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Sample records for growth hormone-insulin-like growth

  1. Effect of sericin on diabetic hippocampal growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 axis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhihong; Yang, Songhe; He, Yaqiang; Song, Chengjun; Liu, Yongping

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that sericin extracted from silk cocoon significantly reduces blood glucose levels and protects the nervous system against diabetes mellitus. In this study, a rat type 2 diabetes mellitus model was established by intraperitoneal injection of 25 mg/kg streptozotocin for 3 successive days, following which the rats were treated with sericin for 35 days. After treatment, the blood glucose levels of the diabetic rats decreased significantly, the growth hormone level in serum and its expression in the hippocampus decreased significantly, while the insulin-like growth factor-1 level in serum and insulin-like growth factor-1 and growth hormone receptor expression in the hippocampus increased significantly. The experimental findings indicate that sericin improves disorders of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 axis to alleviate hippocampal damage in diabetic rats. PMID:25206472

  2. Osteocalcin induces growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 system by promoting testosterone synthesis in male mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Li, K

    2014-10-01

    Osteocalcin has been shown to enhance testosterone production in men. In the present study, we investigated the effects of osteocalcin on testosterone and on induction of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axis. Osteocalcin injection stimulated growth, which could be inhibited by castration. In addition, osteocalcin induced testosterone secretion in testes both in vivo and in vitro. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, we showed that growth hormone expression was significantly increased in the pituitary after osteocalcin injection (p<0.05). Growth hormone expression in CLU401 mouse pituitary cells was also significantly stimulated (p<0.05) by osteocalcin-induced MA-10 cells. Osteocalcin injection also promoted hepatic expression of growth hormone receptor and insulin-like growth factor-1 (p<0.05), as demonstrated by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Similarly, osteocalcin-induced MA-10 cells promoted growth hormone receptor and insulin-like growth factor-1 expression in NCTC1469 cells. These results suggest that the growth-stimulating activities of osteocalcin are mediated by testicular testosterone secretion, and thus provide valuable information regarding the regulatory effects of osteocalcin expression on the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axis via reproductive activities.

  3. Environmental estrogens inhibit growth of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by modulating the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor system.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Andrea M; Kittilson, Jeffrey D; Martin, Lincoln E; Sheridan, Mark A

    2014-01-15

    Although environmental estrogens (EE) have been found to disrupt a wide variety of developmental and reproductive processes in vertebrates, there is a paucity of information concerning their effects on organismal growth, particularly postembryonic growth. In this study, we exposed juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to 17β-estradiol (E2) β-sitosterol (βS), or 4-n-nonylphenol (NP) to assess the effects of EE on overall organismal growth and on the growth hormone-insulin-like-growth factor (GH-IGF) system. EE treatment significantly reduced food conversion, body condition, and body growth. EE-inhibited growth resulted from alterations in peripheral elements of the GH-IGF system, which includes multiple GH receptors (GHRs), IGFs, and IGF receptors (IGFRs). In general, E2, βS, and NP reduced the expression of GHRs, IGFs, and IGFRs; however, the effects varied in an EE-, tissue-, element type-specific manner. For example, in liver, E2 was more efficacious than either βS, and NP in reducing GHR expression, and the effect of E2 was greater on GHR 1 than GHR2 mRNA. By contrast, in gill, all EEs affected GHR expression in a similar manner and there was no difference in the effect on GHR1 and GHR 2 mRNA. With regard to IGF expression, all EEs reduced hepatic IGF1 and IGF2 mRNA levels, whereas as in gill, only E2 and NP significantly reduced IGF1 and IGF2 expression. Lastly, E2 and NP reduced the expression of IGFR1A and IGFR1B mRNA expression similarly in gill and red and white muscle, whereas βS had no effect on expression of IGFR mRNAs. These findings indicate that EEs disrupt post-embryonic growth by reducing GH sensitivity, IGF production, and IGF sensitivity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Diabetes, growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor pathways and association to benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zongwei; Olumi, Aria F

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes significantly increases the risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and low urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The major endocrine aberration in connection with the metabolic syndrome is hyperinsulinemia. Insulin is an independent risk factor and a promoter of BPH. Insulin resistance may change the risk of BPH through several biological pathways. Hyperinsulinemia stimulates the liver to produce more insulin-like growth factor (IGF), another mitogen and an anti-apoptotic agent which binds insulin receptor/IGF receptor and stimulates prostate growth. The levels of IGFs and IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) in prostate tissue and in blood are associated with BPH risk, with the regulation of circulating androgen and growth hormone. Stromal-epithelial interactions play a critical role in the development and growth of the prostate gland and BPH. Previously, we have shown that the expression of c-Jun in the fibroblastic stroma can promote secretion of IGF-I, which stimulates prostate epithelial cell proliferation through activating specific target genes. Here, we will review the epidemiologic, clinical, and molecular findings which have evaluated the relation between diabetes and development of BPH.

  5. Microcystin-LR retards gonadal maturation through disrupting the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factors system in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jie; Su, Yujing; Lin, Wang; Guo, Honghui; Xie, Ping; Chen, Jun; Gu, Zemao; Li, Li

    2017-05-01

    Recent studies have documented that microcystins (MCs) have potential toxic effects on growth and reproduction in fish. However, no systematic data exist on whether MCs cause gonadal development retardation through disrupting the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factors (GH/IGFs) system. To this end, zebrafish hatchlings (5 d post-fertilization) were exposed to 0, 0.3, 3 and 30µg/L microcystin-LR (MC-LR) for 90 d until they reached sexual maturity. Life-cycle exposure to MC-LR caused delayed ovarian maturation and sperm development along with ultrapathological lesions in the brain and liver. Moreover, the retarded gonadal development was accompanied by an inhibition of the GH/IGFs system, which was characterized by significant decreases in the transcriptional levels of brain gh (males only), hepatic igf2a and igf2b as well as gonadal igf1 (males only), igf3 and igf2r. These findings for the first time point to the influence of MC-LR on fish gonadal development via the GH/IGFs system. Also, sex-differential impairments suggested that gonadal development of males is more vulnerable than that of female to MC-LR. Our results provide evidence that MC-LR at environmentally relevant concentrations is able to induce impairments on fish gonadal development.

  6. Growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1 and the aging brain.

    PubMed

    Ashpole, Nicole M; Sanders, Jessica E; Hodges, Erik L; Yan, Han; Sonntag, William E

    2015-08-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 regulate the development and function of cells throughout the body. Several clinical diseases that result in a decline in physical and mental functions are marked by mutations that disrupt GH or IGF-1 signaling. During the lifespan there is a robust decrease in both GH and IGF-1. Because GH and IGF-1 are master regulators of cellular function, impaired GH and IGF-1 signaling in aging/disease states leads to significant alterations in tissue structure and function, especially within the brain. This review is intended to highlight the effects of the GH and IGF-1 on neuronal structure, function, and plasticity. Furthermore, we address several potential mechanisms through which the age-related reductions in GH and IGF-1 affect cognition. Together, the studies reviewed here highlight the importance of maintaining GH and IGF-1 signaling in order to sustain proper brain function throughout the lifespan.

  7. The Role of the Growth Hormone/Insulin-Like Growth Factor System in Visceral Adiposity

    PubMed Central

    Lewitt, Moira S

    2017-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system is involved in the pathophysiology of obesity. Both GH and IGF-I have direct effects on adipocyte proliferation and differentiation, and this system is involved in the cross-talk between adipose tissue, liver, and pituitary. Transgenic animal models have been of importance in identifying mechanisms underlying these interactions. It emerges that this system has key roles in visceral adiposity, and there is a rationale for targeting this system in the treatment of visceral obesity associated with GH deficiency, metabolic syndrome, and lipodystrophies. This evidence is reviewed, gaps in knowledge are highlighted, and recommendations are made for future research. PMID:28469442

  8. Growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor system in children with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Tönshoff, Burkhard; Kiepe, Daniela; Ciarmatori, Sonia

    2005-03-01

    Disturbances of the somatotropic hormone axis play an important pathogenic role in growth retardation and catabolism in children with chronic renal failure (CRF). The apparent discrepancy between normal or elevated growth hormone (GH) levels and diminished longitudinal growth in CRF has led to the concept of GH insensitivity, which is caused by multiple alterations in the distal components of the somatotropic hormone axis. Serum levels of IGF-I and IGF-II are normal in preterminal CRF, while in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) IGF-I levels are slightly decreased and IGF-II levels slightly increased. In view of the prevailing elevated GH levels in ESRD, these serum IGF-I levels appear inadequately low. Indeed, there is both clinical and experimental evidence for decreased hepatic production of IGF-I in CRF. This hepatic insensitivity to the action of GH may be partly the consequence of reduced GH receptor expression in liver tissue and partly a consequence of disturbed GH receptor signaling. The actions and metabolism of IGFs are modulated by specific high-affinity IGFBPs. CRF serum has an IGF-binding capacity that is increased by seven- to tenfold, leading to decreased IGF bioactivity of CRF serum despite normal total IGF levels. Serum levels of intact IGFBP-1, -2, -4, -6 and low molecular weight fragments of IGFBP-3 are elevated in CRF serum in relation to the degree of renal dysfunction, whereas serum levels of intact IGFBP-3 are normal. Levels of immunoreactive IGFBP-5 are not altered in CRF serum, but the majority of IGFBP-5 is fragmented. Decreased renal filtration and increased hepatic production of IGFBP-1 and -2 both contribute to high levels of serum IGFBP. Experimental and clinical evidence suggests that these excessive high-affinity IGFBPs in CRF serum inhibit IGF action in growth plate chondrocytes by competition with the type 1 IGF receptor for IGF binding. These data indicate that growth failure in CRF is mainly due to functional IGF deficiency

  9. Growth Hormone-Insulin-Like Growth Factor Axis, Thyroid Axis, Prolactin, and Exercise.

    PubMed

    Hackney, Anthony C; Davis, Hope C; Lane, Amy R

    2016-01-01

    This chapter addresses what is known about the endocrine system components growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis, thyroid axis, and prolactin relative to exercise and exercise training. Each one of these hormone axes contributes to the maintenance of homeostasis in the body through impact on a multitude of physiological systems. The homeostatic disruption of exercise causes differing responses in each hormone axis. GH levels increase with sufficient stimulation, and IGFs are released in response to GH from the anterior pituitary providing multiple roles including anabolic properties. Changes in the thyroid hormones T3 and T4 vary greatly with exercise, from increases/decreases to no change in levels across different exercise types, intensities and durations. These ambiguous findings could be due to numerous confounding factors (e.g. nutrition status) within the research. Prolactin increases proportionally to the intensity of the exercise. The magnitude may be augmented with extended durations; conflicting findings have been reported with resistance training. While the responses to exercise vary, it appears there may be overall adaptive and regenerative impacts on the body into recovery by these hormones through immune and tissue inflammatory responses/mediations. Nonetheless, well-designed exercise research studies are still needed on each of these hormones, especially thyroid hormones and prolactin.

  10. Growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1, and the kidney: pathophysiological and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Kamenický, Peter; Mazziotti, Gherardo; Lombès, Marc; Giustina, Andrea; Chanson, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    Besides their growth-promoting properties, GH and IGF-1 regulate a broad spectrum of biological functions in several organs, including the kidney. This review focuses on the renal actions of GH and IGF-1, taking into account major advances in renal physiology and hormone biology made over the last 20 years, allowing us to move our understanding of GH/IGF-1 regulation of renal functions from a cellular to a molecular level. The main purpose of this review was to analyze how GH and IGF-1 regulate renal development, glomerular functions, and tubular handling of sodium, calcium, phosphate, and glucose. Whenever possible, the relative contributions, the nephronic topology, and the underlying molecular mechanisms of GH and IGF-1 actions were addressed. Beyond the physiological aspects of GH/IGF-1 action on the kidney, the review describes the impact of GH excess and deficiency on renal architecture and functions. It reports in particular new insights into the pathophysiological mechanism of body fluid retention and of changes in phospho-calcium metabolism in acromegaly as well as of the reciprocal changes in sodium, calcium, and phosphate homeostasis observed in GH deficiency. The second aim of this review was to analyze how the GH/IGF-1 axis contributes to major renal diseases such as diabetic nephropathy, renal failure, renal carcinoma, and polycystic renal disease. It summarizes the consequences of chronic renal failure and glucocorticoid therapy after renal transplantation on GH secretion and action and questions the interest of GH therapy in these conditions.

  11. Regulation of skeletal muscle growth in fish by the growth hormone--insulin-like growth factor system.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo N; Valdés, Juan Antonio; Molina, Alfredo; Björnsson, Björn Thrandur

    2013-10-01

    The growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system is the key promoter of growth in vertebrates; however, how this system modulates muscle mass in fish is just recently becoming elucidated. In fish, the GH induces muscle growth by modulating the expression of several genes belonging to the myostatin (MSTN), atrophy, GH, and IGF systems as well as myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs). The GH controls the expression of igf1 via Janus kinase 2 (JAK2)/signal transducers and activators of the transcription 5 (STAT5) signaling pathway, but it seems that it is not the major regulator. These mild effects of the GH on igf1 expression in fish muscle seem to be related with the presence of higher contents of truncated GH receptor1 (tGHR1) than full length GHR (flGHR1). IGFs in fish stimulate myogenic cell proliferation, differentiation, and protein synthesis through the MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT/TOR signaling pathways, concomitant with abolishing protein degradation and atrophy via the PI3K/AKT/FOXO signaling pathway. Besides these signaling pathways control the expression of several genes belonging to the atrophy and IGF systems. Particularly, IGFs and amino acid control the expression of igf1, thus, suggesting other of alternative signaling pathways regulating the transcription of this growth factor. The possible role of IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) and the contribution of muscle-derived versus hepatic-produced IGF1 on fish muscle growth is also addressed. Thus, a comprehensive overview on the GH-IGF system regulating fish skeletal muscle growth is presented, as well as perspectives for future research in this field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of chronic renal failure and prednisolone on the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor axis.

    PubMed

    Kapila, P; Jones, J; Rees, L

    2001-12-01

    Abnormalities of the growth hormone (GH)/ insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis have been reported in children with chronic renal failure (CRF) and post-transplant, and are thought to contribute to poor growth. This study examined the effect of CRF and steroid therapy (given post-transplant and to children with normal renal function) on the GH-IGF axis in children with normal and abnormal growth. Thirty-one children with CRF, ten on dialysis, 26 with renal transplants and ten taking steroid therapy but with normal renal function, were studied. IGF-I, measured by radioimmunoassay, was normal but IGF bioactivity was low in groups with a decreased glomerular filtration rate (P<0.05). Transplanted children growing at a subnormal growth rate had lower IGF bioactivity than those growing at a normal rate (P=0.03), but there was no such difference in bioactivity in children with CRF. There was no correlation between IGF bioactivity and prednisolone treatment. There was no correlation between IGF binding proteins 1, 2 or 3 and growth.

  13. Influences of the environment on the endocrine and paracrine fish growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-I system.

    PubMed

    Reinecke, M

    2010-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is a key component of the complex system that regulates differentiation, development, growth and reproduction of fishes. The IGF-I gene is mainly expressed in the liver that represents the principal source of endocrine IGF-I but also in numerous other organs where the hormone most probably acts in an autocrine-paracrine manner. The primary stimulus for synthesis and release of IGF-I is growth hormone (GH) from the anterior pituitary. Thus, in analogy to mammals, it is usual to speak of a fish 'GH-IGF-I axis'. The GH-IGF-I system is affected by changes in the environment and probably represents a target of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDC) that impair many physiological processes in fishes. Thus, the review deals with the influences of changes in different environmental factors, such as food availability, temperature, photoperiod, season, salinity and EDCs, on GH gene expression in pituitary, IGF-I gene expression in liver and extrahepatic sites and the physiological effects resulting from the evoked alterations in endocrine and local IGF-I. Environmental influences certainly interact with each other but for convenience of the reader they will be dealt with in separate sections. Current trends in GH-IGF-I research are analysed and future focuses are suggested at the end of the sections.

  14. Growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor 1, and insulin signaling-a pharmacological target in body wasting and cachexia.

    PubMed

    Trobec, Katja; von Haehling, Stephan; Anker, Stefan D; Lainscak, Mitja

    2011-12-01

    Cachexia is an irreversible process that can develop in the course of chronic disease. It is characterized by the remodeling of the metabolic, inflammatory, and endocrine pathways. Insulin, growth hormone (GH), and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) are involved in glucose, protein, and fat metabolism, which regulates body composition. In body wasting and cachexia, their signaling is impaired and causes anabolic/catabolic imbalance. Important mechanisms include inflammatory cytokines and neurohormonal activation. Remodeled post-receptor insulin, GH, and IGF-1 pathways constitute a potential target for pharmacological treatment in the setting of body wasting and cachexia. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists, drugs inhibiting angiotensin II action (angiotensin II antagonists and inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme), and testosterone, which interfere with post-receptor pathways of insulin, GH, and IGF-1, were investigated as pharmacological intervention targets and various clinically important implications were reported. There are several other potential targets, but their treatment feasibility and applicability is yet to be established.

  15. Effects of exercise during normoxia and hypoxia on the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor I axis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, W; Doré, S; Hilgendorf, A; Strauch, S; Gareau, R; Brisson, G R

    1995-01-01

    The response of plasma insulin-like growth factor I (IGF I) to exercise-induced increase of total human growth hormone concentration [hGHtot] and of its molecular species [hGH20kD] was investigated up to 48 h after an 1-h ergometer exercise at 60% of maximal capacity during normoxia (N) and hypoxia (H) (inspiratory partial pressure of oxygen = 92 mmHg (12.7 kPa); n = 8). Lactate and glucose concentrations were differently affected during both conditions showing higher levels under H. Despite similar maximal concentrations, the increase of human growth hormone (hGH) was faster during exercise during H than during N[hGHtot after 30 min: 8.6 (SD 11.4) ng.ml-1 (N); 16.2 (SD 11.6) ng.ml-1 (H); P < 0.05]. The variations in plasma [hGH20kD] were closely correlated to those of [hGHtot], but its absolute concentration did not exceed 3% of the [hGHtot]. Plasma IGF I concentration was significantly decreased 24 h after both experimental conditions [N from 319 (SD 71) ng.ml-1 to 228 (SD 72) ng.ml-1, P < 0.05; H from 253 (SD 47) to 200 (SD 47) ng.ml-1, P < 0.01], and was still lower than basal levels 48 h after exercise during H [204 (SD 44) ng.ml-1, P < 0.01]. Linear regression analysis yielded no significant correlation between increase in plasma [hGHtot] or [hGH20kD] during exercise and the plasma IGF I concentration after exercise. It was concluded that the exercise-associated elevated plasma [hGH] did not increase the hepatic IGF I production. From our study it would seem that the high energy demand during and after the long-lasting intensive exercise may have overridden an existing hGH stimulus on plasma IGH I, which was most obvious during hypoxia.

  16. Seasonal regulation of the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-I axis in the American black bear (Ursus americanus).

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Stanley; Morgan-Boyd, Rebecca; Nelson, Ralph; Garshelis, David L; Turyk, Mary E; Unterman, Terry

    2011-10-01

    The American black bear maintains lean body mass for months without food during winter denning. We asked whether changes in the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I (GH-IGF-I) axis may contribute to this remarkable adaptation to starvation. Serum IGF-I levels were measured by radioimmunoassay, and IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs) were analyzed by ligand blotting. Initial studies in bears living in the wild showed that IGF-I levels are highest in summer and lowest in early winter denning. Detailed studies in captive bears showed that IGF-I levels decline in autumn when bears are hyperphagic, continue to decline in early denning, and later rise above predenning levels despite continued starvation in the den. IGFBP-2 increased and IGFBP-3 decreased in early denning, and these changes were also reversed in later denning. Treatment with GH (0.1 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) × 6 days) during early denning increased serum levels of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 and lowered levels of IGFBP-2, indicating that denning bears remain responsive to GH. GH treatment lowered blood urea nitrogen levels, reflecting effects on protein metabolism. GH also accelerated weight loss and markedly increased serum levels of free fatty acids and β-hydroxybutyrate, resulting in a ketoacidosis (bicarbonate decreased to 15 meq/l), which was reversed when GH was withdrawn. These results demonstrate seasonal regulation of GH/IGF-I axis activity in black bears. Diminished GH activity may promote fat storage in autumn in preparation for denning and prevent excessive mobilization and premature exhaustion of fat stores in early denning, whereas restoration of GH/IGF activity in later denning may prepare the bear for normal activity outside the den.

  17. Evidence for integrity of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axis in patients with severe head trauma during rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Bondanelli, Marta; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Margutti, Angelo; Boldrini, Paolo; Basaglia, Nino; Franceschetti, Paola; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Degli Uberti, Ettore C

    2002-10-01

    Severe traumatic head injury has been recognized to be associated with hypothalamo-hypophyseal impairment and subsequent abnormalities in hormone secretion, which can contribute to a prolonged clinical course and to hampered recovery in many head-injured patients. Most of the data on the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor -1 (GH/IGF-1) axis function have been obtained early after head injury, whereas GH secretory pattern has not been fully elucidated after patients had left the intensive care unit. We examined the activity of the GH/IGF-1 axis in 16 severely closed head-injured (CHI) patients (14 males; age range, 17 to 47 years; body mass index [BMI], 21.4 +/- 0.8 kg/m(2)) during the rehabilitation period at least 1 month after leaving the intensive care unit and in 12 sex-, age-, and weight-matched healthy controls. The severity of trauma was assessed by the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score (8 or less), posttraumatic amnesia (PTA, more than 24 hours), and initial computed tomography (CT) scan. The clinical picture at time of the study was evaluated by the Rancho Los Amigos Scale of Cognitive Functioning (CFS) and the Functional Independence Measure (FIM). In all subjects, we evaluated basal levels of anterior pituitary hormones, IGF-1, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP)-3, and IGFBP-1, as well as the GH responses to intravenous (IV) infusion of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) alone, GHRH plus arginine (ARG), and the GH release evoked by somatostatin (SRIH) infusion withdrawal, which is related to endogenous GHRH tone. In all subjects, nutritional parameters and nitrogen balance were normal. Basal plasma concentrations of GH, IGF-1, IGFBP-3, and IGFBP-1 did not significantly differ between CHI patients and controls. The GH responses to GHRH and GHRH plus ARG did not significantly differ between CHI patients (GH peak, 10.7 +/- 3.0 microg/L; area under the curve [AUC], 5.9 +/- 1.5 microg/L. min; and GH peak, 34.7 +/- 6.1 microg/L; AUC

  18. Rearing Mozambique tilapia in tidally-changing salinities: Effects on growth and the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor I axis.

    PubMed

    Moorman, Benjamin P; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Lerner, Darren T; Grau, E Gordon; Seale, Andre P

    2016-08-01

    The growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis plays a central role in the regulation of growth in teleosts and has been shown to be affected by acclimation salinity. This study was aimed at characterizing the effects of rearing tilapia, Oreochromis mossambicus, in a tidally-changing salinity on the GH/IGF axis and growth. Tilapia were raised in fresh water (FW), seawater (SW), or in a tidally-changing environment, in which salinity is switched between FW (TF) and SW (TS) every 6h, for 4months. Growth was measured over all time points recorded and fish reared in a tidally-changing environment grew significantly faster than other groups. The levels of circulating growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), pituitary GH mRNA, gene expression of IGF-I, IGF-II, and growth hormone receptor 2 (GHR) in the muscle and liver were also determined. Plasma IGF-I was higher in FW and TS than in SW and TF tilapia. Pituitary GH mRNA was higher in TF and TS than in FW and SW tilapia. Gene expression of IGF-I in the liver and of GHR in both the muscle and liver changed between TF and TS fish. Fish growth was positively correlated with GH mRNA expression in the pituitary, and GHR mRNA expression in muscle and liver tissues. Our study indicates that rearing fish under tidally-changing salinities elicits a distinct pattern of endocrine regulation from that observed in fish reared in steady-state conditions, and may provide a new approach to increase tilapia growth rate and study the regulation of growth in euryhaline fish. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Leptin alters the response of the growth hormone releasing factor- growth hormone--insulin-like growth factor-I axis to fasting.

    PubMed

    LaPaglia, N; Steiner, J; Kirsteins, L; Emanuele, M; Emanuele, N

    1998-10-01

    Proper nutritional status is critical for maintaining growth and metabolic function, playing an intimate role in neuroendocrine regulation. Leptin, the recently identified product of the obese gene, may very well be an integral signal which regulates neuroendocrine responses in times of food deprivation. The present study examines leptin's ability to regulate hormonal synthesis and secretion within the GRF-GH-IGF axis in the adult male rat during almost 3 days of fasting. Serum levels of GH and IGF-I were drastically suppressed by fasting. Daily leptin administration was able to fully prevent the fasting-induced fall in serum GH. Leptin failed to restore IGF-I to control levels, however, suggesting possible GH resistance. Fasting caused an insignificant increase in GH mRNA, while leptin injections significantly increased steady-state levels of this message. The GRF receptor (GRFr) message was not altered with fasting or leptin treatment. Leptin also exhibited effects at the hypothalamic level. Fasting induced a sharp fall in GRF mRNA expression and leptin injections partially prevented this fall. However, there were no observed changes in the hypothalamic GRF content. These results provide evidence that leptin may function as a neuromodulator of the GRF-GH-IGF axis communicating to this hormonal system the nutritional status of the animal.

  20. Effects of sericin on the testicular growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axis in a rat model of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Song, Cheng-Jun; Yang, Zhen-Jun; Tang, Qi-Feng; Chen, Zhi-Hong

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of sericin on the testicular growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) axis in rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Forty rats were randomly assigned to normal control, type 2 diabetes mellitus, sericin and metformin treated groups. Type 2 diabetes was established by repeated intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin, and identified by blood glucose ≥16.7 mmol/L at 1 week. The diabetic rats were given no other treatment, these rats in the sericin group were intragastrically perfused with 2.4 g/kg sericin and the metformin treated rats were intragastrically perfused with 55.33 mg/kg Metformin daily for 35 consecutive days. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to determine serum testosterone, growth hormone and IGF-1 levels. Immunohistochemical staining, western blotting and reverse transcription-PCR were used to determine testicular growth hormone, growth hormone receptor and IGF-1 expression. The sericin significantly reduced serum growth hormone levels, downregulated growth hormone expression, increased serum testosterone and IGF-1 levels, and upregulated testicular growth hormone receptor and IGF-1 expression. Moreover, there were no significant differences in any of the parameters between the sericin and metformin treated groups. These findings indicated that sericin improved spermatogenic function through regulating the growth hormone/IGF-1 axis, thereby protecting reproductive function against diabetes-induced damage. PMID:26379831

  1. Animal protein intakes during early life and adolescence differ in their relation to the growth hormone-insulin-like-growth-factor axis in young adulthood.

    PubMed

    Joslowski, Gesa; Remer, Thomas; Assmann, Karen E; Krupp, Danika; Cheng, Guo; Garnett, Sarah P; Kroke, Anja; Wudy, Stefan A; Günther, Anke L B; Buyken, Anette E

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies provide evidence that insulin-like-growth-factor I (IGF-I) and its binding proteins (IGFBP) IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 are related to the risk of several common cancers. It remains to be clarified whether their concentrations can be programmed by protein intake from different sources during growth. This study addressed the hypothesis that animal protein intakes during infancy, mid-childhood, and adolescence differ in their relevance for the growth-hormone (GH)-IGF-I axis in young adulthood. Data from the Dortmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed Study participants with at least 2 plausible 3-d weighed dietary records during adolescence (age: girls, 9-14 y; boys, 10-15 y; n = 213), around the adiposity rebound (age 4-6 y; n = 179) or early life (age 0.5-2 y; n = 130), and one blood sample in young adulthood were included in the study. Mean serum concentrations of IGF-I, IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2, and IGFBP-3 were compared between tertiles of habitual animal protein intake using multivariable regression analysis. Habitually higher animal protein intakes in females during puberty were related to higher IGF-I (P-trend = 0.005) and IGFBP-3 (P-trend = 0.01) and lower IGFBP-2 (P-trend = 0.04), but not to IGFBP-1 in young adulthood. In turn, IGF-I concentrations in young adulthood were inversely related to animal protein intakes in early life among males only (P-trend = 0.03), but not to animal protein intake around adiposity rebound (P-trend > 0.5). Our data suggest that, among females, a habitually higher animal protein intake during puberty may precipitate an upregulation of the GH-IGF-I axis, which is still discernible in young adulthood. By contrast, among males, higher animal protein intakes in early life may exert a long-term programming of the GH-IGF-I axis.

  2. Evidence for growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor I axis regulation of seawater acclimation in the euryhaline teleost Fundulus heteroclitus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mancera, J.M.; McCormick, S.D.

    1998-01-01

    The ability of ovine growth hormone (oGH), recombinant bovine insulin- like growth factor I (rbIGF-I), recombinant human insulin-like growth factor II (rhIGF-II), and bovine insulin to increase hypoosmoregulatory capacity in the euryhaline teleost Fundulus heteroclitus was examined. Fish acclimated to brackish water (BW, 10 ppt salinity, 320 mOsm/kg H2O) were injected with a single dose of hormone and transferred to seawater (SW, 35 ppt salinity, 1120 mOsm/kg H2O) 2 days later. Fish were sampled 24 h after transfer and plasma osmolality, plasma glucose, and gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity were examined. Transfer from BW to SW increased plasma osmolality and gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity. Transfer from BW to BW had no effect on these parameters. rbIGF-I (0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 ??g/g) improved the ability to maintain plasma osmolality and to increase gill Na+, K+-ATPase activity in a dose-dependent manner. oGH (0.5, 1, and 2 ??g/g) also increased hypoosmoregulatory ability but only the higher doses (2 ??g/g) significantly increased gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity. oGH (1 ??g/g) and rbIGF-I (0.1 ??g/g) had a significantly greater effect on plasma osmolality and gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity than either hormone alone. rhIGF-II (0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 ??g/g) and bovine insulin (0.01 and 0.05 ??g/g) were without effect. The results suggest a role of GH and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in seawater acclimation of E heteroclitus. Based on these findings and previous studies, it is concluded that the capacity of the GH/IGF-I axis to increase hypoosmoregulatory ability may be a common feature of euryhalinity in teleosts.

  3. Effects of somatostatin on the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor axis and seawater adaptation of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppinga, J.; Kittilson, J.; McCormick, S.D.; Sheridan, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has been shown to contribute to the seawater (SW) adaptability of euryhaline fish both directly and indirectly through insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). This study examined the role of somatostatin-14 (SS-14), a potent inhibitor of GH, on the GH-IGF-1 axis and seawater adaptation. Juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were injected intraperitoneally with SS-14 or saline and transferred to 20??ppt seawater. A slight elevation in plasma chloride levels was accompanied by significantly reduced gill Na+, K+-ATPase activity in SS-14-treated fish compared to control fish 12??h after SW transfer. Seawater increased hepatic mRNA levels of GH receptor 1 (GHR 1; 239%), GHR 2 (48%), and IGF-1 (103%) in control fish 12??h after transfer. Levels of GHR 1 (155%), GHR 2 (121%), IGF-1 (200%), IGF-1 receptor A (IGFR1A; 62%), and IGFR1B (157%) increased in the gills of control fish 12??h after transfer. SS-14 abolished or attenuated SW-induced changes in the expression of GHR, IGF-1, and IGFR mRNAs in liver and gill. These results indicate that SS-14 reduces seawater adaptability by inhibiting the GH-IGF-1 axis. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Manipulation of the Growth Hormone-Insulin-Like Growth Factor (GH-IGF) Axis: A Treatment Strategy to Reverse the Effects of Early Life Developmental Programming.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Clare M; Perry, Jo K; Vickers, Mark H

    2017-08-08

    Evidence from human clinical, epidemiological, and experimental animal models has clearly highlighted a link between the early life environment and an increased risk for a range of cardiometabolic disorders in later life. In particular, altered maternal nutrition, including both undernutrition and overnutrition, spanning exposure windows that cover the period from preconception through to early infancy, clearly highlight an increased risk for a range of disorders in offspring in later life. This process, preferentially termed "developmental programming" as part of the developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) framework, leads to phenotypic outcomes in offspring that closely resemble those of individuals with untreated growth hormone (GH) deficiency, including increased adiposity and cardiovascular disorders. As such, the use of GH as a potential intervention strategy to mitigate the effects of developmental malprogramming has received some attention in the DOHaD field. In particular, experimental animal models have shown that early GH treatment in the setting of poor maternal nutrition can partially rescue the programmed phenotype, albeit in a sex-specific manner. Although the mechanisms remain poorly defined, they include changes to endothelial function, an altered inflammasome, changes in adipogenesis and cardiovascular function, neuroendocrine effects, and changes in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Similarly, GH treatment to adult offspring, where an adverse metabolic phenotype is already manifest, has shown efficacy in reversing some of the metabolic disorders arising from a poor early life environment. Components of the GH-insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-IGF binding protein (GH-IGF-IGFBP) system, including insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), have also shown promise in ameliorating programmed metabolic disorders, potentially acting via epigenetic processes including changes in miRNA profiles and altered DNA methylation. However, as

  5. Manipulation of the Growth Hormone-Insulin-Like Growth Factor (GH-IGF) Axis: A Treatment Strategy to Reverse the Effects of Early Life Developmental Programming

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Clare M.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence from human clinical, epidemiological, and experimental animal models has clearly highlighted a link between the early life environment and an increased risk for a range of cardiometabolic disorders in later life. In particular, altered maternal nutrition, including both undernutrition and overnutrition, spanning exposure windows that cover the period from preconception through to early infancy, clearly highlight an increased risk for a range of disorders in offspring in later life. This process, preferentially termed “developmental programming” as part of the developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) framework, leads to phenotypic outcomes in offspring that closely resemble those of individuals with untreated growth hormone (GH) deficiency, including increased adiposity and cardiovascular disorders. As such, the use of GH as a potential intervention strategy to mitigate the effects of developmental malprogramming has received some attention in the DOHaD field. In particular, experimental animal models have shown that early GH treatment in the setting of poor maternal nutrition can partially rescue the programmed phenotype, albeit in a sex-specific manner. Although the mechanisms remain poorly defined, they include changes to endothelial function, an altered inflammasome, changes in adipogenesis and cardiovascular function, neuroendocrine effects, and changes in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Similarly, GH treatment to adult offspring, where an adverse metabolic phenotype is already manifest, has shown efficacy in reversing some of the metabolic disorders arising from a poor early life environment. Components of the GH-insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-IGF binding protein (GH-IGF-IGFBP) system, including insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), have also shown promise in ameliorating programmed metabolic disorders, potentially acting via epigenetic processes including changes in miRNA profiles and altered DNA methylation. However

  6. Effects of growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor I, triiodothyronine, thyroxine, and cortisol on gene expression of carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in sea bream hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Leung, L Y; Woo, Norman Y S

    2010-11-01

    The present study investigated the regulatory effects of growth hormone (GH), human insulin-like growth factor I (hIGF-I), thyroxine (T(4)), triiodothyronine (T(3)) and cortisol, on mRNA expression of key enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism, including glucokinase (GK), glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), glycogen synthase (GS), glycogen phosphorylase (GP) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) in hepatocytes isolated from silver sea bream. Genes encoding GK, G6Pase, GS and GP were partially cloned and characterized from silver sea bream liver and real-time PCR assays were developed for the quantification of the mRNA expression profiles of these genes in order to evaluate the potential of these carbohydrate metabolic pathways. GK mRNA level was elevated by GH and hIGF-I, implying that GH-induced stimulation of GK expression may be mediated via IGF-I. GH was found to elevate GS and G6Pase expression, but reduce G6PDH mRNA expression. However, hIGF-I did not affect mRNA levels of GS, G6Pase and G6PDH, suggesting that GH-induced modulation of GS, G6Pase and G6PDH expression levels is direct, and occurs independently of the action of IGF-I. T(3) and T(4) directly upregulated transcript abundance of GK, G6Pase, GS and GP. Cortisol significantly increased transcript amounts of G6Pase and GS but markedly decreased transcript abundance of GK and G6PDH. These changes in transcript abundance indicate that (1) the potential of glycolysis is stimulated by GH and thyroid hormones, but attenuated by cortisol, (2) gluconeogenic and glycogenic potential are augmented by GH, thyroid hormones and cortisol, (3) glycogenolytic potential is upregulated by thyroid hormones but not affected by GH or cortisol, and (4) the potential of the pentose phosphate pathway is attenuated by GH and cortisol but unaffected by thyroid hormones.

  7. Change of the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-I axis in patients with gastrointestinal cancer: related to tumour type and nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qi; Nai, Yong-Jun; Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Li, Jie-Shou

    2005-06-01

    Changes in the growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) axis, especially acquired GH resistance, develop in many severe illnesses, including cachexia. To study changes in the GH-IGF-I axis in patients with cancer cachexia, biochemical markers and body composition parameters were measured in eighty-eight gastric cancer patients, thirty colorectal cancer patients (subclassified according to the presence or absence of cachexia) and twenty-four healthy control subjects. Fifty-nine patients were defined as cachectic, based on the percentage of weight loss compared with their previous normal weight. The remaining fifty-nine patients were defined as non-cachectic. Measurements were repeated in twenty-seven patients (sixteen with gastric cancer and eleven with colorectal cancer) 3 months after radical operation. Compared with the controls, the cachectic gastric cancer patients had high GH levels (1.36 v. 0.32 ng/ml; P=0.001), a trend towards high IGF-I levels (223.74 v. 195.15 ng/ml; P=0.128 compared with non-cachectic patients) and a low log IGF-I/GH ratio (2.55 and 2.66 v. 3.00; P=0.002), along with a decreased BMI; the cachectic colorectal cancer patients showed the biochemical characteristics of acquired GH resistance: high GH (0.71 v. 0.32 ng/ml; P=0.016), a trend towards decreased IGF-I levels (164.18 v. 183.24 ng/ml; P=0.127) and a low log IGF-I/GH ratio (2.54 v. 2.99; P=0.005), with increased IGF-I levels following radical surgery (200.49 v. 141.91 ng/ml; P=0.046). These findings suggest that normal GH reaction and sensitivity occur in gastric cancer patients, controlled by nutritional status, whereas acquired GH resistance develops in cachectic colorectal cancer patients, which may be caused by tumour itself.

  8. Endometrial expression of leptin receptor and members of the growth hormone-Insulin-like growth factor system throughout the estrous cycle in heifers.

    PubMed

    Sosa, C; Carriquiry, M; Chalar, C; Crespi, D; Sanguinetti, C; Cavestany, D; Meikle, A

    2010-12-01

    The growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system is expressed in bovine uterus during the estrous cycle and early pregnancy and is acknowledged to play an important role in regulating the development of the embryo and uterus. The leptin receptor (LEPR) is also expressed in the bovine uterus although it is not known whether its expression varies during the estrous cycle. In this study, the expression of the IGF-I and -II, the type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R), GH receptor (GHR) and LEPR transcripts was determined on endometrial transcervical biopsies collected on days 0 (estrus), 5, 12 and 19 of the cow estrous cycle (n=8). The expression of mRNA was determined by RT real time PCR using ribosomal protein L19 as a housekeeping gene. It has been demonstrated for the first time that LEPR mRNA is expressed in the bovine uterus throughout the estrous cycle and that it presents a cycle-dependent variation, with higher levels observed during the luteal phase. The expression of IGF-I mRNA was greatest at estrus and day 5 (100%), and decreased on days 12 and 19 to 47% and 35% of the initial values. IGF-II mRNA increased on day 12 and decreased sharply thereafter (to one-third of day 12 values). Interestingly, IGF-1R showed the same pattern as IGF-II: increased 50% on day 12 compared to values at estrus and presented a sharp decrease on day 19. The expression of GHR transcript was greatest at estrus and on day 5 and progressively decreased thereafter. These results show that the GH-IGF system components are distinctively regulated during the estrous cycle suggesting that modulation of the IGF system may influence uterine activity during this period. The increase in the uterine sensitivity to IGFs during the late luteal phase - as demonstrated by the increased IGF-1R expression - concomitant with the increased IGF-II mRNA expression may reinforce the role of IGF-II during early pregnancy. Moreover, leptin is also likely to play roles during early embryo development.

  9. Calorie restriction minimizes activation of insulin signaling in response to glucose: potential involvement of the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor 1 axis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hiroko; Yamaza, Haruyoshi; Komatsu, Toshimitsu; Park, Seongjoon; Chiba, Takuya; Higami, Yoshikazu; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Shimokawa, Isao

    2008-09-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) may modulate insulin signaling in response to energy intake through suppression of the growth hormone (GH)-IGF-1 axis. We investigated the glucose-stimulated serum insulin response and subsequent alterations in insulin receptor (IR), Akt, and FoxO1 in the rat liver and quadriceps femoris muscle (QFM). Nine-month-old wild-type (W) male Wistar rats fed ad libitum (AL) or a 30% CR diet initiated at 6 weeks of age and GH-suppressed transgenic (Tg) rats fed AL were killed 15 min after intraperitoneal injection of glucose or saline. In W-AL rats, the serum insulin concentration was elevated by glucose injection. Concomitantly, the phosphorylated (p)-IR and p-Akt levels were increased in both tissues. The active FoxO1 level was decreased in the liver, but not significantly in the QFM. In W-CR and Tg-AL rats, the serum insulin response was lower, and no significant changes were noted for the p-IR, p-Akt, or active FoxO1 levels in the liver. In the QFM, the p-Akt level was increased in W-CR and Tg-AL rats with an insignificant elevation of p-IR levels. The phenotypic similarity of W-CR and Tg-AL rats suggest that CR minimizes activation of insulin signaling in response to energy intake mostly through the GH-IGF-1 axis.

  10. Modulation of the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor (GH-IGF) axis by pharmaceutical, nutraceutical and environmental xenobiotics: an emerging role for xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes and the transcription factors regulating their expression. A review.

    PubMed

    Scarth, J P

    2006-01-01

    The growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor (GH-IGF) axis has gained considerable focus over recent years. One cause of this increased interest is due to a correlation of age-related decline in plasma GH/IGF levels with age-related degenerative processes, and it has led to the prescribing of GH replacement therapy by some practitioners. On the other hand, however, research has also focused on the pro-carcinogenic effects of high GH-IGF levels, providing strong impetus for finding regimes that reduce its activity. Whereas the effects of GH/IGF activity on the action of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme systems is reasonably well appreciated, the effects of xenobiotic exposure on the GH-IGF axis has not received substantial review. Relevant xenobiotics are derived from pharmaceutical, nutraceutical and environmental exposure, and many of the mechanisms involved are highly complex in nature, not easily predictable from existing in vitro tests and do not always predict well from in vivo animal models. After a review of the human and animal in vivo and in vitro literature, a framework for considering the different levels of direct and indirect modulation by xenobiotics is developed herein, and areas that still require further investigation are highlighted, i.e. the actions of common endocrine disruptors such as pesticides and phytoestrogens, as well as the role of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes and the transcription factors regulating their expression. It is anticipated that a fuller appreciation of the existing human paradigms for GH-IGF axis modulation gained through this review may help explain some of the variation in levels of plasma IGF-1 and its binding proteins in the population, aid in the prescription of particular dietary regimens to certain individuals such as those with particular medical conditions, guide the direction of long-term drug/nutraceutical safety trials, and stimulate ideas for future research. It also serves to warn athletes that using

  11. Genome-wide association study for inhibin, luteinizing hormone, insulin-like growth factor 1, testicular size and semen traits in bovine species.

    PubMed

    Fortes, M R S; Reverter, A; Kelly, M; McCulloch, R; Lehnert, S A

    2013-07-01

    The fertility of young bulls impacts on reproduction rates, farm profit and the rate of genetic progress in beef herds. Cattle researchers and industry therefore routinely collect data on the reproductive performance of bulls. Genome-wide association studies were carried out to identify genomic regions and genes associated with reproductive traits measured during the pubertal development of Tropical Composite bulls, from 4 to 24 months of age. Data from 1 085 bulls were collected for seven traits: blood hormone levels of inhibin at 4 months (IN), luteinizing hormone following a gonadotropin releasing hormone challenge at 4 months (LH), insulin-like growth factor 1 at 6 months (IGF1), scrotal circumference at 12 months (SC), sperm motility at 18 months (MOT), percentage of normal spermatozoa at 24 months (PNS) and age at a scrotal circumference of 26 cm (AGE26, or pubertal age). Data from 729 068 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were used in the association analysis. Significant polymorphism associations were discovered for IN, IGF1, SC, AGE26 and PNS. Based on these associations, INHBE, INHBC and HELB are proposed as candidate genes for IN regulation. Polymorphisms associated with IGF1 mapped to the PLAG1 gene region, validating a reported quantitative trait locus on chromosome 14 for IGF1. The X chromosome contained most of the significant associations found for SC, AGE26 and PNS. These findings will contribute to the identification of diagnostic genetic markers and informed genomic selection strategies to assist breeding of cattle with improved fertility. Furthermore, this work provides evidence contributing to gene function annotation in the context of male fertility.

  12. The growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor axis in glycogen storage disease type 1: evidence of different growth patterns and insulin-like growth factor levels in patients with glycogen storage disease type 1a and 1b.

    PubMed

    Melis, Daniela; Pivonello, Rosario; Parenti, Giancarlo; Della Casa, Roberto; Salerno, Mariacarolina; Balivo, Francesca; Piccolo, Pasquale; Di Somma, Carolina; Colao, Annamaria; Andria, Generoso

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system in patients with glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD1). This was a prospective, case-control study. Ten patients with GSD1a and 7 patients with GSD1b who were given dietary treatment and 34 sex-, age-, body mass index-, and pubertal stage-matched control subjects entered the study. Auxological parameters were correlated with circulating GH, either at basal or after growth hormone releasing hormone plus arginine test, insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II), and anti-pituitary antibodies (APA). Short stature was detected in 10.0% of patients with GSD1a, 42.9% of patients with GSD1b (P = .02), and none of the control subjects. Serum IGF-I levels were lower in patients with GSD1b (P = .0001). An impaired GH secretion was found in 40% of patients with GSD1a (P = .008), 57.1% of patients with GSD1b (P = .006), and none of the control subjects. Short stature was demonstrated in 3 of 4 patients with GSD1b and GH deficiency. The prevalence of APA was significantly higher in patients with GSD1b than in patients with GSD1a (P = .02) and control subjects (P = .03). The GH response to the provocative test inversely correlated with the presence of APA (P = .003). Compared with levels in control subjects, serum IGF-II and insulin levels were higher in both groups of patients, in whom IGF-II levels directly correlated with height SD scores (P = .003). Patients with GSD1a have an impaired GH secretion associated with reference range serum IGF-I levels and normal stature, whereas in patients with GSD1b, the impaired GH secretion, probably because of the presence of APA, was associated with reduced IGF-I levels and increased prevalence of short stature. The increased IGF-II levels, probably caused by increased insulin levels, in patients with GSD1 are presumably responsible for the improved growth pattern observed in patients receiving strict dietary treatment. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All

  13. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the growth hormone - insulin like growth factor axis in straight bred and crossbred Angus, Brahman, and Romosinuano heifers: population genetic analyses and association of genotypes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The growth endocrine axis influences reproduction. Objectives of this study were to evaluate population genetic characteristics of SNP genotypes within genes of the GH and IGF axis in straightbred and diallel-crossed Angus, Brahman and Romosinuano heifers (n = 650) and to test the associations of th...

  14. Caloric restriction-associated remodeling of rat white adipose tissue: effects on the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axis, sterol regulatory element binding protein-1, and macrophage infiltration.

    PubMed

    Chujo, Yoshikazu; Fujii, Namiki; Okita, Naoyuki; Konishi, Tomokazu; Narita, Takumi; Yamada, Atsushi; Haruyama, Yushi; Tashiro, Kosuke; Chiba, Takuya; Shimokawa, Isao; Higami, Yoshikazu

    2013-08-01

    The role of the growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 axis in the lifelong caloric restriction (CR)-associated remodeling of white adipose tissue (WAT), adipocyte size, and gene expression profiles was explored in this study. We analyzed the WAT morphology of 6-7-month-old wild-type Wistar rats fed ad libitum (WdAL) or subjected to CR (WdCR), and of heterozygous transgenic dwarf rats bearing an anti-sense GH transgene fed ad libitum (TgAL) or subjected to CR (TgCR). Although less effective in TgAL, the adipocyte size was significantly reduced in WdCR compared with WdAL. This CR effect was blunted in Tg rats. We also used high-density oligonucleotide microarrays to examine the gene expression profile of WAT of WdAL, WdCR, and TgAL rats. The gene expression profile of WdCR, but not TgAL, differed greatly from that of WdAL. The gene clusters with the largest changes induced by CR but not by Tg were genes involved in lipid biosynthesis and inflammation, particularly sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs)-regulated and macrophage-related genes, respectively. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed that the expression of SREBP-1 and its downstream targets was upregulated, whereas the macrophage-related genes were downregulated in WdCR, but not in TgAL. In addition, CR affected the gene expression profile of Tg rats similarly to wild-type rats. Our findings suggest that CR-associated remodeling of WAT, which involves SREBP-1-mediated transcriptional activation and suppression of macrophage infiltration, is regulated in a GH-IGF-1-independent manner.

  15. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor axis in straightbred and crossbred Angus, Brahman, and Romosinuano heifers: population genetic analyses and association of genotypes with reproductive phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Luna-Nevarez, P; Rincon, G; Medrano, J F; Riley, D G; Chase, C C; Coleman, S W; Vanleeuwen, D M; DeAtley, K L; Islas-Trejo, A; Silver, G A; Thomas, M G

    2011-04-01

    The growth endocrine axis influences reproduction. The objectives of this study were to evaluate population genetic characteristics of SNP genotypes within genes of the GH-IGF axis in straightbred and crossbred Angus, Brahman, and Romosinuano heifers (n = 650) and to test the association of these genotypes with measures of reproduction. These objectives were achieved using 73 SNP within 7 genes on chromosome 5 and the pregnancy-associated plasma protein A2 (PAPP-A2) and GH-receptor genes, which map to chromosomes 16 and 20, respectively. The SNP were elucidated by resequencing conserved regions of each gene by using DNA from familial-unrelated cattle of a multibreed discovery population. A multiplex SNP assay yielded 59 biallelic SNP useful for evaluating genetic identity and distance. Specifically, the divergence of straightbred Brahman cattle was approximately 15.5% from 5 Bos taurus-influenced breed groups. In the straightbred groups used as a validation population, only 3 SNP had minor allele frequencies >10%. These SNP were in the genes PAPP-A2 (ss115492449-A/C and ss115492450-G/T within intron 10) and signal transducers and activators of transcription 2 (STAT2; ss252841035-A/G within the 5' untranslated region), and they met the conditions of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P > 0.31). The other 56 SNP were useful for assigning each animal into ancestral clusters (n = 3 proportions) to account for population stratification in genotype to phenotype association analyses. The 2 SNP in the PAPP-A2 gene influenced (P < 0.05) traits indicative of first-calf heifer rebreeding (i.e., calving interval, days to calving, and pregnancy rate). A STAT2 SNP genotype (i.e., GG) × primary ancestral cluster interaction (P < 0.05) suggested heifers primarily of B. taurus ancestry had a reduction of approximately 16.4 ± 0.1% in calving interval and days to calving relative to heifers clustering primarily as Bos indicus ancestry. Even though additional research is needed to

  16. Cloning and characterization of cDNAs for hormones and/or receptors of growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-I, thyroid hormone, and corticosteroid and the gender-, tissue-, and developmental-specific expression of their mRNA transcripts in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Filby, Amy L; Tyler, Charles R

    2007-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), thyroid hormones, and corticosteroids play central roles in a wide range of body functions but, in fish, information on their interactions is limited. These axes of the endocrine system are also potential targets for disruption of signaling pathways by hormone-mimicking chemicals, but have received little study. Molecular approaches offer an effective way to help unravel these endocrine interactions but require the appropriate gene-specific assays to do so. In this study, the cDNAs for a suite of hormones and/or receptors involved in signaling for the effects of GH and IGF-I [GH, GH receptor (GHR), IGF-I, IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR)], thyroid hormones [thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TRalpha) and beta (TRbeta)], and corticosteroids [glucocorticoid receptor (GR)] were cloned from the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas; fhm), and the tissue-, developmental-, and gender-related expression of their mRNA transcripts established. By polymerase chain reaction (PCR) strategy, we obtained full-length 1123-bp GH, 817-bp IGF-I, 1584-bp TRbeta, and 2571-bp GR cDNAs, coding for 210 amino acid (aa) GH, 161 aa IGF-I, 378 aa TRbeta, and 745 aa GR putative proteins, and partial-length 158-bp GHR, 811-bp IGF-IR, and 446-bp TRalpha cDNAs. Real-time PCR analyses revealed broad tissue expression for the target mRNAs; all targets were expressed in brain, pituitary, gill, liver, gonad, intestine, and muscle, with the exception of GH that was expressed only in the pituitary and gonad. Expression patterns in both juvenile and adult fhm were complex, with both temporal-, tissue-, and sex-specific characteristics. For example, hepatic expressions of GHR, IGF-I, and IGF-IR were far higher in males than in females, possibly reflecting the sex-related dimorphism in growth that occurs in this species, and TRalpha and TRbeta showed divergent expression patterns during development (where TRbeta predominated) and in adult tissues implying some

  17. The connection between animal stress and meat production: Uncoupling of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 axis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    For decades, researchers have demonstrated that "stress" can have detrimental effects on the immune system. However, what had not been distinguished until recently are the divergent effects of "acute" stress associated with subclinical immunological burdens on the animal versus long-term or "chronic...

