted in saline for 180 days. Every 2 days, the specimens were transferred into fresh saline and the fluoride content of the solution was measured. Furthermore, 48-h, 14-d, 90-d, and 180-d eluates were inoculated with Streptococcus mutans and bacterial growth was recorded nephelometrically. Fluoride release dropped significantly over time for each material with values between 6.2 (Ketac-Silver) and 29.3 (Photac-Fil) ppm after 48 h to values between 0.6 (Ketac-Silver) and 1.7 (Ketac-Fil, Vitremer) ppm after 180 days. Each material reduced bacterial growth at each time of examination, but the effect decreased significantly over time with a maximum growth of 71.7% (Ketac-Fil) to 85.6% (Ketac-Silver) after 48 h and 94.7 (Vitremer) to 99.0% (Ketac-Silver) after 180 days (growth control = 100%). Both Ketac-Silver and Dyract showed a significantly lower inhibiting effect on bacterial growth than the other materials. The tested materials showed a good correlation between fluoride release and influence on bacterial growth. However, both effects dropped dramatically over the 180-days period.

  19. Therapeutic foam scaffolds incorporating biopolymer-shelled mesoporous nanospheres with growth factors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hyun; Eltohamy, Mohamed; Kim, Meeju; Perez, Roman A; Kim, Joong-Hyun; Yun, Ye-Rang; Jang, Jun-Hyeog; Lee, Eun-Jung; Knowles, Jonathan C; Kim, Hae-Won

    2014-06-01

    A novel therapeutic scaffolding system of engineered nanocarriers within a foam matrix for the long-term and sequential delivery of growth factors is reported. Mesoporous silica nanospheres were first functionalized to have an enlarged mesopore size (12.2nm) and aminated surface, which was then shelled by a biopolymer, poly(lactic acid) (PLA) or poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), via electrospraying. The hybrid nanocarrier was subsequently combined with collagen to produce foam scaffolds. Bovine serum albumin (BSA), used as a model protein, was effectively loaded within the enlarged nanospheres. The biopolymer shell substantially prolonged the release period of BSA (2-3weeks from shelled nanospheres vs. within 1week from bare nanospheres), and the release rate was highly dependent on the shell composition (PEG>PLA). Collagen foam scaffolding of the shelled nanocarrier further slowed down the protein release, while enabling the incorporation of a rapidly releasing protein, which is effective for sequential protein delivery. Acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF), loaded onto the shelled-nanocarrier scaffolds, was released over a month at a highly sustainable rate, profiling a release pattern similar to that of BSA. The biological activity of the aFGF was evidenced by the significant proliferation of osteoblastic precursor cells in the aFGF-releasing scaffolds. Furthermore, the aFGF-delivering scaffolds implanted in rat subcutaneous tissue for 2weeks showed a substantially enhanced invasion of fibroblasts with a homogeneous population. Taken together, it is concluded that the biopolymer encapsulation of mesoporous nanospheres effectively prolongs the release of growth factors over weeks to a month, providing a nanocarrier platform for a long-term growth factor delivery. Moreover, the foam scaffolding of the nanocarrier system is a potential therapeutic three-dimensional matrix for cell culture and tissue engineering. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by

  20. Stress-Derived Corticotropin Releasing Factor Breaches Epithelial Endotoxin Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yong; Geng, Xiao-Rui; Yang, Gui; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims Loss of the endotoxin tolerance of intestinal epithelium contributes to a number of intestinal diseases. The etiology is not clear. Psychological stress is proposed to compromise the intestinal barrier function. The present study aims to elucidate the role of the stress-derived corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) in breaching the established intestinal epithelial endotoxin tolerance. Methods Epithelial cells of HT-29, T84 and MDCK were exposed to lipopolysaccharide to induce the endotoxin tolerance; the cells were then stimulated with CRF. The epithelial barrier function was determined using as indicators of the endotoxin tolerant status. A water-avoid stress mouse model was employed to test the role of CRF in breaching the established endotoxin tolerance in the intestine. Results The established endotoxin tolerance in the epithelial cell monolayers was broken down by a sequent exposure to CRF and LPS manifesting a marked drop of the transepithelial resistance (TER) and an increase in the permeability to a macromolecular tracer, horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The exposure to CRF also increased the expression of Cldn2 in the epithelial cells, which could be mimicked by over expression of TLR4 in epithelial cells. Over expression of Cldn2 resulted in low TER in epithelial monolayers and high permeability to HRP. After treating mice with the 10-day chronic stress, the intestinal epithelial barrier function was markedly compromised, which could be prevented by blocking either CRF, or TLR4, or Cldn2. Conclusions Psychological stress-derived CRF can breach the established endotoxin tolerance in the intestinal mucosa. PMID:23840363

