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Sample records for growth hormone binding

  1. Absence of serum growth hormone binding protein in patients with growth hormone receptor deficiency (Laron dwarfism)

    SciTech Connect

    Daughaday, W.H.; Trivedi, B.

    1987-07-01

    It has recently been recognized that human serum contains a protein that specifically binds human growth hormone (hGH). This protein has the same restricted specificity for hGH as the membrane-bound GH receptor. To determine whether the GH-binding protein is a derivative of, or otherwise related to, the GH receptor, the authors have examined the serum of three patients with Laron-type dwarfism, a condition in which GH refractoriness has been attributed to a defect in the GH receptor. The binding of /sup 125/I-labeled hGH incubated with serum has been measured after gel filtration of the serum through an Ultrogel AcA 44 minicolumn. Results are expressed as percent of specifically bound /sup 125/I-hGH and as specific binding relative to that of a reference serum after correction is made for endogenous GH. The mean +/- SEM of specific binding of sera from eight normal adults (26-46 years of age) was 21.6 +/- 0.45%, and the relative specific binding was 101.1 +/- 8.6%. Sera from 11 normal children had lower specific binding of 12.5 +/- 1.95% and relative specific binding of 56.6 +/- 9.1%. Sera from three children with Laron-type dwarfism lacked any demonstrable GH binding, whereas sera from 10 other children with other types of nonpituitary short stature had normal relative specific binding. They suggest that the serum GH-binding protein is a soluble derivative of the GH receptor. Measurement of the serum GH-binding protein may permit recognition of other abnormalities of the GH receptor.

  2. Thyroid Hormone Receptor Binds to a Site in the Rat Growth Hormone Promoter Required for Induction by Thyroid Hormone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Ronald J.; Brent, Gregory A.; Warne, Robert L.; Reed Larsen, P.; Moore, David D.

    1987-08-01

    Transcription of the rat growth hormone (rGH) gene in pituitary cells is increased by addition of thyroid hormone (T3). This induction is dependent on the presence of specific sequences just upstream of the rGH promoter. We have partially purified T3 receptor from rat liver and examined its interaction with these rGH sequences. We show here that T3 receptor binds specifically to a site just upstream of the basal rGH promoter. This binding site includes two copies of a 7-base-pair direct repeat, the centers of which are separated by 10 base pairs. Deletions that specifically remove the T3 receptor binding site drastically reduce response to T3 in transient transfection experiments. These results demonstrate that T3 receptor can recognize specific DNA sequences and suggest that it can act directly as a positive transcriptional regulatory factor.

  3. Growth hormone receptor/binding protein: Physiology and function

    SciTech Connect

    Herington, A.C.; Ymer, S.I.; Stevenson, J.L.; Roupas, P.

    1994-12-31

    Soluble truncated forms of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) are present in the circulation of many species and are also produced by many tissues/cell types. The major high-affinity forms of these GH-binding proteins (GHBP) are derived by alternative splicing of GHR mRNA in rodents, but probably by proteolytic cleavage in other species. Questions still remain with respect to the origins, native molecular forms(s), physiology, and function of the GHBPs, however. The observation that GH induces dimerization of the soluble GHBP and a membrane GHR, and that dimerization of GHR appears to be critical for GH bioactivity suggests that the presentation of GH to target cells, in an unbound form or as a monomeric or dimeric complex with GHBP, may have significant implications for the ability of GH to activate specific postreceptor signaling pathways (tyrosine kinase, protein kinase C, G-protein pathways) known to be utilized by GH for its diverse biological effects. This minireview addresses some of these aspects and highlights several new questions which have arisen as a result of recent advances in our understanding of the structure, function, and signaling mechanisms of the membrane bound GHR. 43 refs.

  4. Pharmacokinetics and acute lipolytic actions of growth hormone. Impact of age, body composition, binding proteins, and other hormones.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Troels Krarup

    2002-10-01

    The biologic actions of endogeneous growth hormone (GH) depend on its secretion and clearance rates as well as sensitivity at the receptor level. Aberrations in GH pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics may occur with increasing age, and have been implicated in diseases such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and critical illness. In this review, recent insights into the association between GH metabolism and age, body composition, binding proteins and other hormones are discussed.

  5. The first intron of the human growth hormone gene contains a binding site for glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Moore, D D; Marks, A R; Buckley, D I; Kapler, G; Payvar, F; Goodman, H M

    1985-02-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) protein stimulates transcription from a variety of cellular genes. We show here that GCR partially purified from rat liver binds specifically to a site within the first intron of the human growth hormone (hGH) gene, approximately 100 base pairs downstream from the start of hGH transcription. GCR binding is selectively inhibited by methylation of two short, symmetrically arranged clusters of guanine residues within this site. A cloned synthetic 24-base-pair deoxyoligonucleotide containing the predicted GCR binding sequence interacts specifically with GCR. The hGH binding site shares sequence homology with a GCR binding site upstream from the human metallothionein II gene and a subset of GCR binding sites from mouse mammary tumor virus. All of these binding sites for this eukaryotic transcriptional regulatory protein show remarkable similarity in overall geometry to the binding sites for several prokaryotic transcriptional regulatory proteins.

  6. Concentration of free growth hormone-binding protein in the serum of mice is not regulated by growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, A I; Dominici, F P; Bartke, A; Turyn, D

    1997-05-01

    Ames dwarf mice that do not express growth hormone (GH) or prolactin (PRL) genes were used to study the effects of GH deficiency on the presence and the characteristics of GH-binding protein (GHBP) in serum. Chromatographic techniques were used to allow characterization of biological rather than immunological activity of GHBP. Two GH-binding fractions were found in dwarf mice serum, one with low affinity and high capacity (GHBPI) and one with high affinity, low capacity and lower molecular mass (GHBPII). Serum concentration of the high-affinity GHBP was 0.73 +/- 0.03 nM with a Kd of 6.3 +/- 1.7 nM. Since Ames dwarf mice have no GH in the circulation, all the GHBP is free. Interestingly, the concentration of GHBP in dwarf mice was similar to the levels of free GHBP measured in normal mice from the same line. Moreover, this value (0.7 nM) closely resembles the concentration of free GHBP in the serum of transgenic mice overexpressing GH, in which peripheral GH levels are grossly elevated. These observations can be interpreted as evidence that the levels of free GHBP in mouse serum are independent of GH concentration, and that GH influences only the levels of bound GHBP in peripheral circulation.

  7. Binding and signalling properties of a growth hormone enhancing monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Beattie, J; Bramani, S; Secchi, C; Mockridge, J

    1999-08-01

    We have used a sequential, qualitative biosensor based assay to demonstrate that OA15, a monoclonal antibody which enhances in vivo the activity of bovine growth hormone (bGH) does not disrupt the interaction between bGH and its cognate receptor (as represented by recombinant bovine GH binding protein -rbGHBP). We have confirmed this using a classical cell-based radio-receptor assay with the GH-responsive mouse pre-adipocyte cell line 3T3-F442A. The fact that OA 15 binding to bGH still allows hormone to interact with its receptor, allows us to test the hypothesis that there is any amplification of signalling events following hormone-MAb treatment of 3T3-F442A cells. We have used as a reporter of GH activity the rapid stimulation of JAK-2 tyrosine phosphorylation which is a critical first step in GH signalling events. We demonstrate that binding of rbGH by OA15 attenuates hormone stimulation of JAK-2 tyrosine phosphorylation. We conclude that although OA15 does not disrupt GH-GH receptor (GHR) interactions it does interfere with subsequent GH activity at the molecular and cellular level. We further speculate therefore that the biological enhancing activity of this antibody is most likely due to an in vivo effect as presentation of antibody-hormone complexes to a GH-target cell inhibits hormone activity.

  8. The structure and regulation of expression of the mouse growth hormone receptor and binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Talamantes, F.

    1994-12-31

    The mouse growth hormone receptor (mGHR) and the mouse growth hormone-binding protein (mGHBP) are products of a single gene which are generated alternative splicing. The factors that regulate the expression of mGHR and mGHBP mRNA and protein during pregnancy in the mouse are incompletely understood. During pregnancy in the mouse, there are parallel increases in circulating mouse growth hormone (mGH), liver mGHR, and serum mGHBP. The increase in both hepatic mGHR and serum mGHBP begins on Day 9 of gestation and by late gestation the hepatic mGHR content has increased 8-fold and serum mGHBP has increased 30-fold compared with values in nonpregnant controls. A parallel increase occurs in the steady state levels of liver GHR and GHBP encoding mRNAs. The increase in both messages begins on Day 9 of gestation; however, the GHR mRNA reaches maximum levels by Day 13, while the GHBP mRNA continues to increase until the end of pregnancy. The magnitude of the increase in the GHR-encoding message is 15- to 20-fold between nonpregnant and late pregnant mice, and the magnitude of the increase in the GHBP-encoding message is 30- to 50-fold. Both pituitary mGH and the number of conceptuses influence the receptors and binding protein for mGH during pregnancy. 22 refs.

  9. A rapid and simple assay for growth hormone-binding protein activity in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Baumann, G; Shaw, M A; Amburn, K

    1988-12-01

    The newly discovered circulating growth hormone binding proteins dictate a re-evaluation of the state of GH in plasma in health and disease as the binding proteins are known to affect GH metabolism and action. We describe a rapid and simple GH-binding assay that allows determination of free and complexed plasma GH, as well as GH-binding protein activity as an index of GH-binding protein levels, with relative ease. The method is based on incubation of plasma with 125I-GH and separation of bound from free GH on small DEAE-cellulose columns; it can be used on a large scale for routine determinations. The results obtained by this method are comparable to those obtained with the previously used slow and more cumbersome gel filtration technique. Initial data obtained in normal subjects and certain disease states show that the bound fraction of plasma GH is similar in men, women and children, is unaffected by pregnancy or acute infection, but is marginally decreased in liver cirrhosis. In acromegaly, binding protein activity also appears normal when allowance is made for partial saturation of the binding proteins by the high prevailing GH levels. The technique we describe should facilitate investigations of normal and abnormal regulation of the GH binding proteins.

  10. Activin inhibits binding of transcription factor Pit-1 to the growth hormone promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Struthers, R S; Gaddy-Kurten, D; Vale, W W

    1992-01-01

    Activin A is a potent growth and differentiation factor related to transforming growth factor beta. In somatotrophs, activin suppresses the biosynthesis and secretion of growth hormone (GH) and cellular proliferation. We report here that, in MtTW15 somatotrophic tumor cells, activin decreased GH mRNA levels and inhibited expression of transfected GH promoter--chloramphenicol acetyltransferase fusion genes. Deletion mapping of nucleotide sequences mediating this inhibition led to the identification of a region that has previously been characterized as binding the pituitary-specific transcription factor Pit-1/GHF-1. Characterization of nuclear factor binding to this region demonstrated that binding of Pit-1 to the GH promoter is lost on activin treatment. These results indicate that activin-induced repression of GH biosynthesis is mediated by the loss of tissue-specific transcription factor binding to the GH promoter and suggest a possible general mechanism for other activin responses, whereby activin regulates the function of other POU- or homeodomain-containing transcription factors. Images PMID:1454833

  11. Recurrent hormone-binding domain truncated ESR1 amplifications in primary endometrial cancers suggest their implication in hormone independent growth

    PubMed Central

    Holst, Frederik; Hoivik, Erling A.; Gibson, William J.; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Schumacher, Steven E.; Asmann, Yan W.; Grossmann, Patrick; Trovik, Jone; Necela, Brian M.; Thompson, E. Aubrey; Meyerson, Matthew; Beroukhim, Rameen; Salvesen, Helga B.; Cherniack, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    The estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is highly expressed in both endometrial and breast cancers, and represents the most prevalent therapeutic target in breast cancer. However, anti-estrogen therapy has not been shown to be effective in endometrial cancer. Recently it has been shown that hormone-binding domain alterations of ERα in breast cancer contribute to acquired resistance to anti-estrogen therapy. In analyses of genomic data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we observe that endometrial carcinomas manifest recurrent ESR1 gene amplifications that truncate the hormone-binding domain encoding region of ESR1 and are associated with reduced mRNA expression of exons encoding the hormone-binding domain. These findings support a role for hormone-binding alterations of ERα in primary endometrial cancer, with potentially important therapeutic implications. PMID:27160768

  12. Regulation of growth hormone receptor and binding protein expression in domestic species

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, B.; Oldham, E.R.; Baumbach, W.R.

    1994-12-31

    Growth hormone receptor (GHR) expression has been analyzed at the RNA level. In the rat, relative expression of the RNA species encoding the GHR and the GH-binding protein (GHBP) appears to be sensitive to endocrine status. Full-length GHR cDNA clones from ovine, porcine, and chicken were used as probes to investigate the existence of unique RNAs for GHBPs in these species. In the sheep and pig, only a single, {approximately}4.5-kb RNA is apparent. Although quite high levels of GH binding activity are found in pig serum, a variety of methods failed to isolate a separate GHBP message, suggesting that porcine GHBP is produced via a mechanism different from that which is known for rat. One class of chicken GHR cDNA, resulting from alternative use of a splice acceptor 17 bases upstream of the intron 6/exon 7 junction, is also presented. 24 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. SHBG (Sex Hormone Binding Globulin)

    MedlinePlus

    ... as: Testosterone-estrogen Binding Globulin; TeBG Formal name: Sex Hormone Binding Globulin Related tests: Testosterone , Free Testosterone, ... I should know? How is it used? The sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) test may be used ...

  14. Regulation of the growth hormone (GH) receptor and GH-binding protein mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Kaji, Hidesuke; Ohashi, Shin-Ichirou; Abe, Hiromi; Chihara, Kazuo

    1994-12-31

    In fasting rats, a transient increase in growth hormone-binding protein (GHBP) mRNA levels was observed after 1 day, in muscle, heart, and liver, but not in fat tissues. The liver GH receptor (GHR) mRNA level was significantly increased after 1 day (but not after 5 days) of bovine GH (bGH) treatment in fed rats. Both the liver GHR mRNA level and the net increment of plasma IGF-I markedly decreased after 5 days of bGH administration in fasting rats. These findings suggest that GHR and GHBP mRNAs in the liver are expressed in a different way and that the expression of GHBP mRNA is regulated differently between tissues, at least in rats. The results also suggest that refractoriness to GH in a sustained fasting state might be beneficial in preventing anabolic effects of GH. In humans, GHR mRNA in lymphocytes, from subjects with either GH-deficiency or acromegaly, could be detected by the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction method. In one patient with partial GH insensitivity, a heterozygous missense mutation (P561T) was identified in the cytoplasmic domain of GHR. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Multiple antigen peptide dendrimer elicits antibodies for detecting rat and mouse growth hormone binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Roberto M.; Talamantes, Frank J.; Bustamante, Juan J.; Muñoz, Jesus; Treviño, Lisa R.; Martinez, Andrew O.; Haro, Luis S.

    2009-01-01

    The membrane-bound rat growth hormone receptor (GH-R) and an alternatively spliced isoform, the soluble rat GH binding protein (GH-BP), are comprised of identical N-terminal GH binding domains, however, their C-terminal sequences differ. Immunological reagents are needed to distinguish between the two isoforms in order to understand their respective roles in mediating the actions of GH. Accordingly, a tetravalent multiple antigen peptide (MAP) dendrimer with four identical branches of a C-terminal peptide sequence of the rat GH-BP (GH-BP263-279) was synthesized and used as an immunogen in rabbits. Solid-phase peptide synthesis of four GH-BP263-279 segments onto a tetravalent Lys2-Lys-β-Ala-OH core peptide was carried out using N-(9-fluorenyl)methoxycarbonyl chemistry. The mass of the RP-HPLC purified synthetic product, 8398 Da, determined by ESI-MS, was identical to expected mass. Three anti-rat GH-BP263-279 MAP antisera, BETO-8039, BETO-8040 and BETO-8041, at dilutions of 10-3, recognized both the rat GH-BP263-279 MAP and recombinant mouse GH-BP with ED50s within a range of 5-10 fmol but did not cross-react with BSA in dot blot analyses. BETO-8041 antisera (10-3 dilution) recognized GH-BPs of rat serum and liver having Mrs ranging from 35-130 kDa but did not recognize full-length rat GH-Rs. The antisera also detected recombinant mouse GH-BPs. In summary, the tetravalent rat GH-BP263-279 MAP dendrimer served as an effective immunogenic antigen in eliciting high titer antisera specific for the C-termini of both rat and mouse GH-BPs. The antisera will facilitate studies aimed at improving our understanding of the biology of GH-BPs. PMID:19089805

  16. Growth hormone augments superoxide anion secretion of human neutrophils by binding to the prolactin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Y K; Arkins, S; Fuh, G; Cunningham, B C; Wells, J A; Fong, S; Cronin, M J; Dantzer, R; Kelley, K W

    1992-01-01

    Recombinant human growth hormone (HuGH) and human prolactin (HuPRL), but not GH of bovine or porcine origin, prime human neutrophils for enhanced superoxide anion (O2-) secretion. Since HuGH, but not GH of other species, effectively binds to the HuPRL receptor (HuPRL-R), we used a group of HuGH variants created by site-directed mutagenesis to identify the receptor on human neutrophils responsible for HuGH priming. A monoclonal antibody (MAb) directed against the HuPRL-R completely abrogated O2- secretion by neutrophils incubated with either HuGH or HuPRL, whereas a MAb to the HuGH-R had no effect. The HuGH variant K172A/F176A, which has reduced affinity for both the HuGH-binding protein (BP) and the HuPRL-BP, was unable to prime human neutrophils. This indicates that priming is initiated by a ligand-receptor interaction, the affinity of which is near that defined for receptors for PRL and GH. Another HuGH variant, K168A/E174A, which has relatively low affinity for the HuPRL-BP but slightly increased affinity for the HuGH-BP, had much reduced ability to prime neutrophils. In contrast, HuGH variant E56D/R64M, which has a similar affinity as wild-type HuGH for the HuPRL-BP but a lower affinity for the HuGH-BP, primed neutrophils as effectively as the wild-type HuGH. Finally, binding of HuGH to the HuPRL-BP but not to the HuGH-BP has been shown to be zinc dependent, and priming of neutrophils by HuGH was also responsive to zinc. Collectively, these data directly couple the binding of HuGH to the HuPRL-R with one aspect of functional activation of human target cells. Images PMID:1310696

  17. Resistance to juvenile hormone and an insect growth regulator in Drosophila is associated with an altered cytosolic juvenile hormone-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shemshedini, L.; Wilson, T.G. )

    1990-03-01

    The Met mutant of Drosophila melanogaster is highly resistant to juvenile hormone III (JH III) or its chemical analog, methoprene, an insect growth regulator. Five major mechanisms of insecticide resistance were examined in Met and susceptible Met{sup +} flies. These two strains showed only minor differences when penetration, excretion, tissue sequestration, or metabolism of ({sup 3}H)JH III was measured. In contrast, when we examined JH III binding by a cytosolic binding protein from a JH target tissue, Met strains had a 10-fold lower binding affinity than did Met{sup +} strains. Studies using deficiency-bearing chromosomes provide strong evidence that the Met locus controls the binding protein characteristics and may encode the protein. These studies indicate that resistance in Met flies results from reduced binding affinity of a cytosolic binding protein for JH III.

  18. Growth hormone deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... dosage of the medicine. Serious side effects of growth hormone treatment are rare. Common side effects include: Headache Fluid ... years. The rate of growth then slowly decreases. Growth hormone therapy does not work for all children. Left untreated, ...

  19. Influence of Mg2+ on detection of somatogenic and lactogenic components of growth-hormone-binding protein in mammalian sera.

    PubMed Central

    Amit, T; Hochberg, Z; Barkey, R J

    1993-01-01

    We recently classified the growth-hormone (GH)-binding protein (GH-BP) in a wide range of mammalian [including human (h)] sera and reported the existence of a major lactogenic component in GH-BP of type-III sera (rabbit, horse, dog, pig and cat), based on the capacity of bovine (b) and ovine prolactin (PRL) to displace 125I-labelled human growth hormone (hGH) binding and on direct 125I-bPRL binding studies. In this study, we demonstrate the high degree of Mg2+ dependence of the binding of the classically lactogenic hGH and bPRL, but not that of the somatogenic bGH to various mammalian sera (types I-IV). Serum GH-BP was assayed using a previously described and validated charcoal-separation assay. 125I-hGH binding to rat, ovine, bovine, rabbit, horse, dog and human sera was enhanced 1.5-2.5-fold in the presence of 70 mM Mg2+. The Mg2+ effect was concentration-dependent between 3.7 mM and 70 mM, causing a significant and proportional increase in 125I-hGH binding to serum. Like 125I-hGH, 125I-bPRL binding to type-III sera was also Mg(2+)-dependent. In contrast, 125I-bGH binding to all types of serum GH-BP was not affected by Mg2+ concentrations of up to 35 mM, while 70 mM Mg2+ slightly, but significantly, reduced (by approx. 15%) bGH binding to rabbit serum. In keeping with the Mg(2+)-dependent stimulation of lactogenic hormone binding to GH-BP, 70 mM Mg2+ caused a shift to the left in the displacement curves of hGH and bPRL competing with 125I-hGH binding to rabbit, dog, horse and human sera, while the effects of the somatogens bGH and rabbit GH were shifted to the right. Scatchard analysis of hGH displacement curves with sera from various species yielded linear plots and revealed that Mg2+ significantly increased (2.3-3.0-fold) the affinity constants, but not the binding capacities. These results demonstrate the ability of changes in Mg2+ concentration to determine the degree of differential recognition of somatogens versus lactogens by serum GH-BP. It remains to be

  20. Nutritional status and growth hormone regulate insulin-like growth factor binding protein (igfbp) transcripts in Mozambique tilapia.

    PubMed

    Breves, Jason P; Tipsmark, Christian K; Stough, Beth A; Seale, Andre P; Flack, Brenda R; Moorman, Benjamin P; Lerner, Darren T; Grau, E Gordon

    2014-10-01

    Growth in teleosts is controlled in large part by the activities of the growth hormone (Gh)/insulin-like growth factor (Igf) system. In this study, we initially identified igf-binding protein (bp)1b, -2b, -4, -5a and -6b transcripts in a tilapia EST library. In Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus), tissue expression profiling of igfbps revealed that igfbp1b and -2b had the highest levels of expression in liver while igfbp4, -5a and -6b were expressed at comparable levels in most other tissues. We compared changes in hepatic igfbp1b, -2b and -5a expression during catabolic conditions (28days of fasting) along with key components of the Gh/Igf system, including plasma Gh and Igf1 and hepatic gh receptor (ghr2), igf1 and igf2 expression. In parallel with elevated plasma Gh and decreased Igf1 levels, we found that hepatic igfbp1b increased substantially in fasted animals. We then tested whether systemic Gh could direct the expression of igfbps in liver. A single intraperitoneal injection of ovine Gh into hypophysectomized tilapia specifically stimulated liver igfbp2b expression along with plasma Igf1 and hepatic ghr2 levels. Our collective data suggest that hepatic endocrine signaling during fasting may involve post-translational regulation of plasma Igf1 via a shift towards the expression of igfbp1b. Thus, Igfbp1b may operate as a molecular switch to restrict Igf1 signaling in tilapia; furthermore, we provide new details regarding isoform-specific regulation of igfbp expression by Gh.

  1. Nutritional status and growth hormone regulate insulin-like growth factor binding protein (igfbp) transcripts in Mozambique tilapia

    PubMed Central

    Breves, Jason P.; Tipsmark, Christian K.; Stough, Beth A.; Seale, Andre P.; Flack, Brenda R.; Moorman, Benjamin P.; Lerner, Darren T.; Grau, E. Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Growth in teleosts is controlled in large part by the activities of the growth hormone (Gh)/insulin-like growth factor (Igf) system. In this study, we initially identified igf-binding protein (bp)1b, -2b, -4, -5a and -6b transcripts in a tilapia EST library. In Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus), tissue expression profiling of igfbps revealed that igfbp1b and -2b had the highest levels of expression in liver while igfbp4, -5a and -6b were expressed at comparable levels in most other tissues. We compared changes in hepatic igfbp1b, -2b and -5a expression during catabolic conditions (28 days of fasting) along with key components of the Gh/Igf system, including plasma Gh and Igf1 and hepatic gh receptor (ghr2), igf1 and igf2 expression. In parallel with elevated plasma Gh and decreased Igf1 levels, we found that hepatic igfbp1b increased substantially in fasted animals. We then tested whether systemic Gh could direct the expression of igfbps in liver. A single intraperitoneal injection of ovine Gh into hypophysectomized tilapia specifically stimulated liver igfbp2b expression along with plasma Igf1 and hepatic ghr2 levels. Our collective data suggest that hepatic endocrine signaling during fasting may involve post-translational regulation of plasma Igf1 via a shift towards the expression of igfbp1b. Thus, Igfbp1b may operate as a molecular switch to restrict Igf1 signaling in tilapia; furthermore, we provide new details regarding isoform-specific regulation of igfbp expression by Gh. PMID:24818968

  2. [Growth hormone treatment update].

    PubMed

    2014-02-01

    Short stature in children is a common cause for referral to pediatric endocrinologists, corresponding most times to normal variants of growth. Initially growth hormone therapy was circumscribed to children presenting growth hormone deficiency. Since the production of recombinant human hormone its use had spread to other pathologies.

  3. Dermatophyte-hormone relationships: characterization of progesterone-binding specificity and growth inhibition in the genera Trichophyton and Microsporum.

    PubMed Central

    Clemons, K V; Schär, G; Stover, E P; Feldman, D; Stevens, D A

    1988-01-01

    We reported previously that Trichophyton mentagrophytes contains a cytoplasmic macromolecule which specifically binds progesterone. Progesterone is also an effective inhibitor of growth of the fungus. We report here studies which characterize more fully the specific binding properties and the functional responses of T. mentagrophytes and taxonomically related fungi to a series of mammalian steroid hormones. Scatchard analysis of [3H]progesterone binding in both the + and - mating types of Arthroderma benhamiae and in Microsporum canis revealed a single class of binding sites with approximately the same affinity as that in T. mentagrophytes (Kd, 1 X 10(-7) to 2 X 10(-7) M). Trichophyton rubrum had a protein with a higher binding affinity (Kd, 1.6 X 10(-8) M). Characterization of the [3H]progesterone-binding sites in T. mentagrophytes showed the binder to be a protein which was destroyed by trypsin and heating to 56 degrees C. Previous examination of the steroid-binding specificity in T. mentagrophytes had demonstrated that deoxycorticosterone (DOC) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) were effective competitors for [3H]progesterone binding. Expansion of this study to include other competitors revealed that R5020 (a synthetic progestin), androstenedione, and dehydroepiandosterone possessed relative binding affinities which were 20, 11, and 9% of that of progesterone, respectively. Other ligands tested were less effective. Competition studies for the binder in M. canis resulted in similar findings: DOC and DHT were effective competitors for [3H]progesterone binding. The growth of A. benhamiae + and -, M. canis, and T. rubrum were all inhibited by progesterone in a dose-responsive manner, with 50% inhibition achieved at concentrations of 9.8 x 10(-6), 1.2 x 10(-5), 1.5 x 10(-5), and 2.7 x 10(-6) M. respectively,. PMID:3182998

  4. Presence of growth hormone-binding proteins in cattle plasma and milk.

    PubMed

    Devolder, A; Renaville, R; Sneyers, M; Callebaut, I; Massart, S; Goffinet, A; Burny, A; Portetelle, D

    1993-07-01

    The presence of GH-binding proteins (GHBPs) in the plasma of adult cattle was investigated using Sephadex G-200 filtration, Western ligand blotting and Western blotting. The changes in the concentration of GHBP in the plasma of dairy half-sister heifers during the first year of life as well as the presence of GHBP in milk were also investigated. When analytical chromatography (on a 1.6 x 100 cm column) was performed, five peaks of recombinant bovine GH (rbGH)-associated radioactivity were revealed in cattle plasma; the first peak, which appeared near the void volume, was presumed to represent aggregates, the second (M(r) 290 kDa) and the third peaks (M(r) 75 kDa) corresponded to specific rbGH-GHBP complexes; the last two peaks representing free 125I-labelled rbGH and Na[125I]. Western ligand blotting revealed multiple GHBPs. Three major bands were observed at approximately 190, 58 and 31 kDa; an excess of unlabelled hormone blocked the binding of 125I-labelled rbGH. Minor non-specific binding bands were also detected in cattle plasma with molecular weights between 40 and 136 kDa. One monoclonal antibody (8H7) produced against synthetic peptide (amino acids 54-63 of the extracellular domain of the bovine GH receptor) specifically interacted with 190 and 58 kDa bands while the 31 kDa band was not recognized. Finally, Western ligand blots were performed to evaluate the changes in plasma GHBP during the first year of life in 55 dairy half-sister heifers and to identify GHBP in milk. In plasma, the intensity of the 31 kDa band varied greatly between animals while the other specific bands remained stable.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Merlin inhibits growth hormone-regulated Raf-ERKs pathways by binding to Grb2 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Jung Yeon; Kim, Hongtae; Jeun, Sin-Soo . E-mail: ssjeun@catholic.ac.kr; Kang, Seok-Gu; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2006-02-24

    Numerous studies have suggested that the NF2 protein merlin is involved in the regulation of abnormal cell growth and proliferation. In this study, to better understand the merlin's mechanisms that contribute to the inhibition of tumorigenesis, we examined the potential action of merlin on the cell proliferative signaling pathways in response to growth hormone (GH). Merlin effectively attenuated the GH-induced serum response element (SRE) and Elk-1-mediated transcriptional activation, as well as the endogenous SRE-regulated gene c-fos expression in NIH3T3 cells. In addition, merlin prevented the Raf-1 complex activation process, which resulted in the suppression of MAP kinase/ERK, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERKs), and Elk-1 phosphorylation, which are the downstream signals of Raf-1. Moreover, it was shown that merlin interacted with endogenous growth factor receptor bound 2 (Grb2) protein and inhibited its expression. These results suggest that merlin contributes, via its protein-to-protein interaction with Grb2 and consequent inhibition of the MAPK pathways, to the regulation of the abnormal cell proliferation, and this provides a further mechanism underlying the tumor suppressor function of merlin.

  6. Growth hormone suppression of apoptosis in preovulatory rat follicles and partial neutralization by insulin-like growth factor binding protein.

    PubMed

    Eisenhauer, K M; Chun, S Y; Billig, H; Hsueh, A J

    1995-07-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that growth hormone (GH) plays a role in regulating ovarian function by augmenting gonadotropin stimulation of granulosa cell differentiation and folliculogenesis. The majority of follicles in the mammalian ovary do not ovulate, but instead undergo a degenerative process (atresia) involving apoptotic cell death. The objective of the present study was to investigate the role of GH in regulating follicle apoptosis and to determine whether or not insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) mediates GH action in this process. Preovulatory follicles obtained from eCG-primed rats were cultured for 24 h in serum-free conditions with or without hormone treatments. After culture, follicular apoptotic DNA fragmentation was analyzed by autoradiography of size-fractionated DNA labeled at 3' ends with [32P]dideoxy-ATP. Culture of preovulatory follicles resulted in a spontaneous onset of apoptotic DNA fragmentation that was suppressed by ovine GH (oGH) in a dose-dependent manner, reaching a maximum of 65% suppression. To rule out the effect of residual gonadotropin in the oGH preparation, follicles were also cultured with recombinant bovine growth hormone (rbGH). Like oGH, rbGH suppressed apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Our earlier study indicated that hCG and FSH treatment also suppress apoptosis in the present model system, but no additive effect of GH and either hCG or FSH on the suppression of apoptosis was observed. To determine whether the observed effect of GH action on follicle apoptosis is mediated by IGF-I, three types of studies were carried out.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Growth hormone and growth?

    PubMed

    Harvey, Steve

    2013-09-01

    Pituitary GH is obligatory for normal growth in mammals, but the importance of pituitary GH in avian growth is less certain. In birds, pituitary GH is biologically active and has growth promoting actions in the tibia-test bioassay. Its importance in normal growth is indicated by the growth suppression following the surgical removal of the pituitary gland or after the immunoneutralization of endogenous pituitary GH. The partial restoration of growth in some studies with GH-treated hypophysectomized birds also suggests GH dependency in avian growth, as does the dwarfism that occurs in some strains with GHR dysfunctions. Circulating GH concentrations are also correlated with body weight gain, being high in young, rapidly growing birds and low in slower growing older birds. Nevertheless, despite these observations, there is an extensive literature that concludes pituitary GH is not important in avian growth. This is based on numerous studies with hypophysectomized and intact birds that show only slight, transitory or absent growth responses to exogenous GH-treatment. Moreover, while circulating GH levels correlate with weight gain in young birds, this may merely reflect changes in the control of pituitary GH secretion during aging, as numerous studies involving experimental alterations in growth rate fail to show positive correlations between plasma GH concentrations and the alterations in growth rate. Furthermore, growth is known to occur in the absence of pituitary GH, as most embryonic development occurs prior to the ontogenetic appearance of pituitary somatotrophs and the appearance of GH in embryonic circulation. Early embryonic growth is also independent of the endocrine actions of pituitary GH, since removal of the presumptive pituitary gland does not impair early growth. Embryonic growth does, however, occur in the presence of extrapituitary GH, which is produced by most tissues and has autocrine or paracrine roles that locally promote growth and development

  8. Growth hormone test

    MedlinePlus

    ... under the skin) Infection (a slight risk any time the skin is broken) Alternative Names GH test Images Growth hormone stimulation test - series References Ali O. Hyperpituitarism, tall stature, and overgrowth ...

  9. [Growth hormone signaling pathways].

    PubMed

    Zych, Sławomir; Szatkowska, Iwona; Czerniawska-Piatkowska, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    The substantial improvement in the studies on a very complicated mechanism-- growth hormone signaling in a cell, has been noted in last decade. GH-induced signaling is characterized by activation of several pathways, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), the signal transducer and activator of transcription and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3) pathways. This review shows a current model of the growth hormone receptor dimerization, rotation of subunits and JAK2 kinase activation as the initial steps in the cascade of events. In the next stages of the signaling process, the GH-(GHR)2-(JAK2)2 complex may activate signaling molecules such as Stat, IRS-1 and IRS-2, and particularly all cascade proteins that activate MAP kinase. These pathways regulate basal cellular functions including target gene transcription, enzymatic activity and metabolite transport. Therefore growth hormone is considered as a major regulator of postnatal growth and metabolism, probably for mammary gland growth and development too.

  10. Growth hormone signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Carter-Su, Christin; Schwartz, Jessica; Argetsinger, Lawrence S

    2016-06-01

    Over 20years ago, our laboratory showed that growth hormone (GH) signals through the GH receptor-associated tyrosine kinase JAK2. We showed that GH binding to its membrane-bound receptor enhances binding of JAK2 to the GHR, activates JAK2, and stimulates tyrosyl phosphorylation of both JAK2 and GHR. The activated JAK2/GHR complex recruits a variety of signaling proteins, thereby initiating multiple signaling pathways and cellular responses. These proteins and pathways include: 1) Stat transcription factors implicated in the expression of multiple genes, including the gene encoding insulin-like growth factor 1; 2) Shc adapter proteins that lead to activation of the grb2-SOS-Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK1,2 pathway; 3) insulin receptor substrate proteins implicated in the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and Akt pathway; 4) signal regulatory protein α, a transmembrane scaffold protein that recruits proteins including the tyrosine phosphatase SHP2; and 5) SH2B1, a scaffold protein that can activate JAK2 and enhance GH regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Our recent work has focused on the function of SH2B1. We have shown that SH2B1β is recruited to and phosphorylated by JAK2 in response to GH. SH2B1 localizes to the plasma membrane, cytoplasm and focal adhesions; it also cycles through the nucleus. SH2B1 regulates the actin cytoskeleton and promotes GH-dependent motility of RAW264.7 macrophages. Mutations in SH2B1 have been found in humans exhibiting severe early-onset childhood obesity and insulin resistance. These mutations impair SH2B1 enhancement of GH-induced macrophage motility. As SH2B1 is expressed ubiquitously and is also recruited to a variety of receptor tyrosine kinases, our results raise the possibility that effects of SH2B1 on the actin cytoskeleton in various cell types, including neurons, may play a role in regulating body weight.

  11. Insulin-like growth factor-1, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3, growth hormone, and mammographic density in the Nurses' Health Studies.

    PubMed

    Rice, Megan S; Tworoger, Shelley S; Rosner, Bernard A; Pollak, Michael N; Hankinson, Susan E; Tamimi, Rulla M

    2012-12-01

    Higher circulating insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) levels have been associated with higher mammographic density among women in some, but not all studies. Also, few studies have examined the association between mammographic density and circulating growth hormone (GH) in premenopausal women. We conducted a cross-sectional study among 783 premenopausal women and 436 postmenopausal women who were controls in breast cancer case-control studies nested in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and NHSII. Participants provided blood samples in 1989-1990 (NHS) or in 1996-1999 (NHSII), and mammograms were obtained near the time of blood draw. Generalized linear models were used to assess the associations of IGF-1, IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), IGF-1:IGFBP-3 ratio, and GH with percent mammographic density, total dense area, and total non-dense area. Models were adjusted for potential confounders including age and body mass index (BMI), among others. We also assessed whether the associations varied by age or BMI. In both pre- and postmenopausal women, percent mammographic density was not associated with plasma levels of IGF-1, IGFBP-3, or the IGF-1:IGFBP-3 ratio. In addition, GH was not associated with percent density among premenopausal women in the NHSII. Similarly, total dense area and non-dense area were not significantly associated with any of these analytes. In postmenopausal women, IGF-1 was associated with higher percent mammographic density among women with BMI <25 kg/m(2), but not among overweight/obese women. Overall, plasma IGF-1, IGFBP-3, and GH levels were not associated with mammographic density in a sample of premenopausal and postmenopausal women.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Isolated growth hormone deficiency Educational Resources (10 links) Boston Children's Hospital CLIMB: Growth Hormone Deficiency Information Sheet (PDF) Disease InfoSearch: Isolated growth hormone deficiency ...

  13. Extrapituitary growth hormone and growth?

    PubMed

    Harvey, Steve; Baudet, Marie-Laure

    2014-09-01

    While growth hormone (GH) is obligatory for postnatal growth, it is not required for a number of growth-without-GH syndromes, such as early embryonic or fetal growth. Instead, these syndromes are thought to be dependent upon local growth factors, rather than pituitary GH. The GH gene is, however, also expressed in many extrapituitary tissues, particularly during early development and extrapituitary GH may be one of the local growth factors responsible for embryonic or fetal growth. Moreover, as the expression of the GH receptor (GHR) gene mirrors that of GH in extrapituitary tissues the actions of GH in early development are likely to be mediated by local autocrine or paracrine mechanisms, especially as extrapituitary GH expression occurs prior to the ontogeny of pituitary somatotrophs or the appearance of GH in the circulation. The extrapituitary expression of pituitary somatotrophs or the appearance of GH in the circulation. The extrapituitary expression of GH in embryos has also been shown to be of functional relevance in a number of species, since the immunoneutralization of endogenous GH or the blockade of GH production is accompanied by growth impairment or cellular apoptosis. The extrapituitary expression of the GH gene also persists in some central and peripheral tissues postnatally, which may reflect its continued functional importance and physiological or pathophysiological significance. The expression and functional relevance of extrapituitary GH, particularly during embryonic growth, is the focus of this brief review.

  14. Hormonal Control of Fetal Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Paul S.; Nicoll, Charles S.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes recent research on hormonal control of fetal growth, presenting data obtained using a new method for studying the area. Effects of endocrine ablations and congenital deficiencies, studies of hormone/receptor levels, in-vitro techniques, hormones implicated in promoting fetal growth, problems with existing methodologies, and growth of…

  15. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-2 levels in pediatric patients with growth hormone deficiency, eating disorders and acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Barrios, V; Buño, M; Pozo, J; Muñoz, M T; Argente, J

    2000-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) is altered in different diseases and might be used as an indication of its severity. The aims of our study were to investigate: (1) the developmental pattern of the serum IGFBP-2 concentration at birth and during childhood and adolescence; (2) whether the serum IGFBP-2 level could be a marker for the diagnosis and evolution of diseases where the growth hormone (GH)-IGF axis is altered, and (3) whether this binding protein shows a relationship with IGF-I, its free fraction, IGFBP-1 and -3. We report reference values for 55 normal full-term newborns and 221 normal children who were divided into 5 groups according to their Tanner stage. Serum levels were higher in newborns when compared with Tanner stages I-V (p < 0.001, ANOVA), with no further changes throughout development. Furthermore, we studied IGFBP-2 levels in 24 children with congenital GH deficiency (GHD), 26 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), 75 obese children, and 60 girls with anorexia nervosa (AN) at diagnosis and during a follow-up period. IGFBP-2 at diagnosis was increased in GHD, ALL and AN, and decreased in obesity (p < 0.05, ANOVA). During the follow-up, IGFBP-2 concentrations tended to normalize. IGFBP-2 correlated positively with IGFBP-1 and negatively with IGF-I and IGFBP-3 in normal subjects and at diagnosis of the pathologies studied. Although IGFBP-2 functions are not well understood, these results suggest a possible role for this protein in diseases where the GH-IGF axis is altered.

  16. Growth hormone stimulation test - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The growth hormone (GH) is a protein hormone released from the anterior pituitary gland under the control of the hypothalamus. ... performed on infants and children to identify human growth hormone (hGH) deficiency as a cause of growth retardation. ...

  17. Enzyme immunoassay for rat growth hormone: applications to the study of growth hormone variants

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, M.A.; Hymer, W.C.

    1987-06-29

    A sensitive and specific competitive enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for rat growth hormone was developed. In this assay soluble growth hormone and growth hormone adsorbed to a solid-phase support compete for monkey anti-growth hormone antibody binding sites. The immobilized antibody-growth hormone complex is detected and quantified using goat anti-monkey immunoglobin G covalently conjugated to horse radish peroxidase. Therefore, a high concentration of soluble growth hormone in the sample will result in low absorbance detection from the colored products of the enzyme reaction. Assay parameters were optimized by investigating the concentration of reagents and the reaction kinetics in each of the assay steps. The assay can be performed in 27 hours. A sensitivity range of 0.19 ng to 25 ng in the region of 10 to 90% binding was obtained. Near 50% binding (3 ng) the intraassay coefficient of variation (CV) was 5.54% and the interassay CV was 5.33%. The correlation coefficient (r/sup 2/) between radioimmunoassay and EIA was 0.956 and followed the curve Y = 0.78X + 1.0. 9 references, 6 figures.

  18. Preparation of /sup 125/I-labeled human growth hormone of high quality binding properties endowed with long-term stability

    SciTech Connect

    Biscayart, P.L.; Paladini, A.C.; Vita, N.; Roguin, L.P.

    1989-01-01

    /sup 125/I-labeled human growth hormone (/sup 125/I-labeled.hGH) was prepared by using two variants of the chloramine T labelling procedure and purified by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) of the reaction mixture. Variant A produced a tracer with high specific activity (100 +/- 10 microCi/microgram), high maximal binding capacity to antibodies (93%) and long-term stability (at least 150 days at -20/degree/C). No diiodinated tyrosil residues could be detected in this tracer. Variant B was devised to obtain higher yields of labeled hormone. The electrophoresis of the iodination mixture revealed two radioactive components with Rm values of 0.49 and 0.55 which result from the iodination of hGH variants preexisting in the starting material. Both tracers had similar specific activities (70 +/- 10 microCi/microgram), high maximal binding capacity to antibodies or receptors (80-100%, after 80 days of their obtention) and high stability (at least 100 days at -20/degree/C). It is concluded that the iododerivatives of hGH obtained by either method are adequate to perform radioimmunoassay and receptor studies and have long-term stability.

  19. New active series of growth hormone secretagogues.

    PubMed

    Guerlavais, Vincent; Boeglin, Damien; Mousseaux, Delphine; Oiry, Catherine; Heitz, Annie; Deghenghi, Romano; Locatelli, Vittorio; Torsello, Antonio; Ghé, Corrado; Catapano, Filomena; Muccioli, Giampiero; Galleyrand, Jean-Claude; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean

    2003-03-27

    New growth hormone secretagogue (GHS) analogues were synthesized and evaluated for growth hormone releasing activity. This series derived from EP-51389 is based on a gem-diamino structure. Compounds that exhibited higher in vivo GH-releasing potency than hexarelin in rat (subcutaneous administration) were then tested per os in beagle dogs and for their binding affinity to human pituitary GHS receptors and to hGHS-R 1a. Compound 7 (JMV 1843, H-Aib-(d)-Trp-(d)-gTrp-formyl) showed high potency in these tests and was selected for clinical studies.(1)

  20. Effect of zinc binding residues in growth hormone (GH) and altered intracellular zinc content on regulated GH secretion.

    PubMed

    Petkovic, Vibor; Miletta, Maria Consolata; Eblé, Andrée; Iliev, Daniel I; Binder, Gerhard; Flück, Christa E; Mullis, Primus E

    2013-11-01

    Endocrine cells store hormones in concentrated forms (aggregates) in dense-core secretory granules that are released upon appropriate stimulation. Zn(2+) binding to GH through amino acid residues His18, His21, and Glu174 are essential for GH dimerization and might mediate its aggregation and storage in secretory granules. To investigate whether GH-1 gene mutations at these positions interfere with this process, GH secretion and intracellular production were analyzed in GC cells (rat pituitary cell line) transiently expressing wt-GH and/or GH Zn mutant (GH-H18A-H21A-E174A) in forskolin-stimulated vs nonstimulated conditions. Reduced secretion of the mutant variant (alone or coexpressed with wt-GH) compared with wt-GH after forskolin stimulation was observed, whereas an increased intracellular accumulation of GH Zn mutant vs wt-GH correlates with its altered extracellular secretion. Depleting Zn(2+) from culture medium using N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylemethyl)ethylenediamine, a high-affinity Zn(2+) chelator, led to a significant reduction of the stimulated wt-GH secretion. Furthermore, externally added Zn(2+) to culture medium increased intracellular free Zn(2+) levels and recovered wt-GH secretion, suggesting its direct dependence on free Zn(2+) levels after forskolin stimulation. Confocal microscopy analysis of the intracellular secretory pathway of wt-GH and GH Zn mutant indicated that both variants pass through the regulated secretory pathway in a similar manner. Taken together, our data support the hypothesis that loss of affinity of GH to Zn(2+) as well as altering intracellular free Zn(2+) content may interfere with normal GH dimerization (aggregation) and storage of the mutant variant (alone or with wt-GH), which could possibly explain impaired GH secretion.

  1. Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fridlyand, Leonid E.; Tamarina, Natalia A.; Schally, Andrew V.; Philipson, Louis H.

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is produced by the hypothalamus and stimulates growth hormone synthesis and release in the anterior pituitary gland. In addition, GHRH is an important regulator of cellular functions in many cells and organs. Expression of GHRH G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GHRHR) has been demonstrated in different peripheral tissues and cell types, including pancreatic islets. Among the peripheral activities, recent studies demonstrate a novel ability of GHRH analogs to increase and preserve insulin secretion by beta-cells in isolated pancreatic islets, which makes them potentially useful for diabetes treatment. This review considers the role of GHRHR in the beta-cell and addresses the unique engineered GHRH agonists and antagonists for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We discuss the similarity of signaling pathways activated by GHRHR in pituitary somatotrophs and in pancreatic beta-cells and possible ways as to how the GHRHR pathway can interact with glucose and other secretagogues to stimulate insulin secretion. We also consider the hypothesis that novel GHRHR agonists can improve glucose metabolism in Type 2 diabetes by preserving the function and survival of pancreatic beta-cells. Wound healing and cardioprotective action with new GHRH agonists suggest that they may prove useful in ameliorating certain diabetic complications. These findings highlight the future potential therapeutic effectiveness of modulators of GHRHR activity for the development of new therapeutic approaches in diabetes and its complications. PMID:27777568

  2. Nuclear factor-I and activator protein-2 bind in a mutually exclusive way to overlapping promoter sequences and trans-activate the human growth hormone gene.

    PubMed Central

    Courtois, S J; Lafontaine, D A; Lemaigre, F P; Durviaux, S M; Rousseau, G G

    1990-01-01

    Transcription of the human growth hormone (hGH) gene and its regulation are controlled by trans-acting factors that bind to hGH gene promoter sequences. Several DNase I footprints have been described within 500 bp of this promoter, one of which (-289 to -267) has not yet been ascribed to a defined factor. By DNase I footprinting, gel mobility shift, and methylation interference assays with extracts from HeLa cells and GH-producing pituitary tumor (GC) cells, we show that this factor belongs to the NF-I family. When NF-I was competed out of the cell extracts, the trans-acting factor AP-2 bound to the same site as NF-I. AP-2 was present not only in HeLa cells, but also in GC cells albeit at a much lower concentration. Consistent with the mutually exclusive binding of NF-I and AP-2, their methylation interference patterns included four guanine residues that were crucial for binding of both NF-I and AP-2. Cell-free transcription from the hGH gene promoter showed that these two factors can transactivate this gene. Images PMID:2308836

  3. Hormonal regulation of fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Gicquel, C; Le Bouc, Y

    2006-01-01

    Fetal growth is a complex process depending on the genetics of the fetus, the availability of nutrients and oxygen to the fetus, maternal nutrition and various growth factors and hormones of maternal, fetal and placental origin. Hormones play a central role in regulating fetal growth and development. They act as maturational and nutritional signals in utero and control tissue development and differentiation according to the prevailing environmental conditions in the fetus. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system, and IGF-I and IGF-II in particular, plays a critical role in fetal and placental growth throughout gestation. Disruption of the IGF1, IGF2 or IGF1R gene retards fetal growth, whereas disruption of IGF2R or overexpression of IGF2 enhances fetal growth. IGF-I stimulates fetal growth when nutrients are available, thereby ensuring that fetal growth is appropriate for the nutrient supply. The production of IGF-I is particularly sensitive to undernutrition. IGF-II plays a key role in placental growth and nutrient transfer. Several key hormone genes involved in embryonic and fetal growth are imprinted. Disruption of this imprinting causes disorders involving growth defects, such as Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, which is associated with fetal overgrowth, or Silver-Russell syndrome, which is associated with intrauterine growth retardation. Optimal fetal growth is essential for perinatal survival and has long-term consequences extending into adulthood. Given the high incidence of intrauterine growth retardation and the high risk of metabolic and cardiovascular complications in later life, further clinical and basic research is needed to develop accurate early diagnosis of aberrant fetal growth and novel therapeutic strategies.

  4. Transcriptional repressor E4-binding protein 4 (E4BP4) regulates metabolic hormone fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) during circadian cycles and feeding.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xin; Muchnik, Marina; Chen, Zheng; Patel, Manish; Wu, Nan; Joshi, Shree; Rui, Liangyou; Lazar, Mitchell A; Yin, Lei

    2010-11-19

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a potent antidiabetic and triglyceride-lowering hormone whose hepatic expression is highly responsive to food intake. FGF21 induction in the adaptive response to fasting has been well studied, but the molecular mechanism responsible for feeding-induced repression remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrate a novel link between FGF21 and a key circadian output protein, E4BP4. Expression of Fgf21 displays a circadian rhythm, which peaks during the fasting phase and is anti-phase to E4bp4, which is elevated during feeding periods. E4BP4 strongly suppresses Fgf21 transcription by binding to a D-box element in the distal promoter region. Depletion of E4BP4 in synchronized Hepa1c1c-7 liver cells augments the amplitude of Fgf21 expression, and overexpression of E4BP4 represses FGF21 secretion from primary mouse hepatocytes. Mimicking feeding effects, insulin significantly increases E4BP4 expression and binding to the Fgf21 promoter through AKT activation. Thus, E4BP4 is a novel insulin-responsive repressor of FGF21 expression during circadian cycles and feeding.

  5. Anabolic steroids and growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Haupt, H A

    1993-01-01

    Athletes are generally well educated regarding substances that they may use as ergogenic aids. This includes anabolic steroids and growth hormone. Fortunately, the abuse of growth hormone is limited by its cost and the fact that anabolic steroids are simply more enticing to the athlete. There are, however, significant potential adverse effects regarding its use that can be best understood by studying known growth hormone excess, as demonstrated in the acromegalic syndrome. Many athletes are unfamiliar with this syndrome and education of the potential consequences of growth hormone excess is important in counseling athletes considering its use. While athletes contemplating the use of anabolic steroids may correctly perceive their risks for significant physiologic effects to be small if they use the steroids for brief periods of time, many of these same athletes are unaware of the potential for habituation to the use of anabolic steroids. The result may be incessant use of steroids by an athlete who previously considered only short-term use. As we see athletes taking anabolic steroids for more prolonged periods, we are likely to see more severe medical consequences. Those who eventually do discontinue the steroids are dismayed to find that the improvements made with the steroids generally disappear and they have little to show for hours or even years of intense training beyond the psychological scars inherent with steroid use. Counseling of these athletes should focus on the potential adverse psychological consequences of anabolic steroid use and the significant risk for habituation.

  6. Interactions Between Genome-wide Significant Genetic Variants and Circulating Concentrations of Insulin-like Growth Factor 1, Sex Hormones, and Binding Proteins in Relation to Prostate Cancer Risk in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Travis, Ruth C.; Appleby, Paul N.; Allen, Naomi E.; Lindstrom, Sara; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Cox, David; Hsing, Ann W.; Ma, Jing; Severi, Gianluca; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Boeing, Heiner; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Johansson, Mattias; Quirós, J. Ramón; Riboli, Elio; Siddiq, Afshan; Tjønneland, Anne; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tumino, Rosario; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giovannucci, Edward; Hunter, David J.; Kraft, Peter; Stampfer, Meir J.; Giles, Graham G.; Andriole, Gerald L.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hayes, Richard B.; Key, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with prostate cancer risk. There is limited information on the mechanistic basis of these associations, particularly about whether they interact with circulating concentrations of growth factors and sex hormones, which may be important in prostate cancer etiology. Using conditional logistic regression, the authors compared per-allele odds ratios for prostate cancer for 39 GWAS-identified SNPs across thirds (tertile groups) of circulating concentrations of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), testosterone, androstenedione, androstanediol glucuronide, estradiol, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) for 3,043 cases and 3,478 controls in the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium. After allowing for multiple testing, none of the SNPs examined were significantly associated with growth factor or hormone concentrations, and the SNP-prostate cancer associations did not differ by these concentrations, although 4 interactions were marginally significant (MSMB-rs10993994 with androstenedione (uncorrected P = 0.008); CTBP2-rs4962416 with IGFBP-3 (uncorrected P = 0.003); 11q13.2-rs12418451 with IGF-1 (uncorrected P = 0.006); and 11q13.2-rs10896449 with SHBG (uncorrected P = 0.005)). The authors found no strong evidence that associations between GWAS-identified SNPs and prostate cancer are modified by circulating concentrations of IGF-1, sex hormones, or their major binding proteins. PMID:22459122

  7. Human Growth Hormone: 45-kDa Isoform with Extraordinarily Stable Interchain Disulfide Links has Attenuated Receptor-Binding and Cell-Proliferative Activities

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Juan J.; Grigorian, Alexei L.; Muñoz, Jesus; Aguilar, Roberto M.; Treviño, Lisa R.; Martinez, Andrew O.; Haro, Luis S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Human growth hormone (hGH) is a complex mixture of molecular isoforms. Gaps in our knowledge exist regarding the structures and biological significances of the uncharacterized hGH molecular variants. Mercaptoethanol-resistant 45-kDa human growth hormone (MER-45kDa hGH) is an extraordinarily stable disulfide-linked hGH homodimer whose biological significance is unknown. Objectives To elucidate the pharmacokinetic abilities of dimeric MER-45-kDa hGH to bind to GH and prolactin (PRL) receptors and to elucidate its abilities to stimulate cell-proliferation in lactogen-induced and somatogen-induced in vitro cell proliferation bioassays. Design The binding of MER-45-kDa hGH to GH and PRL receptors was tested in radioreceptorassays (RRAs). Competitive displacements of [125I]-bovine GH from bovine liver membranes, [125I]-ovine PRL from lactating rabbit mammary gland membranes and [125I]-hGH from human IM-9 lymphocytes by unlabelled GHs, PRLs or dimeric MER-45-kDa hGH were evaluated. The abilities of dimeric MER-45-kDa hGH to stimulate proliferation of lactogen-responsive Nb2 lymphoma cells and to stimulate proliferation of somatogen-responsive T47-D human breast cancer cells was assessed by incubation of cells with GHs or PRLs and subsequently measuring growth using the MTS cell proliferation assay. Results Dimeric MER-45-kDa hGH, compared to monomeric hGH, had reduced binding affinities to both GH and prolactin receptors. In a bovine liver GH radioreceptorassay its ED50 (197.5 pM) was 40.8% that of monomeric hGH. In a human IM-9 lymphocyte hGH RRA its ED50 (2.96 nM) was 26.2% that of monomeric hGH. In a lactating rabbit mammary gland prolactin RRA its ED50 (3.56 nM) was 16.8% that of a monomeric hGH. Dimeric MER-45-kDa hGH, compared to monomeric hGH, had a diminished capacity to stimulate proliferation of cells in vitro. In a dose-response relationship assessing proliferation of Nb2 lymphoma cells its ED50 (191 pM) was 18.0% that of monomeric hGH. While

  8. Dimerization of Human Growth Hormone by Zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Brian C.; Mulkerrin, Michael G.; Wells, James A.

    1991-08-01

    Size-exclusion chromatography and sedimentation equilibrium studies demonstrated that zinc ion (Zn2+) induced the dimerization of human growth hormone (hGH). Scatchard analysis of 65Zn2+ binding to hGH showed that two Zn2+ ions associate per dimer of hGH in a cooperative fashion. Cobalt (II) can substitute for Zn2+ in the hormone dimer and gives a visible spectrum characteristic of cobalt coordinated in a tetrahedral fashion by oxygen- and nitrogen-containing ligands. Replacement of potential Zn2+ ligands (His18, His21, and Glu174) in hGH with alanine weakened both Zn2+ binding and hGH dimer formation. The Zn2+-hGH dimer was more stable than monomeric hGH to denaturation in guanidine-HCl. Formation of a Zn2+-hGH dimeric complex may be important for storage of hGH in secretory granules.

  9. Analytical performance and clinical usefulness of two binding assays for growth hormone binding protein (GHBP) measurement: high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-gel filtration and dextran-coated charcoal adsorption.

    PubMed

    Llopis, M A; Granada, M L; Audí, L; Sanmartí, A; Bel, J; Sánchez-Planell, L; Formiguera, X; Marin, F; Corominas, A

    1997-11-28

    We compared two binding assays for growth hormone binding protein (GHBP) measurements, which differ in the method of bound and free GH separation: HPLC-gel filtration or dextran coated-charcoal adsorption (DCC). Two pools of sera (high and medium GHBP activity) were used for quality-control assessment. Moreover, 62 samples from 34 children and 28 adults with different nutritional status were studied. Total, between- and intra-iodination coefficients of variation (CVs) from the two methods were not different. Although percentage binding measured in the pool sera significantly differed, the concentrations assessed by Scatchard plot were comparable. Results obtained by the two methods in the 62 sera were significantly correlated (r = 0.77, P < 0.001). With both methods GHBP activity correlated with chronological age and body mass index (BMI) and differed among groups with different nutritional status. Although HPLC and DCC separation methods for GHBP measurement differ in their practicability, our study demonstrates that performance and the clinical usefulness of the two methods are comparable.

  10. Reversible Albumin-Binding GH Possesses a Potential Once-Weekly Treatment Profile in Adult Growth Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Janukonyté, Jurgita; Klose, Marianne; Marina, Djordje; Tanvig, Mette; Nielsen, Lene F.; Höybye, Charlotte; Andersen, Marianne; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl

    2016-01-01

    Context: NNC0195-0092 is a reversible, albumin-binding GH derivative, developed for once-weekly administration. Objectives: The objective of the study was to evaluate safety, local tolerability, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacokinetics of multiple, once-weekly doses of NNC0195-0092, compared with daily GH. Design and Setting: This was a phase 1, randomized, open-label, active-controlled, multiple-dose, dose-escalation trial. Patients: Thirty-four GH-treated adult subjects (male, n = 25) with GH deficiency participated in the study. Interventions and Main Outcome Measures: Subjects were sequentially assigned into four cohorts of eight subjects, randomized within each cohort (3:1) to once-weekly NNC0195-0092 (n = 6) for 4 weeks (0.02, 0.04, 0.08, and 0.12 mg/kg) or daily injections of Norditropin NordiFlex (n = 2) for 4 weeks with a dose replicating the pretrial dose of somatropin. A safety assessment was performed prior to initiating treatment at the next dose level of NNC0195-0092. Daily GH treatment was discontinued 14 days before the trial start. Blood samples were drawn for assessment of safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics (IGF-1 and IGF-binding protein-3) profiles, and immunogenicity studies. Results: Numbers of adverse events were similar at the dose levels of 0.02, 0.04, and 0.08 mg/kg NNC0195-0092 vs daily injections of Norditropin NordiFlex, whereas the number of adverse events was greater at the highest dose level of NNC0195-0092 (0.12 mg/kg). NNC0195-0092 (area under the curve[0–168h]) and peak plasma concentration) increased in a dose-dependent manner, and a dose-dependent increase in IGF-1 levels was observed. IGF-1 profiles were elevated for at least 1 week, and for the 0.02-mg/kg and 0.04-mg/kg NNC0195-0092 doses, the observed IGF-1 levels were similar to the levels for the active control group. Conclusion: Four once-weekly doses of NNC0195-0092 (dose range 0.02–0.12 mg/kg) administered to adult patients with GH deficiency were well tolerated

  11. A Simulated Growth Hormone Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Mary

    1996-08-01

    Growth hormone is a drug that is sometimes abused by amateur or professional athletes for performance-enhancement. This laboratory is a semimicroscale simulation analysis of a sample of "urine" to detect proteins of two very different molecular weights. Gel filtration uses a 10 mL disposable pipette packed with Sephadex. Students analyze the fractions from the filtration by comparing colors of the Brilliant Blue Coomassie Dye as it interacts with the proteins in the sample to a standard set of known concentration of protein with the dye. The simulated analysis of growth hormone is intended to be included in a unit on organic chemistry or in the second year of high school chemistry.

  12. Parathyroid hormone linked to a collagen binding domain promotes hair growth in a mouse model of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in a dose-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Katikaneni, Ranjitha; Ponnapakkam, Tulasi; Seymour, Andrew; Sakon, Joshua; Gensure, Robert

    2014-08-01

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is a major source of psychological stress in patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy, and it can influence treatment decisions. Although there is currently no therapy for alopecia, a fusion protein of parathyroid hormone and collagen binding domain (PTH-CBD) has shown promise in animal models. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are dose-dependent effects of PTH-CBD on chemotherapy-induced alopecia in a mouse model. C57BL/6J mice were waxed to synchronize hair follicles; treated on day 7 with vehicle or PTH-CBD (100, 320, and 1000 mcg/kg subcutaneous injection); and treated on day 9 with vehicle or cyclophosphamide (150 mg/kg intraperitoneally). Mice were photographed every 3-4 days and killed on day 63 for histological analysis. Photographs were quantified by gray scale analysis to assess hair content. Mice not receiving chemotherapy showed regrowth of hair 2 weeks after waxing and normal histology after 2 months. Mice receiving chemotherapy alone showed marked hair loss after chemotherapy, which was sustained for 10 days and was followed by rapid regrowth of a normal coat. Histological analysis revealed rapid cycling dystrophic anagen/catagen follicles. Animals receiving chemotherapy and PTH-CBD showed decreased hair loss and more rapid regrowth of hair than that seen with chemotherapy alone (increased hair growth by gray scale analysis, P<0.05), and the effects were dose dependent. Histologically, hair follicles in animals receiving the highest dose of PTH-CBD were in a quiescent phase, similar to that in mice that did not receive chemotherapy. Single-dose subcutaneous administration of PTH-CBD showed dose-dependent effects in minimizing hair loss and speeding up recovery from chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

  13. Growth and growth hormone: An overview.

    PubMed

    Teran, Enrique; Chesner, Jaclyn; Rapaport, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Growth is a good indicator of a child's health. Growth disturbances, including short stature or growth failure, could be indications of illnesses such as chronic disease, nutritional deficits, celiac disease or hormonal abnormalities. Therefore, a careful assessment of the various requirements for normal growth needs to be done by history, physical examination, and screening laboratory tests. More details will be reviewed about the GH-IGF axis, its abnormalities with special emphasis on GH deficiency, its diagnosis and treatment. GH treatment indications in the US will be reviewed and a few only will be highlighted. They will include GH deficiency, as well as the treatment of children born SGA, including the results of a US study using FDA approved dose of 0.48mg/kg/week. GH deficiency in adults will also be briefly reviewed. Treatment of patients with SHOX deficiency will also be discussed. Possible side effects of GH treatment and the importance of monitoring safety will be highlighted.

  14. An enzyme immunoassay for rat growth hormone - Applications to the study of growth hormone variants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrington, Marianne A.; Hymer, W. C.

    1987-01-01

    A sensitive and specific competitive enzyme immunoassay for rat growth hormone (GH) is described and its use in the detection of GH variants is demonstrated. In the present assay, soluble GH and GH adsorbed to a solid-phase support compete for monkey anti-GH antibody binding sites. The immobilized antibody-GH complex is detected and quantified using goat antimonkey immunoglobin G covalently conjugated to horseradish peroxidase. It is noted that the assay can be performed in 27 hours and that sensitivities in the range of 0.19 to 25 ng can be obtained in the region of 10 to 90 percent binding.

  15. Growth Hormone and Craniofacial Tissues. An update

    PubMed Central

    Litsas, George

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone is an important regulator of bone homeostasis. In childhood, it determines the longitudinal bone growth, skeletal maturation, and acquisition of bone mass. In adulthood, it is necessary to maintain bone mass throughout life. Although an association between craniofacial and somatic development has been clearly established, craniofacial growth involves complex interactions of genes, hormones and environment. Moreover, as an anabolic hormone seems to have an important role in the regulation of bone remodeling, muscle enhancement and tooth development. In this paper the influence of growth hormone on oral tissues is reviewed. PMID:25674165

  16. Expression of growth hormone and growth hormone receptor in fibroadenomas of the breast.

    PubMed

    Lenicek, Tanja; Kasumović, Dino; Stajduhar, Emil; Dzombeta, Tihana; Jukić, Zoran; Kruslin, Bozo

    2013-06-01

    Fibroadenoma is the most prevalent benign breast tumor. It consists of epithelial and stromal components. In general, breast tumors are highly hormonally dependent and growth hormone by its physiology may have a possible oncogenic potential. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the expression of growth hormone and growth hormone receptor in epithelial and stromal components of fibroadenomas. Study group included 30 randomly chosen fibroadenomas from female patients aged between 18 and 69 years. The expression of growth hormone and growth hormone receptor was defined in both histologic components of fibroadenomas. Growth hormone was expressed in 96.7% of both epithelial and stromal components of fibroadenomas, with stronger expression in the stromal component. The same percentage of positive reaction (96.7%) was obtained in the epithelial component of fibroadenomas for growth hormone receptor expression. Only 6.7% of stromal components tested for growth hormone receptor were positive. The high expression of growth hormone and growth hormone receptor in fibroadenoma tissue indicates their possible role in the pathogenesis of this tumor. Follow up of patients with high expression of growth hormone and growth hormone receptor may be suggested.

  17. [Plant hormones, plant growth regulators].

    PubMed

    Végvári, György; Vidéki, Edina

    2014-06-29

    Plants seem to be rather defenceless, they are unable to do motion, have no nervous system or immune system unlike animals. Besides this, plants do have hormones, though these substances are produced not in glands. In view of their complexity they lagged behind animals, however, plant organisms show large scale integration in their structure and function. In higher plants, such as in animals, the intercellular communication is fulfilled through chemical messengers. These specific compounds in plants are called phytohormones, or in a wide sense, bioregulators. Even a small quantity of these endogenous organic compounds are able to regulate the operation, growth and development of higher plants, and keep the connection between cells, tissues and synergy between organs. Since they do not have nervous and immume systems, phytohormones play essential role in plants' life.

  18. Growth hormone and physical performance.

    PubMed

    Birzniece, Vita; Nelson, Anne E; Ho, Ken K Y

    2011-05-01

    There has been limited research and evidence that GH enhances physical performance in healthy adults or in trained athletes. Even so, human growth hormone (GH) is widely abused by athletes. In healthy adults, GH increases lean body mass, although it is possible that fluid retention contributes to this effect. The most recent data indicate that GH does not enhance muscle strength, power, or aerobic exercise capacity, but improves anaerobic exercise capacity. In fact, there are adverse effects of long-term GH excess such that sustained abuse of GH can lead to a state mimicking acromegaly, a condition with increased morbidity and mortality. This review will examine GH effects on body composition and physical performance in health and disease.

  19. Neuroprotective Actions of Ghrelin and Growth Hormone Secretagogues

    PubMed Central

    Frago, Laura M.; Baquedano, Eva; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    The brain incorporates and coordinates information based on the hormonal environment, receiving information from peripheral tissues through the circulation. Although it was initially thought that hormones only acted on the hypothalamus to perform endocrine functions, it is now known that they in fact exert diverse actions on many different brain regions including the hypothalamus. Ghrelin is a gastric hormone that stimulates growth hormone secretion and food intake to regulate energy homeostasis and body weight by binding to its receptor, growth hormone secretagogues–GH secretagogue-receptor, which is most highly expressed in the pituitary and hypothalamus. In addition, ghrelin has effects on learning and memory, reward and motivation, anxiety, and depression, and could be a potential therapeutic agent in neurodegenerative disorders where excitotoxic neuronal cell death and inflammatory processes are involved. PMID:21994488

  20. Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... y Cuidadores Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types ... Clinical Trials Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types ...

  1. [Hormones and hair growth in man].

    PubMed

    Moretti, G; Rampini, E; Rebora, A

    1977-12-01

    A literature review tries to diminish the ambiguity between hormones and hairs. Therefore the hormonal action in general (regulation of the protein synthesis indirectly by enzymatical regulation of the AMP-system or directly by hormones as active metabolites) and the methods to explore hormones-hair-interaction are discussed. Hormones pertaining to the pituitary-adrenal-gonadal axis are regarded as the paramount hormones; therefore the results of research in testosterone, 5-alpha-dihydrotestosterone, estrogens, progesterone, glucocorticoids, the hypophysis and its tropins are recapitulated. The main disorders of hair-growth, pattern baldness and "idiopathic" hirsutism, which would be dependent on a similar disturbance of androgen metabolism, are discussed. Pathology in hair-growth may arise in any point of the cascade of hormone action.

  2. Thyroid hormone and the growth plate.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yvonne Y; Wang, Lai; Ballock, R Tracy

    2006-12-01

    Thyroid hormone was first identified as a potent regulator of skeletal maturation at the growth plate more than forty years ago. Since that time, many in vitro and in vivo studies have confirmed that thyroid hormone regulates the critical transition between cell proliferation and terminal differentiation in the growth plate, specifically the maturation of growth plate chondrocytes into hypertrophic cells. However these studies have neither identified the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of skeletal maturation by thyroid hormone, nor demonstrated how the systemic actions of thyroid hormone interface with the local regulatory milieu of the growth plate. This article will review our current understanding of the role of thyroid hormone in regulating the process of endochondral ossification at the growth plate, as well as what is currently known about the molecular mechanisms involved in this regulation.

  3. Sex steroids and growth hormone interactions.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, Leandro; de Mirecki-Garrido, Mercedes; Guerra, Borja; Díaz, Mario; Díaz-Chico, Juan Carlos

    2016-04-01

    GH and sex hormones are critical regulators of body growth and composition, somatic development, intermediate metabolism, and sexual dimorphism. Deficiencies in GH- or sex hormone-dependent signaling and the influence of sex hormones on GH biology may have a dramatic impact on liver physiology during somatic development and in adulthood. Effects of sex hormones on the liver may be direct, through hepatic receptors, or indirect by modulating endocrine, metabolic, and gender-differentiated functions of GH. Sex hormones can modulate GH actions by acting centrally, regulating pituitary GH secretion, and peripherally, by modulating GH signaling pathways. The endocrine and/or metabolic consequences of long-term exposure to sex hormone-related compounds and their influence on the GH-liver axis are largely unknown. A better understanding of these interactions in physiological and pathological states will contribute to preserve health and to improve clinical management of patients with growth, developmental, and metabolic disorders.

