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Sample records for growth regulatory mediator

  1. Toll-like receptor 2-mediated modulation of growth and functions of regulatory T cells by oral streptococci.

    PubMed

    Saeki, A; Segawa, T; Abe, T; Sugiyama, M; Arimoto, T; Hara, H; Hasebe, A; Ohtani, M; Tanizume, N; Ohuchi, M; Kataoka, H; Kawanami, M; Yokoyama, A; Shibata, K

    2013-08-01

    This study was designed to determine whether oral streptococci modulate the growth and functions of regulatory T cells. Heat-killed cells of wild-type strains of Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus mutans induced the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) -mediated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, but their lipoprotein-deficient strains did not. Stimulation with these streptococci resulted in a significant increase in the frequency of CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in splenocytes derived from both TLR2(+/+) and TLR2(-/-) mice, but the level of increase in TLR2(+/+) splenocytes was stronger than that in TLR2(-/-) splenocytes. Both strains of S. gordonii enhanced the proliferation of CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells isolated from TLR2(+/+) mice at the same level as those from TLR2(-/-) mice in an interleukin-2-independent manner. However, wild-type and lipoprotein-deficient strains of both streptococci did not enhance the suppressive activity of the isolated regulatory T cells in vitro, but rather inhibited it. TLR ligands also inhibited the suppressive activity of the regulatory T cells. Inhibition of the suppressive activity was recovered by the addition of anti-IL-6 antibody. Pretreatment of antigen-presenting cells with the NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082 enhanced the suppressive activity of the regulatory T cells. These results suggested that interleukin-6 produced by antigen-presenting cells inhibits the suppressive activity of the regulatory T cells. Wild-type strain, but not lipoprotein-deficient strain, of S. gordonii reduced the frequency of CD4(+)  CD25(+)  Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in the acute infection model, whereas both strains of S. gordonii increased it in the chronic infection model mice. Hence, this study suggests that oral streptococci are capable of modulating the growth and functions of regulatory T cells in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Class IA PI3Kinase Regulatory Subunit, p85α, Mediates Mast Cell Development through Regulation of Growth and Survival Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Subha; Mali, Raghuveer Singh; Koehler, Karl R.; Vemula, Sasidhar; Chatterjee, Anindya; Ghosh, Joydeep; Ramdas, Baskar; Ma, Peilin; Hashino, Eri; Kapur, Reuben

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) mediated KIT receptor activation plays a pivotal role in mast cell growth, maturation and survival. However, the signaling events downstream from KIT are poorly understood. Mast cells express multiple regulatory subunits of class 1A PI3Kinase (PI3K) including p85α, p85β, p50α, and p55α. While it is known that PI3K plays an essential role in mast cells; the precise mechanism by which these regulatory subunits impact specific mast cell functions including growth, survival and cycling are not known. We show that loss of p85α impairs the growth, survival and cycling of mast cell progenitors (MCp). To delineate the molecular mechanism (s) by which p85α regulates mast cell growth, survival and cycling, we performed microarray analyses to compare the gene expression profile of MCps derived from WT and p85α-deficient mice in response to SCF stimulation. We identified 151 unique genes exhibiting altered expression in p85α-deficient cells in response to SCF stimulation compared to WT cells. Functional categorization based on DAVID bioinformatics tool and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software relates the altered genes due to lack of p85α to transcription, cell cycle, cell survival, cell adhesion, cell differentiation, and signal transduction. Our results suggest that p85α is involved in mast cell development through regulation of expression of growth, survival and cell cycle related genes. PMID:22238586

  3. Maraviroc decreases CCL8-mediated migration of CCR5(+) regulatory T cells and reduces metastatic tumor growth in the lungs.

    PubMed

    Halvorsen, E C; Hamilton, M J; Young, A; Wadsworth, B J; LePard, N E; Lee, H N; Firmino, N; Collier, J L; Bennewith, K L

    2016-06-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a crucial physiological role in the regulation of immune homeostasis, although recent data suggest Tregs can contribute to primary tumor growth by suppressing antitumor immune responses. Tregs may also influence the development of tumor metastases, although there is a paucity of information regarding the phenotype and function of Tregs in metastatic target organs. Herein, we demonstrate that orthotopically implanted metastatic mammary tumors induce significant Treg accumulation in the lungs, which is a site of mammary tumor metastasis. Tregs in the primary tumor and metastatic lungs express high levels of C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) relative to Tregs in the mammary fat pad and lungs of tumor-free mice, and Tregs in the metastatic lungs are enriched for CCR5 expression in comparison to other immune cell populations. We also identify that C-C chemokine ligand 8 (CCL8), an endogenous ligand of CCR5, is produced by F4/80(+) macrophages in the lungs of mice with metastatic primary tumors. Migration of Tregs toward CCL8 ex vivo is reduced in the presence of the CCR5 inhibitor Maraviroc. Importantly, treatment of mice with Maraviroc (MVC) reduces the level of CCR5(+) Tregs and metastatic tumor burden in the lungs. This work provides evidence of a CCL8/CCR5 signaling axis driving Treg recruitment to the lungs of mice bearing metastatic primary tumors, representing a potential therapeutic target to decrease Treg accumulation and metastatic tumor growth.

  4. Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β1–producing Regulatory T Cells Induce Smad-mediated Interleukin 10 Secretion That Facilitates Coordinated Immunoregulatory Activity and Amelioration of TGF-β1–mediated Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kitani, Atsushi; Fuss, Ivan; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Kumaki, Fumiyuki; Usui, Takashi; Strober, Warren

    2003-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 are suppressor cytokines that frequently occur together during a regulatory T cell response. Here we used a one gene doxycycline (Dox)-inducible plasmid encoding TGF-β1 to analyze this association and test its utility. In initial studies, we showed that intranasal administration of this plasmid (along with Dox) led to the appearance of TGF-β1–producing cells (in spleen and lamina propria) and the almost concomitant appearance of IL-10–producing cells. Moreover, we showed that these cells exert Dox-regulated suppression of the T helper cell (Th)1-mediated inflammation in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid colitis. In subsequent in vitro studies using retroviral TGF-β1 expression, we established that IL-10 production by Th1 cells occurs after exposure to TGF-β1 from either an endogenous or exogenous source. In addition, using a self-inactivating retrovirus luciferase reporter construct we showed that TGF-β1 induces Smad4, which then binds to and activates the IL-10 promoter. Furthermore, intranasal TGF-β1 plasmid administration ameliorates bleomycin-induced fibrosis in wild-type but not IL-10–deficient mice, strongly suggesting that the amelioration is IL-10 dependent and that IL-10 protects mice from TGF-β1–mediated fibrosis. Taken together, these findings suggest that the induction of IL-10 by TGF-β1 is not fortuitous, but instead fulfills important requirements of TGF-β1 function after its secretion by regulatory T cells. PMID:14557415

  5. Mediation: Sanity in the regulatory process

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, D.S.

    1993-01-15

    The regulatory process is in need of change. The adversarial model used by most regulatory agencies is an inefficient, expensive, and conflict-producing procedure. Ill-adapted to resolving issues of great public policy concern, regulation calls out for non-adversarial alternative processes to address the resolution of public policy disputes between the players in the regulatory process. The adversarial model of regulation mimics traditional courtroom procedures. It is designed to determine issues of fact, not issues of public policy with legal maneuvering used to shroud the development of facts. Conflict maintenance and not conflict resolution has become the hallmark of the adversarial process in the regulatory arena. Unlike the courtroom process which provides a certain finality to conflicts, the adversarial process in the regulatory process is perpetual.

  6. p85 regulatory subunit of PI3K mediates cAMP-PKA and estrogens biological effects on growth and survival.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, C; Di Domenico, M; Porcellini, A; Cuozzo, C; De Gregorio, G; Santillo, M R; Agnese, S; Di Stasio, R; Feliciello, A; Migliaccio, A; Avvedimento, E V

    2007-03-29

    Cyclic adenosine 3'5' monophosphate (cAMP) and protein kinase A (PKA) cooperate with phosphatidylinositol 3' kinase (PI3K) signals in the control of growth and survival. To determine the molecular mechanism(s) involved, we identified and mutagenized a specific serine (residue 83) in p85alpha(PI3K), which is phosphorylated in vivo and in vitro by PKA. Expression of p85alpha(PI3K) mutants (alanine or aspartic substitutions) significantly altered the biological responses of the cells to cAMP. cAMP protection from anoikis was reduced in cells expressing the alanine version p85alpha(PI3K). These cells did not arrest in G1 in the presence of cAMP, whereas cells expressing the aspartic mutant p85D accumulated in G1 even in the absence of cAMP. S phase was still efficiently inhibited by cAMP in cells expressing both mutants. The binding of PI3K to Ras p21 was greatly reduced in cells expressing p85A in the presence or absence of cAMP. Conversely, expression of the aspartic mutant stimulated robustly the binding of PI3K to p21 Ras in the presence of cAMP. Mutation in the Ser 83 inhibited cAMP, but not PDGF stimulation of PI3K. Conversely, the p85D aspartic mutant amplified cAMP stimulation of PI3K activity. Phosphorylation of Ser 83 by cAMP-PKA in p85alpha(PI3K) was also necessary for estrogen signaling as expression of p85A or p85D mutants inhibited or amplified, respectively, the binding of estrogen receptor to p85alpha and AKT phosphorylation induced by estrogens. The data presented indicate that: (1) phosphorylation of Ser 83 in p85alpha(PI3K) is critical for cAMP-PKA induced G1 arrest and survival in mouse 3T3 fibroblasts; (2) this site is necessary for amplification of estrogen signals by cAMP-PKA and related receptors. Finally, these data suggest a general mechanism of PI3K regulation by cAMP, operating in various cell types and under different conditions. PMID:17016431

  7. Fur-mediated global regulatory circuits in pathogenic Neisseria species.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunxiao; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2012-12-01

    The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) protein has been shown to function as a repressor of transcription in a number of diverse microorganisms. However, recent studies have established that Fur can function at a global level as both an activator and a repressor of transcription through both direct and indirect mechanisms. Fur-mediated indirect activation occurs via the repression of additional repressor proteins, or small regulatory RNAs, thereby activating transcription of a previously silent gene. Fur mediates direct activation through binding of Fur to the promoter regions of genes. Whereas the repressive mechanism of Fur has been thoroughly investigated, emerging studies on direct and indirect Fur-mediated activation mechanisms have revealed novel global regulatory circuits.

  8. Fur-Mediated Global Regulatory Circuits in Pathogenic Neisseria Species

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chunxiao

    2012-01-01

    The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) protein has been shown to function as a repressor of transcription in a number of diverse microorganisms. However, recent studies have established that Fur can function at a global level as both an activator and a repressor of transcription through both direct and indirect mechanisms. Fur-mediated indirect activation occurs via the repression of additional repressor proteins, or small regulatory RNAs, thereby activating transcription of a previously silent gene. Fur mediates direct activation through binding of Fur to the promoter regions of genes. Whereas the repressive mechanism of Fur has been thoroughly investigated, emerging studies on direct and indirect Fur-mediated activation mechanisms have revealed novel global regulatory circuits. PMID:22885296

  9. IL-35-mediated induction of a potent regulatory T cell population.

    PubMed

    Collison, Lauren W; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Henderson, Abigail L; Giacomin, Paul R; Guy, Cliff; Bankoti, Jaishree; Finkelstein, David; Forbes, Karen; Workman, Creg J; Brown, Scott A; Rehg, Jerold E; Jones, Michael L; Ni, Hsiao-Tzu; Artis, David; Turk, Mary Jo; Vignali, Dario A A

    2010-12-01

    Regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells) have a critical role in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance. Here we show that treatment of naive human or mouse T cells with IL-35 induced a regulatory population, which we call 'iT(R)35 cells', that mediated suppression via IL-35 but not via the inhibitory cytokines IL-10 or transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). We found that iT(R)35 cells did not express or require the transcription factor Foxp3, and were strongly suppressive and stable in vivo. T(reg) cells induced the generation of iT(R)35 cells in an IL-35- and IL-10-dependent manner in vitro and induced their generation in vivo under inflammatory conditions in intestines infected with Trichuris muris and within the tumor microenvironment (B16 melanoma and MC38 colorectal adenocarcinoma), where they contributed to the regulatory milieu. Thus, iT(R)35 cells constitute a key mediator of infectious tolerance and contribute to T(reg) cell-mediated tumor progression. Furthermore, iT(R)35 cells generated ex vivo might have therapeutic utility.

  10. Multiple Regulatory Systems Coordinate DNA Replication with Cell Growth in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Heath; Koh, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In many bacteria the rate of DNA replication is linked with cellular physiology to ensure that genome duplication is coordinated with growth. Nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation has been appreciated for decades, however the mechanism(s) that connects these cell cycle activities has eluded understanding. In order to help address this fundamental question we have investigated regulation of DNA replication in the model organism Bacillus subtilis. Contrary to the prevailing view we find that changes in DnaA protein level are not sufficient to account for nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation, although this regulation does require both DnaA and the endogenous replication origin. We go on to report connections between DNA replication and several essential cellular activities required for rapid bacterial growth, including respiration, central carbon metabolism, fatty acid synthesis, phospholipid synthesis, and protein synthesis. Unexpectedly, the results indicate that multiple regulatory systems are involved in coordinating DNA replication with cell physiology, with some of the regulatory systems targeting oriC while others act in a oriC-independent manner. We propose that distinct regulatory systems are utilized to control DNA replication in response to diverse physiological and chemical changes. PMID:25340815

  11. Secretory pattern and regulatory mechanism of growth hormone in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The ultradian rhythm of growth hormone (GH) secretion has been known in several animal species for years and has recently been observed in cattle. Although the physiological significance of the rhythm is not yet fully understood, it appears essential for normal growth. In this review, previous studies concerning the GH secretory pattern in cattle, including its ultradian rhythm, are introduced and the regulatory mechanism is discussed on the basis of recent findings. PMID:26260675

  12. Early growth and postprandial appetite regulatory hormone responses.

    PubMed

    Perälä, Mia-Maria; Kajantie, Eero; Valsta, Liisa M; Holst, Jens J; Leiviskä, Jaana; Eriksson, Johan G

    2013-11-14

    Strong epidemiological evidence suggests that slow prenatal or postnatal growth is associated with an increased risk of CVD and other metabolic diseases. However, little is known whether early growth affects postprandial metabolism and, especially, the appetite regulatory hormone system. Therefore, we investigated the impact of early growth on postprandial appetite regulatory hormone responses to two high-protein and two high-fat content meals. Healthy, 65-75-year-old volunteers from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study were recruited; twelve with a slow increase in BMI during the first year of life (SGI group) and twelve controls. Subjects ate a test meal (whey meal, casein meal, SFA meal and PUFA meal) once in a random order. Plasma glucose, insulin, TAG, NEFA, ghrelin, peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (PYY), glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, glucagon-like peptide-1 and a satiety profile were measured in the fasting state and for 4 h after each test meal. Compared with the controls, the SGI group had about 1·5-fold higher insulin responses after the whey meal (P= 0·037), casein meal (P= 0·023) and PUFA meal (P= 0·002). TAG responses were 34-69 % higher for the SGI group, but only the PUFA-meal responses differed significantly between the groups. The PYY response of the SGI group was 44 % higher after the whey meal (P= 0·046) and 115 % higher after the casein meal (P= 0·025) compared with the controls. No other statistically significant differences were seen between the groups. In conclusion, early growth may have a role in programming appetite regulatory hormone secretion in later life. Slow early growth is also associated with higher postprandial insulin and TAG responses but not with incretin levels.

  13. A coculture model mimicking the intestinal mucosa reveals a regulatory role for myofibroblasts in immune-mediated barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, L E M; Schreurs, C C H M; Kroes, H; Spillenaar Bilgen, E J; Van Deventer, S J H; Van Tol, E A F

    2002-10-01

    The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease involves a mucosal inflammatory response affecting the barrier function of the gut. Myofibroblasts directly underlining the intestinal epithelium may have a regulatory role in immune-mediated barrier disruption. A coculture system of T84 epithelial and CCD-18Co myofibroblasts was established in order to mimic the in situ spatial interactions between these cell types and to evaluate their role in barrier: integrity. Lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) were introduced in co- and monocultures. Effects of immune cells on barrier integrity was determined by measuring resistance and permeability for macromolecules. Introduction of LPMC in both culture systems caused a time-dependent decrease in barrier integrity. This was found to be less pronounced in cocultures indicating a regulatory role for mesenchymal cells. The effects were also found to depend on the route of LPMC stimulation. Additional analyses suggested that the regulatory role of myofibroblasts in barrier integrity involves production of growth factors. PMID:12395905

  14. Putting theory to the test: which regulatory mechanisms can drive realistic growth of a root?

    PubMed

    De Vos, Dirk; Vissenberg, Kris; Broeckhove, Jan; Beemster, Gerrit T S

    2014-10-01

    In recent years there has been a strong development of computational approaches to mechanistically understand organ growth regulation in plants. In this study, simulation methods were used to explore which regulatory mechanisms can lead to realistic output at the cell and whole organ scale and which other possibilities must be discarded as they result in cellular patterns and kinematic characteristics that are not consistent with experimental observations for the Arabidopsis thaliana primary root. To aid in this analysis, a 'Uniform Longitudinal Strain Rule' (ULSR) was formulated as a necessary condition for stable, unidirectional, symplastic growth. Our simulations indicate that symplastic structures are robust to differences in longitudinal strain rates along the growth axis only if these differences are small and short-lived. Whereas simple cell-autonomous regulatory rules based on counters and timers can produce stable growth, it was found that steady developmental zones and smooth transitions in cell lengths are not feasible. By introducing spatial cues into growth regulation, those inadequacies could be avoided and experimental data could be faithfully reproduced. Nevertheless, a root growth model based on previous polar auxin-transport mechanisms violates the proposed ULSR due to the presence of lateral gradients. Models with layer-specific regulation or layer-driven growth offer potential solutions. Alternatively, a model representing the known cross-talk between auxin, as the cell proliferation promoting factor, and cytokinin, as the cell differentiation promoting factor, predicts the effect of hormone-perturbations on meristem size. By down-regulating PIN-mediated transport through the transcription factor SHY2, cytokinin effectively flattens the lateral auxin gradient, at the basal boundary of the division zone, (thereby imposing the ULSR) to signal the exit of proliferation and start of elongation. This model exploration underlines the value of

  15. Interleukin-35-mediated induction of a novel regulatory T cell population

    PubMed Central

    Collison, Lauren W.; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Henderson, Abigail L.; Giacomin, Paul R.; Guy, Cliff; Bankoti, Jaishree; Finkelstein, David; Forbes, Karen; Workman, Creg J.; Brown, Scott A.; Rehg, Jerold E.; Jones, Michael L.; Ni, Hsiao-Tzu; Artis, David; Turk, Mary Jo; Vignali, Dario A. A.

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a critical role in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance. Naïve human or murine T cell treatment with the inhibitory cytokine IL-35 induces a regulatory population, termed iTR35, that mediates suppression via IL-35, but not IL-10 or TGFβ, neither express nor require Foxp3, are strongly suppressive in five in vivo models, and exhibit in vivo stability. Treg-mediated suppression induces iTR35 generation in an IL-35- and IL-10-dependent manner in vitro, and in inflammatory conditions in vivo in Trichuris-infected intestines and within the tumor microenvironment, where they appear to contribute to the regulatory milieu. iTR35 may constitute a key mediator of infectious tolerance, may contribute to Treg-mediated tumor progression, and ex vivo generated iTR35 may possess therapeutic utility. PMID:20953201

  16. Compensatory adrenal growth - A neurally mediated reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dallman, M. F.; Engeland, W. C.; Shinsako, J.

    1976-01-01

    The responses of young rats to left adrenalectomy or left adrenal manipulation were compared to surgical sham adrenalectomy in which adrenals were observed but not touched. At 12 h right adrenal wet weight, dry weight, DNA, RNA, and protein content were increased (P less than 0.05) after the first two operations. Left adrenal manipulation resulted in increased right adrenal weight at 12 h but no change in left adrenal weight. Sequential manipulation of the left adrenal at time 0 and the right adrenal at 12 h resulted in an enlarged right adrenal at 12 h (P less than 0.01), and an enlarged left adrenal at 24 h (P less than 0.05), showing that the manipulated gland was capable of response. Bilateral adrenal manipulation of the adrenal glands resulted in bilateral enlargement of 12 h (P less than 0.01). Taken together with previous results, these findings strongly suggest that compensatory adrenal growth is a neurally mediated reflex.

  17. BET bromodomain inhibition releases the Mediator complex from select cis-regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, Anand S.; Roe, Jae-Seok; Mok, Beverly A.; Hohmann, Anja F.; Shi, Junwei; Vakoc, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    The bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) protein BRD4 can physically interact with the Mediator complex, but the relevance of this association to the therapeutic effects of BET inhibitors in cancer is unclear. Here, we show that BET inhibition causes a rapid release of Mediator from a subset of cis-regulatory elements in the genome of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. These sites of Mediator eviction were highly correlated with transcriptional suppression of neighboring genes, which are enriched for targets of the transcription factor MYB and for functions related to leukemogenesis. An shRNA screen of Mediator in AML cells identified the MED12, MED13, MED23, and MED24 subunits as performing a similar regulatory function to BRD4 in this context, including a shared role in sustaining a block in myeloid maturation. These findings suggest that the interaction between BRD4 and Mediator has functional importance for gene-specific transcriptional activation and for AML maintenance. PMID:27068464

  18. Regulatory focus and burnout in nurses: The mediating effect of perception of transformational leadership.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rui; Zhang, Shilei; Xu, Hang; Liu, Xufeng; Miao, Danmin

    2015-12-01

    This correlation study investigated the relationship between nurses' regulatory focus and burnout, as mediated by their perceptions of transformational leadership, using a cross-sectional research design with anonymous questionnaires. In July-August 2012, data were collected from 378 nurses from three hospitals in Shaanxi Province, China, using self-report questionnaires for measuring the nurses' regulatory focus, their level of burnout and their perception of whether the leadership of their supervisor was transformational. Structural equation modelling and bootstrapping procedures were used to identify the mediating effect of their perceptions of transformational leadership. The results supported our hypothesized model. The type of regulatory focus emerged as a significant predictor of burnout. Having a perception of transformational leadership partially mediated the relationship between regulatory focus and burnout. Having a promotion focus reduced burnout when the participants perceived transformational leadership, whereas having a prevention focus exhibited the opposite pattern. The mediating effect of the perception of transformational leadership suggests that a promotion focus may help diminish burnout, directly and indirectly. Nurse managers must be aware of the role of a regulatory focus and cultivate promotion focus in their followers.

  19. Minireview: mechanisms of growth hormone-mediated gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Chia, Dennis J

    2014-07-01

    GH exerts a diverse array of physiological actions that include prominent roles in growth and metabolism, with a major contribution via stimulating IGF-1 synthesis. GH achieves its effects by influencing gene expression profiles, and Igf1 is a key transcriptional target of GH signaling in liver and other tissues. This review examines the mechanisms of GH-mediated gene regulation that begin with signal transduction pathways activated downstream of the GH receptor and continue with chromatin events at target genes and additionally encompasses the topics of negative regulation and cross talk with other cellular inputs. The transcription factor, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b, is regarded as the major signaling pathway by which GH achieves its physiological effects, including in stimulating Igf1 gene transcription in liver. Recent studies exploring the mechanisms of how activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b accomplishes this are highlighted, which begin to characterize epigenetic features at regulatory domains of the Igf1 locus. Further research in this field offers promise to better understand the GH-IGF-1 axis in normal physiology and disease and to identify strategies to manipulate the axis to improve human health.

  20. Cpeb4-mediated translational regulatory circuitry controls terminal erythroid differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wenqian; Yuan, Bingbing; Lodish, Harvey F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY While we have considerable understanding of the transcriptional networks controlling mammalian cell differentiation, our knowledge of post-transcriptional regulatory events is very limited. Using differentiation of primary erythroid cells as a model, we show that the sequence-specific mRNA-binding protein Cpeb4 is strongly induced by the erythroid important transcription factors Gata1 and Tal1 and is essential for terminal erythropoiesis. By interacting with the translation initiation factor eIF3 Cpeb4 represses the translation of a large set of mRNAs, including its own mRNA. Thus transcriptional induction and translational repression combine to form a negative feedback loop to control Cpeb4 protein levels within a specific range that is required for terminal erythropoiesis. Our study provides an example of how translational control is integrated with transcriptional regulation to precisely control gene expression during mammalian cell differentiation. PMID:25220394

  1. Cpeb4-mediated translational regulatory circuitry controls terminal erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenqian; Yuan, Bingbing; Lodish, Harvey F

    2014-09-29

    While we have considerable understanding of the transcriptional networks controlling mammalian cell differentiation, our knowledge of posttranscriptional regulatory events is very limited. Using differentiation of primary erythroid cells as a model, we show that the sequence-specific mRNA-binding protein Cpeb4 is strongly induced by the erythroid-important transcription factors Gata1 and Tal1 and is essential for terminal erythropoiesis. By interacting with the translation initiation factor eIF3, Cpeb4 represses the translation of a large set of mRNAs, including its own mRNA. Thus, transcriptional induction and translational repression combine to form a negative feedback loop to control Cpeb4 protein levels within a specific range that is required for terminal erythropoiesis. Our study provides an example of how translational control is integrated with transcriptional regulation to precisely control gene expression during mammalian cell differentiation.

  2. Iron Regulatory Proteins Mediate Host Resistance to Salmonella Infection.

    PubMed

    Nairz, Manfred; Ferring-Appel, Dunja; Casarrubea, Daniela; Sonnweber, Thomas; Viatte, Lydie; Schroll, Andrea; Haschka, David; Fang, Ferric C; Hentze, Matthias W; Weiss, Guenter; Galy, Bruno

    2015-08-12

    Macrophages are essential for systemic iron recycling, and also control iron availability to pathogens. Iron metabolism in mammalian cells is orchestrated posttranscriptionally by iron-regulatory proteins (IRP)-1 and -2. Here, we generated mice with selective and combined ablation of both IRPs in macrophages to investigate the role of IRPs in controlling iron availability. These animals are hyperferritinemic but otherwise display normal clinical iron parameters. However, mutant mice rapidly succumb to systemic infection with Salmonella Typhimurium, a pathogenic bacterium that multiplies within macrophages, with increased bacterial burdens in liver and spleen. Ex vivo infection experiments indicate that IRP function restricts bacterial access to iron via the EntC and Feo bacterial iron-acquisition systems. Further, IRPs contain Salmonella by promoting the induction of lipocalin 2, a host antimicrobial factor that inhibits bacterial uptake of iron-laden siderophores, and by suppressing the ferritin iron pool. This work reveals the importance of the IRPs in innate immunity.

  3. Bayesian non-negative factor analysis for reconstructing transcription factor mediated regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Transcriptional regulation by transcription factor (TF) controls the time and abundance of mRNA transcription. Due to the limitation of current proteomics technologies, large scale measurements of protein level activities of TFs is usually infeasible, making computational reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory network a difficult task. Results We proposed here a novel Bayesian non-negative factor model for TF mediated regulatory networks. Particularly, the non-negative TF activities and sample clustering effect are modeled as the factors from a Dirichlet process mixture of rectified Gaussian distributions, and the sparse regulatory coefficients are modeled as the loadings from a sparse distribution that constrains its sparsity using knowledge from database; meantime, a Gibbs sampling solution was developed to infer the underlying network structure and the unknown TF activities simultaneously. The developed approach has been applied to simulated system and breast cancer gene expression data. Result shows that, the proposed method was able to systematically uncover TF mediated transcriptional regulatory network structure, the regulatory coefficients, the TF protein level activities and the sample clustering effect. The regulation target prediction result is highly coordinated with the prior knowledge, and sample clustering result shows superior performance over previous molecular based clustering method. Conclusions The results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed approach in reconstructing transcriptional networks mediated by TFs through simulated systems and real data. PMID:22166063

  4. College Students' Homework and Academic Achievement: The Mediating Role of Self-Regulatory Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitsantas, Anastasia; Zimmerman, Barry J.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of homework experiences on students' academic grades was studied with 223 college students. Students' self-efficacy for learning and perceived responsibility beliefs were included as mediating variables in this research. The students' homework influenced their achievement indirectly via these two self-regulatory beliefs as well as…

  5. The expanding regulatory network of STING-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Surpris, Guy; Poltorak, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    The identification and characterization of DNA-sensing pathways has been a subject of intensive investigation for the last decade. This interest, in part, is supported by the fact that the main outcome of DNA-responses is production of type I interferon (IFN-I), which, if produced in excessive amounts, leads to various pathologies. STING (stimulator of interferon genes) is positioned in the center of these responses and is activated either via direct sensing of second messengers or via interaction with upstream sensors of dsDNA. STING mediates responses to pathogens as well as host-derived DNA and is, therefore, linked to various autoimmune diseases, cancer predisposition and ageing. Recent mouse models of DNA damage showed the adaptor STING to be crucial for heightened resting levels of IFN-I. In this review, we will focus on recent advances in understanding the regulation of STING-signaling and identification of its novel components. PMID:27414485

  6. Close encounters of many kinds: Fos-Jun interactions that mediate transcription regulatory specificity.

    PubMed

    Chinenov, Y; Kerppola, T K

    2001-04-30

    Fos and Jun family proteins regulate the expression of a myriad of genes in a variety of tissues and cell types. This functional versatility emerges from their interactions with related bZIP proteins and with structurally unrelated transcription factors. These interactions at composite regulatory elements produce nucleoprotein complexes with high sequence-specificity and regulatory selectivity. Several general principles including binding cooperativity and conformational adaptability have emerged from studies of regulatory complexes containing Fos-Jun family proteins. The structural properties of Fos-Jun family proteins including opposite orientations of heterodimer binding and the ability to bend DNA can contribute to the assembly and functions of such complexes. The cooperative recruitment of transcription factors, coactivators and chromatin remodeling factors to promoter and enhancer regions generates multiprotein transcription regulatory complexes with cell- and stimulus-specific transcriptional activities. The gene-specific architecture of these complexes can mediate the selective control of transcriptional activity.

  7. Daylength mediated control of seasonal growth patterns in perennial trees.

    PubMed

    Petterle, Anna; Karlberg, Anna; Bhalerao, Rishikesh P

    2013-06-01

    Daylength is a key regulator of seasonal growth patterns in perennial trees in temperate regions. Cessation of growth is induced by short day signal in these trees before the advent of winter and constitutes a major adaptive developmental program. In this review, we report on the recent progress made in identifying the molecular mechanisms that underlie the daylength mediated control of seasonal growth in perennial trees. A major finding that has emerged from the analysis of this process is that the regulation of growth cessation in perennial trees and flowering time by daylength in annuals such as Arabidopsis thaliana involves identical signalling components.

  8. Surfactant mediated growth of Ti/Ni multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Mukul; Amir, S. M.; Gupta, Ajay; Stahn, Jochen

    2011-03-07

    The surfactant mediated growth of Ti/Ni multilayers is studied. They were prepared using ion beam sputtering at different adatom energies. It was found that the interface roughness decreased significantly when the multilayers were sputtered with Ag as surfactant at an ion energy of 0.75 keV. On the other hand, when the ion energy was increased to 1 keV, it resulted in enhanced intermixing at the interfaces and no appreciable effect of Ag surfactant could be observed. On the basis of the obtained results, the influence of adatom energy on the surfactant mediated growth mechanism is discussed.

  9. Arsenite-mediated promotion of anchorage-independent growth of HaCaT cells through placental growth factor.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Ichiro; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Ohnuma, Shoko; Ohgami, Nobutaka; Naito, Hisao; Shekhar, Hossain U; Omata, Yasuhiro; Kato, Masashi

    2015-04-01

    Various cancers including skin cancer are increasing in 45 million people exposed to arsenic above the World Health Organization's guideline value of 10 μg l(-1). However, there is limited information on key molecules regulating arsenic-mediated carcinogenesis. Our fieldwork in Bangladesh demonstrated that levels of placental growth factor (PlGF) in urine samples from residents of cancer-prone areas with arsenic-polluted drinking water were higher than those in urine samples from residents of an area that was not polluted with arsenic. Our experimental study in human nontumorigenic HaCaT skin keratinocytes showed that arsenite promoted anchorage-independent growth with increased expression and secretion of PlGF, a ligand of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor1 (VEGFR1), and increased VEGFR1/mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activities. The arsenite-mediated promotion of anchorage-independent growth was strongly inhibited by PlGF depletion with decreased activities of the PlGF/VEGFR1/MEK/ERK pathway. Moreover, arsenite proteasome-dependently degrades metal-regulatory transcription factor-1 (MTF-1) protein, resulting in a decreased amount of MTF-1 protein binding to the PlGF promoter. MTF-1 negatively controlled PlGF transcription in HaCaT cells, resulting in increased PlGF transcription. These results suggest that arsenite-mediated MTF-1 degradation enhances the activity of PlGF/VEGFR1/MEK/ERK signaling, resulting in promotion of the malignant transformation of keratinocytes. Thus, this study proposed a molecular mechanism for arsenite-mediated development of skin cancer. PMID:25493652

  10. Arsenite-mediated promotion of anchorage-independent growth of HaCaT cells through placental growth factor.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Ichiro; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Ohnuma, Shoko; Ohgami, Nobutaka; Naito, Hisao; Shekhar, Hossain U; Omata, Yasuhiro; Kato, Masashi

    2015-04-01

    Various cancers including skin cancer are increasing in 45 million people exposed to arsenic above the World Health Organization's guideline value of 10 μg l(-1). However, there is limited information on key molecules regulating arsenic-mediated carcinogenesis. Our fieldwork in Bangladesh demonstrated that levels of placental growth factor (PlGF) in urine samples from residents of cancer-prone areas with arsenic-polluted drinking water were higher than those in urine samples from residents of an area that was not polluted with arsenic. Our experimental study in human nontumorigenic HaCaT skin keratinocytes showed that arsenite promoted anchorage-independent growth with increased expression and secretion of PlGF, a ligand of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor1 (VEGFR1), and increased VEGFR1/mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activities. The arsenite-mediated promotion of anchorage-independent growth was strongly inhibited by PlGF depletion with decreased activities of the PlGF/VEGFR1/MEK/ERK pathway. Moreover, arsenite proteasome-dependently degrades metal-regulatory transcription factor-1 (MTF-1) protein, resulting in a decreased amount of MTF-1 protein binding to the PlGF promoter. MTF-1 negatively controlled PlGF transcription in HaCaT cells, resulting in increased PlGF transcription. These results suggest that arsenite-mediated MTF-1 degradation enhances the activity of PlGF/VEGFR1/MEK/ERK signaling, resulting in promotion of the malignant transformation of keratinocytes. Thus, this study proposed a molecular mechanism for arsenite-mediated development of skin cancer.

  11. Neuropilin 1 deficiency on CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells impairs mouse melanoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Hutzler, Marina; Abel, Simone; Alter, Christina; Stockmann, Christian; Kliche, Stefanie; Albert, Juliane; Sparwasser, Tim; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Westendorf, Astrid M.; Schadendorf, Dirk; Buer, Jan; Helfrich, Iris

    2012-01-01

    Infiltration of Foxp3+ regulatory T (T reg) cells is considered to be a critical step during tumor development and progression. T reg cells supposedly suppress locally an effective anti-tumor immune response within tumor tissues, although the precise mechanism by which T reg cells infiltrate the tumor is still unclear. We provide evidence that Neuropilin 1 (Nrp-1), highly expressed by Foxp3+ T reg cells, regulates the immunological anti-tumor control by guiding T reg cells into the tumor in response to tumor-derived vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We demonstrate for the first time that T cell–specific ablation of Nrp-1 expression results in a significant breakdown in tumor immune escape in various transplantation models and in a spontaneous, endogenously driven melanoma model associated with strongly reduced tumor growth and prolonged tumor-free survival. Strikingly, numbers of tumor-infiltrating Foxp3+ T reg cells were significantly reduced accompanied by enhanced activation of CD8+ T cells within tumors of T cell–specific Nrp-1–deficient mice. This phenotype can be reversed by adoptive transfer of Nrp-1+ T reg cells from wild-type mice. Thus, our data strongly suggest that Nrp-1 acts as a key mediator of Foxp3+ T reg cell infiltration into the tumor site resulting in a dampened anti-tumor immune response and enhanced tumor progression. PMID:23045606

  12. The dual effects of leading for safety: The mediating role of employee regulatory focus.

    PubMed

    Kark, Ronit; Katz-Navon, Tal; Delegach, Marianna

    2015-09-01

    This study examined the underlying mechanisms through which transformational and transactional leadership influence employee safety behaviors. Linking leadership theory with self-regulatory focus (SRF) theory, we examined a model of dual effects of leadership on safety initiative and safety compliance behaviors as mediated by promotion and prevention self-regulations. We conducted an experimental study (N = 107), an online study (N = 99) and a field study (N = 798 employees and 49 managers). Results demonstrated that followers' situational promotion focus mediated the positive relationship between transformational leadership and safety initiative behaviors. Through all 3 studies, transactional active leadership was positively associated with followers' situational prevention focus, however, the association between followers' prevention focus and safety compliance behaviors was inconsistent, showing the expected mediation relationships in the experimental setting, but not in the online and field studies. We discuss theoretical and practical implications of the findings.

  13. Mediation Analysis in a Latent Growth Curve Modeling Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Soest, Tilmann; Hagtvet, Knut A.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents several longitudinal mediation models in the framework of latent growth curve modeling and provides a detailed account of how such models can be constructed. Logical and statistical challenges that might arise when such analyses are conducted are also discussed. Specifically, we discuss how the initial status (intercept) and…

  14. Identification of bolting-related microRNAs and their targets reveals complex miRNA-mediated flowering-time regulatory networks in radish (Raphanus sativus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Shanshan; Xu, Liang; Wang, Yan; Huang, Danqiong; Muleke, Everlyne M.; Sun, Xiaochuan; Wang, Ronghua; Xie, Yang; Gong, Yiqin; Liu, Liwang

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play vital regulatory roles in plant growth and development. The phase transition from vegetative growth to flowering is crucial in the life cycle of plants. To date, miRNA-mediated flowering regulatory networks remain largely unexplored in radish. In this study, two small RNA libraries from radish leaves at vegetative and reproductive stages were constructed and sequenced by Solexa sequencing. A total of 94 known miRNAs representing 21 conserved and 13 non-conserved miRNA families, and 44 potential novel miRNAs, were identified from the two libraries. In addition, 42 known and 17 novel miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed and identified as bolting-related miRNAs. RT-qPCR analysis revealed that some miRNAs exhibited tissue- or developmental stage-specific expression patterns. Moreover, 154 target transcripts were identified for 50 bolting-related miRNAs, which were predominately involved in plant development, signal transduction and transcriptional regulation. Based on the characterization of bolting-related miRNAs and their target genes, a putative schematic model of miRNA-mediated bolting and flowering regulatory network was proposed. These results could provide insights into bolting and flowering regulatory networks in radish, and facilitate dissecting the molecular mechanisms underlying bolting and flowering time regulation in vegetable crops. PMID:26369897

  15. Identification of bolting-related microRNAs and their targets reveals complex miRNA-mediated flowering-time regulatory networks in radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Nie, Shanshan; Xu, Liang; Wang, Yan; Huang, Danqiong; Muleke, Everlyne M; Sun, Xiaochuan; Wang, Ronghua; Xie, Yang; Gong, Yiqin; Liu, Liwang

    2015-09-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play vital regulatory roles in plant growth and development. The phase transition from vegetative growth to flowering is crucial in the life cycle of plants. To date, miRNA-mediated flowering regulatory networks remain largely unexplored in radish. In this study, two small RNA libraries from radish leaves at vegetative and reproductive stages were constructed and sequenced by Solexa sequencing. A total of 94 known miRNAs representing 21 conserved and 13 non-conserved miRNA families, and 44 potential novel miRNAs, were identified from the two libraries. In addition, 42 known and 17 novel miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed and identified as bolting-related miRNAs. RT-qPCR analysis revealed that some miRNAs exhibited tissue- or developmental stage-specific expression patterns. Moreover, 154 target transcripts were identified for 50 bolting-related miRNAs, which were predominately involved in plant development, signal transduction and transcriptional regulation. Based on the characterization of bolting-related miRNAs and their target genes, a putative schematic model of miRNA-mediated bolting and flowering regulatory network was proposed. These results could provide insights into bolting and flowering regulatory networks in radish, and facilitate dissecting the molecular mechanisms underlying bolting and flowering time regulation in vegetable crops.

  16. Possible dual regulatory circuits involving AtS6K1 in the regulation of plant cell cycle and growth.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yun-jeong; Kim, Sunghan; Du, Hui; Choi, Soonyoung; Verma, Desh Pal S; Cheon, Choong-Ill

    2012-05-01

    The role of Arabidopsis S6 Kinase 1 (AtS6K1), a downstream target of TOR kinase, in controlling plant growth and ribosome biogenesis was characterized after generating transgenic plants expressing AtS6K1 under auxin-inducible promoter. Down regulation of selected cell cycle regulatory genes upon auxin treatment was observed in the transgenic plants, confirming the negative regulatory role of AtS6K1 in the plant cell cycle progression reported earlier. Callus tissues established from these transgenic plants grew to larger cell masses with more number of enlarged cells than untransformed control, demonstrating functional implication of AtS6K1 in the control of plant cell size. The observed negative correlation between the expression of AtS6K1 and the cell cycle regulatory genes, however, was completely reversed in protoplasts generated from the transgenic plants expressing AtS6K1, suggesting a possible existence of dual regulatory mechanism of the plant cell cycle regulation mediated by AtS6K1. An alternative method of kinase assay, termed "substrate-mediated kinase pull down", was employed to examine the additional phosphorylation on other domains of AtS6K1 and verified the phosphorylation of both amino- and carboxy-terminal domains, which is a novel finding regarding the phosphorylation target sites on plant S6Ks by upstream regulatory kinases. In addition, this kinase assay under the stress conditions revealed the salt- and sugar-dependencies of AtS6K1 phosphorylations.

  17. Drug-device combination products: regulatory landscape and market growth.

    PubMed

    Bayarri, L

    2015-08-01

    Combination products are therapeutic and diagnostic products that combine drugs, devices and/or biological products, leading to safer and more effective treatments thanks to careful and precise drug targeting, local administration and individualized therapy. These technologies can especially benefit patients suffering from serious diseases and conditions such as cancer, heart disease, multiple sclerosis and diabetes, among others. On the other hand, drug-device combination products have also introduced a new dynamic in medical product development, regulatory approval and corporate interaction. Due to the increasing integration of drugs and devices observed in the latest generation of combination products, regulatory agencies have developed specific competences and regulations over the last decade. Manufacturers are required to fully understand the specific requirements in each country in order to ensure timely and accurate market access of new combination products, and the development of combination products involves a very specific pattern of interactions between manufacturers and regulatory agencies. The increased sophistication of the products brought to market over the last couple of decades has accentuated the need to develop drugs and devices collaboratively using resources from both industries, fostering the need of business partnering and technology licensing. This review will provide a global overview of the market trends, as well as (in the last section) an analysis of the drug-device combination products approved by the FDA during the latest 5 years.

  18. Drug-device combination products: regulatory landscape and market growth.

    PubMed

    Bayarri, L

    2015-08-01

    Combination products are therapeutic and diagnostic products that combine drugs, devices and/or biological products, leading to safer and more effective treatments thanks to careful and precise drug targeting, local administration and individualized therapy. These technologies can especially benefit patients suffering from serious diseases and conditions such as cancer, heart disease, multiple sclerosis and diabetes, among others. On the other hand, drug-device combination products have also introduced a new dynamic in medical product development, regulatory approval and corporate interaction. Due to the increasing integration of drugs and devices observed in the latest generation of combination products, regulatory agencies have developed specific competences and regulations over the last decade. Manufacturers are required to fully understand the specific requirements in each country in order to ensure timely and accurate market access of new combination products, and the development of combination products involves a very specific pattern of interactions between manufacturers and regulatory agencies. The increased sophistication of the products brought to market over the last couple of decades has accentuated the need to develop drugs and devices collaboratively using resources from both industries, fostering the need of business partnering and technology licensing. This review will provide a global overview of the market trends, as well as (in the last section) an analysis of the drug-device combination products approved by the FDA during the latest 5 years. PMID:26380388

  19. Cutting edge: Human regulatory T cells require IL-35 to mediate suppression and infectious tolerance.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Vandana; Collison, Lauren W; Guy, Clifford S; Workman, Creg J; Vignali, Dario A A

    2011-06-15

    Human regulatory T cells (T(reg)) are essential for the maintenance of immune tolerance. However, the mechanisms they use to mediate suppression remain controversial. Although IL-35 has been shown to play an important role in T(reg)-mediated suppression in mice, recent studies have questioned its relevance in human T(reg). In this study, we show that human T(reg) express and require IL-35 for maximal suppressive capacity. Substantial upregulation of EBI3 and IL12A, but not IL10 and TGFB, was observed in activated human T(reg) compared with conventional T cells (T(conv)). Contact-independent T(reg)-mediated suppression was IL-35 dependent and did not require IL-10 or TGF-β. Lastly, human T(reg)-mediated suppression led to the conversion of the suppressed T(conv) into iTr35 cells, an IL-35-induced T(reg) population, in an IL-35-dependent manner. Thus, IL-35 contributes to human T(reg)-mediated suppression, and its conversion of suppressed target T(conv) into IL-35-induced T(reg) may contribute to infectious tolerance.

  20. Genetic modification through oligonucleotide-mediated mutagenesis. A GMO regulatory challenge?

    PubMed

    Breyer, Didier; Herman, Philippe; Brandenburger, Annick; Gheysen, Godelieve; Remaut, Erik; Soumillion, Patrice; Van Doorsselaere, Jan; Custers, René; Pauwels, Katia; Sneyers, Myriam; Reheul, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    In the European Union, the definition of a GMO is technology-based. This means that a novel organism will be regulated under the GMO regulatory framework only if it has been developed with the use of defined techniques. This approach is now challenged with the emergence of new techniques. In this paper, we describe regulatory and safety issues associated with the use of oligonucleotide-mediated mutagenesis to develop novel organisms. We present scientific arguments for not having organisms developed through this technique fall within the scope of the EU regulation on GMOs. We conclude that any political decision on this issue should be taken on the basis of a broad reflection at EU level, while avoiding discrepancies at international level.

  1. Genetic modification through oligonucleotide-mediated mutagenesis. A GMO regulatory challenge?

    PubMed

    Breyer, Didier; Herman, Philippe; Brandenburger, Annick; Gheysen, Godelieve; Remaut, Erik; Soumillion, Patrice; Van Doorsselaere, Jan; Custers, René; Pauwels, Katia; Sneyers, Myriam; Reheul, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    In the European Union, the definition of a GMO is technology-based. This means that a novel organism will be regulated under the GMO regulatory framework only if it has been developed with the use of defined techniques. This approach is now challenged with the emergence of new techniques. In this paper, we describe regulatory and safety issues associated with the use of oligonucleotide-mediated mutagenesis to develop novel organisms. We present scientific arguments for not having organisms developed through this technique fall within the scope of the EU regulation on GMOs. We conclude that any political decision on this issue should be taken on the basis of a broad reflection at EU level, while avoiding discrepancies at international level. PMID:19833073

  2. Deciphering Cis-Regulatory Element Mediated Combinatorial Regulation in Rice under Blast Infected Condition

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Arindam; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) present at the promoters facilitate the binding of several transcription factors (TFs), thereby altering the consequent gene expressions. Due to the eminent complexity of the regulatory mechanism, the combinatorics of CRE-mediated transcriptional regulation has been elusive. In this work, we have developed a new methodology that quantifies the co-occurrence tendencies of CREs present in a set of promoter sequences; these co-occurrence scores are filtered in three consecutive steps to test their statistical significance; and the significantly co-occurring CRE pairs are presented as networks. These networks of co-occurring CREs are further transformed to derive higher order of regulatory combinatorics. We have further applied this methodology on the differentially up-regulated gene-sets of rice tissues under fungal (Magnaporthe) infected conditions to demonstrate how it helps to understand the CRE-mediated combinatorial gene regulation. Our analysis includes a wide spectrum of biologically important results. The CRE pairs having a strong tendency to co-occur often exhibit very similar joint distribution patterns at the promoters of rice. We couple the network approach with experimental results of plant gene regulation and defense mechanisms and find evidences of auto and cross regulation among TF families, cross-talk among multiple hormone signaling pathways, similarities and dissimilarities in regulatory combinatorics between different tissues, etc. Our analyses have pointed a highly distributed nature of the combinatorial gene regulation facilitating an efficient alteration in response to fungal attack. All together, our proposed methodology could be an important approach in understanding the combinatorial gene regulation. It can be further applied to unravel the tissue and/or condition specific combinatorial gene regulation in other eukaryotic systems with the availability of annotated genomic sequences and suitable

  3. Deciphering Cis-Regulatory Element Mediated Combinatorial Regulation in Rice under Blast Infected Condition.

    PubMed

    Deb, Arindam; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) present at the promoters facilitate the binding of several transcription factors (TFs), thereby altering the consequent gene expressions. Due to the eminent complexity of the regulatory mechanism, the combinatorics of CRE-mediated transcriptional regulation has been elusive. In this work, we have developed a new methodology that quantifies the co-occurrence tendencies of CREs present in a set of promoter sequences; these co-occurrence scores are filtered in three consecutive steps to test their statistical significance; and the significantly co-occurring CRE pairs are presented as networks. These networks of co-occurring CREs are further transformed to derive higher order of regulatory combinatorics. We have further applied this methodology on the differentially up-regulated gene-sets of rice tissues under fungal (Magnaporthe) infected conditions to demonstrate how it helps to understand the CRE-mediated combinatorial gene regulation. Our analysis includes a wide spectrum of biologically important results. The CRE pairs having a strong tendency to co-occur often exhibit very similar joint distribution patterns at the promoters of rice. We couple the network approach with experimental results of plant gene regulation and defense mechanisms and find evidences of auto and cross regulation among TF families, cross-talk among multiple hormone signaling pathways, similarities and dissimilarities in regulatory combinatorics between different tissues, etc. Our analyses have pointed a highly distributed nature of the combinatorial gene regulation facilitating an efficient alteration in response to fungal attack. All together, our proposed methodology could be an important approach in understanding the combinatorial gene regulation. It can be further applied to unravel the tissue and/or condition specific combinatorial gene regulation in other eukaryotic systems with the availability of annotated genomic sequences and suitable

  4. Deciphering Cis-Regulatory Element Mediated Combinatorial Regulation in Rice under Blast Infected Condition.

    PubMed

    Deb, Arindam; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) present at the promoters facilitate the binding of several transcription factors (TFs), thereby altering the consequent gene expressions. Due to the eminent complexity of the regulatory mechanism, the combinatorics of CRE-mediated transcriptional regulation has been elusive. In this work, we have developed a new methodology that quantifies the co-occurrence tendencies of CREs present in a set of promoter sequences; these co-occurrence scores are filtered in three consecutive steps to test their statistical significance; and the significantly co-occurring CRE pairs are presented as networks. These networks of co-occurring CREs are further transformed to derive higher order of regulatory combinatorics. We have further applied this methodology on the differentially up-regulated gene-sets of rice tissues under fungal (Magnaporthe) infected conditions to demonstrate how it helps to understand the CRE-mediated combinatorial gene regulation. Our analysis includes a wide spectrum of biologically important results. The CRE pairs having a strong tendency to co-occur often exhibit very similar joint distribution patterns at the promoters of rice. We couple the network approach with experimental results of plant gene regulation and defense mechanisms and find evidences of auto and cross regulation among TF families, cross-talk among multiple hormone signaling pathways, similarities and dissimilarities in regulatory combinatorics between different tissues, etc. Our analyses have pointed a highly distributed nature of the combinatorial gene regulation facilitating an efficient alteration in response to fungal attack. All together, our proposed methodology could be an important approach in understanding the combinatorial gene regulation. It can be further applied to unravel the tissue and/or condition specific combinatorial gene regulation in other eukaryotic systems with the availability of annotated genomic sequences and suitable

  5. Regulatory Focus as a Mediator of the Influence of Initiating Structure and Servant Leadership on Employee Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neubert, Mitchell J.; Kacmar, K. Michele; Carlson, Dawn S.; Chonko, Lawrence B.; Roberts, James A.

    2008-01-01

    In this research, the authors test a model in which the regulatory focus of employees at work mediates the influence of leadership on employee behavior. In a nationally representative sample of 250 workers who responded over 2 time periods, prevention focus mediated the relationship of initiating structure to in-role performance and deviant…

  6. Uncovering MicroRNA and Transcription Factor Mediated Regulatory Networks in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingchun; Gong, Xue; Purow, Benjamin; Zhao, Zhongming

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal brain tumor in humans. Recent studies revealed that patterns of microRNA (miRNA) expression in GBM tissue samples are different from those in normal brain tissues, suggesting that a number of miRNAs play critical roles in the pathogenesis of GBM. However, little is yet known about which miRNAs play central roles in the pathology of GBM and their regulatory mechanisms of action. To address this issue, in this study, we systematically explored the main regulation format (feed-forward loops, FFLs) consisting of miRNAs, transcription factors (TFs) and their impacting GBM-related genes, and developed a computational approach to construct a miRNA-TF regulatory network. First, we compiled GBM-related miRNAs, GBM-related genes, and known human TFs. We then identified 1,128 3-node FFLs and 805 4-node FFLs with statistical significance. By merging these FFLs together, we constructed a comprehensive GBM-specific miRNA-TF mediated regulatory network. Then, from the network, we extracted a composite GBM-specific regulatory network. To illustrate the GBM-specific regulatory network is promising for identification of critical miRNA components, we specifically examined a Notch signaling pathway subnetwork. Our follow up topological and functional analyses of the subnetwork revealed that six miRNAs (miR-124, miR-137, miR-219-5p, miR-34a, miR-9, and miR-92b) might play important roles in GBM, including some results that are supported by previous studies. In this study, we have developed a computational framework to construct a miRNA-TF regulatory network and generated the first miRNA-TF regulatory network for GBM, providing a valuable resource for further understanding the complex regulatory mechanisms in GBM. The observation of critical miRNAs in the Notch signaling pathway, with partial verification from previous studies, demonstrates that our network-based approach is promising for the identification of new and important

  7. Glucocorticoid receptor-mediated cell cycle arrest is achieved through distinct cell-specific transcriptional regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Rogatsky, I; Trowbridge, J M; Garabedian, M J

    1997-01-01

    Glucocorticoids inhibit proliferation of many cell types, but the events leading from the activated glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to growth arrest are not understood. Ectopic expression and activation of GR in human osteosarcoma cell lines U2OS and SAOS2, which lack endogenous receptors, result in a G1 cell cycle arrest. GR activation in U2OS cells represses expression of the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) CDK4 and CDK6 as well as their regulatory partner, cyclin D3, leading to hypophosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb). We also demonstrate a ligand-dependent reduction in the expression of E2F-1 and c-Myc, transcription factors involved in the G1-to-S-phase transition. Mitogen-activated protein kinase, CDK2, cyclin E, and the CDK inhibitors (CDIs) p27 and p21 are unaffected by receptor activation in U2OS cells. The receptor's N-terminal transcriptional activation domain is not required for growth arrest in U2OS cells. In Rb-deficient SAOS2 cells, however, the expression of p27 and p21 is induced upon receptor activation. Remarkably, in SAOS2 cells that express a GR deletion derivative lacking the N-terminal transcriptional activation domain, induction of CDI expression is abolished and the cells fail to undergo ligand-dependent cell cycle arrest. Similarly, murine S49 lymphoma cells, which, like SAOS2 cells, lack Rb, require the N-terminal activation domain for growth arrest and induce CDI expression upon GR activation. These cell-type-specific differences in receptor domains and cellular targets linking GR activation to cell cycle machinery suggest two distinct regulatory mechanisms of GR-mediated cell cycle arrest: one involving transcriptional repression of G1 cyclins and CDKs and the other involving enhanced transcription of CDIs by the activated receptor. PMID:9154817

  8. Regulatory T cells-derived IL-35 promotes the growth of adult acute myeloid leukemia blasts.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qianshan; Pan, Ying; Wang, Yiping; Wang, Huiping; Xiong, Shudao; Li, Qing; Wang, Jia; Tao, Lili; Wang, Zhitao; Wu, Fan; Zhang, Rui; Zhai, Zhimin

    2015-11-15

    Tumor immune escape mechanism mediated by CD4+CD25+regulatory T cells (Tregs) is a key factor in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). IL-35, as a novel inhibitory cytokine, is produced by Tregs specially and regulates functions of Tregs in murine. However, IL-35 expression of Tregs in human is still disputed, and its role in AML is yet to be elucidated. In this study, we found that IL-35 was expressed highly in peripheral blood plasma of adult patients with AML and significantly correlated with the clinical stages of malignancy. Tregs-derived from adult AML patients produced IL-35 in a stimulation-dependent manner. IL-35 promoted AML blasts immune escape by expanding Tregs and inhibiting CD4+CD25-effector T cells (Teffs). Furthermore, IL-35 directly promoted the proliferation of AML blasts and reduced the apoptosis of AML blasts. Together, our study demonstrates that IL-35-derived from Tregs promotes the growth of adult AML blasts, suggesting that IL-35 has an important role in the pathogenesis of AML.

  9. The mediating role of LPFC-vmPFC functional connectivity in the relation between regulatory mode and delay discounting.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yiqun; Feng, Tingyong

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that regulatory mode orientation can affect many human behaviors, such as risk-taking, counterfactual thinking and economic decision making. However, little is known about how regulatory mode affects delay discounting. To address this question, we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) to investigate whether regulatory mode orientations can be represented by functional connectivity and the influence of two regulatory modes (assessment and locomotion) on delay discounting. The behavioral results showed that delay discounting was negatively correlated with assessment scores but positively correlated with locomotion scores. Neuroimaging results indicated that the functional connectivity between lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) was negatively correlated with assessment scores but positively correlated with locomotion scores. Furthermore, mediation analysis showed that the effect of regulatory mode on delay discounting is mediated by LPFC-vmPFC functional connectivity. These results suggested that people's regulatory mode orientation could predict delay discounting, which is mediated by LPFC-vmPFC functional connectivity. Therefore, the present study extends our perspective on regulatory mode and provides neural mechanism for understanding the link between regulatory mode and delay discounting.

  10. Gibberellins and DELLAs: central nodes in growth regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Claeys, Hannes; De Bodt, Stefanie; Inzé, Dirk

    2014-04-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are growth-promoting phytohormones that were crucial in breeding improved semi-dwarf varieties during the green revolution. However, the molecular basis for GA-induced growth stimulation is poorly understood. In this review, we use light-regulated hypocotyl elongation as a case study, combined with a meta-analysis of available transcriptome data, to discuss the role of GAs as central nodes in networks connecting environmental inputs to growth. These networks are highly tissue-specific, with dynamic and rapid regulation that mostly occurs at the protein level, directly affecting the activity and transcription of effectors. New systems biology approaches addressing the role of GAs in growth should take these properties into account, combining tissue-specific interactomics, transcriptomics and modeling, to provide essential knowledge to fuel a second green revolution.

  11. Gibberellins - a multifaceted hormone in plant growth regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Gantait, Saikat; Sinniah, Uma Rani; Ali, Md Nasim; Sahu, Narayan Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Plants tend to acclimatize to unfavourable environs by integrating growth and development to environmentally activated signals. Phytohormones strongly regulate convergent developmental and stress adaptive procedures and synchronize cellular reaction to the exogenous and endogenous conditions within the adaptive signaling networks. Gibberellins (GA), a group of tetracyclic diterpenoids, being vital regulators of plant growth, are accountable for regulating several aspects of growth and development of higher plants. If the element of reproduction is considered as an absolute requisite then for a majority of the higher plants GA signaling is simply indispensable. Latest reports have revealed unique conflicting roles of GA and other phytohormones in amalgamating growth and development in plants through environmental signaling. Numerous physiological researches have detailed substantial crosstalk between GA and other hormones like abscisic acid, auxin, cytokinin, and jasmonic acid. In this review, a number of explanations and clarifications for this discrepancy are explored based on the crosstalk among GA and other phytohormones.

  12. Reappraisal and suppression mediate the contribution of regulatory focus to anxiety in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Llewellyn, Nicole; Dolcos, Sanda; Iordan, Alexandru D; Rudolph, Karen D; Dolcos, Florin

    2013-08-01

    Theory and research link regulatory focus (RF) in the form of promotion and prevention goal orientation with internalizing symptoms (e.g., anxiety), but the relevant mechanisms are not well understood. This study investigated the role of two emotion regulation (ER) strategies (cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression) as possible mediators. Path analysis using data from 179 healthy young participants (110 women, 69 men) revealed that stronger promotion orientation was significantly associated with less anxiety, and that the use of reappraisal and suppression partially mediated this association. Prevention was associated with more suppression but was not directly associated with anxiety. There were no gender differences in these effects. Collectively, these findings suggest that effective ER, through heightened use of reappraisal and dampened use of suppression, serves as a mechanism through which promotion confers protection against anxiety. This research provides empirical support to initiatives aimed at promoting healthy psychological adjustment and preventing anxiety, by optimizing ER strategies with respect to RF goal orientations.

  13. Penfluridol suppresses pancreatic tumor growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Alok; Srivastava, Sanjay K.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors exhibit enhanced autophagy as compared to any other cancer, making it resistant to chemotherapy. We evaluated the effect of penfluridol against pancreatic cancer. Penfluridol treatment induced apoptosis and inhibited the growth of Panc-1, BxPC-3 and AsPC-1, pancreatic cancer cells with IC50 ranging between 6–7 μM after 24 h of treatment. Significant autophagy was induced by penfluridol treatment in pancreatic cancer cells. Punctate LC3B and autophagosomes staining confirmed autophagy. Inhibiting autophagy by chloroquine, bafilomycin, 3-methyladenine or LC3BsiRNA, significantly blocked penfluridol-induced apoptosis, suggesting that autophagy lead to apoptosis in our model. Penfluridol treatment suppressed the growth of BxPC-3 tumor xenografts by 48% as compared to 17% when treated in combination with chloroquine. Similarly, penfluridol suppressed the growth of AsPC-1 tumors by 40% versus 16% when given in combination with chloroquine. TUNEL staining and caspase-3 cleavage revealed less apoptosis in the tumors from mice treated with penfluridol and chloroquine as compared to penfluridol alone. Penfluridol treatment also suppressed the growth of orthotopically implanted Panc-1 tumors by 80% by inducing autophagy-mediated apoptosis in the tumors. These studies established that penfluridol inhibits pancreatic tumor growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis. Since penfluridol is already in clinic, positive findings from our study will accelerate its clinical development. PMID:27189859

  14. Lipid rafts mediate chemotropic guidance of nerve growth cones.

    PubMed

    Guirland, Carmine; Suzuki, Shingo; Kojima, Masami; Lu, Bai; Zheng, James Q

    2004-04-01

    Axon guidance requires signal transduction of extracellular cues through the plasma membrane for directional motility. Here we present evidence that cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains (lipid rafts) mediate specific guidance responses of nerve growth cones. Disruption of lipid rafts by various approaches targeting cholesterol or gangliosides selectively abolished growth cone attraction and repulsion in BDNF and netrin-1 gradients, respectively, without affecting glutamate-induced attraction. Interestingly, local raft disruption on one side of the growth cone in bath BDNF or netrin-1 produced opposite turning responses to that induced by the gradients. Raft manipulation also blocked Semaphorin 3A-induced growth cone repulsion, inhibition, and collapse. Finally, guidance responses appeared to involve raft-dependent activation of p42/p44 MAPK and ligand-induced receptor recruitment to lipid rafts. Together with the observation of asymmetric receptor-raft associations at the growth cone in guidance gradients, our findings indicate that localized signaling through membrane rafts plays a role in mediating guidance actions of extracellular cues on developing axons. PMID:15066264

  15. Integrative analyses reveal a long noncoding RNA-mediated sponge regulatory network in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhou; Sun, Tong; Hacisuleyman, Ezgi; Fei, Teng; Wang, Xiaodong; Brown, Myles; Rinn, John L.; Lee, Mary Gwo-Shu; Chen, Yiwen; Kantoff, Philip W.; Liu, X. Shirley

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) can function as microRNA sponges and compete for microRNA binding to protein-coding transcripts. However, the prevalence, functional significance and targets of lncRNA-mediated sponge regulation of cancer are mostly unknown. Here we identify a lncRNA-mediated sponge regulatory network that affects the expression of many protein-coding prostate cancer driver genes, by integrating analysis of sequence features and gene expression profiles of both lncRNAs and protein-coding genes in tumours. We confirm the tumour-suppressive function of two lncRNAs (TUG1 and CTB-89H12.4) and their regulation of PTEN expression in prostate cancer. Surprisingly, one of the two lncRNAs, TUG1, was previously known for its function in polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated transcriptional regulation, suggesting its sub-cellular localization-dependent function. Our findings not only suggest an important role of lncRNA-mediated sponge regulation in cancer, but also underscore the critical influence of cytoplasmic localization on the efficacy of a sponge lncRNA. PMID:26975529

  16. Depletion of CD4+ CD25+ Regulatory T Cells Promotes CCL21-Mediated Antitumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shuang; Tao, Huihong; Zhen, Zhiwei; Chen, Haixia; Chen, Guolin; Yang, Yaoqin

    2013-01-01

    CCL21 is known to attract dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells that may reverse tumor-mediated immune suppression. The massive infiltration of tumors by regulatory T cells (Tregs) prevents the development of a successful helper immune response. In this study, we investigated whether elimination of CD4+ CD25+ Tregs in the tumor microenvironment using anti-CD25 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was capable of enhancing CCL21-mediated antitumor immunity in a mouse hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) model. We found that CCL21 in combination with anti-CD25 mAbs (PC61) resulted in improved antitumor efficacy and prolonged survival, not only inhibited tumor angiogenesis and cell proliferation, but also led to significant increases in the frequency of CD4+, CD8+ T cells and CD11c+ DCs within the tumor, coincident with marked induction of tumor-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) at the local tumor site. The intratumoral immune responses were accompanied by the enhanced elaboration of IL-12 and IFN-γ, but reduced release of the immunosuppressive mediators IL-10 and TGF-β1. The results indicated that depletion of Tregs in the tumor microenvironment could enhance CCL21-mediated antitumor immunity, and CCL21 combined with anti-CD25 mAbs may be a more effective immunotherapy to promote tumor rejection. PMID:24023916

  17. Twin-mediated crystal growth: an enigma resolved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahani, Ashwin J.; Gulsoy, E. Begum; Poulsen, Stefan O.; Xiao, Xianghui; Voorhees, Peter W.

    2016-06-01

    During crystal growth, faceted interfaces may be perturbed by defects, leading to a rich variety of polycrystalline growth forms. One such defect is the coherent Σ3 {111} twin boundary, which is widely known to catalyze crystal growth. These defects have a profound effect on the properties of many materials: for example, electron-hole recombination rates strongly depend on the character of the twin boundaries in polycrystalline Si photovoltaic cells. However, the morphology of the twinned interface during growth has long been a mystery due to the lack of four-dimensional (i.e., space and time resolved) experiments. Many controversial mechanisms have been proposed for this process, most of which lack experimental verification. Here, we probe the real-time interfacial dynamics of polycrystalline Si particles growing from an Al-Si-Cu liquid via synchrotron-based X-ray tomography. Our novel analysis of the time evolution of the interfacial normals allows us to quantify unambiguously the habit plane and grain boundary orientations during growth. This, when combined with direct measurements of the interfacial morphology provide the first confirmation of twin-mediated growth, proposed over 50 years ago. Using the insights provided by these experiments, we have developed a unified picture of the phenomena responsible for the dynamics of faceted Si growth.

  18. Twin-mediated crystal growth: an enigma resolved

    PubMed Central

    Shahani, Ashwin J.; Gulsoy, E. Begum; Poulsen, Stefan O.; Xiao, Xianghui; Voorhees, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    During crystal growth, faceted interfaces may be perturbed by defects, leading to a rich variety of polycrystalline growth forms. One such defect is the coherent Σ3 {111} twin boundary, which is widely known to catalyze crystal growth. These defects have a profound effect on the properties of many materials: for example, electron-hole recombination rates strongly depend on the character of the twin boundaries in polycrystalline Si photovoltaic cells. However, the morphology of the twinned interface during growth has long been a mystery due to the lack of four-dimensional (i.e., space and time resolved) experiments. Many controversial mechanisms have been proposed for this process, most of which lack experimental verification. Here, we probe the real-time interfacial dynamics of polycrystalline Si particles growing from an Al-Si-Cu liquid via synchrotron-based X-ray tomography. Our novel analysis of the time evolution of the interfacial normals allows us to quantify unambiguously the habit plane and grain boundary orientations during growth. This, when combined with direct measurements of the interfacial morphology provide the first confirmation of twin-mediated growth, proposed over 50 years ago. Using the insights provided by these experiments, we have developed a unified picture of the phenomena responsible for the dynamics of faceted Si growth. PMID:27346073

  19. Thyroid hormone mediates otolith growth and development during flatfish metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, A M; Wang, X; Tan, Y; Sievers, Q; Sievers, B; Lee, M; Burrall, K

    2010-11-01

    Flatfish begin life as bilaterally symmetrical larvae that swim up-right, then abruptly metamorphose into asymmetrically shaped juveniles with lateralized swimming postures. Flatfish metamorphosis is mediated entirely by thyroid hormone (TH). Changes in flatfish swim posture are thought to be regulated via vestibular remodeling, although the influence of TH on teleost inner ear development remains unclear. This study addresses the role of TH on the development of the three otolith end-organs (sacculus, utricle, and lagena) during southern flounder (Paralichthys lethostigma) metamorphosis. Compared with pre-metamorphosis, growth rates of the sacculus and utricle otoliths increase dramatically during metamorphosis in a manner that is uncoupled from general somatic growth. Treatment of P. lethostigma larvae with methimazol (a pharmacological inhibitor of endogenous TH production) inhibits growth of the sacculus and utricle, whereas treatment with TH dramatically accelerates their growth. In contrast with the sacculus and utricle otoliths that begin to form and mineralize during embryogenesis, a non-mineralized lagena otolith is first visible 10-12 days after hatching. The lagena grows during pre- and pro-metamorphosis, then abruptly mineralizes during metamorphic climax. Mineralization of the lagena, but not growth, can be induced with TH treatment, whereas treatment with methimazol completely inhibits lagena mineralization without inhibiting its growth. These findings suggest that during southern flounder metamorphosis TH exerts differential effects on growth and development among the three types of otolith.

  20. Advantages of mixing bioinformatics and visualization approaches for analyzing sRNA-mediated regulatory bacterial networks

    PubMed Central

    Bourqui, Romain; Benchimol, William; Gaspin, Christine; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Uricaru, Raluca; Dutour, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The revolution in high-throughput sequencing technologies has enabled the acquisition of gigabytes of RNA sequences in many different conditions and has highlighted an unexpected number of small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria. Ongoing exploitation of these data enables numerous applications for investigating bacterial transacting sRNA-mediated regulation networks. Focusing on sRNAs that regulate mRNA translation in trans, recent works have noted several sRNA-based regulatory pathways that are essential for key cellular processes. Although the number of known bacterial sRNAs is increasing, the experimental validation of their interactions with mRNA targets remains challenging and involves expensive and time-consuming experimental strategies. Hence, bioinformatics is crucial for selecting and prioritizing candidates before designing any experimental work. However, current software for target prediction produces a prohibitive number of candidates because of the lack of biological knowledge regarding the rules governing sRNA–mRNA interactions. Therefore, there is a real need to develop new approaches to help biologists focus on the most promising predicted sRNA–mRNA interactions. In this perspective, this review aims at presenting the advantages of mixing bioinformatics and visualization approaches for analyzing predicted sRNA-mediated regulatory bacterial networks. PMID:25477348

  1. Distinct regulatory elements mediate similar expression patterns in the excretory cell of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhongying; Fang, Li; Chen, Nansheng; Johnsen, Robert C; Stein, Lincoln; Baillie, David L

    2005-11-18

    Identification of cis-regulatory elements and their binding proteins constitutes an important part of understanding gene function and regulation. It is well accepted that co-expressed genes tend to share transcriptional elements. However, recent findings indicate that co-expression data show poor correlation with co-regulation data even in unicellular yeast. This motivates us to experimentally explore whether it is possible that co-expressed genes are subject to differential regulatory control using the excretory cell of Caenorhabditis elegans as an example. Excretory cell is a functional equivalent of human kidney. Transcriptional regulation of gene expression in the cell is largely unknown. We isolated a 10-bp excretory cell-specific cis-element, Ex-1, from a pgp-12 promoter. The significance of the element has been demonstrated by its capacity of converting an intestine-specific promoter into an excretory cell-specific one. We also isolated a cDNA encoding an Ex-1 binding transcription factor, DCP-66, using a yeast one-hybrid screen. Role of the factor in regulation of pgp-12 expression has been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. Search for occurrence of Ex-1 reveals that only a small portion of excretory cell-specific promoters contain Ex-1. Two other distinct cis-elements isolated from two different promoters can also dictate the excretory cell-specific expression but are independent of regulation by DCP-66. The results indicate that distinct regulatory elements are able to mediate the similar expression patterns.

  2. Measurement of plant growth in view of an integrative analysis of regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Wuyts, Nathalie; Dhondt, Stijn; Inzé, Dirk

    2015-06-01

    As the regulatory networks of growth at the cellular level are elucidated at a fast pace, their complexity is not reduced; on the contrary, the tissue, organ and even whole-plant level affect cell proliferation and expansion by means of development-induced and environment-induced signaling events in growth regulatory processes. Measurement of growth across different levels aids in gaining a mechanistic understanding of growth, and in defining the spatial and temporal resolution of sampling strategies for molecular analyses in the model Arabidopsis thaliana and increasingly also in crop species. The latter claim their place at the forefront of plant research, since global issues and future needs drive the translation from laboratory model-acquired knowledge of growth processes to improvements in crop productivity in field conditions. PMID:26002069

  3. Regulatory effects of matrix protein variations on influenza virus growth.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, J; Toyoda, T; Nakayama, M; Ishihama, A

    1993-01-01

    Influenza virus A/WSN/33 forms large plaques (> 3 mm diameter) on MDCK cells whereas A/Aichi/2/68 forms only small plaques (< 1 mm diameter). Fast growing reassortants (AWM), isolated by mixed infection of MDCK cells with these two virus strains in the presence of anti-WSN antibodies, all carried the M gene from WSN. On MDCK cells, these reassortants produced progeny viruses as rapidly as did WSN, and the virus yield was as high as Aichi. The fast-growing reassortants overcame the growth inhibitory effect of lignins. Pulse-labeling experiments at various times after virus infection showed that the reassortant AWM started to synthesize viral proteins earlier than Aichi. Taken together, we conclude that upon infecting MDCK cells, the reassortant viruses advance rapidly into the growth cycle, thereby leading to an elevated level of progeny viruses in the early period of infection. Possible mechanisms of the M gene involvement in the determination of virus growth rate are discussed, in connection with multiple functions of the M proteins. PMID:8257290

  4. PKA regulatory IIα subunit is essential for PGD2-mediated resolution of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Deping; Shen, Yujun; Liu, Guizhu; Zuo, Shengkai; Ji, Yong; Lu, Ankang; Nakamura, Masataka; Lazarus, Michael; Stratakis, Constantine A; Breyer, Richard M; Yu, Ying

    2016-09-19

    The kinetic participation of macrophages is critical for inflammatory resolution and recovery from myocardial infarction (MI), particularly with respect to the transition from the M1 to the M2 phenotype; however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we found that the deletion of prostaglandin (PG) D2 receptor subtype 1 (DP1) in macrophages retarded M2 polarization, antiinflammatory cytokine production, and resolution in different inflammatory models, including the MI model. DP1 deletion up-regulated proinflammatory genes expression via JAK2/STAT1 signaling in macrophages, whereas its activation facilitated binding of the separated PKA regulatory IIα subunit (PRKAR2A) to the transmembrane domain of IFN-γ receptor, suppressed JAK2-STAT1 axis-mediated M1 polarization, and promoted resolution. PRKAR2A deficiency attenuated DP1 activation-mediated M2 polarization and resolution of inflammation. Collectively, PGD2-DP1 axis-induced M2 polarization facilitates resolution of inflammation through the PRKAR2A-mediated suppression of JAK2/STAT1 signaling. These observations indicate that macrophage DP1 activation represents a promising strategy in the management of inflammation-associated diseases, including post-MI healing. PMID:27621415

  5. Regulatory focus as a mediator of the influence of initiating structure and servant leadership on employee behavior.

    PubMed

    Neubert, Mitchell J; Kacmar, K Michele; Carlson, Dawn S; Chonko, Lawrence B; Roberts, James A

    2008-11-01

    In this research, the authors test a model in which the regulatory focus of employees at work mediates the influence of leadership on employee behavior. In a nationally representative sample of 250 workers who responded over 2 time periods, prevention focus mediated the relationship of initiating structure to in-role performance and deviant behavior, whereas promotion focus mediated the relationship of servant leadership to helping and creative behavior. The results indicate that even though initiating structure and servant leadership share some variance in explaining other variables, each leadership style incrementally predicts disparate outcomes after controlling for the other style and dispositional tendencies. A new regulatory focus scale, the Work Regulatory Focus (WRF) Scale, also was developed and initially validated for this study. Implications for the results and the WRF Scale are discussed.

  6. TGF-β Controls miR-181/ERK Regulatory Network during Retinal Axon Specification and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Carrella, Sabrina; Salierno, Francesco Giuseppe; Manfredi, Anna; Banfi, Sandro; Conte, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Retinal axon specification and growth are critically sensitive to the dosage of numerous signaling molecules and transcription factors. Subtle variations in the expression levels of key molecules may result in a variety of axonal growth anomalies. miR-181a and miR-181b are two eye-enriched microRNAs whose inactivation in medaka fish leads to alterations of the proper establishment of connectivity and function in the visual system. miR-181a/b are fundamental regulators of MAPK signaling and their role in retinal axon growth and specification is just beginning to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate that miR-181a/b are key nodes in the interplay between TGF-β and MAPK/ERK within the functional pathways that control retinal axon specification and growth. Using a variety of in vivo and in vitro approaches in medaka fish, we demonstrate that TGF-β signaling controls the miR-181/ERK regulatory network, which in turn strengthens the TGF-β-mediated regulation of RhoA degradation. Significantly, these data uncover the role of TGF-β signaling in vivo, for the first time, in defining the correct wiring and assembly of functional retina neural circuits and further highlight miR-181a/b as key factors in axon specification and growth. PMID:26641497

  7. Receptor-mediated control of regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and apoptotic volume decrease (AVD).