  1. [Ca2+ release from intracellular stores of pig oocytes during different stages of growth].

    PubMed

    Denisenko, V Iu; Kuz'mina, T I

    2011-01-01

    Ca2+ release from intracellular stores of pig oocytes was investigated using the Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent dye chlorotetracycline. Oocytes were divided into growing ones and those that completed their growth using brilliant cresyl clue (BCB) staining. The stained oocytes (BCB "+") were determined as the ones that completed their growth, while the stainless ones (BCB "-") were determined as those in the final stages of growth. In the BCB "+" and BCB "-" oocytes, prolactin, theophylline, GTP, and GDP cause Ca2+ to exit intracellular stores. In the oocytes that completed their growth, joint action of prolactin and GTP activates additional release of Ca2+, in which protein kinase C takes part. In growing oocytes, joint action of prolactin and GTP does not lead to additional release of Ca2+. Joint action of theophylline and GDP in growing oocytes and oocytes that completed the growth stage promotes additional Ca2+ exit from intracellular stores. This exit is regulated by protein kinase A. The obtained data show that there various routes of Ca2+ release from intracellular stores in growing and grown pig oocytes.

  2. [Growth Factors and Interleukins in Amniotic Membrane Tissue Homogenate].

    PubMed

    Stachon, T; Bischoff, M; Seitz, B; Huber, M; Zawada, M; Langenbucher, A; Szentmáry, N

    2015-07-01

    Application of amniotic membrane homogenate eye drops may be a potential treatment alternative for therapy resistant corneal epithelial defects. The purpose of this study was to determine the concentrations of epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibroblast growth factor basic (bFGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in amniotic membrane homogenates. Amniotic membranes of 8 placentas were prepared and thereafter stored at - 80 °C using the standard methods of the LIONS Cornea Bank Saar-Lor-Lux, Trier/Westpfalz. Following defreezing, amniotic membranes were cut in two pieces and homogenized in liquid nitrogen. One part of the homogenate was prepared in cell-lysis buffer, the other part was prepared in PBS. The tissue homogenates were stored at - 20 °C until enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis for EGF, bFGF, HGF, KGF, IL-6 and IL-8 concentrations. Concentrations of KGF, IL-6 and IL-8 were below the detection limit using both preparation techniques. The EGF concentration in tissue homogenates treated with cell-lysis buffer (2412 pg/g tissue) was not significantly different compared to that of tissue homogenates treated with PBS (1586 pg/g tissue, p = 0.72). bFGF release was also not significantly different using cell-lysis buffer (3606 pg/g tissue) or PBS treated tissue homogenates (4649 pg/g tissue, p = 0.35). HGF release was significantly lower using cell-lysis buffer (23,555 pg/g tissue), compared to PBS treated tissue (47,766 pg/g tissue, p = 0.007). Containing EGF, bFGF and HGF, and lacking IL-6 and IL-8, the application of amniotic membrane homogenate eye drops may be a potential treatment alternative for therapy-resistant corneal epithelial defects. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Hormonal and lactational responses to growth hormone-releasing hormone treatment in lactating Japanese Black cows.