  4. Recombinant Bovine Growth Hormone Criticism Grows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaard, Greta

    1995-01-01

    Discusses concerns related to the use of recombinant bovine growth hormone in the United States and other countries. Analyses the issue from the perspectives of animal rights, human health, world hunger, concerns of small and organic farmers, costs to the taxpayer, and environmental questions. A sidebar discusses Canadian review of the hormone.…

  5. Growth hormone replacement therapy in Costello syndrome.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllou, Panagiota; Christoforidis, Athanasios; Vargiami, Euthymia; Zafeiriou, Dimitrios I

    2014-12-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) is considered an overgrowth disorder given the macrosomia that is present at birth .However, shortly after birth the weight drops dramatically and the patients are usually referred for failure to thrive. Subsequently, affected patients develop the distinctive coarse facial appearance and are at risk for cardiac anomalies and solid tumor malignancies. Various endocrine disorders, although not very often, have been reported in patients with CS, including growth hormone deficiency, hypoglycemia, ACTH deficiency, cryptorchidism and hypothyroidism. We report a case of Costello syndrome with hypothyroidism, cryptorchidism and growth hormone deficiency and we evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of growth hormone replacement therapy. The index patient is a paradigm of successful and safe treatment with growth hormone for almost 7 years. Since patients with CS are at increased risk for cardiac myopathy and tumor development they deserve close monitoring during treatment.

  6. 21 CFR 862.1370 - Human growth hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Human growth hormone test system. 862.1370 Section... Systems § 862.1370 Human growth hormone test system. (a) Identification. A human growth hormone test system is a device intended to measure the levels of human growth hormone in plasma. Human growth...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1370 - Human growth hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Human growth hormone test system. 862.1370 Section... Systems § 862.1370 Human growth hormone test system. (a) Identification. A human growth hormone test system is a device intended to measure the levels of human growth hormone in plasma. Human growth...

  8. Hormone symphony during root growth and development.

    PubMed

    Garay-Arroyo, Adriana; De La Paz Sánchez, María; García-Ponce, Berenice; Azpeitia, Eugenio; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R

    2012-12-01

    Hormones regulate plant growth and development in response to external environmental stimuli via complex signal transduction pathways, which in turn form complex networks of interaction. Several classes of hormones have been reported, and their activity depends on their biosynthesis, transport, conjugation, accumulation in the vacuole, and degradation. However, the activity of a given hormone is also dependent on its interaction with other hormones. Indeed, there is a complex crosstalk between hormones that regulates their biosynthesis, transport, and/or signaling functionality, although some hormones have overlapping or opposite functions. The plant root is a particularly useful system in which to study the complex role of plant hormones in the plastic control of plant development. Physiological, cellular, and molecular genetic approaches have been used to study the role of plant hormones in root meristem homeostasis. In this review, we discuss recent findings on the synthesis, signaling, transport of hormones and role during root development and examine the role of hormone crosstalk in maintaining homeostasis in the apical root meristem.

  9. Obtaining growth hormone from calf blood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalchev, L. A.; Ralchev, K. K.; Nikolov, I. T.

    1979-01-01

    The preparation of a growth hormone from human serum was used for the isolation of the hormone from calf serum. The preparation was biologically active - it increased the quantity of the free fatty acids released in rat plasma by 36.4 percent. Electrophoresis in Veronal buffer, ph 8.6, showed the presence of a single fraction having mobility intermediate between that of alpha and beta globulins. Gel filtration through Sephadex G 100 showed an elutriation curve identical to that obtained by the growth hormone prepared from pituitary glands.

  10. Growth Hormone Response after Administration of L-dopa, Clonidine, and Growth Hormone Releasing Hormone in Children with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Seigfried M.

    1993-01-01

    This study of eight growth-retarded children with Down's syndrome (aged 1 to 6.5 years) found that administration of growth hormone was more effective than either L-dopa or clonidine. Results suggest that children with Down's syndrome have both anatomical and biochemical hypothalamic derangements resulting in decreased growth hormone secretion and…

  11. [Hormone replacement therapy--growth hormone, melatonin, DHEA and sex hormones].

    PubMed

    Fukai, Shiho; Akishita, Masahiro

    2009-07-01

    The ability to maintain active and independent living as long as possible is crucial for the healthy longevity. Hormones responsible for some of the manifestations associated with aging are growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), melatonin, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), sex hormones and thyroid hormones. These hormonal changes are associated with changes in body composition, visceral obesity, muscle weakness, osteoporosis, urinary incontinence, loss of cognitive functioning, reduction in well being, depression, as well as sexual dysfunction. With the prolongation of life expectancy, both men and women today live the latter third life with endocrine deficiencies. Hormone replacement therapy may alleviate the debilitating conditions of secondary partial endocrine deficiencies by preventing or delaying some aspects of aging.

  12. Lactam formation increases receptor binding, adenylyl cyclase stimulation and bone growth stimulation by human parathyroid hormone (hPTH)(1-28)NH2.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, J F; Morley, P; Willick, G E; Isaacs, R J; MacLean, S; Ross, V; Barbier, J R; Divieti, P; Bringhurst, F R

    2000-05-01

    Human parathyroid hormone (1-28)NH2 [hPTH(1-28)NH2] is the smallest of the PTH fragments that can fully stimulate adenylyl cyclase in ROS 17/2 rat osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells. This fragment has an IC50 of 110 nM for displacing 125I-[Nle8,18,Tyr34]bovine PTH(1-34)NH2 from HKRK B7 porcine kidney cells, which stably express 950,000 human type 1 PTH/PTH-related protein (PTHrP) receptors (PTH1Rs) per cell. It also has an EC50 of 23.9 nM for stimulating adenylyl cyclase in ROS 17/2 cells. Increasing the amphiphilicity of the alpha-helix in the residue 17-28 region by replacing Lys27 with Leu and stabilizing the helix by forming a lactam between Glu22 and Lys26 to produce the [Leu27]cyclo(Glu22-Lys26)hPTH(1-28)NH2 analog dramatically reduced the IC50 for displacing 125I-[Nle8,18,Tyr34]bPTH(1-34)NH2 from hPTH1Rs from 110 to 6 nM and dropped the EC50 for adenylyl cyclase stimulation in ROS 17/2 cells from 23.9 to 9.6 nM. These modifications also increased the osteogenic potency of hPTH(1-28)NH2. Thus, hPTH(1-28)NH2 did not significantly stimulate either femoral or vertebral trabecular bone growth in rats when injected daily at a dose of 5 nmol/100 g body weight for 6 weeks, beginning 2 weeks after ovariectomy (OVX), but it strongly stimulated the growth of trabeculae in the cancellous bone of the distal femurs and L5 vertebrae when injected at 25 nmol/100 g body weight. By contrast [Leu27]cyclo(Glu22-Lys26)hPTH(1-28)NH2 significantly stimulated trabecular bone growth when injected at 5 nmol/100 g of body weight. Thus, these modifications have brought the bone anabolic potency of hPTH(1-28)NH2 considerably closer to the potencies of the larger PTH peptides and analogs.

  13. Growth Hormone Research Society perspective on the development of long-acting growth hormone preparations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Growth Hormone (GH) Research Society (GRS) convened a workshop to address important issues regarding trial design, efficacy, and safety of long-acting growth hormone preparations (LAGH). A closed meeting of 55 international scientists with expertise in GH, including pediatric and adult endocrino...

  14. Diurnal secretion of ghrelin, growth hormone, insulin binding proteins, and prolactin in normal weight and overweight subjects with and without the night eating syndrome.

    PubMed

    Birketvedt, Grethe S; Geliebter, Allan; Kristiansen, Ingrid; Firgenschau, Yngve; Goll, Rasmus; Florholmen, Jon R

    2012-12-01

    The regulatory peptide ghrelin has been proposed to help mediate both hunger and sleep. The neuroendocrine circadian patterns in the night eating syndrome (NES) have been distinguished by an attenuated nocturnal rise in the plasma concentrations of melatonin and leptin and a greater increase in the concentrations of cortisol. In this study we wanted to test the hypothesis that night eaters have disturbances in the circadian levels of ghrelin, growth hormone (GH) and associated regulatory peptides. In 12 female night eaters (6 normal weight and 6 overweight), and 25 healthy controls (12 normal weight and 13 overweight), blood was sampled over a 24-hour period. Four meals were served from 8 AM to 8 PM, and blood samples were drawn every second hour for determination of plasma ghrelin concentrations and GH by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Analysis of serum GH, IGF-1, IGFBP-3 and prolactin were performed by ELISA. In healthy normal weight subjects there was a slight but non significant nocturnal increase of ghrelin, whereas a more or less flat curve was observed for healthy overweight, NES normal weight and NES overweight patients. The RMANOVA analysis showed a significant independent lowering effect of overweight on the grand mean of ghrelin. No direct effects on NES normal weight and overweight subjects were found, but a near-significant interaction was found between healthy overweight and overweight NES subjects. There were independent significant lowering effects of overweight and NES on the serum GH levels. During the time course no changes in the serum levels of IGF-1 or IGFB-3 were observed. Independent significant lowering effects of overweight and NES on the levels of IGF-1 were detected, whereas a near significant reduction in the global levels of IGFBP-3 was observed in both NES groups. Finally, significant nocturnal changes were observed for serum levels of prolactin in all four subgroups. Grand mean levels tended to be higher in NES subjects whereas the opposite

  15. Long-term effects of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I on serum IGF-I, IGF-binding protein-3 and acid labile subunit in Laron syndrome patients with normal growth hormone binding protein.

    PubMed

    Kanety, H; Silbergeld, A; Klinger, B; Karasik, A; Baxter, R C; Laron, Z

    1997-12-01

    A minority of patients with Laron syndrome have normal serum GH binding protein (GHBP), indicating that the defect is elsewhere than in the extracellular domain of the GH receptor. We have evaluated the effect of long-term IGF-I treatment on serum IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-3 and the acid-labile subunit (ALS) in three sibling with Laron syndrome caused by a GH post-receptor defect and with normal GHBP. The children (a boy aged 3 years, a girl aged 4 years and a boy aged 10 years) were treated by daily s.c. injection of IGF-I in a dose of 150 micrograms/kg. IGFBP-3 was measured by RIA and Western ligand blotting, ALS by RIA. Based values of IGFBP-3 and ALS were low. During IGF-I treatment, the IGFBP-3 concentrations in the girl gradually increased, whereas in the boys there was a 60% decrease during the first week, followed by gradual increase towards baseline. The ALS concentrations followed a similar pattern. We conclude that IGF-I treatment induces and initial suppression and then an increase in the IGFBP-3 and ALS concentrations, confirming data from animal experiments that IGFBP-3 synthesis is not solely under GH control. The differences in responsiveness between the female and male siblings may reflect genetic differences, or lower circulating concentrations of IGF-I in the boys compared with the girl.

  16. Growth Hormone Deficiency in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Slowed growth in height in infants, children, or adolescents (teenagers) • A young-looking face compared with other ... your child if you see signs of poor self-esteem or sadness that could be related to being ...

  17. Ghrelin and obestatin modulate growth hormone-releasing hormone release and synaptic inputs onto growth hormone-releasing hormone neurons.

    PubMed

    Feng, Dan D; Yang, Seung-Kwon; Loudes, Catherine; Simon, Axelle; Al-Sarraf, Tamara; Culler, Michael; Alvear-Perez, Rodrigo; Llorens-Cortes, Catherine; Chen, Chen; Epelbaum, Jacques; Gardette, Robert

    2011-09-01

    Ghrelin, a natural ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), is synthesized in the stomach but may also be expressed in lesser quantity in the hypothalamus where the GHS-R is located on growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) neurons. Obestatin, a peptide derived from the same precursor as ghrelin, is able to antagonize the ghrelin-induced increase of growth hormone (GH) secretion in vivo but not from pituitary explants in vitro. Thus, the blockade of ghrelin-induced GH release by obestatin could be mediated at the hypothalamic level by the neuronal network that controls pituitary GH secretion. Ghrelin increased GHRH and decreased somatostatin (somatotropin-releasing inhibitory factor) release from hypothalamic explants, whereas obestatin only reduced the ghrelin-induced increase of GHRH release, thus indicating that the effect of ghrelin and obestatin is targeted to GHRH neurons. Patch-clamp recordings on mouse GHRH-enhanced green fluorescent protein neurons indicated that ghrelin and obestatin had no significant effects on glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Ghrelin decreased GABAergic synaptic transmission in 44% of the recorded neurons, an effect blocked in the presence of the GHS-R antagonist BIM28163, and stimulated the firing rate of 78% of GHRH neurons. Obestatin blocked the effects of ghrelin by acting on a receptor different from the GHS-R. These data suggest that: (i) ghrelin increases GHRH neuron excitability by increasing their action potential firing rate and decreasing the strength of GABA inhibitory inputs, thereby leading to an enhanced GHRH release; and (ii) obestatin counteracts ghrelin actions. Such interactions on GHRH neurons probably participate in the control of GH secretion.

  18. IGF-1 and insulin as growth hormones.

    PubMed

    Laron, Zvi

    2004-01-01

    IGF-1 generated in the liver is the anabolic effector and linear growth promoting hormone of the pituitary growth hormone (GH). This is evidenced by dwarfism in states of congenital IGF-1 deficiency, Igf1 gene mutation/deletions or knockouts, and in Laron syndrome (LS), due to GH receptor gene mutations/deletions or IGF-1 receptor blocking. In a positive way, daily IGF-1 administration to stunted patients with LS or hGH gene deletion accelerates linear growth velocity. IGF-1 acts on the proliferative cells of the epiphyseal cartilage. IGF-1 also induces organ and tissue growth; its absence causing organomicria. Insulin shares a common ancestry with IGF-1 and with 45% amino acid homology, as well as very close relationships in the structure of its receptors and post-receptor cascade, also acts as a growth hormone. It has protein anabolic activity and stimulates IGF-1 synthesis. Pancreas agenesis causes short babies, and obese children with hyperinsulinism, with or without pituitary GH, have an accelerated growth rate and skeletal maturation; so do babies with macrosomia. Whether the insulin growth effect is direct, or mediated by IGF-1 or leptin is controversial.

  19. Nutrient Sensing Overrides Somatostatin and Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone to Control Pulsatile Growth Hormone Release.

    PubMed

    Steyn, F J

    2015-07-01

    Pharmacological studies reveal that interactions between hypothalamic inhibitory somatostatin and stimulatory growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) govern pulsatile GH release. However, in vivo analysis of somatostatin and GHRH release into the pituitary portal vasculature and peripheral GH output demonstrates that the withdrawal of somatostatin or the appearance of GHRH into pituitary portal blood does not reliably dictate GH release. Consequently, additional intermediates acting at the level of the hypothalamus and within the anterior pituitary gland are likely to contribute to the release of GH, entraining GH secretory patterns to meet physiological demand. The identification and validation of the actions of such intermediates is particularly important, given that the pattern of GH release defines several of the physiological actions of GH. This review highlights the actions of neuropeptide Y in regulating GH release. It is acknowledged that pulsatile GH release may not occur selectively in response to hypothalamic control of pituitary function. As such, interactions between somatotroph networks, the median eminence and pituitary microvasculature and blood flow, and the emerging role of tanycytes and pericytes as critical regulators of pulsatility are considered. It is argued that collective interactions between the hypothalamus, the median eminence and pituitary vasculature, and structural components within the pituitary gland dictate somatotroph function and thereby pulsatile GH release. These interactions may override hypothalamic somatostatin and GHRH-mediated GH release, and modify pulsatile GH release relative to the peripheral glucose supply, and thereby physiological demand.

  20. History of growth hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Blizzard, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    The first human to receive GH therapy was in 1956; it was of bovine origin and was given for 3 wk for metabolic balance studies revealing no effects. By 1958, three separate laboratories utilizing different extraction methods retrieved hGH from human pituitaries, purified it and used for clinical investigation. By 1959 presumed GHD patients were being given native hGH collected and extracted by various methods. Since 1 mg of hGH was needed to treat one patient per day, >360 human pituitaries were needed per patient per year. Thus, the availability of hGH was limited and was awarded on the basis of clinical research protocols approved by the National Pituitary Agency (NPA) established in 1961. hGH was dispensed and injected on a milligram weight basis with varied concentrations between batches from 0.5 units/mg to 2.0 units/mg of hGH. By 1977 a centralized laboratory was established to extract all human pituitaries in the US, this markedly improved the yield of hGH obtained and most remarkably, hGH of this laboratory was never associated with Creutzfeld-Jacob disease (CJD) resulting from the injection of apparently prior- contaminated hGH produced years earlier. However, widespread rhGH use was not possible even if a pituitary from each autopsy performed in the US was collected, this would only permit therapy for about 4,000 patients. Thus, the mass production of rhGH required the identification of the gene structure of the hormone, methodology that began in 1976 to make insulin by recombinant technology. Serendipity was manifest in 1985 when patients who had received hGH years previously were reported to have died of CJD. This led to the discontinuation of the distribution and use of hGH, at a time when a synthetic rhGH became available for clinical use. The creation of a synthetic rhGH was accompanied by unlimited supplies of hGH for investigation and therapy. However, the appropriate use and the potential abuse of this hormone are to be dealt with. The

  1. Growth Hormone Deficiency, Brain Development, and Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Available from: American Medical Association, 535 N. Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60610. In order to determine what effect, if any, growth hormone (GH) has on human brain development, 29 patients (mean age 11.7 years) with GH deficiency were selected according to the following criteria: no evidence of reversible GH deficiency, onset of…

  2. Growth hormone: health considerations beyond height gain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The therapeutic benefit of growth hormone (GH) therapy in improving height in short children is widely recognized; however, GH therapy is associated with other metabolic actions that may be of benefit in these children. Beneficial effects of GH on body composition have been documented in several dif...

  3. Human Growth Hormone: The Latest Ergogenic Aid?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowart, Virginia S.

    1988-01-01

    Believing that synthetic human growth hormone (hGH) will lead to athletic prowess and fortune, some parents and young athletes wish to use the drug to enhance sports performance. Should hGH become widely available, its abuse could present many problems, from potential health risks to the ethics of drug-enhanced athletic performance. (JL)

  4. Growth Hormone: Use and Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... made by the pituitary gland, located at the base of the brain. GH helps children grow taller (also called linear growth), increases muscle mass, and decreases body fat. In both children and adults, GH also helps control the body’s metabolism—the process by which cells change food into ...

  5. Growth hormone, growth factors, and acromegaly

    SciTech Connect

    Ludecke, D.K.; Tolis, G.T.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains five sections, each consisting of several papers. The section headings are: Biochemistry and Physiology of GH and Growth Factors, Pathology of Acromegaly, Clinical Endocrinology of Acromegaly, Nonsurgical Therapy of Acromegaly, and Surgical Therapy of Acromegaly.

  6. Climacteric in untreated isolated growth hormone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Menilson; Salvatori, Roberto; Oliveira, Carla R.P.; Pereira, Rossana M.C.; Souza, Anita H.O.; Nobrega, Luciana M.A.; Cruz, Edla do A.C.; Menezes, Marcos; Alves, Érica O.; Aguiar-Oliveira, Manuel H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the time, intensity of symptoms, hormonal profile, and related morbidity of climacteric in women with untreated isolated growth hormone (GH) deficiency (IGHD). Design Women belonging to a large Brazilian kindred with IGHD due to a homozygous mutation in the GH-releasing hormone receptor gene were studied. None of them had ever received GH replacement therapy. A two-step protocol was performed. In the first case-control experiment, aimed to determine the age at climacteric, we compared eight women with IGHD and 32 normal women between 37 and 55 years of age. In the second cross-sectional experiment, aimed to determine the severity of climacteric symptoms, seven women with IGHD (aged 47-65 y) were compared with 13 controls (aged 44-65 y). The Kupperman Index scores, serum follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, prolactin, and estradiol levels were determined, and pelvic and mammary ultrasonography, mammography, and colpocytology were performed. Results The number of women with follicle-stimulating hormone above 20 mIU/mL was higher in women with IGHD than controls. Kupperman’s Index was not different between the two groups. Menarche had been delayed and parity was lower in women with IGHD. Hormonal profile was similar, but prolactin was lower in women with IGHD. Uterine volume was smaller in women with IGHD, and endometrial thickness and ovarian volume were similar in the two groups. No difference in breast images or in colpocytology was observed between the two groups. Conclusions Menarche was delayed and the beginning of climacteric is anticipated in untreated lifetime IGHD, but menopausal symptoms and hormonal profile resemble the normal climacteric. PMID:18223507

  7. Anti-idiotypic antibody: A new strategy for the development of a growth hormone receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Lan, Hainan; Zheng, Xin; Khan, Muhammad Akram; Li, Steven

    2015-11-01

    In general, traditional growth hormone receptor antagonist can be divided into two major classes: growth hormone (GH) analogues and anti-growth hormone receptor (GHR) antibodies. Herein, we tried to explore a new class of growth hormone receptor (GHR) antagonist that may have potential advantages over the traditional antagonists. For this, we developed a monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody growth hormone, termed CG-86. A series of experiments were conducted to characterize and evaluate this antibody, and the results from a competitive receptor-binding assay, Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISA) and epitope mapping demonstrate that CG-86 behaved as a typical Ab2β. Next, we examined its antagonistic activity using in vitro cell models, and the results showed that CG-86 could effectively inhibit growth hormone receptor-mediated signalling and effectively inhibit growth hormone-induced Ba/F3-GHR638 proliferation. In summary, these studies show that an anti-idiotypic antibody (CG-86) has promise as a novel growth hormone receptor antagonist. Furthermore, the current findings also suggest that anti-idiotypic antibody may represent a novel strategy to produce a new class of growth hormone receptor antagonist, and this strategy may be applied with other cytokines or growth factors.

  8. Specific involvement of gonadal hormones in the functional maturation of growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) neurons.

    PubMed

    Gouty-Colomer, Laurie-Anne; Méry, Pierre-François; Storme, Emilie; Gavois, Elodie; Robinson, Iain C; Guérineau, Nathalie C; Mollard, Patrice; Desarménien, Michel G

    2010-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is the key hormone involved in the regulation of growth and metabolism, two functions that are highly modulated during infancy. GH secretion, controlled mainly by GH releasing hormone (GHRH), has a characteristic pattern during postnatal development that results in peaks of blood concentration at birth and puberty. A detailed knowledge of the electrophysiology of the GHRH neurons is necessary to understand the mechanisms regulating postnatal GH secretion. Here, we describe the unique postnatal development of the electrophysiological properties of GHRH neurons and their regulation by gonadal hormones. Using GHRH-eGFP mice, we demonstrate that already at birth, GHRH neurons receive numerous synaptic inputs and fire large and fast action potentials (APs), consistent with effective GH secretion. Concomitant with the GH secretion peak occurring at puberty, these neurons display modifications of synaptic input properties, decrease in AP duration, and increase in a transient voltage-dependant potassium current. Furthermore, the modulation of both the AP duration and voltage-dependent potassium current are specifically controlled by gonadal hormones because gonadectomy prevented the maturation of these active properties and hormonal treatment restored it. Thus, GHRH neurons undergo specific developmental modulations of their electrical properties over the first six postnatal weeks, in accordance with hormonal demand. Our results highlight the importance of the interaction between the somatotrope and gonadotrope axes during the establishment of adapted neuroendocrine functions.

  9. Hypopituitarism: growth hormone and corticotropin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Capatina, Cristina; Wass, John A H

    2015-03-01

    This article presents an overview of adult growth hormone deficiency (AGHD) and corticotropin deficiency (central adrenal failure, CAI). Both conditions can result from various ailments affecting the hypothalamus or pituitary gland (most frequently a tumor in the area or its treatment). Clinical manifestations are subtle in AGHD but potentially life-threatening in CAI. The diagnosis needs dynamic testing in most cases. Treatment of AGHD is recommended in patients with documented severe deficiency, and treatment of CAI is mandatory in all cases. Despite significant progress in replacement hormonal therapy, more physiologic treatments and more reliable indicators of treatment adequacy are still needed.

  10. Prolactin and growth hormone in fish osmoregulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sakamoto, T.; McCormick, S.D.

    2006-01-01

    Prolactin is an important regulator of multiple biological functions in vertebrates, and has been viewed as essential to ion uptake as well as reduction in ion and water permeability of osmoregulatory surfaces in freshwater and euryhaline fish. Prolactin-releasing peptide seems to stimulate prolactin expression in the pituitary and peripheral organs during freshwater adaptation. Growth hormone, a member of the same family of hormones as prolactin, promotes acclimation to seawater in several teleost fish, at least in part through the action of insulin-like growth factor I. In branchial epithelia, development and differentiation of the seawater-type chloride cell (and their underlying biochemistry) is regulated by GH, IGF-I, and cortisol, whereas the freshwater-type chloride cell is regulated by prolactin and cortisol. In the epithelia of gastrointestinal tract, prolactin induces cell proliferation during freshwater adaptation, whereas cortisol stimulates both cell proliferation and apoptosis. We propose that control of salinity acclimation in teleosts by prolactin and growth hormone primarily involves regulation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation (the latter including upregulation of specific ion transporters), and that there is an important interaction of these hormones with corticosteroids. ?? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Obesity, growth hormone and weight loss.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Michael Højby

    2010-03-25

    Growth hormone (GH) is the most important hormonal regulator of postnatal longitudinal growth in man. In adults GH is no longer needed for longitudinal growth. Adults with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) are characterised by perturbations in body composition, lipid metabolism, cardiovascular risk profile and bone mineral density. It is well established that adult GHD usually is accompanied by an increase in fat accumulation and GH replacement in adult patients with GHD results in reduction of fat mass and abdominal fat mass in particular. It is also recognized that obesity and abdominal obesity in particular results in a secondary reduction in GH secretion and subnormal insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels. The recovery of the GH IGF-I axis after weight loss suggest an acquired defect, however, the pathophysiologic role of GH in obesity is yet to be fully understood. In clinical studies examining the efficacy of GH in obese subjects very little or no effect are observed with respect to weight loss, whereas GH seems to reduce total and abdominal fat mass in obese subjects. The observed reductions in abdominal fat mass are modest and similar to what can be achieved by diet or exercise interventions.

  12. Preventing Growth Hormone Abuse: An Emerging Health Concern.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, George L.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Facts about growth hormone abuse should be incorporated into substance abuse components of health education curriculums. Sources, uses, and dangers associated with human growth hormones are discussed. A sample lesson plan is included. (IAH)

  13. Gravitational effects on plant growth hormone concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandurski, R. S.; Schulze, A.

    1983-01-01

    Dolk's (1936) finding that more growth hormone diffuses from the lower side of a gravity-stimulated plant shoot than from the upper side is presently confirmed by means of both an isotope dilution assay and selected ion monitoring-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and it is established that the asymmetrically distributed hormone is indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). This is the first physicochemical demonstration that there is more IAA on the lower sides of a geostimulated plant shoot. It is also found that free IAA primarily occurs in the conductive vascular tissues of the shoot, while IAA esters predominate in the growing cortical cells. A highly sensitive gas chromatographic isotope dilution assay shows that the hormone asymmetry also occurs in the nonvascular tissue.

  14. Neither bovine somatotropin nor growth hormone-releasing factor alters expression of thyroid hormone receptors in liver and mammary tissues.

    PubMed

    Capuco, A V; Binelli, M; Tucker, H A

    2011-10-01

    Physiological effects of thyroid hormones are mediated primarily by binding of triiodothyronine to specific nuclear receptors. Organ-specific changes in production of triiodothyronine from its prohormone, thyroxine, have been hypothesized to target the action of thyroid hormones on the mammary gland and play a role in mediating or augmenting a galactopoietic response to bovine somatotropin (bST). Additionally, tissue responsiveness to thyroid hormones may be altered by changes in the number or affinity of nuclear receptors for thyroid hormones. In the present study, effects of bST and bovine growth hormone-releasing factor (bGRF) on thyroid hormone receptors in liver and mammary gland were studied. Lactating Holstein cows received continuous infusions of bST or bGRF for 63 d or served as uninfused controls. Nuclei were isolated from harvested mammary and liver tissues and incubated with [(125)I]-triiodothyronine. Treatments did not alter the capacity or affinity of specific binding sites for triiodothyronine in liver or mammary nuclei. Evaluation of transcript abundance for thyroid hormone receptors showed that isoforms of thyroid hormone receptor or retinoid receptor (which may influence thyroid receptor action) expressed in the mammary gland were not altered by bST or bGRF treatment. Data do not support the hypothesis that administration of bST or bGRF alters sensitivity of mammary tissue by changing expression of thyroid hormone receptors.

  15. Ontogeny of hepatic bovine growth hormone receptors in cattle.

    PubMed

    Badinga, L; Collier, R J; Thatcher, W W; Wilcox, C J; Head, H H; Bazer, F W

    1991-05-01

    A series of studies examined the binding characteristics and ontogeny of hepatic growth hormone binding sites in dairy bulls on d 2, 30, 180, and 365 of age. Binding of iodinated recombinant bovine growth hormone ([125I]rbGH) to liver membrane receptors was membrane protein-dependent. Receptors were considered growth hormone-specific, because physiological concentrations of bovine prolactin (bPRL) failed to displace [125I]rbGH from bovine hepatocyte membranes. Only 50% of [125I]rbGH was bound reversibly to hepatic microsomes. Addition of dithiothreitol (DTT) to the receptor-assay buffer increased the binding of [125I]rbGH to hepatic membranes in a time-dependent manner. Moderate concentrations of Ca++ and Mg++ in the receptor-assay buffer had no detectable effects on binding of [125I]rbGH to hepatic microsomes. In growing dairy bulls, specific binding of [125I]rbGH per milligram of membrane protein increased from 1.9 +/- 1.8% at d 2 to 14.1 +/- 1.8% at d 180 and then declined to 5.2 +/- 1.6% at d 365. Likewise, concentration of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I in serum was low during the 1st mo of age (d 2, 13.3 +/- 8.8 ng/ml; d 30, 9.7 +/- 8.8 ng/ml), but it became maximal at d 180 (151.0 +/- 8.8 ng/ml). Circulating concentrations of IGF-II increased linearly during the 1st yr of growth. Serum concentrations of GH, triiodothyronine, and thyroxine declined from 39.9 +/- 6.5, 2.7 +/- .2, and 75.4 +/- 4.6 ng/ml at d 2 to 16.5 +/- 6.5, 1.3 +/- .2, and 53.4 +/- 4.6 ng/ml at d 30, respectively, and remained low through 1 yr of age. Insulin concentration in serum did not change significantly with development. Results indicated that increasing concentrations of specific bGH receptors in the bovine liver may play a key role in regulating postnatal growth in cattle.

  16. 21 CFR 862.1370 - Human growth hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human growth hormone test system. 862.1370 Section 862.1370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 862.1370 Human growth hormone test system. (a) Identification. A human growth hormone...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1370 - Human growth hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Human growth hormone test system. 862.1370 Section 862.1370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 862.1370 Human growth hormone test system. (a) Identification. A human growth hormone...

  18. Cortistatin vaccination--a solution to growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Moaeen-ud-Din, M; Malik, Nosheen; Guo, Yang Li; Ali, Ahmad; Babar, Masroor Ellahi

    2009-12-01

    Cortistatin and somatostatin are neuropeptides which have inhibitory effects on growth hormone through common five receptors. Although, both have inhibitory effects but, only cortistatin has direct inhibitory effects on growth hormone secretagogue and is more potent inhibitor of growth hormone than somatostatin. This control of growth hormone can be manipulated through immunoneutralization of cortistatin through cortistatin DNA vaccine rather than antibodies application. A DNA vaccine of cortistatin can be produced using recombinant DNA technology in a eukaryotic expression system and will serve as a tool not to only alleviate the growth hormone deficiency problems in human but, can also be used to improve growth rate in farm animals.

  19. Administration of growth hormone (GH), but not insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), by continuous infusion can induce the formation of the 150-kilodalton IGF-binding protein-3 complex in GH-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Gargosky, S E; Tapanainen, P; Rosenfeld, R G

    1994-05-01

    In the adult circulation, 70-90% of the serum insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are carried by IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), which exists as part of a 150-kilodalton (kDa) ternary complex including IGF and an acid-labile subunit (ALS). We have examined the hormonal regulation and molecular distribution of IGFBP-3 in the circulation of a uniquely GH-deficient (GHD) rat model. For 7 days, GHD rats were given GH by either twice daily injections (1 mg/kg) or continuous infusion (2.4 mg/kg.day) or IGF-I by continuous infusion (1.4 mg/kg.day). Each day, weight and feed and water intake were monitored, and on day 7, liver, kidney, spleen, heart, and lung were weighted, and sera were collected. Serum IGF-I was analyzed by immunoassay, and the molecular distribution of the IGFBPs was determined by neutral size-exclusion chromatography combined with Western ligand blot and Western immunoblot. The GHD rats were 40-60% lighter than their normal littermates, and all organs examined were proportionately smaller. Serum IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels were less than 10% of those in normal rats. Incubation of serum from GHD rats with [125I]IGF-II showed that radiolabel was incorporated only into a 44-kDa IGFBP region that contained the smaller IGFBPs. IGFBP-3 eluted around 60 kDa. No 150-kDa IGFBP region was detected. The administration of GH or IGF-I to GHD rats resulted in significant increases in weight gained, although food and water intake remained unaltered. Weight gain was observed in all three treatments groups. Both GH treatment regimens significantly increased liver, spleen, and lung weight, whereas IGF-I therapy increased spleen, kidney, and heart. Administration of GH twice daily did not increase serum IGF-I or IGFBP-3 concentrations, and the molecular distribution of IGFBP-3 remained unchanged. In contrast, continuous infusion of GH resulted in 5-fold increases in serum IGF-I and increases in IGFBP-3 levels. Size-exclusion chromatography combined with Western ligand blot

  20. Effect of growth hormone deficiency on brain structure, motor function and cognition.

    PubMed

    Webb, Emma A; O'Reilly, Michelle A; Clayden, Jonathan D; Seunarine, Kiran K; Chong, Wui K; Dale, Naomi; Salt, Alison; Clark, Chris A; Dattani, Mehul T

    2012-01-01

    The growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 axis plays a role in normal brain growth but little is known of the effect of growth hormone deficiency on brain structure. Children with isolated growth hormone deficiency (peak growth hormone <6.7 µg/l) and idiopathic short stature (peak growth hormone >10 µg/l) underwent cognitive assessment, diffusion tensor imaging and volumetric magnetic resonance imaging prior to commencing growth hormone treatment. Total brain, corpus callosal, hippocampal, thalamic and basal ganglia volumes were determined using Freesurfer. Fractional anisotropy (a marker of white matter structural integrity) images were aligned and tract-based spatial statistics performed. Fifteen children (mean 8.8 years of age) with isolated growth hormone deficiency [peak growth hormone <6.7 µg/l (mean 3.5 µg/l)] and 14 controls (mean 8.4 years of age) with idiopathic short stature [peak growth hormone >10 µg/l (mean 15 µg/l) and normal growth rate] were recruited. Compared with controls, children with isolated growth hormone deficiency had lower Full-Scale IQ (P < 0.01), Verbal Comprehension Index (P < 0.01), Processing Speed Index (P < 0.05) and Movement-Assessment Battery for Children (P < 0.008) scores. Verbal Comprehension Index scores correlated significantly with insulin-like growth factor-1 (P < 0.03) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (P < 0.02) standard deviation scores in isolated growth hormone deficiency. The splenium of the corpus callosum, left globus pallidum, thalamus and hippocampus (P < 0.01) were significantly smaller; and corticospinal tract (bilaterally; P < 0.045, P < 0.05) and corpus callosum (P < 0.05) fractional anisotropy were significantly lower in the isolated growth hormone deficiency group. Basal ganglia volumes and bilateral corticospinal tract fractional anisotropy correlated significantly with Movement-Assessment Battery for Children scores, and

  1. Hepatic receptors for homologous growth hormone in the eel

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, T. )

    1991-03-01

    The specific binding of 125I-labeled eel growth hormone (eGH) to liver membranes of the eel was examined. The specific binding to the 10,000g pellet was greater than that to the 600g pellet. The specific binding was linear up to about 100 mg fresh tissue, and was saturable with increasing amounts of membrane. The specific binding was pH-, temperature-, and time-dependent, with the optimum pH at 7.4, and greater specific binding was obtained at 15 and 25 degrees than at 35 degrees. Scatchard analysis of liver binding gave an association constant of 1.1 x 10(9) M-1 and a capacity of 105 fmol/mg protein. The receptor preparation was highly specific for GHs. Natural and recombinant eel GHs as well as recombinant salmon GH competed equally with 125I-eGH for the receptor sites of the 10,000g liver membrane. Ovine GH was more potent in displacing the labeled eGH than the homologous eel hormone. Tilapia GH and ovine prolactin (PRL) were needed in greater amounts (40 times) than eGH to displace the labeled eGH. Salmon and tilapia PRLs were still less potent (500 times) than eGH. There was no displacement with eel PRL. No significant change in the specific binding was seen 1 week after hypophysectomy, whereas injection of eGH into the hypophysectomized eel caused a significant reduction after 24 hr. The binding to the membrane fractions from gills, kidney, muscle, intestine, and brain was low and exclusively nonspecific, indicating the presence of specific GH receptors predominantly in the liver.

  2. Hormone-binding assay using living bacteria expressing eukaryotic receptors.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Georgy A; Lomin, Sergey N

    2009-01-01

    Studies on hormone-receptor interaction include, as a rule, isolation and extensive purification of the receptor protein or a particular receptor-containing fraction. To bypass these time- and resource-consuming procedures, we proposed a live cell-based assay using transgenic bacteria expressing single eukaryotic receptors. We describe here 3H-cytokinin binding to corresponding plant receptors as an example. The method includes procedures of bacteria growing, incubation with labeled hormone, separation of bound from unbound ligand, determination of radioactivity in bacterial precipitates, and mathematical analysis of primary data. The established simple protocol for specific labeling hormone-binding sites in intact bacteria allows determination of the main parameters of the ligand-receptor interaction.

  3. Multiple Effects of Growth Hormone in the Body: Is it Really the Hormone for Growth?

    PubMed Central

    Devesa, Jesús; Almengló, Cristina; Devesa, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we analyze the effects of growth hormone on a number of tissues and organs and its putative role in the longitudinal growth of an organism. We conclude that the hormone plays a very important role in maintaining the homogeneity of tissues and organs during the normal development of the human body or after an injury. Its effects on growth do not seem to take place during the fetal period or during the early infancy and are mediated by insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) during childhood and puberty. In turn, IGF-I transcription is dependent on an adequate GH secretion, and in many tissues, it occurs independent of GH. We propose that GH may be a prohormone, rather than a hormone, since in many tissues and organs, it is proteolytically cleaved in a tissue-specific manner giving origin to shorter GH forms whose activity is still unknown. PMID:27773998

  4. Synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2007-01-23

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain that binds a heparin-binding growth factor receptor, covalently bound to a hydrophobic linker, which is in turn covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  5. IGF-I and IGF Binding Protein-3 Generation Tests and Response to Growth Hormone in Children with Silver-Russell Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beserra, Izabel C. R.; Ribeiro, Márcia G.; Collett-Solberg, Paulo F.; Vaisman, Mário; Guimarães, Marília M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate, in children with Silver-Russell Syndrome, the response to the IGF-I and IGFBP-3 generation test and compare results to the growth response after 6 months of rhGH. Methods. Eight children (6 males), with a mean age of 5.71 ± 2.48 years and height SDS of −3.88 ± 1.28 received rhGH for 6 months. IGF-I and IGFBP-3 were analyzed before and after 4 doses of rhGH. Results. The mean growth velocity (GV) before treatment was 5.28 ± 1.9 cm/year. GV increased after rhGH in five children to a mean GV of 10.3 ± 3.64 cm/year. Six children had normal basal IGF-I levels and two low levels. After 4 doses of rhGH, the IGF-I levels were normal in seven. There was no correlation between the growth response and the IGF-I generation test. Conclusions. Children with SRS have normal IGF-I generation test. There is no correlation between the generation test and the growth velocity after 6 months of rhGH. PMID:21234390

  6. Role of abnormal anterior pituitary hormones-growth hormone and prolactin in active systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaohua; Xu, Jinhua; Li, Shujuan; Huang, Wen; Li, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background: The role of anterior pituitary hormones in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) remains controversial. Aims and Objectives: We determined the expression levels of human growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and their receptors in subjects presenting with SLE, and modulation of disease severity. Materials and methods: Forty-seven subjects and ten healthy controls were assessed for possible association between SLE disease activity and levels of serum PRL, GH and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH). In peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), specific binding and mRNA expression of receptors for GH (GHR), and PRL (PRLR) were determined by receptor-ligand binding assay (RLBA) and RT-PCR. PBMC of recruited subjects were treated with hPRL and rhGH to assess IgG production and antibodies against dsDNA. Results: In active SLE subjects we found elevated PRL and GH levels. Study subject PBMCs displayed augmented GHR and PRLR protein and mRNA expression. Study subjects also showed a positive correlation in serum PRL levels and specific antibodies against dsDNA, SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), and proteinuria. However, a negative correlation was found between serum PRL levels and complement component C3. We found a positive correlation between specific binding rates of PRLR and GHR and both SLE activity and dsDNA antibody titers. Enhanced IgG and anti-dsDNA secretion was observed in cultured PBMC stimulated by PRL or GH with/without PHA, PWM, IL-2 or IL-10. In active SLE, a close association was found between augmented PRL and GH levels, expression and specific binding activities of PRLR and GHR, and changes in the specific titer of anti-dsDNA. Conclusion: Anterior pituitary hormones play an important role in the pathogenesis of SLE. High levels of growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) play a role in pathogenesis of SLE, which is correlated with SLE disease activity and antibodies against dsDNA. The mechanism of GH and PRL in SLE was complicated and should

  7. Growth hormone (GH)-releasing activity of chicken GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) in chickens.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S; Gineste, C; Gaylinn, B D

    2014-08-01

    Two peptides with sequence similarities to growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) have been identified by analysis of the chicken genome. One of these peptides, chicken (c) GHRH-LP (like peptide) was previously found to poorly bind to chicken pituitary membranes or to cloned and expressed chicken GHRH receptors and had little, if any, growth hormone (GH)-releasing activity in vivo or in vitro. In contrast, a second more recently discovered peptide, cGHRH, does bind to cloned and expressed cGHRH receptors and increases cAMP activity in transfected cells. The possibility that this peptide may have in vivo GH-releasing activity was therefore assessed. The intravenous (i.v.) administration of cGHRH to immature chickens, at doses of 3-100 μg/kg, significantly increased circulating GH concentrations within 10 min of injection and the plasma GH levels remained elevated for at least 30 min after the injection of maximally effective doses. The plasma GH responses to cGHRH were comparable with those induced by human (h) or porcine (p) GHRH preparations and to that induced by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH). In marked contrast, the i.v. injection of cGHRH-LP had no significant effect on circulating GH concentrations in immature chicks. GH release was also increased from slaughterhouse chicken pituitary glands perifused for 5 min with cGHRH at doses of 0.1 μg/ml or 1.0 μg/ml, comparable with GH responses to hGHRH1-44. In contrast, the perifusion of chicken pituitary glands with cGHRH-LP had no significant effect on GH release. In summary, these results demonstrate that cGHRH has GH-releasing activity in chickens and support the possibility that it is the endogenous ligand of the cGHRH receptor.

  8. The pituitary growth hormone cell in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, Wesley C.; Grindeland, R.

    1989-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH), produced and secreted from specialized cells in the pituitary gland, controls the metabolism of protein, fat, and carbohydrate. It is also probably involved in the regulation of proper function of bone, muscle and immune systems. The behavior of the GH cell system was studied by flying either isolated pituitary cells or live rats. In the latter case, pituitary GH cells are prepared on return to earth and then either transplanted into hypophysectomized rats or placed into cell culture so that function of GH cells in-vivo vs. in-vitro can be compared. The results from three flights to date (STS-8, 1983; SL-3, 1985; Cosmos 1887, 1987) established that the ability of GH cells to release hormone, on return to earth, is compromised. The mechanism(s) responsible for this attenuation response is unknown. However, the data are sufficiently positive to indicate that the nature of the secretory defect resides directly within the GH cells.

  9. Regulation of bone mass by growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Olney, Robert C

    2003-09-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is a peptide hormone secreted from the pituitary gland under the control of the hypothalamus. It has a many actions in the body, including regulating a number of metabolic pathways. Some, but not all, of its effects are mediated through insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Both GH and IGF-I play significant roles in the regulation of growth and bone metabolism and hence are regulators of bone mass. Bone mass increases steadily through childhood, peaking in the mid 20s. Subsequently, there is a slow decline that accelerates in late life. During childhood, the accumulation in bone mass is a combination of bone growth and bone remodeling. Bone remodeling is the process of new bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts. GH directly and through IGF-I stimulates osteoblast proliferation and activity, promoting bone formation. It also stimulates osteoclast differentiation and activity, promoting bone resorption. The result is an increase in the overall rate of bone remodeling, with a net effect of bone accumulation. The absence of GH results in a reduced rate of bone remodeling and a gradual loss of bone mineral density. Bone growth primarily occurs at the epiphyseal growth plates and is the result of the proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes. GH has direct effects on these chondrocytes, but primarily regulates this function through IGF-I, which stimulates the proliferation of and matrix production by these cells. GH deficiency severely limits bone growth and hence the accumulation of bone mass. GH deficiency is not an uncommon complication in oncology and has long-term effects on bone health.

  10. Novel growth hormone receptor gene mutation in a patient with Laron syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arman, Ahmet; Yüksel, Bilgin; Coker, Ajda; Sarioz, Ozlem; Temiz, Fatih; Topaloglu, Ali Kemal

    2010-04-01

    Growth Hormone (GH) is a 22 kDa protein that has effects on growth and glucose and fat metabolisms. These effects are initiated by binding of growth hormone (GH) to growth hormone receptors (GHR) expressed in target cells. Mutations or deletions in the growth hormone receptor cause an autosomal disorder called Laron-type dwarfism (LS) characterized by high circulating levels of serum GH and low levels of insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). We analyzed the GHR gene for genetic defect in seven patients identified as Laron type dwarfism. We identified two missense mutations (S40L and W104R), and four polymorphisms (S473S, L526I, G168G and exon 3 deletion). We are reporting a mutation (W104R) at exon 5 of GHR gene that is not previously reported, and it is a novel mutation.

  11. Investigation of the solid- and solution-phase binding reactivities of continuous epitopes recognized by polyclonal guinea-pig anti-recombinant bovine growth hormone antisera.

    PubMed

    Beattie, J

    1992-09-01

    We have used the technique of multiple pin peptide synthesis to identify three major continuous epitopes in the recombinant bovine (rb) GH molecule. We have synthesized these peptides, residues 24-40, 139-152 and 179-189, as N-terminally acetylated, C-terminal amides and confirmed their reactivity in a standard solid-phase ELISA. Subsequently, for epitope 139-152, we have synthesized a peptide affinity column and used this to isolate antibodies with this epitope specificity from whole antiserum. In addition, we demonstrate that under native conditions in a liquid phase RIA, these antibodies will precipitate [125I]rbGH. Further, peptide 139-152 itself also cross-reacts in an rbGH RIA inhibiting binding by up to 20%. Our data suggest that during the immune response to rbGH in guinea-pigs a substantial part of the B-cell response is directed to the 139-152 region and that this part of the protein is a native epitope.

  12. Psychomotor retardation in a girl with complete growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Dayal, Devi; Malhi, Prabhjot; Kumar Bhalla, Anil; Sachdeva, Naresh; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Infants with complete growth hormone deficiency may suffer from psychomotor retardation in addition to severe growth failure. Without replacement therapy, they may have a compromised intellectual potential manifesting as learning disabilities and attention-deficit disorders in later life. In this communication, we discuss an infant who showed improvement in physical growth after growth hormone therapy but her psychomotor skills did not improve probably due to late start of treatment. There is a need to start growth hormone therapy as early as possible in infants with complete growth hormone deficiency to avoid adverse effects on psychomotor and brain development.

  13. Growth hormone receptors in ovary and liver during gametogenesis in female rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Gomez, J M; Mourot, B; Fostier, A; Le Gac, F

    1999-03-01

    Changes of growth hormone receptivity in the ovary during the reproductive cycle were studied in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). A method for characterizing growth hormone receptors in crude ovary homogenate was required for this. Binding of radiolabelled recombinant rainbow trout growth hormone (125I-labelled rtGH) to crude ovary preparation was dependent on ovarian tissue concentration. The sites were specific to growth hormone, with no affinity for prolactins and gonadotrophins. Similar high affinities for 125I-labelled rtGH were obtained with crude ovary (4.2 x 10(9) +/- 0.3 mol l-1) and crude liver preparations (4.9 x 10(9) +/- 0.1 mol l-1) at all stages of ovogenesis, and with ovarian membrane preparations (8.2 x 10(9) mol l-1) tested at the beginning of vitellogenesis. Ovarian growth hormone receptor concentration was highest during the early phases of follicular development (endogenous vitellogenesis: 315-310 fmol g-1 ovary) and decreased regularly during oocyte and follicular growth (exogenous vitellogenesis) to reach a minimal value at oocyte maturation (42 fmol g-1 ovary). In postovulated fish, binding was at a similar level (297 fmol g-1 ovary) to that found in endogenous vitellogenesis. Conversely, the absolute binding capacity of the whole ovary was low from immaturity to early exogenous vitellogenesis (0.1-0.6 pmol per pair of gonads), increased slowly during vitellogenesis and more markedly during rapid oocyte growth and at the time of final maturation (10.8 pmol per pair of gonads). In postovulated fish, the absolute binding capacity decreased partially (4.4 pmol per pair of gonads). Mean hepatic growth hormone receptor concentration did not vary with the reproductive stage for most of the cycle (3.0-4.5 pmol g-1 liver) except in endogenous vitellogenesis where significantly higher concentrations were observed (6.7 pmol g-1 liver). Individual ovarian growth hormone receptor concentrations were correlated with hepatic growth hormone receptor

  14. Effects of ghrelin, growth hormone-releasing peptide-6, and growth hormone-releasing hormone on growth hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and cortisol release in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    de Sá, Larissa Bianca Paiva Cunha; Nascif, Sergio Oliva; Correa-Silva, Silvia Regina; Molica, Patricia; Vieira, José Gilberto Henriques; Dib, Sergio Atala; Lengyel, Ana-Maria Judith

    2010-10-01

    In type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), growth hormone (GH) responses to provocative stimuli are normal or exaggerated, whereas the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis has been less studied. Ghrelin is a GH secretagogue that also increases adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol levels, similarly to GH-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6). Ghrelin's effects in patients with T1DM have not been evaluated. We therefore studied GH, ACTH, and cortisol responses to ghrelin and GHRP-6 in 9 patients with T1DM and 9 control subjects. The GH-releasing hormone (GHRH)-induced GH release was also evaluated. Mean fasting GH levels (micrograms per liter) were higher in T1DM (3.5 ± 1.2) than in controls (0.6 ± 0.3). In both groups, ghrelin-induced GH release was higher than that after GHRP-6 and GHRH. When analyzing Δ area under the curve (ΔAUC) GH values after ghrelin, GHRP-6, and GHRH, no significant differences were observed in T1DM compared with controls. There was a trend (P = .055) to higher mean basal cortisol values (micrograms per deciliter) in T1DM (11.7 ± 1.5) compared with controls (8.2 ± 0.8). No significant differences were seen in ΔAUC cortisol values in both groups after ghrelin and GHRP-6. Mean fasting ACTH values were similar in T1DM and controls. No differences were seen in ΔAUC ACTH levels in both groups after ghrelin and GHRP-6. In summary, patients with T1DM have normal GH responsiveness to ghrelin, GHRP-6, and GHRH. The ACTH and cortisol release after ghrelin and GHRP-6 is also similar to controls. Our results suggest that chronic hyperglycemia of T1DM does not interfere with GH-, ACTH-, and cortisol-releasing mechanisms stimulated by these peptides.

  15. Predicting the Probability of Abnormal Stimulated Growth Hormone Response in Children After Radiotherapy for Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hua Chiaho; Wu Shengjie; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Lukose, Renin C.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a mathematical model utilizing more readily available measures than stimulation tests that identifies brain tumor survivors with high likelihood of abnormal growth hormone secretion after radiotherapy (RT), to avoid late recognition and a consequent delay in growth hormone replacement therapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 191 prospectively collected post-RT evaluations of peak growth hormone level (arginine tolerance/levodopa stimulation test), serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein 3, height, weight, growth velocity, and body mass index in 106 children and adolescents treated for ependymoma (n = 72), low-grade glioma (n = 28) or craniopharyngioma (n = 6), who had normal growth hormone levels before RT. Normal level in this study was defined as the peak growth hormone response to the stimulation test {>=}7 ng/mL. Results: Independent predictor variables identified by multivariate logistic regression with high statistical significance (p < 0.0001) included IGF-1 z score, weight z score, and hypothalamic dose. The developed predictive model demonstrated a strong discriminatory power with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.883. At a potential cutoff point of probability of 0.3 the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 78%. Conclusions: Without unpleasant and expensive frequent stimulation tests, our model provides a quantitative approach to closely follow the growth hormone secretory capacity of brain tumor survivors. It allows identification of high-risk children for subsequent confirmatory tests and in-depth workup for diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency.

  16. Effects of retinoic acid on growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor gene expression and growth hormone secretion in rat anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Maliza, Rita; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Azuma, Morio; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2016-06-30

    Retinoic acid (RA) is an important signaling molecule in embryonic development and adult tissue. The actions of RA are mediated by the nuclear receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR), which regulate gene expression. RAR and RXR are widely expressed in the anterior pituitary gland. RA was reported to stimulate growth hormone (GH) gene expression in the anterior pituitary cells. However, current evidence is unclear on the role of RA in gene expression of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor (Ghrh-r), growth hormone secretagogue receptor (Ghs-r) and somatostatin receptors (Sst-rs). Using isolated anterior pituitary cells of rats, we examined the effects of RA on gene expression of these receptors and GH release. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA; 10(-6) M) for 24 h increased gene expression levels of Ghrh-r and Ghs-r; however, expressions of Sst-r2 and Sst-r5 were unchanged. Combination treatment with the RAR-agonist Am80 and RXR-agonist PA024 mimicked the effects of ATRA on Ghrh-r and Ghs-r gene expressions. Exposure of isolated pituitary cells to ATRA had no effect on basal GH release. In contrast, ATRA increased growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH)- and ghrelin-stimulated GH release from cultured anterior pituitary cells. Our results suggest that expressions of Ghrh-r and Ghs-r are regulated by RA through the RAR-RXR receptor complex and that RA enhances the effects of GHRH and ghrelin on GH release from the anterior pituitary gland.

  17. Random Secretion of Growth Hormone in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prank, Klaus; Kloppstech, Mirko; Nowlan, Steven J.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Brabant, Georg

    1996-08-01

    In normal humans, growth hormone (GH) is secreted from a gland located adjacent to the brain (pituitary) into the blood in distinct pulses, but in patients bearing a tumor within the pituitary (acromegaly) GH is excessively secreted in an irregular manner. It has been hypothesized that GH secretion in the diseased state becomes random. This hypothesis is supported by demonstrating that GH secretion in patients with acromegaly cannot be distinguished from a variety of linear stochastic processes based on the predictability of the fluctuations of GH concentration in the bloodstream.

  18. Gravitational effects on plant growth hormone concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandurski, Robert S.; Schulze, Aga

    Numerous studies, particularly those of H. Dolk in the 1930's, established by means of bio-assay, that more growth hormone diffused from the lower, than from the upper side of a gravity-stimulated plant shoot. Now, using an isotope dilution assay, with 4,5,6,7 tetradeutero indole-3-acetic acid as internal standard, and selected ion monitoring-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as the method of determination, we have confirmed Dolk's finding and established that the asymmetrically distributed hormone is, in fact, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). This is the first physico-chemical demonstration that there is more free IAA on the lower sides of a geo-stimulated plant shoot. We have also shown that free IAA occurs primarily in the conductive vascular tissues of the shoot, whereas IAA esters predominate in the growing cortical cells. Now, using an especially sensitive gas chromatographic isotope dilution assay we have found that the hormone asymmetry also occurs in the non-vascular tissue. Currently, efforts are directed to developing isotope dilution assays, with picogram sensitivity, to determine how this asymmetry of IAA distribution is attained so as to better understand how the plant perceives the geo-stimulus.

  19. Thyroid hormones and growth in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Tarım, Ömer

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid hormones regulate growth by several mechanisms. In addition to their negative feedback effect on the stimulatory hormones thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and thyrotropin (TSH), thyroid hormones also regulate their receptors in various physiological and pathological conditions. Up-regulation and down-regulation of the thyroid receptors fine-tune the biological effects exerted by the thyroid hormones. Interestingly, the deiodinase enzyme system is another intrinsic regulator of thyroid physiology that adjusts the availability of thyroid hormones to the tissues, which is essential for normal growth and development. Almost all chronic diseases of childhood impair growth and development. Every disease may have a unique mechanism to halt linear growth, but reduced serum concentration or diminished local availability of thyroid hormones seems to be a common pathway. Therefore, the effects of systemic diseases on thyroid physiology must be taken into consideration in the evaluation of growth retardation in affected children.

  20. Metastatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor that Progressed to Ectopic Adrenocorticotropic Hormone (ACTH) Syndrome with Growth Hormone-releasing Hormone (GHRH) Production

    PubMed Central

    Tadokoro, Rie; Sato, Shotaro; Otsuka, Fumiko; Ueno, Makoto; Ohkawa, Shinichi; Katakami, Hideki; Taniyama, Matsuo; Nagasaka, Shoichiro

    2016-01-01

    The patient was a 61-year-old woman who had a well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) with lymph node metastasis. After 15 months of octreotide treatment, glucose control deteriorated and pigmentation of the tongue and moon face developed, leading to the diagnosis of ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) syndrome. An abnormal secretion of growth hormone (GH) was identified, and the plasma growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) level was elevated. A tumor biopsy specimen positively immunostained for ACTH and GHRH. Ectopic hormone secretion seems to have evolved along with the progression of the PNET. PMID:27746436

  1. Metastatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor that Progressed to Ectopic Adrenocorticotropic Hormone (ACTH) Syndrome with Growth Hormone-releasing Hormone (GHRH) Production.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Rie; Sato, Shotaro; Otsuka, Fumiko; Ueno, Makoto; Ohkawa, Shinichi; Katakami, Hideki; Taniyama, Matsuo; Nagasaka, Shoichiro

    The patient was a 61-year-old woman who had a well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) with lymph node metastasis. After 15 months of octreotide treatment, glucose control deteriorated and pigmentation of the tongue and moon face developed, leading to the diagnosis of ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) syndrome. An abnormal secretion of growth hormone (GH) was identified, and the plasma growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) level was elevated. A tumor biopsy specimen positively immunostained for ACTH and GHRH. Ectopic hormone secretion seems to have evolved along with the progression of the PNET.

  2. Radioiodination of chicken luteinizing hormone without affecting receptor binding potency

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, M.; Ishii, S. )

    1989-12-01

    By improving the currently used lactoperoxidase method, we were able to obtain radioiodinated chicken luteinizing hormone (LH) that shows high specific binding and low nonspecific binding to a crude plasma membrane fraction of testicular cells of the domestic fowl and the Japanese quail, and to the ovarian granulosa cells of the Japanese quail. The change we made from the original method consisted of (1) using chicken LH for radioiodination that was not only highly purified but also retained a high receptor binding potency; (2) controlling the level of incorporation of radioiodine into chicken LH molecules by employing a short reaction time and low temperature; and (3) fractionating radioiodinated chicken LH further by gel filtration using high-performance liquid chromatography. Specific radioactivity of the final {sup 125}I-labeled chicken LH preparation was 14 microCi/micrograms. When specific binding was 12-16%, nonspecific binding was as low as 2-4% in the gonadal receptors. {sup 125}I-Labeled chicken LH was displaced by chicken LH and ovine LH but not by chicken follicle-stimulating hormone. The equilibrium association constant of quail testicular receptor was 3.6 x 10(9) M-1. We concluded that chicken LH radioiodinated by the present method is useful for studies of avian LH receptors.

  3. Effect of Growth Hormone Deficiency on Brain Structure, Motor Function and Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Emma A.; O'Reilly, Michelle A.; Clayden, Jonathan D.; Seunarine, Kiran K.; Chong, Wui K.; Dale, Naomi; Salt, Alison; Clark, Chris A.; Dattani, Mehul T.

    2012-01-01

    The growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 axis plays a role in normal brain growth but little is known of the effect of growth hormone deficiency on brain structure. Children with isolated growth hormone deficiency (peak growth hormone less than 6.7 [micro]g/l) and idiopathic short stature (peak growth hormone greater than 10 [micro]g/l)…

  4. Detecting growth hormone misuse in athletes

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Richard I. G.

    2013-01-01

    Athletes have been misusing growth hormone (GH) for its anabolic and metabolic effects since the early 1980s, at least a decade before endocrinologists began to treat adults with GH deficiency. Although there is an ongoing debate about whether GH is performance enhancing, recent studies suggest that GH improves strength and sprint capacity, particularly when combined with anabolic steroids. The detection of GH misuse is challenging because it is an endogenous hormone. Two approaches have been developed to detect GH misuse; the first is based on the measurement of pituitary GH isoforms and the ratio of 22-kDa isoform to total GH. The second is based on the measurement of insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and N-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (P-III-NP) which increase in a dose-dependent manner in response to GH administration. Both methodologies have been approved by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and have led to the detection of a number of athletes misusing GH. PMID:24251151

  5. Hormonal and lactational responses to growth hormone-releasing hormone treatment in lactating Japanese Black cows.

    PubMed

    Shingu, H; Hodate, K; Kushibiki, S; Ueda, Y; Touno, E; Shinoda, M; Ohashi, S

    2004-06-01

    Ten multiparous lactating Japanese Black cows (beef breed) were used to evaluate the effects of bovine growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) analog on milk yield and profiles of plasma hormones and metabolites. The cows received 2 consecutive 21-d treatments (a daily s.c. injection of 3-mg GHRH analog or saline) in a 2 (group) x 2 (period) Latin square crossover design. The 5 cows in group A received GHRH analog during period 1 (from d 22 to 42 postpartum) and saline during period 2 (from d 57 to 77 postpartum), and those in group B received saline and GHRH analog during periods 1 and 2, respectively. Mean milk yield decreased in saline treated compared with that during the 1-wk period before treatment 7.4 and 19.1% during periods 1 (group B) and 2 (group A), respectively. Treatment with GHRH analog increased milk yield 17.4% (period 1, group A) and 6.3% (period 2, group B). Treatment with GHRH analog induced higher basal plasma concentrations of growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), insulin, and glucose compared with saline-treated cows. In glucose challenge, the GHRH analog-treated beef cows had greater insulin secretion than the saline-treated beef cows. In insulin challenge, however, there were no significant differences in the areas surrounded by hypothetical lines of basal glucose concentrations and glucose response curves between GHRH analog- and saline-treated cows. These results demonstrate that GHRH analog treatment facilitates endogenous GH secretion in lactating Japanese Black cows, leading to increases in milk yield and plasma concentrations of IGF-1, insulin, and glucose.

  6. Parathyroid hormone linked to a collagen binding domain (PTH-CBD) promotes hair growth in a mouse model of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in a dose-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Katikaneni, Ranjitha; Ponnapakkam, Tulasi; Seymour, Andrew; Sakon, Joshua; Gensure, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is a major source of psychological stress in patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy, and can influence treatment decisions. While there is currently no therapy, PTH-CBD, a fusion protein of parathyroid hormone and collagen binding domain, has shown promise in animal models. Objective To determine if there are dose-dependent effects of PTH-CBD on chemotherapy-induced alopecia in a mouse model. Methods C57BL/6J mice were waxed to synchronize hair follicles; treated on day 7 with vehicle or PTH-CBD (100, 320 and 1000 mcg/kg subcutaneous injection); treated on day 9 with vehicle or cyclophosphamide (150 mg/kg i.p.). Mice were photographed every 3–4 days and sacrificed on day 63 for histological analysis. Photographs were quantified by grey scale analysis to assess hair content. Results Mice not receiving chemotherapy showed regrowth of hair 2 weeks following waxing, and normal histology after 2 months. Mice receiving chemotherapy alone showed marked hair loss after chemotherapy, which was sustained for 10 days and was followed by rapid regrowth of a normal coat. Histology revealed rapid cycling dystrophic anagen/catagen follicles. Animals receiving chemotherapy and PTH-CBD showed decreased hair loss and more rapid regrowth of hair than that seen with chemotherapy alone (increased hair growth by grey scale analysis, p<0.05), and the effects were dose dependent. Histologically, hair follicles in animals receiving the highest dose of PTH-CBD were in a quiescent phase, similar to mice which did not receive chemotherapy. Conclusions Single dose subcutaneous administration of PTH-CBD showed dose-dependent effects in minimizing hair loss and speeding recovery from chemotherapy-induced alopecia. PMID:24710191

  7. Nuclear hormone receptor coregulator: role in hormone action, metabolism, growth, and development.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Muktar A; Samuels, Herbert H

    2005-06-01

    Nuclear hormone receptor coregulator (NRC) (also referred to as activating signal cointegrator-2, thyroid hormone receptor-binding protein, peroxisome proliferator activating receptor-interacting protein, and 250-kDa receptor associated protein) belongs to a growing class of nuclear cofactors widely known as coregulators or coactivators that are necessary for transcriptional activation of target genes. The NRC gene is also amplified and overexpressed in breast, colon, and lung cancers. NRC is a 2063-amino acid protein that harbors a potent N-terminal activation domain (AD1) and a second more centrally located activation domain (AD2) that is rich in Glu and Pro. Near AD2 is a receptor-interacting domain containing an LxxLL motif (LxxLL-1), which interacts with a wide variety of ligand-bound nuclear hormone receptors with high affinity. A second LxxLL motif (LxxLL-2) located in the C-terminal region of NRC is more restricted in its nuclear hormone receptor specificity. The intrinsic activation potential of NRC is regulated by a C-terminal serine, threonine, leucine-regulatory domain. The potential role of NRC as a cointegrator is suggested by its ability to enhance transcriptional activation of a wide variety of transcription factors and from its in vivo association with a number of known transcriptional regulators including CBP/p300. Recent studies in mice indicate that deletion of both NRC alleles leads to embryonic lethality resulting from general growth retardation coupled with developmental defects in the heart, liver, brain, and placenta. NRC(-/-) mouse embryo fibroblasts spontaneously undergo apoptosis, indicating the importance of NRC as a prosurvival and antiapoptotic gene. Studies with 129S6 NRC(+/-) mice indicate that NRC is a pleiotropic regulator that is involved in growth, development, reproduction, metabolism, and wound healing.

  8. Effect of growth hormone-releasing factor on growth hormone release in children with radiation-induced growth hormone deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Lustig, R.H.; Schriock, E.A.; Kaplan, S.L.; Grumbach, M.M.

    1985-08-01

    Five male children who received cranial irradiation for extrahypothalamic intracranial neoplasms or leukemia and subsequently developed severe growth hormone (GH) deficiency were challenged with synthetic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF-44), in an attempt to distinguish hypothalamic from pituitary dysfunction as a cause of their GH deficiency, and to assess the readily releasable GH reserve in the pituitary. In response to a pulse of GRF-44 (5 micrograms/kg intravenously), mean peak GH levels rose to values higher than those evoked by the pharmacologic agents L-dopa or arginine (6.4 +/- 1.3 ng/mL v 1.5 +/- 0.4 ng/mL, P less than .05). The peak GH value occurred at a mean of 26.0 minutes after administration of GRF-44. These responses were similar to those obtained in children with severe GH deficiency due to other etiologies (peak GH 6.3 +/- 1.7 ng/mL, mean 28.0 minutes). In addition, there was a trend toward an inverse relationship between peak GH response to GRF-44 and the postirradiation interval. Prolactin and somatomedin-C levels did not change significantly after the administration of a single dose of GRF-44. The results of this study support the hypothesis that cranial irradiation in children can lead to hypothalamic GRF deficiency secondary to radiation injury of hypothalamic GRF-secreting neurons. This study also lends support to the potential therapeutic usefulness of GRF-44 or an analog for GH deficiency secondary to cranial irradiation.

  9. A phase 2 trial of long-acting TransCon growth hormone in adult GH deficiency.

    PubMed

    Höybye, Charlotte; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Ferone, Diego; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl; Gilfoyle, David; Christoffersen, Eva Dam; Mortensen, Eva; Leff, Jonathan A; Beckert, Michael

    2017-04-01

    TransCon growth hormone is a sustained-release human growth hormone prodrug under development in which unmodified growth hormone is transiently linked to a carrier molecule. It is intended as an alternative to daily growth hormone in the treatment of growth hormone deficiency. This was a multi-center, randomized, open-label, active-controlled trial designed to compare the safety (including tolerability and immunogenicity), pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of three doses of weekly TransCon GH to daily growth hormone (Omnitrope). Thirty-seven adult males and females diagnosed with adult growth hormone deficiency and stable on growth hormone replacement therapy for at least 3 months were, following a wash-out period, randomized (regardless of their pre-study dose) to one of three TransCon GH doses (0.02, 0.04 and 0.08 mg GH/kg/week) or Omnitrope 0.04 mg GH/kg/week (divided into 7 equal daily doses) for 4 weeks. Main outcomes evaluated were adverse events, immunogenicity and growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 levels. TransCon GH was well tolerated; fatigue and headache were the most frequent drug-related adverse events and reported in all groups. No lipoatrophy or nodule formation was reported. No anti-growth hormone-binding antibodies were detected. TransCon GH demonstrated a linear, dose-dependent increase in growth hormone exposure without accumulation. Growth hormone maximum serum concentration and insulin-like growth factor 1 exposure were similar after TransCon GH or Omnitrope administered at comparable doses. The results suggest that long-acting TransCon GH has a profile similar to daily growth hormone but with a more convenient dosing regimen. These findings support further TransCon GH development.

  10. The role of growth hormone in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Holly, J M; Amiel, S A; Sandhu, R R; Rees, L H; Wass, J A

    1988-09-01

    The insulin and growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) axis are two endocrine systems that are interlinked at many levels. GH is one of the glucose counter-regulatory hormones, rising in response to hypoglycaemia, it has both intrinsic hyperglycaemic actions and causes insulin resistance. Both IGF-I and its receptor have high structural and functional homology to insulin and its receptor. Insulin can regulate IGF-I production, acting on the GH receptor or at a post-receptor site. Conversely IGF-I is thought to have a permissive effect on the pancreatic insulin response to glucose. Growth is compromised in poorly controlled diabetic children; however, a causal link with altered GH/IGF-I levels has not been proven. Insulin-dependent diabetes clearly causes derangements in the GH/IGF-I axis. In poorly controlled diabetics GH levels are invariably raised whilst normal or low levels of IGF-I are found, indicating a dissociation between the two factors. Altered IGF-binding protein levels are also found, with high levels of small binding protein and low levels of large binding protein. These derangements are probably the result of interactions at many levels although the exact mechanisms are not fully understood. Raised GH levels could result from altered hypothalamic/pituitary control or reduced feedback inhibition. The latter could, in turn, result from low IGF-I levels, reduced availability of IGF-I to relevant receptors or increased levels of inhibitors (possibly the small binding protein). Low IGF-I levels could be directly due to deficient insulin levels or simply to lack of available circulating binding protein. Alternative or altered molecular forms of circulating GH in diabetes seem unlikely on present evidence. That GH has an effect on glycaemic control is most evident from the abnormal glucose tolerance seen in acromegalics, but is also seen with physiological GH variations such as during the pubertal growth spurt. In diabetics the

  11. Growth hormone deficiency in treated acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Mazziotti, Gherardo; Marzullo, Paolo; Doga, Mauro; Aimaretti, Gianluca; Giustina, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) of the adult is characterized by reduced quality of life (QoL) and physical fitness, skeletal fragility, and increased weight and cardiovascular risk. Hypopituitarism may develop in patients after definitive treatment of acromegaly, but an exact prevalence of GHD in this population is still uncertain owing to limited awareness and the scarce and conflicting data available on this topic. Because acromegaly and GHD may yield adverse consequences on similar target systems, the final outcomes of some complications of acromegaly may be further affected by the occurrence of GHD. However, it is still largely unknown whether patients with post-acromegaly GHD may benefit from GH replacement. We review the diagnostic, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of GHD in adult patients treated for acromegaly.

  12. Model for growth hormone receptor activation based on subunit rotation within a receptor dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Richard J.; Adams, Julian J.; Pelekanos, Rebecca A.; Wan, Yu; McKinstry, William J.; Palethorpe, Kathryn; Seeber, Ruth M.; Monks, Thea A.; Eidne, Karin A.; Parker, Michael W.; Waters, Michael J.

