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Sample records for growth hormone-releasing peptides

  1. Metabolism of growth hormone releasing peptides.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andreas; Delahaut, Philippe; Krug, Oliver; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2012-12-01

    New, potentially performance enhancing compounds have frequently been introduced to licit and illicit markets and rapidly distributed via worldwide operating Internet platforms. Developing fast analytical strategies to follow these new trends is one the most challenging issues for modern doping control analysis. Even if reference compounds for the active drugs are readily obtained, their unknown metabolism complicates effective testing strategies. Recently, a new class of small C-terminally amidated peptides comprising four to seven amino acid residues received considerable attention of sports drug testing authorities due to their ability to stimulate growth hormone release from the pituitary. The most promising candidates are the growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP)-1, -2, -4, -5, -6, hexarelin, alexamorelin, and ipamorelin. With the exemption of GHRP-2, the entity of these peptides represents nonapproved pharmaceuticals; however, via Internet providers, all compounds are readily available. To date, only limited information on the metabolism of these substances is available and merely one metabolite for GHRP-2 is established. Therefore, a comprehensive in vivo (po and iv administration in rats) and in vitro (with human serum and recombinant amidase) study was performed in order to generate information on urinary metabolites potentially useful for routine doping controls. The urine samples from the in vivo experiments were purified by mixed-mode cation-exchange solid-phase extraction and analyzed by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) separation followed by high-resolution/high-accuracy mass spectrometry. Combining the high resolution power of a benchtop Orbitrap mass analyzer for the first metabolite screening and the speed of a quadrupole/time-of-flight (Q-TOF) instrument for identification, urinary metabolites were screened by means of a sensitive full scan analysis and subsequently confirmed by high-accuracy product ion scan experiments. Two

  2. Growth Hormone-Releasing Peptide 6 Enhances the Healing Process and Improves the Esthetic Outcome of the Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza Marí, Yssel; Fernández Mayola, Maday; Aguilera Barreto, Ana; García Ojalvo, Ariana; Bermúdez Alvarez, Yilian; Mir Benítez, Ana Janet; Berlanga Acosta, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    In addition to its cytoprotective effects, growth hormone-releasing peptide 6 (GHRP-6) proved to reduce liver fibrotic induration. CD36 as one of the GHRP-6 receptors appears abundantly represented in cutaneous wounds granulation tissue. The healing response in a scenario of CD36 agonistic stimulation had not been previously investigated. Excisional full-thickness wounds (6 mmØ) were created in the dorsum of Wistar rats and topically treated twice a day for 5 days. The universal model of rabbit's ears hypertrophic scars was implemented and the animals were treated daily for 30 days. Treatments for both species were based on a CMC jelly composition containing GHRP-6 400 μg/mL. Wounds response characterization included closure dynamic, RT-PCR transcriptional profile, histology, and histomorphometric procedures. The rats experiment indicated that GHRP-6 pharmacodynamics involves attenuation of immunoinflammatory mediators, their effector cells, and the reduction of the expression of fibrotic cytokines. Importantly, in the hypertrophic scars rabbit's model, GHRP-6 intervention dramatically reduced the onset of exuberant scars by activating PPARγ and reducing the expression of fibrogenic cytokines. GHRP-6 showed no effect on the reversion of consolidated lesions. This evidence supports the notion that CD36 is an active and pharmacologically approachable receptor to attenuate wound inflammation and accelerate its closure so as to improve wound esthetic. PMID:27200188

  3. Growth Hormone Releasing Peptide-2 Attenuation of Protein Kinase C-Induced Inflammation in Human Ovarian Granulosa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Yi-Ning; Sun, David; Peng, Yen-Chun; Wu, Yuh-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) are two important inflammatory mediators in ovulation. Ghrelin may modulate inflammatory signaling via growth hormone secretagogue receptors. We investigated the role of ghrelin in KGN human ovarian granulosa cells using protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12, 13-didecanoate (PDD) and synthetic ghrelin analog growth hormone releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2). GHRP-2 attenuated PDD-induced expression of protein and mRNA, the promoter activity of COX-2 and IL-8 genes, and the secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and IL-8. GHRP-2 promoted the degradation of PDD-induced COX-2 and IL-8 proteins with the involvement of proteasomal and lysosomal pathways. PDD-mediated COX-2 production acts via the p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) pathways; PDD-mediated IL-8 production acts via the p38, JNK and ERK pathways. GHRP-2 reduced the PDD-induced phosphorylation of p38 and JNK and activator protein 1 (AP-1) reporter activation and PDD-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation and reporter activation. The inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) and protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A) reduced the inhibitory effect of GHRP-2 on PDD-induced COX-2 and IL-8 expression. Our findings demonstrate an anti-inflammatory role for ghrelin (GHRP-2) in PKC-mediated inflammation of granulosa cells, at least in part, due to its inhibitory effect on PKC-induced activation of p38, JNK and NF-κB, possibly by targeting to MKP-1 and PP2A. PMID:27548147

  4. Growth hormone releasing peptide 2 reverses anorexia associated with chemotherapy with 5-fluoruracil in colon cancer cell-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Perboni, Simona; Bowers, Cyril; Kojima, Shinya; Asakawa, Akihiro; Inui, Akio

    2008-11-01

    The cancer-associated anorexia-cachexia syndrome is observed in 80% of patients with advanced-stage cancer, and is one of the major obstacles in chemotherapy. Ghrelin is a orexigenic hormone that has been proposed to prevent anorexia. Aim of the study was to determine whether the addition of the ghrelin agonist growth hormone releasing peptide 2 (GHRP-2) to cytotoxic therapy with 5-fluoruracil (5-FU) prevents the anorexia associated with chemotherapy in cancer cachectic mice. Thirty-three BALB/c female tumour-bearing mice were randomized to receive a solution containing: (a) placebo; (b) GHRP-2; (c) 5-FU; or (d) 5-FU+GHRP-2. Ten BALB/c no tumour-bearing mice received placebo solution. Food intake and survival were checked. Six hours after the drug injection the cumulative food intake was significantly increased in mice treated with the combination of 5-FU+GHRP-2 versus the 5-FU alone (P=0.0096). On day 3, the cumulative food intake of mice treated with GHRP-2, 5-FU and 5-FU+GHRP-2 significantly increased compared with naive and vehicle groups (P=0.0007, P=0.0038 and P=0.0166, respectively). The median survival time was longer in 5-FU+GHRP-2 treated mice than in those with 5-FU, although it was not significant (18 d versus 15.5 d, P=0.7). For the first time, we demonstrated that the addition of GHRP-2 to cytotoxic therapy with 5-FU improved appetite in tumour-bearing mice with anorexia/cachexia syndrome in early stage. These data suggest that GHRP-2 may improve the efficacy of therapy and the quality of life of cancer patients thank to the amelioration of their nutritional state.

  5. Effects of repeated doses and continuous infusions of the growth hormone-releasing peptide hexarelin in conscious male rats.

    PubMed

    Conley, L K; Gaillard, R C; Giustina, A; Brogan, R S; Wehrenberg, W B

    1998-09-01

    We have previously shown that hexarelin, a novel GH-releasing peptide (GHRP), is able to elicit GH release when administered i.v., s.c. or by mouth and that it is a more potent GH secretagogue than GHRP-6. In the current study, we investigated the effects of hexarelin administered as repeated doses at 2 h intervals or as a continuous 6, 30 or 174 h infusion to conscious male rats. In the first experiment, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were prepared with dual indwelling jugular catheters. On the day of experimentation, these animals received three 25 micrograms/kg i.v. boluses of hexarelin at 2 h intervals with blood sampling at 5, 10, 15, 30, 60, 90 and 120 min after each dose. The mean peak GH response and the mean area under the GH response curve (AUC) for the 30 min after each administration were calculated and are reported as the mean +/- S.E.M. For both the peak and AUC results there was a significant (P < 0.05) difference in the GH response noted between the first (peak 301 +/- 37 ng/ml; AUC 5585 +/- 700 ng/ml per 30 min) and second (peak 149 +/- 47 ng/ml; AUC 3056 +/- 908 ng/ml per 30 min) injections of hexarelin, but not between the first and third (peak 214 +/- 49 ng/ml; AUC 3862 +/- 844 ng/ml per 30 min). In a second series of experiments, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received continuous infusions (100 micrograms/h) of hexarelin or saline (1 ml/h) for 6, 30 or 174 h. Blood samples were collected every 20 min for the duration of the 6 h infusion and for the last 6 h of the two longer hexarelin infusions. Plasma GH concentrations peaked within 40 min of the initiation of infusion, but soon returned to basal levels. Mean plasma GH concentrations did not differ between any of the treatment groups, nor did any of the parameters of pulsatile hormone release analyzed. No significant differences in plasma corticosterone concentrations were noted between any of the treatment groups. On the other hand, while neither the 6 h (941 +/- 70 ng/ml) nor the 30 h (954

  6. Pralmorelin: GHRP 2, GPA 748, growth hormone-releasing peptide 2, KP-102 D, KP-102 LN, KP-102D, KP-102LN.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Pralmorelin [GPA 748, GHRP 2, growth hormone-releasing peptide 2, KP-102 D, KP 102 LN] is an orally active, synthetic growth hormone-releasing peptide from a series of compounds that were developed by Polygen in Germany and Tulane University in the US. Researchers at Tulane University led by Dr Cyril Bowers synthesised a series of small highly active peptides ranging in size from 3-5 amino acids or partial peptides that were suitable for a variety of administration formats (subcutaneous, buccal, oral, depot). These peptides mimic the actions of ghrelin, a 28 amino acid octanoyl peptide that regulates the release of growth hormone (GH), and may play an important role in bone and muscle growth, food intake and possibly improve recovery from injury. The use of pralmorelin as a diagnostic agent for GH deficiency is based on its ability to markedly increase plasma levels of GH in healthy subjects irrespectively of gender, obesity or age. However, in patients with GH deficiency, the effect of pralmorelin on GH levels is significantly lower compared with healthy controls. Analysis of the receiver-operating characteristics curve provided the cut-off threshold value for the GH peak of 15.0 micro g/L for the identification of patients with GH deficiency from those of healthy controls. Kaken acquired worldwide manufacturing and marketing rights to pralmorelin, and then sublicensed it to Wyeth (formerly American Home Products) for the US and Canada. Kaken retains rights to pralmorelin in Japan. On 11 March 2002 American Home Products changed its name and the names of its subsidiaries Wyeth-Ayerst and Wyeth Lederle to Wyeth. Kaken also granted exclusive sublicense options in Africa, Australia, Europe, Latin America and New Zealand to unspecified partners. Pralmorelin as KP-102 D [KP-102D] is currently awaiting approval in Japan as a diagnostic agent for hypothalamo-pituitary function. It is planned to be launched in Japan for this indication in 2004. Pralmorelin is also

  7. Growth hormone-releasing peptide-biotin conjugate stimulates myocytes differentiation through insulin-like growth factor-1 and collagen type I

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chae Jin; Jeon, Jung Eun; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Yoon, Seok Jeong; Kwon, Seon Deok; Lim, Jina; Park, Keedon; Kim, Dae Yong; Ahn, Jeong Keun; Kim, Bong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Based on the potential beneficial effects of growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP)-6 on muscle functions, a newly synthesized GHRP-6-biotin conjugate was tested on cultured myoblast cells. Increased expression of myogenic marker proteins was observed in GHRP-6-biotin conjugate-treated cells. Additionally, increased expression levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 and collagen type I were observed. Furthermore, GHRP-6-biotin conjugate-treated cells showed increased metabolic activity, as indicated by increased concentrations of energy metabolites, such as ATP and lactate, and increased enzymatic activity of lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase. Finally, binding protein analysis suggested few candidate proteins, including desmin, actin, and zinc finger protein 691 as potential targets for GHRP6-biotin conjugate action. These results suggest that the newly synthesized GHRP-6-biotin conjugate has myogenic stimulating activity through, at least in part, by stimulating collagen type I synthesis and several key proteins. Practical applications of the GHRP-6-biotin conjugate could include improving muscle condition. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(9): 501-506] PMID:25644636

  8. Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fridlyand, Leonid E.; Tamarina, Natalia A.; Schally, Andrew V.; Philipson, Louis H.

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is produced by the hypothalamus and stimulates growth hormone synthesis and release in the anterior pituitary gland. In addition, GHRH is an important regulator of cellular functions in many cells and organs. Expression of GHRH G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GHRHR) has been demonstrated in different peripheral tissues and cell types, including pancreatic islets. Among the peripheral activities, recent studies demonstrate a novel ability of GHRH analogs to increase and preserve insulin secretion by beta-cells in isolated pancreatic islets, which makes them potentially useful for diabetes treatment. This review considers the role of GHRHR in the beta-cell and addresses the unique engineered GHRH agonists and antagonists for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We discuss the similarity of signaling pathways activated by GHRHR in pituitary somatotrophs and in pancreatic beta-cells and possible ways as to how the GHRHR pathway can interact with glucose and other secretagogues to stimulate insulin secretion. We also consider the hypothesis that novel GHRHR agonists can improve glucose metabolism in Type 2 diabetes by preserving the function and survival of pancreatic beta-cells. Wound healing and cardioprotective action with new GHRH agonists suggest that they may prove useful in ameliorating certain diabetic complications. These findings highlight the future potential therapeutic effectiveness of modulators of GHRHR activity for the development of new therapeutic approaches in diabetes and its complications. PMID:27777568

  9. Tissue deiodinase activity during prolonged critical illness: effects of exogenous thyrotropin-releasing hormone and its combination with growth hormone-releasing peptide-2.

    PubMed

    Debaveye, Yves; Ellger, Björn; Mebis, Liese; Van Herck, Erik; Coopmans, Willy; Darras, Veerle; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2005-12-01

    Prolonged critical illness is characterized by reduced pulsatile TSH secretion, causing reduced thyroid hormone release and profound changes in thyroid hormone metabolism, resulting in low circulating T(3) and elevated rT(3) levels. To further unravel the underlying mechanisms, we investigated the effects of exogenous TRH and GH-releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2) in an in vivo model of prolonged critical illness. Burn-injured, parenterally fed rabbits were randomized to receive 4-d treatment with saline, 60 microg/kg.h GHRP-2, 60 microg/kg.h TRH, or 60 microg/kg.h TRH plus 60 microg/kg.h GHRP-2 started on d 4 of the illness (n = 8/group). The activities of the deiodinase 1 (D1), D2, and D3 in snap-frozen liver, kidney, and muscle as well as their impact on circulating thyroid hormone levels were studied. Compared with healthy controls, hepatic D1 activity in the saline-treated, ill animals was significantly down-regulated (P = 0.02), and D3 activity tended to be up-regulated (P = 0.06). Infusion of TRH and TRH plus GHRP-2 restored the catalytic activity of D1 (P = 0.02) and increased T(3) levels back within physiological range (P = 0.008). D3 activity was normalized by all three interventions, but only addition of GHRP-2 to TRH prevented the rise in rT(3) seen with TRH alone (P = 0.02). Liver D1 and D3 activity were correlated (respectively, positively and negatively) with the changes in circulating T(3) (r = 0.84 and r = -0.65) and the T(3)/rT(3) ratio (r = 0.71 and r = -0.60). We conclude that D1 activity during critical illness is suppressed and related to the alterations within the thyrotropic axis, whereas D3 activity tends to be increased and under the joint control of the somatotropic and thyrotropic axes. PMID:16150898

  10. GH responses to growth hormone releasing factor in depression.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R; Beer, R; Harris, B; John, R; Scanlon, M

    1989-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH), thyrotrophin (TSH) and prolactin response to growth hormone releasing factor (GRF) was investigated in 18 patients suffering from major depression with melancholia and in 18 age- and sex-matched normal controls. There was no significant difference in the GH response to GRF stimulation between the patients and controls and in neither subject group was there a demonstrable TSH or prolactin response to GRF. These findings indicate that the pathophysiology underlying the blunted GH response to pharmacological challenge, demonstrated in other studies, must lie at a suprapituitary level.

  11. Growth-hormone-releasing factor immunoreactivity in human endocrine tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Bostwick, D. G.; Quan, R.; Hoffman, A. R.; Webber, R. J.; Chang, J. K.; Bensch, K. G.

    1984-01-01

    Seventy-three human tumors and adjacent nonneoplastic tissues were analyzed immunohistochemically for the presence of growth-hormone-releasing factor (GRF). Four of 9 pancreatic endocrine tumors, 2 of 3 appendiceal carcinoids, and 1 of 5 cecal carcinoids were immunoreactive for GRF. One of the GRF-containing pancreatic tumors was associated with acromegaly. Histologically, the growth patterns of these tumors were variable, and the distribution of immunoreactive cells was patchy and irregular. There were no normal cells that contained GRF. These results indicate that GRF production by human tumors is more common than previously thought, although clinical acromegaly may not be apparent in patients who harbor such neoplasms. Images Figure 1 PMID:6093542

  12. Effect of growth hormone-releasing factor on growth hormone release in children with radiation-induced growth hormone deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Lustig, R.H.; Schriock, E.A.; Kaplan, S.L.; Grumbach, M.M.

    1985-08-01

    Five male children who received cranial irradiation for extrahypothalamic intracranial neoplasms or leukemia and subsequently developed severe growth hormone (GH) deficiency were challenged with synthetic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF-44), in an attempt to distinguish hypothalamic from pituitary dysfunction as a cause of their GH deficiency, and to assess the readily releasable GH reserve in the pituitary. In response to a pulse of GRF-44 (5 micrograms/kg intravenously), mean peak GH levels rose to values higher than those evoked by the pharmacologic agents L-dopa or arginine (6.4 +/- 1.3 ng/mL v 1.5 +/- 0.4 ng/mL, P less than .05). The peak GH value occurred at a mean of 26.0 minutes after administration of GRF-44. These responses were similar to those obtained in children with severe GH deficiency due to other etiologies (peak GH 6.3 +/- 1.7 ng/mL, mean 28.0 minutes). In addition, there was a trend toward an inverse relationship between peak GH response to GRF-44 and the postirradiation interval. Prolactin and somatomedin-C levels did not change significantly after the administration of a single dose of GRF-44. The results of this study support the hypothesis that cranial irradiation in children can lead to hypothalamic GRF deficiency secondary to radiation injury of hypothalamic GRF-secreting neurons. This study also lends support to the potential therapeutic usefulness of GRF-44 or an analog for GH deficiency secondary to cranial irradiation.

  13. Interactions of growth hormone secretagogues and growth hormone-releasing hormone/somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, G S; Bowers, C Y

    2001-02-01

    The class of novel synthetic compounds termed growth hormone secretagogues (GHSs) act in the hypothalamus through, as yet, unknown pathways. We performed physiologic and histochemical studies to further understand how the GHS system interacts with the well-established somatostatin (SRIF)/growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) neuroendocrine system for regulating pulsatile GH secretion. Comparison of the GH-releasing activities of the hexapeptide growth hormone-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) and GHRH administered intravenously to conscious adult male rats showed that the pattern of GH responsiveness to GHRP-6 was markedly time-dependent, similar to that observed with GHRH. Immunoneutralization of endogenous SRIF reversed the blunted GH response to GHRP-6 at trough times, suggesting that GHRP-6 neither disrupts nor inhibits the cyclical release of endogenous hypothalamic SRIF. By striking contrast, passive immunization with anti-GHRH serum virtually obliterated the GH responses to GHRP-6, irrespective of the time of administration. These findings suggest that the GHSs do not act by altering SRIF release but, rather, stimulate GH release via GHRH-dependent pathways. Our dual chromogenic and autoradiographic in situ hybridization experiments revealed that a subpopulation of GHRH mRNA-containing neurons in the arcuate (Arc) nucleus and ventromedial nucleus (VMN) of the hypothalamus expressed the GHS receptor (GHS-R) gene. These results provide strong anatomic evidence that GHSs may directly stimulate GHRH release into hypophyseal portal blood, and thereby influence GH secretion, through interaction with the GHS-R on GHRH- containing neurons. Altogether, these findings support the notion that an additional neuroendocrine pathway may exist to regulate pulsatile GH secretion, possibly through the influence of the newly discovered GHS natural peptide, ghrelin. PMID:11322498

  14. Algorithmic complexity of growth hormone release in humans.

    PubMed

    Prank, K; Wagner, M; Brabant, G

    1997-01-01

    Most hormones are secreted in an pulsatile rather than in a constant manner. This temporal pattern of pulsatile hormone release plays an important role in the regulation of cellular function and structure. In healthy humans growth hormone (GH) secretion is characterized by distinct pulses whereas patients bearing a GH producing tumor accompanied with excessive secretion (acromegaly) exhibit a highly irregular pattern of GH release. It has been hypothesized that this highly disorderly pattern of GH release in acromegaly arises from random events in the GH-producing tumor under decreased normal control of GH secretion. Using a context-free grammar complexity measure (algorithmic complexity) in conjunction with random surrogate data sets we demonstrate that the temporal pattern of GH release in acromegaly is not significantly different from a variety of stochastic processes. In contrast, normal subjects clearly exhibit deterministic structure in their temporal patterns of GH secretion. Our results support the hypothesis that GH release in acromegaly is due to random events in the GH-producing tumorous cells which might become independent from hypothalamic regulation.

  15. Ectopic acromegaly due to growth hormone releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Ghazi, Ali A; Amirbaigloo, Alireza; Dezfooli, Azizollah Abbasi; Saadat, Navid; Ghazi, Siavash; Pourafkari, Marina; Tirgari, Farrokh; Dhall, Dheepti; Bannykh, Serguei; Melmed, Shlomo; Cooper, Odelia

    2013-04-01

    Acromegaly secondary to extra-pituitary tumors secreting growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) is rarely encountered. We review the literature on ectopic acromegaly and present the index report of ectopic acromegaly secondary to GHRH secretion from a mediastinal paraganglioma. Clinical and pathological manifestations and therapeutic management of 99 patients with ectopic acromegaly are reviewed. Acromegaly secondary to ectopic GHRH secretion is usually caused by a neuroendocrine tumor in the lung and pancreas. We report an additional cause of ectopic acromegaly from a mediastinal paraganglioma. Diagnostic criteria of ectopic GHRH syndrome include biochemical and pathologic tumoral confirmation of GHRH secretion and expression. Management of ectopic acromegaly consists of surgical resection of the primary tumor and biochemical normalization, with possible adjuvant use of somatostatin analogs. The review demonstrates that there are several tumor types, including paragangliomas which may secrete GHRH, leading to acromegaly. Clinical and laboratory manifestations of the syndrome and challenges in diagnosis and management of these rarely encountered patients require early diagnosis and appropriate treatment to prevent long-term morbidity and mortality with ectopic acromegaly. PMID:22983831

  16. Algorithmic complexity of growth hormone release in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Prank, K.; Wagner, M.; Brabant, G.

    1996-12-31

    Most hormones are secreted in an pulsatile rather than in a constant manner. This temporal pattern of pulsatile hormone release plays an important role in the regulation of cellular function and structure. In healthy humans growth hormone (GH) secretion is characterized by distinct pulses whereas patients bearing a GH producing tumor accompanied with excessive secretion (acromegaly) exhibit a highly irregular pattern of GH release. It has been hypothesized that this highly disorderly pattern of GH release in acromegaly arises from random events in the GH-producing tumor under decreased normal control of GH secretion. Using a context-free grammar complexity measure (algorithmic complexity) in conjunction with random surrogate data sets we demonstrate that the temporal pattern of GH release in acromegaly is not significantly different from a variety of stochastic processes. In contrast, normal subjects clearly exhibit deterministic structure in their temporal patterns of GH secretion. Our results support the hypothesis that GH release in acromegaly is due to random events in the GH-producing tumorous cells which might become independent from hypothalamic regulation. 17 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  17. Purification of a high-molecular-weight somatoliberin (growth-hormone-releasing factor) from pig hypothalami.

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, J E; Lowry, P J

    1983-01-01

    Preliminary observations [Sykes & Lowry (1980) J. Endocrinol. 85, 42P-43P] had suggested that the major hypothalamic somatoliberin (growth-hormone-releasing factor) was a larger peptide than the other characterized hypothalamic factors, with an elution position on Sephadex G-50 between those of neurophysin and corticotropin. The present paper reports the isolation and preliminary characterization of pig hypothalamic somatoliberin. Acid extracts of pig stalk median eminence were purified by gel filtration and preparative and analytical high-pressure liquid chromatography to yield a preparation that was specific in the release of somatotropin (growth hormone) in vitro, giving a steep dose--response curve at doses in the range 0.20-3.0 ng. Amino acid analysis revealed a non-cysteine-containing peptide with a high number of glutamate (or glutamine) and aspartate (or asparagine) residues. The peptide had about 56-57 amino acid residues and an apparent molecular weight of 6400, in keeping with its elution position on a column of Sephadex G-50. PMID:6409074

  18. Central administration of chicken growth hormone-releasing hormone decreases food intake in chicks.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Tetsuya; Sugimoto, Ikue; Ogino, Madoka; Khan, Md Sakirul Islam; Masuda, Keiko; Ukena, Kazuyoshi; Wang, Yajun

    2015-02-01

    Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is well known as a stimulator of growth hormone (GH) secretion. GHRH not only stimulates GH release but also modifies feeding behavior and energy homeostasis in rodents. In chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus), on the other hand, two types of GHRH, namely, chicken GHRH (cGHRH) and cGHRH-like peptide (cGHRH-LP), have been identified. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of central injection of cGHRH and cGHRH-LP on feeding behavior in chicks. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of both cGHRH and cGHRH-LP (0.04 to 1 nmol) significantly decreased food intake without any abnormal behavior in chicks. Furthermore, the feeding-inhibitory effect was not abolished by co-injection of the antagonist for pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) or corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) receptors, suggesting that the anorexigenic effect of cGHRH and cGHRH-LP might not be related to the PACAP and CRH systems in the brain of chicks. Finally, 24-h food deprivation increased mRNA expression of cGHRH but not cGHRH-LP in the diencephalon. These results suggest that central cGHRH is related to inhibiting feeding behavior and energy homeostasis in chicks.

  19. Role of growth hormone-releasing hormone in dyslipidemia associated with experimental type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Maritza J.; Lucas, Rudolf; Dou, Huijuan; Sridhar, Supriya; Czikora, Istvan; Mosieri, Eby M.; Rick, Ferenc G.; Block, Norman L.; Sridhar, Subbaramiah; Fulton, David; Weintraub, Neal L.; Bagi, Zsolt; Schally, Andrew V.

    2016-01-01

    Dyslipidemia associated with triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) represents an important residual risk factor for cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Levels of growth hormone (GH) are elevated in T1D, which aggravates both hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia. The hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) regulates the release of GH by the pituitary but also exerts separate actions on peripheral GHRH receptors, the functional role of which remains elusive in T1D. In a rat model of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced T1D, GHRH receptor expression was found to be up-regulated in the distal small intestine, a tissue involved in chylomicron synthesis. Treatment of T1D rats with a GHRH antagonist, MIA-602, at a dose that did not affect plasma GH levels, significantly reduced TRL, as well as markers of renal injury, and improved endothelial-dependent vasorelaxation. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) reduces hyperglucagonemia and postprandial TRL, the latter in part through a decreased synthesis of apolipoprotein B-48 (ApoB-48) by intestinal cells. Although plasma GLP-1 levels were elevated in diabetic animals, this was accompanied by increased rather than reduced glucagon levels, suggesting impaired GLP-1 signaling. Treatment with MIA-602 normalized GLP-1 and glucagon to control levels in T1D rats. MIA-602 also decreased secretion of ApoB-48 from rat intestinal epithelial cells in response to oleic acid stimulation in vitro, in part through a GLP-1–dependent mechanism. Our findings support the hypothesis that antagonizing the signaling of GHRH in T1D may improve GLP-1 function in the small intestine, which, in turn, diminishes TRL and reduces renal and vascular complications. PMID:26831066

  20. Interaction between a growth-hormone releasing hexapeptide and phospholipids spread as monolayers at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Issaurat, B; Teissié, J

    1988-10-20

    The interaction between a growth-hormone releasing hexapeptide and phospholipids was studied on mixed monolayers models by means of surface fluorescence. When in a monolayer this hexapeptide which contains two tryptophan molecules was observed to fluoresce. Isothermal compression experiments showed that the complex was destroyed upon compression in the case of phosphatidylethanolamine. With phosphatidylglycerol it was observed to be stable but a dramatic reversible decrease in emission was observed at high surface pressure. This is indicative of a reversible change in the organization of the peptide-phospholipid complex. These observations indicate that, in the complex, hydrophobic interactions were weak but electrostatic ones, when present, were strong enough to maintain the GHRP attached to the monolayer and not to destabilize it. The integrity of the lipid monolayer appeared not to be affected by the peptide. PMID:3179304

  1. PLGA microsphere-mediated growth hormone release hormone expression induces intergenerational growth.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Luo, Hu-Ying; Li, Hong-Yi; Liu, Song-Cai; Zhang, Ming-Jun; Ouyang, Song-Ying; Xi, Qian-Yun; Jiang, Qing-Yan

    2009-01-01

    To improve animal growth, growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) expression vectors that maintain constant GHRH expression can be directly injected into muscles. To deliver the GHRH expression vectors, biodegradable microspheres have been used as a sustained release system. Although administering GHRH through microspheres is a common practice, the intergenerational effects of this delivery system are unknown. To investigate the intergenerational effects of polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) encapsulated plasmid-mediated GHRH supplements, pCMV-Rep-GHRH microspheres were injected into pregnant mice. Growth and expression of GHRH were measured in the offspring. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry reveal GHRH expression 3-21 days post-injection. The proportion of GH-positive cells in the GHRH treated offspring was 48.2% higher than in the control group (P < 0.01). The GHRH treated offspring were 6.15% (P < 0.05) larger than the control offspring. At day 49 post-injection, IGF-I serum levels were significantly higher in the treatment group than in the control group. This study confirms that intramuscular expression of GHRH mediated by PLGA microspheres significantly enhances intergenerational growth.

  2. Identification of the growth hormone-releasing hormone analogue [Pro1, Val14]-hGHRH with an incomplete C-term amidation in a confiscated product.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Simone; Deventer, Koen; Van Eenoo, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a modified version of the 44 amino acid human growth hormone-releasing hormone (hGHRH(1-44)) containing an N-terminal proline extension, a valine residue in position 14, and a C-terminus amidation (sequence: PYADAIFTNSYRKVVLGQLSARKLLQDIMSRQQGESNQERGARARL-NH2 ) has been identified in a confiscated product by liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). Investigation of the product suggests also an incomplete C-term amidation. Similarly to other hGHRH analogues, available in black markets, this peptide can potentially be used as performance-enhancing drug due to its growth hormone releasing activity and therefore it should be considered as a prohibited substance in sport. Additionally, the presence of partially amidated molecule reveals the poor pharmaceutical quality of the preparation, an aspect which represents a big concern for public health as well.

  3. Intimate associations between the endogenous opiate systems and the growth hormone-releasing hormone system in the human hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Olsen, J; Peroski, M; Kiczek, M; Grignol, G; Merchenthaler, I; Dudas, B

    2014-01-31

    Although it is a general consensus that opioids modulate growth, the mechanism of this phenomenon is largely unknown. Since endogenous opiates use the same receptor family as morphine, these peptides may be one of the key regulators of growth in humans by impacting growth hormone (GH) secretion, either directly, or indirectly, via growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) release. However, the exact mechanism of this regulation has not been elucidated yet. In the present study we identified close juxtapositions between the enkephalinergic/endorphinergic/dynorphinergic axonal varicosities and GHRH-immunoreactive (IR) perikarya in the human hypothalamus. Due to the long post mortem period electron microscopy could not be utilized to detect the presence of synapses between the enkephalinergic/endorphinergic/dynorphinergic and GHRH neurons. Therefore, we used light microscopic double-label immunocytochemistry to identify putative juxtapositions between these systems. Our findings revealed that the majority of the GHRH-IR perikarya formed intimate associations with enkephalinergic axonal varicosities in the infundibular nucleus/median eminence, while endorphinergic-GHRH juxtapositions were much less frequent. In contrast, no significant dynorphinergic-GHRH associations were detected. The density of the abutting enkephalinergic fibers on the surface of the GHRH perikarya suggests that these juxtapositions may be functional synapses and may represent the morphological substrate of the impact of enkephalin on growth. The small number of GHRH neurons innervated by the endorphin and dynorphin systems indicates significant differences between the regulatory roles of endogenous opiates on growth in humans. PMID:24239719

  4. Combined nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics study of growth hormone releasing hexapeptide GHRP-6 and a cyclic analogue.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Oliva, Miguel; Santana, Héctor; Suardíaz, Reynier; Gavín, José A; Pérez, Carlos S

    2012-05-01

    The Growth Hormone Releasing Hexapeptide, GHRP-6 was the first of a family of synthetic peptides that enhance the release of the Growth Hormone by the pituitary gland in a dose-dependent manner. Since its discovery, it has been used as a benchmark and starting point in numerous researches aiming to obtain new drugs. Complete resonance assignment of GHRP-6 NMR spectra in both open and cyclic forms are reported, showing some differences to random coil chemical shifts. Connectivities observed in the ROESY spectra indicate spatial proximity between the aromatic residues side-chains in both molecules, as well as between residues DPhe5 and Lys6 sidechains. An ensemble of 10 structures was generated for each one of the molecules, showing RMSD values indicative of nonrandom structures. Molecular Dynamics simulations, both with and without explicit solvent, were carried out for GHRP-6 and its cyclic analogue. Conformational analysis performed on the trajectories showed a nonrandom structure with a well preserved backbone. The presence of geometrical patterns resembling those typical of π-π interactions in both peptides, suggest that this kind of interactions may be relevant for the biological activity of GHRP-6. Same conclusion can be drawn from the spatial proximity of residues DPhe5 and Lys6 sidechains.

  5. Regulation of hypothalamic somatostatin and growth hormone releasing hormone mRNA levels by inhibin.

    PubMed

    Carro, E; Señarís, R M; Mallo, F; Diéguez, C

    1999-03-20

    Although it is well established that inhibin plays a major role in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, its influence in the regulation of other neuroendocrine functions is still poorly understood. Recent results indicate that inhibin suppresses plasma GH levels, but its site of action is yet unknown. Therefore, in the present work we investigated the effects of inhibin on somatostatin and growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) mRNA levels in the hypothalamus by 'in situ' hybridization. We found that inhibin administration (4, 12 and 24 h, i.c.v.) led to an increase in somatostatin mRNA levels in the periventricular nucleus, and to a decrease in GHRH mRNA content in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. These findings indicate that inhibin regulates the hypothalamic levels of somatostatin and GHRH mRNA.

  6. Growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) induced growth hormone advances puberty in female buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Haldar, A; Prakash, B S

    2006-05-01

    Exogenous bovine growth hormone-releasing factor (bGRF) at the dose rate of 10 microg/100 kg body weight was administered intravenously (i.v.) to six Murrah buffalo heifers as treatment group, while another six buffalo heifers served as control group which received the vehicle (0.9% NaCl solution) at an interval of 15 days for a period of 9 months to study the effect of bGRF on puberty onset associated with temporal hormonal changes in peri-pubertal buffalo heifers. Blood samples were collected at 3-day interval from all the animals during the experimental period and plasma harvested was assayed for growth hormonal (GH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and progesterone. The day that plasma progesterone was greater than 1.0 ng/ml for three consecutive sampling days was defined as the day of puberty. Exogenous bGRF administration increased (P = 0.02) plasma GH concentration in treatment group over control group during the treatment of bGRF as well as during the peri-pubertal period. Plasma progesterone concentrations increased transiently earlier (P = 0.05) by 58.5 days in bGRF-treated buffaloes than that in the control group. However, plasma LH concentrations were unaffected by the treatment of bGRF (P = 0.48). Both plasma GH and LH in the buffalo heifers increased (P < 0.01) over time preceding puberty and the higher hormonal concentrations were maintained during the onset of puberty, and thereafter, the concentrations of both the hormones declined (P < 0.05) after puberty. GH and LH were positively correlated both before puberty (r = +0.59 and +0.63; P < 0.05 for control and treatment group, respectively) and after puberty (r = +0.42 and +0.46; P < 0.05 for control and treatment group, respectively) indicating the interaction and/or close relationship of GH and LH in the mechanism of puberty in buffalo species. PMID:16011881

  7. Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone and Its Analogues: Significance for MSCs-Mediated Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Quanwei; Ma, Qunchao; Chen, Huiqiang; Wang, Jian'an

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for regenerative medicine because of their multipotency, immune-privilege, and paracrine properties including the potential to promote angiogenesis. Accumulating evidence suggests that the inherent properties of cytoprotection and tissue repair by native MSCs can be enhanced by various preconditioning stimuli implemented prior to cell transplantation. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), a stimulator in extrahypothalamus systems including tumors, has attracted great attentions in recent years because GHRH and its agonists could promote angiogenesis in various tissues. GHRH and its agonists are proangiogenic in responsive tissues including tumors, and GHRH antagonists have been tested as antitumor agents through their ability to suppress angiogenesis and cell growth. GHRH-R is expressed by MSCs and evolving work from our laboratory indicates that treatment of MSCs with GHRH agonists prior to cell transplantation markedly enhanced the angiogenic potential and tissue reparative properties of MSCs through a STAT3 signaling pathway. In this review we summarized the possible effects of GHRH analogues on cell growth and development, as well as on the proangiogenic properties of MSCs. We also discussed the relationship between GHRH analogues and MSC-mediated angiogenesis. The analyses provide new insights into molecular pathways of MSCs-based therapies and their augmentation by GHRH analogues. PMID:27774107

  8. Growth hormone-releasing hormone disruption extends lifespan and regulates response to caloric restriction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liou Y; Spong, Adam; Swindell, William R; Fang, Yimin; Hill, Cristal; Huber, Joshua A; Boehm, Jacob D; Westbrook, Reyhan; Salvatori, Roberto; Bartke, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    We examine the impact of targeted disruption of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) in mice on longevity and the putative mechanisms of delayed aging. GHRH knockout mice are remarkably long-lived, exhibiting major shifts in the expression of genes related to xenobiotic detoxification, stress resistance, and insulin signaling. These mutant mice also have increased adiponectin levels and alterations in glucose homeostasis consistent with the removal of the counter-insulin effects of growth hormone. While these effects overlap with those of caloric restriction, we show that the effects of caloric restriction (CR) and the GHRH mutation are additive, with lifespan of GHRH-KO mutants further increased by CR. We conclude that GHRH-KO mice feature perturbations in a network of signaling pathways related to stress resistance, metabolic control and inflammation, and therefore provide a new model that can be used to explore links between GHRH repression, downregulation of the somatotropic axis, and extended longevity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01098.001 PMID:24175087

  9. Structural and functional divergence of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptors in early sarcopterygians: lungfish and Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Tam, Janice K V; Chow, Billy K C; Lee, Leo T O

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionary trajectories of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor remain enigmatic since the discovery of physiologically functional GHRH-GHRH receptor (GHRHR) in non-mammalian vertebrates in 2007. Interestingly, subsequent studies have described the identification of a GHRHR(2) in chicken in addition to the GHRHR and the closely related paralogous receptor, PACAP-related peptide (PRP) receptor (PRPR). In this article, we provide information, for the first time, on the GHRHR in sarcopterygian fish and amphibians by the cloning and characterization of GHRHRs from lungfish (P. dolloi) and X. laevis. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated structural resemblance of lungfish GHRHR to their mammalian orthologs, while the X. laevis GHRHR showed the highest homology to GHRHR(2) in zebrafish and chicken. Functionally, lungfish GHRHR displayed high affinity towards GHRH in triggering intracellular cAMP and calcium accumulation, while X. laevis GHRHR(2) was able to react with both endogenous GHRH and PRP. Tissue distribution analyses showed that both lungfish GHRHR and X. laevis GHRHR(2) had the highest expression in brain, and interestingly, X. laevis(GHRHR2) also had high abundance in the reproductive organs. These findings, together with previous reports, suggest that early in the Sarcopterygii lineage, GHRHR and PRPR have already established diverged and specific affinities towards their cognate ligands. GHRHR(2), which has only been found in xenopus, zebrafish and chicken hitherto, accommodates both GHRH and PRP.

  10. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) polymorphisms associated with carcass traits of meat in Korean cattle

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Hyun Sub; Yoon, Du-Hak; Kim, Lyoung Hyo; Park, Byung Lae; Choi, Yoo Hyun; Chung, Eui Ryong; Cho, Yong Min; Park, Eng Woo; Cheong, Il-Cheong; Oh, Sung-Jong; Yi, Sung-Gon; Park, Taesung; Shin, Hyoung Doo

    2006-01-01

    Background Cold carcass weight (CW) and longissimus muscle area (EMA) are the major quantitative traits in beef cattle. In this study, we found several polymorphisms of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) gene and examined the association of polymorphisms with carcass traits (CW and EMA) in Korean native cattle (Hanwoo). Results By direct DNA sequencing in 24 unrelated Korean cattle, we identified 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms within the 9 kb full gene region, including the 1.5 kb promoter region. Among them, six polymorphic sites were selected for genotyping in our beef cattle (n = 428) and five marker haplotypes (frequency > 0.1) were identified. Statistical analysis revealed that -4241A>T showed significant associations with CW and EMA. Conclusion Our findings suggest that polymorphisms in GHRH might be one of the important genetic factors that influence carcass yield in beef cattle. Sequence variation/haplotype information identified in this study would provide valuable information for the production of a commercial line of beef cattle. PMID:16749938

  11. Myogenic expression of an injectable protease-resistant growth hormone-releasing hormone augments long-term growth in pigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draghia-Akli, R.; Fiorotto, M. L.; Hill, L. A.; Malone, P. B.; Deaver, D. R.; Schwartz, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    Ectopic expression of a new serum protease-resistant porcine growth hormone-releasing hormone, directed by an injectable muscle-specific synthetic promoter plasmid vector (pSP-HV-GHRH), elicits growth in pigs. A single 10 mg intramuscular injection of pSP-HV-GHRH DNA followed by electroporation in three-week-old piglets elevated serum GHRH levels by twofold to fourfold, enhanced growth hormone secretion, and increased serum insulin-like growth factor-I by threefold to sixfold over control pigs. After 65 days the average body weight of the pigs injected with pSP-HV-GHRH was approximately 37% greater than the placebo-injected controls and resulted in a significant reduction in serum urea concentration, indicating a decrease in amino acid catabolism. Evaluation of body composition indicated a uniform increase in mass, with no organomegaly or associated pathology.

  12. The CB1 receptor mediates the peripheral effects of ghrelin on AMPK activity but not on growth hormone release.

    PubMed

    Kola, Blerina; Wittman, Gábor; Bodnár, Ibolya; Amin, Faisal; Lim, Chung Thong; Oláh, Márk; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Lolli, Francesca; van Thuijl, Hinke; Leontiou, Chrysanthia A; Füzesi, Tamás; Dalino, Paolo; Isidori, Andrea M; Harvey-White, Judith; Kunos, George; Nagy, György M; Grossman, Ashley B; Fekete, Csaba; Korbonits, Márta

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether the growth hormone release and metabolic effects of ghrelin on AMPK activity of peripheral tissues are mediated by cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and the central nervous system. CB1-knockout (KO) and/or wild-type mice were injected peripherally or intracerebroventricularly with ghrelin and CB1 antagonist rimonabant to study tissue AMPK activity and gene expression (transcription factors SREBP1c, transmembrane protein FAS, enzyme PEPCK, and protein HSL). Growth hormone levels were studied both in vivo and in vitro. Peripherally administered ghrelin in liver, heart, and adipose tissue AMPK activity cannot be observed in CB1-KO or CB1 antagonist-treated mice. Intracerebroventricular ghrelin treatment can influence peripheral AMPK activity. This effect is abolished in CB1-KO mice and by intracerebroventricular rimonabant treatment, suggesting that central CB1 receptors also participate in the signaling pathway that mediates the effects of ghrelin on peripheral tissues. Interestingly, in vivo or in vitro growth hormone release is intact in response to ghrelin in CB1-KO animals. Our data suggest that the metabolic effects of ghrelin on AMPK in peripheral tissues are abolished by the lack of functional CB1 receptor via direct peripheral effect and partially through the central nervous system, thus supporting the existence of a possible ghrelin-cannabinoid-CB1-AMPK pathway.

  13. Puberty, statural growth, and growth hormone release in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kuperminc, Michelle N.; Gurka, Matthew J.; Houlihan, Christine M.; Henderson, Richard C.; Roemmich, James N.; Rogol, Alan D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Children with cerebral palsy (CP) are smaller than normally growing children.. The association between the growth hormone (GH) axis and growth in children with CP during puberty is unknown. We compared growth and markers of the GH axis in pre-pubertal and pubertal children with moderate to severe CP and without CP over a three-year period. Study design Twenty children with CP, ages 6–18, Gross Motor Function Classification System levels III–V, were compared to a group of sixty-three normally growing children of similar age. Anthropometry, Tanner stage, bone age, and laboratory analyses were performed every six months for three years. Laboratory values included spontaneous overnight GH release, fasting IGF-1 and IGFBP-3. Repeated measures models were used to evaluate interactions among Tanner stage and group (children with CP vs. reference children), taking into account gender, age, and nutritional status. Results Children with CP grew more slowly than those without CP at all Tanner stages (p<0.01). Patterns of IGF-1 and GH secretion in children with CP were similar to those of the reference group; however, the concentrations of IGF-1 (p<0.01) and GH (p<0.01) were lower in girls with CP, with a similar trend for boys (p=0.10 and 0.14, respectively). Conclusions Diminished circulating IGF-1 and GH concentrations may explain the differences in growth between the two groups. PMID:20216931

  14. Inhibitory effects of antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone on growth and invasiveness of PC3 human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Moreno, Laura; Arenas, M Isabel; Schally, Andrew V; Fernández-Martínez, Ana B; Zarka, Elías; González-Santander, Marta; Carmena, María J; Vacas, Eva; Prieto, Juan C; Bajo, Ana M

    2013-02-15

    New approaches are needed to the therapy of advanced prostate cancer. This study determined the effect of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) antagonists, JMR-132 and JV-1-38 on growth of PC3 tumors as well as on angiogenesis and metastasis through the evaluation of various factors that contribute largely to the progression of prostate cancer. Human PC3 androgen-independent prostate cancer cells were injected subcutaneously into nude mice. The treatment with JMR-132 (10 μg/day) or JV-1-38 (20 μg/day) lasted 41 days. We also evaluated the effects of JMR-132 and JV-1-38 on proliferation, cell adhesion and migration in PC-3 cells in vitro. Several techniques (Western blot, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, ELISA and zymography) were used to evaluate the expression levels of GHRH receptors and its splice variants, GHRH, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α, metalloproteinases (MMPs) -2 and -9, β-catenin and E-cadherin. GHRH antagonists suppressed the proliferation of PC-3 cells in vitro and significantly inhibited growth of PC3 tumors. After treatment with these analogues, we found an increase in expression of GHRH receptor accompanied by a decrease of GHRH levels, a reduction in both VEGF and HIF-1α expression and in active forms of MMP-2 and MMP-9, a significant increase in levels of membrane-associated β-catenin and a significant decline in E-cadherin. These results support that the blockade of GHRH receptors can modulate elements involved in angiogenesis and metastasis. Consequently, GHRH antagonists could be considered as suitable candidates for therapeutic trials in the management of androgen-independent prostate cancer.

  15. Chronic [D-Ala2]-growth hormone-releasing hormone administration attenuates age-related deficits in spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Thornton, P L; Ingram, R L; Sonntag, W E

    2000-02-01

    The age-related decline in growth hormone is one of the most robust endocrine markers of biological aging and has been hypothesized to contribute to the physiological deficits observed in aged animals. However, there have been few studies of the impact of this hormonal decline on brain aging. In this study, the effect of long-term subcutaneous administration of [D-Ala2]-growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) on one measure of brain function, memory, was investigated. Animals were injected daily with 2.3 microg of [D-Ala2]-GHRH or saline from 9 to 30 months of age, and the spatial learning and reference memory of animals were assessed by using the Morris water maze and compared with those of 6-month-old animals. Results indicated that spatial memory decreased with age and that chronic [D-Ala2]-GHRH prevented this age-related decrement (24% improvement in the annulus-40 time and 23% improvement in the number of platform crossings compared with saline treated, age-matched controls; p < .05 each). No changes were noted in sensorimotor performance. [D-Ala2]-GHRH attenuated the age-related decline in plasma concentrations of insulinlike growth factor-1 (IGF-1) (p <.05). These data suggest that growth hormone and IGF-1 have important effects on brain function, that the decline in growth hormone and IGF-1 with age contributes to impairments in reference memory, and that these changes can be reversed by the chronic administration of GHRH.

  16. A 66-bp deletion in growth hormone releasing hormone gene 5'-flanking region with largemouth bass recessive embryonic lethal.

    PubMed

    Ma, D M; Han, L Q; Bai, J J; Li, S J; Fan, J J; Yu, L Y; Quan, Y C

    2014-06-01

    Growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) regulates the secretion of growth hormone (GH) in the pituitary gland. A 66-bp deletion (c.-923_-858del) was detected in the 5'-flanking sequence of the largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) GHRH gene. In two cultured random populations of adult individuals (A: n = 170 and B: n = 150), the genotype ratios of +/+:+/- were 2.5:1 and 2.8:1 respectively. Only one -/- fish was detected. A Largemouth bass family was constructed with two heterozygous individuals (+/-) as parents. The genotype ratio of +/+:+/-:-/- in the filial generation embryos was 1:1.6:0.1 at the neurula and 1:2:0 at hatched larvae stages. This indicated that the 66-bp deletion was a recessive lethal site and that homozygous individuals (-/-) died off in embryonic development. The growth traits (body weight, body length and body depth) were measured, and the GHRH mRNA expression levels in brain tissue were detected using real-time PCR. The effects of genotype (+/-) on growth traits and GHRH mRNA expression were not significant. Although the cause of death was not clear, the results hint that the 66-bp deletion site in GHRH 5'-flanking sequence significantly affects the livability in largemouth bass embryonic development. PMID:24697798

  17. A 66-bp deletion in growth hormone releasing hormone gene 5'-flanking region with largemouth bass recessive embryonic lethal.

    PubMed

    Ma, D M; Han, L Q; Bai, J J; Li, S J; Fan, J J; Yu, L Y; Quan, Y C

    2014-06-01

    Growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) regulates the secretion of growth hormone (GH) in the pituitary gland. A 66-bp deletion (c.-923_-858del) was detected in the 5'-flanking sequence of the largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) GHRH gene. In two cultured random populations of adult individuals (A: n = 170 and B: n = 150), the genotype ratios of +/+:+/- were 2.5:1 and 2.8:1 respectively. Only one -/- fish was detected. A Largemouth bass family was constructed with two heterozygous individuals (+/-) as parents. The genotype ratio of +/+:+/-:-/- in the filial generation embryos was 1:1.6:0.1 at the neurula and 1:2:0 at hatched larvae stages. This indicated that the 66-bp deletion was a recessive lethal site and that homozygous individuals (-/-) died off in embryonic development. The growth traits (body weight, body length and body depth) were measured, and the GHRH mRNA expression levels in brain tissue were detected using real-time PCR. The effects of genotype (+/-) on growth traits and GHRH mRNA expression were not significant. Although the cause of death was not clear, the results hint that the 66-bp deletion site in GHRH 5'-flanking sequence significantly affects the livability in largemouth bass embryonic development.

  18. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) antagonists inhibit the proliferation of androgen-dependent and -independent prostate cancers

    PubMed Central

    Letsch, Markus; Schally, Andrew V.; Busto, Rebeca; Bajo, Ana M.; Varga, Jozsef L.

    2003-01-01

    The antiproliferative effects of an antagonist of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) JV-1-38 were evaluated in nude mice bearing s.c. xenografts of LNCaP and MDA-PCa-2b human androgen-sensitive and DU-145 androgen-independent prostate cancers. In the androgen-sensitive models, JV-1-38 greatly potentiated the antitumor effect of androgen deprivation induced by surgical castration, but was ineffective when given alone. Thus, in castrated animals bearing MDA-PCa-2b cancers, the administration of JV-1-38 for 35 days virtually arrested tumor growth (94% inhibition vs. intact control, P < 0.01; and 75% vs. castrated control, P < 0.05). The growth of LNCaP tumors was also powerfully suppressed by JV-1-38 combined with castration (83% inhibition vs. intact control, P < 0.01; and 68% vs. castrated control, P < 0.05). However, in androgen-independent DU-145 cancers, JV-1-38 alone could inhibit tumor growth by 57% (P < 0.05) after 45 days. In animals bearing MDA-PCa-2b and LNCaP tumors, the reduction in serum prostate-specific antigen levels, after therapy with JV-1-38, paralleled the decrease in tumor volume. Inhibition of MDA-PCa-2b and DU-145 cancers was associated with the reduction in the expression of mRNA and protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor. The mRNA expression for GHRH receptor splice variants was found in all these models of prostate cancer. Our results demonstrate that GHRH antagonists inhibit androgen-independent prostate cancers and, after combination with androgen deprivation, also androgen-sensitive tumors. Thus, the therapy with GHRH antagonist could be considered for the management of both androgen-dependent or -independent prostate cancers. PMID:12538852

  19. Neither bovine somatotropin nor growth hormone-releasing factor alters expression of thyroid hormone receptors in liver and mammary tissues.

    PubMed

    Capuco, A V; Binelli, M; Tucker, H A

    2011-10-01

    Physiological effects of thyroid hormones are mediated primarily by binding of triiodothyronine to specific nuclear receptors. Organ-specific changes in production of triiodothyronine from its prohormone, thyroxine, have been hypothesized to target the action of thyroid hormones on the mammary gland and play a role in mediating or augmenting a galactopoietic response to bovine somatotropin (bST). Additionally, tissue responsiveness to thyroid hormones may be altered by changes in the number or affinity of nuclear receptors for thyroid hormones. In the present study, effects of bST and bovine growth hormone-releasing factor (bGRF) on thyroid hormone receptors in liver and mammary gland were studied. Lactating Holstein cows received continuous infusions of bST or bGRF for 63 d or served as uninfused controls. Nuclei were isolated from harvested mammary and liver tissues and incubated with [(125)I]-triiodothyronine. Treatments did not alter the capacity or affinity of specific binding sites for triiodothyronine in liver or mammary nuclei. Evaluation of transcript abundance for thyroid hormone receptors showed that isoforms of thyroid hormone receptor or retinoid receptor (which may influence thyroid receptor action) expressed in the mammary gland were not altered by bST or bGRF treatment. Data do not support the hypothesis that administration of bST or bGRF alters sensitivity of mammary tissue by changing expression of thyroid hormone receptors.

  20. Immunocytochemical and pharmacological evidence for an intrinsic cholinomimetic system modulating prolactin and growth hormone release in rat pituitary.

    PubMed

    Carmeliet, P; Denef, C

    1988-08-01

    Pituitary cells were cultured as three-dimensional reaggregates in serum-free chemically defined medium supplemented with different concentrations of dexamethasone. Immunostaining of the cells using a polyclonal antiserum and three monoclonal antibodies raised against choline acetyl transferase (CAT), revealed the presence of CAT immunoreactivity in 4-10% of anterior pituitary cells depending on the antibody used. CAT immunoreactivity was also found in freshly dispersed anterior pituitary cells. CAT-immunoreactive cells could be enriched on BSA and Percoll gradients and codistributed with ACTH-immunoreactive cells in these gradients. Perifusion of the aggregates with the potent muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (Atr) resulted in a dose-dependent (0.1-100 nM) increase in both basal PRL and GH secretion; the response was dependent on the dexamethasone concentration in the culture medium. A similar response to Atr was observed in organ-cultured pituitaries. The specificity of the Atr effect was supported by the findings that the potent and highly specific muscarinic receptor blocker dexetimide showed a similar action, whereas its inactive enantiomer levetimide and the nicotinic receptor blocker hexamethonium failed to do so. Two other muscarinic antagonists, benzatropine and pirenzepine, showed a dose-dependent hormone-releasing action similar to that of Atr, but were less potent than the latter. Pirenzepine was only effective at high molar concentrations, suggesting that an M2 muscarinic receptor subtype was mediating the present phenomenon. Atr also potentiated GH release stimulated by the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol and PRL release stimulated by vasoactive intestinal peptide, but had no effect on GRF-stimulated GH release. The choline uptake blocker hemicholinium abolished the effect of Atr on GH and PRL release. These data suggest that certain pituitary cells can express CAT activity and that these cells exert a tonic inhibitory activity on GH and

  1. Specific involvement of gonadal hormones in the functional maturation of growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) neurons.

    PubMed

    Gouty-Colomer, Laurie-Anne; Méry, Pierre-François; Storme, Emilie; Gavois, Elodie; Robinson, Iain C; Guérineau, Nathalie C; Mollard, Patrice; Desarménien, Michel G

    2010-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is the key hormone involved in the regulation of growth and metabolism, two functions that are highly modulated during infancy. GH secretion, controlled mainly by GH releasing hormone (GHRH), has a characteristic pattern during postnatal development that results in peaks of blood concentration at birth and puberty. A detailed knowledge of the electrophysiology of the GHRH neurons is necessary to understand the mechanisms regulating postnatal GH secretion. Here, we describe the unique postnatal development of the electrophysiological properties of GHRH neurons and their regulation by gonadal hormones. Using GHRH-eGFP mice, we demonstrate that already at birth, GHRH neurons receive numerous synaptic inputs and fire large and fast action potentials (APs), consistent with effective GH secretion. Concomitant with the GH secretion peak occurring at puberty, these neurons display modifications of synaptic input properties, decrease in AP duration, and increase in a transient voltage-dependant potassium current. Furthermore, the modulation of both the AP duration and voltage-dependent potassium current are specifically controlled by gonadal hormones because gonadectomy prevented the maturation of these active properties and hormonal treatment restored it. Thus, GHRH neurons undergo specific developmental modulations of their electrical properties over the first six postnatal weeks, in accordance with hormonal demand. Our results highlight the importance of the interaction between the somatotrope and gonadotrope axes during the establishment of adapted neuroendocrine functions.

  2. The expression of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) and splice variants of its receptor in human gastroenteropancreatic carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Busto, Rebeca; Schally, Andrew V.; Varga, Jozsef L.; Garcia-Fernandez, M. Olga; Groot, Kate; Armatis, Patricia; Szepeshazi, Karoly

    2002-01-01

    Splice variants (SVs) of receptors for growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) have been found in primary human prostate cancers and diverse human cancer cell lines. GHRH antagonists inhibit growth of various experimental human cancers, including pancreatic and colorectal, xenografted into nude mice or cultured in vitro, and their antiproliferative action could be mediated in part through SVs of GHRH receptors. In this study we examined the expression of mRNA for GHRH and for SVs of its receptors in tumors of human pancreatic, colorectal, and gastric cancer cell lines grown in nude mice. mRNA for both GHRH and SV1 isoform of GHRH receptors was expressed in tumors of pancreatic (SW1990, PANC-1, MIA PaCa-2, Capan-1, Capan-2, and CFPAC1), colonic (COLO 320DM and HT-29), and gastric (NCI-N87, HS746T, and AGS) cancer cell lines; mRNA for SV2 was also present in Capan-1, Capan-2, CFPAC1, HT-29, and NCI-N87 tumors. In proliferation studies in vitro, the growth of pancreatic, colonic, and gastric cancer cells was stimulated by GHRH(1–29)NH2 and inhibited by GHRH antagonist JV-1–38. The stimulation of some gastroenteropancreatic cancer cells by GHRH was followed by an increase in cAMP production, and GHRH antagonist JV-1–38 competitively inhibited this effect. Our study indicates the presence of an autocrine/paracrine stimulatory loop based on GHRH and SV1 of GHRH receptors in human pancreatic, colorectal, and gastric cancers. The finding of SV1 receptor in human cancers provides an approach to an antitumor therapy based on the blockade of this receptor by specific GHRH antagonists. PMID:12186980

  3. Bed rest suppresses bioassayable growth hormone release in response to muscle activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCall, G. E.; Goulet, C.; Grindeland, R. E.; Hodgson, J. A.; Bigbee, A. J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    Hormonal responses to muscle activity were studied in eight men before (-13 or -12 and -8 or -7 days), during (2 or 3, 8 or 9, and 13 or 14 days) and after (+2 or +3 and +10 or +11 days) 17 days of bed rest. Muscle activity consisted of a series of unilateral isometric plantar flexions, including 4 maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs), 48 contractions at 30% MVC, and 12 contractions at 80% MVC, all performed at a 4:1-s work-to-rest ratio. Blood was collected before and immediately after muscle activity to measure plasma growth hormone by radioimmunoassay (IGH) and by bioassay (BGH) of tibia epiphyseal cartilage growth in hypophysectomized rats. Plasma IGH was unchanged by muscle activity before, during, or after bed rest. Before bed rest, muscle activity increased (P < 0.05) BGH by 66% at -13 or -12 days (2,146 +/- 192 to 3,565 +/- 197 microg/l) and by 92% at -8 or -7 days (2,162 +/- 159 to 4,161 +/- 204 microg/l). After 2 or 3 days of bed rest, there was no response of BGH to the muscle activity, a pattern that persisted through 8 or 9 days of bed rest. However, after 13 or 14 days of bed rest, plasma concentration of BGH was significantly lower after than before muscle activity (2,594 +/- 211 to 2,085 +/- 109 microg/l). After completion of bed rest, muscle activity increased BGH by 31% at 2 or 3 days (1,807 +/- 117 to 2,379 +/- 473 microg/l; P < 0.05), and by 10 or 11 days the BGH response was similar to that before bed rest (1,881 +/- 75 to 4,160 +/- 315 microg/l; P < 0.05). These data demonstrate that the ambulatory state of an individual can have a major impact on the release of BGH, but not IGH, in response to a single bout of muscle activity.

  4. Thyroid hormone and estrogen regulate exercise-induced growth hormone release.

    PubMed

    Ignacio, Daniele Leão; da S Silvestre, Diego H; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Louzada, Ruy Andrade; Carvalho, Denise P; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1) activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60%) in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold) 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU) injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response. PMID:25874614

  5. Ghrelin-induced growth hormone release from goldfish pituitary cells is nitric oxide dependent.

    PubMed

    Grey, Caleb L; Chang, John P

    2012-11-01

    Ghrelin (GRLN) is an important neuroendocrine regulator of growth hormone (GH) release in vertebrates. Previous studies show goldfish (g)GRLN(19)-induced GH from the goldfish pituitary involves voltage sensitive Ca(2+) channels, increases in intracellular Ca(2+) and the PKC signalling pathway. We set out to examine the role of the nitric oxide (NO) pathway in gGLRN(19)-induced GH release from primary cultures of goldfish pituitary cells using pharmacological regulators in cell column perifusion systems. The NO scavenger PTIO abolished gGRLN(19)-induced GH release and co-treatment with the NO donor SNP and GRLN did not produce additive GH release responses. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors 1400 W and 7-Ni abolished GRLN-induced GH release while treatment with another NOS inhibitor, AGH, had no significant effect. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the NOS/NO is an integral component of gGRLN(19)-induced signalling within the goldfish pituitary cells, and given the relative specificity of AGH for inducible NOS and endothelial NOS isoforms, suggests that neuronal NOS is the likely NOS isoform utilized in goldfish somatotropes by this physiological regulator.

  6. Thyroid Hormone and Estrogen Regulate Exercise-Induced Growth Hormone Release

    PubMed Central

    Ignacio, Daniele Leão; da S. Silvestre, Diego H.; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Louzada, Ruy Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1) activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60%) in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold) 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU) injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response. PMID:25874614

  7. Ontogeny and pituitary regulation of testicular growth hormone-releasing hormone-like messenger ribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Berry, S A; Pescovitz, O H

    1990-09-01

    The testis is rich in central nervous system-type neuropeptides, including a GH-releasing hormone (GHRH)-like substance. We examined the ontogeny and pituitary regulation of testicular GHRH-like mRNA (t-GHRH mRNA) and compared this to expression of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-II mRNA in developing testis. t-GHRH mRNA was measured by dot blot hybridization and quantitated using a hypothalamic GHRH cRNA standard. t-GHRH mRNA was not detectable in Northern blots in fetal testis on day 19 of gestation, but was present in low but detectable amounts in testicular dot blots on day 2 of life (0.44 pg/micrograms total RNA). Levels of the RNA increased beginning on day 21 (1.72 +/- 0.23 pg/micrograms total RNA) and reached adult levels by day 30 (4.96 +/- 0.84 pg/micrograms total RNA). The GHRH species on Northern analysis was about 1750 nucleotides at all ages examined; there was a larger species of about 3350 nucleotides seen on days 65 and 90. There was no correlation between the ontogeny of t-GHRH mRNA and either IGF-I or IGF-II mRNAs, which were maximally expressed in the testes of day 2 animals and decreased with age. To examine the influence of the pituitary gland on t-GHRH mRNA, levels of the mRNA were measured in the tests of hypophysectomized animals and age-matched controls. In animals hypophysectomized on day 21 and killed on day 42 and in animals hypophysectomized on day 42 and killed on day 63, there was marked diminution of t-GHRH mRNA (19 +/- 5% and 9 +/- 2% of age-matched controls, respectively). In contrast, in animals hypophysectomized on day 65 and killed on either day 80 or 90, there was a much smaller difference in levels of t-GHRH mRNA compared to values in control animals (73 +/- 20%). This was unlike the effect of hypophysectomy on testicular IGF-I mRNA, where uniform diminution was seen in all three groups. Because GH is important in the regulation of hypothalamic GHRH mRNA, we examined the effects of administration of recombinant

  8. Feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, hormones, and metabolites in steers actively immunized against growth hormone-releasing factor.

    PubMed

    Harvey, R W; Armstrong, J D; Heimer, E P; Campbell, R M

    1993-11-01

    Large-framed Simmental and Charolais steers were actively immunized against growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) to evaluate the effect on growth, carcass characteristics (especially intramuscular fat deposition), and concentrations of somatotropin (ST) and IGF-I. Primary immunizations of 1.5 mg of GRF-(1-29)-Gly-Gly-Cys-NH2 conjugated to 1.5 mg of human serum albumin (GRFi, n = 12) or 1.5 mg of human serum albumin (HSAi, n = 12) were given at approximately 10 mo of age. Booster immunizations of .5 mg of the appropriate antigen were given at d 49 and 125. Weights of steers administered GRFi were less (P < .05) than those given HSAi at 126 d (34.6 kg) or at 262 d (48.2 kg) after treatment. Carcass weights were 28.2 kg less (P < .01) for GRFi than for HSAi steers. Dry matter intake was not affected by immunization treatment, whereas feed efficiency was reduced in GRFi steers. Marbling scores were higher (P < .05) for HSAi than for GRFi steers but similar percentages (83.3) of both treatments graded Low Choice or higher. Rib sections of GRFi steers contained more fat (31.2 vs 25.0%) and less lean (63.3 vs 68.4%) than those of HSAi steers (P < .05). A breed x treatment interaction was observed for percentage of fat within the trimmed longissimus muscle (P < .05); percentage of fat was similar for Charolais and Simmental steers when immunized against HSAi but was higher for Simmental than for Charolais when immunized against GRFi.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Agonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone stimulate self-renewal of cardiac stem cells and promote their survival.

    PubMed

    Florea, Victoria; Majid, Sonia S; Kanashiro-Takeuchi, Rosemeire M; Cai, Ren-Zhi; Block, Norman L; Schally, Andrew V; Hare, Joshua M; Rodrigues, Claudia O

    2014-12-01

    The beneficial effects of agonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor (GHRH-R) in heart failure models are associated with an increase in the number of ckit(+) cardiac stem cells (CSCs). The goal of the present study was to determine the presence of GHRH-R in CSCs, the effect of GHRH-R agonists on their proliferation and survival, and the mechanisms involved. We investigated the expression of GHRH-R in CSCs of different species and the effect of GHRH-R agonists on their cell proliferation and survival. GHRH-R is expressed in ckit(+) CSCs isolated from mouse, rat, and pig. Treatment of porcine CSCs with the GHRH-R agonist JI-38 significantly increased the rate of cell division. Similar results were observed with other GHRH-R agonists, MR-356 and MR-409. JI-38 exerted a protective effect on survival of porcine CSCs under conditions of oxidative stress induced by exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Treatment with JI-38 before exposure to peroxide significantly reduced cell death. A similar effect was observed with MR-356. Addition of GHRH-R agonists to porcine CSCs induced activation of ERK and AKT pathways as determined by increased expression of phospho-ERK and phospho-AKT. Inhibitors of ERK and AKT pathways completely reversed the effect of GHRH-R agonists on CSC proliferation. Our findings extend the observations of the expression of GHRH-R by CSCs and demonstrate that GHRH-R agonists have a direct effect on proliferation and survival of CSCs. These results support the therapeutic use of GHRH-R agonists for stimulating endogenous mechanisms for myocardial repair or for preconditioning of stem cells before transplantation.

  10. Direct nose-to-brain transfer of a growth hormone releasing neuropeptide, hexarelin after intranasal administration to rabbits.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Kim, Kwonho

    2009-08-13

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the olfactory transfer of a growth hormone releasing neuropeptide, hexarelin to the brain tissues by comparing brain uptake levels after intranasal administration with those after intravenous administration. The hexarelin nasal formulation was prepared using an aqueous cosolvent vehicle consisting of ethanol, propylene glycol, and n-tridecyl-beta-D-maltoside as a permeation enhancer. Hexarelin was administered intravenously or intranasally to male rabbits at a dose of 1 mg/kg. Drug concentrations in the plasma, cerebrospinal fluid and six different regions of the brain, i.e., olfactory bulb (OB), olfactory tract (OT), anterior (CB1), middle (CB2), posterior (CB3) cerebrum, and cerebellum (CL) were analyzed by LC/MS method after solid phase extraction. The brain and cerebrospinal fluid levels achieved following intranasal administration were approximately 1.6 times greater than those attained after intravenous administration despite the intranasal plasma levels being significantly lower than the intravenous plasma levels. Intranasal administration resulted in significantly different spatial distribution patterns in various regions of brain with the rank order of C(OB)>C(OT)>C(CB1, CB2, CB3)>C(CL) at 10, 20, and 40 min post-dosing, whereas intravenous administration yielded nearly similar distribution patterns in the brain. The intranasal administration into one nostril (left or right) exhibited markedly greater hexarelin concentrations in olfactory bulb and olfactory tract on the treated-side of brain tissues than those on the non-treated-side of the brain hemisphere. It was demonstrated that the hydrophilic neuropeptide hexarelin was transferred via olfactory pathway to the brain hemispheres and the drug transfer via this route significantly contributed to high brain concentrations after nasal administration to rabbits.

  11. Glucagon-like peptide-1 stimulates luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone secretion in a rodent hypothalamic neuronal cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Beak, S A; Heath, M M; Small, C J; Morgan, D G; Ghatei, M A; Taylor, A D; Buckingham, J C; Bloom, S R; Smith, D M

    1998-01-01

    To examine the influence of the putative satiety factor (GLP-1) on the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis, we used GT1-7 cells as a model of neuronal luteinizing hormone- releasing hormone (LHRH) release. GLP-1 caused a concentration-dependent increase in LHRH release from GT1-7 cells. Specific, saturable GLP-1 binding sites were demonstrated on these cells. The binding of [125I]GLP-1 was time-dependent and consistent with a single binding site (Kd = 0.07+/-0.016 nM; binding capacity = 160+/-11 fmol/mg protein). The specific GLP-1 receptor agonists, exendin-3 and exendin-4, also showed high affinity (Ki = 0.3+/-0.05 and 0.32+/-0.06 nM, respectively) as did the antagonist exendin-(9-39) (Ki = 0.98+/-0.24 nM). At concentrations that increased LHRH release, GLP-1 (0.5-10 nM) also caused an increase in intracellular cAMP in GT1-7 cells (10 nM GLP-1: 7.66+/-0.4 vs. control: 0.23+/-0.02 nmol/mg protein; P < 0.001). Intracerebroventricular injection of GLP-1 at a single concentration (10 microg) produced a prompt increase in the plasma luteinizing hormone concentration in male rats (GLP-1: 1.09+/-0.11 vs. saline: 0.69+/-0.06 ng/ml; P < 0.005). GLP-1 levels in the hypothalami of 48-h-fasted male rats showed a decrease, indicating a possible association of the satiety factor with the low luteinizing hormone levels in animals with a negative energy balance. PMID:9502775

  12. Effect of exogenous growth-hormone-releasing factor on blood metabolites and minerals in late maturing buffalo heifers (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Haldar, A; Prakash, B S

    2007-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested that growth-hormone-releasing factor (GRF) enhanced growth and advanced puberty onset along with hormonal changes in buffalo heifers (Bubalus bubalis). However, it is not known to what extent exogenous GRF could influence blood metabolites and minerals to bring about puberty in buffalo heifers. Therefore, we planned to investigate the effect of exogenous bovine GRF (bGRF) on blood metabolites and minerals in buffalo heifers during a 3-month pre-treatment period, 9-month treatment period and 1-month post-treatment period. Six buffalo heifers were treated intravenously with bGRF (10 mug per 100 kg body weight) at 15-day interval for 9 months. Another six buffalo heifers of weight- and age-matched received requisite amount of vehicle (0.9% NaCl solution) during the same period. Exogenous bGRF enhanced (p < 0.01) plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) concentrations in treatment group when compared with control group during the treatment and post-treatment period, while plasma alpha-amino nitrogen (AAN) concentrations showed a decreasing trend (p < 0.05) in the treatment group when compared with the control group during the treatment and post-treatment periods. The plasma inorganic phosphorus (Pi) was found to be higher (p < 0.05) in the treatment group animals in comparison with the levels recorded in the control group animals during the treatment as well as post-treatment periods. However, there was no change (p > 0.05) in plasma glucose and calcium concentrations between the two groups. Plasma NEFA was found to be positively correlated with plasma growth hormone (GH); however, it was only significant for the treatment group (r = + 0.76; p < 0.05). Plasma AAN in the treatment group exhibited negative correlation with plasma GH (r = 0.72; p < 0.05), while plasma AAN and GH were recorded to be positively correlated in the control group (r = 0.47; p < 0.05). The present findings suggest that exogenous bGRF induces GH release that

  13. The effects of a continuous infusion of hexarelin on pulsatile growth hormone release, growth axis and galanin gene expression and on the response of the growth axis to growth hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Conley, L K; Brogan, R S; Giustina, A; Wehrenberg, W B

    2000-05-01

    The effect of a 6 hour continuous infusion of Hexarelin (100 micrograms/hour) on GH peak frequency, amplitude and duration, GH trough concentrations, the interval between successive peaks and the pituitary responsiveness to GHRH, as well as GH axis and galanin mRNA contents, were examined in conscious adult male rats. Plasma GH concentrations peaked within 15 minutes after the initiation of Hexarelin infusion, but returned to baseline levels by 60 minutes. No significant differences between Hexarelin and saline infused rats were noted for any of the parameters of pulsatile GH release analyzed. However, following a 6 hour infusion, rats treated with Hexarelin demonstrated a greater GH responsiveness to GHRH (delta GH: 57 +/- 16 ng/ml for Hexarelin infused; 21 +/- 7 ng/ml for saline infused; p < 0.05). Furthermore, the rats infused with Hexarelin demonstrated decreased GHRH and increased hypothalamic galanin mRNA contents as compared to the saline infused rats, while hypothalamic somatostatin and pituitary GH mRNA contents appeared unchanged. Rats infused with Hexarelin had lower pituitary galanin mRNA content than did the rats which were infused with saline. Collectively, these results suggest that Hexarelin may not act via alteration of somatostatin synthesis and that suppression of somatostatin's action at the pituitary can not be excluded. The current study also suggests that other hypothalamic pathways aside from those currently defined for the growth axis may be involved in the mechanism by which Hexarelin and the other GH-releasing peptides elicit GH release.

  14. Experiment K-7-22: Growth Hormone Regulation Synthesis and Secretion in Microgravity. Part 2; Hypothalamic Growth Hormone-Releasing Factor, Somatostatin Immunoreactivity, and Messenger RNA Levels in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawchenko, P. E.; Arias, C.; Krasnov, I.; Grindeland, R. E.; Vale, W.

    1994-01-01

    Immunohistochemical analyses of hypothalamic hormones carried out on tissue from rats flown on an earlier flight (Cosmos 1887) suggested preferential effects on hypophysiotropic principles involved in the regulation of growth hormone secretion and synthesis. We found that staining in the median eminence for peptides that provide both stimulatory (growth hormone-releasing factor, or GRF) and inhibitory (somatostatin, SS) influences on growth hormone secretion were depressed in flight animals relative to synchronous controls, while staining for other neuroendocrine peptides, cortocotropin-releasing factor and arginine vasopressin, were similar in these two groups. While this suggests some selective impact of weightlessness on the two principal central nervous system regulators of growth hormone dynamics, the fact that both GRF- and SS-immunoreactivity (IR) appeared affected in the same direction is somewhat problematic, and makes tentative any intimation that effects on CNS control mechanisms may be etiologically significant contributors to the sequelae of reduced growth hormone secretion seen in prolonged space flight. To provide an additional, and more penetrating, analysis we attempted in hypothalamic material harvested from animals flown on Cosmos 2044 to complement immunohistochemical analyses of GRF and SS staining with quantitative, in situ assessments of messenger RNAs encoding the precursors for both these hormones.

  15. Protective effect of Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone agonist in bacterial toxin-induced pulmonary barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Czikora, Istvan; Sridhar, Supriya; Gorshkov, Boris; Alieva, Irina B.; Kasa, Anita; Gonzales, Joyce; Potapenko, Olena; Umapathy, Nagavedi S.; Pillich, Helena; Rick, Ferenc G.; Block, Norman L.; Verin, Alexander D.; Chakraborty, Trinad; Matthay, Michael A.; Schally, Andrew V.; Lucas, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Antibiotic treatment of patients infected with G− or G+ bacteria promotes release of the toxins lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and pneumolysin (PLY) in their lungs. Growth Hormone-releasing Hormone (GHRH) agonist JI-34 protects human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HL-MVEC), expressing splice variant 1 (SV-1) of the receptor, from PLY-induced barrier dysfunction. We investigated whether JI-34 also blunts LPS-induced hyperpermeability. Since GHRH receptor (GHRH-R) signaling can potentially stimulate both cAMP-dependent barrier-protective pathways as well as barrier-disruptive protein kinase C pathways, we studied their interaction in GHRH agonist-treated HL-MVEC, in the presence of PLY, by means of siRNA-mediated protein kinase A (PKA) depletion. Methods: Barrier function measurements were done in HL-MVEC monolayers using Electrical Cell substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) and VE-cadherin expression by Western blotting. Capillary leak was assessed by Evans Blue dye (EBD) incorporation. Cytokine generation in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was measured by multiplex analysis. PKA and PKC-α activity were assessed by Western blotting. Results: GHRH agonist JI-34 significantly blunts LPS-induced barrier dysfunction, at least in part by preserving VE-cadherin expression, while not affecting inflammation. In addition to activating PKA, GHRH agonist also increases PKC-α activity in PLY-treated HL-MVEC. Treatment with PLY significantly decreases resistance in control siRNA-treated HL-MVEC, but does so even more in PKA-depleted monolayers. Pretreatment with GHRH agonist blunts PLY-induced permeability in control siRNA-treated HL-MVEC, but fails to improve barrier function in PKA-depleted PLY-treated monolayers. Conclusions: GHRH signaling in HL-MVEC protects from both LPS and PLY-mediated endothelial barrier dysfunction and concurrently induces a barrier-protective PKA-mediated and a barrier-disruptive PKC-α-induced pathway in the presence of PLY, the

  16. Growth Hormone Response after Administration of L-dopa, Clonidine, and Growth Hormone Releasing Hormone in Children with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Seigfried M.