  18. Effect of Growth Hormone Deficiency on Brain Structure, Motor Function and Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Emma A.; O'Reilly, Michelle A.; Clayden, Jonathan D.; Seunarine, Kiran K.; Chong, Wui K.; Dale, Naomi; Salt, Alison; Clark, Chris A.; Dattani, Mehul T.

    2012-01-01

    The growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 axis plays a role in normal brain growth but little is known of the effect of growth hormone deficiency on brain structure. Children with isolated growth hormone deficiency (peak growth hormone less than 6.7 [micro]g/l) and idiopathic short stature (peak growth hormone greater than 10 [micro]g/l)…

  19. Effect of Growth Hormone Deficiency on Brain Structure, Motor Function and Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Emma A.; O'Reilly, Michelle A.; Clayden, Jonathan D.; Seunarine, Kiran K.; Chong, Wui K.; Dale, Naomi; Salt, Alison; Clark, Chris A.; Dattani, Mehul T.

    2012-01-01

    The growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 axis plays a role in normal brain growth but little is known of the effect of growth hormone deficiency on brain structure. Children with isolated growth hormone deficiency (peak growth hormone less than 6.7 [micro]g/l) and idiopathic short stature (peak growth hormone greater than 10 [micro]g/l)…

  20. Growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axis, calciotropic hormones and bone mineral density in young patients with chronic viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Marek, Bogdan; Kajdaniuk, Dariusz; Niedziołka, Danuta; Borgiel-Marek, Halina; Nowak, Mariusz; Siemińska, Lucyna; Ostrowska, Zofia; Głogowska-Szeląg, Joanna; Piecha, Tomasz; Otremba, Łukasz; Holona, Karol; Kazimierczak, Aleksandra; Wierzbicka-Chmiel, Joanna; Kos-Kudła, Beata

    2015-01-01

    Chronic liver disease caused by HBV and HCV infections, due to its great prevalence and serious medical consequences, is at the present time a significant clinical problem. An impaired liver function can provoke severe disturbances in calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, and consequently in the bone metabolism resulting in hepatic osteodystrophy. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are significant differences in bone mineral density (BMD) and/or circadian levels of hormones connected with bone metabolism and bone turnover markers in patients with chronic viral hepatitis. Circadian levels (AUC, area under the curve) of GH, IGF-I, IGFBP-3, osteocalcin (BGLAP), C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP), PTH, 25(OH)D, total calcium and total phosporus were measured in the blood of members of the study group (n = 80). BMD was assessed using the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry method of the L2-L4 lumbar spine. Data was compared to that of healthy individuals (n = 40). BMD (1.05 g/cm3 vs. 1.20 g/cm3), total calcium concentration (2.20 mmol/L vs. 2.45 mmol/L), total phosphorus concentration (1.06 mmol/L vs. 1.33 mmol/L), IGF-I (AUC 3,982.32 ng/mL vs. 5,167.61 ng/mL), IGFBP-3 (AUC 725.09 ng/L vs. 944.35 ng/L), 25(OH)D (AUC 356.35 ng/mL vs. 767.53 ng/mL) and BGLAP (AUC 161.39 ng/L vs. 298 ng/L) were lower in the study group. GH (AUC 88.3 ng/mL vs. 48.04 ng/mL), iPTH (AUC 1,201.94 pg/mL vs. 711.73 pg/mL) and ICTP (AUC 104.30 μg/L vs. 54.49 μg/L) were higher in patients with hepatitis. Positive correlations were noted between bone mineral density and IGF-I, IGFBP-3, and BGLAP levels. Chronic viral hepatitis causes a decrease in bone mineral density. Impaired liver function disrupts homeostasis of the calcium- vitamin D-parathyroid hormone axis and provokes secondary hyperparathyroidism. Chronic viral hepatitis induces a decrease in the synthesis of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 and an increase in GH secretion. Hepatic osteodystrophy is probably caused by both changes in calciotropic hormones as well as in the somatotropin hormone axis.

  1. Growth Hormone Therapy in Children with Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Cayir, Atilla; Kosan, Celalettin

    2015-01-01

    Growth is impaired in a chronic renal failure. Anemia, acidosis, reduced intake of calories and protein, decreased synthesis of vitamin D and increased parathyroid hormone levels, hyperphosphatemia, renal osteodystrophy and changes in growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor and the gonadotropin-gonadal axis are implicated in this study. Growth is adversely affected by immunosuppressives and corticosteroids after kidney transplantation. Treating metabolic disorders using the recombinant human growth hormone is an effective option for patients with inadequate growth rates. PMID:25745347

  2. Growth hormone therapy in children with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Cayir, Atilla; Kosan, Celalettin

    2015-02-01

    Growth is impaired in a chronic renal failure. Anemia, acidosis, reduced intake of calories and protein, decreased synthesis of vitamin D and increased parathyroid hormone levels, hyperphosphatemia, renal osteodystrophy and changes in growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor and the gonadotropin-gonadal axis are implicated in this study. Growth is adversely affected by immunosuppressives and corticosteroids after kidney transplantation. Treating metabolic disorders using the recombinant human growth hormone is an effective option for patients with inadequate growth rates.

  3. Growth

    Treesearch

    John R. Jones; George A. Schier

    1985-01-01

    This chapter considers aspen growth as a process, and discusses some characteristics of the growth and development of trees and stands. For the most part, factors affecting growth are discussed elsewhere, particularly in the GENETICS AND VARIATION chapter and in chapters in PART 11. ECOLOGY. Aspen growth as it relates to wood production is examined in the WOOD RESOURCE...

  4. Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waag, Andreas

    This chapter is devoted to the growth of ZnO. It starts with various techniques to grow bulk samples and presents in some detail the growth of epitaxial layers by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The last section is devoted to the growth of nanorods. Some properties of the resulting samples are also presented. If a comparison between GaN and ZnO is made, very often the huge variety of different growth techniques available to fabricate ZnO is said to be an advantage of this material system. Indeed, growth techniques range from low cost wet chemical growth at almost room temperature to high quality MOCVD growth at temperatures above 1, 000∘C. In most cases, there is a very strong tendency of c-axis oriented growth, with a much higher growth rate in c-direction as compared to other crystal directions. This often leads to columnar structures, even at relatively low temperatures. However, it is, in general, not straight forward to fabricate smooth ZnO thin films with flat surfaces. Another advantage of a potential ZnO technology is said to be the possibility to grow thin films homoepitaxially on ZnO substrates. ZnO substrates are mostly fabricated by vapor phase transport (VPT) or hydrothermal growth. These techniques are enabling high volume manufacturing at reasonable cost, at least in principle. The availability of homoepitaxial substrates should be beneficial to the development of ZnO technology and devices and is in contrast to the situation of GaN. However, even though a number of companies are developing ZnO substrates, only recently good quality substrates have been demonstrated. However, these substrates are not yet widely available. Still, the situation concerning ZnO substrates seems to be far from low-cost, high-volume production. The fabrication of dense, single crystal thin films is, in general, surprisingly difficult, even when ZnO is grown on a ZnO substrate. However

  5. The influence of tropical adaptation on plasma concentrations of insulin-like growth factor-I in purebred and crossbred beef cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In an effort to determine whether tropical adaptation influences circulating concentrations of the growth-related hormone, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), 3-breed diallel matings were conducted using temperate Bos taurus (A; Angus), tropical Bos indicus (B; Brahman), and tropical Bos taurus (R...

  6. Nutritionally-Induced Catch-Up Growth

    PubMed Central

    Gat-Yablonski, Galia; Phillip, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is considered a leading cause of growth attenuation in children. When food is replenished, spontaneous catch-up (CU) growth usually occurs, bringing the child back to its original growth trajectory. However, in some cases, the CU growth is not complete, leading to a permanent growth deficit. This review summarizes our current knowledge regarding the mechanism regulating nutrition and growth, including systemic factors, such as insulin, growth hormone, insulin- like growth factor-1, vitamin D, fibroblast growth factor-21, etc., and local mechanisms, including autophagy, as well as regulators of transcription, protein synthesis, miRNAs and epigenetics. Studying the molecular mechanisms regulating CU growth may lead to the establishment of better nutritional and therapeutic regimens for more effective CU growth in children with malnutrition and growth abnormalities. It will be fascinating to follow this research in the coming years and to translate the knowledge gained to clinical benefit. PMID:25594438

  7. Utility of Measuring Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I for Assessing Military Operational Stress: Supporting Future Force Warrior from the Bench Top to the Battlefield

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    assessing the effectiveness of intervention and recovery strategies. The growth hormone /insulin-like axis is a central endocrine axis and is...Friedl et al., 2000; Nindl et al. 2003a; Rosen, 1999; Rosendal et al., 2002). For this reason, periodic assessment of the growth hormone /insulin...Thissen et al., 1992; Thissen et al., 1999). Additionally, IGF-I concentrations are relatively stable. Unlike hormones such as growth hormone , IGF

  8. Primary medical therapy for acromegaly: an open, prospective, multicenter study of the effects of subcutaneous and intramuscular slow-release octreotide on growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-I, and tumor size.

    PubMed

    Bevan, J S; Atkin, S L; Atkinson, A B; Bouloux, P-M; Hanna, F; Harris, P E; James, R A; McConnell, M; Roberts, G A; Scanlon, M F; Stewart, P M; Teasdale, E; Turner, H E; Wass, J A H; Wardlaw, J M

    2002-10-01

    Conventional surgery and radiotherapy for acromegaly have limitations. There are few data on the use of the somatostatin analog octreotide (Oct) as primary medical therapy. An open prospective study of 27 patients with newly diagnosed acromegaly was conducted in nine endocrine centers in the United Kingdom. Twenty patients had macroadenomas, and 7 had microadenomas. For the first 24 wk (phase 1), patients received sc Oct in an initial dose of 100 microg, 3 times daily, increased to 200 micro g three times daily after 4 wk in the 13 patients whose mean serum GH remained greater than 5 mU/liter (2 microg/liter). Five-point GH profiles were performed at 0, 4, 12, and 24 wk, and high resolution pituitary imaging using a standard protocol was performed at 0, 12, and 24 wk (magnetic resonance imaging in 25 patients and computed tomography in 2). Tumor dimensions and volumes were calculated by a central, reporting neuroradiologist, and the results were audited by a second, independent neuroradiologist. After 24 wk, 15 patients proceeded to phase 2 of the study with a direct switch to monthly injections of the depot formulation of Oct, Sandostatin long-acting release (Oct-LAR). Further GH profiles were performed at 36 and 48 wk, and pituitary imaging was performed at 48 wk. The median pretreatment serum GH concentration was 30.7 mU/liter (range, 6.7-141.4). During sc Oct, serum GH fell to less than 5 mU/liter in 9 patients (38%), and IGF-I fell to normal in 8 patients (33%). All 27 tumors shrank during sc Oct; for microadenomas the median tumor volume reduction was 49% (range, 12-73), and for macroadenomas it was 43% (range, 6-92). After 24 wk of Oct-LAR (end of phase 2), the GH level was less than 5 mU/liter in 11 of 14 patients (79%), and IGF-I was normal in 8 of 15 patients (53%). In the 15 patients given Oct-LAR (10 macroadenomas), wk 48 scans showed a further overall median tumor volume reduction of 24%. At the end of the study 79% of patients had mean serum GH levels below 5 mU/liter, 53% had normal IGF-I levels, and 73% showed greater than 30% tumor shrinkage. Twenty-nine percent of patients achieved all 3 targets, but no patient with pretreatment GH levels above 50 mU/liter did so at any stage of the study. Primary medical therapy with Oct offers the prospect of normalization of GH/IGF-I levels together with substantial tumor shrinkage in a significant subset of acromegalic patients. This is most likely to occur in patients with pretreatment GH levels less than 50 mU/liter (20 microg/liter).

  9. Growth hormone in chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vishal; Lee, Marilyn

    2012-03-01

    Severe growth retardation (below the third percentile for height) is seen in up to one-third children with chronic kidney disease. It is thought to be multifactorial and despite optimal medical therapy most children are unable to reach their normal height. Under-nutrition, anemia, vitamin D deficiency with secondary hyperparathyroidism, metabolic acidosis, hyperphosphatemia, renal osteodystrophy; abnormalities in the growth hormone/insulin like growth factor system and sex steroids, all have been implicated in the pathogenesis of growth failure. Therapy includes optimization of nutritional and metabolic abnormalities. Failure to achieve adequate height despite 3-6 months of optimal medical measures mandates the use of recombinant GH (rGH) therapy, which has shown to result in catch-up growth, anywhere from 2 cm to 10 cm with satisfactory liner, somatic and psychological development.

  10. Growth hormone in chronic renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vishal; Lee, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Severe growth retardation (below the third percentile for height) is seen in up to one-third children with chronic kidney disease. It is thought to be multifactorial and despite optimal medical therapy most children are unable to reach their normal height. Under-nutrition, anemia, vitamin D deficiency with secondary hyperparathyroidism, metabolic acidosis, hyperphosphatemia, renal osteodystrophy; abnormalities in the growth hormone/insulin like growth factor system and sex steroids, all have been implicated in the pathogenesis of growth failure. Therapy includes optimization of nutritional and metabolic abnormalities. Failure to achieve adequate height despite 3–6 months of optimal medical measures mandates the use of recombinant GH (rGH) therapy, which has shown to result in catch-up growth, anywhere from 2 cm to 10 cm with satisfactory liner, somatic and psychological development. PMID:22470855

  11. Growth and bone development.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Cyrus; Harvey, Nicholas; Javaid, Kassim; Hanson, Mark; Dennison, Elaine

    2008-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality through its association with age-related fractures. Although most effort in fracture prevention has been directed at retarding the rate of age-related bone loss, and reducing the frequency and severity of trauma among elderly people, evidence is growing that peak bone mass is an important contributor to bone strength during later life. The normal patterns of skeletal growth have been well characterized in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. It has been confirmed that boys have higher bone mineral content, but not volumetric bone density, than girls. Furthermore, there is a dissociation between the peak velocities for height gain and bone mineral accrual, in both genders. Puberty is the period during which volumetric density appears to increase in both axial and appendicular sites. Many factors influence the accumulation of bone mineral during childhood and adolescence, including heredity, gender, diet, physical activity, endocrine status, and sporadic risk factors such as cigarette smoking. In addition to these modifiable factors during childhood, evidence has also accrued that fracture risk might be programmed during intrauterine life. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a relationship between birthweight, weight in infancy, and adult bone mass. This appears to be mediated through modulation of the set-point for basal activity of pituitary-dependent endocrine systems such as the hypothalamicpituitary-adrenal and growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axes. Maternal smoking, diet (particularly vitamin D deficiency), and physical activity also appear to modulate bone mineral acquisition during intrauterine life; furthermore, both low birth size and poor childhood growth are directly linked to the later risk of hip fracture. The optimization of maternal nutrition and intrauterine growth should also be included within preventive strategies against osteoporotic fracture, albeit for future

  12. Skeletal Effects of Growth Hormone and Insulin-like Growth Factor-I Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Richard C.; Mohan, Subburaman

    2015-01-01

    The growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor (GH/IGF) axis is critically important for the regulation of bone formation, and deficiencies in this system have been shown to contribute to the development of osteoporosis and other diseases of low bone mass. The GH/IGF axis is regulated by a complex set of hormonal and local factors which can act to regulate this system at the level of the ligands, receptors, IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs), or IGFBP proteases. A combination of in vitro studies, transgenic animal models, and clinical human investigations has provided ample evidence of the importance of the endocrine and local actions of both GH and IGF-I, the two major components of the GH/IGF axis, in skeletal growth and maintenance. GH- and IGF-based therapies provide a useful avenue of approach for the prevention and treatment of diseases such as osteoporosis. PMID:26408965

  13. Growth hormone and growth?

    PubMed

    Harvey, Steve

    2013-09-01

    Pituitary GH is obligatory for normal growth in mammals, but the importance of pituitary GH in avian growth is less certain. In birds, pituitary GH is biologically active and has growth promoting actions in the tibia-test bioassay. Its importance in normal growth is indicated by the growth suppression following the surgical removal of the pituitary gland or after the immunoneutralization of endogenous pituitary GH. The partial restoration of growth in some studies with GH-treated hypophysectomized birds also suggests GH dependency in avian growth, as does the dwarfism that occurs in some strains with GHR dysfunctions. Circulating GH concentrations are also correlated with body weight gain, being high in young, rapidly growing birds and low in slower growing older birds. Nevertheless, despite these observations, there is an extensive literature that concludes pituitary GH is not important in avian growth. This is based on numerous studies with hypophysectomized and intact birds that show only slight, transitory or absent growth responses to exogenous GH-treatment. Moreover, while circulating GH levels correlate with weight gain in young birds, this may merely reflect changes in the control of pituitary GH secretion during aging, as numerous studies involving experimental alterations in growth rate fail to show positive correlations between plasma GH concentrations and the alterations in growth rate. Furthermore, growth is known to occur in the absence of pituitary GH, as most embryonic development occurs prior to the ontogenetic appearance of pituitary somatotrophs and the appearance of GH in embryonic circulation. Early embryonic growth is also independent of the endocrine actions of pituitary GH, since removal of the presumptive pituitary gland does not impair early growth. Embryonic growth does, however, occur in the presence of extrapituitary GH, which is produced by most tissues and has autocrine or paracrine roles that locally promote growth and development

  14. Growth factors: possible roles for clinical management of the short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    McMellen, Mark E; Wakeman, Derek; Longshore, Shannon W; McDuffie, Lucas A; Warner, Brad W

    2010-02-01

    The structural and functional changes during intestinal adaptation are necessary to compensate for the sudden loss of digestive and absorptive capacity after massive intestinal resection. When the adaptive response is inadequate, short bowel syndrome (SBS) ensues and patients are left with the requirement for parenteral nutrition and its associated morbidities. Several hormones have been studied as potential enhancers of the adaptation process. The effects of growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1, epidermal growth factor, and glucagon-like peptide 2 on adaptation have been studied extensively in animal models. In addition, growth hormone and glucagon-like peptide 2 have shown promise for the treatment of SBS in clinical trials in human beings. Several lesser studied hormones, including leptin, corticosteroids, thyroxine, testosterone, and estradiol, are also discussed.

  15. [Hormone replacement therapy--growth hormone, melatonin, DHEA and sex hormones].

    PubMed

    Fukai, Shiho; Akishita, Masahiro

    2009-07-01

    The ability to maintain active and independent living as long as possible is crucial for the healthy longevity. Hormones responsible for some of the manifestations associated with aging are growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), melatonin, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), sex hormones and thyroid hormones. These hormonal changes are associated with changes in body composition, visceral obesity, muscle weakness, osteoporosis, urinary incontinence, loss of cognitive functioning, reduction in well being, depression, as well as sexual dysfunction. With the prolongation of life expectancy, both men and women today live the latter third life with endocrine deficiencies. Hormone replacement therapy may alleviate the debilitating conditions of secondary partial endocrine deficiencies by preventing or delaying some aspects of aging.

  16. Role of various cytokines and growth factors in pubertal development.

    PubMed

    Casazza, Krista; Hanks, Lynae J; Alvarez, Jessica A

    2010-01-01

    Historical data suggest that body composition is intricately involved in pubertal development. Progression through puberty is dependent on the interaction between the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 (GH-IGF-1) axis, reproductive and metabolic hormones as well as pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines which induce alterations in feedback mechanisms and therefore mediate body composition and growth. Simultaneous increases in GH and IGF-1, and the concomitant changes in the hormonal milieu (i.e. reproductive hormones, testosterone and estrogen, and insulin)are the major contributors to anabolic effects seen throughout the pubertal transition, and are affected by various factors including (but not limited to) energy status and body composition. Orexigenic agents (i.e. ghrelin and leptin) also play a role at the level of the hypothalamus affecting not only energy intake, but also pubertal onset and progression. Effects of cytokines, many of which may be considered catabolic, extend beyond their traditionally viewed role involving the immune system, accompanying reproductive maturity further regulating aspects of energy and bone metabolism. As such, the signal(s) initiating the hypothalamic response that triggers puberty is likely reliant on a number of neural, metabolic and endocrine networks, all of which are at least partially influenced by pubertal growth factors, and act independently, antagonistically and/or synergistically to regulate anabolic pathways, therefore modifying body composition trajectory and growth during adolescence.

  17. Hyperphagia in male melanocortin 4 receptor deficient mice promotes growth independently of growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Tan, H Y; Steyn, F J; Huang, L; Cowley, M; Veldhuis, J D; Chen, C

    2016-12-15

    Loss of function of the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) results in hyperphagia, obesity and increased growth. Despite knowing that MC4Rs control food intake, we are yet to understand why defects in the function of the MC4R receptor contribute to rapid linear growth. We show that hyperphagia following germline loss of MC4R in male mice promotes growth while suppressing the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 (GH-IGF-1) axis. We propose that hyperinsulinaemia promotes growth while suppressing the GH-IGF-1 axis. It is argued that physiological responses essential to maintain energy flux override conventional mechanisms of pubertal growth to promote the storage of excess energy while ensuring growth. Defects in melanocortin-4-receptor (MC4R) signalling result in hyperphagia, obesity and increased growth. Clinical observations suggest that loss of MC4R function may enhance growth hormone (GH)-mediated growth, although this remains untested. Using male mice with germline loss of the MC4R, we assessed pulsatile GH release and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) production and/or release relative to pubertal growth. We demonstrate early-onset suppression of GH release in rapidly growing MC4R deficient (MC4RKO) mice, confirming that increased linear growth in MC4RKO mice does not occur in response to enhanced activation of the GH-IGF-1 axis. The progressive suppression of GH release in MC4RKO mice occurred alongside increased adiposity and the progressive worsening of hyperphagia-associated hyperinsulinaemia. We next prevented hyperphagia in MC4RKO mice through restricting calorie intake in these mice to match that of wild-type (WT) littermates. Pair feeding of MC4RKO mice did not prevent increased adiposity, but attenuated hyperinsulinaemia, recovered GH release, and normalized linear growth rate to that seen in pair-fed WT littermate controls. We conclude that the suppression of GH release in MC4RKO mice occurs independently of increased adipose mass, and is a

  18. Growth Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... because their parents are. But some children have growth disorders. Growth disorders are problems that prevent children from developing ... or other features. Very slow or very fast growth can sometimes signal a gland problem or disease. ...

  19. Growth Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... function and also play a role in growth. Hypothyroidism can cause slow growth because the thyroid gland ... to support normal growth. A major symptom of hypothyroidism is feeling tired or sluggish. A blood test ...

  20. [The use of growth hormone to treat endocrine-metabolic disturbances in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients].

    PubMed

    Spinola-Castro, Angela Maria; Siviero-Miachon, Adriana A; da Silva, Marcos Tadeu Nolasco; Guerra-Junior, Gil

    2008-07-01

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (Aids) was initially related to HIV-associated wasting syndrome, and its metabolic disturbances to altered body composition. After Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) was started, malnutrition has declined and HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome has emerged as an important metabolic disorder. Aids is also characterized by hormonal disturbances, principally in growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 (GH/IGF-1) axis. The use of recombinant human GH (hrGH) was formerly indicated to treat wasting syndrome, in order to increase lean body mass. Even though the use of hrGH in lipodystrophy syndrome has been considered, the decrease in insulin sensitivity is a limitation for its use, which has not been officially approved yet. Diversity in therapeutic regimen is another limitation to its use in Aids patients. The present study has reviewed the main HIV-related endocrine-metabolic disorders as well as the use of hrGH in such conditions.

  1. Vitamin B12–dependent taurine synthesis regulates growth and bone mass

    PubMed Central

    Roman-Garcia, Pablo; Quiros-Gonzalez, Isabel; Mottram, Lynda; Lieben, Liesbet; Sharan, Kunal; Wangwiwatsin, Arporn; Tubio, Jose; Lewis, Kirsty; Wilkinson, Debbie; Santhanam, Balaji; Sarper, Nazan; Clare, Simon; Vassiliou, George S.; Velagapudi, Vidya R.; Dougan, Gordon; Yadav, Vijay K.

    2014-01-01

    Both maternal and offspring-derived factors contribute to lifelong growth and bone mass accrual, although the specific role of maternal deficiencies in the growth and bone mass of offspring is poorly understood. In the present study, we have shown that vitamin B12 (B12) deficiency in a murine genetic model results in severe postweaning growth retardation and osteoporosis, and the severity and time of onset of this phenotype in the offspring depends on the maternal genotype. Using integrated physiological and metabolomic analysis, we determined that B12 deficiency in the offspring decreases liver taurine production and associates with abrogation of a growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 (GH/IGF1) axis. Taurine increased GH-dependent IGF1 synthesis in the liver, which subsequently enhanced osteoblast function, and in B12-deficient offspring, oral administration of taurine rescued their growth retardation and osteoporosis phenotypes. These results identify B12 as an essential vitamin that positively regulates postweaning growth and bone formation through taurine synthesis and suggests potential therapies to increase bone mass. PMID:24911144

  2. Vitamin B₁₂-dependent taurine synthesis regulates growth and bone mass.

    PubMed

    Roman-Garcia, Pablo; Quiros-Gonzalez, Isabel; Mottram, Lynda; Lieben, Liesbet; Sharan, Kunal; Wangwiwatsin, Arporn; Tubio, Jose; Lewis, Kirsty; Wilkinson, Debbie; Santhanam, Balaji; Sarper, Nazan; Clare, Simon; Vassiliou, George S; Velagapudi, Vidya R; Dougan, Gordon; Yadav, Vijay K

    2014-07-01

    Both maternal and offspring-derived factors contribute to lifelong growth and bone mass accrual, although the specific role of maternal deficiencies in the growth and bone mass of offspring is poorly understood. In the present study, we have shown that vitamin B12 (B12) deficiency in a murine genetic model results in severe postweaning growth retardation and osteoporosis, and the severity and time of onset of this phenotype in the offspring depends on the maternal genotype. Using integrated physiological and metabolomic analysis, we determined that B12 deficiency in the offspring decreases liver taurine production and associates with abrogation of a growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 (GH/IGF1) axis. Taurine increased GH-dependent IGF1 synthesis in the liver, which subsequently enhanced osteoblast function, and in B12-deficient offspring, oral administration of taurine rescued their growth retardation and osteoporosis phenotypes. These results identify B12 as an essential vitamin that positively regulates postweaning growth and bone formation through taurine synthesis and suggests potential therapies to increase bone mass.

  3. Extrapituitary growth hormone and growth?

    PubMed

    Harvey, Steve; Baudet, Marie-Laure

    2014-09-01

    While growth hormone (GH) is obligatory for postnatal growth, it is not required for a number of growth-without-GH syndromes, such as early embryonic or fetal growth. Instead, these syndromes are thought to be dependent upon local growth factors, rather than pituitary GH. The GH gene is, however, also expressed in many extrapituitary tissues, particularly during early development and extrapituitary GH may be one of the local growth factors responsible for embryonic or fetal growth. Moreover, as the expression of the GH receptor (GHR) gene mirrors that of GH in extrapituitary tissues the actions of GH in early development are likely to be mediated by local autocrine or paracrine mechanisms, especially as extrapituitary GH expression occurs prior to the ontogeny of pituitary somatotrophs or the appearance of GH in the circulation. The extrapituitary expression of pituitary somatotrophs or the appearance of GH in the circulation. The extrapituitary expression of GH in embryos has also been shown to be of functional relevance in a number of species, since the immunoneutralization of endogenous GH or the blockade of GH production is accompanied by growth impairment or cellular apoptosis. The extrapituitary expression of the GH gene also persists in some central and peripheral tissues postnatally, which may reflect its continued functional importance and physiological or pathophysiological significance. The expression and functional relevance of extrapituitary GH, particularly during embryonic growth, is the focus of this brief review.

  4. Growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 levels and their relation to survival in children with bacterial sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Onenli-Mungan, N; Yildizdas, D; Yapicioglu, H; Topaloglu, A K; Yüksel, B; Ozer, G

    2004-04-01

    Despite improved supportive care, the mortality of sepsis and septic shock is still high. Multiple changes in the neuroendocrine systems, at least in part, are responsible for the high morbidity and mortality. A reduced circulating level of insulin-like growth factor and an elevated level of growth hormone are the reported characteristic findings early in the course of sepsis and septic shock in adults. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes of growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 axis in sepsis and septic shock and investigate the relationship between these hormones and survival. Fifty-one children with sepsis (S), 21 children with septic shock (SS) and 30 healthy, age- and sex-matched children (C) were enrolled in this study. Growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor 1 and cortisol levels of the sepsis and septic shock groups were obtained before administration of any inotropic agent. Growth hormone levels were 32.3 +/- 1.5 microIU/mL (range 4-56), 15.9 +/- 0.6 microIU/mL (range 11-28) and 55.7 +/- 2.7 microIU/mL (range 20-70) in S, C and SS groups, respectively. The difference between the growth hormone levels of the S and C groups, S and SS groups, and C and SS groups were significant (P < 0.001). Non-survivors (54.7 +/- 1.6 microIU/mL) had significantly higher growth hormone levels than survivors (29.4 +/- 1.5 microIU/mL) (P < 0.001). Insulin-like growth factor 1 levels were 38.1 +/- 2.1 ng/mL (range 19-100), 122.9 +/- 9.6 ng/mL (range 48-250) and 22.2 +/- 1.9 ng/mL (range 10-46) in the S, C and SS groups, respectively, and the difference between the insulin-like growth factor 1 levels of the S and C, S and SS, and C and SS groups were significant (P < 0.001). Non-survivors (8.8 +/- 1.1 micro g/dL) had significantly lower cortisol levels than survivors (40.9 +/- 2.1 microg/dL) (P < 0.001). We detected a significant difference between the levels of cortisol in non-survivors (19.7 +/- 1.8 microg/dL) and survivors (33.9 +/- 0.9 microg/dL) (P

  5. Arginine and ornithine supplementation increases growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 serum levels after heavy-resistance exercise in strength-trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Zajac, Adam; Poprzecki, Stanisław; Zebrowska, Aleksandra; Chalimoniuk, Małgorzata; Langfort, Jozef

    2010-04-01

    This placebo-controlled double-blind study was designed to investigate the effect of arginine and ornithine (arg and orn) supplementation during 3-week heavy-resistance training on serum growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1/insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 (GH/IGF-1/IGFBP-3), testosterone, cortisol, and insulin levels in experienced strength-trained athletes. The subjects were randomly divided between a placebo group (n = 8) and the l-Arg/l-Orn-supplemented group (n = 9), and performed pre and posttraining standard exercise tests with the same absolute load, which consisted of the same exercise schedule as that applied in the training process. Fasting blood samples were obtained at rest, 2 minutes after the cessation of the strength exercise protocol, and after 1 hour of recovery. The resting concentrations of the investigated hormones and IGFBP-3 did not differ significantly between the study groups. In response to exercise test, all the hormones were elevated (p < 0.05) at both time points. Significant increases (p < 0.05) were observed in both GH and IGF-1 serum levels after arg and orn supplementation at both time points, whereas a significant decrease was seen in IGFBP-3 protein during the recovery period. Because there was no between-group difference in the remaining hormone levels, it appears that the GH/IGF-1/IGFBP-3 complex may be the major player in muscle tissue response to short-term resistance training after arg and orn supplementation.

  6. Comparative Transcriptomic Study of Muscle Provides New Insights into the Growth Superiority of a Novel Grouper Hybrid

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinhui; Ruan, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Guo, Chuanyu; Tang, Zhujing; Li, Xiaofeng; You, Xinxin; Lin, Haoran; Zhang, Yong; Shi, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Grouper (Epinephelus spp.) is a group of fish species with great economic importance in Asian countries. A novel hybrid grouper, generated by us and called the Hulong grouper (Hyb), has better growth performance than its parents, E. fuscoguttatus (Efu, ♀) and E. lanceolatus (Ela, ♂). We previously reported that the GH/IGF (growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor) system in the brain and liver contributed to the superior growth of the Hyb. In this study, using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), we analyzed RNA expression levels of comprehensive genes in the muscle of the hybrid and its parents. Our data showed that genes involved in glycolysis and calcium signaling in addition to troponins are up-regulated in the Hyb. The results suggested that the activity of the upstream GH/IGF system in the brain and liver, along with the up-regulated glycolytic genes as well as ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and troponins related to the calcium signaling pathway in muscle, led to enhanced growth in the hybrid grouper. Muscle contraction inducing growth could be the major contributor to the growth superiority in our novel hybrid grouper, which may be a common mechanism for hybrid superiority in fishes. PMID:28005961

  7. Comparative Transcriptomic Study of Muscle Provides New Insights into the Growth Superiority of a Novel Grouper Hybrid.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Huang, Yu; Hu, Guojun; Zhang, Xinhui; Ruan, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Guo, Chuanyu; Tang, Zhujing; Li, Xiaofeng; You, Xinxin; Lin, Haoran; Zhang, Yong; Shi, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Grouper (Epinephelus spp.) is a group of fish species with great economic importance in Asian countries. A novel hybrid grouper, generated by us and called the Hulong grouper (Hyb), has better growth performance than its parents, E. fuscoguttatus (Efu, ♀) and E. lanceolatus (Ela, ♂). We previously reported that the GH/IGF (growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor) system in the brain and liver contributed to the superior growth of the Hyb. In this study, using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), we analyzed RNA expression levels of comprehensive genes in the muscle of the hybrid and its parents. Our data showed that genes involved in glycolysis and calcium signaling in addition to troponins are up-regulated in the Hyb. The results suggested that the activity of the upstream GH/IGF system in the brain and liver, along with the up-regulated glycolytic genes as well as ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and troponins related to the calcium signaling pathway in muscle, led to enhanced growth in the hybrid grouper. Muscle contraction inducing growth could be the major contributor to the growth superiority in our novel hybrid grouper, which may be a common mechanism for hybrid superiority in fishes.

  8. Acute exposure to tris (2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) affects growth and development of embryo-larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiran; Wu, Ding; Xu, Qinglong; Yu, Liqin; Liu, Chunsheng; Wang, Jianghua

    2017-10-01

    Tris (2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP), is used as a flame retardant worldwide. It is an additive in materials and can be easily discharged into the surrounding environment. There is evidence linking TBOEP exposure to abnormal development and growth in zebrafish embryos/larvae. Here, using zebrafish embryo as a model, we investigated toxicological effects on developing zebrafish (Danio rerio) caused by TBOEP at concentrations of 0, 20, 200, 1000, 2000μg/L starting from 2h post-fertilization (hpf). Our findings revealed that TBOEP exposure caused developmental toxicity, such as malformation, growth delay and decreased heart rate in zebrafish larvae. Correlation analysis indicated that inhibition of growth was possibly due to down-regulation of expression of genes related to the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor (GH/IGF) axis. Furthermore, exposure to TBOEP significantly increased thyroxine (T4) and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) in whole larvae. In addition, changed expression of genes involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis was observed, indicating that perturbation of HPT axis might be responsible for the developmental damage and growth delay induced by TBOEP. The present study provides a new set of evidence that exposure of embryo-larval zebrafish to TBOEP can cause perturbation of GH/IGF axis and HPT axis, which could result in developmental impairment and growth inhibition. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Growth Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... that can lead to significantly short stature is dwarfism . Dwarfism results from abnormal growth of the bones and cartilage in the body. In many forms of dwarfism the person has abnormal body proportions, such as ...

  10. Growth Hormone

    MedlinePlus

    ... to help diagnose and monitor the treatment of acromegaly and gigantism . Growth hormone is essential for normal ... signs and symptoms of GH excess ( gigantism and acromegaly ). Suppression testing may be done when a pituitary ...

  11. Delayed growth

    MedlinePlus

    ... ready-to-feed formula. When to Contact a Medical Professional Contact your health care provider if you are concerned about your child's growth. Medical evaluations are important even if you think developmental ...

  12. Eyelid Growths

    MedlinePlus

    ... any growths that do not respond to initial treatments. Resources In This Article Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Figure 1 Xanthelasma Figure 2 Basal Cell Carcinoma of Eyelid Eyelid and Tearing Disorders Overview of ...

  13. Population growth and economic growth.

    PubMed

    Narayana, D L

    1984-01-01

    This discussion of the issues relating to the problem posed by population explosion in the developing countries and economic growth in the contemporary world covers the following: predictions of economic and social trends; the Malthusian theory of population; the classical or stationary theory of population; the medical triage model; ecological disaster; the Global 2000 study; the limits to growth; critiques of the Limits to Growth model; nonrenewable resources; food and agriculture; population explosion and stabilization; space and ocean colonization; and the limits perspective. The Limits to Growth model, a general equilibrium anti-growth model, is the gloomiest economic model ever constructed. None of the doomsday models, the Malthusian theory, the classical stationary state, the neo-Malthusian medical triage model, the Global 2000 study, are so far reaching in their consequences. The course of events that followed the publication of the "Limits to Growth" in 1972 in the form of 2 oil shocks, food shock, pollution shock, and price shock seemed to bear out formally the gloomy predictions of the thesis with a remarkable speed. The 12 years of economic experience and the knowledge of resource trends postulate that even if the economic pressures visualized by the model are at work they are neither far reaching nor so drastic. Appropriate action can solve them. There are several limitations to the Limits to Growth model. The central theme of the model, which is overshoot and collapse, is unlikely to be the course of events. The model is too aggregative to be realistic. It exaggerates the ecological disaster arising out of the exponential growth of population and industry. The gross underestimation of renewable resources is a basic flaw of the model. The most critical weakness of the model is its gross underestimation of the historical trend of technological progress and the technological possiblities within industry and agriculture. The model does correctly emphasize

  14. Comparative effects of recombinant ovine placental lactogen and bovine growth hormone on galactopoiesis in ewes.

    PubMed

    Min, S H; Mackenzie, D D; McCutcheon, S N; Breier, B H; Gluckman, P D

    1997-04-01

    The effects of recombinant ovine placental lactogen and bovine growth hormone on milk yield, milk composition, and concentrations of blood hormones and metabolites were compared in ewes during an established lactation. Beginning on d 17 of lactation, ewes were treated for 5 d with twice daily subcutaneous injections of ovine placental lactogen (n = 9), bovine growth hormone (n = 10) at a dose of 0.10 mg/d per kg of body weight, or saline (n = 10). Circulating concentrations of ovine placental lactogen were 24.6 +/- 1.6 ng/ml on d 5 for ewes treated with ovine placental lactogen, but concentrations of ovine placental lactogen were undetectable in ewes treated with either saline or bovine growth hormone. Treatment with bovine growth hormone increased circulating concentrations of growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-I, and nonesterified fatty acids and decreased urea concentrations relative to those in ewes treated with ovine placental lactogen or saline. Compared with saline treatment, no parameters were affected by treatment with ovine placental lactogen. Treatment with bovine growth hormone or ovine placental lactogen treatment had no significant effects on plasma concentrations of insulin, glucose, or creatinine. Treatment with bovine growth hormone, but not ovine placental lactogen, increased yields of milk, fat, and lactose. Weight of the mammary gland was increased by bovine growth hormone, but not by ovine placental lactogen. Despite the fact that ovine placental lactogen is a potent somatogen, it does not appear to exhibit the same galactopoietic activity as bovine growth hormone in lactating ewes.

  15. Relationship between maternal growth, infant birthweight and nutrient partitioning in teenage pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Jones, R L; Cederberg, H M S; Wheeler, S J; Poston, L; Hutchinson, C J; Seed, P T; Oliver, R L; Baker, P N

    2010-01-01

    Teenagers are susceptible to delivering small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infants. Previous studies suggest that maternal growth may contribute, as a result of preferential nutrient partitioning to the mother. We investigated the impact of maternal growth on birthweight in pregnant teenagers in the UK, and examined endocrine mediators of nutrient partitioning. A prospective observational multicentre study, About Teenage Eating, conducted between 2004 and 2007. Four hospitals in socially-deprived areas of Manchester and London. A total of 500 pregnant adolescents (14-18 years of age) with a singleton pregnancy were recruited at 10-21 weeks of gestation, with follow-up studies on 368 subjects. A cohort of 80 pregnant adults (25-40 years of age) provided a control group for determining growth. Skeletal growth, weight gain and skinfold thickness were measured from first to third trimester, together with maternal levels of micronutrients and metabolic hormones: insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system and leptin. Dietary analyses were performed. SGA birth. Maternal growth was not associated with SGA birth: growing mothers delivered more large-for-gestational-age infants (OR 2.51; P < 0.05). Growers had greater weight gain (P < 0.001), fat accrual (P < 0.001) and red cell folate concentrations (P < 0.01) than non-growers. Maternal IGF-I (P < 0.01) and leptin (P < 0.001) were positively associated with maternal and fetal growth, whereas IGF-I (P < 0.001) was negatively associated. Teenagers that were underweight at booking or with low weight gain were at greater risk of SGA birth. Maternal growth was not detrimental to fetal growth in this UK population of teenagers. Greater weight gain and higher concentrations of IGF-I in growing teenagers may provide anabolic drive for maternal and fetal growth.

  16. Expression of IGF-I and Protein Degradation Markers During Hindlimb Unloading and Growth Hormone Administration in Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinsoo, T. A.; Turtikova, O. V.; Shenkman, B. S.

    2013-02-01

    It is known that hindlimb unloading or spaceflight produce atrophy and a number of phenotypic alterations in skeletal muscles. Many of these processes are triggered by the axis growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor I. However growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) expression relationship in rodent models of gravitational unloading is weakly investigated. We supposed the IGF-I is involved in regulation of protein turnover. In this study we examined the IGF-I expression by RT-PCR assay in the rat soleus, tibialis anterior and liver after 3 day of hindlimb suspension with growth hormone administration. Simultaneously were studied expression levels of MuRF-1 and MAFbx/atrogin as a key markers of intracellular proteolysis. We demonstrated that GH administration did not prevent IGF-I expression decreasing under the conditions of simulated weightlessness. It was concluded there are separate mechanisms of action of GH and IGF-I on protein metabolism in skeletal muscles. Gravitational unloading activate proteolysis independently of growth hormone activity.

  17. Growth Kinetics in Epitaxial Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessinger, Uwe

    Growth kinetics in heteroepitaxial growth are related to the nucleation and growth of atomic-height islands during the deposition of a material on a dissimilar substrate. Experimental measurements of the initial morphology of CaF_2 films deposited on Si(111) substrates were performed. These measurements consisted of photoemission spectroscopy and diffraction, which give sub-nanometer scale information averaged over the entire sample, and plan-view transmission electron microscopy, which gives localized information on a scale of several nanometers. These results, combined with others in the literature, revealed four distinct growth morphologies dependent on the deposition rate, substrate temperature and spacing between atomic-height steps on the surface, two of which had not been previously explained. A model based on two extant theories of homoepitaxial growth kinetics was developed to explain the different observed growth morphologies for the heteroepitaxial system CaF_2/Si(111). The first theory deals with whether the initial nucleation will occur at substrate steps or through adatom collisions on flat terraces, while the second deals with the nucleation of subsequent layers as these initial atomic islands increase in size. In extending these theories to heteroepitaxy, very different rates of upper-layer nucleation for the different size islands that nucleated at steps and on terraces are predicted. By applying this theory to CaF_2/Si(111), the diffusion barriers for CaF_2 molecule migration both on the reacted Si-Ca-F interface layer and on subsequent CaF_2 layers was extracted. The four different growth morphologies are explained within a common framework. The theory is quite general, and should apply to most heteroepitaxial systems. These theories were extended to predict a means by which the upper-layer nucleation may be inhibited while the underlying layer is completed. This method involves initiating the growth at conditions favoring many, small islands on

  18. Economic Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, James B.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A conceptual introduction for teachers explains economic growth and how it is measured. Four instructional units follow, beginning with a preschool and kindergarten unit which offers young students an opportunity to interview puppet workers, set up a classroom corner store, and learn the importance of capital resources for increasing productivity…

  19. Root growth

    Treesearch

    Terrell T. Baker; William H. Conner; B. Graeme Lockaby; Marianne K. Burke; John A. Stanturf

    2000-01-01

    While vegetation dynamics of forested floodplains have received considerable attention (Megonigal and others 1997, Mitch and Gosselink 1993), the highly dynamic fine root component of these ecosystems has been primarily ignored. Characterizing fine root growth is a challenging endeavor in any system, but the difficulties are particularly evident in forested floodplains...

  20. Effect of growth hormone deficiency on brain structure, motor function and cognition.

    PubMed

    Webb, Emma A; O'Reilly, Michelle A; Clayden, Jonathan D; Seunarine, Kiran K; Chong, Wui K; Dale, Naomi; Salt, Alison; Clark, Chris A; Dattani, Mehul T

    2012-01-01

    The growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 axis plays a role in normal brain growth but little is known of the effect of growth hormone deficiency on brain structure. Children with isolated growth hormone deficiency (peak growth hormone <6.7 µg/l) and idiopathic short stature (peak growth hormone >10 µg/l) underwent cognitive assessment, diffusion tensor imaging and volumetric magnetic resonance imaging prior to commencing growth hormone treatment. Total brain, corpus callosal, hippocampal, thalamic and basal ganglia volumes were determined using Freesurfer. Fractional anisotropy (a marker of white matter structural integrity) images were aligned and tract-based spatial statistics performed. Fifteen children (mean 8.8 years of age) with isolated growth hormone deficiency [peak growth hormone <6.7 µg/l (mean 3.5 µg/l)] and 14 controls (mean 8.4 years of age) with idiopathic short stature [peak growth hormone >10 µg/l (mean 15 µg/l) and normal growth rate] were recruited. Compared with controls, children with isolated growth hormone deficiency had lower Full-Scale IQ (P < 0.01), Verbal Comprehension Index (P < 0.01), Processing Speed Index (P < 0.05) and Movement-Assessment Battery for Children (P < 0.008) scores. Verbal Comprehension Index scores correlated significantly with insulin-like growth factor-1 (P < 0.03) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (P < 0.02) standard deviation scores in isolated growth hormone deficiency. The splenium of the corpus callosum, left globus pallidum, thalamus and hippocampus (P < 0.01) were significantly smaller; and corticospinal tract (bilaterally; P < 0.045, P < 0.05) and corpus callosum (P < 0.05) fractional anisotropy were significantly lower in the isolated growth hormone deficiency group. Basal ganglia volumes and bilateral corticospinal tract fractional anisotropy correlated significantly with Movement-Assessment Battery for Children scores, and

  1. Transcriptome assembly and identification of genes and SNPs associated with growth traits in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides).

    PubMed

    Li, Shengjie; Liu, Hao; Bai, Junjie; Zhu, Xinping

    2017-04-01

    Growth is one of the most crucial economic traits of all aquaculture species, but the molecular mechanisms involved in growth of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) are poorly understood. The objective of this study was to screen growth-related genes of M. salmoides by RNA sequencing and identify growth-related single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers through a growth association study. The muscle transcriptomes of fast- and slow-growing largemouth bass were obtained using the RNA-Seq technique. A total of 54,058,178 and 54,742,444 qualified Illumina read pairs were obtained for the fast-growing and slow-growing groups, respectively, giving rise to 4,865,236,020 and 4,926,819,960 total clean bases, respectively. Gene expression profiling showed that 3,530 unigenes were differentially expressed between the fast-growing and slow-growing phenotypes (false discovery rate ≤0.001, the absolute value of log2 (fold change) ≥1), including 1,441 up-regulated and 2,889 down-regulated unigenes in the fast-growing largemouth bass. Analysis of these genes revealed that several signalling pathways, including the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor 1 axis and signalling pathway, the glycolysis pathway, and the myostatin/transforming growth factor beta signalling pathway, as well as heat shock protein, cytoskeleton, and myofibril component genes might be associated with muscle growth. From these genes, 10 genes with putative SNPs were selected, and 17 SNPs were genotyped successfully. Marker-trait analysis in 340 individuals of Youlu No. 1 largemouth bass revealed three SNPs associated with growth in key genes (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1, FOXO3b, and heat shock protein beta-1). This research provides information about key genes and SNPs related to growth, providing new clues to understanding the molecular basis of largemouth bass growth.

  2. Population growth.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    Despite efforts to reduce population growth, the World Bank projects a world population of 10 billion by 2050, with 7 billion living in developing countries. From October 1979 to September 1984, the US Agency for International Development (AID) funded the Research Triangle Institute's (RTI) Integrated Population and Development Planning (IPDP) project to assess rapid population growth effects in 25 developing countries. In October 1984, US AID extended funding for the program, nicknamed INPLAN, for 3 years, at a cost of $6.3 million. Up to 50% of people in developing countries are under age 15, a fact that guarantees large population increases for the next 50-75 years. Also, many regions have been slow to correlate high fertility with socioeconomic development, and in some areas, fertility is actually increasing. INPLAN aims to make governments more aware of population dynamics and to provide training and tools for effective development planning. 40% of INPLAN's work will be done in Africa, 25% in Latin America, and 20% in Asia, with some activity in the Near East. One project in Egypt, involving the use of model generation by microcomputer, was developed by RTI to show rural to urban migration and rapid population growth affects on the educational system. INPLAN expects to develop several other planning sector models on labor force and employment, health and family planning, food supply, housing, and urban development, and apply them to 20-25 countries. Another project provided 9 microcomputer systems and training to Nigerian government agencies. IMPLAN will purchase and distribute 60 such systems in the future.

  3. Growth, chronic kidney disease and pediatric kidney transplantation: is it useful to use recombinant growth hormone in Colombian children with renal transplant?

    PubMed

    Castañeda, D A; López, L F; Ovalle, D F; Buitrago, J; Rodríguez, D; Lozano, E

    2011-11-01

    Kidney transplantation has become the best treatment for children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In recent times, knowledge concerning the effect of CKD and kidney transplantation over the normal growth rate has increased; now it is known that 40% of children with CKD do not reach the expected height for age. Growth retardation has been associated with the type of nephropathy, metabolic and endocrine disorders that are secondary to kidney disease, immunosuppressive therapy with glucocorticoids, and suboptimal function of renal allograft. Nowadays, we know better the role of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 axis in growth retardation we can see it in children with CKD or recipients of renal allograft. Several studies have shown that administration of recombinant growth hormone (rhGH) has a positive effect on the longitudinal growth of children and teenagers who have received a kidney transplant. On the other hand, there have been reported side effects associated with using rhGH; however, these are not statistically significant. In this article, we show a small review about growth in children with CKD and/or recipients of renal allografts the growth pattern of three children who were known by the Transplant Group of National University of Colombia, and the results obtained with the use of rhGH in one of these cases. We want to show the possibility of achieving a secure use of rhGH in children with CKD and its use as a therapeutic option for treating the growth retardation in children with kidney transplantation, and set out the need of typifying the growth pattern of Colombian children with CKD and/or who are recipients of renal allografts through multicenter studies to propose and analyze the inclusion of rhGH in the therapeutic scheme of Colombian children with these two medical conditions. rhGH could be a useful tool for treating children with CKD or kidney transplantation who have not reached the expected longitudinal growth for age. However

  4. Growth hormone/IGF-I and/or resistive exercise maintains myonuclear number in hindlimb unweighted muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, D. L.; Linderman, J. K.; Roy, R. R.; Grindeland, R. E.; Mukku, V.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    In the present study of rats, we examined the role, during 2 wk of hindlimb suspension, of growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor I (GH/IGF-I) administration and/or brief bouts of resistance exercise in ameliorating the loss of myonuclei in fibers of the soleus muscle that express type I myosin heavy chain. Hindlimb suspension resulted in a significant decrease in mean soleus wet weight that was attenuated either by exercise alone or by exercise plus GH/IGF-I treatment but was not attenuated by hormonal treatment alone. Both mean myonuclear number and mean fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) of fibers expressing type I myosin heavy chain decreased after 2 wk of suspension compared with control (134 vs. 162 myonuclei/mm and 917 vs. 2,076 micron2, respectively). Neither GH/IGF-I treatment nor exercise alone affected myonuclear number or fiber CSA, but the combination of exercise and growth-factor treatment attenuated the decrease in both variables. A significant correlation was found between mean myonuclear number and mean CSA across all groups. Thus GH/IGF-I administration and brief bouts of muscle loading had an interactive effect in attenuating the loss of myonuclei induced by chronic unloading.

  5. Growth hormone/IGF-I and/or resistive exercise maintains myonuclear number in hindlimb unweighted muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, D. L.; Linderman, J. K.; Roy, R. R.; Grindeland, R. E.; Mukku, V.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    In the present study of rats, we examined the role, during 2 wk of hindlimb suspension, of growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor I (GH/IGF-I) administration and/or brief bouts of resistance exercise in ameliorating the loss of myonuclei in fibers of the soleus muscle that express type I myosin heavy chain. Hindlimb suspension resulted in a significant decrease in mean soleus wet weight that was attenuated either by exercise alone or by exercise plus GH/IGF-I treatment but was not attenuated by hormonal treatment alone. Both mean myonuclear number and mean fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) of fibers expressing type I myosin heavy chain decreased after 2 wk of suspension compared with control (134 vs. 162 myonuclei/mm and 917 vs. 2,076 micron2, respectively). Neither GH/IGF-I treatment nor exercise alone affected myonuclear number or fiber CSA, but the combination of exercise and growth-factor treatment attenuated the decrease in both variables. A significant correlation was found between mean myonuclear number and mean CSA across all groups. Thus GH/IGF-I administration and brief bouts of muscle loading had an interactive effect in attenuating the loss of myonuclei induced by chronic unloading.

  6. Differential growth in estuarine and freshwater habitats indicated by plasma IGF1 concentrations and otolith chemistry in Dolly Varden Salvelinus malma.