    2010-07-13

    Growth hormone is believed to activate the growth hormone receptor (GHR) by dimerizing two identical receptor subunits, leading to activation of JAK2 kinase associated with the cytoplasmic domain. However, we have reported previously that dimerization alone is insufficient to activate full-length GHR. By comparing the crystal structure of the liganded and unliganded human GHR extracellular domain, we show here that there is no substantial change in its conformation on ligand binding. However, the receptor can be activated by rotation without ligand by inserting a defined number of alanine residues within the transmembrane domain. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and coimmunoprecipitation studies suggest that receptor subunits undergo specific transmembrane interactions independent of hormone binding. We propose an activation mechanism involving a relative rotation of subunits within a dimeric receptor as a result of asymmetric placement of the receptor-binding sites on the ligand.

  13. Genome-Wide Binding Patterns of Thyroid Hormone Receptor Beta

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, Stephen; Switnicki, Michal Piotr; Angajala, Anusha; Lammel, Jan; Arumanayagam, Anithachristy S.; Webb, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) receptors (TRs) play central roles in metabolism and are major targets for pharmaceutical intervention. Presently, however, there is limited information about genome wide localizations of TR binding sites. Thus, complexities of TR genomic distribution and links between TRβ binding events and gene regulation are not fully appreciated. Here, we employ a BioChIP approach to capture TR genome-wide binding events in a liver cell line (HepG2). Like other NRs, TRβ appears widely distributed throughout the genome. Nevertheless, there is striking enrichment of TRβ binding sites immediately 5′ and 3′ of transcribed genes and TRβ can be detected near 50% of T3 induced genes. In contrast, no significant enrichment of TRβ is seen at negatively regulated genes or genes that respond to unliganded TRs in this system. Canonical TRE half-sites are present in more than 90% of TRβ peaks and classical TREs are also greatly enriched, but individual TRE organization appears highly variable with diverse half-site orientation and spacing. There is also significant enrichment of binding sites for TR associated transcription factors, including AP-1 and CTCF, near TR peaks. We conclude that T3-dependent gene induction commonly involves proximal TRβ binding events but that far-distant binding events are needed for T3 induction of some genes and that distinct, indirect, mechanisms are often at play in negative regulation and unliganded TR actions. Better understanding of genomic context of TR binding sites will help us determine why TR regulates genes in different ways and determine possibilities for selective modulation of TR action. PMID:24558356

  14. Hypoglycemia associated with clonidine testing for growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Huang, C; Banerjee, K; Sochett, E; Perlman, K; Wherrett, D; Daneman, D

    2001-08-01

    We have observed 4 cases of hypoglycemia associated with clonidine stimulation of growth hormone secretion; only one patient had growth hormone deficiency. Significant drowsiness after administration of clonidine may prolong the period of fasting in these children and mask early signs and symptoms, leading to severe hypoglycemia.

  15. Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Banu; Winters, Stephen J

    2016-03-05

    Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is a circulating glycoprotein that transports testosterone and other steroids in the blood. Interest in SHBG has escalated in recent years because of its inverse association with obesity and insulin resistance, and because many studies have linked lower circulating levels of SHBG to metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, polycystic ovary syndrome, and early puberty. The purpose of this review is to summarize molecular, clinical, endocrine, and epidemiological findings to illustrate how measurement of plasma SHBG may be useful in clinical medicine in children.

  16. Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Banu; Winters, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is a circulating glycoprotein that transports testosterone and other steroids in the blood. Interest in SHBG has escalated in recent years because of its inverse association with obesity and insulin resistance, and because many studies have linked lower circulating levels of SHBG to metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, polycystic ovary syndrome, and early puberty. The purpose of this review is to summarize molecular, clinical, endocrine, and epidemiological findings to illustrate how measurement of plasma SHBG may be useful in clinical medicine in children. PMID:26761949

  17. Bovine growth hormone: human food safety evaluation.

    PubMed

    Juskevich, J C; Guyer, C G

    1990-08-24

    Scientists in the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), after reviewing the scientific literature and evaluating studies conducted by pharmaceutical companies, have concluded that the use of recombinant bovine growth hormone (rbGH) in dairy cattle presents no increased health risk to consumers. Bovine GH is not biologically active in humans, and oral toxicity studies have demonstrated that rbGH is not orally active in rats, a species responsive to parenterally administered bGH. Recombinant bGH treatment produces an increase in the concentration of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in cow's milk. However, oral toxicity studies have shown that bovine IGF-I lacks oral activity in rats. Additionally, the concentration of IGF-I in milk of rbGH-treated cows is within the normal physiological range found in human breast milk, and IGF-I is denatured under conditions used to process cow's milk for infant formula. On the basis of estimates of the amount of protein absorbed intact in humans and the concentration of IGF-I in cow's milk during rbGH treatment, biologically significant levels of intact IGF-I would not be absorbed.

  18. Extrapituitary growth hormone synthesis in humans.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ibave, Diana Cristina; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Iram Pablo; Garza-Rodríguez, María de Lourdes; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The gene for pituitary growth hormone (GH-N) in man belongs to a multigene locus located at chromosome 17q24.2, which also harbors four additional genes: one for a placental variant of GH-N (named GH-V) and three of chorionic somatommamotropin (CSH) type. Their tandem arrangement from 5' to 3' is: GH-N, CSH-L, CSH-1, GH-V and CSH-2. GH-N is mainly expressed in the pituitary from birth throughout life, while the remaining genes are expressed in the placenta of pregnant women. Pituitary somatotrophs secrete GH into the bloodstream to act at receptor sites in most tissues. GH participates in the regulation of several complex physiological processes, including growth and metabolism. Recently, the presence of GH has been described in several extrapituitary sites, such as neural, ocular, reproductive, immune, cardiovascular, muscular, dermal and skeletal tissues. It has been proposed that GH has an autocrine action in these tissues. While the body of evidence for its presence is constantly growing, research of its possible function and implications lag behind. In this review we highlight the evidence of extrapituitary synthesis of GH in humans.

  19. Sex hormones, sex hormone binding globulin, and vertebral fractures in older men.

    PubMed

    Cawthon, Peggy M; Schousboe, John T; Harrison, Stephanie L; Ensrud, Kristine E; Black, Dennis; Cauley, Jane A; Cummings, Steven R; LeBlanc, Erin S; Laughlin, Gail A; Nielson, Carrie M; Broughton, Augusta; Kado, Deborah M; Hoffman, Andrew R; Jamal, Sophie A; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Orwoll, Eric S

    2016-03-01

    The association between sex hormones and sex hormone binding globin (SHBG) with vertebral fractures in men is not well studied. In these analyses, we determined whether sex hormones and SHBG were associated with greater likelihood of vertebral fractures in a prospective cohort study of community dwelling older men. We included data from participants in MrOS who had been randomly selected for hormone measurement (N=1463, including 1054 with follow-up data 4.6years later). Major outcomes included prevalent vertebral fracture (semi-quantitative grade≥2, N=140, 9.6%) and new or worsening vertebral fracture (change in SQ grade≥1, N=55, 5.2%). Odds ratios per SD decrease in sex hormones and per SD increase in SHBG were estimated with logistic regression adjusted for potentially confounding factors, including age, bone mineral density, and other sex hormones. Higher SHBG was associated with a greater likelihood of prevalent vertebral fractures (OR: 1.38 per SD increase, 95% CI: 1.11, 1.72). Total estradiol analyzed as a continuous variable was not associated with prevalent vertebral fractures (OR per SD decrease: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.68 to 1.10). Men with total estradiol values ≤17pg/ml had a borderline higher likelihood of prevalent fracture than men with higher values (OR: 1.46, 95% CI: 0.99, 2.16). There was no association between total testosterone and prevalent fracture. In longitudinal analyses, SHBG (OR: 1.42 per SD increase, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.95) was associated with new or worsening vertebral fracture, but there was no association with total estradiol or total testosterone. In conclusion, higher SHBG (but not testosterone or estradiol) is an independent risk factor for vertebral fractures in older men.

  20. Studies on the nature of plasma growth hormone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S.; Grindeland, R. E.; Reilly, T. J.; Yang, S. H.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents further evidence for the existence of two discrete forms of growth hormone in human plasma, one which is detectable by both radioimmunoassay and bioassay and is immunoreactive, and the other, termed 'bioactive', which is detected by tibial bioassay but shows little reactivity with currently available antisera to pituitary growth hormone. The same division of immunoactive and bioactive growth hormone occurs in rats, though with less disparity. Tests on rats indicated that the bioactive hormone is preferentially released into jugular vein plasma and that plasma concentrations of the bioactive hormone can be enhanced by insulin administration. The bioactive hormone was detectable by tibial assays in Cohn fractions IV, IV-1, and IV-4, and could be concentrated about 40-fold by fractionation with (NaPO3)6 and (NH4)2SO4.

  1. Synthesis and binding affinity of an iodinated juvenile hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, G.D.; Eng, W.S.; Robles, S.; Vogt, R.G.; Wisniewski, J.R.; Wawrzenczyk, C.

    1988-01-25

    The synthesis of the first iodinated juvenile hormone (JH) in enantiomerically enriched form is reported. This chiral compound, 12-iodo-JH I, has an iodine atom replacing a methyl group of the natural insect juvenile hormone, JH I, which is important in regulating morphogenesis and reproduction in the Lepidoptera. The unlabeled compound shows approximately 10% of the relative binding affinity for the larval hemolymph JH binding protein (JHBP) of Manduca sexta, which specifically binds natural /sup 3/H-10R,11S-JH I (labeled at 58 Ci/mmol) with a KD of 8 X 10(-8) M. It is also approximately one-tenth as biologically active as JH I in the black Manduca and epidermal commitment assays. The 12-hydroxy and 12-oxo compounds are poor competitors and are also biologically inactive. The radioiodinated (/sup 125/I)12-iodo-JH I can be prepared in low yield at greater than 2500 Ci/mmol by nucleophilic displacement using no-carrier-added /sup 125/I-labeled sodium iodide in acetone; however, synthesis using sodium iodide carrier to give the approximately 50 Ci/mmol radioiodinated ligand proceeds in higher radiochemical yield with fewer by-products and provides a radioligand which is more readily handled in binding assays. The KD of (/sup 125/I)12-iodo-JH I was determined for hemolymph JHBP of three insects: M. sexta, 795 nM; Galleria mellonella, 47 nM; Locusta migratoria, 77 nM. The selectivity of 12-iodo-JH I for the 32-kDa JHBP of M. sexta was demonstrated by direct autoradiography of a native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gel of larval hemolymph incubated with the radioiodinated ligand. Thus, the in vitro and in vivo activity of 12-iodo-JH I indicate that it can serve as an important new gamma-emitting probe in the search for JH receptor proteins in target tissues.

  2. Synthesis and binding affinity of an iodinated juvenile hormone.

    PubMed

    Prestwich, G D; Eng, W S; Robles, S; Vogt, R G; Wiśniewski, J R; Wawrzeńczyk, C

    1988-01-25

    The synthesis of the first iodinated juvenile hormone (JH) in enantiomerically enriched form is reported. This chiral compound, 12-iodo-JH I, has an iodine atom replacing a methyl group of the natural insect juvenile hormone, JH I, which is important in regulating morphogenesis and reproduction in the Lepidoptera. The unlabeled compound shows approximately 10% of the relative binding affinity for the larval hemolymph JH binding protein (JHBP) of Manduca sexta, which specifically binds natural 3H-10R,11S-JH I (labeled at 58 Ci/mmol) with a KD of 8 X 10(-8) M. It is also approximately one-tenth as biologically active as JH I in the black Manduca and epidermal commitment assays. The 12-hydroxy and 12-oxo compounds are poor competitors and are also biologically inactive. The radioiodinated [125I]12-iodo-JH I can be prepared in low yield at greater than 2500 Ci/mmol by nucleophilic displacement using no-carrier-added 125I-labeled sodium iodide in acetone; however, synthesis using sodium iodide carrier to give the approximately 50 Ci/mmol radioiodinated ligand proceeds in higher radiochemical yield with fewer by-products and provides a radioligand which is more readily handled in binding assays. The KD of [125I]12-iodo-JH I was determined for hemolymph JHBP of three insects: M. sexta, 795 nM; Galleria mellonella, 47 nM; Locusta migratoria, 77 nM. The selectivity of 12-iodo-JH I for the 32-kDa JHBP of M. sexta was demonstrated by direct autoradiography of a native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gel of larval hemolymph incubated with the radioiodinated ligand. Thus, the in vitro and in vivo activity of 12-iodo-JH I indicate that it can serve as an important new gamma-emitting probe in the search for JH receptor proteins in target tissues.

  3. Reevaluation of lipolytic activity of growth hormone in rabbit adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Barenton, B; Batifol, V; Combarnous, Y; Dulor, J P; Durand, P; Vezinhet, A

    1984-07-18

    The lipolytic activities of porcine pituitary fractions and purified growth hormone (GH) from human (h), porcine (p), ovine (o) and rabbit (Rb) origin as well as ovine placental lactogen (oPL), were compared to that of ACTH on rabbit adipocytes. All the GH preparations and oPL were equivalent in inhibiting the binding of labelled oGH to liver plasma membranes from pregnant rabbits. ACTH, and to a lesser extent porcine pituitary fractions and hGH, stimulated free fatty acid production by isolated adipocytes. The sensitivity of the adipocytes to these factors was increased when adenosine deaminase was added to the incubation medium. But, RbGH, pGH, oGH and oPL had no effect. We conclude that GH is not directly involved in the control of lipolysis in rabbit adipocytes and that the effect of hGH is rather due to a contamination of this preparation by other pituitary factors.

  4. MENTAL RETARDATION AND ACCELERATED GROWTH: INAPPROPRIATE SECRETION OF HUMAN GROWTH HORMONE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    he had periodic elevations of the fasting plasma growth hormone levels and regularly had a paradoxical fall in the hormone level associated with...insulin-induced hypoglycemia. The human growth hormone response to arginine infusion was perfectly normal. It is suggested that the occasional elevations...in human growth hormone under fasting conditions and the paradoxical response to insulin are compatible with the hypothesis that this patient

  5. Anthropometric measurements in patients with growth hormone deficiency before treatment with human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Zachmann, M; Fernandez, F; Tassinari, D; Thakker, R; Prader, A

    1980-05-01

    In 74 children (52 males, 22 females) with growth hormone (GH) deficiency (30 cases with isolated GH-deficiency, two of them familial; 4 familial and one isolated case with tendency for formation of antibodies against hGH; 29 with other pituitary hormone defects; 10 craniopharyngiomas), various anthropometric measurements were analyzed before treatment with hGH. In all groups, standing height, sitting height, and subischial leg height were equally retarded, and bihumeral width was more retarded than biiliac width; the head was relatively large; fat tissue was increased with subscapular skinfolds being greater than triceps skinfolds, indicating relative obestiy of the trunk; muscle and/or bone mass was reduced. In isolated GH-deficiency, head shape was slightly scaphoid; in combined defects, it was round, and in craniopharyngioma cases, it was brachycephalic. It is concluded that antrhopometric measurements may help in differentiating the type of GH-deficiency.

  6. Growth hormone in the aging male.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Fred R

    2013-08-01

    Secretion of growth hormone (GH) and IGF-1 levels decline during advancing years-of-life. These changes (somatopause) are associated with loss of vitality, muscle mass, physical function, together with the occurrence of frailty, central adiposity, cardiovascular complications, and deterioration of mental function. For GH treatment to be considered for anti-aging, improved longevity, organ-specific function, or quality of life should be demonstrable. A limited number of controlled studies suggest that GH supplementation in older men increases lean mass by ∼2 kg with similar reductions in fat mass. There is little evidence that GH treatment improves muscle strength and performance (e.g. walking speed or ability to climb stairs) or quality of life. The GHRH agonist (tesamorelin) restores normal GH pulsatility and amplitude, selectively reduces visceral fat, intima media thickness and triglycerides, and improves cognitive function in older persons. This report critically reviews the potential for GH augmentation during aging with emphasis on men since women appear more resistant to treatment.

  7. Justified and unjustified use of growth hormone

    PubMed Central

    van der Lely, A J

    2004-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy for children and adults with proven GH deficiency due to a pituitary disorder has become an accepted therapy with proven efficacy. GH is increasingly suggested, however, as a potential treatment for frailty, osteoporosis, morbid obesity, cardiac failure, and various catabolic conditions. However, the available placebo controlled studies have not reported many significant beneficial effects, and it might even be dangerous to use excessive GH dosages in conditions in which the body has just decided to decrease GH actions. GH can indeed induce changes in body composition that are considered to be advantageous to GH deficient and non-GH deficient subjects. In contrast to GH replacement therapy in GH deficient subjects, however, excessive GH action due to GH misuse seems to be ineffective in improving muscle power. Moreover, there are no available study data to indicate that the use of GH for non-GH deficient subjects should be advocated, especially as animal data suggest that lower GH levels are positively correlated with longevity. PMID:15466991

  8. Effectiveness of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone for Pharyngocutaneous Fistula Closure

    PubMed Central

    Sari, Murat; Midi, Ahmet; Yumusakhuylu, Ali Cemal; Findik, Ozan; Binnetoglu, Adem

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In laryngeal cancer, which comprises 25% of head and neck cancer, chemotherapy has come into prominence with the increase in organ-protective treatments. With such treatment, salvage surgery has increased following recurrence; the incidence of pharyngocutaneous fistula has also increased in both respiratory and digestive system surgery. We investigated the effects of recombinant human growth hormone on pharyngocutaneous fistula closure in Sprague-Dawley rats, based on an increase in amino acid uptake and protein synthesis for wound healing, an increase in mitogenesis, and enhancement of collagen formation by recombinant human growth hormone. Methods This study was experimental animal study. Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were separated into two groups, and pharyngoesophagotomy was performed. The pharyngoesophagotomy was sutured with vicryl in both groups. Rats in group 1 (control group) received no treatment, while those in group 2 were administered a subcutaneous injection of recombinant human growth hormone daily. On day 14, the pharynx, larynx, and upper oesophagus were excised and examined microscopically. Results Pharyngocutaneous fistula exhibited better closure macroscopically in the recombinant human growth hormone group. There was a significant difference in collagen formation and epithelisation in the recombinant human growth hormone group compared to the control group. Conclusion This study is believed to be the first in which the effect of recombinant human growth hormone on pharyngocutaneous fistula closure was evaluated, and the findings suggest the potential of use of growth hormone for treatment of pharyngocutaneous fistula. PMID:26622960

  9. Ontogeny of pituitary growth hormone and growth hormone mRNA in the chicken.

    PubMed

    McCann-Levorse, L M; Radecki, S V; Donoghue, D J; Malamed, S; Foster, D N; Scanes, C G

    1993-01-01

    The changes in pituitary growth hormone (GH) mRNA levels have been determined by Northern blot analysis and laser densitometry during embryonic development and posthatch growth of white Leghorn cockerels. Pituitary GH mRNA levels were observed to progressively increase between 18 days of embryonic development to a maximum at 4 weeks of age (posthatch). Subsequently, pituitary GH mRNA levels declined between 4 and 8 weeks of age, and between 12 weeks of age and adulthood. Pituitary GH contents showed increases during embryonic development and posthatch growth that paralleled the rise in GH mRNA. The decline in pituitary GH mRNA levels between 4 weeks of age and adulthood occurs when GH secretion has been observed previously to decline.

  10. Towards Engineering Hormone-Binding Globulins as Drug Delivery Agents

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wee Lee; Zhou, Aiwu; Read, Randy J.

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of many diseases such as cancer requires the use of drugs that can cause severe side effects. Off-target toxicity can often be reduced simply by directing the drugs specifically to sites of diseases. Amidst increasingly sophisticated methods of targeted drug delivery, we observed that Nature has already evolved elegant means of sending biological molecules to where they are needed. One such example is corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), the major carrier of the anti-inflammatory hormone, cortisol. Targeted release of cortisol is triggered by cleavage of CBG's reactive centre loop by elastase, a protease released by neutrophils in inflamed tissues. This work aimed to establish the feasibility of exploiting this mechanism to carry therapeutic agents to defined locations. The reactive centre loop of CBG was altered with site-directed mutagenesis to favour cleavage by other proteases, to alter the sites at which it would release its cargo. Mutagenesis succeeded in making CBG a substrate for either prostate specific antigen (PSA), a prostate-specific serine protease, or thrombin, a key protease in the blood coagulation cascade. PSA is conspicuously overproduced in prostatic hyperplasia and is, therefore, a good way of targeting hyperplastic prostate tissues. Thrombin is released during clotting and consequently is ideal for conferring specificity to thrombotic sites. Using fluorescence-based titration assays, we also showed that CBG can be engineered to bind a new compound, thyroxine-6-carboxyfluorescein, instead of its physiological ligand, cortisol, thereby demonstrating that it is possible to tailor the hormone binding site to deliver a therapeutic drug. In addition, we proved that the efficiency with which CBG releases bound ligand can be increased by introducing some well-placed mutations. This proof-of-concept study has raised the prospect of a novel means of targeted drug delivery, using the serpin conformational change to combat the problem of

  11. Growth hormone treatment in non-growth hormone-deficient children

    PubMed Central

    Carta, Luisanna; Ibba, Anastasia; Guzzetti, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Until 1985 growth hormone (GH) was obtained from pituitary extracts, and was available in limited amounts only to treat severe growth hormone deficiency (GHD). With the availability of unlimited quantities of GH obtained from recombinant DNA technology, researchers started to explore new modalities to treat GHD children, as well as to treat a number of other non-GHD conditions. Although with some differences between different countries, GH treatment is indicated in children with Turner syndrome, chronic renal insufficiency, Prader-Willi syndrome, deletions/mutations of the SHOX gene, as well as in short children born small for gestational age and with idiopathic short stature. Available data from controlled trials indicate that GH treatment increases adult height in patients with Turner syndrome, in patients with chronic renal insufficiency, and in short children born small for gestational age. Patients with SHOX deficiency seem to respond to treatment similarly to Turner syndrome. GH treatment in children with idiopathic short stature produces a modest mean increase in adult height but the response in the individual patient is unpredictable. Uncontrolled studies indicate that GH treatment may be beneficial also in children with Noonan syndrome. In patients with Prader-Willi syndrome GH treatment normalizes growth and improves body composition and cognitive function. In any indication the response to GH seems correlated to the dose and the duration of treatment. GH treatment is generally safe with no major adverse effects being recorded in any condition. PMID:24926456

  12. Epiphyseal growth plate growth hormone receptor signaling is decreased in chronic kidney disease-related growth retardation.

    PubMed

    Troib, Ariel; Landau, Daniel; Kachko, Leonid; Rabkin, Ralph; Segev, Yael

    2013-11-01

    Linear growth retardation in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been ascribed to insensitivity to growth hormone. This resistance state has been attributed to impaired growth hormone signaling through the JAK2/STAT5 pathway in liver and skeletal muscle leading to reduced insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Here we determine whether systemic and growth plate alterations in growth hormone signaling contribute to CKD-induced linear growth retardation using partially nephrectomized and pair-fed control 20-day-old rats. Serum growth hormone did not change in rats with CKD, yet serum IGF-I levels were decreased and growth retarded. The tibial growth plate hypertrophic zone was wider and vascularization at the primary ossification center was reduced in CKD. This was associated with a decrease in growth plate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA and immunostainable VEGF and IGF-I levels. Growth plate growth hormone receptor and STAT5 protein levels were unchanged, while JAK2 was reduced. Despite comparable growth hormone and growth hormone receptor levels in CKD and control rats, relative STAT5 phosphorylation was significantly depressed in CKD. Of note, the mRNA of SOCS2, an inhibitor of growth hormone signaling, was increased. Thus, linear growth impairment in CKD can in part be explained by impaired long bone growth plate growth hormone receptor signaling through the JAK2/STAT5 pathway, an abnormality that may be caused by an increase in SOCS2 expression.

  13. Regulation of growth hormone secretion by the growth hormone releasing hexapeptide (GHRP-6).

    PubMed

    Micic, D; Mallo, F; Peino, R; Cordido, F; Leal-Cerro, A; Garcia-Mayor, R V; Casanueva, F F

    1993-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion is regulated by a complex system of central and peripheral signals. Recently, a new GH-releasing hexapeptide (His-D-Trp-Ala-Trp-D-Phe-Lys-NH2) called GHRP-6 which specifically releases GH has been studied. In the present work the mechanism of action of GHRP-6 has been addressed in experimental animal models as well as in obese subjects. GHRP-6 releases GH independently of the hypothalamic factors GHRH and somatostatin and is a powerful GH releaser in obesity.

  14. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein Beta-2 is involved in growth hormone-regulated insulin-like growth factor-II gene expression in the liver of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously, we showed that levels of different CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) mRNAs in the liver of rainbow trout were modulated by GH and suggested that C/EBPs might be involved in GH induced IGF-II gene expression. As a step toward further investigation, we have developed monospecific poly...

  15. Improved response of growth hormone to growth hormone-releasing hormone and reversible chronic thyroiditis after hydrocortisone replacement in isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Miho; Sato, Haruhiro; Miyamoto, Yoshiyasu; Hirukawa, Takashi; Sawaya, Asako; Miyakogawa, Takayo; Tatsumi, Ryoko; Kakuta, Takatoshi

    2009-07-20

    We report a 44-year-old Japanese man who showed a reversible blunted response of growth hormone (GH) to GH-releasing hormone (GRH) stimulation test and reversible chronic thyroiditis accompanied by isolated ACTH deficiency. He was admitted to our hospital because of severe general malaise, hypotension, and hypoglycemia. He showed repeated attacks of hypoglycemia, and his serum sodium level gradually decreased. Finally, he was referred to the endocrinology division, where his adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol values were found to be low, and his GH level was slightly elevated. An increased value of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and decreased values of free triidothyronine and free thyroxine were observed along with anti-thyroglobulin antibody, suggesting chronic thyroiditis. Pituitary stimulation tests revealed a blunted response of ACTH and cortisol to corticotropin-releasing hormone, and a blunted response of GH to GRH. Hydrocortisone replacement was then started, and this improved the patient's general condition. His hypothyroid state gradually ameliorated and his titer of anti-thyroglobulin antibody decreased to the normal range. Pituitary function was re-evaluated with GRH stimulation test under a maintenance dose of 20 mg/day hydrocortisone and showed a normal response of GH to GRH. It is suggested that re-evaluation of pituitary and thyroid function is useful for diagnosing isolated ACTH deficiency after starting a maintenance dose of hydrocortisone in order to avoid unnecessary replacement of thyroid hormone.

  16. Concomitant occurrence of Turner syndrome and growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jung; Shin, Ha Young; Lee, Chong Guk; Kim, Jae Hyun

    2016-11-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic disorder in phenotypic females that has characteristic physical features and presents as partial or complete absence of the second sex chromosome. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is a condition caused by insufficient release of growth hormone from the pituitary gland. The concomitant occurrence of TS and GHD is rare and has not yet been reported in Korea. Here we report 2 cases of TS and GHD. In case 1, GHD was initially diagnosed. Karyotyping was performed because of the presence of the typical phenotype and poor response to growth hormone therapy, which revealed 45,X/45,X+mar. The patient showed increased growth velocity after the growth hormone dose was increased. In case 2, a growth hormone provocation test and chromosomal analysis were performed simultaneously because of decreased growth velocity and the typical TS phenotype, which showed GHD and a mosaic karyotype of 45,X/46,XX. The patient showed spontaneous pubertal development. In female patients with short stature, it is important to perform a throughout physical examination and test for hormonal and chromosomal abnormalities because diagnostic accuracy is important for treatment and prognosis.

  17. Concomitant occurrence of Turner syndrome and growth hormone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jung; Shin, Ha Young; Lee, Chong Guk

    2016-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic disorder in phenotypic females that has characteristic physical features and presents as partial or complete absence of the second sex chromosome. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is a condition caused by insufficient release of growth hormone from the pituitary gland. The concomitant occurrence of TS and GHD is rare and has not yet been reported in Korea. Here we report 2 cases of TS and GHD. In case 1, GHD was initially diagnosed. Karyotyping was performed because of the presence of the typical phenotype and poor response to growth hormone therapy, which revealed 45,X/45,X+mar. The patient showed increased growth velocity after the growth hormone dose was increased. In case 2, a growth hormone provocation test and chromosomal analysis were performed simultaneously because of decreased growth velocity and the typical TS phenotype, which showed GHD and a mosaic karyotype of 45,X/46,XX. The patient showed spontaneous pubertal development. In female patients with short stature, it is important to perform a throughout physical examination and test for hormonal and chromosomal abnormalities because diagnostic accuracy is important for treatment and prognosis. PMID:28018463

  18. Liquid growth hormone: preservatives and buffers.

    PubMed

    Kappelgaard, Anne-Marie; Bojesen, Anders; Skydsgaard, Karsten; Sjögren, Ingrid; Laursen, Torben

    2004-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) treatment is a successful medical therapy for children and adults with GH deficiency as well as for growth retardation due to chronic renal disease, Turner syndrome and in children born small for gestational age. For all of these conditions, treatment is long term and patients receive daily subcutaneous injections of GH for many years. Patient compliance is therefore of critical importance to ensure treatment benefit. One of the major factors influencing compliance is injection pain. Besides the injection device used, pain perception and local tissue reaction following injection are dependent on the preservative used in the formulation and the concentration of GH. Injection pain may also be related to the buffer substance and injection volume. A liquid formulation of GH, Norditropi SimpleXx, has been developed that dispenses with the need for reconstitution before administration. The formulation uses phenol (3 mg/ml) as a preservative (to protect product from microbial degradation or contamination) and histidine as a buffer. Alternative preservatives used in other GH formulations include m-cresol (9 mg/ml) and benzyl alcohol (3-9 mg/ml). Buffering agents include citrate and phosphate. Phenol has been successfully used as a preservative in drug formulations for more than 50 years and is considered a safe and effective agent which complies with strict international requirements for preservatives in drug formulations. In toxicological studies, no or only mild local reactions have been observed following subcutaneous administration of phenol (7.5 mg/ml), m-cresol (3-4 mg/ml) and benzyl alcohol (9 mg/ml). No general toxicity reactions were observed after subcutaneous administration of these agents. Clinical evaluation of the preservatives and buffers used in Norditropin SimpleXx showed that pain perception was similar between formulations containing phenol and benzyl alcohol, whereas m-cresol was associated with more painful injections than benzyl

  19. Human Growth Hormone (HGH): Does It Slow Aging?

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Healthy aging Human growth hormone is described by some as the key to slowing the aging ... about proven ways to improve your health. Remember, healthy lifestyle choices — such as eating a healthy diet and ...

  20. Growth hormone treatment in young children with Down's syndrome: effects on growth and psychomotor development

    PubMed Central

    Anneren, G; Tuvemo, T; Carlsson-Skwirut, C; Lonnerholm, T; Bang, P; Sara, V; Gustafsson, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Learning disability and short stature are cardinal signs of Down's syndrome. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), regulated by growth hormone (GH) from about 6 months of age, may be involved in brain development.
AIMS—To study long term effects of GH on linear growth and psychomotor development in young children with Down's syndrome. 
Study design—Fifteen children with Down's syndrome were treated with GH for three years from the age of 6 to 9 months (mean, 7.4). Linear growth, psychomotor development, skeletal maturation, serum concentrations of IGF-I and its binding proteins (BPs), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of IGF-II were studied.
RESULTS—The mean height of the study group increased from −1.8 to −0.8 SDS (Swedish standard) during treatment, whereas that of a Down's syndrome control group fell from −1.7 to −2.2 SDS. Growth velocity declined after treatment stopped. Head growth did not accelerate during treatment. No significant difference in mental or gross motor development was found. The low concentrations of serum IGF-I and IGFBP-3 became normal during GH treatment.
CONCLUSIONS—GH treatment results in normal growth velocity in Down's syndrome but does not affect head circumference or mental or gross motor development. Growth velocity declines after treatment stops.

 PMID:10086938

  1. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... affect many different processes, including Growth and development Metabolism - how your body gets energy from the foods you eat Sexual function Reproduction Mood Endocrine glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the ...

  2. Adrenergic receptor control mechanism for growth hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Blackard, W G; Heidingsfelder, S A

    1968-06-01

    The influence of catecholamines on growth hormone secretion has been difficult to establish previously, possibly because of the suppressive effect of the induced hyperglycemia on growth hormone concentrations. In this study, an adrenergic receptor control mechanism for human growth hormone (HGH) secretion was uncovered by studying the effects of alpha and beta receptor blockade on insulin-induced growth hormone elevations in volunteer subjects. Alpha adrenergic blockade with phentolamine during insulin hypoglycemia, 0.1 U/kg, inhibited growth hormon elevations to 30-50% of values in the same subjects during insulin hypoglycemia without adrenergic blockade. More complete inhibition by phentolamine could not be demonstrated at a lower dose of insulin (0.05 U/kg). Beta adrenergic blockade with propranolol during insulin hypoglycemia significantly enhanced HGH concentrations in paired experiments. The inhibiting effect of alpha adrenergic receptor blockade on HGH concentrations could not be attributed to differences in blood glucose or free fatty acid values; however, more prolonged hypoglycemia and lower plasma free fatty acid values may have been a factor in the greater HGH concentrations observed during beta blockade. In the absence of insulin induced hypoglycemia, neither alpha nor beta adrenergic receptor blockade had a detectable effect on HGH concentrations. Theophylline, an inhibitor of cyclic 3'5'-AMP phosphodiesterase activity, also failed to alter plasma HGH concentrations. These studies demonstrate a stimulatory effect of alpha receptors and a possible inhibitory effect of beta receptors on growth hormone secretion.

  3. Growth hormone is permissive for neoplastic colon growth

    PubMed Central

    Chesnokova, Vera; Zonis, Svetlana; Zhou, Cuiqi; Recouvreux, Maria Victoria; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Araki, Takako; Barrett, Robert; Workman, Michael; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Ljubimov, Vladimir A.; Uhart, Magdalena; Melmed, Shlomo

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) excess in acromegaly is associated with increased precancerous colon polyps and soft tissue adenomas, whereas short-stature humans harboring an inactivating GH receptor mutation do not develop cancer. We show that locally expressed colon GH is abundant in conditions predisposing to colon cancer and in colon adenocarcinoma-associated stromal fibroblasts. Administration of a GH receptor (GHR) blocker in acromegaly patients induced colon p53 and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), reversing progrowth GH signals. p53 was also induced in skin fibroblasts derived from short-statured humans with mutant GHR. GH-deficient prophet of pituitary-specific positive transcription factor 1 (Prop1)−/− mice exhibited induced colon p53 levels, and cross-breeding them with Apcmin+/− mice that normally develop intestinal and colon tumors resulted in GH-deficient double mutants with markedly decreased tumor number and size. We also demonstrate that GH suppresses p53 and reduces apoptosis in human colon cell lines as well as in induced human pluripotent stem cell-derived intestinal organoids, and confirm in vivo that GH suppresses colon mucosal p53/p21. GH excess leads to decreased colon cell phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), increased cell survival with down-regulated APC, nuclear β-catenin accumulation, and increased epithelial–mesenchymal transition factors and colon cell motility. We propose that GH is a molecular component of the “field change” milieu permissive for neoplastic colon growth. PMID:27226307

  4. Growth hormone is permissive for neoplastic colon growth.

    PubMed

    Chesnokova, Vera; Zonis, Svetlana; Zhou, Cuiqi; Recouvreux, Maria Victoria; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Araki, Takako; Barrett, Robert; Workman, Michael; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Ljubimov, Vladimir A; Uhart, Magdalena; Melmed, Shlomo

    2016-06-07

    Growth hormone (GH) excess in acromegaly is associated with increased precancerous colon polyps and soft tissue adenomas, whereas short-stature humans harboring an inactivating GH receptor mutation do not develop cancer. We show that locally expressed colon GH is abundant in conditions predisposing to colon cancer and in colon adenocarcinoma-associated stromal fibroblasts. Administration of a GH receptor (GHR) blocker in acromegaly patients induced colon p53 and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), reversing progrowth GH signals. p53 was also induced in skin fibroblasts derived from short-statured humans with mutant GHR. GH-deficient prophet of pituitary-specific positive transcription factor 1 (Prop1)(-/-) mice exhibited induced colon p53 levels, and cross-breeding them with Apc(min+/-) mice that normally develop intestinal and colon tumors resulted in GH-deficient double mutants with markedly decreased tumor number and size. We also demonstrate that GH suppresses p53 and reduces apoptosis in human colon cell lines as well as in induced human pluripotent stem cell-derived intestinal organoids, and confirm in vivo that GH suppresses colon mucosal p53/p21. GH excess leads to decreased colon cell phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), increased cell survival with down-regulated APC, nuclear β-catenin accumulation, and increased epithelial-mesenchymal transition factors and colon cell motility. We propose that GH is a molecular component of the "field change" milieu permissive for neoplastic colon growth.

  5. Simplified method for measuring sex-hormone binding globulin

    SciTech Connect

    Fattah, D.I.; Chard, T.

    1981-07-01

    We describe a simple, rapid method for measurement of sex-hormone binding globulin. Serial dilutions of pregnancy serum are prepared in serum from males that has been pre-treated by heating to 60 degrees C for 1 h to destroy endogenous binding globulin, which is then determined by a long-used technique to yield a set of ''standards.'' In the assay itself, a fixed amount of (/sup 3/H)-labeled and unlabeled dihydrotestosterone is incubated with standard or unknown, and the bound fraction precipitated with saturated ammonium sulfate. A plot of percent of the steroid bound vs standard dilution yields a sigmoid curve, from which the results in unknowns can be read by simple extrapolation. Within-assay CVs for pools of serum from men, women, and women in late pregnancy were 6.56, 9.59, and 8.4%, respectively. Between-assay CVs for the same pools were 8.05, 9.5, and 11.5%, respectively. The correlation between results obtained by this method and those of the older technique was 0.95 for samples from non-pregnant subjects and 0.73 for those from pregnant women. Our procedure is simpler and faster than previous methods and accurately measures the differences in the globulin in sera from men, women, and pregnant women. Forty to 50 samples can be assayed in a working day.

  6. Evolutionary aspects of growth hormones and prolactins and their receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Tarpey, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    The interactions of GH's, PRL's and PL's with receptors for GH and PRL were examined from a comparative and evolutionary viewpoint. The binding of /sup 125/I-bGH to membrane preparations from liver of representatives of the major classes of non-mammalian vertebrates was also studied. Only hepatic membranes from sturgeon and Gillichthys had significant bGH binding and were further characterized and compared with male rabbit liver membranes in terms of time, temperature, pH, and membrane concentration to optimize binding conditions. The binding of several members of the GH, PRL, PL family of hormones to GH receptors from liver of sturgeon, Gillichthys, rabbit, mouse and rat was investigated. in terms of hormonal specificity, the mammalian receptors and the sturgeon binding sites were similar, while Gillichthys receptors had a different pattern of hormonal specificity. The binding of /sup 125/I-oPRL to renal membranes of the turtle, Pseudemys scripta elegans, was characterized and compared to PRL binding sites of kidney membranes of the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana, and the tiger salamander, Ambystoma tigrinum.

  7. Growth hormone replacement therapy reduces risk of cancer in adult with growth hormone deficiency: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhanzhan; Zhou, Qin; Li, Yanyan; Fu, Jun; Huang, Xinqiong; Shen, Liangfang

    2016-01-01

    The risk of growth hormone on cancer in adult with growth hormone deficiency remains unclear. We carried out a meta-analysis to evaluate the risk of cancer in adult with and without growth hormone replacement therapy. We searched PubMed, Web of Science, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and WanFang databases up to 31 July 2016 for eligible studies. Pooled risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated using fixed-or random-effects models if appropriate. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used to assess the study quality. Two retrospective and seven prospective studies with a total of 11191 participants were included in the final analysis. The results from fixed-effects model showed this therapy was associated with the deceased risk of cancer in adult with growth hormone deficiency (RR=0.69, 95%CI: 0.59-0.82), with low heterogeneity within studies (I2=39.0%, P=0.108). We performed sensitivity analyses by sequentially omitting one study each time, and the pooled RRs did not materially change, indicating that our results were statistically stable. Begger's and Egger's tests suggested that there was no publication bias (Z=-0.63, P=0.520; t=0.16, P=0.874). Our study suggests that growth hormone replacement therapy could reduce risk of cancer in adult with growth hormone deficiency. PMID:27835910

  8. Sex Hormone Binding Globulin Modifies Testosterone Action and Metabolism in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Huika; Pham, Thy; McWhinney, Brett C; Ungerer, Jacobus P; Pretorius, Carel J; Richard, Derek J; Mortimer, Robin H; d'Emden, Michael C; Richard, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) is the major serum carrier of sex hormones. However, growing evidence suggests that SHBG is internalised and plays a role in regulating intracellular hormone action. This study was to determine whether SHBG plays a role in testosterone uptake, metabolism, and action in the androgen sensitive LNCaP prostate cancer cell line. Internalisation of SHBG and testosterone, the effects of SHBG on testosterone uptake, metabolism, regulation of androgen responsive genes, and cell growth were assessed. LNCaP cells internalised SHBG by a testosterone independent process. Testosterone was rapidly taken up and effluxed as testosterone-glucuronide; however this effect was reduced by the presence of SHBG. Addition of SHBG, rather than reducing testosterone bioavailability, further increased testosterone-induced expression of prostate specific antigen and enhanced testosterone-induced reduction of androgen receptor mRNA expression. Following 38 hours of testosterone treatment cell morphology changed and growth declined; however, cotreatment with SHBG abrogated these inhibitory effects. These findings clearly demonstrate that internalised SHBG plays an important regulatory and intracellular role in modifying testosterone action and this has important implications for the role of SHBG in health and disease.

  9. Sex Hormone Binding Globulin Modifies Testosterone Action and Metabolism in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huika; Ungerer, Jacobus P.; Pretorius, Carel J.; Mortimer, Robin H.; d'Emden, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) is the major serum carrier of sex hormones. However, growing evidence suggests that SHBG is internalised and plays a role in regulating intracellular hormone action. This study was to determine whether SHBG plays a role in testosterone uptake, metabolism, and action in the androgen sensitive LNCaP prostate cancer cell line. Internalisation of SHBG and testosterone, the effects of SHBG on testosterone uptake, metabolism, regulation of androgen responsive genes, and cell growth were assessed. LNCaP cells internalised SHBG by a testosterone independent process. Testosterone was rapidly taken up and effluxed as testosterone-glucuronide; however this effect was reduced by the presence of SHBG. Addition of SHBG, rather than reducing testosterone bioavailability, further increased testosterone-induced expression of prostate specific antigen and enhanced testosterone-induced reduction of androgen receptor mRNA expression. Following 38 hours of testosterone treatment cell morphology changed and growth declined; however, cotreatment with SHBG abrogated these inhibitory effects. These findings clearly demonstrate that internalised SHBG plays an important regulatory and intracellular role in modifying testosterone action and this has important implications for the role of SHBG in health and disease. PMID:27990161

  10. Diabetes, growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor pathways and association to benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zongwei; Olumi, Aria F

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes significantly increases the risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and low urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The major endocrine aberration in connection with the metabolic syndrome is hyperinsulinemia. Insulin is an independent risk factor and a promoter of BPH. Insulin resistance may change the risk of BPH through several biological pathways. Hyperinsulinemia stimulates the liver to produce more insulin-like growth factor (IGF), another mitogen and an anti-apoptotic agent which binds insulin receptor/IGF receptor and stimulates prostate growth. The levels of IGFs and IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) in prostate tissue and in blood are associated with BPH risk, with the regulation of circulating androgen and growth hormone. Stromal-epithelial interactions play a critical role in the development and growth of the prostate gland and BPH. Previously, we have shown that the expression of c-Jun in the fibroblastic stroma can promote secretion of IGF-I, which stimulates prostate epithelial cell proliferation through activating specific target genes. Here, we will review the epidemiologic, clinical, and molecular findings which have evaluated the relation between diabetes and development of BPH.

  11. Resistance to growth hormone releasing hormone and gonadotropins in Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Giovanna; Spada, Anna

    2006-05-01

    Heterozygous inactivating mutations in the Gs alpha gene cause Albright's hereditary osteo-dystrophy (AHO). Consistent with the observation that only maternally inherited mutations lead to resistance to hormone action (pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia [PHP-Ia), recent studies have provided evidence for a predominant maternal origin of Gs alpha transcripts in endocrine organs, such as thyroid, gonad and pituitary. Accordingly, patients with PHP-Ia display variable degrees of resistance to parathyroid hormone (PTH), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), gonadotropins and growth hormone (GH) releasing hormone (GHRH). Although the incidence and the clinical and biochemical characteristics of PTH and TSH resistance have been widely investigated and described, the cause and significance of the reproductive dysfunction in AHO is still poorly understood. The clinical finding of alterations of GH secretion in these patients was described for the first time only 2 years ago. The present report briefly reviews the literature focusing on the actual knowledge about these last two subjects.

  12. Thyroid hormones in fetal growth and prepartum maturation.

    PubMed

    Forhead, A J; Fowden, A L

    2014-06-01

    The thyroid hormones, thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), are essential for normal growth and development of the fetus. Their bioavailability in utero depends on development of the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid gland axis and the abundance of thyroid hormone transporters and deiodinases that influence tissue levels of bioactive hormone. Fetal T4 and T3 concentrations are also affected by gestational age, nutritional and endocrine conditions in utero, and placental permeability to maternal thyroid hormones, which varies among species with placental morphology. Thyroid hormones are required for the general accretion of fetal mass and to trigger discrete developmental events in the fetal brain and somatic tissues from early in gestation. They also promote terminal differentiation of fetal tissues closer to term and are important in mediating the prepartum maturational effects of the glucocorticoids that ensure neonatal viability. Thyroid hormones act directly through anabolic effects on fetal metabolism and the stimulation of fetal oxygen consumption. They also act indirectly by controlling the bioavailability and effectiveness of other hormones and growth factors that influence fetal development such as the catecholamines and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs). By regulating tissue accretion and differentiation near term, fetal thyroid hormones ensure activation of physiological processes essential for survival at birth such as pulmonary gas exchange, thermogenesis, hepatic glucogenesis, and cardiac adaptations. This review examines the developmental control of fetal T4 and T3 bioavailability and discusses the role of these hormones in fetal growth and development with particular emphasis on maturation of somatic tissues critical for survival immediately at birth.

  13. [Benefits and risks of growth hormone in adults with growth hormone deficiency].

    PubMed

    Díez, Juan J; Cordido, Fernando

    2014-10-21

    Adult growth hormone (GH) deficiency is a well-recognized clinical syndrome with adverse health consequences. Many of these may improve after replacement therapy with recombinant GH. This treatment induces an increase in lean body mass and a decrease in fat mass. In long-term studies, bone mineral density increases and muscle strength improves. Health-related quality of life tends to increase after treatment with GH. Lipid profile and markers of cardiovascular risk also improve with therapy. Nevertheless, GH replacement therapy is not without risk. According to some studies, GH increases blood glucose, body mass index and waist circumference and may promote long-term development of diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Risk of neoplasia does not appear to be increased in adults treated with GH, but there are some high-risk subgroups. Methodological shortcomings and difficulties inherent to long-term studies prevent definitive conclusions about the relationship between GH and survival. Therefore, research in this field should remain active.

  14. Adult Growth Hormone Deficiency – Benefits, Side Effects, and Risks of Growth Hormone Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Mary L.; Merriam, George R.; Kargi, Atil Y.

    2013-01-01

    Deficiency of growth hormone (GH) in adults results in a syndrome characterized by decreased muscle mass and exercise capacity, increased visceral fat, impaired quality of life, unfavorable alterations in lipid profile and markers of cardiovascular risk, decrease in bone mass and integrity, and increased mortality. When dosed appropriately, GH replacement therapy (GHRT) is well tolerated, with a low incidence of side effects, and improves most of the alterations observed in GH deficiency (GHD); beneficial effects on mortality, cardiovascular events, and fracture rates, however, remain to be conclusively demonstrated. The potential of GH to act as a mitogen has resulted in concern over the possibility of increased de novo tumors or recurrence of pre-existing malignancies in individuals treated with GH. Though studies of adults who received GHRT in childhood have produced conflicting reports in this regard, long-term surveillance of adult GHRT has not demonstrated increased cancer risk or mortality. PMID:23761782

  15. Vibrational spectroscopic studies of solid recombinant bovine growth hormone and related growth hormone analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thamann, Thomas J.; Chao, Robert S.

    1999-09-01

    Infrared and Raman spectra have been obtained for lyophilized recombinant bovine growth hormone (r-bGH), partially reduced, and completely reduced r-bGH, plus a tryptic digest fragment of r-bGH. Amide I and II data indicate r-bGH to have substantial helical character. Partially reduced r-bGH, in which the carboxyl terminal disulfide bridge (residues 181, 189) has been cleaved, has slightly less helical content than r-bGH. The spectral data indicate that breaking the carboxyl terminal cystine link produces only localized structural alterations. The additional cleavage of the second disulfide bridge (residues 53 164) leads to a further decrease in helix content, accompanied by increases in β-sheet and disordered structures. A tryptic digest r-bGH fragment (residues 96-133), which contains a small amount of biological activity (≈10%), has predominantly helical structure.

  16. Localization and synthesis of the hormone-binding regions of the human thyrotropin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Atassi, M.Z.; Manshouri, T. ); Sakata, Shigeki )

    1991-05-01

    Two regions of human thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH) receptor (TSHR) were selected on the basis that they exhibit no sequence resemblance to luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor. Five synthetic overlapping peptides (12-30, 24-44, 308-328, 324-344, and 339-364) were studied for their ability to bind {sup 125}I-labeled human TSH (hTSH), its isolated {alpha} and {beta} subunits, bovine TSH, ovine TSH, human luteinizing hormone, and human follicle-stimulating hormone. The human TSHR peptides 12-30 and 324-344 exhibited remarkable binding activity to human, bovine, and ovine TSH and to the {beta} chain of hTSH. Lower binding activity resided in the adjacent overlapping peptides, probably due to the contribution of the shared overlap to the binding. The specificity of TSH binding to these peptides was confirmed by their inability to bind human luteinizing hormone, human follicle-stimulating hormone, and the {alpha} chain of hTSH. Thyrotropins did not bind to bovine serum albumin or to peptide controls unrelated to the TSHR system. It is concluded that the binding of TSH to its receptor involves extensive contacts and that the TSHR peptides 12-30 and 324-344 contain specific binding regions for TSH that might be either independent sites or two faces (subsites) within a large binding site.

  17. Growth hormone and the transition from puberty into adulthood.

    PubMed

    Attanasio, Andrea F; Shalet, Stephen M

    2007-03-01

    With modern growth hormone (GH) replacement algorithms, children with a diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency achieve at the end of pediatric GH treatment an adult height that is on the average in the normal range. Recent experience with GH replacement in young adults with childhood-onset growth hormone deficiency, however, has shown that these patients present with variable degrees of somatic immaturity. As childhood GH treatment is discontinued when final height is attained, attention moves to the phase of somatic development that follows the end of longitudinal growth, called ''transition'', which had been excluded previously from consideration for either pediatric or adult GH replacement. This article reviews the changes taking place during this phase of development and their relevance for the attainment of adult body maturation. The critical role of GH in this process is described.

  18. Ethylene and Hormonal Cross Talk in Vegetative Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    Van de Poel, Bram; Smet, Dajo; Van Der Straeten, Dominique

    2015-09-01

    Ethylene is a gaseous plant hormone that most likely became a functional hormone during the evolution of charophyte green algae, prior to land colonization. From this ancient origin, ethylene evolved into an important growth regulator that is essential for myriad plant developmental processes. In vegetative growth, ethylene appears to have a dual role, stimulating and inhibiting growth, depending on the species, tissue, and cell type, developmental stage, hormonal status, and environmental conditions. Moreover, ethylene signaling and response are part of an intricate network in cross talk with internal and external cues. Besides being a crucial factor in the growth control of roots and shoots, ethylene can promote flowering, fruit ripening and abscission, as well as leaf and petal senescence and abscission and, hence, plays a role in virtually every phase of plant life. Last but not least, together with jasmonates, salicylate, and abscisic acid, ethylene is important in steering stress responses.

  19. [Fish growth-hormone genes: functionality evidence of paralogous genes in Levanidov's charr].

    PubMed

    Kamenskaya, D N; Pankova, M V; Atopkin, D M; Brykov, V A

    2015-01-01

    In the genome of most vertebrates growth-hormone gene is presented in a single copy, while in salmonids after one of the duplication events many genes were multiplied, including growth hormone gene. In salmonids, the growth-hormone gene exists as two independently inherited functional paralogues, gh1 and gh2. In this study, we performed a comparative analysis of gh1 and gh2 growth-hormone genes and their adjacent sequences in Levanidov's charr Salvelinus levanidovi to determine their functionality and define the potential differences. We found that both genes have the same gene structure and are composed of six exons (I-VI) and five introns (A, B, C, D, E). However, the respective gene sequences differ in length. A comparison of exons showed that the size of each exon is identical in both paralogues. The overall length of genes differs due to the varying lengths of introns. Coding sequence of both genes contains an open reading frame for 210 amino acids. We identified regulatory elements in the promoter region of both genes: TATA box, A/T-rich regions that contain binding sites for pituitary-specific transcriptional activator Pit-1, and regions responsible for interaction with other transcriptional activators and initiators, in particular hormone receptors. The obtained data indicate that both genes are functional.

  20. Plant growth-promoting hormones activate mammalian guanylate cyclase activity.

    PubMed

    Vesely, D L; Hudson, J L; Pipkin, J L; Pack, L D; Meiners, S E

    1985-05-01

    In vivo injections of plant growth-promoting hormones increase the growth of animals as well as plants. Plant growth-promoting hormones and positive plant growth regulators are known to increase RNA and protein synthesis. Since cyclic GMP also increases RNA and protein synthesis, the object of the present investigation was to determine whether physiological levels of plant growth-promoting hormones and positive plant growth regulators have part of their mechanism(s) of action through stimulation of the guanylate cyclase (EC 4.6.1.2)-cyclic GMP system. Representatives of the three classes of growth-promoting hormones were investigated. Thus, auxins (indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-butyric acid, beta-naphthoxyacetic acid, and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxy acetic acid), gibberellins (gibberellic acid), and cytokinins [N6-benzyl adenine, kinetin (6-furfuryl aminopurine), and beta-(2-furyl) acrylic acid] all increased rat lung, small intestine, liver, and renal cortex guanylate cyclase activity 2- to 4-fold at the 1 microM concentration. Dose response curves revealed that maximal stimulation of guanylate cyclase by these plant growth regulators was at 1 microM; there was no augmented cyclase activity at 1 nM. The guanylate cyclase cationic cofactor manganese was not essential for augmentation of guanylate cyclase by these plant growth-promoting regulators. The antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene did not block the enhancement of guanylate cyclase by these plant growth-promoting factors. These data suggest that guanylate cyclase may play a role in the mechanism of action of plant growth-promoting hormones and even of positive plant regulators at the cellular level.

  1. Purification and cultivation of human pituitary growth hormone secreting cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    A multiphase study was conducted to examine the properties of growth hormone cells. Topics investigated included: (1) to determine if growth hormone (GH) cells contained within the rat pituitary gland can be separated from the other hormone producing cell types by continuous flow electrophoresis (CFE); (2) to determine what role, if any, gravity plays in the electrophoretic separation of GH cells; (3) to compare in vitro GH release from rat pituitary cells previously exposed to microgravity conditions vs release from cells not exposed to microgravity; (4) to determine if the frequency of different hormone producing pituitary cell types contained in cell suspensions can be quantitated by flow cytometry; and (5) to determine if GH contained within the human post mortem pituitary gland can be purified by CFE. Specific experimental procedures and results are included.

  2. Hormonal Control of Breast Cancer Cell Growth.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    known function , which is virtually identical to that of the pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH), is the stimulation of the production of gonadal...HI-1 did not match any previously identified genes, appearing to be a novel gene whose function might be related with process of differentiation. Its...in and in vitro (112-121) indicates that further identification of the functional role of this protein and of others whose synthesis is stimulated by

  3. Growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) signaling modulates intermittent hypoxia-induced oxidative stress and cognitive deficits in mouse.

    PubMed

    Nair, Deepti; Ramesh, Vijay; Li, Richard C; Schally, Andrew V; Gozal, David

    2013-11-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) during sleep, such as occurs in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), leads to degenerative changes in the hippocampus, and is associated with spatial learning deficits in adult mice. In both patients and murine models of OSA, the disease is associated with suppression of growth hormone (GH) secretion, which is actively involved in the growth, development, and function of the central nervous system (CNS). Recent work showed that exogenous GH therapy attenuated neurocognitive deficits elicited by IH during sleep in rats. Here, we show that administration of the Growth Hormone Releasing Hormone (GHRH) agonist JI-34 attenuates IH-induced neurocognitive deficits, anxiety, and depression in mice along with reduction in oxidative stress markers such as MDA and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, and increases in hypoxia inducible factor-1α DNA binding and up-regulation of insulin growth factor-1 and erythropoietin expression. In contrast, treatment with a GHRH antagonist (MIA-602) during intermittent hypoxia did not affect any of the IH-induced deleterious effects in mice. Thus, exogenous GHRH administered as the formulation of a GHRH agonist may provide a viable therapeutic intervention to protect IH-vulnerable brain regions from OSA-associated neurocognitive dysfunction. Sleep apnea, characterized by chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH), is associated with substantial cognitive and behavioral deficits. Here, we show that administration of a GHRH agonist (JI-34) reduces oxidative stress, increases both HIF-1α nuclear binding and downstream expression of IGF1 and erythropoietin (EPO) in hippocampus and cortex, and markedly attenuates water maze performance deficits in mice exposed to intermittent hypoxia during sleep.

  4. Sex hormone-binding globulin changes during the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Plymate, S R; Moore, D E; Cheng, C Y; Bardin, C W; Southworth, M B; Levinski, M J

    1985-11-01

    Although sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) production is stimulated by estrogen, no change in SHBG has been demonstrated during the menstrual cycle. To further study possible cyclic changes in serum SHBG, 12 women with a normal menstrual and fertility history had daily SHBG measurements during a menstrual cycle. SHBG was measured by dextran-coated charcoal saturation analysis and RIA. Serum LH was measured by mouse Leydig cell bioassay and RIA, and FSH, estradiol (E2), and progesterone were determined by RIA. In 10 women, a significant increase in mean SHBG by both methods occurred during the luteal phase of the cycle, immediately after the preovulatory increase in serum E2 (P less than 0.001). Two women had no SHBG increase; although each had a significant rise in serum E2 before the LH surge, luteal phase E2 levels were similar to those in the early follicular phase. In one of these women, a rise in SHBG was demonstrated by RIA. This study demonstrates that SHBG changes during the menstrual cycle in association with E2 changes, and it appears to be a marker for the endogenous estrogen changes that occur in normal ovulating women.

  5. Efficacy and Safety of Sustained-Release Recombinant Human Growth Hormone in Korean Adults with Growth Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngsook; Hong, Jae Won; Chung, Yoon-Sok; Kim, Sung-Woon; Cho, Yong-Wook; Kim, Jin Hwa; Kim, Byung-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The administration of recombinant human growth hormone in adults with growth hormone deficiency has been known to improve metabolic impairment and quality of life. Patients, however, have to tolerate daily injections of growth hormone. The efficacy, safety, and compliance of weekly administered sustained-release recombinant human growth hormone (SR-rhGH, Declage™) supplement in patients with growth hormone deficiency were evaluated. Materials and Methods This trial is 12-week prospective, single-arm, open-label trial. Men and women aged ≥20 years with diagnosed growth hormone deficiency (caused by pituitary tumor, trauma and other pituitary diseases) were eligible for this study. Each subject was given 2 mg (6 IU) of SR-rhGH once a week, subcutaneously for 12 weeks. Efficacy and safety at baseline and within 30 days after the 12th injection were assessed and compared. Score of Assessment of Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults (AGHDA score) for quality of life and serum IGF-1 level. Results The IGF-1 level of 108.67±74.03 ng/mL was increased to 129.01±68.37 ng/mL (p=0.0111) and the AGHDA QoL score was decreased from 9.80±6.51 to 7.55±5.76 (p<0.0001) at week 12 compared with those at baseline. Adverse events included pain, swelling, erythema, and warmth sensation at the administration site, but many adverse events gradually disappeared during the investigation. Conclusion Weekly administered SR-rhGH for 12 weeks effectively increased IGF-1 level and improved the quality of life in patients with GH deficiency without serious adverse events. PMID:24954335

  6. Myogenic expression of an injectable protease-resistant growth hormone-releasing hormone augments long-term growth in pigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draghia-Akli, R.; Fiorotto, M. L.; Hill, L. A.; Malone, P. B.; Deaver, D. R.; Schwartz, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    Ectopic expression of a new serum protease-resistant porcine growth hormone-releasing hormone, directed by an injectable muscle-specific synthetic promoter plasmid vector (pSP-HV-GHRH), elicits growth in pigs. A single 10 mg intramuscular injection of pSP-HV-GHRH DNA followed by electroporation in three-week-old piglets elevated serum GHRH levels by twofold to fourfold, enhanced growth hormone secretion, and increased serum insulin-like growth factor-I by threefold to sixfold over control pigs. After 65 days the average body weight of the pigs injected with pSP-HV-GHRH was approximately 37% greater than the placebo-injected controls and resulted in a significant reduction in serum urea concentration, indicating a decrease in amino acid catabolism. Evaluation of body composition indicated a uniform increase in mass, with no organomegaly or associated pathology.

  7. Hormonal regulation of wheat growth during hydroponic culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherell, Donald

    1988-01-01

    Hormonal control of root growth has been explored as one means to alleviate the crowding of plant root systems experienced in prototype hydroponic biomass production chambers being developed by the CELSS Breadboard Project. Four plant hormones, or their chemical analogs, which have been reported to selectively inhibit root growth, were tested by adding them to the nutrient solutions on day 10 of a 25 day growth test using spring wheat in hydroponic cultures. Growth and morphological changes is both shoot and root systems were evaluated. In no case was it possible to inhibit root growth without a comparable inhibition of shoot growth. It was concluded that this approach is unlikely to prove useful for wheat.

  8. Stochastic humoral expression of human growth hormone epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Etcheverrigaray, M; Paladini, A C; Retegui, L A

    1988-01-01

    Competition experiments between insolubilized monoclonal antibodies (mAb) and polyclonal antisera has led to the description of the humoral expression of human growth hormone (hGH) epitopes. This study was carried out with sera from mice and hamsters submitted to different immunization schedules: chronic administration of the antigen, secondary response and conventional hyperimmunization. The results indicated the absence of a unique immunodominant epitope in hGH; a significant individual variation of antibody (Ab) population titres with time; changes with time in the relative proportion of one Ab population with respect to the others; and the occurrence of Ab enhancing the 125I-hGH binding to five mAb depending upon the individuals and the time of immunization. Heterocliticity towards non-human GH was also detected. Although most of the animals showed cross-reacting Ab, two out of 12 mice, chronically injected, developed heteroclitic Ab. The data suggest that the humoral response to different epitopes of a protein antigen during the maturation of the immune response is a stochastic process leading to transient humoral immunodominance, enhancing Ab populations and heterocliticity, depending upon individual characteristics, either in outbred or inbred populations. PMID:2452789

  9. Impact of growth hormone hypersecretion on the adult human kidney.

    PubMed

    Grunenwald, Solange; Tack, Ivan; Chauveau, Dominique; Bennet, Antoine; Caron, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Acromegaly is most often secondary to a GH-secreting pituitary adenoma with increased Insulin-like Growth Factor type 1 (IGF-1) level. The consequences of GH/IGF-1 hypersecretion reflect the diversity of action of these hormones. The genes of the GH receptor (GHR), IGF-1, IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and IGF-binding proteins (IGF-BP) are physiologically expressed in the adult kidney, suggesting a potential role of the somatotropic axis on renal structure and functions. The expression of these proteins is highly organized and differs according to the anatomical and functional segments of the nephron suggesting different roles of GH and IGF-1 in these segments. In animals, chronic exposure to high doses of GH induces glomerulosclerosis and increases albuminuria. Studies in patients with GH hypersecretion have identified numerous targets of GH/IGF-1 axis on the kidney: 1) an impact on renal filtration with increased glomerular filtration rate (GFR), 2) a structural impact with an increase in kidney weight and glomerular hypertrophy, and 3) a tubular impact leading to hyperphosphatemia, hypercalciuria and antinatriuretic effects. Despite the increased glomerular filtration rate observed in patients with GH hypersecretion, GH is an inefficient treatment for chronic renal failure. GH and IGF-1 seem to be involved in the physiopathology of diabetic nephropathy; this finding offers the possibility of targeting the GH/IGF-1 axis for the prevention and the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  10. Growth and anabolic hormones, leptin, and neuromuscular performance in moderately trained prepubescent athletes and untrained boys.

    PubMed

    Tsolakis, Charilaos; Vagenas, George; Dessypris, Athanasios

    2003-02-01

    We investigated hormonal regulators of growth and development, leptin levels, body composition, neuromuscular performance, and the associations among them in trained prepubertal athletes (experimental group [EG]) and an untrained control group (CG). Informed consent was obtained from the children and their parents. Their maturation stage was evaluated according to Tanner's criteria. There were no differences between EG and CG in physical characteristics, body mass index (BMI), lean body mass, testosterone (T), sex hormone-binding globulin, free androgen index, growth hormone (GH), hand grip strength, and jumping performance. Leptin levels and percent fat of the EG were significantly lower than those of the CG (p < 0.05-0.005). Leptin levels were significantly correlated to body fat and BMI for both the EG and the CG (r = 0.51-0.79). There is little evidence that leptin has a positive effect on growth and anabolic factors. Sex hormone-binding globulin and GH may explain the variation of leptin in athletes with low T (R(2) = 0.43) and in CG (R(2) = 0.35), respectively. Leptin seems to be a permissive factor for the onset of puberty, and the training background needs an optimal biological maturation to produce significant differences in muscle and power performance.

  11. Hormonal and nonhormonal factors affecting sex hormone-binding globulin levels in blood.

    PubMed

    Thijssen, J H

    1988-01-01

    Researchers in Utrecht, the Netherlands have studied the effects of different factors, such as oral contraceptives (OCs), on sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels in blood. The SHBG levels in women who continuously used OCs consisting only of .05 mg of ethinyl estradiol (EE2) rose as high as 260% + or - 25% of those in women not using OCs. Further, mean SHBG levels of women using combination OCs of EE2 and levonorgestrel were 10-60% higher than women not using OCs. SHBG levels were significantly higher than the use of a sequential OC containing decreasing amounts of EE2 and increasing amounts of levonorgestrel than those cause by use of a continuous combined OC with .03 mg and .15 mg respectively. As the dosage of EE2 increased in combination OCs with 2.5 mg lynestrenol, the SHBG increased from 20% (.05 mg EE2) to 150% (.75 mg EE2). SHBG levels after taking EE2 and cyproterone acetate increased significantly more (240%) than levels after EE2 and desogestrel (170%), or after EE2 and gestoden (140%) [p.001]. SHBG levels of women who took OCs containing only .03 mg of levonorgestrel daily decreased 35% (p.01). These levels fell by 30% in women who received 150 mg of medroxyprogesterone acetate intramuscularly every 3 months (p.001). SHBG concentrations increased when estrogens were taken orally for noncontraceptive purposes, but they did not change when they were administered percutaneously. As body weight increased the SHBG levels decreased despite hormonal status or sex. Further, the lower the fat content of one's diet the higher the SHBG levels and vice versa. SHBG levels are higher in males with flaccid lungs than they are in males with healthy lungs.

  12. Impaired hair growth and wound healing in mice lacking thyroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Jurado, Constanza; García-Serrano, Laura; Martínez-Fernández, Mónica; Ruiz-Llorente, Lidia; Paramio, Jesus M; Aranda, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Both clinical and experimental observations show that the skin is affected by the thyroidal status. In hypothyroid patients the epidermis is thin and alopecia is common, indicating that thyroidal status might influence not only skin proliferation but also hair growth. We demonstrate here that the thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) mediate these effects of the thyroid hormones on the skin. Mice lacking TRα1 and TRβ (the main thyroid hormone binding isoforms) display impaired hair cycling associated to a decrease in follicular hair cell proliferation. This was also observed in hypothyroid mice, indicating the important role of the hormone-bound receptors in hair growth. In contrast, the individual deletion of either TRα1 or TRβ did not impair hair cycling, revealing an overlapping or compensatory role of the receptors in follicular cell proliferation. In support of the role of the receptors in hair growth, TRα1/TRβ-deficient mice developed alopecia after serial depilation. These mice also presented a wound-healing defect, with retarded re-epithelialization and wound gaping, associated to impaired keratinocyte proliferation. These results reinforce the idea that the thyroid hormone nuclear receptors play an important role on skin homeostasis and suggest that they could be targets for the treatment of cutaneous pathologies.

  13. Impaired Hair Growth and Wound Healing in Mice Lacking Thyroid Hormone Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Fernández, Mónica; Ruiz-Llorente, Lidia; Paramio, Jesus M.; Aranda, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Both clinical and experimental observations show that the skin is affected by the thyroidal status. In hypothyroid patients the epidermis is thin and alopecia is common, indicating that thyroidal status might influence not only skin proliferation but also hair growth. We demonstrate here that the thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) mediate these effects of the thyroid hormones on the skin. Mice lacking TRα1 and TRβ (the main thyroid hormone binding isoforms) display impaired hair cycling associated to a decrease in follicular hair cell proliferation. This was also observed in hypothyroid mice, indicating the important role of the hormone-bound receptors in hair growth. In contrast, the individual deletion of either TRα1 or TRβ did not impair hair cycling, revealing an overlapping or compensatory role of the receptors in follicular cell proliferation. In support of the role of the receptors in hair growth, TRα1/TRβ-deficient mice developed alopecia after serial depilation. These mice also presented a wound-healing defect, with retarded re-epithelialization and wound gaping, associated to impaired keratinocyte proliferation. These results reinforce the idea that the thyroid hormone nuclear receptors play an important role on skin homeostasis and suggest that they could be targets for the treatment of cutaneous pathologies. PMID:25254665

  14. Purification and cultivation of human pituitary growth hormone secreting cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    The maintainance of actively secreting human pituitary growth hormone cells (somatotrophs) in vitro was studied. The primary approach was the testing of agents which may be expected to increase the release of the human growth hormone (hGH). A procedure for tissue procurement is described along with the methodologies used to dissociate human pituitary tissue (obtained either at autopsy or surgery) into single cell suspensions. The validity of the Biogel cell column perfusion system for studying the dynamics of GH release was developed and documented using a rat pituitary cell system.

  15. Purification and cultivation of human pituitary growth hormone secreting cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Efforts were directed towards maintenance of actively secreting human pituitary growth hormone cells (somatotrophs) in vitro. The production of human growth hormone (hGH) by this means would be of benefit for the treatment of certain human hypopituitary diseases such as dwarfism. One of the primary approaches was the testing of agents which may logically be expected to increase hGH release. The progress towards this goal is summarized. Results from preliminary experiments dealing with electrophoresis of pituitary cell for the purpose of somatotroph separation are described.

  16. A new method of detecting hormone-binding proteins electroblotted onto glass fiber filter: juvenile hormone-binding proteins from grasshopper hemolymph.

    PubMed

    Jefferies, L S; Roberts, P E

    1990-03-01

    We have developed a new method to identify juvenile hormone (JH)-binding proteins blotted onto glass fiber filter (GFF) after electrophoretic separation. Insect JH regulates reproduction in the two-striped grasshopper, Melanoplus bivittatus. A number of proteins are involved in the delivery of JH from its site of synthesis to the nuclei of fat body cells where it acts to induce vitellogenesis. To identify JH binding proteins, hemolymph was separated by PAGE, electroblotted onto GFF, and incubated in [10-3H]JH-III. The amount of hormone bound by blotted proteins increased with the amount of protein on the filter, was competitively displaced by excess non-labeled hormone, and was affiliated with individual bands on fluorograms of proteins blotted after electrophoretic separation. GFF etched with trifluoroacetic acid was better than nitrocellulose, Zeta Probe, cellulose acetate or unetched GFF. Phosphate (pH 6.0-7.3) or Tris buffers (pH 7.3-8.0) worked equally well for the procedure. Unbound hormone was easily removed by short washes in buffer, and adequate binding for detection was achieved in a 15 min incubation. Preliminary data suggest that this technique may be used to detect receptors, carriers, and binding proteins of steroid hormones.

