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Sample records for gtpase irga6 iigp1

  1. Mechanisms regulating the positioning of mouse p47 resistance GTPases LRG-47 and IIGP1 on cellular membranes: retargeting to plasma membrane induced by phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Martens, Sascha; Sabel, Katja; Lange, Rita; Uthaiah, Revathy; Wolf, Eva; Howard, Jonathan C

    2004-08-15

    The recently identified p47 GTPases are one of the most effective cell-autonomous resistance systems known against intracellular pathogens in the mouse. One member of the family, LRG-47, has been shown to be essential for immune control in vivo of Listeria monocytogenes, Toxoplasma gondii, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Mycobacterium avium, possibly by promoting acidification of the phagosome. However, the intracellular localization of LRG-47, and the nature of its association with the phagosomal or any other membrane system is unknown. In this study, we show that LRG-47 is a Golgi-associated protein in the IFN-stimulated cell, which is rapidly recruited to active plasma membrane upon phagocytosis and remains associated with phagosomes as they mature. We show that the Golgi localization of LRG-47 is dependent on the integrity of an amphipathic helix near the C terminus, whereas the plasma membrane localization depends on an unidentified signal associated with the G domain. Unlike LRG-47, but like the published p47 resistance GTPase, IGTP, a further p47 GTPase, IIGP1, is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum. However, unlike IGTP, IIGP1 is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum by an N-terminal myristoylation modification. Thus, the p47 GTPases are a diverse battery of intracellular defense factors dynamically associated with different membrane systems.

  2. In astrocytes the accumulation of the immunity-related GTPases Irga6 and Irgb6 at the vacuole of Toxoplasma gondii is dependent on the parasite virulence.

    PubMed

    Lubitz, Felix P; Degrandi, Daniel; Pfeffer, Klaus; Mausberg, Anne K

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite responsible for a common infection of the central nervous system. Interferon (IFN) γ is the key cytokine of host defence against T. gondii. However, T. gondii strains differ in virulence and T. gondii factors determining virulence are still poorly understood. In astrocytes IFN γ primarily induces immunity-related GTPases (IRGs), providing a cell-autonomous resistance system. Here, we demonstrate that astrocytes prestimulated with IFN γ inhibit the proliferation of various avirulent, but not virulent, T. gondii strains. The two analyzed immunity-related GTPases Irga6 and Irgb6 accumulate at the PV only of avirulent T. gondii strains, whereas in virulent strains this accumulation is only detectable at very low levels. Both IRG proteins could temporarily be found at the same PV, but did only partially colocalize. Coinfection of avirulent and virulent parasites confirmed that the accumulation of the two analyzed IRGs was a characteristic of the individual PV and not determined by the presence of other strains of T. gondii in the same host cell. Thus, in astrocytes the accumulation of Irga6 and Irgb6 significantly differs between avirulent and virulent T. gondii strains correlating with the toxoplasmacidal properties suggesting a role for this process in parasite virulence.

  3. RabGDIα is a negative regulator of interferon-γ–inducible GTPase-dependent cell-autonomous immunity to Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Ohshima, Jun; Sasai, Miwa; Liu, Jianfa; Yamashita, Kazuo; Ma, Ji Su; Lee, Youngae; Bando, Hironori; Howard, Jonathan C.; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Hayashi, Mikako; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Standley, Daron M.; Frickel, Eva-Maria; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    IFN-γ orchestrates cell-autonomous host defense against various intracellular vacuolar pathogens. IFN-γ–inducible GTPases, such as p47 immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and p65 guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), are recruited to pathogen-containing vacuoles, which is important for disruption of the vacuoles, culminating in the cell-autonomous clearance. Although the positive regulation for the proper recruitment of IRGs and GBPs to the vacuoles has been elucidated, the suppressive mechanism is unclear. Here, we show that Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor α (RabGDIα), originally identified as a Rab small GTPase inhibitor, is a negative regulator of IFN-γ–inducible GTPases in cell-autonomous immunity to the intracellular pathogen Toxoplasma gondii. Overexpression of RabGDIα, but not of RabGDIβ, impaired IFN-γ–dependent reduction of T. gondii numbers. Conversely, RabGDIα deletion in macrophages and fibroblasts enhanced the IFN-γ–induced clearance of T. gondii. Furthermore, upon a high dose of infection by T. gondii, RabGDIα-deficient mice exhibited a decreased parasite burden in the brain and increased resistance in the chronic phase than did control mice. Among members of IRGs and GBPs important for the parasite clearance, Irga6 and Gbp2 alone were more frequently recruited to T. gondii-forming parasitophorous vacuoles in RabGDIα-deficient cells. Notably, Gbp2 positively controlled Irga6 recruitment that was inhibited by direct and specific interactions of RabGDIα with Gbp2 through the lipid-binding pocket. Taken together, our results suggest that RabGDIα inhibits host defense against T. gondii by negatively regulating the Gbp2–Irga6 axis of IFN-γ–dependent cell-autonomous immunity. PMID:26240314

  4. RabGDIα is a negative regulator of interferon-γ-inducible GTPase-dependent cell-autonomous immunity to Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Jun; Sasai, Miwa; Liu, Jianfa; Yamashita, Kazuo; Ma, Ji Su; Lee, Youngae; Bando, Hironori; Howard, Jonathan C; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Hayashi, Mikako; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Standley, Daron M; Frickel, Eva-Maria; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2015-08-18

    IFN-γ orchestrates cell-autonomous host defense against various intracellular vacuolar pathogens. IFN-γ-inducible GTPases, such as p47 immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and p65 guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), are recruited to pathogen-containing vacuoles, which is important for disruption of the vacuoles, culminating in the cell-autonomous clearance. Although the positive regulation for the proper recruitment of IRGs and GBPs to the vacuoles has been elucidated, the suppressive mechanism is unclear. Here, we show that Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor α (RabGDIα), originally identified as a Rab small GTPase inhibitor, is a negative regulator of IFN-γ-inducible GTPases in cell-autonomous immunity to the intracellular pathogen Toxoplasma gondii. Overexpression of RabGDIα, but not of RabGDIβ, impaired IFN-γ-dependent reduction of T. gondii numbers. Conversely, RabGDIα deletion in macrophages and fibroblasts enhanced the IFN-γ-induced clearance of T. gondii. Furthermore, upon a high dose of infection by T. gondii, RabGDIα-deficient mice exhibited a decreased parasite burden in the brain and increased resistance in the chronic phase than did control mice. Among members of IRGs and GBPs important for the parasite clearance, Irga6 and Gbp2 alone were more frequently recruited to T. gondii-forming parasitophorous vacuoles in RabGDIα-deficient cells. Notably, Gbp2 positively controlled Irga6 recruitment that was inhibited by direct and specific interactions of RabGDIα with Gbp2 through the lipid-binding pocket. Taken together, our results suggest that RabGDIα inhibits host defense against T. gondii by negatively regulating the Gbp2-Irga6 axis of IFN-γ-dependent cell-autonomous immunity.

  5. GTPases in semaphorin signaling.

    PubMed

    Püschel, Andreas W

    2007-01-01

    A hallmark of semaphorin receptors is their interaction with multiple GTPases. Plexins, the signal transducing component of semaphorin receptors, directly associate with several GTPases. In addition, they not only recruit guaninine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) but also are the only known integral membrane proteins that show a catalytic activity as GAPs for small GTPases. GTPases function upstream of semaphorin receptors and regulate the activity of plexins through an interaction with the cytoplasmic domain. The association of Plexin-Al (Sema3A receptor) or Plexin-B1 (Sema4D receptor) with the GTPase Rnd1 and ligand-dependent receptor clustering are required for their activity as R-Ras GAPs. The GTPases R-Ras and Rho function downstream of plexins and are required for the repulsive effects of semaphorins. In this review, I will focus on the role of GTPases in signaling by two plexins that have been analyzed in most detail, Plexin-A1 and Plexin-B1.

  6. Immunity-related GTPase M (IRGM) proteins influence the localization of guanylate-binding protein 2 (GBP2) by modulating macroautophagy.

    PubMed

    Traver, Maria K; Henry, Stanley C; Cantillana, Viviana; Oliver, Tim; Hunn, Julia P; Howard, Jonathan C; Beer, Sandra; Pfeffer, Klaus; Coers, Jörn; Taylor, Gregory A

    2011-09-02

    The immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) are a family of proteins induced by interferon-γ that play a crucial role in innate resistance to intracellular pathogens. The M subfamily of IRG proteins (IRGM) plays a profound role in this context, in part because of the ability of its members to regulate the localization and expression of other IRG proteins. We present here evidence that IRGM proteins affect the localization of the guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), a second family of interferon-induced GTP-binding proteins that also function in innate immunity. Absence of Irgm1 or Irgm3 led to accumulation of Gbp2 in intracellular compartments that were positive for both the macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as autophagy) marker LC3 and the autophagic adapter molecule p62/Sqstm1. Gbp2 was similarly relocalized in cells in which autophagy was impaired because of the absence of Atg5. Both in Atg5- and IRGM-deficient cells, the IRG protein Irga6 relocalized to the same compartments as Gbp2, raising the possibility of a common regulatory mechanism. However, other data indicated that Irga6, but not Gbp2, was ubiquitinated in IRGM-deficient cells. Similarly, coimmunoprecipitation studies indicated that although Irgm3 did interact directly with Irgb6, it did not interact with Gbp2. Collectively, these data suggest that IRGM proteins indirectly modulate the localization of GBPs through a distinct mechanism from that through which they regulate IRG protein localization. Further, these results suggest that a core function of IRGM proteins is to regulate autophagic flux, which influences the localization of GBPs and possibly other factors that instruct cell-autonomous immune resistance.

  7. Small GTPases and cilia.

    PubMed

    Li, Yujie; Hu, Jinghua

    2011-01-01

    Small GTPases are key molecular switches that bind and hydrolyze GTP in diverse membrane- and cytoskeleton-related cellular processes. Recently, mounting evidences have highlighted the role of various small GTPases, including the members in Arf/Arl, Rab, and Ran subfamilies, in cilia formation and function. Once overlooked as an evolutionary vestige, the primary cilium has attracted more and more attention in last decade because of its role in sensing various extracellular signals and the association between cilia dysfunction and a wide spectrum of human diseases, now called ciliopathies. Here we review recent advances about the function of small GTPases in the context of cilia, and the correlation between the functional impairment of small GTPases and ciliopathies. Understanding of these cellular processes is of fundamental importance for broadening our view of cilia development and function in normal and pathological states and for providing valuable insights into the role of various small GTPases in disease processes, and their potential as therapeutic targets.

  8. Atypical GTPases as drug targets.

    PubMed

    Soundararajan, Meera; Eswaran, Jeyanthy

    2012-01-01

    The Ras GTPases are the founding members of large Ras superfamily, which constitutes more than 150 of these important class of enzymes. These GTPases function as GDP-GTP-regulated binary switches that control many fundamental cellular processes. There are a number of GTPases that have been identified recently, which do not confine to this prototype termed as "atypical GTPases" but have proved to play a remarkable role in vital cellular functions. In this review, we provide an overview of the crucial physiological functions mediated by RGK and Centaurin class of multi domain atypical GTPases. Moreover, the recently available atypical GTPase structures of the two families, regulation, physiological functions and their critical roles in various diseases will be discussed. In summary, this review will highlight the emerging atypical GTPase family which allows us to understand novel regulatory mechanisms and thus providing new avenues for drug discovery programs.

  9. Antimicrobial effects of murine mesenchymal stromal cells directed against Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum: role of immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs).

    PubMed

    Spekker, K; Leineweber, M; Degrandi, D; Ince, V; Brunder, S; Schmidt, S K; Stuhlsatz, S; Howard, J C; Schares, G; Degistirici, O; Meisel, R; Sorg, R V; Seissler, J; Hemphill, A; Pfeffer, K; Däubener, W

    2013-06-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have a multilineage differentiation potential and provide immunosuppressive and antimicrobial functions. Murine as well as human MSCs restrict the proliferation of T cells. However, species-specific differences in the underlying molecular mechanisms have been described. Here, we analyzed the antiparasitic effector mechanisms active in murine MSCs. Murine MSCs, in contrast to human MSCs, could not restrict the growth of a highly virulent strain of Toxoplasma gondii (BK) after stimulation with IFN-γ. However, the growth of a type II strain of T. gondii (ME49) was strongly inhibited by IFN-γ-activated murine MSCs. Immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) as well as guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) contributed to this antiparasitic effect. Further analysis showed that IFN-γ-activated mMSCs also inhibit the growth of Neospora caninum, a parasite belonging to the apicomplexan group as well. Detailed studies with murine IFN-γ-activated MSC indicated an involvement in IRGs like Irga6, Irgb6 and Irgd in the inhibition of N. caninum. Additional data showed that, furthermore, GBPs like mGBP1 and mGBP2 could have played a role in the anti-N. caninum effect of murine MSCs. These data underline that MSCs, in addition to their regenerative and immunosuppressive activity, function as antiparasitic effector cells as well. However, IRGs are not present in the human genome, indicating a species-specific difference in anti-T. gondii and anti-N. caninum effect between human and murine MSCs.

  10. The universally conserved prokaryotic GTPases.

    PubMed

    Verstraeten, Natalie; Fauvart, Maarten; Versées, Wim; Michiels, Jan

    2011-09-01

    Members of the large superclass of P-loop GTPases share a core domain with a conserved three-dimensional structure. In eukaryotes, these proteins are implicated in various crucial cellular processes, including translation, membrane trafficking, cell cycle progression, and membrane signaling. As targets of mutation and toxins, GTPases are involved in the pathogenesis of cancer and infectious diseases. In prokaryotes also, it is hard to overestimate the importance of GTPases in cell physiology. Numerous papers have shed new light on the role of bacterial GTPases in cell cycle regulation, ribosome assembly, the stress response, and other cellular processes. Moreover, bacterial GTPases have been identified as high-potential drug targets. A key paper published over 2 decades ago stated that, "It may never again be possible to capture [GTPases] in a family portrait" (H. R. Bourne, D. A. Sanders, and F. McCormick, Nature 348:125-132, 1990) and indeed, the last 20 years have seen a tremendous increase in publications on the subject. Sequence analysis identified 13 bacterial GTPases that are conserved in at least 75% of all bacterial species. We here provide an overview of these 13 protein subfamilies, covering their cellular functions as well as cellular localization and expression levels, three-dimensional structures, biochemical properties, and gene organization. Conserved roles in eukaryotic homologs will be discussed as well. A comprehensive overview summarizing current knowledge on prokaryotic GTPases will aid in further elucidating the function of these important proteins.

  11. Bacterial Cytotoxins Target Rho GTPases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Gudula; Aktories, Klaus

    1998-06-01

    Low molecular mass GTPases of the Rho family, which are involved in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and in various signal transduction processes, are the eukaryotic targets of bacterial protein toxins. The toxins covalently modify Rho proteins by ADP ribosylation, glucosylation, and deamidation, thereby inactivating and activating the GTPases.

  12. Rho GTPases, phosphoinositides, and actin

    PubMed Central

    Croisé, Pauline; Estay-Ahumada, Catherine; Gasman, Stéphane; Ory, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Rho GTPases are well known regulators of the actin cytoskeleton that act by binding and activating actin nucleators. They are therefore involved in many actin-based processes, including cell migration, cell polarity, and membrane trafficking. With the identification of phosphoinositide kinases and phosphatases as potential binding partners or effectors, Rho GTPases also appear to participate in the regulation of phosphoinositide metabolism. Since both actin dynamics and phosphoinositide turnover affect the efficiency and the fidelity of vesicle transport between cell compartments, Rho GTPases have emerged as critical players in membrane trafficking. Rho GTPase activity, actin remodeling, and phosphoinositide metabolism need to be coordinated in both space and time to ensure the progression of vesicles along membrane trafficking pathways. Although most molecular pathways are still unclear, in this review, we will highlight recent advances made in our understanding of how Rho-dependent signaling pathways organize actin dynamics and phosphoinositides and how phosphoinositides potentially provide negative feedback to Rho GTPases during endocytosis, exocytosis and membrane exchange between intracellular compartments. PMID:24914539

  13. [GTPases of prokaryotic translational apparatus].

