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Sample records for growth mode resulting

  1. Regularity in budding mode and resultant growth morphology of the azooxanthellate colonial scleractinian Tubastraea coccinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentoku, A.; Ezaki, Y.

    2012-03-01

    Scleractinia exhibit a variety of growth forms, whether zooxanthellate or azooxanthellate, according to factors that control asexual reproduction and ensuing coral growth. The azooxanthellate branching scleractinian Dendrophyllia arbuscula shows regular modes of budding in terms of the locations of budding sites, the orientations of directive septa, and the inclination angle of budding throughout colonial growth. This study reports that such regularities are also found in the apparently different growth form of the massive dendrophylliid Tubastraea coccinea, which shows the following growth features: (1) the offsets (lateral corallites) always occur near four primary septa, except the two directive primary septa, meaning that the lateral corallites do not appear in the sectors of the two directive septa; (2) the two directive septa in lateral corallites tend to be oriented subperpendicular to the growth direction of the parental corallites; (3) the lateral corallites grow approximately diagonally upwards; and (4) these regularities are seen in the axial and derived lateral corallites among all generations during colony growth. Large differences in growth form are found between the branching D. arbuscula and massive T. coccinea, irrespective of the presence of specific regularities. It is likely that subtle modifications of certain parameters (e.g., budding interval, branch length, corallite size, and inclination angle of lateral corallites) have a strong effect on the overall growth morphology. A precise understanding of such regularities, which occur regardless of generation or taxonomic position, would contribute to understanding the "shape-controlling mechanism" of corals, which are an archetypal modular organism.

  2. On new non-modal hydrodynamic stability modes and resulting non-exponential growth rates - a Lie symmetry approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberlack, Martin; Nold, Andreas; Sanjon, Cedric Wilfried; Wang, Yongqi; Hau, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Classical hydrodynamic stability theory for laminar shear flows, no matter if considering long-term stability or transient growth, is based on the normal-mode ansatz, or, in other words, on an exponential function in space (stream-wise direction) and time. Recently, it became clear that the normal mode ansatz and the resulting Orr-Sommerfeld equation is based on essentially three fundamental symmetries of the linearized Euler and Navier-Stokes equations: translation in space and time and scaling of the dependent variable. Further, Kelvin-mode of linear shear flows seemed to be an exception in this context as it admits a fourth symmetry resulting in the classical Kelvin mode which is rather different from normal-mode. However, very recently it was discovered that most of the classical canonical shear flows such as linear shear, Couette, plane and round Poiseuille, Taylor-Couette, Lamb-Ossen vortex or asymptotic suction boundary layer admit more symmetries. This, in turn, led to new problem specific non-modal ansatz functions. In contrast to the exponential growth rate in time of the modal-ansatz, the new non-modal ansatz functions usually lead to an algebraic growth or decay rate, while for the asymptotic suction boundary layer a double-exponential growth or decay is observed.

  3. Filamentation as primitive growth mode?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigan, Erwan; Steyaert, Jean-Marc; Douady, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Osmotic pressure influences cellular shape. In a growing cell, chemical reactions and dilution induce changes in osmolarity, which in turn influence the cellular shape. Using a protocell model relying upon random conservative chemical reaction networks with arbitrary stoichiometry, we find that when the membrane is so flexible that its shape adjusts itself quasi-instantaneously to balance the osmotic pressure, the protocell either grows filamentous or fails to grow. This behavior is consistent with a mathematical proof. This suggests that filamentation may be a primitive growth mode resulting from the simple physical property of balanced osmotic pressure. We also find that growth is favored if some chemical species are only present inside the protocell, but not in the outside growth medium. Such an insulation requires specific chemical schemes. Modern evolved cells such as E. coli meet these requirements through active transport mechanisms such as the phosphotransferase system.

  4. Drift mode growth rates and associated transport

    SciTech Connect

    Redd, A.J.; Kritz, A.H.; Bateman, G.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.

    1999-04-01

    Drift mode linear growth rates and quasilinear transport are investigated using the FULL kinetic stability code [Rewoldt {ital et al.}, Phys. Plasmas {bold 5}, 1815 (1998)] and a version of the Weiland transport model [Strand {ital et al.}, Nucl. Fusion {bold 38}, 545 (1998)]. It is shown that the drift mode growth rates (as well as the marginal stability temperature gradient) obtained using the FULL code are dependent on the accuracy of the equilibrium employed. In particular, when an approximate equilibrium model is utilized by the FULL code, the results can differ significantly from those obtained using a more accurate numerical equilibrium. Also investigated are the effects of including full electron physics. It is shown, using both the FULL code and the Weiland model, that the nonadiabatic (e.g., trapped) electron response produces a significant increase in the linear growth rate of the ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) driven branch of the drift instability. Other consequences of the nonadiabatic electron response include a reduction in the marginal temperature gradient for the onset of the ITG mode and an additional contribution to transport due to the excitation of the Trapped Electron Mode (TEM). Physical explanations are given for the sensitivity of the mode growth rates to the equilibrium and the nonadiabatic electron response. Finally, linear growth rates for the ITG mode computed using the FULL code are compared with growth rates obtained using the Weiland model. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Evolution of growth modes for polyelectrolyte bundles.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ghee Hwee; Coridan, Rob; Zribi, Olena V; Golestanian, Ramin; Wong, Gerard C L

    2007-05-04

    Multivalent ions induce attractions between polyelectrolytes, but lead to finite-sized bundles rather than macroscopic phase separation. The kinetics of aggregation and bundle formation of actin is tracked using two different fluorescently labeled populations of F-actin. It is found that the growth mode of these bundles evolves with time and salt concentration, varying from an initial lateral growth to a longitudinal one at later stages. The results suggest that kinetics play a role in bundle growth, but not in the lateral size of bundles, which is constant for linear and branched topologies.

  6. Growth Kinematics of Opening-Mode Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhubl, P.; Alzayer, Y.; Laubach, S.; Fall, A.

    2014-12-01

    Fracture aperture is a primary control on flow in fractured reservoirs of low matrix permeability including unconventional oil and gas reservoirs and most geothermal systems. Guided by principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, fracture aperture is generally assumed to be a linear function of fracture length and elastic material properties. Natural opening-mode fractures with significant preserved aperture are observed in core and outcrop indicative of fracture opening strain accommodated by permanent solution-precipitation creep. Fracture opening may thus be decoupled from length growth if the material effectively weakens after initial elastic fracture growth by either non-elastic deformation processes or changes in elastic properties. To investigate the kinematics of fracture length and aperture growth, we reconstructed the opening history of three opening-mode fractures that are bridged by crack-seal quartz cement in Travis Peak Sandstone of the SFOT-1 well, East Texas. Similar crack-seal cement bridges had been interpreted to form by repeated incremental fracture opening and subsequent precipitation of quartz cement. We imaged crack-seal cement textures for bridges sampled at varying distance from the tips using scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence, and determined the number and thickness of crack-seal cement increments as a function of position along the fracture length and height. Observed trends in increment number and thickness are consistent with an initial stage of fast fracture propagation relative to aperture growth, followed by a stage of slow propagation and pronounced aperture growth. Consistent with fluid inclusion observations indicative of fracture opening and propagation occurring over 30-40 m.y., we interpret the second phase of pronounced aperture growth to result from fracture opening strain accommodated by solution-precipitation creep and concurrent slow, possibly subcritical, fracture propagation. Similar deformation

  7. Rotational modes of relativistic stars: Analytic results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockitch, Keith H.; Andersson, Nils; Friedman, John L.

    2001-01-01

    We study the r modes and rotational ``hybrid'' modes (inertial modes) of relativistic stars. As in Newtonian gravity, the spectrum of low-frequency rotational modes is highly sensitive to the stellar equation of state. If the star and its perturbations obey the same one-parameter equation of state (as with barotropic stars), there exist no pure r modes at all-no modes whose limit, for a star with zero angular velocity, is an axial-parity perturbation. Rotating stars of this kind similarly have no pure g modes, no modes whose spherical limit is a perturbation with polar parity and vanishing perturbed pressure and density. In spherical stars of this kind, the r modes and g modes form a degenerate zero-frequency subspace. We find that rotation splits the degeneracy to zeroth order in the star's angular velocity Ω, and the resulting modes are generically hybrids, whose limit as Ω-->0 is a stationary current with both axial and polar parts. Because each mode has definite parity, its axial and polar parts have alternating values of l. We show that each mode belongs to one of two classes, axial-led or polar-led, depending on whether the spherical harmonic with the lowest value of l that contributes to its velocity field is axial or polar. Newtonian barotropic stars retain a vestigial set of purely axial modes (those with l=m); however, for relativistic barotropic stars, we show that these modes must also be replaced by axial-led hybrids. We compute the post-Newtonian corrections to the l=m modes for uniform density stars. On the other hand, if the star is nonbarotropic (that is, if the perturbed star obeys an equation of state that differs from that of the unperturbed star), the r modes alone span the degenerate zero-frequency subspace of the spherical star. In Newtonian stars, this degeneracy is split only by the order-Ω2 rotational corrections. However, when relativistic effects are included, the degeneracy is again broken at zeroth order. We compute the r modes of a

  8. New growth mode through decorated twin boundaries.

    PubMed

    Bleikamp, Sebastian; Thoma, Arne; Polop, Celia; Pirug, Gerhard; Linke, Udo; Michely, Thomas

    2006-03-24

    Scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron diffraction were used to investigate the growth of partly twinned Ir thin films on Ir(111). A transition from the expected layer-by-layer to a defect dominated growth mode with a fixed lateral length scale and increasing roughness is observed. During growth, the majority of the film is stably transformed to twinned stacking. This transition is initiated by the energetic avoidance of the formation of intrinsic stacking faults compared to two independent twin faults. The atomistic details of the defect kinetics are outlined.

  9. Possible burst-like facet growth mode at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovrić, Davorin; Vučić, Zlatko; Gladić, Jadranko

    2008-07-01

    A decade ago, a burst-like growth mode of c-facets of 4He crystals growing at mK temperatures, characterized by the alternation of time intervals during which the facet does not advance with the intervals of its fast advancement, was found [J.P. Ruutu, P.J. Hakonen, A.V. Babkin, A.Y. Parshin, J.S. Penttilä, J.P. Saramäki, G. Tvalashvili, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76 (1996) 4187]. We investigate the possibility that a similar facet growth mode exists for facets at high growth temperatures. We have applied the digital laser interferometry for monitoring facet kinetics of spherical copper selenide single crystals during their growth at constant volume growth rate around 800 K. Our analysis of directly measured (1 1 1) facet advancement curves has revealed that they consist of time intervals during which the facet does not advance vertically alternating with the time intervals of enhanced growth, resembling the burst-like facet growth mode. The results are discussed in terms of the enhancement of the local supersaturation induced by the existence of nucleation barrier.

  10. Family Mode Deactivation Therapy Results and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.

    2006-01-01

    This article highlights the inclusion of Mode Deactivation Therapy as a treatment modality for families in crisis. As an empirically validated treatment, Mode Deactivation Therapy has been effective in treating a wide variety of psychological issues. Mode Deactivation Therapy, (MDT) was developed to treat adolescents with disorders of conduct…

  11. Growth modes of nanoparticle superlattice thin films.

    PubMed

    Mishra, D; Greving, D; Badini Confalonieri, G A; Perlich, J; Toperverg, B P; Zabel, H; Petracic, O

    2014-05-23

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of iron oxide nanoparticle thin film superlattices. The formation into different film morphologies is controlled by tuning the particle plus solvent-to-substrate interaction. It turns out that the wetting vs dewetting properties of the solvent before the self-assembly process during solvent evaporation plays a major role in determining the resulting film morphology. In addition to layerwise growth three-dimensional mesocrystalline growth is also evidenced. The understanding of the mechanisms ruling nanoparticle self-assembly represents an important step towards the fabrication of novel materials with tailored optical, magnetic or electrical transport properties.

  12. Subcritical crack growth in soda-lime glass in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Dileep; Shetty, Dinesh K.

    1990-01-01

    Subcritical crack growth under mixed-mode loading was studied in soda-lime glass. Pure mode I, combined mode I and mode II, and pure mode II loadings were achieved in precracked disk specimens by loading in diametral compression at selected angles with respect to the symmetric radial crack. Crack growth was monitored by measuring the resistance changes in a microcircuit grid consisting of parallel, electrically conducting grid lines deposited on the surface of the disk specimens by photolithography. Subcritical crack growth rates in pure mode I, pure mode II, and combined mode I and mode II loading could be described by an exponential relationship between crack growth rate and an effective crack driving force derived from a mode I-mode II fracture toughness envelope. The effective crack driving force was based on an empirical representation of the noncoplanar strain energy release rate. Stress intensities for kinked cracks were assessed using the method of caustics and an initial decrease and a subsequent increase in the subcritical crack growth rates of kinked cracks were shown to correlate with the variations of the mode I and the mode II stress intensities.

  13. Subcritical crack growth in soda-lime glass in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Dileep; Shetty, Dinesh K.

    1990-01-01

    Subcritical crack growth under mixed-mode loading was studied in soda-lime glass. Pure mode I, combined mode I and mode II, and pure mode II loadings were achieved in precracked disk specimens by loading in diametral compression at selected angles with respect to the symmetric radial crack. Crack growth was monitored by measuring the resistance changes in a microcircuit grid consisting of parallel, electrically conducting grid lines deposited on the surface of the disk specimens by photolithography. Subcritical crack growth rates in pure mode I, pure mode II, and combined mode I and mode II loading could be described by an exponential relationship between crack growth rate and an effective crack driving force derived from a mode I-mode II fracture toughness envelope. The effective crack driving force was based on an empirical representation of the noncoplanar strain energy release rate. Stress intensities for kinked cracks were assessed using the method of caustics and an initial decrease and a subsequent increase in the subcritical crack growth rates of kinked cracks were shown to correlate with the variations of the mode I and the mode II stress intensities.

  14. Swarm's Absolute Scalar Magnetometers Burst Mode Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coisson, P.; Vigneron, P.; Hulot, G.; Crespo Grau, R.; Brocco, L.; Lalanne, X.; Sirol, O.; Leger, J. M.; Jager, T.; Bertrand, F.; Boness, A.; Fratter, I.

    2014-12-01

    Each of the three Swarm satellites embarks an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) to provide absolute scalar measurements of the magnetic field with high accuracy and stability. Nominal data acquisition of these ASMs is 1 Hz. But they can also run in a so-called "burst mode" and provide data at 250 Hz. During the commissioning phase of the mission, seven burst mode acquisition campaigns have been run simultaneously for all satellites, obtaining a total of ten days of burs-mode data. These campaigns allowed the identification of issues related to the operations of the piezo-electric motor and the heaters connected to the ASM, that do not impact the nominal 1 Hz scalar data. We analyze the burst mode data to identify high frequency geomagnetic signals, focusing the analysis in two regions: the low latitudes, where we seek signatures of ionospheric irregularities, and the high latitudes, to identify high frequency signals related to polar region currents. Since these campaigns have been conducted during the initial months of the mission, the three satellites where still close to each other, allowing to analyze the spatial coherency of the signals. Wavelet analysis have revealed 31 Hz signals appearing in the night-side in the equatorial region.

  15. Slow crack growth in glass in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shetty, D. K.; Rosenfield, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    Slow crack growth in soda-lime glass under combined mode I and mode II loading was investigated in precracked disk specimens in which pure mode I, pure mode II, and various combinations of mode I and mode II were achieved by loading in diametral compression at selected angles with respect to symmetric radial cracks. It is shown that slow crack growth under these conditions can be described by a simple exponential relationship with elastic strain energy release rate as the effective crack-driving force parameter. It is possible to interpret this equation in terms of theoretical models that treat subcritical crack growth as a thermally activated bond-rupture process with an activation energy dependent on the environment, and the elastic energy release rate as the crack-driving force parameter.

  16. Slow crack growth in glass in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shetty, D. K.; Rosenfield, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    Slow crack growth in soda-lime glass under combined mode I and mode II loading was investigated in precracked disk specimens in which pure mode I, pure mode II, and various combinations of mode I and mode II were achieved by loading in diametral compression at selected angles with respect to symmetric radial cracks. It is shown that slow crack growth under these conditions can be described by a simple exponential relationship with elastic strain energy release rate as the effective crack-driving force parameter. It is possible to interpret this equation in terms of theoretical models that treat subcritical crack growth as a thermally activated bond-rupture process with an activation energy dependent on the environment, and the elastic energy release rate as the crack-driving force parameter.

  17. Transport modes during crystal growth in a centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, William A.; Wilcox, William R.; Carlson, Frederick; Chait, Arnon; Regel', Liia L.

    1992-01-01

    Flow modes arising under average acceleration in centrifugal crystal growth, the gradient of acceleration, and the Coriolis force are investigated using a fully nonlinear three-dimensional numerical model for a centrifugal crystal growth experiment. The analysis focuses on an examination of the quasi-steady state flow modes. The importance of the gradient acceleration is determined by the value of a new nondimensional number, Ad.

  18. Island growth as a growth mode in atomic layer deposition: A phenomenological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puurunen, Riikka L.; Vandervorst, Wilfried

    2004-12-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has recently gained world-wide attention because of its suitability for the fabrication of conformal material layers with thickness in the nanometer range. Although the principles of ALD were realized about 40 years ago, the description of many physicochemical processes that occur during ALD growth is still under development. A constant amount of material deposited in an ALD reaction cycle, that is, growth-per-cycle (GPC), has been a paradigm in ALD through decades. The GPC may vary, however, especially in the beginning of the ALD growth. In this work, a division of ALD processes to four classes is proposed, on the basis of how the GPC varies with the number of ALD reaction cycles: linear growth, substrate-enhanced growth, and substrate-inhibited growth of type 1 and type 2. Island growth is identified as a likely origin for type 2 substrate-inhibited growth, where the GPC increases and goes through a maximum before it settles to a constant value characteristic of a steady growth. A simple phenomenological model is developed to describe island growth in ALD. The model assumes that the substrate is unreactive with the ALD reactants, except for reactive defects. ALD growth is assumed to proceed symmetrically from the defects, resulting islands of a conical shape. Random deposition is the growth mode on the islands. The model allows the simulation of GPC curves, surface fraction curves, and surface roughness, with physically significant parameters. When the model is applied to the zirconium tetrachloride/water and the trimethylaluminum/water ALD processes on hydrogen-terminated silicon, the calculated GPC curves and surface fractions agree with the experiments. The island growth model can be used to assess the occurrence of island growth, the size of islands formed, and point of formation of a continuous ALD-grown film. The benefits and limitations of the model and the general characteristics of type 2 substrate-inhibited ALD are

  19. A Mixed-Mode I/II Fracture Criterion and Its Application in Crack Growth Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, Michael A.; Deng, Xiaomin; Ma, Fashang; Newman, James S., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A crack tip opening displacement (CTOD)-based, mixed mode fracture criterion is developed for predicting the onset and direction of crack growth. The criterion postulates that crack growth occurs in either the Mode I or Mode II direction, depending on whether the maximum in either the opening or the shear component of CTOD, measured at a specified distance behind the crack tip, attains a critical value. For crack growth direction prediction, the proposed CTOD criterion is shown to be equivalent to seven commonly used crack growth criteria under linearly elastic and asymptotic conditions. Under elastic-plastic conditions the CTOD criterion's prediction of the dependence of the crack growth direction on the crack-up mode mixity is in excellent agreement with the Arcan test results. Furthermore, the CTOD criterion correctly predicts the existence of a crack growth transition from mode I to mode II as the mode mixity approaches the mode II loading condition. The proposed CTOD criterion has been implemented in finite element crack growth simulation codes Z1P2DL and FRANC2DL to predict the crack growth paths in (a) a modified Arcan test specimen and fixture made of AL 2024-T34 and (b) a double cantilever beam (DCB) specimen made of AL 7050. A series of crack growth simulations have been carried out for the crack growth tests in the Arcan and DCB specimens and the results further demonstrate the applicability of the mixed mode CTOD fracture criterion crack growth predictions and residual strength analyses for airframe materials.

  20. Elastic-Plastic Finite Element Analysis of Fatigue Crack Growth in Mode 1 and Mode 2 Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakagaki, M.; Atluri, S. N.

    1978-01-01

    Presented is an alternate cost-efficient and accurate elastic-plastic finite element procedure to analyze fatigue crack closure and its effects under general spectrum loading. Both Modes 1 and 2 type cycling loadings are considered. Also presented are the results of an investigation, using the newly developed procedure, of various factors that cause crack growth acceleration or retardation and delay effects under high-to-low, low-to-high, single overload, and constant amplitude type cyclic loading in a Mode 1 situation. Further, the results of an investigation of a centercracked panel under external pure shear (Mode 2) cyclic loading, of constant amplitude, are reported.

  1. Growth Modes and Energetics of 101 Face Lysozyme Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, L.

    2004-01-01

    From analyses of lysozyme 101 face growth rate data using a 2D nucleation model for layer-by-layer growth, we find the effective barrier for crystal growth to be gamma = 1.0 +/- 0.2 x 10(exp -13) erg/molecule. The magnitude of the effective barrier is 2.4 +/- 0.5 k(sub beta)T, at 22 C. We also find that beyond a critical solution supersaturation, sigma(sub c), crystal growth rates are more accurately described by a kinetic roughening hypothesis. Beyond sigma(sub c), crystals grow by the continuous addition of molecules anywhere on the crystal surface rather than layer-by-layer. The magnitude of the critical supersaturation (sigma(sub c), = 1.7 +/- 0.2) for a crossover from a layer-by-layer to continuous growth is found to be statistically independent of the solution conditions that vary with buffer pH, temperature or precipitant concentration. Using the experimentally determined values for gamma and sigma(sub c), we find the crystal growth unit to be comprised of 7 +/- 3 molecules. The energy barrier, E(sub c), for the continuous addition of the growth Units is 6.2 +/- 0.3 x 10(exp -13) erg/molecule or 15 +/1 1 k(sub beta)T at 22C.

  2. Characterization of Mode I and mixed-mode delamination growth in T300/5208 graphite/epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramkumar, R. L.; Whitcomb, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The roles played by Mode I and Mode II strain-energy release rates (G-I and G-II, respectively) in inducing delamination growth under static and fatigue loading were investigated, using T300/5208 graphite/epoxy specimens. Double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens and cracked lap shear (CLS) specimens were used for pure Mode I and mixed-mode tests, respectively. Fatigue-induced delamination growth was characterized by constant-amplitude fatigue tests at a minimum to maximum cyclic load ratio of 0.05 and a frequency of 10 Hz. During the tests, the maximum and minimum strain-energy release rates (Gmax, Gmin) and the delamination growth rate (da/dN) were monitored. Static tests on mixed-mode CLS specimens measured the total strain-energy release rate, which was broken into G-I and G-II components using finite-element analysis. A power-law relationship between da/dN and G-Imax, and da/dN and Gmax were obtained from fatigue test results on DCB and CLS specimens, respectively. The power law for a pure Mode II delamination was derived from CLS results by subtracting the contribution due to G-I.

  3. Growth rate, transmission mode and virulence in human pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Cornwallis, Charlie K.; Buckling, Angus; West, Stuart A.

    2017-01-01

    The harm that pathogens cause to hosts during infection, termed virulence, varies across species from negligible to a high likelihood of rapid death. Classic theory for the evolution of virulence is based on a trade-off between pathogen growth, transmission and host survival, which predicts that higher within-host growth causes increased transmission and higher virulence. However, using data from 61 human pathogens, we found the opposite correlation to the expected positive correlation between pathogen growth rate and virulence. We found that (i) slower growing pathogens are significantly more virulent than faster growing pathogens, (ii) inhaled pathogens and pathogens that infect via skin wounds are significantly more virulent than pathogens that are ingested, but (iii) there is no correlation between symptoms of infection that aid transmission (such as diarrhoea and coughing) and virulence. Overall, our results emphasize how virulence can be influenced by mechanistic life-history details, especially transmission mode, that determine how parasites infect and exploit their hosts. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Opening the black box: re-examining the ecology and evolution of parasite transmission’. PMID:28289261

  4. Growth modes of ZnO nanostructures from laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Amarilio-Burshtein, I.; Tamir, S.; Lifshitz, Y.

    2010-03-08

    ZnO nanowires (NWs) and other nanostructures were grown by laser ablation of a ZnO containing target onto different substrates with and without the presence of an Au catalyst. The morphology and structure of the NWs were studied using high resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopes [including imaging, selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS)]. The different growth modes obtainable could be tuned by varying the Zn concentration in the vapor phase keeping other growth parameters intact. Possible growth mechanisms of these nanowires are suggested and discussed.

  5. Effect of Temperature Gradient Direction in the Catalyst Nanoparticle on CNTs Growth Mode

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    To improve the understanding on CNT growth modes, the various processes, including thermal CVD, MP-CVD and ECR-CVD, have been used to deposit CNTs on nanoporous SBA-15 and Si wafer substrates with C2H2 and H2 as reaction gases. The experiments to vary process parameter of ΔT, defined as the vector quantities of temperature at catalyst top minus it at catalyst bottom, were carried out to demonstrate its effect on the CNT growth mode. The TEM and TGA analyses were used to characterize their growth modes and carbon yields of the processes. The results show that ΔT can be used to monitor the temperature gradient direction across the catalyst nanoparticle during the growth stage of CNTs. The results also indicate that the tip-growth CNTs, base-growth CNTs and onion-like carbon are generally fabricated under conditions of ΔT > 0, <0 and ~0, respectively. Our proposed growth mechanisms can be successfully adopted to explain why the base- and tip-growth CNTs are common in thermal CVD and plasma-enhanced CVD processes, respectively. Furthermore, our experiments have also successfully demonstrated the possibility to vary ΔT to obtain the desired growth mode of CNTs by thermal or plasma-enhanced CVD systems for different applications. PMID:20730080

  6. Characterization of Mode I and Mode II delamination growth and thresholds in AS4/PEEK composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.; Murri, Gretchen Bostaph

    1990-01-01

    Composite materials often fail by delamination. The onset and growth of delamination in AS4/PEEK, a tough thermoplastic matrix composite, was characterized for mode 1 and mode 2 loadings, using the Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) and the End Notched Flexure (ENF) test specimens. Delamination growth per fatigue cycle, da/dN, was related to strain energy release rate, G, by means of a power law. However, the exponents of these power laws were too large for them to be adequately used as a life prediction tool. A small error in the estimated applied loads could lead to large errors in the delamination growth rates. Hence strain energy release rate thresholds, G sub th, below which no delamination would occur were also measured. Mode 1 and 2 threshold G values for no delamination growth were found by monitoring the number of cycles to delamination onset in the DCB and ENF specimens. The maximum applied G for which no delamination growth had occurred until at least 1,000,000 cycles was considered the threshold strain energy release rate. Comments are given on how testing effects, facial interference or delamination front damage, may invalidate the experimental determination of the constants in the expression.

  7. Characterization of Mode I and Mode II delamination growth and thresholds in AS4/PEEK composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.; Murri, Gretchen Bostaph

    1990-01-01

    Composite materials often fail by delamination. The onset and growth of delamination in AS4/PEEK, a tough thermoplastic matrix composite, was characterized for mode 1 and mode 2 loadings, using the Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) and the End Notched Flexure (ENF) test specimens. Delamination growth per fatigue cycle, da/dN, was related to strain energy release rate, G, by means of a power law. However, the exponents of these power laws were too large for them to be adequately used as a life prediction tool. A small error in the estimated applied loads could lead to large errors in the delamination growth rates. Hence strain energy release rate thresholds, G sub th, below which no delamination would occur were also measured. Mode 1 and 2 threshold G values for no delamination growth were found by monitoring the number of cycles to delamination onset in the DCB and ENF specimens. The maximum applied G for which no delamination growth had occurred until at least 1,000,000 cycles was considered the threshold strain energy release rate. Comments are given on how testing effects, facial interference or delamination front damage, may invalidate the experimental determination of the constants in the expression.

  8. Characterization of Mode 1 and Mode 2 delamination growth and thresholds in graphite/peek composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.; Murri, Gretchen B.

    1988-01-01

    Composite materials often fail by delamination. The onset and growth of delamination in AS4/PEEK, a tough thermoplastic matrix composite, was characterized for mode 1 and mode 2 loadings, using the Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) and the End Notched Flexure (ENF) test specimens. Delamination growth per fatigue cycle, da/dN, was related to strain energy release rate, G, by means of a power law. However, the exponents of these power laws were too large for them to be adequately used as a life prediction tool. A small error in the estimated applied loads could lead to large errors in the delamination growth rates. Hence strain energy release rate thresholds, G sub th, below which no delamination would occur were also measured. Mode 1 and 2 threshold G values for no delamination growth were found by monitoring the number of cycles to delamination onset in the DCB and ENF specimens. The maximum applied G for which no delamination growth had occurred until at least 1,000,000 cycles was considered the threshold strain energy release rate. Comments are given on how testing effects, facial interference or delamination front damage, may invalidate the experimental determination of the constants in the expression.

  9. Results with a 32-element dual mode imager.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Robert Lee; Gerling, Mark; Brennan, James S.; Mascarenhas, Nicholas; Mrowka, Stanley; Marleau, Peter

    2010-12-01

    We present advances with a 32 element scalable, segmented dual mode imager. Scaling up the number of cells results in a 1.4 increase in efficiency over a system we deployed last year. Variable plane separation has been incorporated which further improves the efficiency of the detector. By using 20 cm diameter cells we demonstrate that we could increase sensitivity by a factor of 6. We further demonstrate gamma ray imaging in from Compton scattering. This feature allows for powerful dual mode imaging. Selected results are presented that demonstrate these new capabilities.

  10. Results with a 32 element dual mode imager.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Robert Lee; Gerling, Mark; Brennan, James S.; Mascarenhas, Nicholas; Mrowka, Stanley; Marleau, Peter

    2010-11-01

    We present advances with a 32 element scalable, segmented dual mode imager. Scaling up the number of cells results in a 1.4 increase in efficiency over a system we deployed last year. Variable plane separation has been incorporated which further improves the efficiency of the detector. By using 20 cm diameter cells we demonstrate that we could increase sensitivity by a factor of 6. We further demonstrate gamma ray imaging in from Compton scattering. This feature allows for powerful dual mode imaging. Selected results are presented that demonstrate these new capabilities.

  11. Initiation and growth of mode II delamination in toughened composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Alan J.

    The origins of nonlinearity in the mode-II delamination fracture of three organic-matrix carbon-fiber composite materials was investigated. This was accomplished by testing specimens with different types of starter cracks and by loading and unloading these specimens several times so that the change in nonlinearity as the delaminations grew could be measured. The load at which crack growth initiated was determined by acoustic emission. Slow crack growth as found to be the principal cause of nonlinearity in the materials tested. The crack velocity obeyed the same power law dependence on GII as is observed for slow crack growth in viscoelastic polymers. For the first loading from the end of the starter cracks, plastic deformation at the crack tip also contributed to the nonlinearity. Other sources of nonlinearity included an increasing fracture resistance in one of the materials as well as problems associated with producing a clean starter notch with a straight crack front.

  12. Designing of a Testing Machine for Shear-Mode Fatigue Crack Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusaba, A.; Okazaki, S.; Endo, M.; Yanase, K.

    As recognized, flaking-type failure is one of the serious problems for railroad tracks and bearings. In essence, flaking-type failure is closely related to the growth of the shear-mode (Mode-II and Mode-III) fatigue crack. In our research group, it is demonstrated that a shear-mode fatigue crack can be reproduced for cylindrical specimens by applying the cyclic torsion in the presence of the static axial compressive stress. However, a biaxial servo-hydraulic fatigue testing machine is quite expensive to purchase and costly to maintain. The low testing speed (about 10Hz) of the testing machine further aggravates the situation. As a result, study on shear-mode fatigue crack growth is still in the nascent stage. To overcome the difficulties mentioned above, in this research activity, we developed a high-performance and cost-effective testing machine to reproduce the shear-mode fatigue crack growth by improving the available resonance-type torsion fatigue testing machine. The primary advantage of using the resonance-type torsion fatigue testing machine is cost-efficiency. In addition, the testing speed effectively can be improved, in comparison with that of a biaxial servo-hydraulic fatigue testing machine. By utilizing the newly-designed testing machine, we have demonstrated that we can successfully reproduce the shear-mode fatigue crack.

  13. Promotion of protein crystal growth by actively switching crystal growth mode via femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, Yusuke; Maruyama, Mihoko; Yoshimura, Masashi; Koizumi, Haruhiko; Tachibana, Masaru; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Adachi, Hiroaki; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Mori, Yusuke

    2016-11-01

    Large single crystals with desirable shapes are essential for various scientific and industrial fields, such as X-ray/neutron crystallography and crystalline devices. However, in the case of proteins the production of such crystals is particularly challenging, despite the efforts devoted to optimization of the environmental, chemical and physical parameters. Here we report an innovative approach for promoting the growth of protein crystals by directly modifying the local crystal structure via femtosecond laser ablation. We demonstrate that protein crystals with surfaces that are locally etched (several micrometers in diameter) by femtosecond laser ablation show enhanced growth rates without losing crystal quality. Optical phase-sensitive microscopy and X-ray topography imaging techniques reveal that the local etching induces spiral growth, which is energetically advantageous compared with the spontaneous two-dimensional nucleation growth mode. These findings prove that femtosecond laser ablation can actively switch the crystal growth mode, offering flexible control over the size and shape of protein crystals.

  14. What is the growth mode of ultrathin Co films on Pd(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y. S.

    2016-12-01

    Thin Co films with varying thickness from 1 to 8 monolayers (ML) are epitaxially grown on Pd (001) and are studied in situ by using reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), scanning tunneling microscope (STM), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), and magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE). The films take the layer-by-layer growth mode up to 3 ML, and then switch to the 3-dimensional growth mode afterward. For the as-grown films, MOKE measurements show that the easy axis of magnetism is in-plane and the interfacial Pd layer is magnetized. These results are confirmed and explained by density functional calculations.

  15. On a separating method for mixed-modes crack growth in wood material using image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutou Pitti, R.; Dubois, F.; Pop, O.

    2010-06-01

    Due to the complex wood anatomy and the loading orientation, the timber elements are subjected to a mixed-mode fracture. In these conditions, the crack tip advance is characterized by mixed-mode kinematics. In order to characterize the fracture process function versus the loading orientation, a new mixed-mode crack growth timber specimen is proposed. In the present paper, the design process and the experimental validation of this specimen are proposed. Using experimental results, the energy release rate is calculated for several modes. The calculi consist on the separation of each fracture mode. The design of the specimen is based on the analytical approach and numerical simulation by finite element method. The specimen particularity is the stability of the crack propagation under a force control.

  16. Subcritical crack growth under mode I, II, and III loading for Coconino sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Tae Young

    In systems subjected to long-term loading, subcritical crack growth is the principal mechanism causing the time-dependent deformation and failure of rocks. Subcritical crack growth is environmentally-assisted crack growth, which can allow cracks to grow over a long period of time at stresses far smaller than their failure strength and at tectonic strain rates. The characteristics of subcritical crack growth can be described by a relationship between the stress intensity factor and the crack velocity. This study presents the results of studies conducted to validate the constant stress-rate test for determining subcritical crack growth parameters in Coconino sandstone, compared with the conventional testing method, the double torsion test. The results of the constant stress-rate test are in good agreement with the results of double torsion test. More importantly, the stress-rate tests can determine the parameter A with a much smaller standard deviation than the double torsion test. Thus the constant stress-rate test seems to be both a valid and preferred test method for determining the subcritical crack growth parameters in rocks. We investigated statistical aspects of the constant stress-rate test. The effects of the number of tests conducted on the subcritical crack growth parameters were examined and minimum specimen numbers were determined. The mean and standard deviation of the subcritical crack growth parameters were obtained by randomly selecting subsets from the original strength data. In addition, the distribution form of the subcritical crack growth parameters and the relation between the parameter n and A were determined. We extended the constant stress-rate test technique to modes II and III subcritical crack growth in rocks. The experimental results of the modes I, II and III tests show that the values of the subcritical crack growth parameters are similar to each other. The subcritical crack growth parameter n value for Coconino sandstone has the range

  17. Analysis of Mode I and Mode II Crack Growth Arrest Mechanism with Z-Fibre Pins in Composite Laminated Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeevan Kumar, N.; Ramesh Babu, P.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents the numerical study of the mode I and mode II interlaminar crack growth arrest in hybrid laminated curved composite stiffened joint with Z-fibre reinforcement. A FE model of hybrid laminated skin-stiffener joint reinforced with Z-pins is developed to investigate the effect of Z- fibre pins on mode I and mode II crack growth where the delamination is embedded inbetween the skin and stiffener interface. A finite element model was developed using S4R element of a 4-node doubly curved thick shell elements to model the composite laminates and non linear interface elements to simulate the reinforcements. The numerical analyses revealed that Z-fibre pinning were effective in suppressing the delamination growth when propagated due to applied loads. Therefore, the Z-fibre technique effectively improves the crack growth resistance and hence arrests or delays crack growth extension.

  18. Initial Results from Fitting Resolved Modes using HMI Intensity Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzennik, Sylvain G.

    2017-08-01

    The HMI project recently started processing the continuum intensity images following global helioseismology procedures similar to those used to process the velocity images. The spatial decomposition of these images has produced time series of spherical harmonic coefficients for degrees up to l=300, using a different apodization than the one used for velocity observations. The first 360 days of observations were processed and made available. I present initial results from fitting these time series using my state of the art fitting methodology and compare the derived mode characteristics to those estimated using co-eval velocity observations.

  19. Incubation time of heterogeneous growth of islands in the mode of incomplete condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskii, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    The incubation time necessary for the growth of surface islands on heterogeneous nucleation centers to begin has been theoretically analyzed depending on the material gas flow and surface temperature. It is shown that, under heterogeneous growth in the mode of incomplete condensation, the incubation time increases with temperature according to the Arrhenius law and is inversely proportional to the flow, irrespective of the mechanism of diffusion transport to islands. The results obtained have been qualitatively compared with the experimental data on the incubation time for three-dimensional GaN islands arising in the initial stage of self-induced growth of GaN nanowires.

  20. A model for predicting crack growth rate for mixed mode fracture under biaxial loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shliannikov, V. N.; Braude, N. Z.

    1992-09-01

    A model for predicting the crack growth rate of an initially angled crack under biaxial loads of arbitrary direction is suggested. The model is based on a combination of both the Manson-Coffin equation for low cycle fatigue and the Paris equation for fatigue crack propagation. The model takes into consideration the change in material plastic properties in the region around the crack tip due to the stress state, together with the initial orientation of the crack and also its trajectory of growth. Predictions of crack growth rate for any mixed mode fracture is based on the results of uniaxial tension experiments.

  1. Computational comparison of mediated current generation capacity of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in photosynthetic and respiratory growth modes.

    PubMed

    Mao, Longfei; Verwoerd, Wynand S

    2014-11-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii possesses many potential advantages to be exploited as a biocatalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for electricity generation. In the present study, we performed computational studies based on flux balance analysis (FBA) to probe the maximum potential of C. reinhardtii for current output and identify the metabolic mechanisms supporting a high current generation in three different cultivation conditions, i.e., heterotrophic, photoautotrophic and mixotrophic growth. The results showed that flux balance limitations allow the highest current output for C. reinhardtii in the mixotrophic growth mode (2.368 A/gDW), followed by heterotrophic growth (1.141 A/gDW) and photoautotrophic growth the lowest (0.7035 A/gDW). The significantly higher mediated electron transfer (MET) rate in the mixotrophic mode is in complete contrast to previous findings for a photosynthetic cyanobacterium, and was attributed to the fact that for C. reinhardtii the photophosphorylation improved the efficiency of converting the acetate into biomass and NADH production. Overall, the cytosolic NADH-dependent current production was mainly associated with five reactions in both mixotrophic and photoautotrophic nutritional modes, whereas four reactions participated in the heterotrophic mode. The mixotrophic and photoautotrophic metabolisms were alike and shared the same set of reactions for maximizing current production, whereas in the heterotrophic mode, the current production was additionally contributed by the metabolic activities in the two organelles: glyoxysome and chloroplast. In conclusion, C. reinhardtii has a potential to be exploited in MFCs of MET mode to produce a high current output. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The mode I crack growth resistance of metallic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Fleck, N. A.; Lu, T. J.

    2001-02-01

    A Dugdale-type cohesive zone model is used to predict the mode I crack growth resistance ( R-curve) of metallic foams, with the fracture process characterised by an idealised traction-separation law that relates the crack surface traction to crack opening displacement. A quadratic yield function, involving the von Mises effective stress and mean stress, is used to account for the plastic compressibility of metallic foams. Finite element calculations are performed for the crack growth resistance under small scale yielding and small scale bridging in plane strain, with K-field boundary conditions. The following effects upon the fracture process are quantified: material hardening, bridging strength, T-stress (the non-singular stress acting parallel to the crack plane), and the shape of yield surface. To study the failure behaviour and notch sensitivity of metallic foams in the presence of large scale yielding, a study is made for panels embedded with either a centre-crack or an open hole and subjected to tensile stressing. For the centre-cracked panel, a transition crack size is predicted for which the fracture response switches from net section yielding to elastic-brittle fracture. Likewise, for a panel containing a centre-hole, a transition hole diameter exists for which the fracture response switches from net section yielding to a local maximum stress criterion at the edge of the hole.

  3. Growth mode transition of Ni thin films on nanopatterned substrate: Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuhan; Liang, Jingshu; Zhu, Yuan; Jiang, Shaoji

    2012-03-01

    A three-dimension (3D) kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model with Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier is presented. A uniform arranged triangular prism structure is introduced to mimic the nanopatterned substrate. The transition from continuous growth to anisotropic columnar growth has been demonstrated. The kinetic process and the growth exponent are discussed by our KMC model. Results show that the growth exponent is smaller than 0.5 when the film thickness surpasses 70 ML under normal deposition but larger than 0.5 under high oblique angle deposition, such as 77°. We assume that the modulation of nanopatterned substrate reduces more quickly when the film thickness is larger than 70 ML in our model. The growth mode transition can be mainly attributed to difference in the relative importance of diffusion and shadowing with normal and high oblique angle deposition conditions. Besides, the competition and vanishing process during oblique angle deposition are also demonstrated.

  4. Late-time quadratic growth in single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

    PubMed

    Wei, Tie; Livescu, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    The growth of the two-dimensional single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) at low Atwood number (A=0.04) is investigated using Direct Numerical Simulations. The main result of the paper is that, at long times and sufficiently high Reynolds numbers, the bubble acceleration becomes stationary, indicating mean quadratic growth. This is contrary to the general belief that single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability reaches a constant bubble velocity at long times. At unity Schmidt number, the development of the instability is strongly influenced by the perturbation Reynolds number, defined as Rep≡λsqrt[Agλ/(1+A)]/ν. Thus, the instability undergoes different growth stages at low and high Rep. A new stage, chaotic development, was found at sufficiently high Rep values, after the reacceleration stage. During the chaotic stage, the instability experiences seemingly random acceleration and deceleration phases, as a result of complex vortical motions, with strong dependence on the initial perturbation shape (i.e., wavelength, amplitude, and diffusion thickness). Nevertheless, our results show that the mean acceleration of the bubble front becomes constant at late times, with little influence from the initial shape of the interface. As Rep is lowered to small values, the later instability stages, chaotic development, reacceleration, potential flow growth, and even the exponential growth described by linear stability theory, are subsequently no longer reached. Therefore, the results suggest a minimum Reynolds number and a minimum development time necessary to achieve all stages of single-mode RTI development, requirements which were not satisfied in the previous studies of single-mode RTI.

  5. Growth of nucleation mode particles in the summertime Arctic: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Megan D.; Burkart, Julia; Thomas, Jennie L.; Köllner, Franziska; Schneider, Johannes; Bozem, Heiko; Hoor, Peter M.; Aliabadi, Amir A.; Schulz, Hannes; Herber, Andreas B.; Leaitch, W. Richard; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.

    2016-06-01

    The summertime Arctic lower troposphere is a relatively pristine background aerosol environment dominated by nucleation and Aitken mode particles. Understanding the mechanisms that control the formation and growth of aerosol is crucial for our ability to predict cloud properties and therefore radiative balance and climate. We present an analysis of an aerosol growth event observed in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago during summer as part of the NETCARE project. Under stable and clean atmospheric conditions, with low inversion heights, carbon monoxide less than 80 ppbv, and black carbon less than 5 ng m-3, we observe growth of small particles, < 20 nm in diameter, into sizes above 50 nm. Aerosol growth was correlated with the presence of organic species, trimethylamine, and methanesulfonic acid (MSA) in particles ˜ 80 nm and larger, where the organics are similar to those previously observed in marine settings. MSA-to-sulfate ratios as high as 0.15 were observed during aerosol growth, suggesting an important marine influence. The organic-rich aerosol contributes significantly to particles active as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN, supersaturation = 0.6 %), which are elevated in concentration during aerosol growth above background levels of ˜ 100 to ˜ 220 cm-3. Results from this case study highlight the potential importance of secondary organic aerosol formation and its role in growing nucleation mode aerosol into CCN-active sizes in this remote marine environment.

  6. Growth mode and structures of magnetic Mn clusters on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai-Zhuang

    2016-06-22

    We present a systematic study of Mn clusters on graphene by first-principles calculations. We show that the growth of Mn on graphene follows a three-dimensional (3D) mode. Both adsorption and attachment energies show that (Mn)3 and (Mn)6 on graphene are energetically favorable in the size range (Mn)1-7. Moreover, larger formation energy for Mn cluster on graphene implies the incoming Mn atoms are likely to nucleate and grow into bigger and bigger Mn clusters on graphene. The magnetic moments of (Mn)1,5,7 on graphene are enhanced by 11%, 186%, and 26% from their values at free-standing clusters, respectively. By contrast, the net magnetic moment of (Mn)2,3,4,6 on graphene is reduced from that of the corresponding free-standing clusters. The origin of the magnetic moment changes can be attributed to the charge transfer within the Mn clusters and between the clusters and graphene upon adsorption.

  7. Growth mode and structures of magnetic Mn clusters on graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai-Zhuang

    2016-06-22

    We present a systematic study of Mn clusters on graphene by first-principles calculations. We show that the growth of Mn on graphene follows a three-dimensional (3D) mode. Both adsorption and attachment energies show that (Mn)3 and (Mn)6 on graphene are energetically favorable in the size range (Mn)1-7. Moreover, larger formation energy for Mn cluster on graphene implies the incoming Mn atoms are likely to nucleate and grow into bigger and bigger Mn clusters on graphene. The magnetic moments of (Mn)1,5,7 on graphene are enhanced by 11%, 186%, and 26% from their values at free-standing clusters, respectively. By contrast, the netmore » magnetic moment of (Mn)2,3,4,6 on graphene is reduced from that of the corresponding free-standing clusters. The origin of the magnetic moment changes can be attributed to the charge transfer within the Mn clusters and between the clusters and graphene upon adsorption.« less

  8. Nucleation site in CVD graphene growth investigated by radiation-mode optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Takanobu; Obata, Seiji; Saiki, Koichiro

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the graphene nucleation site in real space using radiation-mode optical microscopy (Rad-OM), which we have developed for the real-time observation of the graphene growth in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) conditions. We found the bright spot in the Rad-OM image worked as a nucleation site through continuous observation of a Cu substrate from pretreatment to graphene growth. The bright spot, considered as a C impurity, was effectively removed by Ar bombardment, which significantly reduced the nucleation density. The present result directly elucidates the role of C impurities and provides a means to grow single-crystalline and large-area graphene via CVD.

  9. InAs nanowire growth modes on Si (111) by gas source molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, M. T.; LaPierre, R. R.

    2016-02-01

    InAs nanowires (NWs) were grown on silicon substrates by gas source molecular beam epitaxy using five different growth modes: (1) Au-assisted growth, (2) positioned (patterned) Au-assisted growth, (3) Au-free growth, (4) positioned Au-assisted growth using a patterned oxide mask, and (5) Au-free selective-area epitaxy (SAE) using a patterned oxide mask. Optimal growth conditions (temperature, V/III flux ratio) were identified for each growth mode for control of NW morphology and vertical NW yield. The highest yield (72%) was achieved with the SAE method at a growth temperature of 440 °C and a V/III flux ratio of 4. Growth mechanisms are discussed for each of the growth modes.

  10. Effect of adherend thickness and mixed mode loading on debond growth in adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangalgiri, P. D.; Johnson, W. S.; Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Symmetric and unsymmetric double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens were tested and analyzed to assess the effect of: (1) adherend thickness, and (2) a predominantly mode I mixed mode loading on cyclic debond growth and static fracture toughness. The specimens were made of unidirectional composite (T300/5208) adherends bonded together with EC3445 structural adhesive. The thickness was 8, 16, or 24 plies. The experimental results indicated that the static fracture toughness increases and the cyclic debond growth rate decreases with increasing adherend thickness. This behavior was related to the length of the plastic zone ahead of the debond tip. For the symmetric DCB specimens, it was further found that displacement control tests resulted in higher debond growth rates than did load control tests. While the symmetric DCB tests always resulted in cohesive failures in the bondline, the unsymmetric DCB tests resulted in the debond growing into the thinner adherend and the damage progressing as delamination in that adherend. This behavior resulted in much lower fracture toughness and damage growth rates than found in the symmetric DCB tests.

  11. Evidence for two growth modes during tungsten oxide vapor deposition on mica substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mašek, Karel; Gillet, Marcel; Matolín, Vladimír

    2014-05-01

    The morphology, the structure and the orientation of tungsten oxide nanorods grown on mica are investigated as a function of the deposition time. The previous results are recalled to point out the changes with the nanorod thickness. The investigations were conducted by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction (RHEED). The results evidence two successive growth modes. In the first stage thin and long nanorods were formed. They grew layer by layer with a hexagonal tungsten bronze structure and two different (1-10) and (2-10) planes parallel to the mica surface. In the second stage, as the deposition time increased thin nanorods with the (1-10) orientation grew in thickness when the others preserve their morphology and structure. In the discussion the difference between the two growth modes is emphasized. In the first stage the nanorod growth proceeds mainly by the surface diffusion of KxWO3 species. In the second stage the growth is due to the by direct impinging of WO3 molecules on some thin nanorods having already the (1-10) orientation, leading to growth of thick nanorods with a monoclinic structure.

  12. The growth of the tearing mode - Boundary and scaling effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.; Van Hoven, G.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical model of resistive magnetic tearing is developed in order to verify and relate the results of the principal approximations used in analytic analyses and to investigate the solutions and their growth-rate scalings over a large range of primary parameters which include parametric values applicable to the solar atmosphere. The computations cover the linear behavior for a variety of boundary conditions, emphasizing effects which differentiate magnetic tearing in astrophysical situations from that in laboratory devices. Eigenfunction profiles for long and short wavelengths are computed and the applicability of the 'constant psi' approximation is investigated. The growth rate is computed for values of the magnetic Reynolds number up to a trillion and of the dimensionless wavelength parameter down to 0.001. The analysis predicts significant effects due to differing values of the magnetic Reynolds number.

  13. Effect of pressure on the semipolar GaN (10-11) growth mode on patterned Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Ming; Zhang, Jie; Lin, Wen-Yu; Ye, Meng-Xin; Feng, Xiang-Xu; Zhang, Dong-Yan; Steve, Ding; Xu, Chen-Ke; Liu, Bao-Lin

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of pressure on the growth mode of high quality (10-11) GaN using an epitaxial lateral over growth (ELO) technique by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Two pressure growth conditions, high pressure (HP) 1013 mbar and low pressure growth (LP) 500 mbar, are employed during growth. In the high pressure growth conditions, the crystal quality is improved by decreasing the dislocation and stack fault density in the strip connection locations. The room temperature photoluminescence measurement also shows that the light emission intensity increases three times using the HP growth condition compared with that using the LP growth conditions. In the low temperature (77 K) photoluminescence, the defects-related peaks are very obvious in the low pressure growth samples. This result also indicates that the crystal quality is improved using the high pressure growth conditions. Project support by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Green Laser).

  14. Development and Application of Benchmark Examples for Mode II Static Delamination Propagation and Fatigue Growth Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    The development of benchmark examples for static delamination propagation and cyclic delamination onset and growth prediction is presented and demonstrated for a commercial code. The example is based on a finite element model of an End-Notched Flexure (ENF) specimen. The example is independent of the analysis software used and allows the assessment of the automated delamination propagation, onset and growth prediction capabilities in commercial finite element codes based on the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). First, static benchmark examples were created for the specimen. Second, based on the static results, benchmark examples for cyclic delamination growth were created. Third, the load-displacement relationship from a propagation analysis and the benchmark results were compared, and good agreement could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. Fourth, starting from an initially straight front, the delamination was allowed to grow under cyclic loading. The number of cycles to delamination onset and the number of cycles during delamination growth for each growth increment were obtained from the automated analysis and compared to the benchmark examples. Again, good agreement between the results obtained from the growth analysis and the benchmark results could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. The benchmarking procedure proved valuable by highlighting the issues associated with choosing the input parameters of the particular implementation. Selecting the appropriate input parameters, however, was not straightforward and often required an iterative procedure. Overall the results are encouraging, but further assessment for mixed-mode delamination is required.

  15. HIGH-MODE RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR GROWTH IN NIF IGNITION CAPSULES

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, B A; Haan, S W; Clark, D; Edwards, M J; Langer, S H; Marinak, M; Patel, M; Salmonson, J; Scott, H A

    2009-08-04

    An assessment of short wavelength hydrodynamic stability is an essential component in the optimization of NIF ignition target designs. Using highly-resolved massively-parallel 2-D Hydra simulations, we routinely evaluate target designs up to mode numbers of 2000 ({lambda} {approx} 2 {micro}m). On the outer ablator surface, mode numbers up to {approx}300 ({lambda} {approx} 20 {micro}m) can have significant growth in CH capsule designs. At the internal fuel:ablator interface mode numbers up to {approx}2000 are important for both CH and Be designs. In addition, 'isolated features' on the capsule, such as the 'fill-tube' ({approx} 5 {micro}m scale-length) and defects, can seed short wavelength growth at the ablation front and the fuel:ablator interface, leading to the injection of {approx} 10's ng of ablator material into the central hot-spot. We are developing methods to measure high-mode mix on NIF implosion experiments. X-ray spectroscopic methods are appealing since mix into the hot-spot will result in x-ray emission from the high-Z dopant (Cu or Ge) in the ablator material (Be or CH).

  16. Modification of the tearing mode growth rate by the presence of a stochastic magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Carreras, B. A.; Rosenbluth, M. N.; Hicks, H. R.

    1980-12-01

    We have studied the effect of a stochastic magnetic field on the growth of a tearing mode. An analytic solution is given for the case in which the stochastic magnetic field is static. In that case, an unstable tearing mode is further destabilized (stabilized) if the ..delta..' values of the nonlinearly driven modes are positive (negative). This mechanism explains the destabilization of the (m = 3; n = 2) tearing mode observed in nonlinear three-dimensional calculations.

  17. Source region and growth analysis of narrowband Z-mode emission at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Yoon, P. H.; Písa, D.; Ye, S.-Y.; Santolík, O.; Arridge, C. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Coates, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Intense Z-mode emission is observed in the lower density region near the inner edge of the Enceladus torus at Saturn, where these waves may resonate with MeV electrons. The source mechanism of this emission, which is narrow-banded and most intense near 5 kHz, is not well understood. We survey the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science data to isolate several probable source regions near the inner edge of the Enceladus density torus. Electron phase space distributions are obtained from the Cassini Electron Spectrometer, part of the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer investigation. We perform a plasma wave growth analysis to conclude that an electron temperature anisotropy and possibly a weak loss cone can drive the Z mode as observed. Electrostatic electron acoustic waves and perhaps weak beam modes are also found to be unstable coincident with the Z mode. Quasi-steady conditions near the Enceladus density torus may result in the observations of narrowband Z-mode emission at Saturn.

  18. Guided wave modes in porous cylinders: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Wisse, C J; Smeulders, D M J; van Dongen, M E H; Chao, G

    2002-09-01

    In this paper guided wave modes in porous media are investigated. A water-saturated porous cylinder is mounted in the test section of a shock tube. Between the porous sample and the wall of the shock tube a water-filled annulus exists. For very small annulus width, bulk waves are generated and one-dimensional modeling is sufficient. Otherwise two-dimensional effects become important and multiple guided wave modes occur. Using a newly developed traversable positioning system in the shock tube, the frequency-dependent phase velocities and damping coefficients in the 1-120 kHz frequency range were measured. Prony's method was used for data processing. Agreement was found between the experimental data and the two-dimensional modeling of the shock tube which was based on Biot's theory.

  19. Influence of Mixed Mode I-Mode II Loading on Fatigue Delamination Growth Characteristics of a Graphite Epoxy Tape Laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; Johnston, William M., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Mixed mode I-mode II interlaminar tests were conducted on IM7/8552 tape laminates using the mixed-mode bending test. Three mixed mode ratios, G(sub II)/G(sub T) = 0.2, 0.5, and 0.8, were considered. Tests were performed at all three mixed-mode ratios under quasi-static and cyclic loading conditions, where the former static tests were used to determine initial loading levels for the latter fatigue tests. Fatigue tests at each mixed-mode ratio were performed at four loading levels, Gmax, equal to 0.5G(sub c), 0.4G(sub c), 0.3G(sub c), and 0.2G(sub c), where G(sub c) is the interlaminar fracture toughness of the corresponding mixed-mode ratio at which a test was performed. All fatigue tests were performed using constant-amplitude load control and delamination growth was automatically documented using compliance solutions obtained from the corresponding quasi-static tests. Static fracture toughness data yielded a mixed-mode delamination criterion that exhibited monotonic increase in Gc with mixed-mode ratio, G(sub II)/G(sub T). Fatigue delamination onset parameters varied monotonically with G(sub II)/G(sub T), which was expected based on the fracture toughness data. Analysis of non-normalized data yielded a monotonic change in Paris law exponent with mode ratio. This was not the case when normalized data were analyzed. Fatigue data normalized by the static R-curve were most affected in specimens tested at G(sub II)/G(sub T)=0.2 (this process has little influence on the other data). In this case, the normalized data yielded a higher delamination growth rate compared to the raw data for a given loading level. Overall, fiber bridging appeared to be the dominant mechanism, affecting delamination growth rates in specimens tested at different load levels and differing mixed-mode ratios.

  20. Structural properties, crystal quality and growth modes of MOCVD-grown AlN with TMAl pretreatment of sapphire substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Haiding; Wu, Feng; tahtamouni, T. M. Al; Alfaraj, Nasir; Li, Kuang-Hui; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Dupuis, Russell D.; Li, Xiaohang

    2017-10-01

    The growth of high quality AlN epitaxial films relies on precise control of the initial growth stages. In this work, we examined the influence of the trimethylaluminum (TMAl) pretreatment of sapphire substrates on the structural properties, crystal quality and growth modes of heteroepitaxial AlN films on (0 0 0 1) sapphire substrates. Without the pretreatment, the AlN films nucleated on the smooth surface but exhibited mixed crystallographic Al- (N-) polarity, resulting in rough AlN film surfaces. With increasing the pretreatment time from 1 to 5 s, the N-polarity started to be impeded. However, small islands were formed on sapphire surface due to the decompostion of TMAl. As a result, small voids became noticeable at the nucleation layer (NL) because the growth started as quasi three-dimensional (3D) but transformed to 2D mode as the film grew thicker and got coalesced, leading to smoother and Al-polar films. On the other hand, longer pretreatment time of 40 s formed large 3D islands on sapphire, and thus initiated a 3D-growth mode of the AlN film, generating Al-polar AlN nanocolumns with different facets, which resulted into rougher film surfaces. The epitaxial growth modes and their correlation with the AlN film crystal quality under different TMAl pretreatments are also discussed.

  1. Single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements with the OMEGA laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Knauer, J. P.; Verdon, C. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Boehly, T. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Ofer, D.; McKenty, P. W.; Glendinning, S. G.; Kalantar, D. H.; Watt, R. G.; Gobby, P. L.; Willi, O.; Taylor, R. J.

    1997-04-15

    The results from a series of single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five to six 351-nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Experiments were performed with both 3-ns ramp and 3-ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4%-7% over a 600-{mu}m-diam region defined by the 90% intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using through-foil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets with and without a foam buffer. The growth of both 31-{mu}m and 60-{mu}m wavelength perturbations was found to be in good agreement with ORCHID simulations when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The addition of a 30-mg/cc, 100-{mu}m-thick polystyrene foam buffer layer resulted in reduced growth of the 31-{mu}m perturbation and essentially unchanged growth for the 60-{mu}m case when compared to targets without foam.

  2. Single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements with the OMEGA laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauer, J. P.; Verdon, C. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Boehly, T. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Ofer, D.; McKenty, P. W.; Glendinning, S. G.; Kalantar, D. H.; Watt, R. G.; Gobby, P. L.; Willi, O.; Taylor, R. J.

    1997-04-01

    The results from a series of single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five to six 351-nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5×1014W/cm2. Experiments were performed with both 3-ns ramp and 3-ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4%-7% over a 600-μm-diam region defined by the 90% intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using through-foil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets with and without a foam buffer. The growth of both 31-μm and 60-μm wavelength perturbations was found to be in good agreement with ORCHID simulations when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The addition of a 30-mg/cc, 100-μm-thick polystyrene foam buffer layer resulted in reduced growth of the 31-μm perturbation and essentially unchanged growth for the 60-μm case when compared to targets without foam.

  3. Single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements with the OMEGA laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Knauer, J.P.; Verdon, C.P.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Boehly, T.R.; Bradley, D.K.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Ofer, D.; McKenty, P.W.; Glendinning, S.G.; Kalantar, D.H.; Watt, R.G.; Gobby, P.L.; Willi, O.; Taylor, R.J.

    1997-04-01

    The results from a series of single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five to six 351-nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5{times}10{sup 14}W/cm{sup 2}. Experiments were performed with both 3-ns ramp and 3-ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4{percent}{endash}7{percent} over a 600-{mu}m-diam region defined by the 90{percent} intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using through-foil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets with and without a foam buffer. The growth of both 31-{mu}m and 60-{mu}m wavelength perturbations was found to be in good agreement with {ital ORCHID} simulations when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The addition of a 30-mg/cc, 100-{mu}m-thick polystyrene foam buffer layer resulted in reduced growth of the 31-{mu}m perturbation and essentially unchanged growth for the 60-{mu}m case when compared to targets without foam. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Extending non-fatigue Mode I subcritical crack growth data to subcritical fatigue crack growth: Demonstration of the equivalence of the Charles' law and Paris law exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keanini, Russell; Eppes, Martha-Cary

    2016-04-01

    Paris's law connects fatigue-induced subcritical crack growth and fatigue loading. Environmentally-driven subcritical crack growth, while a random process, can be decomposed into a spectrum of cyclic processes, where each spectral component is governed by Paris's law. Unfortunately, almost no data exists concerning the Paris law exponent, m; rather, the great majority of existing sub-critical crack growth measurements on rock have been carried out via Mode I tensile tests, where corresponding data are generally correlated using Charles' law, and where the latter, similar to Paris's law, exposes a power law relationship between crack growth rate and stress intensity. In this study, a statistical argument is used to derive a simple, rigorous relationship between the all-important Paris law and Charles law exponents, m and n. This result has a significant practical implication: subcritical fatigue crack growth in rock, driven by various random environmental weathering processes can now be predicted using available Mode I stress corrosion indices, n.

  5. AOF LTAO mode: reconstruction strategy and first test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberti, Sylvain; Kolb, Johann; Le Louarn, Miska; La Penna, Paolo; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Neichel, Benoit; Sauvage, Jean-François; Fusco, Thierry; Donaldson, Robert; Soenke, Christian; Suárez Valles, Marcos; Arsenault, Robin

    2016-07-01

    GALACSI is the Adaptive Optics (AO) system serving the instrument MUSE in the framework of the Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF) project. Its Narrow Field Mode (NFM) is a Laser Tomography AO (LTAO) mode delivering high resolution in the visible across a small Field of View (FoV) of 7.5" diameter around the optical axis. From a reconstruction standpoint, GALACSI NFM intends to optimize the correction on axis by estimating the turbulence in volume via a tomographic process, then projecting the turbulence profile onto one single Deformable Mirror (DM) located in the pupil, close to the ground. In this paper, the laser tomographic reconstruction process is described. Several methods (virtual DM, virtual layer projection) are studied, under the constraint of a single matrix vector multiplication. The pseudo-synthetic interaction matrix model and the LTAO reconstructor design are analysed. Moreover, the reconstruction parameter space is explored, in particular the regularization terms. Furthermore, we present here the strategy to define the modal control basis and split the reconstruction between the Low Order (LO) loop and the High Order (HO) loop. Finally, closed loop performance obtained with a 3D turbulence generator will be analysed with respect to the most relevant system parameters to be tuned.

  6. The essential features and modes of bacterial polar growth.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Todd A; Zupan, John R; Zambryski, Patricia C

    2015-06-01

    Polar growth represents a surprising departure from the canonical dispersed cell growth model. However, we know relatively little of the underlying mechanisms governing polar growth or the requisite suite of factors that direct polar growth. Underscoring how classic doctrine can be turned on its head, the peptidoglycan layer of polar-growing bacteria features unusual crosslinks and in some species the quintessential cell division proteins FtsA and FtsZ are recruited to the growing poles. Remarkably, numerous medically important pathogens utilize polar growth, accentuating the need for intensive research in this area. Here we review models of polar growth in bacteria based on recent research in the Actinomycetales and Rhizobiales, with emphasis on Mycobacterium and Agrobacterium species.

  7. Interface chemistry and epitaxial growth modes of SrF2 on Si(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquali, L.; Suturin, S. M.; Kaveev, A. K.; Ulin, V. P.; Sokolov, N. S.; Doyle, B. P.; Nannarone, S.

    2007-02-01

    Molecular beam epitaxy has been used to grow SrF2 thin films on Si(001). The growth modes have been investigated by atomic force microscopy, electron diffraction, and photoemission. Two principal growth regimes have been identified: (i) when deposition is carried out with the substrate held at a temperature of 700-750°C , SrF2 molecules react with the substrate giving rise to a Sr-rich wetting layer on top of which three dimensional bulklike fluoride ridges develop; (ii) when deposition is carried out with the substrate held at 400°C , a nanopatterned film forms with characteristic triangular islands. Results are compared to the growth mode of CaF2 on Si(001) under analogous deposition conditions. Morphological and structural differences between the two systems are associated with the larger lattice parameter of SrF2 with respect to CaF2 , resulting in a larger mismatch with the Si substrate.

  8. NMR metabolomics of planktonic and biofilm modes of growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gjersing, Erica L; Herberg, Julie L; Horn, Joanne; Schaldach, Charlene M; Maxwell, Robert S

    2007-11-01

    Bacteria often reside in communities where the cells have secreted sticky, polymeric compounds that allow them to attach to surfaces. This sessile lifestyle, referred to as a biofilm, affords the cells within these communities a tolerance of antibiotics and antimicrobial treatments. Biofilms of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been implicated in cystic fibrosis and are capable of colonizing medical implant devices, such as heart valves and catheters, where treatment of the infection often requires the removal of the infected device. This mode of growth is in stark contrast to planktonic, free floating cells, which are more easily eradicated with antibiotics. The mechanisms contributing to a biofilm's tenacity and a planktonic cell's susceptibility are just beginning to be explored. In this study, we have used a metabolomic approach employing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to study the metabolic distinctions between these two modes of growth in P. aeruginosa. One-dimensional 1H NMR spectra of fresh growth medium were compared with spent medium supernatants from batch and chemostat planktonic and biofilms generated in continual flow system culture. In addition, 1H high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR techniques were employed to collect 1H NMR spectra of the corresponding cells. Principal component analysis and spectral comparisons revealed that the overall metabolism of planktonic and biofilm modes of growth appeared similar for the spent media, while the planktonic and biofilm cells displayed marked differences. To determine the robustness of this technique, we prepared cell samples under slightly different preparation methods. Both techniques showed similar results. These feasibility studies show that there exist chemical differences between planktonic and biofilm cells; however, in order to identify these metabolomic differences, more extensive studies would have to be performed, including 1H-1H total correlated spectroscopy.