    1993-01-01

    This study of eight growth-retarded children with Down's syndrome (aged 1 to 6.5 years) found that administration of growth hormone was more effective than either L-dopa or clonidine. Results suggest that children with Down's syndrome have both anatomical and biochemical hypothalamic derangements resulting in decreased growth hormone secretion and…

  17. Effects of growth hormone-releasing factor on growth hormone response, growth and feed conversion efficiency in buffalo heifers (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Haldar, A; Prakash, B S

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the benefits of growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) on growth and feed conversion efficiency (FCE) in buffaloes. Twelve Murrah buffalo heifers (Bubalus bubalis) of mean age 24.8 months and mean body weight 302.4kg were divided into two groups (treatment and control) with six animals in each group. The buffaloes were given intravenous injections of bovine GRF (bGRF) at a dose rate of 10microg/100kg body weight or an equal volume of saline at 15-day intervals for a period of 9 months. Plasma growth hormone (GH) responses to bGRF challenge were measured in blood samples collected at 90-day intervals on days 1, 90, 180 and 270 and samples were taken at -60, -30, 0, +10, +20, +30, +60, +120 and +180min relative to bGRF injection. Blood samples were also collected weekly by jugular venepuncture for the quantification of plasma GH. The average growth rate (AGR) and FCE of all animals were recorded at 15-day intervals. Plasma GH concentrations increased (P=0.001) steadily following bGRF challenge, peaking 10-20min after challenge and declining to baseline by 180min. In the treatment group, there were no significant differences (P>0.05) in either the peak heights of the GH response or the area under the curve (AUC) of the GH response after bGRF challenge on any of the four occasions of intensive bleeding. There were overall increases in plasma GH concentrations (P<0.01), AGR (P<0.01) and FCE (P=0.05) in the treatment group compared with the control animals. The study showed that GH responsiveness to administration of bGRF at 15-day intervals over 9 months of treatment remained unchanged in buffalo heifers. Exogenous bGRF treatment for a long period can therefore enhance GH release leading to higher growth rates and better feed conversion efficiency in buffalo heifers. PMID:17113797

  18. Growth hormone response to a growth hormone-releasing hormone stimulation test in a population-based study following cranial irradiation of childhood brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Schmiegelow, M; Lassen, S; Poulsen, H S; Feldt-Rasmussen, U; Schmiegelow, K; Hertz, H; Müller, J

    2000-01-01

    Children with brain tumors are at high risk of developing growth hormone deficiency (GHD) after cranial irradiation (CI) if the hypothalamus/pituitary (HP) axis falls within the fields of irradiation. The biological effective dose (BED) of irradiation to the HP region was determined, since BED gives a means of expressing the biological effect of various irradiation treatment schedules in a uniform way. Hypothalamic versus pituitary damage as cause of GHD was distinguished in 62 patients by comparing the growth hormone (GH) peak response to an insulin tolerance test (ITT)/arginine stimulation test and the GH response to a growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) stimulation test. Peak GH response to a GHRH test was significantly higher (median 7.3 mU/l; range: 0.5--79.0 mU/l) than that of an ITT/arginine test (median 4.7 mU/l; range: 0.01--75.0 mU/l) (p = 0.017). Peak GH after a GHRH test was significantly inversely correlated to follow-up time (r(s) = -0.46, p < 0.0001) and to BED (R(s) = -0.28, p = 0.03), and both were found to be of significance in a multivariante regression analysis. We speculate that a significant number of patients developed hypothalamic radiation-induced damage to the GHRH secreting neurons, and secondary to this the pituitary gland developed decreased responsiveness to GHRH following CI in childhood.

  19. Antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone inhibit growth of androgen-independent prostate cancer through inactivation of ERK and Akt kinases.

    PubMed

    Rick, Ferenc G; Schally, Andrew V; Szalontay, Luca; Block, Norman L; Szepeshazi, Karoly; Nadji, Mehrdad; Zarandi, Marta; Hohla, Florian; Buchholz, Stefan; Seitz, Stephan

    2012-01-31

    The management of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) presents a clinical challenge because of limitations in efficacy of current therapies. Novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of CRPC are needed. Antagonists of hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) inhibit growth of various malignancies, including androgen-dependent and independent prostate cancer, by suppressing diverse tumoral growth factors, especially GHRH itself, which acts as a potent autocrine/paracrine growth factor in many tumors. We evaluated the effects of the GHRH antagonist, JMR-132, on PC-3 human androgen-independent prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. JMR-132 suppressed the proliferation of PC-3 cells in vitro in a dose-dependent manner and significantly inhibited growth of PC-3 tumors by 61% (P < 0.05). The expression of GHRH, GHRH receptors, and their main splice variant, SV1, in PC-3 cells and tumor xenografts was demonstrated by RT-PCR and Western blot. The content of GHRH protein in PC-3 xenografts was lowered markedly, by 66.3% (P < 0.01), after treatment with JMR-132. GHRH induced a significant increase in levels of ERK, but JMR-132 abolished this outcome. Our findings indicate that inhibition of PC-3 prostate cancer by JMR-132 involves inactivation of Akt and ERK. The inhibitory effect produced by GHRH antagonist can result in part from inactivation of the PI3K/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin and Raf/MEK/ERK pathways and from the reduction in GHRH produced by cancer cells. Our findings support the role of GHRH as an autocrine growth factor in prostate cancer and suggest that antagonists of GHRH should be considered for further development as therapy for CRPC.

  20. Modulation of long-term memory and extinction responses induced by growth hormone (GH) and growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) in rats.

    PubMed

    Schneider-Rivas, S; Rivas-Arancibia, S; Vázquez-Pereyra, F; Vázquez-Sandoval, R; Borgonio-Pérez, G

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the participation of growth hormone (GH) and growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) in the modulation of long-term memory and the extinction response of a passive avoidance task in rats. However, the effect on memory vary according to the age of the animals due to plasma levels of either hormone being modified during the aging process. Male Wistar rats were divided according to age into two experimental blocks (young rats 3 months old and aged rats 24 months old at the start of the experiment) where each block received the same treatment. Each experimental block was then divided randomly into three groups where two were experimental and the other served as control. The animals were then submitted to a one-trial passive avoidance conditioning and tested for memory retention 24 hrs after as well as twice a week until the extinction response occurred. The control group received an isotonic saline solution and the other two groups received 0.8 U.I. of GH or 4 mcg of GHRH respectively. All substances were in a 0.08 ml volume and applied 24 hrs before training as well as 24 hrs before each retention session. The results indicate that GH and GHRH modulate long-term memory as well as the extinction response and in either case the response seems to vary with age. GH and GHRH facilitates long-term memory in young rats but not in aged rats. Finally, whereas GH delays the extinction response in both groups, GHRH retards the extinction only in aged rats.

  1. Effects of long-term growth hormone-releasing factor administration on plasma growth hormone, luteinizing hormone and progesterone profiles in growing female buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Mondal, M; Prakash, B S

    2004-10-01

    To investigate the effects of long-term growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) administration on plasma growth hormone (GH), LH and progesterone and body weight gain in growing buffalo calves, 12 female Murrah buffaloes within the age group of 6-8 months of age were divided into two groups (treatment and control groups) of six each in such a way so that average body weights between the groups did not differ (p > 0.05). Control buffaloes were not given any hormonal treatment and treatment group buffaloes were treated with synthetic bovine GRF [bGRF (1-44)-NH(2)] at the rate of 10 microg/100 kg body weight intravenously at an interval of 15 days from week 6 (5-week pre-treatment period) till 18 injections were completed (week 6-42 treatment period) and thereafter, effect of exogenous GRF were observed for 10-week post-treatment period. Jugular blood samples were drawn twice a week at 3-4-day intervals for plasma GH, LH and progesterone quantification. Body weight of all animals was recorded twice a week. During pre-treatment period, mean plasma GH, LH and progesterone did not differ (p > 0.05) between the groups. But during treatment as well as post-treatment period, mean plasma GH levels were found to be significantly (p < 0.01) higher in treatment than control group of buffaloes. Administration of GRF for longer term sustained a higher level of plasma GH even after cessation of treatment. GRF-treated buffaloes attained higher (p < 0.01) body weight than the controls. Repeated GRF administration for long-term significantly (p < 0.01) increased plasma LH and progesterone. In conclusion, repeated long-term exogenous GRF administration induces and even enhances GH release without any sign of refractoriness. GRF may, therefore, be used to induce daily GH release without loss of responsiveness over an extended period of time in young growing female buffaloes and it may assist these animals to grow faster. PMID:15367266

  2. Effects of long-term growth hormone-releasing factor treatment on growth, feed conversion efficiency and dry matter intake in growing female buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Mondal, M; Prakash, B S

    2005-08-01

    Effects of long-term growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) on growth performance, feed conversion efficiency (FCE) and dry matter intake (DMI) were studied in growing buffaloes. Twelve female Murrah buffaloes of 6-8 months of age were divided into two groups of six each on the basis of their body weights so that the average body weights of the groups did not differ (p > 0.05). Animals of each group were administered intravenously with either sterile distilled water (control group) or equal volume of GRF solution containing 10 mug GRF (1-44)-NH2/100 kg body weight (treatment group) at fortnight interval from week 6 (5-week pre-treatment period) for 36 weeks (weeks 6-42 treatment period). Thereafter a 10-week post-treatment period was added. All the animals were weighed consecutively 2 days in a week and the average body weight of the two observations in the week was thus considered for further calculation. Dry matter intake was recorded daily. Average daily gain, FCE and DMI/100 kg body weight were also calculated. Plasma progesterone was estimated in the samples collected twice a week at 3-4-day intervals to assess whether either group had begun ovarian cycles. It was found that ADG and FCE were higher (p < 0.01) in GRF-treated animals during treatment and even 10-week post-treatment period. Interestingly, total DMI was not different (p > 0.05) between the groups during treatment period but found to be lower in GRF treated animals during post-treatment period. The DMI/100 kg body weight was lower (p < 0.01) in GRF-treated animals during treatment and even after cessation of treatment for 10 weeks. The GRF administration for long-term increased (p < 0.05) plasma progesterone. Plasma progesterone concentrations suggest that no animal from either group reached puberty till the end of the experiment. In conclusion, repeated GRF administration for longer term decreased (p < 0.01) DMI/100 kg body weight and increased (p < 0.01) FCE and enabled the animals to grow faster

  3. Effects of long-term growth hormone-releasing factor treatment on growth, feed conversion efficiency and dry matter intake in growing female buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Mondal, M; Prakash, B S

    2005-08-01

    Effects of long-term growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) on growth performance, feed conversion efficiency (FCE) and dry matter intake (DMI) were studied in growing buffaloes. Twelve female Murrah buffaloes of 6-8 months of age were divided into two groups of six each on the basis of their body weights so that the average body weights of the groups did not differ (p > 0.05). Animals of each group were administered intravenously with either sterile distilled water (control group) or equal volume of GRF solution containing 10 mug GRF (1-44)-NH2/100 kg body weight (treatment group) at fortnight interval from week 6 (5-week pre-treatment period) for 36 weeks (weeks 6-42 treatment period). Thereafter a 10-week post-treatment period was added. All the animals were weighed consecutively 2 days in a week and the average body weight of the two observations in the week was thus considered for further calculation. Dry matter intake was recorded daily. Average daily gain, FCE and DMI/100 kg body weight were also calculated. Plasma progesterone was estimated in the samples collected twice a week at 3-4-day intervals to assess whether either group had begun ovarian cycles. It was found that ADG and FCE were higher (p < 0.01) in GRF-treated animals during treatment and even 10-week post-treatment period. Interestingly, total DMI was not different (p > 0.05) between the groups during treatment period but found to be lower in GRF treated animals during post-treatment period. The DMI/100 kg body weight was lower (p < 0.01) in GRF-treated animals during treatment and even after cessation of treatment for 10 weeks. The GRF administration for long-term increased (p < 0.05) plasma progesterone. Plasma progesterone concentrations suggest that no animal from either group reached puberty till the end of the experiment. In conclusion, repeated GRF administration for longer term decreased (p < 0.01) DMI/100 kg body weight and increased (p < 0.01) FCE and enabled the animals to grow faster.

  4. A case for hypothalamic acromegaly: a clinicopathological study of six patients with hypothalamic gangliocytomas producing growth hormone-releasing factor.

    PubMed

    Asa, S L; Scheithauer, B W; Bilbao, J M; Horvath, E; Ryan, N; Kovacs, K; Randall, R V; Laws, E R; Singer, W; Linfoot, J A

    1984-05-01

    We report the histological, ultrastructural, and immunocytochemical features of six hypothalamic gangliocytomas associated with pituitary GH cell adenomas and/or acromegaly. In four patients, the gangliocytoma was intrasellar, and no hypothalamic investigation was performed; in two patients, autopsy confirmed hypothalamic involvement. Four patients had a gangliocytoma associated with pituitary GH cell adenoma and acromegaly; electron microscopy demonstrated an intimate association between neurons and adenomatous GH cells. One patient had a gangliocytoma and a GH cell adenoma but no clinical evidence of acromegaly. In the sixth patient, clinical and biochemical acromegaly was manifest, but no pituitary adenoma was demonstrated. Using immunocytochemistry, human pancreatic tumor GRF (hptGRF-40) was localized in the majority of neurons of all six gangliocytomas. The pituitary adenomas and nontumorous adenohypophyses were negative for hptGRF-40. In addition, somatostatin, glucagon, and GnRH were demonstrated within some neurons of several tumors; insulin and gastrin stains were equivocal. These findings confirm previous proposals of production of a GRF by such gangliocytomas. While the significance of other peptides found in some of the tumors is uncertain, the presence of hptGRF-40 in neurons of these gangliocytomas supports the theory that GRF excess is the mechanism responsible for over-production of GH and provides evidence for a syndrome of hypothalamic acromegaly.

  5. Androgen-dependent somatotroph function in a hypogonadal adolescent male: evidence for control of exogenous androgens on growth hormone release

    SciTech Connect

    Mauras, N.; Blizzard, R.M.; Rogol, A.D.

    1989-03-01

    A 14(10/12)-year-old white male with primary gonadal failure following testicular irradiation for acute lymphocytic leukemia was evaluated for poor growth. He had received 2400 rad of prophylactic cranial irradiation. The growth velocity had decelerated from 7 to 3.2 cm/yr over 3 years. His bone age was 12(0/12) years (by TW2-RUS), and his peak growth hormone (GH) response to provocative stimuli was 1.4 ng/mL. The 24-hour GH secretion was studied by drawing blood every 20 minutes for 24 hours. The resulting GH profile was analyzed by a computerized pulse detection algorithm, CLUSTER. Timed serum GH samples were also obtained after a 1 microgram/kg IV bolus injection of the GH releasing factor (GRH). The studies showed a flat 24-hour profile and a peak GH response to GRH of 3.9 ng/ml. Testosterone enanthate treatment was started, 100 mg IM every 4 weeks. Ten months after the initiation of therapy the calculated growth rate was 8.6 cm/yr. The 24-hour GH study and GRH responses were repeated at the time, showing a remarkably normal 24-hour GH secretory pattern and a peak GH response to GRH of 14.4 ng/mL. Testosterone therapy was discontinued, and 4 months later similar studies were repeated. A marked decrease in the mean 24-hour GH secretion and mean peak height occurred, but with maintenance of the GH pulse frequency. The GH response to GRH was intermediate, with a peak of 8 ng/mL. There was no further growth during those 4 months despite open epiphyses.

  6. Effect of aging on GHRF-induced growth hormone release from anterior pituitary cells in primary culture

    SciTech Connect

    Spik, K.W.; Boyd, R.L.; Sonntag, W.E.

    1991-03-01

    Five criteria were developed to validate the primary cell culture model for comparison of GRF-induced release of growth hormone in pituitary tissue from aging animals. Pituitaries from young (5-mo), middle-aged (14-mo), and old (24-mo) male Fischer 344 rats were dispersed using either trypsin/trypsin inhibitor or dispase and compared with respect to the number of pituitary cells recovered, cell viability, 3H-leucine incorporation into total protein, time course for recovery of optimal response to GRF, and the dose-relationship for GRF-induced release of growth hormone 2, 4, and 6 days after dispersal. Results indicated that direct comparison of cellular responses between tissues from young, middle-aged, and old rats in primary cell culture is confounded by variations in time for recovery of optimal responses, the effects of the enzymes used for dispersal, and the methods used to express the data.

  7. Beneficial effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone agonists on rat INS-1 cells and on streptozotocin-induced NOD/SCID mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianyang; Cui, Tengjiao; He, Jinlin; Wang, Haibo; Cai, Renzhi; Popovics, Petra; Vidaurre, Irving; Sha, Wei; Schmid, Janine; Ludwig, Barbara; Block, Norman L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Schally, Andrew V.

    2015-01-01

    Agonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) have been previously reported to promote growth, function, and engraftment of islet cells following transplantation. Here we evaluated recently synthesized GHRH agonists on the proliferation and biological functions of rat pancreatic β-cell line (INS-1) and islets. In vitro treatment of INS-1 cells with GHRH agonists increased cell proliferation, the expression of cellular insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1), and GHRH receptor, and also stimulated insulin secretion in response to glucose challenge. Exposure of INS-1 cells to GHRH agonists, MR-356 and MR-409, induced activation of ERK and AKT pathways. Agonist MR-409 also significantly increased the levels of cellular cAMP and the phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in INS-1 cells. Treatment of rat islets with agonist, MR-409 significantly increased cell proliferation, islet size, and the expression of insulin. In vivo daily s.c. administration of 10 μg MR-409 for 3 wk dramatically reduced the severity of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice. The maximal therapeutic benefits with respect to the efficiency of engraftment, ability to reach normoglycemia, gain in body weight, response to high glucose challenge, and induction of higher levels of serum insulin and IGF1 were observed when diabetic mice were transplanted with rat islets preconditioned with GHRH agonist, MR-409, and received additional treatment with MR-409 posttransplantation. This study provides an improved approach to the therapeutic use of GHRH agonists in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. PMID:26474831

  8. Beneficial effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone agonists on rat INS-1 cells and on streptozotocin-induced NOD/SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianyang; Cui, Tengjiao; He, Jinlin; Wang, Haibo; Cai, Renzhi; Popovics, Petra; Vidaurre, Irving; Sha, Wei; Schmid, Janine; Ludwig, Barbara; Block, Norman L; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schally, Andrew V

    2015-11-01

    Agonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) have been previously reported to promote growth, function, and engraftment of islet cells following transplantation. Here we evaluated recently synthesized GHRH agonists on the proliferation and biological functions of rat pancreatic β-cell line (INS-1) and islets. In vitro treatment of INS-1 cells with GHRH agonists increased cell proliferation, the expression of cellular insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1), and GHRH receptor, and also stimulated insulin secretion in response to glucose challenge. Exposure of INS-1 cells to GHRH agonists, MR-356 and MR-409, induced activation of ERK and AKT pathways. Agonist MR-409 also significantly increased the levels of cellular cAMP and the phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in INS-1 cells. Treatment of rat islets with agonist, MR-409 significantly increased cell proliferation, islet size, and the expression of insulin. In vivo daily s.c. administration of 10 μg MR-409 for 3 wk dramatically reduced the severity of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice. The maximal therapeutic benefits with respect to the efficiency of engraftment, ability to reach normoglycemia, gain in body weight, response to high glucose challenge, and induction of higher levels of serum insulin and IGF1 were observed when diabetic mice were transplanted with rat islets preconditioned with GHRH agonist, MR-409, and received additional treatment with MR-409 posttransplantation. This study provides an improved approach to the therapeutic use of GHRH agonists in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. PMID:26474831

  9. Effects of a growth hormone-releasing hormone antagonist on telomerase activity, oxidative stress, longevity, and aging in mice

    PubMed Central

    Banks, William A.; Morley, John E.; Farr, Susan A.; Price, Tulin O.; Ercal, Nuran; Vidaurre, Irving; Schally, Andrew V.

    2010-01-01

    Both deficiency and excess of growth hormone (GH) are associated with increased mortality and morbidity. GH replacement in otherwise healthy subjects leads to complications, whereas individuals with isolated GH deficiency such as Laron dwarfs show increased life span. Here, we determined the effects of treatment with the GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor antagonist MZ-5-156 on aging in SAMP8 mice, a strain that develops with aging cognitive deficits and has a shortened life expectancy. Starting at age 10 mo, mice received daily s.c. injections of 10 μg/mouse of MZ-5-156. Mice treated for 4 mo with MZ-5-156 showed increased telomerase activity, improvement in some measures of oxidative stress in brain, and improved pole balance, but no change in muscle strength. MZ-5-156 improved cognition after 2 mo and 4 mo, but not after 7 mo of treatment (ages 12, 14 mo, and 17 mo, respectively). Mean life expectancy increased by 8 wk with no increase in maximal life span, and tumor incidence decreased from 10 to 1.7%. These results show that treatment with a GHRH antagonist has positive effects on some aspects of aging, including an increase in telomerase activity. PMID:21135231

  10. Older individuals heterozygous for a growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor gene mutation are shorter than normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Aguiar-Oliveira, Manuel H; Cardoso-Filho, Marco A; Pereira, Rossana M C; Oliveira, Carla R P; Souza, Anita H O; Santos, Elenilde G; Campos, Viviane C; Valença, Eugênia H O; de Oliveira, Francielle T; Oliveira-Neto, Luiz A; Gois-Junior, Miburge B; Oliveira-Santos, Alecia A; Salvatori, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GHRH) is the most important stimulus for GH secretion by the pituitary gland. Subjects homozygous for GHRH receptor (GHRHR) gene (GHRHR) inactivating mutations have severe GH deficiency, resulting in severe short stature if not treated. We previously reported that young adults heterozygous for the c.57+1G>A null GHRHR mutation (MUT/N) have reduced weight and body mass index (BMI) but normal stature. Here we have studied whether older MUT/N have an additional phenotype. In a cross-sectional study, we measured height, weight and blood pressure, and calculated BMI in two groups (young, 20-40 years of age) and old (60-80 years) of individuals heterozygous for the same GHRHR mutation, and compared with a large number of individuals of normal genotype residing in the same geographical area. Standard deviation score (SDS) of weight was lower, and BMI had a trend toward reduction in young heterozygous compared with young normals, without significant difference in stature. Conversely, SDS of height was lower in older heterozygous individuals than in controls, corresponding to a reduction of 4.2 cm. These data show a reduced stature in older subjects heterozygous for the c.57+1G>A GHRHR mutation, indicating different effects of heterozygosis through lifespan. PMID:25761575

  11. Relationship between nitric oxide- and calcium-dependent signal transduction pathways in growth hormone release from dispersed goldfish pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, John P; Sawisky, Grant R; Davis, Philip J; Pemberton, Joshua G; Rieger, Aja M; Barreda, Daniel R

    2014-09-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) and Ca(2+) are two of the many intracellular signal transduction pathways mediating the control of growth hormone (GH) secretion from somatotropes by neuroendocrine factors. We have previously shown that the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) elicits Ca(2+) signals in identified goldfish somatotropes. In this study, we examined the relationships between NO- and Ca(2+)-dependent signal transduction mechanisms in GH secretion from primary cultures of dispersed goldfish pituitary cells. Morphologically identified goldfish somatotropes stained positively for an NO-sensitive dye indicating they may be a source of NO production. In 2h static incubation experiments, GH release responses to the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-d,l-penicillamine (SNAP) were attenuated by CoCl2, nifedipine, verapamil, TMB-8, BHQ, and KN62. In column perifusion experiments, the ability of SNP to induce GH release was impaired in the presence of TMB-8, BHQ, caffeine, and thapsigargin, but not ryanodine. Caffeine-elicited GH secretion was not affected by the NO scavenger PTIO. These results suggest that NO-stimulated GH release is dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) availability and voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channels, as well as intracellular Ca(2+) store(s) that possess BHQ- and/or thapsigargin-inhibited sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases, as well as TMB-8- and/or caffeine-sensitive, but not ryanodine-sensitive, Ca(2+)-release channels. Calmodulin kinase-II also likely participates in NO-elicited GH secretion but caffeine-induced GH release is not upstream of NO production. These findings provide insights into how NO actions many integrate with Ca(2+)-dependent signalling mechanisms in goldfish somatotropes and how such interactions may participate in the GH-releasing actions of regulators that utilize both NO- and Ca(2+)-dependent transduction pathways. PMID:25038498

  12. Relationship between nitric oxide- and calcium-dependent signal transduction pathways in growth hormone release from dispersed goldfish pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, John P; Sawisky, Grant R; Davis, Philip J; Pemberton, Joshua G; Rieger, Aja M; Barreda, Daniel R

    2014-09-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) and Ca(2+) are two of the many intracellular signal transduction pathways mediating the control of growth hormone (GH) secretion from somatotropes by neuroendocrine factors. We have previously shown that the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) elicits Ca(2+) signals in identified goldfish somatotropes. In this study, we examined the relationships between NO- and Ca(2+)-dependent signal transduction mechanisms in GH secretion from primary cultures of dispersed goldfish pituitary cells. Morphologically identified goldfish somatotropes stained positively for an NO-sensitive dye indicating they may be a source of NO production. In 2h static incubation experiments, GH release responses to the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-d,l-penicillamine (SNAP) were attenuated by CoCl2, nifedipine, verapamil, TMB-8, BHQ, and KN62. In column perifusion experiments, the ability of SNP to induce GH release was impaired in the presence of TMB-8, BHQ, caffeine, and thapsigargin, but not ryanodine. Caffeine-elicited GH secretion was not affected by the NO scavenger PTIO. These results suggest that NO-stimulated GH release is dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) availability and voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channels, as well as intracellular Ca(2+) store(s) that possess BHQ- and/or thapsigargin-inhibited sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases, as well as TMB-8- and/or caffeine-sensitive, but not ryanodine-sensitive, Ca(2+)-release channels. Calmodulin kinase-II also likely participates in NO-elicited GH secretion but caffeine-induced GH release is not upstream of NO production. These findings provide insights into how NO actions many integrate with Ca(2+)-dependent signalling mechanisms in goldfish somatotropes and how such interactions may participate in the GH-releasing actions of regulators that utilize both NO- and Ca(2+)-dependent transduction pathways.

  13. Comparative immunohistochemical study of the distribution of neuropeptide Y, growth hormone-releasing factor and the carboxyterminus of precursor protein GHRF in the human hypothalamic infundibular area.

    PubMed

    Ciofi, P; Tramu, G; Bloch, B

    1990-04-01

    It is now well documented that various polyclonal antisera to the human growth hormone-releasing factor (hGHRF, somatocrinin) visualize in the brain by immunohistochemistry the classical hypothalamic hypophysiotropic neurons and also antigens present in otherwise characterized peptidergic neuronal systems. The nature of these antigens is still an open question. One of these hGHRF antisera, raised against an immunogen of hGHRF1-44NH2, labels in the arcuate nucleus of the human mediobasal hypothalamus the neuropeptide Y (NPY) containing neurons which for the most part constitute a tuberoextrainfundibular system. The identity of the hGHRF-like substance present in these neurons with true somatocrinin has been assessed by performing a comparative immunohistochemical study including sequential double and triple labeling using the antiserum to hGHRF1-44NH2 in conjunction with antisera to the carboxyterminus of preprosomatocrinin (CTPG) and to NPY. This made it feasible to dissociate the hGHRF1-44NH2-immunoreactive neurons into two major subpopulations costaining either for CTPG of NPY, and a minor neuronal group displaying simultaneously the three labelings. A subset of arcuate neurons also showed NPY staining only. These results suggest that (1) the hGHRF-like antigen present in the majority of the NPY neurons is not true somatocrinin, or alternatively that preprosomatocrinin undergoes a unique maturational processing in these neurons, and (2) a subset of tuberoinfundibular somatocrininergic neurons produces and releases NPY which may be involved in the multifactorial control of the pituitary function.

  14. Effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone on sleep and brain interstitial fluid amyloid-β in an APP transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Fan; Zhang, Tony J.; Mahan, Thomas E.; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by impairment of cognitive function, extracellular amyloid plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, and synaptic and neuronal loss. There is substantial evidence that the aggregation of amyloid β (Aβ) in the brain plays a key role in the pathogenesis of AD and that Aβ aggregation is a concentration dependent process. Recently, it was found that Aβ levels in the brain interstitial fluid (ISF) are regulated by the sleep-wake cycle in both humans and mice; ISF Aβ is higher during wakefulness and lower during sleep. Intracerebroventricular infusion of orexin increased wakefulness and ISF Aβ levels, and chronic sleep deprivation significantly increased Aβ plaque formation in amyloid precursor protein transgenic (APP) mice. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is a well-documented sleep regulatory substance which promotes non-rapid eye movement sleep. GHRHRlit/lit mice that lack functional GHRH receptor have shorter sleep duration and longer wakefulness during light periods. The current study was undertaken to determine whether manipulating sleep by interfering with GHRH signaling affects brain ISF Aβ levels in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 (PS1APP) transgenic mice that overexpress mutant forms of APP and PSEN1 that cause autosomal dominant AD. We found that intraperitoneal injection of GHRH at dark onset increased sleep and decreased ISF Aβ and that delivery of a GHRH antagonist via reverse-microdialysis suppressed sleep and increased ISF Aβ. The diurnal fluctuation of ISF Aβ in PS1APP/GHRHRlit/lit mice was significantly smaller than that in PS1APP/GHRHRlit/+ mice. However despite decreased sleep in GHRHR deficient mice, this was not associated with an increase in Aβ accumulation later in life. One of several possibilities for the finding is the fact that GHRHR deficient mice have GHRH-dependent but sleep-independent factors which protect against Aβ deposition. PMID:25218899

  15. Enhanced Anti-Tumoral Activity of Methotrexate-Human Serum Albumin Conjugated Nanoparticles by Targeting with Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone (LHRH) Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Azade; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Ahadi, Fatemeh; Nouri, Farank Salman; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Borougeni, Atefeh Taheri; Mansoori, Pooria

    2011-01-01

    Active targeting could increase the efficacy of anticancer drugs. Methotrexate-human serum albumin (MTX-HSA) conjugates, functionalized by luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) as targeting moieties, with the aim of specifically targeting the cancer cells, were prepared. Owing to the high expression of LHRH receptors in many cancer cells as compared to normal cells, LHRH was used as the targeting ligand in this study. LHRH was conjugated to MTX-HSA nanoparticles via a cross-linker. Three types of LHRH targeted nanoparticles with a mean particle size between 120–138 nm were prepared. The cytotoxicity of LHRH targeted and non-targeted nanoparticles were determined on the LHRH positive and negative cell lines. The internalization of the targeted and non-targeted nanoparticles in LHRH receptor positive and negative cells was investigated using flow cytometry analysis and fluorescence microscopy. The cytotoxicity of the LHRH targeted nanoparticles on the LHRH receptor positive cells were significantly more than non-targeted nanoparticles. LHRH targeted nanoparticles were also internalized by LHRH receptor positive cells significantly more than non-targeted nanoparticles. There were no significant differences between the uptake of targeted and non-targeted nanoparticles to the LHRH receptor negative cells. The active targeting procedure using LHRH targeted MTX-HSA nanoparticles could increase the anti-tumoral activity of MTX. PMID:21845098

  16. Predictors of Treatment Response to Tesamorelin, a Growth Hormone-Releasing Factor Analog, in HIV-Infected Patients with Excess Abdominal Fat

    PubMed Central

    Mangili, Alexandra; Falutz, Julian; Mamputu, Jean-Claude; Stepanians, Miganush; Hayward, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    Background Tesamorelin, a synthetic analog of human growth hormone-releasing factor, decreases visceral adipose tissue (VAT) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy. Objectives 1) To evaluate the utility of patient characteristics and validated disease-risk scores, namely indicator variables for the metabolic syndrome defined by the International Diabetes Federation (MetS-IDF) or the National Cholesterol Education Program (MetS-NCEP) and the Framingham Risk Score (FRS), as predictors of VAT reduction during tesamorelin therapy at 3 and 6 months, and 2) To explore the characteristics of patients who reached a threshold of VAT <140 cm2, a level associated with lower risk of adverse health outcomes, after 6 months of treatment with tesamorelin. Methods Data were analyzed from two Phase 3 studies in which HIV-infected patients with excess abdominal fat were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive tesamorelin 2 mg (n = 543) or placebo (n = 263) subcutaneously daily for 6 months, using ANOVA and ANCOVA models. Results Metabolic syndrome (MetS-IDF or MetS-NCEP) and FRS were significantly associated with VAT at baseline. Presence of metabolic syndrome ([MetS-NCEP), triglyceride levels >1.7 mmol/L, and white race had a significant impact on likelihood of response to tesamorelin after 6 months of therapy (interaction p-values 0.054, 0.063, and 0.025, respectively). No predictive factors were identified at 3 months. The odds of a VAT reduction to <140 cm2 for subjects treated with tesamorelin was 3.9 times greater than that of subjects randomized to placebo after controlling for study, gender, baseline body mass index (BMI) and baseline VAT (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.03; 7.44). Conclusions Individuals with baseline MetS-NCEP, elevated triglyceride levels, or white race were most likely to experience reductions in VAT after 6 months of tesamorelin treatment. The odds of response of VAT <140 cm2 was 3.9 times greater for tesamorelin

  17. Outcome of growth hormone therapy in children with growth hormone deficiency showing an inadequate response to growth hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Saenger, P; Pescovitz, O H; Bercu, B B; Murray, F T; Landy, H; Brentzel, J; O'Dea, L; Hanson, B; Howard, C; Reiter, E O

    2001-06-01

    Saizen (recombinant growth hormone [GH]), 0.2 mg/(kg x wk), was given in an open-label fashion for an average of 51 mo to 27 children with presumed idiopathic GH deficiency who had withdrawn from a trial of Geref (recombinant GH-releasing hormone [GHRH] 1-29) because of inadequate height velocity (HV) (25 children), the onset of puberty (1 child), or injection site reactions (1 child). Measurements were made every 3-12 mo of a number of auxologic variables, including HV, height standard deviation score, and bone age. The children in the study showed excellent responses to Saizen. Moreover, first-year growth during Saizen therapy was inversely correlated with the GH response to provocative GHRH testing carried out 6 and 12 mo after the initiation of Geref treatment. These findings indicate that GH is effective in accelerating growth in GH-deficient children who do not show or maintain a satisfactory response to treatment with GHRH. In addition, they suggest that the initial response to GH therapy used in this way can be predicted by means of provoc-ative testing.

  18. Characterization of the potent luteinizing hormone-releasing activity of KiSS-1 peptide, the natural ligand of GPR54.

    PubMed

    Navarro, V M; Castellano, J M; Fernández-Fernández, R; Tovar, S; Roa, J; Mayen, A; Nogueiras, R; Vazquez, M J; Barreiro, M L; Magni, P; Aguilar, E; Dieguez, C; Pinilla, L; Tena-Sempere, M

    2005-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of the gene encoding GPR54, the putative receptor for the KiSS-1-derived peptide metastin, have been recently associated with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, in both rodents and humans. Yet the actual role of the KiSS-1/GPR54 system in the neuroendocrine control of gonadotropin secretion remains largely unexplored. To initiate such analysis, the effects of KiSS-1 peptide on LH secretion were monitored using in vivo and in vitro settings under different experimental conditions. Central intracerebroventricular administration of KiSS-1 peptide potently elicited LH secretion in vivo over a range of doses from 10 pmol to 1 nmol. The effect of centrally injected KiSS-1 appeared to be mediated via the hypothalamic LHRH. However, no effect of central administration of KiSS-1 was detected on relative LHRH mRNA levels. Likewise, systemic (i.p. and i.v.) injection of KiSS-1 markedly stimulated LH secretion. This effect was similar in terms of maximum response to that of central administration of KiSS-1 and might be partially attributed to its ability to stimulate LH secretion directly at the pituitary. Finally, the LH-releasing activity of KiSS-1 was persistently observed after blockade of endogenous excitatory amino acid and nitric oxide pathways, i.e. relevant neurotransmitters in the neuroendocrine control of LH secretion. In summary, our results provide solid evidence for a potent stimulatory effect of KiSS-1 on LH release, acting at central levels (likely the hypothalamus) and eventually at the pituitary, and further document a novel role of the KiSS-1/GPR54 system as a relevant downstream element in the neuroendocrine network governing LH secretion. PMID:15375028

  19. The Inhibitory Effects of RFamide-Related Peptide 3 on Luteinizing Hormone Release Involves an Estradiol-Dependent Manner in Prepubertal but Not in Adult Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Wei; Zhang, Baoyun; Lv, Fenglin; Ma, Yunxia; Chen, Hang; Chen, Long; Yang, Fang; Wang, Pingqing; Chu, Mingxing

    2015-08-01

    The mammalian gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) ortholog, RFamide-related peptide (RFRP), is considered to act on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons and the pituitary to inhibit gonadotropin synthesis and release. However, there is little evidence documenting whether RFamide-related peptide 3 (RFRP-3) plays a primary role in inhibition of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis prior to the onset of puberty. The present study aimed to understand the functional significance of the neuropeptide on pubertal development. The developmental changes in reproductive-related gene expression at the mRNA level were investigated in the hypothalamus of female mice. The results indicated that RFRP-3 may be an endogenous inhibitory factor for the activation of the HPG axis prior to the onset of puberty. In addition, centrally administered RFRP-3 significantly suppressed plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) levels in prepubertal female mice. Surprisingly, centrally administered RFRP-3 had no effects on plasma LH levels in ovariectomized (OVX) prepubescent female mice. In contrast, RFRP-3 also inhibited plasma LH levels in OVX prepubescent female mice that were treated with 17beta-estradiol replacement. Our study also examined the effects of RFRP-3 on plasma LH release in adult female mice that were ovariectomized at dioestrus, with or without estradiol (E2). Our results showed that the inhibitory effects of RFRP-3 were independent of E2 status. Quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry analyses showed that RFRP-3 inhibited GnRH expression at both the mRNA and protein levels in the hypothalamus. These data demonstrated that RFRP-3 could effectively suppress pituitary LH release, via the inhibition of GnRH transcription and translation in prepubescent female mice, which is associated with estrogen signaling pathway and developmental stages.

  20. Growth hormone-releasing hormone stimulates GH release while inhibiting ghrelin- and sGnRH-induced LH release from goldfish pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Grey, Caleb L; Chang, John P

    2013-06-01

    Goldfish GH-releasing hormone (gGHRH) has been recently identified and shown to stimulate GH release in goldfish. In goldfish, neuroendocrine regulation of GH release is multifactorial and known stimulators include goldfish ghrelin (gGRLN19) and salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (sGnRH), factors that also enhance LH secretion. To further understand the complex regulation of pituitary hormone release in goldfish, we examined the interactions between gGHRH, gGRLN19, and sGnRH on GH and LH release from primary cultures of goldfish pituitary cells in perifusion. Treatment with 100nM gGHRH for 55min stimulated GH release. A 5-min pulse of either 1nM gGRLN19 or 100nM sGnRH induced GH release in naïve cells, and these were just as effective in cells receiving gGHRH. Interestingly, gGHRH abolished both gGRLN19- and sGnRH-induced LH release and reduced basal LH secretion levels. These results suggest that gGHRH does not interfere with sGnRH or gGRLN19 actions in the goldfish somatotropes and further reveal, for the first time, that GHRH may act as an inhibitor of stimulated and basal LH release by actions at the level of pituitary cells.

  1. Effects of hypothalamic dopamine on growth hormone-releasing hormone-induced growth hormone secretion and thyrotropin-releasing hormone-induced prolactin secretion in goats.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jin; Hashizume, Tsutomu

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the effects of hypothalamic dopamine (DA) on the secretion of growth hormone (GH) in goats. The GH-releasing response to an intravenous (i.v.) injection of GH-releasing hormone (GHRH, 0.25 μg/kg body weight (BW)) was examined after treatments to augment central DA using carbidopa (carbi, 1 mg/kg BW) and L-dopa (1 mg/kg BW) in male and female goats under a 16-h photoperiod (16 h light, 8 h dark) condition. GHRH significantly and rapidly stimulated the release of GH after its i.v. administration to goats (P < 0.05). The carbi and L-dopa treatments completely suppressed GH-releasing responses to GHRH in both male and female goats (P < 0.05). The prolactin (PRL)-releasing response to an i.v. injection of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH, 1 μg/kg BW) was additionally examined in male goats in this study to confirm modifications to central DA concentrations. The treatments with carbi and L-dopa significantly reduced TRH-induced PRL release in goats (P < 0.05). These results demonstrated that hypothalamic DA was involved in the regulatory mechanisms of GH, as well as PRL secretion in goats.

  2. Effect of different growth hormone-releasing factors on the concentrations of growth hormone, insulin and metabolites in the plasma of sheep maintained in positive and negative energy balance.

    PubMed

    Hart, I C; Chadwick, P M; Coert, A; James, S; Simmonds, A D

    1985-04-01

    Three experiments were conducted to compare the ability of different preparations of growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) to stimulate GH secretion in sheep maintained in positive and negative energy balance. In experiment 1 five sheep were injected (i.v.) with three preparations of human pancreatic GRF (hpGRF-44, hpGRF-40, hpGRF-29-NH2) and one preparation of rat hypothalamic GRF (rhGRF-29-NH2) all at 98.0 pmol/kg, or control vehicle, in a Latin square design when the animals either had free access to food or were fed half their maintenance requirements. Analysis of plasma samples, obtained before and for 150 min after injection, revealed that the reduced food intake resulted in the expected changes in body weight and circulating GH, insulin, glucose, urea and non-esterified fatty acids. The maximum post-injection concentrations of GH did not differ between either the two levels of feeding or the four GRF preparations but the mean post-injection concentration of GH was significantly higher for all GRF treatments on the restricted ration (P less than 0.001). The mean post-injection response to rhGRF-29-NH2 was less than that obtained with hpGRF-44 for sheep with food available ad libitum (P less than 0.05) and was clearly more persistent for all GRF treatments in animals fed the reduced diet (P less than 0.001). In experiment 2 the same five sheep were injected i.v. with rhGRF-29-NH2 (98.0 pmol/kg) when they had free access to food and after food had been withdrawn for 3 days.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2859343

  3. Molecular cloning of growth hormone-releasing hormone/pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide in the frog Xenopus laevis: brain distribution and regulation after castration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z; Lelievre, V; Tam, J; Cheng, J W; Fuenzalida, G; Zhou, X; Waschek, J A

    2000-09-01

    Pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) appears to regulate several neuroendocrine functions in the frog, but its messenger RNA (mRNA) structure and brain distribution are unknown. To understand the potential role of PACAP in the male frog hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, we cloned the frog Xenopus laevis PACAP mRNA and determined its distribution in the brain. We then analyzed the castration-induced alterations of mRNA expression for PACAP and its selective type I receptor (PAC1) in the hypothalamic anterior preoptic area, a region known to regulate reproductive function. The PACAP mRNA encodes a peptide precursor predicted to give rise to both GH-releasing hormone and PACAP. The deduced peptide sequence of PACAP-38 was nearly identical to that of human PACAP with one amino acid substitution. Abundant PACAP mRNA was detected in the brain, but not several other tissues, including the testis. In situ hybridization revealed strong expression of the PACAP gene in the dorsal pallium, ventral hypothalamus, and nuclei of cerebellum. PACAP mRNA signals were weak to moderate in the hypothalamic anterior preoptic area and were absent in the pituitary. Castration induced an increase in the expression of PACAP and PAC1 receptor mRNAs in the hypothalamic anterior preoptic area after 3 days. Replacement with testosterone prevented the castration-induced changes. These results provide a molecular basis for studying the physiological functions of PACAP in frog brain and suggest that PACAP may be involved in the feedback regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  4. Inhibition of growth of OV-1063 human epithelial ovarian cancer xenografts in nude mice by treatment with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonist SB-75.

    PubMed Central

    Yano, T; Pinski, J; Halmos, G; Szepeshazi, K; Groot, K; Schally, A V

    1994-01-01

    Female athymic nude mice bearing xenografts of OV-1063 human epithelial ovarian cancer cell line were treated with potent luteinizing hormone (LH)-releasing hormone (LH-RH) antagonist SB-75 (Cetrorelix; [Ac-D-Nal(2)1, D-Phe(4 CI)2, D-Pal(3)3, D-Cit6, D-Ala10]LH-RH in which Ac-D-Nal(2) = N-acetyl-3-(2-naphthyl)-D-alanine, D-Phe(4CI) = 4-chloro-D-phenylalanine, D-Pal(3) = 3-(3-pyridyl)-D-alanine, and D-Cit = D-Citrulline) or with the agonist [D-Trp6]LH-RH. In the first experiment, SB-75 and [D-Trp6]LH-RH were administered in the form of microcapsules releasing 60 and 25 micrograms/day, respectively. In the second study, the analogs were given by daily s.c. injections in doses of 100 micrograms/day. In both experiments, tumor growth, as measured by reduction in tumor volume, percentage change in tumor volume, tumor burden, and increase in tumor doubling time, was significantly inhibited by treatment with SB-75 but not with [D-Trp6]LH-RH. Uterine and ovarian weights were reduced and serum LH levels decreased by administration of either analog. Chronic treatment with SB-75 greatly reduced the concentration of receptors for epidermal growth factor and insulin-like growth factor I in tumor cell membranes, a phenomenon that might be related to tumor growth inhibition. It is possible that the antitumoral effects of SB-75 on OV-1063 ovarian cancers are exerted not only through the suppression of the pituitary-gonadal axis, but also directly. In view of its strong inhibitory effect on the growth of OV-1063 ovarian cancers in vivo, the potent LH-RH antagonist SB-75 might be considered for possible hormonal therapy of advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma. PMID:7518926

  5. Effect of long-term administration of an analog of growth hormone-releasing factor on the GH response in rats.

    PubMed

    Karashima, T; Olsen, D; Schally, A V

    1987-06-22

    The effect of the repeated or continuous administration of an analog of GH releasing factor (GH-RF), D-Tyr-1, D-Ala-2, Nle-27, GH-RF(1-29)-NH2 (DBO-29), on the subsequent response to this peptide was investigated in pentobarbital-anesthetized male rats. A sc administration of this analog induced a greater and more prolonged GH release than doses 10 times larger of GH-RF(1-29). The GH increase after sc injection of 10 micrograms/kg bw of the analog was greater than that induced by iv administration of 2 micrograms/kg bw of GH-RF(1-44). Pretreatment with 10 micrograms/kg bw of the analog did not affect the pituitary response to a strong stimulus (20 micrograms/kg bw) of GH-RF(1-44), 24 h later. Pretreatment with the analog in doses of 10 micrograms/kg bw, sc twice a day, 5 days per week for 4 weeks, significantly diminished the GH release in response to a sc injection of the analog (10 micrograms/kg bw), as compared to vehicle-pretreated controls (P less than 0.01). On the other hand, a continuous sc administration of 0.4 micrograms/h of the analog to intact rats for 7 days did not result in a decrease in GH response to a sc injection of the analog (10 micrograms/kg bw). Since the rats injected repeatedly with the analog for 4 weeks still showed a marked, although somewhat reduced response, analogs of this type may be useful clinically.

  6. Inhibition of proliferation, VEGF secretion of human neuroendocrine tumor cell line NCI-H727 by an antagonist of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GH-RH) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sacewicz, Małgorzata; Lawnicka, Hanna; Siejka, Agnieszka; Stepień, Tomasz; Krupiński, Roman; Komorowski, Jan; Stepień, Henryk

    2008-09-01

    Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GH-RH) can stimulate not only growth hormone (GH) secretion by anterior pituitary gland but also proliferation of many cancer cell lines in vitro and in xenografts tumor models in vivo. Several antagonists of GH-RH have been shown to inhibit several cancer growths, but the role of GH-RH antagonists in the regulation of neuroendocrine cancers cell proliferation and tumor progression remains obscure. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of JV-1-36 (synthetic GH-RH antagonist) on proliferation and VEGF secretion by human neuroendocrine lung non-small cell carcinoma (NCI-H727) using cell culture model. The in vitro effect of JV-1-36 on the proliferation of NCI-H727 cells was assessed by the measurement of BrdU incorporation by colorimetric immunoassay. The presence of VEGF and membrane GH-RH receptors on the surface of H727 cells were visualized by immunocytochemistry using specific anti-GH-RH receptor antibody directed to the carboxy-terminal region. VEGF secretion to the cell cultures supernatants was assessed by ELISA methods. Immunoreactive cell membrane GH-RH receptors and VEGF-immunopositive cytoplasmatic granules were clearly confined on the surface of nearly all cancer cells. JV-1-36 at the concentration of 10(-6)-10(-10)M significantly inhibited growth of H727 cells, compared with untreated controls. In H727 cells, the antiproliferative JV-1-36 effect was associated with a dose-dependent reduction of VEGF secretion. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate the strong evidence for the antiproliferative action of GH-RH antagonist JV-1-36 for the NCI-H727 cells. In addition the suppression of VEGF secretion by H727 cells might contribute, at least in part, to the antitumor action of GH-RH antagonists.

  7. Impaired growth hormone-releasing hormone signal transduction in the dwarf (dw) rat is independent of a generalized defect in the stimulatory G-protein, Gs alpha.

    PubMed

    Zeitler, P; Downs, T R; Frohman, L A

    1993-12-01

    The homozygous dwarf (dw) rat pituitary is characterized by a 95% reduction in GH content as well as a 75-80% reduction in the number of somatotrophs. The nature of the mutation responsible for this phenotype is unknown. Previous investigations from our laboratory indicate that dw somatotrophs exhibit decreased sensitivity and a reduced GH secretory response to GH-releasing hormone in vitro, accompanied by a decreased generation of cAMP. We hypothesized that dw rats have a defect in the pathway linking the GH-releasing hormone receptor to adenylyl cyclase and focused on the expression and function of the stimulatory G-protein, Gs alpha. When corrected for differences in pituitary size and cell number, GH mRNA content was reduced by 78% compared to that in controls. However, there was no difference in Gs alpha mRNA content or size in dw pituitaries. Similarly, there was no difference in the content or size of mRNA for the pituitary transcription factor pit-1 in dw pituitaries. Immunoblot analysis of pituitary membrane proteins using a Gs alpha-specific antibody revealed no differences in size, quantity, or relative distribution of Gs alpha peptides between control and dw pituitaries. In addition, cholera toxin effectively ribosylated dw Gs alpha, and there were no differences in the size, quantity, or relative distribution of ribosylated membrane proteins between dw and control pituitaries. Finally, to examine for mutations in other regions of the Gs alpha-coding sequence, we cloned the full-length Gs alpha cDNA from dw rat pituitaries by polymerase chain reaction. The sequence of this clone was identical to that of normal rat Gs alpha cDNA. These results indicate that 1) 52-kilodalton Gs alpha appears to predominate in both normal and dw pituitary; 2) the content, function, and sequence of Gs alpha in adult dw rats are normal; and 3) a generalized Gs alpha regulatory or structural mutation as the cause of the observed phenotype can be excluded. The results also

  8. Overexpression of the growth-hormone-releasing hormone gene in acromegaly-associated pituitary tumors. An event associated with neoplastic progression and aggressive behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, K.; Kovacs, K.; Stefaneanu, L.; Scheithauer, B.; Killinger, D. W.; Lioyd, R. V.; Smyth, H. S.; Barr, A.; Thorner, M. O.; Gaylinn, B.; Laws, E. R.

    1997-01-01

    The clinical behavior of growth hormone (GH)-producing pituitary tumors is known to vary greatly; however, the events underlying this variability remain poorly understood. Herein we demonstrate that tumor overexpression of the GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) gene is one prognostically informative event associated with the clinical aggressiveness of somatotroph pituitary tumors. Accumulation of GHRH mRNA transcripts was demonstrated in 91 of a consecutive series of 100 somatotroph tumors by in situ hybridization; these findings were corroborated by Northern analysis and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and protein translation was confirmed by Western blotting. By comparison, transcript accumulation was absent or negligibly low in 30 normal pituitary glands. GHRH transcripts were found to preferentially accumulate among clinically aggressive tumors. Specifically, GHRH mRNA signal intensity was 1) linearly correlated with Ki-67 tumor growth fractions (r = 0.71; P < 0.001), 2) linearly correlated with preoperative serum GH levels (r = 0.56; p = 0.01), 3) higher among invasive tumors (P < 0.001), and 4) highest in those tumors in which post-operative remission was not achieved (P < 0.001). Using multivariate logistic regression, a model of postoperative remission likelihood was derived wherein remission was defined by the single criterion of suppressibility of GH levels to less than 2 ng/ml during an oral glucose tolerance test. In this outcome model, GHRH mRNA signal intensity proved to be the most important explanatory variable overall, eclipsing any and all conventional clinicopathological predictors as the single most significant predictor of postoperative remission; increases in GHRH mRNA signal were associated with marked declines in remission likelihood. The generalizability of this outcome model was further validated by the model's significant performance in predicting postoperative remission in a random sample of 30 somatotroph tumors treated at

  9. Treatment of true precocious puberty with a potent luteinizing hormone-releasing factor agonist: effect on growth, sexual maturation, pelvic sonography, and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

    PubMed

    Styne, D M; Harris, D A; Egli, C A; Conte, F A; Kaplan, S L; Rivier, J; Vale, W; Grumbach, M M

    1985-07-01

    We used the LHRH agonist D-Trp6-Pro6-N-ethylamide LHRH (LHRH-A) to treat 19 children (12 girls and 7 boys) with true precocious puberty. Fourteen patients had idiopathic true precocious puberty, 4 had a hamartoma of the tuber cinereum, and 1 had a hypothalamic astrocytoma. Basal gonadotropin secretion and responses to native LHRH decreased within 1 week of initiation LHRH-A therapy, and sex steroid secretion decreased within 2 weeks to or within the prepubertal range. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the uterus indicated a postmenarchal size and shape in all 11 girls studied before treatment, which reverted to prepubertal size and configuration in 5 girls during LHRH-A therapy. The enlarged ovaries decreased in size and the multiple ovarian follicular cysts regressed. Sexual characteristics ceased advancing or reverted toward the prepubertal state in all patients receiving therapy for 6-36 months. All 5 girls with menarche before therapy had no further menses. Three girls had hot flashes after LHRH-A-induced reduction of the plasma estradiol concentration. Height velocity, SDs above the mean height velocity for age, and SDs above the mean height for age decreased during LHRH-A therapy; the velocity of skeletal maturation decreased after 12 months of LHRH-A therapy and was sustained during continued therapy over 18-36 months. In 4 patients, a subnormal growth rate (less than 4.5 cm/yr) occurred during LHRH-A therapy. Six patients had cutaneous reactions of LHRH-A, but no demonstrable circulating antibodies to LHRH-A. In 2 patients in whom LHRH-A therapy was discontinued because of skin reactions, precocious sexual maturation resumed at the previous rate for the ensuing 6-12 months; subsequently, they were desensitized to LHRH-A, and during a second course of therapy, their secondary sexual development and sex steroid levels again quickly decreased. LHRH-A proved an effective and safe treatment for true precocious puberty in boys as well as girls with central

  10. Analogues of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone containing cytotoxic groups.

    PubMed Central

    Janáky, T; Juhász, A; Bajusz, S; Csernus, V; Srkalovic, G; Bokser, L; Milovanovic, S; Redding, T W; Rékási, Z; Nagy, A

    1992-01-01

    In an attempt to produce better cytotoxic analogues, chemotherapeutic antineoplastic radicals including an alkylating nitrogen mustard derivative of D-phenylalanine (D-melphalan), reactive cyclopropane, anthraquinone derivatives [2-(hydroxymethyl)anthraquinone and the anticancer antibiotic doxorubicin], and an antimetabolite (methotrexate) were coupled to suitably modified agonists and antagonists of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH). Analogues with D-lysine6 and D-ornithine6 or N epsilon-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-lysine and N delta-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-ornithine were used as carriers for one or two cytotoxic moieties. The enhanced biological activities produced by the incorporation of D amino acids into position 6 of the agonistic analogues were further increased by the attachment of hydrophobic cytotoxic groups, resulting in compounds with 10-50 times higher activity than LH-RH. Most of the monosubstituted agonistic analogues showed high affinities for the membrane receptors of human breast cancer cells, while the receptor binding affinities of peptides containing two cytotoxic side chains were lower. Antagonistic carriers [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Trp3,Arg5,D-Lys6,D-Ala10] LH-RH [where Nal(2) is 3-(2-naphthyl)alanine], [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Trp3,Arg5,N epsilon-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-Lys6,D-Ala10]LH-RH, and their D-Pal(3)3 homologs [Pal(3) is 3-(3-pyridyl)alanine] as well as [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Pal(3)3,Tyr5,N epsilon-(2,3-diamino-propionyl)-D-Lys6,D-Ala10]LH-RH were linked to cytotoxic compounds. The hybrid molecules inhibited ovulation in rats at doses of 10 micrograms and suppressed LH release in vitro. The receptor binding of cytotoxic analogues was decreased compared to the precursor peptides, although analogues with 2-(hydroxymethyl)anthraquinone hemiglutarate had high affinities. All of the cytotoxic analogues tested inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA in cultures of human breast and prostate cancer cell lines

  11. β-Hydroxybutyric acid inhibits growth hormone-releasing hormone synthesis and secretion through the GPR109A/extracellular signal-regulated 1/2 signalling pathway in the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Fu, S-P; Liu, B-R; Wang, J-F; Xue, W-J; Liu, H-M; Zeng, Y-L; Huang, B-X; Li, S-N; Lv, Q-K; Wang, W; Liu, J-X

    2015-03-01

    β-Hydroxybutyric acid (BHBA) has recently been shown to regulate hormone synthesis and secretion in the hypothalamus. However, little is known about the effects of BHBA-mediated hormone regulation or the detailed mechanisms by which BHBA regulates growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) synthesis and secretion. In the present study, we examined the expression of the BHBA receptor GPR109A in primary hypothalamic cell cultures. We hypothesised that BHBA regulates GHRH via GPR109A and its downstream signals. Initial in vivo studies conducted in rats demonstrated that GHRH mRNA expression in the hypothalamus was strongly inversely correlated with BHBA levels in the cerebrospinal fluid during postnatal development (r = -0.89, P < 0.01). Furthermore, i.c.v. administration of BHBA acutely decreased GHRH mRNA expression in rats. Further in vitro studies revealed a decrease in GHRH synthesis and secretion in primary hypothalamic cells after treatment with BHBA; this effect was inhibited when hypothalamic cells were pretreated with pertussis toxin (PTX). BHBA had no effect on GHRH synthesis and secretion in GT1-7 cells, which do not exhibit cell surface expression of GPR109A. Furthermore, BHBA acutely decreased the transcription of the homeobox gene for Gsh-1 in the hypothalamus in both in vivo and in vitro, and this effect was also inhibited by PTX in vitro. In primary hypothalamic cells, BHBA activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinases, as shown by western blot analysis. Moreover, inhibition of ERK1/2 with U0126 attenuated the BHBA-mediated reduction in Gsh-1 expression and GHRH synthesis and secretion. These results strongly suggest that BHBA directly regulates GHRH synthesis and secretion via the GPR109A/ERK1/2 MAPK pathway, and also that Gsh-1 is essential for this function.

  12. Simultaneous expression of growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) and hepatitis B surface antigen/somatostatin (HBsAg/SS) fusion genes in a construct in the skeletal muscle enhances rabbit weight gain.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jian-wei; Liu, Song-cai; Hao, Lin-lin; Zhang, Yong-liang; Zhang, Qianqian; Ren, Xiao-hui; Jiang, Qing-yan

    2008-01-01

    Somatostatin (SS) and growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) are synthesized and secreted by the hypothalamus, which can control the synthesis and secretion of the growth hormone (GH) from the hypophysis as well as regulate the GH concentrations in animals and humans. In this article, we describe the regulation of animal growth using plasmid DNA encoding both the GHRH gene and the SS gene fused with the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) gene. We constructed a series of expression plasmids to express the GHRH and HBsAg-SS fusion genes individually as well as collectively. The fusion gene and GHRH were successfully expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, as proven by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunoblotting tests. Poly D, L-lactide-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) plasmid-encapsulating microspheres were prepared and injected intramuscularly into the leg skeletal muscles of rabbits. Weight gain/day and the levels of insulinlike growth factor-I (IGF-I), SS, and hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb) were monitored. During days 30 postinjection, increase in weight gain/day and IGF- I concentration and decrease in SS were observed in treatment groups. From days 15 to 30 postinjection, the weight gain/day significantly increased (P < 0.05) by 129.13%, 106.8%, and 72.82% relative to the control group in the co-expression GHRH and fusion gene (named P-G-HS), fusion gene (named P-HS), and GHRH (named P-G) groups, respectively. And most importantly, the P-G-HS group showed significant weight gain/day (P < 0.05) relative to the P-G and P-HS groups. A significant increase in the IGF-I concentration and decrease in the SS level relative to the control group were also observed. The results indicated that the combination of plasmid-mediated GHRH supplementation and positive immunization against SS led to more robust weight gain/day in rabbits.

  13. Effects of spaceflight on hypothalamic peptide systems controlling pituitary growth hormone dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawchenko, P. E.; Arias, C.; Krasnov, I.; Grindeland, R. E.; Vale, W.

    1992-01-01

    Possible effects of reduced gravity on central hypophysiotropic systems controlling growth hormone (GH) secretion were investigated in rats flown on Cosmos 1887 and 2044 biosatellites. Immunohistochemical (IHC)staining for the growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF), somatostatin (SS), and other hypothalamic hormones was performed on hypothalami obtained from rats. IHC analysis was complemented by quantitative in situ assessments of mRNAs encoding the precursors for these hormones. Data obtained suggest that exposure to microgravity causes a preferential reduction in GRF peptide and mRNA levels in hypophysiotropic neurons, which may contribute to impared GH secretion in animals subjected to spaceflight. Effects of weightlessness are not mimicked by hindlimb suspension in this system.

  14. Physiological role of somatostatin-mediated autofeedback regulation for growth hormone: importance of growth hormone in triggering somatostatin release during a trough period of pulsatile growth hormone release in conscious male rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Chihara, K; Kita, T; Kashio, Y; Okimura, Y; Kitajima, N; Fujita, T

    1989-08-01

    In mammals including human, it is generally accepted that growth hormone (GH) can regulate its own secretion through an autofeedback mechanism in which somatostatin (SRIF) may be involved. To explore a physiological role of SRIF-mediated GH autoregulation, the effect of exogenous human GH administration on plasma rat GH response to [D-Ala2, Nle27]-human GH-releasing hormone-(1-28)-agmatine (hGHRH-analog), which does not crossreact with anti-rat GH-releasing hormone gamma-globulin (GHRH-Ab), was examined in conscious male rats treated with GHRH-Ab in the absence and presence of anti-SRIF gamma-globulin (SRIF-Ab). Enhanced SRIF release during a trough period of natural pulsatile GH secretion, suggested by the blunted GH response to exogenous hGHRH-analog, no longer occurred when major GH secretory bursts were abolished by GHRH-Ab treatment. On the other hand, when hGH was administered in GHRH-Ab-treated rats so as to simulate the quantity and dynamic change of GH in hypophysial portal circulation in rats exhibiting pulsatile GH secretion, hGHRH-analog-induced GH rises were significantly suppressed during the period corresponding to a GH trough. This suppression was completely prevented by simultaneous treatment with SRIF-Ab. Furthermore, administration of bovine GH, but not ovine prolactin, resulted in significant suppression of hGHRH-analog-provoked GH rises. These findings suggest that enhanced SRIF release during a trough period of spontaneous GH secretory rhythm is induced by the preceding GH secretory burst, and also suggest a possible role for SRIF-mediated GH autoregulation in a physiological state.

  15. Mapping the human growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor (GHRHR) gene to the short arm of chromosome 7(7p13-p21) near the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Vamvakopoulos, N.C. ); Kunz, J.; Olberding, U. ); Scherer, S.W. ); Sioutopoulou, O.T. ); Schneider, V.; Durkin, A.S.; Nierman, W.C. )

    1994-03-15

    In this report, the authors have assigned the human GHRHR gene to chromosome 7p13-p21, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of DNA from well-defined human-rodent somatic cell hybrids. The GHRHR gene was assigned to human chromosome 7 by discordancy analysis (data not shown) of PCR amplification products from NIGMS mapping panel Nos. 1 and 2 DNA templates. The PCR primers (p[sub f], 5[prime]-GCTGCCTCATCACGCCACTGGAGTCCAC-3[prime]; and P[sub r], 5[prime]-CAGGTTTATTGGCTCCTCTGAGCCTTGG-3[prime]) amplified a 276-bp-long fragment from the 3[prime] untranslated region of the human GHRHR gene. Subsequently, they determined the location of the GHRHR gene within human chromosome 7 by PCR amplification of genomic DNA template from somatic cell hybrids that contain deletions of this chromosome. Amplification of the 276-bp DNA fragment was seen only in the cell lines that contained an intact chromosome 7 short arm. The lack of amplification using genomic DNA from 0044 Rag 1-15 and It A9 2-21-14 maps this gene to 7p13-p21. Additionally, the appropriate amplified product was observed from the human chromosome 4 containing NIGMS panel 2 cell line GM10115. This line was reported to have retained a small region of human chromosome 7 containing the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene that is mapped to 7p12-p13. The authors conclude that the human GHRHR gene maps to the small arm of chromosome 7 within 7p13-p21 and close to the EGFR gene. This assignment is consistent with the syntenic relationship between mouse chromosome 6 and human chromosome 7 in this region.

  16. Effects of antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) on GH and insulin-like growth factor I levels in transgenic mice overexpressing the human GHRH gene, an animal model of acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, M; Kineman, R D; Schally, A V; Zarandi, M; Groot, K; Frohman, L A

    1997-11-01

    Transgenic mice overexpressing the human GH-releasing hormone (hGHRH) gene, an animal model of acromegaly, were used to investigate the effects of potent GHRH antagonists MZ-4-71 and MZ-5-156 on the excessive GH and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) secretion caused by overproduction of hGHRH. Because metallothionein (MT)-GHRH mice express the hGHRH transgene in various tissues, including the pituitary and hypothalamus, initial experiments focused on the effectiveness of the GHRH antagonists in blocking basal and stimulated GH secretion from pituitary cells in vitro. Both MZ-4-71 and MZ-5-156 suppressed basal release of GH from superfused MT-GHRH pituitary cells, apparently by blocking the action of endogenously produced hGHRH. In addition, these antagonists effectively eliminated the response to stimulatory action of exogenous hGHRH(1-29)NH2 (30 and 100 nM). To ascertain whether MZ-4-71 and MZ-5-156 could antagonize the effect of hGHRH hyperstimulation in vivo, each antagonist was administered to MT-GHRH transgenic mice in a single iv dose of 10-200 microg. Both compounds decreased serum GH levels in transgenic mice by 39-72% at 1 h after injection. The inhibitory effect of 50 microg MZ-5-156 was maintained for 5 h. Twice daily ip administration of 100 microg MZ-5-156 for 3 days suppressed the highly elevated serum GH and IGF-I concentrations in transgenic mice by 56.8% and 39.0%, respectively. This treatment also reduced IGF-I messenger RNA levels in the liver by 21.8% but did not affect the level of GH messenger RNA in the pituitary. Our results demonstrate that GHRH antagonists MZ-4-71 and MZ-5-156 can inhibit elevated GH levels caused by overproduction of hGHRH. The suppression of circulating GH concentrations induced by the antagonists seems to be physiologically relevant, because both IGF-I secretion and synthesis also were reduced. Our findings, showing the suppression of GH and IGF-I secretion with GHRH antagonists, suggest that this class of analogs

  17. Peptide growth factors, part A

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.; Sirbasku, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains information on the following topics: Epidermal Growth Factor;Transforming Growth Factors;Bone and Cartilage Growth Factors;Somatomedin/Insulin-Like Growth Factors;Techniques for the Study of Growth Factor Activity;Assays, Phosphorylation, and Surface Membrane Effects.

  18. Peptide growth factors, part B

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.; Sirbasku, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the following topics: Platelet-Derived Growth Factor;Nerve and Glial Growth Factors;PC12 Pheochromocytoma Cells;Techniques for the Study of Growth Factor Activity;Genetic Approaches and Biological Effects.

  19. Inhibitory effects of a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist on basal and epidermal growth factor-induced cell proliferation and metastasis-associated properties in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Tang; Hwang, Jiuan-Jiuan; Lee, Lung-Ta; Liebow, Charles; Lee, Ping-Ping H; Ke, Ferng-Chun; Lo, Tung-Bin; Schally, Andrew V; Lee, Ming-Ting

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a potent LHRH agonist, [D-Trp(6)]LHRH on the basal and EGF-induced cell proliferation and the metastasis-associated properties in A431 human epidermoid carcinoma. [D-Trp(6)]LHRH time-dependently inhibited the basal and EGF-stimulated growth of A431 cancer cells. It is assumed that phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of cellular proteins is highly related to cell growth. This study demonstrates that [D-Trp(6)]LHRH decreased the basal and EGF-induced total cellular kinase activity, particularly the tyrosine phosphorylation of several cellular proteins including the EGFR. In contrast, [D-Trp(6)]LHRH did not cause detectable changes in basal and EGF-stimulated serine/threonine phosphorylation of A431 cellular proteins. The inhibitory effect of [D-Trp(6)]LHRH on A431 cell proliferation was associated with apoptosis as evidenced by the cell morphology and DNA integrity (ladder pattern), the expression of interleukin 1beta-converting enzyme (ICE) and activation of caspase. Furthermore, EGF could rescue the remaining attached A431 cells following [D-Trp(6)]LHRH treatment for 48 hr, which suggests that limited exposure to [D-Trp(6)]LHRH did not channel all cells to irreversible apoptotic process. We also determined the effects of [D-Trp(6)]LHRH on metastasis-associated properties in A431 cells. [D-Trp(6)]LHRH reduced both basal and EGF-stimulated secretion of MMP-9 and MMP-2. In addition, [D-Trp(6)]LHRH suppressed the basal and EGF-induced invasive activity of A431 cells based on an in vitro invasion assay. In conclusion, this study indicates that [D-Trp(6)]LHRH may act partly through activating tyrosine phosphatase activity to inhibit cell proliferation and the metastasis-associated properties of A431 cancer cells. Our work suggests that [D-Trp(6)]LHRH may be therapeutically useful in limiting the tumor growth and metastasis of some neoplasms.

  20. Highly potent antagonists of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone free of edematogenic effects.

    PubMed Central

    Bajusz, S; Kovacs, M; Gazdag, M; Bokser, L; Karashima, T; Csernus, V J; Janaky, T; Guoth, J; Schally, A V

    1988-01-01

    To eliminate the undesirable edematogenic effect of the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) antagonists containing basic D amino acids at position 6, exemplified by [Ac-D-Phe(pCl)1,2,D-Trp3,D-Arg6,D-Ala10]LH-RH [Phe(pCl) indicates 4-chlorophenylalanine], analogs with D-ureidoalkyl amino acids such as D-citrulline (D-Cit) or D-homocitrulline (D-Hci) at position 6 were synthesized and tested in several systems in vitro and in vivo. HPLC analysis revealed that the overall hydrophobicity of the D-Cit/D-Hci6 analogs was similar to that of the basic D-Arg6 antagonists. In vitro, most of the analogs completely inhibited LH-RH-mediated luteinizing hormone release in perfused rat pituitary cell systems at an antagonist to LH-RH molar ratio of 5:1. In vivo, the most active peptides, [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(pCl)2,D-Trp3,D-Cit6,D-Ala10]LH-RH [Nal(2) indicates 3-(2-naphthyl)alanine] and its D-Hci6 analog, caused 100% inhibition of ovulation in cycling rats in doses of 3 micrograms and suppressed the luteinizing hormone level in ovariectomized female rats for 47 hr when administered at doses of 25 micrograms. Characteristically, these peptides did not exert any edematogenic effects even at 1.5 mg/kg. These properties of the D-Cit/D-Hci6 antagonists may make them useful clinically. PMID:3278323

  1. Responses of ram lambs to active immunization against testosterone and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Schanbacher, B D

    1982-03-01

    Active immunization of young ram lambs against testosterone and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) was shown to block the growth attributes characteristic of intact ram lambs. Testosterone and LHRH-immunized lambs grew at a slower rate and converted feed to live weight gain less efficiently than albumin-immunized controls. Lambs immunized against testosterone and LHRH had high antibody titers for their respective antigens. Moreover, testosterone-immunized lambs had high serum concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone, whereas LHRH-immunized lambs had low to nondetectable serum concentrations of these hormones. Release of LH and testosterone following the intravenous administration of LHRH (250 ng) was absent in LHRH-immunized lambs, but quantitatively similar for intact and albumin-immunized control lambs. Testosterone-immunized lambs responded as did conventional castrates with a large LH release, but testosterone concentrations were unchanged. These findings are discussed relative to the integrity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular endocrine axis and the importance of gonadotropin support for normal testicular development. These data show that LHRH immunoneutralization effectively retards testicular development and produces a castration effect in young ram lambs.

  2. Short Anabolic Peptides for Bone Growth.

    PubMed

    Amso, Zaid; Cornish, Jillian; Brimble, Margaret A

    2016-07-01

    Loss of bone occurs in the age-related skeletal disorder, osteoporosis, leading to bone fragility and increased incidence of fractures, which are associated with enormous costs and substantial morbidity and mortality. Recent data indicate that osteoporotic fractures are more common than other diseases, which usually attract public attention (e.g., heart attack and breast cancer). The prevention and treatment of this skeletal disorder are therefore of paramount importance. Majority of osteoporosis medications restore skeletal balance by reducing osteoclastic activity, thereby reducing bone resorption. These agents, however, do not regenerate damaged bone tissue, leaving limited options for patients once bone loss has occurred. Recently, attention has turned to bone-anabolic agents. Such agents have the ability to increase bone mass and strength, potentially reversing structural damage. To date, only one bone-anabolic drug is available in the market. The discovery of more novel, cost-effective bone anabolic agents is therefore a priority to treat those suffering from this disabling condition. Short peptides offer an important alternative for the development of novel bone-anabolic agents given their high target binding specificity, which translates into potent activity with limited side effects. This review summarizes attempts in the identification of bone-anabolic peptides, and their development for promoting bone growth. PMID:27297498

  3. Short Anabolic Peptides for Bone Growth.

    PubMed

    Amso, Zaid; Cornish, Jillian; Brimble, Margaret A

    2016-07-01

    Loss of bone occurs in the age-related skeletal disorder, osteoporosis, leading to bone fragility and increased incidence of fractures, which are associated with enormous costs and substantial morbidity and mortality. Recent data indicate that osteoporotic fractures are more common than other diseases, which usually attract public attention (e.g., heart attack and breast cancer). The prevention and treatment of this skeletal disorder are therefore of paramount importance. Majority of osteoporosis medications restore skeletal balance by reducing osteoclastic activity, thereby reducing bone resorption. These agents, however, do not regenerate damaged bone tissue, leaving limited options for patients once bone loss has occurred. Recently, attention has turned to bone-anabolic agents. Such agents have the ability to increase bone mass and strength, potentially reversing structural damage. To date, only one bone-anabolic drug is available in the market. The discovery of more novel, cost-effective bone anabolic agents is therefore a priority to treat those suffering from this disabling condition. Short peptides offer an important alternative for the development of novel bone-anabolic agents given their high target binding specificity, which translates into potent activity with limited side effects. This review summarizes attempts in the identification of bone-anabolic peptides, and their development for promoting bone growth.

  4. Precocious puberty associated with neurofibromatosis and optic gliomas. Treatment with luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogue.

    PubMed

    Laue, L; Comite, F; Hench, K; Loriaux, D L; Cutler, G B; Pescovitz, O H

    1985-11-01

    Seven children with central precocious puberty and either neurofibromatosis and/or optic gliomas were referred to the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md, for evaluation and treatment with the long-acting luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogue (LHRHa) D-Trp6-Pro9-NEt-LHRH. Only six of the seven children chose to receive treatment. Four children presented with neurofibromatosis, three of whom also had optic gliomas; the remaining three children had isolated optic gliomas, without other neurocutaneous stigmas. All had central precocious puberty mediated by activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Six months of LHRHa therapy caused suppression of gonadotropin and sex steroid levels, stabilization or regression of secondary sexual characteristics, and decreases in growth velocity and the rate of bone age maturation. We conclude that LHRHa therapy is effective in the treatment of central precocious puberty secondary to neurofibromatosis and/or optic gliomas.

  5. Characterization of cDNA for precursor of human luteinizing hormone releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Seeburg, P H; Adelman, J P

    Human reproduction is controlled by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis laid down early in fetal development. Luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH), also termed gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), is a decapeptide and is a key molecule in this control circuit. It is produced by hypothalamic neurones, secreted in a pulsatile manner into the capillary plexus of the median eminence and effects the release of luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone from gonadotropic cells in the anterior pituitary. The peptide may have further functions, including behavioural ones, as LHRH or LHRH-like immunoreactivity has been found in gonadal tissue, placenta and the central nervous system, and exogenously administered LHRH is shown to affect behaviour. To investigate the biosynthesis of LHRH, we have now isolated cloned genomic and cDNA sequences encoding the precursor form of LHRH, the existence of which had been suggested from chromatographic studies of hypothalamic and placental extracts. These DNA sequences code for a protein of 92 amino acids in which the LHRH decapeptide is preceded by a signal peptide of 23 amino acids and followed by a Gly-Lys-Arg sequence, as expected for enzymatic cleavage of the decapeptide from its precursor and amidation of the carboxy-terminal of LHRH.