    PubMed

    Shingu, H; Hodate, K; Kushibiki, S; Ueda, Y; Touno, E; Shinoda, M; Ohashi, S

    2004-06-01

    Ten multiparous lactating Japanese Black cows (beef breed) were used to evaluate the effects of bovine growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) analog on milk yield and profiles of plasma hormones and metabolites. The cows received 2 consecutive 21-d treatments (a daily s.c. injection of 3-mg GHRH analog or saline) in a 2 (group) x 2 (period) Latin square crossover design. The 5 cows in group A received GHRH analog during period 1 (from d 22 to 42 postpartum) and saline during period 2 (from d 57 to 77 postpartum), and those in group B received saline and GHRH analog during periods 1 and 2, respectively. Mean milk yield decreased in saline treated compared with that during the 1-wk period before treatment 7.4 and 19.1% during periods 1 (group B) and 2 (group A), respectively. Treatment with GHRH analog increased milk yield 17.4% (period 1, group A) and 6.3% (period 2, group B). Treatment with GHRH analog induced higher basal plasma concentrations of growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), insulin, and glucose compared with saline-treated cows. In glucose challenge, the GHRH analog-treated beef cows had greater insulin secretion than the saline-treated beef cows. In insulin challenge, however, there were no significant differences in the areas surrounded by hypothetical lines of basal glucose concentrations and glucose response curves between GHRH analog- and saline-treated cows. These results demonstrate that GHRH analog treatment facilitates endogenous GH secretion in lactating Japanese Black cows, leading to increases in milk yield and plasma concentrations of IGF-1, insulin, and glucose.

  4. Autologous Growth Factor Injections in Chronic Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sandrey, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    Reference: de Vos RJ, van Veldhoven PLJ, Moen MH, Weir A, Tol JL. Autologous growth factor injections in chronic tendinopathy: a systematic review. Br Med Bull. 2010;95:63–77. Clinical Question: The authors of this systematic review evaluated the literature to critically consider the effects of growth factors delivered through autologous whole-blood and platelet-rich–plasma (PRP) injections in managing wrist-flexor and -extensor tendinopathies, plantar fasciopathy, and patellar tendinopathy. The primary question was, according to the published literature, is there sufficient evidence to support the use of growth factors delivered through autologous whole-blood and PRP injections for chronic tendinopathy? Data Sources: The authors performed a comprehensive, systematic literature search in October 2009 using PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane library without time limits. The following key words were used in different combinations: tendinopathy, tendinosis, tendinitis, tendons, tennis elbow, plantar fasciitis, platelet rich plasma, platelet transfusion, and autologous blood or injection. The search was limited to human studies in English. All bibliographies from the initial literature search were also viewed to identify additional relevant studies. Study Selection: Studies were eligible based on the following criteria: (1) Articles were suitable (inclusion criteria) if the participants had been clinically diagnosed as having chronic tendinopathy; (2) the design had to be a prospective clinical study, randomized controlled trial, nonrandomized clinical trial, or prospective case series; (3) a well-described intervention in the form of a growth factor injection with either PRP or autologous whole blood was used; and (4) the outcome was reported in terms of pain or function (or both). Data Extraction: All titles and abstracts were assessed by 2 researchers, and all relevant articles were obtained. Two researchers independently read the full text of

  5. Autologous growth factor injections in chronic tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Sandrey, Michelle A

    2014-01-01

    de Vos RJ, van Veldhoven PLJ, Moen MH, Weir A, Tol JL. Autologous growth factor injections in chronic tendinopathy: a systematic review. Br Med Bull. 2010;95:63-77. The authors of this systematic review evaluated the literature to critically consider the effects of growth factors delivered through autologous whole-blood and platelet-rich-plasma (PRP) injections in managing wrist-flexor and -extensor tendinopathies, plantar fasciopathy, and patellar tendinopathy. The primary question was, according to the published literature, is there sufficient evidence to support the use of growth factors delivered through autologous whole-blood and PRP injections for chronic tendinopathy? The authors performed a comprehensive, systematic literature search in October 2009 using PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane library without time limits. The following key words were used in different combinations: tendinopathy, tendinosis, tendinitis, tendons, tennis elbow, plantar fasciitis, platelet rich plasma, platelet transfusion, and autologous blood or injection. The search was limited to human studies in English. All bibliographies from the initial literature search were also viewed to identify additional relevant studies. Studies were eligible based on the following criteria: (1) Articles were suitable (inclusion criteria) if the participants had been clinically diagnosed as having chronic tendinopathy; (2) the design had to be a prospective clinical study, randomized controlled trial, nonrandomized clinical trial, or prospective case series; (3) a well-described intervention in the form of a growth factor injection with either PRP or autologous whole blood was used; and (4) the outcome was reported in terms of pain or function (or both). All titles and abstracts were assessed by 2 researchers, and all relevant articles were obtained. Two researchers independently read the full text of each article to determine if it met the inclusion criteria. If opinions differed on

