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Sample records for gtp binding affects

  1. Partial characterization of GTP-binding proteins in Neurospora

    SciTech Connect

    Hasunuma, K.; Miyamoto-Shinohara, Y.; Furukawa, K.

    1987-08-14

    Six fractions of GTP-binding proteins separated by gel filtration of a mycelial extract containing membrane components of Neurospora crassa were partially characterized. (/sup 35/S)GTP gamma S bound to GTP-binding protein was assayed by repeated treatments with a Norit solution and centrifugation. The binding of (/sup 35/S)GTP gamma S to GTP-binding proteins was competitively prevented in the presence of 0.1 to 1 mM GTP but not in the presence of ATP. These GTP-binding proteins fractionated by the gel column had Km values of 20, 7, 4, 4, 80 and 2 nM. All six fractions of these GTP-binding proteins showed the capacity to be ADP-ribosylated by pertussis toxin.

  2. GTP binding to the ROC domain of DAP-kinase regulates its function through intramolecular signalling.

    PubMed

    Carlessi, Rodrigo; Levin-Salomon, Vered; Ciprut, Sara; Bialik, Shani; Berissi, Hanna; Albeck, Shira; Peleg, Yoav; Kimchi, Adi

    2011-09-01

    Death-associated protein kinase (DAPk) was recently suggested by sequence homology to be a member of the ROCO family of proteins. Here, we show that DAPk has a functional ROC (Ras of complex proteins) domain that mediates homo-oligomerization and GTP binding through a defined P-loop motif. Upon binding to GTP, the ROC domain negatively regulates the catalytic activity of DAPk and its cellular effects. Mechanistically, GTP binding enhances an inhibitory autophosphorylation at a distal site that suppresses kinase activity. This study presents a new mechanism of intramolecular signal transduction, by which GTP binding operates in cis to affect the catalytic activity of a distal domain in the protein.

  3. Altering the GTP binding site of the DNA/RNA-binding protein, Translin/TB-RBP, decreases RNA binding and may create a dominant negative phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chennathukuzhi, V M; Kurihara, Y; Bray, J D; Yang, J; Hecht, N B

    2001-11-01

    The DNA/RNA-binding protein, Translin/Testis Brain RNA-binding protein (Translin/TB-RBP), contains a putative GTP binding site in its C-terminus which is highly conserved. To determine if guanine nucleotide binding to this site functionally alters nucleic acid binding, electrophoretic mobility shift assays were performed with RNA and DNA binding probes. GTP, but not GDP, reduces RNA binding by approximately 50% and the poorly hydrolyzed GTP analog, GTPgammaS, reduces binding by >90% in gel shift and immunoprecipitation assays. No similar reduction of DNA binding is seen. When the putative GTP binding site of TB-RBP, amino acid sequence VTAGD, is altered to VTNSD by site directed mutagenesis, GTP will no longer bind to TB-RBP(GTP) and TB-RBP(GTP) no longer binds to RNA, although DNA binding is not affected. Yeast two-hybrid assays reveal that like wild-type TB-RBP, TB-RBP(GTP) will interact with itself, with wild-type TB-RBP and with Translin associated factor X (Trax). Transfection of TB-RBP(GTP) into NIH 3T3 cells leads to a marked increase in cell death suggesting a dominant negative function for TB-RBP(GTP) in cells. These data suggest TB-RBP is an RNA-binding protein whose activity is allosterically controlled by nucleotide binding.

  4. Subcellular distribution of small GTP binding proteins in pancreas: Identification of small GTP binding proteins in the rough endoplasmic reticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Nigam, S.K. )

    1990-02-01

    Subfractionation of a canine pancreatic homogenate was performed by several differential centrifugation steps, which gave rise to fractions with distinct marker profiles. Specific binding of guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-({sup 35}S)thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S)) was assayed in each fraction. Enrichment of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding was greatest in the interfacial smooth microsomal fraction, expected to contain Golgi and other smooth vesicles. There was also marked enrichment in the rough microsomal fraction. Electron microscopy and marker protein analysis revealed the rough microsomes (RMs) to be highly purified rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER). The distribution of small (low molecular weight) GTP binding proteins was examined by a ({alpha}-{sup 32}P)GTP blot-overlay assay. Several apparent GTP binding proteins of molecular masses 22-25 kDa were detected in various subcellular fractions. In particular, at least two such proteins were found in the Golgi-enriched and RM fractions, suggesting that these small GTP binding proteins were localized to the Golgi and RER. To more precisely localize these proteins to the RER, native RMs and RMs stripped of ribosomes by puromycin/high salt were subjected to isopycnic centrifugation. The total GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding, as well as the small GTP binding proteins detected by the ({alpha}-{sup 32}P)GTP blot overlay, distributed into fractions of high sucrose density, as did the RER marker ribophorin I. Consistent with a RER localization, when the RMS were stripped of ribosomes and subjected to isopycnic centrifugation, the total GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding and the small GTP binding proteins detected in the blot-overlay assay shifted to fractions of lighter sucrose density along with the RER marker.

  5. Ligand binding to the inhibitory and stimulatory GTP cyclohydrolase I/GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, T; Hatakeyama, K

    2001-04-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) mediates feedback inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I activity by 6R-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), which is an essential cofactor for key enzymes producing catecholamines, serotonin, and nitric oxide as well as phenylalanine hydroxylase. GFRP also mediates feed-forward stimulation of GTP cyclohydrolase I activity by phenylalanine at subsaturating GTP levels. These ligands, BH4 and phenylalanine, induce complex formation between one molecule of GTP cyclohydrolase I and two molecules of GFRP. Here, we report the analysis of ligand binding using the gel filtration method of Hummel and Dreyer. BH4 binds to the GTP cyclohydrolase I/GFRP complex with a Kd of 4 microM, and phenylalanine binds to the protein complex with a Kd of 94 microM. The binding of BH4 is enhanced by dGTP. The binding stoichiometrics of BH4 and phenylalanine were estimated to be 10 molecules of each per protein complex, in other words, one molecule per subunit of protein, because GTP cyclohydrolase I is a decamer and GFRP is a pentamer. These findings were corroborated by data from equilibrium dialysis experiments. Regarding ligand binding to free proteins, BH4 binds weakly to GTP cyclohydrolase I but not to GFRP, and phenylalanine binds weakly to GFRP but not to GTP cyclohydrolase I. These results suggest that the overall structure of the protein complex contributes to binding of BH4 and phenylalanine but also that each binding site of BH4 and phenylalanine may be primarily composed of residues of GTP cyclohydrolase I and GFRP, respectively.

  6. Uncoupling of gamma-aminobutyric acid B receptors from GTP-binding proteins by N-ethylmaleimide: effect of N-ethylmaleimide on purified GTP-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, T.; Ogasawara, N.

    1986-03-01

    Treatment of membranes from bovine cerebral cortex with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) resulted in inhibition of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding to GABAB receptors. The binding curve for increasing concentrations of agonist was shifted to the right by NEM treatment. Guanine nucleotide had little effect on the binding of GABA to NEM-treated membranes. The addition of purified GTP-binding proteins, which were the substrates of islet-activating protein (IAP), pertussis toxin, to the NEM-treated membranes caused a shift of the binding curve to the left, suggesting modification of GTP-binding proteins rather than receptors by NEM. The effect of NEM on two purified GTP-binding proteins, Gi (composed of three subunits with molecular weight of alpha, 41,000; beta, 35,000; gamma, 10,000) and Go (alpha, 39,000; beta, 35,000; gamma, 10,000) was studied. NEM did not significantly change guanosine 5'-(3-O-thio)triphosphate (GTP gamma S) binding and GTPase activity of these two proteins. NEM-treated Gi and Go were not ADP-ribosylated by IAP and did not increase GABA binding to NEM-treated membranes. When alpha and beta gamma subunits were treated with NEM and then mixed with nontreated alpha and beta gamma to form Gi or Go, respectively, both oligomers with NEM-treated alpha-subunits lost their abilities to be IAP substrates and to couple to receptors. Results indicate that NEM uncoupled GTP-binding proteins from receptors by modifying alpha-subunits of GTP-binding proteins, and the site seemed to be on or near the site of ADP-ribosylation by IAP. When alpha and beta gamma subunits were treated with NEM and then mixed to form Gi or Go, GTP gamma S binding in the absence of Mg2+ and GTPase activity were changed, although they were not affected when oligomers were treated with NEM. Results suggest the existence of another sulfhydryl group which is protected from NEM by the association of subunits.

  7. LRRK2 kinase activity is dependent on LRRK2 GTP binding capacity but independent of LRRK2 GTP binding.

    PubMed

    Taymans, Jean-Marc; Vancraenenbroeck, Renée; Ollikainen, Petri; Beilina, Alexandra; Lobbestael, Evy; De Maeyer, Marc; Baekelandt, Veerle; Cookson, Mark R

    2011-01-01

    Leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is a Parkinson's disease (PD) gene that encodes a large multidomain protein including both a GTPase and a kinase domain. GTPases often regulate kinases within signal transduction cascades, where GTPases act as molecular switches cycling between a GTP bound "on" state and a GDP bound "off" state. It has been proposed that LRRK2 kinase activity may be increased upon GTP binding at the LRRK2 Ras of complex proteins (ROC) GTPase domain. Here we extensively test this hypothesis by measuring LRRK2 phosphorylation activity under influence of GDP, GTP or non-hydrolyzable GTP analogues GTPγS or GMPPCP. We show that autophosphorylation and lrrktide phosphorylation activity of recombinant LRRK2 protein is unaltered by guanine nucleotides, when co-incubated with LRRK2 during phosphorylation reactions. Also phosphorylation activity of LRRK2 is unchanged when the LRRK2 guanine nucleotide binding pocket is previously saturated with various nucleotides, in contrast to the greatly reduced activity measured for the guanine nucleotide binding site mutant T1348N. Interestingly, when nucleotides were incubated with cell lysates prior to purification of LRRK2, kinase activity was slightly enhanced by GTPγS or GMPPCP compared to GDP, pointing to an upstream guanine nucleotide binding protein that may activate LRRK2 in a GTP-dependent manner. Using metabolic labeling, we also found that cellular phosphorylation of LRRK2 was not significantly modulated by nucleotides, although labeling is significantly reduced by guanine nucleotide binding site mutants. We conclude that while kinase activity of LRRK2 requires an intact ROC-GTPase domain, it is independent of GDP or GTP binding to ROC.

  8. LRRK2 Kinase Activity Is Dependent on LRRK2 GTP Binding Capacity but Independent of LRRK2 GTP Binding

    PubMed Central

    Taymans, Jean-Marc; Vancraenenbroeck, Renée; Ollikainen, Petri; Beilina, Alexandra; Lobbestael, Evy; De Maeyer, Marc; Baekelandt, Veerle; Cookson, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is a Parkinson's disease (PD) gene that encodes a large multidomain protein including both a GTPase and a kinase domain. GTPases often regulate kinases within signal transduction cascades, where GTPases act as molecular switches cycling between a GTP bound “on” state and a GDP bound “off” state. It has been proposed that LRRK2 kinase activity may be increased upon GTP binding at the LRRK2 Ras of complex proteins (ROC) GTPase domain. Here we extensively test this hypothesis by measuring LRRK2 phosphorylation activity under influence of GDP, GTP or non-hydrolyzable GTP analogues GTPγS or GMPPCP. We show that autophosphorylation and lrrktide phosphorylation activity of recombinant LRRK2 protein is unaltered by guanine nucleotides, when co-incubated with LRRK2 during phosphorylation reactions. Also phosphorylation activity of LRRK2 is unchanged when the LRRK2 guanine nucleotide binding pocket is previously saturated with various nucleotides, in contrast to the greatly reduced activity measured for the guanine nucleotide binding site mutant T1348N. Interestingly, when nucleotides were incubated with cell lysates prior to purification of LRRK2, kinase activity was slightly enhanced by GTPγS or GMPPCP compared to GDP, pointing to an upstream guanine nucleotide binding protein that may activate LRRK2 in a GTP-dependent manner. Using metabolic labeling, we also found that cellular phosphorylation of LRRK2 was not significantly modulated by nucleotides, although labeling is significantly reduced by guanine nucleotide binding site mutants. We conclude that while kinase activity of LRRK2 requires an intact ROC-GTPase domain, it is independent of GDP or GTP binding to ROC. PMID:21858031

  9. Blue News Update: BODIPY-GTP Binds to the Blue-Light Receptor YtvA While GTP Does Not

    PubMed Central

    Schmieder, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Light is an important environmental factor for almost all organisms. It is mainly used as an energy source but it is also a key factor for the regulation of multiple cellular functions. Light as the extracellular stimulus is thereby converted into an intracellular signal by photoreceptors that act as signal transducers. The blue-light receptor YtvA, a bacterial counterpart of plant phototropins, is involved in the stress response of Bacillus subtilis. The mechanism behind its activation, however, remains unknown. It was suggested based on fluorescence spectroscopic studies that YtvA function involves GTP binding and that this interaction is altered by absorption of light. We have investigated this interaction by several biophysical methods and show here using fluorescence spectroscopy, ITC titrations, and three NMR spectroscopic assays that while YtvA interacts with BODIPY-GTP as a fluorescent GTP analogue originally used for the detection of GTP binding, it does not bind GTP. PMID:22247770

  10. Immunochemical similarity of GTP-binding proteins from different systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinina, S.N.

    1986-06-20

    It was found that antibodies against the GTP-binding proteins of bovine retinal photoreceptor membranes blocked the inhibitory effect of estradiol on phosphodiesterase from rat and human uterine cytosol and prevented the cumulative effect of catecholamines and guanylyl-5'-imidodiphosphate on rat skeletal muscle adenylate cyclase. It was established by means of double radial immunodiffusion that these antibodies form a precipitating complex with purified bovine brain tubulin as well as with retinal preparations obtained from eyes of the bull, pig, rat, frog, some species of fish, and one reptile species. Bands of precipitation were not observed with these antibodies when retinal preparations from invertebrates (squid and octopus) were used as the antigens. The antibodies obtained interacted with the ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-subunits of GTP-binding proteins from bovine retinal photoreceptor membranes.

  11. A Novel Class of RanGTP Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Görlich, Dirk; Dabrowski, Marylena; Bischoff, F. Ralf; Kutay, Ulrike; Bork, Peer; Hartmann, Enno; Prehn, Siegfried; Izaurralde, Elisa

    1997-01-01

    The importin-α/β complex and the GTPase Ran mediate nuclear import of proteins with a classical nuclear localization signal. Although Ran has been implicated also in a variety of other processes, such as cell cycle progression, a direct function of Ran has so far only been demonstrated for importin-mediated nuclear import. We have now identified an entire class of ∼20 potential Ran targets that share a sequence motif related to the Ran-binding site of importin-β. We have confirmed specific RanGTP binding for some of them, namely for two novel factors, RanBP7 and RanBP8, for CAS, Pse1p, and Msn5p, and for the cell cycle regulator Cse1p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have studied RanBP7 in more detail. Similar to importin-β, it prevents the activation of Ran's GTPase by RanGAP1 and inhibits nucleotide exchange on RanGTP. RanBP7 binds directly to nuclear pore complexes where it competes for binding sites with importin-β, transportin, and apparently also with the mediators of mRNA and U snRNA export. Furthermore, we provide evidence for a Ran-dependent transport cycle of RanBP7 and demonstrate that RanBP7 can cross the nuclear envelope rapidly and in both directions. On the basis of these results, we propose that RanBP7 might represent a nuclear transport factor that carries an as yet unknown cargo, which could apply as well for this entire class of related RanGTP-binding proteins. PMID:9214382

  12. GEFs: structural basis for their activation of small GTP-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Cherfils, J; Chardin, P

    1999-08-01

    Small GTP-binding proteins of the Ras superfamily function as molecular switches in fundamental events such as signal transduction, cytoskeleton dynamics and intracellular trafficking. Guanine-nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs) positively regulate these GTP-binding proteins in response to a variety of signals. GEFs catalyze the dissociation of GDP from the inactive GTP-binding proteins. GTP can then bind and induce structural changes that allow interaction with effectors. Representative structures of four main classes of exchange factors have been described recently and, in two cases, structures of the GTP-binding protein-GEF complex have been solved. These structures, together with biochemical studies, have allowed a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of activation of Ras-like GTP-binding proteins and suggested how they might represent targets for therapeutic intervention.

  13. Light-dependent GTP-binding proteins in squid photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, P R; Wood, S F; Szuts, E Z; Fein, A; Hamm, H E; Lisman, J E

    1990-01-01

    Previous biochemical and electrophysiological evidence suggests that in invertebrate photoreceptors, a GTP-binding protein (G-protein) mediates the actions of photoactivated rhodopsin in the initial stages of transduction. We find that squid photoreceptors contain more than one protein (molecular masses 38, 42 and 46 kDa) whose ADP-ribosylation by bacterial exotoxins is light-sensitive. Several lines of evidence suggest that these proteins represent distinct alpha subunits of G-proteins. (1) Pertussis toxin and cholera toxin react with distinct subsets of these polypeptides. (2) Only the 42 kDa protein immunoreacts with the monoclonal antibody 4A, raised against the alpha subunit of the G-protein of vertebrate rods [Hamm & Bownds (1984) J. Gen. Physiol. 84. 265-280]. (3) In terms of ADP-ribosylation, the 42 kDa protein is the least labile to freezing. (4) Of the 38 kDa and 42 kDa proteins, the former is preferentially extracted with hypo-osmotic solutions, as demonstrated by the solubility of its ADP-ribosylated state and by the solubility of the light-dependent binding of guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate. The specific target enzymes for the observed G-proteins have not been established. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2124806

  14. Discovery of widespread GTP-binding motifs in genomic DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Edward A; Liu, David R

    2013-04-18

    Biological RNAs that bind small molecules have been implicated in a variety of regulatory and catalytic processes. Inspired by these examples, we used in vitro selection to search a pool of genome-encoded RNA fragments for naturally occurring GTP aptamers. Several aptamer classes were identified, including one (the "G motif") with a G-quadruplex structure. Further analysis revealed that most RNA and DNA G-quadruplexes bind GTP. The G motif is abundant in eukaryotes, and the human genome contains ~75,000 examples with dissociation constants comparable to the GTP concentration of a eukaryotic cell (~300 μM). G-quadruplexes play roles in diverse cellular processes, and our findings raise the possibility that GTP may play a role in the function of these elements. Consistent with this possibility, the sequence requirements of several classes of regulatory G-quadruplexes parallel those of GTP binding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Phytochrome regulates GTP-binding protein activity in the envelope of pea nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. B.; Memon, A. R.; Thompson, G. A. Jr; Roux, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    Three GTP-binding proteins with apparent molecular masses of 27, 28 and 30 kDa have been detected in isolated nuclei of etiolated pea plumules. After LDS-PAGE and transfer to nitrocellulose these proteins bind [32P]GTP in the presence of excess ATP, suggesting that they are monomeric G proteins. When nuclei are disrupted, three proteins co-purify with the nuclear envelope fraction and are highly enriched in this fraction. The level of [32P]GTP-binding for all three protein bands is significantly increased when harvested pea plumules are irradiated by red light, and this effect is reversed by far-red light. The results indicate that GTP-binding activity associated with the nuclear envelope of plant cells is photoreversibly regulated by the pigment phytochrome.

  16. Phytochrome regulates GTP-binding protein activity in the envelope of pea nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. B.; Memon, A. R.; Thompson, G. A. Jr; Roux, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    Three GTP-binding proteins with apparent molecular masses of 27, 28 and 30 kDa have been detected in isolated nuclei of etiolated pea plumules. After LDS-PAGE and transfer to nitrocellulose these proteins bind [32P]GTP in the presence of excess ATP, suggesting that they are monomeric G proteins. When nuclei are disrupted, three proteins co-purify with the nuclear envelope fraction and are highly enriched in this fraction. The level of [32P]GTP-binding for all three protein bands is significantly increased when harvested pea plumules are irradiated by red light, and this effect is reversed by far-red light. The results indicate that GTP-binding activity associated with the nuclear envelope of plant cells is photoreversibly regulated by the pigment phytochrome.

  17. GTP-blot analysis of small GTP-binding proteins. The C-terminus is involved in renaturation of blotted proteins.

    PubMed

    Klinz, F J

    1994-10-01

    Recombinant c-Ha-ras, ralA and rap2, but not rap1A or rap1B proteins retained their ability to bind [alpha-32P]GTP after SDS/PAGE and transfer to nitrocellulose. Recombinant c-Has-ras missing the C-terminal 23 amino acid residues failed to bind [alpha-32P]GTP after the blot, and the ability of recombinant ralA missing the C-terminal 28 amino acid residues to bind [alpha-32P]GTP was decreased many-fold. The presence of nonionic detergents of the polyoxyethylene type such as Tween 20, Triton X-100, Nonidet P40 or Lubrol PX in the incubation buffer was necessary to induce renaturation of blotted recombinant c-Ha-ras protein, whereas other types of detergents were ineffective. We propose that detergents of the polyoxyethylene type induce the refolding of some types of blotted small GTP-binding proteins and that the C-terminus is involved in the refolding process. Membranes from NIH3T3 fibroblasts overexpressing c-Ha-ras protein showed much weaker binding of [alpha-32P]GTP as expected from the level of ras immunoreactivity. Treatment of fibroblasts with lovastatin, an inhibitor of hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, caused the accumulation of the unfarnesylated form of c-Ha-ras in the cytosol. Examination of [alpha-32P]GTP-binding and immunoreactivity for cytosolic and membrane-bound c-Ha-ras revealed that binding of [alpha-32P]GTP to unprocessed c-Ha-ras was increased about threefold compared to the same amount of processed c-Ha-ras. Our results demonstrate that detection and quantification of small GTP-binding proteins in eukaryotic cells by GTP-blot analysis is hampered by the fact that these proteins differ strongly in their ability to renature after blotting to nitrocellulose.

  18. Characterization of GTP-binding proteins in Golgi-associated membrane vesicles from rat adipocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Schürmann, A; Rosenthal, W; Schultz, G; Joost, H G

    1992-01-01

    We have previously reported that guanine nucleotides inhibit glucose transport activity reconstituted from adipocyte membrane fractions. In order to further investigate the hypothetical involvement of guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins (GTP-binding proteins) in the regulation of insulin-sensitive glucose transport activity, we studied their subcellular distribution in adipocytes treated or not with insulin. Adipocytes were homogenized and fractionated to yield plasma membranes (PM) and a Golgi-enriched fraction of intracellular membranes (low-density microsomes, LDM). In these membrane fractions, total guanosine 5'-[gamma-[35S]thio]triphosphate ([35S]GTP[S]) binding, alpha- and beta-subunits of heterotrimeric G-proteins, proto-oncogenes Ha-ras and K-ras, and 23-28 kDa GTP-binding proteins were assayed. The levels of alpha s and alpha i (the alpha-subunits of Gs and Gi) were approx. 8-fold lower in LDM than in PM; beta-subunits, Ha-ras and K-ras were not detectable in LDM. Total GTP[S]-binding sites and 23-28 kDa GTP-binding proteins were present in LDM in approximately the same concentrations as in PM. Insulin gave rise to the characteristic translocation of glucose transporters, but failed to alter the subcellular distribution of any of the GTP-binding proteins. Fractionation of the LDM on a discontinuous sucrose gradient revealed that alpha s and alpha i, as detected with antiserum against a common peptide sequence (alpha common), and the bulk of the 23-28 kDa G-proteins sedimented at different sucrose densities. None of the GTP-binding proteins co-sedimented with glucose transporters. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of GTP[S] on the reconstituted transport activity was lost in the peak fractions of glucose transporters partially purified on the sucrose gradient. These data indicate that LDM from adipocytes contain several GTP-binding proteins in discrete vesicle populations. However, the intracellular GTP-binding proteins are not tightly associated with the

  19. A functional GTP-binding motif is necessary for antiviral activity of Mx proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Pitossi, F; Blank, A; Schröder, A; Schwarz, A; Hüssi, P; Schwemmle, M; Pavlovic, J; Staeheli, P

    1993-01-01

    Mx proteins are interferon-induced GTPases that inhibit the multiplication of certain negative-stranded RNA viruses. However, it has been unclear whether GTPase activity is necessary for antiviral function. Here, we have introduced mutations into the tripartite GTP-binding consensus elements of the human MxA and mouse Mx1 proteins. The invariant lysine residue of the first consensus motif, which interacts with the beta- and gamma-phosphates of bound GTP in other GTPases, was deleted or replaced by methionine or alanine. These Mx mutants and appropriate controls were then tested for antiviral activity, GTP-binding capacity, and GTPase activity. We found a direct correlation between the GTP-binding capacities and GTP hydrolysis activities of the purified Mx mutants in vitro and their antiviral activities in transfected 3T3 cells, demonstrating that a functional GTP-binding motif is necessary for virus inhibition. Our results, thus, firmly establish antiviral activity as a novel function of a GTPase, emphasizing the enormous functional diversity of GTPase superfamily members. Images PMID:8411374

  20. How guanylate-binding proteins achieve assembly-stimulated processive cleavage of GTP to GMP.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Agnidipta; Praefcke, Gerrit J K; Renault, Louis; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Herrmann, Christian

    2006-03-02

    Interferons are immunomodulatory cytokines that mediate anti-pathogenic and anti-proliferative effects in cells. Interferon-gamma-inducible human guanylate binding protein 1 (hGBP1) belongs to the family of dynamin-related large GTP-binding proteins, which share biochemical properties not found in other families of GTP-binding proteins such as nucleotide-dependent oligomerization and fast cooperative GTPase activity. hGBP1 has an additional property by which it hydrolyses GTP to GMP in two consecutive cleavage reactions. Here we show that the isolated amino-terminal G domain of hGBP1 retains the main enzymatic properties of the full-length protein and can cleave GDP directly. Crystal structures of the N-terminal G domain trapped at successive steps along the reaction pathway and biochemical data reveal the molecular basis for nucleotide-dependent homodimerization and cleavage of GTP. Similar to effector binding in other GTP-binding proteins, homodimerization is regulated by structural changes in the switch regions. Homodimerization generates a conformation in which an arginine finger and a serine are oriented for efficient catalysis. Positioning of the substrate for the second hydrolysis step is achieved by a change in nucleotide conformation at the ribose that keeps the guanine base interactions intact and positions the beta-phosphates in the gamma-phosphate-binding site.

  1. Involvement of a small GTP binding protein in HIV-1 release

    PubMed Central

    Audoly, Gilles; Popoff, Michel R; Gluschankof, Pablo

    2005-01-01

    Background There is evidence suggesting that actin binding to HIV-1 encoded proteins, or even actin dynamics themselves, might play a key role in virus budding and/or release from the infected cell. A crucial step in the reorganisation of the actin cytoskeleton is the engagement of various different GTP binding proteins. We have thus studied the involvement of GTP-binding proteins in the final steps of the HIV-1 viral replication cycle. Results Our results demonstrate that virus production is abolished when cellular GTP binding proteins involved in actin polymerisation are inhibited with specific toxins. Conclusion We propose a new HIV budding working model whereby Gag interactions with pre-existing endosomal cellular tracks as well as with a yet non identified element of the actin polymerisation pathway are required in order to allow HIV-1 to be released from the infected cell. PMID:16080789

  2. Importin {beta}-type nuclear transport receptors have distinct binding affinities for Ran-GTP

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Silvia; Schlenstedt, Gabriel

    2011-03-18

    Highlights: {yields} Determination of binding properties of nuclear transport receptor/Ran-GTP complexes. {yields} Biosensor measurements provide constants for dissociation, on-rates, and off-rates. {yields} The affinity of receptors for Ran-GTP is widely divergent. {yields} Dissociation constants differ for three orders of magnitude. {yields} The cellular concentration of yeast Ran is not limiting. -- Abstract: Cargos destined to enter or leave the cell nucleus are typically transported by receptors of the importin {beta} family to pass the nuclear pore complex. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae comprises 14 members of this protein family, which can be divided in importins and exportins. The Ran GTPase regulates the association and dissociation of receptors and cargos as well as the transport direction through the nuclear pore. All receptors bind to Ran exclusively in its GTP-bound state and this event is restricted to the nuclear compartment. We determined the Ran-GTP binding properties of all yeast transport receptors by biosensor measurements and observed that the affinity of importins for Ran-GTP differs significantly. The dissociation constants range from 230 pM to 270 nM, which is mostly based on a variability of the off-rate constants. The divergent affinity of importins for Ran-GTP suggests the existence of a novel mode of nucleocytoplasmic transport regulation. Furthermore, the cellular concentration of {beta}-receptors and of other Ran-binding proteins was determined. We found that the number of {beta}-receptors altogether about equals the amounts of yeast Ran, but Ran-GTP is not limiting in the nucleus. The implications of our results for nucleocytoplasmic transport mechanisms are discussed.

  3. A family of ras-like GTP-binding proteins expressed in electromotor neurons.

    PubMed

    Ngsee, J K; Elferink, L A; Scheller, R H

    1991-02-05

    The cDNAs encoding seven low molecular weight (LMW) GTP-binding proteins were isolated from an electrode lobe library of the marine ray Discopyge ommata. Four were assigned as the ray homologues of previously identified LMW GTP-binding proteins rab1, ral, Krev, and rho. Three others showed unique sequences, including two exhibiting significant similarity to the yeast SEC4 protein. Northern analysis indicated that several of the transcripts are enriched in neural tissues with a moderate level of expression in cardiac muscle. This tissue distribution was corroborated with affinity purified antibodies against the LMW GTP-binding proteins. Subcellular fractionation revealed that the proteins co-purify with cholinergic synaptic vesicles. Immunohistochemical analysis confirms this localization. At least two of the proteins, oral and o-rho, are localized to the pre-synaptic terminals.

  4. A neutrophil GTP-binding protein that regulates cell free NADPH oxidase activation is located in the cytosolic fraction.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G; Eklund, E A; Potter, G B; Dykes, J R

    1990-08-01

    The dormant O2(-)-generating oxidase in plasma membranes from unstimulated neutrophils becomes activated in the presence of arachidonate and a multicomponent cytosolic fraction. This process is stimulated by nonhydrolyzable GTP analogues and may involve a pertussis toxin insensitive GTP-binding protein. Our studies were designed to characterize the putative GTP-binding protein, localizing it to either membrane or cytosolic fraction in this system. Exposure of the isolated membrane fraction to guanosine-5'-(3-O-thio)triphosphate (GTP gamma S), with or without arachidonate, had no effect on subsequent NADPH oxidase activation by the cytosolic fraction. Preexposure of the cytosolic fraction to GTP gamma S alone did not enhance activation of the membrane oxidase. However, preexposure of the cytosol to GTP gamma S then arachidonate caused a four-fold enhancement of its ability to activate the membrane oxidase. This enhancement was evident after removal of unbound GTP gamma S and arachidonate, and was not augmented by additional GTP gamma S during membrane activation. A reconstitution assay was developed for cytosolic component(s) responsible for the GTP gamma S effect. Cytosol preincubated with GTP gamma 35S then arachidonate was fractionated by anion exchange chromatography. A single peak of protein-bound GTP gamma 35S was recovered that had reconstitutive activity. Cytosol preincubated with GTP gamma 35S alone was similarly fractionated and the same peak of protein-bound GTP gamma 35S was observed. However, this peak had no reconstitutive activity. We conclude that the GTP-binding protein regulating this cellfree system is located in the cytosolic fraction. The GTP gamma S-liganded form of this protein may be activated or stabilized by arachidonate.

  5. GTP binding to the. beta. -subunit of tubulin is greatly reduced in Alzheimers disease

    SciTech Connect

    Khatoon, S.; Slevin, J.T.; Haley, B.E.

    1987-05-01

    A decrease occurs (80-100%) in the (/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/GTP photoinsertion into a cytosolic protein (55K M/sub r/) of Alzheimer's (AD) brain, tentatively identified as the ..beta..-subunit of tubulin (co-migration with purified tubulin, concentration dependence of interaction with GTP, ATP and their 8-azido photoprobes, and similar effects of Ca/sup 2 +/ and EDTA on photoinsertion). This agrees with prior observations of (/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/GTP interactions with brain tubulin and a recent report on faulty microtubular assembly in AD brain. The decrease in (/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/GTP photoinsertion into the 55K M/sub r/ protein of AD brain was in contrast with other photolabeled proteins, which remained at equal levels in AD and age-matched normal brain tissues. The 55K and 45K M/sub r/ were the two major (/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/GTP photoinsertion species in non-AD brain. Of 5 AD brains, the photoinsertion of (/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/GTP into the 55K M/sub r/ region was low or absent in 4 (55K/45K=0.1); one was 75% below normals (55K/45K=0.24). Total protein migrating at 55K M/sub r/ was similar in AD and controls. AD brain tubulin, while present, has its exchangeable GTP binding site on ..beta..-tubulin blocked/modified such that (/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/GTP cannot interact normally with this site.

  6. Crystal structure of transglutaminase 2 with GTP complex and amino acid sequence evidence of evolution of GTP binding site.

    PubMed

    Jang, Tae-Ho; Lee, Dong-Sup; Choi, Kihang; Jeong, Eui Man; Kim, In-Gyu; Kim, Young Whan; Chun, Jung Nyeo; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Park, Hyun Ho

    2014-01-01

    Transglutaminase2 (TG2) is a multi-functional protein involved in various cellular processes, including apoptosis, differentiation, wound healing, and angiogenesis. The malfunction of TG2 causes many human disease including inflammatory disease, celiac disease, neurodegenerative diseases, tissue fibrosis, and cancers. Protein cross-linking activity, which is representative of TG2, is activated by calcium ions and suppressed by GTP. Here, we elucidated the structure of TG2 in complex with its endogenous inhibitor, GTP. Our structure showed why GTP is the optimal nucleotide for interacting with and inhibiting TG2. In addition, sequence comparison provided information describing the evolutionary scenario of GTP usage for controlling the activity of TG2.

  7. Characterization of GTP binding and hydrolysis in plasma membranes of zucchini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perdue, D. O.; Lomax, T. L.

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility that G-protein-like entities may be present in the plasma membrane (PM) of zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyls by examining a number of criteria common to animal and yeast G-proteins. The GTP binding and hydrolysis characteristics of purified zucchini PM are similar to the characteristics of a number of known G-proteins. Our results demonstrate GTP binding to a single PM site having a Kd value between 16-31 nM. This binding has a high specificity for guanine nucleotides, and is stimulated by Mg2+, detergents, and fluoride or aluminium ions. The GTPase activity (Km = 0.49 micromole) of zucchini PM shows a sensitivity to NaF similar to that seen for other G-proteins. Localization of GTP mu 35S binding to nitrocellulose blots of proteins separated by SDS-PAGE indicates a 30-kDa protein as the predominant GTP-binding species in zucchini PM. Taken together, these data indicate that plant PM contains proteins which are biochemically similar to previously characterized G-proteins.

  8. Characterization of GTP binding and hydrolysis in plasma membranes of zucchini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perdue, D. O.; Lomax, T. L.

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility that G-protein-like entities may be present in the plasma membrane (PM) of zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyls by examining a number of criteria common to animal and yeast G-proteins. The GTP binding and hydrolysis characteristics of purified zucchini PM are similar to the characteristics of a number of known G-proteins. Our results demonstrate GTP binding to a single PM site having a Kd value between 16-31 nM. This binding has a high specificity for guanine nucleotides, and is stimulated by Mg2+, detergents, and fluoride or aluminium ions. The GTPase activity (Km = 0.49 micromole) of zucchini PM shows a sensitivity to NaF similar to that seen for other G-proteins. Localization of GTP mu 35S binding to nitrocellulose blots of proteins separated by SDS-PAGE indicates a 30-kDa protein as the predominant GTP-binding species in zucchini PM. Taken together, these data indicate that plant PM contains proteins which are biochemically similar to previously characterized G-proteins.

  9. GTP binding controls complex formation by the human ROCO protein MASL1.

    PubMed

    Dihanich, Sybille; Civiero, Laura; Manzoni, Claudia; Mamais, Adamantios; Bandopadhyay, Rina; Greggio, Elisa; Lewis, Patrick A

    2014-01-01

    The human ROCO proteins are a family of multi-domain proteins sharing a conserved ROC-COR supra-domain. The family has four members: leucine-rich repeat kinase 1 (LRRK1), leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) and malignant fibrous histiocytoma amplified sequences with leucine-rich tandem repeats 1 (MASL1). Previous studies of LRRK1/2 and DAPK1 have shown that the ROC (Ras of complex proteins) domain can bind and hydrolyse GTP, but the cellular consequences of this activity are still unclear. Here, the first biochemical characterization of MASL1 and the impact of GTP binding on MASL1 complex formation are reported. The results demonstrate that MASL1, similar to other ROCO proteins, can bind guanosine nucleotides via its ROC domain. Furthermore, MASL1 exists in two distinct cellular complexes associated with heat shock protein 60, and the formation of a low molecular weight pool of MASL1 is modulated by GTP binding. Finally, loss of GTP enhances MASL1 toxicity in cells. Taken together, these data point to a central role for the ROC/GTPase domain of MASL1 in the regulation of its cellular function.

  10. Hypocretin stimulates [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding in Hcrtr 2-transfected cell lines and in brain homogenate.

    PubMed

    Shiba, T; Ozu, M; Yoshida, Y; Mignot, E; Nishino, S

    2002-06-14

    In vitro functional analyses of hypocretin/orexin receptor systems were performed using [(125)I]hypocretin radioreceptor and hypocretin-stimulated [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding assay in cell lines expressing human or canine (wild-type and narcoleptic-mutation) hypocretin receptor 2 (Hcrtr 2). Hypocretin-2 stimulated [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding in human and canine Hcrtr 2 expressing cell lines, while cell lines expressing the mutated canine Hcrtr 2 did not exhibit specific binding for [(125)I]hypocretin or hypocretin-stimulated [(35)S]GTP gamma S. In rat brain homogenates, regional specific hypocretin-stimulated [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding was also observed. Hypocretin-stimulated [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding, may thus be a useful functional assay for hypocretin receptors in both cell lines and brain tissue homogenates.

  11. Free energy simulations of a GTPase: GTP and GDP binding to archaeal initiation factor 2.

    PubMed

    Satpati, Priyadarshi; Clavaguéra, Carine; Ohanessian, Gilles; Simonson, Thomas

    2011-05-26

    Archaeal initiation factor 2 (aIF2) is a protein involved in the initiation of protein biosynthesis. In its GTP-bound, "ON" conformation, aIF2 binds an initiator tRNA and carries it to the ribosome. In its GDP-bound, "OFF" conformation, it dissociates from tRNA. To understand the specific binding of GTP and GDP and its dependence on the ON or OFF conformational state of aIF2, molecular dynamics free energy simulations (MDFE) are a tool of choice. However, the validity of the computed free energies depends on the simulation model, including the force field and the boundary conditions, and on the extent of conformational sampling in the simulations. aIF2 and other GTPases present specific difficulties; in particular, the nucleotide ligand coordinates a divalent Mg(2+) ion, which can polarize the electronic distribution of its environment. Thus, a force field with an explicit treatment of electronic polarizability could be necessary, rather than a simpler, fixed charge force field. Here, we begin by comparing a fixed charge force field to quantum chemical calculations and experiment for Mg(2+):phosphate binding in solution, with the force field giving large errors. Next, we consider GTP and GDP bound to aIF2 and we compare two fixed charge force fields to the recent, polarizable, AMOEBA force field, extended here in a simple, approximate manner to include GTP. We focus on a quantity that approximates the free energy to change GTP into GDP. Despite the errors seen for Mg(2+):phosphate binding in solution, we observe a substantial cancellation of errors when we compare the free energy change in the protein to that in solution, or when we compare the protein ON and OFF states. Finally, we have used the fixed charge force field to perform MDFE simulations and alchemically transform GTP into GDP in the protein and in solution. With a total of about 200 ns of molecular dynamics, we obtain good convergence and a reasonable statistical uncertainty, comparable to the force

  12. Actin filament organization in activated mast cells is regulated by heterotrimeric and small GTP-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Rat peritoneal mast cells, both intact and permeabilized, have been used widely as model secretory cells. GTP-binding proteins and calcium play a major role in controlling their secretory response. Here we have examined changes in the organization of actin filaments in intact mast cells after activation by compound 48/80, and in permeabilized cells after direct activation of GTP-binding proteins by GTP-gamma-S. In both cases, a centripetal redistribution of cellular F-actin was observed: the content of F-actin was reduced in the cortical region and increased in the cell interior. The overall F-actin content was increased. Using permeabilized cells, we show that AIF4-, an activator of heterotrimeric G proteins, induces the disassembly of F-actin at the cortex, while the appearance of actin filaments in the interior of the cell is dependent on two small GTPases, rho and rac. Rho was found to be responsible for de novo actin polymerization, presumably from a membrane-bound monomeric pool, while rac was required for an entrapment of the released cortical filaments. Thus, a heterotrimeric G-protein and the small GTPases, rho and rac, participate in affecting the changes in the actin cytoskeleton observed after activation of mast cells. PMID:8051203

  13. Identification of residues in the human guanylate-binding protein 1 critical for nucleotide binding and cooperative GTP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Praefcke, Gerrit J K; Kloep, Stephan; Benscheid, Utz; Lilie, Hauke; Prakash, Balaji; Herrmann, Christian

    2004-11-12

    The guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) form a group of interferon-gamma inducible GTP-binding proteins which belong to the family of dynamin-related proteins. Like other members of this family, human guanylate-binding protein 1 (hGBP1) shows nucleotide-dependent oligomerisation that stimulates the GTPase activity of the protein. A unique feature of the GBPs is their ability to hydrolyse GTP to GDP and GMP. In order to elucidate the relationship between these findings, we designed point mutants in the phosphate-binding loop (P-loop) as well as in the switch I and switch II regions of the protein based on the crystal structure of hGBP1. These mutant proteins were analysed for their interaction with guanine nucleotides labeled with a fluorescence dye and for their ability to hydrolyse GTP in a cooperative manner. We identified mutations of amino acid residues that decrease GTPase activity by orders of magnitude a part of which are conserved in GTP-binding proteins. In addition, mutants in the P-loop were characterized that strongly impair binding of nucleotide. In consequence, together with altered GTPase activity and given cellular nucleotide concentrations this results in hGBP1 mutants prevailingly resting in the nucleotide-free (K51A and S52N) or the GTP bound form (R48A), respectively. Using size-exclusion chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation we addressed the impact on protein oligomerisation. In summary, mutants of hGBP1 were identified and biochemically characterized providing hGBP1 locked in defined states in order to investigate their functional role in future cell biology studies.

  14. The RGK family: a regulatory tail of small GTP-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Kathleen

    2005-12-01

    RGK proteins are small Ras-related GTP-binding proteins that function as potent inhibitors of voltage-dependent calcium channels, and two members of the family, Gem and Rad, modulate Rho-dependent remodeling of the cytoskeleton. Within the Ras superfamily, RGK proteins have distinct structural and regulatory characteristics. It is an open question as to whether RGK proteins catalyze GTP hydrolysis in vivo. Binding of calmodulin and the 14-3-3 protein to RGK proteins controls downstream pathways. Here, we discuss the structural and functional properties of RGK proteins and highlight recent work by Beguin and colleagues addressing the mechanism of Gem regulation by calmodulin and 14-3-3.

  15. Multiple GTP-binding proteins regulate vesicular transport from the ER to Golgi membranes

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Using indirect immunofluorescence we have examined the effects of reagents which inhibit the function of ras-related rab small GTP- binding proteins and heterotrimeric G alpha beta gamma proteins in ER to Golgi transport. Export from the ER was inhibited by an antibody towards rab1B and an NH2-terminal peptide which inhibits ARF function (Balch, W. E., R. A. Kahn, and R. Schwaninger. 1992. J. Biol. Chem. 267:13053-13061), suggesting that both of these small GTP-binding proteins are essential for the transport vesicle formation. Export from the ER was also potently inhibited by mastoparan, a peptide which mimics G protein binding regions of seven transmembrane spanning receptors activating and uncoupling heterotrimeric G proteins from their cognate receptors. Consistent with this result, purified beta gamma subunits inhibited the export of VSV-G from the ER suggesting an initial event in transport vesicle assembly was regulated by a heterotrimeric G protein. In contrast, incubation in the presence of GTP gamma S or AIF(3-5) resulted in the accumulation of transported protein in different populations of punctate pre-Golgi intermediates distributed throughout the cytoplasm of the cell. Finally, a peptide which is believed to antagonize the interaction of rab proteins with putative downstream effector molecules inhibited transport at a later step preceding delivery to the cis Golgi compartment, similar to the site of accumulation of transported protein in the absence of NSF or calcium (Plutner, H., H. W. Davidson, J. Saraste, and W. E. Balch. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 119:1097-1116). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that multiple GTP-binding proteins including a heterotrimeric G protein(s), ARF and rab1 differentially regulate steps in the transport of protein between early compartments of the secretory pathway. The concept that G protein-coupled receptors gate the export of protein from the ER is discussed. PMID:1447289

  16. Synthetic inhibitors of bacterial cell division targeting the GTP-binding site of FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Avila, Laura B; Huecas, Sonia; Artola, Marta; Vergoñós, Albert; Ramírez-Aportela, Erney; Cercenado, Emilia; Barasoain, Isabel; Vázquez-Villa, Henar; Martín-Fontecha, Mar; Chacón, Pablo; López-Rodríguez, María L; Andreu, José M

    2013-09-20

    Cell division protein FtsZ is the organizer of the cytokinetic Z-ring in most bacteria and a target for new antibiotics. FtsZ assembles with GTP into filaments that hydrolyze the nucleotide at the association interface between monomers and then disassemble. We have replaced FtsZ's GTP with non-nucleotide synthetic inhibitors of bacterial division. We searched for these small molecules among compounds from the literature, from virtual screening (VS), and from our in-house synthetic library (UCM), employing a fluorescence anisotropy primary assay. From these screens we have identified the polyhydroxy aromatic compound UCM05 and its simplified analogue UCM44 that specifically bind to Bacillus subtilis FtsZ monomers with micromolar affinities and perturb normal assembly, as examined with light scattering, polymer sedimentation, and negative stain electron microscopy. On the other hand, these ligands induce the cooperative assembly of nucleotide-devoid archaeal FtsZ into distinct well-ordered polymers, different from GTP-induced filaments. These FtsZ inhibitors impair localization of FtsZ into the Z-ring and inhibit bacterial cell division. The chlorinated analogue UCM53 inhibits the growth of clinical isolates of antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. We suggest that these interfacial inhibitors recapitulate binding and some assembly-inducing effects of GTP but impair the correct structural dynamics of FtsZ filaments and thus inhibit bacterial division, possibly by binding to a small fraction of the FtsZ molecules in a bacterial cell, which opens a new approach to FtsZ-based antibacterial drug discovery.

  17. Olfactory GTP-binding protein: signal-transducing polypeptide of vertebrate chemosensory neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Pace, U; Lancet, D

    1986-01-01

    The sense of smell involves the stimulation of sensory neurons by odorants to produce depolarization and action potentials. We show that olfactory responses may be mediated by a GTP-binding protein (G protein), a homolog of the visual, hormonal, and brain signal transducing polypeptides. The olfactory G protein is identified in isolated dendritic membranes (olfactory cilia preparations) of chemosensory neurons from three vertebrate species and is shown to mediate the stimulation by odorants of the highly active adenylate cyclase in these membranes. The G protein of olfactory neurons is most similar to Gs, the hormonal stimulatory GTP-binding protein. Its alpha subunit has a molecular weight of about 42,000, and it undergoes ADP-ribosylation catalyzed by cholera toxin that leads to adenylate cyclase activation. The slight difference in molecular weights of the frog olfactory and the liver Gs alpha subunits and the higher sensitivity of olfactory adenylate cyclase to nonhydrolyzable GTP analogs are consistent with the possible existence of different Gs variants. Signal amplification due to the olfactory G protein may be responsible for the unusual acuity of the sense of smell. Images PMID:3088569

  18. A novel GTP-binding protein hGBP3 interacts with NIK/HGK.

    PubMed

    Luan, Zhidong; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Aihua; Man, Yunfang; Cheng, Lu; Hu, Gengxi

    2002-10-23

    A novel human guanylate-binding protein (GBP) hGBP3 was identified and characterized. Similar as the two human guanylate-binding proteins hGBP1 and hGBP2, hGBP3 has the first two motifs of the three classical guanylate-binding motifs, GXXXXGKS (T) and DXXG, but lacks the N (T) KXD motif. Escherichia coli-expressed hGBP3 protein specifically binds to guanosine triphosphate (GTP). Using a yeast two-hybrid system, it was revealed that the N-terminal region of hGBP3 binds to the C-terminal regulatory domain of NIK/HGK, a member of the group I GCK (germinal center kinase) family. This interaction was confirmed by in vitro glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays.

  19. Activation of a GTP-binding protein and a GTP-binding-protein-coupled receptor kinase (beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase-1) by a muscarinic receptor m2 mutant lacking phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, K; Haga, K; Haga, T; Moro, O; Sadée, W

    1994-12-01

    A mutant of the human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtype (m2 receptor), lacking a large part of the third intracellular loop, was expressed and purified using the baculovirus/insect cell culture system. The mutant was not phosphorylated by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase, as expected from the previous assignment of phosphorylation sites to the central part of the third intracellular loop. However, the m2 receptor mutant was capable of stimulating beta-adrenergic-receptor-kinase-1-mediated phosphorylation of a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein containing the m2 phosphorylation sites in an agonist-dependent manner. Both mutant and wild-type m2 receptors reconstituted with the guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G protein), G(o) and G(i)2, displayed guanine-nucleotide-sensitive high-affinity agonist binding, as assessed by displacement of [3H]quinuclidinyl-benzilate binding with carbamoylcholine, and both stimulated guanosine 5'-3-O-[35S]thiotriphosphate ([35S]GTP[S]) binding in the presence of carbamoylcholine and GDP. The Ki values of carbamoylcholine effects on [3H]quinuclidinyl-benzilate binding were indistinguishable for the mutant and wild-type m2 receptors. Moreover, the phosphorylation of the wild-type m2 receptor by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase-1 did not affect m2 interaction with G proteins as assessed by the binding of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate or [35S]GTP[S]. These results indicate that (a) the m2 receptor serves both as an activator and as a substrate of beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase, and (b) a large part of the third intracellular loop of the m2 receptor does not contribute to interaction with G proteins and its phosphorylation by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase does not uncouple the receptor and G proteins in reconstituted lipid vesicles.

  20. Structure and Mutational Analysis of the Archaeal GTP:AdoCbi-P Guanylyltransferase (CobY) from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii: Insights into GTP Binding and Dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Newmister, Sean A.; Otte, Michele M.; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.; Rayment, Ivan

    2012-02-08

    In archaea and bacteria, the late steps in adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) biosynthesis are collectively known as the nucleotide loop assembly (NLA) pathway. In the archaeal and bacterial NLA pathways, two different guanylyltransferases catalyze the activation of the corrinoid. Structural and functional studies of the bifunctional bacterial guanylyltransferase that catalyze both ATP-dependent corrinoid phosphorylation and GTP-dependent guanylylation are available, but similar studies of the monofunctional archaeal enzyme that catalyzes only GTP-dependent guanylylation are not. Herein, the three-dimensional crystal structure of the guanylyltransferase (CobY) enzyme from the archaeon Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (MjCobY) in complex with GTP is reported. The model identifies the location of the active site. An extensive mutational analysis was performed, and the functionality of the variant proteins was assessed in vivo and in vitro. Substitutions of residues Gly8, Gly153, or Asn177 resulted in {ge}94% loss of catalytic activity; thus, variant proteins failed to support AdoCbl synthesis in vivo. Results from isothermal titration calorimetry experiments showed that MjCobY{sup G153D} had 10-fold higher affinity for GTP than MjCobY{sup WT} but failed to bind the corrinoid substrate. Results from Western blot analyses suggested that the above-mentioned substitutions render the protein unstable and prone to degradation; possible explanations for the observed instability of the variants are discussed within the framework of the three-dimensional crystal structure of MjCobY{sup G153D} in complex with GTP. The fold of MjCobY is strikingly similar to that of the N-terminal domain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis GlmU (MtbGlmU), a bifunctional acetyltransferase/uridyltransferase that catalyzes the formation of uridine diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc).

  1. Molecular analysis of the monomeric GTP-binding proteins of oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Burcelin, R; Rodriguez-Gabin, A G; Charron, M J; Almazan, G; Larocca, J N

    1997-10-15

    Vesicle transport plays an important role in the formation of myelin. Transport of proteins, including proteolipid protein and myelin associated glycoprotein, from their site of synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum in the perikaryon of the oligodendrocytes, to myelin, takes place via carrier vesicles. The mechanisms that regulate vesicle transport in oligodendrocytes are largely unknown. The presence of monomeric GTP-binding proteins in myelin and oligodendrocytes suggested the hypothesis that these proteins participate in the regulation of vesicle transport. In an attempt to identify the Rab and Rho GTP-binding proteins present in oligodendrocytes, a cDNA library specific for these proteins was generated using a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) approach. Twelve different clones containing sequences that coded for members of the Rab and Rho families of GTP-binding proteins were isolated. This group includes Rab1, -1b, -2, -5b, -5c, -7, -8, -12, -14, -23 and Rho A. One additional clone revealed a novel cDNA sequence. Analysis of the effector loop motif indicated that this sequence encodes for a member of the Rab family. We refer to this new sequence as Rab0. Comparison of Rab0 with the most similar rat Rab sequences, Rab 14 and Rab 22, and with a recently cloned human Rab22b, showed a 71%, 72% and 94% identity, respectively. By RT-PCR analysis the Rab0 mRNA was found to be mainly expressed in oligodendrocytes and to a lesser extent in oligodendrocyte precursors, astrocytes and microglia. Moreover, the highest levels of Rab0 mRNA were observed in areas of the brain that are heavily myelinated. Rab0 mRNA was also detected in other tissues such as kidney, liver, skeletal muscle. These data provide initial evidence regarding signal transduction pathways that regulate intracellular transport in oligodendrocytes.

  2. Conformational selection through electrostatics: Free energy simulations of GTP and GDP binding to archaeal initiation factor 2.

    PubMed

    Satpati, Priyadarshi; Simonson, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Archaeal Initiation Factor 2 is a GTPase involved in protein biosynthesis. In its GTP-bound, "ON" conformation, it binds an initiator tRNA and carries it to the ribosome. In its GDP-bound, "OFF" conformation, it dissociates from tRNA. To understand the specific binding of GTP and GDP and their dependence on the conformational state, molecular dynamics free energy simulations were performed. The ON state specificity was predicted to be weak, with a GTP/GDP binding free energy difference of -1 kcal/mol, favoring GTP. The OFF state specificity is larger, 4 kcal/mol, favoring GDP. The overall effects result from a competition among many interactions in several complexes. To interpret them, we use a simpler, dielectric continuum model. Several effects are robust with respect to the model details. Both nucleotides have a net negative charge, so that removing them from solvent into the binding pocket carries a desolvation penalty, which is large for the ON state, and strongly disfavors GTP binding compared to GDP. Short-range interactions between the additional GTP phosphate group and ionized sidechains in the binding pocket offset most, but not all of the desolvation penalty; more distant groups also contribute significantly, and the switch 1 loop only slightly. The desolvation penalty is lower for the more open, wetter OFF state, and the GTP/GDP difference much smaller. Short-range interactions in the binding pocket and with more distant groups again make a significant contribution. Overall, the simulations help explain how conformational selection is achieved with a single phosphate group. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Membrane-associated 41-kDa GTP-binding protein in collagen-induced platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, G.; Bourguignon, L.Y. )

    1990-08-01

    Initially we established that the binding of collagen to human blood platelets stimulates both the rapid loss of PIP2 and the generation of inositol-4,5-bisphosphate (IP2) and inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3). These results indicate that the binding of collagen stimulates inositol phospholipid-specific phospholipase C during platelet activation. The fact that GTP or GTP-gamma-S augments, and pertussis toxin inhibits, collagen-induced IP3 formation suggests that a GTP-binding protein or (or proteins) may be directly involved in the regulation of phospholipase C-mediated phosphoinositide turnover in human platelets. We have used several complementary techniques to isolate and characterize a platelet 41-kDa polypeptide (or polypeptides) that has a number of structural and functional similarities to the regulatory alpha i subunit of the GTP-binding proteins isolated from bovine brain. This 41-kDa polypeptide (or polypeptides) is found to be closely associated with at least four membrane glycoproteins (e.g., gp180, gp110, gp95, and gp75) in a 330-kDa complex that can be dissociated by treatment with high salt plus urea. Most important, we have demonstrated that antilymphoma 41-kDa (alpha i subunit of GTP-binding proteins) antibody cross-reacts with the platelet 41-kDa protein (or proteins) and the alpha i subunit of bovine brain Gi alpha proteins, and blocks GTP/collagen-induced IP3 formation. These data provide strong evidence that the 41-kDa platelet GTP-binding protein (or proteins) is directly involved in collagen-induced signal transduction during platelet activation.

  4. Association of the GTP-binding protein Rab3A with bovine adrenal chromaffin granules

    SciTech Connect

    Darchen, F.; Hammel, F.; Monteils, M.P.; Scherman, D. ); Zahraoui, A.; Tavitian, A. )

    1990-08-01

    The Rab3A protein belongs to a large family of small GTP-binding proteins that are present in eukaryotic cells and that share amino acid identities with the Ras proteins (products of the ras protooncogenes). Rab3A, which is specifically located in nervous and endocrine tissues, is suspected to play a key role in secretion. Its localization was investigated in bovine adrenal gland by using a polyclonal antibody. Rab3A was detected in adrenal medulla but not in adrenal cortex. In cultured adrenal medulla cells, Rab3A was specifically expressed in the catecholamine-secreting chromaffin cells. Subcellular fractionation suggested that Rab3A is about 30% cytosolic and that particulate Rab3A is associated with the membrane of chromaffin granules (the catecholamine storage organelles) and with a second compartment likely to be the plasma membrane. The Rab3A localization on chromaffin granule membranes was confirmed by immunoadsorption with an antibody against dopamine {beta}-hydroxylase. Rab3A was not extracted from this membrane by NaCl or KBr but was partially extracted by urea and totally solubilized by Triton X-100, suggesting either an interaction with an intrinsic protein or a membrane association through fatty acid acylation. This study suggests that Rab3A, which may also be located on other secretory vesicles containing noncharacterized small GTP-binding proteins, is involved in their biogenesis or in the regulated secretion process.

  5. Canoe binds RanGTP to promote PinsTPR/Mud-mediated spindle orientation

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Brett; Johnston, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Regulated spindle orientation maintains epithelial tissue integrity and stem cell asymmetric cell division. In Drosophila melanogaster neural stem cells (neuroblasts), the scaffolding protein Canoe (Afadin/Af-6 in mammals) regulates spindle orientation, but its protein interaction partners and mechanism of action are unknown. In this paper, we use our recently developed induced cell polarity system to dissect the molecular mechanism of Canoe-mediated spindle orientation. We show that a previously uncharacterized portion of Canoe directly binds the Partner of Inscuteable (Pins) tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. The Canoe–PinsTPR interaction recruits Canoe to the cell cortex and is required for activation of the PinsTPR-Mud (nuclear mitotic apparatus in mammals) spindle orientation pathway. We show that the Canoe Ras-association (RA) domains directly bind RanGTP and that both the CanoeRA domains and RanGTP are required to recruit Mud to the cortex and activate the Pins/Mud/dynein spindle orientation pathway. PMID:22024168

  6. The role of Mg2+ cofactor in the guanine nucleotide exchange and GTP hydrolysis reactions of Rho family GTP-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, B; Zhang, Y; Wang, Z; Zheng, Y

    2000-08-18

    The biological activities of Rho family GTPases are controlled by their guanine nucleotide binding states in cells. Here we have investigated the role of Mg(2+) cofactor in the guanine nucleotide binding and hydrolysis processes of the Rho family members, Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoA. Differing from Ras and Rab proteins, which require Mg(2+) for GDP and GTP binding, the Rho GTPases bind the nucleotides in the presence or absence of Mg(2+) similarly, with dissociation constants in the submicromolar concentration. The presence of Mg(2+), however, resulted in a marked decrease in the intrinsic dissociation rates of the nucleotides. The catalytic activity of the guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) appeared to be negatively regulated by free Mg(2+), and GEF binding to Rho GTPase resulted in a 10-fold decrease in affinity for Mg(2+), suggesting that one role of GEF is to displace bound Mg(2+) from the Rho proteins. The GDP dissociation rates of the GTPases could be further stimulated by GEF upon removal of bound Mg(2+), indicating that the GEF-catalyzed nucleotide exchange involves a Mg(2+)-independent as well as a Mg(2+)-dependent mechanism. Although Mg(2+) is not absolutely required for GTP hydrolysis by the Rho GTPases, the divalent ion apparently participates in the GTPase reaction, since the intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rates were enhanced 4-10-fold upon binding to Mg(2+), and k(cat) values of the Rho GTPase-activating protein (RhoGAP)-catalyzed reactions were significantly increased when Mg(2+) was present. Furthermore, the p50RhoGAP specificity for Cdc42 was lost in the absence of Mg(2+) cofactor. These studies directly demonstrate a role of Mg(2+) in regulating the kinetics of nucleotide binding and hydrolysis and in the GEF- and GAP-catalyzed reactions of Rho family GTPases. The results suggest that GEF facilitates nucleotide exchange by destabilizing both bound nucleotide and Mg(2+), whereas RhoGAP utilizes the Mg(2+) cofactor to achieve high catalytic efficiency

  7. Structure of human guanylate-binding protein 1 representing a unique class of GTP-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Prakash, B; Praefcke, G J; Renault, L; Wittinghofer, A; Herrmann, C

    2000-02-03

    Interferon-gamma is an immunomodulatory substance that induces the expression of many genes to orchestrate a cellular response and establish the antiviral state of the cell. Among the most abundant antiviral proteins induced by interferon-gamma are guanylate-binding proteins such as GBP1 and GBP2. These are large GTP-binding proteins of relative molecular mass 67,000 with a high-turnover GTPase activity and an antiviral effect. Here we have determined the crystal structure of full-length human GBP1 to 1.8 A resolution. The amino-terminal 278 residues constitute a modified G domain with a number of insertions compared to the canonical Ras structure, and the carboxy-terminal part is an extended helical domain with unique features. From the structure and biochemical experiments reported here, GBP1 appears to belong to the group of large GTP-binding proteins that includes Mx and dynamin, the common property of which is the ability to undergo oligomerization with a high concentration-dependent GTPase activity.

  8. Small GTP-binding proteins of the ras family: a conserved functional mechanism?

    PubMed

    Chardin, P

    1991-04-01

    Mutated ras genes can acquire a transforming potential and are frequently detected in human tumors. The mammalian ras gene family includes at least 35 distinct members that can be divided into three main groups on the basis of their sequence similarity to ras, rho, or rab genes. All these genes encode small GTP-binding proteins. Rho proteins are implicated in actin organization and control of cell shape, probably by interacting with the cytoskeleton and intracellular membranes. Rab proteins are involved in vesicular traffic, and appear to control the translocation of vesicles from donor to acceptor membranes. The precise function of ras proteins is unknown, although the prevailing view is that they act as transducers of mitogenic signals. We propose that ras proteins, by analogy with rho and rab, are involved in the lateral segregation of multi-protein complexes at the plasma membrane, and we suggest how this process may be important for mitogenic signal transduction.

  9. Dephosphorylation of cofilin in stimulated platelets: roles for a GTP-binding protein and Ca2+.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, M M; Haslam, R J

    1994-01-01

    In human platelets, thrombin not only stimulates the phosphorylation of pleckstrin (P47) and of myosin P-light chains, but also induces the dephosphorylation of an 18-19 kDa phosphoprotein (P18) [Imaoka, Lynham and Haslam (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 11404-11414]. We have now studied this protein in detail. The thrombin-induced dephosphorylation reaction did not begin until the phosphorylation of myosin P-light chains and the secretion of dense-granule 5-hydroxytryptamine were nearly complete, but did parallel the later stages of platelet aggregation. Experiments with ionophore A23187 and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate indicated that dephosphorylation of P18 was stimulated by Ca2+, but not by protein kinase C. Two-dimensional analysis of platelet proteins, using non-equilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis followed by SDS/PAGE, showed that thrombin decreased the amount of phosphorylated P18 in platelets by up to 70% and slightly increased the amount of a more basic unlabelled protein that was present in 3-fold excess of P18 in unstimulated platelets. These two proteins were identified as the phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms of the pH-sensitive actin-depolymerizing protein, cofilin, by sequencing of peptide fragments and immunoblotting with a monoclonal antibody specific for cofilin. The molar concentration of cofilin in platelets was approx. 10% that of actin. Platelet cofilin was phosphorylated exclusively on serine. Experiments with electropermeabilized platelets showed that dephosphorylation of cofilin could be stimulated by guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[S]) in the absence of Ca2+ or by a free Ca2+ concentration of 10 microM. This GTP[S]-induced dephosphorylation reaction was inhibited by 1-naphthyl phosphate, but not by okadaic acid. Our results add cofilin to the actin-binding proteins that may regulate the platelet cytoskeleton, and suggest that platelet cofilin can be activated by dephosphorylation reactions initiated either by a GTP-binding

  10. ADP-ribosylation factor, a small GTP-binding protein, is required for binding of the coatomer protein beta-COP to Golgi membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, J G; Cassel, D; Kahn, R A; Klausner, R D

    1992-01-01

    The coatomer is a cytosolic protein complex that reversibly associates with Golgi membranes and is implicated in modulating Golgi membrane transport. The association of beta-COP, a component of coatomer, with Golgi membranes is enhanced by guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[gamma S]), a nonhydrolyzable analogue of GTP, and by a mixture of aluminum and fluoride ions (Al/F). Here we show that the ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) is required for the binding of beta-COP. Thus, beta-COP contained in a coatomer fraction that has been resolved from ARF does not bind to Golgi membranes, whereas binding can be reconstituted by the addition of recombinant ARF. Furthermore, an N-terminal peptide of ARF, which blocks ARF binding to Golgi membranes, inhibits GTP[gamma S]- as well as the Al/F-enhanced binding of beta-COP. We show that Golgi coat protein binding involves a sequential reaction where an initial interaction of ARF and GTP[gamma S] with the membrane allows subsequent binding of beta-COP to take place in the absence of free ARF and GTP[gamma S]. The fungal metabolite brefeldin A, which is known to prevent the association of coat proteins with Golgi membrane, is shown to exert this effect by interfering with the initial ARF-membrane interaction step. Images PMID:1631136

  11. Ras p21 and other Gn proteins are detected in mammalian cell lines by (gamma-/sup 35/S)GTP gamma S binding

    SciTech Connect

    Comerford, J.G.; Gibson, J.R.; Dawson, A.P.; Gibson, I.

    1989-03-31

    The presence of guanine nucleotide binding proteins in mouse and human cell lines was investigated using (gamma-/sup 35/S)GTP gamma S and (gamma-32P)GTP. Cell lysate polypeptides were separated by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and transferred to nitrocellulose. Incubation of the nitrocellulose blots with (gamma-/sup 35/S)GTP gamma S identified 9 distinct GTP-binding polypeptides in all lysates. One of these is the ras oncogene product, p21, as demonstrated by subsequent immunochemical staining of the nitrocellulose blots. We have shown that this procedure provides a sensitive method for detection of p21 in culture cell lines.

  12. Interferon-induced guanylate-binding proteins lack an N(T)KXD consensus motif and bind GMP in addition to GDP and GTP.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y S; Patterson, C E; Staeheli, P

    1991-09-01

    The primary structures of interferon (IFN)-induced guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) were deduced from cloned human and murine cDNAs. These proteins contained only two of the three sequence motifs typically found in GTP/GDP-binding proteins. The N(T)KXD motif, which is believed to confer guanine specificity in other nucleotide-binding proteins, was absent. Nevertheless, the IFN-induced GBPs exhibited a high degree of selectivity for binding to agarose-immobilized guanine nucleotides. An interesting feature of IFN-induced GBPs is that they strongly bound to GMP agarose in addition to GDP and GTP agaroses but failed to bind to ATP agarose and all other nucleotide agaroses tested. Both GTP and GMP, but not ATP, competed for binding of murine GBP-1 to agarose-immobilized GMP. The IFN-induced GBPs thus define a distinct novel family of proteins with GTP-binding activity. We further demonstrate that human and murine cells contain at least two genes encoding IFN-induced GBPs. The cloned murine cDNA codes for GBP-1, an IFN-induced protein previously shown to be absent from mice of Gbp-1b genotype.

  13. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ski7 Is a GTP-Binding Protein Adopting the Characteristic Conformation of Active Translational GTPases.

    PubMed

    Kowalinski, Eva; Schuller, Anthony; Green, Rachel; Conti, Elena

    2015-07-07

    Ski7 is a cofactor of the cytoplasmic exosome in budding yeast, functioning in both mRNA turnover and non-stop decay (NSD), a surveillance pathway that degrades faulty mRNAs lacking a stop codon. The C-terminal region of Ski7 (Ski7C) shares overall sequence similarity with the translational GTPase (trGTPase) Hbs1, but whether Ski7 has retained the properties of a trGTPase is unclear. Here, we report the high-resolution structures of Ski7C bound to either intact guanosine triphosphate (GTP) or guanosine diphosphate-Pi. The individual domains of Ski7C adopt the conformation characteristic of active trGTPases. Furthermore, the nucleotide-binding site of Ski7C shares similar features compared with active trGTPases, notably the presence of a characteristic monovalent cation. However, a suboptimal polar residue at the putative catalytic site and an unusual polar residue that interacts with the γ-phosphate of GTP distinguish Ski7 from other trGTPases, suggesting it might function rather as a GTP-binding protein than as a GTP-hydrolyzing enzyme.

  14. Pertussis toxin modifies the characteristics of both the inhibitory GTP binding proteins and the somatostatin receptor in anterior pituitary tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mahy, N.; Woolkalis, M.; Thermos, K.; Carlson, K.; Manning, D.; Reisine, T.

    1988-08-01

    The effects of pertussis toxin treatment on the characteristics of somatostatin receptors in the anterior pituitary tumor cell line AtT-20 were examined. Pertussis toxin selectively catalyzed the ADP ribosylation of the alpha subunits of the inhibitory GTP binding proteins in AtT-20 cells. Toxin treatment abolished somatostatin inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity and somatostatin stimulation of GTPase activity. To examine the effects of pertussis toxin treatment on the characteristics of the somatostatin receptor, the receptor was labeled by the somatostatin analog (125I)CGP 23996. (125I)CGP 23996 binding to AtT-20 cell membranes was saturable and within a limited concentration range was to a single high affinity site. Pertussis toxin treatment reduced the apparent density of the high affinity (125I)CGP 23996 binding sites in AtT-20 cell membranes. Inhibition of (125I)CGP 23996 binding by a wide concentration range of CGP 23996 revealed the presence of two binding sites. GTP predominantly reduced the level of high affinity sites in control membranes. Pertussis toxin treatment also diminished the amount of high affinity sites. GTP did not affect (125I)CGP 23996 binding in the pertussis toxin-treated membranes. The high affinity somatostatin receptors were covalently labeled with (125I) CGP 23996 and the photoactivated crosslinking agent n-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azidobenzoate. No high affinity somatostatin receptors, covalently bound to (125I)CGP 23996, were detected in the pertussis toxin-treated membranes. These results are most consistent with pertussis toxin uncoupling the inhibitory G proteins from the somatostatin receptor thereby converting the receptor from a mixed population of high and low affinity sites to only low affinity receptors.

  15. The small GTP-binding protein rab4 is associated with early endosomes

    SciTech Connect

    van der Sluijs, P.; Hull, M.; Mellman, I. ); Zahraoui, A.; Tavitian, A. ); Goud, B. )

    1991-07-15

    Small GTP-binding proteins of the rab family have been implicated as playing important roles in controlling membrane traffic on the biosynthetic and endocytic pathways. The authors demonstrate that a distinct rab protein, rab4p, is associated with the population of early endosomes involved in transferrin-receptor recycling. An antibody to human rab4p was found to detect a doublet of {approx} 24-kDa proteins on immunoblots from various cell types. Seventy-five percent of these proteins were tightly membrane bound and could be released only by detergent treatment. Upon isolation of early endosomes, late endosomes, and lysosomes, by free-flow electrophoresis and Percoll density-gradient centrifugation, most (70%) of the rab4p was found to cofractionate with early endosomes and endocytic vesicles containing {sup 125}-labeled transferrin. The rab proteins previously localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and/or Golgi apparatus were not found in these fractions. They also localized rab4p to tansferrin-receptor-containing early endosomes by immunofluorescence after expression of rab4p cDNA. The association of rab4p with early endosomes and other vesicles involved in the intracellular tansport of transferrin receptor suggests that rab4p may play a role in regulating the pathway of receptor recycling.

  16. Inhibitory GTP binding protein G/sub i/ regulates US -adrenoceptor affinity towards US -agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Marbach, I.; Levitzki, A.

    1987-05-01

    Treatment of S-49 lymphoma cell membranes with pertussis toxin (PT) causes a three-fold reduction of US -adrenoceptor (US AR) affinity towards isoproterenol. A similar treatment with cholera toxin (CT) does not cause such a modulation. The effects were studied by the detailed analysis of SVI-cyanopindolol (CYP) binding curves in the absence and presence of increasing agonist concentrations. Thus, the authors were able to compare in detail the effects of G/sub s/ and G/sub i/ on the agonist-associated state of the US AR. In contrast to these findings, PT treatment does not have any effect on the displacement of SVI-CYP by (-)isoproterenol. These results demonstrate that the inhibitory GTP protein G/sub i/ modulates the US AR affinity towards US -agonists. This might be due to the association of G/sub i/ with the agonist-bound US AR x G/sub s/ x C complex within the membrane. This hypothesis, as well as others, is under investigation.

  17. Myristoylation of an inhibitory GTP-binding protein. alpha. subunit is essential for its membrane attachment

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T.L.Z.; Simonds, W.F.; Merendino, J.J. Jr.; Brann, M.R.; Spiegel, A.M. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors transfected COS cells with cDNAs for the {alpha} subunits of stimulatory and inhibitory GTP-binding proteins, {alpha}{sub s} and {alpha}{sub i1}, respectively, and immunoprecipitated the metabolically labeled products with specific peptide antibodies. Cells were separated into particulate and soluble fractions before immunoprecipitation; ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled {alpha}{sub s} and {alpha}{sub i} were both found primarily in the particulate fraction. ({sup 3}H)Myristate was incorporated into endogenous and transfected {alpha}{sub i} but could not be detected in {alpha}{sub s} even when it was overexpressed. They converted the second residue, glycine, of {alpha}{sub i1} into alanine by site-directed mutagenesis. Upon transfection of the mutant {alpha}{sub i1} into COS cells, the ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled product was localized primarily to the soluble fraction, and, also unlike normal {alpha}{sub i1}, the mutant failed to incorporate ({sup 3}H)myristate. The unmyristoylated mutant {alpha}{sub i1} could still interact with the {beta}-{gamma} complex, since purified {beta}{gamma} subunits promoted pertussis toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of both the normal and mutant {alpha}{sub i1} subunits. These results indicate that myristoylation is critical for membrane attachment of {alpha}{sub i} but not {alpha}{sub s} subunits.

  18. 6-Acetyldihydrohomopterin and sepiapterin affect some GTP cyclohydrolase I's and not others

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, K.B.; Manos, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    The first enzyme in pteridine biosynthesis, GTP cyclohydrolase I, is a likely site for regulation of pteridine biosynthesis to occur. GTP cyclohydrolase I responds to hormonal treatment and is found altered in a variety of mice with genetically based neurological and immunological disorders. Genetic loci can greatly modify the activity of GTP cyclohydrolase: Punch mutant in Drosophila hph-1 in mouse and atypical phenylketonuria in human. This report examines the ability of Ahp and sepiapterin to alter the activity of GTP cyclohydrolase I from mouse liver, rat liver and Drosophila head. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. Pheromone signalling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the small GTP-binding protein Cdc42p and its activator CDC24.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Z S; Leung, T; Manser, E; Lim, L

    1995-01-01

    Pheromone signalling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is mediated by the STE4-STE18 G-protein beta gamma subunits. A possible target for the subunits is Ste20p, whose structural homolog, the serine/threonine kinase PAK, is activated by GTP-binding p21s Cdc42 and Rac1. The putative Cdc42p-binding domain of Ste20p, expressed as a fusion protein, binds human and yeast GTP-binding Cdc42p. Cdc42p is required for alpha-factor-induced activation of FUS1.cdc24ts strains defective for Cdc42p GDP/GTP exchange show no pheromone induction at restrictive temperatures but are partially rescued by overexpression of Cdc42p, which is potentiated by Cdc42p12V mutants. Epistatic analysis indicates that CDC24 and CDC42 lie between STE4 and STE20 in the pathway. The two-hybrid system revealed that Ste4p interacts with Cdc24p. We propose that Cdc42p plays a pivotal role both in polarization of the cytoskeleton and in pheromone signalling. PMID:7565673

  20. Molecular cloning of the gene for the human placental GTP-binding protein Gp (G25K): identification of this GTP-binding protein as the human homolog of the yeast cell-division-cycle protein CDC42.