  6. Hormone release from isolated nerve endings of the rat neurohypophysis.

    PubMed Central

    Cazalis, M; Dayanithi, G; Nordmann, J J

    1987-01-01

    1. Isolated neurosecretory nerve endings were prepared from rat neurohypophyses. The amount of vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin released was measured by radioimmunoassay. 2. The amount of hormone release under resting conditions was not affected by external calcium (Ca2+o). Secretion decreased by ca. 50% when external sodium (Na+o) was replaced by choline or sucrose. 3. Ouabain did not modify the basal AVP release. 4. The Na+ ionophore monensin increased the release of AVP only in the presence of Na+o. This increase was maintained during prolonged exposure to the ionophore and occurred in the presence of Ca2+o only. 5. In the presence of Ca2+o, the amount of evoked hormone release was dependent on the external K+ concentration. Half-maximal activation was achieved with ca. 40 mM-K+. The K+-induced secretion was potentiated in Na+-free solution. 6. Prolonged 100 mM-K+-induced depolarization in the presence of Ca2+o gave rise to a large increase in hormone secretion which decreased with time (t1/2 = 2.5 min). The release could be reactivated after permeabilization of the nerve terminals in the presence of micromolar concentrations of Ca2+. 7. A stepwise paradigm in which Ko+ is incrementally increased to 25, 50, 75 and then 100 mM released more AVP than a prolonged exposure to 100 mM-K+. 8. Veratridine increased the amount of AVP released. This effect was considerably reduced in the absence of Nao+ and abolished in the presence of D600. 9. The depolarization-induced AVP release was blocked by different Ca2+-antagonists. Their effectiveness was nitrendipine = nicardipine greater than Cd2+ greater than Gd3+ greater than Co2+ = Mn2+. 10. The dihydropyridine Bay K 8644 potentiated both the basal and the K+-evoked AVP release. Its maximal effect was obtained with 25-50 mM-Ko+. 11. In conclusion, the isolated neurohypophysial terminals which have both Na+ and Ca2+ channels and release AVP and oxytocin upon depolarization might be an excellent system to study further the

  7. Neuronal influence on hormone release from anglerfish islet cells.

    PubMed

    Milgram, S L; McDonald, J K; Noe, B D

    1991-10-01

    Pancreatic islets in anglerfish (AF) are macroscopic collections of nearly pure endocrine cells that are densely innervated. Immunohistochemical staining for neurotransmitter biosynthetic enzymes revealed noradrenergic and cholinergic innervation of AF islets. An in vitro preparation of perifused dispersed AF islet cells was developed to study nutrient and neural control of islet hormone secretion. Glucose stimulated insulin and somatostatin-14 (SS-14) secretion in a dose-dependent manner, and 16.7 mM glucose inhibited glucagon secretion. In 2 mM glucose, norepinephrine and isoproterenol stimulated glucagon and SS-14 release. Isoproterenol stimulated insulin secretion, and norepinephrine stimulated or inhibited insulin release, depending on the concentration. Clonidine potently inhibited glucose-stimulated insulin secretion but stimulated glucagon release. Methacholine, a muscarinic cholinergic agonist, stimulated insulin, glucagon, and SS-14 release. The control of AF hormone release by neurotransmitter agonists in vitro was similar to that in higher vertebrate species. Therefore we used this tissue preparation to study postsynaptic interactions between glucose and neurotransmitters in islets. PMID:1681734

  8. Hydroxyapatite Growth Inhibition Effect of Pellicle Statherin Peptides.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Karttunen, M; Jalkanen, J; Mussi, M C M; Liao, Y; Grohe, B; Lagugné-Labarthet, F; Siqueira, W L

    2015-08-01

    In our recent studies, we have shown that in vivo-acquired enamel pellicle is a sophisticated biological structure containing a significant portion of naturally occurring salivary peptides. From a functional aspect, the identification of peptides in the acquired enamel pellicle is of interest because many salivary proteins exhibit functional domains that maintain the activities of the native protein. Among the in vivo-acquired enamel pellicle peptides that have been newly identified, 5 peptides are derived from statherin. Here, we assessed the ability of these statherin pellicle peptides to inhibit hydroxyapatite crystal growth. In addition, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms of hydroxyapatite growth inhibition. A microplate colorimetric assay was used to quantify hydroxyapatite growth. Statherin protein, 5 statherin-derived peptides, and a peptide lacking phosphate at residues 2 and 3 were analyzed. Statherin peptide phosphorylated on residues 2 and 3 indicated a significant inhibitory effect when compared with the 5 other peptides (P < 0.05). MD simulations showed a strong affinity and fast adsorption to hydroxyapatite for phosphopeptides, whereas unphosphorylated peptides interacted weakly with the hydroxyapatite. Our data suggest that the presence of a covalently linked phosphate group (at residues 2 and 3) in statherin peptides modulates the effect of hydroxyapatite growth inhibition. This study provides a mechanism to account for the composition and function of acquired enamel pellicle statherin peptides that will contribute as a base for the development of biologically stable and functional synthetic peptides for therapeutic use against dental caries and/or periodontal disease.

  9. Hydroxyapatite Growth Inhibition Effect of Pellicle Statherin Peptides.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Karttunen, M; Jalkanen, J; Mussi, M C M; Liao, Y; Grohe, B; Lagugné-Labarthet, F; Siqueira, W L

    2015-08-01

    In our recent studies, we have shown that in vivo-acquired enamel pellicle is a sophisticated biological structure containing a significant portion of naturally occurring salivary peptides. From a functional aspect, the identification of peptides in the acquired enamel pellicle is of interest because many salivary proteins exhibit functional domains that maintain the activities of the native protein. Among the in vivo-acquired enamel pellicle peptides that have been newly identified, 5 peptides are derived from statherin. Here, we assessed the ability of these statherin pellicle peptides to inhibit hydroxyapatite crystal growth. In addition, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms of hydroxyapatite growth inhibition. A microplate colorimetric assay was used to quantify hydroxyapatite growth. Statherin protein, 5 statherin-derived peptides, and a peptide lacking phosphate at residues 2 and 3 were analyzed. Statherin peptide phosphorylated on residues 2 and 3 indicated a significant inhibitory effect when compared with the 5 other peptides (P < 0.05). MD simulations showed a strong affinity and fast adsorption to hydroxyapatite for phosphopeptides, whereas unphosphorylated peptides interacted weakly with the hydroxyapatite. Our data suggest that the presence of a covalently linked phosphate group (at residues 2 and 3) in statherin peptides modulates the effect of hydroxyapatite growth inhibition. This study provides a mechanism to account for the composition and function of acquired enamel pellicle statherin peptides that will contribute as a base for the development of biologically stable and functional synthetic peptides for therapeutic use against dental caries and/or periodontal disease. PMID:26116492

  10. Serotonin directly stimulates luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone release from GT1 cells via 5-HT7 receptors.

    PubMed

    Héry, M; François-Bellan, A M; Héry, F; Deprez, P; Becquet, D

    1997-10-01

    Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH release, which serves as the primary drive to the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis, is controlled by many neuromediators. Serotonin has been implicated in this regulation. However, it is unclear whether the central effect of serotonin on LHRH secretion is exerted directly on LHRH neurosecretory neurons or indirectly via multisynaptic pathways. The present studies were undertaken in order to examine whether LHRH secretion from immortalized LHRH cell lines is directly regulated by serotonin and, if so, to identify the receptor subtype involved. 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), a 5-HT1A/7 receptor agonist, stimulated LHRH release from GT1-1 cells. This effect was blocked by ritanserin, a 5-HT2/7 receptor antagonist, but not by SDZ-216-525, a 5-HT1A antagonist. Basal LHRH release was not affected by the 5-HT2 agonist DOI. Reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction technique (RT-PCR) was used in order to identify 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptor mRNA in immortalized LHRH cell lines. GT1-1 cells express mRNA for the 5-HT7, but not the 5-HT1A receptor subtypes. These results demonstrate a direct stimulatory effect of serotonin on LHRH release via 5-HT7 receptor.

  11. In vivo pharmacological evaluation of a lactose-conjugated luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogue.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Shayli Varasteh; Varamini, Pegah; Steyn, Frederik; Toth, Istvan

    2015-11-10

    In the current study, the efficacy and pharmacokinetic profile of lactose-conjugated luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) was examined following oral administration in male rats. A rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry technique was developed and applied for measuring the concentration of lactose[Q(1)][w(6)]LHRH (compound 1) in rat plasma in order to allow measurement of pharmacokinetic parameters. LH release was evaluated using a sandwich ELISA. Maximum serum concentration (Cmax = 0.11 μg/ml) was reached at 2h (Tmax) following oral administration of the compound at 10mg/kg. The half-life was determined to be 2.6h. The absolute bioavailability of the orally administered compound was found to be 14%, which was a remarkable improvement compared to zero-to-low oral bioavailability of the native peptide. Compound 1 was effective in stimulating LH release at 20mg/kg after oral administration. The method was validated at a linear range of 0.01-20.0 μg/ml and a correlation coefficient of r(2) ≥ 0.999. The accuracy and precision values showed the reliability and reproducibility of the method for evaluation of the pharmacokinetic parameters. These findings showed that the lactose derivative of LHRH has a therapeutic potential to be further developed as an orally active therapeutics for the treatment of hormone-dependent diseases.

  12. Central stimulation of hormone release and the proliferative response of lymphocytes in humans.

    PubMed

    Juránková, E; Jezová, D; Vigas, M

    1995-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) may communicate with the immune system by direct innervation of lymphoid organs and/or by neurotransmitters and changes in neuroendocrine functioning and hormone release. The consequences of selective transient changes in circulating hormones on immune functioning in humans have not yet been studied. To address this problem, the authors evaluated the lymphoproliferative responses to optimal and suboptimal concentrations of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and pokeweek mitogen (PWM) under selective enhancement of circulating growth hormone, prolactin, or norepinephrine. The authors failed to demonstrate any effect of elevated growth hormone levels after clonidine challenge on the lymphoproliferative response to mitogens. Similarly, the results did not show any effect of elevated prolactin concentrations induced by domperidone administration on the immune test. Exposure of volunteers to cold resulted in elevation of plasma norepinephrine levels without changes in growth hormone, epinephrine, or cortisol secretion. Cold exposure induced elevation of plasma norepinephrine and reduction of the lymphoproliferative response to the suboptimal dosage of PHA. The reduction was significant 180 and 240 min after exposure. These results are indicative of a relationship between norepinephrine and immunity. PMID:8534322

  13. Antifertility effects of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists.

    PubMed

    Labrie, F; Bélanger, A; Kelly, P A; Séguin, C; Cusan, L; Lefebvre, F A; Reeves, J J; Lemay, A; Faure, N; Gourdeau, Y; Raynaud, J P

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews the mechanisms responsible for the antifertility effects of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists. Large doses of the LHRH agonist LHRH-EA lead to a marked reduction of testicular and secondary sex organ weight, LH receptor levels, and plasma testosterone concentration. A marked inhibition of basal testicular and testosterone concentrations is obtained after daily administration of the LHRH agonists at doses greater than 10 ng. Treatment with low doses of the LHRH agonist can lead to an increased steroidogenic response to LH. Treatment with low doses of LHRH agonists could stimulate Leydig cell function while high doses are history. A study of the effects of longterm treatment with an LHRH agonsist on spermatogenesis revelaed that testis, prostate, and seminal vesicle weight decreased and plasma LH and FSH levels increased over 12 weeks. Comparison of the effects of increasing doses of LHRH agonist on testicular and ovarian gonadotropin receptors and steroidogenesis in male rats indicates that single or repeated administration of LHRH agonists can lead to loss of testicular LH receptors in the absence of the pituitary gland. The loss of ovarian gonadotropin receptors in female rats is also investigated. Antifertility effects of LHRH ethylamide are accompanied by a marked loss of LH/hCG and FSH receptors in ovarian tissue. The injection of 1,3, or 10 ng LHRH-EA in intact rats has no significant effect on ovarian LH receptor levels. A study of the direct action of LHRH agonists at the ovarian level demonstrates a close relationship between the binding activity of a large series of LHRH agonists and antagonists in the anterior pituitary gland and the ovary. Inhibition of testicular steroidogenesis in man by treatment with a potent LHRH agonist is also demonstrated. Intranasal administration of LHRH ethylamide has luteolytic effects in normal women. Daily administration of LHRH-EA inhibited ovulation in all but 2 of 89 treatment

  14. Biosynthesis and the conjugation of magnetite nanoparticles with luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH).

    PubMed

    Obayemi, J D; Dozie-Nwachukwu, S; Danyuo, Y; Odusanya, O S; Anuku, N; Malatesta, K; Soboyejo, W O

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of the biosynthesis of magnetite nanoparticles (BMNPs) with particle sizes between 10 nm and 60 nm. The biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles are produced from Magnetospirillum magneticum (M.M.) bacteria that respond to magnetic fields. M.M. bacteria were cultured and used to synthesize magnetite nanoparticles. This was done in an enriched magnetic spirillum growth medium (EMSGM) at different pH levels. The nanoparticle concentrations were characterized with UV-Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, while the particle shapes were elucidated via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The structure of the particles was studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), while the hydrodynamic radii, particle size distributions and polydispersity of the nanoparticles were characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS). Carbodiimide reduction was also used to functionalize the BMNPs with a molecular recognition unit (luteinizing hormone releasing hormone, LHRH) that attaches specifically to receptors that are over-expressed on the surfaces of most breast cancer cell types. The resulting nanoparticles were examined using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and quantitative image analysis. The implications of the results are then discussed for the potential development of magnetic nanoparticles for the specific targeting and treatment of breast cancer.

  15. Hydroxyapatite-binding peptides for bone growth and inhibition

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Song, Jie; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2011-09-20

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-binding peptides are selected using combinatorial phage library display. Pseudo-repetitive consensus amino acid sequences possessing periodic hydroxyl side chains in every two or three amino acid sequences are obtained. These sequences resemble the (Gly-Pro-Hyp).sub.x repeat of human type I collagen, a major component of extracellular matrices of natural bone. A consistent presence of basic amino acid residues is also observed. The peptides are synthesized by the solid-phase synthetic method and then used for template-driven HA-mineralization. Microscopy reveal that the peptides template the growth of polycrystalline HA crystals .about.40 nm in size.

  16. L‐arginine promotes gut hormone release and reduces food intake in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Alamshah, A.; McGavigan, A. K.; Spreckley, E.; Kinsey‐Jones, J. S.; Amin, A.; Tough, I. R.; O'Hara, H. C.; Moolla, A.; Banks, K.; France, R.; Hyberg, G.; Norton, M.; Cheong, W.; Lehmann, A.; Bloom, S. R.; Cox, H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To investigate the anorectic effect of L‐arginine (L‐Arg) in rodents. Methods We investigated the effects of L‐Arg on food intake, and the role of the anorectic gut hormones glucagon‐like peptide‐1 (GLP‐1) and peptide YY (PYY), the G‐protein‐coupled receptor family C group 6 member A (GPRC6A) and the vagus nerve in mediating these effects in rodents. Results Oral gavage of L‐Arg reduced food intake in rodents, and chronically reduced cumulative food intake in diet‐induced obese mice. Lack of the GPRC6A in mice and subdiaphragmatic vagal deafferentation in rats did not influence these anorectic effects. L‐Arg stimulated GLP‐1 and PYY release in vitro and in vivo. Pharmacological blockade of GLP‐1 and PYY receptors did not influence the anorectic effect of L‐Arg. L‐Arg‐mediated PYY release modulated net ion transport across the gut mucosa. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) and intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of L‐Arg suppressed food intake in rats. Conclusions L‐Arg reduced food intake and stimulated gut hormone release in rodents. The anorectic effect of L‐Arg is unlikely to be mediated by GLP‐1 and PYY, does not require GPRC6A signalling and is not mediated via the vagus. I.c.v. and i.p. administration of L‐Arg suppressed food intake in rats, suggesting that L‐Arg may act on the brain to influence food intake. Further work is required to determine the mechanisms by which L‐Arg suppresses food intake and its utility in the treatment of obesity. PMID:26863991

  17. Short Laminin Peptide for Improved Neural Stem Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Xiaoyan; Josey, Benjamin; Chou, C. James; Tan, Yu; Zhang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Human neural stem/progenitor cells (hNSCs) are very difficult to culture and require human or animal source extracellular matrix molecules, such as laminin or collagen type IV, to support attachment and to regulate their survival and proliferation. These extracellular matrix molecules are difficult to purify from human or animal tissues, have high batch-to-batch variability, and may cause an immune response if used in clinical applications. Although several laminin- and collagen IV-derived peptides are commercially available, they do not support long-term hNSC attachment and growth. To solve this problem, we developed a novel peptide sequence with only 12 amino acids based on the Ile-Lys-Val-Ala-Val, or IKVAV, sequence: Ac-Cys-Cys-Arg-Arg-Ile-Lys-Val-Ala-Val-Trp-Leu-Cys. This short peptide sequence, similar to tissue-derived full laminin molecules, supported hNSCs to attach and proliferate to confluence for continuous passage and subculture. This short peptide also directed hNSCs to differentiate into neurons. When conjugated to poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels, this short peptide benefited hNSC attachment and proliferation on the surface of hydrogels and promoted cell migration inside the hydrogels with maximum enhancement at a peptide density of 10 μM. This novel short peptide shows great promise in artificial niche development for supporting hNSC culture in vitro and in vivo and for promoting hNSC transplantation in future clinical therapy. PMID:24692587

  18. Sex steroids modulate luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone secretion in a cholinergic cell line from the basal forebrain.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Morales, J R; López-Coviella, I; Hernández-Jiménez, J G; Reyes, R; Bello, A R; Hernández, G; Blusztajn, J K; Alonso, R

    2001-01-01

    The function of a particular neuronal population is in part determined by its neurotransmitter phenotype. We have found that a neuronal-derived septal cell line (SN56), known for its cholinergic properties, also synthesizes and releases luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. In addition, these cells express the messenger RNAs encoding estrogen and progesterone receptors. The activation of these receptors by their respective ligands cooperatively modulates the depolarization-induced release of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in these cells. We have also found that a number of septal neurons in postnatal (1-week-old) mice are immunoreactive to both choline acetyltransferase and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. These results indicate that both neurotransmitters, acetylcholine and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone, may co-exist in septal neurons of the CNS and that they could be modulated by gonadal hormones, and suggest that luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone could be involved in some of the actions of sex steroids on cholinergic neurotransmission.

  19. Hypothalamic hamartoma: a source of luteinizing-hormone-releasing factor in precocious puberty.

    PubMed

    Judge, D M; Kulin, H E; Page, R; Santen, R; Trapukdi, S

    1977-01-01

    The presence of a hypothalamic hamartoma and precocious puberty in a 19-month-old boy provided an opportunity to study their relation. Excised tissue had the ultrastructural characteristics of an independent neuroendocrine unit -- i.e., neurons containing neurosecretory granules and blood vessels with fenestrated endothelium and double basement membranes. Immunofluorescence studies using specific antibody to luteinizing-hormone-releasing factor showed antigenicity to the factor in the hamartoma. The testicular-hypothalamic-pituitary axis was tested. Clomiphene unresponsiveness suggested a lack of maturation of central-nervous-system events characteristic of normal puberty. The negative feedback system between gonad and brain was intact but partially resistant to steroid suppression. These studies suggest that hypothalamic hamartomas may cause precocious puberty by autonomous production and release of luteinizing-hormone-releasing factor into vessels that communicate with the pituitary portal blood system.

  20. Derivation of Diverse Hormone-Releasing Pituitary Cells from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Bastian; Piao, Jinghua; Ramnarine, Kiran; Tomishima, Mark J; Tabar, Viviane; Studer, Lorenz

    2016-06-14

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide an unlimited cell source for regenerative medicine. Hormone-producing cells are particularly suitable for cell therapy, and hypopituitarism, a defect in pituitary gland function, represents a promising therapeutic target. Previous studies have derived pituitary lineages from mouse and human ESCs using 3D organoid cultures that mimic the complex events underlying pituitary gland development in vivo. Instead of relying on unknown cellular signals, we present a simple and efficient strategy to derive human pituitary lineages from hPSCs using monolayer culture conditions suitable for cell manufacturing. We demonstrate that purified placode cells can be directed into pituitary fates using defined signals. hPSC-derived pituitary cells show basal and stimulus-induced hormone release in vitro and engraftment and hormone release in vivo after transplantation into a murine model of hypopituitarism. This work lays the foundation for future cell therapy applications in patients with hypopituitarism.

  1. Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone Distribution in the Anterior Hypothalamus of the Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Castañeyra-Ruiz, Leandro; González-Marrero, Ibrahim; Castañeyra-Ruiz, Agustín; González-Toledo, Juan M.; Castañeyra-Ruiz, María; de Paz-Carmona, Héctor; Castañeyra-Perdomo, Agustín; Carmona-Calero, Emilia M.

    2013-01-01

    Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) neurons and fibers are located in the anteroventral hypothalamus, specifically in the preoptic medial area and the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis. Most luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone neurons project to the median eminence where they are secreted in the pituitary portal system in order to control the release of gonadotropin. The aim of this study is to provide, using immunohistochemistry and female brain rats, a new description of the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone fibers and neuron localization in the anterior hypothalamus. The greatest amount of the LHRH immunoreactive material was found in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis that is located around the anterior region of the third ventricle. The intensity of the reaction of LHRH immunoreactive material decreases from cephalic to caudal localization; therefore, the greatest immunoreaction is in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, followed by the dorsomedial preoptic area, the ventromedial preoptic area, and finally the ventrolateral medial preoptic area, and in fibers surrounding the suprachiasmatic nucleus and subependymal layer on the floor of the third ventricle where the least amount immunoreactive material is found. PMID:25938107

  2. Distribution of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in the upper brainstem and diencephalon of the cat: an immunocytochemical study.

    PubMed

    Belda, M; Coveñas, R; Narváez, J A; Aguirre, J A; Tramu, G

    2000-03-01

    The distribution of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH)-immunostained cell bodies and fibres was studied in the brainstem and diencephalon of the cat using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique. The brainstem and the thalamus were devoid of immunostained cell bodies, whereas in the hypothalamus immunopositive perikarya were observed in the supraoptic nucleus, the anterior hypothalamus, the preoptic region and in the arcuate nucleus. Our findings also showed that the hypothalamus is richer in immunostained fibres, and that in this region such fibres are more widely distributed than in the thalamus and upper brainstem. No immunopositive fibres were observed in the lower brainstem. Our results point to a more widespread distribution of LH-RH-immunostained perikarya in the cat hypothalamus than that previously reported in the cat; a similar distribution to that found in the rat, and a more restricted distribution than in primates. Additionally, our study shows a more widespread distribution of immunostained fibres in the cat brainstem and diencephalon than that previously described for other mammals. In this context, our results describe for the first time in the mammals central nervous system fibres containing LH-RH located in the stria medullaris of the thalamus, the supramammillary decussation, the laterodorsal and lateroposterior thalamic nuclei, the nucleus reuniens, the supraoptic nucleus, and the optic chiasm. Thus, our findings reveal that LH-RH-immunostained structures are widely distributed in the upper brainstem and in the diencephalon of the cat, suggesting that the peptide may be involved in several physiological functions.

  3. Corpus luteum derived copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase serves as a luteinizing hormone-release inhibiting factor in sheep.

    PubMed

    Al-Gubory, Kaïs H; Huet, Jean-Claude; Pernollet, Jean-Claude; Martal, Jacques; Locatelli, Alain

    2003-01-31

    In the present study, we report the purification and characterization of a polypeptide from the sheep corpus luteum of pregnancy with a potent luteinizing hormone-release inhibiting factor (LH-RIF) bioactivity that stained as a single band in SDS-PAGE with an apparent molecular mass of 16000 Da. The amino acid sequences obtained after sequence analysis of peptides derived from the trypsin digestion of LH-RIF were subjected to a protein data bank search and were found to be identical with regions of sheep copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD). The measured mass of LH-RIF (15604.2+/-1.9 Da) was found to be similar to the theoretical mass of sheep Cu,Zn-SOD (15603.5 Da), with a disulfide bond and N acetylated alanine at the N-terminus. The inhibitory action of Cu,Zn-SOD on pulsatile LH secretion would suggest that this antioxidant may play an important role, either independently or in concert with some neurotransmitters, in the neuroendocrine regulation of sheep female reproductive function.

  4. Differential involvement of signaling pathways in the regulation of growth hormone release by somatostatin and growth hormone-releasing hormone in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Qin, Chaobin; Zhang, Cong; Jia, Jirong; Sun, Caiyun; Li, Wensheng

    2014-02-15

    Somatostatin is the most effective inhibitor of GH release, and GHRH was recently identified as one of the primary GH-releasing factors in teleosts. In this study, we analyzed the possible intracellular transduction pathways that are involved in the mechanisms induced by SRIF and GHRH to regulate GH release. Using a pharmacological approach, the blockade of the PLC/IP/PKC pathway reversed the SRIF-induced inhibition of GH release but did not affect the GHRH-induced stimulation of GH release. Furthermore, SRIF reduced the GH release induced by two PKC activators. Inhibitors of the AC/cAMP/PKA pathway reversed both the SRIF- and GHRH-induced effects on GH release. Moreover, the GH release evoked by forskolin and 8-Br-cAMP were completely abolished by SRIF. The blockade of the NOS/NO pathway attenuated the GHRH-induced GH release but had minimal effects on the inhibitory actions of SRIF. In addition, inhibitors of the sGC/cGMP pathway did not modify the SRIF- or GHRH-induced regulation of GH release. Taken together, these findings indicate that the SRIF-induced inhibition of GH release is mediated by both the PLC/IP/PKC and the AC/cAMP/PKA pathways and not by the NOS/NO/sGC/cGMP pathway. In contrast, the GHRH-induced stimulation of GH secretion is mediated by both the AC/cAMP/PKA and the NOS/NO pathways and is independent of the sGC/cGMP pathway and the PLC/IP/PKC system.

  5. Highly potent analogues of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone containing D-phenylalanine nitrogen mustard in position 6

    SciTech Connect

    Bajusz, S.; Janaky, T.; Csernus, V.J.; Bokser, L.; Fekete, M.; Srkalovic, G.; Redding, T.W.; Schally, A.V. )

    1989-08-01

    The nitrogen mustard derivatives of 4-phenylbutyric acid and L-phenylalanine, called chlorambucil (Chl) and melphalan (Mel), respectively, have been incorporated into several peptide hormones, including luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH). The alkylating analogues of LH-RH were prepared by linking Chl, as an N-acyl moiety, to the complete amino acid sequence of agonistic and antagonistic analogues. These compounds, in particular the antagonistic analogues, showed much lower potency than their congeners carrying other acyl groups. To obtain highly potent alkylating analogues of LH-RH, the D enantiomer of Mel was incorporated into position 6 of the native hormone and some of its antagonistic analogues. Of the peptides prepared, (D-Mel{sup 6})LH-RH (SB-05) and (Ac-D-Nal(2){sup 1},D-Phe(pCl){sup 2},D-Pal(3){sup 3},Arg{sup 5},D-Mel{sup 6},D-Ala{sup 10})LH-RH (SB-86, where Nal(2) is 3-(2-naphthyl)alanine and Pal(3) is 3-(3-pyridyl)alanine) possessed the expected high agonistic and antagonistic activities, respectively, and also showed high affinities for the membrane receptors of rat pituitary cells, human breast cancer cells, human prostate cancer cells, and rat Dunning R-3327 prostate tumor cells. These two analogues exerted cytotoxic effects on human and rat mammary cancer cells in vitro. Thus these two D-Mel{sup 6} analogues seem to be particularly suitable for the study of how alkylating analogues of LH-RH could interfere with intracellular events in certain cancer cells.

  6. A therapeutic response to a single diagnostic dose of luteinising hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Distiller, L A; Sagel, J; Polakow, E S; Morley, J E

    1975-01-11

    Luteinising hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) administration is a useful provocative test for the evaluation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Seven cases with oligomenorrhoea or amenorrhoea are reported, in which a single diagnostic injection of LH-RH produced an apparent therapeutic response. Six patients converted to a regular normal menstrual cycle, and 4 of these had evidence of ovulation. The seventh patient conceived. It is postulated that in some cases of hypothalamic menstrual dysfunction the gonadotrophic imbalance may be corrected by a single intravenous dose of LH-RH.

  7. Semaphorin 4D regulates gonadotropin hormone-releasing hormone-1 neuronal migration through PlexinB1-Met complex.

    PubMed

    Giacobini, Paolo; Messina, Andrea; Morello, Francesca; Ferraris, Nicoletta; Corso, Simona; Penachioni, Junia; Giordano, Silvia; Tamagnone, Luca; Fasolo, Aldo

    2008-11-01

    In mammals, reproduction is dependent on specific neurons secreting the neuropeptide gonadotropin hormone-releasing hormone-1 (GnRH-1). These cells originate during embryonic development in the olfactory placode and migrate into the forebrain, where they become integral members of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. This migratory process is regulated by a wide range of guidance cues, which allow GnRH-1 cells to travel over long distances to reach their appropriate destinations. The Semaphorin4D (Sema4D) receptor, PlexinB1, is highly expressed in the developing olfactory placode, but its function in this context is still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that PlexinB1-deficient mice exhibit a migratory defect of GnRH-1 neurons, resulting in reduction of this cell population in the adult brain. Moreover, Sema4D promotes directional migration in GnRH-1 cells by coupling PlexinB1 with activation of the Met tyrosine kinase (hepatocyte growth factor receptor). This work identifies a function for PlexinB1 during brain development and provides evidence that Sema4D controls migration of GnRH-1 neurons.

  8. Gender, neuroendocrine-immune interactions and neuron-glial plasticity. Role of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH).

    PubMed

    Marchetti, B; Gallo, F; Farinella, Z; Tirolo, C; Testa, N; Caniglia, S; Morale, M C

    2000-01-01

    Signals generated by the hypothalamic-pitutary-gonadal (HPG) axis powerfully modulate immune system function. This article summarizes some aspects of the impact of gender in neuroendocrine immunomodulation. Emphasis is given to the astroglial cell compartment, defined as a key actor in neuroendocrine immune communications. In the brain, the principal hormones of the HPG axis directly interact with astroglial cells. Thus, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone, LHRH, influences hypothalamic astrocyte development and growth, and hypothalamic astrocytes direct LHRH neuron differentiation. Hormonally induced changes in neuron-glial plasticity may dictate major changes in CNS output, and thus actively participate in sex dimorphic immune responses. The impact of gender in neuroimmunomodulation is further underlined by the sex dimorphism in the expression of genes encoding for neuroendocrine hormones and their receptors within the thymus, and by the potent modulation exerted by circulating sex steroids during development and immunization. The central role of glucocorticoids in the interactive communication between neuroendocrine and immune systems, and the impact of gender on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis modulation is underscored in transgenic mice expressing a glucocorticoid receptor antisense RNA.

  9. Identification and functional characterization of a novel locust peptide belonging to the family of insect growth blocking peptides.

    PubMed

    Duressa, Tewodros Firdissa; Boonen, Kurt; Hayakawa, Yoichi; Huybrechts, Roger

    2015-12-01

    Growth blocking peptides (GBPs) are recognized as insect cytokines that take part in multifaceted functions including immune system activation and growth retardation. The peptides induce hemocyte spreading in vitro, which is considered as the initial step in hemocyte activation against infection in many insect species. Therefore, in this study, we carried out a series of in vitro bioassay driven fractionations of Locusta migratoria hemolymph combined with mass spectrometry to identify locust hemocyte activation factors belonging to the family of insect GBPs. We identified the locust hemocyte spreading peptide (locust GBP) as a 28-mer peptide encoded at the C-terminus of a 64 amino acid long precursor polypeptide. As demonstrated by QRT-PCR, the gene encoding the locust GBP precursor (proGBP) was expressed in large quantities in diverse locust tissues including fat body, endocrine glands, central nervous system, reproductive tissues and flight muscles. In contrary, hemocytes, gut tissues and Malpighian tubules displayed little expression of the proGBP transcript. The bioactive peptide induces transient depletion of hemocytes in vivo and when injected in last instar nymphs it extends the larval growth phase and postpones adult molting. In addition, we identified a functional homologous hemocyte spreading peptide in Schistocerca gregaria.

  10. Identification and functional characterization of a novel locust peptide belonging to the family of insect growth blocking peptides.

    PubMed

    Duressa, Tewodros Firdissa; Boonen, Kurt; Hayakawa, Yoichi; Huybrechts, Roger

    2015-12-01

    Growth blocking peptides (GBPs) are recognized as insect cytokines that take part in multifaceted functions including immune system activation and growth retardation. The peptides induce hemocyte spreading in vitro, which is considered as the initial step in hemocyte activation against infection in many insect species. Therefore, in this study, we carried out a series of in vitro bioassay driven fractionations of Locusta migratoria hemolymph combined with mass spectrometry to identify locust hemocyte activation factors belonging to the family of insect GBPs. We identified the locust hemocyte spreading peptide (locust GBP) as a 28-mer peptide encoded at the C-terminus of a 64 amino acid long precursor polypeptide. As demonstrated by QRT-PCR, the gene encoding the locust GBP precursor (proGBP) was expressed in large quantities in diverse locust tissues including fat body, endocrine glands, central nervous system, reproductive tissues and flight muscles. In contrary, hemocytes, gut tissues and Malpighian tubules displayed little expression of the proGBP transcript. The bioactive peptide induces transient depletion of hemocytes in vivo and when injected in last instar nymphs it extends the larval growth phase and postpones adult molting. In addition, we identified a functional homologous hemocyte spreading peptide in Schistocerca gregaria. PMID:26471907

  11. Detecting peptidic drugs, drug candidates and analogs in sports doping: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Thomas, Andreas; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2014-12-01

    With the growing availability of mature systems and strategies in biotechnology and the continuously expanding knowledge of cellular processes and involved biomolecules, human sports drug testing has become a considerably complex field in the arena of analytical chemistry. Proving the exogenous origin of peptidic drugs and respective analogs at lowest concentration levels in biological specimens (commonly blood, serum and urine) of rather limited volume is required to pursue an action against cheating athletes. Therefore, approaches employing chromatographic-mass spectrometric, electrophoretic, immunological and combined test methods have been required and developed. These allow detecting the misuse of peptidic compounds of lower (such as growth hormone-releasing peptides, ARA-290, TB-500, AOD-9604, CJC-1295, desmopressin, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormones, synacthen, etc.), intermediate (e.g., insulins, IGF-1 and analogs, 'full-length' mechano growth factor, growth hormone, chorionic gonadotropin, erythropoietin, etc.) and higher (e.g., stamulumab) molecular mass with desired specificity and sensitivity. A gap between the technically possible detection and the day-to-day analytical practice, however, still needs to be closed.

  12. Effects of a synthetic bioactive peptide on neurite growth and nerve growth factor release in chondroitin sulfate hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Conovaloff, Aaron W; Beier, Brooke L; Irazoqui, Pedro P; Panitch, Alyssa

    2011-01-01

    Previous work has revealed robust dorsal root ganglia neurite growth in hydrogels of chondroitin sulfate. In the current work, it was determined whether addition of a synthetic bioactive peptide could augment neurite growth in these matrices via enhanced binding and sequestering of growth factors. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching studies revealed that addition of peptide slowed nerve growth factor diffusivity in chondroitin sulfate gels, but not in control gels of hyaluronic acid. Furthermore, cultures of chick dorsal root ganglia in gels of hyaluronic acid or chondroitin sulfate revealed enhanced growth in chondroitin sulfate gels only upon addition of peptide. Taken together, these results suggest a synergistic nerve growth factor-binding activity between this peptide and chondroitin sulfate. PMID:23507745

  13. Active immunization to luteinizing hormone releasing hormone to inhibit the induction of mammary tumors in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ravdin, P.M.; Jordan, V.C.

    1988-01-01

    Immunization of female rats with a bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone releasing hormone conjugate results in suppression of dimethylbenzanthracene mammary tumor incidence. Tumor incidence was 1.3, and 1.29 tumors per rat in bovine serum albumin alone (n = 10) and unimmunized (n = 18) control groups, but no tumors were found in the bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone releasing hormone conjugate immunized animals (n = 10). In a second experiment immunization with bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone releasing hormone conjugates reduced tumor incidence to 0.3 tumors per rat (n = 10) from the 1.2 tumors per animal seen in the control animals (n = 10) immunized with bovine serum albumin alone. Bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone immunization caused the production of anti-LHRH antibodies, an interruption of estrous cycles, lowered serum estradiol and progesterone levels, and atrophy of the ovaries and uteri. Immunization BSA-hormone conjugates is a novel anti-tumor strategy.

  14. A simple pharmacokinetic model linking plasma progesterone concentrations with the hormone released from bovine intravaginal inserts.

    PubMed

    Mariano, R N; Turino, L N; Cabrera, M I; Scándolo, D E; Maciel, M G; Grau, R J A

    2010-10-01

    On the basis of pharmacokinetic modeling, this study provides some insights into predicting in vivo plasma progesterone concentrations when using bovine intravaginal inserts for systemic progesterone delivery. More significantly, this contribution is the first attempt to build a simple pharmacokinetic model that links plasma progesterone concentrations with the hormone released from bovine intravaginal inserts. After evaluating three rival pharmacokinetic models and considering some phenomena involved in the intravaginal administration of progesterone, a primary pharmacokinetic model having a good data fitting capability with only two adjustable parameters is proposed to the above mentioned task. Kinetic parameters are given for lactating Holstein dairy cows with two levels of daily milk yields; and non-pregnant, non-lactating Holstein-Friesian cattle. Model predictions indicate the occurrence of a preferential distribution of the intravaginally administered progesterone dose through a first uterine pass effect.

  15. Luteinizing hormone releasing factor in rat hypophysial portal blood collected during electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Harris, G. W.; Ruf, K. B.

    1970-01-01

    1. Ovulation was induced in Nembutal-blocked pro-oestrous rats by electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus. 2. The same type of electrical stimulation was applied during the collection of hypophysial portal blood. 3. Pooled hypophysial portal plasma from donors in pro-oestrus, oestrus and met-oestrus was assayed for ovarian ascorbic acid depleting (OAAD) activity. 4. Electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus increased the OAAD activity, believed to be due to luteinizing hormone releasing factor (LRF), in pro-oestrus and met-oestrus, but not in oestrus. 5. It is concluded that the hypothalamic nerve fibres responsible for releasing LRF into the hypophysial portal vessels are depleted of their store of this releasing factor, or are refractory to electrical stimulation, during oestrus. PMID:5499765

  16. Effects of Growth Hormone Releasing Hormone on Visceral Fat, Metabolic and Cardiovascular Indices in Human Studies

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Takara L.; Grinspoon, Steven K.

    2014-01-01

    Increased visceral adipose tissue (VAT) is associated with reductions in endogenous GH secretion, possibly as a result of hyperinsulinemia, increased circulating free fatty acid, increased somatostatin tone, and reduced ghrelin. Reduced GH may, in turn, further exacerbate visceral fat accumulation because of decreased hormone sensitive lipolysis in this depot. Data from multiple populations demonstrate that both reduced GH and increased VAT appear to contribute independently to dyslipidemia, increased systemic inflammation, and increased cardiovascular risk. The reductions in GH in states of visceral adiposity are characterized by reduced basal and pulsatile GH secretion with intact pulse frequency. Treatment with GH releasing hormone (GHRH) provides a means to reverse these abnormalities, increasing endogenous basal and pulsatile GH secretion without altering pulse frequency. This review describes data from HIV-infected individuals and individuals with general obesity showing that treatment with GHRH significantly reduces visceral fat, ameliorates dyslipidemia, and reduces markers of cardiovascular risk. Further research is needed regarding long term efficacy and safety of this treatment modality. PMID:25555516

  17. Secretion of growth hormone-releasing hormone in patients with idiopathic pituitary dwarfism and acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, R; Saito, H; Kameyama, K; Hosoi, E; Saito, S

    1988-03-01

    The plasma levels of immunoreactive-GHRH in patients with idiopathic pituitary dwarfism and acromegaly were studied in the basal state and during various tests by a sensitive and specific RIA. The fasting plasma GHRH level in 22 patients with idiopathic pituitary dwarfism was 6.3 +/- 2.3 ng/l (mean +/- SD), which was significantly lower than that in normal children (9.8 +/- 2.8 ng/l, N = 21), and eight of them had undetectable concentrations (less than 4.0 ng/l). Little or no response of plasma GHRH to oral administration of L-dopa was observed in 7 of 10 pituitary dwarfs, and 3 of the 7 patients showed a response of plasma GH to iv administration of GHRH (1 microgram/kg). These findings suggest that one of the causes of idiopathic pituitary dwarfism is insufficient GHRH release from the hypothalamus. The fasting plasma GHRH level in 14 patients with acromegaly and one patient with gigantism was 8.0 +/- 3.9 ng/l, which was slightly lower than that in normal adults (10.4 +/- 4.1 ng/l, N = 72). One acromegalic patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia type I had a high level of plasma GHRH (270 ng/l) with no change in response to L-dopa and TRH test. In 3 untreated patients with acromegaly L-dopa did not induce any response of plasma GHRH in spite of inconsistent GH release, and in 4 patients with acromegaly, TRH evoked no response of plasma GHRH in spite of a marked GH release, suggesting that the GH responses are not mediated by hypothalamic GHRH.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2898191

  18. Treatment of nitrosamine-induced pancreatic tumors in hamsters with analogs of somatostatin and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Bouza, J.I.; Redding, T.W.; Schally, A.V.

    1987-02-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma was induced in female Syrian golden hamsters by injecting N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) once a week at a dose of 10 mg per kg of body weight for 18 weeks. Hamsters were then treated with somatostatin analog (RC-160) or with (6-D-tryptophan)luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ((D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH) delayed delivery systems. After 18 weeks of BOP administration, the hamsters were divided into three groups of 10-20 animals each. Group I consisted of untreated controls, group II was injected with RC-160, and group III was injected with (D-Trp/sub 2/)LH-RH. A striking decrease in tumor weight and volume was obtained in animals treated with (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH or with the somatostatin analog RC-160. After 45 days of treatment with either analog, the survival rate was significantly higher in groups II and III (70%), as compared with the control group (35%). The studies, done by light microscopy, high-resolution microscopy, and electron microscopy, showed a decrease in the total number of cancer cells and changes in the epithelium, connective tissue, and cellular organelles in groups II and III treated with the hypothalamic analogs as compared to controls. These results in female hamsters with induced ductal pancreatic tumors confirm and extend the authors findings, obtained in male animals with transplanted tumors, that (D-Trp/sub 6/)LH-RH and somatostatin analogs inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancers.

  19. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone induces thyroxine release together with testosterone in the neotenic axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, G F; Kühn, E R

    1988-09-01

    In male neotenic axolotls Ambystoma mexicanum plasma concentrations of thyroxine (T4) and testosterone were increased following intravenous injection of 10 micrograms luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. A dose of 50 micrograms influenced only plasma T4 levels. This observation suggests for the first time that a hypothalamic hormone is capable of stimulating the thyroidal axis in the neotenic axolotl.

  20. Self-assembling peptide amphiphiles and related methods for growth factor delivery

    DOEpatents

    Stupp, Samuel I.; Donners, Jack J. J. M.; Silva, Gabriel A.; Behanna, Heather A.; Anthony, Shawn G.

    2009-06-09

    Amphiphilic peptide compounds comprising one or more epitope sequences for binding interaction with one or more corresponding growth factors, micellar assemblies of such compounds and related methods of use.

  1. Self-assembling peptide amphiphiles and related methods for growth factor delivery

    DOEpatents

    Stupp, Samuel I.; Donners, Jack J. J. M.; Silva, Gabriel A.; Behanna, Heather A.; Anthony, Shawn G.

    2012-03-20

    Amphiphilic peptide compounds comprising one or more epitope sequences for binding interaction with one or more corresponding growth factors, micellar assemblies of such compounds and related methods of use.

  2. Self-assembling peptide amphiphiles and related methods for growth factor delivery

    DOEpatents

    Stupp, Samuel I; Donners, Jack J.J.M.; Silva, Gabriel A; Behanna, Heather A; Anthony, Shawn G

    2013-11-12

    Amphiphilic peptide compounds comprising one or more epitope sequences for binding interaction with one or more corresponding growth factors, micellar assemblies of such compounds and related methods of use.

  3. Growth hormone stimulation test - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The growth hormone (GH) is a protein hormone released from the anterior pituitary gland under the control of the hypothalamus. ... performed on infants and children to identify human growth hormone (hGH) deficiency as a cause of growth retardation. ...

  4. Pituitary responsiveness to luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone in different reproductive disorders. A review.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, J M; Greenblatt, R B

    1985-08-01

    As a result of the use of synthetic luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) (and its analogs), significant advances in modern clinical practice are being realized. We studied the use of LHRH as a test for pituitary reserve for gonadotropin secretion in different reproductive disorders. Synthetic LHRH was used as a diagnostic test for discriminating pituitary from hypothalamic disorders. After appropriate LHRH priming of the pituitary, LHRH was used to document hypothalamic dysfunction in patients with Kallmann's syndrome who had normal gonadotropin responsiveness to LHRH. The gonadotropin responsiveness to 100 micrograms of LHRH was impaired or absent in patients with panhypopituitarism, craniopharyngiomas, hemochromatosis and acromegaly accompanied by abnormal lactation. In women with gonadal dysgenesis, the absence of gonadal steroid feedback exacerbated the pituitary responsiveness to LHRH. Women with hyperprolactinemia are also known to have a blunted gonadotropin response to endogenous and exogenous LHRH. An experimental rat model was developed in our laboratory to study the site of prolactin action on gonadotropin secretion. LHRH challenge tests during perphenazine-induced hyperprolactinemia in rats indicated that prolactin may decrease pituitary sensitivity to LHRH. Additional experiments indicated that the increased progesterone produced in these hyperprolactinemic (pseudopregnant) rats was probably responsible for the decreased pituitary responsiveness to LHRH. Further studies will be necessary to determine whether prolactin, which can alter ovarian steroidogenesis in vitro, interferes with ovulation directly in addition to affecting the hypothalamic-pituitary axis.

  5. Suppression of meiosis of male germ cells by an antagonist of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed Central

    Szende, B; Redding, T W; Schally, A V

    1990-01-01

    Male nude mice were implanted with osmotic minipumps releasing 50 micrograms of a potent antagonist of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) per day [N-Ac-[D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(pCl)2,D-Pal(3)3,D-Cit6,D-Ala10]LH-RH] (SB-75) [Nal(2), 3-(2-naphthyl)alanine; Phe(pCl), 4-chlorophenylalanine; Pal(3), 3-(3-pyridyl)alanine; Cit, citrulline], or they were treated with s.c. injections of SB-75 (25 micrograms twice a day). Another group of nude mice received an injection of microcapsules of the agonist [D-Trp6]LH-RH liberating 25 micrograms/day. One month after the initiation of treatment, the testicular weights were significantly reduced and the blood testosterone values were at castration levels in all treated groups. Histologically, only the testicles of the mice treated with SB-75 released from minipumps showed a significant decrease of meiosis. The most advanced forms of germ cells were spermatogonia in 26%, spermatocytes in 17%, and round spermatids in 35% of the seminiferous tubules. Only 22% of the tubules contained elongated spermatids. The suppression of meiotic activity by this modern LH-RH antagonist can possibly be used for the development of methods for male contraception and for the protection of germ cells against the damage caused by cytotoxic drugs and x-radiation. Images PMID:2405399

  6. Glucose absorption, hormonal release and hepatic metabolism after guar gum ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoes Nunes, C.; Malmlof, K.

    1992-01-01

    Six non-anaesthetized Large White pigs (mean body weight 59 +/- 1.7 kg) were fitted with permanent catheters in the portal vein, the brachiocephalic artery and the right hepatic vein and with electromagnetic flow probes around the portal vein and the hepatic artery. The animals were provided a basal none-fibre diet (diet A) alone or together with 6% guar gum (diet B) or 15% purified cellulose (diet C). The diets were given for 1 week and according to a replicated 3 x 3 latin-square design. On the last day of each adaptation period test meals of 800 g were given prior to blood sampling. The sampling was continued for 8 h. Guar gum strongly reduced the glucose absorption as well as the insulin, gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) production. However, the reduction in peripheral blood insulin levels caused by guar gum was not associated with a change in hepatic insulin extraction. IGF-1 appeared to be strongly produced by the gut. The liver had a net uptake of the peptide. Ingestion of guar gum increased the hepatic extraction coefficient of gut produced IGF-1. Guar gum ingestion also appeared to decrease pancreatic glucagon secretion. Cellulose at the level consumed had very little effect on the parameters considered. It is suggested that the modulation of intestinal mechanisms by guar gum was sufficient to mediate the latter internal metabolic effects.

  7. Selected antimicrobial peptides inhibit in vitro growth of Campylobacter spp.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel alternatives to traditional antibiotics are urgently needed for food-animal production. A goal of our laboratory is to develop and evaluate antimicrobial peptides (AMP) to control and reduce foodborne pathogens in poultry. AMP have been found in most every class of living organism where they h...

  8. Substantial expression of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor type I in human uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Schally, Andrew V.; Block, Norman L; Dezso, Balazs; Olah, Gabor; Rozsa, Bernadett; Fodor, Klara; Buglyo, Armin; Gardi, Janos; Berta, Andras; Halmos, Gabor

    2013-01-01

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults, with a very high mortality rate due to frequent liver metastases. Consequently, the therapy of uveal melanoma remains a major clinical challenge and new treatment approaches are needed. For improving diagnosis and designing a rational and effective therapy, it is essential to elucidate molecular characteristics of this malignancy. The aim of this study therefore was to evaluate as a potential therapeutic target the expression of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor in human uveal melanoma. The expression of LHRH ligand and LHRH receptor transcript forms was studied in 39 human uveal melanoma specimens by RT-PCR using gene specific primers. The binding charachteristics of receptors for LHRH on 10 samples were determined by ligand competition assays. The presence of LHRH receptor protein was further evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The expression of mRNA for type I LHRH receptor was detected in 18 of 39 (46%) of tissue specimens. mRNA for LHRH-I ligand could be detected in 27 of 39 (69%) of the samples. Seven of 10 samples investigated showed high affinity LHRH-I receptors. The specific presence of full length LHRH receptor protein was further confirmed by immunohistochemistry. A high percentage of uveal melanomas express mRNA and protein for type-I LHRH receptors. Our results support the merit of further investigation of LHRH receptors in human ophthalmological tumors. Since diverse analogs of LHRH are in clinical trials or are already used for the treatment of various cancers, these analogs could be considered for the LHRH receptor-based treatment of uveal melanoma. PMID:24077773

  9. Effects of aging on pituitary and testicular luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone receptors in the rat.

    PubMed

    Limonta, P; Dondi, D; Maggi, R; Martini, L; Piva, F

    1988-01-01

    Aging exerts profound influences on the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular-axis. This work has been performed in order to verify whether, in male rats, the decreased secretion of LH and testosterone (T) occurring in old animals is reflected by modifications of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptors at the level of the anterior pituitary and of the testes. To this purpose, the affinity constant (Ka) and the maximal binding capacity (Bmax) for the LHRH analog [D-Ser(tBu)6]des-Gly10-LHRH-N-ethylamide were evaluated, by means of a receptor binding assay, in membrane preparations derived from the anterior pituitary and testicular Leydig cells of male rats of 3 and 19 months of age. Serum levels of LH and T were measured by specific RIAs. The results obtained show that, in aged male rats, the concentration of pituitary LHRH receptors is significantly lower than that found in young animals. On the other hand, the concentration of LHRH binding sites is significantly increased on the membranes of Leydig cells of old rats. In no instance the Ka for the LHRH analog is significantly affected. Serum levels of LH and T are significantly lower in old than in young male rats. In conclusion, these results suggest that the reduced secretion of LH in old male rats may be linked, at least partially, to a decrease of the number of pituitary LHRH receptors. The impaired production of testosterone occurring in aged rats is accompanied by a significant increase of the number of testicular LHRH receptors, indicating that also the intratesticular mechanisms controlling testosterone release undergo significant alterations with aging.

  10. Adrenarche and skeletal maturation during luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogue suppression of gonadarche.

    PubMed Central

    Wierman, M E; Beardsworth, D E; Crawford, J D; Crigler, J F; Mansfield, M J; Bode, H H; Boepple, P A; Kushner, D C; Crowley, W F

    1986-01-01

    During puberty the effects of adrenal androgens upon skeletal maturation are obscured by the influence of gonadal steroids. Suppression of gonadarche with an analogue of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRHa) affords an opportunity to examine the onset and progression of adrenarche in the absence of pubertal levels of gonadal steroids in a controlled fashion and to explore the relationship between adrenal androgens and the rate of epiphyseal maturation. In 29 children with central precocious puberty, gonadarche was suppressed with LHRHa administration for 1-4 yr. During LHRHa exposure, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHAS) levels, as an index of adrenal maturation, were constant or increased in an age-expected manner. The change in bone age for change in chronologic age decreased from 1.7 +/- 0.1 to 0.49 +/- 0.05 (P = 0.00005), indicating that the LHRHa-induced return to a prepubertal gonadal steroid environment was associated with a slowing of skeletal maturation. DHAS levels were correlated with the rate of skeletal advancement before (r = 0.57, P = 0.001) and during 12 to 48 mo of exposure to LHRHa (r = 0.52, P = 0.003). A negative correlation of DHAS values with subsequent increases in predicted mature height was observed (r = -0.49, P = 0.007). Thus, in children with central precocious puberty, adrenarche progressed normally during LHRHa suppression of gonadarche. In children with the onset of progression of adrenarche during maintenance of a prepubertal gonadal steroid milieu, there was less evidence than in preadrenarchal children of a restraint upon skeletal maturation. These data suggest that adrenal androgens contribute importantly to epiphyseal advancement during childhood. PMID:2935557

  11. Allosteric modulation of hormone release from thyroxine and corticosteroid-binding globulins.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaoqiang; Loiseau, François; Chan, Wee Lee; Yan, Yahui; Wei, Zhenquan; Milroy, Lech-Gustav; Myers, Rebecca M; Ley, Steven V; Read, Randy J; Carrell, Robin W; Zhou, Aiwu

    2011-05-01

    The release of hormones from thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) and corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) is regulated by movement of the reactive center loop in and out of the β-sheet A of the molecule. To investigate how these changes are transmitted to the hormone-binding site, we developed a sensitive assay using a synthesized thyroxine fluorophore and solved the crystal structures of reactive loop cleaved TBG together with its complexes with thyroxine, the thyroxine fluorophores, furosemide, and mefenamic acid. Cleavage of the reactive loop results in its complete insertion into the β-sheet A and a substantial but incomplete decrease in binding affinity in both TBG and CBG. We show here that the direct interaction between residue Thr(342) of the reactive loop and Tyr(241) of the hormone binding site contributes to thyroxine binding and release following reactive loop insertion. However, a much larger effect occurs allosterically due to stretching of the connecting loop to the top of the D helix (hD), as confirmed in TBG with shortening of the loop by three residues, making it insensitive to the S-to-R transition. The transmission of the changes in the hD loop to the binding pocket is seen to involve coherent movements in the s2/3B loop linked to the hD loop by Lys(243), which is, in turn, linked to the s4/5B loop, flanking the thyroxine-binding site, by Arg(378). Overall, the coordinated movements of the reactive loop, hD, and the hormone binding site allow the allosteric regulation of hormone release, as with the modulation demonstrated here in response to changes in temperature.

  12. [Influence of 50% proximal or distal small bowel resection on gut hormone release after test meal loading in dogs].

    PubMed

    Kato, M; Sasaki, I; Naito, H; Takahashi, M; Matsuno, S

    1991-10-01

    The effect of proximal and distal small bowel resection on gut hormone release after test meal loading in dogs was studied. Ten beagle dogs were subjected to 50% proximal or distal small bowel resection, and test meal loading was performed after one night fasting to examine gut hormone release. Fasting levels of plasma gastrin were not changed after both proximal and distal resection, but response to test meal was increased at 18 weeks of postoperative period in 50% proximal resection. Postprandial release of plasma GIP was significantly decreased in both proximal and distal resection compared with preoperative period. Postprandial release of enteroglucagon was increased at 4 and 8 weeks in proximal resection. In distal resection, it was increased at 4 weeks but returned to preoperative levels at 8 weeks. Villus height of middle part of the intestine was increased in both proximal and distal resection, and significant change was observed in the duodenal mucosa of proximal resection at 4 weeks. These findings suggest that part of the resection of small bowel influences gut hormone release, and these may play an important role in intestinal adaptation.

  13. Identification of major urinary metabolites of nafarelin acetate, a potent agonist of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone, in the rhesus monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, R.L.; Chaplin, M.D.

    1985-09-01

    Nafarelin acetate (less than Glu-His-Trp-Ser-Tyr-3-(2-naphthyl)-D-Ala-Leu-Arg-Pro-Gly-NH2) is a potent agonistic analogue of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. After a single iv administration of nafarelin acetate (with UC label at C-3 of 3-(2-naphthyl)-D-Ala) to female rhesus monkeys, about 80% of the radioactivity was eliminated in urine. Five major radioactive urinary metabolites were isolated and purified by reversed phase HPLC. Four of these metabolites, identified by amino acid analysis, were short peptides: the 5-10-hexapeptide amide, the 6-10-pentapeptide amide, the 5-7-tripeptide, and the 6-7-dipeptide. The fifth metabolite, which accounted for about 15% of the radioactivity administered, was shown by NMR and mass spectrometry to be 2-naphthylacetic acid. A possible pathway of its formation is by oxidative deamination of 3-(2-napthyl)-D-Ala to give the corresponding alpha-keto acid, followed by oxidative decarboxylation of the alpha-keto acid. These five metabolites together accounted for about 70% of the radioactivity recovered in the urine of rhesus monkeys, or more than half of the radioactivity in the administered dose. Nafarelin acetate was also present in small amounts. Several of these metabolites were also present in plasma of the rhesus monkey.

  14. Delta opioid receptors are involved in morphine-induced inhibition of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone in SK-N-SH cells.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Lunawati; Ratka, Anna

    2003-10-01

    Opioids play an important role in the regulation of lutenizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH). In the present study, we attempted to find out the subtype of opioid receptors involved in the inhibitory effect of morphine on LHRH. Experiments were conducted on SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells that express both micro and delta opioid receptors, LHRH mRNA, and release the LHRH peptide. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was employed to measure the levels of LHRH. LHRH level was decreased by 1000 microM of morphine regardless of the duration of exposure or differentiation status of the SK-N-SH cells and was not reversed by naloxone. Selective antagonism of micro opioid receptors, but not delta opioid receptors, allowed lower concentrations (1-100 microM) of morphine to inhibit LHRH. The results of this study imply that (1) delta opioid receptors may mediate the inhibitory effect of lower concentrations of morphine on LHRH levels in SK-N-SH cells, and (2) inhibition of LHRH level by high concentrations of morphine may involve systems other than opioid receptors.

  15. Steroid hormone release as well as renal water and electrolyte excretion of mice expressing PKB/SGK-resistant GSK3.

    PubMed

    Boini, Krishna M; Bhandaru, Madhuri; Mack, Andreas; Lang, Florian

    2008-09-01

    activity in the regulation of steroid hormone release, renal water and electrolyte excretion and blood pressure control.

  16. Message in a bottle: small signalling peptide outputs during growth and development.

    PubMed

    Czyzewicz, Nathan; Yue, Kun; Beeckman, Tom; De Smet, Ive

    2013-12-01

    Classical and recently found phytohormones play an important role in plant growth and development, but plants additionally control these processes through small signalling peptides. Over 1000 potential small signalling peptide sequences are present in the Arabidopsis genome. However, to date, a mere handful of small signalling peptides have been functionally characterized and few have been linked to a receptor. Here, we assess the potential small signalling peptide outputs, namely the molecular, biochemical, and morphological changes they trigger in Arabidopsis. However, we also include some notable studies in other plant species, in order to illustrate the varied effects that can be induced by small signalling peptides. In addition, we touch on some evolutionary aspects of small signalling peptides, as studying their signalling outputs in single-cell green algae and early land plants will assist in our understanding of more complex land plants. Our overview illustrates the growing interest in the small signalling peptide research area and its importance in deepening our understanding of plant growth and development.

  17. Peptide T bolus normalizes the growth hormone secretion pattern in two children with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Barbey-Morel, Charlotte; McDonnell, Kevin; Pert, Candace B; Adams, MerriBeth; Farrand, Dean; Ruff, Michael R; Lumpkin, Michael D

    2002-12-01

    In humans, HIV infection reduces growth hormone (GH) secretion contributing to AIDS wasting. In rats, the HIV envelope protein gp120 alone blocks GH secretion both in vitro and in vivo through GH-releasing hormone receptors. Peptide T, a modified octapeptide derived from gp120, normalizes GH secretion. We now report that an intravenous bolus of peptide T normalizes nocturnal GH secretion in two out of three children with AIDS. These results, coupled with the lack of toxicity of this experimental AIDS therapeutic, justify clinical trials for AIDS wasting and pediatric AIDS. A clinical and basic science update on peptide T appears in Current HIV Research. PMID:12535709

  18. Cell-Penetrating Ability of Peptide Hormones: Key Role of Glycosaminoglycans Clustering.

    PubMed

    Neree, Armelle Tchoumi; Nguyen, Phuong Trang; Bourgault, Steve

    2015-11-16

    Over the last two decades, the potential usage of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) for the intracellular delivery of various molecules has prompted the identification of novel peptidic identities. However, cytotoxic effects and unpredicted immunological responses have often limited the use of various CPP sequences in the clinic. To overcome these issues, the usage of endogenous peptides appears as an appropriate alternative approach. The hormone pituitary adenylate-cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP38) has been recently identified as a novel and very efficient CPP. This 38-residue polycationic peptide is a member of the secretin/glucagon/growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) superfamily, with which PACAP38 shares high structural and conformational homologies. In this study, we evaluated the cell-penetrating ability of cationic peptide hormones in the context of the expression of cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Our results indicated that among all peptides evaluated, PACAP38 was unique for its potent efficiency of cellular uptake. Interestingly, the abilities of the peptides to reach the intracellular space did not correlate with their binding affinities to sulfated GAGs, but rather to their capacity to clustered heparin in vitro. This study demonstrates that the uptake efficiency of a given cationic CPP does not necessarily correlate with its affinity to sulfated GAGs and that its ability to cluster GAGs should be considered for the identification of novel peptidic sequences with potent cellular penetrating properties.

  19. Lactobacillus gasseri requires peptides, not proteins or free amino acids, for growth in milk.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, K; Matsunaga, K; Takihiro, S; Moritoki, A; Ryuto, S; Kawai, Y; Masuda, T; Miyamoto, T

    2015-03-01

    Lactobacillus gasseri is a widespread commensal lactic acid bacterium inhabiting human mucosal niches and has many beneficial effects as a probiotic. However, L. gasseri is difficult to grow in milk, which hurts usability for the food industry. It had been previously reported that supplementation with yeast extract or proteose peptone, including peptides, enables L. gasseri to grow well in milk. In this study, our objective was to confirm peptide requirement of L. gasseri and evaluate efficacy of peptide release by enzymatic proteolysis on growth of L. gassei in milk. Three strains of L. gasseri did not grow well in modified DeMan, Rogosa, Sharpe broth without any nitrogen sources (MRS-N), but addition of a casein-derived peptide mixture, tryptone, promoted growth. In contrast, little effect was observed after adding casein or a casein-derived amino acid mixture, casamino acids. These results indicate that L. gasseri requires peptides, not proteins or free amino acids, among milk-derived nitrogen sources for growth. Lactobacillus gasseri JCM 1131T hardly had growth capacity in 6 kinds of milk-based media: bovine milk, human milk, skim milk, cheese whey, modified MRS-N (MRSL-N) supplemented with acid whey, and MRSL-N supplemented with casein. Moreover, treatment with digestive proteases, particularly pepsin, to release peptides made it grow well in each milk-based medium. The pepsin treatment was the most effective for growth of strain JCM 1131T in skim milk among the tested food-grade proteases such as trypsin, α-chymotrypsin, calf rennet, ficin, bromelain, and papain. As well as strain JCM 1131T, pepsinolysis of milk improved growth of other L. gasseri strains and some strains of enteric lactobacilli such as Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gallinarum, Lactobacillus johnsonii, and Lactobacillus reuteri. These results suggest that some relatives of L. gasseri also use peptides as desirable nitrogen sources, and that milk may be a good supplier of nutritious

  20. Radioimmunoassay for 6-D-tryptophan analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone: measurement of serum levels after administration of long-acting microcapsule formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mason-Garcia, M.; Vigh, S.; Comaru-Schally, A.M.; Redding, T.W.; Somogyvari-Vigh, A.; Horvath, J.; Schally, A.V.

    1985-03-01

    A sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay for (6-D-tryptophan)luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ((D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH) was developed and used for following the rate of liberation of (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH from a long-acting delivery systems based on a microcapsule formulation. Rabbit antibodies were generated against (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH conjugated to bovine serum albumin with glutaraldehyde. Crossreactivity with LH-RH was less than 1%; there was no significant cross-reactivity with other peptides. The minimal detectable dose of (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH was 2 pg per tube. In tra- and interassay coefficients of variation were 8% and 10%, respectively. The radioimmunoassay was suitable for direct determination of (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH in serum, permitting the study of blood levels of the analog after single injections into normal men and after one-a-month administration of microcapsules to rats. In men, 90 min after subcutaneous injection of 250 ..mu..g of the peptide, serum (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH rose to 6-12 ng/ml. Luteinizing hormone was increased 90 min and 24 hr after the administration of the analog. Several batches of microcapsules were tested in rats and the rate of release of (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH was followed. The improved batch of microcapsules of (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH increased serum concentrations of the analog for 30 days or longer after intramuscular injection.

  1. Length-dependent β-sheet growth mechanisms of polyalanine peptides in water and on hydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Yan; Tang, Binqing; Yu, Meng

    2014-03-01

    Fibrillar assemblies by peptides are becoming one of the most promising nanomaterials due to their exceptional properties. The self-assembly of peptides into β sheets is a critical step in the fibrillization pathway. We investigated the length-dependent β-sheet growth mechanisms of polyalanine [poly(A)] peptides consisting of 6 to 24 alanines (A6 to A24) in water and on the hydrophobic surface, respectively, by molecular dynamics simulations. β-sheet growth behavior in water fits negative exponential growth model, showing that β-sheet growth rate decays exponentially with time. Meanwhile, increasing chain length leads to an accelerated decay of the β-sheet growth rate. By contrast, β-sheet growth on the surface from A6 to A18 occurs in two consecutive stages, both of which fit linear growth models. β-sheet growth rate in the first stage increases as chain length is increased, while the intermediate length peptide A12 has the highest β-sheet growth rate in the second stage. β-sheet growth behavior of A24 on the surface still fits negative exponential model. Overall, the hydrophobic surface accelerates β-sheet growth by enhancing local concentration and reducing conformational entropy of poly(A) peptide, and the β-sheet growth of the intermediate length peptide A12 is the fastest on the surface. Our simulation results shed light on understanding the accelerated peptide fibrillization on the hydrophobic surface.

  2. Secreted peptide Dilp8 coordinates Drosophila tissue growth with developmental timing.

    PubMed

    Colombani, Julien; Andersen, Ditte S; Léopold, Pierre

    2012-05-01

    Little is known about how organ growth is monitored and coordinated with the developmental timing in complex organisms. In insects, impairment of larval tissue growth delays growth and morphogenesis, revealing a coupling mechanism. We carried out a genetic screen in Drosophila to identify molecules expressed by growing tissues participating in this coupling and identified dilp8 as a gene whose silencing rescues the developmental delay induced by abnormally growing tissues. dilp8 is highly induced in conditions where growth impairment produces a developmental delay. dilp8 encodes a peptide for which expression and secretion are sufficient to delay metamorphosis without affecting tissue integrity. We propose that Dilp8 peptide is a secreted signal that coordinates the growth status of tissues with developmental timing.

  3. Breast cancer growth inhibition by delivery of the MDGI-derived peptide P108.

    PubMed

    Wang, H L; Kurtz, A

    2000-05-11

    Mammary derived growth inhibitor (MDGI) is a member of the family of cytoplasmic fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs), which bind hydrophobic ligands such as fatty acids, retinoids, eicosanoids and prostaglandines. MDGI and an 11 amino acid MDGI-derived conserved C-terminal peptide (P108) inhibits growth of normal mammary epithelial cells in tissue and organ culture, but fails to inhibit proliferation of many breast cancer cell lines in vitro. Here, the effects of peptide P108 on tumor growth of MCF-7, MDA-MB468 and MDA-MB231 human breast cancer cell lines in nude mice were tested. To deliver P108 into tumors, a novel peptide production system was applied for expression and secretion of small bioactive peptides in mammalian cells. Functional differentiation was observed in MCF-7 and MDA-MB468 cells upon P108 expression. In addition, EGF-dependent colony formation in soft agar by MDA-MB468 cells was inhibited by secreted P108. Tumor growth in athymic nude mice was suppressed in all three cell lines tested. Furthermore, P108 expressed by MCF-7/P108 cells caused paracrine tumor growth inhibition of MDA-MB231 cells. These results indicate that breast cancer inhibition by P108 is independent of binding to hydrophobic ligands and is perhaps mediated by interference with EGF-dependent signaling pathways.

  4. Inhibitory Effects of Synthetic Peptides Containing Bovine Lactoferrin C-lobe Sequence on Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woan-Sub; Ohashi, Midori; Shimazaki, Kei-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Lactoferrin is a glycoprotein with various biological effects, with antibacterial activity being one of the first effects reported. This glycoprotein suppresses bacterial growth through bacteriostatic or bactericidal action. It also stimulates the growth of certain kinds of bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria. In this study, Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg was selected and chemically synthesized based on the partial sequences of bovine lactoferrin tryptic fragments. Synthetic Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg suppressed the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens, P. syringae and Escherichia coli. P. fluorescens is a major psychrotrophic bacteria found in raw and pasteurized milk, which decreases milk quality. P. syringae is a harmful infectious bacterium that damages plants. However, synthetic Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg did not inhibit the growth of Lactobacillus acidophilus. It is expected that this synthetic peptide would be the first peptide sequence from the bovine lactoferrin C-lobe that shows antibacterial activity.

  5. Inhibitory Effects of Synthetic Peptides Containing Bovine Lactoferrin C-lobe Sequence on Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woan-Sub; Ohashi, Midori; Shimazaki, Kei-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Lactoferrin is a glycoprotein with various biological effects, with antibacterial activity being one of the first effects reported. This glycoprotein suppresses bacterial growth through bacteriostatic or bactericidal action. It also stimulates the growth of certain kinds of bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria. In this study, Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg was selected and chemically synthesized based on the partial sequences of bovine lactoferrin tryptic fragments. Synthetic Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg suppressed the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens, P. syringae and Escherichia coli. P. fluorescens is a major psychrotrophic bacteria found in raw and pasteurized milk, which decreases milk quality. P. syringae is a harmful infectious bacterium that damages plants. However, synthetic Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg did not inhibit the growth of Lactobacillus acidophilus. It is expected that this synthetic peptide would be the first peptide sequence from the bovine lactoferrin C-lobe that shows antibacterial activity. PMID:27621684

  6. Inhibitory Effects of Synthetic Peptides Containing Bovine Lactoferrin C-lobe Sequence on Bacterial Growth.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woan-Sub; Ohashi, Midori; Shimazaki, Kei-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Lactoferrin is a glycoprotein with various biological effects, with antibacterial activity being one of the first effects reported. This glycoprotein suppresses bacterial growth through bacteriostatic or bactericidal action. It also stimulates the growth of certain kinds of bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria. In this study, Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg was selected and chemically synthesized based on the partial sequences of bovine lactoferrin tryptic fragments. Synthetic Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg suppressed the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens, P. syringae and Escherichia coli. P. fluorescens is a major psychrotrophic bacteria found in raw and pasteurized milk, which decreases milk quality. P. syringae is a harmful infectious bacterium that damages plants. However, synthetic Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg did not inhibit the growth of Lactobacillus acidophilus. It is expected that this synthetic peptide would be the first peptide sequence from the bovine lactoferrin C-lobe that shows antibacterial activity.

  7. The inhibition of calcium carbonate crystal growth by the cysteine-rich Mdm2 peptide.

    PubMed

    Dalas, E; Chalias, A; Gatos, D; Barlos, K

    2006-08-15

    The crystal growth of calcite, the most stable calcium carbonate polymorph, in the presence of the cysteine-rich Mdm2 peptide (containing 48 amino acids in the ring finger configuration), has been investigated by the constant composition technique. Crystallization took place exclusively on well-characterized calcite crystals in solutions supersaturated only with respect to this calcium carbonate salt. The kinetic results indicated a surface diffusion spiral growth mechanism. The presence of the Mdm2 peptide inhibited the crystal growth of calcite by 22-58% in the concentration range tested, through adsorption onto the active growth sites of the calcite crystal surface. The kinetic results favored a Langmuir-type adsorption model, and the value of the calculated affinity constant was k(aff)=147x10(4) dm(3)mol(-1), a(ads)=0.29. PMID:16678843

  8. Inhibitory Effects of Synthetic Peptides Containing Bovine Lactoferrin C-lobe Sequence on Bacterial Growth.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woan-Sub; Ohashi, Midori; Shimazaki, Kei-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Lactoferrin is a glycoprotein with various biological effects, with antibacterial activity being one of the first effects reported. This glycoprotein suppresses bacterial growth through bacteriostatic or bactericidal action. It also stimulates the growth of certain kinds of bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria. In this study, Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg was selected and chemically synthesized based on the partial sequences of bovine lactoferrin tryptic fragments. Synthetic Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg suppressed the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens, P. syringae and Escherichia coli. P. fluorescens is a major psychrotrophic bacteria found in raw and pasteurized milk, which decreases milk quality. P. syringae is a harmful infectious bacterium that damages plants. However, synthetic Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg did not inhibit the growth of Lactobacillus acidophilus. It is expected that this synthetic peptide would be the first peptide sequence from the bovine lactoferrin C-lobe that shows antibacterial activity. PMID:27621684

  9. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Peptide Ligands Explored by Competition Assay and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Reille-Seroussi, Marie; Gaucher, Jean-François; Desole, Claudia; Gagey-Eilstein, Nathalie; Brachet, Franck; Broutin, Isabelle; Vidal, Michel; Broussy, Sylvain

    2015-08-25

    The v114* cyclic peptide has been identified as a tight vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) ligand. Here we report on the use of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), 96-well plate competition assay, and circular dichroism (CD) to explore the binding determinants of a new set of related peptides. Anti-VEGF antibodies are currently used in the clinic for regulating angiogenesis in cancer and age-related macular degeneration treatment. In this context, our aim is to develop smaller molecular entities with high affinity for the growth factor by a structure activity relationship approach. The cyclic disulfide peptide v114* was modified in several ways, including truncation, substitution, and variation of the size and nature of the cycle. The results indicated that truncation or substitution of the four N-terminal amino acids did not cause severe loss in affinity, allowing potential peptide labeling. Increase of the cycle size or substitution of the disulfide bridge with a thioether linkage drastically decreased the affinity, due to an enthalpy penalty. The leucine C-terminal residue positively contributed to affinity. Cysteine N-terminal acetylation induced favorable ΔΔG° and ΔΔH° of binding, which correlated with free peptide CD spectra changes. We also propose a biochemical model to extrapolate Ki from IC50 values measured in the displacement assay. These calculated Ki correlate well with the Kd values determined by extensive direct and reverse ITC measurements. PMID:26222917

  10. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Peptide Ligands Explored by Competition Assay and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Reille-Seroussi, Marie; Gaucher, Jean-François; Desole, Claudia; Gagey-Eilstein, Nathalie; Brachet, Franck; Broutin, Isabelle; Vidal, Michel; Broussy, Sylvain

    2015-08-25

    The v114* cyclic peptide has been identified as a tight vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) ligand. Here we report on the use of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), 96-well plate competition assay, and circular dichroism (CD) to explore the binding determinants of a new set of related peptides. Anti-VEGF antibodies are currently used in the clinic for regulating angiogenesis in cancer and age-related macular degeneration treatment. In this context, our aim is to develop smaller molecular entities with high affinity for the growth factor by a structure activity relationship approach. The cyclic disulfide peptide v114* was modified in several ways, including truncation, substitution, and variation of the size and nature of the cycle. The results indicated that truncation or substitution of the four N-terminal amino acids did not cause severe loss in affinity, allowing potential peptide labeling. Increase of the cycle size or substitution of the disulfide bridge with a thioether linkage drastically decreased the affinity, due to an enthalpy penalty. The leucine C-terminal residue positively contributed to affinity. Cysteine N-terminal acetylation induced favorable ΔΔG° and ΔΔH° of binding, which correlated with free peptide CD spectra changes. We also propose a biochemical model to extrapolate Ki from IC50 values measured in the displacement assay. These calculated Ki correlate well with the Kd values determined by extensive direct and reverse ITC measurements.

  11. Decrease in the AgNOR number in Dunning R3327 prostate cancers after treatment with an agonist and antagonist of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed Central

    Szepeshazi, K.; Korkut, E.; Schally, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    The argyrophilic staining of the nucleolar organizer region (AgNOR) in cells of Dunning R3327 rat prostate tumors was studied and the effect of hormonal treatments on their appearance was analyzed. The nuclei of the control tumor cells contained 4.1 +/- 0.17 AgNOR granules. Treatment of rats for 8 weeks with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) agonist (D-Trp-6-LH-RH) and antagonist SB-75 induced a marked inhibition of tumor growth and decreased significantly (P less than 0.01) the number of Ag-NORs in the tumors to 2.89 +/- 0.10 AgNOR granules/cell in the group given the agonist and to 2.82 +/- 0.10 after therapy with the highest dose of the antagonist. A reduced AgNOR number (3.14 +/- 0.16) also was found after 3 days of treatment with SB-75 (P less than 0.05), but the AgNORs returned to near control values 1 week after the short-term therapy, showing the reversibility of these changes. These results suggest that the AgNOR method, which was widely tested on human tumors in the past few years, can be a valuable technique in experimental tumor pathology and useful in the evaluation of the effects of various treatments. Images Figure 1 PMID:1827237

  12. A ligand-specific action of chelated copper on hypothalamic neurons: stimulation of the release of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone from median eminence explants.

    PubMed Central

    Barnea, A; Colombani-Vidal, M

    1984-01-01

    We have previously shown that chelated copper stimulates the release of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) from isolated hypothalamic granules. In this study, we wished to ascertain if chelated copper acts on hypothalamic neurons to stimulate LHRH release and, if so, what is the ligand specificity of this interaction. An in vitro system of explants of the median eminence area (MEA) was established and characterized. MEA explants were exposed for 15 min to 50 microM copper, and then they were incubated for 75 min in copper-free medium. Copper led to a transient increase in the rate of LHRH release; the maximal rate was attained 15 min after transfer of the MEA to copper-free medium. In addition, we found that copper complexed to histidine (Cu-His), but not ionic copper, stimulated LHRH release, the magnitude of which was dependent on the dose of Cu-His. The chelator specificity for Cu complex action was such that Cu-His stimulated LHRH release 4.9-fold and Cu-Cys stimulated release 2.5-fold, whereas neither Cu-Thr, Cu-Gly-His-Lys, Cu-bovine serum albumin, nor ceruloplasmin stimulated LHRH release. Based on these results and those of others indicating that the concentration of copper in hypothalamic axonal terminals is 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than plasma, we propose that copper released in the vicinity of the LHRH neurons interacts with specific sites on the LHRH axonal terminals, which leads to release of the peptide. PMID:6390443

  13. Regulatory peptides--the distribution of two newly discovered peptides: PHI and NPY.

    PubMed

    Polak, J M; Bloom, S R

    1984-01-01

    PHI (peptide with histidine and isoleucine) and NPY (neuropeptide with tyrosine) are recently discovered regulatory peptides. There are close sequence similarities between PHI and both growth hormone releasing factor (GRF) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and between NPY and pancreatic polypeptide. Using immunocytochemistry and radioimmunoassay we have revealed the broad distributions of PHI and NPY in neurons of the central nervous system and the majority of peripheral tissues. Tissues which are particularly well provided with these peptides include gut, pancreas, respiratory tract, skin and the genitourinary and cardiovascular systems. In most peripheral tissues, PHI-containing ganglion cells occur locally. NPY-containing fibres originate in part from cell bodies outside the tissues, in the sympathetic nervous system. Comparative studies indicate that PHI and VIP are co-stored in the same neurone and are identically distributed, thus suggesting the existence of a common precursor and subsequent gene duplication. The possible co-existence of catecholamines and NPY, suggested by the consistent finding of very similar distributions of the two substances, was investigated using antibodies to converting enzymes involved in catecholamine synthesis (tyrosine-hydroxylase and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase). The two enzymes and NPY were found together in at least part of the same neuronal system.