    PubMed

    Hauryliuk, V V

    2006-01-01

    Four protein factors, belonging to the GTPase superfamily, participate in bacterial biosynthesis: IF2, EF-G, EF-Tu and RF3. The exact role and mechanism of action of these proteins was of particular interest over the last several decades. Recent advances in structural methods of ribosomal research, especially application of cryoelectron microscopy, provided powerful experimental tools for the investigation of ribosomal dynamics during translation. Simultaneously, progress in the biochemical investigation of translation allowed us to link structural rearrangements occurring in the ribosome to functional changes in the ribosome-bound translational GTPases--GDP/GTP exchange, GTPase activation and its conformational changes. Accumulated data have lead to formulation of current models of mechanisms of translation. More and more facts testify in favor of the idea that the ribosome plays a prominent role both in the nucleotide exchange and in GTPase activation, thus playing the role both of GAP and GEF for RF3, IF2 and EF-G. In our work we attempted to systematize the most important experimental findings and models for mechanisms of GTPases function and regulation in prokaryotic translation.

  14. What vibrations tell us about GTPases.

    PubMed

    Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    In this review, we discuss how time-resolved Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is used to understand how GTP hydrolysis is catalyzed by small GTPases and their cognate GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). By interaction with small GTPases, GAPs regulate important signal transduction pathways and transport mechanisms in cells. The GTPase reaction terminates signaling and controls transport. Dysfunctions of GTP hydrolysis in these proteins are linked to serious diseases including cancer. Using FTIR, we resolved both the intrinsic and GAP-catalyzed GTPase reaction of the small GTPase Ras with high spatiotemporal resolution and atomic detail. This provided detailed insight into the order of events and how the active site is completed for catalysis. Comparisons of Ras with other small GTPases revealed conservation and variation in the catalytic mechanisms. The approach was extended to more nearly physiological conditions at a membrane. Interactions of membrane-anchored GTPases and their extraction from the membrane are studied using the attenuated total reflection (ATR) technique.

  15. Rho GTPases, oxidation, and cell redox control

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, G Aaron; Zhou, Bingying; Cox, Adrienne D; Campbell, Sharon L

    2014-01-01

    While numerous studies support regulation of Ras GTPases by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, the Rho subfamily has received considerably less attention. Over the last few years, increasing evidence is emerging that supports the redox sensitivity of Rho GTPases. Moreover, as Rho GTPases regulate the cellular redox state by controlling enzymes that generate and convert reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, redox feedback loops likely exist. Here, we provide an overview of cellular oxidants, Rho GTPases, and their inter-dependence. PMID:24809833

  16. GTPases in intracellular trafficking: an overview.

    PubMed

    Segev, Nava

    2011-02-01

    Small GTPases that belong to the ras sub-families of Rab, Arf, and Rho, and the large GTPase dynamin, regulate intracellular trafficking. This issue of Seminars of Cell and Developmental Biology highlights topics regarding mechanisms by which these GTPases regulate the different steps of vesicular transport: vesicle formation, scission, targeting and fusion. In addition, the emerging roles of GTPases in coordination of individual transport steps as well as coordination of intracellular trafficking with other cellular processes are reviewed. Finally, common structures and mechanisms underlying the function of the ras-like GTPases and the importance of their function to human health and disease are discussed.

  17. Redox regulation of Ran GTPase

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Jongyun

    2008-11-21

    Ran, a small Ras-like GTP-binding nuclear protein, plays a key role in modulation of various cellular signaling events including the cell cycle. This study shows that a cellular redox agent (nitrogen dioxide) facilitates Ran guanine nucleotide dissociation, and identifies a unique Ran redox architecture involved in that process. Sequence analysis suggests that Dexras1 and Rhes GTPases also possess the Ran redox architecture. As Ran releases an intact nucleotide, the redox regulation mechanism of Ran is likely to differ from the radical-based guanine nucleotide modification mechanism suggested for Ras and Rho GTPases. These results provide a mechanistic reason for the previously observed oxidative stress-induced perturbation of the Ran-mediated nuclear import, and suggest that oxidative stress could be a factor in the regulation of cell signal transduction pathways associated with Ran.

  18. Rho GTPases in embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Duquette, Philippe M; Lamarche-Vane, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, several mouse models for RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 have emerged and have contributed a great deal to understanding the precise functions of Rho GTPases at early stages of development. This review summarizes our current knowledge of various mouse models of tissue-specific ablation of Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoA with emphasis on early embryogenesis, epithelial and skin morphogenesis, tubulogenesis, development of the central nervous system, and limb development. PMID:25483305

  19. Regulation of Rap GTPases in mammalian neurons.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bhavin; Püschel, Andreas W

    2016-10-01

    Small GTPases are central regulators of many cellular processes. The highly conserved Rap GTPases perform essential functions in the mammalian nervous system during development and in mature neurons. During neocortical development, Rap1 is required to regulate cadherin- and integrin-mediated adhesion. In the adult nervous system Rap1 and Rap2 regulate the maturation and plasticity of dendritic spine and synapses. Although genetic studies have revealed important roles of Rap GTPases in neurons, their regulation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that activate them and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) that inactivate them by stimulating their intrinsic GTPase activity is just beginning to be explored in vivo. Here we review how GEFs and GAPs regulate Rap GTPases in the nervous system with a focus on their in vivo function.

  20. GTPases in bacterial cell polarity and signalling.

    PubMed

    Bulyha, Iryna; Hot, Edina; Huntley, Stuart; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2011-12-01

    In bacteria, large G domain GTPases have well-established functions in translation, protein translocation, tRNA modification and ribosome assembly. In addition, bacteria also contain small Ras-like GTPases consisting of stand-alone G domains. Recent data have revealed that small Ras-like GTPases as well as large G domain GTPases in bacteria function in the regulation of cell polarity, signal transduction and possibly also in cell division. The small Ras-like GTPase MglA together with its cognate GAP MglB regulates cell polarity in Myxococcus xanthus, and the small Ras-like GTPase CvnD9 in Streptomyces coelicolor is involved in signal transduction. Similarly, the large GTPase FlhF together with the ATPase FlhG regulates the localization and number of flagella in polarly flagellated bacteria. Moreover, large dynamin-like GTPases in bacteria may function in cell division. Thus, the function of GTPases in bacteria may be as pervasive as in eukaryotes.

  1. COMMUNICATION BETWEEN 5-HT AND SMALL GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Mercado, Charles P.; Ziu, Endrit; Kilic, Fusun

    2011-01-01

    Advances over the past decade have improved our understanding of the serotonin (5-HT) biology outside the central nervous system specifically the molecular mechanisms of serotonergic signaling in association with small GTPases. It is now recognized that the communication between 5-HT and GTPases plays important roles in peripheral tissues, vascular cells and are involved in coagulation, hypertension, inflammation, healing and protection. Furthermore, 5-HT receptors as heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein-coupled receptors act as effector protein on the small GTPases. Therefore, the antagonists or agonists of the effector proteins of small GTPases could be useful therapeutic agents for the treatment of several diseases and disorders. PMID:21320798

  2. LRRK2 autophosphorylation enhances its GTPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiyong; Mobley, James A.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Kahn, Richard A.; West, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    The leucine-rich repeat kinase (LRRK)-2 protein contains nonoverlapping GTPase and kinase domains, and mutation in either domain can cause Parkinson disease. GTPase proteins are critical upstream modulators of many effector protein kinases. In LRRK2, this paradigm may be reversed, as the kinase domain phosphorylates its own GTPase domain. In this study, we found that the ameba LRRK2 ortholog ROCO4 phosphorylates the GTPase domain [termed Ras-of-complex (ROC) domain in this family] of human LRRK2 on the same residues as the human LRRK2 kinase. Phosphorylation of ROC enhances its rate of GTP hydrolysis [from kcat (catalytic constant) 0.007 to 0.016 min−1], without affecting GTP or GDP dissociation kinetics [koff = 0.093 and 0.148 min−1 for GTP and GDP, respectively). Phosphorylation also promotes the formation of ROC dimers, although GTPase activity appears to be equivalent between purified dimers and monomers. Modeling experiments show that phosphorylation induces conformational changes at the critical p-loop structure. Finally, ROC appears to be one of many GTPases phosphorylated in p-loop residues, as revealed by alignment of LRRK2 autophosphorylation sites with GTPases annotated in the phosphoproteome database. These results provide an example of a novel mechanism for kinase-mediated control of GTPase activity.—Liu, Z., Mobley, J. A., DeLucas, L. J., Kahn, R. A., West, A. B. LRRK2 autophosphorylation enhances its GTPase activity. PMID:26396237

  3. Deregulation of Rho GTPases in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Andrew P.; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Malliri, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In vitro and in vivo studies and evidence from human tumors have long implicated Rho GTPase signaling in the formation and dissemination of a range of cancers. Recently next generation sequencing has identified direct mutations of Rho GTPases in human cancers. Moreover, the effects of ablating genes encoding Rho GTPases and their regulators in mouse models, or through pharmacological inhibition, strongly suggests that targeting Rho GTPase signaling could constitute an effective treatment. In this review we will explore the various ways in which Rho signaling can be deregulated in human cancers. PMID:27104658

  4. Rho family and Rap GTPase activation assays.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Richard T; Knaus, Ulla G

    2014-01-01

    The detection of Ras superfamily GTPase activity in innate immune cells is important when studying signaling events elicited by various ligands and cellular processes. The development of high-affinity probes detecting the activated, GTP-bound form of small GTPases has significantly enhanced our understanding of initiation and termination of GTPase-regulated signaling pathways. These probes are created by fusing a high-affinity GTPase-binding domain derived from a specific downstream effector protein to glutathione S-transferase (GST). Such domains bind preferentially to the GTP-bound form of the upstream Rho or Ras GTPase. Coupling these probes to beads enables extraction of the complex and subsequent quantification of the active GTP-binding protein by immunoblotting. Although effector domains that discriminate efficiently between GDP- and GTP-bound states and highly specific antibodies are not yet available for every small GTPase, analysis of certain members of the Rho and Ras GTPase family is now routinely performed. Here, we describe affinity-based pulldown assays for detection of Rho GTPase (Rac1/2, Cdc42, RhoA/B) and Rap1/2 activity in stimulated neutrophils or macrophages.

  5. Ribosome-associated GTPases: the role of RNA for GTPase activation.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Nina; Polacek, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    The GTPase super-family comprises a variety of G proteins found in all three domains of life. Although they are participating in completely different processes like signal transduction, protein biosynthesis and regulation of cell proliferation, they all share a highly conserved G domain and use a common mechanism for GTP hydrolysis. Exact timing in hydrolyzing the bound GTP serves as a molecular switch to initiate diverse cellular reactions. Classical GTPases depend on external proteins to fire GTP hydrolysis (GAPs), and following the GTPase reaction to exchange GDP for GTP (GEFs), converting the GTPase into the active state again. In recent years it became clear that there are many GTPases that do not follow this classical switch mode scheme. Certain ribosome-associated GTPases are not reliant on other GEF proteins to exchange GDP for GTP. Furthermore many of these G proteins are not activated by external GAPs, but by evolutionarily ancient molecules, namely by RNA.

  6. Locking GTPases covalently in their functional states.

    PubMed

    Wiegandt, David; Vieweg, Sophie; Hofmann, Frank; Koch, Daniel; Li, Fu; Wu, Yao-Wen; Itzen, Aymelt; Müller, Matthias P; Goody, Roger S

    2015-07-16

    GTPases act as key regulators of many cellular processes by switching between active (GTP-bound) and inactive (GDP-bound) states. In many cases, understanding their mode of action has been aided by artificially stabilizing one of these states either by designing mutant proteins or by complexation with non-hydrolysable GTP analogues. Because of inherent disadvantages in these approaches, we have developed acryl-bearing GTP and GDP derivatives that can be covalently linked with strategically placed cysteines within the GTPase of interest. Binding studies with GTPase-interacting proteins and X-ray crystallography analysis demonstrate that the molecular properties of the covalent GTPase-acryl-nucleotide adducts are a faithful reflection of those of the corresponding native states and are advantageously permanently locked in a defined nucleotide (that is active or inactive) state. In a first application, in vivo experiments using covalently locked Rab5 variants provide new insights into the mechanism of correct intracellular localization of Rab proteins.

  7. Locking GTPases covalently in their functional states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegandt, David; Vieweg, Sophie; Hofmann, Frank; Koch, Daniel; Li, Fu; Wu, Yao-Wen; Itzen, Aymelt; Müller, Matthias P.; Goody, Roger S.

    2015-07-01

    GTPases act as key regulators of many cellular processes by switching between active (GTP-bound) and inactive (GDP-bound) states. In many cases, understanding their mode of action has been aided by artificially stabilizing one of these states either by designing mutant proteins or by complexation with non-hydrolysable GTP analogues. Because of inherent disadvantages in these approaches, we have developed acryl-bearing GTP and GDP derivatives that can be covalently linked with strategically placed cysteines within the GTPase of interest. Binding studies with GTPase-interacting proteins and X-ray crystallography analysis demonstrate that the molecular properties of the covalent GTPase-acryl-nucleotide adducts are a faithful reflection of those of the corresponding native states and are advantageously permanently locked in a defined nucleotide (that is active or inactive) state. In a first application, in vivo experiments using covalently locked Rab5 variants provide new insights into the mechanism of correct intracellular localization of Rab proteins.

  8. Rho GTPases and cancer cell transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Nicolas; Riou, Philippe; Ridley, Anne J

    2012-01-01

    Small Rho GTPases are major regulators of actin cytoskeleton dynamics and influence cell shape and migration. The expression of several Rho GTPases is often up-regulated in tumors and this frequently correlates with a poor prognosis for patients. Migration of cancer cells through endothelial cells that line the blood vessels, called transendothelial migration or extravasation, is a critical step during the metastasis process. The use of siRNA technology to target specifically each Rho family member coupled with imaging techniques allows the roles of individual Rho GTPases to be investigated. In this chapter we describe methods to assess how Rho GTPases affect the different steps of cancer cell transendothelial cell migration in vitro.

  9. Comparison of human and Drosophila atlastin GTPases.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fuyun; Hu, Xiaoyu; Bian, Xin; Liu, Xinqi; Hu, Junjie

    2015-02-01

    Formation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network requires homotypic membrane fusion, which involves a class of atlastin (ATL) GTPases. Purified Drosophila ATL is capable of mediating vesicle fusion in vitro, but such activity has not been reported for any other ATLs. Here, we determined the preliminary crystal structure of the cytosolic segment of Drosophila ATL in a GDP-bound state. The structure reveals a GTPase domain dimer with the subsequent three-helix bundles associating with their own GTPase domains and pointing in opposite directions. This conformation is similar to that of human ATL1, to which GDP and high concentrations of inorganic phosphate, but not GDP only, were included. Drosophila ATL restored ER morphology defects in mammalian cells lacking ATLs, and measurements of nucleotide-dependent dimerization and GTPase activity were comparable for Drosophila ATL and human ATL1. However, purified and reconstituted human ATL1 exhibited no in vitro fusion activity. When the cytosolic segment of human ATL1 was connected to the transmembrane (TM) region and C-terminal tail (CT) of Drosophila ATL, the chimera still exhibited no fusion activity, though its GTPase activity was normal. These results suggest that GDP-bound ATLs may adopt multiple conformations and the in vitro fusion activity of ATL cannot be achieved by a simple collection of functional domains.