    PubMed Central

    Shinjo, K; Koland, J G; Hart, M J; Narasimhan, V; Johnson, D I; Evans, T; Cerione, R A

    1990-01-01

    We have isolated cDNA clones from a human placental library that code for a low molecular weight GTP-binding protein originally designated Gp (also called G25K). This identification is based on comparisons with the available peptide sequences for the purified human Gp protein and the use of two highly specific anti-peptide antibodies. The predicted amino acid sequence of the protein is very similar to those of various members of the ras superfamily of low molecular weight GTP-binding proteins, including the N-, Ki-, and Ha-ras proteins (30-35% identical), the rho proteins (approximately 50% identical), and the rac proteins (approximately 70% identical). The highest degree of sequence identity (80%) is found with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell-division-cycle protein CDC42. The human placental gene, which we designate CDC42Hs, complements the cdc42-1 mutation in S. cerevisiae, which suggests that this GTP-binding protein is the human homolog of the yeast protein. Images PMID:2124704

  1. Molecular cloning of the gene for the human placental GTP-binding protein Gp (G25K): identification of this GTP-binding protein as the human homolog of the yeast cell-division-cycle protein CDC42.

    PubMed

    Shinjo, K; Koland, J G; Hart, M J; Narasimhan, V; Johnson, D I; Evans, T; Cerione, R A

    1990-12-01

    We have isolated cDNA clones from a human placental library that code for a low molecular weight GTP-binding protein originally designated Gp (also called G25K). This identification is based on comparisons with the available peptide sequences for the purified human Gp protein and the use of two highly specific anti-peptide antibodies. The predicted amino acid sequence of the protein is very similar to those of various members of the ras superfamily of low molecular weight GTP-binding proteins, including the N-, Ki-, and Ha-ras proteins (30-35% identical), the rho proteins (approximately 50% identical), and the rac proteins (approximately 70% identical). The highest degree of sequence identity (80%) is found with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell-division-cycle protein CDC42. The human placental gene, which we designate CDC42Hs, complements the cdc42-1 mutation in S. cerevisiae, which suggests that this GTP-binding protein is the human homolog of the yeast protein.

  2. Molecular cloning of the gene for the human placental GTP-binding protein G sub p (G25K): Identification of this GTP-binding protein as the human homolog of the yeast cell-division-cycle protein CDC42

    SciTech Connect

    Shinjo, K.; Koland, J.G.; Hart, M.J.; Narasimhan, V.; Cerione, R.A. ); Johnson, D.I. ); Evans, T. )

    1990-12-01

    The authors have isolated cDNA clones from a human placental library that code for a low molecular weight GTP-binding protein originally designated G{sub p} (also called G25K). This identification is based on comparisons with the available peptide sequences for the purified human G{sub p} protein and the use of two highly specific anti-peptide antibodies. The predicted amino acid sequence of the protein is very similar to those of various members of the ras superfamily of low molecular weight GTP-binding proteins, including the N-, Ki-, and Ha-ras proteins (30-35% identical), the rho proteins and the rac proteins. The highest degree of sequence identity (80%) is found with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell division-cycle protein CDC42. The human placental gene, which they designate CDC42Hs, complements the cdc42-1 mutation in S. cerevisiae, which suggests that this GTP-binding protein is the human homolog of the yeast protein.

  3. A putative GTP binding protein homologous to interferon-inducible Mx proteins performs an essential function in yeast protein sorting.

    PubMed

    Rothman, J H; Raymond, C K; Gilbert, T; O'Hara, P J; Stevens, T H

    1990-06-15

    Members of the Mx protein family promote interferon-inducible resistance to viral infection in mammals and act by unknown mechanisms. We identified an Mx-like protein in yeast and present genetic evidence for its cellular function. This protein, the VPS1 product, is essential for vacuolar protein sorting, normal organization of intracellular membranes, and growth at high temperature, implying that Mx-like proteins are engaged in fundamental cellular processes in eukaryotes. Vps1p contains a tripartite GTP binding motif, which suggests that binding to GTP is essential to its role in protein sorting. Vps1p-specific antibody labels punctate cytoplasmic structures that condense to larger structures in a Golgi-accumulating sec7 mutant; thus, Vps1p may associate with an intermediate organelle of the secretory pathway.

  4. Src homology 2 domain containing protein 5 (SH2D5) binds the breakpoint cluster region protein, BCR, and regulates levels of Rac1-GTP.

    PubMed

    Gray, Elizabeth J; Petsalaki, Evangelia; James, D Andrew; Bagshaw, Richard D; Stacey, Melissa M; Rocks, Oliver; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Pawson, Tony

    2014-12-19

    SH2D5 is a mammalian-specific, uncharacterized adaptor-like protein that contains an N-terminal phosphotyrosine-binding domain and a C-terminal Src homology 2 (SH2) domain. We show that SH2D5 is highly enriched in adult mouse brain, particularly in Purkinjie cells in the cerebellum and the cornu ammonis of the hippocampus. Despite harboring two potential phosphotyrosine (Tyr(P)) recognition domains, SH2D5 binds minimally to Tyr(P) ligands, consistent with the absence of a conserved Tyr(P)-binding arginine residue in the SH2 domain. Immunoprecipitation coupled to mass spectrometry (IP-MS) from cultured cells revealed a prominent association of SH2D5 with breakpoint cluster region protein, a RacGAP that is also highly expressed in brain. This interaction occurred between the phosphotyrosine-binding domain of SH2D5 and an NxxF motif located within the N-terminal region of the breakpoint cluster region. siRNA-mediated depletion of SH2D5 in a neuroblastoma cell line, B35, induced a cell rounding phenotype correlated with low levels of activated Rac1-GTP, suggesting that SH2D5 affects Rac1-GTP levels. Taken together, our data provide the first characterization of the SH2D5 signaling protein. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Src Homology 2 Domain Containing Protein 5 (SH2D5) Binds the Breakpoint Cluster Region Protein, BCR, and Regulates Levels of Rac1-GTP*

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Elizabeth J.; Petsalaki, Evangelia; James, D. Andrew; Bagshaw, Richard D.; Stacey, Melissa M.; Rocks, Oliver; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Pawson, Tony

    2014-01-01

    SH2D5 is a mammalian-specific, uncharacterized adaptor-like protein that contains an N-terminal phosphotyrosine-binding domain and a C-terminal Src homology 2 (SH2) domain. We show that SH2D5 is highly enriched in adult mouse brain, particularly in Purkinjie cells in the cerebellum and the cornu ammonis of the hippocampus. Despite harboring two potential phosphotyrosine (Tyr(P)) recognition domains, SH2D5 binds minimally to Tyr(P) ligands, consistent with the absence of a conserved Tyr(P)-binding arginine residue in the SH2 domain. Immunoprecipitation coupled to mass spectrometry (IP-MS) from cultured cells revealed a prominent association of SH2D5 with breakpoint cluster region protein, a RacGAP that is also highly expressed in brain. This interaction occurred between the phosphotyrosine-binding domain of SH2D5 and an NxxF motif located within the N-terminal region of the breakpoint cluster region. siRNA-mediated depletion of SH2D5 in a neuroblastoma cell line, B35, induced a cell rounding phenotype correlated with low levels of activated Rac1-GTP, suggesting that SH2D5 affects Rac1-GTP levels. Taken together, our data provide the first characterization of the SH2D5 signaling protein. PMID:25331951

  6. A recombinant inwardly rectifying potassium channel coupled to GTP- binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    GTP-binding (G) proteins have been shown to mediate activation of inwardly rectifying potassium (K+) channels in cardiac, neuronal and neuroendocrine cells. Here, we report functional expression of a recombinant inwardly rectifying channel which we call KGP (or hpKir3.4), to signify that it is K+ selective, G-protein-gated and isolated from human pancreas. KGP expression in Xenopus oocytes resulted in sizeable basal (or agonist-independent) currents while coexpression with a G-protein-linked receptor, yielded additional agonist-induced currents. Coexpression of KGP and hGIRK1 (a human brain homolog of GIRK1/Kir3.1) produced much larger basal currents than those observed with KGP or hGIRK1 alone, and upon coexpression with receptor, similarly large agonist-induced currents could be obtained. Pertussis toxin treatment significantly diminished agonist-dependent currents due to either KGP or KGP/hGIRK1 expression. Interestingly, PTX also significantly reduced basal KGP or KGP/hGIRK1 currents, suggesting that basal activity is largely the result of G-protein gating as well. When the two channels were coexpressed with receptor, the relative increase in current elicited by agonist was similar whether KGP and hGIRK1 were expressed alone or together. When in vitro translated or when expressed in Xenopus oocytes or CHO mammalian cells, KGP gave rise to a nonglycosylated 45-kD protein. Antibodies directed against either KGP or hGIRK1 coprecipitated both proteins coexpressed in oocytes, providing evidence for the heteromeric assembly of the two channels and suggesting that the current potentiation seen with coexpression of the two channel subunits is due to specific interactions between them. An endogenous oocyte protein similar in size to KGP was also coprecipitated with hGIRK1. PMID:8868049

  7. Ultrastructural localization of the small GTP-binding protein Rap1 in human platelets and megakaryocytes.

    PubMed

    Berger, G; Quarck, R; Tenza, D; Levy-Toledano, S; de Gunzburg, J; Cramer, E M

    1994-10-01

    Several functions have been proposed for Rap1B in human platelets, including the regulation of phospholipase (PL) C gamma and Ca2+ ATPase. However, its localization is largely unknown. In the present study we have investigated the subcellular distribution of Rap1 by immunocytochemical techniques using affinity purified polyclonal antibodies raised against residues 121-137 common to the 95% homologous Rap1A and Rap1B proteins. By immunofluorescence, a positive labelling was obtained on intact resting platelets and was abolished after adsorption of the antibodies with the control peptide. Immunoelectron microscopy was then used to further define the subcellular localization of Rap1B in platelets and megakaryocytes (MK). In resting cells, immunolabelling for Rap1B was associated with the plasma membrane, mostly at its inner face, and lined the membrane of the open canalicular system (OCS). Some labelling was also found outlining the alpha-granules, identified as such by a double labelling with an anti-GPIIb-IIIa. On thrombasthenic platelets the same localization was observed. When platelets were stimulated by thrombin, immunolabelling for Rap1B was redistributed to the zones of fusion of the granules with the OCS, and to the plasma membrane with a higher concentration on pseudopods. Human MK expressed Rap1 and the staining revealed the association of the protein with the demarcation membranes and alpha-granules. This study presents a first approach to the localization of a small GTP binding-protein Rap1B in whole platelets and MK, and shows its association with both the plasma and OCS membranes, as well as with the alpha-granule membranes.

  8. Distribution of adenylate cyclase and GTP-binding proteins in hepatic plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Dixon, B S; Sutherland, E; Alexander, A; Nibel, D; Simon, F R

    1993-10-01

    Hepatic membrane subfractions prepared from control rats demonstrated forskolin (FSK)-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in the basolateral (sinusoidal) but not apical (canalicular) plasma membrane. After bile duct ligation (BDL) for 12 or 24 h, there was an increase in FSK-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in the apical membrane (54.2 +/- 3.9 pmol.mg-1 x min-1). The mechanism for this increase was explored further. ATP hydrolysis was found to be much higher in the apical than the basolateral membrane. Increasing the ATP levels in the assay enhanced apical membrane adenylate cyclase activity (10.5 +/- 0.2 pmol.mg-l.min-1); however, total adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) activity was not altered after BDL. Extraction of the apical membrane with bile acids or other detergents resulted in a two- to threefold increase in adenylate cyclase activity (30.6 +/- 3.6 pmol.mg-1 x min-1; detergent C12E8) This suggested that bile duct ligation was acting via the detergent-like action of bile acids to uncover latent adenylate cyclase activity on apical membranes. Further studies demonstrated that both BDL and detergent extraction also enhanced toxin-directed ADP-ribosylation of Gs alpha (cholera toxin) and Gi alpha (pertussis toxin) in the apical but not the basolateral membrane. After BDL, Gi alpha was found to be twofold greater in the apical membrane than the basolateral membrane. Immunoblotting using specific G protein antibodies further confirmed that apical membranes from control rats had a higher concentration of Gi1, 2 alpha and beta and slightly elevated levels of Gi3 alpha and Gs alpha compared with the basolateral membrane. The results demonstrate that adenylate cyclase and heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins are present on the apical membrane, but measurement of their functional activity requires detergent permeabilization of apical membrane vesicles and is limited by the presence of high ATPase activity.

  9. Mutational analysis of op18/stathmin-tubulin-interacting surfaces. Binding cooperativity controls tubulin GTP hydrolysis in the ternary complex.

    PubMed

    Segerman, B; Larsson, N; Holmfeldt, P; Gullberg, M

    2000-11-17

    Oncoprotein 18 (Op18) is a microtubule regulator that forms a ternary complex with two tubulin heterodimers. Dispersed regions of Op18 are involved in two-site cooperative binding and subsequent modulation of tubulin GTPase activity. Here we have analyzed specific determinants of Op18 that govern both stoichiometry and positive cooperativity in tubulin binding and consequent stimulatory and inhibitory effects on tubulin GTPase activity. The data revealed that the central and C-terminal regions of Op18 contain overlapping binding-motifs contacting both tubulin heterodimers, suggesting that these regions of Op18 are wedged into the previously noted 1-nm gap between the two longitudinally arranged tubulin heterodimers. Both the N- and C-terminal flanks adjacent to the central region are involved in stabilizing the ternary complex, but only the C-terminal flank does so by imposing positive binding cooperativity. Within the C-terminal flank, deletion of a 7-amino acid region attenuated positive binding cooperativity and resulted in a switch from stimulation to inhibition of tubulin GTP hydrolysis. This switch can be explained by attenuated binding cooperativity, because Op18 under these conditions may block longitudinal contact surfaces of single tubulins with consequent interference of tubulin-tubulin interaction-dependent GTP hydrolysis. Together, our results suggest that Op18 links two tubulin heterodimers via longitudinal contact surfaces to form a ternary GTPase productive complex.

  10. A green fluorescent protein solubility screen in E. coli reveals domain boundaries of the GTP-binding domain in the P element transposase

    PubMed Central

    Sabogal, Alex; Rio, Donald C

    2010-01-01

    Guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding and hydrolysis events often act as molecular switches in proteins, modulating conformational changes between active and inactive states in many signaling molecules and transport systems. The P element transposase of Drosophila melanogaster requires GTP binding to proceed along its reaction pathway, following initial site-specific DNA binding. GTP binding is unique to P elements and may represent a novel form of transpositional regulation, allowing the bound transposase to find a second site, looping the transposon DNA for strand cleavage and excision. The GTP-binding activity has been previously mapped to the central portion of the transposase protein; however, the P element transposase contains little sequence identity with known GTP-binding folds. To identify soluble, active transposase domains, a GFP solubility screen was used testing the solubility of random P element gene fragments in E. coli. The screen produced a single clone spanning known GTP-binding residues in the central portion of the transposase coding region. This clone, amino acids 275–409 in the P element transposase, was soluble, highly expressed in E.coli and active for GTP-binding activity, therefore is a candidate for future biochemical and structural studies. In addition, the chimeric screen revealed a minimal N-terminal THAP DNA-binding domain attached to an extended leucine zipper coiled-coil dimerization domain in the P element transposase, precisely delineating the DNA-binding and dimerization activities on the primary sequence. This study highlights the use of a GFP-based solubility screen on a large multidomain protein to identify highly expressed, soluble truncated domain subregions. PMID:20842711

  11. Prenylation of an interferon-gamma-induced GTP-binding protein: the human guanylate binding protein, huGBP1.

    PubMed

    Nantais, D E; Schwemmle, M; Stickney, J T; Vestal, D J; Buss, J E

    1996-09-01

    Interferons (IFN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cause multiple changes in isoprenoid-modified proteins in murine macrophages, the most dramatic being the expression of a prenyl protein of 65 kDa. The guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) are IFN-inducible GTP-binding proteins of approximately 65 kDa that possess a CaaX motif at their C-terminus, indicating that they might be substrates for prenyltransferases. The human GBP1 protein, when expressed in transfected COS-1 cells, incorporates radioactivity from the isoprenoid precursor [3H]mevalonate. In addition, huGBPs expressed from the endogenous genes in IFN-gamma-treated human fibroblasts or monocytic cells were also found to be isoprenoid modified. IFN-gamma-induced huGBPs in HL-60 cells were not labeled by the specific C20 isoprenoid, [3H]geranylgeraniol, but did show decreased isoprenoid incorporation in cells treated with the farnesyl transferase inhibitor BZA-5B, indicating that huGBPs in HL-60 cells are probably modified by a C15 farnesyl rather than the more common C20 lipid. Differentiated HL-60 cells treated with IFN-gamma/LPS showed no change in the profile of constitutive isoprenylated proteins and the IFN-gamma/LPS-induced huGBPs remained prenylated. Despite being prenylated, huGBP1 in COS cells and endogenous huGBPs in HL-60 cells were primarily (approximately 85%) cytosolic. Human GBPs are thus among the select group of prenyl proteins whose synthesis is tightly regulated by a cytokine. HuGBP1 is an abundant protein whose prenylation may be vulnerable to farnesyl transferase inhibitors that are designed to prevent farnesylation of Ras proteins.

  12. The roles of phospholipase D and a GTP-binding protein in guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate-stimulated hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine in rat liver plasma membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, K M; Hughes, B P; Barritt, G J

    1990-01-01

    1. Guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[S]) stimulated by 50% the rate of release of [3H]choline and [3H]phosphorylcholine in rat liver plasma membranes labelled with [3H]choline. About 70% of the radioactivity released in the presence of GTP[S] was [3H]choline and 30% was [3H]phosphorylcholine. 2. The hydrolysis of phosphorylcholine to choline and the conversion of choline to phosphorylcholine did not contribute to the formation of [3H]choline and [3H]phosphorylcholine respectively. 3. The release of [3H]choline from membranes was inhibited by low concentrations of SDS or Triton X-100. Considerably higher concentrations of the detergents were required to inhibit the release of [3H]phosphorylcholine. 4. Guanosine 5'-[beta gamma-imido]triphosphate and guanosine 5'-[alpha beta-methylene]triphosphate, but not adenosine 5'-[gamma-thio]-triphosphate, stimulated [3H]choline release to the same extent as did GTP[S]. The GTP[S]-stimulated [3H]choline release was inhibited by guanosine 5'-[beta-thio]diphosphate, GDP and GTP but not by GMP. 5. It is concluded that, in rat liver plasma membranes, (a) GTP[S]-stimulated hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine is catalysed predominantly by phospholipase D with some contribution from phospholipase C, and (b) the stimulation of phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis by GTP[s] occurs via a GTP-binding regulatory protein. PMID:2125211

  13. GTP Binding and Oncogenic Mutations May Attenuate Hypervariable Region (HVR)-Catalytic Domain Interactions in Small GTPase K-Ras4B, Exposing the Effector Binding Site*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shaoyong; Banerjee, Avik; Jang, Hyunbum; Zhang, Jian; Gaponenko, Vadim; Nussinov, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras4B, a frequently mutated oncogene in cancer, plays an essential role in cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Its C-terminal membrane-associated hypervariable region (HVR) is required for full biological activity. In the active GTP-bound state, the HVR interacts with acidic plasma membrane (PM) headgroups, whereas the farnesyl anchors in the membrane; in the inactive GDP-bound state, the HVR may interact with both the PM and the catalytic domain at the effector binding region, obstructing signaling and nucleotide exchange. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and NMR, we aim to figure out the effects of nucleotides (GTP and GDP) and frequent (G12C, G12D, G12V, G13D, and Q61H) and infrequent (E37K and R164Q) oncogenic mutations on full-length K-Ras4B. The mutations are away from or directly at the HVR switch I/effector binding site. Our results suggest that full-length wild-type GDP-bound K-Ras4B (K-Ras4BWT-GDP) is in an intrinsically autoinhibited state via tight HVR-catalytic domain interactions. The looser association in K-Ras4BWT-GTP may release the HVR. Some of the oncogenic mutations weaken the HVR-catalytic domain association in the K-Ras4B-GDP/-GTP bound states, which may facilitate the HVR disassociation in a nucleotide-independent manner, thereby up-regulating oncogenic Ras signaling. Thus, our results suggest that mutations can exert their effects in more than one way, abolishing GTP hydrolysis and facilitating effector binding. PMID:26453300

  14. A host small GTP-binding protein ARL8 plays crucial roles in tobamovirus RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Nishikiori, Masaki; Mori, Masashi; Dohi, Koji; Okamura, Hideyasu; Katoh, Etsuko; Naito, Satoshi; Meshi, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2011-12-01

    Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV), like other eukaryotic positive-strand RNA viruses, replicates its genomic RNA in replication complexes formed on intracellular membranes. Previous studies showed that a host seven-pass transmembrane protein TOM1 is necessary for efficient ToMV multiplication. Here, we show that a small GTP-binding protein ARL8, along with TOM1, is co-purified with a FLAG epitope-tagged ToMV 180K replication protein from solubilized membranes of ToMV-infected tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cells. When solubilized membranes of ToMV-infected tobacco cells that expressed FLAG-tagged ARL8 were subjected to immunopurification with anti-FLAG antibody, ToMV 130K and 180K replication proteins and TOM1 were co-purified and the purified fraction showed RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity that transcribed ToMV RNA. From uninfected cells, TOM1 co-purified with FLAG-tagged ARL8 less efficiently, suggesting that a complex containing ToMV replication proteins, TOM1, and ARL8 are formed on membranes in infected cells. In Arabidopsis thaliana, ARL8 consists of four family members. Simultaneous mutations in two specific ARL8 genes completely inhibited tobamovirus multiplication. In an in vitro ToMV RNA translation-replication system, the lack of either TOM1 or ARL8 proteins inhibited the production of replicative-form RNA, indicating that TOM1 and ARL8 are required for efficient negative-strand RNA synthesis. When ToMV 130K protein was co-expressed with TOM1 and ARL8 in yeast, RNA 5'-capping activity was detected in the membrane fraction. This activity was undetectable or very weak when the 130K protein was expressed alone or with either TOM1 or ARL8. Taken together, these results suggest that TOM1 and ARL8 are components of ToMV RNA replication complexes and play crucial roles in a process toward activation of the replication proteins' RNA synthesizing and capping functions.

  15. Nucleotide binding interactions modulate dNTP selectivity and facilitate 8-oxo-dGTP incorporation by DNA polymerase lambda

    PubMed Central

    Burak, Matthew J.; Guja, Kip E.; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    8-Oxo-7,8,-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine triphosphate (8-oxo-dGTP) is a major product of oxidative damage in the nucleotide pool. It is capable of mispairing with adenosine (dA), resulting in futile, mutagenic cycles of base excision repair. Therefore, it is critical that DNA polymerases discriminate against 8-oxo-dGTP at the insertion step. Because of its roles in oxidative DNA damage repair and non-homologous end joining, DNA polymerase lambda (Pol λ) may frequently encounter 8-oxo-dGTP. Here, we have studied the mechanisms of 8-oxo-dGMP incorporation and discrimination by Pol λ. We have solved high resolution crystal structures showing how Pol λ accommodates 8-oxo-dGTP in its active site. The structures indicate that when mispaired with dA, the oxidized nucleotide assumes the mutagenic syn-conformation, and is stabilized by multiple interactions. Steady-state kinetics reveal that two residues lining the dNTP binding pocket, Ala510 and Asn513, play differential roles in dNTP selectivity. Specifically, Ala510 and Asn513 facilitate incorporation of 8-oxo-dGMP opposite dA and dC, respectively. These residues also modulate the balance between purine and pyrimidine incorporation. Our results shed light on the mechanisms controlling 8-oxo-dGMP incorporation in Pol λ and on the importance of interactions with the incoming dNTP to determine selectivity in family X DNA polymerases. PMID:26220180

  16. Role of GTP-binding proteins in the regulation of mammalian cardiac chloride conductance

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Beta-Adrenoceptor agonists activate a time- and voltage-independent Cl- conductance in mammalian cardiac myocytes. To characterize the cellular signaling pathways underlying its regulation, wide-tipped pipettes fitted with a pipette perfusion device were used to record whole-cell current and to introduce nucleotides to the interior of guinea pig ventricular myocytes. Replacement of pipette GTP with GDP beta S prevented activation of the Cl- conductance by Iso, suggesting a requirement for G protein turnover. With GTP in the pipette, the effect of Iso could be abolished by the beta-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol, and mimicked by histamine or forskolin. These actions of Iso and forskolin are mediated exclusively via cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), because (a) maximal activation of the Cl- conductance by forskolin or pipette cAMP occluded the effect of Iso, and (b) switching to pipette solution containing a synthetic peptide inhibitor (PKI) of PKA completely abolished the Cl- conductance activated by Iso and prevented the action of forskolin, but had no further effect. These results argue against basal activation of the Cl- conductance, and make it extremely unlikely that the stimulatory G protein, Gs, has any direct, phosphorylation-independent influence. The muscarinic receptor agonists acetylcholine (ACh) and carbachol diminished, in a reversible manner, Cl- conductance activated by Iso or forskolin, but not that elicited by cAMP. The muscarinic inhibition was abolished by replacing pipette GTP with GDP beta S, or by preincubating cells with pertussis toxin (PTX), and was therefore mediated by an inhibitory G protein, presumably Gi, influencing adenylyl cyclase activity. Nonhydrolyzable GTP analogues (GTP gamma S or GppNHp) applied via the pipette did not themselves activate Cl- conductance, but rendered Cl- current activation by brief exposures to Iso or histamine, but not to forskolin, irreversible. The Cl- conductance persistently activated by Iso was

  17. Individual binding pockets of importin-beta for FG-nucleoporins have different binding properties and different sensitivities to RanGTP.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Shotaro; Iwasaka, Shizuka; Yoneda, Yoshihiro; Takeyasu, Kunio; Yoshimura, Shige H

    2008-10-21

    Importin-beta mediates protein transport across the nuclear envelope through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) by interacting with components of the NPC, called nucleoporins, and a small G protein, Ran. Although there is accumulated knowledge on the specific interaction between importin-beta and the Phe-Gly (FG) motif in the nucleoporins as well as the effect of RanGTP on this interaction, the molecular mechanism by which importin-beta shuttles across the nuclear envelope through the NPC is unknown. In this study, we focused on four binding pockets of importin-beta for the FG motifs and characterized the interaction using a single-molecule force-measurement technique with atomic-force microscopy. The results from a series of importin-beta mutants containing amino acid substitutions within the FG-binding pockets demonstrate that the individual FG-binding pockets have different affinities to FG-Nups (Nup62 and Nup153) and different sensitivities to RanGTP; the binding of RanGTP to the amino-terminal domain of importin-beta induces the conformational change of the entire molecule and reduces the affinity of some of the pockets but not others. These heterogeneous characteristics of the multiple FG-binding pockets may play an important role in the behavior of importin-beta within the NPC. Single-molecule force measurement using the entire molecule of an NPC from a Xenopus oocyte also implies that the reduction of the affinity by RanGTP really occurs at the nucleoplasmic side of the entire NPC.

  18. The Inner Nuclear Membrane Protein Nemp1 Is a New Type of RanGTP-Binding Protein in Eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Shibano, Takashi; Mamada, Hiroshi; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Taira, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    The inner nuclear membrane (INM) protein Nemp1/TMEM194A has previously been suggested to be involved in eye development in Xenopus, and contains two evolutionarily conserved sequences in the transmembrane domains (TMs) and the C-terminal region, named region A and region B, respectively. To elucidate the molecular nature of Nemp1, we analyzed its interacting proteins through those conserved regions. First, we found that Nemp1 interacts with itself and lamin through the TMs and region A, respectively. Colocalization of Nemp1 and lamin at the INM suggests that the interaction with lamin participates in the INM localization of Nemp1. Secondly, through yeast two-hybrid screening using region B as bait, we identified the small GTPase Ran as a probable Nemp1-binding partner. GST pulldown and co-immunoprecipitation assays using region B and Ran mutants revealed that region B binds directly to the GTP-bound Ran through its effector domain. Immunostaining experiments using transfected COS-7 cells revealed that full-length Nemp1 recruits Ran near the nuclear envelope, suggesting a role for Nemp1 in the accumulation of RanGTP at the nuclear periphery. At the neurula-to-tailbud stages of Xenopus embryos, nemp1 expression overlapped with ran in several regions including the eye vesicles. Co-knockdown using antisense morpholino oligos for nemp1 and ran caused reduction of cell densities and severe eye defects more strongly than either single knockdown alone, suggesting their functional interaction. Finally we show that Arabidopsis thaliana Nemp1-orthologous proteins interact with A. thaliana Ran, suggesting their evolutionally conserved physical and functional interactions possibly in basic cellular functions including nuclear transportation. Taken together, we conclude that Nemp1 represents a new type of RanGTP-binding protein.

  19. Identification and biochemical characterization of Rap2C, a new member of the Rap family of small GTP-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Paganini, Simona; Guidetti, Gianni Francesco; Catricalà, Silvia; Trionfini, Piera; Panelli, Simona; Balduini, Cesare; Torti, Mauro

    2006-01-01

    The Rap family of small GTP-binding proteins is composed by four different members: Rap1A, Rap1B, Rap2A and Rap2B. In this work we report the identification and characterization of a fifth member of this family of small GTPases. This new protein is highly homologous to Rap2A and Rap2B, binds labeled GTP on nitrocellulose, and is recognized by a specific anti-Rap2 antibody, but not by an anti-Rap1 antibody. The protein has thus been named Rap2C. Binding of GTP to recombinant purified Rap2C was Mg(2+)-dependent. However, accurate comparison of the kinetics of nucleotide binding and release revealed that Rap2C bound GTP less efficiently and possessed slower rate of GDP release compared to the highly homologous Rap2B. Moreover, in the presence of Mg(2+), the relative affinity of Rap2C for GTP was only about twofold higher than that for GDP, while, under the same conditions, Rap2B was able to bind GTP with about sevenfold higher affinity than GDP. When expressed in eukaryotic cells, Rap2C localized at the plasma membrane, as dictated by the presence of a CAAX motif at the C-terminus. We found that Rap2C represented the predominant Rap2 protein expressed in circulating mononuclear leukocytes, but was not present in platelets. Importantly, Rap2C was found to be expressed in human megakaryocytes, suggesting that the protein may be down-regulated during platelets generation. This work demonstrates that Rap2C is a new member of the Rap2 subfamily of proteins, able to bind guanine nucleotides with peculiar properties, and differently expressed by various hematopoietic subsets. This new protein may therefore contribute to the still poorly clarified cellular events regulated by this subfamily of GTP-binding proteins.

  20. RanGTP-Binding Protein NXT1 Facilitates Nuclear Export of Different Classes of RNA In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ossareh-Nazari, Batool; Maison, Christèle; Black, Ben E.; Lévesque, Lyne; Paschal, Bryce M.; Dargemont, Catherine

    2000-01-01

    To better characterize the mechanisms responsible for RNA export from the nucleus, we developed an in vitro assay based on the use of permeabilized HeLa cells. This new assay supports nuclear export of U1 snRNA, tRNA, and mRNA in an energy- and Xenopus extract-dependent manner. U1 snRNA export requires a 5′ monomethylated cap structure, the nuclear export signal receptor CRM1, and the small GTPase Ran. In contrast, mRNA export does not require the participation of CRM1. We show here that NXT1, an NTF2-related protein that binds directly to RanGTP, strongly stimulates export of U1 snRNA, tRNA, and mRNA. The ability of NXT1 to promote export is dependent on its capacity to bind RanGTP. These results support the emerging view that NXT1 is a general export factor, functioning on both CRM1-dependent and CRM1-independent pathways of RNA export. PMID:10848583

  1. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a GTP-binding protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hao; Sun, Lei; Brouns, Stan J. J.; Fu, Sheng; Akerboom, Jasper; Li, Xuemei; Oost, John van der

    2007-03-01

    A GTP-binding protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus has been crystallized. Combined with biochemical analyses, it is expected that the structure of this protein will give insight in the function of a relatively unknown subfamily of the GTPase superfamily. A predicted GTP-binding protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus, termed SsGBP, has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique in the presence of 0.05 M cadmium sulfate and 0.8 M sodium acetate pH 7.5. A single-wavelength anomalous dispersion data set was collected to a maximum resolution of 2.0 Å using a single cadmium-incorporated crystal. The crystal form belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with approximate unit-cell parameters a = 65.0, b = 72.6, c = 95.9 Å and with a monomer in the asymmetric unit.

  2. GABAB receptor GTP-binding is decreased in the prefrontal cortex but not the hippocampus of aged rats

    PubMed Central

    McQuail, Joseph A.; Bañuelos, Cristina; LaSarge, Candi L.; Nicolle, Michelle M.; Bizon, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    GABAB receptors (GABABRs) have been linked to a wide range of physiological and cognitive processes and are of interest for treating a number of neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. As many of these diseases are associated with advanced age, it is important to understand how the normal aging process impacts GABABR expression and signaling. Thus, we investigated GABABR expression and function in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus of young and aged rats characterized in a spatial learning task. Baclofen-stimulated GTP-binding and GABABR1 and GABABR2 proteins were reduced in the PFC of aged rats but these reductions were not associated with spatial learning abilities. In contrast, hippocampal GTP-binding was comparable between young and aged rats but reduced hippocampal GABABR1 expression was observed in aged rats with spatial learning impairment. These data demonstrate marked regional differences in GABABR complexes in the adult and aged brain and could have implications for both understanding the role of GABAergic processes in normal brain function and the development of putative interventions that target this system. PMID:22169202

  3. Effect of mutational alteration of Asn-128 in the putative GTP-binding domain of tetracycline resistance determinant Tet(O) from Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, J; Manavathu, E K; Taylor, D E

    1993-01-01

    The deduced amino acid sequence of Campylobacter jejuni Tet(O), cloned in Escherichia coli, has shown that it contains the five highly conserved sequences of the GTP-binding domain found in other GTPases. Asn-128 belongs to the G4 motif of such a domain and is involved in hydrogen bonding with the guanine ring of the nucleotide. Substitution of Asn-128 by 11 other amino acids resulted in a decrease in tetracycline resistance, indicating that tetracycline resistance conferred by Tet(O) is related to GTP binding. The effect of the mutations on the GTP-binding domain is discussed with the EF-Tu-GDP complex as a model. PMID:8109930

  4. Rho-associated kinase, a novel serine/threonine kinase, as a putative target for small GTP binding protein Rho.

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, T; Amano, M; Yamamoto, T; Chihara, K; Nakafuku, M; Ito, M; Nakano, T; Okawa, K; Iwamatsu, A; Kaibuchi, K

    1996-01-01

    The small GTP binding protein Rho is implicated in cytoskeletal responses to extracellular signals such as lysophosphatidic acid to form stress fibers and focal contacts. Here we have purified a Rho-interacting protein with a molecular mass of approximately 164 kDa (p164) from bovine brain. This protein bound to GTPgammaS (a non-hydrolyzable GTP analog).RhoA but not to GDP.RhoA or GTPgammaS.RhoA with a mutation in the effector domain (RhoAA37).p164 had a kinase activity which was specifically stimulated by GTPgammaS.RhoA. We obtained the cDNA encoding p164 on the basis of its partial amino acid sequences and named it Rho-associated kinase (Rho-kinase). Rho-kinase has a catalytic domain in the N-terminal portion, a coiled coil domain in the middle portion and a zinc finger-like motif in the C-terminal portion. The catalytic domain shares 72% sequence homology with that of myotonic dystrophy kinase and the coiled coil domain contains a Rho-interacting interface. When COS7 cells were cotransfected with Rho-kinase and activated RhoA, some Rho-kinase was recruited to membranes. Thus it is likely that Rho-kinase is a putative target serine/threonine kinase for Rho and serves as a mediator of the Rho-dependent signaling pathway. Images PMID:8641286

  5. Trypsin pretreatment dissociates the effect of GTP and Na/sup +/ on ligand binding to human platelet. cap alpha. /sub 2/-adrenoreceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Periyasamy, S.M.; Somani, P.

    1986-03-01

    The authors recently showed that maximal concentration of trypsin (TR) inactivated only 70-80% of specific (/sup 3/H)yohimbine (/sup 3/H-Y) binding to human platelet ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoreceptors (..cap alpha../sub 2/-AR). The effect of TR on the interaction between the agonist, epinephrine, and GTP or Na/sup +/ on /sup 3/H-Y binding to ..cap alpha../sub 2/-AR of human platelets was investigated in the present study. Partially purified ..cap alpha../sub 2/-AR protein was pretreated with 500 ..mu..g TR for 3 min at 35/sup 0/C, the proteolytic action was terminated by specific TR-inhibitor, and the membranes were washed twice prior to specific ligand binding studies. Under these conditions, TR produced a 40-50% reduction of specific /sup 3/H-Y binding. Further characterization of the specific ligand binding by Scatchard plots showed that TR did not modify the affinity of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-AR to the agonist or the antagonist or the antagonists. However, in the TR-pretreated membranes, the ability of GTP to reduce the receptor affinity for epinephrine was lost. The effect of Na/sup +/, on the other hand, remained intact under these conditions. Thus, TR can selectively destroy the GTP-..cap alpha../sub 2/-AR but not Na/sup +/-..cap alpha../sub 2/-AR interaction suggesting that the GTP- and Na/sup +/-binding proteins are distinct.

  6. A novel member of the rho family of small GTP-binding proteins is specifically required for cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Several members of the rho/rac family of small GTP-binding proteins are known to regulate the distribution of the actin cytoskeleton in various subcellular processes. We describe here a novel rac protein, racE, which is specifically required for cytokinesis, an actomyosin-mediated process. The racE gene was isolated in a molecular genetic screen devised to isolate genes required for cytokinesis in Dictyostelium. Phenotypic characterization of racE mutants revealed that racE is not essential for any other cell motility event, including phagocytosis, chemotaxis, capping, or development. Our data provide the first genetic evidence for the essential requirement of a rho-like protein, specifically in cytokinesis, and suggest a role for these proteins in coordinating cytokinesis with the mitotic events of the cell cycle. PMID:8682867

  7. Glucose- and GTP-dependent stimulation of the carboxyl methylation of CDC42 in rodent and human pancreatic islets and pure beta cells. Evidence for an essential role of GTP-binding proteins in nutrient-induced insulin secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Kowluru, A; Seavey, S E; Li, G; Sorenson, R L; Weinhaus, A J; Nesher, R; Rabaglia, M E; Vadakekalam, J; Metz, S A

    1996-01-01

    Several GTP-binding proteins (G-proteins) undergo post-translational modifications (isoprenylation and carboxyl methylation) in pancreatic beta cells. Herein, two of these were identified as CDC42 and rap 1, using Western blotting and immunoprecipitation. Confocal microscopic data indicated that CDC42 is localized only in islet endocrine cells but not in acinar cells of the pancreas. CDC42 undergoes a guanine nucleotide-specific membrane association and carboxyl methylation in normal rat islets, human islets, and pure beta (HIT or INS-1) cells. GTPgammaS-dependent carboxyl methylation of a 23-kD protein was also demonstrable in secretory granule fractions from normal islets or beta cells. AFC (a specific inhibitor of prenyl-cysteine carboxyl methyl transferases) blocked the carboxyl methylation of CDC42 in five types of insulin-secreting cells, without blocking GTPgammaS-induced translocation, implying that methylation is a consequence (not a cause) of transfer to membrane sites. High glucose (but not a depolarizing concentration of K+) induced the carboxyl methylation of CDC42 in intact cells, as assessed after specific immunoprecipitation. This effect was abrogated by GTP depletion using mycophenolic acid and was restored upon GTP repletion by coprovision of guanosine. In contrast, although rap 1 was also carboxyl methylated, it was not translocated to the particulate fraction by GTPgammaS; furthermore, its methylation was also stimulated by 40 mM K+ (suggesting a role which is not specific to nutrient stimulation). AFC also impeded nutrient-induced (but not K+-induced) insulin secretion from islets and beta cells under static or perifusion conditions, whereas an inactive structural analogue of AFC failed to inhibit insulin release. These effects were reproduced not only by S-adenosylhomocysteine (another methylation inhibitor), but also by GTP depletion. Thus, the glucose- and GTP-dependent carboxyl methylation of G-proteins such as CDC42 is an obligate step in

  8. Septin6 and Septin7 GTP Binding Proteins Regulate AP-3- and ESCRT-Dependent Multivesicular Body Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Traikov, Sofia; Stange, Christoph; Wassmer, Thomas; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Salamero, Jean; Raposo, Graça; Hoflack, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Septins (SEPTs) form a family of GTP-binding proteins implicated in cytoskeleton and membrane organization, cell division and host/pathogen interactions. The precise function of many family members remains elusive. We show that SEPT6 and SEPT7 complexes bound to F-actin regulate protein sorting during multivesicular body (MVB) biogenesis. These complexes bind AP-3, an adapter complex sorting cargos destined to remain in outer membranes of maturing endosomes, modulate AP-3 membrane interactions and the motility of AP-3-positive endosomes. These SEPT-AP interactions also influence the membrane interaction of ESCRT (endosomal-sorting complex required for transport)-I, which selects ubiquitinated cargos for degradation inside MVBs. Whereas our findings demonstrate that SEPT6 and SEPT7 function in the spatial, temporal organization of AP-3- and ESCRT-coated membrane domains, they uncover an unsuspected coordination of these sorting machineries during MVB biogenesis. This requires the E3 ubiquitin ligase LRSAM1, an AP-3 interactor regulating ESCRT-I sorting activity and whose mutations are linked with Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies. PMID:25380047

  9. Autophosphorylation in the Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 (LRRK2) GTPase Domain Modifies Kinase and GTP-Binding Activities

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Philip J.; Smith, Archer D.; Sen, Saurabh; Renfrow, Matthew B.; Mobley, James A.; West, Andrew B.

    2011-01-01

    The LRRK2 protein has both GTPase and kinase activities and mutation in either enzymatic domain can cause late-onset Parkinson’s disease (PD). Nucleotide binding in the GTPase domain may be required for kinase activity and residues in the GTPase domain are potential sites for autophosphorylation, suggesting a complex mechanism of intrinsic regulation. To further define the effects of LRRK2 autophosphorylation, we applied a technique optimal for detection of protein phosphorylation, electron transfer dissociation (ETD), and identified autophosphorylation events exclusively nearby the nucleotide binding pocket in the GTPase domain. PD-linked mutations alter kinase activity but did not alter autophosphorylation site specificity or sites of phosphorylation in a robust in vitro substrate myelin basic protein. Amino-acid substitutions in the GTPase domain have large effects on kinase activity, as insertion of the GTPase-associated R1441C pathogenic mutation together with the G2019S kinase-domain mutation resulted in a multiplicative increase (~7-fold) in activity. Removal of a conserved autophosphorylation site (T1503) by mutation to an alanine residue resulted in greatly decreased GTP-binding and kinase activity. While autophosphorylation likely serves to potentiate kinase activity, we find that oligomerization and loss of the active dimer species occurs in an ATP and autophosphorylation independent manner. LRRK2 autophosphorylation sites are overall robustly protected from dephosphorylation in vitro, suggesting tight control over activity in vivo. We developed highly specific antibodies targeting pT1503 but failed to detect endogenous autophosphorylation in protein derived from transgenic mice and cell lines. LRRK2 activity in vivo is unlikely to be constitutive but rather refined to specific responses. PMID:21806997

  10. A small nuclear GTP-binding protein from tomato suppresses a Schizosaccharomyces pombe cell-cycle mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Ach, R A; Gruissem, W

    1994-01-01

    Ran is a 25-kDa Ras-related nuclear GTP-binding protein which is very highly conserved in humans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Ran has been found to form a stable, noncovalent complex with the chromatin-associated protein RCC1, a negative regulator of mitosis. In Sch. pombe, a temperature-sensitive mutation in the RCC1 homolog encoded by the pim1 gene causes premature induction of mitosis, and this mutation can be suppressed by overexpression of the Ran homolog encoded by spi1. We report here the cloning of three Ran cDNAs from tomato. The Ran protein is very highly conserved among plants, animals, and fungi. In tomato, Ran mRNA is expressed in all tissues examined, even those with little or no cell division, indicating that Ran in plants may have functions other than just control of mitosis. We have found that the tomato Ran protein can direct a beta-glucuronidase reporter protein to the plant cell nucleus, confirming that Ran is a nuclear protein in plants. We show that the tomato Ran protein can suppress the Sch. pombe pim1 mutation, indicating that the tomato Ran protein and the Sch. pombe spi1 protein are functionally homologous. Images PMID:8016079

  11. GTP-Binding Proteins Inhibit cAMP Activation of Chloride Channels in Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwiebert, Erik M.; Kizer, Neil; Gruenert, Dieter C.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    1992-11-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease characterized, in part, by defective regulation of Cl^- secretion by airway epithelial cells. In CF, cAMP does not activate Cl^- channels in the apical membrane of airway epithelial cells. We report here whole-cell patch-clamp studies demonstrating that pertussis toxin, which uncouples heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (G proteins) from their receptors, and guanosine 5'-[β-thio]diphosphate, which prevents G proteins from interacting with their effectors, increase Cl^- currents and restore cAMP-activated Cl^- currents in airway epithelial cells isolated from CF patients. In contrast, the G protein activators guanosine 5'-[γ-thio]triphosphate and AlF^-_4 reduce Cl^- currents and inhibit cAMP from activating Cl^- currents in normal airway epithelial cells. In CF cells treated with pertussis toxin or guanosine 5'-[β-thio]diphosphate and in normal cells, cAMP activates a Cl^- conductance that has properties similar to CF transmembrane-conductance regulator Cl^- channels. We conclude that heterotrimeric G proteins inhibit cAMP-activated Cl^- currents in airway epithelial cells and that modulation of the inhibitory G protein signaling pathway may have the therapeutic potential for improving cAMP-activated Cl^- secretion in CF.

  12. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RanGTP-binding protein msn5p is involved in different signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Alepuz, P M; Matheos, D; Cunningham, K W; Estruch, F

    1999-01-01

    In eukaryotes, control of transcription by extracellular signals involves the translocation to the nucleus of at least one component of the signal transduction pathway. Transport through the nuclear envelope requires the activity of an import or export receptor that interacts with the small GTPase Ran. We have cloned the MSN5 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is postulated to encode one of these receptors. Msn5p belongs to a family of proteins with a conserved N-terminal sequence that acts as a RanGTP-binding domain. The results presented here provide genetic data supporting Msn5p involvement in several different signal transduction pathways. All of these pathways include changes in gene expression, and regulated nucleocytoplasmic redistribution of a component in response to external conditions has already been described in some of them. We have cloned MSN5 following two different strategies. Msn5p was constitutively localized in the nucleus. Phenotypic analysis of the msn5 mutant demonstrated that this protein participates in processes such as catabolite repression, calcium signaling, mating, and cell proliferation, as well as being involved in previously characterized phosphate utilization. Therefore, Msn5p could be a receptor for several proteins involved in different signaling pathways. PMID:10545454

  13. Development of time-resolved fluorescent based [EU]-GTP binding assay for selection of human Histamine 3 receptor antagonists/inverse agonist: a potential target for Alzheimer's treatment.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jitendra K; Maniyar, Reema C; Shirsath, Vikas S

    2012-04-01

    The histamine H3 receptor is an attractive G protein-coupled receptor drug target that regulates neurotransmission in the central nervous system and plays a crucial role in cognitive and homeostatic functions. This receptor exhibits molecular, pharmacological, and functional heterogeneity that affects the preclinical development of effective antagonists. The range of assay technologies like radio isotope based [35S] GTPγS binding assay, luminescent based reporter gene assay (In-direct cAMP measurement) for binding and signaling have been developed in High Throughput Screening (HTS) laboratories for the identification of hit or lead compounds acting on H3 receptor. The [35S] GTPγS binding assay still remains a useful and a simple technique to demonstrate receptor activation and is one of the few functional, cell-free assays that has set the standards in the field of research. However, its radioactive nature imposes clear limitations to its use in regular laboratory practice and in high-throughput experimentation. Herein, we have developed and optimized a membrane based non-radioactive assay using a europium-labeled GTP analogue in which europium-GTP binding can be assayed using time-resolved fluorescence technology. The characterization of H3 agonist or antagonist with HTRF platform has revealed a rank order potency (pEC50 & P K B) comparable to that from isotopic functional studies measured by liquid scintillation counter (LSC). Lastly, the Eu-GTP binding assay has been found to be highly robust (Z' factor 0.84) with high percentage over basal counts. This assay can be utilized as a component of cascade for the screening of H3 receptor ligands.

  14. Distinct forms of the. beta. subunit of GTP-binding regulatory proteins identified by molecular cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, H.K.W.; Amatruda, T.T. III; Birren, B.W.; Simon, M.I.

    1987-06-01

    Two distinct ..beta.. subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins have been identified by cDNA cloning and are referred to as ..beta../sub 1/ and ..beta../sub 1/ subunits. The bovine transducin ..beta.. subunit (..beta../sub 1/) has been cloned previously. The author now isolated and analyzed cDNA clones that encode the ..beta../sub 2/ subunit from bovine adrenal, bovine brain, and a human myeloid leukemia cell line, HL-60. The 340-residue M/sub r/ 37,329 BETA/sub 2/ protein is 90% identical with ..beta../sub 1/ in predicted amino acid sequence, and it is also organized as a series of repetitive homologous segments. The major mRNA that encodes the bovine ..beta../sub 2/ subunit is 1.7 kilobases in length. It is expressed at lower levels than ..beta../sub 1/ subunit mRNA in all tissues examined. The ..beta../sub 1/ and ..beta../sub 2/ messages are expressed in cloned human cell lines. Hybridization of cDNA probes to bovine DNA showed that ..beta../sub 1/ and ..beta../sub 2/ are encoded by separate genes. The amino acid sequences for the bovine and human ..beta../sub 2/ subunit are identical, as are the amino acid sequences for the bovine and human ..beta../sub 1/ subunit. This evolutionary conservation suggests that the two ..beta.. subunits have different roles in the signal transduction process.

  15. Deletion mutants of Harvey ras p21 protein reveal the absolute requirement of at least two distant regions for GTP-binding and transforming activities.

    PubMed Central

    Lacal, J C; Anderson, P S; Aaronson, S A

    1986-01-01

    Deletions of small sequences from the viral Harvey ras gene have been generated, and resulting ras p21 mutants have been expressed in Escherichia coli. Purification of each deleted protein allowed the in vitro characterization of GTP-binding, GTPase and autokinase activity of the proteins. Microinjection of the highly purified proteins into quiescent NIH/3T3 cells, as well as transfection experiments utilizing a long terminal repeat (LTR)-containing vector, were utilized to analyze the biological activity of the deleted proteins. Two small regions located at 6-23 and 152-165 residues are shown to be absolutely required for in vitro and in vivo activities of the ras product. By contrast, the variable region comprising amino acids 165-184 was shown not to be necessary for either in vitro or in vivo activities. Thus, we demonstrate that: (i) amino acid sequences at positions 5-23 and 152-165 of ras p21 protein are probably directly involved in the GTP-binding activity; (ii) GTP-binding is required for the transforming activity of ras p21 and by extension for the normal function of the proto-oncogene product; and (iii) the variable region at the C-terminal end of the ras p21 molecule from amino acids 165 to 184 is not required for transformation. Images Fig.2. Fig.4. PMID:3011420

  16. Inhibition of TCR/CD3-mediated signaling by a mutant of the hematopoietically expressed G16 GTP-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Stanners, J; Kabouridis, P; Han, H; Tsoukas, C D

    1998-05-01

    We have investigated the role of the hematopoietically expressed G16 GTP-binding protein on T cell activation. We constructed transfectants of Jurkat T cells that express a function-deficient mutant of G alpha 16 predicted to prevent activation of this G protein. Upon stimulation with anti-CD3 epsilon antibodies, mutant G alpha 16 transfectants display a profound defect in the production of IL-2 and IL-10, as well as in the expression of CD69. In contrast, the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced IL-10 production and CD69 expression, and the ionomycin plus PMA-induced IL-2 production are not affected. Consistent with the reduction in cytokine production is the inhibition of early signaling events in the mutant G alpha 16-expressing cells. There are significant reductions in anti-epsilon-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of zeta, epsilon, ZAP-70, and phospholipase C gamma 1, as well as in intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. In accordance with the effects on tyrosine phosphorylation is the reduction of TCR/CD3-mediated Fyn and Lck activities in G alpha 16 mutant cells. Even though the mechanism through which the G alpha 16 mutant mediates inhibition of T cell activation is not known, the data suggest a model where G proteins become activated upon TCR/CD3 engagement and regulate the activation of tyrosine kinases and subsequent downstream signaling events that lead to the activation of cytokine genes.

  17. Statins Exert the Pleiotropic Effects Through Small GTP-Binding Protein Dissociation Stimulator Upregulation With a Resultant Rac1 Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shin-ichi; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Nochioka, Kotaro; Minami, Tatsuro; Kudo, Shun; Shiba, Nobuyuki; Takai, Yoshimi; Williams, Carol L.; Liao, James K.; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    Objective The pleiotropic effects of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) independent of cholesterol-lowering effects are thought to be mediated through inhibition of the Rho/Rho-kinase pathway. However, we have previously demonstrated that the pleiotropic effects of regular-dose statins are mediated mainly through inhibition of the Rac1 signaling pathway rather than the Rho/Rho-kinase pathway, although the molecular mechanisms of the selective inhibition of the Rac1 signaling pathway by regular-dose statins remain to be elucidated. In this study, we tested our hypothesis that small GTP-binding protein GDP dissociation stimulator (SmgGDS) plays a crucial role in the molecular mechanisms of the Rac1 signaling pathway inhibition by statins in endothelial cells. Approach and Results In cultured human umbilical venous endothelial cells, statins concentration-dependently increased SmgGDS expression and decreased nuclear Rac1. Statins also enhanced SmgGDS expression in mouse aorta. In control mice, the protective effects of statins against angiotensin II–induced medial thickening of coronary arteries and fibrosis were noted, whereas in SmgGDS-deficient mice, the protective effects of statins were absent. When SmgGDS was knocked down by its small interfering RNA in human umbilical venous endothelial cells, statins were no longer able to induce Rac1 degradation or inhibit angiotensin II–induced production of reactive oxygen species. Finally, in normal healthy volunteers, statins significantly increased SmgGDS expression with a significant negative correlation between SmgGDS expression and oxidative stress markers, whereas no correlation was noted with total or low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. Conclusions These results indicate that statins exert their pleiotropic effects through SmgGDS upregulation with a resultant Rac1 degradation and reduced oxidative stress in animals and humans. PMID:23640485

  18. Site-directed mutagenesis of putative GTP-binding sites of yeast beta-tubulin: evidence that alpha-, beta-, and gamma-tubulins are atypical GTPases.

    PubMed

    Sage, C R; Dougherty, C A; Davis, A S; Burns, R G; Wilson, L; Farrell, K W

    1995-06-06

    The exchangeable GTP-binding site on beta-tubulin has been extensively studied, but the primary sequence elements which form the binding site on beta-tubulin remain unknown. We have used site-directed mutagenesis of the single beta-tubulin gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to test a model for the GTP-binding site on beta-tubulin, which was based on sequence comparisons with members of the GTPase superfamily [Sternlicht, H., Yaffe, M.B., & Farr, G. W. (1987) FEBS Lett. 214, 226-235]. We analyzed the effects of D295N, N298K, and N298Q mutations in a proposed base-binding motif, 295DAKN298, on tubulin-GTP binding and on nucleotide-binding specificity. We also examined the effects of a D203S mutation in a putative phosphate-binding region, 203DNEA206, on nucleotide binding affinity, on the assembly-dependent tubulin GTPase activity in vitro, and on the dynamic properties of individual "mutant" microtubules in vitro. The effects of the mutations on cell phenotype and on microtubule polymerization in cells were also measured. The results do not support the proposal that the 203DNEA206 and 295DAKN298 [corrected] motifs are cognate to motifs found in GTPase superfamily members. Instead, the data argue that the primary sequence elements of beta-tubulins that interact with bound nucleotide, and presumably also those of the alpha- and gamma-tubulin family members, are different from those of "typical" GTPase superfamily members, such as p21ras. The GTPase superfamily should thus be broadened to include not just the typical GTPases that show strong conservation of primary sequence consensus motifs (GxxxxGK, T, DxxG, NKxD) [corrected] but also "atypical" GTPases, exemplified by the tubulins and other recently identified GTPases, that do not show the consensus motifs of typical GTPases and which also show no obvious primary sequence relationships between themselves. The tubulins and other atypical GTPases thus appear to represent convergent solutions to the GTP-binding and

  19. Identification of a prostacyclin receptor coupled to the adenylate cyclase system via a stimulatory GTP-binding protein in mouse mastocytoma P-815 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, H.; Negishi, M.; Ichikawa, A. )

    1990-11-01

    A stable analogue of prostacyclin, iloprost, specifically bound to 30,000 x g pellet (the membrane fraction) prepared from mouse mastocytoma P-815 cells. The binding was dependent on time, temperature and pH, and absolutely required a divalent cation. The equilibrium dissociation constant and the maximal concentration of the binding site as determined by Scatchard plot analysis were 10.4 nM and 1.12 pmol/mg of protein, respectively. The Hill coefficient was 1.0, indicating a single entity of binding site and no cooperativity. The binding site was highly specific for iloprost among PGs tested (iloprost much greater than PGE1 greater than carbacyclin greater than PGE2). In contrast, the membrane fraction had the binding site specific for PGE2 and PGE1, which was distinct from the prostacyclin receptor. The dissociation of bound (3H)iloprost from the membrane fraction was specifically enhanced by guanine nucleotides. Furthermore, iloprost dose-dependently enhanced the activity of adenylate cyclase in a GTP-dependent manner. These results indicate that a specific prostacyclin receptor is coupled to the adenylate cyclase system via a stimulatory GTP-binding protein in mastocytoma cells.

  20. Functional polymorphism of the GTP cyclohydrolase 1 gene affects the personality trait of novelty seeking in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sadahiro, Ryoichi; Suzuki, Akihito; Matsumoto, Yoshihiko; Shibuya, Naoshi; Enokido, Masanori; Kamata, Mitsuhiro; Goto, Kaoru; Otani, Koichi

    2011-10-10

    GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) is the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin, which is an essential cofactor for biosynthetic enzymes of dopamine, serotonin, and nitric oxide. In the present study, the association of functional polymorphism of the GCH1 gene (C+243T, rs841) with personality traits was examined in 902 healthy Japanese subjects. Personality traits were assessed by the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), and the GCH1 genotype was detected by a PCR-RFLP method. There were no significant main effects of the GCH1 genotype on the seven TCI dimension scores, but significant interaction effects between the GCH1 genotype and gender were found on the scores of novelty seeking. Post-hoc analysis revealed that males with the C/C genotype had higher scores of novelty seeking than those with the C/T genotype or those with the T/T genotype, while in females the scores of novelty seeking were not different among the genotype groups. The present study thus suggests that the C+243T polymorphism of the GCH1 gene affects the personality trait of novelty seeking in males.

  1. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel type of regulatory protein (GDI) for smg p25A, a ras p21-like GTP-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Y; Kikuchi, A; Araki, S; Hata, Y; Kondo, J; Teranishi, Y; Takai, Y

    1990-01-01

    We recently purified to near homogeneity a novel type of regulatory protein for smg p25A, a ras p21-like GTP-binding protein, from bovine brain cytosol. This regulatory protein, named smg p25A GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI), regulates the GDP-GTP exchange reaction of smg p25A by inhibiting dissociation of GDP from and subsequent binding of GTP to it. In the present studies, we isolated and sequenced the cDNA of smg p25A GDI from a bovine brain cDNA library by using an oligonucleotide probe designed from the partial amino acid sequence of purified smg p25A GDI. The cDNA has an open reading frame that encodes a protein of 447 amino acids with a calculated Mr of 50,565. This Mr is similar to those of the purified smg p25A GDI estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, which are about 54,000 and 65,000, respectively. The isolated cDNA is expressed in Escherichia coli, and the encoded protein exhibits GDI activity. smg p25A GDI is hydrophilic overall, except for one hydrophobic region near the N terminus. smg p25A GDI shares low amino acid sequence homology with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CDC25-encoded protein, which has been suggested to serve as a factor that regulates the GDP-GTP exchange reaction of the yeast RAS2-encoded protein, but not with the beta gamma subunits of GTP-binding proteins having an alpha beta gamma subunit structure, such as Gs and Gi. The smg p25A GDI mRNA was present in various tissues, including not only tissues in which smg p25A was detectable but also tissues in which it was not detectable. This fact has raised the possibility that smg p25A GDI interacts with another G protein in tissues in which smg p25A is absent. Images PMID:2115118

  2. Inositol phospholipids regulate the guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor Tiam1 by facilitating its binding to the plasma membrane and regulating GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Ian N; Batty, Ian H; Prescott, Alan R; Gray, Alex; Kular, Gursant S; Stewart, Hazel; Downes, C Peter

    2004-09-15

    Binding of the Rac1-specific guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor, Tiam1, to the plasma membrane requires the N-terminal pleckstrin homology domain. In the present study, we show that membrane-association is mediated by binding of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) to the pleckstrin homology domain. Moreover, in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, translocation of Tiam1 to the cytosol, following receptor-mediated stimulation of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) breakdown, correlates with decreased Rac1-GTP levels, indicating that membrane-association is required for GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1. In addition, we show that platelet-derived growth factor activates Rac1 in vivo by increasing PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) concentrations, rather than the closely related lipid, PtdIns(3,4)P(2). Finally, the data demonstrate that PtdIns(4,5)P(2) and PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) bind to the same pleckstrin homology domain in Tiam1 and that soluble inositol phosphates appear to compete with lipids for this binding. Together, these novel observations provide strong evidence that distinct phosphoinositides regulate different functions of this enzyme, indicating that local concentrations of signalling lipids and the levels of cytosolic inositol phosphates will play crucial roles in determining its activity in vivo.

  3. Inositol phospholipids regulate the guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor Tiam1 by facilitating its binding to the plasma membrane and regulating GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Binding of the Rac1-specific guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor, Tiam1, to the plasma membrane requires the N-terminal pleckstrin homology domain. In the present study, we show that membrane-association is mediated by binding of PtdIns(4,5)P2 to the pleckstrin homology domain. Moreover, in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, translocation of Tiam1 to the cytosol, following receptor-mediated stimulation of PtdIns(4,5)P2 breakdown, correlates with decreased Rac1-GTP levels, indicating that membrane-association is required for GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1. In addition, we show that platelet-derived growth factor activates Rac1 in vivo by increasing PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 concentrations, rather than the closely related lipid, PtdIns(3,4)P2. Finally, the data demonstrate that PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 bind to the same pleckstrin homology domain in Tiam1 and that soluble inositol phosphates appear to compete with lipids for this binding. Together, these novel observations provide strong evidence that distinct phosphoinositides regulate different functions of this enzyme, indicating that local concentrations of signalling lipids and the levels of cytosolic inositol phosphates will play crucial roles in determining its activity in vivo. PMID:15242348

  4. Farnesylcysteine analogues inhibit store-regulated Ca2+ entry in human platelets: evidence for involvement of small GTP-binding proteins and actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, J A; Sage, S O

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanism of Ca(2+) entry into fura-2-loaded human platelets by preventing the prenylation of proteins such as small GTP-binding proteins. The farnesylcysteine analogues farnesylthioacetic acid (FTA) and N-acetyl-S-geranylgeranyl-L-cysteine (AGGC), which are inhibitors of the methylation of prenylated and geranylgeranylated proteins respectively, significantly decreased thrombin-evoked increases in intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in the presence, but not in the absence, of external Ca(2+), suggesting a relatively selective inhibition of Ca(2+) entry over internal release. Both these compounds and N-acetyl-S-farnesyl-L-cysteine, which had similar effects to those of FTA, also decreased Ca(2+) entry evoked by the depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores with thapsigargin. The inactive control N-acetyl-S-geranyl-L-cysteine was without effect. Patulin, an inhibitor of prenylation that is inert with respect to methyltransferases, also decreased store-regulated Ca(2+) entry. Cytochalasin D, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, significantly decreased store-regulated Ca(2+) entry in a time-dependent manner. Both cytochalasin D and the farnesylcysteine analogues FTA and AGGC inhibited actin polymerization; however, when evoking the same extent of decrease in actin filament formation, FTA and AGGC showed greater inhibitory effects on Ca(2+) entry, indicating a cytoskeleton-independent component in the regulation of Ca(2+) entry by small GTP-binding-protein. These findings suggest that prenylated proteins such as small GTP-binding proteins are involved in store-regulated Ca(2+) entry through actin cytoskeleton-dependent and cytoskeleton-independent mechanisms in human platelets. PMID:10727417

  5. The GTP-binding protein YlqF participates in the late step of 50 S ribosomal subunit assembly in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Yoshitaka; Morimoto, Takuya; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Loh, Pek Chin; Oshima, Taku; Ogasawara, Naotake

    2006-03-24

    Bacillus subtilis YlqF belongs to the Era/Obg subfamily of small GTP-binding proteins and is essential for bacterial growth. Here we report that YlqF participates in the late step of 50 S ribosomal subunit assembly. YlqF was co-fractionated with the 50 S subunit, depending on the presence of noncleavable GTP analog. Moreover, the GTPase activity of YlqF was stimulated specifically by the 50 S subunit in vitro. Dimethyl sulfate footprinting analysis disclosed that YlqF binds to a unique position in 23 S rRNA. Yeast two-hybrid data revealed interactions between YlqF and the B. subtilis L25 protein (Ctc). The interaction was confirmed by the pull-down assay of the purified proteins. Specifically, YlqF is positioned around the A-site and P-site on the 50 S subunit. Proteome analysis of the abnormal 50 S subunits that accumulated in YlqF-depleted cells showed that L16 and L27 proteins, located near the YlqF-binding domain, are missing. Our results collectively indicate that YlqF will organize the late step of 50 S ribosomal subunit assembly.

  6. A Small GTP-Binding Host Protein Is Required for Entry of Powdery Mildew Fungus into Epidermal Cells of Barley1

    PubMed Central

    Schultheiss, Holger; Dechert, Cornelia; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Hückelhoven, Ralph

    2002-01-01

    Small GTP-binding proteins such as those from the RAC family are cytosolic signal transduction proteins that often are involved in processing of extracellular stimuli. Plant RAC proteins are implicated in regulation of plant cell architecture, secondary wall formation, meristem signaling, and defense against pathogens. We isolated a RacB homolog from barley (Hordeum vulgare) to study its role in resistance to the barley powdery mildew fungus (Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei). RacB was constitutively expressed in the barley epidermis and its expression level was not strongly influenced by inoculation with B. graminis. However, after biolistic bombardment of barley leaf segments with RacB-double-stranded RNA, sequence-specific RNA interference with RacB function inhibited fungal haustorium establishment in a cell-autonomous and genotype-specific manner. Mutants compromised in function of the Mlo wild-type gene and the Ror1 gene (genotype mlo5 ror1) that are moderately susceptible to B. graminis showed no alteration in powdery mildew resistance upon RacB-specific RNA interference. Thus, the phenotype, induced by RacB-specific RNA interference, was apparently dependent on the same processes as mlo5-mediated broad resistance, which is suppressed by ror1. We conclude that an RAC small GTP-binding protein is required for successful fungal haustorium establishment and that this function may be linked to MLO-associated functions. PMID:11950993

  7. Structure-Activity Relationships of Potent, Targeted Covalent Inhibitors That Abolish Both the Transamidation and GTP Binding Activities of Human Tissue Transglutaminase.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Abdullah; McNeil, Nicole M R; Albert, Marie R; Ta, Viviane; Adhikary, Gautam; Bourgeois, Karine; Eckert, Richard L; Keillor, Jeffrey W

    2017-09-28

    Human tissue transglutaminase (hTG2) is a multifunctional enzyme. It is primarily known for its calcium-dependent transamidation activity that leads to formation of an isopeptide bond between glutamine and lysine residues found on the surface of proteins, but it is also a GTP binding protein. Overexpression and unregulated hTG2 activity have been associated with numerous human diseases, including cancer stem cell survival and metastatic phenotype. Herein, we present a series of targeted covalent inhibitors (TCIs) based on our previously reported Cbz-Lys scaffold. From this structure-activity relationship (SAR) study, novel irreversible inhibitors were identified that block the transamidation activity of hTG2 and allosterically abolish its GTP binding ability with a high degree of selectivity and efficiency (kinact/KI > 10(5) M(-1) min(-1)). One optimized inhibitor (VA4) was also shown to inhibit epidermal cancer stem cell invasion with an EC50 of 3.9 μM, representing a significant improvement over our previously reported "hit" NC9.

  8. The N-terminal peptide of mammalian GTP cyclohydrolase I is an autoinhibitory control element and contributes to binding the allosteric regulatory protein GFRP.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Christina E; Gross, Steven S

    2011-04-08

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is the rate-limiting enzyme for biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an obligate cofactor for NO synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. BH4 can limit its own synthesis by triggering decameric GTPCH to assemble in an inhibitory complex with two GTPCH feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) pentamers. Subsequent phenylalanine binding to the GTPCH·GFRP inhibitory complex converts it to a stimulatory complex. An N-terminal inhibitory peptide in GTPCH may also contribute to autoregulation of GTPCH activity, but mechanisms are undefined. To characterize potential regulatory actions of the N-terminal peptide in rat GTPCH, we expressed, purified, and characterized a truncation mutant, devoid of 45 N-terminal amino acids (Δ45-GTPCH) and contrasted its catalytic and GFRP binding properties to wild type GTPCH (wt-GTPCH). Contrary to prior reports, we show that GFRP binds wt-GTPCH in the absence of any small molecule effector, resulting in allosteric stimulation of GTPCH activity: a 20% increase in Vmax, 50% decrease in KmGTP, and increase in Hill coefficient to 1.6, from 1.0. These features of GFRP-stimulated wt-GTPCH activity were phenocopied by Δ45-GTPCH in the absence of bound GFRP. Addition of GFRP to Δ45-GTPCH failed to elicit complex formation or a substantial further increase in GTPCH catalytic activity. Expression of Δ45-GTPCH in HEK-293 cells elicited 3-fold greater BH4 accumulation than an equivalent of wt-GTPCH. Together, results indicate that the N-terminal peptide exerts autoinhibitory control over rat GTPCH and is required for GFRP binding on its own. Displacement of the autoinhibitory peptide provides a molecular mechanism for physiological up-regulation of GTPCH activity.

  9. Characterization of a small GTP-binding protein gene TaRab18 from wheat involved in the stripe rust resistance.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhengning; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Guoqin; Zhao, Renhui; Bie, Tongde; Zhang, Ruiqi; Gao, Derong; Xing, Liping; Cao, Aizhong

    2017-04-01

    The stripe rust resistance gene, Yr26, is commonly used in wheat production. Identification of Yr26 resistance related genes is important for better understanding of the resistance mechanism. TaRab18, a putative small GTP-binding protein, was screened as a resistance regulated gene as it showed differential expression between the Yr26-containing resistant wheat and the susceptible wheat at different time points after Pst inoculation. TaRab18 contains four typical domains (GI to GIV) of the small GTP-binding proteins superfamily and five domains (RabF1 to RabF5) specific to the Rab subfamily. From the phylogenetic tree that TaRab18 was identified as belonging to the RABC1 subfamily. Chromosome location analysis indicated that TaRab18 and its homeoalles were on the homeologous group 7 chromosomes, and the Pst induced TaRab18 was on the 7 B chromosome. Functional analysis by virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) indicated that TaRab18 was positively involved in the stripe rust resistance through regulating the hypersensitive response, and Pst can develop on the leaves of TaRab18 silenced 92R137. However, over-expression of TaRab18 in susceptible Yangmai158 did not enhance its resistance dramatically, only from 9 grade in Yangmai158 to 8 grade in the transgenic plant. However, histological observation indicated that the transgenic plants with over-expressed TaRab18 showed a strong hypersensitive response at the early infection stage. The research herein, will improve our understanding of the roles of Rab in wheat resistance.

  10. Differential regulation of serotonin-1A receptor-stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding in the dorsal raphe nucleus by citalopram and escitalopram.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Dania V; Burke, Teresa F; Hensler, Julie G

    2008-03-31

    The effect of chronic citalopram or escitalopram administration on 5-HT1A receptor function in the dorsal raphe nucleus was determined by measuring [35S]GTP gamma S binding stimulated by the 5-HT1A receptor agonist (R)-(+)-8-OH-DPAT (1nM-10 microM). Although chronic administration of citalopram or escitalopram has been shown to desensitize somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptors, we found that escitalopram treatment decreased the efficacy of 5-HT1A receptors to activate G proteins, whereas citalopram treatment did not. The binding of [3H]8-OH-DPAT to the coupled, high affinity agonist state of the receptor was not altered by either treatment. Interestingly, escitalopram administration resulted in greater occupancy of serotonin transporter sites as measured by the inhibition of [3H]cyanoimipramine binding. As the binding and action of escitalopram is limited by the inactive enantiomer R-citalopram present in racemic citalopram, we propose that the regulation of 5-HT1A receptor function in the dorsal raphe nucleus at the level of receptor-G protein interaction may be a result of greater inhibition of the serotonin transporter by escitalopram.

  11. Tandem duplications of a degenerated GTP-binding domain at the origin of GTPase receptors Toc159 and thylakoidal SRP

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez Torres, Jorge Maldonado, Monica Alexandra Arias; Chomilier, Jacques

    2007-12-14

    The evolutionary origin of some nuclear encoded proteins that translocate proteins across the chloroplast envelope remains unknown. Therefore, sequences of GTPase proteins constituting the Arabidopsis thaliana translocon at the outer membrane of chloroplast (atToc) complexes were analyzed by means of HCA. In particular, atToc159 and related proteins (atToc132, atToc120, and atToc90) do not have proven homologues of prokaryotic or eukaryotic ancestry. We established that the three domains commonly referred to as A, G, and M originate from the GTPase G domain, tandemly repeated, and probably evolving toward an unstructured conformation in the case of the A domain. It resulted from this study a putative common ancestor for these proteins and a new domain definition, in particular the splitting of A into three domains (A1, A2, and A3), has been proposed. The family of Toc159, previously containing A. thaliana and Pisum sativum, has been extended to Medicago truncatula and Populus trichocarpa and it has been revised for Oryza sativa. They have also been compared to GTPase subunits involved in the cpSRP system. A distant homology has been revealed among Toc and cpSRP GTP-hydrolyzing proteins of A. thaliana, and repetitions of a GTPase domain were also found in cpSRP protein receptors, by means of HCA analysis.

  12. The domain architecture of large guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the small GTP-binding protein Arf.

    PubMed

    Mouratou, Barbara; Biou, Valerie; Joubert, Alexandra; Cohen, Jean; Shields, David J; Geldner, Niko; Jürgens, Gerd; Melançon, Paul; Cherfils, Jacqueline

    2005-02-17

    Small G proteins, which are essential regulators of multiple cellular functions, are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that stimulate the exchange of the tightly bound GDP nucleotide by GTP. The catalytic domain responsible for nucleotide exchange is in general associated with non-catalytic domains that define the spatio-temporal conditions of activation. In the case of small G proteins of the Arf subfamily, which are major regulators of membrane trafficking, GEFs form a heterogeneous family whose only common characteristic is the well-characterized Sec7 catalytic domain. In contrast, the function of non-catalytic domains and how they regulate/cooperate with the catalytic domain is essentially unknown. Based on Sec7-containing sequences from fully-annotated eukaryotic genomes, including our annotation of these sequences from Paramecium, we have investigated the domain architecture of large ArfGEFs of the BIG and GBF subfamilies, which are involved in Golgi traffic. Multiple sequence alignments combined with the analysis of predicted secondary structures, non-structured regions and splicing patterns, identifies five novel non-catalytic structural domains which are common to both subfamilies, revealing that they share a conserved modular organization. We also report a novel ArfGEF subfamily with a domain organization so far unique to alveolates, which we name TBS (TBC-Sec7). Our analysis unifies the BIG and GBF subfamilies into a higher order subfamily, which, together with their being the only subfamilies common to all eukaryotes, suggests that they descend from a common ancestor from which species-specific ArfGEFs have subsequently evolved. Our identification of a conserved modular architecture provides a background for future functional investigation of non-catalytic domains.

  13. Modulation of insulin secretion from normal rat islets by inhibitors of the post-translational modifications of GTP-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Metz, S A; Rabaglia, M E; Stock, J B; Kowluru, A

    1993-10-01

    Many GTP-binding proteins (GBPs) are modified by mevalonic acid (MVA)-dependent isoprenylation, carboxyl methylation or palmitoylation. The effects of inhibitors of these processes on insulin release were studied. Intact pancreatic islets were shown to synthesize and metabolize MVA and to prenylate several candidate proteins. Culture with lovastatin (to inhibit synthesis of endogenous MVA) caused the accumulation in the cytosol of low-M(r) GBPs (labelled by the [alpha-32P]GTP overlay technique), suggesting a disturbance of membrane association. Concomitantly, lovastatin pretreatment reduced glucose-induced insulin release by about 50%; co-provision of 100-200 microM MVA totally prevented this effect. Perillic acid, a purported inhibitor of the prenylation of small GBPs, also markedly reduced glucose-induced insulin secretion. Furthermore, both N-acetyl-S-trans,trans-farnesyl-L-cysteine (AFC), which inhibited the base-labile carboxyl methylation of GBPs in islets or in transformed beta-cells, and cerulenic acid, an inhibitor of protein palmitoylation, also reduced nutrient-induced secretion; an inactive analogue of AFC (which did not inhibit carboxyl methylation in islets) had no effect on secretion. In contrast with nutrients, the effects of agonists that induce secretion by directly activating distal components in signal transduction (such as a phorbol ester or mastoparan) were either unaffected or enhanced by lovastatin or AFC. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that post-translational modifications are required for one or more stimulatory GBPs to promote proximal step(s) in fuel-induced insulin secretion, whereas one or more inhibitory GBPs might reduce secretion at a more distal locus.