  9. The contribution of feeding mode to obesogenic growth trajectories in American Samoan infants

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, Nicola L; Johnson, William; Nu’usolia, Ofeira; McGarvey, Stephen T

    2013-01-01

    Background Samoans are recognized for their particularly high body mass index and prevalent adult obesity but infants are understudied. Objective To examine the prevalence of overweight and obesity and determine the contribution of feeding mode to obesogenic growth trajectories in American Samoan infants. Methods Data were extracted from the well baby records of 795 (n=417 male) Samoan infants aged 0-15 months. Mixed-effects growth models were used to produce individual weight and length curves. Further mixed-effects models were fitted with feeding mode (breastfed, formula- or mixed-fed) as a single observation at age four (±2) months. Weight and length values were converted to Z-scores according to the CDC 2000 reference. Results At 15 months, 23.3% of boys and 16.7% of girls were obese (weight-for-length > 95th percentile). Feeding mode had a significant effect on weight and length trajectories. Formula-fed infants gained weight and length faster than breastfed infants. Formula-fed boys were significantly more likely to be obese at 15 months (38.6%) than breastfed boys (23.4%), χ2=8.4, P<0.01, odds ratio=2.05, 95% CI [1.04, 4.05]. Conclusion Obesity in American Samoans is not confined to adults. Obesity prevention efforts should be targeted at early life and promotion of breastfeeding may be a suitable intervention target. PMID:23386576

  10. Dynamic growth of mixed-mode shear cracks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    A pure mode II (in-plane) shear crack cannot propagate spontaneously at a speed between the Rayleigh and S-wave speeds, but a three-dimensional (3D) or two-dimensional (2D) mixed-mode shear crack can propagate in this range, being driven by the mode III (antiplane) component. Two different analytic solutions have been proposed for the mode II component in this case. The first is the solution valid for crack speed less than the Rayleigh speed. When applied above the Rayleigh speed, it predicts a negative stress intensity factor, which implies that energy is generated at the crack tip. Burridge proposed a second solution, which is continuous at the crack tip, but has a singularity in slip velocity at the Rayleigh wave. Spontaneous propagation of a mixed-mode rupture has been calculated with a slip-weakening friction law, in which the slip velocity vector is colinear with the total traction vector. Spontaneous trans-Rayleigh rupture speed has been found. The solution depends on the absolute stress level. The solution for the in-plane component appears to be a superposition of smeared-out versions of the two analytic solutions. The proportion of the first solution increases with increasing absolute stress. The amplitude of the negative in-plane traction pulse is less than the absolute final sliding traction, so that total in-plane traction does not reverse. The azimuth of the slip velocity vector varies rapidly between the onset of slip and the arrival of the Rayleigh wave. The variation is larger at smaller absolute stress.

  11. Characterization of debond growth mechanism in adhesively bonded composites under mode II static and fatigue loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Kochhar, N. K.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental investigation of adhesively bonded composite joint was conducted to characterize the debond growth mechanism under mode II static and fatigue loadings. For this purpose, end-notched flexure specimens of graphite/epoxy (T300/5208) adherends bonded with EC 3445 adhesive were tested. In all specimen tested, the fatigue failure occurred in the form of cyclic debonding. The present study confirmed the result of previous studies that total strain-energy-release rate is the driving parameter for cyclic debonding. Further, the debond growth resistance under cyclic loading with full shear reversal (i.e., stress ratio, R = -1) is drastically reduced in comparison to the case when subjected to cyclic shear loading with no shear reversal (i.e., R = 0.1).

  12. Growth Mode Transition in Complex Oxide Heteroepitaxy: Atomically Resolved Studies

    DOE PAGES

    Tselev, Alexander; Vasudevan, Rama K.; Gianfrancesco, Anthony G.; ...

    2016-04-04

    Here we performed investigations of the atomic-scale surface structure of epitaxial La5/8Ca3/8MnO3 thin films as a model system dependent on growth conditions in pulsed laser deposition with emphasis on film growth kinetics. Postdeposition in situ scanning tunneling microscopy was combined with in operando reflective high-energy electron diffraction to monitor the film growth and ex situ X-ray diffraction for structural analysis. We find a correlation between the out-of-plane lattice parameter and both adspecies mobility and height of the Ehrlich–Schwoebel barrier, with mobility of adatoms greater over the cationically stoichiometric terminations. We find that the data suggest that the out-of-plane lattice parametermore » is dependent on the mechanism of epitaxial strain relaxation, which is controlled by the oxidative power of the deposition environment.« less

  13. Growth Mode Transition in Complex Oxide Heteroepitaxy: Atomically Resolved Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tselev, Alexander; Vasudevan, Rama K.; Gianfrancesco, Anthony G.; Qiao, Liang; Meyer, Tricia L.; Lee, Ho Nyung; Biegalski, Michael D.; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2016-04-04

    Here we performed investigations of the atomic-scale surface structure of epitaxial La5/8Ca3/8MnO3 thin films as a model system dependent on growth conditions in pulsed laser deposition with emphasis on film growth kinetics. Postdeposition in situ scanning tunneling microscopy was combined with in operando reflective high-energy electron diffraction to monitor the film growth and ex situ X-ray diffraction for structural analysis. We find a correlation between the out-of-plane lattice parameter and both adspecies mobility and height of the Ehrlich–Schwoebel barrier, with mobility of adatoms greater over the cationically stoichiometric terminations. We find that the data suggest that the out-of-plane lattice parameter is dependent on the mechanism of epitaxial strain relaxation, which is controlled by the oxidative power of the deposition environment.

  14. Antibiotic growth promoters in agriculture: history and mode of action.

    PubMed

    Dibner, J J; Richards, J D

    2005-04-01

    This report will review the history of antibiotic growth promoter (AGP) use in the animal industry, concerns about development of antimicrobial resistance, and response in the European Union and United States to these concerns. A brief description of the history of legislation regarding feed use of antimicrobials in Denmark and the experience of animal producers following the 1998 ban will serve to illustrate the consequences on animal performance and health of withdrawing the approval for this use. The biological basis for antibiotic effects on animal growth efficiency will consider effects on intestinal microbiota and effects on the host animal and will use the germ-free animal to illustrate effects of the conventional microflora. The probability that no single compound will replace all of the functions of antimicrobial growth promoters will be considered, and methods to consolidate and analyze the enlarging database will be discussed.

  15. Biofilm mode of growth of Streptococcus intermedius favored by a competence-stimulating signaling peptide.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Fernanda C; Pecharki, Daniele; Scheie, Anne A

    2004-09-01

    Gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria use quorum sensing to coordinate population behavior. In several streptococci, quorum sensing mediated by competence-stimulating peptides (CSP) is associated with development of competence for transformation. We show here that a synthetic CSP favored the biofilm mode of growth of Streptococcus intermedius without affecting the rate of culture growth.

  16. Population growth rate responses of Ceriodaphnia dubia to ternary mixtures of specific acting chemicals: pharmacological versus ecotoxicological modes of action.

    PubMed

    Barata, Carlos; Fernández-San Juan, María; Feo, Maria Luisa; Eljarrrat, Ethel; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Barceló, Damià; Baird, Donald J

    2012-09-04

    When considering joint toxic apical effects at higher levels of biological organization, such as the growth of populations, the so-called pharmacological mode of action that relies on toxicological mechanistic effects on molecular target sites may not be relevant. Such effects on population growth rate will depend on the extent to which juvenile and adult survival rates and production rates (juvenile developmental rates and reproduction) are affected by toxic exposure and also by the sensitivity of population growth rates to life-history changes. In such cases, the ecotoxicological mode of action, defined as the crucial life-history trait processes and/or xenobiotic-life-history trait interactions underlying a toxicological effect on population growth rate, should be considered. Life-table response experiments with the crustacean Ceriodaphnia dubia exposed to single and ternary mixtures of nine compounds were conducted to test the hypothesis that joint effects on population growth rates could be predicted from the mixture constituent ecotoxicological mode of action. Joint effects of mixtures containing pharmacologically dissimilar compounds (cadmium, λ-cyhalothrin, and chlorpyrifos) that differentially affected life-history traits contributing to population growth rates were accurately predicted by the independent-action concept. Conversely, the concentration-addition concept accurately predicted joint effects of two different mixtures: one containing pharmacologically similar acting pyrethroids that also affected similarly life-history traits, the other one that included pharmacologically dissimilar compounds (3,4-dichloroaniline, sodium bromide, and fenoxycarb) acting mainly on reproduction rates. These results indicate that when assessing combined effects on population growth rate responses, selection of mixture toxicity conceptual models based on the ecotoxicological mode of action of mixture constituents provided more accurate predictions than those based on

  17. Controlling the Growth Modes of Femtoliter Sessile Droplets Nucleating on Chemically Patterned Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuehua; Bao, Lei; Werbiuk, Zenon; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-11-01

    Femtoliter droplet arrays on immersed substrates are essential elements in a broad range of advanced droplet-based technologies, such as light manipulation, sensing, and high throughput diagnosis. Solvent exchange is a bottom-up approach for producing those droplets from a pulse of oil oversaturation when a good solvent of the droplet liquid is displaced by a poor solvent. The position and arrangement of the droplets are regulated by chemical micropatterns on the substrate. Here we show experimentally and theoretically that the growth modes of droplets confined in planar micropatterns on the surface can be manipulated through the laminar flow of the solvent exchange. The control parameters are the area size of the micropatterns and the flow rate, and the observables are the contact angle and the final droplet volume. For a given pattern size, the Peclet number of the flow determines whether the growing droplets switch from an initial constant contact angle mode to a subsequent constant contact radius mode. Good agreement is achieved between the experimental results and our theoretical model that describes the dependence of the final droplet size on Pe.

  18. [Effects of nitrogen source and aeration mode on algae growth in freshwater].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Guang; Jin, Xiang-Can; Sun, Ling; Sun, Hong-Wen; Zhu, Lin; Yu, Yang; Dai, Shu-Gui; Zhuang, Yuan-Yi

    2006-01-01

    Aquarium microcosms were used to study the effects of nitrogen source and aeration mode on the growth and species changes of algae in freshwater. Nitrate nitrogen(NO3(-) -N) and ammonia nitrogen(NH4(+) -N) were used as nitrogen sources. For each nitrogen source, four modes of aeration were selected, including control, continuous aeration, aeration during the day, and aeration at night. In the early stage of the experiment, algae in the NH4(+) -N treatment experiment grew well. In the later stage, algae in the NO3(-) -N treatment experiment grew better. For different aeration modes, continuous aeration show varied effects on algae growth in the two nitrogen source treatments. Day-only aeration had little effect on algae growth. Night-only aeration inhibited algae growth considerably. In NH(+) -N treatments, cyanophyta became dominant species easily. In contrast, chlorophyta dominated in NO3(-) -N treatments.

  19. Revisiting the Galileo Probe results by a stretched atmospheric mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Janssen, Michael A.

    2015-11-01

    The Juno spacecraft will arrive at Jupiter in the late 2016. One of its major scientific target is to measure the deep water abundance through its Microwave Radiometer (MWR). Prior to the arrival of Juno, the only observation of the weather layer of Jupiter was the Galileo probe (Niemann et al. 1996; Wong et al. 2004), which returned puzzling results. In contrast to the detected 2 - 5 times enrichment of CH4, NH3 and H2S with respect to the solar values, the amount of water was severely subsolar. Three dimensional modeling (Showman & Dowling 2000) shows that dynamic dry downdrafts could create a huge trough in the material surface, such that air flowing through the hot spots undergoes a temporary increase in pressure by a factor of 2, though it is still too small to explain the Galileo probe results. Inspired by the 3D modeling result, we constructed a stretched atmospheric model to parameterize the alteration of the thermodynamic state of air parcel by dynamics. In our model, an air parcel is initially in its equilibrium condensation state and later has been dynamically stretched to higher pressure modeled by a multiplicative factor S. When S=1, the atmosphere is unaltered by dynamics, representing the equilibrium condensation model. We found that, when S=4, the mixing ratios of H2O, NH3 and H2S match all observations coming from the Galileo probe site. Thus, this stretch parameter provides a continuous representation of dynamic processes from the equilibrium condensation model to the Galileo probe results. We also show that the strength of stretch (S) can be retrieved from Juno/MWR limb darkening observations.

  20. Correlation of 4-month infant feeding modes with their growth and iron status in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu-hua; Ji, Cheng-ye; Zheng, Xiu-xia; Shan, Jin-ping; Hou, Rui

    2008-03-05

    Growth and development of infants has been an important topic in pediatrics for a long time. Infants must be provided with food containing all necessary nutrients. Breast milk is believed to be the most desirable natural and cheapest food for well-balanced nutrition. But with the progress in the development of substitute food in developed countries, it is thought that formula milk can meet the requirement for infant growth. During early infancy, growth, as the most sensitive index of health, is therefore a critical component in evaluating the adequacy of breast-feeding, mixed-feeding and formula feeding. Iron status is another important index of infant health. Iron deficiency anemia remains the most prevalent nutritional deficiency index in infants worldwide. This study is to compare infants in Beijing at 4 months who are on three different feeding modes (breast feeding, mixed feeding and formula feeding) in physical changes and iron status. The results may provide new mothers with support in feeding mode selection, which will also be helpful to the China Nutrition Association in feeding mode education. This is a cohort study. One thousand and one normal Beijing infants were followed regularly for 12 months. Body weight and horizontal length were measured. Hemoglobin, red blood cell counts, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin and serum iron were analyzed at 4 months. The breast feeding percentage in the first 4 months was 47.9%. The feeding mode was not significantly related to maternal delivery age, education, labor pathway nor infant sex (P>0.05). Infant boys and girls exclusively breast-fed from 0 to 4 months had the highest weight at 0-6 months. The anemia rate of breast-fed infant boys at 4 months was the highest. Breast feeding should be given more emphasis. It is compulsory for new mothers to breast-feed their infants if possible. Social environment should also guarantee the requirement for breast feeding. Furthermore the normal values of

  1. Mode II fatigue crack propagation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R.; Kibler, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation rates were obtained for 2024-T3 bare aluminum plates subjected to in-plane, mode I, extensional loads and transverse, mode II, bending loads. These results were compared to the results of Iida and Kobayashi for in-plane mode I-mode II extensional loads. The engineering significance of mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth is considered in view of the present results. A fatigue crack growth equation for handling mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth rates from existing mode I data is also discussed.

  2. New insights into the generalized Rutherford equation for nonlinear neoclassical tearing mode growth from 2D reduced MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerhof, E.; de Blank, H. J.; Pratt, J.

    2016-03-01

    Two dimensional reduced MHD simulations of neoclassical tearing mode growth and suppression by ECCD are performed. The perturbation of the bootstrap current density and the EC drive current density perturbation are assumed to be functions of the perturbed flux surfaces. In the case of ECCD, this implies that the applied power is flux surface averaged to obtain the EC driven current density distribution. The results are consistent with predictions from the generalized Rutherford equation using common expressions for Δ \\text{bs}\\prime and Δ \\text{ECCD}\\prime . These expressions are commonly perceived to describe only the effect on the tearing mode growth of the helical component of the respective current perturbation acting through the modification of Ohm’s law. Our results show that they describe in addition the effect of the poloidally averaged current density perturbation which acts through modification of the tearing mode stability index. Except for modulated ECCD, the largest contribution to the mode growth comes from this poloidally averaged current density perturbation.

  3. Fuzzy-logic-based hybrid locomotion mode classification for an active pelvis orthosis: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kebin; Parri, Andrea; Yan, Tingfang; Wang, Long; Munih, Marko; Vitiello, Nicola; Wang, Qining

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fuzzy-logic-based hybrid locomotion mode classification method for an active pelvis orthosis. Locomotion information measured by the onboard hip joint angle sensors and the pressure insoles is used to classify five locomotion modes, including two static modes (sitting, standing still), and three dynamic modes (level-ground walking, ascending stairs, and descending stairs). The proposed method classifies these two kinds of modes first by monitoring the variation of the relative hip joint angle between the two legs within a specific period. Static states are then classified by the time-based absolute hip joint angle. As for dynamic modes, a fuzzy-logic based method is proposed for the classification. Preliminary experimental results with three able-bodied subjects achieve an off-line classification accuracy higher than 99.49%.

  4. Latest results and future perspectives on Few-Mode Erbium Doped Fiber Amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinel, Jean-Baptiste; Le Cocq, Guillaume; Andresen, Esben Ravn; Quiquempois, Yves; Bigot, Laurent

    2017-02-01

    Space division multiplexing has generated a lot of interest during the last five years and motivated intensive work on multicore and few-mode fibers. Whereas some concepts like multimode waveguides and mode coupling have been re-visited for mode-division multiplexing, some new problems have been addressed, as is the case for multimode optical amplifiers. This paper recalls the general context of the work on Few-Mode Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifiers and reviews the main results reported so far on this topic.

  5. Single-mode, Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements on the OMEGA laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauer, J. P.; Betti, R.; Bradley, D. K.; Boehly, T. R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Verdon, C. P.; Glendinning, S. G.; Kalantar, D. H.; Watt, R. G.

    2000-01-01

    The results from a series of single-mode, Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five or six 351 nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5×1014 W/cm2. Experiments were performed with both 3 ns ramp and 3 ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4%-7% over a 600 μm diam region defined by the 90% intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using throughfoil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets. Two-dimensional (2-D) hydrodynamic simulations (ORCHID) [R. L. McCrory and C. P. Verdon, in Inertial Confinement Fusion (Editrice Compositori, Bologna, 1989), pp. 83-124] of the growth of 20, 31, and 60 μm wavelength perturbations were in good agreement with the experimental data when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The amplitude of the simulation optical depth is in good agreement with the experimental optical depth; therefore, great care must be taken when the growth rates are compared to dispersion formulas. Since the foil's initial condition just before it is accelerated is not that of a uniformly compressed foil, the optical density measurement does not accurately reflect the amplitude of the ablation surface but is affected by the initial nonuniform density profile.

  6. Single-mode, Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements on the OMEGA laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Knauer, J. P.; Betti, R.; Bradley, D. K.; Boehly, T. R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Verdon, C. P.

    2000-01-01

    The results from a series of single-mode, Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five or six 351 nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Experiments were performed with both 3 ns ramp and 3 ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4%-7% over a 600 {mu}m diam region defined by the 90% intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using throughfoil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets. Two-dimensional (2-D) hydrodynamic simulations (ORCHID) [R. L. McCrory and C. P. Verdon, in Inertial Confinement Fusion (Editrice Compositori, Bologna, 1989), pp. 83-124] of the growth of 20, 31, and 60 {mu}m wavelength perturbations were in good agreement with the experimental data when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The amplitude of the simulation optical depth is in good agreement with the experimental optical depth; therefore, great care must be taken when the growth rates are compared to dispersion formulas. Since the foil's initial condition just before it is accelerated is not that of a uniformly compressed foil, the optical density measurement does not accurately reflect the amplitude of the ablation surface but is affected by the initial nonuniform density profile. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  7. High-resistance GaN epilayers with low dislocation density via growth mode modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z. Y.; Xu, F. J.; Wang, J. M.; Lu, L.; Yang, Z. J.; Wang, X. Q.; Shen, B.

    2016-09-01

    High-resistance GaN with low dislocation density adopting growth mode modification has been investigated by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The sheet resistance of the order of 1016 Ω/sq has been achieved at room temperature by diminishing the oxygen impurity level close to the substrate with an AlN blocking layer. Attributed to this method which offers more freedom to tailor the growth mode, a three-dimensional (3D) growth process is introduced by adjusting the growth pressure and temperature at the initial stage of the GaN epitaxy to improve the crystalline quality. The large 3D GaN grains formed during this period roughen the surface, and the following coalescence of the GaN grains causes threading dislocations bending, which finally remarkably reduces the dislocation density.

  8. Consideration of the growth mode in isochronal austenite-ferrite transformation of ultra-low-carbon Fe-C alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Liu, Yongchang; Yan, Zesheng; Li, Yanli; Zhang, Lifang

    2010-01-01

    The three cooling rates of 10, 100, 200 K/min dilatometry experiments are used to investigate the kinetics of the isochronal austenite ( γ) to ferrite ( α) transformation of Fe-0.0036wt.%C alloy. “Normal transformation” and “abnormal transformation” have both been observed for transformations at different cooling rates. In accordance with the thermodynamic characteristics of the γ→ α transformation investigated here and previous kinetic considerations, a JMAK-like approach for the kinetics of isochronal phase transformations was developed that incorporates three overlapping processes: site saturation nucleation, alternate growth modes (from interface-controlled to diffusion-controlled to interface-controlled growth), as well as impingement for random distribution nuclei. The JMAK-like approach has been employed to fit the experimental results, and the fitting results show that for the γ→ α transformation of the Fe-C alloy at all applied cooling rates, the growth mode evolves in the corresponding order: from interface-controlled to diffusion-controlled growth; from interface-controlled to diffusion-controlled to interface-controlled growth; and interface-controlled growth.

  9. Small Fatigue Crack Growth and Failure Mode Transitions in a Ni-Base Superalloy at Elevated Temperature (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2010-4070 SMALL FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH AND FAILURE MODE TRANSITIONS IN A Ni-BASE SUPERALLOY AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURE (Preprint...CRACK GROWTH AND FAILURE MODE TRANSITIONS IN A Ni-BASE SUPERALLOY AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURE (Preprint) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN HOUSE 5b. GRANT...by ANSI Std. Z39-18 Page 1 of 28 Small Fatigue Crack Growth and Failure Mode Transitions in a Ni-Base Superalloy at Elevated Temperature M. J

  10. Mixed-mode static and fatigue crack growth in central notched and compact tension shear specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Shlyannikov, V.N.

    1999-07-01

    Elastic-plastic crack growth under mixed Mode I and 2 in six types of aluminum alloys and three types of steel were investigated. The experimental study of fatigue crack growth in six types of the aluminum alloys and one type of the steel is performed on biaxially loaded eight-petal specimens (EPS). All specimens for biaxial loading contained inclined through thickness central cracks. Mixed Mode I/2 static and fatigue crack growth experiments on the three types of steels and one type of the aluminum alloy used compact tension shear (CTS) specimens. Two approaches are developed for geometrical modeling of crack growth trajectories for the central notched and compact tension shear specimens respectively. The principal feature of such modeling is the determination of crack growth direction and the definition of crack length increment in this direction. On the basis of the analysis of the experimental data for the aluminum alloys and the steels an empirical crack reorientation criterion is suggested for both brittle and ductile materials. The damage process zone size concept is used for calculations and mixed-mode crack path. The influence of specimen geometry, biaxial loading and properties of the aluminum alloys and the steels on both crack growth direction and crack path at the macroscopic scale is discussed.

  11. Growth of Daphnia magna exposed to mixtures of chemicals with diverse modes of action

    SciTech Connect

    Deneer, J.W.; Seinen, W.; Hermens, J.L.

    1988-02-01

    Concentrations causing inhibition of growth of Daphnia magna after 16 days of exposure were determined for nine chemicals that presumably act through different modes of action. The joint toxic effect of a mixture of these chemicals is found to be nonadditive.

  12. Molecular phylogenetics of Echinopsis (Cactaceae): Polyphyly at all levels and convergent evolution of pollination modes and growth forms.

    PubMed

    Schlumpberger, Boris O; Renner, Susanne S

    2012-08-01

    In its current circumscription, Echinopsis with 100-150 species is one of the largest and morphologically most diverse genera of Cactaceae. This diversity and an absence of correlated characters have resulted in numerous attempts to subdivide Echinopsis into more homogeneous subgroups. To infer natural species groups in this alliance, we here provide a plastid phylogeny and use it to infer changes in growth form, pollination mode, and ploidy level. We sequenced 3800 nucleotides of chloroplast DNA from 162 plants representing 144 species and subspecies. The sample includes the type species of all genera close to, or included in, Echinopsis as well as a dense sample of other genera of the Trichocereeae and further outgroups. New and published chromosome counts were compiled and traced on the phylogeny, as were pollination modes and growth habits. A maximum likelihood phylogeny confirms that Echinopsis s.l. is not monophyletic nor are any of the previously recognized genera that have more than one species. Pollination mode and, to a lesser extent, growth habit are evolutionarily labile, and diploidy is the rule in Echinopsis s.l., with the few polyploids clustered in just a few clades. The use of evolutionary labile floral traits and growth habit has led to nonnatural classifications. Taxonomic realignments are required, but further study of less evolutionary labile traits suitable for circumscribing genera are needed. Surprisingly, polyploidy seems infrequent in the Echinopsis alliance and hybridization may thus be of minor relevance in the evolution of this clade.

  13. Abbreviated epitaxial growth mode (AGM) method for reducing cost and improving quality of LEDs and lasers

    DOEpatents

    Tansu, Nelson; Chan, Helen M; Vinci, Richard P; Ee, Yik-Khoon; Biser, Jeffrey

    2013-09-24

    The use of an abbreviated GaN growth mode on nano-patterned AGOG sapphire substrates, which utilizes a process of using 15 nm low temperature GaN buffer and bypassing etch-back and recovery processes during epitaxy, enables the growth of high-quality GaN template on nano-patterned AGOG sapphire. The GaN template grown on nano-patterned AGOG sapphire by employing abbreviated growth mode has two orders of magnitude lower threading dislocation density than that of conventional GaN template grown on planar sapphire. The use of abbreviated growth mode also leads to significant reduction in cost of the epitaxy. The growths and characteristics of InGaN quantum wells (QWs) light emitting diodes (LEDs) on both templates were compared. The InGaN QWs LEDs grown on the nano-patterned AGOG sapphire demonstrated at least a 24% enhancement of output power enhancement over that of LEDs grown on conventional GaN templates.

  14. The contribution of feeding mode to obesogenic growth trajectories in American Samoan infants.

    PubMed

    Hawley, N L; Johnson, W; Nu'usolia, O; McGarvey, S T

    2014-02-01

    What is already known about this subject Samoan adults are recognized for their particularly high body mass index and prevalent obesity. While Polynesians are understudied, in other populations infancy is a critical period in the development of obesity. Breastfeeding has been shown to attenuate obesity risk. What this study adds Samoan infants show remarkably rapid gain in weight but not length in early infancy resulting in a prevalence of overweight and obesity far higher than has been previously reported elsewhere. Breastfeeding is associated with slower weight gain in infancy suggesting that its protective benefits for obesity risk are generalizable outside of European-derived populations. Samoans are recognized for their particularly high body mass index and prevalent adult obesity but infants are understudied. To examine the prevalence of overweight and obesity and determine the contribution of feeding mode to obesogenic growth trajectories in American Samoan infants. Data were extracted from the well baby records of 795 (n = 417 male) Samoan infants aged 0-15 months. Mixed-effects growth models were used to produce individual weight and length curves. Further mixed-effects models were fitted with feeding mode (breastfed, formula- or mixed-fed) as a single observation at age 4 (±2) months. Weight and length values were converted to z-scores according to the Centers for Disease Control 2000 reference. At 15 months, 23.3% of boys and 16.7% of girls were obese (weight-for-length > 95th percentile). Feeding mode had a significant effect on weight and length trajectories. Formula-fed infants gained weight and length faster than breastfed infants. Formula-fed boys were significantly more likely to be obese at 15 months (38.6%) than breastfed boys (23.4%), χ(2)  = 8.4, P < 0.01, odds ratio = 2.05, 95% confidence interval (1.04, 4.05). Obesity in American Samoans is not confined to adults. Obesity prevention efforts should be targeted at early

  15. An atomistic study of growth mode and microstructure evolution of amorphous carbon films by different incident carbon atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Chen; Zhou, Jianqiu

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has been performed to describe the growth and interfacial microstructure of amorphous carbon films. We focus on the film growth mode and surface morphology for diverse deposition process parameters mainly including incident energy and incident angle. To explore the relationship between the motion of deposition atoms and amorphous films growth, a series of snapshots for each deposition process has been taken for comparison. The snapshots show that the films growth modes are diverse at different incident parameters. In the next step, surface morphology, atom distribution along film growth direction and internal structure including vacancy defects evolution during deposition process are analyzed. The results reveal that incident energy on the horizontal plane dominates the surface roughness, and incident energy on the vertical plane dominates the compactness of the film. We conclude that a suitable incident parameter is not only beneficial to prepare amorphous films with compact and smooth or bump-like surface which will meet different needs, but also can avoid formation of defects during deposition. The simulation results are expected to provide useful guidance for improving amorphous carbon films quality.

  16. Mode growth and competition in the x-ray free-electron laser oscillator start-up from noise.

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, R. R.; Kim, K.-J. )

    2009-07-02

    We describe the radiation properties of an x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) oscillator, beginning with its start-up from noise through saturation. We first decompose the initially chaotic undulator radiation into the growing longitudinal modes of the composite system consisting of the electron beam, the undulator, and the Bragg mirror resonator cavity. Because the radiation initially comprises several modes whose growth rates are comparable, we find that only after many oscillator passes is the output pulse dominantly characterized by the lowest-order Gaussian mode. We verify our analytic results with a novel, reduced one-dimensional FEL code (derived in the text), and with two-dimensional FEL simulations. Understanding the full longitudinal structure during the initial amplification will be critical in assessing the tolerances on the electron beam, undulator, and optical cavity required for robust operation.

  17. Mode growth and competition in the x-ray free-electron laser oscillator start-up from noise.

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, R. R.; Kim, K.-J.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2009-07-01

    We describe the radiation properties of an x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) oscillator, beginning with its start-up from noise through saturation. We first decompose the initially chaotic undulator radiation into the growing longitudinal modes of the composite system consisting of the electron beam, the undulator, and the Bragg mirror resonator cavity. Because the radiation initially comprises several modes whose growth rates are comparable, we find that only after many oscillator passes is the output pulse dominantly characterized by the lowest-order Gaussian mode. We verify our analytic results with a novel, reduced one-dimensional FEL code (derived in the text), and with two-dimensional FEL simulations. Understanding the full longitudinal structure during the initial amplification will be critical in assessing the tolerances on the electron beam, undulator, and optical cavity required for robust operation.

  18. Stability and Growth Modes of Ni-C Clusters: A Study based on All-Electron Density Function Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zun; Ma, Qing-Min; Liu, Ying; Li, You-Cheng

    2008-04-01

    Growth modes of the free-standing NiCN (N <= 8) and Ni2CN (N <= 8) clusters are investigated by the all-electron density functional theory. The results reveal that there are two competing modes for the growth of these clusters: the linear chain and the ring structure without transannular bonds. The lowest-energy geometries of NiCN (N <= 8) are the linear chains with the Ni atom at one end, except for NiC2 and NiC7. The Ni2CN (N <= 8) clusters all prefer to the linear chains with the two Ni atoms at the two ends. Mülliken population analysis indicates that the total spin of the lowest-energy cluster show significant odd-even alternation. The NiMCN (M = 1,2) clusters with the even N are one and those with the odd-N are zero.

  19. Relative Phase of Sidebands of Whistler Mode Triggered Emissions and Implications for Non-linear Wave Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golkowski, M.; Costabile, J. D.; Wall, R. E.

    2016-12-01

    The Siple Station Antarctic Transmitter was used in 1973-1988 to inject ELF/VLF waves into the Earth's magnetosphere to study whistler mode wave particle interactions. Waves were observed at the conjugate point in Canada after propagating in the ducted mode in the magnetosphere and experiencing nonlinear growth and triggering of emissions driven by cyclotron resonance interactions with radiation belt electrons. On certain occasions single frequency input waves were seen to trigger symmetric sidebands with 20- 70 Hz separation from the injected frequency space. While the amplitude of such magnetospheric sidebands has been treated before, little work has examined the relative phase of the sidebands. We analyze the sidebands using concepts from communication theory of amplitude (AM) and frequency (FM) modulation. We use a hybrid AM/FM model along with the MINUIT minimization package to quantify the relative phase of the observed sidebands and its evolution as the main input frequency undergoes nonlinear growth. Results of multiple cases show sidebands exhibit initial FM phase characteristics which change to phasing more typical of AM modulation. The results are discussed in the context of the nonlinear whistler mode growth theory based on particle phase trapping and formation of an electron phase-space hole.

  20. In situ investigation of growth modes during plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy of (0001) GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Koblmueller, G.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Calleja, E.; Speck, J. S.

    2007-10-15

    Real-time analysis of the growth modes during homoepitaxial (0001) GaN growth by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy was performed using reflection high energy electron diffraction. A growth mode map was established as a function of Ga/N flux ratio and growth temperature, exhibiting distinct transitions between three-dimensional (3D), layer-by-layer, and step-flow growth modes. The layer-by-layer to step-flow growth transition under Ga-rich growth was surfactant mediated and related to a Ga adlayer coverage of one monolayer. Under N-rich conditions the transition from 3D to layer-by-layer growth was predominantly thermally activated, facilitating two-dimensional growth at temperatures of thermal decomposition.

  1. A new description of Earth's wobble modes using Clairaut coordinates 2: results and inferences on the core mode spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossley, D. J.; Rochester, M. G.

    2014-09-01

    Numerical solutions are presented for the formulation of the linear momentum description of Earth's dynamics using Clairaut coordinates. We have developed a number of methods to integrate the equations of motion, including starting at the Earth's centre of mass, starting at finite radius and separating the displacement associated with the primary rigid rotation. We include rotation and ellipticity to second order up to spherical harmonic T_5^m, starting with the primary displacement T_1^m with m = ±1. We are able to confirm many of the previous results for models PREM (with no surface ocean) and 1066A, both in their original form and with neutrally stratified liquid cores. Our period search ranges from the near-seismic band [0.1 sidereal days (sd)] to 3500 sd, within which we have identified the four well-known wobble-nutation modes: the Free Core Nutation (retrograde) at -456 sd, the Free Inner Core Nutation (FICN, prograde) at 468 sd, the Chandler Wobble (prograde) at 402 sd, and the Inner Core Wobble (ICW, prograde) at about 2842 sd (7.8 yr) for neutral PREM. The latter value varies significantly with earth model and integration method. In addition we have verified to high accuracy the tilt-over mode at 1 sd within a factor 10-6. In an exhaustive search we found no additional near-diurnal wobble modes that could be identified as nutations. We show that the eigenfunctions for the as-yet-unidentified ICW are extremely sensitive to the details of the earth model, especially the core stability profile and there is no well-defined sense of its wobble relative to the mantle. Calculations are also done for a range of models derived from PREM with homogeneous layers, as well as with incompressible cores. For this kind of model the ICW ceases to have just a simple IC rigid motion when the fluid compressibility is either unchanged or multiplied by a factor 10; in this case the outer core exhibits oscillations that arise from an unstable fluid density stratification. For

  2. Electron-cyclotron maser emission - Relative growth and damping rates for different modes and harmonics. [of auroral kilometric radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melrose, D. B.; Dulk, G. A.; Hewitt, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    The temporal growth rate and the number of e-folding growths are calculated and compared for the following wave modes due to a loss-cone-driven cyclotron maser: fundamental x, o, and z modes and second harmonic x and o modes. The dominant mode of the maser should be the fastest growing mode for a saturated maser and should be the mode with the greatest number of e-folding growths for an unsaturated maser; this mode is the fundamental x mode) for a plasma frequency to cyclotron frequency ratio of less than about 0.3; it is the z mode (or perhaps the fundamental o mode) for ratios between 0.3 and 1.0, and the z mode (or perhaps the second harmonic x mode) for ratios between 1.0 and 1.3. Two main points are made: the dominance of the z mode over the range of ratios considered and the very weak effect of cyclotron damping. Electron-cyclotron maser emission is seen as responsible for auroral kilometric radiation, decametric radio emission from Jupiter and Saturn, solar microwave spike bursts, and microwave emission from some flare stars.

  3. Chin development as a result of differential jaw growth.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Steven D; Low, Laura E; Holton, Nathan E; Franciscus, Robert G; Frazier, Mike; Qian, Fang; Mann, Kyle; Schneider, Galen; Scott, Jill E; Southard, Thomas E

    2011-04-01

    During facial growth, the maxilla and mandible translate downward and forward. Although the forward displacement of the maxilla is less than that of the mandible, the interarch relationship of the teeth in the sagittal view during growth remains essentially unchanged. Interdigitation is thought to provide a compensatory (tooth movement) mechanism for maintaining the pattern of occlusion during growth: the maxillary teeth move anteriorly relative to the maxilla while the mandibular teeth move posteriorly relative to the basilar mandible. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that the human chin develops as a result of this process. Twenty-five untreated subjects from the Iowa Facial Growth Study with Class I normal occlusion were randomly selected based on availability of cephalograms at T1 (mean = 8.32 yr) and T2 (mean = 19.90 yr). Measurements of growth (T2 minus T1) parallel to the Frankfort horizontal (FH) for the maxilla, maxillary dentition, mandible, mandibular dentition, and pogonion (Pg) were made. Relative to Pg (a stable bony landmark), B-point moved posteriorly, on average 2.34 mm during growth, and bony chin development (B-point to Pg) increased concomitantly. Similarly, the mandibular and maxillary incisors moved posteriorly relative to Pg 2.53 mm and 2.76 mm, respectively. A-point, relative to Pg, moved posteriorly 4.47 mm during growth. Bony chin development during facial growth occurs, in part, from differential jaw growth and compensatory dentoalveolar movements. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Does Sequence Matter in Multi-Mode Surveys: Results from an Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, James; Arrieta, Jennifer; Guyer, Heidi; Ofstedal, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    Interest in a multi-mode approach to surveys has grown substantially in recent years, in part due to increased costs of face-to-face interviewing and the emergence of the internet as a survey mode. Yet, there is little systematic evidence of the impact of a multimode approach on survey costs and errors. This paper reports the results of an experiment designed to evaluate whether a mixed-mode approach to a large screening survey would produce comparable response rates at a lower cost than a face-to-face screening effort. The experiment was carried out in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), an ongoing panel study of Americans over age 50. In 2010, HRS conducted a household screening survey to recruit new sample members to supplement the existing sample. The experiment varied the sequence of modes with which the screening interview was delivered. One treatment offered mail first, followed by face-to-face interviewing; the other started with face-to-face and then mail. A control group was offered only face-to-face interviewing. Results suggest that the mixed mode options reduced costs without reducing response rates to the screening interview. There is some evidence, however, that the sequence of modes offered may impact the response rate for a follow-up in-depth interview PMID:24764767

  5. Recent Results From the Whistler- and Z-mode Radio Sounding From the IMAGE Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonwalkar, V. S.; Reddy, A.; Mayank, K.; Hazra, S.; Carpenter, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Whistler mode radio sounding method [Sonwalkar et al., JGR, 2011] was applied to two case studies: (1) daytime and nighttime cases of whistler mode echoes observed on IMAGE inside the plasmasphere (L<4, altitude <5000 km), and (2) cases of whistler mode echoes observed during geomagnetic storm activity. Preliminary results indicate: (i) O+/H+ and O+/ (H+ + He+) transition heights at nighttime are a few hundred kilometers lower than that at daytime. (ii) Electron and ion densities found from whistler mode sounding are consistent with those from the past in situ and radio sounding measurements, but differ from those predicted by IRI-2012 and GCPM. (iii) Electron and ion densities undergo temporal changes as a function of geomagnetic storm activity, and each species has different recovery period. (iv) Major, moderate, and minor storms affect Ne, H+, and O+ densities in a similar manner, but affect He+ density differently-the minor storm did not affect it. By comparing the electron and ion densities measured by whistler mode radio sounding with those predicted by physics based ionospheric models (e.g. SAMI 2) it may be possible to understand how thermospheric winds influence the evolution of the ionospheric electron and ion densities during geomagnetic storms. The application of Sonwalkar et al. [2011] method to nonducted and ducted fast Z mode echoes observed on IMAGE has led to the measurement of field aligned electron density and duct width and enhancement factor from ~1000 km up to the equator. In two cases, ducts with widths of ~0.05-0.1 L and density depletions of ~5-10 % accounted for the observed properties of ducted Z mode echoes. The measurements of both electron density and ducts are consistent with past measurements. The results from the whistler and Z mode sounding will lead to new empirical models of field aligned electron and ion densities and a statistical characterization of ducts in the magnetosphere.

  6. Characterization of Mode I fatigue crack growth in GFRP woven laminates at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Shindo, Yasuhide . E-mail: shindo@material.tohoku.ac.jp; Inamoto, Akihiro; Narita, Fumio

    2005-03-01

    This paper describes an experimental and analytical study on the cryogenic fatigue behavior of glass fiber reinforced polymer woven laminates under Mode I loading. Fatigue crack growth rate tests were performed using compact tension specimens at room temperature, liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K), and liquid helium temperature (4 K). The fracture surfaces were also examined by scanning electron microscopy to correlate with the fatigue properties. A finite element method coupled with fatigue damage was adopted for the extensional analysis. The effects of temperature and loading condition on the fatigue crack growth rates are examined.

  7. Time resolved x-ray studies on growth mode changes induced by quantum electronic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Hawoong; Basile, Leonardo; Peter, Czoschke; Tai-C., Chiang

    2004-03-01

    Growth of Pb thin films on Si(111)-(7x7) was studied by reflection surface x-ray diffraction in real time. During the deposition of Pb films at low temperatures, not only the reflectivity curves, but also all the rocking curves at every points on the reflectivity curves were continuously measured. In other words, two dimensional k-space mapping around specula reflectivity was obtained instead of conventional time-resolved reflectivity measurement at an anti-Bragg position. The abundance of information from real time 2-D k-space maps reveals very clear changes in the growth mode of ultra thin Pb films. In a temperature range where the quantum size effect is dominant, alternating layer and island growth was observed.[1] At the lower temperatures, layer-by-layer growth proceeds without a break. At the higher temperature, films grow rough. Kinetics leading to the growth mode changes will be discussed. [1] Hawoong Hong, C.-M.Wei, M.Y. Chou, Z.Wu, L. Basile, H. Chen, M. Holt, and T.-C. Chiang, Phys. Rev. Lett., 90, 076104 (2003)

  8. Non-linear growth of double tearing mode: Explosive reconnection, plasmoid formation, and particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akramov, Tohir; Baty, Hubert

    2017-08-01

    The nonlinear evolution of double tearing modes (DTMs) is investigated within the framework of resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations in a two-dimensional Cartesian geometry. We have explored the explosive reconnection phase associated with the growth of the secondary structure-driven instability for a range of resistivity values. The time scale of the explosive phase (that is of order of a few Alfvénic time scales) is shown to be quasi-independent of the resistivity, even when fast growing plasmoids develop for the highest enough Lundquist number cases. Test particle accelerations are performed using the MHD explosive simulations as input parameters. Our results show that reconnection DTM dynamics is able to provide an efficient process for accelerating charged particles far beyond characteristic thermal velocities within the reconnection layers. The main acceleration mechanism is attributed to the strong inductive electric field generated by the island structure-driven instability, with an additional smaller contribution due to the presence of plasmoids. Finally, our results are used to discuss some features of the accelerated particle spectra during flaring activity in the solar corona.

  9. Guided-mode refraction model for optical fiber sensing of surface crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Lamb, David W; Boerkamp, Martijn; Lye, Peter G

    2010-11-01

    An empirical "guided-mode refraction model" has been invoked to explain the optical attenuation of radiation in an exposed core optical fiber sensor subject to heterogeneous (surface) crystal growth. Based on Fresnel reflectance values at the internal fiber-crystal and crystal-solution interfaces, the model predictions agree with experimental observations of radial loss of radiation from the fiber core through the crystals as well as attenuation of guided radiation as a function of the radiation launch angle into the fiber.

  10. Combined effect of viscosity and vorticity on single mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability bubble growth

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Rahul; Mandal, Labakanta; Roy, S.; Khan, M.; Gupta, M. R.

    2011-02-15

    The combined effect of viscosity and vorticity on the growth rate of the bubble associated with single mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability is investigated. It is shown that the effect of viscosity on the motion of the lighter fluid associated with vorticity accumulated inside the bubble due to mass ablation may be such as to reduce the net viscous drag on the bubble exerted by the upper heavier fluid as the former rises through it.

  11. Growth of lithium triborate crystals. II. Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parfeniuk, C.; Samarasekera, I. V.; Weinberg, F.; Edel, J.; Fjeldsted, K.; Lent, B.

    1996-02-01

    In Part I [C. Parfeniuk, I.V. Samarasekera and F. Weinberg, J. Crystal Growth 158 (1996) 514], a mathematical model of the flux growth of lithium triborate (LBO) crystals was used to calculate the temperature distribution and fluid flow in the melt during growth. In this report the model results are related to experimental observations. Temperature measurements in the melt, for different crucible rotation rates, are compared to the corresponding temperatures determined from the model. Direct observations of fluid flow in the melt, using a transparent glycerol/water solution as a physical model, are related to the calculated flow paths and velocities. As the LBO crystal grows, the rejected MoO 3 flux concentrates ahead of the interface leading to the formation of eutectic phases. The factors leading to the formation of these phases are examined, using flow velocity values determined from the model. A number of LBO crystals were grown, first using convenient growth parameters, and then using parameters determined from the model results. The size and quality of the crystals obtained are discussed and related to the growth conditions.

  12. Alcator C-Mod's Quasi-Coherent Mode Antenna: Experimental Results and Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golfinopoulos, T.; Labombard, B.; Parker, R. R.; Burke, W.; Davis, E. M.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Marmar, E.; Porkolab, M.; Terry, J. L.; Wolfe, S. M.; Woskov, P. P.; Xu, X.

    2012-10-01

    A new ``Shoelace'' antenna has been installed on Alcator C-Mod. Its goal is to interact with edge fluctuations, and particularly the quasi-coherent mode (QCM) associated with the steady-state EDA H-mode. With k=1.5 cm-1 and frequency range, 40Mode (WCM) of the I-mode regime. Here, we present initial results from the first operation of the antenna into ohmic, ohmic EDA H-mode, and I-mode plasmas. The antenna response observed on fluctuations diagnostics, including Mirnov coils and a Gas Puff Imaging (GPI) system, is discussed and compared with BOUT++ simulations. The coherent response on Mirnov coils reveals an antenna-driven field perturbation that competes with background turbulence. The edge plasma stability to antenna perturbations is investigated by searching for poles in the coil response. A reciprocating probe scans through the scrape-off layer. Mounting a magnetic coil head on the probe gives the perturbation's radial decay rate, kR 0.3-1.0 cm-1; a Langmuir probe head examines the antenna's effect on radial transport.

  13. Modifications to JLab 12 GeV Refrigerator and Wide Range Mix Mode Performance Testing Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, P.; Ganni, V.; Hasan, N.; Dixon, K.; Norton, R.; Creel, J.

    2017-02-01

    Analysis of data obtained during the spring 2013 commissioning of the new 4.5 K refrigeration system at Jefferson Lab (JLab) for the 12 GeV upgrade indicated a wide capacity range with good efficiency and minimal operator interaction. Testing also showed that the refrigerator required higher liquid nitrogen (LN) consumption for its pre-cooler than anticipated by the design. This does not affect the capacity of the refrigerator, but it does result in an increased LN utility cost. During the summer of 2015 the modifications were implemented by the cold box manufacturer, according to a design similar to the JLab 12 GeV cold box specification. Subsequently, JLab recommissioned the cold box and performed extensive performance testing, ranging from 20% to 100% of the design maximum capacity, and in various modes of operation, ranging from pure refrigeration, pure liquefaction, half-and-half mix mode and at selected design modes using the Floating Pressure - Ganni Cycle. The testing demonstrated that the refrigerator system has a good and fairly constant performance over a wide capacity range and different modes of operation. It also demonstrated the modifications resulted in a LN consumption that met the design for the pure refrigeration mode (which is the most demanding) and was lower than the design for the nominal and maximum capacity modes. In addition, a pulsed-load test, similar to what is expected for cryogenic systems supporting fusion experiments, was conducted to observe the response using the Floating Pressure - Ganni Cycle, which was stable and robust. This paper will discuss the results and analysis of this testing pertaining to the LN consumption, the system efficiency over a wide range of capacity and different modes and the behaviour of the system to a pulsed load.

  14. Simulation and modeling of whistler mode wave growth through cyclotron resonance with energetic electrons in the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Curtis Ray

    New models and simulations of wave growth experienced by electromagnetic waves propagating through the magnetosphere in the whistler mode are presented. The main emphasis is to simulate single frequency wave pulses, in the 2 to 6 kHz range, that have been injected into the magnetosphere, near L approximately 4. Simulations using a new transient model reproduce exponential wave growth and saturation coincident with a linearly increasing frequency versus time (up to 60 Hz/s). Unique methods for calculating the phased bunched currents, stimulated radiation, and radiation propagation are based upon test particle trajectories calculated by integrating nonlinear equations of motion generalized to allow the evolution of the frequency and wave number at each point in space. Results show the importance of the transient aspects in the wave growth process. The wave growth established as the wave propagates toward the equator is given a spatially advancing wave phase structure by the geomagnetic inhomogeneity. Through the feedback of this radiation upon other electrons, the conditions are set up which result in the linearly increasing output frequency with time. The transient simulations also show that features like growth rate and total growth are simply related to the various parameters, such as applied wave intensity, energetic electron flux, and energetic electron distribution.

  15. Growth modes in metal-organic molecular beam epitaxy of TiO{sub 2} on r-plane sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Jalan, Bharat; Engel-Herbert, Roman; Cagnon, Joeel; Stemmer, Susanne

    2009-03-15

    Phase pure, epitaxial (101) rutile TiO{sub 2} films were grown on (012) sapphire substrates at temperatures between 485 and 725 deg. C using metal-organic molecular beam epitaxy with titanium tetraisopropoxide as the Ti source. Growth modes and rates were investigated as a function of substrate temperature using reflection high-energy electron diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Growth rates were as high as 125 nm/h. The influence of additional oxygen supplied from a rf plasma source was investigated. Without oxygen plasma, the growth rate exhibited reaction and flux-limited regimes and layer-by-layer growth was observed in the initial stages of film growth. With oxygen plasma the growth rate became independent of temperature; films grew initially in step-flow mode and were insulating. The mechanisms for the different growth modes as a function of film thickness, temperature, and presence of oxygen are discussed.

  16. Linear growth rates of resistive tearing modes with sub-Alfvénic streaming flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, L. N.; Ma, Z. W.

    2014-07-15

    The tearing instability with sub-Alfvénic streaming flow along the external magnetic field is investigated using resistive MHD simulation. It is found that the growth rate of the tearing mode instability is larger than that without the streaming flow. With the streaming flow, there exist two Alfvén resonance layers near the central current sheet. The larger perturbation of the magnetic field in two closer Alfvén resonance layers could lead to formation of the observed cone structure and can largely enhance the development of the tearing mode for a narrower streaming flow. For a broader streaming flow, a larger separation of Alfvén resonance layers reduces the magnetic reconnection. The linear growth rate decreases with increase of the streaming flow thickness. The growth rate of the tearing instability also depends on the plasma beta (β). When the streaming flow is embedded in the current sheet, the growth rate increases with β if β < β{sub s}, but decreases if β > β{sub s}. The existence of the specific value β{sub s} can be attributed to competition between the suppressing effect of β and the enhancing effect of the streaming flow on the magnetic reconnection. The critical value β{sub s} increases with increase of the streaming flow strength.

  17. Carbon Fixation Driven by Molecular Hydrogen Results in Chemolithoautotrophically Enhanced Growth of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Kuhns, Lisa G.; Benoit, Stéphane L.; Bayyareddy, Krishnareddy; Johnson, Darryl; Orlando, Ron; Evans, Alexandra L.; Waldrop, Grover L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A molecular hydrogen (H2)-stimulated, chemolithoautotrophic growth mode for the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is reported. In a culture medium containing peptides and amino acids, H2-supplied cells consistently achieved 40 to 60% greater growth yield in 16 h and accumulated 3-fold more carbon from [14C]bicarbonate (on a per cell basis) in a 10-h period than cells without H2. Global proteomic comparisons of cells supplied with different atmospheric conditions revealed that addition of H2 led to increased amounts of hydrogenase and the biotin carboxylase subunit of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) carboxylase (ACC), as well as other proteins involved in various cellular functions, including amino acid metabolism, heme synthesis, or protein degradation. In agreement with this result, H2-supplied cells contained 3-fold more ACC activity than cells without H2. Other possible carbon dioxide (CO2) fixation enzymes were not up-expressed under the H2-containing atmosphere. As the gastric mucus is limited in carbon and energy sources and the bacterium lacks mucinase, this new growth mode may contribute to the persistence of the pathogen in vivo. This is the first time that chemolithoautotrophic growth is described for a pathogen. IMPORTANCE Many pathogens must survive within host areas that are poorly supplied with carbon and energy sources, and the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori resides almost exclusively in the nutritionally stringent mucus barrier of its host. Although this bacterium is already known to be highly adaptable to gastric niches, a new aspect of its metabolic flexibility, whereby molecular hydrogen use (energy) is coupled to carbon dioxide fixation (carbon acquisition) via a described carbon fixation enzyme, is shown here. This growth mode, which supplements heterotrophy, is termed chemolithoautotrophy and has not been previously reported for a pathogen. PMID:26929299

  18. Growth modes of thin films of ligand-free metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Dollinger, A.; Strobel, C. H.; Bleuel, H.; Marsteller, A.; Gantefoer, G.; Fairbrother, D. H.; Tang, Xin; Bowen, K. H.; Kim, Young Dok

    2015-05-21

    Size-selected Mo{sub n}{sup −}, W{sub n}{sup −}, and Fe{sub n}{sup −} cluster anions are deposited on a weakly interacting substrate (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) and studied ex-situ using atomic force microscopy. Depending on size, three growth modes can be distinguished. Very small clusters consisting of less than 10–30 atoms behave similar to atoms and coalesce into 3-dimensional bulk-like islands. Medium sized clusters consisting of hundreds of atoms do not coalesce and follow a Stanski-Krastanov growth pattern. At low coverage, an almost perfect monolayer is formed. This is a new finding different from all previous studies on deposited metal clusters. For clusters with several thousands of atoms, the growth pattern again changes. At low coverage, the substrate is dotted with individual clusters, while at high coverage, the surface becomes extremely rough.

  19. Continuous monitoring of bacterial biofilm growth using uncoated Thickness-Shear Mode resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, P.; Resa, P.; Durán, C.; Maestre, J. R.; Mateo, M.; Elvira, L.

    2012-12-01

    Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCM) were used to nondestructively monitor in real time the microbial growth of the bacteria Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) in a liquid broth. QCM, sometimes referred to as Thickness-Shear Mode (TSM) resonators, are highly sensitive sensors not only able to measure very small mass, but also non-gravimetric contributions of viscoelastic media. These devices can be used as biosensors for bacterial detection and are employed in many applications including their use in the food industry, water and environment monitoring, pharmaceutical sciences and clinical diagnosis. In this work, three strains of S. epidermidis (which differ in the ability to produce biofilm) have been continuously monitored using an array of piezoelectric TSM resonators, at 37 °C in a selective culturing media. Microbial growth was followed by measuring the changes in the crystal resonant frequency and bandwidth at several harmonics. It was shown that microbial growth can be monitored in real time using multichannel and multiparametric QCM sensors.

  20. Effective representation of amide III, II, I, and A modes on local vibrational modes: Analysis of ab initio quantum calculation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Seungsoo

    2016-10-01

    The Hamiltonian matrix for the first excited vibrational states of a protein can be effectively represented by local vibrational modes constituting amide III, II, I, and A modes to simulate various vibrational spectra. Methods for obtaining the Hamiltonian matrix from ab initio quantum calculation results are discussed, where the methods consist of three steps: selection of local vibrational mode coordinates, calculation of a reduced Hessian matrix, and extraction of the Hamiltonian matrix from the Hessian matrix. We introduce several methods for each step. The methods were assessed based on the density functional theory calculation results of 24 oligopeptides with four different peptide lengths and six different secondary structures. The completeness of a Hamiltonian matrix represented in the reduced local mode space is improved by adopting a specific atom group for each amide mode and reducing the effect of ignored local modes. The calculation results are also compared to previous models using C=O stretching vibration and transition dipole couplings. We found that local electric transition dipole moments of the amide modes are mainly bound on the local peptide planes. Their direction and magnitude are well conserved except amide A modes, which show large variation. Contrary to amide I modes, the vibrational coupling constants of amide III, II, and A modes obtained by analysis of a dipeptide are not transferable to oligopeptides with the same secondary conformation because coupling constants are affected by the surrounding atomic environment.

  1. Effective representation of amide III, II, I, and A modes on local vibrational modes: Analysis of ab initio quantum calculation results.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Seungsoo

    2016-10-28

    The Hamiltonian matrix for the first excited vibrational states of a protein can be effectively represented by local vibrational modes constituting amide III, II, I, and A modes to simulate various vibrational spectra. Methods for obtaining the Hamiltonian matrix from ab initio quantum calculation results are discussed, where the methods consist of three steps: selection of local vibrational mode coordinates, calculation of a reduced Hessian matrix, and extraction of the Hamiltonian matrix from the Hessian matrix. We introduce several methods for each step. The methods were assessed based on the density functional theory calculation results of 24 oligopeptides with four different peptide lengths and six different secondary structures. The completeness of a Hamiltonian matrix represented in the reduced local mode space is improved by adopting a specific atom group for each amide mode and reducing the effect of ignored local modes. The calculation results are also compared to previous models using C=O stretching vibration and transition dipole couplings. We found that local electric transition dipole moments of the amide modes are mainly bound on the local peptide planes. Their direction and magnitude are well conserved except amide A modes, which show large variation. Contrary to amide I modes, the vibrational coupling constants of amide III, II, and A modes obtained by analysis of a dipeptide are not transferable to oligopeptides with the same secondary conformation because coupling constants are affected by the surrounding atomic environment.

  2. Stability of Microtearing Modes and the Resulting Electron Thermal Transport in Tokamak Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiq, T.; Weiland, J.; Luo, L.; Kritz, A.; Pankin, A.

    2016-10-01

    Microtearing modes (MTMs) have been identified as a source of significant electron thermal transport in tokamak discharges. In order to understand how MTMs affect transport, and, consequently, the evolution of electron temperature in tokamak discharges, a reduced transport model for MTMs was developed for use in integrated predictive modeling studies. A unified fluid/kinetic approach was used to derive the nonlinear dispersion relation in order to advance the kinetic description and to include the nonlinear effects due to magnetic fluctuations. The dependence of the MTM real frequency and growth rate on radial and poloidal mode numbers (ky) , electron beta, collisionality, safety factor, magnetic shear, density gradient, temperature gradient, and curvature is examined in a numerical study. The magnetic fluctuation amplitude saturation level is computed for each flux surface using the nonlinear MTMs envelope equation. This level depends upon the most unstable eigenvalue as well as on the sidebands in the ky spectrum. The magnetic fluctuation levels are then used to compute electron thermal transport that is due to the presence of the unstable microtearing modes. Research supported in part by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science.

  3. Overexpression of the tomato pollen receptor kinase LePRK1 rewires pollen tube growth to a blebbing mode.

    PubMed

    Gui, Cai-Ping; Dong, Xin; Liu, Hai-Kuan; Huang, Wei-Jie; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Shu-Jie; Barberini, María Laura; Gao, Xiao-Yan; Muschietti, Jorge; McCormick, Sheila; Tang, Wei-Hua

    2014-09-01

    The tubular growth of a pollen tube cell is crucial for the sexual reproduction of flowering plants. LePRK1 is a pollen-specific and plasma membrane-localized receptor-like kinase from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). LePRK1 interacts with another receptor, LePRK2, and with KINASE PARTNER PROTEIN (KPP), a Rop guanine nucleotide exchange factor. Here, we show that pollen tubes overexpressing LePRK1 or a truncated LePRK1 lacking its extracellular domain (LePRK1ΔECD) have enlarged tips but also extend their leading edges by producing "blebs." Coexpression of LePRK1 and tomato PLIM2a, an actin bundling protein that interacts with KPP in a Ca(2+)-responsive manner, suppressed these LePRK1 overexpression phenotypes, whereas pollen tubes coexpressing KPP, LePRK1, and PLIM2a resumed the blebbing growth mode. We conclude that overexpression of LePRK1 or LePRK1ΔECD rewires pollen tube growth to a blebbing mode, through KPP- and PLIM2a-mediated bundling of actin filaments from tip plasma membranes. Arabidopsis thaliana pollen tubes expressing LePRK1ΔECD also grew by blebbing. Our results exposed a hidden capability of the pollen tube cell: upon overexpression of a single membrane-localized molecule, LePRK1 or LePRK1ΔECD, it can switch to an alternative mechanism for extension of the leading edge that is analogous to the blebbing growth mode reported for Dictyostelium and for Drosophila melanogaster stem cells. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of Viscosity on Growth Rates of Interchange Modes in Magnetic Inertial Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, R. L.; Nachtrieb, R.

    1999-11-01

    Thermal insulating B fields in imploding MIF/MTF confinement systems, as in predecessor static wall confinement systems, must close in the confined plasma and, therefore, have unfavorable curvature for MHD interchange mode stability. Analytic inviscid estimates with typical compressed z-pinch fields Bth=1MG, plasma density n=3.e20 and radius a=1cm give max. m=0 mode growth rates, Gm, of order 1.e8s-1 with wavelengths Lz of .1a to .5a. Thermal conduction to the confining wall increases B there and Gm significantly, as Vekstein discusses in concluding in effect that such confinement would not be useful for fusion. These growth rates and mode forms are confirmed by two supporting compressible models(Freidberg/McCrory). Happily when viscosity(Braginskii) is included; G is reduced, esp. at longer wavelengths, Lz, with scaling Lz**-1, and viscosities of 1e2 to 1e4 poise for the example plasmas give Gm's of order 1.e7s-1 and less with realistic time dependent profiles. We conclude that these Gm's are consistent with significant fusion yields. This work was presented at the UCLA/DoE ICC conference, 3/3-6/97.

  5. Results from a Test Fixture for button BPM Trapped Mode Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron,P.; Bacha, B.; Blednykh, A.; Pinayev, I.; Singh, O.

    2009-05-04

    A variety of measures have been suggested to mitigate the problem of button BPM trapped mode heating. A test fixture, using a combination of commercial-off-the-shelf and custom machined components, was assembled to validate the simulations. We present details of the fixture design, measurement results, and a comparison of the results with the simulations. A brief history of the trapped mode button heating problem and a set of design rules for BPM button optimization are presented elsewhere in these proceedings. Here we present measurements on a test fixture that was assembled to confirm, if possible, a subset of those rules: (1) Minimize the trapped mode impedance and the resulting power deposited in this mode by the beam. (2) Maximize the power re-radiated back into the beampipe. (3) Maximize electrical conductivity of the outer circumference of the button and minimize conductivity of the inner circumference of the shell, to shift power deposition from the button to the shell. The problem is then how to extract useful and relevant information from S-parameter measurements of the test fixture.

  6. Mode-Stirred Method Implementation for HIRF Susceptibility Testing and Results Comparison with Anechoic Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Koppen, Sandra V.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of mode-stirred method for susceptibility testing according to the current DO-160D standard. Test results on an Engine Data Processor using the implemented procedure and the comparisons with the standard anechoic test results are presented. The comparison experimentally shows that the susceptibility thresholds found in mode-stirred method are consistently higher than anechoic. This is consistent with the recent statistical analysis finding by NIST that the current calibration procedure overstates field strength by a fixed amount. Once the test results are adjusted for this value, the comparisons with the anechoic results are excellent. The results also show that test method has excellent chamber to chamber repeatability. Several areas for improvements to the current procedure are also identified and implemented.

  7. Phase diagram of interfacial growth modes by vapor deposition and its application for ZnO nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Da-Jun; Xiong, Xiang; Liu, Ming; Wang, Mu

    2017-09-01

    Interfacial growth from vapor has been extensively studied. However, a straightforward picture of the growth mode under different growth conditions is still lacking. In this paper, we develop a comprehensive interfacial growth theory based on the stochastic approach. Using a critical interisland separation, we construct a general phase diagram of the growth modes. It has been revealed that if the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier EES is smaller than a critical value, the interfacial growth proceeds in a layer-by-layer (LBL) mode at any deposition rate. However, if EES is larger than the critical value, LBL growth occurs only at very small or very large deposition rates relative to the intralayer hopping rate, and multilayer (ML) growth occurs at a moderate deposition rate. Experiments with zinc oxide growth by chemical vapor deposition have been designed to qualitatively demonstrate the theoretical model. By changing the flux of the carrier gas (nitrogen gas) in chemical vapor deposition, we realize LBL, ML, and then reentrance of LBL homoepitaxial growth of ZnO successively. Moreover, we find that surface kinetics of ZnO is suppressed by decreasing oxygen partial pressure by comparing the experimental observations and theoretical models, which is supported by our recent first-principles calculations. Since the influence of the substrate and the growth species on growth can approximately be represented by binding energy and surface kinetics, we suggest that the phase diagram is essential for interfacial growth of different materials by vapor deposition.

  8. Error Field Assessment from Driven Mode Rotation: Results from Extrap-T2R Reversed-Field-Pinch and Perspectives for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, F. A.; Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.; Olofsson, K. E. J.

    2012-10-01

    A new ITER-relevant non-disruptive error field (EF) assessment technique not restricted to low density and thus low beta was demonstrated at the Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch. Resistive Wall Modes (RWMs) were generated and their rotation sustained by rotating magnetic perturbations. In particular, stable modes of toroidal mode number n=8 and 10 and unstable modes of n=1 were used in this experiment. Due to finite EFs, and in spite of the applied perturbations rotating uniformly and having constant amplitude, the RWMs were observed to rotate non-uniformly and be modulated in amplitude (in the case of unstable modes, the observed oscillation was superimposed to the mode growth). This behavior was used to infer the amplitude and toroidal phase of n=1, 8 and 10 EFs. The method was first tested against known, deliberately applied EFs, and then against actual intrinsic EFs. Applying equal and opposite corrections resulted in longer discharges and more uniform mode rotation, indicating good EF compensation. The results agree with a simple theoretical model. Extensions to tearing modes, to the non-uniform plasma response to rotating perturbations, and to tokamaks, including ITER, will be discussed.

  9. Non-equilibrium atomic condensates and mixtures: collective modes, condensate growth and thermalisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loon Lee, Kean; Proukakis, Nick P.

    2016-11-01

    The non-equilibrium dynamics of trapped ultracold atomic gases, or mixtures thereof, is an extremely rich subject. Despite 20 years of studies, and remarkable progress mainly on the experimental front, numerous open question remain, related to the growth, relaxation and thermalisation of such systems, and there is still no universally accepted theory for their theoretical description. In this paper we discuss one of the state-of-the-art kinetic approaches, which gives an intuitive picture of the physical processes happening at the microscopic scale, being broadly applicable both below and above the critical region (but not within the critical region itself, where fluctuations become dominant and symmetry breaking takes place). Specifically, the ‘Zaremba-Nikuni-Griffin’ (ZNG) scheme provides a self-consistent description of the coupling between the condensate and the thermal atoms, including the collisions between these two subsystems. It has been successfully tested against experiments in various settings, including investigation of collective modes (e.g. monopole, dipole and quadrupole modes), dissipation of topological excitations (solitons and vortices) as well as surface evaporative cooling. Here, we show that the ZNG model can capture two important aspects of non-equilibrium dynamics for both single-component and two-component BECs: the Kohn mode (the undamped dipole oscillation independent of interactions and temperature) and (re)thermalisation leading to condensate growth following sudden evaporation. Our simulations, performed in a spherically symmetric trap reveal (i) an interesting two-stage dynamics and the emergence of a prominent monopole mode in the evaporative cooling of a single-component Bose gas, and (ii) the long thermalisation time associated with the sympathetic cooling of a realistic two-component mixture. Related open questions arise about the mechanisms and the nature of thermalisation in such systems, where further controlled

  10. Multimode to single-mode converters: new results on 1-to-61 photonic lanterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaya, J.-C.; Ehrlich, K.; Haynes, D. M.; Haynes, R.; Leon-Saval, S. G.; Schirdewahn, D.

    2012-09-01

    Photonic Lanterns are a fibre-based component performing the adiabatic conversion from a multimode fibre to a series of single-mode fibres. This conversion is required for combining fibre-based instruments used in astronomy with complex photonic functions. As any fibre-based system, the optical properties of the Photonic Lanterns need to be fully evaluated. In this paper, we present results on the performance of a 1-to-61 Photonic Lantern in terms of spectral transmission and modal noise characteristics. Firstly, we compare the spectra obtained at the output of two photonic lanterns spliced together in multimode-to-multimode configuration with spectra obtained when transmitting light through step-index single-mode and multimode fibres. We then show that the photonic lantern is generating less modal noise than a step-index multimode fibre of same core diameter, when it is submitted to bending and stretching, and we propose an interpretation of this result based on static mode scrambling performance and single-mode behavior.

  11. Controlled Growth of one-dimensional zinc oxide nanostructures in the pulsed electrodeposition mode

    SciTech Connect

    Klochko, N. P. Khrypunov, G. S.; Myagchenko, Yu. O.; Melnychuk, E. E.; Kopach, V. R.; Klepikova, E. S.; Lyubov, V. M.; Kopach, A. V.

    2012-06-15

    Zinc oxide nanostructures are objects of study in the field of optoelectronics, solar power engineering, nanosensorics, and catalysis. For the purpose of the controlled growth of one-dimensional submicrometer zinc oxide structures in the pulsed electrodeposition mode, the effect of the pulse electrolysis parameters on the morphology of ZnO layers, their optical properties, and structural and substructural characteristics is determined using X-ray diffraction, optical spectrophotometry, and atomic-force microscopy. The possibility of fabricating arrays of ZnO nanowires with different geometrical shapes, perpendicular to the substrate surface, by varying the frequency of cathode-substrate potential pulses is shown.

  12. Results of mathematical simulation of steam jet efflux in atmosphere under various modes affecting noise generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tupov, V. B.; Taratorin, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    Mathematical simulation results for various modes of the steam jet efflux into atmosphere are represented. It is shown that, to describe processes in steam jet, in particular during coherent structure formation, there is a need to use a nonstationary model. Mathematical simulation results for the steam jet efflux into the atmosphere under various modes (subsonic, transonic, and supersonic) are described. Features of the formation and emission of noise by the steam jet are shown in dependence of its parameters at the exhaust line section. The obtained results are qualitatively compared with known experimental data on the location of the acoustical center of the steam jet and for instantaneous velocity field of the underexpanded air jet.