  6. Released advance reproduction of white and red fir. . . growth, damage, mortality

    Treesearch

    Donald T. Gordon

    1973-01-01

    Advance reproduction of white fir and red fir released by cutting overmature over-story was studied at the Swain Mountain Experimental Forest in northern California, at 6,300 feet elevation. Seedling and sapling height growth before logging was only 0.1-0.2 foot per year. Five years after cutting, seedling and sapling height growth had accelerated to about 0.5 to 0.8...

  7. Insulin/IGF signaling in Drosophila and other insects: factors that regulate production, release and post-release action of the insulin-like peptides.

    PubMed

    Nässel, Dick R; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Insulin, insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and insulin-like peptides (ILPs) are important regulators of metabolism, growth, reproduction and lifespan, and mechanisms of insulin/IGF signaling (IIS) have been well conserved over evolution. In insects, between one and 38 ILPs have been identified in each species. Relatively few insect species have been investigated in depth with respect to ILP functions, and therefore we focus mainly on the well-studied fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. In Drosophila eight ILPs (DILP1-8), but only two receptors (dInR and Lgr3) are known. DILP2, 3 and 5 are produced by a set of neurosecretory cells (IPCs) in the brain and their biosynthesis and release are controlled by a number of mechanisms differing between larvae and adults. Adult IPCs display cell-autonomous sensing of circulating glucose, coupled to evolutionarily conserved mechanisms for DILP release. The glucose-mediated DILP secretion is modulated by neurotransmitters and neuropeptides, as well as by factors released from the intestine and adipocytes. Larval IPCs, however, are indirectly regulated by glucose-sensing endocrine cells producing adipokinetic hormone, or by circulating factors from the intestine and fat body. Furthermore, IIS is situated within a complex physiological regulatory network that also encompasses the lipophilic hormones, 20-hydroxyecdysone and juvenile hormone. After release from IPCs, the ILP action can be modulated by circulating proteins that act either as protective carriers (binding proteins), or competitive inhibitors. Some of these proteins appear to have additional functions that are independent of ILPs. Taken together, the signaling with multiple ILPs is under complex control, ensuring tightly regulated IIS in the organism.

  8. Transforming growth factor beta regulates thyroid growth. Role in the pathogenesis of nontoxic goiter.

    PubMed Central

    Grubeck-Loebenstein, B; Buchan, G; Sadeghi, R; Kissonerghis, M; Londei, M; Turner, M; Pirich, K; Roka, R; Niederle, B; Kassal, H

    1989-01-01

    The production and growth regulatory activity of transforming growth factor beta were studied in human thyroid tissue. As estimated by its mRNA expression in fresh tissue samples, transforming growth factor beta was produced in normal and in diseased thyroid glands. Transforming growth factor beta mRNA was mainly produced by thyroid follicular cells and in lesser quantities by thyroid infiltrating mononuclear cells. The concentrations of transforming growth factor beta mRNA were lower in iodine-deficient nontoxic goiter than in Graves' disease and normal thyroid tissue. Transforming growth factor beta protein secretion by cultured thyroid follicular cells was also low in nontoxic goiter, but could be increased by addition of sodium iodide (10 microM) to the culture medium. Recombinant transforming growth factor beta did not affect basal tritiated thymidine incorporation in cultured thyroid follicular cells, but inhibited, at a concentration of 10 ng/ml, the growth stimulatory influence of insulin-like growth factor I, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor alpha, TSH, and partly that of normal human serum on cultured thyroid follicular cells. This inhibition was greater in Graves' disease than in nontoxic goiter. These results suggest that transforming growth factor beta may act as an autocrine growth inhibitor on thyroid follicular cells. Decreased transforming growth factor beta production and decreased responsiveness to transforming growth factor beta may be cofactors in the pathogenesis of iodine-deficient nontoxic goiter. Images PMID:2921318