  14. The structure of the pleiotropic transcription regulator CodY provides insight into its GTP-sensing mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ah-reum; Kang, Hye-Ri; Son, Jonghyeon; Kwon, Do Hoon; Kim, Sulhee; Lee, Woo Cheol; Song, Hyun Kyu; Song, Moon Jung; Hwang, Kwang Yeon

    2016-01-01

    GTP and branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are metabolic sensors that are indispensable for the determination of the metabolic status of cells. However, their molecular sensing mechanism remains unclear. CodY is a unique global transcription regulator that recognizes GTP and BCAAs as specific signals and affects expression of more than 100 genes associated with metabolism. Herein, we report the first crystal structures of the full-length CodY complex with sensing molecules and describe their functional states. We observed two different oligomeric states of CodY: a dimeric complex of CodY from Staphylococcus aureus with the two metabolites GTP and isoleucine, and a tetrameric form (apo) of CodY from Bacillus cereus. Notably, the tetrameric state shows in an auto-inhibitory manner by blocking the GTP-binding site, whereas the binding sites of GTP and isoleucine are clearly visible in the dimeric state. The GTP is located at a hinge site between the long helical region and the metabolite-binding site. Together, data from structural and electrophoretic mobility shift assay analyses improve understanding of how CodY senses GTP and operates as a DNA-binding protein and a pleiotropic transcription regulator. PMID:27596595

  15. A SelB/EF-Tu/aIF2γ-like protein from Methanosarcina mazei in the GTP-bound form binds cysteinyl-tRNA(Cys.).

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Tatsuo; Ishii, Ryohei; Hikida, Yasushi; Fukunaga, Ryuya; Sengoku, Toru; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-03-01

    The putative translation elongation factor Mbar_A0971 from the methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina barkeri was proposed to be the pyrrolysine-specific paralogue of EF-Tu ("EF-Pyl"). In the present study, the crystal structures of its homologue from Methanosarcina mazei (MM1309) were determined in the GMPPNP-bound, GDP-bound, and apo forms, by the single-wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing method. The three MM1309 structures are quite similar (r.m.s.d. < 0.1 Å). The three domains, corresponding to domains 1, 2, and 3 of EF-Tu/SelB/aIF2γ, are packed against one another to form a closed architecture. The MM1309 structures resemble those of bacterial/archaeal SelB, bacterial EF-Tu in the GTP-bound form, and archaeal initiation factor aIF2γ, in this order. The GMPPNP and GDP molecules are visible in their co-crystal structures. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements of MM1309·GTP·Mg(2+), MM1309·GDP·Mg(2+), and MM1309·GMPPNP·Mg(2+) provided dissociation constants of 0.43, 26.2, and 222.2 μM, respectively. Therefore, the affinities of MM1309 for GTP and GDP are similar to those of SelB rather than those of EF-Tu. Furthermore, the switch I and II regions of MM1309 are involved in domain-domain interactions, rather than nucleotide binding. The putative binding pocket for the aminoacyl moiety on MM1309 is too small to accommodate the pyrrolysyl moiety, based on a comparison of the present MM1309 structures with that of the EF-Tu·GMPPNP·aminoacyl-tRNA ternary complex. A hydrolysis protection assay revealed that MM1309 binds cysteinyl (Cys)-tRNA(Cys) and protects the aminoacyl bond from non-enzymatic hydrolysis. Therefore, we propose that MM1309 functions as either a guardian protein that protects the Cys moiety from oxidation or an alternative translation factor for Cys-tRNA(Cys).

  16. Interaction of the GTP-binding and GTPase-activating domains of ARD1 involves the effector region of the ADP-ribosylation factor domain.

    PubMed

    Vitale, N; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1997-02-14

    ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are a family of approximately 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins and members of the Ras superfamily, originally identified and purified by their ability to enhance the ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of cholera toxin and more recently recognized as critical participants in vesicular trafficking pathways and phospholipase D activation. ARD1 is a 64-kDa protein with an 18-kDa carboxyl-terminal ARF domain (p3) and a 46-kDa amino-terminal extension (p5) that is widely expressed in mammalian tissues. Using recombinant proteins, we showed that p5, the amino-terminal domain of ARD1, stimulates the GTPase activity of p3, the ARF domain, and appears to be the GTPase-activating protein (GAP) component of this bifunctional protein, whereas in other members of the Ras superfamily a separate GAP molecule interacts with the effector region of the GTP-binding protein. p5 stimulated the GTPase activity of p3 but not of ARF1, which differs from p3 in several amino acids in the effector domain. After substitution of 7 amino acids from p3 in the appropriate position in ARF1, the chimeric protein ARF1(39-45p3) bound to p5, which increased its GTPase activity. Specifically, after Gly40 and Thr45 in the putative effector domain of ARF1 were replaced with the equivalent Asp and Pro, respectively, from p3, functional interaction of the chimeric ARF1 with p5 was increased. Thus, Asp25 and Pro30 of the ARF domain (p3) of ARD1 are involved in its functional and physical interaction with the GTPase-activating (p5) domain of ARD1. After deletion of the amino-terminal 15 amino acids from ARF1(39-45p3), its interaction with p5 was essentially equivalent to that of p3, suggesting that the amino terminus of ARF1(39-45p3) may interfere with binding to p5. These results are consistent with the conclusion that the GAP domain of ARD1 interacts with the effector region of the ARF domain and thereby stimulates GTP hydrolysis.

  17. The small G-protein Arf6GTP recruits the AP-2 adaptor complex to membranes.

    PubMed

    Paleotti, Olivia; Macia, Eric; Luton, Frederic; Klein, Stephanie; Partisani, Mariagrazia; Chardin, Pierre; Kirchhausen, Tom; Franco, Michel

    2005-06-03

    The small GTP-binding protein ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) is involved in plasma membrane/endosomes trafficking. However, precisely how the activation of Arf6 regulates vesicular transport is still unclear. Here, we show that, in vitro, recombinant Arf6GTP recruits purified clathrin-adaptor complex AP-2 (but not AP-1) onto phospholipid liposomes in the absence of phosphoinositides. We also show that phosphoinositides and Arf6 tightly cooperate to translocate AP-2 to the membrane. In vivo, Arf6GTP (but not Arf6GDP) was found associated to AP-2. The expression of the GTP-locked mutant of Arf6 leads to the plasma membrane redistribution of AP-2 in Arf6GTP-enriched areas. Finally, we demonstrated that the expression of the GTP-locked mutant of Arf6 inhibits transferrin receptor internalization without affecting its recycling. Altogether, our results demonstrated that Arf6GTP interacts specifically with AP-2 and promotes its membrane recruitment. These findings strongly suggest that Arf6 plays a major role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis by directly controlling the assembly of the AP-2/clathrin coat.

  18. Nucleolar GTP-binding Protein-1 (NGP-1) Promotes G1 to S Phase Transition by Activating Cyclin-dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21Cip1/Waf1*

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Debduti; Anbarasu, Kumaraswamy; Rajabather, Suryaraja; Priya, Rangasamy Sneha; Desai, Pavitra; Mahalingam, Sundarasamy

    2015-01-01

    Nucleolar GTP-binding protein (NGP-1) is overexpressed in various cancers and proliferating cells, but the functional significance remains unknown. In this study, we show that NGP-1 promotes G1 to S phase transition of cells by enhancing CDK inhibitor p21Cip-1/Waf1 expression through p53. In addition, our results suggest that activation of the cyclin D1-CDK4 complex by NGP-1 via maintaining the stoichiometry between cyclin D1-CDK4 complex and p21 resulted in hyperphosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein at serine 780 (p-RBSer-780) followed by the up-regulation of E2F1 target genes required to promote G1 to S phase transition. Furthermore, our data suggest that ribosomal protein RPL23A interacts with NGP-1 and abolishes NGP-1-induced p53 activity by enhancing Mdm2-mediated p53 polyubiquitination. Finally, reduction of p-RBSer-780 levels and E2F1 target gene expression upon ectopic expression of RPL23a resulted in arrest at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Collectively, this investigation provides evidence that NGP-1 promotes cell cycle progression through the activation of the p53/p21Cip-1/Waf1 pathway. PMID:26203195

  19. A novel rabconnectin-3-binding protein that directly binds a GDP/GTP exchange protein for Rab3A small G protein implicated in Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis of neurotransmitter.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Hiroshi; Sakisaka, Toshiaki; Yasumi, Masato; Shingai, Tatsushi; Izumi, Genkichi; Nagano, Fumiko; Deguchi-Tawarada, Maki; Takeuchi, Masakazu; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Takai, Yoshimi

    2003-06-01

    Rab3A, a member of the Rab3 small G protein family, regulates Ca2+-dependent exocytosis of neurotransmitter. The cyclical activation and inactivation of Rab3A are essential for the Rab3A action in exocytosis. GDP-Rab3A is activated to GTP-Rab3A by Rab3 GDP/GTP exchange protein (Rab3 GEP) and GTP-Rab3A is inactivated to GDP-Rab3A by Rab3 GTPase-activating protein (Rab3 GAP). We have recently found a novel protein, named rabconnectin-3, which is co-immunoprecipitated with Rab3 GEP or GAP from the extract of the crude synaptic vesicle (CSV) fraction of rat brain. Rabconnectin-3 is abundantly expressed in the brain where it is associated with synaptic vesicles. We have found that two more proteins are co-immunoprecipitated with Rab3 GEP from the CSV fraction of rat brain. We attempted here to isolate and characterize one of them. We determined its partial amino acid sequence, cloned its cDNA from a human cDNA library, and determined its primary structure. The protein consisted of 1490 amino acids (aa) and showed a calculated molecular weight of 163808. The protein had 7 WD domains. The protein was abundantly expressed in the brain where it co-localized with rabconnectin-3 on synaptic vesicles. The protein formed a stable complex with rabconnectin-3. We named this protein rabconnectin-3beta and renamed rabconnectin-3 rabconnectin-3alpha. Rabconnectin-3beta, but not rabconnectin-3alpha, directly bound Rab3 GEP. Neither rabconnectin-3alpha nor -3beta directly bound Rab3 GAP. These results indicate that rabconnectin-3 consists of the alpha and beta subunits and binds directly Rab3 GEP through the beta subunit and indirectly Rab3 GAP through an unidentified molecule(s).

  20. GTP-specific fab fragment-based GTPase activity assay.

    PubMed

    Kopra, Kari; Rozwandowicz-Jansen, Anita; Syrjänpää, Markku; Blaževitš, Olga; Ligabue, Alessio; Veltel, Stefan; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Abankwa, Daniel; Härmä, Harri

    2015-03-17

    GTPases are central cellular signaling proteins, which cycle between a GDP-bound inactive and a GTP-bound active conformation in a controlled manner. Ras GTPases are frequently mutated in cancer and so far only few experimental inhibitors exist. The most common methods for monitoring GTP hydrolysis rely on luminescent GDP- or GTP-analogs. In this study, the first GTP-specific Fab fragment and its application are described. We selected Fab fragments using the phage display technology. Six Fab fragments were found against 2'/3'-GTP-biotin and 8-GTP-biotin. Selected antibody fragments allowed specific detection of endogenous, free GTP. The most potent Fab fragment (2A4(GTP)) showed over 100-fold GTP-specificity over GDP, ATP, or CTP and was used to develop a heterogeneous time-resolved luminescence based assay for the monitoring of GTP concentration. The method allows studying the GEF dependent H-Ras activation (GTP binding) and GAP-catalyzed H-Ras deactivation (GTP hydrolysis) at nanomolar protein concentrations.

  1. Cholera Toxin-Sensitive GTP-Binding Protein-Coupled Activation of Augmenter of Liver Regeneration (ALR) Receptor and Its Function in Rat Kupffer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R.; Murase, Noriko; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Mitogenic effect of augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR), a protein produced and released by hepatocytes, on hepatocytes in vivo but not in vitro suggests that the effect is mediated by nonparenchymal cells. Since mediators produced by Kupffer cells are implicated in hepatic regeneration, we investigated receptor for ALR and its functions in rat Kupffer cells. Kupffer cells were isolated from rat liver by enzymatic digestion and centrifugal elutriation. Radioligand ([125I] ALR) receptor binding, ALR-induced GTP/G-protein association, and nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interleukin-6 (IL-6) synthesis were determined. High-affinity receptor for ALR, belonging to the G-protein family, with Kd of 1.25 ± 0.18 nM and Bmax of 0.26 ± 0.02 fmol/μg DNA was identified. ALR stimulated NO, TNF-α, and IL-6 synthesis via cholera toxin-sensitive G-protein, as well as p38-MAPK activity and nuclear translocation of NFκB. While inhibitor of NFκB (MG132) inhibited ALR-induced NO synthesis, MG132 and p38-MAPK inhibitor (SB203580) abrogated ALR-induced TNF-α and IL-6 synthesis. ALR also prevented the release of mediator(s) from Kupffer cells that cause inhibition of DNA synthesis in hepatocytes. Administration of ALR to 40% partially hepatectomized rats increased expression of TNF-α, IL-6, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and caused augmentation of hepatic regeneration. These results demonstrate specific G-protein coupled binding of ALR and its function in Kupffer cells and suggest that mediators produced by ALR-stimulated Kupffer cells may elicit physiologically important effects on hepatocytes. PMID:19859909

  2. Digital expression analysis of the genes associated with salinity resistance after overexpression of a stress-responsive small GTP-binding RabG protein in peanut.

    PubMed

    Sui, J M; Li, G; Chen, G X; Yu, M Y; Ding, S T; Wang, J S; Qiao, L X

    2017-03-08

    The Rab protein family is the largest family of the small GTP-binding proteins. Among them, the RabG genes are known to be responsive to abiotic stresses, but the molecular mechanisms of the stress responses mediated by RabG genes in plants is poorly understood. To investigate the molecular mechanism of AhRabG gene in peanut, transgenic plants overexpressing the AhRabG gene (S6) with relatively higher salinity resistance than the non-transgenic plants (S7) were obtained. Digital gene expression (DGE) sequencing was performed with the leaves of S6 and S7 plants before and after salinity-stress treatment. The AhRabG gene in peanut was found to be involved in a few pathways such as "photosynthesis", "oxidative phosphorylation", "AMPK signaling pathway", "plant hormone signal transduction", etc. A total of 298 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found to be upregulated or downregulated at five sampling time points based on the comparison between S6 and S7 plants. Among them, 132 DEGs were responsive to salinity stress in S6 and/or S7 after salinity-stress treatment. These 132 DEGs included genes encoding various transcription factors and proteins involved in resistance to salinity stress such as MYB, AP2, RING-H2 zinc finger proteins, late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, dehydration-responsive protein RD22, peroxidases, CBL-interacting protein kinases, calcium-binding proteins, and others. The information from this study will be useful for further studies on elucidating the mechanism of salinity resistance conferred by RabG genein peanut.

  3. Assessment of the Activation State of Rho Family GTP-Binding Proteins in Breast Cancer Cells and Specimens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    Biology Vol.13 No.1 January 2003 19 kinases. Activation of Src in cells leads to phosphorylation and phosphatidic acid (PA), and the stimulation by these of...GEF activity, while removal of the N- terminal 348 amino acids resulted in a significant increase in both transformation and GEF potential. Together...residues of proto-Dbl did not significantly affect either its transforming activity or GEF activity, while removal of the N-terminal 348 amino acids

  4. The GTP-binding protein RhoA localizes to the cortical granules of Strongylocentrotus purpuratas sea urchin egg and is secreted during fertilization.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar-Mata, P; Martínez-Cadena, G; López-Godínez, J; Obregón, A; García-Soto, J

    2000-02-01

    The sea urchin egg has thousands of secretory vesicles known as cortical granules. Upon fertilization, these vesicles undergo a Ca2+-dependent exocytosis. G-protein-linked mechanisms may take place during the egg activation. In somatic cells from mammals, GTP-binding proteins of the Rho family regulate a number of cellular processes, including organization of the actin cytoskeleton. We report here that a crude membrane fraction from homogenates of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus sea urchin eggs, incubated with C3 (which ADP-ribosylates specifically Rho proteins) and [32P]NAD, displayed an [32P]ADP-ribosylated protein of 25 kDa that had the following characteristics: i) identical electrophoretic mobility in SDS-PAGE gels as the [32P]ADP-ribosylated Rho from sea urchin sperm; ii) identical mobility in isoelectro focusing gels as human RhoA; iii) positive cross-reactivity by immunoblotting with an antibody against mammalian RhoA. Thus, unfertilized S. purpuratus eggs contain a mammalian RhoA-like protein. Immunocytochemical analyses indicated that RhoA was localized preferentially to the cortical granules; this was confirmed by experiments of [32P]ADP-ribosylation with C3 in isolated cortical granules. Rho was secreted and retained in the fertilization membrane after insemination or activation with A23187. It was observed that the Rho protein present in the sea urchin sperm acrosome was also secreted during the exocytotic acrosome reaction. Thus, Rho could participate in those processes related to the cortical granules, i.e., in the Ca2+-regulated exocytosis or actin reorganization that accompany the egg activation.

  5. The small GTP-binding protein Rho links G protein-coupled receptors and Gα12 to the serum response element and to cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Fromm, Christian; Coso, Omar A.; Montaner, Silvia; Xu, Ningzhi; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    1997-01-01

    Receptors coupled to heterotrimeric G proteins can effectively stimulate growth promoting pathways in a large variety of cell types, and if persistently activated, these receptors can also behave as dominant-acting oncoproteins. Consistently, activating mutations for G proteins of the Gαs and Gαi2 families were found in human tumors; and members of the Gαq and Gα12 families are fully transforming when expressed in murine fibroblasts. In an effort aimed to elucidate the molecular events involved in proliferative signaling through heterotrimeric G proteins we have focused recently on gene expression regulation. Using NIH 3T3 fibroblasts expressing m1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors as a model system, we have observed that activation of this transforming G protein-coupled receptors induces the rapid expression of a variety of early responsive genes, including the c-fos protooncogene. One of the c-fos promoter elements, the serum response element (SRE), plays a central regulatory role, and activation of SRE-dependent transcription has been found to be regulated by several proteins, including the serum response factor and the ternary complex factor. With the aid of reporter plasmids for gene expression, we observed here that stimulation of m1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors potently induced SRE-driven reporter gene activity in NIH 3T3 cells. In these cells, only the Gα12 family of heterotrimeric G protein α subunits strongly induced the SRE, while Gβ1γ2 dimers activated SRE to a more limited extent. Furthermore, our study provides strong evidence that m1, Gα12 and the small GTP-binding protein RhoA are components of a novel signal transduction pathway that leads to the ternary complex factor-independent transcriptional activation of the SRE and to cellular transformation. PMID:9294169

  6. Hydrolysis of bound GTP by ARF protein triggers uncoating of Golgi- derived COP-coated vesicles

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The cycle of nucleotide exchange and hydrolysis by a small GTP-binding protein, ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF), helps to provide vectoriality to vesicle transport. Coat assembly is triggered when ARF binds GTP, initiating transport vesicle budding, and coat disassembly is triggered when ARF hydrolyzes GTP, allowing the uncoated vesicle to fuse. PMID:8253837

  7. Direct binding of translation initiation factor eIF2gamma-G domain to its GTPase-activating and GDP-GTP exchange factors eIF5 and eIF2B epsilon.

    PubMed

    Alone, Pankaj V; Dever, Thomas E

    2006-05-05

    The GTP-binding eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF2 delivers initiator methionyl-tRNA to the 40 S ribosomal subunit. The factor eIF5 stimulates hydrolysis of GTP by eIF2 upon AUG codon recognition, whereas the factor eIF2B promotes guanine nucleotide exchange on eIF2 to recycle the factor for additional rounds of translation initiation. The GTP-binding (G) domain resides in the gamma subunit of the heterotrimeric eIF2; however, only eIF2beta, and not eIF2gamma, has been reported to directly bind to eIF5 or eIF2B. Using proteins expressed in yeast or recombinant systems we show that full-length yeast eIF2gamma, as well as its isolated G domain, binds directly to eIF5 and the epsilon subunit of eIF2B, and we map the interaction sites to the catalytically important regions of these factors. Consistently, an internal deletion of residues 50-100 of yeast eIF5 impairs the interaction with recombinant eIF2gamma-G domain and abolishes the ability of eIF5 to stimulate eIF2 GTPase activity in translation initiation complexes in vitro. Thus, rather than allosterically regulating eIF2gamma-G domain function via eIF2beta, our data support a model in which the GTPase-activating factor eIF5 and the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor eIF2B modulate eIF2 function through direct interactions with the eIF2gamma-G domain.

  8. The myristoylated amino terminus of ADP-ribosylation factor 1 is a phospholipid- and GTP-sensitive switch.

    PubMed

    Randazzo, P A; Terui, T; Sturch, S; Fales, H M; Ferrige, A G; Kahn, R A

    1995-06-16

    ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (Arf1) is an essential N-myristoylated 21-kDa GTP-binding protein with activities that include the regulation of membrane traffic and phospholipase D activity. Both the N terminus of the protein and the N-myristate bound to glycine 2 have previously been shown to be essential to the function of Arf in cells. We show that the bound nucleotide affects the conformation of either the N terminus or residues of Arf1 that are in direct contact with the N terminus. This was demonstrated by examining the effects of mutations in this N-terminal domain on guanosine 5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate (GTP gamma S) and GDP binding and dissociation kinetics. Arf1 mutants, lacking 13 or 17 residues from the N terminus or mutated at residues 3-7, had a greater affinity for GTP gamma S and a lower affinity for GDP than did the wild-type protein. As the N terminus is required for interactions with target proteins, we conclude that the N terminus of Arf1 is a GTP-sensitive effector domain. When Arf1 was acylated, the GTP-dependent conformational changes were codependent on added phospholipids. In the absence of phospholipids, myristoylated Arf1 has a lower affinity for GTP gamma S than for GDP, and in the presence of phospholipids, the myristoylated protein has a greater affinity for GTP gamma S than for GDP. Thus, N-myristoylation is a critical component in the construction of this phospholipid- and GTP-dependent switch.

  9. Decameric GTP cyclohydrolase I forms complexes with two pentameric GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory proteins in the presence of phenylalanine or of a combination of tetrahydrobiopterin and GTP.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, T; Hatakeyama, K

    1998-08-07

    The activity of GTP cyclohydrolase I is inhibited by (6R)-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and stimulated by phenylalanine through complex formation with GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). Gel filtration experiments as well as enzyme activity measurements showed that the number of subunits of GFRP in both the inhibitory and stimulatory complexes is equal to that of GTP cyclohydrolase I. Because GFRP is a pentamer and GTP cyclohydrolase I was shown here by cross-linking experiments to be a decamer, the results indicate that two molecules of a pentameric GFRP associate with one molecule of GTP cyclohydrolase I. Gel filtration analysis suggested that the complex has a radius of gyration similar to that of the enzyme itself. These observations support our model that one molecule of GFRP binds to each of the two outer faces of the torus-shaped GTP cyclohydrolase I. For formation of the inhibitory protein complex, both BH4 and GTP were required; the median effective concentrations of BH4 and GTP were 2 and 26 microM, respectively. BH4 was the most potent of biopterins with different oxidative states. Among GTP analogues, dGTP as well as guanosine 5'-O-(3'-thiotriphosphate) exhibited similar inducibility compared with GTP, whereas other nucleotide triphosphates had no effect. On the other hand, phenylalanine alone was enough for formation of the stimulatory protein complex, and positive cooperativity was found for the phenylalanine-induced protein complex formation. Phenylalanine was the most potent of the aromatic amino acids.

  10. GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein-dependent and -independent inhibitors of GTP cyclohydrolase I.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, T; Wilson, L M; Hatakeyama, K

    2001-04-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) mediates the feedback inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I activity by (6R)-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) through protein complex formation. Since guanine and BH4 have a common pyrimidine ring structure, we examined the inhibitory effect of guanine and its analogs on the enzyme activity. Guanine, 8-hydroxyguanine, 8-methylguanine, and 8-bromoguanine inhibited the enzyme activity in a GFRP-dependent and pH-dependent manner and induced complex formation between GTP cyclohydrolase I and GFRP. The type of inhibition by this group is a mixed type. All these properties were shared with BH4. In striking contrast, inhibition by 8-azaguanine and 8-mercaptoguanine was GFRP-independent and pH-independent. The type of inhibition by 8-azaguanine and 8-mercaptoguanine was a competitive type. The two compounds did not induce complex formation between the enzyme and GFRP. These results demonstrate that guanine compounds of the first group bind to the BH4-binding site of the GTP cyclohydrolase I/GFRP complex, whereas 8-azaguanine and 8-mercaptoguanine bind to the active site of the enzyme. Finally, the possible implications in Lesch-Nyhan syndrome and Parkinson diseases of the inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I by guanine and 8-hydroxyguanine are discussed.

  11. Selective impairment of a subset of Ran-GTP-binding domains of ran-binding protein 2 (Ranbp2) suffices to recapitulate the degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) triggered by Ranbp2 ablation.

    PubMed

    Patil, Hemangi; Saha, Arjun; Senda, Eugene; Cho, Kyoung-in; Haque, MdEmdadul; Yu, Minzhong; Qiu, Sunny; Yoon, Dosuk; Hao, Ying; Peachey, Neal S; Ferreira, Paulo A

    2014-10-24

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) degeneration underpins diseases triggered by disparate genetic lesions, noxious insults, or both. The pleiotropic Ranbp2 controls the expression of intrinsic and extrinsic pathological stressors impinging on cellular viability. However, the physiological targets and mechanisms controlled by Ranbp2 in tissue homeostasis, such as RPE, are ill defined. We show that mice, RPE-cre::Ranbp2(-/-), with selective Ranbp2 ablation in RPE develop pigmentary changes, syncytia, hypoplasia, age-dependent centrifugal and non-apoptotic degeneration of the RPE, and secondary leakage of choriocapillaris. These manifestations are accompanied by the development of F-actin clouds, metalloproteinase-11 activation, deregulation of expression or subcellular localization of critical RPE proteins, atrophic cell extrusions into the subretinal space, and compensatory proliferation of peripheral RPE. To gain mechanistic insights into what Ranbp2 activities are vital to the RPE, we performed genetic complementation analyses of transgenic lines of bacterial artificial chromosomes of Ranbp2 harboring loss of function of selective Ranbp2 domains expressed in a Ranbp2(-/-) background. Among the transgenic lines produced, only Tg(RBD2/3*-HA)::RPE-cre::Ranbp2(-/-)-expressing mutations, which selectively impair binding of RBD2/3 (Ran-binding domains 2 and 3) of Ranbp2 to Ran-GTP, recapitulate RPE degeneration, as observed with RPE-cre::Ranbp2(-/-). By contrast, Tg(RBD2/3*-HA) expression rescues the degeneration of cone photoreceptors lacking Ranbp2. The RPE of RPE-cre::Ranbp2(-/-) and Tg(RBD2/3*-HA)::RPE-cre::Ranbp2(-/-) share proteostatic deregulation of Ran GTPase, serotransferrin, and γ-tubulin and suppression of light-evoked electrophysiological responses. These studies unravel selective roles of Ranbp2 and its RBD2 and RBD3 in RPE survival and functions. We posit that the control of Ran GTPase by Ranbp2 emerges as a novel therapeutic target in diseases promoting

  12. Rabconnectin-3, a novel protein that binds both GDP/GTP exchange protein and GTPase-activating protein for Rab3 small G protein family.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Fumiko; Kawabe, Hiroshi; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Shinohara, Masahiko; Deguchi-Tawarada, Maki; Takeuchi, Masakazu; Sasaki, Takuya; Takai, Yoshimi

    2002-03-22

    Rab3A, a member of the Rab3 small G protein family, regulates Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis of neurotransmitter. The cyclical activation and inactivation of Rab3A are essential for the Rab3A action in exocytosis. GDP-Rab3A is activated to GTP-Rab3A by Rab3 GDP/GTP exchange protein (Rab3 GEP), and GTP-Rab3A is inactivated to GDP-Rab3A by Rab3 GTPase-activating protein (Rab3 GAP). It remains unknown how or in which step of the multiple exocytosis steps these regulators are activated and inactivated. We isolated here a novel protein that was co-immunoprecipitated with Rab3 GEP and GAP by their respective antibodies from the crude synaptic vesicle fraction of rat brain. The protein, named rabconnectin-3, bound both Rab3 GEP and GAP. The cDNA of rabconnectin-3 was cloned from a human cDNA library and its primary structure was determined. Human rabconnectin-3 consisted of 3,036 amino acids and showed a calculated M(r) of 339,753. It had 12 WD domains. Tissue and subcellular distribution analyses in rat indicated that rabconnectin-3 was abundantly expressed in the brain where it was enriched in the synaptic vesicle fraction. Immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy revealed that rabconnectin-3 was concentrated on synaptic vesicles at synapses. These results indicate that rabconnectin-3 serves as a scaffold molecule for both Rab3 GEP and GAP on synaptic vesicles.

  13. Exportin 5 is a RanGTP-dependent dsRNA-binding protein that mediates nuclear export of pre-miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Bohnsack, Markus T; Czaplinski, Kevin; Gorlich, Dirk

    2004-02-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are widespread among eukaryotes, and studies in several systems have revealed that miRNAs can regulate expression of specific genes. Primary miRNA transcripts are initially processed to approximately 70-nucleotide (nt) stem-loop structures (pre-miRNAs), exported to the cytoplasm, further processed to yield approximately 22-nt dsRNAs, and finally incorporated into ribonucleoprotein particles, which are thought to be the active species. Here we study nuclear export of pre-miRNAs and show that the process is saturable and thus carrier-mediated. Export is sensitive to depletion of nuclear RanGTP and, according to this criterion, mediated by a RanGTP-dependent exportin. An unbiased affinity chromatography approach with immobilized pre-miRNAs identified exportin 5 as the pre-miRNA-specific export carrier. We have cloned exportin 5 from Xenopus and demonstrate that antibodies raised against the Xenopus receptor specifically block pre-miRNA export from nuclei of Xenopus oocytes. We further show that exportin 5 interacts with double-stranded RNA in a sequence-independent manner.

  14. Proteins that interact with GTP during sporulation of Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, C.; Vary, J.C. )

    1989-06-01

    During sporulation of Bacillus subtilis, several proteins were shown to interact with GTP in specific ways. UV light was used to cross-link ({alpha}-{sup 32}P)GTP to proteins in cell extracts at different stages of growth. After electrophoresis, 11 bands of radioactivity were found in vegetative cells, 4 more appeared during sporulation, and only 9 remained in mature spores. Based on the labeling pattern with or without UV light to cross-link either ({alpha}-{sup 32}P)GTP or ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)GTP, 11 bands of radioactivity were apparent guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, and 5 bands appeared to be phosphorylated and/or guanylated. Similar results were found with Bacillus megaterium. Assuming the GTP might be a type of signal for sporulation, it could interact with and regulate proteins by at least three mechanisms.

  15. Human Gpn1 purified from bacteria binds guanine nucleotides and hydrolyzes GTP as a protein dimer stabilized by its C-terminal tail.

    PubMed

    González-González, Rogelio; Guerra-Moreno, José A; Cristóbal-Mondragón, Gema R; Romero, Violeta; Peña-Gómez, Sonia G; Montero-Morán, Gabriela M; Lara-González, Samuel; Hernández-Arana, Andrés; Fernández-Velasco, Daniel A; Calera, Mónica R; Sánchez-Olea, Roberto

    2017-04-01

    The essential GTPase Gpn1 mediates RNA polymerase II nuclear targeting and controls microtubule dynamics in yeast and human cells by molecular mechanisms still under investigation. Here, we purified human HisGpn1 expressed as a recombinant protein in bacteria E. coli BL-21 (DE3). Affinity purified HisGpn1 eluted from a size exclusion column as a protein dimer, a state conserved after removing the hexa-histidine tail and confirmed by separating HisGpn1 in native gels, and in dynamic light scattering experiments. Human HisGpn1 purity was higher than 95%, molecularly monodisperse and could be concentrated to more than 10 mg/mL without aggregating. Circular dichroism spectra showed that human HisGpn1 was properly folded and displayed a secondary structure rich in alpha helices. HisGpn1 effectively bound GDP and the non-hydrolyzable GTP analogue GMPPCP, and hydrolyzed GTP. We next tested the importance of the C-terminal tail, present in eukaryotic Gpn1 but not in the ancestral archaeal Gpn protein, on HisGpn1 dimer formation. C-terminal deleted human HisGpn1 (HisGpn1ΔC) was also purified as a protein dimer, indicating that the N-terminal GTPase domain contains the interaction surface needed for dimer formation. In contrast to HisGpn1, however, HisGpn1ΔC dimer spontaneously dissociated into monomers. In conclusion, we have developed a method to purify properly folded and functionally active human HisGpn1 from bacteria, and showed that the C-terminal tail, universally conserved in all eukaryotic Gpn1 orthologues, stabilizes the GTPase domain-mediated Gpn1 protein dimer. The availability of recombinant human Gpn1 will open new research avenues to unveil the molecular and pharmacological properties of this essential GTPase.

  16. Involvement of rho p21 and its inhibitory GDP/GTP exchange protein (rho GDI) in cell motility.

    PubMed Central

    Takaishi, K; Kikuchi, A; Kuroda, S; Kotani, K; Sasaki, T; Takai, Y

    1993-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that rho p21, a ras p21-related small GTP-binding protein (G protein), regulates the actomyosin system. The actomyosin system is known to be essential for cell motility. In the present study, we examined the action of rho p21, its inhibitory GDP/GTP exchange protein (named rho GDI), its stimulatory GDP/GTP exchange protein (named smg GDS), and Clostridium botulinum ADP-ribosyltransferase C3, known to selectively ADP-ribosylate rho p21 and to impair its function, in cell motility (chemokinesis) of Swiss 3T3 cells. We quantitated the capacity of cell motility by measuring cell tracks by phagokinesis. Microinjection of the GTP gamma S-bound active form of rhoA p21 or smg GDS into Swiss 3T3 cells did not affect cell motility, but microinjection of rho GDI into the cells did inhibit cell motility. This rho GDI action was prevented by comicroinjection of rho GDI with the GTP gamma S-bound form of rhoA p21 but not with the same form of rhoA p21 lacking the C-terminal three amino acids which was not posttranslationally modified with lipids. The rho GDI action was not prevented by Ki-rasVal-12 p21 or any of the GTP gamma S-bound form of other small GTP-binding proteins including rac1 p21, G25K, and smg p21B. Among these small G proteins, rhoA p21, rac1 p21, and G25K are known to be substrates for rho GDI. The rho GDI action was not prevented by comicroinjection of rho GDI with smg GDS. Microinjection of C3 into Swiss 3T3 cells also inhibited cell motility. These results indicate that the rho GDI-rho p21 system regulates cell motility, presumably through the actomyosin system. Images PMID:8417362

  17. Rheb protein binds CAD (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase) protein in a GTP- and effector domain-dependent manner and influences its cellular localization and carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase (CPSase) activity.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tatsuhiro; Akasu, Hitomi; Shimono, Wataru; Matsu, Chisa; Fujiwara, Yuki; Shibagaki, Yoshio; Heard, Jeffrey J; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Hattori, Seisuke

    2015-01-09

    Rheb small GTPases, which consist of Rheb1 and Rheb2 (also known as RhebL1) in mammalian cells, are unique members of the Ras superfamily and play central roles in regulating protein synthesis and cell growth by activating mTOR. To gain further insight into the function of Rheb, we carried out a search for Rheb-binding proteins and found that Rheb binds to CAD protein (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase), a multifunctional enzyme required for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. CAD binding is more pronounced with Rheb2 than with Rheb1. Rheb binds CAD in a GTP- and effector domain-dependent manner. The region of CAD where Rheb binds is located at the C-terminal region of the carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase domain and not in the dihydroorotase and aspartate transcarbamoylase domains. Rheb stimulated carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activity of CAD in vitro. In addition, an elevated level of intracellular UTP pyrimidine nucleotide was observed in Tsc2-deficient cells, which was attenuated by knocking down of Rheb. Immunostaining analysis showed that expression of Rheb leads to increased accumulation of CAD on lysosomes. Both a farnesyltransferase inhibitor that blocks membrane association of Rheb and knockdown of Rheb mislocalized CAD. These results establish CAD as a downstream effector of Rheb and suggest a possible role of Rheb in regulating de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Rheb Protein Binds CAD (Carbamoyl-phosphate Synthetase 2, Aspartate Transcarbamoylase, and Dihydroorotase) Protein in a GTP- and Effector Domain-dependent Manner and Influences Its Cellular Localization and Carbamoyl-phosphate Synthetase (CPSase) Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Tatsuhiro; Akasu, Hitomi; Shimono, Wataru; Matsu, Chisa; Fujiwara, Yuki; Shibagaki, Yoshio; Heard, Jeffrey J.; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Hattori, Seisuke

    2015-01-01

    Rheb small GTPases, which consist of Rheb1 and Rheb2 (also known as RhebL1) in mammalian cells, are unique members of the Ras superfamily and play central roles in regulating protein synthesis and cell growth by activating mTOR. To gain further insight into the function of Rheb, we carried out a search for Rheb-binding proteins and found that Rheb binds to CAD protein (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase), a multifunctional enzyme required for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. CAD binding is more pronounced with Rheb2 than with Rheb1. Rheb binds CAD in a GTP- and effector domain-dependent manner. The region of CAD where Rheb binds is located at the C-terminal region of the carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase domain and not in the dihydroorotase and aspartate transcarbamoylase domains. Rheb stimulated carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activity of CAD in vitro. In addition, an elevated level of intracellular UTP pyrimidine nucleotide was observed in Tsc2-deficient cells, which was attenuated by knocking down of Rheb. Immunostaining analysis showed that expression of Rheb leads to increased accumulation of CAD on lysosomes. Both a farnesyltransferase inhibitor that blocks membrane association of Rheb and knockdown of Rheb mislocalized CAD. These results establish CAD as a downstream effector of Rheb and suggest a possible role of Rheb in regulating de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis. PMID:25422319

  19. Selective Impairment of a Subset of Ran-GTP-binding Domains of Ran-binding Protein 2 (Ranbp2) Suffices to Recapitulate the Degeneration of the Retinal Pigment Epithelium (RPE) Triggered by Ranbp2 Ablation*

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Hemangi; Saha, Arjun; Senda, Eugene; Cho, Kyoung-in; Haque, MdEmdadul; Yu, Minzhong; Qiu, Sunny; Yoon, Dosuk; Hao, Ying; Peachey, Neal S.; Ferreira, Paulo A.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) degeneration underpins diseases triggered by disparate genetic lesions, noxious insults, or both. The pleiotropic Ranbp2 controls the expression of intrinsic and extrinsic pathological stressors impinging on cellular viability. However, the physiological targets and mechanisms controlled by Ranbp2 in tissue homeostasis, such as RPE, are ill defined. We show that mice, RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/−, with selective Ranbp2 ablation in RPE develop pigmentary changes, syncytia, hypoplasia, age-dependent centrifugal and non-apoptotic degeneration of the RPE, and secondary leakage of choriocapillaris. These manifestations are accompanied by the development of F-actin clouds, metalloproteinase-11 activation, deregulation of expression or subcellular localization of critical RPE proteins, atrophic cell extrusions into the subretinal space, and compensatory proliferation of peripheral RPE. To gain mechanistic insights into what Ranbp2 activities are vital to the RPE, we performed genetic complementation analyses of transgenic lines of bacterial artificial chromosomes of Ranbp2 harboring loss of function of selective Ranbp2 domains expressed in a Ranbp2−/− background. Among the transgenic lines produced, only TgRBD2/3*-HA::RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/−-expressing mutations, which selectively impair binding of RBD2/3 (Ran-binding domains 2 and 3) of Ranbp2 to Ran-GTP, recapitulate RPE degeneration, as observed with RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/−. By contrast, TgRBD2/3*-HA expression rescues the degeneration of cone photoreceptors lacking Ranbp2. The RPE of RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/− and TgRBD2/3*-HA::RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/− share proteostatic deregulation of Ran GTPase, serotransferrin, and γ-tubulin and suppression of light-evoked electrophysiological responses. These studies unravel selective roles of Ranbp2 and its RBD2 and RBD3 in RPE survival and functions. We posit that the control of Ran GTPase by Ranbp2 emerges as a novel therapeutic target in diseases

  20. A polymorphism of the GTP-cyclohydrolase I feedback regulator gene alters transcriptional activity and may affect response to SSRI antidepressants.

    PubMed

    McHugh, P C; Joyce, P R; Deng, X; Kennedy, M A

    2011-06-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) is an essential cofactor for synthesis of many neurotransmitters including serotonin. In serotonergic neurons, BH(4) is tightly regulated by GTP-cyclohydrolase I feedback regulator (GFRP). Given the pivotal role of the serotonergic system in mood disorders and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) antidepressant function, we tested the hypothesis that GFRP gene (GCHFR) variants would modify response to antidepressants in subjects with major depression. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs7164342 and rs7163862) in the GCHFR promoter were identified and occurred as two haplotypes (GA or TT). A multiple regression analysis revealed that homozygous individuals for the TT haplotype were less likely to respond to the SSRI fluoxetine than to the tricyclic antidepressant nortriptyline (P = 0.037). Moreover, the TT haplotype showed a reduced transcription rate in luciferase reporter gene assays, which may impact on BH(4)-mediated neurotransmitter production, thus suggesting a biological process through which GCHFR promoter variants might influence antidepressant response.

  1. Tyr39 of ran preserves the Ran.GTP gradient by inhibiting GTP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Brucker, Sven; Gerwert, Klaus; Kötting, Carsten

    2010-08-06

    Ran is a member of the superfamily of small GTPases, which cycle between a GTP-bound "on" and a GDP-bound "off" state. Ran regulates nuclear transport. In order to maintain a gradient of excess Ran.GTP within the nucleoplasm and excess Ran.GDP within the cytoplasm, the hydrolysis of Ran.GTP in the nucleoplasm should be prevented, whereas in the cytoplasm, hydrolysis is catalyzed by Ran.GAP (GTPase-activating protein). In this article, we investigate the GTPase reaction of Ran in complex with its binding protein Ran-binding protein 1 by time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy: We show that the slowdown of the intrinsic hydrolysis of RanGTP is accomplished by tyrosine 39, which is probably misplacing the attacking water. We monitored the interaction of Ran with RanGAP, which reveals two reactions steps. By isotopic labeling of Ran and RanGAP, we were able to assign the first step to a small conformational change within the catalytic site. The following bond breakage is the rate-limiting step of hydrolysis. An intermediate of protein-bound phosphate as found for Ras or Rap systems is kinetically unresolved. This demonstrates that despite the structural similarity among the G-domain of the GTPases, different reaction mechanisms are utilized.

  2. Initiation factor eIF2γ promotes eIF2-GTP-Met-tRNAi(Met) ternary complex binding to the 40S ribosome.

    PubMed

    Shin, Byung-Sik; Kim, Joo-Ran; Walker, Sarah E; Dong, Jinsheng; Lorsch, Jon R; Dever, Thomas E

    2011-10-16

    In contrast to prokaryotic elongation factor EF-Tu, which delivers aminoacyl-tRNAs to the ribosomal A-site, eukaryotic initiation factor eIF2 binds methionyl initiator transfer RNA (Met-tRNA(i)(Met)) to the P-site of the 40S ribosomal subunit. The results of directed hydroxyl radical probing experiments to map binding of Saccharomyces cerevisiae eIF2 on the ribosome and on Met-tRNA(i)(Met) revealed that eIF2γ primarily contacts the acceptor stem of Met-tRNA(i)(Met) and identified a key binding interface between domain III of eIF2γ and 18S rRNA helix h44 on the 40S subunit. Whereas the analogous domain III of EF-Tu contacts the T stem of tRNAs, biochemical analyses demonstrated that eIF2γ domain III is important for ribosome, not Met-tRNA(i)(Met). Thus, despite their structural similarity, eIF2 and EF-Tu bind tRNAs in substantially different manners, and we propose that the tRNA-binding domain III of EF-Tu has acquired a new ribosome-binding function in eIF2γ.

  3. Internally ratiometric fluorescent sensors for evaluation of intracellular GTP levels and distribution.

    PubMed

    Bianchi-Smiraglia, Anna; Rana, Mitra S; Foley, Colleen E; Paul, Leslie M; Lipchick, Brittany C; Moparthy, Sudha; Moparthy, Kalyana; Fink, Emily E; Bagati, Archis; Hurley, Edward; Affronti, Hayley C; Bakin, Andrei V; Kandel, Eugene S; Smiraglia, Dominic J; Feltri, Maria Laura; Sousa, Rui; Nikiforov, Mikhail A

    2017-10-01

    GTP is a major regulator of multiple cellular processes, but tools for quantitative evaluation of GTP levels in live cells have not been available. We report the development and characterization of genetically encoded GTP sensors, which we constructed by inserting a circularly permuted yellow fluorescent protein (cpYFP) into a region of the bacterial G protein FeoB that undergoes a GTP-driven conformational change. GTP binding to these sensors results in a ratiometric change in their fluorescence, thereby providing an internally normalized response to changes in GTP levels while minimally perturbing those levels. Mutations introduced into FeoB to alter its affinity for GTP created a series of sensors with a wide dynamic range. Critically, in mammalian cells the sensors showed consistent changes in ratiometric signal upon depletion or restoration of GTP pools. We show that these GTP evaluators (GEVALs) are suitable for detection of spatiotemporal changes in GTP levels in living cells and for high-throughput screening of molecules that modulate GTP levels.

  4. Ribosomal protein L7/L12 is required for GTPase translation factors EF-G, RF3, and IF2 to bind in their GTP state to 70S ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Markus A; Haddad, Bassam G; Weis, Amanda J; Blackwood, Colby S; Shelton, Catherine D; Wuerth, Michelle E; Walter, Justin D; Spiegel, Paul Clint

    2017-06-01

    Ribosomal protein L7/L12 is associated with translation initiation, elongation, and termination by the 70S ribosome. The guanosine 5' triphosphate hydrolase (GTPase) activity of elongation factor G (EF-G) requires the presence of L7/L12, which is critical for ribosomal translocation. Here, we have developed new methods for the complete depletion of L7/L12 from Escherichia coli 70S ribosomes to analyze the effect of L7/L12 on the activities of the GTPase factors EF-G, RF3, IF2, and LepA. Upon removal of L7/L12 from ribosomes, the GTPase activities of EF-G, RF3, and IF2 decreased to basal levels, while the activity of LepA decreased marginally. Upon reconstitution of ribosomes with recombinant L12, the GTPase activities of all GTPases returned to full activity. Moreover, ribosome binding assays indicated that EF-G, RF3, and IF2 require L7/L12 for stable binding in the GTP state, and LepA retained > 50% binding. Lastly, an EF-G∆G' truncation mutant possessed ribosome-dependent GTPase activity, which was insensitive to L7/L12. Our results indicate that L7/L12 is required for stable binding of ribosome-dependent GTPases that harbor direct interactions to the L7/L12 C-terminal domains, either through a G' domain (EF-G, RF3) or a unique N-terminal domain (IF2). Furthermore, we hypothesize this interaction is concomitant with counterclockwise ribosomal intersubunit rotation, which is required for translocation, initiation, and post-termination. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  5. Physical factors affecting chloroquine binding to melanin.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, R L; Pendleton, P; Gerber, J P

    2015-10-01

    Chloroquine is an antimalarial drug but is also prescribed for conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Long-term users risk toxic side effects, including retinopathy, thought to be caused by chloroquine accumulation on ocular melanin. Although the binding potential of chloroquine to melanin has been investigated previously, our study is the first to demonstrate clear links between chloroquine adsorption by melanin and system factors including temperature, pH, melanin type, and particle size. In the current work, two Sepia melanins were compared with bovine eye as a representative mammalian melanin. Increasing the surface anionic character due to a pH change from 4.7 to 7.4 increased each melanin's affinity for chloroquine. Although the chloroquine isotherms exhibited an apparently strong interaction with each melanin, isosteric heat analysis indicated a competitive interaction. Buffer solution cations competed effectively at low surface coverage; chloroquine adsorption occurs via buffer cation displacement and is promoted by temperature-influenced secondary structure swelling.

  6. Structure of Escherichia coli dGTP Triphosphohydrolase: A Hexameric Enzyme with DNA Effector Molecules

    DOE PAGES

    Singh, Deepa; Gawel, Damian; Itsko, Mark; ...

    2015-02-18

    The Escherichia coli dgt gene encodes a dGTP triphosphohydrolase whose detailed role still remains to be determined. Deletion of dgt creates a mutator phenotype, indicating that the dGTPase has a fidelity role, possibly by affecting the cellular dNTP pool. In the present paper, we have investigated the structure of the Dgt protein at 3.1-Å resolution. One of the obtained structures revealed a protein hexamer that contained two molecules of single-stranded DNA. The presence of DNA caused significant conformational changes in the enzyme, including in the catalytic site of the enzyme. Dgt preparations lacking DNA were able to bind single-stranded DNAmore » with high affinity (Kd ~ 50 nM). DNA binding positively affected the activity of the enzyme: dGTPase activity displayed sigmoidal (cooperative) behavior without DNA but hyperbolic (Michaelis-Menten) kinetics in its presence, consistent with a specific lowering of the apparent Km for dGTP. A mutant Dgt enzyme was also created containing residue changes in the DNA binding cleft. This mutant enzyme, whereas still active, was incapable of DNA binding and could no longer be stimulated by addition of DNA. We also created an E. coli strain containing the mutant dgt gene on the chromosome replacing the wild-type gene. The mutant also displayed a mutator phenotype. Finally, our results provide insight into the allosteric regulation of the enzyme and support a physiologically important role of DNA binding.« less

  7. Cleavage of the sarcin–ricin loop of 23S rRNA differentially affects EF-G and EF-Tu binding

    PubMed Central

    García-Ortega, Lucía; Álvarez-García, Elisa; Gavilanes, José G.; Martínez-del-Pozo, Álvaro; Joseph, Simpson

    2010-01-01

    Ribotoxins are potent inhibitors of protein biosynthesis and inactivate ribosomes from a variety of organisms. The ribotoxin α-sarcin cleaves the large 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) at the universally conserved sarcin–ricin loop (SRL) leading to complete inactivation of the ribosome and cellular death. The SRL interacts with translation factors that hydrolyze GTP, and it is important for their binding to the ribosome, but its precise role is not yet understood. We studied the effect of α-sarcin on defined steps of translation by the bacterial ribosome. α-Sarcin-treated ribosomes showed no defects in mRNA and tRNA binding, peptide-bond formation and sparsomycin-dependent translocation. Cleavage of SRL slightly affected binding of elongation factor Tu ternary complex (EF-Tu•GTP•tRNA) to the ribosome. In contrast, the activity of elongation factor G (EF-G) was strongly impaired in α-sarcin-treated ribosomes. Importantly, cleavage of SRL inhibited EF-G binding, and consequently GTP hydrolysis and mRNA–tRNA translocation. These results suggest that the SRL is more critical in EF-G than ternary complex binding to the ribosome implicating different requirements in this region of the ribosome during protein elongation. PMID:20215430

  8. Inhibitory heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins inhibit hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis by up-regulation of Bcl-2 via NF-{kappa}B in H1299 human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Mi Ran; Nam, Hyo-Jung; Kim, So-Young; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2009-04-03

    Inhibitory heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (Gi proteins) mediate a variety of signaling pathways by coupling receptors and effectors to regulate cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. However, the role of Gi proteins in the modulation of hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis is not clearly understood. Thus, we investigated the effect of Gi proteins on hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis and the underlying mechanisms in H1299 human lung cancer cells. The stable expression of constitutively active alpha subunits of Gi1 (G{alpha}i1QL), Gi2, or Gi3 inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis. The expression of G{alpha}i1QL up-regulated Bcl-2 expression, and the knockdown of Bcl-2 with siRNA abolished the anti-apoptotic effect of G{alpha}i1QL. G{alpha}i1 induced the transcription of Bcl-2 by activation of NF-{kappa}B, which resulted from an increase in NF-{kappa}B p50 protein. We conclude that G{alpha}i1 inhibits hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of H1299 lung cancer cells by up-regulating the transcription of Bcl-2 through a p50-mediated NF-{kappa}B activation.

  9. Inhibitory heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins inhibit hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis by up-regulation of Bcl-2 via NF-kappaB in H1299 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Miran; Nam, Hyo-Jung; Kim, So-Young; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2009-04-03

    Inhibitory heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (Gi proteins) mediate a variety of signaling pathways by coupling receptors and effectors to regulate cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. However, the role of Gi proteins in the modulation of hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis is not clearly understood. Thus, we investigated the effect of Gi proteins on hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis and the underlying mechanisms in H1299 human lung cancer cells. The stable expression of constitutively active alpha subunits of Gi1 (Galphai1QL), Gi2, or Gi3 inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis. The expression of Galphai1QL up-regulated Bcl-2 expression, and the knockdown of Bcl-2 with siRNA abolished the anti-apoptotic effect of Galphai1QL. Galphai1 induced the transcription of Bcl-2 by activation of NF-kappaB, which resulted from an increase in NF-kappaB p50 protein. We conclude that Galphai1 inhibits hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of H1299 lung cancer cells by up-regulating the transcription of Bcl-2 through a p50-mediated NF-kappaB activation.

  10. Molecular cloning of the microtubule-associated mechanochemical enzyme dynamin reveals homology with a new family of GTP-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Obar, R A; Collins, C A; Hammarback, J A; Shpetner, H S; Vallee, R B

    1990-09-20

    A complementary DNA encoding the D100 polypeptide of rat brain dynamin--a force-producing, microtubule-activated nucleotide triphosphatase--has been cloned and sequenced. The predicted amino acid sequence includes a guanine nucleotide-binding domain that is homologous with those of a family of antiviral factors, inducible by interferon and known as Mx proteins, and with the product of the essential yeast vacuolar protein sorting gene VPS1. These relationships imply the existence of a new family of GTPases with physiological roles that may include microtubule-based motility and protein sorting.

  11. Oligomerization and GTP-binding Requirements of MxA for Viral Target Recognition and Antiviral Activity against Influenza A Virus.

    PubMed

    Nigg, Patricia E; Pavlovic, Jovan

    2015-12-11

    The IFN-induced human myxovirus resistance protein A (MxA) exhibits a broad antiviral activity against many viruses, including influenza A virus (IAV). MxA belongs to the family of dynamin-like GTPases and assembles in vitro into dimers, tetramers, and oligomeric ring-like structures. The molecular mechanism of action remains to be elucidated. Furthermore, it is not clear whether MxA exerts its antiviral activity in a monomeric and/or multimeric form. Using a set of MxA mutants that form complexes with defined stoichiometry, we observed that, in the presence of guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate), purified MxA disassembled into tetramers and dimers. Dimeric forms did not further disassemble into monomers. Infection experiments revealed that besides wild-type MxA, dimeric and monomeric variants of MxA also efficiently restricted IAV at a replication step after primary transcription. Moreover, only dimeric MxA was able to form stable complexes with the nucleoprotein (NP) of IAV. MxA interacted with NP independently of other viral components. Interestingly, the dimeric form of MxA was able to efficiently bind to NP from several MxA-sensitive strains but interacted much more weakly with NP from the MxA-resistant PR8 strain derived from the H1N1 1918 lineage. Taken together, these data suggest that, during infection, a fraction of MxA disassembles into dimers that bind to NP synthesized following primary transcription in the cytoplasm, thereby preventing viral replication. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Structure of the human gene and two rat cDNAs encoding the alpha chain of GTP-binding regulatory protein Go: two different mRNAs are generated by alternative splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, T; Toyama, R; Itoh, H; Kozasa, T; Matsuoka, M; Kaziro, Y

    1991-01-01

    Go is a specific class ("other") of signal-transducing heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (G proteins) that is expressed in high levels in mammalian brain. We have cloned two different rat cDNAs encoding the alpha subunit of Go (Go alpha-1 and Go alpha-2) and a human Go alpha chromosomal gene. The human Go alpha gene spans more than 100 kilobases and contains 11 exons, including one noncoding exon in the 3' flanking region. The 5' flanking region is highly G + C-rich and contains five G.C boxes (Sp1 binding sites) but no TATA box. Exons 7 and 8 coding for amino acid residues 242-354 of Go alpha protein are duplicated (referred to as exons 7A, 7B, 8A, and 8B). It was found that exons 7A and 8A code for Go alpha-1, and 7B and 8B code for Go alpha-2. This indicates that two different Go alpha mRNAs may be generated by alternative splicing of a single Go alpha gene. The splice sites of the Go alpha-1 and Go alpha-2 genes are completely identical with those encoding human inhibitory G protein alpha subunits Gi2 alpha and Gi3 alpha [Itoh, H., Toyama, R., Kozasa, T., Tsukamoto, T., Matsuoka, M. & Kaziro, Y. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 6656-6664] and also transducin G protein alpha subunit Gt1 alpha [Raport, C. J., Dere, B. & Hurley, J. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 7122-7128]. Sequence homology and conservation of the exon-intron organization indicate that the genes coding for Go alpha, Gi2 alpha, Gi3 alpha, Gt1 alpha, and probably Gi1 alpha may be evolved from a common progenitor. Like Go alpha-1, Go alpha-2 is expressed mainly in brain. Images PMID:1901650

  13. Identification of a GTP-binding protein. cap alpha. subunit that lacks an apparent ADP-ribosylation site for pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, H.K.W.; Yoshimoto, K.K.; Eversole-Cire, P.; Simon, M.I.

    1988-05-01

    Recent molecular cloning of cDNA for the ..cap alpha.. subunit of bovine transducin (a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein, or G protein) has revealed the presence of two retinal-specific transducins, called T/sub r/ and T/sub c/, which are expressed in rod or cone photoreceptor cells. In a further study of G-protein diversity and signal transduction in the retina, the authors have identified a G-protein ..cap alpha.. subunit, which they refer to as G/sub z/..cap alpha.., by isolating a human retinal cDNA clone that cross-hybridizes at reduced stringency with bovine T/sub r/ ..cap alpha..-subunit cDNA. The deduced amino acid sequence of G/sub z/..cap alpha.. is 41-67% identical with those of other known G-protein ..cap alpha.. subunits. However, the 355-residue G/sub z/..cap alpha.. lacks a consensus site for ADP-ribosylation by pertussis toxin, and its amino acid sequence varies within a number of regions that are strongly conserved among all of the other G-protein ..cap alpha.. subunits. They suggest that G/sub z/..cap alpha.., which appears to be highly expressed in neural tissues, represents a member of a subfamily of G proteins that mediate signal transduction in pertussis toxin-insensitive systems.

  14. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase activation by synthetic peptides mapping within the carboxyl-terminal domain of small GTP-binding proteins. Lack of amino acid sequence specificity and importance of polybasic motif.

    PubMed

    Joseph, G; Gorzalczany, Y; Koshkin, V; Pick, E

    1994-11-18

    The small GTP-binding protein (G protein) Rac1 is an obligatory participant in the assembly of the superoxide (O2-.)-generating NADPH oxidase complex of macrophages. We investigated the effect of synthetic peptides, mapping within the near carboxyl-terminal domains of Rac1 and of related G proteins, on the activity of NADPH oxidase in a cell-free system consisting of solubilized guinea pig macrophage membrane, a cytosolic fraction enriched in p47phox and p67phox (or total cytosol), highly purified Rac1-GDP dissociation inhibitor for Rho (Rho GDI) complex, and the activating amphiphile, lithium dodecyl sulfate. Peptides Rac1-(178-188) and Rac1-(178-191), but not Rac2-(178-188), inhibited NADPH oxidase activity in a Rac1-dependent system when added prior to or simultaneously with the initiation of activation. However, undecapeptides corresponding to the near carboxyl-terminal domains of RhoA and RhoC and, most notably, a peptide containing the same amino acids as Rac1-(178-188), but in reversed orientation, were also inhibitory. Surprisingly, O2-. production in a Rac2-dependent cell-free system was inhibited by Rac1-(178-188) but not by Rac2-(178-188). Finally, basic polyamino acids containing lysine, histidine, or arginine, also inhibited NADPH oxidase activation. We conclude that inhibition of NADPH oxidase activation by synthetic peptides mapping within the carboxyl-terminal domain of certain small G proteins is not amino acid sequence-specific but related to the presence of a polybasic motif. It has been proposed that such a motif serves as a plasma membrane targeting signal for a number of small G proteins (Hancock, J.F., Paterson, H., and Marshall, C.J. (1990) Cell 63, 133-139).

  15. RanBP1 is crucial for the release of RanGTP from importin beta-related nuclear transport factors.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, F R; Görlich, D

    1997-12-15

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport appears mediated by shuttling transport receptors that bind RanGTP as a means to regulate interactions with their cargoes. The receptor-RanGTP complexes are kinetically very stable with nucleotide exchange and GTP hydrolysis being blocked, predicting that a specific disassembly mechanism exists. Here we show in three cases receptor RanGTP x RanBP1 complexes to be the key disassembly intermediates, where RanBP1 stimulates the off-rate at the receptor/RanGTP interface by more than two orders of magnitude. The transiently released RanGTP x RanBP1 complex is then induced by RanGAP to hydrolyse GTP, preventing the receptor to rebind RanGTP. The efficient release of importin beta from RanGTP requires importin alpha, in addition to RanBP1.

  16. Mechanisms of calcium release induced by GTP and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, D.L.; Chueh, S.H.; Mullaney, J.M.; Mallet, M.K.

    1987-05-01

    Recent studies show that Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux from ER is controlled by a sensitive and specific guanine nucleotide regulatory mechanism. Using microsomes of permeabilized cells derived from N1E-115 neuroblastoma or DDT/sub 1/MF-2 smooth muscle cell lines, both GTP and IP/sub 3/ effect Ca/sup 2 +/ release from a common intracellular pool; however, the mechanisms of activation of Ca/sup 2 +/ release by the two agents appear distinct with regard to several parameters. Studies using liver microsomes are currently investigating whether similar distinctions between the actions of IP/sub 3/ and GTP exist in other cell types. At present it is unknown if GTP-activated Ca/sup 2 +/ release is mediated by a G-protein-like activity. Studies indicate that such release is not altered by pertussis toxin. Since GTP..gamma..S is inactive and blocks the action of GTP, a modified G-protein activation process must be invoked. Current investigations are attempting to identify the protein(s) involved in GTP-mediated Ca/sup 2 +/ release by direct photo-crosslinking experiments using (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)GTP. Successful labeling of many nucleotide-binding proteins has been accomplished; most but not all labeling is displaced by ATP. GTP-specifically labeled proteins are being assessed as candidates for the GTP-mediated release process.

  17. GTP hydrolysis of cell division protein FtsZ: evidence that the active site is formed by the association of monomers.

    PubMed

    Scheffers, Dirk-Jan; de Wit, Janny G; den Blaauwen, Tanneke; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2002-01-15

    The essential prokaryotic cell division protein FtsZ is a tubulin homologue that forms a ring at the division site. FtsZ forms polymers in a GTP-dependent manner. Recent biochemical evidence has shown that FtsZ forms multimeric structures in vitro and in vivo and functions as a self-activating GTPase. Structural analysis of FtsZ points to an important role for the highly conserved tubulin-like loop 7 (T7-loop) in the self-activation of GTP hydrolysis. The T7-loop was postulated to form the active site together with the nucleotide-binding site on an adjacent FtsZ monomer. To characterize the role of the T7-loop of Escherichia coli FtsZ, we have mutagenized residues M206, N207, D209, D212, and R214. All the mutant proteins, except the R214 mutant, are severely affected in polymerization and GTP hydrolysis. Charged residues D209 and D212 cannot be substituted with a glutamate residue. All mutants interact with wild-type FtsZ in vitro, indicating that the T7-loop mutations do not abolish FtsZ self-association. Strikingly, in mixtures of wild-type and mutant proteins, most mutants are capable of inhibiting wild-type GTP hydrolysis. We conclude that the T7-loop is part of the active site for GTP hydrolysis, formed by the association of two FtsZ monomers.

  18. Invited review: Activation of G proteins by GTP and the mechanism of Gα-catalyzed GTP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Sprang, Stephen R

    2016-08-01

    This review addresses the regulatory consequences of the binding of GTP to the alpha subunits (Gα) of heterotrimeric G proteins, the reaction mechanism of GTP hydrolysis catalyzed by Gα and the means by which GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) stimulate the GTPase activity of Gα. The high energy of GTP binding is used to restrain and stabilize the conformation of the Gα switch segments, particularly switch II, to afford stable complementary to the surfaces of Gα effectors, while excluding interaction with Gβγ, the regulatory binding partner of GDP-bound Gα. Upon GTP hydrolysis, the energy of these conformational restraints is dissipated and the two switch segments, particularly switch II, become flexible and are able to adopt a conformation suitable for tight binding to Gβγ. Catalytic site pre-organization presents a significant activation energy barrier to Gα GTPase activity. The glutamine residue near the N-terminus of switch II (Glncat ) must adopt a conformation in which it orients and stabilizes the γ phosphate and the water nucleophile for an in-line attack. The transition state is probably loose with dissociative character; phosphoryl transfer may be concerted. The catalytic arginine in switch I (Argcat ), together with amide hydrogen bonds from the phosphate binding loop, stabilize charge at the β-γ bridge oxygen of the leaving group. GAPs that harbor "regulator of protein signaling" (RGS) domains, or structurally unrelated domains within G protein effectors that function as GAPs, accelerate catalysis by stabilizing the pre-transition state for Gα-catalyzed GTP hydrolysis, primarily by restraining Argcat and Glncat to their catalytic conformations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 449-462, 2016.

  19. Dynamic structure of membrane-anchored Arf•GTP

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yizhou; Kahn, Richard A.; Prestegard, James H.

    2010-01-01

    Arfs (ADP ribosylation factors) are N-myristoylated GTP/GDP switch proteins playing key regulatory roles in vesicle transport in eukaryotic cells. ARFs execute their roles by anchoring to membrane surfaces where they interact with other proteins to initiate budding and maturation of transport vesicles. However, existing structures of Arf•GTP are limited to non-myristoylated and truncated forms with impaired membrane binding. We report a high resolution NMR structure for full-length myristoylated yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Arf1 in complex with a membrane mimic. The two domain structure, in which the myristoylated N-terminal helix is separated from the C-terminal domain by a flexible linker, suggests a level of adaptability in binding modes for the myriad of proteins with which Arf interacts, and allows predictions of specific lipid binding sites on some of these proteins. PMID:20601958

  20. Structure of Escherichia coli dGTP Triphosphohydrolase: A Hexameric Enzyme with DNA Effector Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Deepa; Gawel, Damian; Itsko, Mark; Hochkoeppler, Alejandro; Krahn, Juno M.; London, Robert E.; Schaaper, Roel M.

    2015-02-18

    The Escherichia coli dgt gene encodes a dGTP triphosphohydrolase whose detailed role still remains to be determined. Deletion of dgt creates a mutator phenotype, indicating that the dGTPase has a fidelity role, possibly by affecting the cellular dNTP pool. In the present paper, we have investigated the structure of the Dgt protein at 3.1-Å resolution. One of the obtained structures revealed a protein hexamer that contained two molecules of single-stranded DNA. The presence of DNA caused significant conformational changes in the enzyme, including in the catalytic site of the enzyme. Dgt preparations lacking DNA were able to bind single-stranded DNA with high affinity (Kd ~ 50 nM). DNA binding positively affected the activity of the enzyme: dGTPase activity displayed sigmoidal (cooperative) behavior without DNA but hyperbolic (Michaelis-Menten) kinetics in its presence, consistent with a specific lowering of the apparent Km for dGTP. A mutant Dgt enzyme was also created containing residue changes in the DNA binding cleft. This mutant enzyme, whereas still active, was incapable of DNA binding and could no longer be stimulated by addition of DNA. We also created an E. coli strain containing the mutant dgt gene on the chromosome replacing the wild-type gene. The mutant also displayed a mutator phenotype. Finally, our results provide insight into the allosteric regulation of the enzyme and support a physiologically important role of DNA binding.

  1. Nucleotide binding affects intrinsic dynamics and structural communication in Ras GTPases.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Francesca; Raimondi, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The Ras superfamily comprises many guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) that are essential to intracellular signal transduction. These proteins act biologically as molecular switches, which, cycling between OFF and ON states, play fundamental role in cell biology. This review article summarizes the inferences from the widest computational analyses done so far on Ras GTPases aimed at providing a comprehensive structural/dynamic view of the trans-family and family-specific functioning mechanisms. These variegated comparative analyses could infer the evolutionary and intrinsic flexibilities as well as the structural communication features in the most representative G protein families in different functional states. In spite of the low sequence similarities, the members of the Ras superfamily share the topology of the Ras-like domain, including the nucleotide binding site. GDP and GTP make very similar interactions in all GTPases and differences in their binding modes are localized around the γ-phosphate of GTP. Remarkably, such subtle local differences result in significant differences in the functional dynamics and structural communication features of the protein. In Ras GTPases, the nucleotide plays a central and active role in dictating functional dynamics, establishing the major structure network, and mediating the communication paths instrumental in function retention and specialization. Collectively, the results of these studies support the speculation that an "extended conformational selection model" that embraces a repertoire of selection and adjustment processes is likely more suitable to describe the nucleotide behavior in these important molecular switches.

  2. Structure of Escherichia coli dGTP triphosphohydrolase: a hexameric enzyme with DNA effector molecules.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepa; Gawel, Damian; Itsko, Mark; Hochkoeppler, Alejandro; Krahn, Juno M; London, Robert E; Schaaper, Roel M

    2015-04-17

    The Escherichia coli dgt gene encodes a dGTP triphosphohydrolase whose detailed role still remains to be determined. Deletion of dgt creates a mutator phenotype, indicating that the dGTPase has a fidelity role, possibly by affecting the cellular dNTP pool. In the present study, we have investigated the structure of the Dgt protein at 3.1-Å resolution. One of the obtained structures revealed a protein hexamer that contained two molecules of single-stranded DNA. The presence of DNA caused significant conformational changes in the enzyme, including in the catalytic site of the enzyme. Dgt preparations lacking DNA were able to bind single-stranded DNA with high affinity (Kd ∼ 50 nM). DNA binding positively affected the activity of the enzyme: dGTPase activity displayed sigmoidal (cooperative) behavior without DNA but hyperbolic (Michaelis-Menten) kinetics in its presence, consistent with a specific lowering of the apparent Km for dGTP. A mutant Dgt enzyme was also created containing residue changes in the DNA binding cleft. This mutant enzyme, whereas still active, was incapable of DNA binding and could no longer be stimulated by addition of DNA. We also created an E. coli strain containing the mutant dgt gene on the chromosome replacing the wild-type gene. The mutant also displayed a mutator phenotype. Our results provide insight into the allosteric regulation of the enzyme and support a physiologically important role of DNA binding. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Obligatory role in GTP hydrolysis for the amide carbonyl oxygen of the Mg(2+)-coordinating Thr of regulatory GTPases.

    PubMed

    Zurita, Adolfo; Zhang, Yinghao; Pedersen, Lee; Darden, Tom; Birnbaumer, Lutz

    2010-05-25

    When G-protein alpha subunits binds GTP and Mg(2+), they transition from their inactive to their active conformation. This transition is accompanied by completion of the coordination shell of Mg(2+) with electrons from six oxygens: two water molecules, the ss and gamma phosphoryls of GTP, a helix-alpha1 Ser, and a switch I domain (SWI) Thr, and the repositioning of SWI and SWII domains. SWII binds and regulates effector enzymes and facilitates GTP hydrolysis by repositioning the gamma-carbonyl of a Gln. Mutating the Ser generates regulatory GTPases that cannot lock Mg(2+) into its place and are locked in their inactive state with dominant negative properties. Curiously, mutating the Thr appears to reduce GTP hydrolysis. The reason for this difference is not known because it is also not known why removal of the Thr should affect the overall GTPase cycle differently than removal of the Ser. Working with recombinant Gsalpha, we report that mutating its SWI-Thr to either Ala, Glu, Gln, or Asp results not only in diminished GTPase activity but also in spontaneous activation of the SWII domain. Upon close examination of existing alpha subunit crystals, we noted the oxygen of the backbone carbonyl of SWI-Thr and of the gamma-carbonyl of SWII Gln to be roughly equidistant from the oxygen of the hydrolytic H(2)O. Our observations indicate that the Gln and Thr carbonyls play equihierarchical roles in the GTPase process and provide the mechanism that explains why mutating the Thr mimics mutating the Gln and not that of the Ser.

  4. GDP-to-GTP exchange on the microtubule end can contribute to the frequency of catastrophe

    PubMed Central

    Piedra, Felipe-Andrés; Kim, Tae; Garza, Emily S.; Geyer, Elisabeth A.; Burns, Alexander; Ye, Xuecheng; Rice, Luke M.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules are dynamic polymers of αβ-tubulin that have essential roles in chromosome segregation and organization of the cytoplasm. Catastrophe—the switch from growing to shrinking—occurs when a microtubule loses its stabilizing GTP cap. Recent evidence indicates that the nucleotide on the microtubule end controls how tightly an incoming subunit will be bound (trans-acting GTP), but most current models do not incorporate this information. We implemented trans-acting GTP into a computational model for microtubule dynamics. In simulations, growing microtubules often exposed terminal GDP-bound subunits without undergoing catastrophe. Transient GDP exposure on the growing plus end slowed elongation by reducing the number of favorable binding sites on the microtubule end. Slower elongation led to erosion of the GTP cap and an increase in the frequency of catastrophe. Allowing GDP-to-GTP exchange on terminal subunits in simulations mitigated these effects. Using mutant αβ-tubulin or modified GTP, we showed experimentally that a more readily exchangeable nucleotide led to less frequent catastrophe. Current models for microtubule dynamics do not account for GDP-to-GTP exchange on the growing microtubule end, so our findings provide a new way of thinking about the molecular events that initiate catastrophe. PMID:27146111

  5. GDP-to-GTP exchange on the microtubule end can contribute to the frequency of catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Piedra, Felipe-Andrés; Kim, Tae; Garza, Emily S; Geyer, Elisabeth A; Burns, Alexander; Ye, Xuecheng; Rice, Luke M

    2016-11-07

    Microtubules are dynamic polymers of αβ-tubulin that have essential roles in chromosome segregation and organization of the cytoplasm. Catastrophe-the switch from growing to shrinking-occurs when a microtubule loses its stabilizing GTP cap. Recent evidence indicates that the nucleotide on the microtubule end controls how tightly an incoming subunit will be bound (trans-acting GTP), but most current models do not incorporate this information. We implemented trans-acting GTP into a computational model for microtubule dynamics. In simulations, growing microtubules often exposed terminal GDP-bound subunits without undergoing catastrophe. Transient GDP exposure on the growing plus end slowed elongation by reducing the number of favorable binding sites on the microtubule end. Slower elongation led to erosion of the GTP cap and an increase in the frequency of catastrophe. Allowing GDP-to-GTP exchange on terminal subunits in simulations mitigated these effects. Using mutant αβ-tubulin or modified GTP, we showed experimentally that a more readily exchangeable nucleotide led to less frequent catastrophe. Current models for microtubule dynamics do not account for GDP-to-GTP exchange on the growing microtubule end, so our findings provide a new way of thinking about the molecular events that initiate catastrophe.

  6. GTP- and GDP-Dependent Rab27a Effectors in Pancreatic Beta-Cells.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Mami; Ishizaki, Toshimasa; Kimura, Toshihide

    2015-01-01

    Small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) participate in a wide variety of cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and intracellular transport. Conventionally, only the guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP)-bound small GTPase interacts with effector proteins, and the resulting downstream signals control specific cellular functions. Therefore, the GTP-bound form is regarded as active, and the focus has been on searching for proteins that bind the GTP form to look for their effectors. The Rab family small GTPase Rab27a is highly expressed in some secretory cells and is involved in the control of membrane traffic. The present study reviews recent progress in our understanding of the roles of Rab27a and its effectors in pancreatic beta-cells. In the basal state, GTP-bound Rab27a controls insulin secretion at pre-exocytic stages via its GTP-dependent effectors. We previously identified novel guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-bound Rab27-interacting proteins. Interestingly, GDP-bound Rab27a controls endocytosis of the secretory membrane via its interaction with these proteins. We also demonstrated that the insulin secretagogue glucose converts Rab27a from its GTP- to GDP-bound forms. Thus, GTP- and GDP-bound Rab27a regulate pre-exocytic and endocytic stages in membrane traffic, respectively. Since the physiological importance of GDP-bound GTPases has been largely overlooked, we consider that the investigation of GDP-dependent effectors for other GTPases is necessary for further understanding of cellular function.

  7. Light- and GTP-activated hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate in squid photoreceptor membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, K.M.; Saibil, H.R.