  10. IFN-inducible GTPases in Host Defense

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bae-Hoon; Shenoy, Avinash R.; Kumar, Pradeep; Bradfield, Clinton J.; MacMicking, John D.

    2012-01-01

    From plants to humans, the ability to control infection at the level of an individual cell – a process termed cell-autonomous immunity – equates firmly with survival of the species. Recent work has begun to unravel this programmed cell-intrinsic response and the central roles played by IFN-inducible GTPases in defending the mammalian cell’s interior against a diverse group of invading pathogens. These immune GTPases regulate vesicular traffic and protein complex assembly to stimulate oxidative, autophagic, membranolytic and inflammasome-related antimicrobial activities within the cytosol as well as on pathogen-containing vacuoles. Moreover, human genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and disease-related transcriptional profiling have linked mutations in the Immunity-Related GTPase M (IRGM) locus and altered expression of Guanylate Binding Proteins (GBPs) with tuberculosis susceptibility and Crohn’s colitis. PMID:23084913

  11. Are There Rab GTPases in Archaea?

    PubMed Central

    Surkont, Jaroslaw; Pereira-Leal, Jose B.

    2016-01-01

    A complex endomembrane system is one of the hallmarks of Eukaryotes. Vesicle trafficking between compartments is controlled by a diverse protein repertoire, including Rab GTPases. These small GTP-binding proteins contribute identity and specificity to the system, and by working as molecular switches, trigger multiple events in vesicle budding, transport, and fusion. A diverse collection of Rab GTPases already existed in the ancestral Eukaryote, yet, it is unclear how such elaborate repertoire emerged. A novel archaeal phylum, the Lokiarchaeota, revealed that several eukaryotic-like protein systems, including small GTPases, are present in Archaea. Here, we test the hypothesis that the Rab family of small GTPases predates the origin of Eukaryotes. Our bioinformatic pipeline detected multiple putative Rab-like proteins in several archaeal species. Our analyses revealed the presence and strict conservation of sequence features that distinguish eukaryotic Rabs from other small GTPases (Rab family motifs), mapping to the same regions in the structure as in eukaryotic Rabs. These mediate Rab-specific interactions with regulators of the REP/GDI (Rab Escort Protein/GDP dissociation Inhibitor) family. Sensitive structure-based methods further revealed the existence of REP/GDI-like genes in Archaea, involved in isoprenyl metabolism. Our analysis supports a scenario where Rabs differentiated into an independent family in Archaea, interacting with proteins involved in membrane biogenesis. These results further support the archaeal nature of the eukaryotic ancestor and provide a new insight into the intermediate stages and the evolutionary path toward the complex membrane-associated signaling circuits that characterize the Ras superfamily of small GTPases, and specifically Rab proteins. PMID:27034425

  12. Phylogenetic distribution of translational GTPases in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Margus, Tõnu; Remm, Maido; Tenson, Tanel

    2007-01-01

    Background Translational GTPases are a family of proteins in which GTPase activity is stimulated by the large ribosomal subunit. Conserved sequence features allow members of this family to be identified. Results To achieve accurate protein identification and grouping we have developed a method combining searches with Hidden Markov Model profiles and tree based grouping. We found all the genes for translational GTPases in 191 fully sequenced bacterial genomes. The protein sequences were grouped into nine subfamilies. Analysis of the results shows that three translational GTPases, the translation factors EF-Tu, EF-G and IF2, are present in all organisms examined. In addition, several copies of the genes encoding EF-Tu and EF-G are present in some genomes. In the case of multiple genes for EF-Tu, the gene copies are nearly identical; in the case of multiple EF-G genes, the gene copies have been considerably diverged. The fourth translational GTPase, LepA, the function of which is currently unknown, is also nearly universally conserved in bacteria, being absent from only one organism out of the 191 analyzed. The translation regulator, TypA, is also present in most of the organisms examined, being absent only from bacteria with small genomes. Surprisingly, some of the well studied translational GTPases are present only in a very small number of bacteria. The translation termination factor RF3 is absent from many groups of bacteria with both small and large genomes. The specialized translation factor for selenocysteine incorporation – SelB – was found in only 39 organisms. Similarly, the tetracycline resistance proteins (Tet) are present only in a small number of species. Proteins of the CysN/NodQ subfamily have acquired functions in sulfur metabolism and production of signaling molecules. The genes coding for CysN/NodQ proteins were found in 74 genomes. This protein subfamily is not confined to Proteobacteria, as suggested previously but present also in many other

  13. Small RAB GTPases Regulate Multiple Steps of Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Miserey-Lenkei, Stéphanie; Colombo, María I.

    2016-01-01

    GTPases of the RAB family are key regulators of multiple steps of membrane trafficking. Several members of the RAB GTPase family have been implicated in mitotic progression. In this review, we will first focus on the function of endosome-associated RAB GTPases reported in early steps of mitosis, spindle pole maturation, and during cytokinesis. Second, we will discuss the role of Golgi-associated RAB GTPases at the metaphase/anaphase transition and during cytokinesis. PMID:26925400

  14. Invited review: Small GTPases and their GAPs.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ashwini K; Lambright, David G

    2016-08-01

    Widespread utilization of small GTPases as major regulatory hubs in many different biological systems derives from a conserved conformational switch mechanism that facilitates cycling between GTP-bound active and GDP-bound inactive states under control of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs), which accelerate slow intrinsic rates of activation by nucleotide exchange and deactivation by GTP hydrolysis, respectively. Here we review developments leading to current understanding of intrinsic and GAP catalyzed GTP hydrolytic reactions in small GTPases from structural, molecular and chemical mechanistic perspectives. Despite the apparent simplicity of the GTPase cycle, the structural bases underlying the hallmark hydrolytic reaction and catalytic acceleration by GAPs are considerably more diverse than originally anticipated. Even the most fundamental aspects of the reaction mechanism have been challenging to decipher. Through a combination of experimental and in silico approaches, the outlines of a consensus view have begun to emerge for the best studied paradigms. Nevertheless, recent observations indicate that there is still much to be learned. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 431-448, 2016.

  15. Cofactor dependent conformational switching of GTPases.

    PubMed

    Hauryliuk, Vasili; Hansson, Sebastian; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2008-08-01

    This theoretical work covers structural and biochemical aspects of nucleotide binding and GDP/GTP exchange of GTP hydrolases belonging to the family of small GTPases. Current models of GDP/GTP exchange regulation are often based on two specific assumptions. The first is that the conformation of a GTPase is switched by the exchange of the bound nucleotide from GDP to GTP or vice versa. The second is that GDP/GTP exchange is regulated by a guanine nucleotide exchange factor, which stabilizes a GTPase conformation with low nucleotide affinity. Since, however, recent biochemical and structural data seem to contradict this view, we present a generalized scheme for GTPase action. This novel ansatz accounts for those important cases when conformational switching in addition to guanine nucleotide exchange requires the presence of cofactors, and gives a more nuanced picture of how the nucleotide exchange is regulated. The scheme is also used to discuss some problems of interpretation that may arise when guanine nucleotide exchange mechanisms are inferred from experiments with analogs of GTP, like GDPNP, GDPCP, and GDP gamma S.

  16. Cofactor Dependent Conformational Switching of GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Hauryliuk, Vasili; Hansson, Sebastian; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2008-01-01

    This theoretical work covers structural and biochemical aspects of nucleotide binding and GDP/GTP exchange of GTP hydrolases belonging to the family of small GTPases. Current models of GDP/GTP exchange regulation are often based on two specific assumptions. The first is that the conformation of a GTPase is switched by the exchange of the bound nucleotide from GDP to GTP or vice versa. The second is that GDP/GTP exchange is regulated by a guanine nucleotide exchange factor, which stabilizes a GTPase conformation with low nucleotide affinity. Since, however, recent biochemical and structural data seem to contradict this view, we present a generalized scheme for GTPase action. This novel ansatz accounts for those important cases when conformational switching in addition to guanine nucleotide exchange requires the presence of cofactors, and gives a more nuanced picture of how the nucleotide exchange is regulated. The scheme is also used to discuss some problems of interpretation that may arise when guanine nucleotide exchange mechanisms are inferred from experiments with analogs of GTP, like GDPNP, GDPCP, and GDP \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\gamma}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} S. PMID:18502805

  17. A Pan-GTPase Inhibitor as a Molecular Probe.

    PubMed

    Hong, Lin; Guo, Yuna; BasuRay, Soumik; Agola, Jacob O; Romero, Elsa; Simpson, Denise S; Schroeder, Chad E; Simons, Peter; Waller, Anna; Garcia, Matthew; Carter, Mark; Ursu, Oleg; Gouveia, Kristine; Golden, Jennifer E; Aubé, Jeffrey; Wandinger-Ness, Angela; Sklar, Larry A

    2015-01-01

    Overactive GTPases have often been linked to human diseases. The available inhibitors are limited and have not progressed far in clinical trials. We report here a first-in-class small molecule pan-GTPase inhibitor discovered from a high throughput screening campaign. The compound CID1067700 inhibits multiple GTPases in biochemical, cellular protein and protein interaction, as well as cellular functional assays. In the biochemical and protein interaction assays, representative GTPases from Rho, Ras, and Rab, the three most generic subfamilies of the GTPases, were probed, while in the functional assays, physiological processes regulated by each of the three subfamilies of the GTPases were examined. The chemical functionalities essential for the activity of the compound were identified through structural derivatization. The compound is validated as a useful molecular probe upon which GTPase-targeting inhibitors with drug potentials might be developed.

  18. A tale of two GTPases in cotranslational protein targeting.

    PubMed

    Saraogi, Ishu; Akopian, David; Shan, Shu-Ou

    2011-11-01

    Guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) comprise a superfamily of proteins that provide molecular switches to regulate numerous cellular processes. The "GTPase switch" paradigm, in which a GTPase acts as a bimodal switch that is turned "on" and "off" by external regulatory factors, has been used to interpret the regulatory mechanism of many GTPases. Recent work on a pair of GTPases in the signal recognition particle (SRP) pathway has revealed a distinct mode of GTPase regulation. Instead of the classical GTPase switch, the two GTPases in the SRP and SRP receptor undergo a series of conformational changes during their dimerization and reciprocal activation. Each conformational rearrangement provides a point at which these GTPases can communicate with and respond to their upstream and downstream biological cues, thus ensuring the spatial and temporal precision of all the molecular events in the SRP pathway. We suggest that the SRP and SRP receptor represent an emerging class of "multistate" regulatory GTPases uniquely suited to provide exquisite control over complex cellular pathways that require multiple molecular events to occur in a highly coordinated fashion.

  19. Small GTPases as regulators of cell division.

    PubMed

    Militello, Rodrigo; Colombo, María I

    2013-09-01

    The superfamily of small GTPases serves as a signal transducer to regulate a diverse array of cellular functions. The members of this superfamily are structurally and functionally classified into at least 5 groups (Ras, Rho/Rac, Rab, Arf, and Ran) and they are involved in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking, and nuclear transport. It is widely reported that members of the Rab family participate in the control of intracellular membrane trafficking through the interaction with specific effector molecules. However, many Rabs and other small GTPases have also been shown to function in cell division. In this review, we discuss current knowledge about Rab proteins regulating different stages of the cell cycle, such as the congregation and segregation of chromosomes (during metaphase) and the final stage of cell division known as cytokinesis, in which a cell is cleaved originating 2 daughter cells.

  20. Small Rho-GTPases and cortical malformations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Rho-GTPases have been found to be crucial for cytoskeleton remodelling and cell polarity, as well as key players in directed cell migration in various tissues and organs, therefore becoming good candidates for involvement in neuronal migration disorders. We recently found that genetic deletion of the small GTPase RhoA in the developing mouse cerebral cortex results in three distinct cortical malformations: a defect in the proliferation of progenitor cells during development that leads to a bigger cerebral cortex in the adult mouse, a change in the morphology of radial glial cells that results in the formation of a subcortical band heterotopia (SBH, also called Double Cortex) and an increase in the speed of migrating newborn neurons. The latter, together with the aberrant radial glial shape, is likely to be the cause of cobblestone lissencephaly, where neurons protrude beyond layer I at the pial surface of the brain. PMID:23524873

  1. Locking GTPases covalently in their functional states

    PubMed Central

    Wiegandt, David; Vieweg, Sophie; Hofmann, Frank; Koch, Daniel; Li, Fu; Wu, Yao-Wen; Itzen, Aymelt; Müller, Matthias P.; Goody, Roger S.

    2015-01-01

    GTPases act as key regulators of many cellular processes by switching between active (GTP-bound) and inactive (GDP-bound) states. In many cases, understanding their mode of action has been aided by artificially stabilizing one of these states either by designing mutant proteins or by complexation with non-hydrolysable GTP analogues. Because of inherent disadvantages in these approaches, we have developed acryl-bearing GTP and GDP derivatives that can be covalently linked with strategically placed cysteines within the GTPase of interest. Binding studies with GTPase-interacting proteins and X-ray crystallography analysis demonstrate that the molecular properties of the covalent GTPase–acryl–nucleotide adducts are a faithful reflection of those of the corresponding native states and are advantageously permanently locked in a defined nucleotide (that is active or inactive) state. In a first application, in vivo experiments using covalently locked Rab5 variants provide new insights into the mechanism of correct intracellular localization of Rab proteins. PMID:26178622

  2. Rho GTPases, Statins, and Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Rikitake, Yoshiyuki; Liao, James K.

    2009-01-01

    The lipid-lowering drugs, 3-hydroxy-3-methylgulutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors or statins, are used in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Recent experimental and clinical studies suggest that statins may exert vascular protective effects beyond cholesterol reduction. For example, statins improve endothelial function by cholesterol-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The cholesterol-independent or “pleiotropic” effects of statins include the upregulation and activation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Because statins inhibit an early step in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, they also inhibit the synthesis of isoprenoids such as farnesylpyrophosphate and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate, which are important posttranslational lipid attachments for intracellular signaling molecules such as the Rho GTPases. Indeed, decrease in Rho GTPase responses as a consequence of statin treatment increases the production and bioavailability of endothelium-derived NO. The mechanism involves, in part, Rho/Rho-kinase (ROCK)-mediated changes in the actin cytoskeleton, which leads to decreases in eNOS mRNA stability. The regulation of eNOS by Rho GTPases, therefore, may be an important mechanism underlying the cardiovascular protective effect of statins. PMID:16339495

  3. BAR domain proteins regulate Rho GTPase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Aspenström, Pontus

    2014-01-01

    BAR proteins comprise a heterogeneous group of multi-domain proteins with diverse biological functions. The common denominator is the Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain that not only confers targeting to lipid bilayers, but also provides scaffolding to mold lipid membranes into concave or convex surfaces. This function of BAR proteins is an important determinant in the dynamic reconstruction of membrane vesicles, as well as of the plasma membrane. Several BAR proteins function as linkers between cytoskeletal regulation and membrane dynamics. These links are provided by direct interactions between BAR proteins and actin-nucleation-promoting factors of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family and the Diaphanous-related formins. The Rho GTPases are key factors for orchestration of this intricate interplay. This review describes how BAR proteins regulate the activity of Rho GTPases, as well as how Rho GTPases regulate the function of BAR proteins. This mutual collaboration is a central factor in the regulation of vital cellular processes, such as cell migration, cytokinesis, intracellular transport, endocytosis, and exocytosis. PMID:25483303

  4. Crosstalk of small GTPases at the Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Baschieri, Francesco; Farhan, Hesso

    2012-01-01

    Small GTPases regulate a wide range of homeostatic processes such as cytoskeletal dynamics, organelle homeostasis, cell migration and vesicle trafficking, as well as in pathologic conditions such as carcinogenesis and metastatic spreading. Therefore, it is important to understand the regulation of small GTPase signaling, but this is complicated by the fact that crosstalk exists between different GTPase families and that we have to understand how they signal in time and space. The Golgi apparatus represents a hub for several signaling molecules and its importance in this field is constantly increasing. In this review we will discuss small GTPases signaling at the Golgi apparatus. Then, we will highlight recent work that contributed to a better understanding of crosstalk between different small GTPase families, with a special emphasis on their crosstalk at the Golgi apparatus. Finally, we will give a brief overview of available methods and tools to investigate spatio-temporal small GTPase crosstalk.