    PubMed

    Bond, M H; Beckman, B R; Rohrbach, L; Quinn, T P

    2014-11-01

    This study employed a combination of otolith microchemistry to indicate the recent habitat use, and plasma concentrations of the hormone insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) as an index of recent growth rate, to demonstrate differences in growth and habitat use by Dolly Varden Salvelinus malma occupying both freshwater and estuarine habitats in south-west Alaska. Extensive sampling in all habitats revealed that fish had higher IGF1 levels in estuarine compared to lake habitats throughout the summer, and that the growth rates in different habitats within the estuary varied seasonally. In addition, otolith microchemistry indicated differentiation in estuarine habitat use among individual S. malma throughout summer months. Although growth in the estuary was higher than in fresh water in nearly all sites and months, the benefits and use of the estuarine habitats varied on finer spatial scales. Therefore, this study further illustrates the diverse life histories of S. malma and indicates an evaluation of the benefits of marine waters needs to include sub-estuary scale habitat use. © 2014 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  7. Amino acids and mammary gland development: nutritional implications for milk production and neonatal growth.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Reza; Wu, Zhenlong; Hou, Yongqing; Bazer, Fuller W; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    Milk is synthesized by mammary epithelial cells of lactating mammals. The synthetic capacity of the mammary gland depends largely on the number and efficiency of functional mammary epithelial cells. Structural development of the mammary gland occurs during fetal growth, prepubertal and post-pubertal periods, pregnancy, and lactation under the control of various hormones (particularly estrogen, growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-I, progesterone, placental lactogen, and prolactin) in a species- and stage-dependent manner. Milk is essential for the growth, development, and health of neonates. Amino acids (AA), present in both free and peptide-bound forms, are the most abundant organic nutrients in the milk of farm animals. Uptake of AA from the arterial blood of the lactating dam is the ultimate source of proteins (primarily β-casein and α-lactalbumin) and bioactive nitrogenous metabolites in milk. Results of recent studies indicate extensive catabolism of branched-chain AA (leucine, isoleucine and valine) and arginine to synthesize glutamate, glutamine, alanine, aspartate, asparagine, proline, and polyamines. The formation of polypeptides from AA is regulated not only by hormones (e.g., prolactin, insulin and glucocorticoids) and the rate of blood flow across the lactating mammary gland, but also by concentrations of AA, lipids, glucose, vitamins and minerals in the maternal plasma, as well as the activation of the mechanistic (mammalian) target rapamycin signaling by certain AA (e.g., arginine, branched-chain AA, and glutamine). Knowledge of AA utilization (including metabolism) by mammary epithelial cells will enhance our fundamental understanding of lactation biology and has important implications for improving the efficiency of livestock production worldwide.

  8. Burns: where are we standing with propranolol, oxandrolone, recombinant human growth hormone, and the new incretin analogs?

    PubMed

    Gauglitz, Gerd G; Williams, Felicia N; Herndon, David N; Jeschke, Marc G

    2011-03-01

    The hypermetabolic response in critically ill patients is characterized by hyperdynamic circulatory, physiologic, catabolic and immune system responses. Failure to satisfy overwhelming energy and protein requirements after, and during critical illness, results in multiorgan dysfunction, increased susceptibility to infection, and death. Attenuation of the hypermetabolic response by various pharmacologic modalities is emerging as an essential component of the management of severe burn patients. This review focuses on the more recent advances in therapeutic strategies to attenuate the hypermetabolic response and its associated insulin resistance postburn. At present, beta-adrenergic blockade with propranolol represents probably the most efficacious anticatabolic therapy in the treatment of burns. Other pharmacological strategies include growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor, oxandrolone and intensive insulin therapy. Novel approaches to the management of critical illness by judicious glucose control and the use of pharmacologic modulators to the hypercatabolic response to critical illness have emerged. Investigation of alternative strategies, including the use of metformin, glucagon-like-peptide-1 and the PPAR-γ agonists are under current investigation.

  9. Growth hormone (GH) increases cognition and expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA and NMDA) in transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Studzinski, Ana Lupe Motta; Barros, Daniela Martí; Marins, Luis Fernando

    2015-11-01

    The growth hormone/insulin-like factor I (GH/IGF-I) somatotropic axis is responsible for somatic growth in vertebrates, and has important functions in the nervous system. Among these, learning and memory functions related to the neural expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors, mainly types AMPA (α-amino-3hydroxy-5methylisoxazole-4propionic) and NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) can be highlighted. Studies on these mechanisms have been almost exclusively conducted on mammal models, with little information available on fish. Consequently, this study aimed at evaluating the effects of the somatotropic axis on learning and memory of a GH-transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio) model (F0104 strain). Long-term memory (LTM) was tested in an inhibitory avoidance apparatus, and brain expression of igf-I and genes that code for the main subunits of the AMPA and NMDA receptors were evaluated. Results showed a significant increase in LTM for transgenic fish. Transgenic animals also showed a generalized pattern of increase in the expression of AMPA and NMDA genes, as well as a three-fold induction in igf-I expression in the brain. When analyzed together, these results indicate that GH, mediated by IGF-I, has important effects on the brain, with improvement in LTM as a result of increased glutamate receptors. The transgenic strain F0104 was shown to be an interesting model for elucidating the intricate mechanisms related to the effect of the somatotropic axis on learning and memory in vertebrates.

  10. Step-Growth Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stille, J. K.

    1981-01-01

    Following a comparison of chain-growth and step-growth polymerization, focuses on the latter process by describing requirements for high molecular weight, step-growth polymerization kinetics, synthesis and molecular weight distribution of some linear step-growth polymers, and three-dimensional network step-growth polymers. (JN)

  11. Simulating Population Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byington, Scott

    1997-01-01

    Presents a strategy to help students grasp the important implications of population growth. Involves an interactive demonstration that allows students to experience exponential and logistic population growth followed by a discussion of the implications of population-growth principles. (JRH)

  12. Silicon dendritic web growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, S.

    1984-01-01

    Technological goals for a silicon dendritic web growth program effort are presented. Principle objectives for this program include: (1) grow long web crystals front continuously replenished melt; (2) develop temperature distribution in web and melt; (3) improve reproductibility of growth; (4) develop configurations for increased growth rates (width and speed); (5) develop new growth system components as required for improved growth; and (6) evaluate quality of web growth.

  13. Effects of steroid treatment on growth, nutrient partitioning, and expression of genes related to growth and nutrient metabolism in adult triploid rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Cleveland, B M; Weber, G M

    2016-07-01

    The contribution of sex steroids to nutrient partitioning and energy balance during gonad development was studied in rainbow trout. Specifically, 19-mo old triploid (3N) female rainbow trout were fed treatment diets supplemented with estradiol-17β (E2), testosterone (T), or dihydrotestosterone at 30-mg steroid/kg diet for a 1-mo period. Growth performance, nutrient partitioning, and expression of genes central to growth and nutrient metabolism were compared with 3N and age-matched diploid (2N) female fish consuming a control diet not supplemented with steroids. Only 2 N fish exhibited active gonad development, with gonad weights increasing from 3.7% to 5.5% of body weight throughout the study, whereas gonad weights in 3N fish remained at 0.03%. Triploid fish consuming dihydrotestosterone exhibited faster specific growth rates than 3N-controls (P < 0.05). Consumption of E2 in 3N fish reduced fillet growth and caused lower fillet yield compared with all other treatment groups (P < 0.05). In contrast, viscera fat gain was not affected by steroid consumption (P > 0.05). Gene transcripts associated with physiological pathways were identified in maturing 2N and E2-treated 3N fish that differed in abundance from 3N-control fish (P < 0.05). In liver these mechanisms included the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis (igf1, igf2), IGF binding proteins (igfbp1b1, igfbp2b1, igfbp5b1, igfbp6b1), and genes associated with lipid binding and transport (fabp3, fabp4, lpl, cd36), fatty acid oxidation (cpt1a), and the pparg transcription factor. In muscle, these mechanisms included reductions in myogenic gene expression (fst, myog) and the proteolysis-related gene, cathepsin-L, suggesting an E2-induced reduction in the capacity for muscle growth. These findings suggest that increased E2 signaling in the sexually maturing female rainbow trout alters physiological pathways in liver, particularly those related to IGF signaling and lipid metabolism, to partition

  14. Time-dependent inhibitory effects of Tris(1, 3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate on growth and transcription of genes involved in the GH/IGF axis, but not the HPT axis, in female zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ya; Su, Guanyong; Yang, Dandong; Zhang, Yongkang; Yu, Liqin; Li, Yufei; Giesy, John P; Letcher, Robert J; Liu, Chunsheng

    2017-10-01

    Growth curves were used to determine sensitive exposure windows for evaluation of developmental toxicity of chemicals to zebrafish. Dose- and time-dependent effects on body mass, body length and expression of genes involved in the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor (GH/IGF) axis and the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis were examined after exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCIPP). Based on growth curves, zebrafish grew most rapidly between 60 and 90 days post fertilization (dpf). Exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of TDCIPP significantly decreased body mass and body length and down-regulated expression of several genes involved in the GH/IGF axis of female zebrafish, but no such effects were observed in male zebrafish. Exposure to TDCIPP did not change concentrations of thyroid hormones or expression of genes along the HPT axis in female and male zebrafish. These results suggest that growth stages of zebrafish between 60 and 90 dpf might be most appropriate for evaluation of developmental toxicity of chemicals, and down-regulation of genes involved in the GH/IGF axis, but not the HPT axis, might be responsible for the observed growth inhibition in females exposed to TDCIPP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Factors affecting bone growth.

    PubMed

    Gkiatas, Ioannis; Lykissas, Marios; Kostas-Agnantis, Ioannis; Korompilias, Anastasios; Batistatou, Anna; Beris, Alexandros

    2015-02-01

    Bone growth and development are products of the complex interactions of genetic and environmental factors. Longitudinal bone growth depends on the growth plate. The growth plate has 5 different zones-each with a different functional role-and is the final target organ for longitudinal growth. Bone length is affected by several systemic, local, and mechanical factors. All these regulation systems control the final length of bones in a complicated way. Despite its significance to bone stability, bone growth in width has not been studied as extensively as longitudinal bone growth. Bone growth in width is also controlled by genetic factors, but mechanical loading regulates periosteal apposition. In this article, we review the most recent data regarding bone growth from the embryonic age and analyze the factors that control bone growth. An understanding of this complex system is important in identifying metabolic and developmental bone diseases and fracture risk.

  16. Mycobacterium leprae-induced Insulin-like Growth Factor I attenuates antimicrobial mechanisms, promoting bacterial survival in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Batista-Silva, L. R.; Rodrigues, Luciana Silva; Vivarini, Aislan de Carvalho; Costa, Fabrício da Mota Ramalho; Mattos, Katherine Antunes de; Costa, Maria Renata Sales Nogueira; Rosa, Patricia Sammarco; Toledo-Pinto, T. G.; Dias, André Alves; Moura, Danielle Fonseca; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Lopes, Ulisses Gazos; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae (ML), the etiologic agent of leprosy, can subvert macrophage antimicrobial activity by mechanisms that remain only partially understood. In the present study, the participation of hormone insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in this phenomenum was investigated. Macrophages from the dermal lesions of the disseminated multibacillary lepromatous form (LL) of leprosy expressed higher levels of IGF-I than those from the self-limited paucibacillary tuberculoid form (BT). Higher levels of IGF-I secretion by ML-infected macrophages were confirmed in ex vivo and in vitro studies. Of note, the dampening of IGF-I signaling reverted the capacity of ML-infected human and murine macrophages to produce antimicrobial molecules and promoted bacterial killing. Moreover, IGF-I was shown to inhibit the JAK/STAT1-dependent signaling pathways triggered by both mycobacteria and IFN-γ most probably through its capacity to induce the suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3). Finally, these in vitro findings were corroborated by in vivo observations in which higher SOCS3 expression and lower phosphorylation of STAT1 levels were found in LL versus BT dermal lesions. Altogether, our data strongly suggest that IGF-I contributes to the maintenance of a functional program in infected macrophages that suits ML persistence in the host, reinforcing a key role for IGF-I in leprosy pathogenesis. PMID:27282338

  17. Health and endogenous growth.

    PubMed

    van Zon, A; Muysken, J

    2001-03-01

    The focus of endogenous growth theory on human capital formation and the physical embodiment of knowledge in people, suggests the integration of the growth supporting character of health production and the growth generating services of human capital accumulation in an endogenous growth framework. We show that a slow down in growth may be explained by a preference for health that is positively influenced by a growing income per head, or by an ageing population. Growth may virtually disappear for countries with high rates of decay of health, low productivity of the health-sector, or high rates of discount.

  18. Zinc and growth.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Y

    1996-08-01

    Zinc is an essential nutrients and plays an important role in growth and sexual function. Zinc deficiency has been known to cause growth retardation and hypogonadism. Several mechanisms of growth retardation and hypogonadism due to zinc deficiency have been suggested. Zinc affects growth hormone (GH) metabolism. Conversely, GH affects zinc metabolism. Zinc deficiency may result in reduced GH production and/or insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Zinc deficiency may also affect bone metabolism and gonadal function. The interrelationships among zinc, growth, gonadal function, and GH-IGF-I axis appears to be complex.

  19. Feeding rates affect growth, intestinal digestive and absorptive capabilities and endocrine functions of juvenile blunt snout bream Megalobrama amblycephala.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Li, Xiang-Fei; Tian, Hong-Yan; Jiang, Guang-Zhen; Liu, Wen-Bin

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the optimal feeding rate for juvenile blunt snout bream (average initial weight 23.74 ± 0.09 g) based on the results on growth performance, intestinal digestive and absorptive capabilities and endocrine functions. A total of 840 fish were randomly distributed into 24 cages and fed a commercial feed at six feeding rates ranging from 2.0 to 7.0% body weight (BW)/day. The results indicated that weight gain rate increased significantly (P < 0.05) as feeding rates increased from 2.0 to 5.0% BW/day, but decreased with the further increasing feeding rates (P > 0.05). Protein efficiency ratio and nitrogen and energy retention all showed a similar trend. However, feed conversion ratio increased significantly (P < 0.05) with increasing feeding rates. Feeding rates have little effects (P > 0.05) on whole-body moisture, ash and protein contents, but significantly (P < 0.05) affect both lipid and energy contents with the highest values both observed in fish fed 4.0% BW/day. In addition, moderate ration sizes (2.0-4.0% BW/day) resulted in the enhanced activities of intestinal enzymes, including lipase, protease, Na(+), K(+)-ATPase, alkaline phosphatase and creatine kinase. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of growth hormone, insulin-like growth factors-I, growth hormone receptor and neuropeptide all increased significantly (P < 0.05) as feeding rates increased from 2.0 to 5.0% and 6.0% BW/day, but decreased significantly (P < 0.05) with the further increase in feeding rates, whereas both leptin and cholecystokinin expressions showed an opposite trend. Based on the broken-line regression analysis of SGR against feeding rates, the optimal feeding rate for juvenile blunt snout bream was estimated to be 4.57% BW/day.

  20. Nutritional modulation of IGF-1 in relation to growth and body condition in Sceloporus lizards.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Christine A; Jetzt, Amanda E; Cohick, Wendie S; John-Alder, Henry B

    2015-05-15

    Nutrition and energy balance are important regulators of growth and the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor (GH/IGF) axis. However, our understanding of these functions does not extend uniformly to all classes of vertebrates and is mainly limited to controlled laboratory conditions. Lizards can be useful models to improve our understanding of the nutritional regulation of the GH/IGF-1 axis because many species are relatively easy to observe and manipulate both in the laboratory and in the field. In the present study, the effects of variation in food intake on growth, body condition, and hepatic IGF-1 mRNA levels were measured in (1) juveniles of Sceloporus jarrovii maintained on a full or 1/3 ration and (2) hatchlings of Sceloporus undulatus subjected to full or zero ration with or without re-feeding. These parameters plus plasma IGF-1 were measured in a third experiment using adults of S. undulatus subjected to full or zero ration with or without re-feeding. In all experiments, plasma corticosterone was measured as an anticipated indicator of nutritional stress. In S. jarrovii, growth and body condition were reduced but lizards remained in positive energy balance on 1/3 ration, and hepatic IGF-1 mRNA and plasma corticosterone were not affected in comparison to full ration. In S. undulatus, growth, body condition, hepatic IGF-1 mRNA, and plasma IGF-1 were all reduced by zero ration and restored by refeeding. Plasma corticosterone was increased in response to zero ration and restored by full ration in hatchlings but not adults of S. undulatus. These data indicate that lizards conform to the broader vertebrate model in which severe food deprivation and negative energy balance is required to attenuate systemic IGF-1 expression. However, when animals remain in positive energy balance, reduced food intake does not appear to affect systemic IGF-1. Consistent with other studies on lizards, the corticosterone response to reduced food intake is an unreliable indicator

  1. The effects of branched-chain amino acid interactions on growth performance, blood metabolites, enzyme kinetics and transcriptomics in weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Wiltafsky, Markus Karl; Pfaffl, Michael Walter; Roth, Franz Xaver

    2010-04-01

    The impact of excess dietary leucine (Leu) was studied in two growth assays with pigs (8-25 kg). In each trial, forty-eight pigs were allotted to one of six dietary groups. The dietary Leu supply increased from treatment L100 to L200 (three increments). To guarantee that interactions between the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) were not cushioned either surpluses of isoleucine (Ile, expt 1) or valine (Val; expt 2) were avoided. In the fifth treatment, the effects of a simultaneous excess of Leu and Val (expt 1), or of Leu and Ile (expt 2) were investigated. The sixth treatment was a positive control. An increase in dietary Leu decreased growth performance, and increased plasma Leu and serum alpha-keto-isocaproate levels in a linear, dose-dependent manner. Levels of plasma Ile and Val, and of serum alpha-keto-beta-methylvalerate and alpha-keto-isovalerate, indicated increased catabolism. Linear increases in the activity of basal branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase in the liver confirmed these findings. No major alterations occurred in the mRNA of branched-chain amino acid catabolism genes. In liver tissue from expt 2, however, the mRNA levels of growth hormone receptor, insulin-like growth factor acid labile subunit and insulin-like growth factor 1 decreased significantly with increasing dietary Leu. In conclusion, excess dietary Leu increased the catabolism of BCAA mainly through posttranscriptional mechanisms. The impact of excess Leu on the growth hormone--insulin-like growth factor-1 axis requires further investigation.

  2. Growth Charts (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Measured on One Growth Chart? No. Girls and boys are measured on different growth charts because they ... include: Ages birth to 36 months (3 years): Boys' length- and weight-for-age Girls' length- and ...

  3. Your Child's Growth

    MedlinePlus

    ... properly? Physical growth refers to the increases in height and weight and other body changes that happen ... quite a bit. By age 2, growth in height usually continues at a fairly steady rate of ...

  4. Regional Smart Growth Alliances

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page describes the Urban Land Institute regional smart growth alliances that received funding from EPA to help support economic development, accommodate growth, enhance quality of, and protect the environment in regions across the country.

  5. Growth and Development

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tots Understanding Puberty Your Child's Changing Voice Your Child's Development: 1.5 Years (18 Months) Your Child's Growth ... 8 Months Your Baby's Growth: 9 Months Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Your Child's Development: 15 ...

  6. Growth hormone deficiency - children

    MedlinePlus

    Growth hormone deficiency means the pituitary gland does not make enough growth hormone. ... The pituitary gland is located at the base of the brain. This gland controls the body's balance of hormones. It ...

  7. The growth of birdwings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meunier, K.

    1980-01-01

    Growth and order allometry is defined and applied to the growth of bird effects of negative wing allometry discussed with regard to body size and flight power. Transposition and evolutionary significance are explained.

  8. Growth Plate Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most widely used by doctors is the Salter-Harris system, described below. Type I Fractures These ... incidence of growth plate fractures peaks in adolescence. Salter-Harris classification of growth plate fractures. AAOS does ...

  9. Growth hormone test

    MedlinePlus

    ... is called acromegaly . In children it is called gigantism . Too little growth hormone can cause a slow ... growth due to excess GH during childhood, called gigantism. (A special test is done to confirm this ...

  10. Urban tree growth modeling

    Treesearch

    E. Gregory McPherson; Paula J. Peper

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes three long-term tree growth studies conducted to evaluate tree performance because repeated measurements of the same trees produce critical data for growth model calibration and validation. Several empirical and process-based approaches to modeling tree growth are reviewed. Modeling is more advanced in the fields of forestry and...

  11. [Growth hormone treatment update].

    PubMed

    2014-02-01

    Short stature in children is a common cause for referral to pediatric endocrinologists, corresponding most times to normal variants of growth. Initially growth hormone therapy was circumscribed to children presenting growth hormone deficiency. Since the production of recombinant human hormone its use had spread to other pathologies.

  12. Growth and growth hormone: An overview.

    PubMed

    Teran, Enrique; Chesner, Jaclyn; Rapaport, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Growth is a good indicator of a child's health. Growth disturbances, including short stature or growth failure, could be indications of illnesses such as chronic disease, nutritional deficits, celiac disease or hormonal abnormalities. Therefore, a careful assessment of the various requirements for normal growth needs to be done by history, physical examination, and screening laboratory tests. More details will be reviewed about the GH-IGF axis, its abnormalities with special emphasis on GH deficiency, its diagnosis and treatment. GH treatment indications in the US will be reviewed and a few only will be highlighted. They will include GH deficiency, as well as the treatment of children born SGA, including the results of a US study using FDA approved dose of 0.48mg/kg/week. GH deficiency in adults will also be briefly reviewed. Treatment of patients with SHOX deficiency will also be discussed. Possible side effects of GH treatment and the importance of monitoring safety will be highlighted.

  13. Growth hormone, growth factors, and acromegaly

    SciTech Connect

    Ludecke, D.K.; Tolis, G.T.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains five sections, each consisting of several papers. The section headings are: Biochemistry and Physiology of GH and Growth Factors, Pathology of Acromegaly, Clinical Endocrinology of Acromegaly, Nonsurgical Therapy of Acromegaly, and Surgical Therapy of Acromegaly.

  14. The insulin-like growth factor system in chronic kidney disease: Pathophysiology and therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Oh, Youngman

    2012-03-01

    The growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-insulin-like growth factor binding protein (GH-IGF-IGFBP) axis plays a critical role in the maintenance of normal renal function and the pathogenesis and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Serum IGF-I and IGFBPs are altered with different stages of CKD, the speed of onset, the amount of proteinuria, and the potential of remission. Recent studies demonstrate that growth failure in children with CKD is due to a relative GH insensitivity and functional IGF deficiency. The functional IGF deficiency in CKD results from either IGF resistance due to increased circulating levels of IGFBPs or IGF deficiency due to increased urinary excretion of serum IGF-IGFBP complexes. In addition, not only GH and IGFs in circulation, but locally produced IGFs, the high-affinity IGFBPs, and low-affinity insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related proteins (IGFBP-rPs) may also affect the kidney. With respect to diabetic kidney disease, there is growing evidence suggesting that GH, IGF-I, and IGFBPs are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Thus, prevention of GH action by blockade either at the receptor level or along its signal transduction pathway offers the potential for effective therapeutic opportunities. Similarly, interrupting IGF-I and IGFBP actions also may offer a way to inhibit the development or progression of DN. Furthermore, it is well accepted that the systemic inflammatory response is a key player for progression of CKD, and how to prevent and treat this response is currently of great interest. Recent studies demonstrate existence of IGF-independent actions of high-affinity and low-affinity-IGFBPs, in particular, antiinflammatory action of IGFBP-3 and profibrotic action of IGFBP-rP2/CTGF. These findings reinforce the concept in support of the clinical significance of the IGF-independent action of IGFBPs in the assessment of pathophysiology of kidney disease and its therapeutic potential for

  15. Radial plant growth.

    PubMed

    Tonn, Nina; Greb, Thomas

    2017-09-11

    One of the extraordinary features of plants is their growth capacity. Depending on the species and the environment, body forms are manifold and, at the same time, constantly reshaped. An important basis of this plastic variation and life-long accumulation of biomass is radial growth. Here, we use this term to describe the ability to grow in girth by the formation of wood, bast and cork. The more technical term for radial growth is secondary growth, which distinguishes the process from primary growth taking place at the tips of stems and roots during plant elongation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Growth in Cushing syndrome.

    PubMed

    Voutilainen, R; Leisti, S; Perheentupa, J

    1985-07-01

    Pre- and post-operative growth was analysed in eight children with Cushing syndrome. Six children had Cushing's disease; three of them were treated by bilateral adrenalectomy and three by transphenoidal pituitary adenectomy. One child had an adrenocortical adenoma and another primary adrenocortical nodular dysplasia. The typical cushingoid habitus was not always present during hypercortisolism. In contrast, abnormal deceleration of longitudinal growth and increase in relative weight were constant. The slowing of growth started 0.2-5.1 years before diagnosis. In four children these changes concurred. In three others the excessive weight gain preceded the slowing of growth, by 2.5-7.0 years. In one patient the deceleration appeared first; this was a girl with concomitant coeliac disease. This pattern of growth change occurring before (normal slowing of growth in) late puberty should raise the possibility of hypercortisolism. There was a suggestion of a better growth recovery in Cushing disease after pituitary adenectomy than after bilateral adrenalectomy.

  17. Growth hormone regulation of follicular growth.

    PubMed

    Lucy, Matthew C

    2011-01-01

    The somatotropic axis-consisting of growth hormone (GH), the insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2 (IGF1 and IGF2), GH binding protein (GHBP), IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) 1 to 6, and the cell-surface receptors for GH and the IGFs-has major effects on growth, lactation and reproduction. The primary target tissues for GH are involved in growth and metabolism. The functionality of the somatotropic axis depends in part on the expression of liver GH receptor (GHR), which determines the amount of IGF1 released from the liver in response to GH. The IGF1 acts as a pleiotropic growth factor and also serves as the endocrine negative feedback signal controlling pituitary GH secretion. Growth hormone and IGF1 undergo dynamic changes throughout the life cycle, particularly when animals are either growing, early post partum or lactating. Cells within the reproductive tract can respond directly to GH but to a lesser degree than the primary target tissues. The major impact that GH has on reproduction, therefore, may be secondary to its systemic effects on metabolism (including insulin sensitivity) or secondary to the capacity for GH to control IGF1 secretion. Insulin-like growth factor 1 and IGFBP are also synthesised within the ovary and this local synthesis is a component of the collective IGF1 action on the follicle. Future studies of GH should focus on its direct effects on the follicle as well as its indirect effects mediated by shifts in nutrient metabolism, insulin sensitivity, IGF1 and IGFBP.

  18. Growth and growth factors in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Salardi, S; Tonioli, S; Tassoni, P; Tellarini, M; Mazzanti, L; Cacciari, E

    1987-01-01

    Growth of 79 children with diabetes was analysed at diagnosis and again after one to 10.7 years of treatment with insulin. Both sexes were tall at onset, whereas at the last observation boys alone showed significant growth retardation. Height standard deviation score (SDS), however, showed no significant fall either in 32 subjects reassessed after five years of disease or in 18 subjects examined at full stature. Skeletal maturity was not significantly impaired after treatment. Pubertal growth spurt was reduced, especially in girls and in subjects with onset of disease at or around puberty. We found no significant correlation between height and height velocity SDS and glycosylated haemoglobin values or secretion of growth hormone during the arginine test. Somatomedin C values were correlated with height velocity SDS in prepubertal boys. The results of this study suggest that there are interferences in the growth of children with diabetes but that they do not seem to have a significant influence on adult height. PMID:3813637

  19. Synthetic growth reference charts.

    PubMed

    Hermanussen, Michael; Stec, Karol; Aßmann, Christian; Meigen, Christof; Van Buuren, Stef

    2016-01-01

    To reanalyze the between-population variance in height, weight, and body mass index (BMI), and to provide a globally applicable technique for generating synthetic growth reference charts. Using a baseline set of 196 female and 197 male growth studies published since 1831, common factors of height, weight, and BMI are extracted via Principal Components separately for height, weight, and BMI. Combining information from single growth studies and the common factors using in principle a Bayesian rationale allows for provision of completed reference charts. The suggested approach can be used for generating synthetic growth reference charts with LMS values for height, weight, and BMI, from birth to maturity, from any limited set of height and weight measurements of a given population. Generating synthetic growth reference charts by incorporating information from a large set of reference growth studies seems suitable for populations with no autochthonous references at hand yet. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Growth of Bacterial Colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Mya; Hwa, Terence

    2013-03-01

    On hard agar gel, there is insufficient surface hydration for bacteria to swim or swarm. Instead, growth occurs in colonies of close-packed cells, which expand purely due to repulsive interactions: individual bacteria push each other out of the way through the force of their growth. In this way, bacterial colonies represent a new type of ``active'' granular matter. In this study, we investigate the physical, biochemical, and genetic elements that determine the static and dynamic aspects of this mode of bacterial growth for E. coli. We characterize the process of colony expansion empirically, and use discrete and continuum models to examine the extent to which our observations can be explained by the growth characteristics of non-communicating cells, coupled together by physical forces, nutrients, and waste products. Our results challenge the commonly accepted modes of bacterial colony growth and provide insight into sources of growth limitation in crowded bacterial communities.

  1. Growth of breastfed infants.

    PubMed

    Nommsen-Rivers, Laurie A; Dewey, Kathryn G

    2009-10-01

    Understanding normal growth for the healthy breastfed infant is an important component of promoting and supporting child health in general and breastfeeding in particular. In this article, we summarize what is known regarding differences in growth between breastfed and formula-fed infants; we describe the development and use of infant growth references and growth standards; we introduce the new World Health Organization growth velocity standards for early infancy (which provide standards for gain in g/day during the first weeks of life); and, in closing, we present a snapshot of recent data from a cohort of breastfed newborns in Sacramento, CA, and examine how their early weight gain compares to the new growth velocity standards.

  2. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to extend the work performed in the base program (CR 182247) into the regime of time-dependent crack growth under isothermal and thermal mechanical fatigue (TMF) loading, where creep deformation also influences the crack growth behavior. The investigation was performed in a two-year, six-task, combined experimental and analytical program. The path-independent integrals for application to time-dependent crack growth were critically reviewed. The crack growth was simulated using a finite element method. The path-independent integrals were computed from the results of finite-element analyses. The ability of these integrals to correlate experimental crack growth data were evaluated under various loading and temperature conditions. The results indicate that some of these integrals are viable parameters for crack growth prediction at elevated temperatures.

  3. Growth of platinum nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Movie showing the growth of platinum nanocrystals in a liquid cell observed in situ using the JEOL 3010 TEM at the National Center for Electron Microscopy. This is the first ever-real time movie showing nucleation and growth by monomer attachment or by smaller nanocrystals coalescing to form larger nanocrystals. All the nanocrystals end up being roughly the same shape and size. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2009/08/04/growth-spurts/

  4. Growth hormone receptor, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, and IGF-binding protein-2 expression in the reproductive tissues of early postpartum dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, M L; Meyer, J P; Kolath, S J; Lamberson, W R; Lucy, M C

    2008-05-01

    The growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system plays a critical endocrine role controlling nutrient metabolism in dairy cattle. In liver, growth hormone receptor (GHR) and IGF-1 are dynamically regulated by lactation and energy balance. Less is known about the regulation of GHR, IGF-1, and IGF-binding protein mRNA in reproductive tissues (uterus, ovarian follicle, and corpus luteum). The objective was to determine expression patterns for GHR, IGF-1, and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-2 mRNA in the liver, uterus, dominant follicle, and corpus luteum in Holstein cows (n = 21) sampled at 3 times during early lactation. The first postpartum ovulation was induced with an injection of GnRH within 15 d of calving. Nine days after ovulation [23 +/- 1 d postpartum; 20 d in milk (DIM)], the liver, uterus, dominant follicle, and corpus luteum were biopsied. Prostaglandin F(2alpha) and GnRH were injected 7 and 9 d after each biopsy to synchronize the second (41 +/- 1 d postpartum; 40 DIM) and third (60 +/- 1 d postpartum; 60 DIM) tissue collections. Total RNA was isolated and used for mRNA analysis by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Liver had more GHR, IGF-1, and IGFBP-2 mRNA than the reproductive tissues that were tested. Gene expression for GHR, IGF-1, and IGFPB-2 within tissues did not change across the sampling interval (20 to 60 DIM). The only detected change in gene expression across days was for cyclophilin in uterus (increased after 20 DIM). Parity had an effect on gene expression for GHR in corpus luteum. Neither level of milk production nor body condition score affected the amount of GHR, IGF-1, or IGFBP-2 mRNA in the respective tissues. The repeatability of gene expression within a tissue was 0.25 to 0.5 for most genes. In most instances, expression of a single gene within a tissue was correlated with other genes in the same tissue but was not correlated with the same gene in a different tissue. We did not find evidence for major changes

  5. Smart Growth and Transportation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Describes the relationship between smart growth and transportation, focusing smart and sustainable street design, transit-oriented development, parking management, sustainable transportation planning, and related resources.

  6. Differential flank growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieschang, H. E.; Sievers, A.

    1994-08-01

    With the mathematical basis for the precise analysis of developmental processes in plants, the patterns of growth in phototropic and gravitropic responses have become better understood. A detailed temporal and spatial quantification of a growth process is an important tool for evaluating hypotheses about the underlying physiological mechanisms. Studies of growth rates and curvature show that the original Cholodny-Went hypothesis cannot explain the complex growth patterns during tropic responses of shoots and roots. In addition, regulating factors other than the lateral redistribution of hormones must be taken into account. Electrophysiological studies on roots led to a modification of the Cholodny-Went hypothesis in that redistributions of bioelectrical activities are observed.

  7. Leaf growth is conformal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alim, Karen; Armon, Shahaf; Shraiman, Boris I.; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2016-10-01

    Growth pattern dynamics lie at the heart of morphogenesis. Here, we investigate the growth of plant leaves. We compute the conformal transformation that maps the contour of a leaf at a given stage onto the contour of the same leaf at a later stage. Based on the mapping we predict the local displacement field in the leaf blade and find it to agree with the experimentally measured displacement field to 92%. This approach is applicable to any two-dimensional system with locally isotropic growth, enabling the deduction of the whole growth field just from observation of the tissue contour.

  8. Corticosteroids and growth.

    PubMed

    Fine, R N

    1993-10-01

    In summary, corticosteroids suppress linear growth. The growth suppression is mediated by perturbations in growth factors as evidenced by: (1) abnormal spontaneous GH secretion and a blunted response to provocative stimuli and (2) decreased local production of IGF-I. Corticosteroids suppress GH responses by altering somatostatin tone. In addition, corticosteroids are anti-anabolic with resultant protein wasting. Exogenous administration of rhGH is effective in reversing all the clinical catabolic effects of corticosteroids. The duel factors of corticosteroids and uremia which are growth suppressive can be overcome by exogenous rhGH administration.

  9. Rethinking cell growth models.

    PubMed

    Kafri, Moshe; Metzl-Raz, Eyal; Jonas, Felix; Barkai, Naama

    2016-11-01

    The minimal description of a growing cell consists of self-replicating ribosomes translating the cellular proteome. While neglecting all other cellular components, this model provides key insights into the control and limitations of growth rate. It shows, for example, that growth rate is maximized when ribosomes work at full capacity, explains the linear relation between growth rate and the ribosome fraction of the proteome and defines the maximal possible growth rate. This ribosome-centered model also highlights the challenge of coordinating cell growth with related processes such as cell division or nutrient production. Coordination is promoted when ribosomes don't translate at maximal capacity, as it allows escaping strict exponential growth. Recent data support the notion that multiple cellular processes limit growth. In particular, increasing transcriptional demand may be as deleterious as increasing translational demand, depending on growth conditions. Consistent with the idea of trade-off, cells may forgo maximal growth to enable more efficient interprocess coordination and faster adaptation to changing conditions. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Electrochemical immunosensor for the determination of insulin-like growth factor-1 using electrodes modified with carbon nanotubes-poly(pyrrole propionic acid) hybrids.

    PubMed

    Serafín, V; Agüí, L; Yáñez-Sedeño, P; Pingarrón, J M

    2014-02-15

    An amperometric immunosensor for the determination of the hormone insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) is reported for the first time in this work. As electrochemical transducer, a multiwalled carbon nanotubes-modified glassy carbon electrode on which poly(pyrrole propionic acid) was electropolymerized was prepared. This approach provided a high content of surface confined carboxyl groups suitable for direct covalent binding of anti-IGF1 monoclonal antibody. A sandwich-type immunoassay using a polyclonal antibody labeled with peroxidase, hydrogen peroxide as the enzyme substrate and catechol as redox mediator was employed to monitor the affinity reaction. All the variables involved in the preparation of the modified electrode were optimized and the electrodes were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Moreover, the different experimental variables affecting the amperometric response of the immunosensor were also optimized. The calibration graph for IGF1 showed a range of linearity extending from 0.5 to 1000 pg/mL, with a detection limit, 0.25 pg/mL, more than 100 times lower than the lowest values reported for the ELISA immunoassays available for IGF1 (30 pg/mL, approximately). Excellent reproducibility for the measurements carried out with different immunosensors and selectivity against other hormones were also evidenced. A commercial human serum spiked with IGF1 at different levels between 0.01 and 10.0 ng/mL was analyzed with good results. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Maintenance of myonuclear domain size in rat soleus after overload and growth hormone/IGF-I treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCall, G. E.; Allen, D. L.; Linderman, J. K.; Grindeland, R. E.; Roy, R. R.; Mukku, V. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of functional overload (FO) combined with growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor I (GH/IGF-I) administration on myonuclear number and domain size in rat soleus muscle fibers. Adult female rats underwent bilateral ablation of the plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles and, after 7 days of recovery, were injected three times daily for 14 days with GH/IGF-I (1 mg/kg each; FO + GH/IGF-I group) or saline vehicle (FO group). Intact rats receiving saline vehicle served as controls (Con group). Muscle wet weight was 32% greater in the FO than in the Con group: 162 +/- 8 vs. 123 +/- 16 mg. Muscle weight in the FO + GH/IGF-I group (196 +/- 14 mg) was 59 and 21% larger than in the Con and FO groups, respectively. Mean soleus fiber cross-sectional area of the FO + GH/IGF-I group (2,826 +/- 445 microm2) was increased compared with the Con (2,044 +/- 108 microm2) and FO (2,267 +/- 301 microm2) groups. The difference in fiber size between the FO and Con groups was not significant. Mean myonuclear number increased in FO (187 +/- 15 myonuclei/mm) and FO + GH/IGF-I (217 +/- 23 myonuclei/mm) rats compared with Con (155 +/- 12 myonuclei/mm) rats, although the difference between FO and FO + GH/IGF-I animals was not significant. The mean cytoplasmic volume per myonucleus (myonuclear domain) was similar across groups. These results demonstrate that the larger mean muscle weight and fiber cross-sectional area occurred when FO was combined with GH/IGF-I administration and that myonuclear number increased concomitantly with fiber volume. Thus there appears to be some mechanism(s) that maintains the myonuclear domain when a fiber hypertrophies.

  12. Maintenance of myonuclear domain size in rat soleus after overload and growth hormone/IGF-I treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCall, G. E.; Allen, D. L.; Linderman, J. K.; Grindeland, R. E.; Roy, R. R.; Mukku, V. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of functional overload (FO) combined with growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor I (GH/IGF-I) administration on myonuclear number and domain size in rat soleus muscle fibers. Adult female rats underwent bilateral ablation of the plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles and, after 7 days of recovery, were injected three times daily for 14 days with GH/IGF-I (1 mg/kg each; FO + GH/IGF-I group) or saline vehicle (FO group). Intact rats receiving saline vehicle served as controls (Con group). Muscle wet weight was 32% greater in the FO than in the Con group: 162 +/- 8 vs. 123 +/- 16 mg. Muscle weight in the FO + GH/IGF-I group (196 +/- 14 mg) was 59 and 21% larger than in the Con and FO groups, respectively. Mean soleus fiber cross-sectional area of the FO + GH/IGF-I group (2,826 +/- 445 microm2) was increased compared with the Con (2,044 +/- 108 microm2) and FO (2,267 +/- 301 microm2) groups. The difference in fiber size between the FO and Con groups was not significant. Mean myonuclear number increased in FO (187 +/- 15 myonuclei/mm) and FO + GH/IGF-I (217 +/- 23 myonuclei/mm) rats compared with Con (155 +/- 12 myonuclei/mm) rats, although the difference between FO and FO + GH/IGF-I animals was not significant. The mean cytoplasmic volume per myonucleus (myonuclear domain) was similar across groups. These results demonstrate that the larger mean muscle weight and fiber cross-sectional area occurred when FO was combined with GH/IGF-I administration and that myonuclear number increased concomitantly with fiber volume. Thus there appears to be some mechanism(s) that maintains the myonuclear domain when a fiber hypertrophies.

  13. Modeling Exponential Population Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Bonnie

    2009-01-01

    The concept of population growth patterns is a key component of understanding evolution by natural selection and population dynamics in ecosystems. The National Science Education Standards (NSES) include standards related to population growth in sections on biological evolution, interdependence of organisms, and science in personal and social…

  14. Approaches to growth faltering.

    PubMed

    Poindexter, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    Postnatal growth failure remains a nearly universal complication of extreme prematurity. The incidence of postnatal growth failure is inversely related to gestational age. Unfortunately, by the time growth faltering is recognized, the nutrient deficits that have accumulated can be difficult, if not impossible, to recover. The perceived severity of illness in the first week can significantly impact decisions made related to early nutritional support. It is becoming increasingly clear that optimizing nutrient intake in the first few weeks of life is critical to reduce growth faltering. In order to promote growth and reduce growth faltering, a goal of 120 kcal/kg/day and 3.8 g/kg/day of protein should be supplied to very low birth weight infants by the end of the first week. A combined strategy of both parenteral and enteral nutrition is necessary to ensure that adequate protein and energy intake is delivered and that nutrient deficits are minimized. Finally, careful monitoring of growth--including both linear and head circumference growth--is necessary to achieve optimal outcomes. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Growth Charts (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to ... indicate that there's a growth problem because the child is not following ... certain points in development, when it's normal for growth rates to vary ...

  16. Vicarious Occupational Posttraumatic Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Traditional studies of posttraumatic growth center on the individual or close family members as they deal with traumatic events. The current study examines workers who experience posttraumatic growth when a coworker has a traumatic experience. The participants in this study were firefighters in suburban Cook County, Illinois. Participants were…

  17. Plant Growth Regulators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickell, Louis G.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the effect of "plant growth regulators" on plants, such as controlling the flowering, fruit development, plant size, and increasing crop yields. Provides a list of plant growth regulators which includes their chemical, common, and trade names, as well as their different use(s). (GA)

  18. Plant Growth Regulators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickell, Louis G.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the effect of "plant growth regulators" on plants, such as controlling the flowering, fruit development, plant size, and increasing crop yields. Provides a list of plant growth regulators which includes their chemical, common, and trade names, as well as their different use(s). (GA)

  19. Microgravity Plant Growth Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Two visitors watch a TV monitor showing plant growth inside a growth chamber designed for operation aboard the Space Shuttle as part of NASA's Space Product Development program. The exhibit, featuring work by the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics, was at AirVenture 2000 sponsored by the Experimental Aircraft Association in Oshkosh, WI.

  20. Growth Modulation in Achondroplasia.

    PubMed

    McClure, Philip K; Kilinc, Eray; Birch, John G

    2017-09-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common skeletal dysplasia with a rate of nearly 1/10,000. The development of lower extremity deformity is well documented, and various modes of correction have been reported. There are no reports on the use of growth modulation to correct angular deformity in achondroplasia. Medical Records from 1985 to 2015 were reviewed for the diagnosis of achondroplasia and growth modulation procedures. Patients who had been treated for angular deformity of the legs by growth modulation were identified. A detailed analysis of their medical record and preoperative and final lower extremity radiographs was completed. Four patients underwent growth modulation procedures, all to correct existing varus deformity of the legs. Three of the 4 patients underwent bilateral distal femoral and proximal tibial growth modulation. The remaining patient underwent tibial correction only. Two of the 4 patients had a combined proximal fibular epiphysiodesis. All limbs had some improvement of alignment; however, 1 patient went on to bilateral osteotomies. Only 1 limb corrected to a neutral axis with growth modulation alone at last follow-up, initial implantation was done before 5 years of age. Growth modulation is an effective means for deformity correction in the setting of achondroplasia. However implantation may need to be done earlier than would be typical for patients without achondroplasia. Osteotomy may still be required after growth modulation for incomplete correction.

  1. Impact of Population Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Paul R.; Holdren, John P.

    1971-01-01

    Discusses the interrelated crises in population growth, natural resources, and environmental quality. Major problems include population control, redirection of technology, closed resource cycles, equitable opportunity distribution and prosperity. Population growth is regarded as causing a disportionate world-wide negative environmental impact.…

  2. Modeling Exponential Population Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Bonnie

    2009-01-01

    The concept of population growth patterns is a key component of understanding evolution by natural selection and population dynamics in ecosystems. The National Science Education Standards (NSES) include standards related to population growth in sections on biological evolution, interdependence of organisms, and science in personal and social…

  3. [Growth hormone signaling pathways].

    PubMed

    Zych, Sławomir; Szatkowska, Iwona; Czerniawska-Piatkowska, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    The substantial improvement in the studies on a very complicated mechanism-- growth hormone signaling in a cell, has been noted in last decade. GH-induced signaling is characterized by activation of several pathways, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), the signal transducer and activator of transcription and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3) pathways. This review shows a current model of the growth hormone receptor dimerization, rotation of subunits and JAK2 kinase activation as the initial steps in the cascade of events. In the next stages of the signaling process, the GH-(GHR)2-(JAK2)2 complex may activate signaling molecules such as Stat, IRS-1 and IRS-2, and particularly all cascade proteins that activate MAP kinase. These pathways regulate basal cellular functions including target gene transcription, enzymatic activity and metabolite transport. Therefore growth hormone is considered as a major regulator of postnatal growth and metabolism, probably for mammary gland growth and development too.

  4. Growth factors for nanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftcioglu, Neva; Kajander, E. Olavi

    1999-12-01

    Nanobacteria are novel microorganisms recently isolated from fetal bovine serum and blood of cows and humans. These coccoid, gram negative bacteria in alpha-2 subgroup of Proteobacteria grow slowly under mammalian cell culture conditions but not in common media for microbes. Now we have found two different kinds of culture supplement preparations that improve their growth and make them culturable in the classical sense. These are supernatant fractions of conditioned media obtained from 1 - 3 months old nanobacteria cultures and from about a 2 weeks old Bacillus species culture. Both improved multiplication and particle yields and the latter increased their resistance to gentamicin. Nanobacteria cultured with any of the methods shared similar immunological property, structure and protein pattern. The growth supporting factors were heat-stabile and nondialyzable, and dialysis improved the growth promoting action. Nanobacteria formed stony colonies in a bacteriological medium supplemented with the growth factors. This is an implication that nanobacterial growth is influenced by pre-existing bacterial flora.

  5. Growth and inequality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2015-11-01

    How are growth and inequality related? Evidently, this question is of prime importance in the social sciences, as socioeconomic inequality is one of the major forces shaping the course of human history. Moreover, this question is of importance also in the physical sciences, as the notion of socioeconomic inequality can be applied to analyze physical growth. In this paper we consider general growth processes whose dynamics are governed by ordinary differential equations, and present a comprehensive inequality-based socioeconophysical study of their evolutions. From a social-sciences perspective, the results established describe the inequality that will be generated by different types of economic growth. From a physical-sciences perspective, the results established provide a socioeconomic classification of growth processes.

  6. Plant phototropic growth.

    PubMed

    Fankhauser, Christian; Christie, John M

    2015-05-04

    Plants are photoautotrophic sessile organisms that use environmental cues to optimize multiple facets of growth and development. A classic example is phototropism - in shoots this is typically positive, leading to growth towards the light, while roots frequently show negative phototropism triggering growth away from the light. Shoot phototropism optimizes light capture of leaves in low light environments and hence increases photosynthetic productivity. Phototropins are plasma-membrane-associated UV-A/blue-light activated kinases that trigger phototropic growth. Light perception liberates their protein kinase domain from the inhibitory action of the amino-terminal photosensory portion of the photoreceptor. Following a series of still poorly understood events, phototropin activation leads to the formation of a gradient of the growth hormone auxin across the photo-stimulated stem. The greater auxin concentration on the shaded compared with the lit side of the stem enables growth reorientation towards the light. In this Minireview, we briefly summarize the signaling steps starting from photoreceptor activation until the establishment of a lateral auxin gradient, ultimately leading to phototropic growth in shoots. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. On Dinosaur Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Gregory M.

    2014-05-01

    Despite nearly two centuries of investigation, a comprehensive understanding of dinosaur biology has proven intractable. The recent development of means to study tissue-level growth, age these animals, and make growth curves has revolutionized our knowledge of dinosaur lives. From such data it is now understood that dinosaurs grew both disruptively and determinately; that they rarely if ever exceeded a century in age; that they became giants through accelerated growth and dwarfed through truncated development; that they were likely endothermic, sexually matured like crocodiles, and showed survivorship like populations of large mammals; and that basal birds retained dinosaurian physiology.

  8. Aluminum Nitride Crystal Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    UOSR-TR- 80 - 04 2 4EL4- G LEYEL ALUMINUM NITRIDE CRYSTAL GROWTH G.A. Slack FINAL REPORT Contract F49620-78-C-0021 DTIC Period Covered ELECTE I...Laboratory personnel worked on the problem of Aluminum Nitride Heat Sink Crystal Growth for the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Contract...Number F44620-76-C-0039. From November 1, 1977 to the present we have worked on Aluminum Nitride and Boron Phosphide Crystal Growth under Contract NUmber

  9. Peptide growth factors, part A

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.; Sirbasku, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains information on the following topics: Epidermal Growth Factor;Transforming Growth Factors;Bone and Cartilage Growth Factors;Somatomedin/Insulin-Like Growth Factors;Techniques for the Study of Growth Factor Activity;Assays, Phosphorylation, and Surface Membrane Effects.

  10. ECOSYSTEM GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermodynamically, ecosystem growth and development is the process by which energy throughflow and stored biomass increase. Several proposed hypotheses describe the natural tendencies that occur as an ecosystem matures, and here, we consider five: minimum entropy production, maxi...

  11. Growth Plate Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... where many inherited disorders that affect the musculoskeletal system appear. Scientists are beginning to understand the genes and gene mutations involved in skeletal formation, growth, and development. This new information is ...

  12. ECOSYSTEM GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermodynamically, ecosystem growth and development is the process by which energy throughflow and stored biomass increase. Several proposed hypotheses describe the natural tendencies that occur as an ecosystem matures, and here, we consider five: minimum entropy production, maxi...

  13. Growth of dopamine crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, Vidya Patki, Mugdha

    2016-05-06

    Many nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals have been identified as potential candidates in optical and electro-optical devices. Use of NLO organic crystals is expected in photonic applications. Hence organic nonlinear optical materials have been intensely investigated due to their potentially high nonlinearities, and rapid response in electro-optic effect compared to inorganic NLO materials. There are many methods to grow organic crystals such as vapor growth method, melt growth method and solution growth method. Out of these methods, solution growth method is useful in providing constraint free crystal. Single crystals of Dopamine have been grown by evaporating the solvents from aqueous solution. Crystals obtained were of the size of orders of mm. The crystal structure of dopamine was determined using XRD technique. Images of crystals were obtained using FEG SEM Quanta Series under high vacuum and low KV.

  14. Floods and Mold Growth

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Mold growth may be a problem after flooding. Excess moisture in the home is cause for concern about indoor air quality primarily because it provides breeding conditions for pests, molds and other microorganisms.

  15. Growth and Your Newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to ... Your Child's Growth Breastfeeding vs. Formula Feeding Your Child's Development: Newborn Contact Us Print Resources Send to a ...

  16. Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watching growth is done in several ways. A measurement called the uterine fundal height helps estimate a baby's size by measuring a mother's belly from the top of the pubic bone to the top of the uterus. Another way ...

  17. Noise in Exponential Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Wright, Charles; Henry, Jon; Burov, Stas; Lin, Yihan; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron; Scherer, Norbert

    2013-03-01

    The interplay between growth and division of cells is has been studied in the context of exponential growth of bacterial cells (in suitable conditions) for decades. However, bulk culture studies obscure phenomena that manifest in single cells over many generations. We introduce a unique technology combining microfluidics, single-cell imaging, and quantitative analysis. This enables us to track the growth of single Caulobacter crescentus stalked cells over hundreds of generations. The statistics that we extract indicate a size thresholding mechanism for cell division and a non-trivial scaling collapse of division time distributions at different temperatures. In this talk I shall discuss these observations and a stochastic model of growth and division that captures all our observations with no free parameters.

  18. Growth of dopamine crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Vidya; Patki, Mugdha

    2016-05-01

    Many nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals have been identified as potential candidates in optical and electro-optical devices. Use of NLO organic crystals is expected in photonic applications. Hence organic nonlinear optical materials have been intensely investigated due to their potentially high nonlinearities, and rapid response in electro-optic effect compared to inorganic NLO materials. There are many methods to grow organic crystals such as vapor growth method, melt growth method and solution growth method. Out of these methods, solution growth method is useful in providing constraint free crystal. Single crystals of Dopamine have been grown by evaporating the solvents from aqueous solution. Crystals obtained were of the size of orders of mm. The crystal structure of dopamine was determined using XRD technique. Images of crystals were obtained using FEG SEM Quanta Series under high vacuum and low KV.