    PubMed

    Okada, Y; Maeno, E; Shimizu, T; Dezaki, K; Wang, J; Morishima, S

    2001-04-01

    A fundamental property of animal cells is the ability to regulate their own cell volume. Even under hypotonic stress imposed by either decreased extracellular or increased intracellular osmolarity, the cells can re-adjust their volume after transient osmotic swelling by a mechanism known as regulatory volume decrease (RVD). In most cell types, RVD is accomplished mainly by KCl efflux induced by parallel activation of K+ and Cl- channels. We have studied the molecular mechanism of RVD in a human epithelial cell line (Intestine 407). Osmotic swelling results in a significant increase in the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration and thereby activates intermediate-conductance Ca2+-dependent K+ (IK) channels. Osmotic swelling also induces ATP release from the cells to the extracellular compartment. Released ATP stimulates purinergic ATP (P2Y2) receptors, thereby inducing phospholipase C-mediated Ca2+ mobilization. Thus, RVD is facilitated by stimulation of P2Y2 receptors due to augmentation of IK channels. In contrast, stimulation of another G protein-coupled Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaR) enhances the activity of volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying Cl- channels, thereby facilitating RVD. Therefore, it is possible that Ca2+ efflux stimulated by swelling-induced and P2Y2 receptor-mediated intracellular Ca2+ mobilization activates the CaR, thereby secondarily upregulating the volume-regulatory Cl- conductance. On the other hand, the initial process towards apoptotic cell death is coupled to normotonic cell shrinkage, called apoptotic volume decrease (AVD). Stimulation of death receptors, such as TNF receptor and Fas, induces AVD and thereafter biochemical apoptotic events in human lymphoid (U937), human epithelial (HeLa), mouse neuroblastoma x rat glioma hybrid (NG108-15) and rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells. In those cells exhibiting AVD, facilitation of RVD is always observed. Both AVD induction and RVD facilitation as well as succeeding apoptotic events can be abolished by

  8. A Wave of Regulatory T Cells into Neonatal Skin Mediates Tolerance to Commensal Microbes.

    PubMed

    Scharschmidt, Tiffany C; Vasquez, Kimberly S; Truong, Hong-An; Gearty, Sofia V; Pauli, Mariela L; Nosbaum, Audrey; Gratz, Iris K; Otto, Michael; Moon, James J; Liese, Jan; Abbas, Abul K; Fischbach, Michael A; Rosenblum, Michael D

    2015-11-17

    The skin is a site of constant dialog between the immune system and commensal bacteria. However, the molecular mechanisms that allow us to tolerate the presence of skin commensals without eliciting destructive inflammation are unknown. Using a model system to study the antigen-specific response to S. epidermidis, we demonstrated that skin colonization during a defined period of neonatal life was required for establishing immune tolerance to commensal microbes. This crucial window was characterized by an abrupt influx of highly activated regulatory T (Treg) cells into neonatal skin. Selective inhibition of this Treg cell wave completely abrogated tolerance. Thus, the host-commensal relationship in the skin relied on a unique Treg cell population that mediated tolerance to bacterial antigens during a defined developmental window. This suggests that the cutaneous microbiome composition in neonatal life is crucial in shaping adaptive immune responses to commensals, and disrupting these interactions might have enduring health implications. PMID:26588783

  9. A Wave of Regulatory T Cells into Neonatal Skin Mediates Tolerance to Commensal Microbes.

    PubMed

    Scharschmidt, Tiffany C; Vasquez, Kimberly S; Truong, Hong-An; Gearty, Sofia V; Pauli, Mariela L; Nosbaum, Audrey; Gratz, Iris K; Otto, Michael; Moon, James J; Liese, Jan; Abbas, Abul K; Fischbach, Michael A; Rosenblum, Michael D

    2015-11-17

    The skin is a site of constant dialog between the immune system and commensal bacteria. However, the molecular mechanisms that allow us to tolerate the presence of skin commensals without eliciting destructive inflammation are unknown. Using a model system to study the antigen-specific response to S. epidermidis, we demonstrated that skin colonization during a defined period of neonatal life was required for establishing immune tolerance to commensal microbes. This crucial window was characterized by an abrupt influx of highly activated regulatory T (Treg) cells into neonatal skin. Selective inhibition of this Treg cell wave completely abrogated tolerance. Thus, the host-commensal relationship in the skin relied on a unique Treg cell population that mediated tolerance to bacterial antigens during a defined developmental window. This suggests that the cutaneous microbiome composition in neonatal life is crucial in shaping adaptive immune responses to commensals, and disrupting these interactions might have enduring health implications.

  10. microRNA 21-mediated suppression of Sprouty1 by Pokemon affects liver cancer cell growth and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiu-Li; Sun, Qin-Sheng; Liu, Feng; Yang, Hong-Wei; Liu, Min; Liu, Hong-Xia; Xu, Wei; Jiang, Yu-Yang

    2013-07-01

    Transcriptional repressor Pokemon is a critical factor in embryogenesis, development, cell proliferation, differentiation, and oncogenesis, thus behaving as an oncogene. Oncomine database suggests a potential correlation between the expressions of Pokemon and Sprouty1. This study investigated the regulatory role of Pokemon in Sprouty1 expression and the effect on liver cancer cell growth and proliferation, revealing a novel miR-21-mediated regulatory circuit. In normal (HL-7702) and cancer (QGY-7703) liver cell lines, Sprouty1 expression is inversely correlated with Pokemon levels. Targeted expression or siRNA-mediated silencing showed that Pokemon is a repressor of Sprouty1 expression at both mRNA and protein levels, but Pokemon cannot affect the promoter activity of Sprouty1. Sprouty1 is a target of miR-21 and interestingly, we found that miR-21 is up-regulated by Pokemon in liver cancer cells. Luciferase reporter assays showed that Pokemon up-regulated miR-21 transcription in a dose-dependent manner, and ChIP assay exhibited a direct binding of Pokemon to the miR-21 promoter at -747 to -399 bp. Site-directed mutagenesis of the GC boxes at -684 to -679 bp and -652 to -647 bp of miR-21 promoter abolished the regulatory activity by Pokemon. Furthermore, we found that the modulation of Pokemon and miR-21 expression affected the growth and proliferation of liver cancer cells QGY-7703. In summary, our findings demonstrate that Pokemon suppresses Sprouty1 expression through a miR-21-mediated mechanism, affecting the growth and proliferation of liver cancer cells. This study recognized miR-21 and Sprouty1 as novel targets of the Pokemon regulatory network. PMID:23355454

  11. microRNA 21-mediated suppression of Sprouty1 by Pokemon affects liver cancer cell growth and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiu-Li; Sun, Qin-Sheng; Liu, Feng; Yang, Hong-Wei; Liu, Min; Liu, Hong-Xia; Xu, Wei; Jiang, Yu-Yang

    2013-07-01

    Transcriptional repressor Pokemon is a critical factor in embryogenesis, development, cell proliferation, differentiation, and oncogenesis, thus behaving as an oncogene. Oncomine database suggests a potential correlation between the expressions of Pokemon and Sprouty1. This study investigated the regulatory role of Pokemon in Sprouty1 expression and the effect on liver cancer cell growth and proliferation, revealing a novel miR-21-mediated regulatory circuit. In normal (HL-7702) and cancer (QGY-7703) liver cell lines, Sprouty1 expression is inversely correlated with Pokemon levels. Targeted expression or siRNA-mediated silencing showed that Pokemon is a repressor of Sprouty1 expression at both mRNA and protein levels, but Pokemon cannot affect the promoter activity of Sprouty1. Sprouty1 is a target of miR-21 and interestingly, we found that miR-21 is up-regulated by Pokemon in liver cancer cells. Luciferase reporter assays showed that Pokemon up-regulated miR-21 transcription in a dose-dependent manner, and ChIP assay exhibited a direct binding of Pokemon to the miR-21 promoter at -747 to -399 bp. Site-directed mutagenesis of the GC boxes at -684 to -679 bp and -652 to -647 bp of miR-21 promoter abolished the regulatory activity by Pokemon. Furthermore, we found that the modulation of Pokemon and miR-21 expression affected the growth and proliferation of liver cancer cells QGY-7703. In summary, our findings demonstrate that Pokemon suppresses Sprouty1 expression through a miR-21-mediated mechanism, affecting the growth and proliferation of liver cancer cells. This study recognized miR-21 and Sprouty1 as novel targets of the Pokemon regulatory network.

  12. Intrinsic Mathematics Motivation as a Mediator between Regulatory Fit and Mathematics Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Slooten, Courtney

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory Fit Theory research has indicated that the presence of a regulatory fit between an individuals chronic regulatory focus orientation and induced regulatory state can increase motivation, performance, and achievement. The research in support of regulatory fit theory is immense; however, there has been little research that focuses on…

  13. ERK-mediated uterine artery contraction: role of thick and thin filament regulatory pathways.

    PubMed

    Xiao, DaLiao; Pearce, William J; Longo, Lawrence D; Zhang, Lubo

    2004-05-01

    We have demonstrated that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) plays an important role in the regulation of uterine artery contraction. The present study tested the hypothesis that ERK regulates thick and thin filament regulatory pathways in the uterine artery. Isometric tension, intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), and 20-kDa myosin light chain (LC20) phosphorylation were measured simultaneously in uterine arteries isolated from near-term (140 days gestation) pregnant sheep. Phenylephrine produced time-dependent increases in [Ca2+]i and LC20 phosphorylation that preceded the contraction, which were inhibited by the MEK (ERK) inhibitor PD-098059. In addition, PD-098059 decreased the intercept of the regression line of LC20 phosphorylation vs. [Ca2+]i but increased the rate of tension development vs. LC20 phosphorylation. In contrast to phenylephrine, phorbol 12,13-bibutyrate (PDBu) produced contractions without changing [Ca2+]i or LC20 phosphorylation. PD-098059 potentiated PDBu-induced contractions without affecting [Ca2+]i and LC20 phosphorylation. PDBu produced time-dependent increases in phosphorylation of p42 and p44 ERK and ERK-dependent phosphorylation of caldesmon at Ser789 in the uterine artery. PD-098059 blocked PDBu-mediated phosphorylation of p42 and p44 ERK and caldesmon. The results indicate that ERK may regulate force by a dual regulation of thick and thin filaments in uterine artery smooth muscle. ERK potentiates the thick filament regulatory pathway by enhancing LC20 phosphorylation via increases in [Ca2+]i and Ca2+ sensitivity of LC20 phosphorylation. In contrast, ERK attenuates the thin filament regulatory pathway and suppresses contractions independent of changes in LC20 phosphorylation in the uterine artery.

  14. Inferring transcriptional and microRNA-mediated regulatory programs in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Setty, Manu; Helmy, Karim; Khan, Aly A; Silber, Joachim; Arvey, Aaron; Neezen, Frank; Agius, Phaedra; Huse, Jason T; Holland, Eric C; Leslie, Christina S

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale cancer genomics projects are profiling hundreds of tumors at multiple molecular layers, including copy number, mRNA and miRNA expression, but the mechanistic relationships between these layers are often excluded from computational models. We developed a supervised learning framework for integrating molecular profiles with regulatory sequence information to reveal regulatory programs in cancer, including miRNA-mediated regulation. We applied our approach to 320 glioblastoma profiles and identified key miRNAs and transcription factors as common or subtype-specific drivers of expression changes. We confirmed that predicted gene expression signatures for proneural subtype regulators were consistent with in vivo expression changes in a PDGF-driven mouse model. We tested two predicted proneural drivers, miR-124 and miR-132, both underexpressed in proneural tumors, by overexpression in neurospheres and observed a partial reversal of corresponding tumor expression changes. Computationally dissecting the role of miRNAs in cancer may ultimately lead to small RNA therapeutics tailored to subtype or individual. PMID:22929615

  15. Growth hormone STAT5-mediated signaling and its modulation in mice liver during the growth period.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Carolina S; Piazza, Verónica G; Ratner, Laura D; Matos, Marina N; González, Lorena; Rulli, Susana B; Miquet, Johanna G; Sotelo, Ana I

    2013-01-01

    Postnatal growth exhibits two instances of rapid growth in mice: the first is perinatal and independent of growth hormone (GH), the second is peripuberal and GH-dependent. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b (STAT5b) is the main GH-signaling mediator and it is related to IGF1 synthesis and somatic growth. The aim of this work was to assess differential STAT5 sensitivity to GH during the growth period in mouse liver of both sexes. Three representative ages were selected: 1-week-old animals, in the GH-independent phase of growth; 2.5-week-old mice, at the onset of the GH-dependent phase of growth; and 9-week-old young adults. GH-signaling mediators were assessed by immunoblotting, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. GH-induced STAT5 phosphorylation is low at one-week and maximal at 2.5-weeks of age when compared to young adults, accompanied by higher protein content at the onset of growth. Suppressor CIS and phosphatase PTP1B exhibit high levels in one-week animals, which gradually decline, while SOCS2 and SOCS3 display higher levels at adulthood. Nuclear phosphorylated STAT5 is low in one-week animals while in 2.5-week animals it is similar to 9-week control; expression of SOCS3, an early response GH-target gene, mimics this pattern. STAT5 coactivators glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and hepatic nuclear factor 1 (HNF1) abundance is higher in adulthood. Therefore, GH-induced STAT5 signaling presents age-dependent activity in liver, with its maximum coinciding with the onset of GH-dependent phase of growth, accompanied by an age-dependent variation of modulating factors. This work contributes to elucidate the molecular mechanisms implicated in GH responsiveness during growth.

  16. Self-Regulatory Processes Mediating between Career Calling and Perceived Employability and Life Satisfaction in Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praskova, Anna; Creed, Peter A.; Hood, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    We tested a cross-sectional, mediation model of career calling, in which career calling was associated positively with life satisfaction and perceptions of future employability, and these relationships were explained by the self-regulatory mechanisms of work effort, career strategies, and emotional regulation. Using a sample of 664 emerging adults…

  17. Insulin-like 3-induced rat preantral follicular growth is mediated by growth differentiation factor 9.

    PubMed

    Xue, Kai; Kim, Ji Young; Liu, Jia-yin; Tsang, Benjamin K

    2014-01-01

    The communication of somatic cells and oocytes by intrafollicular paracrine factors is essential for follicular growth in the ovary. Insulin-like 3 (INSL3) is a theca cell-secreted paracrine factor. Androgens and growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9), an oocyte-derived growth factor, are essential for follicular development. Using a rat preantral follicle culture model, we examined in the present study the influence of INSL3 on preantral follicular growth and the molecular mechanisms involved. We have observed that the receptor for INSL3, relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 2 (RXFP2), was exclusively expressed in oocytes. Recombinant INSL3 stimulated Gdf9 expression, preantral follicular growth, and testosterone synthesis in vitro. Inhibition of the cAMP/protein kinase A signaling pathway (with cAMP antagonist, 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate, Rp-isomer) attenuated INSL3-induced Gdf9 expression and preantral follicular growth. Moreover, knocking down Gdf9 expression (with small interfering RNA) or inhibiting GDF9 signaling (with SB431542, an activin receptor-like kinase receptor 5 inhibitor, or specific inhibitor of mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 3) or androgen action (with flutamide, an androgen receptor antagonist) suppressed INSL3-induced preantral follicular growth. In addition, LH and DHT regulated the expression of Insl3 mRNA in preantral follicles. These observations suggest that INSL3 is a key theca cell-derived growth factor for preantral follicle and that its action is mediated by GDF9.

  18. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C.; Côté, Maxime C.; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors. PMID:27739523

  19. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C.; Côté, Maxime C.; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-10-01

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors.

  20. Study of surfactant mediated growth of Ni/V superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Amir, S. M.; Gupta, Mukul; Potdar, Satish; Gupta, Ajay; Stahn, Jochen

    2013-07-14

    The Ni/V multilayers are useful as soft x-ray mirrors, polarizers, and phase retarders. For these applications, it is necessary that the interfaces roughness and interdiffusion must be as small as possible. The V-on-Ni and Ni-on-V interfaces are asymmetric due to the difference in the surface free energy of Ni and V. In this work, we report Ag surfactant mediated growth of Ni/V superlattices prepared using ion beam sputter deposition technique. These superlattices were studied using x-ray and neutron scattering techniques. It was found that when added in an optimum amount, Ag surfactant results in reduced interface roughness and interdiffusion across the interfaces. Obtained results can be understood with the surfactant floating-off mechanism leading to a balance in the surface free energy of Ni and V.

  1. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Claire; Lafosse, Jean-Michel; Malavaud, Bernard; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK.

  2. Polymer-mediated growth of crystals and mesocrystals.

    PubMed

    Cölfen, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Polymers are important additives for the control of mineralization reactions in both biological and bioinspired mineralization. The reason is that they allow for a number of interactions with the growing crystals and even amorphous minerals. These can substantially influence the way the mineral grows on several levels. Already in the prenucleation phase, polymers can control the formation of prenucleation clusters and subsequently the nucleation event. Also, polymers can control whether the further crystallization follows a classical or nonclassical particle-mediated growth path. In this chapter, the main ways in which polymers can be used to control a crystallization reaction will be highlighted. In addition, polymers that are useful for this purpose and the experimental conditions suitable for directing a crystallization reaction into the desired direction through the use of polymers will be described.

  3. PLGA microsphere-mediated growth hormone release hormone expression induces intergenerational growth.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Luo, Hu-Ying; Li, Hong-Yi; Liu, Song-Cai; Zhang, Ming-Jun; Ouyang, Song-Ying; Xi, Qian-Yun; Jiang, Qing-Yan

    2009-01-01

    To improve animal growth, growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) expression vectors that maintain constant GHRH expression can be directly injected into muscles. To deliver the GHRH expression vectors, biodegradable microspheres have been used as a sustained release system. Although administering GHRH through microspheres is a common practice, the intergenerational effects of this delivery system are unknown. To investigate the intergenerational effects of polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) encapsulated plasmid-mediated GHRH supplements, pCMV-Rep-GHRH microspheres were injected into pregnant mice. Growth and expression of GHRH were measured in the offspring. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry reveal GHRH expression 3-21 days post-injection. The proportion of GH-positive cells in the GHRH treated offspring was 48.2% higher than in the control group (P < 0.01). The GHRH treated offspring were 6.15% (P < 0.05) larger than the control offspring. At day 49 post-injection, IGF-I serum levels were significantly higher in the treatment group than in the control group. This study confirms that intramuscular expression of GHRH mediated by PLGA microspheres significantly enhances intergenerational growth.

  4. Delineating the core regulatory elements crucial for directed cell migration by examining folic-acid-mediated responses.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Kamalakkannan; Wright, Gus A; Hames, Nicole; Housman, Max; Roberts, Alayna; Aufderheide, Karl J; Janetopoulos, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum shows chemotaxis towards folic acid (FA) throughout vegetative growth, and towards cAMP during development. We determined the spatiotemporal localization of cytoskeletal and signaling molecules and investigated the FA-mediated responses in a number of signaling mutants to further our understanding of the core regulatory elements that are crucial for cell migration. Proteins enriched in the pseudopods during chemotaxis also relocalize transiently to the plasma membrane during uniform FA stimulation. In contrast, proteins that are absent from the pseudopods during migration redistribute transiently from the PM to the cytosol when cells are globally stimulated with FA. These chemotactic responses to FA were also examined in cells lacking the GTPases Ras C and G. Although Ras and phosphoinositide 3-kinase activity were significantly decreased in Ras G and Ras C/G nulls, these mutants still migrated towards FA, indicating that other pathways must support FA-mediated chemotaxis. We also examined the spatial movements of PTEN in response to uniform FA and cAMP stimulation in phospholipase C (PLC) null cells. The lack of PLC strongly influences the localization of PTEN in response to FA, but not cAMP. In addition, we compared the gradient-sensing behavior of polarized cells migrating towards cAMP to that of unpolarized cells migrating towards FA. The majority of polarized cells make U-turns when the cAMP gradient is switched from the front of the cell to the rear. Conversely, unpolarized cells immediately extend pseudopods towards the new FA source. We also observed that plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)P3] levels oscillate in unpolarized cells treated with Latrunculin-A, whereas polarized cells had stable plasma membrane PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 responses toward the chemoattractant gradient source. Results were similar for cells that were starved for 4 hours, with a mixture of polarized and unpolarized cells responding

  5. Delineating the core regulatory elements crucial for directed cell migration by examining folic-acid-mediated responses

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Kamalakkannan; Wright, Gus A.; Hames, Nicole; Housman, Max; Roberts, Alayna; Aufderheide, Karl J.; Janetopoulos, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Summary Dictyostelium discoideum shows chemotaxis towards folic acid (FA) throughout vegetative growth, and towards cAMP during development. We determined the spatiotemporal localization of cytoskeletal and signaling molecules and investigated the FA-mediated responses in a number of signaling mutants to further our understanding of the core regulatory elements that are crucial for cell migration. Proteins enriched in the pseudopods during chemotaxis also relocalize transiently to the plasma membrane during uniform FA stimulation. In contrast, proteins that are absent from the pseudopods during migration redistribute transiently from the PM to the cytosol when cells are globally stimulated with FA. These chemotactic responses to FA were also examined in cells lacking the GTPases Ras C and G. Although Ras and phosphoinositide 3-kinase activity were significantly decreased in Ras G and Ras C/G nulls, these mutants still migrated towards FA, indicating that other pathways must support FA-mediated chemotaxis. We also examined the spatial movements of PTEN in response to uniform FA and cAMP stimulation in phospholipase C (PLC) null cells. The lack of PLC strongly influences the localization of PTEN in response to FA, but not cAMP. In addition, we compared the gradient-sensing behavior of polarized cells migrating towards cAMP to that of unpolarized cells migrating towards FA. The majority of polarized cells make U-turns when the cAMP gradient is switched from the front of the cell to the rear. Conversely, unpolarized cells immediately extend pseudopods towards the new FA source. We also observed that plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)P3] levels oscillate in unpolarized cells treated with Latrunculin-A, whereas polarized cells had stable plasma membrane PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 responses toward the chemoattractant gradient source. Results were similar for cells that were starved for 4 hours, with a mixture of polarized and unpolarized cells

  6. MicroRNA and transcription factor mediated regulatory network for ovarian cancer: regulatory network of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Ying, Huanchun; Lv, Jing; Ying, Tianshu; Li, Jun; Yang, Qing; Ma, Yuan

    2013-10-01

    A better understanding on the regulatory interactions of microRNA (miRNA) target genes and transcription factor (TF) target genes in ovarian cancer may be conducive for developing early diagnosis strategy. Thus, gene expression data and miRNA expression data were downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas in this study. Differentially expressed genes and miRNAs were selected out with t test, and Gene Ontology enrichment analysis was performed with DAVID tools. Regulatory interactions were retrieved from miRTarBase, TRED, and TRANSFAC, and then networks for miRNA target genes and TF target genes were constructed to globally present the mechanisms. As a result, a total of 1,939 differentially expressed genes were identified, and they were enriched in 28 functions, among which cell cycle was affected to the most degree. Besides, 213 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified. Two regulatory networks for miRNA target genes and TF target genes were established and then both were combined, in which E2F transcription factor 1, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A, cyclin E1, and miR-16 were the hub genes. These genes may be potential biomarkers for ovarian cancer.

  7. Analysis of a gene regulatory cascade mediating circadian rhythm in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Li, Guang; Wang, Haifang; Du, Jiulin; Yan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    In the study of circadian rhythms, it has been a puzzle how a limited number of circadian clock genes can control diverse aspects of physiology. Here we investigate circadian gene expression genome-wide using larval zebrafish as a model system. We made use of a spatial gene expression atlas to investigate the expression of circadian genes in various tissues and cell types. Comparison of genome-wide circadian gene expression data between zebrafish and mouse revealed a nearly anti-phase relationship and allowed us to detect novel evolutionarily conserved circadian genes in vertebrates. We identified three groups of zebrafish genes with distinct responses to light entrainment: fast light-induced genes, slow light-induced genes, and dark-induced genes. Our computational analysis of the circadian gene regulatory network revealed several transcription factors (TFs) involved in diverse aspects of circadian physiology through transcriptional cascade. Of these, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor a (mitfa), a dark-induced TF, mediates a circadian rhythm of melanin synthesis, which may be involved in zebrafish's adaptation to daily light cycling. Our study describes a systematic method to discover previously unidentified TFs involved in circadian physiology in complex organisms.

  8. Oxidant-induced apoptosis is mediated by oxidation of the actin-regulatory protein cofilin

    PubMed Central

    Klamt, Fábio; Zdanov, Stéphanie; Levine, Rodney L.; Pariser, Ashley; Zhang, Yaqin; Zhang, Baolin; Yu, Li-Rong; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Shacter, Emily

    2012-01-01

    Physiological oxidants that are generated by activated phagocytes comprise the main source of oxidative stress during inflammation1,2. Oxidants such as taurine chloramine (TnCl) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can damage proteins and induce apoptosis, but the role of specific protein oxidation in this process has not been defined. We found that the actin-binding protein cofilin is a key target of oxidation. When oxidation of this single regulatory protein is prevented, oxidant-induced apoptosis is inhibited. Oxidation of cofilin causes it to lose its affinity for actin and to translocate to the mitochondria, where it induces swelling and cytochrome c release by mediating opening of the permeability transition pore (PTP). This occurs independently of Bax activation and requires both oxidation of cofilin Cys residues and dephosphorylation at Ser 3. Knockdown of endogenous cofilin using targeted siRNA inhibits oxidant-induced apoptosis, which is restored by re-expression of wild-type cofilin but not by cofilin containing Cys to Ala mutations. Exposure of cofilin to TnCl results in intramolecular disulphide bonding and oxidation of Met residues to Met sulphoxide, but only Cys oxidation causes cofilin to induce mitochondrial damage. PMID:19734890

  9. Histamine suppresses regulatory T cells mediated by TGF-β in murine chronic allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Tamaka, Kyoko; Seike, Masahiro; Hagiwara, Tamio; Sato, Atsushi; Ohtsu, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress effector T cells and ameliorate contact hypersensitivity (CH); however, the role of Tregs in chronic allergic contact dermatitis (CACD) has not been assessed. Repeated elicitation of CH has been used to produce CACD models in mice. We previously showed that the presence of histamine facilitates the creation of eczematous lesions in this model using histidine decarboxylase (HDC) (-/-) mice. Therefore, the effects of histamine on Tregs in the CACD model were investigated in this study. CACD was developed by repeated epicutaneous application of 2, 4, 6-trinitro-1-chlorobenzene (TNCB) on HDC (+/+) and HDC (-/-) murine skin to assess the effects of histamine in CACD. Histamine aggravated CACD in the murine model and suppressed the number of Tregs in the skin. Histamine also suppressed the level of TGF-β1 in this model. Recombinant TGF-β1 or anti-TGF-β1 antibody was injected into the dorsal dermis of HDC (+/+) mice daily just before TNCB challenge to determine the effects of histamine-regulated TGF-β on the Treg population in CACD. Recombinant TGF-β1 injection promoted the infiltration of Tregs in the skin and the production of IL-10; however, anti-TGF-β1 antibody injection suppressed the number of Tregs in the skin and the production of IL-10. Histamine suppresses the number of Tregs in CACD, and this effect is mediated by TGF-β.

  10. Syntrophic growth via quinone-mediated interspecies electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jessica A.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which microbial species exchange electrons are of interest because interspecies electron transfer can expand the metabolic capabilities of microbial communities. Previous studies with the humic substance analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) suggested that quinone-mediated interspecies electron transfer (QUIET) is feasible, but it was not determined if sufficient energy is available from QUIET to support the growth of both species. Furthermore, there have been no previous studies on the mechanisms for the oxidation of anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AHQDS). A co-culture of Geobacter metallireducens and G. sulfurreducens metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate much faster in the presence of AQDS, and there was an increase in cell protein. G. sulfurreducens was more abundant, consistent with G. sulfurreducens obtaining electrons from acetate that G. metallireducens produced from ethanol, as well as from AHQDS. Co-cultures initiated with a citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens that was unable to use acetate as an electron donor also metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate and cell growth, but acetate accumulated over time. G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens were equally abundant in these co-cultures reflecting the inability of the citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens to metabolize acetate. Evaluation of the mechanisms by which G. sulfurreducens accepts electrons from AHQDS demonstrated that a strain deficient in outer-surface c-type cytochromes that are required for AQDS reduction was as effective at QUIET as the wild-type strain. Deletion of additional genes previously implicated in extracellular electron transfer also had no impact on QUIET. These results demonstrate that QUIET can yield sufficient energy to support the growth of both syntrophic partners, but that the mechanisms by which electrons are derived from extracellular hydroquinones require further investigation. PMID

  11. CD55 is a key complement regulatory protein that counteracts complement-mediated inactivation of Newcastle Disease Virus.

    PubMed

    Rangaswamy, Udaya S; Cotter, Christopher R; Cheng, Xing; Jin, Hong; Chen, Zhongying

    2016-08-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is being developed as an oncolytic virus for virotherapy. In this study we analysed the regulation of complement-mediated inactivation of a recombinant NDV in different host cells. NDV grown in human cells was less sensitive to complement-mediated virus inactivation than NDV grown in embryonated chicken eggs. Additionally, NDV produced from HeLa-S3 cells is more resistant to complement than NDV from 293F cells, which correlated with higher expression and incorporation of complement regulatory proteins (CD46, CD55 and CD59) into virions from HeLa-S3 cells. Further analysis of the recombinant NDVs individually expressing the three CD molecules showed that CD55 is the most potent in counteracting complement-mediated virus inactivation. The results provide important information on selecting NDV manufacture substrate to mitigate complement-mediated virus inactivation.

  12. Role of the DmpR-Mediated Regulatory Circuit in Bacterial Biodegradation Properties in Methylphenol-Amended Soils

    PubMed Central

    Sarand, Inga; Skärfstad, Eleonore; Forsman, Mats; Romantschuk, Martin; Shingler, Victoria

    2001-01-01

    Pathway substrates and some structural analogues directly activate the regulatory protein DmpR to promote transcription of the dmp operon genes encoding the (methyl)phenol degradative pathway of Pseudomonas sp. strain CF600. While a wide range of phenols can activate DmpR, the location and nature of substituents on the basic phenolic ring can limit the level of activation and thus utilization of some compounds as assessed by growth on plates. Here we address the role of the aromatic effector response of DmpR in determining degradative properties in two soil matrices that provide different nutritional conditions. Using the wild-type system and an isogenic counterpart containing a DmpR mutant with enhanced ability to respond to para-substituted phenols, we demonstrate (i) that the enhanced in vitro biodegradative capacity of the regulator mutant strain is manifested in the two different soil types and (ii) that exposure of the wild-type strain to 4-methylphenol-contaminated soil led to rapid selection of a subpopulation exhibiting enhanced capacities to degrade the compound. Genetic and functional analyses of 10 of these derivatives demonstrated that all harbored a single mutation in the sensory domain of DmpR that mediated the phenotype in each case. These findings establish a dominating role for the aromatic effector response of DmpR in determining degradation properties. Moreover, the results indicate that the ability to rapidly adapt regulator properties to different profiles of polluting compounds may underlie the evolutionary success of DmpR-like regulators in controlling aromatic catabolic pathways. PMID:11133441

  13. Identification of miRNAs and miRNA-mediated regulatory pathways in Carica papaya.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gang; Li, Yang; He, Hua; Wang, Fang; Yu, Diqiu

    2013-10-01

    Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) post-transcriptionally regulate target gene expression to modulate growth and development and biotic and abiotic stress responses. By analyzing small RNA deep sequencing data in combination with the genome sequence, we identified 75 conserved miRNAs and 11 novel miRNAs. Their target genes were also predicted. For most conserved miRNAs, the miRNA-target pairs were conserved across plant species. In addition to these conserved miRNA-target pairs, we also identified some papaya-specific miRNA-target regulatory pathways. Both miR168 and miR530 target the Argonaute 1 gene, indicating a second autoregulatory mechanism for miRNA regulation. A non-conserved miRNA was mapped within an intron of Dicer-like 1 (DCL1), suggesting a conserved homeostatic autoregulatory mechanism for DCL1 expression. A 21-nt miRNA triggers secondary siRNA production from its target genes, nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat protein genes. Certain phased-miRNAs were processed from their conserved miRNA precursors, indicating a putative miRNA evolution mechanism. In addition, we identified a Carica papaya-specific miRNA that targets an ethylene receptor gene, implying its function in the ethylene signaling pathway. This work will also advance our understanding of miRNA functions and evolution in plants.

  14. Nitric oxide-mediated modulation of iron regulatory proteins: implication for cellular iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangwon; Ponka, Prem

    2002-01-01

    Iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) control the synthesis of transferrin receptors (TfR) and ferritin by binding to iron-responsive elements (IREs) that are located in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) and the 5' UTR of their respective mRNAs. Cellular iron levels affect binding of IRPs to IREs and consequently expression of TfR and ferritin. Moreover, NO(.), a redox species of nitric oxide that interacts primarily with iron, can activate IRP1 RNA-binding activity resulting in an increase in TfR mRNA levels and a decrease in ferritin synthesis. We have shown that treatment of RAW 264.7 cells (a murine macrophage cell line) with NO(+) (nitrosonium ion, which causes S-nitrosylation of thiol groups) resulted in a rapid decrease in RNA-binding of IRP2, followed by IRP2 degradation, and these changes were associated with a decrease in TfR mRNA levels and a dramatic increase in ferritin synthesis. Moreover, we demonstrated that stimulation of RAW 264.7 cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) increased IRP1 binding activity, whereas RNA-binding of IRP2 decreased and was followed by a degradation of this protein. Furthermore, the decrease of IRP2 binding/protein levels was associated with a decrease in TfR mRNA levels and an increase in ferritin synthesis in LPS/IFN-gamma-treated cells, and these changes were prevented by inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase. These results suggest that NO(+)-mediated degradation of IRP2 plays a major role in iron metabolism during inflammation.

  15. Experience-dependent plasticity and modulation of growth regulatory molecules at central synapses.

    PubMed

    Foscarin, Simona; Ponchione, Danilo; Pajaj, Ermira; Leto, Ketty; Gawlak, Maciej; Wilczynski, Grzegorz M; Rossi, Ferdinando; Carulli, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    Structural remodeling or repair of neural circuits depends on the balance between intrinsic neuronal properties and regulatory cues present in the surrounding microenvironment. These processes are also influenced by experience, but it is still unclear how external stimuli modulate growth-regulatory mechanisms in the central nervous system. We asked whether environmental stimulation promotes neuronal plasticity by modifying the expression of growth-inhibitory molecules, specifically those of the extracellular matrix. We examined the effects of an enriched environment on neuritic remodeling and modulation of perineuronal nets in the deep cerebellar nuclei of adult mice. Perineuronal nets are meshworks of extracellular matrix that enwrap the neuronal perikaryon and restrict plasticity in the adult CNS. We found that exposure to an enriched environment induces significant morphological changes of Purkinje and precerebellar axon terminals in the cerebellar nuclei, accompanied by a conspicuous reduction of perineuronal nets. In the animals reared in an enriched environment, cerebellar nuclear neurons show decreased expression of mRNAs coding for key matrix components (as shown by real time PCR experiments), and enhanced activity of matrix degrading enzymes (matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9), which was assessed by in situ zymography. Accordingly, we found that in mutant mice lacking a crucial perineuronal net component, cartilage link protein 1, perineuronal nets around cerebellar neurons are disrupted and plasticity of Purkinje cell terminal is enhanced. Moreover, all the effects of environmental stimulation are amplified if the afferent Purkinje axons are endowed with enhanced intrinsic growth capabilities, induced by overexpression of GAP-43. Our observations show that the maintenance and growth-inhibitory function of perineuronal nets are regulated by a dynamic interplay between pre- and postsynaptic neurons. External stimuli act on this interaction and shift the

  16. Shape-dependent control of cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis: switching between attractors in cell regulatory networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, S.; Ingber, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    Development of characteristic tissue patterns requires that individual cells be switched locally between different phenotypes or "fates;" while one cell may proliferate, its neighbors may differentiate or die. Recent studies have revealed that local switching between these different gene programs is controlled through interplay between soluble growth factors, insoluble extracellular matrix molecules, and mechanical forces which produce cell shape distortion. Although the precise molecular basis remains unknown, shape-dependent control of cell growth and function appears to be mediated by tension-dependent changes in the actin cytoskeleton. However, the question remains: how can a generalized physical stimulus, such as cell distortion, activate the same set of genes and signaling proteins that are triggered by molecules which bind to specific cell surface receptors. In this article, we use computer simulations based on dynamic Boolean networks to show that the different cell fates that a particular cell can exhibit may represent a preprogrammed set of common end programs or "attractors" which self-organize within the cell's regulatory networks. In this type of dynamic network model of information processing, generalized stimuli (e.g., mechanical forces) and specific molecular cues elicit signals which follow different trajectories, but eventually converge onto one of a small set of common end programs (growth, quiescence, differentiation, apoptosis, etc.). In other words, if cells use this type of information processing system, then control of cell function would involve selection of preexisting (latent) behavioral modes of the cell, rather than instruction by specific binding molecules. Importantly, the results of the computer simulation closely mimic experimental data obtained with living endothelial cells. The major implication of this finding is that current methods used for analysis of cell function that rely on characterization of linear signaling pathways or

  17. Spatio-temporal sequence of cross-regulatory events in root meristem growth.

    PubMed

    Scacchi, Emanuele; Salinas, Paula; Gujas, Bojan; Santuari, Luca; Krogan, Naden; Ragni, Laura; Berleth, Thomas; Hardtke, Christian S

    2010-12-28

    A central question in developmental biology is how multicellular organisms coordinate cell division and differentiation to determine organ size. In Arabidopsis roots, this balance is controlled by cytokinin-induced expression of SHORT HYPOCOTYL 2 (SHY2) in the so-called transition zone of the meristem, where SHY2 negatively regulates auxin response factors (ARFs) by protein-protein interaction. The resulting down-regulation of PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin efflux carriers is considered the key event in promoting differentiation of meristematic cells. Here we show that this regulation involves additional, intermediary factors and is spatio-temporally constrained. We found that the described cytokinin-auxin crosstalk antagonizes BREVIS RADIX (BRX) activity in the developing protophloem. BRX is an auxin-responsive target of the prototypical ARF MONOPTEROS (MP), a key promoter of vascular development, and transiently enhances PIN3 expression to promote meristem growth in young roots. At later stages, cytokinin induction of SHY2 in the vascular transition zone restricts BRX expression to down-regulate PIN3 and thus limit meristem growth. Interestingly, proper SHY2 expression requires BRX, which could reflect feedback on the auxin responsiveness of SHY2 because BRX protein can directly interact with MP, likely acting as a cofactor. Thus, cross-regulatory antagonism between BRX and SHY2 could determine ARF activity in the protophloem. Our data suggest a model in which the regulatory interactions favor BRX expression in the early proximal meristem and SHY2 prevails because of supplementary cytokinin induction in the later distal meristem. The complex equilibrium of this regulatory module might represent a universal switch in the transition toward differentiation in various developmental contexts.

  18. Innovation of a Regulatory Mechanism Modulating Semi-determinate Stem Growth through Artificial Selection in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Jieqing; Li, Shuai; Chen, Zhixiang; Ma, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that Terminal Flowering 1 (TFL1) in Arabidopsis and its functional orthologs in other plants specify indeterminate stem growth through their specific expression that represses floral identity genes in shoot apical meristems (SAMs), and that the loss-of-function mutations at these functional counterparts result in the transition of SAMs from the vegetative to reproductive state that is essential for initiation of terminal flowering and thus formation of determinate stems. However, little is known regarding how semi-determinate stems, which produce terminal racemes similar to those observed in determinate plants, are specified in any flowering plants. Here we show that semi-determinacy in soybean is modulated by transcriptional repression of Dt1, the functional ortholog of TFL1, in SAMs. Such repression is fulfilled by recently enabled spatiotemporal expression of Dt2, an ancestral form of the APETALA1/FRUITFULL orthologs, which encodes a MADS-box factor directly binding to the regulatory sequence of Dt1. In addition, Dt2 triggers co-expression of the putative SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (GmSOC1) in SAMs, where GmSOC1 interacts with Dt2, and also directly binds to the Dt1 regulatory sequence. Heterologous expression of Dt2 and Dt1 in determinate (tfl1) Arabidopsis mutants enables creation of semi-determinacy, but the same forms of the two genes in the tfl1 and soc1 background produce indeterminate stems, suggesting that Dt2 and SOC1 both are essential for transcriptional repression of Dt1. Nevertheless, the expression of Dt2 is unable to repress TFL1 in Arabidopsis, further demonstrating the evolutionary novelty of the regulatory mechanism underlying stem growth in soybean. PMID:26807727

  19. Epidermal growth factor receptor distribution in burn wounds. Implications for growth factor-mediated repair.

    PubMed Central

    Wenczak, B A; Lynch, J B; Nanney, L B

    1992-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) along with several related peptide growth factors has been shown both in vivo and in vitro to accelerate events associated with epidermal wound repair. EGF and transforming growth factor alpha act by binding to a common EGF receptor tyrosine kinase thereby initiating a series of events which ultimately regulate cell proliferation. This study examined the immunohistochemical localization of EGF receptor (EGF-R) in burn wound margins, adjacent proliferating epithelium, and closely associated sweat ducts, sebaceous glands, and hair follicles. Tissue specimens removed during surgical debridement were obtained from full and partial thickness burn wounds in 32 patients with total body surface area burns ranging from 2 to 88%. In the early postburn period (days 2-4), prominent staining for EGF-R was found in undifferentiated, marginal keratinocytes, adjacent proliferating, hypertrophic epithelium, and both marginal and nonmarginal hair follicles, sweat ducts, and sebaceous glands. During the late postburn period (days 5-16), EGF-R was depleted along leading epithelial margins; however, immunoreactive EGF-R remained intensely positive in the hypertrophic epithelium and all skin appendages. Increased detection of immunoreactive EGF-R and the presence of [125I]EGF binding in the hypertrophic epithelium correlated positively with proliferating cell nuclear antigen distributions. Thus, the presence of EGF-R in the appropriate keratinocyte populations suggests a functional role for this receptor during wound repair. Dynamic modulation in EGF receptor distribution during the temporal sequence of repair provides further evidence that an EGF/transforming growth factor alpha/EGF-R-mediated pathway is activated during human wound repair. Images PMID:1361495

  20. Regulatory role for amino acids in mammary gland growth and milk synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Woo; Wu, Guoyao

    2009-05-01

    The health and growth of mammalian neonates critically depend on the yield and composition of their mothers' milk. However, impaired lactogenesis occurs in both women in response to stress and hormonal imbalance and in primiparous sows which exhibit low voluntary feed intake and underdevelopment of mammary tissues. Because of ethical concerns over lactation research with women and children, swine is often used as an animal model to study mammary gland development and the underlying regulatory mechanisms. Available evidence from work with lactating sows shows that amino acids are not only building blocks for protein but are also key regulators of metabolic pathways critical to milk production. Particularly, arginine is the common substrate for the generation of nitric oxide (NO; a major vasodilator and angiogenic factor) and polyamines (key regulators of protein synthesis). Thus, modulation of the arginine-NO pathway may provide a new strategy to enhance the growth (including vascular growth) of mammary tissue and its uptake of nutrients, therefore improving lactation performance in mammals. In support of this proposition, supplementing 0.83% L: -arginine (as 1% L: -arginine-HCl) or 50 mg/day diethylenetriamine-NO adduct (NO donor) to diets of lactating primiparous sows increased milk production and the growth of suckling piglets. Future studies with animal models (e.g., pigs, sheep, cows, and rats) are necessary to elucidate the underlying mechanisms at molecular, cellular, tissue, and whole-body levels. PMID:18683019

  1. Hepatic carcinoma-associated fibroblasts induce IDO-producing regulatory dendritic cells through IL-6-mediated STAT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, J-T; Deng, Y-N; Yi, H-M; Wang, G-Y; Fu, B-S; Chen, W-J; Liu, W; Tai, Y; Peng, Y-W; Zhang, Q

    2016-02-22

    Although carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in tumor microenvironments have a critical role in immune cell modulation, their effects on the generation of regulatory dendritic cells (DCs) are still unclear. In this study, we initially show that CAFs derived from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumors facilitate the generation of regulatory DCs, which are characterized by low expression of costimulatory molecules, high suppressive cytokines production and enhanced regulation of immune responses, including T-cell proliferation impairment and promotion of regulatory T-cell (Treg) expansion via indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) upregulation. Our findings also indicate that STAT3 activation in DCs, as mediated by CAF-derived interleukin (IL)-6, is essential to IDO production. Moreover, IDO inhibitor, STAT3 and IL-6 blocking antibodies can reverse this hepatic CAF-DC regulatory function. Therefore, our results provide new insights into the mechanisms by which CAFs induce tumor immune escape as well as a novel cancer immunotherapeutic approach (for example, targeting CAFs, IDO or IL-6).

  2. Methionine enkephalin (MENK) inhibits tumor growth through regulating CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Meng, Yiming; Plotnikoff, Nicolas P; Youkilis, Gene; Griffin, Noreen; Wang, Enhua; Lu, Changlong; Shan, Fengping

    2015-01-01

    Methionine enkephalin (MENK), an endogenous neuropeptide, plays an crucial role in both neuroendocrine and immune systems. CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are identified as a major subpopulation of T lymphocytes in suppressing immune system to keep balanced immunity. The aim of this research work was to elucidate the mechanisms via which MENK interacts with Tregs in cancer situation. The influence of MENK on transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) mediated conversion from naïve CD4+CD25- T cells to CD4+CD25+ Tregs was determined and the data from flow cytometry (FCM) analysis indicated that MENK effectively inhibited the expression of Foxp3 during the process of TGF-βinduction. Furthermore, this inhibiting process was accompanied by diminishing phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Smad2/3, confirmed by western blot (WB) analysis and immunofluorescence (IF) at molecular level. We established sarcoma mice model with S180 to investigate whether MENK could modulate Tregs in tumor circumstance. Our findings showed that MENK delayed the development of tumor in S180 tumor bearing mice and down-regulated level of Tregs. Together, these novel findings reached a conclusion that MENK could inhibit Tregs activity directly and retard tumor development through down-regulating Tregs in mice. This work advances the deepening understanding of the influence of MENK on Tregs in cancer situation, and relation of MENK with immune system, supporting the implication of MENK as a new strategy for cancer immunotherapy.

  3. Methionine Enkephalin (MENK) Inhibits tumor growth through regulating CD4+Foxp3+ Regulatory T cells (Tregs) in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuan; Meng, Yiming; Plotnikoff, Nicolas P; Youkilis, Gene; Griffin, Noreen; Wang, Enhua; Lu, Changlong; Shan, Fengping

    2015-01-01

    Methionine enkephalin (MENK), an endogenous neuropeptide, plays an crucial role in both neuroendocrine and immune systems. CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are identified as a major subpopulation of T lymphocytes in suppressing immune system to keep balanced immunity. The aim of this research work was to elucidate the mechanisms via which MENK interacts with Tregs in cancer situation. The influence of MENK on transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) mediated conversion from naïve CD4+CD25- T cells to CD4+CD25+ Tregs was determined and the data from flow cytometry (FCM) analysis indicated that MENK effectively inhibited the expression of Foxp3 during the process of TGF-βinduction. Furthermore, this inhibiting process was accompanied by diminishing phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Smad2/3, confirmed by western blot (WB) analysis and immunofluorescence (IF) at molecular level. We established sarcoma mice model with S180 to investigate whether MENK could modulate Tregs in tumor circumstance. Our findings showed that MENK delayed the development of tumor in S180 tumor bearing mice and down-regulated level of Tregs. Together, these novel findings reached a conclusion that MENK could inhibit Tregs activity directly and retard tumor development through down-regulating Tregs in mice. This work advances the deepening understanding of the influence of MENK on Tregs in cancer situation, and relation of MENK with immune system, supporting the implication of MENK as a new strategy for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25701137

  4. MEK inhibition prevents tumour-shed transforming growth factor-β-induced T-regulatory cell augmentation in tumour milieu

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Dewan M S; Panda, Abir K; Chakrabarty, Sreeparna; Bhattacharjee, Pushpak; Kajal, Kirti; Mohanty, Suchismita; Sarkar, Irene; Sarkar, Diptendra K; Kar, Santosh K; Sa, Gaurisankar

    2015-01-01

    Tumour progression is associated with immune-suppressive conditions that facilitate the escape of tumour cells from the regimen of immune cells, subsequently paralysing the host defence mechanisms. Induction of CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells has been implicated in the tumour immune escape mechanism, although the novel anti-cancer treatment strategies targeting Treg cells remain unknown. The focus of this study is to define the interaction between tumour and immune system, i.e. how immune tolerance starts and gradually leads to the induction of adaptive Treg cells in the tumour microenvironment. Our study identified hyperactivated mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) -signalling as a potential target for reversing Treg cell augmentation in breast cancer patients. In more mechanistic detail, pharmacological inhibitors of MEK/ERK signalling inhibited transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production in tumour cells that essentially blocked TGF-β-SMAD3/SMAD4-mediated induction of CD25/interleukin-2 receptor α on CD4+ T-cell surface. As a result high-affinity binding of interleukin-2 on those cells was prohibited, causing lack of Janus kinase 1 (JAK1)/JAK3-mediated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)/STAT5 activation required for FoxP3 expression. Finally, for a more radical approach towards a safe MEK inhibitor, we validate the potential of multi-kinase inhibitor curcumin, especially the nano-curcumin made out of pure curcumin with greater bioavailability; in repealing tumour-shed TGF-β-induced Treg cell augmentation. PMID:25284464

  5. Transcriptome-wide analysis of chromium-stress responsive microRNAs to explore miRNA-mediated regulatory networks in radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Xu, Liang; Wang, Yan; Shen, Hong; Zhu, Xianwen; Zhang, Keyun; Chen, Yinglong; Yu, Rugang; Limera, Cecilia; Liu, Liwang

    2015-09-11

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that play pivotal roles in plant growth, development and stress response. Chromium (Cr) is one of common environmental contaminants possessing potential health hazards to living organisms. To date, little is known about the regulatory roles of miRNAs in response to Cr stress in radish. To systematically identify Cr-responsive miRNAs and their targets in radish, two sRNA libraries derived from Cr-free (CK) and Cr-treated (Cr200) roots were constructed. With Solexa sequencing, 81 known and 72 novel miRNAs were identified, from which 54 known and 16 novel miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed under Cr stress. Several target genes for Cr-responsive miRNAs encode different transcription factor (TF) families, including SPLs, MYBs, ERFs and bZIPs, might regulate corresponding HM-related transcriptional processes in plants. Notably, a few key responsive enzymes or proteins, including HMA, YSL1 and ABC transporter protein were involved in Cr uptake and homeostasis process. Furthermore, the expression patterns of some Cr-responsive miRNAs and their targets were validated by RT-qPCR. This study represents the first characterization of Cr-responsive miRNAs and their targets in radish. The outcomes of this study could provide novel insights into miRNA-mediated regulatory mechanisms underlying plant response to Cr stress in root vegetable crops.

  6. Transcriptome-wide analysis of chromium-stress responsive microRNAs to explore miRNA-mediated regulatory networks in radish (Raphanus sativus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Xu, Liang; Wang, Yan; Shen, Hong; Zhu, Xianwen; Zhang, Keyun; Chen, Yinglong; Yu, Rugang; Limera, Cecilia; Liu, Liwang

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that play pivotal roles in plant growth, development and stress response. Chromium (Cr) is one of common environmental contaminants possessing potential health hazards to living organisms. To date, little is known about the regulatory roles of miRNAs in response to Cr stress in radish. To systematically identify Cr-responsive miRNAs and their targets in radish, two sRNA libraries derived from Cr-free (CK) and Cr-treated (Cr200) roots were constructed. With Solexa sequencing, 81 known and 72 novel miRNAs were identified, from which 54 known and 16 novel miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed under Cr stress. Several target genes for Cr-responsive miRNAs encode different transcription factor (TF) families, including SPLs, MYBs, ERFs and bZIPs, might regulate corresponding HM-related transcriptional processes in plants. Notably, a few key responsive enzymes or proteins, including HMA, YSL1 and ABC transporter protein were involved in Cr uptake and homeostasis process. Furthermore, the expression patterns of some Cr-responsive miRNAs and their targets were validated by RT-qPCR. This study represents the first characterization of Cr-responsive miRNAs and their targets in radish. The outcomes of this study could provide novel insights into miRNA-mediated regulatory mechanisms underlying plant response to Cr stress in root vegetable crops. PMID:26357995

  7. Regulatory role of UvrY in adaptation of Photorhabdus luminescens growth inside the insect.

    PubMed

    Krin, Evelyne; Derzelle, Sylviane; Bedard, Karine; Adib-Conquy, Minou; Turlin, Evelyne; Lenormand, Pascal; Hullo, Marie-Francoise; Bonne, Isabelle; Chakroun, Nesrine; Lacroix, Celine; Danchin, Antoine

    2008-05-01

    We report global expression profiling of a uvrY-deficient mutant of Photorhabdus luminescens. We found that the regulator moiety of the two-component regulatory system BarA/UvrY regulated more than 500 target genes coding for functions involved in the synthesis of major compartments and metabolic pathways of the cell. This regulation appeared to be in part indirect as UvrY affected the expression of several regulators. Indeed, the flagellum biosynthesis transcription activator FlhC and the flagella regulon were induced in the absence of UvrY, leading to a hyperflagellated phenotype and an increase in motility and biofilm formation. Two major regulatory systems were also altered: the type 2 quorum-sensing inducer AI-2 was activated by UvrY, and the CsrA regulator function appeared to be repressed by the increase of the small-untranslated RNA csrB, the CsrA activity inhibitor TldD and the chaperonin GroESL. Both through and independently of these systems, UvrY regulated oxidative stress resistance; bioluminescence; iron, sugar and peptide transport; proteases; polyketide synthesis enzymes and nucleobases recycling, related to insect degradation and assimilation by bacteria. As a consequence, the uvrY-deficient strain exhibited a decreased killing of insect cells and a reduced growth on insect cells culture, suggesting a UvrY role in the adaptation of P. luminescens inside the insect. PMID:18248456

  8. Sterol regulatory element binding protein-dependent regulation of lipid synthesis supports cell survival and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Regulation of lipid metabolism via activation of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) has emerged as an important function of the Akt/mTORC1 signaling axis. Although the contribution of dysregulated Akt/mTORC1 signaling to cancer has been investigated extensively and altered lipid metabolism is observed in many tumors, the exact role of SREBPs in the control of biosynthetic processes required for Akt-dependent cell growth and their contribution to tumorigenesis remains unclear. Results We first investigated the effects of loss of SREBP function in non-transformed cells. Combined ablation of SREBP1 and SREBP2 by siRNA-mediated gene silencing or chemical inhibition of SREBP activation induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress and engaged the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway, specifically under lipoprotein-deplete conditions in human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Induction of ER-stress led to inhibition of protein synthesis through increased phosphorylation of eIF2α. This demonstrates for the first time the importance of SREBP in the coordination of lipid and protein biosynthesis, two processes that are essential for cell growth and proliferation. SREBP ablation caused major changes in lipid composition characterized by a loss of mono- and poly-unsaturated lipids and induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis. Alterations in lipid composition and increased ROS levels, rather than overall changes to lipid synthesis rate, were required for ER-stress induction. Next, we analyzed the effect of SREBP ablation in a panel of cancer cell lines. Importantly, induction of apoptosis following SREBP depletion was restricted to lipoprotein-deplete conditions. U87 glioblastoma cells were highly susceptible to silencing of either SREBP isoform, and apoptosis induced by SREBP1 depletion in these cells was rescued by antioxidants or by restoring the levels of mono-unsaturated fatty acids. Moreover, silencing of SREBP1

  9. Strigolactones as mediators of plant growth responses to environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Koltai, Hinanit; Kapulnik, Yoram

    2011-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) have been recently identified as a new group of plant hormones or their derivatives thereof, shown to play a role in plant development. Evolutionary forces have driven the development of mechanisms in plants that allow adaptive adjustments to a variety of different habitats by employing plasticity in shoot and root growth and development. The ability of SLs to regulate both shoot and root development suggests a role in the plant's response to its growth environment. To play this role, SL pathways need to be responsive to plant growth conditions, and affect plant growth toward increased adaptive adjustment. Here, the effects of SLs on shoot and root development are presented, and possible feedback loops between SLs and two environmental cues, light and nutrient status, are discussed; these might suggest a role for SLs in plants' adaptive adjustment to growth conditions.

  10. The transcriptional regulator BZR1 mediates trade-off between plant innate immunity and growth

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Macho, Alberto P; Boutrot, Freddy; Segonzac, Cécile; Somssich, Imre E; Zipfel, Cyril

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the trade-off between plant innate immunity and steroid-mediated growth are controversial. Here, we report that activation of the transcription factor BZR1 is required and sufficient for suppression of immune signaling by brassinosteroids (BR). BZR1 induces the expression of several WRKY transcription factors that negatively control early immune responses. In addition, BZR1 associates with WRKY40 to mediate the antagonism between BR and immune signaling. We reveal that BZR1-mediated inhibition of immunity is particularly relevant when plant fast growth is required, such as during etiolation. Thus, BZR1 acts as an important regulator mediating the trade-off between growth and immunity upon integration of environmental cues. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00983.001 PMID:24381244

  11. A MicroRNA-Mediated Positive Feedback Regulatory Loop of the NF-κB Pathway in Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Hongliang; Yuan, Jia; Chen, Yonggui; Li, Sedong; Su, Ziqi; Wei, Erman; Li, Chaozheng; Weng, Shaoping; Xu, Xiaopeng; He, Jianguo

    2016-05-01

    In the evolutionarily conserved canonical NF-κB pathway, degradation of the NF-κB inhibitor IκB in the cytoplasmic NF-κB/IκB complex allows the liberated NF-κB to translocate into the nucleus to activate various target genes. The regulatory mechanism governing this process needs further investigation. In this study, a novel microRNA, temporarily named miR-1959, was first identified from an invertebrate Litopenaeus vannamei miR-1959 targets the 3'-untranslated region of the IκB homolog Cactus gene and reduces the protein level of Cactus in vivo, whereas the NF-κB homolog Dorsal directly binds the miR-1959 promoter to activate its transcription. Therefore, miR-1959 mediates a positive feedback regulatory loop, in that Dorsal activates miR-1959 expression, and in turn, miR-1959 inhibits the expression of Cactus, further leading to enhanced activation of Dorsal. Moreover, miR-1959 regulates the expression of many antimicrobial peptides in vivo and is involved in antibacterial immunity. To our knowledge, it is the first discovery of a microRNA-mediated feedback loop that directly regulates the NF-κB/IκB complex. This positive feedback loop could collaborate with the known NF-κB/IκB negative loop to generate a dynamic balance to regulate the activity of NF-κB, thus constituting an effective regulatory mechanism at the critical node of the NF-κB pathway. PMID:26994223

  12. Collapsin Response Mediator Protein-2 (Crmp2) Regulates Trafficking by Linking Endocytic Regulatory Proteins to Dynein Motors*

    PubMed Central

    Rahajeng, Juliati; Giridharan, Sai S. P.; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Endocytosis is a conserved cellular process in which nutrients, lipids, and receptors are internalized and transported to early endosomes, where they are sorted and either channeled to degradative pathways or recycled to the plasma membrane. MICAL-L1 and EHD1 are important regulatory proteins that control key endocytic transport steps. However, the precise mechanisms by which they mediate transport, and particularly the mode by which they connect to motor proteins, have remained enigmatic. Here we have identified the collapsin response mediator protein-2 (Crmp2) as an interaction partner of MICAL-L1 in non-neuronal cells. Crmp2 interacts with tubulin dimers and kinesin and negatively regulates dynein-based transport in neuronal cells, but its expression and function in non-neuronal cells have remained poorly characterized. Upon Crmp2 depletion, we observed dramatic relocalization of internalized transferrin (Tf) from peripheral vesicles to the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC), similar to the effect of depleting either MICAL-L1 or EHD1. Moreover, Tf relocalization to the ERC could be inhibited by interfering with microtubule polymerization, consistent with a role for uncoupled motor protein-based transport upon depletion of Crmp2, MICAL-L1, or EHD1. Finally, transfection of dynamitin, a component of the dynactin complex whose overexpression inhibits dynein activity, prevented the relocalization of internalized Tf to the ERC upon depletion of Crmp2, MICAL-L1, or EHD1. These data provide the first trafficking regulatory role for Crmp2 in non-neuronal cells and support a model in which Crmp2 is an important endocytic regulatory protein that links MICAL-L1·EHD1-based vesicular transport to dynein motors. PMID:20801876

  13. A MicroRNA-Mediated Positive Feedback Regulatory Loop of the NF-κB Pathway in Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Hongliang; Yuan, Jia; Chen, Yonggui; Li, Sedong; Su, Ziqi; Wei, Erman; Li, Chaozheng; Weng, Shaoping; Xu, Xiaopeng; He, Jianguo

    2016-05-01

    In the evolutionarily conserved canonical NF-κB pathway, degradation of the NF-κB inhibitor IκB in the cytoplasmic NF-κB/IκB complex allows the liberated NF-κB to translocate into the nucleus to activate various target genes. The regulatory mechanism governing this process needs further investigation. In this study, a novel microRNA, temporarily named miR-1959, was first identified from an invertebrate Litopenaeus vannamei miR-1959 targets the 3'-untranslated region of the IκB homolog Cactus gene and reduces the protein level of Cactus in vivo, whereas the NF-κB homolog Dorsal directly binds the miR-1959 promoter to activate its transcription. Therefore, miR-1959 mediates a positive feedback regulatory loop, in that Dorsal activates miR-1959 expression, and in turn, miR-1959 inhibits the expression of Cactus, further leading to enhanced activation of Dorsal. Moreover, miR-1959 regulates the expression of many antimicrobial peptides in vivo and is involved in antibacterial immunity. To our knowledge, it is the first discovery of a microRNA-mediated feedback loop that directly regulates the NF-κB/IκB complex. This positive feedback loop could collaborate with the known NF-κB/IκB negative loop to generate a dynamic balance to regulate the activity of NF-κB, thus constituting an effective regulatory mechanism at the critical node of the NF-κB pathway.

  14. The growth regulatory fibroblast IK channel is the prominent electrophysiological feature of rat prostatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rane, S G

    2000-03-16

    Physiological effectors for mitogenic cell growth control remain to be determined for mammalian tumor cells, particularly those derived from prostatic tissue. One such effector for mitogenic Ras/MAPK signaling in fibroblasts is an intermediate-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channel (FIK). In this study patch-clamp electrophysiology was used to show that both AT2.1 and MatLyLu rat prostate cancer cell lines express high levels of a current identified as FIK, based on the following criteria: activation by elevation of intracellular calcium, voltage independence, potassium selectivity, and block by charybdotoxin (ChTX) and the Stichodactyla helianthus potassium channel neurotoxin (StK). FIK current densities in AT2.1 and MatLyLu cells were comparable to the high levels seen in fibroblasts transfected with oncogenic Ras or Raf, suggesting hyperactivity of the Ras/MAPK pathway in prostatic cancer cells. Voltage-gated sodium current was present in most MatLyLu cells but absent from AT2.1 cells, and all AT2.1 cells had voltage-gated potassium currents. Thus, FIK is the main electrophysiological feature of rat prostatic cancer cells as it is for mitogenically active fibroblasts, suggesting it may play a similar growth regulatory role in both. PMID:10708575

  15. Antioxidant and insect growth regulatory activities of stilbenes and extracts from Yucca periculosa.

    PubMed

    Torres, Patricio; Avila, J Guillermo; Romo de Vivar, Alfonso; García, Ana M; Marín, Juan C; Aranda, Eduardo; Céspedes, Carlos L

    2003-09-01

    The methanol extract from the bark of Yucca periculosa F. Baker afforded 4,4'-dihydroxstilbene, resveratrol and 3,3',5,5'-tetrahydroxy-4-methoxystilbene and had growth regulatory activity against the Fall Army worm (Spodoptera frugiperda J.E. Smith, Lepidoptera:Noctuidae) an insect pest of corn. The most active compound was 3,3',5,5'-tetrahydroxy-4-methoxystilbene which had significant effects at 3 microg/g in diets. In addition to the inhibitory activity on bleaching of crocin induced by alkoxyl radicals, these compounds also demonstrated scavenging properties toward 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl in TLC autographic and spectrophotometric assays. Our results indicate that these compounds could be involved in interference of sclerotization and moulting. These compounds appear to have selective effects on the pre-emergence metabolism of the insect. The results were fully comparable to known natural insect growth inhibitors such as gedunin and Cedrela extracts and have had a possible role as natural insecticidal agents. PMID:12943764

  16. Industry growth, work role characteristics, and job satisfaction: a cross-level mediation model.

    PubMed

    Ford, Michael T; Wooldridge, Jessica D

    2012-10-01

    The associations between industry revenue growth, individual work role characteristics, and job satisfaction were examined in this cross-level mediation analysis. Work roles were expected to be more autonomous, involve greater skill variety, and offer more opportunities for growth and development for workers in growing industries than for workers in declining industries. Supervisor support was also hypothesized to be stronger for workers in high-growth industries. Results from a nationally representative (U.S.) sample of service industry workers, using multilevel modeling, supported these propositions and suggest that job enrichment mediates relations between industry growth and job satisfaction. Associations between industry growth and autonomy were also stronger among workers in occupations that are less normatively autonomous, suggesting that industry growth fosters a weakening, and industry decline a strengthening, of traditional differences in autonomy across work roles. These results contribute to a multilevel perspective on organizational environments, individual work roles, and worker attitudes and well-being.

  17. Retinoic acid receptor alpha mediates growth inhibition by retinoids in human colon carcinoma HT29 cells.

    PubMed

    Nicke, B; Kaiser, A; Wiedenmann, B; Riecken, E O; Rosewicz, S

    1999-08-11

    Although retinoids have been suggested to inhibit chemically induced colon carcinogenesis, the molecular mechanisms underlying retinoid-mediated growth regulation in colon carcinoma cells are unknown. Therefore, we investigated the biological effects of retinoids on growth in HT29 colon carcinoma cells. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) treatment of HT29 cells resulted in a profound inhibition of anchorage-independent growth without biochemical or morphological evidence for induction of differentiation. Treatment with the selective RARalpha agonist Ro 40-6055 completely mimicked the effects of ATRA on growth and transactivation of a betaRAREx2-luciferase reporter construct, while RARbeta- and gamma-specific analogues were ineffective. Furthermore, ATRA-regulated growth and transactivation could be completely blocked by a RARalpha-selective receptor antagonist. Thus, ATRA potently inhibits anchorage-independent growth in HT29 cells and this effect is mainly if not exclusively mediated by the retinoic acid receptor alpha.

  18. An Intergenic Regulatory Region Mediates Drosophila Myc -Induced Apoptosis and Blocks Tissue Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Can; Tintó, Sergio Casas; Li, Guangyao; Lin, Nianwei; Chung, Michelle; Moreno, Eduardo; Moberg, Kenneth H.; Zhou, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Induction of cell autonomous apoptosis following oncogene-induced overproliferation is a major tumor-suppressive mechanism in vertebrates. However the detailed mechanism mediating this process remains enigmatic. In this study we demonstrate that dMyc-induced cell-autonomous apoptosis in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster relies on an intergenic sequence termed the IRER (Irradiation Responsive Enhancer Region). The IRER mediates expression of surrounding pro-apoptotic genes, and we use an in vivo reporter of the IRER chromatin state to gather evidence that epigenetic control of DNA accessibility within the IRER is an important determinant of the strength of this response to excess dMyc. In prior work we showed that the IRER also mediates P53-dependent induction of pro-apoptotic genes following DNA damage, and the chromatin conformation within IRER is regulated by Polycomb group-mediated histone modifications. dMyc-induced apoptosis and the P53-mediated DNA damage response thus overlap in a requirement for the IRER. The epigenetic mechanisms controlling IRER accessibility appear to set thresholds for the P53 and dMyc-induced expression of apoptotic genes in vivo and may have a profound impact on cellular sensitivity to oncogene-induced stress. PMID:24931167

  19. MODELING OF GENE REGULATORY PROCESSES BY POPULATION MEDIATED SIGNALING. NEW APPLICATIONS OF POPULATION BALANCES

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Che-Chi; Chatterjee, Anushree; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2011-01-01

    Population balance modeling is considered for cell populations in gene regulatory processes in which one or more intracellular variables undergo stochastic dynamics as determined by Ito stochastic differential equations. This paper addresses formulation and computational issues with sample applications to the spread of drug resistance among bacterial cells. It is shown that predictions from population balances can display qualitative differences from those made with single cell models which are usually encountered in the literature. Such differences are deemed to be important. PMID:22581980

  20. Overexpression of iron regulatory protein 1 suppresses growth of tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guohua; Fillebeen, Carine; Wang, Jian; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2007-04-01

    Iron is essential for proliferation of normal and neoplastic cells. Cellular iron uptake, utilization and storage are regulated by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that the disruption of iron homeostasis may modulate the growth properties of cancer cells. To address this, we employed H1299 lung cancer cells engineered for tetracycline-inducible overexpression of the post-transcriptional regulator iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1). The induction of IRP1 (wild-type or the constitutive IRP1(C437S) mutant) did not affect the proliferation of the cells in culture, and only modestly reduced their efficiency to form colonies in soft agar. However, IRP1 dramatically impaired the capacity of the cells to form solid tumor xenografts in nude mice. Tumors derived from IRP1-transfectants were <20% in size compared to those from parent cells. IRP1 coordinately controls the expression of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and ferritin by binding to iron-responsive elements (IREs) within their mRNAs. Biochemical analysis revealed high expression of epitope-tagged IRP1 in tumor tissue, which was associated with a profound increase in IRE-binding activity. As expected, this response misregulated iron metabolism by increasing TfR1 levels. Surprisingly, IRP1 failed to suppress ferritin expression and did not affect the levels of the iron transporter ferroportin. Our results show that the overexpression of IRP1 is associated with an apparent tumor suppressor phenotype and provide a direct regulatory link between the IRE/IRP system and cancer.

  1. Integrated analyses to reconstruct microRNA-mediated regulatory networks in mouse liver using high-throughput profiling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) simultaneously target many transcripts through partial complementarity binding, and have emerged as a key type of post-transcriptional regulator for gene expression. How miRNA accomplishes its pleiotropic effects largely depends on its expression and its target repertoire. Previous studies discovered thousands of miRNAs and numerous miRNA target genes mainly through computation and prediction methods which produced high rates of false positive prediction. The development of Argonaute cross-linked immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (CLIP-Seq) provides a system to effectively determine miRNA target genes. Likewise, the accuracy of dissecting the transcriptional regulation of miRNA genes has been greatly improved by chromatin immunoprecipitation of the transcription factors coupled with sequencing (ChIP-Seq). Elucidation of the miRNA target repertoire will provide an in-depth understanding of the functional roles of microRNA pathways. To reliably reconstruct a miRNA-mediated regulatory network, we established a computational framework using publicly available, sequence-based transcription factor-miRNA databases, including ChIPBase and TransmiR for the TF-miRNA interactions, along with miRNA-target databases, including miRTarBase, TarBase and starBase, for the miRNA-target interactions. We applied the computational framework to elucidate the miRNA-mediated regulatory network in the Mir122a-/- mouse model, which has an altered transcriptome and progressive liver disease. Results We applied our computational framework to the expression profiles of miRNA/mRNA of Mir122a-/- mutant mice and wild-type mice. The miRNA-mediated network involves 40 curated TFs contributing to the aberrant expression of 65 miRNAs and 723 curated miRNA target genes, of which 56% was found in the differentially-expressed genes of Mir122a--mice. Hence, the regulatory network disclosed previously-known and also many previously-unidentified miRNA-mediated

  2. P-selectin-mediated platelet adhesion promotes tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Qi, Cuiling; Wei, Bo; Zhou, Weijie; Yang, Yang; Li, Bin; Guo, Simei; Li, Jialin; Ye, Jie; Li, Jiangchao; Zhang, Qianqian; Lan, Tian; He, Xiaodong; Cao, Liu; Zhou, Jia; Geng, Jianguo; Wang, Lijing

    2015-03-30

    Blood platelets foster carcinogenesis. We found that platelets are accumulated in human tumors. P-selectin deficiency and soluble P-selectin abolish platelet deposition within tumors, decreasing secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor and angiogenesis, thereby suppressing tumor growth. Binding of the P-selectin cytoplasmic tail to talin1 triggers the talin1 N-terminal head to interact with the β3 cytoplasmic tail. This activates αIIbβ3 and recruits platelets into tumors. Platelet infiltration into solid tumors occurs through a P-selectin-dependent mechanism.

  3. Light-Mediated Hormonal Regulation of Plant Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Mieke; Galvão, Vinicius Costa; Fankhauser, Christian

    2016-04-29

    Light is crucial for plant life, and perception of the light environment dictates plant growth, morphology, and developmental changes. Such adjustments in growth and development in response to light conditions are often established through changes in hormone levels and signaling. This review discusses examples of light-regulated processes throughout a plant's life cycle for which it is known how light signals lead to hormonal regulation. Light acts as an important developmental switch in germination, photomorphogenesis, and transition to flowering, and light cues are essential to ensure light capture through architectural changes during phototropism and the shade avoidance response. In describing well-established links between light perception and hormonal changes, we aim to give insight into the mechanisms that enable plants to thrive in variable light environments.

  4. Cutting edge: TNFR-shedding by CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells inhibits the induction of inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    van Mierlo, Geertje J D; Scherer, Hans U; Hameetman, Marjolijn; Morgan, Mary E; Flierman, Roelof; Huizinga, Tom W J; Toes, René E M

    2008-03-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells play an essential role in maintaining tolerance to self and nonself. In several models of T cell-mediated (auto) immunity, Treg cells exert protective effects by the inhibition of pathogenic T cell responses. In addition, Treg cells can modulate T cell-independent inflammation. We now show that CD4+CD25+ Treg cells are able to shed large amounts of TNFRII. This is paralleled by their ability to inhibit the action of TNF-alpha both in vitro and in vivo. In vivo, Treg cells suppressed IL-6 production in response to LPS injection in mice. In contrast, Treg cells from TNFRII-deficient mice were unable to do so despite their unhampered capacity to suppress T cell proliferation in a conventional in vitro suppression assay. Thus, shedding of TNFRII represents a novel mechanism by which Treg cells can inhibit the action of TNF, a pivotal cytokine driving inflammation.

  5. Regulation of gene expression mediating indeterminate muscle growth in teleosts.

    PubMed

    Ahammad, A K Shakur; Asaduzzaman, Md; Asakawa, Shuichi; Watabe, Shugo; Kinoshita, Shigeharu

    2015-08-01

    Teleosts are unique among vertebrates due to their indeterminate muscle growth, i.e., continued production of neonatal muscle fibers until death. However, the molecular mechanism(s) underlying this property is unknown. Here, we focused on the torafugu (Takifugu rubripes) myosin heavy chain gene, MYHM2528-1, which is specifically expressed in neonatal muscle fibers produced by indeterminate muscle growth. We examined the flanking region of MYHM2528-1 through an in vivo reporter assay using zebrafish (Danio rerio) and identified a 2100 bp 5'-flanking sequence that contained sufficient promoter activity to allow specific gene expression. The effects of enhanced promoter activity were observed at the outer region of the fast muscle and the dorsal edge of slow muscle in zebrafish larvae. At the juvenile stage, the promoter was specifically activated in small diameter muscle fibers scattered throughout fast muscle and in slow muscle near the septum separating slow and fast muscles. This spatio-temporal promoter activity overlapped with known myogenic zones involved in teleost indeterminate muscle growth. A deletion mutant analysis revealed that the -2100 to -600 bp 5'flanking sequence of MYHM2528-1 is essential for promoter activity. This region contains putative binding sites for several representative myogenesis-related transcription factors and nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT), a transcription activator involved in regeneration of mammalian adult skeletal muscle. A significant reduction in the promoter activity of the MYHM2528-1 deletion constructs was observed in accordance with a reduction in the number of these binding sites, suggesting the involvement of specific transcription factors in indeterminate muscle growth.

  6. Regulatory Mode and Risk-Taking: The Mediating Role of Anticipated Regret

    PubMed Central

    Panno, Angelo; Lauriola, Marco; Pierro, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We propose that decision maker’s regulatory mode affects risk-taking through anticipated regret. In the Study 1 either a locomotion or an assessment orientation were experimentally induced, and in the Studies 2 and 3 these different orientations were assessed as chronic individual differences. To assess risk-taking we used two behavioral measures of risk: BART and hot-CCT. The results show that experimentally induced assessment orientation–compared to locomotion–leads to decreased risk-taking through increased anticipated regret (Study 1). People chronically predisposed to be in the assessment state take less risk through increased anticipated regret (Study 2 and Study 3). Study 2 results also show a marginally non-significant indirect effect of chronic locomotion mode on BART through anticipated regret. Differently, Study 3 shows that people chronically predisposed to be in the locomotion state take greater risk through decreased anticipated regret, when play a dynamic risk task triggering stronger emotional arousal. Through all three studies, the average effect size for the relationship of assessment with anticipated regret was in the moderate-large range, whereas for risk-taking was in the moderate range. The average effect size for the relationship of locomotion with anticipated regret was in the moderate range, whereas for risk-taking was in the small-moderate range. These results increase our understanding of human behavior under conditions of risk obtaining novel insights into regulatory mode theory and decision science. PMID:26580960

  7. The simple neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network in oyster Crassostrea gigas mediates complex functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhaoqun; Wang, Lingling; Zhou, Zhi; Sun, Ying; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Hao; Hou, Zhanhui; Gao, Dahai; Gao, Qiang; Song, Linsheng

    2016-05-01

    The neuroendocrine-immune (NEI) regulatory network is a complex system, which plays an indispensable role in the immunity of the host. In the present study, the bioinformatical analysis of the transcriptomic data from oyster Crassostrea gigas and further biological validation revealed that oyster TNF (CgTNF-1 CGI_10018786) could activate the transcription factors NF-κB and HSF (heat shock transcription factor) through MAPK signaling pathway, and then regulate apoptosis, redox reaction, neuro-regulation and protein folding in oyster haemocytes. The activated immune cells then released neurotransmitters including acetylcholine, norepinephrine and [Met5]-enkephalin to regulate the immune response by arising the expression of three TNF (CGI_10005109, CGI_10005110 and CGI_10006440) and translocating two NF-κB (Cgp65, CGI_10018142 and CgRel, CGI_10021567) between the cytoplasm and nuclei of haemocytes. Neurotransmitters exhibited the immunomodulation effects by influencing apoptosis and phagocytosis of oyster haemocytes. Acetylcholine and norepinephrine could down-regulate the immune response, while [Met5]-enkephalin up-regulate the immune response. These results suggested that the simple neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network in oyster might be activated by oyster TNF and then regulate the immune response by virtue of neurotransmitters, cytokines and transcription factors.