  17. Relationship between initial treatment effect of recombinant human growth hormone and exon 3 polymorphism of growth hormone receptor in Chinese children with growth hormone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhangqian; Cao, Lingfeng; Pei, Zhou; Zhi, Dijing; Zhao, Zhuhui; Xi, Li; Cheng, Ruoqian; Luo, Feihong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency distribution of exon 3 deleted (d3-GHR) genetic polymorphism of growth hormone receptor (GHR) in growth hormone deficient (GHD) Chinese children and to explore the correlation between the growth promoting effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) and exon 3 genetic polymorphism of GHR in GHD children. In this study, 111 GHD (excluded small for gestational age) children were treated with rhGH (0.20 mg/kg/week) for six months. The body height (Ht), body weight, bone age (BA) and growth velocity (GV) were measured before and after six months of treatment. The d3-GHR and full length GHR (fl-GHR) were analyzed to detect the frequency distribution of two isoforms and their influence on growth promoting effect of rhGH. The results indicated that the frequencies of fl/fl, fl/d3 and d3/d3 GHR genotypes were 67.6%, 18.9% and 13.5%. After six months of GH therapy, there were significant differences of ΔGV (ΔGV: 10.77±3.40 cm/year vs 12.18±3.08 cm/year) (P<0.05) and ΔHt (ΔHt: 5.38±1.70 cm vs 6.09±1.54 cm) (P<0.05) were found among GHD children with different genotypes (fl/fl vs fl/d3 and d3/d3). In conclusion, the frequency distribution of three GHR genotypes in 111 Chinese GHD children was different from that reported in Caucasian, indicating the existence of ethnic difference of exon 3 GHR polymorphism. There was a closely relationship between GHR genotypes and growth-promoting effect of rhGH in Chinese GHD children. PMID:26221355

  18. The haematopoietic effects of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-I.

    PubMed

    Merchav, S

    1998-01-01

    The process of haemopoiesis, occurring primarily within the bone marrow, involves the proliferation and differentiation of pluripotent haemopoietic stem cells into committed, or pathway-restricted progenitors /1/. The latter further proliferate and undergo a process of maturation into circulating blood cells of myeloid and erythroid lineages /2/. Haemopoietic cell growth and differentiation is primarily regulated by the local production of various cytokines within the bone marrow micro-environment /3/, as well as by the circulating hormone, erythropoietin (EPO). The formation as well as functional activation of mature blood cells, are also modulated by a variety of hormones and growth peptides, including growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) /4,5/. Early evidence for the role of GH in modulating haemopoiesis was provided in classical studies in rodents, which showed that removal of the pituitary gland affects blood cell formation and function /6/ and that impairment of the latter can be restored by GH administration /7/. GH exerts its effects on target cells by binding to its own receptor, which belongs to the class I cytokine receptor superfamily /8/. In humans, GH can also bind to and activate the prolactin receptor /9/. Based on the somatomedin hypothesis of Salmon and Daughaday /10/, it is now generally accepted that, in addition to the above, GH exerts many of its effects via autocrine or paracrine IGF-I, as well as via endocrine IGF-I produced in the liver. IGF-I, a small single-chain polypeptide, is one of two highly homologous peptides (IGF-I and IGF-II), that stimulate the proliferation and differentiation of a wide variety of cell types, including bone marrow cells /5,11/. Both IGF-I and IGF-II play an important role in prenatal growth and IGF-I is also essential for postnatal growth and development /12/. Two types of IGF receptors have been described. The type I IGF receptor, a tyrosine kinase receptor highly homologous to the

  19. Risk Assessment of Growth Hormones and Antimicrobial Residues in Meat

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Sang-Hee; Kang, Daejin; Lim, Myung-Woon; Kang, Chang Soo

    2010-01-01

    Growth promoters including hormonal substances and antibiotics are used legally and illegally in food producing animals for the growth promotion of livestock animals. Hormonal substances still under debate in terms of their human health impacts are estradiol-17β, progesterone, testosterone, zeranol, trenbolone, and melengestrol acetate (MGA) . Many of the risk assessment results of natural steroid hormones have presented negligible impacts when they are used under good veterinary practices. For synthetic hormonelike substances, ADIs and MRLs have been established for food safety along with the approval of animal treatment. Small amounts of antibiotics added to feedstuff present growth promotion effects via the prevention of infectious diseases at doses lower than therapeutic dose. The induction of antimicrobial resistant bacteria and the disruption of normal human intestinal flora are major concerns in terms of human health impact. Regulatory guidance such as ADIs and MRLs fully reflect the impact on human gastrointestinal microflora. However, before deciding on any risk management options, risk assessments of antimicrobial resistance require large-scale evidence regarding the relationship between antimicrobial use in food-producing animals and the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in human pathogens. In this article, the risk profiles of hormonal and antibacterial growth promoters are provided based on recent toxicity and human exposure information, and recommendations for risk management to prevent human health impacts by the use of growth promoters are also presented. PMID:24278538

  20. [How corticoids, growth hormone and oestrogens influence lipids and atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Marek, J; Hána, V; Krsek, M

    2007-04-01

    The hormones with a strong influence on the lipid spectrum and the development of atherosclerosis include cortisol, growth hormone and oestrogens. Cortisol accelerates atherosclerosis both through dyslipidemia and through an increase in visceral fat, hypertension, increased insulin resistance and the development of reduced glucose tolerance which may result in diabetes mellitus. Even when a cortisol excess disappears, as is the case of patients cured of Cushing syndrome, arterial walls remain permanently vulnerable to the atherosclerotic process. In conditions involving a lack of growth hormone, dyslipidemia develops and increases the burden on the cardiovascular system if not treated in a timely manner by the substitution of growth hormone. Oestrogens have a double effect: they have an anti-atherogenic effect on artery walls that are not yet damaged by an atherosclerotic process, but where atherosclerosis has already developed they have a prothrombotic effect and destabilise the atheromatous plaques. If oestrogen is to be used as protection against the onset of atherogenesis, it is necessary to start in a period when the atherosclerotic process has not yet begun to damage the woman's arterial walls and it is best to use natural hormones (estradiol) and to prevent endometriosis it should be combined with crystalline progesterone applied locally--inravaginally. Oestrogens should be given in small doses, preferably parenterally. Even this will not prevent genetic oestrogen effects though.

  1. Usability and Tolerability of the Norditropin NordiFlex® Injection Device in Children Never Previously Treated With Growth Hormone

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-23

    Growth Hormone Disorder; Growth Hormone Deficiency in Children; Genetic Disorder; Turner Syndrome; Foetal Growth Problem; Small for Gestational Age; Chronic Kidney Disease; Chronic Renal Insufficiency; Delivery Systems

  2. Effects of hypothalamic dopamine on growth hormone-releasing hormone-induced growth hormone secretion and thyrotropin-releasing hormone-induced prolactin secretion in goats.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jin; Hashizume, Tsutomu

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the effects of hypothalamic dopamine (DA) on the secretion of growth hormone (GH) in goats. The GH-releasing response to an intravenous (i.v.) injection of GH-releasing hormone (GHRH, 0.25 μg/kg body weight (BW)) was examined after treatments to augment central DA using carbidopa (carbi, 1 mg/kg BW) and L-dopa (1 mg/kg BW) in male and female goats under a 16-h photoperiod (16 h light, 8 h dark) condition. GHRH significantly and rapidly stimulated the release of GH after its i.v. administration to goats (P < 0.05). The carbi and L-dopa treatments completely suppressed GH-releasing responses to GHRH in both male and female goats (P < 0.05). The prolactin (PRL)-releasing response to an i.v. injection of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH, 1 μg/kg BW) was additionally examined in male goats in this study to confirm modifications to central DA concentrations. The treatments with carbi and L-dopa significantly reduced TRH-induced PRL release in goats (P < 0.05). These results demonstrated that hypothalamic DA was involved in the regulatory mechanisms of GH, as well as PRL secretion in goats.

  3. Effects of growth hormone on growth performance, haematology, metabolites and hormones in iron-deficient veal calves.

    PubMed

    Ceppi, A; Blum, J W

    1994-08-01

    Effects of subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of 50 micrograms/kg body weight of recombinant bovine growth hormone (rbGH) or saline were studied for 11 weeks in 40 intact male veal calves supplied 50 mg or 10 mg of iron (Fe)/kg of milk replacer (MR). Feed intake, average daily gain and growth: feed ratio were reduced in Fe-deficient calves, but not significantly influenced by rbGH. Plasma Fe and haemoglobin concentration, red-cell number and packed cell volume were decreased in Fe-deficient calves (P < 0.05) and rbGH further reduced red-cell number in Fe-deficient calves (P < 0.05). The age-dependent increase of total Fe binding capacity was greater in Fe-deficient calves and enhanced by rbGH (P < 0.05). Plasma urea concentrations increased, whereas glucose (G) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels decreased in Fe-deficient calves. rbGH significantly increased G in calves fed MR containing 50 mg/kg (P < 0.05) and influenced urea concentrations (P < 0.05). Plasma insulin (I) and IGF-I concentrations were lower in Fe-deficient calves (P < 0.05). Plasma GH in the first hours after rbGH injections increased (P < 0.05) to higher levels in calves fed 10 than in those fed 50 mg Fe/kg MR, but incremental changes were comparable. In conclusion, low Fe intake caused haematologic, metabolic and endocrine changes. Plasma IGF-I, I and T3 concentrations after rbGH administration and effects of rbGH on IGF-I in Fe-deficient calves were reduced, even though plasma GH levels were increased.

  4. [Use of recombinant Human Growth Hormone (rHGH)].

    PubMed

    Calzada-León, Raúl

    2017-01-01

    Recombinant human growth hormone, synthesized in E.coli or mammalian cells cultures, is since 1985, a useful therapeutic resource to increase growth velocity and final height. In this paper are discussed the four phases (aims, security and efficacy, utility and efficiency) indispensables to define the start of treatment, as well as the absolute, relative and metabolic indications and the transitory and permanent conditions that contraindicate its use. It is commented the way to optimize the results (simple but indispensables indications for the physician, the patients and their family). Finally it is analyzed the results of treatment in patients with growth hormone deficiency, Turner syndrome, chronic renal failure, Prader-Willi syndrome, Noonan syndrome, SHOX deficiency, intrauterine growth retardation and idiopathic short stature.

  5. 21 CFR 862.1370 - Human growth hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Human growth hormone test system. 862.1370 Section 862.1370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  6. Endocrine changes of Paralichthys olivaceus after oral administration with exogenous growth hormone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zong-Zhu; Xu, De-Wu; Wang, Yong; Xu, Yong-Li; Zhang, Pei-Jun

    2000-12-01

    Recombinant salmon growth hormone contained in yeast was given for 5 months to flounder in its diet. Both free and total specific binding sites for the growth hormone were examined in liver membranes of control and treated fish. The association constants of both free and total specific binding sites were of the same order (1 nM-1), and no significant difference was found between any two groups in the capacity of their free binding sites. The capacity of total binding sites in the liver of treated fish increased significantly compared with that of control. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels in the plasma of treated fish increased by 22.61% (P<0.05), compared with that of control. While the T4 levels in plasma did not increase significantly (from 1.35±0.91 ng/ml to 2.29±1.13 ng/ml), T3 levels were elevated significantly (from 1.78±1.14 ng/ml to 4.87±1.22 ng/ml, P<0.01), as compared with that of control.

  7. Development and Characterization of a Novel Anti-idiotypic Monoclonal Antibody to Growth Hormone, Which Can Mimic Physiological Functions of Growth Hormone in Primary Porcine Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lan, Hai-Nan; Jiang, Hai-Long; Li, Wei; Wu, Tian-Cheng; Hong, Pan; Li, Yu Meng; Zhang, Hui; Cui, Huan-Zhong; Zheng, Xin

    2015-04-01

    B-32 is one of a panel of monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies to growth hormone (GH) that we developed. To characterize and identify its potential role as a novel growth hormone receptor (GHR) agonist, we determined that B-32 behaved as a typical Ab2β based on a series of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay assays. The results of fluorescence-activated cell sorting, indirect immunofluorescence and competitive receptor binding assays demonstrated that B-32 specifically binds to the GHR expressed on target cells. Next, we examined the resulting signal transduction pathways triggered by this antibody in primary porcine hepatocytes. We found that B-32 can activate the GHR and Janus kinase (2)/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK2/STAT5) signalling pathways. The phosphorylation kinetics of JAK2/STAT5 induced by either GH or B-32 were analysed in dose-response and time course experiments. In addition, B32 could also stimulate porcine hepatocytes to secrete insulin-like growth factors-1. Our work indicates that a monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody to GH (B-32) can serve as a GHR agonist or GH mimic and has application potential in domestic animal (pig) production.

  8. Growth hormone therapy and craniofacial bones: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Litsas, G

    2013-09-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has significant effects on linear bone growth, bone mass and bone metabolism. The primary role of GH supplementation in children with GH deficiency, those born small for gestational age or with other types of disorders in somatic development is to increase linear growth. However, GH therapy seems to elicit varying responses in the craniofacial region. Whereas the effects of GH administration on somatic development are well documented, comparatively little is known of its effects on the craniofacial region. The purpose of this review was to search the literature and compile results from both animal and human studies related to the impact of GH on craniofacial growth.

  9. Secretory pattern and regulatory mechanism of growth hormone in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The ultradian rhythm of growth hormone (GH) secretion has been known in several animal species for years and has recently been observed in cattle. Although the physiological significance of the rhythm is not yet fully understood, it appears essential for normal growth. In this review, previous studies concerning the GH secretory pattern in cattle, including its ultradian rhythm, are introduced and the regulatory mechanism is discussed on the basis of recent findings. PMID:26260675

  10. Secretory pattern and regulatory mechanism of growth hormone in cattle.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Etsuko

    2016-02-01

    The ultradian rhythm of growth hormone (GH) secretion has been known in several animal species for years and has recently been observed in cattle. Although the physiological significance of the rhythm is not yet fully understood, it appears essential for normal growth. In this review, previous studies concerning the GH secretory pattern in cattle, including its ultradian rhythm, are introduced and the regulatory mechanism is discussed on the basis of recent findings.

  11. Saccharin and Cyclamate Inhibit Binding of Epidermal Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, L. S.

    1981-02-01

    The binding of 125I-labeled mouse epidermal growth factor (EGF) to 18 cell lines, including HeLa (human carcinoma), MDCK (dog kidney cells), HTC (rat hepatoma), K22 (rat liver), HF (human foreskin), GM17 (human skin fibroblasts), XP (human xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts), and 3T3-L1 (mouse fibroblasts), was inhibited by saccharin and cyclamate. The human cells were more sensitive to inhibition by these sweeteners than mouse or rat cells. EGF at doses far above the physiological levels reversed the inhibition in rodent cells but not in HeLa cells. In HeLa cells, the doses of saccharin and cyclamate needed for 50% inhibition were 3.5 and 9.3 mg/ml, respectively. Glucose, 2-deoxyglucose, sucrose, and xylitol did not inhibit EGF binding. Previous studies have shown that phorbol esters, strongly potent tumor promoters, also inhibit EGF binding to tissue culture cells. To explain the EGF binding inhibition by such greatly dissimilar molecules as phorbol esters, saccharin, and cyclamate, it is suggested that they operate through the activation of a hormone response control unit.

  12. Generalized resistance to thyroid hormone associated with a mutation in the ligand-binding domain of the human thyroid hormone receptor. beta

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, A.; Takeda, K.; Ain, K.; Ceccarelli, P.; Nakai, A.; Seino, S.; Bell, G.I.; Refetoff, S.; DeGroot, L.J. )

    1989-11-01

    The syndrome of generalized resistance to thyroid hormone is characterized by elevated circulating levels of thyroid hormone in the presence of an overall eumetabolic state and failure to respond normally to triiodothyronine. The authors have evaluated a family with inherited generalized resistance to thyroid hormone for abnormalities in the thyroid hormone nuclear receptors. A single guanine {yields} cytosine replacement in the codon for amino acid 340 resulted in a glycine {yields} arginine substitution in the hormone-binding domain of one of two alleles of the patient's thyroid hormone nuclear receptor {beta} gene. In vitro translation products of this mutant human thyroid hormone nuclear receptor {beta} gene did not bind triiodothyronine. Thus, generalized resistance to thyroid hormone can result from expression of an abnormal thyroid hormone nuclear receptor molecule.

  13. Enhanced basal and disorderly growth hormone secretion distinguish acromegalic from normal pulsatile growth hormone release.

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, M L; Pincus, S M; Johnson, M L; Matthews, D H; Faunt, L M; Vance, M L; Thorner, M O; Veldhuis, J D

    1994-01-01

    Pulses of growth hormone (GH) release in acromegaly may arise from hypothalamic regulation or from random events intrinsic to adenomatous tissue. To distinguish between these possibilities, serum GH concentrations were measured at 5-min intervals for 24 h in acromegalic men and women with active (n = 19) and inactive (n = 9) disease and in normal young adults in the fed (n = 20) and fasted (n = 16) states. Daily GH secretion rates, calculated by deconvolution analysis, were greater in patients with active acromegaly than in fed (P < 0.05) but not fasted normal subjects. Significant basal (nonpulsatile) GH secretion was present in virtually all active acromegalics but not those in remission or in fed and fasted normal subjects. A recently introduced scale- and model-independent statistic, approximate entropy (ApEn), was used to test for regularity (orderliness) in the GH data. All but one acromegalic had ApEn values greater than the absolute range in normal subjects, indicating reduced orderliness of GH release; ApEn distinguished acromegalic from normal GH secretion (fed, P < 10(-12); fasted, P < 10(-7)) with high sensitivity (95%) and specificity (100%). Acromegalics in remission had ApEn scores larger than those of normal subjects (P < 0.0001) but smaller than those of active acromegalics (P < 0.001). The coefficient of variation of successive incremental changes in GH concentrations was significantly lower in acromegalics than in normal subjects (P < 0.001). Fourier analysis in acromegalics revealed reduced fractional amplitudes compared to normal subjects (P < 0.05). We conclude that GH secretion in acromegaly is highly irregular with disorderly release accompanying significant basal secretion. Images PMID:8083369

  14. Growth hormone treatment in growth hormone-deficient adults. II. Effects on exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Cuneo, R C; Salomon, F; Wiles, C M; Hesp, R; Sönksen, P H

    1991-02-01

    Growth hormone (GH) treatment in adults with GH deficiency increases lean body mass and thigh muscle cross-sectional area. The functional significance of this was examined by incremental cycle ergometry in 24 GH-deficient adults treated in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial with recombinant DNA human GH (rhGH) for 6 mo (0.07 U/kg body wt daily). Compared with placebo, the rhGH group increased mean maximal O2 uptake (VO2max) (+406 +/- 71 vs. +133 +/- 84 ml/min; P = 0.016) and maximal power output (+24.6 +/- 4.3 vs. +9.7 +/- 4.8 W; P = 0.047), without differences in maximal heart rate or ventilation. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s, vital capacity, and corrected CO gas transfer were within normal limits and did not change with treatment. Mean predicted VO2max, based on height and age, increased from 78.9 to 96.0% in the rhGH group (compared with 78.5 and 85.0% for placebo; P = 0.036). The anaerobic ventilatory threshold increased in the rhGH group (+159 +/- 39 vs. +1 +/- 51 ml/min; P = 0.02). The improvement in VO2max was noted when expressed per kilogram body weight but not lean body mass or thigh muscle area. We conclude that rhGH treatment in adults with GH deficiency improves and normalizes maximal exercise performance and improves submaximal exercise performance and that these changes are related to increases in lean body mass and muscle mass. Improved cardiac output may also contribute to the effect of rhGH on exercise performance.

  15. Growth and endocrine effects of recombinant bovine growth hormone treatment in non-transgenic and growth hormone transgenic coho salmon.

    PubMed

    Raven, P A; Sakhrani, D; Beckman, B; Neregård, L; Sundström, L F; Björnsson, B Th; Devlin, R H

    2012-05-15

    To examine the relative growth, endocrine, and gene expression effects of growth hormone (GH) transgenesis vs. GH protein treatment, wild-type non-transgenic and GH transgenic coho salmon were treated with a sustained-release formulation of recombinant bovine GH (bGH; Posilac). Fish size, specific growth rate (SGR), and condition factor (CF) were monitored for 14 weeks, after which endocrine parameters were measured. Transgenic fish had much higher growth, SGR and CF than non-transgenic fish, and bGH injection significantly increased weight and SGR in non-transgenic but not transgenic fish. Plasma salmon GH concentrations decreased with bGH treatment in non-transgenic but not in transgenic fish where levels were similar to controls. Higher GH mRNA levels were detected in transgenic muscle and liver but no differences were observed in GH receptor (GHR) mRNA levels. In non-transgenic pituitary, GH and GHR mRNA levels per mg pituitary decreased with bGH dose to levels seen in transgenic salmon. Plasma IGF-I was elevated with bGH dose only in non-transgenic fish, while transgenic fish maintained an elevated level of IGF-I with or without bGH treatment. A similar trend was seen for liver IGF-I mRNA levels. Thus, bGH treatment increased fish growth and influenced feedback on endocrine parameters in non-transgenic but not in transgenic fish. A lack of further growth stimulation of GH transgenic fish suggests that these fish are experiencing maximal growth stimulation via GH pathways.

  16. Covalent coupling of bovine growth hormone to its receptor in bovine liver membranes.

    PubMed

    Badinga, L; Collier, R J; Thatcher, W W; Quintana, S J; Bazer, F W

    1987-07-01

    The structure of bovine somatotropin receptor was examined following covalent coupling of iodinated recombinant bovine growth hormone ([125I]rbGH) to bovine liver membrane receptors using ethylene glycol bis(succinimidyl succinate). Iodinated rbGH was incorporated into a complex of estimated Mr of 140,000 under reducing conditions. Excess unlabeled rbGH, but not bovine prolactin (bPRL), inhibited completely the incorporation of [125I]rbGH into the Mr = 140,000 species. In dairy bulls, the Mr = 140,000 complex was undetectable soon after birth but became predominant at 6 months of age. No evidence was found to support presence of bPRL receptors in steer liver membranes. Assuming a 1:1 stoichiometry of hormone binding to receptor, it appears that bGH binds to a major receptor subunit of Mr = 119,000 which does not recognize bPRL.

  17. [Growth Hormone-Insulin Growth Factor I (GH-IGF-I) axis and growth].

    PubMed

    Castell, A-L; Sadoul, J-L; Bouvattier, C

    2013-10-01

    Normal human linear growth results from an evolutionary process expressing the sum effect of multiple genes. The growth hormone (GH) - insulin like growth factor (IGF)-I axis is one of the main actors in the growth process. Defects in this axis can be responsible for short or tall stature. Short stature is defined as smaller than - 2 standard deviations (SD). It is a very common reason for consultation in pediatrics; indeed, 2.5 % of children are concerned. Multiple causes make diagnosis difficult. In this article, we detail the most common constitutional causes of small size, including those related to a defect in the GH-IGF-I axis. Then, we report, the first results of the clinical and genetic study conducted on 213 patients with gigantism. Tall stature is defined by a height superior to 2 SD. Finally, recent work linking epigenetics and growth - via signaling pathways of GH-IGF-I axis - will be presented.

  18. The role of growth hormone in fetal development.

    PubMed

    Waters, M J; Kaye, P L

    2002-06-01

    Studies across several species, particularly the mouse, show that growth hormone (GH, somatotrophin) is an important determinant of litter size, and to a lesser extent, of birth length. GH acts at all stages of development, from ovulation through preimplantation development to the late fetus, with actions on both embryo/fetus and mother contributing to successful fetal development. The fact that these are not more obvious in vivo is likely a result of redundancy of cytokine hormone action, particularly in relation to prolactin, which shares common actions and receptor locations with GH.

  19. Thyrotrophin-releasing hormone induces growth hormone secretion in adult hypothyroid fowl.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S; Scanes, C G; Klandorf, H

    1988-02-01

    While thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (TRH) stimulated growth hormone (GH) secretion in adult anesthetized cockerels, the GH response was blocked in anesthetized birds pretreated with thyroxine (T4) or triiodothyronine (T3). Moreover, whereas GH secretion in conscious adult birds was poorly responsive to TRH stimulation, conscious birds made hypothyroid by goitrogen pretreatment (with propylthiouracil, methimazole, or thiourea) were responsive to TRH challenge. Basal circulating GH concentrations in the goitrogen-pretreated birds were also higher than in the vehicle-injected controls. Surgical thyroidectomy similarly increased the basal GH concentration in adult birds and promoted TRH-induced GH secretion. These results demonstrate inhibitory effects of the thyroid hormones on basal and stimulated GH secretion in adult domestic fowl and suggest that GH release in adults is partly under tonic thyroidal inhibition.

  20. Central administration of chicken growth hormone-releasing hormone decreases food intake in chicks.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Tetsuya; Sugimoto, Ikue; Ogino, Madoka; Khan, Md Sakirul Islam; Masuda, Keiko; Ukena, Kazuyoshi; Wang, Yajun

    2015-02-01

    Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is well known as a stimulator of growth hormone (GH) secretion. GHRH not only stimulates GH release but also modifies feeding behavior and energy homeostasis in rodents. In chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus), on the other hand, two types of GHRH, namely, chicken GHRH (cGHRH) and cGHRH-like peptide (cGHRH-LP), have been identified. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of central injection of cGHRH and cGHRH-LP on feeding behavior in chicks. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of both cGHRH and cGHRH-LP (0.04 to 1 nmol) significantly decreased food intake without any abnormal behavior in chicks. Furthermore, the feeding-inhibitory effect was not abolished by co-injection of the antagonist for pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) or corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) receptors, suggesting that the anorexigenic effect of cGHRH and cGHRH-LP might not be related to the PACAP and CRH systems in the brain of chicks. Finally, 24-h food deprivation increased mRNA expression of cGHRH but not cGHRH-LP in the diencephalon. These results suggest that central cGHRH is related to inhibiting feeding behavior and energy homeostasis in chicks.

  1. Carboxypeptidase Z (CPZ) links thyroid hormone and Wnt signaling pathways in growth plate chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lai; Shao, Yvonne Y; Ballock, R Tracy

    2009-02-01

    Carboxypeptidase Z (CPZ) removes carboxyl-terminal basic amino acid residues, particularly arginine residues, from proteins. CPZ contains a cysteine-rich domain (CRD) similar to the CRD found in the frizzled family of Wnt receptors. We have previously shown that thyroid hormone regulates terminal differentiation of growth plate chondrocytes through activation of Wnt-4 expression and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. The Wnt-4 protein contains a C-terminal arginine residue and binds to CPZ through the CRD. The objective of this study was to determine whether CPZ modulates Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and terminal differentiation of growth plate chondrocytes. Our results show that CPZ and Wnt-4 mRNA are co-expressed throughout growth plate cartilage. In primary pellet cultures of rat growth plate chondrocytes, thyroid hormone increases both Wnt-4 and CPZ expression, as well as CPZ enzymatic activity. Knockdown of either Wnt-4 or CPZ mRNA levels using an RNA interference technique or blocking CPZ enzymatic activity with the carboxypeptidase inhibitor GEMSA reduces the thyroid hormone effect on both alkaline phosphatase activity and Col10a1 mRNA expression. Adenoviral overexpression of CPZ activates Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and promotes the terminal differentiation of growth plate cells. Overexpression of CPZ in growth plate chondrocytes also removes the C-terminal arginine residue from a synthetic peptide consisting of the carboxyl-terminal 16 amino acids of the Wnt-4 protein. Removal of the C-terminal arginine residue of Wnt-4 by site-directed mutagenesis enhances the positive effect of Wnt-4 on terminal differentiation. These data indicate that thyroid hormone may regulate terminal differentiation of growth plate chondrocytes in part by modulating Wnt signaling pathways through the induction of CPZ and subsequent CPZ-enhanced activation of Wnt-4.

  2. Effect of sericin on diabetic hippocampal growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 axis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhihong; Yang, Songhe; He, Yaqiang; Song, Chengjun; Liu, Yongping

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that sericin extracted from silk cocoon significantly reduces blood glucose levels and protects the nervous system against diabetes mellitus. In this study, a rat type 2 diabetes mellitus model was established by intraperitoneal injection of 25 mg/kg streptozotocin for 3 successive days, following which the rats were treated with sericin for 35 days. After treatment, the blood glucose levels of the diabetic rats decreased significantly, the growth hormone level in serum and its expression in the hippocampus decreased significantly, while the insulin-like growth factor-1 level in serum and insulin-like growth factor-1 and growth hormone receptor expression in the hippocampus increased significantly. The experimental findings indicate that sericin improves disorders of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 axis to alleviate hippocampal damage in diabetic rats. PMID:25206472

  3. Neither bST nor Growth Hormone Releasing Factor Alter Expression of Thyroid Hormone Receptors in Liver and Mammary Tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physiological effects of thyroid hormones are mediated primarily by binding of triiodothyronine, to specific nuclear receptors. It has been hypothesized that organ-specific changes in production of triiodothyronine from its prohormone, thyroxine, target the action of thyroid hormones to the mammary...

  4. Regulatory mechanisms of growth hormone secretion are sexually dimorphic.

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, C A; Ocampo-Lim, B; Guo, W; Krueger, K; Sugahara, I; DeMott-Friberg, R; Bermann, M; Barkan, A L

    1998-01-01

    Sexually dimorphic growth hormone (GH) secretory pattern is important in the determination of gender-specific patterns of growth and metabolism in rats. Whether GH secretion in humans is also sexually dimorphic and the neuroendocrine mechanisms governing this potential difference are not fully established. We have compared pulsatile GH secretion profiles in young men and women in the baseline state and during a continuous intravenous infusion of recombinant human insulin-like growth factor I (rhIGF-I). During the baseline study, men had large nocturnal GH pulses and relatively small pulses during the rest of the day. In contrast, women had more continuous GH secretion and more frequent GH pulses that were of more uniform size. The infusion of rhIGF-I (10 microg/kg/h) potently suppressed both spontaneous and growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH)-induced GH secretion in men. In women, however, rhIGF-I had less effect on pulsatile GH secretion and did not suppress the GH response to GHRH. These data demonstrate the existence of sexual dimorphism in the regulatory mechanisms involved in GH secretion in humans. The persistence of GH responses to GHRH in women suggests that negative feedback by IGF-I might be expressed, in part, through suppression of hypothalamic GHRH. PMID:9649569

  5. Hormonal growth promoting agents in food producing animals.

    PubMed

    Stephany, Rainer W

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to the use of hormonal doping agents in sports to enhance the performance of athletes, in the livestock industry hormonal growth promoters ("anabolics") are used to increase the production of muscle meat. This leads to international disputes about the safety of meat originating from animals treated with such anabolics.As a consequence of the total ban in the EU of all hormonal active growth promoters ("hormones") in livestock production, in contrast to their legal use [e.g. of five such hormones (17beta-estradiol, testosterone, progesterone, trenbolone and zeranol) as small solid ear implants and two hormones as feed additives for feedlot heifers (melengestrol acetate) and for swine (ractopamine) in the USA], the regulatory controls also differ sharply between the EU and the USA.In the EU the treatment of slaughter animals is the regulatory offence that has to be controlled in inspection programs. In the USA testing for compliance of a regulatory maximum residue level in the edible product (muscle, fat, liver or kidney) is the purpose of the inspection program (if any).The EU inspection programs focus on sample materials that are more suitable for testing for banned substances, especially if the animals are still on the farm, such as urine and feces or hair. In the case of slaughtered animals, the more favored sample materials are bile, blood, eyes and sometimes liver. Only in rare occasions is muscle meat sampled. This happens only in the case of import controls or in monitoring programs of meat sampled in butcher shops or supermarkets.As a result, data on hormone concentrations in muscle meat samples from the EU market are very rare and are obtained in most cases from small programs on an ad hoc basis. EU data for natural hormones in meat are even rarer because of the absence of "legal natural levels" for these hormones in compliance testing. With the exception of samples from the application sites - in the EU the site of injection of liquid hormone

  6. Growth Hormone Response to L-Dopa and Clonidine in Autistic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Realmuto, George M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Seven medication-free autistic subjects (ages 6-19) were administered clonidine and L-Dopa to investigate neuroendocrine responses through changes in growth hormone levels. Findings showed that, compared to normal controls, the L-Dopa-stimulated growth hormone peak was delayed and the clonidine growth hormone peak was premature. (Author/JDD)

  7. Antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone suppress in vivo tumor growth and gene expression in triple negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Perez, Roberto; Schally, Andrew V; Vidaurre, Irving; Rincon, Ricardo; Block, Norman L; Rick, Ferenc G

    2012-09-01

    This study evaluated the effects of a modern antagonistic analog of GHRH on tumor growth and on expression of inflammatory cytokine genes in two models of human triple negative breast cancers (TNBC). The TNBC subtype is refractory to the treatment options available for other hormone-independent breast cancers. Inflammatory cytokines play a major role in the cellular signaling associated with breast cancer pathogenesis and enhance epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMT), drug resistance, and metastatic potential. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide which regulates the synthesis and release of growth hormone by the pituitary and is an autocrine/paracrine growth factor for multiple human cancers. The effects of analogs of GHRH on tumoral cytokine expression have not been previously investigated. Animals bearing xenografts of the human TNBC cell lines, HCC1806 and MX-1, were treated with MIA-602, an antagonistic analog of GHRH. Treatment with MIA-602 significantly reduced tumor growth. We quantified transcript levels of the genes for several inflammatory cytokines. Expression of INFγ, IL-1α, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNFα, was significantly reduced by treatment with MIA-602. We conclude that treatment of TNBC with GHRH antagonists reduces tumor growth through an action mediated by tumoral GHRH receptors and produces a suppression of inflammatory cytokine signaling. Silencing of GHRH receptors in vitro with siRNA inhibited the expression of GHRH-R genes and inflammatory cytokine genes in HCC1806 and MX-1 cells. Further studies on GHRH antagonists may facilitate the development of new strategies for the treatment of resistant cancers.

  8. The Growth Hormone Secretagogue Receptor: Its Intracellular Signaling and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yue; Li, Yin; Zhang, Weizhen

    2014-01-01

    The growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), also known as the ghrelin receptor, is involved in mediating a wide variety of biological effects of ghrelin, including: stimulation of growth hormone release, increase of food intake and body weight, modulation of glucose and lipid metabolism, regulation of gastrointestinal motility and secretion, protection of neuronal and cardiovascular cells, and regulation of immune function. Dependent on the tissues and cells, activation of GHSR may trigger a diversity of signaling mechanisms and subsequent distinct physiological responses. Distinct regulation of GHSR occurs at levels of transcription, receptor interaction and internalization. Here we review the current understanding on the intracellular signaling pathways of GHSR and its modulation. An overview of the molecular structure of GHSR is presented first, followed by the discussion on its signaling mechanisms. Finally, potential mechanisms regulating GHSR are reviewed. PMID:24651458

  9. AAS, growth hormone, and insulin abuse: psychological and neuroendocrine effects

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Michael R; Evans, Peter; Davies, Bruce; Baker, Julien S

    2008-01-01

    The nontherapeutic use of prescription medicines by individuals involved in sport is increasing. Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are the most widely abused drug. Much of our knowledge of the psychological and physiological effects of human growth hormone (hGH) and insulin has been learned from deficiency states. As a consequence of the Internet revolution, previously unobtainable and expensive designer drugs, particularly recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) and insulin, have become freely available at ridiculously discounted prices from countries such as China and are being abused. These drugs have various physiological and psychological effects and medical personnel must become aware that such prescription medicine abuse appears to be used not only for performance and cosmetic reasons, but as a consequence of psychological pre-morbidity. PMID:18827854

  10. [Effects of growth hormone replacement therapy on bone metabolism].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masahiro; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2014-06-01

    Growth hormone (GH) as well as insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) are essential hormones to maintain homeostasis of bone turnover by activating osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis. Results from GH replacement therapy for primary osteoporosis and adult-onset GH deficiency (AGHD) suggest that one year or more treatment period by this agent is required to gain bone mineral density (BMD) over the basal level after compensating BMD loss caused by dominant increase in bone resorption which was observed at early phase of GH treatment. A recent meta-analysis demonstrates the efficacy of GH replacement therapy on increases in BMD in male patients with AGHD. Additional analyses are needed to draw firm conclusions in female patients with AGHD, because insufficient amounts of GH might be administrated to them without considerations of influence of estrogen replacement therapy on IGF-1 production. Further observational studies are needed to clarify whether GH replacement therapy prevent fracture risk in these patients.

  11. Influence of Dietary Copper on Serum Growth-Related Hormone Levels and Growth Performance of Weanling Pigs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianguo; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Guo, Yazhou; Wang, Zhe; Zhao, Baoyu; Yin, Yunhou; Liu, Guowen

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the effect of dietary copper on serum growth-related hormones levels and growth performance, a total of 60 weanling pigs were randomly assigned to six groups each containing 10 pigs, fed on basal diets supplemented with 0 (control), 100, 150, 200, 250, and 300 mg/kg copper sulfate for 80 days, respectively. The average daily gain (ADG), feed to gain ratio (F/G), feed intake and serum growth hormone (GH), insulin (INS), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) levels were detected at interval of 20 days. The results revealed that ADG, and serum GH, INS, IGF-1, and IGFBP-3 concentrations were increased significantly in the pigs fed on diets added with 100, 150, 200, 250, and 300 mg/kg copper sulfate. Meanwhile, in the pigs supplemented with 250 mg/kg copper sulfate, ADG was increased significantly from the 40th to the 60th day of the experiment (P < 0.01), and the levels of GH, INS, IGF-1, and IGFBP-3 in serum were elevated significantly from the 20th to the 40th day of the experiment (P < 0.01). It is concluded that effects of copper supplemented in the diet on the growth of pigs were related to the increasing levels of GH, INS, IGF-1, and IGFBP-3 in serum which were induced by copper. High dietary copper increase the concentrations of growth-related hormones in serum, resulting in improving the growth performance of weanling pigs.

  12. Disturbances in the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor axis in children and adolescents with different eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Argente, J; Caballo, N; Barrios, V; Muñoz, M T; Pozo, J; Chowen, J A; Hernández, M

    1997-01-01

    Numerous endocrine abnormalities of the growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor axis have been described in patients with both anorexia nervosa and obesity during childhood and adolescence. These alterations include changes in the levels of 24-hour spontaneous GH secretion, high-affinity, low-capacity GH binding protein (GHBP), IGF-I, IGF-II and the IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs). However, the existing information is sometimes confusing and contradictory. Furthermore, little or no data in these pathologies are available concerning IGFBP-2 or free IGF-I. We have analysed the GH-IGF axis in large populations of adolescents with anorexia nervosa and prepubertal children with exogenous obesity. These patients were studied at the time of diagnosis and at two timepoints during nutritional therapy and normal weight recovery. The results of these studies using age- and sex-matched controls are described here.

  13. Plasma concentrations of luteinising hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, androgen, growth hormone, prolactin, thyroxine and triiodothyronine during growth and sexual development in the cockerel.

    PubMed

    Sterling, R J; Sharp, P J; Klandorf, H; Harvey, S; Lea, R W

    1984-07-01

    Changes in concentrations of plasma luteinising hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), androgen, growth hormone (GH), prolactin (Prl), thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) were measured during growth and sexual maturation in broiler cockerels reared in continuous light to 7 weeks and 14 h light/d thereafter. Concentrations of LH and FSH began to increase between 13 and 15 weeks, while those of androgens increased between 16 and 17 weeks. FSH concentration increased faster than that of LH. Concentrations of GH and Prl were high at 3 weeks; that of GH decreasing progressively between 3 and 14 weeks of age and thereafter remaining low, while that of Prl was low between 5 and 9 weeks, relatively high between 10 and 13 weeks, and then temporarily decreasing before increasing progressively during sexual maturation. Concentrations of T3 and T4 were higher in juvenile than in adult birds.

  14. [Acral acanthosis nigricans associated with taking growth hormone].

    PubMed

    Peña Irún, A

    2014-01-01

    Acanthosis nigricans is a skin lesion characterized by the presence of a hyperpigmented, velvety cutaneous thickening that usually appears in flexural areas. Less frequently, it can occur in other locations, such as the dorsum of hands and feet. In this case it is called acral acanthosis nigricans. It is a dermatological manifestation of systemic disease. It is often associated with insulin resistance-mediated endocrine diseases. A case is presented on a patient with acanthosis nigricans secondary to the use of growth hormone.

  15. Allosteric Modulation of Hormone Release from Thyroxine and Corticosteroid-binding Globulins*

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xiaoqiang; Loiseau, François; Chan, Wee Lee; Yan, Yahui; Wei, Zhenquan; Milroy, Lech-Gustav; Myers, Rebecca M.; Ley, Steven V.; Read, Randy J.; Carrell, Robin W.; Zhou, Aiwu

    2011-01-01

    The release of hormones from thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) and corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) is regulated by movement of the reactive center loop in and out of the β-sheet A of the molecule. To investigate how these changes are transmitted to the hormone-binding site, we developed a sensitive assay using a synthesized thyroxine fluorophore and solved the crystal structures of reactive loop cleaved TBG together with its complexes with thyroxine, the thyroxine fluorophores, furosemide, and mefenamic acid. Cleavage of the reactive loop results in its complete insertion into the β-sheet A and a substantial but incomplete decrease in binding affinity in both TBG and CBG. We show here that the direct interaction between residue Thr342 of the reactive loop and Tyr241 of the hormone binding site contributes to thyroxine binding and release following reactive loop insertion. However, a much larger effect occurs allosterically due to stretching of the connecting loop to the top of the D helix (hD), as confirmed in TBG with shortening of the loop by three residues, making it insensitive to the S-to-R transition. The transmission of the changes in the hD loop to the binding pocket is seen to involve coherent movements in the s2/3B loop linked to the hD loop by Lys243, which is, in turn, linked to the s4/5B loop, flanking the thyroxine-binding site, by Arg378. Overall, the coordinated movements of the reactive loop, hD, and the hormone binding site allow the allosteric regulation of hormone release, as with the modulation demonstrated here in response to changes in temperature. PMID:21325280

  16. Regulation of skeletal muscle growth in fish by the growth hormone--insulin-like growth factor system.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo N; Valdés, Juan Antonio; Molina, Alfredo; Björnsson, Björn Thrandur

    2013-10-01

    The growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system is the key promoter of growth in vertebrates; however, how this system modulates muscle mass in fish is just recently becoming elucidated. In fish, the GH induces muscle growth by modulating the expression of several genes belonging to the myostatin (MSTN), atrophy, GH, and IGF systems as well as myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs). The GH controls the expression of igf1 via Janus kinase 2 (JAK2)/signal transducers and activators of the transcription 5 (STAT5) signaling pathway, but it seems that it is not the major regulator. These mild effects of the GH on igf1 expression in fish muscle seem to be related with the presence of higher contents of truncated GH receptor1 (tGHR1) than full length GHR (flGHR1). IGFs in fish stimulate myogenic cell proliferation, differentiation, and protein synthesis through the MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT/TOR signaling pathways, concomitant with abolishing protein degradation and atrophy via the PI3K/AKT/FOXO signaling pathway. Besides these signaling pathways control the expression of several genes belonging to the atrophy and IGF systems. Particularly, IGFs and amino acid control the expression of igf1, thus, suggesting other of alternative signaling pathways regulating the transcription of this growth factor. The possible role of IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) and the contribution of muscle-derived versus hepatic-produced IGF1 on fish muscle growth is also addressed. Thus, a comprehensive overview on the GH-IGF system regulating fish skeletal muscle growth is presented, as well as perspectives for future research in this field.

  17. Thyroid hormone regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor levels in mouse mammary glands

    SciTech Connect

    Vonderhaar, B.K.; Tang, E.; Lyster, R.R.; Nascimento, M.C.

    1986-08-01

    The specific binding of iodinated epidermal growth factor ((/sup 125/I)iodo-EGF) to membranes prepared from the mammary glands and spontaneous breast tumors of euthyroid and hypothyroid mice was measured in order to determine whether thyroid hormones regulate the EGF receptor levels in vivo. Membranes from hypothyroid mammary glands of mice at various developmental ages bound 50-65% less EGF than those of age-matched euthyroid controls. Treatment of hypothyroid mice with L-T4 before killing restored binding to the euthyroid control level. Spontaneous breast tumors arising in hypothyroid mice also bound 30-40% less EGF than tumors from euthyroid animals even after in vitro desaturation of the membranes of endogenous growth factors with 3 M MgCl2 treatment. The decrease in binding in hypothyroid membranes was due to a decrease in the number of binding sites, not to a change in affinity of the growth factor for its receptor, as determined by Scatchard analysis of the binding data. Both euthyroid and hypothyroid membranes bound EGF primarily to a single class of high affinity sites (dissociation constant (Kd) = 0.7-1.8 nM). Euthyroid membranes bound 28.4 +/- (SE) 0.6 fmol/mg protein, whereas hypothyroid membranes bound 15.5 +/- 1.0 fmol/mg protein. These data indicate that EGF receptor levels in normal mammary glands and spontaneous breast tumors in mice are subject to regulation by thyroid status.

  18. Isolated growth hormone deficiency type 2: from gene to therapy.

    PubMed

    Miletta, Maria Consolata; Lochmatter, Didier; Pektovic, Vibor; Mullis, Primus-E

    2012-01-01

    Isolated growth hormone deficiency type-2 (IGHD-2), the autosomal-dominant form of GH deficiency, is mainly caused by specific splicing mutations in the human growth hormone (hGH) gene (GH-1). These mutations, occurring in and around exon 3, cause complete exon 3 skipping and produce a dominant-negative 17.5 kD GH isoform that reduces the accumulation and secretion of wild type-GH (wt-GH). At present, patients suffering from IGHD-2 are treated with daily injections of recombinant human GH (rhGH) in order to reach normal height. However, this type of replacement therapy, although effective in terms of growth, does not prevent toxic effects of the 17.5-kD mutant on the pituitary gland, which can eventually lead to other hormonal deficiencies. Considering a well-known correlation between the clinical severity observed in IGHD-2 patients and the increased expression of the 17.5-kD isoform, therapies that specifically target this isoform may be useful in patients with GH-1 splicing defects. This chapter focuses on molecular strategies that could represent future directions for IGHD-2 treatment.

  19. Growth hormone, enhancement and the pharmaceuticalisation of short stature.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Michael

    2015-04-01

    This paper takes the biological drug human Growth Hormone (hGH) as a case study to investigate processes of pharmaceuticalisation and medicalisation in configuring childhood short stature as a site for pharmaceutical intervention. Human growth hormone is considered to have legitimate applications in treating childhood growth hormone deficiency and short stature associated with other recognised conditions. It is also regarded by bioethicists and others as a form of human biomedical enhancement when applied to children with idiopathic or 'normal' short stature. The purpose of this study is not to evaluate whether treatment of idiopathic short stature is enhancement or not, but to evaluate how some applications of hGH in treating short stature have come to be accepted and stabilised as legitimate 'therapies' while others remain contested as 'enhancements'. A comparative, historical approach is employed, drawing on approaches from medical sociology and Science and Technology Studies (STS) to set out a socio-technical history of hGH in the US and UK. Through this history the relative influence and interplay of drivers of pharmaceuticalisation, including industry marketing and networks of drug distribution, and processes of medicalisation will be employed to address this question and simultaneously query the value of enhancement as a sociological concept.

  20. Regulation of growth hormone secretion by (pro)renin receptor.

    PubMed

    Tani, Yuji; Yamada, Shozo; Inoshita, Naoko; Hirata, Yukio; Shichiri, Masayoshi

    2015-06-03

    (Pro)renin receptor (PRR) has a single transmembrane domain that co-purifies with the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase). In addition to its role in cellular acidification, V-ATPase has been implicated in membrane fusion and exocytosis via its Vo domain. Results from the present study show that PRR is expressed in pituitary adenoma cells and regulates growth hormone (GH) release via V-ATPase-induced cellular acidification. Positive PRR immunoreactivity was detected more often in surgically resected, growth hormone-producing adenomas (GHomas) than in nonfunctional pituitary adenomas. GHomas strongly expressing PRR showed excess GH secretion, as evidenced by distinctly high plasma GH and insulin-like growth factor-1 levels, as well as an elevated nadir GH in response to the oral glucose tolerance test. Suppression of PRR expression in rat GHoma-derived GH3 cells using PRR siRNA resulted in reduced GH secretion and significantly enhanced intracellular GH accumulation. GH3 treatment with bafilomycin A1, a V-ATPase inhibitor, also blocked GH release, indicating mediation via impaired cellular acidification of V-ATPase. PRR knockdown decreased Atp6l, a subunit of the Vo domain that destabilizes V-ATPase assembly, increased intracellular GH, and decreased GH release. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating a pivotal role for PRR in a pituitary hormone release mechanism.

  1. Development of predictive models for predicting binding affinity of endocrine disrupting chemicals to fish sex hormone-binding globulin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huihui; Yang, Xianhai; Yin, Cen; Wei, Mengbi; He, Xiao

    2017-02-01

    Disturbing the transport process is a crucial pathway for endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) exerting disrupting endocrine function. However, this mechanism has not received enough attention compared with that of hormones receptors and synthetase. Recently, we have explored the interaction between EDCs and sex hormone-binding globulin of human (hSHBG). In this study, interactions between EDCs and sex hormone-binding globulin of eight fish species (fSHBG) were investigated by employing classification methods and quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR). In the modeling, the relative binding affinity (RBA) of a chemical with 17β-estradiol binding to fSHBG was selected as the endpoint. Classification models were developed for two fish species, while QSAR models were established for the other six fish species. Statistical results indicated that the models had satisfactory goodness of fit, robustness and predictive ability, and that application domain covered a large number of endogenous and exogenous steroidal and non-steroidal chemicals. Additionally, by comparing the log RBA values, it was found that the same chemical may have different affinities for fSHBG from different fish species, thus species diversity should be taken into account. However, the affinity of fSHBG showed a high correlation for fishes within the same Order (i.e., Salmoniformes, Cypriniformes, Perciformes and Siluriformes), thus the fSHBG binding data for one fish species could be used to extrapolate other fish species in the same Order.

  2. Insulin-like growth factor 1: common mediator of multiple enterotrophic hormones and growth factors

    PubMed Central

    Bortvedt, Sarah F.; Lund, P. Kay

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize recent evidence that IGF1 mediates growth effects of multiple trophic factors and discuss clinical relevance. Recent findings Recent reviews and original reports indicate benefits of growth hormone (GH) and long-acting glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP2) analogues in short bowel syndrome and Crohn’s disease. This review highlights evidence that biomarkers of sustained small intestinal growth or mucosal healing and evaluation of intestinal epithelial stem cell biomarkers may improve clinical measures of intestinal growth or response to trophic hormones. Compelling evidence that IGF1 mediates growth effects of GH and GLP2 on intestine or linear growth in preclinical models of resection or Crohn’s disease is presented, along with a concept that these hormones or IGF1 may enhance sustained growth if given early after bowel resection. Evidence that SOCS protein induction by GH or GLP2 in normal or inflamed intestine, may limit IGF1-induced growth, but protect against risk of dysplasia or fibrosis is reviewed. Whether IGF1 receptor mediates IGF1 action and potential roles of insulin receptors are addressed. Summary IGF1 has a central role in mediating trophic hormone action in small intestine. Better understanding of benefits and risks of IGF1, receptors that mediate IGF1 action, and factors that limit undesirable growth are needed. PMID:22241077

  3. [Growth hormone in adults. An elixir of youth?].

    PubMed

    Rainfray, M; Hamon-Vilcot, B; Cnockaert, X; Pellerin, J; Bouillanne, O; Durand, D; Piette, F

    1995-01-01

    Studies have revealed a partial deficiency of growth hormone (GH) secretion in the elderly. Aging has a central effect on the GH secretion and probably a peripheral effect on insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) or somatomedin C through changes in body composition. Simultaneously therapeutic efficiency of recombinant GH was confirmed in adults with GH deficiency. These notions have led to some controlled trials of GH treatment in elderly. Further studies of GH replacement are needed, examining issues such as dosage, tolerance (still inadequate) and efficacy before the widespread use of GH or IGH-F 1 in the elderly is advocated.

  4. Initiating growth hormone therapy for children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Acerini, Carlo; Albanese, Assunta; Casey, Angela; Denvir, Louise; Jones, Julie; Mathew, Verghese; Musson, Pauline; Sparrow, Susan

    It is common for children and adolescents on growth hormone (GH) treatment to miss one or more injections per week, thereby compromising their linear growth outcome. Among factors likely to affect treatment concordance are patient education and support in the selection of the most appropriate GH injection device. The authors discovered inconsistencies in the process of starting patients on GH therapy throughout the UK, and found that there were no clinical recommendations to support health professionals starting patients on treatment. This article describes the issues involved and the development of practical recommendations for use when starting paediatric patients on long-term GH therapy.

  5. The contribution of growth hormone to mammary neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Jo K; Mohankumar, Kumarasamypet M; Emerald, B Starling; Mertani, Hichem C; Lobie, Peter E

    2008-01-01

    While the effects of growth hormone (GH) on longitudinal growth are well established, the observation that GH contributes to neoplastic progression is more recent. Accumulating literature implicates GH-mediated signal transduction in the development and progression of a wide range malignancies including breast cancer. Recently autocrine human GH been demonstrated to be an orthotopically expressed oncogene for the human mammary gland. This review will highlight recent evidence linking GH and mammary carcinoma and discuss GH-antagonism as a potential therapeutic approach for treatment of breast cancer. PMID:18253708

  6. Search for novel therapies for triple negative breast cancers (TNBC): analogs of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) and growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH).

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Stefan; Seitz, Stephan; Engel, Jörg B; Montero, Alberto; Ortmann, Olaf; Perez, Roberto; Block, Norman L; Schally, Andrew V

    2012-04-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive breast cancer subtype that is clinically negative for the expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors (ER/PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2). Patients with TNBC have a worse clinical outcome, as measured by time to metastasis and median overall survival. Chemotherapy has been the mainstay of treatment of TNBC but responses are disappointing. A substantial proportion of TNBC expresses luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH), receptors for LHRH, in addition to receptors for growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH). These receptors represent potential therapeutic targets. Potent antagonists of GHRH and LHRH receptors have been developed in recent years and these antagonists inhibit the growth, tumorigenicity and metastatic potential of various human experimental malignancies. These antagonists could be utilized for the treatment of TNBC. The targeted cytotoxic analog of LHRH, AN-152 (AEZS-108) containing doxorubicin, must also be strongly considered for therapy of TNBC. Experimental studies suggest the merit of clinical trials with LHRH antagonists and AEZS-108 in TNBC patients.

  7. Hormonal modulation of brain tumour growth: a cell culture study.

    PubMed

    Gibelli, N; Zibera, C; Butti, G; Assietti, R; Sica, G; Scerrati, M; Iacopino, F; Roselli, R; Paoletti, P; Robustelli della Cuna, G

    1989-01-01

    Tissue samples derived from two neuroepithelial tumours and five meningiomas were obtained at surgery from seven patients and cultured in order to study the effect of dexamethasone (DEX) and testosterone acetate (TA) on cell proliferation. Glucocorticoid and androgen receptors (GR, AR) were determined both on tissue samples (7 cases) and on five out of the seven cell cultures obtained by tumours. GR and AR were present respectively in 5 and in 4 out of the tumour specimens assayed and in 4/5 and 2/3 of the tested cell cultures. DEX activity on cell growth was tested on six cell cultures. Four of them showed a significant growth inhibition at the highest drug concentration. On the contrary, a significant growth stimulation was observed in four out of the five cultures, where GR were present, using low hormone concentrations. Treatment with pharmacological doses of TA caused a significant cytotoxicity in all the tested cultures. Low TA concentrations inhibited cell growth in one out of the two cell cultures which contained AR, but were ineffective in cultures lacking AR. Our preliminary results suggest a possible role in growth regulation by DEX and TA in intracranial tumours, on the basis of the presence of specific hormone receptors.

  8. The glucocorticoid receptor hormone binding domain mediates transcriptional activation in vitro in the absence of ligand.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, J; Stunnenberg, H G

    1993-01-01

    We show that recombinant rat glucocorticoid receptor (vvGR) expressed using vaccinia virus is indistinguishable from authentic GR with respect to DNA and hormone binding. In the absence of hormone, vvGR is mainly found in the cytoplasm in a complex with heat shock protein 90. Upon incubation with ligand, vvGR is released from this complex and translocated to the nucleus. Thus, the ligand binding domain displays the known biochemical properties. However, in vitro, transcription from a synthetic promoter and from the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter is enhanced by recombinant GR in a ligand independent manner. Both transactivation domains contribute to the transcriptional activity, additively on a synthetic promoter and cooperatively on the MMTV promoter. We thus provide the first evidence that in vitro the hormone binding domain has a transcriptional activity even in the absence of ligand. Images PMID:8392705

  9. A potassium current evoked by growth hormone-releasing hormone in follicular oocytes of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, S; Plant, S

    1991-01-01

    1. Electrophysiological properties of the growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRH) receptor were studied in Xenopus oocytes with an intact follicle cell layer (i.e. follicular oocytes) by measuring whole-cell current using the two-electrode voltage-clamp method. 2. A slow transient outward current was elicited in oocytes, clamped at -60 mV, by the application of rat GRH but not bovine, porcine, or human GRH. 3. The response to GRH was not suppressed by blockers known to inhibit other endogenous receptors present in follicular Xenopus oocytes; blockers used were timolol (2 microM; beta-adrenergic blocker), theophylline (0.1 mM; purinergic blocker) and atropine (100 nM; muscarinic blocker). 4. The current response evoked by rat GRH occurred in a dose-dependent manner. The concentrations of GRH for threshold and maximum responses were 1 and 100 nM respectively and the estimated EC50 (half-maximal effective concentration) was approximately 7 nM. The amplitude and conductance of the response became larger and the latency, time-to-peak and half-decay time were shortened when the concentration of GRH was increased. 5. The GRH response was reversibly inhibited by a K+ channel blocker, tetraethylammonium+ (TEA+; 20 mM). The reversal potential for the GRH response was around -100 mV and was compatible with the reported value for a K+ current in Xenopus oocytes. Furthermore, a depolarizing shift of 40 mV in the reversal potential was observed when the external K+ concentration was increased from 2 to 10 mM, agreeing with the Nernst equation. In contrast, no significant shift in the reversal potential was observed by changing the external concentration of Na+ or Cl-. 6. The GRH response was not suppressed in oocytes treated with an acetoxy-methyl ester of bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA/AM; 10 microM) which penetrates the cell membrane and chelates internal Ca2+. 7. The GRH response was potentiated by pre-treatment with forskolin (0.4 microM; 5 min

  10. Clinical practice. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)23: a new hormone.

    PubMed

    Alon, Uri S

    2011-05-01

    Until a decade ago, two main hormones were recognized as directly affecting phosphate homeostasis and, with that, bone metabolism: parathyroid hormone and 1,25(OH)(2) vitamin D (calcitriol). It was only a decade ago that the third major player hormone was found, linking gut, bone, and kidney. The physiologic role of fibrinogen growth factor (FGF)23 is to maintain serum phosphate concentration within a narrow range. Secreted from osteocytes, it modulates kidney handling of phosphate reabsorption and calcitriol production. Genetic and acquired abnormalities in FGF23 structure and metabolism cause conditions of either hyper-FGF23-manifested by hypophosphatemia, low serum calcitriol, and rickets/osteomalacia-or hypo-FGF23, expressed by hyperphosphatemia, high serum calcitriol, and extra-skeletal calcifications. In patients with chronic renal failure, FGF23 levels increase as kidney functions deteriorate and are under investigation to learn if the hormone actually participates in the pathophysiology of the deranged bone and mineral metabolism typical for these patients and, if so, whether it might serve as a therapeutic target. This review addresses the physiology and pathophysiology of FGF23 and its clinical applications.

  11. Evaluation of growth hormone release and human growth hormone treatment in children with cranial irradiation-associated short stature

    SciTech Connect

    Romshe, C.A.; Zipf, W.B.; Miser, A.; Miser, J.; Sotos, J.F.; Newton, W.A.

    1984-02-01

    We studied nine children who had received cranial irradiation for various malignancies and subsequently experienced decreased growth velocity. Their response to standard growth hormone stimulation and release tests were compared with that in seven children with classic GH deficiency and in 24 short normal control subjects. With arginine and L-dopa stimulation, six of nine patients who received radiation had a normal GH response (greater than 7 ng/ml), whereas by design none of the GH deficient and all of the normal children had a positive response. Only two of nine patients had a normal response to insulin hypoglycemia, with no significant differences in the mean maximal response of the radiation and the GH-deficient groups. Pulsatile secretion was not significantly different in the radiation and GH-deficient groups, but was different in the radiation and normal groups. All subjects in the GH-deficient and radiation groups were given human growth hormone for 1 year. Growth velocity increased in all, with no significant difference in the response of the two groups when comparing the z scores for growth velocity of each subject's bone age. We recommend a 6-month trial of hGH in children who have had cranial radiation and are in prolonged remission with a decreased growth velocity, as there is no completely reliable combination of GH stimulation or release tests to determine their response.

  12. Growth Hormone Induces Recurrence of Infantile Hemangiomas After Apparent Involution: Evidence of Growth Hormone Receptors in Infantile Hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Munabi, Naikhoba C O; Tan, Qian Kun; Garzon, Maria C; Behr, Gerald G; Shawber, Carrie J; Wu, June K

    2015-01-01

    Infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common benign tumor of infancy, characterized by a natural history of early proliferation in the first months of life to eventual involution during childhood, often with residual fibrofatty tissue. Once involution has been achieved, IHs do not typically recur. We present two cases of exogenous growth hormone therapy resulting in the recurrence of IHs in late childhood, supported by radiological, immunohistochemical, in vitro, and in vivo evidence.

  13. Acute handling disturbance modulates plasma insulin-like growth factor binding proteins in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of acute stressor exposure on proximal (growth hormone; GH) and distal (insulin-like growth factor-I; IGF-I and IGF-binding proteins) components of the somatotropic axis are poorly understood in finfish. We exposed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to a 5-minute handling disturbance to...

  14. Growth hormone deficiency in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Oświęcimska, Joanna; Roczniak, Wojciech; Mikołajczak, Agata; Szymlak, Agnieszka

    2016-09-13

    Growth hormone (GH) is a naturally occurring polypeptide hormone produced by somatotropic cells in the anterior pituitary. The main function of somatotropin is stimulation of linear growth, but it also affects carbohydrate metabolism, increases bone mass and has potent lipolytic, antinatriuretic and antidiuretic effects. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) may occur both in children and in adults. At the moment there is no gold standard for the diagnosis of GHD, and the diagnosis should take into account clinical, auxological, biochemical and radiological changes and, if necessary, genetic testing. Recent studies have highlighted that the biochemical diagnosis of GH deficiency is still imperfect. Stimuli used in the tests are non-physiological, and various substances are characterized by a different mechanism of action and potency. A few years ago it was thought that GHD treatment in children must be completed at the end of linear growth. Studies performed in the last two decades have shown that GHD deficiency in adults may result in complex clinical problems, and if untreated shortens the life expectancy and worsens its comfort. Discontinuation of GH therapy after the final height has been reached in fact negatively impacts the physiological processes associated with the transition phase, which is the period of human life between achieving the final height and 25-30 years of age. Given the adverse metabolic effects of GH treatment interruption after linear growth has been completed, the latest recommendations propose reassessment of GH secretion in the period at least one month after cessation of treatment and continuation of the therapy in case of persistent deficit.

  15. Concentrations of triiodothyronine, growth hormone, and luteinizing hormone in the plasma of thyroidectomised fowl (Gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Harvey, S; Sterling, R J; Klandorf, H

    1983-05-01

    Surgical thyroidectomy increased (P less than 0.05) the basal concentrations of growth hormone (GH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) in the plasma of 10- to 12-week-old domestic fowl. The administration of thyrotrophin releasing hormone (TRH) (100 micrograms, sc) increased (P less than 0.01) the GH concentration in both intact and thyroidectomised birds. The magnitude of the TRH-induced increase in GH level was greater (P less than 0.01) in thyroidectomised birds than in intact controls. Although TRH had no effect on LH secretion in the controls, it induced a small (P less than 0.05) rise in the plasma LH level in thyroidectomised birds. In both the intact and thyroidectomised birds the LH concentration was enhanced (P less than 0.05) following the administration of LH-releasing hormone (LH-RH) (20 micrograms, sc). The increase in the LH level by LH-RH in the thyroidectomised birds was greater (P less than 0.001) than that in the intact controls. Plasma GH concentrations were unaffected by LH-RH treatment. These results suggest that thyroid hormones inhibit the secretion of LH and GH in birds. In thyroidectomised birds low levels of immunoreactive triiodothyronine (T3)-like material were measurable in the circulation, despite the absence of regenerated thyroid tissue. The administration of TRH (100 micrograms, sc) did not enhance the plasma level of this material in thyroidectomised birds, whereas plasma T3 concentrations were enhanced in intact birds following TRH treatment. These results suggest that the T3 immunoreactive substance in thyroidectomised birds is extrathyroidal in origin.

  16. All-atom structural models of insulin binding to the insulin receptor in the presence of a tandem hormone-binding element.

    PubMed

    Vashisth, Harish; Abrams, Cameron F

    2013-06-01

    Insulin regulates blood glucose levels in higher organisms by binding to and activating insulin receptor (IR), a constitutively homodimeric glycoprotein of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) superfamily. Therapeutic efforts in treating diabetes have been significantly impeded by the absence of structural information on the activated form of the insulin/IR complex. Mutagenesis and photo-crosslinking experiments and structural information on insulin and apo-IR strongly suggest that the dual-chain insulin molecule, unlike the related single-chain insulin-like growth factors, binds to IR in a very different conformation than what is displayed in storage forms of the hormone. In particular, hydrophobic residues buried in the core of the folded insulin molecule engage the receptor. There is also the possibility of plasticity in the receptor structure based on these data, which may in part be due to rearrangement of the so-called CT-peptide, a tandem hormone-binding element of IR. These possibilities provide opportunity for large-scale molecular modeling to contribute to our understanding of this system. Using various atomistic simulation approaches, we have constructed all-atom structural models of hormone/receptor complexes in the presence of CT in its crystallographic position and a thermodynamically favorable displaced position. In the "displaced-CT" complex, many more insulin-receptor contacts suggested by experiments are satisfied, and our simulations also suggest that R-insulin potentially represents the receptor-bound form of hormone. The results presented in this work have further implications for the design of receptor-specific agonists/antagonists.

  17. Effects of growth hormone administration in pediatric renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Bartosh, S; Kaiser, B; Rezvani, I; Polinsky, M; Schulman, S; Palmer, J; Baluarte, H J

    1992-01-01

    The efficacy of recombinant human growth hormone (rGH) was assessed in five pediatric allograft recipients with severe growth retardation despite successful renal transplants. rGH 0.05 mg/kg per dose was given six times weekly by subcutaneous injection to five prepubertal children (mean age 15.2 +/- 2.0 years) all of whom had bone ages less than or equal to 12 years (10.0 +/- 1.4 years), a height standard deviation score of less than -2.5 (-4.9 +/- 1.5), no evidence of catch-up growth, a calculated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of more than 40 ml/min per 1.73 m2 (51 +/- 6.8 ml/min per 1.73 m2), and stable renal function on alternate-day prednisone (16.7 +/- 2.6 mg/m2 per dose). Growth hormone profiles were abnormal in all children before treatment. rGH administration led to a significant increase in both growth rate (3.5 +/- 1.6 cm/year pre therapy, 8.5 +/- 1.4 cm/year post therapy, P less than 0.001) and percentage of expected growth velocity for bone age (67 +/- 31% pre therapy, 163 +/- 27% post therapy, P less than 0.001) with evidence of true catch-up growth. During the study period, three children had the appearance of secondary sexual characteristics, and one had premature advancement of his bone age. GFR decreased in three children, and in one rGH was discontinued due to a steady rise in serum creatinine. No significant changes were seen in serum calcium, phosphorus, cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, or thyroid function, although a significant increase in alkaline phosphatase was found. In summary, growth-retarded pediatric renal allograft recipients may have abnormal endogenous GH production and respond favorably to rGH.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Plant hormone cross-talk: the pivot of root growth.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, Elena; Polverari, Laura; Sabatini, Sabrina

    2015-02-01

    Root indeterminate growth and its outstanding ability to produce new tissues continuously make this organ a highly dynamic structure able to respond promptly to external environmental stimuli. Developmental processes therefore need to be finely tuned, and hormonal cross-talk plays a pivotal role in the regulation of root growth. In contrast to what happens in animals, plant development is a post-embryonic process. A pool of stem cells, placed in a niche at the apex of the meristem, is a source of self-renewing cells that provides cells for tissue formation. During the first days post-germination, the meristem reaches its final size as a result of a balance between cell division and cell differentiation. A complex network of interactions between hormonal pathways co-ordinates such developmental inputs. In recent years, by means of molecular and computational approaches, many efforts have been made aiming to define the molecular components of these networks. In this review, we focus our attention on the molecular mechanisms at the basis of hormone cross-talk during root meristem size determination.

  19. Growth Hormone-Insulin-Like Growth Factor Axis, Thyroid Axis, Prolactin, and Exercise.

    PubMed

    Hackney, Anthony C; Davis, Hope C; Lane, Amy R

    2016-01-01

    This chapter addresses what is known about the endocrine system components growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis, thyroid axis, and prolactin relative to exercise and exercise training. Each one of these hormone axes contributes to the maintenance of homeostasis in the body through impact on a multitude of physiological systems. The homeostatic disruption of exercise causes differing responses in each hormone axis. GH levels increase with sufficient stimulation, and IGFs are released in response to GH from the anterior pituitary providing multiple roles including anabolic properties. Changes in the thyroid hormones T3 and T4 vary greatly with exercise, from increases/decreases to no change in levels across different exercise types, intensities and durations. These ambiguous findings could be due to numerous confounding factors (e.g. nutrition status) within the research. Prolactin increases proportionally to the intensity of the exercise. The magnitude may be augmented with extended durations; conflicting findings have been reported with resistance training. While the responses to exercise vary, it appears there may be overall adaptive and regenerative impacts on the body into recovery by these hormones through immune and tissue inflammatory responses/mediations. Nonetheless, well-designed exercise research studies are still needed on each of these hormones, especially thyroid hormones and prolactin.

  20. Experiment K-7-22: Growth Hormone Regulation Synthesis and Secretion in Microgravity. Part 3; Plasma Analysis Hormone Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindeland, R. E.; Popova, I. A.; Grossman, E.; Rudolph, I.

    1994-01-01

    Plasma from space flight and tail suspended rats was analyzed for a number of constituents in order to evaluate their metabolic status and endocrine function. The data presented here cover plasma hormone measurements. Corticosterone, thyroxine, and testosterone were measured by radioimmunoassay. Prolactin and growth hormone were measured by double antibody immunoassays using hormones and antisera prepared in house. Data were evaluated by analysis of variance.

  1. Human sex hormone-binding globulin binding affinities of 125 structurally diverse chemicals and comparison with their binding to androgen receptor, estrogen receptor, and α-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    Hong, Huixiao; Branham, William S; Ng, Hui Wen; Moland, Carrie L; Dial, Stacey L; Fang, Hong; Perkins, Roger; Sheehan, Daniel; Tong, Weida

    2015-02-01

    One endocrine disruption mechanism is through binding to nuclear receptors such as the androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor (ER) in target cells. The concentration of a chemical in serum is important for its entry into the target cells to bind the receptors, which is regulated by the serum proteins. Human sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is the major transport protein in serum that can bind androgens and estrogens and thus change a chemical's availability to enter the target cells. Sequestration of an androgen or estrogen in the serum can alter the chemical elicited AR- and ER-mediated responses. To better understand the chemical-induced endocrine activity, we developed a competitive binding assay using human pregnancy plasma and measured the binding to the human SHBG for 125 structurally diverse chemicals, most of which were known to bind AR and ER. Eighty seven chemicals were able to bind the human SHBG in the assay, whereas 38 chemicals were nonbinders. Binding data for human SHBG are compared with that for rat α-fetoprotein, ER and AR. Knowing the binding profiles between serum and nuclear receptors will improve assessment of a chemical's potential for endocrine disruption. The SHBG binding data reported here represent the largest data set of structurally diverse chemicals tested for human SHBG binding. Utilization of the SHBG binding data with AR and ER binding data could enable better evaluation of endocrine disrupting potential of chemicals through AR- and ER-mediated responses since sequestration in serum could be considered.

  2. Role of growth hormone-releasing hormone in sleep and growth impairments induced by upper airway obstruction in rats.

    PubMed

    Tarasiuk, A; Berdugo-Boura, N; Troib, A; Segev, Y

    2011-10-01

    Upper airway obstruction (UAO) can lead to abnormal growth hormone (GH) homeostasis and growth retardation but the mechanisms are unclear. We explored the effect of UAO on hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone (GHRH), which has a role in both sleep and GH regulation. The tracheae of 22-day-old rats were narrowed; UAO and sham-operated animals were sacrificed 16 days post-surgery. To stimulate slow-wave sleep (SWS) and GH secretion, rats were treated with ritanserin (5-HT(2) receptor antagonist). Sleep was measured with a telemetric system. Hypothalamic GHRH, hypothalamic GHRH receptor (GHRHR) and GH receptor, and orexin were analysed using ELISA, real-time PCR and Western blot. UAO decreased hypothalamic GHRH, GHRHR and GH receptor levels, while orexin mRNA increased (p<0.01). In UAO rats, the duration of wakefulness was elevated and the duration of SWS, paradoxical sleep and slow-wave activity was reduced (p<0.001). Ritanserin alleviated these effects, i.e. normalised hypothalamic GHRH content, decreased wake duration, increased duration and depth of SWS, and attenuated growth impairment (p<0.001). Here, we present evidence that growth retardation in UAO is associated with a reduction in hypothalamic GHRH content. Our findings show that abnormalities in the GHRH/GH axis underlie both growth retardation and SWS-disorder UAO.