  13. Diffractive pion production at COMPASS - First results on 3{pi} final states - neutral mode

    SciTech Connect

    Nerling, Frank

    2010-08-05

    The COMPASS experiment at CERN is designed for light hadron spectroscopy with emphasis on the detection of new states, in particular the search for exotic states and glue-balls. After a short pilot run in 2004 (190 GeV/c negative pion beam, lead target) showing significant production strength for an exotic J{sup PC} = 1{sup -+} state at 1.66 GeV/c{sup 2}, we have collected data with a 190 GeV/c negative charged hadron beam on a proton (liquid hydrogen) and nuclear targets in 2008 and 2009. The spectrometer features good coverage by electromagnetic calorimetry, and our data provide excellent opportunity for simultaneous observation of new states in two different decay modes in the same experiment. The diffractively produced (3{pi}){sup -} system for example can be studied in both modes {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{pi}{sup -{pi}+{pi}-}p and {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{pi}{sup -{pi}0{pi}0}p. Charged and neutral mode rely on completely different parts of the spectrometer. Observing a new state in both modes provides important crosscheck. First results of a preliminary PWA performed on the 2008 data are presented.

  14. Effects of experimental conditions on the morphologies, structures and growth modes of pulsed laser-deposited CdS nanoneedles.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Chen, Li; Zhao, Yu; Liu, Xujun; Guan, Leilei; Sun, Jian; Wu, Jiada; Xu, Ning

    2014-02-22

    CdS nanoneedles with different morphologies, structures, and growth modes have been grown on Ni-coated Si(100) surface under different experimental conditions by pulsed laser deposition method. The effects of catalyst layer, substrate temperature, and laser pulse energy on the growth of the CdS nanoneedles were studied in detail. It was confirmed that the formation of the molten catalyst spheres is the key to the nucleation of the CdS nanoneedles by observing the morphologies of the Ni catalyst thin films annealed at different substrate temperatures. Both the substrate temperature and laser pulse energy strongly affected the growth modes of the CdS nanoneedles. The secondary growth of the smaller nanoneedles on the top of the main nanoneedles was found at appropriate conditions. A group of more completed pictures of the growth modes of the CdS nanoneedles were presented.

  15. Damage detection and quantification using mode curvature variation on framed structures: analysis of the preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovino, Chiara; Ditommaso, Rocco; Auletta, Gianluca; Ponzo, Felice C.

    2017-04-01

    Continuous monitoring based on vibrational identification methods is increasingly employed for the evaluation of the state of health of existing buildings after strong motion earthquake. Different damage identification methods are based on the variations of damage indices defined in terms modal (eigenfrequencies, mode shapes, and modal damping) and/or non-modal parameters. Most of simplified methods for structural health monitoring and damage detection are based on the evaluation of the dynamic characteristics evolution associated to the fundamental mode of vibration of a monitored structure. Aim of this work is the upgrade of an existing method for damage localization on framed structures during a moderate/destructive earthquake. The existing version of the method is based on the comparison of the geometric characteristics (with particular reference to the mode curvature) exhibited by the structures, related to fundamental mode of vibration, before and during an earthquake. The approach is based on the use of a nonlinear filter, the band-variable filter, based on the Stockwell Transform able to extract the nonlinear response of each mode of vibration. The new version of the method provides the possibility to quantify a possible damage occurred on the monitored structure linking the mode curvature variation with the maximum inter-story drift. This paper shows the preliminary results obtained from several simulations on nonlinear numerical models of reinforced concrete framed structures, designed for only gravity loads, without and with the presence of infill panels. Furthermore, a correlation between maximum mode curvature difference and maximum inter-story drift has been defined for the different numerical models in order to quantify the structural damage. Acknowledgements This study was partially funded by the Italian Department of Civil Protection within the project DPC-RELUIS 2016 - RS4 ''Seismic observatory of structures and health monitoring'' and by the

  16. Initial Single-Mode Rayleigh-Taylor Growth Rates Measured with the OMEGA Laser System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Boehly, T. R.; Ofer, D.; Verdon, C. P.; Bradley, D. K.; McKenty, P. W.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    1996-11-01

    A series of single-mode growth measurements done with the OMEGA laser system are reported. These measurements were done to qualify the laser irradiation and diagnostic suite for future experiments that will use the growth of perturbations at the ablation interface to quantify improvements in irradiation uniformity, reduced growth due to increased ablation velocities, and the effect of increased density scale lengths on the growth rate at the ablation interface. This series of measurements used a laser intensity of 2 × 10^14 W/cm^2 over a spot size of 700 μm for both Gaussian and non-Gaussian shaped pulses with an rms irradiation nonuniformity of 7%. Data were collected with a gated x-ray framing camera with a 10-μm spatial resolution and a 40-ps temporal resolution. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  17. Harmonization of growth hormone measurement results: the empirical approach.

    PubMed

    Ross, H A; Lentjes, E W G M; Menheere, P M M; Sweep, C G J

    2014-05-15

    Growth hormone (hGH) is a measurand belonging to ISO category 4, indicating intrinsic unavailability of a reference measurement procedure and primary standard material. Large between-method differences have been raising confusion, especially in the interpretation of results of stimulation tests for exclusion of juvenile growth hormone deficiency. Within the framework of the external quality assessment scheme (EQAS) of the SKML (Dutch Foundation for Quality Assessment in Clinical Laboratories), attempts to reduce between-method variation of hGH measurements have been made, starting in 1994 with an inter-laboratory comparison of 9 different immunoassays by using a panel of sera and standard materials available at that time. Methods appeared to differ from each other largely in a systematic, sample-independent manner. These systematic differences are reflected in the hGH measurement results obtained in commutable sera. A commutable serum pool was introduced as a consensus reference material, permitting correction of each method's results to a common scale. Pair wise comparisons ("twin studies") were carried out to investigate and corroborate the effectiveness of this material for harmonization. A significant reduction of the between-laboratory coefficient (CV) of variation from 22 to 9.0% was attained.

  18. Finite-time normal mode disturbances and error growth during Southern Hemisphere blocking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Mozheng; Frederiksen, Jorgen S.

    2005-01-01

    The structural organization of initially random errors evolving in a barotropic tangent linear model, with time-dependent basic states taken from analyses, is examined for cases of block development, maturation and decay in the Southern Hemisphere atmosphere during April, November, and December 1989. The statistics of 100 evolved errors are studied for six-day periods and compared with the growth and structures of fast growing normal modes and finite-time normal modes (FTNMs). The amplification factors of most initially random errors are slightly less than those of the fastest growing FTNM for the same time interval. During their evolution, the standard deviations of the error fields become concentrated in the regions of rapid dynamical development, particularly associated with developing and decaying blocks. We have calculated probability distributions and the mean and standard deviations of pattern correlations between each of the 100 evolved error fields and the five fastest growing FTNMs for the same time interval. The mean of the largest pattern correlation, taken over the five fastest growing FTNMs, increases with increasing time interval to a value close to 0.6 or larger after six days. FTNM 1 generally, but not always, gives the largest mean pattern correlation with error fields. Corresponding pattern correlations with the fast growing normal modes of the instantaneous basic state flow are significant but lower than with FTNMs. Mean pattern correlations with fast growing FTNMs increase further when the time interval is increased beyond six days.

  19. f- and r-modes of slowly rotating stars: New results in the linear treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirenti, C.; Skákala, J.; Yoshida, S.

    2014-09-01

    Newly born neutron stars can present differential rotation, even if later it should be suppressed by viscosity or a sufficiently strong magnetic field. In this early stage of its life, a neutron star is expected to have a strong emission of gravitational waves, which could be influenced by the differential rotation. We present here a new formalism for modelling differentially rotating neutron stars, working on the slow rotation approximation and assuming a small degree of differential rotation. After we establish our equilibrium model, we explore the influence of the differential rotation on the f and r-modes of oscillation of the neutron star in the Cowling approximation, and we also analyze an effect of the differential rotation on the emission of gravitational radiation from the f-modes. Based on results presented in Chirenti, C., Skákala, J., & Yoshida, S. 2013, Phys. Rev.D, 87, 044043.

  20. Modal identification using single-mode projection filters and comparison with ERA and MLE results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jen-Kuang; Shen, Ji-Yao; Pappa, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    The Single-Mode Projection Filter (SPF) is a newly developed algorithm for eigensystem parameter identification from both analytical results and test data. The SPF is formulated with a single mode only and practical for parallel processing implementation. Explicit formulations of SPF are derived for the multi-input multi-output (MIMO) system by using the orthogonal matrices of the controllability and observability matrices in the general sense. The modal parameters of SPF are initially obtained from an analytical model in modal space. The experimental data are then processed through SPF to update its modal parameters and to minimize a cost function defined by the norm of an error matrix. The updated modal parameters represent the characteristics of the test data. A two-dimensional global minimum optimization algorithm is developed and applied for the filter update by using the interval analysis method. The SPF is developed based on a single-mode subsystem and identifies only one modal frequency and one modal damping within a specified region. For an n-modes structure, n SPF can be implemented for parallel processing to reduce the computational burden. The SPF is applied to analyze the simulated data for the MAST beam structure. The estimated modal parameters are comparable to those from the Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA) and repeated modal frequencies are identified. The modal analysis of the Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE) data is also performed by using the ERA and the Maximum Likelihood Estimate (MLE). The result shows that the first five modal frequencies are very close from ERA and MLE. However, there are slight disparities in the damping rates and the computational burdens are quite different among these two algorithms.

  1. Rapid Population Growth-Cause or Result of Global Problems?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Richard H.

    Explosive population growth is a symptom of the world's unjust and inequitable social, political, and economic conditions. The current rate of growth is staggering, particularly in the cities of the underdeveloped countries. While some progress has been made in slowing population growth, several factors still contribute to its momentum. One of…

  2. Temperature-gradient epitaxy under in situ growth mode diagnostics by scanning reflection high-energy electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koida, T.; Komiyama, D.; Koinuma, H.; Ohtani, M.; Lippmaa, M.; Kawasaki, M.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a parallel film growth method on a temperature-gradient substrate to quickly control and optimize the film growth mode. A continuous-wave neodymium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser heating was used to achieve a stable temperature gradient covering a 300 °C range of temperatures over a distance of 11 mm. The growth mode was determined by time-resolved scanning reflection high-energy electron diffraction. Transition from layer-by-layer to step-flow growth by the deposition temperature was observed during La0.5Sr0.5MnO3 film growth on a single SrTiO3 substrate, proving a powerful tool not only for investigating the growth dynamics but also for seeking the optimized deposition conditions in one run of experiment.

  3. Comparison of results between the ballooning-modes codes BLOON and BALOON

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, J.K. Jr.

    1981-08-01

    Ballooning mode equation eigenvalues calculated by two different codes, BLOON (written at General Atomic) and BALOON (written at Oak Ridge National Laboratory) have been compared for a sequence of equilibria having a range of ..beta.. values. The results agree for marginal stability only. Differences away from marginal stability may be due to differences in the coordinate systems used for the analysis in the two codes. Equilibria were generated using the ISLAND code of D. Stevens of New York University. Results of various convergence studies made with the codes are presented together with recommendations for their use.

  4. First laboratory results of SPHERE/IRDIS dual-band imaging and long slit spectroscopy modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigan, Arthur; Langlois, Maud; Martinez, Patrice; Le Mignant, David; Dohlen, Kjetil; Moutou, Claire; Gry, Cécile; Madec, Fabrice

    2012-09-01

    IRDIS is one of the science sub-systems of VLT/SPHERE dedicated to the detection and characterization of giant exoplanets at large orbital radii with high-contrast direct imaging. It offers a unique set of observational modes including dual-band imaging (DBI) with very low differential aberrations, and long slit spectroscopy (LSS) coupled with a classical Lyot coronograph that will be used to obtain spectra at low (R = ~50) and medium (R = ~500) resolution. During the past year, IRDIS has been integrated and tested in laboratory in a standalone configuration, and it has recently been integrated on the full SPHERE bench including the calibration unit, the common path optics and the extreme AO system. We present the first analysis of data obtained during laboratory tests of IRDIS in the DBI mode, both in standalone and with the full SPHERE bench, but without simulated seeing and AO correction. We show the first performance estimates of spectral differential imaging with IRDIS in H-band, which is used to attenuate the speckle noise induced by the instrumental aberrations. Similarly, for the LSS mode we present the first application of the spectral deconvolution data analysis method to attenuate the speckle noise on IRDIS data. Finally we compare these results to simulations that were performed during the development phase of the instrument.

  5. Preliminary results of the ultralong-range sounding of ionospheric irregularities using the ducted mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponyatov, A. A.; Uryadov, V. P.; Batukhtin, V. I.; Ivanov, V. A.; Ivanov, D. V.; Ryabova, N. V.; Chernov, A. G.; Shumaev, V. V.; Anderson, S. J.

    1999-12-01

    We present preliminary experimental results concerning transequatorial propagation (TEP) of HF waves upon chirp sounding over the 11950-km path alice Springs (Australia)-Yoshkar-Ola (Russia). The measurements were made in August, 1998. Two anomalous signals with delays of 3.0 and 4.5 ms with respect to the main mode were observed during night time (21:30 23:00 UT). The maximum observed frequencies (MOF) of these signals were 2 3 MHz greater than the main-mode MOF. Simulations allowed us to identify these signals as the ducted signals trapped in the FE interlayer duct due to radiowave refraction on a negative gradient of the electron density and that escaped from the duct due to the scattering by small-scale field-aligned irregularities of the subpolar ionosphere. We discuss radiophysical and geophysical aspects concerning localization of the irregularities responsible for scattering and perspectives of using the ducted mode for over-the-horizon diagnostics of the inhomogeneous structure of the ionosphere with a global network of chirp sounders and HF radars.

  6. On the abrupt growth dynamics of nonlinear resistive tearing mode and the viscosity effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, A.; Li, Jiquan; Kishimoto, Y.

    2014-05-15

    The nonlinear evolution of the resistive tearing mode exhibits an abrupt growth after an X-point collapse once the magnetic island exceeds a certain critical width Δ′w{sub c} for large instability parameter Δ′, leading to a current sheet formation [N. F. Loureiro et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 235003 (2005)]. In this work, we investigate the underlying mechanism of the X-point collapse as well as the current sheet formation including the viscosity effects, based on a secondary instability analysis. The secondary instability is excited due to the quasilinear current modification by the zonal current. In particular, it is identified that the current peaking effect is plausibly responsible for the onset of the X-point collapse and the current sheet formation, leading to the explosive growth of reconnected flux. In the presence of finite viscosity, the Δ′w{sub c} scaling with the resistivity gets modified. A transition behavior is revealed at P{sub r}≈1 for the viscosity dependence of Δ′w{sub c} and the linear tearing instability. However, the explosive growth seems to be independent of the viscosity in the magnetic Prandtl number P{sub r}<1 regime, while large viscosity plays a strong dissipation role.

  7. Growth mode and defect evaluation of GaSb on GaAs substrate: a transmission electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shenghong; Balakrishnan, Ganesh; Huffaker, Diana L

    2011-06-01

    We use transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) techniques to confirm and analyze the interfacial misfit (IMF) and non-IMF growth modes for GaSb epilayers on GaAs substrates. Under optimized IMF growth conditions, only pure 90 degrees dislocations are generated along both [110] and [1-10] directions and located exactly at the epi-substrate interface, which leads to very low density of misfit dislocations propagating from the GaSb/GaAs interface along the growth direction, compared to the non-IMF growth condition. The mechanism of defect annihilation indicates that this IMF mergence process happens without formation of threading dislocations into the GaSb epilayer, which is a completely relaxed growth mode with extremely low defect density. Based on scanning several sets of wafer surfaces, plan-view TEM confirms that the misfit defect densities are estimated to be approximately 5 x 10(5) cm(-2) for IMF growth mode and approximately 10(9) cm(-2) for non-IMF growth mode.

  8. Microgravity protein crystal growth; results and hardware development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Smith, Graig D.; Carter, Daniel C.; Snyder, Robert S.; McPherson, A.; Koszelak, S.; Bugg, Charles E.

    1991-02-01

    Protein crystal growth experiments have been performed on a series of US shuttle missions. Crystallographic studies of proteins and nucleic acids have played key roles in establishing the structural foundations of molecular biology and biochemistry and for revealing structure/function relationships that are of major importance in understanding how macromolecules operate in biological systems. A number of major advances in the technology involved in determining protein structures have shortened the time span involved in structure determination. The major bottleneck in the widespread application of protein crystallography is the ability to produce high quality crystals that are suitable for a complete structural analysis. Evidence from several investigations indicates that crystals of superior quality can be obtained in a microgravity environment. This paper summarizes results obtained from a series of US shuttle missions and describes new hardware currently being developed for future shuttle missions.

  9. A new testing method for investigating the shear-mode fatigue crack growth behavior in hydrogen environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akaki, Y.; Matsuo, T.; Nishimura, Y.; Miyakawa, S.; Endo, M.

    2017-05-01

    Ball bearing is widely used in a variety of machines including the transportation equipments of the automobiles and airplanes. Flaking failure is a common problem for ball bearing and it is caused by shear-mode fatigue crack growth under cyclic shear stress. Further, it is known that the premature flaking is attributed to the combined effect of hydrogen penetration into the material and cyclic shear stress during the operation. Therefore, in order to ensure the integrity of ball bearing, it is necessary to clarify the effect of hydrogen on shear-mode fatigue crack growth behavior, in particular, the threshold behavior. The evaluation of the shear-mode crack growth behavior is not easy because mode I crack branching occurs easily. Our previous studies revealed that it is required to apply static compression in the direction of specimen axis to attain a stable shear-mode fatigue crack growth. In addition, successive hydrogen supply to the specimen is essential for the evaluation of hydrogen effect on the fatigue threshold because hydrogen emits from the specimen during the fatigue test. In other words, the hydrogen-precharging method, commonly used for the research on hydrogen embrittlement, is not appropriate for the evaluation of fatigue threshold. In this study, to solve these problems, we have developed a novel, easy-to-use experimental method to evaluate the threshold behavior of shear-mode fatigue crack in the presence of hydrogen. The fundamental principle of the method is introduced in this paper.

  10. Synchronized growth and neutral lipid accumulation in Chlorella sorokiniana FC6 IITG under continuous mode of operation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vikram; Muthuraj, Muthusivaramapandian; Palabhanvi, Basavaraj; Das, Debasish

    2016-01-01

    Synchronized growth and neutral lipid accumulation with high lipid productivity under mixotrophic growth of the strain Chlorella sorokiniana FC6 IITG was achieved via manipulation of substrates feeding mode and supplementation of lipid elicitors in the growth medium. Screening and optimization of lipid elicitors resulted in lipid productivity of 110.59mgL(-1)day(-1) under the combined effect of lipid inducers sodium acetate and sodium chloride. Fed-batch cultivation of the strain in bioreactor with intermittent feeding of limiting nutrients and lipid inducer resulted in maximum biomass and lipid productivity of 2.08 and 0.97gL(-1)day(-1) respectively. Further, continuous production of biomass with concomitant lipid accumulation was demonstrated via continuous feeding of BG11 media supplemented with lipid inducers sodium acetate and sodium chloride. The improved biomass and lipid productivity in chemostat was found to be 2.81 and 1.27gL(-1)day(-1) respectively operated at a dilution rate of 0.54day(-1).

  11. Linear growth rates of types I and II convective modes within the rotating-cone boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, S. J.

    2010-04-01

    Experimental observations have shown that the transition characteristics of the boundary-layer flow over rotating cones depends on the cone half-angle. In particular, pairs of counter-rotating Görtler-type vortices are observed over cones with slender half-angles and co-rotating vortices are observed over broad cones. Garrett et al (2009 J. Fluid Mech. 622 209-32) have hypothesized the existence of a centrifugal instability mode over slender cones that is more dangerous than the types I (crossflow) and II (streamline curvature) modes which dominate over rotating disks and broad cones. Work is currently underway to clarify this alternative mode; however, a clear understanding of the growth rates of types I and II modes is crucial to the ultimate understanding of how the dominant mode changes with half-angle. In this paper, we demonstrate that the maximum growth rate for types I and II modes decreases with reduced half-angle, which clears the way for the dominance of the alternative instability mode. Furthermore, it is suggested that vortices travelling at 75% of the cone surface speed will be selected over smooth, clean rotating cones with half-angle such that the type I mode is dominant. Interestingly, this vortex speed has been experimentally observed by Kobayashi and Arai within the rotating-sphere boundary layer.

  12. Molecular mechanisms for the evolution of bacterial morphologies and growth modes.

    PubMed

    Randich, Amelia M; Brun, Yves V

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria exhibit a rich diversity of morphologies. Within this diversity, there is a uniformity of shape for each species that is replicated faithfully each generation, suggesting that bacterial shape is as selectable as any other biochemical adaptation. We describe the spatiotemporal mechanisms that target peptidoglycan synthesis to different subcellular zones to generate the rod-shape of model organisms Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. We then demonstrate, using the related genera Caulobacter and Asticcacaulis as examples, how the modularity of the core components of the peptidoglycan synthesis machinery permits repositioning of the machinery to achieve different growth modes and morphologies. Finally, we highlight cases in which the mechanisms that underlie morphological evolution are beginning to be understood, and how they depend upon the expansion and diversification of the core components of the peptidoglycan synthesis machinery.

  13. Non-linear mode coupling and the growth of perturbations in ΛCDM

    SciTech Connect

    Enqvist, Kari; Rigopoulos, Gerasimos E-mail: gerasimos.rigopoulos@helsinki.fi

    2011-03-01

    Cosmic structures at small non-linear scales k > L ∼ 0.2h Mpc{sup −1} have an impact on the longer (quasi-)linear wavelengths with k < L via non-linear UV-IR mode coupling. We evaluate this effect for a ΛCDM universe applying the effective fluid method of Baumann, Nicolis, Senatore and Zaldarriaga. For k < L the ΛCDM growth function for the density contrast is found to receive a scale dependent correction and an effective anisotropic stress sources a shift between the two gravitational potentials, setting φ−ψ≠0. Since such a situation is generically considered as a signature of modified gravity and/or dark energy, these effects should be taken into account before any conclusions on the dark sector are drawn from the interpretation of future observations.

  14. Non-linear mode coupling and the growth of perturbations in ΛCDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enqvist, Kari; Rigopoulos, Gerasimos

    2011-03-01

    Cosmic structures at small non-linear scales k > L ~ 0.2h Mpc-1 have an impact on the longer (quasi-)linear wavelengths with k < L via non-linear UV-IR mode coupling. We evaluate this effect for a ΛCDM universe applying the effective fluid method of Baumann, Nicolis, Senatore and Zaldarriaga. For k < L the ΛCDM growth function for the density contrast is found to receive a scale dependent correction and an effective anisotropic stress sources a shift between the two gravitational potentials, setting phi-ψ≠0. Since such a situation is generically considered as a signature of modified gravity and/or dark energy, these effects should be taken into account before any conclusions on the dark sector are drawn from the interpretation of future observations.

  15. Molecular mechanisms for the evolution of bacterial morphologies and growth modes

    PubMed Central

    Randich, Amelia M.; Brun, Yves V.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria exhibit a rich diversity of morphologies. Within this diversity, there is a uniformity of shape for each species that is replicated faithfully each generation, suggesting that bacterial shape is as selectable as any other biochemical adaptation. We describe the spatiotemporal mechanisms that target peptidoglycan synthesis to different subcellular zones to generate the rod-shape of model organisms Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. We then demonstrate, using the related genera Caulobacter and Asticcacaulis as examples, how the modularity of the core components of the peptidoglycan synthesis machinery permits repositioning of the machinery to achieve different growth modes and morphologies. Finally, we highlight cases in which the mechanisms that underlie morphological evolution are beginning to be understood, and how they depend upon the expansion and diversification of the core components of the peptidoglycan synthesis machinery. PMID:26106381

  16. Initial Results from Fitting p-Modes Using Intensity Observations from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzennik, Sylvain G.

    2017-09-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager project recently started processing the continuum-intensity images following global helioseismology procedures similar to those used to process the velocity images. The spatial decomposition of these images has produced time series of spherical harmonic coefficients for degrees up to ℓ=300, using a different apodization than the one used for velocity observations. The first 360 days of observations were processed and are made available. I present initial results from fitting these time series using my fitting method and compare the derived mode characteristics to those estimated using coeval velocity observations.

  17. Experimental and Computational Investigation of Biofilm Formation by Rhodopseudomonas palustris Growth under Two Metabolic Modes

    PubMed Central

    Kernan, Chase; Chow, Philicia P.; Christianson, Rebecca J.; Huang, Jean

    2015-01-01

    We examined biofilms formed by the metabolically versatile bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris grown via different metabolic modes. R. palustris was grown in flow cell chambers with identical medium conditions either in the presence or absence of light and oxygen. In the absence of oxygen and the presence of light, R. palustris grew and formed biofilms photoheterotrophically, and in the presence of oxygen and the absence of light, R. palustris grew and formed biofilms heterotrophically. We used confocal laser scanning microscopy and image analysis software to quantitatively analyze and compare R. palustris biofilm formation over time in these two metabolic modes. We describe quantifiable differences in structure between the biofilms formed by the bacterium grown heterotrophically and those grown photoheterotrophically. We developed a computational model to explore ways in which biotic and abiotic parameters could drive the observed biofilm architectures, as well as a random-forest machine-learning algorithm based on structural differences that was able to identify growth conditions from the confocal imaging of the biofilms with 87% accuracy. Insight into the structure of phototrophic biofilms and conditions that influence biofilm formation is relevant for understanding the generation of biofilm structures with different properties, and for optimizing applications with phototrophic bacteria growing in the biofilm state. PMID:26087200

  18. Surface structures and growth mode for the {Cu}/{Si(110)} surfaces depending on heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, T.; Kawashima, Y.; Itoh, H.; Ichinokawa, T.

    1995-11-01

    The surface structures and growth mode for the {Cu}/{Si(110)} surfaces depending on Cu segregation by heat treatment have been studied with low energy electron diffraction (LEED), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), isothermal desorption spectroscopy (ITDS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). At room temperature, Cu was intermixed with Si and no defined interface structure was observed at coverages higher than 2 ML. However, the growth mode of the {Cu}/{Si(110)} surface above 400°C is the Stranski-Krastanov type and a part of Cu atoms deposited on the surface diffuse into the bulk above 400°C in addition to the island formation on the surface. The Cu atoms diffusing into the bulk are segregated to the surface by quenching and the segregated Cu atoms form several new structures depending on quenching temperature and annealing time. The 2 × 1, 4 × 5, 4 × 3, and 6 × 6 structures were found by LEED in the ranges of {Cu}/{Si} Auger ratios, 0.01-0.04, 0.04-0.06, 0.06-0.1, and 0.1-0.2, respectively. There are one to one correspondences between surface structures and surface Cu concentrations. The islands nucleated on the surface at Cu 10 ML above 800°C are rectangular with a composition of Cu3Si. The segregation of Cu to the surface by quenching and the trapping of Cu to islands by annealing are discussed with comparing to those of the {Cu}/{Si(100)} surfaces.

  19. Preliminary results on the simultaneous excitation of the TM_010 and TE_011 MODES in a single cell niobium cavity

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ciovati; P. Kneisel

    2005-05-01

    Simultaneous excitation of both modes has been carried out on a CEBAF single cell cavity. The cavity has two beam pipe side-ports for each mode for input and pick-up couplers. Coupling to the TE011 mode is done by magnetic loop couplers while for the TM010 mode coaxial antennas are used. Simultaneous excitation of both TM and TE modes has been proposed recently for superconducting photoinjector applications to take advantage of the accelerating electric field of the TM mode, combined with the focusing magnetic field of the TE mode. The TE011 mode has the property of having zero surface electric field, surface magnetic field orthogonal to the one in the TM010 mode and concentrated in the iris/wall regions of the cavity. The presence of both modes in the cavity at the same time can also be used to investigate the so-called high field Q-drop in the TM010 mode. This paper will present some preliminary result on the test of the single cell cavity at 2 K.

  20. 45-Day safety screening results for tank 241-U-102, push mode cores 143 and 144

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, F.H.

    1996-06-28

    This document is the 45-day report deliverable for tank 241-U-102 push mode core segments collected between April 16, 1996 and May 6, 1996 and received by the 222-S Laboratory between April 17, 1996 and May 8, 1996. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance, with the Tank 241-U-102 Push Mode Core Sampling and analysis Plan (TSAP) (Hu, 1996) and the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995). The analytical results are included in Table 1. Attachment I is a cross reference to relate the tank farm identification numbers to the 222-S Laboratory LabCore sample numbers. The subsamples generated in the laboratory for analysis are identified in these diagrams with their sources shown. The diagram identifying the hydrostatic head fluid (HHF) blank is also included, Primary safety screening results and the raw data from Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) analyses are included in this report. Two of the samples submitted for DSC analysis exceeded notification limits as stated in the Safety Screening DQO (Dukelow, et al., 1995). Cyanide analysis was requested on these samples and a Reactive System Screening Tool analysis was requested for the sample exhibiting the highest exothenn in accordance with the TSAP (Hu, 1996). The results for these analyses will be reported in a revision to this document.

  1. Statistical results describing the bandwidth and coherence coefficient of whistler mode waves using THEMIS waveform data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; Angelopoulos, V.; Lu, Q.; Tao, X.; Wang, S.

    2014-11-01

    The bandwidths and coherence coefficients of lower band whistler mode waves are analyzed using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) waveform data for rising tones, falling tones, and hiss-like emissions separately. We also evaluate their dependences on the spatial location, electron density, the ratio of plasma frequency to local electron gyrofrequency (fpe/fce), and the wave amplitude. Our results show that the bandwidth normalized by the local electron gyrofrequency (fce) of rising and falling tones is very narrow (~0.01 fce), smaller than that of the hiss-like emissions (~0.025 fce). Meanwhile, the normalized bandwidth of discrete emissions gradually decreases with increasing wave amplitude, whereas that of hiss-like emissions increases slowly. The coherence coefficient of rising and falling tones is extremely large (~1), while the coherence coefficient of hiss-like emissions is smaller but is still larger than 0.5. For all categories of whistler mode waves, the normalized bandwidth increases at larger L shells. Furthermore, the normalized bandwidth is positively correlated with local fpe/fce but is inversely correlated with the electron density. Interactions between radiation belt electrons and whistler mode waves have been widely described by quasi-linear diffusion theory. Our results suggest that although quasi-linear theory is not entirely applicable for modeling electron interactions with rising and falling tones due to their narrow bandwidth and high coherence coefficient, it is suitable to treat wave-particle interactions between electrons and low-amplitude hiss-like emissions. Moreover, the correlations between the normalized bandwidth of chorus waves (especially the discrete emissions) and other parameters may provide insights for the generation mechanism of chorus waves.

  2. Kinetic growth mode of epitaxial GaAs on Si(001) micro-pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamaschini, Roberto; Bietti, Sergio; Castellano, Andrea; Frigeri, Cesare; Falub, Claudiu V.; Scaccabarozzi, Andrea; Bollani, Monica; von Känel, Hans; Miglio, Leo; Sanguinetti, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional, epitaxial GaAs crystals are fabricated on micro-pillars patterned into Si(001) substrates by exploiting kinetically controlled growth conditions in Molecular Beam Epitaxy. The evolution of crystal morphology during growth is assessed by considering samples with increasing GaAs deposit thickness. Experimental results are interpreted by a kinetic growth model, which takes into account the fundamental aspects of the growth and mutual deposition flux shielding between neighboring crystals. Different substrate pattern geometries with dissimilar lateral sizes and periodicities of the Si micro-pillars are considered and self-similar crystal structures are recognized. It is demonstrated that the top faceting of the GaAs crystals is tunable, which can pave the way to locally engineer compound semiconductor quantum structures on Si(001) substrates.

  3. [Methods for extraction of exopolymeric complex in plankton and biofilm growth mode of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia 22M].

    PubMed

    Boretskaia, M A; Suslova, O S

    2013-01-01

    The optimal methods for the extraction of exopolymeric complex (EPS) of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia 22M was determined. That EPS was synthesized in plankton and biofilm growth mode on the mild steel surface. It is desirable to use different physical and chemical methods for studying the EPS composition (carbohydrates and proteins) depending on the bacteria growth mode. In this way the interaction with ion exchange resin was the most effective for plankton growth mode to determine the maximum amount of carbohydrates (9.5 microg/ml), and the impact of heating to determine protein (3.9 microg/ml). For EPS biofilm in order to obtain maximum amount of carbohydrate it is desirable to use heating (30 microg/ml) and centrifugation (35 microg/ml). It is recommended to determine protein in the biofilm EPS after treatment with heating (3.75 microg/ml) and centrifugation (3.75 microg/ml).

  4. First results from negative ion beam extraction in ROBIN in surface mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Kaushal; Gahlaut, Agrajit; Yadav, Ratnakar K.; Bhuyan, Manas; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak; Das, B. K.; Bharathi, P.; Vupugalla, Mahesh; Parmar, K. G.; Tyagi, Himanshu; Patel, Kartik; Bhagora, Jignesh; Mistri, Hiren; Prajapati, Bhavesh; Pandey, Ravi; Chakraborty, Arun. K.

    2017-08-01

    ROBIN, the first step in the Indian R&D program on negative ion beams has reached an important milestone, with the production of negative ions in the surface conversion mode through Cesium (Cs) vapor injection into the source. In the present set-up, negative hydrogen ion beam extraction is effected through an extraction area of ˜73.38 cm2 (146 apertures of 8mm diameter). The three grid electrostatic accelerator system of ROBIN is fed by high voltage DC power supplies (Extraction Power Supply System: 11kV, 35A and Acceleration Power Supply System: 35kV, 15A). Though, a considerable reduction of co-extracted electron current is usually observed during surface mode operation, in order to increase the negative ion current, various other parameters such as plasma grid temperature, plasma grid bias, extraction to acceleration voltage ratio, impurity control and Cs recycling need to be optimized. In the present experiments, to control and to understand the impurity behavior, a Cryopump (14,000 l/s for Hydrogen) is installed along with a Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA). To characterize the source plasma, two sets of Langmuir probes are inserted through the diagnostic flange ports available at the extraction plane. To characterize the beam properties, thermal differential calorimeter, Doppler Shift Spectroscopy and electrical current measurements are implemented in ROBIN. In the present set up, all the negative ion beam extraction experiments have been performed by varying different experimental parameters e.g. RF power (30-70 kW), source operational pressure (0.3 - 0.6Pa), plasma grid bias voltage, extraction & acceleration voltage combination etc. The experiments in surface mode operation is resulted a reduction of co-extracted electron current having electron to ion ratio (e/i) ˜2 whereas the extracted negative ion current density was increased. However, further increase in negative ion current density is expected to be improved after a systematic optimization of the

  5. Effects of Trophic Modes, Carbon Sources, and Salinity on the Cell Growth and Lipid Accumulation of Tropic Ocean Oilgae Strain Desmodesmus sp. WC08.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenyu; Ma, Shasha; Li, Ang; Liu, Pinghuai; Wang, Meng

    2016-10-01

    The effects of trophic modes, carbon sources, and salinity on the growth and lipid accumulation of a marine oilgae Desmodesmus sp. WC08 in different trophic cultures were assayed by single factor experiment based on the blue-green algae medium (BG-11). The results implied that biomass and lipid accumulation culture process were optimized depending on the tophic modes, sorts, and concentration of carbon sources and salinity in the cultivation. There was no significant difference in growth or lipid accumulation with Na2CO3 amendment or NaHCO3 amendment. However, Na2CO3 amendment did enhance the biomass and lipid accumulation to some extent. The highest Desmodesmus sp. WC08 biomass and lipid accumulation was achieved in the growth medium with photoautotrophic cultivation, 0.08 g L(-1) Na2CO3 amendment and 15 g L(-1) sea salt, respectively.

  6. Real-time Implementation of a Dual-Mode Ultrasound Array System: In Vivo Results

    PubMed Central

    Casper, Andrew J.; Liu, Dalong; Ballard, John R.; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2013-01-01

    A real-time dual-mode ultrasound array (DMUA) system for imaging and therapy is described. The system utilizes a concave (40-mm radius of curvature) 3.5 MHz, 32 element array and modular multi-channel transmitter/receiver. It is capable of operating in a variety of imaging and therapy modes (on transmit) and continuous receive on all array elements even during high-power operation. A signal chain consisting of field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA) and graphical processing units (GPU) is used to enable real-time, software-defined beamforming and image formation. Imaging data, from quality assurance phantoms as well as in vivo small and large animal models, are presented and discussed. Corresponding images obtained using a temporally-synchronized and spatially-aligned diagnostic probe confirm the DMUA’s ability to form anatomically-correct images with sufficient contrast in an extended field of view (FOV) around its geometric center. In addition, high frame rate DMUA data also demonstrate the feasibility of detection and localization of echo changes indicative of cavitation and/or tissue boiling during HIFU exposures with 45 – 50 dB dynamic range. The results also show that the axial and lateral resolution of the DMUA are consistent with its fnumber and bandwidth with well behaved speckle cell characteristics. These results point the way to a theranostic DMUA system capable of quantitative imaging of tissue property changes with high specificity to lesion formation using focused ultrasound. PMID:23708766

  7. Magnetorotational Instability: Nonmodal Growth and the Relationship of Global Modes to the Shearing Box

    SciTech Connect

    J Squire, A Bhattacharjee

    2014-07-01

    We study the magnetorotational instability (MRI) (Balbus & Hawley 1998) using non-modal stability techniques.Despite the spectral instability of many forms of the MRI, this proves to be a natural method of analysis that is well-suited to deal with the non-self-adjoint nature of the linear MRI equations. We find that the fastest growing linear MRI structures on both local and global domains can look very diff erent to the eigenmodes, invariably resembling waves shearing with the background flow (shear waves). In addition, such structures can grow many times faster than the least stable eigenmode over long time periods, and be localized in a completely di fferent region of space. These ideas lead – for both axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric modes – to a natural connection between the global MRI and the local shearing box approximation. By illustrating that the fastest growing global structure is well described by the ordinary diff erential equations (ODEs) governing a single shear wave, we find that the shearing box is a very sensible approximation for the linear MRI, contrary to many previous claims. Since the shear wave ODEs are most naturally understood using non-modal analysis techniques, we conclude by analyzing local MRI growth over finite time-scales using these methods. The strong growth over a wide range of wave-numbers suggests that non-modal linear physics could be of fundamental importance in MRI turbulence (Squire & Bhattacharjee 2014).

  8. Comprehensive protocol of traceability during IVF: the result of a multicentre failure mode and effect analysis.

    PubMed

    Rienzi, L; Bariani, F; Dalla Zorza, M; Albani, E; Benini, F; Chamayou, S; Minasi, M G; Parmegiani, L; Restelli, L; Vizziello, G; Costa, A Nanni

    2017-08-01

    Can traceability of gametes and embryos be ensured during IVF? The use of a simple and comprehensive traceability system that includes the most susceptible phases during the IVF process minimizes the risk of mismatches. Mismatches in IVF are very rare but unfortunately possible with dramatic consequences for both patients and health care professionals. Traceability is thus a fundamental aspect of the treatment. A clear process of patient and cell identification involving witnessing protocols has to be in place in every unit. To identify potential failures in the traceability process and to develop strategies to mitigate the risk of mismatches, previously failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) has been used effectively. The FMEA approach is however a subjective analysis, strictly related to specific protocols and thus the results are not always widely applicable. To reduce subjectivity and to obtain a widespread comprehensive protocol of traceability, a multicentre centrally coordinated FMEA was performed. Seven representative Italian centres (three public and four private) were selected. The study had a duration of 21 months (from April 2015 to December 2016) and was centrally coordinated by a team of experts: a risk analysis specialist, an expert embryologist and a specialist in human factor. Principal investigators of each centre were first instructed about proactive risk assessment and FMEA methodology. A multidisciplinary team to perform the FMEA analysis was then formed in each centre. After mapping the traceability process, each team identified the possible causes of mistakes in their protocol. A risk priority number (RPN) for each identified potential failure mode was calculated. The results of the FMEA analyses were centrally investigated and consistent corrective measures suggested. The teams performed new FMEA analyses after the recommended implementations. In each centre, this study involved: the laboratory director, the Quality Control & Quality

  9. THE MODE OF ACTION OF ANTIBIOTICS IN STIMULATING GROWTH OF CHICKS

    PubMed Central

    Eyssen, H.; de Somer, P.

    1963-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of antibiotics on growth of chicks and on intestinal absorption of fats and carbohydrates. Around the 8th day of life, chicks fed an antibiotic-free casein-sucrose diet developed a transitory syndrome of malabsorption of fats and carbohydrates, associated with disturbance of the efficiency of feed utilization and poor weight increase. Administration of virginiamycin, at a level of 20 ppm, suppressed this period of malabsorption and resulted in improved feed conversion and increased weight gain. The temporary growth depression and malabsorption were not observed in disinfected rooms in new quarters. Under these conditions virginiamycin did not stimulate growth nor was the efficiency of feed utilization improved by the antibiotic. However, the growth-depressing flora could be introduced to the new quarters by feeding each bird 50 mg of fresh feces collected from chicks in old quarters. Both the intestinal absorption and the growth-promoting effect of virginiamycin were influenced by the type of carbohydrate in the basal diet, and have been found to be most pronounced when sucrose was fed as the sole source of carbohydrate. The malabsorption was less obvious when cornstarch was substituted for sucrose. In this case virginiamycin had only a limited effect on growth and on feed conversion. The present investigations suggest that antibiotics stimulate growth of chicks by their antibacterial action against Gram-positive microorganisms which interfere with the absorption of nutrients. Furthermore, the growth-promoting effect seems to be most pronounced during a limited period of a few days around the 8th day of life. PMID:19867220

  10. Characteristic fault zone architectures as result of different failure modes: first results from scale models of normal faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettermann, Michael; Urai, Janos L.

    2014-05-01

    It is known that fault zone architecture and structural style vary distinctly between tensile and shear failure modes, with strong effects on the associated fluid flow properties. A systematically comparative study in 3D has not been done so far, though. Inferring transport properties in sub-seismic scale from fault network geometries would have important applications in brittle lithologies such as carbonates or basalts. We present a method to investigate the structural properties of fault networks in 3D using cohesive hemihydrate powder (CaSO4 * 1/2H2O) embedded in two layers of dry fine grained sand. The material properties of the sand and powder are well known from previous studies. By increasing the overburden stress the failure mode of the powder can be changed from tensile to shear failure. Using hemihydrate powder allows us to harden and excavate the layer after the deformation by wetting the model slowly and brushing off the overburden sand. Visual investigation of the 3D structures is then possible in very high resolution. Analyses using photographs and 3D models from photogrammetry include qualitative observations as well as measurements of e.g. strike of fault segments, fault dip or graben width. We show a total of eight experiments that produce graben faults at four different overburden stresses (0, 1.5, 3, 6 cm overburden thickness) and at two increasing stages of strain (3 and 5 mm). In this set of models we describe two structural domains that show characteristic differences in their defining attributes. The tensile domain at small overburden stress (0 and 1.5 cm overburden) shows strongly dilatant faults with open fissures, vertical faults and large changes in strike at segment boundaries. The shear domain, formed by larger overburden stress (6 cm overburden), shows shallower fault dips around 65° with striations, numerous undulating fault branches and splays with low-angle fault intersections. Models with 3 cm overburden show a hybrid failure type

  11. Results of ASTM round robin testing for mode 1 interlaminar fracture toughness of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin; Martin, Roderick H.

    1992-01-01

    The results are summarized of several interlaboratory 'round robin' test programs for measuring the mode 1 interlaminar fracture toughness of advanced fiber reinforced composite materials. Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) tests were conducted by participants in ASTM committee D30 on High Modulus Fibers and their Composites and by representatives of the European Group on Fracture (EGF) and the Japanese Industrial Standards Group (JIS). DCB tests were performed on three AS4 carbon fiber reinforced composite materials: AS4/3501-6 with a brittle epoxy matrix; AS4/BP907 with a tough epoxy matrix; and AS4/PEEK with a tough thermoplastic matrix. Difficulties encountered in manufacturing panels, as well as conducting the tests are discussed. Critical issues that developed during the course of the testing are highlighted. Results of the round robin testing used to determine the precision of the ASTM DCB test standard are summarized.

  12. 45-day safety screen results for tank 241-U-204, push mode, cores 81 and 82

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, K.E.

    1995-05-17

    This is the 45-Day report for the fiscal year 1995 tank 241-U-204 (U-204) push-mode characterization effort. Included are a summary of analytical results and copies of the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) scans. Core samples 81 and 82 from tank U-204, obtained by the push-mode core sampling method, were received by the 222-S Laboratories. Each core consisted of only one segment. Both core samples and the field blank were extruded, subsampled, and analyzed in accordance with Reference 1. Drainable liquids and the field blank were analyzed at the segment level for energetics by DSC, percent water by TGA, and total organic carbon (TOC) by furnace oxidation. In addition, the presence or absence of any separable, presumably organic, layer in drainable liquid samples was noted and none was observed. The solids were analyzed directly at the half segment level for energetics by DSC, percent water by TGA, and TOC by persulfate oxidation. Total alpha activity was determined on fusion digestions of the sludge subsamples. No immediate notifications were necessary on samples from cores 81 or 82.

  13. Electronic states and growth modes of Zn atoms deposited on Cu(111) studied by XPS, UPS and DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koitaya, Takanori; Shiozawa, Yuichiro; Yoshikura, Yuki; Mukai, Kozo; Yoshimoto, Shinya; Torii, Siro; Muttaqien, Fahdzi; Hamamoto, Yuji; Inagaki, Kouji; Morikawa, Yoshitada; Yoshinobu, Jun

    2017-09-01

    Electronic states and growth modes of the Zn-deposited Cu(111) surface at 300 K were quantitatively studied using core-level and valence photoelectron spectroscopies. Both Cu 2p and Zn 2p core-levels shifted to higher binding energy with increasing the amount of deposited Zn up to multilayer. The origin of the core-level shift of Cu 2p was further investigated by density functional theory calculations; the shift of the Cu 2p peak results from the change in the effective electrostatic potential (initial state effect) caused by the formation of Zn-Cu surface alloy, and the increase of coordination numbers of surface Cu atoms by Zn overlayer. The observed valence photoelectron spectra show the formation of the two atomic-layer Zn-Cu alloy up to the Zn coverage of 1 ML, followed by the formation of three-dimensional Zn islands on the alloyed surface at 300 K.

  14. Nonlinear Spring Finite Elements for Predicting Mode I-Dominated Delamination Growth in Laminated Structure with Through-Thickness reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; Krueger, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    One particular concern of polymer matrix composite laminates is the relatively low resistance to delamination cracking, in particular when the dominant type of failure is mode I opening. One method proposed for alleviating this problem involves the insertion pultruded carbon pins through the laminate thickness. The pins, known as z-pins, are inserted into the prepreg laminate using an ultrasonic hammer prior to the curing process, resulting in a field of pins embedded normal to the laminate plane as illustrated in Figure. 1. Pin diameters range between 0.28-mm to 0.5-mm and standard areal densities range from 0.5% to 4%. The z-pins are provided by the manufacturer, Aztex(Registered TradeMark) , in a low-density foam preform, which acts to stabilize orientation of the pins during the insertion process [1-3]. Typical pin materials include boron and carbon fibers embedded in a polymer matrix. A number of methods have been developed for predicting delamination growth in laminates reinforced with z-pins. During a study on the effect of z-pin reinforcement on mode I delamination resistance, finite element analyses of z-pin reinforced double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens were performed by Cartie and Partridge [4]. The z-pin bridging stresses were modeled by applying equivalent forces at the pin locations. Single z-pin pull-out tests were performed to characterize the traction law of the pins under mode I loading conditions. Analytical solutions for delamination growth in z-pin reinforced DCB specimens were independently derived by Robinson and Das [5] and Ratcliffe and O'Brien [6]. In the former case, pin bridging stresses were modeled using a distributed load and in the latter example the bridging stresses were discretely modeled by way of grounded springs. Additionally, Robinson and Das developed a data reduction strategy for calculating mode I fracture toughness, G(sub Ic), from a z-pin reinforced DCB specimen test [5]. In both cases a traction law similar to that

  15. Evaluation of Delamination Growth Characterization Methods Under Mode I Fatigue Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen B.

    2012-01-01

    Reliable delamination characterization data for laminated composites are needed for input to analytical models of structures to predict delamination. The double-cantilevered beam (DCB) specimen is used with laminated composites to measure fracture toughness, G(sub Ic), delamination onset strain energy release rate, and growth rate data under cyclic loading. In the current study, DCB specimens of IM7/8552 graphite/epoxy supplied by two different manufacturers were tested in static and fatigue to compare the measured characterization data from the two sources, and to evaluate a proposed ASTM standard for generating Paris Law equations. Static results were used to generate compliance calibration constants for the fatigue data, and a delamination resistance curve, G(sub IR), which was used to determine the effects of fiber-bridging on delamination growth. Specimens were tested in fatigue at a cyclic G(sub Imax) level equal to 50, 40 or 30% of G(sub Ic), to determine a delamination onset curve and delamination growth rate. The delamination onset curve equations had similar exponents and the same trends. Delamination growth rate was calculated by fitting a Paris Law to the da/dN versus G(sub Imax) data. Both a 2-point and a 7-point data reduction method were used and the Paris Law equations were compared. To determine the effects of fiber-bridging, growth rate results were normalized by the delamination resistance curve for each material and compared to the non-normalized results. Paris Law exponents were found to decrease by 31% to 37% due to normalizing the growth data. Normalizing the data also greatly reduced the amount of scatter between the different specimens. Visual data records from the fatigue testing were used to calculate individual compliance calibration constants from the fatigue data for some of the specimens. The resulting da/dN versus G(sub Imax) plots showed much improved repeatability between specimens. Gretchen

  16. Island growth in the atomic layer deposition of zirconium oxide and aluminum oxide on hydrogen-terminated silicon: Growth mode modeling and transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puurunen, Riikka L.; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Besling, Wim F. A.; Richard, Olivier; Bender, Hugo; Conard, Thierry; Zhao, Chao; Delabie, Annelies; Caymax, Matty; De Gendt, Stefan; Heyns, Marc; Viitanen, Minna M.; de Ridder, Marco; Brongersma, Hidde H.; Tamminga, Yde; Dao, Thuy; de Win, Toon; Verheijen, Marcel; Kaiser, Monja; Tuominen, Marko

    2004-11-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is used in applications where inorganic material layers with uniform thickness down to the nanometer range are required. For such thicknesses, the growth mode, defining how the material is arranged on the surface during the growth, is of critical importance. In this work, the growth mode of the zirconium tetrachloride/water and the trimethyl aluminum/water ALD process on hydrogen-terminated silicon was investigated by combining information on the total amount of material deposited with information on the surface fraction of the material. The total amount of material deposited was measured by Rutherford backscattering, x-ray fluorescence, and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy, and the surface fractions by low-energy ion scattering. Growth mode modeling was made assuming two-dimensional growth or random deposition (RD), with a "shower model" of RD recently developed for ALD. Experimental surface fractions of the ALD-grown zirconium oxide and aluminum oxide films were lower than the surface fractions calculated assuming RD, suggesting the occurrence of island growth. Island growth was confirmed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements, from which the island size and number of islands per unit surface area could also be estimated. The conclusion of island growth for the aluminum oxide deposition on hydrogen-terminated silicon contradicts earlier observations. In this work, physical aluminum oxide islands were observed in TEM after 15 ALD reaction cycles. Earlier, thicker aluminum oxide layers have been analyzed, where islands have not been observed because they have already coalesced to form a continuous film. The unreactivity of hydrogen-terminated silicon surface towards the ALD reactants, except for reactive defect areas, is proposed as the origin of island growth. Consequently, island growth can be regarded as "undesired surface-selective ALD."

  17. Planck intermediate results. XLI. A map of lensing-induced B-modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Harrison, D. L.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-12-01

    The secondary cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-modes stem from the post-decoupling distortion of the polarization E-modes due to the gravitational lensing effect of large-scale structures. These lensing-induced B-modes constitute both a valuable probe of the dark matter distribution and an important contaminant for the extraction of the primary CMB B-modes from inflation. Planck provides accurate nearly all-sky measurements of both the polarization E-modes and the integrated mass distribution via the reconstruction of the CMB lensing potential. By combining these two data products, we have produced an all-sky template map of the lensing-induced B-modes using a real-space algorithm that minimizes the impact of sky masks. The cross-correlation of this template with an observed (primordial and secondary) B-mode map can be used to measure the lensing B-mode power spectrum at multipoles up to 2000. In particular, when cross-correlating with the B-mode contribution directly derived from the Planck polarization maps, we obtain lensing-induced B-mode power spectrum measurement at a significance level of 12σ, which agrees with the theoretical expectation derived from the Planck best-fit Λ cold dark matter model. This unique nearly all-sky secondary B-mode template, which includes the lensing-induced information from intermediate to small (10 ≲ ℓ ≲ 1000) angular scales, is delivered as part of the Planck 2015 public data release. It will be particularly useful for experiments searching for primordial B-modes, such as BICEP2/Keck Array or LiteBIRD, since it will enable an estimate to be made of the lensing-induced contribution to the measured total CMB B-modes.

  18. Planck intermediate results: XLI. A map of lensing-induced B-modes

    DOE PAGES

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; ...

    2016-12-12

    The secondary cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-modes stem from the post-decoupling distortion of the polarization E-modes due to the gravitational lensing effect of large-scale structures. These lensing-induced B-modes constitute both a valuable probe of the dark matter distribution and an important contaminant for the extraction of the primary CMB B-modes from inflation. Planck provides accurate nearly all-sky measurements of both the polarization E-modes and the integrated mass distribution via the reconstruction of the CMB lensing potential. By combining these two data products, we have produced in this paper an all-sky template map of the lensing-induced B-modes using a real-space algorithmmore » that minimizes the impact of sky masks. The cross-correlation of this template with an observed (primordial and secondary) B-mode map can be used to measure the lensing B-mode power spectrum at multipoles up to 2000. In particular, when cross-correlating with the B-mode contribution directly derived from the Planck polarization maps, we obtain lensing-induced B-mode power spectrum measurement at a significance level of 12σ, which agrees with the theoretical expectation derived from the Planck best-fit Λ cold dark matter model. This unique nearly all-sky secondary B-mode template, which includes the lensing-induced information from intermediate to small (10 ≲ ℓ ≲ 1000) angular scales, is delivered as part of the Planck 2015 public data release. Finally, it will be particularly useful for experiments searching for primordial B-modes, such as BICEP2/Keck Array or LiteBIRD, since it will enable an estimate to be made of the lensing-induced contribution to the measured total CMB B-modes.« less

  19. Subsurface growth mode of cobalt and nickel suicides at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Li; Smith, G. A.; Hashimoto, S.; Gibson, W. M.

    1991-06-01

    Ion channeling and Auger electron spectroscopy were used to investigate the initial growth of cobalt and nickel disilicide on boron stabilized Si(111)√3 × √3-B surfaces at room temperature. The results show that Co and Ni interact initially at subsurface sites and then the reaction proceeds toward the surface forming a barrier to further interaction.

  20. Mode of Action of Polyamine Analogues on the Growth and Biochemistry of Leishmanial Cells.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-15

    At least two of these compounds,namely MGBG ( methylglyoxal bis-(guanylhydrazone) and sinefungin gave promising results (18,19). In addition, known...K.P., Steiger, R.F., Dave, C., Cheng, Y.-C.: Effect of methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) on tryponosomatid flagellates: Tnhibition of growth and

  1. Uptake and intracellular transport of the connective tissue growth factor: a potential mode of action.

    PubMed Central

    Wahab, N A; Brinkman, H; Mason, R M

    2001-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a secreted cysteine-rich protein now considered as an important effector molecule in both physiological and pathological processes. An increasing amount of evidence indicates that CTGF plays a key role in the pathogenesis of different fibrotic disorders including diabetic nephropathy. However, the molecular mechanisms by which CTGF exerts its effects are not known. Here we provide the first evidence for the existence of an intracellular transport pathway for the growth factor in human mesangial cells. Our results demonstrate that CTGF is internalized from the cell surface in endosomes and accumulates in a juxtanuclear organelle from which the growth factor is then translocated into the cytosol. In the cytosol CTGF is phosphorylated by protein kinase C and PMA treatment can enhance this phosphorylation. Phosphorylated CTGF may have an important role in the cytosol, but it is also translocated into the nucleus where it may directly affect transcription. PMID:11563972

  2. An approach to the damping of local modes of oscillations resulting from large hydraulic transients

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrijevic, D.M.; Jankovic, M.V.

    1999-09-01

    A new method of damping of local modes of oscillations under large disturbance is presented in this paper. The digital governor controller is used. Controller operates in real time to improve the generating unit transients through the guide vane position and the runner blade position. The developed digital governor controller, whose control signals are adjusted using the on-line measurements, offers better damping effects for the generator oscillations under large disturbances than the conventional controller. Digital simulations of hydroelectric power plant equipped with low-head Kaplan turbine are performed and the comparisons between the digital governor control and the conventional governor control are presented. Simulation results show that the new controller offers better performances, than the conventional controller, when the system is subjected to large disturbances.

  3. Comparison of sulfur measurements from a regional fine particle network with concurrent acid modes network results

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, R.L.; Stockburger, L.; Barnes, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    The Fine Particle Network (FPN), a system of fine particle (less than 2.5 micrometers) samplers, was operated at 41 sites selected from the Enviromental Protection Agency Acid MODES program during the two year period in 1988-90. The 24-hour sample results included fine particle mass and the most predominant chemical element concentrations determined by wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis. Statistical summaries of the fine mass and sulfur concentrations by site and season were prepared. The availability of simultaneous particulate sulfate measurements from independent collection and analytical procedures provided an opportunity to examine their agreement and provide a more reliable data base for evaluation of regional particulate models and estimation of contribution to urban aerosol concentration.

  4. Evaluation of Delamination Onset and Growth Characterization Methods under Mode I Fatigue Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen B.

    2013-01-01

    Double-cantilevered beam specimens of IM7/8552 graphite/epoxy from two different manufacturers were tested in static and fatigue to compare the material characterization data and to evaluate a proposed ASTM standard for generating Paris Law equations for delamination growth. Static results were used to generate compliance calibration constants for reducing the fatigue data, and a delamination resistance curve, GIR, for each material. Specimens were tested in fatigue at different initial cyclic GImax levels to determine a delamination onset curve and the delamination growth rate. The delamination onset curve equations were similar for the two sources. Delamination growth rate was calculated by plotting da/dN versus GImax on a log-log scale and fitting a Paris Law. Two different data reduction methods were used to calculate da/dN. To determine the effects of fiber-bridging, growth results were normalized by the delamination resistance curves. Paris Law exponents decreased by 31% to 37% after normalizing the data. Visual data records from the fatigue tests were used to calculate individual compliance constants from the fatigue data. The resulting da/dN versus GImax plots showed improved repeatability for each source, compared to using averaged static data. The Paris Law expressions for the two sources showed the closest agreement using the individually fit compliance data.

  5. First results from a laboratory hypertelescope using single-mode fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patru, F.; Mourard, D.; Clausse, J.-M.; Delage, L.; Reynaud, F.; Dubreuil, M.; Bonneau, D.; Bosio, S.; Bresson, Y.; Hugues, Y.; Lardière, O.; Roussel, A.

    2008-01-01

    Context: In the future, giant optical interferometric arrays will be developed with kilometric baselines and a large number of telescopes. Such arrays could have direct imaging capabilities if optimized beam combiners are used. Aims: This paper aims at studying the performance of an interferometric beam combiner using single mode fibers and in the frame of a hypertelescope. Methods: A laboratory testbed called SIRIUS was developed. We describe the general concept, the technical specifications and the results obtained. These results are analyzed with the help of a numerical simulator. Results: Direct images were obtained at the densified focus of SIRIUS. We show that the fibers greatly ease the pupil rearrangement. They also greatly improve the quality and the stability of the direct image. The computed images allow us to reproduce the effects of differential photometry and the influence of optical path difference variations. Optical path difference errors less than λ/10 and differential photometries less than 60% are required to keep the quality of the direct image. Conclusions: These results demonstrate the great potential of direct imaging interferometric beam combiners for future optical large arrays. The excellent comparison between experience and simulation clearly shows the simplicity of the fibered pupil densifier. It also gives us a great confidence in the extrapolation of these results and specifications for future arrays with a very large number of apertures.

  6. Prosocial Growth during College: Results of a National Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandenberger, Jay W.; Bowman, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Ethical growth and prosocial development are increasingly salient learning outcomes in higher education. Previous research has shown that the traditional college years facilitate moral development, especially with respect to moral reasoning. This research examined the impact of college experiences on students' sense of active responsibility for…

  7. Prosocial Growth during College: Results of a National Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandenberger, Jay W.; Bowman, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Ethical growth and prosocial development are increasingly salient learning outcomes in higher education. Previous research has shown that the traditional college years facilitate moral development, especially with respect to moral reasoning. This research examined the impact of college experiences on students' sense of active responsibility for…

  8. Growth Model Comparison Study: A Summary of Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auty, Bill; Brockmann, Frank

    2012-01-01

    School accountability is subject to considerable scrutiny. It generates sharp political debate, policy challenges, and continuous discussion. Growth models are now a part of that discussion. To many practitioners the sheer volume of "important to know" information is daunting. The members of the Technical Issues in Large Scale Assessment…

  9. Parental feeding control in relation to feeding mode and growth pattern during early infancy.

    PubMed

    Timby, Niklas; Hernell, Olle; Lönnerdal, Bo; Domellöf, Magnus

    2014-10-01

    A high level of parental control of feeding and disturbed energy self-regulation has previously been suggested as a mechanism for the accelerated growth observed in formula-fed compared with breast-fed infants. This study explored factors associated with parental control of feeding in a population of formula-fed infants with high levels of self-regulation. We included 141 formula-fed and 72 breast-fed infants from a randomised controlled trial, who were prospectively followed from under 2 months of age to 12 months of age. Anthropometry was recorded at baseline, 4, 6 and 12 months of age. Parental feeding control was assessed using a Child Feeding Questionnaire at 4 and 12 months. The formula-fed groups fully compensated for different energy and protein densities by regulating their volume intakes. Parents of formula-fed infants had a lower pressure to eat score at 12 months than parents of breast-fed infants. A high parental restrictive score at 12 months was associated with weight at 12 months and high parental pressure to eat score at 12 months with body mass index at 12 months. Neither were associated with feeding mode. Formula-fed infants had a high level of energy self-regulation and were subjected to low parental control. Parental control of feeding was mainly influenced by infant growth. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Growth and smolting in lower-mode Atlantic Salmon stocked into the Penobscot River, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zydlewski, Joseph; O'Malley, Andrew; Cox, Oliver; Ruksznis, Peter; Trial, Joan G.

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of Atlantic Salmon Salmo salar in Maine has relied on hatchery-produced fry and smolts for critical stocking strategies. Stocking fry minimizes domestication selection, but these fish have poor survival. Conversely, stocked smolts have little freshwater experience but provide higher adult returns. Lower-mode (LM) fish, those not growing fast enough to ensure smolting by the time of stocking, are a by-product of the smolt program and are an intermediate hatchery product. From 2002 to 2009, between 70,000 and 170,000 marked LM Atlantic Salmon were stocked into the Pleasant River (a tributary in the Penobscot River drainage, Maine) in late September to early October. These fish were recaptured as actively migrating smolts (screw trapping), as nonmigrants (electrofishing), and as returning adults to the Penobscot River (Veazie Dam trap). Fork length (FL) was measured and a scale sample was taken to retrospectively estimate FL at winter annulus one (FW1) using the intercept-corrected direct proportion model. The LM fish were observed to migrate as age-1, age-2, and infrequently as age-3 smolts. Those migrating as age-1 smolts had a distinctly larger estimated FL at FW1 (>112 mm) than those that remained in the river for at least one additional year. At the time of migration, age-2 and age-3 smolts were substantially larger than age-1 smolts. Returning adult Atlantic Salmon of LM origin had estimated FLs at FW1 that corresponded to smolt age (greater FL for age 1 than age 2). The LM product produces both age-1 and age-2 smolts that have greater freshwater experience than hatchery smolts and may have growth and fitness advantages. The data from this study will allow managers to better assess the probability of smolting age and manipulate hatchery growth rates to produce a targeted-size LM product.

  11. Simulation results of few-mode signal propagation over graded multimode optical fibers with periodical slowly varying core diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdine, Anton V.

    2008-12-01

    Simulation results of few-mode signal propagation over silica graded multimode optical fibers with periodical slowly varying core diameter, excited by laser source, are represented. Weakly-guiding irregular multimode fibers with axialsymmetric graded index profile under central defect, local fluctuations and single outer cladding are considered. It is supposed, the core diameter varies slowly along fiber length according to sine function. The period of sine function is more then 106 times greater then fiber core diameter. Solution is based on proposed time domain model of piece-wise regular multimode fiber link under few-mode signal propagation under laser source exciting. Model takes into account differential mode delay, higher-order mode chromatic dispersion, mode mixing and power diffusion. Some results of pulse dynamics calculation during propagation over described fiber with periodical slowly varying core diameter are represented.

  12. Influence of supersaturation and spontaneous catalyst formation on the growth of PbS wires: toward a unified understanding of growth modes.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Patricia L; Sun, Minghua; Ning, Cun-Zheng

    2011-11-22

    High quality stoichiometric lead sulfide (PbS) wires were synthesized by a simple chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process using pure PbS powder as the material source. Growth mechanisms were systematically investigated under various growth conditions, with three modes of growth identified: direct vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) wire growth nucleating from the substrate surface, bulk PbS crystallites by vapor-solid (VS) deposition, and subsequent VLS growth nucleating on top of the bulk deposition through spontaneously formed catalyst particles. Furthermore, we found that these growth modes can be organized in terms of different levels of supersaturation, with VS bulk deposition dominating at high supersaturation and VLS wire growth on the substrate dominating at low supersaturation. At intermediate supersaturation, the bulk VS deposition can form larger crystallites with domains of similarly oriented wires extending from the flat facets. Both predeposited catalysts and spontaneously formed Pb particles were observed as nucleation catalysts, and their interplay leads to various interesting growth scenarios such as reversely tapered growth with increasing diameter. The VLS growth mechanism was confirmed by the presence of Pb-rich caps revealed in an elaborate cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiment after focused ion beam milling in a modified lift-out procedure. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) of PbS wires was performed in the mid-infrared wavelength range for the first time, demonstrating strong light emission from band edge, blue-shifted with increasing temperature. The high optical quality of PbS wires may lead to important applications in mid-infrared photonics. The substrate growth temperature as low as 400 °C allows for silicon-compatible processing for integrated optoelectronics applications. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  13. One-step growth of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} stem-branch featured nanostructures: Morphology control by VS and VLS mode

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qiushi; Gao Wei; Shan Lianchen; Zhang Jian; Jin Yunxia; Cong Ridong; Cui Qiliang

    2011-09-15

    We report here one-step synthesis of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanodendrites by selectively applying a vapor-solid (VS) and vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) strategy via direct current arc discharge method. The resultant nanodendrites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The spine-shaped nanodendrites were generated by a noncatalytic growth following a VS mode. The uniform secondary nanowire branches were epitaxial grown from two side surfaces of the nanowire stems. The pine-shaped nanodendrites were obtained through a catalytic growth in a VLS process. These branch nanowires were unsystematically grown from the nanocone-like stems. The photoluminescence spectra of the nanodendrites show a strong white light emission around 400-750 nm, suggesting their potential applications in light and electron emission devices. - Graphical abstract: Spine-shaped and pine-shaped Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} hierarchical nanostructures were synthesized by VS and VLS mode with plasma-assisted dc arc discharge method. Highlights: > Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} stem-branch featured nanostructures have been prepared. > Spine-shaped nanodendrites were generated by a noncatalytic growth following a VS mode. > Pine-shaped nanodendrites were obtained through a catalytic growth in a VLS process.

  14. Steady-state crack growth in single crystals under Mode I loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juul, K. J.; Nielsen, K. L.; Niordson, C. F.

    The active plastic zone that surrounds the tip of a sharp crack growing under plane strain Mode I loading conditions at a constant velocity in a single crystal is studied. Both the characteristics of the plastic zone and its effect on the macroscopic toughness is investigated in terms of crack tip shielding due to plasticity (quantified by employing the Suo, Shih, and Varias set-up). Three single crystals (FCC, BCC, HCP) are modelled in a steady-state elastic visco-plastic framework, with emphasis on the influence of rate-sensitivity and crystal structures. Distinct velocity discontinuities at the crack tip predicted by Rice [Rice J.R., 1987. Tensile crack tip fields in elastic-ideally plastic crystals. Mech. Mater. 6, pp. 317-335] for quasi-static crack growth are confirmed through the numerical simulations and highly refined details are revealed. Through a detailed study, it is demonstrated that the largest shielding effect develops in HCP crystals, while the lowest shielding exists for FCC crystals. Rate-sensitivity is found to affect the plastic zone size, but the characteristics overall remain similar for each individual crystal structure. An increasing rate-sensitivity at low crack velocities monotonically increases the crack tip shielding, whereas the opposite behaviour is observed at high velocities. This observation leads to the existence of a characteristic velocity at which the crack tip shielding becomes independent of the rate-sensitivity.