  5. Posttranslational lipid modification of Rho family small GTPases.

    PubMed

    Mitin, Natalia; Roberts, Patrick J; Chenette, Emily J; Der, Channing J

    2012-01-01

    The Rho family comprises a major branch of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases. A majority of Rho GTPases are synthesized as inactive, cytosolic proteins. They then undergo posttranslational modification by isoprenoid or fatty acid lipids, and together with additional carboxyl-terminal sequences target Rho GTPases to specific membrane and subcellular compartments essential for function. We summarize the use of biochemical and cellular assays and pharmacologic inhibitors instrumental for the study of the role of posttranslational lipid modifications and processing in Rho GTPase biology.

  6. Rho GTPases at the crossroad of signaling networks in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Wojnacki, José; Quassollo, Gonzalo; Marzolo, María-Paz; Cáceres, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Microtubule (MT) organization and dynamics downstream of external cues is crucial for maintaining cellular architecture and the generation of cell asymmetries. In interphase cells RhoA, Rac, and Cdc42, conspicuous members of the family of small Rho GTPases, have major roles in modulating MT stability, and hence polarized cell behaviors. However, MTs are not mere targets of Rho GTPases, but also serve as signaling platforms coupling MT dynamics to Rho GTPase activation in a variety of cellular conditions. In this article, we review some of the key studies describing the reciprocal relationship between small Rho-GTPases and MTs during migration and polarization. PMID:24691223

  7. Rho GTPases at the crossroad of signaling networks in mammals: impact of Rho-GTPases on microtubule organization and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wojnacki, José; Quassollo, Gonzalo; Marzolo, María-Paz; Cáceres, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Microtubule (MT) organization and dynamics downstream of external cues is crucial for maintaining cellular architecture and the generation of cell asymmetries. In interphase cells RhoA, Rac, and Cdc42, conspicuous members of the family of small Rho GTPases, have major roles in modulating MT stability, and hence polarized cell behaviors. However, MTs are not mere targets of Rho GTPases, but also serve as signaling platforms coupling MT dynamics to Rho GTPase activation in a variety of cellular conditions. In this article, we review some of the key studies describing the reciprocal relationship between small Rho-GTPases and MTs during migration and polarization.

  8. GTPases involved in bacterial ribosome maturation.

    PubMed

    Goto, Simon; Muto, Akira; Himeno, Hyouta

    2013-05-01

    The ribosome is an RNA- and protein-based macromolecule having multiple functional domains to facilitate protein synthesis, and it is synthesized through multiple steps including transcription, stepwise cleavages of the primary transcript, modifications of ribosomal proteins and RNAs and assemblies of ribosomal proteins with rRNAs. This process requires dozens of trans-acting factors including GTP- and ATP-binding proteins to overcome several energy-consuming steps. Despite accumulation of genetic, biochemical and structural data, the entire process of bacterial ribosome synthesis remains elusive. Here, we review GTPases involved in bacterial ribosome maturation.

  9. Regulation of phagocytosis by Rho GTPases.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yingyu; Finnemann, Silvia C

    2015-01-01

    Phagocytosis is defined as a cellular uptake pathway for particles of greater than 0.5 μm in diameter. Particle clearance by phagocytosis is of critical importance for tissue health and homeostasis. The ultimate goal of anti-pathogen phagocytosis is to destroy engulfed bacteria or fungi and to stimulate cell-cell signaling that mount an efficient immune defense. In contrast, clearance phagocytosis of apoptotic cells and cell debris is anti-inflammatory. High capacity clearance phagocytosis pathways are available to professional phagocytes of the immune system and the retina. Additionally, a low capacity, so-called bystander phagocytic pathway is available to most other cell types. Different phagocytic pathways are stimulated by particle ligation of distinct surface receptors but all forms of phagocytosis require F-actin recruitment beneath tethered particles and F-actin re-arrangement promoting engulfment, which are controlled by Rho family GTPases. The specificity of Rho GTPase activity during the different forms of phagocytosis by mammalian cells is the subject of this review.

  10. Ras-related GTPases and the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, A

    1992-01-01

    Incorporation of the available data on rac in neutrophils, CDC42 in yeast, and rho in fibroblasts suggests a general model for the function of rho-like GTPase (Figure 1). Conversion of an inactive cytoplasmic rho-related p21GDP/GDI complex to active p21. GTP occurs by inhibition of GAP and/or stimulation of exchange factors in response to cell signals. p21.GTP is then able to interact with its target at the plasma membrane. This could result in a conformational change in the target, enabling it to bind cytosolic protein(s). Alternatively, p21.GTP could be actively involved in transporting cytosolic protein(s) to the target. A GAP protein, perhaps intrinsic to the complex, would stimulate GTP hydrolysis allowing p21.GDP to dissociate. Solubilization of p21GDP by interaction with GDI would complete a cycle. What about the nature of the final complex? The rac-regulated NADPH oxidase complex in neutrophils is currently the best understood and most amenable to further biochemical analysis. Two plasma-membrane bound subunits encode the catalytic function necessary for producing superoxide, but the two cytosolic proteins, p47 and p67, are essential for activity. Why the complexity? Production of superoxide is tightly coordinated with phagocytosis, a membrane process driven by rearrangement of cortical actin. This is not unrelated to the membrane ruffling and macropinocytosis that we observe in fibroblasts microinjected with p21rac. It is tempting to speculate, therefore, that in neutrophils rac is involved not only in promoting the assembly of the NADPH oxidase but also in the coordinate reorganization of cortical actin leading to phagocytosis. For CDC42 controlled bud assembly in yeast, the components of the plasma-membrane complex are not so clear. By analogy with rac in neutrophils, it seems likely that CDC42 is involved in promoting the assembly of cytosolic components at the bud site on the plasma membrane. These putative cytosolic proteins have not yet been

  11. Interferon-Inducible GTPases in Host Resistance, Inflammation and Disease.

    PubMed

    Pilla-Moffett, Danielle; Barber, Matthew F; Taylor, Gregory A; Coers, Jörn

    2016-08-28

    Cell-autonomous immunity is essential for host organisms to defend themselves against invasive microbes. In vertebrates, both the adaptive and the innate branches of the immune system operate cell-autonomous defenses as key effector mechanisms that are induced by pro-inflammatory interferons (IFNs). IFNs can activate cell-intrinsic host defenses in virtually any cell type ranging from professional phagocytes to mucosal epithelial cells. Much of this IFN-induced host resistance program is dependent on four families of IFN-inducible GTPases: the myxovirus resistance proteins, the immunity-related GTPases, the guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), and the very large IFN-inducible GTPases. These GTPase families provide host resistance to a variety of viral, bacterial, and protozoan pathogens through the sequestration of microbial proteins, manipulation of vesicle trafficking, regulation of antimicrobial autophagy (xenophagy), execution of intracellular membranolytic pathways, and the activation of inflammasomes. This review discusses our current knowledge of the molecular function of IFN-inducible GTPases in providing host resistance, as well as their role in the pathogenesis of autoinflammatory Crohn's disease. While substantial advances were made in the recent past, few of the known functions of IFN-inducible GTPases have been explored in any depth, and new functions await discovery. This review will therefore highlight key areas of future exploration that promise to advance our understanding of the role of IFN-inducible GTPases in human diseases.

  12. Role of host GTPases in infection by Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Ireton, Keith; Rigano, Luciano A; Dowd, Georgina C

    2014-09-01

    The bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes induces internalization into mammalian cells and uses actin-based motility to spread within tissues. Listeria accomplishes this intracellular life cycle by exploiting or antagonizing several host GTPases. Internalization into human cells is mediated by the bacterial surface proteins InlA or InlB. These two modes of uptake each require a host actin polymerization pathway comprised of the GTPase Rac1, nucleation promotion factors, and the Arp2/3 complex. In addition to Rac1, InlB-mediated internalization involves inhibition of the GTPase Arf6 and participation of Dynamin and septin family GTPases. After uptake, Listeria is encased in host phagosomes. The bacterial protein GAPDH inactivates the human GTPase Rab5, thereby delaying phagosomal acquisition of antimicrobial properties. After bacterial-induced destruction of the phagosome, cytosolic Listeria uses the surface protein ActA to stimulate actin-based motility. The GTPase Dynamin 2 reduces the density of microtubules that would otherwise limit bacterial movement. Cell-to-cell spread results when motile Listeria remodel the host plasma membrane into protrusions that are engulfed by neighbouring cells. The human GTPase Cdc42, its activator Tuba, and its effector N-WASP form a complex with the potential to restrict Listeria protrusions. Bacteria overcome this restriction through two microbial factors that inhibit Cdc42-GTP or Tuba/N-WASP interaction.

  13. In vitro comparative kinetic analysis of the chloroplast Toc GTPases.

    PubMed

    Reddick, L Evan; Vaughn, Michael D; Wright, Sarah J; Campbell, Ian M; Bruce, Barry D

    2007-04-13

    A unique aspect of protein transport into plastids is the coordinate involvement of two GTPases in the translocon of the outer chloroplast membrane (Toc). There are two subfamilies in Arabidopsis, the small GTPases (Toc33 and Toc34) and the large acidic GTPases (Toc90, Toc120, Toc132, and Toc159). In chloroplasts, Toc34 and Toc159 are implicated in precursor binding, yet mechanistic details are poorly understood. How the GTPase cycle is modulated by precursor binding is complex and in need of careful dissection. To this end, we have developed novel in vitro assays to quantitate nucleotide binding and hydrolysis of the Toc GTPases. Here we present the first systematic kinetic characterization of four Toc GTPases (cytosolic domains of atToc33, atToc34, psToc34, and the GTPase domain of atToc159) to permit their direct comparison. We report the KM, Vmax, and Ea values for GTP hydrolysis and the Kd value for nucleotide binding for each protein. We demonstrate that GTP hydrolysis by psToc34 is stimulated by chloroplast transit peptides; however, this activity is not stimulated by homodimerization and is abolished by the R133A mutation. Furthermore, we show peptide stimulation of hydrolytic rates are not because of accelerated nucleotide exchange, indicating that transit peptides function as GTPase-activating proteins and not guanine nucleotide exchange factors in modulating the activity of psToc34. Finally, by using the psToc34 structure, we have developed molecular models for atToc33, atToc34, and atToc159G. By combining these models with the measured enzymatic properties of the Toc GTPases, we provide new insights of how the chloroplast protein import cycle may be regulated.

  14. Timing Is Everything: GTPase Regulation in Phototransduction

    PubMed Central

    Arshavsky, Vadim Y.; Wensel, Theodore G.

    2013-01-01

    As the molecular mechanisms of vertebrate phototransduction became increasingly clear in the 1980s, a persistent problem was the discrepancy between the slow GTP hydrolysis catalyzed by the phototransduction G protein, transducin, and the much more rapid physiological recovery of photoreceptor cells from light stimuli. Beginning with a report published in 1989, a series of studies revealed that transducin GTPase activity could approach the rate needed to explain physiological recovery kinetics in the presence of one or more factors present in rod outer segment membranes. One by one, these factors were identified, beginning with PDEγ, the inhibitory subunit of the cGMP phosphodiesterase activated by transducin. There followed the discovery of the crucial role played by the regulator of G protein signaling, RGS9, a member of a ubiquitous family of GTPase-accelerating proteins, or GAPs, for heterotrimeric G proteins. Soon after, the G protein β isoform Gβ5 was identified as an obligate partner subunit, followed by the discovery or R9AP, a transmembrane protein that anchors the RGS9 GAP complex to the disk membrane, and is essential for the localization, stability, and activity of this complex in vivo. The physiological importance of all of the members of this complex was made clear first by knockout mouse models, and then by the discovery of a human visual defect, bradyopsia, caused by an inherited deficiency in one of the GAP components. Further insights have been gained by high-resolution crystal structures of subcomplexes, and by extensive mechanistic studies both in vitro and in animal models. PMID:24265205

  15. RhoGTPase Regulators Orchestrate Distinct Stages of Synaptic Development

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Vilchez, Samuel; Whitmore, Leanna; Asmussen, Hannelore; Zareno, Jessica; Horwitz, Rick; Newell-Litwa, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Small RhoGTPases regulate changes in post-synaptic spine morphology and density that support learning and memory. They are also major targets of synaptic disorders, including Autism. Here we sought to determine whether upstream RhoGTPase regulators, including GEFs, GAPs, and GDIs, sculpt specific stages of synaptic development. The majority of examined molecules uniquely regulate either early spine precursor formation or later maturation. Specifically, an activator of actin polymerization, the Rac1 GEF β-PIX, drives spine precursor formation, whereas both FRABIN, a Cdc42 GEF, and OLIGOPHRENIN-1, a RhoA GAP, regulate spine precursor elongation. However, in later development, a novel Rac1 GAP, ARHGAP23, and RhoGDIs inactivate actomyosin dynamics to stabilize mature synapses. Our observations demonstrate that specific combinations of RhoGTPase regulatory proteins temporally balance RhoGTPase activity during post-synaptic spine development. PMID:28114311

  16. Study on the chaperone properties of conserved GTPases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Xue, Jiaying; Sun, Zhe; Qin, Yan; Gong, Weimin

    2012-01-01

    As a large family of hydrolases, GTPases are widespread in cells and play the very important biological function of hydrolyzing GTP into GDP and inorganic phosphate through binding with it. GTPases are involved in cell cycle regulation, protein synthesis, and protein transportation. Chaperones can facilitate the folding or refolding of nascent peptides and denatured proteins to their native states. However, chaperones do not occur in the native structures in which they can perform their normal biological functions. In the current study, the chaperone activity of the conserved GTPases of Escherichia coli is tested by the chemical denaturation and chaperone-assisted renaturation of citrate synthase and α-glucosidase. The effects of ribosomes and nucleotides on the chaperone activity are also examined. Our data indicate that these conserved GTPases have chaperone properties, and may be ancestral protein folding factors that have appeared before dedicated chaperones.

  17. Direct targeting of Rab-GTPase-effector interactions.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Jochen; Cromm, Philipp M; Itzen, Aymelt; Goody, Roger S; Grossmann, Tom N; Waldmann, Herbert

    2014-02-24

    Small GTPases are molecular switches using GDP/GTP alternation to control numerous vital cellular processes. Although aberrant function and regulation of GTPases are implicated in various human diseases, direct targeting of this class of proteins has proven difficult, as GTPase signaling and regulation is mediated by extensive and shallow protein interfaces. Here we report the development of inhibitors of protein-protein interactions involving Rab proteins, a subfamily of GTPases, which are key regulators of vesicular transport. Hydrocarbon-stapled peptides were designed based on crystal structures of Rab proteins bound to their interaction partners. These modified peptides exhibit significantly increased affinities and include a stapled peptide (StRIP3) that selectively binds to activated Rab8a and inhibits a Rab8a-effector interaction in vitro.