    1988-01-05

    Light stimulates the hydrolysis of exogenous, (/sup 3/H)inositol-labeled phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PtdInsP2) added to squid photoreceptor membranes, releasing inositol trisphosphate (InsP3). At free calcium levels of 0.05 microM or greater, hydrolysis of the labeled lipid is stimulated up to 4-fold by GTP and light together, but not separately. This activity is the biochemical counterpart of observations on intact retina showing that a rhodopsin-activated GTP-binding protein is involved in visual transduction in invertebrates, and that InsP3 release is correlated with visual excitation and adaptation. Using an in vitro assay, we investigated the calcium and GTP dependence of the phospholipase activity. At calcium concentrations between 0.1 and 0.5 microM, some hydrolysis occurs independently of GTP and light, with a light- and GTP-activated component superimposed. At 1 microM calcium there is no background activity, and hydrolysis absolutely requires both GTP and light. Ion exchange chromatography on Dowex 1 (formate form) of the water-soluble products released at 1 microM calcium reveals that the product is almost entirely InsP3. Invertebrate rhodopsin is homologous in sequence and function to vertebrate visual pigment, which modulates the concentration of cyclic GMP through the mediation of the GTP-binding protein transducin. While there is some evidence that light also modulates PtdInsP2 content in vertebrate photoreceptors, the case for its involvement in phototransduction is stronger for the invertebrate systems. The results reported here support the scheme of rhodopsin----GTP-binding protein----phospholipase C activation in invertebrate photoreceptors.

  8. The structure of affective action representations: temporal binding of affective response codes.

    PubMed

    Eder, Andreas B; Müsseler, Jochen; Hommel, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments examined the hypothesis that preparing an action with a specific affective connotation involves the binding of this action to an affective code reflecting this connotation. This integration into an action plan should lead to a temporary occupation of the affective code, which should impair the concurrent representation of affectively congruent events, such as the planning of another action with the same valence. This hypothesis was tested with a dual-task setup that required a speeded choice between approach- and avoidance-type lever movements after having planned and before having executed an evaluative button press. In line with the code-occupation hypothesis, slower lever movements were observed when the lever movement was affectively compatible with the prepared evaluative button press than when the two actions were affectively incompatible. Lever movements related to approach and avoidance and evaluative button presses thus seem to share a code that represents affective meaning. A model of affective action control that is based on the theory of event coding is discussed.

  9. Thermodynamics of the GTP-GDP-operated conformational switch of selenocysteine-specific translation factor SelB.

    PubMed

    Paleskava, Alena; Konevega, Andrey L; Rodnina, Marina V

    2012-08-10

    SelB is a specialized translation factor that binds GTP and GDP and delivers selenocysteyl-tRNA (Sec-tRNA(Sec)) to the ribosome. By analogy to elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), SelB is expected to control the delivery and release of Sec-tRNA(Sec) to the ribosome by the structural switch between GTP- and GDP-bound conformations. However, crystal structures of SelB suggested a similar domain arrangement in the apo form and GDP- and GTP-bound forms of the factor, raising the question of how SelB can fulfill its delivery function. Here, we studied the thermodynamics of guanine nucleotide binding to SelB by isothermal titration calorimetry in the temperature range between 10 and 25 °C using GTP, GDP, and two nonhydrolyzable GTP analogs, guanosine 5'-O-(γ-thio)triphosphate (GTPγS) and guanosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)-triphosphate (GDPNP). The binding of SelB to either guanine nucleotide is characterized by a large heat capacity change (-621, -467, -235, and -275 cal × mol(-1) × K(-1), with GTP, GTPγS, GDPNP, and GDP, respectively), associated with compensatory changes in binding entropy and enthalpy. Changes in heat capacity indicate a large decrease of the solvent-accessible surface area in SelB, amounting to 43 or 32 amino acids buried upon binding of GTP or GTPγS, respectively, and 15-19 amino acids upon binding GDP or GDPNP. The similarity of the GTP and GDP forms in the crystal structures can be attributed to the use of GDPNP, which appears to induce a structure of SelB that is more similar to the GDP than to the GTP-bound form.

  10. The pretranslocation ribosome is targeted by GTP-bound EF-G in partially activated form

    PubMed Central

    Hauryliuk, Vasili; Mitkevich, Vladimir A.; Eliseeva, Natalia A.; Petrushanko, Irina Yu.; Ehrenberg, Måns; Makarov, Alexander A.

    2008-01-01

    Translocation of the tRNA·mRNA complex through the bacterial ribosome is driven by the multidomain guanosine triphosphatase elongation factor G (EF-G). We have used isothermal titration calorimetry to characterize the binding of GDP and GTP to free EF-G at 4°C, 20°C, and 37°C. The binding affinity of EF-G is higher to GDP than to GTP at 4°C, but lower at 37°C. The binding enthalpy and entropy change little with temperature in the case of GDP binding but change greatly in the case of GTP binding. These observations are compatible with a large decrease in the solvent-accessible hydrophobic surface area of EF-G on GTP, but not GDP, binding. The explanation we propose is the locking of the switch 1 and switch 2 peptide loops in the G domain of EF-G to the γ-phosphate of GTP. From these data, in conjunction with previously reported structural data on guanine nucleotide-bound EF-G, we suggest that EF-G enters the pretranslocation ribosome as an “activity chimera,” with the G domain activated by the presence of GTP but the overall factor conformation in the inactive form typical of a GDP-bound multidomain guanosine triphosphatase. We propose that the active overall conformation of EF-G is attained only in complex with the ribosome in its “ratcheted state,” with hybrid tRNA binding sites. PMID:18836081

  11. Regulation of cytoplasmic division of Xenopus embryo by rho p21 and its inhibitory GDP/GTP exchange protein (rho GDI)

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that the rho family, a member of the ras p21- related small GTP-binding protein superfamily, regulates cell morphology, cell motility, and smooth muscle contraction through the actomyosin system. The actomyosin system is also known to be essential for cytoplasmic division of cells (cytokinesis). In this study, we examined the action of rho p21, its inhibitory GDP/GTP exchange protein, named rho GDI, its stimulatory GDP/GTP exchange protein, named smg GDS, and botulinum ADP-ribosyltransferase C3, known to selectively ADP-ribosylate rho p21 and to impair its function, in the cytoplasmic division using Xenopus embryos. The sperm-induced cytoplasmic division of Xenopus embryos was not affected by microinjection into the embryos of either smg GDS or the guanosine-5'-(3-O-thio)triphosphate (GTP gamma S)-bound form of rhoA p21, one member of the rho family, but completely inhibited by microinjection of rho GDI or C3. Under these conditions, nuclear division occurred normally but the furrow formation, which was induced by the contractile ring consisting of actomyosin just beneath the plasma membrane, was impaired. Comicroinjection of rho GDI with the GTP gamma S-bound form of rhoA p21 prevented the rho GDI action. Moreover, the sperm-induced cytoplasmic division of Xenopus embryos was inhibited by microinjection into the embryos of the rhoA p21 pre-ADP- ribosylated by C3 which might serve as a dominant negative inhibitor of endogenous rho p21. These results indicate that rho p21 together with its regulatory proteins regulates the cytoplasmic division through the actomyosin system. PMID:8436590

  12. Analysis of GTPases carrying hydrophobic amino acid substitutions in lieu of the catalytic glutamine: implications for GTP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rajeev; Gara, Sudheer Kumar; Mishra, Shambhavi; Prakash, Balaji

    2005-05-01

    Ras superfamily GTP-binding proteins regulate important signaling events in the cell. Ras, which often serves as a prototype, efficiently hydrolyzes GTP in conjunction with its regulator GAP. A conserved glutamine plays a vital role in GTP hydrolysis in most GTP-binding proteins. Mutating this glutamine in Ras has oncogenic effects, since it disrupts GTP hydrolysis. The analysis presented here is of GTP-binding proteins that are a paradox to oncogenic Ras, since they have the catalytic glutamine (Glncat) substituted by a hydrophobic amino acid, yet can hydrolyze GTP efficiently. We term these proteins HAS-GTPases. Analysis of the amino acid sequences of HAS-GTPases reveals prominent presence of insertions around the GTP-binding pocket. Homology modeling studies suggest an interesting means to achieve catalysis despite the drastic hydrophobic substitution replacing the key Glncat of Ras-like GTPases. The substituted hydrophobic residue adopts a "retracted conformation," where it is positioned away from the GTP, as its role in catalysis would be unproductive. This conformation is further stabilized by interactions with hydrophobic residues in its vicinity. These interacting residues are strongly conserved and hydrophobic in all HAS-GTPases, and correspond to residues Asp92 and Tyr96 of Ras. An experimental support for the "retracted conformation" of Switch II arises from the crystal structures of Ylqf and hGBP1. This conformation allows us to hypothesize that, unlike in classical GTPases, catalytic residues could be supplied by regions other than the Switch II (i.e., either the insertions or a neighboring domain).

  13. Invited review: Mechanisms of GTP hydrolysis and conformational transitions in the dynamin superfamily.

    PubMed

    Daumke, Oliver; Praefcke, Gerrit J K

    2016-08-01

    Dynamin superfamily proteins are multidomain mechano-chemical GTPases which are implicated in nucleotide-dependent membrane remodeling events. A prominent feature of these proteins is their assembly- stimulated mechanism of GTP hydrolysis. The molecular basis for this reaction has been initially clarified for the dynamin-related guanylate binding protein 1 (GBP1) and involves the transient dimerization of the GTPase domains in a parallel head-to-head fashion. A catalytic arginine finger from the phosphate binding (P-) loop is repositioned toward the nucleotide of the same molecule to stabilize the transition state of GTP hydrolysis. Dynamin uses a related dimerization-dependent mechanism, but instead of the catalytic arginine, a monovalent cation is involved in catalysis. Still another variation of the GTP hydrolysis mechanism has been revealed for the dynamin-like Irga6 which bears a glycine at the corresponding position in the P-loop. Here, we highlight conserved and divergent features of GTP hydrolysis in dynamin superfamily proteins and show how nucleotide binding and hydrolysis are converted into mechano-chemical movements. We also describe models how the energy of GTP hydrolysis can be harnessed for diverse membrane remodeling events, such as membrane fission or fusion. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 580-593, 2016.

  14. Invited review: Mechanisms of GTP hydrolysis and conformational transitions in the dynamin superfamily

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dynamin superfamily proteins are multidomain mechano‐chemical GTPases which are implicated in nucleotide‐dependent membrane remodeling events. A prominent feature of these proteins is their assembly‐ stimulated mechanism of GTP hydrolysis. The molecular basis for this reaction has been initially clarified for the dynamin‐related guanylate binding protein 1 (GBP1) and involves the transient dimerization of the GTPase domains in a parallel head‐to‐head fashion. A catalytic arginine finger from the phosphate binding (P‐) loop is repositioned toward the nucleotide of the same molecule to stabilize the transition state of GTP hydrolysis. Dynamin uses a related dimerization‐dependent mechanism, but instead of the catalytic arginine, a monovalent cation is involved in catalysis. Still another variation of the GTP hydrolysis mechanism has been revealed for the dynamin‐like Irga6 which bears a glycine at the corresponding position in the P‐loop. Here, we highlight conserved and divergent features of GTP hydrolysis in dynamin superfamily proteins and show how nucleotide binding and hydrolysis are converted into mechano‐chemical movements. We also describe models how the energy of GTP hydrolysis can be harnessed for diverse membrane remodeling events, such as membrane fission or fusion. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 580–593, 2016. PMID:27062152

  15. Simulating GTP:Mg and GDP:Mg with a simple force field: a structural and thermodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Thomas; Satpati, Priyadarshi

    2013-04-05

    Di- and tri-phosphate nucleotides are essential cofactors for many proteins, usually in an Mg(2+) -bound form. Proteins like GTPases often detect the difference between NDP and NTP and respond by changing conformations. To study such complexes, simple, fixed charge force fields have been used, which allow long simulations and precise free energy calculations. The preference for NTP or NDP binding depends on many factors, including ligand structure and Mg(2+) coordination and the changes they undergo upon binding. Here, we use a simple force field to examine two Mg(2+) coordination modes for the unbound GDP and GTP: direct, or "Inner Sphere" (IS) coordination by one or more phosphate oxygens and indirect, "Outer Sphere" (OS) coordination involving one or more bridging waters. We compare GTP: and GDP:Mg binding with OS and IS coordination; combining the results with experimental data then indicates that GTP prefers the latter. We also examine different kinds of IS coordination and their sensitivity to a key force field parameter: the optimal Mg:oxygen van der Waals distance Rmin . Increasing Rmin improves the Mg:oxygen distances, the GTP: and GDP:Mg binding affinities, and the fraction of GTP:Mg with β + γ phosphate coordination, but does not improve or change the GTP/GDP affinity difference, which remains much larger than experiment. It has no effect on the free energy of GDP binding to a GTPase. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Interaction of a novel fluorescent GTP analogue with the small G-protein K-Ras.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Seigo; Masuhara, Kaori; Umeki, Nobuhisa; Sako, Yasushi; Maruta, Shinsaku

    2016-01-01

    A novel fluorescent guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) analogue, 2'(3')-O-{6-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-l,3-diazol-4-yl)amino) hexanoic}-GTP (NBD-GTP), was synthesized and utilized to monitor the effect of mutations in the functional region of mouse K-Ras. The effects of the G12S, A59T and G12S/A59T mutations on GTPase activity, nucleotide exchange rates were compared with normal Ras. Mutation at A59T resulted in reduction of the GTPase activity by 0.6-fold and enhancement of the nucleotide exchange rate by 2-fold compared with normal Ras. On the other hand, mutation at G12S only slightly affected the nucleotide exchange rate and did not affect the GTPase activity. We also used NBD-GTP to study the effect of these mutations on the interaction between Ras and SOS1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor. The mutation at A59T abolished the interaction with SOS1. The results suggest that the fluorescent GTP analogue, NBD-GTP, is applicable to the kinetic studies for small G-proteins.

  17. Intermembrane contact affects calcium binding to phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Ekerdt, R; Papahadjopoulos, D

    1982-01-01

    Binding of Ca2+ to liposomes composed of phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) was analyzed by potentiometric titrations. Ca2+ binding to large unilamellar PtdSer vesicles was saturable at a stoichiometry of 1:2 (Ca2+/PtdSer). At approximately 6 X 10(-4) M [Ca2+]free, the binding curve exhibited a discontinuity that can be attributed to the formation of a Ca2+/PtdSer complex with a higher affinity. When both Ca2+ and Mg2+ are present, depending on the relative concentrations, Mg2+ can either complete or can enhance Ca2+ binding. Concomitant to the enhanced binding, the vesicle suspension was found to aggregate, suggesting that close contact of membranes is a prerequisite for the abrupt change in affinity. This concept was tested by binding studies with liposomes of mixed composition. It was found that the incorporation of 50 mol% phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn) into PtdSer liposomes produced a similar binding pattern to that of pure PtdSer with a saturable stoichiometry of 1:2 (Ca2+/PtdSer). However, incorporation of 50 mol% phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) completely abolished the discontinuous shift in affinity and apparent saturation was reached at a stoichiometry of 1:4 (Ca2+/PtdSer). In addition, Ca2+ binding to PtdSer liposomes with 10 mol% galactosylcerebroside was not altered when compared to pure PtdSer, whereas 10 mol% of the glycolipid GL-4 abolished the increased binding. The results are closely correlated with recent findings on the role of the membrane composition in Ca2+-induced fusion of liposomes and argue in favor of a specific Ca2+/PtdSer complex (with 1:2 stoichiometry) forming only at points of close contact between membranes and serving as the trigger for membrane fusion. PMID:6954538

  18. Structure of the protein core of translation initiation factor 2 in apo, GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms

    SciTech Connect

    Simonetti, Angelita; Fabbretti, Attilio; Hazemann, Isabelle; Jenner, Lasse; Gualerzi, Claudio O.; Klaholz, Bruno P.

    2013-06-01

    The crystal structures of the eubacterial translation initiation factor 2 in apo form and with bound GDP and GTP reveal conformational changes upon nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, notably of the catalytically important histidine in the switch II region. Translation initiation factor 2 (IF2) is involved in the early steps of bacterial protein synthesis. It promotes the stabilization of the initiator tRNA on the 30S initiation complex (IC) and triggers GTP hydrolysis upon ribosomal subunit joining. While the structure of an archaeal homologue (a/eIF5B) is known, there are significant sequence and functional differences in eubacterial IF2, while the trimeric eukaryotic IF2 is completely unrelated. Here, the crystal structure of the apo IF2 protein core from Thermus thermophilus has been determined by MAD phasing and the structures of GTP and GDP complexes were also obtained. The IF2–GTP complex was trapped by soaking with GTP in the cryoprotectant. The structures revealed conformational changes of the protein upon nucleotide binding, in particular in the P-loop region, which extend to the functionally relevant switch II region. The latter carries a catalytically important and conserved histidine residue which is observed in different conformations in the GTP and GDP complexes. Overall, this work provides the first crystal structure of a eubacterial IF2 and suggests that activation of GTP hydrolysis may occur by a conformational repositioning of the histidine residue.

  19. Aminoglycoside 2′′-Phosphotransferase IIIa (APH(2′′)-IIIa) Prefers GTP over ATP

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Clyde A.; Toth, Marta; Frase, Hilary; Byrnes, Laura J.; Vakulenko, Sergei B.

    2012-01-01

    Contrary to the accepted dogma that ATP is the canonical phosphate donor in aminoglycoside kinases and protein kinases, it was recently demonstrated that all members of the bacterial aminoglycoside 2′′-phosphotransferase IIIa (APH(2′′)) aminoglycoside kinase family are unique in their ability to utilize GTP as a cofactor for antibiotic modification. Here we describe the structural determinants for GTP recognition in these enzymes. The crystal structure of the GTP-dependent APH(2′′)-IIIa shows that although this enzyme has templates for both ATP and GTP binding superimposed on a single nucleotide specificity motif, access to the ATP-binding template is blocked by a bulky tyrosine residue. Substitution of this tyrosine by a smaller amino acid opens access to the ATP template. Similar GTP binding templates are conserved in other bacterial aminoglycoside kinases, whereas in the structurally related eukaryotic protein kinases this template is less conserved. The aminoglycoside kinases are important antibiotic resistance enzymes in bacteria, whose wide dissemination severely limits available therapeutic options, and the GTP binding templates could be exploited as new, previously unexplored targets for inhibitors of these clinically important enzymes. PMID:22367198

  20. The nucleoporin MEL-28 promotes RanGTP-dependent γ-tubulin recruitment and microtubule nucleation in mitotic spindle formation.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Hideki; Koch, Birgit; Walczak, Rudolf; Ciray-Duygu, Fulya; González-Sánchez, Juan Carlos; Devos, Damien P; Mattaj, Iain W; Gruss, Oliver J

    2014-01-01

    The GTP-bound form of the Ran GTPase (RanGTP), produced around chromosomes, drives nuclear envelope and nuclear pore complex (NPC) re-assembly after mitosis. The nucleoporin MEL-28/ELYS binds chromatin in a RanGTP-regulated manner and acts to seed NPC assembly. Here we show that, upon mitotic NPC disassembly, MEL-28 dissociates from chromatin and re-localizes to spindle microtubules and kinetochores. MEL-28 directly binds microtubules in a RanGTP-regulated way via its C-terminal chromatin-binding domain. Using Xenopus egg extracts, we demonstrate that MEL-28 is essential for RanGTP-dependent microtubule nucleation and spindle assembly, independent of its function in NPC assembly. Specifically, MEL-28 interacts with the γ-tubulin ring complex and recruits it to microtubule nucleation sites. Our data identify MEL-28 as a RanGTP target that functions throughout the cell cycle. Its cell cycle-dependent binding to chromatin or microtubules discriminates MEL-28 functions in interphase and mitosis, and ensures that spindle assembly occurs only after NPC breakdown.

  1. Neutron crystal structure of RAS GTPase puts in question the protonation state of the GTP γ-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Knihtila, Ryan; Holzapfel, Genevieve; Weiss, Kevin; Meilleur, Flora; Mattos, Carla

    2015-10-29

    RAS GTPase is a prototype for nucleotide-binding proteins that function by cycling between GTP and GDP, with hydrogen atoms playing an important role in the GTP hydrolysis mechanism. It is one of the most well studied proteins in the superfamily of small GTPases, which has representatives in a wide range of cellular functions. These proteins share a GTP-binding pocket with highly conserved motifs that promote hydrolysis to GDP. The neutron crystal structure of RAS presented here strongly supports a protonated gamma-phosphate at physiological pH. This counters the notion that the phosphate groups of GTP are fully deprotonated at the start of the hydrolysis reaction, which has colored the interpretation of experimental and computational data in studies of the hydrolysis mechanism. As a result, the neutron crystal structure presented here puts in question our understanding of the pre-catalytic state associated with the hydrolysis reaction central to the function of RAS and other GTPases.

  2. Neutron Crystal Structure of RAS GTPase Puts in Question the Protonation State of the GTP γ-Phosphate*

    PubMed Central

    Knihtila, Ryan; Holzapfel, Genevieve; Weiss, Kevin; Meilleur, Flora; Mattos, Carla

    2015-01-01

    RAS GTPase is a prototype for nucleotide-binding proteins that function by cycling between GTP and GDP, with hydrogen atoms playing an important role in the GTP hydrolysis mechanism. It is one of the most well studied proteins in the superfamily of small GTPases, which has representatives in a wide range of cellular functions. These proteins share a GTP-binding pocket with highly conserved motifs that promote hydrolysis to GDP. The neutron crystal structure of RAS presented here strongly supports a protonated γ-phosphate at physiological pH. This counters the notion that the phosphate groups of GTP are fully deprotonated at the start of the hydrolysis reaction, which has colored the interpretation of experimental and computational data in studies of the hydrolysis mechanism. The neutron crystal structure presented here puts in question our understanding of the pre-catalytic state associated with the hydrolysis reaction central to the function of RAS and other GTPases. PMID:26515069

  3. Neutron Crystal Structure of RAS GTPase Puts in Question the Protonation State of the GTP γ-Phosphate.

    PubMed

    Knihtila, Ryan; Holzapfel, Genevieve; Weiss, Kevin; Meilleur, Flora; Mattos, Carla

    2015-12-25

    RAS GTPase is a prototype for nucleotide-binding proteins that function by cycling between GTP and GDP, with hydrogen atoms playing an important role in the GTP hydrolysis mechanism. It is one of the most well studied proteins in the superfamily of small GTPases, which has representatives in a wide range of cellular functions. These proteins share a GTP-binding pocket with highly conserved motifs that promote hydrolysis to GDP. The neutron crystal structure of RAS presented here strongly supports a protonated γ-phosphate at physiological pH. This counters the notion that the phosphate groups of GTP are fully deprotonated at the start of the hydrolysis reaction, which has colored the interpretation of experimental and computational data in studies of the hydrolysis mechanism. The neutron crystal structure presented here puts in question our understanding of the pre-catalytic state associated with the hydrolysis reaction central to the function of RAS and other GTPases.

  4. Radioiodination of chicken luteinizing hormone without affecting receptor binding potency

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, M.; Ishii, S. )

    1989-12-01

    By improving the currently used lactoperoxidase method, we were able to obtain radioiodinated chicken luteinizing hormone (LH) that shows high specific binding and low nonspecific binding to a crude plasma membrane fraction of testicular cells of the domestic fowl and the Japanese quail, and to the ovarian granulosa cells of the Japanese quail. The change we made from the original method consisted of (1) using chicken LH for radioiodination that was not only highly purified but also retained a high receptor binding potency; (2) controlling the level of incorporation of radioiodine into chicken LH molecules by employing a short reaction time and low temperature; and (3) fractionating radioiodinated chicken LH further by gel filtration using high-performance liquid chromatography. Specific radioactivity of the final {sup 125}I-labeled chicken LH preparation was 14 microCi/micrograms. When specific binding was 12-16%, nonspecific binding was as low as 2-4% in the gonadal receptors. {sup 125}I-Labeled chicken LH was displaced by chicken LH and ovine LH but not by chicken follicle-stimulating hormone. The equilibrium association constant of quail testicular receptor was 3.6 x 10(9) M-1. We concluded that chicken LH radioiodinated by the present method is useful for studies of avian LH receptors.

  5. Crystal structure of the stimulatory complex of GTP cyclohydrolase I and its feedback regulatory protein GFRP.

    PubMed

    Maita, Nobuo; Okada, Kengo; Hatakeyama, Kazuyuki; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2002-02-05

    In the presence of phenylalanine, GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) forms a stimulatory 360-kDa complex with GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCHI), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin. The crystal structure of the stimulatory complex reveals that the GTPCHI decamer is sandwiched by two GFRP homopentamers. Each GFRP pentamer forms a symmetrical five-membered ring similar to beta-propeller. Five phenylalanine molecules are buried inside each interface between GFRP and GTPCHI, thus enhancing the binding of these proteins. The complex structure suggests that phenylalanine-induced GTPCHI x GFRP complex formation enhances GTPCHI activity by locking the enzyme in the active state.

  6. Effect of thiostrepton and 3'-terminal fragments of aminoacyl-tRNA on EF-Tu and ribosome-dependent GTP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Bhuta, P; Chládek, S

    1982-08-30

    The effect of the antibiotics thiostrepton and micrococcin on EF-Tu-catalyzed (ribosome-dependent) GTP hydrolysis in the presence of A-Phe, C-A-Phe, or C-C-A-Phe (related to the sequence of the 3'-terminus of aminoacyl-tRNA)(System I) or by methanol ('uncoupled GTPase', System II) was investigated. In System I, thiostrepton increases the binding affinities of the effectors to the EF-Tu.GTP.70 S ribosome complex, as well as the extent of the GTP hydrolysis, while the KmGTP is virtually unchanged. Similarly, in the uncoupled system (System II) and in the absence of effectors, thiostrepton significantly increases VmaxGTP, whereas KmGTP remains unaffected. Micrococcin is without any effect in both systems. The 'uncoupled GTPase' (in System II) is also strongly inhibited by C-A-Phe. The results indicate the crucial role of the EF-Tu site which binds the aminoacylated C-C-A terminus of aminoacyl-tRNA in promoting GTP hydrolysis. It follows that the binding of the model effectors (such as C-C-A-Phe) to that site is favorably influenced by the interaction of thiostrepton with the 50 S ribosomal subunit, whereas thiostrepton, per se, does not influence the affinity of EF-Tu for GTP.

  7. Factors affecting binding of galacto ligands to Actinomyces viscosus lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Heeb, M J; Marini, A M; Gabriel, O

    1985-01-01

    The specificity requirements for the binding of Actinomyces viscosus T14V were examined by testing simple sugars, oligopeptides, and glycoproteins as inhibitors of the aggregation of glycoprotein-coated latex beads and washed A. viscosus cells. Lactose was the most inhibitory simple sugar; D-fucose and D-galactose were equally inhibitory, methyl-alpha-D-fucoside was slightly less inhibitory, and L-fucose and raffinose were not inhibitory. The concentration of galactose residues required for 50% inhibition of aggregation was 15 times higher in the form of lactose than in the form of asialoglycoprotein, suggesting an enhancement of lectin binding when galactose residues are clustered. However, when the inhibitory power of bi-, tri-, and tetraantennary asialooligopeptides of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein was compared with that of equivalent concentrations of galactose in the form of lactose, the biantennary form was slightly less effective than lactose, the triantennary form was approximately as effective as lactose, and the tetraantennary form was slightly more effective than lactose. Steric interference may prevent this type of clustering from enhancing lectin binding. The O-linked asialooligopeptides of asialofetuin were 10 times more inhibitory than an equivalent concentration of galactose in the form of N-linked asialooligopeptides. Thus, galactose beta-1----3 linked to N-acetylgalactosamine exhibits greater specificity for the A. viscosus lectin than does galactose beta-1----4 linked to N-acetylglucosamine. These results, taken together with previously reported data, are consistent with a lectin of low affinity, binding enhanced by multivalency, and specificity for beta-linked galactose. PMID:2578122

  8. Mechanism and catalytic strategy of the prokaryotic specific GTP cyclohydrolase IB

    PubMed Central

    Paranagama, Naduni; Bonnett, Shilah A.; Alvarez, Jonathan; Luthra, Amit; Stec, Boguslaw; Gustafson, Andrew; Iwata-Reuyl, Dirk; Swairjo, Manal A.

    2017-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I catalyzes the first step in folic acid biosynthesis in bacteria and plants, biopterin biosynthesis in mammals, and the biosynthesis of 7-deazaguanosine modified tRNA nucleosides in bacteria and archaea. The type IB GTP cyclohydrolase (GCYH-IB) is a prokaryotic-specific enzyme found in a number of pathogens. GCYH-IB is structurally distinct from the canonical type IA GTP cyclohydrolase involved in biopterin biosynthesis in humans and animals, and thus is of interest as a potential antibacterial drug target. We report kinetic and inhibition data of Neisseria gonorrhoeae GCYH-IB, and two high-resolution crystal structures of the enzyme; one in complex with the reaction intermediate analog and competitive inhibitor 8-oxo-GTP, and one with a TRIS molecule bound in the active site and mimicking another reaction intermediate. Comparison with the type IA enzyme bound to 8-oxo-GTP reveals an inverted mode of binding of the inhibitor ribosyl moiety and, together with site-directed mutagenesis data, shows that the two enzymes utilize different strategies for catalysis. Notably, the inhibitor interacts with a conserved active site Cys149, and this residue is S-nitrosylated in the structures. This is the first structural characterization of a biologically S-nitrosylated bacterial protein. Mutagenesis and biochemical analyses demonstrate that Cys149 is essential for the cyclohydrolase reaction, and S-nitrosylation maintains enzyme activity, suggesting a potential role of the S-nitrosothiol in catalysis. PMID:28126741

  9. Mechanism and catalytic strategy of the prokaryotic specific GTP cyclohydrolase IB.

    PubMed

    Paranagama, Naduni; Bonnett, Shilah A; Alvarez, Jonathan; Luthra, Amit; Stec, Boguslaw; Gustafson, Andrew; Iwata-Reuyl, Dirk; Swairjo, Manal

    2017-01-26

    GTP cyclohydrolase I catalyzes the first step in folic acid biosynthesis in bacteria and plants, biopterin biosynthesis in mammals, and the biosynthesis of 7-deazaguanosine modified tRNA nucleosides in bacteria and archaea.  The type IB GTP cyclohydrolase (GCYH-IB) is a prokaryotic-specific enzyme found in a number of pathogens. GCYH-IB is structurally distinct from the canonical type IA GTP cyclohydrolase involved in biopterin biosynthesis in humans and animals, and thus is of interest as a potential antibacterial drug target.  We report kinetic and inhibition data of Neisseria gonorrhoeae GCYH-IB, and two high-resolution crystal structures of the enzyme; one in complex with the reaction intermediate analog and competitive inhibitor 8-oxo-GTP, and one with a TRIS molecule bound in the active site and mimicking another reaction intermediate. Comparison with the type IA enzyme bound to 8-oxo-GTP reveals an inverted mode of binding of the inhibitor ribosyl moiety and, together with site-directed mutagenesis data, shows that the two enzymes utilize different strategies for catalysis. Notably, the inhibitor interacts with a conserved active site Cys149, and this residue is S-nitrosylated in the structures. This is the first structural characterization of a biologically S-nitrosylated bacterial protein. Mutagenesis and biochemical analyses demonstrate that Cys149 is essential for the cyclohydrolase reaction, and S-nitrosylation maintains enzyme activity, suggesting a potential role of the S-nitrosothiol in catalysis.

  10. Structure of a GTP-dependent Bacterial PEP-carboxykinase from Corynebacterium glutamicum

    SciTech Connect

    Aich, Sanjukta; Prasad, Lata; Delbaere, Louis T.J.

    2008-06-23

    GTP-dependent phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) is the key enzyme that controls the blood glucose level during fasting in higher animals. Here we report the first substrate-free structure of a GTP-dependent phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase from a bacterium, Corynebacterium glutamicum (CgPCK). The protein crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1} with four molecules per asymmetric unit. The 2.3 {angstrom} resolution structure was solved by molecular replacement using the human cytosolic PCK (hcPCK) structure (PDB ID: 1KHF) as the starting model. The four molecules in the asymmetric unit pack as two dimers, and is an artifact of crystal packing. However, the P-loop and the guanine binding loop of the substrate-free CgPCK structure have different conformations from the other published GTP-specific PCK structures, which all have bound substrates and/or metal ions. It appears that a change in the P-loop and guanine binding loop conformation is necessary for substrate binding in GTP-specific PCKs, as opposed to overall domain movement in ATP-specific PCKs.

  11. GTP promotes the formation of early-import intermediates but is not required during the translocation step of protein import into chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.E.; Keegstra, K.; Froehlich, J.E.

    1999-09-01

    Protein import into chloroplasts is an energy-requiring process mediated by a pertinacious import apparatus. Although previous work has shown that low levels of ATP or GTP can support precursor binding, the role of GTP during the import process remains unclear. Specifically, it is unknown whether GTP plays a separate role from ATP during the early stages of protein import and whether GTP has any role in the later stages of transport. The authors investigated the role of GTP during the various stages of protein import into chloroplasts by using purified GTP analogs and an in vitro import assay. GTP, GDP, the nonhydrolyzable analog GMP-PNP, and the slowly hydrolyzable analogs guanosine 5{prime}-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) and guanosine 5{prime}-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) were used in this study. Chromatographically purified 5{prime}-guanylyl-imido-diphosphate and guanosine 5{prime}-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) were found to inhibit the formation of early-import intermediates, even in the presence of ATP. The authors also observed that GTP does not play a role during the translocation of precursors from the intermediate state. They conclude that GTP hydrolysis influences events leading to the formation of early-import intermediates, but not subsequent steps such as precursor translocation.

  12. Nuclear Ras2-GTP controls invasive growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Broggi, Serena; Martegani, Enzo; Colombo, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Using an eGFP-RBD3 probe, which specifically binds Ras-GTP, we recently showed that the fluorescent probe was localized to the plasma membrane and to the nucleus in wild type cells growing exponentially on glucose medium, indicating the presence of active Ras in these cellular compartments. To investigate the nuclear function of Ras-GTP, we generated a strain where Ras2 is fused to the nuclear export signal (NES) from the HIV virus, in order to exclude this protein from the nucleus. Our results show that nuclear active Ras2 is required for invasive growth development in haploid yeast, while the expression of the NES-Ras2 protein does not cause growth defects either on fermentable or non-fermentable carbon sources and does not influence protein kinase A (PKA) activity related phenotypes analysed. Moreover, we show that the cAMP/PKA pathway controls invasive growth influencing the localization of active Ras. In particular, we show that PKA activity plays a role in the localization of active Ras and influences the ability of the cells to invade the agar: high PKA activity leads to a predominant nuclear accumulation of active Ras and induces invasive growth, while low PKA activity leads to plasma membrane localization of active Ras and to a defective invasive growth phenotype.

  13. Nuclear Ras2-GTP Controls Invasive Growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Broggi, Serena; Martegani, Enzo; Colombo, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Using an eGFP-RBD3 probe, which specifically binds Ras-GTP, we recently showed that the fluorescent probe was localized to the plasma membrane and to the nucleus in wild type cells growing exponentially on glucose medium, indicating the presence of active Ras in these cellular compartments. To investigate the nuclear function of Ras-GTP, we generated a strain where Ras2 is fused to the nuclear export signal (NES) from the HIV virus, in order to exclude this protein from the nucleus. Our results show that nuclear active Ras2 is required for invasive growth development in haploid yeast, while the expression of the NES-Ras2 protein does not cause growth defects either on fermentable or non-fermentable carbon sources and does not influence protein kinase A (PKA) activity related phenotypes analysed. Moreover, we show that the cAMP/PKA pathway controls invasive growth influencing the localization of active Ras. In particular, we show that PKA activity plays a role in the localization of active Ras and influences the ability of the cells to invade the agar: high PKA activity leads to a predominant nuclear accumulation of active Ras and induces invasive growth, while low PKA activity leads to plasma membrane localization of active Ras and to a defective invasive growth phenotype. PMID:24244466

  14. Initiation factor IF2, thiostrepton and micrococcin prevent the binding of elongation factor G to the Escherichia coli ribosome.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Dale M; Thompson, Jill; March, Paul E; Dahlberg, Albert E

    2002-05-24

    The bacterial translational GTPases (initiation factor IF2, elongation factors EF-G and EF-Tu and release factor RF3) are involved in all stages of translation, and evidence indicates that they bind to overlapping sites on the ribosome, whereupon GTP hydrolysis is triggered. We provide evidence for a common ribosomal binding site for EF-G and IF2. IF2 prevents the binding of EF-G to the ribosome, as shown by Western blot analysis and fusidic acid-stabilized EF-G.GDP.ribosome complex formation. Additionally, IF2 inhibits EF-G-dependent GTP hydrolysis on 70 S ribosomes. The antibiotics thiostrepton and micrococcin, which bind to part of the EF-G binding site and interfere with the function of the factor, also affect the function of IF2. While thiostrepton is a strong inhibitor of EF-G-dependent GTP hydrolysis, GTP hydrolysis by IF2 is stimulated by the drug. Micrococcin stimulates GTP hydrolysis by both factors. We show directly that these drugs act by destabilizing the interaction of EF-G with the ribosome, and provide evidence that they have similar effects on IF2.

  15. Role of GTP-CHI links PAH and TH in melanin synthesis in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Wang, Jiying; Li, Haiyin; Li, Yan; Chen, Peng; Li, Tian; Chen, Xi; Xiao, Junjie; Zhang, Liang

    2015-08-10

    In insects, pigment patterns are formed by melanin, ommochromes, and pteridines. Here, the effects of pteridine synthesis on melanin formation were studied using 4th instar larvae of a wild-type silkworm strain, dazao (Bombyx mori), with normal color and markings. Results from injected larvae and in vitro integument culture indicated that decreased activity of guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase I (GTP-CH I, a rate-limiting enzyme for pteridine synthesis), lowers BH4 (6R-l-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin, a production correlated with GTP-CH I activity) levels and eliminates markings and coloration. The conversion of phenylalanine and tyrosine to melanin was prevented when GTP-CH I was inhibited. When BH4 was added, phenylalanine was converted to tyrosine, and the tyrosine concentration increased. Tyrosine was then converted to melanin to create normal markings and coloration. Decreasing GTP-CH I activity did not affect L-DOPA (3,4-l-dihydroxyphenylalanine). GTP-CH I affected melanin synthesis by generating the BH4 used in two key reaction steps: (1) conversion of phenylalanine to tyrosine by PAH (phenylalanine hydroxylase) and (2) conversion of tyrosine to L-DOPA by TH (tyrosine hydroxylase). Expression profiles of BmGTPCH Ia, BmGTPCH Ib, BmTH, and BmPAH in the integument were consistent with the current findings.

  16. GTP hydrolysis by EF-G synchronizes tRNA movement on small and large ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Holtkamp, Wolf; Cunha, Carlos E; Peske, Frank; Konevega, Andrey L; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V

    2014-01-01

    Elongation factor G (EF-G) promotes the movement of two tRNAs and the mRNA through the ribosome in each cycle of peptide elongation. During translocation, the tRNAs transiently occupy intermediate positions on both small (30S) and large (50S) ribosomal subunits. How EF-G and GTP hydrolysis control these movements is still unclear. We used fluorescence labels that specifically monitor movements on either 30S or 50S subunits in combination with EF-G mutants and translocation-specific antibiotics to investigate timing and energetics of translocation. We show that EF-G–GTP facilitates synchronous movements of peptidyl-tRNA on the two subunits into an early post-translocation state, which resembles a chimeric state identified by structural studies. EF-G binding without GTP hydrolysis promotes only partial tRNA movement on the 50S subunit. However, rapid 30S translocation and the concomitant completion of 50S translocation require GTP hydrolysis and a functional domain 4 of EF-G. Our results reveal two distinct modes for utilizing the energy of EF-G binding and GTP hydrolysis and suggest that coupling of GTP hydrolysis to translocation is mediated through rearrangements of the 30S subunit. PMID:24614227

  17. Protein-Binding RNA Aptamers Affect Molecular Interactions Distantly from Their Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Daniel M.; Thuesen, Cathrine K.; Bøtkjær, Kenneth A.; Behrens, Manja A.; Dam, Karen; Sørensen, Hans P.; Pedersen, Jan S.; Ploug, Michael; Jensen, Jan K.; Andreasen, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamer selection is a powerful strategy for the development of regulatory agents for molecular intervention. Accordingly, aptamers have proven their diligence in the intervention with serine protease activities, which play important roles in physiology and pathophysiology. Nonetheless, there are only a few studies on the molecular basis underlying aptamer-protease interactions and the associated mechanisms of inhibition. In the present study, we use site-directed mutagenesis to delineate the binding sites of two 2´-fluoropyrimidine RNA aptamers (upanap-12 and upanap-126) with therapeutic potential, both binding to the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). We determine the subsequent impact of aptamer binding on the well-established molecular interactions (plasmin, PAI-1, uPAR, and LRP-1A) controlling uPA activities. One of the aptamers (upanap-126) binds to the area around the C-terminal α-helix in pro-uPA, while the other aptamer (upanap-12) binds to both the β-hairpin of the growth factor domain and the kringle domain of uPA. Based on the mapping studies, combined with data from small-angle X-ray scattering analysis, we construct a model for the upanap-12:pro-uPA complex. The results suggest and highlight that the size and shape of an aptamer as well as the domain organization of a multi-domain protein such as uPA, may provide the basis for extensive sterical interference with protein ligand interactions considered distant from the aptamer binding site. PMID:25793507

  18. Nonconsensus Protein Binding to Repetitive DNA Sequence Elements Significantly Affects Eukaryotic Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Barber-Zucker, Shiran; Gordân, Raluca; Lukatsky, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome-wide experiments in different eukaryotic genomes provide an unprecedented view of transcription factor (TF) binding locations and of nucleosome occupancy. These experiments revealed that a large fraction of TF binding events occur in regions where only a small number of specific TF binding sites (TFBSs) have been detected. Furthermore, in vitro protein-DNA binding measurements performed for hundreds of TFs indicate that TFs are bound with wide range of affinities to different DNA sequences that lack known consensus motifs. These observations have thus challenged the classical picture of specific protein-DNA binding and strongly suggest the existence of additional recognition mechanisms that affect protein-DNA binding preferences. We have previously demonstrated that repetitive DNA sequence elements characterized by certain symmetries statistically affect protein-DNA binding preferences. We call this binding mechanism nonconsensus protein-DNA binding in order to emphasize the point that specific consensus TFBSs do not contribute to this effect. In this paper, using the simple statistical mechanics model developed previously, we calculate the nonconsensus protein-DNA binding free energy for the entire C. elegans and D. melanogaster genomes. Using the available chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) results on TF-DNA binding preferences for ~100 TFs, we show that DNA sequences characterized by low predicted free energy of nonconsensus binding have statistically higher experimental TF occupancy and lower nucleosome occupancy than sequences characterized by high free energy of nonconsensus binding. This is in agreement with our previous analysis performed for the yeast genome. We suggest therefore that nonconsensus protein-DNA binding assists the formation of nucleosome-free regions, as TFs outcompete nucleosomes at genomic locations with enhanced nonconsensus binding. In addition, here we perform a new, large-scale analysis using

  19. Nonconsensus Protein Binding to Repetitive DNA Sequence Elements Significantly Affects Eukaryotic Genomes.

    PubMed

    Afek, Ariel; Cohen, Hila; Barber-Zucker, Shiran; Gordân, Raluca; Lukatsky, David B

    2015-08-01

    Recent genome-wide experiments in different eukaryotic genomes provide an unprecedented view of transcription factor (TF) binding locations and of nucleosome occupancy. These experiments revealed that a large fraction of TF binding events occur in regions where only a small number of specific TF binding sites (TFBSs) have been detected. Furthermore, in vitro protein-DNA binding measurements performed for hundreds of TFs indicate that TFs are bound with wide range of affinities to different DNA sequences that lack known consensus motifs. These observations have thus challenged the classical picture of specific protein-DNA binding and strongly suggest the existence of additional recognition mechanisms that affect protein-DNA binding preferences. We have previously demonstrated that repetitive DNA sequence elements characterized by certain symmetries statistically affect protein-DNA binding preferences. We call this binding mechanism nonconsensus protein-DNA binding in order to emphasize the point that specific consensus TFBSs do not contribute to this effect. In this paper, using the simple statistical mechanics model developed previously, we calculate the nonconsensus protein-DNA binding free energy for the entire C. elegans and D. melanogaster genomes. Using the available chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) results on TF-DNA binding preferences for ~100 TFs, we show that DNA sequences characterized by low predicted free energy of nonconsensus binding have statistically higher experimental TF occupancy and lower nucleosome occupancy than sequences characterized by high free energy of nonconsensus binding. This is in agreement with our previous analysis performed for the yeast genome. We suggest therefore that nonconsensus protein-DNA binding assists the formation of nucleosome-free regions, as TFs outcompete nucleosomes at genomic locations with enhanced nonconsensus binding. In addition, here we perform a new, large-scale analysis using

  20. The RanGTP Pathway: From Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Transport to Spindle Assembly and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Cavazza, Tommaso; Vernos, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase Ran regulates the interaction of transport receptors with a number of cellular cargo proteins. The high affinity binding of the GTP-bound form of Ran to import receptors promotes cargo release, whereas its binding to export receptors stabilizes their interaction with the cargo. This basic mechanism linked to the asymmetric distribution of the two nucleotide-bound forms of Ran between the nucleus and the cytoplasm generates a switch like mechanism controlling nucleo-cytoplasmic transport. Since 1999, we have known that after nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD) Ran and the above transport receptors also provide a local control over the activity of factors driving spindle assembly and regulating other aspects of cell division. The identification and functional characterization of RanGTP mitotic targets is providing novel insights into mechanisms essential for cell division. Here we review our current knowledge on the RanGTP system and its regulation and we focus on the recent advances made through the characterization of its mitotic targets. We then briefly review the novel functions of the pathway that were recently described. Altogether, the RanGTP system has moonlighting functions exerting a spatial control over protein interactions that drive specific functions depending on the cellular context. PMID:26793706

  1. Measuring Ras-family GTP levels in vivo--running hot and cold.

    PubMed

    Castro, Ariel F; Rebhun, John F; Quilliam, Lawrence A

    2005-10-01

    The detection of Ras-family GTPase activity is important in the determination of cell signaling events elicited by numerous ligands and cellular processes. This has been made much easier in recent years by the use of glutathione S-transferase (GST)-fused Ras binding domains. These domains from downstream effectors such as Raf and RalGDS preferentially bind the GTP-bound Ras proteins enabling their extraction and subsequent quantification by immunoblotting. Despite this advance, effectors that efficiently discriminate between GTP- and GDP-bound states are not available for many Ras-family members. While this hampers the ability to detect activity in tissue specimens, it is still possible to metabolically label cells with (32)Pi to load the GTP/GDP pool with labeled nucleotides, immunoprecipitate the Ras protein and detect the bound label following thin layer chromatographic separation and exposure to film or a phosphorimager. Using a transfection system and antibodies that recognize epitope tags one can test the ability of a protein to work as a GEF or GAP for a certain GTPase. Alternatively, if an immunoprecipitating antibody is available to the target GTPase, then analysis of endogenous GTP/GDP ratio is possible. Here we describe the detection of M-Ras and Rap1 activity by GST-RBD pull-down as well as that of Rheb and epitope-tagged R-Ras by classical metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation.

  2. Arabidopsis AtADF1 is functionally affected by mutations on actin binding sites.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chun-Hai; Tang, Wei-Ping; Liu, Jia-Yao

    2013-03-01

    The plant actin depolymerizing factor (ADF) binds to both monomeric and filamentous actin, and is directly involved in the depolymerization of actin filaments. To better understand the actin binding sites of the Arabidopsis thaliana L. AtADF1, we generated mutants of AtADF1 and investigated their functions in vitro and in vivo. Analysis of mutants harboring amino acid substitutions revealed that charged residues (Arg98 and Lys100) located at the α-helix 3 and forming an actin binding site together with the N-terminus are essential for both G- and F-actin binding. The basic residues on the β-strand 5 (K82/A) and the α-helix 4 (R135/A, R137/A) form another actin binding site that is important for F-actin binding. Using transient expression of CFP-tagged AtADF1 mutant proteins in onion (Allium cepa) peel epidermal cells and transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana L. plants overexpressing these mutants, we analyzed how these mutant proteins regulate actin organization and affect seedling growth. Our results show that the ADF mutants with a lower affinity for actin filament binding can still be functional, unless the affinity for actin monomers is also affected. The G-actin binding activity of the ADF plays an essential role in actin binding, depolymerization of actin polymers, and therefore in the control of actin organization. © 2012 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  3. Identification of cDNA encoding an additional. alpha. subunit of a human GTP-binding protein: Expression of three. alpha. sub i subtypes in human tissues and cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Ang, S.L.; Bloch, D.B.; Bloch, K.D.; Kawahara, Y.; Tolman, C.; Lee, R.; Seidman, J.G.; Neer, E.J. )

    1988-06-01

    The guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins), which mediate hormonal regulation of many membrane functions, are composed of {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} subunits. The authors have cloned and characterized cDNA from a human T-cell library encoding a form of {alpha}{sub i} that is different from the human {alpha}{sub i} subtypes previously reported. {alpha}{sub i} is the {alpha} subunit of a class of G proteins that inhibits adenylate cyclase and regulates other enzymes and ion channels. This cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 354 amino acids and is assigned to encode the {alpha}{sub i-3} subtype of G proteins on the basis of its similarity to other {alpha}{sub i}-like cDNAs and the presence of a predicted site for ADP ribosylation by pertussis toxin. They have determined the expression of mRNA for this and two other subtypes of human {alpha}{sub i} ({alpha}{sub i-1} and {alpha}{sub i-2}) in a variety of human fetal tissues and in human cell lines. All three {alpha}{sub i} subtypes were present in the tissues tested. However, analysis of individual cell types reveals specificity of {alpha}{sub i-1} expression. mRNA for {alpha}{i-1} is absent in T cells, B cells, and monocytes but is present in other cell lines. The finding of differential expression of {alpha}{sub i-1} genes may permit characterization of distinct physiological roles for this {alpha}{sub i} subunit. mRNA for {alpha}{sub i-2} and {alpha}{sub i-3} was found in all the primary and transformed cell lines tested. Thus, some cells contain all three {alpha}{sub i} subtypes. This observation raises the question of how cells prevent cross talk among receptors that are coupled to effectors through such similar {alpha} proteins.

  4. Diethyl pyrocarbonate reaction with the lactose repressor protein affects both inducer and DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sams, C.F.; Matthews, K.S.

    1988-04-05

    Modification of the lactose repressor protein of Escherichia coli with diethyl pyrocarbonate (DPC) results in decreased inducer binding as well as operator and nonspecific DNA binding. Spectrophotometric measurements indicated a maximum of three histidines per subunit was modified, and quantitation of lysine residues with trinitrobenzenesulfonate revealed the modification of one lysine residue. The loss of DNA binding, both operator and nonspecific, was correlated with histidine modification; removal of the carbethoxy groups from the histidines by hydroxylamine was accompanied by significant recovery of DNA binding function. The presence of inducing sugars during the DPC reaction had no effect on histidine modification or the loss of DNA binding activity. In contrast, inducer binding was not recovered upon reversal of the histidine modification. However, the presence of inducer during reaction protected lysine from reaction and also prevented the decrease in inducer binding; these results indicate that reaction of the lysine residue(s) may correlate to the loss of sugar binding activity. Since no difference in incorporation of radiolabeled carbethoxy was observed following reaction with diethyl pyrocarbonate in the presence or absence of inducer, the reagent appears to function as a catalyst in the modification of the lysine. The formation of an amide bond between the affected lysine and a nearby carboxylic acid moiety provides a possible mechanism for the activity loss. Reaction of the isolated NH2-terminal domain resulted in loss of DNA binding with modification of the single histidine at position 29. Results from the modification of core domain paralleled observations with intact repressor.

  5. Structural basis unifying diverse GTP hydrolysis mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Anand, Baskaran; Majumdar, Soneya; Prakash, Balaji

    2013-02-12

    Central to biological processes is the regulation rendered by GTPases. Until recently, the GTP hydrolysis mechanism, exemplified by Ras-family (and G-α) GTPases, was thought to be universal. This mechanism utilizes a conserved catalytic Gln supplied "in cis" from the GTPase and an arginine finger "in trans" from a GAP (GTPase activating protein) to stabilize the transition state. However, intriguingly different mechanisms are operative in structurally similar GTPases. MnmE and dynamin like cation-dependent GTPases lack the catalytic Gln and instead employ a Glu/Asp/Ser situated elsewhere and in place of the arginine finger use a K(+) or Na(+) ion. In contrast, Rab33 possesses the Gln but does not utilize it for catalysis; instead, the GAP supplies both a catalytic Gln and an arginine finger in trans. Deciphering the underlying principles that unify seemingly unrelated mechanisms is central to understanding how diverse mechanisms evolve. Here, we recognize that steric hindrance between active site residues is a criterion governing the mechanism employed by a given GTPase. The Arf-ArfGAP structure is testimony to this concept of spatial (in)compatibility of active site residues. This understanding allows us to predict an as yet unreported hydrolysis mechanism and clarifies unexplained observations about catalysis by Rab11 and the need for HAS-GTPases to employ a different mechanism. This understanding would be valuable for experiments in which abolishing GTP hydrolysis or generating constitutively active forms of a GTPase is important.

  6. rhoB encoding a UV-inducible Ras-related small GTP-binding protein is regulated by GTPases of the Rho family and independent of JNK, ERK, and p38 MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Fritz, G; Kaina, B

    1997-12-05

    The small GTPase RhoB is immediate-early inducible by DNA damaging treatments and thus part of the early response of eukaryotic cells to genotoxic stress. To investigate the regulation of this cellular response, we isolated the gene for rhoB from a mouse genomic library. Sequence analysis of the rhoB gene showed that its coding region does not contain introns. The promoter region of rhoB harbors regulatory elements such as TATA, CAAT, and Sp1 boxes but not consensus sequences for AP-1, Elk-1, or c-Jun/ATF-2. The rhoB promoter was activated by UV irradiation, but not by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment. rhoB promoter deletion constructs revealed a fragment of 0.17 kilobases in size which was sufficient in eliciting the UV response. This minimal promoter fragment contains TATA and CAAT boxes but no other known regulatory elements. Neither MEK inhibitor PD98059 nor p38 kinase inhibitor SB203580 blocked stimulation of rhoB by UVC (UV light, 254 nm) which indicates that ERK or p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase are not involved in the UV induction of rhoB. Also, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin, which blocks UV stimulation of both JNK and p38 MAP kinase, did not inhibit rhoB activation. Furthermore, activation of JNK by interleukin-1beta did not affect rhoB expression. These data indicate that JNK is not involved in the regulation of rhoB. Overexpression of wild-type Rac as well as the Rho guanine-dissociation inhibitor caused activation of rhoB. Wild-type RhoB inhibited both basal and UV-stimulated rhoB promoter activity, indicating a negative regulatory feedback by RhoB itself. The data provide evidence both for a signal transduction pathway independent of JNK, ERK, and p38 MAP kinase to be involved in the induction of rhoB by genotoxic stress, and furthermore, indicate autoregulation of rhoB.

  7. Fluoroaluminate treatment of rat liver microsomes inhibits GTP-dependent vesicle fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Comerford, J G; Dawson, A P

    1991-01-01

    1. Inhibition of GTP-dependent membrane fusion of rat liver microsomes requires preincubation of the membranes with GDP (17 microM) and relatively high Mg2+ concentration (0.5 mM) as well as AlCl3 (30 microM) and KF (5 mM). Preincubation is required for maximal inhibition (75%). 2. Vesicle fusion in rat liver microsomes has been demonstrated in the absence of polyethylene glycol (PEG). Further, inhibition by AlF4- of GTP-dependent vesicle fusion in the absence of PEG has been demonstrated. 3. Under similar preincubation conditions AlF4- can bring about inhibition (80%) of the high-affinity PEG-stimulated GTPase activity in rat liver microsomes, previously described by Nicchitta, Joseph & Williamson [(1986) FEBS Lett. 209, 243-248]. 4. Preincubation of small-Mr GTP-binding proteins (Gn proteins) on nitrocellulose strips with GDP (20 pM), AlCl3 (30 microM) and KF (5 mM) results in inhibition of binding of guanosine 5'-[gamma-[35S]thio]triphosphate to Gn proteins. The extent of inhibition of this binding differs for different Gn proteins. PMID:1747106

  8. Integration of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Steady-state Kinetics and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Gαi1 Distinguishes between the GTP Hydrolysis and GDP Release Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Schröter, Grit; Mann, Daniel; Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus

    2015-07-10

    Gα subunits are central molecular switches in cells. They are activated by G protein-coupled receptors that exchange GDP for GTP, similar to small GTPase activation mechanisms. Gα subunits are turned off by GTP hydrolysis. For the first time we employed time-resolved FTIR difference spectroscopy to investigate the molecular reaction mechanisms of Gαi1. FTIR spectroscopy is a powerful tool that monitors reactions label free with high spatio-temporal resolution. In contrast to common multiple turnover assays, FTIR spectroscopy depicts the single turnover GTPase reaction without nucleotide exchange/Mg(2+) binding bias. Global fit analysis resulted in one apparent rate constant of 0.02 s(-1) at 15 °C. Isotopic labeling was applied to assign the individual phosphate vibrations for α-, β-, and γ-GTP (1243, 1224, and 1156 cm(-1), respectively), α- and β-GDP (1214 and 1134/1103 cm(-1), respectively), and free phosphate (1078/991 cm(-1)). In contrast to Ras · GAP catalysis, the bond breakage of the β-γ-phosphate but not the Pi release is rate-limiting in the GTPase reaction. Complementary common GTPase assays were used. Reversed phase HPLC provided multiple turnover rates and tryptophan fluorescence provided nucleotide exchange rates. Experiments were complemented by molecular dynamics simulations. This broad approach provided detailed insights at atomic resolution and allows now to identify key residues of Gαi1 in GTP hydrolysis and nucleotide exchange. Mutants of the intrinsic arginine finger (Gαi1-R178S) affected exclusively the hydrolysis reaction. The effect of nucleotide binding (Gαi1-D272N) and Ras-like/all-α interface coordination (Gαi1-D229N/Gαi1-D231N) on the nucleotide exchange reaction was furthermore elucidated.

  9. Integration of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Steady-state Kinetics and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Gαi1 Distinguishes between the GTP Hydrolysis and GDP Release Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Schröter, Grit; Mann, Daniel; Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Gα subunits are central molecular switches in cells. They are activated by G protein-coupled receptors that exchange GDP for GTP, similar to small GTPase activation mechanisms. Gα subunits are turned off by GTP hydrolysis. For the first time we employed time-resolved FTIR difference spectroscopy to investigate the molecular reaction mechanisms of Gαi1. FTIR spectroscopy is a powerful tool that monitors reactions label free with high spatio-temporal resolution. In contrast to common multiple turnover assays, FTIR spectroscopy depicts the single turnover GTPase reaction without nucleotide exchange/Mg2+ binding bias. Global fit analysis resulted in one apparent rate constant of 0.02 s−1 at 15 °C. Isotopic labeling was applied to assign the individual phosphate vibrations for α-, β-, and γ-GTP (1243, 1224, and 1156 cm−1, respectively), α- and β-GDP (1214 and 1134/1103 cm−1, respectively), and free phosphate (1078/991 cm−1). In contrast to Ras·GAP catalysis, the bond breakage of the β-γ-phosphate but not the Pi release is rate-limiting in the GTPase reaction. Complementary common GTPase assays were used. Reversed phase HPLC provided multiple turnover rates and tryptophan fluorescence provided nucleotide exchange rates. Experiments were complemented by molecular dynamics simulations. This broad approach provided detailed insights at atomic resolution and allows now to identify key residues of Gαi1 in GTP hydrolysis and nucleotide exchange. Mutants of the intrinsic arginine finger (Gαi1-R178S) affected exclusively the hydrolysis reaction. The effect of nucleotide binding (Gαi1-D272N) and Ras-like/all-α interface coordination (Gαi1-D229N/Gαi1-D231N) on the nucleotide exchange reaction was furthermore elucidated. PMID:25979337

  10. Over-expression of GTP-cyclohydrolase 1 feedback regulatory protein attenuates LPS and cytokine-stimulated nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Manasi; Kelly, Peter; Vallance, Patrick; Leiper, James

    2008-02-01

    GTP-cyclohydrolase 1 (GTP-CH1) catalyses the first and rate-limiting step for the de novo production of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)), an essential cofactor for nitric oxide synthase (NOS). The GTP-CH1-BH(4) pathway is emerging as an important regulator in a number of pathologies associated with over-production of nitric oxide (NO) and hence a more detailed understanding of this pathway may lead to novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of certain vascular diseases. GTP-CH1 activity can be inhibited by BH(4) through its protein-protein interactions with GTP-CH1 regulatory protein (GFRP), and transcriptional and post-translational modification of both GTP-CH1 and GFRP have been reported in response to proinflammatory stimuli. However, the functional significance of GFRP/GTP-CH1 interactions on NO pathways has not yet been demonstrated. We aimed to investigate whether over-expression of GFRP could affect NO production in living cells. Over-expression of N-terminally Myc-tagged recombinant human GFRP in the murine endothelial cell line sEnd 1 resulted in no significant effect on basal BH(4) nor NO levels but significantly attenuated the rise in BH(4) and NO observed following lipopolysaccharide and cytokine stimulation of cells. This study demonstrates that GFRP can play a direct regulatory role in iNOS-mediated NO synthesis and suggests that the allosteric regulation of GTP-CH1 activity by GFRP may be an important mechanism regulating BH(4) and NO levels in vivo.

  11. Platelet (/sup 3/H)imipramine binding in affective disorders: trait versus state characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, M.; Barkai, A.; Gruen, R.; Peselow, E.; Fieve, R.R.; Quitkin, F.

    1986-06-01

    Platelet (3H)imipramine binding (Bmax) was determined in 67 patients with major affective illness (33 euthymic bipolar, 34 depressed unipolar) and 58 normal control subjects. Bipolar patients had significantly lower Bmax values than did control subjects. The mean Bmax in the unipolar patients was lower than in the control subjects, but the difference was not statistically significant. Dissociation constant (Kd) values did not distinguish patients in either category from control subjects. The significantly lower Bmax in euthymic bipolar patients and the apparent state independence of Bmax in some but not all unipolar patients suggest that platelet imipramine binding may be a trait marker in a subset of affective disorders.

  12. GTP cyclohydrolase I inhibition by the prototypic inhibitor 2, 4-diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine. Mechanisms and unanticipated role of GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Xie, L; Smith, J A; Gross, S S

    1998-08-14

    2,4-Diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine (DAHP) is considered to be a selective and direct-acting inhibitor of GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH), the first and rate-limiting enzyme in the pathway for synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). Accordingly, DAHP has been widely employed to distinguish whether de novo BH4 synthesis is required in a given biological system. Although it has been assumed that DAHP inhibits GTPCH by direct competition with substrate GTP, this has never been formally demonstrated. In view of apparent structural homology between DAHP and BH4, we questioned whether DAHP may mimic BH4 in its inhibition of GTPCH by an indirect mechanism, involving interaction with a recently cloned 9.5-kDa protein termed GTPCH Feedback Regulatory Protein (GFRP). We show by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction that GFRP mRNA is constitutively expressed in rat aortic smooth muscle cells and further induced by treatment with immunostimulants. Moreover, functional GFRP is expressed and immunostimulant-induced BH4 accumulates in sufficient quantity to trigger feedback inhibition of GTPCH. Studies with DAHP reveal that GFRP is also essential to achieve potent inhibition of GTPCH. Indeed, DAHP inhibits GTPCH by dual mechanisms. At a relatively low concentration, DAHP emulates BH4 and engages the GFRP-dependent feedback inhibitory system; at higher concentrations, DAHP competes directly for binding with GTP substrate. This knowledge predicts that DAHP would preferably target GTPCH in tissues with abundant GFRP.

  13. Binding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebsamen, Werner

    1981-01-01

    Categorizes contemporary methods of binding printed materials in terms of physical preservation--hand binding (archival restoration), edition binding (paperback, hardcover), publication binding (magazines), textbook binding (sidesewn), single-sheet binding (loose-leaf, mechanical), and library binding (oversewn, sidesewn). Seven references are…

  14. Feature binding and affect: emotional modulation of visuo-motor integration.

    PubMed

    Colzato, Lorenza S; van Wouwe, Nelleke C; Hommel, Bernhard

    2007-01-28

    The primate cortex represents the external world in a distributed fashion, which calls for a mechanism that integrates and binds the features of a perceived or processed event. Animal and patients studies provide evidence that feature binding in the visual cortex is driven by the muscarinic-cholinergic system, whereas visuo-motor integration may be under dopaminergic control. Consistent with this scenario, we present indication that the binding of visual and action features is modulated by emotions through the probable stimulation of the dopaminergic system. Interestingly, the impact of emotions on binding was restricted to tasks in which shape was task-relevant, suggesting that extracting affective information is not automatic but requires attention to shape.

  15. GTP and cytosol stimulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis in isolated platelet membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Baldassare, J.J.; Fisher, G.J.

    1986-06-13

    Hydrolysis of polyphosphoinositides by phospholipase C was examined in isolated membranes prepared from (/sup 32/P)labelled platelets. In the presence of guanosine 5'-(3-O)-thiotriphosphate (GTP..gamma..S), thrombin increased the release of inositol triphosphate and inositol biphosphate approximately 500%. GTP..gamma..S alone stimulated release 2 fold. Maximal activation of thrombin-induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis was observed at 10 ..mu..M GTP. Although addition of calcium had no effect, 2 mM EGTA completely inhibited inositolphosphate release. Addition of high speed supernatant to (/sup 32/P)labelled membranes stimulated the release of inositolphosphates. This hydrolysis was further enhanced by the addition of GTP. These data demonstrate that the breakdown of polyphosphoinositides in isolated platelet membranes is dependent on GTP and stimulated by platelet cytosol.

  16. Mechanism of muscarinic receptor-induced K+ channel activation as revealed by hydrolysis-resistant GTP analogues

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The role of a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (Gk) in the coupling between muscarinic receptor activation and opening of an inwardly rectifying K+ channel [IK(M)] was examined in cardiac atrial myocytes, using hydrolysis-resistant GTP analogues. In the absence of muscarinic agonist, GTP analogues produced a membrane current characteristic of IK(M). The initial rate of appearance of this receptor-independent IK(M) was measured for the various analogues in order to explore the kinetic properties of IK(M) activation. We found that IK(M) activation is controlled solely by the intracellular analogue/GTP ratio and not by the absolute concentrations of the nucleotides. Analogues competed with GTP for binding to Gk with the following relative affinities: GTP gamma S greater than GTP greater than GppNHp greater than GppCH2p. At sufficiently high intracellular concentrations, however, all GTP analogues produced the same rate of IK(M) activation. This analogue- independent limiting rate is likely to correspond to the rate of GDP release from inactive, GDP-bound Gk. Muscarinic receptor stimulation by nanomolar concentrations of acetylcholine (ACh), which do not elicit IK(M) under control conditions, catalyzed IK(M) activation in the presence of GTP analogues. The rate of Gk activation by ACh (kACh) was found to be described by the simple relationship kACh = 8.4 X 10(8) min- 1 M-1.[ACh] + 0.44 min-1, the first term of which presumably reflects the agonist-catalyzed rate of GDP release from the Gk.GDP complex, while the second term corresponds to the basal rate of receptor- independent GDP release. Combined with the estimated K0.5 of the IK(M)- [ACh] dose-effect relationship, 160 nM, this result also allowed us to estimate the rate of Gk.GTP hydrolysis, kcat, to be near 135 min-1. These results provide, for the first time, a quantitative description of the salient features of G-protein function in vivo. PMID:2455765

  17. Vibrational structure of GDP and GTP bound to RAS: an isotope-edited FTIR study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, H; Sukal, S; Deng, H; Leyh, T S; Callender, R

    2001-04-03

    A complete vibrational description of the bonding of a ligand to a protein requires the assignment of both symmetric and antisymmetric vibrational modes. The symmetric modes of isotopically enriched enzyme-bound ligands can be obtained by Raman difference spectroscopy, but until now, the antisymmetric modes, which require IR difference spectroscopy, have not been generally accessible. We have developed the methodology needed to perform IR difference spectroscopy, assign the antisymmetric modes, and accurately describe bonding. The method is used to assess the bonding changes that occur as Mg.GDP and Mg.GTP move from solution into the active site of RAS. Binding to RAS opens the nonbridging, O--P--O angle of the gamma-phosphate of GTP by 2.7 degrees, yet the angular freedom (dispersion of the O--P--O angle) of the gamma-phosphate is comparable to that in solution. In contrast, the motion of the beta-phosphate of GDP is highly restricted, suggesting that it positions the gamma-phosphate for nucleophilic attack. The beta,gamma-bridging O-P bond of bound GTP is slightly weakened, being lengthened by 0.005 A in the active site, corresponding to a bond order decrease of 0.012 valence unit (vu). The observed binding changes are consistent with a RAS-mediated hydrolysis mechanism that parallels that for solution hydrolysis.

  18. Ras-GTP dimers activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway

    DOE PAGES

    Nan, Xiaolin; Tamgüney, Tanja M.; Collisson, Eric A.; ...

    2015-06-16

    Rat sarcoma (Ras) GTPases regulate cell proliferation and survival through effector pathways including Raf-MAPK, and are the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. Although it is well established that Ras activity requires binding to both GTP and the membrane, details of how Ras operates on the cell membrane to activate its effectors remain elusive. Efforts to target mutant Ras in human cancers to therapeutic benefit have also been largely unsuccessful. Here we show that Ras-GTP forms dimers to activate MAPK. We used quantitative photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) to analyze the nanoscale spatial organization of PAmCherry1-tagged KRas 4B (hereafter referredmore » to KRas) on the cell membrane under various signaling conditions. We found that at endogenous expression levels KRas forms dimers, and KRasG12D, a mutant that constitutively binds GTP, activates MAPK. Overexpression of KRas leads to formation of higher order Ras nanoclusters. Conversely, at lower expression levels, KRasG12D is monomeric and activates MAPK only when artificially dimerized. Moreover, dimerization and signaling of KRas are both dependent on an intact CAAX (C, cysteine; A, aliphatic; X, any amino acid) motif that is also known to mediate membrane localization. These results reveal a new, dimerization-dependent signaling mechanism of Ras, and suggest Ras dimers as a potential therapeutic target in mutant Ras-driven tumors.« less

  19. Ras-GTP dimers activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Xiaolin; Tamgüney, Tanja M.; Collisson, Eric A.; Lin, Li -Jung; Pitt, Cameron; Galeas, Jacqueline; Lewis, Sophia; Gray, Joe W.; McCormick, Frank; Chu, Steven

    2015-06-16

    Rat sarcoma (Ras) GTPases regulate cell proliferation and survival through effector pathways including Raf-MAPK, and are the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. Although it is well established that Ras activity requires binding to both GTP and the membrane, details of how Ras operates on the cell membrane to activate its effectors remain elusive. Efforts to target mutant Ras in human cancers to therapeutic benefit have also been largely unsuccessful. Here we show that Ras-GTP forms dimers to activate MAPK. We used quantitative photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) to analyze the nanoscale spatial organization of PAmCherry1-tagged KRas 4B (hereafter referred to KRas) on the cell membrane under various signaling conditions. We found that at endogenous expression levels KRas forms dimers, and KRasG12D, a mutant that constitutively binds GTP, activates MAPK. Overexpression of KRas leads to formation of higher order Ras nanoclusters. Conversely, at lower expression levels, KRasG12D is monomeric and activates MAPK only when artificially dimerized. Moreover, dimerization and signaling of KRas are both dependent on an intact CAAX (C, cysteine; A, aliphatic; X, any amino acid) motif that is also known to mediate membrane localization. These results reveal a new, dimerization-dependent signaling mechanism of Ras, and suggest Ras dimers as a potential therapeutic target in mutant Ras-driven tumors.

  20. Seasonal difference in brain serotonin transporter binding predicts symptom severity in patients with seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Mc Mahon, Brenda; Andersen, Sofie B; Madsen, Martin K; Hjordt, Liv V; Hageman, Ida; Dam, Henrik; Svarer, Claus; da Cunha-Bang, Sofi; Baaré, William; Madsen, Jacob; Hasholt, Lis; Holst, Klaus; Frokjaer, Vibe G; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2016-05-01

    Cross-sectional neuroimaging studies in non-depressed individuals have demonstrated an inverse relationship between daylight minutes and cerebral serotonin transporter; this relationship is modified by serotonin-transporter-linked polymorphic region short allele carrier status. We here present data from the first longitudinal investigation of seasonal serotonin transporter fluctuations in both patients with seasonal affective disorder and in healthy individuals. Eighty (11)C-DASB positron emission tomography scans were conducted to quantify cerebral serotonin transporter binding; 23 healthy controls with low seasonality scores and 17 patients diagnosed with seasonal affective disorder were scanned in both summer and winter to investigate differences in cerebral serotonin transporter binding across groups and across seasons. The two groups had similar cerebral serotonin transporter binding in the summer but in their symptomatic phase during winter, patients with seasonal affective disorder had higher serotonin transporter than the healthy control subjects (P = 0.01). Compared to the healthy controls, patients with seasonal affective disorder changed their serotonin transporter significantly less between summer and winter (P < 0.001). Further, the change in serotonin transporter was sex- (P = 0.02) and genotype- (P = 0.04) dependent. In the patients with seasonal affective disorder, the seasonal change in serotonin transporter binding was positively associated with change in depressive symptom severity, as indexed by Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression - Seasonal Affective Disorder version scores (P = 0.01). Our findings suggest that the development of depressive symptoms in winter is associated with a failure to downregulate serotonin transporter levels appropriately during exposure to the environmental stress of winter, especially in individuals with high predisposition to affective disorders.media-1vid110.1093/brain/aww043_video_abstractaww043_video_abstract.

  1. Importin-beta is a GDP-to-GTP exchange factor of Ran: implications for the mechanism of nuclear import.

    PubMed

    Lonhienne, Thierry G; Forwood, Jade K; Marfori, Mary; Robin, Gautier; Kobe, Bostjan; Carroll, Bernard J

    2009-08-21

    Ran-GTP interacts strongly with importin-beta, and this interaction promotes the release of the importin-alpha-nuclear localization signal cargo from importin-beta. Ran-GDP also interacts with importin-beta, but this interaction is 4 orders of magnitude weaker than the Ran-GTP.importin-beta interaction. Here we use the yeast complement of nuclear import proteins to show that the interaction between Ran-GDP and importin-beta promotes the dissociation of GDP from Ran. The release of GDP from the Ran-GDP-importin-beta complex stabilizes the complex, which cannot be dissociated by importin-alpha. Although Ran has a higher affinity for GDP compared with GTP, Ran in complex with importin-beta has a higher affinity for GTP. This feature is responsible for the generation of Ran-GTP from Ran-GDP by importin-beta. Ran-binding protein-1 (RanBP1) activates this reaction by forming a trimeric complex with Ran-GDP and importin-beta. Importin-alpha inhibits the GDP exchange reaction by sequestering importin-beta, whereas RanBP1 restores the GDP nucleotide exchange by importin-beta by forming a tetrameric complex with importin-beta, Ran, and importin-alpha. The exchange is also inhibited by nuclear-transport factor-2 (NTF2). We suggest a mechanism for nuclear import, additional to the established RCC1 (Ran-guanine exchange factor)-dependent pathway that incorporates these results.

  2. The constant region affects antigen binding of antibodies to DNA by altering secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yumin; Janda, Alena; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Casadevall, Arturo; Putterman, Chaim

    2013-11-01

    We previously demonstrated an important role of the constant region in the pathogenicity of anti-DNA antibodies. To determine the mechanisms by which the constant region affects autoantibody binding, a panel of isotype-switch variants (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b) was generated from the murine PL9-11 IgG3 autoantibody. The affinity of the PL9-11 antibody panel for histone was measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Tryptophan fluorescence was used to determine wavelength shifts of the antibody panel upon binding to DNA and histone. Finally, circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to measure changes in secondary structure. SPR analysis revealed significant differences in histone binding affinity between members of the PL9-11 panel. The wavelength shifts of tryptophan fluorescence emission were found to be dependent on the antibody isotype, while circular dichroism analysis determined that changes in antibody secondary structure content differed between isotypes upon antigen binding. Thus, the antigen binding affinity is dependent on the particular constant region expressed. Moreover, the effects of antibody binding to antigen were also constant region dependent. Alteration of secondary structures influenced by constant regions may explain differences in fine specificity of anti-DNA antibodies between antibodies with similar variable regions, as well as cross-reactivity of anti-DNA antibodies with non-DNA antigens.

  3. Formation of a Trimeric Xpo1-Ran[GTP]-Ded1 Exportin Complex Modulates ATPase and Helicase Activities of Ded1.

    PubMed

    Hauk, Glenn; Bowman, Gregory D

    2015-01-01

    The DEAD-box RNA helicase Ded1, which is essential in yeast and known as DDX3 in humans, shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm and takes part in several basic processes including RNA processing and translation. A key interacting partner of Ded1 is the exportin Xpo1, which together with the GTP-bound state of the small GTPase Ran, facilitates unidirectional transport of Ded1 out of the nucleus. Here we demonstrate that Xpo1 and Ran[GTP] together reduce the RNA-stimulated ATPase and helicase activities of Ded1. Binding and inhibition of Ded1 by Xpo1 depend on the affinity of the Ded1 nuclear export sequence (NES) for Xpo1 and the presence of Ran[GTP]. Association with Xpo1/Ran[GTP] reduces RNA-stimulated ATPase activity of Ded1 by increasing the apparent KM for the RNA substrate. Despite the increased KM, the Ded1:Xpo1:Ran[GTP] ternary complex retains the ability to bind single stranded RNA, suggesting that Xpo1/Ran[GTP] may modulate the substrate specificity of Ded1. These results demonstrate that, in addition to transport, exportins such as Xpo1 also have the capability to alter enzymatic activities of their cargo.