  15. Enhanced acoustic mode coupling resulting from an internal solitary wave approaching the shelfbreak in the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Linus Y S; Reeder, D Benjamin; Chang, Yuan-Ying; Chen, Chi-Fang; Chiu, Ching-Sang; Lynch, James F

    2013-03-01

    Internal waves and bathymetric variation create time- and space-dependent alterations in the ocean acoustic waveguide, and cause subsequent coupling of acoustic energy between propagating normal modes. In this paper, the criterion for adiabatic invariance is extended to the case of an internal solitary wave (ISW) encountering a sloping bathymetry (i.e., continental shelfbreak). Predictions based on the extended criterion for adiabatic invariance are compared to experimental observations from the Asian Seas International Acoustics Experiment. Using a mode 1 starter field, results demonstrate time-dependent coupling of mode 1 energy to higher adjacent modes, followed by abrupt coupling of mode 5-7 energy to nonadjacent modes 8-20, produces enhanced mode coupling and higher received levels downrange of the oceanographic and bathymetric features. Numerical simulations demonstrate that increasing ISW amplitude and seafloor slope enhance the coupling of energy to adjacent and nonadjacent modes. This enhanced coupling is the direct result of the simultaneous influence of the ISW and its proximity to the shelfbreak, and, compared to the individual effect of the ISW or shelfbreak, has the capacity to scatter 2-4 times the amount of acoustic energy from below the thermocline into the upper water column beyond the shelfbreak in realistic environments.

  16. Mode-locked laser realized by selective area growth for short pulse generation and optical clock recovery in TDM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Eugen; Baums, Dieter; Bouayad-Amine, Jamal; Hache, Claudia; Haisch, Hansjorg; Kuhn, Edgar; Satzke, Klaus; Schilling, Michael; Weber, Juergen; Zielinski, Erich

    1996-04-01

    We report on monolithically integrated active/passive coupled cavity mode locked lasers for 1.55 micrometer realized by selective area growth technology of InGaAs(P) quantum wells. Mode locked FP or DBR lasers are fabricated with an integrated cavity comprising up to three different band gaps. The devices emit short light pulses at around 10 GHz repetition rate with pulse width down to 8.7 ps. A time-bandwidth product of 0.5 is achieved for mode locked DBR lasers. Active/passive integrated mode locked laser is used for generation of optical 10 GHz clock signal from optical 10 Gb/s PRBS RZ data stream injected into the laser cavity.

  17. Analysis of the Numerical and Geometrical Parameters Influencing the Simulation of Mode I and Mode II Delamination Growth in Unidirectional and Textile Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, S.; De Baere, I.; Van Paepegem, W.

    2015-12-01

    The reliability of composite structures depends, among other damage mechanisms, on their ability to withstand delaminations. In order to have a better understanding of the cohesive zone method technique for delamination simulations, a complete analysis of the multiple parameters influencing the results is necessary. In this paper the work is concentrated on the cohesive zone method using cohesive elements. First a summary of the theory of the cohesive zone method is given. A numerical investigation on the multiple parameters influencing the numerical simulation of the mode I and mode II delamination tests has been performed. The parameters such as the stabilization method, the output frequency, the friction and the computational efficiency have been taken into account. The results will be compared to an analytical solution obtained by linear elastic fracture mechanics. Additionally the numerical simulation results will be compared to the experimental results of a glass-fibre reinforced composite material for the mode I Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) and to a carbon fibre 5-harness satin weave reinforced polyphenylene sulphide composite for the mode I DCB and mode II End Notched Flexure (ENF).

  18. Simulation of optical diagnostics for crystal growth: models and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banish, Michele R.; Clark, Rodney L.; Kathman, Alan D.; Lawson, Shelah M.

    1991-12-01

    A computer simulation of a two-color holographic interferometric (TCHI) optical system was performed using a physical (wave) optics model. This model accurately simulates propagation through time-varying, 2-D or 3-D concentration and temperature fields as a wave phenomenon. The model calculates wavefront deformations that can be used to generate fringe patterns. This simulation modeled a proposed TriGlycine sulphate TGS flight experiment by propagating through the simplified onion-like refractive index distribution of the growing crystal and calculating the recorded wavefront deformation. The phase of this wavefront was used to generate sample interferograms that map index of refraction variation. Two such fringe patterns, generated at different wavelengths, were used to extract the original temperature and concentration field characteristics within the growth chamber. This proves feasibility for this TCHI crystal growth diagnostic technique. This simulation provides feedback to the experimental design process.

  19. Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus: epidemiology, mode of presentation, pathogenesis and growth.

    PubMed

    Soliman, A T; elZalabany, M M; Bappal, B; alSalmi, I; de Silva, V; Asfour, M

    1999-01-01

    Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNIDDM) is a rare form of IDDM with unclear etiology and pathogenesis. We determined the incidence and prevalence rates and studied the clinical and biochemical features of PNIDDM in the Sultanate of Oman. The mean incidence rate during the study period from January 1989 to December 1994 was 1.788 +/- 0.82 per 100,000 live births per year. At the end of December 1994 the prevalence rate was 2.4 per 100,000 children below the age of 5 years. They constituted 41.6% of all cases of IDDM in this age group. Diarrhoea, fever, lethargy, poor feeding and failure to thrive were the most common presenting symptoms. Dehydration and tachypnoea were the most common signs. All patients who developed IDDM during the neonatal period had intrauterine growth retardation and 4.5 presented with diabetic ketoacidosis (plasma glucose 37 +/- 9 mmol/L, pH 7.12 +/- 0.1). Hypertriglyceridemia was a constant feature (19.4 +/- 4.8 mmol/L). They were products of consanguineous marriage with significantly high prevalence of IDDM and NIDDM in their family members. None of the infants had clinical or immunological evidence of congenital viral infection. Three of the five children had HLA-DR2, the diabetes resistance alleles. C-peptide secretion was absent during and after metabolic control of hyperglycemia in all the studied infants and none had circulating islet cell antibody at presentation or during the first year after diagnosis. Despite marked growth retardation at birth, there was a significant improvement of growth after initiating insulin therapy. Four of the 5 patients had normal developmental milestones, one had mild developmental delay following a severe and prolonged attack of hypoglycemia. None of the patients had exocrine pancreatic deficiency. In summary, the very high rate of parental consanguinity, occurrence in both sexes and in two siblings in the same family, absence of islet cell antibodies and the presence of HLA-DR2 loci in 3/5 of

  20. Dynamical stationarity as a result of sustained random growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biró, Tamás S.; Néda, Zoltán

    2017-03-01

    In sustained growth with random dynamics stationary distributions can exist without detailed balance. This suggests thermodynamical behavior in fast-growing complex systems. In order to model such phenomena we apply both a discrete and a continuous master equation. The derivation of elementary rates from known stationary distributions is a generalization of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. Entropic distance evolution is given for such systems. We reconstruct distributions obtained for growing networks, particle production, scientific citations, and income distribution.

  1. Rate-dependent mode I interlaminar crack growth mechanisms in graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, J. W., Jr.; Carlsson, L. A.; Smiley, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the mode I fracture behavior of graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK composites is examined over four decades of crosshead rates (0.25-250 mm/min). Straight-sided double-cantilever-beam specimens consisting of unidirectional laminates were tested at room temperature. For graphite/epoxy the load-deflection response was linear to fracture, and stable slow crack growth initiating at the highest load level was observed for all rates tested. In contrast, mode I crack growth in the graphite/PEEK material was often unstable and showed stick-slip behavior. Subcritical crack growth occurring prior to the onset of fracture was observed at intermediate displacement rates. A mechanism for the fracture behavior of the graphite/PEEK material (based on viscoelastic, plastic, and microcrack coalescence in the process zone) is proposed and related to the observed rate-dependent phenomena.

  2. Mechanism of selective area growth of GaN nanorods by pulsed mode metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yen-Ting; Yeh, Ting-Wei; Dapkus, P. Daniel

    2012-10-23

    The growth mechanism for the formation of GaN nanorods using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) selective area growth by pulsed source injection is proposed. The pulsed mode procedure and the kinetic model are discussed and experiments performed to support the model are described. The achievement of rod shape nanostructures grown by the pulsed mode can be attributed to two mechanisms: (1) the differences in the adsorption/desorption behavior of Ga adatoms on the c-plane (0001) and the boundary m-planes $\\{ 1\\bar {1}0 0\\} $, and (2) the growth behavior of the semi-polar planes (especially the semi-polar $\\{ 1\\bar {1}0 1\\} $ plane).

  3. Existence of fermion zero modes and deconfinement of spinons in quantum antiferromagnetism resulting from algebraic spin liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ki-Seok

    2005-12-01

    We investigate the quantum antiferromagnetism arising from algebraic spin liquid via spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking. We claim that in the antiferromagnet massive Dirac spinons can appear to make a broad continuum spectrum at high energies in inelastic neutron scattering. The mechanism of spinon deconfinement results from the existence of fermion zero modes in single monopole potentials. Neel vectors can make a hedgehog configuration around a magnetic monopole of compact U(1) gauge fields. Remarkably, in the monopole composite potential the Dirac fermion is shown to have a zero mode. The emergence of the fermion zero mode forbids the condensation of monopoles, resulting in deconfinement of Dirac spinons in the quantum antiferromagnet.

  4. First results from a laboratory hypertelescope with single-mode fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patru, F.; Mourard, D.; Clausse, J. M.; Delage, L.; Reynaud, F.; Dubreuil, M.; Bonneau, D.; Bosio, S.; Bresson, Y.; Hugues, Y.; Lardière, O.; Roussel, A.

    2007-07-01

    In the future, giant optical interferometric arrays will be developed with kilometric baselines and a large number of telescopes. Such arrays could have direct imaging capabilities if optimized beam combiners are used. This paper aims at studying the performances of an interferometric beam combiner using single mode fibers and the hypertelescope principle. A laboratory testbed called SIRIUS has been developed. We present here the results obtained and analyzed with the help of a numerical simulator. Direct images have been obtained at the densified focus of SIRIUS. It is shown that the fibers improve the quality and the stability of the direct image. The computed images allow to reproduce the effects of differential photometry and the influence of optical path difference (OPD) variations. OPD's errors less than λ/10 and differential photometries less than 60% are required to keep the quality of the direct image. The excellent comparison between experience and simulation clearly shows the simplicity of the fibered pupil densifier. It also gives us a great confidence in the extrapolation of these results and specifications for future arrays with a very large number of apertures.

  5. A Novel Method for Characterizing Fatigue Delamination Growth Under Mode I Using the Double Cantilever Beam Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carvalho, Nelson; Murri, G.

    2014-01-01

    A novel method is proposed to obtain Mode I delamination growth rate from a Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimen. In the proposed method, Unidirectional (UD) DCB specimens are tested in fatigue at different initial maximum energy release rates levels. The growth rate data obtained in the first increments of crack growth at each maximum energy release rate level are used to generate a Paris Law equation, which characterizes delamination growth rate without fiber-bridging, and can also be used to determine a delamination onset curve. The remaining delamination growth rate data from each test are used to determine a modified Paris law, which characterizes the delamination growth rate in a DCB specimen, explicitly accounting for fiber-bridging. The proposed expression captures well the scatter in experimental data obtained using the DCB specimens, suggesting its adequacy. The Paris Law characterizing delamination growth rate without fiber-bridging predicts higher delamination growth rates for the same maximum energy release rate applied, leading to a conservative estimate for delamination growth. This is particularly relevant, since in generic ply interfaces, fiber-bridging is less predominant than in UD DCB specimens. Failing to account for fiber-bridging in UD DCB specimens may underestimate the delamination growth rate, yielding non-conservative predictions.

  6. Growth of compaction bands: A new deformation mode for porous rock

    SciTech Connect

    OLSSON,WILLIAM A.; HOLCOMB,DAVID J.

    2000-03-14

    Compaction bands are thin, tabular zones of grain breakage and reduced porosity that are found in sandstones. These structures may form due to tectonic stresses or as a result of local stresses induced during production of fluids from wells, resulting in barriers to fluid (oil, gas, water) movement in sandstone reservoirs. To gain insight into the formation of compaction bands the authors have produced them in the laboratory. Acoustic emission locations were used to define and track the thickness of compaction bands throughout the stress history during axisymmetric compression experiments. Narrow zones of intense acoustic emission, demarcating the boundaries between the uncompacted and compacted regions were found to develop. Unexpectedly, these boundaries moved at velocities related to the fractional porosity reduction across the boundary and to the imposed specimen compression stress. This appears to be a previously unrecognized, fundamental mode of deformation of a porous, granular material subjected to compressive loading with significant implications for the production of hydrocarbons.

  7. Superlinear growth of Rayleigh scattering-induced intensity noise in single-mode fibers.

    PubMed

    Cahill, James P; Okusaga, Olukayode; Zhou, Weimin; Menyuk, Curtis R; Carter, Gary M

    2015-03-09

    Rayleigh scattering generates intensity noise close to an optical carrier that propagates in a single-mode optical fiber. This noise degrades the performance of optoelectronic oscillators and RF-photonic links. When using a broad linewidth laser, we previously found that the intensity noise power scales linearly with optical power and fiber length, which is consistent with guided entropy mode Rayleigh scattering (GEMRS), a third order nonlinear scattering process, in the spontaneous limit. In this work, we show that this behavior changes significantly with the use of a narrow linewidth laser. Using a narrow linewidth laser, we measured the bandwidth of the intensity noise plateau to be 10 kHz. We found that the scattered noise power scales superlinearly with fiber length up to lengths of 10 km in the frequency range of 500 Hz to 10 kHz, while it scales linearly in the frequency range of 10 Hz to 100 Hz. These results suggest that the Rayleigh-scattering-induced intensity noise cannot be explained by third-order nonlinear scattering in the spontaneous limit, as previously hypothesized.

  8. Growth performance, innate immune responses and disease resistance of fingerling blunt snout bream, Megalobrama amblycephala adapted to different berberine-dietary feeding modes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei-Na; Chen, Dan-Hong; Chen, Qing-Qing; Liu, Wen-Bin

    2017-09-01

    A 8-week feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of different berberine-dietary feeding modes on growth, non-specific immune responses and disease resistance of blunt snout bream, Megalobrama amblycephala. Fish (average initial weight 4.70 ± 0.02 g) were fed two fat levels (5% and 10%) diets in three berberine-feeding modes (supplementing 50 mg/kg berberine continuously, two-week or four-week intervals) with four replicates, respectively. Then, fish were challenged by Aeromonas hydrophila and mortality was recorded for the next 96 h after feeding trial. The results showed that different feeding modes of berberine significantly influenced growth, innate immunity and antioxidant capability of fish. Fish fed normal diet with 50 mg/kg berberine at two-week interval mode reflected remarkably (P < 0.05) high weight gain (WG). Plasma TC and TG contents were significantly (P < 0.05) decreased. The lysozyme (LYZ) activities, complement component 3 (C3) and complement component 4 (C4) concentrations were significantly (P < 0.05) increased. Fish not only exhibited relatively low hepatopancreas malondialdehyde (MDA) and lipid peroxide (LPO) contents, but also significantly (P < 0.05) improved superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities. Fish mortality after challenged by Aeromonas hydrophila was decreased. Same results were also presented in fish fed high-fat diet with 50 mg/kg berberine at two-week, four-week intervals or continuous feeding modes. Based on fish healthy improvement and feeding cost saving, blunt snout bream fed normal diet with 50 mg/kg berberine at two-week interval or fed high-fat diet with berberine at two-week or four-week intervals were optimal feeding mode, respectively. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. 60-day safety screen results for tank 241-BY-106, rotary mode, cores 64 and 65

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, K.E.

    1995-05-01

    Core samples 64 and 65 from tank BY-106, obtained by rotary-mode core sampling, were received by the 222-S Laboratories. Differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis were carried out.

  10. The LXD-mode Main-Belt/NEO Observing Program (LMNOP): Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivkin, A.; Howell, E.; Emery, J.

    2014-07-01

    The spectral region beyond 2.5 μ m is rich with spectral features due to OH, water, and organic materials. For many low-albedo objects, it hosts the only detectable absorption bands. For this reason, astronomical observations of asteroids at these wavelengths are critical to understanding their nature, even though such observations can be difficult due to the Earth's atmosphere [1]. Since 2002, we have been obtaining data in the 2--4 μ m region using the SpeX instrument on the IRTF in ''LXD mode'' [2]. While not originally designed as a survey, we call the collection of individual projects that we have completed over the years the ''LXD-mode Main- belt/NEO Observing Program'' (LMNOP). At the time of the upgrade of the SpeX instrument earlier in 2014, 390 observations of 210 different asteroids have been observed in the LMNOP. We have focused on C-complex asteroids (53 % of targets), but the survey also includes significant numbers of targets in the X complex (24 %) and S complex (11 %). The SpeX upgrade, with an associated break in observing and a need to change the reduction pipeline for future data, marks a convenient time to mark the end of this phase of the LMNOP. The data collected has already been used to determine the surface compositional variation on Ceres [3-4], Lutetia [5], and Vesta [6], and to discover water ice frost on the surface of Themis [7]. Analysis is now moving forward into studies of compositional variation on Pallas and Hygiea, among other objects. The data is also being analyzed to study the links between the Ch-class asteroids and the CM meteorites, and to calculate the amount of water/OH implied by the asteroid spectra. We will present results from the LMNOP dataset, including in-depth studies of individual objects, interpretations of taxonomic groups, and the beginnings of a taxonomic system in the 3-μ m range itself.

  11. First results from the TUS orbital detector in the extensive air shower mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrenov, B. A.; Klimov, P. A.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Sharakin, S. A.; Tkachev, L. G.; Zotov, M. Yu.; Biktemerova, S. V.; Botvinko, A. A.; Chirskaya, N. P.; Eremeev, V. E.; Garipov, G. K.; Grebenyuk, V. M.; Grinyuk, A. A.; Jeong, S.; Kalmykov, N. N.; Kim, M.; Lavrova, M. V.; Lee, J.; Martinez, O.; Park, I. H.; Petrov, V. L.; Ponce, E.; Puchkov, A. E.; Salazar, H.; Saprykin, O. A.; Senkovsky, A. N.; Shirokov, A. V.; Tkachenko, A. V.; Yashin, I. V.

    2017-09-01

    TUS (Tracking Ultraviolet Set-up), the first orbital detector of extreme energy cosmic rays (EECRs), those with energies above 50 EeV, was launched into orbit on April 28, 2016, as a part of the Lomonosov satellite scientific payload. The main aim of the mission is to test a technique of registering fluorescent and Cherenkov radiation of extensive air showers generated by EECRs in the atmosphere with a space telescope. We present preliminary results of its operation in a mode dedicated to registering extensive air showers in the period from August 16, 2016, to November 4, 2016. No EECRs have been conclusively identified in the data yet, but the diversity of ultraviolet emission in the atmosphere was found to be unexpectedly rich. We discuss typical examples of data obtained with TUS and their possible origin. The data is important for obtaining more accurate estimates of the nocturnal ultraviolet glow of the atmosphere, necessary for successful development of more advanced orbital EECR detectors including those of the KLYPVE (K-EUSO) and JEM-EUSO missions.

  12. Two-Dimensional Visualization of Growth and Burst of the Edge-Localized Filaments in KSTAR H-Mode Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Choi, M. J.; Lee, J.; Park, H. K.; Tobias, B.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Donné, A. J. H.; Lee, J. H.

    2011-07-01

    The filamentary nature and dynamics of edge-localized modes (ELMs) in the KSTAR high-confinement mode plasmas have been visualized in 2D via electron cyclotron emission imaging. The ELM filaments rotating with a net poloidal velocity are observed to evolve in three distinctive stages: initial linear growth, interim quasisteady state, and final crash. The crash is initiated by a narrow fingerlike perturbation growing radially from a poloidally elongated filament. The filament bursts through this finger, leading to fast and collective heat convection from the edge region into the scrape-off layer, i.e., ELM crash.

  13. Electrostatic modes in dense dusty plasmas with high fugacity: Numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, N. N.

    2000-08-01

    The existence of ultra low-frequency wave modes in dusty plasmas has been investigated over a wide range of dust fugacity [defined by f≡4πnd0λD2R, where nd0 is the dust number density, λD is the plasma Debye length, and R is the grain size (radius)] and the grain charging frequency (ω1) by numerically solving the dispersion relation obtained from the kinetic (Vlasov) theory. A detailed comparison between the numerical and the analytical results applicable for the tenuous (low fugacity, f≪1), the dilute (medium fugacity, f˜1), and the dense (high fugacity, f≫1) regimes has been carried out. In the long wavelength limit and for frequencies ω≪ω1, the dispersion curves obtained from the numerical solutions of the real as well as the complex (kinetic) dispersion relations agree, both qualitatively and quantitatively, with the analytical expressions derived from the fluid and the kinetic theories, and are thus identified with the ultra low-frequency electrostatic dust modes, namely, the dust-acoustic wave (DAW), the dust charge-density wave (DCDW) and the dust-Coulomb wave (DCW) discussed earlier [N. N. Rao, Phys. Plasmas 6, 4414 (1999); 7, 795 (2000)]. In particular, the analytical scaling between the phase speeds of the DCWs and the DAWs predicted from theoretical considerations, namely, (ω/k)DCW=(ω/k)DAW/√fδ (where δ is the ratio of the charging frequencies) is in excellent agreement with the numerical results. A simple physical picture of the DCWs has been proposed by defining an effective pressure called "Coulomb pressure" as PC≡nd0qd02/R, where qd0 is the grain surface charge. Accordingly, the DCW dispersion relation is given, in the lowest order, by (ω/k)DCW=√PC/ρdδ , where ρd≡nd0md is the dust mass density. Thus, the DCWs which are driven by the Coulomb pressure can be considered as the electrostatic analogue of the hydromagnetic (Alfvén or magnetoacoustic) waves which are driven by the magnetic field pressure. For the frequency

  14. Effects of adhesion layer on Ag nanorod growth mode and morphology using glancing angle physical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Matthew P.; McKinney, Casey S.; Serrano, Joel M.; Mullen, Thomas J.; Stagon, Stephen P.

    2017-01-01

    This letter reports on the transition from a non-wetting to an effectively wetting growth mode of silver (Ag) nanorods when an adhesion layer is used during glancing angle physical vapor deposition growth. When deposited onto a silicon substrate without an adhesion layer, Ag nanorods grow from partially interconnected non-wetting islands with diameters of ˜100 nm, although many connect with their neighbors due to small rod-to-rod spacing. When a 1 nm thick Cr adhesion layer is used, which is shown not to completely coat the substrate, the growth mode becomes effectively wetting through the coalescence of closely spaced nuclei, and both Ag nanorod diameter and spacing increase. Alternatively, when a thicker 10 nm Cr adhesion layer is used, the growth mode becomes mixed, as both small effective wetting regions and film gaps exist. For the cases of no adhesion layer and 1 nm Cr adhesion layer, the nanorods are oriented at ˜23° from the substrate but lay down onto the substrate when a 10 nm thick Cr adhesion layer is used. Thin film adhesion tests demonstrate that both 1 nm and 10 nm Cr adhesion layers offer an enhanced performance over no adhesion layer or a glancing angle adhesion layer.

  15. A Numerical Study of 2-D Surface Roughness Effects on the Growth of Wave Modes in Hypersonic Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Kahei Danny

    The current understanding and research efforts on surface roughness effects in hypersonic boundary-layer flows focus, almost exclusively, on how roughness elements trip a hypersonic boundary layer to turbulence. However, there were a few reports in the literature suggesting that roughness elements in hypersonic boundary-layer flows could sometimes suppress the transition process and delay the formation of turbulent flow. These reports were not common and had not attracted much attention from the research community. Furthermore, the mechanisms of how the delay and stabilization happened were unknown. A recent study by Duan et al. showed that when 2-D roughness elements were placed downstream of the so-called synchronization point, the unstable second-mode wave in a hypersonic boundary layer was damped. Since the second-mode wave is typically the most dangerous and dominant unstable mode in a hypersonic boundary layer for sharp geometries at a zero angle of attack, this result has pointed to an explanation on how roughness elements delay transition in a hypersonic boundary layer. Such an understanding can potentially have significant practical applications for the development of passive flow control techniques to suppress hypersonic boundary-layer transition, for the purpose of aero-heating reduction. Nevertheless, the previous study was preliminary because only one particular flow condition with one fixed roughness parameter was considered. The study also lacked an examination on the mechanism of the damping effect of the second mode by roughness. Hence, the objective of the current research is to conduct an extensive investigation of the effects of 2-D roughness elements on the growth of instability waves in a hypersonic boundary layer. The goal is to provide a full physical picture of how and when 2-D roughness elements stabilize a hypersonic boundary layer. Rigorous parametric studies using numerical simulation, linear stability theory (LST), and parabolized

  16. Growth mode of carbide from C 2H 4 or CO on Ni( 1 1 1 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, H.; Ogawa, J.; Nakamura, J.

    2002-08-01

    The growth of carbide on a Ni(1 1 1) surface by the decomposition of C 2H 4 and the Boudouard reaction (2CO g→C a+CO 2,g) was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), Auger electron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction. STM results showed that the carbide growth by the Boudouard reaction started at step edges on Ni(1 1 1), while for the C 2H 4 decomposition the carbide was formed preferentially at terrace sites with very low concentration of carbide at the step edge. The different behavior for the carbide growth was ascribed to the difference in the dissociation sites of CO and C 2H 4. As for the Boudouard reaction, CO was dissociated at the step edge and then carbon migrated into the bulk at a reaction temperature of 500 K. The carbon was then segregated at room temperature to the surface from the bulk to form a single domain of the ( 39× 39) R16.1° structure at the step edge. On the other hand, the C 2H 4 decomposition took place on the terrace leading to an isolated carbide unit or carbide short strings on the terrace.

  17. Experimental and theoretical studies of active control of resistive wall mode growth in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, J. R.; Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J. A.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Bolzonella, T.; Manduchi, G.; Marrelli, L.; Ortolani, S.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.; Bondeson, A.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2005-07-01

    Active feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been demonstrated in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch experiment. The control system includes a sensor consisting of an array of magnetic coils (measuring mode harmonics) and an actuator consisting of a saddle coil array (producing control harmonics). Closed-loop (feedback) experiments using a digital controller based on a real time Fourier transform of sensor data have been studied for cases where the feedback gain was constant and real for all harmonics (corresponding to an intelligent-shell) and cases where the feedback gain could be set for selected harmonics, with both real and complex values (targeted harmonics). The growth of the dominant RWMs can be reduced by feedback for both the intelligent-shell and targeted-harmonic control systems. Because the number of toroidal positions of the saddle coils in the array is half the number of the sensors, it is predicted and observed experimentally that the control harmonic spectrum has sidebands. Individual unstable harmonics can be controlled with real gains. However if there are two unstable mode harmonics coupled by the sideband effect, control is much less effective with real gains. According to the theory, complex gains give better results for (slowly) rotating RWMs, and experiments support this prediction. In addition, open loop experiments have been used to observe the effects of resonant field errors applied to unstable, marginally stable and robustly stable modes. The observed effects of field errors are consistent with the thin-wall model, where mode growth is proportional to the resonant field error amplitude and the wall penetration time for that mode harmonic.

  18. Improved efficiency of a hybrid CO2 laser as a result of increased TEM00 mode filling factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Aniruddha; Nilaya, J. Padma; Biswas, Dhruba J.

    2004-12-01

    Considerable improvement in the operating efficiency of a hybrid CO2 laser has been achieved by increasing the TEM00 mode filling factor in the TEA section. The usage of helium-free gas mixture in the TEA section restricted the width of the glow discharge to the central zone in the interelectrode region allowing the oscillating TEM00 mode to experience a higher gain in the TEA section resulting in an improved performance of the laser.

  19. Evidence of critical cooling rates in the nonisothermal crystallization of triacylglycerols: a case for the existence and selection of growth modes of a lipid crystal network.

    PubMed

    Bouzidi, Laziz; Narine, Suresh S

    2010-03-16

    The isoconversional method, a model-free analysis of the kinetics of liquid-solid transformations, was used to determine the effective activation energy of the nonisothermal crystallization of melts of pure and complex systems of triacylglycerols (TAGs). The method was applied to data from differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements of the heat of crystallization of purified 1,3-dilauroyl-2-stearoyl-sn-glycerol (LSL) and commercially available cocoa butter melts. The method conclusively demonstrated the existence of specific growth modes and critical rates of cooling at specific degrees of conversion. The existence of critical rates suggests that the crystallization mechanism is composed of growth modes that can be effectively treated as mutually exclusive, each being predominant for one range of cooling rates and extent of conversion. Importantly, the data suggests that knowledge of the critical cooling rates at specific rates of conversion can be exploited to select preferred growth modes for lipid networks, with concomitant benefits of structural organization and resultant physical functionality. Differences in transport phenomena induced by different cooling rates suggest the existence of thresholds for particular growth mechanisms and help to explain the overall complexity of lipid crystallization. The results of this model-free analysis may be attributed to the relative importance of nucleation and growth at different stages of crystallization. A mechanistic explanation based on the competing effects of the thermodynamic driving force and limiting heat and transport phenomena is provided to explain the observed behavior. This work, furthermore, offers satisfactory explanations for the noted effect of cooling-rate-induced changes in the physical functionality of lipid networks.

  20. Influence of modes of metal transfer on grain structure and direction of grain growth in low nickel austenitic stainless steel weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Manidipto; Saha, Saptarshi; Pal, Tapan Kumar; Kanjilal, Prasanta

    2015-04-15

    The present study elaborately discussed the effect of different modes of metal transfer (i.e., short circuit mode, spray mode and pulse mode) on grain structure and direction of grain growth in low nickel austenitic stainless steel weld metals. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis was used to study the grain growth direction and grain structure in weld metals. The changes in grain structure and grain growth direction were found to be essentially varied with the weld pool shape and acting forces induced by modes of metal transfer at a constant welding speed. Short circuit mode of metal transfer owing to higher Marangoni force (M{sub a}) and low electromagnetic force (R{sub m}) promotes the lower weld pool volume (Γ) and higher weld pool maximum radius (r{sub m}). Short circuit mode also shows curved and tapered columnar grain structures and the grain growth preferentially occurred in <001> direction. In contrast, spray mode of metal transfer increases the Γ and reduces the r{sub m} values due to very high R{sub m} and typically reveals straight and broad columnar grain structures with preferential growth direction in <111>. In the pulse mode of metal transfer relatively high M{sub a} and R{sub m} simultaneously increase the weld pool width and the primary penetration which might encourage relatively complex grain growth directions in the weld pool and cause a shift of major intensity from <001> to <111> direction. It can also be concluded that the fusion zone grain structure and direction of grain growth are solely dependent on modes of metal transfer and remain constant for a particular mode of metal transfer irrespective of filler wire used. - Highlights: • Welded joints of LNiASS were prepared by varying modes of metal transfer. • Weld pool shape, grain structure and grain growth direction were studied. • Short circuit mode shows curved and tapered grain growth in <001> direction. • Spray mode shows straight and broad columnar grain growth

  1. Protein crystal growth results from shuttle flight 51-F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    The protein crystal growth (PCG) experiments run on 51-F were analyzed. It was found that: (1) sample stability is increased over that observed during the experiments on flight 51-D; (2) the dialysis experiments produced lysozyme crystals that were significantly larger than those obtained in our identical ground-based studies; (3) temperature fluctuations apparently caused problems during the crystallization experiments on 51-F; (4) it is indicated that teflon tape stabilizes droplets on the syringe tips; (5) samples survived during the reentry and landing in glass tips that were not stoppered with plungers; (6) from the ground-based studies, it was expected that equilibration should be complete within 2 to 4 days for all of these vapor-diffusion experiments, thus it appears that the vapor diffusion rates are somewhat slower under microgravity conditions; (7) drop tethering was highly successful, all four of the tethered drops were stable, even though they contained MPD solutions; (8) the PCG experiments on 51-F were done to assess the hardware and experimental procedures that are developed for future flights, when temperature control will be available. Lysozyme crystals obtained by microdialysis are considerably larger than those obtained on the ground, using the identical apparatus and procedures.

  2. A Failure Mode in Dense Infrared Detector Arrays Resulting in Increased Dark Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkie, Benjamin; Bellotti, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate a failure mode that arises in dense infrared focal plane detector arrays as a consequence of the interactions of neighboring pixels through the minority carrier profiles in the common absorber layer. We consider the situation in which one pixel in a hexagonal array becomes de-biased relative to its neighbors and show that the dark current in the six neighboring pixels increases exponentially as a function of the difference between the nominal and anomalous biases. Moreover, we show that the current increase in the six nearest-neighbor pixels is in total larger than that by which the current in the affected pixel decreases, causing a net increase in the dark current. The physical origins of this effect are explained as being due to increased lateral diffusion currents that arise as a consequence of breaking the symmetry of the minority carrier profiles. We then perform a parametric study to quantify the magnitude of this effect for a number of detector geometric parameters, operating temperatures, and spectral bands. Particularly, numerical simulations are carried out for short-, mid-, and long-wavelength HgCdTe infrared detectors operating between 77 K and 210 K. We show that this effect is most prevalent in architectures for which the lateral diffusion current is the largest component of the total dark current—high operating temperature devices with narrow epitaxial absorber thicknesses and pitches small compared to the diffusion length of minority carriers. These results could prove significant particularly for short- and mid-wave infrared detectors, which are typically designed to fit these conditions.

  3. Physiological state, growth mode, and oxidative stress play a role in Cd(II)-mediated inhibition of Nitrosomonas europaea 19718.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Kartik; Love, Nancy G

    2008-04-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the impact of physiological growth states (batch exponential and batch stationary growth) and growth modes (substrate-limited chemostat, substrate-sufficient exponential batch, and substrate-depleted stationary batch growth) on several measures of growth and responses to Cd(II)-mediated inhibition of Nitrosomonas europaea strain 19718. The specific oxygen uptake rate (sOUR) was the most sensitive indicator of inhibition among the different responses analyzed, including total cell abundance, membrane integrity, intracellular 16S rRNA/DNA ratio, and amoA expression. This observation remained true irrespective of the physiological state, the growth mode, or the mode of Cd(II) exposure. Based on the sOUR, a strong time-dependent exacerbation of inhibition (in terms of an inhibition coefficient [K(i)]) in exponential batch cultures was observed. Long-term inhibition levels (based on K(i) estimates) in metabolically active chemostat and exponential batch cultures were also especially severe and comparable. In contrast, the inhibition level in stationary-phase cultures was 10-fold lower and invariable with exposure time. Different strategies for surviving substrate limitation (a 10-fold increase in amoA expression) and starvation (the retention of 16S rRNA levels) in N. europaea cultures were observed. amoA expression was most negatively impacted by Cd(II) exposure in the chemostat cultures, was less impacted in exponential batch cultures, and was least impacted in stationary batch cultures. Although the amoA response was consistent with that of the sOUR, the amoA response was not as strong. The intracellular 16S rRNA/DNA ratio, as determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization, also did not uniformly correlate with the sOUR under conditions of inhibition or no inhibition. Finally, Cd(II)-mediated inhibition of N. europaea was attributed partially to oxidative stress.

  4. Waste compatibility safety issues and final results for tank 241-T-110 push mode samples

    SciTech Connect

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-05-15

    This document is the final laboratory report for Tank 241-T-110. Push mode core segments were removed from risers 2 and 6 between January 29, 1997, and February 7, 1997. Segments were received and extruded at 222-S Laboratory. Analyses were performed in accordance with Tank 241-T-110 Push Mode Core Sampling and analysis Plan (TSAP) and Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO). None of the subsamples submitted for total alpha activity (AT) or differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses exceeded the notification limits stated in DQO.

  5. Ponderomotive stabilization of flute modes in mirrors Feedback control and numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Similon, P. L.

    1987-01-01

    Ponderomotive stabilization of rigid plasma flute modes is numerically investigated by use of a variational principle, for a simple geometry, without eikonal approximation. While the near field of the studied antenna can be stabilizing, the far field has a small contribution only, because of large cancellation by quasi mode-coupling terms. The field energy for stabilization is evaluated and is a nonnegligible fraction of the plasma thermal energy. A new antenna design is proposed, and feedback stabilization is investigated. Their use drastically reduces power requirements.

  6. Growth rate and shape as possible control mechanisms for the selection of mode development in optimal biological branching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarcón, Tomás; Castillo, Jorge; García-Ponce, Berenice; Herrero, Miguel Angel; Padilla, Pablo

    2016-11-01

    Recently three branching modes were characterized during the formation of the lung in mice. These modes are highly stereotyped and correspond to domain formation, planar bifurcation and three dimensional branching respectively. At the same time it is proved that although genetic control mechanisms are presumably related to the selection of any of these modes, other external factors will most probably be involved in the branching process during development. In this paper we propose that the underlying controling factors might be related to the rate at which the tubes that form the lung network grow. We present a mathematical model that allows us to formulate specific experimental predictions on these growth rates. Moreover we show that according to this formulation, there is an optimization criterion which governs the branching process during lung development, namely, efficient local space filling properties of the network. If there is no space limitation the branches are allowed to grow freely and faster, selecting one branching mode, namely, domain formation. As soon as volume constraints appear the growth rate decreases, triggering the selection of planar and orthogonal bifurcation.

  7. Quantitative analysis of tissue deformation dynamics reveals three characteristic growth modes and globally aligned anisotropic tissue deformation during chick limb development.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Yoshihiro; Kuroiwa, Atsushi; Suzuki, Takayuki

    2015-05-01

    Tissue-level characterization of deformation dynamics is crucial for understanding organ morphogenetic mechanisms, especially the interhierarchical links among molecular activities, cellular behaviors and tissue/organ morphogenetic processes. Limb development is a well-studied topic in vertebrate organogenesis. Nevertheless, there is still little understanding of tissue-level deformation relative to molecular and cellular dynamics. This is mainly because live recording of detailed cell behaviors in whole tissues is technically difficult. To overcome this limitation, by applying a recently developed Bayesian approach, we here constructed tissue deformation maps for chick limb development with high precision, based on snapshot lineage tracing using dye injection. The precision of the constructed maps was validated with a clear statistical criterion. From the geometrical analysis of the map, we identified three characteristic tissue growth modes in the limb and showed that they are consistent with local growth factor activity and cell cycle length. In particular, we report that SHH signaling activity changes dynamically with developmental stage and strongly correlates with the dynamic shift in the tissue growth mode. We also found anisotropic tissue deformation along the proximal-distal axis. Morphogenetic simulation and experimental studies suggested that this directional tissue elongation, and not local growth, has the greatest impact on limb shaping. This result was supported by the novel finding that anisotropic tissue elongation along the proximal-distal axis occurs independently of cell proliferation. Our study marks a pivotal point for multi-scale system understanding in vertebrate development. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Results of the modal analysis of the underground mine hydraulic leg in various modes of its operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyalich, G. D.; Buyalich, К G.; Uvakin, S. V.

    2017-02-01

    The article describes the construction of models and the initial conditions for the various modes of legs operation. The article presents the way of setting the initial conditions for the initial thrust with constant pressure and for leg operation in the mode of increased pressure caused by the lowering of the roof. The results of modal analyses conducted for 2 modes of leg operation are shown. It is shown that the form and frequency of natural oscillations of hydraulic legs are determined by their design, pressures of the initial thrust and nominal operating resistance, as well as by the operating modes which differ in schemes of interaction of leg elements with interacting elements of the support and the roof and floor strata. At the same time, changing the operating mode of the legs changes the natural frequency both to the higher and to the lower side, as well as the form of oscillations of certain frequencies. For more accurate calculation of the frequency response of hydraulic legs to the external load of frequencies, it is proposed to take into account not only their design and power properties, but also the modes of their loading.

  9. Two-dimensional and M-mode assessment of aortic growth in the normal and growth-retarded (IUGR) human fetuses.

    PubMed

    Veille, J C; Sivakoff, M

    1989-01-01

    This study compares human fetal aortic dimensions in 128 normal and 30 intrauterine growth-retarded (IUGR) fetuses using two-dimensional (2D) and M-mode echocardiography. We found that the fetal aortic root in the normally grown fetuses is significantly larger than the descending aorta at all gestational ages. Furthermore, IUGR fetuses had smaller descending aortic dimensions then did normally grown fetuses. When the descending aortic dimension in the IUGR fetuses was corrected for estimated fetal weight, it was found to be of comparable size to those of the normal fetuses. The difference in aortic size of growth-retarded fetuses is proportional to growth and therefore probably a secondary phenomenon.

  10. Recent Experimental Results Related to Ejector Mode Studies of Rocket-Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, J. M.; Pal, S.; Marshall, W. M.; Santoro, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Contents include the folloving: 1. Motivation. Support NASA's 3d generation launch vehicle technology program. RBCC is promising candidate for 3d generation propulsion system. 2. Approach. Focus on ejector mode p3erformance (Mach 0-3). Perform testing on established flowpath geometry. Use conventional propulsion measurement techniques. Use advanced optical diagnostic techniques to measure local combustion gas properties. 3. Objectives. Gain physical understanding of detailing mixing and combustion phenomena. Establish an experimental data set for CFD code development and validation.

  11. Use of anomolous thermal imaging effects for multi-mode systems control during crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wargo, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    Real time image processing techniques, combined with multitasking computational capabilities are used to establish thermal imaging as a multimode sensor for systems control during crystal growth. Whereas certain regions of the high temperature scene are presently unusable for quantitative determination of temperature, the anomalous information thus obtained is found to serve as a potentially low noise source of other important systems control output. Using this approach, the light emission/reflection characteristics of the crystal, meniscus and melt system are used to infer the crystal diameter and a linear regression algorithm is employed to determine the local diameter trend. This data is utilized as input for closed loop control of crystal shape. No performance penalty in thermal imaging speed is paid for this added functionality. Approach to secondary (diameter) sensor design and systems control structure is discussed. Preliminary experimental results are presented.

  12. III-Vs at Scale: A PV Manufacturing Cost Analysis of the Thin Film Vapor-Liquid-Solid Growth Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Maxwell; Horowitz, Kelsey; Woodhouse, Michael; Battaglia, Corsin; Kapadia, Rehan; Javey, Ali

    2016-06-01

    The authors present a manufacturing cost analysis for producing thin-film indium phosphide modules by combining a novel thin-film vapor-liquid-solid (TF-VLS) growth process with a standard monolithic module platform. The example cell structure is ITO/n-TiO2/p-InP/Mo. For a benchmark scenario of 12% efficient modules, the module cost is estimated to be $0.66/W(DC) and the module cost is calculated to be around $0.36/W(DC) at a long-term potential efficiency of 24%. The manufacturing cost for the TF-VLS growth portion is estimated to be ~$23/m2, a significant reduction compared with traditional metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The analysis here suggests the TF-VLS growth mode could enable lower-cost, high-efficiency III-V photovoltaics compared with manufacturing methods used today and open up possibilities for other optoelectronic applications as well.

  13. High-resolution simulations and modeling of reshocked single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. I. Comparison to experimental data and to amplitude growth model predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Latini, M; Schilling, O; Don, W

    2006-05-15

    The reshocked single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is simulated in two spatial dimensions using the fifth- and ninth-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory shock-capturing method with uniform spatial resolution of 256 points per initial perturbation wavelength. The initial conditions and computational domain are modeled after the single-mode, Mach 1.21 air(acetone)/SF{sub 6} shock tube experiment of Collins and Jacobs [J. Fluid Mech. 464, 113 (2002)]. The simulation densities are shown to be in very good agreement with the corrected experimental planar laser-induced fluorescence images at selected times before reshock of the evolving interface. Analytical, semianalytical and phenomenological linear and nonlinear, impulsive, perturbation and potential flow models for single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable perturbation growth are summarized. The simulation amplitudes are shown to be in very good agreement with the experimental data and with the predictions of linear amplitude growth models for small times and with those of nonlinear amplitude growth models at later times up to the time at which the driver-based expansion in the experiment (but not present in the simulations or models) expands the layer before reshock. The qualitative and quantitative differences between the fifth- and ninth-order simulation results are discussed. Using a local and global quantitative metric, the prediction of the Zhang and Sohn [Phys. Fluids 9, 1106 (1997)] nonlinear Pade model is shown to be in best overall agreement with the simulation amplitudes before reshock. The sensitivity of the amplitude growth model predictions to the initial growth rate from linear instability theory, the post-shock Atwood number and amplitude, and the velocity jump due to the passage of the shock through the interface is also investigated numerically. In Part II [Phys. Fluids (2006)], a comprehensive investigation of mixing induced by the reshocked single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is

  14. Variable growth modes of CaF2 on Si(111) determined by x-ray photoelectron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denlinger, J. D.; Rotenberg, Eli; Hessinger, Uwe; Leskovar, M.; Olmstead, Marjorie A.

    1993-04-01

    Chemical discrimination of bulk and interface Ca 2p x-ray photoelectron diffraction modulations is used to identify three growth regimes during the initial stages of CaF2 epitaxy on Si(111). Low flux, high temperature conditions produce island growth atop a nonwetting, chemically reacted Ca-F interface layer. Changing the growth kinetics by increasing the flux produces more laminar growth. Lowering the substrate temperature produces a more stoichiometric CaF2 interface layer that results in immediate wetting and laminar growth.

  15. Overexpression of the Tomato Pollen Receptor Kinase LePRK1 Rewires Pollen Tube Growth to a Blebbing Mode[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Cai-Ping; Dong, Xin; Liu, Hai-Kuan; Huang, Wei-Jie; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Shu-Jie; Barberini, María Laura; Gao, Xiao-Yan; Muschietti, Jorge; McCormick, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    The tubular growth of a pollen tube cell is crucial for the sexual reproduction of flowering plants. LePRK1 is a pollen-specific and plasma membrane–localized receptor-like kinase from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). LePRK1 interacts with another receptor, LePRK2, and with KINASE PARTNER PROTEIN (KPP), a Rop guanine nucleotide exchange factor. Here, we show that pollen tubes overexpressing LePRK1 or a truncated LePRK1 lacking its extracellular domain (LePRK1ΔECD) have enlarged tips but also extend their leading edges by producing “blebs.” Coexpression of LePRK1 and tomato PLIM2a, an actin bundling protein that interacts with KPP in a Ca2+-responsive manner, suppressed these LePRK1 overexpression phenotypes, whereas pollen tubes coexpressing KPP, LePRK1, and PLIM2a resumed the blebbing growth mode. We conclude that overexpression of LePRK1 or LePRK1ΔECD rewires pollen tube growth to a blebbing mode, through KPP- and PLIM2a-mediated bundling of actin filaments from tip plasma membranes. Arabidopsis thaliana pollen tubes expressing LePRK1ΔECD also grew by blebbing. Our results exposed a hidden capability of the pollen tube cell: upon overexpression of a single membrane-localized molecule, LePRK1 or LePRK1ΔECD, it can switch to an alternative mechanism for extension of the leading edge that is analogous to the blebbing growth mode reported for Dictyostelium and for Drosophila melanogaster stem cells. PMID:25194029

  16. Normal mode solutions for seismo-acoustic propagation resulting from shear and combined wave point sources.

    PubMed

    Nealy, Jennifer L; Collis, Jon M; Frank, Scott D

    2016-04-01

    Normal mode solutions to range-independent seismo-acoustic problems are benchmarked against elastic parabolic equation solutions and then used to benchmark the shear elastic parabolic equation self-starter [Frank, Odom, and Collis, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 1358-1367 (2013)]. The Pekeris waveguide with an elastic seafloor is considered for a point source located in the ocean emitting compressional waves, or in the seafloor, emitting both compressional and shear waves. Accurate solutions are obtained when the source is in the seafloor, and when the source is at the interface between the fluid and elastic layers.

  17. Interfacial wave theory of dendrite growth - Global mode solution and quantum condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Jian-Jun

    1990-01-01

    The signal feedback process at the edge of the dendrite tip is investigated, and the global instability mechanism of the system is derived. A mechanism is developed to describe a discrete set of unstable global modes for the system. Called WEASR, the method considers the wave emission at the turning point and signal reflections between the turning point and the front edge of the tip. It is shown that the method can obtain the asymptotic solutions for the unstable global modes and the quantum condition for the corresponding eigenvalues. A turning point called the pattern formation condition is shown to be crucial in the formation of dendritic structure and the choice of the final tip velocity. The wave emission process is outlined, and the importance of a signal feedback process at the edge of the dendrite tip is demonstrated. Parameters such as stability and surface tension can be analyzed in terms of their effects on WEASR modes.

  18. Interfacial wave theory of dendrite growth - Global mode solution and quantum condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Jian-Jun

    1990-01-01

    The signal feedback process at the edge of the dendrite tip is investigated, and the global instability mechanism of the system is derived. A mechanism is developed to describe a discrete set of unstable global modes for the system. Called WEASR, the method considers the wave emission at the turning point and signal reflections between the turning point and the front edge of the tip. It is shown that the method can obtain the asymptotic solutions for the unstable global modes and the quantum condition for the corresponding eigenvalues. A turning point called the pattern formation condition is shown to be crucial in the formation of dendritic structure and the choice of the final tip velocity. The wave emission process is outlined, and the importance of a signal feedback process at the edge of the dendrite tip is demonstrated. Parameters such as stability and surface tension can be analyzed in terms of their effects on WEASR modes.

  19. Measurements of sideband mode-coupling effects and linear MHD growth rates associated with the ponderomotive force

    SciTech Connect

    Meassick, S.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of the interactions of rf waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) with flute interchange modes are presented. Interactions between the applied l = +1 rf wave and an m = {minus}1 flute mode give rise to sidebands above and below the rf frequency with mode numbers of l = 0 and l = +2 respectively. The contribution of the sideband terms to perturbed energy are shown to cancel 40% of the direct ponderomotive contribution for w/w{sub ci} = 1.25. This is less then the 90% predicted by self-consistent theories of the ponderomotive force for an applied l = +1 rf wave above the ion cyclotron frequency with a large separation between the plasma and the vacuum vessel. Measurements of the linear growth and decay rate of the flute instability in the presence of rf are presented. These measurements allow a determination of the net stabilizing force on the plasma. The measured growth rate is in good agreement with that calculated by considering only the curvature driven instability and the ponderomotive force.

  20. [Effects of different water-saving irrigation modes on chestnut growth and fruiting in drought hilly land].

    PubMed

    Tian, Shou-Le; Shen, Guang-Ning; Xu, Lin; Sun, Xiao-Li

    2012-03-01

    Taking the chestnut trees in a semi-arid and semi-humid hilly orchard of Tai' an, Shandong Province of East China as test objects, a field experiment was conducted to study the effects of different water-saving irrigation modes (pottery jar storing water, small hole storing water, and border irrigation with covering) on the soil moisture characteristics and the growth, fruiting, and development of chestnut roots. Comparing with the control (border irrigation), all the three water-saving irrigation modes could prolong the period of soil keeping moist, and the best effect came from pottery, jar treatment, with the soil keeping moist for 32 days, 13 days longer than the control. Under water-saving irrigations, the bearing branches length and number, leaf area and mass, and shoot mixed buds all increased obviously. Both pottery jar storing water and small hole storing water could irrigate deeper roots and induce root growth in deeper soil layers, and thus, relieve the drought stress on superficial roots. The three water-saving irrigation modes could increase chestnut yield markedly, with an increment of 18.8%, 16.5%, and 14.2%, respectively, as compared with the control.

  1. The free-fall mode experiment on LISA Pathfinder: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusteri, Roberta; LPF Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    The LISA Pathfinder space mission is testing the critical experimental challenge for LISA by measuring the differential acceleration between two free-falling test masses inside a single co-orbiting spacecraft at a level of sub-femto-g for frequencies down to 0.1mHz. In LPF it is necessary that one test mass (TM) is electrostatically forced to follow the orbit of the other TM. This force represents a noise source in differential acceleration at frequencies below 1mHz. The free-fall mode experiment has been performed in order to reduce this source of noise: the actuation is limited to short impulses on one TM, so that it is in free fall between two successive kicks, while the other TM is drag-free. The free-fall mode thus provides a different technique for measuring the differential TM acceleration without the added force noise and calibration issues introduced by the actuator. Data analysis challenge is related to the presence of the kicks: they represent a high-noise contribution and need to be removed, thus leaving short gaps in data. This article presents preliminary data of the LPF free-fall measurement campaign and describes the three data analysis techniques developed to mitigate the presence of gaps.

  2. SPA-LEED Study of the Morphology and Nucleation of a Novel Growth Mode and the ''devil's staircase'' on Pb/Si(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Wang-Chi Vincent

    2003-01-01

    This thesis was developed to address the following questions for the Pb/Si(111) system: (1) Is it possible to control the nano-structure growth by changing the initial substrate; (2) is the nucleation theory applicable to the case of the 7-step growth mode; and (3) what phase or phases could be formed between coverage 6/5 ML and 4/3 ML? The first question was answered in chapter 2, different growth results were observed for different initial substrate, suggesting the possibility of controlling nano-structure growth by selecting the initial substrate. The applicability of nucleation theory was determined to be unclear in chapter 3, from the results that the saturation island density does not depend on deposition rate, in contrary to the prediction of nucleation theory. Chapter 4 revealed a novel ''devil's staircase'' in Pb/Si(111) within the coverage range 6/5 ML and 4/3 ML. Low temperature deposition experiments showed high order of self-organization in such a system. Theoretical studies are needed to understand such a low temperature behavior. In general, this thesis provides possibilities of controlling nano-structure growth, which can be possibly an indication for future application. It also raises interesting questions in fundamental researches: a modified theory of nucleation is needed, and a detailed study of low temperature behavior is required. Details of the conclusions in each of the chapters are collected in the following sections.

  3. Mixotrophic growth of Phaeodactylum tricornutum on fructose and glycerol in fed-batch and semi-continuous modes.

    PubMed

    Cerón-García, M C; Fernández-Sevilla, J M; Sánchez-Mirón, A; García-Camacho, F; Contreras-Gómez, A; Molina-Grima, E

    2013-11-01

    Mixotrophic cultures of Phaeodactylum tricornutum were carried out in bubble columns using fructose and glycerol in indoor fed-batch and semi-continuous modes. In the fed-batch cultures, different nutrient-addition strategies, combined with stepwise increments in the light intensity, were assayed. It was found that glycerol promoted significantly higher biomass productivity than fructose. A glycerol-induced photoinhibition that arrested the growth of P. tricornutun was also observed. As this was considered a limitation as regards transferring the fed-batch mode to outdoor conditions, this information was used to culture P. tricornutum in semi-continuous mode. Similar glycerol-induced photoinhibition was not observed in these cultures, even at highest dilution rates. Although the highest biomass (1.5 g L(-1) d(-1)) and EPA (40 mg L(-1) d(-1)) productivities found in the semi-continuous cultures were lower than those obtained photoautotrophically in outdoor photobioreactors, the findings showed that semi-continuous mode was an excellent candidate for transferring mixotrophic culture to an outdoor setting.

  4. Summary of Mode Deactivation Therapy, Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Social Skills Training with Two Year Post Treatment Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.; Siv, Alexander M.

    2006-01-01

    This study summarized two treatment research studies and included recidivism data for two years post discharge for group therapy. The study compared Mode deactivation Therapy (MDT), Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT), and Social Skills training (SST), results of the MDT series of studies and the two year post-study recidivism data. The data from the…

  5. Biochar Treatment Resulted in a Combined Effect on Soybean Growth Promotion and a Shift in Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Egamberdieva, Dilfuza; Wirth, Stephan; Behrendt, Undine; Abd_Allah, Elsayed F.; Berg, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    The application of biochar to soil is considered to have the potential for long-term soil carbon sequestration, as well as for improving plant growth and suppressing soil pathogens. In our study we evaluated the effect of biochar on the plant growth of soybeans, as well as on the community composition of root-associated bacteria with plant growth promoting traits. Two types of biochar, namely, maize biochar (MBC), wood biochar (WBC), and hydrochar (HTC) were used for pot experiments to monitor plant growth. Soybean plants grown in soil amended with HTC char (2%) showed the best performance and were collected for isolation and further characterization of root-associated bacteria for multiple plant growth promoting traits. Only HTC char amendment resulted in a statistically significant increase in the root and shoot dry weight of soybeans. Interestingly, rhizosphere isolates from HTC char amended soil showed higher diversity than the rhizosphere isolates from the control soil. In addition, a higher proportion of isolates from HTC char amended soil compared with control soil was found to express plant growth promoting properties and showed antagonistic activity against one or more phytopathogenic fungi. Our study provided evidence that improved plant growth by biochar incorporation into soil results from the combination of a direct effect that is dependent on the type of char and a microbiome shift in root-associated beneficial bacteria. PMID:26941730

  6. Biochar Treatment Resulted in a Combined Effect on Soybean Growth Promotion and a Shift in Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria.

    PubMed

    Egamberdieva, Dilfuza; Wirth, Stephan; Behrendt, Undine; Abd Allah, Elsayed F; Berg, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    The application of biochar to soil is considered to have the potential for long-term soil carbon sequestration, as well as for improving plant growth and suppressing soil pathogens. In our study we evaluated the effect of biochar on the plant growth of soybeans, as well as on the community composition of root-associated bacteria with plant growth promoting traits. Two types of biochar, namely, maize biochar (MBC), wood biochar (WBC), and hydrochar (HTC) were used for pot experiments to monitor plant growth. Soybean plants grown in soil amended with HTC char (2%) showed the best performance and were collected for isolation and further characterization of root-associated bacteria for multiple plant growth promoting traits. Only HTC char amendment resulted in a statistically significant increase in the root and shoot dry weight of soybeans. Interestingly, rhizosphere isolates from HTC char amended soil showed higher diversity than the rhizosphere isolates from the control soil. In addition, a higher proportion of isolates from HTC char amended soil compared with control soil was found to express plant growth promoting properties and showed antagonistic activity against one or more phytopathogenic fungi. Our study provided evidence that improved plant growth by biochar incorporation into soil results from the combination of a direct effect that is dependent on the type of char and a microbiome shift in root-associated beneficial bacteria.

  7. Pistillate flower development and pollen tube growth mode during the delayed fertilization stage in Corylus heterophylla Fisch.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Huidi; Cheng, Yunqing; Kafkas, Salih; Güney, Murat

    2014-09-01

    Unlike most angiosperms, in which fertilization occurs within several days after pollination, fertilization in hazel (Corylus Spp.) is delayed by two to three and a half months. However, the female inflorescences or young fruits are too hard or lignified to be dissected according to regular paraffin sectioning technique. So, what the nature of development during the extended progamic phases of hazel remains unknown. The female inflorescence development and pollen tube growth mode during the delayed fertilization stage in hazel were investigated by improved paraffin sectioning and aniline blue staining of pollen tubes. The results showed ovaries and ovules of hazel were invisible at the time of blooming. Early ovary and ovule primordium began to form from 15 to 20 days after blooming, respectively. Integument and mature embryo sacs differentiated from the nucellus on 40th and 55th day after blooming, respectively. Pollen tubes were retarded in the bottom of the style or the pollen tube cavity (PTC, a specifical lignified cavity structure at the bottom of style for pollen tube to rest during progamic phase) for about 26 days. Then, the pollen tubes were observed to leave the PTC and began to enter the ovary. After that, a single pollen tube passed through the vicinity of the micropyle. Finally, pollen tubes turned a corner and penetrated the embryo sac through the tissue of the chalaza instead of micropyle on 52 and 55 days after blooming, respectively. The results of more in-depth information will be beneficial to better understanding of the delayed fertilization process in hazel.

  8. Lake Urmia Bridge Stability Assessment: Results from Terrasar-X Spotlight Mode Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, F.; Motagh, M.; Vajedian, S.; Sharifi, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we investigate stability of Lake Urmia bridge, locally also known as Shahid Kalantari's highway bridge, in northwest of Iran using high-resolution satellite radar imagery. The radar dataset includes 22 SAR images acquired in SpotLight mode from 2014 to 2015 in an ascending orbit by TerraSAR-X satellite. A high-resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the area was constructed from a pair of TanDEM-X bi-static data on June 2012 to remove the effect of topography from interferometry observations. The analysis of X-band interferograms shows high number of displacement fringes, which are interpreted as being caused by thermal dilation due to temperature differences in the imaged area between two SAR acquisitions. This effect, which can often be observed in single interferograms, have important impact on time-series products and should be considered for deformation analysis of bridge structures.

  9. Growth of large-scale boron nanowire patterns with identical base-up mode and in situ field emission studies of individual boron nanowire.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Gan, Haibo; Tang, Dai-Ming; Cao, Yunzhe; Mo, Xiaoshu; Chen, Jun; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Golberg, Dmitri; Bando, Yoshio

    2014-02-26

    Boron nanowires (BNWs) are considered as an ideal optoelectronic nanomaterial, but controlling them in identical growth mode and large-area patterns is technically challenging. Here, large-scale BNW patterns with a uniform base-up growth mode are successfully fabricated by choosing Ni film as the catalyst. Moreover, they exhibit low turn-on field (4.3 V/μm) and excellent field emission uniformity (88%).

  10. Multistep mineral fouling growth on a cation-exchange membrane ruled by gradual sieving effects of magnesium and carbonate ions and its delay by pulsed modes of electrodialysis.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes-Araya, Nicolás; Pourcelly, Gérald; Bazinet, Laurent

    2012-04-15

    The aim of this study was to reveal the mechanisms ruling a fouling growth on both sides of a CMX-SB cation-exchange membrane (CEM), run after run during three consecutive electrodialysis (ED) treatments. A model solution containing a high magnesium/calcium ratio (2/5) was demineralized under two different pulsed electric field (PEF) on-duty ratios and dc current. The results showed a series of mechanisms ruling a multilayer mineral fouling growth and its delay by PEFs. The nature of the fouling layer, during a first run, depended on the diluate pH-value evolutions and the ion migration rates through the membrane. A subsequent multilayer fouling growth during consecutive treatments was ruled by the already formed mineral layers, where gradual sieving effects inverted the migration rates and led to a multistep crystal growth. Calcium carbonate grew on the diluate side of CEM, starting from its amorphous phase to then crystallize in a coexisting presence of aragonite and calcite. Amorphous magnesium hydroxide appeared on CEM apparently through fouling dehydration ruled by the mineral layers themselves and by overlimiting current regimes. A delayed fouling growth was observed for PEF ratio 0.3. A long pause lapse during pulse modes was demonstrated as an important parameter for fouling mitigation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The lack of synchronization between iron uptake and cell growth leads to iron overload in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during post-exponential growth modes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinkyu; McCormick, Sean P; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Lindahl, Paul A

    2013-12-31

    Fermenting cells growing exponentially on rich (YPAD) medium underwent a transition to a slow-growing state as glucose levels declined and their metabolism shifted to respiration. During exponential growth, Fe import and cell-growth rates were matched, affording an approximately invariant cellular Fe concentration. During the transition period, the high-affinity Fe import rate declined slower than the cell-growth rate declined, causing Fe to accumulate, initially as Fe(III) oxyhydroxide nanoparticles but eventually as mitochondrial and vacuolar Fe. Once the cells had reached slow-growth mode, Fe import and cell-growth rates were again matched, and the cellular Fe concentration was again approximately invariant. Fermenting cells grown on minimal medium (MM) grew more slowly during the exponential phase and underwent a transition to a true stationary state as glucose levels declined. The Fe concentration of MM cells that just entered the stationary state was similar to that of YPAD cells, but MM cells continued to accumulate Fe in the stationary state. Fe initially accumulated as nanoparticles and high-spin Fe(II) species, but vacuolar Fe(III) also eventually accumulated. Surprisingly, Fe-packed 5-day-old MM cells suffered no more reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage than younger cells, suggesting that the Fe concentration alone does not accurately predict the extent of ROS damage. The mode and rate of growth at the time of harvesting dramatically affected cellular Fe content. A mathematical model of Fe metabolism in a growing cell was developed. The model included the import of Fe via a regulated high-affinity pathway and an unregulated low-affinity pathway. The import of Fe from the cytosol to vacuoles and mitochondria and nanoparticle formation were also included. The model captured essential trafficking behavior, demonstrating that cells regulate Fe import in accordance with their overall growth rate and that they misregulate Fe import when nanoparticles

  12. Quantitative low-energy electron-diffraction study of the epitaxy of Fe on Ag l brace 001 r brace : Questions about the growth mode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Li, Y.S.; Quinn, J.; Tian, D. ); Sokolov, J. ); Jona, F. ); Marcus, P.M. )

    1990-11-15

    We point out contradictions among several reports relating to the mode of growth of Fe on Ag{l brace}001{r brace}, particularly between the studies done by reflection-high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and those done by low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). We describe qualitative LEED observations that agree with those of other workers. These observations, as well as quantitative analyses reported herein, indicate that on the samples used in all LEED experiments reported to date, the growth of Fe on Ag{l brace}001{r brace} was neither layer by layer nor of Stranski-Krastanov type. These results are inconsistent with the conclusions drawn by others from RHEED intensity oscillations. We also establish quantitatively that the structure of thicker (10--30 layers) films of Fe on Ag{l brace}001{r brace} is either the stable bcc structure of {alpha}-Fe or a slight body-centered-tetragonal distortion thereof.

  13. Effects of dietary fructooligosaccharide levels and feeding modes on growth, immune responses, antioxidant capability and disease resistance of blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Nuan; Li, Xiang-Fei; Jiang, Guang-Zhen; Zhang, Ding-Dong; Tian, Hong-Yan; Li, Jun-Yi; Liu, Wen-Bin

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of fructooligosaccharide (FOS) levels and its feeding modes on growth, immune response, antioxidant capability and disease resistance of blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala). Fish (12.5 ± 0.5 g) were subjected to three FOS levels (0, 0.4% and 0.8%) and two feeding modes (supplementing FOS continuously and supplementing FOS two days interval 5 days) according to a 3 × 2 factorial design. At the end of 8-week feeding trial, fish were challenged by Aeromonas hydrophila with concentration of 1 × 10(5) CFU mL(-1) and mortality was recorded for the next 96 h. Fish fed 0.4% FOS continuously (D2) and fish fed the basal diet for 5 days followed by 0.8% FOS for 2 days (D5) showed admirable growth performance. The highest plasma lysozyme, acid phosphatase and myeloperoxidase activities as well as complement component 3, total protein and immunoglobulin M (IgM) levels were all observed in fish fed D5. They were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those of the control group and/or fish fed 0.8% FOS continuously, but exhibited no statistical difference (P > 0.05) with that of fish fed D2. A similar trend was also observed in antioxidant capability as well as the expression of Leap-I and Leap-Ⅱ. Mortality showed an opposite trend with the immune response with the lowest rate observed in fish fed D5. The results indicated that diet supplementing FOS in appropriate levels and feeding modes could improve the growth, immune response and antioxidant capability of fish, as might consequently lead to enhanced disease resistance. It can be speculated that the basal diet for 5 days followed by 0.8% FOS for 2 days was most suitable for blunt snout bream.

  14. Thermal infrared stellar interferometry using single-mode guided optics: first scientific results from the IOTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennesson, Bertrand P.; Perrin, Guy; Coudé du Foresto, Vincent; Chagnon, Gilles; Ruilier, Cyril; Morel, Sebastien; Ridgway, Stephen T.; Lopez, Bruno; de Laverny, Patrick; Traub, Wesley A.; Carleton, Nathaniel P.; Lacasse, Marc G.

    2000-07-01

    We report on first scientific observations of a few bright late type stars by direct long baseline interferometry in the thermal infrared (3.4 to 4.1 microns) obtained with the TISIS (Thermal Infrared Stellar Interferometric Set-up) experiment of the IOTA (Infrared and Optical Telescope Array) interferometer. Beam combination is provided by a single-mode fluoride glass coupler optimized for operation in that wavelength domain and yielding visibility measurements with 2% typical relative accuracy. First precise estimations of uniform disk diameters for (alpha) Orionis, (alpha) Herculis, o Ceti and R Leonis are presented in the L band. Very large increase (50 to 70%) in apparent angular diameters have been found for the 2 Mira stars o Ceti and R Leonis with respect to previous measurements obtained at shorter infrared wavelengths and same luminosity phase. Extended optically thin close-by dust shells characterized by Infrared Spatial Interferometer measurements are not found to play a significant role in the observed L band intensity distribution. Gas properties are likely to have a greater impact at these wavelengths. Our o Ceti interferometric observations look indeed in good agreement with the presence of very extended circumstellar gas layers (mostly H2O and SiO) derived from recent Infrared Space Observatory thermal infrared spectral data.

  15. Mode analysis for a microwave driven plasma discharge: A comparison between analytical and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeremley, Daniel; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Zimmermanns, Marc; Rolfes, Ilona; Eremin, Denis; Ruhr-University Bochum, Theoretical Electrical Engineering Team; Ruhr-University Bochum, Institute of Microwave Systems Team

    2015-09-01

    The market shows in recent years a growing demand for bottles made of polyethylene terephthalate (PET). Therefore, fast and efficient sterilization processes as well as barrier coatings to decrease gas permeation are required. A specialized microwave plasma source - referred to as the plasmaline - has been developed to allow for depositing thin films of e.g. silicon oxid on the inner surface of such PET bottles. The plasmaline is a coaxial waveguide combined with a gas-inlet which is inserted into the empty bottle and initiates a reactive plasma. To optimize and control the different surface processes, it is essential to fully understand the microwave power coupling to the plasma and the related heating of electrons inside the bottle and thus the electromagnetic wave propagation along the plasmaline. In this contribution, we present a detailed dispersion analysis based on a numerical approach. We study how modes of guided waves are propagating under different conditions, if at all. The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the German Research Foundation (DFG) within the framework of the collaborative research centre TRR87.