  9. Evaluation of growth hormone release and human growth hormone treatment in children with cranial irradiation-associated short stature

    SciTech Connect

    Romshe, C.A.; Zipf, W.B.; Miser, A.; Miser, J.; Sotos, J.F.; Newton, W.A.

    1984-02-01

    We studied nine children who had received cranial irradiation for various malignancies and subsequently experienced decreased growth velocity. Their response to standard growth hormone stimulation and release tests were compared with that in seven children with classic GH deficiency and in 24 short normal control subjects. With arginine and L-dopa stimulation, six of nine patients who received radiation had a normal GH response (greater than 7 ng/ml), whereas by design none of the GH deficient and all of the normal children had a positive response. Only two of nine patients had a normal response to insulin hypoglycemia, with no significant differences in the mean maximal response of the radiation and the GH-deficient groups. Pulsatile secretion was not significantly different in the radiation and GH-deficient groups, but was different in the radiation and normal groups. All subjects in the GH-deficient and radiation groups were given human growth hormone for 1 year. Growth velocity increased in all, with no significant difference in the response of the two groups when comparing the z scores for growth velocity of each subject's bone age. We recommend a 6-month trial of hGH in children who have had cranial radiation and are in prolonged remission with a decreased growth velocity, as there is no completely reliable combination of GH stimulation or release tests to determine their response.

  10. Lactoferrin – A Novel Bone Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Naot, Dorit; Grey, Andrew; Reid, Ian R; Cornish, Jillian

    2005-01-01

    Lactoferrin is an iron-binding glycoprotein that belongs to the transferrin family. It is present in breast milk, in epithelial secretions, and in the secondary granules of neutrophils. In healthy subjects lactoferrin circulates at concentrations of 2–7 x 10−6 g/ml. Lactoferrin is a pleiotropic factor with potent antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities. Recently, we have shown that lactoferrin can also promote bone growth. At physiological concentrations, lactoferrin potently stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of primary osteoblasts and also acts as a survival factor inhibiting apoptosis induced by serum withdrawal. Lactoferrin also affects osteoclast formation and, in murine bone marrow culture, lactoferrin potently inhibits osteoclastogenesis. In vivo, local injection of lactoferrin above the hemicalvaria of adult mice results in substantial increases in the dynamic histomorphometric indices of bone formation and bone area. The mitogenic effect of lactoferrin in osteoblast-like cells is mediated mainly through LRP1, a member of the family of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related proteins that are primarily known as endocytic receptors. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy, we demonstrated that fluorescently labeled lactoferrin is endocytosed and can be visualized in the cytoplasm of primary osteoblastic cells. Lactoferrin also induces activation of p42/44 MAPK signaling in primary osteoblasts, but the two pathways seem to operate independently as activation of MAPK signaling, but not endocytosis, is necessary for the mitogenic effect of lactoferrin. We conclude that lactoferrin may have a physiological role in bone growth and healing, and a potential therapeutic role as an anabolic factor in osteoporosis. PMID:16012127

  11. [Effects of slow/controlled release fertilizers on the growth and nutrient use efficiency of pepper].