  8. The simple neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network in oyster Crassostrea gigas mediates complex functions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhaoqun; Wang, Lingling; Zhou, Zhi; Sun, Ying; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Hao; Hou, Zhanhui; Gao, Dahai; Gao, Qiang; Song, Linsheng

    2016-01-01

    The neuroendocrine-immune (NEI) regulatory network is a complex system, which plays an indispensable role in the immunity of the host. In the present study, the bioinformatical analysis of the transcriptomic data from oyster Crassostrea gigas and further biological validation revealed that oyster TNF (CgTNF-1 CGI_10018786) could activate the transcription factors NF-κB and HSF (heat shock transcription factor) through MAPK signaling pathway, and then regulate apoptosis, redox reaction, neuro-regulation and protein folding in oyster haemocytes. The activated immune cells then released neurotransmitters including acetylcholine, norepinephrine and [Met5]-enkephalin to regulate the immune response by arising the expression of three TNF (CGI_10005109, CGI_10005110 and CGI_10006440) and translocating two NF-κB (Cgp65, CGI_10018142 and CgRel, CGI_10021567) between the cytoplasm and nuclei of haemocytes. Neurotransmitters exhibited the immunomodulation effects by influencing apoptosis and phagocytosis of oyster haemocytes. Acetylcholine and norepinephrine could down-regulate the immune response, while [Met5]-enkephalin up-regulate the immune response. These results suggested that the simple neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network in oyster might be activated by oyster TNF and then regulate the immune response by virtue of neurotransmitters, cytokines and transcription factors. PMID:27193598

  9. Methylselenocysteine Resets the Rhythmic Expression of Circadian and Growth Regulatory Genes Disrupted by Nitrosomethylurea in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ming Zhu; Zhang, Xun; Zarbl, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological and animal studies indicate that disruption of circadian rhythm increases breast cancer risk. Previously, we demonstrated that methylselenocysteine (MSC) reduced the incidence of N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU)-induced mammary carcinomas in Fischer 344 rats by 63%. MSC also increased the expression of Period 2 (Per2) and D-binding protein (DBP), providing evidence for a link between circadian rhythm and chemoprevention. Here, we report that NMU disrupted the expression of core circadian genes (Per1, Per2, Cry1, Cry2, and RevErbAα) and circadian-controlled genes (CCGs), including melatonin receptor 1α (MTNR1A), estrogen receptors (ER a and β), and growth regulatory genes (Trp53, p21, Gadd45α, and c-Myc) in mammary glands of F344 rats. By contrast, dietary MSC (3 ppm Selenium) given for 30 days, significantly enhanced the circadian expression of these genes (except for Cry1 and Cry2). The largest effect was on the levels of the Per2, MTNR1A, and ERβ mRNAs, which respectively showed 16.5-, 4.7-, and 9.5-fold increases in their rhythm-adjusted means, and 44.5-, 6.5-, and 9.7-fold increases in amplitude as compared to the control diet. MSC also shifted the peak expression times of these genes to Zeitgeber Time 12 (ZT12; light off). MSC also induced rhythmic expression of Trp53, p21, and Gadd45α mRNAs with peak levels at ZT12, when c-Myc expression was at its lowest level. However, MSC had no significant impact on the circadian expression of these genes in liver. These results suggest that dietary MSC counteracted the disruptive effect of NMU on circadian expression of genes essential to the normal mammary cell growth and differentiation. PMID:20424134

  10. Opposing Growth Regulatory Roles of Protein Kinase D Isoforms in Human Keratinocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Ryvkin, Vladislav; Rashel, Mohammad; Gaddapara, Trivikram; Ghazizadeh, Soosan

    2015-01-01

    PKD is a family of three serine/threonine kinases (PKD-1, -2, and -3) involved in the regulation of diverse biological processes including proliferation, migration, secretion, and cell survival. We have previously shown that despite expression of all three isoforms in mouse epidermis, PKD1 plays a unique and critical role in wound healing, phorbol ester-induced hyperplasia, and tumor development. In translating our findings to the human, we discovered that PKD1 is not expressed in human keratinocytes (KCs) and there is a divergence in the expression and function of other PKD isoforms. Contrary to mouse KCs, treatment of cultured human KCs with pharmacological inhibitors of PKDs resulted in growth arrest. We found that PKD2 and PKD3 are expressed differentially in proliferating and differentiating human KCs, with the former uniformly present in both compartments whereas the latter is predominantly expressed in the proliferating compartment. Knockdown of individual PKD isoforms in human KCs revealed contrasting growth regulatory roles for PKD2 and PKD3. Loss of PKD2 enhanced KC proliferative potential while loss of PKD3 resulted in a progressive proliferation defect, loss of clonogenicity and diminished tissue regenerative ability. This proliferation defect was correlated with up-regulation of CDK4/6 inhibitor p15INK4B and induction of a p53-independent G1 cell cycle arrest. Simultaneous silencing of PKD isoforms resulted in a more pronounced proliferation defect consistent with a predominant role for PKD3 in proliferating KCs. These data underline the importance and complexity of PKD signaling in human epidermis and suggest a central role for PKD3 signaling in maintaining human epidermal homeostasis. PMID:25802335

  11. Plasmodesmata-mediated intercellular signaling during plant growth and development

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Shri R.; Yan, Dawei; Sevilem, Iris; Helariutta, Ykä

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) are cytoplasmic channels that connect neighboring cells for cell-to-cell communication. PD structure and function vary temporally and spatially to allow formation of symplastic domains during different stages of plant development. Reversible deposition of callose at PD plays an important role in controlling molecular trafficking through PD by regulating their size exclusion limit. Previously, we reported several semi-dominant mutants for CALLOSE SYNTHASE 3 (CALS3) gene, which overproduce callose at PD in Arabidopsis. By combining two of these mutations in a LexA-VP16-ER (XVE)-based estradiol inducible vector system, a tool known as the “icals3m system” was developed to temporally obstruct the symplastic connections in a specified spatial domain. The system has been successfully tested and used, in combination with other methods, to investigate the route for mobile signals such as the SHR protein, microRNA165/6, and cytokinins in Arabidopsis roots, and also to understand the role of symplastic domain formation during lateral root development. We envision that this tool may also be useful for identifying tissue-specific symplastic regulatory networks and to analyze symplastic movement of metabolites. PMID:24596574

  12. Lactose inhibits regulatory T-cell-mediated suppression of effector T-cell interferon-γ and IL-17 production.

    PubMed

    Paasela, Monika; Kolho, Kaija-Leena; Vaarala, Outi; Honkanen, Jarno

    2014-12-14

    Our interest in lactose as an immunomodulatory molecule results from studies showing that lactose binds to galectin-9, which has been shown to have various regulatory functions in the immune system including regulation of T-cell responses. Impaired regulation of T helper (Th)1 and Th17 type immune responses and dysfunction of regulatory T cells (Treg) have been implicated in many human immune-mediated diseases. In the present study, we investigated the effects of lactose on immune regulation using co-cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived Treg and effector T cells (Teff) obtained from twenty healthy adults. Treg, i.e. CD4+CD25+CD127-, were isolated from PBMC by immunomagnetic separation. The fraction of CD4+CD127- cells that was depleted of CD25+ cells was used as Teff. Treg and Teff at a ratio 1:5 were activated and the effects of lactose on the secretion of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and IL-17 were analysed using ELISA for protein and quantitative RT-PCR for mRNA. Treg down-regulated the secretion of both IFN-γ (8.8-3.9 ng/ml, n 20, P= 0.003) and IL-17 (0.83-0.64 ng/ml, n 15, P= 0.04) in co-cultures, while in the presence of lactose the levels of secreted IFN-γ and IL-17 remained high and no down-regulation was observed (16.4 v. 3.99 ng/ml, n 20, P< 0.0001, and 0.74 v. 0.64 ng/ml, n 15, P= 0.005, respectively). We showed that lactose inhibits human Treg-mediated suppression of Th1 and Th17 immune responses in vitro.

  13. PD-L1 is a critical mediator of regulatory B cells and T cells in invasive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Honggeng; Wan, Yuqiu; Lan, Jing; Wang, Qin; Wang, Zhangyu; Li, Yecheng; Zheng, Jiqing; Zhang, Xueguang; Wang, Zemin; Shen, Yueping; Xie, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs), a key mediator in regulating anti-tumor immune suppression, tumor immune escape, metastasis and relapse, are considered an important therapeutic target in immunotherapy of human cancers. In the present investigation, elevated CD19+ CD24+ CD38+ regulatory B cells (Bregs) were observed in PBMCs of invasive carcinoma of breast (IBCa) patients compared with that in patients with fibroadenoma (FIBma) or healthy individuals, and the positive correlation existed between Bregs and CD4+ CD25+ CD127− Tregs (r = 0.316, P = 0.001). We found that PD-L1 expression was higher on Bregs in IBCa patients compared with patients with FIBma or healthy individuals (P < 0.05, respectively), and that a tight correlation exists between CD19+ CD24+ CD38+ PD-L1+ Bregs and CD19+ CD24+ CD38+ Bregs (r = 0.267, P = 0.007), poor TNM phases and up-regulated expression of PD-L1 on Bregs. The pattern of PD-1 expression on CD4+ T cells indicated that high level of PD-1hi expressed on CD4+ CD25+ CD127+ effector T cells (P < 0.001). More importantly, the presence of PD-L1 on Bregs was positively correlated with Tregs (r = 0.299, P = 0.003), but negatively correlated with PD-1hi effector T cells (r = −0.22, P = 0.031). Together, results of the present study indicated that PD-L1 is an important molecule on Bregs, mediated the generation of Tregs in IBCa. PMID:27762298

  14. The miR-199-dynamin regulatory axis controls receptor-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Juan F; Canfrán-Duque, Alberto; Goedeke, Leigh; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2015-09-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (microRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression that modulate many physiological processes; however, their role in regulating intracellular transport remains largely unknown. Intriguingly, we found that the dynamin (DNM) genes, a GTPase family of proteins responsible for endocytosis in eukaryotic cells, encode the conserved miR-199a and miR-199b family of miRNAs within their intronic sequences. Here, we demonstrate that miR-199a and miR-199b regulate endocytic transport by controlling the expression of important mediators of endocytosis such as clathrin heavy chain (CLTC), Rab5A, low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and caveolin-1 (Cav-1). Importantly, miR-199a-5p and miR-199b-5p overexpression markedly inhibits CLTC, Rab5A, LDLR and Cav-1 expression, thus preventing receptor-mediated endocytosis in human cell lines (Huh7 and HeLa). Of note, miR-199a-5p inhibition increases target gene expression and receptor-mediated endocytosis. Taken together, our work identifies a new mechanism by which microRNAs regulate intracellular trafficking. In particular, we demonstrate that the DNM, miR-199a-5p and miR-199b-5p genes act as a bifunctional locus that regulates endocytosis, thus adding an unexpected layer of complexity in the regulation of intracellular trafficking.

  15. Social support influences on eating awareness in children and adolescents: the mediating effect of self-regulatory strategies.

    PubMed

    Gaspar de Matos, Margarida; Palmeira, Antonio L; Gaspar, Tania; De Wit, John B F; Luszczynska, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    The impact of the social environment on healthy eating awareness results from complex interactions among physical, economic, cultural, interpersonal and individual characteristics. This study investigated the impact of social support and social influence on healthy eating awareness, controlling for socio-economic status, gender and age. Additionally, the mediating effect of self-regulation strategies was examined. A total of 2764 children and adolescents aged 10-17 from four European countries completed self-report measures on healthy eating awareness, social influence and the use of self-regulation strategies. Healthy eating awareness and the use of self-regulation strategies were more likely to occur among younger participants. An interaction between gender and age was related to the use of some self-regulation strategies; compared to girls, boys decreased the use of self-regulation strategies more from pre-adolescence to adolescence. Peer social influence was associated with more unhealthy eating in older participants. Results suggest a need to promote self-regulatory competences among young people in order to assist them with regulating their eating behaviours, especially in the presence of peers. Both school-based interventions and family-based interventions, focusing on self-regulation cognitions and social (peer) influence, could help children and adolescents to use self-regulatory strategies which are essential to eat healthier.

  16. Antibody Targeting of “Steady-State” Dendritic Cells Induces Tolerance Mediated by Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mahnke, Karsten; Ring, Sabine; Enk, Alexander H.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are often defined as pivotal inducers of immunity, but these proinflammatory properties only develop after stimulation or ex vivo manipulation of DCs. Under non-inflammatory conditions in vivo, DCs are embedded into a tissue environment and encounter a plethora of self-antigens derived from apoptotic material. This material is transported to secondary lymphoid organs. As DCs maintain their non-activated phenotype in a sterile tissue environment, interaction with T cells will induce rather regulatory T cells than effector T cells. Thus, DCs are not only inducers of immunity but are also critical for maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Therapeutically, intervention for the induction of long-lasting tolerance in several autoimmune conditions may therefore be possible by manipulating DC activation and/or targeting of DCs in their “natural” tissue environment. PMID:26941742

  17. Autophagy is required for IL-2-mediated fibroblast growth

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Rui; Tang, Daolin; Lotze, Michael T.; Zeh III, Herbert J.

    2013-02-15

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved pathway responsible for delivery of cytoplasmic material into the lysosomal degradation pathway to enable vesicular exocytosis. Interleukin (IL)-2 is produced by T-cells and its activity is important for immunoregulation. Fibroblasts are an immune competent cell type, playing a critical role in wound healing, chronic inflammation, and tumor development. Although autophagy plays an important role in each of these processes, whether it regulates IL-2 activity in fibroblasts is unknown. Here, we show that autophagy is required for IL-2-induced cell growth in fibroblasts. IL-2 significantly induced autophagy in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and primary lung fibroblasts. Autophagy inhibitors (e.g., 3-methylamphetamine and bafilomycin A1) or knockdown of ATG5 and beclin 1 blocked clinical grade IL-2-induced autophagy. Moreover, IL-2 induced HMGB1 cytoplasmic translocation in MEFs and promoted interaction between HMGB1 and beclin1, which is required for autophagy induction. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy inhibited IL-2-induced cell proliferation and enhanced IL-2-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that autophagy is an important pro-survival regulator for IL-2-induced cell growth in fibroblasts.

  18. Spalt-mediated dve repression is a critical regulatory motif and coordinates with Iroquois complex in Drosophila vein formation.

    PubMed

    Sugimori, Seiko; Hasegawa, Aya; Nakagoshi, Hideki

    2016-08-01

    Veins are longitudinal cuticular structures that maintain shape of the wing. Drosophila melanogaster has six longitudinal veins (L1-L6) and two cross veins. The Zn-finger transcription factors of Spalt-complex (Sal) are required for positioning of the L2 and L5, and the homeodomain transcription factors of Iroquois complex (Iro-C) are required for formation of the L3 and L5 veins. The homeodomain transcriptional repressor Defective proventriculus (Dve) is uniformly expressed in the wing pouch of the larval imaginal disc. However, dve mutant wings showed loss of the L2 and L5, but not of the L3 and L4 veins. Temporal dve knockdown experiments indicate that the Dve activity is required for vein formation from late third larval instar to the prepupal stage. In the prepupal wing, Dve expression becomes nearly complementary to that of Sal through the Sal-mediated dve repression. Furthermore, coexpression of Dve and Iro-C relieved of Sal-mediated repression is required for the L5 formation in a dose-dependent manner. The relationship between Sal, Dve, and Iro-C in wing vein specification is quite similar to that in ommatidial cell-type specification. Our results provide information about the conserved function of dve regulatory motifs in cell differentiation. PMID:27349585

  19. The Yin and Yang of the Opioid Growth Regulatory System: Focus on Diabetes—The Lorenz E. Zimmerman Tribute Lecture

    PubMed Central

    Mc Laughlin, Patricia J.; Zagon, Ian S.

    2016-01-01

    The Opioid Growth Regulatory System consists of opioid growth factor (OGF), [Met5]-enkephalin, and its unique receptor (OGFr). OGF inhibits cell division when bound to OGFr. Conversely, blockade of the interaction of OGF and OGFr, using the potent, long-acting opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone (NTX), results in increased DNA synthesis and cell division. The authors have demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo that the addition of exogenous OGF or an increase in available OGFr decreases corneal epithelial cell division and wound healing. Conversely, blockade of the OGF-OGFr interaction by NTX or a decrease in the production of the OGFr increases corneal epithelial cell division and facilitates corneal epithelial wound healing. The authors also have demonstrated that depressed corneal and cutaneous wound healing, dry eye, and abnormal corneal sensitivity in type 1 and type 2 diabetes in animals can be reversed by OGF-OGFr blockade by NTX. Thus, the function of the Opioid Growth Regulatory System appears to be disordered in diabetic animals, and its function can be restored with NTX treatment. These studies suggest a fundamental role for the Opioid Growth Regulatory System in the pathobiology of diabetic complications and a need for studies to elucidate this role further. PMID:27703986

  20. The position and function of the Notch-mediated eye growth organizer: the roles of JAK/STAT and four-jointed.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Aviño, Francisco Jose; Ferres-Marco, Dolors; Dominguez, Maria

    2009-09-01

    In many animal systems, the local activation of patterning signals in spatially confined regions (organizers) is crucial for promoting the growth of developing organs. Nevertheless, how organizers are set up and how their activity influences global organ growth remains poorly understood. In the Drosophila eye, local Notch activation establishes a conserved dorsal-ventral organizer that promotes growth. The dorsal selector Iroquois complex defines the position of the organizer at the mid-first instar, and through its ligand, unpaired, the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducers and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway is thought to mediate global growth downstream of the organizer. However, here we show that the unpaired/JAK/STAT pathway is actually a fundamental element in the spatial control of the organizer, upstream from Notch activation. Furthermore, we identify four-jointed, a target of the Fat and Hippo tumour-suppressor pathways, as a mediator of the growth controlled by the organizer. These findings redefine the process of organizer formation and function, and they identify four-jointed as a regulatory node, integrating multiple growth-control pathways.

  1. Mammalian mediator 19 mediates H1299 lung adenocarcinoma cell clone conformation, growth, and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu-Lu; Guo, Shu-Liang; Ma, Su-Ren; Luo, Yong-Ai

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian mediator (MED) is a multi-protein coactivator that has been identified by several research groups. The involvement of the MED complex subunit 19 (MED 19) in the metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma cell line (H1299), which expresses the MED 19 subunit, was here investigated. When MED 19 expression was decreased by RNA interference H1299 cells demonstrated reduced clone formation, arrest in the S phase of the cell cycle, and lowered metastatic capacity. Thus, MED 19 appears to play important roles in the biological behavior of non-small cell lung carcinoma cells. These findings may be important for the development of novel lung carcinoma treatments.

  2. Control of transferrin receptor expression via nitric oxide-mediated modulation of iron-regulatory protein 2.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Ponka, P

    1999-11-12

    Cellular iron storage and uptake are coordinately regulated post-transcriptionally by cytoplasmic factors, iron-regulatory proteins 1 and 2 (IRP-1 and IRP-2). When iron in the intracellular transit pool is scarce, IRPs bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) in the 5'-untranslated region of the ferritin mRNA and 3'-untranslated region of the transferrin receptor (TfR) mRNA. Such binding inhibits translation of ferritin mRNA and stabilizes the mRNA for TfR, whereas the opposite scenario develops when iron in the transit pool is plentiful. However, we (Richardson, D. R., Neumannova, V., Nagy, E., and Ponka, P. (1995) Blood 86, 3211-3219) and others reported that the binding of IRPs to IREs can also be modulated by nitric oxide (NO). In this study, we showed that a short exposure of RAW 264.7 cells (a murine macrophage cell line) to the NO(+) donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), caused a significant decrease in IRP-2 binding to the IREs followed by IRP-2 degradation and that these changes occurred without affecting IRP-1 binding. The SNP-mediated degradation of IRP-2 in RAW 264.7 cells could be prevented by MG-132 or lactacystin, known inhibitors of proteasome-dependent protein degradation. A SNP-mediated decrease in IRP-2 binding and levels was associated with a dramatic decrease in TfR mRNA levels and an increase in ferritin synthesis. Importantly, the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 prevented the SNP-mediated decrease in TfR mRNA levels. These observations suggest that IRP-2 can play an important role in controlling transferrin receptor expression.

  3. Coordination of the arc regulatory system and pheromone-mediated positive feedback in controlling the Vibrio fischeri lux operon.

    PubMed

    Septer, Alecia N; Stabb, Eric V

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pheromone signaling is often governed both by environmentally responsive regulators and by positive feedback. This regulatory combination has the potential to coordinate a group response among distinct subpopulations that perceive key environmental stimuli differently. We have explored the interplay between an environmentally responsive regulator and pheromone-mediated positive feedback in intercellular signaling by Vibrio fischeri ES114, a bioluminescent bacterium that colonizes the squid Euprymna scolopes. Bioluminescence in ES114 is controlled in part by N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3OC6), a pheromone produced by LuxI that together with LuxR activates transcription of the luxICDABEG operon, initiating a positive feedback loop and inducing luminescence. The lux operon is also regulated by environmentally responsive regulators, including the redox-responsive ArcA/ArcB system, which directly represses lux in culture. Here we show that inactivating arcA leads to increased 3OC6 accumulation to initiate positive feedback. In the absence of positive feedback, arcA-mediated control of luminescence was only ∼2-fold, but luxI-dependent positive feedback contributed more than 100 fold to the net induction of luminescence in the arcA mutant. Consistent with this overriding importance of positive feedback, 3OC6 produced by the arcA mutant induced luminescence in nearby wild-type cells, overcoming their ArcA repression of lux. Similarly, we found that artificially inducing ArcA could effectively repress luminescence before, but not after, positive feedback was initiated. Finally, we show that 3OC6 produced by a subpopulation of symbiotic cells can induce luminescence in other cells co-colonizing the host. Our results suggest that even transient loss of ArcA-mediated regulation in a sub-population of cells can induce luminescence in a wider community. Moreover, they indicate that 3OC6 can communicate information about both cell density and the state of

  4. Stem cell regulatory function mediated by expression of a novel mouse Oct4 pseudogene

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Huey; Shabbir, Arsalan; Molnar, Merced; Lee, Techung . E-mail: chunglee@buffalo.edu

    2007-03-30

    Multiple pseudogenes have been proposed for embryonic stem (ES) cell-specific genes, and their abundance suggests that some of these potential pseudogenes may be functional. ES cell-specific expression of Oct4 regulates stem cell pluripotency and self-renewing state. Although Oct4 expression has been reported in adult tissues during gene reprogramming, the detected Oct4 signal might be contributed by Oct4 pseudogenes. Among the multiple Oct4 transcripts characterized here is a {approx}1 kb clone derived from P19 embryonal carcinoma stem cells, which shares a {approx}87% sequence homology with the parent Oct4 gene, and has the potential of encoding an 80-amino acid product (designated as Oct4P1). Adenoviral expression of Oct4P1 in mesenchymal stem cells promotes their proliferation and inhibits their osteochondral differentiation. These dual effects of Oct4P1 are reminiscent of the stem cell regulatory function of the parent Oct4, and suggest that Oct4P1 may be a functional pseudogene or a novel Oct4-related gene with a unique function in stem cells.

  5. Cerebral regulatory T cells restrain microglia/macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses via IL-10.

    PubMed

    Xie, Luokun; Choudhury, Gourav Roy; Winters, Ali; Yang, Shao-Hua; Jin, Kunlin

    2015-01-01

    Forkhead box P3 (Foxp3)(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells maintain the immune tolerance and prevent inflammatory responses in the periphery. However, the presence of Treg cells in the CNS under steady state has not been studied. Here, for the first time, we show a substantial TCRαβ (+) CD4(+) Foxp3(+) T-cell population (cerebral Treg cells) in the rat cerebrum, constituting more than 15% of the cerebral CD4(+) T-cell compartment. Cerebral Treg cells showed an activated/memory phenotype and expressed many Treg-cell signature genes at higher levels than peripheral Treg cells. Consistent with their activated/memory phenotype, cerebral Treg cells robustly restrained the LPS-induced inflammatory responses of brain microglia/macrophages, suggesting a role in maintaining the cerebral homeostasis by inhibiting the neuroinflammation. In addition, brain astrocytes were the helper cells that sustained Foxp3 expression in Treg cells through IL-2/STAT5 signaling, showing that the interaction between astrocytes and Treg cells contributes to the maintenance of Treg-cell identity in the brain. Taken together, our work represents the first study to characterize the phenotypic and functional features of Treg cells in the rat cerebrum. Our data have provided a novel insight for the contribution of Treg cells to the immunosurveillance and immunomodulation in the cerebrum under steady state.

  6. PRMT1 mediated methylation of TAF15 is required for its positive gene regulatory function

    SciTech Connect

    Jobert, Laure; Argentini, Manuela; Tora, Laszlo

    2009-04-15

    TAF15 (formerly TAF{sub II}68) is a nuclear RNA-binding protein that is associated with a distinct population of TFIID and RNA polymerase II complexes. TAF15 harbours an N-terminal activation domain, an RNA recognition motif (RRM) and many Arg-Gly-Gly (RGG) repeats at its C-terminal end. The N-terminus of TAF15 serves as an essential transforming domain in the fusion oncoprotein created by chromosomal translocation in certain human chondrosarcomas. Post-transcriptional modifications (PTMs) of proteins are known to regulate their activity, however, nothing is known on how PTMs affect TAF15 function. Here we demonstrate that endogenous human TAF15 is methylated in vivo at its numerous RGG repeats. Furthermore, we identify protein arginine N-methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) as a TAF15 interactor and the major PRMT responsible for its methylation. In addition, the RGG repeat-containing C-terminus of TAF15 is responsible for the shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and the methylation of RGG repeats affects the subcellular localization of TAF15. The methylation of TAF15 by PRMT1 is required for the ability of TAF15 to positively regulate the expression of the studied endogenous TAF15-target genes. Our findings demonstrate that arginine methylation of TAF15 by PRMT1 is a crucial event determining its proper localization and gene regulatory function.

  7. Low-Dose IL-2 Induces Regulatory T Cell-Mediated Control of Experimental Food Allergy.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Benjamin; Vigneron, James; Levacher, Béatrice; Vazquez, Thomas; Pitoiset, Fabien; Brimaud, Faustine; Churlaud, Guillaume; Klatzmann, David; Bellier, Bertrand

    2016-07-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are pivotal for maintenance of immune self-tolerance and also regulate immune responses to exogenous Ags, including allergens. Both decreased Treg number and function have been reported in allergic patients, offering new therapeutic perspectives. We previously demonstrated that Tregs can be selectively expanded and activated by low doses of IL-2 (ld-IL-2) inducing immunoregulation without immunosuppression and established its protective effect in autoimmune diseases. In this study, we evaluated the ability of ld-IL-2 to control allergy in an experimental model of food allergy. Ld-IL-2 induced Treg expansion and activation that elicited protection against clinical manifestations of food allergy in two mouse models with OVA and peanut. This clinical effect was lost in Treg-depleted mice, demonstrating the major contribution of Tregs in ld-IL-2 efficacy. Mechanistic studies further indicated that protection from allergy could be explained by a Treg-dependent local modification of the Th1/Th2 balance and an inhibition of mast cell recruitment and activation. Preventive and therapeutic effects of ld-IL-2 were observed over a 7-mo-period, highlighting its long-term efficacy. This study demonstrated that ld-IL-2 is efficient to prevent and to treat allergic immune responses, and thus represents a promising therapeutic strategy for managing allergic diseases. PMID:27259854

  8. T regulatory cell chemokine production mediates pathogenic T cell attraction and suppression.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Scott J; Pesenacker, Anne M; Wang, Adele Y; Gillies, Jana; Mojibian, Majid; Morishita, Kim; Tan, Rusung; Kieffer, Timothy J; Verchere, C Bruce; Panagiotopoulos, Constadina; Levings, Megan K

    2016-03-01

    T regulatory cells (Tregs) control immune homeostasis by preventing inappropriate responses to self and nonharmful foreign antigens. Tregs use multiple mechanisms to control immune responses, all of which require these cells to be near their targets of suppression; however, it is not known how Treg-to-target proximity is controlled. Here, we found that Tregs attract CD4+ and CD8+ T cells by producing chemokines. Specifically, Tregs produced both CCL3 and CCL4 in response to stimulation, and production of these chemokines was critical for migration of target T cells, as Tregs from Ccl3-/- mice, which are also deficient for CCL4 production, did not promote migration. Moreover, CCR5 expression by target T cells was required for migration of these cells to supernatants conditioned by Tregs. Tregs deficient for expression of CCL3 and CCL4 were impaired in their ability to suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis or islet allograft rejection in murine models. Moreover, Tregs from subjects with established type 1 diabetes were impaired in their ability to produce CCL3 and CCL4. Together, these results demonstrate a previously unappreciated facet of Treg function and suggest that chemokine secretion by Tregs is a fundamental aspect of their therapeutic effect in autoimmunity and transplantation. PMID:26854929

  9. Nitric Oxide Mediated Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Activation of Multiple Regulatory Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Adil; Mun, Bong-Gyu; Imran, Qari M; Lee, Sang-Uk; Adamu, Teferi A; Shahid, Muhammad; Kim, Kyung-Min; Yun, Byung-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance between the accumulation and removal of nitric oxide and its derivatives is a challenge faced by all plants at the cellular level, and is especially important under stress conditions. Exposure of plants to various biotic and abiotic stresses causes rapid changes in cellular redox tone potentiated by the rise in reactive nitrogen species that serve as signaling molecules in mediating defensive responses. To understand mechanisms mediated by these signaling molecules, we performed a large-scale analysis of the Arabidopsis transcriptome induced by nitrosative stress. We generated an average of 84 and 91 million reads from three replicates each of control and 1 mM S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO)-infiltrated Arabidopsis leaf samples, respectively. After alignment, more than 95% of all reads successfully mapped to the reference and 32,535 genes and 55,682 transcripts were obtained. CysNO infiltration caused differential expression of 6436 genes (3448 up-regulated and 2988 down-regulated) and 6214 transcripts (3335 up-regulated and 2879 down-regulated) 6 h post-infiltration. These differentially expressed genes were found to be involved in key physiological processes, including plant defense against various biotic and abiotic stresses, hormone signaling, and other developmental processes. After quantile normalization of the FPKM values followed by student's T-test (P < 0.05) we identified 1165 DEGs (463 up-regulated and 702 down-regulated) with at least 2-folds change in expression after CysNO treatment. Expression patterns of selected genes involved in various biological pathways were verified using quantitative real-time PCR. This study provides comprehensive information about plant responses to nitrosative stress at transcript level and would prove helpful in understanding and incorporating mechanisms associated with nitrosative stress responses in plants.

  10. Nitric Oxide Mediated Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Activation of Multiple Regulatory Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Adil; Mun, Bong-Gyu; Imran, Qari M.; Lee, Sang-Uk; Adamu, Teferi A.; Shahid, Muhammad; Kim, Kyung-Min; Yun, Byung-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance between the accumulation and removal of nitric oxide and its derivatives is a challenge faced by all plants at the cellular level, and is especially important under stress conditions. Exposure of plants to various biotic and abiotic stresses causes rapid changes in cellular redox tone potentiated by the rise in reactive nitrogen species that serve as signaling molecules in mediating defensive responses. To understand mechanisms mediated by these signaling molecules, we performed a large-scale analysis of the Arabidopsis transcriptome induced by nitrosative stress. We generated an average of 84 and 91 million reads from three replicates each of control and 1 mM S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO)-infiltrated Arabidopsis leaf samples, respectively. After alignment, more than 95% of all reads successfully mapped to the reference and 32,535 genes and 55,682 transcripts were obtained. CysNO infiltration caused differential expression of 6436 genes (3448 up-regulated and 2988 down-regulated) and 6214 transcripts (3335 up-regulated and 2879 down-regulated) 6 h post-infiltration. These differentially expressed genes were found to be involved in key physiological processes, including plant defense against various biotic and abiotic stresses, hormone signaling, and other developmental processes. After quantile normalization of the FPKM values followed by student's T-test (P < 0.05) we identified 1165 DEGs (463 up-regulated and 702 down-regulated) with at least 2-folds change in expression after CysNO treatment. Expression patterns of selected genes involved in various biological pathways were verified using quantitative real-time PCR. This study provides comprehensive information about plant responses to nitrosative stress at transcript level and would prove helpful in understanding and incorporating mechanisms associated with nitrosative stress responses in plants. PMID:27446194

  11. Nitric Oxide Mediated Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Activation of Multiple Regulatory Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Adil; Mun, Bong-Gyu; Imran, Qari M; Lee, Sang-Uk; Adamu, Teferi A; Shahid, Muhammad; Kim, Kyung-Min; Yun, Byung-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance between the accumulation and removal of nitric oxide and its derivatives is a challenge faced by all plants at the cellular level, and is especially important under stress conditions. Exposure of plants to various biotic and abiotic stresses causes rapid changes in cellular redox tone potentiated by the rise in reactive nitrogen species that serve as signaling molecules in mediating defensive responses. To understand mechanisms mediated by these signaling molecules, we performed a large-scale analysis of the Arabidopsis transcriptome induced by nitrosative stress. We generated an average of 84 and 91 million reads from three replicates each of control and 1 mM S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO)-infiltrated Arabidopsis leaf samples, respectively. After alignment, more than 95% of all reads successfully mapped to the reference and 32,535 genes and 55,682 transcripts were obtained. CysNO infiltration caused differential expression of 6436 genes (3448 up-regulated and 2988 down-regulated) and 6214 transcripts (3335 up-regulated and 2879 down-regulated) 6 h post-infiltration. These differentially expressed genes were found to be involved in key physiological processes, including plant defense against various biotic and abiotic stresses, hormone signaling, and other developmental processes. After quantile normalization of the FPKM values followed by student's T-test (P < 0.05) we identified 1165 DEGs (463 up-regulated and 702 down-regulated) with at least 2-folds change in expression after CysNO treatment. Expression patterns of selected genes involved in various biological pathways were verified using quantitative real-time PCR. This study provides comprehensive information about plant responses to nitrosative stress at transcript level and would prove helpful in understanding and incorporating mechanisms associated with nitrosative stress responses in plants. PMID:27446194

  12. Reactive oxygen species mediate growth and death in submerged plants

    PubMed Central

    Steffens, Bianka; Steffen-Heins, Anja; Sauter, Margret

    2013-01-01

    Aquatic and semi-aquatic plants are well adapted to survive partial or complete submergence which is commonly accompanied by oxygen deprivation. The gaseous hormone ethylene controls a number of adaptive responses to submergence including adventitious root growth and aerenchyma formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as signaling intermediates in ethylene-controlled submergence adaptation and possibly also independent of ethylene. ROS levels are controlled by synthesis, enzymatic metabolism, and non-enzymatic scavenging. While the actors are by and large known, we still have to learn about altered ROS at the subcellular level and how they are brought about, and the signaling cascades that trigger a specific response. This review briefly summarizes our knowledge on the contribution of ROS to submergence adaptation and describes spectrophotometrical, histochemical, and live cell imaging detection methods that have been used to study changes in ROS abundance. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is introduced as a method that allows identification and quantification of specific ROS in cell compartments. The use of advanced technologies such as EPR spectroscopy will be necessary to untangle the intricate and partially interwoven signaling networks of ethylene and ROS. PMID:23761805

  13. Notch1 Pathway Activity Determines the Regulatory Role of Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts in Melanoma Growth and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Hongwei; Kong, Ranran; Ferrari, Massimiliano L.; Radtke, Freddy; Capobianco, Anthony J.; Liu, Zhao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) play a crucial role in regulating cancer progression, yet the molecular determinant that governs the tumor regulatory role of CAF remains unknown. Using a mouse melanoma model in which exogenous melanoma cells were grafted on the skin of two lines of mice where the genetic activation or inactivation of Notch1 signaling specifically occurs in natural host stromal fibroblasts, we demonstrated that Notch1 pathway activity could determine the tumor-promoting or tumor-suppressing phenotype in CAF. CAF carrying elevated Notch1 activity significantly inhibited melanoma growth and invasion, while those with a null Notch1 promoted melanoma invasion. These findings identify the Notch1 pathway as a molecular determinant that controls the regulatory role of CAF in melanoma skin growth and invasion, unveiling Notch1 signaling as a potential therapeutic target for melanoma and potentially other solid tumors. PMID:26562315

  14. Investigation of Mediational Processes Using Parallel Process Latent Growth Curve Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheong, JeeWon; MacKinnon, David P.; Khoo, Siek Toon

    2003-01-01

    Investigated a method to evaluate mediational processes using latent growth curve modeling and tested it with empirical data from a longitudinal steroid use prevention program focusing on 1,506 high school football players over 4 years. Findings suggest the usefulness of the approach. (SLD)

  15. Anion-Mediated End-Shape Control in Seed-Mediated Growth of Gold Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Youl; Kim, Joo-Hyung; Kim, Minsoo P; Yi, Gi-Ra

    2016-06-01

    End-shape-controlled gold nanorods (GNRs) were synthesized at room-temperature by a seeded-growth method, in which hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was used as a stabilizer and capping agent. The average dimension of the GNRs was 46 nm in length and 15 nm in diameter, which corresponds to aspect ratio of c.a. 3.0. Then, their both ends were further grown at the presence of silver precursor (AgNO3), resulting in formation of arrow-head GNRs. By tuning the amount of the silver precursor, the end-shape of the GNRs was changed to dumbbell like shape. Moreover, the growth rate of gold could be controlled by tuning the amount of hydrochloric acid (HCl). While arrow-headed GNRs having sharp edges were produced without HCl, the GNRs having dog-bone like or round-head shape at both ends were obtained with HCl. PMID:27427712

  16. The circadian clock gene regulatory module enantioselectively mediates imazethapyr-induced early flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Qian, Haifeng; Han, Xiao; Peng, Xiaofeng; Lu, Tao; Liu, Weiping; Fu, Zhengwei

    2014-03-01

    Plant growth and development are strongly affected by environmental pollutants, such as herbicides. Widely used herbicides can remain in soil or aquatic systems for long periods of time. Herbicide pollutants have been reported to heavily affect global plant growth and pose a significant challenge to agriculture. However, it is unclear whether herbicides affect plant flowering. Here, we demonstrated that imazethapyr (IM), a chiral herbicide, can enantioselectively promote flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana. We clarified the possible mechanism by which IM promotes flowering and found that the photoperiod pathway may play an important role in propagating the IM stress signal. IM enantiomers decreased the amplitude of core oscillators (CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 and LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL) and utilized the up-regulation of the GIGANTEA-(CONSTANS)-FLOWERING LOCUS T pathway to induce floral gene, APETALA1 over-expression enantioselectively; this treatment ultimately caused early flowering. Our findings provide new insight into the method by which plants control reproductive timing in response to herbicide stress. Flowering time is an important trait in crops and affects the life cycles of pollinator species. The persistence of herbicides in the biosphere will alter plant life cycles and diversity. PMID:24484962

  17. MECP2 promotes the growth of gastric cancer cells by suppressing miR-338-mediated antiproliferative effect

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Dongdong; Zhao, Lingyu; He, Kang; Sun, Hongfei; Cai, Donghui; Ni, Lei; Sun, Ruifang; Chang, Su'e; Song, Tusheng; Huang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2), a transcriptional suppressor, is involved in gene regulation by binding to methylated promoters. We found that MECP2 is overexpressed in gastric cancer (GC), and that Mecp2 knockdown affects the growth of GC cells both in vitro and in vivo. MECP2 can directly bind to the methylated-CpG island of miR-338 promoter and suppress the expression of two mature microRNAs, namely, miR-338-3p and miR-338-5p. Furthermore, miR-338-5p can suppress GC cell growth by targeting BMI1 (B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 homolog). We additionally found that decreased miR-338-5p expression in GC tissues, relative to normal tissues, was significantly negatively correlated with increased BMI1 expression. Silencing MECP2 can indirectly lead to reduced expression of P-REX2, which has been identified as the miR-338-3p target, as well as BMI1 and increasing expression of P16 or P21 both in vitro and in vivo. Altogether, our results indicate that MECP2 promote the proliferation of GC cells via miR-338 (miR-338-3p and miR-338-5p)-mediated antitumor and gene regulatory effect. PMID:27166996

  18. Hormone stimulation of androgen receptor mediates dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns at regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Vineet K.; Attwood, Kristopher; Campbell, Moray J.; Smiraglia, Dominic J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that contributes to stable gene silencing by interfering with the ability of transcriptional regulators to bind to DNA. Recent findings have revealed that hormone stimulation of certain nuclear receptors induces rapid, dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns alongside transcriptional responses at a subset of target loci, over time. However, the ability of androgen receptor (AR) to dynamically regulate gene transcription is relatively under-studied and its role in the regulation of DNA methylation patterns remains to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate in normal prostate cells that hormone stimulated AR activity results in dynamic changes in the transcription rate and DNA methylation patterns at the AR target genes, TIPARP and SGK1. Time-resolved chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments on the SGK1 locus reveals dynamic recruitment of AR and RNA Polymerase II, as well as the recruitment of proteins involved in the DNA demethylation process, TET1 and TDG. Furthermore, the presence of DNA methylation at dynamic regions inhibits protein binding and transcriptional activity of SGK1. These findings establish AR activity as a contributing factor to the dynamic regulation of DNA methylation patterns at target genes in prostate biology and infer further complexity involved in nuclear receptor mediation of transcriptional regulation. PMID:26646795

  19. Alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated decay modulate expression of important regulatory genes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kalyna, Maria; Simpson, Craig G.; Syed, Naeem H.; Lewandowska, Dominika; Marquez, Yamile; Kusenda, Branislav; Marshall, Jacqueline; Fuller, John; Cardle, Linda; McNicol, Jim; Dinh, Huy Q.; Barta, Andrea; Brown, John W. S.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) coupled to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is a post-transcriptional mechanism for regulating gene expression. We have used a high-resolution AS RT–PCR panel to identify endogenous AS isoforms which increase in abundance when NMD is impaired in the Arabidopsis NMD factor mutants, upf1-5 and upf3-1. Of 270 AS genes (950 transcripts) on the panel, 102 transcripts from 97 genes (32%) were identified as NMD targets. Extrapolating from these data around 13% of intron-containing genes in the Arabidopsis genome are potentially regulated by AS/NMD. This cohort of naturally occurring NMD-sensitive AS transcripts also allowed the analysis of the signals for NMD in plants. We show the importance of AS in introns in 5′ or 3′UTRs in modulating NMD-sensitivity of mRNA transcripts. In particular, we identified upstream open reading frames overlapping the main start codon as a new trigger for NMD in plants and determined that NMD is induced if 3′-UTRs were >350 nt. Unexpectedly, although many intron retention transcripts possess NMD features, they are not sensitive to NMD. Finally, we have shown that AS/NMD regulates the abundance of transcripts of many genes important for plant development and adaptation including transcription factors, RNA processing factors and stress response genes. PMID:22127866

  20. Intrinsic disorder mediates the diverse regulatory functions of the Cdk inhibitor p21

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuefeng; Fisher, John C.; Mathew, Rose; Ou, Li; Otieno, Steve; Sublett, Jack; Xiao, Limin; Chen, Jianhan; Roussel, Martine F.; Kriwacki, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, well-defined three-dimensional structure was thought to be essential for protein function. However, myriad biological functions are performed by highly dynamic, intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). IDPs often fold upon binding their biological targets and frequently exhibit “binding diversity” by targeting multiple ligands. We sought to understand the physical basis of IDP binding diversity and herein report that the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor, p21Cip1, adaptively binds to and inhibits the various Cdk/cyclin complexes that regulate eukaryotic cell division. Based on results from NMR spectroscopy, and biochemical and cellular assays, we show that structural adaptability of a helical sub-domain within p21 termed LH enables two other sub-domains termed D1 and D2 to specifically bind conserved surface features of the cyclin and Cdk subunits, respectively, within otherwise structurally distinct Cdk/cyclin complexes. Adaptive folding upon binding is likely to mediate the diverse biological functions of the thousands of IDPs present in eukaryotes. PMID:21358637

  1. UV-B-induced DNA damage mediates expression changes of cell cycle regulatory genes in Arabidopsis root tips.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Wang, Yan; Björn, Lars Olof; Li, Shaoshan

    2011-04-01

    Even though a number of studies have shown that UV-B radiation inhibits plant growth and regulates the cell cycle progress, little is known about the molecular and cellular mechanisms. Here, we developed a synchronous root-tip cell system to investigate expression changes of cell cycle marker genes and DNA damage under UV-B radiation. Expression analysis of cell cycle marker genes revealed that G1-to-S transition in root-tip cells was accomplished within 6 h. In the in vivo synchronous root-tip cells, high level of UV-B radiation (0.45 W m(-2)) induced expression changes of the cell cycle regulatory genes. Genes involved in G1-to-S transition, Histone H4 and E2Fa, were down-regulated by UV-B radiation during 2-6 h; whereas transcripts for KRP2, a negative regulator of G1-to-S transition, were up-regulated by UV-B at 2 h. The peak time for transcript level of CYCD3;1, a positive factor in G1-to-S transition, was delayed by UV-B radiation. Interestingly, a medium level of UV-B radiation (0.25 W m(-2)) did not change the expression of these genes in root tip cells from wild type. However, cell cycle regulatory genes were greatly affected in uvh1 mutant, which exhibited higher content of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). Ascorbic acid treatment did not change the expression pattern of cell cycle regulatory genes that were affected by high-level UV-B. Our results implied that UV-B-induced DNA damage results in the delay of G1-to-S transition of plant cell cycle. UV-B-induced G1-to-S arrest may be a protective mechanism that prevents cells with damaged DNA from dividing and may explain the plant growth inhibition under increased solar UV-B radiation.

  2. Analysis of tomato plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase gene family suggests a mycorrhiza-mediated regulatory mechanism conserved in diverse plant species.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junli; Liu, Jianjian; Chen, Aiqun; Ji, Minjie; Chen, Jiadong; Yang, Xiaofeng; Gu, Mian; Qu, Hongye; Xu, Guohua

    2016-10-01

    In plants, the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase (HA) is considered to play a crucial role in regulating plant growth and respoding to environment stresses. Multiple paralogous genes encoding different isozymes of HA have been identified and characterized in several model plants, while limited information of the HA gene family is available to date for tomato. Here, we describe the molecular and expression features of eight HA-encoding genes (SlHA1-8) from tomato. All these genes are interrupted by multiple introns with conserved positions. SlHA1, 2, and 4 were widely expressed in all tissues, while SlHA5, 6, and 7 were almost only expressed in flowers. SlHA8, the transcripts of which were barely detectable under normal or nutrient-/salt-stress growth conditions, was strongly activated in arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal-colonized roots. Extreme lack of SlHA8 expression in M161, a mutant defective to AM fungal colonization, provided genetic evidence towards the dependence of its expression on AM symbiosis. A 1521-bp SlHA8 promoter could direct the GUS reporter expression specifically in colonized cells of transgenic tobacco, soybean, and rice mycorrhizal roots. Promoter deletion assay revealed a 223-bp promoter fragment of SlHA8 containing a variant of AM-specific cis-element MYCS (vMYCS) sufficient to confer the AM-induced activity. Targeted deletion of this motif in the corresponding promoter region causes complete abolishment of GUS staining in mycorrhizal roots. Together, these results lend cogent evidence towards the evolutionary conservation of a potential regulatory mechanism mediating the activation of AM-responsive HA genes in diverse mycorrhizal plant species.

  3. A new regulatory element modulates homoserine lactone-mediated autoinduction of Ti plasmid conjugal transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, I; Cook, D M; Farrand, S K

    1995-01-01

    Conjugal transfer of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens nopaline-type Ti plasmid pTiC58 is induced by agrocinopines A and B, opines secreted by crown gall tumors induced by the bacterium. This regulation functions through the transcriptional repressor, AccR. However, actual transcription of the tra genes is regulated by autoinduction through the activator TraR and the substituted homoserine lactone second messenger, Agrobacterium autoinducer (AAI). We have identified a new regulatory element that modulates the response of TraR to AAI. The gene, called traM, suppresses TraR-AAI activation of transcription of tra genes carried on recombinant clones. The suppression could be relieved by increasing the expression of TraR but not by increasing AAI levels. traM is located between traR and traAF on pTiC58 and is transcribed in the clockwise direction. The 306-bp gene encodes an 11.2-kDa protein showing no significant relatedness to other proteins in the databases. Mutations in traM in pTiC58 conferred a transfer-constitutive phenotype, and strains harboring the Ti plasmid produced easily detectable amounts of AAI. These same mutations engineered into the transfer-constitutive Ti plasmid pTiC58 delta accR conferred a hyperconjugal phenotype and very high levels of AAI production. Expression of traM required TraR, indicating that transcription of the gene is regulated by the autoinduction system. TraM had no effect on the expression of traR, demonstrating that the suppressive effect is not due to repression of the gene encoding the activator. These results suggest that TraM is not a direct transcriptional regulator. Since the suppressive effect is demonstrable only when traM is overexpressed with respect to traR, we suggest that TraM functions to sequester TraR from the very small amounts of AAI produced under conditions when the agrocinopines are not present. PMID:7814335

  4. Pharmacological Inhibition of Microsomal Prostaglandin E Synthase-1 Suppresses Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Mediated Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bocci, Elena; Coletta, Isabella; Polenzani, Lorenzo; Mangano, Giorgina; Alisi, Maria Alessandra; Cazzolla, Nicola; Giachetti, Antonio; Ziche, Marina; Donnini, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Background Blockade of Prostaglandin (PG) E2 production via deletion of microsomal Prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) gene reduces tumor cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo on xenograft tumors. So far the therapeutic potential of the pharmacological inhibition of mPGES-1 has not been elucidated. PGE2 promotes epithelial tumor progression via multiple signaling pathways including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we evaluated the antitumor activity of AF3485, a compound of a novel family of human mPGES-1 inhibitors, in vitro and in vivo, in mice bearing human A431 xenografts overexpressing EGFR. Treatment of the human cell line A431 with interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) increased mPGES-1 expression, PGE2 production and induced EGFR phosphorylation, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) expression. AF3485 reduced PGE2 production, both in quiescent and in cells stimulated by IL-1β. AF3485 abolished IL-1β-induced activation of the EGFR, decreasing VEGF and FGF-2 expression, and tumor-mediated endothelial tube formation. In vivo, in A431 xenograft, AF3485, administered sub-chronically, decreased tumor growth, an effect related to inhibition of EGFR signalling, and to tumor microvessel rarefaction. In fact, we observed a decrease of EGFR phosphorylation, and VEGF and FGF-2 expression in tumours explanted from treated mice. Conclusion Our work demonstrates that the pharmacological inhibition of mPGES-1 reduces squamous carcinoma growth by suppressing PGE2 mediated-EGFR signalling and by impairing tumor associated angiogenesis. These results underscore the potential of mPGES-1 inhibitors as agents capable of controlling tumor growth. PMID:22815767

  5. Hormone-Mediated Pattern Formation in Seedling of Plants: a Competitive Growth Dynamics Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Mimura, Masayasu; Ohya, Tomoyuki; Oikawa, Noriko; Okabe, Hirotaka; Kai, Shoichi

    2001-10-01

    An ecologically relevant pattern formation process mediated by hormonal interactions among growing seedlings is modeled based on the experimental observations on the effects of indole acetic acid, which can act as an inhibitor and activator of root growth depending on its concentration. In the absence of any lateral root with constant hormone-sensitivity, the edge effect phenomenon is obtained depending on the secretion rate of hormone from the main root. Introduction of growth-stage-dependent hormone-sensitivity drastically amplifies the initial randomness, resulting in spatially irregular macroscopic patterns. When the lateral root growth is introduced, periodic patterns are obtained whose periodicity depends on the length of lateral roots. The growth-stage-dependent hormone-sensitivity and the lateral root growth are crucial for macroscopic periodic-pattern formation.

  6. Ipilimumab-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity of regulatory T cells ex vivo by nonclassical monocytes in melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Emanuela; Kusio-Kobialka, Monika; Foukas, Periklis G.; Baumgaertner, Petra; Meyer, Christiane; Ballabeni, Pierluigi; Michielin, Olivier; Weide, Benjamin; Romero, Pedro; Speiser, Daniel E.

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing immune responses with immune-modulatory monoclonal antibodies directed to inhibitory immune receptors is a promising modality in cancer therapy. Clinical efficacy has been demonstrated with antibodies blocking inhibitory immune checkpoints such as cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) or PD-1/PD-L1. Treatment with ipilimumab, a fully human CTLA-4–specific mAb, showed durable clinical efficacy in metastatic melanoma; its mechanism of action is, however, only partially understood. This is a study of 29 patients with advanced cutaneous melanoma treated with ipilimumab. We analyzed peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and matched melanoma metastases from 15 patients responding and 14 not responding to ipilimumab by multicolor flow cytometry, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay, and immunohistochemistry. PBMCs and matched tumor biopsies were collected 24 h before (i.e., baseline) and up to 4 wk after ipilimumab. Our findings show, to our knowledge for the first time, that ipilimumab can engage ex vivo FcγRIIIA (CD16)-expressing, nonclassical monocytes resulting in ADCC-mediated lysis of regulatory T cells (Tregs). In contrast, classical CD14++CD16− monocytes are unable to do so. Moreover, we show that patients responding to ipilimumab display significantly higher baseline peripheral frequencies of nonclassical monocytes compared with nonresponder patients. In the tumor microenvironment, responders have higher CD68+/CD163+ macrophage ratios at baseline and show decreased Treg infiltration after treatment. Together, our results suggest that anti–CTLA-4 therapy may target Tregs in vivo. Larger translational studies are, however, warranted to substantiate this mechanism of action of ipilimumab in patients. PMID:25918390

  7. Ultrasound-mediated interferon {beta} gene transfection inhibits growth of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Kazuki; Feril, Loreto B.; Tachibana, Katsuro; Takahashi, Akira; Matsuo, Miki; Endo, Hitomi; Harada, Yoshimi; Nakayama, Juichiro

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} Successful ultrasound-mediated transfection of melanoma (C32) cells with IFN-{beta} genes both in vitro and in vivo. {yields} Ultrasound-mediated IFN-{beta} transfection inhibited proliferation of melanoma cells in vitro. {yields} Ultrasound-mediated IFN-{beta} transfection inhibited melanoma tumor growth in vivo. -- Abstract: We investigated the effects of ultrasound-mediated transfection (sonotransfection) of interferon {beta} (IFN-{beta}) gene on melanoma (C32) both in vitro and in vivo. C32 cells were sonotransfected with IFN-{beta} in vitro. Subcutaneous C32 tumors in mice were sonicated weekly immediately after intra-tumor injection with IFN-{beta} genes mixed with microbubbles. Successful sonotransfection with IFN-{beta} gene in vitro was confirmed by ELISA, which resulted in C32 growth inhibition. In vivo, the growth ratio of tumors transfected with IFN-{beta} gene was significantly lower than the other experimental groups. These results may lead to a new method of treatment against melanoma and other hard-to-treat cancers.

  8. Regulatory and functional interactions of plant growth regulators and plant glutathione S-transferases (GSTs).

    PubMed

    Moons, Ann

    2005-01-01

    Plant glutathioneS-transferases (GSTs) are a heterogeneous superfamily of multifunctional proteins, grouped into six classes. The tau (GSTU) and phi (GSTF) class GSTs are the most represented ones and are plant-specific, whereas the smaller theta (GSTT) and zeta (GSTZ) classes are also found in animals. The lambda GSTs (GSTL) and the dehydroascorbate reductases (DHARs) are more distantly related. Plant GSTs perform a variety of pivotal catalytic and non-enzymatic functions in normal plant development and plant stress responses, roles that are only emerging. Catalytic functions include glutathione (GSH)-conjugation in the metabolic detoxification of herbicides and natural products. GSTs can also catalyze GSH-dependent peroxidase reactions that scavenge toxic organic hydroperoxides and protect from oxidative damage. GSTs can furthermore catalyze GSH-dependent isomerizations in endogenous metabolism, exhibit GSH-dependent thioltransferase safeguarding protein function from oxidative damage and DHAR activity functioning in redox homeostasis. Plant GSTs can also function as ligandins or binding proteins for phytohormones (i.e., auxins and cytokinins) or anthocyanins, thereby facilitating their distribution and transport. Finally, GSTs are also indirectly involved in the regulation of apoptosis and possibly also in stress signaling. Plant GST genes exhibit a diversity of expression patterns during biotic and abiotic stresses. Stress-induced plant growth regulators (i.e., jasmonic acid [JA], salicylic acid [SA], ethylene [ETH], and nitric oxide [NO] differentially activate GST gene expression. It is becoming increasingly evident that unique combinations of multiple, often interactive signaling pathways from various phytohormones and reactive oxygen species or antioxidants render the distinct transcriptional activation patterns of individual GSTs during stress. Underestimated post-transcriptional regulations of individual GSTs are becoming increasingly evident and roles

  9. TLR2 ligation protects effector T cells from regulatory T-cell mediated suppression and repolarizes T helper responses following MVA-based cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Amiset, Laurent; Fend, Laetitia; Gatard-Scheikl, Tania; Rittner, Karola; Duong, Vanessa; Rooke, Ronald; Muller, Sylviane; Bonnefoy, Jean-Yves; Préville, Xavier; Haegel, Hélène

    2012-11-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is hampered by the immunosuppression maintained by regulatory T cells (Tregs) in tumor-bearing hosts. Stimulation of the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) by Pam3Cys is known to affect Treg-mediated suppression. We found that Pam3Cys increases the proliferation of both CD4(+) effector T cells (Teffs) and Tregs co-cultured in vitro, but did not induce the proliferation of Tregs alone upon CD3 and CD28 stimulation. In a mouse model of RMA-MUC1 tumors, Pam3Cys was administered either alone or in combination with a modified vaccinia ankara (MVA)-based mucin 1 (MUC1) therapeutic vaccine. The combination of Pam3Cys with MVA-MUC1 (1) diminished splenic Treg/CD4(+) T-cell ratios to those found in tumor-free mice, (2) stimulated a specific anti-MUC1 interferon γ (IFNγ) response and (3) had a significant therapeutic effect on tumor growth and mouse survival. When CD4(+) Teffs and Tregs were isolated from Pam3Cys-treated mice, Teffs had become resistant to Treg-mediated suppression while upregulating the expression of BclL-x(L). Tregs from Pam3Cys-treated mice were fully suppressive for Teffs from naïve mice. Bcl-x(L) was induced by Pam3Cys with different kinetics in Tregs and Teffs. Teff from Pam3Cys-treated mice produced increased levels of Th1 and Th2-type cytokines and an interleukin (IL)-6-dependent secretion of IL-17 was observed in Teff:Treg co-cultures, suggesting that TLR2 stimulation had skewed the immune response toward a Th17 profile. Our results show for the first time that in a tumor-bearing host, TLR2 stimulation with Pam3Cys affects both Tregs and Teffs, protects Teff from Treg-mediated suppression and has strong therapeutic effects when combined with an MVA-based antitumor vaccine. PMID:23243590

  10. TLR2 ligation protects effector T cells from regulatory T-cell mediated suppression and repolarizes T helper responses following MVA-based cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Amiset, Laurent; Fend, Laetitia; Gatard-Scheikl, Tania; Rittner, Karola; Duong, Vanessa; Rooke, Ronald; Muller, Sylviane; Bonnefoy, Jean-Yves; Préville, Xavier; Haegel, Hélène

    2012-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is hampered by the immunosuppression maintained by regulatory T cells (Tregs) in tumor-bearing hosts. Stimulation of the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) by Pam3Cys is known to affect Treg-mediated suppression. We found that Pam3Cys increases the proliferation of both CD4+ effector T cells (Teffs) and Tregs co-cultured in vitro, but did not induce the proliferation of Tregs alone upon CD3 and CD28 stimulation. In a mouse model of RMA-MUC1 tumors, Pam3Cys was administered either alone or in combination with a modified vaccinia ankara (MVA)-based mucin 1 (MUC1) therapeutic vaccine. The combination of Pam3Cys with MVA-MUC1 (1) diminished splenic Treg/CD4+ T-cell ratios to those found in tumor-free mice, (2) stimulated a specific anti-MUC1 interferon γ (IFNγ) response and (3) had a significant therapeutic effect on tumor growth and mouse survival. When CD4+ Teffs and Tregs were isolated from Pam3Cys-treated mice, Teffs had become resistant to Treg-mediated suppression while upregulating the expression of BclL-xL. Tregs from Pam3Cys-treated mice were fully suppressive for Teffs from naïve mice. Bcl-xL was induced by Pam3Cys with different kinetics in Tregs and Teffs. Teff from Pam3Cys-treated mice produced increased levels of Th1 and Th2-type cytokines and an interleukin (IL)-6-dependent secretion of IL-17 was observed in Teff:Treg co-cultures, suggesting that TLR2 stimulation had skewed the immune response toward a Th17 profile. Our results show for the first time that in a tumor-bearing host, TLR2 stimulation with Pam3Cys affects both Tregs and Teffs, protects Teff from Treg-mediated suppression and has strong therapeutic effects when combined with an MVA-based antitumor vaccine. PMID:23243590

  11. How, with whom and when: an overview of CD147-mediated regulatory networks influencing matrix metalloproteinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Grass, G. Daniel; Toole, Bryan P.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) comprise a family of 23 zinc-dependent enzymes involved in various pathologic and physiologic processes. In cancer, MMPs contribute to processes from tumour initiation to establishment of distant metastases. Complex signalling and protein transport networks regulate MMP synthesis, cell surface presentation and release. Earlier attempts to disrupt MMP activity in patients have proven to be intolerable and with underwhelming clinical efficacy; thus targeting ancillary proteins that regulate MMP activity may be a useful therapeutic approach. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) was originally characterized as a factor present on lung cancer cells, which stimulated collagenase (MMP-1) production in fibroblasts. Subsequent studies demonstrated that EMMPRIN was identical with several other protein factors, including basigin (Bsg), all of which are now commonly termed CD147. CD147 modulates the synthesis and activity of soluble and membrane-bound [membrane-type MMPs (MT-MMPs)] in various contexts via homophilic/heterophilic cell interactions, vesicular shedding or cell-autonomous processes. CD147 also participates in inflammation, nutrient and drug transporter activity, microbial pathology and developmental processes. Despite the hundreds of manuscripts demonstrating CD147-mediated MMP regulation, the molecular underpinnings governing this process have not been fully elucidated. The present review summarizes our present knowledge of the complex regulatory systems influencing CD147 biology and provides a framework to understand how CD147 may influence MMP activity. PMID:26604323

  12. Transcriptome Profiling Reveals the Regulatory Mechanism Underlying Pollination Dependent and Parthenocarpic Fruit Set Mainly Mediated by Auxin and Gibberellin

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ning; Deng, Wei; Hu, Guojian; Hu, Nan; Li, Zhengguo

    2015-01-01

    Background Fruit set is a key process for crop production in tomato which occurs after successful pollination and fertilization naturally. However, parthenocarpic fruit development can be uncoupled from fertilization triggered by exogenous auxin or gibberellins (GAs). Global transcriptome knowledge during fruit initiation would help to characterize the molecular mechanisms by which these two hormones regulate pollination-dependent and -independent fruit set. Principal Findings In this work, digital gene expression tag profiling (DGE) technology was applied to compare the transcriptomes from pollinated and 2, 4-D/GA3-treated ovaries. Activation of carbohydrate metabolism, cell division and expansion as well as the down-regulation of MADS-box is a comprehensive regulatory pathway during pollination-dependent and parthenocarpic fruit set. The signaling cascades of auxin and GA are significantly modulated. The feedback regulations of Aux/IAAs and DELLA genes which functioned to fine-tune auxin and GA response respectively play fundamental roles in triggering fruit initiation. In addition, auxin regulates GA synthesis via up-regulation of GA20ox1 and down-regulation of KNOX. Accordingly, the effect of auxin on fruit set is mediated by GA via ARF2 and IAA9 down-regulation, suggesting that both pollination-dependent and parthenocarpic fruit set depend on the crosstalk between auxin and GA. Significance This study characterizes the transcriptomic features of ovary development and more importantly unravels the integral roles of auxin and GA on pollination-dependent and parthenocarpic fruit set. PMID:25909657

  13. Regulatory T cell-mediated resolution of lung injury: identification of potential target genes via expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Neil R.; D'Alessio, Franco R.; Tsushima, Kenji; Sidhaye, Venkataramana K.; Cheadle, Christopher; Grigoryev, Dmitry N.; Barnes, Kathleen C.

    2010-01-01

    In animal models of acute lung injury (ALI), gene expression studies have focused on the acute phase of illness, with little emphasis on resolution. In this study, the acute phase of intratracheal lipopolysaccharide (IT LPS)-induced lung injury was similar in wild-type (WT) and recombinase-activating gene-1-deficient (Rag-1−/−) lymphocyte-deficient mice, but resolution was impaired and resolution-phase lung gene expression remained different from baseline only in Rag-1−/− mice. By focusing on groups of genes involved in similar biological processes (gene ontologies) pertinent to inflammation and the immune response, we identified 102 genes at days 4 and 10 after IT LPS with significantly different expression between WT and Rag-1−/− mice. After adoptive transfer of isolated CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) to Rag-1−/− mice at the time of IT LPS, resolution was similar to that in WT mice. Of the 102 genes distinctly changed in either WT or Rag-1−/− mice from our 7 gene ontologies, 19 genes reverted from the Rag-1−/− to the WT pattern of expression after adoptive transfer of Tregs, implicating those 19 genes in Treg-mediated resolution of ALI. PMID:20028937

  14. Interferon Regulatory Factor-1 Mediates Alveolar Macrophage Pyroptosis During LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dongdong; Pan, Pinhua; Su, Xiaoli; Zhang, Lemeng; Qin, Qingwu; Tan, Hongyi; Huang, Li; Li, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previously, we demonstrated that pyroptosis in alveolar macrophages (AMs) plays an essential role in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury. However, the underlying mechanism remains largely unclear. Here, we show that the absence of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) in genetic knock-out mice strongly abrogates pyroptosis in AMs and alleviates the LPS-induced lung injury and systemic inflammation. Our study demonstrates that IRF-1 contributes to caspase-1 activation and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase activation and recruitment domain pyroptosome formation in AMs and leads to downstream inflammatory cytokine release, including that of IL-1β, IL-18, and HMGB1. The nuclear translocation of IRF-1 is linked to the presence of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Our findings suggest that pyroptosis and the downstream inflammatory response in AMs induced by LPS is a process that is dependent on TLR4-mediated up-regulation of IRF-1. In summary, IRF-1 plays a key role in controlling caspase-1-dependent pyroptosis and inflammation. PMID:26939040

  15. Cis-regulatory Changes at FLOWERING LOCUS T Mediate Natural Variation in Flowering Responses of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Christopher; Balasubramanian, Sureshkumar; Warthmann, Norman; Michael, Todd P.; Lempe, Janne; Sureshkumar, Sridevi; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Maloof, Julin N.; Borevitz, Justin O.; Chory, Joanne; Weigel, Detlef

    2009-01-01

    Flowering time, a critical adaptive trait, is modulated by several environmental cues. These external signals converge on a small set of genes that in turn mediate the flowering response. Mutant analysis and subsequent molecular studies have revealed that one of these integrator genes, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), responds to photoperiod and temperature cues, two environmental parameters that greatly influence flowering time. As the central player in the transition to flowering, the protein coding sequence of FT and its function are highly conserved across species. Using QTL mapping with a new advanced intercross-recombinant inbred line (AI-RIL) population, we show that a QTL tightly linked to FT contributes to natural variation in the flowering response to the combined effects of photoperiod and ambient temperature. Using heterogeneous inbred families (HIF) and introgression lines, we fine map the QTL to a 6.7 kb fragment in the FT promoter. We confirm by quantitative complementation that FT has differential activity in the two parental strains. Further support for FT underlying the QTL comes from a new approach, quantitative knockdown with artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs). Consistent with the causal sequence polymorphism being in the promoter, we find that the QTL affects FT expression. Taken together, these results indicate that allelic variation at pathway integrator genes such as FT can underlie phenotypic variability and that this may be achieved through cis-regulatory changes. PMID:19652183

  16. Identification of microRNAs and Their Target Genes Explores miRNA-Mediated Regulatory Network of Cytoplasmic Male Sterility Occurrence during Anther Development in Radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Xie, Yang; Xu, Liang; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Xianwen; Wang, Ronghua; Zhang, Yang; Muleke, Everlyne M; Liu, Liwang

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a type of endogenous non-coding small RNAs that play critical roles in plant growth and developmental processes. Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is typically a maternally inherited trait and widely used in plant heterosis utilization. However, the miRNA-mediated regulatory network of CMS occurrence during anther development remains largely unknown in radish. In this study, a comparative small RNAome sequencing was conducted in floral buds of CMS line 'WA' and its maintainer line 'WB' by high-throughput sequencing. A total of 162 known miRNAs belonging to 25 conserved and 24 non-conserved miRNA families were isolated and 27 potential novel miRNA families were identified for the first time in floral buds of radish. Of these miRNAs, 28 known and 14 potential novel miRNAs were differentially expressed during anther development. Several target genes for CMS occurrence-related miRNAs encode important transcription factors and functional proteins, which might be involved in multiple biological processes including auxin signaling pathways, signal transduction, miRNA target silencing, floral organ development, and organellar gene expression. Moreover, the expression patterns of several CMS occurrence-related miRNAs and their targets during three stages of anther development were validated by qRT-PCR. In addition, a potential miRNA-mediated regulatory network of CMS occurrence during anther development was firstly proposed in radish. These findings could contribute new insights into complex miRNA-mediated genetic regulatory network of CMS occurrence and advance our understanding of the roles of miRNAs during CMS occurrence and microspore formation in radish and other crops.

  17. Identification of microRNAs and Their Target Genes Explores miRNA-Mediated Regulatory Network of Cytoplasmic Male Sterility Occurrence during Anther Development in Radish (Raphanus sativus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Xie, Yang; Xu, Liang; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Xianwen; Wang, Ronghua; Zhang, Yang; Muleke, Everlyne M.; Liu, Liwang

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a type of endogenous non-coding small RNAs that play critical roles in plant growth and developmental processes. Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is typically a maternally inherited trait and widely used in plant heterosis utilization. However, the miRNA-mediated regulatory network of CMS occurrence during anther development remains largely unknown in radish. In this study, a comparative small RNAome sequencing was conducted in floral buds of CMS line ‘WA’ and its maintainer line ‘WB’ by high-throughput sequencing. A total of 162 known miRNAs belonging to 25 conserved and 24 non-conserved miRNA families were isolated and 27 potential novel miRNA families were identified for the first time in floral buds of radish. Of these miRNAs, 28 known and 14 potential novel miRNAs were differentially expressed during anther development. Several target genes for CMS occurrence-related miRNAs encode important transcription factors and functional proteins, which might be involved in multiple biological processes including auxin signaling pathways, signal transduction, miRNA target silencing, floral organ development, and organellar gene expression. Moreover, the expression patterns of several CMS occurrence-related miRNAs and their targets during three stages of anther development were validated by qRT-PCR. In addition, a potential miRNA-mediated regulatory network of CMS occurrence during anther development was firstly proposed in radish. These findings could contribute new insights into complex miRNA-mediated genetic regulatory network of CMS occurrence and advance our understanding of the roles of miRNAs during CMS occurrence and microspore formation in radish and other crops. PMID:27499756

  18. Identification of microRNAs and Their Target Genes Explores miRNA-Mediated Regulatory Network of Cytoplasmic Male Sterility Occurrence during Anther Development in Radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Xie, Yang; Xu, Liang; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Xianwen; Wang, Ronghua; Zhang, Yang; Muleke, Everlyne M; Liu, Liwang

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a type of endogenous non-coding small RNAs that play critical roles in plant growth and developmental processes. Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is typically a maternally inherited trait and widely used in plant heterosis utilization. However, the miRNA-mediated regulatory network of CMS occurrence during anther development remains largely unknown in radish. In this study, a comparative small RNAome sequencing was conducted in floral buds of CMS line 'WA' and its maintainer line 'WB' by high-throughput sequencing. A total of 162 known miRNAs belonging to 25 conserved and 24 non-conserved miRNA families were isolated and 27 potential novel miRNA families were identified for the first time in floral buds of radish. Of these miRNAs, 28 known and 14 potential novel miRNAs were differentially expressed during anther development. Several target genes for CMS occurrence-related miRNAs encode important transcription factors and functional proteins, which might be involved in multiple biological processes including auxin signaling pathways, signal transduction, miRNA target silencing, floral organ development, and organellar gene expression. Moreover, the expression patterns of several CMS occurrence-related miRNAs and their targets during three stages of anther development were validated by qRT-PCR. In addition, a potential miRNA-mediated regulatory network of CMS occurrence during anther development was firstly proposed in radish. These findings could contribute new insights into complex miRNA-mediated genetic regulatory network of CMS occurrence and advance our understanding of the roles of miRNAs during CMS occurrence and microspore formation in radish and other crops. PMID:27499756

  19. Seeking security or growth: a regulatory focus perspective on motivations in romantic relationships.

    PubMed

    Winterheld, Heike A; Simpson, Jeffry A

    2011-11-01

    Using a multimethod approach, we examined how regulatory focus shapes people's perceptual, behavioral, and emotional responses in different situations in romantic relationships. We first examined how chronic regulatory focus affects romantic partners' support perceptions and problem-solving behaviors while they were engaged in a conflict resolution discussion (Study 1). Next, we experimentally manipulated regulatory focus and tested its effects on partner perceptions when individuals recalled a prior conflict resolution discussion (Study 2). We then examined how chronic regulatory focus influences individuals' emotional responses to hypothetical relationship events (Study 3) and identified specific partner behaviors to which people should respond with regulatory goal-congruent emotions (Study 4). Strongly prevention-focused people perceived their partners as more distancing and less supportive during conflict (Studies 1 and 2), approached conflict resolution by discussing the details related to the conflict (Study 1), and experienced a negative relationship outcome with more agitation (Study 3). Strongly promotion-focused people perceived their partners as more supportive and less distancing (Studies 1 and 2), displayed more creative conflict resolution behavior (Study 1), and experienced a negative relationship outcome with more sadness and a favorable outcome with more positive emotions (Study 3). In Study 4, recalling irresponsible and responsible partner behaviors was associated with experiencing more prevention-focused emotions, whereas recalling affectionate and neglectful partner behaviors was associated with more promotion-focused emotions. The findings show that regulatory focus and approach-avoidance motivations influence certain interpersonal processes in similar ways, but regulatory focus theory also generates novel predictions on which approach-avoidance models are silent.

  20. PTEN modulates vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated signaling and angiogenic effects.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianhua; Kontos, Christopher D

    2002-03-29

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase is activated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and many of the angiogenic cellular responses of VEGF are regulated by the lipid products of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. The tumor suppressor PTEN has been shown to down-regulate phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling, yet the effects of PTEN on VEGF-mediated signaling and angiogenesis are unknown. Inhibition of endogenous PTEN in cultured endothelial cells by adenovirus-mediated overexpression of a dominant negative PTEN mutant (PTEN-C/S) enhanced VEGF-mediated Akt phosphorylation, and this effect correlated with decreases in caspase-3 cleavage, caspase-3 activity, and DNA degradation after induction of apoptosis with tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Overexpression of PTEN-C/S also enhanced VEGF-mediated endothelial cell proliferation and migration. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type PTEN inhibited the anti-apoptotic, proliferative, and chemotactic effects of VEGF. Moreover, PTEN-C/S increased the length of vascular sprouts in the rat aortic ring assay and modulated VEGF-mediated tube formation in an in vitro angiogenesis assay, whereas PTEN-wild type inhibited these effects. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that PTEN potently modulates VEGF-mediated signaling and function and that PTEN is a viable target in therapeutic approaches to promote or inhibit angiogenesis.

  1. Selective Photoreceptor Gene Knock-out Reveals a Regulatory Role for the Growth Behavior of Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rashmi; Pathak, Gopal; Drepper, Thomas; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    The plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae (Ps) is a well-established model organism for bacterial infection of plants. The genome sequences of two pathovars, pv. syringae and pv. tomato, revealed one gene encoding a blue and two genes encoding red/far red light-sensing photoreceptors. Continuing former molecular characterization of the photoreceptor proteins, we here report selective photoreceptor gene disruption for pv. tomato aiming at identification of potentially regulatory functions of these photoreceptors. Transformation of Ps cells with linear DNA constructs yielded interposon mutations of the corresponding genes. Cell growth studies of the generated photoreceptor knock-out mutants revealed their role in light-dependent regulation of cell growth and motility. Disruption of the blue-light (BL) receptor gene caused a growth deregulation, in line with an observed increased virulence of this mutant (Moriconi et al., Plant J., 2013, 76, 322). Bacterial phytochrome-1 (BphP1) deletion mutant caused unaltered cell growth, but a stronger swarming capacity. Inactivation of its ortholog, BphP2, however, caused reduced growth and remarkably altered dendritic swarming behavior. Combined knock-out of both bacteriophytochromes reproduced the swarming pattern observed for the BphP2 mutant alone. A triple knock-out mutant showed a growth rate between that of the BL (deregulation) and the phytochrome-2 mutant (growth reduction).