  16. First results on double {beta}-decay modes of Cd, Te, and Zn Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Bloxham, T.; Freer, M.; Boston, A.; Nolan, P.; Dawson, J.; Reeve, C.; Wilson, J. R.; Zuber, K.; Dobos, D.; Goessling, C.; Kiel, H.; Muenstermann, D.; Oehl, S.; Fox, S. P.; Fulton, B. R.; McGrath, J.; Wadsworth, R.; Harrison, P. F.; Morgan, B.; Ramachers, Y.

    2007-08-15

    Four 1-cm{sup 3} CdZnTe semiconductor detectors were operated in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory to explore the feasibility of such devices for double {beta}-decay searches as proposed for the COBRA experiment. The research involved background studies accompanied by measurements of energy resolution performed at the surface. Energy resolutions sufficient to reduce the contribution of two-neutrino double {beta}-decay events to a negligible level for a large-scale experiment have already been achieved and further improvements are expected. Using activity measurements of contaminants in all construction materials a background model was developed with the help of Monte Carlo simulations and major background sources were identified. A total exposure of 4.34 kg{center_dot}days of underground data have been accumulated allowing a search for neutrinoless double {beta}-decay modes of seven isotopes found in CdZnTe. Half-life limits (90% C.L.) are presented for decays to ground and excited states. Four improved lower limits have been obtained, including zero neutrino double electron capture transitions of {sup 64}Zn and {sup 120}Te to the ground state, which are 1.19x10{sup 17} years and 2.68x10{sup 15} years, respectively.

  17. Growth curves for Turkish Girls with Turner Syndrome: Results of the Turkish Turner Syndrome Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Darendeliler, Feyza; Yeşilkaya, Ediz; Bereket, Abdullah; Baş, Firdevs; Bundak, Rüveyde; Sarı, Erkan; Küçükemre Aydın, Banu; Darcan, Şükran; Dündar, Bumin; Büyükinan, Muammer; Kara, Cengiz; Mazıcıoğlu, Mümtaz M.; Adal, Erdal; Akıncı, Ayşehan; Atabek, Mehmet Emre; Demirel, Fatma; Çelik, Nurullah; Özkan, Behzat; Özhan, Bayram; Orbak, Zerrin; Ersoy, Betül; Doğan, Murat; Ataş, Ali; Turan, Serap; Gökşen, Damla; Tarım, Ömer; Yüksel, Bilgin; Ercan, Oya; Hatun, Şükrü; Şimşek, Enver; Ökten, Ayşenur; Abacı, Ayhan; Döneray, Hakan; Özbek, Mehmet Nuri; Keskin, Mehmet; Önal, Hasan; Akyürek, Nesibe; Bulan, Kezban; Tepe, Derya; Emeksiz, Hamdi Cihan; Demir, Korcan; Kızılay, Deniz; Topaloğlu, Ali Kemal; Eren, Erdal; Özen, Samim; Demirbilek, Hüseyin; Abalı, Saygın; Akın, Leyla; Eklioğlu, Beray Selver; Kaba, Sultan; Anık, Ahmet; Baş, Serpil; Ünüvar, Tolga; Sağlam, Halil; Bolu, Semih; Özgen, Tolga; Doğan, Durmuş; Çakır, Esra Deniz; Şen, Yaşar; Andıran, Nesibe; Çizmecioğlu, Filiz; Evliyaoğlu, Olcay; Karagüzel, Gülay; Pirgon, Özgür; Çatlı, Gönül; Can, Hatice Dilek; Gürbüz, Fatih; Binay, Çiğdem; Baş, Veysel Nijat; Sağlam, Celal; Gül, Davut; Polat, Adem; Açıkel, Cengizhan; Cinaz, Peyami

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Children with Turner syndrome (TS) have a specific growth pattern that is quite different from that of healthy children. Many countries have population-specific growth charts for TS. Considering national and ethnic differences, we undertook this multicenter collaborative study to construct growth charts and reference values for height, weight and body mass index (BMI) from 3 years of age to adulthood for spontaneous growth of Turkish girls with TS. Methods: Cross-sectional height and weight data of 842 patients with TS, younger than 18 years of age and before starting any therapy, were evaluated. Results: The data were processed to calculate the 3rd, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th and 97th percentile values for defined ages and to construct growth curves for height-for-age, weight-for-age and BMI-for-age of girls with TS. The growth pattern of TS girls in this series resembled the growth pattern of TS girls in other reports, but there were differences in height between our series and the others. Conclusion: This study provides disease-specific growth charts for Turkish girls with TS. These disease-specific national growth charts will serve to improve the evaluation of growth and its management with growth-promoting therapeutic agents in TS patients. PMID:26831551

  18. Multi-stacked InAs/GaAs quantum dots grown with different growth modes for quantum dot solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yeongho; Ban, Keun-Yong Honsberg, Christiana B.

    2015-06-01

    We have studied the material properties and device performance of InAs/GaAs quantum dot solar cells (QDSCs) made using three different QD growth modes: Stranski-Krastanov (S-K), quasi-monolayer (QML), and sub-monolayer (SML) growth modes. All QDSCs show an extended external quantum efficiency (EQE) at near infrared wavelengths of 950–1070 nm from the QD absorption. Compared to the S-K and SML QDSCs, the QML QDSC with a higher strain exhibits a poor EQE response in the wavelength region of 300–880 nm due to increased non-radiative recombination. The conversion efficiency of the S-K and SML QDSCs exceeds that of the reference cell (13.4%) without QDs due to an enhanced photocurrent (>16% increase) produced by the silicon doped QD stacks. However, as expected from the EQE of the QML QDSC, the increase of strain-induced crystalline defects greatly degrades the photocurrent and open-circuit voltage, leading to the lowest conversion efficiency (8.9%)

  19. Multi-stacked InAs/GaAs quantum dots grown with different growth modes for quantum dot solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeongho; Ban, Keun-Yong; Honsberg, Christiana B.

    2015-06-01

    We have studied the material properties and device performance of InAs/GaAs quantum dot solar cells (QDSCs) made using three different QD growth modes: Stranski-Krastanov (S-K), quasi-monolayer (QML), and sub-monolayer (SML) growth modes. All QDSCs show an extended external quantum efficiency (EQE) at near infrared wavelengths of 950-1070 nm from the QD absorption. Compared to the S-K and SML QDSCs, the QML QDSC with a higher strain exhibits a poor EQE response in the wavelength region of 300-880 nm due to increased non-radiative recombination. The conversion efficiency of the S-K and SML QDSCs exceeds that of the reference cell (13.4%) without QDs due to an enhanced photocurrent (>16% increase) produced by the silicon doped QD stacks. However, as expected from the EQE of the QML QDSC, the increase of strain-induced crystalline defects greatly degrades the photocurrent and open-circuit voltage, leading to the lowest conversion efficiency (8.9%).

  20. Mixed gravity mode growth during directional dendritic solidification aboard the KC-135

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.

    1989-01-01

    NASA's KC-135, which flies a cyclic parabolic route designed to furnish periods of low gravity alternating with periods of high gravity, has been used to directionally solidify a superalloy and a FE-C-Si alloy. Probable transient effects, due to the rapid changes in the gravity levels, must be taken into account. An effort is presently made to show that experimental design is especially critical in the case of dendritic directional solidification experiments in which mixed gravity modes occur; inappropriate design easily leads to anomalous structures and data.

  1. Quantitative Analysis of the Modes of Growth Inhibition by Weak Organic Acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Azmat; Orij, Rick; Brul, Stanley

    2012-01-01

    Weak organic acids are naturally occurring compounds that are commercially used as preservatives in the food and beverage industries. They extend the shelf life of food products by inhibiting microbial growth. There are a number of theories that explain the antifungal properties of these weak acids, but the exact mechanism is still unknown. We set out to quantitatively determine the contributions of various mechanisms of antifungal activity of these weak acids, as well as the mechanisms that yeast uses to counteract their effects. We analyzed the effects of four weak organic acids differing in lipophilicity (sorbic, benzoic, propionic, and acetic acids) on growth and intracellular pH (pHi) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although lipophilicity of the acids correlated with the rate of acidification of the cytosol, our data confirmed that not initial acidification, but rather the cell's ability to restore pHi, was a determinant for growth inhibition. This pHi recovery in turn depended on the nature of the organic anion. We identified long-term acidification as the major cause of growth inhibition under acetic acid stress. Restoration of pHi, and consequently growth rate, in the presence of this weak acid required the full activity of the plasma membrane ATPase Pma1p. Surprisingly, the proposed anion export pump Pdr12p was shown to play an important role in the ability of yeast cells to restore the pHi upon lipophilic (sorbic and benzoic) acid stress, probably through a charge interaction of anion and proton transport. PMID:23001666

  2. Quantitative analysis of the modes of growth inhibition by weak organic acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Azmat; Orij, Rick; Brul, Stanley; Smits, Gertien J

    2012-12-01

    Weak organic acids are naturally occurring compounds that are commercially used as preservatives in the food and beverage industries. They extend the shelf life of food products by inhibiting microbial growth. There are a number of theories that explain the antifungal properties of these weak acids, but the exact mechanism is still unknown. We set out to quantitatively determine the contributions of various mechanisms of antifungal activity of these weak acids, as well as the mechanisms that yeast uses to counteract their effects. We analyzed the effects of four weak organic acids differing in lipophilicity (sorbic, benzoic, propionic, and acetic acids) on growth and intracellular pH (pH(i)) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although lipophilicity of the acids correlated with the rate of acidification of the cytosol, our data confirmed that not initial acidification, but rather the cell's ability to restore pH(i), was a determinant for growth inhibition. This pH(i) recovery in turn depended on the nature of the organic anion. We identified long-term acidification as the major cause of growth inhibition under acetic acid stress. Restoration of pH(i), and consequently growth rate, in the presence of this weak acid required the full activity of the plasma membrane ATPase Pma1p. Surprisingly, the proposed anion export pump Pdr12p was shown to play an important role in the ability of yeast cells to restore the pH(i) upon lipophilic (sorbic and benzoic) acid stress, probably through a charge interaction of anion and proton transport.

  3. Rate-dependent extensional deformation resulting from crack growth in rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segall, Paul

    1984-06-01

    Quasi-static propagation and dilation of macroscopic mode I cracks is considered as a source of inelastic strain in crustal rocks undergoing extensional deformations. The approach here is to first characterize the propagation of a single dilating crack and then to consider how a large two-dimensional array of similar, parallel cracks accomodates an applied deformation. The driving force for propagation of each crack, Gi, is found as a function of the applied strain and the instantaneous crack lengths ci. The rate of crack propagation is taken to be a function of the instantaneous crack extension force ċi = ċ (Gi). A specific propagation rate extension force relation is developed that both fits the available experimental data and has vanishing propagation rate at a finite value of G. From these results a specific internal state variable constitutive law is derived relating uniaxial stress to the instantaneous uniaxial strain and crack density. For strains less than those necessary to cause crack propagation, the rock is predicted to behave like a linear elastic solid. Following the onset of propagation, the average stress may continue to increase if the strain rate accommodated by crack growth is slow in comparison to the applied strain rate. For constant strain rate boundary conditions the solutions exhibit strain softening, leading to peak stress and then a stress decrease. The peak stress increases nearly logarithmically with increasing applied strain rate. The response to unloading depends strongly on whether or not cracks heal. Unloading that follows sealing of the cracks with mineral precipitates causes the rock to undergo a permanent nonrecoverable strain.

  4. Pd/Pt(1 1 1) surface structure and metal epitaxy by time-of-flight impact-collision ion scattering spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy: Does lattice mismatch really determine the growth mode?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umezawa, K.; Narihiro, E.; Ohta, Y.; Ohira, Y.; Yoshimura, M.

    2008-04-01

    We have investigated the growth of 3 ML of Pd on Pt(1 1 1) at substrate temperature of around 300 K using TOF-ICISS. Also a series of STM topographs were taken as a function of coverage of Pd atoms. The Pd-Pt(1 1 1) combination does not have lattice mismatch (less than 1%); the nearest neighbor distance of bulk Pd(1 1 1) and Pt(1 1 1) are 2.75 Å and 2.77 Å, respectively. Experimental data and computer simulations result clearly show the growth mode of Pd(1 1 1) [ 2 bar 1 1]/Pt(1 1 1) [ 2 bar 1 1] hetero epitaxy at the coverage of the Pd deposition less than 3 ML. The growth mode of Pd(1 1 1) [ 1 bar 1 bar 2 ]/Pt(1 1 1) [ 2 bar 1 1] could not be observed at all. One would expect that the growth mode of Pd atoms on Pt(1 1 1) surfaces is like homo epitaxy (layer-by-layer growth), because of no lattice mismatch (less than 1%). However, it was not. The calculated surface and interface energies and STM results show 2D or 3D dimensional island growth. Pd atoms is mainly form dense islands at the steps on Pt(1 1 1) surfaces at the coverage of 0.13 ML.

  5. The course of growth response in released white spruce--10-year results

    Treesearch

    Robert M. Frank; Robert M. Frank

    1973-01-01

    Weekly bole measurements at 4.5 feet in height were made on individual codominant white spruce trees released on one, two, three, and four sides, and on untreated controls. Results showed that after 10 years annual circumference growth was still significantly related to the degree of release. The growth trend was established the first year but significant differences...

  6. Casein Utilization by Streptococcus thermophilus Results in a Diauxic Growth in Milk

    PubMed Central

    Letort, Catherine; Nardi, Michèle; Garault, Peggy; Monnet, Véronique; Juillard, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    In milk, Streptococcus thermophilus displays two distinct exponential growth phases, separated by a nonexponential one, during which proteinase synthesis was initiated. During the second exponential phase, utilization of caseins as the source of amino acids resulted in a decrease in growth rate, presumably caused by a limiting peptide transport activity. PMID:12039785

  7. Casein utilization by Streptococcus thermophilus results in a diauxic growth in milk.

    PubMed

    Letort, Catherine; Nardi, Michèle; Garault, Peggy; Monnet, Véronique; Juillard, Vincent

    2002-06-01

    In milk, Streptococcus thermophilus displays two distinct exponential growth phases, separated by a nonexponential one, during which proteinase synthesis was initiated. During the second exponential phase, utilization of caseins as the source of amino acids resulted in a decrease in growth rate, presumably caused by a limiting peptide transport activity.

  8. 45-Day safety screen results for tank 241-U-202, push mode, cores 75 and 78

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, J.

    1995-05-05

    This document is a report of the analytical results for samples collected from the radioactive wastes in Tank 241-U-202 at the Hanford Reservation. Core samples were collected from the solid wastes in the tank and underwent safety screening analyses including differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and total alpha analysis. Results indicate that no safety screening notification limits were exceeded.

  9. Solar p-mode frequencies and their dependence on solar activity recent results from the BISON network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsworth, Y.; Howe, R.; Isaak, G. R.; McLeod, C. P.; Miller, B. A.; New, R.; Speake, C. C.; Wheeler, S. J.

    1994-10-01

    We present here high-accuracy determinations of the frequencies of low-l solar p-modes and their solar-cycle dependence. The data were obtained using the Birmingham network of solar spectrometers (BISON). The precision of the measurements is discussed. Our previously published results of a significant frequency shift between solar minimum and solar maximum, apparently independent of l and similar to that found by other workers for intermediate-l modes, is confirmed and extended. This suggests that at most only a small fraction of the variation is due to the solar core. Sets of frequencies at high and low solar activity, and an average corrected for solar-activity effects, are presented. There is now evidence that the solar-activity dependence of the frequencies varies across the 5 minute spectrum.

  10. Binding mode of the breakthrough inhibitor AZD9291 to epidermal growth factor receptor revealed.

    PubMed

    Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Silva, Shevan; Dickson, James M; Patterson, Adam V; Smaill, Jeff B; Flanagan, Jack U; McKeage, Mark J; Squire, Christopher J

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of genetic drivers of lung cancer in patient sub-groups has led to their use as predictive biomarkers and as targets for selective drug therapy. Some of the most important lung cancer drivers are mutations in the EGFR gene, for example, the exon 19 deletions and the L858R variant that confer sensitivity to the front line drugs erlotinib and gefitinib; the acquired T790M variants confer drug resistance and a poor prognosis. A challenge then in targeting EGFR is to produce drugs that inhibit both sensitising variants and resistance variants, leaving wild type protein in healthy cells unaffected. One such agent is AstraZeneca's "breakthrough" AZD9291 molecule that shows a 200-fold selectivity for T790M/L858R over wild type EGFR. Our X-ray crystal structure reveals the binding mode of AZD9291 to the kinase domain of wild type EGFR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. SiC formation by reaction of Si(001) with acetylene: Electronic structure and growth mode

    SciTech Connect

    Dufour, G.; Rochet, F.; Stedile, F.C.; Poncey, C.; De Crescenzi, M.; Gunnella, R.; Froment, M.

    1997-08-01

    The carbonization process of a single domain 2{times}1-reconstructed Si(001) vicinal surface (5{degree} off axis from [001] in the [{bar 1}10] direction) in acetylene has been studied by combining in situ surface science techniques (x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron diffraction, reflection-electron energy loss spectroscopy, low-energy electron diffraction) and ex situ analytical techniques ({sup 12}C and {sup 2}H dosing by nuclear reaction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and reflection high-energy electron diffraction). It is found that at a growth temperature of about 820{degree}C a variety of growth mechanisms can be observed, particularly during the first step of carbonization. An analysis of C1s and Si2p core-level shifts and of the respective intensities of them, combined with the examination of photoelectron diffraction curves, gives evidence for a penetration of C atoms into the silicon substrate, to form a nonstoichiometric compound. Contemporaneously 3C-SiC nuclei form, aligned with respect to the substrate. Then a quasicontinuous 3C-SiC film grows heteroepitaxially (cube on cube unstrained growth) on the substrate up to a thickness of {approximately}40{Angstrom}. C1s and Si2p photoelectron diffraction patterns, compared with calculated ones, show that the single domain initial surface does not necessarily force a preferential alignment of one of the two inequivalent SiC{l_brace}110{r_brace} planes with respect to the (110) Si plane. Consequently, such vicinal Si(001) surfaces are not necessarily templates for the growth of crystalline films free of antiphase boundary domains. Finally, we have observed that an imperfect coalescence of 3C-SiC nuclei leaves easy paths for Si out migration from the substrate and SiC polycrystalline growth, even at a temperature as low as 820{degree}C. The current models of Si(001) carbonization are examined and compared to our experimental findings. (Abstract Truncated)

  12. Ratios between acute aquatic toxicity and effects on population growth rates in relation to toxicant mode of action

    SciTech Connect

    Roex, E.W.M.; Gestel, C.A.M. Van; Wezel, A.P. Van; Straalen, N.M. Van

    2000-03-01

    Environmental risk assessment of chemicals is mostly based on the results of standardized toxicity tests. To obtain environmental quality criteria, extrapolation factors are used that depend on the amount and quality of available data. These extrapolation factors do not, however, take into account the mode of action of the compound tested or the life history of the test organism. In this study, the authors analyzed the variability in acute-to-chronic ratios (ACRs) for various chemicals in relation to their mode of action. Chemicals were classified as nonpolar narcotics, polar narcotics, specifically acting compounds, and heavy metals. As an acute endpoint, the LC50 was used; as a chronic endpoint, the lowest test concentration at which the natural rate of population increase (r) is affected, or LOEC(r), was used. Data were derived from the on-line literature. Nonpolar narcotic chemicals demonstrate the smallest variation in ACRs, and acute tests can be used to derive chronic endpoints for this class. For the other classes, the variation in ACRs is larger. Fish species especially show a relatively large ACR. For heavy metals, differences in the mode of action may play an important role in explaining differences in ACRs. For the other three classes, however, it is less reliable to predict chronic toxicity using the results of acute tests. In general, differences in species sensitivity rather than in mode of action for the chemical seem to determine differences in ACRs.

  13. Accelerated fatigue crack growth behavior of PWA 1480 single crystal alloy and its dependence on the deformation mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, Jack; Ghosn, Louis J.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of the fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior of PWA 1480 single crystal nickel base superalloy was conducted. Typical Paris region behavior was observed above a delta K of 8 MPa sq rt of m. However, below that stress intensity range, the alloy exhibited highly unusual behavior. This behavior consisted of a region where the crack growth rate became essentially independent of the applied stress intensity. The transition in the FCG behavior was related to a change in the observed crack growth mechanisms. In the Paris region, fatigue failure occurred along (111) facets; however, at the lower stress intensities, (001) fatigue failure was observed. A mechanism was proposed, based on barriers to dislocation motion, to explain the changes in the observed FCG behavior. The FCG data were also evaluated in terms of a recently proposed stress intensity parameter, K sub rss. This parameter, based on the resolved shear stresses on the slip planes, quantified the crack driving force as well as the mode I delta K, and at the same time was also able to predict the microscopic crack path under different stress states.

  14. Rapid growth results in increased susceptibility to predation in Menidia menidia.

    PubMed

    Munch, Stephan B; Conover, David O

    2003-09-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that rapid growth early in life leads to decreased physiological performance. Nearly all involved experiments over short time periods (<1 day) to control for potentially confounding effects of size. This approach, however, neglects the benefits an individual accrues by growing. The net effect of growth can only be evaluated over a longer interval in which rapidly growing individuals are allowed the time required to attain the expected benefits of large size. We used two populations of Menidia menidia with disparate intrinsic growth rates to address this issue. We compared growth and survivorship among populations subject to predation in mesocosms under ambient light and temperature conditions for a period of up to 30 days to address two questions: Do the growth rates of fish in these populations respond differently to the presence of predators? Is the previously demonstrated survival cost of growth counterbalanced by the benefits of increased size? We found that growth was insensitive to predation risk: neither population appeared to modify growth rates in response to predation levels. Moreover, the fast-growing population suffered significantly higher mortality throughout the trials despite being 40% larger than the slow-growing population at the experiment's end. These results confirm that the costs of rapid growth extend over prolonged intervals and are not ameliorated merely by the attainment of large size.

  15. Development of a numerical procedure for mixed mode K-solutions and fatigue crack growth in FCC single crystal superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Srikant

    2005-11-01

    Fatigue-induced failures in aircraft gas turbine and rocket engine turbopump blades and vanes are a pervasive problem. Turbine blades and vanes represent perhaps the most demanding structural applications due to the combination of high operating temperature, corrosive environment, high monotonic and cyclic stresses, long expected component lifetimes and the enormous consequence of structural failure. Single crystal nickel-base superalloy turbine blades are being utilized in rocket engine turbopumps and jet engines because of their superior creep, stress rupture, melt resistance, and thermomechanical fatigue capabilities over polycrystalline alloys. These materials have orthotropic properties making the position of the crystal lattice relative to the part geometry a significant factor in the overall analysis. Computation of stress intensity factors (SIFs) and the ability to model fatigue crack growth rate at single crystal cracks subject to mixed-mode loading conditions are important parts of developing a mechanistically based life prediction for these complex alloys. A general numerical procedure has been developed to calculate SIFs for a crack in a general anisotropic linear elastic material subject to mixed-mode loading conditions, using three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). The procedure does not require an a priori assumption of plane stress or plane strain conditions. The SIFs KI, KII, and KIII are shown to be a complex function of the coupled 3D crack tip displacement field. A comprehensive study of variation of SIFs as a function of crystallographic orientation, crack length, and mode-mixity ratios is presented, based on the 3D elastic orthotropic finite element modeling of tensile and Brazilian Disc (BD) specimens in specific crystal orientations. Variation of SIF through the thickness of the specimens is also analyzed. The resolved shear stress intensity coefficient or effective SIF, Krss, can be computed as a function of crack tip SIFs and the

  16. 45-Day safety screen results for tank 241-C-105, push mode, cores 72 and 76

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, L.M.

    1995-05-03

    This document is a report of the analytical results for samples collected between March 14 and March 22, 1995 from the radioactive wastes in Tank 241-C-105 at the Hanford Reservation. Core samples were collected from the solid wastes in the tank and underwent safety screening analyses including differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and total alpha analysis.

  17. TOPICAL REVIEW: The various modes of growth of metals on quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smerdon, J. A.

    2010-11-01

    Quasicrystals are fascinating intermetallic compounds composed of two or more elements. They differ from conventional crystals in that they possess long-range order, but no translational symmetry—that is, they are aperiodic. Much effort has been expended on identifying routes towards exploiting and exploring the properties of such systems due to their aperiodic nature. One such route is concerned with the deposition of thin films, particularly of metals, to investigate how their growth progresses in this inherently frustrated scenario. This topical review will examine the various epitaxial relationships observed in quasicrystal research with particular emphasis on single-element metallic films deposited under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions.

  18. Use of mode subspace projections for depth discrimination with a horizontal line array: theory and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Premus, Vincent E; Helfrick, Mark N

    2013-06-01

    A solution to the problem of acoustic source depth discrimination in a downward refracting, shallow-water ocean waveguide is presented for the case of a horizontal line array at endfire. The approach exploits the phenomenon of mode trapping, wherein a shallow acoustic source cannot excite the lowest order waveguide modes due to its evanescent amplitude dependence near the surface. The important implication of this "trapping" behavior is that, given sufficient spatial aperture, it provides a mechanism for differentiating a shallow acoustic noise source from one at depth. The method does not require array cant, or physical vertical aperture of any kind, but instead relies only on the sensitivity of a line array at endfire to differences in horizontal wave number to resolve low and high order mode subspace excitations. The only inputs to the algorithm are an approximate sound speed profile, water depth, and bottom type. The theoretical basis for the test statistic is first reviewed, followed by discussion of key requirements, and illustration of the concept using results from a RAM PE simulation for a downward refracting environment. Finally, the algorithm is experimentally demonstrated using data from a bottom-mounted HLA deployed in the moderately cluttered continental shelf environment of the Florida Straits.

  19. Experimental results of superimposing 9.9 GHz extraordinary mode microwaves on 2.45 GHz ECRIS plasma.

    PubMed

    Nishiokada, Takuya; Nagaya, Tomoki; Hagino, Shogo; Otsuka, Takuro; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Sato, Fuminobu; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Kato, Yushi

    2016-02-01

    Efficient production of multicharged ions has been investigated on the tandem-type ECRIS in Osaka University. According to the consideration of the accessibility conditions of microwaves to resonance and cutoff regions, it was suggested that the upper hybrid resonance (UHR) heating contributed to enhancement of ion beam intensity. In order to enhance multicharged ion beams efficiently, injecting higher frequency microwave with extraordinary (X-mode) toward UHR region has been tried. In this study, 2.45 GHz frequency microwaves are used for conventional ECR discharge, and 9.9 GHz frequency microwaves with X-mode are superimposed for UHR heating. The effects of additive microwave injection are investigated experimentally in terms of plasma parameters and electron energy distribution function (EEDF) measured by Langmuir probe and ion beam current. As the results show, it is confirmed that the electrons in the high energy region are affected by 9.9 GHz X-mode microwave injection from the detailed analysis of EEDF.

  20. Experimental results of superimposing 9.9 GHz extraordinary mode microwaves on 2.45 GHz ECRIS plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiokada, Takuya; Nagaya, Tomoki; Hagino, Shogo; Otsuka, Takuro; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Sato, Fuminobu; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Kato, Yushi

    2016-02-01

    Efficient production of multicharged ions has been investigated on the tandem-type ECRIS in Osaka University. According to the consideration of the accessibility conditions of microwaves to resonance and cutoff regions, it was suggested that the upper hybrid resonance (UHR) heating contributed to enhancement of ion beam intensity. In order to enhance multicharged ion beams efficiently, injecting higher frequency microwave with extraordinary (X-mode) toward UHR region has been tried. In this study, 2.45 GHz frequency microwaves are used for conventional ECR discharge, and 9.9 GHz frequency microwaves with X-mode are superimposed for UHR heating. The effects of additive microwave injection are investigated experimentally in terms of plasma parameters and electron energy distribution function (EEDF) measured by Langmuir probe and ion beam current. As the results show, it is confirmed that the electrons in the high energy region are affected by 9.9 GHz X-mode microwave injection from the detailed analysis of EEDF.

  1. Experimental results of superimposing 9.9 GHz extraordinary mode microwaves on 2.45 GHz ECRIS plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiokada, Takuya Nagaya, Tomoki; Hagino, Shogo; Otsuka, Takuro; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Kitagawa, Atsushi

    2016-02-15

    Efficient production of multicharged ions has been investigated on the tandem-type ECRIS in Osaka University. According to the consideration of the accessibility conditions of microwaves to resonance and cutoff regions, it was suggested that the upper hybrid resonance (UHR) heating contributed to enhancement of ion beam intensity. In order to enhance multicharged ion beams efficiently, injecting higher frequency microwave with extraordinary (X-mode) toward UHR region has been tried. In this study, 2.45 GHz frequency microwaves are used for conventional ECR discharge, and 9.9 GHz frequency microwaves with X-mode are superimposed for UHR heating. The effects of additive microwave injection are investigated experimentally in terms of plasma parameters and electron energy distribution function (EEDF) measured by Langmuir probe and ion beam current. As the results show, it is confirmed that the electrons in the high energy region are affected by 9.9 GHz X-mode microwave injection from the detailed analysis of EEDF.

  2. Atomic Resolution in Situ Imaging of a Double-Bilayer Multistep Growth Mode in Gallium Nitride Nanowires

    DOE PAGES

    Gamalski, A. D.; Tersoff, J.; Stach, E. A.

    2016-04-13

    We study the growth of GaN nanowires from liquid Au–Ga catalysts using environmental transmission electron microscopy. GaN wires grow in either (11¯20) or (11¯00) directions, by the addition of {11¯00} double bilayers via step flow with multiple steps. Step-train growth is not typically seen with liquid catalysts, and we suggest that it results from low step mobility related to the unusual double-height step structure. Finally, the results here illustrate the surprising dynamics of catalytic GaN wire growth at the nanoscale and highlight striking differences between the growth of GaN and other III–V semiconductor nanowires.

  3. Atomic Resolution in Situ Imaging of a Double-Bilayer Multistep Growth Mode in Gallium Nitride Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Gamalski, A. D.; Tersoff, J.; Stach, E. A.

    2016-04-13

    We study the growth of GaN nanowires from liquid Au–Ga catalysts using environmental transmission electron microscopy. GaN wires grow in either (11¯20) or (11¯00) directions, by the addition of {11¯00} double bilayers via step flow with multiple steps. Step-train growth is not typically seen with liquid catalysts, and we suggest that it results from low step mobility related to the unusual double-height step structure. Finally, the results here illustrate the surprising dynamics of catalytic GaN wire growth at the nanoscale and highlight striking differences between the growth of GaN and other III–V semiconductor nanowires.

  4. Atomic Resolution in Situ Imaging of a Double-Bilayer Multistep Growth Mode in Gallium Nitride Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Gamalski, A D; Tersoff, J; Stach, E A

    2016-04-13

    We study the growth of GaN nanowires from liquid Au-Ga catalysts using environmental transmission electron microscopy. GaN wires grow in either ⟨112̅0⟩ or ⟨11̅00⟩ directions, by the addition of {11̅00} double bilayers via step flow with multiple steps. Step-train growth is not typically seen with liquid catalysts, and we suggest that it results from low step mobility related to the unusual double-height step structure. The results here illustrate the surprising dynamics of catalytic GaN wire growth at the nanoscale and highlight striking differences between the growth of GaN and other III-V semiconductor nanowires.

  5. Experimental Results of Ground Disturbance Detection Using Uncooled Infrared Imagers in Wideband and Multispectral Modes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    Pyranometer Heat exchange rate and apparent temperature contrast are governed by factors such as solar radiation and air temperatures, we must...condition resulting in a high apparent temperature contrast which favors detection. The solar radiation was measured by a CMP11 pyranometer manufactured...a stage about 150 inches from the ground where it pointed downward viewing the sand boxes and the two black bodies. The pyranometer was positioned

  6. Thromboelastography results on citrated whole blood from clinically healthy cats depend on modes of activation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background During the last decade, thromboelastography (TEG) has gained increasing acceptance as a diagnostic test in veterinary medicine for evaluation of haemostasis in dogs, however the use of TEG in cats has to date only been described in one previous study and a few abstracts. The objective of the present study was to evaluate and compare three different TEG assays in healthy cats, in order to establish which assay may be best suited for TEG analyses in cats. Methods 90 TEG analyses were performed on citrated whole blood samples from 15 clinically healthy cats using assays without activator (native) or with human recombinant tissue factor (TF) or kaolin as activators. Results for reaction time (R), clotting time (K), angle (α), maximum amplitude (MA) and clot lysis (LY30; LY60) were recorded. Results Coefficients of variation (CVs) were highest in the native assay and comparable in TF and kaolin activated assays. Significant differences were observed between native and kaolin assays for all measured parameters, between kaolin and TF for all measured parameters except LY60 and between native and TF assays for R and K. Conclusion The results indicate that TEG is a reproducible method for evaluation of haemostasis in clinically healthy cats. However, the three assays cannot be used interchangeably and the kaolin- and TF activated assays have the lowest analytical variation indicating that using an activator may be superior for performing TEG in cats. PMID:20529334

  7. Analysis of a Schnute postulate-based unified growth mode for model selection in evolutionary computations

    PubMed Central

    Bentil, D.E.; Osei, B.M.; Ellingwood, C.D.; Hoffmann, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    In order to evaluate the feasibility of a combined evolutionary algorithm-information theoretic approach to select the best model from a set of candidate invasive species models in ecology, and/or to evolve the most parsimonious model from a suite of competing models by comparing their relative performance, it is prudent to use a unified model that covers a myriad of situations. Using Schnute’s postulates as a starting point, we present a single, unified model for growth that can be successfully utilized for model selection in evolutionary computations. Depending on the parameter settings, the unified equation can describe several growth mechanisms. Such a generalized model mechanism, which encompasses a suite of competing models, can be successfully implemented in evolutionary computational algorithms to evolve the most parsimonious model that best fits ground truth data. We have done exactly this by testing the effectiveness of our reaction-diffusion-advection (RDA) model in an evolutionary computation model selection algorithm. The algorithm was validated (with success) against field data sets of the Zebra mussel invasion of Lake Champlain in the United States. PMID:17197072

  8. Magnetorotational instability: nonmodal growth and the relationship of global modes to the shearing box

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2014-12-10

    We study magnetorotational instability (MRI) using nonmodal stability techniques. Despite the spectral instability of many forms of MRI, this proves to be a natural method of analysis that is well-suited to deal with the non-self-adjoint nature of the linear MRI equations. We find that the fastest growing linear MRI structures on both local and global domains can look very different from the eigenmodes, invariably resembling waves shearing with the background flow (shear waves). In addition, such structures can grow many times faster than the least stable eigenmode over long time periods, and be localized in a completely different region of space. These ideas lead—for both axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric modes—to a natural connection between the global MRI and the local shearing box approximation. By illustrating that the fastest growing global structure is well described by the ordinary differential equations (ODEs) governing a single shear wave, we find that the shearing box is a very sensible approximation for the linear MRI, contrary to many previous claims. Since the shear wave ODEs are most naturally understood using nonmodal analysis techniques, we conclude by analyzing local MRI growth over finite timescales using these methods. The strong growth over a wide range of wave-numbers suggests that nonmodal linear physics could be of fundamental importance in MRI turbulence.

  9. Simulation of coupled bunch mode growth driven by a high-Q resonator: A transient response approach

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, S.; Bogacz, S.A.

    1989-03-01

    In this article the use of a longitudinal phase-space tracking code, ESME, to simulate the growth of a coupled-bunch instability in the Fermilab Booster is examined. A description of the calculation of the resonant response is given, and results are presented for the growth of the coupled bunch instability in a ring in which all of the rf buckets are equally populated and in one in which several consecutive buckets are empty. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Effect of Pb adatom flux rate on adlayer coverage for Stranski-Krastanov growth mode on Si(1 1 1)7 × 7 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesaria, Manoj; Kumar, Mahesh; Govind; Shivaprasad, S. M.

    2009-10-01

    Lead (Pb) has been a prototypical system to study diffusion and reconstruction of silicon surfaces. However, there is a discrepancy in literature regarding the critical coverage at which island formation takes place in the Stranski-Krastanov (S-K) mode. We address this issue by studying the initial stages of evolution of the Pb/Si(1 1 1)7 × 7 system by careful experiments in ultra-high vacuum with in situ characterization by auger electron spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and low-energy electron diffraction. We have adsorbed Pb onto clean Si(1 1 1 )7 × 7 surface with sub-monolayer control at different flux rates of 0.05 ML/min, 0.14 ML/min and 0.22 ML/min, at room temperature. The results clearly show that the coverage of the Pb adlayer before the onset of 3D Pb islands in the S-K mode depends on the flux rates. LEED results show the persistence of the (7 × 7) substrate reconstruction until the onset of the island formation, while EELS results do not show any intermixing at the interface. This suggests that the flux rates influence the kinetics of growth and the passivation of dangling bonds to result in the observed rate-dependent adlayer coverages.

  11. Synthesis, growth and characterization of ZnO microtubes using a traveling-wave mode microwave system

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Naser, Qusay A.H.; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Han; Liu, Guizhen; Wang, Lin

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • ZnO microtubes were successfully synthesized within 15 min. • Introducing a design of a traveling-wave mode microwave system. • Growth temperature of ZnO microtubes becomes predominant between 1350 °C and 1400 °C. • ZnO microtube showed a strong ultraviolet and a weak and broad green emission. • ZnO microtube is composed only of ZnO with high crystallinity. - Abstract: Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) investigation reveals that zinc oxide (ZnO) microtubes have been successfully synthesized via a traveling-wave mode microwave system. These products are hexagonal tubular crystals with an average diameter of 60 μm and 250 μm in length, having a well faceted end and side surfaces. The wall thickness of the ZnO tubes is about 3–5 μm. The influence of reaction temperature on the formation of crystalline ZnO hexagonal tubes is studied. Room temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectra have also been examined to explore the optical property which exhibits strong ultraviolet emission at 377.422 nm and a weak and broad green emission band at 587.548 nm. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) show that the product is composed only of ZnO with high crystallinity. The presented synthesis method possesses several advantages, which would be significant to the deeper study and wide applications of ZnO tubes in the future.

  12. A series of experiments aimed at clarifying the mode of action of barley straw in cyanobacterial growth control.

    PubMed

    Iredale, Robert S; McDonald, Adrian T; Adams, David G

    2012-11-15

    For over 25 years it has been known that rotting barley straw can be used to prevent the development of blooms of cyanobacteria and algae in freshwater bodies, although its effectiveness can be variable. The mode of action is still not understood, although a number of hypotheses have been suggested, many of which are supported by little or no experimental evidence. Here, we provide the first experimental confirmation that microbial activity is responsible for the release of either the growth inhibitory fraction, or its precursor, from whole straw, after three or more weeks of decomposition. However, a much more rapid release of inhibitory components was achieved by fine chopping of fresh straw. In bioassays of straw activity the choice of both the cyanobacterial test strain and the assay temperature affected the outcome. The inhibitory activity of straw was greater when decomposition was carried out in the presence of UV-supplemented visible light and this activity was reduced in the presence of catalase, implying that straw activity may in part involve hydrogen peroxide. A better understanding of straw decomposition is required to clarify the mode of action of straw and allow the optimisation of its use in the field.

  13. C-di-GMP regulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa stress response to tellurite during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Song Lin; Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Rybtke, Morten; Yuan, Mingjun; Andersen, Jens Bo; Nielsen, Thomas E.; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Cao, Bin; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Stress response plays an important role on microbial adaptation under hostile environmental conditions. It is generally unclear how the signaling transduction pathway mediates a stress response in planktonic and biofilm modes of microbial communities simultaneously. Here, we showed that metalloid tellurite (TeO32–) exposure induced the intracellular content of the secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), SadC and SiaD, were responsible for the increased intracellular content of c-di-GMP. Enhanced c-di-GMP levels by TeO32– further increased P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and resistance to TeO32–. P. aeruginosa ΔsadCΔsiaD and PAO1/plac-yhjH mutants with low intracellular c-di-GMP content were more sensitive to TeO32– exposure and had low relative fitness compared to the wild-type PAO1 planktonic and biofilm cultures exposed to TeO32–. Our study provided evidence that c-di-GMP level can play an important role in mediating stress response in microbial communities during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. PMID:25992876

  14. Densely adherent growth mode, rather than extracellular polymer substance matrix build-up ability, contributes to high resistance of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yue; Daley, Andrew J; Istivan, Taghrid S; Rouch, Duncan A; Deighton, Margaret A

    2010-07-01

    (i) To evaluate the role of the adherent growth mode and extracellular polymer substance build-up in biofilm resistance to antibiotics. (ii) To re-assess various mechanisms leading to biofilm resistance to antibiotics. We compared the biofilm MICs, biofilm MBCs using the viable count method, biofilm MBCs based on broth recovery methods and minimum biofilm eradication concentrations (MBECs) of antistaphylococcal antibiotics for multilayer biofilms formed by 'biofilm-positive' S. epidermidis strains and monolayer biofilms formed by their 'biofilm-negative' mutants/variants. Bacterial densities and the quantity of persister cells in both multilayer and monolayer biofilms were assessed to evaluate their roles in biofilm resistance. Monolayer and multilayer biofilms presented similar susceptibilities to multiple antibiotics, based on biofilm MIC, broth recovery-based biofilm MBC and MBEC results. Multilayer biofilms demonstrated higher viable count-based MBCs than monolayer biofilms. Both monolayer and multilayer biofilms had very high bacterial densities of approximately 10(11-12) cfu/mL. Persister cells were found in both monolayer and multilayer biofilms, but not in planktonic cultures at log phase. The presence of persister cells in monolayer and multilayer biofilms appeared to be strain and antibiotic dependent. The adherent growth mode, rather than the ability to build up a typical multilayer biofilm structure, contributes to the high resistance of biofilms to antibiotics, and therefore might be the main virulence factor of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) with respect to antibiotic resistance. The presence of persister cells in CoNS biofilms plays an important role in antibiotic resistance. Growth at high bacterial densities is another significant factor in biofilm resistance.

  15. Evaluation of proximal caries in images resulting from different modes of radiographic digitalization

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, CRG; Araujo-Pires, AC; Poleti, ML; Rubira-Bullen, IRF; Ferreira, O; Capelozza, ALA

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the performances of observers in diagnosing proximal caries in digital images obtained from digital bitewing radiographs using two scanners and four digital cameras in Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) and tagged image file format (TIFF) files, and comparing them with the original conventional radiographs. Method In total, 56 extracted teeth were radiographed with Kodak Insight film (Eastman Kodak, Rochester, NY) in a Kaycor Yoshida X-ray device (Kaycor X-707; Yoshida Dental Manufacturing Co., Tokyo, Japan) operating at 70 kV and 7 mA with an exposure time of 0.40 s. The radiographs were obtained and scanned by CanonScan D646U (Canon USA Inc., Newport News, VA) and Genius ColorPage HR7X (KYE Systems Corp. America, Doral, FL) scanners, and by Canon Powershot G2 (Canon USA Inc.), Canon RebelXT (Canon USA Inc.), Nikon Coolpix 8700 (Nikon Inc., Melville, NY), and Nikon D70s (Nikon Inc.) digital cameras in JPEG and TIFF formats. Three observers evaluated the images. The teeth were then observed under the microscope in polarized light for the verification of the presence and depth of the carious lesions. Results The probability of no diagnosis ranged from 1.34% (Insight film) to 52.83% (CanonScan/JPEG). The sensitivity ranged from 0.24 (Canon RebelXT/JPEG) to 0.53 (Insight film), the specificity ranged from 0.93 (Nikon Coolpix/JPEG, Canon Powershot/TIFF, Canon RebelXT/JPEG and TIFF) to 0.97 (CanonScan/TIFF and JPEG) and the accuracy ranged from 0.82 (Canon RebelXT/JPEG) to 0.91 (CanonScan/JPEG). Conclusion The carious lesion diagnosis did not change in either of the file formats (JPEG and TIFF) in which the images were saved for any of the equipment used. Only the CanonScan scanner did not have adequate performance in radiography digitalization for caries diagnosis and it is not recommended for this purpose. PMID:21831972

  16. Jasmonate controls leaf growth by repressing cell proliferation and the onset of endoreduplication while maintaining a potential stand-by mode.

    PubMed

    Noir, Sandra; Bömer, Moritz; Takahashi, Naoki; Ishida, Takashi; Tsui, Tjir-Li; Balbi, Virginia; Shanahan, Hugh; Sugimoto, Keiko; Devoto, Alessandra

    2013-04-01

    Phytohormones regulate plant growth from cell division to organ development. Jasmonates (JAs) are signaling molecules that have been implicated in stress-induced responses. However, they have also been shown to inhibit plant growth, but the mechanisms are not well understood. The effects of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) on leaf growth regulation were investigated in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants altered in JA synthesis and perception, allene oxide synthase and coi1-16B (for coronatine insensitive1), respectively. We show that MeJA inhibits leaf growth through the JA receptor COI1 by reducing both cell number and size. Further investigations using flow cytometry analyses allowed us to evaluate ploidy levels and to monitor cell cycle progression in leaves and cotyledons of Arabidopsis and/or Nicotiana benthamiana at different stages of development. Additionally, a novel global transcription profiling analysis involving continuous treatment with MeJA was carried out to identify the molecular players whose expression is regulated during leaf development by this hormone and COI1. The results of these studies revealed that MeJA delays the switch from the mitotic cell cycle to the endoreduplication cycle, which accompanies cell expansion, in a COI1-dependent manner and inhibits the mitotic cycle itself, arresting cells in G1 phase prior to the S-phase transition. Significantly, we show that MeJA activates critical regulators of endoreduplication and affects the expression of key determinants of DNA replication. Our discoveries also suggest that MeJA may contribute to the maintenance of a cellular "stand-by mode" by keeping the expression of ribosomal genes at an elevated level. Finally, we propose a novel model for MeJA-regulated COI1-dependent leaf growth inhibition.

  17. In-situ growth of HfO2 on clean 2H-MoS2 surface: Growth mode, interface reactions and energy band alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chang Pang; Ong, Bin Leong; Ong, Sheau Wei; Ong, Weijie; Tan, Hui Ru; Chai, Jian Wei; Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Shi Jie; Pan, Ji Sheng; Harrison, Leslie John; Kang, Hway Chuan; Tok, Eng Soon

    2017-10-01

    Room temperature growth of HfO2 thin film on clean 2H-MoS2 via plasma-sputtering of Hf-metal target in an argon/oxygen environment was studied in-situ using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The deposited film was observed to grow akin to a layer-by-layer growth mode. At the onset of growth, a mixture of sulfate- and sulfite-like species (SOx2- where x = 3, 4), and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3), are formed at the HfO2/MoS2 interface. An initial decrease in binding energies for both Mo 3d and S 2p core-levels of the MoS2 substrate by 0.4 eV was also observed. Their binding energies, however, did not change further with increasing HfO2 thickness. There was no observable change in the Hf4f core-level binding energy throughout the deposition process. With increasing HfO2 deposition, MoO3 becomes buried at the interface while SOx2- was observed to be present in the film. The shift of 0.4 eV for both Mo 3d and S 2p core-levels of the MoS2 substrate can be attributed to a charge transfer from the substrate to the MoO3/SOx2--like interface layer. Consequently, the Type I heterojunction valence band offset (conduction band offset) becomes 1.7 eV (2.9 eV) instead of 1.3 eV (3.3 eV) expected from considering the bulk HfO2 and MoS2 valence band offset (conduction band offset). The formation of these states and its influence on band offsets will need to be considered in their device applications.

  18. Growth rate enhancement by microcrystals and the quality of resulting potash alum crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiyama, H.; Tezuka, N.; Matsuoka, M.; Ristic, R. I.; Sherwood, J. N.

    1998-09-01

    Growth rate enhancement resulting from the addition of ground powder crystals to a growing larger crystal has been examined for the potash alum-water system. The crystal quality of the large crystal after the addition and subsequent growth rate enhancement was evaluated in terms of the formation of inclusions and dislocations. Inclusions were observed with an optical microscope and the dislocations were analysed using X-ray transmission topography. It was found that the development of inclusions occurs at the time of the addition to the solution of the ground powder crystals and their attachment to the growing crystal surface. Simultaneously, dislocation bundles were generated. It is proposed that the inclusions form as the growing crystal surface envelopes the adhering particles and that the dislocations form both as a consequence of the strain that develops and the lattice mismatch required to refacet the surface. Both result in the development of additional growth centres which cause the growth rate enhancement.

  19. Initial results of Alloy 600 crack growth rate testing in PWR environments

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, J.P.; Bamford, W.H.; Pathania, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    Initial crack growth rate results on the effects of stress intensity factor, temperature, material heat and experimental methods were studied on Alloy 600 control rod drive head penetrations using fracture mechanics samples. Crack growth rate data were obtained using the reverse DC potential difference crack monitoring method on 1/2T CT samples tested at temperatures of 310 to 330 C in 1200 ppm B + 2 ppm Li + 25 cc/kg H{sub 2} water. The results are consistent with a crack growth rate estimation model developed by Scott. Most of the heats tested to date are consistent with the Scott model; however, enhanced crack growth rates were exhibited by two heats with low grain boundary carbide coverage.

  20. Transition from laminar to three-dimensional growth mode in pulsed laser deposited BiFeO3 film on (001) SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinta, Priya V.; Callori, Sara J.; Dawber, Matthew; Ashrafi, Almamun; Headrick, Randall L.

    2012-11-01

    Real-time specular x-ray reflectivity of pulsed laser deposited BiFeO3 films exhibits unit-cell oscillations, with diffuse scattering intensity out-of-phase with the specular intensity. The growth mode is thus identified as nucleation and coalescence of unit-cell height islands. The growth rate is insensitive to the deposition rate, suggesting self-limiting growth. Beyond several monolayers the diffuse intensity increases abruptly, signaling a transition from two-dimensional to three-dimensional growth. Ex situ atomic force microscopy shows that mounds merge after a few more deposited layers, leaving arrays of mesas with some holes due to incomplete coalescence.

  1. Flat or lumpy: Surface structure and growth modes in silicon-germanium epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailes, Allison Arthur, III

    We have investigated the surface structure of Ge/Sb/Si(100) and H/Ge/Si(100) with transmission ion channeling. The former was a continuation of our studies of surfactant-mediated epitaxy and our attempt to determine the exchange mechanism as the surfactant segregates to the surface during growth. The method of analysis used for this part was comparison of experimental with simulated scattered ion energy distributions. Our interest in the latter system grew out of the differences observed between H/Si(100) and H/Ge(100). We studied this system using the traditional angular scan (yield versus tilt) analysis. After depositing Ge on Sb-terminated Si(100)-2x1 at room temperature (RT), we collected ion scattering data near the < 100> direction of beam incidence. First, we determined that the single adatom exchange model did not fit our previous data for Ge coverages of 0.15 ML and 0.68 ML. Second, we deposited 2 ML Ge and found the system at RT to be in the same configuration that we had found for 0.68 ML Ge (elongated Ge dimers). Third, we studied this system with 0.4 ML Ge after RT and after anneals at 80sp°C, 150sp°C, 200sp°C, 350sp°C, and 500sp°C. We found the Ge to be described by the all dimer model at RT and 80sp°C, an intermediate state at 150sp°C and 200sp°C, and the final state (Sb dimers and near-substitutional Ge) at 350sp°C, and 500sp°C. We had difficulty distinguishing between which of three models best described the Sb structure in this experiment because of limitations in the method of analyzing energy distributions. We found energy shifts in the experimental distributions that can be caused by thickness variation and perhaps by deformation of the sample because of strain in the Ge layer. Finally, in our study of the monohydride-covered Ge/Si(100) surface, we determined that the Ge dimers were elongated relative to the previously-studied Ge/Si(100) without H. The dimer bond length was 2.8 A and the dimers were untilted, whereas previous work

  2. [Effects of different fertilization modes on vegetable growth, fertilizer nitrogen utilization, and nitrogen loss from vegetable field].

    PubMed

    Huang, Dong-feng; Wang, Guo; Li, Wei-hua; Qiu, Xiao-xuan

    2009-03-01

    A field experiment with Chinese cabbage, water spinach, and three-colored amaranth cropped three times in one year was conducted to study the effects of seven fertilization modes, i.e., none fertilization, basal application of chemical fertilizers, 1/2 basal application and 1/2 top-dressing of chemical fertilizers, basal application of chemical fertilizers and dicyandiamide, 1/2 basal application and 1/2 top-dressing of chemical fertilizers and dicyandiamide, 1/2 basal application and 1/2 top-dressing of chemical fertilizers and organic manure, and basal application of organic manure, on the plant height, yield, nitrogen accumulation, and fertilizer nitrogen utilization of the vegetables, and the loss of NO3- -N and NH4+ -N from vegetable field under natural rainfall condition. The results showed that comparing with none fertilization, the fertilization modes '1/2 basal application and 1/2 top-dressing of chemical fertilizers and organic manure' and 'basal application of chemical fertilizers and dicyandiamide' improved the agronomic properties of test vegetables, increased their yields by 103%-219% and 93%-226%, and nitrogen accumulation by 153% -216% and 231%-320%, respectively, and enhanced fertilizer nitrogen utilization rate. They also decreased the surface runoff loss of NO3- -N and NH4+ -N by 48.1% and 46.5%, respectively, compared with the mode 'basal application of chemical fertilizers', and hence, reduced the risk of agricultural non-point pollution. Therefore, these two fertilization modes could be popularized in vegetable production.

  3. 45-Day safety screen results for Tank 241-U-201, push mode, cores 70, 73 and 74

    SciTech Connect

    Sathyanarayana, P.

    1995-05-04

    Three core samples, each having two segments, from Tank 241-U-201 (U-201) were received by the 222-S Laboratories. Safety screening analysis, such as differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and total alpha activity were conducted on Core 70, Segment 1 and 2 and on Core 73, Segment 1 and 2. Core 74, Segment 1 and 2 were taken to test rotary bit in push mode sampling. No analysis was requested on Core 74, Segment 1 and 2. Analytical results for the TGA analyses for Core 70, Segment 1, Upper half solid sample was less than the safety screening notification limit of 17 percent water. Notification was made on April 27, 1995. No exotherm was associated with this sample. Analytical results are presented in Tables 1 to 4, with the applicable notification limits shaded.

  4. High-Ti, bright-CL rims in volcanic quartz: a result of very rapid growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamukcu, Ayla S.; Ghiorso, Mark S.; Gualda, Guilherme A. R.

    2016-12-01

    Volcanic quartz commonly contains Ti-enriched zones and CO2-enriched melt inclusions, and crystallization temperatures and pressures derived from Ti-in-quartz geothermobarometry and H2O-CO2 glass geobarometry applied to these compositions are typically high. Consequently, these features are generally interpreted to represent high temperatures and/or pressures. Yet, growth rate estimates from some high-Ti/bright-CL quartz rims suggest they grew at rates orders of magnitude faster than did cores and interiors of the crystals. This observation is notable in light of studies that suggest that fast crystal growth rates can produce a boundary layer in the melt surrounding a growing crystal that is enriched in components that diffuse comparatively slowly in the melt. In these circumstances, the composition of zones or melt inclusions formed from such a boundary layer melt will not accurately represent that of the far-field melt, and temperatures and pressures estimated from these compositions will be anomalous. We use a numerical model based on the coupled growth-diffusion equation of Lasaga (1982) to assess the effect of growth rate on the production of high-Ti/bright-CL zones and high-CO2 melt inclusions in quartz in rhyolitic melts. Simulations span a wide range of growth rates (10-7 to 10-13 m/s) and timescales (1 minute-1 year), and results suggest that quartz growth at 10-10 m/s or faster can produce a boundary layer enriched in these components. This suggests that appropriate application of Ti-in-quartz and H2O-CO2 glass geothermobarometry is contingent upon the verification that the compositions used are not those of boundary layer melts. Applying our model to the Bishop Tuff, which contains quartz displaying high-Ti/bright-CL rims and high-CO2 rim-hosted melt inclusions, we find that growth rates of 10-7 to 10-9 m/s can produce the observed enrichments in these components over the timescales estimated for the growth of the rims (days-weeks); these growth rates

  5. Planck intermediate results: XLI. A map of lensing-induced B-modes

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Harrison, D. L.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-12-12

    The secondary cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-modes stem from the post-decoupling distortion of the polarization E-modes due to the gravitational lensing effect of large-scale structures. These lensing-induced B-modes constitute both a valuable probe of the dark matter distribution and an important contaminant for the extraction of the primary CMB B-modes from inflation. Planck provides accurate nearly all-sky measurements of both the polarization E-modes and the integrated mass distribution via the reconstruction of the CMB lensing potential. By combining these two data products, we have produced in this paper an all-sky template map of the lensing-induced B-modes using a real-space algorithm that minimizes the impact of sky masks. The cross-correlation of this template with an observed (primordial and secondary) B-mode map can be used to measure the lensing B-mode power spectrum at multipoles up to 2000. In particular, when cross-correlating with the B-mode contribution directly derived from the Planck polarization maps, we obtain lensing-induced B-mode power spectrum measurement at a significance level of 12σ, which agrees with the theoretical expectation derived from the Planck best-fit Λ cold dark matter model. This unique nearly all-sky secondary B-mode template, which includes the lensing-induced information from intermediate to small (10 ≲ ℓ ≲ 1000) angular scales, is delivered as part of the Planck 2015 public data release. Finally, it will be particularly useful for experiments searching for primordial B-modes, such as BICEP2/Keck Array or LiteBIRD, since it will enable an estimate to be made of the lensing-induced contribution to the measured total CMB B-modes.

  6. Mode of the autocrine/paracrine mechanism of growth hormone action.

    PubMed

    Liu, N; Mertani, H C; Norstedt, G; Törnell, J; Lobie, P E

    1997-11-25

    GH is synthesized at multiple extrapituitary sites suggestive of an autocrine/paracrine mechanism of action. We have investigated a possible autocrine/paracrine mechanism of GH action, compared the cellular response to exogenous versus endogenously produced GH, and determined the nature of the interaction between external stimuli and endogenously produced GH. BRL cells expressing the GH receptor were transiently transfected with expression plasmids containing either the hGH or the bGH gene and the response of the cell was measured by CAT reporter plasmids requiring either STATs 1 and 3 or STAT5 for their response. Transient transfection of the hGH gene resulted in hGH accumulation in the cell and secretion into the media. The functional response through STATs 1 and 3 and STAT5 obtained with endogenously produced hGH was comparable or greater in magnitude to that obtained with the maximal stimulatory dose of exogenous hGH. Similar results were obtained with an expression plasmid containing the bGH gene. Endogenously produced hGH interacted in an additive manner when combined with submaximal doses of both exogenous hGH and serum. Such results were also observed in a more physiologically relevant mammary carcinoma cell line (MCF-7). The nonreceptor-dimerizing hGH antagonist, hGH-G120R, used in cells expressing the homologous receptor extracellular domain was able to only partially inhibit the response of the cell to endogenously produced hGH, in contrast to full inhibition of exogenous hGH. We therefore conclude that GH can function in an autocrine/paracrine manner, additive in effect to external stimuli.

  7. Energy of auroral electrons and Z mode generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss-Varban, D.; Wong, H. K.

    1990-01-01

    The present consideration of Z-mode radiation generation, in light of observational results indicating that the O mode and second-harmonic X-mode emissions can prevail over the X-mode fundamental radiation when suprathermal electron energy is low, gives attention to whether the thermal effect on the Z-mode dispersion can be equally important, and whether the Z-mode can compete for the available free-energy source. It is found that, under suitable circumstances, the growth rate of the Z-mode can be substantial even for low suprathermal auroral electron energies. Growth is generally maximized for propagation perpendicular to the magnetic field.

  8. Energy of auroral electrons and Z mode generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss-Varban, D.; Wong, H. K.

    1990-01-01

    The present consideration of Z-mode radiation generation, in light of observational results indicating that the O mode and second-harmonic X-mode emissions can prevail over the X-mode fundamental radiation when suprathermal electron energy is low, gives attention to whether the thermal effect on the Z-mode dispersion can be equally important, and whether the Z-mode can compete for the available free-energy source. It is found that, under suitable circumstances, the growth rate of the Z-mode can be substantial even for low suprathermal auroral electron energies. Growth is generally maximized for propagation perpendicular to the magnetic field.

  9. Mixed Mode I and II Fully Plastic Crack Growth from Simulated Weld Defects.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-23

    steel 281 348 105 61.1 hot rolled 0.29% C max, 0.60-0.90% Mn HY80 steel 587 692 175 69.9 0.18% C, 2-3.25% Ni, 0.10-0.40...8217S MN/rn Alloy *1018 steel 796 0.05152 0.10 cold finished 1018 steel 818 0.01718 0.23 normalized A36 steel 697 0.02628 0.24 hot rolled * HY80 steel 1107...0.00702 0.12 *HY100 steel 1180 0.00488 0.10 5088-Hlll 589 0.00554 0.19 - aluminum 47 TABLE 3 - TEST RESULTS (Ligament 10=2.54 mm) Alloy 1018 CF HY80

  10. Biofilm growth mode promotes maximum carrying capacity and community stability during product inhibition syntrophy.

    PubMed

    Brileya, Kristen A; Camilleri, Laura B; Zane, Grant M; Wall, Judy D; Fields, Matthew W

    2014-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can interact syntrophically with other community members in the absence of sulfate, and interactions with hydrogen-consuming methanogens are beneficial when these archaea consume potentially inhibitory H2 produced by the SRB. A dual continuous culture approach was used to characterize population structure within a syntrophic biofilm formed by the SRB Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and the methanogenic archaeum Methanococcus maripaludis. Under the tested conditions, monocultures of D. vulgaris formed thin, stable biofilms, but monoculture M. maripaludis did not. Microscopy of intact syntrophic biofilm confirmed that D. vulgaris formed a scaffold for the biofilm, while intermediate and steady-state images revealed that M. maripaludis joined the biofilm later, likely in response to H2 produced by the SRB. Close interactions in structured biofilm allowed efficient transfer of H2 to M. maripaludis, and H2 was only detected in cocultures with a mutant SRB that was deficient in biofilm formation (ΔpilA). M. maripaludis produced more carbohydrate (uronic acid, hexose, and pentose) as a monoculture compared to total coculture biofilm, and this suggested an altered carbon flux during syntrophy. The syntrophic biofilm was structured into ridges (∼300 × 50 μm) and models predicted lactate limitation at ∼50 μm biofilm depth. The biofilm had structure that likely facilitated mass transfer of H2 and lactate, yet maximized biomass with a more even population composition (number of each organism) when compared to the bulk-phase community. Total biomass protein was equivalent in lactate-limited and lactate-excess conditions when a biofilm was present, but in the absence of biofilm, total biomass protein was significantly reduced. The results suggest that multispecies biofilms create an environment conducive to resource sharing, resulting in increased biomass retention, or carrying capacity, for cooperative populations.

  11. Biofilm growth mode promotes maximum carrying capacity and community stability during product inhibition syntrophy

    PubMed Central

    Brileya, Kristen A.; Camilleri, Laura B.; Zane, Grant M.; Wall, Judy D.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2014-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can interact syntrophically with other community members in the absence of sulfate, and interactions with hydrogen-consuming methanogens are beneficial when these archaea consume potentially inhibitory H2 produced by the SRB. A dual continuous culture approach was used to characterize population structure within a syntrophic biofilm formed by the SRB Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and the methanogenic archaeum Methanococcus maripaludis. Under the tested conditions, monocultures of D. vulgaris formed thin, stable biofilms, but monoculture M. maripaludis did not. Microscopy of intact syntrophic biofilm confirmed that D. vulgaris formed a scaffold for the biofilm, while intermediate and steady-state images revealed that M. maripaludis joined the biofilm later, likely in response to H2 produced by the SRB. Close interactions in structured biofilm allowed efficient transfer of H2 to M. maripaludis, and H2 was only detected in cocultures with a mutant SRB that was deficient in biofilm formation (ΔpilA). M. maripaludis produced more carbohydrate (uronic acid, hexose, and pentose) as a monoculture compared to total coculture biofilm, and this suggested an altered carbon flux during syntrophy. The syntrophic biofilm was structured into ridges (∼300 × 50 μm) and models predicted lactate limitation at ∼50 μm biofilm depth. The biofilm had structure that likely facilitated mass transfer of H2 and lactate, yet maximized biomass with a more even population composition (number of each organism) when compared to the bulk-phase community. Total biomass protein was equivalent in lactate-limited and lactate-excess conditions when a biofilm was present, but in the absence of biofilm, total biomass protein was significantly reduced. The results suggest that multispecies biofilms create an environment conducive to resource sharing, resulting in increased biomass retention, or carrying capacity, for cooperative populations. PMID:25566209

  12. Test beam results of micro channel plates in 'ionisation mode' for the detection of single charged particle and electromagnetic showers

    SciTech Connect

    Barnyakov, A.; Barnyakov, M.; Brianza, L.; Ghezzi, A.; Gotti, C.; Govoni, P.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Pigazzini, S.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Trevisani, N.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Gelli, S.; Jorda Lope, C.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Pernie, L.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.

    2015-07-01

    IMCP is an R and D project aimed at the exploitation of secondary emission of electrons from the surface of microchannel plates (MCP) for fast timing of showers in high rate environments. The usage of MCPs in 'ionisation' mode has long been proposed and is used extensively in ion time-of-flight mass spectrometers. What has not been investigated in depth is their use to detect the ionizing component of showers. The fast time resolution of MCPs exceeds anything that has been previously used in calorimeters, and, if exploited effectively, could aid in the event reconstruction at high luminosities. Results from tests with electrons with energies up to 150 GeV of MCP devices with different characteristics will be presented, in particular detection efficiency and time resolution. (authors)

  13. The Growth Characteristics of Patients with Noonan Syndrome: Results of Three Years of Growth Hormone Treatment: A Nationwide Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Şıklar, Zeynep; Genens, Mikayir; Poyrazoğlu, Şükran; Baş, Firdevs; Darendeliler, Feyza; Bundak, Rüveyde; Aycan, Zehra; Savaş Erdeve, Şenay; Çetinkaya, Semra; Güven, Ayla; Abalı, Saygın; Atay, Zeynep; Turan, Serap; Kara, Cengiz; Can Yılmaz, Gülay; Akyürek, Nesibe; Abacı, Ayhan; Çelmeli, Gamze; Sarı, Erkan; Bolu, Semih; Korkmaz, Hüseyin Anıl; Şimşek, Enver; Çatlı, Gönül; Büyükinan, Muammer; Çayır, Atilla; Evliyaoğlu, Olcay; İşgüven, Pınar; Özgen, Tolga; Hatipoğlu, Nihal; Elhan, Atilla Halil; Berberoğlu, Merih

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Noonan syndrome (NS) is a multisystem disorder, and short stature is its most striking manifestation. Optimal growth hormone (GH) treatment for NS is still controversial. In this study, using a nationwide registration system, we aimed to evaluate the growth characteristics and the clinical features of NS patients in Turkey and their growth response to GH treatment. Methods: Children and adolescents with a diagnosis of NS were included inthe study. Laboratory assessment including standard GH stimulation test results were evaluated. Height increment of patients with or without GH treatment were analyzed after three years of therapy. Results: A total of 124 NS patients from different centers were entered in the web-based system. Short stature and typical face appearance were the most frequently encountered diagnostic features of our patients. Of the 84 patients who were followed long-term, 47 hadreceived recombinant human GH (rhGH). In this group of 47 patients, height standard deviation score (HSDS) increased from -3.62±1.14 to -2.85±0.96 after three years of therapy, indicating significant differences from the patients who did not receive GH treatment. PTPN11 gene was analyzed in 61 patients, and 64% of these patients were found to have a mutation. HSDS at admission was similar in patients with or without PTPN11 gene mutation. Conclusion: A diagnosis of NS should be kept in mind in all patients with short stature showing systemic clinical findings. GH therapy is effective for improvement of short stature especially in the first two years of treatment. Further studies are needed for optimisation of GH therapy and evaluation of final height data in NS patients. PMID:27125300

  14. Investigations with the Sentinel-1 Interferometric Wide Swath mode: first results and comparison with in-situ geodetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgstrom, Sven; Del Gaudio, Carlo; De Martino, Prospero; Ricciardi, Giovanni P.; Ricco, Ciro; Siniscalchi, Valeria; Prats-Iraola, Pau; Nannini, Matteo; Costantini, Mario; Minati, Federico; Walter, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The contribution focuses on the current status of the ESA study entitled "INSARAP: Sentinel-1 InSAR Performance study with TOPS Data". The study investigates the performance of the interferometric wide swath (IW) mode of Sentinel-1, which is implemented using the terrain observation by progressive scans (TOPS) mode. In this regard, first analyses with Sentinel-1 time series will be shown, with a comparison with in-situ geodetic measurements on different test sites identified in the framework of the study, namely, Campi Flegrei/Vesuvius area in Italy, Istanbul city in Turkey, and Mexico City. The evaluation of the results will be performed by exploiting mainly continuous GPS stations located on the different sites, besides leveling measurements when also available. Also in a recent past, the comparison between InSAR and continuous GPS data, the latter projected into the radar LOS, has proven to be very effective for a cross comparison, besides InSAR Cal/Val activities, as it was for instance in the case of the recent inflation events occurred in Campi Flegrei area, marked by the well know bradyseismic phenomenon. Although continuous GPS networks are characterized by a poor space coverage in comparison with InSAR results, continuous GPS data recording allows to complement the geodetic information from InSAR sensors, limited by their revisiting time. The issue to be faced in this study is the possibility to deal with very low deformation rates in comparison with the Sentinel-1 C-band data, although the Sentinel-1 time series we expect to get from October 2014 to date should allow the identification of ground deformation in the areas of interest.