    PubMed

    Tang, Shuan-Hu; Zhang, Fa-Bao; Huang, Xu; Chen, Jian-Sheng; Xu, Pei-Zhi

    2008-05-01

    Pot trails were conducted from 2003 to 2005 to study the effects of slow/controlled release fertilizers on the growth and nutrient use efficiency of pepper. The results indicated that in comparison with conventional splitting fertilization (T1), basal application of polymer-coated controlled release fertilizer (T2) enhanced the single fruit mass and vitamin C concentration, improved the root activity, and increased the fruit yield by 8.4%, but no significant effect was observed on the dissoluble sugar concentration in fruit. NH4MgPO4-coated controlled release fertilizer (T3) increased the dissoluble sugar concentration by 5.67%, but had less effect on single fruit mass and vitamin C concentration. Under the application of T3, the root system had a vigorous growth at early stages but became infirm at later stages, resulting in a lower yield. Comparing with T1, the application of 3 slow release fertilizers increased the dissoluble sugar concentration in fruit, enhanced the root activity, but had less effect on the yield. All test slow/controlled release fertilizers increased the use efficiency of N, P, and K significantly, with an exception for T2 which increased the use efficiency of N and K but decreased that of P. It was demonstrated that an appropriate application of slow/controlled release fertilizers could enhance pepper' s root activity and improve nutrient use efficiency.

  12. Effect of catch-and-release angling on growth and survival of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pope, K.L.; Wilde, G.R.; Knabe, D.W.

    2007-01-01

    Catch-and-release angling is popular in many parts of the world and plays an increasingly important role in fish conservation efforts. Although survival rates associated with catch-and-release angling are well documented for many species, sublethal effects have been less studied. An experiment was conducted to directly assess the effects of catch-and-release angling on growth and survival of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum). Catch-and-release events were simulated in laboratory tanks maintained at 15-16 ??C with hooks manually placed in pre-designated locations in the mouths of the fish. There were no differences in standard length (P = 0.59) or wet weight (P = 0.81) gained between caught and uncaught fish over a 1-month angling and recovery period. Survival was 96.99 ?? 0.06% for rainbow trout caught and released, and did not vary with number (one, two or four) of captures. Thus, catch-and-release angling appears to have little effect on growth and mortality of rainbow trout hooked in the mouth. ?? 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Identification of the growth-hormone-releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2) in a nutritional supplement.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andreas; Kohler, Maxie; Mester, Joachim; Geyer, Hans; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Petrou, Michael; Thevis, Mario

    2010-03-01

    Black market products of a pharmaceutical nature and nutritional supplements have received substantial and increasing attention because of potential performance enhancement in elite and non-professional sports. In addition, improved general health is claimed for non-competing individuals. The risks and foreseeable dangers of the uncontrolled use of highly potent and non-approved pharmaceutical compounds in healthy individuals are of considerable concern. In the present case report, the emerging drug candidate GHRP-2 with verified growth-hormone-releasing properties was identified and quantified in tablets offered as an over-the-counter nutritional supplement. The impact of this orally active peptide on the hGH/IGF-axis has been established for several years and its illicit use in elite sports has been assumed. As a releasing factor for hGH, GHRP-2 belongs to the list of substances prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). Unfortunately, to date there is no routinely performed assay for the determination of these peptides potentially occurring in biological fluids of competing athletes, but the present data will facilitate the implementation by providing principle analytical information on liquid chromatographic and mass spectrometric behaviour. Qualitative identification of the target analyte after extraction from the tablet matrix was performed by high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry after liquid chromatographic separation under consideration of the accurate masses and the ratios of the protonated molecules and their fragment ions derived from their collisionally induced dissociation. Quantitative results were obtained by means of liquid chromatography coupled to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer and linear regression using an external calibration curve (with GHRP-2 reference compound) adjusted via internal standard (Hexarelin). Hereby, the content of GHRP-2 was determined with approximately 50 µg per tablet.

  14. Fifth-year pine growth response to woody release treatments in young loblolly plantations

    Treesearch

    A.W. Ezell; J.L. Yeiser; L.R. Nelson

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of adding Oust® XP to woody release treatments was evaluated on second-year pine plantations in Texas, Mississippi, and South Carolina. Overall, the residual control of herbaceous weeds on these sites was excellent the growing season following application. Pine height and diameter growth was evaluated for 5 years following application. Generally, the...