  14. Thiol-disulfide exchange in peptides derived from human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Saradha; Epling, Daniel E; Sophocleous, Andreas M; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2014-04-01

    Disulfide bonds stabilize proteins by cross-linking distant regions into a compact three-dimensional structure. They can also participate in hydrolytic and oxidative pathways to form nonnative disulfide bonds and other reactive species. Such covalent modifications can contribute to protein aggregation. Here, we present experimental data for the mechanism of thiol-disulfide exchange in tryptic peptides derived from human growth hormone in aqueous solution. Reaction kinetics was monitored to investigate the effect of pH (6.0-10.0), temperature (4-50°C), oxidation suppressants [ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and N2 sparging], and peptide secondary structure (amide cyclized vs. open form). The concentrations of free thiol containing peptides, scrambled disulfides, and native disulfide-linked peptides generated via thiol-disulfide exchange and oxidation reactions were determined using reverse-phase HPLC and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Concentration versus time data were fitted to a mathematical model using nonlinear least squares regression analysis. At all pH values, the model was able to fit the data with R(2) ≥ 0.95. Excluding oxidation suppressants (EDTA and N2 sparging) resulted in an increase in the formation of scrambled disulfides via oxidative pathways but did not influence the intrinsic rate of thiol-disulfide exchange. In addition, peptide secondary structure was found to influence the rate of thiol-disulfide exchange. PMID:24549831

  15. Growth-Blocking Peptides As Nutrition-Sensitive Signals for Insulin Secretion and Body Size Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Takashi; Mirth, Christen K.

    2016-01-01

    In Drosophila, the fat body, functionally equivalent to the mammalian liver and adipocytes, plays a central role in regulating systemic growth in response to nutrition. The fat body senses intracellular amino acids through Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signaling, and produces an unidentified humoral factor(s) to regulate insulin-like peptide (ILP) synthesis and/or secretion in the insulin-producing cells. Here, we find that two peptides, Growth-Blocking Peptide (GBP1) and CG11395 (GBP2), are produced in the fat body in response to amino acids and TOR signaling. Reducing the expression of GBP1 and GBP2 (GBPs) specifically in the fat body results in smaller body size due to reduced growth rate. In addition, we found that GBPs stimulate ILP secretion from the insulin-producing cells, either directly or indirectly, thereby increasing insulin and insulin-like growth factor signaling activity throughout the body. Our findings fill an important gap in our understanding of how the fat body transmits nutritional information to the insulin producing cells to control body size. PMID:26928023

  16. Conformational Flexibility and pH Effects on Anisotropic Growth of Sheet-Like Assembly of Amphiphilic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongzhou; Ganguly, Debabani; Chen, Jianhan; Sun, Xiuzhi S

    2015-06-01

    Peptide-based biomaterials have many potential applications in tissue engineering, drug delivery, surface engineering, and other areas. In this study, we exploited a series of amphiphilic diblock model peptides (L5K10, L5GSIIK10, and L5P(D)PK10) to understand how the supramolecular assembly morphology may be modulated by the physical properties of the peptide monomer and experimental conditions. A combination of experimentation and simulation revealed that although all three peptides lack stable structures as monomers, their levels of conformational heterogeneity differ significantly. Importantly, such differences appear to be correlated with the peptides' ability to form sheet-like assemblies. In particular, substantial conformational heterogeneity appears to be required for anisotropic growth of sheet-like materials, likely by reducing the peptide assembly kinetics. To test this hypothesis, we increased the pH to neutralize the lysine residues and promote peptide aggregation, and the resulting faster assembly rate hindered the growth of the sheet morphology as predicted. In addition, we designed and investigated the assembly morphologies of a series of diblock peptides with various lengths of polyglycine inserts, L5GxK10, x = 1, 2, 3, 4. The results further supported the importance of peptide conformational flexibility and pH in modulation of the peptide supramolecular assembly morphology.

  17. Restrain of bone growth by estrogen-mimetic peptide-1 (EMP-1): a micro-computed tomographic study.

    PubMed

    Kasher, Roni; Bajayo, Alon; Gabet, Yankel; Nevo, Nava; Fridkin, Mati; Katchalski-Katzir, Ephraim; Kohen, Fortune; Bab, Itai

    2009-06-01

    Estrogen has a key role in the regulation of skeletal growth and maintenance of bone mass. Recently, we developed peptides having estrogen-like activity as potential estrogen-based new drugs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of long-term administration of the most efficacious of these peptides, the hexapeptide EMP-1 (VSWFFE), on bone mass and development. EMP-1 was injected daily to ovariectomized (OVX) and intact young, sexually mature female mice for 10 weeks. Whole femora, including the cartilaginous growth plates were analyzed by micro-computed tomography (microCT). We found that peptide EMP-1 restrains bone growth in OVX mice: it inhibited dramatically bone longitudinal growth (40%), and decreased femoral diaphyseal diameter. Peptide EMP-1 had no effect on bone growth in normal mice, and did not influence the OVX-induced bone loss. We then developed a new microCT methodology to evaluate uncalcified and calcified growth plate parameters. In the OVX mice, peptide EMP-1 reduced volume and thickness of the uncalcified growth plate, a possible cause for the inhibition of bone longitudinal growth. Peptide EMP-1 may be used as a lead compound for the development of drugs to treat acromegalic patients.

  18. In vitro growth of growth of campylobacter spp. inhibited by selected antimicrobial peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Novel alternatives to traditional antibiotics are urgently needed for food-animal production. A goal of our laboratory is to develop and evaluate antimicrobial peptides (AMP) to control and reduce foodborne pathogens in poultry. AMP have been found in most every class of living organism...

  19. Luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone-releasing hormone test in patients with hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, C H; Besser, G M; McNeilly, A S; Marshall, J C; Harsoulis, P; Tunbridge, W M; Gomez-Pan, A; Hall, R

    1973-10-13

    A standard intravenous 100 mug luteinizing hormone/follicle stimulating hormone-releasing hormone (LH/FSH-RH) test was used to assess the pituitary gonadotrophin responses in 155 patients with a variety of diseases of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. In all but nine patients there was an increase in circulating levels of either LH or FSH in response to the releasing hormone though 137 (88%) were clinically hypogonadal. It was not possible with this test to distinguish between hypothalamic and pituitary causes of hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, since a variety of LH and FSH responses emerged within the disease groups. However, primary gonadal failure characteristically resulted in exaggerated gonadotrophin response. The potential therapeutic use of the gonadotrophin releasing decapeptide is suggested in certain patients with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism.

  20. Controlled release of a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogue from poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres.

    PubMed

    Sanders, L M; Kent, J S; McRae, G I; Vickery, B H; Tice, T R; Lewis, D H

    1984-09-01

    The performance in vivo of nafarelin acetate, a potent analogue of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone, microencapsulated in poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide), was evaluated. The influence of polymer composition and molecular weight on the estrus-suppressing activity of the microspheres in female rats was determined. Compound release was shown to be effected by polymer erosion rather than by diffusion. A triphasic release of compound was observed, which was adjusted by altering the critical parameters of the polymer. A mechanism for the release of the compound was proposed. The primary release phase was compound loss by diffusion from the surface of the microspheres. The secondary phase of subeffective rates of release occurred concomitantly with polymer hydrolysis and a decrease in its molecular weight, although it remained insoluble. Dissolution of low-molecular weight fragments and erosion of the bulk of the polymer then initiated the tertiary phase of release of compound. PMID:6238157

  1. Apparent involvement of opioid peptides in stress-induced enhancement of tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J W; Shavit, Y; Terman, G W; Nelson, L R; Gale, R P; Liebeskind, J C

    1983-01-01

    Exposure to stress has been associated with alterations in both immune function and tumor development in man and laboratory animals. In the present study, we investigated the effect of a particular type of inescapable footshock stress, known to cause an opioid mediated form of analgesia, on survival time of female Fischer 344 rats injected with a mammary ascites tumor. Rats subjected to inescapable footshock manifested an enhanced tumor growth indicated by a decreased survival time and decreased percent survival. This tumor enhancing effect of stress was prevented by the opiate antagonist, naltrexone, suggesting a role for endogenous opioid peptides in this process. In the absence of stress, naltrexone did not affect tumor growth.

  2. [Hormones and osteoporosis update. Effects of natriuretic peptides on endochondral bone growth].

    PubMed

    Yasoda, Akihiro; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2009-07-01

    We revealed that the C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and its receptor guanylyl cyclase-B (GC-B) system is a potent and physiological stimulator of endochondral bone growth by using transgenic and knockout mice. In humans, one form of skeletal dysplasias, acromesomelic dysplasia, type Maroteaux, was reported to be caused by loss of function mutations in the GC-B gene. Further studies are needed for clarifying the patho-physiological roles of the CNP/GC-B system on human skeletal dysplasias. Moreover, we will have to translate this effect of the CNP/GC-B system on endochondral bone growth into skeletal dysplasias.

  3. Calcium carbonate crystal growth beneath Langmuir monolayers of acidic β-hairpin peptides.

    PubMed

    Gong, Haofei; Yang, Yi; Pluntke, Manuela; Marti, Othmar; Majer, Zsuzsa; Sewald, Norbert; Volkmer, Dirk

    2014-11-28

    Four amphiphilic peptides with designed hairpin structure were synthesized and their monolayers were employed as model systems to study biologically inspired calcium carbonate crystallization. Langmuir monolayers of hairpin peptides were investigated by surface pressure area isotherms, surface potential isotherms, Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. A β-hairpin conformation was found for all peptides at the air-water interface although their packing arrangements seem to be different. Crystallization of calcium carbonate under these peptide monolayers was investigated at different surface pressures and growth times both by in situ optical microscopy, BAM and ex situ investigations such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). An amorphous calcium carbonate precursor was found at the initial crystallization stage. The crystallization process occurred in three stages. It starts from the nucleation of amorphous particles being a kinetically controlled process. Crystal nuclei subsequently aggregate to large particles and vaterite crystals start to form inside the amorphous layer, with the monolayer fluidity exerting an important role. The third process includes the re-crystallization of vaterite to calcite, which is thermodynamically controlled by monolayer structural factors including the monolayer flexibility and packing arrangement of the polar headgroups. Thus, the kinetic factors, monolayer fluidity and flexibility as well as structure factors govern the crystal morphology and polymorph distribution simultaneously and synergistically.

  4. Signature motif-guided identification of receptors for peptide hormones essential for root meristem growth.

    PubMed

    Song, Wen; Liu, Li; Wang, Jizong; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Heqiao; Tang, Jiao; Lin, Guangzhong; Wang, Yichuan; Wen, Xing; Li, Wenyang; Han, Zhifu; Guo, Hongwei; Chai, Jijie

    2016-06-01

    Peptide-mediated cell-to-cell signaling has crucial roles in coordination and definition of cellular functions in plants. Peptide-receptor matching is important for understanding the mechanisms underlying peptide-mediated signaling. Here we report the structure-guided identification of root meristem growth factor (RGF) receptors important for plant development. An assay based on a signature ligand recognition motif (Arg-x-Arg) conserved in a subfamily of leucine-rich repeat receptor kinases (LRR-RKs) identified the functionally uncharacterized LRR-RK At4g26540 as a receptor of RGF1 (RGFR1). We further solved the crystal structure of RGF1 in complex with the LRR domain of RGFR1 at a resolution of 2.6 Å, which reveals that the Arg-x-Gly-Gly (RxGG) motif is responsible for specific recognition of the sulfate group of RGF1 by RGFR1. Based on the RxGG motif, we identified additional four RGFRs. Participation of the five RGFRs in RGF-induced signaling is supported by biochemical and genetic data. We also offer evidence showing that SERKs function as co-receptors for RGFs. Taken together, our study identifies RGF receptors and co-receptors that can link RGF signals with their downstream components and provides a proof of principle for structure-based matching of LRR-RKs with their peptide ligands. PMID:27229311

  5. Antibodies for Growth Hormone and Prolactin Using Multiple Antigen Peptide Immunogens.

    PubMed

    González-Villaseñor; Chen

    1999-05-01

    : Antibodies elicited by novel synthetic peptide antigens derived from a highly conserved domain of the growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) of vertebrates were developed using the multiple antigen peptide approach. The sequence of the antigens is located near the carboxy-terminus in the D domain of the GH and PRL in a cluster of 11 and 10 conserved amino acids, respectively, within a sequence of 18 residues. The synthetic peptides were manually synthesized, purified by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the corresponding antibodies, elicited in rabbits, were cross-reacted with the GH and PRL of a variety of mammalian (human, bovine, ovine, pig, and equine) and nonmammalian (chicken, coho salmon, chum salmon, rainbow trout, catfish and striped bass) vertebrates. The cross-reactivity between the immunogen and its corresponding antigen was tested by immunobloting using either GH or PRL. The GH and PRL of the organisms tested cross-reacted specifically with the corresponding antibody. Chicken and fish GH and PRL showed stronger antibody cross-reactivity than that observed in mammalian sources. These results demonstrate the utility of peptide-derived polyclonal antibodies in the detection of native and recombinant GH and PRL of a variety of vertebrates.

  6. Heterologous Stacking of Prion Protein Peptides Reveals Structural Details of Fibrils and Facilitates Complete Inhibition of Fibril GrowthS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Boshuizen, Ronald S.; Schulz, Veronica; Morbin, Michela; Mazzoleni, Giulia; Meloen, Rob H.; Langedijk, Johannes P. M.

    2009-01-01

    Fibrils play an important role in the pathogenesis of amyloidosis; however, the underlying mechanisms of the growth process and the structural details of fibrils are poorly understood. Crucial in the fibril formation of prion proteins is the stacking of PrP monomers. We previously proposed that the structure of the prion protein fibril may be similar as a parallel left-handed β-helix. The β-helix is composed of spiraling rungs of parallel β-strands, and in the PrP model residues 105–143 of each PrP monomer can contribute two β-helical rungs to the growing fibril. Here we report data to support this model. We show that two cyclized human PrP peptides corresponding to residues 105–124 and 125–143, based on two single rungs of the left-handed β-helical core of the human PrPSc fibril, show spontaneous cooperative fibril growth in vitro by heterologous stacking. Because the structural model must have predictive value, peptides were designed based on the structure rules of the left-handed β-helical fold that could stack with prion protein peptides to stimulate or to block fibril growth. The stimulator peptide was designed as an optimal left-handed β-helical fold that can serve as a template for fibril growth initiation. The inhibiting peptide was designed to bind to the exposed rung but frustrate the propagation of the fibril growth. The single inhibitory peptide hardly shows inhibition, but the combination of the inhibitory with the stimulatory peptide showed complete inhibition of the fibril growth of peptide huPrP-(106–126). Moreover, the unique strategy based on stimulatory and inhibitory peptides seems a powerful new approach to study amyloidogenic fibril structures in general and could prove useful for the development of therapeutics. PMID:19304665

  7. A novel neuropeptide in suppressing luteinizing hormone release in goldfish, Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Li, Shuisheng; Qi, Xing; Zhou, Wenyi; Liu, Xiaochun; Lin, Haoran; Zhang, Yong; Cheng, Christopher H K

    2013-07-15

    The fish reproductive axis is regulated by many neuroendocrine factors. However, factors involved in the suppression of this axis are largely uncharacterized. In this study, we describe a novel neuropeptide derived from the spexin precursor acting as a negative factor to suppress the reproductive axis in teleost. The cDNA sequences of the spexin precursors have been cloned from both zebrafish and goldfish. A 14-aa mature peptide with the C-terminal amidated (spexin-14a: NWTPQAMLYLKGTQ-NH2) is conceivably generated by processing of the spexin precursors in both species. Spexin is mainly expressed in the brain and ovary of zebrafish and spexin-14a-ir cells are located in several brain regions of goldfish. Functionally, goldfish spexin-14a could significantly suppress luteinizing hormone (LH) release in cultured goldfish pituitary cells. Moreover, intraperitoneal injection of spexin-14a could effectively suppress serum LH level. The mRNA expression of spexin is lower in the breeding season and hypothalamic expression of spexin is regulated by gonadal hormones. These results constitute the first report on the novel role of spexin in the negative regulation of the reproductive axis in teleost.

  8. Effects of growth factors and trefoil peptides on migration and replication in primary oxyntic cultures.

    PubMed

    Kato, K; Chen, M C; Nguyen, M; Lehmann, F S; Podolsky, D K; Soll, A H

    1999-05-01

    Restitution, the lateral migration of cells over an intact basement membrane, maintains mucosal integrity. We studied the regulation of migration and proliferation of enzyme-dispersed canine oxyntic mucosa cells in primary culture. Confluent monolayers were wounded and cultured in serum-free medium, and cells migrating into the wound were counted. [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA was studied using subconfluent cultures. Considerable migration occurred in untreated monolayers; however, epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor (TGF)-alpha, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), two trefoil peptides, and interleukin (IL)-1beta further enhanced migration. The specific EGF receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody, MAb-528, inhibited both basal and TGF-alpha- or IL-1beta-stimulated migration, but not the response to trefoil peptide, bFGF, or IGF-I. Exogenous TGF-beta inhibited cell proliferation but did not alter migration. Immunoneutralization with anti-TGF-beta blocked the response to exogenous TGF-beta and produced a small enhancement of basal thymidine incorporation but did not attenuate basal or TGF-alpha-stimulated migration. In conclusion, endogenous EGFR ligands regulate proliferation and migration. TGF-beta inhibits mitogenesis; it did not upregulate migration in these cultures. Although bFGF, IGF-I, and IL-1beta enhance gastric epithelial migration, only IL-1beta acted in a TGF-alpha-dependent fashion.

  9. Temporally controlled release of multiple growth factors from a self-assembling peptide hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Bruggeman, Kiara F; Rodriguez, Alexandra L; Parish, Clare L; Williams, Richard J; Nisbet, David R

    2016-09-23

    Protein growth factors have demonstrated great potential for tissue repair, but their inherent instability and large size prevents meaningful presentation to biologically protected nervous tissue. Here, we create a nanofibrous network from a self-assembling peptide (SAP) hydrogel to carry and stabilize the growth factors. We significantly reduced growth factor degradation to increase their lifespan by over 40 times. To control the temporal release profile we covalently attached polysaccharide chitosan molecules to the growth factor to increase its interactions with the hydrogel nanofibers and achieved a 4 h delay, demonstrating the potential of this method to provide temporally controlled growth factor delivery. We also describe release rate based analysis to examine the growth factor delivery in more detail than standard cumulative release profiles allow and show that the chitosan attachment method provided a more consistent release profile with a 60% reduction in fluctuations. To prove the potential of this system as a complex growth factor delivery platform we demonstrate for the first time temporally distinct release of multiple growth factors from a single tissue specific SAP hydrogel: a significant goal in regenerative medicine. PMID:27517970

  10. Temporally controlled release of multiple growth factors from a self-assembling peptide hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Kiara F.; Rodriguez, Alexandra L.; Parish, Clare L.; Williams, Richard J.; Nisbet, David R.

    2016-09-01

    Protein growth factors have demonstrated great potential for tissue repair, but their inherent instability and large size prevents meaningful presentation to biologically protected nervous tissue. Here, we create a nanofibrous network from a self-assembling peptide (SAP) hydrogel to carry and stabilize the growth factors. We significantly reduced growth factor degradation to increase their lifespan by over 40 times. To control the temporal release profile we covalently attached polysaccharide chitosan molecules to the growth factor to increase its interactions with the hydrogel nanofibers and achieved a 4 h delay, demonstrating the potential of this method to provide temporally controlled growth factor delivery. We also describe release rate based analysis to examine the growth factor delivery in more detail than standard cumulative release profiles allow and show that the chitosan attachment method provided a more consistent release profile with a 60% reduction in fluctuations. To prove the potential of this system as a complex growth factor delivery platform we demonstrate for the first time temporally distinct release of multiple growth factors from a single tissue specific SAP hydrogel: a significant goal in regenerative medicine.

  11. Therapeutic effects of cell-permeant peptides that activate G proteins downstream of growth factors

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Gary S.; Aznar, Nicolas; Kalogriopoulos, Nicholas; Midde, Krishna K.; Lopez-Sanchez, Inmaculada; Sato, Emi; Dunkel, Ying; Gallo, Richard L.; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and trimeric G proteins are two major signaling hubs. Signal transduction via trimeric G proteins has long been believed to be triggered exclusively by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). This paradigm has recently been challenged by several studies on a multimodular signal transducer, Gα-Interacting Vesicle associated protein (GIV/Girdin). We recently demonstrated that GIV’s C terminus (CT) serves as a platform for dynamic association of ligand-activated RTKs with Gαi, and for noncanonical transactivation of G proteins. However, exogenous manipulation of this platform has remained beyond reach. Here we developed cell-permeable GIV-CT peptides by fusing a TAT-peptide transduction domain (TAT-PTD) to the minimal modular elements of GIV that are necessary and sufficient for activation of Gi downstream of RTKs, and used them to engineer signaling networks and alter cell behavior. In the presence of an intact GEF motif, TAT-GIV-CT peptides enhanced diverse processes in which GIV’s GEF function has previously been implicated, e.g., 2D cell migration after scratch-wounding, invasion of cancer cells, and finally, myofibroblast activation and collagen production. Furthermore, topical application of TAT-GIV-CT peptides enhanced the complex, multireceptor-driven process of wound repair in mice in a GEF-dependent manner. Thus, TAT-GIV peptides provide a novel and versatile tool to manipulate Gαi activation downstream of growth factors in a diverse array of pathophysiologic conditions. PMID:25926659

  12. Indirect assessment of pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone release in agonadal prepubertal rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Suter, K J; Pohl, C R; Plant, T M

    1999-01-01

    The major purpose of this study was to characterize the open-loop frequency of pulsatile GnRH release in the female rhesus monkey at an age (15-20 months) when the prepubertal restraint on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis is maximally imposed. Additionally, evidence for pulsatile GnRH release in agonadal males of comparable age was also sought. Episodic LH secretion from the pituitary was used as an indirect index of GnRH discharges. In order to maximize the sensitivity of this in situ bioassay, the responsiveness of the pituitary gonadotrophs was usually first heightened by an i.v. intermittent infusion of the synthetic peptide. Monkeys (five females, three males) were castrated between 9 and 14 months of age, implanted with indwelling venous catheters, fitted with nylon jackets and housed in specialized cages that permitted remote access to the venous circulation with minimal restraint and without interruption of the light-darkness cycle. In females, LH secretion was generally assessed at 20-day intervals during alternate nighttime (1900-0200 h) and daytime (0700-1400 h) windows. In males, LH was assessed less frequently and only at night. The mean frequency of pulsatile LH release in agonadal prepubertal females was 4 pulses/7 h during the night and 2 pulses/7 h during the day. These findings indicate that, prior to puberty in the female monkey, the GnRH pulse generator operates at a relatively slow frequency and is subjected to diurnal modulation. In males, evidence for robust pulsatile GnRH release was not observed. The striking difference in activity of the GnRH pulse generator in agonadal prepubertal male and female monkeys reinforces the view that the ontogeny of the hypothalamic drive to the pituitary-gonadal axis in higher primates, including man, is sexually differentiated.

  13. True precocious puberty complicating congenital adrenal hyperplasia: treatment with a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analog.

    PubMed

    Pescovitz, O H; Comite, F; Cassorla, F; Dwyer, A J; Poth, M A; Sperling, M A; Hench, K; McNemar, A; Skerda, M; Loriaux, D L

    1984-05-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a recognized cause of precocious pseudopuberty. Some children with CAH also develop true precocious puberty with early maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. We have seen four such children (three boys and one girl) who had the diagnosis of CAH made between the ages of 3 and 6 yr. These patients were treated with standard doses of hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone. A diagnosis of true precocious puberty was made because of testicular enlargement in the boys, breast development in the girl, progressive pubic hair development, rapid growth, and rapid bone age maturation. Plasma steroid levels were elevated for age, and gonadotropin levels were within the normal pubertal range, both basally and in response to LHRH stimulation. We treated these children with daily sc injections of a LHRH analog (LHRHa) for 6-18 months in addition to the standard hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone therapy for CAH. LHRHa significantly decreased basal plasma LH and FSH, peak LH and FSH responses to native LHRH, and testosterone levels. Testis size decreased in the males, and breast development regressed in the female. LHRHa therapy led to significant decreases in linear growth rate, ulnar growth rate, and rate of bone age advancement. These results suggest that LHRHa is an effective adjunct to hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone in the treatment of true precocious puberty complicating CAH.

  14. Receptor binding peptides for target-selective delivery of nanoparticles encapsulated drugs

    PubMed Central

    Accardo, Antonella; Aloj, Luigi; Aurilio, Michela; Morelli, Giancarlo; Tesauro, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Active targeting by means of drug encapsulated nanoparticles decorated with targeting bioactive moieties represents the next frontier in drug delivery; it reduces drug side effects and increases the therapeutic index. Peptides, based on their chemical and biological properties, could have a prevalent role to direct drug encapsulated nanoparticles, such as liposomes, micelles, or hard nanoparticles, toward the tumor tissues. A considerable number of molecular targets for peptides are either exclusively expressed or overexpressed on both cancer vasculature and cancer cells. They can be classified into three wide categories: integrins; growth factor receptors (GFRs); and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Therapeutic agents based on nanovectors decorated with peptides targeting membrane receptors belonging to the GPCR family overexpressed by cancer cells are reviewed in this article. The most studied targeting membrane receptors are considered: somatostatin receptors; cholecystokinin receptors; receptors associated with the Bombesin like peptides family; luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone receptors; and neurotensin receptors. Nanovectors of different sizes and shapes (micelles, liposomes, or hard nanoparticles) loaded with doxorubicin or other cytotoxic drugs and externally functionalized with natural or synthetic peptides are able to target the overexpressed receptors and are described based on their formulation and in vitro and in vivo behaviors. PMID:24741304

  15. Effect of the antimicrobial peptide tritrpticin on the in vitro viability and growth of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Infante, Veronica V; Miranda-Olvera, Alma D; De Leon-Rodriguez, Luis M; Anaya-Velazquez, Fernando; Rodriguez, Mayra C; Avila, Eva E

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are widely distributed in nature; they play important roles in several aspects of innate immunity and may provide a basis for the design of novel therapeutic agents. In this study, C-amidated tritrpticin, a 13 amino acid tryptophan-rich antimicrobial peptide derived from a porcine cathelicidin, was tested against Trichomonas vaginalis, a protozoan that causes a serious non-viral sexually transmitted disease associated with preterm birth, low birth weight, and high risk of HIV-1 infection. Tritrpticin was selected due to its reasonably easy synthesis and because analogs with lower toxicity may be designed. Our results show that tritrpticin-NH(2) at either 100 or 200 μg/ml (52.5 or 105 μM) clearly reduces the viability and growth of Trichomonas vaginalis. Together with tritrpticin-NH(2), sodium bicarbonate further limited trichomonad growth. Additionally, a low concentration of metronidazole (5.8 μM), the most commonly used medication for Trichomonas vaginalis, was more effective against the growth of the parasite when it was combined with tritrpticin-NH(2). PMID:20640424

  16. Effect of the antimicrobial peptide tritrpticin on the in vitro viability and growth of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Infante, Veronica V; Miranda-Olvera, Alma D; De Leon-Rodriguez, Luis M; Anaya-Velazquez, Fernando; Rodriguez, Mayra C; Avila, Eva E

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are widely distributed in nature; they play important roles in several aspects of innate immunity and may provide a basis for the design of novel therapeutic agents. In this study, C-amidated tritrpticin, a 13 amino acid tryptophan-rich antimicrobial peptide derived from a porcine cathelicidin, was tested against Trichomonas vaginalis, a protozoan that causes a serious non-viral sexually transmitted disease associated with preterm birth, low birth weight, and high risk of HIV-1 infection. Tritrpticin was selected due to its reasonably easy synthesis and because analogs with lower toxicity may be designed. Our results show that tritrpticin-NH(2) at either 100 or 200 μg/ml (52.5 or 105 μM) clearly reduces the viability and growth of Trichomonas vaginalis. Together with tritrpticin-NH(2), sodium bicarbonate further limited trichomonad growth. Additionally, a low concentration of metronidazole (5.8 μM), the most commonly used medication for Trichomonas vaginalis, was more effective against the growth of the parasite when it was combined with tritrpticin-NH(2).

  17. Generation and Recovery of β-cell Spheroids From Step-growth PEG-peptide Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Asad; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogels are hydrophilic crosslinked polymers that provide a three-dimensional microenvironment with tissue-like elasticity and high permeability for culturing therapeutically relevant cells or tissues. Hydrogels prepared from poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) derivatives are increasingly used for a variety of tissue engineering applications, in part due to their tunable and cytocompatible properties. In this protocol, we utilized thiol-ene step-growth photopolymerizations to fabricate PEG-peptide hydrogels for encapsulating pancreatic MIN6 b-cells. The gels were formed by 4-arm PEG-norbornene (PEG4NB) macromer and a chymotrypsin-sensitive peptide crosslinker (CGGYC). The hydrophilic and non-fouling nature of PEG offers a cytocompatible microenvironment for cell survival and proliferation in 3D, while the use of chymotrypsin-sensitive peptide sequence (CGGY↓C, arrow indicates enzyme cleavage site, while terminal cysteine residues were added for thiol-ene crosslinking) permits rapid recovery of cell constructs forming within the hydrogel. The following protocol elaborates techniques for: (1) Encapsulation of MIN6 β-cells in thiol-ene hydrogels; (2) Qualitative and quantitative cell viability assays to determine cell survival and proliferation; (3) Recovery of cell spheroids using chymotrypsin-mediated gel erosion; and (4) Structural and functional analysis of the recovered spheroids. PMID:23241531

  18. Hedgehog signaling activation induces stem cell proliferation and hormone release in the adult pituitary gland

    PubMed Central

    Pyczek, Joanna; Buslei, Rolf; Schult, David; Hölsken, Annett; Buchfelder, Michael; Heß, Ina; Hahn, Heidi; Uhmann, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling is known to be essential during the embryonal development of the pituitary gland but the knowledge about its role in the adult pituitary and in associated tumors is sparse. In this report we investigated the effect of excess Hh signaling activation in murine pituitary explants and analyzed the HH signaling status of human adenopituitary lobes and a large cohort of pituitary adenomas. Our data show that excess Hh signaling led to increased proliferation of Sox2+ and Sox9+ adult pituitary stem cells and to elevated expression levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (Acth), growth hormone (Gh) and prolactin (Prl) in the adult gland. Inhibition of the pathway by cyclopamine reversed these effects indicating that active Hh signaling positively regulates proliferative processes of adult pituitary stem cells and hormone production in the anterior pituitary. Since hormone producing cells of the adenohypophysis as well as ACTH-, GH- and PRL-immunopositive adenomas express SHH and its target GLI1, we furthermore propose that excess HH signaling is involved in the development/maintenance of hormone-producing pituitary adenomas. These findings advance the understanding of physiological hormone regulation and may open new treatment options for pituitary tumors. PMID:27109116

  19. Pituitary and testicular response to luteinizing hormone releasing hormone in normal and sulpiride-induced hyperprolactinaemic men.

    PubMed

    Nakano, R; Yagi, S; Nishi, T

    1988-05-01

    Pituitary and testicular response to an intravenous infusion of 480 micrograms luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) for 8 hours (1 microgram/min) was investigated in 8 male volunteers in normal and hyperprolactinaemic state. Eight normal men were given 150 mg of sulpiride daily for 14 days. Serum prolactin (PRL) levels were elevated significantly, but basal serum levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) did not change following daily oral administration of sulpiride in 8 normal men. Eight men showed biphasic LH response to LHRH infusion in both normal and hyperprolactinaemic state, and there was a rather exaggerated response in serum LH concentration in hyperprolactinaemic state. Serum FSH response to LHRH was similar in normal and hyperprolactinaemic state. Although slight increase in serum testosterone concentration was observed during LHRH infusion in normal and hyperprolactinaemic state, the statistical difference was not significant. The result of the present study suggests that the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, as measured by serum gonadotrophin and testosterone responses, is well reserved.

  20. New insights on the role of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone agonists in premenopausal early breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Del Mastro, Lucia; Rossi, Giovanni; Lambertini, Matteo; Poggio, Francesca; Pronzato, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Luteinising hormone releasing hormone agonists (LH-RHa) are effective in the treatment of advanced endocrine-sensitive breast cancer in premenopausal patients, but their role in the adjuvant setting has remained controversial for a long time. Tamoxifen for 5 years has been traditionally considered the standard endocrine therapy for premenopausal patients and this is still valid for many patients. However, the recently reported SOFT trial has suggested that adding ovarian function suppression (OFS) to tamoxifen could improve DFS in women at sufficient risk to warrant adjuvant chemotherapy and who remained premenopausal after this therapy. The administration of an aromatase inhibitor plus OFS represents an additional therapeutic option for hormone-receptor positive premenopausal breast cancer patients, according to the combined analysis of the SOFT and TEXT trials. Temporary ovarian suppression induced by LH-RHa has been recognized as an effective strategy to preserve ovarian function from the toxic effects of chemotherapy and is now recommended in young breast cancer patients with endocrine-insensitive tumors. In this review, we discuss recent data on the role of LH-RHa in combination with tamoxifen or with an aromatase inhibitor, and we comment on its role as a strategy to preserve ovarian function in young patients candidates for adjuvant or neo-adjuvant chemotherapy.

  1. Acute Effect of Manganese on Hypothalamic Luteinizing Hormone Releasing Hormone Secretion in Adult Male Rats: Involvement of Specific Neurotransmitter Systems

    PubMed Central

    Prestifilippo, Juan Pablo; Fernández-Solari, Javier; De Laurentiis, Andrea; Mohn, Claudia Ester; de la Cal, Carolina; Reynoso, Roxana; Dees, W. Les; Rettori, Valeria

    2008-01-01

    Manganese chloride (MnCl2) is capable of stimulating luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) secretion in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats through the activation of the hypothalamic nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)/protein kinase G pathway. The present study aimed to determine the involvement of specific neurotransmitters involved in this action. Our results indicate that dopamine, but not glutamic acid and prostaglandinds, mediates the MnCl2 stimulated secretion of LHRH from medial basal hypothalami in vitro, as well as increases the activity of nitric oxide synthase. Furthermore, a biphasic response was observed in that gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) release was also increased, which acts to attenuate the MnCl2 action to stimulate LHRH secretion. Although it is clear that manganese (Mn+2) can acutely induce LHRH secretion in adult males, we suggest that the additional action of MnCl2 to release GABA, a LHRH inhibitor, may ultimately contribute to suppressed reproductive function observed in adult animals following exposure to high chromic levels of Mn+2. PMID:18603625

  2. Administration of Luteinizing Hormone Releasing Hormone Agonist for Synchronization of Estrus and Generation of Pseudopregnancy for Embryo Transfer in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Borjeson, Tiffany M; Pang, Jassia; Fox, James G; García, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, the use of genetically engineered rats has increased exponentially; therefore, the ability to perform embryo transfer (ET) in rats to rederive, reanimate, or create mutant rat lines is increasingly important. However, the successful generation of pseudopregnant female rats for ET represents a limiting factor. We here evaluated the subcutaneous administration of 40 µg luteinizing hormone releasing hormone agonist (LHRHa) for estrus synchronization during the development and implementation of a rat ET program. Our first experiment assessed endogenous estrus cycling patterns by examining vaginal cytology without administration of LHRHa in 5-wk-old peripubertal Sprague–Dawley female rats. These rats then received LHRHa at approximately 7 wk of age; 57% of the rats were synchronized in proestrus or estrus as assessed by vaginal cytology 96 h later. In a second experiment, 8-wk-old virgin, unmanipulated Sprague–Dawley female rats received LHRHa; 55% were synchronized in proestrus or estrus 96 h later. Copulatory plugs were confirmed in 28% and 82% of the rats that had been synchronized in the first and second experiments, respectively, and mated with vasectomized male rats. Embryo transfer surgery was performed, and live pups were born from both fresh and cryopreserved transgenic rat embryos. Our results indicate that subcutaneous administration of 40 µg LHRHa followed by examination of vaginal cytology 96 h later is an effective technique to generate multiple pseudopregnant recipient rats for use in an ET program. PMID:24827564

  3. Is radiation-induced ovarian failure in rhesus monkeys preventable by luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists?: Preliminary observations

    SciTech Connect

    Ataya, K.; Pydyn, E.; Ramahi-Ataya

    1995-03-01

    With the advent of cancer therapy, increasing numbers of cancer patients are achieving long term survival. Impaired ovarian function after radiation therapy has been reported in several studies. Some investigators have suggested that luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists (LHRHa) can prevent radiation-induced ovarian injury in rodents. Adult female rhesus monkeys were given either vehicle or Leuprolide acetate before, during, and after radiation. Radiation was given in a dose of 200 rads/day for a total of 4000 rads to the ovaries. Frequent serum samples were assayed for estradiol (E{sub 2}) and FSH. Ovariectomy was performed later. Ovaries were processed and serially sectioned. Follicle count and size distribution were determined. Shortly after radiation started, E{sub 2} dropped to low levels, at which it remained, whereas serum FSH level, which was low before radiation, rose soon after starting radiation. In monkeys treated with a combination of LHRHa and radiation, FSH started rising soon after the LHRHa-loaded minipump was removed (after the end of radiation). Serum E{sub 2} increased after the end of LHRHa treatment in the non-irradiated monkey, but not in the irradiated monkey. Follicle counts were not preserved in the LHRHa-treated monkeys that received radiation. The data demonstrated no protective effect of LHRHa treatment against radiation-induced ovarian injury in this rhesus monkey model. 58 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Administration of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone agonist for synchronization of estrus and generation of pseudopregnancy for embryo transfer in rats.

    PubMed

    Borjeson, Tiffany M; Pang, Jassia; Fox, James G; García, Alexis

    2014-05-01

    In the past decade, the use of genetically engineered rats has increased exponentially; therefore, the ability to perform embryo transfer (ET) in rats to rederive, reanimate, or create mutant rat lines is increasingly important. However, the successful generation of pseudopregnant female rats for ET represents a limiting factor. We here evaluated the subcutaneous administration of 40 μg luteinizing hormone releasing hormone agonist (LHRHa) for estrus synchronization during the development and implementation of a rat ET program. Our first experiment assessed endogenous estrus cycling patterns by examining vaginal cytology without administration of LHRHa in 5-wk-old peripubertal Sprague-Dawley female rats. These rats then received LHRHa at approximately 7 wk of age; 57% of the rats were synchronized in proestrus or estrus as assessed by vaginal cytology 96 h later. In a second experiment, 8-wk-old virgin, unmanipulated Sprague-Dawley female rats received LHRHa; 55% were synchronized in proestrus or estrus 96 h later. Copulatory plugs were confirmed in 28% and 82% of the rats that had been synchronized in the first and second experiments, respectively, and mated with vasectomized male rats. Embryo transfer surgery was performed, and live pups were born from both fresh and cryopreserved transgenic rat embryos. Our results indicate that subcutaneous administration of 40 μg LHRHa followed by examination of vaginal cytology 96 h later is an effective technique to generate multiple pseudopregnant recipient rats for use in an ET program.

  5. Direct evidence of estrogen modulation of pituitary sensitivity to luteinizing hormone-releasing factor during the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C F; Yen, S S

    1975-01-01

    To delineate the role of estradiol in the augmented pituitary gonadotropin responsiveness to synthetic luteinizing hormone releasing factor (LRF) seen during high-estrogen phases of the ovulatory cycles (late follicular and midluteal phases), the anti-estrogenic effect of clomiphene citrate (Clomid) on pituitary response to LRF was evaluated during different phases of the ovulatory cycle. Clomid administration (100 mg/day times 5 days) completely negates the augmented gonadotropin responses to LRF (150 mug) during late follicular and midluteal phases observed during the control studies. Thus, a quantitatively and qualitatively similar pituitary sensitivity to LRF during three distinct phases of the menstrual cycle was induced by Clomid treatment that resembles the LRF responsiveness of themale pituitary. The present study demonstrates the pituitary component of the estrogen-induced changes in the sensitivity to LRF. From this and previous data, we conclude that the increases of estradiol secretion associated with the follicular maturation and corpus luteum formation represent a major component of the feedback signal in the modulation of cyclic gonadotropin release occasioned in a large measure by the augmented pituitary sensitivity to LRF. PMID:1088908

  6. Growth hormone-releasing hormone resistance in pseudohypoparathyroidism type ia: new evidence for imprinting of the Gs alpha gene.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Giovanna; Maghnie, Mohamad; Weber, Giovanna; De Menis, Ernesto; Brunelli, Valeria; Cappa, Marco; Loli, Paola; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Spada, Anna

    2003-09-01

    Heterozygous inactivating mutations in the Gs alpha gene cause Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy. Consistent with the observation that only maternally inherited mutations lead to resistance to hormone action [pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia (PHP Ia)], recent studies provided evidence for a predominant maternal origin of Gs alpha transcripts in endocrine organs, such as thyroid, gonad, and pituitary. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of pituitary resistance to hypothalamic hormones acting via Gs alpha-coupled receptors in patients with PHP Ia. Six of nine patients showed an impaired GH responsiveness to GHRH plus arginine, consistent with a complete GH deficiency (GH peak from 2.6-8.6 microg/liter, normal > 16.5), and partial (GH peak 13.9 and 13.6 microg/liter) and normal responses were found in two and one patient, respectively. Accordingly, IGF-I levels were below and in the low-normal range in seven and two patients. All patients had a normal cortisol response to 1 microg ACTH test, suggesting a normal corticotroph function that was confirmed by a normal ACTH and cortisol response to CRH test in three patients. In conclusion, we report that in addition to PTH and TSH resistance, patients with PHP Ia display variable degrees of GHRH resistance, consistent with Gs alpha imprinting in human pituitary. PMID:12970263

  7. Growth hormone-releasing hormone resistance in pseudohypoparathyroidism type ia: new evidence for imprinting of the Gs alpha gene.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Giovanna; Maghnie, Mohamad; Weber, Giovanna; De Menis, Ernesto; Brunelli, Valeria; Cappa, Marco; Loli, Paola; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Spada, Anna

    2003-09-01

    Heterozygous inactivating mutations in the Gs alpha gene cause Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy. Consistent with the observation that only maternally inherited mutations lead to resistance to hormone action [pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia (PHP Ia)], recent studies provided evidence for a predominant maternal origin of Gs alpha transcripts in endocrine organs, such as thyroid, gonad, and pituitary. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of pituitary resistance to hypothalamic hormones acting via Gs alpha-coupled receptors in patients with PHP Ia. Six of nine patients showed an impaired GH responsiveness to GHRH plus arginine, consistent with a complete GH deficiency (GH peak from 2.6-8.6 microg/liter, normal > 16.5), and partial (GH peak 13.9 and 13.6 microg/liter) and normal responses were found in two and one patient, respectively. Accordingly, IGF-I levels were below and in the low-normal range in seven and two patients. All patients had a normal cortisol response to 1 microg ACTH test, suggesting a normal corticotroph function that was confirmed by a normal ACTH and cortisol response to CRH test in three patients. In conclusion, we report that in addition to PTH and TSH resistance, patients with PHP Ia display variable degrees of GHRH resistance, consistent with Gs alpha imprinting in human pituitary.

  8. Neither bST nor Growth Hormone Releasing Factor Alter Expression of Thyroid Hormone Receptors in Liver and Mammary Tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physiological effects of thyroid hormones are mediated primarily by binding of triiodothyronine, to specific nuclear receptors. It has been hypothesized that organ-specific changes in production of triiodothyronine from its prohormone, thyroxine, target the action of thyroid hormones to the mammary...

  9. Accelerated bone growth in vitro by the conjugation of BMP2 peptide with hydroxyapatite on titanium alloy.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yanli; Wang, Xiaoyan; Poh, Chye Khoon; Tan, Hark Chuan; Soe, Min Tun; Zhang, Sam; Wang, Wilson

    2014-04-01

    Titanium alloys have been widely used in orthopedic practice due to their inherent bioactivity, however it is still insufficient to truly and reliably incorporate into living bone. In this work, polydopamine film was employed to induce the growth of hydroxyapatite (HA) on titanium alloy to enhance its osteoconductivity. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) peptide was absorbed into the HA particles for osteoinductivity. The precipitation of HA and the existence of BMP2 peptide were examined by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy. The dissolution of HA and the release of BMP2 peptide were monitored by measuring the concentrations of calcium ions and BMP2 peptide in phosphate buffered saline solution, respectively. The effect of BMP2 peptide incorporated into HA coating on bone growth was evaluated in vitro by cell culture tests, including cell attachment, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and gene expression. The results show that the HA particles grown on the substrate are mediated by the polydopamine film. The BMP2 peptide is distributed uniformly on HA-coated substrate and released in a sustained manner. Moreover, the conjunction of HA and BMP2 peptide increases cell adhesion, ALP activity and gene expression of osteogenic markers, which are potentially useful in the development of enhanced orthopedic medical devices.

  10. Circadian and sleep-dependent regulation of hormone release in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czeisler, C. A.; Klerman, E. B.

    1999-01-01

    Daily oscillations characterize the release of nearly every hormone. The circadian pacemaker, located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, generates circadian, approximately 24-hour rhythms in many physiologic functions. However, the observed hormonal oscillations do not simply reflect the output of this internal clock. Instead, daily hormonal profiles are the product of a complex interaction between the output of the circadian pacemaker, periodic changes in behavior, light exposure, neuroendocrine feedback mechanisms, gender, age, and the timing of sleep and wakefulness. The interaction of these factors can affect hormonal secretory pulse frequency and amplitude, with each endocrine system differentially affected by these factors. This chapter examines recent advances in understanding the effects on endocrine rhythms of a number of these factors. Sleep exerts a profound effect on endocrine secretion. Sleep is a dynamic process that is characterized by periodic changes in electrophysiologic activity. These electrophysiologic changes, which are used to mark the state and depth of sleep, are associated with periodic, short-term variations in hormonal levels. The secretion of hormones such as renin and human growth hormone are strongly influenced by sleep or wake state, while melatonin and cortisol levels are relatively unaffected by sleep or wake state. In addition, sleep is associated with changes in posture, behavior, and light exposure, each of which is known to affect endocrine secretion. Furthermore, the tight concordance of habitual sleep and wake times with certain circadian phases has made it difficult to distinguish sleep and circadian effects on these hormones. Specific protocols, designed to extract circadian and sleep information semi-independently, have been developed and have yielded important insights into the effects of these regulatory processes. These results may help to account for changes in endocrine rhythms observed in circadian

  11. Iron oxide nanoparticles induce Pseudomonas aeruginosa growth, induce biofilm formation, and inhibit antimicrobial peptide function.

    PubMed

    Borcherding, Jennifer; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Chen, Haihan; Stebounova, Larissa; Wu, Chia-Ming; Rubasinghege, Gayan; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A; Caraballo, Juan Carlos; Zabner, Joseph; Grassian, Vicki H; Comellas, Alejandro P

    2014-04-01

    Given the increased use of iron-containing nanoparticles in a number of applications, it is important to understand any effects that iron-containing nanoparticles can have on the environment and human health. Since iron concentrations are extremely low in body fluids, there is potential that iron-containing nanoparticles may influence the ability of bacteria to scavenge iron for growth, affect virulence and inhibit antimicrobial peptide (AMP) function. In this study, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA01) and AMPs were exposed to iron oxide nanoparticles, hematite (α-Fe2O3), of different sizes ranging from 2 to 540 nm (2 ± 1, 43 ± 6, 85 ± 25 and 540 ± 90 nm) in diameter. Here we show that the greatest effect on bacterial growth, biofilm formation, and AMP function impairment is found when exposed to the smallest particles. These results are attributed in large part to enhanced dissolution observed for the smallest particles and an increase in the amount of bioavailable iron. Furthermore, AMP function can be additionally impaired by adsorption onto nanoparticle surfaces. In particular, lysozyme readily adsorbs onto the nanoparticle surface which can lead to loss of peptide activity. Thus, this current study shows that co-exposure of nanoparticles and known pathogens can impact host innate immunity. Therefore, it is important that future studies be designed to further understand these types of impacts. PMID:25221673

  12. Phylogenetic Investigation of Peptide Hormone and Growth Factor Receptors in Five Dipteran Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Kevin J.; Brown, Mark R.; Strand, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Peptide hormones and growth factors bind to membrane receptors and regulate a myriad of processes in insects and other metazoans. The evolutionary relationships among characterized and uncharacterized (“orphan”) receptors can provide insights into receptor-ligand biology and narrow target choices in deorphanization studies. However, the large number and low sequence conservation of these receptors make evolutionary analysis difficult. Here, we characterized the G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), receptor guanylyl cyclases (RGCs), and protein kinase receptors (PKRs) of mosquitoes and select other flies by interrogating the genomes of Aedes aegypti, Anopheles gambiae, Culex quinquefasciatus, Drosophila melanogaster, and D. mojavensis. Sequences were grouped by receptor type, clustered using the program CLANS, aligned using HMMR, and phylogenetic trees built using PhyML. Our results indicated that PKRs had relatively few orphan clades whereas GPCRs and RGCs had several. In addition, more than half of the Class B secretin-like GPCRs and RGCs remained uncharacterized. Additional studies revealed that Class B GPCRs exhibited more gain and loss events than other receptor types. Finally, using the neuropeptide F family of insect receptors and the neuropeptide Y family of vertebrate receptors, we also show that functional sites considered critical for ligand binding are conserved among distinct family members and between distantly related taxa. Overall, our results provide the first comprehensive analysis of peptide hormone and growth factor receptors for a major insect group. PMID:24379806

  13. The FGF-2-Derived Peptide FREG Inhibits Melanoma Growth In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Aguzzi, Maria S; Faraone, Debora; D'Arcangelo, Daniela; De Marchis, Francesco; Toietta, Gabriele; Ribatti, Domenico; Parazzoli, Alberto; Colombo, Paolo; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Facchiano, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Previous data report that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)-derived peptide FREG potently inhibits FGF-2-dependent angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Here, we show that FREG inhibits up to 70% in vitro growth and invasion/migration of smooth muscle and melanoma cells. Such inhibition is mediated by platelet-derived growth factor-receptor-α (PDGF-Rα); in fact, proliferation and migration were restored upon PDGF-Rα neutralization. Further experiments demonstrated that FREG interacts with PDGF-Rα both in vitro and in vivo and stimulates its phosphorylation. We have previously shown that overexpressing PDGF-Rα strongly inhibits melanoma growth in vivo; we, therefore, hypothesized that PDGF-Rα agonists may represent a novel tool to inhibit melanoma growth in vivo. To support this hypothesis, FREG was inoculated intravenously (i.v.) in a mouse melanoma model and markedly inhibited pulmonary metastases formation. Immunohistochemical analyses showed less proliferation, less angiogenesis, and more apoptosis in metastasized lungs upon FREG treatment, as compared to untreated controls. Finally, in preliminary acute toxicity studies, FREG showed no toxicity signs in healthy animals, and neither microscopic nor macroscopic toxicity at the liver, kidney, and lungs level. Altogether, these data indicate that FREG systemic treatment strongly inhibits melanoma metastases development and indicate for the first time that agonists of PDGF-Rα may control melanoma both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:20924364

  14. The FGF-2-derived peptide FREG inhibits melanoma growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Aguzzi, Maria S; Faraone, Debora; D'Arcangelo, Daniela; De Marchis, Francesco; Toietta, Gabriele; Ribatti, Domenico; Parazzoli, Alberto; Colombo, Paolo; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Facchiano, Antonio

    2011-02-01

    Previous data report that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)-derived peptide FREG potently inhibits FGF-2-dependent angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Here, we show that FREG inhibits up to 70% in vitro growth and invasion/migration of smooth muscle and melanoma cells. Such inhibition is mediated by platelet-derived growth factor-receptor-α (PDGF-Rα); in fact, proliferation and migration were restored upon PDGF-Rα neutralization. Further experiments demonstrated that FREG interacts with PDGF-Rα both in vitro and in vivo and stimulates its phosphorylation. We have previously shown that overexpressing PDGF-Rα strongly inhibits melanoma growth in vivo; we, therefore, hypothesized that PDGF-Rα agonists may represent a novel tool to inhibit melanoma growth in vivo. To support this hypothesis, FREG was inoculated intravenously (i.v.) in a mouse melanoma model and markedly inhibited pulmonary metastases formation. Immunohistochemical analyses showed less proliferation, less angiogenesis, and more apoptosis in metastasized lungs upon FREG treatment, as compared to untreated controls. Finally, in preliminary acute toxicity studies, FREG showed no toxicity signs in healthy animals, and neither microscopic nor macroscopic toxicity at the liver, kidney, and lungs level. Altogether, these data indicate that FREG systemic treatment strongly inhibits melanoma metastases development and indicate for the first time that agonists of PDGF-Rα may control melanoma both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:20924364

  15. Peptide-modified Substrate for Modulating Gland Tissue Growth and Morphology In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Taketa, Hiroaki; Sathi, Gulsan Ara; Farahat, Mahmoud; Rahman, Kazi Anisur; Sakai, Takayoshi; Hirano, Yoshiaki; Kuboki, Takuo; Torii, Yasuhiro; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    In vitro fabricated biological tissue would be a valuable tool to screen newly synthesized drugs or understand the tissue development process. Several studies have attempted to fabricate biological tissue in vitro. However, controlling the growth and morphology of the fabricated tissue remains a challenge. Therefore, new techniques are required to modulate tissue growth. RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid), which is an integrin-binding domain of fibronectin, has been found to enhance cell adhesion and survival; it has been used to modify substrates for in vitro cell culture studies or used as tissue engineering scaffolds. In addition, this study shows novel functions of the RGD peptide, which enhances tissue growth and modulates tissue morphology in vitro. When an isolated submandibular gland (SMG) was cultured on an RGD-modified alginate hydrogel sheet, SMG growth including bud expansion and cleft formation was dramatically enhanced. Furthermore, we prepared small RGD-modified alginate beads and placed them on the growing SMG tissue. These RGD-modified beads successfully induced cleft formation at the bead position, guiding the desired SMG morphology. Thus, this RGD-modified material might be a promising tool to modulate tissue growth and morphology in vitro for biological tissue fabrication. PMID:26098225

  16. Phytosulfokine peptide signaling controls pollen tube growth and funicular pollen tube guidance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Stührwohldt, Nils; Dahlke, Renate I; Kutschmar, Anke; Peng, Xiongbo; Sun, Meng-Xiang; Sauter, Margret

    2015-04-01

    Phytosulfokine (PSK) is a peptide growth factor that requires tyrosine sulfation carried out by tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase (TPST) for its activity. PSK is processed from precursor proteins encoded by five genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and perceived by receptor kinases encoded by two genes in Arabidopsis. pskr1-3 pskr2-1 and tpst-1 knockout mutants displayed reduced seed production, indicative of a requirement for PSK peptide signaling in sexual plant reproduction. Expression analysis revealed PSK precursor and PSK receptor gene activity in reproductive organs with strong expression of PSK2 in pollen. In support of a role for PSK signaling in pollen, in vitro pollen tube (PT) growth was enhanced by exogenously added PSK while PTs of pskr1-3 pskr2-1 and of tpst-1 were shorter. In planta, growth of wild-type pollen in pskr1-3 pskr2-1 and tpst-1 flowers appeared slower than growth in wild-type flowers. But PTs did eventually reach the base of the style, suggesting that PT elongation rate may not be responsible for the reduced fertility. Detailed analysis of anthers, style and ovules did not reveal obvious developmental defects. By contrast, a high percentage of unfertilized ovules in pskr1-3 pskr2-1 and in tpst-1 siliques displayed loss of funicular PT guidance, suggesting that PSK signaling is required to guide the PT from the transmitting tract to the embryo sac. Cross-pollination experiments with wild-type, pskr1-3 pskr2-1 and tpst-1 male and female parents revealed that both the PT and the female sporophytic tissue and/or female gametophyte contribute to successful PT guidance via PSK signaling and to fertilization success.

  17. Peptide nucleic acids inhibit growth of Brucella suis in pure culture and in infected murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Parthiban; Alexander, Jeffry C.; Seleem, Mohamed N.; Jain, Neeta; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Wattam, Alice R.; Setubal, João C.; Boyle, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are single-stranded, synthetic nucleic acid analogues containing a pseudopeptide backbone in place of the phosphodiester sugar–phosphate. When PNAs are covalently linked to cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) they readily penetrate the bacterial cell envelope, inhibit expression of targeted genes and cause growth inhibition both of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. However, the effectiveness of PNAs against Brucella, a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen, was unknown. The susceptibility of a virulent Brucella suis strain to a variety of PNAs was assessed in pure culture as well as in murine macrophages. The studies showed that some of the PNAs targeted to Brucella genes involved in DNA (polA, dnaG, gyrA), RNA (rpoB), cell envelope (asd), fatty acid (kdtA, acpP) and protein (tsf) synthesis inhibit the growth of B. suis in culture and in macrophages after 24 h of treatment. PNA treatment inhibited Brucella growth by interfering with gene expression in a sequence-specific and dose-dependent manner at micromolar concentrations. The most effective PNA in broth culture was that targeting polA at ca. 12 μM. In contrast, in B. suis-infected macrophages, the most effective PNAs were those targeting asd and dnaG at 30 μM; both of these PNAs had little inhibitory effect on Brucella in broth culture. The polA PNA that inhibits wild-type B. suis also inhibits the growth of wild-type Brucella melitensis 16M and Brucella abortus 2308 in culture. This study reveals the potential usefulness of antisense PNA constructs as novel therapeutic agents against intracellular Brucella. PMID:23305655

  18. Combination of long-acting microcapsules of the D-tryptophan-6 analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone with chemotherapy: investigation in the rat prostate cancer model.

    PubMed Central

    Schally, A V; Redding, T W

    1985-01-01

    The effect of combining hormonal treatment consisting of long-acting microcapsules of the agonist [D-Trp6]LH-RH (the D-tryptophan-6 analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone) with the chemotherapeutic agent cyclophosphamide was investigated in the Dunning R-3327H rat prostate cancer model. Microcapsules of [D-Trp6]LH-RH formulated from poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) and calculated to release a controlled dose of 25 micrograms/day were injected intramuscularly once a month. Cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan) (5 mg/kg of body weight) was injected intraperitoneally twice a week. When the therapy was started 90 days after tumor transplantation--at the time that the cancers were well developed-and was continued for 2 months, tumor volume was significantly reduced by the microcapsules or Cytoxan given alone. The combination of these two agents similarly inhibited tumor growth but did not show a synergistic effect. In another study, the treatment was started 2 months after transplantation, when the developing tumors measured 60-70 mm3. Throughout the treatment period of 100 days, the microcapsules of [D-Trp6]LH-RH reduced tumor volume more than Cytoxan did, and the combination of the two drugs appeared to completely arrest tumor growth. Tumor weights also were diminished significantly in all experimental groups, the decrease in weight being smaller in the Cytoxan-treated group than in rats that received the microcapsules. The combination of Cytoxan plus the microcapsules was 10-100 times more effective than the single agents in reducing tumor weights. In both experiments, testes and ventral prostate weights were significantly diminished, serum testosterone was suppressed to undetectable levels, and prolactin values were reduced by administration of microcapsules of [D-Trp6]LH-RH alone or in combination with Cytoxan. These results in rats suggest that combined administration of long acting microcapsules of [D-Trp6]LH-RH with a chemotherapeutic agent, started soon after the

  19. Suppression of Soft Tissue Sarcoma Growth by a Host Defense-Like Lytic Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Steinstraesser, Lars; Hauk, Jennifer; Schubert, Cornelius; Al-Benna, Sammy; Stricker, Ingo; Hatt, Hanns; Shai, Yechiel; Steinau, Hans-Ulrich; Jacobsen, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Background Soft tissue sarcoma (STS) is an anatomically and histologically heterogeneous neoplasia that shares a putative mesenchymal cell origin. The treatment with common chemotherapeutics is still unsatisfying because of association with poor response rates. Although evidence is accumulating for potent oncolytic activity of host defense peptides (HDPs), their potential therapeutic use is often limited by poor bioavailability and inactivation in serum. Therefore, we tested the designer host defense-like lytic D,L-amino acid peptide [D]-K3H3L9 on two STS cell lines in vitro and also in an athymic and syngeneic mouse model. In recent studies the peptide could show selectivity against prostate carcinoma cells and also an active state in serum. Methods In vitro the human synovial sarcoma cell line SW982, the murine fibrosarcoma cell line BFS-1 and primary human fibroblasts as a control were exposed to [D]-K3H3L9, a 15mer D,L-amino acid designer HDP. Cell vitality in physiological and acidic conditions (MTT-assay), cell growth (BrdU) and DNA-fragmentation (TUNEL) were investigated. Membrane damage at different time points could be analyzed with LDH assay. An antibody against the tested peptide and recordings using scanning electron microscopy could give an inside in the mode of action. In vivo [D]-K3H3L9 was administered intratumorally in an athymic and syngeneic (immunocompetent) mouse model with SW982 and BFS-1 cells, respectively. After three weeks tumor sections were histologically analyzed. Results The peptide exerts rapid and high significant cytotoxicity and antiproliferating activity against the malignant cell lines, apparently via a membrane disrupting mode of action. The local intratumoral administration of [D]-K3H3L9 in the athymic and syngeneic mice models significantly inhibited tumor progression. The histological analyses of the tumor sections revealed a significant antiproliferative, antiangiogenic activity of the treatment group. Conclusion These

  20. Peptide vaccines and peptidomimetics of EGFR (HER-1) ligand binding domain inhibit cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Foy, Kevin Chu; Wygle, Ruthie M; Miller, Megan J; Overholser, Jay P; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Kaumaya, Pravin T P

    2013-07-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a validated target for several cancers including lung, colorectal, and certain subtypes of breast cancer. Cetuximab targets ligand binding of EGFR, but major problems like high cost, short t1/2, toxicity, and emergence of resistance are associated with the drug. Immunization with EGFR B cell epitopes will train the immune system to produce specific Abs that can kill cancer cells. Also, therapy with stable, less-expensive, and nontoxic EGFR peptide mimics will block EGFR signaling and inhibit cancer growth. We designed three peptides based on the contact sites between EGF and EGFR. The B cell epitopes were synthesized alone and also linked with the measles virus T cell epitope to produce a chimeric peptide vaccine. The peptide vaccines were immunogenic in both mice and rabbits and Abs raised against the vaccine specifically bound EGFR-expressing cells and recombinant human EGFR protein. The peptide mimics and the anti-peptide Abs were able to inhibit EGFR signaling pathways. Immunization with the peptide vaccine or treatment with the B cell epitopes significantly reduced tumor growth in both transplantable breast and lung cancer models. Immunohistochemical analysis also showed significant reductions in microvascular density and actively dividing cells in the tumor sections after treatment in the FVB/n breast cancer model. The 418-435 B cell epitope was the best candidate both as a vaccine or peptide mimic because it caused significant inhibition in the two mouse models. Our results show that this novel EGFR B cell epitope has great potential to be used as a vaccine or treatment option for EGFR-expressing cancers.

  1. Characterization of vasoactive intestinal peptide pituitary membrane receptors in turkey hens during different stages of reproduction.

    PubMed

    Rozenboim, I; el Halawani, M E

    1993-05-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a prolactin-releasing factor in turkey hens. Membranes from anterior pituitaries of turkey hens were used to characterize VIP receptors. Using HPLC-purified monoiodinated VIP, we found specific VIP receptors in the anterior pituitary glands. Binding was saturable and was time- and temperature-dependent. Scatchard analysis of competitive binding studies indicated two binding sites, a high-affinity binding site (Kd1) of 6.6 +/- 1.8 pM and maximum binding (Bmax1) of 1.52 +/- 0.2 pM, and a low-affinity binding site (Kd2) of 542 +/- 200 pM and Bmax2 of 15.8 +/- 8.0 pM. Binding of VIp to pituitary membranes was specific, as compared to other peptides of the glucagon family. The rank order of potency of the peptides tested was chicken VIP > porcine VIP > peptide histidine isoleucine > secretin > glucagon > growth hormone-releasing factor. Two binding sites were found in all the examined reproductive stages. The lowest binding site levels were found in nonphotostimulated and photorefractory birds, followed by photostimulated birds and layers; highest levels were found in incubating birds. Nest deprivation significantly reduced Bmax1 levels without changing hypothalamic VIP content. These results suggest the involvement of the anterior pituitary VIP receptors in the regulation of prolactin secretion from the pituitary gland.

  2. From Peptides to Proteins: Systematic Control of Net Molecular Charge and Hydrophilicity on the Kinetics of Calcite Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhadj, S.; de Yoreo, J. J.; Hoyer, J. J.; Dove, P. M.

    2006-12-01

    The compartment-specific compositions of biologic molecules isolated from biominerals suggest that control of mineral growth may be linked to biochemical features. Here we define a systematic relationship between the ability of biomolecules in solution to promote the growth of calcite (CaCO3) and their net negative molecular charge and hydrophilicity. The degree of enhancement is dependent on peptide composition, but not on peptide sequence. Data analysis shows that this rate enhancement arises from an increase in the kinetic coefficient. We interpret the mechanism of growth enhancement to be a catalytic process whereby biomolecules reduce the magnitude of the diffusive barrier, Ek, by perturbations that displace water molecules- a water shell destruction mechanism. The result is a decrease in the repulsive barrier for attachment of solutes to the solid phase. This previously unrecognized relationship also rationalizes recently reported data showing acceleration of calcite growth rates over rates measured in the pure system by nanomolar levels of abalone nacre proteins. These findings show that the growth-modifying properties of small model peptides may be scaled up to analyze mineralization processes that are mediated by more complex proteins. We suggest that enhancement of calcite growth may now be estimated a priori from the composition of peptide sequences and the calculated values of hydrophilicity and net molecular charge without need for detailed tests for each biomolecule. This insight may contribute to an improved understanding of mineralization in diverse systems of biomineralization.

  3. Multi-species sequence comparison reveals conservation of ghrelin gene-derived splice variants encoding a truncated ghrelin peptide.

    PubMed

    Seim, Inge; Jeffery, Penny L; Thomas, Patrick B; Walpole, Carina M; Maugham, Michelle; Fung, Jenny N T; Yap, Pei-Yi; O'Keeffe, Angela J; Lai, John; Whiteside, Eliza J; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2016-06-01

    The peptide hormone ghrelin is a potent orexigen produced predominantly in the stomach. It has a number of other biological actions, including roles in appetite stimulation, energy balance, the stimulation of growth hormone release and the regulation of cell proliferation. Recently, several ghrelin gene splice variants have been described. Here, we attempted to identify conserved alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene by cross-species sequence comparisons. We identified a novel human exon 2-deleted variant and provide preliminary evidence that this splice variant and in1-ghrelin encode a C-terminally truncated form of the ghrelin peptide, termed minighrelin. These variants are expressed in humans and mice, demonstrating conservation of alternative splicing spanning 90 million years. Minighrelin appears to have similar actions to full-length ghrelin, as treatment with exogenous minighrelin peptide stimulates appetite and feeding in mice. Forced expression of the exon 2-deleted preproghrelin variant mirrors the effect of the canonical preproghrelin, stimulating cell proliferation and migration in the PC3 prostate cancer cell line. This is the first study to characterise an exon 2-deleted preproghrelin variant and to demonstrate sequence conservation of ghrelin gene-derived splice variants that encode a truncated ghrelin peptide. This adds further impetus for studies into the alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene and the function of novel ghrelin peptides in vertebrates.

  4. Walker 256 Tumor Growth Suppression by Crotoxin Involves Formyl Peptide Receptors and Lipoxin A4

    PubMed Central

    Brigatte, Patrícia; Faiad, Odair Jorge; Ferreira Nocelli, Roberta Cornélio; Landgraf, Richardt G.; Palma, Mario Sergio; Cury, Yara; Curi, Rui; Sampaio, Sandra Coccuzzo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of Crotoxin (CTX), the main toxin of South American rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus) venom, on Walker 256 tumor growth, the pain symptoms associated (hyperalgesia and allodynia), and participation of endogenous lipoxin A4. Treatment with CTX (s.c.), daily, for 5 days reduced tumor growth at the 5th day after injection of Walker 256 carcinoma cells into the plantar surface of adult rat hind paw. This observation was associated with inhibition of new blood vessel formation and decrease in blood vessel diameter. The treatment with CTX raised plasma concentrations of lipoxin A4 and its natural analogue 15-epi-LXA4, an effect mediated by formyl peptide receptors (FPRs). In fact, the treatment with Boc-2, an inhibitor of FPRs, abolished the increase in plasma levels of these mediators triggered by CTX. The blockage of these receptors also abolished the inhibitory action of CTX on tumor growth and blood vessel formation and the decrease in blood vessel diameter. Together, the results herein presented demonstrate that CTX increases plasma concentrations of lipoxin A4 and 15-epi-LXA4, which might inhibit both tumor growth and formation of new vessels via FPRs. PMID:27190493

  5. Ethanol-induced alterations in the posttranslational processing, but not secretion of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in vitro.

    PubMed

    Uddin, S; Wilson, T; Emanuele, M A; Williams, D; Kelley, M R; Emanuele, N

    1996-05-01

    The effects of ethanol (EtOH) on the male hypothalamic pituitary reproductive axis are multiple and varied. Although direct gonadal toxicity has been reported, hypothalamic-pituitary perturbations have also been noted. The difficulty of sampling the hypothalamus has made direct investigation of EtOH-induced alterations on luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) fraught with interpretation problems. To circumvent this, we have conducted a series of experiments exploring the effect of 200 mg% EtOH in vitro on GT1-7 cells, a newly developed LHRH secreting neural cell line. Cell lines were treated with EtOH-containing or EtOH-free media for 2, 6, 24, or 48 hr. EtOH caused no significant change in LHRH secretion at any time point, although there was a trend to increased secretion after 2 hr EtOH exposure when compared with control. Significantly increased total (i.e., cellular plus secreted) pro-LHRH coupled with significantly reduced cellular LHRH after 6 hr only of EtOH exposure suggested that EtOH caused a transient decrease in processing from bioinactive pro-LHRH to bioactive LHRH. However, even at this time point, LHRH secretion from these EtOH-exposed cells was no different than from control cells. Steady-state LHRH mRNA levels were not changed by EtOH at any time point. These findings are concordant with previous in vitro data using hypothalamic tissue that has similarly demonstrated no effect of EtOH on LHRH secretion. Taken together with the in vivo demonstration that EtOH reduces hypothalamic-pituitary portal blood levels of LHRH, these data indicate that EtOH exerts its effect either at an extrahypothalamic locus and/or on non-LHRH-producing cells within the hypothalamus.

  6. Potentiation of the gonadotoxicity of Cytoxan in the dog by adjuvant treatment with a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist.

    PubMed

    Goodpasture, J C; Bergstrom, K; Vickery, B H

    1988-04-15

    This study evaluates the effect on spermatogenesis of coadministration of Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide) and nafarelin, a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist. Nafarelin causes complete aspermatogenesis in dogs by interrupting the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, which might protect against the testicular cytotoxicity associated with cyclophosphamide. The four treatment groups, each consisting of 2 mature male beagle dogs, were (a) no drug; (b) cyclophosphamide (p.o. 3x weekly for 43 and 48 wk for a total dose of 582 and 709 mg/kg, with dose varying according to weekly hematological profile); (c) nafarelin (2 micrograms/kg s.c. daily for 48 and 52 wk); and (d) cyclophosphamide plus nafarelin [same schedule as above with cyclophosphamide (570 and 698 mg/kg total dose) starting 7 wk after beginning nafarelin]. Plasma testosterone, spermatogenesis, and ejaculate volume were completely suppressed by nafarelin prior to starting cyclophosphamide. By 2 wk after cessation of treatment (posttreatment, PT), plasma testosterone reached normal levels, and at 5 wk PT ejaculates appeared which reached normal volumes 2 to 3 wk later. Normally motile ejaculated spermatozoa were noted at 6 to 8 wk PT in nafarelin-only-treated animals; normal sperm numbers were reached at 14 wk PT. The animals receiving cyclophosphamide plus nafarelin were azoospermic for the entire 65-wk PT period, and at 65 wk PT no germinal cells were found upon evaluation of testicular histology. Sperm numbers in cyclophosphamide-only-treated animals began to rise 10-11 wk PT and reached 150 x 10(6) sperm/ejaculate at approximately 65 wk PT (contemporaneous control dogs had sperm numbers of approximately 300-600 x 10(6)/ejaculate). Spermatogenesis in these cyclophosphamide-only-treated animals was normal in most seminiferous tubules at this time. The addition of nafarelin to cyclophosphamide treatment thus exacerbated the deleterious effects of cyclophosphamide on the testes, suggesting caution for use

  7. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogues--the rationale for adjuvant use in premenopausal women with early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jonat, W

    1998-09-01

    Current standard adjuvant therapies for early breast cancer include tamoxifen and chemotherapy, depending on the disease prognosis and menopausal status. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogues offer a different approach to the management of early breast cancer in pre- and perimenopausal women. The most widely studied LHRH analogue is goserelin. It acts on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis to suppress ovarian function, decreasing luteinizing hormone and oestradiol levels to post-menopausal values. Pooled data from 228 premenopausal and perimenopausal patients with advanced breast cancer enrolled in 29 studies worldwide demonstrated an objective response rate for goserelin, 3.6 mg, of 36.4%, with a median duration of response of 44 weeks. These results fall well within the ranges of reported response rates for ovarian ablation and for tamoxifen in similar patient populations. By virtue of its mode of action, goserelin does not stimulate the ovaries and is unlikely to have detrimental effects on the endometrium. In addition, given that goserelin has no oestrogen agonist-like effects, unlike tamoxifen, there is no potential for tumour stimulation in those patients becoming resistant to treatment. Goserelin is generally well tolerated, and the main side-effects are related to ovarian suppression, which is potentially reversible. Preliminary results in premenopausal women with early breast cancer indicate that endocrine treatment with goserelin plus tamoxifen may be as effective as standard combination chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide-methotrexate-5-fluorouracil), but has significantly less acute toxicity. A number of large, randomized trials are now in progress to assess the potential role of goserelin as adjuvant therapy for early breast cancer.

  8. Cu nanocrystal growth on peptide nanotubes by biomineralization: Size control of Cu nanocrystals by tuning peptide conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Ipsita A.; Yu, Lingtao; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2003-12-01

    With recent interest in seeking new biologically inspired device-fabrication methods in nanotechnology, a new biological approach was examined to fabricate Cu nanotubes by using sequenced histidine-rich peptide nanotubes as templates. The sequenced histidine-rich peptide molecules were assembled as nanotubes, and the biological recognition of the specific sequence toward Cu lead to efficient Cu coating on the nanotubes. Cu nanocrystals were uniformly coated on the histidine-incorporated nanotubes with high packing density. In addition, the diameter of Cu nanocrystal was controlled between 10 and 30 nm on the nanotube by controlling the conformation of histidine-rich peptide by means of pH changes. Those nanotubes showed significant change in electronic structure by varying the nanocrystal diameter; therefore, this system may be developed to a conductivity-tunable building block for microelectronics and biological sensors. This simple biomineralization method can be applied to fabricate various metallic and semiconductor nanotubes with peptides whose sequences are known to mineralize specific ions.

  9. La Crosse virus (LACV) Gc fusion peptide mutants have impaired growth and fusion phenotypes, but remain neurotoxic

    SciTech Connect

    Soldan, Samantha S.; Hollidge, Bradley S.; Wagner, Valentina; Weber, Friedemann; Gonzalez-Scarano, Francisco

    2010-09-01

    La Crosse virus is a leading cause of pediatric encephalitis in the Midwestern United States and an emerging pathogen in the American South. The LACV glycoprotein Gc plays a critical role in entry as the virus attachment protein. A 22 amino acid hydrophobic region within Gc (1066-1087) was recently identified as the LACV fusion peptide. To further define the role of Gc (1066-1087) in virus entry, fusion, and neuropathogenesis, a panel of recombinant LACV (rLACV) fusion peptide mutant viruses was generated. Replication of mutant rLACVs was significantly reduced. In addition, the fusion peptide mutants demonstrated decreased fusion phenotypes relative to LACV-WT. Interestingly, these viruses maintained their ability to cause neuronal loss in culture, suggesting that the fusion peptide of LACV Gc is a determinant of properties associated with neuroinvasion (growth to high titer in muscle cells and a robust fusion phenotype), but not necessarily of neurovirulence.

  10. Patterning nanofibrils through the templated growth of multiple modified amyloid peptides.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroki; Watanabe, Ken; Kudoh, Fuki; Kamada, Rui; Chuman, Yoshiro; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in the patterning of functionalized nanowires because of the potential applications of these materials to the construction of nanodevices. A variety of biomolecular building blocks containing amyloid peptides have been used to functionalize nanowires. However, the patterning of self-assembled nanowires can be challenging because of the difficulties associated with controlling the self-assembly of these functionalized building blocks. Herein, we present a versatile approach for the patterning of nanowires based on the combination of templated fibril growth with a versatile functionalization method using our structure-controllable amyloid peptides (SCAPs). Using this approach, we have succeeded in the formation of multi-type nanowires with tandem domain structures in high yields. Given that the mixing-SCAP method can lead to the formation of tandem fibrils, it is noteworthy that our method allowed us to control the initiation of fibril formation from the gold nanoparticles, which were attached to a short fibril as initiation points. This approach could be used to prepare a wide variety of fibril patterns, and therefore holds great potential for the development of novel self-assembled nanodevices. PMID:27559011

  11. Patterning nanofibrils through the templated growth of multiple modified amyloid peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Hiroki; Watanabe, Ken; Kudoh, Fuki; Kamada, Rui; Chuman, Yoshiro; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2016-08-01

    There has been considerable interest in the patterning of functionalized nanowires because of the potential applications of these materials to the construction of nanodevices. A variety of biomolecular building blocks containing amyloid peptides have been used to functionalize nanowires. However, the patterning of self-assembled nanowires can be challenging because of the difficulties associated with controlling the self-assembly of these functionalized building blocks. Herein, we present a versatile approach for the patterning of nanowires based on the combination of templated fibril growth with a versatile functionalization method using our structure-controllable amyloid peptides (SCAPs). Using this approach, we have succeeded in the formation of multi-type nanowires with tandem domain structures in high yields. Given that the mixing-SCAP method can lead to the formation of tandem fibrils, it is noteworthy that our method allowed us to control the initiation of fibril formation from the gold nanoparticles, which were attached to a short fibril as initiation points. This approach could be used to prepare a wide variety of fibril patterns, and therefore holds great potential for the development of novel self-assembled nanodevices.

  12. Patterning nanofibrils through the templated growth of multiple modified amyloid peptides

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Hiroki; Watanabe, Ken; Kudoh, Fuki; Kamada, Rui; Chuman, Yoshiro; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in the patterning of functionalized nanowires because of the potential applications of these materials to the construction of nanodevices. A variety of biomolecular building blocks containing amyloid peptides have been used to functionalize nanowires. However, the patterning of self-assembled nanowires can be challenging because of the difficulties associated with controlling the self-assembly of these functionalized building blocks. Herein, we present a versatile approach for the patterning of nanowires based on the combination of templated fibril growth with a versatile functionalization method using our structure-controllable amyloid peptides (SCAPs). Using this approach, we have succeeded in the formation of multi-type nanowires with tandem domain structures in high yields. Given that the mixing-SCAP method can lead to the formation of tandem fibrils, it is noteworthy that our method allowed us to control the initiation of fibril formation from the gold nanoparticles, which were attached to a short fibril as initiation points. This approach could be used to prepare a wide variety of fibril patterns, and therefore holds great potential for the development of novel self-assembled nanodevices. PMID:27559011

  13. Replica exchange molecular dynamics of the thermodynamics of fibril growth of Alzheimer's Aβ42 peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ming; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2011-08-01

    The growth of amyloid fibrils is studied by replica exchange molecular dynamics in an implicit solvent. Our data indicate that extremely long simulation times (at least a few hundred ns) are necessary to study the thermodynamics of fibril elongation in detail. However some aspects of the aggregation process are already accessible on the time scales available in the present study. A peak in the specific heat indicates a docking temperature of Tdock ≈ 320 K. Irreversible locking requires lower temperatures with the locking temperature estimated as Tlock ≈ 280 K. In our simulation the fibril grows from both sides with the C-terminal of the incoming monomer attaching to the C-terminal of the peptides in the fibril forming a β-sheet on the fibril edge. Our simulation indicates that the C-terminal is crucial for aggregation.