  15. A Microplate Growth Inhibition Assay for Screening Bacteriocins against Listeria monocytogenes to Differentiate Their Mode-of-Action.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Paul Priyesh; Muriana, Peter M

    2015-06-11

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have historically been used in food fermentations to preserve foods and are generally-recognized-as-safe (GRAS) by the FDA for use as food ingredients. In addition to lactic acid; some strains also produce bacteriocins that have been proposed for use as food preservatives. In this study we examined the inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes 39-2 by neutralized and non-neutralized bacteriocin preparations (Bac+ preps) produced by Lactobacillus curvatus FS47; Lb. curvatus Beef3; Pediococcus acidilactici Bac3; Lactococcus lactis FLS1; Enterococcus faecium FS56-1; and Enterococcus thailandicus FS92. Activity differences between non-neutralized and neutralized Bac+ preps in agar spot assays could not readily be attributed to acid because a bacteriocin-negative control strain was not inhibitory to Listeria in these assays. When neutralized and non-neutralized Bac+ preps were used in microplate growth inhibition assays against L. monocytogenes 39-2 we observed some differences attributed to acid inhibition. A microplate growth inhibition assay was used to compare inhibitory reactions of wild-type and bacteriocin-resistant variants of L. monocytogenes to differentiate bacteriocins with different modes-of-action (MOA) whereby curvaticins FS47 and Beef3, and pediocin Bac3 were categorized to be in MOA1; enterocins FS92 and FS56-1 in MOA2; and lacticin FLS1 in MOA3. The microplate bacteriocin MOA assay establishes a platform to evaluate the best combination of bacteriocin preparations for use in food applications as biopreservatives against L. monocytogenes.

  16. A Microplate Growth Inhibition Assay for Screening Bacteriocins against Listeria monocytogenes to Differentiate Their Mode-of-Action

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Paul Priyesh; Muriana, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have historically been used in food fermentations to preserve foods and are generally-recognized-as-safe (GRAS) by the FDA for use as food ingredients. In addition to lactic acid; some strains also produce bacteriocins that have been proposed for use as food preservatives. In this study we examined the inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes 39-2 by neutralized and non-neutralized bacteriocin preparations (Bac+ preps) produced by Lactobacillus curvatus FS47; Lb. curvatus Beef3; Pediococcus acidilactici Bac3; Lactococcus lactis FLS1; Enterococcus faecium FS56-1; and Enterococcus thailandicus FS92. Activity differences between non-neutralized and neutralized Bac+ preps in agar spot assays could not readily be attributed to acid because a bacteriocin-negative control strain was not inhibitory to Listeria in these assays. When neutralized and non-neutralized Bac+ preps were used in microplate growth inhibition assays against L. monocytogenes 39-2 we observed some differences attributed to acid inhibition. A microplate growth inhibition assay was used to compare inhibitory reactions of wild-type and bacteriocin-resistant variants of L. monocytogenes to differentiate bacteriocins with different modes-of-action (MOA) whereby curvaticins FS47 and Beef3, and pediocin Bac3 were categorized to be in MOA1; enterocins FS92 and FS56-1 in MOA2; and lacticin FLS1 in MOA3. The microplate bacteriocin MOA assay establishes a platform to evaluate the best combination of bacteriocin preparations for use in food applications as biopreservatives against L. monocytogenes. PMID:26111195

  17. The Membrane-anchoring Domain of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Ligands Dictates Their Ability to Operate in Juxtacrine Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Jianying; Opresko, Lee; Chrisler, William B.; Orr, Galya; Quesenberry, Ryan D.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Wiley, H S.

    2005-06-01

    All ligands of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are synthesized as membrane-anchored precursors. Previous work has suggested that some ligands, such as EGF, must be proteolytically released to be active, whereas others, such as heparin binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) can function while still anchored to the membrane (i.e., juxtacrine signaling). To explore the structural basis for these differences in ligand activity, we engineered a series of membrane-anchored ligands in which the core, receptor-binding domain of EGF was combined with different domains of both EGF and HB-EGF. We found that ligands having the N-terminal extension of EGF could not bind to the EGFR, even when released from the membrane. Ligands lacking an N-terminal extension, but possessing the membrane-anchoring domain of EGF still required proteolytic release for activity, whereas ligands with the membrane anchoring domain of HB-EGF could elicit full biological activity while still membrane anchored. Ligands containing the HB-EGF membrane anchor, but lacking an N-terminal extension, activated EGFR during their transit through the Golgi apparatus . However, cell-mixing experiments and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) studies showed that juxtacrine signaling typically occurred in trans at the cell surface, at points of cell-cell contact. Our data suggest that the membrane-anchoring domain of ligands selectively controls their ability to participate in juxtacrine signaling and thus, only a subclass of EGFR ligands can act in a juxtacrine mode.

  18. Influence of surface hydroxylation on 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane growth mode during chemical functionalization of GaN Surfaces: an angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Arranz, A; Palacio, C; García-Fresnadillo, D; Orellana, G; Navarro, A; Muñoz, E

    2008-08-19

    A comparative study of the chemical functionalization of undoped, n- and p-type GaN layers grown on sapphire substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition was carried out. Both types of samples were chemically functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) using a well-established silane-based approach for functionalizing hydroxylated surfaces. The untreated surfaces as well as those modified by hydroxylation and APTES deposition were analyzed using angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Strong differences were found between the APTES growth modes on n- and p-GaN surfaces that can be associated with the number of available hydroxyl groups on the GaN surface of each sample. Depending on the density of surface hydroxyl groups, different mechanisms of APTES attachment to the GaN surface take place in such a way that the APTES growth mode changes from a monolayer to a multilayer growth mode when the number of surface hydroxyl groups is decreased. Specifically, a monolayer growth mode with a surface coverage of approximately 78% was found on p-GaN, whereas the formation of a dense film, approximately 3 monolayers thick, was observed on n-GaN.

  19. Evidencing the transition from Mode I cracking to dilation banding: Results from physical experiments with fractographic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, S.; Chemenda, A.; Petit, J.; Ambre, J.; Geo-Fracnet-Géoazur

    2010-12-01

    The mechanism of quasi-brittle fracture/rupture remains one of the central problems in different domains of material science/mechanics including geomechanics. There are basically two approaches to this problem. One is the fracture mechanics dealing with stability conditions of cracks characterized by a strong stress concentration at the tips causing crack propagation. The other approach is the formation of deformation localization bands as constitutive instabilities, whose onset in quasi-brittle rocks can be considered as corresponding to the inception of rupture. We investigate the conditions of applicability of these end-member approaches and show a continuous transition from one to another with an increase in the confining pressure P in the experimental extension tests on a synthetic physical rock analogue (granular, frictional, cohesive and dilatant) material GRAM1. Discontinuities/fractures perpendicular to the least (axial) stress σ3 were generated in GRAM1 samples. These fractures form dynamically and are of two types defined by the mean stress σ or P. When σ is very small, the fractures form through mode I cracking with σ3 equal to the material tensile strength. The fracture walls have smooth surfaces in this case. Increase in σ causes increase in σ3 at fracturing, which becomes less negative and reaches small positive (compression) values, while the failure still occurs along a discontinuity perpendicular to σ3. Thus, the discontinuities generated starting from a certain σ value cannot be mode I fractures. Increase in σ also results in changes in the relief of the surfaces of discontinuities after their postmortem opening (separation of the walls): the surfaces become rougher, with the topography features forming faint/delicate plumose patterns very similar to those on the geological joint walls. SEM observations of the unopened discontinuities show that they represent several grain sizes-thick bands of a material which underwent a heterogeneous

  20. Whiskey springs long-term coast redwood density management; final growth, sprout, and yield results

    Treesearch

    Lynn A. Webb; James L. Lindquist; Erik Wahl; Andrew. Hubb

    2012-01-01

    Multi-decadal studies of commercial and precommercial thinning in redwood stands are rare and consequently of value. The Whiskey Springs study at Jackson Demonstration State Forest has a data set spanning 35 years. In addition to growth and yield response to commercial thinning, the results provide important information for evaluating regeneration and...

  1. Tree damage resulting from thinning in young-growth Douglas-fir and western hemlock.

    Treesearch

    Norman P. Worthington

    1961-01-01

    Thinning trials on three cooperative experimental forests in western Washington have provided an excellent opportunity to evaluate tree damage resulting from typical thinning operations in young-growth timber. The type and degree of damage can, of course, be expected to strongly affect condition and vigor of the residual stand and ultimate success of a thinning regime...

  2. Impact of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae biofilm mode of growth on the lipid A structures and stimulation of immune cells.

    PubMed

    Hathroubi, Skander; Beaudry, Francis; Provost, Chantale; Martelet, Léa; Segura, Mariela; Gagnon, Carl A; Jacques, Mario

    2016-07-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (APP), the etiologic agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, forms biofilms on biotic and abiotic surfaces. APP biofilms confers resistance to antibiotics. To our knowledge, no studies have examined the role of APP biofilm in immune evasion and infection persistence. This study was undertaken to (i) investigate biofilm-associated LPS modifications occurring during the switch to biofilm mode of growth; and (ii) characterize pro-inflammatory cytokines expression in porcine pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs) and proliferation in porcine PBMCs challenged with planktonic or biofilm APP cells. Extracted lipid A samples from biofilm and planktonic cultures were analyzed by HPLC high-resolution, accurate mass spectrometry. Biofilm cells displayed significant changes in lipid A profiles when compared with their planktonic counterparts. Furthermore, in vitro experiments were conducted to examine the inflammatory response of PAMs exposed to UV-inactivated APP grown in biofilm or in suspension. Relative mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory genes IL1, IL6, IL8 and MCP1 decreased in PAMs when exposed to biofilm cells compared to planktonic cells. Additionally, the biofilm state reduced PBMCs proliferation. Taken together, APP biofilm cells show a weaker ability to stimulate innate immune cells, which could be due, in part, to lipid A structure modifications. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Epitaxial Growth of GaN Films by Pulse-Mode Hot-Mesh Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komae, Yasuaki; Yasui, Kanji; Suemitsu, Maki; Endoh, Tetsuo; Ito, Takashi; Nakazawa, Hideki; Narita, Yuzuru; Takata, Masasuke; Akahane, Tadashi

    2009-07-01

    Intermittent gas supplies for hot-mesh chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for the epitaxial growth of gallium nitride (GaN) films were investigated to improve film crystallinity and optical properties. The GaN films were deposited on SiC/Si(111) substrates using an alternating-source gas supply or an intermittent supply of source gases such as ammonia (NH3) and trimethylgallium (TMG) in hot-mesh CVD after deposition of an aluminum nitride (AlN) buffer layer. The AlN layer was deposited using NH3 and trimethylaluminum (TMA) on a SiC layer grown by carbonization of a Si substrate using propane (C3H8). GaN films were grown on the AlN layer by a reaction between NHx radicals generated on a ruthenium (Ru)-coated tungsten (W) mesh and TMG molecules. After testing various gas supply modes, GaN films with good crystallinity and surface morphology were obtained using an intermittent supply of TMG and a continuous supply of NH3 gas. An optimal interval for the TMG gas supply was also obtained for the apparatus employed.

  4. The Growth Characteristics of Patients with Noonan Syndrome: Results of Three Years of Growth Hormone Treatment: A Nationwide Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Şıklar, Zeynep; Genens, Mikayir; Poyrazoğlu, Şükran; Baş, Firdevs; Darendeliler, Feyza; Bundak, Rüveyde; Aycan, Zehra; Savaş Erdeve, Şenay; Çetinkaya, Semra; Güven, Ayla; Abalı, Saygın; Atay, Zeynep; Turan, Serap; Kara, Cengiz; Can Yılmaz, Gülay; Akyürek, Nesibe; Abacı, Ayhan; Çelmeli, Gamze; Sarı, Erkan; Bolu, Semih; Korkmaz, Hüseyin Anıl; Şimşek, Enver; Çatlı, Gönül; Büyükinan, Muammer; Çayır, Atilla; Evliyaoğlu, Olcay; İşgüven, Pınar; Özgen, Tolga; Hatipoğlu, Nihal; Elhan, Atilla Halil; Berberoğlu, Merih

    2016-09-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is a multisystem disorder, and short stature is its most striking manifestation. Optimal growth hormone (GH) treatment for NS is still controversial. In this study, using a nationwide registration system, we aimed to evaluate the growth characteristics and the clinical features of NS patients in Turkey and their growth response to GH treatment. Children and adolescents with a diagnosis of NS were included inthe study. Laboratory assessment including standard GH stimulation test results were evaluated. Height increment of patients with or without GH treatment were analyzed after three years of therapy. A total of 124 NS patients from different centers were entered in the web-based system. Short stature and typical face appearance were the most frequently encountered diagnostic features of our patients. Of the 84 patients who were followed long-term, 47 hadreceived recombinant human GH (rhGH). In this group of 47 patients, height standard deviation score (HSDS) increased from -3.62±1.14 to -2.85±0.96 after three years of therapy, indicating significant differences from the patients who did not receive GH treatment. PTPN11 gene was analyzed in 61 patients, and 64% of these patients were found to have a mutation. HSDS at admission was similar in patients with or without PTPN11 gene mutation. A diagnosis of NS should be kept in mind in all patients with short stature showing systemic clinical findings. GH therapy is effective for improvement of short stature especially in the first two years of treatment. Further studies are needed for optimisation of GH therapy and evaluation of final height data in NS patients.

  5. Effect of product form upon fatigue-crack growth behavior in Alloy 718: additional results

    SciTech Connect

    James, L A

    1980-08-01

    A previous study had characterized the fatigue-crack growth behavior of four wrought product forms (sheet, plate, bar and forging) from a single heat of Alloy 718 and concluded that there were no consistent trends in the crack growth rate results that could be attributed to product form variability. The present study adds one additional product form (gas-tungsten-arc weldments) from the same heat, and compares the behavior to that exhibited by the wrought product forms. Two different precipitation heat-treatments were employed at each of five test temperatures (24, 316, 427, 538, and 649{sup 0}C).

  6. The effect of product form upon fatigue-crack growth behavior in Alloy 718: Additional results

    SciTech Connect

    James, L.A.

    1980-08-01

    A previous study had characterized the fatigue-crack growth behavior of four wrought product forms (sheet, plate, bar and forging) from a single heat of Alloy 718 and concluded that there were no consistent trends in the crack growth rate results that could be attributed to product form variability. The present study adds one additional product form (gas-tungsten-arc weldments) from the same heat, and compares the behavior to that exhibited by the wrought product forms. Two different precipitation heat-treatments were employed at each of five test temperatures. 11 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Neoproterozoic to Paleozoic Geological Evolution of Mongolia: Constraints on Modes of "Crustal Growth" in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, F. A.; Bold, U.; Smith, E.; Olin, P. H.; Crowley, J. L.; Schmitz, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) is widely considered the largest area of Phanerozoic juvenile crustal growth on Earth. However, the timing and nature of the orogenic events in the core of the CAOB in Mongolia has remained poorly constrained due to a dearth of detailed geological and geochronological studies. To bridge this gap and test models of crustal growth, here we refine the sequencing of geological events by focusing on the formation and destruction of Neoproterozoic and Paleozoic tectonic basins. Mongolia's basins record a complete Neoproterozoic to Cambrian Wilson cycle with rifting of the Mongolian continent at ca. 700 Ma, the development of a Cryogenian to Ediacaran thermally subsiding passive margin, an arc-continent collision at ca. 520 Ma, and a continent-arc-continent collision at ca. 500 Ma. During this collisional orogeny, that is the Cambrian Altaids, crustal growth occurred largely through the obduction of ophiolites. Rifting of the southern margin occurred during the Ordovician Period, with the development of a Silurian passive margin. Oblique northwest-dipping subduction was initiated during the Devonian and resulted in a transpressional accretionary orogen. The CAOB culminated with a continent-arc-continent collision and the accretion of the North China and Tarim Blocks in the latest Permian. The Devonian to early Permian accretionary orogen is associated not only with voluminous plutonism, but also, major translational structures oblique to the margin resulting in the appearance of many accreted terranes. These data are consistent with existing coarse Hf and Nd isotopic data, but also provide a framework for future detailed studies. Although our geological constraints suggest distinct periods of apparent crustal growth through either collisional or accretionary orogenies, net crustal growth after accounting for recycling is equivocal.

  8. The Oporto mixed-longitudinal growth, health and performance study. Design, methods and baseline results.

    PubMed

    Souza, Michele Caroline de; Chaves, Raquel Nichele de; Dos Santos, Fernanda Karina; Gomes, Thayse Natacha Queiroz Ferreira; Santos, Daniel Vilhena E; Borges, Alessandra Silva; Pereira, Sara Isabel Sampaio; Forjaz, Cláudia Lúcia de Moraes; Eisenmann, Joey; Maia, José António Ribeiro

    2017-02-01

    Studies concerning child and adolescent growth, development, performance and health aimed at the multiple interactions amongst this complex set of variables are not common in the Portuguese speaking countries. The aim of this paper is to address the key ideas, methodology and design of the Oporto Growth, Health and Performance Study (OGHPS). The OGHPS is a multidisciplinary mixed-longitudinal study whose main purpose is to examine the multiple interactions among biological, environmental and lifestyle indicators that affect growth, development, health and performance of Portuguese adolescents aged 10-18 years old. This study briefly presents baseline results for growth, physical fitness and lifestyle behaviours for those participating in the cross-sectional sample (n ≈ 8000). Approximately 30% were over-fat or obese. On average, boys were more physically fit and active than girls. Few adolescents meet the guidelines for sleep duration (≈10%) and eating habits (16.2-24.8%), while 76-85% meet the recommended levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. The OGHPS has an innovative approach due to its mixed-longitudinal design and the broad array of variables. Furthermore, subsequent analyses of the longitudinal data will enable a detailed exploration of important factors affecting the growth trajectories of health and performance variables and will also help to identify some of the most opportune times for interventions in terms of health behaviours.

  9. The Influence of Prior Modes of Growth, Temperature, Medium, and Substrate Surface on Biofilm Formation by Antibiotic-Resistant Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Teh, Amy Huei Teen; Lee, Sui Mae; Dykes, Gary A

    2016-12-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is one of the most common causes of bacterial gastrointestinal food-borne infection worldwide. It has been suggested that biofilm formation may play a role in survival of these bacteria in the environment. In this study, the influence of prior modes of growth (planktonic or sessile), temperatures (37 and 42 °C), and nutrient conditions (nutrient broth and Mueller-Hinton broth) on biofilm formation by eight C. jejuni strains with different antibiotic resistance profiles was examined. The ability of these strains to form biofilm on different abiotic surfaces (stainless steel, glass, and polystyrene) as well as factors potentially associated with biofilm formation (bacterial surface hydrophobicity, auto-aggregation, and initial attachment) was also determined. The results showed that cells grown as sessile culture generally have a greater ability to form biofilm (P < 0.05) compared to their planktonic counterparts. Biofilm was also greater (P < 0.05) in lower nutrient media, while growth at different temperatures affects biofilm formation in a strain-dependent manner. The strains were able to attach and form biofilms on different abiotic surfaces, but none of them demonstrated strong, complex, or structured biofilm formation. There were no clear trends between the bacterial surface hydrophobicity, auto-aggregation, attachment, and biofilm formation by the strains. This finding suggests that environmental factors did affect biofilm formation by C. jejuni, and they are more likely to persist in the environment in the form of mixed-species rather than monospecies biofilms.

  10. A unifying mode-coupling theory for transport properties of electrolyte solutions. II. Results for equal-sized ions electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Aburto, Claudio Contreras; Nägele, Gerhard

    2013-10-07

    On the basis of a versatile mode-coupling theory (MCT) method developed in Paper I [C. Contreras Aburto and G. Nägele, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 134109 (2013)], we investigate the concentration dependence of conduction-diffusion linear transport properties for a symmetric binary electrolyte solution. The ions are treated in this method as charged Brownian spheres, and the solvent-mediated ion-ion hydrodynamic interactions are accounted for also in the ion atmosphere relaxation effect. By means of a simplified solution scheme, convenient semi-analytic MCT expressions are derived for the electrophoretic mobilities, and the molar conductivity, of an electrolyte mixture with equal-sized ions. These expressions reduce to the classical Debye-Falkenhagen-Onsager-Fuoss results in the limit of very low ion concentration. The MCT expressions are numerically evaluated for a binary electrolyte, and compared to experimental data and results by another theoretical method. Our analysis encloses, in addition, the electrolyte viscosity. To analyze the dynamic influence of the hydration shell, the significance of mixed slip-stick hydrodynamic surface boundary conditions, and the effect of solvent permeability are explored. For the stick boundary condition employed in the hydrodynamic diffusivity tensors, our theoretical results for the molar conductivity and viscosity of an aqueous 1:1 electrolyte are in good overall agreement with reported experimental data for aqueous NaCl solutions, for concentrations extending even up to two molar.

  11. Validation of first chemistry mode retrieval results from new limb-imaging FTS GLORIA with correlative MIPAS-STR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woiwode, W.; Suminska-Ebersoldt, O.; Oelhaf, H.; Höpfner, M.; Belyaev, G. V.; Ebersoldt, A.; Friedl-Vallon, F.; Grooß, J.-U.; Gulde, T.; Kaufmann, M.; Kleinert, A.; Krämer, M.; Kretschmer, E.; Kulessa, T.; Maucher, G.; Neubert, T.; Piesch, C.; Preusse, P.; Riese, M.; Rongen, H.; Sartorius, C.; Schardt, G.; Schönfeld, A.; Schuettemeyer, D.; Sha, M. K.; Stroh, F.; Ungermann, J.; Volk, C. M.; Orphal, J.

    2014-12-01

    We report first chemistry mode retrieval results from the new airborne limb-imaging infrared FTS (Fourier transform spectrometer) GLORIA and comparisons with observations by the conventional airborne limb-scanning infrared FTS MIPAS-STR. For GLORIA, the flights aboard the high-altitude research aircraft M55 Geophysica during the ESSenCe campaign (ESa Sounder Campaign 2011) were the very first in field deployment after several years of development. The simultaneous observations of GLORIA and MIPAS-STR during the flight on 16 December 2011 inside the polar vortex and under the conditions of optically partially transparent polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) provided us the unique opportunity to compare the observations by two different infrared FTS generations directly. The retrieval results of temperature, HNO3, O3, H2O, CFC-11 and CFC-12 show reasonable agreement of GLORIA with MIPAS-STR and collocated in-situ observations. For the horizontally binned hyperspectral limb-images, the GLORIA sampling outnumbered the horizontal cross-track sampling of MIPAS-STR by up to one order of magnitude. Depending on the target parameter, typical vertical resolutions of 0.5 to 2.0 km were obtained for GLORIA and are typically by factors of 2 to 4 better compared to MIPAS-STR. While the improvement of the performance, characterisation and data processing of GLORIA are subject of ongoing work, the presented first results already demonstrate the considerable gain in sampling and vertical resolution achieved with GLORIA.

  12. Protein crystal growth results from the United States Microgravity Laboratory-1 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delucas, Lawrence J.; Moore, K. M.; Vanderwoerd, M.; Bray, T. L.; Smith, C.; Carson, M.; Narayana, S. V. L.; Rosenblum, W. M.; Carter, D.; Clark, A. D, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Protein crystal growth experiments have been performed by this laboratory on 18 Space Shuttle missions since April, 1985. In addition, a number of microgravity experiments also have been performed and reported by other investigators. These Space Shuttle missions have been used to grow crystals of a variety of proteins using vapor diffusion, liquid diffusion, and temperature-induced crystallization techniques. The United States Microgravity Laboratory - 1 mission (USML-1, June 25 - July 9, 1992) was a Spacelab mission dedicated to experiments involved in materials processing. New protein crystal growth hardware was developed to allow in orbit examination of initial crystal growth results, the knowledge from which was used on subsequent days to prepare new crystal growth experiments. In addition, new seeding hardware and techniques were tested as well as techniques that would prepare crystals for analysis by x-ray diffraction, a capability projected for the planned Space Station. Hardware that was specifically developed for the USML-1 mission will be discussed along with the experimental results from this mission.

  13. Impact of Survey Administration Mode on the Results of a Health-Related Discrete Choice Experiment: Online and Paper Comparison.

    PubMed

    Determann, Domino; Lambooij, Mattijs S; Steyerberg, Ewout W; de Bekker-Grob, Esther W; de Wit, G Ardine

    Electronic data collection is increasingly being used for discrete choice experiments (DCEs). To study whether paper or electronic administration results in measurement effects. Respondents were drawn from the same sample frame (an Internet panel) and completed a nearly identical DCE survey either online or on paper during the same period. A DCE on preferences for basic health insurance served as a case study. We used panel mixed logit models for the analysis. In total, 898 respondents completed the survey: 533 respondents completed the survey online, whereas 365 respondents returned the paper survey. There were no significant differences with respect to sociodemographic characteristics between the respondents in both samples. The median response time was shorter for the online sample than for the paper sample, and a smaller proportion of respondents from the online sample were satisfied with the number of choice sets. Although some willingness- to-pay estimates were higher for the online sample, the elicited preferences for basic health insurance characteristics were similar between both modes of administration. We find no indication that online surveys yield inferior results compared with paper-based surveys, whereas the price per respondent is lower for online surveys. Researchers might want to include fewer choice sets per respondent when collecting DCE data online. Because our findings are based on a nonrandomized DCE that covers one health domain only, research in other domains is needed to support our findings. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Step-flow growth mode instability of N-polar GaN under N-excess

    SciTech Connect

    Chèze, C.

    2013-08-12

    GaN layers were grown on N-polar GaN substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under different III/V ratios. Ga-rich conditions assure step-flow growth with atomically flat surface covered by doubly-bunched steps, as for Ga-polar GaN. Growth under N-excess however leads to an unstable step-flow morphology. Particularly, for substrates slightly miscut towards <1010>, interlacing fingers are covered by atomic steps pinned on both sides by small hexagonal pits. In contrast, a three-dimensional island morphology is observed on the Ga-polar equivalent sample. We attribute this result to lower diffusion barriers on N-polar compared to Ga-polar GaN under N-rich conditions.

  15. Effects of proof loads and combined mode loadings on fracture and flaw growth characteristics of aerospace alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    This experimental program was undertaken to determine the effects of (1) combined tensile and bending loadings, (2) combined tensile and shear loadings, and (3) proof overloads on fracture and flaw growth characteristics of aerospace alloys. Tests were performed on four alloys: 2219-T87 aluminum, 5Al-2.5Sn (ELl) titanium, 6Al-4V beta STA titanium and high strength 4340 steel. Tests were conducted in room air, gaseous nitrogen at -200F (144K), liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen. Flat center cracked and surface flawed specimens, cracked tube specimens, circumferentially notched round bar and surface flawed cylindrical specimens were tested. The three-dimensional photoelastic technique of stress freezing and slicing was used to determine stress intensity factors for surface flawed cylindrical specimens subjected to tension or torsion. Results showed that proof load/temperature histories used in the tests have a small beneficial effect or no effect on subsequent fracture strength and flaw growth rates.

  16. Impact of interfacial misfit dislocation growth mode on highly lattice-mismatched InxGa1-xSb epilayer grown on GaAs substrate by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Sa Hoang; Ha, Minh Thien Huu; Do, Huy Binh; Luc, Quang Ho; Yu, Hung Wei; Chang, Edward Yi

    2016-09-01

    Highly lattice-mismatch (over 8%) ternary InxGa1-xSb alloy directly grown on GaAs substrates was demonstrated by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The influence of growth parameters, such as growth temperature, indium vapor composition, and V/III ratio, on the film properties was investigated, and it was found that the growth temperature has the strongest effect on the surface morphology and the crystal quality of the InxGa1-xSb epilayer. An optimized growth temperature of ˜590 °C and a V/III ratio of 2.5 were used for the growth of the InxGa1-xSb epilayer on GaAs that displays a lower surface roughness. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy micrographs exhibit that InxGa1-xSb epilayer growth on GaAs was governed by the interfacial misfit dislocation growth mode. Furthermore, the variation of the intermixing layer thickness at the InxGa1-xSb/GaAs heterointerface was observed. These results provide an information of growing highly lattice-mismatched epitaxial material systems by MOCVD growth process.

  17. Analyzing Exercise Behaviors during the College Years: Results from Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wittman, Werner

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze changes in the predictors of physical activity behavior among college students. The Theory of Planned Behavior served as its theoretical framework. Methods: Among an initial sample of 417 college students, 195 participants completed a validated questionnaire measuring attitudes, subjective norms, perceived control, intentions and self-reported physical activity, at the beginning and end of each of 3 college semesters. Latent growth curve modeling analyses were conducted to examine the relationships between the trajectories of changes in PA, intentions, attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control. Results: Good fit indices supported the validity of the proposed longitudinal model (CFI > .97, RMSEA < .05). Changes in perceived control (γ = 0.57) were significantly linked with changes in intentions (p < .05). Perceived control (γ = 0.28) and intention growth (γ = 0.36) predicted behavior changes (p < .05). No gender differences were observed on attitudes, subjective norms and perceived control (p > .10). However, girls tend to have higher growth parameters on intentions and physical activity (p < .05). In summary, intentions and physical activity has significantly increased over 3 college semesters (growth parameters significant at p < .05). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that attitudes and perceived control are key determinants regarding the intentions of being active. On a longer term perspective, future physical activity interventions should focus on the enhancement of students’ perceived control. Such educational context should help in promoting the adoption of an active lifestyle during college. PMID:27124179

  18. Development of infrared single-mode fibers for 2 wavelength bands of the Darwin mission: test results of prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lun K.; Dijkhuizen, Niels; Nieuwland, Remco; Faber, Anne-Jans; Gielesen, Wim; Lucas, Jacques; Boussard-Plédel, Catherine; Houizot, Patrick; Pereira do Carmo, João

    2009-08-01

    Various space telescope array systems are being considered to investigate other terrestrial planets orbiting around nearby stars in order to find extra-terrestrial life. One of them is the DARWIN mission of the European Space Agency (ESA). The required technology is the nulling interferometer. The challenge of nulling is making the null in the interferometric signal sufficiently deep to cancel the light from the bright star during the collection of light from its surrounding planets. The performance of the nulling is limited by the wavefront quality of the beams. The wavefront error can be reduced by filtering using a single mode fiber. For the DARWIN mission, the operational wavelength range is 6.5-20μm. Within the current ESA project, this is covered by a dual-band fiber system. A chalcogenide glass fiber based on the Te-As-Se (TAS) composition is selected to be used for the short wavelength band. For the long wavelength band up to 20 μm, Tellurium based glass is proposed. Different samples of various composition based on Te glass are manufactured and tested. The fibers are designed by TNO and different prototypes have been manufactured by the University of Rennes. Test setups are developed to demonstrate/investigate the single mode operation. Cladding modes are found to disturb the single mode operation. The effect of cladding modes is modeled. Solutions to eliminate the cladding modes are investigated and tested.

  19. Mode of delivery in pregnancies with suspected fetal growth restriction following induction of labor with vaginal prostaglandin E2.

    PubMed

    Ben-Haroush, Avi; Yogev, Yariv; Glickman, Hagit; Kaplan, Boris; Hod, Moshe; Bar, Jacob

    2004-01-01

    Many fetuses below the 10th percentile for gestational age are uncompromised. We aimed to evaluate the mode of delivery and immediate neonatal outcome in pregnancies with suspected fetal growth restriction (FGR) and normal antenatal assessment following induction of labor with vaginal application of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Ninety women with suspected FGR (sonographic estimated fetal weight < 10th percentile) with normal oxytocin contraction test (OCT), biophysical profile (BPP) and reassuring fetal heart rate underwent induction of labor with vaginal application of PGE2 tablets. The findings were compared with 115 women admitted for induction of labor because of decreased fetal movement (group 2) and with 510 women with normal spontaneous onset of labor (group 3). There were no between-group differences in mean maternal age, gravidity, parity, nulliparity rate, number of tablets used or rate of patients receiving more than one PGE2 application. The rate of cesarean section (CS) in the study group (8.9%) was similar to the rate in groups 2 and 3 (14.8% and 9.0%, respectively). The incidence of nonreassuring fetal heart rate pattern leading to cesarean delivery was higher in the study group, but the rate of low 5-min Apgar scores (< 7) was similar in all groups. A logistic regression model and forward likelihood analysis yielded no single significant variable associated with increased risk of cesarean delivery. In selected cases of suspected FGR with reassuring fetal heart rate and normal OCT and BPP, induction of labor with vaginal PGE2 may yield a similar immediate fetal outcome and CS rate as in uncomplicated, induced or spontaneous deliveries.

  20. Whispering Gallery Mode Biosensor Quantification of Fibronectin Adsorption Kinetics onto Alkylsilane Monolayers and Interpretation of Resultant Cellular Response

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kerry A.; Finch, Craig A.; Anderson, Phillip; Vollmer, Frank; Hickman, James J.

    2011-01-01

    A Whispering Gallery Mode (WGM) biosensor was constructed to measure the adsorption of protein onto alkysilane self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) at solution concentrations unattainable with other techniques. The high sensitivity was provided by a WGM resonance excited in a silica microsphere that was functionalized with alkylsilane SAMs and integrated in a microfluidic flow cell under laminar flow conditions. It was found that FN adsorbed at biologically relevant surface densities, however, the adsorption kinetics and concentration dependent saturation values varied significantly from work published utilizing alkanethiol SAMs. Mathematical models were applied to the experimental results to interpret the observed kinetics of FN adsorption. Embryonic hippocampal neurons and skeletal myoblasts were cultured on the modified surfaces, and a live-dead assay was used to determine the viability of the FN surfaces for cell culture, and major differences were noted in the biological response to the different SAMs. The high sensitivity and simplicity of the WGM biosensor, combined with its ability to quantify the adsorption of any dilute protein in a label-free assay, establishes the importance of this technology for the study of surface accretion and its effect on cellular function, which can affect biomaterials for both in vivo and in vitro applications. PMID:21983134

  1. First results with a surface conversion H ion source based on helicon wave mode-driven plasma discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Tarvainen, Ollie A; Geros, Ernest; Rouleau, Gary; Zaugg, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    The currently employed converter-type negative ion source at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is based on cesium enhanced surface production of H{sup -} ion beams in a filament-driven discharge. The extracted H{sup -} beam current is limited by the achievable plasma density, which depends primarily on the electron emission current from the filaments. The emission current can be increased by increasing the filament temperature but, unfortunately, this leads not only to shorter filament lifetime but also to an increase in metal evaporation from the filament, which degrades the performance of the H{sup -} conversion surface. In order to overcome these limitations we have designed and tested a prototype of a surface conversion H{sup -} ion source, based on excitation of helicon plasma wave mode with an external antenna. The source has been operated with and without cesium injection. An H{sup -} beam current of over 12 mA has been transported through the low energy beam transport of the LANSCE ion source test stand. The results of these experiments and the effects of different source parameters on the extracted beam current are presented. The limitations of the source prototype are discussed and future improvements are proposed based on the experimental observations.

  2. The impact of water column variability on horizontal wave number estimation and mode based geoacoustic inversion results.

    PubMed

    Becker, Kyle M; Frisk, George V

    2008-02-01

    The influence of water column variability on low-frequency, shallow water geoacoustic inversion results is considered. The data are estimates of modal eigenvalues obtained from measurements of a point source acoustic field using a horizontal aperture array in the water column. The inversion algorithm is based on perturbations to a background waveguide model with seabed properties consistent with the measured eigenvalues. Water column properties in the background model are assumed to be known, as would be obtained from conductivity, temperature, and depth measurements. The scope of this work in addressing the impact of water column variability on inversion is twofold. Range-dependent propagation effects as they pertain to eigenvalue estimation are first considered. It is shown that mode coupling is important even for weak internal waves and can enhance modal eigenvalue estimates. Second, the effect of the choice of background sound speed profile in the water column is considered for its impact on the estimated bottom acoustic properties. It is shown that a range-averaged sound velocity profile yields the best geoacoustic parameter estimates.

  3. Dose-response approaches for nuclear receptor-mediated modes of action for liver carcinogenicity: Results of a workshop.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Melvin E; Preston, R Julian; Maier, Andrew; Willis, Alison M; Patterson, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    A public workshop, organized by a Steering Committee of scientists from government, industry, universities and research organizations, was held at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) in September, 2010. The workshop explored the dose-response implications of toxicant modes of action (MOA) mediated by nuclear receptors. The dominant paradigm in human health risk assessment has been linear extrapolation without a threshold for cancer, and estimation of sub-threshold doses for non-cancer and (in appropriate cases) cancer endpoints. However, recent publications question the application of dose-response modeling approaches with a threshold. The growing body of molecular toxicology information and computational toxicology tools has allowed for exploration of the presence or absence of sub-threshold doses for a number of receptor-mediated MOAs. The workshop explored the development of dose-response approaches for nuclear receptor-mediated liver cancer, within a MOA Human Relevance Framework (HRF). Case studies addressed activation of the AHR, the CAR and the PPARα. This article describes the workshop process, key issues discussed and conclusions. The value of an interactive workshop approach to apply current MOA/HRF frameworks was demonstrated. The results may help direct research on the MOA and dose-response of receptor-based toxicity, since there are commonalities for many receptors in the basic pathways involved for late steps in the MOA, and similar data gaps in early steps. Three additional papers in this series describe the results and conclusions for each case-study receptor regarding its MOA, relevance of the MOA to humans and the resulting dose-response implications.

  4. Modes of Action and Functions of ERECTA-family Receptor-like Kinases in Plant Organ Growth and Development

    SciTech Connect

    TORII, Keiko U.

    2012-05-01

    Higher plants constitute the central resource for renewable lignocellulose biomass that can supplement for the world's depleting stores of fossil fuels. As such, understanding the molecular and genetic mechanisms of plant organ growth will provide key knowledge and genetic resources that enables manipulation of plant biomass feedstock for better growth and productivity. The goal of this proposal is to understand how cell proliferation and growth are coordinated during aboveground organ morphogenesis, and how cell-cell signaling mediated by a family of receptor kinases coordinates plant organogenesis. The well-established model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is used for our research to facilitate rapid progress. Specifically, we focus on how ERECTA-family leucine-rich repeat receptor kinases (LRR-RLKs) interact in a synergistic manner to promote organogenesis and pattern formation in Arabidopsis. This project was highly successful, resulted in fourteen publications including nine peer-reviewed original research articles. One provisional US patent has been filed through this DOE funding. We have addressed the critical roles for a family of receptor kinases in coordinating proliferation and differentiation of plants, and we successfully elucidated the downstream targets of this signaling pathway in specifying stomatal patterning.

  5. Characterization and optimization of 2-step MOVPE growth for single-mode DFB or DBR laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugge, F.; Mogilatenko, A.; Zeimer, U.; Brox, O.; Neumann, W.; Erbert, G.; Weyers, M.

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the MOVPE regrowth of AlGaAs over a grating for GaAs-based laser diodes with an internal wavelength stabilisation. Growth temperature and aluminium concentration in the regrown layers considerably affect the oxygen incorporation. Structural characterisation by transmission electron microscopy of the grating after regrowth shows the formation of quaternary InGaAsP regions due to the diffusion of indium atoms from the top InGaP layer and As-P exchange processes during the heating-up procedure. Additionally, the growth over such gratings with different facets leads to self-organisation of the aluminium content in the regrown AlGaAs layer, resulting in an additional AlGaAs grating, which has to be taken into account for the estimation of the coupling coefficient. With optimized growth conditions complete distributed feedback laser structures have been grown for different emission wavelengths. At 1062 nm a very high single-frequency output power of nearly 400 mW with a slope efficiency of 0.95 W/A for a 4 μm ridge-waveguide was obtained.

  6. Delivery Mode, Duration of Labor, and Cord Blood Adiponectin, Leptin, and C-Reactive Protein: Results of the Population-Based Ulm Birth Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Chad A.; Thiel, Larissa; Bornemann, Rebecca; Koenig, Wolfgang; Reister, Frank; Brenner, Hermann; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Genuneit, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have reported associations between delivery mode and health outcomes in infancy and later life. Previous smaller studies indicated a relationship between delivery mode and newborn inflammation potentially constituting a mediating factor. We aimed to determine the influence of delivery mode and duration of labor on cord blood concentrations of adiponectin, leptin, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Methods In the Ulm SPATZ Health Study, 934 singleton newborns and their mothers were recruited during their hospital stay in the University Medical Center Ulm, Southern Germany, from 04/2012-05/2013. Inflammatory biomarkers were measured by ELISAs (n = 836). Delivery mode was analyzed categorically (elective cesarean (reference), active labor delivery: emergency cesarean, assisted vaginal, and spontaneous vaginal); duration of labor continuously. Following log-transformation, linear regression was used to estimate geometric means ratios (GMR) adjusted for potential confounders for the effects of delivery mode and duration of labor on each biomarker separately. Independent replication was sought in the similarly conducted Ulm Birth Cohort Study recruited from 11/2000-11/2001. Results Individually, active labor delivery modes as well as increasing duration of labor were associated with higher leptin and hs-CRP concentrations. After mutual adjustment, the associations with delivery modes were attenuated but those for duration of labor remained statistically significant (GMR (95%CI) 1.10 (1.00; 1.21) and 1.15 (1.04; 1.27) for leptin and hs-CRP per hour of labor, respectively). No significant adjusted associations were observed between delivery modes and adiponectin concentrations. These findings were replicated in an independent birth cohort study. Conclusions Cord blood leptin and hs-CRP concentrations were associated with duration of labor rather than delivery mode. Further research is warranted to investigate these associations

  7. A novel mode-of-action mediated by the fetal muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor resulting in developmental toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Rasoulpour, Reza J; Ellis-Hutchings, Robert G; Terry, Claire; Millar, Neil S; Zablotny, Carol L; Gibb, Alasdair; Marshall, Valerie; Collins, Toby; Carney, Edward W; Billington, Richard

    2012-06-01

    Sulfoxaflor (X11422208), a novel agricultural molecule, induced fetal effects (forelimb flexure, hindlimb rotation, and bent clavicle) and neonatal death in rats at high doses (≥ 400 ppm in diet); however, no such effects occurred in rabbit dietary studies despite achieving similar maternal and fetal plasma exposure levels. Mode-of-action (MoA) studies were conducted to test the hypothesis that the effects in rats had a single MoA induced by sulfoxaflor agonism on the fetal rat muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). The studies included cross-fostering and critical windows of exposure studies in rats, fetal ((α1)(2)β1γδ) and adult ((α1)(2)β1δε) rat and human muscle nAChR in vitro agonism experiments, and neonatal rat phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm contracture studies. The weight of evidence from these studies supported a novel MoA where sulfoxaflor is an agonist to the fetal, but not adult, rat muscle nAChR and that prolonged agonism on this receptor in fetal/neonatal rats causes sustained striated muscle contracture resulting in concomitant reduction in muscle responsiveness to physiological nerve stimulation. Fetal effects were inducible with as little as 1 day of exposure at the end of gestation, but were rapidly reversible after birth, consistent with a pharmacological MoA. With respect to human relevance, sulfoxaflor was shown to have no agonism on human fetal or adult muscle nAChRs. Taken together, the data support the hypothesis that the developmental effects of sulfoxaflor in rats are mediated via sustained agonism on the fetal muscle nAChR during late fetal development and are considered not relevant to humans.

  8. The association between low 50 g glucose challenge test result and fetal growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Melamed, Nir; Hiersch, Liran; Peled, Yoav; Hod, Moshe; Wiznitzer, Arnon; Yogev, Yariv

    2013-07-01

    To determine whether a low-GCT result is predictive of low birthweight and to identify the lower GCT threshold for prediction of fetal growth restriction. A retrospective cohort study of 12,899 women who underwent a GCT (24-28 weeks). Women with a low-GCT result (<10th percentile (70 mg/dL) were compared to women with normal-GCT result (70-140 mg/dL). ROC analysis was used to determine the optimal lower GCT threshold for the prediction of growth restriction. Women in the low GCT had significant lower rates of cesarean delivery (18.7% versus 22.5%), shoulder dystocia (0.0% versus 0.3%), mean birthweight (3096 ± 576 versus 3163 ± 545) and birthweight percentile (49.1 ± 27.0 versus 53.1 ± 26.7) and significant higher rates of birthweight <2500 g (11.3% versus 8.5%), below the 10th percentile (8.3% versus 6.5%) and 3rd percentile (2.3% versus 1.4%). Low GCT was independently associated with an increased risk for birthweight <2500 g (OR = 1.6, 1.2-2.0), birthweight <10th percentile (OR = 1.3, 1.1-1.6), birthweight <3rd percentile (OR = 1.7, 1.2-2.5) and neonatal hypoglycemia (OR = 1.4, 1.02-2.0). The optimal GCT threshold for the prediction of birthweight <10th percentile was 88.5 mg/dL (sensitivity 48.5%, specificity 58.1%). Low-GCT result is independently associated with low birthweight and can be used in combination with additional factors for the prediction of fetal growth restriction.

  9. Fifteen-year results from six cutting methods in second-growth northern hardwoods.

    Treesearch

    Gayne G. Erdmann; Robert R. Oberg

    1973-01-01

    Presents and compares stand growth and yield information from three single-tree selection cuts, a crop-tree release treatment, an 8-inch diameter limit cut, and an uncut control. Discusses the influence of stand density on basal area growth, cubic volume growth, and board-foot volume growth.

  10. Viscoelastic-damage interface model formulation with friction to simulate the delamination growth in mode II shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodarzi, Mohammad Saeed; Hosseini-Toudeshky, Hossein

    2017-02-01

    In this paper a formulation of a viscoelastic-damage interface model with friction in mode-II is presented. The cohesive constitutive law contains elastic and damage regimes. It has been assumed that the shear stress in the elastic regime follows the viscoelastic properties of the matrix material. The three element Voigt model has been used for the formulation of relaxation modulus of the material. Damage evolution proceeds according to the bilinear cohesive constitutive law combined with friction stress consideration. Combination of damage and friction is based on the presumption that the damaged area, related to an integration point, can be dismembered into the un-cracked area with the cohesive damage and cracked area with friction. Samples of a one element model have been presented to see the effect of parameters on the cohesive constitutive law. A comparison between the predicted results with available results of end-notched flexure specimens in the literature is also presented to verify the model. Transverse crack tension specimens are also simulated for different applied displacement velocities.

  11. MODE OF ACTION: NEUROTOXICITY INDUCED BY THYROID HORMONE DISRUPTION DURING DEVELOPMENT - HEARING LOSS RESULTING FROM EXPOSURE TO PHAHS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A manuscript summarizes a workshop aimed at developing a framework to determine the relevancy of animal modes-of-action for extrapolation to humans. This specific report used animal data on the neurodevelopmental effects of hypothyroidism to test the framework. Propylthiouracil,...

  12. MODE OF ACTION: NEUROTOXICITY INDUCED BY THYROID HORMONE DISRUPTION DURING DEVELOPMENT - HEARING LOSS RESULTING FROM EXPOSURE TO PHAHS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A manuscript summarizes a workshop aimed at developing a framework to determine the relevancy of animal modes-of-action for extrapolation to humans. This specific report used animal data on the neurodevelopmental effects of hypothyroidism to test the framework. Propylthiouracil,...

  13. Comparison study between the observed ELM dynamics in the KSTAR H-mode and simulation results from BOUT++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minwoo; Xu, Xueqiao; Yun, Gunsu S.; Lee, Jaehyun; Park, Hyeon K.

    2012-10-01

    The BOUT++ simulations [1] of edge localized modes (ELMs) have been quantitatively compared with high resolution 2D images of ELMs observed in typical KSTAR H-mode plasmas through an electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system [2]. The poloidal structure of the most unstable mode predicted by the linear 3-field simulation qualitatively matches with the observed ELM structure. As the next step, simulation studies for the nonlinear aspects of the ELM dynamics are planned; in particular, the transient mode structure change prior to the ELM crash [2] will be investigated. In addition, the parametric dependence of the observed ELM suppression/mitigation process during resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) [2, 3] and supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) experiments will be studied using 5-field BOUT++ simulation.[4pt] [1] X.Q. Xu et al., PRL, 105 (2010).[0pt] [2] G.S. Yun et al., Phys. Plasmas, 19 (2012).[0pt] [3] Y.M. Jeon et al., accepted for publication in PRL.

  14. MODE OF ACTION: NEUROTOXICITY INDUCED BY DEVELOPMENTAL THYROID HORMONE INSUFFICIENCY -- NEUROLOGICAL ABNORMALITIES RESULTING FROM EXPOSURE TO PROPYLTHIOURACIL.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A manuscript summarizes a workshop aimed at developing a framework to determine the relevancy of animal modes-of-action for extrapolation to humans. This specific report used animal data on neurodevelopmental effects of thyroid hormone disruption to test the framework. Polyhaloge...

  15. MODE OF ACTION: NEUROTOXICITY INDUCED BY DEVELOPMENTAL THYROID HORMONE INSUFFICIENCY -- NEUROLOGICAL ABNORMALITIES RESULTING FROM EXPOSURE TO PROPYLTHIOURACIL.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A manuscript summarizes a workshop aimed at developing a framework to determine the relevancy of animal modes-of-action for extrapolation to humans. This specific report used animal data on neurodevelopmental effects of thyroid hormone disruption to test the framework. Polyhaloge...

  16. Validation of NDVI/LAI Empirical Model to Force a Pasture Growth Model: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, C.; Lajoie, G.; Tillard, E.; Salgado, P.

    2016-08-01

    Estimating forage biomass is nowadays essential for a good farm management. To answer to this problem we can use mathematic models that use meteorological, soil, grass data. However, in specifics territories as Reunion Island, they are not efficient. That is why we want to force this kind of model to improve the biomass prediction. The Leaf Area Index (LAI) is one parameter used in growth models. Estimate this parameter from satellite images could a solution to predict better the forage biomass. Preliminary results show a strong relation between LAI and NDVI (Normalized Vegetation Index).

  17. Recent results and new hardware developments for protein crystal growth in microactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delucas, L. J.; Long, M. M.; Moore, K. M.; Smith, C.; Carson, M.; Narayana, S. V. L.; Carter, D.; Clark, A. D., Jr.; Nanni, R. G.; Ding, J.

    1993-01-01

    Protein crystal growth experiments have been performed on 16 space shuttle missions since April, 1985. The initial experiments utilized vapor diffusion crystallization techniques similar to those used in laboratories for earth-based experiments. More recent experiments have utilized temperature induced crystallization as an alternative method for growing high quality protein crystals in microgravity. Results from both vapor diffusion and temperature induced crystallization experiments indicate that proteins grown in microgravity may be larger, display more uniform morphologies, and yield diffraction data to significantly higher resolutions than the best crystals of these proteins grown on earth.

  18. Results from prototypes of environmental and health alarm devices based on gaseous detectors operating in air in counting mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpak, G.; Benaben, P.; Breuil, P.; Martinengo, P.; Nappi, E.; Peskov, V.

    2011-02-01

    We have developed and successfully tested two prototypes of detectors of dangerous gases based on wire-type counters operating in air in avalanche mode: one is for radon (Rn) detection whereas the other one is for the detection of gases with an ionization potential less than the air components. Due to the operation in pulse counting mode these prototypes have sensitivities comparable to (in the case of the Rn detector) or much higher than (in the case of the detector for low ionization gases) the best commercial devices currently available on the market. We believe that due to their high sensitivity, simplicity and low cost such new detectors will find massive applications. One of them, discussed in this paper, could be the on-line monitoring of Rn for the prediction of earthquakes.

  19. Meckel's and condylar cartilages anomalies in achondroplasia result in defective development and growth of the mandible.

    PubMed

    Biosse Duplan, Martin; Komla-Ebri, Davide; Heuzé, Yann; Estibals, Valentin; Gaudas, Emilie; Kaci, Nabil; Benoist-Lasselin, Catherine; Zerah, Michel; Kramer, Ina; Kneissel, Michaela; Porta, Diana Grauss; Di Rocco, Federico; Legeai-Mallet, Laurence

    2016-07-15

    Activating FGFR3 mutations in human result in achondroplasia (ACH), the most frequent form of dwarfism, where cartilages are severely disturbed causing long bones, cranial base and vertebrae defects. Because mandibular development and growth rely on cartilages that guide or directly participate to the ossification process, we investigated the impact of FGFR3 mutations on mandibular shape, size and position. By using CT scan imaging of ACH children and by analyzing Fgfr3(Y367C/+) mice, a model of ACH, we show that FGFR3 gain-of-function mutations lead to structural anomalies of primary (Meckel's) and secondary (condylar) cartilages of the mandible, resulting in mandibular hypoplasia and dysmorphogenesis. These defects are likely related to a defective chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation and pan-FGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor NVP-BGJ398 corrects Meckel's and condylar cartilages defects ex vivo. Moreover, we show that low dose of NVP-BGJ398 improves in vivo condyle growth and corrects dysmorphologies in Fgfr3(Y367C/+) mice, suggesting that postnatal treatment with NVP-BGJ398 mice might offer a new therapeutic strategy to improve mandible anomalies in ACH and others FGFR3-related disorders. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. Silencing of Doublecortin-Like (DCL) Results in Decreased Mitochondrial Activity and Delayed Neuroblastoma Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo, Carla S.; Elands, Rachel; Cheng, Sou; Saaltink, Dirk-Jan; ter Horst, Judith P.; Alme, Maria N.; Pont, Chantal; van de Water, Bob; Håvik, Bjarte; Fitzsimons, Carlos P.; Vreugdenhil, Erno

    2013-01-01

    Doublecortin-like (DCL) is a microtubule-binding protein crucial for neuroblastoma (NB) cell proliferation. We have investigated whether the anti-proliferative effect of DCL knockdown is linked to reduced mitochondrial activity. We found a delay in tumor development after DCL knockdown in vivo in doxycycline-inducible NB tumor xenografts. To understand the mechanisms underlying this tumor growth retardation we performed a series of in vitro experiments in NB cell lines. DCL colocalizes with mitochondria, interacts with the mitochondrial outer membrane protein OMP25/ SYNJ2BP and DCL knockdown results in decreased expression of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation. Moreover, DCL knockdown decreases cytochrome c oxidase activity and ATP synthesis. We identified the C-terminal Serine/Proline-rich domain and the second microtubule-binding area as crucial DCL domains for the regulation of cytochrome c oxidase activity and ATP synthesis. Furthermore, DCL knockdown causes a significant reduction in the proliferation rate of NB cells under an energetic challenge induced by low glucose availability. Together with our previous studies, our results corroborate DCL as a key player in NB tumor growth in which DCL controls not only mitotic spindle formation and the stabilization of the microtubule cytoskeleton, but also regulates mitochondrial activity and energy availability, which makes DCL a promising molecular target for NB therapy. PMID:24086625

  1. Accumulation of phosphorylated sphingoid long chain bases results in cell growth inhibition in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S; Fyrst, H; Saba, J

    2000-01-01

    Sphingolipid metabolites in mammals can function as signaling molecules with cell-specific functions. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, phosphorylated long chain bases, such as dihydrosphingosine 1-phosphate and phytosphingosine 1-phosphate, have also been implicated in stress responses. To further explore the biological roles of these molecules, we created disruption mutants for LCB4, LCB5, DPL1, YSR2, YSR3, and SUR2. LCB4 and LCB5 encode kinases that phosphorylate long chain bases. DPL1 and YSR2/YSR3 are involved in degradation of the phosphorylated long chain bases. SUR2 catalyzes conversion of dihydrosphingosine to phytosphingosine. We adapted an HPLC method to measure intracellular concentrations of the phosphorylated long chain bases. Double mutants of dpl1 and ysr2 were inviable, whereas dpl1 ysr2 lcb4 triple mutants were viable. Further, growth inhibition associated with accumulated phosphorylated long chain bases was observed in the triple mutant dpl1 ysr2 lcb4 overexpressing LCB4 or LCB5. These results indicate that phosphorylated long chain bases can inhibit cell growth. Mutants defective in both YSR2 and SUR2, which accumulated dihydrosphingosine 1-phosphate only, grew poorly. The phenotypes of the ysr2 sur2 mutants were suppressed by overexpression of DPL1. Our results clearly show that elevated levels of phosphorylated long chain bases have an antiproliferative effect in yeast. PMID:11102354

  2. Experimental results of H-mode power threshold with lower hybrid wave heating on the EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Canbin; Gao, Xiang; Liu, Zixi; Han, Xiang; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Yumin; Zang, Shoubiao; Kong, Defeng; the EAST Team

    2016-07-01

    The density roll-over dependence on H-mode power threshold is observed on EAST for the first time. In campaign 2014 and 2015 shots with a toroidal field of 2.25 T have observed roll-over dependence with lower hybrid wave as the only auxiliary heating method, while shots with a toroidal field of 1.79 T and 1.9 T exhibit linear dependence consistent with scaling law. The density of minimum power for accessing H-mode on EAST has different plasma current values of 400 kA and 500 kA, and is better described in the normalized Greenwald fraction {{\\widehat{n}}\\text{e,min}}/{{n}\\text{G}}~≈ ~0.4 at {{B}\\text{T}}=2.35 \\text{T} . The absence of {{\\widehat{n}}\\text{e,min}} in 1.7 T and 1.8 T may be attributed to the positive dependence with toroidal field. Besides, correlation analysis of H-mode power threshold and divertor geometry in scanning X-point is summarized and compared. Outer leg length (distance from X-point to outer strike point) has the highest correlation coefficient with H-mode power threshold, which explains the data scattering within the same plasma parameters. A new equation of scaling law is proposed: {{P}\\text{th \\_\\text{EAST}}}=4.27\\text{OL}{{\\text{L}}1.4}× {{P}\\text{th \\_\\text{08}}}.~ Neutral particles are believed to be the hidden factor in different divertor geometry, and play a negative role in L-H transition via charge exchange damping.

  3. Changes in structural style of normal faults due to failure mode transition: First results from excavated scale models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettermann, Michael; Urai, Janos L.

    2015-05-01

    The effects of failure mode transition from tensile to shear on structural style and fault zone architecture have long been recognized but are not well studied in 3D, although the two modes are both common in the upper crust of Earth and terrestrial planets, and are associated with large differences in transport properties. We present a simple method to study this in physical scale models of normal faults, using a cohesive powder embedded in cohesionless sand. By varying the overburden thickness, the failure mode changes from tensile to hybrid and finally to shear. Hardening and excavating the cohesive layer allows post mortem investigation of 3D structures at high resolution. We recognize two end member structural domains that differ strongly in their attributes. In the tensile domain faults are strongly dilatant with steep open fissures and sharp changes in strike at segment boundaries and branch points. In the shear domain fault dips are shallower and fault planes develop striations; map-view fault traces undulate with smaller changes in strike at branches. These attributes may be recognized in subsurface fault maps and could provide a way to better predict fault zone structure in the subsurface.

  4. Nanocrystalline diamond surfaces for adhesion and growth of primary neurons, conflicting results and rational explanation

    PubMed Central

    Ojovan, Silviya M.; McDonald, Mathew; Rabieh, Noha; Shmuel, Nava; Erez, Hadas; Nesladek, Milos; Spira, Micha E.

    2014-01-01

    Using a variety of proliferating cell types, it was shown that the surface of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) provides a permissive substrate for cell adhesion and development without the need of complex chemical functionalization prior to cell seeding. In an extensive series of experiments we found that, unlike proliferating cells, post-mitotic primary neurons do not adhere to bare NCD surfaces when cultured in defined medium. These observations raise questions on the potential use of bare NCD as an interfacing layer for neuronal devices. Nevertheless, we also found that classical chemical functionalization methods render the “hostile” bare NCD surfaces with adhesive properties that match those of classically functionalized substrates used extensively in biomedical research and applications. Based on the results, we propose a mechanism that accounts for the conflicting results; which on one hand claim that un-functionalized NCD provides a permissive substrate for cell adhesion and growth, while other reports demonstrate the opposite. PMID:24966832

  5. Microcystin-RR exposure results in growth impairment by disrupting thyroid endocrine in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Xie, Liqiang; Yan, Wei; Li, Jing; Yu, Liqin; Wang, Jianghua; Li, Guangyu; Chen, Nan; Steinman, Alan D

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that cyanobacteria-derived microcystins (MCs) have the potential to disrupt endocrine systems. However, the effects of microcystin-RR (MC-RR) and their underlying mechanisms are poorly resolved in fish. In this study, MC-RR exposure through submersion caused serious developmental toxicity, such as growth delay and depressed heart rates in zebrafish larvae. We also detected decreased levels of thyroid hormones (THs), suggesting that MC-RR-triggered thyroid endocrine disruption might contribute to the growth impairment observed in developing zebrafish. To further our understanding of mechanisms of MC-RR-induced endocrine toxicity, quantitative real-time PCR (QPCR) analysis was performed on hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis related genes, i.e., corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), sodium/iodide symporter (NIS), thyroglobulin (TG), thyroid receptors (TRα and TRβ) and iodothyronine deiodinases (Dio1 and Dio2), of developing zebrafish embryos exposed to 0, 0.3, 1.0 or 3.0mgL(-1) MC-RR until 96h post-fertilization. Our results showed that transcription pattern of HPT axis related genes were greatly changed by MC-RR exposure, except TG gene. Furthermore, western blot was used to validate the results of gene expression. The results showed protein synthesis of TG was not affected, while that of NIS was significantly up-regulated, which are in accordance with gene expression. The overall results indicated that exposure to MC-RR can induce developmental toxicity, which might be associated with thyroid endocrine disruption in developing zebrafish larvae.

  6. Positional Isomers of Aspirin Are Equally Potent in Inhibiting Colon Cancer Cell Growth: Differences in Mode of Cyclooxygenase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kodela, Ravinder; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Goswami, Satindra; Gan, Zong Yuan; Rao, Praveen P. N.; Nia, Kamran V.; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A.

    2013-01-01

    We compared the differential effects of positional isomers of acetylsalicylic acid (o-ASA, m-ASA, and p-ASA) on cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition, gastric prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), malondialdehyde, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, human adenocarcinoma colon cancer cell growth inhibition, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell-cycle progression. We also evaluated the gastric toxicity exerted by ASA isomers. All ASA isomers inhibit COX enzymes, but only the o-ASA exerted an irreversible inhibitory profile. We did not observe a significant difference between ASA isomers in their ability to decrease the in vivo synthesis of PGE2 and SOD activity. Furthermore, all isomers increased the levels of gastric and TNF-α when administered orally at equimolar doses. We observed a dose-dependent cell growth inhibitory effect; the order of potency was p-ASA > m-ASA ≈ o-ASA. There was a dose-dependent decrease in cell proliferation and an increase in apoptosis, with a concomitant Go/G1 arrest. The ulcerogenic profile of the three ASA isomers showed a significant difference between o-ASA (aspirin) and its two positional isomers when administered orally at equimolar doses (1 mmol/kg); the ulcer index (UI) for o-ASA indicated extensive mucosal injury (UI = 38), whereas m-ASA and p-ASA produced a significantly decreased toxic response (UI = 12 and 8, respectively) under the same experimental conditions. These results suggest that the three positional isomers of ASA exert practically the same biologic profile in vitro and in vivo but showed different safety profiles. The mechanism of gastric ulcer formation exerted by aspirin and its two isomers warrants a more detailed and thorough investigation. PMID:23349335

  7. Positional isomers of aspirin are equally potent in inhibiting colon cancer cell growth: differences in mode of cyclooxygenase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kodela, Ravinder; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Goswami, Satindra; Gan, Zong Yuan; Rao, Praveen P N; Nia, Kamran V; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2013-04-01

    We compared the differential effects of positional isomers of acetylsalicylic acid (o-ASA, m-ASA, and p-ASA) on cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition, gastric prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), malondialdehyde, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, human adenocarcinoma colon cancer cell growth inhibition, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell-cycle progression. We also evaluated the gastric toxicity exerted by ASA isomers. All ASA isomers inhibit COX enzymes, but only the o-ASA exerted an irreversible inhibitory profile. We did not observe a significant difference between ASA isomers in their ability to decrease the in vivo synthesis of PGE2 and SOD activity. Furthermore, all isomers increased the levels of gastric and TNF-α when administered orally at equimolar doses. We observed a dose-dependent cell growth inhibitory effect; the order of potency was p-ASA > m-ASA ≈ o-ASA. There was a dose-dependent decrease in cell proliferation and an increase in apoptosis, with a concomitant Go/G1 arrest. The ulcerogenic profile of the three ASA isomers showed a significant difference between o-ASA (aspirin) and its two positional isomers when administered orally at equimolar doses (1 mmol/kg); the ulcer index (UI) for o-ASA indicated extensive mucosal injury (UI = 38), whereas m-ASA and p-ASA produced a significantly decreased toxic response (UI = 12 and 8, respectively) under the same experimental conditions. These results suggest that the three positional isomers of ASA exert practically the same biologic profile in vitro and in vivo but showed different safety profiles. The mechanism of gastric ulcer formation exerted by aspirin and its two isomers warrants a more detailed and thorough investigation.

  8. [Evaluation of growth hormone treatment results in children with chronic renal failure--one center experience].

    PubMed

    Szczepańska, Maria; Broll, Iwona; Dymon, Izabela; Szprynger, Krystyna

    2008-01-01

    The study aimed at the retrospective evaluation of rhGH treatment results in children with chronic renal failure CRF and short stature treated at Dpt. and Clinic of Pediatrics, Dialysis Unit and Ambulatory in Zabrze, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice. Medical records of 21 children at mean age of 11.0 years (7 girls and 14 boys) were analysed. Eleven children remained on renal replacement therapy. The mean dose of rhGH was 1.1 UI/kg/week). Five children are still on rhGH treatment. Mean growth velocity during rhGH treatment was 15.2 cm/ total period of treatment, 6.98 cm/year. Mean SDS of growth at the beginning of treatment was: -3.25, at the end of treatment: -2.76 (p < 0.02). PTH value 123.6 pg/ml, at the end of treatment 241.29 pg/mL (p < 0.05). RhGH treatment in children with CRF gives the opportunity to gain the final height compared to healthy children.

  9. Fourty-five day safety screen results for Tank 241-C-107, push mode, cores 68 and 69

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, K.E.

    1995-05-08

    Reported are the safety-screening analytes required by the C-107 tank characterization plan. Also included are copies of the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) scans. Two core samples from tank C-107, obtained by the push-mode core sampling method, were received, extruded, and analyzed by the 222-S Laboratories. Drainable liquid was analyzed at the segment level for a separable organic layer, energetics by DSC, and percent water by TGA. Sludge samples were analyzed at the half-segment level by DSC, TGA, and for total alpha activity. No safety-screening notification limits were exceeded on any samples.

  10. Label-free Growth Receptor-2 Detection and Dissociation Constant Assessment in Diluted Human Serum Using a Longitudinal Extension Mode of a Piezoelectric Microcantilever Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Capobianco, Joseph A.; Shih, Wan Y.; Adams, Gregory P.; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated real-time, label-free, in-situ detection of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2) in diluted serum using the first longitudinal extension mode of a lead zirconate-lead titanate (PZT)/glass piezoelectric microcantilever sensor (PEMS) with H3 single-chain variable fragment (scFv) immobilized on the 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) insulation layer of the PEMS surface. We showed that with the longitudinal extension mode, the PZT/glass PEMS consisting of a 1 mm long and 127 μm thick PZT layer bonded with a 75 μm thick glass layer with a 1.8 mm long glass tip could detect Her2 at a concentration of 6-60 ng/ml (or 0.06-0.6 nM) in diluted human serum, about 100 times lower than the concentration limit obtained using the lower-frequency flexural mode of a similar PZT/glass PEMS. We further showed that with the longitudinal mode, the PZT/glass PEMS determined the equilibrium H3-Her2 dissociation constant Kd to be 3.3±0.3 × 10-8 M consistent with the value, 3.2±0.28 ×10-8 M deduced by the surface plasmon resonance method (BIAcore). PMID:22888196

  11. Overview of the Results on Divertor Heat Loads in RMP Controlled H-mode Plasmas on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubowski, M. W.; Evans, T. E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Groth, M.; Lasnier, C. J.; Leonard, A. W.; Schmitz, O.; Watkins, J. G.; Elch, T.; Wolf, R. C.; Baylor, L. B.; Boedo, J.A.; Burrell, K. H.; Frerichs, H.; DeGrassie, J. S.; Gohil, P.; Joseph, I.; Mordijck, S.; Lehnen, M.; Petty, C C.; Pinsker, R. I.; Reiter, D.; Rhodes, T. L.; Samm, U.; Schaffer, M. J.; Snyder, P. B.; Stoschus, H.; Unterberg, E. A.; West, W. P.