  18. Rit Subfamily Small GTPases: Regulators in Neuronal Differentiation and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Geng-Xian; Cai, Weikang; Andres, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    Ras family small GTPases serve as binary molecular switches to regulate a broad array of cellular signaling cascades, playing essential roles in a vast range of normal physiological processes, with dysregulation of numerous Ras-superfamily G-protein-dependent regulatory cascades underlying the development of human disease. However, the physiological function for many “orphan” Ras-related GTPases remain poorly characterized, including members of the Rit subfamily GTPases. Rit is the founding member of a novel branch of the Ras subfamily, sharing close homology with the neuronally expressed Rin and Drosophila Ric GTPases. Here, we highlight recent studies using transgenic and knockout animal models which have begun to elucidate the physiological roles for the Rit subfamily, including emerging roles in the regulation of neuronal morphology and cellular survival signaling, and discuss new genetic data implicating Rit and Rin signaling in disorders such as cancer, Parkinson’s disease, autism, and schizophrenia. PMID:23770287

  19. Reverse engineering GTPase programming languages with reconstituted signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Scott M

    2016-07-02

    The Ras superfamily GTPases represent one of the most prolific signaling currencies used in Eukaryotes. With these remarkable molecules, evolution has built GTPase networks that control diverse cellular processes such as growth, morphology, motility and trafficking. (1-4) Our knowledge of the individual players that underlie the function of these networks is deep; decades of biochemical and structural data has provided a mechanistic understanding of the molecules that turn GTPases ON and OFF, as well as how those GTPase states signal by controlling the assembly of downstream effectors. However, we know less about how these different activities work together as a system to specify complex dynamic signaling outcomes. Decoding this molecular "programming language" would help us understand how different species and cell types have used the same GTPase machinery in different ways to accomplish different tasks, and would also provide new insights as to how mutations to these networks can cause disease. We recently developed a bead-based microscopy assay to watch reconstituted H-Ras signaling systems at work under arbitrary configurations of regulators and effectors. (5) Here we highlight key observations and insights from this study and propose extensions to our method to further study this and other GTPase signaling systems.

  20. IFN-inducible GTPases in host cell defense.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bae-Hoon; Shenoy, Avinash R; Kumar, Pradeep; Bradfield, Clinton J; MacMicking, John D

    2012-10-18

    From plants to humans, the ability to control infection at the level of an individual cell-a process termed cell-autonomous immunity-equates firmly with survival of the species. Recent work has begun to unravel this programmed cell-intrinsic response and the central roles played by IFN-inducible GTPases in defending the mammalian cell's interior against a diverse group of invading pathogens. These immune GTPases regulate vesicular traffic and protein complex assembly to stimulate oxidative, autophagic, membranolytic, and inflammasome-related antimicrobial activities within the cytosol, as well as on pathogen-containing vacuoles. Moreover, human genome-wide association studies and disease-related transcriptional profiling have linked mutations in the Immunity-Related GTPase M (IRGM) locus and altered expression of guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) with tuberculosis susceptibility and Crohn's colitis.

  1. Ral-GTPases: approaching their 15 minutes of fame.

    PubMed

    Feig, Larry A

    2003-08-01

    Andy Warhol, the famous pop artist, once claimed that "in the future everyone will be famous for 15 minutes". The same, it seems, can be said of proteins, because at any given time some proteins become more "fashionable" to study than others. But most proteins have been highly conserved throughout millions of years of evolution, which implies that they all have essential roles in cell biology. Thus, each one will no doubt enter the limelight if the right experiment in the right cell type is done. A good example of this is the Ras-like GTPases (Ral-GTPases), which until recently existed in the shadow of their close cousins--the Ras proto-oncogenes. Recent studies have yielded insights into previously unappreciated roles for Ral-GTPases in intensively investigated disciplines such as vesicle trafficking, cell morphology, transcription and possibly even human oncogenesis.

  2. Regulation of bacterial cell polarity by small GTPases.

    PubMed

    Keilberg, Daniela; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria are polarized with many proteins localizing dynamically to specific subcellular sites. Two GTPase families have important functions in the regulation of bacterial cell polarity, FlhF homologues and small GTPases of the Ras superfamily. The latter consist of only a G domain and are widespread in bacteria. The rod-shaped Myxococcus xanthus cells have two motility systems, one for gliding and one that depends on type IV pili. The function of both systems hinges on proteins that localize asymmetrically to the cell poles. During cellular reversals, these asymmetrically localized proteins are released from their respective poles and then bind to the opposite pole, resulting in an inversion of cell polarity. Here, we review genetic, cell biological, and biochemical analyses that identified two modules containing small Ras-like GTPases that regulate the dynamic polarity of motility proteins. The GTPase SofG interacts directly with the bactofilin cytoskeletal protein BacP to ensure polar localization of type IV pili proteins. In the second module, the small GTPase MglA, its cognate GTPase activating protein (GAP) MglB, and the response regulator RomR localize asymmetrically to the poles and sort dynamically localized motility proteins to the poles. During reversals, MglA, MglB, and RomR switch poles, in that way inducing the relocation of dynamically localized motility proteins. Structural analyses have demonstrated that MglB has a Roadblock/LC7 fold, the central β2 strand in MglA undergoes an unusual screw-type movement upon GTP binding, MglA contains an intrinsic Arg finger required for GTP hydrolysis, and MglA and MglB form an unusual G protein/GAP complex with a 1:2 stoichiometry.

  3. Rabifier2: an improved bioinformatic classifier of Rab GTPases.

    PubMed

    Surkont, Jaroslaw; Diekmann, Yoan; Pereira-Leal, José B

    2016-10-22

    The Rab family of small GTPases regulates and provides specificity to the endomembrane trafficking system; each Rab subfamily is associated with specific pathways. Thus, characterization of Rab repertoires provides functional information about organisms and evolution of the eukaryotic cell. Yet, the complex structure of the Rab family limits the application of existing methods for protein classification. Here, we present a major redesign of the Rabifier, a bioinformatic pipeline for detection and classification of Rab GTPases. It is more accurate, significantly faster than the original version and is now open source, both the code and the data, allowing for community participation.

  4. G domain dimerization controls dynamin's assembly-stimulated GTPase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Chappie, Joshua S.; Acharya, Sharmistha; Leonard, Marilyn; Schmid, Sandra L.; Dyda, Fred

    2010-06-14

    Dynamin is an atypical GTPase that catalyses membrane fission during clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The mechanisms of dynamin's basal and assembly-stimulated GTP hydrolysis are unknown, though both are indirectly influenced by the GTPase effector domain (GED). Here we present the 2.0 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a human dynamin 1-derived minimal GTPase-GED fusion protein, which was dimeric in the presence of the transition state mimic GDP.AlF{sub 4}{sup -}. The structure reveals dynamin's catalytic machinery and explains how assembly-stimulated GTP hydrolysis is achieved through G domain dimerization. A sodium ion present in the active site suggests that dynamin uses a cation to compensate for the developing negative charge in the transition state in the absence of an arginine finger. Structural comparison to the rat dynamin G domain reveals key conformational changes that promote G domain dimerization and stimulated hydrolysis. The structure of the GTPase-GED fusion protein dimer provides insight into the mechanisms underlying dynamin-catalysed membrane fission.

  5. Control of T lymphocyte morphology by the GTPase Rho

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodside, Darren G.; Wooten, David K.; Teague, T. Kent; Miyamoto, Yuko J.; Caudell, Eva G.; Udagawa, Taturo; Andruss, Bernard F.; McIntyre, Bradley W.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rho family GTPase regulation of the actin cytoskeleton governs a variety of cell responses. In this report, we have analyzed the role of the GTPase Rho in maintenance of the T lymphocyte actin cytoskeleton. RESULTS: Inactivation of the GTPase Rho in the human T lymphocytic cell line HPB-ALL does not inhibit constitutively high adhesion to the integrin beta1 substrate fibronectin. It did however result in the aberrant extension of finger-like dendritic processes on the substrates VCAM-1, Fn, and mAb specific to beta1 integrins. Time-lapse video microscopy demonstrated that C3 induced extensions were primarily the result of an altered pseudopod elongation rather than retraction. Once the stellate pseudopodia extended, none retracted, and cells became completely immobile. Filipodial structures were absent and the dendritic-like processes in C3 treated cells were rich in filamentous actin. Immunolocalization of RhoA in untreated HPB-ALL cells spreading on fibronectin demonstrated a diffuse staining pattern within the pseudopodia. In C3 treated cells, clusters of RhoA were pronounced and localized within the altered extensions. CONCLUSIONS: GTPase Rho is actively involved in the regulation of T lymphocyte morphology and motility.

  6. GTPase regulation: getting aRnd Rock and Rho inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chardin, Pierre

    2003-09-16

    Rnd proteins are atypical members of the Rho small G protein family that inhibit the formation of actomyosin contractile fibers via activation of RhoGAPs and inhibition of a Rho effector, the Ser/Thr kinase Rock. These mechanisms might be used to fine-tune Rho GTPase inhibition locally at sites where particular actin structures need to be made.

  7. MIRO GTPases in Mitochondrial Transport, Homeostasis and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Bor Luen

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionarily-conserved mitochondrial Rho (MIRO) small GTPase is a Ras superfamily member with three unique features. It has two GTPase domains instead of the one found in other small GTPases, and it also has two EF hand calcium binding domains, which allow Ca2+-dependent modulation of its activity and functions. Importantly, it is specifically associated with the mitochondria and via a hydrophobic transmembrane domain, rather than a lipid-based anchor more commonly found in other small GTPases. At the mitochondria, MIRO regulates mitochondrial homeostasis and turnover. In metazoans, MIRO regulates mitochondrial transport and organization at cellular extensions, such as axons, and, in some cases, intercellular transport of the organelle through tunneling nanotubes. Recent findings have revealed a myriad of molecules that are associated with MIRO, particularly the kinesin adaptor Milton/TRAK, mitofusin, PINK1 and Parkin, as well as the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) complex. The mechanistic aspects of the roles of MIRO and its interactors in mitochondrial homeostasis and transport are gradually being revealed. On the other hand, MIRO is also increasingly associated with neurodegenerative diseases that have roots in mitochondrial dysfunction. In this review, I discuss what is currently known about the cellular physiology and pathophysiology of MIRO functions. PMID:26729171

  8. Structural Mechanisms and Drug Discovery Prospects of Rho GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Smithers, Cameron C.; Overduin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Rho GTPases regulate cellular morphology and dynamics, and some are key drivers of cancer progression. This superfamily offers attractive potential targets for therapeutic intervention, with RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 being prime examples. The challenges in developing agents that act on these signaling enzymes include the lack of obvious druggable pockets and their membrane-bound activities. However, progress in targeting the similar Ras protein is illuminating new strategies for specifically inhibiting oncogenic GTPases. The structures of multiple signaling and regulatory states of Rho proteins have been determined, and the post-translational modifications including acylation and phosphorylation points have been mapped and their functional effects examined. The development of inhibitors to probe the significance of overexpression and mutational hyperactivation of these GTPases underscores their importance in cancer progression. The ability to integrate in silico, in vitro, and in vivo investigations of drug-like molecules indicates the growing tractability of GTPase systems for lead optimization. Although no Rho-targeted drug molecules have yet been clinically approved, this family is clearly showing increasing promise for the development of precision medicine and combination cancer therapies. PMID:27304967

  9. Epithelial junctions and Rho family GTPases: the zonular signalosome

    PubMed Central

    Citi, Sandra; Guerrera, Diego; Spadaro, Domenica; Shah, Jimit

    2014-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of epithelial cell-cell junctions is crucially important to regulate adhesion, apico-basal polarity and motility of epithelial cells, and ultimately controls the architecture and physiology of epithelial organs. Junctions are supported, shaped and regulated by cytoskeletal filaments, whose dynamic organization and contractility are finely tuned by GTPases of the Rho family, primarily RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42. Recent research has identified new molecular mechanisms underlying the cross-talk between these GTPases and epithelial junctions. Here we briefly summarize the current knowledge about the organization, molecular evolution and cytoskeletal anchoring of cell-cell junctions, and we comment on the most recent advances in the characterization of the interactions between Rho GTPases and junctional proteins, and their consequences with regards to junction assembly and regulation of cell behavior in vertebrate model systems. The concept of “zonular signalosome” is proposed, which highlights the close functional relationship between proteins of zonular junctions (zonulae occludentes and adhaerentes) and the control of cytoskeletal organization and signaling through Rho GTPases, transcription factors, and their effectors. PMID:25483301

  10. Atlastin GTPases are required for Golgi apparatus and ER morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rismanchi, Neggy; Soderblom, Cynthia; Stadler, Julia; Zhu, Peng-Peng; Blackstone, Craig

    2008-06-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias (SPG1-33) comprise a cluster of inherited neurological disorders characterized principally by lower extremity spasticity and weakness due to a length-dependent, retrograde axonopathy of corticospinal motor neurons. Mutations in the gene encoding the large oligomeric GTPase atlastin-1 are responsible for SPG3A, a common autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia. Here we describe a family of human GTPases, atlastin-2 and -3 that are closely related to atlastin-1. Interestingly, while atlastin-1 is predominantly localized to vesicular tubular complexes and cis-Golgi cisternae, mostly in brain, atlastin-2 and -3 are localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are most enriched in other tissues. Knockdown of atlastin-2 and -3 levels in HeLa cells using siRNA (small interfering RNA) causes disruption of Golgi morphology, and these Golgi structures remain sensitive to brefeldin A treatment. Interestingly, expression of SPG3A mutant or dominant-negative atlastin proteins lacking GTPase activity causes prominent inhibition of ER reticularization, suggesting a role for atlastin GTPases in the formation of three-way junctions in the ER. However, secretory pathway trafficking as assessed using vesicular stomatitis virus G protein fused to green fluorescent protein (VSVG-GFP) as a reporter was essentially normal in both knockdown and dominant-negative overexpression conditions for all atlastins. Thus, the atlastin family of GTPases functions prominently in both ER and Golgi morphogenesis, but they do not appear to be required generally for anterograde ER-to-Golgi trafficking. Abnormal morphogenesis of the ER and Golgi resulting from mutations in atlastin-1 may ultimately underlie SPG3A by interfering with proper membrane distribution or polarity of the long corticospinal motor neurons.

  11. Redox control of GTPases: from molecular mechanisms to functional significance in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jongyun

    2011-02-15

    Small GTPases, including the proto-oncoprotein Ras and Rho GTPases, are involved in various cellular signaling events. Some of these small GTPases are redox sensitive, including Ras, Rho, Ran, Dexras1, and Rhes GTPases. Thus, the redox-mediated regulation of these GTPases often determines the course of their cellular signaling cascades. This article takes into consideration the application of Marcus theory to potential redox-based molecular mechanisms in the regulation of these redox-sensitive GTPases and the relevance of such mechanisms to a specific redox-sensitive motif. The discussion also takes into account various diseases, including cancers, heart, and neuronal disorders, that are often linked with the dysregulation of the redox signaling cascades associated with these redox-sensitive GTPases.

  12. Mechanisms for spatiotemporal regulation of Rho-GTPase signaling at synapses

    PubMed Central

    Duman, Joseph G.; Mulherkar, Shalaka; Tu, Yen-Kuei; Cheng, Jinxuan; Tolias, Kimberley F.