  2. Selective Photoreceptor Gene Knock-out Reveals a Regulatory Role for the Growth Behavior of Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rashmi; Pathak, Gopal; Drepper, Thomas; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    The plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae (Ps) is a well-established model organism for bacterial infection of plants. The genome sequences of two pathovars, pv. syringae and pv. tomato, revealed one gene encoding a blue and two genes encoding red/far red light-sensing photoreceptors. Continuing former molecular characterization of the photoreceptor proteins, we here report selective photoreceptor gene disruption for pv. tomato aiming at identification of potentially regulatory functions of these photoreceptors. Transformation of Ps cells with linear DNA constructs yielded interposon mutations of the corresponding genes. Cell growth studies of the generated photoreceptor knock-out mutants revealed their role in light-dependent regulation of cell growth and motility. Disruption of the blue-light (BL) receptor gene caused a growth deregulation, in line with an observed increased virulence of this mutant (Moriconi et al., Plant J., 2013, 76, 322). Bacterial phytochrome-1 (BphP1) deletion mutant caused unaltered cell growth, but a stronger swarming capacity. Inactivation of its ortholog, BphP2, however, caused reduced growth and remarkably altered dendritic swarming behavior. Combined knock-out of both bacteriophytochromes reproduced the swarming pattern observed for the BphP2 mutant alone. A triple knock-out mutant showed a growth rate between that of the BL (deregulation) and the phytochrome-2 mutant (growth reduction). PMID:27289014

  3. Tumorigenic properties of iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) mediated by its specific 73-amino acids insert.

    PubMed

    Maffettone, Carmen; Chen, Guohua; Drozdov, Ignat; Ouzounis, Christos; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2010-04-13

    Iron regulatory proteins, IRP1 and IRP2, bind to mRNAs harboring iron responsive elements and control their expression. IRPs may also perform additional functions. Thus, IRP1 exhibited apparent tumor suppressor properties in a tumor xenograft model. Here we examined the effects of IRP2 in a similar setting. Human H1299 lung cancer cells or clones engineered for tetracycline-inducible expression of wild type IRP2, or the deletion mutant IRP2(Delta73) (lacking a specific insert of 73 amino acids), were injected subcutaneously into nude mice. The induction of IRP2 profoundly stimulated the growth of tumor xenografts, and this response was blunted by addition of tetracycline in the drinking water of the animals, to turnoff the IRP2 transgene. Interestingly, IRP2(Delta73) failed to promote tumor growth above control levels. As expected, xenografts expressing the IRP2 transgene exhibited high levels of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1); however, the expression of other known IRP targets was not affected. Moreover, these xenografts manifested increased c-MYC levels and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. A microarray analysis identified distinct gene expression patterns between control and tumors containing IRP2 or IRP1 transgenes. By contrast, gene expression profiles of control and IRP2(Delta73)-related tumors were more similar, consistently with their growth phenotype. Collectively, these data demonstrate an apparent pro-oncogenic activity of IRP2 that depends on its specific 73 amino acids insert, and provide further evidence for a link between IRPs and cancer biology.

  4. Environmental toxicants perturb human Sertoli cell adhesive function via changes in F-actin organization mediated by actin regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D.; Tang, Elizabeth I.; Wong, Chris K.C.; Lee, Will M.; John, Constance M.; Turek, Paul J.; Silvestrini, Bruno; Cheng, C. Yan

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Can human Sertoli cells cultured in vitro and that have formed an epithelium be used as a model to monitor toxicant-induced junction disruption and to better understand the mechanism(s) by which toxicants disrupt cell adhesion at the Sertoli cell blood–testis barrier (BTB)? SUMMARY ANSWER Our findings illustrate that human Sertoli cells cultured in vitro serve as a reliable system to monitor the impact of environmental toxicants on the BTB function. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Suspicions of a declining trend in semen quality and a concomitant increase in exposures to environmental toxicants over the past decades reveal the need of an in vitro system that efficiently and reliably monitors the impact of toxicants on male reproductive function. Furthermore, studies in rodents have confirmed that environmental toxicants impede Sertoli cell BTB function in vitro and in vivo. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE AND DURATION We examined the effects of two environmental toxicants: cadmium chloride (0.5–20 µM) and bisphenol A (0.4–200 µM) on human Sertoli cell function. Cultured Sertoli cells from three men were used in this study, which spanned an 18-month period. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Human Sertoli cells from three subjects were cultured in F12/DMEM containing 5% fetal bovine serum. Changes in protein expression were monitored by immunoblotting using specific antibodies. Immunofluorescence analyses were used to assess changes in the distribution of adhesion proteins, F-actin and actin regulatory proteins following exposure to two toxicants: cadmium chloride and bisphenol A (BPA). MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Human Sertoli cells were sensitive to cadmium and BPA toxicity. Changes in the localization of cell adhesion proteins were mediated by an alteration of the actin-based cytoskeleton. This alteration of F-actin network in Sertoli cells as manifested by truncation and depolymerization of actin microfilaments at the Sertoli cell BTB was caused by

  5. The effect of cell growth phase on the regulatory cross-talk between flagellar and Spi1 virulence gene expression.

    PubMed

    Mouslim, Chakib; Hughes, Kelly T

    2014-03-01

    The flagellar regulon controls Salmonella biofilm formation, virulence gene expression and the production of the major surface antigen present on the cell surface: flagellin. At the top of a flagellar regulatory hierarchy is the master operon, flhDC, which encodes the FlhD₄C₂ transcriptional complex required for the expression of flagellar, chemotaxis and Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (Spi1) genes. Of six potential transcriptional start-sites within the flhDC promoter region, only two, P1(flhDC) and P5(flhDC), were functional in a wild-type background, while P6(flhDC) was functional in the absence of CRP. These promoters are transcribed differentially to control either flagellar or Spi1 virulent gene expression at different stages of cell growth. Transcription from P1(flhDC) initiates flagellar assembly and a negative autoregulatory loop through FlhD₄C₂-dependent transcription of the rflM gene, which encodes a repressor of flhDC transcription. Transcription from P1(flhDC) also initiates transcription of the Spi1 regulatory gene, hilD, whose product, in addition to activating Spi1 genes, also activates transcription of the flhDC P5 promoter later in the cell growth phase. The regulators of flhDC transcription (RcsB, LrhA, RflM, HilD, SlyA and RtsB) also exert their control at different stages of the cell growth phase and are also subjected to cell growth phase control. This dynamic of flhDC transcription separates the roles of FlhD₄C₂ transcriptional activation into an early cell growth phase role for flagellar production from a late cell growth phase role in virulence gene expression.

  6. Collapsin response mediator protein 4 regulates growth cone dynamics through the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Khazaei, Mohamad R; Girouard, Marie-Pier; Alchini, Ricardo; Ong Tone, Stephan; Shimada, Tadayuki; Bechstedt, Susanne; Cowan, Mitra; Guillet, Dominique; Wiseman, Paul W; Brouhard, Gary; Cloutier, Jean Francois; Fournier, Alyson E

    2014-10-24

    Coordinated control of the growth cone cytoskeleton underlies axon extension and guidance. Members of the collapsin response mediator protein (CRMP) family of cytosolic phosphoproteins regulate the microtubule and actin cytoskeleton, but their roles in regulating growth cone dynamics remain largely unexplored. Here, we examine how CRMP4 regulates the growth cone cytoskeleton. Hippocampal neurons from CRMP4-/- mice exhibited a selective decrease in axon extension and reduced growth cone area, whereas overexpression of CRMP4 enhanced the formation and length of growth cone filopodia. Biochemically, CRMP4 can impact both microtubule assembly and F-actin bundling in vitro. Through a structure function analysis of CRMP4, we found that the effects of CRMP4 on axon growth and growth cone morphology were dependent on microtubule assembly, whereas filopodial extension relied on actin bundling. Intriguingly, anterograde movement of EB3 comets, which track microtubule protrusion, slowed significantly in neurons derived from CRMP4-/- mice, and rescue of microtubule dynamics required CRMP4 activity toward both the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton. Together, this study identified a dual role for CRMP4 in regulating the actin and microtubule growth cone cytoskeleton. PMID:25225289

  7. Surface observation for seed-mediated growth attachment of gold nanoparticles on a glassy carbon substrate.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Munetaka; Yamaguchi, Shin-Ya; Zhang, Jingdong

    2009-02-01

    A seed-mediated growth method for surface modification was applied to the attachment of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to glassy carbon (GC) surfaces. By simply immersing a GC plate at first into a seed solution containing 4 nm Au nano-seed particles and then into a growth solution containing HAuCl(4), ascorbic acid and cetyltrimethyammonium bromide, AuNPs could be successfully attached to the GC surface via the growth of nanoparticles. A possible control of the size and density of AuNPs on GC was examined by observing surface images with a field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) after several preparations with different immersion times. Compared with previous results on the growth of AuNPs on indium tin oxide (ITO) surfaces, it was characteristic that the AuNPs attached to GC surfaces exhibited smaller size and higher density as well as a flatter and non-crystal-like morphology. In addition, for performing the dense attachment of regular nano-sized AuNPs on GC surfaces, immersion for 2 h into the growth solution was sufficient. Longer immersion for 24 h caused an irregular growth of bold Au micro-crystals, while 24 h was necessary in the case of AuNPs on ITO surfaces. Shorter seeding and growth times were found to be effective for a sparse attachment of smaller Au nanoparticles whose size was ca. 20 nm. It was clarified that the seed-mediated growth method for surface modification was valid for fabricating a nanointerface composed of AuNPs on GC surfaces.

  8. IL4 receptor α mediates enhanced glucose and glutamine metabolism to support breast cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Venmar, Katherine T; Kimmel, Danielle W; Cliffel, David E; Fingleton, Barbara

    2015-05-01

    The type II interleukin-4 receptor (IL4R) is expressed in human breast cancer, and in murine models thereof. It is activated by interleukin-4 (IL4), a cytokine produced predominantly by immune cells. Previously, we showed that expression of IL4Rα, a signaling component of IL4R, mediates enhanced metastatic growth through promotion of tumor cell survival and proliferation. In lymphocytes, these processes are supported by increased glucose and glutamine metabolism, and B lymphocyte survival is dependent upon IL4/IL4R-induced glucose metabolism. However, it is unknown whether IL4R-mediated metabolic reprogramming could support tumor growth. Here, we show that IL4Rα expression increases proliferation thus enhancing primary mammary tumor growth. In vitro, IL4-enhanced glucose consumption and lactate production in 4T1 cells was mediated by IL4Rα. Expression of the glucose transporter GLUT1 increased in response to IL4 in vitro, and enhanced GLUT1 expression was associated with the presence of IL4Rα in 4T1 mammary tumors in vivo. Although IL4 treatment did not induce changes in glucose metabolism in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells, it increased expression of the main glutamine transporter, ASCT2, and enhanced glutamine consumption in both MDA-MB-231 and 4T1 cells. Pharmacologic inhibition of glutamine metabolism with compound 968 blocked IL4/IL4Rα-increased cell number in both cell lines. Our results demonstrate that IL4R mediates enhanced glucose and glutamine metabolism in 4T1 cancer cells, and that IL4-induced growth is supported by IL4/IL4R-enhanced glutamine metabolism in both human and murine mammary cancer cells. This highlights IL4Rα as a possible target for effective breast cancer therapy.

  9. MACROD2 overexpression mediates estrogen independent growth and tamoxifen resistance in breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mohseni, Morassa; Cidado, Justin; Croessmann, Sarah; Cravero, Karen; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Wong, Hong Yuen; Scharpf, Rob; Zabransky, Daniel J.; Abukhdeir, Abde M.; Garay, Joseph P.; Wang, Grace M.; Beaver, Julia A.; Cochran, Rory L.; Blair, Brian G.; Rosen, D. Marc; Erlanger, Bracha; Argani, Pedram; Hurley, Paula J.; Lauring, Josh; Park, Ben Ho

    2014-01-01

    Tamoxifen is effective for treating estrogen receptor-alpha (ER) positive breast cancers. However, few molecular mediators of tamoxifen resistance have been elucidated. Here we describe a previously unidentified gene, MACROD2 that confers tamoxifen resistance and estrogen independent growth. We found MACROD2 is amplified and overexpressed in metastatic tamoxifen-resistant tumors. Transgene overexpression of MACROD2 in breast cancer cell lines results in tamoxifen resistance, whereas RNAi-mediated gene knock down reverses this phenotype. MACROD2 overexpression also leads to estrogen independent growth in xenograft assays. Mechanistically, MACROD2 increases p300 binding to estrogen response elements in a subset of ER regulated genes. Primary breast cancers and matched metastases demonstrate MACROD2 expression can change with disease evolution, and increased expression and amplification of MACROD2 in primary tumors is associated with worse overall survival. These studies establish MACROD2 as a key mediator of estrogen independent growth and tamoxifen resistance, as well as a potential novel target for diagnostics and therapy. PMID:25422431

  10. Trauma or growth after a natural disaster? The mediating role of rumination processes

    PubMed Central

    García, Felipe E.; Cova, Félix; Rincón, Paulina; Vázquez, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test a cognitive model of posttraumatic symptoms (PTS) and posttraumatic growth (PTG) after exposure to a natural disaster. It was hypothesized that although subjective severity of trauma would be related to the severity of PTS, this relation would be mediated by brooding and cognitive strategies related to the presence of repetitive negative content in thoughts. Furthermore, the relation between severity and PTG would be fully mediated by deliberate rumination (DR), cognitive strategies related to conscious efforts focused on handling the event. To evaluate the cognitive model, adults (N=351) who lost their homes as a result of the earthquake and tsunami that occurred in Chile on February 27, 2010, were selected. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data. The resulting model had adequate indices of goodness adjustment and showed that brooding completely mediated the relation between subjective severity and PTS, and DR completely mediated the relation between subjective severity, brooding, and PTG. These results highlight the role of both the content and process of rumination in mediating the association between subjective severity of trauma, PTS, and PTG. The implications of these results for a more comprehensive model of symptom severity that occurs after trauma are discussed. PMID:26234365

  11. A mitochondrial kinase complex is essential to mediate an ERK1/2-dependent phosphorylation of a key regulatory protein in steroid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Poderoso, Cecilia; Converso, Daniela P; Maloberti, Paula; Duarte, Alejandra; Neuman, Isabel; Galli, Soledad; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Paz, Cristina; Carreras, María C; Poderoso, Juan J; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2008-01-16

    ERK1/2 is known to be involved in hormone-stimulated steroid synthesis, but its exact roles and the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Both ERK1/2 phosphorylation and steroidogenesis may be triggered by cAMP/cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-dependent and-independent mechanisms; however, ERK1/2 activation by cAMP results in a maximal steroidogenic rate, whereas canonical activation by epidermal growth factor (EGF) does not. We demonstrate herein by Western blot analysis and confocal studies that temporal mitochondrial ERK1/2 activation is obligatory for PKA-mediated steroidogenesis in the Leydig-transformed MA-10 cell line. PKA activity leads to the phosphorylation of a constitutive mitochondrial MEK1/2 pool with a lower effect in cytosolic MEKs, while EGF allows predominant cytosolic MEK activation and nuclear pERK1/2 localization. These results would explain why PKA favors a more durable ERK1/2 activation in mitochondria than does EGF. By means of ex vivo experiments, we showed that mitochondrial maximal steroidogenesis occurred as a result of the mutual action of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein -a key regulatory component in steroid biosynthesis-, active ERK1/2 and PKA. Our results indicate that there is an interaction between mitochondrial StAR and ERK1/2, involving a D domain with sequential basic-hydrophobic motifs similar to ERK substrates. As a result of this binding and only in the presence of cholesterol, ERK1/2 phosphorylates StAR at Ser(232). Directed mutagenesis of Ser(232) to a non-phosphorylable amino acid such as Ala (StAR S232A) inhibited in vitro StAR phosphorylation by active ERK1/2. Transient transfection of MA-10 cells with StAR S232A markedly reduced the yield of progesterone production. In summary, here we show that StAR is a novel substrate of ERK1/2, and that mitochondrial ERK1/2 is part of a multimeric protein kinase complex that regulates cholesterol transport. The role of MAPKs in mitochondrial function is underlined.

  12. Assisted curation of regulatory interactions and growth conditions of OxyR in E. coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Gama-Castro, Socorro; Rinaldi, Fabio; López-Fuentes, Alejandra; Balderas-Martínez, Yalbi Itzel; Clematide, Simon; Ellendorff, Tilia Renate; Santos-Zavaleta, Alberto; Marques-Madeira, Hernani; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Given the current explosion of data within original publications generated in the field of genomics, a recognized bottleneck is the transfer of such knowledge into comprehensive databases. We have for years organized knowledge on transcriptional regulation reported in the original literature of Escherichia coli K-12 into RegulonDB (http://regulondb.ccg.unam.mx), our database that is currently supported by >5000 papers. Here, we report a first step towards the automatic biocuration of growth conditions in this corpus. Using the OntoGene text-mining system (http://www.ontogene.org), we extracted and manually validated regulatory interactions and growth conditions in a new approach based on filters that enable the curator to select informative sentences from preprocessed full papers. Based on a set of 48 papers dealing with oxidative stress by OxyR, we were able to retrieve 100% of the OxyR regulatory interactions present in RegulonDB, including the transcription factors and their effect on target genes. Our strategy was designed to extract, as we did, their growth conditions. This result provides a proof of concept for a more direct and efficient curation process, and enables us to define the strategy of the subsequent steps to be implemented for a semi-automatic curation of original literature dealing with regulation of gene expression in bacteria. This project will enhance the efficiency and quality of the curation of knowledge present in the literature of gene regulation, and contribute to a significant increase in the encoding of the regulatory network of E. coli. RegulonDB Database URL: http://regulondb.ccg.unam.mx OntoGene URL: http://www.ontogene.org.

  13. Why are people with high self-control happier? The effect of trait self-control on happiness as mediated by regulatory focus

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Tracy T. L.; Gillebaart, Marleen; Kroese, Floor; De Ridder, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Background: While self-control has often been related to positive outcomes in life such as higher academic achievements and better health, recent insights reveal that people with high trait self-control (TSC) may even experience greater life satisfaction or happiness. Objective: The current study further scrutinizes this potential association between TSC and happiness, and examines how regulatory focus, defined as the way people frame and direct their goal pursuit strategies, plays a role in this relationship. Accordingly, the present study examines the mediating role of regulatory-focus (promotion and prevention focus) on the relationship between TSC and happiness. Method: Data was collected from 545 individuals (65.9% female, Mage = 27.52 years) regarding their TSC, regulatory focus, and happiness. Results: Mediation analyses demonstrate that TSC positively predicts happiness, while this effect was partially mediated by relatively more promotion focus and less prevention focus. Conclusion: Results suggest that people with higher TSC are happier possibly because they are: (1) more promotion-focused on acquiring positive gains thereby facilitating more approach-oriented behaviors, and (2) less prevention-focused on avoiding losses thereby reducing avoidance-oriented behaviors. These findings are relevant for topical scientific debates regarding the underlying mechanisms of self-control regarding initiatory and inhibitory behaviors. PMID:25071683

  14. Tumor sialylation impedes T cell mediated anti-tumor responses while promoting tumor associated-regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Perdicchio, Maurizio; Cornelissen, Lenneke A M; Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Engels, Steef; Verstege, Marleen I; Boon, Louis; Geerts, Dirk; van Kooyk, Yvette; Unger, Wendy W J

    2016-02-23

    The increased presence of sialylated glycans on the tumor surface has been linked to poor prognosis, yet the effects on tumor-specific T cell immunity are hardly studied. We here show that hypersialylation of B16 melanoma substantially influences tumor growth by preventing the formation of effector T cells and facilitating the presence of high regulatory T cell (Treg) frequencies. Knock-down of the sialic acid transporter created "sialic acid low" tumors, that grew slower in-vivo than hypersialylated tumors, altered the Treg/Teffector balance, favoring immunological tumor control. The enhanced effector T cell response in developing "sialic acid low" tumors was preceded by and dependent on an increased influx and activity of Natural Killer (NK) cells. Thus, tumor hypersialylation orchestrates immune escape at the level of NK and Teff/Treg balance within the tumor microenvironment, herewith dampening tumor-specific T cell control. Reducing sialylation provides a therapeutic option to render tumors permissive to immune attack. PMID:26741508

  15. Regulatory T Cells Promote β-Catenin–Mediated Epithelium-to-Mesenchyme Transition During Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Shanshan; Pan, Xiujie; Xu, Long; Yang, Zhihua; Guo, Renfeng; Gu, Yongqing; Li, Ruoxi; Wang, Qianjun; Xiao, Fengjun; Du, Li; Zhou, Pingkun; Zhu, Maoxiang

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis results from thoracic radiation therapy and severely limits radiation therapy approaches. CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}FoxP3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs) as well as epithelium-to-mesenchyme transition (EMT) cells are involved in pulmonary fibrosis induced by multiple factors. However, the mechanisms of Tregs and EMT cells in irradiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the influence of Tregs on EMT in radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Methods and Materials: Mice thoraxes were irradiated (20 Gy), and Tregs were depleted by intraperitoneal injection of a monoclonal anti-CD25 antibody 2 hours after irradiation and every 7 days thereafter. Mice were treated on days 3, 7, and 14 and 1, 3, and 6 months post irradiation. The effectiveness of Treg depletion was assayed via flow cytometry. EMT and β-catenin in lung tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry. Tregs isolated from murine spleens were cultured with mouse lung epithelial (MLE) 12 cells, and short interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of β-catenin in MLE 12 cells was used to explore the effects of Tregs on EMT and β-catenin via flow cytometry and Western blotting. Results: Anti-CD25 antibody treatment depleted Tregs efficiently, attenuated the process of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis, hindered EMT, and reduced β-catenin accumulation in lung epithelial cells in vivo. The coculture of Tregs with irradiated MLE 12 cells showed that Tregs could promote EMT in MLE 12 cells and that the effect of Tregs on EMT was partially abrogated by β-catenin knockdown in vitro. Conclusions: Tregs can promote EMT in accelerating radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. This process is partially mediated through β-catenin. Our study suggests a new mechanism for EMT, promoted by Tregs, that accelerates radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

  16. Activation of PPARalpha inhibits IGF-I-mediated growth and survival responses in medulloblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Urbanska, Katarzyna; Pannizzo, Paola; Grabacka, Maja; Croul, Sidney; Del Valle, Luis; Khalili, Kamel; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2008-09-01

    Recent studies suggest a potential role of lipid lowering drugs, fibrates and statins, in anticancer treatment. One candidate for tumor chemoprevention is fenofibrate, which is a potent agonist of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). Our results demonstrate elevated expression of PPARalpha in the nuclei of neoplatic cells in 12 out of 13 cases of medulloblastoma, and of PPARgamma in six out of 13 cases. Further analysis demonstrated that aggressive mouse medulloblastoma cells, BsB8, express PPARalpha in the absence PPARgamma, and human medulloblastoma cells, D384 and Daoy, express both PPARalpha and PPARgamma. Mouse and human cells responded to fenofibrate by a significant increase of PPAR-mediated transcriptional activity, and by a gradual accumulation of cells in G1 and G2/M phase of the cell cycle, leading to the inhibition of cell proliferation and elevated apoptosis. Preincubation of BsB8 cells with fenofibrate attenuated IGF-I-induced IRS-1, Akt, ERKs and GSK3beta phosphorylation, and inhibited clonogenic growth. In Daoy and D384 cells, fenofibrate also inhibited IGF-I-mediated growth responses, and simultaneous delivery of fenofibrate with low dose of the IGF-IR inhibitor, NVP-AEW541, completely abolished their clonogenic growth and survival. These results indicate a strong supportive role of fenofibrate in chemoprevention against IGF-I-induced growth responses in medulloblastoma.

  17. GH3-mediated auxin homeostasis links growth regulation with stress adaptation response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Eun; Park, Ju-Young; Kim, Youn-Sung; Staswick, Paul E; Jeon, Jin; Yun, Ju; Kim, Sun-Young; Kim, Jungmook; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Park, Chung-Mo

    2007-03-30

    Plants constantly monitor environmental fluctuations to optimize their growth and metabolism. One example is adaptive growth occurring in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we demonstrate that GH3-mediated auxin homeostasis is an essential constituent of the complex network of auxin actions that regulates stress adaptation responses in Arabidopsis. Endogenous auxin pool is regulated, at least in part, through negative feedback by a group of auxin-inducible GH3 genes encoding auxin-conjugating enzymes. An Arabidopsis mutant, wes1-D, in which a GH3 gene WES1 is activated by nearby insertion of the (35)S enhancer, exhibited auxin-deficient traits, including reduced growth and altered leaf shape. Interestingly, WES1 is also induced by various stress conditions as well as by salicylic acid and abscisic acid. Accordingly, wes1-D was resistant to both biotic and abiotic stresses, and stress-responsive genes, such as pathogenesis-related genes and CBF genes, were upregulated in this mutant. In contrast, a T-DNA insertional mutant showed reduced stress resistance. We therefore propose that GH3-mediated growth suppression directs reallocation of metabolic resources to resistance establishment and represents the fitness costs of induced resistance.

  18. Novel Regulation of Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF2)-mediated Cell Growth by Polysialic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Sayaka; Hane, Masaya; Kitajima, Ken; Sato, Chihiro

    2012-01-01

    Polysialic acid (polySia) is a unique polysaccharide that modifies neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) spatiotemporally. Recently, we demonstrated that polySia functions as a reservoir for several neurotrophic factors and neurotransmitters. Here, we showed the direct interaction between polySia and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) by native-PAGE, gel filtration, and surface plasmon resonance. The minimum chain length of polySia required for the interaction with FGF2 was 17. Compared with heparan sulfate, a well known glycosaminoglycan capable of forming a complex with FGF2, polySia formed a larger complex with distinct properties in facilitating oligomerization of FGF2, as well as in binding to FGF receptors. In polySia-NCAM-expressing NIH-3T3 cells, which were established by transfecting cells with either of the plasmids for the expression of the polysialyltransferases ST8SiaII/STX and ST8SiaIV/PST that can polysialylate NCAM, FGF2-stimulated cell growth, but not cell survival, was inhibited. Taken together, these results suggest that polySia-NCAM might be involved in the regulation of FGF2-FGF receptor signaling through the direct binding of FGF2 in a manner distinct from heparan sulfate. PMID:22158871

  19. Preservation of Gene Duplication Increases the Regulatory Spectrum of Ribosomal Protein Genes and Enhances Growth under Stress.

    PubMed

    Parenteau, Julie; Lavoie, Mathieu; Catala, Mathieu; Malik-Ghulam, Mustafa; Gagnon, Jules; Abou Elela, Sherif

    2015-12-22

    In baker's yeast, the majority of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) are duplicated, and it was recently proposed that such duplications are preserved via the functional specialization of the duplicated genes. However, the origin and nature of duplicated RPGs' (dRPGs) functional specificity remain unclear. In this study, we show that differences in dRPG functions are generated by variations in the modality of gene expression and, to a lesser extent, by protein sequence. Analysis of the sequence and expression patterns of non-intron-containing RPGs indicates that each dRPG is controlled by specific regulatory sequences modulating its expression levels in response to changing growth conditions. Homogenization of dRPG sequences reduces cell tolerance to growth under stress without changing the number of expressed genes. Together, the data reveal a model where duplicated genes provide a means for modulating the expression of ribosomal proteins in response to stress. PMID:26686636

  20. Drosophila Tribbles Antagonizes Insulin Signaling-Mediated Growth and Metabolism via Interactions with Akt Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rahul; Sebo, Zachary; Pence, Laramie; Dobens, Leonard L.

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila Tribbles (Trbl) is the founding member of the Trib family of kinase-like docking proteins that modulate cell signaling during proliferation, migration and growth. In a wing misexpression screen for Trbl interacting proteins, we identified the Ser/Thr protein kinase Akt1. Given the central role of Akt1 in insulin signaling, we tested the function of Trbl in larval fat body, a tissue where rapid increases in size are exquisitely sensitive to insulin/insulin-like growth factor levels. Consistent with a role in antagonizing insulin-mediated growth, trbl RNAi knockdown in the fat body increased cell size, advanced the timing of pupation and increased levels of circulating triglyceride. Complementarily, overexpression of Trbl reduced fat body cell size, decreased overall larval size, delayed maturation and lowered levels of triglycerides, while circulating glucose levels increased. The conserved Trbl kinase domain is required for function in vivo and for interaction with Akt in a yeast two-hybrid assay. Consistent with direct regulation of Akt, overexpression of Trbl in the fat body decreased levels of activated Akt (pSer505-Akt) while misexpression of trbl RNAi increased phospho-Akt levels, and neither treatment affected total Akt levels. Trbl misexpression effectively suppressed Akt-mediated wing and muscle cell size increases and reduced phosphorylation of the Akt target FoxO (pSer256-FoxO). Taken together, these data show that Drosophila Trbl has a conserved role to bind Akt and block Akt-mediated insulin signaling, and implicate Trib proteins as novel sites of signaling pathway integration that link nutrient availability with cell growth and proliferation. PMID:25329475

  1. Antisense oligonucleotide–mediated MDM4 exon 6 skipping impairs tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Dewaele, Michael; Tabaglio, Tommaso; Willekens, Karen; Bezzi, Marco; Teo, Shun Xie; Low, Diana H.P.; Koh, Cheryl M.; Rambow, Florian; Fiers, Mark; Rogiers, Aljosja; Radaelli, Enrico; Al-Haddawi, Muthafar; Tan, Soo Yong; Hermans, Els; Amant, Frederic; Yan, Hualong; Lakshmanan, Manikandan; Koumar, Ratnacaram Chandrahas; Lim, Soon Thye; Derheimer, Frederick A.; Campbell, Robert M.; Bonday, Zahid; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Shackleton, Mark; Blattner, Christine; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Guccione, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    MDM4 is a promising target for cancer therapy, as it is undetectable in most normal adult tissues but often upregulated in cancer cells to dampen p53 tumor-suppressor function. The mechanisms that underlie MDM4 upregulation in cancer cells are largely unknown. Here, we have shown that this key oncogenic event mainly depends on a specific alternative splicing switch. We determined that while a nonsense-mediated, decay-targeted isoform of MDM4 (MDM4-S) is produced in normal adult tissues as a result of exon 6 skipping, enhanced exon 6 inclusion leads to expression of full-length MDM4 in a large number of human cancers. Although this alternative splicing event is likely regulated by multiple splicing factors, we identified the SRSF3 oncoprotein as a key enhancer of exon 6 inclusion. In multiple human melanoma cell lines and in melanoma patient–derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models, antisense oligonucleotide–mediated (ASO-mediated) skipping of exon 6 decreased MDM4 abundance, inhibited melanoma growth, and enhanced sensitivity to MAPK-targeting therapeutics. Additionally, ASO-based MDM4 targeting reduced diffuse large B cell lymphoma PDX growth. As full-length MDM4 is enhanced in multiple human tumors, our data indicate that this strategy is applicable to a wide range of tumor types. We conclude that enhanced MDM4 exon 6 inclusion is a common oncogenic event and has potential as a clinically compatible therapeutic target. PMID:26595814

  2. Evaluation of growth and early infant feeding: a challenge for scientists, industry and regulatory bodies.

    PubMed

    Haschke, Ferdinand; Steenhout, Philipp; Grathwohl, Dominik; Haschke-Becher, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Growth studies are necessary to prove safety and efficacy of new or renovated infant formulas. Healthy infants need to be followed in randomized clinical trials until 4-6 months of age. Breastfed reference groups should be included in such studies, because growth of formula-fed infants may deviate from breastfed infants. The WHO growth standard describes growth of exclusively or predominantly breastfed infants and is frequently used as reference. However, the limitations of the standard must be known because weight-for-age until 6 months is higher than in all international growth references. Meta-analyses indicate that both weight and BMI of breastfed reference groups in clinical trials and of infants fed a low protein formula are somehow lower than the WHO standard. Infants of overweight and obese mothers or at risk for malnutrition are considered as at-risk populations. Any infant formula trial in those populations should use the WHO standard to document safety. PMID:23428678

  3. Evaluation of growth and early infant feeding: a challenge for scientists, industry and regulatory bodies.

    PubMed

    Haschke, Ferdinand; Steenhout, Philipp; Grathwohl, Dominik; Haschke-Becher, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Growth studies are necessary to prove safety and efficacy of new or renovated infant formulas. Healthy infants need to be followed in randomized clinical trials until 4-6 months of age. Breastfed reference groups should be included in such studies, because growth of formula-fed infants may deviate from breastfed infants. The WHO growth standard describes growth of exclusively or predominantly breastfed infants and is frequently used as reference. However, the limitations of the standard must be known because weight-for-age until 6 months is higher than in all international growth references. Meta-analyses indicate that both weight and BMI of breastfed reference groups in clinical trials and of infants fed a low protein formula are somehow lower than the WHO standard. Infants of overweight and obese mothers or at risk for malnutrition are considered as at-risk populations. Any infant formula trial in those populations should use the WHO standard to document safety.

  4. Growth control in colon epithelial cells: gadolinium enhances calcium-mediated growth regulation.

    PubMed

    Attili, Durga; Jenkins, Brian; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Dame, Michael K; Varani, James

    2012-12-01

    Gadolinium, a member of the lanthanoid family of transition metals, interacts with calcium-binding sites on proteins and other biological molecules. The overall goal of the present investigation was to determine if gadolinium could enhance calcium-induced epithelial cell growth inhibition in the colon. Gadolinium at concentrations as low as 1-5 μM combined with calcium inhibits proliferation of human colonic epithelial cells more effectively than calcium alone. Gadolinium had no detectable effect on calcium-induced differentiation in the same cells based on change in cell morphology, induction of E-cadherin synthesis, and translocation of E-cadherin from the cytosol to the cell surface. When the colon epithelial cells were treated with gadolinium and then exposed to increased calcium concentrations, movement of extracellular calcium into the cell was suppressed. In contrast, gadolinium treatment had no effect on ionomycin-induced release of stored intracellular calcium into the cytoplasm. Whether these in vitro observations can be translated into an approach for reducing abnormal proliferation in the colonic mucosa (including polyp formation) is not known. These results do, however, provide an explanation for our recent findings that a multi-mineral supplement containing all of the naturally occurring lanthanoid metals including gadolinium are more effective than calcium alone in preventing colon polyp formation in mice on a high-fat diet.

  5. Epidermal growth factor-mediated effects on equine vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grosenbaugh, D.A.; Amoss, M.S.; Hood, D.M.; Morgan, S.J.; Williams, J.D. )

    1988-10-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor binding kinetics and EGF-mediated stimulation of DNA synthesis and cellular proliferation were studied in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from the equine thoracic aorta. Binding studies, using murine {sup 125}I-labeled EGF, indicate the presence of a single class of high-affinity binding sites, with an estimated maximal binding capacity of 5,800 sites/cells. EGF stimulated ({sup 3}H)thymidine uptake in confluent quiescent monolayers in a dose-dependent fashion, half-maximal stimulation occurring at 7.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} M. Likewise, EGF-mediated cellular proliferation was dose dependent under reduced serum concentrations. Equine VSMC contain specific receptors for EGF, and EGF can stimulate DNA synthesis and proliferation in these cultured cells, which suggests that EGF may participate in the proliferative changes observed in equine distal digital peripheral vascular disease.

  6. Transforming growth factor-beta1 mediates cellular response to DNA damage in situ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewan, Kenneth B.; Henshall-Powell, Rhonda L.; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Pajares, Maria Jose; Arteaga, Carlos; Warters, Ray; Akhurst, Rosemary J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2002-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 is rapidly activated after ionizing radiation, but its specific role in cellular responses to DNA damage is not known. Here we use Tgfbeta1 knockout mice to show that radiation-induced apoptotic response is TGF-beta1 dependent in the mammary epithelium, and that both apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation in response to DNA damage decrease as a function of TGF-beta1 gene dose in embryonic epithelial tissues. Because apoptosis in these tissues has been shown previously to be p53 dependent, we then examined p53 protein activation. TGF-beta1 depletion, by either gene knockout or by using TGF-beta neutralizing antibodies, resulted in decreased p53 Ser-18 phosphorylation in irradiated mammary gland. These data indicate that TGF-beta1 is essential for rapid p53-mediated cellular responses that mediate cell fate decisions in situ.

  7. A novel epigenetic CREB-miR-373 axis mediates ZIP4-induced pancreatic cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuqing; Yang, Jingxuan; Cui, Xiaobo; Chen, Yong; Zhu, Vivian F; Hagan, John P; Wang, Huamin; Yu, Xianjun; Hodges, Sally E; Fang, Jing; Chiao, Paul J; Logsdon, Craig D; Fisher, William E; Brunicardi, F Charles; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Li, Min

    2013-09-01

    Changes in the intracellular levels of the essential micronutrient zinc have been implicated in multiple diseases including pancreatic cancer; however, the molecular mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we report a novel mechanism where increased zinc mediated by the zinc importer ZIP4 transcriptionally induces miR-373 in pancreatic cancer to promote tumour growth. Reporter, expression and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrate that ZIP4 activates the zinc-dependent transcription factor CREB and requires this transcription factor to increase miR-373 expression through the regulation of its promoter. miR-373 induction is necessary for efficient ZIP4-dependent enhancement of cell proliferation, invasion, and tumour growth. Further analysis of miR-373 in vivo oncogenic function reveals that it is mediated through its negative regulation of TP53INP1, LATS2 and CD44. These results define a novel ZIP4-CREB-miR-373 signalling axis promoting pancreatic cancer growth, providing mechanistic insights explaining in part how a zinc transporter functions in cancer cells and may have broader implications as inappropriate regulation of intracellular zinc levels plays an important role in many other diseases.

  8. Early growth response-1 suppresses epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated airway hyperresponsiveness and lung remodeling in mice.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Elizabeth L; Mushaben, Elizabeth M; Pastura, Patricia A; Acciani, Thomas H; Deutsch, Gail H; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K; Korfhagen, Thomas R; Hardie, William D; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Le Cras, Timothy D

    2009-10-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-alpha and its receptor, the epidermal growth factor receptor, are induced after lung injury and are associated with remodeling in chronic pulmonary diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis and asthma. Expression of TGF-alpha in the lungs of adult mice causes fibrosis, pleural thickening, and pulmonary hypertension, in addition to increased expression of a transcription factor, early growth response-1 (Egr-1). Egr-1 was increased in airway smooth muscle (ASM) and the vascular adventitia in the lungs of mice conditionally expressing TGF-alpha in airway epithelium (Clara cell secretory protein-rtTA(+/-)/[tetO](7)-TGF-alpha(+/-)). The goal of this study was to determine the role of Egr-1 in TGF-alpha-induced lung disease. To accomplish this, TGF-alpha-transgenic mice were crossed to Egr-1 knockout (Egr-1(ko/ko)) mice. The lack of Egr-1 markedly increased the severity of TGF-alpha-induced pulmonary disease, dramatically enhancing airway muscularization, increasing pulmonary fibrosis, and causing greater airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Smooth muscle hyperplasia, not hypertrophy, caused the ASM thickening in the absence of Egr-1. No detectable increases in pulmonary inflammation were found. In addition to the airway remodeling disease, vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension were also more severe in Egr-1(ko/ko) mice. Thus, Egr-1 acts to suppress epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated airway and vascular muscularization, fibrosis, and airway hyperresponsiveness in the absence of inflammation. This provides a unique model to study the processes causing pulmonary fibrosis and ASM thickening without the complicating effects of inflammation.

  9. Modulations of critical cell cycle regulatory events during chemoprevention of ultraviolet B-mediated responses by resveratrol in SKH-1 hairless mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Reagan-Shaw, Shannon; Afaq, Farrukh; Aziz, Moammir Hasan; Ahmad, Nihal

    2004-07-01

    Multiple exposures to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation cause critical damages that may lead to the development of several cutaneous disorders including skin cancer, the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in the USA. Therefore, efforts are needed to: (i) study the mechanism(s) of UV-mediated cutaneous damages, and (ii) design novel approaches for the management of skin cancer. 'Chemoprevention' via plant-based agents may be a useful approach for the management of neoplasia. Here, we evaluated the involvement of cell cycle regulatory molecules during resveratrol-mediated protection from multiple exposures of UVB (180 mJ/cm(2); on alternate days x 7 exposures) radiations in the SKH-1 hairless mouse skin. Resveratrol was topically applied on the skin of SKH-1 hairless mice at a dose of 10 micromol/mouse (in 0.2 ml acetone; 30 min prior to each UVB exposure). Studies were performed at 24 h following the last UVB exposure. Topical application of resveratrol resulted in significant decrease in UVB-induced bi-fold skin thickness, hyperplasia, and infiltration of leukocytes. The data from immunoblot and/or immunohistochemical analyses revealed that multiple exposure to UVB radiations causes significant upregulation in: (i) proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a marker of cellular proliferation, and (ii) cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk)-2, -4 and -6, cyclin-D1, and cyclin-D2. Resveratrol treatment resulted in significant downregulation in UV-mediated increases in these critical cell cycle regulatory proteins. An interesting observation of this study was that resveratrol treatment resulted in a further stimulation of UVB-mediated increases in cyclin kinase inhibitor WAF1/p21 and tumor suppressor p53. Further, resveratrol was also found to cause significant decreases in UVB-mediated upregulation of: (i) the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase, and (ii) the 42 kDa isotype of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Thus, our data suggested that the antiproliferative

  10. Mediation of wound-related Rous sarcoma virus tumorigenesis by TFG (transforming growth factor)-. beta

    SciTech Connect

    Sieweke, M.H.; Bissell, M.J. ); Thompson, N.L.; Sporn, M.B. )

    1990-06-29

    In Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-infected chickens, wounding leads to tumor formation with nearly 100% frequency in tissues that would otherwise remain tumor-free. Identifying molecular mediators of this phenomenon should yield important clues to the mechanisms involved in RSV tumorigenesis. Immunohistochemical staining showed that TGF-{beta} is present locally shortly after wounding, but not in unwounded controls. In addition, subcutaneous administration of recombinant transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) could substitute completely for wounding in tumor induction. A treatment protocol of four doses of 800 nanograms of TGF-{beta} resulted in v-src-expressing tumors with 100% frequency; four doses of only 10 nanograms still led to tumor formation in 80% of the animals. This effect was specific, as other growth factors with suggested roles in would healing did not elicit the same response. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) or TGF-{alpha} had no effect, and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) or insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) yielded only occasional tumors after longer latency. TGF-{beta} release during the would-healing response may thus be a critical event that creates a conducive environment for RSV tumorigenesis and may act as a cofactor for transformation in this system. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Synchrotron X-ray and optical studies of the DNA-mediated growth of plasmonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Wang, Geng; Zhang, Xiaonan; Geng, Heping; Xu, Lifeng; Li, Wenqin; Liu, Xin

    2015-03-01

    Reproducible and controllable growth of nanostructures with well-defined physical and chemical properties is a longstanding problem in nanoscience. A key step to address this issue is to understand their underlying growth mechanism, which is often entangled in the complexity of growth environments and obscured by rapid reaction speeds. Synchrotron x-rays, because of their specific wavelengths (nanometers) and advantages of large flux, high penetration and adjustable photon energy, have a particularly important position in structural and electronic characterizations of nanomaterials. Herein, we demonstrate that the evolution of size, surface morphology, and the optical properties of plasmonic nanostructures could be quantitatively intercepted by dynamic and stoichiometric control of the DNA-mediated growth. By combining synchrotron-based small-angle X-ray scattering with transmission electron microscopy, we reliably obtained quantitative structural parameters for these fine nanostructures that correlate well with their optical properties as identified by UV/Vis absorption and dark-field scattering spectroscopy. We report growth mechanisms for SERS active plasmonic nanostructures, and the remarkable interplay between their morphology and plasmonic properties. Work supported by NNSF of China (11375256) and Sci. and Tech. Commission of Shanghai Municipality (14JC1493300).

  12. Helicobacter pylori-Mediated Protection from Allergy Is Associated with IL-10-Secreting Peripheral Blood Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Khiyam; Letley, Darren P.; Greenaway, A. Borgel; Kenefeck, Rupert; Winter, Jody A.; Tomlinson, William; Rhead, Joanne; Staples, Emily; Kaneko, Kazuyo; Atherton, John C.; Robinson, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infections are usually established in early childhood and continuously stimulate immunity, including T-helper 1 (Th1), Th17, and regulatory T-cell (Treg) responses, throughout life. Although known to be the major cause of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, disease occurs in a minority of those who are infected. Recently, there has been much interest in beneficial effects arising from infection with this pathogen. Published data robustly show that the infection is protective against asthma in mouse models. Epidemiological studies show that H. pylori is inversely associated with human allergy and asthma, but there is a paucity of mechanistic data to explain this. Since Th1 and Treg responses are reported to protect against allergic responses, we investigated if there were links between the human systemic Th1 and Treg response to H. pylori and allergen-specific IgE levels. The human cytokine and T-cell responses were examined using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 49 infected and 58 uninfected adult patients. Concentrations of total and allergen-specific plasma IgE were determined by ELISA and ImmunoCAP assays. These responses were analyzed according to major virulence factor genotypes of the patients’ colonizing H. pylori strains. An in vitro assay was employed, using PBMCs from infected and uninfected donors, to determine the role of Treg cytokines in the suppression of IgE. Significantly higher frequencies of IL-10-secreting CD4+CD25hi Tregs, but not H. pylori-specific Th1 cells, were present in the peripheral blood of infected patients. Total and allergen-specific IgE concentrations were lower when there was a strong Treg response, and blocking IL-10 in vitro dramatically restored IgE responses. IgE concentrations were also significantly lower when patients were infected with CagA+ strains or those expressing the more active i1 form of VacA. The systemic IL-10+ Treg response is therefore likely to play a role in H. pylori-mediated

  13. Helicobacter pylori-Mediated Protection from Allergy Is Associated with IL-10-Secreting Peripheral Blood Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Khiyam; Letley, Darren P; Greenaway, A Borgel; Kenefeck, Rupert; Winter, Jody A; Tomlinson, William; Rhead, Joanne; Staples, Emily; Kaneko, Kazuyo; Atherton, John C; Robinson, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infections are usually established in early childhood and continuously stimulate immunity, including T-helper 1 (Th1), Th17, and regulatory T-cell (Treg) responses, throughout life. Although known to be the major cause of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, disease occurs in a minority of those who are infected. Recently, there has been much interest in beneficial effects arising from infection with this pathogen. Published data robustly show that the infection is protective against asthma in mouse models. Epidemiological studies show that H. pylori is inversely associated with human allergy and asthma, but there is a paucity of mechanistic data to explain this. Since Th1 and Treg responses are reported to protect against allergic responses, we investigated if there were links between the human systemic Th1 and Treg response to H. pylori and allergen-specific IgE levels. The human cytokine and T-cell responses were examined using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 49 infected and 58 uninfected adult patients. Concentrations of total and allergen-specific plasma IgE were determined by ELISA and ImmunoCAP assays. These responses were analyzed according to major virulence factor genotypes of the patients' colonizing H. pylori strains. An in vitro assay was employed, using PBMCs from infected and uninfected donors, to determine the role of Treg cytokines in the suppression of IgE. Significantly higher frequencies of IL-10-secreting CD4(+)CD25(hi) Tregs, but not H. pylori-specific Th1 cells, were present in the peripheral blood of infected patients. Total and allergen-specific IgE concentrations were lower when there was a strong Treg response, and blocking IL-10 in vitro dramatically restored IgE responses. IgE concentrations were also significantly lower when patients were infected with CagA(+) strains or those expressing the more active i1 form of VacA. The systemic IL-10(+) Treg response is therefore likely to play a role in H

  14. Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and growth by nanoparticle-mediated p53 gene therapy in mice.

    PubMed

    Prabha, S; Sharma, B; Labhasetwar, V

    2012-08-01

    Mutation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene, the most common genetic alteration in human cancers, results in more aggressive disease and increased resistance to conventional therapies. Aggressiveness may be related to the increased angiogenic activity of cancer cells containing mutant p53. To restore wild-type p53 function in cancer cells, we developed polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) for p53 gene delivery. Previous in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated the ability of these NPs to provide sustained intracellular release of DNA, thus sustained gene transfection and decreased tumor cell proliferation. We investigated in vivo mechanisms involved in NP-mediated p53 tumor inhibition, with focus on angiogenesis. We hypothesize that sustained p53 gene delivery will help decrease tumor angiogenic activity and thus reduce tumor growth and improve animal survival. Xenografts of p53 mutant tumors were treated with a single intratumoral injection of p53 gene-loaded NPs (p53NPs). We observed intratumoral p53 gene expression corresponding to tumor growth inhibition, over 5 weeks. Treated tumors showed upregulation of thrombospondin-1, a potent antiangiogenic factor, and a decrease in microvessel density vs controls (saline, p53 DNA alone, and control NPs). Greater levels of apoptosis were also observed in p53NP-treated tumors. Overall, this led to significantly improved survival in p53NP-treated animals. NP-mediated p53 gene delivery slowed cancer progression and improved survival in an in vivo cancer model. One mechanism by which this was accomplished was disruption of tumor angiogenesis. We conclude that the NP-mediated sustained tumor p53 gene therapy can effectively be used for tumor growth inhibition.

  15. Testosterone mediates seasonal growth of the song control nuclei in a tropical bird

    PubMed Central

    Small, Thomas W.; Brenowitz, Eliot A.; Wojtenek, Winfried; Moore, Ignacio T.

    2015-01-01

    In mid- to high-latitude songbirds seasonal reproduction is stimulated by increasing daylength accompanied by elevated plasma sex steroid levels, increased singing, and growth of the song control nuclei (SCN). Plasticity of the SCN and song behavior are primarily mediated by testosterone (T) and its metabolites in most species studied thus far. However, the majority of bird species are tropical and have less pronounced seasonal reproductive cycles. We have previously documented that equatorial rufous-collared sparrows (Zonotrichia capensis) exhibit seasonal neuroplasticity in the SCN. Manipulating T in these birds, however, did not alter singing behavior. In the current study we investigated whether T mediates plasticity of the SCN in a similar manner to temperate songbirds. In the first experiment we treated captive male birds with T or blank implants during the non-breeding season. In a second experiment we treated captive males with either blank implants, T-filled implants, T with Flutamide (FLU; an androgen receptor antagonist) or T with FLU and 1,4,6-androstatriene-3,17-dione (ATD; an estrogen synthesis inhibitor) during the breeding season. In both experiments, the volumes of brain areas HVC, Area X, and RA were measured along with singing behavior. In summary, T stimulated growth of HVC and RA and the combined effect of FLU and ATD reversed this effect in HVC. Area X was not affected by testosterone treatment in either experiment. Neither T-treated birds nor controls sang in captivity during either experiment. Together these data indicate that T mediates seasonal changes in the HVC and RA of both tropical and higher latitude bird species even if the environmental signals differ. However, unlike most higher latitude songbirds, we found no evidence that motivation to sing or growth of Area X are stimulated by T under captive conditions. PMID:26346733

  16. Redox signalling to nuclear regulatory proteins by reactive oxygen species contributes to oestrogen-induced growth of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Okoh, V O; Garba, N A; Penney, R B; Das, J; Deoraj, A; Singh, K P; Sarkar, S; Felty, Q; Yoo, C; Jackson, R M; Roy, D

    2015-01-01

    Background: 17β-Oestradiol (E2)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in regulating the growth of breast cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanism of this is not clear. Here we show how ROS through a novel redox signalling pathway involving nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) and p27 contribute to E2-induced growth of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Methods: Chromatin immunoprecipitation, qPCR, mass spectrometry, redox western blot, colony formation, cell proliferation, ROS assay, and immunofluorescence microscopy were used to study the role of NRF-1. Results: The major novel finding of this study is the demonstration of oxidative modification of phosphatases PTEN and CDC25A by E2-generated ROS along with the subsequent activation of AKT and ERK pathways that culminated in the activation of NRF-1 leading to the upregulation of cell cycle genes. 17β-Oestradiol-induced ROS by influencing nuclear proteins p27 and Jab1 also contributed to the growth of MCF-7 cells. Conclusions: Taken together, our results present evidence in the support of E2-induced ROS-mediated AKT signalling leading to the activation of NRF-1-regulated cell cycle genes as well as the impairment of p27 activity, which is presumably necessary for the growth of MCF-7 cells. These observations are important because they provide a new paradigm by which oestrogen may contribute to the growth of breast cancer. PMID:25965299

  17. Interleukin 10 and dendritic cells are the main suppression mediators of regulatory T cells in human neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Arce-Sillas, A; Álvarez-Luquín, D D; Cárdenas, G; Casanova-Hernández, D; Fragoso, G; Hernández, M; Proaño Narváez, J V; García-Vázquez, F; Fleury, A; Sciutto, E; Adalid-Peralta, L

    2016-02-01

    Neurocysticercosis is caused by the establishment of Taenia solium cysticerci in the central nervous system. It is considered that, during co-evolution, the parasite developed strategies to modulate the host's immune response. The action mechanisms of regulatory T cells in controlling the immune response in neurocysticercosis are studied in this work. Higher blood levels of regulatory T cells with CD4(+) CD45RO(+) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3)(high) and CD4(+) CD25(high) FoxP3(+) CD95(high) phenotype and of non-regulatory CD4(+) CD45RO(+) FoxP3(med) T cells were found in neurocysticercosis patients with respect to controls. Interestingly, regulatory T cells express higher levels of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4), lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG-3), programmed death 1 (PD-1) and glucocorticoid-induced tumour necrosis factor receptor (GITR), suggesting a cell-to-cell contact mechanism with dendritic cells. Furthermore, higher IL-10 and regulatory T cell type 1 (Tr1) levels were found in neurocysticercosis patients' peripheral blood, suggesting that the action mechanism of regulatory T cells involves the release of immunomodulatory cytokines. No evidence was found of the regulatory T cell role in inhibiting the proliferative response. Suppressive regulatory T cells from neurocysticercosis patients correlated negatively with late activated lymphocytes (CD4(+) CD38(+) ). Our results suggest that, during neurocysticercosis, regulatory T cells could control the immune response, probably by a cell-to-cell contact with dendritic cells and interleukin (IL)-10 release by Tr1, to create an immunomodulatory environment that may favour the development of T. solium cysticerci and their permanence in the central nervous system.

  18. Involvement of hexokinase1 in plant growth promotion as mediated by Burkholderia phytofirmans.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Min; Lazarovits, George

    2014-06-01

    Potato plantlets inoculated with strain PsJN of the bacterium Burkholderia phytofirmans exhibit consistent and significant increases in plant growth under in vitro conditions, when compared with uninoculated plants. The greatest influence on the degree and type of growth enhancement that develops has been shown to be mediated by the sugar concentration in the agar media. Bacterial growth promotion has been suggested in other studies to be regulated by the sugar sensor enzyme hexokinase1, the role of which is activation of glucose phosphorylation. In this present study, we examined the co-relationship between root and stem development in potato plants treated with PsJN and the activity of hexokinase1. Plants grown in the presence of 1.5% and 3% sucrose showed increased levels of hexokinase1 activity only in the roots of inoculated plants, suggesting that the increased enzyme levels may be associated with root growth. Analysis for mRNA using reverse transcriptase did not reveal any significant differences in transcription levels of the gene between inoculated and uninoculated plants. When PsJN-inoculated plants were grown in 1.5% and 3% concentrations of glucose and fructose, stem height and mass, leaf number, root mass, and overall biomass increased. No growth promotion occurred when PsJN-inoculated plants were grown in 3% maltose. Subsequently, a hexokinase1 activity assay showed that PsJN-induced growth of potato plants was found to only occur when plants were grown in the presence of sugars that are recognized by the plant hexokinase1. The results suggest that PsJN may enhance sugar uptake in plants by direct or indirect stimulation of hexokinase1 activity in roots and this results in enhanced overall plant growth.

  19. Antimony mediated growth of high-density InAs quantum dots for photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tutu, F. K.; Wu, J.; Lam, P.; Tang, M.; Liu, H.; Miyashita, N.; Okada, Y.; Wilson, J.; Allison, R.

    2013-07-22

    We report enhanced solar cell performance using high-density InAs quantum dots. The high-density quantum dot was grown by antimony mediated molecular beam epitaxy. In-plane quantum dot density over 1 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2} was achieved by applying a few monolayers of antimony on the GaAs surface prior to quantum dot growth. The formation of defective large clusters was reduced by optimization of the growth temperature and InAs coverage. Comparing with a standard quantum dot solar cell without the incorporation of antimony, the high-density quantum dot solar cell demonstrates a distinct improvement in short-circuit current from 7.4 mA/cm{sup 2} to 8.3 mA/cm{sup 2}.

  20. The complement cascade as a mediator of tissue growth and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Martin J; Sughrue, Michael E; Kane, Ari J; Ahn, Brian J; Fang, Shanna; Parsa, Andrew T

    2010-11-01

    Recent evidence has demonstrated that the complement cascade is involved in a variety of physiologic and pathophysiologic processes in addition to its role as an immune effector. Research in a variety of organ systems has shown that complement proteins are direct participants in maintenance of cellular turnover, healing, proliferation and regeneration. As a physiologic housekeeper, complement proteins maintain tissue integrity in the absence of inflammation by disposing of cellular debris and waste, a process critical to the prevention of autoimmune disease. Developmentally, complement proteins influence pathways including hematopoietic stem cell engraftment, bone growth, and angiogenesis. They also provide a potent stimulus for cellular proliferation including regeneration of the limb and eye in animal models, and liver proliferation following injury. Here, we describe the complement cascade as a mediator of tissue growth and regeneration.

  1. Thyroid hormone-responsive genes mediate otolith growth and development during flatfish metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Tan, Y; Sievers, Q; Sievers, B; Lee, M; Burrall, K; Schreiber, A M

    2011-01-01

    Flatfish begin life as up-right swimming, bilaterally symmetrical larvae that metamorphose into asymmetrically shaped juveniles that swim with a highly lateralized posture. We have previously shown that TH induces abrupt growth and mineralization of one component of the vestibular system, the otoliths, during early larval development and metamorphosis. Here we report that four of five vestibular-specific genes that we tested (alpha-tectorin, otogelin, otolith matrix protein, and otopetrins 1 and 2 that are known to be associated with otolith development in other vertebrates are up-regulated 1.5- to 7-fold in larval flatfish during spontaneous metamorphosis and/or following 72 h of TH treatment. These findings suggest that otolith growth and development are mediated by diverse TH-responsive genes during flatfish metamorphosis.

  2. Hammerhead Ribozyme-Mediated Knockdown of mRNA for Fibrotic Growth Factors: Transforming Growth Factor-Beta 1 and Connective Tissue Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Paulette M.; Blalock, Timothy D.; Yuan, Rong; Lewin, Alfred S.; Schultz, Gregory S.

    2013-01-01

    Excessive scarring (fibrosis) is a major cause of pathologies in multiple tissues, including lung, liver, kidney, heart, cornea, and skin. The transforming growth factor- β (TGF- β) system has been shown to play a key role in regulating the formation of scar tissue throughout the body. Furthermore, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) has been shown to mediate most of the fibrotic actions of TGF- β, including stimulation of synthesis of extracellular matrix and differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts. Currently, no approved drugs selectively and specifically regulate scar formation. Thus, there is a need for a drug that selectively targets the TGF- β cascade at the molecular level and has minimal off-target side effects. This chapter focuses on the design of hammerhead ribozymes, measurement of kinetic activity, and assessment of knockdown mRNAs of TGF- β and CTGF in cell cultures. PMID:22131029

  3. Altered distribution of regulatory lymphocytes by oral administration of soy-extracts exerts a hepatoprotective effect alleviating immune mediated liver injury, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Tawfik; Ben Ya'acov, Ami; Shabat, Yehudit; Zolotarovya, Lidya; Snir, Ram; Ilan, Yaron

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the immune-modulatory and the hepatoprotective effects of oral administration of two soy extracts in immune mediated liver injury and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). METHODS: Two soy extracts, M1 and OS, were orally administered to mice with concanavalin A (ConA) immune-mediated hepatitis, to high-fat diet (HFD) mice and to methionine and choline reduced diet combined with HFD mice. Animals were followed for disease and immune biomarkers. RESULTS: Oral administration of OS and M1 had an additive effect in alleviating ConA hepatitis manifested by a decrease in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase serum levels. Oral administration of the OS and M1 soy derived fractions, ameliorated liver injury in the high fat diet model of NASH, manifested by a decrease in hepatic triglyceride levels, improvement in liver histology, decreased serum cholesterol and triglycerides and improved insulin resistance. In the methionine and choline reduced diet combined with the high fat diet model, we noted a decrease in hepatic triglycerides and improvement in blood glucose levels and liver histology. The effects were associated with reduced serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and alteration of regulatory T cell distribution. CONCLUSION: Oral administration of the combination of OS and M1 soy derived extracts exerted an adjuvant effect in the gut-immune system, altering the distribution of regulatory T cells, and alleviating immune mediated liver injury, hyperlipidemia and insulin resistance. PMID:26139990

  4. Akt1-mediated fast/glycolytic skeletal muscle growth attenuates renal damage in experimental kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Hanatani, Shinsuke; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Araki, Satoshi; Rokutanda, Taku; Kimura, Yuichi; Walsh, Kenneth; Ogawa, Hisao

    2014-12-01

    Muscle wasting is frequently observed in patients with kidney disease, and low muscle strength is associated with poor outcomes in these patients. However, little is known about the effects of skeletal muscle growth per se on kidney diseases. In this study, we utilized a skeletal muscle-specific, inducible Akt1 transgenic (Akt1 TG) mouse model that promotes the growth of functional skeletal muscle independent of exercise to investigate the effects of muscle growth on kidney diseases. Seven days after Akt1 activation in skeletal muscle, renal injury was induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in Akt1 TG and wild-type (WT) control mice. The expression of atrogin-1, an atrophy-inducing gene in skeletal muscle, was upregulated 7 days after UUO in WT mice but not in Akt1 TG mice. UUO-induced renal interstitial fibrosis, tubular injury, apoptosis, and increased expression of inflammatory, fibrosis-related, and adhesion molecule genes were significantly diminished in Akt1 TG mice compared with WT mice. An increase in the activating phosphorylation of eNOS in the kidney accompanied the attenuation of renal damage by myogenic Akt1 activation. Treatment with the NOS inhibitor L-NAME abolished the protective effect of skeletal muscle Akt activation on obstructive kidney disease. In conclusion, Akt1-mediated muscle growth reduces renal damage in a model of obstructive kidney disease. This improvement appears to be mediated by an increase in eNOS signaling in the kidney. Our data support the concept that loss of muscle mass during kidney disease can contribute to renal failure, and maintaining muscle mass may improve clinical outcome. PMID:25012168

  5. Akt1-mediated fast/glycolytic skeletal muscle growth attenuates renal damage in experimental kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Hanatani, Shinsuke; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Araki, Satoshi; Rokutanda, Taku; Kimura, Yuichi; Walsh, Kenneth; Ogawa, Hisao

    2014-12-01

    Muscle wasting is frequently observed in patients with kidney disease, and low muscle strength is associated with poor outcomes in these patients. However, little is known about the effects of skeletal muscle growth per se on kidney diseases. In this study, we utilized a skeletal muscle-specific, inducible Akt1 transgenic (Akt1 TG) mouse model that promotes the growth of functional skeletal muscle independent of exercise to investigate the effects of muscle growth on kidney diseases. Seven days after Akt1 activation in skeletal muscle, renal injury was induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in Akt1 TG and wild-type (WT) control mice. The expression of atrogin-1, an atrophy-inducing gene in skeletal muscle, was upregulated 7 days after UUO in WT mice but not in Akt1 TG mice. UUO-induced renal interstitial fibrosis, tubular injury, apoptosis, and increased expression of inflammatory, fibrosis-related, and adhesion molecule genes were significantly diminished in Akt1 TG mice compared with WT mice. An increase in the activating phosphorylation of eNOS in the kidney accompanied the attenuation of renal damage by myogenic Akt1 activation. Treatment with the NOS inhibitor L-NAME abolished the protective effect of skeletal muscle Akt activation on obstructive kidney disease. In conclusion, Akt1-mediated muscle growth reduces renal damage in a model of obstructive kidney disease. This improvement appears to be mediated by an increase in eNOS signaling in the kidney. Our data support the concept that loss of muscle mass during kidney disease can contribute to renal failure, and maintaining muscle mass may improve clinical outcome.

  6. The wedelolactone derivative inhibits estrogen receptor-mediated breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer cells growth.

    PubMed

    Xu, Defeng; Lin, Tzu-Hua; Yeh, Chiuan-Ren; Cheng, Max A; Chen, Lu-Min; Chang, Chawnshang; Yeh, Shuyuan

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen and estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated signaling pathways play important roles in the etiology and progression of human breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. Attenuating ER activities by natural products and their derivatives is a relatively practical strategy to control and reduce breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer risk. Here, we found 3-butoxy-1,8,9-trihydroxy-6H-benzofuro[3,2-c]benzopyran-6-one (BTB), a new derivative of wedelolactone, could effectively inhibit the 17-estradiol (E2)-induced ER transactivation and suppress the growth of breast cancer as well as endometrial and ovarian cancer cells. Our results indicate that 2.5 μM BTB effectively suppresses ER-positive, but not ER-negative, breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, our data indicate that BTB can modulate ER transactivation and suppress the expression of E2-mediated ER target genes (Cyclin D1, E2F1, and TERT) in the ER-positive MCF-7, Ishikawa, and SKOV-3 cells. Importantly, this BTB mediated inhibition of ER activity is selective since BTB does not suppress the activities of other nuclear receptors, including glucocorticoid receptor and progesterone receptor, suggesting that BTB functions as a selective ER signaling inhibitor with the potential to treat breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers.

  7. Inhibition of tumor cell growth by Sigma1 ligand mediated translational repression

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Felix J.; Schrock, Joel M.; Spino, Christina M.; Marino, Jacqueline C.; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2012-09-21

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sigma1 ligand treatment mediates decrease in tumor cell mass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of a Sigma1 ligand with reversible translational repressor actions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstration of a role for Sigma1 in cellular protein synthesis. -- Abstract: Treatment with sigma1 receptor (Sigma1) ligands can inhibit cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. However, the cellular pathways engaged in response to Sigma1 ligand treatment that contribute to these outcomes remain largely undefined. Here, we show that treatment with putative antagonists of Sigma1 decreases cell mass. This effect corresponds with repressed cap-dependent translation initiation in multiple breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Sigma1 antagonist treatment suppresses phosphorylation of translational regulator proteins p70S6K, S6, and 4E-BP1. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Sigma1 also results in translational repression, consistent with the effects of antagonist treatment. Sigma1 antagonist mediated translational repression and decreased cell size are both reversible. Together, these data reveal a role for Sigma1 in tumor cell protein synthesis, and demonstrate that small molecule Sigma1 ligands can be used as modulators of protein translation.

  8. Brevundimonas diminuta mediated alleviation of arsenic toxicity and plant growth promotion in Oryza sativa L.

    PubMed

    Singh, Namrata; Marwa, Naina; Mishra, Shashank K; Mishra, Jyoti; Verma, Praveen C; Rathaur, Sushma; Singh, Nandita

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic (As), a toxic metalloid adversely affects plant growth in polluted areas. In the present study, we investigated the possibility of improving phytostablization of arsenic through application of new isolated strain Brevundimonas diminuta (NBRI012) in rice plant [Oryza sativa (L.) Var. Sarju 52] at two different concentrations [10ppm (low toxic) and 50ppm (high toxic)] of As. The plant growth promoting traits of bacterial strains revealed the inherent ability of siderophores, phosphate solubilisation, indole acetic acid (IAA), 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase production which may be associated with increased biomass, chlorophyll and MDA content of rice and thereby promoting plant growth. The study also revealed the As accumulation property of NBRI012 strain which could play an important role in As removal from contaminated soil. Furthermore, NBRI012 inoculation significantly restored the hampered root epidermal and cortical cell growth of rice plant and root hair elimination. Altogether our study highlights the multifarious role of B. diminuta in mediating stress tolerance and modulating translocation of As in edible part of rice plant. PMID:26650422

  9. Brevundimonas diminuta mediated alleviation of arsenic toxicity and plant growth promotion in Oryza sativa L.

    PubMed

    Singh, Namrata; Marwa, Naina; Mishra, Shashank K; Mishra, Jyoti; Verma, Praveen C; Rathaur, Sushma; Singh, Nandita

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic (As), a toxic metalloid adversely affects plant growth in polluted areas. In the present study, we investigated the possibility of improving phytostablization of arsenic through application of new isolated strain Brevundimonas diminuta (NBRI012) in rice plant [Oryza sativa (L.) Var. Sarju 52] at two different concentrations [10ppm (low toxic) and 50ppm (high toxic)] of As. The plant growth promoting traits of bacterial strains revealed the inherent ability of siderophores, phosphate solubilisation, indole acetic acid (IAA), 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase production which may be associated with increased biomass, chlorophyll and MDA content of rice and thereby promoting plant growth. The study also revealed the As accumulation property of NBRI012 strain which could play an important role in As removal from contaminated soil. Furthermore, NBRI012 inoculation significantly restored the hampered root epidermal and cortical cell growth of rice plant and root hair elimination. Altogether our study highlights the multifarious role of B. diminuta in mediating stress tolerance and modulating translocation of As in edible part of rice plant.

  10. Human Sarcoma Growth Is Sensitive to Small-Molecule Mediated AXIN Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Marco; Valensin, Silvia; Tunici, Patrizia; Mori, Elisa; Caradonna, Nicola; Varrone, Maurizio; Salerno, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    Sarcomas are mesenchymal tumors showing high molecular heterogeneity, reflected at the histological level by the existence of more than fifty different subtypes. Genetic and epigenetic evidences link aberrant activation of the Wnt signaling to growth and progression of human sarcomas. This phenomenon, mainly accomplished by autocrine loop activity, is sustained by gene amplification, over-expression of Wnt ligands and co-receptors or epigenetic silencing of endogenous Wnt antagonists. We previously showed that pharmacological inhibition of Wnt signaling mediated by Axin stabilization produced in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity in glioblastoma tumors. Here, we report that targeting different sarcoma cell lines with the Wnt inhibitor/Axin stabilizer SEN461 produces a less transformed phenotype, as supported by modulation of anchorage-independent growth in vitro. At the molecular level, SEN461 treatment enhanced the stability of the scaffold protein Axin1, a key negative regulator of the Wnt signaling with tumor suppressor function, resulting in downstream effects coherent with inhibition of canonical Wnt signaling. Genetic phenocopy of small molecule Axin stabilization, through Axin1 over-expression, coherently resulted in strong impairment of soft-agar growth. Importantly, sarcoma growth inhibition through pharmacological Axin stabilization was also observed in a xenograft model in vivo in female CD-1 nude mice. Our findings suggest the usefulness of Wnt inhibitors with Axin stabilization activity as a potentialyl clinical relevant strategy for certain types of sarcomas. PMID:24842792

  11. Human Sarcoma growth is sensitive to small-molecule mediated AXIN stabilization.

    PubMed

    De Robertis, Alessandra; Mennillo, Federica; Rossi, Marco; Valensin, Silvia; Tunici, Patrizia; Mori, Elisa; Caradonna, Nicola; Varrone, Maurizio; Salerno, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    Sarcomas are mesenchymal tumors showing high molecular heterogeneity, reflected at the histological level by the existence of more than fifty different subtypes. Genetic and epigenetic evidences link aberrant activation of the Wnt signaling to growth and progression of human sarcomas. This phenomenon, mainly accomplished by autocrine loop activity, is sustained by gene amplification, over-expression of Wnt ligands and co-receptors or epigenetic silencing of endogenous Wnt antagonists. We previously showed that pharmacological inhibition of Wnt signaling mediated by Axin stabilization produced in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity in glioblastoma tumors. Here, we report that targeting different sarcoma cell lines with the Wnt inhibitor/Axin stabilizer SEN461 produces a less transformed phenotype, as supported by modulation of anchorage-independent growth in vitro. At the molecular level, SEN461 treatment enhanced the stability of the scaffold protein Axin1, a key negative regulator of the Wnt signaling with tumor suppressor function, resulting in downstream effects coherent with inhibition of canonical Wnt signaling. Genetic phenocopy of small molecule Axin stabilization, through Axin1 over-expression, coherently resulted in strong impairment of soft-agar growth. Importantly, sarcoma growth inhibition through pharmacological Axin stabilization was also observed in a xenograft model in vivo in female CD-1 nude mice. Our findings suggest the usefulness of Wnt inhibitors with Axin stabilization activity as a potentialyl clinical relevant strategy for certain types of sarcomas. PMID:24842792

  12. Yes is a central mediator of cell growth in malignant mesothelioma cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Ayami; Sekine, Miki; Virgona, Nantiga; Ota, Masako; Yano, Tomohiro

    2012-11-01

    The constitutive activation of the Src family kinases (SFKs) has been established as a poor prognostic factor in malignant mesothelioma (MM), however, the family member(s) which contribute to the malignancy have not been defined. This study aimed to identify the SFK member(s) contributing to cell growth using RNA interference in various MM cell lines. Silencing of Yes but not of c-Src or Fyn in MM cells leads to cell growth suppression. This suppressive effect caused by Yes silencing mainly depends on G1 cell cycle arrest and partly the induction of apoptosis. Also, the knockout of Yes induces the inactivation of β-catenin signaling and subsequently decreases the levels of cyclin D necessary for G1-S transition in the cell cycle. In addition, Yes knockout has less effect on cell growth suppression in β-catenin-deficient H28 MM cells compared to other MM cells which express the catenin. Overall, we conclude that Yes is a central mediator for MM cell growth that is not shared with other SFKs such as c-Src.

  13. The effects of anxiety and depression on stress-related growth among Chinese army recruits: Resilience and coping as mediators.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongju; Peng, Li; Liu, Botao; Liu, Yunbo; Li, Min; Chen, Long; Xie, Junrun; Li, Jing; Li, Jiawen

    2016-09-01

    Stress-related growth can occur after various traumas or stressful events. In order to investigate how anxiety and depression relate to stress-related growth, this study was conducted with 443 Chinese army recruits who had just finished a 3-month recruit training program. Path analyses revealed that resilience and positive/negative coping partially mediated the effect of anxiety on perceived stress-related growth, while negative coping fully mediated the relationship between depression and perceived stress-related growth. Moreover, positive coping partially carried the influence of resilience on perceived stress-related growth. Anxiety and depression may be potential targets for intervention to enhance the development of stress-related growth among Chinese army recruits.

  14. Amplification of TLO Mediator Subunit Genes Facilitate Filamentous Growth in Candida Spp.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongle; Moran, Gary P.; Myers, Lawrence C.

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous growth is a hallmark of C. albicans pathogenicity compared to less-virulent ascomycetes. A multitude of transcription factors regulate filamentous growth in response to specific environmental cues. Our work, however, suggests the evolutionary history of C. albicans that resulted in its filamentous growth plasticity may be tied to a change in the general transcription machinery rather than transcription factors and their specific targets. A key genomic difference between C. albicans and its less-virulent relatives, including its closest relative C. dubliniensis, is the unique expansion of the TLO (TeLOmere-associated) gene family in C. albicans. Individual Tlo proteins are fungal-specific subunits of Mediator, a large multi-subunit eukaryotic transcriptional co-activator complex. This amplification results in a large pool of ‘free,’ non-Mediator associated, Tlo protein present in C. albicans, but not in C. dubliniensis or other ascomycetes with attenuated virulence. We show that engineering a large ‘free’ pool of the C. dubliniensis Tlo2 (CdTlo2) protein in C. dubliniensis, through overexpression, results in a number of filamentation phenotypes typically associated only with C. albicans. The amplitude of these phenotypes is proportional to the amount of overexpressed CdTlo2 protein. Overexpression of other C. dubliniensis and C. albicans Tlo proteins do result in these phenotypes. Tlo proteins and their orthologs contain a Mediator interaction domain, and a potent transcriptional activation domain. Nuclear localization of the CdTlo2 activation domain, facilitated naturally by the Tlo Mediator binding domain or artificially through an appended nuclear localization signal, is sufficient for the CdTlo2 overexpression phenotypes. A C. albicans med3 null mutant causes multiple defects including the inability to localize Tlo proteins to the nucleus and reduced virulence in a murine systemic infection model. Our data supports a model in which the

  15. Interaction between Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein and Extracellular Matrix Protein 1 Mediates Endochondral Bone Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Li; Tian, Qingyun; Guo, Fengjin; Mucignat, Maria T.; Perris, Roberto; Sercu, Sandy; Merregaert, Joseph; Di Cesare, Paul E.; Liu, Chuan-ju

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to define the biological functions of COMP, a functional genetic screen was performed. This led to the identification of extracellular matrix protein 1 (ECM1) as a novel COMP-associated partner. COMP directly binds to ECM1 both in vitro and in vivo. The EGF domain of COMP and the C-terminus of ECM1 mediate the interaction between them. COMP and ECM1 Colocalize in the Growth Plates in Vivo. ECM1 inhibits chondrocyte hypertrophy, matrix mineralization, and endochondral bone formation, and COMP overcomes the inhibition by ECM1. In addition, COMP-mediated neutralization of ECM1 inhibition depends on their interaction, since COMP largely fails to overcome the ECM1 inhibition in the presence of the EGF domain of COMP, which disturbs the association of COMP and ECM1. These findings provide the first evidence linking the association of COMP and ECM1 and the biological significance underlying the interaction between them in regulating endochondral bone growth. PMID:20138147

  16. INO80 governs superenhancer-mediated oncogenic transcription and tumor growth in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bingying; Wang, Li; Zhang, Shu; Bennett, Brian D; He, Fan; Zhang, Yan; Xiong, Chengliang; Han, Leng; Diao, Lixia; Li, Pishun; Fargo, David C; Cox, Adrienne D; Hu, Guang

    2016-06-15

    Superenhancers (SEs) are large genomic regions with a high density of enhancer marks. In cancer, SEs are found near oncogenes and dictate cancer gene expression. However, how oncogenic SEs are regulated remains poorly understood. Here, we show that INO80, a chromatin remodeling complex, is required for SE-mediated oncogenic transcription and tumor growth in melanoma. The expression of Ino80, the SWI/SNF ATPase, is elevated in melanoma cells and patient melanomas compared with normal melanocytes and benign nevi. Furthermore, Ino80 silencing selectively inhibits melanoma cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, tumorigenesis, and tumor maintenance in mouse xenografts. Mechanistically, Ino80 occupies >90% of SEs, and its occupancy is dependent on transcription factors such as MITF and Sox9. Ino80 binding reduces nucleosome occupancy and facilitates Mediator recruitment, thus promoting oncogenic transcription. Consistently, genes co-occupied by Ino80 and Med1 are selectively expressed in melanomas compared with melanocytes. Together, our results reveal an essential role of INO80-dependent chromatin remodeling in SE function and suggest a novel strategy for disrupting SEs in cancer treatment. PMID:27340176

  17. Tyk2 mediates effects of urokinase on human vascular smooth muscle cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Patecki, Margret; Schaewen, Markus von; Tkachuk, Sergey; Jerke, Uwe; Dietz, Rainer; Dumler, Inna; Kusch, Angelika . E-mail: angelika.kusch@charite.de

    2007-08-03

    The urokinase (uPA)/uPA receptor (uPAR) system plays a role in the response of the vessel wall to injury, presumably by modulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) functional behaviour. The Jak/Stat signaling pathway has been implicated to mediate the uPA/uPAR-directed cell migration and proliferation in VSMC. We have therefore investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms, which remained not completely understood. In particular, we aimed at identification of the kinase involved in the signaling cascade leading to Stat1 phosphorylation by uPA and its impact on VSMC growth. We performed expression in VSMC of kinase-deficient mutant forms of the Janus kinases Jak1 and Tyk2 and used different cell culture models imitating the response to vascular injury. We provide evidence that Tyk2, but not Jak1, mediates uPA-induced Stat1 phosphorylation and VSMC growth inhibition and suggest a novel function for Tyk2 as an important modulator of the uPA-directed VSMC functional behaviour at the place of injury.