    2009-01-01

    n this paper the manipulation of power deposition on divertor targets at DIII-D by the application of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) for suppression of large type-I edge localized modes (ELMs) is analysed. We discuss the modification of the ELM characteristics by the RMP applied. It is shown that the width of the deposition pattern in ELMy H-mode depends linearly on the ELM deposited energy, whereas in the RMP phase of the discharge those patterns are controlled by the externally induced magnetic perturbation. It was also found that the manipulation of heat transport due to the application of small, edge RMP depends on the plasma pedestal electron collisionality nu(e)*. We compare in this analysis RMP and no RMP phases with and without complete ELM suppression. At high nu(e)* > 0.5, the heat flux during the ELM suppressed phase is of the same order as the inter-ELM and the no-RMP phase. However, below this collisionality value, a slight increase in the total power flux to the divertor is observed during the RMP phase. This is most likely caused by a more negative potential at the divertor surface due to hot electrons reaching the divertor surface from the pedestal area along perturbed, open field lines.

  12. Selected mode of dendritic growth with n-fold symmetry in the presence of a forced flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, D. V.; Galenko, P. K.

    2017-07-01

    The effect of n-fold crystal symmetry is investigated for a two-dimensional stable dendritic growth in the presence of a forced convective flow. We consider dendritic growth in a one-component undercooled liquid. The theory is developed for the parabolic solid-liquid surface of dendrite growing at arbitrary growth Péclet numbers keeping in mind small anisotropies of surface energy and growth kinetics. The selection criterion determining the stable growth velocity of the dendritic tip and its stable tip diameter is found on the basis of solvability analysis. The obtained criterion includes previously developed theories of thermally and kinetically controlled dendritic growth with convection for the case of four-fold crystal symmetry. The obtained nonlinear system of equations (representing the selection criterion and undercooling balance) for the determination of dendrite tip velocity and dendrite tip diameter is analytically solved in a parametric form. These exact solutions clearly demonstrate a transition between thermally and kinetically controlled growth regimes. In addition, we show that the dendrites with larger crystal symmetry grow faster than those with smaller symmetry.

  13. No evidence for consistent long-term growth stimulation of 13 tropical tree species: results from tree-ring analysis.

    PubMed

    Groenendijk, Peter; van der Sleen, Peter; Vlam, Mart; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Bongers, Frans; Zuidema, Pieter A

    2015-10-01

    The important role of tropical forests in the global carbon cycle makes it imperative to assess changes in their carbon dynamics for accurate projections of future climate-vegetation feedbacks. Forest monitoring studies conducted over the past decades have found evidence for both increasing and decreasing growth rates of tropical forest trees. The limited duration of these studies restrained analyses to decadal scales, and it is still unclear whether growth changes occurred over longer time scales, as would be expected if CO2 -fertilization stimulated tree growth. Furthermore, studies have so far dealt with changes in biomass gain at forest-stand level, but insights into species-specific growth changes - that ultimately determine community-level responses - are lacking. Here, we analyse species-specific growth changes on a centennial scale, using growth data from tree-ring analysis for 13 tree species (~1300 trees), from three sites distributed across the tropics. We used an established (regional curve standardization) and a new (size-class isolation) growth-trend detection method and explicitly assessed the influence of biases on the trend detection. In addition, we assessed whether aggregated trends were present within and across study sites. We found evidence for decreasing growth rates over time for 8-10 species, whereas increases were noted for two species and one showed no trend. Additionally, we found evidence for weak aggregated growth decreases at the site in Thailand and when analysing all sites simultaneously. The observed growth reductions suggest deteriorating growth conditions, perhaps due to warming. However, other causes cannot be excluded, such as recovery from large-scale disturbances or changing forest dynamics. Our findings contrast growth patterns that would be expected if elevated CO2 would stimulate tree growth. These results suggest that commonly assumed growth increases of tropical forests may not occur, which could lead to erroneous

  14. Growth

    Treesearch

    John R. Jones; George A. Schier

    1985-01-01

    This chapter considers aspen growth as a process, and discusses some characteristics of the growth and development of trees and stands. For the most part, factors affecting growth are discussed elsewhere, particularly in the GENETICS AND VARIATION chapter and in chapters in PART 11. ECOLOGY. Aspen growth as it relates to wood production is examined in the WOOD RESOURCE...

  15. Reconstructing skeletal fiber arrangement and growth mode in the coral Porites lutea (Cnidaria, Scleractinia): a confocal Raman microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, M.; Nehrke, G.

    2012-11-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) mapping was used to investigate the microstructural arrangement and organic matrix distribution within the skeleton of the coral Porites lutea. Relative changes in the crystallographic orientation of crystals within the fibrous fan-system could be mapped, without the need to prepare thin sections, as required if this information is obtained by polarized light microscopy. Simultaneously, incremental growth lines can be visualized without the necessity of etching and hence alteration of sample surface. Using these methods two types of growth lines could be identified: one corresponds to the well-known incremental growth layers, whereas the second type of growth lines resemble denticle finger-like structures (most likely traces of former spines or skeletal surfaces). We hypothesize that these lines represent the outer skeletal surface before another growth cycle of elongation, infilling and thickening of skeletal areas continues. We show that CRM mapping with high spatial resolution can significantly improve our understanding of the micro-structural arrangement and growth patterns in coral skeletons.

  16. Mode of resistance to viral lysis affects host growth across multiple environments in the marine picoeukaryote Ostreococcus tauri.

    PubMed

    Heath, Sarah E; Collins, Sinead

    2016-12-01

    Viruses play important roles in population dynamics and as drivers of evolution in single-celled marine phytoplankton. Viral infection of Ostreococcus tauri often causes cell lysis, but two spontaneously arising resistance mechanisms occur: resistant cells that cannot become infected and resistant producer cells that are infected but not lysed, and which may slowly release viruses. As of yet, little is known about how consistent the effects of viruses on their hosts are across different environments. To measure the effect of host resistance on host growth, and to determine whether this effect is environmentally dependent, we compared the growth and survival of susceptible, resistant and resistant producer O. tauri cells under five environmental conditions with and without exposure to O. tauri virus. While the effects of exposure to virus on growth rates did not show a consistent pattern in populations of resistant cells, there were several cases where exposure to virus affected growth in resistant hosts, sometimes positively. In the absence of virus, there was no detectable cost of resistance in any environment, as measured by growth rate. In fact, the opposite was the case, with populations of resistant producer cells having the highest growth rates across four of the five environments. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Early Asteroseismic Results from Kepler: Structural and Core Parameters of the Hot B Subdwarf KPD 1943+4058 as Inferred from g-mode Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Grootel, V.; Charpinet, S.; Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.; Green, E. M.; Randall, S. K.; Silvotti, R.; Østensen, R. H.; Kjeldsen, H.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Borucki, W. J.; Koch, D.

    2010-08-01

    We present a seismic analysis of the pulsating hot B subdwarf KPD 1943+4058 (KIC 005807616) on the basis of the long-period, gravity-mode pulsations recently uncovered by Kepler. This is the first time that g-mode seismology can be exploited quantitatively for stars on the extreme horizontal branch, all previous successful seismic analyses having been confined so far to short-period, p-mode pulsators. We demonstrate that current models of hot B subdwarfs can quite well explain the observed g-mode periods, while being consistent with independent constraints provided by spectroscopy. We identify the 18 pulsations retained in our analysis as low-degree (ell = 1 and 2), intermediate-order (k = -9 through -58) g-modes. The periods (frequencies) are recovered, on average, at the 0.22% level, which is comparable to the best results obtained for p-mode pulsators. We infer the following structural and core parameters for KPD 1943+4058 (formal fitting uncertainties only): T eff = 28,050 ± 470 K, log g = 5.52 ± 0.03, M * = 0.496 ± 0.002 M sun, log (M env/M *) = -2.55 ± 0.07, log (1 - M core/M *) = -0.37 ± 0.01, and X core(C+O) = 0.261 ± 0.008. We additionally derive the age of the star since the zero-age extended horizontal branch 18.4 ± 1.0 Myr, the radius R = 0.203 ± 0.007 R sun, the luminosity L = 22.9 ± 3.13 L sun, the absolute magnitude MV = 4.21 ± 0.11, the reddening index E(B - V) = 0.094 ± 0.017, and the distance d = 1180 ± 95 pc.

  18. Tip moth control and loblolly pine growth in intensive pine culture: four year results

    Treesearch

    David L. Kulhavy; Jimmie L. Yeiser; L. Allen Smith

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-two treatments replicated four times were applied to planted loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L., on bedded industrial forest land in east Texas for measurement of growth impact of Nantucket pine tip moth (NPTM), Rhyacionia frustrana Comstock, and effects on pine growth over 2 years. Treatments were combinations of Velpar®,...

  19. Formation and growth of indoor air aerosol particles as a result of D-limonene oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartiainen, E.; Kulmala, M.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Taipale, R.; Rinne, J.; Vehkamäki, H.

    Oxidation of D-limonene, which is a common monoterpene, can lead to new aerosol particle formation in indoor environments. Thus, products containing D-limonene, such as citrus fruits, air refresheners, household cleaning agents, and waxes, can act as indoor air aerosol particle sources. We released D-limonene into the room air by peeling oranges and measured the concentration of aerosol particles of three different size ranges. In addition, we measured the concentration of D-limonene, the oxidant, and the concentration of ozone, the oxidizing gas. Based on the measurements we calculated the growth rate of the small aerosol particles, which were 3-10 nm in diameter, to be about 6300nmh-1, and the losses of the aerosol particles that were due to the coagulation and condensation processes. From these, we further approximated the concentration of the condensable vapour and its source rate and then calculated the formation rate of the small aerosol particles. For the final result, we calculated the nucleation rate and the maximum number of molecules in a critical cluster. The nucleation rate was in the order of 105cm-3s-1 and the number of molecules in a critical-sized cluster became 1.2. The results were in agreement with the activation theory.

  20. Some results from studies on the effects of weightlessness on the growth of epiphytic orchids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherevchenko, T. M.; Mayko, T. K.

    1983-01-01

    Epidendrum orchids were placed in a Malakhit-2 micro-greenhouse aboard the Soyuz-36-Salyut-6 space station to test their growth under weightless conditions. Growth occurred but was less than in control plants left on Earth; cells were smaller and parenchymal development slowed in all tissues. Stems, roots, and leaves were smaller. The number of stomas on the leaves was about the same as in the controls, but, because of the smaller leaf size, there were more per unit area. A modeling experiment using a clinostat revealed a large decrease in gibberellin activity and auxin activity. It was assumed that weightlessness primarily affects gibberellin biosynthesis, inhibiting cell growth. Reestablishment of growth compound activity upon return of the plants to Earth was indicated by the fact that the orchids resumed growth thereafter.

  1. In situ doping of catalyst-free InAs nanowires with Si: Growth, polytypism, and local vibrational modes of Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimakis, Emmanouil; Ramsteiner, Manfred; Huang, Chang-Ning; Trampert, Achim; Davydok, Anton; Biermanns, Andreas; Pietsch, Ullrich; Riechert, Henning; Geelhaar, Lutz

    2013-09-01

    Growth and structural aspects of the in situ doping of InAs nanowires with Si have been investigated. The nanowires were grown catalyst-free on Si(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. The supply of Si influenced the growth kinetics, affecting the nanowire dimensions, but not the degree of structural polytypism, which was always pronounced. As determined by Raman spectroscopy, Si was incorporated as substitutional impurity exclusively on In sites, which makes it a donor. Previously unknown Si-related Raman peaks at 355 and 360 cm-1 were identified, based on their symmetry properties in polarization-dependent measurements, as the two local vibrational modes of an isolated Si impurity on In site along and perpendicular, respectively, to the c-axis of the wurtzite InAs crystal.

  2. In situ doping of catalyst-free InAs nanowires with Si: Growth, polytypism, and local vibrational modes of Si

    SciTech Connect

    Dimakis, Emmanouil; Ramsteiner, Manfred; Huang, Chang-Ning; Trampert, Achim; Riechert, Henning; Geelhaar, Lutz; Davydok, Anton; Biermanns, Andreas; Pietsch, Ullrich

    2013-09-30

    Growth and structural aspects of the in situ doping of InAs nanowires with Si have been investigated. The nanowires were grown catalyst-free on Si(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. The supply of Si influenced the growth kinetics, affecting the nanowire dimensions, but not the degree of structural polytypism, which was always pronounced. As determined by Raman spectroscopy, Si was incorporated as substitutional impurity exclusively on In sites, which makes it a donor. Previously unknown Si-related Raman peaks at 355 and 360 cm{sup −1} were identified, based on their symmetry properties in polarization-dependent measurements, as the two local vibrational modes of an isolated Si impurity on In site along and perpendicular, respectively, to the c-axis of the wurtzite InAs crystal.

  3. Prenatal Exposure to Organophosphorous Pesticides and Fetal Growth: Pooled Results from Four Longitudinal Birth Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Harley, Kim G.; Engel, Stephanie M.; Vedar, Michelle G.; Eskenazi, Brenda; Whyatt, Robin M.; Lanphear, Bruce P.; Bradman, Asa; Rauh, Virginia A.; Yolton, Kimberly; Hornung, Richard W.; Wetmur, James G.; Chen, Jia; Holland, Nina T.; Barr, Dana Boyd; Perera, Frederica P.; Wolff, Mary S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Organophosphorous (OP) pesticides are associated with reduced fetal growth in animals, but human studies are inconsistent. Objectives: We pooled data from four cohorts to examine associations of prenatal OP exposure with birth weight (n = 1,169), length (n = 1,152), and head circumference (n = 1,143). Methods: Data were from the CHAMACOS, HOME, Columbia, and Mount Sinai birth cohorts. Concentrations of three diethyl phosphate (ΣDEP) and three dimethyl phosphate (ΣDMP) metabolites of OP pesticides [summed to six dialkyl phosphates (ΣDAPs)] were measured in maternal urine. Linear regression and mixed-effects models were used to examine associations with birth outcomes. Results: We found no significant associations of ΣDEP, ΣDMP, or ΣDAPs with birth weight, length, or head circumference overall. However, among non-Hispanic black women, increasing urinary ΣDAP and ΣDMP concentrations were associated with decreased birth length (β = –0.4 cm; 95% CI: –0.9, 0.0 and β = –0.4 cm; 95% CI: –0.8, 0.0, respectively, for each 10-fold increase in metabolite concentration). Among infants with the PON1192RR genotype, ΣDAP and ΣDMP were negatively associated with length (β = –0.4 cm; 95% CI: –0.9, 0.0 and β = –0.5 cm; 95% CI: –0.9, –0.1). Conclusions: This study confirms previously reported associations of prenatal OP exposure among black women with decreased infant size at birth, but finds no evidence of smaller birth weight, length, or head circumference among whites or Hispanics. Contrary to our hypothesis, we found stronger inverse associations of DAPs and birth outcome in infants with the less susceptible PON1192RR genotype. The large pooled data set facilitated exploration of interactions by race/ethnicity and PON1 genotype, but was limited by differences in study populations. Citation: Harley KG, Engel SM, Vedar MG, Eskenazi B, Whyatt RM, Lanphear BP, Bradman A, Rauh VA, Yolton K, Hornung RW, Wetmur JG, Chen J, Holland NT, Barr DB

  4. Modification of the high latitude ionosphere F region by X-mode powerful HF radio waves: Experimental results from multi-instrument diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskaya, N. F.; Borisova, T. D.; Yeoman, T. K.; Häggström, I.; Kalishin, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    We present experimental results concentrating on a variety of phenomena in the high latitude ionosphere F2 layer induced by an extraordinary (X-mode) HF pump wave at high heater frequencies (fH=6.2-8.0 MHz), depending on the pump frequency proximity to the ordinary and extraordinary mode critical frequencies, foF2 and fxF2. The experiments were carried out at the EISCAT HF heating facility with an effective radiated power of 450-650 MW in October 2012 and October-November 2013. Their distinctive feature is a wide diapason of critical frequency changes, when the fH/foF2 ratio was varied through a wide range from 0.9 to 1.35. It provides both a proper comparison of X-mode HF-induced phenomena excited under different ratios of fH/foF2 and an estimation of the frequency range above foF2 in which such X-mode phenomena are still possible. It was shown that the HF-enhanced ion and plasma lines are excited above foF2 when the HF pump frequency is lying in range between the foF2 and fxF2, foF2≤fH≤fxF2, whereas small-scale field-aligned irregularities continued to be generated even when fH exceeded fxF2 by up to 1 MHz and an X-polarized pump wave cannot be reflected from the ionosphere. Another parameter of importance is the magnetic zenith effect (HF beam/radar angle direction) which is typical for X-mode phenomena under fH/foF2 >1 as well as fH/foF2 ≤1. We have shown for the first time that an X-mode HF pump wave is able to generate strong narrowband spectral components in the SEE spectra (within 1 kHz of pump frequency) in the ionosphere F region, which were recorded at distance of 1200 km from the HF heating facility. The observed spectral lines can be associated with the ion acoustic, electrostatic ion cyclotron, and electrostatic ion cyclotron harmonic waves (otherwise known as neutralized ion Bernstein waves). The comparison between the O- and X-mode SEE spectra recorded at distance far from HF heating facility clearly demonstrated that variety of the narrowband

  5. Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waag, Andreas

    This chapter is devoted to the growth of ZnO. It starts with various techniques to grow bulk samples and presents in some detail the growth of epitaxial layers by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The last section is devoted to the growth of nanorods. Some properties of the resulting samples are also presented. If a comparison between GaN and ZnO is made, very often the huge variety of different growth techniques available to fabricate ZnO is said to be an advantage of this material system. Indeed, growth techniques range from low cost wet chemical growth at almost room temperature to high quality MOCVD growth at temperatures above 1, 000∘C. In most cases, there is a very strong tendency of c-axis oriented growth, with a much higher growth rate in c-direction as compared to other crystal directions. This often leads to columnar structures, even at relatively low temperatures. However, it is, in general, not straight forward to fabricate smooth ZnO thin films with flat surfaces. Another advantage of a potential ZnO technology is said to be the possibility to grow thin films homoepitaxially on ZnO substrates. ZnO substrates are mostly fabricated by vapor phase transport (VPT) or hydrothermal growth. These techniques are enabling high volume manufacturing at reasonable cost, at least in principle. The availability of homoepitaxial substrates should be beneficial to the development of ZnO technology and devices and is in contrast to the situation of GaN. However, even though a number of companies are developing ZnO substrates, only recently good quality substrates have been demonstrated. However, these substrates are not yet widely available. Still, the situation concerning ZnO substrates seems to be far from low-cost, high-volume production. The fabrication of dense, single crystal thin films is, in general, surprisingly difficult, even when ZnO is grown on a ZnO substrate. However

  6. Bioassays with unicellular algae: deviations from exponential growth and its implications for toxicity test results.

    PubMed

    Altenburger, Rolf; Schmitt-Jansen, Mechthild; Riedl, Janet

    2008-01-01

    Growth assays with unicellular green algae are an established tool in ecotoxicological effect assessment for chemicals and environmental samples. From an ecological perspective it seems appropriate to use the growth rate as a process variable rather than a measure of biomass gain for calculating inhibitory effects of contaminants. The notion of simple exponential growth for the description of the population increase in undisturbed suspension cultures of unicellular green algae, however, seems to be an oversimplification. Experimental findings describe the increase in biomass, cell number, the development of cell volume distributions of populations, and the relationship between cell size and chlorophyll content for individual cells over one generation at a time resolution of 2-h intervals. It was observed that algal populations of Desmodesmus subspicatus show a time pattern of cell size growth; the average cell volume increases about sixfold, without corresponding increase in population size. This is followed by a distinct cell division phase with little gain in biomass. This synchronous growth behavior despite continuous illumination may be explained by the multiple fission characteristic of unicellular green algae which is an adaptation to cyclic light-dark changes in the environment. It might be controlled by an independent cell cycle clock. For routine regulatory testing fluorescence-based measurements rather than cell counting minimizes the confounding effect on toxicity determination. For investigations of time-dependent effects, e.g., by pulsed exposure, an alternative mechanistically based growth function for unicellular algae is proposed that accommodates for the observed growth pattern.

  7. The Solar Core: New Low-l p-Mode Fine-Spacing Results from BiSON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin, W. J.; Elsworth, Y.; Isaak, G. R.; McLeod, C. P.; Miller, B. A.; New, R.

    1997-05-01

    The fine-structure spacing dl(n) = νl,n - νl+2,n-1 for low-degree solar p modes of angular degree l and radial order n is sensitive to conditions in the deep radiative interior of the Sun. Here we present fine-structure spacings derived from the analysis of nearly 5 years of helioseismological data collected between 1991 July and 1996 February by the Birmingham Solar Oscillations Network (BiSON). These data cover 9 <= n <= 28 for d0(n), and 11 <= n <= 27 for d1(n). The measured spacings are much more precise and cover a greater range than earlier measurements from BiSON data (Elsworth et al. 1990a). The predicted fine-structure spacings for a ``standard'' solar model are clearly excluded by the BiSON data (at ~10 σ) models that include helium and heavy-element settling provide a much better match to the observed spacings (see also Elsworth et al. 1995). Since the inclusion of core settling in solar models will tend to increase slightly the predicted neutrino flux, the BiSON fine-structure data appear to reinforce previous conclusions, i.e., an astrophysical solution to the solar neutrino problem seems unlikely. Birmingham Solar Oscillations Network; http://bison.ph.bham.ac.uk.

  8. Vascular normalization induced by sinomenine hydrochloride results in suppressed mammary tumor growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huimin; Ren, Yu; Tang, Xiaojiang; Wang, Ke; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Li; Li, Xiao; Liu, Peijun; Zhao, Changqi; He, Jianjun

    2015-03-09

    Solid tumor vasculature is characterized by structural and functional abnormality and results in a hostile tumor microenvironment that mediates several deleterious aspects of tumor behavior. Sinomenine is an alkaloid extracted from the Chinese medicinal plant, Sinomenium acutum, which has been utilized to treat rheumatism in China for over 2000 years. Though sinomenine has been demonstrated to mediate a wide range of pharmacological actions, few studies have focused on its effect on tumor vasculature. We showed here that intraperitoneally administration of 100 mg/kg sinomenine hydrochloride (SH, the hydrochloride chemical form of sinomenine) in two orthotopic mouse breast cancer models for 14 days, delayed mammary tumor growth and decreased metastasis by inducing vascular maturity and enhancing tumor perfusion, while improving chemotherapy and tumor immunity. The effects of SH on tumor vessels were caused in part by its capability to restore the balance between pro-angiogenic factor (bFGF) and anti-angiogenic factor (PF4). However 200 mg/kg SH didn't exhibit the similar inhibitory effect on tumor progression due to the immunosuppressive microenvironment caused by excessive vessel pruning, G-CSF upregulation, and GM-CSF downregulation. Altogether, our findings suggest that SH induced vasculature normalization contributes to its anti-tumor and anti-metastasis effect on breast cancer at certain dosage.

  9. Vascular Normalization Induced by Sinomenine Hydrochloride Results in Suppressed Mammary Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huimin; Ren, Yu; Tang, Xiaojiang; Wang, Ke; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Li; Li, Xiao; Liu, Peijun; Zhao, Changqi; He, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Solid tumor vasculature is characterized by structural and functional abnormality and results in a hostile tumor microenvironment that mediates several deleterious aspects of tumor behavior. Sinomenine is an alkaloid extracted from the Chinese medicinal plant, Sinomenium acutum, which has been utilized to treat rheumatism in China for over 2000 years. Though sinomenine has been demonstrated to mediate a wide range of pharmacological actions, few studies have focused on its effect on tumor vasculature. We showed here that intraperitoneally administration of 100 mg/kg sinomenine hydrochloride (SH, the hydrochloride chemical form of sinomenine) in two orthotopic mouse breast cancer models for 14 days, delayed mammary tumor growth and decreased metastasis by inducing vascular maturity and enhancing tumor perfusion, while improving chemotherapy and tumor immunity. The effects of SH on tumor vessels were caused in part by its capability to restore the balance between pro-angiogenic factor (bFGF) and anti-angiogenic factor (PF4). However 200 mg/kg SH didn't exhibit the similar inhibitory effect on tumor progression due to the immunosuppressive microenvironment caused by excessive vessel pruning, G-CSF upregulation, and GM-CSF downregulation. Altogether, our findings suggest that SH induced vasculature normalization contributes to its anti-tumor and anti-metastasis effect on breast cancer at certain dosage. PMID:25749075

  10. Circulating nerve growth factor in primary and secondary Raynaud's syndrome - results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Klein-Weigel, P; Gutsche-Petrak, B; Humpel, C; Riemekasten, G; Ivanov, S; Heidrich, H

    2009-02-01

    In this pilot study we examined circulating concentrations of nerve growth factor (NGF) in controls and patients suffering from primary or secondary Raynaud's syndrome and determined their relation to digital vasospasm. Eighteen controls, 16 patients with primary RP and 19 patients with systemic sclerosis (SScl) were included. Degree of vasospasm was graduated according to the degree of plethysmographically measured vasospastic reaction after cold test. A diary was handed out for documentation of the daily number and duration of RP during a period of 16 days. Circulating NGF levels were analysed by a commercial ELISA (Promega Inc., USA). SScl-patients were significantly older (p < 0.0001) and more severely affected by spontaneously occurring RP (p = 0.03), whereas the severity of the vasospastic reactions after a standard cold test were not significantly different between the groups (p = 0.09). Within each study group and between the study groups elevated NGF levels were observed only in SScl-patients after thermal provocations (p = < 0.05). In a correlation analysis restricted to patients with PRP or SRP, the degree of vasospasm after cold testing as well as the intensity of Raynaud's symptoms were not correlated with NGF-levels (p = n.s.). Our results do not support the hypothesis that NGF plays a major role in the generation of vasospasm in Raynaud's phenomenon.

  11. Infant feeding bottle design, growth and behaviour: results from a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Whether the design of an anti-vacuum infant feeding bottle influences infant milk intake, growth or behavior is unknown, and was the subject of this randomized trial. Methods Subjects 63 (36 male) healthy, exclusively formula-fed term infants. Intervention Randomisation to use Bottle A (n = 31), one-way air valve: Philips Avent) versus Bottle B (n = 32), internal venting system: Dr Browns). 74 breast-fed reference infants were recruited, with randomisation (n = 24) to bottle A (n = 11) or B (n = 13) if bottle-feeding was subsequently introduced. Randomisation stratified by gender and parity; computer-based telephone randomisation by independent clinical trials unit. Setting Infant home. Primary outcome measure infant weight gain to 4 weeks. Secondary outcomes (i) milk intake (ii) infant behaviour measured at 2 weeks (validated 3-day diary); (iii) risk of infection; (iv) continuation of breastfeeding following introduction of mixed feeding. Results Number analysed for primary outcome Bottle A n = 29, Bottle B n = 25. Primary outcome There was no significant difference in weight gain between randomised groups (0-4 weeks Bottle A 0.74 (SD 1.2) SDS versus bottle B 0.51 (0.39), mean difference 0.23 (95% CI -0.31 to 0.77). Secondary outcomes Infants using bottle A had significantly less reported fussing (mean 46 versus 74 minutes/day, p < 0.05) than those using bottle B. There was no significant difference in any other outcome measure. Breast-fed reference group There were no significant differences in primary or secondary outcomes between breast-fed and formula fed infants. The likelyhood of breastfeeding at 3 months was not significantly different in infants subsequently randomised to bottle A or B. Conclusion Bottle design may have short-term effects on infant behaviour which merit further investigation. No significant effects were seen on milk intake or growth; confidence in these findings is limited by the small sample size and this needs confirmation in

  12. Preliminary results of Physiological plant growth modelling for human life support in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasidharan L, Swathy; Dussap, Claude-Gilles; Hezard, Pauline

    2012-07-01

    Human life support is fundamental and crucial in any kind of space explorations. MELiSSA project of European Space Agency aims at developing a closed, artificial ecological life support system involving human, plants and micro organisms. Consuming carbon dioxide and water from the life support system, plants grow in one of the chambers and convert it into food and oxygen along with potable water. The environmental conditions, nutrient availability and its consumption of plants should be studied and necessarily modeled to predict the amount of food, oxygen and water with respect to the environmental changes and limitations. The reliability of a completely closed system mainly depends on the control laws and strategies used. An efficient control can occur, only if the system to control is itself well known, described and ideally if the responses of the system to environmental changes are predictable. In this aspect, the general structure of plant growth model has been designed together with physiological modelling.The physiological model consists of metabolic models of leaves, stem and roots, of which concern specific metabolisms of the associated plant parts. On the basis of the carbon source transport (eg. sucrose) through stem, the metabolic models (leaf and root) can be interconnected to each other and finally coupled to obtain the entire plant model. For the first step, leaf metabolic model network was built using stoichiometric, mass and energy balanced metabolic equations under steady state approach considering all necessary plant pathways for growth and maintenance of leaves. As the experimental data for lettuce plants grown in closed and controlled environmental chambers were available, the leaf metabolic model has been established for lettuce leaves. The constructed metabolic network is analyzed using known stoichiometric metabolic technique called metabolic flux analysis (MFA). Though, the leaf metabolic model alone is not sufficient to achieve the

  13. Thymus vulgaris essential oil and thymol against Alternaria alternata (Fr.) Keissler: effects on growth, viability, early infection and cellular mode of action.

    PubMed

    Perina, Fabiano J; Amaral, Douglas C; Fernandes, Rafael S; Labory, Claudia Rg; Teixeira, Glauco A; Alves, Eduardo

    2015-10-01

    In initial assays, Thymus vulgaris essential oil (TEO) has demonstrated activity against several plant-pathogenic fungi and has reduced the fungal diseases to levels comparable with commercial fungicides. Thus, the goal of this work was to identify the mode of action in fungi of TEO and its major compound thymol (TOH) at the cellular level using an ultrastructure approach. TEO from leaves and TOH had minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 500 and 250 µg mL(-1) respectively against A. alternata; under the same conditions, MIC for a commercial fungicide was 1250 µg mL(-1) . Ultrastructure analysis showed that TOH phenolic substance prevented fungal growth, reduced fungal viability and prevented the penetration in fruits by a cell wall/plasma membrane interference mode of action with organelles targeted for destruction in the cytoplasm. Such mode of action differs from protective and preventive-curative commercial fungicides used as pattern control. These findings suggest that TOH was responsible for the antifungal activity of TEO. Therefore, both the essential oil and its major substance have potential for use in the development of new phenolic structures and analogues to control Alternaria brown spot disease caused by Alternaria alternata. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Large area growth of monolayer MoS2 film on quartz and its use as a saturable absorber in laser mode-locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei-fang; Yu, Hua; Liao, Meng-zhou; Zhang, Ling; Zou, Shu-zhen; Yu, Hai-juan; He, Chao-jian; Zhang, Jing-yuan; Zhang, Guang-yu; Lin, Xue-chun

    2017-02-01

    Monolayer MoS2 film on quartz was fabricated by a home-made three-temperature zone chemical vapor deposition method. The photo, AFM image, Raman spectroscopy and HRTEM image showed that high quality as-grown MoS2 film completely covered the whole quartz substrate of a few cm2. A Nd:YVO4 laser with mode-locking operation was obtained by using the monolayer MoS2 on quartz as the saturable absorber (SA). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on large-area growth of high quality monolayer MoS2 film on transparent quartz substrate, and the first time that the CVD MoS2 SA was used in mode-locked solid state lasers. Because of the large area, high transmission, low non-saturable loss and high optical damage threshold of this material, it is very suitable for application in mode-locked solid state lasers.

  15. Growth mode, magnetic and magneto-optical properties of pulsed-laser-deposited Au/Co/Au(1 1 1) trilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavero, C.; Cebollada, A.; Armelles, G.; Fruchart, O.

    2010-03-01

    The growth mode, magnetic and magneto-optical properties of epitaxial Au/Co/Au(1 1 1) ultrathin trilayers grown by pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) under ultra-high vacuum are presented. Sapphire wafers buffered with a single-crystalline Mo(1 1 0) buffer layer were used as substrates. Owing to PLD-induced interfacial intermixing at the lower Co/Au(1 1 1) interface, a close-to layer-by-layer growth mode is promoted. Surprisingly, despite this intermixing, ferromagnetic behavior is found at room temperature for coverings starting at 1 atomic layer (AL). The films display perpendicular magnetization with anisotropy constants reduced by 50% compared to TD-grown or electrodeposited films, and with a coercivity more than one order of magnitude lower (≲5 mT). The magneto-optical (MO) response in the low Co thickness range is dominated by Au/Co interface contributions. For thicknesses starting at 3 AL Co, the MO response has a linear dependence with the Co thickness, indicative of a continuous-film-like MO behavior.

  16. Development of annualized diameter and height growth equations for red alder: preliminary results.

    Treesearch

    Aaron Weiskittel; Sean M. Garber; Greg Johnson; Doug Maguire; Robert A. Monserud

    2006-01-01

    Most individual-tree based growth and yield models use a 5- to 10-year time step, which can make projections for a fast-growing species like red alder quite difficult. Further, it is rather cumbersome to simulate the effects of intensive silvicultural treatments such as thinning or pruning on a time step longer than one year given the highly dynamic nature of growth...

  17. Size-dependent standard deviation for growth rates: Empirical results and theoretical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podobnik, Boris; Horvatic, Davor; Pammolli, Fabio; Wang, Fengzhong; Stanley, H. Eugene; Grosse, I.

    2008-05-01

    We study annual logarithmic growth rates R of various economic variables such as exports, imports, and foreign debt. For each of these variables we find that the distributions of R can be approximated by double exponential (Laplace) distributions in the central parts and power-law distributions in the tails. For each of these variables we further find a power-law dependence of the standard deviation σ(R) on the average size of the economic variable with a scaling exponent surprisingly close to that found for the gross domestic product (GDP) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 3275 (1998)]. By analyzing annual logarithmic growth rates R of wages of 161 different occupations, we find a power-law dependence of the standard deviation σ(R) on the average value of the wages with a scaling exponent β≈0.14 close to those found for the growth of exports, imports, debt, and the growth of the GDP. In contrast to these findings, we observe for payroll data collected from 50 states of the USA that the standard deviation σ(R) of the annual logarithmic growth rate R increases monotonically with the average value of payroll. However, also in this case we observe a power-law dependence of σ(R) on the average payroll with a scaling exponent β≈-0.08 . Based on these observations we propose a stochastic process for multiple cross-correlated variables where for each variable (i) the distribution of logarithmic growth rates decays exponentially in the central part, (ii) the distribution of the logarithmic growth rate decays algebraically in the far tails, and (iii) the standard deviation of the logarithmic growth rate depends algebraically on the average size of the stochastic variable.

  18. Regularity Results for a Class of Functionals with Non-Standard Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acerbi, Emilio; Mingione, Giuseppe

    We consider the integral functional under non-standard growth assumptions that we call p(x) type: namely, we assume that a relevant model case being the functional Under sharp assumptions on the continuous function p(x)>1 we prove regularity of minimizers. Energies exhibiting this growth appear in several models from mathematical physics.

  19. Overexpression of the tomato pollen receptor kinase LePRK1 rewires pollen tube growth to a blebbling mode

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The tubular growth of a pollen tube cell is crucial for the sexual reproduction of flowering plants. LePRK1 is a pollen-specific and plasma membrane–localized receptor-like kinase from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). LePRK1 interacts with another receptor, LePRK2, and with KINASE PARTNER PROTEIN (KPP...

  20. Peritoneal dialysis catheter placement as a mode of renal replacement therapy: Long-term results from a tertiary academic institution.

    PubMed

    Haskins, Ivy N; Schreiber, Martin; Prabhu, Ajita S; Krpata, David M; Perez, Arielle J; Tastaldi, Luciano; Tu, Chao; Rosen, Michael J; Rosenblatt, Steven

    2017-08-31

    Peritoneal dialysis as a mode of renal replacement therapy still has not been embraced widely as an alternative to hemodialysis. Furthermore, there is marked variability in peritoneal dialysis catheter insertion techniques and perioperative management within the United States. After the publication of best-demonstrated practices for peritoneal dialysis catheter placement, the utilization of peritoneal dialysis has increased significantly at our institution. We detail the long-term success of peritoneal dialysis catheter placement after the adoption of best-demonstrated practices. Retrospective chart review was performed on all patients who underwent laparoscopic peritoneal dialysis catheter placement using the best-demonstrated practice technique from January 2005 through December 2015. Preoperative patient demographic information, intraoperative variables, 30-day morbidity and mortality, and long-term catheter durability outcomes were investigated. A total of 457 patients met inclusion criteria. Four (0.9%) patients experienced an immediate postoperative complication requiring return to the operating room. There were no perioperative mortalities. A total of 298 (65.2%) patients were available for long-term follow-up; 221 (74.2%) patients are still alive, 76 (25.6%) patients are still undergoing peritoneal dialysis, 63 (21.1%) patients transitioned from peritoneal dialysis to hemodialysis, and 88 (29.5%) patients have undergone kidney transplantation. Based on Kaplan-Meier survival plots, 30% of patients will transition from peritoneal dialysis to hemodialysis after 5.5 years of peritoneal dialysis and the median time from commencing peritoneal dialysis to kidney transplantation is 5.6 years. Based on our institutional data, the adoption of best-demonstrated practices should provide long-term and reliable access to the peritoneal cavity. We recommend the adoption of these techniques to facilitate long-term peritoneal dialysis catheter survival. Copyright © 2017

  1. Orbital- versus glacial-mode forcing of tropical African climate: Results of scientific drilling in Lake Malawi, East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, C. A.; Cohen, A. S.; Johnson, T. C.; King, J. W.; Brown, E. T.; Lyons, R. P.; Stone, J. R.; Beuning, K. R.

    2007-12-01

    Lake Malawi extends from 9-14 degrees S within the East African Rift Valley, and at 700 m deep, contains more than 20 percent of the surface water on the African continent. In 2005 the Lake Malawi Scientific Drilling Project drilled 7 holes at two sites in the lake, recovering a continuous sediment record that samples much of the Quaternary. Detailed studies completed to date on sediments deposited during the past 145 ka indicate periods of severe aridity at precessional frequency between 135 and 75 ka, when the lake's water volume was periodically reduced by at least 95 percent. These dramatic drops in lake level (more than 550 m), signifying markedly arid conditions in the catchment, are documented in sediment lithology (decreased organic carbon content and increased authigenic carbonate content during severe lowstands), aquatic microfossils (appearance of a littoral ostracode fauna, and saline/alkaline lake diatom flora during extreme low lake stages), as well as in dramatic reductions in catchment pollen production. These intervals of pronounced tropical African aridity in the early late-Pleistocene were much more severe than the Last Glacial Maximum, and are consistent with sediment records from Lakes Tanganyika (East Africa) and Bosumtwi (West Africa). In all three lakes a major rise in water levels and a shift to more humid conditions is observed after ~70 ka. The transition to wetter, more stable conditions coincides with the relaxation of orbital eccentricity and a reduction in the amplitude of precession. The observed climate mode switch to decreased environmental variability is consistent with terrestrial and marine records from in and around tropical Africa, but these new drill cores provide evidence for dramatically drier conditions prior to 70 ka that have not as yet been detected in marine sediment records. Such climate change may have stimulated the expansion and migrations of early modern human populations.

  2. Naturally occurring and forced azimuthal modes in a turbulent jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, Ganesh; Rice, Edward J.; Reshotko, Eli

    1991-01-01

    Naturally occurring instability modes in an axisymmetric jet are studied utilizing the modal frequency spectrum method. In the early evolution of the jet the axisymmetric mode was predominant, with the azimuthal modes growing quickly but dominating only after the end of the potential core. The growth of the azimuthal modes is seen nearer to the nozzle exit for the jet in the laminar boundary layer case than for the turbulent. Based on the results from these naturally occurring jet instability mode tests, target modes for efficient excitation were determined and two cases of excitation were examined.

  3. Impact of E × B flow shear on turbulence and resulting power fall-off width in H-mode plasmas in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Q. Q. Zhong, F. C. E-mail: fczhong@dhu.edu.cn; Jia, M. N.; Xu, G. S. E-mail: fczhong@dhu.edu.cn; Wang, L.; Wang, H. Q.; Chen, R.; Yan, N.; Liu, S. C.; Chen, L.; Li, Y. L.; Liu, J. B.

    2015-06-15

    The power fall-off width in the H-mode scrape-off layer (SOL) in tokamaks shows a strong inverse dependence on the plasma current, which was noticed by both previous multi-machine scaling work [T. Eich et al., Nucl. Fusion 53, 093031 (2013)] and more recent work [L. Wang et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 114002 (2014)] on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. To understand the underlying physics, probe measurements of three H-mode discharges with different plasma currents have been studied in this work. The results suggest that a higher plasma current is accompanied by a stronger E×B shear and a shorter radial correlation length of turbulence in the SOL, thus resulting in a narrower power fall-off width. A simple model has also been applied to demonstrate the suppression effect of E×B shear on turbulence in the SOL and shows relatively good agreement with the experimental observations.

  4. GLOBAL MODELING OF NEBULAE WITH PARTICLE GROWTH, DRIFT, AND EVAPORATION FRONTS. I. METHODOLOGY AND TYPICAL RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada, Paul R.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Morgan, Demitri A.

    2016-02-20

    We model particle growth in a turbulent, viscously evolving protoplanetary nebula, incorporating sticking, bouncing, fragmentation, and mass transfer at high speeds. We treat small particles using a moments method and large particles using a traditional histogram binning, including a probability distribution function of collisional velocities. The fragmentation strength of the particles depends on their composition (icy aggregates are stronger than silicate aggregates). The particle opacity, which controls the nebula thermal structure, evolves as particles grow and mass redistributes. While growing, particles drift radially due to nebula headwind drag. Particles of different compositions evaporate at “evaporation fronts” (EFs) where the midplane temperature exceeds their respective evaporation temperatures. We track the vapor and solid phases of each component, accounting for advection and radial and vertical diffusion. We present characteristic results in evolutions lasting 2 × 10{sup 5} years. In general, (1) mass is transferred from the outer to the inner nebula in significant amounts, creating radial concentrations of solids at EFs; (2) particle sizes are limited by a combination of fragmentation, bouncing, and drift; (3) “lucky” large particles never represent a significant amount of mass; and (4) restricted radial zones just outside each EF become compositionally enriched in the associated volatiles. We point out implications for millimeter to submillimeter SEDs and the inference of nebula mass, radial banding, the role of opacity on new mechanisms for generating turbulence, the enrichment of meteorites in heavy oxygen isotopes, variable and nonsolar redox conditions, the primary accretion of silicate and icy planetesimals, and the makeup of Jupiter’s core.

  5. Global Modeling of Nebulae with Particle Growth, Drift, and Evaporation Fronts. I. Methodology and Typical Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Paul R.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Morgan, Demitri A.

    2016-02-01

    We model particle growth in a turbulent, viscously evolving protoplanetary nebula, incorporating sticking, bouncing, fragmentation, and mass transfer at high speeds. We treat small particles using a moments method and large particles using a traditional histogram binning, including a probability distribution function of collisional velocities. The fragmentation strength of the particles depends on their composition (icy aggregates are stronger than silicate aggregates). The particle opacity, which controls the nebula thermal structure, evolves as particles grow and mass redistributes. While growing, particles drift radially due to nebula headwind drag. Particles of different compositions evaporate at “evaporation fronts” (EFs) where the midplane temperature exceeds their respective evaporation temperatures. We track the vapor and solid phases of each component, accounting for advection and radial and vertical diffusion. We present characteristic results in evolutions lasting 2 × 105 years. In general, (1) mass is transferred from the outer to the inner nebula in significant amounts, creating radial concentrations of solids at EFs; (2) particle sizes are limited by a combination of fragmentation, bouncing, and drift; (3) “lucky” large particles never represent a significant amount of mass; and (4) restricted radial zones just outside each EF become compositionally enriched in the associated volatiles. We point out implications for millimeter to submillimeter SEDs and the inference of nebula mass, radial banding, the role of opacity on new mechanisms for generating turbulence, the enrichment of meteorites in heavy oxygen isotopes, variable and nonsolar redox conditions, the primary accretion of silicate and icy planetesimals, and the makeup of Jupiter’s core.

  6. Discontinuation and resumption of contraceptive use: Results from the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Barbara; Trussell, James; Kost, Kathryn; Singh, Susheela; Jones, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    Background: Discontinuation of contraceptive use that is not immediately followed by resumption of use of another method while a woman is at risk is a common cause of unintended pregnancy. Study Design: We provide new estimates of discontinuation for the pill, injectable, male condom, withdrawal, and fertility-awareness-based methods, and identify socioeconomic characteristics associated with discontinuation for the pill, male condom, and withdrawal. We provide new estimates of resumption of use by prior method used and identify socioeconomic characteristics associated with resumption of use. Estimates are obtained using the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth, supplemented by the 2001 Abortion Patient Survey to correct for underreporting of abortion. Results: The fraction of method use segments discontinued for method-related reasons within one year was highest for the male condom (57%), withdrawal (54%) and fertility-awareness-based methods (53%) and lowest for the pill (33%), with the injectable in-between (44%). However, contraception was abandoned altogether in only 25% of cases. The probability of resuming use of a contraceptive was 72% in the initial month of exposure to the risk of an unintended pregnancy; this rose to 76% by the third month. Conclusion: The risk of discontinuation of use of reversible methods of contraception for method-related reasons, including a change of method is very high, but fortunately the risk of abandoning use of contraception altogether is far lower, and most spells of exposure to risk of an unintended pregnancy following discontinuation are protected from the start by a switch to another method. PMID:18847574

  7. Growth Hormone Plus Resistance Exercise Attenuate Structural Changes in Rat Myotendinous Junctions Resulting from Chronic Unloading

    PubMed Central

    Curzi, D.; Lattanzi, D.; Ciuffoli, S.; Burattini, S.; Grindeland, R.E.; Edgerton, V.R.; Roy, R.R.; Tidball, J.G.; Falcieri, E.

    2013-01-01

    Myotendinous junctions (MTJs) are specialized sites on the muscle surface where forces generated by myofibrils are transmitted across the sarcolemma to the extracellular matrix. At the ultrastructural level, the interface between the sarcolemma and extracellular matrix is highly folded and interdigitated at these junctions. In this study, the effect of exercise and growth hormone (GH) treatments on the changes in MTJ structure that occur during muscle unloading, has been analyzed. Twenty hypophysectomized rats were assigned randomly to one of five groups: ambulatory control, hindlimb unloaded, hindlimb unloaded plus exercise (3 daily bouts of 10 climbs up a ladder with 50% body wt attached to the tail), hindlimb unloaded plus GH (2 daily injections of 1 mg/kg body wt, i.p.), and hindlimb unloaded plus exercise plus GH. MTJs of the plantaris muscle were analyzed by electron microscopy and the contact between muscle and tendon was evaluated using an IL/B ratio, where B is the base and IL is the interface length of MTJ’s digit-like processes. After 10 days of unloading, the mean IL/B ratio was significantly lower in unloaded (3.92), unloaded plus exercise (4.18), and unloaded plus GH (5.25) groups than in the ambulatory control (6.39) group. On the opposite, the mean IL/B ratio in the group treated with both exercise and GH (7.3) was similar to control. These findings indicate that the interaction between exercise and GH treatments attenuates the changes in MTJ structure that result from chronic unloading and thus can be used as a countermeasure to these adaptations. PMID:24441190

  8. Influence of biodynamic preparations on compost development and resultant compost extracts on wheat seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Jennifer R; Carpenter-Boggs, Lynne; Reganold, John P; York, Alan L; Brinton, William F

    2010-07-01

    Biodynamic (BD) agriculture, a form of organic agriculture, includes the use of specially fermented preparations, but peer-reviewed studies on their efficacy are rare. Composting of a grape pomace and manure mixture was studied in two years (2002 and 2005) with and without the BD compost preparations. Water extracts of finished composts were then used to fertigate wheat seedlings, with and without added inorganic fertilizer. BD-treated mixtures had significantly greater dehydrogenase activity than did untreated (control) mixtures during composting, suggesting greater microbial activity in BD-treated compost. In both years there was a distinct compost effect on wheat shoot and root biomass irrespective of supplemental fertilizer. Shoot biomass was highest in all treatments receiving 1% compost extract. Wheat seedlings that received 1% compost extract in 2005 grew similar root and shoot biomass as fertilized seedlings, despite only containing 30% as much nitrogen as the fertilizer treatment. In both years seedlings that received fertilizer plus 1% compost extract produced 22-61% more shoot biomass and 40-66% more root biomass than seedlings that received fertilizer alone, even at higher rates. In 2002 a 1% extract of BD compost grew 7% taller wheat seedlings than did 1% extract of untreated compost. At 0.1% only BD extract grew taller plants than water, but in 2002 only. No effect on shoot or root biomass was seen at 0.1%. Our results support the use of compost extracts as fertilizer substitutes or supplements, testimonial reports on the growth promoting effects of compost extracts, and the occasional superiority of BD compost to untreated compost. Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Novel Mode of Nucleation and Growth of Complex Oxide Heterostructures at the Extreme of High Supersaturation. Effects of Orbital Reconstruction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-31

    adatom population and either facilitates the ease of nucleation (low SS) or for a sufficiently high pulse-rate acts to bound the critical radius to a...temperature and (B) corresponding layer roughness, Δ. The stages of growth marked as 1-3 correspond to the same time- intevals in Fig. 2(A). Supplementary...intervals are defined in Fig. 2(A). Dashed lines represent lower and upper confidence limits. Figure 6: Auxiliary Supplement:(Color online) RHEED

  10. Effect of dosage and application mode of L-carnitine on plasma lipid and egg-yolk cholesterol of turkeys, hatchability of eggs and post-hatch growth of their offsprings.

    PubMed

    Oso, A O; Fafiolu, A O; Adeleke, M A; Ladokun, O A; Sobayo, R A; Jegede, A V; Peters, S O; Oyebamiji, O A; Akinsola, J

    2014-08-01

    The effect of dosage and application mode of L-carnitine on plasma lipid and egg-yolk cholesterol of breeder turkeys, hatchability of eggs and post-hatch growth response was investigated using 180 breeder hens. The hens were assigned to six dietary treatments in a 2 × 3 factorial arrangements of two application modes of L-carnitine (diet and drinking water) supplemented at 0, 50 and 100 ppm (mg/kg or mg/l) levels, respectively. Each treatment was replicated five times with six hens per replicate. Dietary inclusion of 50 ppm L-carnitine showed the lowest (p < 0.01) plasma total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein concentration (LDL). Breeder hens offered 50 ppm L-carnitine with no regard to application mode recorded the highest (p < 0.01) plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Hens offered 50 and 100 ppm L-carnitine irrespective of application mode also showed reduced (p < 0.01) egg-yolk TC concentration at 32 weeks of age. Dietary supplementation of 50 ppm L-carnitine for breeder turkeys recorded the lowest (p < 0.01) egg-yolk triglyceride (TG) at 40 weeks of age. Hens offered 50 ppm L-carnitine irrespective of application mode recorded the highest (p < 0.05) hen-day egg production. Incidence of dead-in-shell also reduced (p < 0.05) with increasing dosage of L-carnitine. Dietary supplementation of 50 ppm and oral application in drinking water of 100 ppm L-carnitine for breeder turkeys resulted in highest (p < 0.05) egg fertility. Offsprings from breeder hens fed diets supplemented with L-carnitine recorded no post-hatch mortality. Highest (p < 0.05) post-hatch final live weight and weight gain was obtained with poults obtained from hens fed diet supplemented with 50 ppm L-carnitine. In conclusion, dietary supplementation of 50 ppm L-carnitine for turkey hens showed improved serum lipid profile, egg fertility, reduced dead-in-shell, egg-yolk cholesterol and resulted in improved post-hatch growth performance.

  11. Defective minor spliceosome mRNA processing results in isolated familial growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Argente, Jesús; Flores, Raquel; Gutiérrez-Arumí, Armand; Verma, Bhupendra; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Cuscó, Ivon; Oghabian, Ali; Chowen, Julie A; Frilander, Mikko J; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2014-03-01

    The molecular basis of a significant number of cases of isolated growth hormone deficiency remains unknown. We describe three sisters affected with severe isolated growth hormone deficiency and pituitary hypoplasia caused by biallelic mutations in the RNPC3 gene, which codes for a minor spliceosome protein required for U11/U12 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) formation and splicing of U12-type introns. We found anomalies in U11/U12 di-snRNP formation and in splicing of multiple U12-type introns in patient cells. Defective transcripts include preprohormone convertases SPCS2 and SPCS3 and actin-related ARPC5L genes, which are candidates for the somatotroph-restricted dysfunction. The reported novel mechanism for familial growth hormone deficiency demonstrates that general mRNA processing defects of the minor spliceosome can lead to very narrow tissue-specific consequences.

  12. Defective minor spliceosome mRNA processing results in isolated familial growth hormone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Argente, Jesús; Flores, Raquel; Gutiérrez-Arumí, Armand; Verma, Bhupendra; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Cuscó, Ivon; Oghabian, Ali; Chowen, Julie A; Frilander, Mikko J; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2014-01-01

    The molecular basis of a significant number of cases of isolated growth hormone deficiency remains unknown. We describe three sisters affected with severe isolated growth hormone deficiency and pituitary hypoplasia caused by biallelic mutations in the RNPC3 gene, which codes for a minor spliceosome protein required for U11/U12 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) formation and splicing of U12-type introns. We found anomalies in U11/U12 di-snRNP formation and in splicing of multiple U12-type introns in patient cells. Defective transcripts include preprohormone convertases SPCS2 and SPCS3 and actin-related ARPC5L genes, which are candidates for the somatotroph-restricted dysfunction. The reported novel mechanism for familial growth hormone deficiency demonstrates that general mRNA processing defects of the minor spliceosome can lead to very narrow tissue-specific consequences. Subject Categories Genetics, Gene Therapy ' Genetic Disease; Metabolism PMID:24480542

  13. Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry of Seabird Guano Fertilization: Results from Growth Chamber Studies with Maize (Zea Mays)

    PubMed Central

    Szpak, Paul; Longstaffe, Fred J.; Millaire, Jean-François; White, Christine D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Stable isotope analysis is being utilized with increasing regularity to examine a wide range of issues (diet, habitat use, migration) in ecology, geology, archaeology, and related disciplines. A crucial component to these studies is a thorough understanding of the range and causes of baseline isotopic variation, which is relatively poorly understood for nitrogen (δ15N). Animal excrement is known to impact plant δ15N values, but the effects of seabird guano have not been systematically studied from an agricultural or horticultural standpoint. Methodology/Principal Findings This paper presents isotopic (δ13C and δ15N) and vital data for maize (Zea mays) fertilized with Peruvian seabird guano under controlled conditions. The level of 15N enrichment in fertilized plants is very large, with δ15N values ranging between 25.5 and 44.7‰ depending on the tissue and amount of fertilizer applied; comparatively, control plant δ15N values ranged between −0.3 and 5.7‰. Intraplant and temporal variability in δ15N values were large, particularly for the guano-fertilized plants, which can be attributed to changes in the availability of guano-derived N over time, and the reliance of stored vs. absorbed N. Plant δ13C values were not significantly impacted by guano fertilization. High concentrations of seabird guano inhibited maize germination and maize growth. Moreover, high levels of seabird guano greatly impacted the N metabolism of the plants, resulting in significantly higher tissue N content, particularly in the stalk. Conclusions/Significance The results presented in this study demonstrate the very large impact of seabird guano on maize δ15N values. The use of seabird guano as a fertilizer can thus be traced using stable isotope analysis in food chemistry applications (certification of organic inputs). Furthermore, the fertilization of maize with seabird guano creates an isotopic signature very similar to a high-trophic level marine resource, which must

  14. Growth modes of multiferroic BiFeO3 (001) thin films on SrTiO3 -- Real time X-ray synchrotron study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinta, Priya V.; Headrick, Randall; Almamun, Ashrafi; Callori, Sara; Dawber, Matthew

    2012-02-01

    Real time X-ray scattering measurements during heteroepitaxial film deposition provide details of initial nucleation and growth, thus giving insight into atomic-scale processes and growth mechanisms. In this work the growth of pulsed laser deposited (PLD), and RF-magnetron sputter deposited multiferroic BiFeO3 (001) thin films on SrTiO3 substrates are studied using in-situ X-ray specular and diffuse scattering. Both the out-of-plane (height distribution) and lateral (surface mounds and correlations) information is obtained from these measurements. Specular X-ray intensity monitored at (00 .5ex1 -.1em/ -.15em.25ex2 ) shows unit-cell growth oscillations during the first few monolayers, while both diffuse scattering width and intensity oscillate out-of-phase with specular, characteristic of 2D layer-by-layer growth for PLD deposited films. The coarsening process is consistent with growth and coalescence of islands - identified as key fundamental processes in epitaxial growth. Beyond several monolayers oscillations decay and the diffuse intensity increases indicating rapid growth of mounds. However, the mounds themselves subsequently merge after a few more deposited layers, leaving arrays of mesas with some holes due to incomplete coalescence. This behavior was corroborated with ex-situ Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) at each stage. Results for sputter deposited films showed unusually strong specular and diffuse oscillations; implications for interface structure and formation will be discussed.

  15. A further result on consensus problems of second-order multi-agent systems with directed graphs, a moving mode and multiple delays.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Gao, Kai; Lin, Peng; Mo, Lipo

    2017-07-03

    This paper considers a consensus problem of a class of second-order multi-agent systems with a moving mode and multiple delays on directed graphs. Using local information, a distributed algorithm is adopted to make all agents reach a consensus while moving together with a constant velocity in the presence of delays. To study the effects of the coexistence of the moving mode and delays on the consensus convergence, a frequency domain approach is employed through analyzing the relationship between the components of the eigenvector associated with the eigenvalue on imaginary axis. Then based on the continuity of the system function, an upper bound for the delays is given to ensure the consensus convergence of the system. A numerical example is included to illustrate the obtained theoretical results. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Key components of the mode of action for hemangiosarcoma induction in pregabalin-treated mice: evidence of increased bicarbonate, dysregulated erythropoiesis, macrophage activation, and increased angiogenic growth factors in mice but not in rats.

    PubMed

    Criswell, Kay A; Wojcinski, Zbigniew; Pegg, David; Albassam, Mudher; Duddy, Steven; Olsen, Eric; Bailie, Marc; Foote, Stephen; Anderson, Timothy

    2012-07-01

    In carcinogenicity studies, pregabalin increased hemangiosarcoma incidence in mice but not in rats. Investigative studies, ranging in length from 24 h to 12 months, were conducted in mice (1000 or 5000 mg/kg) and rats (900 mg/kg) to evaluate a potential mode-of-action scheme for tumor formation. Three areas were evaluated: (1) hematopoiesis (because endothelial and hematopoietic cells arise from the same precursor and hemangiosarcomas are primarily located in mouse hematopoietic tissues), (2) angiogenic growth factors (because increased angiogenic growth factors may stimulate vascular tumors), and (3) pulmonary/blood gas parameters (because hypoxia is a known driver for endothelial cell proliferation). In mice, pregabalin rapidly increased platelet and megakaryocyte counts, activated platelets and bone marrow erythrophages, decreased the myeloid-to-erythroid (M:E) ratio (49%), and produced bone marrow and splenic congestion and extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH). Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor immunohistochemical staining were also increased in mouse bone marrow and spleen and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 immunolabeling was increased in liver. Serum bicarbonate was increased within 24 h of pregabalin administration, persisted over time, and was accompanied by decreased respiratory rate (up to 34%) and increased partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO(2)), resulting in sustained metabolic alkalosis and elevated blood pH in mice. In contrast, in rats, pregabalin decreased overall bone marrow cellularity, including decreased number of megakaryocytes (24%) with no evidence of erythrophages, no change in M:E ratio, no EMH, and no increase in angiogenic growth factors or blood pH. Persistent alterations in serum bicarbonate, respiratory function, and blood gas parameters in mice, without adequate compensatory mechanisms, has the potential to create chronic tissue hypoxia, an accepted driver of endothelial

  17. Preliminary results of sugar maple carbohydrate and growth response under vacuum and gravity sap extraction

    Treesearch

    Mark L. Isselhardt; Timothy D. Perkins; Abby K. van den Berg; Paul G. Schaberg

    2016-01-01

    Recent technological advancements have increased the amount of sugar-enriched sap that can be extracted from sugar maple (Acer saccharum). This pilot study quantified overall sugar removal and the impacts of vacuum (60 cm Hg) and gravity sap extraction on residual nonstructural carbohydrate (NSC) concentrations and on stem and twig growth. Vacuum...

  18. Evaluating Tree Protection Devices: Effects on Growth and Survival–First-Year Results

    Treesearch

    L. R. Costello; R. H. Schmidt; Gregory A. Giusti

    1991-01-01

    The protection of seedlings from animal browsing is critical for the survival and growth of many tree species. This is particularly true in wildland areas and arid areas (McAuliffe, 1986), and oftentimes in urban areas. A variety of techniques and devices have been used to protect seedlings, from using straw stubble to milk cartons to plastic or metal screens. Recently...

  19. Growth of ponderosa pine thinned to different stocking levels in central Oregon: 30-year results.

    Treesearch

    P.H. Cochran; James W. Barrett

    1999-01-01

    Periodic annual increments (PAI) for survivor diameters decreased curvilinearly with increasing stand density. Gross volume and basal areas PAIs increased linearly with increasing stand density. Growth of basal area and volume for the 20 largest trees per acre were reduced curvilinearly with increasing stand density. Bark beetles were the primary cause of mortality. No...

  20. Surface segregation and growth-mode transitions during the initial stages of Si growth on Ge(001)2 × 1 by cyclic gas-source molecular beam epitaxy from Si2H6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsu, R.; Xiao, H. Z.; Kim, Y.-W.; Hasan, M.-A.; Birnbaum, H. K.; Greene, J. E.; Lin, D.-S.; Chiang, T.-C.

    1994-01-01

    Surface morphological and compositional evolution during the initial stages of Si growth on Ge(001)2×1 by cyclic gas-source molecular beam epitaxy from Si2H6 has been investigated using in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), Auger electron spectroscopy, electron-energy-loss spectroscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy, combined with post-deposition high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. The layers were deposited using repetitive cycles consisting of saturation Si2H6 dosing at room temperature, followed by annealing for 1 min at 550 °C. Film growth was observed to proceed via a mixed Stranski-Krastanov mode. Single-step-height two-dimensional growth was obtained for nominal Si deposition thicknesses tSi up to ≂1.5 monolayers (ML). However, the upper layer remained essentially pure Ge which segregated to the surface through site exchange with deposited Si as H was desorbed. At higher tSi, the Ge coverage decreased slowly, the surface roughened, and two-dimensional multilayer island growth was observed for tSi up to ≂7.5 ML, where bulk reflections in RHEED patterns provided evidence for the evolution of three-dimensional island formula.

  1. Reduced drought tolerance during domestication and the evolution of weediness results from tolerance-growth trade-offs

    PubMed Central

    Koziol, E. K.; Rieseberg, L.H.; Kane, Nolan; Bever, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    The increased reproductive potential, size, shoot allocation, and growth rate of weedy plants may result from reduced resource allocation to other aspects of plant growth and defense. To investigate whether changes in resource allocation occurred during domestication or the evolution of weediness, we compared the mycorrhizal responsiveness, growth, and drought tolerance of nine native ruderal, nine agriculturally weedy (four US weedy and five Australian weedy), and fourteen domesticated populations (eight ancient landraces and six improved cultivars) of the common sunflower (Helianthus annuus). Domesticated sunflower cultivars were less drought tolerant, but had higher plant growth and fecundity and coarser roots than wild populations. There were no changes in level of drought tolerance between improved cultivars and ancient landraces plants, but there was an increase in allocation to flowers with recent selection. Weedy populations were intermediate between domesticated cultivars and native ruderal populations for plant growth rate, root architecture and drought tolerance. Weedy populations benefited most from mycorrhizal inoculation by having fewer wilted leaves and wetter soil. Overall, we found that trade-offs between drought tolerance and several aspects of plant growth, including growth rate, allocation to flowering and root architecture, govern evolution during sunflower domestication and the invasion of disturbed habitat. PMID:23206138

  2. Reduced drought tolerance during domestication and the evolution of weediness results from tolerance-growth trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Koziol, Liz; Rieseberg, Loren H; Kane, Nolan; Bever, James D

    2012-12-01

    The increased reproductive potential, size, shoot allocation, and growth rate of weedy plants may result from reduced resource allocation to other aspects of plant growth and defense. To investigate whether changes in resource allocation occurred during domestication or the evolution of weediness, we compared the mycorrhizal responsiveness, growth, and drought tolerance of nine native ruderal, nine agriculturally weedy (four U.S. weedy and five Australian weedy), and 14 domesticated populations (eight ancient landraces and six improved cultivars) of the common sunflower (Helianthus annuus). Domesticated sunflower cultivars were less drought tolerant, but had higher plant growth and fecundity and coarser roots than wild populations. There were no changes in level of drought tolerance between improved cultivars and ancient landrace plants, but there was an increase in allocation to flowers with recent selection. Weedy populations were intermediate between domesticated cultivars and native ruderal populations for plant growth rate, root architecture, and drought tolerance. Weedy populations benefited most from mycorrhizal inoculation by having fewer wilted leaves and wetter soil. Overall, we found that trade-offs between drought tolerance and several aspects of plant growth, including growth rate, allocation to flowering, and root architecture, govern evolution during sunflower domestication and the invasion of disturbed habitat. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  3. Growth modes of InN (000-1) on GaN buffer layers on sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bing; Kitajima, Takeshi; Chen, Dongxue; Leone, Stephen R.

    2005-03-01

    In this work, using atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy, we study the surface morphologies of epitaxial InN films grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy with intervening GaN buffer layers on sapphire substrates. On smooth GaN buffer layers, nucleation and evolution of three-dimensional InN islands at various coverages and growth temperatures are investigated. The shapes of the InN islands are observed to be predominantly mesalike with large flat (000-1) tops, which suggests a possible role of indium as a surfactant. Rough GaN buffer layers composed of dense small GaN islands are found to significantly improve uniform InN wetting of the substrates, on which atomically smooth InN films are obtained that show the characteristics of step-flow growth. Scanning tunneling microscopy imaging reveals the defect-mediated surface morphology of smooth InN films, including surface terminations of screw dislocations and a high density of shallow surface pits with depths less than 0.3 nm. The mechanisms of the three-dimensional island size and shape evolution and formation of defects on smooth surfaces are considered.

  4. The nonantibiotic anti-inflammatory effect of antimicrobial growth promoters, the real mode of action? A hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Niewold, T A

    2007-04-01

    Societal concern and government regulations increasingly press for restricting the use of antibiotics as antimicrobial growth promoters (AGP). The search for alternatives is on, hampered by a lack of knowledge about the exact mechanism of AGP. Feed additives, such as AGP and alternatives, interact with the intestine. In the intestine, feed components, microbiota, and the mucosa interact in a very complex and dynamic way. Various mechanisms for AGP have been proposed, invariably based on the direct antibiotic influence on the microbial composition of the intestines. In the literature on antibiotics, however, the direct effects of antibiotics on host cells, in particular inflammatory cells, have been described. It is curious that this has never been considered in the literature on AGP. Presently, a case is being made that AGP most likely work as growth permitters by inhibiting the production and excretion of catabolic mediators by intestinal inflammatory cells. Concomitant or subsequent changes in microflora are most likely the consequence of an altered condition of the intestinal wall. This common, basic mechanism potentially offers an excellent explanation for the highly reproducible effects of AGP, as opposed to those obtained by alternatives aimed at microflora management. Therefore, the search for alternatives could be aimed at nonantibiotic compounds with an effect on the inflammatory system similar to that of AGP.

  5. Antimicrobial growth promoter use in livestock: a requirement to understand their modes of action to develop effective alternatives.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kirsty; Uwiera, Richard R E; Kalmokoff, Martin L; Brooks, Steve P J; Inglis, G Douglas

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial agents (AMAs) have been used in agriculture since the 1950s as growth-promoting agents [antimicrobial growth promoters (AGPs)]. They have provided benefits to the agricultural industry by increasing production efficiencies and maximising livestock health, yet the potential risks surrounding resistance to AMAs in medically important pathogenic bacteria have enhanced public and government scrutiny regarding AMA use in agriculture. Although it is recognised that AGP administration can select for resistance to AMAs in enteric bacteria of livestock, conclusive evidence showing a link between resistant bacteria from livestock and human health is lacking (e.g. transmission of resistant zoonotic pathogens). Livestock production output must be increased significantly due to the increase in global population, and thus the identification of non-AMA alternatives to AGP use is required. One strategy employed to identify alternatives to AGPs is an observational empirical methodology, but this approach has failed to deliver effective alternatives. A second approach is aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in AGP function and developing alternatives that mimic the physiological responses to AGPs. New evidence indicates that AGP function is more complex than merely affecting enteric bacterial populations, and AGPs likely function by directly or indirectly modulating host responses such as the immune system. As such, a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms associated with AMA function as AGPs will facilitate the development of effective alternatives.

  6. Identification of genes in the σ²² regulon of Pseudomonas aeruginosa required for cell envelope homeostasis in either the planktonic or the sessile mode of growth.