  15. Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling in the Developing Neuroendocrine Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Pei-San; Brooks, Leah R.; Rochester, Johanna R.; Kavanaugh, Scott I.; Chung, Wilson C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling is pivotal to the formation of numerous central regions. Increasing evidence suggests FGF signaling also directs the development of the neuroendocrine hypothalamus, a collection of neuroendocrine neurons originating primarily within the nose and the ventricular zone of the diencephalon. This review outlines evidence for a role of FGF signaling in the prenatal and postnatal development of several hypothalamic neuroendocrine systems. The emphasis is placed on the nasally derived gonadotropin- releasing hormone neurons, which depend on neurotrophic cues from FGF signaling throughout the neurons' lifetime. Although less is known about neuroendocrine neurons derived from the diencephalon, recent studies suggest they also exhibit variable levels of dependence on FGF signaling. Overall, FGF signaling provides a broad spectrum of cues that ranges from genesis, cell survival/death, migration, morphological changes, to hormone synthesis in the neuroendocrine hypothalamus. Abnormal FGF signaling will deleteriously impact multiple hypothalamic neuroendocrine systems, resulting in the disruption of diverse physiological functions. PMID:21129392

  16. Proteasome Inhibition by Fellutamide B Induces Nerve Growth Factor Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hines, John; Groll, Michael; Fahnestock, Margaret; Crews, Craig M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Neurotrophic small molecules have the potential to aid in the treatment of neuronal injury and neurodegenerative diseases. The natural product fellutamide B, originally isolated from Penicillium fellutanum, potently induces nerve growth factor (NGF) release from fibroblasts and glial-derived cells, although the mechanism for this neurotrophic activity has not been elucidated. Here, we report that fellutamide B potently inhibits proteasome catalytic activity. High resolution structural information obtained from co-crystallization of the 20S proteasome reveals novel aspects regarding β-subunit binding and adduct formation by fellutamide B to inhibit their hydrolytic activity. We demonstrate that fellutamide B and other proteasome inhibitors increased NGF gene transcription via a cis-acting element (or elements) in the promoter. These results demonstrate an unrecognized connection between proteasome inhibition and NGF production, suggesting a possible new strategy in the development of neurotrophic agents. PMID:18482702

  17. Application of photoremovable protecting group for controlled release of plant growth regulators by sunlight.

    PubMed

    Atta, Sanghamitra; Ikbal, Mohammed; Kumar, Ashutosh; Pradeep Singh, N D

    2012-06-04

    We report a novel technique for controlled release of plant growth regulators (PGRs) by sunlight using photoremovable protecting group (PRPG) as a delivery device. In the present work, carboxyl-containing PGRs of the auxin group [indoleacetic acid (IAA) and naphthoxyacetic acid (NOAA)] were chemically caged using PRPGs of coumarin derivatives. Photophysical studies showed that caged PGRs exhibited good fluorescence properties. Irradiation of caged PGRs by sunlight in both aqueous ethanol and soil media resulted in controlled release of PGRs. The results of the bioactivity experiments indicated that caged PGRs showed better enhancement in the root and shoot length growth of Cicer arietinum compared to PGRs after 10days of sunlight exposure. Our results indicated that use of PRPG as a delivery device for controlled release of PGRs by sunlight in soil holds great interest for field application since it can overcome the rapid loss of PGRs in environmental conditions.

  18. [Growth Hormone-Insulin Growth Factor I (GH-IGF-I) axis and growth].

    PubMed

    Castell, A-L; Sadoul, J-L; Bouvattier, C

    2013-10-01

    Normal human linear growth results from an evolutionary process expressing the sum effect of multiple genes. The growth hormone (GH) - insulin like growth factor (IGF)-I axis is one of the main actors in the growth process. Defects in this axis can be responsible for short or tall stature. Short stature is defined as smaller than - 2 standard deviations (SD). It is a very common reason for consultation in pediatrics; indeed, 2.5 % of children are concerned. Multiple causes make diagnosis difficult. In this article, we detail the most common constitutional causes of small size, including those related to a defect in the GH-IGF-I axis. Then, we report, the first results of the clinical and genetic study conducted on 213 patients with gigantism. Tall stature is defined by a height superior to 2 SD. Finally, recent work linking epigenetics and growth - via signaling pathways of GH-IGF-I axis - will be presented.