    2015-01-01

    Synapses mediate information flow between neurons and undergo plastic changes in response to experience, which is critical for learning and memory. Conversely, synaptic defects impair information processing and underlie many brain pathologies. Rho-family GTPases control synaptogenesis by transducing signals from extracellular stimuli to the cytoskeleton and nucleus. The Rho-GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42 promote synapse development and the growth of axons and dendrites, while RhoA antagonizes these processes. Despite its significance, many aspects of Rho-GTPase signaling remain relatively unknown. Rho-GTPases are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and inhibited by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). Though the number of both GEFs and GAPs greatly exceeds that of Rho-GTPases, loss of even a single GEF or GAP often has profound effects on cognition and behavior. Here, we explore how the actions of specific GEFs and GAPs give rise to the precise spatiotemporal activation patterns of Rho-GTPases in neurons. We consider the effects of coupling GEFs and GAPs targeting the same Rho-GTPase and the modular pathways that connect specific cellular stimuli with a given Rho-GTPase via different GEFs. We discuss how the creation of sharp borders between Rho-GTPase activation zones is achieved by pairing a GEF for one Rho-GTPase with a GAP for another and the extensive crosstalk between different Rho-GTPases. Given the importance of synapses for cognition and the fundamental roles that Rho-GTPases play in regulating them, a detailed understanding of Rho-GTPase signaling is essential to the progress of neuroscience. PMID:26003445

  13. Signal recognition particle (SRP) and SRP receptor: a new paradigm for multistate regulatory GTPases.

    PubMed

    Shan, Shu-ou; Schmid, Sandra L; Zhang, Xin

    2009-07-28

    The GTP-binding proteins or GTPases comprise a superfamily of proteins that provide molecular switches in numerous cellular processes. The "GTPase switch" paradigm, in which a GTPase acts as a bimodal switch that is turned "on" and "off" by external regulatory factors, has been used to interpret the regulatory mechanism of many GTPases for more than two decades. Nevertheless, recent work has unveiled an emerging class of "multistate" regulatory GTPases that do not adhere to this classical paradigm. Instead of relying on external nucleotide exchange factors or GTPase activating proteins to switch between the on and off states, these GTPases have the intrinsic ability to exchange nucleotides and to sense and respond to upstream and downstream factors. In contrast to the bimodal nature of the GTPase switch, these GTPases undergo multiple conformational rearrangements, allowing multiple regulatory points to be built into a complex biological process to ensure the efficiency and fidelity of the pathway. We suggest that these multistate regulatory GTPases are uniquely suited to provide spatial and temporal control of complex cellular pathways that require multiple molecular events to occur in a highly coordinated fashion.

  14. Role of Rho GTPases in desmosomal adhesion and pemphigus pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Spindler, Volker; Waschke, Jens

    2011-05-01

    Desmosomes are distinct intercellular contacts essential to the integrity of epithelial tissues and the heart muscle. This function is impaired in the disease pemphigus, in which patients develop autoantibodies against the cadherin-type desmosomal core proteins desmogleins. Autoantibody binding induces loss of cell-cell adhesion leading to blisters within the epidermis and mucous membranes. Despite the relevance of desmosomes for integrity of such essential organs as the skin, data on the regulation of desmosome assembly and maintenance and desmosome-mediated adhesion are only slowly emerging. Small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) of the Rho family have long been established as regulators of other cell junctions such as adherens junctions, but also have been implicated in participating in the formation of desmosomes. In this short review we summarize two papers from our group dealing with the role of Rho family GTPases for desmosomal adhesion and pemphigus and discuss these data integrating novel work recently published.

  15. Differential effects of thiopeptide and orthosomycin antibiotics on translational GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Mikolajka, Aleksandra; Liu, Hanqing; Chen, Yuanwei; Starosta, Agata L.; Márquez, Viter; Ivanova, Marina; Cooperman, Barry S.; Wilson, Daniel N.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The ribosome is a major target in the bacterial cell for antibiotics. Here we dissect the effects that the thiopeptide antibiotics thiostrepton (ThS) and micrococcin (MiC) as well as the orthosomycin antibiotic evernimicin (Evn) have on translational GTPases. We demonstrate that, like ThS, MiC is a translocation inhibitor, and that the activation by MiC of the ribosome-dependent GTPase activity of EF-G is dependent on the presence of the ribosomal proteins L7/L12 as well as the G′ subdomain of EF-G. In contrast, Evn does not inhibit translocation, but is a potent inhibitor of back-translocation as well as IF2-dependent 70S initiation complex formation. Collectively, these results shed insights not only into fundamental aspects of translation, but also into the unappreciated specificities of these classes of translational inhibitors. PMID:21609840

  16. Modelling Rho GTPase biochemistry to predict collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merchant, Brian; Feng, James

    The collective migration of cells, due to individual cell polarization and intercellular contact inhibition of locomotion, features prominently in embryogenesis and metastatic cancers. Existing methods for modelling collectively migrating cells tend to rely either on highly abstracted agent-based models, or on continuum approximations of the group. Both of these frameworks represent intercellular interactions such as contact inhibition of locomotion as hard-coded rules defining model cells. In contrast, we present a vertex-dynamics framework which predicts polarization and contact inhibition of locomotion naturally from an underlying model of Rho GTPase biochemistry and cortical mechanics. We simulate the interaction between many such model cells, and study how modulating Rho GTPases affects migratory characteristics of the group, in the context of long-distance collective migration of neural crest cells during embryogenesis.

  17. [Rab GTPases networks in membrane traffic in Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Nagano, Makoto; Toshima, Junko Y; Toshima, Jiro

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular membrane trafficking between membranous compartments is essential for organelle biogenesis, structure, and identity. Rab/Ypt GTPases are well-characterized regulators of intracellular membrane trafficking, functioning as molecular switches that alternate between GTP- and GDP-bound forms. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, 11 Rab/Ypt GTPases have been identified and their functions are known to be conserved in their mammalian counterparts. In yeast, the secretory pathway is regulated by sequential activation and inactivation (the so-called Rab cascade) of three types of yeast Rab protein -Ypt1p, Ypt31p/32p and Sec4p -via specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). In addition to these Rabs, we and others have recently demonstrated that Ypt6p is predominantly localized to the early Golgi compartment, and functions as another regulator of anterograde transport for intra-Golgi trafficking in the secretory pathway. On the other hand, the endocytic pathway is known to be regulated by three yeast Rab5s (Vps21p, Ypt52p and Ypt53p) and one Rab7 (Ypt7p). Rab5 and Rab7 are key determinants of endosome identity, and the Rab5-Rab7 cascade is important for the progression from early to late endosome. Our recent study demonstrates that the endocytic pathway branches into two vacuolar targeting pathways, the Rab5-dependent vacuole protein sorting (VPS) pathway and the Rab5-independent pathway. In this review, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of molecular mechanisms that regulate the localization and activity of yeast Rab GTPases in intracellular membrane trafficking.

  18. Mevalonate kinase deficiency leads to decreased prenylation of Rab GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Jurczyluk, Julie; Munoz, Marcia A; Skinner, Oliver P; Chai, Ryan C; Ali, Naveid; Palendira, Umaimainthan; Quinn, Julian MW; Preston, Alexandra; Tangye, Stuart G; Brown, Andrew J; Argent, Elizabeth; Ziegler, John B; Mehr, Sam; Rogers, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is caused by mutations in a key enzyme of the mevalonate–cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, leading to recurrent autoinflammatory disease characterised by enhanced release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). It is currently believed that the inflammatory phenotype of MKD is triggered by temperature-sensitive loss of mevalonate kinase activity and reduced biosynthesis of isoprenoid lipids required for the prenylation of small GTPase proteins. However, previous studies have not clearly shown any change in protein prenylation in patient cells under normal conditions. With lymphoblast cell lines from two compound heterozygous MKD patients, we used a highly sensitive in vitro prenylation assay, together with quantitative mass spectrometry, to reveal a subtle accumulation of unprenylated Rab GTPases in cells cultured for 3 days or more at 40 °C compared with 37 °C. This included a 200% increase in unprenylated Rab7A, Rab14 and Rab1A. Inhibition of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) activation by fatostatin led to more pronounced accumulation of unprenylated Rab proteins in MKD cells but not parent cells, suggesting that cultured MKD cells may partially overcome the loss of isoprenoid lipids by SREBP-mediated upregulation of enzymes required for isoprenoid biosynthesis. Furthermore, while inhibition of Rho/Rac/Rap prenylation promoted the release of IL-1β, specific inhibition of Rab prenylation by NE10790 had no effect in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells or human THP-1 monocytic cells. These studies demonstrate for the first time that mutations in mevalonate kinase can lead to a mild, temperature-induced defect in the prenylation of small GTPases, but that loss of prenylated Rab GTPases is not the cause of enhanced IL-1β release in MKD. PMID:27377765

  19. Mevalonate kinase deficiency leads to decreased prenylation of Rab GTPases.

    PubMed

    Jurczyluk, Julie; Munoz, Marcia A; Skinner, Oliver P; Chai, Ryan C; Ali, Naveid; Palendira, Umaimainthan; Quinn, Julian Mw; Preston, Alexandra; Tangye, Stuart G; Brown, Andrew J; Argent, Elizabeth; Ziegler, John B; Mehr, Sam; Rogers, Michael J

    2016-11-01

    Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is caused by mutations in a key enzyme of the mevalonate-cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, leading to recurrent autoinflammatory disease characterised by enhanced release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). It is currently believed that the inflammatory phenotype of MKD is triggered by temperature-sensitive loss of mevalonate kinase activity and reduced biosynthesis of isoprenoid lipids required for the prenylation of small GTPase proteins. However, previous studies have not clearly shown any change in protein prenylation in patient cells under normal conditions. With lymphoblast cell lines from two compound heterozygous MKD patients, we used a highly sensitive in vitro prenylation assay, together with quantitative mass spectrometry, to reveal a subtle accumulation of unprenylated Rab GTPases in cells cultured for 3 days or more at 40 °C compared with 37 °C. This included a 200% increase in unprenylated Rab7A, Rab14 and Rab1A. Inhibition of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) activation by fatostatin led to more pronounced accumulation of unprenylated Rab proteins in MKD cells but not parent cells, suggesting that cultured MKD cells may partially overcome the loss of isoprenoid lipids by SREBP-mediated upregulation of enzymes required for isoprenoid biosynthesis. Furthermore, while inhibition of Rho/Rac/Rap prenylation promoted the release of IL-1β, specific inhibition of Rab prenylation by NE10790 had no effect in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells or human THP-1 monocytic cells. These studies demonstrate for the first time that mutations in mevalonate kinase can lead to a mild, temperature-induced defect in the prenylation of small GTPases, but that loss of prenylated Rab GTPases is not the cause of enhanced IL-1β release in MKD.

  20. Structural determinants allowing endolysosomal sorting and degradation of endosomal GTPases.

    PubMed

    Valero, Ruth A; Oeste, Clara L; Stamatakis, Konstantinos; Ramos, Irene; Herrera, Mónica; Boya, Patricia; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2010-09-01

    Rapid control of protein degradation is usually achieved through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. We recently found that the short-lived GTPase RhoB is degraded in lysosomes. Moreover, the fusion of the RhoB C-terminal sequence CINCCKVL, containing the isoprenylation and palmitoylation sites, to other proteins directs their sorting into multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and rapid lysosomal degradation. Here, we show that this process is highly specific for RhoB. Alteration of late endosome lipid dynamics produced the accumulation of RhoB, but not of other endosomal GTPases, including Rab5, Rab7, Rab9 or Rab11, into enlarged MVB. Other isoprenylated and bipalmitoylated GTPases, such as H-Ras, Rap2A, Rap2B and TC10, were not accumulated into MVB and were stable. Remarkably, although TC10, which is highly homologous to RhoB, was stable, a sequence derived from its C-terminus (CINCCLIT) elicited MVB sorting and degradation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-chimeric protein. This led us to identify a cluster of basic amino acids (KKH) in the TC10 hypervariable region, constituting a secondary signal potentially involved in electrostatic interactions with membrane lipids. Mutation of this cluster allowed TC10 MVB sorting and degradation, whereas inserting it into RhoB hypervariable region rescued this protein from its lysosomal degradation pathway. These findings define a highly specific structural module for entering the MVB pathway and rapid lysosomal degradation.

  1. Interferon-inducible GTPases in cell autonomous and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Etienne; Broz, Petr

    2016-02-01

    Detection and clearance of invading pathogens requires a coordinated response of the adaptive and innate immune system. Host cell, however, also features different mechanisms that restrict pathogen replication in a cell-intrinsic manner, collectively referred to as cell-autonomous immunity. In immune cells, the ability to unleash those mechanisms strongly depends on the activation state of the cell, which is controlled by cytokines or the detection of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by pattern-recognition receptors. The interferon (IFN) class of cytokines is one of the strongest inducers of antimicrobial effector mechanisms and acts against viral, bacterial and parasitic intracellular pathogens. This has been linked to the upregulation of several hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes, among them the so-called IFN-inducible GTPases. Two subfamilies of IFN-inducible GTPases, the immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and the guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), have gained attention due to their exceptional ability to specifically target intracellular vacuolar pathogens and restrict their replication by destroying their vacuolar compartment. Their repertoire has recently been expanded to the regulation of inflammasome complexes, which are cytosolic multi-protein complexes that control an inflammatory cell death called pyroptosis and the release of cytokines like interleukin-1β and interleukin-18. Here we discuss recent advances in understanding the function, the targeting and regulation of IRG and GBP proteins during microbial infections.

  2. Small GTPases and Brucella entry into the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    de Bolle, Xavier; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2012-12-01

    A key determinant for intracellular pathogenic bacteria to ensure their virulence within host cells is their ability to bypass the endocytic pathway and to reach a safe niche of replication. In the case of Brucella, the bacterium targets the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) to create a replicating niche called the BCV (Brucella-containing vacuole). The ER is a suitable strategic place for pathogenic Brucella. Indeed, bacteria can be hidden from host cell defences to persist within the host, and they can take advantage of the membrane reservoir delivered by the ER to replicate. Interaction with the ER leads to the presence on the BCV of the GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) and the small GTPase Rab2 known to be located on secretory vesicles that traffic between the ER and the Golgi apparatus. GAPDH and the small GTPase Rab2 controls Brucella replication at late times post-infection. A specific interaction between the human small GTPase Rab2 and a Brucella spp. protein named RicA was identified. Altered kinetics of intracellular trafficking and faster proliferation of the Brucella abortus ΔricA mutant was observed compared with the wild-type strain. RicA is the first reported effector with a proposed function for B. abortus.