  14. Osteogenic growth peptide accelerates bone healing during distraction osteogenesis in rabbit tibia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Z-Y; Shao, L; Zhao, H-M; Zhong, Z-H; Liu, J-Y; Hao, C-G

    2011-01-01

    Distraction osteogenesis is a valuable treatment method that allows limb lengthening or reconstruction of large bone defects. However, its major disadvantage is the long period required for the consolidation of a distraction callus. Osteogenic growth peptide (OGP) stimulates endochondral bone formation in fracture callus, but its capacity to promote regenerate ossification during distraction osteogenesis has not been evaluated. This study investigated whether intravenously administered OGP accelerated bone healing during distraction osteogenesis in 36 male New Zealand White rabbits, randomized into two groups. The treatment group received OGP (200 ng/kg body weight) in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), intravenously, each day; the control group received PBS alone. A 15-mm lengthening of the right lower leg was performed using the method of Ilizarov. Evidence from biomechanical, histological and radiographic evaluations demonstrated that systemic OGP treatment promoted optimal new bone formation during distraction osteogenesis in this rabbit model.

  15. Simultaneous Inhibition of Key Growth Pathways in Melanoma Cells and Tumor Regression by a Designed Bidentate Constrained Helical Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Amlanjyoti; Mallick, Shampa; Ghosh, Piya; Maiti, Atanu; Ahmed, Israr; Bhattacharyya, Seemana; Mandal, Tapashi; Manna, Asit; Roy, Koushik; Singh, Sandeep; Nayak, Dipak Kumar; Wilder, Paul T.; Markowitz, Joseph; Weber, David J.; Ghosh, Mrinal K.; Chattopadhyay, Samit; Guha, Rajdeep; Konar, Aditya; Bandyopadhyay, Santu; Roy, Siddhartha

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are part of a large number of signaling networks and potential targets for drug development. However, discovering molecules that can specifically inhibit such interactions is a major challenge. S100B, a calcium-regulated protein, plays a crucial role in the proliferation of melanoma cells through protein-protein interactions. In this article, we report the design and development of a bidentate conformationally constrained peptide against dimeric S100B based on a natural tight binding peptide, TRTK-12. The helical conformation of the peptide was constrained by substitution of α-amino isobutyric acid----an amino acid having high helical propensity----in positions which do not interact with S100B. A branched bidentate version of the peptide, bound to S100B tightly with a dissociation constant of 8 nM. When conjugated to a cell penetrating peptide, it caused growth inhibition and rapid apoptosis in melanoma cells. The molecule exerts anti-proliferative action through simultaneous inhibition of key growth pathways including reactivation of wild-type p53 and inhibition of Akt and STAT-3 phosphorylation. The apoptosis induced by the bidentate constrained helix is caused by direct migration of p53 to mitochondria. At moderate intravenous dose, the peptide completely inhibits melanoma growth in a mouse model without any significant observable toxicity. The specificity was shown by lack of ability of a double mutant peptide to cause tumor regression at the same dose level. The methodology described here for direct protein-protein interaction inhibition may be effective for rapid development of inhibitors against relatively weak protein-protein interactions for de novo drug development. PMID:24839139

  16. Preparation and properties of nanometer silk fibroin peptide/polyvinyl alcohol blend films for cell growth.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qin; Chen, Zhongmin; Hao, Xuefei; Zhu, Qiangsong; Zhou, Yucheng

    2013-10-01

    Nanometer silk fibroin peptide (Nano-SFP) was prepared from silkworm cocoons through the process of dissolution, dialysis and enzymolysis. For comparison, silk fibroin was decomposed with α-chymotrypsin, trypsin and neutrase, respectively. From the SEM and particle size analysis results, the Nano-SFP prepared by neutrase was found to be the most desirable at about 50-200 nm. Nano-SFP/polyvinyl alcohol films (Nano-SFP/PVA) were prepared by blending Nano-SFP and PVA in water with different weight ratios of 10/90, 20/80, 30/70, and 40/60. The films were characterized by IR, SEM, TG, DSC and tensile strength test for investigating their structure, surface morphology, thermostability, and mechanical property. The results showed that Nano-SFP inserted in the PVA films with small linear particles, and Nano-SFP/PVA films exhibited smooth surface, good thermostability and tensile strength. The growth of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells on films with and without Nano-SFP was investigated with MTT colorimetric assay to assess the films' ability to promote cell growth. It was observed that the Nano-SFP improved cell adhesion on the film surface, and the ability of promoting cell growth increased with the increasing content of Nano-SFP in the blend films. Nano-SFP/PVA film with the ratio of 30/70 was concluded to have the best properties.

  17. Controlling the Growth and Catalytic Activity of Platinum Nanoparticles Using Peptide and Polymer Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Lauren Marie

    Heterogeneous catalysts have widespread industrial applications. Platinum nanomaterials in particular, due to their particularly high electrocatalytic activity and durability, are used to catalyze a wide variety of reactions, including oxygen reduction, which is frequently used as the cathode reaction in fuel cells. As platinum is a very expensive material, a high priority in fuel cell research is the exploration of less expensive, more efficient catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). We demonstrate here the use of phage display to identify peptides that bind to Pt (100) which were then used to synthesize platinum cubes in solution. However, while the peptides were able to control particle growth, the bio-synthesized Pt particles showed extremely poor activity when tested for ORR. This could be attributed to peptide coverage on the surface or strong interactions between particular amino acids and the metal that are detrimental for catalysis. To investigate this further, we decided to investigate the role of individual amino acids on Pt nanocrystal synthesis and catalysis. For this, we conjugated the R-groups of single amino acids to polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains. Through this work we have determined that the identity of the amino acid R-group is important in both the synthesis and the catalytic activity of the particles. For Pt nanoparticle synthesis, we found that the hydrophobicity of the functional groups affected their ability to interact well with the particles during nucleation and growth, and thus only the hydrophilic functional groups were capable of mediating the synthesis to produce well-defined faceted particles. With respect to ORR, we found distinct trends that showed that the inclusion of certain amino acids could significantly enhance catalysis---even at high polymer loadings. This work presents evidence that counters the common conception that organic capping ligands decrease catalytic activity; in fact activity may actually be

  18. Effects of guar gum and cellulose on glucose absorption, hormonal release and hepatic metabolism in the pig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, C. S.; Malmlof, K.

    1992-01-01

    Six Large White pigs (mean body-weight 59 (SE 1.7) kg) were surgically fitted with permanent catheters in the portal vein, the brachiocephalic artery and the right hepatic vein, as well as with electromagnetic flow probes around the portal vein and the hepatic artery, and allowed to recover. The non-anaesthetized animals were given a basal non-fibre diet (diet A) alone or together with 60 g guar gum/kg (diet B) or 150 g purified cellulose/kg (diet C) by substitution for mica. The diets were given for weekly periods and according to a replicated 3 x 3 Latin square design. On the last day of each such adaptation period, test meals of 800 g were given before blood sampling. Sampling was continued for 8 h. Guar gum strongly reduced glucose apparent absorption without changing the absorption and the hepatic uptake profiles. Production rates of insulin, gastric inhibitory polypeptide and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) were lowest after guar gum ingestion. However, the reductions in peripheral blood insulin levels caused by guar gum were not associated with a change in hepatic insulin extraction. IGF-1 appeared to be strongly secreted by the gut, whereas the liver had a net uptake of the peptide. Ingestion of guar gum increased the hepatic extraction coefficient of gut-produced IGF-1. Guar gum ingestion appeared also to decrease glucagon secretion. Cellulose at the level consumed had very few effects on the variables considered. It is suggested that the modulation of intestinal mechanisms by guar gum was sufficient to mediate the metabolic effects described.

  19. Preparation and characterization of luteinising-hormone releasing hormone nanoliposomal microbubbles specifically targeting ovarian cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinyi; Liu, Sisun; Zhu, Yuanfang; Zhang, Liping; Li, Wenjuan; Wang, Fen; Huang, Shuying

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to prepare luteinizing-hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) nanoliposomal microbubbles specifically targeting ovarian cancer cells. The lyophilization/sonication method was used to prepare non-targeting nanoliposomal microbubbles (N-N-Mbs). Using the biotin-avidin bridge method, conjugated LHRH antibodies to N-N-Mbs generated LHRH nanoliposomal microbubbles (LHRH-N-Mbs) specifically targeting ovarian cancer cells. The morphology and physicochemical properties of the microbubbles was detected using an optical microscope and zeta detector. The binding affinity between the secondary antibody and LHRH-N-Mbs or N-N-Mbs was determined by flow cytometry. The binding of LHRH-N-Mb to human ovarian cancer cells (OVCAR-3) was detected by light microscopy. The rounded and uniformly distributed N-N-Mbs and LHRH-N-Mbs were successfully generated. The particle size ranged from 295-468 nm with a mean of 360 nm for N-N-Mbs or 369-618 nm with a mean of 508 nm for LHRH-N-Mbs. There was a significant difference in size between the two groups (P<0.05), although the surface potential of the two microbubbles remained the same (-14.6 mV). Following being kept at room temperature for 14 days, no significant difference in the physicochemical properties of the LHRH-N-Mbs was detected compared with that of freshly prepared microbubbles. The secondary antibody binding rate of LHRH-N-Mbs and N-N-Mbs was 75.6 and 0.83%, respectively. Furthermore, the formation of a rosette-like structure surrounding OVCAR-3 cells was observed after the cells were incubated with LHRH-N-Mbs, whereas pre-incubation with LHRH antibody blocked this rosette formation. In conclusion, LHRH-N-Mbs specifically targeting ovarian cancer cells were successfully prepared through biotin-avidin mediation and the lyophilization/sonication method. The key feature of LHRH-N-Mbs is their small size, stability and high efficiency in targeting human OVCAR-3 cells in vitro. PMID:24805264

  20. Preparation and characterization of luteinising-hormone releasing hormone nanoliposomal microbubbles specifically targeting ovarian cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinyi; Liu, Sisun; Zhu, Yuanfang; Zhang, Liping; Li, Wenjuan; Wang, Fen; Huang, Shuying

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to prepare luteinizing-hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) nanoliposomal microbubbles specifically targeting ovarian cancer cells. The lyophilization/sonication method was used to prepare non-targeting nanoliposomal microbubbles (N-N-Mbs). Using the biotin-avidin bridge method, conjugated LHRH antibodies to N-N-Mbs generated LHRH nanoliposomal microbubbles (LHRH-N-Mbs) specifically targeting ovarian cancer cells. The morphology and physicochemical properties of the microbubbles was detected using an optical microscope and zeta detector. The binding affinity between the secondary antibody and LHRH-N-Mbs or N-N-Mbs was determined by flow cytometry. The binding of LHRH-N-Mb to human ovarian cancer cells (OVCAR-3) was detected by light microscopy. The rounded and uniformly distributed N-N-Mbs and LHRH-N-Mbs were successfully generated. The particle size ranged from 295-468 nm with a mean of 360 nm for N-N-Mbs or 369-618 nm with a mean of 508 nm for LHRH-N-Mbs. There was a significant difference in size between the two groups (P<0.05), although the surface potential of the two microbubbles remained the same (-14.6 mV). Following being kept at room temperature for 14 days, no significant difference in the physicochemical properties of the LHRH-N-Mbs was detected compared with that of freshly prepared microbubbles. The secondary antibody binding rate of LHRH-N-Mbs and N-N-Mbs was 75.6 and 0.83%, respectively. Furthermore, the formation of a rosette-like structure surrounding OVCAR-3 cells was observed after the cells were incubated with LHRH-N-Mbs, whereas pre-incubation with LHRH antibody blocked this rosette formation. In conclusion, LHRH-N-Mbs specifically targeting ovarian cancer cells were successfully prepared through biotin-avidin mediation and the lyophilization/sonication method. The key feature of LHRH-N-Mbs is their small size, stability and high efficiency in targeting human OVCAR-3 cells in vitro.

  1. Drug release and bone growth studies of antimicrobial peptide-loaded calcium phosphate coating on titanium.

    PubMed

    Kazemzadeh-Narbat, Mehdi; Noordin, Shahryar; Masri, Bassam A; Garbuz, Donald S; Duncan, Clive P; Hancock, Robert E W; Wang, Rizhi

    2012-07-01

    Preventing infection is one of the major challenges in total hip and joint arthroplasty. The main concerns of local drug delivery as a solution have been the evolution of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the potential inhibition of osseointegration caused by the delivery systems. This work investigated the in vitro drug release, antimicrobial performance, and cytotoxicity, as well as the in vivo bone growth of an antimicrobial peptide loaded into calcium phosphate coated Ti implants in a rabbit model. Two potent AMP candidates (HHC36: KRWWKWWRR, Tet213: KRWWKWWRRC) were first investigated through an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. MTT absorbance values revealed that HHC36 showed much lower cytotoxicity (minimal cytotoxic concentration 200 μg/mL) than Tet 213 (50 μg/mL). The AMP HHC36 loaded onto CaP (34.7 ± 4.2 μg/cm(2)) had a burst release during the first few hours followed by a slow and steady release for 7 days as measured spectrophotometrically. The CaP-AMP coatings were antimicrobial against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in colony-forming units (CFU) in vitro assays. No cytotoxicity was observed on CaP-AMP samples against MG-63 osteoblast-like cells after 5 days in vitro. In a trabecular bone growth in vivo study using cylindrical implants, loading of AMP HHC36 did not impair bone growth onto the implants. Significant bone on-growth was observed on CaP-coated Ti with or without HHC36 loading, as compared with Ti alone. The current AMP-CaP coating thus offers in vivo osteoconductivity to orthopedic implants. It also offers in vitro antimicrobial property, with its in vivo performance to be confirmed in future animal infection models.

  2. A peptide targeted against phosphoprotein and leader RNA interaction inhibits growth of Chandipura virus -- an emerging rhabdovirus.

    PubMed

    Roy, Arunava; Chakraborty, Prasenjit; Polley, Smarajit; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Roy, Siddhartha

    2013-11-01

    The fatal illness caused by Chandipura virus (CHPV), an emerging pathogen, presently lacks any therapeutic option. Previous research suggested that interaction between the virally encoded phosphoprotein (P) and the positive sense leader RNA (le-RNA) may play an important role in the viral lifecycle. In this report, we have identified a β-sheet/loop motif in the C-terminal domain of the CHPV P protein as essential for this interaction. A synthetic peptide encompassing this motif and spanning a continuous stretch of 36 amino acids (Pep208-243) was found to bind the le-RNA in vitro and inhibit CHPV growth in infected cells. Furthermore, a stretch of three amino acid residues at position 217-219 was identified as essential for this interaction, both in vitro and in infected cells. siRNA knockdown-rescue experiments demonstrated that these three amino acid residues are crucial for the leader RNA binding function of P protein in the CHPV life cycle. Mutations of these three amino acid residues render the peptide completely ineffective against CHPV. Effect of inhibition of phosphoprotein-leader RNA interaction on viral replication was assayed. Peptide Pep208-243 tagged with a cell penetrating peptide was found to inhibit CHPV replication as ascertained by real time RT-PCR. The specific inhibition of viral growth observed using this peptide suggests a new possibility for designing of anti-viral agents against Mononegavirale group of human viruses.

  3. Solution Structures, Dynamics, and Ice Growth Inhibitory Activity of Peptide Fragments Derived from an Antarctic Yeast Protein

    PubMed Central

    Asmawi, Azren A.; Rahman, Mohd Basyaruddin A.; Murad, Abdul Munir A.; Mahadi, Nor M.; Basri, Mahiran; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha A.; Salleh, Abu B.; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Tejo, Bimo A.; Bhunia, Anirban

    2012-01-01

    Exotic functions of antifreeze proteins (AFP) and antifreeze glycopeptides (AFGP) have recently been attracted with much interest to develop them as commercial products. AFPs and AFGPs inhibit ice crystal growth by lowering the water freezing point without changing the water melting point. Our group isolated the Antarctic yeast Glaciozyma antarctica that expresses antifreeze protein to assist it in its survival mechanism at sub-zero temperatures. The protein is unique and novel, indicated by its low sequence homology compared to those of other AFPs. We explore the structure-function relationship of G. antarctica AFP using various approaches ranging from protein structure prediction, peptide design and antifreeze activity assays, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies and molecular dynamics simulation. The predicted secondary structure of G. antarctica AFP shows several α-helices, assumed to be responsible for its antifreeze activity. We designed several peptide fragments derived from the amino acid sequences of α-helical regions of the parent AFP and they also showed substantial antifreeze activities, below that of the original AFP. The relationship between peptide structure and activity was explored by NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation. NMR results show that the antifreeze activity of the peptides correlates with their helicity and geometrical straightforwardness. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation also suggests that the activity of the designed peptides can be explained in terms of the structural rigidity/flexibility, i.e., the most active peptide demonstrates higher structural stability, lower flexibility than that of the other peptides with lower activities, and of lower rigidity. This report represents the first detailed report of downsizing a yeast AFP into its peptide fragments with measurable antifreeze activities. PMID:23209600

  4. Diversity of Arabidopsis Genes Encoding Precursors for Phytosulfokine, a Peptide Growth Factor1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Heping; Matsubayashi, Yoshikatsu; Nakamura, Kenzo; Sakagami, Youji

    2001-01-01

    Phytosulfokine-α (PSK-α), a unique plant peptide growth factor, was originally isolated from conditioned medium of asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) mesophyll cell cultures. PSK-α has several biological activities including promoting plant cell proliferation. Four genes that encode precursors of PSK-α have been identified from Arabidopsis. Analysis of cDNAs for two of these, AtPSK2 and AtPSK3, shows that both of these genes consist of two exons and one intron. The predicted precursors have N-terminal signal peptides and only a single PSK-α sequence located close to their carboxyl termini. Both precursors contain dibasic processing sites flanking PSK, analogous to animal and yeast prohormones. Although the PSK domain including the sequence of PSK-α and three amino acids preceding it are perfectly conserved, the precursors bear very limited similarity among Arabidopsis and rice (Oryza sativa), suggesting a new level of diversity among polypeptides that are processed into the same signaling molecule in plants, a scenario not found in animals and yeast. Unnatural [serine-4]PSK-β was found to be secreted by transgenic Arabidopsis cells expressing a mutant of either AtPSK2 or AtPSK3 cDNAs, suggesting that both AtPSK2 and AtPSK3 encode PSK-α precursors. AtPSK2 and AtPSK3 were expressed demonstrably not only in cultured cells but also in intact plants, suggesting that PSK-α may be essential for plant cell proliferation in vivo as well as in vitro. Overexpression of either precursor gene allowed the transgenic calli to grow twice as large as the controls. However, the transgenic cells expressing either antisense cDNA did not dramatically decrease mitogenic activity, suggesting that these two genes may act redundantly. PMID:11706167

  5. Growth phase and pH influence peptide signaling for competence development in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiang; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Kaspar, Justin; Zhou, Xuedong; Burne, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    The development of competence by the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans is mediated primarily through the alternative sigma factor ComX (SigX), which is under the control of multiple regulatory systems and activates the expression of genes involved in DNA uptake and recombination. Here we report that the induction of competence and competence gene expression by XIP (sigX-inducing peptide) and CSP (competence-stimulating peptide) is dependent on the growth phase and that environmental pH has a potent effect on the responses to XIP. A dramatic decline in comX and comS expression was observed in mid- and late-exponential-phase cells. XIP-mediated competence development and responses to XIP were optimal around a neutral pH, although mid-exponential-phase cells remained refractory to XIP treatment, and acidified late-exponential-phase cultures were resistant to killing by high concentrations of XIP. Changes in the expression of the genes for the oligopeptide permease (opp), which appears to be responsible for the internalization of XIP, could not entirely account for the behaviors observed. Interestingly, comS and comX expression was highly induced in response to endogenously overproduced XIP or ComS in mid-exponential-phase cells. In contrast to the effects of pH on XIP, competence induction and responses to CSP in complex medium were not affected by pH, although a decreased response to CSP in cells that had exited early-exponential phase was observed. Collectively, these results indicate that competence development may be highly sensitive to microenvironments within oral biofilms and that XIP and CSP signaling in biofilms could be spatially and temporally heterogeneous.

  6. Amyloid beta-peptide possesses a transforming growth factor-beta activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, S S; Huang, F W; Xu, J; Chen, S; Hsu, C Y; Huang, J S

    1998-10-16

    Amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) of 39-42 amino acid residues is a major constituent of Alzheimer's disease neurite plaques. Abeta aggregates (fibrils) are believed to be responsible for neuronal damage and dysfunction, as well as microglia and astrocyte activation in disease lesions by multiple mechanisms. Since Abeta aggregates possess the multiple valencies of an FAED motif (20th to 23rd amino acid residues), which resembles the putative transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) active site motif, we hypothesize that Abeta monomers and Abeta aggregates may function as TGF-beta antagonists and partial agonists, analogous to previously described monovalent and multivalent TGF-beta peptide antagonists and agonists (Huang, S. S., Liu, Q., Johnson, F. E., Konish, Y., and Huang, J. S. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 27155-27159). Here, we report that the Abeta monomer, Abeta-(1-40) and its fragment, containing the motif inhibit radiolabeled TGF-beta binding to cell-surface TGF-beta receptors in mink lung epithelial cells (Mv1Lu cells). Abeta-(1-40)-bovine serum albumin conjugate (Abeta-(1-40)-BSA), a multivalent synthetic analogue of Abeta aggregates, exhibited cytotoxicity toward bovine cerebral endothelial cells and rat post-mitotic differentiated hippocampal neuronal cells (H19-7 cells) and inhibitory activities of radiolabeled TGF-beta binding to TGF-beta receptors and TGF-beta-induced plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression, that were approximately 100-670 times more potent than those of Abeta-(1-40) monomers. At less than micromolar concentrations, Abeta-(1-40)-BSA but not Abeta-(1-40) monomers inhibited proliferation of Mv1Lu cells. Since TGF-beta is an organizer of responses to neurodegeneration and is also found in neurite plaques, the TGF-beta antagonist and partial agonist activities of Abeta monomers and aggregates may play an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  7. Combination of a long-acting delivery system for luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist with Novantrone chemotherapy: increased efficacy in the rat prostate cancer model.

    PubMed Central

    Schally, A V; Kook, A I; Monje, E; Redding, T W; Paz-Bouza, J I

    1986-01-01

    The combination of hormonal treatment based on a long-acting delivery system for the agonist [6-D-tryptophan]luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ([D-Trp6]-LH-RH) with the chemotherapeutic agent Novantrone (mitoxantrone dihydrochloride) was studied in the Dunning R3327H rat prostate cancer model. Microcapsules of [D-Trp6]-LH-RH formulated from poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) and calculated to release a controlled dose of 25 micrograms/day were injected intramuscularly once a month. Novantrone (0.25 mg/kg) was injected intravenously once every 3 weeks. Three separate experiments were carried out. When the therapy was started 45 days after transplantation and continued for 70 days, tumor volume in the presence of the microcapsules (966 +/- 219 mm3) or Novantrone (3606 +/- 785 mm3) given alone was significantly decreased compared to controls (14,476 +/- 3045 mm3). However, the combination of microcapsules and Novantrone caused a greater inhibition of tumor growth (189 +/- 31 mm3) than the single agents. Similar effects were seen when the percent increase in tumor volume was examined. Tumor volume increased 10,527 +/- 1803% for the control group. The inhibition of growth caused by the [D-Trp6]LH-RH microcapsules alone (672 +/- 153% increase in volume) was again greater than that caused by Novantrone alone (2722 +/- 421% increase). The combination of the two agents was again the most effective, resulting in an increase in tumor volume of only 105 +/- 29%. Control tumors weighed 30.0 +/- 6.5 g. Tumor weights were much less in the groups treated with either microcapsules (3.28 +/- 0.69 g) or Novantrone (19.53 +/- 3.3 g) alone. The lowest tumor weights after 70 days of treatment were obtained in the group that received the combination of [D-Trp6]LH-RH microcapsules and Novantrone (1.02 +/- 0.2 g). Testes and ventral prostate weights were significantly diminished by the administration of microcapsules of [D-Trp6]LH-RH alone or in combination with Novantrone. In both of these

  8. Enterococcus faecalis strains from food, environmental, and clinical origin produce ACE-inhibitory peptides and other bioactive peptides during growth in bovine skim milk.

    PubMed

    Gútiez, Loreto; Gómez-Sala, Beatriz; Recio, Isidra; del Campo, Rosa; Cintas, Luis M; Herranz, Carmen; Hernández, Pablo E

    2013-08-16

    Enterococcus faecalis isolates from food and environmental origin were evaluated for their angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity (ACE-IA) after growth in bovine skim milk (BSM). Most (90% active) but not all (10% inactive) E. faecalis strains produced BSM-derived hydrolysates with high ACE-IA. Known ACE-inhibitory peptides (ACE-IP) and an antioxidant peptide were identified in the E. faecalis hydrolysates by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (RP-HPLC-MS/MS). Antimicrobial activity against Pediococcus damnosus CECT4797 and Listeria ivanovii CECT913 was also observed in the E. faecalis hydrolysates. The incidence of virulence factors in the E. faecalis strains with ACE-IA and producers of ACE-IP was variable but less virulence factors were observed in the food and environmental strains than in the clinical reference strains. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) based analysis demonstrated that food and environmental E. faecalis strains were genetically different from those of clinical origin. When evaluated, most E. faecalis strains of clinical origin also originated BSM-derived hydrolysates with high ACE-IA due to the production of ACE-IP. Accordingly, the results of this work suggest that most E. faecalis strains of food, environmental and clinical origin produce BSM-derived bioactive peptides with human health connotations and potential biotechnological applications.

  9. Peptide growth factors in tracheal aspirates of mechanically ventilated preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Novak, Zuzana E

    2003-02-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF or FGF-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and endothelin-1 (ET-1) are peptide growth factors (PGF) mediating normal lung development, maturation, injury, and repair. These PGF may therefore be involved in the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). We hypothesized that elevated levels of these PGF in tracheal aspirates would be associated with a) BPD and/or death; b) markers of cell injury and apoptosis; and c) chorioamnionitis, a risk factor for BPD. Tracheal aspirates collected in 29 preterm (<34 wk gestation, 500-2000 g birth weight), mechanically ventilated infants on d 1 of life were assayed for PGF and histone-associated DNA fragments by ELISA and for LDH by enzyme assay. Clinical and pathologic examination was performed for chorioamnionitis. BPD was defined as oxygen requirement/mechanical ventilation at 28 d postnatal age. The birth weight (mean +/- SE) was 1009 +/- 85 g and median gestational age was 26 wk (range, 22-33). Eighteen infants died or developed BPD. bFGF levels were elevated in infants who died or developed BPD [median (25%,75%) level of 36 (23, 44) pg/mL versus 14 (6, 30) in the survivors without BPD, p = 0.01]. bFGF levels correlated with apoptosis (r = 0.73, p < 0.001) and LDH levels (r = 0.59, p < 0.001). VEGF and ET-1 levels were not associated with apoptosis or with BPD/death. PGF levels were not associated with chorioamnionitis. We conclude that elevated bFGF levels in the preterm trachea correlate with BPD/death and markers of cell injury and apoptosis but not with chorioamnionitis. We speculate that bFGF may play a role in the development of BPD.

  10. Imaging exocytosis of single glucagon-like peptide-1 containing granules in a murine enteroendocrine cell line with total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Aoyagi, Kyota; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Nakamichi, Yoko; Nishiwaki, Chiyono; Kawakami, Hayato; Nagamatsu, Shinya

    2009-12-04

    To analyze the exocytosis of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) granules, we imaged the motion of GLP-1 granules labeled with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (Venus) fused to human growth hormone (hGH-Venus) in an enteroendocrine cell line, STC-1 cells, by total internal reflection fluorescent (TIRF) microscopy. We found glucose stimulation caused biphasic GLP-1 granule exocytosis: during the first phase, fusion events occurred from two types of granules (previously docked granules and newcomers), and thereafter continuous fusion was observed mostly from newcomers during the second phase. Closely similar to the insulin granule fusion from pancreatic {beta} cells, the regulated biphasic exocytosis from two types of granules may be a common mechanism in glucose-evoked hormone release from endocrine cells.

  11. Imaging exocytosis of single glucagon-like peptide-1 containing granules in a murine enteroendocrine cell line with total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Aoyagi, Kyota; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Nakamichi, Yoko; Nishiwaki, Chiyono; Kawakami, Hayato; Nagamatsu, Shinya

    2009-12-01

    To analyze the exocytosis of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) granules, we imaged the motion of GLP-1 granules labeled with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (Venus) fused to human growth hormone (hGH-Venus) in an enteroendocrine cell line, STC-1 cells, by total internal reflection fluorescent (TIRF) microscopy. We found glucose stimulation caused biphasic GLP-1 granule exocytosis: during the first phase, fusion events occurred from two types of granules (previously docked granules and newcomers), and thereafter continuous fusion was observed mostly from newcomers during the second phase. Closely similar to the insulin granule fusion from pancreatic beta cells, the regulated biphasic exocytosis from two types of granules may be a common mechanism in glucose-evoked hormone release from endocrine cells.

  12. Levels of hormones and cytokines associated with growth in Honamlı and native hair goats.

    PubMed

    Devrim, A K; Elmaz, O; Mamak, N; Sudagidan, M

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to assess alterations of hormone and cytokine levels associated with growth period during puberty in Honamlı goats which were identified as a new goat breed and had one of the highest meat production potential among the other goat breeds in Turkey. Honamlı goats are originated from native hair goats, so parallel studies of sampling and analyzing were conducted also in native hair goats which have moderate meat production. Blood serum samples of Honamlı (n=90) and native hair goats (n=90) were obtained from the pure herds in Korkuteli and Ka districts of Anatolia. Concentrations of growth hormone (GH), myostatin (MSTN), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH), growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP), leptin, transforming growth factor-betal (TGF-β1) and vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) levels were measured by ELISA in each breed in the age groups of 4, 8 and 12 months. The present results indicate interesting correlations among the age groups and all the examined hormone and cytokine parameters exhibited significant (P<0.05 and P<0.001) differences. The parameters investigated were usually begun to increase after 4 months of age in the both breeds and sexes. Therefore, this paper supported the view that the beginning of hormonal alterations of goats could occur at 4th month of age. The results reported here emphasize the primary role played by GH, MSTN, IGF-1, leptin, GHRH, GHRP, TGF-βi and VEGF in the first year growth period of goats.

  13. Intracellular protein delivery activity of peptides derived from insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 3 and 5

    SciTech Connect

    Goda, Natsuko; Tenno, Takeshi; Inomata, Kosuke; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Toshiki; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2008-08-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) have various IGF-independent cellular activities, including receptor-independent cellular uptake followed by transcriptional regulation, although mechanisms of cellular entry remain unclear. Herein, we focused on their receptor-independent cellular entry mechanism in terms of protein transduction domain (PTD) activity, which is an emerging technique useful for clinical applications. The peptides of 18 amino acid residues derived from IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, which involve heparin-binding regions, mediated cellular delivery of an exogenous protein into NIH3T3 and HeLa cells. Relative protein delivery activities of IGFBP-3/5-derived peptides were approximately 20-150% compared to that of the HIV-Tat peptide, a potent PTD. Heparin inhibited the uptake of the fusion proteins with IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, indicating that the delivery pathway is heparin-dependent endocytosis, similar to that of HIV-Tat. The delivery of GST fused to HIV-Tat was competed by either IGFBP-3 or IGFBP-5-derived synthetic peptides. Therefore, the entry pathways of the three PTDs are shared. Our data has shown a new approach for designing protein delivery systems using IGFBP-3/5 derived peptides based on the molecular mechanisms of IGF-independent activities of IGFBPs.

  14. Mechano-growth factor peptide, the COOH terminus of unprocessed insulin-like growth factor 1, has no apparent effect on myoblasts or primary muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fornaro, Mara; Hinken, Aaron C; Needle, Saul; Hu, Erding; Trendelenburg, Anne-Ulrike; Mayer, Angelika; Rosenstiel, Antonia; Chang, Calvin; Meier, Viktor; Billin, Andrew N; Becherer, J David; Brace, Arthur D; Evans, William J; Glass, David J; Russell, Alan J

    2014-01-15

    A splice form of IGF-1, IGF-1Eb, is upregulated after exercise or injury. Physiological responses have been ascribed to the 24-amino acid COOH-terminal peptide that is cleaved from the NH3-terminal 70-amino acid mature IGF-1 protein. This COOH-terminal peptide was termed "mechano-growth factor" (MGF). Activities claimed for the MGF peptide included enhancing muscle satellite cell proliferation and delaying myoblast fusion. As such, MGF could represent a promising strategy to improve muscle regeneration. Thus, at our two pharmaceutical companies, we attempted to reproduce the claimed effect of MGF peptides on human and mouse muscle myoblast proliferation and differentiation in vitro. Concentrations of peptide up to 500 ng/ml failed to increase the proliferation of C2C12 cells or primary human skeletal muscle myoblasts. In contrast, all cell types exhibited a proliferative response to mature IGF-1 or full-length IGF-1Eb. MGF also failed to inhibit the differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes. To address whether the response to MGF was lost in these tissue culture lines, we measured proliferation and differentiation of primary mouse skeletal muscle stem cells exposed to MGF. This, too, failed to demonstrate a significant effect. Finally, we tested whether MGF could alter a separate documented in vitro effect of the peptide, activation of p-ERK, but not p-Akt, in cardiac myocytes. Although a robust response to IGF-1 was observed, there were no demonstrated activating responses from the native or a stabilized MGF peptide. These results call in to question whether there is a physiological role for MGF.

  15. Identification of the sAPRIL Binding Peptide and Its Growth Inhibition Effects in the Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Li, Jing; He, Mei-rong

    2015-01-01

    Background A proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) super family. It binds to its specific receptors and is involved in multiple processes during tumorigenesis and tumor cells proliferation. High levels of APRIL expression are closely correlated to the growth, metastasis, and 5-FU drug resistance of colorectal cancer. The aim of this study was to identify a specific APRIL binding peptide (BP) able to block APRIL activity that could be used as a potential treatment for colorectal cancer. Methods A phage display library was used to identify peptides that bound selectively to soluble recombinant human APRIL (sAPRIL). The peptides with the highest binding affinity for sAPRIL were identified using ELISA. The effects of sAPRIL-BP on cell proliferation and cell cycle/apoptosis in vitro were evaluated using the CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry, respectively. An in vivo mouse model of colorectal cancer was used to determine the anti-tumor efficacy of the sAPRIL-BP. Results Three candidate peptides were characterized from eight phage clones with high binding affinity for sAPRIL. The peptide with the highest affinity was selected for further characterization. The identified sAPRIL-BP suppressed tumor cell proliferation and cell cycle progression in LOVO cells in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo in a mouse colorectal challenge model, the sAPRIL-BP reduced the growth of tumor xenografts in nude mice by inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis intratumorally. Moreover, in an in vivo metastasis model, sAPRIL-BP reduced liver metastasis of colorectal cancer cells. Conclusions sAPRIL-BP significantly suppressed tumor growth in vitro and in vivo and might be a candidate for treating colorectal cancers that express high levels of APRIL. PMID:25826583

  16. Design and biological activity of epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted peptide doxorubicin conjugate.

    PubMed

    Fan, Mingliang; Yang, Danbo; Liang, Xiaofei; Ao, Junping; Li, Zonghai; Wang, Hongyang; Shi, Bizhi

    2015-03-01

    The nonspecific toxicity of anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) toward both tumor and normal cells can result in serious side effects, thereby limiting its clinical applications. In this wok, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antagonist peptide GE11 was introduced into DOX structure via a disulfide bond which can be cleaved by reduced glutathione (GSH). We have investigated the intracellular delivery and in vitro cytotoxicity of GE11-DOX conjugate and free DOX in high (SMMC-7721) and low (MCF-7) EGFR expressing cancer cell models. GE11-DOX accumulated at higher levels in SMMC-7721 cells than in MCF-7 cells, while the cellular uptake of free DOX was almost the same in both cells. Furthermore, pretreating with anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody reduced intracellular accumulation of GE11-DOX in SMMC-7721, indicating the involvement of EGFR pathway in the transport of conjugate. Our results suggest that GE11-DOX conjugate has the potential to be a therapeutic agent for treating EGFR overexpressing tumor.

  17. Regulation of growth-blocking peptide expression during embryogenesis of the cabbage army worm

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuzuki, Seiji; Sekiguchi, Shiroh; Hayakawa, Yoichi . E-mail: hayakayo@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2005-10-07

    Growth-blocking peptide (GBP) is an insect cytokine with diverse biological functions. Northern blot analysis revealed high heterogeneity in the size distribution of GBP mRNAs as well as in the tissues where they are detected. The s patio-temporal transcription pattern is dynamic, especially during embryogenesis. Gel shift assays demonstrated that the cabbage army worm embryo nuclear extract specifically binds to a 178-bp element, at position +234 to +411 from the transcription start site of the 1.3 kb GBP transcript, in which two Drosophila Deformed (DfD) binding sites are repeated in tandem. The specific binding between this element and Dfd was demonstrated using recombinant cabbage armyworm Dfd protein. Silencing the Dfd expression in embryos by treating with DfD double-stranded RNA did not reduce the expression level of GBP, but ectopic GBP expression was observed in the lateral region of the embryo, suggesting that DD could serve as a transcriptional repressor for the GBP gene.

  18. Neuroactive Peptides as Putative Mediators of Antiepileptic Ketogenic Diets

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Carmela; Marchiò, Maddalena; Timofeeva, Elena; Biagini, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Various ketogenic diet (KD) therapies, including classic KD, medium chain triglyceride administration, low glycemic index treatment, and a modified Atkins diet, have been suggested as useful in patients affected by pharmacoresistant epilepsy. A common goal of these approaches is to achieve an adequate decrease in the plasma glucose level combined with ketogenesis, in order to mimic the metabolic state of fasting. Although several metabolic hypotheses have been advanced to explain the anticonvulsant effect of KDs, including changes in the plasma levels of ketone bodies, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and brain pH, direct modulation of neurotransmitter release, especially purinergic (i.e., adenosine) and γ-aminobutyric acidergic neurotransmission, was also postulated. Neuropeptides and peptide hormones are potent modulators of synaptic activity, and their levels are regulated by metabolic states. This is the case for neuroactive peptides such as neuropeptide Y, galanin, cholecystokinin, and peptide hormones such as leptin, adiponectin, and growth hormone-releasing peptides (GHRPs). In particular, the GHRP ghrelin and its related peptide des-acyl ghrelin are well-known controllers of energy homeostasis, food intake, and lipid metabolism. Notably, ghrelin has also been shown to regulate the neuronal excitability and epileptic activation of neuronal networks. Several lines of evidence suggest that GHRPs are upregulated in response to starvation and, particularly, in patients affected by anorexia and cachexia, all conditions in which also ketone bodies are upregulated. Moreover, starvation and anorexia nervosa are accompanied by changes in other peptide hormones such as adiponectin, which has received less attention. Adipocytokines such as adiponectin have also been involved in modulating epileptic activity. Thus, neuroactive peptides whose plasma levels and activity change in the presence of ketogenesis might be potential candidates for elucidating the neurohormonal

  19. Identification and Evaluation of Cryoprotective Peptides from Chicken Collagen: Ice-Growth Inhibition Activity Compared to That of Type I Antifreeze Proteins in Sucrose Model Systems.

    PubMed

    Du, Lihui; Betti, Mirko

    2016-06-29

    The ability of chicken collagen peptides to inhibit the growth of ice crystals was evaluated and compared to that of fish antifreeze proteins (AFPs). This ice inhibition activity was assessed using a polarized microscope by measuring ice crystal dimensions in a sucrose model system with and without collagen peptides after seven thermal cycles. The system was stabilized at -25 °C and cycled between -16 and -12 °C. Five candidate peptides with ice inhibition activity were identified using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry and were then synthesized. Their ice inhibition capacity was compared to that of type I AFPs in a 23% sucrose model system. Specific collagen peptides with certain amino acid sequences reduced the extent of ice growth by approximately 70% at a relatively low concentration (1 mg/mL). These results suggest that specific collagen peptides may act in a noncolligative manner, inhibiting ice crystal growth like type I AFPs, but less efficiently. PMID:27293017

  20. Role of thymic peptides as transmitters between the neuroendocrine and immune systems.

    PubMed

    Dardenne, M

    1999-10-01

    Thymic peptides, a heterogenous family of polypeptidic hormones synthesized within the thymus, not only exert important regulatory effects within both the immune and neuroendocrine systems but are also themselves subject to control by hormones derived from the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) and other endocrine glands. Regarding thymic hormonal function, thymulin production is up-regulated by several hormones, including prolactin, growth hormone and thyroid hormones. Other aspects of the physiology of thymic epithelial cells can also be modulated by hormones and neuropeptides, particularly cytokeratin expression, cell growth and production of extracellular matrix proteins, thus characterizing the pleiotrophic action of these molecules on the thymic epithelium. Conversely, thymic-derived peptides also regulate hormone release from the HPA axis and may act directly on target endocrine glands of this axis, modulating gonadal tissues. In addition, it has recently been shown that thymulin can modulate some peripheral nervous sensory functions, including those related to sensitivity to pain. According to the dose given, thymulin induces or reduces hyperalgesia related to both mechanical and thermal nociceptors and thus represents an important interface between the immune, endocrine and nervous systems.

  1. Fibroblast Growth Factor-Peptide Improves Barrier Function and Proliferation in Human Keratinocytes After Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Kunzhong; Tian Yeping; Yin Liangjie; Zhang Mei; Beck, Lisa A.; Zhang, Bingrong; Okunieff, Paul; Zhang Lurong; Vidyasagar, Sadasivan

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Epidermal keratinocytes, which can be severely damaged after ionizing radiation (IR), are rapid turnover cells that function as a barrier, protecting the host from pathogenic invasion and fluid loss. We tested fibroblast growth factor-peptide (FGF-P), a small peptide derived from the receptor-binding domain of FGF-2, as a potential mitigator of radiation effects via proliferation and the barrier function of keratinocytes. Methods and Materials: Keratinocytes isolated from neonatal foreskin were grown on transwells. After being exposed to 0, 5, or 10 Gy IR, the cells were treated with a vehicle or FGF-P. The permeability of IR cells was assessed by using transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and a paracellular tracer flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) with Ussing chambers. The cell proliferation was measured with yellow tetrazolium salt (MTT) and tritiated thymidine ([{sup 3}H]-TdR) assays. The phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) was measured in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA)-like assay, and the proteins related to tight junctions (TJ) and adherens junctions (AJ) were examined with Western blotting. We used a mouse model to assess the ability of FGF-P to promote the healing of skin {beta} burns created with a strontium applicator. Results: We found (1) FGF-P reduced the permeability of irradiated keratinocytes, as evidenced by increased TEER and decreased diffusion of FITC-BSA, both associated with the regulation of different proteins and levels of TJ and AJ; and (2) FGF-P enhanced the proliferation of irradiated keratinocytes, as evidenced by increased MTT activity and [{sup 3}H]-TdR incorporation, which was associated with activation of the ERK pathway; and (3) FGF-P promoted the healing of skin {beta} burns. Conclusions: FGF-P enhances the barrier function, including up-regulation of TJ proteins, increases proliferation of human keratinocytes, and accelerates the

  2. Multiple biological activities for two peptides derived from the nerve growth factor precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Dicou, Eleni . E-mail: dicou@ipmc.cnrs.fr

    2006-09-01

    ProNGF can be cleaved proteolytically at dibasic residues and liberates two other peptides beside NGF, LIP1 a 29 amino acid (aa) peptide and LIP2 a 38 aa peptide. These peptides were found present in the rat intestine and shown to induce rapid phosphorylation of the Trk receptor in cell lines. The present study describes several novel biological properties for these peptides. They exert an anti-proliferative effect on the mitogenic activity of estrogen and IGF in MCF-7 cells. They protect against in vivo induction of excitotoxic lesions by the glutamatergic analogue ibotenate injected into the developing mouse brain and against in vitro NMDA-induced cell death in primary neuronal cultures. They bind to murine microglial cells and induce phosphorylation of Akt. These results suggest a role for LIP1 and LIP2 in cell survival.

  3. Thiol-Disulfide Exchange in Peptides Derived from Human Growth Hormone during Lyophilization and Storage in the Solid State

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekhar, Saradha; Topp, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Lyophilization (freeze-drying) is frequently used to stabilize protein therapeutics. However, covalent modifications such as thiol-disulfide exchange and disulfide scrambling can occur even in the solid state. The effects of lyophilization and storage of lyophilized powders on the mechanism and kinetics of thioldisulfide exchange have not been elucidated and are explored here. Reaction kinetics were monitored in peptides corresponding to tryptic fragments of human growth hormone (T20 + T20-T21 or T20 + cT20-T21) during different stages of lyophilization and during storage of the lyophilized powders at 22 °C and ambient RH. The concentrations of reactants and products were determined using RP-HPLC and product identity confirmed using LC-MS. Loss of native disulfide was observed for the reaction of T20 with both linear (T20-T21) and cyclic (cT20-T21) peptides during the primary drying step, however, the native disulfides were regenerated during secondary drying with no further change till the end of lyophilization. Deviations from Arrhenius parameters predicted from solution studies and the absence of buffer effects during lyophilization suggest that factors such as temperature, initial peptide concentration, buffer type and concentration do not influence thiol-disulfide exchange during lyophilization. Results from a ‘cold finger’ method used to study peptide adsorption to ice indicate that there is no preferential adsorption to the ice surface and that its presence may not influence disulfide reactivity during primary drying. Overall, reaction rates and product distribution differ for the reaction of T20 with T20-T21 or cT20-T21 in the solid state and aqueous solution, while the mechanism of thiol-disulfide remains unchanged. Increased reactivity of the cyclic peptide in the solid state suggests that peptide cyclization does not offer protection against lyophilization and that damage induced by a process stress further affects storage stability at 22 °C and

  4. A novel nanoparticle containing neuritin peptide with grp170 induces a CTL response to inhibit tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bangqing; Shen, Hanchao; Su, Tonggang; Lin, Li; Chen, Ting; Yang, Zhao

    2015-10-01

    Malignant glioma is among the most challenging of all cancers to treat successfully. Despite recent advances in surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, current treatment regimens have only a marginal impact on patient survival. In this study, we constructed a novel nanoparticle containing neuritin peptide with grp170. The nanoparticle could elicit a neuritin-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response to lyse glioma cells in vitro. In addition, the nanoparticle could inhibit tumor growth and improve the lifespan of tumor-bearing mice in vivo. Taken together, the results demonstrated that the nanoparticle can inhibit tumor growth and represents a promising therapy for glioma. PMID:26290143

  5. Growth of Streptococcus mutans in Biofilms Alters Peptide Signaling at the Sub-population Level

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Robert C.; Burne, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans activates multiple cellular processes in response to the formation of a complex between comX-inducing peptide (XIP) and the ComR transcriptional regulator. Bulk phase and microfluidic experiments previously revealed that ComR-dependent activation of comX is altered by pH and by carbohydrate source. Biofilm formation is a major factor in bacterial survival and virulence in the oral cavity. Here, we sought to determine the response of S. mutans biofilm cells to XIP during different stages of biofilm maturation. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, we showed that exogenous addition of XIP to early biofilms resulted in robust comX activation. However, as the biofilms matured, increasing amounts of XIP were required to activate comX expression. Single-cell analysis demonstrated that the entire population was responding to XIP with activation of comX in early biofilms, but only a sub-population was responding in mature biofilms. The sub-population response of mature biofilms was retained when the cells were dispersed and then treated with XIP. The proportion and intensity of the bi-modal response of mature biofilm cells was altered in mutants lacking the Type II toxins MazF and RelE, or in a strain lacking the (p)ppGpp synthase/hydrolase RelA. Thus, competence signaling is markedly altered in cells growing in mature biofilms, and pathways that control cell death and growth/survival decisions modulate activation of comX expression in these sessile populations. PMID:27471495

  6. Biomimetic and Aggregation-Driven Crystallization Route for Room-Temperature Material Synthesis: Growth of β-Ga2O3 Nanoparticles Using Peptide Assemblies as Nanoreactors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Yup; Gao, Xueyun; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    The room temperature synthesis of β-Ga2O3 nanocrystal was examined by coupling two biomimetic crystallization techniques, the enzymatic peptide nano-assembly templating and the aggregation-driven crystallization. The catalytic template of peptide assembly nucleated and mineralized primary β-Ga2O3 crystals, and then fused them to grow single-crystalline and monodisperse nanoparticles in the cavity of the peptide assembly at room temperature. In this work, the peptide assembly was exploited as a nano-reactor with an enzymatic functionality catalyzing the hydrolysis of gallium precursors. In addition, the characteristic ring-structure of peptide assembly is expected to provide an efficient dehydration pathway and the crystallization control over the surface tension, which are advantageous for the β-Ga2O3 crystal growth. This multifunctional peptide assembly could be applied for syntheses of a variety of nanomaterials that are kinetically difficult to grow at room temperature. PMID:17302413

  7. Recombinant vascular basement-membrane-derived multifunctional peptide inhibits angiogenesis and growth of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, You-Hua; Cao, Jian-Guo; Xiang, Hong-Lin; Xia, Hong; Qin, Yong; Huang, A-Ji; Xiao, Di; Xu, Fang

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor activities of recombinant vascular basement membrane-derived multifunctional peptide (rVBMDMP) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: HepG2, Bel-7402, Hep-3B, HUVE-12 and L-02 cell lines were cultured in vitro and the inhibitory effect of rVBMDMP on proliferation of cells was detected by MTT assay. The in vivo antitumor efficacy of rVBMDMP on HCC was assessed by HepG2 xenografts in nude mice. Distribution of rVBMDMP, mechanism by which the growth of HepG2 xenografts is inhibited, and microvessel area were observed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and CD31 immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: MTT assay showed that rVBMDMP markedly inhibited the proliferation of human HCC (HepG2, Bel-7402, Hep-3B) cells and human umbilical vein endothelial (HUVE-12) cells in a dose-dependent manner, with little effect on the growth of L-02 cells. When the IC50 was 4.68, 7.65, 8.96, 11.65 and 64.82 μmol/L, respectively, the potency of rVBMDMP to HepG2 cells was similar to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) with an IC50 of 4.59 μmol/L. The selective index of cytotoxicity to HepG2 cells of rVBMDMP was 13.8 (64.82/4.68), which was higher than that of 5-FU [SI was 1.9 (8.94/4.59)]. The VEGF-targeted recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody bevacizumab (100 mg/L) did not affect the proliferation of HepG2, Bel-7402, Hep-3B and L-02 cells, but the growth inhibitory rate of bevacizumab (100 mg/L) to HUVE-12 cells was 87.6% ± 8.2%. Alternis diebus intraperitoneal injection of rVBMDMP suppressed the growth of HepG2 xenografts in a dose-dependent manner. rVBMDMP (1, 3, 10 mg/kg) decreased the tumor weight by 12.6%, 55.9% and 79.7%, respectively, compared with the vehicle control. Immunohistochemical staining of rVBMDMP showed that the positive area rates (2.2% ± 0.73%, 4.5% ± 1.3% and 11.5% ± 3.8%) in rVBMDMP treated group (1, 3, 10 mg/kg) were significantly higher than that (0.13% ± 0.04%) in the control group (P < 0.01). The positive

  8. Effects of chytrid and carbaryl exposure on survival, growth and skin peptide defenses in foothill yellow-legged frogs.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Carlos; Benard, Michael F; Shaffer, H Bradley; Parker, John M; O'Leary, Chadrick; Conlon, J Michael; Rollins-Smith, Louise A

    2007-03-01

    Environmental contaminants and disease may synergistically contribute to amphibian population declines. Sub-lethal levels of contaminants can suppress amphibian immune defenses and, thereby, may facilitate disease outbreaks. We conducted laboratory experiments on newly metamorphosed foothill yellow-legged frogs (Rana boylii) to determine whether sublethal exposure to the pesticide carbaryl would increase susceptibility to the pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis that is widely associated with amphibian declines. We examined the effect of carbaryl alone, chytrid alone, and interactions of the two on individual survival, growth, and antimicrobial skin defenses. We found no effect of chytrid, carbaryl, or their interaction on survival. However, chytrid infection reduced growth by approximately one-half. This is the first report of suppressed growth in post-metamorphic amphibians due to infection with chytrid. Rana boylii skin peptides strongly inhibited chytrid growth in vitro, which may explain why chytrid exposure did not result in significant mortality. Skin peptide defenses were significantly reduced after exposure to carbaryl suggesting that pesticides may inhibit this innate immune defense and increase susceptibility to disease.

  9. A pool of peptides extracted from wheat bud chromatin inhibits tumor cell growth by causing defective DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We previously reported that a pool of low molecular weight peptides can be extracted by alkali treatment of DNA preparations obtained from prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells after intensive deproteinization. This class of peptides, isolated from wheat bud chromatin, induces growth inhibition, DNA damage, G2 checkpoint activation and apoptosis in HeLa cells. In this work we studied their mechanism of action by investigating their ability to interfere with DNA synthesis. Methods BrdUrd comet assays were used to detect DNA replication defects during S phase. DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and DNA damage response pathway activation were assessed using 3H-thymidine incorporation, DNA flow cytometry and Western blotting, respectively. Results BrdUrd labelling close to DNA strand discontinuities (comet tails) detects the number of active replicons. This number was significantly higher in treated cells (compared to controls) from entry until mid S phase, but markedly lower in late S phase, indicating the occurrence of defective DNA synthesis. In mid S phase the treated cells showed less 3H-thymidine incorporation with respect to the controls, which supports an early arrest of DNA synthesis. DNA damage response activation was also shown in both p53-defective HeLa cells and p53-proficient U2OS cells by the detection of the phosphorylated form of H2AX after peptide treatment. These events were accompanied in both cell lines by an increase in p21 levels and, in U2OS cells, of phospho-p53 (Ser15) levels. At 24 h of recovery after peptide treatment the cell cycle phase distribution was similar to that seen in controls and CDK1 kinase accumulation was not detected. Conclusion The data reported here show that the antiproliferative effect exhibited by these chromatin peptides results from their ability to induce genomic stress during DNA synthesis. This effect seems to be S-phase specific since surviving cells are able to progress through their

  10. Brain monoamines and peptides: role in the control of eating behavior.

    PubMed

    Leibowitz, S F

    1986-04-01

    Studies of brain monoamines and neuropeptides have provided extensive evidence in support of their role in the control of normal eating behavior. In this process, the medial and lateral portions of the hypothalamus, working in conjunction with forebrain and hindbrain sites and with peripheral autonomic-endocrine systems, have a critical responsibility in balancing signals for hunger and satiety. Via its rich and biologically active neurotransmitter substances, the hypothalamus monitors and integrates the complex sensory and metabolic input concerning the nutritional status of the organism and transduces this information into appropriate quantitative and qualitative adjustments in food intake. The specific neurotransmitters for which there is the most extensive evidence for a physiological function include the eating-stimulatory substances norepinephrine (alpha 2), opioid peptides, pancreatic polypeptides, growth hormone-releasing factor, and gamma-aminobutyric acid; the eating-inhibitory substances dopamine, epinephrine, serotonin, cholecystokinin, neurotensin, calcitonin, glucagon, and corticotropin-releasing factor; and possibly other gut-brain peptides. From biochemical, pharmacological, and anatomical studies, hypotheses have been generated to explain the role of these various monoamines and neuropeptides in controlling total energy intake, in determining the amount and pattern of macronutrient selection, and in maintaining normal energy and nutrient stores under fluctuating conditions within the external environment.

  11. [Effects of castration and testosterone-replacement on hypothalamic and plasma luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone levels in the aged male rat].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z J; Ren, H M; Hu, H T; Ling, F D

    1992-06-01

    Hypothalamic and plasma luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) levels following orchidectomy (ORDX) and testosterone (T)-replacement were compared between young (2-3 months old) and aged (24-26 months old) male rats by radioimmunoassay. Plasma T level and hypothalamic LHRH content are markedly decreased in the aged rat as compared to those of the young rat, whereas plasma LHRH levels are similar in the two groups. Following ORDX and ORDX plus T-replacement, plasma T levels in both groups are about the same, whereas the rates of variation of hypothalamic and plasma LHRH levels in the aged rat are significantly lower than those in the young rat. These results suggest that the negative feedback mechanism of the hypothalamic LHRHergic system is impaired in the aged rat, which may be one of the important reasons causing age-dependent deterioration of the functional control of hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis.

  12. In vitro effect of. Delta. sup 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol to stimulate somatostatin release and block that of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone by suppression of the release of prostaglandin E sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Rettori, V.; Aguila, M.C.; McCann, S.M. ); Gimeno, M.F.; Franchi, A.M. )

    1990-12-01

    Previous in vivo studies have shown that {Delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the principal active ingredient in marijuana, can suppress both luteinizing hormone (LH) and growth hormone (GH) secretion after its injection into the third ventricle of conscious male rats. The present studies were deigned to determine the mechanism of these effects. Various doses of THC were incubated with either stalk median eminence fragments (MEs) or mediobasal hypothalamic (MBH) fragments in vitro. Although THC (10 nM) did not alter basal release of LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) from MEs in vitro, it completely blocked the stimulatory action of dopamine or nonrepinephrine on LHRH release. The effective doses to block LHRH release were associated with a blockade of synthesis and release of prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) from MBH in vitro. In contrast to the suppressive effect of THC on LHRH release, somatostatin release from MEs was enhanced in a dose-related manner with a minimal effective dose of 1 nM. Since PGE{sub 2} suppresses somatostatin release, this enhancement may also be related to the suppressive effect of THC on PGE{sub 2} synthesis and release. The authors speculate that these actions are mediated by the recently discovered THC receptors in the tissue. The results indicate that the suppressive effect of THC on LH release is mediated by a blockade of LHRH release, whereas the suppressive effect of the compound on growth hormone release is mediated, at least in part, by a stimulation of somatostatin release.

  13. Norcocaine is a potent modulator of haemodynamic responses, plasma catecholamines and cardiac hormone release in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Mahlakaarto, J; Ruskoaho, H; Huttunen, P; MacDonald, E; Pasanen, M

    1998-07-01

    We examined the effects of intravenously administered cocaine and norcocaine on the haemodynamics, the plasma immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), the N-terminal peptide of proANP (NT-ANP) and the plasma catecholamine levels in conscious, chronically cannulated Sprague-Dawley rats. Cocaine caused an immediate significant peak rise in the mean arterial pressure which was followed by a dose-dependent sustained pressor response. Cocaine also decreased the heart rate and increased the right atrial pressure. Norcocaine at a dose of 1 mg/kg maximally decreased the heart rate which did not recover to the basal level within 15 min. Norcocaine (1 mg/kg) did not affect the right atrial pressure but with a dose of 3 mg/kg an elevation of 2.2 +/- 0.3 mmHg (P < 0.005) was observed which did not recover to the control level during the 30 min study period. Plasma immunoreactive ANP and NT-ANP levels increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner after the injection of cocaine. Norcocaine treatments also resulted in significant correlations between ANP or NT-ANP levels and haemodynamic variables, especially between the right atrial pressure and the plasma immunoreactive ANP levels (r = 0.58, n = 28, P < 0.005). Cocaine and norcocaine enhanced the plasma adrenaline levels but norcocaine, already at a dose of 1 mg/kg, caused a maximal increase in the plasma adrenaline levels. The long lasting increase in the right atrial pressure after norcocaine and the decrease in the heart rate after higher doses of cocaine suggest the role for this metabolite, or a further metabolite of norcocaine, in the cardiovascular and haemodynamic responses to cocaine seen in conscious rats.

  14. Forced Trefoil Factor Family Peptide 3 (TFF3) Expression Reduces Growth, Viability, and Tumorigenicity of Human Retinoblastoma Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Große-Kreul, Jan; Busch, Maike; Winter, Claudia; Pikos, Stefanie; Stephan, Harald; Dünker, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides have been shown to effect cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion of normal cells and various cancer cell lines. In the literature TFF peptides are controversially discussed as tumor suppressors and potential tumor progression factors. In the study presented, we investigated the effect of TFF3 overexpression on growth, viability, migration and tumorigenicity of the human retinoblastoma cell lines Y-79, WERI-Rb1, RBL-13 and RBL-15. As revealed by WST-1 and TUNEL assays as well as DAPI and BrdU cell counts, recombinant human TFF3 significantly lowers retinoblastoma cell viability and increases apoptosis levels. Transient TFF3 overexpression likewise significantly increases RB cell apoptosis. Stable, lentiviral TFF3 overexpression lowers retinoblastoma cell viability, proliferation and growth and significantly increases cell death in retinoblastoma cells. Blockage experiments using a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor and capase-3 immunocytochemistry revealed the involvement of caspases in general and of caspase-3 in particular in TFF3 induced apoptosis in retinoblastoma cell lines. Soft agarose and in ovo chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays revealed that TFF3 overexpression influences anchorage independent growth and significantly decreases the size of tumors forming from retinoblastoma cells. Our study demonstrates that forced TFF3 expression exerts a significant pro-apoptotic, anti-proliferative, and tumor suppressive effect in retinoblastoma cells, setting a starting point for new additive chemotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of retinoblastoma. PMID:27626280

  15. Forced Trefoil Factor Family Peptide 3 (TFF3) Expression Reduces Growth, Viability, and Tumorigenicity of Human Retinoblastoma Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Große-Kreul, Jan; Busch, Maike; Winter, Claudia; Pikos, Stefanie; Stephan, Harald; Dünker, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides have been shown to effect cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion of normal cells and various cancer cell lines. In the literature TFF peptides are controversially discussed as tumor suppressors and potential tumor progression factors. In the study presented, we investigated the effect of TFF3 overexpression on growth, viability, migration and tumorigenicity of the human retinoblastoma cell lines Y-79, WERI-Rb1, RBL-13 and RBL-15. As revealed by WST-1 and TUNEL assays as well as DAPI and BrdU cell counts, recombinant human TFF3 significantly lowers retinoblastoma cell viability and increases apoptosis levels. Transient TFF3 overexpression likewise significantly increases RB cell apoptosis. Stable, lentiviral TFF3 overexpression lowers retinoblastoma cell viability, proliferation and growth and significantly increases cell death in retinoblastoma cells. Blockage experiments using a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor and capase-3 immunocytochemistry revealed the involvement of caspases in general and of caspase-3 in particular in TFF3 induced apoptosis in retinoblastoma cell lines. Soft agarose and in ovo chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays revealed that TFF3 overexpression influences anchorage independent growth and significantly decreases the size of tumors forming from retinoblastoma cells. Our study demonstrates that forced TFF3 expression exerts a significant pro-apoptotic, anti-proliferative, and tumor suppressive effect in retinoblastoma cells, setting a starting point for new additive chemotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of retinoblastoma.

  16. Forced Trefoil Factor Family Peptide 3 (TFF3) Expression Reduces Growth, Viability, and Tumorigenicity of Human Retinoblastoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Claudia; Pikos, Stefanie; Stephan, Harald; Dünker, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides have been shown to effect cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion of normal cells and various cancer cell lines. In the literature TFF peptides are controversially discussed as tumor suppressors and potential tumor progression factors. In the study presented, we investigated the effect of TFF3 overexpression on growth, viability, migration and tumorigenicity of the human retinoblastoma cell lines Y-79, WERI-Rb1, RBL-13 and RBL-15. As revealed by WST-1 and TUNEL assays as well as DAPI and BrdU cell counts, recombinant human TFF3 significantly lowers retinoblastoma cell viability and increases apoptosis levels. Transient TFF3 overexpression likewise significantly increases RB cell apoptosis. Stable, lentiviral TFF3 overexpression lowers retinoblastoma cell viability, proliferation and growth and significantly increases cell death in retinoblastoma cells. Blockage experiments using a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor and capase-3 immunocytochemistry revealed the involvement of caspases in general and of caspase-3 in particular in TFF3 induced apoptosis in retinoblastoma cell lines. Soft agarose and in ovo chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays revealed that TFF3 overexpression influences anchorage independent growth and significantly decreases the size of tumors forming from retinoblastoma cells. Our study demonstrates that forced TFF3 expression exerts a significant pro-apoptotic, anti-proliferative, and tumor suppressive effect in retinoblastoma cells, setting a starting point for new additive chemotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of retinoblastoma. PMID:27626280

  17. Metabolic Effects of a Growth Hormone-Releasing Factor in Obese Subjects with Reduced Growth Hormone Secretion: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Makimura, Hideo; Feldpausch, Meghan N.; Rope, Alison M.; Hemphill, Linda C.; Torriani, Martin; Lee, Hang

    2012-01-01

    Context: Obesity is associated with reduced GH secretion and increased cardiovascular disease risk. Objective: We performed this study to determine the effects of augmenting endogenous GH secretion on body composition and cardiovascular disease risk indices in obese subjects with reduced GH secretion. Design, Patients and Methods: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was performed involving 60 abdominally obese subjects with reduced GH secretion. Subjects received tesamorelin, a GHRH1–44 analog, 2 mg once daily, or placebo for 12 months. Abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT) was assessed by abdominal computed tomography scan, and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) was assessed by ultrasound. Treatment effect was determined by longitudinal linear mixed-effects modeling. Results: VAT [−16 ± 9 vs.19 ± 9 cm2, tesamorelin vs. placebo; treatment effect (95% confidence interval): −35 (−58, −12) cm2; P = 0.003], cIMT (−0.03 ± 0.01 vs. 0.01 ± 0.01 mm; −0.04 (−0.07, −0.01) mm; P = 0.02), log C-reactive protein (−0.17 ± 0.04 vs. −0.03 ± 0.05 mg/liter; −0.15 (−0.30, −0.01) mg/liter, P = 0.04), and triglycerides (−26 ± 16 vs. 12 ± 8 mg/dl; −37 (−67, −7) mg/dl; P = 0.02) improved significantly in the tesamorelin group vs. placebo. No significant effects on abdominal sc adipose tissue (−6 ± 6 vs. 3 ± 11 cm2; −10 (−32, +13) cm2; P = 0.40) were seen. IGF-I increased (86 ± 21 vs. −6 ± 8 μg/liter; 92 (+52, +132) μg/liter; P < 0.0001). No changes in fasting, 2-h glucose, or glycated hemoglobin were seen. There were no serious adverse events or differences in adverse events between the groups. Conclusion: Among obese subjects with relative reductions in GH, tesamorelin selectively reduces VAT without significant effects on sc adipose tissue and improves triglycerides, C-reactive protein, and cIMT, without aggravating glucose. PMID:23015655

  18. Failure of growth hormone-suppressing agents to affect TSH-releasing hormone- and LH-releasing hormone-induced growth hormone release in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, K; Obara, T

    1977-01-01

    In patients with acromegaly whose basal plasma GH levels were suppressed with 9 mg/day of dexamethasone for 2 days, TRH-(6 cases) and LHRH-(1 case) induced GH release were unaffected when the responses were compared to the basal levels. Phentolamine infusion, 70 mg in 150 min, or hyperglycemia induced by iv infusion of 700 ml of 50% glucose solution also did not suppress TRH-induced GH release in 2 acromegalic patients whose basal GH levels were lowered with these agents alone. These results seem to indicate that dexamethasone does not affect TRH- or LHRH-induced GH release per se, but affects the basal state which determines the absolute level of response. They also support the concept that TRH and LHRH act directly on pituitary tumor cells to release GH in acromegaly.

  19. Effect of intravenous bovine growth hormone or human pancreatic growth hormone-releasing factor on milk production and plasma hormones and metabolites in sheep.

    PubMed

    Hart, I C; Chadwick, P M; James, S; Simmonds, A D

    1985-05-01

    Although it is well known that exogenous bovine GH (bGH) increases milk yield in ruminants it has not been possible to determine whether an increase in endogenous GH secretion has the same effect. The recent isolation of human pancreatic GH-releasing factor (hpGRF-44) has enabled this comparison of the effects of bGH and hpGRF-44 on milk production in sheep. Three pairs of Dorset ewes underwent three 4-day treatments according to a Latin square design. Treatment 1 involved: 2-hourly i.v. injections (approximately 3.0 ml) of bGH (15 micrograms/kg; 1.8 units/mg); treatment 2: 2-hourly i.v. injections (approximately 3.0 ml) of hpGRF-44 (0.6 microgram/kg); treatment 3: 2-hourly i.v. injections (3.0 ml) of the vehicle. Treatment periods were separated by 10 days. Sheep were milked twice daily and the milk was analysed for fat, protein and lactose. Blood samples (5.0 ml) were taken before and at 15, 45, 75 and 100 min after every third injection throughout the 4 days. Plasma was analysed for insulin, glucose, urea and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA). The changes in plasma GH stimulated by hpGRF-44 were consistent and repeatable throughout the 4 days of treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3921646

  20. A Nerve Growth Factor Peptide Retards Seizure Development and Inhibits Neuronal Sprouting in a Rat Model of Epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Kashif; van der Zee, Catharina E. E. M.; Ross, Gregory M.; Chapman, C. Andrew; Stanisz, Jolanta; Riopelle, Richard J.; Racine, Ronald J.; Fahnestock, Margaret

    1995-10-01

    Kindling, an animal model of epilepsy wherein seizures are induced by subcortical electrical stimulation, results in the upregulation of neurotrophin mRNA and protein in the adult rat forebrain and causes mossy fiber sprouting in the hippocampus. Intraventricular infusion of a synthetic peptide mimic of a nerve growth factor domain that interferes with the binding of neurotrophins to their receptors resulted in significant retardation of kindling and inhibition of mossy fiber sprouting. These findings suggest a critical role for neurotrophins in both kindling and kindling-induced synaptic reorganization.

  1. Characterization and in vitro biological evaluation of mineral/osteogenic growth peptide nanocomposites synthesized biomimetically on titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cen; Kong, Xiangdong; Zhang, Sheng-Min; Lee, In-Seop

    2015-04-01

    Nanocomposite layers of mineral/osteogenic growth peptide (OGP) were synthesized on calcium phosphate coated titanium substrates by immersing in calcium-phosphate buffer solution containing OGP. Peptide incorporated mineral was characterized by determining quantity loaded, effects on mineral morphology and structure. Also, the biological activity was investigated by cell adhesion, proliferation assay, and measurement of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and micro-bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay revealed that OGP was successfully incorporated with mineral and the amount was increased with immersion time. Incorporated OGP changed the mineral morphology from sharp plate-like shape to more rounded one, and the octacalcium phosphate structure of the mineral was gradually transformed into apatite. With confocal microscopy to examine the incorporation of fluorescently labeled peptide, OGP was evenly distributed throughout mineral layers. Mineral/OGP nanocomposites promoted cell adhesion and proliferation, and also increased ALP activity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Results presented here indicated that the mineral/OGP nanocomposites formed on titanium substrates had the potential for applications in dental implants.

  2. Thiol-disulfide exchange in peptides derived from human growth hormone during lyophilization and storage in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Saradha; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2015-04-01

    Lyophilization (freeze-drying) is frequently used to stabilize protein therapeutics. However, covalent modifications such as thiol-disulfide exchange and disulfide scrambling can occur even in the solid state. The effects of lyophilization and storage of lyophilized powders on the mechanism and kinetics of thiol-disulfide exchange have not been elucidated and are explored here. Reaction kinetics was monitored in peptides corresponding to tryptic fragments of human growth hormone (T20 + T20-T21 or T20 + cT20-T21) during different stages of lyophilization and during storage of the lyophilized powders at 22°C and ambient RH. The concentrations of reactants and products were determined using RP-HPLC and product identity confirmed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Loss of native disulfide was observed for the reaction of T20 with both linear (T20-T21) and cyclic (cT20-T21) peptides during the primary drying step; however, the native disulfides were regenerated during secondary drying with no further change till the end of lyophilization. Deviations from Arrhenius parameters predicted from solution studies and the absence of buffer effects during lyophilization suggest that factors such as temperature, initial peptide concentration, buffer type, and concentration do not influence thiol-disulfide exchange during lyophilization. Results from a "cold finger" method used to study peptide adsorption to ice indicate that there is no preferential adsorption to the ice surface and that its presence may not influence disulfide reactivity during primary drying. Overall, reaction rates and product distribution differ for the reaction of T20 with T20-T21 or cT20-T21 in the solid state and aqueous solution, whereas the mechanism of thiol-disulfide remains unchanged. Increased reactivity of the cyclic peptide in the solid state suggests that peptide cyclization does not offer protection against lyophilization and that damage induced by a process stress further affects

  3. Construction of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Peptide Magnetic Nanovesicles with Lipid Bilayers for Enhanced Capture of Liver Cancer Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jian; Wang, Kai; Tang, Wen-Jie; Li, Dan; Wei, You-Zhen; Lu, Ying; Li, Zong-Hai; Liang, Xiao-Fei

    2016-09-20

    Highly effective targeted tumor recognition via vectors is crucial for cancer detection. In contrast to antibodies and proteins, peptides are direct targeting ligands with a low molecular weight. In the present study, a peptide magnetic nanovector platform containing a lipid bilayer was designed using a peptide amphiphile (PA) as a skeleton material in a controlled manner without surface modification. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) peptide nanoparticles (NPs) could specifically bind to EGFR-positive liver tumor cells. EGFR peptide magnetic vesicles (EPMVs) could efficiently recognize and separate hepatoma carcinoma cells from cell solutions and treated blood samples (ratio of magnetic EPMVs versus anti-EpCAM NPs: 3.5 ± 0.29). Analysis of the circulating tumor cell (CTC) count in blood samples from 32 patients with liver cancer showed that EPMVs could be effectively applied for CTC capture. Thus, this nanoscale, targeted cargo-packaging technology may be useful for designing cancer diagnostic systems.

  4. A PCNA-Derived Cell Permeable Peptide Selectively Inhibits Neuroblastoma Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Long; Smith, Shanna; Li, Caroline; Hickey, Robert J.; Stark, Jeremy M.; Fields, Gregg B.; Lang, Walter H.; Sandoval, John A.; Malkas, Linda H.

    2014-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), through its interaction with various proteins involved in DNA synthesis, cell cycle regulation, and DNA repair, plays a central role in maintaining genome stability. We previously reported a novel cancer associated PCNA isoform (dubbed caPCNA), which was significantly expressed in a broad range of cancer cells and tumor tissues, but not in non-malignant cells. We found that the caPCNA-specific antigenic site lies between L126 and Y133, a region within the interconnector domain of PCNA that is known to be a major binding site for many of PCNA's interacting proteins. We hypothesized that therapeutic agents targeting protein-protein interactions mediated through this region may confer differential toxicity to normal and malignant cells. To test this hypothesis, we designed a cell permeable peptide containing the PCNA L126-Y133 sequence. Here, we report that this peptide selectively kills human neuroblastoma cells, especially those with MYCN gene amplification, with much less toxicity to non-malignant human cells. Mechanistically, the peptide is able to block PCNA interactions in cancer cells. It interferes with DNA synthesis and homologous recombination-mediated double-stranded DNA break repair, resulting in S-phase arrest, accumulation of DNA damage, and enhanced sensitivity to cisplatin. These results demonstrate conceptually the utility of this peptide for treating neuroblastomas, particularly, the unfavorable MYCN-amplified tumors. PMID:24728180

  5. Transgenic tobacco expressing a modified spider peptide inhibits the growth of plant pathogens and insect larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gene encoding lycotoxin I, an amphipathic pore-forming peptide, was modified to increase oral toxicity to insects. One of the most active modified genes was then constitutively expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and transformants were evaluated for insect and disease resistance. Pathogenic...

  6. Two Peptides Derived from the Nerve Growth Factor Precursor Are Biologically Active

    PubMed Central

    Dicou, Eleni; Pflug, Beth; Magazin, Marilyn; Lehy, Thérèse; Djakiew, Daniel; Ferrara, Pascual; Nerrière, Véronique; Harvie, Douglas

    1997-01-01

    This report provides evidence that the proregion of the NGF precursor protein contains two novel bioactive peptides. The presence of pairs of basic amino acid (aa) residues in the NGF proregion suggests that two or three peptides other than NGF may be generated by proteolytic cleavage. Synthetic peptides of 29 aa (LIP1) and 38aa (LIP2) corresponding to the sequences −71 to −43 and −40 to −3 of the proNGF, respectively, were used in this study. ELISA specific for these two peptides revealed their presence in the rat intestine. LIP1 was localized by immunohistochemistry in endocrine cells of the intestinal epithelium, and LIP2 was immunoprecipitated from an intestinal extract. We also provide evidence for the presence of specific receptors for LIP2 in several cell lines. Scatchard analysis indicated the presence of a low affinity binding site with a Kd of ∼10−7 M and a high affinity binding site of 10−9 M. Cross-linking studies revealed receptor forms of about 140 kD and 93 kD in a prostatic adenocarcinoma cell line. LIP1 and LIP2 induced rapid F-actin redistribution in PC12 cells within 2 min of incubation, which suggests a role of LIP1 and LIP2 in the process of neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, both propeptides induced rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of the Trk protein in both prostatic adenocarcinoma cells and PC12 cells, thus implicating trk in their mechanism of action. These results support our hypothesis that two peptides within the NGF precursor protein are biologically active. PMID:9015309

  7. A cyclic peptide derived from alpha-fetoprotein inhibits the proliferative effects of the epidermal growth factor and estradiol in MCF7 cells.

    PubMed

    Torres, Cristian; Antileo, Elmer; Epuñán, Maráa José; Pino, Ana María; Valladares, Luis Emilio; Sierralta, Walter Daniel

    2008-06-01

    A cyclic peptide derived from the active domain of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) significantly inhibited the proliferation of MCF7 cells stimulated with the epidermal growth factor (EGF) or estradiol (E2). The action of these three agents on cell growth was independent of the presence of calf serum in the culture medium. Our results demonstrated that the cyclic peptide interfered markedly with the regulation of MAPK by activated c-erbB2. The cyclic peptide showed no effect on the E2-stimulated release of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 nor on the shedding of heparin-binding EGF into the culture medium. We propose that the AFP-derived cyclic peptide represents a valuable novel antiproliferative agent for treating breast cancer. PMID:18497971

  8. A cyclic peptide derived from alpha-fetoprotein inhibits the proliferative effects of the epidermal growth factor and estradiol in MCF7 cells.

    PubMed

    Torres, Cristian; Antileo, Elmer; Epuñán, Maráa José; Pino, Ana María; Valladares, Luis Emilio; Sierralta, Walter Daniel

    2008-06-01

    A cyclic peptide derived from the active domain of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) significantly inhibited the proliferation of MCF7 cells stimulated with the epidermal growth factor (EGF) or estradiol (E2). The action of these three agents on cell growth was independent of the presence of calf serum in the culture medium. Our results demonstrated that the cyclic peptide interfered markedly with the regulation of MAPK by activated c-erbB2. The cyclic peptide showed no effect on the E2-stimulated release of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 nor on the shedding of heparin-binding EGF into the culture medium. We propose that the AFP-derived cyclic peptide represents a valuable novel antiproliferative agent for treating breast cancer.