  3. Glucocorticoids and the regulation of growth hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Mazziotti, Gherardo; Giustina, Andrea

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoids modulate the secretion of growth hormone (GH) by various and competing effects on the hypothalamus and pituitary gland. The final effects of this modulation depend on hormone concentrations and the duration of exposure. The traditional hypothesis is that chronically raised levels of glucocorticoids suppress the secretion of GH. However, a functional impairment of the GH reserve might also be observed in patients with low levels of glucocorticoids, such as those with secondary hypoadrenalism, which is consistent with the model of biphasic dose-dependent effects of glucocorticoids on the somatotropic axis. This Review updates our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the effects of glucocorticoids on the secretion of GH and the clinical implications of the dual action of glucocorticoids on the GH reserve in humans. This Review will also address the potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications of GH for patients with a deficiency or excess of glucocorticoids.

  4. Sex hormone-binding globulin regulation of androgen bioactivity in vivo: validation of the free hormone hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Michaël R.; Hammond, Geoffrey L.; Blokland, Marco; Jardí, Ferran; Antonio, Leen; Dubois, Vanessa; Khalil, Rougin; Sterk, Saskia S.; Gielen, Evelien; Decallonne, Brigitte; Carmeliet, Geert; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Fiers, Tom; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T.; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is the high-affinity binding protein for androgens and estrogens. According to the free hormone hypothesis, SHBG modulates the bioactivity of sex steroids by limiting their diffusion into target tissues. Still, the in vivo physiological role of circulating SHBG remains unclear, especially since mice and rats lack circulating SHBG post-natally. To test the free hormone hypothesis in vivo, we examined total and free sex steroid concentrations and bioactivity on target organs in mice expressing a human SHBG transgene. SHBG increased total androgen and estrogen concentrations via hypothalamic-pituitary feedback regulation and prolonged ligand half-life. Despite markedly raised total sex steroid concentrations, free testosterone was unaffected while sex steroid bioactivity on male and female reproductive organs was attenuated. This occurred via a ligand-dependent, genotype-independent mechanism according to in vitro seminal vesicle organ cultures. These results provide compelling support for the determination of free or bioavailable sex steroid concentrations in medicine, and clarify important comparative differences between translational mouse models and human endocrinology. PMID:27748448

  5. The effects of growth hormone on avian skeletal muscle satellite cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Halevy, O; Hodik, V; Mett, A

    1996-01-01

    Growth hormone receptor (GH-R) mRNA was expressed in avian skeletal muscle tissue and satellite cells in culture, and was capable of binding chicken growth hormone (cGH). In the satellite cells, GH-R gene expression was regulated by cGH in a biphasic manner which correlated with the GH effect on cell proliferation: 2-10 ng/ml of the hormone increased GH-R mRNA and DNA synthesis, whereas higher concentrations attenuated these effects. GH induced insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) mRNA, a potential factor for satellite cell proliferation and differentiation. However, GH inhibited the gene expression of myogenin and the expression of muscle-specific proteins in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest a role of GH for inhibiting satellite cell differentiation in an IGF-I-independent manner. During satellite cell differentiation, both GH-R mRNA expression and cGH binding peaked when cells were still proliferating and beginning to fuse, and then declined as cells fully differentiated. GH-R mRNA expression in muscle tissue and the satellite cell fraction was evaluated during chicken growth. In both fractions, GH-R mRNA peaked at 4 days of age and then declined in correlation with the reduction of muscle regulatory gene expression. Our results are in contrast with previous studies on rat muscle satellite cells, suggesting a difference between mammalian and avian species in the mode of action of GH in these cells. Our notion is that GH, via its own receptor, promotes more satellite cells to proliferate by inhibiting their differentiation, leading to the addition of more nuclei to the growing muscle.

  6. Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone and Its Analogues: Significance for MSCs-Mediated Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Quanwei; Ma, Qunchao; Chen, Huiqiang; Wang, Jian'an

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for regenerative medicine because of their multipotency, immune-privilege, and paracrine properties including the potential to promote angiogenesis. Accumulating evidence suggests that the inherent properties of cytoprotection and tissue repair by native MSCs can be enhanced by various preconditioning stimuli implemented prior to cell transplantation. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), a stimulator in extrahypothalamus systems including tumors, has attracted great attentions in recent years because GHRH and its agonists could promote angiogenesis in various tissues. GHRH and its agonists are proangiogenic in responsive tissues including tumors, and GHRH antagonists have been tested as antitumor agents through their ability to suppress angiogenesis and cell growth. GHRH-R is expressed by MSCs and evolving work from our laboratory indicates that treatment of MSCs with GHRH agonists prior to cell transplantation markedly enhanced the angiogenic potential and tissue reparative properties of MSCs through a STAT3 signaling pathway. In this review we summarized the possible effects of GHRH analogues on cell growth and development, as well as on the proangiogenic properties of MSCs. We also discussed the relationship between GHRH analogues and MSC-mediated angiogenesis. The analyses provide new insights into molecular pathways of MSCs-based therapies and their augmentation by GHRH analogues. PMID:27774107

  7. Azapeptide analogues of the growth hormone releasing peptide 6 as cluster of differentiation 36 receptor ligands with reduced affinity for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a.

    PubMed

    Proulx, Caroline; Picard, Émilie; Boeglin, Damien; Pohankova, Petra; Chemtob, Sylvain; Ong, Huy; Lubell, William D

    2012-07-26

    The synthetic hexapeptide growth hormone releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) exhibits dual affinity for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a) and the cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) receptor. Azapeptide GHRP-6 analogues have been synthesized, exhibiting micromolar affinity to the CD36 receptor with reduced affinity toward the GHS-R1a. A combinatorial split-and-mix approach furnished aza-GHRP-6 leads, which were further examined by alanine scanning. Incorporation of an aza-amino acid residue respectively at the D-Trp(2), Ala(3), or Trp(4) position gave aza-GHRP-6 analogues with reduced affinity toward the GHS-R1a by at least a factor of 100 and in certain cases retained affinity for the CD36 receptor. In the latter cases, the D-Trp(2) residue proved important for CD36 receptor affinity; however, His(1) could be replaced by Ala(1) without considerable loss of binding. In a microvascular sprouting assay using a choroid explant, [azaTyr(4)]-GHRP-6 (15), [Ala(1), azaPhe(2)]-GHRP-6 (16), and [azaLeu(3), Ala(6)]-GHRP-6 (33) all exhibited antiangiogenic activity.

  8. Mouse hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing hormone and somatostatin responses to probes of signal transduction systems.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Downs, T R; Frohman, L A

    1993-01-01

    Signal transduction mechanisms involved in mouse growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRH) and somatostatin (SRIH) release were investigated using an in vitro perifusion system. Hypothalamic fragments were exposed to depolarizing agents, protein kinase A and C activators, and a calcium ionophore. The depolarizing agents, KCl (60 mM) and veratridine (50 microM), induced similar patterns of GRH and SRIH release. Somatostatin release in response to both agents was twofold greater than that of GRH. Forskolin (10 microM and 100 microM), an adenylate cyclase activator, stimulated both GRH and SRIH release, though with different secretory profiles. The SRIH response was prolonged and persisted beyond removal of the drug from the system, while the GRH response was brief, ending even prior to forskolin removal. Neither GRH nor SRIH were stimulated by 1,9-dideoxy-forskolin (100 microM), a forskolin analog with cAMP-independent actions. A23187 (5 microM), a calcium ionophore, stimulated the release of SRIH to a much greater extent than that of GRH. The GRH and SRIH secretory responses to PMA (1 microM), a protein kinase C activator, were similar, though delayed. The results suggest that 1) GRH and SRIH secretion are regulated by both protein kinase A and C pathways, and 2) depolarizing agents are important for the release of both hormones.

  9. Novel Bioluminescent Binding Assays for Ligand–Receptor Interaction Studies of the Fibroblast Growth Factor Family

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ge; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Wu, Qing-Ping; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Liu, Ya-Li; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed novel bioluminescent binding assays for several protein/peptide hormones to study their interactions with receptors using the so far brightest NanoLuc reporter. To validate the novel bioluminescent binding assay using a variety of protein/peptide hormones, in the present work we applied it to the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family using the prototype member FGF2 as an example. A fully active recombinant FGF2 retaining a unique exposed cysteine (Cys) residue was chemically conjugated with an engineered NanoLuc carrying a unique exposed Cys residue at the C-terminus via formation of an intermolecular disulfide linkage. The NanoLuc-conjugated FGF2 (FGF2-Luc) retained high binding affinity to the overexpressed FGFR1 and the endogenous FGF receptor with the calculated dissociation constants of 161 ± 21 pM (n = 3) and 25 ± 4 pM (n = 3), respectively. In competition binding assays using FGF2-Luc as a tracer, receptor-binding potencies of wild-type or mutant FGF2s were accurately quantified. Thus, FGF2-Luc represents a novel non-radioactive tracer for the quantitative measurement of ligand–receptor interactions in the FGF family. These data suggest that the novel bioluminescent binding assay can be applied to a variety of protein/peptide hormones for ligand–receptor interaction studies. PMID:27414797

  10. Binding properties of solubilized gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor: role of carboxylic groups

    SciTech Connect

    Hazum, E.

    1987-11-03

    The interaction of /sup 125/I-buserelin, a superactive agonist of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), with solubilized GnRH receptor was studied. The highest specific binding of /sup 125/I-buserelin to solubilized GnRH receptor is evident at 4/sup 0/C, and equilibrium is reached after 2 h of incubation. The soluble receptor retained 100% of the original binding activity when kept at 4 or 22/sup 0/C for 60 min. Mono- and divalent cations inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, the binding of /sup 125/I-buserelin to solubilized GnRH receptor. Monovalent cations require higher concentrations than divalent cations to inhibit the binding. Since the order of potency with the divalent cations was identical with that of their association constants to dicarboxylic compounds, it is suggested that there are at least two carboxylic groups of the receptor that participate in the binding of the hormone. The carboxyl groups of sialic acid residues are not absolutely required for GnRH binding since the binding of /sup 125/I-buserelin to solubilized GnRH receptor was only slightly affected by pretreatment with neuraminidase and wheat germ agglutinin. The finding that polylysines stimulate luteinizing hormone (LH) release from pituitary cell cultures with the same efficacy as GnRH suggest that simple charge interactions can induce LH release. According to these results, the authors propose that the driving force for the formation of the hormone-receptor complex is an ionic interaction between the positively charged amino acid arginine in position 8 and the carboxyl groups in the binding site.

  11. Thyroid hormone mediates otolith growth and development during flatfish metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, A M; Wang, X; Tan, Y; Sievers, Q; Sievers, B; Lee, M; Burrall, K

    2010-11-01

    Flatfish begin life as bilaterally symmetrical larvae that swim up-right, then abruptly metamorphose into asymmetrically shaped juveniles with lateralized swimming postures. Flatfish metamorphosis is mediated entirely by thyroid hormone (TH). Changes in flatfish swim posture are thought to be regulated via vestibular remodeling, although the influence of TH on teleost inner ear development remains unclear. This study addresses the role of TH on the development of the three otolith end-organs (sacculus, utricle, and lagena) during southern flounder (Paralichthys lethostigma) metamorphosis. Compared with pre-metamorphosis, growth rates of the sacculus and utricle otoliths increase dramatically during metamorphosis in a manner that is uncoupled from general somatic growth. Treatment of P. lethostigma larvae with methimazol (a pharmacological inhibitor of endogenous TH production) inhibits growth of the sacculus and utricle, whereas treatment with TH dramatically accelerates their growth. In contrast with the sacculus and utricle otoliths that begin to form and mineralize during embryogenesis, a non-mineralized lagena otolith is first visible 10-12 days after hatching. The lagena grows during pre- and pro-metamorphosis, then abruptly mineralizes during metamorphic climax. Mineralization of the lagena, but not growth, can be induced with TH treatment, whereas treatment with methimazol completely inhibits lagena mineralization without inhibiting its growth. These findings suggest that during southern flounder metamorphosis TH exerts differential effects on growth and development among the three types of otolith.

  12. High specific activity enantiomerically enriched juvenile hormones: synthesis and binding assay.

    PubMed Central

    Prestwich, G D; Wawrzeńczyk, C

    1985-01-01

    A stereoselective total synthesis of chiral juvenile hormone I is described that allows stoichiometric introduction of two tritium atoms in the final step. Both optical antipodes of the pivotal epoxy alcohol intermediate were prepared in 95% enantiomeric excess by the Sharpless epoxidation of a (Z)-allylic alcohol. Elaboration of the hydroxy-methyl group to a vinyl group followed by selective homogeneous tritiation affords optically active juvenile hormone I analogs at 58 Ci/mmol. Competitive binding of the labeled 10R, 11S and 10S,11R enantiomers with unlabeled enantiomers to the hemolymph binding protein of Manduca sexta larvae was determined by using a dextran-coated charcoal assay. The natural 10R,11S enantiomer has twice the relative binding affinity of the 10S,11R enantiomer. The availability of such high specific activity optically pure hormones will contribute substantially to the search for high-affinity receptors for juvenile hormones in the nuclei of cells. Moreover, the chiral 12-hydroxy-(10R,11S)-epoxy intermediate allows modification of juvenile hormone for solid-phase biochemical and radioimmunochemical work without altering either the biologically important carbomethoxy or epoxy recognition sites. PMID:3860862

  13. High specific activity enantiomerically enriched juvenile hormones: synthesis and binding assay.

    PubMed

    Prestwich, G D; Wawrzeńczyk, C

    1985-08-01

    A stereoselective total synthesis of chiral juvenile hormone I is described that allows stoichiometric introduction of two tritium atoms in the final step. Both optical antipodes of the pivotal epoxy alcohol intermediate were prepared in 95% enantiomeric excess by the Sharpless epoxidation of a (Z)-allylic alcohol. Elaboration of the hydroxy-methyl group to a vinyl group followed by selective homogeneous tritiation affords optically active juvenile hormone I analogs at 58 Ci/mmol. Competitive binding of the labeled 10R, 11S and 10S,11R enantiomers with unlabeled enantiomers to the hemolymph binding protein of Manduca sexta larvae was determined by using a dextran-coated charcoal assay. The natural 10R,11S enantiomer has twice the relative binding affinity of the 10S,11R enantiomer. The availability of such high specific activity optically pure hormones will contribute substantially to the search for high-affinity receptors for juvenile hormones in the nuclei of cells. Moreover, the chiral 12-hydroxy-(10R,11S)-epoxy intermediate allows modification of juvenile hormone for solid-phase biochemical and radioimmunochemical work without altering either the biologically important carbomethoxy or epoxy recognition sites.

  14. [Breast hormones--regulators of energy homeostasis: growth of infants].

    PubMed

    Kon', I Ia; Shilina, N M; Gmoshinskaia, M V; Ivanushkina, T A

    2011-01-01

    Studied the possible relationship between the growth rate of children who are breastfed, and the level of protein, fat, insulin-like growth factor- 1 (IGF-1), ghrelin, leptin, adiponectin in breast milk. Examined 71 pair--a mother and a healthy child, who is breastfed. All infants were divided into 3 groups: low, normal and high weight gain. Daily breast milk intake, the level of fat, protein and hormones proteins regulators of energy homeostasis (adiponectin, grelin, IGF-1 and leptin) in breast milk were measured at 1, 2 and 3 months of lactation. It was found that daily breast milk consumption was higher in the group of infants with high weight gain and the content of protein and fat in it did not differ in three groups. Total daily consumption of protein and fat with breast milk was higher in groups of infants with high weight gain. There was significantly higher IGF-1 level and the tendency to higher grelin level in breast milk of mothers of infants with higher weight gain. The possible link of breast milk hormones with growth velocity of breast-fed infants is discussed.

  15. Growth hormone reduces mortality and bacterial translocation in irradiated rats.

    PubMed

    Gómez-de-Segura, I A; Prieto, I; Grande, A G; García, P; Guerra, A; Mendez, J; De Miguel, E

    1998-01-01

    Growth hormone stimulates the growth of intestinal mucosa and may reduce the severity of injury caused by radiation. Male Wistar rats underwent abdominal irradiation (12 Gy) and were treated with either human growth hormone (hGH) or saline, and sacrificed at day 4 or 7 post-irradiation. Bacterial translocation, and the ileal mucosal thickness, proliferation, and disaccharidase activity were assessed. Mortality was 65% in irradiated animals, whereas hGH caused a decrement (29%, p < 0.05). Bacterial translocation was also reduced by hGH (p < 0.05). Treating irradiated rats with hGH prevented body weight loss (p < 0.05). Mucosal thickness increased faster in irradiated hGH-treated animals. The proliferative index showed an increment in hGH-treated animals (p < 0.05). Giving hGH to irradiated rats prevented decrease in sucrose activity, and increment in lactase activity. In conclusion, giving hGH to irradiated rats promotes the adaptative process of the intestine and acute radiation-related negative effects, including mortality, bacterial translocation, and weight loss.

  16. Multicenter study on adult growth hormone level in postoperative pituitary tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing-min; Gu, Jian-wen; Kuang, Yong-qin; Ma, Yuan; Xia, Xun; Yang, Tao; Lu, Min; He, Wei-qi; Sun, Zhi-yong; Zhang, Yan-chao

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study is to observe the adult growth hormone level in postoperative pituitary tumor patients of multi-centers, and explore the change of hypophyseal hormones in postoperative pituitary tumor patients. Sixty patients with pituitary tumor admitted during March, 2011-March, 2012 were selected. Postoperative hypophyseal hormone deficiency and the change of preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative growth hormone levels were recorded. Growth hormone hypofunction was the most common hormonal hypofunction, which took up to 85.0 %. Adrenocortical hormone hypofunction was next to it and accounted for 58.33 %. GH + ACTH + TSH + Gn deficiency was the most common in postoperative hormone deficiency, which took up to 40.00 %, and GH + ACTH + TSH + Gn + AVP and GH deficiencies were next to it and accounted for 23.33 and 16.67 %, respectively. The hormone levels in patients after total pituitary tumor resection were significantly lower than those after partial pituitary tumor resection, and the difference was statistically significant; growth hormone and serum prolactin levels after surgery in two groups were decreased, and the difference was statistically significant. The incidence rate of growth hormone deficiency in postoperative pituitary tumor patients is high, which is usually complicated with deficiency of various hypophyseal hormones. In clinical, we should pay attention to the levels of the hypopnyseal hormones, and take timely measures to avoid postoperative complications.

  17. Human growth hormone: a case study in treatment priorities.

    PubMed

    Tauer, Carol A

    1995-01-01

    One of the most commonly cited examples of enhancement genetic engineering is insertion of the growth hormone (GH) gene into a medically normal child. At this time, insertion of the gene itself is not planned. However, the modification of height, which is possible through administration of biochemical GH, raises the same questions about therapeutic versus enhancement uses of genetics. While insertion of the gene is a more drastic measure and probably carries more risks, the question of appropriate limits on use of the GH drug raises similar ethical and policy questions.

  18. Expression of growth hormone receptor in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Castro, J R; Costoya, J A; Gallego, R; Prieto, A; Arce, V M; Señarís, R

    2000-03-10

    This study was designed to investigate the presence of growth hormone receptor (GHR) expression in the human brain tissue, both normal and tumoral, as well as in the human glioblastoma cell line U87MG. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed the presence of GHR mRNA in all brain samples investigated and in U87MG cells. GHR immunoreactivity was also detected in this cell line using both immunocytochemistry and western blotting. All together, our data demonstrate the existence of GHR expression within the central nervous system (CNS), thus supporting a possible role for GH in the CNS physiology.

  19. Purification and Cultivation of Human Pituitary Growth Hormones Secreting Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Todd, P.; Grindeland, R.; Lanham, W.; Morrison, D.

    1985-01-01

    The rat and human pituitary gland contains a mixture of hormone producing cell types. The separation of cells which make growth hormone (GH) is attempted for the purpose of understanding how the hormone molecule is made within the pituitary cell; what form(s) it takes within the cell; and what form(s) GH assumes as it leaves the cell. Since GH has a number of biological targets (e.g., muscle, liver, bone), the assessment of the activities of the intracellular/extracellular GH by new and sensitive bioassays. GH cells contained in the mixture was separated by free flow electrophoresis. These experiments show that GH cells have different electrophoretic mobilities. This is relevant to NASA since a lack of GH could be a prime causative factor in muscle atrophy. Further, GH has recently been implicated in the etiology of motion sickness in space. Continous flow electrophoresis experiment on STS-8 showed that GH cells could be partially separated in microgravity. However, definitive cell culture studies could not be done due to insufficient cell recoveries.

  20. Algorithmic complexity of growth hormone release in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Prank, K.; Wagner, M.; Brabant, G.

    1996-12-31

    Most hormones are secreted in an pulsatile rather than in a constant manner. This temporal pattern of pulsatile hormone release plays an important role in the regulation of cellular function and structure. In healthy humans growth hormone (GH) secretion is characterized by distinct pulses whereas patients bearing a GH producing tumor accompanied with excessive secretion (acromegaly) exhibit a highly irregular pattern of GH release. It has been hypothesized that this highly disorderly pattern of GH release in acromegaly arises from random events in the GH-producing tumor under decreased normal control of GH secretion. Using a context-free grammar complexity measure (algorithmic complexity) in conjunction with random surrogate data sets we demonstrate that the temporal pattern of GH release in acromegaly is not significantly different from a variety of stochastic processes. In contrast, normal subjects clearly exhibit deterministic structure in their temporal patterns of GH secretion. Our results support the hypothesis that GH release in acromegaly is due to random events in the GH-producing tumorous cells which might become independent from hypothalamic regulation. 17 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Growth hormone secretion from chicken adenohypophyseal cells in primary culture: effects of human pancreatic growth hormone-releasing factor, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, and somatostatin on growth hormone release.

    PubMed

    Perez, F M; Malamed, S; Scanes, C G

    1987-03-01

    A primary culture of chicken adenohypophyseal cells has been developed to study the regulation of growth hormone (GH) secretion. Following collagenase dispersion, cells were exposed for 2 hr to vehicle (control) or test agents. Human pancreatic (tumor) growth hormone-releasing factor (hpGRF) and rat hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing factor stimulated GH release to similar levels. GH release was increased by the presence of dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) alone did not influence GH release; however, TRH plus hpGRF together exerted a synergistic (greater than additive) effect, increasing GH release by 100 to 300% over the sum of the values for each secretagogue acting alone. These relationships between TRH and hpGRF were further examined in cultured cells exposed to secretagogues for two consecutive 2-hr incubations. TRH pretreatment enhanced subsequent hpGRF-stimulated GH release by about 80% over that obtained if no secretagogue was present during the first incubation. In other experiments, somatostatin (SRIF) alone did not alter GH secretion. However, SRIF reduced hpGRF-stimulated GH release to levels found in controls. Furthermore, GH release stimulated by the presence of both TRH and hpGRF was lowered to control values by SRIF. The results of these studies demonstrate that a primary culture of chicken adenohypophyseal cells is a useful model for the study of GH secretion. Indeed, these results suggest that TRH and hpGRF regulate GH secretion by mechanisms which are not identical.

  2. Computational gibberellin-binding channel discovery unraveling the unexpected perception mechanism of hormone signal by gibberellin receptor.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ge-Fei; Yang, Sheng-Gang; Yang, Guang-Fu; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2013-09-15

    Gibberellins (GAs) are phytohormones essential for many developmental processes in plants. In this work, fundamental mechanism of hormone perception by receptor GID1 has been studied by performing computational simulations, revealing a new GA-binding channel of GID1 and a novel hormone perception mechanism involving only one conformational state of GID1. The novel hormone perception mechanism demonstrated here is remarkably different from the previously proposed/speculated mechanism [Murase et al., Nature 2008, 456, 459] involving two conformational states ("OPEN" and "CLOSED") of GID1. According to the new perception mechanism, GA acts as a "conformational stabilizer," rather than the previously speculated "allosteric inducer," to induce the recognition of protein DELLA by GID1. The novel mechanistic insights obtained in this study provide a new starting point for further studies on the detailed molecular mechanisms of GID1 interacting with DELLA and various hormones and for mechanism-based rational design of novel, potent growth regulators that target crops and ornamental plants.

  3. MANAGEMENT OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Growth and growth hormone therapy in short children born preterm.

    PubMed

    Boguszewski, Margaret Cristina da Silva; Cardoso-Demartini, Adriane de Andre

    2017-03-01

    Approximately 15 million babies are born preterm across the world every year, with less than 37 completed weeks of gestation. Survival rates increased during the last decades with the improvement of neonatal care. With premature birth, babies are deprived of the intense intrauterine growth phase, and postnatal growth failure might occur. Some children born prematurely will remain short at later ages and adult life. The risk of short stature increases if the child is also born small for gestational age. In this review, the effects of being born preterm on childhood growth and adult height and the hormonal abnormalities possibly associated with growth restriction are discussed, followed by a review of current information on growth hormone treatment for those who remain with short stature during infancy and childhood.

  4. Identification of Growth Hormone Receptor in Plexiform Neurofibromas of Patients with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Karin Soares Gonçalves; Barboza, Eliane Porto; da Fonseca, Eliene Carvalho

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of growth hormone receptor in plexiform neurofibromas of neurofibromatosis type 1 patients. INTRODUCTION The development of multiple neurofibromas is one of the major features of neurofibromatosis type 1. Since neurofibromas commonly grow during periods of hormonal change, especially during puberty and pregnancy, it has been suggested that hormones may influence neurofibromatosis type 1 neurofibromas. A recent study showed that the majority of localized neurofibromas from neurofibromatosis type 1 patients have growth hormone receptor. METHODS Growth hormone receptor expression was investigated in 5 plexiform neurofibromas using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS Four of the 5 plexiform neurofibromas were immunopositive for growth hormone receptor. CONCLUSION This study suggests that growth hormone may influence the development of plexiform neurofibromas in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1. PMID:18297205

  5. Direct and in vitro observation of growth hormone receptor molecules in A549 human lung epithelial cells by nanodiamond labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C.-Y.; Perevedentseva, E.; Tu, J.-S.; Chung, P.-H.; Cheng, C.-L.; Liu, K.-K.; Chao, J.-I.; Chen, P.-H.; Chang, C.-C.

    2007-04-01

    This letter presents direct observation of growth hormone receptor in one single cancer cell using nanodiamond-growth hormone complex as a specific probe. The interaction of surface growth hormone receptor of A549 human lung epithelial cells with growth hormone was observed using nanodiamond's unique spectroscopic signal via confocal Raman mapping. The growth hormone molecules were covalent conjugated to 100nm diameter carboxylated nanodiamonds, which can be recognized specifically by the growth hormone receptors of A549 cell. The Raman spectroscopic signal of diamond provides direct and in vitro observation of growth hormone receptors in physiology condition in a single cell level.

  6. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Zamora, Paul O.; Pena, Louis A.; Lin, Xinhua

    2009-10-06

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  7. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Zamora, Paul O [Gaithersburg, MD; Pena, Louis A [Poquott, NY; Lin, Xinhua [Plainview, NY

    2012-04-24

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  8. Endogenous growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone is required for GH responses to pharmacological stimuli.

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, C A; DeMott-Friberg, R; Barkan, A L

    1996-01-01

    The roles of hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) and of somatostatin (SRIF) in pharmacologically stimulated growth hormone (GH) secretion in humans are unclear. GH responses could result either from GHRH release or from acute decline in SRIF secretion. To assess directly the role of endogenous GHRH in human GH secretion, we have used a competitive GHRH antagonist, (N-Ac-Tyr1,D-Arg2)GHRH(1-29)NH2 (GHRH-Ant), which we have previously shown is able to block the GH response to GHRH. We first tested whether an acute decline in SRIF, independent of GHRH action, would release GH. Pretreatment with GHRH-Ant abolished the GH response to exogenous GHRH (0.33 microgram/kg i.v.) but did not modify the GH rise after termination of an SRIF infusion. We then investigated the role of endogenous GHRH in the GH responses to pharmacologic stimuli of GH release. The GH responses to arginine (30 g i.v. over 30 min), L-dopa (0.5 g orally), insulin hypoglycemia (0.1 U/Kg i.v.), clonidine (0.25 mg orally), or pyridostigmine (60 mg orally) were measured in healthy young men after pretreatment with either saline of GHRH-Ant 400 microgram/kg i.v. In every case, GH release was significantly suppressed by GHRH-Ant. We conclude that endogenous GHRH is required for the GH response to each of these pharmacologic stimuli. Acute release of hypothalamic GHRH may be a common mechanism by which these compounds mediate GH secretion. PMID:8613546

  9. Acceleration of wound healing by growth hormone-releasing hormone and its agonists.

    PubMed

    Dioufa, Nikolina; Schally, Andrew V; Chatzistamou, Ioulia; Moustou, Evi; Block, Norman L; Owens, Gary K; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G; Kiaris, Hippokratis

    2010-10-26

    Despite the well-documented action of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) on the stimulation of production and release of growth hormone (GH), the effects of GHRH in peripheral tissues are incompletely explored. In this study, we show that GHRH plays a role in wound healing and tissue repair by acting primarily on wound-associated fibroblasts. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) in culture and wound-associated fibroblasts in mice expressed a splice variant of the receptors for GHRH (SV1). Exposure of MEFs to 100 nM and 500 nM GHRH or the GHRH agonist JI-38 stimulated the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) based on immunoblot analyses as well as the expression of an αSMA-β-galactosidase reporter transgene in primary cultures of fibroblasts isolated from transgenic mice. Consistent with this induction of αSMA expression, results of transwell-based migration assays and in vitro wound healing (scratch) assays showed that both GHRH and GHRH agonist JI-38 stimulated the migration of MEFs in vitro. In vivo, local application of GHRH or JI-38 accelerated healing in skin wounds of mice. Histological evaluation of skin biopsies showed that wounds treated with GHRH and JI-38 were both characterized by increased abundance of fibroblasts during the early stages of wound healing and accelerated reformation of the covering epithelium at later stages. These results identify another function of GHRH in promoting skin tissue wound healing and repair. Our findings suggest that GHRH may have clinical utility for augmenting healing of skin wounds resulting from trauma, surgery, or disease.

  10. Effect of prolactin and bromocriptine on growth of transplanted hormone-dependent mouse mammary tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Briand, P.; Thorpe, S. M.; Daehnfeldt, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Administration of ovine prolactin alone supported growth of hormone-dependent GR mouse mammary tumours. Growth of hormone-independent tumours was not stimulated. Furthermore, administration of bromocriptine, a compound that inhibits release of prolactin from the pituitary gland, was shown to inhibit the growth of hormone-dependent tumours in animals receiving treatment with progesterone + oestrone. Administration of prolactin or bromocriptine to mice bearing tumours that grew independently of progesterone + oestrone treatment had no influence on tumour growth. We conclude that direct as well as indirect evidence has been found for the involvement of prolactin in the growth of transplanted, hormone-dependent GR mouse mammary tumours. PMID:577471

  11. Orthopedic complications related to growth hormone therapy in a pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Haidar, Rachid K; Nasrallah, Mona P; Der-Boghossian, Asdghig H; Ghanem, Ismat B

    2011-01-01

    Since the introduction of recombinant growth hormone, its use has diversified and multiplied. Growth hormone is now the recommended therapy for a growing indication to all forms of short stature because of its direct and indirect role on bone growth. Hereby, we discuss the orthopedic complications associated with growth hormone treatment in pediatric patients. These complications include carpal tunnel syndrome, Legg-Calve-Perthes' disease, scoliosis, and slipped capital femoral epiphysis. Their incidence rates recorded in several growth hormone therapy-related pharmacovigilance studies will be summarized in this study with focused discussion on their occurrence in the pediatric and adolescent age groups. The pathogenesis of these complications is also reviewed.

  12. Effects of Plant Growth Hormones on Mucor indicus Growth and Chitosan and Ethanol Production

    PubMed Central

    Safaei, Zahra; Karimi, Keikhosro; Golkar, Poorandokht; Zamani, Akram

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and kinetin (KIN) on Mucor indicus growth, cell wall composition, and ethanol production. A semi-synthetic medium, supplemented with 0–5 mg/L hormones, was used for the cultivations (at 32 °C for 48 h). By addition of 1 mg/L of each hormone, the biomass and ethanol yields were increased and decreased, respectively. At higher levels, however, an inverse trend was observed. The glucosamine fraction of the cell wall, as a representative for chitosan, followed similar but sharper changes, compared to the biomass. The highest level was 221% higher than that obtained without hormones. The sum of glucosamine and N-acetyl glucosamine (chitin and chitosan) was noticeably enhanced in the presence of the hormones. Increase of chitosan was accompanied by a decrease in the phosphate content, with the lowest phosphate (0.01 g/g cell wall) being obtained when the chitosan was at the maximum (0.45 g/g cell wall). In conclusion, IAA and KIN significantly enhanced the M. indicus growth and chitosan production, while at the same time decreasing the ethanol yield to some extent. This study shows that plant growth hormones have a high potential for the improvement of fungal chitosan production by M. indicus. PMID:26204839

  13. Studies on the bioassayable growth hormone-like activity of plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S.; Vodian, M. A.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Evidence supporting the existence of bioassayable growth hormone-like activity in blood plasma distinct from the growth hormone measurable by radioimmunoassay and from somatomedin is presented. Tibial assays of the growth-hormone-like activity of injected, concentrated normal human and rat plasma in hypophysectomized rats reveal 200- and 50-fold activity excesses, respectively, with respect to the amount of growth hormone detected by radioimmunoassay. The origin of this bioassayable plasma hormone has been localized to the region of the pituitary, the origin of growth hormone, a distribution not followed by somatomedin C. Purification of the bioassayable agent indicates that is has a molecular weight of between 60,000 and 80,000, in contrast to that of growth hormone (20,000), and that the bioassayable activity is distinct from that of somatomedin C. Growth hormone-like activity detected in Cohn fraction IV as well as plasma activity, are found to be collectable on Dowex 50 resin, in contrast to somatomedin C and nonsuppressible insulin-like activity. The formation of bioassayable growth hormone-activity agents from radioimmunoassayable growth hormone and directly in the pituitary is suggested.

  14. Preparation and characterization of recombinant dolphin fish (Coryphaena hippurus) growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Paduel, A; Chapnik-Cohen, N; Gertler, A; Elizur, A

    1999-08-01

    Dolphin fish (Coryphaena hippurus) growth hormone (dfGH) cDNA encoding the mature protein was cloned in a pET11a expression vector and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 cells upon induction with isopropyl-1-thio-beta-d-galactopyranoside as an insoluble protein. The expressed protein, contained within the inclusion-body pellet, was solubilized in 4.5 M urea, refolded at pH 11.3 in the presence of catalytic amounts of cysteine, and purified to homogeneity, as evidenced by SDS-PAGE. Gel filtration on a Superdex column under nondenaturing conditions and amino-terminal analysis showed the purified protein to be monomeric methionyl-dfGH. Binding assays of the (125)I-labeled dfGH to dolphin fish liver microsomal fraction resulted in high specific binding characterized by a K(a) of 0.77 nM(-1) and a B(max) of 285 fmol/mg microsomal fraction protein. The purified dfGH was capable of stimulating proliferation of FDC-P1-B9 cells transfected with rabbit growth hormone (GH) receptor. The maximal effect of dfGH was identical to that of human GH but their respective EC(50) values were 28 nM versus 0.095 nM.

  15. Central effects of growth hormone-releasing hexapeptide (GHRP-6) on growth hormone release are inhibited by central somatostatin action.

    PubMed

    Fairhall, K M; Mynett, A; Robinson, I C

    1995-03-01

    Growth hormone (GH) release is stimulated by a variety of synthetic secretagogues, of which growth hormone-releasing hexapeptide (GHRP-6) has been most thoroughly studied; it is thought to have actions at both pituitary and hypothalamic sites. To evaluate the central actions of this peptide, we have studied GH release in response to direct i.c.v. injections in anaesthetized guinea pigs. GHRP-6 (0.04-1 microgram) stimulated GH release > 10-fold 30-40 min after i.c.v. injection. The same GH response required > 20-fold more GHRP-6 when given by i.v. injection. GH release could also be elicited by a non-peptide GHRP analogue (L-692,585, 1 microgram i.c.v.), whereas a growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) analogue (human GRF27Nle(1-29)NH2, 2 micrograms, i.c.v.) was ineffective. A long acting somatostatin analogue (Sandostatin, SMS 201-995, 10 micrograms i.c.v.) (SMS) given 20 min before 200 ng GHRP-6 blocked GH release. This was unlikely to be due to a direct effect of SMS leaking out to the pituitary, since central SMS injections did not affect basal GH release, nor did they block GH release in response to i.v. GRF injections. We conclude that the hypothalamus is a major target for GHRP-6 in vivo. Since the GH release induced by central GHRP-6 injections can be inhibited by a central action of somatostatin, and other data indicate that GHRP-6 activates GRF neurones, we suggest that somatostatin may block this activation via receptors known to be located on or near the GRF cells themselves. Somatostatin may therefore be a functional antagonist of GHRP-6 acting centrally, as well as at the pituitary gland.

  16. The Role of Growth Hormone and Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 in Human Breast Cancer Growth in a Mouse Xenograft Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this research is to determine the role of human growth hormone (hGH) and insulin-like growth factor 1(IGF-1) in the development of an...progression of tumor growth in the animal model. In addition, growth hormone may be semi-inhibitory to growth for tumors dependent upon estrogen

  17. The Role of Growth Hormone and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 in Human Breast Cancer Growth in a Mouse Xenograft Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    The purpose of this research is to determine the role of human growth hormone (hGH) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF- 1) in the development of...the progression of tumor growth in the animal model. In addition growth hormone may be semi-inhibitory to growth for tumors dependent upon estrogen

  18. Placental Vitamin D-Binding Protein Expression in Human Idiopathic Fetal Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Wookey, Alice F.; Chollangi, Tejasvy; Yong, Hannah E. J.

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D-binding protein is a multifunctional serum protein with multiple actions related to normal health. Vitamin D-binding protein transports vitamin D and influences the metabolism of this key hormone but it also has additional immunomodulatory and actin-clearing properties. We investigated whether vitamin D-binding protein expression is altered in fetal growth restriction-associated placental dysfunction. Protein was extracted from 35 placentae derived from 17 healthy control subjects and 18 gestation-matched subjects with fetal growth restriction (FGR). FGR subjects were further subdivided as idiopathic (n = 9) and nonidiopathic (n = 9). Vitamin D-binding protein and 25(OH) vitamin D were measured by ELISA and normalized to protein concentration. The results showed significantly reduced levels of placental vitamin D-binding protein (control versus FGR, p < 0.05, Student's t-test) that were strongly associated with idiopathic fetal growth restriction (p < 0.01, Kruskal-Wallis), whereas levels of vitamin D-binding protein were not associated with placental 25(OH) vitamin D stores (p = 0.295, Pearson's correlation). As such, vitamin D-binding protein may be a factor in unexplained placental dysfunction associated with idiopathic fetal growth restriction and may potentially serve as a biomarker of this disease. PMID:28293436

  19. Sexual hormones modulate compensatory renal growth and function.

    PubMed

    Azurmendi, Pablo J; Oddo, Elisabet M; Toledo, Jorge E; Martin, Rodolfo S; Ibarra, Fernando R; Arrizurieta, Elvira E

    2013-01-01

    The role played by sexual hormones and vasoactive substances in the compensatory renal growth (CRG) that follows uninephrectomy (uNx) is still controversial. Intact and gonadectomized adult Wistar rats of both sexes, with and without uNx, performed at 90 days age, were studied at age 150 days. Daily urine volume, electrolyte excretion and kallikrein activity (UKa) were determined. Afterwards, glomerular filtration rate and blood pressure were measured, the kidneys weighed and DNA, protein and RNA studied to determine nuclei content and cell size. When the remnant kidney weight at age 150 days was compared with the weight of the kidney removed at the time of uNx, male uNx rats showed the greatest CRG (50%) while growth in the other uNx groups was 25%, 15% and 19% in orchidectomized, female and ovariectomized rats, respectively. The small CRG observed in the uNx female rats was accompanied by the lowest glomerular filtration value, 0.56 ± 0.02 ml/ min/g kwt compared, with the other uNx groups, p < 0.05. Cell size (protein or RNA/DNA) was similar for all the groups except for uNx orchidectomized rats. In this group the cytoplasmatic protein or RNA content was lower than in the other groups while DNA (nuclei content) was similar. Some degree of hyperplasia was determined by DNA content in the uNx groups. Male sexual hormones positively influenced CRG and its absence modulated cell size. Female sexual hormones, instead, did not appear to stimulate CRG. The kallikrein kinin system may not be involved in CRG.

  20. Ligand-binding properties of a juvenile hormone receptor, Methoprene-tolerant

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Jean-Philippe; Iwema, Thomas; Epa, V. Chandana; Takaki, Keiko; Rynes, Jan; Jindra, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a sesquiterpenoid of vital importance for insect development, yet the molecular basis of JH signaling remains obscure, mainly because a bona fide JH receptor has not been identified. Mounting evidence points to the basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH)/Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain protein Methoprene-tolerant (Met) as the best JH receptor candidate. However, details of how Met transduces the hormonal signal are missing. Here, we demonstrate that Met specifically binds JH III and its biologically active mimics, methoprene and pyriproxyfen, through its C-terminal PAS domain. Substitution of individual amino acids, predicted to form a ligand-binding pocket, with residues possessing bulkier side chains reduces JH III binding likely because of steric hindrance. Although a mutation that abolishes JH III binding does not affect a Met–Met complex that forms in the absence of methoprene, it prevents both the ligand-dependent dissociation of the Met–Met dimer and the ligand-dependent interaction of Met with its partner bHLH-PAS protein Taiman. These results show that Met can sense the JH signal through direct, specific binding, thus establishing a unique class of intracellular hormone receptors. PMID:22167806

  1. Ligand-binding properties of a juvenile hormone receptor, Methoprene-tolerant.

    PubMed

    Charles, Jean-Philippe; Iwema, Thomas; Epa, V Chandana; Takaki, Keiko; Rynes, Jan; Jindra, Marek

    2011-12-27

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a sesquiterpenoid of vital importance for insect development, yet the molecular basis of JH signaling remains obscure, mainly because a bona fide JH receptor has not been identified. Mounting evidence points to the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)/Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain protein Methoprene-tolerant (Met) as the best JH receptor candidate. However, details of how Met transduces the hormonal signal are missing. Here, we demonstrate that Met specifically binds JH III and its biologically active mimics, methoprene and pyriproxyfen, through its C-terminal PAS domain. Substitution of individual amino acids, predicted to form a ligand-binding pocket, with residues possessing bulkier side chains reduces JH III binding likely because of steric hindrance. Although a mutation that abolishes JH III binding does not affect a Met-Met complex that forms in the absence of methoprene, it prevents both the ligand-dependent dissociation of the Met-Met dimer and the ligand-dependent interaction of Met with its partner bHLH-PAS protein Taiman. These results show that Met can sense the JH signal through direct, specific binding, thus establishing a unique class of intracellular hormone receptors.

  2. Analysis of the hormone-binding domain of steroid receptors using chimeras generated by homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Elisabeth D.; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan; Danielsen, Mark . E-mail: dan@bc.georgetown.edu

    2005-08-15

    The glucocorticoid receptor and the mineralocorticoid receptor are members of the steroid receptor family that exhibit ligand cross-reactivity. Specificity of steroid receptor action is investigated in the present work by the construction and characterization of chimeras between the glucocorticoid receptor and the mineralocorticoid receptor. We used an innovative approach to make novel steroid receptor proteins in vivo that in general, contrary to our expectations, show increased ligand specificity compared to the parental receptors. We describe a receptor that is specific for the potent synthetic glucocorticoid triamcinolone acetonide and does not bind aldosterone. A further set of chimeras has an increased ability to discriminate between ligands, responding potently to mineralocorticoids and only very weakly to synthetic glucocorticoids. A chimera with the fusion site in the hinge highlights the importance of the region between the DNA-binding and the hormone-binding domains since, unlike both the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors, it only responds to mineralocorticoids. One chimera has reduced specificity in that it acts as a general corticoid receptor, responding to glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids with similar potency and efficacy. Our data suggest that regions of the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor hormone-binding domains are functionally non-reciprocal. We present transcriptional, hormone-binding, and structure-modeling evidence that suggests that receptor-specific interactions within and across domains mediate aspects of specificity in transcriptional responses to steroids.

  3. Effects of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 deficiency on ageing and longevity.

    PubMed

    Laron, Zvi

    2002-01-01

    Present knowledge on the effects of growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth hormone (IGF)1 deficiency on ageing and lifespan are reviewed. Evidence is presented that isolated GH deficiency (IGHD), multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies (MPHD) including GH, as well as primary IGE1 deficiency (GH resistance, Laron syndrome) present signs of early ageing such as thin and wrinkled skin, obesity, hyperglycemia and osteoporosis. These changes do not seem to affect the lifespan, as patients reach old age. Animal models of genetic MPHD (Ames and Snell mice) and GH receptor knockout mice (primary IGF1 deficiency) also have a statistically significant higher longevity compared to normal controls. On the contrary, mice transgenic for GH and acromegalic patients secreting large amounts of GH have premature death. In conclusion longstanding GH/IGF1 deficiency affects several parameters of the ageing process without impairing lifespan, and as shown in animal models prolongs longevity. In contrast high GH/IGF1 levels accelerate death.

  4. Extrapituitary growth hormone in the chicken reproductive system.

    PubMed

    Luna, Maricela; Martínez-Moreno, Carlos G; Ahumada-Solórzano, Marisela S; Harvey, Steve; Carranza, Martha; Arámburo, Carlos

    2014-07-01

    Increasing evidence shows that growth hormone (GH) expression is not limited to the pituitary, as it can be produced in many other tissues. It is known that growth hormone (GH) plays a role in the control of reproductive tract development. Acting as an endocrine, paracrine and/or autocrine regulator, GH influences proliferation, differentiation and function of reproductive tissues. In this review we substantiate the local expression of GH mRNA and GH protein, as well as the GH receptor (GHR) in both male and female reproductive tract, mainly in the chicken. Locally expressed GH was found to be heterogeneous, with a 17 kDa variant being predominant. GH secretagogues, such as GHRH and TRH co-localize with GH expression in the chicken testis and induce GH release. In the ovarian follicular granulosa cells, GH and GHR are co-expressed and stimulate progesterone production, which was neutralized by a specific GH antibody. Both testicular and follicular cells in primary cultures were able to synthesize and release GH to the culture medium. We also characterized GH and GH mRNA expression in the hen's oviduct and showed that it had 99.6% sequence identity with pituitary GH. Data suggest local reproductive GH may have important autocrine/paracrine effects.

  5. Production of recombinant mink growth hormone in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Sereikaite, Jolanta; Statkute, Alina; Morkunas, Mindaugas; Radzevicius, Kostas; Borromeo, Vitaliano; Secchi, Camillo; Bumelis, Vladas-Algirdas

    2007-02-01

    Escherichia coli cells expressing mink (Mustela vison) growth hormone were grown in a batch fermentation process. The expression level was estimated to be 27% of the total cellular protein after 3 h of induction with 1 mM isopropyl beta-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG). If the expression of mink growth hormone (mGH) was induced with 0.2 mM IPTG, the concentration of target protein was slightly lower and was found to be 23% at the same time after induction. mGH expressed as inclusion bodies was solubilized in 8 M urea and renatured by dilution protocol at a protein concentration of 1.4-2.1 mg/ml in the presence of glutathione pair in a final concentration of 11.3 mM. [GSH]/[GSSG] ratio equal to 2/1 was used. Two-step purification process comprising of ion-exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose and hydrophobic chromatography on Phenyl-Sepharose was developed. Some 25-30 mg of highly purified and biologically active mGH was obtained from 4 g of biomass. The method presented in this study allows producing large quantities of mGH and considering initiation of scientific investigation on mGH effect on mink in vivo and availability in fur industry.

  6. Baraitser and Winter syndrome with growth hormone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Chentli, Farida; Zellagui, Hadjer

    2014-01-01

    Baraitser–Winter syndrome (BWS), first reported in 1988, is apparently due to genetic abnormalities that are still not well-defined, although many gene abnormalities are already discovered and de novo missense changes in the cytoplasmic actin-encoding genes (called ACTB and ACTG1) have been recently discovered. The syndrome combines facial and cerebral malformations. Facial malformations totally or partially present in the same patient are: Iris coloboma, bilateral ptosis, hypertelorism, broad nasal bridge, and prominent epicanthic folds. The various brain malformations are probably responsible for growth and mental retardation. To the best of our knowledge, the syndrome is very rare as few cases have been reported so far. Our aim was to describe a child with a phenotype that looks like BWS with proved partial growth hormone (GH) deficiency which was not reported before. A girl aged 7-year-old of consanguineous parents was referred for short stature and mental retardation. Clinical examination showed dwarfism and a delay in her mental development. Other clinical features included: Strabismus, epicanthic folds, broad nasal bridge, and brain anomalies such as lissencephaly, bilateral hygroma, and cerebral atrophy. Hormonal assessment showed partial GH deficiency without other endocrine disorders. Our case looks exactly like BWS. However, apart from facial and cerebral abnormalities, there is a partial GH deficiency which can explain the harmonious short stature. This case seems worth to be reported as it adds GH deficiency to the very rare syndrome. PMID:25624931

  7. Harmonization of growth hormone measurement results: the empirical approach.

    PubMed

    Ross, H A; Lentjes, E W G M; Menheere, P M M; Sweep, C G J

    2014-05-15

    Growth hormone (hGH) is a measurand belonging to ISO category 4, indicating intrinsic unavailability of a reference measurement procedure and primary standard material. Large between-method differences have been raising confusion, especially in the interpretation of results of stimulation tests for exclusion of juvenile growth hormone deficiency. Within the framework of the external quality assessment scheme (EQAS) of the SKML (Dutch Foundation for Quality Assessment in Clinical Laboratories), attempts to reduce between-method variation of hGH measurements have been made, starting in 1994 with an inter-laboratory comparison of 9 different immunoassays by using a panel of sera and standard materials available at that time. Methods appeared to differ from each other largely in a systematic, sample-independent manner. These systematic differences are reflected in the hGH measurement results obtained in commutable sera. A commutable serum pool was introduced as a consensus reference material, permitting correction of each method's results to a common scale. Pair wise comparisons ("twin studies") were carried out to investigate and corroborate the effectiveness of this material for harmonization. A significant reduction of the between-laboratory coefficient (CV) of variation from 22 to 9.0% was attained.

  8. Prader-Willi syndrome and growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Aycan, Zehra; Baş, Veysel Nijat

    2014-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a rare multisystem genetic disorder demonstrating great variability with changing clinical features during patient's life. It is characterized by severe hypotonia with poor sucking and feeding difficulties in early infancy, followed by excessive eating and gradual development of morbid obesity in later infancy or early childhood. The phenotype is most probably due to hypothalamic dysfunction which is also responsible for growth hormone (GH) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) deficiencies, central adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadism. The multidimensional problems of patients with PWS can be managed with multidisciplinary approach. Reduced GH secretion, low peak GH response to stimulation, decreased spontaneous GH secretion and low serum IGF-1 levels in PWS patients have been documented in many studies. GH therapy has multiple beneficial effects on growth and body composition, motor and mental development in PWS patients. The recommended dosage for GH is 0.5-1 mg/m2/day. GH therapy should not be started in the presence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, adenotonsillar hypertrophy, severe obesity and diabetes mellitus. GH treatment should be considered for patients with genetically confirmed PWS in conjunction with dietary, environmental and life-style measures.

  9. Effects of recombinant human growth hormone in the treatment of dwarfism and relationship between IGF-1, IGFBP-3 and thyroid hormone

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Shanxiang; Nie, Yuxiang; Wang, Aihong

    2016-01-01

    The effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) in the treatment of dwarfism and the relationship between insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-3 and thyroid hormone were examined in the present study. For this purpose, 66 patients diagnosed with dwarfism were selected retrospectively, with 36 cases of growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and 30 cases of idiopathic short stature (ISS). The therapeutic dose of GHD 0.10 IU/kg·day and ISS 0.15 IU/kg·day were injected subcutaneously every night before sleep until adulthood. The average follow-up was 5 years, and the results were evaluated and measured every 3 months, including height, BA, secondary test of growth hormone (GH peak), IGF-1, IGFBP-3 and thyroid hormone (FT3, FT4 and TSH). After treatment, the height, BA, GH peak, IGF-A and IGFBP-3 of the GHD group were all increased, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05), while FT3, FT4 and TSH had no significant change (P<0.05). The height and BA increased and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The indexes of the ISS group were not statistically significant (P>0.05). The results of the Pearson-related analysis suggested that GH peak of the GHD group, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 were positively associated with height (P<0.05), and had no relationship with BA (P<0.05). None of the above indexes of the ISS group had an obvious correlation with height and BA (P>0.05). rhGH was effective for GHD and ISS, with the GHD effect being positively associated with the GH peak, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3. ISS had no obvious relationship with GH peak, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 although other influencing factors may be involved. PMID:28105090

  10. Plasma steroid-binding proteins: primary gatekeepers of steroid hormone action

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Biologically active steroids are transported in the blood by albumin, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG). These plasma proteins also regulate the non-protein-bound or ‘free’ fractions of circulating steroid hormones that are considered to be biologically active; as such, they can be viewed as the ‘primary gatekeepers of steroid action’. Albumin binds steroids with limited specificity and low affinity, but its high concentration in blood buffers major fluctuations in steroid concentrations and their free fractions. By contrast, SHBG and CBG play much more dynamic roles in controlling steroid access to target tissues and cells. They bind steroids with high (~nM) affinity and specificity, with SHBG binding androgens and estrogens and CBG binding glucocorticoids and progesterone. Both are glycoproteins that are structurally unrelated, and they function in different ways that extend beyond their transportation or buffering functions in the blood. Plasma SHBG and CBG production by the liver varies during development and different physiological or pathophysiological conditions, and abnormalities in the plasma levels of SHBG and CBG or their abilities to bind steroids are associated with a variety of pathologies. Understanding how the unique structures of SHBG and CBG determine their specialized functions, how changes in their plasma levels are controlled, and how they function outside the blood circulation provides insight into how they control the freedom of steroids to act in health and disease. PMID:27113851

  11. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor II receptors by growth hormone and insulin in rat adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Loennroth, P.; Assmundsson, K.; Eden, S.; Enberg, G.; Gause, I.; Hall, K.; Smith, U.

    1987-06-01

    The acute and long-term effects of growth hormone (GH) on the binding of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) were evaluated in adipose cells from hypophysectomized rats given replacement therapy with thyroxine and hydrocortisone and in cells from their sham-operated littermates. After the cells were incubated with insulin and/or GH, the recycling of /sup 125/I-labeled IGF-II receptors was metabolically inhibited by treating the cells with KCN. IGF-II binding was 100 +/- 20% higher in cells from GH-deficient animals when compared with sham-operated controls. These GH-deficient cells also showed an increased sensitivity for insulin as compared with control cells (the EC/sub 50/ for insulin was 0.06 ng/ml in GH-deficient cells and 0.3 ng/ml in control cells.). However, the maximal incremental effect of insulin on IGH-II binding was reduced approx. = 27% by hypophysectomy. GH added to the incubation medium increased the number of IGF-II binding sites by 100 +/- 18% in cells from hypophysectomized animals. This increase was rapidly induced, but the time course was slower than that for the stimulatory effect of insulin. Half-maximal effect of GH on IGF-II binding was obtained at approx. = 30 ng/ml. Thus, GH added in vitro exerted a rapid insulin-like effect on the number of IGH-II receptors. GH also appears to play a regulating role for maintaining the cellular number of IGH-II receptors and, in addition, modulates the stimulatory effect of insulin on IGF-II binding.

  12. The cardiovascular system in growth hormone excess and growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, G; Di Somma, C; Grasso, L F S; Savanelli, M C; Colao, A; Pivonello, R

    2012-12-01

    The clinical conditions associated with GH excess and GH deficiency (GHD) are known to be associated with an increased risk for the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, suggesting that either an excess or a deficiency in GH and/or IGF-I is deleterious for cardiovascular system. In patients with acromegaly, chronic GH and IGF-I excess commonly causes a specific cardiomyopathy characterized by a concentric cardiac hypertrophy associated with diastolic dysfunction and, in later stages, with systolic dysfunction ending in heart failure if GH/IGF-I excess is not controlled. Abnormalities of cardiac rhythm and anomalies of cardiac valves can also occur. Moreover, the increased prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and insulin resistance, as well as dyslipidemia, confer an increased risk for vascular atherosclerosis. Successful control of the disease is accompanied by a decrease of the cardiac mass and improvement of cardiac function and an improvement in cardiovascular risk factors. In patients with hypopituitarism, GHD has been considered the under- lying factor of the increased mortality when appropriate standard replacement of the pituitary hormones deficiencies is given. Either childhood-onset or adulthood-onset GHD are characterized by a cluster of abnormalities associated with an increased cardiovascular risk, including altered body composition, unfavorable lipid profile, insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction and vascular atherosclerosis, a decrease in cardiac mass together with an impairment of systolic function mainly after exercise. Treatment with recombinant GH in patients with GHD is followed by an improvement of the cardiovascular risk factors and an increase in cardiac mass together with an improvement in cardiac performance. In conclusion, acromegaly and GHD are associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, but the control of GH/IGF-I secretion reverses cardiovascular

  13. Small Molecule Inhibited Parathyroid Hormone Mediated cAMP Response by N–Terminal Peptide Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Baumann, Monika; Balbach, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Ligand binding to certain classes of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) stimulates the rapid synthesis of cAMP through G protein. Human parathyroid hormone (PTH), a member of class B GPCRs, binds to its receptor via its N–terminal domain, thereby activating the pathway to this secondary messenger inside cells. Presently, GPCRs are the target of many pharmaceuticals however, these drugs target only a small fraction of structurally known GPCRs (about 10%). Coordination complexes are gaining interest due to their wide applications in the medicinal field. In the present studies we explored the potential of a coordination complex of Zn(II) and anthracenyl–terpyridine as a modulator of the parathyroid hormone response. Preferential interactions at the N–terminal domain of the peptide hormone were manifested by suppressed cAMP generation inside the cells. These observations contribute a regulatory component to the current GPCR–cAMP paradigm, where not the receptor itself, but the activating hormone is a target. To our knowledge, this is the first report about a coordination complex modulating GPCR activity at the level of deactivating its agonist. Developing such molecules might help in the control of pathogenic PTH function such as hyperparathyroidism, where control of excess hormonal activity is essentially required. PMID:26932583

  14. Effect of antibodies against distinctive rat liver estrogen-binding protein on hormone-binding activity of this protein and steroid hormone receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, A.N.; Shchelkunova, T.A.; Smirnova, O.V.; Rozen, V.B.

    1986-12-10

    The effect of rabbit polyclonal antibodies (AB) against a distinctive estrogen-binding protein (DEBP) of rat liver, isolated using an immunosorbent, on the interaction of (/sup 3/H)estradiol with the DEBP and estrogen receptors of the uterus and other tissues, as well as of (/sup 3/H)dihydrotestosterone with prostate androgen receptors, (/sup 3/H)progesterone with uterine progesterone receptors, and (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone with rat thymus glucocorticoid receptors was investigated. It was found that preincubation of the cytosol of the tissues under investigation with the antibodies decreases the capacity of the DEBP of the estrogen and androgen receptors to bind the corresponding ligand. The hormone-binding activity of progesterone and the glucocorticoid receptors does not change in the presence of AB. The binding activity of DEBP in the presence of AB decreases as a result of a decrease in the concentration of binding sites of the protein, while that of the estrogen and androgen receptors drops as a result of a decrease in affinity for the ligand, due to a drop in the association rate constant. A cross effect of AB on the activity of uterine estrogen receptors of the rabbit, guinea pig, and mouse was found. It was concluded that there is a definite similarity in the structure of DEBP and sex steroid receptors.

  15. Cognitive and Adaptive Advantages of Growth Hormone Treatment in Children with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykens, Elisabeth M.; Roof, Elizabeth; Hunt-Hawkins, Hailee

    2017-01-01

    Background: People with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) typically have mild to moderate intellectual deficits, compulsivity, hyperphagia, obesity, and growth hormone deficiencies. Growth hormone treatment (GHT) in PWS has well-established salutatory effects on linear growth and body composition, yet cognitive benefits of GHT, seen in other patient…

  16. Potentiation of cytotoxic chemotherapy by growth hormone-releasing hormone agonists

    PubMed Central

    Jaszberenyi, Miklos; Rick, Ferenc G.; Popovics, Petra; Block, Norman L.; Zarandi, Marta; Cai, Ren-Zhi; Vidaurre, Irving; Szalontay, Luca; Jayakumar, Arumugam R.; Schally, Andrew V.

    2014-01-01

    The dismal prognosis of malignant brain tumors drives the development of new treatment modalities. In view of the multiple activities of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), we hypothesized that pretreatment with a GHRH agonist, JI-34, might increase the susceptibility of U-87 MG glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells to subsequent treatment with the cytotoxic drug, doxorubicin (DOX). This concept was corroborated by our findings, in vivo, showing that the combination of the GHRH agonist, JI-34, and DOX inhibited the growth of GBM tumors, transplanted into nude mice, more than DOX alone. In vitro, the pretreatment of GBM cells with JI-34 potentiated inhibitory effects of DOX on cell proliferation, diminished cell size and viability, and promoted apoptotic processes, as shown by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide proliferation assay, ApoLive-Glo multiplex assay, and cell volumetric assay. Proteomic studies further revealed that the pretreatment with GHRH agonist evoked differentiation decreasing the expression of the neuroectodermal stem cell antigen, nestin, and up-regulating the glial maturation marker, GFAP. The GHRH agonist also reduced the release of humoral regulators of glial growth, such as FGF basic and TGFβ. Proteomic and gene-expression (RT-PCR) studies confirmed the strong proapoptotic activity (increase in p53, decrease in v-myc and Bcl-2) and anti-invasive potential (decrease in integrin α3) of the combination of GHRH agonist and DOX. These findings indicate that the GHRH agonists can potentiate the anticancer activity of the traditional chemotherapeutic drug, DOX, by multiple mechanisms including the induction of differentiation of cancer cells. PMID:24379381

  17. Modulation of cultured porcine granulosa cell responsiveness to follicle stimulating hormone and epidermal growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    Ovarian follicular development is dependent upon the coordinated growth and differentiation of the granulosa cells which line the follicle. Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) induces granulosa cell differentiation both in vivo and in vitro. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates granulosa cell proliferation in vitro. The interaction of these two effectors upon selected parameters of growth and differentiation was examined in monolayer cultures of porcine granulose cells. Analysis of the EGF receptor by /sup 125/I-EGF binding revealed that the receptor was of high affinity with an apparent dissociation constant of 4-6 x 10/sup -10/ M. The average number of receptors per cell varied with the state of differentiation both in vivo and in vitro; highly differentiated cells bound two-fold less /sup 125/I-EGF and this effect was at least partially induced by FSH in vitro. EGF receptor function was examined by assessing EGF effects on cell number and /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation. EGF stimulated thymidine incorporation in both serum-free and serum-supplemented culture, but only in serum-supplemented conditions was cell number increased. EGF receptor function was inversely related to the state of differentiation and was attenuated by FSH. The FSH receptor was examined by /sup 125/I-FSH binding. EGF increased FSH receptor number, and lowered the affinity of the receptor. The function of these receptors was assessed by /sup 125/I-hCG binding and progesterone radioimmunoassay. If EGF was present continuously in the cultures. FSH receptor function was attenuated regardless of FSH receptor number. A preliminary effort to examine the mechanism of this interaction was performed by analyzing hormonally controlled protein synthesis with /sup 35/S-methionine labeling, SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography. FSH promoted the expression of a 27,000 dalton protein. This effect was attenuated by EGF.

  18. Diminished growth hormone secretion in blind males after L-dopa stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fatranská, M; Jurcovicová, J; Németh, S; Vigas, M

    1988-12-01

    Growth hormone secretion after L-dopa administration (1000 mg p.o.) was investigated in young adult normal and blind volunteers. The average increment of plasma growth hormone after L-dopa stimulation in the blind was below the criterion for a positive response (less than 5 ng ml-1). The control volunteers showed normal response. After L-dopa stimulation there was a significantly diminished growth hormone response in the young adult blind compared to control volunteers.

  19. Intronic mutation in the growth hormone (GH) receptor gene from a girl with Laron syndrome and extremely high serum GH binding protein: extended phenotypic study in a very large pedigree.

    PubMed

    Silbergeld, A; Dastot, F; Klinger, B; Kanety, H; Eshet, R; Amselem, S; Laron, Z

    1997-01-01

    Laron syndrome (LS) is a hereditary form of GH resistance due to molecular defects in the GH receptor (GHR). Most of the identified mutations are located in the extracellular domain of the receptor, resulting in a lack of serum GHBP in the majority of LS patients. We present an LS patient with supranormal levels of serum GHBP, in addition to 35 of her relatives. The proband is a 3.5 year-old Druse girl with severe short stature (height SDS -5.1), high GH (250 micrograms/l), low IGF-I (2.7 nmol/l) and IGFBP-3 (410 micrograms/l), both unresponsive to exogenous GH. The binding capacity of the serum GHBP was 22 nM (adult reference serum, 0.7 nM), with an affinity constant Ka = 1.9 x 10(9) M-1 comparable to that of normal sera (Ka = 1.7-2.1 x 10(9) M-1). The apparent MW of the GHBP was approximately 60-80 kDa, similar to that of control sera. In the proband's sister, parents, grandparents and uncles, extremely high GHBP values were observed (43.0 +/- 4.8 RSB, n = 10) compared with normal adults (0.81 +/- 0.06 RSB) (p < 0.001). The remaining subjects had normal or moderately elevated GHBP levels. Serum GH in adults with high GHBP was significantly elevated above control values (6.0 +/- 0.9 micrograms/l vs 0.76 +/- 0.13 microgram/l, p < 0.001). Serum IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels were normal in all the subjects, with the exception of an aunt (IGF-I 3.9 nmol/l) and the proband's sister (IGFBP-3 460 micrograms/l). All the subjects' heights were within the normal range. Analysis of the GHR gene performed in the proband revealed an as yet undescribed homozygous intronic point mutation. It consists of a G-->T substitution at nucleotide 785-1 preceding exon 8, a sequence that encodes the transmembrane domain. This mutation, which destroys the invariant dinucleotide of the splice acceptor site, is expected to alter GHR mRNA splicing and to be responsible for skipping exon 8. The resulting truncated protein that retains GH binding activity is probably no longer anchored in the cell

  20. The Influence of a 12-Week Conditioning Program on Growth Hormone and Somatomedin C Concentrations in Moderately Overweight Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinard, James D.; Bazzarre, Terry L.

    The growth hormone is a lipolytic hormone and somatomedin C mediates the metabolic effects of the growth hormone in many tissues. Growth hormone plasma levels are often depressed in obese individuals, and this low plasma level has been postulated as a reason for perpetuation of excess weight. Substantial weight loss in obese subjects improves…

  1. A Critical Appraisal of Growth Hormone Therapy in Growth Hormone Deficiency and Turner Syndrome Patients in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Yavaş Abalı, Zehra; Darendeliler, Feyza; Neyzi, Olcay

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of abnormal growth, identification of the underlying cause, and appropriate treatment of the medical condition is an important issue for children with short stature. Growth hormone (GH) therapy is widely used in GH-deficient children and also in non-GH-deficient short stature cases who have findings conforming to certain indications. Efficacy of GH therapy has been shown in a multitude of short- and long-term studies. Age at onset of GH therapy is the most important factor for a successful treatment outcome. Optimal dosing is also essential. The aim of this review was to focus on challenges in the early diagnosis and appropriate management of short stature due to GH deficiency (GHD) and Turner syndrome. These are the most frequent two indications for GH therapy in Turkey approved by the Ministry of Health for coverage by the national insurance system. PMID:27354120

  2. Functional Changes after Recombinant Human Growth Hormone Replacement in Patients with Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury and Abnormal Growth Hormone Secretion.

    PubMed

    Mossberg, Kurt A; Durham, William J; Zgaljardic, Dennis J; Gilkison, Charles R; Danesi, Christopher P; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Masel, Brent E; Urban, Randall J

    2017-02-15

    We explored the effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) replacement on physical and cognitive functioning in subjects with a moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) with abnormal growth hormone (GH) secretion. Fifteen individuals who sustained a TBI at least 12 months prior to study enrollment were identified as having abnormal GH secretion by glucagon stimulation testing (maximum GH response less than 8 ng/mL). Peak cardiorespiratory capacity, body composition, and muscle force testing were assessed at baseline and one year after rhGH replacement. Additionally, standardized neuropsychological tests that assess memory, processing speed, and cognitive flexibility, as well as self-report inventories related to depression and fatigue, were administered at baseline and 1 year after rhGH replacement. Comparison tests were performed with proper post hoc analyses. All analyses were carried out at α < 0.05. Peak O2 consumption, peak oxygen pulse (estimate of cardiac stroke volume), and peak ventilation all significantly increased (p < 0.05). Maximal isometric and isokinetic force production were not altered. Skeletal muscle fatigue did not change but the perceptual rating of fatigue was reduced by ∼25% (p = 0.06). Cognitive performance did not change significantly over time, whereas self-reported symptoms related to depression and fatigue significantly improved. The observed changes suggest that rhGH replacement has a positive impact on cardiorespiratory fitness and a positive impact on perceptual fatigue in survivors of TBI with altered GH secretion.

  3. Effects of aerobic exercise on ectopic lipids in patients with growth hormone deficiency before and after growth hormone replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Christ, Emanuel R.; Egger, Andrea; Allemann, Sabin; Buehler, Tania; Kreis, Roland; Boesch, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone replacement therapy (GHRT) increases exercise capacity and insulin resistance while it decreases fat mass in growth hormone-deficient patients (GHD). Ectopic lipids (intramyocellular (IMCL) and intrahepatocellular lipids (IHCL) are related to insulin resistance. The effect of GHRT on ectopic lipids is unknown. It is hypothesized that exercise-induced utilization of ectopic lipids is significantly decreased in GHD patients and normalized by GHRT. GHD (4 females, 6 males) and age/gender/waist-matched control subjects (CS) were studied. VO2max was assessed on a treadmill and insulin sensitivity determined by a two-step hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp. Visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) fat were quantified by MR-imaging. IHCL and IMCL were measured before and after a 2 h exercise at 50–60% of VO2max using MR-spectroscopy (∆IMCL, ∆IHCL). Identical investigations were performed after 6 months of GHRT. VO2max was similar in GHD and CS and significantly increased after GHRT; GHRT significantly decreased SAT and VAT. 2 h-exercise resulted in a decrease in IMCL (significant in CS and GHRT) and a significant increase in IHCL in CS and GHD pre and post GHRT. GHRT didn’t significantly impact on ∆IMCL and ∆IHCL. We conclude that aerobic exercise affects ectopic lipids in patients and controls. GHRT increases exercise capacity without influencing ectopic lipids. PMID:26792091

  4. Efficacy and safety of growth hormone treatment in adults with growth hormone deficiency: a systematic review of studies on morbidity.

    PubMed

    van Bunderen, Christa C; van Varsseveld, Nadège C; Erfurth, Eva Marie; Ket, Johannes C F; Drent, Madeleine L

    2014-07-01

    Due to the positive effects demonstrated in randomized clinical trials on cardiovascular surrogate markers and bone metabolism, a positive effect of growth hormone (GH) treatment on clinically relevant end-points seems feasible. In this review, we discuss the long-term efficacy and safety of GH treatment in adult patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) with emphasis on morbidity: fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular disease (CVD) and stroke, fractures, fatal and nonfatal malignancies and recurrences, and diabetes mellitus. A positive effect of GH treatment on CVD and fracture risk could be concluded, but study design limitations have to be considered. Stroke and secondary brain tumours remained more prevalent. However, other contributing factors have to be taken into account. Regrowth and recurrences of (peri)pituitary tumours were not increased in patients with GH treatment compared to similar patients without GH treatment. All fatal and nonfatal malignancies were not more prevalent in GH-treated adults compared to the general population. However, follow-up time is still relatively short. The studies on diabetes are difficult to interpret, and more evidence is awaited. In clinical practice, a more individualized assessment seems appropriate, taking into consideration the underlying diagnosis of GHD, other treatment regimens, metabolic profile and the additional beneficial effects of GH set against the possible risks. Large and thoroughly conducted observational studies are needed and seem the only feasible way to inform the ongoing debate on health care costs, drug safety and clinical outcomes.