  3. ARHGDIA mutations cause nephrotic syndrome via defective RHO GTPase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Heon Yung; Saisawat, Pawaree; Ashraf, Shazia; Hurd, Toby W.; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Fang, Humphrey; Beck, Bodo B.; Gribouval, Olivier; Zhou, Weibin; Diaz, Katrina A.; Natarajan, Sivakumar; Wiggins, Roger C.; Lovric, Svjetlana; Chernin, Gil; Schoeb, Dominik S.; Ovunc, Bugsu; Frishberg, Yaacov; Soliman, Neveen A.; Fathy, Hanan M.; Goebel, Heike; Hoefele, Julia; Weber, Lutz T.; Innis, Jeffrey W.; Faul, Christian; Han, Zhe; Washburn, Joseph; Antignac, Corinne; Levy, Shawn; Otto, Edgar A.; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2013-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is divided into steroid-sensitive (SSNS) and -resistant (SRNS) variants. SRNS causes end-stage kidney disease, which cannot be cured. While the disease mechanisms of NS are not well understood, genetic mapping studies suggest a multitude of unknown single-gene causes. We combined homozygosity mapping with whole-exome resequencing and identified an ARHGDIA mutation that causes SRNS. We demonstrated that ARHGDIA is in a complex with RHO GTPases and is prominently expressed in podocytes of rat glomeruli. ARHGDIA mutations (R120X and G173V) from individuals with SRNS abrogated interaction with RHO GTPases and increased active GTP-bound RAC1 and CDC42, but not RHOA, indicating that RAC1 and CDC42 are more relevant to the pathogenesis of this SRNS variant than RHOA. Moreover, the mutations enhanced migration of cultured human podocytes; however, enhanced migration was reversed by treatment with RAC1 inhibitors. The nephrotic phenotype was recapitulated in arhgdia-deficient zebrafish. RAC1 inhibitors were partially effective in ameliorating arhgdia-associated defects. These findings identify a single-gene cause of NS and reveal that RHO GTPase signaling is a pathogenic mediator of SRNS. PMID:23867502

  4. Crystal structure of TBC1D15 GTPase-activating protein (GAP) domain and its activity on Rab GTPases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Na; Gu, Xin; Zhou, X Edward; Wang, Weidong; Cheng, Dandan; Ge, Yinghua; Ye, Fei; Xu, H Eric; Lv, Zhengbing

    2017-04-01

    TBC1D15 belongs to the TBC (Tre-2/Bub2/Cdc16) domain family and functions as a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for Rab GTPases. So far, the structure of TBC1D15 or the TBC1D15·Rab complex has not been determined, thus, its catalytic mechanism on Rab GTPases is still unclear. In this study, we solved the crystal structures of the Shark and Sus TBC1D15 GAP domains, to 2.8 Å and 2.5 Å resolution, respectively. Shark-TBC1D15 and Sus-TBC1D15 belong to the same subfamily of TBC domain-containing proteins, and their GAP-domain structures are highly similar. This demonstrates the evolutionary conservation of the TBC1D15 protein family. Meanwhile, the newly determined crystal structures display new variations compared to the structures of yeast Gyp1p Rab GAP domain and TBC1D1. GAP assays show that Shark and Sus GAPs both have higher catalytic activity on Rab11a·GTP than Rab7a·GTP, which differs from the previous study. We also demonstrated the importance of arginine and glutamine on the catalytic sites of Shark GAP and Sus GAP. When arginine and glutamine are changed to alanine or lysine, the activities of Shark GAP and Sus GAP are lost.

  5. Rapid parallel flow cytometry assays of active GTPases using effector beads.

    PubMed

    Buranda, Tione; BasuRay, Soumik; Swanson, Scarlett; Agola, Jacob; Bondu, Virginie; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2013-11-15

    We describe a rapid assay for measuring the cellular activity of small guanine triphosphatases (GTPases) in response to a specific stimulus. Effector-functionalized beads are used to quantify in parallel multiple GTP-bound GTPases in the same cell lysate by flow cytometry. In a biologically relevant example, five different Ras family GTPases are shown for the first time to be involved in a concerted signaling cascade downstream of receptor ligation by Sin Nombre hantavirus.

  6. Inhibition of Rac GTPases in the Therapy of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    subcellular localization of the GTPase Rac3. In ‘‘Proceedings of the Small GTPase Meeting Snowmass’’ (T. S. R. Institute, ed.). La Jolla, CA. Burridge...cell localization . Methods Enzymol 2008;439:365-93. 3. Thomas EK*, Cancelas JA*, Chae H-D, Cox AD, Keller PJ, Perrotti D, Neviani, Druker BJ...302(5644): p. 445-9. 33. Cancelas, J.A., et al., Rac GTPases differentially integrate signals regulating hematopoietic stem cell localization . Nat

  7. Rho family GTPases: key players in neuronal development, neuronal survival, and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Trisha R.; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    The Rho family of GTPases belongs to the Ras superfamily of low molecular weight (∼21 kDa) guanine nucleotide binding proteins. The most extensively studied members are RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42. In the last few decades, studies have demonstrated that Rho family GTPases are important regulatory molecules that link surface receptors to the organization of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. Indeed, Rho GTPases mediate many diverse critical cellular processes, such as gene transcription, cell–cell adhesion, and cell cycle progression. However, Rho GTPases also play an essential role in regulating neuronal morphology. In particular, Rho GTPases regulate dendritic arborization, spine morphogenesis, growth cone development, and axon guidance. In addition, more recent efforts have underscored an important function for Rho GTPases in regulating neuronal survival and death. Interestingly, Rho GTPases can exert either a pro-survival or pro-death signal in neurons depending upon both the cell type and neurotoxic insult involved. This review summarizes key findings delineating the involvement of Rho GTPases and their effectors in the regulation of neuronal survival and death. Collectively, these results suggest that dysregulation of Rho family GTPases may potentially underscore the etiology of some forms of neurodegenerative disease such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:25339865

  8. [Rho GTPases as therapeutic targets in cancer and other human diseases].

    PubMed

    Lorenzano Menna, Pablo; Cardama, Georgina A; Comin, María J; Alonso, Daniel F; Gómez, Daniel E

    2010-01-01

    Rho GTPases are a key protein family controlling the transduction of external signals to cytoplasmatic and nuclear effectors. In the last few years, the development of genetic and pharmacological tools has allowed a more precise definition of the specific roles of Rho GTPases. The aim of this review is to describe the cellular functions regulated by these proteins with focus on the molecular mechanism involved. We also address the role of Rho GTPases in the development of different human diseases such as cancer. Finally, we describe different experimental therapeutic strategies with Rho GTPases as molecular targets.

  9. Comparative genomic analysis of eutherian interferon-γ-inducible GTPases.

    PubMed

    Premzl, Marko

    2012-11-01

    The interferon-γ-inducible GTPases, IFGGs, are intracellular proteins involved in immune response against pathogens. A comprehensive comparative genomic review and analysis of eutherian IFGGs was carried out using public genomic sequences. The 64 eutherian IFGG genes were examined in detail and annotated. The eutherian IFGG promoter types were first catalogued followed by a phylogenetic analysis of eutherian IFGGs, which described five major IFGG clusters. The patterns of differential gene expansions and protein regions that may regulate IFGG catalytic features suggested a new classification of eutherian IFGGs. This mini-review has also provided new tests of reliability of public genomic sequences as well as tests of protein molecular evolution.

  10. Ral GTPases in tumorigenesis: Emerging from the shadows

    PubMed Central

    Kashatus, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Oncogenic Ras proteins rely on a series of key effector pathways to drive the physiological changes that lead to tumorigenic growth. Of these effector pathways, the RalGEF pathway, which activates the two Ras-related GTPases RalA and RalB, remains the most poorly understood. This review will focus on key developments in our understanding of Ral biology, and will speculate on how aberrant activation of the multiple diverse Ral effector proteins might collectively contribute to oncogenic transformation and other aspects of tumor progression. PMID:23830877

  11. The 'invisible hand': regulation of RHO GTPases by RHOGDIs.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Boulter, Etienne; Burridge, Keith

    2011-07-22

    The 'invisible hand' is a term originally coined by Adam Smith in The Theory of Moral Sentiments to describe the forces of self-interest, competition and supply and demand that regulate the resources in society. This metaphor continues to be used by economists to describe the self-regulating nature of a market economy. The same metaphor can be used to describe the RHO-specific guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (RHOGDI) family, which operates in the background, as an invisible hand, using similar forces to regulate the RHO GTPase cycle.

  12. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors for RhoGTPases: good therapeutic targets for cancer therapy?

    PubMed

    Lazer, Galit; Katzav, Shulamit

    2011-06-01

    Rho guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) are a family of small proteins which function as molecular switches in a variety of signaling pathways following stimulation of cell surface receptors. RhoGTPases regulate numerous cellular processes including cytoskeleton organization, gene transcription, cell proliferation, migration, growth and cell survival. Because of their central role in regulating processes that are dysregulated in cancer, it seems reasonable that defects in the RhoGTPase pathway may be involved in the development of cancer. RhoGTPase activity is regulated by a number of protein families: guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) and guanine nucleotide-dissociation inhibitors (GDIs). This review discusses the participation of RhoGTPases and their regulators, especially GEFs in human cancers. In particular, we focus on the involvement of the RhoGTPase GEF, Vav1, a hematopoietic specific signal transducer which is involved in human neuroblastoma, pancreatic ductal carcinoma and lung cancer. Finally, we summarize recent advances in the design and application of a number of molecules that specifically target individual RhoGTPases or their regulators or effectors, and discuss their potential for cancer therapy.

  13. Review: Ras GTPases and myosin: Qualitative conservation and quantitative diversification in signal and energy transduction.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Matthias P; Goody, Roger S

    2016-08-01

    Most GTPases and many ATPases belong to the P-loop class of proteins with significant structural and mechanistic similarities. Here we compare and contrast the basic properties of the Ras family GTPases and myosin, and conclude that there are fundamental similarities but also distinct differences related to their specific roles. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 422-430, 2016.

  14. Small-GTPase-Associated Signaling by the Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors CpDock180 and CpCdc24, the GTPase Effector CpSte20, and the Scaffold Protein CpBem1 in Claviceps purpurea

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Andrea; Tillmann, Britta A. M.; Schürmann, Janine; Bölker, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Monomeric GTPases of the Rho subfamily are important mediators of polar growth and NADPH (Nox) signaling in a variety of organisms. These pathways influence the ability of Claviceps purpurea to infect host plants. GTPase regulators contribute to the nucleotide loading cycle that is essential for proper functionality of the GTPases. Scaffold proteins gather GTPase complexes to facilitate proper function. The guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) CpCdc24 and CpDock180 activate GTPase signaling by triggering nucleotide exchange of the GTPases. Here we show that CpCdc24 harbors nucleotide exchange activity for both Rac and Cdc42 homologues. The GEFs partly share the cellular distribution of the GTPases and interact with the putative upstream GTPase CpRas1. Interaction studies show the formation of higher-order protein complexes, mediated by the scaffold protein CpBem1. Besides the GTPases and GEFs, these complexes also contain the GTPase effectors CpSte20 and CpCla4, as well as the regulatory protein CpNoxR. Functional characterizations suggest a role of CpCdc24 mainly in polarity, whereas CpDock180 is involved in stress tolerance mechanisms. These findings indicate the dynamic formation of small GTPase complexes and improve the model for GTPase-associated signaling in C. purpurea. PMID:24489041

  15. RhoA GTPase inhibition organizes contraction during epithelial morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Frank M.; Xie, Shicong; Vasquez, Claudia G.; Tworoger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    During morphogenesis, contraction of the actomyosin cytoskeleton within individual cells drives cell shape changes that fold tissues. Coordination of cytoskeletal contractility is mediated by regulating RhoA GTPase activity. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activate and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) inhibit RhoA activity. Most studies of tissue folding, including apical constriction, have focused on how RhoA is activated by GEFs to promote cell contractility, with little investigation as to how GAPs may be important. Here, we identify a critical role for a RhoA GAP, Cumberland GAP (C-GAP), which coordinates with a RhoA GEF, RhoGEF2, to organize spatiotemporal contractility during Drosophila melanogaster apical constriction. C-GAP spatially restricts RhoA pathway activity to a central position in the apical cortex. RhoGEF2 pulses precede myosin, and C-GAP is required for pulsation, suggesting that contractile pulses result from RhoA activity cycling. Finally, C-GAP expression level influences the transition from reversible to irreversible cell shape change, which defines the onset of tissue shape change. Our data demonstrate that RhoA activity cycling and modulating the ratio of RhoGEF2 to C-GAP are required for tissue folding. PMID:27551058

  16. GTP-specific fab fragment-based GTPase activity assay.

    PubMed

    Kopra, Kari; Rozwandowicz-Jansen, Anita; Syrjänpää, Markku; Blaževitš, Olga; Ligabue, Alessio; Veltel, Stefan; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Abankwa, Daniel; Härmä, Harri

    2015-03-17

    GTPases are central cellular signaling proteins, which cycle between a GDP-bound inactive and a GTP-bound active conformation in a controlled manner. Ras GTPases are frequently mutated in cancer and so far only few experimental inhibitors exist. The most common methods for monitoring GTP hydrolysis rely on luminescent GDP- or GTP-analogs. In this study, the first GTP-specific Fab fragment and its application are described. We selected Fab fragments using the phage display technology. Six Fab fragments were found against 2'/3'-GTP-biotin and 8-GTP-biotin. Selected antibody fragments allowed specific detection of endogenous, free GTP. The most potent Fab fragment (2A4(GTP)) showed over 100-fold GTP-specificity over GDP, ATP, or CTP and was used to develop a heterogeneous time-resolved luminescence based assay for the monitoring of GTP concentration. The method allows studying the GEF dependent H-Ras activation (GTP binding) and GAP-catalyzed H-Ras deactivation (GTP hydrolysis) at nanomolar protein concentrations.

  17. Regulators and Effectors of Arf GTPases in Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Gamara, Jouda; Chouinard, François; Davis, Lynn; Aoudjit, Fawzi; Bourgoin, Sylvain G

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are key innate immune cells that represent the first line of defence against infection. They are the first leukocytes to migrate from the blood to injured or infected sites. This process involves molecular mechanisms that coordinate cell polarization, delivery of receptors, and activation of integrins at the leading edge of migrating PMNs. These phagocytes actively engulf microorganisms or form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to trap and kill pathogens with bactericidal compounds. Association of the NADPH oxidase complex at the phagosomal membrane for production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and delivery of proteolytic enzymes into the phagosome initiate pathogen killing and removal. G protein-dependent signalling pathways tightly control PMN functions. In this review, we will focus on the small monomeric GTPases of the Arf family and their guanine exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) as components of signalling cascades regulating PMN responses. GEFs and GAPs are multidomain proteins that control cellular events in time and space through interaction with other proteins and lipids inside the cells. The number of Arf GAPs identified in PMNs is expanding, and dissecting their functions will provide important insights into the role of these proteins in PMN physiology.

  18. Regulators and Effectors of Arf GTPases in Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Gamara, Jouda; Chouinard, François; Davis, Lynn; Aoudjit, Fawzi; Bourgoin, Sylvain G.

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are key innate immune cells that represent the first line of defence against infection. They are the first leukocytes to migrate from the blood to injured or infected sites. This process involves molecular mechanisms that coordinate cell polarization, delivery of receptors, and activation of integrins at the leading edge of migrating PMNs. These phagocytes actively engulf microorganisms or form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to trap and kill pathogens with bactericidal compounds. Association of the NADPH oxidase complex at the phagosomal membrane for production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and delivery of proteolytic enzymes into the phagosome initiate pathogen killing and removal. G protein-dependent signalling pathways tightly control PMN functions. In this review, we will focus on the small monomeric GTPases of the Arf family and their guanine exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) as components of signalling cascades regulating PMN responses. GEFs and GAPs are multidomain proteins that control cellular events in time and space through interaction with other proteins and lipids inside the cells. The number of Arf GAPs identified in PMNs is expanding, and dissecting their functions will provide important insights into the role of these proteins in PMN physiology. PMID:26609537

  19. Dendritic spine geometry can localize GTPase signaling in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Samuel A.; Raghavachari, Sridhar; Lew, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic terminals of most excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain. Learning and memory are associated with long-lasting structural remodeling of dendritic spines through an actin-mediated process regulated by the Rho-family GTPases RhoA, Rac, and Cdc42. These GTPases undergo sustained activation after synaptic stimulation, but whereas Rho activity can spread from the stimulated spine, Cdc42 activity remains localized to the stimulated spine. Because Cdc42 itself diffuses rapidly in and out of the spine, the basis for the retention of Cdc42 activity in the stimulated spine long after synaptic stimulation has ceased is unclear. Here we model the spread of Cdc42 activation at dendritic spines by means of reaction-diffusion equations solved on spine-like geometries. Excitable behavior arising from positive feedback in Cdc42 activation leads to spreading waves of Cdc42 activity. However, because of the very narrow neck of the dendritic spine, wave propagation is halted through a phenomenon we term geometrical wave-pinning. We show that this can account for the localization of Cdc42 activity in the stimulated spine, and, of interest, retention is enhanced by high diffusivity of Cdc42. Our findings are broadly applicable to other instances of signaling in extreme geometries, including filopodia and primary cilia. PMID:26337387

  20. Dynamin, a GTPase involved in the initial stages of endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Vallee, R B; Herskovits, J S; Aghajanian, J G; Burgess, C C; Shpetner, H S

    1993-01-01

    Dynamin is a high molecular mass (100 kDa) GTPase which binds to and co-purifies with microtubules. Molecular cloning of rat brain dynamin has revealed the three well-established consensus sequence elements for GTP binding within the N-terminal third of the protein, as well as sequence similarity within this region to the interferon-inducible antiviral Mx proteins, the product of the yeast membrane sorting gene VPS1, and the product of the yeast mitochondrial replication gene MGM1. More extensive sequence similarity between rat dynamin and the product of the Drosophila gene shibire, which is involved in endocytosis, has also been found. In in vitro assays microtubules strongly stimulate the dynamin GTPase. This effect can be reversed by removal of the dynamin C-terminus using papain, which abolishes microtubule binding. Overexpression of mutant forms of dynamin in vivo using Cos-7 cells inhibits transferrin uptake and alters the distribution of clathrin and of alpha-adaptin, but not gamma-adaptin. Deletion of the C-terminus of mutant forms of dynamin abolishes these effects. Together these results suggest a critical role for dynamin in the early stages of endocytosis. It is uncertain whether microtubules interact with dynamin in vivo or whether the in vitro effects of microtubules mimic the effects of other regulatory elements in vivo.