  9. Growth promoting in vitro effect of synthetic cyclic RGD-peptides on human osteoblast-like cells attached to cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Magdolen, Ursula; Auernheimer, Jörg; Dahmen, Claudia; Schauwecker, Johannes; Gollwitzer, Hans; Tübel, Jutta; Gradinger, Reiner; Kessler, Horst; Schmitt, Manfred; Diehl, Peter

    2006-06-01

    In tissue engineering, the application of biofunctional compounds on biomaterials such as integrin binding RGD-peptides has gained growing interest. Anchorage-dependent cells like osteoblasts bind to these peptides thus ameliorating the integration of a synthetic implant. In case sterilized bone grafts are used as substitutes for reconstruction of bone defects, the ingrowth of the implanted bone is often disturbed because of severe pretreatment such as irradiation or autoclaving, impairing the biological and mechanical properties of the bone. We report for the first time on the in vitro coating of the surface of freshly resected, cleaned bone discs with synthetic, cyclic RGD-peptides. For this approach, two different RGD-peptides were used, one containing two phosphonate anchors, the other peptide four of these binding moieties to allow efficient association of these reactive RGD-peptides to the inorganic bone matrix. Human osteoblast-like cells were cultured on RGD-coated bone discs and the adherence and growth of the cells were analyzed. Coating of bone discs with RGD-peptides did not improve the adhesion rate of osteoblast-like cells to the discs but significantly (up to 40%) accelerated growth of these cells within 8 days after attachment. This effect points to pretreatment of bone implants, especially at the critical interface area between the implanted bone and the non-resected residual bone structure, before re-implantation in order to stimulate and enhance osteointegration of a bone implant. PMID:16685410

  10. Glucose-induced incretin hormone release and inactivation are differently modulated by oral fat and protein in mice.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, P Thomas; Winzell, Maria Sörhede; Deacon, Carolyn F; Larsen, Marianne O; Jelic, Katarina; Carr, Richard D; Ahrén, Bo

    2006-07-01

    Monounsaturated fatty acids, such as oleic acid (OA), and certain milk proteins, especially whey protein (WP), have insulinotropic effects and can reduce postprandial glycemia. This effect may involve the incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). To explore this, we examined the release and inactivation of GIP and GLP-1 after administration of glucose with or without OA or WP through gastric gavage in anesthetized C57BL/6J mice. Insulin responses to glucose (75 mg) were 3-fold augmented by addition of WP (75 mg; P < 0.01), which was associated with enhanced oral glucose tolerance (P < 0.01). The insulin response to glucose was also augmented by addition of OA (34 mg; P < 0.05) although only 1.5-fold and with no associated increase in glucose elimination. The slope of the glucose-insulin curve was increased by OA (1.7-fold; P < 0.05) and by WP (4-fold; P < 0.01) compared with glucose alone, suggesting potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin release. WP increased GLP-1 secretion (P < 0.01), whereas GIP secretion was unaffected. OA did not affect GIP or GLP-1 secretion. Nevertheless, WP increased the levels of both intact GIP and intact GLP-1 (both P < 0.01), and OA increased the levels of intact GLP-1 (P < 0.05). WP inhibited dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity in the proximal small intestine by 50% (P < 0.05), suggesting that luminal degradation of WP generates small fragments, which are substrates for dipeptidyl peptidase IV and act as competitive inhibitors. We therefore conclude that fat and protein may serve as exogenous regulators of secretion and inactivation of the incretin hormones with beneficial influences on glucose metabolism.

  11. Saccharomyces cerevisiae CCMI 885 secretes peptides that inhibit the growth of some non-Saccharomyces wine-related strains.

    PubMed

    Albergaria, Helena; Francisco, Diana; Gori, Klaus; Arneborg, Nils; Gírio, Francisco

    2010-04-01

    The nature of the toxic compounds produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae CCMI 885 that induce the early death of Hanseniaspora guilliermondii during mixed fermentations, as well as their ability to inhibit the growth of other non-Saccharomyces wine-related strains, was investigated. The killing effect of mixed supernatants towards H. guilliermondii was inactivated by protease treatments, thus revealing the proteinaceous nature of the toxic compounds. Analysis of the protein pattern of mixed supernatants on Tricine SDS-PAGE showed that this S. cerevisiae strain secretes peptides (<10 kDa), which were detected only when death of H. guilliermondii was already established. Death-inducing supernatants were ultrafiltrated by 10 and 2 kDa membranes, respectively, and the inhibitory effect of those permeates were tested in H. guilliermondii cultures. Results indicated that the (2-10) kDa protein fraction of those supernatants seemed to contain antimicrobial peptides active against H. guilliermondii. Thus, the (2-10) kDa protein fraction was concentrated and its inhibitory effect tested against strains of Kluyveromyces marxianus, Kluyveromyces thermotolerans, Torulaspora delbrueckii and H. guilliermondii. Under the growth conditions used for these tests, the (2-10) kDa protein fraction of S. cerevisiae CCMI 885 supernatants exhibited a fungistatic effect against all the strains and a fungicidal effect against K. marxianus.

  12. Mammary-Derived Growth Inhibitor Targeting Peptide-Modified PEG-PLA Nanoparticles for Enhanced Targeted Glioblastoma Therapy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xingye; Gao, Xiaoling; Kang, Ting; Jiang, Di; Yao, Jianhui; Jing, Yixian; Song, Qingxiang; Jiang, Xinguo; Liang, Jianying; Chen, Jun

    2015-08-19

    Targeting delivery of chemotherapeutics to neovasculature represents a promising means for tumor therapy since angiogenesis has been a featured hallmark of glioblastma. However, anti-angiogenic therapy would induce the occurrence of metastatic tumor and even neoplasm recurrence. Simultaneous targeting of tumor cells and neovasculature perfectly overcome such defects and has been proven to be an efficacious strategy for suppressing tumor growth. In the present study, a tumor homing peptide CooP selective binding to mammary-derived growth inhibitor that overexpressed in glioma cells and blood vessel endothelial cells was decorated on the surface of paclitaxel-loading PEG-PLA nanoparticles (NP-PTX) to obtain the dual targeting nanovector CooP-NP-PTX. In vitro antiproliferation study showed that HUVEC cells and U87MG cells were much more sensitive to CooP-NP-PTX than NP-PTX. In vivo imaging demonstrated that CooP-NP accumulated more selectively and penetrated deeper into the tumor site. In addition, the glioma-bearing mice treated with CooP-NP-PTX achieved the longest survival time compared to NP-PTX and Taxol. The findings observed above indicated that CooP peptide-functionalized anti-neoplastic agent-loaded nanoparticles might possess promising potential for glioblastoma therapy. PMID:26222392

  13. IGF-1R peptide vaccines/mimics inhibit the growth of BxPC3 and JIMT-1 cancer cells and exhibit synergistic antitumor effects with HER-1 and HER-2 peptides

    PubMed Central

    Foy, Kevin Chu; Miller, Megan J; Overholser, Jay; Donnelly, Siobhan M; Nahta, Rita; Kaumaya, Pravin TP

    2014-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) plays a crucial role in cellular growth, proliferation, transformation, and inhibition of apoptosis. A myriad of human cancer types have been shown to overexpress IGF-1R, including breast and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. IGF-1R signaling interferes with numerous receptor pathways, rendering tumor cells resistant to chemotherapy, anti-hormonal therapy, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, also known as HER-1) and v-erb-b2 avian erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog 2, (ERBB2, best known as HER-2) -targeted therapies. Targeting the IGF:IGF-1R axis with innovative peptide inhibitors and vaccine antibodies thus represents a promising therapeutic strategy to overcome drug resistance and to provide new avenues for individualized and combinatorial treatment strategies. In this study, we designed, synthesized, and characterized several B-cell epitopes from the IGF-1:IGF-1R axis. The chimeric peptide epitopes were highly immunogenic in outbred rabbits, eliciting high levels of peptide vaccine antibodies. The IGF-1R peptide antibodies and peptide mimics inhibited cell proliferation and receptor phosphorylation, induced apoptosis and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), and significantly inhibited tumor growth in the transplantable BxPC-3 pancreatic and JIMT-1 breast cancer models. Our results showed that the peptides and antibodies targeting residues 56–81 and 233–251 are potential therapeutic and vaccine candidates for the treatment of IGF-1R-expressing cancers, including those that are resistant to the HER-2-targeted antibody, trastuzumab. Additionally, we found additive antitumor effects for the combination treatment of the IGF-1R 56-81 epitope with HER-1-418 and HER-2-597 epitopes. Treatment with the IGF-1R/HER-1 or IGF-1R/HER-2 combination inhibited proliferation, invasion, and receptor phosphorylation, and induced apoptosis and ADCC, to a greater degree than single agents. PMID:25941587

  14. Anti-synthetic peptide antibody reacting at the fusion junction of deletion-mutant epidermal growth factor receptors in human glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, P.A.; Zalutsky, M.R.; Fuller, G.N.; Archer, G.E.; Friedman, H.S.; Kwatra, M.M.; Bigner, S.H.; Bigner, D.D. ); Wong, A.J. ); Vogelstein, B. )

    1990-06-01

    The authors have investigated human gliomas that amplify and rearrange the epidermal growth factor receptor gene, with generation of an in-frame deletion mutation of 802 nucleotides in the external domain. This in-frame deletion mutation generates a local amino acid sequence at the fusion junction of what normally were distant polypeptide sequences in the intact epidermal growth factor receptor. This 14-amino acid peptide was chemically synthesized, coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, and used as an immunogen in rabbits. The elicited antibody reacted specifically with the fusion peptide in ELISA. The anti-fusion junction peptide antibody was purified by passage of the antiserum over a peptide affinity column with acidic elution. The purified antibody selectively bound the glioma deletion mutant as compared to the intact epidermal growth factor receptor as assessed by immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation with gel electrophoresis, and binding experiments using radioiodinated antibody. These data indicate that it is feasible to generate site-specific anti-peptide antibodies that are highly selective for mutant proteins in human tumors. The anti-peptide antibody described here, and other mutation site-specific antibodies, should be ideal candidates for tumor immunoimaging and immunotherapy.

  15. The Influence of Peptide Modifications of Bioactive Glass on Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Growth and Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammar, Mohamed

    2011-12-01

    Bioactive glass is known for its potential as a bone scaffold due to its ability to stimulate osteogenesis and induce bone formation. Broadening this potential to include the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to bone cells will enhance the healing process in bone defects. The surface of bioactive glass made by the sol-gel technique with the composition of 70% SiO2-30% CaO (mol %) was grafted with 3 peptides sequences in different combinations from proteins (fibronectin BMP-2 and BMP-9) that are known to promote the adhesion, differentiation and osteogenesis process. The experiment was done in two forms, a 2D non-porous thin film and a 3D nano-macroporous structure. hMSCs were grown on the materials for a total of five weeks. The 2D materials were tested for the expression of 3 osteogenic markers (osteopontin, osteocalcin and osteonectin) through immunocytochemistry. The 3D forms were monitored for cell's adhesion, morphology, spreading and proliferation by scanning electron microscopy, in addition to proliferation assay and alkaline phosphatase activity measurement. Results showed that hMSCs poorly adhered to the 2D thin films, but the few cells survived showed enhanced expression of the osteogenic markers. On the 3D form, cells showed enhanced proliferation at week one and more survival of the cells on the materials grafted with the adhesion peptide for the successive weeks in comparison to the positive control samples. Enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity was also detected compared to the negative control samples but were still below the positive control samples. In conclusion, the peptide grafting could increase the effect of bioactive glass but more peptide combinations should be examined to improve the effects on the differentiation and osteogenic activity of the hMSCs.

  16. The Antitumor Peptide CIGB-552 Increases COMMD1 and Inhibits Growth of Human Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fernández Massó, Julio R.; Oliva Argüelles, Brizaida; Tejeda, Yelaine; Astrada, Soledad; Garay, Hilda; Reyes, Osvaldo; Delgado-Roche, Livan; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Vallespí, Maribel G.

    2013-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the peptide L-2 designed from an alanine scanning of the Limulus-derived LALF32-51 region is a potential candidate for the anticancer therapy and its cell-penetrating capacity is an associated useful property. By the modification in the primary structure of L-2, a second-generation peptide (CIGB-552) was developed. However, the molecular mechanism underlying its cytotoxic activity remains partially unknown. In this study, it was shown that CIGB-552 increases the levels of COMMD1, a protein involved in copper homeostasis, sodium transport, and the NF-κB signaling pathway. We found that CIGB-552 induces ubiquitination of RelA and inhibits the antiapoptotic activity regulated by NF-κB, whereas the knockdown of COMMD1 blocks this effect. We also found that CIGB-552 decreases the antioxidant capacity and induces the peroxidation of proteins and lipids in the tumor cells. Altogether, this study provides new insights into the mechanism of action of the peptide CIGB-552, which could be relevant in the design of future anticancer therapies. PMID:23401744

  17. USE OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES TO EVALUATE EFFECT OF ENDOGENOUS HORMONES AND A XENOBIOTIC PESTICIDE ON GROWTH OF SHEEPSHEAD MINNOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have developed a teleost model to screen physiological effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on somatic growth. Growth is largely controlled by the endocrine system via the growth-hormone releasing hormone (GRF) - growth hormone (GH) - insulin-like growth factor (IG...

  18. A Randomised Comparison Evaluating Changes in Bone Mineral Density in Advanced Prostate Cancer: Luteinising Hormone-releasing Hormone Agonists Versus Transdermal Oestradiol

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Ruth E.; Kynaston, Howard G.; Alhasso, Abdulla A.; Duong, Trinh; Paez, Edgar M.; Jovic, Gordana; Scrase, Christopher D.; Robertson, Andrew; Cafferty, Fay; Welland, Andrew; Carpenter, Robin; Honeyfield, Lesley; Abel, Richard L.; Stone, Michael; Parmar, Mahesh K.B.; Abel, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Luteinising hormone-releasing hormone agonists (LHRHa), used as androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in prostate cancer (PCa) management, reduce serum oestradiol as well as testosterone, causing bone mineral density (BMD) loss. Transdermal oestradiol is a potential alternative to LHRHa. Objective To compare BMD change in men receiving either LHRHa or oestradiol patches (OP). Design, setting, and participants Men with locally advanced or metastatic PCa participating in the randomised UK Prostate Adenocarcinoma TransCutaneous Hormones (PATCH) trial (allocation ratio of 1:2 for LHRHa:OP, 2006–2011; 1:1, thereafter) were recruited into a BMD study (2006–2012). Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans were performed at baseline, 1 yr, and 2 yr. Interventions LHRHa as per local practice, OP (FemSeven 100 μg/24 h patches). Outcome measurements and statistical analysis The primary outcome was 1-yr change in lumbar spine (LS) BMD from baseline compared between randomised arms using analysis of covariance. Results and limitations A total of 74 eligible men (LHRHa 28, OP 46) participated from seven centres. Baseline clinical characteristics and 3-mo castration rates (testosterone ≤1.7 nmol/l, LHRHa 96% [26 of 27], OP 96% [43 of 45]) were similar between arms. Mean 1-yr change in LS BMD was −0.021 g/cm3 for patients randomised to the LHRHa arm (mean percentage change −1.4%) and +0.069 g/cm3 for the OP arm (+6.0%; p < 0.001). Similar patterns were seen in hip and total body measurements. The largest difference between arms was at 2 yr for those remaining on allocated treatment only: LS BMD mean percentage change LHRHa −3.0% and OP +7.9% (p < 0.001). Conclusions Transdermal oestradiol as a single agent produces castration levels of testosterone while mitigating BMD loss. These early data provide further supporting evidence for the ongoing phase 3 trial. Patient summary This study found that prostate cancer patients treated with transdermal oestradiol

  19. Pathophysiological and diagnostic implications of cardiac biomarkers and antidiuretic hormone release in distinguishing immersion pulmonary edema from decompression sickness

    PubMed Central

    Louge, Pierre; Coulange, Mathieu; Beneton, Frederic; Gempp, Emmanuel; Le Pennetier, Olivier; Algoud, Maxime; Dubourg, Lorene; Naibo, Pierre; Marlinge, Marion; Michelet, Pierre; Vairo, Donato; Kipson, Nathalie; Kerbaul, François; Jammes, Yves; Jones, Ian M.; Steinberg, Jean-Guillaume; Ruf, Jean; Guieu, Régis; Boussuges, Alain; Fenouillet, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Immersion pulmonary edema (IPE) is a misdiagnosed environmental illness caused by water immersion, cold, and exertion. IPE occurs typically during SCUBA diving, snorkeling, and swimming. IPE is sometimes associated with myocardial injury and/or loss of consciousness in water, which may be fatal. IPE is thought to involve hemodynamic and cardiovascular disturbances, but its pathophysiology remains largely unclear, which makes IPE prevention difficult. This observational study aimed to document IPE pathogenesis and improve diagnostic reliability, including distinguishing in some conditions IPE from decompression sickness (DCS), another diving-related disorder. Thirty-one patients (19 IPE, 12 DCS) treated at the Hyperbaric Medicine Department (Ste-Anne hospital, Toulon, France; July 2013–June 2014) were recruited into the study. Ten healthy divers were recruited as controls. We tested: (i) copeptin, a surrogate marker for antidiuretic hormone and a stress marker; (ii) ischemia-modified albumin, an ischemia/hypoxia marker; (iii) brain-natriuretic peptide (BNP), a marker of heart failure, and (iv) ultrasensitive-cardiac troponin-I (cTnI), a marker of myocardial ischemia. We found that copeptin and cardiac biomarkers were higher in IPE versus DCS and controls: (i) copeptin: 68% of IPE patients had a high level versus 25% of DCS patients (P < 0.05) (mean ± standard-deviation: IPE: 53 ± 61 pmol/L; DCS: 15 ± 17; controls: 6 ± 3; IPE versus DCS or controls: P < 0.05); (ii) ischemia-modified albumin: 68% of IPE patients had a high level versus 16% of DCS patients (P < 0.05) (IPE: 123 ± 25 arbitrary-units; DCS: 84 ± 25; controls: 94 ± 7; IPE versus DCS or controls: P < 0.05); (iii) BNP: 53% of IPE patients had a high level, DCS patients having normal values (P < 0.05) (IPE: 383 ± 394 ng/L; DCS: 37 ± 28; controls: 19 ± 15; IPE versus DCS or controls: P < 0.01); (iv) cTnI: 63% of IPE

  20. Pathophysiological and diagnostic implications of cardiac biomarkers and antidiuretic hormone release in distinguishing immersion pulmonary edema from decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Louge, Pierre; Coulange, Mathieu; Beneton, Frederic; Gempp, Emmanuel; Le Pennetier, Olivier; Algoud, Maxime; Dubourg, Lorene; Naibo, Pierre; Marlinge, Marion; Michelet, Pierre; Vairo, Donato; Kipson, Nathalie; Kerbaul, François; Jammes, Yves; Jones, Ian M; Steinberg, Jean-Guillaume; Ruf, Jean; Guieu, Régis; Boussuges, Alain; Fenouillet, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Immersion pulmonary edema (IPE) is a misdiagnosed environmental illness caused by water immersion, cold, and exertion. IPE occurs typically during SCUBA diving, snorkeling, and swimming. IPE is sometimes associated with myocardial injury and/or loss of consciousness in water, which may be fatal. IPE is thought to involve hemodynamic and cardiovascular disturbances, but its pathophysiology remains largely unclear, which makes IPE prevention difficult. This observational study aimed to document IPE pathogenesis and improve diagnostic reliability, including distinguishing in some conditions IPE from decompression sickness (DCS), another diving-related disorder.Thirty-one patients (19 IPE, 12 DCS) treated at the Hyperbaric Medicine Department (Ste-Anne hospital, Toulon, France; July 2013-June 2014) were recruited into the study. Ten healthy divers were recruited as controls. We tested: (i) copeptin, a surrogate marker for antidiuretic hormone and a stress marker; (ii) ischemia-modified albumin, an ischemia/hypoxia marker; (iii) brain-natriuretic peptide (BNP), a marker of heart failure, and (iv) ultrasensitive-cardiac troponin-I (cTnI), a marker of myocardial ischemia.We found that copeptin and cardiac biomarkers were higher in IPE versus DCS and controls: (i) copeptin: 68% of IPE patients had a high level versus 25% of DCS patients (P < 0.05) (mean ± standard-deviation: IPE: 53 ± 61 pmol/L; DCS: 15 ± 17; controls: 6 ± 3; IPE versus DCS or controls: P < 0.05); (ii) ischemia-modified albumin: 68% of IPE patients had a high level versus 16% of DCS patients (P < 0.05) (IPE: 123 ± 25 arbitrary-units; DCS: 84 ± 25; controls: 94 ± 7; IPE versus DCS or controls: P < 0.05); (iii) BNP: 53% of IPE patients had a high level, DCS patients having normal values (P < 0.05) (IPE: 383 ± 394 ng/L; DCS: 37 ± 28; controls: 19 ± 15; IPE versus DCS or controls: P < 0.01); (iv) cTnI: 63% of IPE patients had a high

  1. Pathophysiological and diagnostic implications of cardiac biomarkers and antidiuretic hormone release in distinguishing immersion pulmonary edema from decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Louge, Pierre; Coulange, Mathieu; Beneton, Frederic; Gempp, Emmanuel; Le Pennetier, Olivier; Algoud, Maxime; Dubourg, Lorene; Naibo, Pierre; Marlinge, Marion; Michelet, Pierre; Vairo, Donato; Kipson, Nathalie; Kerbaul, François; Jammes, Yves; Jones, Ian M; Steinberg, Jean-Guillaume; Ruf, Jean; Guieu, Régis; Boussuges, Alain; Fenouillet, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Immersion pulmonary edema (IPE) is a misdiagnosed environmental illness caused by water immersion, cold, and exertion. IPE occurs typically during SCUBA diving, snorkeling, and swimming. IPE is sometimes associated with myocardial injury and/or loss of consciousness in water, which may be fatal. IPE is thought to involve hemodynamic and cardiovascular disturbances, but its pathophysiology remains largely unclear, which makes IPE prevention difficult. This observational study aimed to document IPE pathogenesis and improve diagnostic reliability, including distinguishing in some conditions IPE from decompression sickness (DCS), another diving-related disorder.Thirty-one patients (19 IPE, 12 DCS) treated at the Hyperbaric Medicine Department (Ste-Anne hospital, Toulon, France; July 2013-June 2014) were recruited into the study. Ten healthy divers were recruited as controls. We tested: (i) copeptin, a surrogate marker for antidiuretic hormone and a stress marker; (ii) ischemia-modified albumin, an ischemia/hypoxia marker; (iii) brain-natriuretic peptide (BNP), a marker of heart failure, and (iv) ultrasensitive-cardiac troponin-I (cTnI), a marker of myocardial ischemia.We found that copeptin and cardiac biomarkers were higher in IPE versus DCS and controls: (i) copeptin: 68% of IPE patients had a high level versus 25% of DCS patients (P < 0.05) (mean ± standard-deviation: IPE: 53 ± 61 pmol/L; DCS: 15 ± 17; controls: 6 ± 3; IPE versus DCS or controls: P < 0.05); (ii) ischemia-modified albumin: 68% of IPE patients had a high level versus 16% of DCS patients (P < 0.05) (IPE: 123 ± 25 arbitrary-units; DCS: 84 ± 25; controls: 94 ± 7; IPE versus DCS or controls: P < 0.05); (iii) BNP: 53% of IPE patients had a high level, DCS patients having normal values (P < 0.05) (IPE: 383 ± 394 ng/L; DCS: 37 ± 28; controls: 19 ± 15; IPE versus DCS or controls: P < 0.01); (iv) cTnI: 63% of IPE patients had a high

  2. The NIH experience with precocious puberty: diagnostic subgroups and response to short-term luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogue therapy.

    PubMed

    Pescovitz, O H; Comite, F; Hench, K; Barnes, K; McNemar, A; Foster, C; Kenigsberg, D; Loriaux, D L; Cutler, G B

    1986-01-01

    Between 1979 and 1983, 129 children (95 girls) with precocious puberty were referred to the National Institutes of Health and received treatment for at least 6 months with the long-acting LHRH analogue D-Trp6-Pro9-NEt-LHRH. The majority (107 of 129) of the children had central precocious puberty mediated by activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in association with hypothalamic hamartomas (24 of 107) or other central nervous system lesions (21 of 107), or idiopathic precocious puberty (62 of 107). Hypothalamic hamartomas or other central nervous system lesions were a frequent cause of central precocious puberty in girls (27 of 87), but idiopathic precocious puberty was still the most frequent diagnosis (63%). Idiopathic precocious puberty was uncommon in boys (6%). The patients with peripheral precocious puberty included six girls with McCune-Albright syndrome and six boys with familial male precocious puberty. These children had peripheral sex steroid secretion in the absence of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis maturation. The children with combined peripheral and central precocious puberty included nine children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia and one girl with a virilizing adrenal tumor. In the patients with central precocious puberty or combined peripheral and central precocious puberty, LHRHa therapy caused suppression of gonadotropin and sex steroid levels (P less than 0.001), stabilization or regression of secondary sexual characteristics, and decreases in growth rate and in the rate of bone age maturation (P less than 0.005). Patients with peripheral precocious puberty, however, had no significant change in gonadotropin or sex steroid levels, growth rate, or the rate of bone age maturation, and no improvement in secondary sexual characteristics. Thus, LHRHa is an effective treatment of central precocious puberty and combined peripheral and central precocious puberty, but is ineffective in the therapy of peripheral precocious puberty.

  3. Sertoli cell maturation is impaired by neonatal passive immunization with antiserum to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Vogel, D L; Gunsalus, G L; Bercu, B B; Musto, N A; Bardin, C W

    1983-03-01

    Male rats treated with a single injection of antiserum to LHRH (LHRH-AS) at 5 days of age have small testes as adults. In the present investigation, the serial maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis was studied in young male rats passively immunized with LHRH-AS. Testicular and epididymal weights, serum androgen and gonadotropin levels, testicular receptors for human CG (hCG), and androgen binding protein (ABP) concentrations in serum, testis, and epididymis were compared in developing animals treated with a single ip injection of LHRH-AS or normal rabbit serum. Rats treated with LHRH-AS had lower serum concentrations of ABP at all ages; the highest levels were on days 22-24, which were several days later than controls. Testicular weight was about 60% that of the control at all ages from 10-90 days. A reduction in epididymal weight to 80% that of the control was seen only in adults at days 60 and 90. Testicular ABP content increased steadily with age, but its concentration peaked at day 17 for controls and day 22 for LHRH-AS treated animals. Both testicular and epididymal ABP content were commensurate with testicular weight in controls and treated rats through day 45. Similarly, hCG-receptor content and concentration increased steadily with age, but differences between control and treated groups paralleled testicular weight. These results suggest an effect of LHRH blockade at a critical period which impairs early testicular growth and causes a permanent reduction in growth. Sertoli cell function and hCG-receptor appearance are impaired in proportion to this reduction.

  4. Cell growth and proteolytic activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, and Streptococcus thermophilus in milk as affected by supplementation with peptide fractions.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Akanksha; Shah, Nagendra P

    2014-12-01

    The present investigation examined the effects of supplementation of milk peptide fractions produced by enzymatic hydrolysis on the fermentation of reconstituted skim milk (RSM). Changes in pH, cell growth, proteolytic activity, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity were monitored during fermentation of RSM by pure cultures of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, and Streptococcus thermophilus. The study showed that supplementation with peptide fractions of different molecular weights did not significantly affect the bacterial growth in RSM. All bacteria showed an increased proteolytic activity in RSM supplemented with large peptides (>10 kDa), and L. helveticus in general exhibited the highest proteolytic activity among the bacteria studied. The ACE-inhibitory activity was observed to be the maximum in RSM supplemented with larger peptides (>10 kDa) for all bacteria. The results suggest that proteolysis by bacteria leads to increased production of ACE-inhibitory peptides compared to the supplemented peptides produced by enzymatic hydrolysis.

  5. Targeting of the epidermal growth factor receptor with mesoporphyrin IX-peptide conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Fontenot, Krystal R.; Ongarora, Benson G.; LeBlanc, Logan E.; Zhou, Zehua; Jois, Seetharama D.; Vicente, M. Graça H.

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis and in vitro evaluation of four mesoporphyrin IX-peptide conjugates designed to target EGFR, over-expressed in colorectal and other cancers, are reported. Two peptides with known affinity for EGFR, LARLLT (1) and GYHWYGYTPQNVI (2), were conjugated to mesoporphyrin IX (MPIX, 3) via one or both the propionic side chains, directly (4, 5) or with a triethylene glycol spacer (7, 8). The conjugates were characterized using NMR, MS, CD, SPR, UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopies. Energy minimization and molecular dynamics suggest different conformations for the conjugates. SPR studies show that conjugate 4, bearing two LARLLT with no PEG spacers, has the greatest affinity for binding to EGFR, followed by conjugate 7 with two PEG and two LARLLT sequences. Molecular modeling and docking studies suggest that both conjugates 4 and 7 can bind to monomer and dimer EGFR in open and closed conformations. The cytotoxicity and cellular targeting ability of the conjugates were investigated in human HEp2 cells over-expressing EGFR. All conjugates showed low dark- and photo-toxicities. The cellular uptake was highest for conjugates 4 and 8 and lowest for 7 bearing two LARLLT linked via PEG groups, likely due to decreased hydrophobicity. Among the conjugates investigated 4 is the most efficient EGFR-targeting agent, and therefore the most promising for the detection of cancers that over-express EGFR. PMID:27738394

  6. Inhibition of serum androgen levels by chronic intranasal and subcutaneous administration of a potent luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) agonist in adult men.

    PubMed

    Faure, N; Labrie, F; Lemay, A; Bélanger, A; Gourdeau, Y; Laroche, B; Robert, G

    1982-03-01

    The effect of chronic treatment with the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) agonist Buserelin (Hoechst AG, Frankfurt/Main, West Germany) ([D-Ser(TBU)6,des-Gly-NH2(10)]LH-RH ethylamide) administrered by nasal spray (200 or 500 micrograms, twice daily) or subcutaneously (50 micrograms daily) for periods of 1 to 8 months was studied on serum sex steroids and LH levels in 18 patients with cancer of the prostate. Basal serum testosterone concentration decreases to 71.1 +/- 18.3 (NS) and 28.6 +/- 9.3%, (P less than 0.01) of control in patients receiving the 200-micrograms and 500-micrograms dose by nasal spray, respectively. In patients treated subcutaneously, a more rapid inhibition of serum testosterone levels to 19.6 +/- 6.4% of control (P less than 0.01) is observed. The finding of decreased levels of 17-OH-progesterone, testosterone, and dihydrotestosterone in the presence of unchanged pregnenolone concentration indicates that the decrease in androgen biosynthesis induced by Buserelin treatment is due to a blockage at the level of 17-hydroxylase and 17,20-desmolase activities. The present data indicate that chronic administration of Buserelin could be a safe and effective means of reducing serum androgens in patients with cancer of the prostate.

  7. The luteinizing hormone response to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone, prostaglandin E2 and naloxone is modulated by divergent sensitivity to testosterone feedback.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, U; Pirke, K M

    1985-11-01

    Testosterone (T) levels necessary to suppress LH secretion are reduced in starvation, and increased feedback sensitivity to T is therefore postulated. The luteinizing hormone (LH) response to naloxone (Nal) is more easily suppressed by starvation than is its response to prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LRH). If the divergent suppressibility is due to altered feedback sensitivity in starvation, it should be feasible to reproduce this phenomenon in normally nourished rats by increasing T levels. Adult male Wistar rats were castrated and implanted with silicone capsules (0-2.6 cm) filled with T. Indwelling jugular cannulae were implanted. On days 4 to 8 post operation rats were injected iv with LRH (25-400 ng/kg body weight), PGE2 (0.05-1.0 mg/kg body weight) or Nal (0.5-50 mg/kg body weight). Blood samples were drawn before and 10, 20 and 30 min after injection. Results show that the response to Nal was already suppressed at medium T levels. The LH response to PGE2 was diminished to a greater extent than the response to LRH but was never completely suppressed by increasing steroid levels. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that steroid feedback sensitivity augments with increasing levels of regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  8. Paradoxical effects of D-Trp6-luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in immature female rats.

    PubMed

    Vilchez-Martinez, J A; Pedroza, E; Arimura, A; Schally, A V

    1979-06-01

    The effect of administration of a superactive and long-acting analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH), D-Trp6-LH-RH, in doses of 0.05 or 1 microgram/day for 10 days on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis was studied in immature female rats. Treatment with a 0.05-microgram dose of analog produced few changes as compared with the control group. Treatment with 1 microgram of D-Trp6-LH-RH did not affect the body weight or the pituitary weight, but increased ovarian weight and decreased uterine weight; elevated serum gonadotropin levels; and lowered the pituitary LH content. This depletion of pituitary LH content was associated with a low pituitary responsiveness to LH-RH. Serum estradiol levels were not modified, suggesting that decreased uterine weight reflects a direct and extrapituitary effect of this analog. The hypothalamic LH-RH content was higher, indicating a possible inhibition of the release of endogenous LH-RH. A delay in vaginal opening was also observed. This indicates that large doses of D-Trp6-LH-RH may interfere with the process of puberty in rats. These findings extend other reports about the paradoxical antifertility effects of large doses of stimulatory analogs of LH-RH.

  9. Effects of ionizing radiation and pretreatment with (D-Leu6,des-Gly10) luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ethylamide on developing rat ovarian follicles

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrell, J.; YoungLai, E.V.; McMahon, A.; Barr, R.; O'Connell, G.; Belbeck, L.

    1987-10-01

    To assess the effects of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, (D-Leu6,des-Gly10) luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ethylamide, in ameliorating the damage caused by ionizing radiation, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist was administered to rats from day 22 to 37 of age in doses of 0.1, 0.4, and 1.0 microgram/day or vehicle and the rats were sacrificed on day 44 of age. There were no effects on estradiol, progesterone, luteinizing, or follicle-stimulating hormone, nor an effect on ovarian follicle numbers or development. In separate experiments, rats treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist in doses of 0.04, 0.1, 0.4, or 1.0 microgram/day were either irradiated or sham irradiated on day 30 and all groups sacrificed on day 44 of age. Irradiation produced a reduction in ovarian weight and an increase in ovarian follicular atresia. Pretreatment with the agonist prevented the reduction in ovarian weight and numbers of primordial and preantral follicles but not healthy or atretic antral follicles. Such putative radioprotection should be tested on actual reproductive performance.

  10. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) attenuates morphine-induced inhibition of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in opioid-responsive SK-N-SH cells.

    PubMed

    Ratka, A; Simpkins, J W

    1997-04-01

    SK-N-SH cells were used to assess the effects of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) on opioid receptor-mediated changes in cyclic AMP (cAMP). Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1, 1 microM) caused a dramatic increase in cAMP levels. Treatment with 10 microM morphine (MOR) significantly inhibited the stimulatory effect of PGE1, LHRH (0.8 microM) caused an increase in the basal level of intracellular cAMP and potentiated the stimulatory effect of PGE1 on cAMP accumulation. In cells pretreated with LHRH the inhibitory effect of MOR on cAMP accumulation was significantly attenuated. An LHRH antagonist had no effect on cAMP. The involvement of pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G proteins in the actions of LHRH was studied. PTX increased the stimulatory effect of PGE1 on cAMP and attenuated the inhibitory effect of MOR. However, PTX pretreatment prevented the effects of LHRH on the intracellular actions of PGE1 but exerted an additive effect with LHRH in blocking the MOR-induced decrease in cAMP levels. We conclude that LHRH attenuates the inhibitory, opioid receptor-mediated effect of MOR on intracellular cAMP accumulation in SK-N-SH cells, and that the G protein-independent mechanism may be involved in LHRH-induced attenuation of the inhibitory effect of MOR on neuronal cAMP.

  11. Stimulation of cholesterol side-chain cleavage by a luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone (luliberin) agonist (ICI 118630) in rat Leydig cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, M H; Cooke, B A

    1983-01-01

    The action of a luliberin (luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone) agonist (ICI 118630) and lutropin (luteinizing hormone) on the activity of the cytochrome P-450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme in rat Leydig cells has been investigated. This has been carried out by studying the metabolism of exogenous (22R)-22- and 25-hydroxycholesterol to testosterone. It was found that both hydroxycholesterols increased testosterone production to higher levels than achieved by lutropin alone. Addition of luliberin agonist but not lutropin was found to increase further the metabolism of the hydroxycholesterol to testosterone; this occurred in the presence of saturating and subsaturating levels of the hydroxycholesterols. This effect of luliberin agonist was potentiated in the presence of lutropin. The protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, inhibited the luliberin agonist-induced stimulation of the hydroxycholesterol metabolism. At low calcium levels (1.1 microM), testosterone production was increased by addition of (22R)-22-hydroxycholesterol but the luliberin agonist effect was negated. The calmodulin inhibitor trifluoperazine inhibited (22R)-22-hydroxycholesterol-stimulated steroidogenesis and negated the luliberin agonist effect. These results indicate that luliberin agonist specifically increases the synthesis of the cytochrome P-450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme in rat testis Leydig cells. PMID:6230077

  12. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone targeted poly(methyl vinyl ether maleic acid) nanoparticles for doxorubicin delivery to MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali; Ghazzavi, Jila

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to design a targeted anti-cancer drug delivery system for breast cancer. Therefore, doxorubicin (DOX) loaded poly(methyl vinyl ether maleic acid) nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by ionic cross-linking method using Zn(2+) ions. To optimise the effect of DOX/polymer ratio, Zn/polymer ratio, and stirrer rate a full factorial design was used and their effects on particle size, zeta potential, loading efficiency (LE, %), and release efficiency in 72 h (RE72, %) were studied. Targeted NPs were prepared by chemical coating of tiptorelin/polyallylamin conjugate on the surface of NPs by using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carboiimid HCl as cross-linking agent. Conjugation efficiency was measured by Bradford assay. Conjugated triptorelin and targeted NPs were studied by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The cytotoxicity of DOX loaded in targeted NPs and non-targeted ones were studied on MCF-7 cells which overexpress luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptors and SKOV3 cells as negative LHRH receptors using Thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide assay. The best results obtained from NPs prepared by DOX/polymer ratio of 5%, Zn/polymer ratio of 50%, and stirrer rate of 960 rpm. FTIR spectrum confirmed successful conjugation of triptorelin to NPs. The conjugation efficiency was about 70%. The targeted NPs showed significantly less IC50 for MCF-7 cells compared to free DOX and non-targeted NPs. PMID:27463791

  13. Trp2 peptide vaccine adjuvanted with (R)-DOTAP inhibits tumor growth in an advanced melanoma model

    PubMed Central

    Vasievich, Elizabeth A.; Ramishetti, Srinivas; Zhang, Yuan; Huang, Leaf

    2012-01-01

    Previously we have shown cationic lipid (R)-DOTAP as the immunologically active enantiomer of the DOTAP racemic mixture, initiating complete tumor regression in an exogenous antigen model (murine cervical cancer model). Here, we investigate the use of (R)-DOTAP as an efficacious adjuvant delivering an endogenous antigen in an aggressive murine solid tumor melanoma model. (R)-DOTAP/Trp2 peptide complexes showed decreasing size and charge with increasing peptide concentration, taking a rod-shape at highest concentrations. The particles were stable for at 2 weeks at 4°C. A dose of 75nmol Trp2 (formulated in (R)-DOTAP) was able to show statistically significant tumor growth delay compared to lower doses of 5 and 25nmol which were no different than untreated tumors. (R)-DOTAP/Trp2 (75nmol) treated mice also showed increased T cell IFN-γ secretion after restimulation with Trp2, as well as CTL activity in vivo. This vaccination group also showed the highest population of functionally active tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, indicated by IFN-γ secretion after restimulation with Trp2. Thus, (R)-DOTAP has shown the ability to break tolerance as an adjuvant. Its activity to enhance immunogenicity of other tumor associated antigens should be studied further. PMID:22142394

  14. A conjugate of methotrexate and an analog of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone shows increased efficacy against prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shengsheng; Wang, Qinxia; Jiang, Juan; Luo, Yongwei; Sun, Zuyue

    2016-01-01

    LHRH receptor, is over-expressed in a variety of human tumors and, is a potential binding site for targeted metastatic prostate cancer therapy. The objectives of our study were to synthesize a bioconjugate of the LHRH analog [DLys6]-LHRH and the anti-tumor agent methotrexate and test the hypothesis that [DLys6]-LHRH-MTX targets and inhibits prostate cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. The results of in vitro studies, showed that both [DLys6]-LHRH-MTX and MTX displayed superior cytotoxicity against prostate cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manners, with IC50 concentrations for PC-3 cells of, 1.02 ± 0.18 μmol/L and 6.34 ± 1.01 μmol/L; for DU-145 cells, 1.53 ± 0.27 μmol/L and 8.03 ± 1.29 μmol/L; and for LNCaP cells, 1.93 ± 0.19 μmol/L and 9.68 ± 1.24 μmol/L, respectively. The IC50 values of [DLys6]-LHRH-MTX and MTX were 110.77 ± 15.31 μmol/L and 42.33 ± 7.25 μmol/L, respectively. Finally, [DLys6]-LHRH-MTX significantly improved the anti-tumor activity of MTX in nude mice bearing PC-3 tumor xenografts. The inhibition ratios of tumor volume and tumor weight in the [DLys6]-LHRH-MTX treated group were significantly higher than those in the MTX-treated group. Tumor volume doubling time was also significantly extended from 6.13 days in control animals to 9.67 days in mice treated with [DLys6]-LHRH-MTX. In conclusion, [DLys6]-LHRH -MTX may be useful in treating prostate cancer. PMID:27654169

  15. In vivo fluorescence imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft using near-infrared labeled epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) peptide

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z.; Zhou, Q.; Zhou, J.; Duan, X.; Zhu, J.; Wang, T. D.

    2016-01-01

    Minimally-invasive surgery of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can be limited by poor tumor visualization with white light. We demonstrate systemic administration of a Cy5.5-labeled peptide specific for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to target HCC in vivo in a mouse xenograft model. We attached a compact imaging module to the proximal end of a medical laparoscope to collect near-infrared fluorescence and reflectance images concurrently at 15 frames/sec. We measured a mean target-to-background ratio of 2.99 ± 0.22 from 13 surgically exposed subcutaneous human HCC tumors in vivo in 5 mice. This integrated imaging methodology is promising to guide laparoscopic resection of HCC.

  16. In vivo fluorescence imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft using near-infrared labeled epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) peptide

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z.; Zhou, Q.; Zhou, J.; Duan, X.; Zhu, J.; Wang, T. D.

    2016-01-01

    Minimally-invasive surgery of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can be limited by poor tumor visualization with white light. We demonstrate systemic administration of a Cy5.5-labeled peptide specific for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to target HCC in vivo in a mouse xenograft model. We attached a compact imaging module to the proximal end of a medical laparoscope to collect near-infrared fluorescence and reflectance images concurrently at 15 frames/sec. We measured a mean target-to-background ratio of 2.99 ± 0.22 from 13 surgically exposed subcutaneous human HCC tumors in vivo in 5 mice. This integrated imaging methodology is promising to guide laparoscopic resection of HCC. PMID:27699089

  17. Potent sub-MIC effect of GSK1322322 and other peptide deformylase inhibitors on in vitro growth of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Butler, Deborah; Chen, Dongzhao; O'Dwyer, Karen; Lewandowski, Thomas; Aubart, Kelly; Zalacain, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF), a clinically unexploited antibacterial target, plays an essential role in protein maturation. PDF inhibitors, therefore, represent a new antibiotic class with a unique mode of action that provides an alternative therapy for the treatment of infections caused by drug-resistant pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). GSK1322322 is a novel PDF inhibitor that is in phase II clinical development for the treatment of lower respiratory tract and skin infections. We have discovered that PDF inhibitors can prevent S. aureus in vitro growth for up to 6 h at concentrations 8- to 32-fold below their MICs. This phenomenon seems specific to PDF inhibitors, as none of the antimicrobial agents with alternative mechanisms of action tested show such a potent and widespread effect. It also appears limited to S. aureus, as PDF inhibitors do not show such an inhibition of growth at sub-MIC levels in Streptococcus pneumoniae or Haemophilus influenzae. Analysis of the effect of GSK1322322 on the early growth of 100 randomly selected S. aureus strains showed that concentrations equal to or below 1/8× MIC inhibited growth of 91% of the strains tested for 6 h, while the corresponding amount of moxifloxacin or linezolid only affected the growth of 1% and 6% of strains, respectively. Furthermore, the sub-MIC effect demonstrated by GSK1322322 appears more substantial on those strains at the higher end of the MIC spectrum. These effects may impact the clinical efficacy of GSK1322322 in serious infections caused by multidrug-resistant S. aureus.

  18. Identification of a new androgen receptor (AR) co-regulator BUD31 and related peptides to suppress wild-type and mutated AR-mediated prostate cancer growth via peptide screening and X-ray structure analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liu, Jai-Shin; Wu, Po-Long; Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Chen, Yuh-Ling; Lin, An-Chi; Ting, Huei-Ju; Pang, See-Tong; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Ma, Wen-Lung; Chen, Chung-Jung; Wu, Wen-Guey; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-01-01

    Treatment with individual anti-androgens is associated with the development of hot-spot mutations in the androgen receptor (AR), including T877A (hydroxyflutamide [HF]) and W741(C/L) (bicalutamide [CDX]). Here, we found that anti-androgens bound mt-ARs (HF-T877A-AR-LBD and CDX-W741L-AR-LBD) have similar binary structure to the 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) bound wild type (wt) AR (DHT-wt-AR-LBD). Phage display revealed that these ARs bound to similar peptides, including BUD31, containing an Fxx(F/H/L/W/Y)Y motif cluster with Tyr in the +5 position. Structural analyses of the AR-LBD-BUD31 complex at 2.1 Å resolution revealed formation of an extra hydrogen bond between the Tyr+5 residue of the peptide and Gln733 of the AR AF2 domain, suggesting that peptides with Fxx(F/H/L/W/Y)Y motifs can interact with wt or mutated ARs. Functional studies showed that BUD31-related peptides suppressed transactivation of both DHT-wt-AR and HF-T877A-AR by interrupting AR N- and C-terminal interactions, thereby inhibiting wt and mutant AR-mediated prostate cancer cell growth. Collectively, these results suggest the combination of peptide screening and X-ray structure analysis as a new strategy for developing anti-androgens that simultaneously suppress both wt and mutated AR function. PMID:25091737

  19. The application of antimicrobial peptides as growth and health promoters for swine.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hao; Shao, Fangyuan; Wu, Miaomiao; Ren, Wenkai; Xiong, Xia; Tan, Bie; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    With the widespread ban on the use of antibiotics in swine feed, alternative measures need to be sought to maintain swine health and performance. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are part of the nonspecific defense system and are natural antibiotics produced by plants, insects, mammalians, and micro-organisms as well as by chemical synthesis. Due to their broad microbicidal activity against various fungi, bacteria and enveloped viruses, AMPs are a potential alternative to conventional antibiotics for use in swine production. This review focuses on the structure and mechanism of action of AMPs, as well as their effects on performance, immune function and intestinal health in pigs. The aim is to provide support for the application of AMPs as feed additives replacing antibiotics in swine nutrition. PMID:26019864

  20. Inhibitory effects of small molecular peptides from Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis on cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhujun; Zhang, Xuewu

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the whole proteins of Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis were extracted, hydrolysis with three proteases (trypsin, alcalase and papain) was performed, and gel filtration chromatography was employed to separate hydrolysates. Totally, 15 polypeptides were isolated, which showed anti-proliferation activities on five cancer cells (HepG-2, MCF-7, SGC-7901, A549 and HT-29), with the IC50 values between <31.25 and 336.57 μg mL(-1). Moreover, a new peptide YGFVMPRSGLWFR was identified from papain-digested hydrolysates. It also exhibited inhibitory activities on cancer cells, and the best activity was observed on A549 cancer cells (IC50 values 104.05 μg mL(-1)). In other words, these polypeptides exhibited anti-proliferation activities on cancer cells, and low toxicity or stimulatory activity on normal cells, suggesting that they are promising ingredients in food and pharmaceutical applications. PMID:26584028

  1. A possible role of insulin-like growth factor-II C-peptide in regulating the function of steroidogenic cells in adult frog adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Songül Süren

    2008-01-01

    The sole structural determinant for the differential ability of the insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II) to induce autophosphorylation of specific insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine residues and activate downstream signaling molecules is the C domain. The IR is structurally related to the type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR). This study aimed to identify the presence of IGF receptors by which the IGF-II C-peptide could mediate its effects in the frog (Rana ridibunda) adrenal glands and to observe whether injection of IGF-II C-peptide affects the function of adrenal steroidogenic cells using light and transmission electron microscopy and by the evaluation of the immunoreactivity of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). After IGF-II C-peptide injection, there was a reduction of StAR protein immunoreactivity levels, an accumulation of large lipid droplets in close contact with each other, and an induction of proliferation of the steroidogenic cells. These results indicate a possible role of IGF-II C-peptide in steroidogenic cell function and in induction of steroidogenesis. The detection in this study of IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) immunoreactivity in frog adrenal glands also indicates that the metabolic and mitogenic effects of IGF-II C-peptide in these glands may occur via the IGF-IR.

  2. Ultrastructural changes in granulosa cells and plasma steroid levels after administration of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in the Western painted turtle, Chrysemys picta.

    PubMed

    Al-Kindi, A Y; Mahmoud, Y; Woller, M J

    2001-08-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of treatment by luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) on the morphology and steroid release of ovarian tissues in the Western painted turtle, (Chrysemys picta). In Experiment I, four adult female turtles were injected with synthetic mammalian LHRH (i.p., 500 pg/g bodyweight) and four with saline 2-3 weeks prior to ovulation. Granulosa cells from LHRH-treated turtles vs controls contained both preovulatory follicles (16-20 mm in diameter) and small follicles (0.5-1.00mm in diameter) with increased RER, free ribosomes and mitochondria with swollen cristae. An increase in the amount of cytoskeletal material (microfilaments) was observed in granulosa cells of the experimental turtles compared to the controls. Cytoplasmic extensions of the oocyte and granulosa cells were longer in the small follicles of treated animals, accounting for the observed increase in the thickness of the zona pellucida (ZP) over the controls. In Experiment II, administration of LHRH (i.p.) to 10 turtles during the same period triggered a substantial increase in plasma progesterone and estradiol-17beta levels over the 10 saline-injected controls. This supports the idea that in this species, as in mammals, steroidogenic activity in the ovarian follicles are under the control of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. The ultrastructure and hormonal levels of the experimental animals were typical of untreated turtles just prior to ovulation. In this species the development of follicles and steroidogenesis can be stimulated prematurely by a releasing hormone from a nonreptilian origin.

  3. Effects of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and arginine-vasotocin on the sperm-release response of Günther's Toadlet, Pseudophryne guentheri

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) is an exogenous hormone commonly used to induce spermiation in anuran amphibians. Over the past few decades, the LHRH dose administered to individuals and the frequency of injection has been highly variable. The sperm-release responses reported have been correspondingly diverse, highlighting a need to quantify dose-response relationships on a species-specific basis. This study on the Australian anuran Pseudophryne guentheri first evaluated the spermiation response of males administered one of five LHRHa doses, and second, determined whether AVT administered in combination with the optimal LHRHa dose improved sperm-release. Methods Male toadlets were administered a single dose of 0, 1, 2, 4 or 8 micrograms/g body weight of LHRHa. A 4 micrograms/g dose of AVT was administered alone or in combination with 2 micrograms/g LHRHa. Spermiation responses were evaluated at 3, 7 and 12 h post hormone administration (PA), and sperm number and viability were quantified using fluorescent microscopy. Results LHRHa administration was highly effective at inducing spermiation in P. guentheri, with 100% of hormone-treated males producing sperm during the experimental period. The number of sperm released in response to 2 micrograms/g LHRHa was greater than all other doses administered and sperm viability was highest in the 1 microgram/g treatment. The administration of AVT alone or in combination with LHRHa resulted in the release of significantly lower sperm numbers. Conclusion Overall, results from this study suggest that in P. guentheri, LHRHa is effective at inducing spermiation, but that AVT inhibits sperm-release. PMID:21059269

  4. Total Androgen Blockade Versus a Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone Agonist Alone in Men With High-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nanda, Akash; Moran, Brian J.; Braccioforte, Michelle H.; Dosoretz, Daniel; Salenius, Sharon; Katin, Michael; Ross, Rudi; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To assess whether short-course total androgen blockade vs. a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist alone affects the risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) in men with localized but high-risk disease treated with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The study cohort comprised 628 men with T1-T4, N0, M0 prostate cancer with high-risk disease (prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL, Gleason score >=8, or clinical category >=T3) treated with 45 Gy of external beam radiotherapy followed by a brachytherapy boost in addition to receiving a median of 4.3 (interquartile range [IQR], 3.6-6.4) months of hormonal blockade with an LHRH agonist plus an antiandrogen or monotherapy with an LHRH agonist. Fine and Gray's multivariable regression analysis was used to determine whether combination androgen suppression therapy (AST) vs. monotherapy affected the risk of PCSM, adjusting for treatment year, duration of AST, age, and known prognostic factors. Results: After a median follow-up of 4.9 (IQR, 3.5-6.5) years, men receiving combination AST had a lower risk of PCSM than those treated with monotherapy (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 0.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.04-0.90; p = 0.04). An increasing prostate-specific antigen level (AHR, 2.70; 95% CI, 1.64-4.45; p < 0.001) and clinical category T3/4 disease (AHR, 29.6; 95% CI, 2.88-303.5; p = 0.004) were also associated with an increased risk of PCSM. Conclusions: In men with localized but high-risk prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy, short-course AST with an LHRH agonist plus an antiandrogen is associated with a decreased risk of PCSM when compared with monotherapy with an LHRH agonist.

  5. Platelet-released growth factors induce the antimicrobial peptide human beta-defensin-2 in primary keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Andreas; Lammel, Justus; Rademacher, Franziska; Groß, Justus; Siggelkow, Markus; Lippross, Sebastian; Klüter, Tim; Varoga, Deike; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Pufe, Thomas; Cremer, Jochen; Gläser, Regine; Harder, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    Platelet-released growth factors (PRGF) and its related clinically used formulations [e.g. Vivostat platelet-rich fibrin (PRF(®) )] are thrombocyte concentrate lysates that support healing of chronic, hard-to-heal and infected wounds. Human beta-defensin-2 (hBD-2) is an antimicrobial peptide expressed in human keratinocytes exhibiting potent antimicrobial activity against wound-related bacteria. In this study, we analysed the influence of PRGF on hBD-2 expression in human primary keratinocytes and the influence of Vivostat PRF(®) on hBD-2 expression in experimentally generated skin wounds in vivo. Treatment of primary keratinocytes with PRGF caused a significant increase in hBD-2 gene and protein expressions in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The use of blocking antibodies revealed that the PRGF-mediated hBD-2 induction was partially mediated by the epidermal growth factor receptor and the interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). Luciferase gene reporter assays indicated that the hBD-2 induction through PRGF required activation of the transcription factor activator protein 1 (AP-1), but not of NF-kappaB. In concordance with these cell culture data, Vivostat PRF(®) induced hBD-2 expression when applied to experimentally generated skin wounds. Together, our results indicate that the induction of hBD-2 by thrombocyte concentrate lysates can contribute to the observed beneficial effects in the treatment of chronic and infected wounds. PMID:26843467

  6. Inhibition of hair follicle growth by a laminin-1 G-domain peptide, RKRLQVQLSIRT, in an organ culture of isolated vibrissa rudiment.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kazuhiro; Mochizuki, Mayumi; Nomizu, Motoyoshi; Uchinuma, Eijyu; Yamashina, Shohei; Kadoya, Yuichi

    2002-04-01

    We established a serum-free organ culture system of isolated single vibrissa rudiments taken from embryonic day 13 mice. This system allowed us to test more than 30 laminin-derived cell adhesive peptides to determine their roles on the growth and differentiation of vibrissa hair follicles. We found that the RKRLQVQLSIRT sequence (designated AG-73), which mapped to the LG-4 module of the laminin-alpha1 chain carboxyl-terminal G domain, perturbed the growth of hair follicles in vitro. AG-73 is one of the cell-binding peptides identified from more than 600 systematically synthesized 12 amino acid peptides covering the whole amino acid sequence of the laminin-alpha1, -beta1, and -gamma1 chains, by cell adhesion assay. Other cell-adhesive laminin peptides and a control scrambled peptide, LQQRRSVLRTKI, however, failed to show any significant effects on the growth of hair follicles. The AG-73 peptide binds to syndecan-1, a transmembrane heparan-sulfate proteoglycan. Syndecan-1 was expressed in both the mesenchymal condensation and the epithelial hair peg of developing vibrissa, suggesting that AG-73 binding to the cell surface syndecan-1 perturbed the epithelial-mesenchymal interactions of developing vibrissa. The formation of hair bulbs was aberrant in the explants treated with AG-73. In addition, impaired basement membrane formation, an abnormal cytoplasmic bleb formation, and an unusual basal formation of actin bundles were noted in the AG-73-treated-hair matrix epithelium, indicating that AG-73 binding perturbs various steps of epithelial morphogenesis, including the basement membrane remodeling. We also found a region-specific loss of the laminin-alpha1 chain in the basement membrane at the distal region of the invading hair follicle epithelium, indicating that laminins play a part in hair morphogenesis.

  7. Growth hormone (GH)-releasing activity of chicken GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) in chickens.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S; Gineste, C; Gaylinn, B D

    2014-08-01

    Two peptides with sequence similarities to growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) have been identified by analysis of the chicken genome. One of these peptides, chicken (c) GHRH-LP (like peptide) was previously found to poorly bind to chicken pituitary membranes or to cloned and expressed chicken GHRH receptors and had little, if any, growth hormone (GH)-releasing activity in vivo or in vitro. In contrast, a second more recently discovered peptide, cGHRH, does bind to cloned and expressed cGHRH receptors and increases cAMP activity in transfected cells. The possibility that this peptide may have in vivo GH-releasing activity was therefore assessed. The intravenous (i.v.) administration of cGHRH to immature chickens, at doses of 3-100 μg/kg, significantly increased circulating GH concentrations within 10 min of injection and the plasma GH levels remained elevated for at least 30 min after the injection of maximally effective doses. The plasma GH responses to cGHRH were comparable with those induced by human (h) or porcine (p) GHRH preparations and to that induced by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH). In marked contrast, the i.v. injection of cGHRH-LP had no significant effect on circulating GH concentrations in immature chicks. GH release was also increased from slaughterhouse chicken pituitary glands perifused for 5 min with cGHRH at doses of 0.1 μg/ml or 1.0 μg/ml, comparable with GH responses to hGHRH1-44. In contrast, the perifusion of chicken pituitary glands with cGHRH-LP had no significant effect on GH release. In summary, these results demonstrate that cGHRH has GH-releasing activity in chickens and support the possibility that it is the endogenous ligand of the cGHRH receptor.

  8. Effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone treatment on milk production and plasma hormones and metabolites in lactating Japanese Black cows under negative energy balance.

    PubMed

    Shingu, H; Hodate, K; Kushibiki, S; Touno, E; Oshibe, A; Ueda, Y; Shinoda, M; Ohashi, S

    2009-04-01

    The current study was performed to clarify the effects of GHRH treatment on milk production and plasma hormones and metabolites in lactating Japanese Black cows (a beef breed) under negative energy balance (EB). Ten multiparous lactating beef cows were offered a normal-energy diet daily (110% of ME requirements for maintenance and lactation) until 5 d in milk (DIM) to standardize the cows before dietary treatment. From 6 DIM to the final days (63 DIM) of the experiment, the cows were allotted to experimental dietary treatments: 5 cows were offered a diet formulated for 130% [high-energy diet (HED)] and the remaining 5 cows were offered a diet formulated for 80% [low-energy diet (LED)] of ME requirements for maintenance and lactation. In addition, all cows received daily subcutaneous injections of 3 mg of bovine GHRH from 36 to 56 DIM (GHRH treatment period). Differences in BW of HED- and LED-fed cows at 63 DIM were +28.4 and -7.2 kg compared with BW at 6 DIM, and HED- and LED-fed cows were under positive EB (+23.7 MJ/d) and negative EB (-11.6 MJ/d) throughout the experiment period. Treatment with GHRH increased (P<0.01) the average daily milk yield to 6.2 kg in HED-fed cows compared with a milk yield of 5.3 kg for 7 d before the GHRH treatment period (pretreatment period); LED-fed cows had no increase in milk production from GHRH treatment. Plasma GH, IGF-1, insulin, and glucose concentrations increased (P<0.05) after GHRH treatment in both HED- and LED-fed cows; GHRH treatment also induced an increase (P<0.05) in the net area under the curve of plasma insulin after glucose challenge in both HED- and LED-fed cows. Plasma urea N concentrations were decreased (P<0.05) by GHRH treatment in HED-fed cows, but not in LED-fed cows. Plasma NEFA concentration was unaffected by GHRH treatment in both HED- and LED-fed cows. We conclude that GHRH treatment of lactating Japanese Black cows stimulates endogenous GH and subsequent IGF-1 secretion and might induce an increase in insulin resistance, irrespective of EB; however, compared with lactating dairy cows, both galactopoietic and lipolytic effects of GHRH might be insufficiently exerted under negative EB in lactating beef cows.

  9. Efficacy of a Complex of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid and Glycyl-Histidyl-Lysine Peptide on Hair Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Hyun Bo; Jang, Yong Hyun; Lee, Seok-Jong; Kim, Do Won; Yim, Soon-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background Pattern hair loss is a very common problem. Although effective therapeutics for the treatment of pattern hair loss have been used, novel therapeutic modalities are still required to enhance hair growth. Objective We investigated the efficacy and safety of a complex (ALAVAX) of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) and glycyl-histidyl-lysine (GHK) peptide for the treatment of pattern hair loss. Methods Forty-five patients with male pattern hair loss were treated with ALAVAX 100 mg/ml (group A), ALAVAX 50 mg/ml (group B) or placebo (group C) once a day for 6 months. Total hair count, hair length, hair thickness, patient's assessment and adverse events were evaluated at month 1, 3, and 6. Results An increase in hair count for 6 months was 52.6 (p<0.05) in group A, 71.5 (p<0.05) in group B, and 9.6 in group C. The ratio of changes in hair count between group B (2.38) and group C (1.21) at 6 months showed a statistically significant difference (p<0.05). The proportion above good satisfaction was higher in group A (26.7%) than in the other groups (group B: 14.3%, group C: 7.1%). There was no statistically significant difference in hair length and hair thickness among 3 groups at 6 months. There was no adverse event in 3 groups. Conclusion Our study showed that a complex of 5-ALA and GHK peptide may be considered as one of the complementary agents for the treatment of male pattern hair loss. PMID:27489425

  10. A new peptide-based urethane polymer: synthesis, biodegradation, and potential to support cell growth in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian Ying; Beckman, Eric J.; Piesco, Nicholas P.; Agarwal, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    A novel non-toxic biodegradable lysine-di-isocyanate (LDI)-based urethane polymer was developed for use in tissue engineering applications. This matrix was synthesized with highly purified LDI made from the lysine diethylester. The ethyl ester of LDI was polymerized with glycerol to form a prepolymer. LDI–glycerol prepolymer when reacted with water foamed with the liberation of CO2 to provide a pliable spongy urethane polymer. The LDI–glycerol matrix degraded in aqueous solutions at 100, 37, 22, and 4°C at a rate of 27.7, 1.8, 0.8, and 0.1 mM per 10 days, respectively. Its thermal stability in water allowed its sterilization by autoclaving. The degradation of the LDI–glycerol polymer yielded lysine, ethanol, and glycerol as breakdown products. The degradation products of LDI–glycerol polymer did not significantly affect the pH of the solution. The glass transition temperature (Tg) of this polymer was found to be 103.4°C. The physical properties of the polymer network were found to be adequate to support the cell growth in vitro, as evidenced by the fact that rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) attached to the polymer matrix and remained viable on its surface. Culture of BMSC on LDI–glycerol matrix for long durations resulted in the formation of multilayered confluent cultures, a characteristic typical of bone cells. Furthermore, cells grown on LDI–glycerol matrix did not differ phenotypically from the cells grown on the tissue culture polystyrene plates as assessed by the cell growth, and expression of mRNA for collagen type I, and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). The observations suggest that biodegradable peptide-based urethane polymers can be synthesized which may pave their way for possible use in tissue engineering applications. PMID:10811306

  11. Nanoscale controls of inorganic impurities and peptides on shape modification during calcite growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, P. M.; de Yoreo, J. J.

    2004-12-01

    Many organisms produce crystalline structures during controlled biomineralization that exhibit complex topological forms. These biominerals often express facets or pseudofacets that are not found on crystals grown from pure solutions in the laboratory. This modification of growth shape, whether by inorganic and organic modulators, is generally explained within the paradigm of "stereochemical recognition". According to this model, stereochemical matching of the growth modulator to the molecular structure of these new and otherwise unexpressed faces, stabilizes the formation of new faces to result in a new crystal shape. This idea, however, was developed primarily from bulk crystallization experiments and geometrical models that focused on interactions between impurities and atomic planes of the newly expressed faces. Over the last several years, we have reported nanoscale investigations of how small molecule modifiers (Mg, Sr, amino acids) interact with calcite surfaces during growth. Low concentrations of these `simple' impurities have significant shape-modifying effects. While the observed mechanisms of growth modification are highly diverse, in all cases, it is clear that the source of shape modification always arises from step-specific interactions that alter either the equilibrium properties of the crystal (step edge and bulk free energy) or the kinetics of step motion. The resulting macroscopic shape changes can be traced to these effects at steps on existing faces rather than to stereochemical matching to and thermodynamic stabilization of new faces. Molecular modeling shows that the essential reason for this is that steps provide non-planar environments in which non-planar modifiers can form contacts to both the lower terrace and the step riser. Our findings provide a mechanism-based understanding of shape modification. This is essential as biomineralization studies advance to investigate more complex studies of systems that employ long-chain polypeptides or

  12. 3-Fluoroazetidinecarboxylic Acids and trans,trans-3,4-Difluoroproline as Peptide Scaffolds: Inhibition of Pancreatic Cancer Cell Growth by a Fluoroazetidine Iminosugar.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zilei; Jenkinson, Sarah F; Vermaas, Tom; Adachi, Isao; Wormald, Mark R; Hata, Yukako; Kurashima, Yukiko; Kaji, Akira; Yu, Chu-Yi; Kato, Atsushi; Fleet, George W J

    2015-05-01

    Reverse aldol opening renders amides of 3-hydroxyazetidinecarboxylic acids (3-OH-Aze) unstable above pH 8. Aze, found in sugar beet, is mis-incorporated for proline in peptides in humans and is associated with multiple sclerosis and teratogenesis. Aze-containing peptides may be oxygenated by prolyl hydroxylases resulting in potential damage of the protein by a reverse aldol of the hydroxyazetidine; this, rather than changes in conformation, may account for the deleterious effects of Aze. This paper describes the synthesis of 3-fluoro-Aze amino acids as hydroxy-Aze analogues which are not susceptible to aldol cleavage. 4-(Azidomethyl)-3-fluoro-Aze and 3,4-difluoroproline are new peptide building blocks. trans,trans-2,4-Dihydroxy-3-fluoroazetidine, an iminosugar, inhibits the growth of pancreatic cancer cells to a similar degree as gemcitabine.

  13. The p27 Pathway Modulates the Regulation of Skeletal Growth and Osteoblastic Bone Formation by Parathyroid Hormone-Related Peptide.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Zhang, Jing; Dong, Zhan; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Rong; Karaplis, Andrew; Goltzman, David; Miao, Dengshun

    2015-11-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) 1-84 knock-in mice (Pthrp KI) develop skeletal growth retardation and defective osteoblastic bone formation. To further examine the mechanisms underlying this phenotype, microarray analyses of differential gene expression profiles were performed in long bone extracts from Pthrp KI mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates. We found that the expression levels of p27, p16, and p53 were significantly upregulated in Pthrp KI mice relative to WT littermates. To determine whether p27 was involved in the regulation by PTHrP of skeletal growth and development in vivo, we generated compound mutant mice, which were homozygous for both p27 deletion and the Pthrp KI mutation (p27(-/-) Pthrp KI). We then compared p27(-/-) Pthrp KI mice with p27(-/-), Pthrp KI, and WT littermates. Deletion of p27 in Pthrp KI mice resulted in a longer lifespan, increased body weight, and improvement in skeletal growth. At 2 weeks of age, skeletal parameters, including length of long bones, size of epiphyses, numbers of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive chondrocytes, bone mineral density, trabecular bone volume, osteoblast numbers, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-, type I collagen-, and osteocalcin-positive bone areas were increased in p27(-/-) mice and reduced in both Pthrp KI and p27(-/-) Pthrp KI mice compared with WT mice; however, these parameters were increased in p27(-/-) Pthrp KI mice compared with Pthrp KI mice. As well, protein expression levels of PTHR, IGF-1, and Bmi-1, and the numbers of total colony-forming unit fibroblastic (CFU-f) and ALP-positive CFU-f were similarly increased in p27(-/-) Pthrp KI mice compared with Pthrp KI mice. Our results demonstrate that deletion of p27 in Pthrp KI mice can partially rescue defects in skeletal growth and osteoblastic bone formation by enhancing endochondral bone formation and osteogenesis. These studies, therefore, indicate that the p27 pathway may function downstream in the action

  14. Effects of small peptides, probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics on growth performance, digestive enzymes, and oxidative stress in orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides, juveniles reared in artificial seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Cheng, Yongzhou; Chen, Xiaoyan; Liu, Zhaopu; Long, Xiaohua

    2016-04-01

    Aquaculture production efficiency may increase by using feed additives. This study investigated the effects of diff erent dietary additives [w/w: 2% small peptides, 0.01% probiotics (Bacillus licheniformis) and 0.2% prebiotics (inulin)] on growth performance, digestive enzyme activities, and oxidative stress in juvenile Epinephelus coioides reared in artificial seawater of two salt concentrations (13.5 vs. 28.5). Weight gain rate was significantly higher in fish fed the diet supplemented with small peptides, B. licheniformis, inulin, or synbiotics than that in fish fed the basal diet; the greatest weight gain rate was found in fish fed the small peptide treatment [56.0% higher than basal diet]. Higher feed efficiency was detected in fish fed the diet supplemented with small peptides than that of fish in the other dietary treatments. Total protease activity in the stomach and intestines was highest in fish fed the small peptide-treated diet, whereas lipase activity was highest in those fed synbiotics (combination of Bacillus licheniformis and inulin) than that in fish fed the other treatments. Antioxidant enzyme (total superoxide dismutase and catalase) activities and hepatic malondialdehyde content were higher in fish receiving the dietary supplements and maintained in artificial seawater containing 13.5 salinity compared with those in the control (28.5). Hepatic catalase activity in grouper fed the diets with small peptides or synbiotics decreased significantly compared with that in control fish. Overall, the three types of additives improved growth rate of juvenile grouper and digestive enzymes activities to varying degrees but did not effectively improve antioxidant capacity under low-salinity stress conditions.

  15. Antimicrobial GL13K Peptide Coatings Killed and Ruptured the Wall of Streptococcus gordonii and Prevented Formation and Growth of Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Hirt, Helmut; Li, Yuping; Gorr, Sven-Ulrik; Aparicio, Conrado

    2014-01-01

    Infection is one of the most prevalent causes for dental implant failure. We have developed a novel antimicrobial peptide coating on titanium by immobilizing the antimicrobial peptide GL13K. GL13K was developed from the human salivary protein BPIFA2. The peptide exhibited MIC of 8 µg/ml against planktonic Pseudonomas aeruginosa and their biofilms were reduced by three orders of magnitude with 100 µg/ml GL13K. This peptide concentration also killed 100% of Streptococcus gordonii. At 1 mg/ml, GL13K caused less than 10% lysis of human red blood cells, suggesting low toxicity to mammalian cells. Our GL13K coating has also previously showed bactericidal effect and inhibition of biofilm growth against peri-implantitis related pathogens, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis. The GL13K coating was cytocompatible with human fibroblasts and osteoblasts. However, the bioactivity of antimicrobial coatings has been commonly tested under (quasi)static culture conditions that are far from simulating conditions for biofilm formation and growth in the oral cavity. Oral salivary flow over a coating is persistent, applies continuous shear forces, and supplies sustained nutrition to bacteria. This accelerates bacteria metabolism and biofilm growth. In this work, the antimicrobial effect of the coating was tested against Streptococcus gordonii, a primary colonizer that provides attachment for the biofilm accretion by P. gingivalis, using a drip-flow biofilm bioreactor with media flow rates simulating salivary flow. The GL13K peptide coatings killed bacteria and prevented formation and growth of S. gordonii biofilms in the drip-flow bioreactor and under regular mild-agitation conditions. Surprisingly the interaction of the bacteria with the GL13K peptide coatings ruptured the cell wall at their septum or polar areas leaving empty shell-like structures or exposed protoplasts. The cell wall rupture was not detected under regular culture conditions, suggesting that cell wall rupture induced

  16. Lead (Pb) alters the norepinephrine-induced secretion of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone from the median eminence of adult male rats in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Bratton, G.R.; Hiney, J.K.; Dees, W.L. )

    1994-01-01

    In the present study, the authors evaluated the in vitro effects of lead (Pb) on basal and stimulated luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) and Prostaglandin E[sub 2] (PGE[sub 2]) secretion. Median eminences (ME) were removed from brains of adult male rats and preincubated for 15 minutes in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate glucose buffer in an atmosphere of 95% O[sub 2]-5% CO[sub 2]. These media were discarded and all MEs were subjected to one of the following experiments. In Experiment 1, all MEs were incubated for 30 minutes in medium only. These media were collected and replaced with medium only (controls) or with medium containing Pb doses ranging from 5 to 20 [mu]M. After this 60-minute incubation, media were collected, then replaced with new medium containing 60 [mu]M norepinephrine (NE), or NE plus each dose of Pb, then incubated for a final 30-minute period. Experiment 2 was conducted as above, except PGE[sub 2] (2.8 [mu]M) replaced the NE. In both experiments, the amounts of LHRH released was measured by RIA. In experiment 3, NE was again used for the challenge; however, this time, the amount of PGE[sub 2] released was measured by RIA. Results indicate that Pb did not alter basal LHRH release, but compared with controls, significantly blocked NE-induced LHRH release in a dose-related manner. Conversely, Pb had no effect on the PGE[sub 2]-induced release of LHRH. Additionally, Pb did not alter basal PGE[sub 2] release; however, it significantly blocked the NE-induced release of PGE[sub 2]. Since NE-induced LHRH release is mediated by PGE[sub 2], these results support the hypothesis that Pb is capable of altering the hypothalamus and suggest that this effect is due, at least in part, to the diminished PGE[sub 2] synthesis/release within the ME, resulting in diminished LHRH secretion.

  17. A comparison of human chorionic gonadotropin and luteinizing hormone releasing hormone on the induction of spermiation and amplexus in the American toad (Anaxyrus americanus)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Captive breeding programs for endangered amphibian species often utilize exogenous hormones for species that are difficult to breed. The purpose of our study was to compare the efficacy of two different hormones at various concentrations on sperm production, quantity and quality over time in order to optimize assisted breeding. Methods Male American toads (Anaxyrus americanus) were divided into three separate treatment groups, with animals in each group rotated through different concentrations of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analog (LHRH; 0.1, 1.0, 4.0 and 32 micrograms/toad), human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG; 50, 100, 200, and 300 IU), or the control over 24 hours. We evaluated the number of males that respond by producing spermic urine, the sperm concentration, percent motility, and quality of forward progression. We also evaluated the effects of hCG and LHRH on reproductive behavior as assessed by amplexus. Data were analyzed using the Generalized Estimating Equations incorporating repeated measures over time and including the main effects of treatment and time, and the treatment by time interaction. Results The hormone hCG was significantly more effective at stimulating spermiation in male Anaxyrus americanus than LHRH and showed a dose-dependent response in the number of animals producing sperm. At the most effective hCG dose (300 IU), 100% of the male toads produced sperm, compared to only 35% for the best LHRH dose tested (4.0 micrograms). In addition to having a greater number of responders (P < 0.05), the 300 IU hCG treatment group had a much higher average sperm concentration (P < 0.05) than the treatment group receiving 4.0 micrograms LHRH. In contrast, these two treatments did not result in significant differences in sperm motility or quality of forward progressive motility. However, more males went into amplexus when treated with LHRH vs. hCG (90% vs. 75%) by nine hours post-administration. Conclusion There is a clear

  18. Production of recombinant human growth hormone conjugated with a transcytotic peptide in Pichia pastoris for effective oral protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Yeong; Kang, Sang-Kee; Li, Hui-Shan; Choi, Chang-Yun; Park, Tae-Eun; Bok, Jin-Duck; Lee, Seung-Ho; Cho, Chong-Su; Choi, Yun-Jaie

    2015-05-01

    Among the possible delivery routes, the oral administration of a protein is simple and achieves high patient compliance without pain. However, the low bioavailability of a protein drug in the intestine due to the physical barriers of the intestinal epithelia is the most critical problem that needs to be solved. To overcome the low bioavailability of a protein drug in the intestine, we aimed to construct a recombinant Pichia pastoris expressing a human growth hormone (hGH) fusion protein conjugated with a transcytotic peptide (TP) that was screened through peroral phage display to target goblet cells in the intestinal epithelia. The TP-conjugated hGH was successfully produced in P. pastoris in a secreted form at concentrations of up to 0.79 g/l. The function of the TP-conjugated hGH was validated by in vitro and in vivo assays. The transcytotic function of the TP through the intestinal epithelia was verified only in the C terminus conjugated hGH, which demonstrated the induction of IGF-1 in a HepG2 cell culture assay, a higher translocation of recombinant hGH into the ileal villi after oral administration in rats and both IGF-1 induction and higher body weight gain in rats after oral administration. The present study introduces the possibility for the development of an effective oral protein delivery system in the pharmaceutical and animal industries through the introduction of an effective TP into hGH.

  19. Phage Displayed Peptides/Antibodies Recognizing Growth Factors and Their Tyrosine Kinase Receptors as Tools for Anti-Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ronca, Roberto; Benzoni, Patrizia; De Luca, Angela; Crescini, Elisabetta; Dell’Era, Patrizia

    2012-01-01

    The basic idea of displaying peptides on a phage, introduced by George P. Smith in 1985, was greatly developed and improved by McCafferty and colleagues at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology and, later, by Barbas and colleagues at the Scripps Research Institute. Their approach was dedicated to building a system for the production of antibodies, similar to a naïve B cell repertoire, in order to by-pass the standard hybridoma technology that requires animal immunization. Both groups merged the phage display technology with an antibody library to obtain a huge number of phage variants, each of them carrying a specific antibody ready to bind its target molecule, allowing, later on, rare phage (one in a million) to be isolated by affinity chromatography. Here, we will briefly review the basis of the technology and the therapeutic application of phage-derived bioactive molecules when addressed against key players in tumor development and progression: growth factors and their tyrosine kinase receptors. PMID:22606042

  20. Local myocardial insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) delivery with biotinylated peptide nanofibers improves cell therapy for myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Michael E.; Hsieh, Patrick C. H.; Takahashi, Tomosaburo; Song, Qing; Zhang, Shuguang; Kamm, Roger D.; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Anversa, Piero; Lee, Richard T.