  5. Caloric Restriction Effect on Proinflammatory Cytokines, Growth Hormone, and Steroid Hormone Concentrations during Exercise in Judokas

    PubMed Central

    Abedelmalek, Salma; Chtourou, Hamdi; Souissi, Nizar; Tabka, Zouhair

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of caloric restriction on the immune and hormonal responses during exercise in judo athletes. In a randomised order, 11 male judokas (age: 20.45 ± 0.51; height: 1.71 ± 0.3 m; and body weight: 75.9 ± 3.1 kg) participate in this study during a period of weight maintenance (baseline) and after 7 days of caloric restriction (CR). All subjects performed the Special Judo Fitness Test (SJFT) during the two conditions. Values for nutrient intakes were obtained from a 7 d food record kept during a period of weight maintenance and after a 7-day food restriction (−5~6 MJ/day). Our results showed that CR resulted in significant decreases in body weight (P < 0.05) and performance (P < 0.05). However, heart rate and SJFT index (P < 0.05) increase significantly during CR in comparison to baseline. Moreover, exercise leads to a significant increase in testosterone, cortisol, growth hormone (GH), leukocytes, neutrophils, TNF-α, and IL-6, in both CR and baseline conditions. Compared to baseline, TNF-α and IL-6 were significantly higher during CR condition (P < 0.05). Additionally, CR leads to an increase in cortisol and GH (P < 0.05) and a decrease in testosterone concentrations (P < 0.05). PMID:26075039

  6. Thyroid Hormone and Estrogen Regulate Exercise-Induced Growth Hormone Release

    PubMed Central

    Ignacio, Daniele Leão; da S. Silvestre, Diego H.; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Louzada, Ruy Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1) activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60%) in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold) 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU) injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response. PMID:25874614

  7. Nutritional state modulates growth hormone-stimulated lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Bergan, Heather E; Kittilson, Jeffrey D; Sheridan, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates several processes in vertebrates, including two metabolically disparate processes: promotion of growth, an anabolic action, and mobilization of stored lipid, a catabolic action. In this study, we used hepatocytes isolated from continuously fed and long-term (4weeks) fasted rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) as a model to investigate the mechanistic basis of the anabolic and catabolic actions of GH. Our hypothesis was that nutritional state modulates the lipolytic responsiveness of cells by adjusting the signal transduction pathways to which GH links. GH stimulated lipolysis as measured by increased glycerol release in both a time- and concentration-related manner from cells of fasted fish but not from cells of fed fish. Expression of mRNAs that encode the lipolytic enzyme hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), HSL1 and HSL2, also was stimulated by GH in cells from fasted fish and not in cells from fed fish. Activation of the signaling pathways that mediate GH action also was studied. In cells from fed fish, GH activated the JAK-STAT, PI3K-Akt, and ERK pathways, whereas in cells from fasted fish, GH activated the PLC/PKC and ERK pathways. In hepatocytes from fasted fish, blockade of PLC/PKC and of the ERK pathway inhibited GH-stimulated lipolysis and GH-stimulated HSL mRNA expression, whereas blockade of JAK-STAT or of the PI3K-Akt pathway had no effect on lipolysis or HSL expression stimulated by GH. These results indicate that during fasting GH activates the PLC/PKC and ERK pathways resulting in lipolysis but during periods of feeding GH activates a different complement of signal elements that do not promote lipolysis. These findings suggest that the responsiveness of cells to GH depends on the signal pathways to which GH links and helps resolve the growth-promoting and lipid catabolic actions of GH.

  8. Juvenile hormone-binding proteins of Melanoplus bivittatus identified by EFDA photoaffinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Winder, B.S.

    1988-01-01

    Proteins that bind juvenile hormone in the hemolymph and fat body of the grasshopper, Melanoplus bivittatus were identified by photoaffinity labeling with radiolabeled epoxyfarnesyl diazoacetate ({sup 3}H-EFDA), and were characterized by electrophoretic analysis. A protocol was developed which allowed detection of {sup 3}H-EFDA that was covalently linked to proteins upon exposure to ultraviolet light at 254 nm. Quantification of protein-linked {sup 3}H-EFDA by liquid scintillation spectrometry took advantage of the differential solubility of unlinked {sup 3}H-EFDA in toluene alone, and of the protein-linked {sup 3}H-EFDA in toluene plus the detergent, Triton X-100. Competition between EFDA and juvenile hormone (JH) for binding to JH-specific binding sites was measured by hydroxyapatite protein binding assays in the presence of radiolabeled JH or EFDA and competing non-radiolabeled hormone. The protein-linked EFDA was detected on fluorograms of SDS or nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels (PAGE), and by liquid scintillation spectrometry of membranes to which the proteins had been electrophoretically transferred. Proteins which specifically bound JH were identified by photolabeling proteins in the presence and absence of nonlabeled JH-III.

  9. USE OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES TO EVALUATE EFFECT OF ENDOGENOUS HORMONES AND A XENOBIOTIC PESTICIDE ON GROWTH OF SHEEPSHEAD MINNOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have developed a teleost model to screen physiological effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on somatic growth. Growth is largely controlled by the endocrine system via the growth-hormone releasing hormone (GRF) - growth hormone (GH) - insulin-like growth factor (IG...

  10. Developmental regulation of insulin-like growth factor-I and growth hormone receptor gene expression.

    PubMed

    Shoba, L; An, M R; Frank, S J; Lowe, W L

    1999-06-25

    During development, the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) gene is expressed in a tissue specific manner; however, the molecular mechanisms governing its developmental regulation remain poorly defined. To examine the hypothesis that expression of the growth hormone (GH) receptor accounts, in part, for the tissue specific expression of the IGF-I gene during development, the developmental regulation of IGF-I and GH receptor gene expression in rat tissues was examined. The level of IGF-I and GH receptor mRNA was quantified in RNA prepared from rats between day 17 of gestation (E17) and 17 months of age (17M) using an RNase protection assay. Developmental regulation of IGF-I gene expression was tissue specific with four different patterns of expression seen. In liver, IGF-I mRNA levels increased markedly between E17 and postnatal day 45 (P45) and declined thereafter. In contrast, in brain, skeletal muscle and testis, IGF-I mRNA levels decreased between P5 and 4M but were relatively unchanged thereafter. In heart and kidney, a small increase in IGF-I mRNA levels was observed between the early postnatal period and 4 months, whereas in lung, minimal changes were observed during development. The changes in GH receptor mRNA levels were, in general, coordinate with the changes in IGF-I mRNA levels, except in skeletal muscle. Interestingly, quantification of GH receptor levels by Western blot analysis in skeletal muscle demonstrated changes coordinate with IGF-I mRNA levels. The levels of the proteins which mediate GH receptor signaling (STAT1, -3, and -5, and JAK2) were quantified by Western blot analysis. These proteins also are expressed in a tissue specific manner during development. In some cases, the pattern of expression was coordinate with IGF-I gene expression, whereas in others it was discordant. To further define molecular mechanisms for the developmental regulation of IGF-I gene expression, protein binding to IGFI-FP1, a protein binding site that is in the major

  11. Growth Hormone Utilization Review in a Pediatric Primary Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Sayarifard, Fatemeh; Imcheh, Fereshteh Bakhshi; Badri, Shirinsadat; Faghihi, Toktam; Qorbani, Mostafa; Radfar, Mania

    2017-01-01

    Objective: One of the main problems facing public health providers and administrators in many countries is ensuring the rational use of high-cost drugs. In this regard, on-going process of medication use evaluation can be considered as a useful tool. In this study, we evaluated certain usage aspects of a highly-cost medication, that is, recombinant growth hormone (GH). Methods: This cross-sectional study conducted from August 2012 to August 2014. Children receiving GH ± gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs were included in the study. A researcher-designed checklist was developed to evaluate the GH utilization in these patients. Baseline demographic characteristics and background clinical and growth data, as well as any aspects of drug therapy including indications, dosing, monitoring, and discontinuation were collected from the patients' medical records. Findings: Seventy children receiving GH entered the study, of which 23 patients (32.85%) received GH and GnRH analogs simultaneously. At the baseline, 67 children (95.7%) had GH stimulation test, whereas serum insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels were measured in 63 (90%) patients. Sixty-seven patients (95.71%) had thyroid function test, whereas bone age was determined in 68 children (97.14%). The mean ± standard deviation of GH dose for idiopathic short stature, GH deficiency, Turner's syndrome and born small for gestational age in our study was 0.22 ± 0.025 mg/kg/week, 0.23 ± 0.04 mg/kg/week, 0.22 ± 0.015 mg/kg/week, and 0.23 ± 0.02 mg/kg/week, respectively. Height and weight of all patients were followed every 3–6 months, regularly. Thirty patients were treated with GH for at least 1 year, of which thyroid hormones and IGF-1 levels were measured annually in 25 (83.33%) and 26 (86.66%) patients, respectively; while bone age was evaluated in 13 (43.33%) children, annually. GH treatment was discontinued in 15 patients (21.42%), while financial problem was the major reason. Conclusion

  12. Effect of growth hormone treatment on pubertal growth in a boy with cystinosis and growth failure after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Haffner, D; Wühl, E; Nissel, R; Schaefer, F; Mehls, O

    1996-08-01

    Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) has proven effective in improving growth in short prepubertal children with chronic renal failure (CRF) before and after renal transplantation. However, its effect in pubertal patients is still doubtful. We report the case of a boy with nephropathic cystinosis and persistent growth failure despite successful renal transplantation who was treated with rhGH (30 i.u./m2 body surface area/week sc) from early puberty up to final height.

  13. Discordant effects of endogenous and exogenous somatostatin on growth hormone-releasing hormone secretion from perifused mouse hypothalami.

    PubMed

    Pecori Giraldi, F; Frohman, L A

    1995-05-01

    The role of somatostatin (SRIF) on growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRH) secretion has been controversial because of discordant findings that may be model dependent. We have examined possible explanations for these findings by altering endogenous and exogenous SRIF tone in a mouse hypothalamic perifusion system. Four mediobasal hypothalamic fragments were perifused in a single chamber for 6 h. After a 2-hour equilibration period, test substances were introduced and maintained throughout the perifusion. After an additional 2 h, fragments were submaximally stimulated with 30 mM K+. Depletion of tissue SRIF by 10(-3) M cysteamine increased K(+)-stimulated GRH release 2-fold without altering basal GRH secretion. Removal of endogenous SRIF tone by anti-SRIF serum also augmented the GRH response to K+. Perifusion of SRIF at concentrations ranging from 10(-12) to 10(-8) M significantly increased the GRH response to K+ in a dose-dependent manner. A significant increase was also observed during the perifusion of 10(-9) M octreotide. Simultaneous perifusion with anti-SRIF serum and 10(-9) M octreotide (to which the antibody does not bind) resulted in a response of GRH to K+ that was similar to that observed with anti-SRIF serum alone. Combined perifusion with cysteamine and 10(-9) M SRIF also resulted in a GRH response to K+ that did not differ from the response observed during cysteamine alone. The enhancement of GRH secretion by reduction of endogenous SRIF tone or tissue content implies an inhibitory role of endogenous SRIF on GRH secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Effects of bovine fatty acid synthase, stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase, sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1, and growth hormone gene polymorphisms on fatty acid composition and carcass traits in Japanese Black cattle.

    PubMed

    Matsuhashi, T; Maruyama, S; Uemoto, Y; Kobayashi, N; Mannen, H; Abe, T; Sakaguchi, S; Kobayashi, E

    2011-01-01

    The quality of fat is an important factor in defining the quality of meat. Fat quality is determined by the composition of fatty acids. Among lipid metabolism-related genes, including fatty acid synthesis genes, several genetic variations have been reported in the bovine fatty acid synthase (FASN), stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD), sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1), and GH genes. In the present study, we evaluated the single and epistatic effects of 5 genetic variations (4 SNP and 1 insertion/deletion) in 4 genes (FASN, SCD, SREBP1, and GH) on the fatty acid composition of the longissimus thoracis muscle and carcass and meat quality traits in 480 commercial Japanese Black cattle. Significant single effects of FASN, SCD, and GH(L127V) polymorphisms on the fatty acid composition of the longissimus thoracis muscle were detected. The A293V polymorphism of SCD had the largest effect on myristic acid (C14:0, P < 0.001), myristoleic acid (C14:1, P < 0.001), stearic acid (C18:0, P < 0.001), oleic acid (C18:1, P < 0.001), and MUFA (P < 0.001). Polymorphisms in the FASN, SCD, and SREBP1 genes showed no effect on any meat yield trait. There were no significant epistatic effects on fatty acid composition among pairs of the 3 genes (FASN, SCD, and SREBP1) involved in fatty acid synthesis. No epistatic interactions (P > 0.1) were detected between FASN and SCD for any carcass trait. When the genotypes of 3 markers (FASN, SCD, and GH(L127V)) were substituted from the lesser effect allele to the greater effect allele, the proportion of C18:1 increased by 4.46%. More than 20% of the genetic variance in the C18:1 level could be accounted for by these 3 genetic markers. The present results revealed that polymorphisms in 2 fatty acid synthesis genes (FASN and SCD) independently influenced fatty acid composition in the longissimus thoracis muscle. These results suggest that SNP in the FASN and SCD genes are useful markers for the improvement of fatty acid composition in

  15. Effects of Hypergravity Rearing on Growth Hormone and Insulin-Like Growth Factor in Rat Pups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer, L. A.; Chowdhury, J. H.; Grindeland, R. E.; Wade, C. E.; Ronca, A. E.

    2003-01-01

    Body weights of rat pups reared during exposure to hypergravity (hg) are significantly reduced relative to 1 g controls. In the present study, we examined in hg-reared rat pups two major contributors to growth and development, namely growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Beginning on Gestational day (G)11 of the rats 22 day pregnancy, rat dams and their litters were continuously exposed to either 1.5-g or 2.0-g. On Postnatal day (P)l0, plasma GH and IGF-1 were analyzed using radioimmunoassay (RIA). Both hormones were significantly elevated in hg pups relative to 1-g control pups. Together, these findings suggest that GH and IGF-1 are not primary determinants of reduced body weights observed in hg-reared pups. The significant elevations in pup GH and IGF-1 may be related to increased physical stimulation in hypergravity.

  16. Association of chicken growth hormone polymorphisms with egg production.

    PubMed

    Su, Y J; Shu, J T; Zhang, M; Zhang, X Y; Shan, Y J; Li, G H; Yin, J M; Song, W T; Li, H F; Zhao, G P

    2014-07-04

    Growth hormone (GH) has diverse functions in animals, together with other hormones from the somatotropic axis. Here, chicken GH (cGH) was investigated in recessive white chickens and Qingyuan partridge chickens as a candidate gene affecting egg production traits. Chicken egg production traits were studied in association with 4 selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (T185G, G662A, T3094C, and C3199T). Genotyping was performed by the polymerase chain reaction-ligase detection reaction method. T185G was significantly associated with the egg production traits of body weight at first egg (BW), egg weight at first egg (EW), and the total egg production of 300-day old birds (EN 300). T3094C was also significantly associated with certain egg production traits; however, it affected the 2 breeds differently. Haplotypes of the 4 single nucleotide polymorphisms were also significantly associated with egg production traits of chicken age at first egg laying, BW, EW, and EN 300. H1H6 was the most advantageous diplotype for egg production. We putatively concluded that polymorphisms in the cGH gene and its haplotypes could be used as potential molecular markers for egg production traits to enhance the breeding programs of indigenous chickens.

  17. A comparison of the growth responses following intramuscular GHRH plasmid administration versus daily growth hormone injections in young pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of daily porcine growth hormone (GH) injections versus plasmid-driven porcine GH-releasing hormone (pGHRH) production to promote growth was assessed. Ten-day-old piglets were injected intramuscularly with 0.1, 1, or 3 mg pGHRH, or a control plasmid followed by electroporation. Plasmid c...

  18. Oral hydration during growth hormone stimulation with clonidine.

    PubMed

    May, Melissa; Rose, Susan R

    2007-10-01

    The arginine-clonidine growth hormone (GH) stimulation test causes hypotension, requiring intravenous fluids to stabilize blood pressure (BP) and delaying departure from clinic. We hypothesized that oral hydration during the stimulation test would decrease need for intravenous fluids and shorten clinic stay. Children drank a diet electrolyte drink (10 ml/kg) on arrival to the test, which was repeated after clonidine. Fifteen children (7 girls) were tested without oral hydration, and 23 (6 girls) were tested with oral hydration (age range, 2-15 years). Compared with no oral hydration, intake of >13 ml/kg rarely required intravenous fluids, improved diastolic BP, and permitted discharge at the end of the GH test, with a higher BP.

  19. Growth hormone prevents neuronal loss in the aged rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Azcoitia, Iñigo; Perez-Martin, Margarita; Salazar, Veronica; Castillo, Carmen; Ariznavarreta, Carmen; Garcia-Segura, Luis M; Tresguerres, Jesus A F

    2005-05-01

    Decline of growth hormone (GH) with aging is associated to memory and cognitive alterations. In this study, the number of neurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus has been assessed in male and female Wistar rats at 3, 6, 12, 14, 18, 22 and 24 months of age, using the optical fractionator method. Male rats had more neurons than females at all the ages studied. Significant neuronal loss was observed in both sexes between 22 and 24 months of age. In a second experiment, 22 month-old male and female rats were treated for 10 weeks with 2 mg/kg/day of GH or saline. At 24 months of age, animals treated with GH had more neurons in the hilus than animals treated with saline. These findings indicate that GH is neuroprotective in old animals and that its administration may ameliorate neuronal alterations associated to aging.

  20. Growth hormone and adipose tissue: beyond the adipocyte

    PubMed Central

    Berryman, Darlene E.; List, Edward O.; Sackmann-Sala, Lucila; Lubbers, Ellen; Munn, Rachel; Kopchick, John J.

    2011-01-01

    The last two decades have seen resurgence in the interest in, and research on, adipose tissue. In part, the increased interest stems from an alarming increase in obesity rates worldwide. However, an understanding that this once simple tissue is significantly more intricate and interactive than previously realized has fostered additional attention. While few would argue that growth hormone (GH) radically alters adipose tissue, a better appreciation of the newer complexities requires that GH's influence on this tissue be reexamined. Therefore, the objective of this review is to describe the more recent understanding of adipose tissue and how GH may influence and contribute to these newer complexities with special focus on the available data from mice with altered GH action. PMID:21470887

  1. Status of long-acting-growth hormone preparations--2015.

    PubMed

    Høybye, Charlotte; Cohen, Pinchas; Hoffman, Andrew R; Ross, Richard; Biller, Beverly M K; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl

    2015-10-01

    Growth hormone (GH) treatment has been an established therapy for GH deficiency (GHD) in children and adults for more than three decades. Numerous studies have shown that GH treatment improves height, body composition, bone density, cardiovascular risk factors, physical fitness and quality of life and that the treatment has few side effects. Initially GH was given as intramuscular injections three times per week, but daily subcutaneous injections were shown to be more effective and less inconvenient and the daily administration has been used since its introduction in the 1980s. However, despite ongoing improvements in injection device design, daily subcutaneous injections remain inconvenient, painful and distressing for many patients, leading to noncompliance, reduced efficacy and increased health care costs. To address these issues a variety of long-acting formulations of GH have been developed. In this review we present the current status of long-acting GH preparations and discuss the specific issues related to their development.

  2. Purification of a recombinant human growth hormone by an integrated IMAC procedure.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Jane T; Fredericks, Dale P; Zhang, Chunfang; Christensen, Thorkild; Jespergaard, Christina; Schiødt, Christine Bruun; Hearn, Milton T W

    2014-02-01

    In this study, integration of three discrete process aspects of the IMAC purification of Escherichia coli expressed recombinant proteins has been investigated. To this end, novel N-terminally tagged human growth hormone variants (tagged-vhGHs) have been expressed in E. coli by tank fermentation and captured directly from the cell lysate by a new IMAC approach. The chelating ligands used were 1,4,7-triaza-cyclononane (tacn) and bis(1,4,7-triazacyclononyl)-propane (dtnp) with copper(II) as the immobilised metal ion. The N-terminal tags were specifically selected for their potential to bind to these immobilised complexes and also for their ease of removal from the tagged protein by the dipeptidyl peptidase, DAP-1. Low levels of detergents in the binding buffer did not dramatically affect the purification, but increased concentrations of NaCl in the loading buffer improved the binding performance. The same IMAC systems, operated in the 'negative' adsorption chromatographic mode, could be used to obtain the purified mature human growth hormone variant, as assessed by MALDI-TOF and N-terminal sequencing studies, following removal of the affinity tag by the dipeptidyl peptidase 1. Western immunoblot analysis of the eluted fractions of both the tagged and de-tagged vhGH demonstrated significant clearance of E. coli host cell proteins (HCPs). Further, these IMAC resins can be used multiple times without the need for metal ion re-charging between runs. This study thus documents an integrated approach for the purification of specifically tagged recombinant proteins expressed in genetically modified E. coli.

  3. Genetic polymorphisms and protein structures in growth hormone, growth hormone receptor, ghrelin, insulin-like growth factor 1 and leptin in Mehraban sheep.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, A; Behzadi, Sh; Miraei-Ashtiani, S R; Roh, S-G; Katoh, K

    2013-09-15

    The somatotropic axis, the control system for growth hormone (GH) secretion and its endogenous factors involved in the regulation of metabolism and energy partitioning, has promising potentials for producing economically valuable traits in farm animals. Here we investigated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the genes of factors involved in the somatotropic axis for growth hormone (GH1), growth hormone receptor (GHR), ghrelin (GHRL), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) and leptin (LEP), using polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and DNA sequencing methods in 452 individual Mehraban sheep. A nonradioactive method to allow SSCP detection was used for genomic DNA and PCR amplification of six fragments: exons 4 and 5 of GH1; exon 10 of GH receptor (GHR); exon 1 of ghrelin (GHRL); exon 1 of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and exon 3 of leptin (LEP). Polymorphisms were detected in five of the six PCR products. Two electrophoretic patterns were detected for GH1 exon 4. Five conformational patterns were detected for GH1 exon 5 and LEP exon 3, and three for IGF-I exon 1. Only GHR and GHRL were monomorphic. Changes in protein structures due to variable SNPs were also analyzed. The results suggest that Mehraban sheep, a major breed that is important for the animal industry in Middle East countries, has high genetic variability, opening interesting prospects for future selection programs and preservation strategies.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of regulation of growth hormone gene expression in cultured rat pituitary cells by thyroid and glucocorticoid hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Yaffe, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    In cultured GC cells, a rat pituitary tumor cell line, growth hormone (GH) is induced in a synergistic fashion by physiologic concentrations of thyroid and glucocorticoid hormones. Abundant evidence indicates that these hormones mediate this response via their specific receptors. The purpose of this thesis is to explore the mechanisms by which these hormones affect GH production. When poly (A){sup +} RNA was isolated from cells grown both with and without hormones and translated in a cell-free wheat germ system, the preGH translation products were shown to be proportional to immunoassayable GH production under all combinations of hormonal milieux, indicating that changes in GH production is modulated at a pretranslational level. A cDNA library was constructed from poly (A){sup +}RNA and one clone containing GH cDNA sequences was isolated. This was used to confirm the above results by Northern dot blot analysis. This probe was also used to assess hormonal effects on GH mRNA half-life and synthetic rates as well as GH gene transcription rates in isolated nuclei. Using a pulse-chase protocol in which cellular RNA was labeled in vivo with ({sup 3}H)uridine, and quantitating ({sup 3}H)GHmRNA directly by hybridization to GH cDNA bound to nitrocellulose filters, GHmRNA was found to have a half-life of approximately 50 hours, and was not significantly altered by the presence of inducing hormones.

  5. Growth hormone use in the treatment of idiopathic short stature.

    PubMed

    Zucchini, Stefano

    2008-04-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) therapy has been used for the possible improvement of adult height in individuals with idiopathic short stature (ISS) for more than 20 years. However, given its heterogeneity, and the distinction between 'partial' or 'transient' GH deficiency, the exact definition of ISS is difficult. Since recombinant hGH became available, individuals with all types of GH deficiency have been extensively treated, often without the need for diagnostic justifications. On the other hand, for ISS individuals GH treatment has so far only been possible in a few countries, or in the context of clinical trials. If hGH is certainly effective in individuals with severe GH deficiency, its efficacy is lower and with a high individual-to-individual variability of response in those with non-severe GH deficiency and with ISS. The most important variables associated with a favorable growth response to hGH therapy in GH- and non-GH-deficient individuals are first-year growth response, younger age at start of treatment, difference at start from target height standard deviation score, GH dose, and other variables not necessarily associated with GH peak levels after provocative stimuli. A better choice of individuals to be treated successfully will improve the cost-effectiveness of the treatment, making it more acceptable to the scientific community and other stakeholders.

  6. Growth hormone resistance exacerbates cholestasis-induced murine liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Stiedl, Patricia; McMahon, Robert; Blaas, Leander; Stanek, Victoria; Svinka, Jasmin; Grabner, Beatrice; Zollner, Gernot; Kessler, Sonja M.; Claudel, Thierry; Müller, Mathias; Mikulits, Wolfgang; Bilban, Martin; Esterbauer, Harald; Eferl, Robert; Haybaeck, Johannes; Trauner, Michael; Casanova, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) resistance has been associated with liver cirrhosis in humans but its contribution to the disease remains controversial. In order to elucidate whether GH resistance plays a causal role in the establishment and development of liver fibrosis, or rather represents a major consequence thereof, we challenged mice lacking the Growth hormone receptor gene (Ghr-/-, a model for GH resistance) by crossing them with Mdr2 knockout mice (Mdr2-/-), a mouse model of inflammatory cholestasis and liver fibrosis. Ghr-/-;Mdr2-/- mice showed elevated serum markers associated with liver damage and cholestasis, extensive bile duct proliferation and increased collagen deposition relative to Mdr2 -/- mice, thus suggesting a more severe liver fibrosis phenotype. Additionally, Ghr-/-;Mdr2-/- mice had a pronounced down-regulation of hepato-protective genes Hnf6, Egfr and Igf-1, and significantly increased levels of ROS and apoptosis in hepatocytes, compared to control mice. Moreover, single knockout mice (Ghr-/-) fed with a diet containing 1% cholic acid displayed an increase in hepatocyte ROS production, hepatocyte apoptosis and bile infarcts compared to their wildtype littermates, indicating that loss of Ghr renders hepatocytes more susceptible to toxic bile acid accumulation. Surprisingly, and despite their severe fibrotic phenotype, Ghr-/-;Mdr2-/- mice displayed a significant decrease in tumour incidence compared to Mdr2-/- mice, indicating that loss of Ghr signaling may slow the progression from fibrosis/cirrhosis to cancer in the liver. Conclusion Our findings suggest that GH resistance dramatically exacerbates liver fibrosis in a mouse model of inflammatory cholestasis, therefore suggesting that GH resistance plays a causal role in the disease and provides a novel target for the development of liver fibrosis treatments. PMID:25179284

  7. Growth hormones therapy in immune response against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Frare, Eduardo Osório; Santello, Fabricia Helena; Caetano, Leony Cristina; Caldeira, Jerri C; Toldo, Míriam Paula Alonso; Prado, José Clóvis do

    2010-04-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is an important hypophyseal hormone that is primarily involved in body growth and metabolism. In mammals, control of Trypanosoma cruzi parasitism during the acute phase of infection is considered to be critically dependent on direct macrophage activation by cytokines. To explore the possibility that GH might be effective in the treatment of Chagas' disease, we investigated its effects on the course of T. cruzi infection in rats, focusing our analyses on its influences on parasitemia, NO, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma concentration and on histopathological alterations and parasite burden in heart tissue. T. cruzi-infected male Wistar rats were intraperitoneally treated with 5 ng/10 g body weight/day of GH. Animals treated with GH showed a significant reduction in the number of blood trypomastigotes during the acute phase of infection compared with untreated animals (P<0.05). For all experimental days (7, 14 and 21 post infection) of the acute phase, infected and GH treated animals reached higher concentrations of TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma and nitric oxide as compared to untreated and infected counterparts (P<0.05) Histopathological observations of heart tissue revealed that GH administration also resulted in fewer and smaller amastigote burdens, and less inflammatory infiltrate and tissue disorganization, indicating a reduced parasitism of this tissue. These results show that GH can be considered as an immunomodulator substance for controlling parasite replication and combined with the current drug used may represent in the future a new therapeutic tool to reduce the harmful effects of Chagas' disease.

  8. Amyloid formation of growth hormone in presence of zinc: Relevance to its storage in secretory granules

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Reeba S.; Das, Subhadeep; Ghosh, Saikat; Anoop, Arunagiri; Jha, Narendra Nath; Khan, Tuhin; Singru, Praful; Kumar, Ashutosh; Maji, Samir K.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids are cross-β-sheet fibrillar aggregates, associated with various human diseases and native functions such as protein/peptide hormone storage inside secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells. In the current study, using amyloid detecting agents, we show that growth hormone (GH) could be stored as amyloid in the pituitary of rat. Moreover, to demonstrate the formation of GH amyloid in vitro, we studied various conditions (solvents, glycosaminoglycans, salts and metal ions) and found that in presence of zinc metal ions (Zn(II)), GH formed short curvy fibrils. The amyloidogenic nature of these fibrils was examined by Thioflavin T binding, Congo Red binding, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Our biophysical studies also suggest that Zn(II) initiates the early oligomerization of GH that eventually facilitates the fibrillation process. Furthermore, using immunofluorescence study of pituitary tissue, we show that GH in pituitary significantly co-localizes with Zn(II), suggesting the probable role of zinc in GH aggregation within secretory granules. We also found that GH amyloid formed in vitro is capable of releasing monomers. The study will help to understand the possible mechanism of GH storage, its regulation and monomer release from the somatotrophs of anterior pituitary. PMID:27004850

  9. Modular Insulators: Genome Wide Search for Composite CTCF/Thyroid Hormone Receptor Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Weth, Oliver; Weth, Christine; Bartkuhn, Marek; Leers, Joerg; Uhle, Florian; Renkawitz, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    The conserved 11 zinc-finger protein CTCF is involved in several transcriptional mechanisms, including insulation and enhancer blocking. We had previously identified two composite elements consisting of a CTCF and a TR binding site at the chicken lysozyme and the human c-myc genes. Using these it has been demonstrated that thyroid hormone mediates the relief of enhancer blocking even though CTCF remains bound to its binding site. Here we wished to determine whether CTCF and TR combined sites are representative of a general feature of the genome, and whether such sites are functional in regulating enhancer blocking. Genome wide analysis revealed that about 18% of the CTCF regions harbored at least one of the four different palindromic or repeated sequence arrangements typical for the binding of TR homodimers or TR/RXR heterodimers. Functional analysis of 10 different composite elements of thyroid hormone responsive genes was performed using episomal constructs. The episomal system allowed recapitulating CTCF mediated enhancer blocking function to be dependent on poly (ADP)-ribose modification and to mediate histone deacetylation. Furthermore, thyroid hormone sensitive enhancer blocking could be shown for one of these new composite elements. Remarkably, not only did the regulation of enhancer blocking require functional TR binding, but also the basal enhancer blocking activity of CTCF was dependent on the binding of the unliganded TR. Thus, a number of composite CTCF/TR binding sites may represent a subset of other modular CTCF composite sites, such as groups of multiple CTCF sites or of CTCF/Oct4, CTCF/Kaiso or CTCF/Yy1 combinations. PMID:20404925

  10. The biomarker sex hormone-binding globulin - from established applications to emerging trends in clinical medicine.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Markus A; Seifert-Klauss, Vanadin; Luppa, Peter B

    2015-10-01

    Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is a serum glycoprotein exhibiting the unique feature of binding sex steroids with high affinity and specificity. Its serum levels are regulated not only by androgens and estrogens but also by thyroid hormones and other metabolic factors. Several disease conditions are accompanied by altered SHBG levels such as hyper- and hypoandrogenism, thyroid disorders, pituitary diseases, liver disorders, and breast as well as prostate cancer. Additionally, several drugs and alcohol consumption influence serum concentrations of SHBG. In some cases, altered SHBG levels are a specific result of the underlying pathology. In others, they merely constitute an epiphenomenon, which still might offer the possibility of using serum measurements of SHBG as surrogate marker. This review article portrays the different disorders associated with altered SHBG levels and discusses the usefulness of SHBG as disease biomarker from a clinicians as well as from an endocrinological researchers point of view.

  11. Growth patterns and the use of growth hormone in the mucopolysaccharidoses

    PubMed Central

    Polgreen, L.E.; Miller, B.S.

    2010-01-01

    Short stature is characteristic of patients with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) diseases. For children with skeletal dysplasias, such as MPS, it is important to know the natural history of growth. An understanding of the natural growth pattern in each MPS disease provides a measurement to which treatments can be compared, as well as data which can help families and providers make individualized decisions about growth promoting treatments. Multiple advancements have been made in the treatment of MPS with both hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). The long term benefit of these treatments on growth is unknown. This article will review the published data on growth in children with MPS, and describe preliminary data on the use of human growth hormone (hGH) in children with MPS. PMID:20563263

  12. Zip1, Zip2, and Zip8 mRNA expressions were associated with growth hormone level during the growth hormone provocation test in children with short stature.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ping; Wang, Shifu; Jiang, Yali; Tao, Yanting; Tian, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Kai; Wan, Haiyan; Zhang, Lehai; Zhang, Lianying

    2013-10-01

    Short stature of children is affected by multiple factors. One of them is growth hormone (GH) deficiency. Growth hormone therapy can increase the final height of children with growth hormone deficiency. Zinc is found to induce dimerization and to enhance the bioactivity of human GH. Two gene families have been identified involved in zinc homeostasis. Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that Zip1, Zip2, Zip6, and ZnT1 mRNA were associated with zinc level in established human breast cancer in nude mice model; Zip8 was significantly lower in zinc-deficient Wistar rats in kidney. In this study, five zinc transporters: Zip1, Zip2, Zip6, Zip8, and ZnT1 were chosen. We aimed to investigate the mRNA expression of zinc transporters and to explore the relationship between zinc transporters and growth hormone in short stature children. Growth hormone provocation test is used to confirm the diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency. Six short children for the test were enrolled. At the same time, 15 sex- and age-matched normal children were enrolled as control. The expression levels of zinc transporters in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Zip1 and Zip2 mRNA expression positively correlated with growth hormone level (r = 0.5133, P = 0.0371; r = 0.6719, P = 0.0032); Zip8 mRNA expression negatively correlated with growth hormone level (r = -0.5264, P = 0.0285) during the test in short stature children. The average expression level of Zip2 was significantly higher and Zip6, Zip8 mRNA levels were significantly lower in short stature children than in health controls at 0 min (P < 0.05, P < 0.05).

  13. Osteocalcin induces growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 system by promoting testosterone synthesis in male mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Li, K

    2014-10-01

    Osteocalcin has been shown to enhance testosterone production in men. In the present study, we investigated the effects of osteocalcin on testosterone and on induction of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axis. Osteocalcin injection stimulated growth, which could be inhibited by castration. In addition, osteocalcin induced testosterone secretion in testes both in vivo and in vitro. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, we showed that growth hormone expression was significantly increased in the pituitary after osteocalcin injection (p<0.05). Growth hormone expression in CLU401 mouse pituitary cells was also significantly stimulated (p<0.05) by osteocalcin-induced MA-10 cells. Osteocalcin injection also promoted hepatic expression of growth hormone receptor and insulin-like growth factor-1 (p<0.05), as demonstrated by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Similarly, osteocalcin-induced MA-10 cells promoted growth hormone receptor and insulin-like growth factor-1 expression in NCTC1469 cells. These results suggest that the growth-stimulating activities of osteocalcin are mediated by testicular testosterone secretion, and thus provide valuable information regarding the regulatory effects of osteocalcin expression on the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axis via reproductive activities.

  14. Triiodothyronine stimulates specifically growth hormone mRNA in rat pituitary tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, H; Vassart, G; Brocas, H; Refetoff, S

    1977-05-01

    In a cell-free protein-synthesizing system from a rabbit reticulocyte lysate, total RNA extracted from cultured rat pituitary tumor (GH3) cells directed, in a dose-related manner, the synthesis of proteins that were precipitated by antisera specific to rat growth hormone (somatotropin) and rat prolactin. A marked decrease in growth hormone secretion and growth hormone mRNA activity was observed when cells were grown in a medium deficient in thyroid hormone. Addition of triiodothyronine in physiologic amounts both prevented and completely reversed this effect within 48 hr. Thyroid hormone had no effect on prolactin secretion or prolactin mRNA activity. These data suggest that thyroid hormone may stimulate synthesis of growth hormone through induction of transcriptional activity. The possibility of an additional effect at the posttranscriptional level has not been excluded. Although thyroid hormone is believed to have a general effect on a variety of metabolic processes, some effects, at the molecular level, may be quite selective, as indicated by the observed changes in growth hormone but not prolactin mRNA activity. The GH3 cell model is useful in the study of triiodothyronine action because of independence from secondary hormonal effects caused by hypothyroidism and because simultaneous measurement of prolactin mRNA activity serves as a unique internal control.

  15. Fungal exposure endocrinopathy in sinusitis with growth hormone deficiency: Dennis-Robertson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Donald; Robertson, David; Curtis, Luke; Black, Judson

    2009-01-01

    A retrospective study was carried out on 79 patients with a history of mold exposure, fatigue, and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) to determine whether there is a causal relationship between fungal exposure and chronic sinusitis, fatigue, and anterior hypopituitarism, especially growth hormone deficiency (GHD). Of the patients, 94% had a history of CRS, endoscopically and/or computed tomography (CT) confirmed; 100% had chronic fatigue and 100% had either significant history of indoor mold exposure and/or positive mold plate testing as measured by settle plates, with an average colony count of 21 (0-4 normal). A total of 62 had positive mold plate testing and 17 had positive history of mold exposure. Of 75, 73 (97.3%) had positive serum immunoglobulin G (IgG)-specific antibodies to fungal antigens. Out of 8, 7 were positive for urinary trichothecenes. Resting levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) averaged 123 ng/mL (range 43-285, normal 88-249 ng/mL). Despite normal resting levels of IGF-1, significant deficiency of serum human growth hormone (GH) was confirmed by insulin tolerance test (ITT) in 40 of 50 tested. In all, 51% (40/79) were GH deficient. Primary or secondary hypothyroidism in T3 and/or T4 was seen in 81% (64/79) patients; 75% (59/79) had adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) deficiency. Fungal exposure endocrinopathy likely represents the major cause of GHD, affecting approximately 4.8 million people compared to approximately known 60,000 cases from all other causes. A literature review indicates a possible mechanism of GHD in fungal exposure is that the fungal glucan receptors in the lenticulostellate cells of the anterior pituitary bind to fungal cells wall glucans and activate the innate immune system, which activates macrophages that destroy the fungus and lenticulostellate tissue. Treatment of patients included normal saline nasal irrigations, antifungal and antibiotic nasal sprays, appropriate use of oral antibiotics and antifungals, facial

  16. A crayfish insulin-like-binding protein: another piece in the androgenic gland insulin-like hormone puzzle is revealed.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Ohad; Weil, Simy; Manor, Rivka; Roth, Ziv; Khalaila, Isam; Sagi, Amir

    2013-08-02

    Across the animal kingdom, the involvement of insulin-like peptide (ILP) signaling in sex-related differentiation processes is attracting increasing attention. Recently, a gender-specific ILP was identified as the androgenic sex hormone in Crustacea. However, moieties modulating the actions of this androgenic insulin-like growth factor were yet to be revealed. Through molecular screening of an androgenic gland (AG) cDNA library prepared from the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus, we have identified a novel insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP) termed Cq-IGFBP. Based on bioinformatics analyses, the deduced Cq-IGFBP was shown to share high sequence homology with IGFBP family members from both invertebrates and vertebrates. The protein also includes a sequence determinant proven crucial for ligand binding, which according to three-dimensional modeling is assigned to the exposed outer surface of the protein. Recombinant Cq-IGFBP (rCq-IGFBP) protein was produced and, using a "pulldown" methodology, was shown to specifically interact with the insulin-like AG hormone of the crayfish (Cq-IAG). Particularly, using both mass spectral analysis and an immunological tool, rCq-IGFBP was shown to bind the Cq-IAG prohormone. Furthermore, a peptide corresponding to residues 23-38 of the Cq-IAG A-chain was found sufficient for in vitro recognition by rCq-IGFBP. Cq-IGFBP is the first IGFBP family member shown to specifically interact with a gender-specific ILP. Unlike their ILP ligands, IGFBPs are highly conserved across evolution, from ancient arthropods, like crustaceans, to humans. Such conservation places ILP signaling at the center of sex-related phenomena in early animal development.

  17. Combination growth hormone and gonadotropin releasing hormone analog therapy in 11beta-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Anurag; Kabra, Madhulika; Menon, P S N

    2006-06-01

    Diagnosis of 11beta-hydroxylase deficiency was made in a boy at the age of 2 1/2 years on the basis of peripheral precocious puberty, growth acceleration (height standard deviation score +4.4) with advanced skeletal maturation (bone age 8.4 years) and elevated deoxycortisol levels. Glucocorticoid supplementation led to normalization of blood pressure but was associated with progression to central precocious puberty and increase in bone age resulting in decrease in predicted adult height to 133.7 cm (target height 163 cm). The child was started on GnRH analog (triptorelin 3.75 mg every 28 days), which led to improvement in predicted adult height by 3.1 cm over 15 months. Addition of growth hormone (0.1 IU/kg/day) resulted in improvement in predicted adult height (151 cm) and height deficit (12 cm) over the next 3.6 years. Final height (151 cm) exceeded predicted height at the initiation of GnRH analog treatment by 17.3 cm. This report suggests that combination GH and GnRH analog treatment may be useful in improving height outcome in children with 11beta-hydroxylase deficiency and compromised final height.

  18. Rasch Measurement in the Assessment of Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adult Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prieto, Luis; Roset, Montse; Badia, Xavier

    2001-01-01

    Tested the metric properties of a Spanish version of the Assessment of Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults (AGHDA) questionnaire through Rasch analysis with a sample of 356 adult patients in Spain. Results suggest that the Spanish AGHDA could be a useful complement of the clinical evaluation of growth hormone deficiency patients at group and…

  19. Messenger RNA patterns in rat liver nuclei before and after treat-ment with growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Drews, J; Brawerman, G

    1967-06-09

    Like cortisol, growth hormone enhances RNA synthesis in rat liver nuclei. However, DNA-RNA hybridization experiments show that the application of growth hormone does not stimulate the formation of new species of messenger RNA. The latter phenomenon was observed after treatment with cortisol.

  20. Gibberellin hormone signal perception: down-regulating DELLA repressors of plant growth and development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gibberellin (GA) hormone signal is perceived by a receptor with homology to hormone sensitive lipases, GID1 (GA-INSENSITIVE DWARF1). This leads to GA-stimulated responses including stem elongation, seed germination, and the transition to flowering. GA-binding enables GID1 to interact with and ...

  1. Effects of the synthetic liver X receptor agonist T0901317 on the growth hormone and thyroid hormone axes in male rats.

    PubMed

    Davies, Jeffrey S; Kotokorpi, Pia; Lindahl, Ulrika; Oscarsson, Jan; Wells, Timothy; Mode, Agneta

    2008-04-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs), activated by oxysterols, play an important role in the regulation of lipid and glucose metabolism, which is also markedly dependent on thyroid hormone and growth hormone (GH) status. Here, we investigated how a 1-week exposure to the synthetic LXR agonist T0901317 affected GH secretion and thyroid hormone status in male rats. While the pulse frequency of GH secretion was marginally affected there was a highly significant decrease in the triiodo-L-thyronine/thyroxine (T3/T4) ratio in plasma. This effect was associated with decreased expression of deiodinase 1 (DIO1) and 2 (DIO2) mRNA in the liver and thyroid gland, respectively. Expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), the hallmark of stimulated lipogenesis, was markedly increased in both thyroid and pituitary implying that protracted pharmacological LXR activation may promote lipid accumulation in these endocrine tissues. These findings suggest that attention must be given to pituitary hormone dependent axes when developing therapeutic strategies based on agonism of the LXRs, e.g. for treatment of atherosclerosis.

  2. Juvenile hormone regulates extreme mandible growth in male stag beetles.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Hiroki; Cornette, Richard; Koshikawa, Shigeyuki; Okada, Yasukazu; Lavine, Laura Corley; Emlen, Douglas J; Miura, Toru

    2011-01-01

    The morphological diversity of insects is one of the most striking phenomena in biology. Evolutionary modifications to the relative sizes of body parts, including the evolution of traits with exaggerated proportions, are responsible for a vast range of body forms. Remarkable examples of an insect trait with exaggerated proportions are the mandibular weapons of stag beetles. Male stag beetles possess extremely enlarged mandibles which they use in combat with rival males over females. As with other sexually selected traits, stag beetle mandibles vary widely in size among males, and this variable growth results from differential larval nutrition. However, the mechanisms responsible for coupling nutrition with growth of stag beetle mandibles (or indeed any insect structure) remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that during the development of male stag beetles (Cyclommatus metallifer), juvenile hormone (JH) titers are correlated with the extreme growth of an exaggerated weapon of sexual selection. We then investigate the putative role of JH in the development of the nutritionally-dependent, phenotypically plastic mandibles, by increasing hemolymph titers of JH with application of the JH analog fenoxycarb during larval and prepupal developmental periods. Increased JH signaling during the early prepupal period increased the proportional size of body parts, and this was especially pronounced in male mandibles, enhancing the exaggerated size of this trait. The direction of this response is consistent with the measured JH titers during this same period. Combined, our results support a role for JH in the nutrition-dependent regulation of extreme mandible growth in this species. In addition, they illuminate mechanisms underlying the evolution of trait proportion, the most salient feature of the evolutionary diversification of the insects.

  3. Gigantism caused by growth hormone secreting pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Noorisaem; Jeong, Kumi; Yang, Eun Mi; Kim, Chan Jong

    2014-06-01

    Gigantism indicates excessive secretion of growth hormones (GH) during childhood when open epiphyseal growth plates allow for excessive linear growth. Case one involved a 14.7-year-old boy presented with extreme tall stature. His random serum GH level was 38.4 ng/mL, and failure of GH suppression was noted during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT; nadir serum GH, 22.7 ng/mL). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed a 12-mm-sized pituitary adenoma. Transsphenoidal surgery was performed and a pituitary adenoma displaying positive immunohistochemical staining for GH was reported. Pituitary MRI scan was performed 4 months after surgery and showed recurrence/residual tumor. Medical treatment with a long-acting somatostatin analogue for six months was unsuccessful. As a result, secondary surgery was performed. Three months after reoperation, the GH level was 0.2 ng/mL and insulin-like growth factor 1 was 205 ng/mL. Case two involved a 14.9-year-old boy, who was referred to our department for his tall stature. His basal GH level was 9.3 ng/mL, and failure of GH suppression was reported during OGTT (nadir GH, 9.0 ng/mL). Pituitary MRI showed a 6-mm-sized pituitary adenoma. Surgery was done and histopathological examination demonstrated a pituitary adenoma with positive staining for GH. Three months after surgery, the GH level was 0.2 ng/mL and nadir GH during OGTT was less than 0.1 ng/mL. Pituitary MRI scans showed no residual tumor. We present two cases of gigantism caused by a GH-secreting pituitary adenoma with clinical and microscopic findings.

  4. Optimization of the purification methods for recovery of recombinant growth hormone from Paralichthys olivaceus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Xiaonan; Zhang, Xuecheng; Mu, Xiaosheng; Liu, Bin

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to optimize the purification of recombinant growth hormone from Paralichthys olivaceus. Recombinant flounder growth hormone (r-fGH) was expressed by Escherichia coli in form of inclusion body or as soluble protein under different inducing conditions. The inclusion body was renatured using two recovery methods, i.e., dilution and dialysis. Thereafter, the refolded protein was purified by Glutathione Sepharase 4B affinity chromatography and r-fGH was obtained by cleavage of thrombin. For soluble products, r-fGH was directly purified from the lysates by Glutathione Sepharase 4B affinity chromatography. ELISA-receptor assay demonstrated that despite its low receptor binding activity, the r-fGH purified from refolded inclusion body had a higher yield (2.605 mg L-1) than that from soluble protein (1.964 mg L-1). Of the tested recovery methods, addition of renaturing buffer (pH 8.5) into denatured inclusion body yielded the best recovery rate (17.9%). This work provided an optimized purification method for high recovery of r-fGH, thus contributing to the application of r-fGH to aquaculture.

  5. Hormone-Mediated Pattern Formation in Seedling of Plants: a Competitive Growth Dynamics Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Mimura, Masayasu; Ohya, Tomoyuki; Oikawa, Noriko; Okabe, Hirotaka; Kai, Shoichi

    2001-10-01

    An ecologically relevant pattern formation process mediated by hormonal interactions among growing seedlings is modeled based on the experimental observations on the effects of indole acetic acid, which can act as an inhibitor and activator of root growth depending on its concentration. In the absence of any lateral root with constant hormone-sensitivity, the edge effect phenomenon is obtained depending on the secretion rate of hormone from the main root. Introduction of growth-stage-dependent hormone-sensitivity drastically amplifies the initial randomness, resulting in spatially irregular macroscopic patterns. When the lateral root growth is introduced, periodic patterns are obtained whose periodicity depends on the length of lateral roots. The growth-stage-dependent hormone-sensitivity and the lateral root growth are crucial for macroscopic periodic-pattern formation.

  6. A study of cell electrophoresis as a means of purifying growth hormone secreting cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, Lindsay D.; Hymer, W. C.; Kunze, M. Elaine; Marks, Gary M.; Lanham, J. Wayne

    1983-01-01

    Growth hormone secreting cells of the rat anterior pituitary are heavily laden with granules of growth hormone and can be partialy purified on the basis of their resulting high density. Two methods of preparative cell electrophoresis were investigated as methods of enhancing the purification of growth hormone producing cells: density gradient electrophoresis and continuous flow electrophoresis. Both methods provided a two- to four-fold enrichment in growth hormone production per cell relative to that achieved by previous methods. Measurements of electrophoretic mobilities by two analytical methods, microscopic electrophoresis and laser-tracking electrophoresis, revealed very little distinction between unpurified anterior pituitary cell suspensions and somatotroph-enriched cell suspensions. Predictions calculated on the basis of analytical electrophoretic data are consistent with the hypothesis that sedimentation plays a significant role in both types of preparative electrophoresis and the electrophoretic mobility of the growth hormone secreting subpopulation of cells remains unknown.

  7. Growth hormone polymorphisms and growth traits in Chinese Tibetan sheep Ovis aries.

    PubMed

    Han, Y C; Sun, Y G; Li, Q

    2016-08-26

    Growth hormone (GH) plays an important role in promoting growth, protein and muscle accretion, and fat catabolism, suggesting that GH is a potential candidate gene affecting growth traits in vertebrates. In this paper, polymorphisms in GH were investigated in 632 Chinese Tibetan sheep, by using DNA sequencing. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified, including two mutations (g.616G>A and g.624G>A) in intron 2 and one synonymous mutation (g.498G>C) in exon 2. Association analyses showed that both g.498G>C and g.616G>A were significantly associated with several growth traits (at P < 0.01 or P < 0.05) in three investigated breeds. Our results demonstrate that GH variation may be used as a molecular marker for growth traits in Chinese Tibetan sheep.

  8. Growth hormone insensitivity syndrome (Laron syndrome): main characteristics and effects of IGF1 treatment.

    PubMed

    Carel, J C; Chaussain, J L; Chatelain, P; Savage, M O

    1996-07-01

    Growth hormone (GH) insensitivity is a pathological state characterized by a disturbance of the physiological relationship between GH secretion, synthesis of insulin-like growth-factor I (IGF-1) and the biological actions of GH. Laron syndrome, the prototype for GH insensitivity, is most often due to GH receptor deficiency. However, this syndrome is heterogeneous in terms of growth characteristics, bio-chemical features and, most importantly, genetic defects. Recent data have indicated that partial GH receptor deficiency could be involved in children with apparently idiopathic short stature. Laron syndrome, because of extreme growth deficiency and a lack of alternative treatment, was the first clinical situation in which recombinant human IGF-1 was used. IGF-1 accelerates growth rate in most patients, induces subtle modifications of the craniofacies and decreases fat mass. However, it is still too early to evaluate the long-term effects of IGF-1 on final height. Tolerance to the drug has been excellent in all reported trials. The major (but rare) side effects are transient intracranial hypertension and hypokalemia. Generalization of data obtained in Laron syndrome to other clinical situations should take account of the profound alterations in IGF-1 pharmacokinetics resulting from a deficiency in IGF-binding proteins.

  9. Exogenous recombinant bovine growth hormone stimulates growth and hepatic IGF expression in shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorhynchus.

    PubMed

    Fenn, Carlin M; Small, Brian C

    2015-02-01

    Sturgeon are a unique fish for physiological research as they are long-lived, slow-growing, and late-maturing. Furthermore, sturgeon growth hormones appear to share greater structural and molecular similarity with mammalian somatotropins than teleostean somatotropins. In this study, changes in insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-II mRNA expression and corresponding whole-body growth and composition following 6 weeks of bi-weekly recombinant bovine growth hormone (rbGH) administration in shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorhynchus were evaluated. Fish were injected intraperitoneally with 240 μg rbGH/g body weight or a sesame oil sham. Hepatic IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA abundance was significantly higher (P≤0.02) in rbGH-treated fish, as were length (P<0.001) and weight gain (P<0.001). In addition, proximate whole-body analysis demonstrated a significant (P<0.05) increase in protein composition of rbGH-treated fish versus sham-treated fish. There were no significant differences in whole-body moisture, lipid, or ash between the two treatments. These results demonstrate functional roles for GH and IGFs in the promotion of lean growth within this ancient fish species and support the view that the functional effects of GH on hepatic IGF-I expression and somatic growth are conserved from chondostrean to teleostean fishes.

  10. Ghrelin and the growth hormone secretagogue receptor in growth and development.

    PubMed

    Chanoine, J-P; De Waele, K; Walia, P

    2009-04-01

    The pancreas is a major source of ghrelin in the perinatal period, whereas gastric production progressively increases after birth. Loss of function of the genes for ghrelin or for the constitutively activated growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) does not affect birth weight and early postnatal growth. However, ghrl(-/-) or ghsr(-/-) mice fed a high fat diet starting soon after weaning are resistant to diet-induced obesity, suggesting that ghrelin affects the maturation of the metabolic axes involved in energy balance. In addition, animal and human studies suggest that GHSR plays a physiological role in linear growth. In mice, absence of the GHSR gene is associated with lower insulin-like growth factor 1 concentrations and lower body mass in adult animals, independently of food intake. In humans, a mutation of the GHSR gene that impairs the constitutive activity of the receptor was found in two families with short stature. Administration of acylated ghrelin to rat pups directly does not affect weight gain. In contrast, administration of ghrelin to pregnant or lactating rats results in greater fetal weight and postnatal weight gain, respectively, suggesting that maternal ghrelin may stimulate perinatal growth. These data point toward a physiological role for ghrelin and GHSR in growth and/or in the maturation of hormonal systems involved in the regulation of energy balance.

  11. Diverse Roles of Growth Hormone and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 in Mammalian Aging: Progress and Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Csiszar, Anna; de Cabo, Raphael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2012-01-01

    Because the initial reports demonstrating that circulating growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 decrease with age in laboratory animals and humans, there have been numerous studies related to the importance of these hormones for healthy aging. Nevertheless, the role of these potent anabolic hormones in the genesis of the aging phenotype remains controversial. In this chapter, we review the studies demonstrating the beneficial and deleterious effects of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 deficiency and explore their effects on specific tissues and pathology as well as their potentially unique effects early during development. Based on this review, we conclude that the perceived contradictory roles of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 in the genesis of the aging phenotype should not be interpreted as a controversy on whether growth hormone or insulin-like growth factor-1 increases or decreases life span but rather as an opportunity to explore the complex roles of these hormones during specific stages of the life span. PMID:22522510

  12. Diverse roles of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 in mammalian aging: progress and controversies.

    PubMed

    Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; deCabo, Raphael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2012-06-01

    Because the initial reports demonstrating that circulating growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 decrease with age in laboratory animals and humans, there have been numerous studies related to the importance of these hormones for healthy aging. Nevertheless, the role of these potent anabolic hormones in the genesis of the aging phenotype remains controversial. In this chapter, we review the studies demonstrating the beneficial and deleterious effects of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 deficiency and explore their effects on specific tissues and pathology as well as their potentially unique effects early during development. Based on this review, we conclude that the perceived contradictory roles of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 in the genesis of the aging phenotype should not be interpreted as a controversy on whether growth hormone or insulin-like growth factor-1 increases or decreases life span but rather as an opportunity to explore the complex roles of these hormones during specific stages of the life span.

  13. Study of V2 vasopressin receptor hormone binding site using in silico methods

    PubMed Central

    Sebti, Yeganeh; Sardari, Soroush; Sadeghi, Hamid Mir Mohammad; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Innamorati, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    The antidiuretic effect of arginine vasopressin (AVP) is mediated by the vasopressin V2 receptor. The docking study of AVP as a ligand to V2 receptor helps in identifying important amino acid residues that might be involved in AVP binding for predicting the lowest free energy state of the protein complex. Whereas previous researchers were not able to detect the exact site of the ligand-receptor binding, we designed the current study to identify the vasopressin V2 receptor hormone binding site using bioinformatic methods. The 3D structure of nonapeptide hormone vasopressin was extracted from Protein Data Bank. Since no suitable template resembling V2 receptor was found, an ab initio approach was chosen to model the protein receptor. Using protein docking methods such as Hex protein-protein docking, the model of V2 receptor was docked to the peptide ligand AVP to identify possible binding sites. The residues that involved in binding site are W293, W296, D297, A300, and P301. The lowest free energy state of the protein complex was predicted after mutation in the above residues. The amount of gained energies permits us to compare the mutant forms with native forms and help to asses critical changes such as positive and negative mutations followed by ranking the best mutations. Based on the mutation/docking predictions, we found some mutants such as W293D and A300E possess positively inducing effect in ligand binding and some of them such as A300R present negatively inducing effect in ligand binding. PMID:26600856

  14. A statistical model of diurnal variation in human growth hormone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klerman, Elizabeth B.; Adler, Gail K.; Jin, Moonsoo; Maliszewski, Anne M.; Brown, Emery N.

    2003-01-01

    The diurnal pattern of growth hormone (GH) serum levels depends on the frequency and amplitude of GH secretory events, the kinetics of GH infusion into and clearance from the circulation, and the feedback of GH on its secretion. We present a two-dimensional linear differential equation model based on these physiological principles to describe GH diurnal patterns. The model characterizes the onset times of the secretory events, the secretory event amplitudes, as well as the infusion, clearance, and feedback half-lives of GH. We illustrate the model by using maximum likelihood methods to fit it to GH measurements collected in 12 normal, healthy women during 8 h of scheduled sleep and a 16-h circadian constant-routine protocol. We assess the importance of the model components by using parameter standard error estimates and Akaike's Information Criterion. During sleep, both the median infusion and clearance half-life estimates were 13.8 min, and the median number of secretory events was 2. During the constant routine, the median infusion half-life estimate was 12.6 min, the median clearance half-life estimate was 11.7 min, and the median number of secretory events was 5. The infusion and clearance half-life estimates and the number of secretory events are consistent with current published reports. Our model gave an excellent fit to each GH data series. Our analysis paradigm suggests an approach to decomposing GH diurnal patterns that can be used to characterize the physiological properties of this hormone under normal and pathological conditions.

  15. Calcitonin: regional distribution of the hormone and its binding sites in the human brain and pituitary.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, J A; Tobler, P H; Kaufmann, M; Born, W; Henke, H; Cooper, P E; Sagar, S M; Martin, J B

    1981-01-01

    Immunoreactive calcitonin (CT), indistinguishable from human CT-(1-32) and its sulfoxide, has been identified in extracts of the hypothalamus, the pituitary, and the thyroid obtained from human subjects at autopsy. DCT concentrations were highest in a region encompassing the posterior hypothalamus, the median eminence, and the pituitary; intermediate in the substantia nigra, the anterior hypothalamus, the globus pallidus, and the inferior colliculus; and low in the caudate nucleus, the hippocampus, the amygdala, and the cerebral and cerebellar cortices. Specific CT binding measured with 125I-labeled salmon CT was highest in homogenates of the posterior hypothalamus and the median eminence, shown to contain the highest concentrations of endogenous CT in the brain; CT binding was less than 12% of hypothalamic binding in all of the other regions of the brain examined and was negligible in the pituitary. Half-maximal binding was achieved with 0.1 nM nonradioactive salmon CT-(1-32), and the binding was directed to structural or conformational sites, or both, in the COOH-terminal half of salmon CT. The rank order of the inhibition of the binding by CT from different species and analogues of the human hormone was the same as in receptors on a human lymphoid cell line (Moran, J., Hunziker, W. & Fischer, J. A. (1978) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 75, 3984-3988). The functional role of CT and of its binding sites in the brain remains to be elucidated. PMID:6950419

  16. Effect of zinc sulphate and zinc methionine on growth, plasma growth hormone concentration, growth hormone receptor and insulin-like growth factor-I gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ze-Peng; Le, Guo-Wei; Shi, Yong-Hui

    2005-04-01

    1. The current experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of zinc sulphate (ZnSO4) and zinc methionine (Zn-Met) on growth and their effect on plasma growth hormone (GH) concentration, growth hormone receptor (GHR) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) mRNA expression in mice. 2. Ninety male KunMing (KM) mice were randomly divided into three treatments. The control group was fed on a basal diet containing 11.67 mg/kg of zinc. The ZnSO4 group and Zn-Met group were fed on the diets supplemented with ZnSO4 or Zn-Met at 30 mg/kg (containing zinc of 40.05 and 40.75 mg/kg, respectively). The mice were offered the test diets for 10 days. Weight gains and food intake were measured at the end of the experiment, zinc contents in liver and serum were determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry; GH was determined by radioimmunoassay, the levels of GHR and IGF-I mRNA were determined with reverse transcript polymerase chain reaction. 3. Both ZnSO4 and Zn-Met enhanced weight gain and food intake in the mice, Zn-Met improved the growth and food intake more effectively than ZnSO4 did (P < 0.05). The both forms of zinc had no effect on GH and the level of GHR mRNA expression (P > 0.05) and they up-regulated the expression of IGF-I mRNA (P < 0.05). As compared to ZnSO4, Zn-Met enhanced the level of IGF-I mRNA significantly (P < 0.05). 4. Both ZnSO4 and Zn-Met had no effect on plasma GH and the expression of GHR mRNA, but they enhanced the expression of IGF-I mRNA. Zinc methionine enhanced the weight gain and up-regulated IGF-I mRNA expression more effectively than ZnSO4.

  17. Growth hormone deficiency: new approaches to the diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Binder, Gerhard

    2011-09-01

    . Because of the well known intrinsic diagnostic inaccuracy of any GH test, the correct selection of the child to be tested remains of utmost importance. The diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in childhood is guided by recommendations of national and international consensus statements which are based on the experience of experts. Most of these recommendations reach only a low level of evidence. Research on two central topics of these guidelines has recently been published by us and will be reviewed here.

  18. The effects of stress hormones on growth of selected periodontitis related bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jentsch, H F R; März, Diana; Krüger, Monika

    2013-12-01

    The focus of this study was to examine in vitro the effects of stress hormones (catecholamines: epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine and hydrocortisone: cortisol) on the growth of four anaerobic species of periodontitis-related bacteria (Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Tannerella forsythia) and one facultative anaerobic species (Eikenella corrodens). Bacterial growth was determined by two different methods: fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and the viable count by culture method. To simulate stress, each single strain was grown in a special growth medium with three different concentrations of each hormone, using an anaerobic chamber at 37 °C. Growth of F. nucleatum increased in the presence of all stress hormones. Growth of P. gingivalis was not significantly influenced by any hormone. Growth of P. intermedia and E. corrodens was inhibited by almost all stress hormones tested. Both methods of analysis revealed that the highest concentrations of norepinephrine and cortisol increased the growth of T. forsythia. Different hormones have a different effect on the growth of periodontitis-related bacteria in vitro. It appears that bacterial viability is more strongly influenced than is bacterial metabolic activity. The growth of F. nucleatum particularly and partially of T. forsythia is increased by several stress hormones and may have an additional negative impact on periodontal disease.

  19. Extended and Structurally Supported Insights into Extracellular Hormone Binding, Signal Transduction and Organization of the Thyrotropin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Gerd; Kreuchwig, Annika; Kleinau, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    The hormone thyrotropin (TSH) and its receptor (TSHR) are crucial for the growth and function of the thyroid gland. The TSHR is evolutionary linked with the receptors of follitropin (FSHR) and lutropin/choriogonadotropin (LHR) and their sequences and structures are similar. The extracellular region of TSHR contains more than 350 amino acids and binds hormone and antibodies. Several important questions related to functions and mechanisms of TSHR are still not comprehensively understood. One major reason for these open questions is the lack of any structural information about the extracellular segment of TSHR that connects the N-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain (LRRD) with the transmembrane helix (TMH) 1, the hinge region. It has been shown experimentally that this segment is important for fine tuning of signaling and ligand interactions. A new crystal structure containing most of the extracellular hFSHR region in complex with hFSH has recently been published. Now, we have applied these new structural insights to the homologous TSHR and have generated a structural model of the TSHR LRRD/hinge-region/TSH complex. This structural model is combined and evaluated with experimental data including hormone binding (bTSH, hTSH, thyrostimulin), super-agonistic effects, antibody interactions and signaling regulation. These studies and consideration of significant and non-significant amino acids have led to a new description of mechanisms at the TSHR, including ligand-induced displacements of specific hinge region fragments. This event triggers conformational changes at a convergent center of the LRRD and the hinge region, activating an “intramolecular agonistic unit” close to the transmembrane domain. PMID:23300822

  20. Growth hormone secretory dynamics in subjects with normal stature.

    PubMed

    Costin, G; Kaufman, F R; Brasel, J A

    1989-10-01

    To evaluate the dynamics of growth hormone (GH) secretion in subjects with normal stature and to determine whether a correlation exists between height and the quantity of GH secreted, we determined the 24-hour GH concentration by measuring GH levels every 30 minutes in 27 boys and 19 girls of normal height, 7 to 18 years of age, of whom 24 were prepubertal and 22 in various stages of puberty. Spontaneous GH secretion had wide variations, with values ranging from less than 1.0 to 67.0 micrograms/L. In prepubertal children the highest GH levels were usually noted during sleep; in pubertal subjects the highest values were distributed almost equally between sleep and wake hours. In all subjects, GH secretion appeared to decrease before meals, followed by an increase after meals. Most indexes of GH secretion and insulin-like growth factor I levels were significantly greater in pubertal than in prepubertal subjects (p less than 0.002), and in both groups the GH concentration was significantly greater during sleep (p less than 0.005). In all groups the 24-hour GH concentration correlated significantly with the area under the GH curve, 24-hour GH pulse amplitude, and GH concentration and peak GH level during sleep and wake hours (P less than 0.0001); 24-hour GH concentrations correlated with insulin-like growth factor I levels only when the entire group of 46 subjects was considered (p less than 0.01). There were no significant correlations between 24-hour GH concentration and the subjects' age, bone age, height (SD score), weight (SD score), or body mass index. We conclude that in subjects with normal stature, mean 24-hour GH concentrations vary considerably and in the low range overlap with values reported in hypopituitarism.

  1. Differential binding of thyroxine and triiodothyronine to acidic isoforms of thyroid hormone binding globulin in human serum

    SciTech Connect

    Terasaki, T.; Pardridge, W.M.

    1988-05-17

    The differential availability of thyroxine (T/sub 4/) and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) to liver from the circulating thyroid hormone binding globulin (TBG)-bound pool suggests that the two thyroid hormones may bind to different TBG isoforms in human serum. In the present study, the binding of (/sup 125/I)T/sub 4/ and (/sup 125/I)T/sub 3/ to human serum proteins was investigated by using slab gel isoelectric focusing and chromatofocusing. In normal human male serum, (/sup 125/I)T/sub 4/ was localized to four isoforms of TBG called TBG-I, -II, -III, and -IV, with isoelectric points (pI's) of 4.30, 4.35, 4.45, and 4.55, respectively. (/sup 125/I)T/sub 3/ was localized to only two isoforms of TBG, TBG-III, and -IV, with pI's that were identical with those for (/sup 125/I)T/sub 4/. In normal female serum, (/sup 125/I)T/sub 4/ was localized to the same four isoforms of TBG as those of normal male serum, while (/sup 125/I)T/sub 3/ was localized to TBG-II, -III, -IV, and -V (pI = 4.65). In pregnant female serum, (/sup 125/I)T/sub 4/ was localized to five isoforms, whereas (/sup 125/I)T/sub 3/ was localized to four. IEF was also performed with male serum loaded with various concentrations of unlabeled T/sub 3/. The K/sub i/ values of T/sub 3/ binding to TBG-I, -II, -III, and -IV were 5.0, 2.4, 0.86, and 0.46 nM, respectively. The TBG isoforms in normal male serum were also separated by sequential concanavalin A-Sepharose affinity chromatography and the chromatofocusing (pH range of 3.5-5.0). T/sub 4/ preferentially bound to the most acidic isoforms of TBG in the pI range of 3.8-4.0, whereas the less acidic fractions (pH 4.0-4.2) bound both T/sub 4/ and T/sub 3/. In conclusion, this study shows that T/sub 4/ and T/sub 3/ do not bind to a single competitive binding site on TBG. Instead, T/sub 4/ is preferentially bound by the most acidic TBG isoforms owing to a 10-fold lower affinity of T/sub 3/ for these proteins.

  2. Hormone-dependent Model on Seed Germination Sensitive to Growth Stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Mimura, Masayasu; Ohya, Tomoyuki; Okabe, Hirotaka; Kai, Shoichi

    2000-04-01

    In the germination of seeds, there often observes cluster-formation of well-grown roots and the edge effect phenomenon.During germination and growth before starting photosynthesis, direct interaction such as competition for nutrition among hosts is rather weak because of self-supplying of nutrition.Instead, hormones play an important role and may cause the above experimental observations.In order to understand these aspects, we propose a growth model for root.The hormone effect and its growth-stage-dependent sensitivity are taken into consideration.It is discussed how the growth process of grouping roots is influenced by exogenous hormones secreted from roots.

  3. Cloning and characterization of Pangasianodon hypophthalmus growth hormone gene and its heterologous expression.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Megarajan; Singh, Shiva Dhar; Gupta, Subodh

    2014-07-01

    Pangasianodon hypophthalmus is one of the fast-growing catfish of freshwater origin, and its growth is attributed by the action of growth hormone (GH). In this study, the growth hormone gene (PhGH) of 3.0 kb was characterized, and it is composed of five exons and four introns and having characteristics of an upstream region that contains TATA, CAAT boxes, and binding sites of important transcription factors like Pit-1a, CRE, CREB, CREBP, Ap-1, SP1, and TBP. The full-length cDNA sequence of 1,069 bp was isolated using RACE technique, and it is composed of untranslated regions of 60 and 403 bp at 5' and 3', respectively, with an open reading frame of 603 bp that encodes a putative polypeptide of 200 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 22.57 kDa. The precursor of PhGH is composed of 22 amino acid signal peptides and 178 amino acid mature peptides. Five conserved Cys residues (Cys(71), Cys(135), Cys(173), Cys(190), and Cys(198)) and two possible sites of N-glycosylation (145th and 197th) were detected on GH polypeptide. The PhGH gene showed more than 90 % sequence similarity with other catfishes, and the phylogeny constructed revealed the close proximity of Siluriformes fishes with Cypriniformes fishes. The PhGH gene was observed to be expressed predominantly in pituitary tissues while weekly expressed in extrapituitary tissues. Further, the recombinant PhGH was expressed in Escherichia coli using His-tag expression vector pET 32(a), and the recombinant protein of ~23 kDa was confirmed by western blotting. Our findings suggest that the identified functional GH gene would provide basic information in transgenic studies aiming for faster growth rate. This recombinant growth hormone (GH) may be produced in large scale to exploit its growth-promoting function in other cultured fishes.