  19. Smart Growth Tools

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page describes a variety of tools useful to federal, state, tribal, regional, and local government staff and elected officials; community leaders; developers; and others interested in smart growth development.

  20. Microgravity crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Advanced finite element models are used to study three-dimensional, time-dependent flow and segregation in crystal growth systems. In this image of a prototypical model for melt and crystal growth, pathlines at one instant in time are shown for the flow of heated liquid silicon in a cylindrical container. The container is subjected to g-jitter disturbances along the vertical axis. A transverse magnetic field is applied to control them. Such computations are extremely powerful for understanding melt growth in microgravity where g-jitter drives buoyant flows. The simulation is part of the Theoretical Analysis of 3D, Transient Convection and Segregation in Microgravity Bridgman Crystal Growth investigation by Dr. Jeffrey J. Derby of the University of Mirnesota, Minneapolis.

  1. Microgravity crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Advanced finite element models are used to study three-dimensional, time-dependent flow and segregation in crystal growth systems. In this image of a prototypical model for melt and crystal growth, pathlines at one instant in time are shown for the flow of heated liquid silicon in a cylindrical container. The container is subjected to g-jitter disturbances along the vertical axis. A transverse magnetic field is applied to control them. Such computations are extremely powerful for understanding melt growth in microgravity where g-jitter drives buoyant flows. The simulation is part of the Theoretical Analysis of 3D, Transient Convection and Segregation in Microgravity Bridgman Crystal Growth investigation by Dr. Jeffrey J. Derby of the University of Mirnesota, Minneapolis.

  2. Craniofacial growth: evolving paradigms.

    PubMed

    Castaldo, Gennaro; Cerritelli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Numerous theories about craniofacial growth have been formulated in the last century. The most influential hypotheses were: genetic, synthetic and functional matrix revisited. Moreover, a large number of experts from different fields tried to explain craniofacial growth and its developmental mechanisms, in order to deliver the best treatment possible to orthodontic patients. The aim of this review is to summarize recent concepts on craniofacial growth, overlap these theories with the development of the general scientific knowledge, and suggest a more integrated multidisciplinary person-based approach. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Pubmed, CINAHL and Google Scholar were screened from inception to February 2014 for relevant papers. Grey literature was considered as part of the search. The influence of new scientific discoveries and intuitions about craniofacial growth produced further insights in orthodontics care, shifting the paradigm from a pre-determined, sectorial treatment to an individualized, multidisciplinary patient-centered approach aiming to enhance the quality of orthodontic assistance.

  3. Growth in liquid media.

    PubMed

    Elbing, Karen; Brent, Roger

    2002-08-01

    The procedure for inoculating overnight (starter) cultures of E. coli from a single colony is described along with considerations for growing larger cultures. Also included are two methods for monitoring cell growth using a spectrophotometer or a hemacytometer.

  4. Modeling tin whisker growth.

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger, Christopher Robert

    2013-08-01

    Tin, lead, and lead-tin solders are the most commonly used solders due to their low melting temperatures. However, due to the toxicity problems, lead must now be removed from solder materials. This has lead to the re-emergence of the issue of tin whisker growth. Tin whiskers are a microelectronic packaging issue because they can lead to shorts if they grow to sufficient length. However, the cause of tin whisker growth is still not well understood and there is lack of robust methods to determine when and if whiskering will be a problem. This report summarizes some of the leading theories on whisker growth and attempts to provide some ideas towards establishing the role microstructure plays in whisker growth.

  5. Planar elliptic growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mineev, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The planar elliptic extension of the Laplacian growth is, after a proper parametrization, given in a form of a solution to the equation for areapreserving diffeomorphisms. The infinite set of conservation laws associated with such elliptic growth is interpreted in terms of potential theory, and the relations between two major forms of the elliptic growth are analyzed. The constants of integration for closed form solutions are identified as the singularities of the Schwarz function, which are located both inside and outside the moving contour. Well-posedness of the recovery of the elliptic operator governing the process from the continuum of interfaces parametrized by time is addressed and two examples of exact solutions of elliptic growth are presented.

  6. Growth outcome: nutritionist perspective.

    PubMed

    Agostoni, Carlo; Fattore, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to a fundamental role of early nutrition on rates of growth and development, and later health. We may identify three major fields of scientific interest and clinical application. (1) In developing countries poor growth is associated with greater risk of morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases, mainly lower respiratory infections and diarrhea. In these settings, failure to promote compensatory growth may have negative short-term consequences, and the nutritionist's task is the primary prevention of nutrient deficiencies to promote the full expression of the individual genetic potential, while allowing for recovery of early secondary functional deficiencies. (2) A second challenge for nutritionists is represented by the approach to growth impairments in rare disorders, ranging from congenital disorders to chronic infections. Most disorders are favorably influenced by improved nutritional status and better growth, and patients may satisfactorily reach adolescence, pubertal and reproductive age, up to ageing. Even for the less positive conditions, an improvement in the quality of life for families is in any case a rewarding aim. (3) A third challenge is represented by the definition of the role of nutrition on growth in physiological conditions for all individuals. Concern has been raised about the potential adverse long-term consequences of accelerated child growth rates, possibly resulting in a predisposition to develop non-communicable chronic diseases in the adult age. Accordingly, this hypothesis might explain the benefits of breastfeeding in terms of slower early growth, and the fetal origins hypothesis in terms of adverse postnatal catch-up growth in infants born small. Therefore, growth as viewed by a pediatric nutritionist perspective is a complex matter, ranging from the early stages of intrauterine development up to adult ages and ageing processes. Cost/benefit analyses of interventions on growth such as cost per DALYs

  7. Creating new growth platforms.

    PubMed

    Laurie, Donald L; Doz, Yves L; Sheer, Claude P

    2006-05-01

    Sooner or later, most companies can't attain the growth rates expected by their boards and CEOs and demanded by investors. To some extent, such businesses are victims of their own successes. Many were able to sustain high growth rates for a long time because they were in high-growth industries. But once those industries slowed down, the businesses could no longer deliver the performance that investors had come to take for granted. Often, companies have resorted to acquisition, though this strategy has a discouraging track record. Over time, 65% of acquisitions destroy more value than they create. So where does real growth come from? For the past 12 years, the authors have been researching and advising companies on this issue. With the support of researchers at Harvard Business School and Insead, they instituted a project titled "The CEO Agenda and Growth". They identified and approached 24 companies that had achieved significant organic growth and interviewed their CEOs, chief strategists, heads of R&D, CFOs, and top-line managers. They asked, "Where does your growth come from?" and found a consistent pattern in the answers. All the businesses grew by creating new growth platforms (NGPs) on which they could build families of products and services and extend their capabilities into multiple new domains. Identifying NGP opportunities calls for executives to challenge conventional wisdom. In all the companies studied, top management believed that NGP innovation differed significantly from traditional product or service innovation. They had independent, senior-level units with a standing responsibility to create NGPs, and their CEOs spent as much as 50% of their time working with these units. The payoff has been spectacular and lasting. For example, from 1985 to 2004, the medical devices company Medtronic grew revenues at 18% per year, earnings at 20%, and market capitalization at 30%.

  8. ECONOMIC GROWTH AND POVERTY,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    that will determine how rapidly we can eliminate poverty in the United States will be the rate of increase in average incomes . And one of the key...The problems of poverty in the United States, and their resolution, are inextricably connected with the nature of the economic growth process and its...economic deprivation, but the adjustments required by growth have left in their wake new pockets of poverty . In the future, one of the key variables

  9. Tetrahymena: growth without phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Basmussen, L; Orias, E

    1975-10-31

    We have succeeded in growing a Tetrahymena mutant without food vacuoles in growth media supplemented with vitamins and heavy-metal salts. This finding implies the existence of adequate alternative routes of entry for every required nutrient, and clearly indicates that the food vacuole in Tetrahymena is a dispensable cellular organelle. The growth of the mutant without food vacuoles makes available a valuable experimental tool.

  10. Photocontrol of stem growth.

    PubMed

    Parks, B M; Folta, K M; Spalding, E P

    2001-10-01

    Rapid and measurable growth rate changes that occur in seedling stems upon illumination serve as an excellent means to analyze signal transduction. Growth kinetic studies have shown how red, far-red and blue light signals are transduced via the solitary and/or coordinated action of known plant photoreceptors. These reports are consistent with current findings describing light-induced photoreceptor interaction and compartmentation.

  11. FGF growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Zamora, Paul O [Gaithersburg, MD; Pena, Louis A [Poquott, NY; Lin, Xinhua [Plainview, NY; Takahashi, Kazuyuki [Germantown, MD

    2012-07-24

    The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

  12. A Decade of Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.; Anzz-Meador, Phillip D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines the Space Surveillance Network catalog's growth in low Earth orbit (LEO) and the geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) over the decade 1990-2000. During this time, innovative space utilization concepts, e.g. the Iridium and Globalstar commercial communication satellite constellations, have increased the public's consciousness of space. At the same time, however, these constellations have increased spatial density per 10 km altitude bin by factors of two and three respectively. While not displaying as spectacular a growth in spatial density, other regions of space have grown steadily in terms of number, mass, size, and operational lifetime. In this work we categorize launch traffic by type (e.g. payload, rocket body, operational debris, fragmentation debris, or anomalous debris), mass, and size so as to present the observed growth numerically, in terms of mass, and in terms of cross-sectional area. GEO traffic is further categorized by operational longitude. Because growth itself defines only the instantaneous environment, we also examine the higher-order derivatives of growth. In addition, we compare the last decade's growth with modeling results to illustrate the subtle effects of inclination, eccentricity, and size, in addition to spatial densities, on estimating the collision probability. We identify those regions of space most subject to accidental collision.

  13. Entrepreneurship, Information, and Growth.

    PubMed

    Bunten, Devin; Weiler, Stephan; Weiler, Stephan; Zahran, Sammy

    2015-09-01

    We examine the contribution to economic growth of entrepreneurial "marketplace information" within a regional endogenous growth framework. Entrepreneurs are posited to provide an input to economic growth through the information revealed by their successes and failures. We empirically identify this information source with the regional variation in establishment births and deaths, which create geographic information asymmetries that influence subsequent entrepreneurial activity and economic growth. We find that local establishment birth and death rates are significantly and positively correlated with subsequent entrepreneurship for US counties. To account for the potential endogeneity caused by forward-looking entrepreneurs, we utilize instruments based on historic mining activity. We find that the information spillover component of local establishment birth and death rates have significant positive effects on subsequent entrepreneurship and employment growth for US counties and metropolitan areas. With the help of these intruments, we show that establishment births have a positive and significant effect on future employment growth within all counties, and that in line with the information hypothesis, local establishment death rates have a similar positive effect within metropolitan counties.

  14. Entrepreneurship, Information, and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Bunten, Devin; Weiler, Stephan; Weiler, Stephan; Zahran, Sammy

    2016-01-01

    We examine the contribution to economic growth of entrepreneurial “marketplace information” within a regional endogenous growth framework. Entrepreneurs are posited to provide an input to economic growth through the information revealed by their successes and failures. We empirically identify this information source with the regional variation in establishment births and deaths, which create geographic information asymmetries that influence subsequent entrepreneurial activity and economic growth. We find that local establishment birth and death rates are significantly and positively correlated with subsequent entrepreneurship for US counties. To account for the potential endogeneity caused by forward-looking entrepreneurs, we utilize instruments based on historic mining activity. We find that the information spillover component of local establishment birth and death rates have significant positive effects on subsequent entrepreneurship and employment growth for US counties and metropolitan areas. With the help of these intruments, we show that establishment births have a positive and significant effect on future employment growth within all counties, and that in line with the information hypothesis, local establishment death rates have a similar positive effect within metropolitan counties. PMID:27516625

  15. Brassinosteroid-promoted growth.

    PubMed

    Müssig, C

    2005-03-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are highly potent growth-promoting sterol derivatives. BR-deficient or BR-insensitive mutants display dwarfism. Whole plants and excised tissues have been used to analyse the mechanisms involved in BR-promoted growth. BR stimulates cell elongation and cell division, and BR has specific effects on differentiation. Underlying physiological pathways include modification of cell wall properties, effects on carbohydrate assimilation and allocation, and control of aquaporin activities. BR apparently coordinates and integrates diverse processes required for growth, partly via interactions with other phytohormones setting the frame for BR responses. Ultimately, BR-promoted growth is mediated through genomic pathways. Positive regulators of the BR response (such as BZR1 and BES1) and putative downstream components (such as EXO) are involved in the regulation of BR-responsive genes and growth promotion. BR-responsive genes have been identified in several plant species. However, causal links between physiological effects and changes of transcript patterns, for the most part, are still unresolved. This review focuses on physiology and molecular mechanisms underlying BR-promoted growth in the different plant organs. Interactions with other phytohormones are discussed.

  16. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    Alloy 718 crack growth experiments were conducted to assess the ability of the selected path-independent (P-I) integrals to describe the elevated temperature crack growth behavior. These tests were performed on single edge notch (SEN) specimens under displacement control with multiple extensometers to monitor the specimen and crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD). The displacements in these tests were sufficiently high to induce bulk cyclic inelastic deformation of the specimen. Under these conditions, the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) parameter K does not correlate the crack growth data. The experimentally measured displacement gradients at the end of specimen gage length were used as the boundary conditions in elastic-plastic finite element method (FEM) analyses. These analyses were performed with a node release approach using CYANIDE, a GEAE FEM code, which included a gap element which is capable of efficiently simulating crack closure. Excellent correlation was obtained between the experimentally measured and predicted variation of stress and CMOD with crack length and the stress-CMOD loops for Alloy 718 tests conducted at 538 C. This confirmed the accuracy of the FEM crack growth simulation approach. The experimentally measured crack growth rate data correlated well the selected P-I integrals. These investigations have produced significant progress in developing P-I integrals as non-linear fracture mechanics parameters. The results suggest that this methodology has the potential of accurately describing elevated temperature crack growth behavior under the combined influence of thermal cycling and bulk elastic-inelastic deformation states.

  17. This Is Smart Growth - Publication

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Is Smart Growth illustrates how communities can turn their visions into reality, using smart growth techniques to improve development. The report features 40 places around the country that have found success by implementing smart growth principles.

  18. China's post-coal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Ye; Stern, Nicholas; Wu, Tong; Lu, Jiaqi; Green, Fergus

    2016-08-01

    Slowing GDP growth, a structural shift away from heavy industry, and more proactive policies on air pollution and clean energy have caused China's coal use to peak. It seems that economic growth has decoupled from growth in coal consumption.

  19. Champions of profitable growth.

    PubMed

    Stewart, G Bennett

    2004-01-01

    Many companies have posted impressive top-line growth over the past two decades in their respective economic regions--for instance, Wal-Mart in North America, BP in Europe, Toyota in Asia, and News Corporation in the Southern Hemisphere. But which were the best at converting all of that revenue growth into shareholder value? Harvard Business Review asked C. Bennett Stewart III, the senior partner of the consulting firm Stern Stewart & Company, and his colleagues to come up with the answer. For the period 1983 to 2003, they assembled a list of the top 20 high-growth value adders (and laggards) in each of the four regions cited above. Their calculations gave equal weight to companies' revenue growth and market-value-added scores, revealing the important effect of region on the performance of companies in the same industry. For instance, while automakers are positioned high on the Asian list of high-growth value adders, U.S. carmakers GM and Ford--each of which reported revenue growth in excess of 100 billion dollars between 1983 and 2003--are among the value laggards on the North American list, as are DaimlerChrysler and Volkswagen on the European list. The Japanese win through better efficiency, higher quality, and narrower product mixes, the author says. And while there are four telecom companies represented among the European high-growth value adders, there are none on the North American list. That's probably because the European telecoms enjoyed more protective regulation, made fewer high-priced acquisitions, and didn't bet as big on the overblown dot-com economy, the author says.

  20. Protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Proteins account for 50% or more of the dry weight of most living systems and play a crucial role in virtually all biological processes. Since the specific functions of essentially all biological molecules are determined by their three-dimensional structures, it is obvious that a detailed understanding of the structural makeup of a protein is essential to any systematic research pertaining to it. At the present time, protein crystallography has no substitute, it is the only technique available for elucidating the atomic arrangements within complicated biological molecules. Most macromolecules are extremely difficult to crystallize, and many otherwise exciting and promising projects have terminated at the crystal growth stage. There is a pressing need to better understand protein crystal growth, and to develop new techniques that can be used to enhance the size and quality of protein crystals. There are several aspects of microgravity that might be exploited to enhance protein crystal growth. The major factor that might be expected to alter crystal growth processes in space is the elimination of density-driven convective flow. Another factor that can be readily controlled in the absence of gravity is the sedimentation of growing crystal in a gravitational field. Another potential advantage of microgravity for protein crystal growth is the option of doing containerless crystal growth. One can readily understand why the microgravity environment established by Earth-orbiting vehicles is perceived to offer unique opportunities for the protein crystallographer. The near term objectives of the Protein Crystal Growth in a Microgravity Environment (PCG/ME) project is to continue to improve the techniques, procedures, and hardware systems used to grow protein crystals in Earth orbit.

  1. Shaped Crystal Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatartchenko, Vitali A.

    Crystals of specified shape and size (shaped crystals) with controlled crystal growth (SCG) defect and impurity structure have to be grown for the successful development of modern engineering. Since the 1950s many hundreds of papers and patents concerned with shaped growth have been published. In this chapter, we do not try to enumerate the successful applications of shaped growth to different materials but rather to carry out a fundamental physical and mathematical analysis of shaping as well as the peculiarities of shaped crystal structures. Four main techniques, based on which the lateral surface can be shaped without contact with the container walls, are analyzed: the Czochralski technique (CZT), the Verneuil technique (VT), the floating zone technique (FZT), and technique of pulling from shaper (TPS). Modifications of these techniques are analyzed as well. In all these techniques the shape of the melt meniscus is controlled by surface tension forces, i.e., capillary forces, and here they are classified as capillary shaping techniques (CST). We look for conditions under which the crystal growth process in each CST is dynamically stable. Only in this case are all perturbations attenuated and a crystal of constant cross section shaping technique (CST) grown without any special regulation. The dynamic stability theory of the crystal growth process for all CST is developed on the basis of Lyapunov's dynamic stability theory. Lyapunov's equations for the crystal growth processes follow from fundamental laws. The results of the theory allow the choice of stable regimes for crystal growth by all CST as well as special designs of shapers in TPS. SCG experiments by CZT, VT, and FZT are discussed but the main consideration is given to TPS. Shapers not only allow crystal of very complicated cross section to be grown but provide a special distribution of impurities. A history of TPS is provided later in the chapter, because it can only be described after explanation of the

  2. Crystal Growth Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.; Batur, Celal; Bennett, Robert J.

    1997-01-01

    We present an innovative design of a vertical transparent multizone furnace which can operate in the temperature range of 25 C to 750 C and deliver thermal gradients of 2 C/cm to 45 C/cm for the commercial applications to crystal growth. The operation of the eight zone furnace is based on a self-tuning temperature control system with a DC power supply for optimal thermal stability. We show that the desired thermal profile over the entire length of the furnace consists of a functional combination of the fundamental thermal profiles for each individual zone obtained by setting the set-point temperature for that zone. The self-tuning system accounts for the zone to zone thermal interactions. The control system operates such that the thermal profile is maintained under thermal load, thus boundary conditions on crystal growth ampoules can be predetermined prior to crystal growth. Temperature profiles for the growth of crystals via directional solidification, vapor transport techniques, and multiple gradient applications are shown to be easily implemented. The unique feature of its transparency and ease of programming thermal profiles make the furnace useful for scientific and commercial applications for the determination of process parameters to optimize crystal growth conditions.

  3. Nanoparticle Growth and Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, M. V.

    2016-12-01

    New particle formation (NPF) is observed around the world and is thought to contribute substantially to the concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Newly formed particles must grow quickly if they are to reach the relevant size range to serve as CCN. In order to better predict the frequency, growth rates, and climatic impacts of NPF, knowledge of the chemical mechanisms by which nucleated nanoparticles grow is needed. We have constructed and tested a flow tube reactor that allows reactant concentrations and reaction times to be systematically varied. The reaction time can be as long as 40 min, making it possible to investigate processes with atmospherically relevant growth rates approaching 10 nm/hr for 10 nm dia. particles. Current experiments are focused on distinguishing the contributions of sulfuric acid and oxidized organics to particle growth using elemental composition measurements with the nano aerosol mass spectrometer and molecular composition measurements with high performance mass spectrometry. The experimental approach allows growth via organic precursors to be quantitatively assessed though comparison with condensational growth by sulfuric acid. These experiments and initial results will be presented.

  4. Population growth and consumption.

    PubMed

    Chalkley, K

    1997-04-01

    The relationship between population growth, resource consumption, and environmental degradation is complex. The rise in "greenhouse gases" that will cause climatic change is clearly due to human activity, and pollutants are often concentrated in densely populated areas. However, even an area with a negative population growth, such as Russia, can experience severe environmental degradation due to poor management. Consumption patterns have the most effect on ozone depletion, while population growth threatens biodiversity of and within species through the destruction of ecosystems. Migration joins population growth and social factors, such as land inequality, as major causes of deforestation, and global demand for water is expected to increase faster than the rate of population growth. Coastal development and over-fishing threaten to deplete the oceans, while soil quality is threatened by inappropriate land use. Estimates of the earth's carrying capacity range from less than 3 billion to more than 44 billion people, indicating how difficult it is to assess this figure. Development efforts throughout the world may lead to human gains that will ultimately be negated by environmental losses. These factors have led to growing support for environmentally sustainable development.

  5. Growth plate senescence and catch-up growth

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Julian C.; Nilsson, Ola; Baron, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Longitudinal bone growth is rapid in prenatal and early postnatal life, but then slows with age and eventually ceases. This growth deceleration is caused primarily by a decrease in chondrocyte proliferation, and is associated with other structural, functional, and molecular changes collectively termed growth plate senescence. Current evidence suggests that growth plate senescence occurs because the progenitor chondrocytes in the resting zone have a limited replicative capacity which is gradually exhausted with increasing cell division. In addition, recent experimental findings from laboratory and clinical studies suggest that growth plate senescence explains the phenomenon of catch-up growth. Growth-inhibiting conditions such as glucocorticoid excess and hypothyroidism delay the program of growth plate senescence. Consequently, growth plates are less senescent after these conditions resolve and therefore grow more rapidly than is normal for age, resulting in catch-up growth. PMID:21865751

  6. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.; Malik, S. N.; Laflen, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    A study was performed to examine the applicability of path-independent (P-I) integrals to crack growth problems in hot section components of gas turbine aircraft engines. Alloy 718 was used and the experimental parameters included combined temperature and strain cycling, thermal gradients, elastic-plastic strain levels, and mean strains. A literature review was conducted of proposed P-I integrals, and those capable of analyzing hot section component problems were selected and programmed into the postprocessor of a finite element code. Detailed elastic-plastic finite element analyses were conducted to simulate crack growth and crack closure of the test specimen, and to evaluate the P-I integrals. It was shown that the selected P-I integrals are very effective for predicting crack growth for isothermal conditions.

  7. Nonlinear Crack Growth Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, DE

    2001-03-27

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed a new technique to monitor the growth of cracks in structural members, and to predict when failure due to this damage is imminent. This technique requires the measurement of global loadings and local deflections/strains at critical locations to indicate the increasing growth of hidden cracks with sufficient warning time prior to failure to take preventative action to correct the problem or retire the structure before failure. The techniques, as described in the referenced report have been proven on a laboratory scale to successfully detect the onset of failure due to fatigue cracking (including cracking of corroded samples), stress corrosion cracking, and low temperature creep crack growth, with a reasonable degree of warning before failure.

  8. Free dendritic growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Free dendritic growth refers to the unconstrained development of crystals within a supercooled melt, which is the classical 'dendrite problem'. Great strides have been taken in recent years in both the theoretical understanding of dendritic growth and its experimental status. The development of this field will be sketched, showing that transport theory and interfacial thermodynamics (capillarity theory) were sufficient ingredients to develop a truly predictive model of dendrite formation. The convenient, but incorrect, notion of 'maximum velocity' was used for many years to estimate the behavior of dendritic transformations until supplanted by modern dynamic stability theory. The proper combinations of transport theory and morphological stability seem to able to predict the salient aspects of dendritic growth, especially in the neighborhood of the tip. The overall development of cast microstructures, such as equiaxed zone formation, rapidly solidified microstructures, etc., also seems to contain additional non-deterministic features which lie outside the current theories discussed here.

  9. New microbial growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Bok, S H; Casida, L E

    1977-01-01

    A screening procedure was used to isolate from soil a Penicillium sp., two bacterial isolates, and a Streptomyces sp. that produced a new microbial growth factor. This factor was an absolute growth requirement for three soil bacteria. The Penicillium sp. and one of the bacteria requiring the factor, an Arthrobacter sp., were selected for more extensive study concerning the production and characteristics of the growth factor. It did not seem to be related to the siderochromes. It was not present in soil extract, rumen fluid, or any other medium component tested. It appears to be a glycoprotein of high molecular weight, and it has high specific activity. When added to the diets for a meadow vole mammalian test system, it caused an increased consumption of diet without a concurrent increase in rate of weight gain. PMID:327929

  10. New microbial growth factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bok, S. H.; Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A screening procedure was used to isolate from soil a Penicillium sp., two bacterial isolates, and a Streptomyces sp. that produced a previously unknown microbial growth factor. This factor was an absolute growth requirement for three soil bacteria. The Penicillium sp. and one of the bacteria requiring the factor, an Arthrobacter sp., were selected for more extensive study concerning the production and characteristics of the growth factor. It did not seem to be related to the siderochromes. It was not present in soil extract, rumen fluid, or any other medium component tested. It appears to be a glycoprotein of high molecular weight and has high specific activity. When added to the diets for a meadow-vole mammalian test system, it caused an increased consumption of diet without a concurrent increase in rate of weight gain.

  11. New microbial growth factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bok, S. H.; Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A screening procedure was used to isolate from soil a Penicillium sp., two bacterial isolates, and a Streptomyces sp. that produced a previously unknown microbial growth factor. This factor was an absolute growth requirement for three soil bacteria. The Penicillium sp. and one of the bacteria requiring the factor, an Arthrobacter sp., were selected for more extensive study concerning the production and characteristics of the growth factor. It did not seem to be related to the siderochromes. It was not present in soil extract, rumen fluid, or any other medium component tested. It appears to be a glycoprotein of high molecular weight and has high specific activity. When added to the diets for a meadow-vole mammalian test system, it caused an increased consumption of diet without a concurrent increase in rate of weight gain.

  12. Free dendritic growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Free dendritic growth refers to the unconstrained development of crystals within a supercooled melt, which is the classical 'dendrite problem'. Great strides have been taken in recent years in both the theoretical understanding of dendritic growth and its experimental status. The development of this field will be sketched, showing that transport theory and interfacial thermodynamics (capillarity theory) were sufficient ingredients to develop a truly predictive model of dendrite formation. The convenient, but incorrect, notion of 'maximum velocity' was used for many years to estimate the behavior of dendritic transformations until supplanted by modern dynamic stability theory. The proper combinations of transport theory and morphological stability seem to able to predict the salient aspects of dendritic growth, especially in the neighborhood of the tip. The overall development of cast microstructures, such as equiaxed zone formation, rapidly solidified microstructures, etc., also seems to contain additional non-deterministic features which lie outside the current theories discussed here.

  13. Thick silicon growth techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, H. E.; Mlavsky, A. I.; Jewett, D. N.

    1973-01-01

    Hall mobility measurements on a number of single crystal silicon ribbons grown from graphite dies have shown some ribbons to have mobilities consistent with their resistivities. The behavior of other ribbons appears to be explained by the introduction of impurities of the opposite sign. Growth of a small single crystal silicon ribbon has been achieved from a beryllia dia. Residual internal stresses of the order of 7 to 18,000 psi have been determined to exist in some silicon ribbon, particularly those grown at rates in excess of 1 in./min. Growth experiments have continued toward definition of a configuration and parameters to provide a reasonable yield of single crystal ribbons. High vacuum outgassing of graphite dies and evacuation and backfilling of growth chambers have provided significant improvements in surface quality of ribbons grown from graphite dies.

  14. Randomized controlled trial to determine the efficacy of long-term growth hormone treatment in severely burned children.

    PubMed

    Branski, Ludwik K; Herndon, David N; Barrow, Robert E; Kulp, Gabriela A; Klein, Gordon L; Suman, Oscar E; Przkora, Rene; Meyer, Walter; Huang, Ted; Lee, Jong O; Chinkes, David L; Mlcak, Ronald P; Jeschke, Marc G

    2009-10-01

    Recovery from a massive burn is characterized by catabolic and hypermetabolic responses that persist up to 2 years and impair rehabilitation and reintegration. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of long-term treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on growth, hypermetabolism, body composition, bone metabolism, cardiac work, and scarring in a large prospective randomized single-center controlled clinical trial in pediatric patients with massive burns. A total of 205 pediatric patients with massive burns over 40% total body surface area were prospectively enrolled between 1998 and 2007 (clinicaltrials.gov ID NCT00675714). Patients were randomized to receive either placebo (n = 94) or long-term rhGH at 0.05, 0.1, or 0.2 mg/kg/d (n = 101). Changes in weight, body composition, bone metabolism, cardiac output, resting energy expenditure, hormones, and scar development were measured at patient discharge and at 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months postburn. Statistical analysis used Tukey t test or ANOVA followed by Bonferroni correction. Significance was accepted at P < 0.05. RhGH administration markedly improved growth and lean body mass, whereas hypermetabolism was significantly attenuated. Serum growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-I, and IGFBP-3 was significantly increased, whereas percent body fat content significantly decreased when compared with placebo, P < 0.05. A subset analysis revealed most lean body mass gain in the 0.2 mg/kg group, P < 0.05. Bone mineral content showed an unexpected decrease in the 0.2 mg/kg group, along with a decrease in PTH and increase in osteocalcin levels, P < 0.05. Resting energy expenditure improved with rhGH administration, most markedly in the 0.1 mg/kg/d rhGH group, P < 0.05. Cardiac output was decreased at 12 and 18 months postburn in the rhGH group. Long-term administration of 0.1 and 0.2 mg/kg/d rhGH significantly improved scarring at 12 months postburn, P < 0.05. This large prospective clinical

  15. Randomized Controlled Trial to Determine the Efficacy of Long-Term Growth Hormone Treatment in Severely Burned Children

    PubMed Central

    Branski, Ludwik K.; Herndon, David N.; Barrow, Robert E.; Kulp, Gabriela A.; Klein, Gordon L.; Suman, Oscar E.; Przkora, Rene; Meyer, Walter; Huang, Ted; Lee, Jong O.; Chinkes, David L.; Mlcak, Ronald P.; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recovery from a massive burn is characterized by catabolic and hypermetabolic responses that persist up to 2 years and impair rehabilitation and reintegration. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of long-term treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on growth, hypermetabolism, body composition, bone metabolism, cardiac work, and scarring in a large prospective randomized single-center controlled clinical trial in pediatric patients with massive burns. Patients and Methods A total of 205 pediatric patients with massive burns over 40% total body surface area were prospectively enrolled between 1998 and 2007 (clinicaltrials.gov ID NCT00675714). Patients were randomized to receive either placebo (n = 94) or long-term rhGH at 0.05, 0.1, or 0.2 mg/kg/d (n = 101). Changes in weight, body composition, bone metabolism, cardiac output, resting energy expenditure, hormones, and scar development were measured at patient discharge and at 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months postburn. Statistical analysis used Tukey t test or ANOVA followed by Bonferroni correction. Significance was accepted at P < 0.05. Results RhGH administration markedly improved growth and lean body mass, whereas hypermetabolism was significantly attenuated. Serum growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-I, and IGFBP-3 was significantly increased, whereas percent body fat content significantly decreased when compared with placebo, P < 0.05. A subset analysis revealed most lean body mass gain in the 0.2 mg/kg group, P < 0.05. Bone mineral content showed an unexpected decrease in the 0.2 mg/kg group, along with a decrease in PTH and increase in osteocalcin levels, P < 0.05. Resting energy expenditure improved with rhGH administration, most markedly in the 0.1 mg/kg/d rhGH group, P < 0.05. Cardiac output was decreased at 12 and 18 months postburn in the rhGH group. Long-term administration of 0.1 and 0.2 mg/kg/d rhGH significantly improved scarring at 12 months postburn, P

  16. Micronutrients and fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Fall, Caroline H D; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Rao, Shobha; Davies, Anna A; Brown, Nick; Farrant, Hannah J W

    2003-05-01

    Fetal undernutrition affects large numbers of infants in developing countries, with adverse consequences for their immediate survival and lifelong health. It manifests as intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), defined as birth weight <10th percentile, which probably underestimates the number failing to achieve full growth potential. Birth weight is a crude measure of the dynamic process of fetal growth and does not capture effects of fetal undernutrition on body composition and the development of specific tissues. The link between maternal nutrition and fetal nutrition is indirect. The fetus is nourished by a complex supply line that includes the mother's diet and absorption, endocrine status and metabolism, cardiovascular adaptations to pregnancy and placental function. Micronutrients are essential for growth, and maternal micronutrient deficiency, frequently multiple in developing countries, may be an important cause of IUGR. Supplementation of undernourished mothers with micronutrients has several benefits but there is little hard evidence of improved fetal growth. However, this has been inadequately tested. Most trials have only used single micronutrients and many were inconclusive because of methodological problems. Several food-based studies (some uncontrolled) suggest benefits from improving maternal dietary quality with micronutrient-dense foods. One trial of a multivitamin supplement (HIV-positive mothers, Tanzania) showed increased birth weight and fewer fetal deaths. Well-conducted randomized controlled trials of adequate sample size and including measures of effectiveness are needed in populations at high risk of micronutrient deficiency and IUGR and should include food-based interventions and better measurements of fetal growth, maternal metabolism, and long-term outcomes in the offspring.

  17. Stochastic ontogenetic growth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, B. J.; West, D.

    2012-02-01

    An ontogenetic growth model (OGM) for a thermodynamically closed system is generalized to satisfy both the first and second law of thermodynamics. The hypothesized stochastic ontogenetic growth model (SOGM) is shown to entail the interspecies allometry relation by explicitly averaging the basal metabolic rate and the total body mass over the steady-state probability density for the total body mass (TBM). This is the first derivation of the interspecies metabolic allometric relation from a dynamical model and the asymptotic steady-state distribution of the TBM is fit to data and shown to be inverse power law.

  18. Lattice models of biological growth

    SciTech Connect

    Young, D.A.; Corey, E.M. )

    1990-06-15

    We show that very simple iterative rules for the growth of cells on a two-dimensional lattice can simulate biological-growth phenomena realistically. We discuss random cellular automata models for the growth of fern gametophytes, branching fungi, and leaves, and for shape transformations useful in the study of biological variation and evolution. Although there are interesting analogies between biological and physical growth processes, we stress the uniqueness of biological automata behavior. The computer growth algorithms that successfully mimic observed growth behavior may be helpful in determining the underlying biochemical mechanisms of growth regulation.

  19. Stillbirth and fetal growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Radek

    2010-09-01

    The association between stillbirth and fetal growth restriction is strong and supported by a large body of evidence and clinically employed for the stillbirth prediction. However, although assessment of fetal growth is a basis of clinical practice, it is not trivial. Essentially, fetal growth is a result of the genetic growth potential of the fetus and placental function. The growth potential is the driving force of fetal growth, whereas the placenta as the sole source of nutrients and oxygen might become the rate limiting element of fetal growth if its function is impaired. Thus, placental dysfunction may prevent the fetus from reaching its full genetically determined growth potential. In this sense fetal growth and its aberration provides an insight into placental function. Fetal growth is a proxy for the test of the effectiveness of placenta, whose function is otherwise obscured during pregnancy.

  20. The Growth Equation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2002-01-01

    Using the example of Clark County school district in Las Vegas, discusses the challenges faced by administrators of rapidly growing areas. Districts confronting rapid growth must find enough money to build needed facilities, secure appropriate sites for new schools, juggle multiple construction projects, and not let the focus on new facilities…

  1. Mechanism of cellular growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Shaquan D.

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the effects of weak static and inhomogeneous magnetic fields on the growth and behavior of living organisms. We studied three common bacterial species of human flora in attempt to relate the effect of bacteria to human health. We measured the effects of various intensities of electromagnetic and randomly distributed fields to the physiological adaptation of the bacteria in relation to its environment. We also notice the different growth patterns of the three bacteria species when exposed to magnetic fields at a fixed temperature. The application of quantum electrodynamics describes the electrochemical interaction between the molecular bonding of the ions within the cell membrane and inorganic ions extracellular to the membrane. External magnetic fields contribute to the breaking and forming of covalent bonds to modify the time difference of DNA replication and metabolism of nutrients available for growth and sustainability. In short, we conclude that weak magnetic fields in a controlled environment affect the physiology and growth of cells.

  2. Teaching about Population Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otero, George G., Jr., Comp.

    This teaching guide contains 20 activities on population growth for students in grades 6-12. The purpose is to help students gain the skills, knowledge, and understanding of population dynamics so that they can make rational decisions and take responsible action regarding population matters and public policy. Activities are organized around the…

  3. Hair follicle growth controls.

    PubMed

    Stenn, K S; Combates, N J; Eilertsen, K J; Gordon, J S; Pardinas, J R; Parimoo, S; Prouty, S M

    1996-10-01

    Research in hair biology has embarked in the pursuit for molecules that control hair growth. Many molecules already have been associated with the controls of hair patterning, hair maturation, and hair cycling and differentiation. Knowing how these molecules work gives us the tools for understanding and treating patients with hair disorders.

  4. Bridgman Growth of Germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szofran, F. R.; Volz, M. P.; Cobb, S. D.; Motakef, S.

    1997-01-01

    The high-magnetic-field crystal growth facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center will be briefly described. This facility has been used to grow bulk germanium by the Bridgman technique in magnetic fields up to 5 Tesla. The results of investigations of ampoule material on the interface shape and thermal field applied to the melt on stability against convection will be discussed.

  5. Stochastic Laplacian growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, Oleg; Mineev-Weinstein, Mark

    2016-12-01

    A point source on a plane constantly emits particles which rapidly diffuse and then stick to a growing cluster. The growth probability of a cluster is presented as a sum over all possible scenarios leading to the same final shape. The classical point for the action, defined as a minus logarithm of the growth probability, describes the most probable scenario and reproduces the Laplacian growth equation, which embraces numerous fundamental free boundary dynamics in nonequilibrium physics. For nonclassical scenarios we introduce virtual point sources, in which presence the action becomes the Kullback-Leibler entropy. Strikingly, this entropy is shown to be the sum of electrostatic energies of layers grown per elementary time unit. Hence the growth probability of the presented nonequilibrium process obeys the Gibbs-Boltzmann statistics, which, as a rule, is not applied out from equilibrium. Each layer's probability is expressed as a product of simple factors in an auxiliary complex plane after a properly chosen conformal map. The action at this plane is a sum of Robin functions, which solve the Liouville equation. At the end we establish connections of our theory with the τ function of the integrable Toda hierarchy and with the Liouville theory for noncritical quantum strings.

  6. Root hair sweet growth

    PubMed Central

    Velasquez, Silvia M; Iusem, Norberto D

    2011-01-01

    Root hairs are single cells specialized in the absorption of water and nutrients from the soil. Growing root hairs require intensive cell-wall changes to accommodate cell expansion at the apical end by a process known as tip or polarized growth. We have recently shown that cell wall glycoproteins such as extensins (EXTs) are essential components of the cell wall during polarized growth. Proline hydroxylation, an early posttranslational modification of cell wall EXTs that is catalyzed by prolyl 4-hydroxylases (P4Hs), defines the subsequent O-glycosylation sites in EXTs. Biochemical inhibition or genetic disruption of specific P4Hs resulted in the blockage of polarized growth in root hairs. Our results demonstrate that correct hydroxylation and also further O-glycosylation on EXTs are essential for cell-wall self-assembly and, hence, root hair elongation. The changes that O-glycosylated cell-wall proteins like EXTs undergo during cell growth represent a starting point to unravel the entire biochemical pathway involved in plant development. PMID:21918376

  7. Growth through Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frawley, Emily

    2016-01-01

    This article explores one teacher-researcher's consideration of how the 50-year anniversary of the Dartmouth Seminar continues to influence and hold relevance for the teaching of English in Australian secondary schools. Particular attention is paid to the influence of John Dixon and the Personal Growth model of English. The author, an early career…

  8. ECONOMIC GROWTH AND POVERTY,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The paradoxical existence of poverty amidst rapid economic growth in the United States is discussed. The problem is considered in terms of average... income levels; adjustments required in view of technological progrrress, production raates, and supply aand demand; and prospects for the future educational needs of skilled and unskilled laborers.

  9. Plant growth promoting rhizobacterium

    DOEpatents

    Doktycz, Mitchel John; Pelletier, Dale A.; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Weston, David

    2015-08-11

    The present invention is directed to the Pseudomonas fluorescens strain GM30 deposited under ATCC Accession No. PTA-13340, compositions containing the GM30 strain, and methods of using the GM30 strain to enhance plant growth and/or enhance plant resistance to pathogens.

  10. Modelling urban growth patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makse, Hernán A.; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H. Eugene

    1995-10-01

    CITIES grow in a way that might be expected to resemble the growth of two-dimensional aggregates of particles, and this has led to recent attempts1á¤-3 to model urban growth using ideas from the statistical physics of clusters. In particular, the model of diffusion-limited aggregation4,5 (DLA) has been invoked to rationalize the apparently fractal nature of urban morphologies1. The DLA model predicts that there should exist only one large fractal cluster, which is almost perfectly screened from incoming á¤~development unitsᤙ (representing, for example, people, capital or resources), so that almost all of the cluster growth takes place at the tips of the clusterᤙs branches. Here we show that an alternative model, in which development units are correlated rather than being added to the cluster at random, is better able to reproduce the observed morphology of cities and the area distribution of sub-clusters (á¤~towns') in an urban system, and can also describe urban growth dynamics. Our physical model, which corresponds to the correlated percolation model6á¤-8 in the presence of a density gradient9, is motivated by the fact that in urban areas development attracts further development. The model offers the possibility of predicting the global properties (such as scaling behaviour) of urban morphologies.

  11. Crystal growth and crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. A.

    1998-01-01

    Selected topics that may be of interest for both crystal-structure and crystal-growth communities are overviewed. The growth of protein crystals, along with that of some other compounds, is one of the topics, and recent insights into related phenomena are considered as examples of applications of general principles. The relationship between crystal growth shape and structure is reviewed and an attempt to introduce semiquantitative characterization of binding for proteins is made. The concept of kinks for complex structures is briefly discussed. Even at sufficiently low supersaturations, the fluctuation of steps may not be sufficient to implement the Gibbs-Thomson law if the kink density is low enough. Subsurface ordering of liquids and growth of rough interfaces from melts is discussed. Crystals growing in microgravity from solution should be more perfect if they preferentially trap stress-inducing impurities, thus creating an impurity-depleted zone around themselves. Evidently, such a zone is developed only around the crystals growing in the absence of convection. Under terrestrial conditions, the self-purified depleted zone is destroyed by convection, the crystal traps more impurity and grows stressed. The stress relief causes mosaicity. In systems containing stress-inducing but poorly trapped impurities, the crystals grown in the absence of convection should be worse than those of their terrestrial counterparts.

  12. On sudden urban growth.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, G J

    1980-01-01

    The author attempts to provide an explanation of the forces shaping urban growth and the possibility of predicting future trends on the basis of behavioral and technological circumstances. A model is developed that considers the relationship between production and city size. Implications for policies aimed at altering this relationship by imposing controls on migration are explored

  13. Growth through Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thissen, David

    2015-01-01

    In "Using Learning Progressions to Design Vertical Scales that Support Coherent Inferences about Student Growth" (hereafter ULR), Briggs and Peck suggest that learning progressions could be used as the basis of vertical scales with naturally benchmarked descriptions of student proficiency. They propose and provide a single example of a…

  14. Rural Growth Slows Down.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Mark; And Others

    1987-01-01

    After decade of growth, rural income, population, and overall economic activity have stalled and again lag behind urban trends. Causes include banking and transportation deregulation, international competition, agricultural finance problems. Only nonmetropolitan counties dependent on retirement, government, and trade show continuing income growth…

  15. Demand, Growth, and Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoskins, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    The paradigm shift to engaged and collaborative learning delivered via distance education technologies has been led by practitioners in adult and continuing education. Online and blended courses are experiencing increased demand and continued growth at all levels of higher education, professional development, and K-12 education. Adult and…

  16. Growth and Environmental Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Larry J.

    1976-01-01

    The author suggests that numbers and distribution of people should be given highest priority in dealing with environmental quality. If population problems are solved, then other environmental problems will be prevented or solved. New Mexico, contends the author, must determine the balance between growth and quality of life. (MR)

  17. Heteroepitaxial diamond growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markunas, R. J.; Rudder, R. A.; Posthill, J. B.; Thomas, R. E.; Hudson, G.

    1994-02-01

    Technical highlights from 1993 include the following: Growth Chemistries: A clear correlation was observed between ionization potential of feedstock gasses and critical power necessary for inductive coupling of the plasma and consequent diamond growth. Substrate preparation and epitaxial film quality: Ion-implantation of C and O has been coupled with either electrochemical etching or acid cleaning for surface preparation prior to homoepitaxial growth. Reactor modifications: Key improvements were made to the RF reactor to allow for long growths to consolidate substrates. Liquid mass flow controllers were added to precisely meter both the water and selected alcohol. Ion-implantation and lift off: Lift off of diamond platelets has been achieved with two processes. Ion-implantation of either C or O followed by annealing and implantation of either C or O followed by water based electrolysis. Diamond characterization: Development of novel detect characterization techniques: (1) Etch delineation of defects by exposure to propane torch flame. (2) Hydrogen plasma exposure to enhance secondary electron emission and provide non-topographical defect contrast. Acetylene will react at room temperature with sites created by partial desorption of oxygen from the (100) diamond surface. Thermal desorption measurements give an apparent activation energy for CO desorption from diamond (100) of 45 kcal/mol. Quantum chemical calculations indicate an activation energy of 38 kcal/mol for CO desorption. Ab initio calculations on (100) surfaces indicates that oxygen adsorbed at one dimer site has an effect on the dimerization of an adjacent site.

  18. Growth through Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frawley, Emily

    2016-01-01

    This article explores one teacher-researcher's consideration of how the 50-year anniversary of the Dartmouth Seminar continues to influence and hold relevance for the teaching of English in Australian secondary schools. Particular attention is paid to the influence of John Dixon and the Personal Growth model of English. The author, an early career…

  19. Laws of population growth.

    PubMed

    Rozenfeld, Hernán D; Rybski, Diego; Andrade, José S; Batty, Michael; Stanley, H Eugene; Makse, Hernán A

    2008-12-02

    An important issue in the study of cities is defining a metropolitan area, because different definitions affect conclusions regarding the statistical distribution of urban activity. A commonly employed method of defining a metropolitan area is the Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs), based on rules attempting to capture the notion of city as a functional economic region, and it is performed by using experience. The construction of MSAs is a time-consuming process and is typically done only for a subset (a few hundreds) of the most highly populated cities. Here, we introduce a method to designate metropolitan areas, denoted "City Clustering Algorithm" (CCA). The CCA is based on spatial distributions of the population at a fine geographic scale, defining a city beyond the scope of its administrative boundaries. We use the CCA to examine Gibrat's law of proportional growth, which postulates that the mean and standard deviation of the growth rate of cities are constant, independent of city size. We find that the mean growth rate of a cluster by utilizing the CCA exhibits deviations from Gibrat's law, and that the standard deviation decreases as a power law with respect to the city size. The CCA allows for the study of the underlying process leading to these deviations, which are shown to arise from the existence of long-range spatial correlations in population growth. These results have sociopolitical implications, for example, for the location of new economic development in cities of varied size.

  20. Growth through Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thissen, David

    2015-01-01

    In "Using Learning Progressions to Design Vertical Scales that Support Coherent Inferences about Student Growth" (hereafter ULR), Briggs and Peck suggest that learning progressions could be used as the basis of vertical scales with naturally benchmarked descriptions of student proficiency. They propose and provide a single example of a…

  1. Nutrition, growth, and cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tryfiates, G.P. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 26 papers. Some of the titles are: Defects in early and late stages of nucleotide excision repair and the origins of cancer; Mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, and the metal elements - DNA interaction; An overview of the role of diet and nutrition in carcinogenesis; Dietary modifiers in cancer; and Factors influencing glia growth in culture: Nutrients and cell-secreted factors.

  2. The Seeds of Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanushek, Eric A.

    2002-01-01

    Argues that human capital formation is the key to economic growth, that U.S. students are falling behind the rest of the World in math and science achievement because of the decline in the quality of their schooling, and that without better schools, other factors such as a quality higher education system may not sustain future U.S. economic…

  3. The Bacterial Growth Curve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulton, Richard J. L.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure that allows students to view an entire bacterial growth curve during a two- to three-hour student laboratory period is described. Observations of the lag phase, logarithmic phase, maximum stationary phase, and phase of decline are possible. A nonpathogenic, marine bacterium is used in the investigation. (KR)

  4. Protein crystal growth tray assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Miller, Teresa Y. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A protein crystal growth tray assembly includes a tray that has a plurality of individual crystal growth chambers. Each chamber has a movable pedestal which carries a protein crystal growth compartment at an upper end. The several pedestals for each tray assembly are ganged together for concurrent movement so that the solutions in the various pedestal growth compartments can be separated from the solutions in the tray's growth chambers until the experiment is to be activated.

  5. Growth variability in a tissue governed by stress dependent growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alim, Karen; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2012-02-01

    Cell wall mechanics lie at the heart of plant cell growth and tissue morphogenesis. Conversely, mechanical forces generated at tissue level can feedback on cellular dynamics. Differential growth of neighboring cells is one eminent origin of mechanical forces and stresses in tissues where cells adhere to each other. How can stresses arising from differential growth orchestrate large scale tissue growth? We show that cell growth coupled to the cell's main stress can reduce or increase tissue growth variability. Employing a cell-based two dimensional tissue model we investigate the dynamics of a tissue with stress depending growth dynamics. We find that the exact cell division rule strongly affects not only the tissue geometry and topology but also its growth dynamics. Our results should enable to infer underlying growth dynamics from live tissue statistics.

  6. Ecosystem growth and development.

    PubMed

    Fath, Brian D; Jørgensen, Sven E; Patten, Bernard C; Straskraba, Milan

    2004-11-01

    One of the most important features of biosystems is how they are able to maintain local order (low entropy) within their system boundaries. At the ecosystem scale, this organization can be observed in the thermodynamic parameters that describe it, such that these parameters can be used to track ecosystem growth and development during succession. Thermodynamically, ecosystem growth is the increase of energy throughflow and stored biomass, and ecosystem development is the internal reorganization of these energy mass stores, which affect transfers, transformations, and time lags within the system. Several proposed hypotheses describe thermodynamically the orientation or natural tendency that ecosystems follow during succession, and here, we consider five: minimize specific entropy production, maximize dissipation, maximize exergy storage (includes biomass and information), maximize energy throughflow, and maximize retention time. These thermodynamic orientors were previously all shown to occur to some degree during succession, and here we present a refinement by observing them during different stages of succession. We view ecosystem succession as a series of four growth and development stages: boundary, structural, network, and informational. We demonstrate how each of these ecological thermodynamic orientors behaves during the different growth and development stages, and show that while all apply during some stages only maximizing energy throughflow and maximizing exergy storage are applicable during all four stages. Therefore, we conclude that the movement away from thermodynamic equilibrium, and the subsequent increase in organization during ecosystem growth and development, is a result of system components and configurations that maximize the flux of useful energy and the amount of stored exergy. Empirical data and theoretical models support these conclusions.

  7. Coupled Growth in Hypermonotectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, J. Barry; Coriell, Sam R.

    2001-01-01

    The overall objective of this project is to obtain a fundamental understanding of the physics controlling solidification processes in immiscible alloy systems. The investigation involves both experimentation and the development of a model describing solidification in monotectic systems. The experimental segment was designed to first demonstrate that it is possible to obtain interface stability and steady state coupled growth in hypermonotectic alloys through microgravity processing. Microgravity results obtained to date have verified this possibility. Future flights will permit experimental determination of the limits of interface stability and the influence of alloy composition and growth rate on microstructure. The objectives of the modeling segment of the investigation include prediction of the limits of interface stability, modeling of convective flow due to residual acceleration, and the influence of surface tension driven flows at the solidification interface. The study of solidification processes in immiscible alloy systems is hindered by the inherent convective flow that occurs on Earth and by the possibility of sedimentation of the higher density immiscible liquid phase. It has been shown that processing using a high thermal gradient and a low growth rate can lead to a stable macroscopically planar growth front even in hypermonotectic alloys. Processing under these growth conditions can avoid constitutional supercooling and prevent the formation of the minor immiscible liquid phase in advance of the solidification front. However, the solute depleted boundary layer that forms in advance of the solidification front is almost always less dense than the liquid away from the solidification front. As a result, convective instability is expected. Ground based testing has indicated that convection is a major problem in these alloy systems and leads to gross compositional variations along the sample and difficulties maintaining interface stability. Sustained low

  8. Coupled Growth in Hypermonotectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, J. Barry; Coriell, Sam R.

    2001-01-01

    The overall objective of this project is to obtain a fundamental understanding of the physics controlling solidification processes in immiscible alloy systems. The investigation involves both experimentation and the development of a model describing solidification in monotectic systems. The experimental segment was designed to first demonstrate that it is possible to obtain interface stability and steady state coupled growth in hypermonotectic alloys through microgravity processing. Microgravity results obtained to date have verified this possibility. Future flights will permit experimental determination of the limits of interface stability and the influence of alloy composition and growth rate on microstructure. The objectives of the modeling segment of the investigation include prediction of the limits of interface stability, modeling of convective flow due to residual acceleration, and the influence of surface tension driven flows at the solidification interface. The study of solidification processes in immiscible alloy systems is hindered by the inherent convective flow that occurs on Earth and by the possibility of sedimentation of the higher density immiscible liquid phase. It has been shown that processing using a high thermal gradient and a low growth rate can lead to a stable macroscopically planar growth front even in hypermonotectic alloys. Processing under these growth conditions can avoid constitutional supercooling and prevent the formation of the minor immiscible liquid phase in advance of the solidification front. However, the solute depleted boundary layer that forms in advance of the solidification front is almost always less dense than the liquid away from the solidification front. As a result, convective instability is expected. Ground based testing has indicated that convection is a major problem in these alloy systems and leads to gross compositional variations along the sample and difficulties maintaining interface stability. Sustained low

  9. Mechanobiology of interfacial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarletta, P.; Preziosi, L.; Maugin, G. A.