  4. Rs2853677 modulates Snail1 binding to the TERT enhancer and affects lung adenocarcinoma susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Yanchao; Zhang, Peng; Yao, Zhi; Ma, Zhenyi; Liu, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have shown that SNPs in non-coding regions are associated with inherited susceptibility to cancer. The effect of one single SNP, however, is weak. To identify potential co-factors of SNPs, we investigated the underlying mechanism by which SNPs affect lung cancer susceptibility. We found that rs2853677 is located within the Snail1 binding site in a TERT enhancer. This enhancer increases TERT transcription when juxtaposed to the TERT promoter. The binding of Snail1 to the enhancer disrupts enhancer-promoter colocalization and silences TERT transcription. The high risk variant of rs2853677 disrupts the Snail1 binding site and derepresses TERT expression in response to Snail1 upregulation, thus increasing lung adenocarcinoma susceptibility. Our data suggest that Snail1 may be a co-factor of rs2853677 for predicting lung adenocarcinoma susceptibility and prognosis. PMID:27191258

  5. Affect influences feature binding in memory: Trading between richness and strength of memory representations.

    PubMed

    Spachtholz, Philipp; Kuhbandner, Christof; Pekrun, Reinhard

    2016-10-01

    Research has shown that long-term memory representations of objects are formed as a natural product of perception even without any intentional memorization. It is not known, however, how rich these representations are in terms of the number of bound object features. In particular, because feature binding rests on resource-limited processes, there may be a context-dependent trade-off between the quantity of stored features and their memory strength. The authors examined whether affective state may bring about such a trade-off. Participants incidentally encoded pictures of real-world objects while experiencing positive or negative affect, and the authors later measured memory for 2 features. Results showed that participants traded between richness and strength of memory representations as a function of affect, with positive affect tuning memory formation toward richness and negative affect tuning memory formation toward strength. These findings demonstrate that memory binding is a flexible process that is modulated by affective state. (PsycINFO Database Record

  6. Mutations in arrestin-3 differentially affect binding to neuropeptide Y receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Luis E; Babilon, Stefanie; Wanka, Lizzy; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G; Gurevich, Vsevolod V

    2014-07-01

    Based on the identification of residues that determine receptor selectivity in arrestins and the phylogenetic analysis of the arrestin (arr) family, we introduced fifteen mutations of receptor-discriminator residues in arr-3, which were identified previously using mutagenesis, in vitro binding, and BRET-based recruitment assay in intact cells. The effects of these mutations were tested using neuropeptide Y receptors Y1R and Y2R. NPY-elicited arr-3 recruitment to Y1R was not affected by these mutations, or even alanine substitution of all ten residues (arr-3-NCA), which prevented arr-3 binding to other receptors tested so far. However, NCA and two other mutations prevented agonist-independent arr-3 pre-docking to Y1R. In contrast, eight out of 15 mutations significantly reduced agonist-dependent arr-3 recruitment to Y2R. NCA eliminated arr-3 binding to active Y2R, whereas Tyr239Thr reduced it ~7-fold. Thus, manipulation of key residues on the receptor-binding surface generates arr-3 with high preference for Y1R over Y2R. Several mutations differentially affect arr-3 pre-docking and agonist-induced recruitment. Thus, arr-3 recruitment to the receptor involves several mechanistically distinct steps. Targeted mutagenesis can fine-tune arrestins directing them to specific receptors and particular activation states of the same receptor.

  7. Mutations in arrestin-3 differentially affect binding to neuropeptide Y receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, Luis E.; Babilon, Stefanie; Wanka, Lizzy; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2014-01-01

    Based on the identification of residues that determine receptor selectivity in arrestins and the phylogenetic analysis of the arrestin (arr) family, we introduced fifteen mutations of receptor-discriminator residues in arr-3, which were identified previously using mutagenesis, in vitro binding, and BRET-based recruitment assay in intact cells. The effects of these mutations were tested using neuropeptide Y receptors Y1R and Y2R. NPY-elicited arr-3 recruitment to Y1R was not affected by these mutations, or even alanine substitution of all ten residues (arr-3-NCA), which prevented arr-3 binding to other receptors tested so far. However, NCA and two other mutations prevented agonist-independent arr-3 pre-docking to Y1R. In contrast, eight out of 15 mutations significantly reduced agonist-dependent arr-3 recruitment to Y2R. NCA eliminated arr-3 binding to active Y2R, whereas Tyr239Thr reduced it ~7-fold. Thus, manipulation of key residues on the receptor-binding surface generates arr-3 with high preference for Y1R over Y2R. Several mutations differentially affect arr-3 pre-docking and agonist-induced recruitment. Thus, arr-3 recruitment to the receptor involves several mechanistically distinct steps. Targeted mutagenesis can fine-tune arrestins directing them to specific receptors and particular activation states of the same receptor. PMID:24686081

  8. How much does emotional valence of action outcomes affect temporal binding?

    PubMed

    Moreton, Joshua; Callan, Mitchell J; Hughes, Gethin

    2017-03-01

    Temporal binding refers to the compression of the perceived time interval between voluntary actions and their sensory consequences. Research suggests that the emotional content of an action outcome can modulate the effects of temporal binding. We attempted to conceptually replicate these findings using a time interval estimation task and different emotionally-valenced action outcomes (Experiments 1 and 2) than used in previous research. Contrary to previous findings, we found no evidence that temporal binding was affected by the emotional valence of action outcomes. After validating our stimuli for equivalence of perceived emotional valence and arousal (Experiment 3), in Experiment 4 we directly replicated Yoshie and Haggard's (2013) original experiment using sound vocalizations as action outcomes and failed to detect a significant effect of emotion on temporal binding. These studies suggest that the emotional valence of action outcomes exerts little influence on temporal binding. The potential implications of these findings are discussed. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of GTP/GDP and magnesium ion on the solvated structure of the protein FtsZ: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Jamous, Carla; Basdevant, Nathalie; Ha-Duong, Tap

    2014-01-01

    We present here a structural analysis of ten extensive all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the monomeric protein FtsZ in various binding states. Since the polymerization and GTPase activities of FtsZ depend on the nature of a bound nucleotide as well as on the presence of a magnesium ion, we studied the structural differences between the average conformations of the following five systems: FtsZ-Apo, FtsZ-GTP, FtsZ-GDP, FtsZ-GTP-Mg, and FtsZ-GDP-Mg. The in silico solvated average structure of FtsZ-Apo significantly differs from the crystallographic structure 1W59 of FtsZ which was crystallized in a dimeric form without nucleotide and magnesium. The simulated Apo form of the protein also clearly differs from the FtsZ structures when it is bound to its ligand, the most important discrepancies being located in the loops surrounding the nucleotide binding pocket. The three average structures of FtsZ-GTP, FtsZ-GDP, and FtsZ-GTP-Mg are overall similar, except for the loop T7 located at the opposite side of the binding pocket and whose conformation in FtsZ-GDP notably differs from the one in FtsZ-GTP and FtsZ-GTP-Mg. The presence of a magnesium ion in the binding pocket has no impact on the FtsZ conformation when it is bound to GTP. In contrast, when the protein is bound to GDP, the divalent cation causes a translation of the nucleotide outwards the pocket, inducing a significant conformational change of the loop H6-H7 and the top of helix H7.

  10. Binding of ATP by pertussis toxin and isolated toxin subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Hausman, S.Z.; Manclark, C.R.; Burns, D.L. )

    1990-07-03

    The binding of ATP to pertussis toxin and its components, the A subunit and B oligomer, was investigated. Whereas, radiolabeled ATP bound to the B oligomer and pertussis toxin, no binding to the A subunit was observed. The binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin and the B oligomer was inhibited by nucleotides. The relative effectiveness of the nucleotides was shown to be ATP > GTP > CTP > TTP for pertussis toxin and ATP > GTP > TTP > CTP for the B oligomer. Phosphate ions inhibited the binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin in a competitive manner; however, the presence of phosphate ions was essential for binding of ATP to the B oligomer. The toxin substrate, NAD, did not affect the binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin, although the glycoprotein fetuin significantly decreased binding. These results suggest that the binding site for ATP is located on the B oligomer and is distinct from the enzymatically active site but may be located near the eukaryotic receptor binding site.

  11. The binding of pirenzepine to digitonin-solubilized muscarinic acetylcholine receptors from the rat myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Birdsall, N. J.; Hulme, E. C.; Keen, M.

    1986-01-01

    The binding of pirenzepine to digitonin-solubilized rat myocardial muscarinic acetylcholine receptors has been examined at 4 degrees C. Solubilization produced only small changes in the binding of N-methylscopolamine and atropine. In contrast to the low affinity binding of pirenzepine found to be present in in the membranes, high affinity binding was detected in the soluble preparation. In both preparations, pirenzepine binding was complex. High affinity pirenzepine binding (KD approximately 3 X 10(-8)M) to the soluble myocardial receptors could be monitored directly using [3H]-pirenzepine. [3H]-pirenzepine-labelled soluble myocardial receptors have a sedimentation coefficient of 11.1 s. This indicates that [3H]-pirenzepine binds predominantly to the uncoupled form of the receptor. However, [3H]-pirenzepine-agonist competition experiments indicated that the high affinity pirenzepine binding sites are capable of coupling with a guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP)-binding protein. Pirenzepine affinities for the soluble myocardial receptors were unaffected by their state of association with the GTP-binding proteins found in the heart. The equilibrium binding properties of the soluble cortical and myocardial receptors were very similar. However, the binding kinetics of the myocardial receptor were much slower. It appears that the membrane environment can affect the affinity of pirenzepine for the rat myocardial muscarinic receptor. Removal of the constraint by solubilization allows the expression of high affinity pirenzepine binding. PMID:3754173

  12. Ribosomal protection from tetracycline mediated by Tet(O): Tet(O) interaction with ribosomes is GTP-dependent.

    PubMed

    Trieber, C A; Burkhardt, N; Nierhaus, K H; Taylor, D E

    1998-07-01

    Tet(O) mediates tetracycline resistance by protecting the ribosome from inhibition. A recombinant Tet(O) protein with a histidine tag was purified and its activity in protein synthesis characterized. Tetracycline inhibited the rate of poly(Phe) synthesis, producing short peptide chains. Tet(O)-His was able to restore the elongation rate and processivity. 70S ribosomes bound tetracycline with high affinity. Tet(O)-His in the presence of GTP, but not GDP or GMP, reduced the affinity of the ribosomes for tetracycline. Non-hydrolyzable GTP analogs in the presence of the factor were also able to interfere with tetracycline binding. Ribosomes increased the affinity of Tet(O)-His for GTPgammaS. Tet(O), 70S ribosomes and GTPgammaS formed a complex that could be isolated by gel filtration. The GTP conformer is the active form of Tet(O) that interacts with the ribosome. GTP binding is necessary for Tet(O) activity.

  13. Neutron crystal structure of RAS GTPase puts in question the protonation state of the GTP γ-phosphate

    DOE PAGES

    Knihtila, Ryan; Holzapfel, Genevieve; Weiss, Kevin; ...

    2015-10-29

    RAS GTPase is a prototype for nucleotide-binding proteins that function by cycling between GTP and GDP, with hydrogen atoms playing an important role in the GTP hydrolysis mechanism. It is one of the most well studied proteins in the superfamily of small GTPases, which has representatives in a wide range of cellular functions. These proteins share a GTP-binding pocket with highly conserved motifs that promote hydrolysis to GDP. The neutron crystal structure of RAS presented here strongly supports a protonated gamma-phosphate at physiological pH. This counters the notion that the phosphate groups of GTP are fully deprotonated at the startmore » of the hydrolysis reaction, which has colored the interpretation of experimental and computational data in studies of the hydrolysis mechanism. As a result, the neutron crystal structure presented here puts in question our understanding of the pre-catalytic state associated with the hydrolysis reaction central to the function of RAS and other GTPases.« less

  14. Live-cell imaging of endogenous Ras-GTP illustrates predominant Ras activation at the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Augsten, Martin; Pusch, Rico; Biskup, Christoph; Rennert, Knut; Wittig, Ute; Beyer, Katja; Blume, Alfred; Wetzker, Reinhard; Friedrich, Karlheinz; Rubio, Ignacio

    2006-01-01

    Ras-GTP imaging studies using the Ras-binding domain (RBD) of the Ras effector c-Raf as a reporter for overexpressed Ras have produced discrepant results about the possible activation of Ras at the Golgi apparatus. We report that RBD oligomerization provides probes for visualization of endogenous Ras-GTP, obviating Ras overexpression and the side effects derived thereof. RBD oligomerization results in tenacious binding to Ras-GTP and interruption of Ras signalling. Trimeric RBD probes fused to green fluorescent protein report agonist-induced endogenous Ras activation at the plasma membrane (PM) of COS-7, PC12 and Jurkat cells, but do not accumulate at the Golgi. PM illumination is exacerbated by Ras overexpression and its sensitivity to dominant-negative RasS17N and pharmacological manipulations matches Ras-GTP formation assessed biochemically. Our data illustrate that endogenous Golgi-located Ras is not under the control of growth factors and argue for the PM as the predominant site of agonist-induced Ras activation. PMID:16282985

  15. The pthaladyns: GTP competitive inhibitors of dynamin I and II GTPase derived from virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Odell, Luke R; Howan, Dian; Gordon, Christopher P; Robertson, Mark J; Chau, Ngoc; Mariana, Anna; Whiting, Ainslie E; Abagyan, Ruben; Daniel, James A; Gorgani, Nick N; Robinson, Phillip J; McCluskey, Adam

    2010-07-22

    We report the development of a homology model for the GTP binding domain of human dynamin I based on the corresponding crystal structure of Dictyostelium discoidum dynamin A. Virtual screening identified 2-[(2-biphenyl-2-yl-1,3-dioxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-isoindole-5-carbonyl)amino]-4-chlorobenzoic acid (1) as a approximately 170 microM potent inhibitor. Homology modeling- and focused library-led synthesis resulted in development of a series of active compounds (the "pthaladyns") with 4-chloro-2-(2-(4-(hydroxymethyl)phenyl)-1,3-dioxoisoindoline-5-carboxamido)benzoic acid (29), a 4.58 +/- 0.06 microM dynamin I GTPase inhibitor. Pthaladyn-29 displays borderline selectivity for dynamin I relative to dynamin II ( approximately 5-10 fold). Only pthaladyn-23 (dynamin I IC(50) 17.4 +/- 5.8 microM) was an effective inhibitor of dynamin I mediated synaptic vesicle endocytosis in brain synaptosomes with an IC(50) of 12.9 +/- 5.9 microM. This compound was also competitive with respect to Mg(2+).GTP. Thus the pthaladyns are the first GTP competitive inhibitors of dynamin I and II GTPase and may be effective new tools for the study of neuronal endocytosis.

  16. RF3:GTP promotes rapid dissociation of the class 1 termination factor.

    PubMed

    Koutmou, Kristin S; McDonald, Megan E; Brunelle, Julie L; Green, Rachel

    2014-05-01

    Translation termination is promoted by class 1 and class 2 release factors in all domains of life. While the role of the bacterial class 1 factors, RF1 and RF2, in translation termination is well understood, the precise contribution of the bacterial class 2 release factor, RF3, to this process remains less clear. Here, we use a combination of binding assays and pre-steady state kinetics to provide a kinetic and thermodynamic framework for understanding the role of the translational GTPase RF3 in bacterial translation termination. First, we find that GDP and GTP have similar affinities for RF3 and that, on average, the t1/2 for nucleotide dissociation from the protein is 1-2 min. We further show that RF3:GDPNP, but not RF3:GDP, tightly associates with the ribosome pre- and post-termination complexes. Finally, we use stopped-flow fluorescence to demonstrate that RF3:GTP enhances RF1 dissociation rates by over 500-fold, providing the first direct observation of this step. Importantly, catalytically inactive variants of RF1 are not rapidly dissociated from the ribosome by RF3:GTP, arguing that a rotated state of the ribosome must be sampled for this step to efficiently occur. Together, these data define a more precise role for RF3 in translation termination and provide insights into the function of this family of translational GTPases.

  17. Ribosome-induced tuning of GTP hydrolysis by a translational GTPase.

    PubMed

    Maracci, Cristina; Peske, Frank; Dannies, Ev; Pohl, Corinna; Rodnina, Marina V

    2014-10-07

    GTP hydrolysis by elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), a translational GTPase that delivers aminoacyl-tRNAs to the ribosome, plays a crucial role in decoding and translational fidelity. The basic reaction mechanism and the way the ribosome contributes to catalysis are a matter of debate. Here we use mutational analysis in combination with measurements of rate/pH profiles, kinetic solvent isotope effects, and ion dependence of GTP hydrolysis by EF-Tu off and on the ribosome to dissect the reaction mechanism. Our data suggest that--contrary to current models--the reaction in free EF-Tu follows a pathway that does not involve the critical residue H84 in the switch II region. Binding to the ribosome without a cognate codon in the A site has little effect on the GTPase mechanism. In contrast, upon cognate codon recognition, the ribosome induces a rearrangement of EF-Tu that renders GTP hydrolysis sensitive to mutations of Asp21 and His84 and insensitive to K(+) ions. We suggest that Asp21 and His84 provide a network of interactions that stabilize the positions of the γ-phosphate and the nucleophilic water, respectively, and thus play an indirect catalytic role in the GTPase mechanism on the ribosome.

  18. Mechanism of activation of elongation factor Tu by ribosome: catalytic histidine activates GTP by protonation.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Alexey; Field, Martin

    2013-09-01

    Elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) is central to prokaryotic protein synthesis as it has the role of delivering amino-acylated tRNAs to the ribosome. Release of EF-Tu, after correct binding of the EF-Tu:aa-tRNA complex to the ribosome, is initiated by GTP hydrolysis. This reaction, whose mechanism is uncertain, is catalyzed by EF-Tu, but requires activation by the ribosome. There have been a number of mechanistic proposals, including those spurred by a recent X-ray crystallographic analysis of a ribosome:EF-Tu:aa-tRNA:GTP-analog complex. In this work, we have investigated these and alternative hypotheses, using high-level quantum chemical/molecular mechanical simulations for the wild-type protein and its His85Gln mutant. For both proteins, we find previously unsuggested mechanisms as being preferred, in which residue 85, either His or Gln, directly assists in the reaction. Analysis shows that the RNA has a minor catalytic effect in the wild-type reaction, but plays a significant role in the mutant by greatly stabilizing the reaction's transition state. Given the similarity between EF-Tu and other members of the translational G-protein family, it is likely that these mechanisms of ribosome-activated GTP hydrolysis are pertinent to all of these proteins.

  19. Intracellular GTP level determines cell's fate toward differentiation and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Meshkini, Azadeh; Yazdanparast, Razieh Nouri, Kazem

    2011-06-15

    Since the adequate supply of guanine nucleotides is vital for cellular activities, limitation of their syntheses would certainly result in modulation of cellular fate toward differentiation and apoptosis. The aim of this study was to set a correlation between the intracellular level of GTP and the induction of relevant signaling pathways involved in the cell's fate toward life or death. In that regard, we measured the GTP level among human leukemia K562 cells exposed to mycophenolic acid (MPA) or 3-hydrogenkwadaphnin (3-HK) as two potent inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibitors. Our results supported the maturation of the cells when the intracellular GTP level was reduced by almost 30-40%. Under these conditions, 3-HK and/or MPA caused up-regulation of PKC{alpha} and PI3K/AKT pathways. Furthermore, co-treatment of cells with hypoxanthine plus 3-HK or MPA, which caused a reduction of about 60% in the intracellular GTP levels, led to apoptosis and activation of mitochondrial pathways through inverse regulation of Bcl-2/Bax expression and activation of caspase-3. Moreover, our results demonstrated that attenuation of GTP by almost 60% augmented the intracellular ROS and nuclear localization of p21 and subsequently led to cell death. These results suggest that two different threshold levels of GTP are needed for induction of differentiation and/or ROS-associated apoptosis. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted

  20. Isolation of a gene encoding a developmentally regulated T cell-specific protein with a guanine nucleotide triphosphate-binding motif

    SciTech Connect

    Carlow, D.A.; Teh, H.S.; Marth, J.

    1995-02-15

    In this study, we describe a novel full length cDNA clone designated Tgtp that encodes a predicted 415-amino acid a T cell-specific guanine nucleotide triphosphate-binding protein (TGTP) bearing the characteristic motifs of a guanine nucleotide triphosphate (GTP) binding protein. Tgtp is expressed preferentially, if not exclusively, in T cells, and is up-regulated in both unfractionated and in purified CD4{sup +}8{sup +} thymocytes upon TCR cross-linking. In contrast, expression of Tgtp in peripheral T cells is maintained at relatively high levels and is not grossly affected by TCR cross-linking. Antiserum generated against synthetic peptides from the predicted TGTP amino acid sequence recognized a single protein with a molecular mass of {approx}50 kDa, corresponding well with the computed molecular mass of 47 kDa. The only known relative of Tgtp is MUSGTP, which is reportedly expressed in B cells and bears a GTP binding motif. Thus, the discovery of Tgtp resolves a subfamily of molecules with GTP binding motifs and apparent lymphoid lineage-restricted expression. Given the restricted expression pattern in T cells, the up-regulated expression observed in response to TCR signaling in immature thymocytes, and the presence of the motifs characteristic of GTP binding proteins, we suggest that TGTP may have an important function in T cell development and/or T cell activation. 51 refs., 6 figs.

  1. SNP2TFBS – a database of regulatory SNPs affecting predicted transcription factor binding site affinity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Ambrosini, Giovanna; Bucher, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    SNP2TFBS is a computational resource intended to support researchers investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying regulatory variation in the human genome. The database essentially consists of a collection of text files providing specific annotations for human single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), namely whether they are predicted to abolish, create or change the affinity of one or several transcription factor (TF) binding sites. A SNP's effect on TF binding is estimated based on a position weight matrix (PWM) model for the binding specificity of the corresponding factor. These data files are regenerated at regular intervals by an automatic procedure that takes as input a reference genome, a comprehensive SNP catalogue and a collection of PWMs. SNP2TFBS is also accessible over a web interface, enabling users to view the information provided for an individual SNP, to extract SNPs based on various search criteria, to annotate uploaded sets of SNPs or to display statistics about the frequencies of binding sites affected by selected SNPs. Homepage: http://ccg.vital-it.ch/snp2tfbs/. PMID:27899579

  2. SNP2TFBS - a database of regulatory SNPs affecting predicted transcription factor binding site affinity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Ambrosini, Giovanna; Bucher, Philipp

    2017-01-04

    SNP2TFBS is a computational resource intended to support researchers investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying regulatory variation in the human genome. The database essentially consists of a collection of text files providing specific annotations for human single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), namely whether they are predicted to abolish, create or change the affinity of one or several transcription factor (TF) binding sites. A SNP's effect on TF binding is estimated based on a position weight matrix (PWM) model for the binding specificity of the corresponding factor. These data files are regenerated at regular intervals by an automatic procedure that takes as input a reference genome, a comprehensive SNP catalogue and a collection of PWMs. SNP2TFBS is also accessible over a web interface, enabling users to view the information provided for an individual SNP, to extract SNPs based on various search criteria, to annotate uploaded sets of SNPs or to display statistics about the frequencies of binding sites affected by selected SNPs. Homepage: http://ccg.vital-it.ch/snp2tfbs/.

  3. Biochemical and functional characterization of the ROC domain of DAPK establishes a new paradigm of GTP regulation in ROCO proteins.

    PubMed

    Bialik, Shani; Kimchi, Adi

    2012-10-01

    DAPK (death-associated protein kinase) is a newly recognized member of the mammalian family of ROCO proteins, characterized by common ROC (Ras of complex proteins) and COR (C-terminal of ROC) domains. In the present paper, we review our recent work showing that DAPK is functionally a ROCO protein; its ROC domain binds and hydrolyses GTP. Furthermore, GTP binding regulates DAPK catalytic activity in a novel manner by enhancing autophosphorylation on inhibitory Ser308, thereby promoting the kinase 'off' state. This is a novel mechanism for in cis regulation of kinase activity by the distal ROC domain. The functional similarities between DAPK and the Parkinson's disease-associated protein LRRK2 (leucine-rich repeat protein kinase 2), another member of the ROCO family, are also discussed.

  4. Nucleic acid binding proteins affect the subcellular distribution of phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Jeffrey K; Shen, Wen; Liang, Xue-Hai; Crooke, Stanley T

    2017-08-09

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are versatile tools that can regulate multiple steps of RNA biogenesis in cells and living organisms. Significant improvements in delivery, potency, and stability have been achieved through modifications within the oligonucleotide backbone, sugar and heterocycles. However, these modifications can profoundly affect interactions between ASOs and intracellular proteins in ways that are only beginning to be understood. Here, we report that ASOs with specific backbone and sugar modifications can become localized to cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein granules such as stress granules and those seeded by the aggregation of specific ASO-binding proteins such as FUS/TLS (FUS) and PSF/SFPQ (PSF). Further investigation into the basis for ASO-FUS binding illustrated the importance of ASO backbone and hydrophobic 2΄ sugar modifications and revealed that the C-terminal region of FUS is sufficient to retain ASOs in cellular foci. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrate that affinities of various nucleic acid binding domains for ASO depend on chemical modifications and further demonstrate how ASO-protein interactions influence the localization of ASOs. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Structures of modified eEF2 80S ribosome complexes reveal the role of GTP hydrolysis in translocation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Derek J; Nilsson, Jakob; Merrill, A Rod; Andersen, Gregers Rom; Nissen, Poul; Frank, Joachim

    2007-05-02

    On the basis of kinetic data on ribosome protein synthesis, the mechanical energy for translocation of the mRNA-tRNA complex is thought to be provided by GTP hydrolysis of an elongation factor (eEF2 in eukaryotes, EF-G in bacteria). We have obtained cryo-EM reconstructions of eukaryotic ribosomes complexed with ADP-ribosylated eEF2 (ADPR-eEF2), before and after GTP hydrolysis, providing a structural basis for analyzing the GTPase-coupled mechanism of translocation. Using the ADP-ribosyl group as a distinct marker, we observe conformational changes of ADPR-eEF2 that are due strictly to GTP hydrolysis. These movements are likely representative of native eEF2 motions in a physiological context and are sufficient to uncouple the mRNA-tRNA complex from two universally conserved bases in the ribosomal decoding center (A1492 and A1493 in Escherichia coli) during translocation. Interpretation of these data provides a detailed two-step model of translocation that begins with the eEF2/EF-G binding-induced ratcheting motion of the small ribosomal subunit. GTP hydrolysis then uncouples the mRNA-tRNA complex from the decoding center so translocation of the mRNA-tRNA moiety may be completed by a head rotation of the small subunit.

  6. Structures of modified eEF2·80S ribosome complexes reveal the role of GTP hydrolysis in translocation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Derek J; Nilsson, Jakob; Merrill, A Rod; Andersen, Gregers Rom; Nissen, Poul; Frank, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of kinetic data on ribosome protein synthesis, the mechanical energy for translocation of the mRNA–tRNA complex is thought to be provided by GTP hydrolysis of an elongation factor (eEF2 in eukaryotes, EF-G in bacteria). We have obtained cryo-EM reconstructions of eukaryotic ribosomes complexed with ADP-ribosylated eEF2 (ADPR-eEF2), before and after GTP hydrolysis, providing a structural basis for analyzing the GTPase-coupled mechanism of translocation. Using the ADP-ribosyl group as a distinct marker, we observe conformational changes of ADPR-eEF2 that are due strictly to GTP hydrolysis. These movements are likely representative of native eEF2 motions in a physiological context and are sufficient to uncouple the mRNA–tRNA complex from two universally conserved bases in the ribosomal decoding center (A1492 and A1493 in Escherichia coli) during translocation. Interpretation of these data provides a detailed two-step model of translocation that begins with the eEF2/EF-G binding-induced ratcheting motion of the small ribosomal subunit. GTP hydrolysis then uncouples the mRNA–tRNA complex from the decoding center so translocation of the mRNA–tRNA moiety may be completed by a head rotation of the small subunit. PMID:17446867

  7. The binding properties of the muscarinic receptors of the cynomolgus monkey ciliary body and the response to the induction of agonist subsensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Bárány, E.; Berrie, C. P.; Birdsall, N. J.; Burgen, A. S.; Hulme, E. C.

    1982-01-01

    1 The binding properties of the muscarinic receptors in the ciliary muscle of cynomolgus monkeys have been evaluated. 2 The concentration of receptor binding sites is the highest yet reported. As found in many species and tissues, there are subclasses of agonist binding sites. Agonist binding is not affected by the non-hydrolysable guanosine triphosphate (GTP) analogue, GppNHp, suggesting that these receptors are not linked to adenylate cyclase. 3 Ciliary muscles made subsensitive by treatment with muscarinic agonists have a decreased receptor concentration but no other changes in the binding properties of the receptors could be detected. PMID:6897523

  8. RhoGDIα Acetylation at K127 and K141 Affects Binding toward Nonprenylated RhoA.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Nora; Wroblowski, Sarah; Scislowski, Lukas; Lammers, Michael

    2016-01-19

    Rho proteins are major regulators of the cytoskeleton. As most Ras-related proteins, they switch between an active, GTP-bound and an inactive, GDP-bound conformation. Rho proteins are targeted to the plasma membrane via a polybasic region and a prenyl group attached to a C-terminal cysteine residue. To distribute Rho proteins in the cell, the molecular chaperone RhoGDIα binds to the prenylated Rho proteins forming a cytosolic pool of mainly GDP-loaded Rho. Most studies characterized the interaction of prenylated Rho proteins and RhoGDIα. However, RhoGDIα was also shown to bind to nonprenylated Rho proteins with physiologically relevant micomolar affinities. Recently, it was discovered that RhoGDIα is targeted by post-translational lysine acetylation. For one site, K141, it was hypothesized that acetylation might lead to increased levels of formation of filamentous actin and filopodia in mammalian cells. The functional consequences of lysine acetylation for the interplay with nonprenylated RhoA have not been investigated. Here, we report that lysine acetylation at lysines K127 and K141 in the RhoGDIα immunoglobulin domain interferes with the interaction toward nonprenylated RhoA using a combined biochemical and biophysical approach. We determined the first crystal structure of a doubly acetylated protein, RhoGDIα, in complex with RhoA·GDP. We discover that the C-terminus of RhoA adopts a different conformation forming an intermolecular β-sheet with the RhoGDIα immunoglobulin domain.

  9. A GTP-dependent Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase from Crassostrea gigas Involved in Immune Recognition.

    PubMed

    Lv, Zhao; Qiu, Limei; Wang, Weilin; Liu, Zhaoqun; Xue, Zhuang; Yu, Zichao; Song, Xiaorui; Chen, Hao; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2017-12-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is well known as a key enzyme involved in the metabolic pathway of gluconeogenesis in organisms, but the information about its involvement in immune response is still very limited. In the present study, a novel PEPCK homolog named CgPEPCK was identified from oyster Crassostrea gigas. The deduced amino acid sequence of CgPEPCK shared 52%-74% similarities with those from other known PEPCKs. There were one conserved guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding site, one substrate binding site, one metal binding site and one active site in CgPEPCK. The mRNA transcripts of CgPEPCK were constitutively expressed in all the tested tissues including hemolymph, mantle, gill, muscle, gonad and hepatopancreas. CgPEPCK proteins were mainly distributed in adductor muscle, gonad, gill and mantle, and rarely detected in hepatopancreas by using immunohistochemical analysis. After the stimulations with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN), Vibrio splendidus and V. anguillarum, CgPEPCK transcripts in hemocytes were significantly up-regulated and peaked at 6 h (LPS, 9.62-fold, p < 0.01), 9 h (PGN, 4.25-fold, p < 0.01), 12 h (V. splendidus, 5.72-fold, p < 0.01), 3 h (V. anguillarum, 2.87-fold, p < 0.01), respectively. The recombinant CgPEPCK protein (rCgPEPCK) exhibited Mn(2+)/Mg(2+) dependent GTP binding activity, and the activities to bind LPS and PGN, but not β-1,3-glucan (GLU), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), mannan (MAN) nor polyinosinic-polycytidylic (Poly I: C). It could also bind Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus luteus and significantly inhibit their growth. All these results collectively suggested that CgPEPCK could not only exert GTP binding activity involved in gluconeogenesis, but also mediate the bacteria recognition and clearance in immune response of oysters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Islands Containing Slowly Hydrolyzable GTP Analogs Promote Microtubule Rescues

    PubMed Central

    Zanic, Marija; Gardner, Melissa K.; Howard, Jonathon

    2012-01-01

    Microtubules are dynamic polymers of GTP- and GDP-tubulin that undergo stochastic transitions between growing and shrinking phases. Rescues, the conversion from shrinking to growing, have recently been proposed to be to the result of regrowth at GTP-tubulin islands within the lattice of growing microtubules. By introducing mixed GTP/GDP/GMPCPP (GXP) regions within the lattice of dynamic microtubules, we reconstituted GXP islands in vitro (GMPCPP is the slowly hydrolyzable GTP analog guanosine-5′-[(α,β)-methyleno]triphosphate). We found that such islands could reproducibly induce rescues and that the probability of rescue correlated with both the size of the island and the percentage of GMPCPP-tubulin within the island. The islands slowed the depolymerization rate of shortening microtubules and promoted regrowth more readily than GMPCPP seeds. Together, these findings provide new mechanistic insights supporting the possibility that rescues could be triggered by enriched GTP-tubulin regions and present a new tool for studying such rescue events in vitro. PMID:22272281

  11. Islands containing slowly hydrolyzable GTP analogs promote microtubule rescues.

    PubMed

    Tropini, Carolina; Roth, Elizabeth A; Zanic, Marija; Gardner, Melissa K; Howard, Jonathon

    2012-01-01

    Microtubules are dynamic polymers of GTP- and GDP-tubulin that undergo stochastic transitions between growing and shrinking phases. Rescues, the conversion from shrinking to growing, have recently been proposed to be to the result of regrowth at GTP-tubulin islands within the lattice of growing microtubules. By introducing mixed GTP/GDP/GMPCPP (GXP) regions within the lattice of dynamic microtubules, we reconstituted GXP islands in vitro (GMPCPP is the slowly hydrolyzable GTP analog guanosine-5'-[(α,β)-methyleno]triphosphate). We found that such islands could reproducibly induce rescues and that the probability of rescue correlated with both the size of the island and the percentage of GMPCPP-tubulin within the island. The islands slowed the depolymerization rate of shortening microtubules and promoted regrowth more readily than GMPCPP seeds. Together, these findings provide new mechanistic insights supporting the possibility that rescues could be triggered by enriched GTP-tubulin regions and present a new tool for studying such rescue events in vitro.

  12. Vibrational studies of phosphoryl transfer enzymes: ras- p21(*)magnesium-GTP and Myosin S1(*)magnesium-ADP- vanadate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianghua

    1999-07-01

    We have measured the Raman spectra of monophosphate compounds in aqueous solution. The measured frequencies were correlated with P••O valence bond order by using a modification of the Hardcastle- Wachs procedure. The P••O bond order and bond length in phosphates can be determined from vibrational spectra by using the derived bond order/stretching frequency correlation and the bond length/bond order correlation of Brown and Wu. The Raman and infrared spectra of guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP) and guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) in aqueous solution were also examined. Frequency shifts were observed as Mg2+ complexes with GDP and GTP in aqueous solution. These results suggested that Mg2+ binds to GDP in a bidentate manner to the α,β P••O bonds and in a tridentate manner to the α,β and γ P••O bonds of Mg•GTP . We have analyzed the previously obtained isotope edited Raman difference spectra of 1:1 complexes of Mg•GDP and Mg•GTP in ras-p21. Frequency changes of the phosphate groups were observed when Mg•GDP , Mg•GTP bind to the protein. Employing both the previous empirical relationships between bond orders/lengths and frequencies as well as vibrational analysis from ab initio calculations, the spectral changes can be explained by the change of the Mg2+ binding sites and hydrogen-bonding. Implications of these structural results for the reaction mechanism of GTP hydrolysis catalyzed by the GTPase are discussed. We have analyzed previously obtained isotope edited Raman difference spectra of the non-bridging V••O bonds of vanadates, both in solution, and when bound to the myosin S1•MgADP complex. By use of ab initio calculations on a model of the vanadate binding site in myosin, the angles between the non-bridging V••O bonds and between these bonds and the apical bonds in the myosin S1•MgADP -Vi complex were determined. The summed bond order of the two apical bonds

  13. Ionic residues of human serum transferrin affect binding to the transferrin receptor and iron release.

    PubMed

    Steere, Ashley N; Miller, Brendan F; Roberts, Samantha E; Byrne, Shaina L; Chasteen, N Dennis; Smith, Valerie C; MacGillivray, Ross T A; Mason, Anne B

    2012-01-17

    Efficient delivery of iron is critically dependent on the binding of diferric human serum transferrin (hTF) to its specific receptor (TFR) on the surface of actively dividing cells. Internalization of the complex into an endosome precedes iron removal. The return of hTF to the blood to continue the iron delivery cycle relies on the maintenance of the interaction between apohTF and the TFR after exposure to endosomal pH (≤6.0). Identification of the specific residues accounting for the pH-sensitive nanomolar affinity with which hTF binds to TFR throughout the cycle is important to fully understand the iron delivery process. Alanine substitution of 11 charged hTF residues identified by available structures and modeling studies allowed evaluation of the role of each in (1) binding of hTF to the TFR and (2) TFR-mediated iron release. Six hTF mutants (R50A, R352A, D356A, E357A, E367A, and K511A) competed poorly with biotinylated diferric hTF for binding to TFR. In particular, we show that Asp356 in the C-lobe of hTF is essential to the formation of a stable hTF-TFR complex: mutation of Asp356 in the monoferric C-lobe hTF background prevented the formation of the stoichiometric 2:2 (hTF:TFR monomer) complex. Moreover, mutation of three residues (Asp356, Glu367, and Lys511), whether in the diferric or monoferric C-lobe hTF, significantly affected iron release when in complex with the TFR. Thus, mutagenesis of charged hTF residues has allowed identification of a number of residues that are critical to formation of and release of iron from the hTF-TFR complex.

  14. Ionic Residues of Human Serum Transferrin Affect Binding to the Transferrin Receptor and Iron Release

    PubMed Central

    Steere, Ashley N.; Miller, Brendan F.; Roberts, Samantha E.; Byrne, Shaina L.; Chasteen, N. Dennis; Smith, Valerie C.; MacGillivray, Ross T.A.; Mason, Anne B.

    2012-01-01

    Efficient delivery of iron is critically dependent on the binding of diferric human serum transferrin (hTF) to its specific receptor (TFR) on the surface of actively dividing cells. Internalization of the complex into an endosome precedes iron removal. The return of hTF to the blood to continue the iron delivery cycle relies on the maintenance of the interaction between apohTF and the TFR after exposure to endosomal pH (≤ 6.0). Identification of the specific residues accounting for the pH-sensitive nanomolar affinity with which hTF binds to TFR throughout the cycle is important to fully understand the iron delivery process. Alanine substitution of eleven charged hTF residues identified by available structures and modeling studies allowed evaluation of the role of each in (1) binding of hTF to the TFR and (2) in TFR-mediated iron release. Six hTF mutants (R50A, R352A, D356A, E357A, E367A and K511A) competed poorly with biotinylated diferric hTF for binding to TFR. In particular, we show that Asp356 in the C-lobe of hTF is essential to the formation of a stable hTF/TFR complex: mutation of Asp356 in the monoferric C-lobe hTF background prevented the formation of the stoichiometric 2:2 (hTF:TFR monomer) complex. Moreover, mutation of three residues (Asp356, Glu367 and Lys511), whether in the diferric or monoferric C-lobe hTF, significantly affected iron release when in complex with the TFR. Thus, mutagenesis of charged hTF residues has allowed identification of a number of residues that are critical to formation of and iron release from the hTF/TFR complex. PMID:22191507

  15. Haemoglobin polymorphisms affect the oxygen-binding properties in Atlantic cod populations.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Oivind; Wetten, Ola Frang; De Rosa, Maria Cristina; Andre, Carl; Carelli Alinovi, Cristiana; Colafranceschi, Mauro; Brix, Ole; Colosimo, Alfredo

    2009-03-07

    A major challenge in evolutionary biology is to identify the genes underlying adaptation. The oxygen-transporting haemoglobins directly link external conditions with metabolic needs and therefore represent a unique system for studying environmental effects on molecular evolution. We have discovered two haemoglobin polymorphisms in Atlantic cod populations inhabiting varying temperature and oxygen regimes in the North Atlantic. Three-dimensional modelling of the tetrameric haemoglobin structure demonstrated that the two amino acid replacements Met55beta1Val and Lys62beta1Ala are located at crucial positions of the alpha1beta1 subunit interface and haem pocket, respectively. The replacements are proposed to affect the oxygen-binding properties by modifying the haemoglobin quaternary structure and electrostatic feature. Intriguingly, the same molecular mechanism for facilitating oxygen binding is found in avian species adapted to high altitudes, illustrating convergent evolution in water- and air-breathing vertebrates to reduction in environmental oxygen availability. Cod populations inhabiting the cold Arctic waters and the low-oxygen Baltic Sea seem well adapted to these conditions by possessing the high oxygen affinity Val55-Ala62 haplotype, while the temperature-insensitive Met55-Lys62 haplotype predominates in the southern populations. The distinct distributions of the functionally different haemoglobin variants indicate that the present biogeography of this ecologically and economically important species might be seriously affected by global warming.

  16. Haemoglobin polymorphisms affect the oxygen-binding properties in Atlantic cod populations

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Øivind; Wetten, Ola Frang; De Rosa, Maria Cristina; Andre, Carl; Carelli Alinovi, Cristiana; Colafranceschi, Mauro; Brix, Ole; Colosimo, Alfredo

    2008-01-01

    A major challenge in evolutionary biology is to identify the genes underlying adaptation. The oxygen-transporting haemoglobins directly link external conditions with metabolic needs and therefore represent a unique system for studying environmental effects on molecular evolution. We have discovered two haemoglobin polymorphisms in Atlantic cod populations inhabiting varying temperature and oxygen regimes in the North Atlantic. Three-dimensional modelling of the tetrameric haemoglobin structure demonstrated that the two amino acid replacements Met55β1Val and Lys62β1Ala are located at crucial positions of the α1β1 subunit interface and haem pocket, respectively. The replacements are proposed to affect the oxygen-binding properties by modifying the haemoglobin quaternary structure and electrostatic feature. Intriguingly, the same molecular mechanism for facilitating oxygen binding is found in avian species adapted to high altitudes, illustrating convergent evolution in water- and air-breathing vertebrates to reduction in environmental oxygen availability. Cod populations inhabiting the cold Arctic waters and the low-oxygen Baltic Sea seem well adapted to these conditions by possessing the high oxygen affinity Val55–Ala62 haplotype, while the temperature-insensitive Met55–Lys62 haplotype predominates in the southern populations. The distinct distributions of the functionally different haemoglobin variants indicate that the present biogeography of this ecologically and economically important species might be seriously affected by global warming. PMID:19033139

  17. Mammalian translation elongation factor eEF1A2: X-ray structure and new features of GDP/GTP exchange mechanism in higher eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Crepin, Thibaut; Shalak, Vyacheslav F; Yaremchuk, Anna D; Vlasenko, Dmytro O; McCarthy, Andrew; Negrutskii, Boris S; Tukalo, Michail A; El'skaya, Anna V

    2014-11-10

    Eukaryotic elongation factor eEF1A transits between the GTP- and GDP-bound conformations during the ribosomal polypeptide chain elongation. eEF1A*GTP establishes a complex with the aminoacyl-tRNA in the A site of the 80S ribosome. Correct codon-anticodon recognition triggers GTP hydrolysis, with subsequent dissociation of eEF1A*GDP from the ribosome. The structures of both the 'GTP'- and 'GDP'-bound conformations of eEF1A are unknown. Thus, the eEF1A-related ribosomal mechanisms were anticipated only by analogy with the bacterial homolog EF-Tu. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the mammalian eEF1A2*GDP complex which indicates major differences in the organization of the nucleotide-binding domain and intramolecular movements of eEF1A compared to EF-Tu. Our results explain the nucleotide exchange mechanism in the mammalian eEF1A and suggest that the first step of eEF1A*GDP dissociation from the 80S ribosome is the rotation of the nucleotide-binding domain observed after GTP hydrolysis. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Unique 5′-P recognition and basis for dG:dGTP misincorporation of ASFV DNA polymerase X

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiqing; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Hehua; Gao, Yanqing; Li, Xuhang; Zheng, Lina; Cui, Ruixue; Yao, Qingqing; Rong, Liang; Li, Jixi; Huang, Zhen; Ma, Jinbiao; Gan, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) can cause highly lethal disease in pigs and is becoming a global threat. ASFV DNA Polymerase X (AsfvPolX) is the most distinctive DNA polymerase identified to date; it lacks two DNA-binding domains (the thumb domain and 8-KD domain) conserved in the homologous proteins. AsfvPolX catalyzes the gap-filling reaction during the DNA repair process of the ASFV virus genome; it is highly error prone and plays an important role during the strategic mutagenesis of the viral genome. The structural basis underlying the natural substrate binding and the most frequent dG:dGTP misincorporation of AsfvPolX remain poorly understood. Here, we report eight AsfvPolX complex structures; our structures demonstrate that AsfvPolX has one unique 5′-phosphate (5′-P) binding pocket, which can favor the productive catalytic complex assembly and enhance the dGTP misincorporation efficiency. In combination with mutagenesis and in vitro catalytic assays, our study also reveals the functional roles of the platform His115-Arg127 and the hydrophobic residues Val120 and Leu123 in dG:dGTP misincorporation and can provide information for rational drug design to help combat ASFV in the future. PMID:28245220

  19. Suppressors of dGTP Starvation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Itsko, Mark; Schaaper, Roel M

    2017-06-15

    dGTP starvation, a newly discovered phenomenon in which Escherichia coli cells are starved specifically for the DNA precursor dGTP, leads to impaired growth and, ultimately, cell death. Phenomenologically, it represents an example of nutritionally induced unbalanced growth: cell mass amplifies normally as dictated by the nutritional status of the medium, but DNA content growth is specifically impaired. The other known example of such a condition, thymineless death (TLD), involves starvation for the DNA precursor dTTP, which has been found to have important chemotherapeutic applications. Experimentally, dGTP starvation is induced by depriving an E. coligpt optA1 strain of its required purine source, hypoxanthine. In our studies of this phenomenon, we noted the emergence of a relatively high frequency of suppressor mutants that proved resistant to the treatment. To study such suppressors, we used next-generation sequencing on a collection of independently obtained mutants. A significant fraction was found to carry a defect in the PurR transcriptional repressor, controlling de novo purine biosynthesis, or in its downstream purEK operon. Thus, upregulation of de novo purine biosynthesis appears to be a major mode of overcoming the lethal effects of dGTP starvation. In addition, another large fraction of the suppressors contained a large tandem duplication of a 250- to 300-kb genomic region that included the purEK operon as well as the acrAB-encoded multidrug efflux system. Thus, the suppressive effects of the duplications could potentially involve beneficial effects of a number of genes/operons within the amplified regions.IMPORTANCE Concentrations of the four precursors for DNA synthesis (2'-deoxynucleoside-5'-triphosphates [dNTPs]) are critical for both the speed of DNA replication and its accuracy. Previously, we investigated consequences of dGTP starvation, where the DNA precursor dGTP was specifically reduced to a low level. Under this condition, E. coli cells

  20. Transcriptome Analysis of Escherichia coli during dGTP Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Itsko, Mark

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Our laboratory recently discovered that Escherichia coli cells starved for the DNA precursor dGTP are killed efficiently (dGTP starvation) in a manner similar to that described for thymineless death (TLD). Conditions for specific dGTP starvation can be achieved by depriving an E. coli optA1 gpt strain of the purine nucleotide precursor hypoxanthine (Hx). To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying dGTP starvation, we conducted genome-wide gene expression analyses of actively growing optA1 gpt cells subjected to hypoxanthine deprivation for increasing periods. The data show that upon Hx withdrawal, the optA1 gpt strain displays a diminished ability to derepress the de novo purine biosynthesis genes, likely due to internal guanine accumulation. The impairment in fully inducing the purR regulon may be a contributing factor to the lethality of dGTP starvation. At later time points, and coinciding with cell lethality, strong induction of the SOS response was observed, supporting the concept of replication stress as a final cause of death. No evidence was observed in the starved cells for the participation of other stress responses, including the rpoS-mediated global stress response, reinforcing the lack of feedback of replication stress to the global metabolism of the cell. The genome-wide expression data also provide direct evidence for increased genome complexity during dGTP starvation, as a markedly increased gradient was observed for expression of genes located near the replication origin relative to those located toward the replication terminus. IMPORTANCE Control of the supply of the building blocks (deoxynucleoside triphosphates [dNTPs]) for DNA replication is important for ensuring genome integrity and cell viability. When cells are starved specifically for one of the four dNTPs, dGTP, the process of DNA replication is disturbed in a manner that can lead to eventual death. In the present study, we investigated the transcriptional changes in the

  1. Mutations in the putative calcium-binding domain of polyomavirus VP1 affect capsid assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, J. I. 2nd; Chang, D.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Calcium ions appear to play a major role in maintaining the structural integrity of the polyomavirus and are likely involved in the processes of viral uncoating and assembly. Previous studies demonstrated that a VP1 fragment extending from Pro-232 to Asp-364 has calcium-binding capabilities. This fragment contains an amino acid stretch from Asp-266 to Glu-277 which is quite similar in sequence to the amino acids that make up the calcium-binding EF hand structures found in many proteins. To assess the contribution of this domain to polyomavirus structural integrity, the effects of mutations in this region were examined by transfecting mutated viral DNA into susceptible cells. Immunofluorescence studies indicated that although viral protein synthesis occurred normally, infective viral progeny were not produced in cells transfected with polyomavirus genomes encoding either a VP1 molecule lacking amino acids Thr-262 through Gly-276 or a VP1 molecule containing a mutation of Asp-266 to Ala. VP1 molecules containing the deletion mutation were unable to bind 45Ca in an in vitro assay. Upon expression in Escherichia coli and purification by immunoaffinity chromatography, wild-type VP1 was isolated as pentameric, capsomere-like structures which could be induced to form capsid-like structures upon addition of CaCl2, consistent with previous studies. However, although VP1 containing the point mutation was isolated as pentamers which were indistinguishable from wild-type VP1 pentamers, addition of CaCl2 did not result in their assembly into capsid-like structures. Immunogold labeling and electron microscopy studies of transfected mammalian cells provided in vivo evidence that a mutation in this region affects the process of viral assembly.

  2. Mutations in the putative calcium-binding domain of polyomavirus VP1 affect capsid assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, J. I. 2nd; Chang, D.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Calcium ions appear to play a major role in maintaining the structural integrity of the polyomavirus and are likely involved in the processes of viral uncoating and assembly. Previous studies demonstrated that a VP1 fragment extending from Pro-232 to Asp-364 has calcium-binding capabilities. This fragment contains an amino acid stretch from Asp-266 to Glu-277 which is quite similar in sequence to the amino acids that make up the calcium-binding EF hand structures found in many proteins. To assess the contribution of this domain to polyomavirus structural integrity, the effects of mutations in this region were examined by transfecting mutated viral DNA into susceptible cells. Immunofluorescence studies indicated that although viral protein synthesis occurred normally, infective viral progeny were not produced in cells transfected with polyomavirus genomes encoding either a VP1 molecule lacking amino acids Thr-262 through Gly-276 or a VP1 molecule containing a mutation of Asp-266 to Ala. VP1 molecules containing the deletion mutation were unable to bind 45Ca in an in vitro assay. Upon expression in Escherichia coli and purification by immunoaffinity chromatography, wild-type VP1 was isolated as pentameric, capsomere-like structures which could be induced to form capsid-like structures upon addition of CaCl2, consistent with previous studies. However, although VP1 containing the point mutation was isolated as pentamers which were indistinguishable from wild-type VP1 pentamers, addition of CaCl2 did not result in their assembly into capsid-like structures. Immunogold labeling and electron microscopy studies of transfected mammalian cells provided in vivo evidence that a mutation in this region affects the process of viral assembly.

  3. High-Density Lipoprotein Binds to Mycobacterium avium and Affects the Infection of THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ichimura, Naoya; Sato, Megumi; Yoshimoto, Akira; Yano, Kouji; Ohkawa, Ryunosuke; Kasama, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is involved in innate immunity toward various infectious diseases. Concerning bacteria, HDL is known to bind to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and to neutralize its physiological activity. On the other hand, cholesterol is known to play an important role in mycobacterial entry into host cells and in survival in the intracellular environment. However, the pathogenicity of Mycobacterium avium (M. avium) infection, which tends to increase worldwide, remains poorly studied. Here we report that HDL indicated a stronger interaction with M. avium than that with other Gram-negative bacteria containing abundant LPS. A binding of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, the main protein component of HDL, with a specific lipid of M. avium might participate in this interaction. HDL did not have a direct bactericidal activity toward M. avium but attenuated the engulfment of M. avium by THP-1 macrophages. HDL also did not affect bacterial killing after ingestion of live M. avium by THP-1 macrophage. Furthermore, HDL strongly promoted the formation of lipid droplets in M. avium-infected THP-1 macrophages. These observations provide new insights into the relationship between M. avium infection and host lipoproteins, especially HDL. Thus, HDL may help M. avium to escape from host innate immunity. PMID:27516907

  4. Calnuc binds to Alzheimer's beta-amyloid precursor protein and affects its biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ping; Li, Feng; Zhang, Yun-Wu; Huang, Haining; Tong, Gary; Farquhar, Marilyn Gist; Xu, Huaxi

    2007-03-01

    Calnuc, a Golgi calcium binding protein, plays a key role in the constitution of calcium storage. Abnormal calcium homeostasis has been linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Excessive production and/or accumulation of beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides that are proteolytically derived from the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) have been linked to the pathogenesis of AD. APP has also been indicated to play multiple physiological functions. In this study, we demonstrate that calnuc interacts with APP through direct binding to the carboxyl-terminal region of APP, possibly in a calcium-sensitive manner. Immunofluorescence study revealed that the two proteins co-localize in the Golgi in both cultured cells and mouse brains. Over-expression of calnuc in neuroblastoma cells significantly reduces the level of endogenous APP. Conversely, down-regulation of calnuc by siRNA increases cellular levels of APP. Additionally, we show that over-expression of calnuc down-regulates the APP mRNA level and inhibits APP biosynthesis, which in turn results in a parallel reduction of APP proteolytic metabolites, sAPP, CTFs and Abeta. Furthermore, we found that the level of calnuc was significantly decreased in the brain of AD patients as compared with that of age-matched non-AD controls. Our results suggest a novel function of calnuc in modulating the levels of APP and its proteolytic metabolites, which may further affect the patho/physiological functions of APP including AD pathogenesis.

  5. The CREB-binding protein affects the circadian regulation of behaviour.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Christian; Winter, Tobias; Chen, Siwei; Hung, Hsiu-Cheng; Weber, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Rhythmic changes in light and temperature conditions form the primary environmental cues that synchronize the molecular circadian clock of most species with the external cycles of day and night. Previous studies established a role for the CREB-binding protein (CBP) in molecular clock function by coactivation of circadian transcription. Here, we report that moderately increased levels of CBP strongly dampen circadian behavioural rhythms without affecting molecular oscillations of circadian transcription. Interestingly, light-dark cycles as well as high temperature facilitated a circadian control of behavioural activity. Based on these observations we propose that in addition to its coactivator function for circadian transcription, CBP is involved in the regulation of circadian behaviour down-stream of the circadian clock.

  6. CTCF-mediated reduction of vigilin binding affects the binding of HP1α to the satellite 2 locus.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wen-Yan; Liu, Qiu-Ying; Wei, Ling; Yu, Xiao-Qin; Li, Ran; Yang, Wen-Li; Xie, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Wen-Quan; Huang, Yuan; Qin, Yang

    2014-05-02

    CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) has been implicated in numerous aspects of chromosome biology, and vigilin, a multi-KH-domain protein, participates in heterochromatin formation and chromosome segregation. We previously showed that CTCF interacts with vigilin. Here, we show that human vigilin, but not CTCF, colocalizes with HP1α on heterochromatic satellite 2 and β-satellite repeats. CTCF up-regulates the transcription of satellite 2, while vigilin down-regulates it. Vigilin depletion or CTCF overexpression reduces the binding of HP1α on the satellite 2 locus. Furthermore, overexpression of CTCF resists the loading of vigilin onto the satellite 2 locus. Thus CTCF may regulate vigilin behavior and thus indirectly influence the binding of HP1α to the satellite 2 locus.

  7. Mutant Huntingtin Impairs BDNF Release from Astrocytes by Disrupting Conversion of Rab3a-GTP into Rab3a-GDP

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yan; Zhao, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is essential for neuronal differentiation and survival. We know that BDNF levels decline in the brains of patients with Huntington's disease (HD), a neurodegenerative disease caused by the expression of mutant huntingtin protein (mHtt), and furthermore that administration of BDNF in HD mice is protective against HD neuropathology. BDNF is produced in neurons, but astrocytes are also an important source of BDNF in the brain. Nonetheless, whether mHtt affects astrocytic BDNF in the HD brain remains unknown. Here we investigated astrocytes from HD140Q knock-in mice and uncovered evidence that mHtt decreases BDNF secretion from astrocytes, which is mediated by exocytosis in astrocytes. Our results demonstrate that mHtt associates with Rab3a, a small GTPase localized on membranes of dense-core vesicles, and prevents GTP-Rab3a from binding to Rab3-GAP1, disrupting the conversion of GTP-Rab3a into GDP-Rab3a and thus impairing the docking of BDNF vesicles on plasma membranes of astrocytes. Importantly, overexpression of Rab3a rescues impaired BDNF vesicle docking and secretion from HD astrocytes. Moreover, ATP release and the number of ATP-containing dense-core vesicles docking are decreased in HD astrocytes, suggesting that the exocytosis of dense-core vesicles is impaired by mHtt in HD astrocytes. Further, Rab3a overexpression reduces reactive astrocytes in the striatum of HD140Q knock-in mice. Our results indicate that compromised exocytosis of BDNF in HD astrocytes contributes to the decreased BDNF levels in HD brains and underscores the importance of improving glial function in the treatment of HD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder that affects one in every 10,000 Americans. To date, there is no effective treatment for HD, in part because the pathogenic mechanism driving the disease is not fully understood. The dysfunction of astrocytes is known to contribute to the

  8. Thiostrepton inhibits stable 70S ribosome binding and ribosome-dependent GTPase activation of elongation factor G and elongation factor 4

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Justin D.; Hunter, Margaret; Cobb, Melanie; Traeger, Geoff; Spiegel, P. Clint

    2012-01-01

    Thiostrepton, a macrocyclic thiopeptide antibiotic, inhibits prokaryotic translation by interfering with the function of elongation factor G (EF-G). Here, we have used 70S ribosome binding and GTP hydrolysis assays to study the effects of thiostrepton on EF-G and a newly described translation factor, elongation factor 4 (EF4). In the presence of thiostrepton, ribosome-dependent GTP hydrolysis is inhibited for both EF-G and EF4, with IC(50) values equivalent to the 70S ribosome concentration (0.15 µM). Further studies indicate the mode of thiostrepton inhibition is to abrogate the stable binding of EF-G and EF4 to the 70S ribosome. In support of this model, an EF-G truncation variant that does not possess domains IV and V was shown to possess ribosome-dependent GTP hydrolysis activity that was not affected by the presence of thiostrepton (>100 µM). Lastly, chemical footprinting was employed to examine the nature of ribosome interaction and tRNA movements associated with EF4. In the presence of non-hydrolyzable GTP, EF4 showed chemical protections similar to EF-G and stabilized a ratcheted state of the 70S ribosome. These data support the model that thiostrepton inhibits stable GTPase binding to 70S ribosomal complexes, and a model for the first step of EF4-catalyzed reverse-translocation is presented. PMID:21908407

  9. Proteome-wide Discovery and Characterizations of Nucleotide-binding Proteins with Affinity-labeled Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Guo, Lei; Jiang, Xinning; Wang, Yinsheng

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding proteins play pivotal roles in many cellular processes including cell signaling. However, targeted study of sub-proteome of nucleotide-binding proteins, especially protein kinases and GTP-binding proteins, remained challenging. Here, we reported a general strategy in using affinity-labeled chemical probes to enrich, identify, and quantify ATP- and GTP-binding proteins in the entire human proteome. Our results revealed that the ATP/GTP affinity probes facilitated the identification of 100 GTP-binding proteins and 206 kinases with the use of low mg quantities of lysate of HL-60 cells. In combination with the use of SILAC-based quantitative proteomics method, we assessed the ATP/GTP binding selectivities of nucleotide-binding proteins at the global proteome scale. Our results confirmed known and, more importantly, unveiled new ATP/GTP-binding preferences of hundreds of nucleotide-binding proteins. Additionally, our strategy led to the identification of three and one unique nucleotide-binding motifs for kinases and GTP-binding proteins, respectively, and the characterizations of the nucleotide binding selectivities of individual motifs. Our strategy for capturing and characterizing ATP/GTP-binding proteins should be generally applicable for those proteins that can interact with other nucleotides. PMID:23413923

  10. Higher-order septin assembly is driven by GTP-promoted conformational changes: evidence from unbiased mutational analysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Weems, Andrew D; Johnson, Courtney R; Argueso, Juan Lucas; McMurray, Michael A

    2014-03-01

    Septin proteins bind GTP and heterooligomerize into filaments with conserved functions across a wide range of eukaryotes. Most septins hydrolyze GTP, altering the oligomerization interfaces; yet mutations designed to abolish nucleotide binding or hydrolysis by yeast septins perturb function only at high temperatures. Here, we apply an unbiased mutational approach to this problem. Mutations causing defects at high temperature mapped exclusively to the oligomerization interface encompassing the GTP-binding pocket, or to the pocket itself. Strikingly, cold-sensitive defects arise when certain of these same mutations are coexpressed with a wild-type allele, suggestive of a novel mode of dominance involving incompatibility between mutant and wild-type molecules at the septin-septin interfaces that mediate filament polymerization. A different cold-sensitive mutant harbors a substitution in an unstudied but highly conserved region of the septin Cdc12. A homologous domain in the small GTPase Ran allosterically regulates GTP-binding domain conformations, pointing to a possible new functional domain in some septins. Finally, we identify a mutation in septin Cdc3 that restores the high-temperature assembly competence of a mutant allele of septin Cdc10, likely by adopting a conformation more compatible with nucleotide-free Cdc10. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that GTP binding and hydrolysis promote, but are not required for, one-time events--presumably oligomerization-associated conformational changes--during assembly of the building blocks of septin filaments. Restrictive temperatures impose conformational constraints on mutant septin proteins, preventing new assembly and in certain cases destabilizing existing assemblies. These insights from yeast relate directly to disease-causing mutations in human septins.

  11. Bacterial Tubulins A and B Exhibit Polarized Growth, Mixed-Polarity Bundling, and Destabilization by GTP Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Celis, César; Risca, Viviana I; Hurtado, Felipe; Polka, Jessica K; Hansen, Scott D; Maturana, Daniel; Lagos, Rosalba; Mullins, R Dyche; Monasterio, Octavio

    2017-10-01

    Bacteria of the genus Prosthecobacter express homologs of eukaryotic α- and β-tubulin, called BtubA and BtubB (BtubA/B), that have been observed to assemble into filaments in the presence of GTP. BtubA/B polymers are proposed to be composed in vitro by two to six protofilaments in contrast to that in vivo, where they have been reported to form 5-protofilament tubes named bacterial microtubules (bMTs). The btubAB genes likely entered the Prosthecobacter lineage via horizontal gene transfer and may be derived from an early ancestor of the modern eukaryotic microtubule (MT). Previous biochemical studies revealed that BtubA/B polymerization is reversible and that BtubA/B folding does not require chaperones. To better understand BtubA/B filament behavior and gain insight into the evolution of microtubule dynamics, we characterized in vitro BtubA/B assembly using a combination of polymerization kinetics assays and microscopy. Like eukaryotic microtubules, BtubA/B filaments exhibit polarized growth with different assembly rates at each end. GTP hydrolysis stimulated by BtubA/B polymerization drives a stochastic mechanism of filament disassembly that occurs via polymer breakage and/or fast continuous depolymerization. We also observed treadmilling (continuous addition and loss of subunits at opposite ends) of BtubA/B filament fragments. Unlike MTs, polymerization of BtubA/B requires KCl, which reduces the critical concentration for BtubA/B assembly and induces it to form stable mixed-orientation bundles in the absence of any additional BtubA/B-binding proteins. The complex dynamics that we observe in stabilized and unstabilized BtubA/B filaments may reflect common properties of an ancestral eukaryotic tubulin polymer.IMPORTANCE Microtubules are polymers within all eukaryotic cells that perform critical functions; they segregate chromosomes, organize intracellular transport, and support the flagella. These functions rely on the remarkable range of tunable dynamic

  12. SR-like RNA-binding protein Slr1 affects Candida albicans filamentation and virulence.

    PubMed

    Ariyachet, Chaiyaboot; Solis, Norma V; Liu, Yaoping; Prasadarao, Nemani V; Filler, Scott G; McBride, Anne E

    2013-04-01

    Candida albicans causes both mucosal and disseminated infections, and its capacity to grow as both yeast and hyphae is a key virulence factor. Hyphal formation is a type of polarized growth, and members of the SR (serine-arginine) family of RNA-binding proteins influence polarized growth of both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus nidulans. Therefore, we investigated whether SR-like proteins affect filamentous growth and virulence of C. albicans. BLAST searches with S. cerevisiae SR-like protein Npl3 (ScNpl3) identified two C. albicans proteins: CaNpl3, an apparent ScNpl3 ortholog, and Slr1, another SR-like RNA-binding protein with no close S. cerevisiae ortholog. Whereas ScNpl3 was critical for growth, deletion of NPL3 in C. albicans resulted in few phenotypic changes. In contrast, the slr1Δ/Δ mutant had a reduced growth rate in vitro, decreased filamentation, and impaired capacity to damage epithelial and endothelial cells in vitro. Mice infected intravenously with the slr1Δ/Δ mutant strain had significantly prolonged survival compared to that of mice infected with the wild-type or slr1Δ/Δ mutant complemented with SLR1 (slr1Δ/Δ+SLR1) strain, without a concomitant decrease in kidney fungal burden. Histopathology, however, revealed differential localization of slr1Δ/Δ hyphal and yeast morphologies within the kidney. Mice infected with slr1Δ/Δ cells also had an increased brain fungal burden, which correlated with increased invasion of brain, but not umbilical vein, endothelial cells in vitro. The enhanced brain endothelial cell invasion was likely due to the increased surface exposure of the Als3 adhesin on slr1Δ/Δ cells. Our results indicate that Slr1 is an SR-like protein that influences C. albicans growth, filamentation, host cell interactions, and virulence.

  13. Structural model of FeoB, the iron transporter from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, predicts a cysteine lined, GTP-gated pore

    PubMed Central

    Seyedmohammad, Saeed; Fuentealba, Natalia Alveal; Marriott, Robert A.J.; Goetze, Tom A.; Edwardson, J. Michael; Barrera, Nelson P.; Venter, Henrietta

    2016-01-01

    Iron is essential for the survival and virulence of pathogenic bacteria. The FeoB transporter allows the bacterial cell to acquire ferrous iron from its environment, making it an excellent drug target in intractable pathogens. The protein consists of an N-terminal GTP-binding domain and a C-terminal membrane domain. Despite the availability of X-ray crystal structures of the N-terminal domain, many aspects of the structure and function of FeoB remain unclear, such as the structure of the membrane domain, the oligomeric state of the protein, the molecular mechanism of iron transport, and how this is coupled to GTP hydrolysis at the N-terminal domain. In the present study, we describe the first homology model of FeoB. Due to the lack of sequence homology between FeoB and other transporters, the structures of four different proteins were used as templates to generate the homology model of full-length FeoB, which predicts a trimeric structure. We confirmed this trimeric structure by both blue-native-PAGE (BN-PAGE) and AFM. According to our model, the membrane domain of the trimeric protein forms a central pore lined by highly conserved cysteine residues. This pore aligns with a central pore in the N-terminal GTPase domain (G-domain) lined by aspartate residues. Biochemical analysis of FeoB from Pseudomonas aeruginosa further reveals a putative iron sensor domain that could connect GTP binding/hydrolysis to the opening of the pore. These results indicate that FeoB might not act as a transporter, but rather as a GTP-gated channel. PMID:26934982

  14. The nuclear import of the constitutive androstane receptor by importin/Ran-GTP systems.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Yuichiro; Miyazaki, Yukari; Inouye, Yoshio

    2010-08-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. The CAR is normally located in the cytoplasmic compartment of untreated liver cells and translocates to the nucleus after exposure to phenobarbital (PB) or PB-like chemicals. Previously, we identified two nuclear localization signals (NLS) in the rat constitutive androstane/active receptor (CAR), NLS1, which is located in the hinge region, and NLS2, which overlaps with the ligand-binding domain. However, the nuclear import mechanism of CAR is unclear. In this study, we show that nuclear import of CAR is regulated by importin/Ran-GTP systems. The regulation of CAR nuclear import by a Ran-GTP concentration gradient was confirmed using the dominant negative, GTPase-deficient form of Ran (RanQ69L), suggesting the involvement of transport receptors of the importinbeta family. IPO13 was shown to be involved in the PB-mediated nuclear translocation of CAR, which was found to be susceptible to inhibition by a dominant negative mutant of IPO13 in primary hepatocytes. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Increased Seasonal Variation in Serotonin Transporter Binding in Seasonal Affective Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tyrer, Andrea E; Levitan, Robert D; Houle, Sylvain; Wilson, Alan A; Nobrega, José N; Meyer, Jeffrey H

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is highly prevalent with rates of 1–6% and greater prevalence at more extreme latitudes; however, there are almost no direct brain investigations of this disorder. In health, serotonin transporter binding potential (5-HTT BPND), an index of 5-HTT levels, is greater throughout the brain in fall-winter compared with spring-summer. We hypothesized that in SAD, this seasonal variation would be greater in brain regions containing structures that regulate affect such as the prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices (PFC and ACC). Furthermore, given the dimensional nature of SAD symptoms, it was hypothesized that seasonal fluctuation of 5-HTT BPND in the PFC and ACC would be greatest in severe SAD. Twenty SAD and twenty healthy participants underwent [11C]DASB positron emission tomography scans in summer and winter to measure seasonal variation in [11C]DASB 5-HTT BPND. Seasonal increases in [11C]DASB 5-HTT BPND were greater in SAD compared with healthy in the PFC and ACC, primarily due to differences between severe SAD and healthy (severe SAD vs healthy; Mann–Whitney U, U=42.5 and 37.0, p=0.005 and 0.003, respectively; greater magnitude in severe SAD of 35.10 and 14.23%, respectively), with similar findings observed in other regions (U=40.0–62.0, p=0.004–0.048; greater magnitude in severe SAD of 13.16–17.49%). To our knowledge, this is the first brain biomarker identified in SAD. This creates a new opportunity for phase 0 studies to target this phenotype and optimize novel prevention/treatment strategies for SAD. PMID:27087270

  16. Increased Seasonal Variation in Serotonin Transporter Binding in Seasonal Affective Disorder.

    PubMed

    Tyrer, Andrea E; Levitan, Robert D; Houle, Sylvain; Wilson, Alan A; Nobrega, José N; Meyer, Jeffrey H

    2016-09-01

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is highly prevalent with rates of 1-6% and greater prevalence at more extreme latitudes; however, there are almost no direct brain investigations of this disorder. In health, serotonin transporter binding potential (5-HTT BPND), an index of 5-HTT levels, is greater throughout the brain in fall-winter compared with spring-summer. We hypothesized that in SAD, this seasonal variation would be greater in brain regions containing structures that regulate affect such as the prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices (PFC and ACC). Furthermore, given the dimensional nature of SAD symptoms, it was hypothesized that seasonal fluctuation of 5-HTT BPND in the PFC and ACC would be greatest in severe SAD. Twenty SAD and twenty healthy participants underwent [(11)C]DASB positron emission tomography scans in summer and winter to measure seasonal variation in [(11)C]DASB 5-HTT BPND. Seasonal increases in [(11)C]DASB 5-HTT BPND were greater in SAD compared with healthy in the PFC and ACC, primarily due to differences between severe SAD and healthy (severe SAD vs healthy; Mann-Whitney U, U=42.5 and 37.0, p=0.005 and 0.003, respectively; greater magnitude in severe SAD of 35.10 and 14.23%, respectively), with similar findings observed in other regions (U=40.0-62.0, p=0.004-0.048; greater magnitude in severe SAD of 13.16-17.49%). To our knowledge, this is the first brain biomarker identified in SAD. This creates a new opportunity for phase 0 studies to target this phenotype and optimize novel prevention/treatment strategies for SAD.

  17. Water molecules inside protein structure affect binding of monosaccharides with HIV-1 antibody 2G12.

    PubMed

    Ueno-Noto, Kaori; Takano, Keiko

    2016-10-05

    Water molecules inside biomolecules constitute integral parts of their structure and participate in the functions of the proteins. Some of the X-ray crystallographic data are insufficient for analyzing a series of ligand-protein complexes in the same condition. We theoretically investigated antibody binding abilities of saccharide ligands and the effects of the inner water molecules of ligand-antibody complexes. Classical molecular dynamics and quantum chemical simulations using a model with possible water molecules inside the protein were performed with saccharide ligands and Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 neutralizing antibody 2G12 complexes to estimate how inner water molecules of the protein affect the dynamics of the complexes as well as the ligand-antibody interaction. Our results indicate the fact that d-fructose's strong affinity to the antibody was partly due to the good retentiveness of solvent water molecules of the ligand and its stability of the ligand's conformation and relative position in the active site. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Cellular glycosylation affects Herceptin binding and sensitivity of breast cancer cells to doxorubicin and growth factors

    PubMed Central

    Peiris, Diluka; Spector, Alexander F.; Lomax-Browne, Hannah; Azimi, Tayebeh; Ramesh, Bala; Loizidou, Marilena; Welch, Hazel; Dwek, Miriam V.

    2017-01-01

    Alterations in protein glycosylation are a key feature of oncogenesis and have been shown to affect cancer cell behaviour perturbing cell adhesion, favouring cell migration and metastasis. This study investigated the effect of N-linked glycosylation on the binding of Herceptin to HER2 protein in breast cancer and on the sensitivity of cancer cells to the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin (DXR) and growth factors (EGF and IGF-1). The interaction between Herceptin and recombinant HER2 protein and cancer cell surfaces (on-rate/off-rate) was assessed using a quartz crystal microbalance biosensor revealing an increase in the accessibility of HER2 to Herceptin following deglycosylation of cell membrane proteins (deglycosylated cells Bmax: 6.83 Hz; glycosylated cells Bmax: 7.35 Hz). The sensitivity of cells to DXR and to growth factors was evaluated using an MTT assay. Maintenance of SKBR-3 cells in tunicamycin (an inhibitor of N-linked glycosylation) resulted in an increase in sensitivity to DXR (0.1 μM DXR P < 0.001) and a decrease in sensitivity to IGF-1 alone and to IGF-1 supplemented with EGF (P < 0.001). This report illustrates the importance of N-linked glycosylation in modulating the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic and biological treatments and highlights the potential of glycosylation inhibitors as future combination treatments for breast cancer. PMID:28223691

  19. Hydration status affects nuclear distribution of transcription factor tonicity responsive enhancer binding protein in rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Cha, J H; Woo, S K; Han, K H; Kim, Y H; Handler, J S; Kim, J; Kwon, H M

    2001-11-01

    Tonicity responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) is the transcription factor that regulates tonicity responsive expression of proteins that catalyze cellular accumulation of compatible osmolytes. In cultured MDCK cells, hypertonicity stimulates the activity of TonEBP via a combination of increased protein abundance and increased nuclear localization. For investigating regulation of TonEBP in the kidney, rats were subjected to water loading or dehydration. Water loading lowered urine osmolality and mRNA expression of sodium/myo-inositol cotransporter (SMIT), a target gene of TonEBP, in the renal medulla; dehydration doubled the urine osmolality and increased SMIT mRNA expression. In contrast, overall abundance of TonEBP and its mRNA measured by immunoblot and ribonuclease protection assay, respectively, was not affected. Immunohistochemical analysis, however, revealed that nuclear distribution of TonEBP is generally increased throughout the medulla in dehydrated animals compared with water loaded animals. Increased nuclear localization was particularly dramatic in thin limbs. Notable exceptions were the middle to terminal portions of the inner medullary collecting ducts and blood vessels, where a change in TonEBP distribution was not evident. Immunohistochemical detection of SMIT mRNA revealed that the changes in nuclear distribution of TonEBP correlate with expression of SMIT. It is concluded that under physiologic conditions, nucleocytoplasmic distribution is the dominant mode of regulation of TonEBP in the renal medulla.