    2006-05-01

    Strategies for cardiac repair include injection of cells, but these approaches have been hampered by poor cell engraftment, survival, and differentiation. To address these shortcomings for the purpose of improving cardiac function after injury, we designed self-assembling peptide nanofibers for prolonged delivery of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), a cardiomyocyte growth and differentiation factor, to the myocardium, using a "biotin sandwich" approach. Biotinylated IGF-1 was complexed with tetravalent streptavidin and then bound to biotinylated self-assembling peptides. This biotin sandwich strategy allowed binding of IGF-1 but did not prevent self-assembly of the peptides into nanofibers within the myocardium. IGF-1 that was bound to peptide nanofibers activated Akt, decreased activation of caspase-3, and increased expression of cardiac troponin I in cardiomyocytes. After injection into rat myocardium, biotinylated nanofibers provided sustained IGF-1 delivery for 28 days, and targeted delivery of IGF-1 in vivo increased activation of Akt in the myocardium. When combined with transplanted cardiomyocytes, IGF-1 delivery by biotinylated nanofibers decreased caspase-3 cleavage by 28% and increased the myocyte cross-sectional area by 25% compared with cells embedded within nanofibers alone or with untethered IGF-1. Finally, cell therapy with IGF-1 delivery by biotinylated nanofibers improved systolic function after experimental myocardial infarction, demonstrating how engineering the local cellular microenvironment can improve cell therapy. engineering | maturation | scaffold

  1. Effects of antimicrobial peptides on Staphylococcus aureus growth and biofilm formation in vitro following isolation from implant-associated infections

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guangfeng; Zhong, Huiming; Zhang, Mao; Hong, Yucai

    2015-01-01

    To prevent biomaterial-associated infections, antibiotic agents are recommended for various medical conditions requiring biomaterial implants, but resistance often appears after the introduction of antibiotics into clinical use. Therefore, new strategies for the prevention or treatment for biomaterial-associated infections are required. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of antimicrobial peptides on growth and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from implant-associated infections. A total of 20 patients with culture-proven staphylococcal infection associated with stable orthopedic implants were selected as the experimental group. S. aureus were isolated from tissue biopsies for identification, the isolated strains were mixed with Tet213 incubated at 37°C and viable bactrial number of S. aureus was counted. For the biofilm formation, the broad spectrum AMP Tet213 was selected and loaded onto the Ti coating first. At the same time Ti coated with Tet213 were mixed with S. aureus in vitro to form biofilm. After 30 min, 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 8 h, the population of S. aureus in the biofilm was counted. Tet213 showed significant antibacterial effect on 16 strains (P < 0.05, Table 1). The inhibition rate reached above 80% among 12 strains of the clinically isolated strain. In biofilm experiments, counts of the NO. 1, 2, 3, 4 strains in biofilms decreased significantly after 2 h (P < 0.05), while there was no obvious difference in counts of NO. 5 strain (P > 0.05). The broad spectrum AMP Tet213 could strongly reduce the growth and biofilm formation of S. aureus in vitro, and the use of this might be an important new approach to target implant-associated infections. PMID:25785171

  2. The recombinant proregion of transforming growth factor beta1 (latency-associated peptide) inhibits active transforming growth factor beta1 in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Böttinger, E P; Factor, V M; Tsang, M L; Weatherbee, J A; Kopp, J B; Qian, S W; Wakefield, L M; Roberts, A B; Thorgeirsson, S S; Sporn, M B

    1996-06-11

    All three isoforms of transforming growth factors beta (TGF-betal, TGF-beta2, and TGF-beta3) are secreted as latent complexes and activated extracellularly, leading to the release of the mature cytokines from their noncovalently associated proregions, also known as latency-associated peptides (LAPs). The LAP region of TGF-beta1 was expressed in a baculovirus expression system and purified to homogeneity. In vitro assays of growth inhibition and gene induction mediated by TGF-beta3 demonstrate that recombinant TGF-beta1 LAP is a potent inhibitor of the activities of TGF-betal, -beta2, and -beta3. Effective dosages of LAP for 50% neutralization of TGF-beta activities range from 4.7- to 80-fold molar excess depending on the TGF-beta isoform and activity examined. Using 125I-labeled LAP, we show that the intraperitoneal application route is effective for systemic administration of LAP. Comparison of concentrations of LAP in tissues shows a homogenous pattern in most organs with the exception of heart and muscle, in which levels of LAP are 4- to 8-fold lower. In transgenic mice with elevated hepatic levels of bioactive TGF-betal, treatment with recombinant LAP completely reverses suppression of the early proliferative response induced by TGF-beta1 in remnant livers after partial hepatectomy. The results suggest that recombinant LAP is a potent inhibitor of bioactive TGF-beta both in vitro and in vivo, after intraperitoneal administration. Recombinant LAP should be a useful tool for novel approaches to study and therapeutically modulate pathophysiological processes mediated by TGF-beta3.

  3. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of ⁶⁴Cu-radiolabeled KCCYSL peptides for targeting epidermal growth factor receptor-2 in breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Senthil R; Gallazzi, Fabio A; Ferdani, Riccardo; Anderson, Carolyn J; Quinn, Thomas P; Deutscher, Susan L

    2010-12-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (EGFR-2) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of breast and other carcinomas. In this report, we tested the ability of a bacteriophage selected peptide KCCYSL, radiolabeled with ⁶⁴Cu, to image EGFR-2 expressing breast tumors in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET). We evaluated and compared the in vivo tissue distribution and imaging properties of ⁶⁴Cu-X-(Gly-Ser-Gly)-KCCYSL peptide (X = 1,4,7,10, tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetracetic acid, [DOTA] 1,4,8,11-tetraazabicyclo[6.6.2]hexadecane-4,11-diacetic acid [CB-TE2A], and 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid [NOTA] chelators) in a human breast cancer xenograft mouse model using dual modality PET and computed tomography (CT). The synthesized peptides DO3A-GSG-KCCYSL, CB-TE2A-GSG-KCCYSL, and NO2A-GSG-KCCYSL were purified, radiolabeled with ⁶⁴Cu, and evaluated for human breast cancer cell (MDA-MB-435) binding, 50% inhibitory concentration, and serum stability. In vivo pharmacokinetic and small animal PET/CT imaging studies were performed using SCID mice bearing MDA-MB-435 xenografts. The radiolabeled peptides bound with an 50% inhibitory concentration of 42.0 ± 10.2 nM (DO3A), 31 ± 7.9 nM (CB-TE2A), and 44.2 ± 6.6 nM (NO2A) to cultured MDA-MB-435 cells. All of the radiolabeled peptides were stable in vitro. The tumor uptake of DO3A, CB-TE2A, and NO2A peptides were 0.73 ± 0.15 percent injected dose per gram (%ID/g), 0.64 ± 0.08%ID/g, and 0.52 ± 0.04%ID/g, respectively at 1 hour. Liver uptake for the ⁶⁴Cu-DO3A-peptide (1.68 ± 0.42%ID/g) was more than that of the ⁶⁴Cu-CB-TE2A-peptide (0.52 ± 0.02% ID/g) and ⁶⁴Cu-NO2A-peptide (0.48 ± 0.05%ID/g) at 2 hours. PET/CT studies revealed successful tumor uptake of ⁶⁴Cu-peptides at 2 hours postinjection. In vivo kidney retention was observed with all of the radiolabeled peptides. The optimization of bifunctional chelators improves the

  4. The role of "mixed" orexigenic and anorexigenic signals and autoantibodies reacting with appetite-regulating neuropeptides and peptides of the adipose tissue-gut-brain axis: relevance to food intake and nutritional status in patients with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Smitka, Kvido; Papezova, Hana; Vondra, Karel; Hill, Martin; Hainer, Vojtech; Nedvidkova, Jara

    2013-01-01

    Eating disorders such as anorexia (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are characterized by abnormal eating behavior. The essential aspect of AN is that the individual refuses to maintain a minimal normal body weight. The main features of BN are binge eating and inappropriate compensatory methods to prevent weight gain. The gut-brain-adipose tissue (AT) peptides and neutralizing autoantibodies play an important role in the regulation of eating behavior and growth hormone release. The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve an interplay between gut, brain, and AT. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and serotoninergic systems are required for communication between brain satiety centre, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include neuropeptides ghrelin, neuropeptide Y (NPY), peptide YY (PYY), cholecystokinin (CCK), leptin, putative anorexigen obestatin, monoamines dopamine, norepinephrine (NE), serotonin, and neutralizing autoantibodies. This extensive and detailed report reviews data that demonstrate that hunger-satiety signals play an important role in the pathogenesis of eating disorders. Neuroendocrine dysregulations of the AT-gut-brain axis peptides and neutralizing autoantibodies may result in AN and BN. The circulating autoantibodies can be purified and used as pharmacological tools in AN and BN. Further research is required to investigate the orexigenic/anorexigenic synthetic analogs and monoclonal antibodies for potential treatment of eating disorders in clinical practice.

  5. The Role of “Mixed” Orexigenic and Anorexigenic Signals and Autoantibodies Reacting with Appetite-Regulating Neuropeptides and Peptides of the Adipose Tissue-Gut-Brain Axis: Relevance to Food Intake and Nutritional Status in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Papezova, Hana; Vondra, Karel; Hill, Martin; Hainer, Vojtech; Nedvidkova, Jara

    2013-01-01

    Eating disorders such as anorexia (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are characterized by abnormal eating behavior. The essential aspect of AN is that the individual refuses to maintain a minimal normal body weight. The main features of BN are binge eating and inappropriate compensatory methods to prevent weight gain. The gut-brain-adipose tissue (AT) peptides and neutralizing autoantibodies play an important role in the regulation of eating behavior and growth hormone release. The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve an interplay between gut, brain, and AT. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and serotoninergic systems are required for communication between brain satiety centre, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include neuropeptides ghrelin, neuropeptide Y (NPY), peptide YY (PYY), cholecystokinin (CCK), leptin, putative anorexigen obestatin, monoamines dopamine, norepinephrine (NE), serotonin, and neutralizing autoantibodies. This extensive and detailed report reviews data that demonstrate that hunger-satiety signals play an important role in the pathogenesis of eating disorders. Neuroendocrine dysregulations of the AT-gut-brain axis peptides and neutralizing autoantibodies may result in AN and BN. The circulating autoantibodies can be purified and used as pharmacological tools in AN and BN. Further research is required to investigate the orexigenic/anorexigenic synthetic analogs and monoclonal antibodies for potential treatment of eating disorders in clinical practice. PMID:24106499

  6. Molecular cloning of the gene encoding the mouse parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor.

    PubMed Central

    McCuaig, K A; Clarke, J C; White, J H

    1994-01-01

    The parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor (PTHR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor containing seven predicted transmembrane domains. We have isolated and characterized recombinant bacteriophage lambda EMBL3 genomic clones containing the mouse PTHR gene, including 10 kilobases of the promoter region. The gene spans > 32 kilobases and is divided into 15 exons, 8 of which contain the transmembrane domains. The PTHR exons containing the predicted membrane-spanning domains are heterogeneous in length and three of the exon-intron boundaries fall within putative transmembrane sequences, suggesting that the exons did not arise from duplication events. This arrangement is closely related to that of the growth hormone releasing factor receptor gene, particularly in the transmembrane region, providing strong evidence that the two genes evolved from a common precursor. Transcription is initiated principally at a series of sites over a 15-base-pair region. The proximal promoter region is highly (G+C)-rich and lacks an apparent TATA box or initiator element homologies but does contain CCGCCC motifs. The presumptive amino acid sequence of the encoded receptor is 99%, 91%, and 76% identical to those of the rat, human, and opossum receptors, respectively. There is no consensus polyadenylation signal in the 3' untranslated region. The poly(A) tail of the PTHR transcript begins 32 bases downstream of a 35-base-long A-rich sequence, suggesting that this region directs polyadenylylation. Images PMID:8197183

  7. Velvet antler peptide prevents pressure overload-induced cardiac fibrosis via transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 pathway inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lihong; Mi, Yang; Guan, Hongya; Xu, Yan; Mei, Yingwu

    2016-07-15

    Velvet antlers (VAs) are commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine and invigorant and contain many functional components for health promotion. The velvet antler peptide sVAP32 is one of active components in VAs; based on structural study, the sVAP32 interacts with TGF-β1 receptors and disrupts the TGF-β1 pathway. We hypothesized that sVAP32 prevents cardiac fibrosis from pressure overload by blocking TGF-β1 signaling. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent transverse aortic constriction (TAC) or a sham operation. After one month, rats received either sVAP32 (15mg/kg/day) or vehicle for an additional one month. TAC surgery induced significant cardiac dysfunction, fibroblast activation and fibrosis; these effects were improved by treatment with sVAP32. In the heart tissue, TAC remarkably increased the expression of TGF-β1 and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), reactive oxygen species levels, and the phosphorylation levels of Smad2/3 and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). SVAP32 inhibited the increases in reactive oxygen species levels, CTGF expression and the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 and ERK1/2, but not TGF-β1 expression. In cultured cardiac fibroblasts, angiotensin II (Ang II) had similar effects compared to TAC surgery, such as increases in α-SMA-positive cardiac fibroblasts and collagen synthesis. SVAP32 eliminated these effects by disrupting TGF-β1 binding to its receptors and blocking Ang II/TGF-β1 downstream signaling. These results demonstrated that sVAP32 has anti-fibrotic effects by blocking the TGF-β1 pathway in cardiac fibroblasts.

  8. A peptide that ameliorates lupus up-regulates the diminished expression of early growth response factors 2 and 3.

    PubMed

    Sela, Uri; Dayan, Molly; Hershkoviz, Rami; Lider, Ofer; Mozes, Edna

    2008-02-01

    Expansion of autoreactive T cells and their resistance to anergy was demonstrated in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A pair of transcription factors, early growth response 2 (Egr-2) and 3 (Egr-3), are negative regulators of T cell activation that were shown to be important in anergy. A peptide (designated hCDR1 for human CDR1) based on the CDR-1 of an anti-DNA Ab ameliorated SLE in both induced and spontaneous lupus models. Our objectives were to determine the expression levels of Egr-2 and Egr-3 in autoreactive T cells following immunization with the lupus-inducing anti-DNA Ab that bears a common Id designated 16/6Id and also in a full-blown SLE and to determine the effect of hCDR1 on these transcription factors. We demonstrated diminished expression levels of Egr-2 and Egr-3 mRNA both early after immunization with the 16/6Id and in SLE-afflicted (NZB x NZW)F1 (New Zealand Black and New Zealand White) mice. Furthermore, by down-regulating Akt phosphorylation and up-regulating TGFbeta secretion, treatment with hCDR1 significantly up-regulated Egr-2 and Egr-3 expression. This was associated with an increased expression of the E3 ligase Cbl-b. Inhibition of Akt in T cells of immunized mice decreased, whereas silencing of the Egr-2 and Egr-3 in T cells of hCDR1-treated mice increased IFN-gamma secretion. Thus, hCDR1 down-regulates Akt phosphorylation, which leads to up-regulated expression of T cell Egr-2 and Egr-3, resulting in the inhibition of IFN-gamma secretion that is required for the maintenance of SLE. PMID:18209054

  9. Non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy compared with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists or surgical castration monotherapy for advanced prostate cancer: a Cochrane systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kunath, Frank; Grobe, Henrik R; Rücker, Gerta; Motschall, Edith; Antes, Gerd; Dahm, Philipp; Wullich, Bernd; Meerpohl, Joerg J

    2015-07-01

    To assess the effects of non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy compared with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists or surgical castration monotherapy for treating advanced hormone-sensitive stages of prostate cancer. We searched the Cochrane Prostatic Diseases and Urologic Cancers Group Specialized Register (PROSTATE), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science with Conference Proceedings, three trial registries and abstracts from three major conferences to 23 December 2013, together with reference lists, and contacted selected experts in the field and manufacturers. We included randomized controlled trials comparing non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy with medical or surgical castration monotherapy for men in advanced hormone-sensitive stages of prostate cancer. Two review authors independently examined full-text reports, identified relevant studies, assessed the eligibility of studies for inclusion, extracted data and assessed risk of bias as well as quality of evidence according to the GRADE working group guidelines. We used Review Manager 5.2 for data synthesis and the fixed-effect model as primary analysis (when heterogeneity was low with I(2) < 50%); we used a random-effects model when confronted with substantial or considerable heterogeneity (when I(2) ≥50%). A total of 11 studies involving 3060 randomly assigned participants were included in the present review. Use of non-steroidal antiandrogens resulted in lower overall survival times (hazard ratio [HR] 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-1.48, six studies, 2712 participants) and greater clinical progression (1 year: risk ratio [RR] 1.25, 95% CI 1.08-1.45, five studies, 2067 participants; 70 weeks: RR 1.26, 95% CI 1.08-1.45, six studies, 2373 participants; 2 years: RR 1.14, 95% CI 1.04-1.25, three studies, 1336 participants), as well as treatment failure (1 year: RR 1.19, 95% CI 1.02-1.38, four studies, 1539 participants; 70 weeks: RR 1

  10. Overexpression of Peptide-Encoding OsCEP6.1 Results in Pleiotropic Effects on Growth in Rice (O. sativa).

    PubMed

    Sui, Zhipeng; Wang, Tianya; Li, Hongjian; Zhang, Ming; Li, Yangyang; Xu, Ruibin; Xing, Guofang; Ni, Zhongfu; Xin, Mingming

    2016-01-01

    Plant peptide hormones play an important role in regulating plant developmental programs via cell-to-cell communication in a non-cell autonomous manner. To characterize the biological relevance of C-TERMINALLY ENCODED PEPTIDE (CEP) genes in rice, we performed a genome-wide search against public databases using a bioinformatics approach and identified six additional CEP members. Expression analysis revealed a spatial-temporal pattern of OsCEP6.1 gene in different tissues and at different developmental stages of panicle. Interestingly, the expression level of the OsCEP6.1 was also significantly up-regulated by exogenous cytokinin. Application of a chemically synthesized 15-amino acid OsCEP6.1 peptide showed that OsCEP6.1 had a negative role in regulating root and seedling growth, which was further confirmed by transgenic lines. Furthermore, the constitutive expression of OsCEP6.1 was sufficient to lead to panicle architecture and grain size variations. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed that the phenotypic variation of OsCEP6.1 overexpression lines resulted from decreased cell size but not reduced cell number. Moreover, starch accumulation was not significantly affected. Taken together, these data suggest that the OsCEP6.1 peptide might be involved in regulating the development of panicles and grains in rice. PMID:26973672

  11. Antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling-Juan; Gallo, Richard L

    2016-01-11

    Antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) are a diverse class of naturally occurring molecules that are produced as a first line of defense by all multicellular organisms. These proteins can have broad activity to directly kill bacteria, yeasts, fungi, viruses and even cancer cells. Insects and plants primarily deploy AMPs as an antibiotic to protect against potential pathogenic microbes, but microbes also produce AMPs to defend their environmental niche. In higher eukaryotic organisms, AMPs can also be referred to as 'host defense peptides', emphasizing their additional immunomodulatory activities. These activities are diverse, specific to the type of AMP, and include a variety of cytokine and growth factor-like effects that are relevant to normal immune homeostasis. In some instances, the inappropriate expression of AMPs can also induce autoimmune diseases, thus further highlighting the importance of understanding these molecules and their complex activities. This Primer will provide an update of our current understanding of AMPs. PMID:26766224

  12. Facile rhenium-peptide conjugate synthesis using a one-pot derived Re(CO)3 reagent.

    PubMed

    Chanawanno, Kullapa; Kondeti, Vinay; Caporoso, Joel; Paruchuri, Sailaja; Leeper, Thomas C; Herrick, Richard S; Ziegler, Christopher J

    2016-03-21

    We have synthesized two Re(CO)3-modified lysine complexes (1 and 2), where the metal is attached to the amino acid at the Nε position, via a one-pot Schiff base formation reaction. These compounds can be used in the solid phase synthesis of peptides, and to date we have produced four conjugate systems incorporating neurotensin, bombesin, leutenizing hormone releasing hormone, and a nuclear localization sequence. We observed uptake into human umbilical vascular endothelial cells as well as differential uptake depending on peptide sequence identity, as characterized by fluorescence and rhenium elemental analysis. PMID:26863280

  13. Effects of composite antimicrobial peptides in weanling piglets challenged with deoxynivalenol: I. Growth performance, immune function, and antioxidation capacity.

    PubMed

    Xiao, H; Wu, M M; Tan, B E; Yin, Y L; Li, T J; Xiao, D F; Li, L

    2013-10-01

    The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is a food contaminant that leads to reduced feed intake and reduced BW gain, as well as organ impairment. On the other hand, antimicrobial peptides have been shown to have positive effects on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, and immune function. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effects of composite antimicrobial peptides (CAP) on piglets challenged with DON. After a 7-d adaptation period, 28 individually housed piglets (Duroc × Landrace × Large Yorkshire) weaned at 28 d of age were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 4 treatments (7 pigs/treatment): negative control, basal diet (NC), basal diet + 0.4% CAP (CAP), basal diet + 4 mg/kg DON (DON), and basal diet + 4 ppm DON + 0.4% CAP (DON + CAP). On d 15 and 30 after the initiation of treatment, blood samples were collected for the determination of blood profile. Piglets were monitored for 30 d to assess performance and then were slaughtered to obtain organs for the determination of the relative weight of organs. The results showed that dietary supplementation with DON decreased (P < 0.05) ADFI, ADG, and G:F, whereas dietary supplementation with CAP improved ADG and G:F (P < 0.05). The relative weight of the kidney and pancreas was greater and the relative weight of the spleen was lighter in the DON treatment than in the other 3 treatments (P < 0.05). There were no effects (P > 0.05) on other relative weights of viscera, except the relative weight of the gallbladder, but the diamine oxidase activity in the liver decreased in DON-treated piglets (P < 0.05). Piglets in the DON treatment had increased serum concentrations of alkaline phosphatase, alanine transaminase, and aspartate aminotransferase and a dramatic decrease in total protein (P < 0.05), whereas there were no differences (P > 0.05) between the DON + CAP treatment and the other treatments. The DON treatment decreased the numbers of red blood cells and platelets, as well as the serum

  14. Effects of composite antimicrobial peptides in weanling piglets challenged with deoxynivalenol: I. Growth performance, immune function, and antioxidation capacity.

    PubMed

    Xiao, H; Wu, M M; Tan, B E; Yin, Y L; Li, T J; Xiao, D F; Li, L

    2013-10-01

    The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is a food contaminant that leads to reduced feed intake and reduced BW gain, as well as organ impairment. On the other hand, antimicrobial peptides have been shown to have positive effects on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, and immune function. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effects of composite antimicrobial peptides (CAP) on piglets challenged with DON. After a 7-d adaptation period, 28 individually housed piglets (Duroc × Landrace × Large Yorkshire) weaned at 28 d of age were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 4 treatments (7 pigs/treatment): negative control, basal diet (NC), basal diet + 0.4% CAP (CAP), basal diet + 4 mg/kg DON (DON), and basal diet + 4 ppm DON + 0.4% CAP (DON + CAP). On d 15 and 30 after the initiation of treatment, blood samples were collected for the determination of blood profile. Piglets were monitored for 30 d to assess performance and then were slaughtered to obtain organs for the determination of the relative weight of organs. The results showed that dietary supplementation with DON decreased (P < 0.05) ADFI, ADG, and G:F, whereas dietary supplementation with CAP improved ADG and G:F (P < 0.05). The relative weight of the kidney and pancreas was greater and the relative weight of the spleen was lighter in the DON treatment than in the other 3 treatments (P < 0.05). There were no effects (P > 0.05) on other relative weights of viscera, except the relative weight of the gallbladder, but the diamine oxidase activity in the liver decreased in DON-treated piglets (P < 0.05). Piglets in the DON treatment had increased serum concentrations of alkaline phosphatase, alanine transaminase, and aspartate aminotransferase and a dramatic decrease in total protein (P < 0.05), whereas there were no differences (P > 0.05) between the DON + CAP treatment and the other treatments. The DON treatment decreased the numbers of red blood cells and platelets, as well as the serum

  15. Clinical Effect of Switching from a Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone Agonist to an Antagonist in Patients with Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer and Serum Testosterone Level ≥ 20 ng/dl

    PubMed Central

    Soga, Norihito; Kageyama, Takumi; Ogura, Yuji; Yamada, Tomomi; Hayashi, Norio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The efficacy of conversion from a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist to an antagonist was evaluated prospectively in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer. Materials and Methods From October 2012 to December 2014, 8 cases with a serum testosterone level ≥ 20 ng/dl during following androgen deprivation therapy were enrolled and received degarelix monthly. The primary end-pointgoal was to determine the effective prostate-specific antigen response rate. The secondary end-pointgoal was to assess the proportion of cases with a decrease in serum testosterone level to < 20 ng/ml. Results One patient achieved a complete response, with a prostate-specific antigen level of 0.02 ng/ml at the nadirend of the study. The effective response rate was 25.0% (2/8), and the proportion of cases with prostate-specific antigen decline was 62.5% (5/8). In 5/8 cases (5/8, 62.5%), serum testosterone levels declined to < 20 ng/dl. Conclusion Switching to a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonist in patients with testosterone levels ≥ 20 ng/dl may be an option in sequential androgen deprivation therapy for some patients. PMID:26989369

  16. Intestinal regulation of urinary sodium excretion and the pathophysiology of diabetic kidney disease: a focus on glucagon-like peptide 1 and dipeptidyl peptidase 4.

    PubMed

    Vallon, Volker; Docherty, Neil G

    2014-09-01

    The tubular hypothesis of glomerular filtration and nephropathy in diabetes is a pathophysiological concept that assigns a critical role to the tubular system, including proximal tubular hyper-reabsorption and growth, which is relevant for early glomerular hyperfiltration and later chronic kidney disease. Here we focus on how harnessing the bioactivity of hormones released from the gut may ameliorate the early effects of diabetes on the kidney in part by attenuating proximal tubular hyper-reabsorption and growth. The endogenous tone of the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1)/GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) system and its pharmacological activation are nephroprotective in diabetes independent of changes in blood glucose. This is associated with suppression of increases in kidney weight and glomerular hyperfiltration, which may reflect, at least in part, its inhibitory effects on tubular hyper-reabsorption and growth. Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) is also nephroprotective independent of changes in blood glucose and involves GLP-1/GLP-1R-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The GLP-1R agonist exendin-4 induces natriuresis via activation of the GLP-1R. In contrast, DPP4 inhibition increases circulating GLP-1, but drives a GLP-1R-independent natriuretic response, implying a role for other DPP-4 substrates. The extent to which the intrarenal DPP-4/GLP-1 receptor system contributes to all these changes remains to be established, as does the direct impact of the system on renal inflammation. PMID:25085841

  17. GHRH, PRP-PACAP and GHRHR Target Sequencing via an Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine Reveals an Association with Growth in Orange-Spotted Grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Guo, Liang; Xia, Junhong; Yang, Sen; Li, Mingming; You, Xinxin; Meng, Zining; Lin, Haoran

    2015-11-02

    Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) and the receptor, GHRHR, constitute important components of the hypothalamus-pituitary growth axis and act on the downstream growth hormone (GH). PACAP-related peptide/pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PRP-PACAP) is a paralog of GHRH. These genes all play key roles in development and growth patterns. To improve the quality of cultured fish strains, natural genetic variation must be examined and understood. A mixed linear model has been widely used in association mapping, taking the population structures and pairwise kinship patterns into consideration. In this study, a mass cross population of orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) was examined. These candidate genes were found to harbor low nucleotide diversity (θw from 0.00154 to 0.00388) and linkage disequilibrium levels (delay of 50% within 2 kbp). Association mapping was employed, and two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (KR269823.1:g.475A>C and KR269823.1:g.2143T>C) were found to be associated with growth (false discovery rate Q < 0.05), explaining 9.0%-17.0% of the phenotypic variance. The association of KR269823.1:g.2143T>C was also found via haplotype-based association (p < 0.05). The identified associations offer new insights into gene functions, and the associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may be used for breeding purposes.

  18. GHRH, PRP-PACAP and GHRHR Target Sequencing via an Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine Reveals an Association with Growth in Orange-Spotted Grouper (Epinephelus coioides)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liang; Xia, Junhong; Yang, Sen; Li, Mingming; You, Xinxin; Meng, Zining; Lin, Haoran

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) and the receptor, GHRHR, constitute important components of the hypothalamus-pituitary growth axis and act on the downstream growth hormone (GH). PACAP-related peptide/pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PRP-PACAP) is a paralog of GHRH. These genes all play key roles in development and growth patterns. To improve the quality of cultured fish strains, natural genetic variation must be examined and understood. A mixed linear model has been widely used in association mapping, taking the population structures and pairwise kinship patterns into consideration. In this study, a mass cross population of orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) was examined. These candidate genes were found to harbor low nucleotide diversity (θw from 0.00154 to 0.00388) and linkage disequilibrium levels (delay of 50% within 2 kbp). Association mapping was employed, and two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (KR269823.1:g.475A>C and KR269823.1:g.2143T>C) were found to be associated with growth (false discovery rate Q < 0.05), explaining 9.0%–17.0% of the phenotypic variance. The association of KR269823.1:g.2143T>C was also found via haplotype-based association (p < 0.05). The identified associations offer new insights into gene functions, and the associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may be used for breeding purposes. PMID:26540042

  19. Reiterated Targeting Peptides on the Nanoparticle Surface Significantly Promote Targeted Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Gene Delivery to Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong-Dong; Yang, Mingying; Zhu, Ye; Mao, Chuanbin

    2015-12-14

    Nonviral gene delivery vectors hold great promise for gene therapy due to the safety concerns with viral vectors. However, the application of nonviral vectors is hindered by their low transfection efficiency. Herein, in order to tackle this challenge, we developed a nonviral vector integrating lipids, sleeping beauty transposon system and 8-mer stem cell targeting peptides for safe and efficient gene delivery to hard-to-transfect mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The 8-mer MSC-targeting peptides, when synthetically reiterated in three folds and chemically presented on the surface, significantly promoted the resultant lipid-based nanoparticles (LBNs) to deliver VEGF gene into MSCs with a high transfection efficiency (∼52%) and long-lasting gene expression (for longer than 170 h) when compared to nonreiterated peptides. However, the reiterated stem cell targeting peptides do not enable the highly efficient gene transfer to other control cells. This work suggests that the surface presentation of the reiterated stem cell-targeting peptides on the nonviral vectors is a promising method for improving the efficiency of cell-specific nonviral gene transfection in stem cells. PMID:26588028

  20. [Preparation of polyvinyl alcohol film inlaid with silk fibroin peptide nano-scale particles and evaluation of its function to promote cell growth].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongmin; Hao, Xuefei; Fan, Kai

    2010-12-01

    Nano-scale particles of silk fibroin peptide (SFP) were prepared from discarded materials of cocoon or filature by dissolving and enzymolysis. Polyvinyl Alcohol films inlaid with silk fibroin peptide nano-scale particles (SFP in PVA) were prepared by blending nano-SFP and PVA in water according to different blending ratios. The films' characteristics and their promoting cell growth functions were investigated. Silk fibroin fiber was dissolved in 60% NaSCN solution, and was decomposed with alpha-Chymotrypsin, Trypsin and Neutral, respectively. The uniformity of size of SFP nano-particles prepared by Neutral was better and appeared about 80-150 nm. (SFP in PVA) films were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (IR) measurement which demonstrated the combination of SFP and PVA. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the PVA films already inlaid with SFP micro-segment. The surface and form stability in water of the (SFP in PVA) films with blending ratios of 10/90, 20/80, 30/70 and 40/60 were observed. And the results showed that SFP/PVA film with the blending ratio of 30/70 has smoother surface and better stability in water. The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were cultured, and the promoting cell growth function of (SFP in PVA) films was assessed by MTT colorimetric assay. These findings indicate that SFP/PVA (30/70) film has excellent function of promoting cell growth.

  1. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) inhibits DMBA/croton oil induced skin tumor growth by modulating NF-κB, MMPs, and infiltrating mast cells in swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Vimala; Vellaichamy, Elangovan

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac hormone atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and its receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) are implicated as a vital regulator of cancer cell growth and tumor progression. However, the underlying mechanism by which ANP opposes the cancer growth in in-vivo remains unknown. Herein, we investigated the anti-cancer activity of ANP on 7, 12-dimethyl benzanthracence (DMBA)/Croton oil- induced two-step skin carcinogenic mouse model. Skin tumor incidence and tumor volume were recorded during the experimental period of 16 weeks. ANP (1 μg/kg body weight/alternate days for 4 weeks) was injected subcutaneously from the 13th week of DMBA/Croton oil induction. ANP treatment markedly inhibited the skin tumor growth (P<0.001). A significant reduction in the level of NF-κB activation (P<0.001), infiltrating mast cell count (P<0.01) and MMP-2/-9 (P<0.001, respectively) were noticed in the ANP treated mice skin tissue. Further, ANP treatment revert back the altered levels of serum LDH-4, C-reactive protein (CRP), and enzymatic antioxidants (SOD and CAT activities) to near normal level. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that ANP opposes the skin carcinogenesis by suppressing the inflammatory response and MMPs.

  2. Overexpression of apolipoprotein A-I fused to an anti-transforming growth factor beta peptide modulates the tumorigenicity and immunogenicity of mouse colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Medina-Echeverz, José; Vasquez, Marcos; Gomar, Celia; Ardaiz, Nuria; Berraondo, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) promotes tumor growth, invasion and metastasis in established tumors. In this study, we analyzed the effect of overexpressing an anti-TGF-β peptide fused to apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) as a scaffold molecule. We generated and characterized stable MC38 colon carcinoma clones expressing ApoA-I fused to the anti-TGF-β peptide P144 and ApoA-I as control cells. We evaluated in vitro the gene expression profile, cell cycle and anchorage-independent growth. The in vivo tumorigenic potential and immunogenicity were analyzed inoculating the MC38 clones into C57BL/6 mice, recombination-activating gene 1 knockout mice or mice deficient in NK cells either subcutaneously or intrasplenically to generate hepatic metastases. While overexpression of ApoA-I had no effect on the parameters analyzed, ApoA-I fused to P144 markedly diminished the tumorigenic capacity and metastatic potential of MC38 in vitro and in vivo, thus generating a highly immunogenic cell line. MC38 cells transfected with ApoA-I fused to P144 triggered memory T cell responses able to eliminate the parental cell line upon re-challenge. In summary, expression of ApoA-I fused to P144 is a novel strategy to modulate TGF-β in tumor cells. These results highlight the potential of TGF-β as a target in the development of new antitumor treatments.

  3. Exploring the in meso crystallization mechanism by characterizing the lipid mesophase microenvironment during the growth of single transmembrane α-helical peptide crystals.

    PubMed

    van 't Hag, Leonie; Knoblich, Konstantin; Seabrook, Shane A; Kirby, Nigel M; Mudie, Stephen T; Lau, Deborah; Li, Xu; Gras, Sally L; Mulet, Xavier; Call, Matthew E; Call, Melissa J; Drummond, Calum J; Conn, Charlotte E

    2016-07-28

    The proposed mechanism for in meso crystallization of transmembrane proteins suggests that a protein or peptide is initially uniformly dispersed in the lipid self-assembly cubic phase but that crystals grow from a local lamellar phase, which acts as a conduit between the crystal and the bulk cubic phase. However, there is very limited experimental evidence for this theory. We have developed protocols to investigate the lipid mesophase microenvironment during crystal growth using standard procedures readily available in crystallography laboratories. This technique was used to characterize the microenvironment during crystal growth of the DAP12-TM peptide using synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) with a micro-sized X-ray beam. Crystal growth was found to occur from the gyroid cubic mesophase. For one in four crystals, a highly oriented local lamellar phase was observed, providing supporting evidence for the proposed mechanism for in meso crystallization. A new observation of this study was that we can differentiate diffraction peaks from crystals grown in meso, from peaks originating from the surrounding lipid matrix, potentially opening up the possibility of high-throughput SAXS analysis of in meso grown crystals.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'.

  4. Exploring the in meso crystallization mechanism by characterizing the lipid mesophase microenvironment during the growth of single transmembrane α-helical peptide crystals.

    PubMed

    van 't Hag, Leonie; Knoblich, Konstantin; Seabrook, Shane A; Kirby, Nigel M; Mudie, Stephen T; Lau, Deborah; Li, Xu; Gras, Sally L; Mulet, Xavier; Call, Matthew E; Call, Melissa J; Drummond, Calum J; Conn, Charlotte E

    2016-07-28

    The proposed mechanism for in meso crystallization of transmembrane proteins suggests that a protein or peptide is initially uniformly dispersed in the lipid self-assembly cubic phase but that crystals grow from a local lamellar phase, which acts as a conduit between the crystal and the bulk cubic phase. However, there is very limited experimental evidence for this theory. We have developed protocols to investigate the lipid mesophase microenvironment during crystal growth using standard procedures readily available in crystallography laboratories. This technique was used to characterize the microenvironment during crystal growth of the DAP12-TM peptide using synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) with a micro-sized X-ray beam. Crystal growth was found to occur from the gyroid cubic mesophase. For one in four crystals, a highly oriented local lamellar phase was observed, providing supporting evidence for the proposed mechanism for in meso crystallization. A new observation of this study was that we can differentiate diffraction peaks from crystals grown in meso, from peaks originating from the surrounding lipid matrix, potentially opening up the possibility of high-throughput SAXS analysis of in meso grown crystals.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'. PMID:27298442

  5. Radiolabeling and evaluation of 64Cu-DOTA-F56 peptide targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 in the molecular imaging of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hua; Zhao, Chuanke; Liu, Fei; Wang, Lixin; Feng, Junnan; Zhou, Zheng; Qu, Like; Shou, Chengchao; Yang, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1) remains a great challenge in early diagnosis of gastric cancer. Here we reported the synthesis, radiolabeling, and evaluation of a novel 64Cu-radiolabeled peptide for noninvasive positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of VEGFR1 positive gastric cancer. The binding of modified peptide WHSDMEWWYLLG (termed as F56) to VEGER-1 expressed in gastric cancer cell BCG823 has been confirmed by immune-fluorescence overlap. DOTA-F56 was designed and prepared by solid-phase synthesis and folded in vitro. 64Cu-DOTA-F56 was synthesized in high radiochemical yield and high specific activity (S.A. up to 255.6 GBq/mmol). It has excellent in vitro stability. Micro-PET imaging of 64Cu-DOTA-F56 identifies tumor in BCG823 tumor-bearing mice, while that of 18F-FDG does not. Immunohistochemical analysis of excised BCG823 xenograft showed colocalization between the PET images and the staining of VEGFR1. These results demonstrated that 64Cu-DOTA-F56 peptide has potential as a noninvasive imaging agent in VEGFR1 positive tumors. PMID:26807312

  6. LPXRFamide peptide stimulates growth hormone and prolactin gene expression during the spawning period in the grass puffer, a semi-lunar synchronized spawner.

    PubMed

    Shahjahan, Md; Doi, Hiroyuki; Ando, Hironori

    2016-02-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) plays as a multifunctional neurohormone that controls reproduction in birds and mammals. LPXRFamide (LPXRFa) peptide, the fish ortholog of GnIH, has been shown to regulate the secretion of not only gonadotropin (GTH) but also growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL), which are potentially important for gonadal function. To investigate the role of LPXRFa peptide on reproduction of the grass puffer, which spawns in semilunar cycles, we examined changes in the levels of gh and prl expression over the several months during the reproductive cycle, and the effects of goldfish LPXRFa peptide-1 (gfLPXRFa-1) on their expression were examined using primary pituitary cultures. The expression levels of both gh and prl showed significant changes during the reproductive cycle in both sexes with one peak in the spawning and pre-spawning periods for gh and prl, respectively. Particularly, gh showed substantial increase in expression in the spawning and post-spawning periods, indicative of its essentiality in the advanced stage of reproduction. gfLPXRFa-1 stimulated the expression of both gh and prl but there was a marked difference in response between them: gfLPXRFa-1 stimulated gh expression at a relatively low dose but little effect was observed on prl. Combined with the previous results of daily and circadian oscillations of lpxrfa expression, the present results suggest that LPXRFa peptide is important in the control of the cyclic reproduction by serving as a multifunctional hypophysiotropic factor that regulates the expression of gh and prl as well as GTH subunit genes.

  7. The Nutrient-Responsive Hormone CCHamide-2 Controls Growth by Regulating Insulin-like Peptides in the Brain of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Hiroko; Nakamura, Akira; Texada, Michael J.; Truman, James W.; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Kamikouchi, Azusa; Nibu, Yutaka; Kume, Kazuhiko; Ida, Takanori; Kojima, Masayasu

    2015-01-01

    The coordination of growth with nutritional status is essential for proper development and physiology. Nutritional information is mostly perceived by peripheral organs before being relayed to the brain, which modulates physiological responses. Hormonal signaling ensures this organ-to-organ communication, and the failure of endocrine regulation in humans can cause diseases including obesity and diabetes. In Drosophila melanogaster, the fat body (adipose tissue) has been suggested to play an important role in coupling growth with nutritional status. Here, we show that the peripheral tissue-derived peptide hormone CCHamide-2 (CCHa2) acts as a nutrient-dependent regulator of Drosophila insulin-like peptides (Dilps). A BAC-based transgenic reporter revealed strong expression of CCHa2 receptor (CCHa2-R) in insulin-producing cells (IPCs) in the brain. Calcium imaging of brain explants and IPC-specific CCHa2-R knockdown demonstrated that peripheral-tissue derived CCHa2 directly activates IPCs. Interestingly, genetic disruption of either CCHa2 or CCHa2-R caused almost identical defects in larval growth and developmental timing. Consistent with these phenotypes, the expression of dilp5, and the release of both Dilp2 and Dilp5, were severely reduced. Furthermore, transcription of CCHa2 is altered in response to nutritional levels, particularly of glucose. These findings demonstrate that CCHa2 and CCHa2-R form a direct link between peripheral tissues and the brain, and that this pathway is essential for the coordination of systemic growth with nutritional availability. A mammalian homologue of CCHa2-R, Bombesin receptor subtype-3 (Brs3), is an orphan receptor that is expressed in the islet β-cells; however, the role of Brs3 in insulin regulation remains elusive. Our genetic approach in Drosophila melanogaster provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, that bombesin receptor signaling with its endogenous ligand promotes insulin production. PMID:26020940

  8. Studies of the chemical basis of the origin of protein synthesis Initiation and direction of peptide growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, D. W., Jr.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The data presented in this paper show that the ease of nonenzymatic activation of carboxylic acids by ATP at pH 5 varies directly with the pKa of the carboxyl group, and is consistent with the idea that it is the protonated form of the carboxyl group which participates in the activation reaction. Consequently, since most N-blocked amino acids have higher pKas than do their unblocked forms, they are activated more readily, and it has been demonstrated that this principle applies to peptides as well, which are activated more rapidly than single amino acids. It is proposed that this fact may be partly responsible for the origin of two important features still observed in contemporary protein synthesis: (1) initiation in prokaryotes is accomplished with an N-blocked amino acid, and (2) elongation in all living systems occurs at the carboxyl end of the growing peptide.

  9. Peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hamley, Ian W

    2014-07-01

    The self-assembly of different classes of peptide, including cyclic peptides, amyloid peptides and surfactant-like peptides into nanotube structures is reviewed. The modes of self-assembly are discussed. Additionally, applications in bionanotechnology and synthetic materials science are summarized.

  10. Selective inhibition of JNK with a peptide inhibitor attenuates pain hypersensitivity and tumor growth in a mouse skin cancer pain model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yong-Jing; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Zeng, Qing; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Decosterd, Isabelle; Xu, Xiaoyin; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2009-09-01

    Cancer pain significantly affects the quality of cancer patients, and current treatments for this pain are limited. C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) has been implicated in tumor growth and neuropathic pain sensitization. We investigated the role of JNK in cancer pain and tumor growth in a skin cancer pain model. Injection of luciferase-transfected B16-Fluc melanoma cells into a hindpaw of mouse induced robust tumor growth, as indicated by increase in paw volume and fluorescence intensity. Pain hypersensitivity in this model developed rapidly (<5 days) and reached a peak in 2 weeks, and was characterized by mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia. Tumor growth was associated with JNK activation in tumor mass, dorsal root ganglion (DRG), and spinal cord and a peripheral neuropathy, such as loss of nerve fibers in the hindpaw skin and induction of ATF-3 expression in DRG neurons. Repeated systemic injections of D-JNKI-1 (6 mg/kg, i.p.), a selective and cell-permeable peptide inhibitor of JNK, produced an accumulative inhibition of mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia. A bolus spinal injection of D-JNKI-1 also inhibited mechanical allodynia. Further, JNK inhibition suppressed tumor growth in vivo and melanoma cell proliferation in vitro. In contrast, repeated injections of morphine (5 mg/kg), a commonly used analgesic for terminal cancer, produced analgesic tolerance after 1 day and did not inhibit tumor growth. Our data reveal a marked peripheral neuropathy in this skin cancer model and important roles of the JNK pathway in cancer pain development and tumor growth. JNK inhibitors such as D-JNKI-1 may be used to treat cancer pain. PMID:19445931

  11. [TREATMENT OF SHORT STATURE PATIENTS WITH NOPMAL GROWTH HORMONE SECRETION OF HYPOPHIS].

    PubMed

    Sprinchuk, N A; Samson, O J; Bol'shova, E V

    2014-12-01

    The article presents the treatment outcome in 86 children with short stature associated with different endocrine pathology and saved growth hormone secretion (congenital adrenal hyperplasia chondrodystrophy, Turner syndrome, idiopathic short stature, syndrome biologically inactive growth hormone and other genetically determined pathology). This study extends prior knowledge about the outcomes of the treatment with recombinant growth hormone and luteinizing hormone--releasing hormone analogue (alone or in combination) in short patients with poor prognosis of final height. PMID:26638471

  12. Endocrine response and ovum transport in women treated with D-Trp6-luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in the postovulatory period.

    PubMed

    Guiloff, E; Salvatierra, A M; Ortiz, M E; Croxatto, H B

    1982-01-15

    Possible alterations in ovum transport during increased activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis were investigated in women. D-Trp6-luteinizing hormone (LH)-releasing hormone, a synthetic peptide with potent gonadotropin-releasing activity, was used to induce a gonadotropin surge and stimulate ovarian steroid secretion in the postovulatory phase. The compound was administered intramuscularly or intravenously 24, 48, or 72 hours following the maximum preovulatory LH level in plasma in seven women. An immediate and pronounced gonadotropin surge accompanied by a moderate increase in the estradiol and progesterone level was obtained in all cases. Ova were recovered from the fallopian tubes in four of the seven women 24 hours following treatment. The rate of recovery and the location of ova within the genital tract indicate that the treatment and the resulting endocrine changes failed to accelerate migration of the ova toward the uterus. This observation, taken together with other negative findings previously reported, suggests that in comparison with other mammals transport of the ovum in the woman is relatively insensitive to endocrine changes occurring in the postovulatory phase.

  13. Cationicity-enhanced analogues of the antimicrobial peptides, AcrAP1 and AcrAP2, from the venom of the scorpion, Androctonus crassicauda, display potent growth modulation effects on human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Du, Qiang; Hou, Xiaojuan; Ge, Lilin; Li, Renjie; Zhou, Mei; Wang, Hui; Wang, Lei; Wei, Minjie; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The non disulphide-bridged peptides (NDBPs) of scorpion venoms are attracting increased interest due to their structural heterogeneity and broad spectrum of biological activities. Here, two novel peptides, named AcrAP1 and AcrAP2, have been identified in the lyophilised venom of the Arabian scorpion, Androctonus crassicauda, through "shotgun" molecular cloning of their biosynthetic precursor-encoding cDNAs. The respective mature peptides, predicted from these cloned cDNAs, were subsequently isolated from the same venom sample using reverse phase HPLC and their identities were confirmed by use of mass spectrometric techniques. Both were found to belong to a family of highly-conserved scorpion venom antimicrobial peptides - a finding confirmed through the biological investigation of synthetic replicates. Analogues of both peptides designed for enhanced cationicity, displayed enhanced potency and spectra of antimicrobial activity but, unlike the native peptides, these also displayed potent growth modulation effects on a range of human cancer cell lines. Thus natural peptide templates from venom peptidomes can provide the basis for rational analogue design to improve both biological potency and spectrum of action. The diversity of such templates from such natural sources undoubtedly provides the pharmaceutical industry with unique lead compounds for drug discovery. PMID:25332684

  14. Activation of epidermal growth factor receptor by metal-ligand complexes decreases levels of extracellular amyloid beta peptide.

    PubMed

    Price, Katherine A; Filiz, Gulay; Caragounis, Aphrodite; Du, Tai; Laughton, Katrina M; Masters, Colin L; Sharples, Robyn A; Hill, Andrew F; Li, Qiao-Xin; Donnelly, Paul S; Barnham, Kevin J; Crouch, Peter J; White, Anthony R

    2008-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor is a receptor tyrosine kinase expressed in a range of tissues and cell-types. Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor by a number of ligands induces downstream signalling that modulates critical cell functions including growth, survival and differentiation. Abnormal epidermal growth factor receptor expression and activation is also involved in a number of cancers. In addition to its cognate ligands, the epidermal growth factor receptor can be activated by metals such as zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu). Due to the important role of these metals in a number of diseases including neurodegenerative disorders, therapeutic approaches are being developed based on the use of lipid permeable metal-complexing molecules. While these agents are showing promising results in animal models and clinical trials, little is known about the effects of metal-ligand complexes on cell signalling pathways. In this study, we investigated the effects of clioquinol (CQ)-metal complexes on activation of epidermal growth factor receptor. We show here that CQ-Cu complexes induced potent epidermal growth factor receptor phosphorylation resulting in downstream activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Similar levels of epidermal growth factor receptor activation were observed with alternative lipid permeable metal-ligands including neocuproine and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate. We found that CQ-Cu complexes induced a significant reduction in the level of extracellular Abeta1-40 in cell culture. Inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor activation by PD153035 blocked extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation and restored Abeta1-40 levels. Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor by CQ-Cu was mediated through up-regulation of src kinase activity by a cognate ligand-independent process involving membrane integrins. These findings provide the first evidence that metal-ligand complexes can activate the epidermal growth

  15. Incorporation of Exogenous RGD Peptide and Inter-Species Blending as Strategies for Enhancing Human Corneal Limbal Epithelial Cell Growth on Bombyx mori Silk Fibroin Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Laura J.; Suzuki, Shuko; Harkin, Damien G.; Chirila, Traian V.

    2013-01-01

    While fibroin isolated from the cocoons of domesticated silkworm Bombyx mori supports growth of human corneal limbal epithelial (HLE) cells, the mechanism of cell attachment remains unclear. In the present study we sought to enhance the attachment of HLE cells to membranes of Bombyx mori silk fibroin (BMSF) through surface functionalization with an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD)-containing peptide. Moreover, we have examined the response of HLE cells to BMSF when blended with the fibroin produced by a wild silkworm, Antheraea pernyi, which is known to contain RGD sequences within its primary structure. A procedure to isolate A. pernyi silk fibroin (APSF) from the cocoons was established, and blends of the two fibroins were prepared at five different BMSF/APSF ratios. In another experiment, BMSF surface was modified by binding chemically the GRGDSPC peptide using a water-soluble carbodiimide. Primary HLE were grown in the absence of serum on membranes made of BMSF, APSF, and their blends, as well as on RGD-modified BMSF. There was no statistically significant enhancing effect on the cell attachment due to the RGD presence. This suggests that the adhesion through RGD ligands may have a complex mechanism, and the investigated strategies are of limited value unless the factors contributing to this mechanism become better known. PMID:24955953

  16. Cellular and molecular insight into the inhibition of primary root growth of Arabidopsis induced by peptaibols, a class of linear peptide antibiotics mainly produced by Trichoderma spp.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei-Ling; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Wang, Li-Xia; Gong, Zhi-Ting; Li, Shuyu; Li, Chun-Long; Xie, Bin-Bin; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Mei; Li, Chuanyou; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Song, Xiao-Yan

    2016-04-01

    Trichoderma spp. are well known biocontrol agents that produce a variety of antibiotics. Peptaibols are a class of linear peptide antibiotics mainly produced by Trichoderma Alamethicin, the most studied peptaibol, is reported as toxic to plants at certain concentrations, while the mechanisms involved are unclear. We illustrated the toxic mechanisms of peptaibols by studying the growth-inhibitory effect of Trichokonin VI (TK VI), a peptaibol from Trichoderma longibrachiatum SMF2, on Arabidopsis primary roots. TK VI inhibited root growth by suppressing cell division and cell elongation, and disrupting root stem cell niche maintenance. TK VI increased auxin content and disrupted auxin response gradients in root tips. Further, we screened the Arabidopsis TK VI-resistant mutant tkr1. tkr1 harbors a point mutation in GORK, which encodes gated outwardly rectifying K(+)channel proteins. This mutation alleviated TK VI-induced suppression of K(+)efflux in roots, thereby stabilizing the auxin gradient. The tkr1 mutant also resisted the phytotoxicity of alamethicin. Our results indicate that GORK channels play a key role in peptaibol-plant interaction and that there is an inter-relationship between GORK channels and maintenance of auxin homeostasis. The cellular and molecular insight into the peptaibol-induced inhibition of plant root growth advances our understanding of Trichoderma-plant interactions.

  17. Cellular and molecular insight into the inhibition of primary root growth of Arabidopsis induced by peptaibols, a class of linear peptide antibiotics mainly produced by Trichoderma spp.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei-Ling; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Wang, Li-Xia; Gong, Zhi-Ting; Li, Shuyu; Li, Chun-Long; Xie, Bin-Bin; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Mei; Li, Chuanyou; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Song, Xiao-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Trichoderma spp. are well known biocontrol agents that produce a variety of antibiotics. Peptaibols are a class of linear peptide antibiotics mainly produced by Trichoderma. Alamethicin, the most studied peptaibol, is reported as toxic to plants at certain concentrations, while the mechanisms involved are unclear. We illustrated the toxic mechanisms of peptaibols by studying the growth-inhibitory effect of Trichokonin VI (TK VI), a peptaibol from Trichoderma longibrachiatum SMF2, on Arabidopsis primary roots. TK VI inhibited root growth by suppressing cell division and cell elongation, and disrupting root stem cell niche maintenance. TK VI increased auxin content and disrupted auxin response gradients in root tips. Further, we screened the Arabidopsis TK VI-resistant mutant tkr1. tkr1 harbors a point mutation in GORK, which encodes gated outwardly rectifying K+ channel proteins. This mutation alleviated TK VI-induced suppression of K+ efflux in roots, thereby stabilizing the auxin gradient. The tkr1 mutant also resisted the phytotoxicity of alamethicin. Our results indicate that GORK channels play a key role in peptaibol–plant interaction and that there is an inter-relationship between GORK channels and maintenance of auxin homeostasis. The cellular and molecular insight into the peptaibol-induced inhibition of plant root growth advances our understanding of Trichoderma–plant interactions. PMID:26850879

  18. One-Dimensional Peptide Nanostructure Templated Growth of Iron Phosphate Nanostructures for Lithium-Ion Battery Cathodes.

    PubMed

    Susapto, Hepi Hari; Kudu, O Ulas; Garifullin, Ruslan; Yılmaz, Eda; Guler, Mustafa O

    2016-07-13

    Template-directed synthesis of nanomaterials can provide benefits such as small crystalline size, high surface area, large surface-to-volume ratio, and structural stability. These properties are important for shorter distance in ion/electron movement and better electrode surface/electrolyte contact for energy storage applications. Here nanostructured FePO4 cathode materials were synthesized by using peptide nanostructures as a template inspired by biomineralization process. The amorphous, high surface area FePO4 nanostructures were utilized as a cathode for lithium-ion batteries. Discharge capacity of 155 mAh/g was achieved at C/20 current rate. The superior properties of biotemplated and nanostructured amorphous FePO4 are shown compared to template-free crystalline FePO4.

  19. Activin-A stimulates hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone release by the explanted male rat hypothalamus: interaction with inhibin and androgens.

    PubMed

    Calogero, A E; Burrello, N; Ossino, A M; Polosa, P; D'Agata, R

    1998-02-01

    The presence of activins in those hypothalamic regions containing gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-secreting neurons suggests that these peptides may regulate the reproductive function modulating not only pituitary FSH release and biosynthesis, but also hypothalamic GnRH release. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of activin-A, a homodimer of inhibin beta A subunit, on hypothalamic GnRH release in vitro and, because of their well known antithetical effects, to evaluate its interaction with inhibin. In addition, since androgens modulate the release of GnRH from male rat hypothalami, we thought it of interest to study the possible interplay between these steroids and activin on GnRH release. To accomplish this, we employed a hypothalamic organ culture system which enabled us to evaluate GnRH release from individually incubated hemi-hypothalami explanted from male rats. Activin-A stimulated GnRH release in a biphasic manner. The maximal effect was reached at a concentration of 10 ng/ml which increased GnRH output by about 75%. Inhibin abolished the stimulatory effect of a maximally effective concentration of activin-A in a dose-dependent manner, whereas alone it had no effect on GnRH output. As previously shown, testosterone (1 nmol/l) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT, 0.1 nmol/l) suppressed basal GnRH release, but only testosterone was able to inhibit the release of GnRH stimulated by activin-A. Since DHT is a non-aromatizable androgen, we evaluated whether the inhibitory effect of testosterone was due to its in vitro conversion into 17 beta-estradiol. The addition of 4-hydroxyandrostenedione, a steroidal aromatase inhibitor, did not influence the suppressive effect of testosterone on GnRH release stimulated by activin-A. In conclusion, activin-A stimulated hypothalamic GnRH release in vitro and this effect was abolished by inhibin and was blunted by testosterone. These findings suggest that activins may participate in the regulation of the

  20. Homology model of human corticosteroid binding globulin: a study of its steroid binding ability and a plausible mechanism of steroid hormone release at the site of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Dey, Raja; Roychowdhury, Priyobroto

    2003-06-01

    Corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG) and thyroxin binding globulin (TBG) both belong to the same SERPIN superfamily of serine-proteinase inhibitors but in the course of evolution CBG has adapted to its new role as a transport agent of insoluble hormones. CBG binds corticosteroids in plasma, delivering them to sites of inflammation to modify the inflammatory response. CBG is an effective drug carrier for genetic manipulation, and hence there is immense biological interest in the location of the hormone binding site. The crystal structure of human CBG (hCBG) has not been determined, but sequence alignment with other SERPINs suggests that it conforms as a whole to the tertiary structure shared by the superfamily. Human CBG shares 52.15% and 55.50% sequence similarity with alpha1-antitrypsin and alpha1-antichymotrypsin, respectively. Multiple sequence alignment among the three sequences shows 73 conserved regions. The molecular structures of alpha1-antitrypsin and alpha1-antichymotrypsin, the archetype of the SERPIN superfamily, obtained by X-ray diffraction methods are used to develop a homology model of hCBG. Energy minimization was applied to the model to refine the structure further. The homology model of hCBG contains 371 residues (His13 to Val383 ). The secondary structure comprises 11 helices, 15 turns and 11 sheets. The putative corticosteroid binding region is found to exist in a pocket between beta-sheets S4, S10, S11 and alpha helix H10. Both cortisol and aldosterone are docked to the elongated hydrophobic ligand binding pocket with the polar residues at the two extremities. A difference accessible surface area (DASA) study revealed that cortisol binds with the native hCBG more tightly than aldosterone. Cleavage at the Val379-Met380 peptide bond causes a deformation of hCBG (also revealed through a DASA study). This deformation could probably trigger the release of the bound hormone. Figure Stereoscopic view of the ribbon diagram of hCBG complexed with

  1. Adhesion between peptides/antibodies and breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, J.; Paetzell, E.; Bogorad, A.; Soboyejo, W. O.

    2010-06-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used to measure the adhesion forces between the receptors on breast cancer cells specific to human luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) peptides and antibodies specific to the EphA2 receptor. The adhesion forces between LHRH-coated AFM tips and human MDA-MB-231 cells (breast cancer cells) were shown to be about five times greater than those between LHRH-coated AFM tips and normal Hs578Bst breast cells. Similarly, those between EphA2 antibody-coated AFM tips and breast cancer cells were over five times greater than those between EphA2 antibody-coated AFM tips and normal breast cells. The results suggest that AFM can be used for the detection of breast cancer cells in biopsies. The implications of the results are also discussed for the early detection and localized treatment of cancer.

  2. Antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With increasing antibiotics resistance, there is an urgent need for novel infection therapeutics. Since antimicrobial peptides provide opportunities for this, identification and optimization of such peptides have attracted much interest during recent years. Here, a brief overview of antimicrobial peptides is provided, with focus placed on how selected hydrophobic modifications of antimicrobial peptides can be employed to combat also more demanding pathogens, including multi-resistant strains, without conferring unacceptable toxicity. PMID:24758244

  3. BRCA1 protein level is not affected by peptide growth factors in MCF10A cell line.

    PubMed

    Aprelikova, O; Kuthiala, A; Bessho, M; Ethier, S; Liu, E T

    1996-12-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility gene (BRCA1) has been identified as a putative tumor suppressor on chromosome 17. We raised antibody against Ring-finger domain of BRCA1. The antibody recognizes a specific BRCA1 protein doublet of about 220 kD. The majority of BRCA1 protein is localized to the nuclear fraction of untreated MCF10A cells. Though BRCA1 is thought to be a growth suppressor gene, no change in BRCA1 protein level was found when MCF10A cells were arrested by growth factor deprivation or stimulation of cell proliferation by re-addition of growth factors. Furthermore the subcellular localization of the BRCA1 protein does not change throughout the cell cycle. These results suggest that BRCA1 may not be directly involved in the regulation of the cell cycle of breast cancer cell line.

  4. The reproductive system at the neuroendocrine-immune interface: focus on LHRH, estrogens and growth factors in LHRH neuron-glial interactions.

    PubMed

    Morale, M C; Gallo, F; Tirolo, C; L'Episcopo, F; Gennuso, F; Testa, N; Caniglia, S; Spina-Purrello, V; Avola, R; Scoto, G M; Marchetti, B

    2003-07-01

    Bidirectional communication between the neuroendocrine and immune systems plays a pivotal role in health and disease. Signals generated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis (i.e. luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone, LHRH, and sex steroids) are major players coordinating the development immune system function. Conversely, products generated by immune system activation exert powerful and longlasting effects on HPG axis activity. In the central nervous system (CNS), one chief neuroendocrine-immune (NEI) compartment is represented by the astroglial cell population and its mediators. Of special interest, the major supporting cells of the brain and the thymus, astrocytes and thymic epithelial cells, share a similar origin and a similar set of peptides, transmitters, hormones and cytokines functioning as paracrine/autocrine regulators. This may explain some fundamental analogies in LHRH regulation of both cell types during ontogeny and in adult life. Hence, the neuropeptide LHRH significantly modulates astrocyte and thymic cell development and function. Here we focus this work on LHRH neuron-glial signaling cascades which dictate major changes during LHRH neuronal differentiation and growth as well as in response to hormonal manipulations and pro-inflammatory challenges. The interplay between LHRH, growth factors, estrogens and pro-inflammatory mediators will be discussed, and the potential physiopathological implications of these findings summarized. The overall study highlights the plasticity of this intersystem cross-talk and emphasize neuron-glial interactions as a key regulatory level of neuroendocrine axes activity.

  5. The atypical antipsychotic, olanzapine, potentiates ghrelin-induced receptor signaling: An in vitro study with cells expressing cloned human growth hormone secretagogue receptor.

    PubMed

    Tagami, Keita; Kashiwase, Yohei; Yokoyama, Akinobu; Nishimura, Hitomi; Miyano, Kanako; Suzuki, Masami; Shiraishi, Seiji; Matoba, Motohiro; Ohe, Yuichiro; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2016-08-01

    The growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) belongs to Gαq-coupled G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that mediates growth hormone release, food intake, appetite, glucose metabolism and body composition. Ghrelin has been identified as an endogenous ligand for GHS-R, and it is the only orexigenic peptide found in the peripheral organs. Olanzapine, an atypical antipsychotic agent that binds to and inhibits the activation of GPCR for several neurotransmitters, has metabolic side effects such as excessive appetite and weight gain. Recently, studies have revealed that the orexigenic mechanism of olanzapine is mediated via GHS-R signaling, although the precise mechanisms have not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the effect of olanzapine on ghrelin-mediated GHS-R signaling by using an electrical impedance-based receptor biosensor assay system (CellKey™). Olanzapine at concentrations of 10(-7) and 10(-6)mol/L enhanced ghrelin-induced (10(-10)-10(-8)mol/L) GHS-R activation. A Ca(2+) imaging assay revealed that olanzapine (10(-7) and 10(-6)mol/L) enhanced ghrelin (10(-7) M)-induced GHS-R activity. In contrast, haloperidol (an antipsychotic agent) failed to enhance this ghrelin-mediated GHS-R activation, as demonstrated by both the CellKey™ and Ca(2+) imaging assays. Together, these results suggest that olanzapine, but not haloperidol, promotes appetite by enhancing ghrelin-mediated GHS-R signaling. PMID:26775231

  6. A composite demineralized bone matrix--self assembling peptide scaffold for enhancing cell and growth factor activity in bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tianyong; Li, Zhiqiang; Luo, Fei; Xie, Zhao; Wu, Xuehui; Xing, Junchao; Dong, Shiwu; Xu, Jianzhong

    2014-07-01

    The need for suitable bone grafts is high; however, there are limitations to all current graft sources, such as limited availability, the invasive harvest procedure, insufficient osteoinductive properties, poor biocompatibility, ethical problems, and degradation properties. The lack of osteoinductive properties is a common problem. As an allogenic bone graft, demineralized bone matrix (DBM) can overcome issues such as limited sources and comorbidities caused by invasive harvest; however, DBM is not sufficiently osteoinductive. Bone marrow has been known to magnify osteoinductive components for bone reconstruction because it contains osteogenic cells and factors. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow are the gold standard for cell seeding in tissue-engineered biomaterials for bone repair, and these cells have demonstrated beneficial effects. However, the associated high cost and the complicated procedures limit the use of tissue-engineered bone constructs. To easily enrich more osteogenic cells and factors to DBM by selective cell retention technology, DBM is modified by a nanoscale self-assembling peptide (SAP) to form a composite DBM/SAP scaffold. By decreasing the pore size and increasing the charge interaction, DBM/SAP scaffolds possess a much higher enriching yield for osteogenic cells and factors compared with DBM alone scaffolds. At the same time, SAP can build a cellular microenvironment for cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation that promotes bone reconstruction. As a result, a suitable bone graft fabricated by DBM/SAP scaffolds and bone marrow represents a new strategy and product for bone transplantation in the clinic.

  7. P144, a Transforming Growth Factor beta inhibitor peptide, generates antitumoral effects and modifies SMAD7 and SKI levels in human glioblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gallo-Oller, Gabriel; Vollmann-Zwerenz, Arabel; Meléndez, Bárbara; Rey, Juan A; Hau, Peter; Dotor, Javier; Castresana, Javier S

    2016-10-10

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent malignant primary brain tumor, accounting for 60-70% of all gliomas. Current median patient survival time is 14-16 months after diagnosis. Numerous efforts in therapy have not significantly altered the nearly uniform lethality of this malignancy. The Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway plays a key role in GBM and is implicated in proliferation, invasion and therapy resistance. Several inhibitors of the TGF-β pathway have entered clinical trials or are under development. In this work, the therapeutic potential of P144, a TGF-β inhibitor peptide, was analyzed. P144 decreased proliferation, migration, invasiveness, and tumorigenicity in vitro, whereas apoptosis and anoikis were significantly increased for GBM cell lines. SMAD2 phosphorylation was reduced, together with a downregulation of SKI and an upregulation of SMAD7 at both transcriptional and translational levels. Additionally, P144 was able to impair tumor growth and increase survival in an in vivo flank model. Our findings suggest a potential effect of P144 in vitro and in vivo that is mediated by regulation of transcriptional target genes of the TGF-β pathway, suggesting a therapeutic potential of P144 for GBM treatment.

  8. P144, a Transforming Growth Factor beta inhibitor peptide, generates antitumoral effects and modifies SMAD7 and SKI levels in human glioblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gallo-Oller, Gabriel; Vollmann-Zwerenz, Arabel; Meléndez, Bárbara; Rey, Juan A; Hau, Peter; Dotor, Javier; Castresana, Javier S

    2016-10-10

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent malignant primary brain tumor, accounting for 60-70% of all gliomas. Current median patient survival time is 14-16 months after diagnosis. Numerous efforts in therapy have not significantly altered the nearly uniform lethality of this malignancy. The Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway plays a key role in GBM and is implicated in proliferation, invasion and therapy resistance. Several inhibitors of the TGF-β pathway have entered clinical trials or are under development. In this work, the therapeutic potential of P144, a TGF-β inhibitor peptide, was analyzed. P144 decreased proliferation, migration, invasiveness, and tumorigenicity in vitro, whereas apoptosis and anoikis were significantly increased for GBM cell lines. SMAD2 phosphorylation was reduced, together with a downregulation of SKI and an upregulation of SMAD7 at both transcriptional and translational levels. Additionally, P144 was able to impair tumor growth and increase survival in an in vivo flank model. Our findings suggest a potential effect of P144 in vitro and in vivo that is mediated by regulation of transcriptional target genes of the TGF-β pathway, suggesting a therapeutic potential of P144 for GBM treatment. PMID:27473823

  9. Sex steroid levels, oocyte maturation and spawning performance in Waigieu seaperch (Psammoperca waigiensis) exposed to thyroxin, human chorionic gonadotropin, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone and carp pituitary extract.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hung Quoc; Nguyen, Anh Tuong; Nguyen, Mao Dinh; Arukwe, Augustine

    2010-02-01

    In the present study, we have investigated the sex steroid hormone levels, oocyte maturation and spawning performance in Waigieu seaperch (Psammoperca waigiensis) exposed to different doses (0, (control), 0.05, 0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg fish) of thyroxin (T(4)) both through diet (continuously) and injection (single injection). In addition, we also studied plasma steroid hormone levels and spawning performances in female fish injected with a single dose of D-Ala(6), Pro(9)-Net-mGnRH (LHRHa: 50 microg/kg), human chronic gonadotropin (HCG: 1,500 IU/kg) and carp pituitary extract (CPE: 10 mg/kg). In all experiments, samples were collected at 0, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after exposure. T4 exposure via dietary route produced differential and enhanced effects, compared with when the compound was injected to the broodstock. A significant association between exposure to dietary T4, elevated plasma steroid hormone levels, maturation-, spawning-, fertilization- and hatching rate, egg diameter, embryogenesis and larval growth were observed. Interestingly, we observed that broodstock groups fed with T4 doses spawned 20 days earlier than the control group. Thus, we propose that these differences may be attributed to higher systemic availability of T4 due to dietary exposure that is easily transferable to eggs and embryos, as opposed to injection that require absorption to increase bioavailability. Furthermore, our results show that LHRHa, CPE and HCG produced significant increase in spawning rate, but significantly reduced fertilization- and hatching rates. Waigieu seaperch is a new candidate for marine aquaculture in Vietnam and relatively little is known about the reproductive biology and endocrinology of this species. Therefore, the present study forms an integral basis for understanding the reproductive endocrinology of a tropical marine finfish with increasing aquaculture prospects and may also contribute in the development of sustainable aquaculture of this species in a developing

  10. Lead alters parathyroid hormone-related peptide and transforming growth factor-beta1 effects and AP-1 and NF-kappaB signaling in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zuscik, Michael J; Pateder, Dhruv B; Puzas, J Edward; Schwarz, Edward M; Rosier, Randy N; O'Keefe, Regis J

    2002-07-01

    The skeletal system is an important target for lead toxicity. One of the impacts of lead in the skeleton, the inhibition of axial bone development, is likely due to its effect on the normal progression of chondrocyte maturation that is central to the process of endochondral ossification. Since little is known about the effect of lead on chondrocyte function/maturation, its impact on (1) growth factor-induced proliferation, (2) expression of maturation-specific markers type X collagen and BMP-6, and (3) the activity of AP-1 and NF-kappaB was examined in chick growth plate and sternal chondrocyte models. Exposure to lead alone (1-30 microM) resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of thymidine incorporation in growth plate chondrocytes. Lead also blunted the stimulation of thymidine incorporation by parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), two critical regulators of chondrocyte maturation. Lead (1 and 10 microM), TGF-beta1 (3 ng/ml) and PTHrP (10(-7) M) all significantly inhibited the expression of type X collagen, a marker of chondrocyte terminal differentiation. However, when in combination, lead completely reversed the inhibition of type X collagen by PTHrP and TGF-beta1. The effect of lead on BMP-6. an inducer of terminal differentiation. was also examined. Independently, lead and TGF-beta1 were without effect on BMP-6 expression, but PTHrP significantly suppressed it. Comparatively, lead did not alter PTHrP-mediated suppression of BMP-6, but in combination with TGF-beta1. BMP-6 expression was increased 3-fold. To determine if lead effects on signaling might play a role in facilitating these events, the impact of lead on NF-kappaB and AP-1 signaling was assessed using luciferase reporter constructs in sternal chondrocytes. Lead had no effect on the AP-1 reporter, but it dose-dependently inhibited the NF-kappaB reporter. PTHrP, which signals through AP-1, did not activate the NF-kappaB reporter and did not affect

  11. A novel peptide sansalvamide analogue inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth through G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Ujiki, Michael B. |; Milam, Ben; Ding Xianzhong |; Roginsky, Alexandra B.; Salabat, M. Reza; Talamonti, Mark S.; Bell, Richard H. |; Gu Wenxin; Silverman, Richard B. ||; Adrian, Thomas E. |. E-mail: tadrian@northwestern.edu

    2006-02-24

    Patients with pancreatic cancer have little hope for cure because no effective therapies are available. Sansalvamide A is a cyclic depsipeptide produced by a marine fungus. We investigated the effect of a novel sansalvamide A analogue on growth, cell-cycle phases, and induction of apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. The sansalvamide analogue caused marked time- and concentration-dependent inhibition of DNA synthesis and cell proliferation of two human pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPC-1 and S2-013). The analogue induced G0/G1 phase cell-cycle arrest and morphological changes suggesting induction of apoptosis. Apoptosis was confirmed by annexin V binding. This novel sansalvamide analogue inhibits growth of pancreatic cancer cells through G0/G1 arrest and induces apoptosis. Sansalvamide analogues may be valuable for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  12. The proliferative effects of Pyropia yezoensis peptide on IEC-6 cells are mediated through the epidermal growth factor receptor signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    LEE, MIN-KYEONG; KIM, IN-HYE; CHOI, YOUN-HEE; CHOI, JEONG-WOOK; KIM, YOUNG-MIN; NAM, TAEK-JEONG

    2015-01-01

    For a number of years, seaweed has been used as a functional food in Asian countries, particularly in Korea, Japan and China. Pyropia yezoensis is a marine red alga that has potentially beneficial biological activities. In this study, we examined the mechanisms through which a Pyropia yezoensis peptide [PYP1 (1–20)] induces the proliferation of IEC-6 cells, a rat intestinal epithelial cell line, and the involvement of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway. First, cell viability assay revealed that PYP1 (1–20) induced cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. Subsequently, we examined the mechanisms responsible for this induction of proliferation induced by PYP1 (1–20). EGFR is widely expressed in mammalian epithelial tissues, and the binding of this ligand affects a variety of cell physiological parameters, such as cell growth and proliferation. PYP1 (1–20) increased the expression of EGFR, Shc, growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2) and son of sevenless (SOS). EGFR also induced the activation of the Ras signaling pathway through Raf, MEK and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. In addition, cell cycle analysis revealed the expression of cell cycle-related proteins. The results demonstrated an increased number of cells in the G1 phase and an enhanced cell proliferation. In addition, the upregulation of cyclin D, cyclin E, Cdk2, Cdk4 and Cdk6 was observed accompanied by a decreased in p21 and p27 expression. These findings suggest that PYP1 (1–20) stimulates the proliferation of rat IEC-6 cells by activating the EGFR signaling pathway. Therefore, PYP1 (1–20) may be a potential source for the development of bio-functional foods which promotes the proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:25716690

  13. Roles of aromatic side chains and template effects of the hydrophobic cavity of a self-assembled peptide nanoarchitecture for anisotropic growth of gold nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Tomizaki, Kin-ya; Kishioka, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Akitsugu; Yamada, Naoki; Kataoka, Shunsuke; Imai, Takahito; Kasuno, Megumi

    2015-11-15

    Gold nanocrystals are promising as catalysts and for use in sensing/imaging systems, photonic/plasmonic devices, electronics, drug delivery systems, and for photothermal therapy due to their unique physical, chemical, and biocompatible properties. The use of various organic templates allows control of the size, shape, structure, surface modification and topology of gold nanocrystals; in particular, currently the synthesis of gold nanorods requires a cytotoxic surfactant to control morphology. To control the shape of gold nanocrystals, we previously demonstrated the de novo design and synthesis of a β-sheet-forming nonapeptide (RU006: Ac-AIAKAXKIA-NH2, X=L-2-naphthylalanine, Nal) and the fabrication of gold nanocrystals by mixing RU006 and HAuCl4 in water. The reaction afforded ultrathin gold nanoribbons 50-100 nm wide, several nanometers high, and microns long. To understand the mechanism underlying gold nanoribbon formation by the RU006 system, we here report (i) the effects of replacement of the Nal aromatic side chain in the RU006 sequence with other aromatic moieties, (ii) the electrochemical properties of aromatic side chains in the de novo designed template peptides to estimate the redox potential and number of electrons participating in the gold crystallization process, and (iii) the stoichiometry of the RU006 system for gold nanoribbon synthesis. Interestingly, RU006 bearing a naphthalene moiety (oxidation peak potential of 1.50 V vs Ag/Ag(+)) and an analog [Ant(6)]-RU006 bearing a bulky anthracene moiety (oxidation peak potential of 1.05 V vs Ag/Ag(+)) allowed the growth of anisotropic (ribbon-like) and isotropic (round) gold nanocrystals, respectively. This trend in morphology of gold nanocrystals was attributed to spatially-arranged hydrophobic cavities sufficiently large to accommodate the gold precursor and to allow directed crystal growth driven by cross-linking reactions among the naphthalene rings. Support for this mechanism was obtained by

  14. Roles of aromatic side chains and template effects of the hydrophobic cavity of a self-assembled peptide nanoarchitecture for anisotropic growth of gold nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Tomizaki, Kin-ya; Kishioka, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Akitsugu; Yamada, Naoki; Kataoka, Shunsuke; Imai, Takahito; Kasuno, Megumi

    2015-11-15

    Gold nanocrystals are promising as catalysts and for use in sensing/imaging systems, photonic/plasmonic devices, electronics, drug delivery systems, and for photothermal therapy due to their unique physical, chemical, and biocompatible properties. The use of various organic templates allows control of the size, shape, structure, surface modification and topology of gold nanocrystals; in particular, currently the synthesis of gold nanorods requires a cytotoxic surfactant to control morphology. To control the shape of gold nanocrystals, we previously demonstrated the de novo design and synthesis of a β-sheet-forming nonapeptide (RU006: Ac-AIAKAXKIA-NH2, X=L-2-naphthylalanine, Nal) and the fabrication of gold nanocrystals by mixing RU006 and HAuCl4 in water. The reaction afforded ultrathin gold nanoribbons 50-100 nm wide, several nanometers high, and microns long. To understand the mechanism underlying gold nanoribbon formation by the RU006 system, we here report (i) the effects of replacement of the Nal aromatic side chain in the RU006 sequence with other aromatic moieties, (ii) the electrochemical properties of aromatic side chains in the de novo designed template peptides to estimate the redox potential and number of electrons participating in the gold crystallization process, and (iii) the stoichiometry of the RU006 system for gold nanoribbon synthesis. Interestingly, RU006 bearing a naphthalene moiety (oxidation peak potential of 1.50 V vs Ag/Ag(+)) and an analog [Ant(6)]-RU006 bearing a bulky anthracene moiety (oxidation peak potential of 1.05 V vs Ag/Ag(+)) allowed the growth of anisotropic (ribbon-like) and isotropic (round) gold nanocrystals, respectively. This trend in morphology of gold nanocrystals was attributed to spatially-arranged hydrophobic cavities sufficiently large to accommodate the gold precursor and to allow directed crystal growth driven by cross-linking reactions among the naphthalene rings. Support for this mechanism was obtained by

  15. Perspectives and Peptides of the Next Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogden, Kim A.

    Shortly after their discovery, antimicrobial peptides from prokaryotes and eukaryotes were recognized as the next potential generation of pharmaceuticals to treat antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections and septic shock, to preserve food, or to sanitize surfaces. Initial research focused on identifying the spectrum of antimicrobial agents, determining the range of antimicrobial activities against bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens, and assessing the antimicrobial activity of synthetic peptides versus their natural counterparts. Subsequent research then focused on the mechanisms of antimicrobial peptide activity in model membrane systems not only to identify the mechanisms of antimicrobial peptide activity in microorganisms but also to discern differences in cytotoxicity for prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Recent, contemporary work now focuses on current and future efforts to construct hybrid peptides, peptide congeners, stabilized peptides, peptide conjugates, and immobilized peptides for unique and specific applications to control the growth of microorganisms in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Stability Analysis of an Inline Peptide-based Conjugate for Metal Delivery: Nickel(II)-claMP Tag Epidermal Growth Factor as a Model System

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Brittney J.; Laurence, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    Metals are a key component of many diagnostic imaging and biotechnology applications, and the majority of cancer patients receive a platinum-based drug as part of their treatment. Significant effort has been devoted to developing tight binding synthetic chelators to enable effective targeted delivery of metal-based conjugates, with most successes involving lanthanides rather than transition metals for diagnostic imaging. Chemical conjugation modifies the protein’s properties and generates a heterogeneous mixture of products. Chelator attachment is typically done by converting the amino group on lysines to an amide, which can impact the stability and solubility of the targeting protein and these properties vary among the set of individual conjugate species. Site-specific attachment is sought to reduce complexity and control stability. Here, the metal abstraction peptide (MAP) technology was applied to create the claMP Tag, an inline platform for generating site-specific conjugates involving transition metals. The claMP Tag was genetically encoded into epidermal growth factor (EGF) and loaded with nickel(II) as a model system to demonstrate that the tag within the homogeneous inline conjugate presents sufficient solution stability to enable biotechnology applications. The structure and disulfide network of the protein and chemical stability of the claMP Tag and EGF components were characterized. PMID:25212829

  17. Protection of SK-N-MC cells against β-amyloid peptide-induced degeneration using neuron growth factor-loaded liposomes with surface lactoferrin.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yung-Chih; Wang, Cheng-Ting

    2014-07-01

    A liposomal system with surface lactoferrin (Lf) was developed for delivering neuron growth factor (NGF) across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and improving the viability of neuron-like SK-N-MC cells with deposited β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). The Lf-grafted liposomes carrying NGF (Lf/NGF-liposomes) were applied to a monolayer of human brain-microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) regulated by human astrocytes (HAs) and to fibrillar Aβ1-42-insulted SK-N-MC cells. An increase in cholesterol mole percentage enhanced the particle size, absolute value of zeta potential, and physical stability, however, reduced the entrapment efficiency and release rate of NGF. In addition, an increase in Lf concentration increased the particle size, surface nitrogen percentage, NGF permeability across the BBB, and viability of HBMECs, HAs, and SK-N-MC cells, however, decreased the absolute value of zeta potential, surface phosphorus percentage, and loading efficiency of Lf. After treating with Lf/NGF-liposomes, a higher Aβ concentration yielded a lower survival of SK-N-MC cells. The current Lf/NGF-liposomes are efficacious drug carriers to target the BBB and inhibit the Aβ-induced neurotoxicity as potential pharmacotherapy for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24746790

  18. Powerful anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic activity of a new anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 peptide in colorectal cancer models.