    2013-03-01

    A multiscale analysis integrating biomechanics and mechanobiology is today required for deciphering the crosstalk between biochemistry, geometry and elasticity in living materials. In this paper we derive a unified thermomechanical theory coupling growth processes with mass transport phenomena across boundaries and/or material interfaces. Inside a living system made by two contiguous bodies with varying volumes, an interfacial growth mechanism is considered to force fast but continuous variations of the physical fields inside a narrow volume across the material interface. Such a phenomenon is modelled deriving homogenized surface fields on a growing non-material discontinuity, possibly including a singular edge line. A number of balance laws is derived for imposing the conservation of the thermomechanical properties of the biological system. From thermodynamical arguments we find that the normal displacement of the non-material interface is governed by the jump of a new form of material mechanical-energy flux, also involving the kinetic energies and the mass fluxes. Furthermore, the configurational balance indicates that the surface Eshelby tensor is the tangential stress measure driving the material inhomogeneities on the non-material interface. Accordingly, stress-dependent evolution laws for bulk and interfacial growth processes are derived for both volume and surface fields. The proposed thermomechanical theory is finally applied to three biological system models. The first two examples are focused on stress-free growth problems, concerning the morphogenesis of animal horns and of seashells. The third application finally deals with the stress-driven surface evolution of avascular tumours with heterogeneous structures. The results demonstrate that the proposed theory can successfully model those biological systems where growth and mass transport phenomena interact at different length-scales. Coupling biological, mechanical and geometrical factors, the proposed

  10. Nutrient utilisation, growth performance and blood metabolites in Murrah buffalo calves (Bubalus bubalis) divergently selected for residual feed intake.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vijay K; Kundu, Shivlal S; Prusty, Sonali; Datt, Chander; Kumar, Muneendra

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in efficiency of feed utilisation between buffalo calves with low and high residual feed intake (RFI) by comparing feed intake, nutrient digestibility, growth traits and blood metabolites. Eighteen male Murrah buffalo calves (aged 4-6 months; 70 ± 1.0 kg body weight) were fed ad libitum with a total mixed ration for 120 d. Based on linear regression models involving dry matter intake (DMI), average daily gain (ADG) and mid-test metabolic body size, calves were assigned into low and high RFI groups. The RFI varied from -0.33 to +0.28 kg DM/d with an average RFI of -0.14 and 0.14 kg DM/d in low and high RFI calves, respectively. Calves had a mean DMI of 1.9 and 2.4 kg/d and an ADG of 0.5 and 0.6 kg/d in low and high RFI groups, respectively. Low RFI calves ate 19.0% less DM each day and required significantly less metabolisable energy for maintenance compared with high RFI calves (12.5 vs. 16.7 MJ/d). Nutrient digestibility and nitrogen balance did not differ among low and high RFI calves. In more efficient animals (low RFI calves) higher (p < 0.05) plasma level of growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), triiodothyronine (T3) and lower concentration of thyroxin hormone were detected. No significant differences in levels of insulin, hydroxyproline, plasma and urine creatinine, total protein and albumin between high and low RFI groups were found. Blood metabolites showed significant (p < 0.05) differences at initial and final stages of study in both groups. At final stage of study, RFI showed negative correlations with growth hormone, IGF-1, T3, urine creatinine and albumin. Low RFI buffalo calves are more efficient in feed utilisation and the differences in blood metabolites are probably due to differences in feed intake and body metabolism.

  11. Dendritic Growth Investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Representatives of NASA materials science experiments supported the NASA exhibit at the Rernselaer Polytechnic Institute's Space Week activities, April 5 through 11, 1999. From left to right are: Angie Jackman, project manager at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center for dendritic growth experiments; Dr. Martin Glicksman of Rennselaer Polytechnic Instutute, Troy, NY, principal investigator on the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) that flew three times on the Space Shuttle; and Dr. Matthew Koss of College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA, a co-investigator on the IDGE and now principal investigator on the Transient Dendritic Solidification Experiment being developed for the International Space Station (ISS). The image at far left is a dendrite grown in Glicksman's IDGE tests aboard the Shuttle. Glicksman is also principal investigator for the Evolution of Local Microstructures: Spatial Instabilities of Coarsening Clusters.

  12. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor system with a vertical deposition chamber was used for the growth of Si films on glass, glass-ceramic, and polycrystalline ceramic substrates. Silicon vapor was produced by pyrolysis of SiH4 in a H2 or He carrier gas. Preliminary deposition experiments with two of the available glasses were not encouraging. Moderately encouraging results, however, were obtained with fired polycrystalline alumina substrates, which were used for Si deposition at temperatures above 1,000 C. The surfaces of both the substrates and the films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, reflection electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy optical microscopy, and surface profilometric techniques. Several experiments were conducted to establish baseline performance data for the reactor system, including temperature distributions on the sample pedestal, effects of carrier gas flow rate on temperature and film thickness, and Si film growth rate as a function of temperature.

  13. Distal ulnar growth arrest.

    PubMed

    Nelson, O A; Buchanan, J R; Harrison, C S

    1984-03-01

    Four cases of arrest of distal ulnar physeal growth occurring in children ages 7 to 13 years had follow-up for 2 to 10 years. Each patient developed bowing of the radial diaphysis, ulnar translation of the distal radial epiphysis, and increased ulnar angulation of the distal radiocarpal joint surface. Growth discrepancies were documented in both the ulna (range 2.2 to 3.9 cm) and to a lesser extent the radius (range 0.2 to 1.6 cm) when compared to the opposite forearm in each patient. The progression of deformity appeared to be greatest during adolescence. Radial deviation and pronation were limited to varying degrees in each case. No patient had significant pain or functional impairment, but the cosmetic appearance was always displeasing. Indications for surgical treatment include increasing ulnar angulation of the distal radial articular surface, progressive loss of motion, and displeasing cosmetic appearance.

  14. Growth velocity in constitutional delay of growth and development.

    PubMed

    Butenandt, Otfrid; Kunze, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Growth velocity was determined in 121 boys and 58 girls with constitutional delay of growth and development (CDGD) of familial origin. No data were included from patients suffering from growth hormone insufficiency (i.e. neurosecretory dysfunction for growth hormone) or any disease. From 479 values obtained in boys and 230 values obtained in girls the 25th, 50th and 75th percentiles were calculated. The mean growth velocity in children and adolescents with CDGD before the beginning of puberty was lower than the mean growth velocity of other European (British, German or Swiss) standards. Specific data of growth velocity should be used in patients with CDGD since population-based data may underestimate the normal growth velocity of these patients.

  15. Payoffs in growth engines

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, D.O. II )

    1989-12-01

    The development history and future potential of the T700/CT7 family of military-helicopter turbine engines are discussed in detail, with an emphasis on the practical advantages of growth and derivative engines over new designs. Particular attention is given to the qualification of the engine and the aircraft/engine installation, the pilot orientation process, and the overall cost. Graphs and tables are provided.

  16. Heteroepitaxial Diamond Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    that will allow their subcontractual work to impact the goals of the RTI prime contract in a timely fashion. As part of this process , new work statements...extremely low temperature diamond growth (250 - 300’C). Another example of where low temperature processing would be indispensable would be for...a low temperature process to preserve the cubic carbide and propagate the diamond. It is now clearly evident that water plays a pivotal role in low

  17. Economic growth and concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Shu-hen

    2017-02-01

    Over the past few decades, shift-share (SS) analysis is widely applied to explore the sources of local economic growth; however, it leaves unanswered the inequality question. The purpose of this paper is to exclude these biases caused by inequalities to generate a new identity, which fully shows the concept of externalities and comparative advantage, the nation-industry-region interactions and the structural change of local industry in a timely manner

  18. Thyroid Growth and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Dillwyn

    2015-01-01

    It is proposed that most papillary thyroid cancers originate in infancy and childhood, based on the early rise in sporadic thyroid carcinoma incidence, the pattern of radiation-induced risk (highest in those exposed as infants), and the high prevalence of sporadic papillary thyroid cancers in children and adolescents (ultrasound screening after the Fukushima accident). The early origin can be linked to the growth pattern of follicular cells, with a high mitotic rate in infancy falling to very low replacement levels in adult life. The cell of origin of thyroid cancers, the differentiated follicular cell, has a limited growth potential. Unlike cancers originating in stem cells, loss of the usually tight link between differentiation and replicative senescence is required for immortalisation. It is suggested that this loss distinguishes larger clinically significant papillary thyroid cancers from micro-papillary thyroid cancers of little clinical significance. Papillary carcinogenesis can then be divided into 3 stages: (1) initiation, the first mutation in the carcinogenic cascade, for radiation-induced papillary thyroid cancers usually a RET rearrangement, (2) progression, acquisition of the additional mutations needed for low-grade malignancy, and (3) escape, further mutations giving immortality and a higher net growth rate. Most papillary thyroid cancers will not have achieved full immortality by adulthood, and remain as so-called micro-carcinomas with a very low growth rate. The use of the term ‘cancer’ to describe micro-papillary thyroid cancers in older patients encourages overtreatment and alarms patients. Invasive papillary thyroid tumours show a spectrum of malignancy, which at its lowest poses no threat to life. The treatment protocols and nomenclature for small papillary carcinomas need to be reconsidered in the light of the new evidence available, the continuing discovery of smaller lesions, and the model of thyroid carcinogenesis proposed. PMID

  19. Correlations and droplet growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marder, M.

    1985-01-01

    Consideration is given to the time development of a system in which small spheres of a stable phase grow out of a supersaturated melt. The spheres then grow and shrink in a manner similar to Ostwald ripening. The growth process of pairs of particles in an effective background accounts for can be used to explain the long time correlations which develop in the system. The correlations broaden the distribution of particles sizes, even for relatively dilute systems.

  20. Growth Processes of Snow.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    no change in concentration until 3300 sec. and 3900 sec. However, there 34 7600- 9 see running moon 2-26-80 7200- 0 S6800- 400 3000 4500-- 6000 1 23...ranging from 1.80 to 1.95. This suggests that during this phase of spectral evolution, the sum of the diameters of snow particles is a conservative...transition from the dominance of deposition to aggregation. During the deposition growth phase the particles are small and collisions are rare

  1. Healthy Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    Ong, Ken K

    2017-01-01

    Observational and experimental studies indicate a remarkably consistent association between rapid growth and weight gain during infancy and higher risks for obesity in later childhood and adult life. This association appears to be equally relevant to breastfed and formula milk-fed infants, and infants small for gestational age and with normal birth weight. The type of infant milk feeding, energy intake, and milk nutrient composition are important determinants of infant growth and weight gain. There is also accumulating evidence that genetic factors related to adult obesity susceptibility act in the central nervous system to regulate intrinsic levels of infant appetite and satiety, and they impact on infant dietary behaviors to influence growth and weight gain. These genetic factors indicate an early life trajectory to later obesity that starts with rapid infancy gains in weight, length, and fat and lean mass, before the subsequent emergence of high BMI and adiposity. Better understanding of the anthropometric, metabolic and behavioral correlates of this trajectory will help to enable early-life prediction and preventive strategies against obesity and related metabolic disorders. © 2017 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Can Growth Be Green?

    PubMed

    Gough, Ian

    2015-01-01

    This short article, based on a presentation at the London School of Economics, criticizes the common opinion that "green growth" offers a relatively painless - some even say pain-free - transition path for capitalist economies. After a brief summary of the daunting arithmetic entailed in combining fast decarbonization with continuing growth, the article advances 3 propositions. First, market-based carbon mitigation programs, such as carbon trading, cannot be sufficient and must be coupled with other policy pillars that foster transformative investment and widespread regulation. Second, a political economy of climate policy needs to draw on the lessons of comparative social policy research, which emphasizes the role of international pressures, interests, institutions, and ideas. Taking these into account gives a more realistic perspective on climate policy making in today's neoliberal world. Third, more radical policies on both consumption and production are called for, to ensure that carbon mitigation is not pursued at the expense of equity and social welfare. These include policies to restrain high-carbon luxury consumption and a transition toward shorter paid working time. The conclusion is that a realistic program of green growth will be immensely difficult and entail radical political change. © SAGE Publications 2015.

  3. [Fibroblast growth factor-2].

    PubMed

    Faitová, J

    2004-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-2 is a member of a large family of proteins that bind heparin and heparan sulfate and modulate the function of a wide range of cell types. FGF-2 occurs in several isoforms resulting from alternative initiations of traslation: an 18 kDa cytoplasmic isoform and four larger molecular weight nuclear isoforms (22, 22.5, 24 and 34 kDa). It acts mainly through a paracrine/autocrine mechanism involving high affinity transmembrane receptors and heparan sulfate proteoglycan low affinity receptors. It is expressed mostly in tissues of mesoderm and neuroectoderm origin, and plays an important role in mesoderm induction, stimulates the growth and development of the new blood vessels (angiogenesis), normal wound healing and tissue development. FGF-2 positively regulates hematopoiesis by acting on various cellular targets: stromal cells, early and committed hematopoietic progenitors and possibly some mature blood cells. FGF-2 is a potent hematopoietic growth factor that is likely to play an important role in physiological and pathological hematopoiesis.

  4. [Hormones and hair growth].

    PubMed

    Trüeb, R M

    2010-06-01

    With respect to the relationship between hormones and hair growth, the role of androgens for androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and hirsutism is best acknowledged. Accordingly, therapeutic strategies that intervene in androgen metabolism have been successfully developed for treatment of these conditions. Clinical observations of hair conditions involving hormones beyond the androgen horizon have determined their role in regulation of hair growth: estrogens, prolactin, thyroid hormone, cortisone, growth hormone (GH), and melatonin. Primary GH resistance is characterized by thin hair, while acromegaly may cause hypertrichosis. Hyperprolactinemia may cause hair loss and hirsutism. Partial synchronization of the hair cycle in anagen during late pregnancy points to an estrogen effect, while aromatase inhibitors cause hair loss. Hair loss in a causal relationship to thyroid disorders is well documented. In contrast to AGA, senescent alopecia affects the hair in a diffuse manner. The question arises, whether the hypothesis that a causal relationship exists between the age-related reduction of circulating hormones and organ function also applies to hair and the aging of hair.

  5. Some Aviation Growth Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. Leroy

    2002-01-01

    The growth of aviation since the first flight of a heavier-than-air powered manned vehicle in 1903 has been somewhat remarkable. Some of the events that have influenced this growth are reviewed in this paper. This review will include some events prior to World War I; the influence of the war itself; the events during the post-war years including the establishment of aeronautical research laboratories; and the influence of World War II which, among other things, introduced new technologies that included rocket and jet propulsion and supersonic aerodynamics. The subsequent era of aeronautical research and the attendant growth in aviation over the past half century will be reviewed from the view point of the author who, since 1944, has been involved in the NACA/NASA aeronautical research effort at what is now the Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. The review will discuss some of the research programs related to the development of some experimental aircraft, the Century series of fighter aircraft, multi-mission aircraft, advanced military aircraft and missiles, advanced civil aircraft, supersonic transports, spacecraft and others.

  6. Growth of Complex Organizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes Amaral, Luis A.

    2000-03-01

    We analyze a database comprising all publicly-traded US firms within the years 1974--93(M.H.R. Stanley et al.), Nature 379, 804 (1996); L.A.N. Amaral et al., J. Phys. (France) I 7, 621 (1997). We find (i) that the distribution of the annual growth rates ---for companies with approximately the same size S--- decays as an exponential, and (ii) that the standard deviation σ of these distributions scales as σ ~ S^-β. We introduce a dynamical model in which we assume that each firm has a complex internal structure comprising many subunits(L.A.N. Amaral et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 1385 (1998). We study the case in which (i) each subunit grows in a multiplicative manner, and (ii) the interactions between the firms are mean field. We find agreement between our predictions and the empirical results for firms. We then analyze the fluctuations in the gross domestic product of 152 countries for the period 1950--92 and find a surprising agreement with the results for firm growth (Y. Lee et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 3275 (1998). Finally, we analyze the fluctuations in the research output and research input of US universities and find sinilar scaling laws(V. Plerou et al.), Nature 400, 433 (1999). Our empirical results and model suggest that the growth of organizations with complex structure are governed by similar mechanisms.

  7. Achondrogenesis

    MedlinePlus

    ... enable JavaScript. Achondrogenesis is a rare type of growth hormone deficiency in which there is a defect in ... Dattani MT, Cohen P, et al. Disorders of growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor secretion and action. In: ...

  8. Control of nucleation and growth in protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Meehan, Edward J.

    1988-01-01

    The potential advantages of nucleation and growth control through temperature, rather than the addition of precipitants or removal of solvent, are discussed. A simple light scattering arrangement for the characterization of nucleation and growth conditions in solutions is described. The temperature dependence of the solubility of low ionic strength lysozyme solutions is applied in preliminary nucleation and growth experiments.

  9. Gambling on growth.

    PubMed

    Feeney, A

    1990-01-01

    When the assumption is made that economic growth must be increased by 10% to accommodate population increases and to reduce poverty, the question is raised as to whether or not sustainable development is possible. The human population increased 3 times since 1900, and global economic activity has increased 7 times faster than population. Use of fossil fuels has increased by 30 times, and industrial production has increased by 50 times. The by-products of population growth and economic activity are loss of tropical rainforests; species extinction; desertification in Africa, India, and the US; toxic and radioactive pollution; and greenhouse warming and ozone depletion. The atmosphere's stability and human habitation is threatened. Sustainable development, as defined by the World Commission on Environment and Development (WCED) in "Our Common Future," is meeting present needs but not at the expense of future needs. Economic growth must proceed at different rates in different countries to close the gap between the rich and poor. Economic expansion has been criticized by the president of Negative Population Growth and the Environmental Defense Fund's coordinator of reform for the World Bank's environmental policies and Third World countries. US government response during the Reagan administration has been indifference, while support has come from the World Resources Institute, the Worldwatch Institute, the US National Wildlife Federation, and the Population Reference Bureau. Recent support has come from signers of the "G-7 Summit" and from IBM and the Dow Chemical Company. A few shared tenets are 1) that economic development is not sustainable, 2) environmental reforms are necessary to make development sustainable, 3) a trade-off is needed to increase Third World energy use, and 4) population must be stabilized. Many proposals have been offered including reducing population to 2 billion, or 40% of the current level. Reducing poverty globally is an environmentally sound

  10. Back pain during growth.

    PubMed

    Hasler, Carol C

    2013-01-08

    It is wrong to believe that back pain only burdens adults: the yearly incidence during growth ranges from 10-20%, continuously increasing from childhood to adolescence. Rapid growth-related muscular dysbalance and insufficiency, poor physical condition in an increasingly sedentary adolescent community or - vice versa - high level sports activities, account for the most prevalent functional pain syndromes. In contrast to adults the correlation of radiographic findings with pain is high: the younger the patient, the higher the probability to establish a rare morphologic cause such as benign or malignant tumours, congenital malformations and infections. In children younger than 5 years old, the likelihood is more than 50%. The following red flags should lower the threshold for a quick in-depth analysis of the problem: Age of the patient <5 years, acute trauma, functional limitation for daily activities, irradiating pain, loss of weight, duration >4 weeks, history of tumour, exposition to tuberculosis, night pain and fever. High level sport equals a biomechanical field test which reveals the biologic individual response of the growing spine to the sports-related forces. Symptomatic or asymptomatic inhibitory or stimulatory growth disturbances like Scheuermann disease, scoliosis or fatigue fractures represent the most frequent pathomorphologies. They usually occur at the disk-growth plate compound: intraspongious disk herniation, diminuition of anterior growth with vertebral wedging and apophyseal ring fractures often occur when the biomechanical impacts exceed the mechanical resistance of the cartilaginous endplates. Spondylolysis is a benign condition which rarely becomes symptomatic and responds well to conservative measures. Associated slippage of L5 on S1 is frequent but rarely progresses. The pubertal spinal growth spurt is the main risk factor for further slippage, whereas sports activity - even at a high level - is not. Therefore, the athlete should only be

  11. Market Acceptance of Smart Growth

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report finds that smart growth developments enjoy market acceptance because of stability in prices over time. Housing resales in smart growth developments often have greater appreciation than their conventional suburban counterparts.

  12. What Are Growth Plate Injuries?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for growth plate injuries are:  Falling down  Competitive sports (like football)  Recreational activities. Other reasons for growth plate injuries are:  Child abuse  Injury from extreme cold (for example, frostbite)  Radiation (used to treat ...

  13. Hormonal regulation of fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Gicquel, C; Le Bouc, Y

    2006-01-01

    Fetal growth is a complex process depending on the genetics of the fetus, the availability of nutrients and oxygen to the fetus, maternal nutrition and various growth factors and hormones of maternal, fetal and placental origin. Hormones play a central role in regulating fetal growth and development. They act as maturational and nutritional signals in utero and control tissue development and differentiation according to the prevailing environmental conditions in the fetus. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system, and IGF-I and IGF-II in particular, plays a critical role in fetal and placental growth throughout gestation. Disruption of the IGF1, IGF2 or IGF1R gene retards fetal growth, whereas disruption of IGF2R or overexpression of IGF2 enhances fetal growth. IGF-I stimulates fetal growth when nutrients are available, thereby ensuring that fetal growth is appropriate for the nutrient supply. The production of IGF-I is particularly sensitive to undernutrition. IGF-II plays a key role in placental growth and nutrient transfer. Several key hormone genes involved in embryonic and fetal growth are imprinted. Disruption of this imprinting causes disorders involving growth defects, such as Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, which is associated with fetal overgrowth, or Silver-Russell syndrome, which is associated with intrauterine growth retardation. Optimal fetal growth is essential for perinatal survival and has long-term consequences extending into adulthood. Given the high incidence of intrauterine growth retardation and the high risk of metabolic and cardiovascular complications in later life, further clinical and basic research is needed to develop accurate early diagnosis of aberrant fetal growth and novel therapeutic strategies.

  14. Advanced dendritic web growth development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    A program to develop the technology of the silicon dendritic web ribbon growth process is examined. The effort is being concentrated on the area rate and quality requirements necessary to meet the JPL/DOE goals for terrestrial PV applications. Closed loop web growth system development and stress reduction for high area rate growth is considered.

  15. Approaches to Academic Growth Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderman, Eric M.; Gimbert, Belinda; O'Connell, Ann A.; Riegel, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is much interest in assessing growth in student learning. Assessments of growth have important implications and affect many policy decisions at many levels. Aims: In the present article, we review some of the different approaches to measuring growth and examine the implications of their usage. Sample: Samples used in research on…

  16. Hormonal Control of Fetal Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Paul S.; Nicoll, Charles S.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes recent research on hormonal control of fetal growth, presenting data obtained using a new method for studying the area. Effects of endocrine ablations and congenital deficiencies, studies of hormone/receptor levels, in-vitro techniques, hormones implicated in promoting fetal growth, problems with existing methodologies, and growth of…

  17. Growth charts: A diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Khadilkar, Vaman; Khadilkar, Anuradha

    2011-09-01

    Assessment of growth by objective anthropometric methods is crucial in child care. India is in a phase of nutrition transition and thus it is vital to update growth references regularly. To review growth standards and references for assessment of physical growth of Indian children for clinical use and research purposes. Basics of growth charts and importance of anthropometric measurements are described. A comparison between growth standards and references is provided. Further, Indian growth reference curves based on the data collected by Agarwal et al. and adopted by the Indian Academy of Pediatrics, World Health Organization growth standards for children under the age of 5 years (2006) and contemporary Indian growth references published on apparently healthy affluent Indian children (data collected in 2007-08) are discussed. The article also discusses the use of adult equivalent body mass index (BMI) cut-offs for screening for overweight and obesity in Indian children. For the assessment of height, weight and BMI, WHO growth standards (for children < 5 years) and contemporary cross sectional reference percentile curves (for children from 5-18 years) are available for clinical use and for research purposes. BMI percentiles (adjusted for the Asian adult BMI equivalent cut-offs) for the assessment of physical growth of present day Indian children are also available. LMS values and Microsoft excel macro for calculating SD scores can be obtained from the author (email: vamankhadilkar@gmail.com). Contemporary growth charts can be obtained by sending a message to 08861201183 or email: gntd@novonordisk.com.

  18. Approaches to Academic Growth Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderman, Eric M.; Gimbert, Belinda; O'Connell, Ann A.; Riegel, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is much interest in assessing growth in student learning. Assessments of growth have important implications and affect many policy decisions at many levels. Aims: In the present article, we review some of the different approaches to measuring growth and examine the implications of their usage. Sample: Samples used in research on…

  19. Your Baby's Growth: 12 Months

    MedlinePlus

    ... Games, and the Internet Your Baby's Growth: 12 Months KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Baby's Growth: 12 Months Print A A A What's in this article? ... Child's Growth Your Child's Checkup: 1 Year (12 Months) Learning, Play, and Your 8- to 12-Month- ...

  20. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This video, captured during the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) flown on STS-87 as a part of the fourth United States Microgravity payload, shows the growth of a dendrite, and the surface solidification that occurred on the front and back windows of the growth chamber. Dendrites are tiny, tree like structures that form as metals solidify.

  1. Hormonal Control of Fetal Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Paul S.; Nicoll, Charles S.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes recent research on hormonal control of fetal growth, presenting data obtained using a new method for studying the area. Effects of endocrine ablations and congenital deficiencies, studies of hormone/receptor levels, in-vitro techniques, hormones implicated in promoting fetal growth, problems with existing methodologies, and growth of…

  2. Evolution of human growth spurts.

    PubMed

    Leigh, S R

    1996-12-01

    This study investigates subadult growth spurts in a large sample of anthropoid primates, including humans. Analyses of body mass growth curves show that humans are not unique in the expression of female and male body mass growth spurts. Subadult growth spurts are observed in both New World and Old World anthropoid primates and are more common in males than in females. Allometric analyses of growth spurts indicate that many aspects of primate growth spurts are strongly correlated with species size. Small species tend not to exhibit growth spurts. Although male and female scaling patterns for velocity and size measures are comparable, scaling relations of variables that measure the timing of growth spurts differ by sex. These patterns can be related to sexual differences in life histories. Scaling analyses further show that humans do not depart substantially from patterns that describe other anthropoid primates. Thus, in relative terms, human growth spurts are not exceptional compared to this sample of primates. The long absolute delay in the initiation of the human growth spurt may be of substantial evolutionary importance and serves to distinguish humans from other primates. In essence, humans exhibit growth spurts that are comparable to other primates in many respects. However, human growth spurts are shifted to very late absolute ages.

  3. The development of growth references and growth charts

    PubMed Central

    Cole, T J

    2014-01-01

    Context De Montbeillard produced the first growth chart in the late 18th century. Since then, growth assessment has developed to become an essential component of child health practice. Objective To provide a brief history of i) anthropometry, i.e. growth measurements; ii) growth references, the statistical summary of anthropometry, and iii) growth charts, the visual representation of growth references for clinical use. Methods The major contributors in the three categories over the past 200 years were identified, and their historical contributions put in context with more recent developments. Results Anthropometry was originally collected for administrative or public health purposes, its medical role emerging at the end of the 19th century. Growth reference data were collected in earnest from the 19th century, during which time the familiar summary statistics – mean, SD, centiles – were developed. More advanced statistical methods emerged much later. Growth charts first appeared in the late 19th century, and Tanner and Whitehouse later popularised the concepts of velocity and conditional references for growth in puberty. The recent WHO growth standard has been adopted by many countries including the UK, where the UK-WHO charts have pioneered many design features to improve usability and accuracy. Conclusion Growth charts have come a long way in 200 years, and they represent an impressive synthesis of anthropometry, statistical summary and chart design. PMID:22780429

  4. Protein crystal growth - Growth kinetics for tetragonal lysozyme crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, M. L.; Snyder, R. S.; Naumann, R.

    1986-01-01

    Results are reported from theoretical and experimental studies of the growth rate of lysozyme as a function of diffusion in earth-gravity conditions. The investigations were carried out to form a comparison database for future studies of protein crystal growth in the microgravity environment of space. A diffusion-convection model is presented for predicting crystal growth rates in the presence of solutal concentration gradients. Techniques used to grow and monitor the growth of hen egg white lysozyme are detailed. The model calculations and experiment data are employed to discuss the effects of transport and interfacial kinetics in the growth of the crystals, which gradually diminished the free energy in the growth solution. Density gradient-driven convection, caused by presence of the gravity field, was a limiting factor in the growth rate.

  5. Limits to growth reconsidered.

    PubMed

    Hagen, E E

    1972-01-01

    In their book, ''The Limits of Growth,'' the authors conclude that through pollution, exhaustion of natural resources, and limits to the food supply, the world faces a catastrophic fall in population and in living standards by the middle of the 21st century. The authors fail to state, however, 1 centrally important assumption underlying their results, but which is present through their omission of the contrary assumption. In their model the continuing technical progress that has been a primary feature of the material world for the past 200 years suddenly ceases. The assumptions of the model presented in ''Limits of Growth'' are not the assumptions other analysts make - these are strangely unrealistic. These assumptions require closer examination. The assumption concerning population assumes that the sole determinants of birthrates are the level of industrialization and the food supply. This is not good demography, for demographers have long recognized that it may have been the decrease in death rates, not industrialization or the rise in income, that caused the decrease in birthrates. Furthermore, their theory that many of the natural resources are irreplacable is like the belief that the sun revolves around the earth. It is obvious and false. It neglects that part of technical process which includes invention of new natural resources. Technical advance is needed and the following are some of the problems that technical advance must overcome: 1) a need to discover how to increase food production progressively while preventing the runoff of chemical fertilizers from the soil into waterways, 2) the ''natural'' minerals on which until recently all have depended are ''biodegradable,'' 3) there is a similar problem with radioactive nuclear wastes; 4) energy must dissipate into heat; and 5) there is a need to hasten the decline in birthrates throughout the world. In conclusion, indefinitely continuing growth is not regarded as desirable only as possible.

  6. Global population growth.

    PubMed

    Langmore, J

    1992-07-01

    The global population passed 5 billion in 1987. In the year 2000 the world's population will be more than 6 billion, increasing by 90-100 million each year. About 95% of future demographic growth will take place in developing countries. The number of school age children is projected to increase from 940 million in 1980 to 1280 million by the year 2000. Under current labor force growth projections in developing countries, around 1.6 billion new jobs will have to be created between 1980 and 2025, with nearly 1 billion of them in Asia. Population often increases at a more rapid rate than agricultural growth. Food production per capita has declined in 70 developing countries. Much of the projected population increase will take place in environmentally fragile regions of the developing world. Population pressures contribute to deforestation, desertification, and scarcity of clean water. The United Nations Population Fund has estimated that in Asia over 43% of women not using family planning would like to postpone, space, or limit their childbearing. Over half of the world's couples of reproductive age are now using contraception. Family planning to postpone the first birth and to eliminate late child bearing would reduce both child loss and maternal illness and death. Both infant and maternal mortality are greater with higher order births. Reducing average family size is an effective way of reducing infant and maternal mortality. The World Bank has given high priority to population assistance, with large programs in Bangladesh, Egypt, India, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Thailand. Population assistance provided by the Australian International Development Assistance Bureau totaled about $4.5 million during 1989-90 and is expected to be about $8 million during 1991-92. Australia should increase the proportion of its development assistance budget devoted to population, and family planning programs should increase to around $26 million in line with other major donors.

  7. Polarized maser growth

    SciTech Connect

    Melrose, D.B.; Judge, A.C.

    2004-11-01

    A polarized maser is assumed to operate in an anisotropic medium with natural modes polarized differently to the maser. It is shown that when the spatial growth rate and the generalized Faraday rotation rate are comparable, the polarization of the growing radiation is different from those of the maser and medium. In particular, for a lineary polarized maser operating in a medium with linearly polarized natural modes, the growing radiation is partially circularly polarized. This provides a previously unrecognized source of circular polarization that may be relevant to pulsar radio emission.

  8. Cell Growth Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Exogene Corporation uses advanced technologies to enhance production of bio-processed substances like proteins, antibiotics and amino acids. Among them are genetic modification and a genetic switch. They originated in research for Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Extensive experiments in cell growth through production of hemoglobin to improve oxygen supply to cells were performed. By improving efficiency of oxygen use by cells, major operational expenses can be reduced. Greater product yields result in decreased raw material costs and more efficient use of equipment. A broad range of applications is cited.

  9. Immigration, assimilation and growth.

    PubMed

    Durkin, J T

    1998-01-01

    "This paper analyzes the welfare effects of immigration and its subsequent effect on ethnic diversity in a model featuring human capital spillovers which depend on the degree of ethnic heterogeneity, variation rates of time preference across individuals and endogenous levels of immigration and assimilation. In the model, an increase in ethnic diversity reduces the spillovers effect for the majority. Nonetheless, immigration can be welfare improving for the majority ethnic group even if it increases the degree of diversity as long as it raises the average human capital level and/or growth rate by increasing the proportion of people with low rates of time preference."

  10. Laws of valley growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seybold, Hansjoerg; Yi, Robert; Willenbring, Jane; Kirchner, James; Rothman, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    The question of how the channel heads advance has long been debated [1,2]. By studying a simplified setting - channels incised by re-emerging groundwater flow - we seek insight into the headward growth of channel networks, by combining theoretical modeling with field observations. A concept for how such seepage channel systems form was first proposed by T. Dunne in the early 1980s [2]. A small bulge in the sidewall of a stream focuses ground water flow. This results in a larger flux and therefore a higher erosion rate in this direction. Over time such small perturbations grow into newly formed streams, but how they do so and how erosion depends on the water flux is unclear. The theory of diffusive growth provides a theoretical framework to describe channelization in response to groundwater flow. For this system the underlying physical equations are well-defined, and numerical and analytical predictions can be obtained and tested in the field. If a stream advances at a rate v˜ q^η, where q is the discharge of ground water into the tip, theory predicts that η has to be smaller than a critical value η^star to obtain ramified networks [3]. We test this hypothesis by measuring erosion rates in a field site in the Florida Panhandle, which provides a natural laboratory to study channel incision by re-emerging groundwater flow [4]. Our theoretical network reconstruction yields tip growth rates which we can directly compare to observational rates obtained from cosmogenic 10Be measurements. This comparison of theory and observation allows us to verify the existence of a constitutive discharge-erosion relation, and to better characterize growth and competition of streams at the channel head. [1] Montgommery, D. R. and Dietrich, W. E. Where do channels begin?, Nature, 336, no. 6196 (1988): 232-234 [2] Dunne, T. Formation and controls of channel networks, Prog. Phys. Geogr., 4 (1980): 211-239 [3] Carleson, L. and Makarov, N. Laplacian path models, J. Anal. Math., 87, no. 1

  11. Optimal growth of preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Corpeleijn, Willemijn E; Kouwenhoven, Stefanie M P; van Goudoever, Johannes B

    2013-01-01

    The cause of growth restriction in preterm infants is multifactorial, but it has been estimated that about 50% of the variance in early postnatal growth can be attributed to nutrition. Very low birth weight (VLBW) infants who were born small-for-gestational age (SGA) seem to have the highest risk to become growth restricted. Possibly, the intrauterine growth-retarded preterm infant is metabolically different from its appropriately grown counterpart and therefore has different nutritional needs. Neonatal nutrition and the resulting postnatal growth are major determinants in the short- and long-term outcomes of preterm neonates. Although having favorable effects on neurodevelopmental outcome, rapid postnatal weight gain after a period of nutritional restriction is associated with the development of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in later life. It seems likely that minimization of postnatal growth failure will decrease the need for catch-up growth and thereby decrease the risk of developing cardiovascular risk factors. Monitoring postnatal growth with current growth charts is complicated. Most growth charts that are currently being used are a reflection of current (nutritional) practices and are not a prescription of how VLBW should grow under optimal conditions. In addition to body weight, other aspects of growth such as lean body mass and length gain should also be taken into account when assessing the quality of postnatal growth. Noninvasive measurements of infant body composition are useful tools in evaluating the success of different nutritional interventions. However, all currently available methods have substantial drawbacks. A relatively new and promising method is air displacement plethysmography. This method still needs to be validated in preterm neonates. In conclusion, neonatal nutrition is a major determinant in the short- and long-term outcomes of preterm neonates. Monitoring postnatal growth is complicated by the lack of prescriptive growth

  12. Carbon nanotube growth density control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Method and system for combined coarse scale control and fine scale control of growth density of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array on a substrate, using a selected electrical field adjacent to a substrate surface for coarse scale density control (by one or more orders of magnitude) and a selected CNT growth temperature range for fine scale density control (by multiplicative factors of less than an order of magnitude) of CNT growth density. Two spaced apart regions on a substrate may have different CNT growth densities and/or may use different feed gases for CNT growth.

  13. Dust Growth by RF Sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Churton, B.; Samarian, A. A.; Coueedel, L.

    2008-09-07

    The effect of the dust particle growth by RF sputtering on glow discharge has been investigated. It has been found that the growth of dust particles modifies the electrical characteristics of the discharge. In particularly, the absolute value of the self-bias voltage decreases during the particle growth due to the electron losses on the dust particles. To find the correlation between the dust growth and the self bias evolution, dust particles have been collected at different times. The dust particle growth rate is found to be linear.

  14. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Campbell, A. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Shaw, G. L.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The objective was to investigate and develop chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques for the growth of large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with resulting sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells that would meet the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. The program involved six main technical tasks: (1) modification and test of an existing vertical-chamber CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures, using impurity diffusion and other standard and near-standard processing techniques supplemented late in the program by the in situ CVD growth of n(+)/p/p(+) sheet structures subsequently processed into experimental cells.

  15. China urges rapid growth

    SciTech Connect

    Hendry, S.

    1993-02-03

    This time last year China's paramount leader, Deng Xiaoping, launched the country on another bout of fast-paced economic growth and restructuring. After three years of riding out political and economic clampdown, foreign chemical companies were jerked awake by major changes in China's chemical industry. As the state becomes less involved with managing the economy, unleashing 12% gross national product growth, closer involvement with domestic factories has become attractive and essential. MCI officials say government funds will now be channeled toward clearing energy and transport bottlenecks, and chemical enterprises will be given more chance to turn a profit. They will be allowed to issue shares, seek foreign investment partners themselves, and bypass trading companies like China National Import-Export Corp. (Sinochem), the former state monopoly. Foreign analysts question whether China's finances and oil resources can support expansion. Even if they can, Cai estimates that ethylene imports will remain around the present level of 1 million tons. To further guarantee chemical supplies, China has invested in urea and polypropylene plants in the US and polystyrene plant in Hong Kong.

  16. Probabilistic Mass Growth Uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumer, Eric; Elliott, Darren

    2013-01-01

    Mass has been widely used as a variable input parameter for Cost Estimating Relationships (CER) for space systems. As these space systems progress from early concept studies and drawing boards to the launch pad, their masses tend to grow substantially, hence adversely affecting a primary input to most modeling CERs. Modeling and predicting mass uncertainty, based on historical and analogous data, is therefore critical and is an integral part of modeling cost risk. This paper presents the results of a NASA on-going effort to publish mass growth datasheet for adjusting single-point Technical Baseline Estimates (TBE) of masses of space instruments as well as spacecraft, for both earth orbiting and deep space missions at various stages of a project's lifecycle. This paper will also discusses the long term strategy of NASA Headquarters in publishing similar results, using a variety of cost driving metrics, on an annual basis. This paper provides quantitative results that show decreasing mass growth uncertainties as mass estimate maturity increases. This paper's analysis is based on historical data obtained from the NASA Cost Analysis Data Requirements (CADRe) database.

  17. Silicon Carbide Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Andrew Trunek has focused on supporting the Sic team through the growth of Sic crystals, making observations and conducting research that meets the collective needs and requirements of the team while fulfilling program commitments. Cancellation of the Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program has had a significant negative impact on resources and research goals. This report highlights advancements and achievements made with this cooperative agreement over the past year. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) continues to make advances in silicon carbide (SiC) research during the past year. Step free surfaces were used as substrates for the deposition of GaN epilayers that yielded very low dislocation densities. Defect free 3C- SiC was successfully nucleated on step free mesas and test diodes were fabricated. Web growth techniques were used to increase the usable surface area of dislocation free SiC by approximately equal to 40%. The greatest advancement has been attained on stepped surfaces of SiC. A metrology standard was developed using high temperature etching techniques titled "Nanometer Step Height Standard". This development culminated in being recognized for a 2004 R&D100 award and the process to produce the steps received a NASA Space Act award.

  18. Protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy uses laser technology to reveal a defect, a double-screw dislocation, on the surface of this crystal of canavalin, a major source of dietary protein for humans and domestic animals. When a crystal grows, attachment kinetics and transport kinetics are competing for control of the molecules. As a molecule gets close to the crystal surface, it has to attach properly for the crystal to be usable. NASA has funded investigators to look at those attachment kinetics from a theoretical standpoint and an experimental standpoint. Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine, is one of those investigators. He uses X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy in his laboratory to answer some of the many questions about how protein crystals grow. Atomic force microscopy provides a means of looking at how individual molecules are added to the surface of growing protein crystals. This helps McPherson understand the kinetics of protein crystal growth. McPherson asks, How fast do crystals grow? What are the forces involved? Investigators funded by NASA have clearly shown that such factors as the level of supersaturation and the rate of growth all affect the habit [characteristic arrangement of facets] of the crystal and the defects that occur in the crystal.

  19. Exchange-driven growth.

    PubMed

    Ben-Naim, E; Krapivsky, P L

    2003-09-01

    We study a class of growth processes in which clusters evolve via exchange of particles. We show that depending on the rate of exchange there are three possibilities: (I) Growth-clusters grow indefinitely, (II) gelation-all mass is transformed into an infinite gel in a finite time, and (III) instant gelation. In regimes I and II, the cluster size distribution attains a self-similar form. The large size tail of the scaling distribution is Phi(x) approximately exp(-x(2-nu)), where nu is a homogeneity degree of the rate of exchange. At the borderline case nu=2, the distribution exhibits a generic algebraic tail, Phi(x) approximately x(-5). In regime III, the gel nucleates immediately and consumes the entire system. For finite systems, the gelation time vanishes logarithmically, T approximately [lnN](-(nu-2)), in the large system size limit N--> infinity. The theory is applied to coarsening in the infinite range Ising-Kawasaki model and in electrostatically driven granular layers.

  20. Protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy uses laser technology to reveal a defect, a double-screw dislocation, on the surface of this crystal of canavalin, a major source of dietary protein for humans and domestic animals. When a crystal grows, attachment kinetics and transport kinetics are competing for control of the molecules. As a molecule gets close to the crystal surface, it has to attach properly for the crystal to be usable. NASA has funded investigators to look at those attachment kinetics from a theoretical standpoint and an experimental standpoint. Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine, is one of those investigators. He uses X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy in his laboratory to answer some of the many questions about how protein crystals grow. Atomic force microscopy provides a means of looking at how individual molecules are added to the surface of growing protein crystals. This helps McPherson understand the kinetics of protein crystal growth. McPherson asks, How fast do crystals grow? What are the forces involved? Investigators funded by NASA have clearly shown that such factors as the level of supersaturation and the rate of growth all affect the habit [characteristic arrangement of facets] of the crystal and the defects that occur in the crystal.

  1. Prediction of Competitive Microbial Growth.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

     Prediction of competitive microbial growth is becoming important for microbial food safety. There would be two approaches to predict competitive microbial growth with mathematical models. The first approach is the development of a growth model for competitive microbes. Among several candidates for the competition model considered, the combination of the primary growth model of the new logistic (NL) model and the competition model of the Lotka-Vorttera (LV) model showed the best performance in predicting microbial competitive growth in the mixed culture of two species. This system further successfully predicted the growth of three competitive species in mixed culture. The second approach is the application of the secondary model especially for the parameter of the maximum cell population in the primary growth model. The combination of the NL model and a polynomial model for the maximum population successfully predicted Salmonella growth in raw ground beef. This system further successfully predicted Salmonella growth in beef at various initial concentrations and temperatures. The first approach requires microbial growth data in monoculture for analysis. The second approach to the prediction of competitive growth from the viewpoint of microbial food safety would be more suitable for practical application.

  2. Plant Growth Facility (PGF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In a microgravity environment aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia Life and Microgravity Mission STS-78, compression wood formation and hence altered lignin deposition and cell wall structure, was induced upon mechanically bending the stems of the woody gymnosperms, Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda). Although there was significant degradation of many of the plant specimens in space-flight due to unusually high temperatures experienced during the mission, it seems evident that gravity had little or no effect on compression wood formation upon bending even in microgravity. Instead, it apparently results from alterations in the stress gradient experienced by the plant itself during bending under these conditions. This preliminary study now sets the stage for long-term plant growth experiments to determine whether compression wood formation can be induced in microgravity during phototropic-guided realignment of growing woody plant specimens, in the absence of any externally provided stress and strain.

  3. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yau, J. F.; Malik, S. N.; Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.; Laflen, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the Elevated Temperature Crack Growth Project is to evaluate proposed nonlinear fracture mechanics methods for application to combustor liners of aircraft gas turbine engines. During the first year of this program, proposed path-independent (P-I) integrals were reviewed for such applications. Several P-I integrals were implemented into a finite-element postprocessor which was developed and verified as part of the work. Alloy 718 was selected as the analog material for use in the forthcoming experimental work. A buttonhead, single-edge notch specimen was designed and verified for use in elevated-temperature strain control testing with significant inelastic strains. A crack mouth opening displacement measurement device was developed for further use.

  4. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the growth of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials is investigated. The objective is to develop CVD techniques for producing large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells meeting the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Specific areas covered include: (1) modification and test of existing CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures, using standard and near-standard processing techniques.

  5. Androgens and hair growth.

    PubMed

    Randall, Valerie Anne

    2008-01-01

    Hair's importance in human communication means that abnormalities like excess hair in hirsutism or hair loss in alopecia cause psychological distress. Androgens are the main regulator of human hair follicles, changing small vellus follicles producing tiny, virtually invisible hairs into larger intermediate and terminal follicles making bigger, pigmented hairs. The response to androgens varies with the body site as it is specific to the hair follicle itself. Normally around puberty, androgens stimulate axillary and pubic hair in both sexes, plus the beard, etc. in men, while later they may also inhibit scalp hair growth causing androgenetic alopecia. Androgens act within the follicle to alter the mesenchyme-epithelial cell interactions, changing the length of time the hair is growing, the dermal papilla size and dermal papilla cell, keratinocyte and melanocyte activity. Greater understanding of the mechanisms of androgen action in follicles should improve therapies for poorly controlled hair disorders like hirsutism and alopecia.

  6. Pattern, Growth and Control

    PubMed Central

    Lander, Arthur D.

    2011-01-01

    The view of biology as goal-directed engineering has deep historical roots in developmental biology, a field currently benefitting from an influx of ideas and methods from systems biology. Systems biology draws on non-biological paradigms to explain developmental mechanisms of control, the specific type of regulation that achieves or maintains a desired end. This review highlights some of the current efforts designed to elucidate basic design principles underlying the engineering objectives of robustness, precision, and scaling that are required during developmental control of growth and pattern formation. Examples from vertebrate and invertebrate development are used to illustrate general principles including the value of integral feedback in achieving set-point control; the usefulness of self-organizing behavior; the importance of recognizing and appropriately handling noise; and the No Free Lunch theory. Through the examination of such principles, systems biology offers a functional framework to make sense of the mechanistic complexity of organismal development. PMID:21414486

  7. Capital Growth Paths of the Neoclassical Growth Model

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Taro

    2012-01-01

    This paper derives the first-order approximated paths of both types of capital in the two-capital neoclassical growth model. The derived capital growth paths reveal that the short-run growth effect of capital injection differs considerably depending on which type of capital is enhanced. This result demonstrates the importance of well-targeted capital enhancement programs such as public sector projects and foreign aid. PMID:23185344

  8. Tempo and amplitude in growth.

    PubMed

    Hermanussen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Growth is defined as an increase of size over time with time usually defined as physical time. Yet, the rigid metric of physical time is not directly relevant to the internal dynamics of growth. Growth is linked to maturation. Children and adolescents differ in the tempo at which they mature. One calendar year differs in its meaning in a fast maturing, and in a slow maturing child. The slow child needs more calendar years for completing the same stage of maturity. Many characteristics in the human growth curve are tempo characteristics. Tempo - being fast or slow maturing - has to be carefully separated from amplitude - being tall or short. Several characteristic phenomena such as catch-up growth after periods of illness and starvation are largely tempo phenomena, and do usually not affect the amplitude component of growth. Applying Functional Data Analysis and Principal Component Analysis, the two main sources of height variance: tempo and amplitude can statistically be separate and quantified. Tempo appears to be more sensitive than amplitude to nutrition, health and environmental stress. An appropriate analysis of growth requires disentangling its two major components: amplitude and tempo. The assessment of the developmental tempo thus is an integral part of assessing child and adolescent growth. Though an Internet portal is currently available to process small amounts of height data (www.willi-will-wachsen.com) for separately determining amplitude and tempo in growth, there is urgent need of better and practical solutions for analyzing individual growth.

  9. Growth hormone signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Carter-Su, Christin; Schwartz, Jessica; Argetsinger, Lawrence S

    2016-06-01

    Over 20years ago, our laboratory showed that growth hormone (GH) signals through the GH receptor-associated tyrosine kinase JAK2. We showed that GH binding to its membrane-bound receptor enhances binding of JAK2 to the GHR, activates JAK2, and stimulates tyrosyl phosphorylation of both JAK2 and GHR. The activated JAK2/GHR complex recruits a variety of signaling proteins, thereby initiating multiple signaling pathways and cellular responses. These proteins and pathways include: 1) Stat transcription factors implicated in the expression of multiple genes, including the gene encoding insulin-like growth factor 1; 2) Shc adapter proteins that lead to activation of the grb2-SOS-Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK1,2 pathway; 3) insulin receptor substrate proteins implicated in the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and Akt pathway; 4) signal regulatory protein α, a transmembrane scaffold protein that recruits proteins including the tyrosine phosphatase SHP2; and 5) SH2B1, a scaffold protein that can activate JAK2 and enhance GH regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Our recent work has focused on the function of SH2B1. We have shown that SH2B1β is recruited to and phosphorylated by JAK2 in response to GH. SH2B1 localizes to the plasma membrane, cytoplasm and focal adhesions; it also cycles through the nucleus. SH2B1 regulates the actin cytoskeleton and promotes GH-dependent motility of RAW264.7 macrophages. Mutations in SH2B1 have been found in humans exhibiting severe early-onset childhood obesity and insulin resistance. These mutations impair SH2B1 enhancement of GH-induced macrophage motility. As SH2B1 is expressed ubiquitously and is also recruited to a variety of receptor tyrosine kinases, our results raise the possibility that effects of SH2B1 on the actin cytoskeleton in various cell types, including neurons, may play a role in regulating body weight.

  10. Gravity and Skeletal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, Emily; Turner, Russell T.

    1999-01-01

    Two simultaneous experiments were performed using 5-week-old male Sprague Dawley rats; in one study, the rats were flown in low earth orbit; in the other study, the hindlimbs of the growing rats were elevated to prevent weight bearing. Following 9 d of unloading, weight bearing was restored for 4, 28, and 76 hrs. Afterwards, additional hindlimb unloading experiments were performed to evaluate the skeletal response to 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, and 24 hrs of restored weight bearing following 7 d of unloading. Cancellous and cortical bone histomorphometry were evaluated in the left tibia at the proximal metaphysis and in the left femur at mid-diaphysis, respectively. Steady-state mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins and skeletal signaling peptides were determined in total cellular RNA extracted from trabeculae from the right proximal tibiametaphysis and periosteum from the right femur. Spaceflight and hindlimb unloading each resulted in cancellous osteopenia, as well as a tendency towards decreased periosteal bone formation. Both models for skeletal unloading resulted in site specific reductions in mRNA levels for transforming growth factor-beta (sub 1) (TGF-beta) osteocalcin (OC), and prepro-alpha (I) subunit of type 1 collagen (collagen) and little or no changes in mRNA levels for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAP) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). Restoration of normal weight bearing resulted in transient increases in mRNA levels for the bone matrix proteins and TGF-beta in the proximal metaphysis and periosteum and no changes in either GAP or IGF-I mRNA levels. The timecourse for the response differed between the two skeletal compartments; the tibial metaphysis responded much more quickly to reloading. These results suggest that the skeletal adaptation to acute physiological changes in mechanical usage are mediated, in part, by changes in mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins and TGF-beta.