  18. Intronic cis-regulatory modules mediate tissue-specific and microbial control of angptl4/fiaf transcription.

    PubMed

    Camp, J Gray; Jazwa, Amelia L; Trent, Chad M; Rawls, John F

    2012-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota enhances dietary energy harvest leading to increased fat storage in adipose tissues. This effect is caused in part by the microbial suppression of intestinal epithelial expression of a circulating inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase called Angiopoietin-like 4 (Angptl4/Fiaf). To define the cis-regulatory mechanisms underlying intestine-specific and microbial control of Angptl4 transcription, we utilized the zebrafish system in which host regulatory DNA can be rapidly analyzed in a live, transparent, and gnotobiotic vertebrate. We found that zebrafish angptl4 is transcribed in multiple tissues including the liver, pancreatic islet, and intestinal epithelium, which is similar to its mammalian homologs. Zebrafish angptl4 is also specifically suppressed in the intestinal epithelium upon colonization with a microbiota. In vivo transgenic reporter assays identified discrete tissue-specific regulatory modules within angptl4 intron 3 sufficient to drive expression in the liver, pancreatic islet β-cells, or intestinal enterocytes. Comparative sequence analyses and heterologous functional assays of angptl4 intron 3 sequences from 12 teleost fish species revealed differential evolution of the islet and intestinal regulatory modules. High-resolution functional mapping and site-directed mutagenesis defined the minimal set of regulatory sequences required for intestinal activity. Strikingly, the microbiota suppressed the transcriptional activity of the intestine-specific regulatory module similar to the endogenous angptl4 gene. These results suggest that the microbiota might regulate host intestinal Angptl4 protein expression and peripheral fat storage by suppressing the activity of an intestine-specific transcriptional enhancer. This study provides a useful paradigm for understanding how microbial signals interact with tissue-specific regulatory networks to control the activity and evolution of host gene transcription. PMID:22479192

  19. Hormone-mediated growth dynamics of the barley pericarp as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging and transcript profiling.

    PubMed

    Pielot, Rainer; Kohl, Stefan; Manz, Bertram; Rutten, Twan; Weier, Diana; Tarkowská, Danuše; Rolčík, Jakub; Strnad, Miroslav; Volke, Frank; Weber, Hans; Weschke, Winfriede

    2015-11-01

    The shape of the maternal pericarp affects cereal grain mass and yield. Pericarp growth was analysed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), revealing topological maps of mobile water in developing pericarp of barley (Hordeum vulgare) and displaying tissue regions actively elongating in specific temporal-spatial patterns. Correlation analysis of MRI signals and growth rates reveals that growth in length is mediated by dorsal and also lateral rather than ventral regions. Growth in thickness is related to ventral regions. Switching from dorsal to ventral growth is associated with differential expression of axial regulators of the HD-ZipIII and Kanadi/Ettin types, and NPH3 photoreceptors, suggesting light-mediated auxin re-distribution. Auxin increases with the highest levels in the basal pericarp at 6 days after fertilization (DAF), together with transcriptionally up-regulated auxin transport and signalling. Gibberellin biosynthesis is transcriptionally up-regulated only later, and levels of bioactive gibberellins increase from 7 to 13 DAF, with higher levels in ventral than dorsal regions. Differential gene expression related to cell expansion indicates genes related to apoplast acidification, wall relaxation, sugar cleavage, water transport, and cell wall biosynthesis. Candidate genes potentially involved in pericarp extension are distinguished by their temporal expression, representing potential isoforms responsible for dorsal-mediated early growth in length or ventral-mediated late growth in thickness. PMID:26276866

  20. Hormone-mediated growth dynamics of the barley pericarp as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging and transcript profiling

    PubMed Central

    Pielot, Rainer; Kohl, Stefan; Manz, Bertram; Rutten, Twan; Weier, Diana; Tarkowská, Danuše; Rolčík, Jakub; Strnad, Miroslav; Volke, Frank; Weber, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The shape of the maternal pericarp affects cereal grain mass and yield. Pericarp growth was analysed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), revealing topological maps of mobile water in developing pericarp of barley (Hordeum vulgare) and displaying tissue regions actively elongating in specific temporal–spatial patterns. Correlation analysis of MRI signals and growth rates reveals that growth in length is mediated by dorsal and also lateral rather than ventral regions. Growth in thickness is related to ventral regions. Switching from dorsal to ventral growth is associated with differential expression of axial regulators of the HD-ZipIII and Kanadi/Ettin types, and NPH3 photoreceptors, suggesting light-mediated auxin re-distribution. Auxin increases with the highest levels in the basal pericarp at 6 days after fertilization (DAF), together with transcriptionally up-regulated auxin transport and signalling. Gibberellin biosynthesis is transcriptionally up-regulated only later, and levels of bioactive gibberellins increase from 7 to 13 DAF, with higher levels in ventral than dorsal regions. Differential gene expression related to cell expansion indicates genes related to apoplast acidification, wall relaxation, sugar cleavage, water transport, and cell wall biosynthesis. Candidate genes potentially involved in pericarp extension are distinguished by their temporal expression, representing potential isoforms responsible for dorsal-mediated early growth in length or ventral-mediated late growth in thickness. PMID:26276866

  1. Ethylene-Mediated Regulation of A2-Type CYCLINs Modulates Hyponastic Growth in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Polko, Joanna K.; van Rooij, Jop A.; Vanneste, Steffen; Pierik, Ronald; Ammerlaan, Ankie M.H.; Vergeer-van Eijk, Marleen H.; McLoughlin, Fionn; Gühl, Kerstin; Van Isterdael, Gert; Voesenek, Laurentius A.C.J.; Millenaar, Frank F.; Beeckman, Tom; Peeters, Anton J.M.; Marée, Athanasius F.M.; van Zanten, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Upward leaf movement (hyponastic growth) is frequently observed in response to changing environmental conditions and can be induced by the phytohormone ethylene. Hyponasty results from differential growth (i.e. enhanced cell elongation at the proximal abaxial side of the petiole relative to the adaxial side). Here, we characterize Enhanced Hyponasty-d, an activation-tagged Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) line with exaggerated hyponasty. This phenotype is associated with overexpression of the mitotic cyclin CYCLINA2;1 (CYCA2;1), which hints at a role for cell divisions in regulating hyponasty. Indeed, mathematical analysis suggested that the observed changes in abaxial cell elongation rates during ethylene treatment should result in a larger hyponastic amplitude than observed, unless a decrease in cell proliferation rate at the proximal abaxial side of the petiole relative to the adaxial side was implemented. Our model predicts that when this differential proliferation mechanism is disrupted by either ectopic overexpression or mutation of CYCA2;1, the hyponastic growth response becomes exaggerated. This is in accordance with experimental observations on CYCA2;1 overexpression lines and cyca2;1 knockouts. We therefore propose a bipartite mechanism controlling leaf movement: ethylene induces longitudinal cell expansion in the abaxial petiole epidermis to induce hyponasty and simultaneously affects its amplitude by controlling cell proliferation through CYCA2;1. Further corroborating the model, we found that ethylene treatment results in transcriptional down-regulation of A2-type CYCLINs and propose that this, and possibly other regulatory mechanisms affecting CYCA2;1, may contribute to this attenuation of hyponastic growth. PMID:26041787

  2. Ethylene-Mediated Regulation of A2-Type CYCLINs Modulates Hyponastic Growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Polko, Joanna K; van Rooij, Jop A; Vanneste, Steffen; Pierik, Ronald; Ammerlaan, Ankie M H; Vergeer-van Eijk, Marleen H; McLoughlin, Fionn; Gühl, Kerstin; Van Isterdael, Gert; Voesenek, Laurentius A C J; Millenaar, Frank F; Beeckman, Tom; Peeters, Anton J M; Marée, Athanasius F M; van Zanten, Martijn

    2015-09-01

    Upward leaf movement (hyponastic growth) is frequently observed in response to changing environmental conditions and can be induced by the phytohormone ethylene. Hyponasty results from differential growth (i.e. enhanced cell elongation at the proximal abaxial side of the petiole relative to the adaxial side). Here, we characterize Enhanced Hyponasty-d, an activation-tagged Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) line with exaggerated hyponasty. This phenotype is associated with overexpression of the mitotic cyclin CYCLINA2;1 (CYCA2;1), which hints at a role for cell divisions in regulating hyponasty. Indeed, mathematical analysis suggested that the observed changes in abaxial cell elongation rates during ethylene treatment should result in a larger hyponastic amplitude than observed, unless a decrease in cell proliferation rate at the proximal abaxial side of the petiole relative to the adaxial side was implemented. Our model predicts that when this differential proliferation mechanism is disrupted by either ectopic overexpression or mutation of CYCA2;1, the hyponastic growth response becomes exaggerated. This is in accordance with experimental observations on CYCA2;1 overexpression lines and cyca2;1 knockouts. We therefore propose a bipartite mechanism controlling leaf movement: ethylene induces longitudinal cell expansion in the abaxial petiole epidermis to induce hyponasty and simultaneously affects its amplitude by controlling cell proliferation through CYCA2;1. Further corroborating the model, we found that ethylene treatment results in transcriptional down-regulation of A2-type CYCLINs and propose that this, and possibly other regulatory mechanisms affecting CYCA2;1, may contribute to this attenuation of hyponastic growth.

  3. The matricellular protein Cyr61 is a key mediator of platelet-derived growth factor-induced cell migration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fuqiang; Hao, Feng; An, Dong; Zeng, Linlin; Wang, Yi; Xu, Xuemin; Cui, Mei-Zhen

    2015-03-27

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), a potent chemoattractant, induces cell migration via the MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways. However, the downstream mediators are still elusive. In particular, the role of extracellular mediators is largely unknown. In this study, we identified the matricellular protein Cyr61, which is de novo synthesized in response to PDGF stimulation, as the key downstream mediator of the ERK and JNK pathways, independent of the p38 MAPK and AKT pathways, and, thereby, it mediates PDGF-induced smooth muscle cell migration but not proliferation. Our results revealed that, when Cyr61 was newly synthesized by PDGF, it was promptly translocated to the extracellular matrix and physically interacted with the plasma membrane integrins α6β1 and αvβ3. We further demonstrate that Cyr61 and integrins are integral components of the PDGF signaling pathway via an "outside-in" signaling route to activate intracellular focal adhesion kinase (FAK), leading to cell migration. Therefore, this study provides the first evidence that the PDGF-induced endogenous extracellular matrix component Cyr61 is a key mediator in modulating cell migration by connecting intracellular PDGF-ERK and JNK signals with integrin/FAK signaling. Therefore, extracellular Cyr61 convergence with growth factor signaling and integrin/FAK signaling is a new concept of growth factor-induced cell migration. The discovered signaling pathway may represent an important therapeutic target in growth factor-mediated cell migration/invasion-related vascular diseases and tumorigenesis.

  4. Increasing matrix stiffness upregulates vascular endothelial growth factor expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells mediated by integrin β1.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yinying; Xie, Xiaoying; Wang, Zhiming; Hu, Chao; Zheng, Qiongdan; Wang, Yaohui; Chen, Rongxin; Xue, Tongchun; Chen, Jie; Gao, Dongmei; Wu, Weizhong; Ren, Zhenggang; Cui, Jiefeng

    2014-02-14

    Matrix stiffness as a novel regulation factor involves in modulating the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) invasion or metastasis. However, the mechanism by which matrix stiffness modulates HCC angiogenesis remains unknown. Here, using buffalo rat HCC models with different liver matrix stiffness backgrounds and an in vitro cell culture system of mechanically tunable Collagen1 (COL1)-coated polyacrylamide gel, we investigated the effects of different matrix stiffness levels on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in HCC cells and explored its regulatory mechanism for controlling HCC angiogenesis. Tissue microarray analysis showed that the expression levels of VEGF and CD31 were gradually upregulated in tumor tissues with increasing COL1 and lysyl oxidase (LOX) expression, indicating a positive correlation between tumor angiogenesis and matrix rigidity. The expression of VEGF and the phosphorylation levels of PI3K and Akt were all upregulated in HCC cells on high-stiffness gel than on low-stiffness gel. Meanwhile, alteration of intergrin β1 expression was found to be the most distinctive, implying that it might mediate the response of HCC cells to matrix stiffness simulation. After integrin β1 was blocked in HCC cells using specific monoclonal antibody, the expression of VEGF and the phosphorylation levels of PI3K and Akt at different culture times were accordingly suppressed and downregulated in the treatment group as compared with those in the control group. All data suggested that the extracellular matrix stiffness stimulation signal was transduced into HCC cells via integrin β1, and this signal activated the PI3K/Akt pathway and upregulated VEGF expression. This study unveils a new paradigm in which matrix stiffness as initiators to modulate HCC angiogenesis.

  5. Human SAP18 mediates assembly of a splicing regulatory multiprotein complex via its ubiquitin-like fold

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kusum K.; Erkelenz, Steffen; Rattay, Stephanie; Dehof, Anna Katharina; Hildebrandt, Andreas; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Schaal, Heiner; Schwerk, Christian

    2010-01-01

    RNPS1, Acinus, and SAP18 form the apoptosis- and splicing-associated protein (ASAP) complex, which is also part of the exon junction complex. Whereas RNPS1 was originally identified as a general activator of mRNA processing, all three proteins have been found within functional spliceosomes. Both RNPS1 and Acinus contain typical motifs of splicing regulatory proteins including arginine/serine-rich domains. Due to the absence of such structural features, however, a function of SAP18 in splicing regulation is completely unknown. Here we have investigated splicing regulatory activities of the ASAP components. Whereas a full-length Acinus isoform displayed only limited splicing regulatory activity, both RNPS1 and, surprisingly, SAP18 strongly modulated splicing regulation. Detailed mutational analysis and three-dimensional modeling data revealed that the ubiquitin-like fold of SAP18 was required for efficient splicing regulatory activity. Coimmunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence experiments demonstrated that SAP18 assembles a nuclear speckle-localized splicing regulatory multiprotein complex including RNPS1 and Acinus via its ubiquitin-like fold. Our results therefore suggest a novel function of SAP18 in splicing regulation. PMID:20966198

  6. Disentangling direct and growth-mediated influences on early survival: a mechanistic approach.

    PubMed

    Plard, Floriane; Yoccoz, Nigel G; Bonenfant, Christophe; Klein, François; Warnant, Claude; Gaillard, Jean-Michel

    2015-09-01

    1. Early survival is a key life-history trait that often accounts for a large part of the variation in individual fitness and shapes population dynamics. The factors influencing early survival are multiple in large herbivores, including malnutrition, predation, cohort variation or maternal effects. However, the mechanistic pathways connecting these drivers to variation in early survival are much less studied. Indeed, whether these factors influence early survival directly or indirectly through early growth remains to be disentangled. 2. In this study, we used a path analysis to separate the direct and indirect (i.e. mediated by early growth) pathways through which sex, birth date, cohort and family effects influence early survival. We used a large data set of marked roe deer newborns collected from 1985 to 2010 in the intensively monitored population of Trois Fontaines (France). 3. We found that most drivers have indirect influences on early survival through early growth. Indeed, cohort effects influenced early survival through the indirect effect of precipitation around birth on early growth. Precipitation also had direct effects on early survival. Family effects indirectly influenced early survival. Twins from the same litter grew at about the same rate, so they had the same fate. Moreover, some factors, such as birth date, had both direct and indirect effects on roe deer early survival, with fawns born early in the season benefiting from high early survival both because they have more time to grow before the harsh season and because they grow faster during their first days of life than late-born fawns. 4. These findings suggest that most drivers of early survival previously identified in large mammalian herbivores may affect early survival primarily through their influence on early growth. Disentangling the direct and indirect pathways by which different factors influence early survival is of crucial importance to understand the mechanisms shaping this key

  7. Activated carbon decreases invasive plant growth by mediating plant-microbe interactions.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Nicole E; Kulmatiski, Andrew; Beard, Karen H; Norton, Jeanette M

    2014-01-01

    There is growing appreciation for the idea that plant-soil interactions (e.g. allelopathy and plant-microbe feedbacks) may explain the success of some non-native plants. Where this is the case, native plant restoration may require management tools that change plant-soil interactions. Activated carbon (AC) is one such potential tool. Previous research has shown the potential for high concentrations of AC to restore native plant growth to areas dominated by non-natives on a small scale (1 m × 1 m plots). Here we (i) test the efficacy of different AC concentrations at a larger scale (15 m × 15 m plots), (ii) measure microbial responses to AC treatment and (iii) use a greenhouse experiment to identify the primary mechanism, allelopathy versus microbial changes, through which AC impacts native and non-native plant growth. Three years after large-scale applications, AC treatments decreased non-native plant cover and increased the ratio of native to non-native species cover, particularly at concentrations >400 g m(-2). Activated carbon similarly decreased non-native plant growth in the greenhouse. This effect, however, was only observed in live soils, suggesting that AC effects were microbially mediated and not caused by direct allelopathy. Bacterial community analysis of field soils indicated that AC increased the relative abundance of an unidentified bacterium and an Actinomycetales and decreased the relative abundance of a Flavobacterium, suggesting that these organisms may play a role in AC effects on plant growth. Results support the idea that manipulations of plant-microbe interactions may provide novel and effective ways of directing plant growth and community development (e.g. native plant restoration). PMID:25387751

  8. Disentangling direct and growth-mediated influences on early survival: a mechanistic approach.

    PubMed

    Plard, Floriane; Yoccoz, Nigel G; Bonenfant, Christophe; Klein, François; Warnant, Claude; Gaillard, Jean-Michel

    2015-09-01

    1. Early survival is a key life-history trait that often accounts for a large part of the variation in individual fitness and shapes population dynamics. The factors influencing early survival are multiple in large herbivores, including malnutrition, predation, cohort variation or maternal effects. However, the mechanistic pathways connecting these drivers to variation in early survival are much less studied. Indeed, whether these factors influence early survival directly or indirectly through early growth remains to be disentangled. 2. In this study, we used a path analysis to separate the direct and indirect (i.e. mediated by early growth) pathways through which sex, birth date, cohort and family effects influence early survival. We used a large data set of marked roe deer newborns collected from 1985 to 2010 in the intensively monitored population of Trois Fontaines (France). 3. We found that most drivers have indirect influences on early survival through early growth. Indeed, cohort effects influenced early survival through the indirect effect of precipitation around birth on early growth. Precipitation also had direct effects on early survival. Family effects indirectly influenced early survival. Twins from the same litter grew at about the same rate, so they had the same fate. Moreover, some factors, such as birth date, had both direct and indirect effects on roe deer early survival, with fawns born early in the season benefiting from high early survival both because they have more time to grow before the harsh season and because they grow faster during their first days of life than late-born fawns. 4. These findings suggest that most drivers of early survival previously identified in large mammalian herbivores may affect early survival primarily through their influence on early growth. Disentangling the direct and indirect pathways by which different factors influence early survival is of crucial importance to understand the mechanisms shaping this key

  9. Activated carbon decreases invasive plant growth by mediating plant–microbe interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Nicole E.; Kulmatiski, Andrew; Beard, Karen H.; Norton, Jeanette M.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing appreciation for the idea that plant–soil interactions (e.g. allelopathy and plant–microbe feedbacks) may explain the success of some non-native plants. Where this is the case, native plant restoration may require management tools that change plant–soil interactions. Activated carbon (AC) is one such potential tool. Previous research has shown the potential for high concentrations of AC to restore native plant growth to areas dominated by non-natives on a small scale (1 m × 1 m plots). Here we (i) test the efficacy of different AC concentrations at a larger scale (15 m × 15 m plots), (ii) measure microbial responses to AC treatment and (iii) use a greenhouse experiment to identify the primary mechanism, allelopathy versus microbial changes, through which AC impacts native and non-native plant growth. Three years after large-scale applications, AC treatments decreased non-native plant cover and increased the ratio of native to non-native species cover, particularly at concentrations >400 g m−2. Activated carbon similarly decreased non-native plant growth in the greenhouse. This effect, however, was only observed in live soils, suggesting that AC effects were microbially mediated and not caused by direct allelopathy. Bacterial community analysis of field soils indicated that AC increased the relative abundance of an unidentified bacterium and an Actinomycetales and decreased the relative abundance of a Flavobacterium, suggesting that these organisms may play a role in AC effects on plant growth. Results support the idea that manipulations of plant–microbe interactions may provide novel and effective ways of directing plant growth and community development (e.g. native plant restoration). PMID:25387751

  10. Eugenol-inhibited root growth in Avena fatua involves ROS-mediated oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Nitina; Singh, Harminder Pal; Batish, Daizy Rani; Kohli, Ravinder Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Plant essential oils and their constituent monoterpenes are widely known plant growth retardants but their mechanism of action is not well understood. We explored the mechanism of phytotoxicity of eugenol, a monoterpenoid alcohol, proposed as a natural herbicide. Eugenol (100-1000 µM) retarded the germination of Avena fatua and strongly inhibited its root growth compared to the coleoptile growth. We further investigated the underlying physiological and biochemical alterations leading to the root growth inhibition. Eugenol induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to oxidative stress and membrane damage in the root tissue. ROS generation measured in terms of hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical content increased significantly in the range of 24 to 144, 21 to 91, 46 to 173% over the control at 100 to 1000 µM eugenol, respectively. The disruption in membrane integrity was indicated by 25 to 125% increase in malondialdehyde (lipid peroxidation byproduct), and decreased conjugated diene content (~10 to 41%). The electrolyte leakage suggesting membrane damage increased both under light as well as dark conditions measured over a period from 0 to 30 h. In defense to the oxidative damage due to eugenol, a significant upregulation in the ROS-scavenging antioxidant enzyme machinery was observed. The activities of superoxide dismutases, catalases, ascorbate peroxidases, guaiacol peroxidases and glutathione reductases were elevated by ~1.5 to 2.8, 2 to 4.3, 1.9 to 5.0, 1.4 to 3.9, 2.5 to 5.5 times, respectively, in response to 100 to 1000 µM eugenol. The study concludes that eugenol inhibits early root growth through ROS-mediated oxidative damage, despite an activation of the antioxidant enzyme machinery.

  11. SIRT3 regulates cellular iron metabolism and cancer growth by repressing iron regulatory protein 1.

    PubMed

    Jeong, S M; Lee, J; Finley, L W S; Schmidt, P J; Fleming, M D; Haigis, M C

    2015-04-16

    Iron metabolism is essential for many cellular processes, including oxygen transport, respiration and DNA synthesis, and many cancer cells exhibit dysregulation in iron metabolism. Maintenance of cellular iron homeostasis is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs), which control the expression of iron-related genes by binding iron-responsive elements (IREs) of target mRNAs. Here, we report that mitochondrial SIRT3 regulates cellular iron metabolism by modulating IRP1 activity. SIRT3 loss increases reactive oxygen species production, leading to elevated IRP1 binding to IREs. As a consequence, IRP1 target genes, such as the transferrin receptor (TfR1), a membrane-associated glycoprotein critical for iron uptake and cell proliferation, are controlled by SIRT3. Importantly, SIRT3 deficiency results in a defect in cellular iron homeostasis. SIRT3 null cells contain high levels of iron and lose iron-dependent TfR1 regulation. Moreover, SIRT3 null mice exhibit higher levels of iron and TfR1 expression in the pancreas. We found that the regulation of iron uptake and TfR1 expression contribute to the tumor-suppressive activity of SIRT3. Indeed, SIRT3 expression is negatively correlated with TfR1 expression in human pancreatic cancers. SIRT3 overexpression decreases TfR1 expression by inhibiting IRP1 and represses proliferation in pancreatic cancer cells. Our data uncover a novel role of SIRT3 in cellular iron metabolism through IRP1 regulation and suggest that SIRT3 functions as a tumor suppressor, in part, by modulating cellular iron metabolism. PMID:24909164

  12. Activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Macrophages Mediates Feedback Inhibition of M2 Polarization and Gastrointestinal Tumor Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gang; Liu, Liping; Peek, Richard M; Hao, Xishan; Polk, D Brent; Li, Hui; Yan, Fang

    2016-09-23

    EGF receptor (EGFR) in tumor cells serves as a tumor promoter. However, information about EGFR activation in macrophages in regulating M2 polarization and tumor development is limited. This study aimed to investigate the effects of EGFR activation in macrophages on M2 polarization and development of gastrointestinal tumors. IL-4, a cytokine to elicit M2 polarization, stimulated release of an EGFR ligand, HB-EGF, and transactivation and down-regulation of EGFR in Raw 264.7 cells and peritoneal macrophages from WT mice. Knockdown of HB-EGF in macrophages inhibited EGFR transactivation by IL-4. IL-4-stimulated STAT6 activation, Arg1 and YM1 gene expression, and HB-EGF production were further enhanced by inhibition of EGFR activity in Raw 264.7 cells using an EGFR kinase inhibitor and in peritoneal macrophages from Egfr(wa5) mice with kinase inactive EGFR and by knockdown of EGFR in peritoneal macrophages from Egfr(fl/fl) LysM-Cre mice with myeloid cell-specific EGFR deletion. Chitin induced a higher level of M2 polarization in peritoneal macrophages in Egfr(fl/fl) LysM-Cre mice than that in Egfr(fl/fl) mice. Accordingly, IL-4-conditioned medium stimulated growth and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in gastric epithelial and colonic tumor cells, which were suppressed by that from Raw 264.7 cells with HB-EGF knockdown but promoted by that from Egfr(wa5) and Egfr(fl/fl) LysM-Cre peritoneal macrophages. Clinical assessment revealed that the number of macrophages with EGFR expression became less, indicating decreased inhibitory effects on M2 polarization, in late stage of human gastric cancers. Thus, IL-4-stimulated HB-EGF-dependent transactivation of EGFR in macrophages may mediate inhibitory feedback for M2 polarization and HB-EGF production, thereby inhibiting gastrointestinal tumor growth.

  13. The ζ isoform of diacylglycerol kinase plays a predominant role in regulatory T cell development and TCR-mediated ras signaling.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rohan P; Schmidt, Amanda M; Das, Jayajit; Pytel, Dariusz; Riese, Matthew J; Lester, Melissa; Diehl, J Alan; Behrens, Edward M; Kambayashi, Taku; Koretzky, Gary A

    2013-11-26

    Diacylglycerol (DAG) is a critical second messenger that mediates T cell receptor (TCR)-stimulated signaling. The abundance of DAG is reduced by the diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs), which catalyze the conversion of DAG to phosphatidic acid (PA) and thus inhibit DAG-mediated signaling. In T cells, the predominant DGK isoforms are DGKα and DGKζ, and deletion of the genes encoding either isoform enhances DAG-mediated signaling. We found that DGKζ, but not DGKα, suppressed the development of natural regulatory T (T(reg)) cells and predominantly mediated Ras and Akt signaling downstream of the TCR. The differential functions of DGKα and DGKζ were not attributable to differences in protein abundance in T cells or in their localization to the contact sites between T cells and antigen-presenting cells. RasGRP1, a key DAG-mediated activator of Ras signaling, associated to a greater extent with DGKζ than with DGKα; however, in silico modeling of TCR-stimulated Ras activation suggested that a difference in RasGRP1 binding affinity was not sufficient to cause differences in the functions of each DGK isoform. Rather, the model suggested that a greater catalytic rate for DGKζ than for DGKα might lead to DGKζ exhibiting increased suppression of Ras-mediated signals compared to DGKα. Consistent with this notion, experimental studies demonstrated that DGKζ was more effective than DGKα at catalyzing the metabolism of DAG to PA after TCR stimulation. The enhanced effective enzymatic production of PA by DGKζ is therefore one possible mechanism underlying the dominant functions of DGKζ in modulating T(reg) cell development.

  14. The ζ Isoform of Diacylglycerol Kinase Plays a Predominant Role in Regulatory T Cell Development and TCR-Mediated Ras Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Rohan P.; Schmidt, Amanda M.; Das, Jayajit; Pytel, Dariusz; Riese, Matthew J.; Lester, Melissa; Diehl, J. Alan; Behrens, Edward M.; Kambayashi, Taku; Koretzky, Gary A.

    2014-01-01

    Diacylglycerol (DAG) is a critical second messenger that mediates T cell receptor (TCR)–stimulated signaling. The abundance of DAG is reduced by the diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs), which catalyze the conversion of DAG to phosphatidic acid (PA) and thus inhibit DAG-mediated signaling. In T cells, the predominant DGK isoforms are DGKα and DGKζ, and deletion of the genes encoding either isoform enhances DAG-mediated signaling. We found that DGKζ, but not DGKα, suppressed the development of natural regulatory T (Treg) cells and predominantly mediated Ras and Akt signaling downstream of the TCR. The differential functions of DGKα and DGKζ were not attributable to differences in protein abundance in T cells or in their localization to the contact sites between T cells and antigen-presenting cells. RasGRP1, a key DAG-mediated activator of Ras signaling, associated to a greater extent with DGKζ than with DGKα; however, in silico modeling of TCR-stimulated Ras activation suggested that a difference in RasGRP1 binding affinity was not sufficient to cause differences in the functions of each DGK isoform. Rather, the model suggested that a greater catalytic rate for DGKζ than for DGKα might lead to DGKζ exhibiting increased suppression of Ras-mediated signals compared to DGKα. Consistent with this notion, experimental studies demonstrated that DGKζ was more effective than DGKα at catalyzing the metabolism of DAG to PA after TCR stimulation. The enhanced effective enzymatic production of PA by DGKζ is therefore one possible mechanism underlying the dominant functions of DGKζ in modulating Treg cell development. PMID:24280043

  15. Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone and Its Analogues: Significance for MSCs-Mediated Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Quanwei; Ma, Qunchao; Chen, Huiqiang; Wang, Jian'an

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for regenerative medicine because of their multipotency, immune-privilege, and paracrine properties including the potential to promote angiogenesis. Accumulating evidence suggests that the inherent properties of cytoprotection and tissue repair by native MSCs can be enhanced by various preconditioning stimuli implemented prior to cell transplantation. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), a stimulator in extrahypothalamus systems including tumors, has attracted great attentions in recent years because GHRH and its agonists could promote angiogenesis in various tissues. GHRH and its agonists are proangiogenic in responsive tissues including tumors, and GHRH antagonists have been tested as antitumor agents through their ability to suppress angiogenesis and cell growth. GHRH-R is expressed by MSCs and evolving work from our laboratory indicates that treatment of MSCs with GHRH agonists prior to cell transplantation markedly enhanced the angiogenic potential and tissue reparative properties of MSCs through a STAT3 signaling pathway. In this review we summarized the possible effects of GHRH analogues on cell growth and development, as well as on the proangiogenic properties of MSCs. We also discussed the relationship between GHRH analogues and MSC-mediated angiogenesis. The analyses provide new insights into molecular pathways of MSCs-based therapies and their augmentation by GHRH analogues. PMID:27774107

  16. FCA mediates thermal adaptation of stem growth by attenuating auxin action in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo-Jun; Jung, Jae-Hoon; Cortés Llorca, Lucas; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Lee, Sangmin; Baldwin, Ian T; Park, Chung-Mo

    2014-11-17

    Global warming is predicted to profoundly affect plant distribution and crop yield in the near future. Higher ambient temperature can influence diverse aspects of plant growth and development. In Arabidopsis, the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Phytochrome-Interacting Factor 4 (PIF4) regulates temperature-induced adaptive responses by modulating auxin biosynthesis. At high temperature, PIF4 directly activates expression of YUCCA8 (YUC8), a gene encoding an auxin biosynthetic enzyme, resulting in auxin accumulation. Here we demonstrate that the RNA-binding protein FCA attenuates PIF4 activity by inducing its dissociation from the YUC8 promoter at high temperature. At 28 °C, auxin content is elevated in FCA-deficient mutants that exhibit elongated stems but reduced in FCA-overexpressing plants that exhibit reduced stem growth. We propose that the FCA-mediated regulation of YUC8 expression tunes down PIF4-induced architectural changes to achieve thermal adaptation of stem growth at high ambient temperature.

  17. Regulatory functions of SnRK1 in stress-responsive gene expression and in plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young-Hee; Hong, Jung-Woo; Kim, Eun-Chul; Yoo, Sang-Dong

    2012-04-01

    Sucrose-nonfermentation1-related protein kinase1 (SnRK1) is an evolutionarily conserved energy sensor protein that regulates gene expression in response to energy depletion in plants. Efforts to elucidate the functions and mechanisms of this protein kinase are hampered, however, by inherent growth defects of snrk1-null mutant plants. To overcome these limitations and study SnRK1 functions in vivo, we applied a method combining transient expression in leaf mesophyll protoplasts and stable expression in transgenic plants. We found that both rice (Oryza sativa) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SnRK1 activities critically influence stress-inducible gene expression and the induction of stress tolerance. Genetic, molecular, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses further revealed that the nuclear SnRK1 modulated target gene transcription in a submergence-dependent manner. From early seedling development through late senescence, SnRK1 activities appeared to modulate developmental processes in the plants. Our findings offer insight into the regulatory functions of plant SnRK1 in stress-responsive gene regulation and in plant growth and development throughout the life cycle.

  18. Germ line and embryonic expression of Fex, a member of the Drosophila F-element retrotransposon family, is mediated by an internal cis-regulatory control region.

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, B; Fellert, S; Taubert, H; Hoch, M

    1996-01-01

    The F elements of Drosophila melanogaster belong to the superfamily of long interspersed nucleotide element retrotransposons. To date, F-element transcription has not been detected in flies. Here we describe the isolation of a member of the F-element family, termed Fex, which is transcribed in specific cells of the female and male germ lines and in various tissues during embryogenesis of D. melanogaster. Sequence analysis revealed that this element contains two complete open reading frames coding for a putative nucleic acid-binding protein and a putative reverse transcriptase. Functional analysis of the 5' region, using germ line transformation of Fex-lacZ reporter gene constructs, demonstrates that major aspects of tissue-specific Fex expression are controlled by internal cis-acting elements that lie in the putative coding region of open reading frame 1. These sequences mediate dynamic gene expression in eight expression domains during embryonic and germ line development. The capacity of the cis-regulatory region of the Fex element to mediate such complex expression patterns is unique among members of the long interspersed nucleotide element superfamily of retrotransposons and is reminiscent of regulatory regions of developmental control genes. PMID:8649411

  19. The SnRK2-APC/CTE regulatory module mediates the antagonistic action of gibberellic acid and abscisic acid pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qibing; Wu, Fuqing; Sheng, Peike; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Xiuping; Wang, Jiulin; Cheng, Zhijun; Wang, Jie; Wang, Haiyang; Wan, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellic acid (GA) antagonistically regulate many developmental processes and responses to biotic or abiotic stresses in higher plants. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this antagonism is still poorly understood. Here, we show that loss-of-function mutation in rice Tiller Enhancer (TE), an activator of the APC/CTE complex, causes hypersensitivity and hyposensitivity to ABA and GA, respectively. We find that TE physically interacts with ABA receptor OsPYL/RCARs and promotes their degradation by the proteasome. Genetic analysis also shows OsPYL/RCARs act downstream of TE in mediating ABA responses. Conversely, ABA inhibits APC/CTE activity by phosphorylating TE through activating the SNF1-related protein kinases (SnRK2s), which may interrupt the interaction between TE and OsPYL/RCARs and subsequently stabilize OsPYL/RCARs. In contrast, GA can reduce the level of SnRK2s and may promote APC/CTE-mediated degradation of OsPYL/RCARs. Thus, we propose that the SnRK2-APC/CTE regulatory module represents a regulatory hub underlying the antagonistic action of GA and ABA in plants. PMID:26272249

  20. PGE{sub 2}-induced colon cancer growth is mediated by mTORC1

    SciTech Connect

    Dufour, Marc Faes, Seraina Dormond-Meuwly, Anne Demartines, Nicolas Dormond, Olivier

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • PGE{sub 2} activates mTORC1 in colon cancer cells. • Inhibition of mTORC1 blocks PGE{sub 2} induced colon cancer cell growth. • mTORC1 is a signaling intermediary in PGE{sub 2} induced colon cancer cell responses. - Abstract: The inflammatory prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) cytokine plays a key role in the development of colon cancer. Several studies have shown that PGE{sub 2} directly induces the growth of colon cancer cells and furthermore promotes tumor angiogenesis by increasing the production of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The signaling intermediaries implicated in these processes have however not been fully characterized. In this report, we show that the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) plays an important role in PGE{sub 2}-induced colon cancer cell responses. Indeed, stimulation of LS174T cells with PGE{sub 2} increased mTORC1 activity as observed by the augmentation of S6 ribosomal protein phosphorylation, a downstream effector of mTORC1. The PGE{sub 2} EP{sub 4} receptor was responsible for transducing the signal to mTORC1. Moreover, PGE{sub 2} increased colon cancer cell proliferation as well as the growth of colon cancer cell colonies grown in matrigel and blocking mTORC1 by rapamycin or ATP-competitive inhibitors of mTOR abrogated these effects. Similarly, the inhibition of mTORC1 by downregulation of its component raptor using RNA interference blocked PGE{sub 2}-induced LS174T cell growth. Finally, stimulation of LS174T cells with PGE{sub 2} increased VEGF production which was also prevented by mTORC1 inhibition. Taken together, these results show that mTORC1 is an important signaling intermediary in PGE{sub 2} mediated colon cancer cell growth and VEGF production. They further support a role for mTORC1 in inflammation induced tumor growth.

  1. Insect growth regulatory effects of some extracts and sterols from Myrtillocactus geometrizans (Cactaceae) against Spodoptera frugiperda and Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, Carlos L; Salazar, J Rodrigo; Martínez, Mariano; Aranda, Eduardo

    2005-10-01

    A methanol extract from the roots and aerial parts of Myrtillocactus geometrizans (Cactaceae) yielded peniocerol 1, macdougallin 2, and chichipegenin 3. The natural products 1, 2 their mixtures, MeOH and CH(2)Cl(2) extracts showed insecticidal and insect growth regulatory activity against fall armyworm [Spodoptera frugiperda J. E. Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)], an important insect pest of corn, and [Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera)], a pest of stored grains in Mexico. The most active compounds were 1, 2, and a mixture (M(2)) of 1 and 2 (6:4). All these extracts, compounds and the mixture had insect growth regulating (IGR) activity between 5.0 and 50.0 ppm and insecticidal effects between 50 and 300 ppm in diets. The extracts were insecticidal to larvae, with lethal doses between 100 and 200 ppm. These compounds appear to have selective effects on the pre-emergence metabolism of Coleoptera, because in all treatments of the larvae of T. molitor, pupation were shortened and this process show precociousness in relation to controls. In contrast to S. frugiperda larvae, onset of pupation was noticeably delayed. Emergence in both cases was drastically diminished. In both pupae and in the few adults that were able to emerge, many deformations were observed. The results of these assays indicated that the compounds were more active than other known natural insect growth inhibitors such as gedunin and methanol extracts of Cedrela salvadorensis and Yucca periculosa. Peniocerol, macdougallin and chichipegenin, as well as mixtures of these substances, may be useful as natural insecticidal agents.

  2. Insect growth regulatory effects of some extracts and sterols from Myrtillocactus geometrizans (Cactaceae) against Spodoptera frugiperda and Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, Carlos L; Salazar, J Rodrigo; Martínez, Mariano; Aranda, Eduardo

    2005-10-01

    A methanol extract from the roots and aerial parts of Myrtillocactus geometrizans (Cactaceae) yielded peniocerol 1, macdougallin 2, and chichipegenin 3. The natural products 1, 2 their mixtures, MeOH and CH(2)Cl(2) extracts showed insecticidal and insect growth regulatory activity against fall armyworm [Spodoptera frugiperda J. E. Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)], an important insect pest of corn, and [Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera)], a pest of stored grains in Mexico. The most active compounds were 1, 2, and a mixture (M(2)) of 1 and 2 (6:4). All these extracts, compounds and the mixture had insect growth regulating (IGR) activity between 5.0 and 50.0 ppm and insecticidal effects between 50 and 300 ppm in diets. The extracts were insecticidal to larvae, with lethal doses between 100 and 200 ppm. These compounds appear to have selective effects on the pre-emergence metabolism of Coleoptera, because in all treatments of the larvae of T. molitor, pupation were shortened and this process show precociousness in relation to controls. In contrast to S. frugiperda larvae, onset of pupation was noticeably delayed. Emergence in both cases was drastically diminished. In both pupae and in the few adults that were able to emerge, many deformations were observed. The results of these assays indicated that the compounds were more active than other known natural insect growth inhibitors such as gedunin and methanol extracts of Cedrela salvadorensis and Yucca periculosa. Peniocerol, macdougallin and chichipegenin, as well as mixtures of these substances, may be useful as natural insecticidal agents. PMID:16122768

  3. Cathepsin L knockdown enhances curcumin-mediated inhibition of growth, migration, and invasion of glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Fei, Yao; Xiong, Yajie; Zhao, Yifan; Wang, Wenjuan; Han, Meilin; Wang, Long; Tan, Caihong; Liang, Zhongqin

    2016-09-01

    Curcumin can be used to prevent and treat cancer. However, its exact underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Cathepsin L, a lysosomal cysteine protease, is overexpressed in several cancer types. This study aimed to determine the role of cathepsin L in curcumin-mediated inhibition of growth, migration, and invasion of glioma cells. Results revealed that the activity of cathepsin L was enhanced in curcumin-treated glioma cells. Cathepsin L knockdown induced by RNA interference significantly promoted curcumin-induced cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest. The knockdown also inhibited the migration and invasion of glioma cells. Our results suggested that the inhibition of cathepsin L can enhance the sensitivity of glioma cells to curcumin. Therefore, cathepsin L may be a new target to enhance the efficacy of curcumin against cancers. PMID:27373979

  4. Transforming growth factor-β: an important mediator in Helicobacter pylori-associated pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nianshuang; Xie, Chuan; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) is a Gram-negative, microaerophilic, helical bacillus that specifically colonizes the gastric mucosa. The interaction of virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors contributes to the pathogenesis of H. pylori-associated conditions, such as atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. Infection with H. pylori has recently been recognized as the strongest risk factor for gastric cancer. As a pleiotropic cytokine, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β regulates various biological processes, including cell cycle, proliferation, apoptosis, and metastasis. Recent studies have shed new light on the involvement of TGF-β signaling in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection. This review focuses on the potential etiological roles of TGF-β in H. pylori-mediated gastric pathogenesis. PMID:26583078

  5. P2y receptor-mediated angiogenesis via vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Rumjahn, Sharif M; Baldwin, Karla A; Buxton, Iain L O

    2007-01-01

    Pathological as well as physiological angiogenesis is known to be regulated by such factors as nucleotides and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF). Activated P2Y nucleotide receptors have been observed to associate and transactivate VEGF Receptor 2 (VEGFR2), suggesting a cooperation between nucleotide and VEGF signaling in angiogenesis. P2YR mediated VEGFR2 signaling therefore may be important in describing the angiogenic signaling of nucleotides such as ATP. Here, we provide evidence that supports the notion of P2YR-VEGFR2 signaling. The significant angiogenic effect of P2Y1/2 receptor agonists (100 microM ATP and 10 microM 2MS-ATP) on endothelial cell tubulogenesis was suppressed back to near control levels upon addition of 1 microM SU1498 (specific VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor). We believe that this P2YR-VEFGR2 signaling is an important component of pathological, as well as physiological angiogenesis.

  6. Stromal inhibition of prostatic epithelial cell proliferation not mediated by transforming growth factor beta.

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, A.; van den Eijnden-van Raaij, A. J.; Klaij, I. A.; Romijn, J. C.; Schröder, F. H.

    1995-01-01

    The paracrine influence of prostatic stroma on the proliferation of prostatic epithelial cells was investigated. Stromal cells from the human prostate have previously been shown to inhibit anchorage-dependent as well as anchorage-independent growth of the prostatic tumour epithelial cell lines PC-3 and LNCaP. Antiproliferative activity, mediated by a diffusible factor in the stromal cell conditioned medium, was found to be produced specifically by prostatic stromal cells. In the present study the characteristics of this factor were examined. It is demonstrated that prostate stroma-derived inhibiting factor is an acid- and heat-labile, dithiothreitol-sensitive protein. Although some similarities with type beta transforming growth factor (TGF-beta)-like inhibitors are apparent, evidence is presented that the factor is not identical to TGF-beta or to the TGF-beta-like factors activin and inhibin. Absence of TGF-beta activity was shown by the lack of inhibitory response of the TGF-beta-sensitive mink lung cell line CCL-64 to prostate stromal cell conditioned medium and to concentrated, partially purified preparations of the inhibitor. Furthermore, neutralising antibodies against TGF-beta 1 or TGF-beta 2 did not cause a decline in the level of PC-3 growth inhibition caused by partially purified inhibitor. Using Northern blot analyses, we excluded the involvement of inhibin or activin. It is concluded that the prostate stroma-derived factor may be a novel growth inhibitor different from any of the currently described inhibiting factors. Images Figure 5 PMID:7543773

  7. Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes inhibit Aspergillus fumigatus conidial growth by lactoferrin-mediated iron depletion.

    PubMed

    Zarember, Kol A; Sugui, Janyce A; Chang, Yun C; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J; Gallin, John I

    2007-05-15

    Aspergillus fumigatus, a common mold, rarely infects humans, except during prolonged neutropenia or in cases of chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the NADPH oxidase that normally produces fungicidal reactive oxygen species. Filamentous hyphae of Aspergillus are killed by normal, but not CGD polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN); however, the few studies on PMN-mediated host defenses against infectious conidia (spores) of this organism have yielded conflicting results, some showing that PMN do not inhibit conidial growth, with others showing that they do, most likely using reactive oxygen species. Given that CGD patients are exposed daily to hundreds of viable A. fumigatus conidia, yet considerable numbers of them survive years without infection, we reasoned that PMN use ROS-independent mechanisms to combat Aspergillus. We show that human PMN from both normal controls and CGD patients are equipotent at arresting the growth of Aspergillus conidia in vitro, indicating the presence of a reactive oxygen species-independent factor(s). Cell-free supernatants of degranulated normal and CGD neutrophils both suppressed fungal growth and were found to be rich in lactoferrin, an abundant PMN secondary granule protein. Purified iron-poor lactoferrin at concentrations occurring in PMN supernatants (and reported in human mucosal secretions in vivo) decreased fungal growth, whereas saturation of lactoferrin or PMN supernatants with iron, or testing in the presence of excess iron in the form of ferritin, completely abolished activity against conidia. These results demonstrate that PMN lactoferrin sequestration of iron is important for host defense against Aspergillus. PMID:17475866

  8. Computational comparison of mediated current generation capacity of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in photosynthetic and respiratory growth modes.

    PubMed

    Mao, Longfei; Verwoerd, Wynand S

    2014-11-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii possesses many potential advantages to be exploited as a biocatalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for electricity generation. In the present study, we performed computational studies based on flux balance analysis (FBA) to probe the maximum potential of C. reinhardtii for current output and identify the metabolic mechanisms supporting a high current generation in three different cultivation conditions, i.e., heterotrophic, photoautotrophic and mixotrophic growth. The results showed that flux balance limitations allow the highest current output for C. reinhardtii in the mixotrophic growth mode (2.368 A/gDW), followed by heterotrophic growth (1.141 A/gDW) and photoautotrophic growth the lowest (0.7035 A/gDW). The significantly higher mediated electron transfer (MET) rate in the mixotrophic mode is in complete contrast to previous findings for a photosynthetic cyanobacterium, and was attributed to the fact that for C. reinhardtii the photophosphorylation improved the efficiency of converting the acetate into biomass and NADH production. Overall, the cytosolic NADH-dependent current production was mainly associated with five reactions in both mixotrophic and photoautotrophic nutritional modes, whereas four reactions participated in the heterotrophic mode. The mixotrophic and photoautotrophic metabolisms were alike and shared the same set of reactions for maximizing current production, whereas in the heterotrophic mode, the current production was additionally contributed by the metabolic activities in the two organelles: glyoxysome and chloroplast. In conclusion, C. reinhardtii has a potential to be exploited in MFCs of MET mode to produce a high current output. PMID:24875305

  9. Epidermal growth factor mediated healing in stem cell-derived vocal fold mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Palencia, Liliana; Das, Amritava; Palecek, Sean P; Thibeault, Susan; Leydon, Ciara

    2015-01-01

    Background The goal of vocal fold wound healing is the reconstitution of functional tissue, including a structurally and functionally intact epithelium. Mechanisms underlying reepithelialization in vocal folds are not known, although it is suspected that healing involves the interplay between several growth factors. We used a three-dimensional human embryonic stem cell-derived model of vocal fold mucosa to examine the effects of one growth factor, exogenous epidermal growth factor (EGF), on wound healing. Materials and methods A scratch wound was created in the in vitro model. Rate of wound healing, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation, and cell proliferation post-injury were analyzed with and without application of both exogenous EGF and an EGFR inhibitor, Gefitinib. Results Wound repair after injury was significantly hastened by application of exogenous EGF (13.3 µm/hour, ±2.63) compared to absence of exogenous EGF (7.1 µm/hour ±2.84), but inhibited with concurrent addition of Gefitinib (5.2 µm/hour, ±2.23), indicating that EGF mediates wound healing in an EGFR-dependent manner. Immunohistochemistry revealed that EGFR activation occurred only in the presence of exogenous EGF. While not statistically significant, increased density of Ki67 staining in epithelium adjacent to the scratch wound was observed following treatment with EGF, suggesting a tendency for exogenous EGF to increase epithelial cell proliferation. Conclusions Exogenous EGF increases the rate of wound healing in an EGFR-dependent manner in a three-dimensional stem cell-derived model of vocal fold mucosa. This model of wound healing can be used to gain insight into the mechanisms that regulate vocal fold epithelial repair following injury. PMID:25818979

  10. EHD1 mediates vesicle trafficking required for normal muscle growth and transverse tubule development.

    PubMed

    Posey, Avery D; Swanson, Kaitlin E; Alvarez, Manuel G; Krishnan, Swathi; Earley, Judy U; Band, Hamid; Pytel, Peter; McNally, Elizabeth M; Demonbreun, Alexis R

    2014-03-15

    EHD proteins have been implicated in intracellular trafficking, especially endocytic recycling, where they mediate receptor and lipid recycling back to the plasma membrane. Additionally, EHDs help regulate cytoskeletal reorganization and induce tubule formation. It was previously shown that EHD proteins bind directly to the C2 domains in myoferlin, a protein that regulates myoblast fusion. Loss of myoferlin impairs normal myoblast fusion leading to smaller muscles in vivo but the intracellular pathways perturbed by loss of myoferlin function are not well known. We now characterized muscle development in EHD1-null mice. EHD1-null myoblasts display defective receptor recycling and mislocalization of key muscle proteins, including caveolin-3 and Fer1L5, a related ferlin protein homologous to myoferlin. Additionally, EHD1-null myoblast fusion is reduced. We found that loss of EHD1 leads to smaller muscles and myofibers in vivo. In wildtype skeletal muscle EHD1 localizes to the transverse tubule (T-tubule), and loss of EHD1 results in overgrowth of T-tubules with excess vesicle accumulation in skeletal muscle. We provide evidence that tubule formation in myoblasts relies on a functional EHD1 ATPase domain. Moreover, we extended our studies to show EHD1 regulates BIN1 induced tubule formation. These data, taken together and with the known interaction between EHD and ferlin proteins, suggests that the EHD proteins coordinate growth and development likely through mediating vesicle recycling and the ability to reorganize the cytoskeleton.

  11. EHD1 mediates vesicle trafficking required for normal muscle growth and tubule development

    PubMed Central

    Posey, Avery D.; Swanson, Kaitlin E.; Alvarez, Manuel G.; Krishnan, Swathi; Earley, Judy E.; Band, Hamid; Pytel, Peter; McNally, Elizabeth M.; Demonbreun, Alexis R.

    2014-01-01

    EHD proteins have been implicated in intracellular trafficking, especially endocytic recycling, where they mediate receptor and lipid recycling back to the plasma membrane. Additionally, EHDs help regulate cytoskeletal reorganization and induce tubule formation. It was previously shown that EHD proteins bind directly to the C2 domains in myoferlin, a protein that regulates myoblast fusion. Loss of myoferlin impairs normal myoblast fusion leading to smaller muscles in vivo but the intracellular pathways perturbed by loss of myoferlin function are not well known. We now characterized muscle development in EHD1-null mice. EHD1-null myoblasts display defective receptor recycling and mislocalization of key muscle proteins, including caveolin-3 and Fer1L5, a related ferlin protein homologous to myoferlin. Additionally, EHD1-null myoblast fusion is reduced. We found that loss of EHD1 leads to smaller muscles and myofibers in vivo. In wildtype skeletal muscle EHD1 localizes to the transverse tubule (T-tubule), and loss of EHD1 results in overgrowth of T-tubules with excess vesicle accumulation in skeletal muscle. We provide evidence that tubule formation in myoblasts relies on a functional EHD1 ATPase domain. Moreover, we extended our studies to show EHD1 regulates BIN1 induced tubule formation. These data, taken together and with the known interaction between EHD and ferlin proteins, suggests that the EHD proteins coordinate growth and development likely through mediating vesicle recycling and the ability to reorganize the cytoskeleton. PMID:24440153

  12. Neuropilin-1 mediates vascular permeability independently of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 activation.

    PubMed

    Roth, Lise; Prahst, Claudia; Ruckdeschel, Tina; Savant, Soniya; Weström, Simone; Fantin, Alessandro; Riedel, Maria; Héroult, Mélanie; Ruhrberg, Christiana; Augustin, Hellmut G

    2016-04-26

    Neuropilin-1 (NRP1) regulates developmental and pathological angiogenesis, arteriogenesis, and vascular permeability, acting as a coreceptor for semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) and the 165-amino acid isoform of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A165). NRP1 is also the receptor for the CendR peptides, a class of cell- and tissue-penetrating peptides with a specific R-x-x-R carboxyl-terminal motif. Because the cytoplasmic domain of NRP1 lacks catalytic activity, NRP1 is mainly thought to act through the recruitment and binding to other receptors. We report here that the NRP1 intracellular domain mediates vascular permeability. Stimulation with VEGF-A165, a ligand-blocking antibody, and a CendR peptide led to NRP1 accumulation at cell-cell contacts in endothelial cell monolayers, increased cellular permeability in vitro and vascular leakage in vivo. Biochemical analyses, VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) silencing, and the use of a specific VEGFR blocker established that the effects induced by the CendR peptide and the antibody were independent of VEGFR-2. Moreover, leakage assays in mice expressing a mutant NRP1 lacking the cytoplasmic domain revealed that this domain was required for NRP1-induced vascular permeability in vivo. Hence, these data define a vascular permeability pathway mediated by NRP1 but independent of VEGFR-2 activation.

  13. Sphingosine-1-phosphate mediates epidermal growth factor-induced muscle satellite cell activation.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Yosuke; Ohashi, Kazuya; Wada, Eiji; Yuasa, Yuki; Shiozuka, Masataka; Nonomura, Yoshiaki; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2014-08-01

    Skeletal muscle can regenerate repeatedly due to the presence of resident stem cells, called satellite cells. Because satellite cells are usually quiescent, they must be activated before participating in muscle regeneration in response to stimuli such as injury, overloading, and stretch. Although satellite cell activation is a crucial step in muscle regeneration, little is known of the molecular mechanisms controlling this process. Recent work showed that the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) plays crucial roles in the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of muscle satellite cells. We investigated the role of growth factors in S1P-mediated satellite cell activation. We found that epidermal growth factor (EGF) in combination with insulin induced proliferation of quiescent undifferentiated mouse myoblast C2C12 cells, which are also known as reserve cells, in serum-free conditions. Sphingosine kinase activity increased when reserve cells were stimulated with EGF. Treatment of reserve cells with the D-erythro-N,N-dimethylsphingosine, Sphingosine Kinase Inhibitor, or siRNA duplexes specific for sphingosine kinase 1, suppressed EGF-induced C2C12 activation. We also present the evidence showing the S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. Moreover, we demonstrated a combination of insulin and EGF promoted activation of satellite cells on single myofibers in a manner dependent on SPHK and S1P2. Taken together, our observations show that EGF-induced satellite cell activation is mediated by S1P and its receptor.

  14. The growth and reproduction performance of TALEN-mediated β-lactoglobulin-knockout bucks.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hengtao; Cui, Chenchen; Liu, Jun; Luo, Yan; Quan, Fusheng; Jin, Yaping; Zhang, Yong

    2016-10-01

    With the technological development of several engineered endonucleases (EENs), such as zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and CRISPR/Cas9, gene targeting by homologous recombination has been efficiently improved to generate site-specifically genetically modified livestock. However, few studies have been done to investigate the health and fertility of these animals. The purpose of the present study is to investigate if gene targeting events and a recloning procedure would affect the production traits of EEN-mediated gene targeted bucks. TALEN-mediated β-lactoglobulin (BLG) gene mono-allelic knockout (BLG (+/-)) goats and bi-allelic knockout (BLG (-/-)) buck produced by using sequential gene targeting combined with recloning in fibroblasts from BLG (+/-) buck were used to evaluate their health and fertility. Birth weight and postnatal growth of BLG (+/-) bucks were similar to the wild-type goats. None of the parameters for both fresh and frozen-thawed semen quality were significantly different in BLG (+/-) or BLG (-/-) bucks compared to their corresponding comparators. In vitro fertilization (IVF) test revealed that the proportion of IVF oocytes developing to the blastocyst stage was identical among BLG (+/-), BLG (-/-) and wild-type bucks. Conception rates of artificial insemination were respectively 42.3, 38.0 and 42.6 % for frozen-thawed semen from the BLG (+/-), BLG (-/-) and wild-type bucks. In addition, germline transmission of the targeted BLG modification was in accordance with Mendelian rules. These results demonstrated that the analyzed growth and reproductive traits were not impacted by targeting BLG gene and recloning, implicating the potential for dairy goat breeding of BLG (+/-) and BLG (-/-) bucks.

  15. The growth and reproduction performance of TALEN-mediated β-lactoglobulin-knockout bucks.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hengtao; Cui, Chenchen; Liu, Jun; Luo, Yan; Quan, Fusheng; Jin, Yaping; Zhang, Yong

    2016-10-01

    With the technological development of several engineered endonucleases (EENs), such as zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and CRISPR/Cas9, gene targeting by homologous recombination has been efficiently improved to generate site-specifically genetically modified livestock. However, few studies have been done to investigate the health and fertility of these animals. The purpose of the present study is to investigate if gene targeting events and a recloning procedure would affect the production traits of EEN-mediated gene targeted bucks. TALEN-mediated β-lactoglobulin (BLG) gene mono-allelic knockout (BLG (+/-)) goats and bi-allelic knockout (BLG (-/-)) buck produced by using sequential gene targeting combined with recloning in fibroblasts from BLG (+/-) buck were used to evaluate their health and fertility. Birth weight and postnatal growth of BLG (+/-) bucks were similar to the wild-type goats. None of the parameters for both fresh and frozen-thawed semen quality were significantly different in BLG (+/-) or BLG (-/-) bucks compared to their corresponding comparators. In vitro fertilization (IVF) test revealed that the proportion of IVF oocytes developing to the blastocyst stage was identical among BLG (+/-), BLG (-/-) and wild-type bucks. Conception rates of artificial insemination were respectively 42.3, 38.0 and 42.6 % for frozen-thawed semen from the BLG (+/-), BLG (-/-) and wild-type bucks. In addition, germline transmission of the targeted BLG modification was in accordance with Mendelian rules. These results demonstrated that the analyzed growth and reproductive traits were not impacted by targeting BLG gene and recloning, implicating the potential for dairy goat breeding of BLG (+/-) and BLG (-/-) bucks. PMID:27272006

  16. Nutritional and regulatory roles of leucine in muscle growth and fat reduction.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yehui; Li, Fengna; Liu, Hongnan; Li, Yinghui; Liu, Yingying; Kong, Xiangfeng; Zhang, Yuzhe; Deng, Dun; Tang, Yulong; Feng, Zemeng; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    The metabolic roles for L-leucine, an essential branched-chain amino acid (BCAA), go far beyond serving exclusively as a building block for de novo protein synthesis. Growing evidence shows that leucine regulates protein and lipid metabolism in animals. Specifically, leucine activates the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, including the 70 kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1) to stimulate protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue and to promote mitochondrial biogenesis, resulting in enhanced cellular respiration and energy partitioning. Activation of cellular energy metabolism favors fatty acid oxidation to CO2 and water in adipocytes, lean tissue gain in young animals, and alleviation of muscle protein loss in aging adults, lactating mammals, and food-deprived subjects. As a functional amino acid, leucine holds great promise to enhance the growth, efficiency of food utilization, and health of animals and humans.  PMID:25553480

  17. Sphingosine-1-phosphate mediates epidermal growth factor-induced muscle satellite cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Yosuke Ohashi, Kazuya; Wada, Eiji; Yuasa, Yuki; Shiozuka, Masataka; Nonomura, Yoshiaki; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2014-08-01

    Skeletal muscle can regenerate repeatedly due to the presence of resident stem cells, called satellite cells. Because satellite cells are usually quiescent, they must be activated before participating in muscle regeneration in response to stimuli such as injury, overloading, and stretch. Although satellite cell activation is a crucial step in muscle regeneration, little is known of the molecular mechanisms controlling this process. Recent work showed that the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) plays crucial roles in the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of muscle satellite cells. We investigated the role of growth factors in S1P-mediated satellite cell activation. We found that epidermal growth factor (EGF) in combination with insulin induced proliferation of quiescent undifferentiated mouse myoblast C2C12 cells, which are also known as reserve cells, in serum-free conditions. Sphingosine kinase activity increased when reserve cells were stimulated with EGF. Treatment of reserve cells with the D-erythro-N,N-dimethylsphingosine, Sphingosine Kinase Inhibitor, or siRNA duplexes specific for sphingosine kinase 1, suppressed EGF-induced C2C12 activation. We also present the evidence showing the S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. Moreover, we demonstrated a combination of insulin and EGF promoted activation of satellite cells on single myofibers in a manner dependent on SPHK and S1P2. Taken together, our observations show that EGF-induced satellite cell activation is mediated by S1P and its receptor. - Highlights: • EGF in combination with insulin induces proliferation of quiescent C2C12 cells. • Sphingosine kinase activity increases when reserve cells are stimulated with EGF. • EGF-induced activation of reserve cells is dependent on sphingosine kinase and ERK. • The S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. • EGF-induced reserve cell activation is mediated by S1P and its

  18. The effect of a brief sprint interval exercise on growth factors and inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Meckel, Yoav; Eliakim, Alon; Seraev, Mariana; Zaldivar, Frank; Cooper, Dan M; Sagiv, Michael; Nemet, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Exercise training efficiency depends on the intensity, volume, duration, and frequency of training, as well as on the athlete's ability to tolerate it. Recent efforts to quantify the effects of aerobic exercise training on hormonal response have suggested that exercise leads to simultaneous changes of antagonistic mediators. The effects of anaerobic exercise on these mediators are not known. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a brief sprint interval session on the balance between anabolic (growth hormone [GH]--> insulin-like growth factor [IGF]-I axis) and catabolic hormones (cortisol), and circulating inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-6. Twelve healthy elite junior handball players (17-20 years) participated in the study. Exercise consisted of a 4 x 250-m run on a treadmill, at a constant intensity of 80% of the personal maximal speed. Each run was separated by 3 minutes of rest. Blood samples were collected before, immediately after each 250-m run, and 1 hour after the last run. Exercise led to significant increases in GH (0.3 +/- 0.2 to 5.1 +/- 2.2 ngxml, p < 0.05), IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-3 (4191 +/- 2.48 to 4875 +/- 301 ngxml, p < 0.05), IL-6 (1.3 +/- 0.2 to 2.1 +/- 0.3 pgxml, p < 0.002), testosterone, and testosterone/cortisol ratio, and to a significant decrease in IGFBP-1 levels. Levels of IL-6 remained elevated 1 hour after the end of exercise. Exercise had no significant effects on IGF-I and cortisol levels. Changes in the GH-IGF-I axis and testosterone/cortisol ratio after the brief sprint interval exercise suggested exercise-related anabolic adaptations. The increase in IL-6 may indicate its important role in muscle tissue repair after anaerobic exercise. Changes in the anabolic-catabolic hormonal balance and in inflammatory mediators can be used as an objective tool to gauge the training intensity of different types of anaerobic exercises and training periods.

  19. The TLR7 agonist induces tumor regression both by promoting CD4+T cells proliferation and by reversing T regulatory cell-mediated suppression via dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Xiongyan; Chen, Xuehua; Li, Jianfang; Zhu, Zhenggang; Liu, Bingya; Su, Liping

    2015-01-01

    Treg-induced immunosuppression is now recognized as a key element in enabling tumors to escape immune-mediated destruction. Although topical TLR7 therapies such as imiquimod have been proved successful in the treatment of dermatological malignancy and a number of conditions beyond the FDA-approved indications, the mechanism behind the effect of TLR7 on effector T cell and Treg cell function in cancer immunosurveillance is still not well understood. Here, we found that Loxoribin, one of the TLR7 ligands, could inhibit tumor growth in xenograft models of colon cancer and lung cancer, and these anti-tumor effects of Loxoribin were mediated by promoting CD4+T cell proliferation and reversing Treg-mediated suppression via dendritic cells (DCs). However, deprivation of IL-6 using a neutralizing antibody abrogated the ability of Loxoribin-treated DCs, which reversed the Treg cell-mediated suppression. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of Loxoribin-treated DCs inhibited the tumor growth in vivo. Thus, this study links TLR7 signaling to the functional control of effector T cells and Treg cells and identifies Loxoribin as a new therapeutic strategy in cancer treatment, which may offer new opportunities to improve the outcome of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25593198

  20. Growth suppression of Leydig TM3 cells mediated by aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Iseki, Minoru; Ikuta, Togo; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Kawajiri, Kaname . E-mail: kawajiri@cancer-c.pref.saitama.jp

    2005-06-17

    Exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin induces developmental toxicity in reproductive organs. To elucidate the function of AhR, we generated stable transformants of TM3 cells overexpressing wild-type aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) or its mutants which carried mutations in nuclear localization signal or nuclear export signal. In the presence of 3-methylcholanthrene (MC), proliferation of the cells transfected with wild-type AhR was completely suppressed, whereas cells expressing AhR mutants proliferated in a manner equivalent to control TM3 cells, suggesting AhR-dependent growth inhibition. The suppression was associated with up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21{sup Cip1}, which was abolished by pretreatment with actinomycin D. A p38 MAPK specific inhibitor, SB203580, blocked the increase of p21{sup Cip1} mRNA in response to MC. Treatment with indigo, another AhR ligand, failed to increase of p21{sup Cip1} mRNA, although up-regulation of mRNA for CYP1A1 was observed. These data suggest AhR in Leydig cells mediates growth inhibition by inducing p21{sup Cip1}.

  1. Mitochondrial dysfunction mediated by cytoplasmic acidification results in pollen tube growth cessation in Pyrus pyrifolia.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yongbin; Zhou, Hongsheng; Chen, Jianqing; Jiang, Xueting; Tao, Shutian; Wu, Juyou; Zhang, Shaoling

    2015-04-01

    The length of pollen tubes grown in synthetic media is normally shorter than those grown in vivo. However, the mechanism(s) underlying the cessation of pollen tube growth under culture conditions remain(s) largely unknown. Here, we report a previously unknown correlation between vacuolar function and the cell's ability to sustain mitochondrial functions in pear pollen tubes. The pear pollen tubes in vitro grew slowly after 15 hours post-cultured (HPC) and nearly ceased growth at 18 HPC. There was increased malondialdehyde content and membrane ion leakage at 15 HPC compared with 12 HPC. Furthermore, cytoplasmic acidification mainly mediated by decreased vacuolar H(+)-ATPase [V-ATPase, Enzyme Commission (EC) 3.6.1.3] activity was observed in pollen tubes after 15 HPC, and this further resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction, including mitochondrial structure disruption, mitochondrial membrane potential collapse and decreases in both oxygen consumption and ATP production. Our findings suggest that vacuoles and mitochondria intimately linked in regulating pollen tube elongation.

  2. Maturational conversion of dendritic early endosomes and their roles in L1-mediated axon growth.

    PubMed

    Lasiecka, Zofia M; Yap, Chan Choo; Katz, Joshua; Winckler, Bettina

    2014-10-29

    The function of endosomes is intricately linked to cellular function in all cell types, including neurons. Intriguingly, neurons express cell type-specific proteins that localize to endosomes, but little is known about how these neuronal proteins interface with canonical endosomes and ubiquitously expressed endosomal components, such as EEA1 (Early Endosomal Antigen 1). NEEP21 (Neuronal Early Endosomal Protein 21 kDa) localizes to somatodendritic endosomes, and downregulation of NEEP21 perturbs the correct trafficking of multiple receptors, including glutamate receptors (GluA2) during LTP and amyloidogenic processing of βAPP. Our own work implicated NEEP21 in correct trafficking of the axonal cell adhesion molecule L1/neuron-glia cell adhesion molecule (NgCAM). NEEP21 dynamically localizes with EEA1-positive early endosomes but is also found in EEA1-negative endosomes. Live imaging reveals that NEEP21-positive, EEA1-negative endosomes arise as a consequence of maturational conversion of EEA1/NEEP21 double-positive endosomes. Interfering with EEA1 function causes missorting of L1/NgCAM, axon outgrowth defects on the L1 substrate, and disturbance of NEEP21 localization. Last, we uncover evidence that functional interference with NEEP21 reduces axon and dendrite growth of primary rat hippocampal neurons on L1 substrate but not on N-cadherin substrate, thus implicating endosomal trafficking through somatodendritic early endosomes in L1-mediated axon growth. PMID:25355216

  3. TGF-β1 mediates the hypertrophic cardiomyocyte growth induced by angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Jo El J.; Witt, Sandra A.; Glascock, Betty J.; Nieman, Michelle L.; Reiser, Peter J.; Nix, Stacey L.; Kimball, Thomas R.; Doetschman, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II), a potent hypertrophic stimulus, causes significant increases in TGFb1 gene expression. However, it is not known whether there is a causal relationship between increased levels of TGF-β1 and cardiac hypertrophy. Echocardiographic analysis revealed that TGF-β1–deficient mice subjected to chronic subpressor doses of Ang II had no significant change in left ventricular (LV) mass and percent fractional shortening during Ang IItreatment. In contrast, Ang II–treated wild-type mice showed a >20% increase in LV mass and impaired cardiac function. Cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area was also markedly increased in Ang II–treated wild-type mice but unchanged in Ang II–treated TGF-β1–deficient mice. No significant levels of fibrosis, mitotic growth, or cytokine infiltration were detected in Ang II–treated mice. Atrial natriuretic factor expression was ∼6-fold elevated in Ang II–treated wild-type, but not TGF-β1–deficient mice. However, the α- to β-myosin heavy chain switch did not occur in Ang II–treated mice, indicating that isoform switching is not obligatorily coupled with hypertrophy or TGF-β1. The Ang IIeffect on hypertrophy was shown not to result from stimulation of the endogenous renin-angiotensis system. These results indicate that TGF-β1 is an important mediator of the hypertrophic growth response of the heart to Ang II. PMID:11901187

  4. Medial gastrocnemius muscle growth during adolescence is mediated by increased fascicle diameter rather than by longitudinal fascicle growth.

    PubMed

    Weide, Guido; Huijing, Peter A; Maas, Josina C; Becher, Jules G; Harlaar, Jaap; Jaspers, Richard T

    2015-06-01

    Using a cross-sectional design, the purpose of this study was to determine how pennate gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscle geometry changes as a function of adolescent age. Sixteen healthy adolescent males (aged 10-19 years) participated in this study. GM muscle geometry was measured within the mid-longitudinal plane obtained from a 3D voxel-array composed of transverse ultrasound images. Images were taken at footplate angles corresponding to standardised externally applied footplate moments (between 4 Nm plantar flexion and 6 Nm dorsal flexion). Muscle activity was recorded using surface electromyography (EMG), expressed as a percentage of maximal voluntary contraction (%MVC). To minimise the effects of muscle excitation, EMG inclusion criteria were set at <10% of MVC. In practice, however, normalised EMG levels were much lower. For adolescent subjects with increasing ages, GM muscle (belly) length increased due to an increase in the length component of the physiological cross-sectional area measured within the mid-longitudinal plane. No difference was found between fascicles at different ages, but the aponeurosis length and pennation angle increased by 0.5 cm year(-1) and 0.5° per year, respectively. Footplate angles corresponding to externally applied 0 and 4 Nm plantarflexion moments were not associated with different adolescent ages. In contrast, footplate angles corresponding to externally applied 4 and 6 Nm dorsal flexion moments decreased by 10° between 10 and 19 years. In conclusion, we found that in adolescents' pennate GM muscles, longitudinal muscle growth is mediated predominantly by increased muscle fascicle diameter.

  5. Active ERK2 is sufficient to mediate growth arrest and differentiation signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Pui-Kei; Hong, Seung-Keun; Yoon, Seung-Hee; Park, Jong-In

    2015-01-01

    Although extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) ½ has been shown for its necessity for a variety of the Raf/MEK/ERK pathway signaling, its sufficiency in mediating the pathway signaling has not been firmly established. In an effort to address this, we evaluated previously reported ERK2 mutants that exhibit enhanced activity of autophosphorylation of TEY sites in the activation loop for their ability to induce growth arrest and differentiation in LNCaP and PC12 cells. Here, we demonstrate that expression of ERK2-L73P/S151D, containing Lys73Pro and Ser151Asp replacements that synergistically promote ERK autophosphorylation, is sufficient to induce growth arrest and differentiation whereas ERK2-I84A and ERK2-R65S/D319N are not as effective. When compared to the constitutively active MEK1-ΔN3/S218E/S222D, expression of ERK2-L73P/S151D could only mildly increase ERK kinase activity in cells, as determined by the ERK substrates, p90RSK and ELK1. Nevertheless, ERK2-L73P/S151D expression effectively induced downregulation of androgen receptor, Rb and E2F1, and upregulation of p16INK4A and p21CIP1, which were accompanied by cell cycle arrest and morphological differentiation, in LNCaP cells and neurite-like processing in PC12 cells. These effects and TEY site phosphorylation of ERK2-L73P/S151D were abrogated upon introducing the active site-disabling Lys52Arg mutation, confirming its sufficiency in this signaling. Moreover, introduction of the mutations (producing Asp316/319Ala or Asp319Asn) that impair the common docking site/D-domain-based physical interaction of ERK did not significantly affect the ERK2-L73P/S151D signaling, suggesting that ERK2 can mediate growth arrest and differentiation independently of the conventional ERK-target interaction mechanism. Our study presents a convincing example of ERK sufficiency for Raf/MEK/ERK signaling. PMID:25639353

  6. Hypoxia-mediated carbohydrate metabolism and transport promote early-stage murine follicle growth and survival.

    PubMed

    Makanji, Yogeshwar; Tagler, David; Pahnke, Jennifer; Shea, Lonnie D; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2014-04-15

    Oxygen tension is critical for follicle growth and metabolism, especially for early-stage follicles, where vascularity is limited. Its role and underlying mechanism in the in vitro activation and maturation of immature to ovulatory follicles is largely unknown. In this study, early secondary (110 μm) murine follicles were isolated and encapsulated in alginate hydrogels to replicate the in vivo environment of the growing/maturing follicle. Encapsulated follicles were cultured for 8 days at either 2.5 or 20% O2. Survival (2.6-fold) and growth (1.2-fold) were significantly higher for follicles cultured at 2.5% compared with 20% O2. Using a mouse hypoxia-signaling pathway qRT-PCR array and GeneGo Metacore analysis, we found that direct target genes of the hypoxia-activated HIF1-complex were significantly upregulated in follicles cultured for 8 days at 2.5% compared with 20% O2, including the carbohydrate transport and metabolism genes Slc2a3, Vegfa, Slc2a1, Edn1, Pgk1, Ldha, and Hmox1. Other upregulated genes included carbohydrate transporters (Slc2a1, Slc2a3, and Slc16a3) and enzymes essential for glycolysis (Pgk1, Hmox1, Hk2, Gpi1, Pfkl, Pfkp, Aldoa, Gapdh, Pgam1, Eno1, Pkm2, and Ldha). For follicles cultured at 2.5% O2, a 7.2-fold upregulation of Vegfa correlated to an 18-fold increase in VEGFA levels, and a 3.2-fold upregulation of Ldha correlated to a 4.8-fold increase in lactate levels. Both VEGFA and lactate levels were significantly higher in follicles cultured at 2.5% compared with 20% O2. Therefore, enhanced hypoxia-mediated glycolysis is essential for growth and survival of early secondary follicles and provides vital insights into improving in vitro culture conditions.

  7. Smad7 protein induces interferon regulatory factor 1-dependent transcriptional activation of caspase 8 to restore tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Suntaek; Kim, Hye-Youn; Kim, Jooyoung; Ha, Huyen Trang; Kim, Young-Mi; Bae, Eunjin; Kim, Tae Hyung; Lee, Kang Choon; Kim, Seong-Jin

    2013-02-01

    Smad7 has been known as a negative regulator for the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathway through feedback regulation. However, Smad7 has been suspected to have other biological roles through the regulation of gene transcription. By screening differentially regulated genes, we found that the caspase 8 gene was highly up-regulated in Smad7-expressing cells. Smad7 was able to activate the caspase 8 promoter through recruitment of the interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) transcription factor to the interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) site. Interaction of Smad7 on the caspase 8 promoter was confirmed with electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiment. Interestingly, Smad7 did not directly interact with the ISRE site, but it increased the binding activity of IRF1 with ISRE. These results support that Smad7 recruits IRF1 protein on the caspase 8 promoter and functions as a transcriptional coactivator. To confirm the biological significance of caspase 8 up-regulation, we tested tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-mediated cell death assay in breast cancer cells. Smad7 in apoptosis-resistant MCF7 cells markedly sensitized the cells to TRAIL-induced cell death by restoring the caspase cascade. Furthermore, restoration of caspase 8-mediated apoptosis pathway repressed the tumor growth in the xenograft model. In conclusion, we suggest a novel role for Smad7 as a transcriptional coactivator for caspase 8 through the interaction with IRF1 in regulation of the cell death pathway. PMID:23255602

  8. Protein Kinase A Regulatory Subunit Isoforms Regulate Growth and Differentiation in Mucor circinelloides: Essential Role of PKAR4

    PubMed Central

    Ocampo, J.; McCormack, B.; Navarro, E.; Moreno, S.; Garre, V.