    PubMed

    Cicatiello, Valeria; Apicella, Ivana; Tudisco, Laura; Tarallo, Valeria; Formisano, Luigi; Sandomenico, Annamaria; Kim, Younghee; Bastos-Carvalho, Ana; Orlandi, Augusto; Ambati, Jayakrishna; Ruvo, Menotti; Bianco, Roberto; De Falco, Sandro

    2015-04-30

    To assess the therapeutic outcome of selective block of VEGFR1, we have evaluated the activity of a new specific antagonist of VEGFR1, named iVR1 (inhibitor of VEGFR1), in syngenic and xenograft colorectal cancer models, in an artificial model of metastatization, and in laser-induced choroid neovascularization. iVR1 inhibited tumor growth and neoangiogenesis in both models of colorectal cancer, with an extent similar to that of bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody anti-VEGF-A. It potently inhibited VEGFR1 phosphorylation in vivo, determining a strong inhibition of the recruitment of monocyte-macrophages and of mural cells as confirmed, in vitro, by the ability to inhibit macrophages migration. iVR1 was able to synergize with irinotecan determining a shrinkage of tumors that became undetectable after three weeks of combined treatment. Such treatment induced a significant prolongation of survival similar to that observed with bevacizumab and irinotecan combination. iVR1 also fully prevented lung invasion by HCT-116 cells injected in mouse tail vein. Also, iVR1 impressively inhibited choroid neovascularization after a single intravitreal injection. Collectively, data showed the strong potential of iVR1 peptide as a new anti-tumor and anti-metastatic agent and demonstrate the high flexibility of VEGFR1 antagonists as therapeutic anti-angiogenic agents in different pathological contexts. PMID:25868854

  19. Sustained release of hepatocyte growth factor by cationic self-assembling peptide/heparin hybrid hydrogel improves β-cell survival and function through modulating inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuyun; Zhang, Lanlan; Cheng, Jingqiu; Lu, Yanrong; Liu, Jingping

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory response is a major cause of grafts dysfunction in islet transplantation. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) had shown anti-inflammatory activity in multiple diseases. In this study, we aim to deliver HGF by self-assembling peptide/heparin (SAP/Hep) hybrid gel to protect β-cell from inflammatory injury. The morphological and slow release properties of SAPs were analyzed. Rat INS-1 β-cell line was treated with tumor necrosis factor α in vitro and transplanted into rat kidney capsule in vivo, and the viability, apoptosis, function, and inflammation of β-cells were evaluated. Cationic KLD1R and KLD2R self-assembled to nanofiber hydrogel, which showed higher binding affinity for Hep and HGF because of electrostatic interaction. Slow release of HGF from cationic SAP/Hep gel is a two-step mechanism involving binding affinity with Hep and molecular diffusion. In vitro and in vivo results showed that HGF-loaded KLD2R/Hep gel promoted β-cell survival and insulin secretion, and inhibited cell apoptosis, cytokine release, T-cell infiltration, and activation of NFκB/p38 MAPK pathways in β-cells. This study suggested that SAP/Hep gel is a promising carrier for local delivery of bioactive proteins in islet transplantation. PMID:27729786

  20. Immobilizing osteogenic growth peptide with and without fibronectin on a titanium surface: effects of loading methods on mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cen; Li, Han; Kong, Xiangdong; Zhang, Sheng-Min; Lee, In-Seop

    2015-01-01

    In this study, to improve the osseointegration of implants, osteogenic growth peptide (OGP) and fibronectin (FN) were loaded within mineral, which was formed on titanium, through adsorption and coprecipitation methods. The release profiles of OGP loaded by either adsorption or coprecipitation and the effects of the loading methods to immobilize OGP with and without FN on rat mesenchymal stem cell (rMSC) osteogenic differentiation were studied. The coprecipitation approach slightly reduced the initial burst release, while the adsorption approach provided a more sustained release. Dual loading of OGP and FN further improved cell attachments compared with either OGP or FN alone. Dually loaded OGP and FN also had a positive impact on rMSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. The difference in methods of loading OGP with and without FN also had some effects on osteogenic differentiation. Compared with coprecipitated OGP alone, adsorbed OGP enhanced later differentiation, such as osteocalcin secretion and matrix mineralization. Simultaneously adsorbed OGP and FN led to higher proliferation and higher osteogenic differentiation in both early and late stages compared with sequentially loaded OGP and FN. rMSC culture clearly indicated that simultaneously adsorbed OGP and FN could improve osseointegration, and this treatment represents a potential method for effective surface modification of dental and orthopedic implants. PMID:25678785

  1. The angiogenic peptide vascular endothelial growth factor-basic fibroblast growth factor signaling is up-regulated in a rat pressure ulcer model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing-Jin; Wang, Xue-Ling; Shi, Bo-Wen; Huang, Fang

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the mRNA and protein expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in pressure ulcers, and to elucidate the molecular mechanism by which VEGF and bFGF are involved in pressure ulcer formation. A rat model of ischemia-reperfusion pressure ulcer was established by magnetic disk circulating compression method. Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR and Western blot assays were conducted to detect the mRNA and protein expression of VEGF and bFGF in the tissues of rat I-, II-, and III-degree pressure ulcers, the surrounding tissues, and normal skin. Our study confirmed that the mRNA and protein expression levels of VEGF and bFGF in the tissues of rat I-degree pressure ulcer were significantly higher than that in the II- and III-degree pressure ulcer tissues (P < 0.05). The expression of VEGF and bFGF in the tissues surrounding I- and II-degree pressure ulcers were higher than the rats with normal skin. The expression of VEGF and bFGF in the tissues of rat III-degree pressure ulcer was lower than that in the surrounding tissues and normal skin (P < 0.05). There was a significant positive correlation between change in the VEGF and bFGF. The results showed that with an increase in the degree of pressure ulcers, the expression of VEGF and bFGF in pressure ulcers tissue are decreased. This leads to a reduction in angiogenesis and may be a crucial factor in the formation of pressure ulcers.

  2. In-vitro/in-vivo studies of the biodegradable poly-(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres of a novel luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonist for prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Du, Lina; Mei, Xingguo; Wang, Chenyun; Li, Xin; Zhang, Fucheng; Jin, Yiguang

    2011-03-01

    The introduction of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogs and their antagonists is revolutionizing the treatment of prostate cancer. In this study, poly(D,L-lactideco-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres containing a highly potent LHRH antagonist (LXT-101) of interest in the indication of prostate cancer were evaluated on release mechanisms in vitro and biological performance in vivo. LXT-101 microspheres were prepared by the water/oil/water double emulsion method and the solid/oil/oil method. The results showed that the mechanism of LXT-101 releasing from PLGA 14,000 microspheres was the cooperation of drug diffusion and polymer degradation. This clarified the relationship between the microsphere characterization and hormone level in vivo. The larger microspheres (33 μm) could inhibit the testosterone level to castration for a longer time (35 days) than the smaller microspheres (15 μm, 14 days). The formulation containing the hydrophilic additive (polyethylene glycol 6000) could suppress the testosterone level to castration for a longer time (> 35 days) than the formulation without polyethylene glycol (14 days). The appearance of testis, vesicular seminalis, and prostates changed after treatment. The weights of sexual organs decreased significantly. The in-vivo release of the LXT-101 PLGA 14,000 microspheres curve showed that in-vivo release started immediately after day 1 (22.7%) and was rapid during the first 5 days (40.2% release). The LXT-101 microspheres could be a promising drug delivery system candidate to treat sex hormone-dependent tumors and other related disorders. PMID:21360849

  3. Targeted delivery of cisplatin by LHRH-peptide conjugated dextran nanoparticles suppresses breast cancer growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingqiang; Tang, Zhaohui; Zhang, Yu; Lv, Shixian; Li, Quanshun; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-05-01

    The metastasis of breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women. In this work, an attempt to simultaneously inhibit the primary tumor growth and organ-specific metastasis by the cisplatin-loaded LHRH-modified dextran nanoparticles (Dex-SA-CDDP-LHRH) was performed in the 4T1 orthotopic mammary tumor metastasis model. With the rationally designed conjugation site of the LHRH ligand, the Dex-SA-CDDP-LHRH nanoparticles maintained the targeting function of LHRH and specifically bound to the LHRH-receptors overexpressed on the surface of 4T1 breast cancer cells. Therefore, the Dex-SA-CDDP-LHRH nanoparticles exhibited improved cellular uptake and promoted cytotoxicity, when compared with the non-targeted Dex-SA-CDDP nanoparticles. Moreover, both the non-targeted and targeted nanoparticles significantly decreased the systemic toxicity of CDDP and increased the maximum tolerated dose of CDDP from 4 to 30mgkg(-1). Importantly, Dex-SA-CDDP-LHRH markedly enhanced the accumulation of CDDP in the injected primary tumor and metastasis-containing organs, and meanwhile significantly reduced the nephrotoxicity of CDDP. Dose-dependent therapeutic effects further demonstrated that the CDDP-loaded LHRH-decorated polysaccharide nanoparticles significantly enhanced the antitumor and antimetastasis efficacy, as compared to the non-targeted nanoparticles. These results suggest that Dex-SA-CDDP-LHRH nanoparticles show great potential for targeted chemotherapy of metastatic breast cancer. PMID:25735801

  4. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  5. Minimal essential length of Clostridium botulinum C3 peptides to enhance neuronal regenerative growth and connectivity in a non-enzymatic mode.

    PubMed

    Loske, Peter; Boato, Francesco; Hendrix, Sven; Piepgras, Johannes; Just, Ingo; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun; Höltje, Markus

    2012-03-01

    C3 ADP-ribosyltransferase is a valuable tool to study Rho-dependent cellular processes. In the current study we investigated the impact of enzyme-deficient peptides derived from Clostridium botulinum C3 transferase in the context of neuronal process elongation and branching, synaptic connectivity, and putative beneficial effects on functional outcome following traumatic injury to the CNS. By screening a range of peptidic fragments, we identified three short peptides from C3bot that promoted axon and dendrite outgrowth in cultivated hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, one of these fragments, a 26-amino acid peptide covering the residues 156-181 enhanced synaptic connectivity in primary hippocampal culture. This peptide was also effective to foster axon outgrowth and re-innervation in organotypical brain slice culture. To evaluate the potential of the 26mer to foster repair mechanisms after CNS injury we applied this peptide to mice subjected to spinal cord injury by either compression impact or hemisection. A single local administration at the site of the lesion improved locomotor recovery. In addition, histological analysis revealed an increased serotonergic input to lumbar motoneurons in treated compared with control mice. Pull-down assays showed that lesion-induced up-regulation of RhoA activity within the spinal cord was largely blocked by C3bot peptides despite the lack of enzymatic activity. PMID:22239108

  6. Identification of multifunctional peptides from human milk.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Santi M; Bharti, Rashmi; Porto, William F; Gauri, Samiran S; Mandal, Mahitosh; Franco, Octavio L; Ghosh, Ananta K

    2014-06-01

    Pharmaceutical industries have renewed interest in screening multifunctional bioactive peptides as a marketable product in health care applications. In this context, several animal and plant peptides with potential bioactivity have been reported. Milk proteins and peptides have received much attention as a source of health-enhancing components to be incorporated into nutraceuticals and functional foods. By using this source, 24 peptides have been fractionated and purified from human milk using RP-HPLC. Multifunctional roles including antimicrobial, antioxidant and growth stimulating activity have been evaluated in all 24 fractions. Nevertheless, only four fractions show multiple combined activities among them. Using a proteomic approach, two of these four peptides have been identified as lactoferrin derived peptide and kappa casein short chain peptide. Lactoferrin derived peptide (f8) is arginine-rich and kappa casein derived (f12) peptide is proline-rich. Both peptides (f8 and f12) showed antimicrobial activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Fraction 8 (f8) exhibits growth stimulating activity in 3T3 cell line and f12 shows higher free radical scavenging activity in comparison to other fractions. Finally, both peptides were in silico evaluated and some insights into their mechanism of action were provided. Thus, results indicate that these identified peptides have multiple biological activities which are valuable for the quick development of the neonate and may be considered as potential biotechnological products for nutraceutical industry.

  7. Synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Francis, M J

    1996-01-01

    Efforts to produce more stable and defined vaccines have concentrated on studying, in detail, the immune response to many infectious diseases in order to identify the antigenic sites on the pathogens that are involved in stimulating protective immumty. Armed with this knowledge, it is possible to mimic such sites by producing short chains of amino acids (peptides) and to use these as the basis for novel vaccines. The earliest documented work on peptide immunization is actually for a plant virus, tobacco mosaic virus. In 1963, Anderer (1) demonstrated that rabbit antibodies to an isolated hexapeptide fragment from the virus-coat protein coupled to bovine serum albumm would neutralize the infectious vn-us in culture. Two years later, he used a synthetically produced copy of the same peptide to confirm this observation. This was pioneering work, and it was over 10 years before the next example of a peptide that elicited antivirus antibody appeared following work by Sela and his colleagues (2) on a virus, MS2 bacteriophage, which infects bacteria. The emergence of more accessible techniques for sequencing proteins in 1977, coupled with the ability to synthesize readily peptides already developed in 1963, heralded a decade of intensive research into experimental peptide vaccines. The first demonstration that peptides could elicit protective immunity in vivo, in addition to neutralizing activity in vitro, was obtained using a peptide from the VP1 coat protein of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in 1982, with the guinea pig as a laboratory animal model (3, 4). PMID:21359696

  8. Immunologic Escape After Prolonged Progression-Free Survival With Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Variant III Peptide Vaccination in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, John H.; Heimberger, Amy B.; Archer, Gary E.; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Friedman, Allan H.; Friedman, Henry S.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Herndon, James E.; McLendon, Roger E.; Mitchell, Duane A.; Reardon, David A.; Sawaya, Raymond; Schmittling, Robert J.; Shi, Weiming; Vredenburgh, James J.; Bigner, Darell D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Immunologic targeting of tumor-specific gene mutations may allow precise eradication of neoplastic cells without toxicity. Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) is a constitutively activated and immunogenic mutation not expressed in normal tissues but widely expressed in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and other neoplasms. Patients and Methods A phase II, multicenter trial was undertaken to assess the immunogenicity of an EGFRvIII-targeted peptide vaccine and to estimate the progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of vaccinated patients with newly diagnosed EGFRvIII-expressing GBM with minimal residual disease. Intradermal vaccinations were given until toxicity or tumor progression was observed. Sample size was calculated to differentiate between PFS rates of 20% and 40% 6 months after vaccination. Results There were no symptomatic autoimmune reactions. The 6-month PFS rate after vaccination was 67% (95% CI, 40% to 83%) and after diagnosis was 94% (95% CI, 67% to 99%; n = 18). The median OS was 26.0 months (95% CI, 21.0 to 47.7 months). After adjustment for age and Karnofsky performance status, the OS of vaccinated patients was greater than that observed in a control group matched for eligibility criteria, prognostic factors, and temozolomide treatment (hazard ratio, 5.3; P = .0013; n = 17). The development of specific antibody (P = .025) or delayed-type hypersensitivity (P = .03) responses to EGFRvIII had a significant effect on OS. At recurrence, 82% (95% CI, 48% to 97%) of patients had lost EGFRvIII expression (P < .001). Conclusion EGFRvIII-targeted vaccination in patients with GBM warrants investigation in a phase III, randomized trial. PMID:20921459

  9. Hypoglycemia in a dog with a leiomyoma of the gastric wall producing an insulin-like growth factor II-like peptide.

    PubMed

    Boari, A; Barreca, A; Bestetti, G E; Minuto, F; Venturoli, M

    1995-06-01

    A 12-year-old mixed-breed male dog was referred to the Clinica Medica Veterinaria of Bologna University for recurrent episodes of seizures due to hypoglycemia with abnormally low plasma insulin levels (18 pmol/l). Resection of a large leiomyoma (780 g) of the gastric wall resulted in a permanent resolution of the hypoglycemic episodes. Insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I and -II) were measured by RIA in serum before and after surgery and in tumor tissue. Results were compared to the serum concentration of 54 normal and to the tissue concentration observed in eight non-hypoglycemic dog gastric wall extracts. Before surgery, circulating immunoreactive IGF-I was 0.92 nmol/l, which is significantly lower than the control values (16.92 +/- 8.44 nmol/l, range 3.53-35.03), while IGF-II was 152 nmol/l, which is significantly higher than the control values (42.21 +/- 3.75, range 31.99-50.74). After surgery, IGF-I increased to 6.80 nmol/l while IGF-II decreased to 45.52 nmol/l. Tumor tissue IGF-II concentration was higher than normal (5.66 nmol/kg tissue as compared to a range in normal gastric wall tissue of 1.14-3.72 nmol/kg), while IGF-I was 0.08 nmol/kg tissue, which is close to the lowest normal value (range in controls, 0.08-1.18 nmol/kg). Partial characterization of IGF-II immunoreactivity extracted from tissue evidenced a molecular weight similar to that of mature IGF-II, thus excluding that peptide released by the tumor is a precursor molecule.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Peptide Antibodies: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Houen, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Peptide antibodies recognize epitopes with amino acid residues adjacent in sequence ("linear" epitopes). Such antibodies can be made to virtually any sequence and have been immensely important in all areas of molecular biology and diagnostics due to their versatility and to the rapid growth in protein sequence information. Today, peptide antibodies can be routinely and rapidly made to large numbers of peptides, including peptides with posttranslationally modified residues, and are used for immunoblotting, immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and immunoassays. In the future, peptide antibodies will continue to be immensely important for molecular biology, TCR- and MHC-like peptide antibodies may be produced routinely, peptide antibodies with predetermined conformational specificities may be designed, and peptide-based vaccines may become part of vaccination programs.

  11. The cell-penetrating peptide domain from human heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) has anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jue-Yeon; Seo, Yoo-Na; Park, Hyun-Jung; Park, Yoon-Jeong; Chung, Chong-Pyoung

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP sequence identified from HB-EGF has cell penetration activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP inhibits the NF-{kappa}B dependent inflammatory responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP directly blocks phosphorylation and degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP inhibits nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B p65 subunit. -- Abstract: A heparin-binding peptide (HBP) sequence from human heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) was identified and was shown to exhibit cell penetration activity. This cell penetration induced an anti-inflammatory reaction in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages. HBP penetrated the cell membrane during the 10 min treatment and reduced the LPS-induced production of nitric oxide (NO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cytokines (TNF-{alpha} and IL-6) in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, HBP inhibited the LPS-induced upregulation of cytokines, including TNF-{alpha} and IL-6, and decreased the interstitial infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in a lung inflammation model. HBP inhibited NF-{kappa}B-dependent inflammatory responses by directly blocking the phosphorylation and degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and by subsequently inhibiting the nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-{kappa}B. Taken together, this novel HBP may be potentially useful candidate for anti-inflammatory treatments and can be combined with other drugs of interest to transport attached molecules into cells.

  12. Increased Secretion of Endogenous GH after Treatment with an Intranasal GH-releasing Peptide-2 Spray Does Not Promote Growth in Short Children with GH Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshiaki; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Yokoya, Susumu; Nishi, Yoshikazu

    2014-10-01

    We investigated whether treatment with an intranasal GH-releasing peptide (GHRP)-2 spray, which acts as a potent GH secretagogue that stimulates endogenous GH secretion, promotes growth in patients with GH deficiency (GHD). This study involved 126 prepubertal short children (81 males, 45 females) with a height SD score of -2 SD or less, who had been diagnosed as having GHD based on GH stimulation tests, and in whom the serum GH concentrations increased up to 9 ng/ml after preliminary administration of an intranasal GHRP-2 spray. The subjects included in this study were divided into 3 groups by use of a double-blind method; that is 44 were placed into the placebo group (P group: 30 males, 14 females), 41 were placed into the GHRP-2 low dose group (L group: 25 males, 16 females), and 41 were placed into the GHRP-2 high dose group (H group: 26 males, 15 females). Those with a body wt of less than 20 kg were administered a placebo (P group), 50 μg of GHRP-2 (L group) or 100 μg of GHRP-2 (H group), and those with a body wt of 20 kg or more were administered a placebo (P group), 100 µg of GHRP-2 (L group) or 200 µg of GHRP-2 (H group) twice daily (morning and evening) for 48 continuous wk. Age and height SD scores at baseline were not significantly different among the three groups: 7.5 yr old and -2.26 SD in the P group, 7.3 yr old and -2.38 SD in the L group, and 7.5 yr old and -2.27 SD in the H group. Of the 126 subjects, 44, 40 and 40 subjects in the P, L and H groups, respectively, completed the 48 continuous wk of treatment. The changes in the mean height SD scores (mean growth rate) after 48 wk of treatment in the P, L and H groups were 0.07 SD, 0.03 SD, and 0.02 SD, respectively, and thus no significant differences was observed among the 3 groups. Also no significant changes in blood IGF-I levels at baseline or after 48 wk of treatment were observed among the 3 groups. This study revealed that in patients with GHD, an increase in endogenous GH secretion as a

  13. Effects of GHRP-2 and Cysteamine Administration on Growth Performance, Somatotropic Axis Hormone and Muscle Protein Deposition in Yaks (Bos grunniens) with Growth Retardation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rui; Wang, Zhisheng; Peng, Quanhui; Zou, Huawei; Wang, Hongze; Yu, Xiaoqiang; Jing, Xiaoping; Wang, Yixin; Cao, Binghai; Bao, Shanke; Zhang, Wenhua; Zhao, Suonan; Ji, Hanzhong; Kong, Xiangying; Niu, Quanxi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of growth hormone-releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2) and cysteamine (CS) administration on growth performance in yaks with growth retardation and try to elucidate its regulatory mechanisms. Trial 1, thirty-six 1-year-old Qinghai high plateau yaks (body weight 38–83.2 kg) were randomly chosen for body weight and jugular blood samples collection. The relationship between body weight and serum GHRH (P < 0.05, R = 0.45), GH (P < 0.05, R = 0.47), IGF-1 (P < 0.05, R = 0.62) was significantly correlated in yaks colonies with lighter body weights. Trial 2, fifteen 1-year-old Qinghai high plateau yaks with growth retardation (average body weight 54.8 ± 8.24 kg) were randomly selected and assigned to negative control group (NG), GHRP-2 injection group (GG) and cysteamine feeding group (CG), with 5 yaks per group. Another five 1-year-old Qinghai high plateau yaks with normal growth performance (average body weight 75.3 ± 2.43 kg) were selected as positive control group (PG). The average daily gain (ADG) of the GG and CG were significantly higher than those in the PG and NG (P < 0.05). Both GHRP-2 and CS administration significantly enhanced the myofiber diameter and area of skeletal muscle (P<0.05). GHRP-2 significantly enhanced the serum GH and IGF-1 levels (P < 0.05), and up-regulated GHR, IGF-1 and IGF-1R mRNA expression in the liver and skeletal muscle (P < 0.05), enhanced the mRNA expression of PI3K, AKt and mTOR in the skeletal muscle (P<0.05). CS significantly reduced the serum SS levels and the hypothalamus SS mRNA expression (P < 0.05), and enhanced GHR and IGF-1 mRNA expression in the liver (P < 0.05), decreased the mRNA expression of muscle atrophy F-box (Atrogin-1) and muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1) mRNA (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Growth retardation in yaks was primarily due to somatotropic axis hormones secretion deficiency. Both GHRP-2 and CS administration can accelerate growth performance and GH, IGF-1

  14. Clinical uses of gut peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, J; Pappas, T N

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors review clinical applications of gut-derived peptides as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: An increasing number of gut peptides have been evaluated for clinical use. Earlier uses as diagnostic agents have been complemented more recently by increasing application of gut peptides as therapeutic agents. METHOD: The authors conducted a literature review. RESULTS: Current experience with clinical use of gut peptides is described. Initial clinical applications focused on using secretomotor effects of gut peptides in diagnostic tests, many of which have now fallen into disuse. More recently, attention has been directed toward harnessing these secretomotor effects for therapeutic use in a variety of disorders, and also using the trophic effects of gut peptides to modulate gut mucosal growth in benign and malignant disease. Gut peptides have been evaluated in a variety of other clinical situations including use as adjuncts to imaging techniques, and modification of behaviors such as feeding and panic disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Gut peptides have been used successfully in an increasing variety of clinical conditions. Further refinements in analogue and antagonist design are likely to lead to even more selective agents that may have important clinical applications. Further studies are needed to identity and evaluate these new agents. PMID:9065291

  15. Direct effects of catecholamines, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, and somatostatin on growth hormone and prolactin secretion from adenomatous and nonadenomatous human pituitary cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, M; Yamaji, T

    1984-01-01

    To determine the mechanism and the site of action of catecholamines as well as hormones including thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)1 and somatostatin on pituitary hormone release in patients with acromegaly and in normal subjects, the effects of these substances on growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) secretion from adenomatous and nonadenomatous human pituitary cells in culture were examined. When dopamine (0.01-0.1 microM) or bromocriptine (0.01-0.1 microM) was added to the culture media, a significant inhibition of GH and PRL secretion from adenoma cells from acromegalic patients was observed. This inhibition was blocked by D2 receptor blockade with metoclopramide or sulpiride, but not by D1 receptor blockade. Similarly, dopamine suppressed GH and PRL release by nonadenomatous pituitary cells in a dose-dependent manner, which was again blocked by D2 receptor blockade. The minimum effective concentration of dopamine required for a significant inhibition of PRL secretion (0.01 microM) was lower than that for GH release (0.1 microM). Norepinephrine, likewise, caused a suppression of PRL secretion from adenomatous and nonadenomatous pituitary cells. This effect was blocked by sulpiride, phentolamine, however, was ineffective. When TRH was added to the media, both GH and PRL secretion were enhanced in adenoma cells, while only the stimulation of PRL release was observed in nonadenomatous pituitary cells. Coincubation of TRH and dopamine resulted in variable effects on GH and PRL secretion. Somatostatin consistently lowered GH and PRL secretion in both adenomatous and nonadenomatous pituitary cells and completely blocked the TRH-induced stimulation of GH and PRL secretion from adenoma cells. Opioid peptides (1 microM) failed to affect hormone release. These results suggest that no qualitative difference in GH and PRL responses to dopaminergic agonists or to somatostatin exists between adenoma cells of acromegalic patients and normal pituitary cells, and that the

  16. A new pro-migratory activity on human myogenic precursor cells for a synthetic peptide within the E domain of the mechano growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Philippe; Lafreniere, Jean-Francois; Benabdallah, Basma Fattouma; El Fahime, El Mostafa; Tremblay, Jacques-P. . E-mail: Jacques-P.Tremblay@crchul.ulaval.ca

    2007-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an inherited disease that leads to progressive muscle wasting. Myogenic precursor cell transplantation is an approach that can introduce the normal dystrophin gene in the muscle fibers of the patients. Unfortunately, these myogenic precursor cells do not migrate well in the muscle and thus many injections have to be done to enable a good graft success. Recent reports have shown that there is extensive splicing of the IGF-1 gene in muscles. The MGF isoform contains a C-terminal 24 amino acids peptide in the E domain (MGF-Ct24E) that has intrinsic properties. It can promote the proliferation while delaying the differentiation of C{sub 2}C{sub 12} cells. Here, we demonstrated that this synthetic peptide is a motogenic factor for human precursor myogenic cells in vitro and in vivo. Indeed, MGF-Ct24E peptide can modulate members of the fibrinolytic and metalloproteinase systems, which are implicated in the migration of myogenic cells. MGF-Ct24E peptide enhances the expression of u-PA, u-PAR and MMP-7 while reducing PAI-1 activity. Moreover, it has no effect on the gelatinases MMP-2 and -9. Those combined effects can favour cell migration. Finally, we present some results suggesting that the MGF-Ct24E peptide induces these cell responses through a mechanism that does not involve the IGF-1 receptor. Thus, this MGF-Ct24E peptide has a new pro-migratory activity on human myogenic precursor cells that may be helpful in the treatment of DMD. Those results reinforce the possibility that the IGF-1Ec isoform may produce an E domain peptide that can act as a cytokine.

  17. Inhibition of mitogen-elicited signal transduction and growth in prostate cancer with a small peptide derived from the functional domain of DOC-2/DAB2 delivered by a unique vehicle.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Fan, Jinhai; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong

    2006-09-15

    Differentially expressed in ovarian cancer-2/disabled 2 (DOC-2/DAB2) protein, often lost in prostate cancer and other cancer types, is a part of homeostatic machinery in normal prostate epithelium. DOC-2/DAB2 modulates mitogen-elicited mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction by sequestering several adaptor or effector molecules, such as growth factor receptor bound protein 2 and c-Src. We have shown that the proline-rich sequence in DOC-2/DAB2 is the key functional domain for this action. In this study, we further synthesized peptide based on the functional proline-rich domain and examined its biological function in prostate cancer using cell-permeable peptide (CPP) as a delivery system. From screening of several CPPs in prostate cancer cell lines, a polyarginine peptide (R11) seemed to be the best delivery vehicle because of its highly efficient uptake. In addition, we also observed a similar in vitro half-life and cellular location of R11 in four different prostate cancer cell lines. By conjugating a proline-rich sequence (PPL) or control sequence (AAL) derived from DOC-2/DAB2 to the COOH terminus of R11, we showed that R11PPL but not R11 or R11AAL was able to suppress either serum- or androgen-induced cell proliferation in prostate cancer cells without endogenous DOC-2/DAB2 expression. Consistently, the activation status of MAPK elicited by these mitogens was significantly inhibited by R11PPL but not by R11AAL or R11. Taken together, we conclude that a functional peptide derived from proline-rich domain in DOC-2/DAB2 has growth-inhibitory activity as its native protein, and CPP seems to be an efficient delivery system in prostate cancer cells.

  18. Phytosulfokine peptide signalling.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Margret

    2015-08-01

    Phytosulfokine (PSK) belongs to the group of plant peptide growth factors. It is a disulfated pentapeptide encoded by precursor genes that are ubiquitously present in higher plants, suggestive of universal functions. Processing of the preproprotein involves sulfonylation by a tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase in the trans-golgi and proteolytic cleavage in the apoplast. The secreted peptide is perceived at the cell surface by a membrane-bound receptor kinase of the leucine-rich repeat family. The PSK receptor PSKR1 from Arabidopsis thaliana is an active kinase and has guanylate cyclase activity resulting in dual-signal outputs. Receptor activity is regulated by calmodulin. While PSK may be an autocrine growth factor, it also acts non-cell autonomously by promoting growth of cells that are receptor-deficient. In planta, PSK has multiple functions. It promotes cell growth, acts in the quiescent centre cells of the root apical meristem, contributes to funicular pollen tube guidance, and differentially alters immune responses depending on the pathogen. It has been suggested that PSK integrates growth and defence signals to balance the competing metabolic costs of these responses. This review summarizes our current understanding of PSK synthesis, signalling, and activity.

  19. Glucagon-like peptide-2 activates beta-catenin signaling in the mouse intestinal crypt: role of insulin-like growth factor-I.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Philip E; Rowland, Katherine J; Brubaker, Patricia L

    2008-01-01

    Chronic administration of glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) induces intestinal growth and crypt cell proliferation through an indirect mechanism requiring IGF-I. However, the intracellular pathways through which IGF-I mediates GLP-2-induced epithelial tropic signaling remain undefined. Because beta-catenin and Akt are important regulators of crypt cell proliferation, we hypothesized that GLP-2 activates these signaling pathways through an IGF-I-dependent mechanism. In this study, fasted mice were administered Gly(2)-GLP-2 or LR(3)-IGF-I (positive control) for 0.5-4 h. Nuclear translocation of beta-catenin in non-Paneth crypt cells was assessed by immunohistochemistry and expression of its downstream proliferative markers, c-myc and Sox9, by quantitative RT-PCR. Akt phosphorylation and activation of its targets, glycogen synthase kinase-3beta and caspase-3, were determined by Western blot. IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) and IGF-I signaling were blocked by preadministration of NVP-AEW541 and through the use of IGF-I knockout mice, respectively. We found that GLP-2 increased beta-catenin nuclear translocation in non-Paneth crypt cells by 72 +/- 17% (P < 0.05) and increased mucosal c-myc and Sox9 mRNA expression by 90 +/- 20 and 376 +/- 170%, respectively (P < 0.05-0.01), with similar results observed with IGF-I. This effect of GLP-2 was prevented by blocking the IGF-IR as well as ablation of IGF-I signaling. GLP-2 also produced a time- and dose-dependent activation of Akt in the intestinal mucosa (P < 0.01), most notably in the epithelium. This action was reduced by IGF-IR inhibition but not IGF-I knockout. We concluded that acute administration of GLP-2 activates beta-catenin and proliferative signaling in non-Paneth murine intestinal crypt cells as well as Akt signaling in the mucosa. However, IGF-I is required only for the GLP-2-induced alterations in beta-catenin.

  20. Synthesis of Electroneutralized Amphiphilic Copolymers with Peptide Dendrons for Intramuscular Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Pu, Linyu; Wang, Jiali; Li, Na; Chai, Qiuxia; Irache, Juan M; Wang, Gang; Tang, James Zhenggui; Gu, Zhongwei

    2016-06-01

    Intramuscular gene delivery materials are of great importance in plasmid-based gene therapy system, but there is limited information so far on how to design and synthesize them. A previous study showed that the peptide dendron-based triblock copolymer with its components arranged in a reversed biomembrane architecture could significantly increase intramuscular gene delivery and expression. Herein, we wonder whether copolymers with biomembrane-mimicking arrangement may have similar function on intramuscular gene delivery. Meanwhile, it is of great significance to uncover the influence of electric charge and molecular structure on the function of the copolymers. To address the issues, amphiphilic triblock copolymers arranged in hydrophilic-hydrophobic-hydrophilic structure were constructed despite the paradoxical characteristics and difficulties in synthesizing such hydrophilic but electroneutral molecules. The as-prepared two copolymers, dendronG2(l-lysine-OH)-poly propylene glycol2k(PPG2k)-dendronG2(l-lysine-OH) (rL2PL2) and dendronG3(l-lysine-OH)-PPG2k-dendronG3(l-lysine-OH) (rL3PL3), were in similar structure but had different hydrophilic components and surface charges, thus leading to different capabilities in gene delivery and expression in skeletal muscle. rL2PL2 was more efficient than Pluronic L64 and rL3PL3 when mediating luciferase, β-galactosidase, and fluorescent protein expressions. Furthermore, rL2PL2-mediated growth-hormone-releasing hormone expression could significantly induce mouse body weight increase in the first 21 days after injection. In addition, both rL2PL2 and rL3PL3 showed good in vivo biosafety in local and systemic administration. Altogether, rL2PL2-mediated gene expression in skeletal muscle exhibited applicable potential for gene therapy. The study revealed that the molecular structure and electric charge were critical factors governing the function of the copolymers for intramuscular gene delivery. It can be concluded that, combined

  1. Antibacterial peptides isolated from insects.

    PubMed

    Otvos, L

    2000-10-01

    Insects are amazingly resistant to bacterial infections. To combat pathogens, insects rely on cellular and humoral mechanisms, innate immunity being dominant in the latter category. Upon detection of bacteria, a complex genetic cascade is activated, which ultimately results in the synthesis of a battery of antibacterial peptides and their release into the haemolymph. The peptides are usually basic in character and are composed of 20-40 amino acid residues, although some smaller proteins are also included in the antimicrobial repertoire. While the proline-rich peptides and the glycine-rich peptides are predominantly active against Gram-negative strains, the defensins selectively kill Gram-positive bacteria and the cecropins are active against both types. The insect antibacterial peptides are very potent: their IC50 (50% of the bacterial growth inhibition) hovers in the submicromolar or low micromolar range. The majority of the peptides act through disintegrating the bacterial membrane or interfering with membrane assembly, with the exception of drosocin, apidaecin and pyrrhocoricin which appear to deactivate a bacterial protein in a stereospecific manner. In accordance with their biological function, the membrane-active peptides form ordered structures, e.g. alpha-helices or beta-pleated sheets and often cast permeable ion-pores. Their cytotoxic properties were exploited in in vivo studies targeting tumour progression. Although the native peptides degrade quickly in biological fluids other than insect haemolymph, structural modifications render the peptides resistant against proteases without sacrificing biological activity. Indeed, a pyrrhocoricin analogue shows lack of toxicity in vitro and in vivo and protects mice against experimental Escherichia coli infection. Careful selection of lead molecules based on the insect antibacterial peptides may extend their utility and produce viable alternatives to the conventional antimicrobial compounds for mammalian therapy.

  2. Ethanol, growth hormone and testosterone in peripubertal rats.

    PubMed

    Tentler, J J; LaPaglia, N; Steiner, J; Williams, D; Castelli, M; Kelley, M R; Emanuele, N V; Emanuele, M A

    1997-03-01

    The deleterious effects of ethanol on the hypothalamic pituitary growth hormone axis in adult male humans and animals have been well documented. It is also well established that ethanol has toxic effects on testicular function in adult humans and animals. Much less is known, however, about the effects of ethanol on the growth hormone (GH) axis and testicular function in adolescence. Recent studies have established that adolescent problem drinking is a widespread and growing threat to the health of young people in the United States. In the present study, therefore, we investigated if acute ethanol exposure in peripubertal male Sprague-Dawley rats altered normal pituitary and testicular function. Serum levels of GH and testosterone were measured at 1.5, 3, 6, and 24 h after a single i.p. injection of either saline or 3 g/kg body weight ethanol. Histologic analysis as well as serum testosterone levels allowed us to assign animals to either early puberty (35-day-old animals), mid-puberty (41-day-old animals), or young adult (51- and 66-day-old animals) status. Ethanol produced significant decrements in serum testosterone in the 51- and 66-day-old animals, with a trend toward suppression in the 41-day-old group. Furthermore acute ethanol administration significantly decreased serum GH (P < 0.0001 by 3 way ANOVA) demonstrating a significant effect of ethanol on serum GH in all age groups and at all time points studied when compared with saline injected controls (P < 0.01 by Turkey's studentized range test). Despite this significant fall in peripheral GH levels, there was no decrease in either GH mRNA or growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) mRNA levels nor in hypothalamic concentration of GRF peptide. We conclude that, as in adult animals, acute exposure to ethanol causes a prolonged and severe decrement in serum GH which is possibly mediated at the level of secretion. In addition, there is attenuation in testosterone secretion. These data are all the more important

  3. Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-01-01

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill “superbugs” emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics). PMID:24287494

  4. Antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-11-28

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill "superbugs" emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics).

  5. Stimulation of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone release from perifused hypothalamic fragments by phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Nava, L E; Malacara, J M

    1987-10-01

    LHRH release is dependent on the availability of calcium, and prostaglandin E2 is a potent releaser of LHRH. Therefore, we investigated the role of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) on the release of LHRH from the hypothalamus. Four rat hypothalami were perifused with Krebs-Ringer buffer, and after a 60-min preincubation period, PLA2 was applied during 10 min. The LHRH response was determined by RIA of 10-min fractions collected for the next 60 min. PLA2 induced LHRH release in a dose-related manner at amounts of 2, 10, and 50 U. Omission of Ca++ from the medium using EGTA eliminated the PLA2 effect. Indomethacin treatment increased rather than diminished the PLA2 stimulation. Perifusion with melittin, an activator of PLA2, also increased LHRH release. These results are interpreted as a demonstration that PLA2 has a role in the release of LHRH and that a different route of the cyclooxygenase may be involved besides the well known mediation of prostaglandin E2.

  6. Peptide-membrane interactions of arginine-tryptophan peptides probed using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring.

    PubMed

    Rydberg, Hanna A; Kunze, Angelika; Carlsson, Nils; Altgärde, Noomi; Svedhem, Sofia; Nordén, Bengt

    2014-07-01

    Membrane-active peptides include peptides that can cross cellular membranes and deliver macromolecular cargo as well as peptides that inhibit bacterial growth. Some of these peptides can act as both transporters and antibacterial agents. It is desirable to combine the knowledge from these two different fields of membrane-active peptides into design of new peptides with tailored actions, as transporters of cargo or as antibacterial substances, targeting specific membranes. We have previously shown that the position of the amino acid tryptophan in the peptide sequence of three arginine-tryptophan peptides affects their uptake and intracellular localization in live mammalian cells, as well as their ability to inhibit bacterial growth. Here, we use quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring to assess the induced changes caused by binding of the three peptides to supported model membranes composed of POPC, POPC/POPG, POPC/POPG/cholesterol or POPC/lactosyl PE. Our results indicate that the tryptophan position in the peptide sequence affects the way these peptides interact with the different model membranes and that the presence of cholesterol in particular seems to affect the membrane interaction of the peptide with an even distribution of tryptophans in the peptide sequence. These results give mechanistic insight into the function of these peptides and may aid in the design of membrane-active peptides with specified cellular targets and actions.

  7. Physiological levels of A-, B- and C-type natriuretic peptide shed the endothelial glycocalyx and enhance vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Matthias; Saller, Thomas; Chappell, Daniel; Rehm, Markus; Welsch, Ulrich; Becker, Bernhard F

    2013-05-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a peptide hormone released from the cardiac atria during hypervolemia. Though named for its well-known renal effect, ANP has been demonstrated to acutely increase vascular permeability in vivo. Experimentally, this phenomenon was associated with a marked shedding of the endothelial glycocalyx, at least for supraphysiological intravascular concentrations. This study investigates the impact and mechanism of action of physiological doses of ANP and related peptides on the vascular barrier. In isolated guinea pig hearts, prepared and perfused in a modified Langendorff mode with and without the intravascular presence of the colloid hydroxyethyl starch (HES), we measured functional changes in vascular permeability and glycocalyx shedding related to intracoronary infusion of physiological concentrations of A-, B- and C-type natriuretic peptide (ANP, BNP and CNP). Significant coronary venous washout of glycocalyx constituents (syndecan-1 and heparan sulfate) was observed. As tested for ANP, this effect was positively related to the intracoronary concentration. Intravascular shedding of the glycocalyx was morphologically confirmed by electron microscopy. Also, functional vascular barrier competence decreased, as indicated by significant increases in transudate formation and HES extravasation. Ortho-phenanthroline, a non-specific inhibitor of matrix metalloproteases, was able to reduce ANP-induced glycocalyx shedding. These findings suggest participation of natriuretic peptides in pathophysiological processes like heart failure, inflammation or sepsis. Inhibition of metalloproteases might serve as a basis for future therapeutical options.

  8. Neurofilaments and NFL-TBS.40-63 peptide penetrate oligodendrocytes through clathrin-dependent endocytosis to promote their growth and survival in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fressinaud, C; Eyer, J

    2015-07-01

    Neurofilaments (NF) are released into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during multiple sclerosis (MS), but their role outside the axon is still unknown. In vitro NF fractions, as well as tubulin (TUB), increase oligodendrocyte (OL) progenitor proliferation and/or their differentiation depending on the stage of their purification (Fressinaud et al., 2012). However the mechanism by which NF enter these cells, as well as that of synthetic peptides displaying NFL-tubulin-binding site (NFL-TBS.40-63) (Fressinaud and Eyer, 2014), remains elusive. Using rat OL secondary cultures we localized NF, TUB, and NFL-TBS.40-63 by double immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. After treating OL cultures with NF P2 (2nd pellet of the purification), or TRITC-TUB, these proteins were localized in the cytoplasmic processes of myelin basic protein (MBP+) expressing OL. Similarly biotinylated NFL-TBS.40-63 synthetic peptides and KER-TBS.1-24 were detected in OL progenitors, differentiated (CNP+) and MBP+ OL. In addition, NFL-TBS.40-63 colocalized with cholera toxin, a known marker of endocytosis, within the cells. Pretreatment of OL by methyl β cyclodextrin abolishes both cholera toxin and NFL-TBS.40-63 uptake, indicating endocytosis. Clathrin-dependent endocytosis was further confirmed by treatment with dynasore, a dynamin inhibitor, which inhibited the uptake of peptides, as well as NFP2 fractions, by 50%. This study demonstrates that axon cytoskeletal proteins and peptides can be internalized by OL through endocytosis. This process could be involved during demyelination, and the release of axon proteins might promote remyelination.

  9. Anti-angiogenic peptides for cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rosca, Elena V; Koskimaki, Jacob E; Rivera, Corban G; Pandey, Niranjan B; Tamiz, Amir P; Popel, Aleksander S

    2011-08-01

    Peptides have emerged as important therapeutics that are being rigorously tested in angiogenesis-dependent diseases due to their low toxicity and high specificity. Since the discovery of endogenous proteins and protein fragments that inhibit microvessel formation (thrombospondin, endostatin) several peptides have shown promise in pre-clinical and clinical studies for cancer. Peptides have been derived from thrombospondin, collagens, chemokines, coagulation cascade proteins, growth factors, and other classes of proteins and target different receptors. Here we survey recent developments for anti-angiogenic peptides with length not exceeding 50 amino acid residues that have shown activity in pre-clinical models of cancer or have been tested in clinical trials; some of the peptides have been modified and optimized, e.g., through L-to-D and non-natural amino acid substitutions. We highlight technological advances in peptide discovery and optimization including computational and bioinformatics tools and novel experimental techniques.

  10. Role of peptide bond in the realization of biological activity of short peptides.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V Kh; Tarnovskaya, S I; Lin'kova, N S; Chervyakova, N A; Nichik, T E; Elashkina, E V; Chalisova, N I

    2015-02-01

    We performed a comparative analysis of biological activity of Lys-Glu peptide and its amino acid constituents. It was established that Lys-Glu stimulated proliferation of splenic cells in organotypic culture, while the mixture of glutamic acid and lysine inhibited culture growth. Using the method of molecular docking, we showed that glutamic acid, lysine, and Lys-Glu peptide can interact with different DNA sequences. The energy of interaction and the most beneficial localization of glutamic acid, lysine, and Lys-Glu peptide in DNA molecule was calculated. We demonstrated the interaction of the peptide and amino acids with DNA along the minor groove. The energy of DNA interaction with the peptide is higher than with individual amino acids. The peptide bonds increase the interaction of Lys-Glu peptide with DNA, which potentiates the biological effect on cell proliferation in organotypic culture of splenic cells.

  11. C-Peptide Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... C-peptide is a useful marker of insulin production. The following are some purposes of C-peptide ... it nearly impossible to directly evaluate endogenous insulin production. In these cases, C-peptide measurement is a ...

  12. Salt Reduction in a Model High-Salt Akawi Cheese: Effects on Bacterial Activity, pH, Moisture, Potential Bioactive Peptides, Amino Acids, and Growth of Human Colon Cells.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Akanksha; Shah, Nagendra P

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the effects of sodium chloride reduction and its substitution with potassium chloride on Akawi cheese during storage for 30 d at 4 °C. Survival of probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, and Bifidobacterium longum) and starter bacteria (Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus), angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitory and antioxidant activities, and concentrations of standard amino acids as affected by storage in different brine solutions (10% NaCl, 7.5% NaCl, 7.5% NaCl+KCl [1:1], 5% NaCl, and 5% NaCl+KCl [1:1]) were investigated. Furthermore, viability of human colon cells and human colon cancer cells as affected by the extract showing improved peptide profiles, highest release of amino acids and antioxidant activity (that is, from cheese brined in 7.5% NaCl+KCl) was evaluated. Significant increase was observed in survival of probiotic bacteria in cheeses with low salt after 30 d. Calcium content decreased slightly during storage in all cheeses brined in various solutions. Further, no significant changes were observed in ACE-inhibitory activity and antioxidant activity of cheeses during storage. Interestingly, concentrations of 4 essential amino acids (phenylalanine, tryptophan, valine, and leucine) increased significantly during storage in brine solutions containing 7.5% total salt. Low concentration of cheese extract (100 μg/mL) significantly improved the growth of normal human colon cells, and reduced the growth of human colon cancer cells. Overall, the study revealed that cheese extracts from reduced-NaCl brine improved the growth of human colon cells, and the release of essential amino acids, but did not affect the activities of potential bioactive peptides.

  13. Salt Reduction in a Model High-Salt Akawi Cheese: Effects on Bacterial Activity, pH, Moisture, Potential Bioactive Peptides, Amino Acids, and Growth of Human Colon Cells.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Akanksha; Shah, Nagendra P

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the effects of sodium chloride reduction and its substitution with potassium chloride on Akawi cheese during storage for 30 d at 4 °C. Survival of probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, and Bifidobacterium longum) and starter bacteria (Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus), angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitory and antioxidant activities, and concentrations of standard amino acids as affected by storage in different brine solutions (10% NaCl, 7.5% NaCl, 7.5% NaCl+KCl [1:1], 5% NaCl, and 5% NaCl+KCl [1:1]) were investigated. Furthermore, viability of human colon cells and human colon cancer cells as affected by the extract showing improved peptide profiles, highest release of amino acids and antioxidant activity (that is, from cheese brined in 7.5% NaCl+KCl) was evaluated. Significant increase was observed in survival of probiotic bacteria in cheeses with low salt after 30 d. Calcium content decreased slightly during storage in all cheeses brined in various solutions. Further, no significant changes were observed in ACE-inhibitory activity and antioxidant activity of cheeses during storage. Interestingly, concentrations of 4 essential amino acids (phenylalanine, tryptophan, valine, and leucine) increased significantly during storage in brine solutions containing 7.5% total salt. Low concentration of cheese extract (100 μg/mL) significantly improved the growth of normal human colon cells, and reduced the growth of human colon cancer cells. Overall, the study revealed that cheese extracts from reduced-NaCl brine improved the growth of human colon cells, and the release of essential amino acids, but did not affect the activities of potential bioactive peptides. PMID:26919457

  14. Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waag, Andreas

    This chapter is devoted to the growth of ZnO. It starts with various techniques to grow bulk samples and presents in some detail the growth of epitaxial layers by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The last section is devoted to the growth of nanorods. Some properties of the resulting samples are also presented. If a comparison between GaN and ZnO is made, very often the huge variety of different growth techniques available to fabricate ZnO is said to be an advantage of this material system. Indeed, growth techniques range from low cost wet chemical growth at almost room temperature to high quality MOCVD growth at temperatures above 1, 000∘C. In most cases, there is a very strong tendency of c-axis oriented growth, with a much higher growth rate in c-direction as compared to other crystal directions. This often leads to columnar structures, even at relatively low temperatures. However, it is, in general, not straight forward to fabricate smooth ZnO thin films with flat surfaces. Another advantage of a potential ZnO technology is said to be the possibility to grow thin films homoepitaxially on ZnO substrates. ZnO substrates are mostly fabricated by vapor phase transport (VPT) or hydrothermal growth. These techniques are enabling high volume manufacturing at reasonable cost, at least in principle. The availability of homoepitaxial substrates should be beneficial to the development of ZnO technology and devices and is in contrast to the situation of GaN. However, even though a number of companies are developing ZnO substrates, only recently good quality substrates have been demonstrated. However, these substrates are not yet widely available. Still, the situation concerning ZnO substrates seems to be far from low-cost, high-volume production. The fabrication of dense, single crystal thin films is, in general, surprisingly difficult, even when ZnO is grown on a ZnO substrate. However

  15. BAM 1 and RECEPTOR-LIKE PROTEIN KINASE 2 constitute a signaling pathway and modulate CLE peptide-triggered growth inhibition in Arabidopsis root.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Noriko; Ishida, Takashi; Yamada, Masashi; Shigenobu, Shuji; Tabata, Ryo; Kinoshita, Atsuko; Yamaguchi, Katsushi; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Mitsumasu, Kanako; Sawa, Shinichiro

    2015-12-01

    Ligand receptor-based signaling is a means of cell-to-cell communication for coordinating developmental and physiological processes in multicellular organisms. In plants, cell-producing meristems utilize this signaling to regulate their activities and ensure for proper development. Shoot and root systems share common requirements for carrying out this process; however, its molecular basis is largely unclear. It has been suggested that synthetic CLV3/EMBRYO SURROUNDING REGION (CLE) peptide shrinks the root meristem through the actions of CLAVATA2 (CLV2) and the RECEPTOR-LIKE PROTEIN KINASE 2 (RPK2) pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our genetic screening for mutations that resist CLE peptide signaling in roots determined that BAM1, which is a member of the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (LRR-RLK) family, is also involved in this pathway. BAM1 is preferentially expressed in the root tip, including the quiescent center and its surrounding stem cells. Our genetic analysis revealed that BAM1 functions together with RPK2. Using coimmunoprecipitation assay, we showed that BAM1 is capable of forming heteromeric complexes with RPK2. These findings suggest that the BAM1 and RPK2 receptors constitute a signaling pathway that modulates cell proliferation in the root meristem and that related molecules are employed in root and shoot meristems. PMID:26083273

  16. Free-radical scavenging properties of low molecular weight peptide(s) isolated from S1 cultivar of mulberry leaves and their impact on Bombyx mori (L.) (Bombycidae)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The mulberry leaves have been considered as a sole food source for silkworm, Bombyx mori (L.). In present work an attempt was made to investigate the role of low molecular weight peptide(s) isolated from mulberry leaves on silkworm rearing. Also we have tried to find out the role of free-radical scavenging activities of isolated peptide(s) on silkworm growth. Larval growth rate was found effective under the influence of peptide(s). Consumption rate of larvae after peptide(s) treatment on mulberry leaves was significantly enhanced over control. High antioxidant activity was found in Low molecular weight peptide(s) which have an effect on silkworm. PMID:24612781

  17. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested.

  18. A synthetic mechano-growth factor E peptide promotes rat tenocyte migration by lessening cell stiffness and increasing F-actin formation via the FAK-ERK1/2 signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bingyu; Luo, Qing; Mao, Xinjian; Xu, Baiyao; Yang, Li; Ju, Yang; Song, Guanbin

    2014-03-10

    Tendon injuries are common in sports and are frequent reasons for orthopedic consultations. The management of damaged tendons is one of the most challenging problems in orthopedics. Mechano-growth factor (MGF), a recently discovered growth repair factor, plays positive roles in tissue repair through the improvement of cell proliferation and migration and the protection of cells against injury-induced apoptosis. However, it remains unclear whether MGF has the potential to accelerate tendon repair. We used a scratch wound assay in this study to demonstrate that MGF-C25E (a synthetic mechano-growth factor E peptide) promotes the migration of rat tenocytes and that this promotion is accompanied by an elevation in the expression of the following signaling molecules: focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and extracellular signal regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2). Inhibitors of the FAK and ERK1/2 pathways inhibited the MGF-C25E-induced tenocyte migration, indicating that MGF-C25E promotes tenocyte migration through the FAK-ERK1/2 signaling pathway. The analysis of the mechanical properties showed that the Young's modulus of tenocytes was decreased through treatment of MGF-C25E, and an obvious formation of pseudopodia and F-actin was observed in MGF-C25E-treated tenocytes. The inhibition of the FAK or ERK1/2 signals restored the decrease in Young's modulus and inhibited the formation of pseudopodia and F-actin. Overall, our study demonstrated that MGF-C25E promotes rat tenocyte migration by lessening cell stiffness and increasing pseudopodia formation via the FAK-ERK1/2 signaling pathway. - Highlights: • Mechano-growth factor E peptide (MGF-C25E) promotes migration of rat tenocytes. • MGF-C25E activates the FAK-ERK1/2 pathway in rat tenocytes. • MGF-C25E induces the actin remodeling and the formation of pseudopodia, and decreases the stiffness in rat tenocytes. • MGF-C25E promotes tenocyte migration via altering stiffness and forming pseudopodia by the activation of the FAK-ERK1

  19. NaRALF, a peptide signal essential for the regulation of root hair tip apoplastic pH in Nicotiana attenuata, is required for root hair development and plant growth in native soils.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinsong; Kurten, Erin L; Monshausen, Gabriele; Hummel, Grégoire M; Gilroy, Simon; Baldwin, Ian T

    2007-12-01

    Rapid alkalinization factor (RALF) is a 49-amino-acid peptide that rapidly alkalinizes cultivated tobacco cell cultures. In the native tobacco Nicotiana attenuata, NaRALF occurs as a single-copy gene and is highly expressed in roots and petioles. Silencing the NaRALF transcript by transforming N. attenuata with an inverted-repeat construct generated plants (irRALF) with normal wild-type (WT) above-ground parts, but with roots that grew longer and produced trichoblasts that developed into abnormal root hairs. Most trichoblasts produced a localized 'bulge' without commencing root hair tip growth; fewer trichoblasts grew, but were only 10% as long as those of WT plants. The root hair phenotype was associated with slowed apoplastic pH oscillations, increased pH at the tips of trichoblasts and decreased accumulation of reactive oxygen species in the root hair initiation zone. The root hair growth phenotype was partially restored when irRALF lines were grown in a low-pH-buffered medium, and reproduced in WT plants grown in a high-pH-buffered medium. When irRALF plants were grown in pH 5.6, 6.7 and 8.1 soils together with WT plants in glasshouse experiments, they were out-competed by WT plants in basic, but not acidic, soils. When WT and irRALF lines were planted into the basic soils of the native habitat of N. attenuata in the Great Basin Desert, irRALF plants had smaller leaves, shorter stalks, and produced fewer flowers and seed capsules than did WT plants. We conclude that NaRALF is required for regulating root hair extracellular pH, the transition from root hair initiation to tip growth and plant growth in basic soils.

  20. Upregulation of voltage-gated Na+ channels by long-term activation of the ghrelin-growth hormone secretagogue receptor in clonal GC somatotropes.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Belisario; Felix, Ricardo; Monjaraz, Eduardo

    2009-05-01

    A central question in adenohypophyseal cell physiology concerns the role of transmembrane ionic fluxes in the initiation of the hormone secretion process. In the current report, we investigated the effects of the growth hormone (GH) secretagogues ghrelin and GH-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) on the regulation of the functional expression of voltage-gated Na(+) channels using the tumoral somatotrope GC cell line as a model. Cells were cultured under control conditions or in presence of the GH secretagogues (GHS) for 96 h, and Na(+) currents (I(Na)) were characterized in whole cell patch-clamp experiments. GHS treatment significantly increased I(Na) density in a dose-dependent manner. The effects of GHRP-6 were accompanied by an augment in conductance without changes in the kinetics and the voltage dependence of the currents, suggesting an increase in the number of channels in the cell membrane. Sustained inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) channel activity decreased I(Na) density and prevented the effects of the GHS, whereas long-term exposure to an L-channel agonist increased I(Na) density and enhanced the actions of GHRP-6, indicating that Ca(2+) entry through these channels plays a role in the regulation of Na(+) channel expression. Likewise, GHRP-6 failed to enhance Na(+) channel expression in the presence of membrane-permeable inhibitors of protein kinases A and C, as well as the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II. Conversely, treatment with a cAMP analog or a protein kinase C activator enhanced both basal and GHS-induced secretion of GH measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay, suggesting that GHRP-6 acting through the ghrelin receptor and different signaling pathways enhances Na(+) channel membrane expression, which favors hormone release from GC somatotropes.

  1. SCUBE3 (Signal Peptide-CUB-EGF Domain-containing Protein 3) Modulates Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling during Fast Muscle Development*

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Cheng-Fen; Tsao, Ku-Chi; Lee, Shyh-Jye; Yang, Ruey-Bing

    2014-01-01

    SCUBE3 (signal peptide CUB-EGF-like domain-containing protein 3) belongs to a newly identified secreted and cell membrane-associated SCUBE family, which is evolutionarily conserved in vertebrates. Scube3 is predominantly expressed in a variety of developing tissues in mice such as somites, neural tubes, and limb buds. However, its function during development remains unclear. In this study, we first showed that knockdown of SCUBE3 in C2C12 myoblasts inhibited FGF receptor 4 expression and FGF signaling, thus resulting in reduced myogenic differentiation. Furthermore, knockdown of zebrafish scube3 by antisense morpholino oligonucleotides specifically suppressed the expression of the myogenic marker myod1 within the lateral fast muscle precursors, whereas its expression in the adaxial slow muscle precursors was largely unaffected. Consistent with these findings, immunofluorescent staining of fast but not slow muscle myosin was markedly decreased in scube3 morphants. Further genetic studies identified fgf8 as a key regulator in scube3-mediated fast muscle differentiation in zebrafish. Biochemical and molecular analysis showed that SCUBE3 acts as a FGF co-receptor to augment FGF8 signaling. Scube3 may be a critical upstream regulator of fast fiber myogenesis by modulating fgf8 signaling during zebrafish embryogenesis. PMID:24849601

  2. Processable Cyclic Peptide Nanotubes with Tunable Interiors

    SciTech Connect

    Hourani, Rami; Zhang, Chen; van der Weegen, Rob; Ruiz, Luis; Li, Changyi; Keten, Sinan; Helms, Brett A.; Xu, Ting

    2011-09-06

    A facile route to generate cyclic peptide nanotubes with tunable interiors is presented. By incorporating 3-amino-2-methylbenzoic acid in the d,l-alternating primary sequence of a cyclic peptide, a functional group can be presented in the interior of the nanotubes without compromising the formation of high aspect ratio nanotubes. The new design of such a cyclic peptide also enables one to modulate the nanotube growth process to be compatible with the polymer processing window without compromising the formation of high aspect ratio nanotubes, thus opening a viable approach toward molecularly defined porous membranes.

  3. Long-term treatment of central precocious puberty with a long-acting analogue of luteinizing hormone release hormone (D-Tryp6-GnRH) in monthly injections. Its possible use in normal puberty.

    PubMed

    Marcondes, J A; Abujamra, A C; Minanni, S L; Mendonca, B B; Nery, M; Lerario, A C; Pereira, M A; Abelin, N; Wajchenberg, B L

    1993-02-01

    The gonadotropin-releasing-hormone-like agonist D-Tryp6-GnRH (GnRHa) has been shown to induce reversible suppression of gonadotropins and gonadal steroids in patients with central precocious puberty. We examined the effect of a long-acting preparation of GnRHa in biodegradable microcapsules. D-Tryptophane6-GnRH, administered intramuscularly at 1 month intervals, for 12 consecutive months, on growth and skeletal maturation in 3 girls and 4 boys with neurogenic or idiopathic precocious puberty. Suppression of gonadotropin release after GnRH stimulation and gonadal steroids was maintained in all subjects. Growth velocity fell from a mean rate (+/- SEM) or 8.60 +/- 0.75 cm/year before treatment to 5.81 +/- 0.60 cm/year (p < 0.005) after 1 year. Bone age advanced a mean of 8.0 +/- 0.45 months during treatment, suggesting an increase in predicted height from the ratio delta bone age/delta chronological age. Two subjects, one of them with compensated Bartter's syndrome with normal hypothalamic pituitary-gonadal-axis, received the analogue to delay pubertal growth with the hope to improve final height. In the first one, the growth velocity fell from 9.9 cm/year to 8 cm/year and delta bone age/delta chronological age decreased from 1.28 to 1.0 and in the other subject, the growth velocity fell from 12 cm/year to 6.0 cm/year in the last year of treatment and delta bone age/delta chronological age fell from 3.2 to 0.75, indicating an improvement in predicted height.

  4. Brain natriutetic peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007509.htm Brain natriuretic peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) test is a blood test that measures ...

  5. Vasoactive intestinal peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003508.htm Vasoactive intestinal peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a test that measures the amount ...

  6. Substance P-, calcitonin gene-related peptide, growth-associated protein-43, and neurotrophin receptor-like immunoreactivity associated with unmyelinated axons in feline ventral roots and pia mater.

    PubMed

    Risling, M; Dalsgaard, C J; Frisén, J; Sjögren, A M; Fried, K

    1994-01-15

    The spinal pia mater receives a rich innervation of small sensory axons via the ventral roots. Other sensory axons enter the ventral roots but end blindly or turn abruptly in hairpin loop-like formations and continue in a distal direction. In the present study, the content of substance P (SP)-, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-, growth-associated protein (GAP-43)-, and low-affinity neurotrophin receptor protein (p75NGFr)-like immunoreactivity (-LI) associated with these different types of sensory axons was assessed with light and electron microscopic immunohistochemical techniques. In addition, the binding of antibodies against synthetic peptides representing unique sequences of residues in the products of the trk and trkB protooncogenes was analyzed. These genes encode membrane spanning proteins, which have been shown to constitute specific high affinity binding sites for several members of the nerve growth factor family of neurotrophic factors. The results of the present study imply that the ventral root afferents comprise several different types of sensory axons, which all contain SP-, CGRP-, GAP-43-, and p75NGFr-like immunoreactivities. In addition, at least some of the presumed sensory fiber bundles in ventral roots and the pia mater were immunoreactive for the trkB gene product. Moreover, leptomeningeal cells and nonneuronal cells of the ventral roots were shown to bind antibodies to both the trk and trkB gene products. The ventral root afferents seem to share their immunohistochemical pattern with pain-transducing axons at some other locations, such as the tooth pulp. The contents of SP- and CGRP-LI in sensory axons that reach the central nervous system (CNS) through the ventral root indicate that ventral root afferents may be involved in sensory mechanisms, such as the ventral root pain reaction, as well as in the control of the pial blood vessels. The demonstration of GAP-43 and neurotrophin receptor-immunoreactivities associated with unmyelinated

  7. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested. PMID:27145593

  8. Effects of carbohydrate sugars and artificial sweeteners on appetite and the secretion of gastrointestinal satiety peptides.

    PubMed

    Steinert, Robert E; Frey, Florian; Töpfer, Antonia; Drewe, Jürgen; Beglinger, Christoph

    2011-05-01

    In vitro, both carbohydrate sugars and artificial sweeteners (AS) stimulate the secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). It has been suggested that the gut tastes sugars and AS through the same mechanisms as the tongue, with potential effects on gut hormone release. We investigated whether the human gut responds in the same way to AS and carbohydrate sugars, which are perceived by lingual taste as equisweet. We focused on the secretion of gastrointestinal (GI) satiety peptides in relation to appetite perception. We performed a placebo-controlled, double-blind, six-way, cross-over trial including twelve healthy subjects. On separate days, each subject received an intragastric infusion of glucose, fructose or an AS (aspartame, acesulfame K and sucralose) dissolved in 250 ml of water or water only (control). In a second part, four subjects received an intragastric infusion of the non-sweet, non-metabolisable sugar analogue 2-deoxy-d-glucose. Glucose stimulated GLP-1 (P = 0·002) and peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY; P = 0·046) secretion and reduced fasting plasma ghrelin (P = 0·046), whereas fructose was less effective. Both carbohydrate sugars increased satiety and fullness (albeit not significantly) compared with water. In contrast, equisweet loads of AS did not affect gastrointestinal peptide secretion with minimal effects on appetite. 2-Deoxy-d-glucose increased hunger ratings, however, with no effects on GLP-1, PYY or ghrelin. Our data demonstrate that the secretion of GLP-1, PYY and ghrelin depends on more than the detection of (1) sweetness or (2) the structural analogy to glucose.

  9. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  10. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  11. The roles of peptide hormones during plant root development.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masashi; Sawa, Shinichiro

    2013-02-01

    Peptide hormones are a key mechanism that plants use for cell-cell interactions; these interactions function to coordinate development, growth, and environmental responses among different cells. Peptide signals are produced by one cell and received by receptors in neighboring cells. It has previously been reported that peptide hormones regulate various aspects of plant development. The mechanism of action of peptides in the shoot is well known. However, the function of peptides in the root has been relatively uncharacterized. Recent studies have discovered important roles for peptide hormones in the development of the root meristem, lateral roots, and nodules. In this review, we focus on current findings regarding the function of peptide hormones in root development.

  12. De-Novo Design of Antimicrobial Peptides for Plant Protection

    PubMed Central

    Zeitler, Benjamin; Herrera Diaz, Areli; Dangel, Alexandra; Thellmann, Martha; Meyer, Helge; Sattler, Michael; Lindermayr, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the de-novo design of peptides that inhibit a broad range of plant pathogens. Four structurally different groups of peptides were developed that differ in size and position of their charged and hydrophobic clusters and were assayed for their ability to inhibit bacterial growth and fungal spore germination. Several peptides are highly active at concentrations between 0,1 and 1 µg/ml against plant pathogenic bacteria, such as Pseudomonas syringae, Pectobacterium carotovorum, and Xanthomonas vesicatoria. Importantly, no hemolytic activity could be detected for these peptides at concentrations up to 200 µg/ml. Moreover, the peptides are also active after spraying on the plant surface demonstrating a possible way of application. In sum, our designed peptides represent new antimicrobial agents and with the increasing demand for antimicrobial compounds for production of “healthy” food, these peptides might serve as templates for novel antibacterial and antifungal agents. PMID:23951222

  13. Morphogenic Peptides in Regeneration of Load Bearing Tissues.

    PubMed

    Moeinzadeh, Seyedsina; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2015-01-01

    Morphogenic proteins due to their short half-life require high doses of growth factors in regeneration of load bearing tissues which leads to undesirable side effects. These side effects include bone overgrowth, tumor formation and immune reaction. An alternative approach to reduce undesirable side effects of proteins in regenerative medicine is to use morphogenic peptides derived from the active domains of morphogenic proteins or soluble and insoluble components of the extracellular matrix of mineralized load bearing tissues to induce differentiation of progenitor cells, mineralization, maturation and bone formation. In that regard, many peptides with osteogenic activity have been discovered. These include peptides derived from bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs), those based on interaction with integrin and heparin-binding receptors, collagen derived peptides, peptides derived from other soluble ECM proteins such as bone sialoprotein and enamel matrix proteins, and those peptides derived from vasculoinductive and neuro-inductive proteins. Although these peptides show significant osteogenic activity in vitro and increase mineralization and bone formation in animal models, they are not widely used in clinical orthopedic applications as an alternative to morphogenic proteins. This is partly due to the limited availability of data on structure and function of morphogenic peptides in physiological medium, particularly in tissue engineered scaffolds. Due to their amphiphilic nature, peptides spontaneously self-assemble and aggregate into micellar structures in physiological medium. Aggregation alters the sequence of amino acids in morphogenic peptides that interact with cell surface receptors thus affecting osteogenic activity of the peptide. Aggregation and micelle formation can dramatically reduce the active concentration of morphogenic peptides with many-fold increase in peptide concentration in physiological medium. Other factors that affect bioactivity are the non

  14. Computational peptide vaccinology.

    PubMed

    Söllner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Immunoinformatics focuses on modeling immune responses for better understanding of the immune system and in many cases for proposing agents able to modify the immune system. The most classical of these agents are vaccines derived from living organisms such as smallpox or polio. More modern vaccines comprise recombinant proteins, protein domains, and in some cases peptides. Generating a vaccine from peptides however requires technologies and concepts very different from classical vaccinology. Immunoinformatics therefore provides the computational tools to propose peptides suitable for formulation into vaccines. This chapter introduces the essential biological concepts affecting design and efficacy of peptide vaccines and discusses current methods and workflows applied to design successful peptide vaccines using computers.

  15. C-Peptide and its intracellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Hills, Claire E; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2009-01-01

    Although long believed to be inert, C-peptide has now been shown to have definite biological effects both in vitro and in vivo in diabetic animals and in patients with type 1 diabetes. These effects point to a protective action of C-peptide against the development of diabetic microvascular complications. Underpinning these observations is undisputed evidence of C-peptide binding to a variety of cell types at physiologically relevant concentrations, and the downstream stimulation of multiple cell signaling pathways and gene transcription via the activation of numerous transcription factors. These pathways affect such fundamental cellular processes as re-absorptive and/or secretory phenotype, migration, growth, and survival. Whilst the receptor remains to be identified, experimental data points strongly to the existence of a specific G-protein-coupled receptor for C-peptide. Of the cell types studied so far, kidney tubular cells express the highest number of C-peptide binding sites. Accordingly, C-peptide exerts major effects on the function of these cells, and in the context of diabetic nephropathy appears to antagonise the pathophysiological effects of major disease mediators such as TGFbeta1 and TNFalpha. Therefore, based on its cellular activity profile C-peptide appears well positioned for development as a therapeutic tool to treat microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes. PMID:20039003

  16. Induction of latency-associated peptide (transforming growth factor-β1) expression on CD4+ T cells reduces Toll-like receptor 4 ligand-induced tumour necrosis factor-α production in a transforming growth factor-β-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Boswell, Sandra; Sharif, Shayan; Alisa, Akeel; Pereira, Stephen P; Williams, Roger; Behboudi, Shahriar

    2011-01-01

    CD4+ T cells expressing the latent form of transforming growth factor-β [latency-associated peptide (LAP) (TGF-β1)] play an important role in the modulation of immune responses. Here, we identified a novel peptide ligand (GPC81–95) with an intrinsic ability to induce membrane-bound LAP (TGF-β1) expression on a subpopulation of human CD4+ T cells (using flow cytometry; ranging from 0·8% to 2·6%) and stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells to release LAP (TGF-β1) (using ELISPOT assay; ranging from 0·03% to 0·16%). In spite of this low percentage of responding cells, GPC81–95 significantly reduced Toll-like receptor 4 ligand-induced tumour necrosis factor-α production in a TGF-β1- and CD4+ T-cell-dependent manner. The results demonstrate that GPC81–95 is a useful tool to study the functional properties of a subpopulation of LAP (TGF-β1)+ CD4+ T cells and suggest a pathway that can be exploited to suppress inflammatory response. PMID:21426338

  17. Ribosomally synthesized peptides from natural sources.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nidhi; Abraham, Jayanthi

    2014-04-01

    There are many antibiotic-resistant microbial pathogens that have emerged in recent years causing normal infections to become harder and sometimes impossible to treat. The major mechanisms of acquired resistance are the ability of the microorganisms to destroy or modify the drug, alter the drug target, reduce uptake or increase efflux of the drug and replace the metabolic step targeted by the drug. However, in recent years, resistant strains have been reported from almost every environment. New antimicrobial compounds are of major importance because of the growing problem of bacterial resistance, and antimicrobial peptides have been gaining a lot of interest. Their mechanism of action, however, is often obscure. Antimicrobial peptides are widespread and have a major role in innate immunity. An increasing number of peptides capable of inhibiting microbial growth are being reviewed here. In this article, we consider the possible use of antimicrobial peptides against pathogens.

  18. Characterization of insulin-like growth factor I and insulin receptors on cultured bovine adrenal fasciculata cells. Role of these peptides on adrenal cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Penhoat, A.; Chatelain, P.G.; Jaillard, C.; Saez, J.M.

    1988-06-01

    We have characterized insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and insulin receptors in cultured bovine adrenal cells by binding and cross-linking affinity experiments. At equilibrium the dissociation constant and the number of binding sites per cell for IGF-I were 1.4 +/- (SE) 0.3 x 10(-9) M and 19,200 +/- 2,100, respectively. Under reduction conditions, disuccinimidyl suberate cross-linked (/sup 125/I)iodo-IGF-I to one receptor complex with an Mr of 125,000. Adrenal cells also contain specific insulin receptors with an apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of 10(-9) M. Under reduction conditions (/sup 125/I)iodo-insulin binds to one band with an approximate Mr of 125,000. IGF-I and insulin at micromolar concentrations, but not at nanomolar concentrations, slightly stimulated DNA synthesis, but markedly potentiated the mitogenic action of fibroblast growth factor. Adrenal cells cultured in a serum-free medium containing transferrin, ascorbic acid, and insulin (5 micrograms/ml) maintained fairly constant angiotensin-II (A-II) receptor concentration per cell and increased cAMP release on response to ACTH and their steroidogenic response to both ACTH and A-II. When the cells were cultured in the same medium without insulin, the number of A-II receptors significantly decreased to 65% and the increased responsiveness was blunted. Treatment of such cells for 3 days with increasing concentrations of IGF-I (1-100 ng/ml) produced a 2- to 3-fold increase in A-II receptors and enhanced the cAMP response (3- to 4-fold) to ACTH and the steroidogenic response (4- to 6-fold) to ACTH and A-II. These effects were time and dose dependent (ED50 approximately equal to 10(-9) M). Insulin at micromolar concentrations produced an effect similar to that of IGF-I, but at nanomolar concentrations the effect was far less.

  19. Insulin-like growth factor-1 protects against prion peptide-induced cell death in neuronal cells via inhibition of Bax translocation.

    PubMed

    Park, Yang-Gyu; Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Moon, Myung-Hee; Lee, Ju-Hee; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Kim, Shang-Jin; Kang, Seog-Jin; Park, Sang-Youel

    2012-11-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is one of the most important components of bovine colostrum. It exhibits antiapoptotic and antioxidative activities. Prion dise