    PubMed

    Wood, Lynn F; Ohman, Dennis E

    2012-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa extracytoplasmic functioning (ECF) sigma factor σ(22) is encoded by algT/algU and is inhibited by anti-sigma factor MucA. σ(22) was originally discovered for its essential role in the expression of the exopolysaccharide alginate by mucoid strains associated with chronic pulmonary infection. However, σ(22) is now known to also have a large regulon associated with the response to cell wall stress. Our recent transcriptome analysis identified 293 open reading frames (ORFs) in the σ(22) stress stimulon that include genes for outer envelope biogenesis and remodeling, although most of the genes have undefined functions. To better understand the σ(22)-dependent stress response, mutants affected in 27 genes of the σ(22) stimulon were examined and expression was studied with lacZ fusions. Mutants constructed in the 27 genes showed no major change in response to cell wall-acting antibiotics or growth at elevated temperatures nor in alginate production. The mutants were examined for their effects on the expression of the σ(22)-dependent promoter of the alginate biosynthetic operon (PalgD) as a measure of σ(22) derepression from MucA. By testing PalgD expression under both planktonic and sessile growth conditions, 11 genes were found to play a role in the stress response that activates σ(22). Some mutations caused an increase or a decrease in the response to cell wall stress. Interestingly, mutations in 7 of the 11 genes caused constitutive PalgD expression under nonstressed conditions and thus showed that these genes are involved in maintaining envelope homeostasis. Mutations in PA0062 and PA1324 showed constitutive PalgD expression during both the planktonic and the sessile modes of growth. However, the PA5178 mutation caused constitutive PalgD expression only during planktonic growth. In contrast, mutations in PA2717, PA0567, PA3040, and PA0920 caused constitutive PalgD expression only in the sessile/biofilm mode of growth. This provides

  7. Motivations toward smoking cessation, reasons for relapse, and modes of quitting: results from a qualitative study among former and current smokers

    PubMed Central

    Buczkowski, Krzysztof; Marcinowicz, Ludmila; Czachowski, Slawomir; Piszczek, Elwira

    2014-01-01

    Background Smoking cessation plays a crucial role in reducing preventable morbidity and mortality and is a recognized public-health-policy issue in many countries. Two of the most important factors that affect the efficacy of quitting smoking are motivation and the ability to cope with situations causing relapse. Aim The objective of the study reported here was to investigate former and current smokers’ motivations for smoking cessation, reasons for relapse, and modes of quitting. Methods We arranged four focus groups with 24 participants (twelve current and twelve former smokers) and eleven semi-structured interviews (five current and six former smokers) with a view to understanding and categorizing their opinions on motivations and the course and process of smoking cessation. The data were next analyzed using descriptive qualitative methods. Results Three main themes were identified: (1) motivations to quit smoking, (2) reasons why smokers sometimes relapse, and (3) modes of quitting smoking. Within the first theme, the following six subthemes surfaced: (1) a smoking ban at home and at work due to other people’s wishes and rules, (2) the high cost of cigarettes, (3) the unpleasant smell, (4) health concern, (5) pregnancy and breastfeeding, and (6) a variety of other factors. The second theme encompassed the following subthemes: (1) stress and the need to lessen it by smoking a cigarette, (2) the need to experience the pleasure connected with smoking, and (3) the smoking environment both at home and at work. Participants presented different smoking-cessation modes, but mainly they were unplanned attempts. Conclusion Two very important motivations for smoking cessation were a smoking ban at home and at work due to other people’s wishes and rules, and the high cost of cigarettes. The most common smoking-cessation mode was a spontaneous decision to quit, caused by a particular trigger factor. Relapse causes encompassed, most notably: stress, lack of the

  8. Fractionation of the organic matter contained in leachate resulting from two modes of landfilling: an indicator of waste degradation.

    PubMed

    Berthe, C; Redon, E; Feuillade, G

    2008-06-15

    Three experimental pilots were set up at the semi-industrial scale to assess the impact of leachate recirculation and Mechanical Biological Pre-treatment (MBP) before landfilling on the biological degradation of landfilled wastes. The organic matter contained in leachates resulting from these pilots has been used as an indicator of waste degradation. Fractionations were carried out (i) using XAD resins in order to divide the organic matter into several fractions according to the hydrophobic character of the molecules and (ii) using an ultrafiltration protocol to divide the organic matter into several fractions according to the apparent molecular weight of molecules. Three phases of degradation are determined according to the distribution of the organic matter and according to the humification rate. The humification process seems to be more rapid for MBP leachates than for Bioreactor leachate. These results were confirmed by the ultrafiltration results indicating that, to date, MBP leachates contain more molecules with a high molecular weight than Bioreactor leachate. However, this could be explained by an interruption of waste degradation due to an accumulation of volatile fatty acids.

  9. The simulation of optical diagnostics for crystal growth - Models and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banish, M. R.; Clark, R. L.; Kathman, A. D.; Lawson, S. M.

    A computer simulation of a Two Color Holographic Interferometric (TCHI) optical system was performed using a physical (wave) optics model. This model accurately simulates propagation through time-varying, 2-D or 3-D concentration and temperature fields as a wave phenomenon. The model calculates wavefront deformations that can be used to generate fringe patterns. This simulation modeled a proposed TriGlycine sulphate TGS flight experiment by propagating through the simplified onion-like refractive index distribution of the growing crystal and calculating the recorded wavefront deformation. The phase of this wavefront was used to generate sample interferograms that map index of refraction variation. Two such fringe patterns, generated at different wavelengths, were used to extract the original temperature and concentration field characteristics within the growth chamber. This proves feasibility for this TCHI crystal growth diagnostic technique. This simulation provides feedback to the experimental design process.

  10. Existence results for differential inclusions with nonlinear growth conditions in Banach spaces.

    PubMed

    Bounkhel, Messaoud

    2013-01-01

    In the Banach space setting, the existence of viable solutions for differential inclusions with nonlinear growth; that is, x(·)(t) ∈ a.e. on I, x(t) ∈ S, ∀t ∈ I, x(0) = x₀ ∈ S, (∗), where S is a closed subset in a Banach space X, I = [0, T], (T > 0), F : I × S → X, is an upper semicontinuous set-valued mapping with convex values satisfying F(t, x) ⊂ c(t)(||x|| + ||x|| (p)K, ∀(t, x) ∈ I × S, where p ∈ ℝ, with p ≠ 1, and c ∈ C([0, T], ℝ(+)). The existence of solutions for nonconvex sweeping processes with perturbations with nonlinear growth is also proved in separable Hilbert spaces.

  11. Effect of Estimated Daily Global Solar Radiation Data on the Results of Crop Growth Models

    PubMed Central

    Trnka, Miroslav; Eitzinger, Josef; Kapler, Pavel; Dubrovský, Martin; Semerádová, Daniela; Žalud, Zden ěk; Formayer, Herbert

    2007-01-01

    The results of previous studies have suggested that estimated daily global radiation (RG) values contain an error that could compromise the precision of subsequent crop model applications. The following study presents a detailed site and spatial analysis of the RG error propagation in CERES and WOFOST crop growth models in Central European climate conditions. The research was conducted i) at the eight individual sites in Austria and the Czech Republic where measured daily RG values were available as a reference, with seven methods for RG estimation being tested, and ii) for the agricultural areas of the Czech Republic using daily data from 52 weather stations, with five RG estimation methods. In the latter case the RG values estimated from the hours of sunshine using the Ångström-Prescott formula were used as the standard method because of the lack of measured RG data. At the site level we found that even the use of methods based on hours of sunshine, which showed the lowest bias in RG estimates, led to a significant distortion of the key crop model outputs. When the Ångström-Prescott method was used to estimate RG, for example, deviations greater than ±10 per cent in winter wheat and spring barley yields were noted in 5 to 6 per cent of cases. The precision of the yield estimates and other crop model outputs was lower when RG estimates based on the diurnal temperature range and cloud cover were used (mean bias error 2.0 to 4.1 per cent). The methods for estimating RG from the diurnal temperature range produced a wheat yield bias of more than 25 per cent in 12 to 16 per cent of the seasons. Such uncertainty in the crop model outputs makes the reliability of any seasonal yield forecasts or climate change impact assessments questionable if they are based on this type of data. The spatial assessment of the RG data uncertainty propagation over the winter wheat yields also revealed significant differences within the study area. We found that RG estimates based on

  12. Effect of Estimated Daily Global Solar Radiation Data on the Results of Crop Growth Models.

    PubMed

    Trnka, Miroslav; Eitzinger, Josef; Kapler, Pavel; Dubrovský, Martin; Semerádová, Daniela; Žalud, Zdeněk; Formayer, Herbert

    2007-10-16

    The results of previous studies have suggested that estimated daily globalradiation (RG) values contain an error that could compromise the precision of subsequentcrop model applications. The following study presents a detailed site and spatial analysis ofthe RG error propagation in CERES and WOFOST crop growth models in Central Europeanclimate conditions. The research was conducted i) at the eight individual sites in Austria andthe Czech Republic where measured daily RG values were available as a reference, withseven methods for RG estimation being tested, and ii) for the agricultural areas of the CzechRepublic using daily data from 52 weather stations, with five RG estimation methods. In thelatter case the RG values estimated from the hours of sunshine using the ångström-Prescottformula were used as the standard method because of the lack of measured RG data. At thesite level we found that even the use of methods based on hours of sunshine, which showedthe lowest bias in RG estimates, led to a significant distortion of the key crop model outputs.When the ångström-Prescott method was used to estimate RG, for example, deviationsgreater than ±10 per cent in winter wheat and spring barley yields were noted in 5 to 6 percent of cases. The precision of the yield estimates and other crop model outputs was lowerwhen RG estimates based on the diurnal temperature range and cloud cover were used (mean bias error 2.0 to 4.1 per cent). The methods for estimating RG from the diurnal temperature range produced a wheat yield bias of more than 25 per cent in 12 to 16 per cent of the seasons. Such uncertainty in the crop model outputs makes the reliability of any seasonal yield forecasts or climate change impact assessments questionable if they are based on this type of data. The spatial assessment of the RG data uncertainty propagation over the winter wheat yields also revealed significant differences within the study area. We found that RG estimates based on diurnal

  13. Crop tree release increases growth of red oak sawtimber in southern New England: 12-year results

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey S. Ward

    2008-01-01

    In winter 1995, five crop tree thinning plots were established in central Connecticut. Stands were mature red oak sawtimber (74-94 years old) with no history of prior management. Crop trees were upper canopy red oaks (northern red, black, and scarlet) with a potential grade 1 or 2 butt log. Growth of crop trees was monitored for the next 12 years. Diameter, cubic-foot...

  14. Impact of pruning intensity on growth of young loblolly pine trees: some early results

    Treesearch

    Ralph L. Amateis; Harold E. Burkhart

    2010-01-01

    In the spring of 2000, a designed experiment was established to study the effects of pruning intensity on the growth of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) trees. Trees were planted at a 1.83 by 1.83 m square spacing in plots of eight rows with eight trees per row; the inner 36 trees constituted the measurement plot. Four blocks containing five treatment...

  15. Growth following pruning of young loblolly pine trees: some early results

    Treesearch

    Ralph L. Amateis; Harold E. Burkhart

    2006-01-01

    In the spring of 2000, a designed experiment was established to study the effects of pruning on juvenile loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) tree growth and the subsequent formation of mature wood. Trees were planted at a 3 m x 3 m square spacing in plots of 6 rows with 6 trees per row, with the inner 16 trees constituting the measurement plot. Among the...

  16. Magnetic flow control in growth and casting of photovoltaic silicon: Numerical and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poklad, A.; Pal, J.; Galindo, V.; Grants, I.; Heinze, V.; Meier, D.; Pätzold, O.; Stelter, M.; Gerbeth, G.

    2017-07-01

    A novel, vertical Bridgman-type technique for growing multi-crystalline silicon ingots in an induction furnace is described. In contrast to conventional growth, a modified setup with a cone-shaped crucible and susceptor is used. A detailed numerical simulation of the setup is presented. It includes a global thermal simulation of the furnace and a local simulation of the melt, which aims at the influence of the melt flow on the temperature and concentration fields. Furthermore, seeded growth of cone-shaped Si ingots using either a monocrystalline seed or a seed layer formed by pieces of poly-Si is demonstrated and compared to growth without seeds. The influences of the seed material on the grain structure and the dislocation density of the ingots are discussed. The second part addresses model experiments for the Czochralski technique using the room temperature liquid metal GaInSn. The studies were focused on the influence of a rotating and a horizontally static magnetic field on the melt flow and the related heat transport in crucibles being heated from bottom and/or side, and cooled by a crystal model covering about 1/3 of the upper melt surface.

  17. Maternal smoking, alcohol drinking, caffeine consumption, and fetal growth: results from a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Shu, X O; Hatch, M C; Mills, J; Clemens, J; Susser, M

    1995-03-01

    In a prospective study of 712 pregnancies, we examined associations between maternal smoking, alcohol, and caffeine consumption and fetal growth. We interviewed patients at entry into care [12.9 +/- 4.3 (standard deviation) weeks], and at 28 and 36 weeks of gestation. We found the expected reductions in adjusted birthweight among women who smoked throughout pregnancy: 168 gm [95% confidence limits (CL) = -326, -10] for low/moderate amounts (< or = 15 cigarettes per day); 288 gm (95% CL = -491, -84) for heavy smoking (> 15 cigarettes per day). We also found a decrease in birthweight (-179 gm; 95% CL = -364, 7) among smokers who reported quiting early in pregnancy. First trimester alcohol consumption (average: four drinks per week) was associated with a 155-gm reduction in fetal growth (95% CL = -324, 15), even after adjustment for number of cigarettes smoked. The association, observed with all types of alcohol consumption, was stronger among smokers (-270 gm) but was also present in nonsmokers (-115 gm). Caffeine consumption showed no relation to fetal growth, even among heavy consumers, although they were relatively few. This study implicates heavy maternal smoking at any point in pregnancy, including solely in the early months, and possibly moderate alcohol drinking as causes of low birthweight.

  18. Intrinsic point defect behavior in silicon crystals during growth from the melt: A model derived from experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Takao; Takahashi, Toru

    2011-11-01

    During the growth of float-zoning (FZ) and Czochralski (CZ) Si crystals, the temperature distributions from the growth interface were measured using a two-color infrared thermometer for the FZ crystal surfaces and three thermocouples within the CZ bulk crystals. The results showed that the thermal gradient is a decreasing function of the growth rate, which forms the basis of this work. In a comparison of the shape variations in the growth interfaces observed in both FZ and CZ crystals of three different diameters, all of the results were in agreement with the above premise. In consideration of Stefan's condition the premise above is discussed. One of the most important observations is that the region of increasing thermal gradient extends not only to the region grown before but also to the region afterward by stopping the pulling in FZ crystals or lowering the growth rate in CZ crystals. This phenomenon is termed the “BA (before and after) effect”. The growing CZ crystals are detached from the melt and rapidly cooled so that the point defects are frozen. Using the anomalous oxygen precipitation (AOP) phenomenon obtained by the above detaching, which demonstrates the existence of vacancies in the crystal, we found that the growth interface is always filled with vacancies. By increasing the thermal gradient, which can be controlled by lowering the growth rate, the vacancy (AOP) region is reduced, due to the generation of a silicon interstitial-rich region. The ratio of vacancies from the growth interface and silicon interstitials generated by the thermal gradient ultimately determines the nature of the bulk silicon crystal grown from the melt, i.e., with voids, defect-free or with dislocation loops.

  19. Structural differences between capped GaSb nanostructures grown by Stranski-Krastanov and droplet epitaxy growth modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeJarld, Matt; Yan, Lifan; Luengo-Kovac, Marta; Sih, Vanessa; Millunchick, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Droplet epitaxy (DE) has emerged as an alternative to Stranski-Krastanov (SK) as a method for epitaxial nanostructure formation. We find significant structural differences of similar sized nanostructures embedded in GaAs between the two methods. Atomic force microscopy and atom probe tomography measurements reveal that uncapped and capped SK structures resemble each other. However, the DE nanostructures appear as rings topographically but are quantum dots compositionally. A GaSb wetting layer is present regardless of the growth method and shares a nearly identical Sb concentration profile. DE nanostructures are shown to have a lower Sb concentration, and transmission electron microscopy measurements reveal that they produce less strain on the capping layer. Despite significant structural differences, SK and DE nanostructures exhibit the same photoluminescence response, suggesting that the emission is from a shared feature such as the wetting layer, rather than the nanostructures.

  20. Growth and Implementation of Carbon-Doped AlGaN Layers for Enhancement-Mode HEMTs on 200 mm Si Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jie; Posthuma, Niels; Wellekens, Dirk; Saripalli, Yoga N.; Decoutere, Stefaan; Arif, Ronald; Papasouliotis, George D.

    2016-12-01

    We are reporting the growth of AlGaN based enhancement-mode high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) on 200 mm silicon (111) substrates using a single wafer metalorganic chemical vapor deposition reactor. It is found that TMAl pre-dosing conditions are critical in controlling the structural quality, surface morphology, and wafer bow of the HEMT stack. Optimal structural quality and pit-free surface are demonstrated for AlGaN HEMTs with pre-dosing temperature at 750°C. Intrinsically, carbon-doped AlGaN, is used as the current blocking layer in the HEMT structures. The lateral buffer breakdown and device breakdown characteristics, reach 400 V at a leakage current of 1 μA/mm measured at 150°C. The fabricated HEMT devices, with a Mg doped p-GaN gate layer, are operating in enhancement mode reaching a positive threshold voltage of 2-2.5 V, a low on-resistance of 10.5 Ω mm with a high drain saturation current of 0.35 A/mm, and a low forward bias gate leakage current of 0.5 × 10-6 A/mm ( V gs = 7 V). Tight distribution of device parameters across the 200 mm wafers and over repeat process runs is observed.

  1. Interface and growth-mode characterization of Ce/Fe and CeH≊2/Fe multilayers by x-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, F.; Steins, M.; Kacsich, T.; Felsch, W.

    1993-07-01

    The detailed structural characterization of ion beam sputtered Ce/Fe and CeH≊2/Fe multilayers offers the possibility for a better understanding of their magnetic properties. In the case of the Ce/Fe multilayers the extension of the interface, as one of the most important features, is determined to 5-7 Å by means of Monte Carlo simulations of the small-angle x-ray scattering diagrams. Below a critical thickness of ≊24 Å Fe grows in an amorphous structure. Here the interface extension is enhanced. In contrast all CeH≊2/Fe multilayers show nearly abrupt interfaces. X-ray scattering experiments at higher angles in reflection and transmission mode provide information about the crystal structure, the texture, and the lateral dimensions of the grains in the samples. Depths profiles of the multilayers are generated by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, which confirm the well-ordered periodic structures. Surprisingly indications of an island-like growth mode of the Fe layers onto the Ce and CeH≊2 layers could be resolved by using this procedure.

  2. Relative performance of biofilm configuration over suspended growth operation on azo dye based wastewater treatment in periodic discontinuous batch mode operation.

    PubMed

    Mohan, S Venkata; Reddy, C Nagendranatha; Kumar, A Naresh; Modestra, J Annie

    2013-11-01

    Functional role of biofilm and suspended growth bioreactor configurations in response to the treatment of azo-dye (C.I. Acid Black 10B) bearing wastewater was evaluated in periodic discontinuous batch mode operation at varying dye concentrations. The biofilm system depicted higher dye removal efficiency (93.14%) compared to suspended mode (84.29%) at 350 mg dye/l operation. Both the reactor configurations did not show much process inhibition at higher dye loads studied. Azo reductase and dehydrogenase enzyme activities showed significant variation indicating the different metabolic capabilities of the native-microflora, stable proton shuttling between metabolic intermediates and differences in the delivery of reducing powers from the substrate metabolism towards dye removal. Voltammograms visualized marked variations in electron discharge properties with the function of reactor configuration, time intervals and dye load. Higher redox catalytic currents, lower Tafel slopes and polarization resistance showed good correlation with enzyme activities and dye removal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Growth mode and atomic structure of ultrathin Fe films on Rh[l brace]001[r brace] determined by quantitative low-energy electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Begley, A.M.; Kim, S.K.; Jona, F. ); Marcus, P.M. )

    1993-07-15

    The epitaxial growth of Fe on Rh[l brace]001[r brace] at room temperature is studied by means of quantitative low-energy electron diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy. The Fe films are pseudomorphic to the substrate and grow in the layer-by-layer mode for at least three layers---no attempts were made to determine the growth mode above this thickness. The spacing between Fe and Rh at the substrate-film interface remains approximately the same (about 1.75 A), within experimental error, when the Fe films grow from one to two and three layers. The Fe-Fe interlayer spacing in the bilayer films is also about the same (1.73 A), but in the three-layer film the first two interlayer spacings collapse to about 1.65 A. Thicker (eight- to ten-layer) Fe films have bulk spacings of 1.56 A and a 5.8%-expanded surface interlayer spacing (1.65 A). These films have a compressive strain in the film plane (the misfit to Rh[l brace]001[r brace] is [minus]6.3%) and have a body-centered-tetragonal structure. Elastic strain analysis shows that the equilibrium (i.e., the unstrained) phase is bcc Fe; the bulk interlayer spacing in the films is expanded by 8.7% over the equilibrium value of bcc Fe (1.43 A) as a consequence of the epitaxial strain in the plane of the layers, and the atomic volume is reduced by 4.5%.

  4. Effect of current mode on PEO treatment of magnesium in Ca- and P-containing electrolyte and resulting coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yonghao; Yerokhin, Aleksey; Matthews, Allan

    2014-10-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coatings were produced on commercially pure magnesium in a biologically friendly electrolyte composed of 2 g L-1 Ca(OH)2 and 12 g L-1 Na3PO4·12H2O using pulsed unipolar and bipolar current regimes with negative biasing varying from 0 to 20 mA cm-2. Analysis of voltage transients was performed to characterise the PEO processes. The coating morphology and phase composition were studied by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction technique, respectively. In vitro corrosion performance of the coatings was evaluated in a simulated body fluid at 37 ± 1 °C, using electrochemical techniques including open circuit potential monitoring, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarisation scans. The influence of the negative biasing on the PEO process and resulting coating characteristics is discussed. Unlike generally recognised beneficial effects of the negative biasing in PEO treatments of some other metal-electrolyte systems, it was found that detrimental effects are induced to the coatings on cp-Mg produced in the studied electrolyte when the negative current amplitude increases, which may be attributed to hydrogen liberation at the coating/substrate interface during the negative biasing cycles. As a result, a deterioration of vitro corrosion performance was observed for the pulsed bipolar PEO coatings compared to those produced using the pulsed unipolar regime which provides better quality coatings.

  5. An intercalation mechanism as a mode of action exerted by psychotropic drugs: results of altered phospholipid substrate availabilities in membranes?

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Anders; Pryme, Ian F.; Holmsen, Holm

    2010-01-01

    Patients respond differently to psychotropic drugs, and this is currently a controversial theme among psychiatrists. The effects of 16 psychotropics on cell membrane parameters have been reported. These drugs belong to three major groups used in therapeutic psychiatry: antipsychotics, antidepressants, and anxiolytic/hypnotics. Human platelets, lacking dopamine (D2) receptors (proposed targets of most psychotropics), have been used as a cell model. Here we discuss the effects of these drugs on three metabolic phenomena and also results from Langmuir experiments. Diazepam, in contrast to the remaining drugs, had negligible effects on metabolic phenomena and had no effects in Langmuir experiments. Psychotropic drugs may work through intercalation in membrane phospholipids. It is possible that the fluidity of membranes, rich in essential fatty acids, the content being influenced by diet, could be a contributing factor to the action of psychotropics. This might in turn explain the observed major differences in therapeutic response among patients. PMID:21270935

  6. Global atmospheric response to specific linear combinations of the main SST modes.. Part I: numerical experiments and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzaska, S.; Moron, V.; Fontaine, B.

    1996-10-01

    This article investigates through numerical experiments the controversial question of the impact of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomena on climate according to large-scale and regional-scale interhemispheric thermal contrast. Eight experiments (two considering only inversed Atlantic thermal anomalies and six combining ENSO warm phase with large-scale interhemispheric contrast and Atlantic anomaly patterns) were performed with the Météo-France atmospheric general circulation model. The definition of boundary conditions from observed composites and principal components is presented and preliminary results concerning the month of August, especially over West Africa and the equatorial Atlantic are discussed. Results are coherent with observations and show that interhemispheric and regional scale sea-surface-temperature anomaly (SST) patterns could significantly modulate the impact of ENSO phenomena: the impact of warm-phase ENSO, relative to the atmospheric model intercomparison project (AMIP) climatology, seems stronger when embedded in global and regional SSTA patterns representative of the post-1970 conditions [i.e. with temperatures warmer (colder) than the long-term mean in the southern hemisphere (northern hemisphere)]. Atlantic SSTAs may also play a significant role. Acknowledgements. We gratefully appreciate the on-line DMSP database facility at APL (Newell et al., 1991) from which this study has benefited greatly. We wish to thank E. Friis-Christensen for his encouragement and useful discussions. A. Y. would like to thank the Danish Meteorological Institute, where this work was done, for its hospitality during his stay there and the Nordic Baltic Scholarship Scheme for its financial support of this stay. Topical Editor K.-H. Glassmeier thanks M. J. Engebretson and H. Lühr for their help in evaluating this paper.--> Correspondence to: A. Yahnin-->

  7. Damage mechanics - failure modes

    SciTech Connect

    Krajcinovic, D.; Vujosevic, M.

    1996-12-31

    The present study summarizes the results of the DOE sponsored research program focused on the brittle failure of solids with disordered microstructure. The failure is related to the stochastic processes on the microstructural scale; namely, the nucleation and growth of microcracks. The intrinsic failure modes, such as the percolation, localization and creep rupture, are studied by emphasizing the effect of the micro-structural disorder. A rich spectrum of physical phenomena and new concepts that emerges from this research demonstrates the reasons behind the limitations of traditional, deterministic, and local continuum models.

  8. Prevention of Chagas' disease resulting from blood transfusion by treatment of blood: toxicity and mode of action of gentian violet.

    PubMed

    Docampo, R; Moreno, S N; Gadelha, F R; de Souza, W; Cruz, F S

    1988-12-01

    Blood transfusion is the second most important mechanism of transmission of Chagas' disease. Gentian violet, a cationic dye, is currently used in blood banks in endemic areas in attempts to eliminate such transmission. A photodynamic action of gentian violet has been demonstrated in Trypanosoma cruzi. Visible light causes photoreduction of gentian violet to a carbon-centered radical. Under aerobic conditions this free radical autooxidizes generating superoxide anion whose dismutation yields hydrogen peroxide. This photodynamic action of gentian violet is thus probably mediated by the oxygen reduction products. Since irradiation with visible light in the presence of sodium ascorbate reduces the effective dose and time of contact of the dye with T. cruzi-infected blood, a possible application of these findings can be envisaged. In addition to this photodynamic action, an uncoupling effect of gentian violet on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation has been described in rat liver and T. cruzi mitochondria. Gentian violet released respiratory control, hindered ATP synthesis, enhanced ATPase activity, released the inhibition of State 3 respiration by oligomycin, and produced swelling of isolated rat liver mitochondria or T. cruzi mitochondria in situ. Taken together, these results indicate that the T. cruzi mitochondrion is the main target of gentian violet toxicity in the dark.

  9. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  10. Temporal Evolution of the Upper Continental Crust: Implications for the Mode of Crustal Growth and the Evolution of the Hydrosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnick, R. L.; Gaschnig, R. M.; Li, S.; Tang, M.; Qiu, L.; Valley, J. W.; Zurkowski, C.; McDonough, W. F.

    2014-12-01

    The upper continental crust (UCC), the interface between the atmosphere and solid Earth, is the site of weathering that produces sedimentary rocks, influences ocean chemistry through runoff of soluble elements, and affects climate through CO2 draw-down. The UCC also contains more than 50% of the crust's highly incompatible element budget (including K, Th, and U). Therefore, understanding its composition and evolution provides insight into how continents have formed, evolved, and interacted with the hydrosphere. New major and trace element compositions of >100 glacial diamictites and >100 Archean shales, plus δ7Li and δ18O for a subset of these samples, combined with data from the literature, show that the average composition of the UCC has changed through time, reflecting both the rise of atmospheric oxygen and its attendant effects on weathering, as well as the mode of crust formation and differentiation. Some changes that occur as a step function near the Archean/Proterozoic boundary (increased Th/U, decreased Mo/Pr, V/Lu) reflect the rise of oxygen at the great oxidation event (GOE) and its influence on chemical weathering signatures in the UCC. Other changes are more gradual with time (e.g., higher Th/Sc and δ18O, lower Ni/Co, La/Nb, Eu/Eu* and transition metal abundances) and reflect an UCC that has transitioned from a more mafic to a more felsic bulk composition, and which experienced increased interaction with the hydrosphere with time. The gradual nature of these compositional changes likely reflects the waning heat production of the Earth, rather than an abrupt change in tectonics or style of crust formation. These more gradual changes in crust composition, which contrast with the abrupt changes associated with the GOE, suggest that a fundamental change in the nature of crust differentiation is unlikely to be responsible for the rise of atmospheric oxygen (cf. Keller and Schoene, 2012). Indeed, it appears that the opposite may be true: that the rise of

  11. Molecular Insights into the Klotho-Dependent, Endocrine Mode of Action of Fibroblast Growth Factor 19 Subfamily Members

    SciTech Connect

    Goetz,R.; Beenken, A.; Ibrahimi, O.; Kalinina, J.; Olsen, S.; Eliseenkova, A.; Xu, C.; Neubert, T.; Zhang, F.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    Unique among fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), FGF19, -21, and -23 act in an endocrine fashion to regulate energy, bile acid, glucose, lipid, phosphate, and vitamin D homeostasis. These FGFs require the presence of Klotho/{beta}Klotho in their target tissues. Here, we present the crystal structures of FGF19 alone and FGF23 in complex with sucrose octasulfate, a disaccharide chemically related to heparin. The conformation of the heparin-binding region between {beta} strands 10 and 12 in FGF19 and FGF23 diverges completely from the common conformation adopted by paracrine-acting FGFs. A cleft between this region and the {beta}1-{beta}2 loop, the other heparin-binding region, precludes direct interaction between heparin/heparan sulfate and backbone atoms of FGF19/23. This reduces the heparin-binding affinity of these ligands and confers endocrine function. Klotho/{beta}Klotho have evolved as a compensatory mechanism for the poor ability of heparin/heparan sulfate to promote binding of FGF19, -21, and -23 to their cognate receptors.

  12. Holistic microstructural techniques reveal synchronous and alternating andalusite and staurolite growth during three tectonic events resulted from shifting partitioning of growth vs deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, T. H.; Fay, C.

    2016-10-01

    Excellent inclusion trails in a sample containing both staurolite and andalusite porphyroblasts are used to demonstrate techniques that allow the intimate relationships between deformation and porphyroblast growth to be recognized, described in detail and understood. This approach reveals three main phases of growth of both mineral phases, some of which was demonstrably synchronous, during three tectonic events. Each main period of growth occurred during the early stages of three deformations that were successively near orthogonal. However, extra periods are distinguishable in andalusite in some of these events because this phase occurs as clusters of large crystals that vary in orientation by 2° to > 10°. All foliations defined by all inclusion trails within every porphyroblast inflect/intersect about an axis trending at 025° (called a FIA). This indicates that the direction of the horizontal component of bulk shortening was identical for the first and third of the three deformations recorded by porphyroblast growth. Portions of sigmoidal to slightly spiral-shaped inclusion trails in most porphyroblast clusters locally diverge in opposite directions due to overprinting orthogonal bulk shortening typical of that which forms millipede geometries. These microstructures confirm the role of coaxial bulk shortening in initiating porphyroblast growth in an environment that locally becomes strongly non-coaxial as the deformation intensifies in the same event. In this sample, increasing non-coaxiality as the deformation intensified resulted in the same asymmetry for each of the three events and thus an overall spiral-like shape. Differing stages in the development of these bulk-shortening geometries preserved in adjacent or touching phases negate any role for porphyroblast rotation during ductile deformation. Andalusite and staurolite grew without any inter-reaction in locations where they lie in contact. This multiply repeated growth behaviour initiated within zones of

  13. Crystal growth of pure substances: Phase-field simulations in comparison with analytical and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestler, B.; Danilov, D.; Galenko, P.

    2005-07-01

    A phase-field model for non-isothermal solidification in multicomponent systems [SIAM J. Appl. Math. 64 (3) (2004) 775-799] consistent with the formalism of classic irreversible thermodynamics is used for numerical simulations of crystal growth in a pure material. The relation of this approach to the phase-field model by Bragard et al. [Interface Science 10 (2-3) (2002) 121-136] is discussed. 2D and 3D simulations of dendritic structures are compared with the analytical predictions of the Brener theory [Journal of Crystal Growth 99 (1990) 165-170] and with recent experimental measurements of solidification in pure nickel [Proceedings of the TMS Annual Meeting, March 14-18, 2004, pp. 277-288; European Physical Journal B, submitted for publication]. 3D morphology transitions are obtained for variations in surface energy and kinetic anisotropies at different undercoolings. In computations, we investigate the convergence behaviour of a standard phase-field model and of its thin interface extension at different undercoolings and at different ratios between the diffuse interface thickness and the atomistic capillary length. The influence of the grid anisotropy is accurately analyzed for a finite difference method and for an adaptive finite element method in comparison.

  14. Changes in the electrochemical interface as a result of the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms on gold.

    PubMed

    Busalmen, Juan Pablo; de Sánchez, Susana R

    2003-06-05

    In this study, variations in corrosion potential and polarization resistance of thin-film gold electrodes as a result of the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms on them are presented. The growth of the volumetric cell fraction of biofilms, as determined by optical sectioning and digital image analysis of phase-contrast images, was found to be exponential during at least 10 hours of incubation. As a consequence of biofilm growth, an exponential decay of the corrosion potential of gold was observed. Most importantly, an increase in polarization resistance of the interface was observed following a strong linear dependence on the mean thickness of biofilms (r = 0.997), as a consequence of oxygen consumption and diffusion limitations. The results presented indicate that the measurement of polarization resistance may be a suitable technique that could be applied easily in industrial or biotechnological systems for monitoring the formation of biofilms. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 82: 619-624, 2003.

  15. Growth modes and epitaxy of FeAl thin films on a-cut sapphire prepared by pulsed laser and ion beam assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Xiang; Trautvetter, Moritz; Ziemann, Paul; Wiedwald, Ulf

    2014-01-14

    FeAl films around equiatomic composition are grown on a-cut (112{sup ¯}0) sapphire substrates by ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) and pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at ambient temperature. Subsequent successive annealing is used to establish chemical order and crystallographic orientation of the films with respect to the substrate. We find a strongly [110]-textured growth for both deposition techniques. Pole figures prove the successful preparation of high quality epitaxial films by PLD with a single in-plane orientation. IBAD-grown films, however, exhibit three in-plane orientations, all of them with broad angular distributions. The difference of the two growth modes is attributed to the existence of a metastable intermediate crystalline orientation as concluded from nonassisted sputter depositions at different substrate temperatures. The formation of the chemically ordered crystalline B2 phase is accompanied by the expected transition from ferromagnetic to paramagnetic behavior of the films. In accordance with the different thermally induced structural recovery, we find a step-like magnetic transition to paramagnetic behavior after annealing for 1 h at T{sub A} = 300 °C for IBAD deposition, while PLD-grown films show a gradual decrease of ferromagnetic signals with rising annealing temperatures.

  16. Well-Hidden Grain Boundary in the Monolayer MoS2 Formed by a Two-Dimensional Core-Shell Growth Mode.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenting; Lin, Yue; Wang, Qi; Li, Weijie; Wang, Zhifeng; Song, Jiangluqi; Li, Xiaodong; Zhang, Lijie; Zhu, Lixin; Xu, Xiaoliang

    2017-09-22

    Guided by the hexagonal lattice symmetry, triangles and hexagons are the most basic morphological units for two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Also, it is widely acknowledged that these units start from the single nucleation site and then grow epitaxially. Accordingly, the triangular monolayer (ML) samples are generally considered as single crystals. Here, we report a 2D core-shell growth mode in the CVD process for ML-MoS2, which leads to one kind of "pseudo" single-crystal triangles containing triangular outline grain boundaries (TO-GBs). It is difficult to be optically distinguished from the "true" single-crystal triangles. The weakening of Raman peaks and the remarkable enhancement of photoluminescence (PL) are found at the built-in TO-GBs, which could be useful for high-performance optoelectronics. In addition, the electrical measurements indicate that the TO-GBs are conductive. Furthermore, TO-GBs and the common grain boundaries (CO-GBs) can coexist in a single flake, whereas their optical visibility and optical modifications (Raman and PL) are quite different. This work is helpful in further understanding the growth mechanism of 2D TMD materials and may also play a significant role in related nanodevices.

  17. Ordinary electromagnetic mode instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, C. Z.

    1974-01-01

    The instability of the ordinary electromagnetic mode propagating perpendicular to an external magnetic field is studied for a single-species plasma with ring velocity distribution. The marginal instability boundaries for both the purely growing mode and the propagating growing modes are calculated from the instability criteria. The dispersion characteristics for various sets of plasma parameters are also given. The typical growth rates are of the order of the cyclotron frequency.

  18. Influence of exercise contraction mode and protein supplementation on human skeletal muscle satellite cell content and muscle fiber growth

    PubMed Central

    Farup, Jean; Rahbek, Stine Klejs; Riis, Simon; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; de Paoli, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells (SCs) are involved in remodeling and hypertrophy processes of skeletal muscle. However, little knowledge exists on extrinsic factors that influence the content of SCs in skeletal muscle. In a comparative human study, we investigated the muscle fiber type-specific association between emergence of satellite cells (SCs), muscle growth, and remodeling in response to 12 wk unilateral resistance training performed as eccentric (Ecc) or concentric (Conc) resistance training ± whey protein (Whey, 19.5 g protein + 19.5 g glucose) or placebo (Placebo, 39 g glucose) supplementation. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were analyzed for fiber type-specific SCs, myonuclei, and fiber cross-sectional area (CSA). Following training, SCs increased with Conc in both type I and type II fibers (P < 0.01) and exhibited a group difference from Ecc (P < 0.05), which did not increase. Myonuclei content in type I fibers increased in all groups (P < 0.01), while a specific accretion of myonuclei in type II fibers was observed in the Whey-Conc (P < 0.01) and Placebo-Ecc (P < 0.01) groups. Similarly, whereas type I fiber CSA increased independently of intervention (P < 0.001), type II fiber CSA increased exclusively with Whey-Conc (P < 0.01) and type II fiber hypertrophy correlated with whole muscle hypertrophy exclusively following Conc training (P < 0.01). In conclusion, isolated concentric knee extensor resistance training appears to constitute a stronger driver of SC content than eccentric resistance training while type II fiber hypertrophy was accentuated when combining concentric resistance training with whey protein supplementation. PMID:25103976

  19. Influence of exercise contraction mode and protein supplementation on human skeletal muscle satellite cell content and muscle fiber growth.

    PubMed

    Farup, Jean; Rahbek, Stine Klejs; Riis, Simon; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; Paoli, Frank de; Vissing, Kristian

    2014-10-15

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells (SCs) are involved in remodeling and hypertrophy processes of skeletal muscle. However, little knowledge exists on extrinsic factors that influence the content of SCs in skeletal muscle. In a comparative human study, we investigated the muscle fiber type-specific association between emergence of satellite cells (SCs), muscle growth, and remodeling in response to 12 wk unilateral resistance training performed as eccentric (Ecc) or concentric (Conc) resistance training ± whey protein (Whey, 19.5 g protein + 19.5 g glucose) or placebo (Placebo, 39 g glucose) supplementation. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were analyzed for fiber type-specific SCs, myonuclei, and fiber cross-sectional area (CSA). Following training, SCs increased with Conc in both type I and type II fibers (P < 0.01) and exhibited a group difference from Ecc (P < 0.05), which did not increase. Myonuclei content in type I fibers increased in all groups (P < 0.01), while a specific accretion of myonuclei in type II fibers was observed in the Whey-Conc (P < 0.01) and Placebo-Ecc (P < 0.01) groups. Similarly, whereas type I fiber CSA increased independently of intervention (P < 0.001), type II fiber CSA increased exclusively with Whey-Conc (P < 0.01) and type II fiber hypertrophy correlated with whole muscle hypertrophy exclusively following Conc training (P < 0.01). In conclusion, isolated concentric knee extensor resistance training appears to constitute a stronger driver of SC content than eccentric resistance training while type II fiber hypertrophy was accentuated when combining concentric resistance training with whey protein supplementation.

  20. Empowering a mesophilic inoculum for thermophilic nitrification: Growth mode and temperature pattern as critical proliferation factors for archaeal ammonia oxidizers.

    PubMed

    Courtens, Emilie N P; Vandekerckhove, Tom; Prat, Delphine; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Vital, Marius; Pieper, Dietmar H; Meerbergen, Ken; Lievens, Bart; Boon, Nico; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E

    2016-04-01

    Cost-efficient biological treatment of warm nitrogenous wastewaters requires the development of thermophilic nitrogen removal processes. Only one thermophilic nitrifying bioreactor was described so far, achieving 200 mg N L(-1) d(-1) after more than 300 days of enrichment from compost samples. From the practical point of view in which existing plants would be upgraded, however, a more time-efficient development strategy based on mesophilic nitrifying sludge is preferred. This study evaluated the adaptive capacities of mesophilic nitrifying sludge for two linear temperature increase patterns (non-oscillating vs. oscillating), two different slopes (0.25 vs. 0.08 °C d(-1)) and two different reactor types (floc vs. biofilm growth). The oscillating temperature pattern (0.25 °C d(-1)) and the moving bed biofilm reactor (0.08 °C d(-1)) could not reach nitrification at temperatures higher than 46 °C. However, nitrification rates up to 800 mg N L(-1) d(-1) and 150 mg N g(-1) volatile suspended solids d(-1) were achieved at a temperature as high as 49 °C by imposing the slowest linear temperature increase to floccular sludge. Microbial community analysis revealed that this successful transition was related with a shift in ammonium oxidizing archaea dominating ammonia oxidizing bacteria, while for nitrite oxidation Nitrospira spp. was constantly more abundant than Nitrobacter spp.. This observation was accompanied with an increase in observed sludge yield and a shift in maximal optimum temperature, determined with ex-situ temperature sensitivity measurements, predicting an upcoming reactor failure at higher temperature. Overall, this study achieved nitrification at 49 °C within 150 days by gradual adaptation of mesophilic sludge, and showed that ex-situ temperature sensitivity screening can be used to monitor and steer the transition process.

  1. Investigations on Substrate Temperature-Induced Growth Modes of Organic Semiconductors at Dielectric/semiconductor Interface and Their Correlation with Threshold Voltage Stability in Organic Field-Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Padma, Narayanan; Maheshwari, Priya; Bhattacharya, Debarati; Tokas, Raj B; Sen, Shashwati; Honda, Yoshihide; Basu, Saibal; Pujari, Pradeep Kumar; Rao, T V Chandrasekhar

    2016-02-10

    Influence of substrate temperature on growth modes of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) thin films at the dielectric/semiconductor interface in organic field effect transistors (OFETs) is investigated. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging at the interface reveals a change from 'layer+island' to "island" growth mode with increasing substrate temperatures, further confirmed by probing the buried interfaces using X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and positron annihilation spectroscopic (PAS) techniques. PAS depth profiling provides insight into the details of molecular ordering while positron lifetime measurements reveal the difference in packing modes of CuPc molecules at the interface. XRR measurements show systematic increase in interface width and electron density correlating well with the change from layer + island to coalesced huge 3D islands at higher substrate temperatures. Study demonstrates the usefulness of XRR and PAS techniques to study growth modes at buried interfaces and reveals the influence of growth modes of semiconductor at the interface on hole and electron trap concentrations individually, thereby affecting hysteresis and threshold voltage stability. Minimum hole trapping is correlated to near layer by layer formation close to the interface at 100 °C and maximum to the island formation with large voids between the grains at 225 °C.

  2. Postpartum mothers' napping and improved cognitive growth fostering of infants: results from a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ronzio, Cynthia R; Huntley, Edward; Monaghan, Maureen

    2013-04-01

    Little is known about how maternal sleep disturbances in the postpartum period affect mother-infant interaction. The study was designed to assess if less maternal sleep disturbance and less fatigue were associated with more positive mother-child interaction, independent of maternal depression symptoms. Twenty-three mothers completed 1 week of actigraphy and self-report measures of fatigue and depression symptoms. To determine the quality of mother-infant interaction, mothers and infants were then observed in a structured, video-recorded teaching episode. Greater maternal napping frequency was associated with better cognitive growth fostering of the infant (r s = .44, p < .05), a subscale of the interaction assessment. Maternal napping, not the quality or quantity of nocturnal sleep, appears to be associated with improvements in mother-infant interactions.

  3. Remote sensing input to GIS-integrated cotton growth model: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogineni, Swapna; Thomasson, J. Alex; Iqbal, Javed; Wooten, James R.; Kolla, Bulli M.; Sui, Ruixiu

    2004-11-01

    External-interface computer code has been written for the cotton growth model, Gossym, such that it can be operated from the ArcView GIS interface. Remote-sensing data have been incorporated as an estimator of plant height for feedback to the model. Management zones are delineated automatically based on available spatially variable data, and Gossym subsequently calculates outputs for each management zone, and uses current remote-sensing data in the calculations. This advanced Gossym model system also gathers local weather data automatically over the internet. Development and use of the model system are also described. Site-specific field data and remotely sensed images have been collected extensively on two agricultural fields in Mississippi from 1998 through 2003. Evaluation of yield prediction based on the Gossym model system indicated that current remote-sensing data can enhance accuracy. Details of experimentation and data analysis are presented.

  4. Association between intimate partner violence and poor child growth: results from 42 demographic and health surveys.

    PubMed

    Chai, Jeanne; Fink, Günther; Kaaya, Sylvia; Danaei, Goodarz; Fawzi, Wafaie; Ezzati, Majid; Lienert, Jeffrey; Smith Fawzi, Mary C

    2016-05-01

    To determine the impact of intimate partner violence against women on children's growth and nutritional status in low- and middle-income countries. We pooled records from 42 demographic and health surveys in 29 countries. Data on maternal lifetime exposure to physical or sexual violence by an intimate partner, socioeconomic and demographic characteristics were collected. We used logistic regression models to determine the association between intimate partner violence and child stunting and wasting. Prior exposure to intimate partner violence was reported by 69 652 (34.1%) of the 204 159 ever-married women included in our analysis. After adjusting for a range of characteristics, stunting in children was found to be positively associated with maternal lifetime exposure to only physical (adjusted odds ratio, aOR: 1.11; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.09-1.14) or sexual intimate partner violence (aOR: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.05-1.13) and to both forms of such violence (aOR: 1.10; 95% CI: 1.05-1.14). The associations between stunting and intimate partner violence were stronger in urban areas than in rural ones, for mothers who had low levels of education than for women with higher levels of education, and in middle-income countries than in low-income countries. We also found a small negative association between wasting and intimate partner violence (aOR: 0.94; 95%CI: 0.90-0.98). Intimate partner violence against women remains common in low- and middle-income countries and is highly detrimental to women and to the growth of the affected women's children. Policy and programme efforts are needed to reduce the prevalence and impact of such violence.

  5. Infant feeding bottle design, growth and behaviour: results from a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Fewtrell, M S; Kennedy, K; Nicholl, R; Khakoo, A; Lucas, A

    2012-03-16

    Whether the design of an anti-vacuum infant feeding bottle influences infant milk intake, growth or behavior is unknown, and was the subject of this randomized trial. 63 (36 male) healthy, exclusively formula-fed term infants. Randomisation to use Bottle A (n = 31), one-way air valve: Philips Avent) versus Bottle B (n = 32), internal venting system: Dr Browns). 74 breast-fed reference infants were recruited, with randomisation (n = 24) to bottle A (n = 11) or B (n = 13) if bottle-feeding was subsequently introduced. Randomisation: stratified by gender and parity; computer-based telephone randomisation by independent clinical trials unit. Infant home. infant weight gain to 4 weeks. (i) milk intake (ii) infant behaviour measured at 2 weeks (validated 3-day diary); (iii) risk of infection; (iv) continuation of breastfeeding following introduction of mixed feeding. Number analysed for primary outcome: Bottle A n = 29, Bottle B n = 25. There was no significant difference in weight gain between randomised groups (0-4 weeks Bottle A 0.74 (SD 1.2) SDS versus bottle B 0.51 (0.39), mean difference 0.23 (95% CI -0.31 to 0.77). Infants using bottle A had significantly less reported fussing (mean 46 versus 74 minutes/day, p < 0.05) than those using bottle B. There was no significant difference in any other outcome measure. Breast-fed reference group: There were no significant differences in primary or secondary outcomes between breast-fed and formula fed infants. The likelyhood of breastfeeding at 3 months was not significantly different in infants subsequently randomised to bottle A or B. Bottle design may have short-term effects on infant behaviour which merit further investigation. No significant effects were seen on milk intake or growth; confidence in these findings is limited by the small sample size and this needs confirmation in a larger study. Clinical Trials.gov NCT00325208.

  6. Association between intimate partner violence and poor child growth: results from 42 demographic and health surveys

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Günther; Kaaya, Sylvia; Danaei, Goodarz; Fawzi, Wafaie; Ezzati, Majid; Lienert, Jeffrey; Smith Fawzi, Mary C

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the impact of intimate partner violence against women on children’s growth and nutritional status in low- and middle-income countries. Methods We pooled records from 42 demographic and health surveys in 29 countries. Data on maternal lifetime exposure to physical or sexual violence by an intimate partner, socioeconomic and demographic characteristics were collected. We used logistic regression models to determine the association between intimate partner violence and child stunting and wasting. Findings Prior exposure to intimate partner violence was reported by 69 652 (34.1%) of the 204 159 ever-married women included in our analysis. After adjusting for a range of characteristics, stunting in children was found to be positively associated with maternal lifetime exposure to only physical (adjusted odds ratio, aOR: 1.11; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.09–1.14) or sexual intimate partner violence (aOR: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.05–1.13) and to both forms of such violence (aOR: 1.10; 95% CI: 1.05–1.14). The associations between stunting and intimate partner violence were stronger in urban areas than in rural ones, for mothers who had low levels of education than for women with higher levels of education, and in middle-income countries than in low-income countries. We also found a small negative association between wasting and intimate partner violence (aOR: 0.94; 95%CI: 0.90–0.98). Conclusion Intimate partner violence against women remains common in low- and middle-income countries and is highly detrimental to women and to the growth of the affected women’s children. Policy and programme efforts are needed to reduce the prevalence and impact of such violence. PMID:27147763

  7. Results of recombinant growth hormone treatment in children with end-stage renal disease on regular hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Doaa Mohammed

    2012-07-01

    Children with chronic kidney disease are at high risk for growth retardation and decreased adult height. Growth hormone (GH) treatment is known to stimulate growth in children with short stature suffering from chronic kidney disease. However, the extent to which this therapy affects final adult height is not known. This study was performed on 15 patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on regular hemodialysis to detect the effect of using recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on growth of patients with ESRD on regular hemodialysis and comparing this effect with the growth velocity in the same group without using rhGH in the year before therapy. There were eight females and seven males with mean age 10.6 ± 2.8 (range 5-14 years). For each patient, recombinant GH was given for one year, three-times weekly. The data of these 15 patients was compared with the year before treatment versus data of the same group of patients after six months and after one year of rhGH therapy. Our results showed that, in the year before therapy, height of these patients increased from a mean of 112.1 ± 11.6 cm to 112.7 ± 11.5 cm, which is a non-significant increase statistically (P >0.05) as well as clinically (mean growth velocity 0.6 cm/year), while height of these patients increased from a mean of 112.7 ± 11.5 cm at the start of therapy to 116.8 ± 11 cm after therapy for one year, which, although statically not significant (P >0.05), was of clinical significance as it makes rate of increase, i.e. the mean growth velocity, 4.1 cm/year close to the normal growth velocity, which is 5 cm/year, before puberty. rhGH therapy for patients with ESRD on regular hemodialysis is helpful in height gain and catch-up growth even when given three-times per week instead of five- or six-times per week. We recommend giving rhGH therapy as a routine supplementation to pediatric patients before epiphyseal closure.

  8. Using Hierarchical Growth Models To Monitor School Performance Over Time: Comparing NCE to Scale Score Results. CSE Report 618

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldschmidt, Pete; Choi, Kilchan; Martinez, Felipe

    2004-01-01

    Monitoring school performance increasingly uses sophisticated analytical techniques. This document investigates whether one such method, hierarchical growth modeling, yields consistent school performance results when different metrics are used as the outcome variable. It is examined as to whether statistical and substantive inferences are altered…

  9. Silvicultural options for young-growth Douglas-fir forests: the Capitol Forest study—establishment and first results.

    Treesearch

    Robert O. Curtis; David D. Marshall; Dean S. DeBell

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the origin, design, establishment and measurement procedures and first results of a large long-term cooperative study comparing a number of widely different silvicultural regimes applied to young-growth Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) stands managed for multiple objectives. Regimes consist of (1) conventional clearcutting...

  10. Ground Based Experiments in Support of Microgravity Research Results-Vapor Growth of Organic Nonlinear Optical Thin Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zugrav, M. Ittu; Carswell, William E.; Haulenbeek, Glen B.; Wessling, Francis C.

    2001-01-01

    This work is specifically focused on explaining previous results obtained for the crystal growth of an organic material in a reduced gravity environment. On STS-59, in April 1994, two experiments were conducted with N,N-dimethyl-p-(2,2-dicyanovinyl) aniline (DCVA), a promising nonlinear optical (NLO) material. The space experiments were set to reproduce laboratory experiments that yielded small, bulk crystals of DCVA. The results of the flight experiment, however, were surprising. Rather than producing a bulk single crystal, the result was the production of two high quality, single crystalline thin films. This result was even more intriguing when it is considered that thin films are more desirable for NLO applications than are bulk single crystals. Repeated attempts on the ground to reproduce these results were fruitless. A second set of flight experiments was conducted on STS-69 in September 1995. This time eight DCVA experiments were flown, with each of seven experiments containing a slight change from the first reference experiment. The reference experiment was programmed with growth conditions identical to those of the STS-59 mission. The slight variations in each of the other seven were an attempt to understand what particular parameter was responsible for the preference of thin film growth over bulk crystal growth in microgravity. Once again the results were surprising. In all eight cases thin films were grown again, albeit with varying quality. So now we were faced with a phenomenon that not only takes place in microgravity, but also is very robust, resisting all attempts to force the growth of bulk single crystals.

  11. Ground Based Experiments in Support of Microgravity Research Results-Vapor Growth of Organic Nonlinear Optical Thin Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zugrav, M. Ittu; Carswell, William E.; Haulenbeek, Glen B.; Wessling, Francis C.

    2001-01-01

    This work is specifically focused on explaining previous results obtained for the crystal growth of an organic material in a reduced gravity environment. On STS-59, in April 1994, two experiments were conducted with N,N-dimethyl-p-(2,2-dicyanovinyl) aniline (DCVA), a promising nonlinear optical (NLO) material. The space experiments were set to reproduce laboratory experiments that yielded small, bulk crystals of DCVA. The results of the flight experiment, however, were surprising. Rather than producing a bulk single crystal, the result was the production of two high quality, single crystalline thin films. This result was even more intriguing when it is considered that thin films are more desirable for NLO applications than are bulk single crystals. Repeated attempts on the ground to reproduce these results were fruitless. A second set of flight experiments was conducted on STS-69 in September 1995. This time eight DCVA experiments were flown, with each of seven experiments containing a slight change from the first reference experiment. The reference experiment was programmed with growth conditions identical to those of the STS-59 mission. The slight variations in each of the other seven were an attempt to understand what particular parameter was responsible for the preference of thin film growth over bulk crystal growth in microgravity. Once again the results were surprising. In all eight cases thin films were grown again, albeit with varying quality. So now we were faced with a phenomenon that not only takes place in microgravity, but also is very robust, resisting all attempts to force the growth of bulk single crystals.

  12. Changes in Maternal Plasma Adiponectin from Late Pregnancy to the Postpartum Period According to the Mode of Delivery: Results from a Prospective Cohort in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rebelo, Fernanda; Franco-Sena, Ana Beatriz; Struchiner, Claudio Jose; Kac, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Maternal plasma adiponectin is inversely related to insulin resistance, atherosclerosis and child health. However, little is known about its concentrations in the perinatal period, especially according to mode of delivery. Our aim is to evaluate the association between mode of delivery and changes in maternal plasma adiponectin from 3rd trimester of pregnancy to 30–45 days postpartum. Methods A cohort was recruited in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with four waves of follow-up: 5-13th, 22-26th, 30-36th gestational weeks and 30–45 days postpartum. Eligible subjects should be between 20–40 years of age, be free of chronic and infectious diseases and presenting with a singleton pregnancy. The mode of delivery was classified as vaginal (VD) or cesarean (CS). Plasma adiponectin concentration (μg/mL) was measured using commercial ELISA kits. Statistical analyses included the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and the multiple linear mixed effects model. Results A total of 159 participated in the study. Median adiponectin concentrations were higher for the VD group (n = 99; 8.25, IQR: 5.85–11.90) than for the CS group (n = 60; 7.34, IQR: 4.36–9.76; p = 0.040) in the postpartum samples but were not different between the two groups in the 3rd trimester. Women who underwent CS had a lower rate of increase in adiponectin concentration from the 3rd trimester to 30–45 days postpartum compared to those who underwent VD (β = -.15, 95% CI: -.28-.02, p = 0.030). Conclusion The CS procedure was associated with lower maternal circulating concentrations of adiponectin at 30–45 days postpartum, compared to the VD. PMID:27391647

  13. Growth of Bacterial Colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Mya; Hwa, Terence

    2013-03-01

    On hard agar gel, there is insufficient surface hydration for bacteria to swim or swarm. Instead, growth occurs in colonies of close-packed cells, which expand purely due to repulsive interactions: individual bacteria push each other out of the way through the force of their growth. In this way, bacterial colonies represent a new type of ``active'' granular matter. In this study, we investigate the physical, biochemical, and genetic elements that determine the static and dynamic aspects of this mode of bacterial growth for E. coli. We characterize the process of colony expansion empirically, and use discrete and continuum models to examine the extent to which our observations can be explained by the growth characteristics of non-communicating cells, coupled together by physical forces, nutrients, and waste products. Our results challenge the commonly accepted modes of bacterial colony growth and provide insight into sources of growth limitation in crowded bacterial communities.

  14. Growth of Sr(0.61)Ba(0.39)Nb2O6 fibers - New results regarding orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilde, Jeffrey P.; Jundt, Dieter H.; Galambos, Ludwig; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes stable growth of Sr(0.61)Ba(0.39)Nb2O6 (SBN) single-crystal optical fibers (grown by the laser-heated pedestal growth method) along the 100-line and 110-line crystallographic axes. The orientation of SBN fibers was investigated using transmission holograms recorded by focusing two separate, but mutually coherent, optical wavefronts into one end of the fiber. Results showed that the crystal quality of 100-line and 110-line SBN fibers grown at a given pull velocity strongly depended on the fiber diameter; generally, the quality improves with decreasing diameter.

  15. Modeling delta growth and channel geometry on Wax Lake Delta, Louisiana. Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viparelli, E.; Czapiga, M. J.; Li, C.; Shaw, J. B.; Parker, G.

    2013-12-01

    A numerical model of delta growth, in which the distributary channels are assumed to have self-constructed their cross sections, is validated on Wax Lake Delta, Louisiana. As in previous laterally averaged models of delta growth, the delta is divided in a low slope delta top, a steep delta front and a low slope basement. The flow on the delta top is assumed steady, and a backwater formulation is implemented. Since one or more channels can actively transport water and sediment on the delta top during floods, we simplify the problem by assuming that the bed material is transported in one rectangular channel, with width and depth roughly equal to the sum of the active channel widths, and to the average depth of the active channels. The problem is characterized by one equation (i.e. the backwater equation) in two unknowns, the channel width and depth. Another equation is thus needed to close the problem. Under the assumptions that 1) the system is at bankfull flow, and 2) the Shields number in the channels is equal to its channel formative value, our closure relation is a channel-formative criterion. In particular, a recently derived relation to estimate the formative (bankfull) Shields number as a function of the friction slope is implemented. Recent field work on Wax Lake Delta shows that the distributary channels are incising into a relatively stiff basement. In our model we do not attempt to directly model channel incision, but we implicitly account for it with a modified formulation to compute the shoreline migration rate. In this formulation the bed material at the shoreline is trapped in the non-channelized portion of the delta front only. Measured and numerical shoreline migration rates, longitudinal profiles of delta elevation, and channel geometry, i.e. width and depth, are compared. In the relatively near future we plan to 1) use our model to estimate land-building potential of engineered diversions of the Mississippi River, and 2) couple the present model

  16. Management of Very Early-onset Fetal Growth Restriction: Results from 92 Consecutive Cases.

    PubMed

    Hoellen, Friederike; Beckmann, Annika; Banz-Jansen, Constanze; Weichert, Jan; Rody, Achim; Bohlmann, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate management of early-onset intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and to define outcome according to obstetric setting. During an 11-year period (2000-2011), data of patients presenting with IUGR and preterm delivery of less than 30 weeks of gestation at a tertiary perinatal center were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 92 pregnancies were investigated. Delivery was indicated for fetal reasons in 38 out of 92 patients. Sixteen children of our cohort died within one year post partum, out of which eight had suffered from severe early-onset IUGR causing iatrogenic preterm delivery. Concerning the fetal outcome, gestational age at delivery and antenatal exposure to corticosteroids were found to be crucial. In some cases, respiratory distress syndrome prophylaxis and a "wait and see" approach to management in favor of a prolongation of the pregnancy might be favorable. Randomized prospective trials in early-onset IUGR with threatened preterm deliveries are needed in order to define guidelines for an individually tailored management of early-onset preterm infants. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  17. [Immediate and long-term results of simultaneous chemoradiotherapy in non-traditional modes of fractionation in the treatment of patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Semin, D Iu; Mardynskiĭ, Iu S; Medvedev, V S; Gulidov, I A; Isaev, P A; Derbugov, D N; Pol'kin, V V; Radzsanova, M U; Vasil'kov, S V

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of the effectiveness of treatment was carried out in 257 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the mucous membranes of the oral cavity and oropharynx. Two methods of irradiation were used in combination with concurrent polychemotherapy: standard radiotherapy (2 Gy 5 times a week) and radiotherapy in non-traditional modes of fractionation with uneven breaking of the daily dose into two fractions (1 Gy + 1.5 Gy or 1 Gy + 2 Gy with 4-hour intervals) to a focal dose of 60 Gy. Chemoradiotherapy with fractionated dose was more effective than standard chemoradiotherapy in frequency of objective tumor responses and regional metastases in the absence of increasing the number of early radiation reactions and late radiation damages. External beam radiotherapy in non-traditional modes of fractionation with simultaneous polychemotherapy exposure can significantly improve the results of the overall five-year survival compared with conventional fractionation technique--60.4 +/- 4.5%, 63.3 +/- 8.2% vs 27.6 +/- 10.2%, respectively.

  18. Cyanamide mode of action during inhibition of onion (Allium cepa L.) root growth involves disturbances in cell division and cytoskeleton formation.

    PubMed

    Soltys, Dorota; Rudzińska-Langwald, Anna; Kurek, Wojciech; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka; Sliwinska, Elwira; Bogatek, Renata

    2011-09-01

    Cyanamide is an allelochemical produced by hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth.). Its phyotoxic effect on plant growth was examined on roots of onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs. Water solution of cyanamide (2-10 mM) restricted growth of onion roots in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of onion roots with cyanamide resulted in a decrease in root growth rate accompanied by a decrease in accumulation of fresh and dry weight. The inhibitory effect of cyanamide was reversed by its removal from the environment, but full recovery was observed only for tissue treated with this chemical at low concentration (2-6 mM). Cytological observations of root tip cells suggest that disturbances in cell division may explain the strong cyanamide allelopathic activity. Moreover, in cyanamide-treated onion the following changes were detected: reduction of mitotic cells, inhibition of proliferation of meristematic cells and cell cycle, and modifications of cytoskeleton arrangement.

  19. Expression of human basic fibroblast growth factor cDNA in baby hamster kidney-derived cells results in autonomous cell growth

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Growth factor over-production by responsive cells might contribute to their autonomous proliferation as well as their acquisition of a transformed phenotype in culture. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) has been shown to induce transient changes in cell behavior that resemble those encountered in transformed cells. In addition, several types of human tumor cells have been shown to produce bFGF. To determine directly the role that bFGF might play in the induction of the transformed phenotype, we have introduced a human bFGF cDNA expression vector into baby hamster kidney-derived (BHK-21) fibroblasts. One of the BHK transfectants, termed clone 19, expresses the bFGF mRNA and produces biologically active bFGF that accumulates to a high concentration inside the cells. These properties correlate with the ability of the cells to grow in serum-free medium without the addition of exogenous bFGF. Clone 19 cells also proliferated in soft agar, indicating that constitutive expression of the bFGF gene results in a loss of anchorage-dependent growth. PMID:3360856

  20. Loss of transcription factor early growth response gene 1 results in impaired endochondral bone repair.

    PubMed

    Reumann, Marie K; Strachna, Olga; Yagerman, Sarah; Torrecilla, Daniel; Kim, Jihye; Doty, Stephen B; Lukashova, Lyudmila; Boskey, Adele L; Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp

    2011-10-01

    Transcription factors that play a role in ossification during development are expected to participate in postnatal fracture repair since the endochondral bone formation that occurs in embryos is recapitulated during fracture repair. However, inherent differences exist between bone development and fracture repair, including a sudden disruption of tissue integrity followed by an inflammatory response. This raises the possibility that repair-specific transcription factors participate in bone healing. Here, we assessed the consequence of loss of early growth response gene 1 (EGR-1) on endochondral bone healing because this transcription factor has been shown to modulate repair in vascularized tissues. Model fractures were created in ribs of wild type (wt) and EGR-1(-/-) mice. Differences in tissue morphology and composition between these two animal groups were followed over 28 post fracture days (PFDs). In wt mice, bone healing occurred in healing phases characteristic of endochondral bone repair. A similar healing sequence was observed in EGR-1(-/-) mice but was impaired by alterations. A persistent accumulation of fibrin between the disconnected bones was observed on PFD7 and remained pronounced in the callus on PFD14. Additionally, the PFD14 callus was abnormally enlarged and showed increased deposition of mineralized tissue. Cartilage ossification in the callus was associated with hyper-vascularity and -proliferation. Moreover, cell deposits located in proximity to the callus within skeletal muscle were detected on PFD14. Despite these impairments, repair in EGR-1(-/-) callus advanced on PFD28, suggesting EGR-1 is not essential for healing. Together, this study provides genetic evidence that EGR-1 is a pleiotropic regulator of endochondral fracture repair.

  1. Loss of transcription factor early growth response gene 1 results in impaired endochondral bone repair

    PubMed Central

    Reumann, Marie K.; Strachna, Olga; Yagerman, Sarah; Torrecilla, Daniel; Kim, Jihye; Doty, Steven B.; Lukashova, Lyudmila; Boskey, Adele L.; Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors that play a role in ossification during development are expected to participate in postnatal fracture repair since the endochondral bone formation that occurs in embryos is recapitulated during fracture repair. However, inherent differences exist between bone development and fracture repair, including a sudden disruption of tissue integrity followed by an inflammatory response. This raises the possibility that repair-specific transcription factors participate in bone healing. Here, we assessed the consequence of loss of early growth response gene 1 (EGR-1) on endochondral bone healing because this transcription factor has been shown to modulate repair in vascularized tissues. Model fractures were created in ribs of wild type (wt) and EGR-1−/− mice. Differences in tissue morphology and composition between these two animal groups were followed over 28 post fracture days (PFDs). In wt mice, bone healing occurred in healing phases characteristic of endochondral bone repair. A similar healing sequence was observed in EGR-1−/− mice but was impaired by alterations. A persistent accumulation of fibrin between the disconnected bones was observed on PFD7 and remained pronounced in the callus on PFD14. Additionally, the PFD14 callus was abnormally enlarged and showed increased deposition of mineralized tissue. Cartilage ossification in the callus was associated with hyper-vascularity and -proliferation. Moreover, cell deposits located in proximity to the callus within skeletal muscle were detected on PFD14. Despite these impairments, repair in EGR-1−/− callus advanced on PFD28, suggesting EGR-1 is not essential for healing. Together, this study provides genetic evidence that EGR-1 is a pleiotropic regulator of endochondral fracture repair. PMID:21726677

  2. Impaired myocardial development resulting in neonatal cardiac hypoplasia alters postnatal growth and stress response in the heart.

    PubMed

    Drenckhahn, Jörg-Detlef; Strasen, Jette; Heinecke, Kirsten; Langner, Patrick; Yin, Kom Voy; Skole, Friederike; Hennig, Maria; Spallek, Bastian; Fischer, Robert; Blaschke, Florian; Heuser, Arnd; Cox, Timothy C; Black, Mary Jane; Thierfelder, Ludwig

    2015-04-01

    Foetal growth has been proposed to influence cardiovascular health in adulthood, a process referred to as foetal programming. Indeed, intrauterine growth restriction in animal models alters heart size and cardiomyocyte number in the perinatal period, yet the consequences for the adult or challenged heart are largely unknown. The aim of this study was to elucidate postnatal myocardial growth pattern, left ventricular function, and stress response i