    2012-01-01

    The protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway plays a role in regulating growth and differentiation in the dimorphic fungus Mucor circinelloides. PKA holoenzyme is comprised of two catalytic (C) and two regulatory (R) subunits. In M. circinelloides, four genes encode the PKAR1, PKAR2, PKAR3, and PKAR4 isoforms of R subunits. We have constructed null mutants and demonstrate that each isoform has a different role in growth and differentiation. The most striking finding is that pkaR4 is an essential gene, because only heterokaryons were obtained in knockout experiments. Heterokaryons with low levels of wild-type nuclei showed an impediment in the emission of the germ tube, suggesting a pivotal role of this gene in germ tube emergence. The remaining null strains showed different alterations in germ tube emergence, sporulation, and volume of the mother cell. The pkaR2 null mutant showed an accelerated germ tube emission and was the only mutant that germinated under anaerobic conditions when glycine was used as a nitrogen source, suggesting that pkaR2 participates in germ tube emergence by repressing it. From the measurement of the mRNA and protein levels of each isoform in the wild-type and knockout strains, it can be concluded that the expression of each subunit has its own mechanism of differential regulation. The PKAR1 and PKAR2 isoforms are posttranslationally modified by ubiquitylation, suggesting another regulation point in the specificity of the signal transduction. The results indicate that each R isoform has a different role in M. circinelloides physiology, controlling the dimorphism and contributing to the specificity of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-PKA pathway. PMID:22635921

  9. Regulatory factor X1-induced down-regulation of transforming growth factor β2 transcription in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chenzhuo; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2012-06-29

    Regulatory factor X (RFX) proteins are transcription factors. Seven mammalian RFX proteins have been identified. RFX1 is the prototype RFX. However, its biological functions are not known. Here, RFX1 overexpression reduced fetal bovine serum-stimulated proliferation of SH-SY5Y cells, a human neuroblastoma cell line. This inhibition is associated with decreased transforming growth factor β2 (TGFβ2) and phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Exogenous TGFβ2 increased cell proliferation and phospho-ERK in cells overexpressing RFX1. An anti-TGFβ2 antibody and PD98059, an ERK activation inhibitor, inhibited SH-SY5Y cell proliferation. TGFβ2 promoter activity was decreased in cells overexpressing RFX1. Chromosome immunoprecipitation assay showed that RFX1 bound the TGFβ2 promoter. RFX1 down-regulation increased TGFβ2 in SH-SY5Y and HCN-1A cells, a normal human neuronal cell line. More importantly, TGFβ2 concentrations were negatively correlated with RFX1 levels in human medulloblastoma tissues with a R(2) of 0.464. These results suggest that RFX1 reduces cell proliferation through inhibiting the TGFβ2-ERK signaling pathway. RFX1 blocks TGFβ2 expression through its direct action on TGFβ2 transcription. This effect also appears in human brain tumor tissues. Because TGFβ is known to be involved in cancer development, our results provide initial evidence to suggest that RFX1 may play an important role in human tumor biology.

  10. A Structural Model of Parental Alcoholism, Family Functioning, and Psychological Health: The Mediating Effects of Hardiness and Personal Growth Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robitschek, Christine; Kashubeck, Susan

    1999-01-01

    This study sought to: (a) determine whether personal-growth orientation and hardiness mediated the relations of parental alcoholism and family functioning to psychological well-being and distress; (b) determine whether this model was invariant across men and women; and (c) examine the role of parental alcoholism in a model that included family…

  11. Pim-2 Kinase Influences Regulatory T Cell Function and Stability by Mediating Foxp3 Protein N-terminal Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guoping; Nagai, Yasuhiro; Xiao, Yan; Li, Zhiyuan; Dai, Shujia; Ohtani, Takuya; Banham, Alison; Li, Bin; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Hancock, Wayne; Samanta, Arabinda; Zhang, Hongtao; Greene, Mark I

    2015-08-14

    Regulation of the extent of immune responses is a requirement to maintain self-tolerance and limit inflammatory processes. CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells play a role in regulation. The Foxp3 transcription factor is considered a dominant regulator for Treg cell development and function. Foxp3 function itself is directly regulated by multiple posttranslational modifications that occur in response to various external stimuli. The Foxp3 protein is a component of several dynamic macromolecular regulatory complexes. The complexes change constituents over time and through different signals to regulate the development and function of regulatory T cells. Here we identified a mechanism regulating Foxp3 level and activity that operates through discrete phosphorylation. The Pim-2 kinase can phosphorylate Foxp3, leading to decreased suppressive functions of Treg cells. The amino-terminal domain of Foxp3 is modified at several sites by Pim-2 kinase. This modification leads to altered expression of proteins related to Treg cell functions and increased Treg cell lineage stability. Treg cell suppressive function can be up-regulated by either pharmacologically inhibiting Pim-2 kinase activity or by genetically knocking out Pim-2 in rodent Treg cells. Deficiency of Pim-2 activity increases murine host resistance to dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis in vivo, and a Pim-2 small molecule kinase inhibitor also modified Treg cell functions. Our studies define a pathway for limiting the regulation of Foxp3 function because the Pim-2 kinase represents a potential therapeutic target for modulating the Treg cell suppressive activities in controlling immune responses. PMID:25987564

  12. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK-2) mediated phosphorylation regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling and cell growth control of Ras-associated tumor suppressor protein, RASSF2

    SciTech Connect

    Kumari, Gita; Mahalingam, S.

    2009-10-01

    Ras GTPase controls the normal cell growth through binding with an array of effector molecules, such as Raf and PI3-kinase in a GTP-dependent manner. RASSF2, a member of the Ras association domain family, is known to be involved in the suppression of cell growth and is frequently down-regulated in various tumor tissues by promoter hypermethylation. In the present study, we demonstrate that RASSF2 shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm by a signal-mediated process and its export from the nucleus is sensitive to leptomycin B. Amino acids between 240 to 260 in the C-terminus of RASSF2 harbor a functional nuclear export signal (NES), which is necessary and sufficient for efficient export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. Substitution of conserved Ile254, Val257 and Leu259 within the minimal NES impaired RASSF2 export from the nucleus. In addition, wild type but not the nuclear export defective RASSF2 mutant interacts with export receptor, CRM-1 and exported from the nucleus. Surprisingly, we observed nucleolar localization for the nuclear export defective mutant suggesting the possibility that RASSF2 may localize in different cellular compartments transiently in a cell cycle dependent manner and the observed nuclear localization for wild type protein may be due to faster export kinetics from the nucleolus. Furthermore, our data suggest that RASSF2 is specifically phosphorylated by MAPK/ERK-2 and the inhibitors of MAPK pathway impair the phosphorylation and subsequently block the export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. These data clearly suggest that ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of RASSF2. Interestingly, nuclear import defective mutant of RASSF2 failed to induce cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase and apoptosis suggesting that RASSF2 regulates cell growth in a nuclear localization dependent manner. Collectively, these data provided evidence for the first time that MAPK/ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation regulates

  13. Phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediates vascular endothelial growth factor-induced penile erection.

    PubMed

    Musicki, Biljana; Palese, Michael A; Crone, Julie K; Burnett, Arthur L

    2004-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced penile erection is mediated by activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) through its phosphorylation. We assessed the role of constitutively activated eNOS in VEGF-induced penile erection using wild-type (WT) and eNOS-knockout (eNOS(-/-)) mice with and without vasculogenic erectile dysfunction. Adult WT and eNOS(-/-) mice were subjected to sham operation or bilateral castration to induce vasculogenic erectile dysfunction. At the time of surgery, animals were injected intracavernosally with a replication-deficient adenovirus expressing human VEGF145 (10(9) particle units) or with empty virus (Ad.Null). After 7 days, erectile function was assessed in response to cavernous nerve electrical stimulation. Total and phosphorylated protein kinase B (Akt) as well as total and phosphorylated eNOS were quantitatively assessed in mice penes using Western immunoblot and immunohistochemistry. In intact WT mice, VEGF145 significantly increased erectile responses, and in WT mice after castration, it completely recovered penile erection. However, VEGF145 failed to increase erectile responses in intact eNOS(-/-) mice and only partially recovered erectile function in castrated eNOS(-/-) mice. In addition, VEGF145 significantly increased phosphorylation of eNOS at Serine 1177 by approximately 2-fold in penes of both intact and castrated WT mice. The data provide a molecular explanation for VEGF stimulatory effect on penile erection, which involves phosphorylated eNOS (Serine 1177) mediation. PMID:14522830

  14. Redox-mediated activation of latent transforming growth factor-beta 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Dix, T. A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF beta) is a multifunctional cytokine that orchestrates response to injury via ubiquitous cell surface receptors. The biological activity of TGF beta is restrained by its secretion as a latent complex (LTGF beta) such that activation determines the extent of TGF beta activity during physiological and pathological events. TGF beta action has been implicated in a variety of reactive oxygen-mediated tissue processes, particularly inflammation, and in pathologies such as reperfusion injury, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. It was recently shown to be rapidly activated after in vivo radiation exposure, which also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the present studies, the potential for redox-mediated LTGF beta activation was investigated using a cell-free system in which ROS were generated in solution by ionizing radiation or metal ion-catalyzed ascorbate reaction. Irradiation (100 Gray) of recombinant human LTGF beta in solution induced 26% activation compared with that elicited by standard thermal activation. Metal-catalyzed ascorbate oxidation elicited extremely efficient recombinant LTGF beta activation that matched or exceeded thermal activation. The efficiency of ascorbate activation depended on ascorbate concentrations and the presence of transition metal ions. We postulate that oxidation of specific amino acids in the latency-conferring peptide leads to a conformation change in the latent complex that allows release of TGF beta. Oxidative activation offers a novel route for the involvement of TGF beta in tissue processes in which ROS are implicated and endows LTGF beta with the ability to act as a sensor of oxidative stress and, by releasing TGF beta, to function as a signal for orchestrating the response of multiple cell types. LTGF beta redox sensitivity is presumably directed toward recovery of homeostasis; however, oxidation may also be a mechanism of LTGF beta activation that can be deleterious during

  15. Phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediates vascular endothelial growth factor-induced penile erection.

    PubMed

    Musicki, Biljana; Palese, Michael A; Crone, Julie K; Burnett, Arthur L

    2004-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced penile erection is mediated by activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) through its phosphorylation. We assessed the role of constitutively activated eNOS in VEGF-induced penile erection using wild-type (WT) and eNOS-knockout (eNOS(-/-)) mice with and without vasculogenic erectile dysfunction. Adult WT and eNOS(-/-) mice were subjected to sham operation or bilateral castration to induce vasculogenic erectile dysfunction. At the time of surgery, animals were injected intracavernosally with a replication-deficient adenovirus expressing human VEGF145 (10(9) particle units) or with empty virus (Ad.Null). After 7 days, erectile function was assessed in response to cavernous nerve electrical stimulation. Total and phosphorylated protein kinase B (Akt) as well as total and phosphorylated eNOS were quantitatively assessed in mice penes using Western immunoblot and immunohistochemistry. In intact WT mice, VEGF145 significantly increased erectile responses, and in WT mice after castration, it completely recovered penile erection. However, VEGF145 failed to increase erectile responses in intact eNOS(-/-) mice and only partially recovered erectile function in castrated eNOS(-/-) mice. In addition, VEGF145 significantly increased phosphorylation of eNOS at Serine 1177 by approximately 2-fold in penes of both intact and castrated WT mice. The data provide a molecular explanation for VEGF stimulatory effect on penile erection, which involves phosphorylated eNOS (Serine 1177) mediation.

  16. Regulatory T-cell neutralization in mice during filariasis helps in parasite clearance by enhancing T helper type 17-mediated pro-inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Manisha; Sharma, Pankaj; Sharma, Aditi; Verma, Meenakshi; Srivastava, Mrigank; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2016-02-01

    Lymphatic filariasis leads to profound impairment of parasite-specific T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th2 immune responses and significantly increases the expression of regulatory networks and regulatory effectors like transforming growth factor-β, CD25, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4, glucocorticoid-induced tumour necrosis factor receptor (GITR) and regulatory T (Treg) cells, which together play an important role in immunosuppression. While Treg cells suppress the activity of effector cells, monocyte dysfunction, characterized by an alternatively activated immunoregulatory phenotype, is one hypothesis that explains the lack of an antigen-specific T-cell response in infected individuals. In the present study, we administered neutralizing antibodies against the Treg cell-associated markers CD25 and GITR and observed its effects on filaria-induced immunosuppression. Our results show that administration of anti-CD25 and anti-GITR in infected animals not only arrested the accumulation of Treg cells and reduced arginase activity, but also led to an increase in the percentages of Th17 cells in the secondary lymphoid organs of mice. Elevated levels of interferon-γ and decreased levels of interleukin-10 were also noted in the culture supernatants of mouse splenocytes that were treated with neutralizing antibodies. Furthermore, treatment with neutralizing antibodies enhanced the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase on host macrophages and CD40 on host dendritic cells with concomitant decreased expression of alternative activation markers Arg1, Ym1 and Fizz1, which together lead to reduced parasite burden in treated animals. In summary, administration of neutralizing antibodies helps in breaking the regulatory network in mice and limits parasite-induced immunosuppression at the earliest host-parasite interface.

  17. Autocrine TGFbeta signaling mediates vitamin D3 analog-induced growth inhibition in breast cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Yang, J; Venkateswarlu, S; Ko, T; Brattain, M G

    2001-09-01

    In this study, we address whether TGFbeta signaling mediates vitamin D3 analog-induced growth inhibition in nonmalignant and malignant breast cells. Normal mammary epithelial cells (184), immortalized nonmalignant mammary epithelial cells (184A1 and MCF10A), and breast cancer cells (early passage MCF7: MCF7E) were sensitive to the inhibitory effects of vitamin D3 analogs (EB1089 and MC1288) while late passage MCF7 breast cancer (MCF7L) cells were relatively resistant. A similar pattern of sensitivity to TGFbeta was observed with these cells. Thus, the sensitivity to the vitamin D3 analogs correlated with the sensitivity to TGFbeta. MCF7L TGFbetaRII-transfected cells, which have autocrine TGFbeta activity, were more sensitive to EB1089 than MCF7L cells. TGFbeta neutralizing antibody was found to block the inhibitory effects of these analogs. These results are consistent with the idea that autocrine TGFbeta signaling mediates the anti-proliferative effects of the vitamin D3 analogs in these cells. The expression of TGFbeta isoforms and/or TGFbeta receptors was induced by the analogs in the vitamin D3 and TGFbeta sensitive cells. Vitamin D3 analogs did not induce TGFbeta or TGFbeta receptor expression in the resistant MCF7L cells. Therefore, EB1089 induces autocrine TGFbeta activity through increasing expression of TGFbeta isoforms and/or TGFbeta receptors. In addition, EB1089 induced nuclear VDR protein levels in the sensitive 184A1 cells but not in the resistant MCF7L cells. 184A1 cells were more sensitive to EB1089-induced VDR-dependent transactivation than MCF7L cells as measured by a luciferase reporter construct containing the VDRE, indicating a defect of VDR signaling in MCF7L cells. Smad3, a TGFbeta signaling mediator, coactivated VDR-dependent transactivation in 184A1 cells but not in MCF7L cells. These results indicate that Smad3 coactivates VDR to further enhance TGFbeta signaling and vitamin D3 signaling in the sensitive 184A1 cells. The results also

  18. Copper-ion-assisted growth of gold nanorods in seed-mediated growth: significant narrowing of size distribution via tailoring reactivity of seeds.

    PubMed

    Wen, Tao; Hu, Zhijian; Liu, Wenqi; Zhang, Hui; Hou, Shuai; Hu, Xiaona; Wu, Xiaochun

    2012-12-18

    In the well-developed seed-mediated growth of gold nanorods (GNRs), adding the proper amount of Cu(2+) ions in the growth solution leads to significant narrowing in the size distribution of the resultant GNRs, especially for those with shorter aspect ratios (corresponding longitudinal surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peaks shorter than 750 nm). Cu(2+) ions were found to be able to catalyze the oxidative etching of gold seeds by oxygen, thus mediating subsequent growth kinetics of the GNRs. At proper Cu(2+) concentrations, the size distribution of the original seeds is greatly narrowed via oxidative etching. The etched seeds are highly reactive and grow quickly into desired GNRs with significantly improved size distribution. A similar mechanism can be employed to tune the end cap of the GNRs. Except for copper ions, no observable catalytic effect is observed from other cations presumably due to their lower affinity to oxygen. Considering the widespread use of seed-mediated growth in the morphology-controlled synthesis of noble metal nanostructures, the tailoring in seed reactivity we presented herein could be extended to other systems. PMID:23173599

  19. Dysregulated flow-mediated vasodilatation in the human placenta in fetal growth restriction

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sarah; Bischof, Helen; Lang, Ingrid; Desoye, Gernot; Greenwood, Sue L; Johnstone, Edward D; Wareing, Mark; Sibley, Colin P; Brownbill, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Increased vascular resistance and reduced fetoplacental blood flow are putative aetiologies in the pathogenesis of fetal growth restriction (FGR); however, the regulating sites and mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesised that placental vessels dictate fetoplacental resistance and in FGR exhibit endothelial dysfunction and reduced flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMVD). Resistance was measured in normal pregnancies (n = 10) and FGR (n = 10) both in vivo by umbilical artery Doppler velocimetry and ex vivo by dual placental perfusion. Ex vivo FMVD is the reduction in fetal-side inflow hydrostatic pressure (FIHP) following increased flow rate. Results demonstrated a significant correlation between vascular resistance measured in vivo and ex vivo in normal pregnancy, but not in FGR. In perfused FGR placentas, vascular resistance was significantly elevated compared to normal placentas (58 ± 7.7 mmHg and 36.8 ± 4.5 mmHg, respectively; 8 ml min−1; means ± SEM; P < 0.0001) and FMVD was severely reduced (3.9 ± 1.3% and 9.1 ± 1.2%, respectively). In normal pregnancies only, the highest level of ex vivo FMVD was associated with the lowest in vivo resistance. Inhibition of NO synthesis during perfusion (100 μm l-NNA) moderately elevated FIHP in the normal group, but substantially in the FGR group. Human placenta artery endothelial cells from FGR groups exhibited increased shear stress-induced NO generation, iNOS expression and eNOS expression compared with normal groups. In conclusion, fetoplacental resistance is determined by placental vessels, and is increased in FGR. The latter also exhibit reduced FMVD, but with a partial compensatory increased NO generation capacity. The data support our hypothesis, which highlights the importance of FMVD regulation in normal and dysfunctional placentation. Key points A correlation was found between in vivo umbilical artery Doppler velocimetry and resistance to fetal-side flow in the human ex vivo dually

  20. Regulatory potential for concerted modulation of Nrf2- and Nfkb1-mediated gene expression in inflammation and carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nair, S; Doh, S T; Chan, J Y; Kong, A-N; Cai, L

    2008-01-01

    Many studies have implicated nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and nuclear factor-κB1 (Nfkb1) in inflammation and cancer. However, the regulatory potential for crosstalk between these two important transcription factors in inflammation and carcinogenesis has not been explored. To delineate conserved transcription factor-binding site signatures, we performed bioinformatic analyses on the promoter regions of human and murine Nrf2 and Nfkb1. We performed multiple sequence alignment of Nrf2 and Nfkb1 genes in five mammalian species – human, chimpanzee, dog, mouse and rat – to explore conserved biological features. We constructed a canonical regulatory network for concerted modulation of Nrf2 and Nfkb1 involving several members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and present a putative model for concerted modulation of Nrf2 and Nfkb1 in inflammation/carcinogenesis. Our results reflect potential for putative crosstalk between Nrf2 and Nfkb1 modulated through the MAPK cascade that may influence inflammation-associated etiopathogenesis of cancer. Taken together, the elucidation of potential relationships between Nrf2 and Nfkb1 may help to better understand transcriptional regulation, as well as transcription factor networks, associated with the etiopathogenesis of inflammation and cancer. PMID:19050705

  1. Functional validation of mouse tyrosinase non-coding regulatory DNA elements by CRISPR–Cas9-mediated mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Seruggia, Davide; Fernández, Almudena; Cantero, Marta; Pelczar, Pawel; Montoliu, Lluis

    2015-01-01

    Newly developed genome-editing tools, such as the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)–Cas9 system, allow simple and rapid genetic modification in most model organisms and human cell lines. Here, we report the production and analysis of mice carrying the inactivation via deletion of a genomic insulator, a key non-coding regulatory DNA element found 5′ upstream of the mouse tyrosinase (Tyr) gene. Targeting sequences flanking this boundary in mouse fertilized eggs resulted in the efficient deletion or inversion of large intervening DNA fragments delineated by the RNA guides. The resulting genome-edited mice showed a dramatic decrease in Tyr gene expression as inferred from the evident decrease of coat pigmentation, thus supporting the functionality of this boundary sequence in vivo, at the endogenous locus. Several potential off-targets bearing sequence similarity with each of the two RNA guides used were analyzed and found to be largely intact. This study reports how non-coding DNA elements, even if located in repeat-rich genomic sequences, can be efficiently and functionally evaluated in vivo and, furthermore, it illustrates how the regulatory elements described by the ENCODE and EPIGENOME projects, in the mouse and human genomes, can be systematically validated. PMID:25897126

  2. Diiron Oxidation State Control of Substrate Access to the Active Site of Soluble Methane Monooxygenase Mediated by the Regulatory Component

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The regulatory component (MMOB) of soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) has a unique N-terminal tail not found in regulatory proteins of other bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases. This N-terminal tail is indispensable for proper function, yet its solution structure and role in catalysis remain elusive. Here, by using double electron–electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy, we show that the oxidation state of the hydroxylase component, MMOH, modulates the conformation of the N-terminal tail in the MMOH–2MMOB complex, which in turn facilitates catalysis. The results reveal that the N-terminal tail switches from a relaxed, flexible conformational state to an ordered state upon MMOH reduction from the diiron(III) to the diiron(II) state. This observation suggests that some of the crystallographically observed allosteric effects that result in the connection of substrate ingress cavities in the MMOH–2MMOB complex may not occur in solution in the diiron(III) state. Thus, O2 may not have easy access to the active site until after reduction of the diiron center. The observed conformational change is also consistent with a higher binding affinity of MMOB to MMOH in the diiron(II) state, which may allow MMOB to displace more readily the reductase component (MMOR) from MMOH following reduction. PMID:24476336

  3. Growth factor-induced activation of a kinase activity which causes regulatory phosphorylation of p42/microtubule-associated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    L'Allemain, G; Her, J H; Wu, J; Sturgill, T W; Weber, M J

    1992-01-01

    p42/microtubule-associated protein kinase (p42mapk) is activated by tyrosine and threonine phosphorylation, and its regulatory phosphorylation is likely to be important in signalling pathways involved in growth control, secretion, and differentiation. Here we show that treatment of quiescent 3T3 cells with diverse agonists results in the appearance of an activity capable of causing the in vitro phosphorylation of p42mapk on the regulatory tyrosine and to a lesser extent on the regulatory threonine, resulting in enzymatic activation of the p42mapk. This p42mapk-activating activity is capable of phosphorylating a kinase-defective p42mapk mutant, thus confirming its activity as a kinase. Images PMID:1314951

  4. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c mediates increase of postprandial stearic acid, a potential target for improving insulin resistance, in hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xia; Liu, Liyan; Na, Lixin; Lu, Huimin; Li, Songtao; Li, Ying; Sun, Changhao

    2013-02-01

    Elevated serum free fatty acids (FFAs) levels play an important role in the development of insulin resistance (IR) and diabetes. We investigated the dynamic changes and the underlying regulatory mechanism of postprandial FFA profile in hyperlipidemia (HLP) and their relation with insulin sensitivity in both humans and mice. We found that serum stearic acid (SA) is the only fatty acid that is increased dramatically in the postprandial state. The elevation of SA is due to increased insulin-stimulated de novo synthesis mediated by sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c)/acetyl-CoA carboxylase/fatty acid synthase/elongation of long-chain fatty acid family member 6 (ELOVL6) and the elongation of palmitic acid (PA) catalyzed by ELOVL6. Downregulation of SREBP-1c or ELOVL6 by small interfering RNA can reduce SA synthesis in liver and serum SA level, followed by amelioration of IR in HLP mice. However, inhibition of SREBP-1c is more effective in improving IR than suppression of ELOVL6, which resulted in accumulation of PA. In summary, increased postprandial SA is caused by the insulin-stimulated SREBP-1c pathway and elongation of PA in HLP. Reduction of postprandial SA is a good candidate for improving IR, and SREBP-1c is potentially a better target to prevent IR and diabetes by decreasing SA.

  5. Antigen Receptor-Intrinsic Non-Self: The Key to Understanding Regulatory Lymphocyte-Mediated Idiotypic Control of Adaptive Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Lemke, Hilmar

    2016-01-01

    The clone-specific or idiotypic characters of B as well as T cell antigen receptors (BCRs/TCRs) are associated with (1) the third-complementarity-determining regions (CDR3s) that are created during V(D)J recombination (they scarcely occur in antibody light chains) and (2) BCR idiotopes created by somatic hypermutations (SHMs) during immune responses. Therefore, BCR/TCR idiotypic sites are antigen receptor-intrinsic Non-Self (AgR-iNS) portions that fulfill two tasks: serving as a crucial component of the epitope-binding paratope and serving as target sites for anti-idiotypic BCR/TCR paratopes of other anti-Non-Self clones that are contained in both normal repertoires. The antigen-induced immune response is thus directed not only toward the environmental stimulus but also against the AgR-iNS portions of the directly and further activated clones that form a subsiding idiotypic cascade. These idiotypic chain reactions form a completely integrated idiotypic control circuit among B and T cells which contains all regulatory T and B cells. However, this circuit cannot be viewed as a network of fixed interacting nodes but rather uses the genetic Self as reference. Hence, AgR-iNS offers a mechanistic understanding of regulatory lymphocyte-mediated idiotypic control of adaptive immune responses and reconciles clonal selection and idiotypic network theories hitherto believed to be incompatible. PMID:27480901

  6. Antigen Receptor-Intrinsic Non-Self: The Key to Understanding Regulatory Lymphocyte-Mediated Idiotypic Control of Adaptive Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Lemke, Hilmar

    2016-01-01

    The clone-specific or idiotypic characters of B as well as T cell antigen receptors (BCRs/TCRs) are associated with (1) the third-complementarity-determining regions (CDR3s) that are created during V(D)J recombination (they scarcely occur in antibody light chains) and (2) BCR idiotopes created by somatic hypermutations (SHMs) during immune responses. Therefore, BCR/TCR idiotypic sites are antigen receptor-intrinsic Non-Self (AgR-iNS) portions that fulfill two tasks: serving as a crucial component of the epitope-binding paratope and serving as target sites for anti-idiotypic BCR/TCR paratopes of other anti-Non-Self clones that are contained in both normal repertoires. The antigen-induced immune response is thus directed not only toward the environmental stimulus but also against the AgR-iNS portions of the directly and further activated clones that form a subsiding idiotypic cascade. These idiotypic chain reactions form a completely integrated idiotypic control circuit among B and T cells which contains all regulatory T and B cells. However, this circuit cannot be viewed as a network of fixed interacting nodes but rather uses the genetic Self as reference. Hence, AgR-iNS offers a mechanistic understanding of regulatory lymphocyte-mediated idiotypic control of adaptive immune responses and reconciles clonal selection and idiotypic network theories hitherto believed to be incompatible.

  7. Acetate-mediated growth inhibition in sterol 14alpha-demethylation-deficient cells of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, O; Nakayama, H

    1999-01-01

    Candida albicans is a fungus thought to be viable in the presence of a deficiency in sterol 14alpha-demethylation. We showed in a strain of this species that the deficiency, caused either by a mutation or by an azole antifungal agent, made the cells susceptible to growth inhibition by acetate included in the culture medium. Studies with a mutant demonstrated that the inhibition was complete at a sodium acetate concentration of 0.24 M (20 g/liter) and was evident even at a pH of 8, the latter result indicating the involvement of acetate ions rather than the undissociated form of acetic acid. In fluconazole-treated cells, sterol profiles determined by thin-layer chromatography revealed that the minimum sterol 14alpha-demethylation-inhibitory concentrations (MDICs) of the drug, thought to be the most important parameter for clinical purposes, were practically identical in the media with and without 0.24 M acetate and were equivalent to the MIC in the acetate-supplemented medium. The acetate-mediated growth inhibition of azole-treated cells was confirmed with two additional strains of C. albicans and four different agents, suggesting the possibility of generalization. From these results, it was surmised that the acetate-containing medium may find use in azole susceptibility testing, for which there is currently no method capable of measuring MDICs directly for those fungi whose viability is not lost as a result of sterol 14alpha-demethylation deficiency. Additionally, the acetate-supplemented agar medium was found to be useful in detecting reversions from sterol 14alpha-demethylation deficiency to proficiency. PMID:9869573

  8. mTORC1 mediated translational elongation limits intestinal tumour initiation and growth

    PubMed Central

    Faller, William J.; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Jamieson, Thomas; Karim, Saadia A.; Jones, Carolyn; Radulescu, Sorina; Huels, David J.; Myant, Kevin B.; Dudek, Kate M.; Casey, Helen A.; Scopelliti, Alessandro; Cordero, Julia B.; Vidal, Marcos; Pende, Mario; Ryazanov, Alexey G.; Sonenberg, Nahum; Meyuhas, Oded; Hall, Michael N.; Bushell, Martin; Willis, Anne E.; Sansom, Owen J.

    2014-01-01

    Inactivation of APC is a strongly predisposing event in the development of colorectal cancer1,2, prompting us to search for vulnerabilities specific to cells that have lost APC function. Signalling through the mTOR pathway is known to be required for epithelial cell proliferation and tumour growth3-5 and the current paradigm suggests that a critical function of mTOR activity is to upregulate translational initiation through phosphorylation of 4EBP16,7. This model predicts that the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin, which does not efficiently inhibit 4EBP18, would be ineffective in limiting cancer progression in APC deficient lesions. Here we show that mTORC1 activity is absolutely required for the proliferation of APC deficient (but not wild type) enterocytes, revealing an unexpected opportunity for therapeutic intervention. Although APC deficient cells show the expected increases in protein synthesis, our studies reveals that it is translation elongation, and not initiation, which is the rate-limiting component. Mechanistically, mTORC1 mediated inhibition of eEF2 kinase is required for the proliferation of APC deficient cells. Importantly, treatment of established APC deficient adenomas with rapamycin (which can target eEF2 through the mTORC1 – S6K – eEF2K axis) causes tumour cells to undergo growth arrest and differentiation. Taken together our data suggest that inhibition of translation elongation using existing, clinically approved drugs such as the Rapalogs, would provide clear therapeutic benefit for patients at high-risk of developing colorectal cancer. PMID:25383520

  9. Role for chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan in NEDD9-mediated breast cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Iida, Joji; Dorchak, Jesse; Clancy, Rebecca; Slavik, Juliana; Ellsworth, Rachel; Katagiri, Yasuhiro; Pugacheva, Elena N; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Mural, Richard J; Cutler, Mary Lou; Shriver, Craig D

    2015-01-15

    There are lines of evidence demonstrating that NEDD9 (Cas-L, HEF-1) plays a key role in the development, progression, and metastasis of breast cancer cells. We previously reported that NEDD9 plays a critical role for promoting migration and growth of MDA-MB-231. In order to further characterize the mechanisms of NEDD9-mediated cancer migration and growth, stable cells overexpressing NEDD9 were generated using HCC38 as a parental cell line which expresses low level of endogenous NEDD9. Microarray studies demonstrated that core proteins of CD44 and Serglycin were markedly upregulated in HCC38(NEDD9) cells compared to HCC38(Vector) cells, while those of Syndecan-1, Syndecan-2, and Versican were downregulated in HCC38(NEDD9). Importantly, enzymes generating chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans (CS) such as CHST11, CHST15, and CSGALNACT1 were upregulated in HCC38(NEDD9) compared to HCC38(Vector). Immunofluorescence studies using specific antibody, GD3G7, confirmed the enhanced expression of CS-E subunit in HCC38(NEDD9). Immunoprecipitation and western blotting analysis demonstrated that CS-E was attached to CD44 core protein. We demonstrated that removing CS by chondroitinase ABC significantly inhibited anchorage-independent colony formation of HCC38(NEDD9) in methylcellulose. Importantly, the fact that GD3G7 significantly inhibited colony formation of HCC38(NEDD9) cells suggests that CS-E subunit plays a key role in this process. Furthermore, treatment of HCC38(NEDD9) cells with chondroitinase ABC or GD3G7 significantly inhibited mammosphere formation. Exogenous addition of CS-E enhanced colony formation and mammosphere formation of HCC38 parental and HCC38(Vector) cells. These results suggest that NEDD9 regulates the synthesis and expression of tumor associated glycocalyx structures including CS-E, which plays a key role in promoting and regulating breast cancer progression and metastasis and possibly stem cell phenotypes.

  10. Necdin, a p53-Target Gene, Is an Inhibitor of p53-Mediated Growth Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Lafontaine, Julie; Rodier, Francis; Ouellet, Véronique; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    In vitro, cellular immortalization and transformation define a model for multistep carcinogenesis and current ongoing challenges include the identification of specific molecular events associated with steps along this oncogenic pathway. Here, using NIH3T3 cells, we identified transcriptionally related events associated with the expression of Polyomavirus Large-T antigen (PyLT), a potent viral oncogene. We propose that a subset of these alterations in gene expression may be related to the early events that contribute to carcinogenesis. The proposed tumor suppressor Necdin, known to be regulated by p53, was within a group of genes that was consistently upregulated in the presence of PyLT. While Necdin is induced following p53 activation with different genotoxic stresses, Necdin induction by PyLT did not involve p53 activation or the Rb-binding site of PyLT. Necdin depletion by shRNA conferred a proliferative advantage to NIH3T3 and PyLT-expressing NIH3T3 (NIHLT) cells. In contrast, our results demonstrate that although overexpression of Necdin induced a growth arrest in NIH3T3 and NIHLT cells, a growing population rapidly emerged from these arrested cells. This population no longer showed significant proliferation defects despite high Necdin expression. Moreover, we established that Necdin is a negative regulator of p53-mediated growth arrest induced by nutlin-3, suggesting that Necdin upregulation could contribute to the bypass of a p53-response in p53 wild type tumors. To support this, we characterized Necdin expression in low malignant potential ovarian cancer (LMP) where p53 mutations rarely occur. Elevated levels of Necdin expression were observed in LMP when compared to aggressive serous ovarian cancers. We propose that in some contexts, the constitutive expression of Necdin could contribute to cancer promotion by delaying appropriate p53 responses and potentially promote genomic instability. PMID:22355404

  11. Using hierarchical linear growth models to evaluate protective mechanisms that mediate science achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Secker, Clare Elaine

    The study of students at risk is a major topic of science education policy and discussion. Much research has focused on describing conditions and problems associated with the statistical risk of low science achievement among individuals who are members of groups characterized by problems such as poverty and social disadvantage. But outcomes attributed to these factors do not explain the nature and extent of mechanisms that account for differences in performance among individuals at risk. There is ample theoretical and empirical evidence that demographic differences should be conceptualized as social contexts, or collections of variables, that alter the psychological significance and social demands of life events, and affect subsequent relationships between risk and resilience. The hierarchical linear growth models used in this dissertation provide greater specification of the role of social context and the protective effects of attitude, expectations, parenting practices, peer influences, and learning opportunities on science achievement. While the individual influences of these protective factors on science achievement were small, their cumulative effect was substantial. Meta-analysis conducted on the effects associated with psychological and environmental processes that mediate risk mechanisms in sixteen social contexts revealed twenty-two significant differences between groups of students. Positive attitudes, high expectations, and more intense science course-taking had positive effects on achievement of all students, although these factors were not equally protective in all social contexts. In general, effects associated with authoritative parenting and peer influences were negative, regardless of social context. An evaluation comparing the performance and stability of hierarchical linear growth models with traditional repeated measures models is included as well.

  12. Aspirin delays mesothelioma growth by inhibiting HMGB1-mediated tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Pellegrini, L; Napolitano, A; Giorgi, C; Jube, S; Preti, A; Jennings, C J; De Marchis, F; Flores, E G; Larson, D; Pagano, I; Tanji, M; Powers, A; Kanodia, S; Gaudino, G; Pastorino, S; Pass, H I; Pinton, P; Bianchi, M E; Carbone, M

    2015-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is an inflammatory molecule that has a critical role in the initiation and progression of malignant mesothelioma (MM). Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA) is the most widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that reduces the incidence, metastatic potential and mortality of many inflammation-induced cancers. We hypothesized that ASA may exert anticancer properties in MM by abrogating the carcinogenic effects of HMGB1. Using HMGB1-secreting and -non-secreting human MM cell lines, we determined whether aspirin inhibited the hallmarks of HMGB1-induced MM cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Our data demonstrated that ASA and its metabolite, salicylic acid (SA), inhibit motility, migration, invasion and anchorage-independent colony formation of MM cells via a novel HMGB1-mediated mechanism. ASA/SA, at serum concentrations comparable to those achieved in humans taking therapeutic doses of aspirin, and BoxA, a specific inhibitor of HMGB1, markedly reduced MM growth in xenograft mice and significantly improved survival of treated animals. The effects of ASA and BoxA were cyclooxygenase-2 independent and were not additive, consistent with both acting via inhibition of HMGB1 activity. Our findings provide a rationale for the well documented, yet poorly understood antitumorigenic activity of aspirin, which we show proceeds via HMGB1 inhibition. Moreover, the use of BoxA appears to allow a more efficient HMGB1 targeting while eluding the known gastrointestinal side effects of ASA. Our findings are directly relevant to MM. Given the emerging importance of HMGB1 and its tumor-promoting functions in many cancer types, and of aspirin in cancer prevention and therapy, our investigation is poised to provide broadly applicable information. PMID:26068794

  13. Platelet-derived growth factor CC-mediated neuroprotection against HIV Tat involves TRPC-mediated inactivation of GSK 3beta.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fuwang; Yao, Honghong; Akturk, Halis Kaan; Buch, Shilpa

    2012-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor-CC (PDGF-CC) is the third member of the PDGF family, and has been implicated both in embryogenesis and development of the CNS. The biological function of this isoform however, remains largely unexplored in the context of HIV-associated dementia (HAD). In the present study, we demonstrate that exposure of human neuroblastoma cells SH-SY5Y to HIV transactivator protein Tat resulted in decreased intrinsic expression of PDGF-CC as evidenced by RT-PCR and western blot assays. Reciprocally, pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with PDGF-CC abrogated Tat-mediated neurotoxicity by mitigating apoptosis and neurite & MAP-2 loss. Using pharmacological and loss of function approaches we identified the role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling in PDGF-CC-mediated neuroprotection. We report herein a novel role about the involvement of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channel 1 in modulation of calcium transients in PDGF-CC-mediated neuroprotection. Furthermore we also demonstrated PDGF-CC-mediated inactivation of the downstream mediator--glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) evidenced by its phosphorylation at Ser-9. This was further validated by gain and loss of function studies using cells transfected with either the wild type or mutant GSK3β constructs. Intriguingly, pretreatment of cells with either the PI3K inhibitor or TRPC blocker resulted in failure of PDGF-CC to inactivate GSK3β, thereby suggesting the intersection of PI3K and TRPC signaling at GSK3β. Taken together our findings lead to the suggestion that PDGF-CC could be developed as a therapeutic target to reverse Tat-mediated neurotoxicity with implications for HAD.

  14. Precise seed-mediated growth and size-controlled synthesis of palladium nanoparticles using a green chemistry approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juncheng; He, Feng; Gunn, Tyler M; Zhao, Dongye; Roberts, Christopher B

    2009-06-16

    In this paper, we present a "green" and size-controlled seed-mediated growth method by which differently sized palladium (Pd) nanoparticles, spanning from 3.4 to 7.6 nm, with an increment of 1.4 nm, were synthesized. Monodisperse Pd nanoparticles (ca. 3.4 nm, standard deviation = 0.7 nm) were first synthesized and stabilized in an aqueous solution at 95 degrees C using nontoxic ascorbic acid and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) as reducing agent and capping agent, respectively. These Pd nanoparticles were subsequently employed as seeds on the surface of which fresh Pd (2+) ions were reduced by the weak reducing agent ascorbic acid. Optimal conditions were determined that favored the homogeneous and sequential accumulation of Pd atoms on the surface of the Pd seeds, rather than the formation of new nucleation sites in the bulk growth solution, thereby achieving atomic-level control over particle sizes. The adsorbed CMC molecules did not inhibit the addition of Pd atoms onto the seeds during the growth but provided stabilization of the Pd nanoparticles in aqueous solution after the growth. Potential mechanisms that underpin this seed-mediated growth process are provided and discussed. One advantage of this seed growth process is that it provides stoichiometric control over the size of the Pd nanoparticles by simply varying Pd(2+) added during the growth stage. Furthermore, the use of ecologically friendly reagents, such as water (solvent), CMC (capping agent), and ascorbic acid (reducing agent), in both the seed synthesis and subsequent seed-mediated growth provides both "green" and economic attributes to this process. PMID:19309120

  15. Vasopressin regulation of epithelial colonic proliferation and permeability is mediated by pericryptal platelet-derived growth factor A.

    PubMed

    Miró, Lluïsa; Pérez-Bosque, Anna; Maijó, Mònica; Naftalin, Richard J; Moretó, Miquel

    2014-10-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) has trophic effects on the rat distal colon, increasing the growth of pericryptal myofibroblasts and reducing the colonic crypt wall permeability. This study aimed to reproduce in vitro the effects of AVP observed in vivo using cultures of human CCD-18Co myofibroblasts and T84 colonic epithelial cells. Proliferation of myofibroblasts was quantified by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation; the expression of platelet-derived growth factor A (PDGFA), platelet-derived growth factor B, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor-β and vascular endothelial growth factor was measured by PCR and the expression of epithelial junction proteins by Western blot. Arginine vasopressin stimulated myofibroblast proliferation and the expression of PDGFA without affecting the expression of platelet-derived growth factor B, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor-β or vascular endothelial growth factor. These effects were prevented when AVP receptor inhibitors were present in the medium. Pre-incubation of CCD-18Co cells with anti-PDGF antibody or with an inhibitor of the PDGF receptor abolished the effects of AVP. When colonocytes were incubated with medium obtained from myofibroblasts incubated with AVP, both cell proliferation and the expression of epithelial junction proteins increased; however, direct incubation of colonocytes with AVP did not modify these variables. These results demonstrate that AVP stimulates myofibroblast proliferation and induces PDGFA secretion, implying that PDGFA mediates local myofibroblast proliferation by an autocrine feedback loop and regulates epithelial proliferation and permeability by a paracrine mechanism. PMID:25085844

  16. The NF2 tumor suppressor gene product, merlin, mediates contact inhibition of growth through interactions with CD44

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Helen; Sherman, Larry S.; Legg, James; Banine, Fatima; Isacke, Clare; Haipek, Carrie A.; Gutmann, David H.; Ponta, Helmut; Herrlich, Peter

    2001-01-01

    The neurofibromatosis-2 (NF2) gene encodes merlin, an ezrin-radixin-moesin-(ERM)-related protein that functions as a tumor suppressor. We found that merlin mediates contact inhibition of growth through signals from the extracellular matrix. At high cell density, merlin becomes hypo-phosphorylated and inhibits cell growth in response to hyaluronate (HA), a mucopolysaccharide that surrounds cells. Merlin's growth-inhibitory activity depends on specific interaction with the cytoplasmic tail of CD44, a transmembrane HA receptor. At low cell density, merlin is phosphorylated, growth permissive, and exists in a complex with ezrin, moesin, and CD44. These data indicate that merlin and CD44 form a molecular switch that specifies cell growth arrest or proliferation. PMID:11316791

  17. RNAi-mediated HOXD3 knockdown inhibits growth in human RKO cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangjun; Sun, Guoping; Peng, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Numerous studies have shown that the multifunctional Homeobox-containing (HOX) D3 gene is involved in various physiological and pathological processes. To elucidate the role and mechanism of HOXD3 in colorectal cancer (CRC), we measured its expression in five CRC cell lines. After determining that HOXD3 was highly expressed in the human RKO cancer cell line, we used lentiviral-mediated small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to knock down HOXD3 expression and assessed proliferation, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis and colony formation using cell proliferation, flow cytometric, and colony formation assays. The expression of HOXD3 was strongly suppressed in the RKO cells infected with the lentiviruse expressing an HOXD3 short hairpin RNA (shRNA). The downregulation of HOXD3 expression in RKO cells significantly decreased proliferation and colony formation, and increased apoptosis in vitro, compared to the cells infected with the mock control (p<0.01). Moreover, specific downregulation of HOXD3 led to the accumulation of cells at the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Our findings revealed that the HOXD3 gene promotes CRC cell growth and plays a pivotal role in the development and survival of malignant human colorectal cancer cells. PMID:27499213

  18. Tissue kallikrein mediates neurite outgrowth through epidermal growth factor receptor and flotillin-2 pathway in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhengyu; Cui, Mei; Zhao, Hong; Wang, Tao; Shen, Yan; Dong, Qiang

    2014-02-01

    Tissue kallikrein (TK) was previously shown to take most of its biological effects through bradykinin receptors. In this study, we assumed that TK mediated neurite outgrowth was independent of bradykinin receptors. To test the hypothesis, we investigated TK-induced neurite outgrowth and its signaling mechanisms in cultured primary neurons and human SH-SY5Y cells. We found that TK stimulation could increase the number of processes and mean process length of primary neurons, which were blocked by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor or down-regulation, small interfering RNA for flotillin-2 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 inhibitor. Moreover, TK-induced neurite outgrowth was associated with EGFR and ERK1/2 activation, which were inhibited by EGFR antagonist or RNA interference and flotillin-2 knockdown. Interestingly, inhibition of bradykinin receptors had no significant effects on EGFR and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. In the present research, our data also suggested that EGFR and flotillin-2 formed constitutive complex that translocated to around the nuclei in the TK stimulation. In sum, our findings provided evidence that TK could promote neurite outgrowth via EGFR, flotillin-2 and ERK1/2 signaling pathway in vitro. PMID:24211626

  19. RNAi-mediated HOXD3 knockdown inhibits growth in human RKO cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fangjun; Sun, Guoping; Peng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that the multifunctional Homeobox-containing (HOX) D3 gene is involved in various physiological and pathological processes. To elucidate the role and mechanism of HOXD3 in colorectal cancer (CRC), we measured its expression in five CRC cell lines. After determining that HOXD3 was highly expressed in the human RKO cancer cell line, we used lentiviral-mediated small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to knock down HOXD3 expression and assessed proliferation, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis and colony formation using cell proliferation, flow cytometric, and colony formation assays. The expression of HOXD3 was strongly suppressed in the RKO cells infected with the lentiviruse expressing an HOXD3 short hairpin RNA (shRNA). The downregulation of HOXD3 expression in RKO cells significantly decreased proliferation and colony formation, and increased apoptosis in vitro, compared to the cells infected with the mock control (p<0.01). Moreover, specific downregulation of HOXD3 led to the accumulation of cells at the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Our findings revealed that the HOXD3 gene promotes CRC cell growth and plays a pivotal role in the development and survival of malignant human colorectal cancer cells. PMID:27499213

  20. P2y Receptor-Mediated Angiogenesis via Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rumjahn, Sharif M.; Baldwin, Karla A; Buxton, Iain L. O.

    2011-01-01

    Pathological as well as physiological angiogenesis is known to be regulated by such factors as nucleotides and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF). Activated P2Y nucleotide receptors have been observed to associate and transactivate VEGF Receptor 2 (VEGFR2), suggesting a cooperation between nucleotide and VEGF signaling in angiogenesis. P2YR mediated VEGFR2 signaling therefore may be important in describing the angiogenic signaling of nucleotides such as ATP. Here, we provide evidence that supports the notion of P2YR-VEGFR2 signaling. The significant angiogenic effect of P2Y1/2 receptor agonists (100 μM ATP and 10 μM 2MS-ATP) on endothelial cell tubulogenesis was suppressed back to near control levels upon addition of 1 μM SU1498 (specific VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor). We believe that this P2YR-VEFGR2 signaling is an important component of pathological, as well as physiological angiogenesis. PMID:18605230

  1. System theoretical investigation of human epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated signalling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yi; Shankaran, Harish; Opresko, Lee; Resat, Haluk

    2008-09-01

    The partitioning of biological networks into coupled functional modules is gaining increasing attention in the biological sciences. This approach has the advantage that predicting a system level response does not require a mechanistic description of the internal dynamics of each module. Identification of the input-output characteristics of the network modules and the connectivity between the modules provide the necessary quantitative representation of system dynamics. However, determination of the input-output relationships of the modules is not trivial; it requires the controlled perturbation of module inputs and systematic analysis of experimental data. In this report, we apply a system theoretical analysis approach to derive the causal input-output relationships of the functional module for the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) mediated Erk and Akt signaling pathways. Using a library of cell lines expressing varying levels of EGFR and HER2, we show that a transfer function-based representation can be successfully applied to quantitatively characterize information transfer in this system.

  2. Classical dendritic cells are required for dietary antigen-mediated peripheral regulatory T cell and tolerance induction

    PubMed Central

    Esterházy, Daria; Loschko, Jakob; London, Mariya; Jove, Veronica; Oliveira, Thiago Y.; Mucida, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Oral tolerance prevents pathological inflammatory responses towards innocuous foreign antigens via peripheral regulatory T cells (pTreg cells). However, whether a particular subset of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is required during dietary antigen exposure to instruct naïve CD4+ T cells to differentiate into pTreg cells has not been defined. Using myeloid lineage-specific APC depletion in mice, we found that monocyte-derived APCs are dispensable, while classical dendritic cells (cDCs) are critical for pTreg cell induction and oral tolerance. CD11b− cDCs from the gut-draining lymph nodes efficiently induced pTreg cells, and conversely, loss of IRF8-dependent CD11b− cDCs impaired their polarization, although oral tolerance remained intact. These data reveal the hierarchy of cDC subsets in pTreg cell induction and their redundancy during oral tolerance development. PMID:27019226

  3. Ectonucleotidase CD38 Demarcates Regulatory, Memory-Like CD8+ T Cells with IFN-γ-Mediated Suppressor Activities

    PubMed Central

    Bollinger, Thomas; Orinska, Zane; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory CD8+ T cells are critical for self-tolerance and restricting excessive immune responses. The variety of immune functions they fulfill, the heterogeneity of their phenotype, and the mechanism of action are still poorly understood. Here we describe that regulatory CD8+ T cells exhibiting immunosuppressive actions in vitro and in vivo are recognized as CD38high T cells and present in naive mice. CD38 is a glycosylated membrane protein with ectonucleotidase properties. CD8+CD38high (CD44+CD122+CD62Lhigh) lymphocytes suppress CD4+ effector T-cell proliferation in an antigen-non specific manner via IFN-γ. While direct cell-to-cell contact is needed for this suppressor activity, it is independent of membrane-bound TGF-β and granzyme B release. IL-15 potentiates the suppressive activity of CD8+CD38high T cells and controls their survival and expansion. In humans CD8+CD38high T cells inhibit CD4+ effector T cell proliferation. In vivo, CD8+CD38high, but not CD8+CD38− T cells mitigate murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) by reducing the clinical score and delaying disease occurrence. EAE suppression is enhanced by pre-treatment of CD8+CD38high T cells with IL-15. These findings add evidence that the expression of ectoenzyme receptor family members positively correlates with suppressor functions and identifies CD8+CD38high T cells as potential inhibitors of excessive immune responses. PMID:23028866

  4. Interruption of dendritic cell-mediated TIM-4 signaling induces regulatory T cells and promotes skin allograft survival.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Melissa Y; McGrath, Martina M; Nakayama, Masafumi; Shimizu, Tetsunosuke; Boenisch, Olaf; Magee, Ciara N; Abdoli, Rozita; Akiba, Hisaya; Ueno, Takuya; Turka, Laurence A; Najafian, Nader

    2013-10-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the central architects of the immune response, inducing inflammatory or tolerogenic immunity, dependent on their activation status. As such, DCs are highly attractive therapeutic targets and may hold the potential to control detrimental immune responses. TIM-4, expressed on APCs, has complex functions in vivo, acting both as a costimulatory molecule and a phosphatidylserine receptor. The effect of TIM-4 costimulation on T cell activation remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that Ab blockade of DC-expressed TIM-4 leads to increased induction of induced regulatory T cells (iTregs) from naive CD4(+) T cells, both in vitro and in vivo. iTreg induction occurs through suppression of IL-4/STAT6/Gata3-induced Th2 differentiation. In addition, blockade of TIM-4 on previously activated DCs still leads to increased iTreg induction. iTregs induced under TIM-4 blockade have equivalent potency to control and, upon adoptive transfer, significantly prolong skin allograft survival in vivo. In RAG(-/-) recipients of skin allografts adoptively transferred with CD4(+) T cells, we show that TIM-4 blockade in vivo is associated with a 3-fold prolongation in allograft survival. Furthermore, in this mouse model of skin transplantation, increased induction of allospecific iTregs and a reduction in T effector responses were observed, with decreased Th1 and Th2 responses. This enhanced allograft survival and protolerogenic skewing of the alloresponse is critically dependent on conversion of naive CD4(+) to Tregs in vivo. Collectively, these studies identify blockade of DC-expressed TIM-4 as a novel strategy that holds the capacity to induce regulatory immunity in vivo.

  5. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSC) Protect Islet Transplants via B7-H1 Mediated Enhancement of T Regulatory Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hong-Shiue; Hsieh, Ching-Chuan; Charles, Ronald; Wang, Lianfu; Wagner, Timothy; Fung, John J.; Qian, Shiguang; L, Lina Lu

    2011-01-01

    Background Side effects of lifetime immunosuppression for cell transplants often outweigh the benefits, therefore, induction of transplant tolerance is needed. We have shown that cotransplantation with myeoid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) effectively protect islet allografts from rejection without requirement of immunosuppression. This study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Methods MDSC were generated by addition of hepatic stellate cells (HpSC) from various stain mice into dendritic cell (DC) culture. The quality of MDSC was monitored by phenotype and function analyses. MDSC mixed with islet allografts were transplanted into diabetic recipients. T cell response was analyzed following transplant by flow and histochemical analyses, and compared to islet alone and islet/DC transplant groups. B7-H1 knockout mice were used to determine the role of B7-H1 on MDSC in regulation of T cell response. Results Cotransplantation with MDSC (not DC) effectively protected islet allografts without requirement of immunosuppression. This is associated with attenuation of CD8 T cells in the grafts and marked expansion of T regulatory (Treg) cells, which contributed to MDSC-induced T cell hyporesponsiveness. Antigen-specific Treg cells were prone to accumulate in lymphoid organs close to the grafts. Both in vitro and in vivo data demonstrated that B7-H1 was absolutely required for MDSC to exert immune regulatory activity and induction of Treg cells. Conclusion The described approach holds great clinical application potential, and may overcome the limitation of requiring chronic administration of immunosuppression in cell transplants. Understanding the underlying mechanisms will facilitate the development of this novel therapeutic strategy. PMID:22179405

  6. Combined Large-Scale Phenotyping and Transcriptomics in Maize Reveals a Robust Growth Regulatory Network1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Dorota; Slabbinck, Bram; Pè, Mario Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Leaves are vital organs for biomass and seed production because of their role in the generation of metabolic energy and organic compounds. A better understanding of the molecular networks underlying leaf development is crucial to sustain global requirements for food and renewable energy. Here, we combined transcriptome profiling of proliferative leaf tissue with in-depth phenotyping of the fourth leaf at later stages of development in 197 recombinant inbred lines of two different maize (Zea mays) populations. Previously, correlation analysis in a classical biparental mapping population identified 1,740 genes correlated with at least one of 14 traits. Here, we extended these results with data from a multiparent advanced generation intercross population. As expected, the phenotypic variability was found to be larger in the latter population than in the biparental population, although general conclusions on the correlations among the traits are comparable. Data integration from the two diverse populations allowed us to identify a set of 226 genes that are robustly associated with diverse leaf traits. This set of genes is enriched for transcriptional regulators and genes involved in protein synthesis and cell wall metabolism. In order to investigate the molecular network context of the candidate gene set, we integrated our data with publicly available functional genomics data and identified a growth regulatory network of 185 genes. Our results illustrate the power of combining in-depth phenotyping with transcriptomics in mapping populations to dissect the genetic control of complex traits and present a set of candidate genes for use in biomass improvement. PMID:26754667

  7. Mechanisms of immune suppression by interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-β: the role of T regulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alison; Verhagen, Johan; Blaser, Kurt; Akdis, Mübeccel; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2006-01-01

    Specific immune suppression and induction of tolerance are essential processes in the regulation and circumvention of immune defence. The balance between allergen-specific type 1 regulatory (Tr1) cells and T helper (Th) 2 cells appears to be decisive in the development of allergy. Tr1 cells consistently represent the dominant subset specific for common environmental allergens in healthy individuals. In contrast, there is a high frequency of allergen-specific interleukin-4 (IL-4)-secreting T cells in allergic individuals. Allergen-specific immunotherapy can induce specific Tr1 cells that abolish allergen-induced proliferation of Th1 and Th2 cells, as well as their cytokine production. Tr1 cells utilize multiple suppressor mechanisms, such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) as secreted cytokines and various surface molecules, such as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 and programmed death-1. IL-10 only inhibits T cells stimulated by low numbers of triggered T-cell receptors, which depend on CD28 costimulation. IL-10 inhibits CD28 tyrosine phosphorylation, preventing the binding of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase p85 and consequently inhibiting the CD28 signalling pathway. In addition, IL-10 and TGF-β secreted by Tr1 cells skew the antibody production from immunoglobulin E (IgE) towards the non-inflammatory isotypes IgG4 and IgA, respectively. Induction of antigen-specific Tr1 cells can thus re-direct an inappropriate immune response against allergens or auto-antigens using a broad range of suppressor mechanisms. PMID:16556256

  8. Exposure of FVIII in the Presence of Phosphatidyl Serine Reduces Generation of Memory B-Cells and Induces Regulatory T-Cell-Mediated Hyporesponsiveness in Hemophilia A Mice.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Radha; Davidowitz, Andrew; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V

    2015-08-01

    A major complication of replacement therapy with Factor VIII (FVIII) for hemophilia A (HA) is the development of unwanted immune responses. Previous studies showed that administration of FVIII in the presence of phosphatidyl serine (PS) reduced the development of anti-FVIII antibodies in HA mice. However, the impact of PS-mediated effects on immunological memory, such as generation of memory B-cells, is not clear. The effect of PS on memory B-cells was therefore investigated using adoptive transfer approach in FVIII(-/-) HA mice. Adoptive transfer of memory B-cells from a PS-FVIII-treated group to naïve mice followed by challenge of the recipient mice with FVIII showed a significantly reduced anti-FVIII antibody response in the recipient mice, compared with animals that received memory B-cells from free FVIII and FVIII-charge matched phosphatidyl glycerol (PG) group. The decrease in memory B-cell response is accompanied by an increase in FoxP3 expressing regulatory T-cells (Tregs). Flow cytometry studies showed that the generation of Tregs is higher in PS-treated animals as compared with FVIII and FVIII-PG treated animals. The PS-mediated hyporesponsiveness was found to be antigen-specific. The PS-FVIII immunization showed hyporesponsiveness toward FVIII rechallenge but not against ovalbumin (OVA) rechallenge, an unrelated antigen. This demonstrates that PS reduces immunologic memory of FVIII and induces antigen-specific peripheral tolerance in HA mice.

  9. Cognitive and Emotion-Regulatory Mediators of the Relationship between Behavioral Approach System Sensitivity and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Taylor A.; Stange, Jonathan P.; Hamilton, Jessica L.; Cohen, Jonah N.; O’Garro-Moore, Jared; Daryanani, Issar; Abramson, Lyn Y.; Alloy, Lauren B.

    2014-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is highly prevalent among late adolescents and predicts the onset of suicidal ideation and behavior. Although research has established an association between the behavioral approach system (BAS) and NSSI, less research has explored mechanisms underlying this relationship. The authors examined negative and positive emotion regulation patterns, as well as the BAS-relevant cognitive style of self-criticism, as potential mechanisms through which a hypersensitive BAS might be related to NSSI frequency. Late adolescents (N=177) with high and moderate BAS levels completed measures of self-criticism, positive emotion regulation, brooding, and both lifetime and last year frequency of NSSI. Results indicated that self-criticism and positive emotion dampening independently mediated the relationship between BAS and last year frequency of NSSI. Self-criticism also mediated the relationship between BAS and lifetime frequency of NSSI. Results suggest that cognitive and emotion-regulatory styles may help to explain why high BAS individuals are likely to engage in NSSI. PMID:25443691

  10. Amphiregulin activates regulatory T lymphocytes and suppresses CD8+ T cell-mediated anti-tumor response in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chun-Hui; Sun, Xiao-Ming; Zhu, Cheng-Liang; Liu, Shao-Ping; Wu, Long; Chen, Hao; Feng, Mao-Hui; Wu, Ke; Wang, Fu-Bing

    2015-10-13

    CD8+ T cell-mediated immune response plays an important role in inhibiting progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). For strategic immunotherapy, it is critical to understand why some of the tumor cells escape from this immune attack. In this study, we investigated how HCC cells alter endogenous anti-tumor immunity and their related signaling pathways. We found that HCC cells, both in vitro and in vivo, substantially secret and express amphiregulin (AR). AR in turn activates immunosuppressive function of intratumoral CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), a major inhibitor of CD8+ T cells. Using either lentiviral siRNA, or AR neutralizing antibody, we blocked the expression and function of AR to test the specificity of AR mediated activation of Tregs, Biochemical and cell biology studies were followed and confirmed that blocking of AR inhibited Tregs activation. In addition, we found that AR can trigger the activation of rapamycin complex 1(mTORC1) signaling in Tregs. The mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin treatment led to compromise Treg function and resulted in enhancing anti-tumor function of CD8+ T cells. Blocking AR/EGFR signaling in Tregs with Gefitinib also enhanced anti-tumor immunity and decreased tumor size in a mouse xenograft tumor model. Taken together, our study suggested a novel mechanism of functional interaction between HCC and Tregs for regulating anti-tumor function of CD8+ T cells. PMID:26451607

  11. Inhibition of root meristem growth by cadmium involves nitric oxide-mediated repression of auxin accumulation and signalling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hong-Mei; Huang, Xi

    2016-01-01

    The root is the first plant organ to get in contact with the toxin cadmium (Cd), which is a widespread soil contaminant. Cd inhibits the growth of the primary root, but the mechanisms underlying this inhibition remain elusive. In this study, we used physiological, pharmacological and genetic approaches to investigate the roles of nitric oxide (NO) and auxin in Cd-mediated inhibition of Arabidopsis thaliana root meristem growth. Our study demonstrated that in the first 12 h of exposure, Cd inhibits primary root elongation through a decrease in the sizes of both the elongation and meristematic zones. Following Cd exposure, a decrease in auxin levels is associated with reduced PIN1/3/7 protein accumulation, but not with reduced PIN1/3/7 transcript levels. Additionally, Cd stabilized AXR3/IAA17 protein to repress auxin signalling in this Cd-mediated process. Furthermore, decreasing Cd-induced NO accumulation with either NO-specific scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) or NO synthase inhibitor N(ω) -nitro-l-Arg-methylester (l-NAME) compromised the Cd-mediated inhibition of root meristem development, reduction in auxin and PIN1/3/7 accumulation, as well as stabilization of AXR3/IAA17, indicating that NO participates in Cd-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth. Taken together, our data suggest that Cd inhibits root meristem growth by NO-mediated repression of auxin accumulation and signalling in Arabidopsis.

  12. Sugar signals and the control of plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Lastdrager, Jeroen; Hanson, Johannes; Smeekens, Sjef

    2014-03-01

    Sugars have a central regulatory function in steering plant growth. This review focuses on information presented in the past 2 years on key players in sugar-mediated plant growth regulation, with emphasis on trehalose 6-phosphate, target of rapamycin kinase, and Snf1-related kinase 1 regulatory systems. The regulation of protein synthesis by sugars is fundamental to plant growth control, and recent advances in our understanding of the regulation of translation by sugars will be discussed.

  13. Synthesis of size-controlled monodisperse Pd nanoparticles via a non-aqueous seed-mediated growth

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrated that stepwise seed-mediated growth could be extended in non-aqueous solution (solvothermal synthesis) and improved as an effective method for controlling the uniform size of palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) in a wide range. The monodisperse Pd NPs with the size of about 5 nm were synthesized by simply reducing Pd(acac)2 with formaldehyde in different organic amine solvents. By an improved stepwise seed-mediated synthesis, the size of the monodisperse Pd NPs can be precisely controlled from approximately 5 to 10 nm. The as-prepared Pd NPs could self assemble to well-shaped superlattice crystal without size selection process. PMID:22713177

  14. Inhibition of fibroblast growth by Notch1 signaling is mediated by induction of Wnt11-dependent WISP-1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhao-Jun; Li, Yan; Tan, Yurong; Xiao, Min; Zhang, Jialin; Radtke, Freddy; Velazquez, Omaida C

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblasts are an integral component of stroma and important source of growth factors and extracellular matrix (ECM). They play a prominent role in maintaining tissue homeostasis and in wound healing and tumor growth. Notch signaling regulates biological function in a variety of cells. To elucidate the physiological function of Notch signaling in fibroblasts, we ablated Notch1 in mouse (Notch1(Flox/Flox)) embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Notch1-deficient (Notch1(-/-)) MEFs displayed faster growth and motility rate compared to Notch1(Flox/Flox) MEFs. Such phenotypic changes, however, were reversible by reconstitution of Notch1 activation via overexpression of the intracellular domain of Notch1 (NICD1) in Notch1-deficient MEFs. In contrast, constitutive activation of Notch1 signaling by introducing NICD1 into primary human dermal fibroblasts (FF2441), which caused pan-Notch activation, inhibited cell growth and motility, whereas cellular inhibition was relievable when the Notch activation was countered with dominant-negative mutant of Master-mind like 1 (DN-MAML-1). Functionally, "Notch-activated" stromal fibroblasts could inhibit tumor cell growth/invasion. Moreover, Notch activation induced expression of Wnt-induced secreted proteins-1 (WISP-1/CCN4) in FF2441 cells while deletion of Notch1 in MEFs resulted in an opposite effect. Notably, WISP-1 suppressed fibroblast proliferation, and was responsible for mediating Notch1's inhibitory effect since siRNA-mediated blockade of WISP-1 expression could relieve cell growth inhibition. Notch1-induced WISP-1 expression appeared to be Wnt11-dependent, but Wnt1-independent. Blockade of Wnt11 expression resulted in decreased WISP-1 expression and liberated Notch-induced cell growth inhibition. These findings indicated that inhibition of fibroblast proliferation by Notch pathway activation is mediated, at least in part, through regulating Wnt1-independent, but Wnt11-dependent WISP-1 expression.

  15. Lentivirus-mediated PLCγ1 gene short-hairpin RNA suppresses tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bingchang; Wang, Fen; Dai, Lianzhi; Cai, Heguo; Zhan, Yanyan; Gang, Song; Hu, Tianhui; Xia, Chun; Zhang, Bing

    2016-02-16

    Targeted molecular therapy has gradually been a potential solution in cancer therapy. Other authors' and our previous studies have demonstrated that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase γ (PLCγ) is involved in regulating tumor growth and metastasis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying PLCγ-dependent tumor growth and metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma and whether PLCγ may be a potential target for tumor therapy in human gastric adenocarcinoma are not yet well determined. Here, we investigated the role of PLCγ inhibition in tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma using BGC-823 cell line and a nude mouse tumor xenograft model. The results manifested that the depletion of PLCγ1 by the transduction with lentivirus-mediated PLCγ1 gene short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) vector led to the decrease of tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the Akt/Bad, Akt/S6, and ERK/Bad signal axes were involved in PLCγ1-mediated tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma. Therefore, the abrogation of PLCγ1 signaling by shRNA could efficaciously suppress human gastric adenocarcinoma tumor growth and metastasis, with important implication for validating PLCγ1 as a potential target for human gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:26811493

  16. Lentivirus-mediated PLCγ1 gene short-hairpin RNA suppresses tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bingchang; Wang, Fen; Dai, Lianzhi; Cai, Heguo; Zhan, Yanyan; Gang, Song; Hu, Tianhui; Xia, Chun; Zhang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Targeted molecular therapy has gradually been a potential solution in cancer therapy. Other authors' and our previous studies have demonstrated that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase γ (PLCγ) is involved in regulating tumor growth and metastasis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying PLCγ-dependent tumor growth and metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma and whether PLCγ may be a potential target for tumor therapy in human gastric adenocarcinoma are not yet well determined. Here, we investigated the role of PLCγ inhibition in tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma using BGC-823 cell line and a nude mouse tumor xenograft model. The results manifested that the depletion of PLCγ1 by the transduction with lentivirus-mediated PLCγ1 gene short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) vector led to the decrease of tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the Akt/Bad, Akt/S6, and ERK/Bad signal axes were involved in PLCγ1-mediated tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma. Therefore, the abrogation of PLCγ1 signaling by shRNA could efficaciously suppress human gastric adenocarcinoma tumor growth and metastasis, with important implication for validating PLCγ1 as a potential target for human gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:26811493

  17. Cell growth suppression by thanatos-associated protein 11(THAP11) is mediated by transcriptional downregulation of c-Myc.

    PubMed

    Zhu, C-Y; Li, C-Y; Li, Y; Zhan, Y-Q; Li, Y-H; Xu, C-W; Xu, W-X; Sun, H B; Yang, X-M

    2009-03-01

    Thanatos-associated proteins (THAPs) are zinc-dependent, sequence-specific DNA-binding factors involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, chromatin modification and transcriptional regulation. THAP11 is the most recently described member of this human protein family. In this study, we show that THAP11 is ubiquitously expressed in normal tissues and frequently downregulated in several human tumor tissues. Overexpression of THAP11 markedly inhibits growth of a number of different cells, including cancer cells and non-transformed cells. Silencing of THAP11 by RNA interference in HepG2 cells results in loss of cell growth repression. These results suggest that human THAP11 may be an endogenous physiologic regulator of cell proliferation. We also provide evidence that the function of THAP11 is mediated by its ability to repress transcription of c-Myc. Promoter reporter assays indicate a DNA binding-dependent c-Myc transcriptional repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitations and EMSA assay suggest that THAP11 directly binds to the c-Myc promoter. The findings that expression of c-Myc rescues significantly cells from THAP11-mediated cell growth suppression and that THAP11 expression only slightly inhibits c-Myc null fibroblasts cells growth reveal that THAP11 inhibits cell growth through downregulation of c-Myc expression. Taken together, these suggest that THAP11 functions as a cell growth suppressor by negatively regulating the expression of c-Myc. PMID:19008924

  18. Microhomology-mediated mechanisms underlie non-recurrent disease-causing microdeletions of the FOXL2 gene or its regulatory domain.

    PubMed

    Verdin, Hannah; D'haene, Barbara; Beysen, Diane; Novikova, Yana; Menten, Björn; Sante, Tom; Lapunzina, Pablo; Nevado, Julian; Carvalho, Claudia M B; Lupski, James R; De Baere, Elfride

    2013-01-01

    Genomic disorders are often caused by recurrent copy number variations (CNVs), with nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) as the underlying mechanism. Recently, several microhomology-mediated repair mechanisms--such as microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ), fork stalling and template switching (FoSTeS), microhomology-mediated break-induced replication (MMBIR), serial replication slippage (SRS), and break-induced SRS (BISRS)--were described in the etiology of non-recurrent CNVs in human disease. In addition, their formation may be stimulated by genomic architectural features. It is, however, largely unexplored to what extent these mechanisms contribute to rare, locus-specific pathogenic CNVs. Here, fine-mapping of 42 microdeletions of the FOXL2 locus, encompassing FOXL2 (32) or its regulatory domain (10), serves as a model for rare, locus-specific CNVs implicated in genetic disease. These deletions lead to blepharophimosis syndrome (BPES), a developmental condition affecting the eyelids and the ovary. For breakpoint mapping we used targeted array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), quantitative PCR (qPCR), long-range PCR, and Sanger sequencing of the junction products. Microhomology, ranging from 1 bp to 66 bp, was found in 91.7% of 24 characterized breakpoint junctions, being significantly enriched in comparison with a random control sample. Our results show that microhomology-mediated repair mechanisms underlie at least 50% of these microdeletions. Moreover, genomic architectural features, like sequence motifs, non-B DNA conformations, and repetitive elements, were found in all breakpoint regions. In conclusion, the majority of these microdeletions result from microhomology-mediated mechanisms like MMEJ, FoSTeS, MMBIR, SRS, or BISRS. Moreover, we hypothesize that the genomic architecture might drive their formation by increasing the susceptibility for DNA breakage or promote replication fork stalling. Finally, our locus-centered study

  19. Affinity-based Selection of Regulatory T Cells Occurs Independent of Agonist-mediated Induction of Foxp3 Expression1

    PubMed Central

    Relland, Lance M.; Mishra, Manoj K.; Haribhai, Dipica; Edwards, Brandon; Ziegelbauer, Jennifer; Williams, Calvin B.

    2010-01-01

    Natural regulatory T (nTreg)3 cells recognize self-peptides with high affinity, yet the understanding of how affinity influences their selection in the thymus is incomplete. We use altered peptide ligands in transgenic mice and in organ culture to create thymic environments spanning a broad range of ligand affinity. We demonstrate that the nTreg TCR repertoire is shaped by affinity-based selection, similar to conventional T (Tconv) cells. The effect of each ligand on the two populations is distinct, consistent with early nTreg cell lineage specification. Foxp3 expression is an independent process that does not rely on “high affinity” binding per se, but requires a high-potency agonistic interaction for its induction. The timing of ligand exposure, TGFβ signaling, and the organization of the thymic architecture are also important. The development of nTreg cells is therefore a multi-step process where ligand affinity, potency and timing of presentation all play roles in determining cell fate. PMID:19155480

  20. Quiescence of Memory CD8(+) T Cells Is Mediated by Regulatory T Cells through Inhibitory Receptor CTLA-4.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Vandana; Penny, Laura Anne; Yuzefpolskiy, Yevgeniy; Baumann, Florian Martin; Sarkar, Surojit

    2015-06-16

    Immune memory cells are poised to rapidly expand and elaborate effector functions upon reinfection yet exist in a functionally quiescent state. The paradigm is that memory T cells remain inactive due to lack of T cell receptor (TCR) stimuli. Here, we report that regulatory T (Treg) cells orchestrate memory T cell quiescence by suppressing effector and proliferation programs through inhibitory receptor, cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte-associated protein-4 (CTLA-4). Loss of Treg cells resulted in activation of genome-wide transcriptional programs characteristic of effector T cells and drove transitioning as well as established memory CD8(+) T cells toward terminally differentiated KLRG-1(hi)IL-7Rα(lo)GzmB(hi) phenotype, with compromised metabolic fitness, longevity, polyfunctionality, and protective efficacy. CTLA-4 functionally replaced Treg cells in trans to rescue memory T cell defects and restore homeostasis. These studies present the CTLA-4-CD28-CD80/CD86 axis as a potential target to accelerate vaccine-induced immunity and improve T cell memory quality in current cancer immunotherapies proposing transient Treg cell ablation.

  1. Smarter vaccine design will circumvent regulatory T cell-mediated evasion in chronic HIV and HCV infection

    PubMed Central

    Moise, Leonard; Terry, Frances; Gutierrez, Andres H.; Tassone, Ryan; Losikoff, Phyllis; Gregory, Stephen H.; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Martin, William D.; De Groot, Anne S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite years of research, vaccines against HIV and HCV are not yet available, due largely to effective viral immunoevasive mechanisms. A novel escape mechanism observed in viruses that cause chronic infection is suppression of viral-specific effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cells by stimulating regulatory T cells (Tregs) educated on host sequences during tolerance induction. Viral class II MHC epitopes that share a T cell receptor (TCR)-face with host epitopes may activate Tregs capable of suppressing protective responses. We designed an immunoinformatic algorithm, JanusMatrix, to identify such epitopes and discovered that among human-host viruses, chronic viruses appear more human-like than viruses that cause acute infection. Furthermore, an HCV epitope that activates Tregs in chronically infected patients, but not clearers, shares a TCR-face with numerous human sequences. To boost weak CD4+ T cell responses associated with persistent infection, vaccines for HIV and HCV must circumvent potential Treg activation that can handicap efficacy. Epitope-driven approaches to vaccine design that involve careful consideration of the T cell subsets primed during immunization will advance HIV and HCV vaccine development. PMID:25339942

  2. A specific CD4 epitope bound by tregalizumab mediates activation of regulatory T cells by a unique signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Helling, Bianca; König, Martin; Dälken, Benjamin; Engling, Andre; Krömer, Wolfgang; Heim, Katharina; Wallmeier, Holger; Haas, Jürgen; Wildemann, Brigitte; Fritz, Brigitte; Jonuleit, Helmut; Kubach, Jan; Dingermann, Theodor; Radeke, Heinfried H; Osterroth, Frank; Uherek, Christoph; Czeloth, Niklas; Schüttrumpf, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) represent a specialized subpopulation of T cells, which are essential for maintaining peripheral tolerance and preventing autoimmunity. The immunomodulatory effects of Tregs depend on their activation status. Here we show that, in contrast to conventional anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), the humanized CD4-specific monoclonal antibody tregalizumab (BT-061) is able to selectively activate the suppressive properties of Tregs in vitro. BT-061 activates Tregs by binding to CD4 and activation of signaling downstream pathways. The specific functionality of BT-061 may be explained by the recognition of a unique, conformational epitope on domain 2 of the CD4 molecule that is not recognized by other anti-CD4 mAbs. We found that, due to this special epitope binding, BT-061 induces a unique phosphorylation of T-cell receptor complex-associated signaling molecules. This is sufficient to activate the function of Tregs without activating effector T cells. Furthermore, BT-061 does not induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These results demonstrate that BT-061 stimulation via the CD4 receptor is able to induce T-cell receptor-independent activation of Tregs. Selective activation of Tregs via CD4 is a promising approach for the treatment of autoimmune diseases where insufficient Treg activity has been described. Clinical investigation of this new approach is currently ongoing. PMID:25512343

  3. Surfactant-mediated growth of Ge/Si(0 0 1) studied by Raman spectroscopy and TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, G.; Smith, David J.; Chandrasekhar, D.; Gogotsi, Y.; Prociuk, A.; Sivananthan, S.