  4. Effect of selenium on rat growth, growth hormone and diet utilization.

    PubMed

    Ewan, R C

    1976-05-01

    Female rats were fed a selenium-deficient diet composed of Torula yeast, sucrose, vitamins (including tocopheryl acetate) and minerals from weaning and during breeding, gestation and lactation. The offspring were used to study the effects of selenium on growth, diet utilization and growth hormon status. The Torula yeast diet containing 200 IU dl-alpha-tocopheryl acetate was fed alone or supplemented with 0.025 or 0.1 ppm of selenium as selenite. Rats fed the selenium-supplemented diets grew significently faster and consumed significantly more diet than rats fed the unsupplemented diet. Anterior pituitary weights were lower in selenium-deficient rats, but if expressed per unit of body weight, were similar to pituitary weight of selenium-supplemented animals. Total growth hormone in the anterior pituitary was reduced in selenium-deficient rats. A metabolism study indicated that rats allowed ad libitum access to supplemented diets consumed more diet and obtained more metabolizable energy from the diet than rats fed the deficient diet. It the intake of rats fed the supplemented diets was limited to that of rats allowed ad libitum access to deficient diet, growth of rats was similar. However, metabolizable energy content of the diet increased quadratically and nitrogen digestibility increased linearly as thelevel of selenium increased. Selenium deficiency reduced growth primarily by decreased diet consumption, but also reduced the utilization of energy and nitrogen.

  5. Egg size-dependent expression of growth hormone receptor accompanies compensatory growth in fish.

    PubMed

    Segers, F H I D; Berishvili, G; Taborsky, B

    2012-02-07

    Large egg size usually boosts offspring survival, but mothers have to trade off egg size against egg number. Therefore, females often produce smaller eggs when environmental conditions for offspring are favourable, which is subsequently compensated for by accelerated juvenile growth. How this rapid growth is modulated on a molecular level is still unclear. As the somatotropic axis is a key regulator of early growth in vertebrates, we investigated the effect of egg size on three key genes belonging to this axis, at different ontogenetic stages in a mouthbrooding cichlid (Simochromis pleurospilus). The expression levels of one of them, the growth hormone receptor (GHR), were significantly higher in large than in small eggs, but remarkably, this pattern was reversed after hatching: young originating from small eggs had significantly higher GHR expression levels as yolk sac larvae and as juveniles. GHR expression in yolk sac larvae was positively correlated with juvenile growth rate and correspondingly fish originating from small eggs grew faster. This enabled them to catch up fully in size within eight weeks with conspecifics from larger eggs. This is the first evidence for a potential link between egg size, an important maternal effect, and offspring gene expression, which mediates an adaptive adjustment in a relevant hormonal axis.

  6. Changes in serum growth hormone and prolactin levels, and in hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing hormone, thyrotropin-releasing hormone and somatostatin content, after superior cervical sympathectomy in rats.

    PubMed

    Cardinalí, D P; Esquifino, A I; Arce, A; Vara, E; Ariznavarreta, C; Tresguerres, J A

    1994-01-01

    After bilateral superior cervical ganglionectomy (SCGx) of adult male rats, norepinephrine (NE) content of the medial basal hypothalamus (MBH) decreased significantly by 39-47% from 16 h to 7 days after surgery. During this time the levels of serum growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) and of MBH GH-releasing hormone (GRH), thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and somatostatin were measured by RIA. In sham-operated controls, serum PRL increased and serum GH decreased 16-24 h after surgery, attaining pre-surgical levels later on. In SCGx rats, significantly lower serum GH and PRL and higher MBH GRH and TRH content as compared to controls was observed 16-24 h after surgery, during the wallerian degeneration phase after SCGx. MBH somatostatin concentration decreased in SCGx rats 20 h after surgery. Two injections of the alpha 1-adrenoceptor blocker prazosin 45 and 90 min before sacrifice, alone or together with the beta-blocker propranolol, prevented the changes in MBH hypophysiotropic hormone content, as well as in serum GH and PRL levels, found in SCGx rats 20 h after surgery. Propranolol treatment did not affect hormone levels. Neither drug modified the decrease in MBH NE content observed after SCGx. The results argue in favor of the existence of physiologically relevant projections from superior cervical ganglion neurons to the MBH controlling hypophysiotropic hormone release.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies to human growth hormone induce an allosteric conformational change in the antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Mazza, M M; Retegui, L A

    1989-01-01

    We re-investigated the properties of a monoclonal antibody (mAb), 4D11, to human growth hormone (hGH) that showed a very weak affinity, recognizing hGH only when the hormone was solubilized on a solid surface. MAb4D11 did not significantly bind 125I-hGH. It was found that three mAb directed to different hGH epitopes (mAb 3C11, 10C1 and NA71) were able to induce the binding of the soluble antigen to mAb 4D11. The co-operative effect could be demonstrated by the formation of binary complexes (Ag:Ab, 1:2) detected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and by the increase of radioactivity found when the synergistic mAb were added to 125I-hGH incubated with mAb 4D11 immobilized on polyvinyl microplates. Other possible explanations, such as the formation of cyclic complexes or the generation of a new epitope in the Fc fragment of the first antibody (Ab), were dismissed because the Fab fragment of one of the enhancing mAb (3C11) gave the same effect as the intact Ab. The data suggest that the hGH molecule undergoes a localized conformational change after binding to mAb 3C11, NA71 or 10C1 and that mAb 4D11 binds with high affinity to the modified region of the hormone. The formation or not of ternary complexes (Ag:Ab, 1:3) was used to localize the 4D11 epitope on the surface of the Ag. It is suggested that mAb 4D11 recognizes a conformational change produced in the region defined by the AE5/AC8 epitopes, which is close to the hGH antigenic domain only expressed when the protein is immobilized on plastic surfaces. PMID:2473953

  8. Hormones and Obesity: Changes in Insulin and Growth Hormone Secretion Following Surgically Induced Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Crockford, P. M.; Salmon, P. A.

    1970-01-01

    Ten obese patients were subjected to insulin tolerance tests (0.2 unit per kg. regular insulin intravenously) and/or treadmill exercise tolerance testing (2.6 m.p.h. at 11° angulation) before and after surgically induced weight reduction. Immunoreactive growth hormone (IRGH) responses returned to normal with weight reduction in all but one—a grossly obese woman studied relatively early in the postoperative period when still far from the ideal body weight. Five of these patients and two additional subjects had intravenous glucose tolerance tests (0.5 g. per kg.) before and after weight reduction. In all, there was a significant diminution in immunoreactive insulin (IRI) values, accompained by little or no change in the glucose disappearance rate (KG) and a significant improvement in insulin effectiveness as indicated by the calculated “insulinogenic index”. It was concluded that the abnormalities in IRGH and IRI secretion, as well as the insulin resistance in obesity, are probably secondary and not of primary importance in the etiology of this disorder. PMID:5430052

  9. Growth hormone signaling is necessary for lifespan extension by dietary methionine.

    PubMed

    Brown-Borg, Holly M; Rakoczy, Sharlene G; Wonderlich, Joseph A; Rojanathammanee, Lalida; Kopchick, John J; Armstrong, Vanessa; Raasakka, Debbie

    2014-12-01

    Growth hormone significantly impacts lifespan in mammals. Mouse longevity is extended when growth hormone (GH) signaling is interrupted but markedly shortened with high-plasma hormone levels. Methionine metabolism is enhanced in growth hormone deficiency, for example, in the Ames dwarf, but suppressed in GH transgenic mice. Methionine intake affects also lifespan, and thus, GH mutant mice and respective wild-type littermates were fed 0.16%, 0.43%, or 1.3% methionine to evaluate the interaction between hormone status and methionine. All wild-type and GH transgenic mice lived longer when fed 0.16% methionine but not when fed higher levels. In contrast, animals without growth hormone signaling due to hormone deficiency or resistance did not respond to altered levels of methionine in terms of lifespan, body weight, or food consumption. Taken together, our results suggest that the presence of growth hormone is necessary to sense dietary methionine changes, thus strongly linking growth and lifespan to amino acid availability.

  10. Plant hormone jasmonate prioritizes defense over growth by interfering with gibberellin signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong-Lei; Yao, Jian; Mei, Chuan-Sheng; Tong, Xiao-Hong; Zeng, Long-Jun; Li, Qun; Xiao, Lang-Tao; Sun, Tai-ping; Li, Jigang; Deng, Xing-Wang; Lee, Chin Mei; Thomashow, Michael F; Yang, Yinong; He, Zuhua; He, Sheng Yang

    2012-05-08

    Plants must effectively defend against biotic and abiotic stresses to survive in nature. However, this defense is costly and is often accompanied by significant growth inhibition. How plants coordinate the fluctuating growth-defense dynamics is not well understood and remains a fundamental question. Jasmonate (JA) and gibberellic acid (GA) are important plant hormones that mediate defense and growth, respectively. Binding of bioactive JA or GA ligands to cognate receptors leads to proteasome-dependent degradation of specific transcriptional repressors (the JAZ or DELLA family of proteins), which, at the resting state, represses cognate transcription factors involved in defense (e.g., MYCs) or growth [e.g. phytochrome interacting factors (PIFs)]. In this study, we found that the coi1 JA receptor mutants of rice (a domesticated monocot crop) and Arabidopsis (a model dicot plant) both exhibit hallmark phenotypes of GA-hypersensitive mutants. JA delays GA-mediated DELLA protein degradation, and the della mutant is less sensitive to JA for growth inhibition. Overexpression of a selected group of JAZ repressors in Arabidopsis plants partially phenocopies GA-associated phenotypes of the coi1 mutant, and JAZ9 inhibits RGA (a DELLA protein) interaction with transcription factor PIF3. Importantly, the pif quadruple (pifq) mutant no longer responds to JA-induced growth inhibition, and overexpression of PIF3 could partially overcome JA-induced growth inhibition. Thus, a molecular cascade involving the COI1-JAZ-DELLA-PIF signaling module, by which angiosperm plants prioritize JA-mediated defense over growth, has been elucidated.

  11. Effects of hypophysectomy and substitution with growth hormone, prolactin, and thyroxine on growth and deposition in juvenile frogs, Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Nybroe, O; Rosenkilde, P; Ryttersgaard, L

    1985-02-01

    Growth was studied in young metamorphosed frogs, Xenopus laevis, following hypophysectomy and substitution with mammalian growth hormone (bGH or pGH), mammalian prolactin (oPRL), and thyroxine. Hypophysectomy reduced growth (weight and length increase). GH and PRL proved equally efficient in restoring growth and in mobilizing energy stores (fat bodies and liver glycogen). No synergistic effects between GH and PRL could be observed. GH exerted its growth-promoting effects by increasing gross food conversion efficiency (weight increase/food intake), but did not stimulate appetite. Moderate GH doses given to a group of frogs in growth stagnation exerted moderate metabolic effects, and may have stimulated appetite in some animals, but did not increase body size significantly. Thyroxine was unable to promote growth, but increased mobilization of energy stores. Hypophysectomy and hormone substitution affected feeding behavior. The nature of the actions of pituitary somatotropic hormones and of thyroxine on growth and deposition is discussed.

  12. Rational Design of Potent Antagonists to the Human Growth Hormone Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuh, Germaine; Cunningham, Brian C.; Fukunaga, Rikiro; Nagata, Shigekazu; Goeddel, David V.; Wells, James A.

    1992-06-01

    A hybrid receptor was constructed that contained the extracellular binding domain of the human growth hormone (hGH) receptor linked to the transmembrane and intracellular domains of the murine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor. Addition of hGH to a myeloid leukemia cell line (FDC-P1) that expressed the hybrid receptor caused proliferation of these cells. The mechanism for signal transduction of the hybrid receptor required dimerization because monoclonal antibodies to the hGH receptor were agonists whereas their monovalent fragments were not. Receptor dimerization occurs sequentially-a receptor binds to site 1 on hGH, and then a second receptor molecule binds to site 2 on hGH. On the basis of this sequential mechanism, which may occur in many other cytokine receptors, inactive hGH analogs were designed that were potent antagonists to hGH-induced cell proliferation. Such antagonists could be useful for treating clinical conditions of hGH excess, such as acromegaly.

  13. Clinical features and growth hormone receptor gene mutations of patients with Laron syndrome from a Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Ying, Yan-Qin; Wei, Hong; Cao, Li-Zhi; Lu, Juan-Juan; Luo, Xiao-Ping

    2007-08-01

    Laron syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by defects of growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene. It is characterized by severe postnatal growth retardation and characteristic facial features as well as high circulating levels of growth hormone (GH) and low levels of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3). This report described the clinical features and GHR gene mutations in 2 siblings with Laron syndrome in a Chinese family. Their heights and weights were in the normal range at birth, but the growth was retarded after birth. When they presented to the clinic, the heights of the boy (8 years old) and his sister (11 years old) were 80.0 cm (-8.2 SDS) and 96.6 cm (-6.8 SDS) respectively. They had typical appearance features of Laron syndrome such as short stature and obesity, with protruding forehead, saddle nose, large eyes, sparse and thin silky hair and high-pitched voice. They had higher basal serum GH levels and lower serum levels of IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and growth hormone binding protein (GHBP) than normal controls. The peak serum GH level after colonidine and insulin stimulations in the boy was over 350 ng/mL. After one-year rhGH treatment, the boy's height increased from 80.0 cm to 83.3 cm. The gene mutation analysis revealed that two patients had same homozygous mutation of S65H (TCA -->CCA) in exon 4, which is a novel gene mutation. It was concluded that a definite diagnosis of Laron syndrome can be made based on characteristic appearance features and serum levels of GH, IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and GHBP. The S65H mutation might be the cause of Laron syndrome in the two patients.

  14. In silico identification of anthropogenic chemicals as ligands of zebrafish sex hormone binding globulin

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsteinson, Nels; Ban, Fuqiang; Santos-Filho, Osvaldo; Tabaei, Seyed M.H.; Miguel-Queralt, Solange; Underhill, Caroline; Cherkasov, Artem Hammond, Geoffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Anthropogenic compounds with the capacity to interact with the steroid-binding site of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) pose health risks to humans and other vertebrates including fish. Building on studies of human SHBG, we have applied in silico drug discovery methods to identify potential binders for SHBG in zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model aquatic organism. Computational methods, including; homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, virtual screening, and 3D QSAR analysis, successfully identified 6 non-steroidal substances from the ZINC chemical database that bind to zebrafish SHBG (zfSHBG) with low-micromolar to nanomolar affinities, as determined by a competitive ligand-binding assay. We also screened 80,000 commercial substances listed by the European Chemicals Bureau and Environment Canada, and 6 non-steroidal hits from this in silico screen were tested experimentally for zfSHBG binding. All 6 of these compounds displaced the [{sup 3}H]5{alpha}-dihydrotestosterone used as labeled ligand in the zfSHBG screening assay when tested at a 33 {mu}M concentration, and 3 of them (hexestrol, 4-tert-octylcatechol, and dihydrobenzo(a)pyren-7(8H)-one) bind to zfSHBG in the micromolar range. The study demonstrates the feasibility of large-scale in silico screening of anthropogenic compounds that may disrupt or highjack functionally important protein:ligand interactions. Such studies could increase the awareness of hazards posed by existing commercial chemicals at relatively low cost.

  15. Arginine and ornithine supplementation increases growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 serum levels after heavy-resistance exercise in strength-trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Zajac, Adam; Poprzecki, Stanisław; Zebrowska, Aleksandra; Chalimoniuk, Małgorzata; Langfort, Jozef

    2010-04-01

    This placebo-controlled double-blind study was designed to investigate the effect of arginine and ornithine (arg and orn) supplementation during 3-week heavy-resistance training on serum growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1/insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 (GH/IGF-1/IGFBP-3), testosterone, cortisol, and insulin levels in experienced strength-trained athletes. The subjects were randomly divided between a placebo group (n = 8) and the l-Arg/l-Orn-supplemented group (n = 9), and performed pre and posttraining standard exercise tests with the same absolute load, which consisted of the same exercise schedule as that applied in the training process. Fasting blood samples were obtained at rest, 2 minutes after the cessation of the strength exercise protocol, and after 1 hour of recovery. The resting concentrations of the investigated hormones and IGFBP-3 did not differ significantly between the study groups. In response to exercise test, all the hormones were elevated (p < 0.05) at both time points. Significant increases (p < 0.05) were observed in both GH and IGF-1 serum levels after arg and orn supplementation at both time points, whereas a significant decrease was seen in IGFBP-3 protein during the recovery period. Because there was no between-group difference in the remaining hormone levels, it appears that the GH/IGF-1/IGFBP-3 complex may be the major player in muscle tissue response to short-term resistance training after arg and orn supplementation.

  16. Bridging endometrial receptivity and implantation: network of hormones, cytokines, and growth factors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mohan; Chaudhry, Parvesh; Asselin, Eric

    2011-07-01

    The prerequisite of successful implantation depends on achieving the appropriate embryo development to the blastocyst stage and at the same time the development of an endometrium that is receptive to the embryo. Implantation is a very intricate process, which is controlled by a number of complex molecules like hormones, cytokines, and growth factors and their cross talk. A network of these molecules plays a crucial role in preparing receptive endometrium and blastocyst. Furthermore, timely regulation of the expression of embryonic and maternal endometrial growth factors and cytokines plays a major role in determining the fate of embryo. Most of the existing data comes from animal studies due to ethical issues. In this study, we comprehend the data from both animal models and humans for better understanding of implantation and positive outcomes of pregnancy. The purpose of this review is to describe the potential roles of embryonic and uterine factors in implantation process such as prostaglandins, cyclooxygenases, leukemia inhibitory factor, interleukin (IL) 6, IL11, transforming growth factor-β, IGF, activins, NODAL, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and heparin binding-EGF. Understanding the function of these players will help us to address the reasons of implantation failure and infertility.

  17. Steroid binding sites in liver membranes: interplay between glucocorticoids, sex steroids, and pituitary hormones.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, L; Flores-Morales, A; Chirino-Godoy, R; Díaz-Chico, J C; Díaz-Chico, B N

    2008-04-01

    Steroid hormones activate target cells through specific receptors that discriminate among ligands based upon recognition of distinct structural features. For most known steroids, membrane and nuclear receptors co-exist in many target cells. However, while the structure of the nuclear receptors and their function as transcriptional activators of specific target genes is generally well understood, the identity of the membrane receptors remains elusive. Using pharmacological and biochemical approaches, we are beginning to characterize receptors for glucocorticoids and anabolic-androgenic steroids in male rat liver membranes. Male rat liver endoplasmic reticulum contains two steroid binding sites which are functionally related and associated with a 90-134 kDa oligomeric protein: (1) the low-affinity glucocorticoid binding site (LAGS), composed at least in part of two peptides (37 and 53 kDa) that bind glucocorticoids and (2) the stanozolol binding protein (STBP), composed at least in part of three peptides (22, 31, and 55 kDa) that bind the synthetic androgen stanozolol. These steroid binding proteins have many properties different from those of classical nuclear receptors, with the salient differences being a failure to recognize "classical" ligands for nuclear receptors together with marked differences in biochemical properties and physiological regulation. The mechanism of interaction of glucocorticoids with the LAGS can be clearly distinguished from that with STBP. Moreover, STBP shows an extremely narrow pharmacological profile, being selective for ST and its analog, danazol, among more than 100 steroids and non-steroidal compounds that were assayed, including those that are able to displace glucocorticoids from the LAGS. The level of LAGS activity undergoes dramatic variations following changes from the physiological serum levels of thyroid hormones, glucocorticoids, GH, vitamin A, and E2. However, neither thyroid hormones nor GH have a critical role on STBP

  18. Constitutional Delay Influences the Auxological Response to Growth Hormone Treatment in Children with Short Stature and Growth Hormone Sufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Katherine C.; Cutfield, Wayne S.; Hofman, Paul L.; Jefferies, Craig A.; Albert, Benjamin B.; Gunn, Alistair J.

    2014-01-01

    In a retrospective, population based cohort study, we examined whether constitutional delay was associated with the growth response to growth hormone (GH) in children with short stature and normal GH responses. 70 patients were treated with 21 GH iu/m2/week from 1975 to 2013 throughout New Zealand. Demographic and auxological data were prospectively collected and standard deviation scores (SDS) were calculated for height (HtSDS), yearly growth velocity (GV-SDS), body mass index (BMI-SDS) and predicted adult height (PAH-SDS) at time of the last available bone age. In the first year, GH was associated with marked increase in HtSDS (+0.46 (0.19, 0.76), p < 0.001) and GV-SDS (from −1.9 (−3.6, −0.7) to +2.7 (0.45, 4.2), p < 0.001). The increase in HtSDS but not in GV-SDS was greatest with younger patients and greater bone age delay, with no effect of sex, BMI-SDS or baseline HtSDS. PAH-SDS increased with treatment (+0.94 (0.18, 1.5)); increased PAH-SDS was associated with less bone age delay and greater initial increase in HtSDS. This study shows that greater bone age delay was associated with greater initial improvement in height but less improvement in predicted adult heights, suggesting that children with very delayed bone ages may show accelerated maturation during GH treatment. PMID:25317732

  19. Growth hormone biases amygdala network activation after fear learning

    PubMed Central

    Gisabella, B; Farah, S; Peng, X; Burgos-Robles, A; Lim, S H; Goosens, K A

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged stress exposure is a risk factor for developing posttraumatic stress disorder, a disorder characterized by the ‘over-encoding' of a traumatic experience. A potential mechanism by which this occurs is through upregulation of growth hormone (GH) in the amygdala. Here we test the hypotheses that GH promotes the over-encoding of fearful memories by increasing the number of neurons activated during memory encoding and biasing the allocation of neuronal activation, one aspect of the process by which neurons compete to encode memories, to favor neurons that have stronger inputs. Viral overexpression of GH in the amygdala increased the number of amygdala cells activated by fear memory formation. GH-overexpressing cells were especially biased to express the immediate early gene c-Fos after fear conditioning, revealing strong autocrine actions of GH in the amygdala. In addition, we observed dramatically enhanced dendritic spine density in GH-overexpressing neurons. These data elucidate a previously unrecognized autocrine role for GH in the regulation of amygdala neuron function and identify specific mechanisms by which chronic stress, by enhancing GH in the amygdala, may predispose an individual to excessive fear memory formation. PMID:27898076

  20. Stability of human growth hormone in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Catherine A; Howdle, Steven M; Naylor, Andrew; Coxhill, Graham; Tye, Laura C; Illum, Lisbeth; Lewis, Andrew L

    2012-01-01

    The instability of human growth hormone (hGH) to temperature and interfaces makes its formulation into injectable, sustained-release drug delivery systems challenging. A novel method of encapsulating hGH in polymeric microparticles has been developed using supercritical CO(2) (scCO(2)) technology, but there is limited understanding of the stability of hGH within this system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the stability of hGH in scCO(2) processing. The integrity of the protein was assessed following exposure to scCO(2) using a range of different analytical techniques. Mass spectrometry showed that no peptide cleavage occurred as a result of processing or exposure to scCO(2). Size-exclusion chromatography detected formation of aggregates at high temperatures, but not as a result of the encapsulation process. Reverse-phase chromatography demonstrated that the production of deamidation products occurred as a function of temperature, but only at temperatures higher than those used for the encapsulation process. Circular dichroism and infrared spectroscopy demonstrated that the use of scCO(2) was not detrimental to the secondary molecular structure of hGH. Together, these results show that the structural integrity of hGH is unaffected by scCO(2) processing and that hGH can be successfully encapsulated in polymer microparticles using this technique.

  1. Growth hormone prevents the development of autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Villares, Ricardo; Kakabadse, Dimitri; Juarranz, Yasmina; Gomariz, Rosa P.; Martínez-A, Carlos; Mellado, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Evidence supports a relationship between the neuroendocrine and the immune systems. Data from mice that overexpress or are deficient in growth hormone (GH) indicate that GH stimulates T and B-cell proliferation and Ig synthesis, and enhances maturation of myeloid progenitor cells. The effect of GH on autoimmune pathologies has nonetheless been little studied. Using a murine model of type 1 diabetes, a T-cell–mediated autoimmune disease characterized by immune cell infiltration of pancreatic islets and destruction of insulin-producing β-cells, we observed that sustained GH expression reduced prodromal disease symptoms and eliminated progression to overt diabetes. The effect involves several GH-mediated mechanisms; GH altered the cytokine environment, triggered anti-inflammatory macrophage (M2) polarization, maintained activity of the suppressor T-cell population, and limited Th17 cell plasticity. In addition, GH reduced apoptosis and/or increased the proliferative rate of β-cells. These results support a role for GH in immune response regulation and identify a unique target for therapeutic intervention in type 1 diabetes. PMID:24218587

  2. Laryngeal and vocal evaluation in untreated growth hormone deficient adults

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, Valéria M.P.; D'Ávila, Jeferson S.; Sales, Neuza J.; Gonçalves, Maria Inês R.; Seabra, Juliane Dantas; Salvatori, Roberto; Aguiar-Oliveira, Manuel H.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the consequences of lifetime, severe and untreated isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD) on vocal and laryngeal function. STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional. SUBJECTS AND METHODS A total of 23 IGHD adult subjects and 22 controls were administered a questionnaire about vocal complaints and harmful voice habits, and underwent video-laryngostroboscopic examination, voice evaluation by perceptual-auditory analysis with GRBAS scale including grade of dysphonia, roughness, breathiness, asthenia and strain items, objective voice evaluation by maximum phonation time (MPT), and acoustic analysis. RESULTS There was no difference in vocal complaints between IGHD subjects and controls. Vocal abuse and smoking were more frequent in IGHD subjects. IGHD subjects presented higher values for roughness, breathiness, and strain. Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) signs and laryngeal constriction were more frequent in IGHD individuals. MPT was similar in the two groups. Fundamental frequency was higher in IGHD females and males. Harmonic to noise ratio was higher in IGHD in both genders and shimmer was lower in IGHD females. CONCLUSIONS IGHD subjects have higher prevalence of signs of LPR and laryngeal constriction, with high pitch in both genders, which suggests a prominent role of IGHD on these parameters. PMID:19130959

  3. Exceptional Association Between Klinefelter Syndrome and Growth Hormone Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Doubi, Sana; Amrani, Zoubida; Ouahabi, Hanan El; Boujraf, Saïd; Ajdi, Farida

    2015-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is characterized in adults by the combination of a tall stature, small testes, gynecomastia, and azoospermia. This case is described in a North African population of the Mediterranean region of North Africa. We report the case of a male 16 years old, of Arab ethnic origin, and diagnosed with this syndrome, who had a small height in relation to a growth hormone (GH) deficiency and a history of absence seizures (generalized myoclonic epilepsy). The patient's size was <-2.8 standard deviation (SD) with weight <-3 SD. GH deficiency was isolated and confirmed by two dynamic tests (insulin - hypoglycemia tolerance test and clonidine) with normal hypothalamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). GH supplementation using recombinant GH was advocated, while gonadotropin treatment was deferred. Small size in children or adolescents should not eliminate the diagnosis of Klinefelter syndrome - on the contrary, the presence of any associated sign (brain maturation, delay in puberty, aggressiveness) should encourage one to request a karyotype for the diagnosis and appropriate care of any case of KS that can be associated with GH deficiency, or which is in a variant form (isochromosome Xq, 49,XXXXY).

  4. Growth hormone response to apomorphine in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed Central

    Pitchot, W; Hansenne, M; Moreno, A G; Ansseau, M

    1996-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that dopamine plays a role in the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Indeed, some trials have shown the efficacy of neuroleptic addition in the treatment of OCD patients. In this study, we assessed the growth hormone (GH) response to 0.5 mg apomorphine(sc) in 8 drug-free inpatients (6 male, 2 female; mean age +/- SD = 34.7 +/- 12.6) meeting DSM-III-R criteria for OCD without major depression and compared their responses with those of 8 healthy male volunteers (mean age = 27.1 +/- 8.5). The groups did not differ in their mean GH peak response: 12.4 +/- 9.7 ng/mL in OCD patients versus 21.1 +/- 14.2 ng/mL in normal controls (F = 0.9, df1, 14, P = 0.37). These results do not support the hypothesis of dopaminergic overactivity in OCD. In fact, the completely blunted GH response to apomorphine in 2 OCD patients suggests the biological heterogeneity of OCD. Some dopaminergic disturbances could be observed in patients with comorbid diagnoses or patients unresponsive to serotonin reuptake inhibitors, but the results of this study require confirmation from a larger sample with a precise assessment of comorbidity. PMID:8973055

  5. Growth Hormone Inhibits Hepatic De Novo Lipogenesis in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cordoba-Chacon, Jose; Majumdar, Neena; List, Edward O.; Diaz-Ruiz, Alberto; Frank, Stuart J.; Manzano, Anna; Bartrons, Ramon; Puchowicz, Michelle; Kopchick, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are reported to have low growth hormone (GH) production and/or hepatic GH resistance. GH replacement can resolve the fatty liver condition in diet-induced obese rodents and in GH-deficient patients. However, it remains to be determined whether this inhibitory action of GH is due to direct regulation of hepatic lipid metabolism. Therefore, an adult-onset, hepatocyte-specific, GH receptor (GHR) knockdown (aLivGHRkd) mouse was developed to model hepatic GH resistance in humans that may occur after sexual maturation. Just 7 days after aLivGHRkd, hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL) was increased in male and female chow-fed mice, compared with GHR-intact littermate controls. However, hepatosteatosis developed only in male and ovariectomized female aLivGHRkd mice. The increase in DNL observed in aLivGHRkd mice was not associated with hyperactivation of the pathway by which insulin is classically considered to regulate DNL. However, glucokinase mRNA and protein levels as well as fructose-2,6-bisphosphate levels were increased in aLivGHRkd mice, suggesting that enhanced glycolysis drives DNL in the GH-resistant liver. These results demonstrate that hepatic GH actions normally serve to inhibit DNL, where loss of this inhibitory signal may explain, in part, the inappropriate increase in hepatic DNL observed in NAFLD patients. PMID:26015548

  6. Growth hormone and cancer: GH production and action in glioma?

    PubMed

    Lea, Robert W; Dawson, Timothy; Martinez-Moreno, Carlos G; El-Abry, Nasra; Harvey, Steve

    2015-09-01

    The hypersecretion of pituitary growth hormone (GH) is associated with an increased risk of cancer, while reducing pituitary GH signaling reduces this risk. Roles for pituitary GH in cancer are therefore well established. The expression of the GH gene is, however, not confined to the pituitary gland and it is now known to occur in many extrapituitary tissues, in which it has local autocrine or paracrine actions, rather than endocrine function. It is, for instance, expressed in cancers of the prostate, lung, skin, endometrium and colon. The oncogenicity of autocrine GH may also be greater than that induced by endocrine or exogenous GH, as higher concentrations of GHR antagonists are required to inhibit its actions. This may reflect the fact that autocrine GH is thought to act at intracellular receptors directly after synthesis, in compartments not readily accessible to endocrine (or exogenous) GH. The roles and actions of extrapituitary GH in cancer may therefore differ from those of pituitary GH. The possibility that GH may be expressed and act in glioma tumors was therefore examined by immunohistochemistry. These results demonstrate, for the first time, the presence of abundant GH- and GH receptor (GHR-) immunoreactivity in glioma, in which they were co-localized in cytoplasmic but not nuclear compartments. These results demonstrate that glioma differs from most cancers in lacking nuclear GHRs, but GH is nevertheless likely to have autocrine or paracrine actions in the induction and progression of glioma.

  7. Growth hormone inhibits apoptosis in in vitro produced bovine embryos.

    PubMed

    Kölle, Sabine; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Boie, Gudrun; Wolf, Eckhard; Sinowatz, Fred

    2002-02-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has recently been shown to exert distinct effects on the differentiation and metabolism of early embryos. Up to now, however, it is not clear whether GH is able to modulate apoptosis during early embryogenesis. Differential cell staining of 8-day-old bovine embryos cultured with 100 ng bovine recombinant GH (rbGH) per ml medium (synthetic oviduct fluid-polyvinylalcohol) demonstrated that GH significantly increased the number of inner cell mass (ICM) and trophectoderm cells in bovine expanded blastocysts. As shown by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP labeling (TUNEL) supplementation of bGH decreased the percentage of 8-day-old embryos showing at least one apoptotic cell from 58 to 21%. The percentage of apoptotic cells in one blastocyst was significantly (P < 0.01) reduced from 4.6 to 1.1% by GH treatment. Incubation of the embryos with 150 mM vanillylnonanamide induced apoptosis in all embryos. Whereas in control embryos 14% of the embryonic cells were TUNEL-positive, the percentage of apoptotic cells declined to 2.7% in the GH treated embryos. Expression of immunoreactive bcl-2 in blastocysts was not affected by GH treatment. Synthesis of the bax protein which is known to promote apoptosis was reduced in embryos cultured with GH. Our results suggest that GH acts as survival factor during in vitro culture and reduces apoptosis by altering the bax to bcl-2 ratio during early embryogenesis.

  8. Glucose metabolic gene expression in growth hormone transgenic coho salmon.

    PubMed

    Panserat, Stéphane; Kamalam, Biju Sam; Fournier, Jeanne; Plagnes-Juan, Elisabeth; Woodward, Krista; Devlin, Robert H

    2014-04-01

    Salmonids are generally known to be glucose intolerant. However, previous studies have shown that growth hormone (GH) transgenic coho salmon display modified nutritional regulation of glycolysis and lipogenesis compared to non-transgenic fish, suggesting the potential for better use of glucose in GH transgenic fish. To examine this in detail, GH transgenic and non-transgenic coho salmon were subjected to glucose tolerance test and subsequent metabolic assessments. After intra-peritoneal injection of 250mg/kg glucose, we analysed post-injection kinetics of glycaemia and expression of several key target genes highly involved in glucose homeostasis in muscle and liver tissues. Our data show no significant differences in plasma glucose levels during peak hyperglycaemia (3-6h after injection), demonstrating a similar glucose tolerance between transgenic and non transgenic. However, and unrelated to the hyperglycaemic episode, GH transgenic fish return to a slightly lower basal glycaemia values 24h after injection. Correspondingly, GH transgenic fish exhibited higher mRNA levels of glucokinase (GK) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) in liver, and glucose transporter (GLUT4) in muscle. These data suggest that these metabolic actors may be involved in different glucose use in GH transgenic fish, which would be expected to influence the glucose challenge response. Overall, our data demonstrate that GH transgenic coho salmon may be a pertinent animal model for further study of glucose metabolism in carnivorous fish.

  9. Further studies on phosphorylated pituitary somatotropin (growth hormone)

    SciTech Connect

    Kornberg, L.J.; Liberti, J.P.

    1987-05-01

    This laboratory made the original observation that naturally-occurring ovine growth hormone (GH) is phosphorylated and that slices of pituitary glands from male rats synthesize and secrete /sup 32/P-GH. This observation has been extended to explore the generality of this process. After incubation in PO/sub 4/-free Ham's F-10 medium (PFH) or in saline/Hepes (SH) containing 300..mu..Ci /sup 32/Pi/mL, tissue and medium were separated and a cell extract was prepared. GH in the medium and extract was recovered by immunoprecipitation using rat GH antiserum. The samples were electrophoresed under denaturating conditions and processed for autoradiography. /sup 32/P-GH was characterized by the presence of a protein-staining band and radioactive area which migrated the same as authentic GH and /sup 125/I-GH. Slices of glands from male rats incubated for 2h in PFH secreted /sup 32/P-GH. Similar results were found upon incubation of slices from female rats in the presence of SH. Short-term incubations of acutely dispersed pituitary cells obtained from young and old male rats also synthesized and secreted /sup 32/P-GH. Thus, the production of /sup 32/P-GH occurs (a) in simple and complex incubaton media, (b) in slices and cells from glands from older and younger rats and (c) in female as well as male rats. Therefore, phosphorylation of GH appears to be a general phenomenon. The physiological action(s) of phosphorylated GH in growth and development is under study.

  10. The effect of chronic ethanol ingestion on growth hormone secretion and hepatic sexual dimorphism in male rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, P.S.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of chronic ethanol ingestion on the activities of several sexually dimorphic hepatic proteins was investigated in male rats by feeding a nutritionally adequate liquid diet supplemented with either ethanol or dextrimaltose. Two androgen-responsive proteins served as markers of masculine hepatic function. A high capacity, moderate affinity male estrogen-binding protein (MEB) is found only in male rat liver cytosol and this activity was significantly reduced in all animals consuming ethanol at a dose of 5% by volume. The estrogen metabolizing enzyme estrogen 2-hydroxylase was also significantly reduced in male rats fed ethanol. Two proteins having higher activity in female compared to male liver were chosen as indicators of feminization: ceruloplasmin and 5[alpha]-reductase. Ceruloplasmin activity was increased after long term feeding of ethanol, but not after shorter durations of alcohol consumption. The 5a-reductase activity was not significantly affected by any of the alcohol feeding studies. Serum testosterone levels were not significantly decreased after ethanol consumption. After 30 or 60 days of ethanol ingestion, serum estradiol was elevated 34% and 40%. The reversibility of ethanol effects was determined by a gradual withdrawal of alcohol from the diet. The effect of ethanol consumption on sex-specific patterns of growth hormone secretion was examined. The secretory pattern of alcohol-fed rats was not feminized; after ethanol ingestion, the frequency of growth hormone pulses was unchanged. An increase in pulse height and mean growth hormone concentration was observed after 60 days of ethanol consumption. This results constitutes a change away from rather than toward the characteristics of a female secretory pattern. The feminization of activities of the male estrogen binding protein and of estrogen 2-hydroxylase in male rat liver after chronic ethanol consumption are not apparently related to a feminization of growth hormone secretion pattern.

  11. Diacylglycerol production induced by growth hormone in Ob1771 preadipocytes arises from phosphatidylcholine breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Catalioto, R.M.; Ailhaud, G.; Negrel, R. )

    1990-12-31

    Growth Hormone has recently been shown to stimulate the formation of diacylglycerol in Ob1771 mouse preadipocyte cells without increasing inositol lipid turnover. Addition of growth hormone to Ob1771 cells prelabelled with ({sup 3}H)glycerol or ({sup 3}H)choline led to a rapid, transient and stoechiometric formation of labelled diacylglycerol and phosphocholine, respectively. In contrast, no change was observed in the level of choline and phosphatidic acid whereas the release of water-soluble metabolites in ({sup 3}H)ethanolamine prelabelled cells exposed to growth hormone was hardly detectable. Stimulation by growth hormone of cells prelabelled with (2-palmitoyl 9, 10 ({sup 3}H))phosphatidylcholine also induced the production of labelled diacyglycerol. Pertussis toxin abolished both diacylglycerol and phosphocholine formation induced by growth hormone. It is concluded that growth hormone mediates diacylglycerol production in Ob1771 cells by means of phosphatidylcholine breakdown involving a phospholipase C which is likely coupled to the growth hormone receptor via a pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein.

  12. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 enhances the growth hormone receptor expression in tendon fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chung-Hsun; Tsai, Wen-Chung; Hsu, Ya-Hui; Pang, Jong-Hwei Su

    2014-11-19

    BPC 157, a pentadecapeptide derived from human gastric juice, has been demonstrated to promote the healing of different tissues, including skin, muscle, bone, ligament and tendon in many animal studies. However, the underlying mechanism has not been fully clarified. The present study aimed to explore the effect of BPC 157 on tendon fibroblasts isolated from Achilles tendon of male Sprague-Dawley rat. From the result of cDNA microarray analysis, growth hormone receptor was revealed as one of the most abundantly up-regulated genes in tendon fibroblasts by BPC 157. BPC 157 dose- and time-dependently increased the expression of growth hormone receptor in tendon fibroblasts at both the mRNA and protein levels as measured by RT/real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. The addition of growth hormone to BPC 157-treated tendon fibroblasts dose- and time-dependently increased the cell proliferation as determined by MTT assay and PCNA expression by RT/real-time PCR. Janus kinase 2, the downstream signal pathway of growth hormone receptor, was activated time-dependently by stimulating the BPC 157-treated tendon fibroblasts with growth hormone. In conclusion, the BPC 157-induced increase of growth hormone receptor in tendon fibroblasts may potentiate the proliferation-promoting effect of growth hormone and contribute to the healing of tendon.

  13. Growth of short children born small for gestational age and their response to growth hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Hemchand Krishna; Khadilkar, Vaman V; Chiplonkar, Shashi A; Khadilkar, Anuradha V

    2013-05-08

    Growth hormone [GH] is licensed for use in children born small for gestational age (SGA) who fail to catch-up. We retrospectively compared the response of twenty children born SGA (who satisfied the auxological criteria) to growth hormone (Group I) versus randomly selected age and sex matched controls from a group of SGA children with growth related complaints, not treated with GH (Group II). After 2 years of GH therapy the HAZ increased from -2.8 to -1.6 in Group I, compared 2.2 to -1.7 in group II (P-value < 0.05). The percentage of pubertal children rose from 55% to 65% in cases versus 60% to 75% in the controls (P>0.05). GH resulted in increase in growth velocity Z-score during the first year and (4.3±0.5 in Group-I versus - 0.5±0.6 in Group-II, P<0.05) second year of treatment (1.7±0.4 in cases versus -0.6±0.7 in controls, P<0.05).Thus, GH improves height of short SGA children without accelerating pubertal progression.

  14. The relationship between growth hormone polymorphism and growth hormone receptor genes with milk yield and reproductive performance in Holstein dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    Hadi, Z; Atashi, H; Dadpasand, M; Derakhshandeh, A; Ghahramani Seno, M. M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential association between growth hormone GH/AluI and growth hormone receptor GHR/AluI polymorphisms with milk yield and reproductive performances in Holstein dairy cows in Iran. Blood samples of 150 Holstein cows were collected and their genomic DNA was extracted using Gene-Fanavaran DNA extracting kit. Fragments of the 428 bp of exon 5 growth hormone (GH) gene and the 342 bp of exon 10 growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene were amplified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. PCR products were digested by the AluI restriction enzyme and electrophoresed on 3% agarose gel. Continuous and categorical data were analyzed using linear mixed models through Proc MIXED and logistic regression models through Proc GENMOD of SAS software, respectively. The results showed no relationship between the examined traits and GH/AluI or GHR/AluI genes. A significant relationship was found between GH/AluI polymorphism and dystocia, but the presence of the GH-L allele reduced the incidence of dystocia. The results suggest that the GH-LL genotype reduces dystocia probably by affecting the release of growth hormone; nevertheless, further studies will be needed to examine the relationship between dystocia and GH genotypes. PMID:27175183

  15. Thyroid hormone modulation of the hypothalamic growth hormone (GH)-releasing factor-pituitary GH axis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Miki, N; Ono, M; Hizuka, N; Aoki, T; Demura, H

    1992-01-01

    Both thyroid hormone and hypothalamic growth hormone (GH)-releasing factor (GRF) facilitate pituitary somatotroph function. However, the pathophysiological role of thyroid hormone in GRF secretion is less well understood. Thyrotoxicosis, induced by administration of thyroxine (T4) in rats, inhibited both pituitary GH levels and immunoreactive GRF secretion from incubated hypothalamus. At the highest dose of T4 given for 12 d, GRF secretion and pituitary GH decreased by 50 and 39%, respectively. Hypothyroidism induced by thyroidectomy (Tx) enhanced GRF secretion approximately twofold while depleting pituitary GH by greater than 99%. Both of these hypothalamic and pituitary effects were reversed by replacement of T4 but not human GH for 7 or 14 d. Human GH was as potent as T4 in restoring decreased body weight gains or serum insulin-like growth factor-1 levels in Tx rats. These results indicate that at both physiological and pathological concentrations in serum, thyroid hormone acts as an inhibitory modulator of GRF secretion, probably not involving a feedback mechanism through GH. A biphasic effect of thyroid hormone on pituitary GH levels appears to derive from the difference in primary target tissues of hyper- and hypothyroidism, the hypothalamus and the pituitary, respectively. PMID:1634603

  16. Cellular regulation of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) binding in rat seminiferous tubules

    SciTech Connect

    Kangasniemi, M.; Kaipia, A.; Toppari, J.; Perheentupa, A.; Huhtaniemi, I.; Parvinen, M. )

    1990-07-01

    Stage-specific binding of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) was measured in rat seminiferous tubules. The binding in single-point assays was over 3-fold higher (P less than 0.05) in stages XIII to I than in stages VI to VII of the epithelial cycle. No difference was found between the equilibrium association constants (Ka) of FSH binding in stages XIV to IV (10 +/- 1.9 X 10(9) 1/mol) and VII to VIII (9.2 +/- 0.6 X 10(9) 1/mol, mean +/- SEM, n = 5). In another experiment, the testes were dosed locally with 3 Gy of 4 MV x-irradiation to selectively lower the number of spermatogonia. After irradiation, FSH binding in staged seminiferous tubule segments was measured when the desired types of spermatogenic cells were reduced in number. Seven days after irradiation when differentiating spermatogonia and preleptotene spermatocytes were reduced in number, FSH binding was decreased in all stages of the cycle, but the cyclic variation remained. Seventeen days after irradiation when intermediate and type B spermatogonia and spermatocytes up to diplotene of stage XIII showed low numbers, FSH binding was decreased in all stages of the cycle and the stage-dependent variation disappeared. At 38 days when pachytene spermatocytes and early spermatids were reduced in number, similar results were found. But at 52 days postirradiation when all spermatids were low in number, FSH binding was slightly elevated compared with days 17 and 38. There were no significant differences in serum FSH or LH levels between irradiated and non-irradiated animals. These findings suggest that all spermatogenic cell types may stimulate FSH binding in the Sertoli cells.

  17. Growth hormone activity in mitochondria depends on GH receptor Box 1 and involves caveolar pathway targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Perret-Vivancos, Cecile; Abbate, Aude; Ardail, Dominique; Raccurt, Mireille; Usson, Yves; Lobie, Peter E.; Morel, Gerard . E-mail: gerard.morel@univ-lyon1.fr

    2006-02-01

    Growth hormone (GH) binding to its receptor (GHR) initiates GH-dependent signal transduction and internalization pathways to generate the biological effects. The precise role and way of action of GH on mitochondrial function are not yet fully understood. We show here that GH can stimulate cellular oxygen consumption in CHO cells transfected with cDNA coding for the full-length GHR. By using different GHR cDNA constructs, we succeeded in determining the different parts of the GHR implicated in the mitochondrial response to GH. Polarography and two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy analysis showed that the Box 1 of the GHR intracellular domain was required for an activation of the mitochondrial respiration in response to a GH exposure. However, confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that cells lacking the GHR Box 1 could efficiently internalize the hormone. We demonstrated that internalization mediated either by clathrin-coated pits or by caveolae was able to regulate GH mitochondrial effect: these two pathways are both essential to obtain the GH stimulatory action on mitochondrial function. Moreover, electron microscopic and biochemical approaches allowed us to identify the caveolar pathway as essential for targeting GH and GHR to mitochondria.

  18. Expression of an Exogenous Growth Hormone Gene by Transplantable Human Epidermal Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Jeffrey R.; Barrandon, Yann; Green, Howard; Mulligan, Richard C.

    1987-09-01

    Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer was used to introduce a recombinant human growth hormone gene into cultured human keratinocytes. The transduced keratinocytes secreted biologically active growth hormone into the culture medium. When grafted as an epithelial sheet onto athymic mice, these cultured keratinocytes reconstituted an epidermis that was similar in appearance to that resulting from normal cells, but from which human growth hormone could be extracted. Transduced epidermal cells may prove to be a general vehicle for the delivery of gene products by means of grafting.

  19. Estrogenic compounds decrease growth hormone receptor abundance and alter osmoregulation in Atlantic salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lerner, Darren T.; Sheridan, Mark A.; McCormick, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of Atlantic salmon smolts to estrogenic compounds is shown to compromise several aspects of smolt development. We sought to determine the underlying endocrine mechanisms of estrogen impacts on the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) axis. Smolts in freshwater (FW) were either injected 3 times over 10 days with 2 μg g−1 17β-estradiol (E2) or 150 μg g−1 4-nonylphenol (NP). Seawater (SW)-acclimated fish received intraperitoneal implants of 30 μg g−1 E2 over two weeks. Treatment with these estrogenic compounds increased hepatosomatic index and total plasma calcium. E2 and NP reduced maximum growth hormone binding by 30–60% in hepatic and branchial membranes in FW and SW, but did not alter the dissociation constant. E2 and NP treatment decreased plasma levels of IGF-I levels in both FW and SW. In FW E2 and NP decreased plasma GH whereas in SW plasma GH increased after E2 treatment. Compared to controls, plasma chloride concentrations of E2-treated fish were decreased 5.5 mM in FW and increased 10.5 mM in SW. There was no effect of NP or E2 on gill sodium–potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+/K+-ATPase) activity in FW smolts, whereas E2 treatment in SW reduced gill Na+/K+-ATPase activity and altered the number and size of ionocytes. Our data indicate that E2 downregulates the GH/IGF-I-axis and SW tolerance which may be part of its normal function for reproduction and movement into FW. We conclude that the mechanism of endocrine disruption of smolt development by NP is in part through alteration of the GH/IGF-I axis via reduced GH receptor abundance.

  20. Endocrine and orexigenic actions of growth hormone secretagogues in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Brian S; Johnson, Jaime K; Silverstein, Jeffrey T; Parhar, Ishwar S; Vijayan, Mathilakath M; McGuire, Alison; Weber, Gregory M

    2007-03-01

    The effects of growth hormone secretagogues (GHSs) on the teleost somatotropic axis are poorly understood, particularly with respect to insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and the IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs). To assess the endocrine and orexigenic responses of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to GHS treatment, animals were injected with human GHRH(1-29)-amide, KP-102 or rat ghrelin at 0, 1 or 10 pmol/g body mass. Feed intake was tested at 2 and 5 h post-injection and plasma levels of growth hormone (GH), IGF-I and the IGFBPs were determined at 3, 6 and 12 h post-injection. Feed intake was significantly elevated by all of the GHSs tested at both post-injection time points. All GHSs elevated plasma GH levels in a time-dependent manner. Plasma IGF-I levels were elevated by all GHSs at 3 h post-injection, whereas those animals treated with KP-102 and ghrelin exhibited depressions at 6 h. Four IGFBPs were identified in the plasma by western blotting. Levels of the 20 kDa IGFBP decreased over the sampling time. Levels of the 32 kDa IGFBP were significantly depressed by all GHSs tested. Levels of the 42 kDa IGFBP were significantly elevated by all GHSs tested. Plasma levels of the 50 kDa IGFBP was decreased in some treatment groups at 3 h, but elevated by 6 h in the ghrelin-treated groups and elevated in all treatment groups by 12 h post-injection. The endocrine and orexigenic responses demonstrate that GHSs influence the teleost neuroendocrine system beyond short-term actions (<3 h post-injection) on GH release and the responses of the IGFBPs to GHS treatment support this notion and clarify their identification as functional homologues to mammalian IGFBPs.

  1. MicroRNA miR-8 regulates multiple growth factor hormones produced from Drosophila fat cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, G J; Jun, J W; Hyun, S

    2015-06-01

    Metabolic organs such as the liver and adipose tissue produce several peptide hormones that influence metabolic homeostasis. Fat bodies, the Drosophila counterpart of liver and adipose tissues, have been thought to analogously secrete several hormones that affect organismal physiology, but their identity and regulation remain poorly understood. Previous studies have indicated that microRNA miR-8, functions in the fat body to non-autonomously regulate organismal growth, suggesting that fat body-derived humoral factors are regulated by miR-8. Here, we found that several putative peptide hormones known to have mitogenic effects are regulated by miR-8 in the fat body. Most members of the imaginal disc growth factors and two members of the adenosine deaminase-related growth factors are up-regulated in the absence of miR-8. Drosophila insulin-like peptide 6 (Dilp6) and imaginal morphogenesis protein-late 2 (Imp-L2), a binding partner of Dilp, are also up-regulated in the fat body of miR-8 null mutant larvae. The fat body-specific reintroduction of miR-8 into the miR-8 null mutants revealed six peptides that showed fat-body organ-autonomous regulation by miR-8. Amongst them, only Imp-L2 was found to be regulated by U-shaped, the miR-8 target for body growth. However, a rescue experiment by knockdown of Imp-L2 indicated that Imp-L2 alone does not account for miR-8's control over the insect's growth. Our findings suggest that multiple peptide hormones regulated by miR-8 in the fat body may collectively contribute to Drosophila growth.

  2. Enlargement of interscapular brown adipose tissue in growth hormone antagonist transgenic and in growth hormone receptor gene-disrupted dwarf mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuesheng; Knapp, Joanne R; Kopchick, John J

    2003-02-01

    Growth hormone (GH) acts on adipose tissue by accelerating fat expenditure, preventing triglyceride accumulation, and facilitating lipid mobilization. To investigate whether GH is involved in the development and metabolism of interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT), a site of nonshivering thermogenesis, we employed three lines of transgenic mice. Two of the lines are dwarf due to expression of a GH antagonist (GHA) or disruption of the GH receptor/binding-protein gene. A third mouse line is giant due to overexpression of a bovine GH (bGH) transgene. We have found that the body weights of those animals are proportional to their body lengths at 10 weeks of age. However, GHA dwarf mice tend to catch up with the nontransgenic (NT) littermates in body weight but not in body length at 52 weeks of age. The increase of body mass index (BMI) for GHA mice accelerates rapidly relative to controls as a function of age. We have also observed that BAT in both dwarf mouse lines but not in giant mice is enlarged in contrast to nontransgenic littermates. This enlargement occurs as a function of age. Northern analysis suggests that BAT can be a GH-responsive tissue because GHR/BP mRNAs were found there. Finally, the level of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) RNA was found to be higher in dwarf mice and lower in giant animals relative to controls, suggesting that GH-mediated signaling may negatively regulate UCP1 gene expression in BAT.

  3. Progress in antiandrogen design targeting hormone binding pocket to circumvent mutation based resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaohong; He, Yang; Zhou, Jinming

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). Current clinically used antiandrogens such as flutamide, bicalutamide, and newly approved enzalutamide mainly target the hormone binding pocket (HBP) of AR. However, over time, drug resistance invariably develops and switches these antiandrogens from antagonist to agonist of the AR. Accumulated evidence indicates that AR mutation is an important cause for the drug resistance. This review will give an overview of the mutation based resistance of the current clinically used antiandrogens and the rational drug design to overcome the resistance, provides a promising strategy for the development of the new generation of antiandrogens targeting HBP. PMID:25852559

  4. Hepatic Long Intergenic Noncoding RNAs: High Promoter Conservation and Dynamic, Sex-Dependent Transcriptional Regulation by Growth Hormone.

    PubMed

    Melia, Tisha; Hao, Pengying; Yilmaz, Feyza; Waxman, David J

    2016-01-01

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are increasingly recognized as key chromatin regulators, yet few studies have characterized lincRNAs in a single tissue under diverse conditions. Here, we analyzed 45 mouse liver RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) data sets collected under diverse conditions to systematically characterize 4,961 liver lincRNAs, 59% of them novel, with regard to gene structures, species conservation, chromatin accessibility, transcription factor binding, and epigenetic states. To investigate the potential for functionality, we focused on the responses of the liver lincRNAs to growth hormone stimulation, which imparts clinically relevant sex differences to hepatic metabolism and liver disease susceptibility. Sex-biased expression characterized 247 liver lincRNAs, with many being nuclear RNA enriched and regulated by growth hormone. The sex-biased lincRNA genes are enriched for nearby and correspondingly sex-biased accessible chromatin regions, as well as sex-biased binding sites for growth hormone-regulated transcriptional activators (STAT5, hepatocyte nuclear factor 6 [HNF6], FOXA1, and FOXA2) and transcriptional repressors (CUX2 and BCL6). Repression of female-specific lincRNAs in male liver, but not that of male-specific lincRNAs in female liver, was associated with enrichment of H3K27me3-associated inactive states and poised (bivalent) enhancer states. Strikingly, we found that liver-specific lincRNA gene promoters are more highly species conserved and have a significantly higher frequency of proximal binding by liver transcription factors than liver-specific protein-coding gene promoters. Orthologs for many liver lincRNAs were identified in one or more supraprimates, including two rat lincRNAs showing the same growth hormone-regulated, sex-biased expression as their mouse counterparts. This integrative analysis of liver lincRNA chromatin states, transcription factor occupancy, and growth hormone regulation provides novel insights into the

  5. Pseudotumor Cerebri in a Child with Idiopathic Growth Hormone Insufficiency Two Months after Initiation of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Loukianou, Eleni; Tasiopoulou, Anastasia; Demosthenous, Constantinos; Brouzas, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To report a rare case of pseudotumor cerebri (PTC) in a child two months after receiving treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) and to emphasize the need of close collaboration between ophthalmologists and pediatric endocrinologists in monitoring children receiving rhGH. Methods. A 12-year-old boy with congenital hypothyroidism started treatment with rhGH on a dose of 1,5 mg/daily IM (4.5 IU daily). Eight weeks later, he was complaining of severe headache without any other accompanying symptoms. The child was further investigated with computed tomography scan and lumbar puncture. Results. Computed tomography scan showed normal ventricular size and lumbar puncture revealed an elevated opening pressure of 360 mm H2O. RhGH was discontinued and acetazolamide 250 mg per os twice daily was initiated. Eight weeks later, the papilledema was resolved. Conclusions. There appears to be a causal relationship between the initiation of treatment with rhGH and the development of PTC. All children receiving rhGH should have a complete ophthalmological examination if they report headache or visual disturbances shortly after the treatment. Discontinuation of rhGH and initiation of treatment with acetazolamide may be needed and regular follow-up examinations by an ophthalmologist should be recommended. PMID:26966604

  6. A vibrational spectroscopic assignment of the disulfide bridges in recombinant bovine growth hormone and growth hormone analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thamann, Thomas J.

    1999-07-01

    Disulfide stretching vibrations for bovine growth hormone (bGH) occur in a vibrational envelope centered at 540 cm -1 which spans 480-580 cm -1. A multitude of vibrational bands present in this envelope, that are not related to disulfide stretching, emphasize the need for model compounds when assigning S-S stretching modes. Raman spectroscopic data for bGH analogs, in which one or both of the two disulfide bridges have been selectively cleaved, have been used to characterize the S-S stretching envelope for the two cystine links in bGH. The Raman data for the r-bGH analogs indicate that the number of disulfide bonds present in r-bGH is determined, not by the observance of the presence or absence of a single spectral peak, but by the relative intensity of vibrational envelope from 520-560 cm -1. Cleavage of disulfide bridges in bGH results in a general decrease in vibrational spectral intensity in the 520-560 cm -1 range. This decrease in intensity is proportional to the number of cystine links severed.

  7. Growth hormone deficiency and pituitary malformation in a recurrent Cat-Eye syndrome: a family report.

    PubMed

    Jedraszak, Guillaume; Braun, Karine; Receveur, Aline; Decamp, Matthieu; Andrieux, Joris; Rabbind Singh, Amrathlal; Copin, Henri; Bremond-Gignac, Dominique; Mathieu, Michèle; Rochette, Jacques; Morin, Gilles

    2015-10-01

    Growth hormone deficiency affects roughly between one in 3000 and one in 4000 children with most instances of growth hormone deficiency being idiopathic. Growth hormone deficiency can also be associated with genetic diseases or chromosome abnormalities. Association of growth hormone deficiency together with hypothalamic-pituitary axis malformation and Cat-Eye syndrome is a very rare condition. We report a family with two brothers presenting with growth delay due to a growth hormone deficiency associated with a polymalformation syndrome. They both displayed pre-auricular pits and tags, imperforate anus and Duane retraction syndrome. Both parents and a third unaffected son displayed normal growth pattern. Cerebral MRI showed a hypothalamic-pituitary axis malformation in the two affected brothers. Cytogenetic studies revealed a type I small supernumerary marker chromosome derived from chromosome 22 resulting in a tetrasomy 22pter-22q11.21 characteristic of the Cat-Eye syndrome. The small supernumerary marker chromosome was present in the two affected sons and the mother in a mosaic state. Patients with short stature due to growth hormone deficiency should be evaluated for chromosomal abnormality. Family study should not be underestimated.

  8. Actin-binding proteins take the reins in growth cones.

    PubMed

    Pak, Chi W; Flynn, Kevin C; Bamburg, James R

    2008-02-01

    Higher-order actin-based networks (actin superstructures) are important for growth-cone motility and guidance. Principles for generating, organizing and remodelling actin superstructures have emerged from recent findings in cell-free systems, non-neuronal cells and growth cones. This Review examines how actin superstructures are initiated de novo at the leading-edge membrane and how the spontaneous organization of actin superstructures is driven by ensembles of actin-binding proteins. How the regulation of actin-binding proteins can affect growth-cone turning and axonal regeneration is also discussed.

  9. Characteristics of gsp-positive growth hormone-secreting pituitary tumors in Korean acromegalic patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, I; Park, S; Ryu, M; Woo, J; Kim, S; Kim, J; Kim, Y; Choi, Y

    1996-06-01

    A subset of human growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary tumors contains the gsp oncogene that encodes an activation mutation of the alpha-subunit of the stimulatory GTP-binding protein (G(S) alpha). This study was undertaken to investigate the frequency of the gsp oncogene in GH-secreting pituitary tumors in Korean acromegalic patients and to elucidate the clinical characteristics of these patients to endocrine testing. Direct polymerase chain reaction sequencing revealed the gsp oncogene mutation in 9 out of 21 tumors (43%) at amino acid 201 of the G(S) alpha protein. A single nucleotide mutation in the tumors carrying the gsp oncogene was observed, which replaced an arginine (CGT) in the normal protein with cysteine (TGT) in eight tumors and serine (AGT) in one tumor. The patients with the gsp oncogene mutation (group 1) were older (54 +/- 10 vs 41 +/- 11 years, p = 0.0085) than those without the mutation (group 2). Sex, tumor size and grade, basal GH and prolactin levels, the GH response to oral glucose loading, the GH fluctuation and the paradoxical response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone or gonadotropin-releasing hormone did not differ between the groups. The gsp oncogene was found mostly in somatotroph adenomas. The octreotide-induced GH suppression was significantly higher in group 1 than in group 2 (95 +/- 5% vs 81 +/- 17%, p = 0.0335). The GH response to bromocriptine did not differ between the groups. These results suggest that the G(S) alpha mutations of GH-secreting tumor are observed in Korean acromegalic patients with similar frequency to those of western countries. The patients with gsp oncogene are likely to be older than those without the oncogene, and show excellent response of GH suppression to octreotide.

  10. William H. Daughaday and the foundations of modern research into growth hormone and the insulin-like growth factors.

    PubMed

    Rotwein, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This vignette summarizes some of the scientific accomplishments of Dr. William H. Daughaday, a founder of modern research into the biological effects of growth hormone and the insulin-like growth factors, and formulator of the somatomedin hypothesis of GH actions on growth.

  11. Different effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRH) and somatostatin on growth hormone and stable metabolite of prostaglandin E2, 13, 14-dihydro-15-keto-prostaglandin E2 (PGE2-M) in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Zacharieva, S; Muchá, I; Popova, J; Andonova, K

    1992-01-01

    Twenty four healthy subjects were placed in two treatment groups: 1. The first group consisted of twelve subjects in whom growth releasing hormone (GRH) (1 microgram/kg.BW) resulted in a marked and sustained elevation of serum growth hormone (GH) and a slight and delayed increase in plasma prostaglandin E2-M. In the second group, consisting also of twelve subjects, somatostatin infusion (500 micrograms/250 ml) was initiated and maintained for 60 min. Serum GH significantly decreased at 30 and 60 min during infusion and 15 min thereafter. We did not observe any changes in plasma prostaglandin E2-M during or after somatostatin infusion. The results obtained confirm previous in vitro studies and suggest a possible link between growth releasing hormone and prostaglandin E2 in their action on growth hormone secretion. It seems that somatostatin does not play a role in the control of prostaglandin E2 release.

  12. Interpulse interval in circulating growth hormone patterns regulates sexually dimorphic expression of hepatic cytochrome P450.

    PubMed

    Waxman, D J; Pampori, N A; Ram, P A; Agrawal, A K; Shapiro, B H

    1991-08-01

    Plasma growth hormone (GH) profiles are sexually differentiated in many species and regulate the sex-dependence of peripubescent growth rates and liver function, including steroid hydroxylase cytochrome P450 expression, by mechanisms that are poorly understood. By use of an external pump to deliver to hypophysectomized rats pulses of rat GH of varying frequency and amplitude, a critical element for liver discrimination between male and female GH patterns was identified. Liver expression of the male-specific steroid 2 alpha (or 16 alpha)-hydroxylase P450, designated CYP2C11, was stimulated by GH at both physiological and nonphysiological pulse amplitudes, durations, and frequencies, provided that an interpulse interval of no detectable GH was maintained for at least 2.5 hr. This finding suggests that hepatocytes undergo an obligatory recovery period after stimulation by a GH pulse. This period may be required to reset a GH-activated intracellular signaling pathway or may relate to the short-term absence of GH receptors at the hepatocyte surface after a cycle of GH binding and receptor internalization. These requirements were distinguished from those necessary for the stimulation by GH of normal male growth rates in hypophysectomized rats, indicating that different GH responses and, perhaps, different GH-responsive tissues recognize distinct signaling elements in the sexually dimorphic patterns of circulating GH.

  13. Increases in Serum Growth Hormone Concentrations Associated with GHB Administration.

    PubMed

    Brailsford, Alan D; Bartlett, Christiaan; Kicman, Andrew T; Cowan, David A

    2017-01-01

    The administration of gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) has been reported to augment the increase in growth hormone (GH) secretion associated with the onset of sleep. The ability of GHB to stimulate GH production in the absence of sleep in both male and female volunteers was investigated as part of a GHB administration study. Twelve healthy volunteers (six men and six women) were given a small oral dose (25 mg/kg) of GHB (as Xyrem(®)) at 10:00 h. Basal blood samples (as serum) were taken 10 min prior to GHB administration, with additional samples taken at 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 240, 360 and 480 min post-administration. The serum concentrations of GHB were measured by GC-MS and GH by immunometric assay. Following GHB administration, volunteers exhibited effects consistent with mild sedation, i.e., relaxed with normal responses to verbal stimuli. Despite none being asleep, an increase in serum GH concentration occurred in 11 out of the 12 volunteers (5 women and 6 men). In these volunteers, peak GH concentrations occurred 45-60 min post-administration compared with a mean serum tmax for GHB of 23 min (SD = 5.4 min). The absolute increase in GH was similar for men and women, averaging 3.4 and 3.7 ng/mL, respectively. The mean intra-individual increase in GH was much greater in males (29 times) compared with females (2 times), as males had (as expected) smaller basal GH concentrations (mean = 0.26 ng/mL) compared with females (mean = 5.4 ng/mL). After maximizing, the GH concentration decreased rapidly (in agreement with GHB concentrations), returning to basal concentrations at ~90-120 min post-administration. GHB administration at a small therapeutic dose results in increases in serum GH concentrations in healthy male and female volunteers in the absence of sleep onset.

  14. Short stature caused by a natural growth hormone antagonist.

    PubMed

    Chihara, K; Takahashi, Y; Kaji, H; Goji, K; Okimura, Y; Abe, H

    1998-01-01

    Severe short stature in a male child due to a single mutation in the GH-1 gene was first reported in 1996 by Takahashi et al. [N Engl J Med 1996;334:432-436]. This missense mutation was predicted to convert codon 77 from arginine (R) to cysteine (C). The child's chronological age was 4 years and 11 months, and his bone age 2 years and 6 months, i.e., equal to only 51% of his chronological age. Body proportions were normal except for the prominent forehead and saddle nose. Pituitary size was normal on magnetic resonance imaging examinations. Serum IGF-1, IGFBP-3 and GHBP were all decreased or at the lower limit of the normal range. Nocturnal urinary growth hormone (GH) excretion was high. Isoelectric focusing analysis revealed the presence of an abnormal GH peak in addition to the normal one. The R77C mutant GH possessed a 6 times greater affinity to GHBP than the wild-type GH, and inhibited tyrosine phosphorylation in IM-9 cells 10 times more potently than the wild-type GH, showing an antagonistic or a dominant negative action. In agreement with the antagonistic property of the mutant GH exhibited, the child did not show any increase in serum IGF-1 levels after exogenous hGH administration. It should be noted that the child in this study is not a typical case of Kowarski syndrome in which endogenous GH is found to be simply bioinactive, as in the patient we recently described elsewhere. Therefore, this patient's condition should be categorized as a new syndrome of short stature caused by a natural GH antagonist.

  15. Growth hormone STAT5-mediated signaling and its modulation in mice liver during the growth period.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Carolina S; Piazza, Verónica G; Ratner, Laura D; Matos, Marina N; González, Lorena; Rulli, Susana B; Miquet, Johanna G; Sotelo, Ana I

    2013-01-01

    Postnatal growth exhibits two instances of rapid growth in mice: the first is perinatal and independent of growth hormone (GH), the second is peripuberal and GH-dependent. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b (STAT5b) is the main GH-signaling mediator and it is related to IGF1 synthesis and somatic growth. The aim of this work was to assess differential STAT5 sensitivity to GH during the growth period in mouse liver of both sexes. Three representative ages were selected: 1-week-old animals, in the GH-independent phase of growth; 2.5-week-old mice, at the onset of the GH-dependent phase of growth; and 9-week-old young adults. GH-signaling mediators were assessed by immunoblotting, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. GH-induced STAT5 phosphorylation is low at one-week and maximal at 2.5-weeks of age when compared to young adults, accompanied by higher protein content at the onset of growth. Suppressor CIS and phosphatase PTP1B exhibit high levels in one-week animals, which gradually decline, while SOCS2 and SOCS3 display higher levels at adulthood. Nuclear phosphorylated STAT5 is low in one-week animals while in 2.5-week animals it is similar to 9-week control; expression of SOCS3, an early response GH-target gene, mimics this pattern. STAT5 coactivators glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and hepatic nuclear factor 1 (HNF1) abundance is higher in adulthood. Therefore, GH-induced STAT5 signaling presents age-dependent activity in liver, with its maximum coinciding with the onset of GH-dependent phase of growth, accompanied by an age-dependent variation of modulating factors. This work contributes to elucidate the molecular mechanisms implicated in GH responsiveness during growth.

  16. Growth in Boys with 45,X/46,XY Mosaicism: Effect of Growth Hormone Treatment on Statural Growth.

    PubMed

    Bertelloni, Silvano; Baroncelli, Giampiero I; Massart, Francesco; Toschi, Benedetta

    2015-01-01

    45,X/46,XY mosaicism is a rare sex chromosome disorder of sex development. Short stature is a main feature of boys with this condition. Different causes likely contribute to growth impairment. Growth hormone (GH) has been administered to treat short stature in boys with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism, but conflicting data are available. Here, spontaneous growth patterns as well as short- and long-term follow-up studies during GH therapy in these patients are reviewed. Short- and mid-term data showed an improvement of the growth pattern in GH-treated boys, mainly when hormonal therapy was started early, while long-term follow-up demonstrated similar adult heights in GH-treated and untreated patients. Individual biological factors (e.g. different chromosome constitution, different mosaicism among various tissues, impaired pubertal growth spurt), non-homogeneous GH doses and different ages at start of therapy may contribute to the variable results. Thus, early GH therapy at pharmacological doses may improve the growth pattern of short boys with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism, but data on adult height are disappointing. Evaluation of larger patient samples treated by homogeneous doses and long-term follow-up studies assessing adult height and safety are needed to reach definitive conclusions on GH therapy in boys with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism.

  17. Short-term therapy with recombinant growth hormone in polytransfused thalassaemia major patients with growth deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, L; Gurrado, R; Zecchino, C; Manolo, F; De Sanctis, V; Cisternino, M; Caruso-Nicoletti, M; Galati, M

    1998-01-01

    Growth failure is commonly described in polytransfused thalassaemia major patients (Th) with or without growth hormone (GH) releasing hormone-GH axis impairment. We have investigated the efficacy of short-term recombinant GH (rhGH) therapy (Saizen [Serono] 0.1 IU/kg/day 6 evenings/week administered s.c. for 12 months) on growth and predicted final height in 28 (19M, 9F) regularly transfused Th with growth deficiency (aged 14.8 +/- 2.0 yr) on long term desferrioxamine s.c. therapy. All Th had no evidence of congestive heart failure, hypothyroidism or impaired glucose tolerance; in all patients the GH peak (evaluated during both insulin and clonidine test) was < or = 20 mIU/l; hypergonadotropic hypogonadism was excluded in Th with delayed puberty. At the start of therapy height age (HA)/bone age (BA) ratio was 0.92 +/- 0.12. Bone age delay was positively correlated to chronological age (CA), serum ferritin levels (mean of the last three years), the age at the start of chelation therapy, growth velocity calculated for CA during the last year; a positive correlation was also found between circulating IGF-I levels and age at the start of chelation therapy. After 1 year on rhGH therapy there was a significant increase of height calculated for CA (not for BA), of growth velocity calculated for both CA and BA and of circulating IGF-I levels; the HA variation/BA variation ratio was 1.85 +/- 1.71, without any significant difference between predicted final height at the start (-1.08 +/- 1.28 SDS) and at the end of rhGH therapy (-0.88 +/- 1.13). The variation of height calculated for CA was positively correlated to both CA and growth velocity during the last year before rhGH therapy (calculated for CA) and negatively to the height at the start (calculated for CA). There were no side effects and haematological parameters did not show significant changes. In conclusion, our data, obtained in a relatively large group of Th, confirm the emerging results of short-term (12 months

  18. Antiglucocorticosteroid effects suggest why steroid hormone is required for receptors to bind DNA in vivo but not in vitro.