  19. Insulin-like growth factor and epidermal growth factor signaling in breast cancer cell growth: focus on endocrine resistant disease.

    PubMed

    Voudouri, Kallirroi; Berdiaki, Aikaterini; Tzardi, Maria; Tzanakakis, George N; Nikitovic, Dragana

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer for women worldwide with a lifetime risk amounting to a staggering total of 10%. It is well established that the endogenous synthesis of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) polypeptide growth factors are closely correlated to malignant transformation and all the steps of the breast cancer metastatic cascade. Numerous studies have demonstrated that both estrogens and growth factors stimulate the proliferation of steroid-dependent tumor cells, and that the interaction between these signaling pathways occurs at several levels. Importantly, the majority of breast cancer cases are estrogen receptor- (ER-) positive which have a more favorable prognosis and pattern of recurrence with endocrine therapy being the backbone of treatment. Unfortunately, the majority of patients progress to endocrine therapy resistant disease (acquired resistance) whereas a proportion of patients may fail to respond to initial therapy (de novo resistance). The IGF-I and EGF downstream signaling pathways are closely involved in the process of progression to therapy resistant disease. Modifications in the bioavailability of these growth factors contribute critically to disease progression. In the present review therefore, we will discuss in depth how IGF and EGF signaling participate in breast cancer pathogenesis and progression to endocrine resistant disease.

  20. Growth factor control of epidermal growth factor receptor kinase activity via an intramolecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Koland, J G; Cerione, R A

    1988-02-15

    The mechanism by which the protein kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is activated by binding of growth factor was investigated. Detergent-solubilized receptor in monomeric form was isolated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation and both its kinase and autophosphorylation activities monitored. In a low ionic strength medium and with MnCl2 as an activator, the activity of the monomeric receptor was EGF-independent. However, with 0.25 M ammonium sulfate present, the MnCl2-stimulated kinase activity was strikingly EGF-dependent. In contrast, the kinase activity expressed in the presence of MgCl2 showed growth factor control in the absence of added salt. Under the conditions of these experiments there was apparently little tendency for growth factor to induce aggregation of the receptor, indicating that the allosteric activation of the receptor kinase by EGF occurred via an intramolecular mechanism. Whereas detergent-solubilized receptor was the subject of these studies, the kinase activity of cell surface receptors might also be controlled by an intramolecular mechanism. These results indicate that an individual receptor molecule has the potential to function as a transmembrane signal transducer.

  1. [Effects of crop tree release on stand growth and stand structure of Cunninghamia lanceolata plantation].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-qiang; Wang, Yi-xiang; Yang, Yi; Zhu, Ting-ting; Zhu, Xu-dan

    2015-02-01

    Crop trees were selected in a 26-year-old even-aged Cunninghamia lanceolata plantation in Lin' an, and compared in plots that were released and unreleased to examine growth and structure responses for 3 years after thinning. Crop tree release significantly increased the mean increments of diameter and volume of individual tree by 1.30 and 1.25 times relative to trees in control stands, respectively. The increments of diameter and volume of crop trees were significantly higher than those of general trees in thinning plots, crop trees and general trees in control plots, which suggested that the responses from different tree types to crop tree release treatment were different. Crop tree release increased the average distances of crop trees to the nearest neighboring trees, reducing competition among crop trees by about 68.2%. 3-year stand volume increment for thinning stands had no significant difference with that of control stands although the number of trees was only 81.5% of the control. Crop trees in thinned plots with diameters over than 14 cm reached 18.0% over 3 years, compared with 12.0% for trees without thinning, suggesting that crop tree release benefited the larger individual trees. The pattern of tree locations in thinning plots tended to be random, complying with the rule that tree distribution pattern changes with growth. Crop tree release in C. lanceolata plantation not only promoted the stand growth, but also optimized the stand structure, benefiting crop trees sustained rapid growth and larger diameter trees production.

  2. Delivery of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) from photoresponsive hydrogel scaffolds.