    1999-05-01

    Growth of Ge/Si follows the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode (2D→3D) because of the 4.2% lattice mismatch between Ge and Si. However, the growth mode can be altered to Frank-Van der Merwe (layer-by-layer) by depositing a suitable surfactant. In this study, we have grown thin and thick Ge(0 0 1)/Si(0 0 1) MBE layers with and without As deposition prior to Ge growth in order to investigate the details of surfactant-mediated epitaxy. Raman spectroscopy shows that without As surfactant use, Ge and Si interdiffuse at the interface and form an alloy. Furthermore, peak shift measurements as well as cross-sectional electron micrographs reveal that layers grown with As slowly relieve misfit strain through the accommodation of Lomer edge dislocations at the interface leaving a relaxed, nearly defect-free layer.

  4. Extracellular calmodulin regulates growth and cAMP-mediated chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    O'Day, Danton H.; Huber, Robert J.; Suarez, Andres

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin is present throughout growth and development in Dictyostelium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin localizes within the ECM during development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin inhibits cell proliferation and increases chemotaxis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin exists in eukaryotic microbes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin may be functionally as important as intracellular calmodulin. -- Abstract: The existence of extracellular calmodulin (CaM) has had a long and controversial history. CaM is a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein that has been found in every eukaryotic cell system. Calcium-free apo-CaM and Ca{sup 2+}/CaM exert their effects by binding to and regulating the activity of CaM-binding proteins (CaMBPs). Most of the research done to date on CaM and its CaMBPs has focused on their intracellular functions. The presence of extracellular CaM is well established in a number of plants where it functions in proliferation, cell wall regeneration, gene regulation and germination. While CaM has been detected extracellularly in several animal species, including frog, rat, rabbit and human, its extracellular localization and functions are less well established. In contrast the study of extracellular CaM in eukaryotic microbes remains to be done. Here we show that CaM is constitutively expressed and secreted throughout asexual development in Dictyostelium where the presence of extracellular CaM dose-dependently inhibits cell proliferation but increases cAMP mediated chemotaxis. During development, extracellular CaM localizes within the slime sheath where it coexists with at least one CaMBP, the matricellular CaM-binding protein CyrA. Coupled with previous research, this work provides direct evidence for the existence of extracellular CaM in the Dictyostelium and provides insight into its functions in this model amoebozoan.

  5. Insulin-like Growth Factor 1-mediated Hyperthermia Involves Anterior Hypothalamic Insulin Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Osborn, Olivia; Tabarean, Iustin V.; Holmberg, Kristina H.; Eberwine, James; Kahn, C. Ronald; Bartfai, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    The objective is to investigate the role of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) in the regulation of core body temperature. Sequencing cDNA libraries from individual warm-sensitive neurons from the preoptic area (POA) of the hypothalamus, a region involved in the central control of thermoregulation, identified neurons that express both IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and insulin receptor transcripts. The effects of administration of IGF-1 into the POA was measured by radiotelemetry monitoring of core temperature, brown adipose tissue (BAT) temperature, metabolic assessment, and imaging of BAT by positron emission tomography of 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose uptake combined with computed tomography. IGF-1 injection into the POA caused dose-dependent hyperthermia that could be blocked by pretreatment with the IGF-1R tyrosine kinase inhibitor, PQ401. The IGF-1-evoked hyperthermia involved activation of brown adipose tissue and was accompanied by a switch from glycolysis to fatty acid oxidation as a source of energy as shown by lowered respiratory exchange ratio. Transgenic mice that lack neuronal insulin receptor expression in the brain (NIRKO mice) were unable to mount the full hyperthermic response to IGF-1, suggesting that the IGF-1 mediated hyperthermia is partly dependent on expression of functional neuronal insulin receptors. These data indicate a novel thermoregulatory role for both IGF-1R and neuronal insulin receptors in IGF-1 activation of BAT and hyperthermia. These central effects of IGF-1 signaling may play a role in regulation of metabolic rate, aging, and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. PMID:21330367

  6. The brassinosteroid growth response in pea is not mediated by changes in gibberellin content.

    PubMed

    Jager, Corinne E; Symons, Gregory M; Ross, John J; Smith, Jennifer J; Reid, James B

    2005-04-01

    The objective of this study was to increase our understanding of the relationship between brassinosteroids (BRs) and gibberellins (GAs) by examining the effects of BR deficiency on the GA biosynthesis pathway in several tissue types of pea (Pisum sativum L.). It was suggested recently that, in Arabidopsis, BRs act as positive regulators of GA 20-oxidation, a key step in GA biosynthesis [Bouquin et al. (2001) Plant Physiol 127:450-458]. However, this may not be the case in pea as GA20 levels were consistently higher in all shoot tissues of BR-deficient (lk and lkb) and BR-response (lka) mutants. The application of brassinolide (BL) to lkb plants reduced GA20 levels, and metabolism studies revealed a reduced conversion of GA19 to GA20 in epi-BL-treated lkb plants. These results indicate that BRs actually negatively regulate GA20 levels in pea. Although GA20 levels are affected by BR levels, this does not result in consistent changes in the level of the bioactive GA, GA1. Therefore, even though a clear interaction exists between endogenous BR levels and the level of GA20, this interaction may not be biologically significant. In addition to the effect of BRs on GA levels, the effect of altered GA1 levels on endogenous BR levels was examined. There was no significant difference in BR levels between the GA mutants and the wild type (wt), indicating that altered GA1 levels have no effect on BR levels in pea. It appears that the BR growth response is not mediated by changes in bioactive GA levels, thus providing further evidence that BRs are important regulators of stem elongation. PMID:15605238

  7. Frs2α enhances fibroblast growth factor-mediated survival and differentiation in lens development

    PubMed Central

    Madakashira, Bhavani P.; Kobrinski, Daniel A.; Hancher, Andrew D.; Arneman, Elizabeth C.; Wagner, Brad D.; Wang, Fen; Shin, Hailey; Lovicu, Frank J.; Reneker, Lixing W.; Robinson, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Most growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) signal through similar intracellular pathways, but they often have divergent biological effects. Therefore, elucidating the mechanism of channeling the intracellular effect of RTK stimulation to facilitate specific biological responses represents a fundamental biological challenge. Lens epithelial cells express numerous RTKs with the ability to initiate the phosphorylation (activation) of Erk1/2 and PI3-K/Akt signaling. However, only Fgfr stimulation leads to lens fiber cell differentiation in the developing mammalian embryo. Additionally, within the lens, only Fgfrs activate the signal transduction molecule Frs2α. Loss of Frs2α in the lens significantly increases apoptosis and decreases phosphorylation of both Erk1/2 and Akt. Also, Frs2α deficiency decreases the expression of several proteins characteristic of lens fiber cell differentiation, including Prox1, p57KIP2, aquaporin 0 and β-crystallins. Although not normally expressed in the lens, the RTK TrkC phosphorylates Frs2α in response to binding the ligand NT3. Transgenic lens epithelial cells expressing both TrkC and NT3 exhibit several features characteristic of lens fiber cells. These include elongation, increased Erk1/2 and Akt phosphorylation, and the expression of β-crystallins. All these characteristics of NT3-TrkC transgenic lens epithelial cells depend on Frs2α. Therefore, tyrosine phosphorylation of Frs2α mediates Fgfr-dependent lens cell survival and provides a mechanistic basis for the unique fiber-differentiating capacity of Fgfs on mammalian lens epithelial cells. PMID:23136392

  8. Novel role of lactosylceramide in vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated angiogenesis in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Mohanraj; Kolmakova, Antonina; Chatterjee, Subroto

    2005-10-14

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated in angiogenesis associated with coronary heart disease, vascular complications in diabetes, inflammatory vascular diseases, and tumor metastasis. The mechanism of VEGF-driven angiogenesis involving glycosphingolipids such as lactosylceramide (LacCer), however, is not known. To demonstrate the involvement of LacCer in VEGF-induced angiogenesis, we used small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing of LacCer synthase expression (GalT-V) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. This gene silencing markedly inhibited VEGF-induced platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) expression and angiogenesis. Second, we used D-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (D-PDMP), an inhibitor of LacCer synthase and glucosylceramide synthase, that significantly mitigated VEGF-induced PECAM-1 expression and angiogenesis. Interestingly, these phenotypic changes were reversed by LacCer but not by structurally related compounds such as glucosylceramide, digalactosylceramide, and ceramide. In a human mesothelioma cell line (REN) that lacks the endogenous expression of PECAM-1, VEGF/LacCer failed to stimulate PECAM-1 expression and tube formation/angiogenesis. In REN cells expressing human PECAM-1 gene/protein, however, both VEGF and LacCer-induced PECAM-1 protein expression and tube formation/angiogenesis. In fact, VEGF-induced but not LacCer-induced angiogenesis was mitigated by SU-1498, a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Also, VEGF/LacCer-induced PECAM-1 expression and angiogenesis was mitigated by protein kinase C and phospholipase A2 inhibitors. These results indicate that LacCer generated in VEGF-treated endothelial cells may serve as an important signaling molecule for PECAM-1 expression and in angiogenesis. This finding and the reagents developed in our report may be useful as anti-angiogenic drugs for further studies in vitro and in vivo. PMID:16151023

  9. Neuroprotection by glial metabotropic glutamate receptors is mediated by transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Bruno, V; Battaglia, G; Casabona, G; Copani, A; Caciagli, F; Nicoletti, F

    1998-12-01

    The medium collected from cultured astrocytes transiently exposed to the group-II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor agonists (2S,1'R, 2'R,3'R)-2-(2,3-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG-IV) or (S)-4-carboxy-3-hydroxyphenylglycine (4C3HPG) is neuroprotective when transferred to mixed cortical cultures challenged with NMDA (). The following data indicate that this particular form of neuroprotection is mediated by transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta). (1) TGFbeta1 and -beta2 were highly neuroprotective against NMDA toxicity, and their action was less than additive with that produced by the medium collected from astrocytes treated with DCG-IV or 4C3HPG (GM/DCG-IV or GM/4C3HPG); (2) antibodies that specifically neutralized the actions of TGFbeta1 or -beta2 prevented the neuroprotective activity of DCG-IV or 4C3HPG, as well as the activity of GM/DCG-IV or GM/4C3HPG; and (3) a transient exposure of cultured astrocytes to either DCG-IV or 4C3HPG led to a delayed increase in both intracellular and extracellular levels of TGFbeta. We therefore conclude that a transient activation of group-II mGlu receptors (presumably mGlu3 receptors) in astrocytes leads to an increased formation and release of TGFbeta, which in turn protects neighbor neurons against excitotoxic death. These results offer a new strategy for increasing the local production of neuroprotective factors in the CNS. PMID:9822720

  10. Rapidly activated epidermal growth factor receptor mediates lipopolysaccharide-triggered migration of microglia.

    PubMed

    Qu, Wen-Sheng; Liu, Jun-Li; Li, Chun-Yu; Li, Xiao; Xie, Min-Jie; Wang, Wei; Tian, Dai-Shi

    2015-11-01

    Previous reports have suggested that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is involved in microglia activation characterized by cell morphology changes, cytokine production and cell migration; and the biochemical regulation of the microglia migration is a potential therapeutic target following CNS inflammatory damages. However, the role of EGFR in microglia motility after inflammatory stimulation remains unknown. In the present study, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was found to trigger rapid EGFR phosphorylation within 10 min, which was sustained during long-term stimulation in both primary microglial cells and the cultured BV2 microglial cells, furthermore, blocking EGFR phosphorylation by AG1478 significantly attenuated the LPS-induced chemotactic and chemokinetic migration of microglia. In addition, LPS could initiate calcium oscillation in microglia during live-cell recording, however, an intracellular calcium chelator and a selective inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, but not an extracellular calcium chelator, remarkably suppressed the LPS-induced EGFR phosphorylation in BV2 microglia cells. As EGFR is not a traditional receptor for LPS, these findings suggest that the rapid phosphorylation of EGFR is attributed to the LPS-triggered intracellular calcium mobilization. By examining the downstream signals of EGFR, we further proved that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is essential for EGFR-mediated microglia migration, because ERK inhibition attenuated the chemotactic and chemokinetic migration of microglia that had been induced by either LPS or EGF. Collectively, these results suggest that LPS could trigger the rapid phosphorylation of EGFR and subsequent ERK activation through mobilizing calcium activity, which underlies the microglia migration in an inflammatory condition.

  11. Attachment Styles and Personal Growth following Romantic Breakups: The Mediating Roles of Distress, Rumination, and Tendency to Rebound

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Tara C.; Bejanyan, Kathrine; Ferenczi, Nelli

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the associations of attachment anxiety and avoidance with personal growth following relationship dissolution, and to test breakup distress, rumination, and tendency to rebound with new partners as mediators of these associations. Study 1 (N = 411) and Study 2 (N = 465) measured attachment style, breakup distress, and personal growth; Study 2 additionally measured ruminative reflection, brooding, and proclivity to rebound with new partners. Structural equation modelling revealed in both studies that anxiety was indirectly associated with greater personal growth through heightened breakup distress, whereas avoidance was indirectly associated with lower personal growth through inhibited breakup distress. Study 2 further showed that the positive association of breakup distress with personal growth was accounted for by enhanced reflection and brooding, and that anxious individuals’ greater personal growth was also explained by their proclivity to rebound. These findings suggest that anxious individuals’ hyperactivated breakup distress may act as a catalyst for personal growth by promoting the cognitive processing of breakup-related thoughts and emotions, whereas avoidant individuals’ deactivated distress may inhibit personal growth by suppressing this cognitive work. PMID:24066169

  12. TIR1/AFB-Aux/IAA auxin perception mediates rapid cell wall acidification and growth of Arabidopsis hypocotyls

    PubMed Central

    Fendrych, Matyáš; Leung, Jeffrey; Friml, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Despite being composed of immobile cells, plants reorient along directional stimuli. The hormone auxin is redistributed in stimulated organs leading to differential growth and bending. Auxin application triggers rapid cell wall acidification and elongation of aerial organs of plants, but the molecular players mediating these effects are still controversial. Here we use genetically-encoded pH and auxin signaling sensors, pharmacological and genetic manipulations available for Arabidopsis etiolated hypocotyls to clarify how auxin is perceived and the downstream growth executed. We show that auxin-induced acidification occurs by local activation of H+-ATPases, which in the context of gravity response is restricted to the lower organ side. This auxin-stimulated acidification and growth require TIR1/AFB-Aux/IAA nuclear auxin perception. In addition, auxin-induced gene transcription and specifically SAUR proteins are crucial downstream mediators of this growth. Our study provides strong experimental support for the acid growth theory and clarified the contribution of the upstream auxin perception mechanisms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19048.001 PMID:27627746

  13. Omics of Brucella: Species-Specific sRNA-Mediated Gene Ontology Regulatory Networks Identified by Computational Biology.

    PubMed

    Vishnu, Udayakumar S; Sankarasubramanian, Jagadesan; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Sridhar, Jayavel; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2016-06-01

    Brucella is an intracellular bacterium that causes the zoonotic infectious disease, brucellosis. Brucella species are currently intensively studied with a view to developing novel global health diagnostics and therapeutics. In this context, small RNAs (sRNAs) are one of the emerging topical areas; they play significant roles in regulating gene expression and cellular processes in bacteria. In the present study, we forecast sRNAs in three Brucella species that infect humans, namely Brucella melitensis, Brucella abortus, and Brucella suis, using a computational biology analysis. We combined two bioinformatic algorithms, SIPHT and sRNAscanner. In B. melitensis 16M, 21 sRNA candidates were identified, of which 14 were novel. Similarly, 14 sRNAs were identified in B. abortus, of which four were novel. In B. suis, 16 sRNAs were identified, and five of them were novel. TargetRNA2 software predicted the putative target genes that could be regulated by the identified sRNAs. The identified mRNA targets are involved in carbohydrate, amino acid, lipid, nucleotide, and coenzyme metabolism and transport, energy production and conversion, replication, recombination, repair, and transcription. Additionally, the Gene Ontology (GO) network analysis revealed the species-specific, sRNA-based regulatory networks in B. melitensis, B. abortus, and B. suis. Taken together, although sRNAs are veritable modulators of gene expression in prokaryotes, there are few reports on the significance of sRNAs in Brucella. This report begins to address this literature gap by offering a series of initial observations based on computational biology to pave the way for future experimental analysis of sRNAs and their targets to explain the complex pathogenesis of Brucella.

  14. INTERRUPTION OF DENDRITIC CELL-MEDIATED TIM-4 SIGNALING INDUCES REGULATORY T CELLS AND PROMOTES SKIN ALLOGRAFT SURVIVAL

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Melissa Y.; McGrath, Martina M.; Nakayama, Masafumi; Shimizu, Tetsunosuke; Boenisch, Olaf; Magee, Ciara N.; Abdoli, Rozita; Akiba, Hisaya; Ueno, Takuya; Turka, Laurence A.; Najafian, Nader

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the central architects of the immune response, inducing inflammatory or tolerogenic immunity, dependent upon their activation status. As such, DCs are highly attractive therapeutic targets and may hold the potential to control detrimental immune responses. TIM-4, expressed on antigen presenting cells, has complex functions in vivo, acting both as a costimulatory molecule and a phosphatidylserine (PS) receptor. The effect of TIM-4 costimulation on T cell activation remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that antibody blockade of DC-expressed TIM-4 leads to increased induction of iTregs from naïve CD4+ T cells, both in vitro and in vivo. iTreg induction occurs through suppression of IL-4/STAT6/Gata3 induced Th2 differentiation. In addition, blockade of TIM-4 on previously activated DCs still leads to increased iTreg induction. iTregs induced under TIM-4 blockade have equivalent potency to control and upon adoptive transfer, significantly prolong skin allograft survival in vivo. In RAG−/− recipients of skin allografts adoptively transferred with CD4+ T cells, we show that TIM-4 blockade in vivo is associated with a three-fold prolongation in allograft survival. Furthermore, in this mouse model of skin transplantation, increased induction of allospecific iTregs and a reduction in T effector responses were observed, with decreased Th1 and Th2 responses. This enhanced allograft survival and pro-tolerogenic skewing of the alloresponse is critically dependent upon conversion of naïve CD4+ to Tregs in vivo. Collectively, these studies identify blockade of DC-expressed TIM-4 as a novel strategy which holds the capacity to induce regulatory immunity in vivo. PMID:24038092

  15. Vpu Mediates Depletion of Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 during HIV Infection by a Lysosome-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Doehle, Brian P.; Chang, Kristina; Rustagi, Arjun; McNevin, John; McElrath, M. Juliana

    2012-01-01

    HIV has evolved sophisticated mechanisms to avoid restriction by intracellular innate immune defenses that otherwise serve to control acute viral infection and virus dissemination. Innate defenses are triggered when pattern recognition receptor (PRR) proteins of the host cell engage pathogen-associated molecule patterns (PAMPs) present in viral products. Interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) plays a central role in PRR signaling of innate immunity to drive the expression of type I interferon (IFN) and interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), including a variety of HIV restriction factors, that serve to limit viral replication directly and/or program adaptive immunity. Productive infection of T cells by HIV is dependent upon the targeted proteolysis of IRF3 that occurs through a virus-directed mechanism that results in suppression of innate immune defenses. However, the mechanisms by which HIV controls innate immune signaling and IRF3 function are not defined. Here, we examined the innate immune response induced by HIV strains identified through their differential control of PRR signaling. We identified viruses that, unlike typical circulating HIV strains, lack the ability to degrade IRF3. Our studies show that IRF3 regulation maps specifically to the HIV accessory protein Vpu. We define a molecular interaction between Vpu and IRF3 that redirects IRF3 to the endolysosome for proteolytic degradation, thus allowing HIV to avoid the innate antiviral immune response. Our studies reveal that Vpu is an important IRF3 regulator that supports acute HIV infection through innate immune suppression. These observations define the Vpu-IRF3 interface as a novel target for therapeutic strategies aimed at enhancing the immune response to HIV. PMID:22593165

  16. Vpu mediates depletion of interferon regulatory factor 3 during HIV infection by a lysosome-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Doehle, Brian P; Chang, Kristina; Rustagi, Arjun; McNevin, John; McElrath, M Juliana; Gale, Michael

    2012-08-01

    HIV has evolved sophisticated mechanisms to avoid restriction by intracellular innate immune defenses that otherwise serve to control acute viral infection and virus dissemination. Innate defenses are triggered when pattern recognition receptor (PRR) proteins of the host cell engage pathogen-associated molecule patterns (PAMPs) present in viral products. Interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) plays a central role in PRR signaling of innate immunity to drive the expression of type I interferon (IFN) and interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), including a variety of HIV restriction factors, that serve to limit viral replication directly and/or program adaptive immunity. Productive infection of T cells by HIV is dependent upon the targeted proteolysis of IRF3 that occurs through a virus-directed mechanism that results in suppression of innate immune defenses. However, the mechanisms by which HIV controls innate immune signaling and IRF3 function are not defined. Here, we examined the innate immune response induced by HIV strains identified through their differential control of PRR signaling. We identified viruses that, unlike typical circulating HIV strains, lack the ability to degrade IRF3. Our studies show that IRF3 regulation maps specifically to the HIV accessory protein Vpu. We define a molecular interaction between Vpu and IRF3 that redirects IRF3 to the endolysosome for proteolytic degradation, thus allowing HIV to avoid the innate antiviral immune response. Our studies reveal that Vpu is an important IRF3 regulator that supports acute HIV infection through innate immune suppression. These observations define the Vpu-IRF3 interface as a novel target for therapeutic strategies aimed at enhancing the immune response to HIV.

  17. Kinetic and Motor Functions Mediated by Distinct Regions of the Regulatory Light Chain of Smooth Muscle Myosin1,2

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Shaowei; Hong, Feng; Brewer, Paul D.; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Onishi, Hirofumi; Baker, Jonathan E.; Facemyer, Kevin C.; Cremo, Christine R.

    2009-01-01

    To understand the importance of selected regions of the regulatory light chain (RLC) for phosphorylation-dependent regulation of smooth muscle myosin (SMM), we expressed three heavy meromyosins (HMMs) containing the following RLC mutants; K12E in a critical region of the phosphorylation domain, GTDP95-98/AAAA in the central hinge, and R160C a putative binding residue for phosphorylated S19. Single-turnover actin-activated Mg2+-ATPase (Vmax and Katpase) and in vitro actin sliding velocities were examined for both unphosphorylated (up-) and phosphorylated (p-) states. Turnover rates for the upstate (0.007-0.030 s-1) and velocities (no motion) for all constructs were not significantly different from the up-wild type (WT) indicating that they were completely turned off. The apparent binding constants for actin in the presence of ATP (Katpase) were too weak to measure as expected for fully regulated constructs. For p-HMM containing GTDP/AAAA, we found that both ATPase and motility were normal. The data suggest that the native sequence in the central hinge between the two lobes of the RLC is not required for turning the HMM off and on both kinetically and mechanically. For p-HMM containing R160C, all parameters were normal, suggesting that R160C is not involved in coordination of the phosphorylated S19. For p-HMM containing K12E, the Vmax was 64% and actin sliding velocity was ∼50% of WT, suggesting that K12 is an important residue for the ability to sense or to promote the conformational changes required for kinetic and mechanical activation. PMID:19635597

  18. Regulation of Calcium-Independent Phospholipase A2 Expression by Adrenoceptors and Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein-Potential Crosstalk Between Sterol and Glycerophospholipid Mediators.

    PubMed

    Chew, Wee-Siong; Ong, Wei-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2) is an 85-kDa enzyme that releases docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from glycerophospholipids. DHA can be metabolized to resolvins and neuroprotectins that have anti-inflammatory properties and effects on neural plasticity. Recent studies show an important role of prefrontal cortical iPLA2 in hippocampo-prefrontal cortical LTP and antidepressant-like effect of the norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (NRI) antidepressant, maprotiline. In this study, we elucidated the cellular mechanisms through which stimulation of adrenergic receptors could lead to increased iPLA2 expression. Treatment of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with maprotiline, another tricyclic antidepressant with noradrenaline reuptake inhibiting properties, nortriptyline, and the adrenergic receptor agonist, phenylephrine, resulted in increased iPLA2β mRNA expression. This increase was blocked by inhibitors to alpha-1 adrenergic receptor, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, and sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP). Maprotiline and phenylephrine induced binding of SREBP-2 to sterol regulatory element (SRE) region on the iPLA2 promoter, as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Together, results indicate that stimulation of adrenoreceptors causes increased iPLA2 expression via MAP kinase/ERK 1/2 and SREBP, and suggest a possible mechanism for effect of CNS noradrenaline on neural plasticity and crosstalk between sterol and glycerophospholipid mediators, that may play a role in physiological or pathophysiological processes in the brain and other organs.

  19. A Case for Regulatory B Cells in Controlling the Severity of Autoimmune-Mediated Inflammation in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis and Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Avijit; Mann, Monica K.; Basu, Sreemanti; Dittel, Bonnie N.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is considered to be a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease that results in the presence of inflammatory lesions/plaques associated with mononuclear cell infiltrates, demyelination and axonal damage within the central nervous system (CNS). To date, FDA approved therapies in MS are thought to largely function by modulation of the immune response. Since autoimmune responses require many arms of the immune system, the direct cellular mechanisms of action of MS therapeutics are not definitively known. The mouse model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), has been instrumental in deciphering the mechanism of action of MS drugs. In addition, EAE has been widely used to study the contribution of individual components of the immune system in CNS autoimmunity. In this regard, the role of B cells in EAE has been studied in mice deficient in B cells due to genetic ablation and following depletion with a B cell-targeted monoclonal antibody (mAb) (anti-CD20). Both strategies have indicated that B cells regulate the extent of EAE clinical disease and in their absence disease is exacerbated. Thus a new population of “regulatory B cells” has emerged. One reoccurring component of regulatory B cell function is the production of IL-10, a pleiotropic cytokine with potent anti-inflammatory properties. B cell depletion has also indicated that B cells, in particular antibody production, play a pathogenic role in EAE. B cell depletion in MS using a mAb to CD20 (rituximab) has shown promising results. In this review, we will discuss the current thinking on the role of B cells in MS drawing from knowledge gained in EAE studies and clinical trials using therapeutics that target B cells. PMID:21145597

  20. Metabolic and regulatory engineering of Serratia marcescens: mimicking phage-mediated horizontal acquisition of antibiotic biosynthesis and quorum-sensing capacities.

    PubMed

    Coulthurst, Sarah J; Williamson, Neil R; Harris, Abigail K P; Spring, David R; Salmond, George P C

    2006-07-01

    Serratia marcescens is an important cause of opportunistic human infections. Many, but not all, strains produce prodigiosin, a secondary metabolic, red-pigment antibiotic, the biosynthesis of which is directed by the pig gene cluster. Quorum sensing (QS) involves the production and detection of chemical signal molecules as a means to regulate gene expression in response to population cell density. Several strains of S. marcescens have previously been shown to possess an N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone (aHSL) QS system. This study aimed to determine the impact of introducing, by phage-mediated horizontal gene transfer, a biosynthetic gene cluster (pig) and a regulatory locus (aHSL QS) into strains lacking the respective trait. The pig cluster from S. marcescens ATCC 274 (Sma 274) was transferred to the non-pigmented strain, S. marcescens strain 12 (Sma 12). In the engineered strain, pigment was expressed and brought under the control of the recipient's native regulatory systems (aHSL QS and luxS). Moreover, transfer of the aHSL locus from Sma 12 to the non-QS Sma 274 resulted in the imposition of aHSL control onto a variety of native traits, including pigment production. In addition, during this study, the QS regulon of the clinical strain, Sma 12, was characterized, and some novel QS-regulated traits in S. marcescens were identified. The results have implications for the evolution and dissemination of biosynthetic and QS loci, illustrating the genetic modularity and ease of acquisition of these traits and the capacity of phages to act as vectors for horizontal gene transfer.

  1. Integrin α5/β1 Mediates Fibronectin-dependent Epithelial Cell Proliferation through Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kuwada, Scott K.; Li, Xiufen

    2000-01-01

    Human integrin α5 was transfected into the integrin α5/β1–negative intestinal epithelial cell line Caco-2 to study EGF receptor (EGFR) and integrin α5/β1 signaling interactions involved in epithelial cell proliferation. On uncoated or fibronectin-coated plastic, the integrin α5 and control (vector only) transfectants grew at similar rates. In the presence of the EGFR antagonistic mAb 225, the integrin α5 transfectants and controls were significantly growth inhibited on plastic. However, when cultured on fibronectin, the integrin α5 transfectants were not growth inhibited by mAb 225. The reversal of mAb 225–mediated growth inhibition on fibronectin for the integrin α5 transfectants correlated with activation of the EGFR, activation of MAPK, and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. EGFR kinase activity was necessary for both MAPK activation and integrin α5/β1–mediated cell proliferation. Although EGFR activation occurred when either the integrin α5–transfected or control cells were cultured on fibronectin, coprecipitation of the EGFR with SHC could be demonstrated only in the integrin α5–transfected cells. These results suggest that integrin α5/β1 mediates fibronectin-induced epithelial cell proliferation through activation of the EGFR. PMID:10888683

  2. Retinoic acid receptor alpha mediates growth inhibition by retinoids in rat pancreatic carcinoma DSL-6A/C1 cells.

    PubMed

    Brembeck, F H; Kaiser, A; Detjen, K; Hotz, H; Foitzik, T; Buhr, H J; Riecken, E O; Rosewicz, S

    1998-11-01

    During carcinogenesis, pancreatic acinar cells can dedifferentiate into ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. DSL-6A/C1 cells represent an in vitro model of this carcinogenic sequence. This study was designed to examine the effects of retinoids on cell growth in DSL-6A/C1 cells and to characterize further the molecular mechanisms underlying the antiproliferative actions of retinoids. Treatment of DSL-6A/C1 cells with retinoids results in a time- and dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth, paralleled by a retinoid-mediated transactivation of a pTK::betaRAREx2-luciferase reporter construct transiently transfected into DSL-6A/C1 cells. Retinoid receptor expression was evaluated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using subtype-specific primers and demonstrated expression of retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR-alpha), RAR-beta and retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR-alpha). Using a panel of receptor subtype-specific agonists, the RAR-alpha specific agonist Ro 40-6055 was the most potent retinoid in terms of growth inhibition. Furthermore, all-trans-retinoic acid-mediated growth inhibition and transactivation was completely blocked by the RAR-alpha-specific antagonist Ro 41-5253. In summary, the RAR-alpha subtype predominantly mediates the antiproliferative effects of retinoids in DSL-6A/C1 cells. Furthermore, this cell system provides a feasible tool to study the molecular mechanisms underlying the growth inhibitory effects of retinoids in ductal pancreatic carcinoma cells derived from a primary acinar cell phenotype.

  3. Growth factors and cardiovascular structure. Implications for calcium antagonist therapy.

    PubMed

    Re, R N; Chen, L

    1991-07-01

    Abnormalities of cellular growth regulation are integral to the development of cardiovascular disorders such as atherogenesis, ventricular hypertrophy, and diabetic glomerulopathy. Moreover, cellular growth is in large measure controlled by peptide and nonpeptide growth factors that mediate their actions, in part, through the transcriptional regulation of normal cellular genes called protooncogenes. Because angiotensin II is one such growth regulatory factor and because changes in intracellular calcium are intimately involved in the action of angiotensin and other growth factors, it is likely that inhibitors of angiotensin action and calcium-channel-blocking agents will be found to have useful growth regulatory properties. PMID:1910639

  4. Mitogen-Inducible Gene-6 Mediates Feedback Inhibition from Mutated BRAF towards the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Thereby Limits Malignant Transformation.

    PubMed

    Milewska, Malgorzata; Romano, David; Herrero, Ana; Guerriero, Maria Luisa; Birtwistle, Marc; Quehenberger, Franz; Hatzl, Stefan; Kholodenko, Boris N; Segatto, Oreste; Kolch, Walter; Zebisch, Armin

    2015-01-01

    BRAF functions in the RAS-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling cascade. Activation of this pathway is necessary to mediate the transforming potential of oncogenic BRAF, however, it may also cause a negative feedback that inhibits the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Mitogen-inducible gene-6 (MIG-6) is a potent inhibitor of the EGFR and has been demonstrated to function as a tumor suppressor. As MIG-6 can be induced via RAS-ERK signaling, we investigated its potential involvement in this negative regulatory loop. Focus formation assays were performed and demonstrated that MIG-6 significantly reduces malignant transformation induced by oncogenic BRAF. Although this genetic interaction was mirrored by a physical interaction between MIG-6 and BRAF, we did not observe a direct regulation of BRAF kinase activity by MIG-6. Interestingly, a selective chemical EGFR inhibitor suppressed transformation to a similar degree as MIG-6, whereas combining these approaches had no synergistic effect. By analyzing a range of BRAF mutated and wildtype cell line models, we could show that BRAF V600E causes a strong upregulation of MIG-6, which was mediated at the transcriptional level via the RAS-ERK pathway and resulted in downregulation of EGFR activation. This feedback loop is operational in tumors, as shown by the analysis of almost 400 patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Presence of BRAF V600E correlated with increased MIG-6 expression on the one hand, and with inactivation of the EGFR and of PI3K/AKT signaling on the other hand. Importantly, we also observed a more aggressive disease phenotype when BRAF V600E coexisted with low MIG-6 expression. Finally, analysis of methylation data was performed and revealed that higher methylation of MIG-6 correlated to its decreased expression. Taken together, we demonstrate that MIG-6 efficiently reduces cellular transformation driven by oncogenic BRAF by orchestrating a negative feedback circuit directed

  5. Impaired muscle growth and response to insulin-like growth factor 1 in dysferlin-mediated muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Demonbreun, Alexis R.; Fahrenbach, John P.; Deveaux, Kieran; Earley, Judy U.; Pytel, Peter; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in dysferlin cause muscular dystrophy, and dysferlin has been implicated in resealing membrane disruption in myofibers. Given the importance of membrane fusion in many aspects of muscle function, we studied the role of dysferlin in muscle growth. We found that dysferlin null myoblasts have a defect in myoblast–myotube fusion, resulting in smaller myotubes in culture. In vivo, dysferlin null muscle was found to have mislocalized nuclei and vacuolation. We found that myoblasts isolated from dysferlin null mice accumulate enlarged, lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP2)-positive lysosomes. Dysferlin null myoblasts accumulate transferrin-488, reflecting abnormal vesicular trafficking. Additionally, dysferlin null myoblasts display abnormal trafficking of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) receptor, where the receptor is shuttled to LAMP2-positive lyososomes. We studied growth, in vivo, by infusing mice with the growth stimulant IGF1. Control IGF1-treated mice increased myofiber diameter by 30% as expected, whereas dysferlin null muscles had no response to IGF1, indicating a defect in myofiber growth. We also noted that dysferlin null fibroblasts also accumulate acidic vesicles, IGF receptor and transferrin, indicating that dysferlin is important for nonmuscle vesicular trafficking. These data implicate dysferlin in multiple membrane fusion events within the cell and suggest multiple pathways by which loss of dysferlin contributes to muscle disease. PMID:21127009

  6. Impaired muscle growth and response to insulin-like growth factor 1 in dysferlin-mediated muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Demonbreun, Alexis R; Fahrenbach, John P; Deveaux, Kieran; Earley, Judy U; Pytel, Peter; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2011-02-15

    Loss-of-function mutations in dysferlin cause muscular dystrophy, and dysferlin has been implicated in resealing membrane disruption in myofibers. Given the importance of membrane fusion in many aspects of muscle function, we studied the role of dysferlin in muscle growth. We found that dysferlin null myoblasts have a defect in myoblast-myotube fusion, resulting in smaller myotubes in culture. In vivo, dysferlin null muscle was found to have mislocalized nuclei and vacuolation. We found that myoblasts isolated from dysferlin null mice accumulate enlarged, lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP2)-positive lysosomes. Dysferlin null myoblasts accumulate transferrin-488, reflecting abnormal vesicular trafficking. Additionally, dysferlin null myoblasts display abnormal trafficking of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) receptor, where the receptor is shuttled to LAMP2-positive lysosomes. We studied growth, in vivo, by infusing mice with the growth stimulant IGF1. Control IGF1-treated mice increased myofiber diameter by 30% as expected, whereas dysferlin null muscles had no response to IGF1, indicating a defect in myofiber growth. We also noted that dysferlin null fibroblasts also accumulate acidic vesicles, IGF receptor and transferrin, indicating that dysferlin is important for nonmuscle vesicular trafficking. These data implicate dysferlin in multiple membrane fusion events within the cell and suggest multiple pathways by which loss of dysferlin contributes to muscle disease.

  7. Manumycin A inhibits triple-negative breast cancer growth through LC3-mediated cytoplasmic vacuolation death.

    PubMed

    Singha, P K; Pandeswara, S; Venkatachalam, M A; Saikumar, P

    2013-01-17

    Therapy resistance can be attributed to acquisition of anti-apoptotic mechanisms by the cancer cells. Therefore, developing approaches that trigger non-apoptotic cell death in cancer cells to compensate for apoptosis resistance will help to treat cancer effectively. Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are among the most aggressive and therapy resistant to breast tumors. Here we report that manumycin A (Man A), an inhibitor of farnesyl protein transferase, reduces cancer cell viability through induction of non-apoptotic, non-autophagic cytoplasmic vacuolation death in TNBC cells. Man A persistently induced cytoplasmic vacuolation and cell death through the expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) and p62 proteins along with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers, Bip and CHOP, and accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins. As inhibitors of apoptosis and autophagy failed to block cytoplasmic vacuolation and its associated protein expression or cell death, it appears that these processes are not involved in the death induced by Man A. Ability of thiol antioxidant, NAC in blocking Man A-induced vacuolation, death and its related protein expression suggests that sulfhydryl homeostasis may be the target of Man A. Surprisingly, normal human mammary epithelial cells failed to undergo cytoplasmic vacuolation and cell death, and grew normally in presence of Man A. In conjunction with its in vitro effects, Man A also reduced tumor burden in vivo in xenograft models that showed extensive cytoplasmic vacuoles and condensed nuclei with remarkable increase in the vacuolation-associated protein expression together with increase of p21, p27, PTEN and decrease of pAkt. Interestingly, Man A-mediated upregulation of p21, p27 and PTEN and downregulation of pAkt and tumor growth suppression were also mimicked by LC3 knockdown in MDA-MB-231 cells. Overall, these results suggest novel therapeutic actions by Man A through the induction of non-apoptotic and non

  8. Insulin-like growth factor factor binding protein-2 is a novel mediator of p53 inhibition of insulin-like growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Grimberg, Adda; Coleman, Carrie M; Shi, Zonggao; Burns, Timothy F; MacLachlan, Timothy K; Wang, Wenge; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2006-10-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor induces cellular growth arrest and apoptosis in response to DNA damage by transcriptionally activating or repressing target genes and also through protein-protein interactions and direct mitochondrial activities. In 1995, insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-3 was identified as one of the genes transcriptionally activated by p53. IGFBP-3 is one of six closely related IGFBP's, with additional IGFBP-related proteins belonging to the IGFBP superfamily. Here we show that IGFBP-2 is also a p53 target. Like IGFBP-3, IGFBP-2 secretion is reduced when p53+/+ lung cancer cells are transfected with human papillomavirus E6, which targets p53 for degradation. IGFBP-2 mRNA is induced by irradiation in vivo in a p53-dependent manner. p53 protein binds IGFBP-2 intronic sequences in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and activates transcription in a luciferase assay. Loss of IGFBP-2 inhibits the ability of p53 to inhibit the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1 by IGF-I. Thus, p53 effects on the IGF axis are more complex than previously appreciated, and overall transform the axis from IGF-mediated mitogenesis to growth inhibition and apoptosis. This has significant implications for how growth hormone and IGF-I can induce growth without also inducing cancer.

  9. Vancomycin susceptibility in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is mediated by YycHI activation of the WalRK essential two-component regulatory system

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, David R.; Jiang, Jhih-Hang; Kostoulias, Xenia; Foxwell, Daniel J.; Peleg, Anton Y.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is complicated by the emergence of strains with intermediate-level resistance to vancomycin (termed VISA). We have characterised a molecular pathway involved in the in vivo evolution of VISA mediated by the regulatory proteins YycH and YycI. In contrast to their function in other bacterial species, we report a positive role for these auxiliary proteins in regulation of the two-component regulator WalRK. Transcriptional profiling of yycH and yycI deletion mutants revealed downregulation of the ‘WalRK regulon’ including cell wall hydrolase genes atlA and sle1, with functional autolysis assays supporting these data by showing an impaired autolytic phenotype for each deletion strain. Using bacterial-two hybrid assays, we showed that YycH and YycI interact, and that YycHI also interacts with the sensor kinase WalK, forming a ternary protein complex. Mutation to YycH or YycI associated with clinical VISA strains had a deleterious impact on the YycHI/WalK complex, suggesting that the interaction is important for the regulation of WalRK. Taken together, we have described a novel antibiotic resistance strategy for the human pathogen S. aureus, whereby YycHI mutations are selected for in vivo leading to reduced WalRK activation, impaired cell wall turnover and ultimately reduced vancomycin efficacy. PMID:27600558

  10. Anti-inflammatory/regulatory cytokine microenvironment mediated by IL-4 and IL-10 coordinates the immune response in hemophilia A patients infected chronically with hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, João Paulo; Chaves, Daniel Gonçalves; Araújo, Ana Ruth Silva; de Araújo, Erbênia Maria Martins; da Silva Fraporti, Liziara; Neves, Walter Luiz Lima; Tarragô, Andrea Monteiro; Torres, Katia Luz; Gentz, Solange Henschke Lima; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Malheiro, Adriana

    2013-06-01

    In the past decades patients with hemophilia were infected commonly by hepatitis C virus (HCV) and a significant number of patients are infected chronically. Focusing on the role of the immune system for controlling and or maintaining HCV infection, the leukocyte and cytokine profiles of peripheral blood from hemophilia A patients and other patients with and without HCV infection were studied. The results demonstrated that hemophilia A is characterized by a general state of circulating leukocytes activation along with an overall increase in the frequency of IL-6 and IL-10 with decrease of IL-8 and IL-12. HCV infection of patients with hemophilia A does not influence further the activation state of circulating leukocytes but is accompanied by lower levels of alanine transaminase (ALT) and a prominent anti-inflammatory/regulatory serum cytokine pattern, mediated by IL-4 and IL-10. Additionally, the results demonstrated that hemophilia A patients infected with HCV displaying No/Low antibody response to C33c and C22 have significant lower viral load and higher serum levels of IL-12 and IL-4. This finding suggests that the differential RIBA reactivity to C33c/C22 HCV core proteins may have a putative value as a prognostic biomarker for the infection in hemophilia A patients.

  11. IDO and regulatory T cell support are critical for cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated Ag-4 Ig-mediated long-term solid organ allograft survival.

    PubMed

    Sucher, Robert; Fischler, Klaus; Oberhuber, Rupert; Kronberger, Irmgard; Margreiter, Christian; Ollinger, Robert; Schneeberger, Stefan; Fuchs, Dietmar; Werner, Ernst R; Watschinger, Katrin; Zelger, Bettina; Tellides, George; Pilat, Nina; Pratschke, Johann; Margreiter, Raimund; Wekerle, Thomas; Brandacher, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    Costimulatory blockade of CD28-B7 interaction with CTLA4Ig is a well-established strategy to induce transplantation tolerance. Although previous in vitro studies suggest that CTLA4Ig upregulates expression of the immunoregulatory enzyme IDO in dendritic cells, the relationship of CTLA4Ig and IDO in in vivo organ transplantation remains unclear. In this study, we studied whether concerted immunomodulation in vivo by CTLA4Ig depends on IDO. C57BL/6 recipients receiving a fully MHC-mismatched BALB/c heart graft treated with CTLA4Ig + donor-specific transfusion showed indefinite graft survival (>100 d) without signs of chronic rejection or donor specific Ab formation. Recipients with long-term surviving grafts had significantly higher systemic IDO activity as compared with rejectors, which markedly correlated with intragraft IDO and Foxp3 levels. IDO inhibition with 1-methyl-dl-tryptophan, either at transplant or at postoperative day 50, abrogated CTLA4Ig + DST-induced long-term graft survival. Importantly, IDO1 knockout recipients experienced acute rejection and graft survival comparable to controls. In addition, αCD25 mAb-mediated depletion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) resulted in decreased IDO activity and again prevented CTLA4Ig + DST induced indefinite graft survival. Our results suggest that CTLA4Ig-induced tolerance to murine cardiac allografts is critically dependent on synergistic cross-linked interplay of IDO and Tregs. These results have important implications for the clinical development of this costimulatory blocker.

  12. Activation and repression of transcription at two different phage phi29 promoters are mediated by interaction of the same residues of regulatory protein p4 with RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Monsalve, M; Mencia, M; Rojo, F; Salas, M

    1996-01-01

    Phage phi29 regulatory protein p4 activates transcription from the late A3 promoter and represses the main early promoters, named A2b and A2c. Activation involves stabilization of RNA polymerase (RNAP) at the A3 promoter as a closed complex and is mediated by interaction between RNAP and a small domain of protein p4 in which residue Arg120 plays an essential role. We show that protein p4 represses the A2c promoter by binding to DNA immediately upstream from RNAP in a way that does not hinder RNAP binding; rather, the two proteins bind cooperatively to DNA. In the presence of protein p4, RNAP can form an initiated complex at the A2c promoter that generates short abortive transcripts, but cannot leave the promoter. Mutation of protein p4 residue Arg120, which relieves the contact between the two proteins, leads to a loss of repression. Therefore, the contact between protein p4 and RNAP through the protein p4 domain containing Arg120 can activate or repress transcription, depending on the promoter. The relative position of protein p4 and RNAP, which is different at each promoter, together with the distinct characteristics of the two promoters, may determine whether protein p4 activates or represses transcription. Images PMID:8617213

  13. Vancomycin susceptibility in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is mediated by YycHI activation of the WalRK essential two-component regulatory system.

    PubMed

    Cameron, David R; Jiang, Jhih-Hang; Kostoulias, Xenia; Foxwell, Daniel J; Peleg, Anton Y

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is complicated by the emergence of strains with intermediate-level resistance to vancomycin (termed VISA). We have characterised a molecular pathway involved in the in vivo evolution of VISA mediated by the regulatory proteins YycH and YycI. In contrast to their function in other bacterial species, we report a positive role for these auxiliary proteins in regulation of the two-component regulator WalRK. Transcriptional profiling of yycH and yycI deletion mutants revealed downregulation of the 'WalRK regulon' including cell wall hydrolase genes atlA and sle1, with functional autolysis assays supporting these data by showing an impaired autolytic phenotype for each deletion strain. Using bacterial-two hybrid assays, we showed that YycH and YycI interact, and that YycHI also interacts with the sensor kinase WalK, forming a ternary protein complex. Mutation to YycH or YycI associated with clinical VISA strains had a deleterious impact on the YycHI/WalK complex, suggesting that the interaction is important for the regulation of WalRK. Taken together, we have described a novel antibiotic resistance strategy for the human pathogen S. aureus, whereby YycHI mutations are selected for in vivo leading to reduced WalRK activation, impaired cell wall turnover and ultimately reduced vancomycin efficacy. PMID:27600558

  14. CD4+ T Cell Tolerance to Tissue-Restricted Self Antigens Is Mediated by Antigen-Specific Regulatory T Cells Rather Than Deletion.

    PubMed

    Legoux, Francois P; Lim, Jong-Baeck; Cauley, Andrew W; Dikiy, Stanislav; Ertelt, James; Mariani, Thomas J; Sparwasser, Tim; Way, Sing Sing; Moon, James J

    2015-11-17

    Deletion of self-antigen-specific T cells during thymic development provides protection from autoimmunity. However, it is unclear how efficiently this occurs for tissue-restricted self antigens, or how immune tolerance is maintained for self-antigen-specific T cells that routinely escape deletion. Here we show that endogenous CD4+ T cells with specificity for a set of tissue-restricted self antigens were not deleted at all. For pancreatic self antigen, this resulted in an absence of steady-state tolerance, while for the lung and intestine, tolerance was maintained by the enhanced presence of thymically-derived antigen-specific Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells. Unlike deletional tolerance, Treg cell-mediated tolerance was broken by successive antigen challenges. These findings reveal that for some tissue-restricted self antigens, tolerance relies entirely on nondeletional mechanisms that are less durable than T cell deletion. This might explain why autoimmunity is often tissue-specific, and it offers a rationale for cancer vaccine strategies targeting tissue-restricted tumor antigens.

  15. The Regulatory Role of Rolipram on Inflammatory Mediators and Cholinergic/Adrenergic Stimulation-Induced Signals in Isolated Primary Mouse Submandibular Gland Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Un; Shin, Dong Min; Hong, Jeong Hee

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) induces inflammatory signals in salivary glands. We investigated the regulatory role of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor rolipram on inflammatory mediators and cholinergic/adrenergic stimulation-induced intracellular Ca2+ signaling in salivary acinar and ductal cells. Submandibular gland (SMG) expressed PDE4A through 4D mRNA and PDE4 was localized in the luminal membrane of SMG. LPS induced Ca2+ signaling and ROS production in SMG. Treatment with rolipram blocked LPS-induced Ca2+ increase and ROS production. The application of histamine evoked Ca2+ signals and ROS production, which were attenuated by rolipram in SMG cells. Moreover, LPS-induced NLRP3 inflammasome and cleaved caspase-1 were inhibited by rolipram. The inhibitory role of rolipram in ROS-induced Ca2+ signaling was mainly observed in acinar cells and not in ductal cells. Rolipram also protected SMG acinar but not ductal cells from LPS-induced cell membrane damage. In the case of cholinergic/adrenergic stimulation, carbachol/isoproterenol-induced Ca2+ signals were upregulated by the treatment of rolipram in SMG. In the case of cAMP-dependent ductal bicarbonate secretion by rolipram, no effect was observed on the modulation of ductal chloride/bicarbonate exchange activity. Rolipram could suppress the inflammatory signals and could be a potential therapeutic strategy against LPS-induced inflammation to protect the salivary gland cells. PMID:27143817

  16. Inhibition of miR301 enhances Akt-mediated cell proliferation by accumulation of PTEN in nucleus and its effects on cell-cycle regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Mayur V.; Shareef, Ahmad; Likus, Wirginia; Cieślar-Pobuda, Artur; Ghavami, Saeid; Łos, Marek J.

    2016-01-01

    Micro-RNAs (miRs) represent an innovative class of genes that act as regulators of gene expression. Recently, the aberrant expression of several miRs has been associated with different types of cancers. In this study, we show that miR301 inhibition influences PI3K-Akt pathway activity. Akt overexpression in MCF7 and MDAMB468 cells caused downregulation of miR301 expression. This effect was confirmed by co-transfection of miR301-modulators in the presence of Akt. Cells overexpressing miR301-inhibitor and Akt, exhibited increased migration and proliferation. Experimental results also confirmed PI3K, PTEN and FoxF2 as regulatory targets for miR301. Furthermore, Akt expression in conjunction with miR301-inhibitor increased nuclear accumulation of PTEN, thus preventing it from downregulating the PI3K-signalling. In summary, our data emphasize the importance of miR301 inhibition on PI3K-Akt pathway-mediated cellular functions. Hence, it opens new avenues for the development of new anti-cancer agents preferentially targeting PI3K-Akt pathway. PMID:26967567

  17. Control of the Inflammatory Response Mechanisms Mediated by Natural and Induced Regulatory T-Cells in HCV-, HTLV-1-, and EBV-Associated Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Moralès, Olivier; Delhem, Nadira

    2014-01-01

    Virus infections are involved in chronic inflammation and, in some cases, cancer development. Although a viral infection activates the immune system's response that eradicates the pathogen mainly through inflammatory mechanisms, it is now recognized that this inflammatory condition is also favorable to the development of tumors. Indeed, it is well described that viruses, such as hepatitis C virus (HCV), Epstein Barr virus (EBV), human papillomavirus (HPV) or human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1), are important risk factors for tumor malignancies. The inflammatory response is a fundamental immune mechanism which involves several molecular and cellular components consisting of cytokines and chemokines that are released by various proinflammatory cells. In parallel to this process, some endogenous recruited components release anti-inflammatory mediators to restore homeostasis. The development of tools and strategies using viruses to hijack the immune response is mostly linked to the presence of regulatory T-cells (Treg) that can inhibit inflammation and antiviral responses of other effector cells. In this review, we will focus on current understanding of the role of natural and induced Treg in the control and the resolution of inflammatory response in HCV-, HTLV-1-, and EBV-associated cancers. PMID:25525301

  18. TOP1 and 2, polysaccharides from Taraxacum officinale, attenuate CCl(4)-induced hepatic damage through the modulation of NF-kappaB and its regulatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Park, Chung Mu; Youn, Hyun Joo; Chang, Hee Kyung; Song, Young Sun

    2010-05-01

    In this work, we estimate the inhibitory effect of two polysaccharides from Taraxacum officinale (TOP) on CCl(4)-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in Sprague-Dawley rats. TOP1 and 2 (304, 92 mg/kg bw) were administered for 7 days via a stomach sonde, and hepatitis was induced by a single dose of CCl(4) (50% CCl(4)/olive oil; 0.5 mL/kg bw) administration. CCl(4) significantly elevated serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities. Histopathological observation further revealed that CCl(4)-induced moderate levels of inflammatory cell infiltration, centrilobular fatty change, apoptosis, and necrosis. However, TOPs pretreatment markedly decreased AST and ALT activities as well as hepatic lesions. TOPs also increased free radical scavenging activity, as exhibited by a lowered TBARS concentration. TOPs pretreatment also reversed other hepatitis-associated symptoms, including GSH depletion, inhibited anti-oxidative enzyme activities, up-regulation of NF-kappaB and increased expression of its regulatory inflammatory mediators, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and interleukin (IL)-1beta. These results suggest that TOPs have a hepatoprotective effect by modulating inflammatory responses and ameliorating oxidative stress.

  19. 1′-Acetoxychavicol acetate suppresses angiogenesis-mediated human prostate tumor growth by targeting VEGF-mediated Src-FAK-Rho GTPase-signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Li; Lai, Li; Chen, Jing; Wu, Yuanyuan; Yi, Zhengfang; Zhang, Jian; Qu, Weijing; Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Liu, Mingyao

    2011-01-01

    Cancer therapeutic agents that are safe, effective and affordable are urgently needed. We describe that 1′-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), a component of Siamese ginger (Languas galanga), can suppress prostate tumor growth by largely abrogating angiogenesis. ACA suppressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced proliferation, migration, adhesion and tubulogenesis of primary cultured human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependent manner. ACA also inhibited VEGF-induced microvessel sprouting from aortic rings ex vivo and suppressed new vasculature formation in Matrigel plugs in vivo. We further demonstrated that the mechanisms of this chavicol were to block the activation of VEGF-mediated Src kinase, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Rho family of small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) (Rac1 and Cdc42 but not RhoA) in HUVECs. Furthermore, treatment of human prostate cancer cells (PC-3) with ACA resulted in decreased cell viability and suppression of angiogenic factor production by interference with dual Src/FAK kinases. After subcutaneous administration to mice bearing human prostate cancer PC-3 xenografts, ACA (6 mg/kg/day) remarkably inhibited tumor volume and tumor weight and decreased levels of Src, CD31, VEGF and Ki-67. As indicated by immunohistochemistry and TUNEL analysis, microvessel density and cell proliferation were also dramatically suppressed in tumors from ACA-treated mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that ACA targets the Src-FAK-Rho GTPase pathway, leading to the suppression of prostate tumor angiogenesis and growth. PMID:21427164

  20. 1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate suppresses angiogenesis-mediated human prostate tumor growth by targeting VEGF-mediated Src-FAK-Rho GTPase-signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Li; Lai, Li; Chen, Jing; Wu, Yuanyuan; Yi, Zhengfang; Zhang, Jian; Qu, Weijing; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Liu, Mingyao

    2011-06-01

    Cancer therapeutic agents that are safe, effective and affordable are urgently needed. We describe that 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), a component of Siamese ginger (Languas galanga), can suppress prostate tumor growth by largely abrogating angiogenesis. ACA suppressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced proliferation, migration, adhesion and tubulogenesis of primary cultured human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependent manner. ACA also inhibited VEGF-induced microvessel sprouting from aortic rings ex vivo and suppressed new vasculature formation in Matrigel plugs in vivo. We further demonstrated that the mechanisms of this chavicol were to block the activation of VEGF-mediated Src kinase, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Rho family of small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) (Rac1 and Cdc42 but not RhoA) in HUVECs. Furthermore, treatment of human prostate cancer cells (PC-3) with ACA resulted in decreased cell viability and suppression of angiogenic factor production by interference with dual Src/FAK kinases. After subcutaneous administration to mice bearing human prostate cancer PC-3 xenografts, ACA (6 mg/kg/day) remarkably inhibited tumor volume and tumor weight and decreased levels of Src, CD31, VEGF and Ki-67. As indicated by immunohistochemistry and TUNEL analysis, microvessel density and cell proliferation were also dramatically suppressed in tumors from ACA-treated mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that ACA targets the Src-FAK-Rho GTPase pathway, leading to the suppression of prostate tumor angiogenesis and growth.

  1. Toward a quantitative understanding of symmetry reduction involved in the seed-mediated growth of Pd nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hsin-Chieh; Park, Jinho; Zhang, Lei; Xia, Younan

    2015-05-27

    We report a quantitative analysis of the symmetry reduction phenomenon involved in the seed-mediated growth of Pd nanocrystals under dropwise addition of a precursor solution. In addition to the elimination of self-nucleation, the dropwise approach allows for the formation of a steady state for the number of precursor ions in the growth solution, which only fluctuates in a narrow range defined by experimental parameters such as the initial concentration of precursor solution and the injection rate. We can deterministically control the growth mode (symmetric vs asymmetric) of a seed by tuning these parameters to quantitatively manipulate the reaction kinetics and thus the lower and upper limits that define the steady state. We demonstrate that there exists a correlation between the growth mode and the lower limit of precursor ions in the steady state of a seed-mediated growth process. For the first few drops of precursor solution, the resultant atoms will only be deposited on a limited number of available sites on the seed if the lower limit of the steady state is below a critical value. Afterward, the deposition of atoms will be largely confined to these initially activated sites to induce symmetry reduction if atom deposition is kept at a faster rate than surface diffusion by controlling the lower limit of precursor ions in the steady state. Otherwise, the migration of atoms to other regions through surface diffusion can access other sites on the surface of a seed and thus lead to the switch of growth mode from asymmetric to symmetric. Our study suggests that symmetry reduction can only be initiated and retained by keeping the atom deposition at a rate slow enough to limit the number of initial nucleation sites on a seed but fast enough to beat the surface diffusion process. PMID:25941798

  2. GPCR cell signaling pathways mediating embryonic chick retinal growth cone collapse induced by LPA and S1P

    PubMed Central

    Fincher, Jarod; Whiteneck, Canaan; Birgbauer, Eric

    2014-01-01

    In the development of the nervous system, one of the critical aspects is the proper navigation of axons to their targets, the problem of axonal guidance. We are using the chick visual system as a model to investigate the role of the lysophospholipids lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) as potential axon guidance cues. We show that both LPA and S1P cause specific, dose-dependent growth cone collapse of retinal neurons in vitro in the chick model system, with slight differences to mouse, but very similar to Xenopus. Because LPA and S1P receptors are GPCRs, we analyzed the intracellular signaling pathways using pharmacological inhibitors in chick retinal neurons. Blocking rho kinase (ROCK) prevented growth cone collapse by LPA and S1P, while blocking PLC or chelating calcium had no effect on growth cone collapse. Inhibiting Gi/o with pertussis toxin resulted in a partial reduction of growth cone collapse, both with LPA and S1P. Inhibition of p38 blocked growth cone collapse mediated by LPA but not S1P. Thus, in addition to the involvement of the G12/13-ROCK pathway, LPA and S1P induced collapse of chick retinal growth cones has a partial requirement for Gi/o. PMID:25138637

  3. The isolation and characterization of growth regulatory factors produced by a herpes simplex virus Type 2 transformed mouse tumor cell line, H238

    SciTech Connect

    Stagg, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    This study was performed in an attempt to associate HSV-2-transformation with specific growth factors in order to develop a testable model for HSV-2-transformation. We report here the isolation and characterization of four growth regulatory factors produced by H238, an HSV-2-transformed mouse tumor cell line. These factors were separated from the H238-CM by heparin-sepharose affinity chromatography into three peaks of mitogenic activity and a fourth containing inhibitory activity for splenocytes. The three peaks of mitogenic activity have been identified based on physiochemical characteristics: the first supported the anchorage-independent growth of EGF treated NRK-c-49 cells and resembles transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}); the second bound to lectin-coated sepharose beads and was sensitive to trypsin, neuroaminidase, and the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) and, resembled a platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-like factor; and the third displaced ({sup 125}I)-labeled basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in a dose-dependent fashion when tested with a radioimmune assay. The fourth peak was inhibitory for a variety of splenocyte function assays. A model for the interaction of these factors in vivo is presented with an emphasis on testability.

  4. The Mediator Kinase Module Restrains Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling and Represses Vulval Cell Fate Specification in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Grants, Jennifer M; Ying, Lisa T L; Yoda, Akinori; You, Charlotte C; Okano, Hideyuki; Sawa, Hitoshi; Taubert, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    Cell signaling pathways that control proliferation and determine cell fates are tightly regulated to prevent developmental anomalies and cancer. Transcription factors and coregulators are important effectors of signaling pathway output, as they regulate downstream gene programs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, several subunits of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex promote or inhibit vulva development, but pertinent mechanisms are poorly defined. Here, we show that Mediator's dissociable cyclin dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) module (CKM), consisting of cdk-8, cic-1/Cyclin C, mdt-12/dpy-22, and mdt-13/let-19, is required to inhibit ectopic vulval cell fates downstream of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. cdk-8 inhibits ectopic vulva formation by acting downstream of mpk-1/ERK, cell autonomously in vulval cells, and in a kinase-dependent manner. We also provide evidence that the CKM acts as a corepressor for the Ets-family transcription factor LIN-1, as cdk-8 promotes transcriptional repression by LIN-1. In addition, we find that CKM mutation alters Mediator subunit requirements in vulva development: the mdt-23/sur-2 subunit, which is required for vulva development in wild-type worms, is dispensable for ectopic vulva formation in CKM mutants, which instead display hallmarks of unrestrained Mediator tail module activity. We propose a model whereby the CKM controls EGFR-Ras-ERK transcriptional output by corepressing LIN-1 and by fine tuning Mediator specificity, thus balancing transcriptional repression vs. activation in a critical developmental signaling pathway. Collectively, these data offer an explanation for CKM repression of EGFR signaling output and ectopic vulva formation and provide the first evidence of Mediator CKM-tail module subunit crosstalk in animals. PMID:26715664

  5. Insulin-like growth factor II mediates epidermal growth factor-induced mitogenesis in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Steller, M A; Delgado, C H; Zou, Z

    1995-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that activation of the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptor plays a major role in the control of cellular proliferation of many cell types. We studied the mitogenic effects of IGF-I, IGF-II, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) on growth-arrested HT-3 cells, a human cervical cancer cell line. All three growth factors promoted dose-dependent increases in cell proliferation. In untransformed cells, EGF usually requires stimulation by a "progression" factor such as IGF-I, IGF-II, or insulin (in supraphysiologic concentrations) in order to exert a mitogenic effect. Accordingly, we investigated whether an autocrine pathway involving IGF-I or IGF-II participated in the EGF-induced mitogenesis of HT-3 cells. With the RNase protection assay, IGF-I mRNA was not detected. However, IGF-II mRNA increased in a time-dependent manner following EGF stimulation. The EGF-induced mitogenesis was abrogated in a dose-dependent manner by IGF-binding protein 5 (IGFBP-5), which binds to IGF-II and neutralizes it. An antisense oligonucleotide to IGF-II also inhibited the proliferative response to EGF. In addition, prolonged, but not short-term, stimulation with EGF resulted in autophosphorylation of the IGF-I receptor, and coincubations with both EGF and IGFBP-5 attenuated this effect. These data demonstrate that autocrine secretion of IGF-II in HT-3 cervical cancer cells can participate in EGF-induced mitogenesis and suggest that autocrine signals involving the IGF-I receptor occur "downstream" of competence growth factor receptors such as the EGF receptor. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8618825

  6. Growth Differentiation Factor-8 Decreases StAR Expression Through ALK5-Mediated Smad3 and ERK1/2 Signaling Pathways in Luteinized Human Granulosa Cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lanlan; Chang, Hsun-Ming; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Yu, Yiping; Leung, Peter C K; Sun, Ying-Pu

    2015-12-01

    Growth differentiation factor-8 (GDF-8) has been recently shown to be expressed in human granulosa cells, and the mature form of GDF-8 protein can be detected in the follicular fluid. However, the biological function and significance of this growth factor in the human ovary remains to be determined. Here, we investigated the effects of GDF-8 on steroidogenic enzyme expression and the potential mechanisms of action in luteinized human granulosa cells. We demonstrated that treatment with GDF-8 did not affect the mRNA levels of P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, whereas it significantly down-regulated steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) expression and decreased progesterone production. The suppressive effect of GDF-8 on StAR expression was abolished by the inhibition of the TGF-β type I receptor. In addition, treatment with GDF-8 activated both Smad2/3 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. Furthermore, knockdown of activin receptor-like kinase 5 reversed the effects of GDF-8 on Smad2/3 phosphorylation and StAR expression. The inhibition of Smad3 or ERK1/2 signaling pathways attenuated the GDF-8-induced down-regulation of StAR and production of progesterone. Interestingly, the concentrations of GDF-8 were negatively correlated with those of progesterone in human follicular fluid. These results indicate a novel autocrine function of GDF-8 to down-regulate StAR expression and decrease progesterone production in luteinized human granulosa cells, most likely through activin receptor-like kinase 5-mediated Smad3 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. Our findings suggest that granulosa cells might play a critical role in the regulation of progesterone production to prevent premature luteinization during the final stage of folliculogenesis.

  7. Co-Targeting Prostate Cancer Epithelium and Bone Stroma by Human Osteonectin-Promoter-Mediated Suicide Gene Therapy Effectively Inhibits Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Growth.

    PubMed

    Sung, Shian-Ying; Chang, Junn-Liang; Chen, Kuan-Chou; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Liu, Yun-Ru; Su, Yen-Hao; Hsueh, Chia-Yen; Chung, Leland W K; Hsieh, Chia-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Stromal-epithelial interaction has been shown to promote local tumor growth and distant metastasis. We sought to create a promising gene therapy approach that co-targets cancer and its supporting stromal cells for combating castration-resistant prostate tumors. Herein, we demonstrated that human osteonectin is overexpressed in the prostate cancer epithelium and tumor stroma in comparison with their normal counterpart. We designed a novel human osteonectin promoter (hON-522E) containing positive transcriptional regulatory elements identified in both the promoter and exon 1 region of the human osteonectin gene. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the hON-522E promoter is highly active in androgen receptor negative and metastatic prostate cancer and bone stromal cells compared to androgen receptor-positive prostate cancer cells. Moreover, in vivo prostate-tumor-promoting activity of the hON-522E promoter was confirmed by intravenous administration of an adenoviral vector containing the hON-522E promoter-driven luciferase gene (Ad-522E-Luc) into mice bearing orthotopic human prostate tumor xenografts. In addition, an adenoviral vector with the hON-522E-promoter-driven herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (Ad-522E-TK) was highly effective against the growth of androgen-independent human prostate cancer PC3M and bone stromal cell line in vitro and in pre-established PC3M tumors in vivo upon addition of the prodrug ganciclovir. Because of the heterogeneity of human prostate tumors, hON-522E promoter-mediated gene therapy has the potential for the treatment of hormone refractory and bone metastatic prostate cancers.

  8. Co-Targeting Prostate Cancer Epithelium and Bone Stroma by Human Osteonectin-Promoter–Mediated Suicide Gene Therapy Effectively Inhibits Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Shian-Ying; Chang, Junn-Liang; Chen, Kuan-Chou; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Liu, Yun-Ru; Su, Yen-Hao; Hsueh, Chia-Yen; Chung, Leland W. K.; Hsieh, Chia-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Stromal-epithelial interaction has been shown to promote local tumor growth and distant metastasis. We sought to create a promising gene therapy approach that co-targets cancer and its supporting stromal cells for combating castration-resistant prostate tumors. Herein, we demonstrated that human osteonectin is overexpressed in the prostate cancer epithelium and tumor stroma in comparison with their normal counterpart. We designed a novel human osteonectin promoter (hON-522E) containing positive transcriptional regulatory elements identified in both the promoter and exon 1 region of the human osteonectin gene. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the hON-522E promoter is highly active in androgen receptor negative and metastatic prostate cancer and bone stromal cells compared to androgen receptor-positive prostate cancer cells. Moreover, in vivo prostate-tumor–promoting activity of the hON-522E promoter was confirmed by intravenous administration of an adenoviral vector containing the hON-522E promoter-driven luciferase gene (Ad-522E-Luc) into mice bearing orthotopic human prostate tumor xenografts. In addition, an adenoviral vector with the hON-522E-promoter–driven herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (Ad-522E-TK) was highly effective against the growth of androgen-independent human prostate cancer PC3M and bone stromal cell line in vitro and in pre-established PC3M tumors in vivo upon addition of the prodrug ganciclovir. Because of the heterogeneity of human prostate tumors, hON-522E promoter-mediated gene therapy has the potential for the treatment of hormone refractory and bone metastatic prostate cancers. PMID:27054343

  9. Co-Targeting Prostate Cancer Epithelium and Bone Stroma by Human Osteonectin-Promoter-Mediated Suicide Gene Therapy Effectively Inhibits Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Growth.

    PubMed

    Sung, Shian-Ying; Chang, Junn-Liang; Chen, Kuan-Chou; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Liu, Yun-Ru; Su, Yen-Hao; Hsueh, Chia-Yen; Chung, Leland W K; Hsieh, Chia-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Stromal-epithelial interaction has been shown to promote local tumor growth and distant metastasis. We sought to create a promising gene therapy approach that co-targets cancer and its supporting stromal cells for combating castration-resistant prostate tumors. Herein, we demonstrated that human osteonectin is overexpressed in the prostate cancer epithelium and tumor stroma in comparison with their normal counterpart. We designed a novel human osteonectin promoter (hON-522E) containing positive transcriptional regulatory elements identified in both the promoter and exon 1 region of the human osteonectin gene. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the hON-522E promoter is highly active in androgen receptor negative and metastatic prostate cancer and bone stromal cells compared to androgen receptor-positive prostate cancer cells. Moreover, in vivo prostate-tumor-promoting activity of the hON-522E promoter was confirmed by intravenous administration of an adenoviral vector containing the hON-522E promoter-driven luciferase gene (Ad-522E-Luc) into mice bearing orthotopic human prostate tumor xenografts. In addition, an adenoviral vector with the hON-522E-promoter-driven herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (Ad-522E-TK) was highly effective against the growth of androgen-independent human prostate cancer PC3M and bone stromal cell line in vitro and in pre-established PC3M tumors in vivo upon addition of the prodrug ganciclovir. Because of the heterogeneity of human prostate tumors, hON-522E promoter-mediated gene therapy has the potential for the treatment of hormone refractory and bone metastatic prostate cancers. PMID:27054343

  10. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor ERRγ Regulates Hepatic CB1 Receptor-Mediated Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yoon Seok; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kim, Ki-Sun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Jina; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, In-Kyu; Kim, Seong Heon; Cho, Sung Jin; Jeong, Won-Il; Lee, Chul-Ho; Harris, Robert A.; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), a stress inducible hepatokine, is synthesized in the liver and plays important roles in glucose and lipid metabolism. However, the mechanism of hepatic cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression is largely unknown. Results Activation of the hepatic CB1 receptor by arachidonyl-2’-chloroethylamide (ACEA), a CB1 receptor selective agonist, significantly increased FGF21 gene expression. Overexpression of estrogen-related receptor (ERR) γ increased FGF21 gene expression and secretion both in hepatocytes and mice, whereas knockdown of ERRγ decreased ACEA-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Moreover, ERRγ, but not ERRα and ERRβ, induced FGF21 gene promoter activity. In addition, deletion and mutation analysis of the FGF21 promoter identified a putative ERRγ-binding motif (AGGTGC, a near-consensus response element). A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed direct binding of ERRγ to the FGF21 gene promoter. Finally, GSK5182, an ERRγ inverse agonist, significantly inhibited hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Conclusion Based on our data, we conclude that ERRγ plays a key role in hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression and secretion. PMID:27455076

  11. Personal growth initiative and identity formation in adolescence through young adulthood: mediating processes on the pathway to well-being.

    PubMed

    Luyckx, Koen; Robitschek, Christine

    2014-10-01

    Developing a personal identity is a challenging task throughout adolescence and the transition to adulthood. The present study sampling 551 14-35 year olds (54.1% female) examined personal growth initiative (PGI) as a potential predictor of core identity processes and explored whether identity functioned as a mediator on the pathway from PGI to self-esteem and depressive symptoms. Path analyses from a structural equation modeling approach indicated that all four components of PGI (i.e., planfulness, readiness for change, intentional behavior, and using resources) predicted different commitment and exploration processes, with planfulness being the most consistent predictor. Important age differences linking PGI-components to identity exploration were found. Finally, especially the degree to which individuals identified themselves with their identity commitments and the degree to which they relied on ruminative or maladaptive forms of identity exploration mediated pathways from PGI to self-esteem and depressive symptoms. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  12. Activation of JNK signaling mediates connective tissue growth factor expression and scar formation in corneal wound healing.

    PubMed

    Shi, Long; Chang, Yuan; Yang, Yongmei; Zhang, Ying; Yu, Fu-Shin X; Wu, Xinyi

    2012-01-01

    Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF) and Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) are key growth factors in regulating corneal scarring. Although CTGF was induced by TGF-β1 and mediated many of fibroproliferative effects of TGF-β1, the signaling pathway for CTGF production in corneal scarring remains to be clarified. In the present study, we firstly investigated the effects of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) on CTGF expression induce by TGF-β1 in Telomerase-immortalized human cornea stroma fibroblasts (THSF). Then, we created penetrating corneal wound model and determined the effect of JNK in the pathogenesis of corneal scarring. TGF-β1 activated MAPK pathways in THSF cells. JNK inhibitor significantly inhibited CTGF, fibronectin and collagen I expression induced by TGF-β1 in THSF. In corneal wound healing, the JNK inhibitor significantly inhibited CTGF expression, markedly improved the architecture of corneal stroma and reduced corneal scar formation, but did not have a measurable impact on corneal wound healing in vivo. Our results indicate that JNK mediates the expression of CTGF and corneal scarring in corneal wound healing, and might be considered as specific targets of drug therapy for corneal scarring.

  13. The CB1 receptor mediates the peripheral effects of ghrelin on AMPK activity but not on growth hormone release.

    PubMed

    Kola, Blerina; Wittman, Gábor; Bodnár, Ibolya; Amin, Faisal; Lim, Chung Thong; Oláh, Márk; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Lolli, Francesca; van Thuijl, Hinke; Leontiou, Chrysanthia A; Füzesi, Tamás; Dalino, Paolo; Isidori, Andrea M; Harvey-White, Judith; Kunos, George; Nagy, György M; Grossman, Ashley B; Fekete, Csaba; Korbonits, Márta

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether the growth hormone release and metabolic effects of ghrelin on AMPK activity of peripheral tissues are mediated by cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and the central nervous system. CB1-knockout (KO) and/or wild-type mice were injected peripherally or intracerebroventricularly with ghrelin and CB1 antagonist rimonabant to study tissue AMPK activity and gene expression (transcription factors SREBP1c, transmembrane protein FAS, enzyme PEPCK, and protein HSL). Growth hormone levels were studied both in vivo and in vitro. Peripherally administered ghrelin in liver, heart, and adipose tissue AMPK activity cannot be observed in CB1-KO or CB1 antagonist-treated mice. Intracerebroventricular ghrelin treatment can influence peripheral AMPK activity. This effect is abolished in CB1-KO mice and by intracerebroventricular rimonabant treatment, suggesting that central CB1 receptors also participate in the signaling pathway that mediates the effects of ghrelin on peripheral tissues. Interestingly, in vivo or in vitro growth hormone release is intact in response to ghrelin in CB1-KO animals. Our data suggest that the metabolic effects of ghrelin on AMPK in peripheral tissues are abolished by the lack of functional CB1 receptor via direct peripheral effect and partially through the central nervous system, thus supporting the existence of a possible ghrelin-cannabinoid-CB1-AMPK pathway.

  14. Integrins and cAMP mediate netrin-induced growth cone collapse

    PubMed Central

    Lemons, M.L.; Abanto, M.L.; Dambrouskas, N.; Clements, C.C.; DeLoughery, Z.; Garozzo, J.; Condic, M.L.

    2013-01-01

    Growth cones integrate a remarkably complex concert of chemical cues to guide axons to their appropriate destinations. Recent work suggests that integrins contribute to axon guidance by interacting with a wide range of extracellular molecules including axon guidance molecules, by mechanisms that are not fully understood. Here, we describe an interaction between integrins and netrin-1 in growth cones that contributes to growth cone collapse. Our data show that netrin-1 causes growth cone collapse in a substratum-specific manner and is integrin-dependent. Netrin-1 causes collapse of cultured chick dorsal root ganglion (DRG) growth cones extending on high levels of laminin-1 (LN) but not growth cones extending on low levels of LN or on fibronectin. Blocking integrin function significantly decreases netrin-induced growth cone collapse on high LN. Netrin-1 and integrins interact on growth cones; netrin-1 causes integrin activation, a conformational shift to a high ligand-affinity state. Netrin-1 directly binds to integrin α3 and α6 peptides, further suggesting a netrin-integrin interaction. Interestingly, our data reveal netrin-1 increases growth cone levels of cAMP in a substratum-specific manner and that netrin-induced growth cone collapse requires increased cAMP in combination with integrin activation. Manipulations that either decrease cAMP levels or integrin activation block netrin-induced collapse. These results imply a common mechanism for growth cone collapse and novel interactions between integrins, netrin-1 and cAMP that contribute to growth cone guidance. PMID:24001590

  15. Evidence for the involvement of cell wall peroxidase in the generation of hydroxyl radicals mediating extension growth.