  11. Growth outside the core.

    PubMed

    Zook, Chris; Allen, James

    2003-12-01

    Growth in an adjacent market is tougher than it looks; three-quarters of the time, the effort fails. But companies can change those odds dramatically. Results from a five-year study of corporate growth conducted by Bain & Company reveal that adjacency expansion succeeds only when built around strong core businesses that have the potential to become market leaders. And the best place to look for adjacency opportunities is inside a company's strongest customers. The study also found that the most successful companies were able to consistently, profitably outgrow their rivals by developing a formula for pushing out the boundaries of their core businesses in predictable, repeatable ways. Companies use their repeatability formulas to expand into any number of adjacencies. Some companies make repeated geographic moves, as Vodafone has done in expanding from one geographic market to another over the past 13 years, building revenues from $1 billion in 1990 to $48 billion in 2003. Others apply a superior business model to new segments. Dell, for example, has repeatedly adapted its direct-to-customer model to new customer segments and new product categories. In other cases, companies develop hybrid approaches. Nike executed a series of different types of adjacency moves: it expanded into adjacent customer segments, introduced new products, developed new distribution channels, and then moved into adjacent geographic markets. The successful repeaters in the study had two common characteristics. First, they were extraordinarily disciplined, applying rigorous screens before they made an adjacency move. This discipline paid off in the form of learning curve benefits, increased speed, and lower complexity. And second, in almost all cases, they developed their repeatable formulas by studying their customers and their customers' economics very, very carefully.

  12. Thermodynamics of firms' growth

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano, Eduardo; Hernando, Alberto; Hernando, Ricardo; Plastino, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of firms' growth and firms' sizes is a topic under intense scrutiny. In this paper, we show that a thermodynamic model based on the maximum entropy principle, with dynamical prior information, can be constructed that adequately describes the dynamics and distribution of firms' growth. Our theoretical framework is tested against a comprehensive database of Spanish firms, which covers, to a very large extent, Spain's economic activity, with a total of 1 155 142 firms evolving along a full decade. We show that the empirical exponent of Pareto's law, a rule often observed in the rank distribution of large-size firms, is explained by the capacity of economic system for creating/destroying firms, and that can be used to measure the health of a capitalist-based economy. Indeed, our model predicts that when the exponent is larger than 1, creation of firms is favoured; when it is smaller than 1, destruction of firms is favoured instead; and when it equals 1 (matching Zipf's law), the system is in a full macroeconomic equilibrium, entailing ‘free’ creation and/or destruction of firms. For medium and smaller firm sizes, the dynamical regime changes, the whole distribution can no longer be fitted to a single simple analytical form and numerical prediction is required. Our model constitutes the basis for a full predictive framework regarding the economic evolution of an ensemble of firms. Such a structure can be potentially used to develop simulations and test hypothetical scenarios, such as economic crisis or the response to specific policy measures. PMID:26510828

  13. Growth factor involvement in tension-induced skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, H. H.

    1987-01-01

    Muscle tissue culture techniques were developed to grow skeletal myofibers which differentiate into more adult-like myofibers. Mechanical simulation studies of these muscle cells in a newly developed mechanical cell simulator can now be performed to study growth processes in skeletal muscle. Conditions in the mechanical cell simulator were defined where mechanical activity can either prevent muscle wasting or stimulate muscle growth. The role of endogenous and exogenous growth factors in tension-induced muscle growth is being investigated under the defined conditions of tissue culture.

  14. Estimation of alga growth stage and lipid content growth rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Embaye, Tsegereda N. (Inventor); Trent, Jonathan D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Method and system for estimating a growth stage of an alga in an ambient fluid. Measured light beam absorption or reflection values through or from the alga and through an ambient fluid, in each of two or more wavelength sub-ranges, are compared with reference light beam absorption values for corresponding wavelength sub-ranges for in each alga growth stage to determine (1) which alga growth stage, if any, is more likely and (2) whether estimated lipid content of the alga is increasing or has peaked. Alga growth is preferably terminated when lipid content has approximately reached a maximum value.

  15. Protein crystal growth in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenblum, William M.; Delucas, Lawrence J.; Wilson, William W.

    1989-01-01

    Major advances have been made in several of the experimental aspects of protein crystallography, leaving protein crystallization as one of the few remaining bottlenecks. As a result, it has become important that the science of protein crystal growth is better understood and that improved methods for protein crystallization are developed. Preliminary experiments with both small molecules and proteins indicate that microgravity may beneficially affect crystal growth. For this reason, a series of protein crystal growth experiments using the Space Shuttle was initiated. The preliminary space experiments were used to evolve prototype hardware that will form the basis for a more advanced system that can be used to evaluate effects of gravity on protein crystal growth. Various optical techniques are being utilized to monitor the crystal growth process from the incipient or nucleation stage and throughout the growth phase. The eventual goal of these studies is to develop a system which utilizes optical monitoring for dynamic control of the crystallization process.

  16. Growth factor involvement in tension-induced skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1993-01-01

    Long-term manned space travel will require a better understanding of skeletal muscle atrophy which results from microgravity. Astronaut strength and dexterity must be maintained for normal mission operations and for emergency situations. Although exercise in space slows the rate of muscle loss, it does not prevent it. A biochemical understanding of how gravity/tension/exercise help to maintain muscle size by altering protein synthesis and/or degradation rate should ultimately allow pharmacological intervention to prevent muscle atrophy in microgravity. The overall objective is to examine some of the basic biochemical processes involved in tension-induced muscle growth. With an experimental in vitro system, the role of exogenous and endogenous muscle growth factors in mechanically stimulated muscle growth are examined. Differentiated avian skeletal myofibers can be 'exercised' in tissue culture using a newly developed dynamic mechanical cell stimulator device which simulates different muscle activity patterns. Patterns of mechanical activity which significantly affect muscle growth and metabolic characteristics were found. Both exogenous and endogenous growth factors are essential for tension-induced muscle growth. Exogenous growth factors found in serum, such as insulin, insulin-like growth factors, and steroids, are important regulators of muscle protein turnover rates and mechanically-induced muscle growth. Endogenous growth factors are synthesized and released into the culture medium when muscle cells are mechanically stimulated. At least one family of mechanically induced endogenous factors, the prostaglandins, help to regulate the rates of protein turnover in muscle cells. Endogenously synthesized IGF-1 is another. The interaction of muscle mechanical activity and these growth factors in the regulation of muscle protein turnover rates with our in vitro model system is studied.

  17. Stochastic roots of growth phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lauro, E.; De Martino, S.; De Siena, S.; Giorno, V.

    2014-05-01

    We show that the Gompertz equation describes the evolution in time of the median of a geometric stochastic process. Therefore, we induce that the process itself generates the growth. This result allows us further to exploit a stochastic variational principle to take account of self-regulation of growth through feedback of relative density variations. The conceptually well defined framework so introduced shows its usefulness by suggesting a form of control of growth by exploiting external actions.

  18. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Independent Effects of Growth Hormone on Growth Plate Chondrogenesis and Longitudinal Bone Growth.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shufang; Yang, Wei; De Luca, Francesco

    2015-07-01

    GH stimulates growth plate chondrogenesis and longitudinal bone growth directly at the growth plate. However, it is not clear yet whether these effects are entirely mediated by the local expression and action of IGF-1 and IGF-2. To determine whether GH has any IGF-independent growth-promoting effects, we generated (TamCart)Igf1r(flox/flox) mice. The systemic injection of tamoxifen in these mice postnatally resulted in the excision of the IGF-1 receptor (Igf1r) gene exclusively in the growth plate. (TamCart)Igf1r(flox/flox) tamoxifen-treated mice [knockout (KO) mice] and their Igf1r(flox/flox) control littermates (C mice) were injected for 4 weeks with GH. At the end of the 4-week period, the tibial growth and growth plate height of GH-treated KO mice were greater than those of untreated C or untreated KO mice. The systemic injection of GH increased the phosphorylation of Janus kinase 2 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5B in the tibial growth plate of the C and KO mice. In addition, GH increased the mRNA expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and the mRNA expression and protein phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB p65 in both C and KO mice. In cultured chondrocytes transfected with Igf1r small interfering RNA, the addition of GH in the culture medium significantly induced thymidine incorporation and collagen X mRNA expression. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that GH can promote growth plate chondrogenesis and longitudinal bone growth directly at the growth plate, even when the local effects of IGF-1 and IGF-2 are prevented. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the intracellular molecular mechanisms mediating the IGF-independent, growth-promoting GH effects.

  19. Smart Growth and Equitable Development

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page discusses how smart growth, environmental justice, and equitable development can improve communities and provide economic, environmental, health, and social benefits to underserved communities.

  20. Protein crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, C. E.; Clifford, D. W.

    1987-01-01

    The advantages of protein crystallization in space, and the applications of protein crystallography to drug design, protein engineering, and the design of synthetic vaccines are examined. The steps involved in using protein crystallography to determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein are discussed. The growth chamber design and the hand-held apparatus developed for protein crystal growth by vapor diffusion techniques (hanging-drop method) are described; the experimental data from the four Shuttle missions are utilized to develop hardware for protein crystal growth in space and to evaluate the effects of gravity on protein crystal growth.

  1. Protein crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, C. E.; Clifford, D. W.

    1987-01-01

    The advantages of protein crystallization in space, and the applications of protein crystallography to drug design, protein engineering, and the design of synthetic vaccines are examined. The steps involved in using protein crystallography to determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein are discussed. The growth chamber design and the hand-held apparatus developed for protein crystal growth by vapor diffusion techniques (hanging-drop method) are described; the experimental data from the four Shuttle missions are utilized to develop hardware for protein crystal growth in space and to evaluate the effects of gravity on protein crystal growth.

  2. Minimizing Public Costs of Residential Growth. Coping With Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Bruce; Beck, Richard

    Rapid residential growth in rural areas or on the fringes of urban areas brings both costs and benefits. Seven factors determine whether new homes and subdivisions generate more revenues than expenditures. Local governments can substantially influence four of these seven factors in order to reduce the public costs of residential growth. Less…

  3. Growth factor involvement in tension-induced skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman W.

    1987-01-01

    New muscle tissue culture techniques were developed to grow embryonic skeletal myofibers which are able to differentiate into more adultlike myofibers. Studies on mechanical simulation of cultured muscle cell growth will now be more directly applicable to mechanically-induced growth in adult muscle, and lead to better models for understanding muscle tissue atrophy caused by disuse in the microgravity of space.

  4. A MODEL OF GROWTH AND GROWTH CONTROL IN MATHEMATICAL TERMS

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Paul; Kavanau, J. Lee

    1957-01-01

    A practicable model of the growth process, which gives better definition to the problem of growth and growth regulation and greater precision to related experimental work than do earlier models, is developed on the basis of the following assumptions: "Growth" is the net balance of mass produced and retained over mass destroyed and otherwise lost, implying continual metabolic degradation and replacement. Terminal size represents stationary equilibrium between incremental and decremental components. The mass of an organic system consists of two functionally different components,—generative and differentiated. Generative mass increases by the catalytic action of key compounds ("templates") characteristic of each cell type. Each cell also produces specific freely diffusible compounds antagonistic to these templates ("antitemplates"). Growth regulation occurs automatically by a negative "feedback" in which increasing numbers of antitemplates progressively block the corresponding templates. Differential equations expressing these interrelationships are formulated, integrated, and the solutions evaluated for the case of chick growth. These specific solutions lead to descriptions of the normal growth of a biological system which are in good agreement with known facts, and to predictions of the course of automatic growth regulations after experimental or pathological disturbances which reproduce adequately biological observations in this domain. PMID:13463267

  5. New growth and yield data on Caspar third growth

    Treesearch

    Norm Henry

    1999-01-01

    A study established in 1981 to monitor and study the growth response of 18 pre-commercially thinned plots in the coast redwood forest type on the Jackson Demonstration State Forest (JDSF) was re-measured recently. A report documenting the results of the last 12 years of growth response (1987-1998) is being developed currently by the principal researcher Jim Lindquist....

  6. The Relationship Between Cost Growth and Schedule Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Relationship between Cost Growth and Schedule Growth, 35th DoDCAS, SCEA 2002, Integrated Program Management Conference (IPMC) 2002, R. L. Coleman...currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 2003 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Relationship Between Cost...

  7. On growth rate hysteresis and catastrophic crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Cecília; Rocha, Fernando A.; Damas, Ana M.; Martins, Pedro M.

    2013-04-01

    Different crystal growth rates as supersaturation is increasing or decreasing in impure media is a phenomenon called growth rate hysteresis (GRH) that has been observed in varied systems and applications, such as protein crystallization or during biomineralization. We have recently shown that the transient adsorption of impurities onto newly formed active sites for growth (or kinks) is sensitive to the direction and rate of supersaturation variation, thus providing a possible explanation for GRH [6]. In the present contribution, we expand on this concept by deriving the analytical expressions for transient crystal growth based on the energetics of growth hillock formation and kink occupation by impurities. Two types of GRH results are described according to the variation of kink density with supersaturation: for nearly constant density, decreasing or increasing supersaturation induce, respectively, growth promoting or inhibiting effects relative to equilibrium conditions. This is the type of GRH measured by us during the crystallization of egg-white lysozyme. For variable kink density, slight changes in the supersaturation level may induce abrupt variations in the crystal growth rate. Different literature examples of this so-called 'catastrophic' crystal growth are discussed in terms of their fundamental consequences.

  8. Ecological Growth Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluszcz, Anna

    2017-03-01

    The trends of the society for the continuous growth, combined with the demographic changes, today have led to the important ecological problems on a global scale, which include, among others: the increased use of non-renewable natural resources, an increase of the greenhouse gas emissions, contamination of soil, water, air and the progressive degradation of ecosystems. In the face of such serious threats the global initiatives of all countries are important to limit the results of the excessive consumption. The aim of the article is to present the methods of measurement of the consumption level of natural resources by the societies and the examination of relationships between the level of development of the societies and the use of resources. The popular measure - the ecological footprint - was used as a measurement method for the consumption of the today's generations in relation to the regenerative possibilities of the natural environment. On the other hand, as the assessment method for the level of development of societies - the Human Development Index (HDI), including three basic areas: the life expectancy, GDP level per capita and education was used. The results of the research indicate that the current trend of the unlimited consumption of the highly developed countries takes place at the expense of the future generations.

  9. Growth control and ribosomopathies.

    PubMed

    Teng, Teng; Thomas, George; Mercer, Carol A

    2013-02-01

    Ribosome biogenesis and protein synthesis are two of the most energy consuming processes in a growing cell. Moreover, defects in their molecular components can alter the pattern of gene expression. Thus it is understandable that cells have developed a surveillance system to monitor the status of the translational machinery. Recent discoveries of causative mutations and deletions in genes linked to ribosome biogenesis have defined a group of similar pathologies termed ribosomopathies. Over the past decade, much has been learned regarding the relationship between growth control and ribosome biogenesis. The discovery of extra-ribosomal functions of several ribosome proteins and their regulation of p53 levels has provided a link from ribosome impairment to cell cycle regulation. Yet, evidence suggesting p53 and/or Hdm2 independent pathways also exists. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding the mechanisms underlying the pathologies of ribosomopathies and discuss the relationship between ribosome production and tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Problems of rapid growth.

    PubMed

    Kim, T D

    1980-01-01

    South Korea's export-oriented development strategy has achieved a remarkable growth record, but it has also brought 2 different problems: 1) since the country's exports accounted for about 1% of total world export volume, the 1st world has become fearful about Korea's aggressive export drive; and 2) the fact that exports account for over 30% of its total gross national product (GNP) exposes the vulnerability of South Korea's economy itself. South Korea continues to be a poor nation, although it is rated as 1 of the most rapidly growing middle income economies. A World Bank 1978 report shows Korea to be 28th of 58 middle income countries in terms of per capita GNP in 1976. Of 11 newly industrializing countries (NIC), 5 in the European continent are more advanced than the others. A recent emphasis on the basic human needs approach has tended to downgrade the concept of GNP. Korea has only an abundant labor force and is without any natural resources. Consequently, Korea utilized an export-oriented development strategy. Oil requirements are met with imports, and almost all raw materials to be processed into exportable products must be imported. To pay import bills Korea must export and earn foreign exchange. It must be emphasized that foreign trade must always be 2-way traffic. In order to export more to middle income countries like Korea, the countries of the 1st world need to ease their protectionist measures against imports from developing countries.

  11. Soybean Growth Aboard ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a photo of soybeans growing in the Advanced Astroculture (ADVASC) Experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The ADVASC experiment was one of the several new experiments and science facilities delivered to the ISS by Expedition Five aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor STS-111 mission. An agricultural seed company will grow soybeans in the ADVASC hardware to determine whether soybean plants can produce seeds in a microgravity environment. Secondary objectives include determination of the chemical characteristics of the seed in space and any microgravity impact on the plant growth cycle. Station science will also be conducted by the ever-present ground crew, with a new cadre of controllers for Expedition Five in the ISS Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Controllers work in three shifts around the clock, 7 days a week, in the POCC, the world's primary science command post for the Space Station. The POCC links Earth-bound researchers around the world with their experiments and crew aboard the Space Station.

  12. Soybean Growth Aboard ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a photo of soybeans growing in the Advanced Astroculture (ADVASC) Experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The ADVASC experiment was one of the several new experiments and science facilities delivered to the ISS by Expedition Five aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor STS-111 mission. An agricultural seed company will grow soybeans in the ADVASC hardware to determine whether soybean plants can produce seeds in a microgravity environment. Secondary objectives include determination of the chemical characteristics of the seed in space and any microgravity impact on the plant growth cycle. Station science will also be conducted by the ever-present ground crew, with a new cadre of controllers for Expedition Five in the ISS Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Controllers work in three shifts around the clock, 7 days a week, in the POCC, the world's primary science command post for the Space Station. The POCC links Earth-bound researchers around the world with their experiments and crew aboard the Space Station.

  13. Quartz crystal growth

    DOEpatents

    Baughman, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    A process for growing single crystals from an amorphous substance that can undergo phase transformation to the crystalline state in an appropriate solvent. The process is carried out in an autoclave having a lower dissolution zone and an upper crystallization zone between which a temperature differential (.DELTA.T) is maintained at all times. The apparatus loaded with the substance, solvent, and seed crystals is heated slowly maintaining a very low .DELTA.T between the warmer lower zone and cooler upper zone until the amorphous substance is transformed to the crystalline state in the lower zone. The heating rate is then increased to maintain a large .DELTA.T sufficient to increase material transport between the zones and rapid crystallization. .alpha.-Quartz single crystal can thus be made from fused quartz in caustic solvent by heating to 350.degree. C. stepwise with a .DELTA.T of 0.25.degree.-3.degree. C., increasing the .DELTA.T to about 50.degree. C. after the fused quartz has crystallized, and maintaining these conditions until crystal growth in the upper zone is completed.

  14. Growth tracks in early childhood.

    PubMed

    Hermanussen, M; Lange, S; Grasedyck, L

    2001-04-01

    Child growth is modulated by numerous factors and, particularly in infancy and early childhood, often tends to follow apparently irregular patterns, with many centiles crossed before the later growth channels are reached. The aim of this study was to visualize the diversity of individual growth. The study investigated 333 girls and 329 boys without chronic illnesses from four paediatric practices in Kiel, Germany. The children were measured on natural, i.e., on various occasions, when they were presented to their doctors for preventive care examinations and for minor illnesses, at the age of 0.25 (range +/- 0.08) y, 0.5 (range +/- 0.16) y, 0.75 (range +/- 0.16) y, 1.0 (range +/- 0.25) y, and at the ages of 1.5, 2, 3, 4 and 5 (range +/- 0.25) y. Each individual growth curve was converted into a series of height SDS (standard deviation scores) using one of the most reputable longitudinal German growth studies as background reference. Height SDS was then converted into residual height SDS (differences between height SDS of each measurement and average personal height SDS of the respective child). Cluster analysis was used to identify groups of children (clusters) with similarities in residual height SDS patterns (growth tracks). The clusters contained a minimum of at least 10 children. Single children or small sets of individuals below the minimum number were rejected from further analysis. In males, 10 growth tracks were identified, each consisting of 11 to 52 boys. Growth in 111 boys was so heterogeneous that they could not be assigned to growth tracks. In females, 11 growth tracks were identified, each consisting of 12 to 48 girls; 112 girls could not be assigned. Approximately 7% of boys and 15% of girls showed evidence of a mild intermittent growth spurt at the end of infancy. Some growth tracks were almost horizontal, or showed declining residual height SDS up to the age of 3 and 4 y, with no evidence of growth spurts during early childhood. Others showed

  15. Nutritional catch-up growth.

    PubMed

    Gat-Yablonski, Galia; Pando, Rakefet; Phillip, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    Malnutrition, marked by variant nutrient deficiencies, is considered a leading cause of stunted growth worldwide. In developing countries, malnutrition is caused mainly by food shortage and infectious diseases. Malnutrition may also be found in the developed world, where it is due mostly to prematurity, chronic diseases, and anorexia nervosa. In most cases, when food consumption is corrected, spontaneous catch-up (CU) growth occurs. However, CU growth is not always complete, leading to growth deficits. Therefore, it is important to understand the mechanisms that govern this process. Using a rat model of food restriction followed by refeeding, we established a nutrition-induced CU growth model. Levels of leptin and insulin-like growth factor-1 were found to significantly decrease when food was restricted and to increase already 1 day after refeeding. Gene expression analysis of the growth plate revealed that food restriction specifically affects transcription factors such as the hypoxia inducible factor-1 and its downstream targets on the one hand, and global gene expression, indicating epigenetic regulation, on the other. Food restriction also reduced the level of several microRNAs, including the chondrocyte-specific miR-140, which led to an increase in its target, SIRT1, a class III histone deacetylase. These findings may explain the global changes in gene expression observed under nutritional manipulation. We suggest that multiple levels of regulation, including transcription factors, epigenetic mechanisms, and microRNAs respond to nutritional cues and offer a possible explanation for some of the effects of food restriction on epiphyseal growth plate growth. The means whereby these components sense changes in nutritional status are still unknown. Deciphering the role of epigenetic regulation in growth may pave the way for the development of new treatments for children with growth disorders.

  16. Growth Hormone Deficiency in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain. In children, GH is essential for normal growth, muscle and bone strength, and distribution of body fat. ... Delayed puberty What are the side effects of growth hormone therapy? Mild to moderate side ... Muscle or joint pain • Mildly underactive thyroid gland • Swelling ...

  17. Growth Hormone: Use and Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... GH helps children grow taller (also called linear growth), increases muscle mass, and decreases body fat. In both children ... syndrome In adults, GH is used to treat • Growth hormone deficiency • Muscle wasting (loss of muscle tissue) from HIV • Short ...

  18. Growth of a Pine Tree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollinson, Susan Wells

    2012-01-01

    The growth of a pine tree is examined by preparing "tree cookies" (cross-sectional disks) between whorls of branches. The use of Christmas trees allows the tree cookies to be obtained with inexpensive, commonly available tools. Students use the tree cookies to investigate the annual growth of the tree and how it corresponds to the number of whorls…

  19. Population Growth: Crisis and Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaton, John R., Ed.; Doberenz, Alexander R., Ed.

    The proceedings of this first annual symposium on population growth considers the consequences of this growth, along with possible means of regulation. Topics of speeches include: Population Outlook in Asia (Irene Taeuber); Malnutrition is a Problem of Ecology (Paul Gyorgy); The Leisure Explosion (E. H. Storey); Effects of Pollution on Population…

  20. Measuring Growth with Vertical Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Derek C.

    2013-01-01

    A vertical score scale is needed to measure growth across multiple tests in terms of absolute changes in magnitude. Since the warrant for subsequent growth interpretations depends upon the assumption that the scale has interval properties, the validation of a vertical scale would seem to require methods for distinguishing interval scales from…

  1. Numerical Simulation of Nanostructure Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    Nanoscale structures, such as nanowires and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), are often grown in gaseous or plasma environments. Successful growth of these structures is defined by achieving a specified crystallinity or chirality, size or diameter, alignment, etc., which in turn depend on gas mixture ratios. pressure, flow rate, substrate temperature, and other operating conditions. To date, there has not been a rigorous growth model that addresses the specific concerns of crystalline nanowire growth, while demonstrating the correct trends of the processing conditions on growth rates. Most crystal growth models are based on the Burton, Cabrera, and Frank (BCF) method, where adatoms are incorporated into a growing crystal at surface steps or spirals. When the supersaturation of the vapor is high, islands nucleate to form steps, and these steps subsequently spread (grow). The overall bulk growth rate is determined by solving for the evolving motion of the steps. Our approach is to use a phase field model to simulate the growth of finite sized nanowire crystals, linking the free energy equation with the diffusion equation of the adatoms. The phase field method solves for an order parameter that defines the evolving steps in a concentration field. This eliminates the need for explicit front tracking/location, or complicated shadowing routines, both of which can be computationally expensive, particularly in higher dimensions. We will present results demonstrating the effect of process conditions, such as substrate temperature, vapor supersaturation, etc. on the evolving morphologies and overall growth rates of the nanostructures.

  2. The Growth of Tense Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rispoli, Matthew; Hadley, Pamela A.; Holt, Janet K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study tests empirical predictions of a maturational model for the growth of tense in children younger than 36 months using a type-based productivity measure. Method: Caregiver-child language samples were collected from 20 typically developing children every 3 months from 21 to 33 months of age. Growth in the productivity of tense…

  3. Temperature and tree growth [editorial

    Treesearch

    Michael G. Ryan

    2010-01-01

    Tree growth helps US forests take up 12% of the fossil fuels emitted in the USA (Woodbury et al. 2007), so predicting tree growth for future climates matters. Predicting future climates themselves is uncertain, but climate scientists probably have the most confidence in predictions for temperature. Temperatures are projected to rise by 0.2 °C in the next two decades,...

  4. Ecological economics and economic growth.

    PubMed

    Victor, Peter A

    2010-01-01

    Boulding's 1966 paper on the economics of spaceship Earth established the framework for ecological economics and an understanding of economic growth. In ecological economics, economies are conceptualized as open subsystems of the closed biosphere and are subject to biophysical laws and constraints. Economic growth measured as an increase in real gross domestic product (GDP) has generally been associated with increases in the use of energy and materials and the generation of wastes. Scale, composition, and technology are the proximate determinants of environmental impacts. They are often reduced to two: scale (GDP) and intensity (impact per unit GDP). New work described in this paper defines "green" growth as intensity that declines faster than scale increases. Similarly, "brown" growth occurs when intensity declines more slowly than increases in scale, and "black" growth happens when both scale and intensity increase. These concepts are then related to the environmental Kuznets curve, which can be understood as a transition from brown to green growth. Ecological economics provides a macroperspective on economic growth. It offers broad policy principles, and it challenges the primacy of economic growth as a policy objective, but many important questions remain.

  5. Physical vapor transport crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoel, Dave W.; Anderson, Elmer; Wu, Maw-Kuen; Cheng, H. Y.

    1987-01-01

    The goals of this research are two-fold: to study effective means of growing ZnSe crystals of good optical quality and to determine the advantages of growing such crystals in microgravity. As of this date the optimal conditions for crystal growth have not been determined. However, successful growth runs were made in two furnances and the results are given.

  6. Robust growth of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Robert, Lydia; Pelletier, James; Dang, Wei Lien; Taddei, Francois; Wright, Andrew; Jun, Suckjoon

    2010-06-22

    The quantitative study of the cell growth has led to many fundamental insights in our understanding of a wide range of subjects, from the cell cycle to senescence. Of particular importance is the growth rate, whose constancy represents a physiological steady state of an organism. Recent studies, however, suggest that the rate of elongation during exponential growth of bacterial cells decreases cumulatively with replicative age for both asymmetrically and symmetrically dividing organisms, implying that a "steady-state" population consists of individual cells that are never in a steady state of growth. To resolve this seeming paradoxical observation, we studied the long-term growth and division patterns of Escherichia coli cells by employing a microfluidic device designed to follow steady-state growth and division of a large number of cells at a defined reproductive age. Our analysis of approximately 10(5) individual cells reveals a remarkable stability of growth whereby the mother cell inherits the same pole for hundreds of generations. We further show that death of E. coli is not purely stochastic but is the result of accumulating damages. We conclude that E. coli, unlike all other aging model systems studied to date, has a robust mechanism of growth that is decoupled from cell death.

  7. Forces Influencing Rural Community Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainey, Kenneth D.

    The paper briefly focuses on two questions: Can the recent growth trend be expected to continue into the future? and What does this imply as far as public policy and programs are concerned? Statistics on growth in the seventies suggest three possibilities: a change in the functions of metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas; the decline of the city…

  8. Increasing Growth of Established Teak

    Treesearch

    C. B. Briscoe; Raul. Ybarra-Cornado

    1971-01-01

    Teak plantations, 3 to 16 years old, were thinned and fertilized in an effort to increase productivity. The best single method for increasing rate of tree increment was removal of competitors. Larger trees had a faster basal area increment but slower height growth than smaller trees on the same site conditions. Height growth was greater in the areas with higher...

  9. Numerical Simulation of Nanostructure Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    Nanoscale structures, such as nanowires and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), are often grown in gaseous or plasma environments. Successful growth of these structures is defined by achieving a specified crystallinity or chirality, size or diameter, alignment, etc., which in turn depend on gas mixture ratios. pressure, flow rate, substrate temperature, and other operating conditions. To date, there has not been a rigorous growth model that addresses the specific concerns of crystalline nanowire growth, while demonstrating the correct trends of the processing conditions on growth rates. Most crystal growth models are based on the Burton, Cabrera, and Frank (BCF) method, where adatoms are incorporated into a growing crystal at surface steps or spirals. When the supersaturation of the vapor is high, islands nucleate to form steps, and these steps subsequently spread (grow). The overall bulk growth rate is determined by solving for the evolving motion of the steps. Our approach is to use a phase field model to simulate the growth of finite sized nanowire crystals, linking the free energy equation with the diffusion equation of the adatoms. The phase field method solves for an order parameter that defines the evolving steps in a concentration field. This eliminates the need for explicit front tracking/location, or complicated shadowing routines, both of which can be computationally expensive, particularly in higher dimensions. We will present results demonstrating the effect of process conditions, such as substrate temperature, vapor supersaturation, etc. on the evolving morphologies and overall growth rates of the nanostructures.

  10. A Simple Plant Growth Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxlade, E.

    1985-01-01

    Describes the analysis of dandelion peduncle growth based on peduncle length, epidermal cell dimensions, and fresh/dry mass. Methods are simple and require no special apparatus or materials. Suggests that limited practical work in this area may contribute to students' lack of knowledge on plant growth. (Author/DH)

  11. Timber growth, mortality, and change

    Treesearch

    Roger C. Conner; Michael T. Thompson

    2009-01-01

    The previous section discussed trends in timber volume. Changes in volume often result from land-use change; that is, land entering or removed from the timber base. On those acres remaining forested, tree growth and mortality are the primary factors for volume change. Annual rates of growth and mortality often differ by species group, ownership, and geographic region....

  12. Teaching "The Limits to Growth"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Nancy E.

    1974-01-01

    Classroom use of "Limits to Growth" and related materials to integrate a course on population growth, food problems, resource problems and environmental issues is described in a journal available from the Foreign Area Materials Center, State Ed. Dept., 60 East 42nd St., New York, N. Y. 10017. (JH)

  13. Growth of a Pine Tree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollinson, Susan Wells

    2012-01-01

    The growth of a pine tree is examined by preparing "tree cookies" (cross-sectional disks) between whorls of branches. The use of Christmas trees allows the tree cookies to be obtained with inexpensive, commonly available tools. Students use the tree cookies to investigate the annual growth of the tree and how it corresponds to the number of whorls…

  14. Phyllodes tumor showing intraductal growth.

    PubMed

    Makidono, Akari; Tsunoda, Hiroko; Mori, Miki; Yagata, Hiroshi; Onoda, Yui; Kikuchi, Mari; Nozaki, Taiki; Saida, Yukihisa; Nakamura, Seigo; Suzuki, Koyu

    2013-07-01

    Phyllodes tumor of the breast is a rare fibroepithelial lesion and particularly uncommon in adolescent girls. It is thought to arise from the periductal rather than intralobular stroma. Usually, it is seen as a well-defined mass. Phyllodes tumor showing intraductal growth is extremely rare. Here we report a girl who has a phyllodes tumor with intraductal growth.

  15. Measuring Growth with Vertical Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Derek C.

    2013-01-01

    A vertical score scale is needed to measure growth across multiple tests in terms of absolute changes in magnitude. Since the warrant for subsequent growth interpretations depends upon the assumption that the scale has interval properties, the validation of a vertical scale would seem to require methods for distinguishing interval scales from…

  16. Your Baby's Growth: 3 Months

    MedlinePlus

    ... Games, and the Internet Your Baby's Growth: 3 Months KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Baby's Growth: 3 Months Print A A A What's in this article? ... continue to grow in weight and length this month. How Much Will My Baby Grow? The first ...

  17. Your Baby's Growth: 5 Months

    MedlinePlus

    ... Games, and the Internet Your Baby's Growth: 5 Months KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Baby's Growth: 5 Months Print A A A What's in this article? ... How Much Will My Baby Grow? By 5 months, your baby's birth weight may have doubled. Babies ...

  18. Growth hormone stimulation test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... test is usually performed to identify if hGH (human growth hormone) is deficient. The test is performed by administering the amino acid arginine in a vein to raise hGH levels. The test measures the ability of the pituitary to secrete growth hormone in ...

  19. Plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria.

    PubMed

    Lugtenberg, Ben; Kamilova, Faina

    2009-01-01

    Several microbes promote plant growth, and many microbial products that stimulate plant growth have been marketed. In this review we restrict ourselves to bacteria that are derived from and exert this effect on the root. Such bacteria are generally designated as PGPR (plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria). The beneficial effects of these rhizobacteria on plant growth can be direct or indirect. This review begins with describing the conditions under which bacteria live in the rhizosphere. To exert their beneficial effects, bacteria usually must colonize the root surface efficiently. Therefore, bacterial traits required for root colonization are subsequently described. Finally, several mechanisms by which microbes can act beneficially on plant growth are described. Examples of direct plant growth promotion that are discussed include (a) biofertilization, (b) stimulation of root growth, (c) rhizoremediation, and (d) plant stress control. Mechanisms of biological control by which rhizobacteria can promote plant growth indirectly, i.e., by reducing the level of disease, include antibiosis, induction of systemic resistance, and competition for nutrients and niches.

  20. Chemical Control of Plant Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agricultural Research Center (USDA), Beltsville, MD.

    Seven experiments are presented in this Science Study Aid to help students investigate the control of plant growth with chemicals. Plant growth regulators, weed control, and chemical pruning are the topics studied in the experiments which are based on investigations that have been and are being conducted at the U. S. Agricultural Research Center,…

  1. Automated protein crystal growth facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donald, Stacey

    1994-01-01

    A customer for the protein crystal growth facility fills the specially designed chamber with the correct solutions, fills the syringes with their quenching solutions, and submits the data needed for the proper growth of their crystal. To make sure that the chambers and syringes are filled correctly, a NASA representative may assist the customer. The data needed is the approximate growth time, the growth temperature, and the desired crystal size, but this data can be changed anytime from the ground, if needed. The chambers are gathered and placed into numbered slots in special drawers. Then, data is entered into a computer for each of the chambers. Technicians map out when each chamber's growth should be activated so that all of the chambers have enough time to grow. All of this data is up-linked to the space station when the previous growth session is over. Anti-vibrational containers need to be constructed for the high forces encountered during the lift off and the landing of the space shuttle, and though our team has not designed these containers, we do not feel that there is any reason why a suitable one could not be made. When the shuttle reaches the space station, an astronaut removes a drawer of quenched chambers from the growth facility and inserts a drawer of new chambers. All twelve of the drawers can be replaced in this fashion. The optical disks can also be removed this way. The old drawers are stored for the trip back to earth. Once inside the growth facility, a chamber is removed by the robot and placed in one of 144 active sites at a time previously picked by a technician. Growth begins when the chamber is inserted into an active site. Then, the sensing system starts to determine the size of the protein crystal. All during the crystal's growth, the customer can view the crystal and read all of the crystal's data, such as growth rate and crystal size. When the sensing system determines that the crystal has reached the predetermined size, the robot is

  2. Collisional Growth of Planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeter, Thomas; Nyffenegger, Oliver; Benz, Willy

    2010-05-01

    Motivation ---------- In the current planet formation paradigm, planets form through collisions. While the size of the primordial planetesimals is not yet established, it is recognized that this collision cascade plays an crucial role not only in determining the growth rate of the bodies but also in determining their internal structure as well as bulk chemical composition. In the case of giant gaseous planets, the nucleated instability scenario begins with the formation of critical cores of order 10 Earth masses through this very process as well. Hence, the process of collisional growth underpins the early formation of all planets massive or not. The most natural and physically appropriate approach for studying these processes is to perform N-body simulations. Unfortunately, simulating the collisional dynamics of a very large number of bodies (several hundreds of millions) over very long timescales (hundred million orbits) turns out to be computationally prohibitive. Therefore, this approach remains for the moment limited to the late stages of formation when the number of bodies has become tractable. Statistical approaches while allowing treating an arbitrary number of bodies do not provide individual collision histories and therefore cannot address some of the most important issues related to the internal structure of young planets. By introducing an orbit averaging method based on a Monte Carlo technique that allows integrating the system using time steps much longer than an orbital period, we are in a position to follow the individual collision history of several tens of millions of bodies over long evolution times. Hence, this method effectively bridges the gap between the early small planetesimals and the large embryos for which the evolution can be followed using an N-body approach. Approach -------- The method is based on an orbit averaging Monte Carlo process. The essential advantage of the method is to allow for time steps that are not dictated by the

  3. Web-dendritic ribbon growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilborn, R. B., Jr.; Faust, J. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A web furnace was constructed for pulling dendritic-web samples. The effect of changes in the furnace thermal geometry on the growth of dendritic-web was studied. Several attempts were made to grow primitive dendrites for use as the dendritic seed crystals for web growth and to determine the optimum twin spacing in the dendritic seed crystal for web growth. Mathematical models and computer programs were used to determine the thermal geometries in the susceptor, crucible melt, meniscus, and web. Several geometries were determined for particular furnace geometries and growth conditions. The information obtained was used in conjunction with results from the experimental growth investigations in order to achieve proper conditions for sustained pulling of two dendrite web ribbons. In addition, the facilities for obtaining the following data were constructed: twin spacing, dislocation density, web geometry, resistivity, majority charge carrier type, and minority carrier lifetime.

  4. A nonpeptidyl growth hormone secretagogue.

    PubMed

    Smith, R G; Cheng, K; Schoen, W R; Pong, S S; Hickey, G; Jacks, T; Butler, B; Chan, W W; Chaung, L Y; Judith, F

    1993-06-11

    A nonpeptidyl secretagogue for growth hormone of the structure 3-amino-3-methyl-N-(2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-2-oxo-1-([2'-(1H-tetrazol-5 -yl) (1,1'-biphenyl)-4-yl]methyl)-1H-1-benzazepin-3(R)-yl)-butanamid e (L-692,429) has been identified. L-692,429 synergizes with the natural growth hormone secretagogue growth hormone-releasing hormone and acts through an alternative signal transduction pathway. The mechanism of action of L-692,429 and studies with peptidyl and nonpeptidyl antagonists suggest that this molecule is a mimic of the growth hormone-releasing hexapeptide His-D-Trp-Ala-Trp-D-Phe-Lys-NH2 (GHRP-6). L-692,429 is an example of a nonpeptidyl specific secretagogue for growth hormone.

  5. Growth declines in red spruce

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, S.B. ); Adams, H.S. )

    1987-10-01

    In this letter, the authors take issue with Zedaker, Hyink, and Smith who have indicated that observed red spruce growth declines can be expected based on growth trends for even-aged stands of red spruce as documented in Meyer (1929). Recently, an examination was made of stand stocking levels at 750 sites where red spruce were cored and neither the rate of growth decline nor the extent of mortality were found to be related to stand stocking levels or previous disturbance history. The authors conclude that the Meyer data do not represent an appropriate model for stand dynamics of old-growth, high-elevation stands and no not adequately explain the growth declines observed at many of those sites.

  6. Theory of Stochastic Laplacian Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, Oleg; Mineev-Weinstein, Mark

    2017-07-01

    We generalize the diffusion-limited aggregation by issuing many randomly-walking particles, which stick to a cluster at the discrete time unit providing its growth. Using simple combinatorial arguments we determine probabilities of different growth scenarios and prove that the most probable evolution is governed by the deterministic Laplacian growth equation. A potential-theoretical analysis of the growth probabilities reveals connections with the tau-function of the integrable dispersionless limit of the two-dimensional Toda hierarchy, normal matrix ensembles, and the two-dimensional Dyson gas confined in a non-uniform magnetic field. We introduce the time-dependent Hamiltonian, which generates transitions between different classes of equivalence of closed curves, and prove the Hamiltonian structure of the interface dynamics. Finally, we propose a relation between probabilities of growth scenarios and the semi-classical limit of certain correlation functions of "light" exponential operators in the Liouville conformal field theory on a pseudosphere.

  7. Pattern formation with proportionate growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, Deepak

    It is a common observation that as baby animals grow, different body parts grow approximately at same rate. This property, called proportionate growth is remarkable in that it is not encountered easily outside biology. The models of growth that have been studied in Physics so far, e.g diffusion -limited aggregation, surface deposition, growth of crystals from melt etc. involve only growth at the surface, with the inner structure remaining frozen. Interestingly, patterns formed in growing sandpiles provide a very wide variety of patterns that show proportionate growth. One finds patterns with different features, with sharply defined boundaries. In particular, even with very simple rules, one can produce patterns that show striking resemblance to those seen in nature. We can characterize the asymptotic pattern exactly in some special cases. I will discuss in particular the patterns grown on noisy backgrounds. Supported by J. C. Bose fellowship from DST (India).

  8. The role of fibroblast growth factors in tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Korc, M; Friesel, R E

    2009-08-01

    Biological processes that drive cell growth are exciting targets for cancer therapy. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling network plays a ubiquitous role in normal cell growth, survival, differentiation, and angiogenesis, but has also been implicated in tumor development. Elucidation of the roles and relationships within the diverse FGF family and of their links to tumor growth and progression will be critical in designing new drug therapies to target FGF receptor (FGFR) pathways. Recent studies have shown that FGF can act synergistically with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to amplify tumor angiogenesis, highlighting that targeting of both the FGF and VEGF pathways may be more efficient in suppressing tumor growth and angiogenesis than targeting either factor alone. In addition, through inducing tumor cell survival, FGF has the potential to overcome chemotherapy resistance highlighting that chemotherapy may be more effective when used in combination with FGF inhibitor therapy. Furthermore, FGFRs have variable activity in promoting angiogenesis, with the FGFR-1 subgroup being associated with tumor progression and the FGFR-2 subgroup being associated with either early tumor development or decreased tumor progression. This review highlights the growing knowledge of FGFs in tumor cell growth and survival, including an overview of FGF intracellular signaling pathways, the role of FGFs in angiogenesis, patterns of FGF and FGFR expression in various tumor types, and the role of FGFs in tumor progression.

  9. Growth disturbances without growth arrest after ACL reconstruction in children.

    PubMed

    Chotel, Franck; Henry, Julien; Seil, Romain; Chouteau, Julien; Moyen, Bernard; Bérard, Jérôme

    2010-11-01

    Growth arrest is a major concern after ACL reconstruction in children. It usually occurs in patients near to closure of the growth plates. Growth disturbances without growth arrest are also possible and more vicious; the authors analyse the mechanism of two patients with growth disturbance due to overgrowth following ACL reconstruction. One was a symmetrical overgrowth process with 15 mm limb length discrepancy treated with percutaneous epiphysiodesis. Full correction at the time of skeletal maturity was achieved. The second patient developed an asymmetrical overgrowth with progressive tibial valgus deformity. This mechanism was similar to a posttraumatic tibial valgus deformity. After nonoperative treatment, a spontaneous correction of the deformity was noticed. Both children were young (7 and 10 years old) at the time of ACL reconstruction with an autologous iliotibial band graft. The clinical relevance of overgrowth disturbance is usually limited when compared to growth arrest but could require a second surgical procedure as reported in this study. Parents must be informed that even in experienced hands, and despite the use of a physeal sparing technique, this specific risk of growth disturbance is still present.

  10. Growth Modes and Energetics of 101 Face Lysozyme Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, L.

    2004-01-01

    From analyses of lysozyme 101 face growth rate data using a 2D nucleation model for layer-by-layer growth, we find the effective barrier for crystal growth to be gamma = 1.0 +/- 0.2 x 10(exp -13) erg/molecule. The magnitude of the effective barrier is 2.4 +/- 0.5 k(sub beta)T, at 22 C. We also find that beyond a critical solution supersaturation, sigma(sub c), crystal growth rates are more accurately described by a kinetic roughening hypothesis. Beyond sigma(sub c), crystals grow by the continuous addition of molecules anywhere on the crystal surface rather than layer-by-layer. The magnitude of the critical supersaturation (sigma(sub c), = 1.7 +/- 0.2) for a crossover from a layer-by-layer to continuous growth is found to be statistically independent of the solution conditions that vary with buffer pH, temperature or precipitant concentration. Using the experimentally determined values for gamma and sigma(sub c), we find the crystal growth unit to be comprised of 7 +/- 3 molecules. The energy barrier, E(sub c), for the continuous addition of the growth Units is 6.2 +/- 0.3 x 10(exp -13) erg/molecule or 15 +/1 1 k(sub beta)T at 22C.

  11. Growth and form of spherulites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gránásy, László; Pusztai, Tamás; Tegze, György; Warren, James A.; Douglas, Jack F.

    2005-07-01

    Many structural materials (metal alloys, polymers, minerals, etc.) are formed by quenching liquids into crystalline solids. This highly nonequilibrium process often leads to polycrystalline growth patterns that are broadly termed “spherulites” because of their large-scale average spherical shape. Despite the prevalence and practical importance of spherulite formation, only rather qualitative concepts of this phenomenon exist. It is established that phase field methods naturally account for diffusional instabilities that are responsible for dendritic single-crystal growth. However, a generalization of this model is required to describe spherulitic growth patterns, and in the present paper we propose a minimal model of this fundamental crystal growth process. Our calculations indicate that the diversity of spherulitic growth morphologies arises from a competition between the ordering effect of discrete local crystallographic symmetries and the randomization of the local crystallographic orientation that accompanies crystal grain nucleation at the growth front [growth front nucleation (GFN)]. This randomization in the orientation accounts for the isotropy of spherulitic growth at large length scales and long times. In practice, many mechanisms can give rise to GFN, and the present work describes and explores three physically prevalent sources of disorder that lead to this kind of growth. While previous phase field modeling elucidated two of these mechanisms—disorder created by particulate impurities or other static disorder or by the dynamic heterogeneities that spontaneously form in supercooled liquids (even pure ones)—the present paper considers an additional mechanism, crystalline branching induced by a misorientation-dependent grain boundary energy, which can significantly affect spherulite morphology. We find the entire range of observed spherulite morphologies can be reproduced by this generalized phase field model of polycrystalline growth.

  12. Subcritical crack growth in marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nara, Yoshitaka; Nishida, Yuki; Toshinori, Ii; Harui, Tomoki; Tanaka, Mayu; Kashiwaya, Koki

    2016-04-01

    It is essential to study time-dependent deformation and fracturing in various rock materials to prevent natural hazards related to the failure of a rock mass. In addition, information of time-dependent fracturing is essential to ensure the long-term stability of a rock mass surrounding various structures. Subcritical crack growth is one of the main causes of time-dependent fracturing in rock. It is known that subcritical crack growth is influenced by not only stress but also surrounding environment. Studies of subcritical crack growth have been widely conducted for silicate rocks such as igneous rocks and sandstones. By contrast, information of subcritical crack growth in carbonate rocks is not enough. Specifically, influence of surrounding environment on subcritical crack growth in carbonate rock should be clarified to ensure the long-term stability of a rock mass. In this study, subcritical crack growth in marble was investigated. Especially, the influence of the temperature, relative humidity and water on subcritical crack growth in marble is investigated. As rock samples, marbles obtained in Skopje-City in Macedonia and Carrara-City in Italy were used. To measure subcritical crack growth, we used the load relaxation method of the double-torsion (DT) test. All measurements by DT test were conducted under controlled temperature and relative humidity. For both marbles, it was shown that the crack velocity in marble in air increased with increasing relative humidity at a constant temperature. Additionally, the crack velocity in water was much higher than that in air. It was also found that the crack velocity increased with increasing temperature. It is considered that temperature and water have significant influences on subcritical crack growth in marble. For Carrara marble in air, it was recognized that the value of subcritical crack growth index became low when the crack velocity was higher than 10-4 m/s. This is similar to Region II of subcritical crack growth

  13. Associations of insulin-like growth factor-I and its binding proteins and testosterone with frailty in older men.

    PubMed

    Yeap, B B; Paul Chubb, S A; Lopez, Derrick; Ho, K K Y; Hankey, Graeme J; Flicker, Leon

    2013-05-01

    Ageing is associated with frailty and decreased anabolic hormones, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and testosterone. We hypothesized that components of the IGF-I system, in conjunction with testosterone, modulate frailty risk in the elderly. We examined associations between IGF-I, its binding proteins IGFBP1 and IGFBP3 and testosterone with frailty in men. Observational study of 3 447 community-dwelling men aged 70-89 years assessed in 2001-04, with 1 654 reassessed in 2008-09. Baseline total IGF-I, IGFBP1, IGFBP3 and testosterone were assayed. Frailty was assessed using the FRAIL scale, comprising 5 domains: fatigue; difficulty climbing stairs; difficulty walking >100 m; >5 illnesses; weight loss >5%. Men with ≥ 3 domains were considered frail. At baseline, 527 men (15·3%) were frail. Frail men had lower IGFBP3 (3 630 ng/ml vs not frail: 3 800 ng/ml, P < 0·001) and comparable IGFBP1 (23·5 vs 21·5 ng/ml, P = 0·09). In multivariate analyses, higher IGFBP1 was associated with increased prevalence of frailty (highest vs lowest quartile Q4:Q1, adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1·39, 95% CI = 1·03-1·88). New-onset frailty arose in 260 (17·5%) of 1 484 men. Lower baseline IGF-I predicted new-onset frailty (Q1:Q4 OR = 1·48, 95% CI = 1·00-2·20) as did higher IGFBP1 (Q4:Q1 OR = 1·59, 95% CI = 1·01-2·50). Men with both IGF-I and free testosterone in Q1 had greater odds of prevalent frailty (OR = 2·13, 95% CI = 1·54-2·95). Older men with higher IGFBP1 level, or both lower IGF-I and testosterone, are more likely to be frail, while those with lower IGF-I and higher IGFBP1 are more likely to become frail. Components of the IGF-I system may be biomarkers or independent predictors of frailty. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Epiphyseal growth plate growth hormone receptor signaling is decreased in chronic kidney disease-related growth retardation.

    PubMed

    Troib, Ariel; Landau, Daniel; Kachko, Leonid; Rabkin, Ralph; Segev, Yael

    2013-11-01

    Linear growth retardation in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been ascribed to insensitivity to growth hormone. This resistance state has been attributed to impaired growth hormone signaling through the JAK2/STAT5 pathway in liver and skeletal muscle leading to reduced insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Here we determine whether systemic and growth plate alterations in growth hormone signaling contribute to CKD-induced linear growth retardation using partially nephrectomized and pair-fed control 20-day-old rats. Serum growth hormone did not change in rats with CKD, yet serum IGF-I levels were decreased and growth retarded. The tibial growth plate hypertrophic zone was wider and vascularization at the primary ossification center was reduced in CKD. This was associated with a decrease in growth plate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA and immunostainable VEGF and IGF-I levels. Growth plate growth hormone receptor and STAT5 protein levels were unchanged, while JAK2 was reduced. Despite comparable growth hormone and growth hormone receptor levels in CKD and control rats, relative STAT5 phosphorylation was significantly depressed in CKD. Of note, the mRNA of SOCS2, an inhibitor of growth hormone signaling, was increased. Thus, linear growth impairment in CKD can in part be explained by impaired long bone growth plate growth hormone receptor signaling through the JAK2/STAT5 pathway, an abnormality that may be caused by an increase in SOCS2 expression.

  15. [Growth Hormone-Insulin Growth Factor I (GH-IGF-I) axis and growth].

    PubMed

    Castell, A-L; Sadoul, J-L; Bouvattier, C

    2013-10-01

    Normal human linear growth results from an evolutionary process expressing the sum effect of multiple genes. The growth hormone (GH) - insulin like growth factor (IGF)-I axis is one of the main actors in the growth process. Defects in this axis can be responsible for short or tall stature. Short stature is defined as smaller than - 2 standard deviations (SD). It is a very common reason for consultation in pediatrics; indeed, 2.5 % of children are concerned. Multiple causes make diagnosis difficult. In this article, we detail the most common constitutional causes of small size, including those related to a defect in the GH-IGF-I axis. Then, we report, the first results of the clinical and genetic study conducted on 213 patients with gigantism. Tall stature is defined by a height superior to 2 SD. Finally, recent work linking epigenetics and growth - via signaling pathways of GH-IGF-I axis - will be presented.