  20. Nanog RNA-binding proteins YBX1 and ILF3 affect pluripotency of embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chuanliang; Xue, Yan; Yang, Guanheng; Yin, Shang; Shi, Wansheng; Cheng, Yan; Yan, Xiaoshuang; Fan, Shuyue; Zhang, Huijun; Zeng, Fanyi

    2016-08-01

    Nanog is a well-known transcription factor that plays a fundamental role in stem cell self-renewal and the maintenance of their pluripotent cell identity. There remains a large data gap with respect to the spectrum of the key pluripotency transcription factors' interaction partners. Limited information is available concerning Nanog-associated RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), and the intrinsic protein-RNA interactions characteristic of the regulatory activities of Nanog. Herein, we used an improved affinity protocol to purify Nanog-interacting RBPs from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and 49 RBPs of Nanog were identified. Among them, the interaction of YBX1 and ILF3 with Nanog mRNA was further confirmed by in vitro assays, such as Western blot, RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP), and ex vivo methods, such as immunofluorescence staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), MS2 in vivo biotin-tagged RNA affinity purification (MS2-BioTRAP). Interestingly, RNAi studies revealed that YBX1 and ILF3 positively affected the expression of Nanog and other pluripotency-related genes. Particularly, downregulation of YBX1 or ILF3 resulted in high expression of mesoderm markers. Thus, a reduction in the expression of YBX1 and ILF3 controls the expression of pluripotency-related genes in ESCs, suggesting their roles in further regulation of the pluripotent state of ESCs.

  1. The pebble GTP exchange factor and the control of cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, L; Somers, W G; Harley, A; Saint, R

    2001-12-01

    Several G proteins of the Rho family have been shown to be required for cytokinesis. The activity of these proteins is regulated by GTP exchange factors (GEFs), which stimulate GDP/GTP exchange, and by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs), which suppress activity by stimulating the intrinsic GTPase activity. The role of Rho family members during cytokinesis is likely to be determined by their spatial and temporal interactions with these factors. Here we focus on the role of the pebble (pbl) gene of Drosophila melanogaster, a RhoGEF that is required for cytokinesis. We summarise the evidence that the primary target of PBL is Rho1 and describe genetic approaches to elucidating the function of PBL and identifying other components of the PBL-activated Rho signalling pathway.

  2. Mammalian translation elongation factor eEF1A2: X-ray structure and new features of GDP/GTP exchange mechanism in higher eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Crepin, Thibaut; Shalak, Vyacheslav F.; Yaremchuk, Anna D.; Vlasenko, Dmytro O.; McCarthy, Andrew; Negrutskii, Boris S.; Tukalo, Michail A.; El'skaya, Anna V.

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic elongation factor eEF1A transits between the GTP- and GDP-bound conformations during the ribosomal polypeptide chain elongation. eEF1A*GTP establishes a complex with the aminoacyl-tRNA in the A site of the 80S ribosome. Correct codon–anticodon recognition triggers GTP hydrolysis, with subsequent dissociation of eEF1A*GDP from the ribosome. The structures of both the ‘GTP’- and ‘GDP’-bound conformations of eEF1A are unknown. Thus, the eEF1A-related ribosomal mechanisms were anticipated only by analogy with the bacterial homolog EF-Tu. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the mammalian eEF1A2*GDP complex which indicates major differences in the organization of the nucleotide-binding domain and intramolecular movements of eEF1A compared to EF-Tu. Our results explain the nucleotide exchange mechanism in the mammalian eEF1A and suggest that the first step of eEF1A*GDP dissociation from the 80S ribosome is the rotation of the nucleotide-binding domain observed after GTP hydrolysis. PMID:25326326

  3. Bile acid salt binding with colesevelam HCl is not affected by suspension in common beverages.

    PubMed

    Hanus, Martin; Zhorov, Eugene

    2006-12-01

    It has been previously reported that anions in common beverages may bind to bile acid sequestrants (BAS), reducing their capacity for binding bile acid salts. This study examined the ability of the novel BAS colesevelam hydrochloride (HCl), in vitro, to bind bile acid sodium salts following suspension in common beverages. Equilibrium binding was evaluated under conditions of constant time and varying concentrations of bile acid salts in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF). A stock solution of sodium salts of glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC), taurodeoxycholic acid (TDC), and glycocholic acid (GC), was added to each prepared sample of colesevelam HCl. Bile acid salt binding was calculated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Kinetics experiments were conducted using constant initial bile acid salt concentrations and varying binding times. The affinity, capacity, and kinetics of colesevelam HCl binding for GCDC, TDC, and GC were not significantly altered after suspension in water, carbonated water, Coca-Cola, Sprite, grape juice, orange juice, tomato juice, or Gatorade. The amount of bile acid sodium salt bound as a function of time was unchanged by pretreatment with any beverage tested. The in vitro binding characteristics of colesevelam HCl are unchanged by suspension in common beverages.

  4. Roscovitine differentially affects CaV2 and Kv channels by binding to the open state.

    PubMed

    Buraei, Zafir; Schofield, Geoffrey; Elmslie, Keith S

    2007-03-01

    Roscovitine potently inhibits cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) and can independently slow the closing of neuronal (CaV2.2) calcium channels. We were interested if this drug could affect other ion channels similarly. Using whole cell recordings, we found that roscovitine specifically slows deactivation of all CaV2 channels (N, P/Q and R) by binding to the open state. This effect had a rapid onset and EC(50)=54, 120 and 54microM for N-, P/Q-, and R-type channels, respectively. Deactivation of other channel types was not slowed, including L-type calcium channels (CaV1.2, CaV1.3), potassium channels (native, Kv4.2, Kv2.1 and Kv1.3), and native sodium channels. However, most of the channels tested were inhibited by roscovitine. The inhibition was characterized by slow development and a lower affinity (EC(50)=100-300microM). Surprisingly, potassium channels were rapidly inhibited with an EC(50)=23microM, which is similar to the EC(50) for roscovitine block of cell division [Meijer, L., Borgne, A., Mulner, O., Chong, J., Blow, J., Inagaki, N., Inagaki, M., Delcros, J., Moulinoux, J., 1997. Biochemical and cellular effects of roscovitine, a potent and selective inhibitor of the cyclin-dependent kinases cdc2, cdk2 and cdk5. Eur. J. Biochem. 243, 527-536]. Potassium current inhibition seemed to result from open channel block. The high potency of these two rapid onset effects makes them complicating factors for ongoing clinical trials and research using roscovitine. Thus, the physiology and pharmacology of slow CaV2 deactivation and potassium channel block must be explored.

  5. Serotonin transporter binding is reduced in seasonal affective disorder following light therapy.

    PubMed

    Tyrer, A E; Levitan, R D; Houle, S; Wilson, A A; Nobrega, J N; Rusjan, P M; Meyer, J H

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the effects of light therapy on serotonin transporter binding (5-HTT BPND ), an index of 5-HTT levels, in the anterior cingulate and prefrontal cortices (ACC and PFC) during winter in seasonal affective disorder (SAD). 5-HTT BPND fluctuates seasonally to a greater extent in SAD relative to health. We hypothesized that in SAD, 5-HTT BPND would be reduced in the ACC and PFC following light therapy. Eleven SAD participants underwent [(11) C] DASB positron emission tomography (PET) scans to measure 5-HTT BPND before and after 2 weeks of daily morning light therapy. The primary finding was a main effect of treatment on 5-HTT BPND in the ACC and PFC (repeated-measures manova, F(2,9) = 6.82, P = 0.016). This effect was significant in the ACC (F(1,10) = 15.11 and P = 0.003, magnitude of decrease, 11.94%) and PFC (F(1,10) = 8.33, P = 0.016, magnitude of decrease, 9.13%). 5-HTT BPND also decreased in other regions assayed following light therapy (repeated-measures manova, F(4,7) = 8.54, P = 0.028) including the hippocampus, ventral striatum, dorsal putamen, thalamus and midbrain (F(1,10) = 8.02-36.94, P < 0.0001-0.018; magnitude -8.83% to -16.74%). These results demonstrate that light therapy reaches an important therapeutic target in the treatment of SAD and provide a basis for improvement of this treatment via application of [(11) C]DASB PET. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Biochemical and functional characterization of Plasmodium falciparum GTP cyclohydrolase I

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Antifolates are currently in clinical use for malaria preventive therapy and treatment. The drugs kill the parasites by targeting the enzymes in the de novo folate pathway. The use of antifolates has now been limited by the spread of drug-resistant mutations. GTP cyclohydrolase I (GCH1) is the first and the rate-limiting enzyme in the folate pathway. The amplification of the gch1 gene found in certain Plasmodium falciparum isolates can cause antifolate resistance and influence the course of antifolate resistance evolution. These findings showed the importance of P. falciparum GCH1 in drug resistance intervention. However, little is known about P. falciparum GCH1 in terms of kinetic parameters and functional assays, precluding the opportunity to obtain the key information on its catalytic reaction and to eventually develop this enzyme as a drug target. Methods Plasmodium falciparum GCH1 was cloned and expressed in bacteria. Enzymatic activity was determined by the measurement of fluorescent converted neopterin with assay validation by using mutant and GTP analogue. The genetic complementation study was performed in ∆folE bacteria to functionally identify the residues and domains of P. falciparum GCH1 required for its enzymatic activity. Plasmodial GCH1 sequences were aligned and structurally modeled to reveal conserved catalytic residues. Results Kinetic parameters and optimal conditions for enzymatic reactions were determined by the fluorescence-based assay. The inhibitor test against P. falciparum GCH1 is now possible as indicated by the inhibitory effect by 8-oxo-GTP. Genetic complementation was proven to be a convenient method to study the function of P. falciparum GCH1. A series of domain truncations revealed that the conserved core domain of GCH1 is responsible for its enzymatic activity. Homology modelling fits P. falciparum GCH1 into the classic Tunnelling-fold structure with well-conserved catalytic residues at the active site. Conclusions

  7. A potential link between insulin signaling and GLUT4 translocation: Association of Rab10-GTP with the exocyst subunit Exoc6/6b

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, Hiroyuki; Peck, Grantley R.; Blachon, Stephanie; Lienhard, Gustav E.

    2015-09-25

    Insulin increases glucose transport in fat and muscle cells by stimulating the exocytosis of specialized vesicles containing the glucose transporter GLUT4. This process, which is referred to as GLUT4 translocation, increases the amount of GLUT4 at the cell surface. Previous studies have provided evidence that insulin signaling increases the amount of Rab10-GTP in the GLUT4 vesicles and that GLUT4 translocation requires the exocyst, a complex that functions in the tethering of vesicles to the plasma membrane, leading to exocytosis. In the present study we show that Rab10 in its GTP form binds to Exoc6 and Exoc6b, which are the two highly homologous isotypes of an exocyst subunit, that both isotypes are found in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and that knockdown of Exoc6, Exoc6b, or both inhibits GLUT4 translocation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. These results suggest that the association of Rab10-GTP with Exoc6/6b is a molecular link between insulin signaling and the exocytic machinery in GLUT4 translocation. - Highlights: • Insulin stimulates the fusion of vesicles containing GLUT4 with the plasma membrane. • This requires vesicular Rab10-GTP and the exocyst plasma membrane tethering complex. • We find that Rab10-GTP associates with the Exoc6 subunit of the exocyst. • We find that knockdown of Exoc6 inhibits fusion of GLUT4 vesicles with the membrane. • The interaction of Rab10-GTP with Exoc6 potentially links signaling to exocytosis.

  8. Tetracycline analogs affecting binding to Tn10-Encoded Tet repressor trigger the same mechanism of induction.

    PubMed

    Lederer, T; Kintrup, M; Takahashi, M; Sum, P E; Ellestad, G A; Hillen, W

    1996-06-11

    We examined the influence of substituents in tetracycline (tc) analogs modified at positions 2 and 4-9 and anhydrotetracycline (atc) on induction of the Tn10-encoded Tet repressor (TetR) by a quantitative in vitro induction assay. The equilibrium association constants of the modified tc to TetR were independently determined to distinguish effects on binding from those on induction. We found a correlation between the binding affinity and induction of TetR for most tc analogs. While a substitution at position 5 revealed only minor effects, changes at position 6 increased binding and induction efficiencies up to 20-fold. A chlorine at position 7 or 8 enhanced binding and induction about 4- and 9-fold, respectively. Substituents at position 9 decreased binding up to 5-fold. Epimerization of the dimethylamino function at position 4 in 4-epi-tc resulted in about 300-fold-reduced binding and 80-fold-reduced induction. Substitution of this grouping by hydrogen in 4-de(dimethylamino)-tc resulted in no binding and no induction. The respective atc analog failed to induce as well, although binding was still observed. The dimethylamino function may, thus, play a role in triggering the conformational change of TetR necessary for induction. Substitution of the 2-carboxamido by a nitrilo function did not influence binding and induction efficiencies. Atc showed about 30-fold increased binding and induction, being the most effective inducer tested in this study. The equilibrium association constants of most TetR-[Mg-tc]+ and TetR-([Mg-tc]+)2 analog complexes with tet operator are decreased about 10(2)- and 10(8)-fold, respectively, as compared to those of free TetR. This suggests that these tc analogs share the same molecular mechanism of TetR induction.

  9. Adenovirus RIDα regulates endosome maturation by mimicking GTP-Rab7

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ankur H.; Cianciola, Nicholas L.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Sönnichsen, Frank D.; Carlin, Cathleen

    2007-01-01

    The small guanosine triphosphatase Rab7 regulates late endocytic trafficking. Rab7-interacting lysosomal protein (RILP) and oxysterol-binding protein–related protein 1L (ORP1L) are guanosine triphosphate (GTP)–Rab7 effectors that instigate minus end–directed microtubule transport. We demonstrate that RILP and ORP1L both interact with the group C adenovirus protein known as receptor internalization and degradation α (RIDα), which was previously shown to clear the cell surface of several membrane proteins, including the epidermal growth factor receptor and Fas (Carlin, C.R., A.E. Tollefson, H.A. Brady, B.L. Hoffman, and W.S. Wold. 1989. Cell. 57:135–144; Shisler, J., C. Yang, B. Walter, C.F. Ware, and L.R. Gooding. 1997. J. Virol. 71:8299–8306). RIDα localizes to endocytic vesicles but is not homologous to Rab7 and is not catalytically active. We show that RIDα compensates for reduced Rab7 or dominant-negative (DN) Rab7(T22N) expression. In vitro, Cu2+ binding to RIDα residues His75 and His76 facilitates the RILP interaction. Site-directed mutagenesis of these His residues results in the loss of RIDα–RILP interaction and RIDα activity in cells. Additionally, expression of the RILP DN C-terminal region hinders RIDα activity during an acute adenovirus infection. We conclude that RIDα coordinates recruitment of these GTP-Rab7 effectors to compartments that would ordinarily be perceived as early endosomes, thereby promoting the degradation of selected cargo. PMID:18039930

  10. Stability of the Octameric Structure Affects Plasminogen-Binding Capacity of Streptococcal Enolase

    PubMed Central

    Law, Ruby H. P.; Casey, Lachlan W.; Valkov, Eugene; Bertozzi, Carlo; Stamp, Anna; Jovcevski, Blagojce; Aquilina, J. Andrew; Whisstock, James C.; Walker, Mark J.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a human pathogen that has the potential to cause invasive disease by binding and activating human plasmin(ogen). Streptococcal surface enolase (SEN) is an octameric α-enolase that is localized at the GAS cell surface. In addition to its glycolytic role inside the cell, SEN functions as a receptor for plasmin(ogen) on the bacterial surface, but the understanding of the molecular basis of plasmin(ogen) binding is limited. In this study, we determined the crystal and solution structures of GAS SEN and characterized the increased plasminogen binding by two SEN mutants. The plasminogen binding ability of SENK312A and SENK362A is ~2- and ~3.4-fold greater than for the wild-type protein. A combination of thermal stability assays, native mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography approaches shows that increased plasminogen binding ability correlates with decreased stability of the octamer. We propose that decreased stability of the octameric structure facilitates the access of plasmin(ogen) to its binding sites, leading to more efficient plasmin(ogen) binding and activation. PMID:25807546

  11. Histamine H3-receptor activation augments voltage-dependent Ca2+ current via GTP hydrolysis in rabbit saphenous artery.

    PubMed

    Oike, M; Kitamura, K; Kuriyama, H

    1992-03-01

    1. Actions of histamine on the voltage-dependent Ba2+(Ca2+) currents (IBa, ICa) were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique on dispersed smooth muscle cells from the rabbit saphenous artery. 2. Histamine (half-maximal dose, EC50 = 530 nM) augmented the IBa evoked by a brief depolarizing pulse (100 ms duration; to +10 mV from a holding potential of -80 mV) in a concentration-dependent manner. The maximum augmentation was obtained with 30 microM-histamine (1.29 times control). This augmentation of IBa was inhibited by the H3-antagonist, thioperamide (Ki = 30 nM, slope of the Schild plot = 1.0), but not by H1- or H2-antagonists (mepyramine or diphenhydramine, or cimetidine, respectively). 3. An H3-agonist, R alpha-methylhistamine (EC50 = 93 nM), also augmented IBa in a concentration-dependent manner at a holding potential of -80 mV and the maximum augmentation (1.25 times control) was obtained with 10 microM. This augmentation was also inhibited by thioperamide, but not by the above H1- and H2- antagonists. 4. Intracellularly applied 500 microM-guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) enhanced, but 1 mM-guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S) abolished, the histamine-induced augmentation of IBa. When one of the non-hydrolysable GTP analogues, guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S; greater than 5 microM), guanylyl-imidodiphosphate (GMP-PNP; 200 microM) or guanylyl (beta, gamma-methylene)-diphosphonate (GMP-PCP; 1 mM) was intracellularly applied, the IBa amplitude evoked without the application of histamine was not affected, but the excitatory effect of histamine on IBa was reversed to an inhibition. Pre-treatment with pertussis toxin (PTX: 300 ng/ml and 3 micrograms/ml) did not modify the histamine-induced responses in the absence or presence of GTP gamma S. 5. 4 beta-Phorbol 12,13-dibutylate (PDBu) increased the amplitude of IBa. However, this action of PDBu was not enhanced by the application of GTP (500 microM) in the pipette, but

  12. Factors affecting the threading of axle molecules through macrocycles: Binding constants for semirotaxane formation

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Thomas; Abushamleh, Ahmad; Busch, Daryle H.

    2002-01-01

    The threading of more or less linear axle molecules through macrocyclic molecules, a fundamental process relating to the formation of interlocked molecular structures, has been investigated through the study in acetone of the equilibrium constants for the formation of pseudorotaxanes by NMR methods. The 30 new axle molecules have in common a secondary ammonium group, present as the thiocyanate salt, and an anthracen-9-ylmethyl group, but are rendered unique by the second amine substituent. All rotaxanes involve the well known polyether macrocycle, benzo[24]crown-8. The constants for the binding of axles having linear groups ranging from 2 to 18 carbon atoms show little variation in binding constant but are divided into two groups by their equilibration rates. Those with less than five methylene groups react rapidly on the NMR timescale, whereas those having more than five methylene groups are slow. Branching inhibits binding, but the effect decreases as the branch is moved away from the amine. Phenyl groups weaken binding when close to the amine but strengthen binding when more remote. Some functional groups decrease pseudorotaxane stability (alcohol functions), whereas others increase binding (carboxylic acid groups). PMID:11959934

  13. Initial Recognition of a Cellodextrin Chain in the Cellulose-Binding Tunnel May Affect Cellobiohydrolase Directional Specificity

    PubMed Central

    GhattyVenkataKrishna, Pavan K.; Alekozai, Emal M.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Schulz, Roland; Crowley, Michael F.; Uberbacher, Edward C.; Cheng, Xiaolin

    2013-01-01

    Cellobiohydrolases processively hydrolyze glycosidic linkages in individual polymer chains of cellulose microfibrils, and typically exhibit specificity for either the reducing or nonreducing end of cellulose. Here, we conduct molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations to examine the initial binding of a cellulose chain into the catalytic tunnel of the reducing-end-specific Family 7 cellobiohydrolase (Cel7A) from Hypocrea jecorina. In unrestrained simulations, the cellulose diffuses into the tunnel from the −7 to the −5 positions, and the associated free energy profiles exhibit no barriers for initial processivity. The comparison of the free energy profiles for different cellulose chain orientations show a thermodynamic preference for the reducing end, suggesting that the preferential initial binding may affect the directional specificity of the enzyme by impeding nonproductive (nonreducing end) binding. Finally, the Trp-40 at the tunnel entrance is shown with free energy calculations to have a significant effect on initial chain complexation in Cel7A. PMID:23442969

  14. Intrinsic GTP hydrolysis is observed for a switch 1 variant of Cdc42 in the presence of a specific GTPase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Morris, Kyla M; Henderson, Rory; Suresh Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy; Heyes, Colin D; Adams, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    The Ras-related protein Cell division cycle 42 (Cdc42) is important in cell-signaling processes. Protein interactions involving Cdc42 occur primarily in flexible "Switch" regions that help regulate effector binding. We studied the kinetics of intrinsic GTP hydrolysis reaction in the absence and presence of a biologically active peptide derivative of a p21-activated kinase effector (PBD46) for wt Cdc42 and compared it to the Switch 1 variant Cdc42(T35A). While the binding of PBD46 to wt Cdc42 results in complete inhibition of GTP hydrolysis, this interaction in Cdc42(T35A) does not. Comparison of the crystal structure of wt Cdc42 in the absence of effector (1AN0.pdb), as well as the NMR structure of wt Cdc42 bound to an effector in the Switch 1 region (1CF4.pdb) ( www.rcsb.org ) suggests that the orientation of T(35) with bound Mg(2+) changes in the presence of effector, resulting in movement of GTP away from the catalytic box leading to the inhibition of GTP hydrolysis. For Cdc42(T35A), molecular dynamics simulations and structural analyses suggest that the nucleotide does not undergo the conformational shift observed for the wt Cdc42-effector interaction. Our data suggest that change in dynamics in the Switch 1 region of Cdc42 caused by the T35A mutation (Chandrashekar, et al. 2011, Biochemistry, 50, p. 6196) fosters a conformation for this Cdc42 variant that allows hydrolysis of GTP in the presence of PBD46, and that alteration of the conformational dynamics could potentially modulate Ras-related over-activity.

  15. Intrinsic GTP hydrolysis is observed for a switch 1 variant of Cdc42 in the presence of a specific GTPase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Kyla M.; Henderson, Rory; Suresh Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy; Heyes, Colin D.; Adams, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Ras-related protein Cell division cycle 42 (Cdc42) is important in cell-signaling processes. Protein interactions involving Cdc42 occur primarily in flexible “Switch” regions that help regulate effector binding. We studied the kinetics of intrinsic GTP hydrolysis reaction in the absence and presence of a biologically active peptide derivative of a p21-activated kinase effector (PBD46) for wt Cdc42 and compared it to the Switch 1 variant Cdc42(T35A). While the binding of PBD46 to wt Cdc42 results in complete inhibition of GTP hydrolysis, this interaction in Cdc42(T35A) does not. Comparison of the crystal structure of wt Cdc42 in the absence of effector (1AN0.pdb), as well as the NMR structure of wt Cdc42 bound to an effector in the Switch 1 region (1CF4.pdb) (www.rcsb.org) suggests that the orientation of T35 with bound Mg2+ changes in the presence of effector, resulting in movement of GTP away from the catalytic box leading to the inhibition of GTP hydrolysis. For Cdc42(T35A), molecular dynamics simulations and structural analyses suggest that the nucleotide does not undergo the conformational shift observed for the wt Cdc42-effector interaction. Our data suggest that change in dynamics in the Switch 1 region of Cdc42 caused by the T35A mutation (Chandrashekar, et al. 2011, Biochemistry, 50, p. 6196) fosters a conformation for this Cdc42 variant that allows hydrolysis of GTP in the presence of PBD46, and that alteration of the conformational dynamics could potentially modulate Ras-related over-activity. PMID:26828437

  16. Feature Binding of Common Everyday Items Is Not Affected by Age

    PubMed Central

    Hoefeijzers, Serge; González Hernández, Alfredis; Magnolia Rios, Angela; Parra, Mario A.

    2017-01-01

    There is a surge of studies confirming that old age spares the ability to bind in visual working memory (VWM) multiple features within singular object representations. Furthermore, it has been suggested that such ability may also be independent of the cultural background of the assessed individual. However, this evidence has been gathered with tasks that use arbitrary bindings of unfamiliar features. Whether age spares memory binding functions when the memoranda are features of everyday life objects remains less well explored. The present study investigated the influence of age, memory delay, and education, on conjunctive binding functions responsible for representing everyday items in VWM. We asked 32 healthy young and 41 healthy older adults to perform a memory binding task. During the task, participants saw visual arrays of objects, colours, or coloured objects presented for 6 s. Immediately after they were asked either to select the objects or the colours that were presented during the study display from larger sets of objects or colours, or to recombine them by selecting from such sets the objects and their corresponding colours. This procedure was repeated immediately after but this time providing a 30 s unfiled delay. We manipulated familiarity by presenting congruent and incongruent object-colour pairings. The results showed that the ability to bind intrinsic features in VWM does not decline with age even when these features belong to everyday items and form novel or well-known associations. Such preserved memory binding abilities held across memory delays. The impact of feature congruency on item-recognition appears to be greater in older than in younger adults. This suggests that long-term memory (LTM) supports binding functions carried out in VWM for familiar everyday items and older adults still benefit from this LTM support. We have expanded the evidence supporting the lack of age effects on VWM binding functions to new feature and object domains (i

  17. Feature Binding of Common Everyday Items Is Not Affected by Age.

    PubMed

    Hoefeijzers, Serge; González Hernández, Alfredis; Magnolia Rios, Angela; Parra, Mario A

    2017-01-01

    There is a surge of studies confirming that old age spares the ability to bind in visual working memory (VWM) multiple features within singular object representations. Furthermore, it has been suggested that such ability may also be independent of the cultural background of the assessed individual. However, this evidence has been gathered with tasks that use arbitrary bindings of unfamiliar features. Whether age spares memory binding functions when the memoranda are features of everyday life objects remains less well explored. The present study investigated the influence of age, memory delay, and education, on conjunctive binding functions responsible for representing everyday items in VWM. We asked 32 healthy young and 41 healthy older adults to perform a memory binding task. During the task, participants saw visual arrays of objects, colours, or coloured objects presented for 6 s. Immediately after they were asked either to select the objects or the colours that were presented during the study display from larger sets of objects or colours, or to recombine them by selecting from such sets the objects and their corresponding colours. This procedure was repeated immediately after but this time providing a 30 s unfiled delay. We manipulated familiarity by presenting congruent and incongruent object-colour pairings. The results showed that the ability to bind intrinsic features in VWM does not decline with age even when these features belong to everyday items and form novel or well-known associations. Such preserved memory binding abilities held across memory delays. The impact of feature congruency on item-recognition appears to be greater in older than in younger adults. This suggests that long-term memory (LTM) supports binding functions carried out in VWM for familiar everyday items and older adults still benefit from this LTM support. We have expanded the evidence supporting the lack of age effects on VWM binding functions to new feature and object domains (i

  18. Nuclear DNA fragmentation negatively affects zona binding competence of Y bearing mouse spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dayanidhi; Upadhya, Dinesh; Uppangala, Shubhashree; Salian, Sujit Raj; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Adiga, Satish Kumar

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the influence of sperm DNA integrity on the zona binding ability of mouse spermatozoa in relation to their sex chromosomal constitution. In this prospective experimental study, the sperm DNA fragmentation was induced by exposing testicular area of Swiss Albino mice (Mus musculus) to different doses of γ-radiation (0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 Gy). Sperm DNA fragmentation was quantified by single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). In vitro sperm zona binding assay was performed and the numbers of zona bound X and Y bearing spermatozoa were determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The assessment of zona pellucida bound X and Y-bearing spermatozoa using fluorescence in situ hybridization has revealed a unique binding pattern. The number of zona bound Y-spermatozoa declined significantly (P < 0.01 to 0.0001) with increase in the DNA damage. The skewed binding pattern of X and Y-bearing sperm was strongly correlated with the extent of sperm DNA damage. The zona pellucida may have a role in preventing DNA damaged mouse sperm binding especially towards Y-bearing sperm. However, the exact mechanism behind this observation needs to be elucidated further.

  19. Dynamic Factors Affecting Gaseous Ligand Binding in an Artificial Oxygen Transport Protein‡

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Andersen, Eskil M.E.; Khajo, Abdelahad; Magliozzo, Richard S.; Koder, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    We report the functional analysis of an artificial hexacoordinate oxygen transport protein, HP7, which operates via a mechanism similar to that of human neuroglobin and cytoglobin: the destabilization of one of two heme-ligating histidine residues. In the case of HP7 this is the result of the coupling of histidine side chain ligation with the burial of three charged glutamate residues on the same helix. Here we compare gaseous ligand binding, including rates, affinities and oxyferrous state lifetimes, of both heme binding sites in HP7. We find that despite the identical sequence of helices in both binding sites, there are differences in oxygen affinity and oxyferrous state lifetime which may be the result of differences in the freedom of motion imposed by the candelabra fold on the two sites of the protein. We further examine the effect of mutational removal of the buried glutamates on function. Heme iron in the ferrous state of this mutant is rapidly oxidized when when exposed to oxygen. Compared to HP7, distal histidine affinity is increased by a 22-fold decrease in the histidine ligand off-rate. EPR comparison of these ferric hemoproteins demonstrates that the mutation increases disorder at the heme binding site. NMR-detected deuterium exchange demonstrates that the mutation greatly increases water penetration into the protein core. The inability of the mutant protein to bind oxygen may be due to increased water penetration, the large decrease in binding rate caused by the increase in distal histidine affinity, or a combination of the two factors. Together these data underline the importance of the control of protein dynamics in the design of functional artificial proteins. PMID:23249163

  20. Phosphorylation states of translational initiation factors affect mRNA cap binding in wheat.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mateen A; Goss, Dixie J

    2004-07-20

    Phosphorylation of eukaryotic translational initiation factors (eIFs) has been shown to be an important means of regulating protein synthesis. Plant initiation factors undergo phosphorylation/dephosphorylation under a variety of stress and growth conditions. We have shown that recombinant wheat cap-binding protein, eIF(iso)4E, produced from E. coli can be phosphorylated in vitro. Phosphorylation of eIF(iso)4E has effects on m(7)G cap-binding affinity similar to those of phosphorylation of mammalian eIF4E even though eIF(iso)4E lacks an amino acid that can be phosphorylated at the residue corresponding to Ser-209, the phosphorylation site in mammalian eIF4E. The cap-binding affinity was reduced 1.2-2.6-fold when eIF(iso)4E was phosphorylated. The in vitro phosphorylation site for wheat eIF(iso)4E was identified as Ser-207. Addition of eIF(iso)4G and eIF4B that had also been phosphorylated in vitro further reduced cap-binding affinity. Temperature-dependent studies showed that DeltaH(degrees) was favorable for cap binding regardless of the phosphorylation state of the initiation factors. The entropy, however, was unfavorable (negative) except when eIF(iso)4E was phosphorylated and interacting with eIF(iso)4G. Phosphorylation may modulate not only cap-binding activity, but other functions of eukaryotic initiation factors as well.

  1. Identification of Residues in Domain III of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac Toxin That Affect Binding and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Kyong; You, Taek H.; Gould, Fred L.; Dean, Donald H.

    1999-01-01

    Alanine substitution mutations in the Cry1Ac domain III region, from amino acid residues 503 to 525, were constructed to study the functional role of domain III in the toxicity and receptor binding of the protein to Lymantria dispar, Manduca sexta, and Heliothis virescens. Five sets of alanine block mutants were generated at the residues 503SS504, 506NNI508, 509QNR511, 522ST523, and 524ST525. Single alanine substitutions were made at the residues 509Q, 510N, 511R, and 513Y. All mutant proteins produced stable toxic fragments as judged by trypsin digestion, midgut enzyme digestion, and circular dichroism spectrum analysis. The mutations, 503SS504-AA, 506NNI508-AAA, 522ST523-AA, 524ST525-AA, and 510N-A affected neither the protein’s toxicity nor its binding to brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) prepared from these insects. Toward L. dispar and M. sexta, the 509QNR511-AAA, 509Q-A, 511R-A, and 513Y-A mutant toxins showed 4- to 10-fold reductions in binding affinities to BBMV, with 2- to 3-fold reductions in toxicity. Toward H. virescens, the 509QNR511-AAA, 509Q-A, 511R-A, and 513Y-mutant toxins showed 8- to 22-fold reductions in binding affinities, but only 509QNR511-AAA and 511R-A mutant toxins reduced toxicity by approximately three to four times. In the present study, greater loss in binding affinity relative to toxicity has been observed. These data suggest that the residues 509Q, 511R, and 513Y in domain III might be only involved in initial binding to the receptor and that the initial binding step becomes rate limiting only when it is reduced more than fivefold. PMID:10508083

  2. Mutations in CypA Binding Region of HIV-1 Capsid Affect Capsid Stability and Viral Replication in Primary Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Setiawan, Laurentia C; van Dort, Karel A; Rits, Maarten A N; Kootstra, Neeltje A

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in the cyclophilin A (CypA) binding region in the HIV-1 capsid affect their dependency on the known HIV-1 cofactor CypA and allow escape from the HIV-1 restriction factor Trim5α in human and simian cells. Here we study the effect of these mutations in the CypA binding region of capsid on cofactor binding, capsid destabilization, and viral replication in primary cells. We showed that the viral capsid with mutations in the CypA binding region (CypA-BR) interacted efficiently with CypA, but had an increased stability upon infection as compared to the wild-type capsid. Interestingly, the wild-type virus was able to infect monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) more efficiently as compared to the CypA-BR mutant variant. The lower infectivity of the CypA-BR mutant virus in MDM was associated with lower levels of reverse transcription products. Similar to the wild-type virus, the CypA-BR mutant variant was unable to induce a strong innate response in primary macrophages. These data demonstrate that mutations in the CypA binding site of the capsid resulted in higher capsid stability and hampered infectivity in macrophages.

  3. Suppression of the GTPase-activating protein RGS10 increases Rheb-GTP and mTOR signaling in ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Molly K.; Alshamrani, Ali A.; Jia, Wei; Nguyen, Ha; Fambrough, Jada M.; Tran, Sterling K.; Patel, Mihir; Hoseinzadeh, Pooya; Beedle, Aaron M.; Murph, Mandi M.

    2015-01-01

    The regulator of G protein signaling 10 (RGS10) protein is a GTPase activating protein that accelerates the hydrolysis of GTP and therefore canonically inactivates G proteins, ultimately terminating signaling. Rheb is a small GTPase protein that shuttles between its GDP- and GTP-bound forms to activate mTOR. Since RGS10 suppression augments ovarian cancer cell viability, we sought to elucidate the molecular mechanism. Following RGS10 suppression in serum-free conditions, phosphorylation of mTOR, the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), p70S6K and S6 Ribosomal Protein appear. Furthermore, suppressing RGS10 increases activated Rheb, suggesting RGS10 antagonizes mTOR signaling via the small G-protein. The effects of RGS10 suppression are enhanced after stimulating cells with the growth factor, lysophosphatidic acid, and reduced with mTOR inhibitors, temsirolimus and INK-128. Suppression of RGS10 leads to an increase in cell proliferation, even in the presence of etoposide. In summary, the RGS10 suppression increases Rheb-GTP and mTOR signaling in ovarian cancer cells. Our results suggest that RGS10 could serve in a novel, and previously unknown, role by accelerating the hydrolysis of GTP from Rheb in ovarian cancer cells. PMID:26319900

  4. Order of application determines the interaction between phorbol esters and GTP-gamma-S in dorsal raphe neurons: evidence that the effect of 5-HT is modified upstream of the G protein Ca channel interaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Penington, N J

    1997-05-01

    Phorbol esters activating protein kinase C (PKC) partially uncouple the inhibitory effect of serotonin (5-HT) from serotonergic neuron Ca2+ current. Presently the site of action of PKC is not known and may be the receptor, G protein, or ion channel. We recorded Ca2+ current from acutely isolated neurons with the use of the patch-clamp technique to study the site of action of PKC. Activation of the G protein with internal guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP-gamma-S) occluded the response to 5-HT, but unexpectedly this effect was not reversed by the addition of the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) despite the voltage-dependent reversal of the effect of GTP-gamma-S by long depolarizing steps to +80 mV. PMA was, however, able to partially reverse 5-HT-induced inhibition of Ca2+ current. The rate of reinhibition of the Ca2+ current (related to the concentration of activated G proteins) by GTP-gamma-S after the addition of PMA at -50 mV was identical to the rate when only GTP-gamma-S was present. By contrast, when cells were exposed first to PMA, and then GTP-gamma-S was perfused into the cell, GTP-gamma-S lost about half of its ability to activate the G protein. The rate of reinhibition of the Ca2+ current by internal GTP-gamma-S was also reduced in cells pretreated with PMA. The original result in which PMA did not reverse the action of GTP-gamma-S suggested that the channel was not the functional site of action of PMA, nor was the site on the G protein that binds to the channel, but it did not rule out the receptor. When the receptor was bypassed, after prior PKC activation, it was found that direct activation of the G protein by a nonhydrolyzable analogue of GTP was reduced; taken as a whole, this indicates that in dorsal raphe, and perhaps other neurons, the site of the critical phosphorylation may be on the G protein and possibly at the GTP binding site.

  5. A wheat embryo cell-free protein synthesis system not requiring an exogenous supply of GTP.

    PubMed

    Koga, Hirohisa; Misawa, Satoru; Shibui, Tatsuro

    2009-01-01

    Most in vitro protein synthesis systems require a supply of GTP for the formation of translation initiation complexes, with two GTP molecules per amino acid needed as an energy source for a peptide elongation reaction. In order to optimize protein synthesis reactions in a continuous-flow wheat embryo cell-free system, we have examined the influence of adding GTP and found that the system does not require any supply of GTP. We report here the preparation of a wheat embryo extract from which endogenous GTP was removed by gel filtration, and the influence of adding GTP to the system on protein synthesis reactions. Using Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) as a reporter, higher levels of production were observed at lower concentrations of GTP, with the optimal level of production obtained with no supply of GTP. A HPLC-based analysis of the extract and the translation mixture containing only ATP as an energy source revealed that GTP was not detectable in the extract, however, 35 microM of GTP was found in the translation mixture. This result suggests that GTP could be generated from other compounds, such as GDP and GMP, using ATP. A similar experiment with a C-terminally truncated form of human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (hPTP1B(1-320)) gave almost the same result. The wheat embryo cell-free translation system worked most efficiently without exogenous GTP, producing 3.5 mg/mL of translation mixture over a 48-h period at 26 degrees C.

  6. Two distinct classes of Ran-binding sites on the nucleoporin Nup-358

    PubMed Central

    Yaseen, Nabeel R.; Blobel, Günter

    1999-01-01

    Nup-358 is a giant nucleoporin located at the tips of the cytoplasmic fibrils of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Its contains four RBH (RanBP1-homologous) domains and a zinc finger domain with eight zinc finger motifs. Using three recombinant fragments of Nup-358 that comprise two of the RBH domains and the zinc finger domain, we show that both RanGDP and RanGTP bind to Nup-358 in vitro. The RBH domains bound either RanGDP or RanGTP. Interestingly, the zinc finger domain was found to bind RanGDP exclusively. Zinc chelation by EDTA treatment abolished the binding of RanGDP to the zinc finger domain without affecting the binding of Ran to the RBH domain. Ultrastructural studies with RanGDP-conjugated colloidal gold in digitonin-permeabilized cells showed a large number of Ran-binding sites on the cytoplasmic fibrils of the NPC. Of those, only a portion that is closer to the central axis of the NPC was sensitive to RanBP1 competition, suggesting that most of the RBH domains of Nup-358 are situated closer to the central axis of the NPC than the zinc finger domain. Thus, the RBH and the zinc finger domains of Nup-358 were identified as two different classes of Ran-binding sites with distinct, ultrastructural locations at the NPC. PMID:10318915

  7. Odorant-binding protein (OBP) genes affect host specificity in a fig-pollinator mutualistic system.

    PubMed

    Wang, N; Wang, N X; Niu, L M; Bian, S N; Xiao, J H; Huang, D W

    2014-10-01

    The interaction between figs and their pollinating wasps is regarded as a model system for studying specialized co-evolved mutualism. Chemoreception of fig wasps plays an important role in this interaction, and odorant-binding proteins (OBP) function in the first step of odorant detection. The OBP repertoire of the fig wasp Ceratosolen solmsi is reported to be one of the smallest among insects; however, it is unknown how these OBPs are related to the complicated mating process occurring within the fig cavity and the extreme host specificity of the species. In the present study, we combined a structural analysis of the conserved cysteine pattern and motif order, a phylogenetic analysis, and previous studies on ligand-binding assays to deduce the function of OBPs. We also quantified the expression of OBP genes in different life stages of female and male fig wasps by using real-time quantitative PCR, which can help to predict the function of these genes. The results indicated that CsolOBP1 and CsolOBP2 (or CsolOBP5) in males may bind to pheromones and play important roles in mate choice, whereas CsolOBP4 and CsolOBP5 may primarily function in host localization by females through binding of volatile compounds emitted by receptive figs.

  8. CacyBP/SIP binds ERK1/2 and affects transcriptional activity of Elk-1

    SciTech Connect

    Kilanczyk, Ewa; Filipek, Slawomir; Jastrzebska, Beata; Filipek, Anna

    2009-02-27

    In this work we showed for the first time that mouse CacyBP/SIP interacts with extracellular signal regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). We also established that a calcium binding protein, S100A6, competes for this interaction. Moreover, the E217K mutant of CacyBP/SIP does not bind significantly to ERK1/2 although it retains the ability to interact with S100A6. Molecular modeling shows that the E217K mutation in the 189-219 CacyBP/SIP fragment markedly changes its electrostatic potential, suggesting that the binding with ERK1/2 might have an electrostatic character. We also demonstrate that CacyBP/SIP-ERK1/2 interaction inhibits phosphorylation of the Elk-1 transcription factor in vitro and in the nuclear fraction of NB2a cells. Altogether, our data suggest that the binding of CacyBP/SIP with ERK1/2 might regulate Elk-1 phosphorylation/transcriptional activity and that S100A6 might further modulate this effect via Ca{sup 2+}-dependent interaction with CacyBP/SIP and competition with ERK1/2.

  9. A new locus affects cell motility, cellulose binding, and degradation by Cytophaga hutchinsonii.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaofei; Xu, Yuanxi; Zhang, Cong; Chen, Ning; Lu, Xuemei

    2012-10-01

    Cytophaga hutchinsonii is a Gram-negative gliding bacterium, which can rapidly degrade crystalline cellulose via a novel strategy without any recognizable processive cellulases. Its mechanism of cellulose binding and degradation is still a mystery. In this study, the mutagenesis of C. hutchinsonii with the mariner-based transposon HimarEm3 and gene complementation with the oriC-based plasmid carrying the antibiotic resistance gene cfxA or tetQ were reported for the first time to provide valuable tools for mutagenesis and genetic manipulation of the bacterium. Mutant A-4 with a transposon mutation in gene CHU_0134, which encodes a putative thiol-disulfide isomerase exhibits defects in cell motility and cellulose degradation. The cellulose binding ability of A-4 was only half of that of the wild-type strain, while the endo-cellulase activity of the cell-free supernatants and on the intact cell surface of A-4 decreased by 40%. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of proteins binding to cellulose in the outer membrane showed that most of them were significantly decreased or disappeared in A-4 including some Gld proteins and hypothetical proteins, indicating that these proteins might play an important role in cell motility and cellulose binding and degradation by the bacterium.

  10. The Binding Ring Illusion: assimilation affects the perceived size of a circular array.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, J Daniel; Kupitz, Colin; Caplovitz, Gideon P

    2013-01-01

    Our perception of an object's size arises from the integration of multiple sources of visual information including retinal size, perceived distance and its size relative to other objects in the visual field. This constructive process is revealed through a number of classic size illusions such as the Delboeuf Illusion, the Ebbinghaus Illusion and others illustrating size constancy. Here we present a novel variant of the Delbouef and Ebbinghaus size illusions that we have named the Binding Ring Illusion. The illusion is such that the perceived size of a circular array of elements is underestimated when superimposed by a circular contour - a binding ring - and overestimated when the binding ring slightly exceeds the overall size of the array. Here we characterize the stimulus conditions that lead to the illusion, and the perceptual principles that underlie it. Our findings indicate that the perceived size of an array is susceptible to the assimilation of an explicitly defined superimposed contour. Our results also indicate that the assimilation process takes place at a relatively high level in the visual processing stream, after different spatial frequencies have been integrated and global shape has been constructed. We hypothesize that the Binding Ring Illusion arises due to the fact that the size of an array of elements is not explicitly defined and therefore can be influenced (through a process of assimilation) by the presence of a superimposed object that does have an explicit size.

  11. CacyBP/SIP binds ERK1/2 and affects transcriptional activity of Elk-1.

    PubMed

    Kilanczyk, Ewa; Filipek, Slawomir; Jastrzebska, Beata; Filipek, Anna

    2009-02-27

    In this work we showed for the first time that mouse CacyBP/SIP interacts with extracellular signal regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). We also established that a calcium binding protein, S100A6, competes for this interaction. Moreover, the E217K mutant of CacyBP/SIP does not bind significantly to ERK1/2 although it retains the ability to interact with S100A6. Molecular modeling shows that the E217K mutation in the 189-219 CacyBP/SIP fragment markedly changes its electrostatic potential, suggesting that the binding with ERK1/2 might have an electrostatic character. We also demonstrate that CacyBP/SIP-ERK1/2 interaction inhibits phosphorylation of the Elk-1 transcription factor in vitro and in the nuclear fraction of NB2a cells. Altogether, our data suggest that the binding of CacyBP/SIP with ERK1/2 might regulate Elk-1 phosphorylation/transcriptional activity and that S100A6 might further modulate this effect via Ca(2+)-dependent interaction with CacyBP/SIP and competition with ERK1/2.

  12. The Binding Ring Illusion: assimilation affects the perceived size of a circular array

    PubMed Central

    Caplovitz, Gideon P

    2013-01-01

    Our perception of an object’s size arises from the integration of multiple sources of visual information including retinal size, perceived distance and its size relative to other objects in the visual field. This constructive process is revealed through a number of classic size illusions such as the Delboeuf Illusion, the Ebbinghaus Illusion and others illustrating size constancy. Here we present a novel variant of the Delbouef and Ebbinghaus size illusions that we have named the Binding Ring Illusion. The illusion is such that the perceived size of a circular array of elements is underestimated when superimposed by a circular contour – a binding ring – and overestimated when the binding ring slightly exceeds the overall size of the array. Here we characterize the stimulus conditions that lead to the illusion, and the perceptual principles that underlie it. Our findings indicate that the perceived size of an array is susceptible to the assimilation of an explicitly defined superimposed contour. Our results also indicate that the assimilation process takes place at a relatively high level in the visual processing stream, after different spatial frequencies have been integrated and global shape has been constructed. We hypothesize that the Binding Ring Illusion arises due to the fact that the size of an array of elements is not explicitly defined and therefore can be influenced (through a process of assimilation) by the presence of a superimposed object that does have an explicit size. PMID:24555042

  13. Mutagenesis in the switch IV of the helical domain of the human Gsalpha reduces its GDP/GTP exchange rate.

    PubMed

    Echeverría, V; Hinrichs, M V; Torrejón, M; Ropero, S; Martinez, J; Toro, M J; Olate, J

    2000-01-01

    The Galpha subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins are constituted by a conserved GTPase "Ras-like" domain (RasD) and by a unique alpha-helical domain (HD). Upon GTP binding, four regions, called switch I, II, III, and IV, have been identified as undergoing structural changes. Switch I, II, and III are located in RasD and switch IV in HD. All Galpha known functions, such as GTPase activity and receptor, effector, and Gbetagamma interaction sites have been found to be localized in RasD, but little is known about the role of HD and its switch IV region. Through the construction of chimeras between human and Xenopus Gsalpha we have previously identified a HD region, encompassing helices alphaA, alphaB, and alphaC, that was responsible for the observed functional differences in their capacity to activate adenylyl cyclase (Antonelli et al. [1994]: FEBS Lett 340:249-254). Since switch IV is located within this region and contains most of the nonconservative amino acid differences between both Gsalpha proteins, in the present work we constructed two human Gsalpha mutant proteins in which we have changed four and five switch IV residues for the ones present in the Xenopus protein. Mutants M15 (hGsalphaalphaS133N, M135P, P138K, P143S) and M17 (hGsalphaalphaS133N, M135P, V137Y, P138K, P143S) were expressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized by their ability to bind GTPgammaS, dissociate GDP, hydrolyze GTP, and activate adenylyl cyclase. A decreased rate of GDP release, GTPgammaS binding, and GTP hydrolysis was observed for both mutants, M17 having considerably slower kinetics than M15 for all functions tested. Reconstituted adenylyl cyclase activity with both mutants showed normal activation in the presence of AlF(4)(-), but a decreased activation with GTPgammaS, which is consistent with the lower GDP dissociating rate they displayed. These data provide new evidence on the role that HD is playing in modulating the GDP/GTP exchange of the Gsalpha subunit.

  14. Purified recombinant human prosaposin forms oligomers that bind procathepsin D and affect its autoactivation

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Before delivery to endosomes, portions of proCD (procathepsin D) and proSAP (prosaposin) are assembled into complexes. We demonstrate that such complexes are also present in secretions of cultured cells. To study the formation and properties of the complexes, we purified proCD and proSAP from culture media of Spodoptera frugiperda cells that were infected with baculoviruses bearing the respective cDNAs. The biological activity of proCD was demonstrated by its pH-dependent autoactivation to pseudocathepsin D and that of proSAP was demonstrated by feeding to saposin-deficient cultured cells that corrected the storage of radioactive glycolipids. In gel filtration, proSAP behaved as an oligomer and proCD as a monomer. ProSAP altered the elution of proCD such that the latter was shifted into proSAP-containing fractions. ProSAP did not change the elution of mature cathepsin D. Using surface plasmon resonance and an immobilized biotinylated proCD, binding of proSAP was demonstrated under neutral and weakly acidic conditions. At pH 6.8, specific binding appeared to involve more than one binding site on a proSAP oligomer. The dissociation of the first site was characterized by a KD1 of 5.8±2.9×10−8 M−1 (calculated for the monomer). ProSAP stimulated the autoactivation of proCD and also the activity of pseudocathepsin D. Concomitant with the activation, proSAP behaved as a substrate yielding tri- and disaposins and smaller fragments. Our results demonstrate that proSAP forms oligomers that are capable of binding proCD spontaneously and independent of the mammalian type N-glycosylation but not capable of binding mature cathepsin D. In addition to binding proSAP, proCD behaves as an autoactivable and processing enzyme and its binding partner as an activator and substrate. PMID:15255780

  15. Crystal structure of rat GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein, GFRP.

    PubMed

    Bader, G; Schiffmann, S; Herrmann, A; Fischer, M; Gütlich, M; Auerbach, G; Ploom, T; Bacher, A; Huber, R; Lemm, T

    2001-10-05

    Tetrahydrobiopterin, the cofactor required for hydroxylation of aromatic amino acids regulates its own synthesis in mammals through feedback inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I. This mechanism is mediated by a regulatory subunit called GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). The 2.6 A resolution crystal structure of rat GFRP shows that the protein forms a pentamer. This indicates a model for the interaction of mammalian GTP cyclohydrolase I with its regulator, GFRP. Kinetic investigations of human GTP cyclohydrolase I in complex with rat and human GFRP showed similar regulatory effects of both GFRP proteins.

  16. Specific Fluorine Labeling of the HyHEL10 Antibody Affects Antigen Binding and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Acchione, Mauro; Lee, Yi-Chien; DeSantis, Morgan E.; Lipschultz, Claudia A.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Li, Mi; Shanmuganathan, Aranganathan; Walter, Richard L.; Smith-Gill, Sandra; Barchi, Jr., Joseph J.

    2012-10-16

    To more fully understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for variations in binding affinity with antibody maturation, we explored the use of site specific fluorine labeling and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Several single-chain (scFv) antibodies, derived from an affinity-matured series of anti-hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) mouse IgG1, were constructed with either complete or individual replacement of tryptophan residues with 5-fluorotryptophan ({sup 5F}W). An array of biophysical techniques was used to gain insight into the impact of fluorine substitution on the overall protein structure and antigen binding. SPR measurements indicated that {sup 5F}W incorporation lowered binding affinity for the HEL antigen. The degree of analogue impact was residue-dependent, and the greatest decrease in affinity was observed when {sup 5F}W was substituted for residues near the binding interface. In contrast, corresponding crystal structures in complex with HEL were essentially indistinguishable from the unsubstituted antibody. {sup 19}F NMR analysis showed severe overlap of signals in the free fluorinated protein that was resolved upon binding to antigen, suggesting very distinct chemical environments for each {sup 5F}W in the complex. Preliminary relaxation analysis suggested the presence of chemical exchange in the antibody-antigen complex that could not be observed by X-ray crystallography. These data demonstrate that fluorine NMR can be an extremely useful tool for discerning structural changes in scFv antibody-antigen complexes with altered function that may not be discernible by other biophysical techniques.

  17. The Protein Partners of GTP Cyclohydrolase I in Rat Organs

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jianhai; Teng, Ru-Jeng; Lawrence, Matt; Guan, Tongju; Xu, Hao; Ge, Ying; Shi, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Objective GTP cyclohydrolase I (GCH1) is the rate-limiting enzyme for tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis and has been shown to be a promising therapeutic target in ischemic heart disease, hypertension, atherosclerosis and diabetes. The endogenous GCH1-interacting partners have not been identified. Here, we determined endogenous GCH1-interacting proteins in rat. Methods and Results A pulldown and proteomics approach were used to identify GCH1 interacting proteins in rat liver, brain, heart and kidney. We demonstrated that GCH1 interacts with at least 17 proteins including GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) in rat liver by affinity purification followed by proteomics and validated six protein partners in liver, brain, heart and kidney by immunoblotting. GCH1 interacts with GFRP and very long-chain specific acyl-CoA dehydrogenase in the liver, tubulin beta-2A chain in the liver and brain, DnaJ homolog subfamily A member 1 and fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase in the liver, heart and kidney and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit I (EIF3I) in all organs tested. Furthermore, GCH1 associates with mitochondrial proteins and GCH1 itself locates in mitochondria. Conclusion GCH1 interacts with proteins in an organ dependant manner and EIF3I might be a general regulator of GCH1. Our finding indicates GCH1 might have broader functions beyond tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis. PMID:22479495

  18. Familial paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia: atypical presentation of autosomal dominant GTP-cyclohydrolase 1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Dale, Russell C; Melchers, Anna; Fung, Victor S C; Grattan-Smith, Padraic; Houlden, Henry; Earl, John

    2010-06-01

    Paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia (PED) is one of the rarer forms of paroxysmal dyskinesia, and can occur in sporadic or familial forms. We report a family (male index case, mother and maternal grandfather) with autosomal dominant inheritance of paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia. The dystonia began in childhood and was only ever induced after many minutes of exercise, and was never present at rest, or on initiation of movements. In addition, family members suffered restless legs syndrome (RLS), depression, and adult-onset Parkinsonism. The index case had low cerebrospinal fluid neurotransmitters and pterins. The PED and RLS stopped on initiation of L-Dopa therapy. Both live family members were found to have a nonsense mutation (p.E84X) in exon 1 of the GTP-cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH-1) gene. We propose that GCH-1 mutations should be considered a genetic cause of familial PED, especially if additional clinical features of monoaminergic deficiency are present in affected individuals.

  19. The targeting of the atToc159 preprotein receptor to the chloroplast outer membrane is mediated by its GTPase domain and is regulated by GTP

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew D.; Hiltbrunner, Andreas; Kessler, Felix; Schnell, Danny J.

    2002-01-01

    The multimeric translocon at the outer envelope membrane of chloroplasts (Toc) initiates the recognition and import of nuclear-encoded preproteins into chloroplasts. Two Toc GTPases, Toc159 and Toc33/34, mediate preprotein recognition and regulate preprotein translocation. Although these two proteins account for the requirement of GTP hydrolysis for import, the functional significance of GTP binding and hydrolysis by either GTPase has not been defined. A recent study indicates that Toc159 is equally distributed between a soluble cytoplasmic form and a membrane-inserted form, raising the possibility that it might cycle between the cytoplasm and chloroplast as a soluble preprotein receptor. In the present study, we examined the mechanism of targeting and insertion of the Arabidopsis thaliana orthologue of Toc159, atToc159, to chloroplasts. Targeting of atToc159 to the outer envelope membrane is strictly dependent only on guanine nucleotides. Although GTP is not required for initial binding, the productive insertion and assembly of atToc159 into the Toc complex requires its intrinsic GTPase activity. Targeting is mediated by direct binding between the GTPase domain of atToc159 and the homologous GTPase domain of atToc33, the Arabidopsis Toc33/34 orthologue. Our findings demonstrate a role for the coordinate action of the Toc GTPases in assembly of the functional Toc complex at the chloroplast outer envelope membrane. PMID:12473690

  20. Amino acid polymorphisms in the fibronectin-binding repeats of fibronectin-binding protein A affect bond strength and fibronectin conformation.

    PubMed

    Casillas-Ituarte, Nadia N; Cruz, Carlos H B; Lins, Roberto D; DiBartola, Alex C; Howard, Jessica; Liang, Xiaowen; Höök, Magnus; Viana, Isabelle F T; Sierra-Hernández, M Roxana; Lower, Steven K

    2017-04-11

    The Staphylococcus aureus cell surface contains cell wall-anchored proteins such as fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBPA) that bind to host ligands (e.g. fibronectin; Fn) present in the extracellular matrix of tissue or coatings on cardiac implants. Recent clinical studies have found a correlation between cardiovascular infections caused by S. aureus and nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in FnBPA. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and molecular simulations were used to investigate interactions between Fn and each of eight, 20-mer peptide variants containing amino acids A, H, I, K, N, and Q at positions equivalent to 782 and/or 786 in Fn-binding repeat-9 (FnBR-9) of FnBPA. Experimentally measured bond lifetimes (1/koff ) and dissociation constants (Kd = koff / kon ), determined by mechanically dissociating the Fn-peptide complex at loading rates relevant to the cardiovascular system varied from the lowest-affinity H782A+K786A peptide (0.011 sec, 747 µM) to the highest-affinity H782Q+K786N peptide (0.192 sec, 15.7 µM). These AFM results tracked remarkably well to metadynamics simulations in which peptide detachment was defined solely by the free-energy landscape. Simulations and SPR experiments suggested that an Fn conformational change may enhance the stability of the binding complex for peptides with K786I or H782Q+K786I (Kd(app) = 0.2 to 0.5 µM. as determined by SPR) compared with the lowest-affinity double alanine peptide (Kd(app) = 3.8 µM). Together, these findings demonstrate that amino acid substitutions in FnBR-9 can significantly affect bond strength and influence the conformation of Fn upon binding. They provide a mechanistic explanation for the observation of nonsynonymous SNPs in fnbA) among clinical isolates of S. aureus that cause endovascular infections.

  1. Cell surface sialylation affects binding of enterovirus 71 to rhabdomyosarcoma and neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative agent of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD), and infection of EV71 to central nerve system (CNS) may result in a high mortality in children less than 2 years old. Although there are two highly glycosylated membrane proteins, SCARB2 and PSGL-1, which have been identified as the cellular and functional receptors of EV71, the role of glycosylation in EV71 infection is still unclear. Results We demonstrated that the attachment of EV71 to RD and SK-N-SH cells was diminished after the removal of cell surface sialic acids by neuraminidase. Sialic acid specific lectins, Maackia amurensis (MAA) and Sambucus Nigra (SNA), could compete with EV71 and restrained the binding of EV71 significantly. Preincubation of RD cells with fetuin also reduced the binding of EV71. In addition, we found that SCARB2 was a sialylated glycoprotein and interaction between SCARB2 and EV71 was retarded after desialylation. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated that cell surface sialic acids assist in the attachment of EV71 to host cells. Cell surface sialylation should be a key regulator that facilitates the binding and infection of EV71 to RD and SK-N-SH cells. PMID:22853823

  2. UV irradiation affects melanocyte stimulatory activity and protein binding of piperine.

    PubMed

    Soumyanath, Amala; Venkatasamy, Radhakrishnan; Joshi, Meghna; Faas, Laura; Adejuyigbe, Bimpe; Drake, Alex F; Hider, Robert C; Young, Antony R

    2006-01-01

    Piperine, the major alkaloid of black pepper (Piper nigrum L.; Piperaceae), stimulates melanocyte proliferation and dendrite formation in vitro. This property renders it a potential treatment for the skin depigmentation disorder vitiligo. However, piperine does not stimulate melanin synthesis in vitro, and treatments based on this compound may therefore be more effective with concomitant exposure of the skin to ultraviolet (UV) radiation or sunlight. The present study investigated the effect of UVA and simulated solar radiation (SSR) on the chemical stability of piperine, its melanocyte stimulatory effects and its ability to bind protein and DNA. Chromatographic and spectroscopic analysis confirmed the anticipated photoisomerization of irradiated piperine and showed the absence of any hydrolysis to piperinic acid. Isomerization resulted in the loss of ability to stimulate proliferation of a mouse melanocyte cell line, and to bind to human serum albumin. There was no evidence of DNA binding by piperine either before or after irradiation, showing the absence of photoadduct formation by either piperine or its geometric isomers. This is unlike the situation with psoralens, which form DNA adducts when administered with UVA in treating skin diseases. The present study suggests that exposure to bright sunlight should be avoided both during active application of piperine to the skin and in the storage of piperine products. If UVA radiation is used with piperine in the treatment of vitiligo, application of the compound and irradiation should be staggered to minimize photoisomerization. This approach is shown to effectively induce pigmentation in a sparsely pigmented mouse strain.

  3. The neurofibromin recruitment factor Spred1 binds to the GAP related domain without affecting Ras inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Dunzendorfer-Matt, Theresia; Mercado, Ellen L.; Maly, Karl; McCormick, Frank; Scheffzek, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and Legius syndrome are related diseases with partially overlapping symptoms caused by alterations of the tumor suppressor genes NF1 (encoding the protein neurofibromin) and SPRED1 (encoding sprouty-related, EVH1 domain-containing protein 1, Spred1), respectively. Both proteins are negative regulators of Ras/MAPK signaling with neurofibromin functioning as a Ras-specific GTPase activating protein (GAP) and Spred1 acting on hitherto undefined components of the pathway. Importantly, neurofibromin has been identified as a key protein in the development of cancer, as it is genetically altered in a large number of sporadic human malignancies unrelated to NF1. Spred1 has previously been demonstrated to interact with neurofibromin via its N-terminal Ena/VASP Homology 1 (EVH1) domain and to mediate membrane translocation of its target dependent on its C-terminal Sprouty domain. However, the region of neurofibromin required for the interaction with Spred1 has remained unclear. Here we show that the EVH1 domain of Spred1 binds to the noncatalytic (GAPex) portion of the GAP-related domain (GRD) of neurofibromin. Binding is compatible with simultaneous binding of Ras and does not interfere with GAP activity. Our study points to a potential targeting function of the GAPex subdomain of neurofibromin that is present in all known canonical RasGAPs. PMID:27313208

  4. Cardiac myosin binding protein C phosphorylation affects cross-bridge cycle's elementary steps in a site-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Sadayappan, Sakthivel; Kawai, Masakata

    2014-01-01

    Based on our recent finding that cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C) phosphorylation affects muscle contractility in a site-specific manner, we further studied the force per cross-bridge and the kinetic constants of the elementary steps in the six-state cross-bridge model in cMyBP-C mutated transgenic mice for better understanding of the influence of cMyBP-C phosphorylation on contractile functions. Papillary muscle fibres were dissected from cMyBP-C mutated mice of ADA (Ala273-Asp282-Ala302), DAD (Asp273-Ala282-Asp302), SAS (Ser273-Ala282-Ser302), and t/t (cMyBP-C null) genotypes, and the results were compared to transgenic mice expressing wide-type (WT) cMyBP-C. Sinusoidal analyses were performed with serial concentrations of ATP, phosphate (Pi), and ADP. Both t/t and DAD mutants significantly reduced active tension, force per cross-bridge, apparent rate constant (2πc), and the rate constant of cross-bridge detachment. In contrast to the weakened ATP binding and enhanced Pi and ADP release steps in t/t mice, DAD mice showed a decreased ADP release without affecting the ATP binding and the Pi release. ADA showed decreased ADP release, and slightly increased ATP binding and cross-bridge detachment steps, whereas SAS diminished the ATP binding step and accelerated the ADP release step. t/t has the broadest effects with changes in most elementary steps of the cross-bridge cycle, DAD mimics t/t to a large extent, and ADA and SAS predominantly affect the nucleotide binding steps. We conclude that the reduced tension production in DAD and t/t is the result of reduced force per cross-bridge, instead of the less number of strongly attached cross-bridges. We further conclude that cMyBP-C is an allosteric activator of myosin to increase cross-bridge force, and its phosphorylation status modulates the force, which is regulated by variety of protein kinases.

  5. Nutritional stress affects an atypical cap-binding protein in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Zinoviev, Alexandra; Manor, Shachar; Shapira, Michal

    2012-12-01

    Many eukaryotes encode multiple isoforms of the cap-binding translation initiation factor (eIF4E). Leishmanias and other trypanosomatids encode four paralogs of this protein, but none can complement the eIF4E function in a yeast mutant. A low conservation is observed between the four paralogs, suggesting they assist these organisms survive a multitude of conditions encountered throughout the life cycle. Earlier attempts to decipher their function led to identification of LeishIF4E-4 as the canonical translation initiation factor. LeishIF4E-1 appears to function during thermal stress, via a mechanism not yet understood. LeishIF4E-3 hardly binds cap-4 and is, therefore, less likely to serve as a typical initiation factor. Although it interacts with an eIF4G homolog, LeishIF4G-4, the two polypeptides do not co-migrate on sucrose gradients. While LeishIF4E-3 enters large particles that increase in size during nutritional stress, LeishIF4G-4 is found only in the top fractions. Confocal microscopy localized LeishIF4E-3 (but not LeishIF4G-4) within nutritional stress-induced granules. Accordingly, interaction between the two proteins reduced upon starvation. We therefore propose that under normal conditions, LeishIF4G-4 sequesters LeishIF4E-3 in the cytoplasm. During a nutritional stress, LeishIF4E-3 is modified and released from LeishIF4G-4 to enter stress granules, where inactive mRNAs are stored. Binding of LeishIF4G-4 to LeishIF4E-3 requires a short peptide within the LeishIF4G-4 N-terminus, which bears no similarity to the consensus 4E-binding peptide, YXXXXLΦ. Mutational analysis combined with structure prediction indicates that this interaction is based on an obligatory, conserved α helix in LeishIF4G-4. These features further highlight the uniqueness of LeishIF4E-3 and how it interacts with its binding partners.

  6. Simplified /sup 14/CO/sub 2/-trapping microassay for GTP cyclohydrolases I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, R.S.; Abell, C.W.

    1986-05-01

    GTP cyclohydrolases (GTP-CH) I and II catalyze the removal of the C/sub 8/ atom from GTP as formate. The reaction product of GTP-CH I is D-erythro-7,8-dihydroneopterin triphosphate, a key intermediate leading to the biosynthesis of folic acid in microorganisms and of tetrahydrobiopterin in mammals and microorganisms, and that of GTP-CH II is 2,5-diamino-6-hydroxy-4-(ribosylamino)pyrimidine 5'-phosphate, a key intermediate in the biosynthesis of riboflavin in microorganisms. They have simplified the /sup 14/CO/sub 2/-trapping assay of Burg and Brown for determining GTP-CH I and II activities. The assay consists of two consecutive steps which are carried out in a 2 ml tube. The first reaction yields formate from GTP (37/sup 0/C, 10 min). The reaction mixture contains 1 mM (8-/sup 14/C)-GTP (0.5 ..mu..Ci/..mu..mol), 50 mM Tris-HCl buffer (pH 8.2 for GTP-CH II and 7.7 for GTP-CH I), 0.2 M MgCl/sub 2/ for GTP-CH II or 0.3 M KCl and 1 mM EDTA for GTP-CH I, and enzyme in a final volume of 0.2 ml. The second reaction is the oxidation of /sup 14/C-formate to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ (95/sup 0/C, 20 min) in the presence of 5% TCA and 1 mM formate (final volume 0.3 ml). Liberated /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ is trapped by the folded filter paper strip (1 x 4 cm), that has been placed inside the top of each tube and impregnated with 30 ..mu..l Protosol. This method is fast, comparable to the HPLC-fluorometric method for the assay of GTP-CH I activity, and ideal for performing a large number of determinations. Human and rat liver express both GTP-CH I and II activities. GTP-CH II is the predominant enzyme in both tissues and exists in multiple forms.

  7. SVOP Is a Nucleotide Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jia; Bajjalieh, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Synaptic Vesicle Protein 2 (SV2) and SV2-related protein (SVOP) are transporter-like proteins that localize to neurotransmitter-containing vesicles. Both proteins share structural similarity with the major facilitator (MF) family of small molecule transporters. We recently reported that SV2 binds nucleotides, a feature that has also been reported for another MF family member, the human glucose transporter 1 (Glut1). In the case of Glut1, nucleotide binding affects transport activity. In this study, we determined if SVOP also binds nucleotides and assessed its nucleotide binding properties. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed in vitro photoaffinity labeling experiments with the photoreactive ATP analogue, 8-azido-ATP[γ] biotin and purified recombinant SVOP-FLAG fusion protein. We found that SVOP is a nucleotide-binding protein, although both its substrate specificity and binding site differ from that of SV2. Within the nucleotides tested, ATP, GTP and NAD show same level of inhibition on SVOP-FLAG labeling. Dose dependent studies indicated that SVOP demonstrates the highest affinity for NAD, in contrast to SV2, which binds both NAD and ATP with equal affinity. Mapping of the binding site revealed a single region spanning transmembrane domains 9–12, which contrasts to the two binding sites in the large cytoplasmic domains in SV2A. Conclusions/Significance SVOP is the third MF family member to be found to bind nucleotides. Given that the binding sites are unique in SVOP, SV2 and Glut1, this feature appears to have arisen separately. PMID:19390693

  8. Rice LGD1 containing RNA binding activity affects growth and development through alternative promoters.

    PubMed

    Thangasamy, Saminathan; Chen, Pei-Wei; Lai, Ming-Hsing; Chen, Jychian; Jauh, Guang-Yuh

    2012-07-01

    Tiller initiation and panicle development are important agronomical traits for grain production in Oryza sativa L. (rice), but their regulatory mechanisms are not yet fully understood. In this study, T-DNA mutant and RNAi transgenic approaches were used to functionally characterize a unique rice gene, LAGGING GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 1 (LGD1). The lgd1 mutant showed slow growth, reduced tiller number and plant height, altered panicle architecture and reduced grain yield. The fewer unelongated internodes and cells in lgd1 led to respective reductions in tiller number and to semi-dwarfism. Several independent LGD1-RNAi lines exhibited defective phenotypes similar to those observed in lgd1. Interestingly, LGD1 encodes multiple transcripts with different transcription start sites (TSSs), which were validated by RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of 5' and 3' cDNA ends (RLM-RACE). Additionally, GUS assays and a luciferase promoter assay confirmed the promoter activities of LGD1.1 and LGD1.5. LGD1 encoding a von Willebrand factor type A (vWA) domain containing protein is a single gene in rice that is seemingly specific to grasses. GFP-tagged LGD1 isoforms were predominantly detected in the nucleus, and weakly in the cytoplasm. In vitro northwestern analysis showed the RNA-binding activity of the recombinant C-terminal LGD1 protein. Our results demonstrated that LGD1 pleiotropically regulated rice vegetative growth and development through both the distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns of its multiple transcripts and RNA binding activity. Hence, the study of LGD1 will strengthen our understanding of the molecular basis of the multiple transcripts, and their corresponding polypeptides with RNA binding activity, that regulate pleiotropic effects in rice.

  9. Special AT-rich Binding Protein-2 (SATB2) Differentially Affects Disease-causing p63 Mutant Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jacky; Grant, R. Ian; Kaplan, David R.; Irwin, Meredith S.

    2011-01-01

    p63, a p53 family member, is critical for proper skin and limb development and directly regulates gene expression in the ectoderm. Mice lacking p63 exhibit skin and craniofacial defects including cleft palate. In humans p63 mutations are associated with several distinct developmental syndromes. p63 sterile-α-motif domain, AEC (ankyloblepharon-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting)-associated mutations are associated with a high prevalence of orofacial clefting disorders, which are less common in EEC (ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting) patients with DNA binding domain p63 mutations. However, the mechanisms by which these mutations differentially influence p63 function remain unclear, and interactions with other proteins implicated in craniofacial development have not been identified. Here, we show that AEC p63 mutations affect the ability of the p63 protein to interact with special AT-rich binding protein-2 (SATB2), which has recently also been implicated in the development of cleft palate. p63 and SATB2 are co-expressed early in development in the ectoderm of the first and second branchial arches, two essential sites where signaling is required for craniofacial patterning. SATB2 attenuates p63-mediated gene expression of perp (p53 apoptosis effector related to PMP-22), a critical downstream target gene during development, and specifically decreases p63 perp promoter binding. Interestingly, AEC but not EEC p63 mutations affect the ability of p63 to interact with SATB2 and the inhibitory effects of SATB2 on p63 transactivation of perp are most pronounced for AEC-associated p63 mutations. Our findings reveal a novel gain-of-function property of AEC-causing p63 mutations and identify SATB2 as the first p63 binding partner that differentially influences AEC and EEC p63 mutant proteins. PMID:21965674

  10. Mutations that affect coenzyme binding and dimer formation of fungal 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Brunskole, Mojca; Kristan, Katja; Stojan, Jure; Rizner, Tea Lanisnik

    2009-03-25

    The 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17beta-HSDcl) is an NADPH-dependent member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily, and it functions as a dimer that is composed of two identical subunits. By constructing the appropriate mutants, we have examined the M204 residue that is situated in the coenzyme binding pocket, for its role in the binding of the coenzyme NADP(H). We have also studied the importance of hydrophobic interactions through F124, F132, F133 and F177 for 17beta-HSDcl dimer formation. The M204G substitution decreased the catalytic efficiency of 17beta-HSDcl, suggesting that M204 sterically coerces the nicotinamide moiety of the coenzyme into the appropriate position for further hydride transfer. Phenylalanine substitutions introduced at the dimer interface produced inactive aggregates and oligomers with high molecular masses, suggesting that these hydrophobic interactions have important roles in the formation of the active dimer.

  11. How hormone receptor-DNA binding affects nucleosomal DNA: the role of symmetry.

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, T C; Kosztin, D; Schulten, K

    1997-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to determine the optimal conformation of an estrogen receptor DNA binding domain dimer bound to a consensus response element, ds(AGGTCACAGTGACCT), and to a nonconsensus response element, ds(AGAACACAGTGACCT). The structures simulated were derived from a crystallographic structure and solvated by a sphere (45-A radius) of explicit water and counterions. Long-range electrostatic interactions were accounted for during 100-ps simulations by means of a fast multipole expansion algorithm combined with a multiple time-step scheme in the molecular dynamics package NAMD. The simulations demonstrate that the dimer induces a bent and underwound (10.7 bp/turn) conformation in the DNA. The bending reflects the dyad symmetry of the receptor dimer and can be described as an S-shaped curve in the helical axis of DNA when projected onto a plane. A similar bent and underwound conformation is observed for nucleosomal DNA near the nucleosome's dyad axis that reflects the symmetry of the histone octamer. We propose that when a receptor dimer binds to a nucleosome, the most favorable dimer-DNA and histone-DNA interactions are achieved if the respective symmetry axes are aligned. Such positioning of a receptor dimer over the dyad of nucleosome B in the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter is in agreement with experiment. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 11 PMID:9129808

  12. Glutamate racemase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibits DNA gyrase by affecting its DNA-binding

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Sugopa; Shah, Meera; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2006-01-01

    Glutamate racemase (MurI) catalyses the conversion of l-glutamate to d-glutamate, an important component of the bacterial cell wall. MurI from Escherichia coli inhibits DNA gyrase in presence of the peptidoglycan precursor. Amongst the two-glutamate racemases found in Bacillus subtilis, only one inhibits gyrase, in absence of the precursor. Mycobacterium tuberculosis has a single gene encoding glutamate racemase. Action of M.tuberculosis MurI on DNA gyrase activity has been examined and its mode of action elucidated. We demonstrate that mycobacterial MurI inhibits DNA gyrase activity, in addition to its precursor independent racemization function. The inhibition is not species-specific as E.coli gyrase is also inhibited but is enzyme-specific as topoisomerase I activity remains unaltered. The mechanism of inhibition is different from other well-known gyrase inhibitors. MurI binds to GyrA subunit of the enzyme leading to a decrease in DNA-binding of the holoenzyme. The sequestration of the gyrase by MurI results in inhibition of all reactions catalysed by DNA gyrase. MurI is thus not a typical potent inhibitor of DNA gyrase and instead its role could be in modulation of the gyrase activity. PMID:17020913

  13. A dispensable peptide from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase affects tRNA binding.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga, Roberto; Salazar, Juan; Canales, Mauricio; Orellana, Omar

    2002-12-18

    The activation domain of class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, which contains the Rossmann fold and the signature sequences HIGH and KMSKS, is generally split into two halves by the connective peptides (CP1, CP2) whose amino acid sequences are idiosyncratic. CP1 has been shown to participate in the binding of tRNA as well as the editing of the reaction intermediate aminoacyl-AMP or the aminoacyl-tRNA. No function has been assigned to CP2. The amino acid sequence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans TrpRS was predicted from the genome sequence. Protein sequence alignments revealed that A. ferrooxidans TrpRS contains a 70 amino acids long CP2 that is not found in any other bacterial TrpRS. However, a CP2 in the same relative position was found in the predicted sequence of several archaeal TrpRSs. A. ferrooxidans TrpRS is functional in vivo in Escherichia coli. A deletion mutant of A. ferrooxidans trpS lacking the coding region of CP2 was constructed. The in vivo activity of the mutant TrpRS in E. coli, as well as the kinetic parameters of the in vitro activation of tryptophan by ATP, were not altered by the deletion. However, the K(m) value for tRNA was seven-fold higher upon deletion, reducing the efficiency of aminoacylation. Structural modeling suggests that CP2 binds to the inner corner of the L shape of tRNA.