    PubMed

    Groyer, A; Schweizer-Groyer, G; Cadepond, F; Mariller, M; Baulieu, E E

    Sequence-specific interaction between steroid hormone receptors (R) and DNA hormone-responsive elements (HRE) takes place in vitro irrespective of the presence of hormone and even when R is liganded with an antagonist. In vivo, in contrast, the presence of hormone is mandatory for glucocorticosteroid (G) receptor-HRE interaction to occur and no HRE occupancy is detected in the presence of an antagonist. One possible explanation is that in vivo R is originally complexed with a protein that prevents its binding to target HREs. The hormone would then induce the dissociation of the oligomer, thus unmasking the functional DNA binding domain of the receptor. The unliganded, non DNA-binding 8S-form of the chick GR is a hetero-oligomer including the relative molecular mass (Mr) 94,000 steroid-binding unit (4S-GR), and the non-steroid-binding, non-DNA-binding 90,000 protein common to all classes of 8S-R and identified as heat-shock protein (hsp 90). We report here that triamcinolone acetonide (TA) promotes the transformation of 8S-GR to 4S-GR complexes both in explants and in cell-free conditions and that the high-affinity antiglucocorticosteroid RU 486 stabilizes the 8S-GR, as assessed by gradient sedimentation and HPLC. However, in vitro TA- and RU 486- 4S-GR showed comparable DNA-binding activity. These results suggest that the lack of affinity for DNA of the 8S form of GR may be attributable in vivo to the interaction of the 4S-GR protein with hsp 90, and that hormone binding might trigger a conformational change which results in the release of active 4S-GR.

  19. Effect of mutations in putative hormone binding sites on V2 vasopressin receptor function.

    PubMed

    Sebti, Y; Rabbani, M; Sadeghi, H Mir Mohammad; Sardari, S; Ghahremani, M H; Innamorati, G

    2015-01-01

    The vasopressin V2 receptor belongs to the large family of the G-protein coupled receptors and is responsible for the antidiuretic effect of the neurohypophyseal hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP). Based on bioinformatic studies it seems that Ala300 and Asp297 of the V2 vasopressin receptor (V2R) are involved in receptor binding. Ala300Glu mutation resulted in lower energy while Asp297Tyr mutation resulted in higher energy in AVP-V2R docked complex rather than the wild type. Therefore we hypothesized that the Ala300Glu mutation results in stronger and Asp297Tyr mutation leads to weaker ligand-receptor binding. Site directed mutagenesis of Asp297Tyr and Ala300Glu was performed using nested polymerase chain reaction. After restriction enzyme digestion, the inserts were ligated into the pcDNA3 vector and Escherichia coli XL1-Blue competent cells were transformed using commercial kit and electroporation methods. The obtained colonies were analyzed for the presence and orientation of the inserts using proper restriction enzymes. After transient transfection of COS-7 cells using ESCORT™ IV transfection reagent, the adenylyl cyclase activity assay was performed for functional studies. The cell surface expression of V2R was analyzed by indirect ELISA method. Based on the obtained results, the Ala300Glu mutation of V2R led to reduced levels of cAMP production without a marked effect on the receptor expression and the receptor binding. Effect of Asp297Tyr mutation on cell surface expression of V2R was the same as the wild type receptor. Pretreatment with 1 nM vasopressin showed an increased level of Asp297Tyr mutant receptor internalization as compared to the wild type receptor, while the effect of 100 nM vasopressin was similar in the mutant and wild type receptors. These data suggest that alterations in Asp297 but not Ala300 would affect the hormone receptor binding.

  20. Characteristics of the brown hagfish Paramyxine atami transthyretin: metal ion-dependent thyroid hormone binding.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shunsuke; Kasai, Kentaro; Nishiyama, Norihito; Ishihara, Akinori; Yamauchi, Kiyoshi

    2017-02-24

    Transthyretin (TTR) is a vertebrate-specific protein involved in thyroid hormone distribution in plasma, and its gene is thought to have emerged by gene duplication from the gene for the ancient TTR-related protein, 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase, at some early stage of chordate evolution. We investigated the molecular and hormone-binding properties of the brown hagfish Paramyxine atami TTR. The amino acid sequence deduced from the cloned hagfish TTR cDNA shared 33-50% identities with those of other vertebrate TTRs but less than 24% identities with those of vertebrate and deuterostome invertebrate 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolases. Hagfish TTR, as well as lamprey and little skate TTRs, had an N-terminal histidine-rich segment, allowing purification by metal-affinity chromatography. The affinity of hagfish TTR for 3,3',5-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) was 190 times higher than that for L-thyroxine, with a dissociation constant of 1.5‒3.9 nM at 4°C. The high-affinity binding sites were strongly sensitive to metal ions. Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) decreased the dissociation constant to one-order of magnitude, whereas a chelator, o-phenanthroline, increased it four times. The number of metal ions (mainly Zn(2+) and Cu(2+)) was approximately 12/TTR (mol/mol). TTR was also a major T3-binding protein in adult hagfish sera and its serum concentration was approximately 8 μM. These results suggest that metal ions and the acquisition of N-terminal histidine-rich segment may cooperatively contribute to the evolution toward an ancient TTR with high T3 binding activity from either 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase after gene duplication.

  1. Growth hormone (GH) activity is associated with increased serum oestradiol and reduced anti-Müllerian hormone in healthy male volunteers treated with GH and a GH antagonist.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, M; Frystyk, J; Faber, J; Kristensen, L Ø; Juul, A

    2013-07-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptors are present on pituitary gonadotrophs and on testicular Leydig and Sertoli cells. Thus, the GH/IGF-I system may modulate the pituitary-gonadal axis in males. This is a randomized cross-over study. Eight healthy male volunteers (mean age 35, range 29-46 years) were treated with GH for 3 weeks (1st week 0.01, 2nd week 0.02, 3rd week 0.03 mg/day/kg) or a GH receptor antagonist (Pegvisomant) (1st week 10, last 2 weeks 15 mg/day), separated by 8 weeks of washout. Before and after the two treatment periods, concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone, testosterone, oestradiol, sex hormone-binding globulin, inhibin B and Anti-Müllerian Hormone (AMH) were measured. During GH treatment, IGF-I increased [(median (IQR)] 166 (162-235) vs. 702 (572-875) μg/L, p < 0.001) together with oestradiol [(mean ± SD) 78 ± 23 vs. 111 ± 30 pm, p = 0.019], and the oestradiol/testosterone ratio (p = 0.003). By contrast, AMH (42 ± 14 vs. 32 ± 7 pm, p = 0.018), Inhibin B (211 (146-226) vs. 176 (129-204) ng/L, p = 0.059) and LH (3.8 ± 1.5 vs. 3.2 ± 1.2 U/L, p = 0.096) decreased. During pegvisomant treatment IGF-I (204 (160-290) vs. 106 (97-157) μg/L, p = 0.001) and oestradiol (86 ± 28 vs. 79 ± 25 pm, p = 0.060) decreased. No significant changes or trends in the other reproductive hormones occurred during the two treatment regimens. GH/IGF-I activity was positively associated with serum oestradiol, suggesting that GH/IGF-I stimulates aromatase activity in vivo. As a novel observation, we found that high GH activity was associated with reduced levels of the Sertoli cell marker AMH. Further studies are needed to evaluate possible effects of GH on Sertoli cell function and/or spermatogenesis.

  2. Effects of growth hormone (GH) transgene and nutrition on growth and bone development in common carp.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tingbing; Zhang, Tanglin; Wang, Yaping; Chen, Yushun; Hu, Wei; Zhu, Zuoyan

    2013-10-01

    Limited information is available on effects of growth hormone transgene and nutrition on growth and development of aquatic animals. Here, we present a study to test these effects with growth-enhanced transgenic common carp under two nutritional conditions or feeding rations (i.e., 5% and 10% of fish body weight per day). Compared with the nontransgenic fish, the growth rates of the transgenic fish increased significantly in both feeding rations. The shape of the pharyngeal bone was similar among treatments, but the transgenic fish had relatively smaller and lighter pharyngeal bone compared with the nontransgenic fish. Calcium content of the pharyngeal bone of the transgenic fish was significantly lower than that of the nontransgenic fish. Feeding ration also affected growth rate but less of an effect on bone development. By manipulating intrinsic growth and controlling for both environment (e.g., feeding ration) and genetic background or genotype (e.g., transgenic or not), this study provides empirical evidence that the genotype has a stronger effect than the environment on pharyngeal bone development. The pharyngeal bone strength could be reduced by decreased calcium content and calcification in the transgenic carp.

  3. Growth and development in a child with resistance to thyroid hormone and ectopic thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Heather, Natasha; Hall, Kate; Neas, Katherine; Potter, Howard; Wiltshire, Esko

    2012-03-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone is an uncommon problem, which has rarely been associated with thyroid dysgenesis. We report a case with both thyroid gland ectopy and resistance to thyroid hormone and, thus, a reduced capacity to produce and respond to thyroid hormone. The patient presented at 2 years of age with developmental delay, dysmorphic features, and elevation in both thyroxine and thyrotropin. We document her response to therapy with thyroxine, with particular regard to her growth and development. Persistent elevation of thyrotropin is commonly recognized during treatment of congenital hypothyroidism. Resistance to thyroid hormone may be an important additional diagnosis to consider in cases where thyrotropin remains persistently elevated.

  4. Growth in renal failure: a longitudinal study of emotional and behavioural changes during trials of growth hormone treatment

    PubMed Central

    Postlethwaite, R; Eminson, D; Reynolds, J; Wood, A; Hollis, S

    1998-01-01

    Growth and psychological functioning were studied in 30 patients with renal failure over a two year period following the offer of growth hormone treatment for significant short stature. Parents' concerns about growth decreased significantly during the study. Twenty eight parents (93%) accepted growth hormone treatment; most (74%) were satisfied with it and would opt for it again (89%). The views of these parents were unrelated to growth outcome in their child. This suggests that the positive responses were related more to the effort to improve growth than to any objective treatment success. In contrast children's reduction in concern about growth, satisfaction with treatment (36%), and decision to opt for growth hormone again (50%) were all significantly related to improvement in growth. Parents' reports of non-compliance increased significantly from 41% at 1 year to 91% at 2 years in the group as a whole. No significant changes were identified in maternal mental distress and no additional costs to the psychological health of the children seem to have resulted from the introduction of growth hormone treatment. A group of children was identified who accepted treatment but had continued poor growth. These appeared to be at particular risk of both physical problems and associated or consequent psychological difficulties.

 PMID:9613351

  5. Exercise‐Induced growth hormone during acute sleep deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Ritsche, Kevin; Nindl, Bradly C.; Wideman, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The effect of acute (24‐h) sleep deprivation on exercise‐induced growth hormone (GH) and insulin‐like growth factor‐1 (IGF‐1) was examined. Ten men (20.6 ± 1.4 years) completed two randomized 24‐h sessions including a brief, high‐intensity exercise bout following either a night of sleep (SLEEP) or (24‐h) sleep deprivation (SLD). Anaerobic performance (mean power [MP], peak power [PP], minimum power [MinP], time to peak power [TTPP], fatigue index, [FI]) and total work per sprint [TWPS]) was determined from four maximal 30‐sec Wingate sprints on a cycle ergometer. Self‐reported sleep 7 days prior to each session was similar between SLEEP and SLD sessions (7.92 ± 0.33 vs. 7.98 ± 0.39 h, P =0.656, respectively) and during the actual SLEEP session in the lab, the total amount of sleep was similar to the 7 days leading up to the lab session (7.72 ± 0.14 h vs. 7.92 ± 0.33 h, respectively) (P =0.166). No differences existed in MP, PP, MinP, TTPP, FI, TWPS, resting GH concentrations, time to reach exercise‐induced peak GH concentration (TTP), or free IGF‐1 between sessions. GH area under the curve (AUC) (825.0 ± 199.8 vs. 2212.9 ± 441.9 μg/L*min, P <0.01), exercise‐induced peak GH concentration (17.8 ± 3.7 vs. 39.6 ± 7.1 μg/L, P <0.01) and ΔGH (peak GH – resting GH) (17.2 ± 3.7 vs. 38.2 ± 7.3 μg/L, P <0.01) were significantly lower during the SLEEP versus SLD session. Our results indicate that the exercise‐induced GH response was significantly augmented in sleep‐deprived individuals. PMID:25281616

  6. Exercise-Induced growth hormone during acute sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Ritsche, Kevin; Nindl, Bradly C; Wideman, Laurie

    2014-10-01

    The effect of acute (24-h) sleep deprivation on exercise-induced growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) was examined. Ten men (20.6 ± 1.4 years) completed two randomized 24-h sessions including a brief, high-intensity exercise bout following either a night of sleep (SLEEP) or (24-h) sleep deprivation (SLD). Anaerobic performance (mean power [MP], peak power [PP], minimum power [MinP], time to peak power [TTPP], fatigue index, [FI]) and total work per sprint [TWPS]) was determined from four maximal 30-sec Wingate sprints on a cycle ergometer. Self-reported sleep 7 days prior to each session was similar between SLEEP and SLD sessions (7.92 ± 0.33 vs. 7.98 ± 0.39 h, P = 0.656, respectively) and during the actual SLEEP session in the lab, the total amount of sleep was similar to the 7 days leading up to the lab session (7.72 ± 0.14 h vs. 7.92 ± 0.33 h, respectively) (P = 0.166). No differences existed in MP, PP, MinP, TTPP, FI, TWPS, resting GH concentrations, time to reach exercise-induced peak GH concentration (TTP), or free IGF-1 between sessions. GH area under the curve (AUC) (825.0 ± 199.8 vs. 2212.9 ± 441.9 μg/L*min, P < 0.01), exercise-induced peak GH concentration (17.8 ± 3.7 vs. 39.6 ± 7.1 μg/L, P < 0.01) and ΔGH (peak GH - resting GH) (17.2 ± 3.7 vs. 38.2 ± 7.3 μg/L, P < 0.01) were significantly lower during the SLEEP versus SLD session. Our results indicate that the exercise-induced GH response was significantly augmented in sleep-deprived individuals.

  7. Elevation of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor messenger ribonucleic acid expression in growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma with Gsalpha protein mutation.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Naoyuki; Kim, Kyongsong; Sanno, Naoko; Yoshida, Daizo; Teramoto, Akira; Shibasaki, Tamotsu

    2008-01-01

    Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) stimulates not only the synthesis and secretion of GH but also the proliferation of normal somatotrophs. The expression of GHRH receptor (GHRHR) is regulated by GHRH, both of which are known to be expressed in human GH-secreting pituitary adenoma cells. Somatic mutations in the subunit of Gsalpha protein (gsp), lead to the constitutive activation of adenylyl cyclase in pituitary adenomas that secrete GH. It has not been examined how gsp mutations influence GHRHR expression in GH-secreting adenomas. We therefore analyzed the expression levels of GHRHR messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) in GH-secreting pituitary adenomas focusing on a gsp mutation. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of GHRH on the expression of GHRHR mRNA in primary cultures of GH-secreting pituitary adenoma cells. GHRHR mRNA expression levels were significantly elevated in gsp mutation-positive GH-secreting adenomas compared with those in gsp mutation-negative ones. In primary-cultured GH-secreting adenoma cells, the increase of GH secretion in response to GHRH was shown in both gsp mutation-positive and -negative adenoma cells with a significantly higher response in the latter adenoma cells. GHRH increased GHRHR mRNA expression level in gsp mutation-negative adenoma cells while it was not influenced by GHRH in gsp mutation-positive adenoma cells. These results suggest that gsp mutations up-regulate GHRHR mRNA expression in GH-secreting pituitary adenoma cells, and that gsp mutations desensitize the adenoma cells to GHRH in terms of their GHRHR mRNA expression probably because of their saturation of GHRH signaling.

  8. Effects of microgravity on growth hormone concentration and distribution in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Aga; Jensen, Philip; Desrosiers, Mark; Bandurski, Robert S.

    1989-01-01

    On earth, gravity affects the distribution of the plant growth hormone, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), in a manner such that the plant grows into a normal vertical orientation (shoots up, roots down). How the plant controls the amount and distribution of IAA is only partially understood and is currently under investigation in this laboratory. The question to be answered in the flight experiment concerns the effect of gravity on the concentration, turn over, and distribution of the growth hormone. The answer to this question will aid in understanding the mechanism by which plants control the amount and distribution of growth hormone. Such knowledge of a plant's hormonal metabolism may aid in the growth of plants in space and will lead to agronomic advances.

  9. Growth hormone improves growth retardation induced by rapamycin without blocking its antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effects on rat growth plate.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-García, Óscar; García-López, Enrique; Loredo, Vanessa; Gil-Peña, Helena; Mejía-Gaviria, Natalia; Rodríguez-Suárez, Julián; Ordóñez, Flor Á; Santos, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Rapamycin, an immunosuppressant agent used in renal transplantation with antitumoral properties, has been reported to impair longitudinal growth in young individuals. As growth hormone (GH) can be used to treat growth retardation in transplanted children, we aimed this study to find out the effect of GH therapy in a model of young rat with growth retardation induced by rapamycin administration. Three groups of 4-week-old rats treated with vehicle (C), daily injections of rapamycin alone (RAPA) or in combination with GH (RGH) at pharmacological doses for 1 week were compared. GH treatment caused a 20% increase in both growth velocity and body length in RGH animals when compared with RAPA group. GH treatment did not increase circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor I, a systemic mediator of GH actions. Instead, GH promoted the maturation and hypertrophy of growth plate chondrocytes, an effect likely related to AKT and ERK1/2 mediated inactivation of GSK3β, increase of glycogen deposits and stabilization of β-catenin. Interestingly, GH did not interfere with the antiproliferative and antiangiogenic activities of rapamycin in the growth plate and did not cause changes in chondrocyte autophagy markers. In summary, these findings indicate that GH administration improves longitudinal growth in rapamycin-treated rats by specifically acting on the process of growth plate chondrocyte hypertrophy but not by counteracting the effects of rapamycin on proliferation and angiogenesis.

  10. Growth Hormone Improves Growth Retardation Induced by Rapamycin without Blocking Its Antiproliferative and Antiangiogenic Effects on Rat Growth Plate

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-García, Óscar; García-López, Enrique; Loredo, Vanessa; Gil-Peña, Helena; Mejía-Gaviria, Natalia; Rodríguez-Suárez, Julián; Ordóñez, Flor Á.; Santos, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Rapamycin, an immunosuppressant agent used in renal transplantation with antitumoral properties, has been reported to impair longitudinal growth in young individuals. As growth hormone (GH) can be used to treat growth retardation in transplanted children, we aimed this study to find out the effect of GH therapy in a model of young rat with growth retardation induced by rapamycin administration. Three groups of 4-week-old rats treated with vehicle (C), daily injections of rapamycin alone (RAPA) or in combination with GH (RGH) at pharmacological doses for 1 week were compared. GH treatment caused a 20% increase in both growth velocity and body length in RGH animals when compared with RAPA group. GH treatment did not increase circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor I, a systemic mediator of GH actions. Instead, GH promoted the maturation and hypertrophy of growth plate chondrocytes, an effect likely related to AKT and ERK1/2 mediated inactivation of GSK3β, increase of glycogen deposits and stabilization of β-catenin. Interestingly, GH did not interfere with the antiproliferative and antiangiogenic activities of rapamycin in the growth plate and did not cause changes in chondrocyte autophagy markers. In summary, these findings indicate that GH administration improves longitudinal growth in rapamycin-treated rats by specifically acting on the process of growth plate chondrocyte hypertrophy but not by counteracting the effects of rapamycin on proliferation and angiogenesis. PMID:22493717

  11. A 66-bp deletion in growth hormone releasing hormone gene 5'-flanking region with largemouth bass recessive embryonic lethal.

    PubMed

    Ma, D M; Han, L Q; Bai, J J; Li, S J; Fan, J J; Yu, L Y; Quan, Y C

    2014-06-01

    Growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) regulates the secretion of growth hormone (GH) in the pituitary gland. A 66-bp deletion (c.-923_-858del) was detected in the 5'-flanking sequence of the largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) GHRH gene. In two cultured random populations of adult individuals (A: n = 170 and B: n = 150), the genotype ratios of +/+:+/- were 2.5:1 and 2.8:1 respectively. Only one -/- fish was detected. A Largemouth bass family was constructed with two heterozygous individuals (+/-) as parents. The genotype ratio of +/+:+/-:-/- in the filial generation embryos was 1:1.6:0.1 at the neurula and 1:2:0 at hatched larvae stages. This indicated that the 66-bp deletion was a recessive lethal site and that homozygous individuals (-/-) died off in embryonic development. The growth traits (body weight, body length and body depth) were measured, and the GHRH mRNA expression levels in brain tissue were detected using real-time PCR. The effects of genotype (+/-) on growth traits and GHRH mRNA expression were not significant. Although the cause of death was not clear, the results hint that the 66-bp deletion site in GHRH 5'-flanking sequence significantly affects the livability in largemouth bass embryonic development.

  12. Induction of chronic growth hormone deficiency by anti-GH serum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindeland, R. E.; Smith, A. T.; Ellis, S.; Evans, E. S.

    1974-01-01

    The observations reported indicate that the growth rate of neonatal rats can be specifically inhibited for at least 78 days following the administration of antisera against growth hormone (GH) for only four days after birth. The inhibition can be correlated with a marked deficit of tibial growth promoting activity in the pituitary but not with the plasma concentrations of immuno-reactive GH.

  13. Simultaneous measurement of hormone release and secretagogue binding by individual pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.F.; Neill, J.D.

    1987-08-01

    The quantitative relationship between receptor binding and hormone secretion at the single-cell level was investigated in the present study by combining a reverse hemolytic plaque assay for measurement of luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion from individual pituitary cells with an autoradiographic assay of /sup 125/I-labeled gonadontropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist binding to the same cells. In the plaque assay, LH secretion induces complement-mediated lysis of the LH-antibody-coated erythrocytes around the gonadotropes, resulting in areas of lysis (plaques). LH release from individual gonadotropes was quantified by comparing radioimmunoassayable LH release to hemolytic area in similarly treated cohort groups of cells; plaque area was linearly related to the amount of LH secreted. Receptor autoradiography was performed using /sup 125/I-labeled GnRH-A (a superagonist analog of GnRH) both as the ligand and as the stimulant for LH release in the plaque assay. The grains appeared to represent specific and high-affinity receptors for GnRH because (i) no pituitary cells other than gonadotropes bound the labeled ligand and (ii) grain development was progressively inhibited by coincubation with increasing doses of unlabeled GnRH-A. The authors conclude that GnRH receptor number for any individual gonadotrope is a weak determinant of the amount of LH it can secrete; nevertheless, full occupancy of all its GnRH receptors is required for any gonadotrope to reach its full LH-secretory capacity. Apparently the levels of other factors comprising the steps along the secretory pathway determine the secretory capacity of an individual cell.

  14. Crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) neuropeptidesfamily: Functions, titer, and binding to target tissues.

    PubMed

    Chung, J Sook; Zmora, N; Katayama, H; Tsutsui, N

    2010-05-01

    The removal of the eyestalk (s) induces molting and reproduction promoted the presence of regulatory substances in the eyestalk (ES), particularly medulla terminalis X-organ and the sinus gland (MTXO-SG). The PCR-based cloning strategies have allowed for isolating a great number of cDNAs sequences of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) neuropeptides family from the eyestalk and non-eyestalk tissues, e.g., pericardial organs and fore- and hindguts. However, the translated corresponding neuropeptides in these tissues, their circulating concentrations, the mode of actions, and specific physiological functions have not been well described. The profiles of CHH neuropeptides present in the MTXO-SG may differ among decapod crustacean species, but they can be largely divided into two sub-groups on the basis of structural homology: (1) CHH and (2) molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH)/mandibular organ-inhibiting hormone (MOIH)/vitellogenesis/gonad-inhibiting hormone (V/GIH). CHH typically elevating the level of circulating glucose from animals under stressful conditions (hyper- and hypothermia, hypoxia, and low salinity) has multiple target tissues and functions such as ecdysteroidogenesis, osmoregulation, and vitellogenesis. Recently, MIH, known for exclusively suppressing ecdysteroidogenesis in Y-organs, is also reported to have an additional role in vitellogenesis of adult female crustacean species, suggesting that some CHH neuropeptides may acquire an extra regulatory role in reproduction at adult stage. This paper reviews the regulatory roles of CHH and MIH at the levels of specific functions, temporal and spatial expression, titers, their binding sites on the target tissues, and second messengers from two crab species: the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, and the European green crab, Carcinus maenas. It further discusses the diverse regulatory roles of these neuropeptides and the functional plasticity of these neuropeptides in regard to life stage and species

  15. Microbiome impact on metabolism and function of sex, thyroid, growth and parathyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Kunc, Michał; Gabrych, Anna; Witkowski, Jacek M

    2016-01-01

    Commensal bacteria and their genes associated with host are known as microbiome. In recent years, microbial influence on host endocrine system has been under detailed investigation. The role of microbiome in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and obesity, the function of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and secretion of hormones regulating appetite is well described in world literature. In this article we discuss poorly reviewed issues: the microbiome role in modulation of non-peptide (sex and thyroid) and peptide (growth hormone and parathyroid hormone) functions. Understanding complex bidirectional relations between host endocrine system and bacteria is of fundamental importance to understanding microbial impact on host reproduction, risk of endocrine-related cancers, pathogenesis of non-thyroidal illness syndrome, growth failure in children and hormonal changes during chronic kidney disease. This article also highlights effects of dietary compounds on microbiome composition and bacterial enzymes activity, and thus host hormonal status.

  16. Growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1 and the aging brain.

    PubMed

    Ashpole, Nicole M; Sanders, Jessica E; Hodges, Erik L; Yan, Han; Sonntag, William E

    2015-08-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 regulate the development and function of cells throughout the body. Several clinical diseases that result in a decline in physical and mental functions are marked by mutations that disrupt GH or IGF-1 signaling. During the lifespan there is a robust decrease in both GH and IGF-1. Because GH and IGF-1 are master regulators of cellular function, impaired GH and IGF-1 signaling in aging/disease states leads to significant alterations in tissue structure and function, especially within the brain. This review is intended to highlight the effects of the GH and IGF-1 on neuronal structure, function, and plasticity. Furthermore, we address several potential mechanisms through which the age-related reductions in GH and IGF-1 affect cognition. Together, the studies reviewed here highlight the importance of maintaining GH and IGF-1 signaling in order to sustain proper brain function throughout the lifespan.

  17. Mercury inhibits rat liver and kidney glucocorticoid receptor hormone binding activity.

    PubMed

    Brkljacić, J; Vojnović Milutinović, D; Dundjerski, J; Matić, G

    2004-05-01

    The present study was focused on the influence of mercury on the rat liver and kidney glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binding properties. The time-course and dose-dependence of mercury effects, as well as possible involvement of thiol groups were examined after in vivo and in vitro administration of the metal in the form of HgCl2. Mercury led to reduction of the liver and kidney GR hormone binding capacity. In both examined tissues maximal reduction was noticed 4 h after administration of the metal at 2 and 3 mg Hg/kg bw, but the effect was more prominent in kidney as compared to liver. On the other hand, binding affinity in the two tissues was similar. The complete reversal of mercury effects on GR binding capacity by 10 mmol/L DTT was achieved in liver and partially in kidney. The reversal by DTT suggested that mercury caused the decrease of GR binding activity by interacting with thiol groups. The difference in the response of the two tissues reflected the fact that kidney contained a higher mercury concentration and a lower thiol content in comparison to liver. The implicated thiols probably belong to GR, since when applied in vitro at 0 degrees C, mercury produced reduction of the receptor binding activity similar to that observed in vivo. GR protein level examined by quantitative Western blot was either unchanged, when determined by polyclonal antibody, or reduced, when determined by BuGR2 antibody, suggesting that Hg might affect BuGR epitope availability.

  18. Leptin activates chicken growth hormone promoter without chicken STAT3 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Murase, Daisuke; Namekawa, Shoko; Ohkubo, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone that not only regulates food intake and energy homeostasis but also induces growth hormone (GH) mRNA expression and release, thereby controlling growth and metabolism in mammals. The molecular mechanism of leptin-induced regulation of GH gene transcription is unclear. The current study investigated the effects of leptin on the chicken GH (cGH) promoter and the molecular mechanism underlying leptin-induced cGH gene expression in vitro. Leptin activated the cGH promoter in the presence of chPit-1α in CHO cells stably expressing the chicken leptin receptor. Promoter activation did not require STAT-binding elements in the cGH promoter or STAT3 activity. However, JAK2 activation was required for leptin-dependent activity. JAK2-dependent pathways include p42/44 MAPK and PI3K, and inhibition of these pathways partially blocked leptin-induced cGH gene transcription. Although CK2 directly activates JAK2, a CK2 inhibitor blocked leptin-dependent activation of the cGH gene without affecting JAK2 phosphorylation. The CK2 inhibitor suppressed Erk1/2 and Akt phosphorylation. Additional data implicate Src family kinases in leptin-dependent cGH gene activation. These results suggest that leptin activates the cGH gene in the presence of chPit-1α via several leptin-activated kinases. Although further study is required, we suggest that the leptin-induced JAK2/p42/44 MAPK and JAK2/PI3K cascades are activated by Src-meditated CK2, leading to CBP phosphorylation and interaction with chPit-1α, resulting in transactivation of the cGH promoter.

  19. The role of nitric oxide in the coronary vasoconstriction caused by growth hormone in anaesthetized pigs.

    PubMed

    Molinari, C; Battaglia, A; Bona, G; Grossini, E; Mary, D A; Vacca, G

    2000-03-01

    Intravenous injection of growth hormone in anaesthetized pigs has been shown to cause coronary vasoconstriction by antagonizing the vasodilatory effects of 2-adrenergic receptors. Because nitric oxide is believed to modulate or mediate 2-adrenergic effects, the present study was undertaken in the same experimental model to determine the role of nitric oxide in the above response to growth hormone. In fourteen pigs anaesthetized with sodium pentobarbitone, changes in left circumflex or anterior descending coronary blood flow caused by intravenous injection of 0.05 i.u. kg-1 of growth hormone at constant heart rate and arterial blood pressure were assessed using electromagnetic flowmeters. In a first control group of six pigs, growth hormone caused a decrease in coronary blood flow which averaged 13.1 % of the baseline values. In a second group of eight pigs, intravenous administration of N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) was used to block the endothelial release of nitric oxide. In these pigs, the subsequent injection of growth hormone did not cause any significant changes in coronary blood flow, even when performed after reversing the increase in arterial blood pressure and coronary vascular resistance caused by L-NAME with continuous intravenous infusion of papaverine. These results indicated that the coronary vasoconstricting effect of growth hormone, known to involve antagonism of 2-adrenergic vasodilatory effect, was mediated by inhibition of nitric oxide release.

  20. Rapid method for the preparation of 125I-labelled human growth hormone for receptor studies, using reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Ilondo, M.M.; Dehart, I.; De Meyts, P.

    1986-01-29

    Human growth hormone was labelled with 125 Iodine by the stoichiometric modification of the chloramine-T method to a specific activity of 50-80 microCi/microgram, and the iodinated mixture was purified by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography using a C18 column (SynChropak RP-P) and a linear gradient. Compared with the usual Sephadex G-100 chromatography, HPLC gave a much better separation, with a higher yield and a considerably reduced analysis time (30 min vs 5 h). The (125I)-labelled preparation had normal binding to IM-9 lymphocyte receptors. The maximum bindability of the HPLC-purified preparation approximated 90%, which is the best value so far reported for human growth hormone. It is concluded that HPLC is a fast, convenient and reproducible method for obtaining an improved (125I)-labelled human growth hormone for receptor studies.

  1. Growth enhancement of fowls by dietary administration of recombinant yeast cultures containing enriched growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Chen, C M; Cheng, W T; Chang, Y C; Chang, T J; Chen, H L

    2000-09-15

    In present study the methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris, was used to express a recombinant growth hormone (rGH) gene of swine. A synthetic secretion cassette was constructed using the promoter of the alcohol oxidase1 gene (AOX1), and a alpha-factor signal peptide. After electroporatic transformation and zeocin selection, several clones exhibited high levels of rGH protein expression constituting more than 20% of total yeast protein. Over 95% of rGH was shown to be export into the culture supernatant. Yeast transformant containing the highest recombinant growth hormone level (rGH yeast) and native GS115 Pichia pastoris (non-rGH yeast, as a control) were separately cultured, harvested and adsorbed by wheat bran. Yeast cultures of four dosages (0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4%) were mixed respectively with chick basal diet and fed to simulated country chickens for 9 weeks. The results showed that, when compared to control chicks, the percentage of body weight gain was improved significantly (P<0.05) in chicks fed with diets containing 0.1 or 0.2% rGH-rich yeast culture at brooding stage, and in chicks fed with 0.4% rGH-rich yeast culture at growing stage. The average weight gain in rGH yeast treated groups for the full-term (0 to 63d) and short term (43 to 63d) of growth were 10.6 and 9.4%, respectively, better than the non-rGH yeast control group. These experimental data suggest that the use of rGH-containing yeast as a supplement in fed provided an alternative approach for growth improvement in simulated country chickens.

  2. Growth hormone, the insulin-like growth factor axis, insulin and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Peter E; Banerjee, Indraneel; Murray, Philip G; Renehan, Andrew G

    2011-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and insulin have potent growth-promoting and anabolic actions. Their potential involvement in tumor promotion and progression has been of concern for several decades. The evidence that GH, IGF-I and insulin can promote and contribute to cancer progression comes from various sources, including transgenic and knockout mouse models and animal and human cell lines derived from cancers. Assessments of the GH-IGF axis in healthy individuals followed up to assess cancer incidence provide direct evidence of this risk; raised IGF-I levels in blood are associated with a slightly increased risk of some cancers. Studies of human diseases characterized by excess growth factor secretion or treated with growth factors have produced reassuring data, with no notable increases in de novo cancers in children treated with GH. Although follow-up for the vast majority of these children does not yet extend beyond young adulthood, a slight increase in cancers in those with long-standing excess GH secretion (as seen in patients with acromegaly) and no overall increase in cancer with insulin treatment, have been observed. Nevertheless, long-term surveillance for cancer incidence in all populations exposed to increased levels of GH is vitally important.

  3. Prolactin, thyrotropin, and growth hormone release during stress associated with parachute jumping.

    PubMed

    Noel, G L; Dimond, R C; Earll, J M; Frantz, A G

    1976-05-01

    Prolactin, growth hormone, and thyrotropin (TSH) release during the stress of parachute jumping has been evaluated in 14 male subjects. Subjects were studied at several times before and immediately after their first military parachute jump. All three hormones had risen significantly 1 to 14 min after the jump, compared to mean levels measured immediately beforehand. Earlier studies of physical exercise by ourselves and others would suggest that emotional stress played a role in producing changes of this magnitude. We conclude that prolactin, TSH, and growth hormone are released in physiologically significant amounts in association with the stress of parachute jumping.

  4. Hypoxia and cytoplasmic alkalinization upregulate growth hormone expression in lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Weigent, Douglas A

    2013-03-01

    We report here that culture of lymphoid cells under hypoxic conditions showed an increase in both luciferase expression from a GH-promoter luciferase construct and the levels of lymphocyte GH. The effect was mimicked by treatment of cells with cobalt chloride consistent with a specific oxygen-sensing mechanism. We identified a putative hypoxia response element (HRE) in the GH promoter at the region -176 bp to -172 bp that contains a copy of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (Hif-1) binding motif (5'-ACGTG-3'). The results also showed that culture of primary rat spleen cells with different doses of TMA induced a dose-dependent increase in lymphocyte GH by Western blot analysis. Greater levels of GH are induced in T cell-enriched populations compared to B cell-enriched populations after treatment with CoCl(2) or TMA. Our results suggest that the stressful cellular conditions likely to occur at sites of inflammation or tumor growth may induce the synthesis of lymphocyte GH.

  5. Concomitant therapies (glucocorticoids and sex hormones) in adult patients with growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Scaroni, C; Ceccato, F; Rizzati, S; Mantero, F

    2008-09-01

    Adult-onset GH deficiency (GHD), mostly due to organic lesions of the pituitary-hypothalamic region, is frequently associated with multiple anterior pituitary deficiencies that need long-term substitutive treatment. The GH-IGF-I axis may play an important role in modulating peripheral metabolism of hormones (adrenal, thyroid, and sex hormones) and these interactions may have clinically significant implications on the phenotypes of adult GHD patients and on the effects of the combined replacement hormonal treatment of this condition. By accelerating the peripheral metabolism of cortisol, GH therapy may precipitate adrenal insufficiency in susceptible hypopituitary patients; estrogen replacement blunts the response to GH in women whereas in men with androgen substitution the responsivity increases over time. Endocrinologists should be mindful of these phenomena when starting patients with hypopituitarism on GH replacement therapy.

  6. Transgenic medaka that overexpress growth hormone have a skin color that does not indicate the activation or inhibition of somatolactin-α signal.

    PubMed

    Komine, Ritsuko; Nishimaki, Toshiyuki; Kimura, Tetsuaki; Oota, Hiroki; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Homma, Noriko; Fukamachi, Shoji

    2016-06-10

    Teleosts have two paralogous growth-hormone receptors (GHRs). In vitro studies demonstrated that both receptors bind to and transmit the signal of the growth hormone (GH). However, one of the GHRs (GHR1) was shown to bind more strongly to somatolactin-α (SLα), a fish-specific peptide hormone that is closely related to GH, and is, therefore, termed somatolactin receptor (SLR). In this study, we questioned whether the dual binding of GHR1/SLR causes a crosstalk (reciprocal activation or inhibition) between GH and SLα signals in vivo. For this purpose, we newly established a transgenic medaka that overexpresses GH (Actb-GH:GFP) and assessed its phenotype. The body weight of these transgenic medaka is about twice that of wild-type fish, showing that functional GH was successfully overexpressed in Actb-GH:GFP fish. The transgenic medaka, especially female fish, showed severe infertility, which was a common side effect in GH transgenesis. The skin color, which reflects the effects of SLα most conspicuously in medaka, was similar to that of neither the SLα-overexpressing nor the SLα-deficient medaka, indicating that GH overexpression does not enhance or suppress the SLα signal. We also verified that a transgenic medaka that overexpressed SLα grew and reproduced normally. Therefore, regardless of the in vitro binding relationships, the GH and SLα signals seem not to crosstalk significantly in vivo even when these hormones are overexpressed.

  7. Commercial assays available for insulin-like growth factor I and their use in diagnosing growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Clemmons, D R

    2001-01-01

    Radioimmunoassays of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) are commonly used for screening adults and children for growth hormone (GH) deficiency or excess. There are, however, many problems with such assays. Attempts to resolve these problems have focused on methods of separating IGF-I from its binding proteins, and on reducing inter- and intra-assay variability. In particular, the collection of sufficient high-quality normative data is a major difficulty in many laboratories. Clinical evaluation of assays is also problematic. IGF-I levels vary with age after puberty, and this is complicated by the maintenance of IGF-binding protein 3 levels by IGF-II. Generally, studies have shown that IGF-I is sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of acromegaly, but screening for GH deficiency (GHD) is less precise. The most commonly used commercial assays are immunoradiometric (IRMA) sandwich assays, using antibodies specific to IGF-I. IRMA assays are quick and accurate, and the two-site antibody reactivity produces a high degree of specificity. Additional techniques such as acid-ethanol extraction or saturation with IGF-II can improve reliability. More recently, the introduction of chemiluminescence has provided enhanced speed and sensitivity. The clinical use of these assays has provided a wealth of information regarding the diagnosis of GHD, and it may be possible to reduce the number of patients who require provocative GH testing. IGF-I assays are also of great use in monitoring GH replacement therapy. Despite the problems, IGF-I measurement is currently the best indirect method available for screening and monitoring patients with GHD.

  8. Muscle force and endurance in untreated and human growth hormone or insulin-like growth factor-I-treated patients with growth hormone deficiency or Laron syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brat, O; Ziv, I; Klinger, B; Avraham, M; Laron, Z

    1997-01-01

    Muscle force and endurance of four muscle groups (biceps, triceps, hamstrings and quadriceps) were measured by a computerized device in three groups: (A) 4 boys with isolated growth hormone deficiencies (IGHD) examined before at 10 and 24 months of hGH treatment; (B) 5 children (2 F, 3 M) with Laron syndrome were examined 3.5-4 years after initiation of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) treatment, and (C) comprised 8 untreated adults (5 F, 3 M) with Laron syndrome. For each patient, 2 matched controls, by age, sex, physical activity and height below the 50th percentile, were examined. GH- or IGF-I-deficient patients before treatment revealed reduced muscle force and endurance. GH treatment (0.6 U/kg/week) restored muscle force and endurance, progressively, mainly in the boys with puberty. Three to 4 years of IGF-I treatment (150 micrograms/kg/day) in patients with Laron syndrome proved to have a weaker effect than GH in restoring muscle force. The difference in effectiveness between hGH and IGF-I in restoring muscle force may be due to either the more marked muscle underdevelopment in Laron syndrome patients than in patients with IGHD or a difference in action potential between the two hormones.

  9. Homologous down-regulation of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor messenger ribonucleic acid levels.

    PubMed

    Aleppo, G; Moskal, S F; De Grandis, P A; Kineman, R D; Frohman, L A

    1997-03-01

    Repeated stimulation of pituitary cell cultures with GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) results in diminished responsiveness, a phenomenon referred to as homologous desensitization. One component of GHRH-induced desensitization is a reduction in GHRH-binding sites, which is reflected by the decreased ability of GHRH to stimulate a rise in intracellular cAMP. In the present study, we sought to determine if homologous down-regulation of GHRH receptor number is due to a decrease in GHRH receptor synthesis. To this end, we developed and validated a quantitative RT-PCR assay system that was capable of assessing differences in GHRH-R messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in total RNA samples obtained from rat pituitary cell cultures. Treatment of pituitary cells with GHRH, for as little as 4 h, resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GHRH-R mRNA levels. The maximum effect was observed with 0.1 and 1 nM GHRH, which reduced GHRH-R mRNA levels to 49 +/- 4% (mean +/- SEM) and 54 +/- 11% of control values, respectively (n = three separate experiments; P < 0.05). Accompanying the decline in GHRH-R mRNA levels was a rise in GH release; reaching 320 +/- 31% of control values (P < 0.01). Because of the possibility that the rise in medium GH level is the primary regulator of GHRH-R mRNA, we pretreated pituitary cultures for 4 h with GH to achieve a concentration comparable with that induced by a maximal stimulation with GHRH (8 micrograms GH/ml medium). Following pretreatment, cultures were stimulated for 15 min with GHRH and intracellular cAMP accumulation was measured by RIA. GH pretreatment did not impair the ability of GHRH to induce a rise in cAMP concentrations. However, as anticipated, GHRH pretreatment (10 nM) significantly reduced subsequent GHRH-stimulated cAMP to 46% of untreated controls. These data suggest that GHRH, but not GH, directly reduces GHRH-R mRNA levels. To determine whether this effect was mediated through cAMP, cultures were treated with forskolin, a direct stimulator of

  10. Effect of recombinant growth hormone on expression of growth hormone receptor, insulin-like growth factor mRNA and serum level of leptin in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingfu; Zhao, Zhihui; Ni, Yingdong; Zhao, Ruqian; Chen, Jie

    2003-04-01

    Sixteen Large White x Landrace castrated male pigs were allotted into treatment and control group. The treatment group was injected intramuscularly with recombinant porcine growth hormone (rpGH, 4 mg d(-1)) and the control group with vehicle for 28 days. Animals were slaughtered 4 h after final injection for liver, longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle and blood sampling. Serum concentration of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) and leptin were determined by RIA. The total RNA was extracted from tissues to measure the abundance of growth hormone receptor (GHR), IGF-I mRNA by RT-PCR with 18S rRNA internal standard. Results showed that rpGH enhanced the average daily weight gain by 26.1% (P < 0.05), the serum IGF-I concentration by 70.94% (P < 0.01), decreased serum leptin by 34.8% (P < 0.01). The relative abundance of GHR and IGF-I mRNA in liver were increased by 24.45% (P < 0.05) and 45.30% (P < 0.01), respectively, but no difference of GHR (P > 0.05) and IGF-I mRNA (P > 0.05) in LD between GH treated and control group was found. These results suggest that rpGH can up-regulate hepatic GHR and IGF-I gene expression and improve animal growth. However the effect of rpGH on GHR and IGF-I gene expression are tissue-specific.

  11. Laboratory diagnosis of multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies: issues with testing of the growth and thyroid axes.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Jon

    2009-01-01

    Clinical manifestations of hypopituitarism are variable and depend on the severity of hormone deficiency, creating a diagnostic challenge for diagnosis of the non-classical patient who may have a less severe growth hormone (GH) deficiency and only a suggestion of possible hypothyroidism. Laboratory tests contribute to the diagnostic process, but the tests for growth and thyroid dysfunction, two of the most common manifestations of multiple pituitary hormone deficiency, are some of the most problematic from a methodological perspective. Patients in the "grey zone" of diagnosis, for whom there is no distinct dividing line or gold standard diagnostic test, are the focus of this article. Issues relating to the use of laboratory tests involving GH, insulin-like growth factor-I, and free thyroxine in the diagnosis of GH and thyroid deficiency are reviewed. Assay harmonization initiatives are required before clinical research studies are performed to establish diagnostic thresholds for GH and thyroid hormone deficiencies.

  12. Modulation of Mammary Gland Development and Milk Production by Growth Hormone Expression in GH Transgenic Goats.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zekun; Lin, Jian; Ye, Lulu; Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Jianquan; Yang, Qian; Yu, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    Mammary gland development during puberty and reconstruction during pregnancy and lactation is under the control of circulating endocrine hormones, such as growth hormone, which are released from the pituitary. In this study, we explored the influence of overexpression of growth hormone in the mammary gland on breast development and milk production in goats. Using transcriptome sequencing, we found that the number of highly expressed genes was greater in GH transgenic goats than non-transgenic goats. Furthermore, KEGG pathway analysis showed that the majority of the genes belonged to the MAPK signaling pathway and the ECM-receptor interaction pathway. The expression of genes related to breast development was further confirmed using qRT-PCR. Interestingly, both milk production and milk quality were increased. The results of these experiments imply that overexpression of growth hormone in the breast may stimulate breast development and enhances milk production by modulating alveolar cell proliferation or branching through the MAPK signaling pathway.

  13. Impaired JAK-STAT signal transduction contributes to growth hormone resistance in chronic uremia.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, F; Chen, Y; Tsao, T; Nouri, P; Rabkin, R

    2001-08-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with resistance to the growth-promoting and anabolic actions of growth hormone (GH). In rats with CRF induced by partial renal ablation, 7 days of GH treatment had a diminished effect on weight gain and hepatic IGF-1 and IGFBP-1 mRNA levels, compared with sham-operated pair-fed controls. To assess whether GH resistance might be due to altered signal transduction, activation of the JAK-STAT pathway was studied 10 or 15 minutes after intravenous injection of 5 mg/kg GH or vehicle. Hepatic GH receptor (GHR) mRNA levels were significantly decreased in CRF, but GHR protein abundance and GH binding to microsomal and plasma membranes was unaltered. JAK2, STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 protein abundance was also unchanged. However, GH-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK2, STAT5, and STAT3 was 75% lower in the CRF animals. Phosphorylated STAT5 and STAT3 were also diminished in nuclear extracts. The expression of the suppressor of cytokine signaling-2 (SOCS-2) was increased twofold in GH-treated CRF animals, and SOCS-3 mRNA levels were elevated by 60% in CRF, independent of GH treatment. In conclusion, CRF causes a postreceptor defect in GH signal transduction characterized by impaired phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of GH-activated STAT proteins, which is possibly mediated, at least in part, by overexpression of SOCS proteins.

  14. Periplasmic production via the pET expression system of soluble, bioactive human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Sockolosky, Jonathan T; Szoka, Francis C

    2013-02-01

    A pET based expression system for the production of recombinant human growth hormone (hGH) directed to the Escherichia coli periplasmic space was developed. The pET22b plasmid was used as a template for creating vectors that encode hGH fused to either a pelB or ompA secretion signal under control of the strong bacteriophage T7 promoter. The pelB- and ompA-hGH constructs expressed in BL21 (λDE3)-RIPL E. coli are secreted into the periplasm which facilitates isolation of soluble hGH by selective disruption of the outer membrane. A carboxy-terminal poly-histidine tag enabled purification by Ni(2+) affinity chromatography with an average yield of 1.4 mg/L culture of purified hGH, independent of secretion signal. Purified pelB- and ompA-hGH are monomeric based on size exclusion chromatography with an intact mass corresponding to mature hGH indicating proper cleavage of the signal peptide and folding in the periplasm. Both pelB- and ompA-hGH bind the hGH receptor with high affinity and potently stimulate Nb2 cell growth. These results demonstrate that the pET expression system is suitable for the rapid and simple isolation of bioactive, soluble hGH from E. coli.

  15. STAT3 upregulation in pituitary somatotroph adenomas induces growth hormone hypersecretion.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cuiqi; Jiao, Yonghui; Wang, Renzhi; Ren, Song-Guang; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Melmed, Shlomo

    2015-04-01

    Pituitary somatotroph adenomas result in dysregulated growth hormone (GH) hypersecretion and acromegaly; however, regulatory mechanisms that promote GH hypersecretion remain elusive. Here, we provide evidence that STAT3 directly induces somatotroph tumor cell GH. Evaluation of pituitary tumors revealed that STAT3 expression was enhanced in human GH-secreting adenomas compared with that in nonsecreting pituitary tumors. Moreover, STAT3 and GH expression were concordant in a somatotroph adenoma tissue array. Promoter and expression analysis in a GH-secreting rat cell line (GH3) revealed that STAT3 specifically binds the Gh promoter and induces transcription. Stable expression of STAT3 in GH3 cells induced expression of endogenous GH, and expression of a constitutively active STAT3 further enhanced GH production. Conversely, expression of dominant-negative STAT3 abrogated GH expression. In primary human somatotroph adenoma-derived cell cultures, STAT3 suppression with the specific inhibitor S3I-201 attenuated GH transcription and reduced GH secretion in the majority of derivative cultures. In addition, S3I-201 attenuated somatotroph tumor growth and GH secretion in a rat xenograft model. GH induced STAT3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation, indicating a positive feedback loop between STAT3 and GH in somatotroph tumor cells. Together, these results indicate that adenoma GH hypersecretion is the result of STAT3-dependent GH induction, which in turn promotes STAT3 expression, and suggest STAT3 as a potential therapeutic target for pituitary somatotroph adenomas.

  16. Testosterone inhibition of growth hormone release stimulated by a growth hormone secretagogue: studies in the rat and dog.

    PubMed

    Rigamonti, Antonello E; Cella, Silvano G; Giordani, Claudio; Bonomo, Sara M; Giunta, Marialuisa; Sartorio, Alessandro; Muller, Eugenio

    2006-01-01

    Anabolic steroids are frequently taken by athletes and bodybuilders together with recombinant human GH (rhGH), though there is some scientific evidence that the use of anabolic steroids reverses the rhGH-induced effects. Recently, we have shown that treatment with rhGH (0.2 IU/kg s.c., daily x 12 days) in the dog markedly reduced the canine GH (cGH) responses stimulated by EP51216, a GH secretagogue (GHS), evaluated after 3 and 5 daily rhGH injections, and that the inhibition was still present a few days after rhGH discontinuation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate in the dog the GH response to EP51216 (125 mug/kg i.v.) in a condition of enhanced androgenic function (i.e. acute injection or 15-day treatment with testosterone at the dose of 2 mg/kg i.m. on alternate days), and in the hypophysectomized rat the hypothalamic and hippocampal expression of ghrelin, the receptor of GHSs (GHS-R), GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) and somatostatin (SS) after specific hormonal replacement therapies (testosterone, 1 mg/kg/day s.c.; hydrocortisone, 500 mug/kg/day s.c.; rhGH, 400 mug/kg/day s.c.; 0.9% saline 0.1 ml/kg/day s.c.; x11 days). In the dog experiments, under baseline conditions, a single injection of EP51216 elicited an abrupt rise of plasma cGH. Twenty-four hours from the acute bolus injection of testosterone, C(max) and AUC(0-90) of the GHS-stimulated cGH response were significantly lower than baseline cGH response; 5 days later, there was still a significant decrease of either parameter versus the original values. Short-term treatment with testosterone markedly reduced the GHS-stimulated cGH responses evaluated during (5th bolus) and at the end (8th bolus) of testosterone treatment. Four and 8 days after testosterone withdrawal, the EP51216-stimulated cGH response was still significantly reduced when compared with that under baseline conditions. Plasma concentrations of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) were stable until the 5th bolus of testosterone and

  17. Development of gonadotropes may involve cyclic transdifferentiation of growth hormone cells.

    PubMed

    Childs, G V

    2002-04-01

    The cyclic rise in expression of anterior pituitary gonadotropins coincides with the appearance of cells sharing gonadotropic and somatotropic phenotypes. To learn more about possible factors that regulate the origin of this cell type, we studied the time of appearance of cells that co-expressed growth hormone (GH) and gonadotropins and estrogen receptors during the estrous cycle and compared this timing with known changes in regulatory hormones or their receptors. The first event in this cell population is an increase in expression of estrogen receptor (ER)beta by GH cells from estrus to metestrus suggesting that estrogen may mediate this early change. Expression of GH mRNA rises rapidly from metestrus to mid-cycle. The rise is seen first in GH cells and then in cells with luteinizing hormone (LH) antigens. These data suggest that, early in the cycle, cells bearing GH and growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) receptors begin to produce LH and gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) receptors. Early in proestrus, there is an increase in cells with GH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) suggesting that this set of multipotential cells develops later than GH-LH cells. This fits with earlier studies showing the later rise in expression of FSH mRNA. Collectively these data suggest that the anterior pituitary contains a subset of GH cells that have the capacity to respond to multiple releasing hormones and support more than one system.

  18. Gastrointestinal hormones stimulate growth of Foregut Neuroendocrine Tumors by transactivating the EGF receptor.

    PubMed

    Di Florio, Alessia; Sancho, Veronica; Moreno, Paola; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Jensen, Robert T

    2013-03-01

    Foregut neuroendocrine tumors [NETs] usually pursuit a benign course, but some show aggressive behavior. The treatment of patients with advanced NETs is marginally effective and new approaches are needed. In other tumors, transactivation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) by growth factors, gastrointestinal (GI) hormones and lipids can stimulate growth, which has led to new treatments. Recent studies show a direct correlation between NET malignancy and EGFR expression, EGFR inhibition decreases basal NET growth and an autocrine growth effect exerted by GI hormones, for some NETs. To determine if GI hormones can stimulate NET growth by inducing transactivation of EGFR, we examined the ability of EGF, TGFα and various GI hormones to stimulate growth of the human foregut carcinoid,BON, the somatostatinoma QGP-1 and the rat islet tumor,Rin-14B-cell lines. The EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, AG1478 strongly inhibited EGF and the GI hormones stimulated cell growth, both in BON and QGP-1 cells. In all the three neuroendocrine cell lines studied, we found EGF, TGFα and the other growth-stimulating GI hormones increased Tyr(1068) EGFR phosphorylation. In BON cells, both the GI hormones neurotensin and a bombesin analogue caused a time- and dose-dependent increase in EGFR phosphorylation, which was strongly inhibited by AG1478. Moreover, we found this stimulated phosphorylation was dependent on Src kinases, PKCs, matrix metalloproteinase activation and the generation of reactive oxygen species. These results raise the possibility that disruption of this signaling cascade by either EGFR inhibition alone or combined with receptor antagonists may be a novel therapeutic approach for treatment of foregut NETs/PETs.

  19. Gastrointestinal hormones stimulate growth of Foregut Neuroendocrine Tumors by transactivating the EGF receptor

    PubMed Central

    Di Florio, Alessia; Sancho, Veronica; Moreno, Paola; Fave, Gianfranco Delle; Jensen, Robert T.

    2012-01-01

    Foregut Neuroendocrine Tumors[NETs] usually pursuit a benign course, but some show aggressive behavior. The treatment of patients with advanced NETs is marginally effective and new approaches are needed. In other tumors, transactivation of the EGF receptor(EGFR) by growth factors, gastrointestinal(GI) hormones and lipids can stimulate growth, which has led to new treatments. Recent studies show a direct correlation between NET malignancy and EGFR expression, EGFR inhibition decreases basal NET growth and an autocrine growth effect exerted by GI hormones, for some NETs. To determine if GI hormones can stimulate NET growth by inducing transactivation of EGFR, we examined the ability of EGF, TGFα and various GI hormones to stimulate growth of the human foregut carcinoid, BON, the somatostatinoma QGP-1 and the rat islet tumor, Rin-14B-cell lines. The EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, AG1478 strongly inhibited EGF and the GI hormones stimulated cell growth, both in BON and QGP-1 cells. In all the three neuroendocrine cell lines studied, we found EGF, TGFα and the other growth-stimulating GI hormones increased Tyr1068 EGFR phosphorylation. In BON cells, both the GI hormones neurotensin and a bombesin analogue caused a time- and dose-dependent increase in EGFR phosphorylation, which was strongly inhibited by AG1478. Moreover, we found this stimulated phosphorylation was dependent on Src kinases, PKCs, matrix metalloproteinase activation and the generation of reactive oxygen species. These results raise the possibility that disruption of this signaling cascade by either EGFR inhibition alone or combined with receptor antagonists may be a novel therapeutic approach for treatment of foregut NETs/PETs. PMID:23220008

  20. Levels of hormones and cytokines associated with growth in Honamlı and native hair goats.

    PubMed

    Devrim, A K; Elmaz, O; Mamak, N; Sudagidan, M

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to assess alterations of hormone and cytokine levels associated with growth period during puberty in Honamlı goats which were identified as a new goat breed and had one of the highest meat production potential among the other goat breeds in Turkey. Honamlı goats are originated from native hair goats, so parallel studies of sampling and analyzing were conducted also in native hair goats which have moderate meat production. Blood serum samples of Honamlı (n=90) and native hair goats (n=90) were obtained from the pure herds in Korkuteli and Ka districts of Anatolia. Concentrations of growth hormone (GH), myostatin (MSTN), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH), growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP), leptin, transforming growth factor-betal (TGF-β1) and vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) levels were measured by ELISA in each breed in the age groups of 4, 8 and 12 months. The present results indicate interesting correlations among the age groups and all the examined hormone and cytokine parameters exhibited significant (P<0.05 and P<0.001) differences. The parameters investigated were usually begun to increase after 4 months of age in the both breeds and sexes. Therefore, this paper supported the view that the beginning of hormonal alterations of goats could occur at 4th month of age. The results reported here emphasize the primary role played by GH, MSTN, IGF-1, leptin, GHRH, GHRP, TGF-βi and VEGF in the first year growth period of goats.

  1. Rooster feathering, androgenic alopecia, and hormone dependent tumor growth: What is in common?

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Julie Ann; Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Widelitz, Randall

    2015-01-01

    Different epithelial organs form as a result of epithelial - mesenchymal interactions and share a common theme modulated by variations (Chuong edit. In Molecular Basis of Epithelial Appendage Morphogenesis, 1998). One of the major modulators is the sex hormone pathway that acts on the prototype signaling pathway to alter organ phenotypes. Here we focus on how the sex hormone pathway interfaces with epithelia morphogenesis related signaling pathways. We first survey these sex hormone regulated morphogenetic processes in various epithelial organs. Sexual dimorphism of hairs and feathers has implications in sexual selection. Diseases of these pathways result in androgenic alopecia, hirsutism, henny feathering, etc. The growth and development of mammary glands, prostate glands and external genitalia essential for reproductive function are also dependent on sex hormones. Diseases affecting these organs include congenital anomalies and hormone dependent type of breast and prostate cancers. To study the role of sex hormones in new growth in the context of system biology / pathology, an in vivo model in which organ formation starts from stem cells is essential. With recent developments (Yu et al., The morphogenesis of feathers. Nature 420:308–312, 2002), the growth of tail feathers in roosters and hens has become a testable model in which experimental manipulations are possible. We show exemplary data of differences in their growth rate, proliferative cell population and signaling molecule expression. Working hypotheses are proposed on how the sex hormone pathways may interact with growth pathways. It is now possible to test these hypotheses using the chicken model to learn fundamental mechanisms on how sex hormones affect organogenesis, epithelial organ cycling, and growth related tumorigenesis. PMID:15617560

  2. Cortical bone growth and maturational changes in dwarf rats induced by recombinant human growth hormone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, D. A.; Orth, M. W.; Carr, K. E.; Vanderby, R. Jr; Vailas, A. C.

    1996-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH)-deficient dwarf rat was used to investigate recombinant human (rh) GH-induced bone formation and to determine whether rhGH facilitates simultaneous increases in bone formation and bone maturation during rapid growth. Twenty dwarf rats, 37 days of age, were randomly assigned to dwarf plus rhGH (GH; n = 10) and dwarf plus vehicle (n = 10) groups. The GH group received 1.25 mg rhGH/kg body wt two times daily for 14 days. Biochemical, morphological, and X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on the femur middiaphysis. rhGH stimulated new bone growth in the GH group, as demonstrated by significant increases (P < 0.05) in longitudinal bone length (6%), middiaphyseal cross-sectional area (20%), and the amount of newly accreted bone collagen (28%) in the total pool of middiaphyseal bone collagen. Cortical bone density, mean hydroxyapatite crystal size, and the calcium and collagen contents (microgram/mm3) were significantly smaller in the GH group (P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that the processes regulating new collagen accretion, bone collagen maturation, and mean hydroxyapatite crystal size may be independently regulated during rapid growth.

  3. Puberty, statural growth, and growth hormone release in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kuperminc, Michelle N.; Gurka, Matthew J.; Houlihan, Christine M.; Henderson, Richard C.; Roemmich, James N.; Rogol, Alan D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Children with cerebral palsy (CP) are smaller than normally growing children.. The association between the growth hormone (GH) axis and growth in children with CP during puberty is unknown. We compared growth and markers of the GH axis in pre-pubertal and pubertal children with moderate to severe CP and without CP over a three-year period. Study design Twenty children with CP, ages 6–18, Gross Motor Function Classification System levels III–V, were compared to a group of sixty-three normally growing children of similar age. Anthropometry, Tanner stage, bone age, and laboratory analyses were performed every six months for three years. Laboratory values included spontaneous overnight GH release, fasting IGF-1 and IGFBP-3. Repeated measures models were used to evaluate interactions among Tanner stage and group (children with CP vs. reference children), taking into account gender, age, and nutritional status. Results Children with CP grew more slowly than those without CP at all Tanner stages (p<0.01). Patterns of IGF-1 and GH secretion in children with CP were similar to those of the reference group; however, the concentrations of IGF-1 (p<0.01) and GH (p<0.01) were lower in girls with CP, with a similar trend for boys (p=0.10 and 0.14, respectively). Conclusions Diminished circulating IGF-1 and GH concentrations may explain the differences in growth between the two groups. PMID:20216931

  4. Position stand on androgen and human growth hormone use.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jay R; Kraemer, William J; Bhasin, Shalender; Storer, Thomas; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Haff, G Gregory; Willoughby, Darryn S; Rogol, Alan D

    2009-08-01

    Hoffman, JR, Kraemer, WJ, Bhasin, S, Storer, T, Ratamess, NA, Haff, GG, Willoughby, DS, and Rogol, AD. Position stand on Androgen and human growth hormone use. J Strength Cond Res 23(5): S1-S59, 2009-Perceived yet often misunderstood demands of a sport, overt benefits of anabolic drugs, and the inability to be offered any effective alternatives has fueled anabolic drug abuse despite any consequences. Motivational interactions with many situational demands including the desire for improved body image, sport performance, physical function, and body size influence and fuel such negative decisions. Positive countermeasures to deter the abuse of anabolic drugs are complex and yet unclear. Furthermore, anabolic drugs work and the optimized training and nutritional programs needed to cut into the magnitude of improvement mediated by drug abuse require more work, dedication, and preparation on the part of both athletes and coaches alike. Few shortcuts are available to the athlete who desires to train naturally. Historically, the NSCA has placed an emphasis on education to help athletes, coaches, and strength and conditioning professionals become more knowledgeable, highly skilled, and technically trained in their approach to exercise program design and implementation. Optimizing nutritional strategies are a vital interface to help cope with exercise and sport demands (). In addition, research-based supplements will also have to be acknowledged as a strategic set of tools (e.g., protein supplements before and after resistance exercise workout) that can be used in conjunction with optimized nutrition to allow more effective adaptation and recovery from exercise. Resistance exercise is the most effective anabolic form of exercise, and over the past 20 years, the research base for resistance exercise has just started to develop to a significant volume of work to help in the decision-making process in program design (). The interface with nutritional strategies has been less

  5. Growth hormone and insulin-like growth factors in fish: Where we are and where to go

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reinecke, M.; Bjornsson, Bjorn Thrandur; Dickhoff, Walton W.; McCormick, S.D.; Navarro, I.; Power, D.M.; Gutierrez, J.

    2005-01-01

    This communication summarizes viewpoints, discussion, perspectives, and questions, put forward at a workshop on "Growth hormone and insulin-like growth factors in fish" held on September 7th, 2004, at the 5th International Symposium on Fish Endocrinology in Castello??n, Spain. ?? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Growth promotion of red sea bream, Pagrosomus major, by oral administration of recombinant eel and salmon growth hormone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bin; Mai, Kang-Sen; Xu, Ying-Li; Miao, Hong-Zhi; Liu, Zhen-Hui; Dong, Yong; Lan, Shan; Wang, Rao; Zhang, Pei-Jun

    2001-06-01

    Recombinant eel GH and yeast containing chinook salmon growth hormone (reGH and rcsGH) were incorporated into gelatin and sodium alginate (reGH-GS and rcsGH-GS) or polymer matrix (reGH-HP55) to protect the hormone from proteolytic cleavage in the stomach. The diets containing reGH-GS, rcsGH-GS, reGH-HP55 and free-reGH or uncoated-rcsGH were administered to red sea bream. Feeding of reGH-GS, reGH-HP55 and rcsGH-GS diets resulted in significant increases in body weight and fork length over those of controls. These results strongly suggest that gelatin and sodium alginate as well as polymer matrix protected the hormone from proteolytic enzymes in the gastrointestinal tract to allow the bioactive hormone to enter the circulation and eventually stimulate fish growth.

  7. Galactopoiesis/Effects of hormones and growth factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The term galactopoiesis was originally coined to describe the enhancement of an established lactation. In this sense, only exogenous somatotropin and thyroid hormones are clearly demonstrated galactopoietic agents in dairy animals. However, in a more inclusive sense, galactopoiesis has been used t...

  8. Evaluation of DNA polymorphisms involving growth hormone relative to growth and carcass characteristics in Brahman steers.

    PubMed

    Beauchemin, V R; Thomas, M G; Franke, D E; Silver, G A

    2006-07-31

    Associations of DNA polymorphisms in growth hormone (GH) relative to growth and carcass characteristics in growing Brahman steers (N = 324 from 68 sires) were evaluated. Polymorphisms were an Msp-I RFLP and a leucine/valine SNP in the GH gene as well as a Hinf-I RFLP and a histidine/arginine SNP in transcriptional regulators of the GH gene, Pit-1 and Prop-1. Genotypic frequencies of the GH SNP, Pit-1 RFLP, and Prop-1 SNP were greater than 88% for one of the bi-allelic homozygous genotypes. Genotypic frequencies for the GH Msp-I RFLP genotypes were more evenly distributed with frequencies of 0.43, 0.42, and 0.15 for the genotypes of +/+, +/-, and -/-, respectively. Mixed model analyses of growth and carcass traits with genotype and contemporary group serving as fixed effects and sire fitted as a random effect suggested that sire was a significant source of variation (P < 0.05) in average daily gain, carcass yield, and marbling score. However, measures of growth and carcass traits were similar across GH Msp-I genotypes as steers were slaughtered when fat thickness was estimated to be approximately 1.0 cm. These polymorphisms within the GH gene and/or its transcriptional regulators do not appear to be informative predictors of growth and carcass characteristics in Brahman steers. This is partly due to the high level of homozygosity of genotypes. These findings do not eliminate the potential importance of these polymorphisms as predictors of growth and carcass traits in Bos taurus or Bos taurus x Bos indicus composite cattle.

  9. Hormone induces binding of receptors and transcription factors to a rearranged nucleosome on the MMTV promoter in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Truss, M; Bartsch, J; Schelbert, A; Haché, R J; Beato, M

    1995-01-01

    Hormonal induction of the mouse mammary tumour virus (MMTV) promoter is mediated by interactions between hormone receptors and other transcription factors bound to a complex array of sites. Previous results suggested that access to these sites is modulated by their precise organization into a positioned regulatory nucleosome. Using genomic footprinting, we show that MMTV promoter DNA is rotationally phased in intact cells containing either episomal or chromosomally integrated proviral fragments. Prior to induction there is no evidence for factors bound to the promoter. Following progesterone induction of cells with high levels of receptor, genomic footprinting detects simultaneous protection over the binding sites for hormone receptors, NF-I and the octamer binding proteins. Glucocorticoid or progestin induction leads to a characteristic chromatin remodelling that is independent of ongoing transcription. The centre of the regulatory nucleosome becomes more accessible to DNase I and restriction enzymes, but the limits of the nucleosome are unchanged and the 145 bp core region remains protected against micrococcal nuclease digestion. Thus, the nucleosome covering the MMTV promoter is neither removed nor shifted upon hormone induction, and all relevant transcription factors bind to the surface of the rearranged nucleosome. Since these factors cannot bind simultaneously to free DNA, maintainance of the nucleosome may be required for binding of factors to contiguous sites. Images PMID:7737125

  10. Hypergravity and estrogen effects on avian anterior pituitary growth hormone and prolactin levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorindo, R. P.; Negulesco, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Developing female chicks with fractured right radii were maintained for 14 d at either earth gravity (1 g) or a hypergravity state (2 g). The birds at 1 g were divided into groups which received daily injections of (1) saline, (2) 200 micrograms estrone, and (3) 400 micrograms estrone for 14 d. The 2-g birds were divided into three similarly treated groups. All 2-g birds showed significantly lower body weights than did 1-g birds. Anterior pituitary (AP) glands were excised and analyzed for growth hormone and prolactin content by analytical electrophoresis. The 1-g chicks receiving either dose of daily estrogen showed increased AP growth hormone levels, whereas hypergravity alone did not affect growth hormone content. Chicks exposed to daily estrogen and hypergravity displayed reduced growth hormone levels. AP prolactin levels were slightly increased by the lower daily estrogen dose in 1-g birds, but markedly reduced in birds exposed only to hypergravity. Doubly-treated chicks displayed normal prolactin levels. Reduced growth in 2-g birds might be due, in part, to reduced AP levels of prolactin and/or growth hormone.

  11. Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins: A Structural Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Briony E.; McCarthy, Peter; Norton, Raymond S.

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP-1 to -6) bind insulin-like growth factors-I and -II (IGF-I and IGF-II) with high affinity. These binding proteins maintain IGFs in the circulation and direct them to target tissues, where they promote cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and survival via the type 1 IGF receptor. IGFBPs also interact with many other molecules, which not only influence their modulation of IGF action but also mediate IGF-independent activities that regulate processes such as cell migration and apoptosis by modulating gene transcription. IGFBPs-1 to -6 are structurally similar proteins consisting of three distinct domains, N-terminal, linker, and C-terminal. There have been major advances in our understanding of IGFBP structure in the last decade and a half. While there is still no structure of an intact IGFBP, several structures of individual N- and C-domains have been solved. The structure of a complex of N-BP-4:IGF-I:C-BP-4 has also been solved, providing a detailed picture of the structural features of the IGF binding site and the mechanism of binding. Structural studies have also identified features important for interaction with extracellular matrix components and integrins. This review summarizes structural studies reported so far and highlights features important for binding not only IGF but also other partners. We also highlight future directions in which structural studies will add to our knowledge of the role played by the IGFBP family in normal growth and development, as well as in disease. PMID:22654863