  16. The relative value of growth.

    PubMed

    Mass, Nathaniel J

    2005-04-01

    Most executives would say that adding a point of growth and gaining a point of operating-profit margin contribute about equally to shareholder value. Margin improvements hit the bottom line immediately, while growth compounds value over time. But the reality is that the two are rarely equivalent. Growth often is far more valuable than managers think. For some companies, convincing the market that they can grow by just one additional percentage point can be worth six, seven, or even ten points of margin improvement. This article presents a new strategic metric, called the relative value of growth (RVG), which gives managers a clear picture of how growth projects and margin improvement initiatives affect shareholder value. Using basic balance sheet and income sheet data, managers can determine their companies' RVGs, as well as those of their competitors. Calculating RVGs gives managers insights into which corporate strategies are working to deliver value and whether their companies are pulling the most powerful value-creation levers. The author examines a number of well-known companies and explains what their RVG numbers say about their strategies. He reviews the unspoken assumption that growth and profits are incompatible over the long term and shows that a fair number of companies are effective at delivering both. Finally, he explains how managers can use the RVG framework to help them define strategies that balance growth and profitability at both the corporate and business unit levels.

  17. Determinants of human population growth.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Wolfgang; Qiang, Ren

    2002-09-29

    The 20th century has seen unprecedented growth of the human population on this planet. While at the beginning of the century the Earth had an estimated 1.6 billion inhabitants, this number grew to 6.1 billion by the end of the century, and further significant growth is a near certainty. This paper tries to summarize what factors lie behind this extraordinary expansion of the human population and what population growth we can expect for the future. It discusses the concept of demographic transition and the preconditions for a lasting secular fertility decline. Recent fertility declines in all parts of the world now make it likely that human population growth will come to an end over the course of this century, but in parts of the developing world significant population growth is still to be expected over the coming decades. The slowing of population growth through declining birth rates, together with still increasing life expectancy, will result in a strong ageing of population age structure. Finally, this paper presents a global level systematic analysis of the relationship between population density on the one hand, and growth and fertility rates on the other. This analysis indicates that in addition to the well-studied social and economic determinants, population density also presents a significant factor for the levels and trends of human birth rates.

  18. Microenvironmental autophagy promotes tumour growth.

    PubMed

    Katheder, Nadja S; Khezri, Rojyar; O'Farrell, Fergal; Schultz, Sebastian W; Jain, Ashish; Rahman, Mohammed M; Schink, Kay O; Theodossiou, Theodossis A; Johansen, Terje; Juhász, Gábor; Bilder, David; Brech, Andreas; Stenmark, Harald; Rusten, Tor Erik

    2017-01-19

    As malignant tumours develop, they interact intimately with their microenvironment and can activate autophagy, a catabolic process which provides nutrients during starvation. How tumours regulate autophagy in vivo and whether autophagy affects tumour growth is controversial. Here we demonstrate, using a well characterized Drosophila melanogaster malignant tumour model, that non-cell-autonomous autophagy is induced both in the tumour microenvironment and systemically in distant tissues. Tumour growth can be pharmacologically restrained using autophagy inhibitors, and early-stage tumour growth and invasion are genetically dependent on autophagy within the local tumour microenvironment. Induction of autophagy is mediated by Drosophila tumour necrosis factor and interleukin-6-like signalling from metabolically stressed tumour cells, whereas tumour growth depends on active amino acid transport. We show that dormant growth-impaired tumours from autophagy-deficient animals reactivate tumorous growth when transplanted into autophagy-proficient hosts. We conclude that transformed cells engage surrounding normal cells as active and essential microenvironmental contributors to early tumour growth through nutrient-generating autophagy.

  19. The repercussion of population growth.

    PubMed

    Barnes, A C

    1981-08-01

    It is self-evident that, "in a finite world, infinite population growth is impossible." Population growth rates are now higher than ever before in history. In addition, there is a certain level of momentum built in, i.e., even achievement of zero population growth would be accompanied by real increases in the population level due to the age-sex structure of the population. While birth, death, and population growth rates can be calculated arithmetically, their repercussions for quality of life indices cannot. With unlimited population growth, life becomes less worth living. A brief examination is made of the following indices of quality of life and the implications for them of unlimited growth: 1) educational facilities and information media; 2) food and nutrition; 3) housing and clothing; 4) health facilities and sanitation; 5) job availability; 6) waste disposal and the quality of the environment; and 7) energy supply and transportation. Except at the local level, it is unlikely that these facilities can grow exponentially with rapid population growth. Population control must ultimately rest on many individual decisions taken at the personal level.

  20. Sociological explanations of economic growth.

    PubMed

    Marsh, R M

    1988-01-01

    Even if questions of how resources are distributed within and between societies are the main concern, it is necessary to continue to grapple with the issue of the causes of economic growth since economic growth and level of development continue to be among the most important causes of inequality, poverty, unemployment, and the quality of life. This paper's dependent variable is the economic growth rate of 55 less developed countries (LDCs) over 2 time periods. 1970-78 and 1965-84. The causal model consists of control variables--level of development and domestic investment in 1965--and a variety of independent variables drawn from major sociological theories of economic growth published during the last 3 decades. Multiple regression analysis shows that, net of the effects of the 2 control variables, the variables which have the strongest effect on economic growth are: 1) direct foreign investment, which has a negative effect, 2) the proportion of the population in military service, and 3) the primary school enrollment ratio, both of which have positive effects on economic growth. On the other hand, variables drawn from some theories receive no empirical support. The mass media of communications, ethnolinguistic heterogeneity, democracy and human rights, income inequality, and state-centric theory's key variable, state strength, all fail to show any significant impact on economic growth rates when the control variables and the significant independent variables are held constant. The theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.

  1. Transport and Growth Kinetics in Microgravity Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otalora, F.; Garcia-Ruiz, J. M.; Carotenuto, L.; Castagnolo, D.; Novella, M. L.; Chernov, A. A.

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic coupling between mass transport and incorporation of growth units into the surface of a crystal growing from solution in microgravity is used to derive quantitative information on the crystal growth kinetics. To this end, new procedures for experiment preparation, interferometric data processing and model fitting have been developed. The use of experimental data from the bulk diffusive maw transport together with a model for steady state stagnant crystal growth allows the detailed quantitative understanding of the kinetics of both the concentration depletion zone around the crystal and the growth of the crystal interface. The protein crystal used in the experiment is shown to be growing in the mixed kinetic regime (0.2 x 10(exp -6) centimeters per second less than beta R/D less than 0.9 x 10(exp -6) centimeters per second).

  2. Measuring growth rate in high-throughput growth phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Blomberg, Anders

    2011-02-01

    Growth rate is an important variable and parameter in biology with a central role in evolutionary, functional genomics, and systems biology studies. In this review the pros and cons of the different technologies presently available for high-throughput measurements of growth rate are discussed. Growth rate can be measured in liquid microcultivation of individual strains, in competition between strains, as growing colonies on agar, as division of individual cells, and estimated from molecular reporters. Irrespective of methodology, statistical issues such as spatial biases and batch effects are crucial to investigate and correct for to ensure low false discovery rates. The rather low correlations between studies indicate that cross-laboratory comparison and standardization are pressing issue to assure high-quality and comparable growth-rate data. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Transport and Growth Kinetics in Microgravity Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otalora, F.; Garcia-Ruiz, J. M.; Carotenuto, L.; Castagnolo, D.; Novella, M. L.; Chernov, A. A.

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic coupling between mass transport and incorporation of growth units into the surface of a crystal growing from solution in microgravity is used to derive quantitative information on the crystal growth kinetics. To this end, new procedures for experiment preparation, interferometric data processing and model fitting have been developed. The use of experimental data from the bulk diffusive maw transport together with a model for steady state stagnant crystal growth allows the detailed quantitative understanding of the kinetics of both the concentration depletion zone around the crystal and the growth of the crystal interface. The protein crystal used in the experiment is shown to be growing in the mixed kinetic regime (0.2 x 10(exp -6) centimeters per second less than beta R/D less than 0.9 x 10(exp -6) centimeters per second).

  4. Cosmic growth and expansion conjoined

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, Eric V.

    2017-01-01

    Cosmological measurements of both the expansion history and growth history have matured, and the two together provide an important test of general relativity. We consider their joint evolutionary track, showing that this has advantages in distinguishing cosmologies relative to considering them individually or at isolated redshifts. In particular, the joint comparison relaxes the shape degeneracy that makes fσ8(z) curves difficult to separate from the overall growth amplitude. The conjoined method further helps visualization of which combinations of redshift ranges provide the clearest discrimination. We examine standard dark energy cosmologies, modified gravity, and "stuttering" growth, each showing distinct signatures.

  5. Intermittent crack growth in fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkoniemi, R.; Miksic, A.; Ovaska, M.; Laurson, L.; Alava, M. J.

    2017-07-01

    Fatigue occurs under cyclic loading at stresses below a material’s static strength limit. We consider fatigue crack growth as a stochastic process and perform crack growth experiments in a metal (copper). We follow optically cracks propagating from initial edge notches. The main interest is in the dynamics of the crack growth—the Paris’ law and the initiation phase prior to that—and especially the intermittency this is discovered to display. How the sampling of the crack advancement, performed at regular intervals, influences such measurement results is analysed by the analogy of planar crack dynamics in slow, driven growth.

  6. Groove growth by surface subdiffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Hamed, M.; Nepomnyashchy, A. A.

    2015-04-01

    The investigation of the grain-boundary groove growth by normal surface diffusion was first done by Mullins. However, the diffusion on a solid surface is often anomalous. Recently, the groove growth in the case of surface superdiffusion has been analyzed. In the present paper, the problem of the groove growth is solved in the case of the surface subdiffusion. An exact self-similar solution is obtained and represented in terms of the Fox H-function. Basic properties of the solution are described.

  7. The biophysics of neuronal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franze, Kristian; Guck, Jochen

    2010-09-01

    For a long time, neuroscience has focused on biochemical, molecular biological and electrophysiological aspects of neuronal physiology and pathology. However, there is a growing body of evidence indicating the importance of physical stimuli for neuronal growth and development. In this review we briefly summarize the historical background of neurobiophysics and give an overview over the current understanding of neuronal growth from a physics perspective. We show how biophysics has so far contributed to a better understanding of neuronal growth and discuss current inconsistencies. Finally, we speculate how biophysics may contribute to the successful treatment of lesions to the central nervous system, which have been considered incurable until very recently.

  8. Dinosaurian growth patterns and rapid avian growth rates.

    PubMed

    Erickson, G M; Rogers, K C; Yerby, S A

    2001-07-26

    Did dinosaurs grow in a manner similar to extant reptiles, mammals or birds, or were they unique? Are rapid avian growth rates an innovation unique to birds, or were they inherited from dinosaurian precursors? We quantified growth rates for a group of dinosaurs spanning the phylogenetic and size diversity for the clade and used regression analysis to characterize the results. Here we show that dinosaurs exhibited sigmoidal growth curves similar to those of other vertebrates, but had unique growth rates with respect to body mass. All dinosaurs grew at accelerated rates relative to the primitive condition seen in extant reptiles. Small dinosaurs grew at moderately rapid rates, similar to those of marsupials, but large species attained rates comparable to those of eutherian mammals and precocial birds. Growth in giant sauropods was similar to that of whales of comparable size. Non-avian dinosaurs did not attain rates like those of altricial birds. Avian growth rates were attained in a stepwise fashion after birds diverged from theropod ancestors in the Jurassic period.

  9. Growth and yield of Giant Sequoia

    Treesearch

    David J. Dulitz

    1986-01-01

    Very little information exists concerning growth and yield of giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum [Lindl.] Buchholz). For old-growth trees, diameter growth is the single factor adding increment since maximum height has been obtained. Diameter growth averages 0.04 inches per year in normal old-growth trees but will fluctuate with changes in the...

  10. Insulin-like growth factor 1 and hair growth.

    PubMed

    Su, H Y; Hickford, J G; Bickerstaffe, R; Palmer, B R

    1999-11-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) has been identified as an important growth factor in many biological systems.[1] It shares considerable structural homology with insulin and exerts insulin-like effects on food intake and glucose metabolism. Recently it has been suggested to play a role in regulating cellular proliferation and migration during the development of hair follicles. [2,3] To exert its biological effects, the IGF-1 is required to activate cells by binding to specific cell-surface receptors. The type I IGF receptor (IGF-1R) is the only IGF receptor to have IGF-mediated signaling functions.[1] In circulation, this growth factor mediates endocrine action of growth hormone (GH) on somatic growth and is bound to specific binding proteins (BPs). The latter control IGF transport, efflux from vascular compartments and association with cell surface receptors.[4] In tissues, IGF-1 is produced by mesenchymal type cells and acts in a paracrine and autocrine fashion by binding to the IGF-1R. This binding activates the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) that triggers the downstream responses and finally stimulates cell division.[5] IGF-1 may therefore be able to stimulate the proliferation of hair follicle cells through cellular signaling pathways of its receptors. Local infusion of IGF-1 into sheep has been reported to be capable of stimulating protein synthesis in the skin.[6] It may also increase the production of wool keratin. Recently, transgenic mice overexpressing IGF-1 in the skin have been shown to have earlier hair follicle development than controls.[7] In addition, this growth factor plays an important role in many cell types as a survival factor to prevent cell death.[8] This anti-apoptotic function of IGF-1 may be important to the development of follicle cells as follicles undergo a growth cycle where the regressive, catagen phase is apoptosis driven. In this review, the effects of IGF-1 on follicle cell proliferation and differentiation are discussed. In

  11. Gravitational effects in dendritic growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Singh, N. B.; Chopra, M.

    1983-01-01

    The theories of diffusion-controlled dendritic crystallization will be reviewed briefly, along with recently published critical experiments on the kinetics and morphology of dendritic growth in pure substances. The influence of the gravitational body force on dendrite growth kinetics will be shown to be highly dependent on the growth orientation with respect to the gravity vector and on the level of the thermal supercooling. In fact, an abrupt transition occurs at a critical supercooling, above which diffusional transport dominates the growth process and below which convective transport dominates. Our most recent work on binary mixtures shows that dilute solute additions influence the crystallization process indirectly, by altering the interfacial stability, rather than by directly affecting the transport mode. Directions for future studies in this field will also be discussed.

  12. Limits to Growth - Two Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Comments by two reviewers (Garrett Hardin and Stephen Berry) on the book The Limits to Growth'' by Meadows and others. The nature of the models used, and the reactions of book reviewers are discussed. (AL)

  13. Space Station Live: Seedling Growth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Public Affairs Officer Lori Meggs talks with Carol Jacobs, payload operations director at the Marshall Space Flight Center's POIC, about the Seedling Growth experiment talking place aboard the Inte...

  14. The Market for Smart Growth

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Based on several studies of market demand, the authors determined that consumer demand for smart growth would translate into more than 600,000 houses out of the approximately 2 million new housing units built in 2007.

  15. Limits to Growth - Two Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Comments by two reviewers (Garrett Hardin and Stephen Berry) on the book The Limits to Growth'' by Meadows and others. The nature of the models used, and the reactions of book reviewers are discussed. (AL)

  16. Isotropic Monte Carlo Grain Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.

    2013-04-25

    IMCGG performs Monte Carlo simulations of normal grain growth in metals on a hexagonal grid in two dimensions with periodic boundary conditions. This may be performed with either an isotropic or a misorientation - and incliantion-dependent grain boundary energy.

  17. The Haikuist's Growth Process Revealed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Patrick

    1996-01-01

    Views personal growth through long-term work in various literary genres, including haiku-senryu sequencing, as a continuous process. Demonstrates how self-integration can be enhanced through the creative processing of dream material. (SR)

  18. Teaching Microbial Growth by Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, A. Fernandez; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presented is a simulation program for Apple II computer which assays the effects of a series of variables on bacterial growth and interactions between microbial populations. Results of evaluation of the program with students are summarized. (CW)

  19. Mesoscopic model for tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo-Kulich, Elena; Nieto-Villar, José Manuel

    2007-10-01

    In this work, we propose a mesoscopic model for tumor growth to improve our understanding of the origin of the heterogeneity of tumor cells. In this sense, this stochastic formalism allows us to not only to reproduce but also explain the experimental results presented by Brú. A significant aspect found by the model is related to the predicted values for beta growth exponent, which capture a basic characteristic of the critical surface growth dynamics. According to the model, the value for growth exponent is between 0,25 and 0,5, which includes the value proposed by Kadar-Parisi-Zhang universality class (0,33) and the value proposed by Brú (0,375) related to the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) universality class. This result suggests that the tumor dynamics are too complex to be associated to a particular universality class.

  20. Oscillatory growth for twisting crystals.

    PubMed

    Ibaraki, Shunsuke; Ise, Ryuta; Ishimori, Koichiro; Oaki, Yuya; Sazaki, Gen; Yokoyama, Etsuro; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Imai, Hiroaki

    2015-05-18

    We demonstrate the oscillatory phenomenon for the twisting growth of a triclinic crystal through in situ observation of the concentration field around the growing tip of a needle by high-resolution phase-shift interferometry.

  1. TOOTH GROWTH IN EXPERIMENTAL SCURVY

    PubMed Central

    Dalldorf, Gilbert; Zall, Celia

    1930-01-01

    1. The incisor teeth of guinea pigs have a constant rate of growth in health. 2. Deprivation of Vitamin C causes the teeth to cease growing. Readministration of the vitamin restores the growth. 3. Administration of small amounts of antiscorbutic substance results in rates of growth roughly proportional to dosage. 4. Under standard experimental conditions used in the testing of foodstuffs for antiscorbutic value, the rate of tooth growth would appear to be a precise indication of the degree of scurvy, being more delicate than the Sherman score, and more constant as well as more simple, than the Höjer method. 5. Stress in terms of usage appears to exaggerate the scorbutic lesions in the teeth. PMID:19869749

  2. Growth Defects in Diamond Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-09

    growth of cadmium crystals21. However, we will not discuss this case and limit ourselves to crystals with diamond cubic structure . A key to...111 planes, but, on a larger scale the crystal grows in the < 211 > directions. A demonstration of the effect of twinning on growth in the diamond cubic ... structure is given by Hamilton and Seidensticker17. Five E=3 twin boundaries, at the most, can meet at a point on a plane, and usually (as discussed

  3. Diamond growth in mantle fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureau, Hélène; Frost, Daniel J.; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Leroy, Clémence; Esteve, Imène; Cordier, Patrick

    2016-11-01

    In the upper mantle, diamonds can potentially grow from various forms of media (solid, gas, fluid) with a range of compositions (e.g. graphite, C-O-H fluids, silicate or carbonate melts). Inclusions trapped in diamonds are one of the few diagnostic tools that can constrain diamond growth conditions in the Earth's mantle. In this study, inclusion-bearing diamonds have been synthesized to understand the growth conditions of natural diamonds in the upper mantle. Diamonds containing syngenetic inclusions were synthesized in multi-anvil presses employing starting mixtures of carbonates, and silicate compositions in the presence of pure water and saline fluids (H2O-NaCl). Experiments were performed at conditions compatible with the Earth's geotherm (7 GPa, 1300-1400 °C). Results show that within the timescale of the experiments (6 to 30 h) diamond growth occurs if water and carbonates are present in the fluid phase. Water promotes faster diamond growth (up to 14 mm/year at 1400 °C, 7 GPa, 10 g/l NaCl), which is favorable to the inclusion trapping process. At 7 GPa, temperature and fluid composition are the main factors controlling diamond growth. In these experiments, diamonds grew in the presence of two fluids: an aqueous fluid and a hydrous silicate melt. The carbon source for diamond growth must be carbonate (CO32) dissolved in the melt or carbon dioxide species in the aqueous fluid (CO2aq). The presence of NaCl affects the growth kinetics but is not a prerequisite for inclusion-bearing diamond formation. The presence of small discrete or isolated volumes of water-rich fluids is necessary to grow inclusion-bearing peridotitic, eclogitic, fibrous, cloudy and coated diamonds, and may also be involved in the growth of ultradeep, ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic diamonds.

  4. The Systemic Control of Growth.

    PubMed

    Boulan, Laura; Milán, Marco; Léopold, Pierre

    2015-08-10

    Growth is a complex process that is intimately linked to the developmental program to form adults with proper size and proportions. Genetics is an important determinant of growth, as exemplified by the role of local diffusible molecules setting up organ proportions. In addition, organisms use adaptive responses allowing modulating the size of individuals according to environmental cues, for example, nutrition. Here, we describe some of the physiological principles participating in the determination of final individual size.

  5. Early stage of nanocrystal growth

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    Berkeley Lab researchers at the Molecular Foundry have elucidated important mechanisms behind oriented attachment, the phenomenon that drives biomineralization and the growth of nanocrystals. This electron microscopy movie shows the early stage of nanocrystal growth. Nanoparticles make transient contact at many points and orientations until their lattices are perfectly matched. The particles then make a sudden jump-to-contact to form attached aggregates. (Movie courtesy of Jim DeYoreo)

  6. Growth hormone therapy in progeria.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi-Nejad, Ab; Demmer, Laurie

    2007-05-01

    Catabolic processes seen in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria resemble those of normal aging and, in the affected children, usually result in death at an early age. In addition to its growth promoting effects, growth hormone (GH) has potent anabolic properties. Administration of GH ameliorates some of the catabolic effects of normal aging. We report the results of GH treatment in a young child with progeria.

  7. Perturbation growth in accreting filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. D.; Whitworth, A. P.; Hubber, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    We use smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the growth of perturbations in infinitely long filaments as they form and grow by accretion. The growth of these perturbations leads to filament fragmentation and the formation of cores. Most previous work on this subject has been confined to the growth and fragmentation of equilibrium filaments and has found that there exists a preferential fragmentation length-scale which is roughly four times the filament's diameter. Our results show a more complicated dispersion relation with a series of peaks linking perturbation wavelength and growth rate. These are due to gravo-acoustic oscillations along the longitudinal axis during the sub-critical phase of growth. The positions of the peaks in growth rate have a strong dependence on both the mass accretion rate onto the filament and the temperature of the gas. When seeded with a multiwavelength density power spectrum, there exists a clear preferred core separation equal to the largest peak in the dispersion relation. Our results allow one to estimate a minimum age for a filament which is breaking up into regularly spaced fragments, as well as an average accretion rate. We apply the model to observations of filaments in Taurus by Tafalla & Hacar and find accretion rates consistent with those estimated by Palmeirim et al.

  8. Understanding follicle growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Oktem, Ozgur; Urman, Bulent

    2010-12-01

    Ovarian reserve is determined by the number of primordial follicles in the ovary. Quiescent primordial follicles are activated for growth and pass through stages of development before they reach the antral stage. Then a cohort of antral follicles is recruited for further growth, dominance and ovulation under the cyclic stimulation of gonadotrophins. What triggers the initiation of growth in primordial follicles has remained a mystery for decades. However, recent studies on mutant mouse models have shown that primordial follicles are maintained in a dormant state by the actions of various inhibitory molecules to preserve the follicle pool, such as the transcription factor Foxo3a, PTEN (phosphotase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) and Tsc-1 (tumour suppressor tuberous schlerosis complex). Mice with deletions of these oocyte-specific genes exhibit premature activation of dormant primordial follicles, and all primordial follicles become depleted in early adulthood, causing premature ovarian failure. Other oocyte and somatic cell-derived growth factors are also involved in the early, gonadotrophin-independent phase of follicle growth via autocrine and paracrine interactions. Interestingly, some of these factors also play critical roles at later stages of follicle growth, such as the process of selecting the dominant follicle, by modifying the response of the follicles to gonadotrophins and inhibiting premature luteinization. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the molecular aspects of folliculogenesis is of paramount importance in the context of translational medicine and future clinical applications in human reproduction.

  9. Frontiers in growth and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, Andreas; Kuhl, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Unlike common engineering materials, living matter can autonomously respond to environmental changes. Living structures can grow stronger, weaker, larger, or smaller within months, weeks, or days as a result of a continuous microstructural turnover and renewal. Hard tissues can adapt by increasing their density and grow strong. Soft tissues can adapt by increasing their volume and grow large. For more than three decades, the mechanics community has actively contributed to understand the phenomena of growth and remodeling from a mechanistic point of view. However, to date, there is no single, unified characterization of growth, which is equally accepted by all scientists in the field. Here we shed light on the continuum modeling of growth and remodeling of living matter, and give a comprehensive overview of historical developments and trends. We provide a state-of-the-art review of current research highlights, and discuss challenges and potential future directions. Using the example of volumetric growth, we illustrate how we can establish and utilize growth theories to characterize the functional adaptation of soft living matter. We anticipate this review to be the starting point for critical discussions and future research in growth and remodeling, with a potential impact on life science and medicine. PMID:22919118

  10. Prenatal Depression Restricts Fetal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Diego, Miguel A.; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Schanberg, Saul; Kuhn, Cynthia; Gonzalez-Quintero, Victor Hugo

    2009-01-01

    Objective To identify whether prenatal depression is a risk factor for fetal growth restriction. Methods Midgestation (18-20 weeks GA) estimated fetal weight and urine cortisol and birth weight and gestational age at birth data were collected on a sample of 40 depressed and 40 non-depressed women. Estimated fetal weight and birthweight data were then used to compute fetal growth rates. Results Depressed women had a 13% greater incidence of premature delivery (Odds Ratio (OR) = 2.61) and 15% greater incidence of low birthweight (OR = 4.75) than non-depressed women. Depressed women also had elevated prenatal cortisol levels (p = .006) and fetuses who were smaller (p = .001) and who showed slower fetal growth rates (p = .011) and lower birthweights (p = .008). Mediation analyses further revealed that prenatal maternal cortisol levels were a potential mediator for the relationship between maternal symptoms of depression and both gestational age at birth and the rate of fetal growth. After controlling for maternal demographic variables, prenatal maternal cortisol levels were associated with 30% of the variance in gestational age at birth and 14% of the variance in the rate of fetal growth. Conclusion Prenatal depression was associated with adverse perinatal outcomes, including premature delivery and slower fetal growth rates. Prenatal maternal cortisol levels appear to play a role in mediating these outcomes. PMID:18723301

  11. Mathematical descriptions of indeterminate growth.

    PubMed

    Powell, Christopher D; López, Secundino; Dumas, André; Bureau, Dominique P; Hook, Sarah E; France, James

    2017-07-21

    Two models were derived in an effort to better describe the indeterminate nature of growth exhibited by ectotherms. The models are characterized by their non-sigmoidal shape and are based on three assumptions: quantity of growth machinery works at a rate dependent on feed intake; the relationship between growth rate and intake level follows the law of diminishing returns; and growth is irreversible. The Michaelis-Menten and Mitscherlich equations are used in their formulation. To investigate their potential, the models were fitted to six datasets, representing repeated measures of live body weights of two species: rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). The models were evaluated on the basis of fitting behaviour, examination of residuals, along with measures of goodness-of-fit. Agreement between predicted and observed body weights, and flexibility to mimic growth patterns given varying species and culture conditions, affirm the ability of both models to describe indeterminate growth in fish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Placental Adaptations in Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Song; Regnault, Timothy R.H.; Barker, Paige L.; Botting, Kimberley J.; McMillen, Isabella C.; McMillan, Christine M.; Roberts, Claire T.; Morrison, Janna L.

    2015-01-01

    The placenta is the primary interface between the fetus and mother and plays an important role in maintaining fetal development and growth by facilitating the transfer of substrates and participating in modulating the maternal immune response to prevent immunological rejection of the conceptus. The major substrates required for fetal growth include oxygen, glucose, amino acids and fatty acids, and their transport processes depend on morphological characteristics of the placenta, such as placental size, morphology, blood flow and vascularity. Other factors including insulin-like growth factors, apoptosis, autophagy and glucocorticoid exposure also affect placental growth and substrate transport capacity. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is often a consequence of insufficiency, and is associated with a high incidence of perinatal morbidity and mortality, as well as increased risk of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases in later life. Several different experimental methods have been used to induce placental insufficiency and IUGR in animal models and a range of factors that regulate placental growth and substrate transport capacity have been demonstrated. While no model system completely recapitulates human IUGR, these animal models allow us to carefully dissect cellular and molecular mechanisms to improve our understanding and facilitate development of therapeutic interventions. PMID:25580812

  13. Phenomenology of stochastic exponential growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirjol, Dan; Jafarpour, Farshid; Iyer-Biswas, Srividya

    2017-06-01

    Stochastic exponential growth is observed in a variety of contexts, including molecular autocatalysis, nuclear fission, population growth, inflation of the universe, viral social media posts, and financial markets. Yet literature on modeling the phenomenology of these stochastic dynamics has predominantly focused on one model, geometric Brownian motion (GBM), which can be described as the solution of a Langevin equation with linear drift and linear multiplicative noise. Using recent experimental results on stochastic exponential growth of individual bacterial cell sizes, we motivate the need for a more general class of phenomenological models of stochastic exponential growth, which are consistent with the observation that the mean-rescaled distributions are approximately stationary at long times. We show that this behavior is not consistent with GBM, instead it is consistent with power-law multiplicative noise with positive fractional powers. Therefore, we consider this general class of phenomenological models for stochastic exponential growth, provide analytical solutions, and identify the important dimensionless combination of model parameters, which determines the shape of the mean-rescaled distribution. We also provide a prescription for robustly inferring model parameters from experimentally observed stochastic growth trajectories.

  14. Human Population: Fundamentals of Growth and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stauffer, Cheryl Lynn, Ed.

    This booklet focuses on eight elements of population dynamics: "Population Growth and Distribution"; "Natural Increase and Future Growth"; "Effect of Migration on Population Growth"; "Three Patterns of Population Change"; "Patterns of World Urbanization"; "The Status of Women";…

  15. What Is a Growth Disorder? (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... these common conditions, which are not growth disorders: Constitutional growth delay: This condition describes children who are ... similar to that of their parents. With both constitutional growth delay and familial short stature, kids and ...

  16. Old growth in northwestern California national forests.

    Treesearch

    Debby Beardsley; Ralph. Warbington

    1996-01-01

    This report estimates old-growth forest area and summarizes stand characteristics of old growth in northwestern California National Forests by forest type. Old-growth definitions for each forest type are used.

  17. Parental stress and growth outcome in growth-deficient children.

    PubMed

    Bithoney, W G; Van Sciver, M M; Foster, S; Corso, S; Tentindo, C

    1995-10-01

    In order to examine the relationship between parental stress, child psychosocial factors, anemia, lead poisoning, and growth deficiency (GD), 48 children attending a GD referral program were recruited consecutively and matched with 50 comparison subjects from a primary care program. Parents completed the Parenting Stress Index (PSI) with subscales and provided demographic data. Children received developmental screening, hemoglobin levels, Pb levels, and growth evaluation. They also received medical evaluation for GD. T tests were used to evaluate group differences. Spearman Rho correlation analyses were computed between group coefficients and PSI scales, Pb, and hemoglobin levels. No differences were found on the PSI with regard to overall parental stress. GD parents perceived themselves as less competent (P < .001), and their children as less adaptable (P < .006). They also reported more social isolation (P < .05). The GD group had more anemia and Pb poisoning (P < .002 and P < .001, respectively); however, these variables were not related to differences in child adaptability or growth outcome. A high sense of parental competence and high child adaptability were associated with improved growth outcomes (P < .001 and P < .02, respectively). We conclude that parents of GD children seen in an outpatient referral setting show no difference in overall perceived stress levels versus comparison subjects. Increased parental competence and child adaptability are strongly associated with improved growth outcome. Decreased child adaptability may contribute to GD pathology. These findings challenge the traditional view of GD etiology.

  18. Growth efficiencies of freshwater bacterioplankton.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, K; Nielsen, H; Riemann, B; Fuhrman, J A

    1992-09-01

    The growth efficiency of freshwater bacteria was examined in continuous cultures. One series of experiments was carried out using generation times from 50 to 200 hours and aged, normal, and enriched media, all of natural origin. Another series of experiments examined the bacterial growth efficiency during the growth season in eutrophic Frederiksborg Slotssø, in relation to changes in the planktonic communities and to factors controlling the bacterial incorporation of (3)H-thymidine. Attachment of bacteria to the inner surfaces of the experimental flasks was examined using various types of bottles, adding glass tubes to the bottles, and measuring (3)H-thymidine incorporation and direct cell counts of attached and free-living bacteria. Attachment of bacteria varied, and in one example up to 36% of the thymidine incorporation was by attached bacteria after 4 days. It was calculated that 36% of attached bacteria caused an underestimation of the growth efficiency of 11%. The mean growth efficiency tended to decrease with generation time using enriched medium (47 to 19%) and aged medium (35 to 12%), and tended to decrease with medium quality (enriched > normal > aged media) from 37% to 27%. The only significant difference in growth efficiency occurred in relation to generation time, in samples with enriched medium (unpaired t-test, P < 0.05). The overall mean value for all generation times and media was 30% (SEM = 3%, n = 24). From April to October, the growth efficiency was determined 5 times in samples from Frederiksborg Slotssø. The overall mean value was 31% (SEM = 3%, n = 30), and there was no significant change in the growth efficiency during the period measured. In June, three bioassay experiments revealed that carbon limitation controlled bacterial incorporation of (3)H-thymidine, whereas additions of phosphate and nitrate did not change the incorporation rates. The narrow range of growth efficiencies obtained in this study (mean 31%, SEM = 2%, n = 54) suggests

  19. Acquired Upper Extremity Growth Arrest.

    PubMed

    Gauger, Erich M; Casnovsky, Lauren L; Gauger, Erica J; Bohn, Deborah C; Van Heest, Ann E

    2017-01-01

    This study reviewed the clinical history and management of acquired growth arrest in the upper extremity in pediatric patients. The records of all patients presenting from 1996 to 2012 with radiographically proven acquired growth arrest were reviewed. Records were examined to determine the etiology and site of growth arrest, management, and complications. Patients with tumors or hereditary etiology were excluded. A total of 44 patients (24 boys and 20 girls) with 51 physeal arrests who presented at a mean age of 10.6 years (range, 0.8-18.2 years) were included in the study. The distal radius was the most common site (n=24), followed by the distal humerus (n=8), metacarpal (n=6), distal ulna (n=5), proximal humerus (n=4), radial head (n=3), and olecranon (n=1). Growth arrest was secondary to trauma (n=22), infection (n=11), idiopathy (n=6), inflammation (n=2), compartment syndrome (n=2), and avascular necrosis (n=1). Twenty-six patients (59%) underwent surgical intervention to address deformity caused by the physeal arrest. Operative procedures included ipsilateral unaffected bone epiphysiodesis (n=21), shortening osteotomy (n=10), lengthening osteotomy (n=8), excision of physeal bar or bone fragment (n=2), angular correction osteotomy (n=1), and creation of single bone forearm (n=1). Four complications occurred; 3 of these required additional procedures. Acquired upper extremity growth arrest usually is caused by trauma or infection, and the most frequent site is the distal radius. Growth disturbances due to premature arrest can be treated effectively with epiphysiodesis or osteotomy. In this series, the specific site of anatomic growth arrest was the primary factor in determining treatment. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(1):e95-e103.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Universality in Stochastic Exponential Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Crooks, Gavin E.; Scherer, Norbert F.; Dinner, Aaron R.

    2014-07-01

    Recent imaging data for single bacterial cells reveal that their mean sizes grow exponentially in time and that their size distributions collapse to a single curve when rescaled by their means. An analogous result holds for the division-time distributions. A model is needed to delineate the minimal requirements for these scaling behaviors. We formulate a microscopic theory of stochastic exponential growth as a Master Equation that accounts for these observations, in contrast to existing quantitative models of stochastic exponential growth (e.g., the Black-Scholes equation or geometric Brownian motion). Our model, the stochastic Hinshelwood cycle (SHC), is an autocatalytic reaction cycle in which each molecular species catalyzes the production of the next. By finding exact analytical solutions to the SHC and the corresponding first passage time problem, we uncover universal signatures of fluctuations in exponential growth and division. The model makes minimal assumptions, and we describe how more complex reaction networks can reduce to such a cycle. We thus expect similar scalings to be discovered in stochastic processes resulting in exponential growth that appear in diverse contexts such as cosmology, finance, technology, and population growth.

  1. Phytochrome, plant growth and flowering

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.W.; Bagnall, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    Attempts to use artificially lit cabinets to grow plants identical to those growing in sunlight have provided compelling evidence of the importance of light quality for plant growth. Changing the balance of red (R) to far-red (FR) radiation, but with a fixed photosynthetic input can shift the phytochrome photoequilibrium in a plant and generate large differences in plant growth. With FR enrichment the plants elongate, and may produce more leaf area and dry matter. Similar morphogenic responses are also obtained when light quality is altered only briefly (15-30 min) at the end-of-the-day. Conversely, for plants grown in natural conditions the response of plant form to selective spectral filtering has again shown that red and far-red wavebands are important as found by Kasperbauer and coworkers. Also, where photosynthetic photon flux densities (PPFD) of sunlight have been held constant, the removal of far-red alone alters plant growth. As shown for chrysanthemum, with FR depletion plants grown in sunlight are small, more branched and darker green. We examine the implications for plant growth and flowering when the far-red composition of incident radiation in plant growth chambers is manipulated.

  2. Strigolactones Effects on Root Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltai, Hinanit

    2012-07-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) were defined as a new group of plant hormones that suppress lateral shoot branching. Our previous studies suggested SLs to be regulators of root development. SLs were shown to alter root architecture by regulating lateral root formation and to affect root hair elongation in Arabidopsis. Another important effect of SLs on root growth was shown to be associated with root directional growth. Supplementation of SLs to roots led to alterations in root directional growth, whereas associated mutants showed asymmetrical root growth, which was influenced by environmental factors. The regulation by SLs of root development was shown to be conducted via a cross talk of SLs with other plant hormones, including auxin. SLs were shown to regulate auxin transport, and to interfere with the activity of auxin-efflux carriers. Therefore, it might be that SLs are regulators of root directional growth as a result of their ability to regulated auxin transport. However, other evidences suggest a localized effect of SLs on cell division, which may not necessarily be associated with auxin efflux. These and other, recent hypothesis as to the SLs mode of action and the associated root perception and response to environmental factors will be discussed.

  3. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Koss, M. B.; Malarik, D. C.

    1998-01-01

    The growth of dendrites is one of the commonly observed forms of solidification encountered when metals and alloys freeze under low thermal gradients, as occurs in most casting and welding processes. In engineering alloys, the details of the dendritic morphology directly relates to important material responses and properties. Of more generic interest, dendritic growth is also an archetypical problem in morphogenesis, where a complex pattern evolves from simple starting conditions. Thus, the physical understanding and mathematical description of how dendritic patterns emerge during the growth process are of interest to both scientists and engineers. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) is a basic science experiment designed to measure, for a fundamental test of theory, the kinetics and morphology of dendritic growth without complications induced by gravity-driven convection. The IDGE, a collaboration between Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, in Troy NY, and NASA's Lewis Research Center (LeRC) was developed over a ten year period from a ground-based research program into a space flight experiment. Important to the success of this flight experiment was provision of in situ near-real-time teleoperations during the spaceflight experiment.

  4. Universality in stochastic exponential growth.

    PubMed

    Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Crooks, Gavin E; Scherer, Norbert F; Dinner, Aaron R

    2014-07-11

    Recent imaging data for single bacterial cells reveal that their mean sizes grow exponentially in time and that their size distributions collapse to a single curve when rescaled by their means. An analogous result holds for the division-time distributions. A model is needed to delineate the minimal requirements for these scaling behaviors. We formulate a microscopic theory of stochastic exponential growth as a Master Equation that accounts for these observations, in contrast to existing quantitative models of stochastic exponential growth (e.g., the Black-Scholes equation or geometric Brownian motion). Our model, the stochastic Hinshelwood cycle (SHC), is an autocatalytic reaction cycle in which each molecular species catalyzes the production of the next. By finding exact analytical solutions to the SHC and the corresponding first passage time problem, we uncover universal signatures of fluctuations in exponential growth and division. The model makes minimal assumptions, and we describe how more complex reaction networks can reduce to such a cycle. We thus expect similar scalings to be discovered in stochastic processes resulting in exponential growth that appear in diverse contexts such as cosmology, finance, technology, and population growth.

  5. Dynamically controlled crystal growth system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, Terry L. (Inventor); Kim, Larry J. (Inventor); Harrington, Michael (Inventor); DeLucas, Lawrence J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Crystal growth can be initiated and controlled by dynamically controlled vapor diffusion or temperature change. In one aspect, the present invention uses a precisely controlled vapor diffusion approach to monitor and control protein crystal growth. The system utilizes a humidity sensor and various interfaces under computer control to effect virtually any evaporation rate from a number of different growth solutions simultaneously by means of an evaporative gas flow. A static laser light scattering sensor can be used to detect aggregation events and trigger a change in the evaporation rate for a growth solution. A control/follower configuration can be used to actively monitor one chamber and accurately control replicate chambers relative to the control chamber. In a second aspect, the invention exploits the varying solubility of proteins versus temperature to control the growth of protein crystals. This system contains miniature thermoelectric devices under microcomputer control that change temperature as needed to grow crystals of a given protein. Complex temperature ramps are possible using this approach. A static laser light scattering probe also can be used in this system as a non-invasive probe for detection of aggregation events. The automated dynamic control system provides systematic and predictable responses with regard to crystal size. These systems can be used for microgravity crystallization projects, for example in a space shuttle, and for crystallization work under terrestial conditions. The present invention is particularly useful for macromolecular crystallization, e.g. for proteins, polypeptides, nucleic acids, viruses and virus particles.

  6. Phytochrome, plant growth and flowering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. W.; Bagnall, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    Attempts to use artificially lit cabinets to grow plants identical to those growing in sunlight have provided compelling evidence of the importance of light quality for plant growth. Changing the balance of red (R) to far-red (FR) radiation, but with a fixed photosynthetic input can shift the phytochrome photoequilibrium in a plant and generate large differences in plant growth. With FR enrichment the plants elongate, and may produce more leaf area and dry matter. Similar morphogenic responses are also obtained when light quality is altered only briefly (15-30 min) at the end-of-the-day. Conversely, for plants grown in natural conditions the response of plant form to selective spectral filtering has again shown that red and far-red wavebands are important as found by Kasperbauer and coworkers. Also, where photosynthetic photon flux densities (PPFD) of sunlight have been held constant, the removal of far-red alone alters plant growth. With FR depletion plants grown in sunlight are small, more branched and darker green. Here we examine the implications for plant growth and flowering when the far-red composition of incident radiation in plant growth chambers is manipulated.

  7. Growth declines in red spruce

    SciTech Connect

    Zedaker, S.M.; Hyink, D.M.; Smith, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Over the past two decades second-growth red spruce stands in the Northeast have demonstrated declines in radial increment. Some observers are implicating air pollution as a primary cause of the declines, based on recently acquired increment cores from dominant trees. Various forms of air pollution (O/sub 3/, NO/sub x/, SO/sub 2/, and trace metals) are known to reduce growth and development of tree species, but few studies have provided concrete evidence of regional pollution-caused declines in forest ecosystems. Recently published evidence of a synchronous, consistent, and unprecedented regional decline in red spruce should be weighed against the realization that radial increment in red spruce declines naturally as stands age. Separating anthropogenic stress-caused growth patterns from natural stand dynamics requires an in-depth knowledge of forest growth and yield, tree silvics, and forest ecosystem processes. Detailed analyses of growth by stand characteristics - site index, density, elevation, stand history - will be necessary to implicate air pollution as a primary cause of red spruce decline.

  8. Breast Cancer and Posttraumatic Growth

    PubMed Central

    İnan, Figen Şengün; Üstün, Besti

    2014-01-01

    The current methods for early diagnosis and increased treatment options have improved survival rates in breast cancer. Breast cancer diagnosis effects individuals in physical, psychological and social dimensions either positively or negatively. In the literature, usually the negative effects encountered in the period after the diagnosis of breast cancer are mostly described, with limited data on the positive effects. Nevertheless, the identification of positive changes and defining its determinants is important in supporting and strengthening posttraumatic growth in this group. The objective of this review is to explain posttraumatic growth and its determinants in breast cancer during the post-treatment period in accordance with the relevant literature. In our evaluation, it was noticed that breast cancer survivors experience posttraumatic growth in the post-treatment period, but the literature is limited in explaining the nature of posttraumatic growth and its determinants. Both qualitative and quantitative research that will provide in-depth information on the subject, explaining culture-specific posttraumatic growth and related factors, are required. PMID:28331647

  9. Modeling microbial growth and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Esser, Daniel S; Leveau, Johan H J; Meyer, Katrin M

    2015-11-01

    Modeling has become an important tool for widening our understanding of microbial growth in the context of applied microbiology and related to such processes as safe food production, wastewater treatment, bioremediation, or microbe-mediated mining. Various modeling techniques, such as primary, secondary and tertiary mathematical models, phenomenological models, mechanistic or kinetic models, reactive transport models, Bayesian network models, artificial neural networks, as well as agent-, individual-, and particle-based models have been applied to model microbial growth and activity in many applied fields. In this mini-review, we summarize the basic concepts of these models using examples and applications from food safety and wastewater treatment systems. We further review recent developments in other applied fields focusing on models that explicitly include spatial relationships. Using these examples, we point out the conceptual similarities across fields of application and encourage the combined use of different modeling techniques in hybrid models as well as their cross-disciplinary exchange. For instance, pattern-oriented modeling has its origin in ecology but may be employed to parameterize microbial growth models when experimental data are scarce. Models could also be used as virtual laboratories to optimize experimental design analogous to the virtual ecologist approach. Future microbial growth models will likely become more complex to benefit from the rich toolbox that is now available to microbial growth modelers.

  10. Growth of Solid Solution Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.; Holland, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    The major objective of this program is to determine the conditions under which single crystals of solid solutions can be grown from the melt in a Bridgman configuration with a high degree of chemical homogeneity. The central aim is to assess the role of gravity in the growth process and to explore the possible advantages for growth in the absence of gravity. The alloy system being investigated is the solid solution semiconductor with x-values appropriate for infrared detector applications in Hg sub (1-x) Cd sub x Te the 8 to 14 micro m wavelength region. Both melt and Te-solvent growth are being considered. The study consists of an extensive ground-based experimental and theoretical research effort followed by flight experimentation where appropriate. Experimental facilities have been established for the purification, casting, and crystal growth of the alloy system. Facilities have been also established for the metallurgical, compositional, electric and optical characterization of the alloys. Crystals are being grown by the Bridgman-Stockbarger method and are analyzed by various experimental techniques to evaluate the effects of growth conditions on the longitudinal and radial compositional variations and defect densities in the crystals.

  11. Interstitial fibrosis and growth factors.

    PubMed Central

    Lasky, J A; Brody, A R

    2000-01-01

    Interstitial pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is scarring of the lung caused by a variety of inhaled agents including mineral particles, organic dusts, and oxidant gases. The disease afflicts millions of individuals worldwide, and there are no effective therapeutic approaches. A major reason for this lack of useful treatments is that few of the molecular mechanisms of disease have been defined sufficiently to design appropriate targets for therapy. Our laboratory has focused on the molecular mechanisms through which three selected peptide growth factors could play a role in the development of IPF. Hundreds of growth factors and cytokines could be involved in the complex disease process. We are studying platelet-derived growth factor because it is the most potent mesenchymal cell mitogen yet described, transforming growth factor beta because it is a powerful inducer of extracellular matrix (scar tissue) components by mesenchymal cells, and tumor necrosis factor alpha because it is a pleiotropic cytokine that we and others have shown is essential for the development of IPF in animal models. This review describes some of the evidence from studies in humans, in animal models, and in vitro, that supports the growth factor hypothesis. The use of modern molecular and transgenic technologies could elucidate those targets that will allow effective therapeutic approaches. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10931794

  12. Cell Biology of Hyphal Growth.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Gero; Peñalva, Miguel A; Riquelme, Meritxell; Wösten, Han A; Harris, Steven D

    2017-04-01

    Filamentous fungi are a large and ancient clade of microorganisms that occupy a broad range of ecological niches. The success of filamentous fungi is largely due to their elongate hypha, a chain of cells, separated from each other by septa. Hyphae grow by polarized exocytosis at the apex, which allows the fungus to overcome long distances and invade many substrates, including soils and host tissues. Hyphal tip growth is initiated by establishment of a growth site and the subsequent maintenance of the growth axis, with transport of growth supplies, including membranes and proteins, delivered by motors along the cytoskeleton to the hyphal apex. Among the enzymes delivered are cell wall synthases that are exocytosed for local synthesis of the extracellular cell wall. Exocytosis is opposed by endocytic uptake of soluble and membrane-bound material into the cell. The first intracellular compartment in the endocytic pathway is the early endosomes, which emerge to perform essential additional functions as spatial organizers of the hyphal cell. Individual compartments within septated hyphae can communicate with each other via septal pores, which allow passage of cytoplasm or organelles to help differentiation within the mycelium. This article introduces the reader to more detailed aspects of hyphal growth in fungi.

  13. Liver-spleen axis, insulin-like growth factor-(IGF)-I axis and fat mass in overweight/obese females

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fat mass (FM) in overweight/obese subjects has a primary role in determining low-grade chronic inflammation and, in turn, insulin resistance (IR) and ectopic lipid storage within the liver. Obesity, aging, and FM influence the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I axis, and chronic inflammation might reduce IGF-I signaling. Altered IGF-I axis is frequently observed in patients with Hepatic steatosis (HS). We tested the hypothesis that FM, or spleen volume and C-reactive protein (CRP)--all indexes of chronic inflammation--could affect the IGF-I axis status in overweight/obese, independently of HS. Methods The study population included 48 overweight/obese women (age 41 ± 13 years; BMI: 35.8 ± 5.8 kg/m2; range: 25.3-53.7), who underwent assessment of fasting plasma glucose and insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA), cholesterol and triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, transaminases, high-sensitive CRP, uric acid, IGF-I, IGF binding protein (BP)-1, IGFBP-3, and IGF-I/IGFBP-3 ratio. Standard deviation score of IGF-I according to age (zSDS) were also calculated. FM was determined by bioelectrical impedance analysis. HS severity grading (score 0-4 according liver hyperechogenicity) and spleen longitudinal diameter (SLD) were evaluated by ultrasound. Results Metabolic syndrome (MS) and HS were present in 33% and 85% of subjects, respectively. MS prevalence was 43% in subjects with increased SLD. IGF-I values, but not IGF-I zSDS, and IGF-I/IGFBP-3 ratio were significantly lower, while FM%, FPI, HOMA, ALT, CRP, were significantly higher in patients with severe HS than in those with mild HS. IGF-I zSDS (r = -0.42, r = -0.54, respectively; p < 0.05), and IGFBP-1 (r = -0.38, r = -0.42, respectively; p < 0.05) correlated negatively with HS severity and FM%. IGF-I/IGFBP-3 ratio correlated negatively with CRP, HS severity, and SLD (r = -0.30, r = -0.33, r = -0.43, respectively; p < 0.05). At multivariate analysis the best

  14. Protein crystals and their growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2003-01-01

    Recent results on the associations between protein molecules in crystal lattices, crystal-solution surface energy, elastic properties, strength, and spontaneous crystal cracking are reviewed and discussed. In addition, some basic approaches to understanding the solubility of proteins are followed by an overview of crystal nucleation and growth. It is argued that variability of mixing in batch crystallization may be a source of the variation in the number of crystals ultimately appearing in the sample. The frequency at which new molecules join a crystal lattice is measured by the kinetic coefficient and is related to the observed crystal growth rate. Numerical criteria used to discriminate diffusion- and kinetic-limited growth are discussed on this basis. Finally, the creation of defects is discussed with an emphasis on the role of impurities and convection on macromolecular crystal perfection.

  15. Dislocation dynamics and bacterial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, Ariel; Nelson, David

    2012-02-01

    Recent experiments have revealed remarkable phenomena in the growth mechanisms of rod-shaped bacteria: proteins associated with the cell wall growth move at constant velocity in circles oriented approximately along the cell circumference (Garner et al., Science 2011, Dom'inguez-Escobar et al., Science 2011, Deng et al., PNAS 2011). We view these dislocations in the partially ordered peptidoglycan structure, and study theoretically the dynamics of these interacting dislocations on the surface of a cylinder. The physics of the nucleation of these dislocations and the resulting dynamics within the model show surprising effects arising from the cylindrical geometry, which are predicted to have important implications on the growth mechanism. We also discuss how long range elastic interactions affect the dynamics of the fraction of active dislocations in the environment.

  16. Protein Crystals and their Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent results on binding between protein molecules in crystal lattice, crystal-solution surface energy, elastic properties and strength and spontaneous crystal cracking are reviewed and discussed in the first half of this paper (Sea 2-4). In the second par&, some basic approaches to solubility of proteins are followed by overview on crystal nucleation and growth (Sec 5). It is argued that variability of mixing in batch crystallization may be a source for scattering of crystal number ultimately appearing in the batch. Frequency at which new molecules join crystal lattice is measured by kinetic coefficient and related to the observable crystal growth rate. Numerical criteria to discriminate diffusion and kinetic limited growth are discussed on this basis in Sec 7. In Sec 8, creation of defects is discussed with the emphasis on the role of impurities and convection on macromolecular crystal I;erfection.

  17. Macroscopic dynamics of cancer growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchón, S. A.; Condat, C. A.

    2007-04-01

    Macroscopic modeling is used to describe various aspects of cancer growth. A recently proposed “dysnamical exponent” hypothesis is critically examined in the context of the angiogenic development. It is also shown that the emergence of necroses facilitates the growth of avascular tumors; the model yields an excellent fit to available experimental data, allowing for the determination of growth parameters. Finally, the global effects of an applied antitumoral immunotherapy are investigated. It is shown that, in the long run, the application of a therapeutical course leads to bigger tumors by weakening the intraspecific competition between surviving viable cancer cells. The strength of this model lies in its simplicity and in the amount of information that can be gleaned using only very general ideas.