  14. Rhes: A GTP–Binding Protein Integral to Striatal Physiology and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Rhes, the Ras Homolog Enriched in Striatum, is a GTP binding protein whose gene was discovered during a screen for mRNAs preferentially expressed in rodent striatum. This 266 amino acid protein is intermediate in size between small Ras-like GTP binding proteins and α-subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins. It is most closely related to another Ras-like GTP binding protein termed Dexras1 or AGS1. Although subsequent studies have shown that the rhes gene is expressed in other brain areas in addition to striatum, the striatal expression level is relatively high, and Rhes protein is likely to play a vital role in striatal physiology and pathology. Indeed, it has recently been shown to interact with the huntingtin protein and play a pivotal role in the selective vulnerability of striatum in Huntington’s Disease. Not surprisingly, Rhes can interact with multiple proteins to affect striatal physiology at multiple levels. Functional studies have indicated that Rhes plays a role in signaling by striatal G protein–coupled receptors (GPCR), although the details of the mechanism remain to be determined. Rhes has been shown to bind to both α- and β-subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins and to affect signaling by both Gi/o- and Gs/olf-coupled receptors. In this context, Rhes can be classified as a member of the family of accessory proteins to GPCR signaling. With documented effects in dopamine- and opioid-mediated behaviors, an interaction with thyroid hormone systems, and a role in Huntington’s Disease pathology, Rhes is emerging as an important protein in striatal physiology and pathology. PMID:22450871

  15. Receptor binding and pH stability - how influenza A virus hemagglutinin affects host-specific virus infection.

    PubMed

    Mair, Caroline M; Ludwig, Kai; Herrmann, Andreas; Sieben, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Influenza A virus strains adopt different host specificities mainly depending on their hemagglutinin (HA) protein. Via HA, the virus binds sialic acid receptors of the host cell and, upon endocytic uptake, HA triggers fusion between the viral envelope bilayer and the endosomal membrane by a low pH-induced conformational change leading to the release of the viral genome into the host cell cytoplasm. Both functions are crucial for viral infection enabling the genesis of new progeny virus. Adaptation to different hosts in vitro was shown to require mutations within HA altering the receptor binding and/or fusion behavior of the respective virus strain. Human adapted influenza virus strains (H1N1, H3N2, H2N2) as well as recent avian influenza virus strains (H5, H7 and H9 subtypes) which gained the ability to infect humans mostly contained mutations in the receptor binding site (RBS) of HA enabling increased binding affinity of these viruses to human type (α-2,6 linked sialic acid) receptors. Thus, the receptor binding specificity seems to be the major requirement for successful adaptation to the human host; however, the RBS is not the only determinant of host specificity. Increased binding to a certain cell type does not always correlate with infection efficiency. Furthermore, viruses carrying mutations in the RBS often resulted in reduced viral fitness and were still unable to transmit between mammals. Recently, the pH stability of HA was reported to affect the transmissibility of influenza viruses. This review summarizes recent findings on the adaptation of influenza A viruses to the human host and related amino acid substitutions resulting in altered receptor binding specificity and/or modulated fusion pH of HA. Furthermore, the role of these properties (receptor specificity and pH stability of HA) for adaptation to and transmissibility in the human host is discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Viral Membrane Proteins -- Channels for Cellular

  16. Crystal structure of human RhoA in a dominantly active form complexed with a GTP analogue.

    PubMed

    Ihara, K; Muraguchi, S; Kato, M; Shimizu, T; Shirakawa, M; Kuroda, S; Kaibuchi, K; Hakoshima, T

    1998-04-17

    The 2.4-A resolution crystal structure of a dominantly active form of the small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) RhoA, RhoAV14, complexed with the nonhydrolyzable GTP analogue, guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate (GTPgammaS), reveals a fold similar to RhoA-GDP, which has been recently reported (Wei, Y., Zhang, Y., Derewenda, U., Liu, X., Minor, W., Nakamoto, R. K., Somlyo, A. V., Somlyo, A. P., and Derewenda, Z. S. (1997) Nat. Struct. Biol. 4, 699-703), but shows large conformational differences localized in switch I and switch II. These changes produce hydrophobic patches on the molecular surface of switch I, which has been suggested to be involved in its effector binding. Compared with H-Ras and other GTPases bound to GTP or GTP analogues, the significant conformational differences are located in regions involving switches I and II and part of the antiparallel beta-sheet between switches I and II. Key residues that produce these conformational differences were identified. In addition to these differences, RhoA contains four insertion or deletion sites with an extra helical subdomain that seems to be characteristic of members of the Rho family, including Rac1, but with several variations in details. These sites also display large displacements from those of H-Ras. The ADP-ribosylation residue, Asn41, by C3-like exoenzymes stacks on the indole ring of Trp58 with a hydrogen bond to the main chain of Glu40. The recognition of the guanosine moiety of GTPgammaS by the GTPase contains water-mediated hydrogen bonds, which seem to be common in the Rho family. These structural differences provide an insight into specific interaction sites with the effectors, as well as with modulators such as guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) and guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI).

  17. Specific interaction between EF-G and RRF and its implication for GTP-dependent ribosome splitting into subunits

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ning; Zavialov, Andrey V.; Ehrenberg, Måns; Frank, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Summary After termination of protein synthesis, the bacterial ribosome is split into its 30S and 50S subunits by the action of ribosome recycling factor (RRF) and elongation factor G (EF-G) in a GTP-hydrolysis dependent manner. Based on a previous cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) study of ribosomal complexes, we have proposed that the binding of EF-G to an RRF containing post-termination ribosome triggers an inter-domain rotation of RRF, which destabilizes two strong intersubunit bridges (B2a and B3) and, ultimately, separates the two subunits. Here, we present a 9 Å (FSC at 0.5 cutoff) cryo-EM map of a 50S EFG GDPNP RRF complex and a quasi-atomic model derived from it, showing the interaction between EF-G and RRF on the 50S subunit in the presence of the non-cleavable GTP analogue GDPNP. The detailed information in this model and a comparative analysis of EF-G structures in various nucleotide- and ribosome-bound states show how rotation of the RRF head domain may be triggered by various domains of EF-G. For validation of our structural model, all known mutations in EF-G and RRF that relate to ribosome recycling have been taken into account. More importantly, our results indicate a substantial conformational change in the Switch I region of EF-G, suggesting that a conformational signal transduction mechanism, similar to that employed in tRNA translocation on the ribosome by EF-G, translates a large-scale movement of EF-G’s domain IV, induced by GTP hydrolysis, into the domain rotation of RRF that eventually splits the ribosome into subunits. PMID:17996252

  18. Characterization of How DNA Modifications Affect DNA Binding by C2H2 Zinc Finger Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Patel, A.; Hashimoto, H.; Zhang, X.; Cheng, X.

    2016-01-01

    Much is known about vertebrate DNA methylation and oxidation; however, much less is known about how modified cytosine residues within particular sequences are recognized. Among the known methylated DNA-binding domains, the Cys2-His2 zinc finger (ZnF) protein superfamily is the largest with hundreds of members, each containing tandem ZnFs ranging from 3 to >30 fingers. We have begun to biochemically and structurally characterize these ZnFs not only on their sequence specificity but also on their sensitivity to various DNA modifications. Rather than following published methods of refolding insoluble ZnF arrays, we have expressed and purified soluble forms of ZnFs, ranging in size from a tandem array of two to six ZnFs, from seven different proteins. We also describe a fluorescence polarization assay to measure ZnFs affinity with oligonucleotides containing various modifications and our approaches for cocrystallization of ZnFs with oligonucleotides. PMID:27372763

  19. TANK-binding kinase-1 broadly affects oyster immune response to bacteria and viruses.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xueying; Huang, Baoyu; Zhang, Linlin; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2016-09-01

    As a benthic filter feeder of estuaries, the immune system of oysters provides one of the best models for studying the genetic and molecular basis of the innate immune pathway in marine invertebrates and examining the influence of environmental factors on the immune system. Here, the molecular function of molluscan TANK-binding kinase-1 (TBK1) (which we named CgTBK1) was studied in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. Compared with known TBK1 proteins in other model organisms, CgTBK1 contains a conserved S-TKc domain and a coiled coil domain at the N- and C-terminals but lacks an important ubiquitin domain. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that the expression level of CgTBK1 was ubiquitous in all selected tissues, with highest expression in the gills. CgTBK1 expression was significantly upregulated in response to infections with Vibrio alginolyticus, ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1 reference strain and μvar), and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid sodium salt, suggesting its broad function in immune response. Subcellular localization showed the presence of CgTBK1 in the cytoplasm of HeLa cells, suggesting its potential function as the signal transducer between the receptor and transcription factor. We further demonstrated that CgTBK1 interacted with CgSTING in HEK293T cells, providing evidence that CgTBK1 could be activated by direct binding to CgSTING. In summary, we characterized the TBK1 gene in C. gigas and demonstrated its role in the innate immune response to pathogen infections.

  20. A novel domain in translational GTPase BipA mediates interaction with the 70S ribosome and influences GTP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    deLivron, Megan A; Makanji, Heeren S; Lane, Maura C; Robinson, Victoria L

    2009-11-10

    BipA is a universally conserved prokaryotic GTPase that exhibits differential ribosome association in response to stress-related events. It is a member of the translation factor family of GTPases along with EF-G and LepA. BipA has five domains. The N-terminal region of the protein, consisting of GTPase and beta-barrel domains, is common to all translational GTPases. BipA domains III and V have structural counterparts in EF-G and LepA. However, the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the protein is unique to the BipA family. To investigate how the individual domains of BipA contribute to the biological properties of the protein, deletion constructs were designed and their GTP hydrolysis and ribosome binding properties assessed. Data presented show that removal of the CTD abolishes the ability of BipA to bind to the ribosome and that ribosome complex formation requires the surface provided by domains III and V and the CTD. Additional mutational analysis was used to outline the BipA-70S interaction surface extending across these domains. Steady state kinetic analyses revealed that successive truncation of domains from the C-terminus resulted in a significant increase in the intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rate and a loss of ribosome-stimulated GTPase activity. These results indicate that, similar to other translational GTPases, the ribosome binding and GTPase activities of BipA are tightly coupled. Such intermolecular regulation likely plays a role in the differential ribosome binding by the protein.

  1. A Novel Domain in Translational GTPase BipA Mediates Interaction with the 70S Ribosome and Influences GTP Hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    deLivron, M.; Makanji, H; Lane, M; Robinson, V

    2009-01-01

    BipA is a universally conserved prokaryotic GTPase that exhibits differential ribosome association in response to stress-related events. It is a member of the translation factor family of GTPases along with EF-G and LepA. BipA has five domains. The N-terminal region of the protein, consisting of GTPase and {beta}-barrel domains, is common to all translational GTPases. BipA domains III and V have structural counterparts in EF-G and LepA. However, the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the protein is unique to the BipA family. To investigate how the individual domains of BipA contribute to the biological properties of the protein, deletion constructs were designed and their GTP hydrolysis and ribosome binding properties assessed. Data presented show that removal of the CTD abolishes the ability of BipA to bind to the ribosome and that ribosome complex formation requires the surface provided by domains III and V and the CTD. Additional mutational analysis was used to outline the BipA-70S interaction surface extending across these domains. Steady state kinetic analyses revealed that successive truncation of domains from the C-terminus resulted in a significant increase in the intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rate and a loss of ribosome-stimulated GTPase activity. These results indicate that, similar to other translational GTPases, the ribosome binding and GTPase activities of BipA are tightly coupled. Such intermolecular regulation likely plays a role in the differential ribosome binding by the protein.

  2. Insights into the GTP/GDP cycle of RabX3, a novel GTPase from Entamoeba histolytica with tandem G-domains.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Mintu; Mukherjee, Madhumita; Srivastava, Vijay Kumar; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Datta, Sunando

    2014-02-25

    Members of the small GTPase Ras superfamily regulate a host of systems through their ability to catalyze the GTP/GDP cycle. All family members reported thus far possess a single GTPase domain with a P-loop containing a nucleoside triphosphate hydrolase fold. Here for the first time we report a novel member from Entamoeba histolytica, EhRabX3, which harbors two GTPase domains in tandem and exhibits unique biochemical properties. A combination of biochemical and microcalorimetric studies revealed that EhRabX3 binds to a single guanine nucleotide through its N-terminal domain. Unlike most of the members of the Ras superfamily, the dissociation of the nucleotide from EhRabX3 is independent of Mg(2+), perhaps indicating a novel mechanism of nucleotide exchange by this protein. We found that EhRabX3 is extremely sluggish in hydrolyzing GTP, and that could be attributed to its atypical nucleotide binding pocket. It harbors substitutions at two positions that confer oncogenicity to Ras because of impaired GTP hydrolysis. Engineering these residues into the conserved counterparts enhanced their GTPase activity by at least 20-fold. In contrast to most of the members of the Ras superfamily, EhRabX3 lacks the prenylation motif. Using indirect immunofluorescence and biochemical fractionation, we demonstrated that the protein is distributed all over the cytosol in amoebic trophozoites. Collectively, this unique ancient GTPase exhibits a striking evolutionary divergence from the other members of the superfamily.

  3. JNK3 Enzyme Binding to Arrestin-3 Differentially Affects the Recruitment of Upstream Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Xuanzhi; Kaoud, Tamer S.; Kook, Seunghyi; Dalby, Kevin N.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2013-01-01

    Arrestin-3 was previously shown to bind JNK3α2, MKK4, and ASK1. However, full JNK3α2 activation requires phosphorylation by both MKK4 and MKK7. Using purified proteins we show that arrestin-3 directly interacts with MKK7 and promotes JNK3α2 phosphorylation by both MKK4 and MKK7 in vitro as well as in intact cells. The binding of JNK3α2 promotes an arrestin-3 interaction with MKK4 while reducing its binding to MKK7. Interestingly, the arrestin-3 concentration optimal for scaffolding the MKK7-JNK3α2 module is ∼10-fold higher than for the MKK4-JNK3α2 module. The data provide a mechanistic basis for arrestin-3-dependent activation of JNK3α2. The opposite effects of JNK3α2 on arrestin-3 interactions with MKK4 and MKK7 is the first demonstration that the kinase components in mammalian MAPK cascades regulate each other's interactions with a scaffold protein. The results show how signaling outcomes can be affected by the relative expression of scaffolding proteins and components of signaling cascades that they assemble. PMID:23960075

  4. Mutations that affect phosphorylation of the adenovirus DNA-binding protein alter its ability to enhance its own synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Morin, N; Delsert, C; Klessig, D F

    1989-01-01

    The multifunctional adenovirus single-strand DNA-binding protein (DBP) is highly phosphorylated. Its phosphorylation sites are located in the amino-terminal domain of the protein, and its DNA- and RNA-binding activity resides in the carboxy-terminal half of the polypeptide. We have substituted cysteine or alanine for up to 10 of these potential phosphorylation sites by using oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. Alteration of one or a few of these sites had little effect on the viability of virus containing the mutated DBP. However, when eight or more sites were altered, viral growth decreased significantly. This suggests that the overall phosphorylation state of the protein was more important than whether any particular site was modified. The reduction in growth correlated with both depressed DNA replication and expression of late genes. This reduction was probably the result of lower DBP accumulation in mutant-infected cells. Interestingly, although the stability of the mutated DBP was not affected, DBP synthesis and the level of its mRNA were depressed 5- to 10-fold for the underphosphorylated protein. These results suggest that DBP enhances its own expression and imply that phosphorylation of the DBP may be important for this function. Similarities to several eucaryotic transcriptional activators, which are composed of negatively charged activating domains and separate binding domains, are discussed. Images PMID:2585602

  5. GTP cyclohydrolase I expression, protein, and activity determine intracellular tetrahydrobiopterin levels, independent of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein expression.

    PubMed

    Tatham, Amy L; Crabtree, Mark J; Warrick, Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J; Channon, Keith M

    2009-05-15

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression versus GTPCH activity and the role of GFRP in relation to BH4 bioavailability remain uncertain. We investigated these relationships in a cell line with tet-regulated GTPCH expression and in the hph-1 mouse model of GTPCH deficiency. Doxycycline exposure resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GTPCH protein and activity, with a strong correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.85, p < 0.0001). These changes in GTPCH and BH4 had no effect on GFRP expression or protein levels. GFRP overexpression and knockdown in tet-GCH cells did not alter GTPCH activity or BH4 levels, and GTPCH-specific knockdown in sEnd.1 endothelial cells had no effect on GFRP protein. In mouse liver we observed a graded reduction of GTPCH expression, protein, and activity, from wild type, heterozygote, to homozygote littermates, with a striking linear correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Neither GFRP expression nor protein differed between wild type, heterozygote, nor homozygote mice, despite the substantial differences in BH4. We suggest that GTPCH expression is the primary regulator of BH4 levels, and changes in GTPCH or BH4 are not necessarily accompanied by changes in GFRP expression.

  6. Distinct roles for the two Rho GDP/GTP exchange factor domains of kalirin in regulation of neurite growth and neuronal morphology.

    PubMed

    Penzes, P; Johnson, R C; Kambampati, V; Mains, R E; Eipper, B A

    2001-11-01

    The actin cytoskeleton, essential for neuronal development, is regulated in part by small GTP binding proteins of the Rho subfamily. Kalirin-9, with two Rho subfamily-specific GDP/GTP exchange factor (GEF) domains, localizes to neurites and growth cones of primary cortical neurons. Kalirin-9 overexpression in cultured cortical neurons induces longer neurites and altered neuronal morphology. Expression of the first GEF domain alone results in drastically shortened axons and excessive growth cones, mediated by Rac1. Expression of the second GEF domain alone induces axonal over-elongation and abundant filopodial neurites, mediated by RhoA. Coordination of the actions of the individual GEF domains through their presence in Kalirin-9, with its Sec14p, spectrin, and Src homology domain 3 motifs, is essential for regulating neurite extension and neuronal morphology.

  7. MiniCD4 protein resistance mutations affect binding to the HIV-1 gp120 CD4 binding site and decrease entry efficiency.

    PubMed

    Grupping, Katrijn; Selhorst, Philippe; Michiels, Johan; Vereecken, Katleen; Heyndrickx, Leo; Kessler, Pascal; Vanham, Guido; Martin, Loïc; Ariën, Kevin K

    2012-05-02

    Binding of the viral envelope protein (Env), and particularly of its gp120 subunit, to the cellular CD4 receptor is the first essential step of the HIV-1 entry process. The CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of gp120, and especially a recessed cavity occupied by the CD4 Phe43 residue, are known to be highly conserved among the different circulating subtypes and therefore constitute particularly interesting targets for vaccine and drug design. The miniCD4 proteins are a promising class of CD4bs inhibitors. Studying virus evolution under pressure of CD4bs inhibitors could provide insight on the gp120-CD4 interaction and viral entry. The present study reports on the resistance induction of two subtype B HIV-1 against the most active miniCD4, M48U1, and its ancestor, M48, and how these mutated positions affect CD4bs recognition, entry efficiency, and sensitivity to other CD4bs inhibitors. Resistance against M48U1 was always associated with S375R/N substitution in both BaL and SF162; M48 resistance was associated with D474N substitution in SF162 and with H105Y substitution in BaL. In addition, some other mutations at position V255 and G471 were of importance for SF162 resistant viruses. Except for 474, all of these mutated positions are conserved, and introducing them into an SF162 Env expressing infectious molecular clone (pBRNL4.3 SF162) resulted in decreased entry efficiency. Furthermore, resistant mutants showed at least some cross-resistance towards other CD4bs inhibitors, the V3 monoclonal antibody 447-52D and some even against the monoclonal antibody 17b, of which the epitope overlaps the co-receptor binding site. The mutations H105Y, V255M, S375R/N, G471R/E, and D474N are found to be involved in resistance towards M48 and M48U1. All mutated positions are part of, or in close proximity to, the CD4bs; most are highly conserved, and all have an impact on the entry efficiency, suggesting their importance for optimal virus infectivity.

  8. Purification and cloning of the GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein, GFRP.

    PubMed

    Milstien, S; Jaffe, H; Kowlessur, D; Bonner, T I

    1996-08-16

    The activity of GTP cyclohydrolase I, the initial enzyme of the de novo pathway for biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin, the cofactor required for aromatic amino acid hydroxylations and nitric oxide synthesis, is sensitive to end-product feedback inhibition by tetrahydrobiopterin. This inhibition by tetrahydrobiopterin is mediated by the GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein GFRP, previously named p35 (Harada, T., Kagamiyama, H., and Hatakeyama, K. (1993) Science 260, 1507-1510), and -phenylalanine specifically reverses the tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent inhibition. As a first step in the investigation of the physiological role of this unique mechanism of regulation, a convenient procedure has been developed to co-purify to homogeneity both GTP cyclohydrolase I and GFRP from rat liver. GTP cyclohydrolase I and GFRP exist in a complex which can be bound to a GTP-affinity column from which GTP cyclohydrolase I and GFRP are separately and selectively eluted. GFRP is dissociated from the GTP agarose-bound complex with 0.2 NaCl, a concentration of salt which also effectively blocks the tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent inhibitory activity of GFRP. GTP cyclohydrolase I is then eluted from the GTP-agarose column with GTP. Both GFRP and GTP cyclohydrolase I were then purified separately to near homogeneity by sequential high performance anion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. GFRP was found to have a native molecular mass of 20 kDa and consist of a homodimer of 9.5-kDa subunits. Based on peptide sequences obtained from purified GFRP, oligonucleotides were synthesized and used to clone a cDNA from a rat liver cDNA library by polymerase chain reaction-based methods. The cDNA contained an open reading frame that encoded a novel protein of 84 amino acids (calculated molecular mass 9665 daltons). This protein when expressed in Escherichia coli as a thioredoxin fusion protein had tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent GTP cyclohydrolase I inhibitory activity. Northern

  9. Proteinase 3 Is a Phosphatidylserine-binding Protein That Affects the Production and Function of Microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Martin, Katherine R; Kantari-Mimoun, Chahrazade; Yin, Min; Pederzoli-Ribeil, Magali; Angelot-Delettre, Fanny; Ceroi, Adam; Grauffel, Cédric; Benhamou, Marc; Reuter, Nathalie; Saas, Philippe; Frachet, Philippe; Boulanger, Chantal M; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-05-13

    Proteinase 3 (PR3), the autoantigen in granulomatosis with polyangiitis, is expressed at the plasma membrane of resting neutrophils, and this membrane expression increases during both activation and apoptosis. Using surface plasmon resonance and protein-lipid overlay assays, this study demonstrates that PR3 is a phosphatidylserine-binding protein and this interaction is dependent on the hydrophobic patch responsible for membrane anchorage. Molecular simulations suggest that PR3 interacts with phosphatidylserine via a small number of amino acids, which engage in long lasting interactions with the lipid heads. As phosphatidylserine is a major component of microvesicles (MVs), this study also examined the consequences of this interaction on MV production and function. PR3-expressing cells produced significantly fewer MVs during both activation and apoptosis, and this reduction was dependent on the ability of PR3 to associate with the membrane as mutating the hydrophobic patch restored MV production. Functionally, activation-evoked MVs from PR3-expressing cells induced a significantly larger respiratory burst in human neutrophils compared with control MVs. Conversely, MVs generated during apoptosis inhibited the basal respiratory burst in human neutrophils, and those generated from PR3-expressing cells hampered this inhibition. Given that membrane expression of PR3 is increased in patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis, MVs generated from neutrophils expressing membrane PR3 may potentiate oxidative damage of endothelial cells and promote the systemic inflammation observed in this disease. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Proteinase 3 Is a Phosphatidylserine-binding Protein That Affects the Production and Function of Microvesicles*

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Katherine R.; Kantari-Mimoun, Chahrazade; Yin, Min; Pederzoli-Ribeil, Magali; Angelot-Delettre, Fanny; Ceroi, Adam; Grauffel, Cédric; Benhamou, Marc; Reuter, Nathalie; Saas, Philippe; Frachet, Philippe; Boulanger, Chantal M.; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3), the autoantigen in granulomatosis with polyangiitis, is expressed at the plasma membrane of resting neutrophils, and this membrane expression increases during both activation and apoptosis. Using surface plasmon resonance and protein-lipid overlay assays, this study demonstrates that PR3 is a phosphatidylserine-binding protein and this interaction is dependent on the hydrophobic patch responsible for membrane anchorage. Molecular simulations suggest that PR3 interacts with phosphatidylserine via a small number of amino acids, which engage in long lasting interactions with the lipid heads. As phosphatidylserine is a major component of microvesicles (MVs), this study also examined the consequences of this interaction on MV production and function. PR3-expressing cells produced significantly fewer MVs during both activation and apoptosis, and this reduction was dependent on the ability of PR3 to associate with the membrane as mutating the hydrophobic patch restored MV production. Functionally, activation-evoked MVs from PR3-expressing cells induced a significantly larger respiratory burst in human neutrophils compared with control MVs. Conversely, MVs generated during apoptosis inhibited the basal respiratory burst in human neutrophils, and those generated from PR3-expressing cells hampered this inhibition. Given that membrane expression of PR3 is increased in patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis, MVs generated from neutrophils expressing membrane PR3 may potentiate oxidative damage of endothelial cells and promote the systemic inflammation observed in this disease. PMID:26961880

  11. Starch-binding domain affects catalysis in two Lactobacillus alpha-amylases.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sanoja, R; Ruiz, B; Guyot, J P; Sanchez, S

    2005-01-01

    A new starch-binding domain (SBD) was recently described in alpha-amylases from three lactobacilli (Lactobacillus amylovorus, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Lactobacillus manihotivorans). Usually, the SBD is formed by 100 amino acids, but the SBD sequences of the mentioned lactobacillus alpha-amylases consist of almost 500 amino acids that are organized in tandem repeats. The three lactobacillus amylase genes share more than 98% sequence identity. In spite of this identity, the SBD structures seem to be quite different. To investigate whether the observed differences in the SBDs have an effect on the hydrolytic capability of the enzymes, a kinetic study of L. amylovorus and L. plantarum amylases was developed, with both enzymes acting on several starch sources in granular and gelatinized forms. Results showed that the amylolytic capacities of these enzymes are quite different; the L. amylovorus alpha-amylase is, on average, 10 times more efficient than the L. plantarum enzyme in hydrolyzing all the tested polymeric starches, with only a minor difference in the adsorption capacities.

  12. Developmental changes affecting lectin binding in the vomeronasal organ of domestic pigs, Sus scrofa.

    PubMed

    Park, Junwoo; Lee, Wonho; Jeong, Chanwoo; Kim, Hwangryong; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Shin, Taekyun

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the developmental changes of glycoconjugate patterns in the porcine vomeronasal organs (VNOs) and associated glands (Jacobson's glands) from prenatal (9 weeks of gestation) and postnatal (2 days after birth) to the sexually mature stage (6 months old). The VNO of pigs (Sus scrofa) was examined using the following: Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), Bandeiraea simplicifolia agglutinin isolectin B4 (BSI-B4), Triticum vulgaris agglutinin (WGA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), and soybean agglutinin (SBA). At the fetal stage, all lectins examined were detected mainly in the free border of the vomeronasal epithelium, but few (WGA and UEA-I) and or absent in the VNO cell bodies. At the postnatal and sexually mature stages, the reactivity of some lectins, including WGA, UEA-I, DBA and SBA, were shown to increase in the VNO sensory epithelium as well as the free border. The increased reactivity of lectins as development progressed was also observed in Jacobson's gland acini. These findings suggest that binding sites of lectins, including those of WGA, UEA-I, DBA, and SBA, increase during development from fetal to postnatal growth, possibly contributing to the increased ability of chemoreception in the pig.

  13. Interference on cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding proteins affects the invasion ability of glioma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, H L; Huo, J F; Liu, Z J; Chen, X B

    2015-10-28

    Glioma stem cells derived from primary cultures were divided into an experiment group, a control group, and a blank group and subjected to cytoplasmic polyadenilation element-binding protein (CPEBs) interference, transfection with empty vector, and normal culture, respectively, to compare their invasion abilities. Western blotting showed that siRNA-3 had the strongest interfering effect on CPEBs. CPEBs were expressed in the experiment group with green fluorescence at an expression rate of over 70%. Significantly lower CPEB expression was observed in the experiment group compared to in the control and blank groups (P < 0.05). After 48-h treatment, the apoptotic rate in the experiment group was 21.43%, which was significantly higher than that in the blank (0.51%) and control (1.43%) groups (P < 0.05). After 3 days of treatment, the experiment group grew significantly more slowly than did the control and blank groups (P < 0.05). The transwell invasion assay showed that significantly fewer cells in the experiment group penetrated the membrane than did cells in the control and blank groups (P < 0.05). After CPEB interference, the growth, proliferation, and invasion of glioma stem cells were substantially inhibited, providing support for targeted therapy of glioma and for improving prognosis.

  14. A functional MiR-124 binding-site polymorphism in IQGAP1 affects human cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lixin; Zhang, Rui; Li, Ming; Wu, Xujun; Wang, Jianhong; Huang, Lin; Shi, Xiaodong; Li, Qingwei; Su, Bing

    2014-01-01

    As a product of the unique evolution of the human brain, human cognitive performance is largely a collection of heritable traits. Rather surprisingly, to date there have been no reported cases to highlight genes that underwent adaptive evolution in humans and which carry polymorphisms that have a marked effect on cognitive performance. IQ motif containing GTPase activating protein 1 (IQGAP1), a scaffold protein, affects learning and memory in a dose-dependent manner. Its expression is regulated by miR-124 through the binding sites in the 3'UTR, where a SNP (rs1042538) exists in the core-binding motif. Here we showed that this SNP can influence the miR-target interaction both in vitro and in vivo. Individuals carrying the derived T alleles have higher IQGAP1 expression in the brain as compared to the ancestral A allele carriers. We observed a significant and male-specific association between rs1042538 and tactile performances in two independent cohorts. Males with the derived allele displayed higher tactual performances as compared to those with the ancestral allele. Furthermore, we found a highly diverged allele-frequency distribution of rs1042538 among world human populations, likely caused by natural selection and/or recent population expansion. These results suggest that current human populations still carry sequence variations that affect cognitive performances and that these genetic variants may likely have been subject to comparatively recent natural selection.

  15. Exchanging Murine and Human Immunoglobulin Constant Chains Affects the Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Antigen Binding and Chimeric Antibody Autoreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Marcela; Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Fiser, András; Casadevall, Arturo

    2007-01-01

    Mouse-human chimeric antibodies composed of murine variable (V) and human (C) chains are useful therapeutic reagents. Consequently, we investigated whether heterologous C-regions from mice and humans affected specificity and affinity, and determined the contribution of CH glycosylation to antigen binding. The interaction of a 12-mer peptide mimetic with monoclonal antibody (mAb) 18B7 to Cryptococcus neoformans glucuronoxylomannan, and its chimeric (ch) and deglycosylated forms were studied by surface plasmon resonance. The equilibrium and rate association constants for the chAb were higher than for mAb 18B7. V region affinity was not affected by CH region glycosylation whereas heterologous C region of the same isotype altered the Ab binding affinity and the specificity for self-antigens. Structural models displayed local differences that implied changes on the connectivity of residues. These findings suggest that V region conformational changes can be dictated by the CH domains through an allosteric effect involving networks of highly connected amino acids. PMID:18074033

  16. A common polymorphism within MSLN affects miR-611 binding site and soluble mesothelin levels in healthy people.

    PubMed

    Garritano, Sonia; De Santi, Chiara; Silvestri, Roberto; Melaiu, Ombretta; Cipollini, Monica; Barone, Elisa; Lucchi, Marco; Barale, Roberto; Mutti, Luciano; Gemignani, Federica; Bonotti, Alessandra; Foddis, Rudy; Cristaudo, Alfonso; Landi, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    Soluble mesothelin related peptide (SMRP) was proposed as a promising diagnostic marker for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). In a previous study, we found that rs1057147 within the 3' untranslated region of MSLN gene was associated with SMRP levels. Thus, we aimed to (1) confirm the previous association on a large series of volunteers and (2) test the hypothesis that the SNP could affect microRNA binding sites. The association analysis was verified in 759 subjects. Then, in silico predictions highlighted miR-611 and miR-887 as candidate miRNAs binding to the polymorphic site. Thus, chimeric constructs bearing the alternative alleles (G > A) were assayed alone or in cotransfection with the miRNA mimics, with dual luciferase reporter assay in non-MPM Met-5A cells. The miRNAs were also assayed by western blot analysis for their ability to down-regulate endogenous mesothelin in the MPM Mero-14 cell line. We confirmed that, among non-MPM volunteers, GG homozygotes have the lowest SMRP levels. When the genotype is taken into account, the specificity of SMRP as biomarker improves from 79.7% to 85.3%. Dual-luciferase assays showed a significantly lower reporter activity when the vector harbored the G allele as compared to A allele. miR-887 mimic caused a reduced reporter activity of vectors harboring A or G alleles, while miR-611 was effective only on the vector harboring the G allele. Transfection of these miRNAs into Mero-14 cells significantly reduced endogenous MSLN protein. SMRP performance as diagnostic biomarker improved by considering the genotype rs1057147. This polymorphism most likely affects a binding site for miR-611.

  17. [Studies on background of gamma-GTP abnormality in human multiphasic screening. (Part 1): Effect of obesity and ingestion of alcohol on gamma-GTP level in serum].

    PubMed

    Maeda, S; Morita, N

    1993-05-01

    The present study deals mainly with the relationship between abnormal gamma-GTP level in serum on the one hand and obesity and ingestion of alcohol on the other hand on the basis of data for 1,493 cases (1,256 male cases, 237 female cases) who visited our clinic for their health check in the short-term human dry dock managed by the Fukuoka University Hospital. Abnormality in gamma-GTP serum level (> 60 mu/ml) was noted in 28.9% of men, which was second highest after 33.5% for the rate of triglyceride abnormality among the laboratory examinations performed in the human dry dock. In women the rate of abnormal LAP level in serum was the highest at 22.0%, while the rate of abnormal level of gamma-GTP was not more than 3%. The rate of abnormal gamma-GTP in serum increased with elevation in the obesity rate. Particularly in men there was a close relationship between the rate of abnormal gamma-GTP in serum and the amount of alcohol ingested, and the rate of abnormal gamma-GTP was 30.8% in men who take between 1 and 2 "gou" of Sake (1 "gou" of Sake contains 30g of alcohol) a day but reached 71.6% in case of the alcohol ingestion exceeding 2 "gou" of Sake. The relative risk ratio for abnormal gamma-GTP in serum was greater for alcohol than for obesity with 6.80 for those who are not obese but drink alcohol and 2.23 for those who are obese but do not drink alcohol. In both men and women, obesity plus ingestion of alcohol brought about a synergistic rather than additional effect. In men the relative risk ratio in the group having both obesity and ingestion of alcohol amounted to 11.5.

  18. Mod5 protein binds to tRNA gene complexes and affects local transcriptional silencing

    PubMed Central

    Pratt-Hyatt, Matthew; Pai, Dave A.; Haeusler, Rebecca A.; Wozniak, Glenn G.; Good, Paul D.; Miller, Erin L.; McLeod, Ian X.; Yates, John R.; Hopper, Anita K.; Engelke, David R.

    2013-01-01

    The tRNA gene-mediated (tgm) silencing of RNA polymerase II promoters is dependent on subnuclear clustering of the tRNA genes, but genetic analysis shows that the silencing requires additional mechanisms. We have identified proteins that bind tRNA gene transcription complexes and are required for tgm silencing but not required for gene clustering. One of the proteins, Mod5, is a tRNA modifying enzyme that adds an N6-isopentenyl adenosine modification at position 37 on a small number of tRNAs in the cytoplasm, although a subpopulation of Mod5 is also found in the nucleus. Recent publications have also shown that Mod5 has tumor suppressor characteristics in humans as well as confers drug resistance through prion-like misfolding in yeast. Here, we show that a subpopulation of Mod5 associates with tRNA gene complexes in the nucleolus. This association occurs and is required for tgm silencing regardless of whether the pre-tRNA transcripts are substrates for Mod5 modification. In addition, Mod5 is bound to nuclear pre-tRNA transcripts, although they are not substrates for the A37 modification. Lastly, we show that truncation of the tRNA transcript to remove the normal tRNA structure also alleviates silencing, suggesting that synthesis of intact pre-tRNAs is required for the silencing mechanism. These results are discussed in light of recent results showing that silencing near tRNA genes also requires chromatin modification. PMID:23898186

  19. Mod5 protein binds to tRNA gene complexes and affects local transcriptional silencing.

    PubMed

    Pratt-Hyatt, Matthew; Pai, Dave A; Haeusler, Rebecca A; Wozniak, Glenn G; Good, Paul D; Miller, Erin L; McLeod, Ian X; Yates, John R; Hopper, Anita K; Engelke, David R

    2013-08-13

    The tRNA gene-mediated (tgm) silencing of RNA polymerase II promoters is dependent on subnuclear clustering of the tRNA genes, but genetic analysis shows that the silencing requires additional mechanisms. We have identified proteins that bind tRNA gene transcription complexes and are required for tgm silencing but not required for gene clustering. One of the proteins, Mod5, is a tRNA modifying enzyme that adds an N6-isopentenyl adenosine modification at position 37 on a small number of tRNAs in the cytoplasm, although a subpopulation of Mod5 is also found in the nucleus. Recent publications have also shown that Mod5 has tumor suppressor characteristics in humans as well as confers drug resistance through prion-like misfolding in yeast. Here, we show that a subpopulation of Mod5 associates with tRNA gene complexes in the nucleolus. This association occurs and is required for tgm silencing regardless of whether the pre-tRNA transcripts are substrates for Mod5 modification. In addition, Mod5 is bound to nuclear pre-tRNA transcripts, although they are not substrates for the A37 modification. Lastly, we show that truncation of the tRNA transcript to remove the normal tRNA structure also alleviates silencing, suggesting that synthesis of intact pre-tRNAs is required for the silencing mechanism. These results are discussed in light of recent results showing that silencing near tRNA genes also requires chromatin modification.

  20. An alternative domain near the nucleotide-binding site of Drosophila muscle myosin affects ATPase kinetics.

    PubMed

    Miller, Becky M; Zhang, Shuxing; Suggs, Jennifer A; Swank, Douglas M; Littlefield, Kimberly P; Knowles, Aileen F; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2005-10-14

    In Drosophila melanogaster expression of muscle myosin heavy chain isoforms occurs by alternative splicing of transcripts from a single gene. The exon 7 domain is one of four variable regions in the catalytic head and is located near the nucleotide-binding site. To ascribe a functional role to this domain, we created two chimeric myosin isoforms (indirect flight isoform-exon 7a and embryonic-exon 7d) that differ from the native indirect flight muscle and embryonic body-wall muscle isoforms only in the exon 7 region. Germline transformation and subsequent expression of the chimeric myosins in the indirect flight muscle of myosin-null Drosophila allowed us to purify the myosin for in vitro studies and to assess in vivo structure and function of transgenic muscles. Intriguingly, in vitro experiments show the exon 7 domain modulates myosin ATPase activity but has no effect on actin filament velocity, a novel result compared to similar studies with other Drosophila variable exons. Transgenic flies expressing the indirect flight isoform-exon 7a have normal indirect flight muscle structure, and flight and jump ability. However, expression of the embryonic-exon 7d chimeric isoform yields flightless flies that show improvements in both the structural stability of the indirect flight muscle and in locomotor abilities as compared to flies expressing the embryonic isoform. Overall, our results suggest the exon 7 domain participates in the regulation of the attachment of myosin to actin in order to fine-tune the physiological properties of Drosophila myosin isoforms.

  1. Hormonal and nonhormonal factors affecting sex hormone-binding globulin levels in blood.

    PubMed

    Thijssen, J H

    1988-01-01

    Researchers in Utrecht, the Netherlands have studied the effects of different factors, such as oral contraceptives (OCs), on sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels in blood. The SHBG levels in women who continuously used OCs consisting only of .05 mg of ethinyl estradiol (EE2) rose as high as 260% + or - 25% of those in women not using OCs. Further, mean SHBG levels of women using combination OCs of EE2 and levonorgestrel were 10-60% higher than women not using OCs. SHBG levels were significantly higher than the use of a sequential OC containing decreasing amounts of EE2 and increasing amounts of levonorgestrel than those cause by use of a continuous combined OC with .03 mg and .15 mg respectively. As the dosage of EE2 increased in combination OCs with 2.5 mg lynestrenol, the SHBG increased from 20% (.05 mg EE2) to 150% (.75 mg EE2). SHBG levels after taking EE2 and cyproterone acetate increased significantly more (240%) than levels after EE2 and desogestrel (170%), or after EE2 and gestoden (140%) [p.001]. SHBG levels of women who took OCs containing only .03 mg of levonorgestrel daily decreased 35% (p.01). These levels fell by 30% in women who received 150 mg of medroxyprogesterone acetate intramuscularly every 3 months (p.001). SHBG concentrations increased when estrogens were taken orally for noncontraceptive purposes, but they did not change when they were administered percutaneously. As body weight increased the SHBG levels decreased despite hormonal status or sex. Further, the lower the fat content of one's diet the higher the SHBG levels and vice versa. SHBG levels are higher in males with flaccid lungs than they are in males with healthy lungs.

  2. Thermodynamic analysis of agonist and antagonist binding to the chicken brain melatonin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Chong, N. W.; Sugden, D.

    1994-01-01

    1. The binding of 2-[125I]-iodomelatonin to chicken brain membranes, and the inhibition of binding by melatonin, N-acetyltryptamine and luzindole, were examined at temperatures between 4 degrees C and 37 degrees C. 2. At all temperatures studied, the binding affinity (Kd or Ki) for 2-[125I]-iodomelatonin, melatonin (both agonists) and, to a lesser extent, N-acetyltryptamine (a partial agonist) was reduced by inclusion of guanosine triphosphate (GTP, 1 mM) in the assay. GTP did not affect the Ki for luzindole, a melatonin receptor antagonist. 3. The maximal density of binding sites (Bmax) was not affected by temperature but the Kd showed a peak at 21 degrees C with lower values at both higher and lower temperatures giving curvilinear van't Hoff plots (lnKA vs l/temperature). 4. Derived changes in entropy (delta S degree) and enthalpy (delta H degree) of binding for all of the melatonin ligands decreased as temperature increased. 5. The affinity, and thus the free energy of binding, delta G degree, of these ligands at the melatonin receptor have identical values at several temperatures yet at these temperatures delta S degree and delta H degree were very different, implying that more than one intermolecular force must be involved in the binding of ligand and receptor. 6. Conceivably, the large positive delta S degree observed at low temperatures, perhaps as a result of hydrophobic interactions, is compensated by a corresponding, but opposite, change in enthalpy at higher temperatures. However, it is not clear what type of binding force(s) would show such a temperature-dependence. 7. These studies suggest that caution must be exercised in the molecular interpretation of derived measures of delta S degree and delta H degree obtained from direct measurements of delta G degree. PMID:8012710

  3. Parkinson’s disease in GTP cyclohydrolase 1 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Mencacci, Niccolò E.; Isaias, Ioannis U.; Reich, Martin M.; Ganos, Christos; Plagnol, Vincent; Polke, James M.; Bras, Jose; Hersheson, Joshua; Stamelou, Maria; Pittman, Alan M.; Noyce, Alastair J.; Mok, Kin Y.; Opladen, Thomas; Kunstmann, Erdmute; Hodecker, Sybille; Münchau, Alexander; Volkmann, Jens; Samnick, Samuel; Sidle, Katie; Nanji, Tina; Sweeney, Mary G.; Houlden, Henry; Batla, Amit; Zecchinelli, Anna L.; Pezzoli, Gianni; Marotta, Giorgio; Lees, Andrew; Alegria, Paulo; Krack, Paul; Cormier-Dequaire, Florence; Lesage, Suzanne; Brice, Alexis; Heutink, Peter; Gasser, Thomas; Lubbe, Steven J.; Morris, Huw R.; Taba, Pille; Koks, Sulev; Majounie, Elisa; Raphael Gibbs, J.; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John; Klebe, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase 1, encoded by the GCH1 gene, is an essential enzyme for dopamine production in nigrostriatal cells. Loss-of-function mutations in GCH1 result in severe reduction of dopamine synthesis in nigrostriatal cells and are the most common cause of DOPA-responsive dystonia, a rare disease that classically presents in childhood with generalized dystonia and a dramatic long-lasting response to levodopa. We describe clinical, genetic and nigrostriatal dopaminergic imaging ([123I]N-ω-fluoropropyl-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl) tropane single photon computed tomography) findings of four unrelated pedigrees with DOPA-responsive dystonia in which pathogenic GCH1 variants were identified in family members with adult-onset parkinsonism. Dopamine transporter imaging was abnormal in all parkinsonian patients, indicating Parkinson’s disease-like nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation. We subsequently explored the possibility that pathogenic GCH1 variants could contribute to the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, even in the absence of a family history for DOPA-responsive dystonia. The frequency of GCH1 variants was evaluated in whole-exome sequencing data of 1318 cases with Parkinson’s disease and 5935 control subjects. Combining cases and controls, we identified a total of 11 different heterozygous GCH1 variants, all at low frequency. This list includes four pathogenic variants previously associated with DOPA-responsive dystonia (Q110X, V204I, K224R and M230I) and seven of undetermined clinical relevance (Q110E, T112A, A120S, D134G, I154V, R198Q and G217V). The frequency of GCH1 variants was significantly higher (Fisher’s exact test P-value 0.0001) in cases (10/1318 = 0.75%) than in controls (6/5935 = 0.1%; odds ratio 7.5; 95% confidence interval 2.4–25.3). Our results show that rare GCH1 variants are associated with an increased risk for Parkinson’s disease. These findings expand the clinical and biological relevance of GTP cycloydrolase 1

  4. Four novel cystic fibrosis mutations in splice junction sequences affecting the CFTR nucleotide binding folds

    SciTech Connect

    Doerk, T.; Wulbrand, U.; Tuemmler, B. )

    1993-03-01

    Single cases of the four novel splice site mutations 1525[minus]1 G [r arrow] A (intron 9), 3601[minus]2 A [r arrow] G (intron 18), 3850[minus]3 T [r arrow] G (intron 19), and 4374+1 G [r arrow] T (intron 23) were detected in the CFTR gene of cystic fibrosis patients of Indo-Iranian, Turkish, Polish, and Germany descent. The nucleotide substitutions at the +1, [minus]1, and [minus]2 positions all destroy splice sites and lead to severe disease alleles associated with features typical of gastrointestinal and pulmonary cystic fibrosis disease. The 3850[minus]3 T-to-G change was discovered in a very mildly affected 33-year-old [Delta]F508 compound heterozygote, suggesting that the T-to-G transversion at the less conserved [minus]3 position of the acceptor splice site may retain some wildtype function. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  5. Post-translational phosphorylation affects the IgE binding capacity of caseins.

    PubMed

    Bernard, H; Meisel, H; Creminon, C; Wal, J M

    2000-02-11

    IgE response specific to those molecular regions of casein that contain a major phosphorylation site was analyzed using native and modified caseins and derived peptides. This study included (i) the naturally occurring common variants A1 and A from beta- and alphas2-caseins, respectively, which were purified in the native form and then dephosphorylated, (ii) a purified rare variant D of alphas2-casein which lacks one major phosphorylation site, and (iii) the native and dephosphorylated tryptic fragment f(1-25) from beta-casein. Direct and indirect ELISA using sera from patients allergic to milk showed that the IgE response to caseins is affected by modifying or eliminating the major phosphorylation site.

  6. Halide binding by the D212N mutant of Bacteriorhodopsin affects hydrogen bonding of water in the active site.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Mikihiro; Yoshitsugu, Maiko; Mizuide, Noriko; Ihara, Kunio; Kandori, Hideki

    2007-06-26

    Bacteriorhodopsin (BR), a membrane protein found in Halobacterium salinarum, functions as a light-driven proton pump. The Schiff base region has a quadrupolar structure with positive charges located at the protonated Schiff base and Arg82, and the counterbalancing negative charges located at Asp85 and Asp212. The quadropole inside the protein is stabilized by three water molecules, forming a roughly planar pentagonal cluster composed of these waters and two oxygens of Asp85 and Asp212 (one from each carboxylate side chain). It is known that BR lacks proton-pumping activity if Asp85 or Asp212 is neutralized by mutation, but binding of Cl- has different functional effects in mutants at these positions. Binding of Cl- to D85T converts into a chloride ion pump (Sasaki, J., Brown, L. S., Chon, Y.-S., Kandori, H., Maeda, A., Needleman, R., and Lanyi, J. K. (1995) Science 269, 73-75). On the other hand, photovoltage measurements suggested that binding of Cl- to D212N restores the proton-pumping activity at low pH (Moltke, S., Krebs, M. P., Mollaaghababa, R., Khorana, H. G., and Heyn, M. P. (1995) Biophys. J. 69, 2074-2083). In this paper, we studied halide-bound D212N mutant BR in detail. Light-induced pH changes in a suspension of proteoliposomes containing D212N(Cl-) at pH 5 clearly showed that Cl- restores the proton-pumping activity. Spectral blue-shift induced by halide binding to D212N indicates that halides affect the counterion of the protonated Schiff base, whereas much smaller halide dependence of the lambdamax than in D85T suggests that the binding site is distant from the chromophore. In fact, the K minus BR difference Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of D212N at 77 K exhibit little halide dependence for vibrational bands of retinal and protein. The only halide-dependent bands were the C=N stretch of Arg82 and some water O-D stretches, suggesting that these groups constitute a halide-binding pocket. A strongly hydrogen-bonded water molecule is

  7. A RanGTP-independent mechanism allows ribosomal protein nuclear import for ribosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Sabina; Fischer, Ute; Altvater, Martin; Nerurkar, Purnima; Peña, Cohue; Gerber, Michaela; Chang, Yiming; Caesar, Stefanie; Schubert, Olga T; Schlenstedt, Gabriel; Panse, Vikram G

    2014-01-01

    Within a single generation time a growing yeast cell imports ∼14 million ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) into the nucleus for ribosome production. After import, it is unclear how these intrinsically unstable and aggregation-prone proteins are targeted to the ribosome assembly site in the nucleolus. Here, we report the discovery of a conserved nuclear carrier Tsr2 that coordinates transfer of the r-protein eS26 to the earliest assembling pre-ribosome, the 90S. In vitro studies revealed that Tsr2 efficiently dissociates importin:eS26 complexes via an atypical RanGTP-independent mechanism that terminates the import process. Subsequently, Tsr2 binds the released eS26, shields it from proteolysis, and ensures its safe delivery to the 90S pre-ribosome. We anticipate similar carriers—termed here escortins—to securely connect the nuclear import machinery with pathways that deposit r-proteins onto developing pre-ribosomal particles. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03473.001 PMID:25144938

  8. A RanGTP-independent mechanism allows ribosomal protein nuclear import for ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Sabina; Fischer, Ute; Altvater, Martin; Nerurkar, Purnima; Peña, Cohue; Gerber, Michaela; Chang, Yiming; Caesar, Stefanie; Schubert, Olga T; Schlenstedt, Gabriel; Panse, Vikram G

    2014-08-21

    Within a single generation time a growing yeast cell imports ∼14 million ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) into the nucleus for ribosome production. After import, it is unclear how these intrinsically unstable and aggregation-prone proteins are targeted to the ribosome assembly site in the nucleolus. Here, we report the discovery of a conserved nuclear carrier Tsr2 that coordinates transfer of the r-protein eS26 to the earliest assembling pre-ribosome, the 90S. In vitro studies revealed that Tsr2 efficiently dissociates importin:eS26 complexes via an atypical RanGTP-independent mechanism that terminates the import process. Subsequently, Tsr2 binds the released eS26, shields it from proteolysis, and ensures its safe delivery to the 90S pre-ribosome. We anticipate similar carriers-termed here escortins-to securely connect the nuclear import machinery with pathways that deposit r-proteins onto developing pre-ribosomal particles. Copyright © 2014, Schütz et al.

  9. Synthesis of a fluorescent 7-methylguanosine analog and a fluorescence spectroscopic study of its reaction with wheatgerm cap binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Ren, J; Goss, D J

    1996-01-01

    In the initiation of protein synthesis, the mRNA 5'-terminal 7-methylguanosine cap structure and several recognition proteins play a pivotal role. For the study of this cap binding reaction, one approach is to use fluorescence spectroscopy. A ribose diol-modified fluorescent cap analog, anthraniloyl-m7GTP (Ant-m7GTP), was designed and synthesized for this purpose. This fluorescent cap analog was found to have a high quantum yield, resistance to photobleaching and avoided overlap of excitation and emission wavelengths with those of proteins. The binding of Ant-m7GTP with wheatgerm initiation factors elF-4F and elF-(iso)4F was determined. The fluorescent cap analog and m7GTP had similar interactions with both cap binding proteins. Fluorescence quenching experiments showed that the microenvironment of Ant-m7GTP when bound to protein was hydrophobic. PMID:8836193

  10. DNA methylation affects nuclear organization, histone modifications, and linker histone binding but not chromatin compaction.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Nick; Thomson, Inga; Boyle, Shelagh; Allan, James; Ramsahoye, Bernard; Bickmore, Wendy A

    2007-05-07

    DNA methylation has been implicated in chromatin condensation and nuclear organization, especially at sites of constitutive heterochromatin. How this is mediated has not been clear. In this study, using mutant mouse embryonic stem cells completely lacking in DNA methylation, we show that DNA methylation affects nuclear organization and nucleosome structure but not chromatin compaction. In the absence of DNA methylation, there is increased nuclear clustering of pericentric heterochromatin and extensive changes in primary chromatin structure. Global levels of histone H3 methylation and acetylation are altered, and there is a decrease in the mobility of linker histones. However, the compaction of both bulk chromatin and heterochromatin, as assayed by nuclease digestion and sucrose gradient sedimentation, is unaltered by the loss of DNA methylation. This study shows how the complete loss of a major epigenetic mark can have an impact on unexpected levels of chromatin structure and nuclear organization and provides evidence for a novel link between DNA methylation and linker histones in the regulation of chromatin structure.

  11. The ties that bind: perceived social support, stress, and IBS in severely affected patients

    PubMed Central

    LACKNER, J. M.; BRASEL, A. M.; QUIGLEY, B M.; KEEFER, L.; KRASNER, S. S.; POWELL, C.; KATZ, L. A.; SITRIN, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Background This study assessed the association between social support and the severity of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms in a sample of severely affected IBS patients recruited to an NIH-funded clinical trial. In addition, we examined if the effects of social support on IBS pain are mediated through the effects on stress. Methods Subjects were 105 Rome II diagnosed IBS patients (F = 85%) who completed seven questionnaires which were collected as part of a pretreatment baseline assessment. Key Results Partial correlations were conducted to clarify the relationships between social support and clinically relevant variables with baseline levels of psychopathology, holding constant number of comorbid medical diseases, age, gender, marital status, ethnicity, and education. Analyses indicated that social support was inversely related to IBS symptom severity. Social support was positively related with less severe pain. A similar pattern of data was found for perceived stress but not quality of life impairment. Regression analyses examined if the effects of social support on pain are mediated by stress. The effects of social support on bodily pain were mediated by stress such that the greater the social support the less stress and the less pain. This effect did not hold for symptom severity, quality of life, or psychological distress. Conclusions & Inferences This study links the perceived adequacy of social support to the global severity of symptoms of IBS and its cardinal symptom (pain). It also suggests that the mechanism by which social support alleviates pain is through a reduction in stress levels. PMID:20465594

  12. A genetic polymorphism for translocator protein 18 kDa affects both in vitro and in vivo radioligand binding in human brain to this putative biomarker of neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Kreisl, William C; Jenko, Kimberly J; Hines, Christina S; Lyoo, Chul Hyoung; Corona, Winston; Morse, Cheryl L; Zoghbi, Sami S; Hyde, Thomas; Kleinman, Joel E; Pike, Victor W; McMahon, Francis J; Innis, Robert B

    2013-01-01

    Second-generation radioligands for translocator protein (TSPO), an inflammation marker, are confounded by the codominant rs6971 polymorphism that affects binding affinity. The resulting three groups are homozygous for high-affinity state (HH), homozygous for low-affinity state (LL), or heterozygous (HL). We tested if in vitro binding to leukocytes distinguished TSPO genotypes and if genotype could affect clinical studies using the TSPO radioligand [(11)C]PBR28. In vitro binding to leukocytes and [(11)C]PBR28 brain imaging were performed in 27 human subjects with known TSPO genotype. Specific [(3)H]PBR28 binding was measured in prefrontal cortex of 45 schizophrenia patients and 47 controls. Leukocyte binding to PBR28 predicted genotype in all subjects. Brain uptake was ∼40% higher in HH than HL subjects. Specific [(3)H]PBR28 binding in LL controls was negligible, while HH controls had ∼80% higher binding than HL controls. After excluding LL subjects, specific binding was 16% greater in schizophrenia patients than controls. This difference was insignificant by itself (P=0.085), but was significant after correcting for TSPO genotype (P=0.011). Our results show that TSPO genotype influences PBR28 binding in vitro and in vivo. Correcting for this genotype increased statistical power in our postmortem study and is recommended for in vivo positron emission tomography studies.

  13. “DNA Binding Region” of BRCA1 Affects Genetic Stability through modulating the Intra-S-Phase Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Takaaki; Xu, Xiaoling; Dimitriadis, Emilios K.; Lahusen, Tyler; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2016-01-01

    The breast cancer associated gene 1 (BRCA1) contains 3 domains: an N-terminal RING domain with ubiquitin E3 ligase activity, C-terminal BRCT protein interaction domain and a central region. RING and BRCT domains are well characterized, yet the function of the central region remains unclear. In this study, we identified an essential DNA binding region (DBR: 421-701 amino acids) within the central region of human BRCA1, and found that BRCA1 brings DNA together and preferably binds to splayed-arm DNA in a sequence-independent manner. To investigate the biological role of the DBR, we generated mouse ES cells, which lack the DBR (ΔDBR) by using the TALEN method. The ΔDBR cells exhibited decreased survival as compared to the wild type (WT) cells treated with a PARP inhibitor, however they have an intact ability to conduct DNA repair mediated by homologous recombination (HR). The ΔDBR cells continued to incorporate more EdU in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU), which causes replication stress and exhibited reduced viability than the WT cells. Moreover, phosphorylation of CHK1, which regulates the intra-S phase checkpoint, was moderately decreased in ΔDBR cells. These data suggest that DNA binding by BRCA1 affects the stability of DNA replication folks, resulting in weakened intra-S-phase checkpoint control in the ΔDBR cells. The ΔDBR cells also exhibited an increased number of abnormal chromosome structures as compared with WT cells, indicating that the ΔDBR cells have increased genetic instability. Thus, we demonstrated that the DBR of BRCA1 modulates genetic stability through the intra-S-phase checkpoint activated by replication stress. PMID:26884712

  14. "DNA Binding Region" of BRCA1 Affects Genetic Stability through modulating the Intra-S-Phase Checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Takaaki; Xu, Xiaoling; Dimitriadis, Emilios K; Lahusen, Tyler; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2016-01-01

    The breast cancer associated gene 1 (BRCA1) contains 3 domains: an N-terminal RING domain with ubiquitin E3 ligase activity, C-terminal BRCT protein interaction domain and a central region. RING and BRCT domains are well characterized, yet the function of the central region remains unclear. In this study, we identified an essential DNA binding region (DBR: 421-701 amino acids) within the central region of human BRCA1, and found that BRCA1 brings DNA together and preferably binds to splayed-arm DNA in a sequence-independent manner. To investigate the biological role of the DBR, we generated mouse ES cells, which lack the DBR (ΔDBR) by using the TALEN method. The ΔDBR cells exhibited decreased survival as compared to the wild type (WT) cells treated with a PARP inhibitor, however they have an intact ability to conduct DNA repair mediated by homologous recombination (HR). The ΔDBR cells continued to incorporate more EdU in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU), which causes replication stress and exhibited reduced viability than the WT cells. Moreover, phosphorylation of CHK1, which regulates the intra-S phase checkpoint, was moderately decreased in ΔDBR cells. These data suggest that DNA binding by BRCA1 affects the stability of DNA replication folks, resulting in weakened intra-S-phase checkpoint control in the ΔDBR cells. The ΔDBR cells also exhibited an increased number of abnormal chromosome structures as compared with WT cells, indicating that the ΔDBR cells have increased genetic instability. Thus, we demonstrated that the DBR of BRCA1 modulates genetic stability through the intra-S-phase checkpoint activated by replication stress.

  15. Polymorphisms in microRNA target sites modulate risk of lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemias and affect microRNA binding

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNA dysregulation is a common event in leukemia. Polymorphisms in microRNA-binding sites (miRSNPs) in target genes may alter the strength of microRNA interaction with target transcripts thereby affecting protein levels. In this study we aimed at identifying miRSNPs associated with leukemia risk and assessing impact of these miRSNPs on miRNA binding to target transcripts. Methods We analyzed with specialized algorithms the 3′ untranslated regions of 137 leukemia-associated genes and identified 111 putative miRSNPs, of which 10 were chosen for further investigation. We genotyped patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, n = 87), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, n = 140), childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, n = 101) and healthy controls (n = 471). Association between SNPs and leukemia risk was calculated by estimating odds ratios in the multivariate logistic regression analysis. For miRSNPs that were associated with leukemia risk we performed luciferase reporter assays to examine whether they influence miRNA binding. Results Here we show that variant alleles of TLX1_rs2742038 and ETV6_rs1573613 were associated with increased risk of childhood ALL (OR (95% CI) = 3.97 (1.43-11.02) and 1.9 (1.16-3.11), respectively), while PML_rs9479 was associated with decreased ALL risk (OR = 0.55 (0.36-0.86). In adult myeloid leukemias we found significant associations between the variant allele of PML_rs9479 and decreased AML risk (OR = 0.61 (0.38-0.97), and between variant alleles of IRF8_ rs10514611 and ARHGAP26_rs187729 and increased CML risk (OR = 2.4 (1.12-5.15) and 1.63 (1.07-2.47), respectively). Moreover, we observed a significant trend for an increasing ALL and CML risk with the growing number of risk genotypes with OR = 13.91 (4.38-44.11) for carriers of ≥3 risk genotypes in ALL and OR = 4.9 (1.27-18.85) for carriers of 2 risk genotypes in CML. Luciferase reporter assays revealed that the C allele of ARHGAP

  16. Lin28a uses distinct mechanisms of binding to RNA and affects miRNA levels positively and negatively.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Jakub Stanislaw; Hobor, Fruzsina; Downie Ruiz Velasco, Angela; Choudhury, Nila Roy; Heikel, Gregory; Kerr, Alastair; Ramos, Andres; Michlewski, Gracjan

    2017-03-01

    Lin28a inhibits the biogenesis of let-7 miRNAs by triggering the polyuridylation and degradation of their precursors by terminal uridylyltransferases TUT4/7 and 3'-5' exoribonuclease Dis3l2, respectively. Previously, we showed that Lin28a also controls the production of neuro-specific miRNA-9 via a polyuridylation-independent mechanism. Here we reveal that the sequences and structural characteristics of pre-let-7 and pre-miRNA-9 are eliciting two distinct modes of binding to Lin28a. We present evidence that Dis3l2 controls miRNA-9 production. Finally, we show that the constitutive expression of untagged Lin28a during neuronal differentiation in vitro positively and negatively affects numerous other miRNAs. Our findings shed light on the role of Lin28a in differentiating cells and on the ways in which one RNA-binding protein can perform multiple roles in the regulation of RNA processing. © 2017 Nowak et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  17. Roscovitine binds to novel L-channel (CaV1.2) sites that separately affect activation and inactivation.

    PubMed

    Yarotskyy, Viktor; Gao, Guofeng; Du, Lei; Ganapathi, Sindura B; Peterson, Blaise Z; Elmslie, Keith S

    2010-01-01

    L-type (Ca(V)1.2) calcium channel antagonists play an important role in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. (R)-Roscovitine, a trisubstituted purine, has been shown to inhibit L-currents by slowing activation and enhancing inactivation. This study utilized molecular and pharmacological approaches to determine whether these effects result from (R)-roscovitine binding to a single site. Using the S enantiomer, we find that (S)-roscovitine enhances inactivation without affecting activation, which suggests multiple sites. This was further supported in studies using chimeric channels comprised of N- and L-channel domains. Those chimeras containing L-channel domains I and IV showed (R)-roscovitine-induced slowed activation like that of wild type L-channels, whereas chimeric channels containing L-channel domain I responded to (R)-roscovitine with enhanced inactivation. We conclude that (R)-roscovitine binds to distinct sites on L-type channels to slow activation and enhance inactivation. These sites appear to be unique from other calcium channel antagonist sites that reside within domains III and IV and are thus novel sites that could be exploited for future drug development. Trisubstituted purines could become a new class of drugs for the treatment of diseases related to hyperfunction of L-type channels, such as Torsades de Pointes.

  18. Lin28a uses distinct mechanisms of binding to RNA and affects miRNA levels positively and negatively

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Jakub Stanislaw; Hobor, Fruzsina; Downie Ruiz Velasco, Angela; Choudhury, Nila Roy; Heikel, Gregory; Kerr, Alastair; Ramos, Andres; Michlewski, Gracjan

    2017-01-01

    Lin28a inhibits the biogenesis of let-7 miRNAs by triggering the polyuridylation and degradation of their precursors by terminal uridylyltransferases TUT4/7 and 3′-5′ exoribonuclease Dis3l2, respectively. Previously, we showed that Lin28a also controls the production of neuro-specific miRNA-9 via a polyuridylation-independent mechanism. Here we reveal that the sequences and structural characteristics of pre-let-7 and pre-miRNA-9 are eliciting two distinct modes of binding to Lin28a. We present evidence that Dis3l2 controls miRNA-9 production. Finally, we show that the constitutive expression of untagged Lin28a during neuronal differentiation in vitro positively and negatively affects numerous other miRNAs. Our findings shed light on the role of Lin28a in differentiating cells and on the ways in which one RNA-binding protein can perform multiple roles in the regulation of RNA processing. PMID:27881476

  19. In vitro Activation of Heat Shock Transcription Factor DNA-Binding by Calcium and Biochemical Conditions that Affect Protein Conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosser, Dick D.; Kotzbauer, Paul T.; Sarge, Kevin D.; Morimoto, Richard I.

    1990-05-01

    The transcription of heat shock genes in response to physiological stress requires activation of heat shock transcription factor (HSF). Although the transcriptional response is most commonly induced by temperature elevation, the biochemical events involved in HSF activation in vivo can also be triggered at normal physiological temperatures by chemicals that inhibit metabolic processes. We have used a HeLa cell-free system in which HSF DNA-binding is activated by conditions that affect protein conformation, including increasing concentrations of hydrogen ions, urea, or nonionic detergents. Treatment with calcium ions also results in a concentration- and time-dependent activation of HSF in vitro. Pretreatment with each of these biochemical conditions reduces the temperature dependence for HSF activation in vitro. These results suggest that HSF is activated either directly by under-going a conformational change or indirectly through interactions with unfolded proteins.

  20. Mass spectrometric identification of key proteolytic cleavage sites in statherin affecting mineral homeostasis and bacterial binding domains.

    PubMed

    Helmerhorst, Eva J; Traboulsi, Georges; Salih, Erdjan; Oppenheim, Frank G

    2010-10-01

    Human salivary statherin inhibits both primary and secondary calcium phosphate precipitation and, upon binding to hydroxyapatite, associates with a variety of oral bacteria. These functions, crucial in the maintenance of tooth enamel integrity, are located in defined regions within the statherin molecule. Proteases associated with saliva, however, cleave statherin effectively, and it is of importance to determine how statherin functional domains are affected by these events. Statherin was isolated from human parotid secretion by zinc precipitation and purified by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). To characterize the proteolytic process provoked by oral proteases, statherin was incubated with whole saliva and fragmentation was monitored by RP-HPLC. The early formed peptides were structurally characterized by reversed phase liquid chromatography electrospray-ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Statherin was degraded 3.6× faster in whole saliva than in whole saliva supernatant. The main and primary cleavage sites were located in the N-terminal half of statherin, specifically after Arg(9), Arg(10), and Arg(13); after Phe(14) and Tyr(18); and after Gly(12), Gly(15), Gly(17) and Gly(19) while the C-terminal half of statherin remained intact. Whole saliva protease activities separated the charged N-terminus from the hydrophobic C-terminus, negatively impacting on full length statherin functions comprising enamel lubrication and inhibition of primary calcium phosphate precipitation. Cryptic epitopes for bacterial binding residing in the C-terminal domain were likewise affected. The full characterization of the statherin peptides generated facilitates the elucidation of their novel functional roles in the oral and gastro-intestinal environment.

  1. Arabidopsis acyl-CoA-binding protein ACBP6 localizes in the phloem and affects jasmonate composition.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zi-Wei; Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Hu, Tai-Hua; Chen, Qin-Fang; Suen, Yung-Lee; Wang, Mingfu; Hoffmann-Benning, Susanne; Yeung, Edward; Chye, Mee-Len

    2016-12-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN6 (AtACBP6) encodes a cytosolic 10-kDa AtACBP. It confers freezing tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis, possibly by its interaction with lipids as indicated by the binding of acyl-CoA esters and phosphatidylcholine to recombinant AtACBP6. Herein, transgenic Arabidopsis transformed with an AtACBP6 promoter-driven β-glucuronidase (GUS) construct exhibited strong GUS activity in the vascular tissues. Immunoelectron microscopy using anti-AtACBP6 antibodies showed AtACBP6 localization in the phloem especially in the companion cells and sieve elements. Also, the presence of gold grains in the plasmodesmata indicated its potential role in systemic trafficking. The AtACBP6 protein, but not its mRNA, was found in phloem exudate of wild-type Arabidopsis. Fatty acid profiling using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed an increase in the jasmonic acid (JA) precursor, 12-oxo-cis,cis-10,15-phytodienoic acid (cis-OPDA), and a reduction in JA and/or its derivatives in acbp6 phloem exudates in comparison to the wild type. Quantitative real-time PCR showed down-regulation of COMATOSE (CTS) in acbp6 rosettes suggesting that AtACBP6 affects CTS function. AtACBP6 appeared to affect the content of JA and/or its derivatives in the sieve tubes, which is consistent with its role in pathogen-defense and in its wound-inducibility of AtACBP6pro::GUS. Taken together, our results suggest the involvement of AtACBP6 in JA-biosynthesis in Arabidopsis phloem tissues.

  2. Affects of N-terminal variation in the SeM protein of Streptococcus equi on antibody and fibrinogen binding.

    PubMed

    Timoney, John F; DeNegri, Rafaela; Sheoran, Abhineet; Forster, Nathalie

    2010-02-10

    The clonal Streptococcus equi causes equine strangles, a highly contagious suppurative lymphadenopathy and rhinopharyngitis. An important virulence factor and vaccine component, the antiphagocytic fibrinogen binding SeM of S. equi is a surface anchored fibrillar protein. Two recent studies of N. American, Japanese and European isolates have revealed a high frequency of N-terminal amino acid variation in SeM of S. equi CF32 that suggests this region of the protein is subject to immunologic selection pressure. The aims of the present study were firstly to map regions of SeM reactive with convalescent equine IgG and IgA and stimulatory for lymph node cells and secondly to determine effects of N-terminal variation on the functionality of SeM. Variation did not significantly affect fibrinogen binding or susceptibility of S. equi to an opsonic equine serum. Linear epitopes reactive with convalescent IgG and mucosal IgA were concentrated toward the conserved center of SeM. However, IgA but not IgG from every horse reacted with at least one peptide that contained variable sequence. Lymph node cells (CD4+) from horses immunized with SeM were strongly responsive to a peptide (alphaalpha36-138) encoding the entire variable region. SeM (CF32) specific mouse Mab 04D11 which reacted strongly with this larger peptide but not with shorter peptides within that sequence reacted strongly with whole cells of S. equi CF32 but only weakly with cells of any of 14 isolates of S. equi expressing different variants of SeM. These results in combination suggest that N-terminal variation alters a conformational epitope of significance in mucosal IgA and systemic T cell responses but does not affect antibody mediated phagocytosis and killing. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The interaction of RNA helicase DDX3 with HIV-1 Rev-CRM1-RanGTP complex during the HIV replication cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Mahboobi, Seyed Hanif; Javanpour, Alex A.; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2015-02-27

    Molecular traffic between the nucleus and the cytoplasm is regulated by the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which acts as a highly selective channel perforating the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exploits the nucleocytoplasmic pathway to export its RNA transcripts across the NPC to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive study on the HIV life cycle and the many drugs developed to target this cycle, no current drugs have been successful in targeting the critical process of viral nuclear export, even though HIV’s reliance on a single host protein, CRM1, to export its unspliced and partially spliced RNA transcripts makes it a tempting target. Due to recent findings implicating a DEAD-box helicase, DDX3, in HIV replication and a member of the export complex, it has become an appealing target for anti-HIV drug inhibition. In the present research, we have applied a hybrid computational protocol to analyze protein-protein interactions in the HIV mRNA export cycle. This method is based on molecular docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation and accompanied by approximate free energy calculation (MM/GBSA), computational alanine scanning, clustering, and evolutionary analysis. We highlight here some of the most likely binding modes and interfacial residues between DDX3 and CRM1 both in the absence and presence of RanGTP. This work shows that although DDX3 can bind to free CRM1, addition of RanGTP leads to more concentrated distribution of binding modes and stronger binding between CRM1 and RanGTP.

  4. The Interaction of RNA Helicase DDX3 with HIV-1 Rev-CRM1-RanGTP Complex during the HIV Replication Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Mahboobi, Seyed Hanif; Javanpour, Alex A.; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular traffic between the nucleus and the cytoplasm is regulated by the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which acts as a highly selective channel perforating the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exploits the nucleocytoplasmic pathway to export its RNA transcripts across the NPC to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive study on the HIV life cycle and the many drugs developed to target this cycle, no current drugs have been successful in targeting the critical process of viral nuclear export, even though HIV’s reliance on a single host protein, CRM1, to export its unspliced and partially spliced RNA transcripts makes it a tempting target. Due to recent findings implicating a DEAD-box helicase, DDX3, in HIV replication and a member of the export complex, it has become an appealing target for anti-HIV drug inhibition. In the present research, we have applied a hybrid computational protocol to analyze protein-protein interactions in the HIV mRNA export cycle. This method is based on molecular docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation and accompanied by approximate free energy calculation (MM/GBSA), computational alanine scanning, clustering, and evolutionary analysis. We highlight here some of the most likely binding modes and interfacial residues between DDX3 and CRM1 both in the absence and presence of RanGTP. This work shows that although DDX3 can bind to free CRM1, addition of RanGTP leads to more concentrated distribution of binding modes and stronger binding between CRM1 and RanGTP. PMID:25723178

  5. The interaction of RNA helicase DDX3 with HIV-1 Rev-CRM1-RanGTP complex during the HIV replication cycle

    DOE PAGES

    Mahboobi, Seyed Hanif; Javanpour, Alex A.; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2015-02-27

    Molecular traffic between the nucleus and the cytoplasm is regulated by the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which acts as a highly selective channel perforating the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exploits the nucleocytoplasmic pathway to export its RNA transcripts across the NPC to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive study on the HIV life cycle and the many drugs developed to target this cycle, no current drugs have been successful in targeting the critical process of viral nuclear export, even though HIV’s reliance on a single host protein, CRM1, to export its unspliced and partially spliced RNAmore » transcripts makes it a tempting target. Due to recent findings implicating a DEAD-box helicase, DDX3, in HIV replication and a member of the export complex, it has become an appealing target for anti-HIV drug inhibition. In the present research, we have applied a hybrid computational protocol to analyze protein-protein interactions in the HIV mRNA export cycle. This method is based on molecular docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation and accompanied by approximate free energy calculation (MM/GBSA), computational alanine scanning, clustering, and evolutionary analysis. We highlight here some of the most likely binding modes and interfacial residues between DDX3 and CRM1 both in the absence and presence of RanGTP. This work shows that although DDX3 can bind to free CRM1, addition of RanGTP leads to more concentrated distribution of binding modes and stronger binding between CRM1 and RanGTP.« less

  6. 2,2′-Pyridylisatogen tosylate antagonizes P2Y1 receptor signaling without affecting nucleotide binding

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhan-Guo; Mamedova, Liaman; Tchilibon, Susanna; Gross, Ariel S.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of 2,2′-pyridylisatogen tosylate (PIT) on the human P2Y1 receptor and on other recombinant P2Y receptors has been studied. We first examined the modulation by PIT of the agonist-induced accumulation of inositol phosphates. PIT blocked 2-methylthio-ADP (2-MeSADP)-induced accumulation of inositol phosphates in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells stably expressing human P2Y1 receptors in a non-competitive and concentration-dependent manner. The IC50 for reduction of the maximal agonist effect was 0.14 μM. In contrast, MRS2179, a competitive P2Y1 receptor antagonist, parallel-shifted the agonist concentration–response curve to the right. PIT also concentration-dependently blocked the P2Y1 receptor signaling induced by the endogenous agonists, ADP and ATP. A simple structural analogue of PIT was synthesized and found to be inactive as a P2Y1 receptor antagonist, suggesting that the nitroxyl group of PIT is a necessary structural component for P2Y1 receptor antagonism. We next examined the possible modulation of the binding of the newly available antagonist radioligand for the P2Y1 receptor, [3H] MRS2279. It was found that PIT (0.01–10 μM) did not inhibit [3H] MRS2279 binding to the human P2Y1 receptor. PIT (10 μM) had no effect on the competition for [3H] MRS2279 binding by agonists, ADP and ATP, suggesting that its antagonism of the P2Y1 receptor may be allosteric. PIT had no significant effect on agonist activation of other P2Y receptors, including P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y6, P2Y11 and P2Y12 receptors. Thus, PIT selectively and non-competitively blocked P2Y1 receptor signaling without affecting nucleotide binding. PMID:15193995

  7. Cation Coordination Alters the Conformation of a Thrombin-Binding G-Quadruplex DNA Aptamer That Affects Inhibition of Thrombin.