    PubMed

    Liszkay, Anja; Kenk, Barbara; Schopfer, Peter

    2003-08-01

    Hydroxyl radicals (*OH), produced in the cell wall, are capable of cleaving wall polymers and can thus mediate cell wall loosening and extension growth. It has recently been proposed that the biochemical mechanism responsible for *OH generation in the cell walls of growing plant organs represents an enzymatic reaction catalyzed by apoplastic peroxidase (POD). This hypothesis was investigated by supplying cell walls of maize ( Zea mays L.) coleoptiles and sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L.) hypocotyls with external NADH, an artificial substrate known to cause *OH generation by POD in vitro. The effects of NADH on wall loosening, growth, and *OH production in vivo were determined. NADH mediates cell wall extension in vitro and in vivo in an H2O2-dependent reaction that shows the characteristic features of POD. NADH-mediated production of *OH in vivo was demonstrated in maize coleoptiles using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in combination with a specific spin-trapping reaction. Kinetic properties and inhibitor/activator sensitivities of the *OH-producing reaction in the cell walls of coleoptiles resembled the properties of horseradish POD. Apoplastic consumption of external NADH by living coleoptiles can be traced back to the superimposed action of two enzymatic reactions, a KCN-sensitive reaction mediated by POD operating in the *OH-forming mode, and a KCN-insensitive reaction with the kinetic properties of a superoxide-producing plasma-membrane NADH oxidase the activity of which can be promoted by auxin. Under natural conditions, i.e. in the absence of external NADH, this enzyme may provide superoxide (O2*-) (and H2O2 utilized by POD for) *OH production in the cell wall.

  16. Suppression of polymorphonuclear (PMN) and monocyte-mediated inhibition of Candida albicans growth by delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol

    SciTech Connect

    Djeu, J.Y.; Parapanios, A.; Halkias, D.; Friedman, H.

    1986-03-05

    This study was an in vitro attempt to identify the effector cells responsible for growth inhibition of the opportunistic fungus, candida albicans, and to determine if THC or another marijuana derivatives, 11-hydroxyTHC, would adversely affect their function. Using a 24h radiolabel assay, the authors found that growth inhibition of C. albicans was primarily mediated by PMN and monocytes that could be isolated normal human peripheral blood. Both effector cell types caused almost complete inhibition of Candida growth at effector/target ratio of 300/1 and inhibition was often still seen at 30/1-. Incubation of PMN, PBL, or monocytes for 1 hr at 37C with THC or 11-hydroxyTHC caused a marked suppression of function in all 3 cell populations. Maximal suppression was obtained with 7.5-10..mu..g/ml of the drugs in medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) or with 2-4..mu..g/ml in 1% FBS. These drug concentrations did not affect lymphoid cell viability or candida growth in the absence of lymphoid effector cells. Marijuana derivatives, therefore, are doubly dangerous in that opportunistic fungi such as C. albicans can grow in their presence while the effector cells that control fungal growth are readily inactivated.

  17. Does testosterone mediate the trade-off between nestling begging and growth in the canary (Serinus canaria)?

    PubMed

    Buchanan, K L; Goldsmith, A R; Hinde, C A; Griffith, S C; Kilner, R M

    2007-12-01

    Nestling birds solicit food from their parents with vigorous begging displays, involving posturing, jostling and calling. In some species, such as canaries, begging is especially costly because it causes a trade off against nestling growth. Fitness costs of begging like this are predicted by evolutionary theory because they function to resolve conflicts of interest within the family over the provision of parental investment. However, the mechanism that links these costs with nestling behaviour remains unclear. In the present study, we determine if the relationships between nestling androgen levels, nestling begging intensities and nestling growth rates are consistent with the hypothesis that testosterone is responsible for the trade-off between begging and growth. We test this idea with a correlational study, using fecal androgens as a non-invasive method for assaying nestling androgen levels. Our results show that fecal androgen levels are positively correlated with nestling begging intensity, and reveal marked family differences in each trait. Furthermore, changes in fecal androgen levels between 5 and 8 days after hatching are positively associated with changes in nestling begging intensity, and negatively associated with nestling growth during this time. Although these correlational results support our predictions, we suggest that that experimental manipulations are now required to test the direct or indirect role of testosterone in mediating the trade-off between begging and growth.

  18. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Growth Suppression of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR Prostate Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) mediates the developmental, physiologic, and pathologic effects of androgens including 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). However, the mechanisms whereby AR regulates growth suppression and differentiation of luminal epithelial cells in the prostate gland and proliferation of malignant versions of these cells are not well understood, though they are central to prostate development, homeostasis, and neoplasia. Here, we identify androgen-responsive genes that restrain cell cycle progression and proliferation of human prostate epithelial cell lines (HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR), and we investigate the mechanisms through which AR regulates their expression. DHT inhibited proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, and cell cycle analysis revealed a prolonged G1 interval. In the cell cycle, the G1/S-phase transition is initiated by the activity of cyclin D and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) complexes, which relieve growth suppression. In HPr-1AR, cyclin D1/2 and CDK4/6 mRNAs were androgen-repressed, whereas CDK inhibitor, CDKN1A, mRNA was androgen-induced. The regulation of these transcripts was AR-dependent, and involved multiple mechanisms. Similar AR-mediated down-regulation of CDK4/6 mRNAs and up-regulation of CDKN1A mRNA occurred in PC3-Lenti-AR. Further, CDK4/6 overexpression suppressed DHT-inhibited cell cycle progression and proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, whereas CDKN1A overexpression induced cell cycle arrest. We therefore propose that AR-mediated growth suppression of HPr-1AR involves cyclin D1 mRNA decay, transcriptional repression of cyclin D2 and CDK4/6, and transcriptional activation of CDKN1A, which serve to decrease CDK4/6 activity. AR-mediated inhibition of PC3-Lenti-AR proliferation occurs through a similar mechanism, albeit without down-regulation of cyclin D. Our findings provide insight into AR-mediated regulation of prostate epithelial cell proliferation. PMID:26372468

  19. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Growth Suppression of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Chae; Chen, Congcong; Bolton, Eric C

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) mediates the developmental, physiologic, and pathologic effects of androgens including 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). However, the mechanisms whereby AR regulates growth suppression and differentiation of luminal epithelial cells in the prostate gland and proliferation of malignant versions of these cells are not well understood, though they are central to prostate development, homeostasis, and neoplasia. Here, we identify androgen-responsive genes that restrain cell cycle progression and proliferation of human prostate epithelial cell lines (HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR), and we investigate the mechanisms through which AR regulates their expression. DHT inhibited proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, and cell cycle analysis revealed a prolonged G1 interval. In the cell cycle, the G1/S-phase transition is initiated by the activity of cyclin D and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) complexes, which relieve growth suppression. In HPr-1AR, cyclin D1/2 and CDK4/6 mRNAs were androgen-repressed, whereas CDK inhibitor, CDKN1A, mRNA was androgen-induced. The regulation of these transcripts was AR-dependent, and involved multiple mechanisms. Similar AR-mediated down-regulation of CDK4/6 mRNAs and up-regulation of CDKN1A mRNA occurred in PC3-Lenti-AR. Further, CDK4/6 overexpression suppressed DHT-inhibited cell cycle progression and proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, whereas CDKN1A overexpression induced cell cycle arrest. We therefore propose that AR-mediated growth suppression of HPr-1AR involves cyclin D1 mRNA decay, transcriptional repression of cyclin D2 and CDK4/6, and transcriptional activation of CDKN1A, which serve to decrease CDK4/6 activity. AR-mediated inhibition of PC3-Lenti-AR proliferation occurs through a similar mechanism, albeit without down-regulation of cyclin D. Our findings provide insight into AR-mediated regulation of prostate epithelial cell proliferation.

  20. Angiotensin II-induced hypertrophy of cultured murine proximal tubular cells is mediated by endogenous transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, G; Mueller, E; Stahl, R A; Ziyadeh, F N

    1993-01-01

    Previous studies by our group have demonstrated that angiotensin II (ANG II), as a single factor in serum-free medium, induces cellular hypertrophy of a cultured murine proximal tubular cell line (MCT). The present study was performed to test the hypothesis that this growth effect was mediated by activation of endogenous transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). Exogenous TGF-beta 1 (1 ng/ml) mimicked the growth effects observed with 10(-8) M ANG II (inhibition of DNA synthesis and induction of cellular hypertrophy). A neutralizing anti-TGF-beta antibody attenuated the ANG II-induced increase in de novo protein and total RNA synthesis as well as total protein content. This antibody also abolished the ANG II-mediated inhibition of [3H]thymidine incorporation into quiescent MCT cells. Control IgG or an unrelated antibody had no effect. A bioassay for TGF-beta using mink lung epithelial cells revealed that MCT cells treated with ANG II released active TGF-beta into the cell culture supernatant. Northern blot analysis and semi-quantitative cDNA amplification demonstrated increases in steady-state levels for TGF-beta 1 mRNA after ANG II stimulation of MCT cells, but not in a syngeneic murine mesangial cell line. Our data indicate that the ANG II-induced hypertrophy in MCT cells is mediated by synthesis and activation of endogenous TGF-beta. It is intriguing to speculate that TGF-beta may play a role in the early tubular cell hypertrophy and the subsequent interstitial scarring observed in several models of chronic renal injury that are characterized by increased activity of intrarenal ANG II. Images PMID:7690779

  1. Modulation of HCV reinfection after orthotopic liver transplantation by fibroblast growth factor-2 and other non-interferon mediators

    PubMed Central

    Van, Nguyen Dinh; Falk, Christine S; Sandmann, Lisa; Vondran, Florian W R; Helfritz, Fabian; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Manns, Michael P; Ciesek, Sandra; von Hahn, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Objective In HCV infected individuals graft infection occurs shortly after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). We aimed to describe the composition of the inflammatory response at this time, how it affects the HCV replication cycle and identify novel proviral and antiviral factors. Design We used a Luminex assay to quantify 50 inflammatory mediators in sera before and shortly after OLT. In vitro grown HCV based on the JFH-1 isolate were used to characterise the effects of patient sera and individual mediators on HCV. Results Although the mediator composition is highly variable between individuals, sera drawn immediately post-OLT significantly enhance HCV infectivity compared with control sera from before OLT in about half of the cases. Among 27 non-interferon inflammatory mediators fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 stood out as it enhanced HCV RNA replication and release of infectious particles. The effect was concentration-dependent and detectable in dividing and non-dividing cells. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of FGF-2 receptor signalling abrogated the enhancing effect of FGF-2 and inhibited HCV replication in the absence of serum FGF-2 suggesting that HCV replication is dependent on basal activation of the FGF-2 triggered signalling pathway. Finally, in individuals with chronic HCV infection with high viral load, serum FGF-2 was significantly higher compared with those with low viral load. Conclusions Although no single mediator may account for this effect, serum shortly post-OLT enhances HCV infection. FGF-2 is a novel endogenous driver of HCV replication and a potential therapeutic target. PMID:25800783

  2. Hepatocyte growth factor induces Mcl-1 in primary human hepatocytes and inhibits CD95-mediated apoptosis via Akt.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Bergkamen, Henning; Brenner, Dirk; Krueger, Andreas; Suess, Dorothee; Fas, Stefanie C; Frey, Christian R; Dax, Andreas; Zink, Dorothea; Büchler, Peter; Müller, Martina; Krammer, Peter H

    2004-03-01

    CD95 (APO-1/Fas)-mediated apoptosis of hepatocytes plays a central role in the pathophysiology of various human liver diseases. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) was shown to exert antiapoptotic functions in rodent hepatocytes. We previously showed that primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are a valuable tool for the investigation of apoptotic processes in liver cells. In this study, we analyzed the influence of HGF on CD95-mediated apoptosis of PHH and its molecular determinants. HGF significantly inhibited CD95-mediated apoptosis of PHH as well as cleavage of caspase-8 and poly (ADP-ribose)polymerase. HGF transcriptionally induced the expression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1). In contrary, HGF did not alter the expression levels of Bcl-2 or Bcl-x(L). HGF activated survival pathways such as the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway, the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase/ERK and the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathway. Notably, HGF triggered serine(727)--but not tyrosine(705)--phosphorylation of STAT3. Pretreatment of PHH with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 as well as adenoviral transduction of dominant negative Akt1 prevented HGF-mediated Mcl-1 induction and reversed the antiapoptotic effects of HGF. In conclusion, HGF confers survival of PHH by activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. PI3K/Akt activation by HGF results in the induction of antiapoptotic proteins such as Mcl-1. Thus, application of HGF may be a therapeutic approach to prevent CD95-mediated hepatocellular damage in human liver diseases. PMID:14999683

  3. Enhancing Interferon Regulatory Factor 7 Mediated Antiviral Responses and Decreasing Nuclear Factor Kappa B Expression Limit HIV-1 Replication in Cervical Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Rollenhage, Christiane; Macura, Sherrill L.; Lathrop, Melissa J.; Mackenzie, Todd A.; Doncel, Gustavo F.; Asin, Susana N.

    2015-01-01

    Establishment of a productive HIV-1 infection in the female reproductive tract likely depends on the balance between anti-viral and pro-inflammatory responses leading to activation and proliferation of HIV target cells. Immune modulators that boost anti-viral and depress pro-inflammatory immune responses may decrease HIV-1 infection or replication. Polyinosinic:polycytidylic [Poly (I:C)] has been reported to down-regulate HIV-1 replication in immune cell subsets and lymphoid tissues, yet the scope and mechanisms of poly (I:C) regulation of HIV-1 replication in the cervicovaginal mucosa, the main portal of viral entry in women remain unknown. Using a relevant, underexplored ex vivo cervical tissue model, we demonstrated that poly (I:C) enhanced Interferon Regulatory Factor (IRF)7 mediated antiviral responses and decreased tissue Nuclear Factor Kappa B (NFκB) RNA expression. This pattern of cellular transcription factor expression correlated with decreased HIV-1 transcription and viral release. Reducing IRF7 expression up-regulated HIV-1 and NFκB transcription, providing proof of concept for the critical involvement of IRF7 in cervical tissues. By combining poly (I:C) with a suboptimal concentration of tenofovir, the leading anti-HIV prophylactic microbicide candidate, we demonstrated an earlier and greater decrease in HIV replication in poly (I:C)/tenofovir treated tissues compared with tissues treated with tenofovir alone, indicating overall improved efficacy. Poly (I:C) decreases HIV-1 replication by stimulating IRF7 mediated antiviral responses while reducing NFκB expression. Early during the infection, poly (I:C) improved the anti-HIV-1 activity of suboptimal concentrations of tenofovir likely to be present during periods of poor adherence i.e. inconsistent or inadequate drug use. Understanding interactions between anti-viral and pro-inflammatory immune responses in the genital mucosa will provide crucial insights for the identification of targets that can be

  4. Model for regulation of VAMP721/722-mediated secretion: growth vs. stress responses.

    PubMed

    Sup Yun, Hye; Yi, Changhyun; Kwon, Hyeokjin; Kwon, Chian

    2013-11-01

    The PEN1-SNAP33-VAMP721/722 exocytic pathway is a conserved immunity-associated secretory pathway between monocotyledonous barley and dicotyledonous Arabidopsis plants. In Arabidopsis, this secretory pathway plays an additional role in plant growth and development. However, how this pathway can be manipulated to engage in both growth/development and immunity remains to be answered. To understand its regulation, we recently analyzed the expression of VAMP721/722 genes whose products drive secretory vesicles to the target plasma membrane. By investigating their transcript and protein levels, we found that plants distinctly control the activity of this secretory pathway during biotic or abiotic stress responses. Since stress responses are in general accompanied by growth inhibition in plants and since plants in nature are simultaneously threatened by a number of environmental stresses, understanding of this growth/immunity-related secretory pathway would help to generate more efficiently growth/immunity-balancing plants.

  5. Staphylococcus aureus SarA is a Regulatory Protein Responsive to Redox and pH that can Support Bacteriophage Lambda Integrase-Mediated Excision/Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, David F.; Higginbotham, Robin H.; Maleki, Soheila J.; Segall1, Anca M.; Smeltzer, Mark S.; Hurlburt, Barry K.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Staphylococcus aureus produces a wide array of virulence factors and causes a correspondingly diverse array of infections. Production of these virulence factors is under the control of a complex network of global regulatory elements, one of which is sarA. sarA encodes a DNA-binding protein that is considered to function as a transcription factor capable of acting as either a repressor or an activator. Using competitive ELISA assays, we demonstrate that SarA is present at approximately 50,000 copies per cell, which is not characteristic of classical transcription factors. We also demonstrate that SarA is present at all stages of growth in vitro and is capable of binding DNA with high affinity but that its binding affinity and pattern of shifted complexes in electrophoretic mobility shift assays is responsive to the redox state. We also show that SarA binds to the bacteriophage lambda (λ) attachment site, attL, producing SarA-DNA complexes similar to intasomes, which consist of bacteriophage lambda integrase, E. coli integration host factor and attL DNA. In addition, SarA stimulates intramolecular excision recombination in the absence of λ excisionase, a DNA-binding accessory protein. Taken together, these data suggest that SarA may function as an architectural accessory protein. PMID:19919677

  6. Effects of interferon-gamma and lipopolysaccharide on macrophage iron metabolism are mediated by nitric oxide-induced degradation of iron regulatory protein 2.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Ponka, P

    2000-03-01

    Iron regulatory proteins (IRP-1 and IRP-2) control the synthesis of transferrin receptors (TfR) and ferritin by binding to iron-responsive elements, which are located in the 3'-untranslated region and the 5'-untranslated region of their respective mRNAs. Cellular iron levels affect binding of IRPs to iron-responsive elements and consequently expression of TfR and ferritin. Moreover, NO(*), a redox species of nitric oxide that interacts primarily with iron, can activate IRP-1 RNA binding activity resulting in an increase in TfR mRNA levels. Recently we found that treatment of RAW 264.7 cells (a murine macrophage cell line) with NO(+) (nitrosonium ion, which causes S-nitrosylation of thiol groups) resulted in a rapid decrease in RNA binding of IRP-2 followed by IRP-2 degradation, and these changes were associated with a decrease in TfR mRNA levels (Kim, S., and Ponka, P. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 33035-33042). In this study, we demonstrated that stimulation of RAW 264.7 cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) increased IRP-1 binding activity, whereas RNA binding of IRP-2 decreased and was followed by a degradation of this protein. Moreover, the decrease of IRP-2 binding/protein levels was associated with a decrease in TfR mRNA levels in LPS/IFN-gamma-treated cells, and these changes were prevented by inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Furthermore, LPS/IFN-gamma-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells showed increased rates of ferritin synthesis. These results suggest that NO(+)-mediated degradation of IRP-2 plays a major role in iron metabolism during inflammation.

  7. FTY720 ameliorates Th1-mediated colitis in mice by directly affecting the functional activity of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Carolin; Sartory, Nico; Zahn, Nadine; Geisslinger, Gerd; Radeke, Heinfried H; Stein, Juergen M

    2007-02-15

    Following the present concepts, the synthetic sphingosine analog of myriocin FTY720 alters migration and homing of lymphocytes via sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors. However, several studies indicate that the immunosuppressive properties of FTY720 may alternatively be due to tolerogenic activities via modulation of dendritic cell differentiation or based on direct effects on CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Treg). As Treg play an important role for the cure of inflammatory colitis, we used the Th1-mediated 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) colitis model to address the therapeutic potential of FTY720 in vivo. A rectal enema of TNBS was given to BALB/c mice. FTY720 was administered i.p. from days 0 to 3 or 3 to 5. FTY720 substantially reduced all clinical, histopathologic, macroscopic, and microscopic parameters of colitis analyzed. The therapeutic effects of FTY720 were associated with a down-regulation of IL-12p70 and subsequent Th1 cytokines. Importantly, FTY720 treatment resulted in a prominent up-regulation of FoxP3, IL-10, TGFbeta, and CTLA4. Supporting the hypothesis that FTY720 directly affects functional activity of CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg, we measured a significant increase of CD25 and FoxP3 expression in isolated lamina propria CD4(+) T cells of FTY720-treated mice. The impact of FTY720 on Treg induction was further confirmed by concomitant in vivo blockade of CTLA4 or IL-10R which significantly abrogated its therapeutic activity. In conclusion, our data provide clear evidence that in addition to its well-established effects on migration FTY720 leads to a specific down-regulation of proinflammatory signals while simultaneously inducing functional activity of CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg. Thus, FTY720 may offer a promising new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of IBD.

  8. Human intrahepatic regulatory T cells are functional, require IL‐2 from effector cells for survival, and are susceptible to Fas ligand‐mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yung‐Yi; Jeffery, Hannah C.; Hunter, Stuart; Bhogal, Ricky; Birtwistle, Jane; Braitch, Manjit Kaur; Roberts, Sheree; Ming, Mikaela; Hannah, Jack; Thomas, Clare; Adali, Gupse; Hübscher, Stefan G.; Syn, Wing‐Kin; Afford, Simon; Lalor, Patricia F.; Adams, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) suppress T effector cell proliferation and maintain immune homeostasis. Autoimmune liver diseases persist despite high frequencies of Treg in the liver, suggesting that the local hepatic microenvironment might affect Treg stability, survival, and function. We hypothesized that interactions between Treg and endothelial cells during recruitment and then with epithelial cells within the liver affect Treg stability, survival, and function. To model this, we explored the function of Treg after migration through human hepatic sinusoidal‐endothelium (postendothelial migrated Treg [PEM Treg]) and the effect of subsequent interactions with cholangiocytes and local proinflammatory cytokines on survival and stability of Treg. Our findings suggest that the intrahepatic microenvironment is highly enriched with proinflammatory cytokines but deficient in the Treg survival cytokine interleukin (IL)‐2. Migration through endothelium into a model mimicking the inflamed liver microenvironment did not affect Treg stability; however, functional capacity was reduced. Furthermore, the addition of exogenous IL‐2 enhanced PEM Treg phosphorylated STAT5 signaling compared with PEMCD8. CD4 and CD8 T cells are the main source of IL‐2 in the inflamed liver. Liver‐infiltrating Treg reside close to bile ducts and coculture with cholangiocytes or their supernatants induced preferential apoptosis of Treg compared with CD8 effector cells. Treg from diseased livers expressed high levels of CD95, and their apoptosis was inhibited by IL‐2 or blockade of CD95. Conclusion: Recruitment through endothelium does not impair Treg stability, but a proinflammatory microenvironment deficient in IL‐2 leads to impaired function and increased susceptibility of Treg to epithelial cell‐induced Fas‐mediated apoptosis. These results provide a mechanism to explain Treg dysfunction in inflamed tissues and suggest that IL‐2 supplementation, particularly if used in conjunction

  9. Pαx6 Expression in Postmitotic Neurons Mediates the Growth of Axons in Response to SFRP1

    PubMed Central

    Sebastián-Serrano, Alvaro; Sandonis, Africa; Cardozo, Marcos; Rodríguez-Tornos, Fernanda M.; Bovolenta, Paola; Nieto, Marta

    2012-01-01

    During development, the mechanisms that specify neuronal subclasses are coupled to those that determine their axonal response to guidance cues. Pax6 is a homedomain transcription factor required for the specification of a variety of neural precursors. After cell cycle exit, Pax6 expression is often shut down in the precursor progeny and most postmitotic neurons no longer express detectable levels of the protein. There are however exceptions and high Pax6 protein levels are found, for example, in postmitotic retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), dopaminergic neurons of the olfactory bulb and the limbic system in the telencephalon. The function of Pax6 in these differentiating neurons remains mostly elusive. Here, we demonstrate that Pax6 mediates the response of growing axons to SFRP1, a secreted molecule expressed in several Pax6-positive forebrain territories. Forced expression of Pax6 in cultured postmitotic cortical neurons, which do not normally express Pax6, was sufficient to increment axonal length. Growth was blocked by the addition of anti-SFRP1 antibodies, whereas exogenously added SFRP1 increased axonal growth of Pax6-transfected neurons but not that of control or untransfected cortical neurons. In the reverse scenario, shRNA-mediated knock-down of Pax6 in mouse retinal explants specifically abolished RGCs axonal growth induced by SFRP1, but had no effect on RGCs differentiation and it did not modify the effect of Shh or Netrin on axon growth. Taken together these results demonstrate that expression of Pax6 is necessary and sufficient to render postmitotic neurons competent to respond to SFRP1. These results reveal a novel and unexpected function of Pax6 in postmitotic neurons and situate Pax6 and SFRP1 as pair regulators of axonal connectivity. PMID:22359602

  10. An auxin-mediated shift toward growth isotropy promotes organ formation at the shoot meristem in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Massimiliano; Ali, Olivier; Boudon, Frédéric; Cloarec, Gladys; Abad, Ursula; Cellier, Coralie; Chen, Xu; Gilles, Benjamin; Milani, Pascale; Friml, Jiří; Vernoux, Teva; Godin, Christophe; Hamant, Olivier; Traas, Jan

    2014-10-01

    To control morphogenesis, molecular regulatory networks have to interfere with the mechanical properties of the individual cells of developing organs and tissues, but how this is achieved is not well known. We study this issue here in the shoot meristem of higher plants, a group of undifferentiated cells where complex changes in growth rates and directions lead to the continuous formation of new organs. Here, we show that the plant hormone auxin plays an important role in this process via a dual, local effect on the extracellular matrix, the cell wall, which determines cell shape. Our study reveals that auxin not only causes a limited reduction in wall stiffness but also directly interferes with wall anisotropy via the regulation of cortical microtubule dynamics. We further show that to induce growth isotropy and organ outgrowth, auxin somehow interferes with the cortical microtubule-ordering activity of a network of proteins, including AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN 1 and KATANIN 1. Numerical simulations further indicate that the induced isotropy is sufficient to amplify the effects of the relatively minor changes in wall stiffness to promote organogenesis and the establishment of new growth axes in a robust manner.

  11. An auxin-mediated shift toward growth isotropy promotes organ formation at the shoot meristem in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Massimiliano; Ali, Olivier; Boudon, Frédéric; Cloarec, Gladys; Abad, Ursula; Cellier, Coralie; Chen, Xu; Gilles, Benjamin; Milani, Pascale; Friml, Jiří; Vernoux, Teva; Godin, Christophe; Hamant, Olivier; Traas, Jan

    2014-10-01

    To control morphogenesis, molecular regulatory networks have to interfere with the mechanical properties of the individual cells of developing organs and tissues, but how this is achieved is not well known. We study this issue here in the shoot meristem of higher plants, a group of undifferentiated cells where complex changes in growth rates and directions lead to the continuous formation of new organs. Here, we show that the plant hormone auxin plays an important role in this process via a dual, local effect on the extracellular matrix, the cell wall, which determines cell shape. Our study reveals that auxin not only causes a limited reduction in wall stiffness but also directly interferes with wall anisotropy via the regulation of cortical microtubule dynamics. We further show that to induce growth isotropy and organ outgrowth, auxin somehow interferes with the cortical microtubule-ordering activity of a network of proteins, including AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN 1 and KATANIN 1. Numerical simulations further indicate that the induced isotropy is sufficient to amplify the effects of the relatively minor changes in wall stiffness to promote organogenesis and the establishment of new growth axes in a robust manner. PMID:25264254

  12. Contributions of Two-Component Regulatory Systems, Alternative σ Factors, and Negative Regulators to Listeria monocytogenes Cold Adaptation and Cold Growth

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yvonne C.; Hu, Yuewei; Chaturongakul, Soraya; Files, Kali D.; Bowen, Barbara M.; Boor, Kathryn J.; Wiedmann, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The ability of Listeria monocytogenes to grow at refrigeration temperatures is critical for transmission of this foodborne pathogen. We evaluated the contributions of different transcriptional regulators and two-component regulatory systems to L. monocytogenes cold adaptation and cold growth. L. monocytogenes parent strain 10403S and selected isogenic null mutants in genes encoding four alternative σ factors (sigB, sigH, sigC, and sigL), two regulators of σB (rsbT and rsbV), two negative regulators (ctsR and hrcA), and 15 two-component response regulators were grown in brain heart infusion broth at 4°C with (i) a high-concentration starting inoculum (108 CFU/ml), (ii) a low-concentration starting inoculum (102 CFU/ml), and (iii) a high-concentration starting inoculum of cold-adapted cells. With a starting inoculum of 108 CFU/ml, null mutants in genes encoding selected alternative σ factors (ΔsigH, ΔsigC, and ΔsigL), a negative regulator (ΔctsR), regulators of σB (ΔrsbT and ΔrsbV), and selected two-component response regulators (ΔlisR, Δlmo1172, and Δlmo1060) had significantly reduced growth (P < 0.05) compared with the parent strain after 12 days at 4°C. The growth defect for ΔsigL was limited and was not confirmed by optical density (OD600) measurement data. With a starting inoculum of 102 CFU/ml and after monitoring growth at 4°C over 84 days, only the ΔctsR strain had a consistent but limited growth defect; the other mutant strains had either no growth defects or limited growth defects apparent at only one or two of the nine sampling points evaluated during the 84-day growth period (ΔsigB, ΔsigC, and Δlmo1172). With a 108 CFU/ml starting inoculum of cold-adapted cells, none of the mutant strains that had a growth defect when inoculation was performed with cells pregrown at 37°C had reduced growth as compared with the parent strain after 12 days at 4°C, suggesting a specific defect in the ability of these mutant strains to adapt to 4

  13. Human chromosome 3 mediates growth arrest and suppression of apoptosis in microcell hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Speevak, M D; Chevrette, M

    1996-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic treatment of tumor cells leads either to tumor cell death (usually by apoptosis) or to the formation of drug-resistant subpopulations. Known mechanisms of cancer cell drug resistance include gene amplification and increased expression of drug transporters. On the other hand, normal cells survive many forms of chemotherapy with minimal damage probably because of their capacity for growth arrest and stringent control of apoptosis. Microcell hybrids between B78 (murine melanoma) and HSF5 (normal human fibroblasts) were analyzed to identify a new human chromosomal region involved in the promotion of drug-induced growth arrest and suppression of apoptosis. In these hybrids, the presence of human chromosome 3 was strongly associated with suppression of apoptosis via G1 and G2 growth arrest during exposure to the antimetabolite N-phosphonoacetyl-L-aspartate (PALA), suggesting that a gene(s) on chromosome 3 serves an antiproliferative role in a drug-responsive growth arrest pathway. PMID:8628288

  14. Spectroscopic studies of nucleic acid additions during seed-mediated growth of gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tapp, Maeling; Sullivan, Rick; Dennis, Patrick; Naik, Rajesh R.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of adding nucleic acids to gold seeds during the growth stage of either nanospheres or nanorods was investigated using UV-Vis spectroscopy to reveal any oligonucleotide base or structure-specific effects on nanoparticle growth kinetics or plasmonic signatures. Spectral data indicate that the presence of DNA duplexes during seed ageing drastically accelerated nanosphere growth while the addition of single-stranded polyadenine at any point during seed ageing induces nanosphere aggregation. For seeds added to a gold nanorod growth solution, single-stranded polythymine induces a modest blue-shift in the longitudinal peak wavelength. Moreover, a particular sequence comprised of 50% thymine bases was found to induce a faster, more dramatic blue-shift in the longitudinal peak wavelength compared to any of the homopolymer incubation cases. Monomeric forms of the nucleic acids, however, do not yield discernable spectral differences in any of the gold suspensions studied. PMID:25960601

  15. Teacher Prejudice as a Mediating Factor in Student Growth and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gay, Geneva

    1979-01-01

    Teacher prejudices exert powerful influences on student growth and development and are naturally restrictive whether the prejudice comes from biases about intelligence, sexuality, ethnicity, physical appearance, or socioeconomic status. (JMF)

  16. Local Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling Mediates the Systemic Pathogenic Effects of Staphylococcus aureus Toxic Shock Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gillman, Aaron N.; Stach, Christopher S.; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Peterson, Marnie L.

    2016-01-01

    Secreted factors of Staphylococcus aureus can activate host signaling from the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The superantigen toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) contributes to mucosal cytokine production through a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM)-mediated shedding of EGFR ligands and subsequent EGFR activation. The secreted hemolysin, α-toxin, can also induce EGFR signaling and directly interacts with ADAM10, a sheddase of EGFR ligands. The current work explores the role of EGFR signaling in menstrual toxic shock syndrome (mTSS), a disease mediated by TSST-1. The data presented show that TSST-1 and α-toxin induce ADAM- and EGFR-dependent cytokine production from human vaginal epithelial cells. TSST-1 and α-toxin also induce cytokine production from an ex vivo porcine vaginal mucosa (PVM) model. EGFR signaling is responsible for the majority of IL-8 production from PVM in response to secreted toxins and live S. aureus. Finally, data are presented demonstrating that inhibition of EGFR signaling with the EGFR-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478 significantly increases survival in a rabbit model of mTSS. These data indicate that EGFR signaling is critical for progression of an S. aureus exotoxin-mediated disease and may represent an attractive host target for therapeutics. PMID:27414801

  17. Bradykinin and nerve growth factor release the capsaicin receptor from PtdIns(4,5)P2-mediated inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chuang, H H; Prescott, E D; Kong, H; Shields, S; Jordt, S E; Basbaum, A I; Chao, M V; Julius, D

    2001-06-21

    Tissue injury generates endogenous factors that heighten our sense of pain by increasing the response of sensory nerve endings to noxious stimuli. Bradykinin and nerve growth factor (NGF) are two such pro-algesic agents that activate G-protein-coupled (BK2) and tyrosine kinase (TrkA) receptors, respectively, to stimulate phospholipase C (PLC) signalling pathways in primary afferent neurons. How these actions produce sensitization to physical or chemical stimuli has not been elucidated at the molecular level. Here, we show that bradykinin- or NGF-mediated potentiation of thermal sensitivity in vivo requires expression of VR1, a heat-activated ion channel on sensory neurons. Diminution of plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2) levels through antibody sequestration or PLC-mediated hydrolysis mimics the potentiating effects of bradykinin or NGF at the cellular level. Moreover, recruitment of PLC-gamma to TrkA is essential for NGF-mediated potentiation of channel activity, and biochemical studies suggest that VR1 associates with this complex. These studies delineate a biochemical mechanism through which bradykinin and NGF produce hypersensitivity and might explain how the activation of PLC signalling systems regulates other members of the TRP channel family. PMID:11418861

  18. Resilience and social support promote posttraumatic growth of women with infertility: the mediating role of positive coping.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongju; Peng, Li; Chen, Long; Long, Ling; He, Wei; Li, Min; Wang, Tao

    2014-02-28

    According to previous research, clinical experience with individuals facing infertility has demonstrated that positive psychological changes can arise from the struggle involved (Paul et al., 2010), which is called posttraumatic growth (PTG). However, little knowledge has been gained about the relationships between PTG and its facilitating factors. The present study examined whether resilience and social support could predict PTG in women with infertility. The role of positive coping as a potential mediator was also assessed. Using a cross-sectional design, all members of a convenience sample of 182 women with infertility completed self-report measures of PTG, resilience, perceived social support, positive coping and background information. It was found that resilience, social support and positive coping positively correlated with PTG, which explained 34.0% of the total variance. The results suggested that positive coping partially mediated the impact of resilience on PTG while it totally mediated the relationship between social support and PTG. These findings demonstrated that, in clinical settings, improving positive coping in women with infertility may be helpful for the attainment of PTG.

  19. Renalase Expression by Melanoma and Tumor-Associated Macrophages Promotes Tumor Growth through a STAT3-Mediated Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hollander, Lindsay; Guo, Xiaojia; Velazquez, Heino; Chang, John; Safirstein, Robert; Kluger, Harriet; Cha, Charles; Desir, Gary V

    2016-07-01

    To sustain their proliferation, cancer cells overcome negative-acting signals that restrain their growth and promote senescence and cell death. Renalase (RNLS) is a secreted flavoprotein that functions as a survival factor after ischemic and toxic injury, signaling through the plasma calcium channel PMCA4b to activate the PI3K/AKT and MAPK pathways. We show that RNLS expression is increased markedly in primary melanomas and CD163(+) tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). In clinical specimens, RNLS expression in the tumor correlated inversely with disease-specific survival, suggesting a pathogenic role for RNLS. Attenuation of RNLS by RNAi, blocking antibodies, or an RNLS-derived inhibitory peptide decreased melanoma cell survival, and anti-RNLS therapy blocked tumor growth in vivo in murine xenograft assays. Mechanistic investigations showed that increased apoptosis in tumor cells was temporally related to p38 MAPK-mediated Bax activation and that increased cell growth arrest was associated with elevated expression of the cell-cycle inhibitor p21. Overall, our results established a role for the secreted flavoprotein RNLS in promoting melanoma cell growth and CD163(+) TAM in the tumor microenvironment, with potential therapeutic implications for the management of melanoma. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3884-94. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197188

  20. Oxide mediated liquid-solid growth of high aspect ratio aligned gold silicide nanowires on Si(110) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatta, Umananda M.; Rath, Ashutosh; Dash, Jatis K.; Ghatak, Jay; Yi-Feng, Lai; Liu, Chuan-Pu; Satyam, P. V.

    2009-11-01

    Silicon nanowires grown using the vapor-liquid-solid method are promising candidates for nanoelectronics applications. The nanowires grow from an Au-Si catalyst during silicon chemical vapor deposition. In this paper, the effect of temperature, oxide at the interface and substrate orientation on the nucleation and growth kinetics during formation of nanogold silicide structures is explained using an oxide mediated liquid-solid growth mechanism. Using real time in situ high temperature transmission electron microscopy (with 40 ms time resolution), we show the formation of high aspect ratio (≈15.0) aligned gold silicide nanorods in the presence of native oxide at the interface during in situ annealing of gold thin films on Si(110) substrates. Steps observed in the growth rate and real time electron diffraction show the existence of liquid Au-Si nano-alloy structures on the surface besides the un-reacted gold nanostructures. These results might enable us to engineer the growth of nanowires and similar structures with an Au-Si alloy as a catalyst.

  1. Oxide mediated liquid-solid growth of high aspect ratio aligned gold silicide nanowires on Si(110) substrates.

    PubMed

    Bhatta, Umananda M; Rath, Ashutosh; Dash, Jatis K; Ghatak, Jay; Yi-Feng, Lai; Liu, Chuan-Pu; Satyam, P V

    2009-11-18

    Silicon nanowires grown using the vapor-liquid-solid method are promising candidates for nanoelectronics applications. The nanowires grow from an Au-Si catalyst during silicon chemical vapor deposition. In this paper, the effect of temperature, oxide at the interface and substrate orientation on the nucleation and growth kinetics during formation of nanogold silicide structures is explained using an oxide mediated liquid-solid growth mechanism. Using real time in situ high temperature transmission electron microscopy (with 40 ms time resolution), we show the formation of high aspect ratio ( approximately 15.0) aligned gold silicide nanorods in the presence of native oxide at the interface during in situ annealing of gold thin films on Si(110) substrates. Steps observed in the growth rate and real time electron diffraction show the existence of liquid Au-Si nano-alloy structures on the surface besides the un-reacted gold nanostructures. These results might enable us to engineer the growth of nanowires and similar structures with an Au-Si alloy as a catalyst. PMID:19843987

  2. ERK activation is required for CCK-mediated pancreatic adaptive growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Bryan J; Lodewyk, Kevin B; Sebolt-Leopold, Judith S; Ernst, Stephen A; Williams, John A

    2014-10-01

    High levels of cholecystokinin (CCK) can stimulate pancreatic adaptive growth in which mature acinar cells divide, leading to enhanced pancreatic mass with parallel increases in protein, DNA, RNA, and digestive enzyme content. Prolonged release of CCK can be induced by feeding trypsin inhibitor (TI) to disrupt normal feedback control. This leads to exocrine growth in a CCK-dependent manner. The extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) pathway regulates many proliferative processes in various tissues and disease models. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of ERK signaling in pancreatic adaptive growth using the MEK inhibitors PD-0325901 and trametinib (GSK-1120212). It was determined that PD-0325901 given two times daily by gavage or mixed into powdered chow was an effective and specific inhibitor of ERK signaling in vivo. TI-containing chow led to a robust increase in pancreatic mass, protein, DNA, and RNA content. This pancreatic adaptive growth was blocked in mice fed chow containing the MEK inhibitors. PD-0325901 blocked TI-induced ERK-regulated early response genes, cell-cycle proteins, and mitogenesis by acinar cells. It was determined that ERK signaling is necessary for the initiation of pancreatic adaptive growth but not necessary to maintain it. PD-0325901 blocked adaptive growth when given before cell-cycle initiation but not after mitogenesis had been established. Furthermore, GSK-1120212, a chemically distinct inhibitor of the ERK pathway that is now approved for clinical use, inhibited growth similar to PD-0325901. These data demonstrate that the ERK pathway is required for CCK-stimulated pancreatic adaptive growth.

  3. Loss of growth polarity and mislocalization of septa in a Neurospora mutant altered in the regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, K S; Aramayo, R; Minke, P F; Metzenberg, R L; Plamann, M

    1996-01-01

    In filamentous fungi, growth polarity (i.e. hyphal extension) and formation of septa require polarized deposition of new cell wall material. To explore this process, we analyzed a conditional Neurospora crassa mutant, mcb, which showed a complete loss of growth polarity when incubated at the restrictive temperature. Cloning and DNA sequence analysis of the mcb gene revealed that it encodes a regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Unexpectedly, the mcb mutant still formed septa when grown at the restrictive temperature, indicating that polarized deposition of wall material during septation is a process that is, at least in part, independent of polarized deposition during hyphal tip extension. However, septa formed in the mcb mutant growing at the restrictive temperature are mislocalized. Both polarized growth and septation are actin-dependent processes, and a concentration of actin patches is observed at growing hyphal tips and sites where septa are being formed. In the mcb mutant growing at the restrictive temperature, actin patches are uniformly distributed over the cell cortex; however, actin patches are still concentrated at sites of septation. Our results suggest that the PKA pathway regulates hyphal growth polarity, possibly through organizing actin patches at the cell cortex. Images PMID:8918454

  4. Effects of polymorphic microsatellites in the regulatory region of IGF1 and GHR on growth and carcass traits in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Curi, R A; Oliveira, H N; Silveira, A C; Lopes, C R

    2005-02-01

    Growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2 (IGF1 and IGF2) and their associated binding proteins and transmembrane receptors (GHR, IGF1R and IGF2R) play an important role in the physiology of mammalian growth. The objectives of the present study were to estimate the allele and genotype frequencies of microsatellite markers located in the 5'-regulatory region of the IGF1 and GHR genes in beef cattle belonging to different genetic groups and to determine effects of these markers on growth and carcass traits in these animals under an intensive production system. For this purpose, genotyping was performed on 384 bulls including 79 Nellore, 30 Canchim (5/8 Charolais + 3/8 Zebu) and 275 crossbred animals originating from crosses of Simmental (1/2 Simmental, n = 30) and Angus (1/2 Angus, n = 245) sires with Nellore females. The effects of substituting L allele for S allele of GHR microsatellite across Nellore, Canchim and 1/2 Angus were significant for weight gain and body weight (P < 0.05). The IGF1 microsatellite allele substitutions of 229 for 225 within Nellore group and of 225 for 229 within 1/2 Angus were not significant for any of the traits. PMID:15670132

  5. Interfactant-mediated quasi-Frank-van der Merwe growth of Pb on Si(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Th.; Bauer, E.

    2000-12-01

    The influence of interfactants (Au, Ag) on the growth of Pb on Si(111) is studied by low-energy electron microscopy in the temperature range from 260 K to 460 K. On the Si(111)-(7×7) surface Pb grows in the Stranski-Krastanov mode, on the Si(111)-(3×3)R30°-Au and on the Si(111)-(6×6)-Au surface in the quasi-Frank-van der Merwe (layer-by-layer) mode. On the Si(111)-(3×3)R30°-Ag surface the growth mode changes from layer-by-layer below 300 K to the Stranski-Krastanov mode above 300 K. The temperature dependence of the growth cannot be explained by thermodynamics but is governed by kinetics. The analysis of the maximum island density in terms of the atomistic nucleation theory gives acceptable values for nucleus size and energies only in the layer-by-layer growth regime. In the Stranski-Krastanov growth regime abnormal values are obtained that are attributed to high cluster mobility on the initial two-dimensional layer. The conditions leading to quasi-Frank-van der Merwe growth are discussed.

  6. Competition- and resource-mediated tradeoffs between growth and defensive chemistry in trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides).

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Jack R; Kruger, Eric L; Lindroth, Richard L

    2006-01-01

    Costs of defense are thought to maintain genetic variations in the expression of defense within plant populations. As with many plant species, aspen exhibits considerable variation in allocation to secondary metabolites. This study examined the independent and interactive effects of genotype, soil fertility and belowground competition on defensive chemistry and growth in trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides). Four aspen genotypes were grown with high and low soil fertility, and with and without root competition. Physiological, morphological and allocational determinants of growth were measured to identify growth-defense tradeoffs. Nutrient limitation and competition decreased growth, leaf mass ratio, leaf nitrogen concentration and photosynthesis, and increased root : shoot ratio and leaf condensed tannin concentrations. The competition treatment also resulted in increased leaf phenolic glycoside (PG) concentrations. Aspen growth was negatively correlated with PG concentrations under low fertility with competition. The relationship between growth and its major determinants was also negatively related to foliar condensed tannins expressed as a proportion of tree mass, indicating an additional indirect cost of allocation to secondary metabolites.

  7. Contrasting growth phenology of native and invasive forest shrubs mediated by genome size.

    PubMed

    Fridley, Jason D; Craddock, Alaä

    2015-08-01

    Examination of the significance of genome size to plant invasions has been largely restricted to its association with growth rate. We investigated the novel hypothesis that genome size is related to forest invasions through its association with growth phenology, as a result of the ability of large-genome species to grow more effectively through cell expansion at cool temperatures. We monitored the spring leaf phenology of 54 species of eastern USA deciduous forests, including native and invasive shrubs of six common genera. We used new measurements of genome size to evaluate its association with spring budbreak, cell size, summer leaf production rate, and photosynthetic capacity. In a phylogenetic hierarchical model that differentiated native and invasive species as a function of summer growth rate and spring budbreak timing, species with smaller genomes exhibited both faster growth and delayed budbreak compared with those with larger nuclear DNA content. Growth rate, but not budbreak timing, was associated with whether a species was native or invasive. Our results support genome size as a broad indicator of the growth behavior of woody species. Surprisingly, invaders of deciduous forests show the same small-genome tendencies of invaders of more open habitats, supporting genome size as a robust indicator of invasiveness.

  8. Methylglyoxal, a glycolysis side-product, induces Hsp90 glycation and YAP-mediated tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Nokin, Marie-Julie; Durieux, Florence; Peixoto, Paul; Chiavarina, Barbara; Peulen, Olivier; Blomme, Arnaud; Turtoi, Andrei; Costanza, Brunella; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Baiwir, Dominique; Scheijen, Jean L; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Leenders, Justine; De Tullio, Pascal; Bianchi, Elettra; Thiry, Marc; Uchida, Koji; Spiegel, David A; Cochrane, James R; Hutton, Craig A; De Pauw, Edwin; Delvenne, Philippe; Belpomme, Dominique; Castronovo, Vincent; Bellahcène, Akeila

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming toward aerobic glycolysis unavoidably induces methylglyoxal (MG) formation in cancer cells. MG mediates the glycation of proteins to form advanced glycation end products (AGEs). We have recently demonstrated that MG-induced AGEs are a common feature of breast cancer. Little is known regarding the impact of MG-mediated carbonyl stress on tumor progression. Breast tumors with MG stress presented with high nuclear YAP, a key transcriptional co-activator regulating tumor growth and invasion. Elevated MG levels resulted in sustained YAP nuclear localization/activity that could be reverted using Carnosine, a scavenger for MG. MG treatment affected Hsp90 chaperone activity and decreased its binding to LATS1, a key kinase of the Hippo pathway. Cancer cells with high MG stress showed enhanced growth and metastatic potential in vivo. These findings reinforce the cumulative evidence pointing to hyperglycemia as a risk factor for cancer incidence and bring renewed interest in MG scavengers for cancer treatment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19375.001 PMID:27759563

  9. Regulatory effects of Spirulina complex polysaccharides on growth of murine RSV-M glioma cells through Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Kawanishi, Yu; Tominaga, Akira; Okuyama, Hiromi; Fukuoka, Satoshi; Taguchi, Takahiro; Kusumoto, Yutaka; Yawata, Toshio; Fujimoto, Yasunori; Ono, Shiro; Shimizu, Keiji

    2013-01-01

    This study is the first to report that Spirulina complex polysaccharides (CPS) suppress glioma growth by down-regulating angiogenesis via a Toll-like receptor 4 signal. Murine RSV-M glioma cells were implanted s.c. into C3H/HeN mice and TLR4 mutant C3H/HeJ mice. Treatment with either Spirulina CPS or Escherichia coli (E. coli) lipopolysaccharides (LPS) strongly suppressed RSV-M glioma cell growth in C3H/HeN, but not C3H/HeJ, mice. Glioma cells stimulated production of interleukin (IL)-17 in both C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ tumor-bearing mice. Treatment with E. coli LPS induced much greater IL-17 production in tumor-bearing C3H/HeN mice than in tumor-bearing C3H/HeJ mice. In C3H/HeN mice, treatment with Spirulina CPS suppressed growth of re-transplanted glioma; however, treatment with E. coli LPS did not, suggesting that Spirulina CPS enhance the immune response. Administration of anti-cluster of differentiation (CD)8, anti-CD4, anti-CD8 antibodies, and anti-asialo GM1 antibodies enhanced tumor growth, suggesting that T cells and natural killer cells or macrophages are involved in suppression of tumor growth by Spirulina CPS. Although anti-interferon-γ antibodies had no effect on glioma cell growth, anti-IL-17 antibodies administered four days after tumor transplantation suppressed growth similarly to treatment with Spirulina CPS. Less angiogenesis was observed in gliomas from Spirulina CPS-treated mice than in those from saline- or E. coli LPS-treated mice. These findings suggest that, in C3H/HeN mice, Spirulina CPS antagonize glioma cell growth by down-regulating angiogenesis, and that this down-regulation is mediated in part by regulating IL-17 production. PMID:23134155

  10. ROLES OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR (EGF) AND TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-ALPHA (TGF-A) IN MEDIATION OF DIOXIN (TCDD)-INDUCED DELAYS IN DEVELOPMENT OF THE MOUSE MAMMARY GLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Roles of Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) and Transforming Growth Factor-alpha (TGF-a) in Mediation of Dioxin (TCDD)-Induced Delays in Development of the Mouse Mammary Gland.
    Suzanne E. Fenton, Barbara Abbott, Lamont Bryant, and Angela Buckalew. U.S. EPA, NHEERL, Reproductive Tox...

  11. NF-κB Activation Limits Airway Branching through Inhibition of Sp1-Mediated Fibroblast Growth Factor-10 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, John T.; Carver, Billy J.; Plosa, Erin J.; Yamamoto, Yasutoshi; Miller, J. Davin; Liu, Jin-Hua; van der Meer, Riet; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Prince, Lawrence S.

    2015-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a frequent complication of preterm birth. This chronic lung disease results from arrested saccular airway development and is most common in infants exposed to inflammatory stimuli. In experimental models, inflammation inhibits expression of fibroblast growth factor-10 (FGF-10) and impairs epithelial–mesenchymal interactions during lung development; however, the mechanisms connecting inflammatory signaling with reduced growth factor expression are not yet understood. In this study we found that soluble inflammatory mediators present in tracheal fluid from preterm infants can prevent saccular airway branching. In addition, LPS treatment led to local production of mediators that inhibited airway branching and FGF-10 expression in LPS-resistant C.C3-Tlr4Lpsd/J fetal mouse lung explants. Both direct NF-κB activation and inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and TNF-α) that activate NF-κB reduced FGF-10 expression, whereas chemokines that signal via other inflammatory pathways had no effect. Mutational analysis of the FGF-10 promoter failed to identify genetic elements required for direct NF-κB–mediated FGF-10 inhibition. Instead, NF-κB activation appeared to interfere with the normal stimulation of FGF-10 expression by Sp1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and nuclear coimmunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that the RelA subunit of NF-κB and Sp1 physically interact at the FGF-10 promoter. These findings indicate that inflammatory signaling through NF-κB disrupts the normal expression of FGF-10 in fetal lung mesenchyme by interfering with the transcriptional machinery critical for lung morphogenesis. PMID:20861353

  12. Viral complement regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Rosengard, A M; Ahearn, J M

    1999-05-01

    The inactivation of complement provides cells and tissues critical protection from complement-mediated attack and decreases the associated recruitment of other inflammatory mediators. In an attempt to evade the host immune response, viruses have evolved two mechanisms to acquire complement regulatory proteins. They can directly seize the host cell complement regulators onto their outer envelope and/or they can produce their own proteins which are either secreted into the neighboring intercellular space or expressed as membrane-bound proteins on the infected host cell. The following review will concentrate on the viral homologues of the mammalian complement regulatory proteins, specifically those containing complement control protein (CCP) repeats. PMID:10408371

  13. Exogenous Estrogen as Mediator of Racial Differences in Bioactive Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Levels Among Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Vitolins, Mara Z.; Paskett, Electra D.; Chang, Shine

    2015-01-01

    Background. The role of exogenous estrogen use in racial differences in insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels which affect cancer risk is unclear. We investigated whether the relationship between race and circulating bioactive IGF-I proteins was mediated by exogenous estrogen and the extent to which exogenous estrogen influenced the race–IGF-I relationship in postmenopausal women. Methods. This cross-sectional study included 636 white and 133 African American postmenopausal women enrolled in an ancillary study of the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study. To assess exogenous estrogen use (nonusers [n = 262] vs users [n = 507]) as a mediator of the race–IGF-I relationship, we used the Baron–Kenny method and an estimation of the proportional change in the odd ratios for IGF-I levels on race plus a bootstrapping test for the significance of the mediation effect. Results. Compared with white women, African American women were more likely to have high IGF-I levels and less likely to use exogenous estrogen. After accounting for race, estrogen nonusers had higher IGF-I levels than estrogen users did. Among oral contraceptive ever users, exogenous estrogen had a strong mediation effect (67%; p = .018) in the race–IGF-I relationship. In the women with a history of hypertension, exogenous estrogen explained racial differences in IGF-I levels to a modest degree (23%; p = .029). Conclusions. Exogenous estrogen use has a potentially important role in disparities in IGF-I bioactivity between postmenopausal African American and white women. A history of oral contraceptive use and hypertension may be part of the interconnected hormonal pathways related to racial differences in IGF-I levels. PMID:25238773

  14. Hypoxia-mediated induction of acidic/basic fibroblast growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor in mononuclear phagocytes stimulates growth of hypoxic endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kuwabara, K; Ogawa, S; Matsumoto, M; Koga, S; Clauss, M; Pinsky, D J; Lyn, P; Leavy, J; Witte, L; Joseph-Silverstein, J

    1995-01-01

    Wound repair and tumor vascularization depend upon blood vessel growth into hypoxic tissue. Although hypoxia slows endothelial cell (EC) proliferation and suppresses EC basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) expression, we report that macrophages (MPs) exposed to PO2 approximately 12-14 torr (1 torr = 133.3 Pa) synthesize and release in a time-dependent manner platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and acidic/basic FGFs (a/bFGFs), which stimulate the growth of hypoxic ECs. Chromatography of hypoxic MP-conditioned medium on immobilized heparin with an ascending NaCl gradient resolved three peaks of mitogenic activity: activity of the first peak was neutralized by antibody to PDGF; activity of the second peak was neutralized by antibody to aFGF; and activity of the third peak was neutralized by antibody to bFGF. Metabolically labeled lysates and supernatants from MPs exposed to hypoxia showed increased synthesis and release of immunoprecipitable PDGF and a/bFGF in the absence of changes in cell viability. Possible involvement of a heme-containing oxygen sensor in MP elaboration of growth factors was suggested by the induction of bFGF and PDGF by normoxic MPs exposed to nickel or cobalt, although metabolic inhibitors such as sodium azide were without effect. These results suggest a paracrine model in which hypoxia stimulates MP release of PDGF and a/bFGF, inducing EC proliferation and potentially promoting angiogenesis in hypoxic environments. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7538678

  15. Flavonoids with epidermal growth factor-receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitory activity stimulate PEPT1-mediated cefixime uptake into human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, U; Kuntz, S; Daniel, H

    2001-10-01

    We have tested 33 flavonoids, occurring ubiquitously in foods of plant origin, for their ability to alter the transport of the beta-lactam antibiotic cefixime via the H+-coupled intestinal peptide transporter PEPT1 in the human intestinal epithelial cell line Caco-2. Of the flavonoids tested, quercetin, genistein, naringin, diosmin, acacetin, and chrysin increased uptake of [14C]cefixime dose dependently by up to 60%. All other flavonoids were either without effect or decreased the absorption of cefixime. Quercetin was shown to increase the Vmax of cefixime influx without changing the apparent Km for transport. However, the expected concomitant increase in intracellular acidification due to PEPT1-mediated cefixime/H+-cotransport was less pronounced in the presence of quercetin. This suggested that pH regulatory systems such as apical Na+/H+-exchange could be activated by quercetin and maintain the proton-motive driving force for cefixime uptake. Since quercetin and genistein have been shown to inhibit epidermal growth factor (EGF)-receptor tyrosine kinases, we applied tyrphostin 25 to prove whether such an inhibition could explain the stimulatory effects seen on cefixime uptake. It was found that tyrphostin 25 simulated the effects of quercetin by increasing cefixime absorption due to maintenance of the transmembrane pH gradient. In conclusion, our studies show that flavonoids with EGF-receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitory activities enhance the intestinal absorption of the beta-lactam antibiotic cefixime in Caco-2 cells by activation of apical Na+/H+-exchange and a concomitant increase of the driving force for PEPT1.

  16. Ninjurin1 inhibits colitis-mediated colon cancer development and growth by suppression of macrophage infiltration through repression of FAK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ju-Hee; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Seong, Je Kyung; Lee, Sang-Jin; Jeon, Sejin; Oh, Goo Taeg

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage infiltration promotes tumorigenesis. However, the macrophage infiltration regulatory molecules have not been fully determined. Nerve injury-induced protein 1 (ninjurin1) is a homophilic cell surface adhesion molecule that plays an important role in cell migration and attachment. Although ninjurin1 is believed to play a role in several malignancies, it is unclear whether ninjurin1 expression contributes to cancer progression. We used transgenic mice (tg mice) that overexpressed ninjurin1 on macrophages. We subjected ninjurin1 tg mice to a well-known mouse model of colitis-associated colon cancer in which animals are treated with azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). After AOM and DSS treatment, ninjurin1 tg mice developed fewer and smaller tumors compared with wild-type (wt) mice. Ninjurin1 tg mice also showed reduced infiltration of macrophages and suppressed angiogenesis in the tumor mass. We therefore explored whether ninjurin1 decreases macrophage migration into the tumor sites. After adoptive transfer to tumor-bearing recipients, wild type and ninjurin1 tg mice's peritoneal macrophages were freshly isolated and labeled with carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE). As expected, compared with that of wt type macrophages, tumor infiltration of ninjurin1-overexpressing macrophages was significantly decreased. We also found that ninjurin1 overexpression suppressed FAK activity. In addition, knockdown of ninjurin1 enhanced FAK activity and migration activity of RAW264.7 cells. Ninjurin1 overexpression on macrophage inhibits tumor growth by suppression of macrophage infiltration through repression of FAK signaling. Ninjurin1 is a key regulator molecule for macrophage migration and Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) mediated tumorigenesis in vivo. PMID:27127177

  17. Monolayer-Mediated Growth of Organic Semiconductor Films with Improved Device Performance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lizhen; Hu, Xiaorong; Chi, Lifeng

    2015-09-15

    Increased interest in wearable and smart electronics is driving numerous research works on organic electronics. The control of film growth and patterning is of great importance when targeting high-performance organic semiconductor devices. In this Feature Article, we summarize our recent work focusing on the growth, crystallization, and device operation of organic semiconductors intermediated by ultrathin organic films (in most cases, only a monolayer). The site-selective growth, modified crystallization and morphology, and improved device performance of organic semiconductor films are demonstrated with the help of the inducing layers, including patterned and uniform Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers, crystalline ultrathin organic films, and self-assembled polymer brush films. The introduction of the inducing layers could dramatically change the diffusion of the organic semiconductors on the surface and the interactions between the active layer with the inducing layer, leading to improved aggregation/crystallization behavior and device performance. PMID:25992464

  18. Lipocortin 1 mediates dexamethasone-induced growth arrest of the A549 lung adenocarcinoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Croxtall, J D; Flower, R J

    1992-01-01

    The synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (1 microM to 1 pM) strongly (maximum greater than 80%) inhibits proliferation of the A549 human lung adenocarcinoma line (EC50 greater than 1 nM) and leads to the appearance, or a further increase (approximately 3-fold) in the expression on the cell surface, of the calcium and phospholipid binding protein lipocortin (annexin) 1. Both these effects, which are shared by hydrocortisone (1 microM) but not by progesterone or aldosterone (1 microM), are inhibited by the antiglucocorticoids RU38486 and RU43044 (1 microM). The nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs indomethacin (1 microM) and naproxen (10 microM) and human recombinant lipocortin 1 (0.05-5.0 micrograms/ml) also produce growth arrest in this cell line. During proliferation A549 cells spontaneously release prostaglandin E2 [10-20 ng (28-57 pmol) per ml per 5-day period] into the growth medium. In concentrations that cause growth-arrest, dexamethasone, indomethacin, and lipocortin 1 abolish the generation of this eicosanoid by A549 cells. Prostaglandin E2 itself (0.01-1 pM) stimulates cell growth and partially reverses (approximately 50%) the inhibition of growth caused by dexamethasone and indomethacin. Addition of the neutralizing anti-lipocortin 1 monoclonal antibody 1A (5 micrograms/ml), but not the nonneutralizing anti-lipocortin monoclonal antibody 1B, substantially reversed (greater than 80%) the inhibitory activity of dexamethasone on both growth and prostaglandin E2 synthesis. The generation of prostaglandin E2 by A549 cells seems to be an important regulator of cell proliferation in vitro and the dexamethasone-induced suppression of proliferation in this model is attributable to eicosanoid inhibition caused by lipocortin 1. Images PMID:1533045

  19. Testosterone-induced adult neurosphere growth is mediated by sexually-dimorphic aromatase expression

    PubMed Central

    Ransome, Mark I.; Boon, Wah Chin

    2015-01-01

    We derived adult neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) from the sub-ventricular zone of male and female mice to examine direct responses to principal sex hormones. In the presence of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) NSPCs of both sexes expressed nestin and sox2, and could be maintained as neurospheres without addition of any sex hormones. The reverse was not observed; neither testosterone (T), 17β-estradiol (E2) nor progesterone (P4) was able to support neurosphere growth in the absence of EGF and FGF2. Ten nanomolar T, E2 or P4 induced nestin(+) cell proliferation within 20 min and enhanced neurosphere growth over 7 days irrespective of sex, which was abolished by Erk inhibition with 20 μM U0126. Maintaining neurospheres with each sex hormone did not affect subsequent neuronal differentiation. However, 10 nM T, E2 or P4 added during differentiation increased βIII tubulin(+) neuron production with E2 being more potent compared to T and P4 in both sexes. Androgen receptor (AR) inhibition with 20 μM flutamide but not aromatase inhibition with 10 μM letrozole reduced basal and T-induced neurosphere growth in females, while only concurrent inhibition of AR and aromatase produced the same effect in males. This sex-specific effect was supported by higher aromatase expression in male neurospheres compared to females measured by Western blot and green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter. Ten micromolar menadione induced oxidative stress, impaired neurosphere growth and up-regulated aromatase expression in both sexes. However, under oxidative stress letrozole significantly exacerbated impaired neurosphere growth in males only. While both E2 and T could prevent oxidative stress-induced growth reduction in both sexes, the effects of T were dependent on innate aromatase activity. We show for the first time that intrinsic androgen and estrogen signaling may impact the capacity of NSPCs to produce neural progenitors under pathological

  20. Regulatory function of organic carbon supplementation on biodiesel production during growth and nutrient stress phases of mixotrophic microalgae cultivation.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Rashmi; Rohit, M V; Swamy, Y V; Venkata Mohan, S

    2014-08-01

    Critical role of organic carbon supplementation on the lipid synthesis during growth and nutrient deprived stress phase was investigated in present study. Mixotrophic cultivation showed relatively higher biomass productivity at lower carbon loading condition (500mgCOD/l). Nutrient deprivation induced physiological stress and glucose supplementation with 2000mgCOD/l supported higher lipid accumulation (26%). Glucose supplementation in mixotrophic growth phase showed distinct influence on biomass growth whereas glucose supplementation in nutrient starvation resulted in higher lipid storage. Compositional variation in FAME profile was observed with respect to saturated fatty acids when operated with increasing glucose concentrations. Mixotrophic mode of cultivation showed remarkable benefits of nutrient removal and organic carbon supplementation influenced greatly on biodiesel production which can be easily scaled up to pilot plant and large scale production facilities.

  1. Wnt-induced calcium signaling mediates axon growth and guidance in the developing corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, B Ian; Li, Li; Kalil, Katherine

    2012-01-10

    Wnt5a gradients guide callosal axons by repulsion through Ryk receptors in vivo. We recently found that Wnt5a repels cortical axons and promotes axon outgrowth through calcium signaling in vitro. Here, using cortical slices, we show that Wnt5a signals through Ryk to guide and promote outgrowth of callosal axons after they cross the midline. Calcium transient frequencies in callosal growth cones positively correlate with axon outgrowth rates in vitro. In cortical slices, calcium release through inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptors and calcium entry through transient receptor potential channels modulate axon growth and guidance. Knocking down Ryk inhibits calcium signaling in cortical axons, reduces rates of axon outgrowth subsequent to midline crossing, and causes axon guidance defects. Calcium- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is required downstream of Wnt-induced calcium signaling for postcrossing callosal axon growth and guidance. Taken together, these results suggest that growth and guidance of postcrossing callosal axons by Wnt-Ryk-calcium signaling involves axon repulsion through CaMKII.

  2. Fetal calf serum-mediated inhibition of neurite growth from ciliary ganglion neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Davis, G E; Skaper, S D; Manthorpe, M; Moonen, G; Varon, S

    1984-01-01

    Embryonic chick ciliary ganglion (CG) neurons cultured in fetal calf serum-containing medium have been previously reported to extend neurites on polyornithine (PORN) substrata precoated with a neurite-promoting factor (PNPF) from rat schwannoma-conditioned medium. On PORN substrata alone, however, no neuritic growth occurred. This was interpreted as evidence that PORN was an incompetent substratum for ciliary neuritic growth. In this study, we now find that an untreated PORN substratum allows neuritic growth in serum-free defined medium. When PNPF was added to PORN, a more rapid and extensive neuritic response occurred. After 5 hr of culture, a 60% neuritic response occurred on PNPF/PORN, whereas no neurons initiated neurites until 10-12 hr on PORN. The inhibitory effect of fetal calf serum noted above on PORN could be obtained in part by pretreating the substratum with serum for 1 hr. Maximal inhibitory effects in the PORN pretreatment were achieved after 30 min and were not further improved by treatments up to 4 hr. Bovine serum albumin was also found to inhibit neurite growth on PORN to about 60% of the inhibition obtained by an equivalent amount of serum protein. Fetal calf serum was shown to cause a 15% reduction in the percentage of neurons bearing neurites after its addition to 18-hr serum-free PORN cultures and to cause statistically significant reductions in neurite lengths measured 2 hr later.

  3. Cyanobacteria-mediated phenylpropanoids and phytohormones in rice (Oryza sativa) enhance plant growth and stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dhananjaya P; Prabha, Ratna; Yandigeri, Mahesh S; Arora, Dilip K

    2011-11-01

    Phenylpropanoids, flavonoids and plant growth regulators in rice (Oryza sativa) variety (UPR 1823) inoculated with different cyanobacterial strains namely Anabaena oryzae, Anabaena doliolum, Phormidium fragile, Calothrix geitonos, Hapalosiphon intricatus, Aulosira fertilissima, Tolypothrix tenuis, Oscillatoria acuta and Plectonema boryanum were quantified using HPLC in pot conditions after 15 and 30 days. Qualitative analysis of the induced compounds using reverse phase HPLC and further confirmation with LC-MS/MS showed consistent accumulation of phenolic acids (gallic, gentisic, caffeic, chlorogenic and ferulic acids), flavonoids (rutin and quercetin) and phytohormones (indole acetic acid and indole butyric acid) in rice leaves. Plant growth promotion (shoot, root length and biomass) was positively correlated with total protein and chlorophyll content of leaves. Enzyme activity of peroxidase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase and total phenolic content was fairly high in rice leaves inoculated with O. acuta and P. boryanum after 30 days. Differential systemic accumulation of phenylpropanoids in plant leaves led us to conclude that cyanobacterial inoculation correlates positively with plant growth promotion and stress tolerance in rice. Furthermore, the study helped in deciphering possible mechanisms underlying plant growth promotion and stress tolerance in rice following cyanobacterial inoculation and indicated the less explored avenue of cyanobacterial colonization in stress tolerance against abiotic stress. PMID:21732035

  4. Fetal calf serum-mediated inhibition of neurite growth from ciliary ganglion neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Davis, G E; Skaper, S D; Manthorpe, M; Moonen, G; Varon, S

    1984-01-01

    Embryonic chick ciliary ganglion (CG) neurons cultured in fetal calf serum-containing medium have been previously reported to extend neurites on polyornithine (PORN) substrata precoated with a neurite-promoting factor (PNPF) from rat schwannoma-conditioned medium. On PORN substrata alone, however, no neuritic growth occurred. This was interpreted as evidence that PORN was an incompetent substratum for ciliary neuritic growth. In this study, we now find that an untreated PORN substratum allows neuritic growth in serum-free defined medium. When PNPF was added to PORN, a more rapid and extensive neuritic response occurred. After 5 hr of culture, a 60% neuritic response occurred on PNPF/PORN, whereas no neurons initiated neurites until 10-12 hr on PORN. The inhibitory effect of fetal calf serum noted above on PORN could be obtained in part by pretreating the substratum with serum for 1 hr. Maximal inhibitory effects in the PORN pretreatment were achieved after 30 min and were not further improved by treatments up to 4 hr. Bovine serum albumin was also found to inhibit neurite growth on PORN to about 60% of the inhibition obtained by an equivalent amount of serum protein. Fetal calf serum was shown to cause a 15% reduction in the percentage of neurons bearing neurites after its addition to 18-hr serum-free PORN cultures and to cause statistically significant reductions in neurite lengths measured 2 hr later. PMID:6481819

  5. Aridopsis COBRA-LIKE 10, a GPI-anchored protien, mediates directional growth of pollen tubes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Successful reproduction of flowering plants requires constant communication between female tissues and growing pollen tubes. Female cells secrete molecules and peptides as nutrients or guidance cues for fast and directional tube growth, which is executed by dynamic changes of intracellular activitie...

  6. Auxin-mediated lamina growth in tomato leaves is restricted by two parallel mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ben-Gera, Hadas; Dafna, Asaf; Alvarez, John Paul; Bar, Maya; Mauerer, Mareike; Ori, Naomi

    2016-06-01

    In the development of tomato compound leaves, local auxin maxima points, separated by the expression of the Aux/IAA protein SlIAA9/ENTIRE (E), direct the formation of discrete leaflets along the leaf margin. The local auxin maxima promote leaflet initiation, while E acts between leaflets to inhibit auxin response and lamina growth, enabling leaflet separation. Here, we show that a group of auxin response factors (ARFs), which are targeted by miR160, antagonizes auxin response and lamina growth in conjunction with E. In wild-type leaf primordia, the miR160-targeted ARFs SlARF10A and SlARF17 are expressed in leaflets, and SlmiR160 is expressed in provascular tissues. Leaf overexpression of the miR160-targeted ARFs SlARF10A, SlARF10B or SlARF17, led to reduced lamina and increased leaf complexity, and suppressed auxin response in young leaves. In agreement, leaf overexpression of miR160 resulted in simplified leaves due to ectopic lamina growth between leaflets, reminiscent of e leaves. Genetic interactions suggest that E and miR160-targeted ARFs act partially redundantly but are both required for local inhibition of lamina growth between initiating leaflets. These results show that different types of auxin signal antagonists act cooperatively to ensure leaflet separation in tomato leaf margins. PMID:27121172

  7. Flavonols Mediate Root Phototropism and Growth through Regulation of Proliferation-to-Differentiation Transition.

    PubMed

    Silva-Navas, Javier; Moreno-Risueno, Miguel A; Manzano, Concepción; Téllez-Robledo, Bárbara; Navarro-Neila, Sara; Carrasco, Víctor; Pollmann, Stephan; Gallego, F Javier; Del Pozo, Juan C

    2016-06-01

    Roots normally grow in darkness, but they may be exposed to light. After perceiving light, roots bend to escape from light (root light avoidance) and reduce their growth. How root light avoidance responses are regulated is not well understood. Here, we show that illumination induces the accumulation of flavonols in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. During root illumination, flavonols rapidly accumulate at the side closer to light in the transition zone. This accumulation promotes asymmetrical cell elongation and causes differential growth between the two sides, leading to root bending. Furthermore, roots illuminated for a long period of time accumulate high levels of flavonols. This high flavonol content decreases both auxin signaling and PLETHORA gradient as well as superoxide radical content, resulting in reduction of cell proliferation. In addition, cytokinin and hydrogen peroxide, which promote root differentiation, induce flavonol accumulation in the root transition zone. As an outcome of prolonged light exposure and flavonol accumulation, root growth is reduced and a different root developmental zonation is established. Finally, we observed that these differentiation-related pathways are required for root light avoidance. We propose that flavonols function as positional signals, integrating hormonal and reactive oxygen species pathways to regulate root growth direction and rate in response to light.

  8. Modulation of the Leptin Receptor Mediates Tumor Growth and Migration of Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chalfant, Madeleine C.; Gorden, Lee D.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been implicated as a significant risk factor for development of pancreatic cancer. In the setting of obesity, a systemic chronic inflammatory response is characterized by alterations in the production and secretion of a wide variety of growth factors. Leptin is a hormone whose level increases drastically in the serum of obese patients. High fat diet induced obesity in mice leads to an overall increased body weight, pancreatic weight, serum leptin, and pancreatic tissue leptin levels. Here we report the contribution of obesity and leptin to pancreatic cancer growth utilizing an in vivo orthotopic murine pancreatic cancer model, which resulted in increased tumor proliferation with concomitant increased tumor burden in the diet induced obese mice compared to lean mice. Human and murine pancreatic cancer cell lines were found to express the short as well as the long form of the leptin receptor and functionally responded to leptin induced activation through an increased phosphorylation of AKT473. In vitro, leptin stimulation increased cellular migration which was blocked by addition of a PI3K inhibitor. In vivo, depletion of the leptin receptor through shRNA knockdown partially abrogated increased orthotopic tumor growth in obese mice. These findings suggest that leptin contributes to pancreatic tumor growth through activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway, which promotes pancreatic tumor cell migration. PMID:25919692

  9. CB1 cannabinoid receptors mediate endochondral skeletal growth attenuation by Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Elad; Tam, Joseph; Mechoulam, Raphael; Zimmer, Andreas; Maor, Gila; Bab, Itai

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid (EC) system regulates bone mass. Because cannabis use during pregnancy results in stature shorter than normal, we examined the role of the EC system in skeletal elongation. We show that CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors are expressed specifically in hypertrophic chondrocytes of the epiphyseal growth cartilage (EGC), which drives vertebrate growth. These cells also express diacylglycerol lipases, critical biosynthetic enzymes of the main EC, and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), which is present at significant levels in the EGC. Femora of CB1- and/or CB2-deficient mice at the end of the rapid growth phase are longer compared to wild-type (WT) animals. We find that Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) slows skeletal elongation of female WT and CB2-, but not CB1-, deficient mice, which is reflected in femoral and lumbar vertebral body length. This in turn results in lower body weight, but unaltered fat content. THC inhibits EGC chondrocyte hypertrophy in ex vivo cultures and reduces the hypertrophic cell zone thickness of CB1-, but not CB2-, deficient mice. These results demonstrate a local growth-restraining EC system in the EGC. The relevance of the present findings to humans remains to be studied.

  10. Flavonols Mediate Root Phototropism and Growth through Regulation of Proliferation-to-Differentiation Transition.

    PubMed

    Silva-Navas, Javier; Moreno-Risueno, Miguel A; Manzano, Concepción; Téllez-Robledo, Bárbara; Navarro-Neila, Sara; Carrasco, Víctor; Pollmann, Stephan; Gallego, F Javier; Del Pozo, Juan C

    2016-06-01

    Roots normally grow in darkness, but they may be exposed to light. After perceiving light, roots bend to escape from light (root light avoidance) and reduce their growth. How root light avoidance responses are regulated is not well understood. Here, we show that illumination induces the accumulation of flavonols in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. During root illumination, flavonols rapidly accumulate at the side closer to light in the transition zone. This accumulation promotes asymmetrical cell elongation and causes differential growth between the two sides, leading to root bending. Furthermore, roots illuminated for a long period of time accumulate high levels of flavonols. This high flavonol content decreases both auxin signaling and PLETHORA gradient as well as superoxide radical content, resulting in reduction of cell proliferation. In addition, cytokinin and hydrogen peroxide, which promote root differentiation, induce flavonol accumulation in the root transition zone. As an outcome of prolonged light exposure and flavonol accumulation, root growth is reduced and a different root developmental zonation is established. Finally, we observed that these differentiation-related pathways are required for root light avoidance. We propose that flavonols function as positional signals, integrating hormonal and reactive oxygen species pathways to regulate root growth direction and rate in response to light. PMID:26628743

  11. Constitutive NF-κB activation and tumor-growth promotion by Romo1-medi