  18. Protein crystals and their growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2003-01-01

    Recent results on the associations between protein molecules in crystal lattices, crystal-solution surface energy, elastic properties, strength, and spontaneous crystal cracking are reviewed and discussed. In addition, some basic approaches to understanding the solubility of proteins are followed by an overview of crystal nucleation and growth. It is argued that variability of mixing in batch crystallization may be a source of the variation in the number of crystals ultimately appearing in the sample. The frequency at which new molecules join a crystal lattice is measured by the kinetic coefficient and is related to the observed crystal growth rate. Numerical criteria used to discriminate diffusion- and kinetic-limited growth are discussed on this basis. Finally, the creation of defects is discussed with an emphasis on the role of impurities and convection on macromolecular crystal perfection.

  19. Filamentation as primitive growth mode?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigan, Erwan; Steyaert, Jean-Marc; Douady, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Osmotic pressure influences cellular shape. In a growing cell, chemical reactions and dilution induce changes in osmolarity, which in turn influence the cellular shape. Using a protocell model relying upon random conservative chemical reaction networks with arbitrary stoichiometry, we find that when the membrane is so flexible that its shape adjusts itself quasi-instantaneously to balance the osmotic pressure, the protocell either grows filamentous or fails to grow. This behavior is consistent with a mathematical proof. This suggests that filamentation may be a primitive growth mode resulting from the simple physical property of balanced osmotic pressure. We also find that growth is favored if some chemical species are only present inside the protocell, but not in the outside growth medium. Such an insulation requires specific chemical schemes. Modern evolved cells such as E. coli meet these requirements through active transport mechanisms such as the phosphotransferase system.

  20. Nonhereditary enhancement of progeny growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Amir S.; Fiorotto, Marta L.; Hill, Leigh-Anne; Malone, P. Brandon; Cummings, Kathleen K.; Parghi, Deena; Schwartz, Robert J.; Smith, Roy G.; Draghia-Akli, Ruxandra

    2002-01-01

    The im electroporated injection of a protease-resistant GH-releasing hormone cDNA into rat dams at 16 d gestation resulted in enhanced long-term growth of the F(1) offspring. The offspring were significantly heavier by 2 wk of age, and the difference was sustained to 10 wk of age. Consistent with their augmented growth, the plasma IGF-I concentration of the F(1) progeny was increased significantly. The pituitary gland of the offspring was significantly heavier and contained an increased number of somatotrophs and PRL-secreting cells, which is indicative of modification of cell lineage differentiation. These unique findings demonstrate that enhanced GH-releasing hormone expression in pregnant dams can result in intergenerational growth promotion by altering development of the pituitary gland in the offspring.

  1. Growth morphologies of crystal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiao, Rong-Fu; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Rosenberger, Franz

    1991-01-01

    A previously proposed Monte Carlo model (Xiao et al., 1988, 1990) is extended to three dimensions, and reevaporation after accommodation and growth on dislocation-induced steps are included. It is found again that, for a given set of growth parameters, the critical size beyond which a crystal cannot retain its macroscopically faceted shape scales linearly with the mean free path in the vapor. However, the three-dimensional systems show increased shape stability as compared with the corresponding two-dimensional cases. The experimental observation that the critical size of a growing crystal depends on the prevailing growth mechanism is confirmed, and detailed insight into the processes leading to the loss of face and facet stability is obtained.

  2. Nonhereditary enhancement of progeny growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Amir S.; Fiorotto, Marta L.; Hill, Leigh-Anne; Malone, P. Brandon; Cummings, Kathleen K.; Parghi, Deena; Schwartz, Robert J.; Smith, Roy G.; Draghia-Akli, Ruxandra

    2002-01-01

    The im electroporated injection of a protease-resistant GH-releasing hormone cDNA into rat dams at 16 d gestation resulted in enhanced long-term growth of the F(1) offspring. The offspring were significantly heavier by 2 wk of age, and the difference was sustained to 10 wk of age. Consistent with their augmented growth, the plasma IGF-I concentration of the F(1) progeny was increased significantly. The pituitary gland of the offspring was significantly heavier and contained an increased number of somatotrophs and PRL-secreting cells, which is indicative of modification of cell lineage differentiation. These unique findings demonstrate that enhanced GH-releasing hormone expression in pregnant dams can result in intergenerational growth promotion by altering development of the pituitary gland in the offspring.

  3. Protein Crystals and their Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent results on binding between protein molecules in crystal lattice, crystal-solution surface energy, elastic properties and strength and spontaneous crystal cracking are reviewed and discussed in the first half of this paper (Sea 2-4). In the second par&, some basic approaches to solubility of proteins are followed by overview on crystal nucleation and growth (Sec 5). It is argued that variability of mixing in batch crystallization may be a source for scattering of crystal number ultimately appearing in the batch. Frequency at which new molecules join crystal lattice is measured by kinetic coefficient and related to the observable crystal growth rate. Numerical criteria to discriminate diffusion and kinetic limited growth are discussed on this basis in Sec 7. In Sec 8, creation of defects is discussed with the emphasis on the role of impurities and convection on macromolecular crystal I;erfection.

  4. Delamination growth in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, J. W., Jr.; Carlson, L. A.; Pipes, R. B.; Rothschilds, R.; Trethewey, B.; Smiley, A.

    1985-01-01

    Research related to growth of an imbedded through-width delamination (ITWD) in a compression loaded composite structural element is presented. Composites with widely different interlaminar fracture resistance were examined, viz., graphite/epoxy (CYCOM 982) and graphite/PEEK (APC-2). The initial part of the program consisted of characterizing the material in tension, compression and shear mainly to obtain consistent material properties for analysis, but also as a check of the processing method developed for the thermoplastic APC-2 material. The characterization of the delamination growth in the ITWD specimen, which for the unidirectional case is essentially a mixed Mode 1 and 2 geometry, requires verified mixed-mode growth criteria for the two materials involved. For this purpose the main emphasis during this part of the investigation was on Mode 1 and 2 fracture specimens, namely the Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) and End Notched Flexure (ENF) specimens.

  5. Bacterial Growth on Aminoalkylphosphonic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Harkness, Donald R.

    1966-01-01

    Harkness, Donald R. (University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Fla.). Bacterial growth on aminoalkylphosphonic acids. J. Bacteriol. 92:623–627. 1966.—Of 10 bacterial strains tested, 9 were found to be able to utilize the phosphorus of at least one of eight different aminoalkylphosphonic acids for growth, indicating that the ability to catabolize the carbon–phosphorus (C–P) bond is widespread among bacteria. Several organisms gave comparable growth rates as well as cell yields when an equimolar amount of either Pi or 2-aminoethylphosphonic acid (2-AEP) was added to the medium. No compounds containing C–P bonds were detected in Escherichia coli B grown on 2-AEP32-orthophosphate. No degradation of phosphonates by cell-free extracts or suspensions of dried cells was demonstrated. The direct involvement of alkaline phosphatases in cleaving the C–P bond was excluded. PMID:5922537

  6. High density protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouleau, Robyn (Inventor); Delucas, Lawrence (Inventor); Hedden, Douglas Keith (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A protein crystal growth assembly including a crystal growth cell and further including a cell body having a top side and a bottom side and a first aperture defined therethrough, the cell body having opposing first and second sides and a second aperture defined therethrough. A cell barrel is disposed within the cell body, the cell barrel defining a cavity alignable with the first aperture of the cell body, the cell barrel being rotatable within the second aperture. A reservoir is coupled to the bottom side of the cell body and a cap having a top side is disposed on the top side of the cell body. The protein crystal growth assembly may be employed in methods including vapor diffusion crystallization, liquid to liquid crystallization, batch crystallization, and temperature induction batch mode crystallization.

  7. Emergence of protocellular growth laws.

    PubMed

    Rocheleau, Tristan; Rasmussen, Steen; Nielsen, Peter E; Jacobi, Martin N; Ziock, Hans

    2007-10-29

    Template-directed replication is known to obey a parabolic growth law due to product inhibition (Sievers & Von Kiedrowski 1994 Nature 369, 221; Lee et al. 1996 Nature 382, 525; Varga & Szathmáry 1997 Bull. Math. Biol. 59, 1145). We investigate a template-directed replication with a coupled template catalysed lipid aggregate production as a model of a minimal protocell and show analytically that the autocatalytic template-container feedback ensures balanced exponential replication kinetics; both the genes and the container grow exponentially with the same exponent. The parabolic gene replication does not limit the protocellular growth, and a detailed stoichiometric control of the individual protocell components is not necessary to ensure a balanced gene-container growth as conjectured by various authors (Gánti 2004 Chemoton theory). Our analysis also suggests that the exponential growth of most modern biological systems emerges from the inherent spatial quality of the container replication process as we show analytically how the internal gene and metabolic kinetics determine the cell population's generation time and not the growth law (Burdett & Kirkwood 1983 J. Theor. Biol. 103, 11-20; Novak et al. 1998 Biophys. Chem. 72, 185-200; Tyson et al. 2003 Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 15, 221-231). Previous extensive replication reaction kinetic studies have mainly focused on template replication and have not included a coupling to metabolic container dynamics (Stadler et al. 2000 Bull. Math. Biol. 62, 1061-1086; Stadler & Stadler 2003 Adv. Comp. Syst. 6, 47). The reported results extend these investigations. Finally, the coordinated exponential gene-container growth law stemming from catalysis is an encouraging circumstance for the many experimental groups currently engaged in assembling self-replicating minimal artificial cells (Szostak 2001 et al. Nature 409, 387-390; Pohorille & Deamer 2002 Trends Biotech. 20 123-128; Rasmussen et al. 2004 Science 303, 963-965; Szathma ry

  8. Leptin Enhances Cholangiocarcinoma Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Giammarco; Alpini, Gianfranco; Rychlicki, Chiara; Saccomanno, Stefania; DeMorrow, Sharon; Trozzi, Luciano; Candelaresi, Cinzia; Venter, Julie; Di Sario, Antonio; Marzioni, Marco; Bearzi, Italo; Glaser, Shannon; Alvaro, Domenico; Marucci, Luca; Francis, Heather; Svegliati-Baroni, Gianluca; Benedetti, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a strongly aggressive malignancy with a very poor prognosis. Effective therapeutic strategies are lacking because molecular mechanisms regulating cholangiocarcinoma cell growth are unknown. Furthermore, experimental in vivo animal models useful to study the pathophysiologic mechanisms of malignant cholangiocytes are lacking. Leptin, the hormone regulating caloric homeostasis, which is increased in obese patients, stimulates the growth of several cancers, such as hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to define if leptin stimulates cholangiocarcinoma growth. We determined the expression of leptin receptors in normal and malignant human cholangiocytes. Effects on intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (HuH-28) cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis of the in vitro exposure to leptin, together with the intracellular pathways, were then studied. Moreover, cholangiocarcinoma was experimentally induced in obese fa/fa Zucker rats, a genetically established animal species with faulty leptin receptors, and in their littermates by chronic feeding with thioacetamide, a potent carcinogen. After 24 weeks, the effect of leptin on cholangiocarcinoma development and growth was assessed. Normal and malignant human cholangiocytes express leptin receptors. Leptin increased the proliferation and the metastatic potential of cholangiocarcinoma cells in vitro through a signal transducers and activators of transcription 3–dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Leptin increased the growth and migration, and was antiapoptotic for cholangiocarcinoma cells. Moreover, the loss of leptin function reduced the development and the growth of cholangiocarcinoma. The experimental carcinogenesis model induced by thioacetamide administration is a valid and reproducible method to study cholangiocarcinoma pathobiology. Modulation of the leptin-mediated signal could be considered a valid tool for the prevention and treatment of

  9. The growth of charged platelets.

    PubMed

    Labbez, C; Jönsson, Bo; Woodward, Cliff; Nonat, A; Delhorme, M

    2014-11-21

    Growth models of charged nanoplatelets are investigated with Monte Carlo simulations and simple theory. In a first model, 2-dimensional simulations in the canonical ensemble are used to demonstrate that the growth of a single weakly charged platelet could be limited by its own internal repulsion. The short range attractive interaction in the crystal is modeled with a square well potential while the electrostatic interactions are described with a screened Coulomb potential. The qualitative behavior of this case can also be described by simply balancing the attractive crystal energy with the screened Coulomb repulsion between the crystal sites. This repulsion is a free energy term dominated by counterion entropy and of course reduced by added salt. For a strongly coupled system, that is with high charge density and divalent counterions as in calcium silicate hydrate, the main product of cement hydration, the screened Coulomb approximation becomes inadequate and the growth behavior has to be described with the full primitive model. In this case, the energetic interactions become relatively more important and the entropy of the system plays a minor role. As a consequence, the electrostatic interactions gradually become less of a hindrance for aggregation and in extreme cases electrostatics actually promote the growth. This is manifested as an increased aggregation with, for example, increasing surface charge density. In the presence of divalent calcium ions and at the high negative surface charge density typical for calcium silicate hydrate, electrostatic interactions are not a hindrance for an infinite growth of the particles. By combining experimental and simulated data we can show that the limited sized platelets found in cement paste is due to a very fast nucleation rate compared to the growth rate.

  10. Bangladesh: planning intermediate growth centers.

    PubMed

    1981-12-01

    In Bangladesh the current level of urbanization--about 10% of a total population of 90 million--is still low compared with most of the developing countries of the world. Yet, urban growth has been very rapid. From 1960 to 1980 the urban population more than tripled. Much of this growth can be attributed to the fact that the agricultural sector cannot absorb any further population, and nonagricultural employment is available only in urban areas. Additionally, almost 1/2 of the rural population is practically landless. These factors along with natural calamities such as the floods, cyclones, and shifting river beds which displace thousands of rural people, contribute to rural-urban migration. Since 1971 the population of Dacca has quadrupled, creating problems of unmanageable proportions. A lack of adequate city services leads to serious health and sanitation problems. The characteristics distinguishing developing countries from those countries already industrialized at the time of most rapid urbanization are outlined. The growth trend of urban areas in Bangladesh indicates the emergence of some 20 cities, one with a population of more than 5 million and 5 others with populations of 1-2 million. These cities will compare with large metropolitan cities of developed countries only in their number of residents, not in terms of their physical infrastructure, services, or modern amenities. To cope with the problems of rapid urbanization, Bangladesh is adopting policies, strategies, and programs in 3 broad areas: the reduction of population growth rates in urban and rural areas; the development of an urban settlement system with wider and more equitable distribution of urban growth and containment of larger cities within manageable limits; and the improvement of infrastructures and services in urban areas. In regard to the goal of reducing population growth rates, attempts are being made to provide greater access to family planning information, education, and suitable

  11. Take command of your growth.

    PubMed

    Treacy, Michael; Sims, Jim

    2004-04-01

    Ask senior managers to pare costs by 10%, and they know just what to do. Ask them to boost growth by 10%, and they're stymied, assuming that growth is not really something they can influence. But managers can control their company's growth if they have better information about where their revenues are coming from. Rather than sort sales by geographic market, business unit, or product line, they should break them out in a way that reveals which part of their strategy is responsible for what part of their revenue. This article presents a tool--the sources of revenue statement (SRS)--that does just that. Through straightforward calculations using data taken from a company's balance sheet, along with estimations of customer-churn and industry growth rates, the SRS enables managers to classify their revenue according to five sources of growth: continuing sales to established customers (base retention); sales won from the competition (share gain); sales that fell into their laps because the market was expanding (market position); sales from moves into adjacent markets; and sales from entirely new lines of business. Once sorted in this way, revenue can be viewed as the outgrowth of manageable circumstances. At one company, seemingly healthy 10% total revenue growth masked substantial customer defections counter-balanced only by sales in a fast-expanding market--a market that actually grew faster than the company did. Rather than doing well, the company was ceding customers and market share to competitors. Comparing the sources of revenue across divisions can uncover similarly profound insights, which can suggest smart ways to change strategy or set stretch goals. Hundreds of companies are perched atop enormous potential that they can't see and so don't exploit. The SRS can endow them with sight and, more important, with understanding.

  12. Assessing Fiscal Impact of Rural Growth. Coping With Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Theodore R.; Meyer, Neil L.

    Growth or development affects a rural community in three separate but interrelated areas: private, social, and public sectors. Private impacts are economic shocks to businesses and citizens of the community. Social impacts affect the community structure as well as individuals within the community, i.e., increased property tax costs may create…

  13. Growth and development symposium: Intestinal development and growth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a critical organ system mediating nutrient uptake and use by the animal. Understanding factors that influence GI development, growth, and function is critical to improving management and therapeutic approaches to maximize health and production efficiency of livesto...

  14. Triennial Growth Symposium: Dietary regulation of growth development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The 2010 Triennial Growth Symposium was held immediately before the Joint Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association, Poultry Science Association, Asociación Mexicana de Producción Animal, Canadian Society of Animal Science, Western Section American Society of Animal Science, and Ameri...

  15. Nonlinear structural crack growth monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Welch, Donald E.; Hively, Lee M.; Holdaway, Ray F.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for the detection, through nonlinear manipulation of data, of an indicator of imminent failure due to crack growth in structural elements. The method is a process of determining energy consumption due to crack growth and correlating the energy consumption with physical phenomena indicative of a failure event. The apparatus includes sensors for sensing physical data factors, processors or the like for computing a relationship between the physical data factors and phenomena indicative of the failure event, and apparatus for providing notification of the characteristics and extent of such phenomena.

  16. Dendritic Growth in Undercooled Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetic and morphological behavior of systems solidifying at small undercooling were investigated with emphasis on the role of convective and diffusive transport and the influence of gravity. A data base was established for pure succinonitrile which permits a comprehensive check on diffusional dendrite growth theory and the development of scaling laws to extend the theory to other material systems. A departure from diffusional-controlled growth was observed which becomes more significant at smaller undercoolings. A shuttle experiment is prepared to test the theory at the low undercoolings where convective effects begin to dominate.

  17. Digital electronic bone growth stimulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kronberg, James W.

    1995-01-01

    A device for stimulating bone tissue by applying a low level alternating current signal directly to the patient's skin. A crystal oscillator, a binary divider chain and digital logic gates are used to generate the desired waveforms that reproduce the natural electrical characteristics found in bone tissue needed for stimulating bone growth and treating osteoporosis. The device, powered by a battery, contains a switch allowing selection of the correct waveform for bone growth stimulation or osteoporosis treatment so that, when attached to the skin of the patient using standard skin contact electrodes, the correct signal is communicated to the underlying bone structures.

  18. Angular Limb Deformities: Growth Retardation.

    PubMed

    McCarrel, Taralyn M

    2017-08-01

    Angular limb deformities are common in foals; however, the importance of the deformity and if treatment is required depend on the degree of deformity relative to normal conformation for stage of growth, the breed and discipline expectations, age, and response to conservative therapies. This article addresses the importance of the foal conformation examination to determine which foals need surgical intervention to correct an angular deformity and when. Techniques for surgical growth retardation include the transphyseal staple, screw and wire transphyseal bridge, and transphyseal screw. Appropriate timing for intervention for each location and complications associated with each procedure are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Population growth, inequality and poverty.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, G

    1983-01-01

    In this discussion of population growth, inequality, and poverty, the type of relationships that can be observed in intercountry comparisons are explored, reviewing the findings of several other authors, presenting some new estimates using an International Labor Office data bank, considering some basic conceptual problems, and examining some of the theoretical and empirical issues that call for investigation at the national level. Intercountry comparisons, despite their limitations, appear to be the easiest starting point for empirical analysis. The approach adopted by most researchers has been to select 1 or more population indicators and a measure of national income inequality and to explain intercountry differences in 1 or both of these variables in terms of each other and of other indicators of economic and social development. Underlying this methodology is the assumption that there are aspects of demographic and economic change that are common to all countries included in the study, so that differences between countries give some guide to the likely evolution over time within any 1 country. This can be accepted at best with reservations, but given the scarcity of data on the evolution of inequality over time, a working hypothesis of this type appears unavoidable. But, as many of the factors likely to cause population growth and inequality operate over extended periods of time, a dynamic model is indicated. A simpler model, which pays particular attention to lags and variations over time, may generate new insights. A summary of the results of a new international cross-section analysis set up on these lines is presented. Results suggest that contrary to expectations, reducing population growth does not seem to generate longterm benefits for the poor in this model, though some short term gains are found. Increasing equality does appear to generate some decline in population growth, as well as persistent gains in incomes among the poor, but the reductions in

  20. Digital electronic bone growth stimulator

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1995-05-09

    A device is described for stimulating bone tissue by applying a low level alternating current signal directly to the patient`s skin. A crystal oscillator, a binary divider chain and digital logic gates are used to generate the desired waveforms that reproduce the natural electrical characteristics found in bone tissue needed for stimulating bone growth and treating osteoporosis. The device, powered by a battery, contains a switch allowing selection of the correct waveform for bone growth stimulation or osteoporosis treatment so that, when attached to the skin of the patient using standard skin contact electrodes, the correct signal is communicated to the underlying bone structures. 5 figs.

  1. Dendritic Growth Velocities in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Koss, M. B.; Winsa, E. A.

    1994-01-01

    We measured dendritic tip velocities in pure succinonitrile (SCN) in microgravity. using a sequence of telemetered binary images sent to Earth from the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-62). Growth velocities were measured as a function of the supercooling over the range 0.05-1.5 K. Microgravity observations show that buoyancy-induced convection alters the growth kinetics of SCN dendrites at supercooling as high as 1.3 K. Also, the dendrite velocity data measured under microgravity agree well with the Ivantsov paraboloidal diffusion solution when coupled to a scaling constant of sigma(sup *) = 0.0157.

  2. Dendritic Growth Velocities in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Koss, M. B.; Winsa, E. A.

    1994-01-01

    We measured dendritic tip velocities in pure succinonitrile (SCN) in microgravity. using a sequence of telemetered binary images sent to Earth from the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-62). Growth velocities were measured as a function of the supercooling over the range 0.05-1.5 K. Microgravity observations show that buoyancy-induced convection alters the growth kinetics of SCN dendrites at supercooling as high as 1.3 K. Also, the dendrite velocity data measured under microgravity agree well with the Ivantsov paraboloidal diffusion solution when coupled to a scaling constant of sigma(sup *) = 0.0157.

  3. Slow Crack Growth of Germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jon

    2016-01-01

    The fracture toughness and slow crack growth parameters of germanium supplied as single crystal beams and coarse grain disks were measured. Although germanium is anisotropic (A=1.7), it is not as anisotropic as SiC, NiAl, or Cu, as evidence by consistent fracture toughness on the 100, 110, and 111 planes. Germanium does not exhibit significant slow crack growth in distilled water. (n=100). Practical values for engineering design are a fracture toughness of 0.7 MPam and a Weibull modulus of m=6+/-2. For well ground and reasonable handled coupons, fracture strength should be greater than 30 MPa.

  4. Growth Factors and Tension-Induced Skeletal Muscle Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1994-01-01

    The project investigated biochemical mechanisms to enhance skeletal muscle growth, and developed a computer based mechanical cell stimulator system. The biochemicals investigated in this study were insulin/(Insulin like Growth Factor) IGF-1 and Steroids. In order to analyze which growth factors are essential for stretch-induced muscle growth in vitro, we developed a defined, serum-free medium in which the differentiated, cultured avian muscle fibers could be maintained for extended periods of time. The defined medium (muscle maintenance medium, MM medium) maintains the nitrogen balance of the myofibers for 3 to 7 days, based on myofiber diameter measurements and myosin heavy chain content. Insulin and IGF-1, but not IGF-2, induced pronounced myofiber hypertrophy when added to this medium. In 5 to 7 days, muscle fiber diameters increase by 71 % to 98% compared to untreated controls. Mechanical stimulation of the avian muscle fibers in MM medium increased the sensitivity of the cells to insulin and IGF-1, based on a leftward shift of the insulin dose/response curve for protein synthesis rates. (54). We developed a ligand binding assay for IGF-1 binding proteins and found that the avian skeletal muscle cultures produced three major species of 31, 36 and 43 kD molecular weight (54) Stretch of the myofibers was found to have no significant effect on the efflux of IGF-1 binding proteins, but addition of exogenous collagen stimulated IGF-1 binding protein production 1.5 to 5 fold. Steroid hormones have a profound effect on muscle protein turnover rates in vivo, with the stress-related glucocorticoids inducing rapid skeletal muscle atrophy while androgenic steroids induce skeletal muscle growth. Exercise in humans and animals reduces the catabolic effects of glucocorticoids and may enhance the anabolic effects of androgenic steroids on skeletal muscle. In our continuing work on the involvement of exogenrus growth factors in stretch-induced avian skeletal muscle growth, we

  5. Evaluating growth performance of young stands

    Treesearch

    A. L. Roe; R. E. Benson

    1966-01-01

    A simple procedure for evaluating the diameter growth of young stands in relation to potential growth is described. A comparison technique is developed which contrasts relative diameter of crop trees to the relative diameter growth of the last decade to show the condition and trend of growth in the stand. The method is objective, easy to use, and has several...

  6. Nonlinear Growth Curves in Developmental Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimm, Kevin J.; Ram, Nilam; Hamagami, Fumiaki

    2011-01-01

    Developmentalists are often interested in understanding change processes, and growth models are the most common analytic tool for examining such processes. Nonlinear growth curves are especially valuable to developmentalists because the defining characteristics of the growth process such as initial levels, rates of change during growth spurts, and…

  7. Crystal growth in fused solvent systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, D. R.; Noone, M. J.; Spear, K. E.; White, W. B.; Henry, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    Research is reported on the growth of electronic ceramic single crystals from solution for the future growth of crystals in a microgravity environment. Work included growth from fused or glass solvents and aqueous solutions. Topics discussed include: crystal identification and selection; aqueous solution growth of triglycine sulphate (TGS); and characterization of TGS.

  8. Mediators in cell growth and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, R.J.; Maizel, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers divided among seven sections. The section headings are: Cell Cycle and Control of Cell Growth, Growth Factors for Nonlymphoid Cells, Colony-Stimulating Factors, Stem Cells and Hematopoiesis, Lymphoid Growth Factors, Growth Factors in Neoplasia, Interferon, and Differentiation in Normal and Neoplastic Cells.

  9. Nonlinear Growth Curves in Developmental Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimm, Kevin J.; Ram, Nilam; Hamagami, Fumiaki

    2011-01-01

    Developmentalists are often interested in understanding change processes, and growth models are the most common analytic tool for examining such processes. Nonlinear growth curves are especially valuable to developmentalists because the defining characteristics of the growth process such as initial levels, rates of change during growth spurts, and…

  10. Growth study of cri du chat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Collins, M S; Eaton-Evans, J

    2001-10-01

    We compared the growth of children with cri du chat (5p-) syndrome with the 1990 UK growth curves. Most subjects had impaired growth, particularly of head circumference. The more emaciated the child the more pronounced the microcephaly, showing the need for growth and nutrition monitoring.

  11. Stability of growth rate of sodium chlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrović, M. M.; Žekić, A. A.; Baroš, Z. Z.

    2009-01-01

    The constancy of stabilized sodium chlorate crystal growth rate is investigated. After the growth rate stabilization, solution supersaturation was altered and then the initial one was restored, which resulted in fast restoring of the growth rate existing prior to the supersaturation change. It is thereby shown that stabilized growth rate is indeed very stable. The majority of crystals decrease the growth rates during the 3-4 growth hours, even if the process develops at the constant experimental conditions all the time. The new crystals introduced into the cell, continue to grow as the already growing crystals, with higher initial growth rates.

  12. Pathogenesis of growth failure in renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, T M; Yi, Z W; Chan, J C

    1994-01-01

    This article reviews our current understanding of the mechanisms of growth failure in chronic renal disease. The neuro-endocrine control of growth hormone secretion and insulin-like growth factor gene expression subject to use of corticosteroids, uremia, and metabolic acidosis are presented. It has been shown in other non-growth hormone deficient conditions such as Turner's syndrome that the use of exogenous growth hormone increases linear growth but also accelerates closure of the growth plate with no significant difference in the final height of such children. An understanding of growth factors is especially important and timely because of the tendency these days to use growth hormone to overcome the growth impairment of children with chronic renal failure.

  13. Diffusion processes in Al2O3 scales - Void growth, grain growth, and scale growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, J. L.; Gibala, R.

    1983-01-01

    The internal microstructure and growth kinetics of Al2O3 scales on Ni-15Cr-13Al (wt percent) are investigated by TEM and analyzed in relation to models of diffusivity. Polished arc-melted specimens were oxidized in 1-atm air at 1100 C for 0.1, 1.0, and 20 hours and ion-thinned for TEM at 100 kV. The frequency distribution of void size and grain size is determined for different oxidation times and scale depths. The kinetics of microvoid growth and of grain and scale growth are plotted and related via simplified models to lattice and grain-boundary oxygen diffusivity, respectively. Good agreement is found between model predictions and data obtained by Oishi and Kingery (1960) on oxygen diffusion in bulk Al2O3. The further implications and limitations of these findings are discssed.

  14. The Growth of Human Hair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Helen J.

    1984-01-01

    Suggests a simple technique for collecting and observing human hair roots to compare structure, function, and variation. Students extract their own hair samples and view them using a 40-power microscope objective. Differences between active/inactive phases of hair growth are readily observed. (The activity can be adapted for younger students.) (DH)

  15. Island morphologies in epitaxial growth.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessinger, Uwe; Leskovar, M.; Rumaner, Lee; Ohuchi, Fumio; Olmstead, Marjorie A.; Ueno, Keiji; Koma, Atsushi

    1996-03-01

    Growth of epitaxial films commonly occurs through the coalescence of individual islands. The morphology of islands has therefore a key importance for the film qualities desired. A uniform layer-by-layer growth of the film is achieved when islands in the first layer coalesce to form a uniform layer before a second layer nucleates; a non-uniform multi-layer growth results from multiple layers successively nucleating on top of each other before the first layer coalesces. We developed a kinetic model based on an analytic solution of the diffusion equation between nucleation events to calculate the evolving island morphology during growth. The morphologies depend on deposition rate, substrate temperature, and activation energies for surface diffusion on the substrate and deposited material. By applying this theory to atomic force microscopy data of GaSe multi-layer islands, we extract a value for the activation energy for Ga diffusion across steps of GaSe. Supported by NSF Grant No. ECS-9209652, DOE Grant No. DE-FG06-94ER45516, and the Japanese New Energy Development Organization.

  16. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Canavalin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Canavalin. The major storage protein of leguminous plants and a major source of dietary protein for humans and domestic animals. It is studied in efforts to enhance nutritional value of proteins through protein engineerings. It is isolated from Jack Bean because of it's potential as a nutritional substance. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Alex McPherson.

  17. Choosing the Right Growth Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehlert, Mark; Koedel, Cory; Parsons, Eric; Podgursky, Michael

    2014-01-01

    State education agencies and school districts are increasingly using measures based on student test-score growth in their systems for evaluating school and teacher performance. In many cases, these systems inform high-stakes decisions such as which schools to close and which teachers to retain. Performance metrics tied directly to student…

  18. Population Growth: Family Planning Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doberenz, Alexander R., Ed.; Taylor, N. Burwell G., Ed.

    These proceedings of the second annual symposium on population growth bring together speeches and panel discussions on family planning programs. Titles of speeches delivered are: Communicating Family Planning (Mrs. Jean Hutchinson); Effects of New York's Abortion Law Change (Dr. Walter Rogers); The Law and Birth Control, Sterilization and Abortion…

  19. Synaptic growth: dancing with adducin.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Robin J; Littleton, J Troy

    2011-05-24

    Manipulations of the actin-capping protein adducin in Drosophila and mammalian neurons provide new insights into the mechanisms linking structural changes to synaptic plasticity and learning. Adducin regulates synaptic remodeling, providing a molecular switch that controls synaptic growth versus disassembly during plasticity.

  20. Population Growth: Stretching the Limits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouse, Deborah E.

    1990-01-01

    Three population education activities that can be used to illustrate the effects of uncontrolled population growth are presented. Included are "Crowding Can Be Seedy," which uses seeds; "Something for Everyone," which illustrates competition for resources; and "More or Less," which illustrates the relationship between humans and the environment.…

  1. Promoting Intellectual Growth in Adulthood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehle, Thomas J.; Bray, Melissa A.; Chafouleas, Sandra M; McLoughlin, Caven S.

    2002-01-01

    Article discusses problems associated with promoting intellectual growth in adulthood. Defines characteristics of intelligent behavior as incorporating individual attainment of Resources, Intimacy, Competence, and Health (RICH). Presents the RICH theory as a way to define and address the goals of intelligent enhancement. (JDM)

  2. Anabolic steroids and growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Haupt, H A

    1993-01-01

    Athletes are generally well educated regarding substances that they may use as ergogenic aids. This includes anabolic steroids and growth hormone. Fortunately, the abuse of growth hormone is limited by its cost and the fact that anabolic steroids are simply more enticing to the athlete. There are, however, significant potential adverse effects regarding its use that can be best understood by studying known growth hormone excess, as demonstrated in the acromegalic syndrome. Many athletes are unfamiliar with this syndrome and education of the potential consequences of growth hormone excess is important in counseling athletes considering its use. While athletes contemplating the use of anabolic steroids may correctly perceive their risks for significant physiologic effects to be small if they use the steroids for brief periods of time, many of these same athletes are unaware of the potential for habituation to the use of anabolic steroids. The result may be incessant use of steroids by an athlete who previously considered only short-term use. As we see athletes taking anabolic steroids for more prolonged periods, we are likely to see more severe medical consequences. Those who eventually do discontinue the steroids are dismayed to find that the improvements made with the steroids generally disappear and they have little to show for hours or even years of intense training beyond the psychological scars inherent with steroid use. Counseling of these athletes should focus on the potential adverse psychological consequences of anabolic steroid use and the significant risk for habituation.

  3. (Plant growth with limited water)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    When water is in short supply, soybean stem growth is inhibited by a physical limitation followed in a few hours by metabolic changes that reduce the extensibility of the cell walls. The extensibility then becomes the main limitation. With time, there is a modest recovery in extensibility along with an accumulation of a 28kD protein in the walls of the growth-affected cells. A 3lkD protein that was 80% similar in amino acid sequence also was present but did not accumulate in the walls of the stem cells. In the stem, growth was inhibited and the mRNA for the 28kD protein increased in response to water deprivation but the mRNA for the 3 1 kD protein did not. The roots continued to grow and the mRNA for the 28kD protein did not accumulate but the mRNA for the 3lkD protein did. Thus, there was a tissuespecific response of gene expression that correlated with the contrasting growth response to low water potential in the same seedlings. Further work using immunogold labeling, fluorescence labeling, and western blotting gave evidence that the 28kD protein is located in the cell wall as well as several compartments in the cytoplasm. Preliminary experiments indicate that the 28kD protein is a phosphatase.

  4. Evolutionary perspective in child growth.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, Ze'ev

    2011-07-01

    Hereditary, environmental, and stochastic factors determine a child's growth in his unique environment, but their relative contribution to the phenotypic outcome and the extent of stochastic programming that is required to alter human phenotypes is not known because few data are available. This is an attempt to use evolutionary life-history theory in understanding child growth in a broad evolutionary perspective, using the data and theory of evolutionary predictive adaptive growth-related strategies. Transitions from one life-history phase to the next have inherent adaptive plasticity in their timing. Humans evolved to withstand energy crises by decreasing their body size, and evolutionary short-term adaptations to energy crises utilize a plasticity that modifies the timing of transition from infancy into childhood, culminating in short stature in times of energy crisis. Transition to juvenility is part of a strategy of conversion from a period of total dependence on the family and tribe for provision and security to self-supply, and a degree of adaptive plasticity is provided and determines body composition. Transition to adolescence entails plasticity in adapting to energy resources, other environmental cues, and the social needs of the maturing adolescent to determine life-span and the period of fecundity and fertility. Fundamental questions are raised by a life-history approach to the unique growth pattern of each child in his given genetic background and current environment.

  5. Targeting Resources for Local Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casto, James E.

    2001-01-01

    Focusing state and federal dollars on targeted areas, the Kentucky Appalachian Community Development Initiative helps communities in eastern Kentucky fund their own strategies for economic growth. In Hindman, the project focuses on creating the Kentucky School of Crafts, to train master artisans; supporting the Kentucky Appalachian Artisan Center;…

  6. Nutrition, Development, and Population Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Alan

    1973-01-01

    Focuses on the problem of malnutrition in developing countries through a description of its interrelationships with human development, national economies, economic growth and income, agricultural advances, the crisis in infant feeding practices, new foods, and the population dilemma. Outlines possible future policy directions to significantly…

  7. Czochralski crystal growth: Modeling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudukovic, M. P.; Ramachandran, P. A.; Srivastava, R. K.; Dorsey, D.

    1986-01-01

    The modeling study of Czochralski (Cz) crystal growth is reported. The approach was to relate in a quantitative manner, using models based on first priniciples, crystal quality to operating conditions and geometric variables. The finite element method is used for all calculations.

  8. The crop growth research chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagenbach, Kimberly

    1993-01-01

    The Crop Growth Research Chamber (CGRC) has been defined by CELSS principle investigators and science advisory panels as a necessary ground-based tool in the development of a regenerative life support system. The focus of CGRC research will be on the biomass production component of the CELSS system. The ground-based Crop Growth Research Chamber is for the study of plant growth and development under stringently controlled environments isolated from the external environment. The chamber has importance in three areas of CELSS activities: (1) crop research; (2) system control and integration, and (3) flight hardware design and experimentation. The laboratory size of the CGRC will be small enough to allow duplication of the unit, the conducting of controlled experiments, and replication of experiments, but large enough to provide information representative of larger plant communities. Experiments will focus on plant growth in a wide variety of environments and the effects of those environments on plant production of food, water, oxygen, toxins, and microbes. To study these effects in a closed system, tight control of the environment is necessary.

  9. Growth Pains for Brazilian Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haussman, Fay

    1978-01-01

    The staggering growth of higher education in Brazil has affected academic performance, income levels, the labor market, and student aspirations as well as the political perspective of the authoritarian regime. Implications of broader access to education and of student activism are discussed. (LBH)

  10. Coral can have growth anomalies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coral growth anomalies (GAs) are changes in the coral cells that deposit the calcium carbonate skeleton. They usually appear as raised areas of the skeleton and tissue that are different from the surrounding normal areas on the same colony. The features include abnormal shape a...

  11. Direct flow crystal growth system

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, K.E.; Milanovich, F.P.

    1989-10-30

    A crystal is grown in a constantly filtered solution which is flowed directly into the growing face of a crystal. In a continuous flow system, solution at its saturation temperature is removed from a crystal growth tank, heated above its saturation temperatue, filtered, cooled back to its saturation temperature, and returned to the tank. 2 figs.

  12. Bean Plants: A Growth Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Donna

    2004-01-01

    Teaching plant growth to seventh-grade life science students has been interesting for the author because she grew up in a rural area and always had to help in the garden. She made many assumptions about what her rural and suburban students knew. One year she decided to have them grow plants to observe the roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and fruit…

  13. Protein crystal growth in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    The overall scientific goals and rationale for growing protein crystals in microgravity are discussed. Data on the growth of human serum albumin crystals which were produced during the First International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-1) are presented. Potential scientific advantages of the utilization of Space Station Freedom are discussed.

  14. Rectified growth of histotripsy bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam D.; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Simon, Julianna C.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; Bailey, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Histotripsy treatments use high-amplitude shock waves to fractionate tissue. Such treatments have been demonstrated using both cavitation bubbles excited with microsecond-long pulses and boiling bubbles excited for milliseconds. A common feature of both approaches is the need for bubble growth, where at 1 MHz cavitation bubbles reach maximum radii on the order of 100 microns and boiling bubbles grow to about 1 mm. To explore how histotripsy bubbles grow, a model of a single, spherical bubble that accounts for heat and mass transport was used to simulate the bubble dynamics. Results suggest that the asymmetry inherent in nonlinearly distorted waveforms can lead to rectified bubble growth, which is enhanced at elevated temperatures. Moreover, the rate of this growth is sensitive to the waveform shape, in particular the transition from the peak negative pressure to the shock front. Current efforts are focused on elucidating this behavior by obtaining an improved calibration of measured histotripsy waveforms with a fiber-optic hydrophone, using a nonlinear propagation model to assess the impact on the focal waveform of higher harmonics present at the source’s surface, and photographically observing bubble growth rates. PMID:26413193

  15. Case Studies Reveal Camper Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannan, Steve; Fullerton, Ann

    1999-01-01

    Case studies in the National Camp Evaluation Project and National Inclusive Camp Practices project used interviews with counselors and parents about camper's growth to yield qualitative data for camp program evaluation. The importance, methods, and benefits of case studies are described. Sidebars give examples of comments on perceived camper…

  16. Unlimited Growth: Growing, Growing, Gone?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bormann, F. H.

    1972-01-01

    The solution for future ecological problems may be in how we view uninterrupted growth in relation to its hazards on natural resources, global life support systems and the human psychosphere. Attempts should be made to bring about fundamental changes in patterns of economic and technology which emphasize humanism and harmony with ecological…

  17. The English Language Growth Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochecouste, Judith; Oliver, Rhonda; Mulligan, Denise; Davies, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The English Language Growth (ELG) Project was conducted in five Australian universities in 2008-09 to address the on-going English language development of international students from non-English speaking backgrounds. Using an online survey inviting both qualitative and quantitative responses, 798 international students provided a rich source of…

  18. Separating Growth from Value Added

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeagley, Raymond

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses Rochester's two academic models that offer different tools for different purposes--measuring individual learning and measuring what affects learning. The main focus of currently available growth measures is formative assessment--providing data to inform instructional planning. Value-added assessment is not a student…

  19. Crystal growth of artificial snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimura, S.; Oka, A.; Taki, M.; Kuwano, R.; Ono, H.; Nagura, R.; Narimatsu, Y.; Tanii, J.; Kamimiytat, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Snow crystals were grown onboard the space shuttle during STS-7 and STS-8 to facilitate the investigation of crystal growth under conditions of weightlessness. The experimental design and hardware are described. Space-grown snow crystals were polyhedrons looking like spheres, which were unlike snow crystals produced in experiments on Earth.

  20. Personal growth after traumatic experiences.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Michael

    Psychiatric practice acknowledges that people who are subjected to traumatic events may develop emotional negativity requiring intervention. However, it has recently been acknowledged that emotional distress caused by a traumatic event can facilitate that person's recovery into an emotionally stronger person. This article aims to provide a clinical understanding of the phenomenon of post-trauma growth.

  1. Osteochondroses: Diseases of Growth Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappas, Arthur M.

    1989-01-01

    Many growth center disorders may be associated with athletic activities like Little League baseball and year-round gymnastics. Osteochondroses are developmental disorders usually diagnosed in growing children and associated with anatomic sites undergoing transition from cartilage to bone. Radiographic methods of diagnosing these problems are…

  2. Modeling Population Growth and Extinction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2009-01-01

    The exponential growth model and the logistic model typically introduced in the mathematics curriculum presume that a population grows exclusively. In reality, species can also die out and more sophisticated models that take the possibility of extinction into account are needed. In this article, two extensions of the logistic model are considered,…

  3. Psychological Models of Educational Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nucci, Larry P.; Walberg, Herbert J.

    A discussion of models of intellectual development and their application to education identifies the two major groups of such models and examines recent attempts to combine them. The two types of theories are described as the psychometric models, which see intellectual growth as the incremental amassing and associating of discrete ideas, and the…

  4. Bean Plants: A Growth Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Donna

    2004-01-01

    Teaching plant growth to seventh-grade life science students has been interesting for the author because she grew up in a rural area and always had to help in the garden. She made many assumptions about what her rural and suburban students knew. One year she decided to have them grow plants to observe the roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and fruit…

  5. Coral can have growth anomalies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coral growth anomalies (GAs) are changes in the coral cells that deposit the calcium carbonate skeleton. They usually appear as raised areas of the skeleton and tissue that are different from the surrounding normal areas on the same colony. The features include abnormal shape a...

  6. Evolutionary Perspective in Child Growth

    PubMed Central

    Hochberg, Ze’ev

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary, environmental, and stochastic factors determine a child’s growth in his unique environment, but their relative contribution to the phenotypic outcome and the extent of stochastic programming that is required to alter human phenotypes is not known because few data are available. This is an attempt to use evolutionary life-history theory in understanding child growth in a broad evolutionary perspective, using the data and theory of evolutionary predictive adaptive growth-related strategies. Transitions from one life-history phase to the next have inherent adaptive plasticity in their timing. Humans evolved to withstand energy crises by decreasing their body size, and evolutionary short-term adaptations to energy crises utilize a plasticity that modifies the timing of transition from infancy into childhood, culminating in short stature in times of energy crisis. Transition to juvenility is part of a strategy of conversion from a period of total dependence on the family and tribe for provision and security to self-supply, and a degree of adaptive plasticity is provided and determines body composition. Transition to adolescence entails plasticity in adapting to energy resources, other environmental cues, and the social needs of the maturing adolescent to determine life-span and the period of fecundity and fertility. Fundamental questions are raised by a life-history approach to the unique growth pattern of each child in his given genetic background and current environment. PMID:23908815

  7. The Growth of Human Hair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Helen J.

    1984-01-01

    Suggests a simple technique for collecting and observing human hair roots to compare structure, function, and variation. Students extract their own hair samples and view them using a 40-power microscope objective. Differences between active/inactive phases of hair growth are readily observed. (The activity can be adapted for younger students.) (DH)

  8. Nutrition, Development, and Population Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Alan

    1973-01-01

    Focuses on the problem of malnutrition in developing countries through a description of its interrelationships with human development, national economies, economic growth and income, agricultural advances, the crisis in infant feeding practices, new foods, and the population dilemma. Outlines possible future policy directions to significantly…

  9. Technological Limits to Growth Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ophuls, William

    1975-01-01

    The author of this article argues the position that technology is not a cure-all, capable of removing environmental constraints indefinitely. He contends that continued technological growth will raise important political and moral issues that cannot be evaded, resulting in social, political, economic, and ethical change. (Author/MA)

  10. Osteochondroses: Diseases of Growth Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappas, Arthur M.

    1989-01-01

    Many growth center disorders may be associated with athletic activities like Little League baseball and year-round gymnastics. Osteochondroses are developmental disorders usually diagnosed in growing children and associated with anatomic sites undergoing transition from cartilage to bone. Radiographic methods of diagnosing these problems are…

  11. Professional Growth & Support Spending Calculator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Resource Strategies, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This "Professional Growth & Support Spending Calculator" helps school systems quantify all current spending aimed at improving teaching effectiveness. Part I provides worksheets to analyze total investment. Part II provides a system for evaluating investments based on purpose, target group, and delivery. In this Spending Calculator…

  12. River impoundment and sunfish growth

    Treesearch

    Andrew L. Rypel

    2011-01-01

    Impoundment of rivers by dams is widespread and one of the most devastating anthropogenic impacts to freshwater environments. Linking theoretical and applied research on river impoundment requires an improved capacity for predicting how varying degrees of impoundment affects a range of species. Here, growth of 14 North American sunfish species resilient to river...

  13. Population Growth: Stretching the Limits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouse, Deborah E.

    1990-01-01

    Three population education activities that can be used to illustrate the effects of uncontrolled population growth are presented. Included are "Crowding Can Be Seedy," which uses seeds; "Something for Everyone," which illustrates competition for resources; and "More or Less," which illustrates the relationship between humans and the environment.…

  14. Direct flow crystal growth system

    DOEpatents

    Montgomery, Kenneth E.; Milanovich, Fred P.

    1992-01-01

    A crystal is grown in a constantly filtered solution which is flowed directly into the growing face of a crystal. In a continuous flow system, solution at its saturation temperature is removed from a crystal growth tank, heated above its saturation temperature, filtered, cooled back to its saturation temperature, and returned to the tank.

  15. Modeling Population Growth and Extinction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2009-01-01

    The exponential growth model and the logistic model typically introduced in the mathematics curriculum presume that a population grows exclusively. In reality, species can also die out and more sophisticated models that take the possibility of extinction into account are needed. In this article, two extensions of the logistic model are considered,…

  16. Growth and dissolution kinetics of tetragonal lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaco, L. A.; Rosenberger, F.

    1993-01-01

    The growth and dissolution kinetics of lysozyme in a 25 ml solution bridge inside a closed growth cell was investigated. It was found that, under all growth conditions, the growth habit forming (110) and (101) faces grew through layer spreading with different growth rate dependence on supersaturation/temperature. On the other hand, (100) faces which formed only at low temperatures underwent a thermal roughening transition around 12 C.

  17. Growth and dissolution kinetics of tetragonal lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaco, L. A.; Rosenberger, F.

    1993-01-01

    The growth and dissolution kinetics of lysozyme in a 25 ml solution bridge inside a closed growth cell was investigated. It was found that, under all growth conditions, the growth habit forming (110) and (101) faces grew through layer spreading with different growth rate dependence on supersaturation/temperature. On the other hand, (100) faces which formed only at low temperatures underwent a thermal roughening transition around 12 C.

  18. Buckling condensation in constrained growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dervaux, Julien; Ben Amar, Martine

    2011-03-01

    The multiple complexities inherent to living objects have motivated the search for abiotic substitutes, able to mimic some of their relevant physical properties. Hydrogels provide a highly monitorable counterpart and have thus found many applications in medicine and bioengineering. Recently, it has been recognized that their ability to swell could be used to unravel some of the universal physical processes at work during biological growth. However, it is yet unknown how the microscopic distinctions between swelling and biological growth affect macroscopic changes (shape, stresses) induced by volume variations. To answer this question, we focus on a clinically motivated example of growth. Some solid tumors such as melanoma or glioblastoma undergo a shape transition during their evolution. This bifurcation appears when growth is confined at the periphery of the tumor and is concomitant with the transition from the avascular to the vascular stage of the tumor evolution. To model this phenomenon, we consider in this paper the deformation of an elastic ring enclosing a core of different stiffness. When the volume of the outer ring increases, the system develops a periodic instability. We consider two possible descriptions of the volume variation process: either by imposing a homogeneous volumetric strain (biological growth) or through migration of solvent molecules inside a solid network (swelling). For thin rings, both theories are in qualitative agreement. When the interior is soft, we predict the emergence of a large wavelength buckling. Upon increasing the stiffness of the inner disc, the wavelength of the instability decreases until a condensation of the buckles occurs at the free boundary. This short wavelength pattern is independent of the stiffness of the disc and is only limited by the presence of surface tension. For thicker rings, two scenarios emerge. When a volumetric strain is prescribed, compressive stresses accumulate in the vicinity of the core and the

  19. Canada's population: growth and dualism.

    PubMed

    Beaujot, R P

    1978-04-01

    In Canada the current 1.3% population growth rate is causing some concern. Those concerned argue that such a rate of growth in combination with high levels of consumption could jeopardize the country's resource base and its comfortable style of living. Many Canadians are questioning high levels of immigration, for now that the fertility level is below replacement level, net immigration contributes substantially to population growth (over 1/3 in 1976). The growing proportion of non-Europeans among recent immigrants is causing resentment, and, in a tight job market, immigrants are regarded as threats to the World War 2 baby boom cohort who are now at working ages. The baby boom generation also puts stress on housing and health services, and it will increase the need for pension checks as it ages. Although French fertility is no longer high and immigration is no longer dominated by the British, the French group's 200-year struggle to preserve its identity continues on in the current effort of the Quebec government to enforce the use of French language by law within that province. Geography and climate dictate another demographic fact that divides the country and pervades its history. In addition to intense regionalism, uneven population distribution is responsible for 2 other concerns: the rapid growth of several already large cities and depopulation of many small communities. Focus in this discussion is on Canada's population growth in the past and as projected for the future, historical and current fertility, mortality and immigration trends, the search for a new immigration policy, the impact of the baby boom generation on the population's age structure and the problems this creates, and recent shifts in population distribution and in the country's ethnic and linguistic makeup. The population policy proposals evolved thus far involve to a great extent the use of immigration as a lever for achieving given population objectives.

  20. Physiological factors influencing capillary growth.

    PubMed

    Egginton, S

    2011-07-01

    (1) Angiogenesis (growth of new capillaries from an existing capillary bed) may result from a mismatch in microvascular supply and metabolic demand (metabolic error signal). Krogh examined the distribution and number of capillaries to explore the correlation between O(2) delivery and O(2) consumption. Subsequently, the heterogeneity in angiogenic response within a muscle has been shown to reflect either differences in fibre type composition or mechanical load. However, local control leads to targetted angiogenesis in the vicinity of glycolytic fibre types following muscle stimulation, or oxidative fibres following endurance training, while heterogeneity of capillary spacing is maintained during ontogenetic growth. (2) Despite limited microscopy resolution and lack of specific markers, Krogh's interest in the structure of the capillary wall paved the way for understanding the mechanisms of capillary growth. Angiogenesis may be influenced by the response of perivascular or stromal cells (fibroblasts, macrophages and pericytes) to altered activity, likely acting as a source for chemical signals modulating capillary growth such as vascular endothelial growth factor. In addition, haemodynamic factors such as shear stress and muscle stretch play a significant role in adaptive remodelling of the microcirculation. (3) Most indices of capillarity are highly dependent on fibre size, resulting in possible bias because of scaling. To examine the consequences of capillary distribution, it is therefore helpful to quantify the area of tissue supplied by individual capillaries. This allows the spatial limitations inherent in most models of tissue oxygenation to be overcome generating an alternative approach to Krogh's tissue cylinder, the capillary domain, to improve descriptions of intracellular oxygen diffusion. © 2010 The Author. Acta Physiologica © 2010 Scandinavian Physiological Society.