    PubMed

    Zavyalova, Elena; Tagiltsev, Grigory; Reshetnikov, Roman; Arutyunyan, Alexander; Kopylov, Alexey

    2016-10-01

    Thrombin-binding aptamers are promising anticoagulants. HD1 is a monomolecular antiparallel G-quadruplex with two G-quartets linked by three loops. Aptamer-thrombin interactions are mediated with two TT-loops that bind thrombin exosite I. Several cations were shown to be coordinated inside the G-quadruplex, including K(+), Na(+), NH4(+), Ba(2+), and Sr(2+); on the contrary, Mn(2+) was coordinated in the grooves, outside the G-quadruplex. K(+) or Na(+) coordination provides aptamer functional activity. The effect of other cations on aptamer functional activity has not yet been described, because of a lack of relevant tests. Interactions between aptamer HD1 and a series of cations were studied. A previously developed enzymatic method was applied to evaluate aptamer inhibitory activity. The structure-function correlation was studied using the characterization of G-quadruplex conformation by circular dichroism spectroscopy. K(+) coordination provided the well-known high inhibitory activity of the aptamer, whereas Na(+) coordination supported low activity. Although NH4(+) coordination yielded a typical antiparallel G-quadruplex, no inhibitory activity was shown; a similar effect was observed for Ba(2+) and Sr(2+) coordination. Mn(2+) coordination destabilized the G-quadruplex that drastically diminished aptamer inhibitory activity. Therefore, G-quadruplex existence per se is insufficient for aptamer inhibitory activity. To elicit the nature of these effects, we thoroughly analyzed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray data on the structure of the HD1 G-quadruplex with various cations. The most reasonable explanation is that cation coordination changes the conformation of TT-loops, affecting thrombin binding and inhibition. HD1 counterparts, aptamers 31-TBA and NU172, behaved similarly with some distinctions. In 31-TBA, an additional duplex module stabilized antiparallel G-quadruplex conformation at high concentrations of divalent cations; whereas in NU172, a

  8. A yeast 2-hybrid analysis of human GTP cyclohydrolase I protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Swick, Lance; Kapatos, Gregory

    2006-06-01

    The yeast 2-hybrid system was used to identify protein domains involved in the oligomerization of human guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) Cyclohydrolase I (GCH1) and the interaction of GCH1 with its regulatory partner, GCH1 feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). When interpreted within the structural framework derived from crystallography, our results indicate that the GCH1 N-terminal alpha-helices are not the only domains involved in the formation of dimers from monomers and also suggest an important role for the C-terminal alpha-helix in the assembly of dimers to form decamers. Moreover, a previously unknown role of the extended N-terminal alpha-helix in the interaction of GCH1 and GFRP was revealed. To discover novel GCH1 protein binding partners, we used the yeast 2-hybrid system to screen a human brain library with GCH1 N-terminal amino acids 1-96 as prey. This protruding extension of GCH1 contains two canonical Type-I Src homology-3 (SH3) ligand domains located within amino acids 1-42. Our screen yielded seven unique clones that were subsequently shown to require amino acids 1-42 for binding to GCH1. The interaction of one of these clones, Activator of Heat Shock 90 kDa Protein (Aha1), with GCH1 was validated by glutathione-s-transferase (GST) pull-down assay. Although the physiological relevance of the Aha1-GCH1 interaction requires further study, Aha1 may recruit GCH1 into the endothelial nitric oxide synthase/heat shock protein (eNOS/Hsp90) complex to support changes in endothelial nitric oxide production through the local synthesis of BH4.

  9. Ca2+-mediated GTP-dependent dynamic assembly of bacterial cell division protein FtsZ into asters and polymer networks in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, X C; Margolin, W

    1997-01-01

    FtsZ, a tubulin-like GTPase that forms a dynamic ring marking the division plane of prokaryotic cells, is essential for cytokinesis. It is not known what triggers FtsZ ring assembly. In this work, we use a FtsZ-green fluorescent protein (Gfp) chimera to assay FtsZ assembly over time by using fluorescence microscopy. We show that FtsZ polymers can assemble dynamically in solution in a GTP-dependent manner. Initially, FtsZ nucleation centers grow into aster-like structures that dramatically resemble microtubule organizing centers. As assembly proceeds further, protofilament bundles emanating from different asters interconnect, mimicking the closure of the FtsZ ring in vivo. Surprisingly, millimolar levels of Ca2+ promote FtsZ dynamic assembly. FtsZ can undergo repeated GTP-dependent assembly and disassembly in solution by sequential addition and removal of Ca2+. In addition, GTP binding and hydrolysis by FtsZ are regulated by Ca2+ concentration. Although the concentration of Ca2+ required for FtsZ assembly in vitro is high, its clear and specific effect on FtsZ dynamics suggests the possibility that Ca2+ may have a role in regulating FtsZ ring assembly in the cell. PMID:9312004

  10. A mutation in the GTP hydrolysis site of Arabidopsis dynamin-related protein 1E confers enhanced cell death in response to powdery mildew infection.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dingzhong; Ade, Jules; Frye, Catherine A; Innes, Roger W

    2006-07-01

    We screened for mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana that displayed enhanced disease resistance to the powdery mildew pathogen Erysiphe cichoracearum and identified the edr3 mutant, which formed large gray lesions upon infection with E. cichoracearum and supported very little sporulation. The edr3-mediated disease resistance and cell death phenotypes were dependent on salicylic acid signaling, but independent of ethylene and jasmonic acid signaling. In addition, edr3 plants displayed enhanced susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, but showed normal responses to virulent and avirulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. The EDR3 gene was isolated by positional cloning and found to encode Arabidopsis dynamin-related protein 1E (DRP1E). The edr3 mutation caused an amino acid substitution in the GTPase domain of DRP1E (proline 77 to leucine) that is predicted to block GTP hydrolysis, but not GTP binding. A T-DNA insertion allele in DRP1E did not cause powdery mildew-induced lesions, suggesting that this phenotype is caused by DRP1E being locked in the GTP-bound state, rather than by a loss of DRP1E activity. Analysis of DRP1E-green fluorescent protein fusion proteins revealed that DRP1E is at least partially localized to mitochondria. These observations suggest a mechanistic link between salicylic acid signaling, mitochondria and programmed cell death in plants.

  11. A potential link between insulin signaling and GLUT4 translocation: Association of Rab10-GTP with the exocyst subunit Exoc6/6b.

    PubMed

    Sano, Hiroyuki; Peck, Grantley R; Blachon, Stephanie; Lienhard, Gustav E

    2015-09-25

    Insulin increases glucose transport in fat and muscle cells by stimulating the exocytosis of specialized vesicles containing the glucose transporter GLUT4. This process, which is referred to as GLUT4 translocation, increases the amount of GLUT4 at the cell surface. Previous studies have provided evidence that insulin signaling increases the amount of Rab10-GTP in the GLUT4 vesicles and that GLUT4 translocation requires the exocyst, a complex that functions in the tethering of vesicles to the plasma membrane, leading to exocytosis. In the present study we show that Rab10 in its GTP form binds to Exoc6 and Exoc6b, which are the two highly homologous isotypes of an exocyst subunit, that both isotypes are found in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and that knockdown of Exoc6, Exoc6b, or both inhibits GLUT4 translocation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. These results suggest that the association of Rab10-GTP with Exoc6/6b is a molecular link between insulin signaling and the exocytic machinery in GLUT4 translocation.

  12. A GTP-driven motor moves proteins across the outer envelope of chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Schleiff, Enrico; Jelic, Marko; Soll, Jürgen

    2003-01-01

    The translocation of proteins across cellular membranes is a key mechanistic problem for every cell. The preprotein translocon at the chloroplast outer envelope is responsible for precursor protein recognition and translocation across the outer envelope. We have reconstituted the translocation process into proteoliposomes from single subunits or by using the purified translocon. Precursor proteins are recognized by the Toc34 receptor in an initial GTP-dependent process. Translocation across the plane of the membrane then occurs through the Toc75 channel in a GTP-dependent process. Correspondingly, GTP hydrolysis of Toc proteoliposomes is 100-fold enhanced in the presence of preprotein. Complete translocation is demonstrated by processing of the precursor form to the mature form by the stromal processing peptidase and by protease resistance of the imported protein. Molecular chaperones are not involved in this translocation event. We show that Toc159 acts as a GTP-driven motor in a sewing-machine-like mechanism. PMID:12665619

  13. A GTP-driven motor moves proteins across the outer envelope of chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Schleiff, Enrico; Jelic, Marko; Soll, Jürgen

    2003-04-15

    The translocation of proteins across cellular membranes is a key mechanistic problem for every cell. The preprotein translocon at the chloroplast outer envelope is responsible for precursor protein recognition and translocation across the outer envelope. We have reconstituted the translocation process into proteoliposomes from single subunits or by using the purified translocon. Precursor proteins are recognized by the Toc34 receptor in an initial GTP-dependent process. Translocation across the plane of the membrane then occurs through the Toc75 channel in a GTP-dependent process. Correspondingly, GTP hydrolysis of Toc proteoliposomes is 100-fold enhanced in the presence of preprotein. Complete translocation is demonstrated by processing of the precursor form to the mature form by the stromal processing peptidase and by protease resistance of the imported protein. Molecular chaperones are not involved in this translocation event. We show that Toc159 acts as a GTP-driven motor in a sewing-machine-like mechanism.

  14. Structural insights into a unique Legionella pneumophila effector LidA recognizing both GDP and GTP bound Rab1 in their active state.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Yin, Kun; Lu, Defen; Li, Bingqing; Zhu, Deyu; Chen, Yuzhen; Zhang, Hao; Xu, Sujuan; Chai, Jijie; Gu, Lichuan

    2012-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila hijacks the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived vesicles to create an organelle designated Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) required for bacterial replication. Maturation of the LCV involved acquisition of Rab1, which is mediated by the bacterial effector protein SidM/DrrA. SidM/DrrA is a bifunctional enzyme having the activity of both Rab1-specific GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) displacement factor (GDF) and guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF). LidA, another Rab1-interacting bacterial effector protein, was reported to promote SidM/DrrA-mediated recruitment of Rab1 to the LCV as well. Here we report the crystal structures of LidA complexes with GDP- and GTP-bound Rab1 respectively. Structural comparison revealed that GDP-Rab1 bound by LidA exhibits an active and nearly identical conformation with that of GTP-Rab1, suggesting that LidA can disrupt the switch function of Rab1 and render it persistently active. As with GTP, LidA maintains GDP-Rab1 in the active conformation through interaction with its two conserved switch regions. Consistent with the structural observations, biochemical assays showed that LidA binds to GDP- and GTP-Rab1 equally well with an affinity approximately 7.5 nM. We propose that the tight interaction with Rab1 allows LidA to facilitate SidM/DrrA-catalyzed release of Rab1 from GDIs. Taken together, our results support a unique mechanism by which a bacterial effector protein regulates Rab1 recycling.

  15. Structural Insights into a Unique Legionella pneumophila Effector LidA Recognizing Both GDP and GTP Bound Rab1 in Their Active State

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Defen; Li, Bingqing; Zhu, Deyu; Chen, Yuzhen; Zhang, Hao; Xu, Sujuan; Chai, Jijie; Gu, Lichuan

    2012-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila hijacks the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived vesicles to create an organelle designated Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) required for bacterial replication. Maturation of the LCV involved acquisition of Rab1, which is mediated by the bacterial effector protein SidM/DrrA. SidM/DrrA is a bifunctional enzyme having the activity of both Rab1-specific GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) displacement factor (GDF) and guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF). LidA, another Rab1-interacting bacterial effector protein, was reported to promote SidM/DrrA-mediated recruitment of Rab1 to the LCV as well. Here we report the crystal structures of LidA complexes with GDP- and GTP-bound Rab1 respectively. Structural comparison revealed that GDP-Rab1 bound by LidA exhibits an active and nearly identical conformation with that of GTP-Rab1, suggesting that LidA can disrupt the switch function of Rab1 and render it persistently active. As with GTP, LidA maintains GDP-Rab1 in the active conformation through interaction with its two conserved switch regions. Consistent with the structural observations, biochemical assays showed that LidA binds to GDP- and GTP-Rab1 equally well with an affinity approximately 7.5 nM. We propose that the tight interaction with Rab1 allows LidA to facilitate SidM/DrrA-catalyzed release of Rab1 from GDIs. Taken together, our results support a unique mechanism by which a bacterial effector protein regulates Rab1 recycling. PMID:22416225

  16. Identification of a second GTP-bound magnesium ion in archaeal initiation factor 2.

    PubMed

    Dubiez, Etienne; Aleksandrov, Alexey; Lazennec-Schurdevin, Christine; Mechulam, Yves; Schmitt, Emmanuelle

    2015-03-11

    Eukaryotic and archaeal translation initiation processes involve a heterotrimeric GTPase e/aIF2 crucial for accuracy of start codon selection. In eukaryotes, the GTPase activity of eIF2 is assisted by a GTPase-activating protein (GAP), eIF5. In archaea, orthologs of eIF5 are not found and aIF2 GTPase activity is thought to be non-assisted. However, no in vitro GTPase activity of the archaeal factor has been reported to date. Here, we show that aIF2 significantly hydrolyses GTP in vitro. Within aIF2γ, H97, corresponding to the catalytic histidine found in other translational GTPases, and D19, from the GKT loop, both participate in this activity. Several high-resolution crystal structures were determined to get insight into GTP hydrolysis by aIF2γ. In particular, a crystal structure of the H97A mutant was obtained in the presence of non-hydrolyzed GTP. This structure reveals the presence of a second magnesium ion bound to GTP and D19. Quantum chemical/molecular mechanical simulations support the idea that the second magnesium ion may assist GTP hydrolysis by helping to neutralize the developing negative charge in the transition state. These results are discussed in light of the absence of an identified GAP in archaea to assist GTP hydrolysis on aIF2.

  17. AtSPX1 affects the AtPHR1 -DNA binding equilibrium by binding monomeric AtPHR1 in solution.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wanjun; Manfield, Iain W; Muench, Stephen P; Baker, Alison

    2017-09-08

    Phosphorus is an essential macronutrient for plant growth, and is deficient in about 50% of agricultural soils. The transcription factor Phosphate Starvation Response 1 (PHR1) plays a central role in regulating the expression of a subset of Phosphate Starvation Induced (PSI) genes through binding to a cis acting DNA element termed P1BS. In Arabidopsis and rice, activity of AtPHR1/OsPHR2 is regulated in part by their downstream target SPX proteins through protein-protein interaction. Here we provide kinetic and affinity data for interaction between AtPHR1 and P1BS sites. Using SPR, a tandem P1BS sequence showed ~50-fold higher affinity for MBPAtdPHR1 (a fusion protein comprising the DNA binding domain and coiled-coiled domain of AtPHR1 fused to maltose binding protein) than a single site. The affinity difference was largely reflected in a much slower dissociation rate from the 2x P1BS binding site, suggesting an important role for protein cooperativity. Injection of AtSPX1 in the presence of phosphate or inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6) failed to alter the MBPAtdPHR1-P1BS dissociation rate, while pre-mixing of these two proteins in the presence of either 5 mM Pi or 500 µM InsP6 resulted in a much lower DNA binding signal from MBPAtdPHR1. These data suggest that in the Pi restored condition, AtSPX1 can bind to monomeric AtPHR1 in solution and therefore regulate PSI gene expression by tuning the AtPHR1-DNA binding equilibrium. This Pi-dependent regulation of AtPHR1-DNA binding equilibrium also generates a negative feedback loop on the expression of AtSPX1 itself, providing a tight control of PSI gene expression. ©2017 The Author(s).

  18. Peptide Chain Termination: Effect of Protein S on Ribosomal Binding of Release Factors

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, J. L.; Caskey, C. T.

    1970-01-01

    The protein factor S, previously shown to stimulate polypeptide chain termination in bacterial extracts, has two effects upon the complex formed between ribosomes, release factor, and terminator (trinucleotide) codon: (1) in the absence of GTP or GDP, S stimulates formation of an [R·UAA·ribosome] intermediate, and (2) in the presence of GTP or GDP, S participates in dissociation of this intermediate. Factor S can stimulate fMet release from [fMet-tRNAf·AUG·ribosome] intermediates in either the presence or absence of GTP or GDP. A model is proposed which relates the in vitro effects of S ± GTP (or GDP) on fMet release to the effects of S ± GTP (or GDP) on the binding and dissociation of R factor from ribosomes. PMID:5289007

  19. pH-sensitive residues in the p19 RNA silencing suppressor protein from carnation Italian ringspot virus affect siRNA binding stability.

    PubMed

    Law, Sean M; Zhang, Bin W; Brooks, Charles L

    2013-05-01

    Tombusviruses, such as Carnation Italian ringspot virus (CIRV), encode a protein homodimer called p19 that is capable of suppressing RNA silencing in their infected hosts by binding to and sequestering short-interfering RNA (siRNA) away from the RNA silencing pathway. P19 binding stability has been shown to be sensitive to changes in pH but the specific amino acid residues involved have remained unclear. Using constant pH molecular dynamics simulations, we have identified key pH-dependent residues that affect CIRV p19-siRNA binding stability at various pH ranges based on calculated changes in the free energy contribution from each titratable residue. At high pH, the deprotonation of Lys60, Lys67, Lys71, and Cys134 has the largest effect on the binding stability. Similarly, deprotonation of several acidic residues (Asp9, Glu12, Asp20, Glu35, and/or Glu41) at low pH results in a decrease in binding stability. At neutral pH, residues Glu17 and His132 provide a small increase in the binding stability and we find that the optimal pH range for siRNA binding is between 7.0 and 10.0. Overall, our findings further inform recent experiments and are in excellent agreement with data on the pH-dependent binding profile. Copyright © 2013 The Protein Society.

  20. pH-sensitive residues in the p19 RNA silencing suppressor protein from carnation Italian ringspot virus affect siRNA binding stability

    PubMed Central

    Law, Sean M; Zhang, Bin W; Brooks, Charles L

    2013-01-01

    Tombusviruses, such as Carnation Italian ringspot virus (CIRV), encode a protein homodimer called p19 that is capable of suppressing RNA silencing in their infected hosts by binding to and sequestering short-interfering RNA (siRNA) away from the RNA silencing pathway. P19 binding stability has been shown to be sensitive to changes in pH but the specific amino acid residues involved have remained unclear. Using constant pH molecular dynamics simulations, we have identified key pH-dependent residues that affect CIRV p19–siRNA binding stability at various pH ranges based on calculated changes in the free energy contribution from each titratable residue. At high pH, the deprotonation of Lys60, Lys67, Lys71, and Cys134 has the largest effect on the binding stability. Similarly, deprotonation of several acidic residues (Asp9, Glu12, Asp20, Glu35, and/or Glu41) at low pH results in a decrease in binding stability. At neutral pH, residues Glu17 and His132 provide a small increase in the binding stability and we find that the optimal pH range for siRNA binding is between 7.0 and 10.0. Overall, our findings further inform recent experiments and are in excellent agreement with data on the pH-dependent binding profile. PMID:23450521

  1. A novel GTP-dependent mechanism of ileal muscarinic metabotropic channel desensitization.

    PubMed Central

    Zholos, A. V.; Bolton, T. B.

    1996-01-01

    1. Cationic current (Icat) was evoked in single isolated smooth muscle cells either by activating muscarinic receptors with the stable muscarinic agonist, carbachol (CCh), or by dialysing cells with GTP-gamma S. It was studied using patch-clamp recording techniques in cells obtained by enzymatic digestion from the longitudinal muscle layer of the guinea-pig small intestine. 2. Icat appears only when muscarinic receptors or G-proteins are activated, but it is strongly voltage-dependent. Its activation could be described by the Boltzmann equation. During desensitization of Icat evoked by 50 microM CCh, the slope factor, k, remained constant whereas the maximal conductance, Gmax, slowly decreased and the potential of half-maximal activation, V1/2, shifted positively by 32 mV during 4 min. 3. At peak response either to extracellular application of CCh (GTP-free, or 1 mM GTP-containing, pipette solution) or to intracellular application of GTP-gamma S (no CCh), the size and voltage-dependent properties of Icat were similar. However, Icat desensitization was slower in the presence of GTP (CCh applied) in the pipette solution and much slower with GTP-gamma S in the pipette (no CCh) compared to GTP-free pipette solution (CCh applied); the decrease in Gmax with time was much delayed and the positive shift of the activation curve was inhibited. GDP-beta S added to the pipette solution at 2 mM abolished Icat in response to applied CCh; 50 microM did not prevent Icat generation but significantly accelerated desensitization. 4. It was concluded that the rate of desensitization of the carbachol-evoked cationic current was due to a decline in the concentration of activated G-protein in the cell, which reduced the maximum number of channels which could be opened and shifted their activation range to less negative potentials. PMID:8922752

  2. The structure of YqeH: An AtNOS1/AtNOA1 ortholog that couples GTP hydrolysis to molecular recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Sudhamsu, J.; Lee, G.I.; Klessig, D.F.; Crane, B.R.

    2009-03-27

    AtNOS1/AtNOA1 was identified as a nitric oxide-generating enzyme in plants, but that function has recently been questioned. To resolve issues surrounding AtNOA1 activity, we report the biochemical properties and a 2.36 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a bacterial AtNOA1 ortholog (YqeH). Geobacillus YqeH fused to a putative AtNOA1 leader peptide complements growth and morphological defects of Atnoa1 mutant plants. YqeH does not synthesize nitric oxide from L-arginine but rather hydrolyzes GTP. The YqeH structure reveals a circularly permuted GTPase domain and an unusual C-terminal {beta}-domain. A small N-terminal domain, disordered in the structure, binds zinc. Structural homology among the C-terminal domain, the RNA-binding regulator TRAP, and the hypoxia factor pVHL define a recognition module for peptides and nucleic acids. TRAP residues important for RNA binding are conserved by the YqeH C-terminal domain, whose positioning is coupled to GTP hydrolysis. YqeH and AtNOA1 probably act as G-proteins that regulate nucleic acid recognition and not as nitric-oxide synthases.

  3. Fluctuating capacity and advance decision-making in Bipolar Affective Disorder — Self-binding directives and self-determination

    PubMed Central

    Gergel, Tania; Owen, Gareth S.

    2015-01-01

    For people with Bipolar Affective Disorder, a self-binding (advance) directive (SBD), by which they commit themselves to treatment during future episodes of mania, even if unwilling, can seem the most rational way to deal with an imperfect predicament. Knowing that mania will almost certainly cause enormous damage to themselves, their preferred solution may well be to allow trusted others to enforce treatment and constraint, traumatic though this may be. No adequate provision exists for drafting a truly effective SBD and efforts to establish such provision are hampered by very valid, but also paralysing ethical, clinical and legal concerns. Effectively, the autonomy and rights of people with bipolar are being ‘protected’ through being denied an opportunity to protect themselves. From a standpoint firmly rooted in the clinical context and experience of mania, this article argues that an SBD, based on a patient-centred evaluation of capacity to make treatment decisions (DMC-T) and grounded within the clinician–patient relationship, could represent a legitimate and ethically coherent form of self-determination. After setting out background information on fluctuating capacity, mania and advance directives, this article proposes a framework for constructing such an SBD, and considers common objections, possible solutions and suggestions for future research. PMID:25939286

  4. Fluctuating capacity and advance decision-making in Bipolar Affective Disorder - Self-binding directives and self-determination.

    PubMed

    Gergel, Tania; Owen, Gareth S

    2015-01-01

    For people with Bipolar Affective Disorder, a self-binding (advance) directive (SBD), by which they commit themselves to treatment during future episodes of mania, even if unwilling, can seem the most rational way to deal with an imperfect predicament. Knowing that mania will almost certainly cause enormous damage to themselves, their preferred solution may well be to allow trusted others to enforce treatment and constraint, traumatic though this may be. No adequate provision exists for drafting a truly effective SBD and efforts to establish such provision are hampered by very valid, but also paralysing ethical, clinical and legal concerns. Effectively, the autonomy and rights of people with bipolar are being 'protected' through being denied an opportunity to protect themselves. From a standpoint firmly rooted in the clinical context and experience of mania, this article argues that an SBD, based on a patient-centred evaluation of capacity to make treatment decisions (DMC-T) and grounded within the clinician-patient relationship, could represent a legitimate and ethically coherent form of self-determination. After setting out background information on fluctuating capacity, mania and advance directives, this article proposes a framework for constructing such an SBD, and considers common objections, possible solutions and suggestions for future research.

  5. Glycosylation changes in the globular head of H3N2 influenza hemagglutinin modulate receptor binding without affecting virus virulence

    PubMed Central

    Alymova, Irina V.; York, Ian A.; Air, Gillian M.; Cipollo, John F.; Gulati, Shelly; Baranovich, Tatiana; Kumar, Amrita; Zeng, Hui; Gansebom, Shane; McCullers, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the emergence of human H3N2 influenza A viruses in the pandemic of 1968, these viruses have become established as strains of moderate severity. A decline in virulence has been accompanied by glycan accumulation on the hemagglutinin globular head, and hemagglutinin receptor binding has changed from recognition of a broad spectrum of glycan receptors to a narrower spectrum. The relationship between increased glycosylation, binding changes, and reduction in H3N2 virulence is not clear. We evaluated the effect of hemagglutinin glycosylation on receptor binding and virulence of engineered H3N2 viruses. We demonstrate that low-binding virus is as virulent as higher binding counterparts, suggesting that H3N2 infection does not require either recognition of a wide variety of, or high avidity binding to, receptors. Among the few glycans recognized with low-binding virus, there were two structures that were bound by the vast majority of H3N2 viruses isolated between 1968 and 2012. We suggest that these two structures support physiologically relevant binding of H3N2 hemagglutinin and that this physiologically relevant binding has not changed since the 1968 pandemic. Therefore binding changes did not contribute to reduced severity of seasonal H3N2 viruses. This work will help direct the search for factors enhancing influenza virulence. PMID:27796371

  6. GTP-independent tRNA Delivery to the Ribosomal P-site by a Novel Eukaryotic Translation Factor*

    PubMed Central

    Dmitriev, Sergey E.; Terenin, Ilya M.; Andreev, Dmitri E.; Ivanov, Pavel A.; Dunaevsky, Jacov E.; Merrick, William C.; Shatsky, Ivan N.

    2010-01-01

    During translation, aminoacyl-tRNAs are delivered to the ribosome by specialized GTPases called translation factors. Here, we report the tRNA binding to the P-site of 40 S ribosomes by a novel GTP-independent factor eIF2D isolated from mammalian cells. The binding of tRNAiMet occurs after the AUG codon finds its position in the P-site of 40 S ribosomes, the situation that takes place during initiation complex formation on the hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site or on some other specific RNAs (leaderless mRNA and A-rich mRNAs with relaxed scanning dependence). Its activity in tRNA binding with 40 S subunits does not require the presence of the aminoacyl moiety. Moreover, the factor possesses the unique ability to deliver non-Met (elongator) tRNAs into the P-site of the 40 S subunit. The corresponding gene is found in all eukaryotes and includes an SUI1 domain present also in translation initiation factor eIF1. The versatility of translation initiation strategies in eukaryotes is discussed. PMID:20566627

  7. Assay for Arf GTP-binding Proteins | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Biology is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize an antibody-based proteomics assay.

  8. Expression of GTP-binding protein alpha subunits in human thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Kabouridis, P S; Waters, S T; Escobar, S; Stanners, J; Tsoukas, C D

    1995-03-09

    In this report, we investigate G protein alpha subunit diversity in human thymocytes, utilizing common properties shared by these genes and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Sequence analysis of PCR amplified gene portions, indicate the presence of members from all four G-protein families that have been described thus far. The alpha subunit genes identified are: G alpha i1-3 and G alpha z but not G alpha o from the Gi family, G alpha s from the Gs family, G alpha 11, G alpha q, and G alpha 16 from the Gq family, and G alpha 12 and G alpha 13 from the G12 family. Also in this report we present the nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequences of the human G alpha 13 cloned from a thymocyte cDNA library. The sequence of the human G alpha 13 has not been previously reported. Comparison of this sequence with the reported murine G alpha 13 shows > 90% identity at the deduced amino acid sequence level. We conclude that thymocytes represent a useful experimental system for the study of G protein involvement in immune responses and lymphocyte development.

  9. Guanine nucleotide binding proteins in zucchini seedlings: Characterization and interactions with the NPA receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Lindeberg, M.; Jacobs, M. )

    1989-04-01

    A microsomal membrane preparation from hypocotyls of dark-grown Cucurbita pepo L. seedlings contains specific high-affinity binding sites for the non-hydrolyzable GTP analog guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio) triphosphate (GTP-{gamma}-S). Both the binding affinity and the pattern of binding specificity for GTP and GTP analogs are similar to animal G-proteins, and two zucchini membrane proteins are recognized in western blots by antiserum specific for the {sigma} subunit of platelet G{sub s} protein. GTP-{gamma}-S can increase specific naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) binding in zucchini microsomal membrane preparations, with its stimulation increasing with large tissue age. Al{sup +3} and F{sup {minus}} agents known to activate G-proteins - decreased NPA specific binding by ca. 15%. In tests of in vitro auxin transport employing zucchini plasma membrane vesicles, AlF{sup {minus}}{sub 4} strongly inhibited {sup 3}H-indoleacetic acid nor accumulation; GTP-{gamma}-S effects on this system will be discussed.

  10. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide down-regulates expression of GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Werner, Ernst R; Bahrami, Soheyl; Heller, Regine; Werner-Felmayer, Gabriele

    2002-03-22

    GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) is a 9.7-kDa protein regulating GTP cyclohydrolase I activity in dependence of tetrahydrobiopterin and phenylalanine concentrations, thus enabling stimulation of tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis by phenylalanine to ensure its efficient metabolism by phenylalanine hydroxylase. Here, we were interested in regulation of GFRP expression by proinflammatory cytokines and stimuli, which are known to induce GTP cyclohydrolase I expression. Recombinant human GFRP stimulated recombinant human GTP cyclohydrolase I in the presence of phenylalanine and mediated feedback inhibition by tetrahydrobiopterin. Levels of GFRP mRNA in human myelomonocytoma (THP-1) cells remained unaltered by treatment of cells with interferon-gamma or interleukin-1beta, but were significantly down-regulated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 1 microg/ml), without or with cotreatment by interferon-gamma, which strongly up-regulated GTP cyclohydrolase I expression and activity. GFRP expression was also suppressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with 1 microg/ml LPS, as well as in rat tissues 7 h post intraperitoneal injection of 10 mg/kg LPS. THP-1 cells stimulated with interferon-gamma alone showed increased pteridine synthesis by addition of phenylalanine to the culture medium. Cells stimulated with interferon-gamma plus LPS, in contrast, showed phenylalanine-independent pteridine synthesis. These results demonstrate that LPS down-regulates expression of GFRP, thus rendering pteridine synthesis independent of metabolic control by phenylalanine.

  11. The lipid kinase PI5P4Kβ is an intracellular GTP sensor for metabolism and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sumita, Kazutaka; Lo, Yu-Hua; Takeuchi, Koh; Senda, Miki; Kofuji, Satoshi; Ikeda, Yoshiki; Terakawa, Jumpei; Sasaki, Mika; Yoshino, Hirofumi; Majd, Nazanin; Zheng, Yuxiang; Kahoud, Emily Rose; Yokota, Takehiro; Emerling, Brooke M.; Asara, John M.; Ishida, Tetsuo; Locasale, Jason W.; Daikoku, Takiko; Anastasiou, Dimitrios; Senda, Toshiya; Sasaki, Atsuo T.

    2016-01-01

    Summary While cellular GTP concentration dramatically changes in response to an organism’s cellular status, whether it serves as a metabolic cue for biological signaling remains elusive due to the lack of molecular identification of GTP sensors. Here we report that PI5P4Kβ, a phosphoinositide kinase that regulates PI(5)P levels, detects GTP concentration and converts them into lipid second messenger signaling. Biochemical analyses show that PI5P4Kβ preferentially utilizes GTP, rather than ATP, for PI(5)P phosphorylation and its activity reflects changes in direct proportion to the physiological GTP concentration. Structural and biological analyses reveal that the GTP-sensing activity of PI5P4Kβ is critical for metabolic adaptation and tumorigenesis. These results demonstrate that PI5P4Kβ is the missing GTP sensor and that GTP concentration functions as a metabolic cue via PI5P4Kβ. The critical role of the GTP-sensing activity of PI5P4Kβ in cancer signifies this lipid kinase as a cancer therapeutic target. PMID:26774281

  12. Phase changes at the end of a microtubule with a GTP cap.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, T L; Chen, Y

    1984-01-01

    Examination of Monte Carlo kinetic simulations, based on a realistic set of microscopic rate constants that apply to the end of a microtubule with a GTP cap, suggests that the end of a microtubule alternates between two quasimacroscopic phases. In one phase, the microtubule end has a GTP cap that fluctuates in size; in the other phase, the GTP cap has been lost. These repeated phase changes take place at any given tubulin concentration in a wide range of concentrations. While in the first phase, the microtubule grows slowly; while in the second phase, it shortens rapidly and may disappear completely. These results are closely related to the recent experimental work of Mitchison and Kirschner [Mitchison, T. & Kirschner, M.W. (1984) Nature (London), in press]. PMID:6592585

  13. Point mutations in Staphylococcus aureus PBP 2 gene affect penicillin-binding kinetics and are associated with resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Hackbarth, C J; Kocagoz, T; Kocagoz, S; Chambers, H F

    1995-01-01

    In Staphylococcus aureus, penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP 2) has been implicated in non-PBP 2a-mediated methicillin resistance. The PBP 2 gene (pbpB) was cloned from an expression library of a methicillin-susceptible strain of S. aureus (209P), and its entire sequence was compared with that of the pbpB gene from strains BB255, BB255R, and CDC6. Point mutations that resulted in amino acid substitutions near the conserved penicillin-binding motifs were detected in BB255R and CDC6, two low-level methicillin-resistant strains. Penicillin binding to PBP 2 in both BB255R and CDC6 is altered, and kinetic analysis indicated that altered binding of PBP 2 by penicillin was due to both lower binding affinity and more rapid release of bound drug. These structural and biochemical changes may contribute to the strains' resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. PMID:7695289

  14. Structure of the Branched-chain Amino Acid and GTP-sensing Global Regulator, CodY, from Bacillus subtilis*

    PubMed Central

    Levdikov, Vladimir M.; Blagova, Elena; Young, Vicki L.; Belitsky, Boris R.; Lebedev, Andrey; Sonenshein, Abraham L.

    2017-01-01

    CodY is a branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) and GTP sensor and a global regulator of transcription in low G + C Gram-positive bacteria. It controls the expression of over 100 genes and operons, principally by repressing during growth genes whose products are required for adaptations to nutrient limitation. However, the mechanism by which BCAA binding regulates transcriptional changes is not clear. It is known that CodY consists of a GAF (cGMP-stimulated phosphodiesterases, adenylate cyclases, FhlA) domain that binds BCAAs and a winged helix-turn-helix (wHTH) domain that binds to DNA, but the way in which these domains interact and the structural basis of the BCAA dependence of this interaction are unknown. To gain new insights, we determined the crystal structure of unliganded CodY from Bacillus subtilis revealing a 10-turn α-helix linking otherwise discrete GAF and wHTH domains. The structure of CodY in complex with isoleucine revealed a reorganized GAF domain. In both complexes CodY was tetrameric. Size exclusion chromatography with multiangle laser light scattering (SEC-MALLS) experiments showed that CodY is a dimer at concentrations found in bacterial cells. Comparison of structures of dimers of unliganded CodY and CodY-Ile derived from the tetramers showed a splaying of the wHTH domains when Ile was bound; splaying is likely to account for the increased affinity of Ile-bound CodY for DNA. Electrophoretic mobility shift and SEC-MALLS analyses of CodY binding to 19–36-bp operator fragments are consistent with isoleucine-dependent binding of two CodY dimers per duplex. The implications of these observations for effector control of CodY activity are discussed. PMID:28011634

  15. Ligand Binding Study of Human PEBP1/RKIP: Interaction with Nucleotides and Raf-1 Peptides Evidenced by NMR and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Tavel, Laurette; Jaquillard, Lucie; Karsisiotis, Andreas I.; Saab, Fabienne; Jouvensal, Laurence; Brans, Alain; Delmas, Agnès F.; Schoentgen, Françoise; Cadene, Martine; Damblon, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Background Human Phosphatidylethanolamine binding protein 1 (hPEBP1) also known as Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP), affects various cellular processes, and is implicated in metastasis formation and Alzheimer's disease. Human PEBP1 has also been shown to inhibit the Raf/MEK/ERK pathway. Numerous reports concern various mammalian PEBP1 binding ligands. However, since PEBP1 proteins from many different species were investigated, drawing general conclusions regarding human PEBP1 binding properties is rather difficult. Moreover, the binding site of Raf-1 on hPEBP1 is still unknown. Methods/Findings In the present study, we investigated human PEBP1 by NMR to determine the binding site of four different ligands: GTP, FMN, and one Raf-1 peptide in tri-phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms. The study was carried out by NMR in near physiological conditions, allowing for the identification of the binding site and the determination of the affinity constants KD for different ligands. Native mass spectrometry was used as an alternative method for measuring KD values. Conclusions/Significance Our study demonstrates and/or confirms the binding of hPEBP1 to the four studied ligands. All of them bind to the same region centered on the conserved ligand-binding pocket of hPEBP1. Although the affinities for GTP and FMN decrease as pH, salt concentration and temperature increase from pH 6.5/NaCl 0 mM/20°C to pH 7.5/NaCl 100 mM/30°C, both ligands clearly do bind under conditions similar to what is found in cells regarding pH, salt concentration and temperature. In addition, our work confirms that residues in the vicinity of the pocket rather than those within the pocket seem to be required for interaction with Raf-1. PMID:22558375

  16. Continued Protein Synthesis at Low [ATP] and [GTP] Enables Cell Adaptation during Energy Limitation▿

    PubMed Central

    Jewett, Michael C.; Miller, Mark L.; Chen, Yvonne; Swartz, James R.

    2009-01-01

    One of biology's critical ironies is the need to adapt to periods of energy limitation by using the energy-intensive process of protein synthesis. Although previous work has identified the individual energy-requiring steps in protein synthesis, we still lack an understanding of the dependence of protein biosynthesis rates on [ATP] and [GTP]. Here, we used an integrated Escherichia coli cell-free platform that mimics the intracellular, energy-limited environment to show that protein synthesis rates are governed by simple Michaelis-Menten dependence on [ATP] and [GTP] (KmATP, 27 ± 4 μM; KmGTP, 14 ± 2 μM). Although the system-level GTP affinity agrees well with the individual affinities of the GTP-dependent translation factors, the system-level KmATP is unexpectedly low. Especially under starvation conditions, when energy sources are limited, cells need to replace catalysts that become inactive and to produce new catalysts in order to effectively adapt. Our results show how this crucial survival priority for synthesizing new proteins can be enforced after rapidly growing cells encounter energy limitation. A diminished energy supply can be rationed based on the relative ATP and GTP affinities, and, since these affinities for protein synthesis are high, the cells can adapt with substantial changes in protein composition. Furthermore, our work suggests that characterization of individual enzymes may not always predict the performance of multicomponent systems with complex interdependencies. We anticipate that cell-free studies in which complex metabolic systems are activated will be valuable tools for elucidating the behavior of such systems. PMID:19028899

  17. Different Effects of Guanine Nucleotides (GDP and GTP) on Protein-Mediated Mitochondrial Proton Leak

    PubMed Central

    Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej M.; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we compared the influence of GDP and GTP on isolated mitochondria respiring under conditions favoring oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and under conditions excluding this process, i.e., in the presence of carboxyatractyloside, an adenine nucleotide translocase inhibitor, and/or oligomycin, an FOF1-ATP synthase inhibitor. Using mitochondria isolated from rat kidney and human endothelial cells, we found that the action of GDP and GTP can differ diametrically depending on the conditions. Namely, under conditions favoring OXPHOS, both in the absence and presence of linoleic acid, an activator of uncoupling proteins (UCPs), the addition of 1 mM GDP resulted in the state 4 (non-phosphorylating respiration)-state 3 (phosphorylating respiration) transition, which is characteristic of ADP oxidative phosphorylation. In contrast, the addition of 1 mM GTP resulted in a decrease in the respiratory rate and an increase in the membrane potential, which is characteristic of UCP inhibition. The stimulatory effect of GDP, but not GTP, was also observed in inside-out submitochondrial particles prepared from rat kidney mitochondria. However, the effects of GDP and GTP were more similar in the presence of OXPHOS inhibitors. The importance of these observations in connection with the action of UCPs, adenine nucleotide translocase (or other carboxyatractyloside-sensitive carriers), carboxyatractyloside- and purine nucleotide-insensitive carriers, as well as nucleoside-diphosphate kinase (NDPK) are considered. Because the measurements favoring oxidative phosphorylation better reflect in vivo conditions, our study strongly supports the idea that GDP cannot be considered a significant physiological inhibitor of UCP. Moreover, it appears that, under native conditions, GTP functions as a more efficient UCP inhibitor than GDP and ATP. PMID:24904988

  18. Different effects of guanine nucleotides (GDP and GTP) on protein-mediated mitochondrial proton leak.

    PubMed

    Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej M; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we compared the influence of GDP and GTP on isolated mitochondria respiring under conditions favoring oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and under conditions excluding this process, i.e., in the presence of carboxyatractyloside, an adenine nucleotide translocase inhibitor, and/or oligomycin, an FOF1-ATP synthase inhibitor. Using mitochondria isolated from rat kidney and human endothelial cells, we found that the action of GDP and GTP can differ diametrically depending on the conditions. Namely, under conditions favoring OXPHOS, both in the absence and presence of linoleic acid, an activator of uncoupling proteins (UCPs), the addition of 1 mM GDP resulted in the state 4 (non-phosphorylating respiration)-state 3 (phosphorylating respiration) transition, which is characteristic of ADP oxidative phosphorylation. In contrast, the addition of 1 mM GTP resulted in a decrease in the respiratory rate and an increase in the membrane potential, which is characteristic of UCP inhibition. The stimulatory effect of GDP, but not GTP, was also observed in inside-out submitochondrial particles prepared from rat kidney mitochondria. However, the effects of GDP and GTP were more similar in the presence of OXPHOS inhibitors. The importance of these observations in connection with the action of UCPs, adenine nucleotide translocase (or other carboxyatractyloside-sensitive carriers), carboxyatractyloside- and purine nucleotide-insensitive carriers, as well as nucleoside-diphosphate kinase (NDPK) are considered. Because the measurements favoring oxidative phosphorylation better reflect in vivo conditions, our study strongly supports the idea that GDP cannot be considered a significant physiological inhibitor of UCP. Moreover, it appears that, under native conditions, GTP functions as a more efficient UCP inhibitor than GDP and ATP.

  19. Microplanktonic ATP-Biomass and GTP-Productivity Associated with Upwelling off Pt. Sur, California.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    growth potential (based on high AATP/ATP; see below). D . ASSAYING ATP AND GTP The luciferin -luciferase assay principle for ATP [Holm- Hansen and...UPWELLING OFF PT. -SUR, CALIFORNIA. by __Sherman Hughes/Bronsink Thesis Advisor: E. D . Traganza A9 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited...triphosphate (GTP) sampling was found to be high throughout the.. A N 7 1 4 7 3 E T I N O N V 0 5 I O S L S SU N C L A S S I F I E D (Page 1) SNO0*I401SECURITY

  20. Mutations in FGD4 Encoding the Rho GDP/GTP Exchange Factor FRABIN Cause Autosomal Recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 4H

    PubMed Central

    Delague, Valérie ; Jacquier, Arnaud ; Hamadouche, Tarik ; Poitelon, Yannick ; Baudot, Cécile ; Boccaccio, Irène ; Chouery, Eliane ; Chaouch, Malika ; Kassouri, Nora ; Jabbour, Rosette ; Grid, Djamel ; Mégarbané, André ; Haase, Georg ; Lévy, Nicolas 

    2007-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disorders are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies characterized by muscle weakness and wasting, foot and hand deformities, and electrophysiological changes. The CMT4H subtype is an autosomal recessive demyelinating form of CMT that was recently mapped to a 15.8-Mb region at chromosome 12p11.21-q13.11, in two consanguineous families of Mediterranean origin, by homozygosity mapping. We report here the identification of mutations in FGD4, encoding FGD4 or FRABIN (FGD1-related F-actin binding protein), in both families. FRABIN is a GDP/GTP nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), specific to Cdc42, a member of the Rho family of small guanosine triphosphate (GTP)–binding proteins (Rho GTPases). Rho GTPases play a key role in regulating signal-transduction pathways in eukaryotes. In particular, they have a pivotal role in mediating actin cytoskeleton changes during cell migration, morphogenesis, polarization, and division. Consistent with these reported functions, expression of truncated FRABIN mutants in rat primary motoneurons and rat Schwann cells induced significantly fewer microspikes than expression of wild-type FRABIN. To our knowledge, this is the first report of mutations in a Rho GEF protein being involved in CMT. PMID:17564959

  1. Mutations in FGD4 encoding the Rho GDP/GTP exchange factor FRABIN cause autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 4H.

    PubMed

    Delague, Valérie; Jacquier, Arnaud; Hamadouche, Tarik; Poitelon, Yannick; Baudot, Cécile; Boccaccio, Iréne; Chouery, Eliane; Chaouch, Malika; Kassouri, Nora; Jabbour, Rosette; Grid, Djamel; Mégarbané, Andre; Haase, Georg; Lévy, Nicolas

    2007-07-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disorders are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies characterized by muscle weakness and wasting, foot and hand deformities, and electrophysiological changes. The CMT4H subtype is an autosomal recessive demyelinating form of CMT that was recently mapped to a 15.8-Mb region at chromosome 12p11.21-q13.11, in two consanguineous families of Mediterranean origin, by homozygosity mapping. We report here the identification of mutations in FGD4, encoding FGD4 or FRABIN (FGD1-related F-actin binding protein), in both families. FRABIN is a GDP/GTP nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), specific to Cdc42, a member of the Rho family of small guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding proteins (Rho GTPases). Rho GTPases play a key role in regulating signal-transduction pathways in eukaryotes. In particular, they have a pivotal role in mediating actin cytoskeleton changes during cell migration, morphogenesis, polarization, and division. Consistent with these reported functions, expression of truncated FRABIN mutants in rat primary motoneurons and rat Schwann cells induced significantly fewer microspikes than expression of wild-type FRABIN. To our knowledge, this is the first report of mutations in a Rho GEF protein being involved in CMT.

  2. Phosphorylation of CREB affects its binding to high and low affinity sites: implications for cAMP induced gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, M; Weih, F; Schmid, W; DeVack, C; Kowenz-Leutz, E; Luckow, B; Boshart, M; Schütz, G

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic AMP treatment of hepatoma cells leads to increased protein binding at the cyclic AMP response element (CRE) of the tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene in vivo, as revealed by genomic footprinting, whereas no increase is observed at the CRE of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene. Several criteria establish that the 43 kDa CREB protein is interacting with both of these sites. Two classes of CRE with different affinity for CREB are described. One class, including the TATCRE, is characterized by asymmetric and weak binding sites (CGTCA), whereas the second class containing symmetrical TGACGTCA sites shows a much higher binding affinity for CREB. Both classes show an increase in binding after phosphorylation of CREB by protein kinase A (PKA). An in vivo phosphorylation-dependent change in binding of CREB increases the occupancy of weak binding sites used for transactivation, such as the TATCRE, while high affinity sites may have constitutive binding of transcriptionally active and inactive CREB dimers, as demonstrated by in vivo footprinting at the PEPCK CRE. Thus, lower basal level and higher relative stimulation of transcription by cyclic AMP through low affinity CREs should result, allowing finely tuned control of gene activation. Images PMID:1354612

  3. Post-translational modification and conformational state of Heat Shock Protein 90 differentially affect binding of chemically diverse small molecule inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Beebe, Kristin; Mollapour, Mehdi; Scroggins, Bradley; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Xu, Wanping; Tokita, Mari; Taldone, Tony; Pullen, Lester; Zierer, Bettina K.; Lee, Min-Jung; Trepel, Jane; Buchner, Johannes; Bolon, Daniel; Chiosis, Gabriela; Neckers, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is an essential molecular chaperone in eukaryotes that facilitates the conformational maturation and function of a diverse protein clientele, including aberrant and/or over-expressed proteins that are involved in cancer growth and survival. A role for Hsp90 in supporting the protein homeostasis of cancer cells has buoyed interest in the utility of Hsp90 inhibitors as anti-cancer drugs. Despite the fact that all clinically evaluated Hsp90 inhibitors target an identical nucleotide-binding pocket in the N domain of the chaperone, the precise determinants that affect drug binding in the cellular environment remain unclear, and it is possible that chemically distinct inhibitors may not share similar binding preferences. Here we demonstrate that two chemically unrelated Hsp90 inhibitors, the benzoquinone ansamycin geldanamycin and the purine analog PU-H71, select for overlapping but not identical subpopulations of total cellular Hsp90, even though both inhibitors bind to an amino terminal nucleotide pocket and prevent N domain dimerization. Our data also suggest that PU-H71 is able to access a broader range of N domain undimerized Hsp90 conformations than is geldanamycin and is less affected by Hsp90 phosphorylation, consistent with its broader and more potent anti-tumor activity. A more complete understanding of the impact of the cellular milieu on small molecule inhibitor binding to Hsp90 should facilitate their more effective use in the clinic. PMID:23867252

  4. Low concentrations of ethanol do not affect radioligand binding to the delta-subunit-containing GABAA receptors in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Ashok K; Marutha Ravindran, C R; Ticku, Maharaj K

    2007-08-24

    In the present study, we investigated the co-localization pattern of the delta subunit with other subunits of GABA(A) receptors in the rat brain using immunoprecipitation and Western blotting techniques. Furthermore, we investigated whether low concentrations of ethanol affect the delta-subunit-containing GABA(A) receptor assemblies in the rat brain using radioligand binding to the rat brain membrane homogenates as well as to the immunoprecipitated receptor assemblies. Our results revealed that delta subunit is not co-localized with gamma(2) subunit but it is associated with the alpha(1), alpha(4) or alpha(6), beta(2) and/or beta(3) subunit(s) of GABA(A) receptors in the rat brain. Ethanol (1-50 mM) neither affected [(3)H]muscimol (3 nM) binding nor diazepam-insensitive [(3)H]Ro 15-4513 (2 nM) binding in the rat cerebellum and cerebral cortex membranes. However, a higher concentration of ethanol (500 mM) inhibited the binding of these radioligands to the GABA(A) receptors partially in the rat cerebellum and cerebral cortex. Similarly, ethanol (up to 50 mM) did not affect [(3)H]muscimol (15 nM) binding to the immunoprecipitated delta-subunit-containing GABA(A) receptor assemblies in the rat cerebellum and hippocampus but it inhibited the binding partially at a higher concentration (500 mM). These results suggest that the native delta-subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors do not play a major role in the pharmacology of clinically relevant low concentrations of ethanol.

  5. Structural basis of biopterin-induced inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I by GFRP, its feedback regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Maita, Nobuo; Hatakeyama, Kazuyuki; Okada, Kengo; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2004-12-03

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCHI) is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin, a key cofactor necessary for nitric oxide synthase and for the hydroxylases that are involved in the production of catecholamines and serotonin. In animals, the GTPCHI feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) binds GTPCHI to mediate feed-forward activation of GTPCHI activity in the presence of phenylalanine, whereas it induces feedback inhibition of enzyme activity in the presence of biopterin. Here, we have reported the crystal structure of the biopterin-induced inhibitory complex of GTPCHI and GFRP and compared it with the previously reported phenylalanine-induced stimulatory complex. The structure reveals five biopterin molecules located at each interface between GTPCHI and GFRP. Induced fitting structural changes by the biopterin binding expand large conformational changes in GTPCHI peptide segments forming the active site, resulting in inhibition of the activity. By locating 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylalanine-responsive dystonia mutations in the complex structure, we found mutations that may possibly disturb the GFRP-mediated regulation of GTPCHI.

  6. Oxidation of 5'-dGMP, 5'-dGDP, and 5'-dGTP by a platinum(IV) complex.

    PubMed

    Kipouros, Ioannis; Fica-Contreras, Sebastian Matias; Bowe, Gregory Joon Kee; Choi, Sunhee

    2015-12-01

    We previously reported that a Pt(IV) complex, [Pt(IV)(dach)Cl4] [trans-d,l-1,2-diaminocyclohexanetetrachloroplatinum(IV)] binds to the N7 of 5'-dGMP (deoxyguanosine-5'-monophosphate) at a relatively fast rate and oxidizes it to 8-oxo-5'-dGMP. Here, we further studied the kinetics of the oxidation of 5'-dGMP by the Pt(IV) complex. The electron transfer rate constants between 5'-dGMP and Pt(IV) in [H8-5'-dGMP-Pt(IV)] and [D8-5'-dGMP-Pt(IV)] were similar, giving a small value of the kinetic isotope effect (KIE: 1.2 ± 0.2). This small KIE indicates that the deprotonation of H8 in [H8-5'-dGMP-Pt(IV)] is not involved in the rate-determining step in the electron transfer between guanine (G) and Pt(IV). We also studied the reaction of 5'-dGDP (deoxyguanosine-5'-diphosphate) and 5'-dGTP (deoxyguanosine-5'-triphosphate) with the Pt(IV) complex. Our results showed that [Pt(IV)(dach)Cl4] oxidized 5'-dGDP and 5'-dGTP to 8-oxo-5'-dGDP and 8-oxo-5'-dGTP, respectively, by the same mechanism and kinetics as for 5'-dGMP. The Pt(IV) complex binds to N7 followed by a two-electron inner sphere electron transfer from G to Pt(IV). The reaction was catalyzed by Pt(II) and occurred faster at higher pH. The electron transfer was initiated by either an intramolecular nucleophilic attack by any of the phosphate groups or an intermolecular nucleophilic attack by free OH(-) in the solution. The rates of reactions for the three nucleotides followed the order: 5'-dGMP > 5'-dGDP > 5'-dGTP, indicating that the bulkier the phosphate groups are, the slower the reaction is, due to the larger steric hindrance and rotational barrier of the phosphate groups.

  7. Imipramine treatment differentially affects platelet /sup 3/H-imipramine binding and serotonin uptake in depressed patients

    SciTech Connect

    Suranyi-Cadotte, B.E.; Quirion, R.; Nair, N.P.V.; Lafaille, F.; Schwartz, G.

    1985-02-25

    Uptake of serotonin and /sup 3/H-imipramine binding in platelets of depressed patients were investigated simultaneously with changes in clinical state. Both V/sub max/ for serotonin uptake and B/sub max/ for /sup 3/H-imipramine binding were significantly lower in unmedicated depressed patients with respect to normal subjects. Successful treatment with imipramine led to a significant increase in B/sub max/ for /sup 3/H-imipramine binding, without significant change in V/sub max/ for serotonin uptake. B/sub max/ values increased to the normal range following complete, rather than partial clinical improvement. These data indicate that successful antidepressant treatment may increase the density of /sup 3/H-imipramine binding sites on platelets by a process which is independent of the uptake of serotonin. 29 references, 1 table.

  8. Metals affect the structure and activity of human plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. II. Binding affinity and conformational changes

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Lawrence C; Goswami, Sumit; Peterson, Cynthia B

    2011-01-01

    Human plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is a serine protease inhibitor with a metastable active conformation. The lifespan of the active form of PAI-1 is modulated via interaction with the plasma protein, vitronectin, and various metal ions. These metal ions fall into two categories: Type I metals, including calcium, magnesium, and manganese, stabilize PAI-1 in the absence of vitronectin, whereas Type II metals, including cobalt, copper, and nickel, destabilize PAI-1 in the absence of vitronectin, but stabilize PAI-1 in its presence. To provide a mechanistic basis for understanding the unusual modulation of PAI-1 structure and activity, the binding characteristics and conformational effects of these two types of metals were further evaluated. Steady-state binding measurements using surface plasmon resonance indicated that both active and latent PAI-1 exhibit a dissociation constant in the low micromolar range for binding to immobilized nickel. Stopped-flow measurements of approach-to-equilibrium changes in intrinsic protein fluorescence indicated that the Type I and Type II metals bind in different modes that induce distinct conformational effects on PAI-1. Changes in the observed rate constants with varying concentrations of metal allowed accurate determination of binding affinities for cobalt, nickel, and copper, yielding dissociation constants of ∼40, 30, and 0.09 μM, respectively. Competition experiments that tested effects on PAI-1 stability were consistent with these measurements of affinity and indicate that copper binds tightly to PAI-1. PMID:21280128

  9. Current Metabolic Status Affects Urinary Liver-Type Fatty-Acid Binding Protein in Normoalbuminuric Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Hitomi; Nakashima, Mina; Takaki, Akifusa; Yukawa, Chiduko; Matsumoto, Suzuko; Omoto, Takashi; Shinozaki, Masahiro; Nishio, Shinya; Abe, Mariko; Antoku, Shinichi; Mifune, Mizuo; Togane, Michiko

    2017-01-01

    Background We aimed to study the association between urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), a biomarker of tubulointerstitial injury, and the clinical characteristics of normoalbuminuric and albuminuric patients with type 2 diabetes in order to detect the factors affecting urinary L-FABP. Methods Urinary L-FABP levels were measured in 788 patients with type 2 diabetes and again in 666 patients at 6 months after the initial measurement. The association between the urinary L-FABP level and the clinical parameters was investigated in a retrospective cross-sectional study and a subsequent observation. Results The HbA1c (odds ratio (OR): 1.42; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11 - 1.79; P < 0.01), systolic blood pressure (OR: 1.03; 95% CI: 1.01 - 1.05; P < 0.01) levels and estimated glomerular filtration rate (OR: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.96 - 1.00; P = 0.01) were significantly associated with the high levels of urinary L-FABP (> 8.4 μg/gCr) in normoalbuminuric patients. However, a logistic regression analysis revealed that use of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors (OR: 2.22; 95% CI: 1.16 - 4.89; P = 0.02), urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) (OR: 1.01; 95% CI: 1.00 - 1.01; P < 0.01) and serum HDL-cholesterol concentration (OR: 0.33; 95% CI: 0.11 - 0.89; P = 0.03) were significantly associated in albuminuric patients. In the follow-up observation, the change in urinary L-FABP was found to be significantly (P < 0.01) influenced by the change in the HbA1c level in both the normoalbuminuric and albuminuric patients. Conclusions High urinary L-FABP is associated with part of the current metabolic abnormalities, including high levels of HbA1c and systolic blood pressure among normoalbuminuric patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:28270898

  10. The Mn-binding proteins of the photosystem II oxygen-evolving complex are decreased in date palms affected by brittle leaf disease.

    PubMed

    Marqués, Jorge; Duran-Vila, Nuria; Daròs, José-Antonio

    2011-04-01

    Brittle leaf disease or maladie des feuilles cassantes (MFC) is a disorder affecting date palms (Phoenix dactylifera L.) which after a long declining process eventually leads to the death of the plant. No causal agent for the disease has been found so far but leaflets of affected palms are Mn-deficient despite the existence of adequate exchangeable Mn in the soils in which affected palms grow. The disease is specifically associated with an increase in a series of chloroplastic RNAs. A proteomic analysis of leaflets of affected and unaffected date palms showed differences in quantities of several proteins. Mn-binding PSBO and PSBP proteins, components of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II, were decreased in affected tissue, reinforcing the relation between MFC and Mn deficiency. The quantities of other proteins were increased by disease suggesting a response to stress.

  11. Substitution of glutamate residue by lysine in the dimerization domain affects DNA binding ability of HapR by inducing structural deformity in the DNA binding domain.

    PubMed

    Singh, Richa; Rathore, Yogendra Singh; Singh, Naorem Santa; Peddada, Nagesh; Ashish; Raychaudhuri, Saumya

    2013-01-01

    HapR has been given the status of a high cell density master regulatory protein in Vibrio cholerae. Though many facts are known regarding its structural and functional aspects, much still can be learnt from natural variants of the wild type protein. This work aims at investigating the nature of functional inertness of a HapR natural variant harboring a substitution of a conserved glutamate residue at position 117 which participates in forming a salt bridge by lysine (HapRV2G-E(117)K). Experimental evidence presented here reveals the inability of this variant to interact with various cognate promoters by in vitro gel shift assay. Furthermore, the elution profiles of HapRV2G-E(117)K protein along with the wild type functional HapRV2G in size-exclusion chromatography as well as circular dichroism spectra did not reflect any significant differences in its structure, thereby indicating the intactness of dimer in the variant protein. To gain further insight into the global shape of the proteins, small angle X-ray scattering analysis (SAXS) was performed. Intriguingly, increased radius of gyration of HapRV2G-E(117)K of 27.5 Å in comparison to the wild type protein from SAXS data analyses implied a significant alteration in the global shape of the dimeric HapRV2G-E(117)K protein. Structure reconstruction brought forth that the DNA binding domains were substantially "parted away" in this variant. Taken together, our data illustrates that substitution of the conserved glutamate residue by lysine in the dimerization domain induces separation of the two DNA binding domains from their native-like positioning without altering the dimeric status of HapR variant.

  12. The fatty acid amide hydrolase C385A variant affects brain binding of the positron emission tomography tracer [11C]CURB.

    PubMed

    Boileau, Isabelle; Tyndale, Rachel F; Williams, Belinda; Mansouri, Esmaeil; Westwood, Duncan J; Le Foll, Bernard; Rusjan, Pablo M; Mizrahi, Romina; De Luca, Vincenzo; Zhou, Qian; Wilson, Alan A; Houle, Sylvain; Kish, Stephen J; Tong, Junchao

    2015-08-01

    The common functional single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs324420, C385A) of the endocannabinoid inactivating enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) has been associated with anxiety disorder relevant phenotype and risk for addictions. Here, we tested whether the FAAH polymorphism affects in vivo binding of the FAAH positron emission tomography (PET) probe [(11)C]CURB ([(11)C-carbonyl]-6-hydroxy-[1,10-biphenyl]-3-yl cyclohexylcarbamate (URB694)). Participants (n=24) completed one [(11)C]CURB/PET scan and were genotyped for rs324420. Relative to C/C (58%), A-allele carriers (42%) had 23% lower [(11)C]CURB binding (λk3) in brain. We report evidence that the genetic variant rs324420 in FAAH is associated with measurable differences in brain FAAH binding as per PET [(11)C]CURB measurement.

  13. The fatty acid amide hydrolase C385A variant affects brain binding of the positron emission tomography tracer [11C]CURB

    PubMed Central

    Boileau, Isabelle; Tyndale, Rachel F; Williams, Belinda; Mansouri, Esmaeil; Westwood, Duncan J; Foll, Bernard Le; Rusjan, Pablo M; Mizrahi, Romina; De Luca, Vincenzo; Zhou, Qian; Wilson, Alan A; Houle, Sylvain; Kish, Stephen J; Tong, Junchao

    2015-01-01

    The common functional single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs324420, C385A) of the endocannabinoid inactivating enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) has been associated with anxiety disorder relevant phenotype and risk for addictions. Here, we tested whether the FAAH polymorphism affects in vivo binding of the FAAH positron emission tomography (PET) probe [11C]CURB ([11C-carbonyl]-6-hydroxy-[1,10-biphenyl]-3-yl cyclohexylcarbamate (URB694)). Participants (n=24) completed one [11C]CURB/PET scan and were genotyped for rs324420. Relative to C/C (58%), A-allele carriers (42%) had 23% lower [11C]CURB binding (λk3) in brain. We report evidence that the genetic variant rs324420 in FAAH is associated with measurable differences in brain FAAH binding as per PET [11C]CURB measurement. PMID:26036940

  14. ATP binding and hydrolysis steps of the uni-site catalysis by the mitochondrial F(1)-ATPase are affected by inorganic phosphate.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, Yakov M

    2010-10-01

    The effect of inorganic phosphate (P(i)) on uni-site ATP binding and hydrolysis by the nucleotide-depleted F(1)-ATPase from beef heart mitochondria (ndMF(1)) has been investigated. It is shown for the first time that P(i) decreases the apparent rate constant of uni-site ATP binding by ndMF(1) 3-fold with the K(d) of 0.38+/-0.14mM. During uni-site ATP hydrolysis, P(i) also shifts equilibrium between bound ATP and ADP+P(i) in the direction of ATP synthesis with the K(d) of 0.17+/-0.03mM. However, 10mM P(i) does not significantly affect ATP binding during multi-site catalysis.

  15. Isolation of cDNAs encoding GTP cyclohydrolase II from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Sugiyama, M; Yamamoto, K

    1995-07-28

    A GTP cyclohydrolase II-encoding gene from Arabidopsis thaliana was isolated through functional complementation of a mutant of Escherichia coli, BSV18, deficient in this protein. The derived amino-acid sequence constitutes a polypeptide of 27 kDa and shows 37-58% identity with previously published sequences of Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Photobacterium leiognathi and P. phosphoreum.

  16. Occurrence and Ecological Significance of GTP in the Ocean and in Microbial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Karl, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison between the ATP concentrations based on peak height light emission values (0 to 3 s) and integrated light flux determinations (15 to 75 s) for a variety of seawater samples revealed that the integrated method of light detection consistently yielded higher ATP concentrations, ranging from 1.38 to 2.35 times larger than the corresponding peak ATP values. A significant correlation (r = 0.923) was observed for a plot of ΔADP (i.e., integrated ATP - peak ATP) versus GTP + UTP, suggesting that the analytical interference on the ATP assay was the result of the presence of non-adenine nucleotide triphosphates. Size-fractionation studies revealed an enrichment of the non-adenine nucleotide triphosphates, relative to ATP, in the smallest size fraction analyzed (<10 μm). Investigations were conducted with 20 species of unicellular marine algae to determine their intracellular nucleotide concentrations, and these determinations were compared to the levels measured in lab cultures of the marine bacterium Serratia marinorubra. These results indicated that the intracellular GTP/ATP ratios in S. marinorubra increase in direct proportion to the rate of cell growth, and that the GTP/ATP ratios in bacteria are much greater than in growing algae, presumably due to the differences in rates of cellular biosynthesis. It is concluded that quantitative determinations of GTP/ATP ratios in environmental sample extracts may be useful for measuring microbial growth. PMID:16345313

  17. Specific interactions between lactose repressor protein and DNA affected by ligand binding: ab initio molecular orbital calculations.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Tatsuya; Hayakawa, Masato; Nishikawa, Shin; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2011-06-01

    Transcription mechanisms of gene information from DNA to mRNA are essentially controlled by regulatory proteins such as a lactose repressor (LacR) protein and ligand molecules. Biochemical experiments elucidated that a ligand binding to LacR drastically changes the mechanism controlled by LacR, although the effect of ligand binding has not been clarified at atomic and electronic levels. We here investigated the effect of ligand binding on the specific interactions between LacR and operator DNA by the molecular simulations combined with classical molecular mechanics and ab initio fragment molecular orbital methods. The results indicate that the binding of anti-inducer ligand strengthens the interaction between LacR and DNA, which is consistent with the fact that the binding of anti-inducer enhances the repression of gene transcription by LacR. It was also elucidated that hydrating water molecules existing between LacR and DNA contribute to the specific interactions between LacR and DNA. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. GDP-GTP exchange processes of G{alpha}i1 protein are accelerated/decelerated depending on the type and the concentration of added detergents.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Makoto; Tanaka, Takeshi; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Wakamatsu, Kaori

    2009-12-01

    Although detergents have been widely used in G-protein studies to increase solubility and stability of the protein, we noticed that detergents modulate the nucleotide-binding properties of G-proteins. Hence, we analysed the effects of detergents on guanine nucleotide exchange reactions of Galpha(i1). Lubrol PX, a non-ionic detergent, which has been widely used in nucleotide dissociation/binding assays, was found to accelerate both GDP dissociation and GTPgammaS binding from/to Galpha in parallel at above its critical micelle concentration (cmc). Sodium cholate, an anionic detergent, which have been used to extract G-proteins from animal tissues, decelerated and accelerated GDP dissociation below and above its cmc, respectively. Surprisingly, micellar cholate decelerated GTPgammaS binding, and the binding rate constant was decreased by three orders of magnitude in the presence of 2% cholate. These results demonstrate that the guanine nucleotide exchange reactions of Galpha(i1) are drastically modulated by detergents differently depending on the type and the state (monomeric or micellar) of the detergents and that dissociation of GDP from Galpha(i1) does not necessarily lead to immediate binding of GTP to Galpha(i1) in some cases. These effects of detergents on G-proteins must be taken into account in G-protein experiments.

  19. Systematic Functional Comparative Analysis of Four Single-Stranded DNA-Binding Proteins and Their Affection on Viral RNA Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jinlei; Zhang, Xun; Song, Haiyan; Lv, Jianxin; Gao, Jimin; Wang, Yuepeng; Chen, Litian; Wang, Yue

    2013-01-01

    The accumulation of single-stranded DNA-binding (SSB) proteins is essential for organisms and has various applications. However, no study has simultaneously and systematically compared the characteristics of SSB proteins. In addition, SSB proteins may bind RNA and play an unknown biological role in RNA metabolism. Here, we expressed a novel species of SSB protein derived from Thermococcus kodakarensis KOD1 (KOD), as well as SSB proteins from Thermus thermophilus (TTH), Escherichia coli, and Sulfolobus Solfataricus P2 (SSOB), abbreviated kod, tth, bl21, and ssob, respectively. These SSB proteins could bind ssDNA and viral RNA. bl21 resisted heat treatment for more than 9 h, Ssob and kod could withstand 95°C for 10 h and retain its ssDNA- and RNA-binding ability. Four SSB proteins promoted the specificity of the DNA polymerase in PCR-based 5- and 9-kb genome fragment amplification. kod also increased the amplification of a 13-kb PCR product, and SSB protein–bound RNA resisted Benzonase digestion. The SSB proteins could also enter the host cell bound to RNA, which resulted in modulation of viral RNA metabolism, particularly ssob and bl21. PMID:23365690

  20. Binding with serum components favorably affects cellular uptake of 111In-oligonucleotide in a leukemia cell line.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jingming; Kinuya, Seigo; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Michigishi, Takatoshi; Tonami, Norihisa

    2006-02-01

    The influence of serum components on the intracellular uptake of an 111In-oligonucleotide (ODN) against mdr1 mRNA was investigated in the murine leukemia cell line, P388/S, and its mdr1-overexpressed P388/R. 111In-ODNs naked and vectorized with lipids were analyzed for binding with serum components using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). 111In-ODN was incubated in albumin and transferrin solutions. 111In-DTPA and 111In-mononucleotide were incubated in serum. Degradation of naked 111In-ODN was detected in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and serum containing endonuclease S1. Cellular uptakes of naked and vectorized 111In-ODN in the above cells were examined with and without fetal calf serum (FCS). Time-dependent binding of naked and vectorized 111In- ODN with serum components was observed throughout 24 hours. Transchelation of 111In to transferrin was not detected. HPLC profiles of 111In-DTPA and 111In-mononucleotide did not change in serum. Degradation of 111In-ODN by S1 was less remarkable in serum than in PBS. Specific accumulation of vectorized 111In-ODN in P388/R cells was achieved in culture with and without 10% FCS. This study verified the intense binding of ODN with serum components, leading to no inhibition on ODN intracellular specific uptake. Binding with serum components protects 111In-ODN from degradation by endonuclease and thus may facilitate ODN transmembrane delivery.

  1. Hydrophobic Peptides Affect Binding of Calmodulin and Ca2+ as Explored by H/D Amide Exchange and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sperry, Justin B.; Huang, Richard Y-C.; Zhu, Mei M.; Rempel, Don L.; Gross, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous intracellular sensor protein, binds Ca2+ and interacts with various targets as part of signal transduction. Using hydrogen/deuterium exchange (H/DX) and a high resolution PLIMSTEX (Protein-Ligand Interactions by Mass Spectrometry, Titration, and H/D Exchange) protocol, we examined five different states of calmodulin: calcium-free, calcium-loaded, and three states of calcium-loaded in the presence of either melittin, mastoparan, or skeletal myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK). When CaM binds Ca2+, the extent of HDX decreased, consistent with the protein becoming stabilized upon binding. Furthermore, Ca2+-saturated calmodulin exhibits increased protection when bound to the peptides, forming high affinity complexes. The protocol reveals significant changes in EF hands 1, 3, and 4 with saturating levels of Ca2+. Titration of the protein using PLIMSTEX provides the binding affinity of Ca2+ to calmodulin within previously reported values. The affinities of calmodulin to Ca2+ increase by factors of 300 and 1000 in the presence of melittin and mastoparan, respectively. A modified PLIMSTEX protocol whereby the protein is digested to component peptides gives a region-specific titration. The titration data taken in this way show a decrease in the root mean square fit of the residuals, indicating a better fit of the data. The global H/D exchange results and those obtained in a region-specific way provide new insight into the Ca2+-binding properties of this well-studied protein. PMID:21765646

  2. Kinetics of binding of dihydropyridine calcium channel ligands to skeletal muscle membranes: Evidence for low-affinity sites and for the involvement of G proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, S.M.J.; Bladen, C. )

    1991-06-11

    Detailed kinetic studies of the binding of the calcium channel antagonist (+)-({sup 3}H)PN200-110 to membrane preparations form rabbit skeletal muscle have demonstrated that, in addition to the high-affinity sites that are readily measured in equilibrium and kinetic experiments, there are also dihydropyridine binding sites with much lower affinities. These sites were detected by the ability of micromolar concentrations of several dihydropyridines to accelerate the rate of dissociation of (+)-({sup 3}H)PN200-110 from its high-affinity sites. The observed increase in rate was dependent on the concentration of competing ligand, and half-maximal effects occurred at approximately 10 {mu}M for the agonist ({plus minus})-Bay K8644 and for the antagonists nifedipine, ({plus minus})-nitrendipine, and (+)-PN200-110. The low-affinity sites appear to be stereospecific since ({minus})-PN200-110 (1-200 {mu}M) did not affect the dissociation rate. The possible involvement of guanine nucleotide binding proteins in dihydropyridine binding has been investigated by studying the effects of guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP{gamma}S) and guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP{beta}S) on binding parameters. GTP{gamma}S did increase the ability of ({plus minus})-({sup 3}H)PN200-110. These results suggest that skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptors have low-affinity binding sites that may be involved in the regulation of calcium channel function and that activation of a guanine nucleotide binding protein may modulate the binding of agonists but not of antagonists to these sites.

  3. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase interferes with GTP. gamma. S stimulated IP sub 3 formation in differentiated HL-60 cell membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Misaki, Naoyuki; Imaizumi, Taro; Watanabe, Yashuiro )

    1989-01-01

    The effects of addition of activated cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) on the function of islet-activating protein (IAP)-sensitive GTP-binding (G) protein were studied in the plasma membranes of {sup 3}H-inositol-labeled differentiated human leukemic (HL-60) cells. Pretreatment of the membranes with activated PKA in the presence of MgATP for 15 min. at 37{degree}C decreased GTP {gamma}S-stimulated inositol trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) formation by about 30%, but had no influence on Ca{sup 2+}-stimulated IP{sub 3} formation. And autoradiography in the phosphorylation experiments of solubilized HL-60 cell membranes by PKA showed some {sup 32}P incorporated bands, and among them one of the major bands showed the migration at 40 kDa supporting that the G protein coupling with PI response was phosphorylated by PKA. These results showed that pretreatment with activated PKA inhibited the mediating function of the G protein between the fMLP receptor and phospholipase C by its phosphorylation.

  4. Specific binding of /sup 125/I-labeled human chorionic gonadotropin to gonadal tissue: comparison of limited-point saturation analyses to Scatchard analyses for determining binding capacities and factors affecting estimates of binding capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, L.J.; Ireland, J.J.

    1986-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to compare gonadotropin binding capacity calculated from limited-point saturation analyses to those obtained from Scatchard analyses, and to test the effects of membrane purity and source of gonadotropin receptors on determining the maximum percentage of radioiodinated hormone bound to receptors (maximum bindability). One- to four-point saturation analyses gave results comparable to results by Scatchard analyses when examin