  1. Ras Family Small GTPase-mediated Neuroprotective Signaling in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Geng-Xian; Andres, Douglas A.; Cai, Weikang

    2012-01-01

    Selective neuronal cell death is one of the major causes of neuronal damage following stroke, and cerebral cells naturally mobilize diverse survival signaling pathways to protect against ischemia. Importantly, therapeutic strategies designed to improve endogenous anti-apoptotic signaling appear to hold great promise in stroke treatment. While a variety of complex mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of stroke, the overall mechanisms governing the balance between cell survival and death are not well-defined. Ras family small GTPases are activated following ischemic insults, and in turn, serve as intrinsic switches to regulate neuronal survival and regeneration. Their ability to integrate diverse intracellular signal transduction pathways makes them critical regulators and potential therapeutic targets for neuronal recovery after stroke. This article highlights the contribution of Ras family GTPases to neuroprotective signaling cascades, including mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family protein kinase- and AKT/PKB-dependent signaling pathways as well as the regulation of cAMP response element binding (CREB), Forkhead box O (FoxO) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1(HIF1) transcription factors, in stroke. PMID:21521171

  2. Neurolastin, a dynamin family GTPase, regulates excitatory synapses and spine density

    PubMed Central

    Madan Lomash, Richa; Gu, Xinglong; Youle, Richard J.; Lu, Wei; Roche, Katherine W.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Membrane trafficking and spinogenesis contribute significantly to changes in synaptic strength during development and in various paradigms of synaptic plasticity. GTPases of the dynamin family are key players regulating membrane trafficking. Here, we identify a brain-specific dynamin family GTPase, neurolastin (RNF112/Znf179), with closest homology to atlastin. We demonstrate that neurolastin has functional GTPase and RING domains, making it a unique protein identified with this multi-enzymatic domain organization. We also show that neurolastin is a peripheral membrane protein, which localizes to endosomes and affects endosomal membrane dynamics via its RING domain. In addition, neurolastin knockout mice have fewer dendritic spines, and rescue of the wildtype phenotype requires both the GTPase and RING domains. Furthermore, we find fewer functional synapses and reduced paired pulse facilitation in neurolastin knockout mice. Thus, we identify neurolastin as a dynamin family GTPase that affects endosome size and spine density. PMID:26212327

  3. High Throughput Flow Cytometry Bead-based Multiplex Assay for Identification of Rho GTPase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Surviladze, Zurab; Young, Susan M; Sklar, Larry A

    2015-01-01

    Summary Rho family GTPases and their effector proteins regulate a wide range of cell signaling pathways. In normal physiological conditions their activity is tightly controlled and it is not surprising that their aberrant activation contributes to tumorigenesis or other diseases. For this reason, the identification of small, cell permeable molecules capable of inhibition of Rho GTPases can be extraordinarily useful, particularly if they are specific and act reversibly. Herein we describe a flow cytometric assay, which allows us to measure the activity of six small GTPases simultaneously. GST-tagged small GTPases are bound to six glutathione bead sets each set having a different intensity of red fluorescence at a fixed wavelength. The coated bead sets were washed, combined, and dispensed into 384-well plates with test compounds, and fluorescent-GTP binding was used as the read-out. This multiplex bead-based assay was successfully used for to identify both general and selective inhibitors of Rho family GTPases. PMID:22144280

  4. Molecular pathways: targeting the kinase effectors of RHO-family GTPases.

    PubMed

    Prudnikova, Tatiana Y; Rawat, Sonali J; Chernoff, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    RHO GTPases, members of the RAS superfamily of small GTPases, are adhesion and growth factor-activated molecular switches that play important roles in tumor development and progression. When activated, RHO-family GTPases such as RAC1, CDC42, and RHOA, transmit signals by recruiting a variety of effector proteins, including the protein kinases PAK, ACK, MLK, MRCK, and ROCK. Genetically induced loss of RHO function impedes transformation by a number of oncogenic stimuli, leading to an interest in developing small-molecule inhibitors that either target RHO GTPases directly, or that target their downstream protein kinase effectors. Although inhibitors of RHO GTPases and their downstream signaling kinases have not yet been widely adopted for clinical use, their potential value as cancer therapeutics continues to facilitate pharmaceutical research and development and is a promising therapeutic strategy.

  5. Evolution and Diversity of the Ras Superfamily of Small GTPases in Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Wuichet, Kristin; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    The Ras superfamily of small GTPases are single domain nucleotide-dependent molecular switches that act as highly tuned regulators of complex signal transduction pathways. Originally identified in eukaryotes for their roles in fundamental cellular processes including proliferation, motility, polarity, nuclear transport, and vesicle transport, recent studies have revealed that single domain GTPases also control complex functions such as cell polarity, motility, predation, development and antibiotic resistance in bacteria. Here, we used a computational genomics approach to understand the abundance, diversity, and evolution of small GTPases in prokaryotes. We collected 520 small GTPase sequences present in 17% of 1,611 prokaryotic genomes analyzed that cover diverse lineages. We identified two discrete families of small GTPases in prokaryotes that show evidence of three distinct catalytic mechanisms. The MglA family includes MglA homologs, which are typically associated with the MglB GTPase activating protein, whereas members of the Rup (Ras superfamily GTPase of unknown function in prokaryotes) family are not predicted to interact with MglB homologs. System classification and genome context analyses support the involvement of small GTPases in diverse prokaryotic signal transduction pathways including two component systems, laying the foundation for future experimental characterization of these proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic GTPases supports that the last universal common ancestor contained ancestral MglA and Rup family members. We propose that the MglA family was lost from the ancestral eukaryote and that the Ras superfamily members in extant eukaryotes are the result of vertical and horizontal gene transfer events of ancestral Rup GTPases. PMID:25480683

  6. Evolution and diversity of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Wuichet, Kristin; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2014-12-04

    The Ras superfamily of small GTPases are single domain nucleotide-dependent molecular switches that act as highly tuned regulators of complex signal transduction pathways. Originally identified in eukaryotes for their roles in fundamental cellular processes including proliferation, motility, polarity, nuclear transport, and vesicle transport, recent studies have revealed that single domain GTPases also control complex functions such as cell polarity, motility, predation, development and antibiotic resistance in bacteria. Here, we used a computational genomics approach to understand the abundance, diversity, and evolution of small GTPases in prokaryotes. We collected 520 small GTPase sequences present in 17% of 1,611 prokaryotic genomes analyzed that cover diverse lineages. We identified two discrete families of small GTPases in prokaryotes that show evidence of three distinct catalytic mechanisms. The MglA family includes MglA homologs, which are typically associated with the MglB GTPase activating protein, whereas members of the Rup (Ras superfamily GTPase of unknown function in prokaryotes) family are not predicted to interact with MglB homologs. System classification and genome context analyses support the involvement of small GTPases in diverse prokaryotic signal transduction pathways including two component systems, laying the foundation for future experimental characterization of these proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic GTPases supports that the last universal common ancestor contained ancestral MglA and Rup family members. We propose that the MglA family was lost from the ancestral eukaryote and that the Ras superfamily members in extant eukaryotes are the result of vertical and horizontal gene transfer events of ancestral Rup GTPases.

  7. Evidence for lateral gene transfer (LGT) in the evolution of eubacteria-derived small GTPases in plant organelles.

    PubMed

    Suwastika, I Nengah; Denawa, Masatsugu; Yomogihara, Saki; Im, Chak Han; Bang, Woo Young; Ohniwa, Ryosuke L; Bahk, Jeong Dong; Takeyasu, Kunio; Shiina, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The genomes of free-living bacteria frequently exchange genes via lateral gene transfer (LGT), which has played a major role in bacterial evolution. LGT also played a significant role in the acquisition of genes from non-cyanobacterial bacteria to the lineage of "primary" algae and land plants. Small GTPases are widely distributed among prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In this study, we inferred the evolutionary history of organelle-targeted small GTPases in plants. Arabidopsis thaliana contains at least one ortholog in seven subfamilies of OBG-HflX-like and TrmE-Era-EngA-YihA-Septin-like GTPase superfamilies (together referred to as Era-like GTPases). Subcellular localization analysis of all Era-like GTPases in Arabidopsis revealed that all 30 eubacteria-related GTPases are localized to chloroplasts and/or mitochondria, whereas archaea-related DRG and NOG1 are localized to the cytoplasm and nucleus, respectively, suggesting that chloroplast- and mitochondrion-localized GTPases are derived from the ancestral cyanobacterium and α-proteobacterium, respectively, through endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT). However, phylogenetic analyses revealed that plant organelle GTPase evolution is rather complex. Among the eubacterium-related GTPases, only four localized to chloroplasts (including one dual targeting GTPase) and two localized to mitochondria were derived from cyanobacteria and α-proteobacteria, respectively. Three other chloroplast-targeted GTPases were related to α-proteobacterial proteins, rather than to cyanobacterial GTPases. Furthermore, we found that four other GTPases showed neither cyanobacterial nor α-proteobacterial affiliation. Instead, these GTPases were closely related to clades from other eubacteria, such as Bacteroides (Era1, EngB-1, and EngB-2) and green non-sulfur bacteria (HflX). This study thus provides novel evidence that LGT significantly contributed to the evolution of organelle-targeted Era-like GTPases in plants.

  8. Evolution of the Ras-like small GTPases and their regulators

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Johannes L; Snel, Berend

    2011-01-01

    Small GTPases are molecular switches at the hub of many signaling pathways and the expansion of this protein family is interwoven with the origin of unique eukaryotic cell features. We have previously reported on the evolution of CDC25 Homology Domain containing proteins, which act as guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Ras-like proteins. We now report on the evolution of both the Ras-like small GTPases as well as the GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) for Ras-like small GTPases. We performed an in depth phylogenetic analysis in 64 genomes of diverse eukaryotic species. These analyses revealed that multiple ancestral Ras-like GTPases and GAPs were already present in the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor (LECA), compatible with the presence of RasGEFs in LECA . Furthermore, we endeavor to reconstruct in which order the different Ras-like GTPases diverged from each other. We identified striking differences between the expansion of the various types of Ras-like GTPases and their respective GAPs and GEFs. Altogether, our analysis forms an extensive evolutionary framework for Ras-like signaling pathways and provides specific predictions for molecular biologists and biochemists. PMID:21686276

  9. RAC1P29S is a spontaneously activating cancer-associated GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Matthew J.; Ha, Byung Hak; Holman, Edna C.; Halaban, Ruth; Schlessinger, Joseph; Boggon, Titus J.

    2013-01-01

    RAC1 is a small, Ras-related GTPase that was recently reported to harbor a recurrent UV-induced signature mutation in melanoma, resulting in substitution of P29 to serine (RAC1P29S), ranking this the third most frequently occurring gain-of-function mutation in melanoma. Although the Ras family GTPases are mutated in about 30% of all cancers, mutations in the Rho family GTPases have rarely been observed. In this study, we demonstrate that unlike oncogenic Ras proteins, which are primarily activated by mutations that eliminate GTPase activity, the activated melanoma RAC1P29S protein maintains intrinsic GTP hydrolysis and is spontaneously activated by substantially increased inherent GDP/GTP nucleotide exchange. Determination and comparison of crystal structures for activated RAC1 GTPases suggest that RAC1F28L—a known spontaneously activated RAC1 mutant—and RAC1P29S are self-activated in distinct fashions. Moreover, the mechanism of RAC1P29S and RAC1F28L activation differs from the common oncogenic mutations found in Ras-like GTPases that abrogate GTP hydrolysis. The melanoma RAC1P29S gain-of-function point mutation therefore represents a previously undescribed class of cancer-related GTPase activity. PMID:23284172

  10. Multiple Roles of the Small GTPase Rab7

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Flora; Bucci, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Rab7 is a small GTPase that belongs to the Rab family and controls transport to late endocytic compartments such as late endosomes and lysosomes. The mechanism of action of Rab7 in the late endocytic pathway has been extensively studied. Rab7 is fundamental for lysosomal biogenesis, positioning and functions, and for trafficking and degradation of several signaling receptors, thus also having implications on signal transduction. Several Rab7 interacting proteins have being identified leading to the discovery of a number of different important functions, beside its established role in endocytosis. Furthermore, Rab7 has specific functions in neurons. This review highlights and discusses the role and the importance of Rab7 on different cellular pathways and processes. PMID:27548222

  11. Rho-GTPase-regulated vesicle trafficking in plant cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu; Friml, Jiří

    2014-02-01

    ROPs (Rho of plants) belong to a large family of plant-specific Rho-like small GTPases that function as essential molecular switches to control diverse cellular processes including cytoskeleton organization, cell polarization, cytokinesis, cell differentiation and vesicle trafficking. Although the machineries of vesicle trafficking and cell polarity in plants have been individually well addressed, how ROPs co-ordinate those processes is still largely unclear. Recent progress has been made towards an understanding of the co-ordination of ROP signalling and trafficking of PIN (PINFORMED) transporters for the plant hormone auxin in both root and leaf pavement cells. PIN transporters constantly shuttle between the endosomal compartments and the polar plasma membrane domains, therefore the modulation of PIN-dependent auxin transport between cells is a main developmental output of ROP-regulated vesicle trafficking. The present review focuses on these cellular mechanisms, especially the integration of ROP-based vesicle trafficking and plant cell polarity.

  12. Rho GTPases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Takaya

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is secreted into blood vessels from β cells of pancreatic islets in response to high blood glucose levels. Insulin stimulates an array of physiological responses in target tissues, including liver, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue, thereby reducing the blood glucose level. Insulin-dependent glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue is primarily mediated by the redistribution of the glucose transporter type 4 from intracellular storage sites to the plasma membrane. Evidence for the participation of the Rho family GTPase Rac1 in glucose uptake signaling in skeletal muscle has emerged from studies using cell cultures and genetically engineered mice. Herein, recent progress in understanding the function and regulation of Rac1, especially the cross-talk with the protein kinase Akt2, is highlighted. In addition, the role for another Rho family member TC10 and its regulatory mechanism in adipocyte insulin signaling are described. PMID:24613967

  13. Studies of the GTPase domain of archaebacterial ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Beauclerk, A A; Hummel, H; Holmes, D J; Böck, A; Cundliffe, E

    1985-09-02

    Ribosomes from the methanogens Methanococcus vannielii and Methanobacterium formicicum catalyse uncoupled hydrolysis of GTP in the presence of factor EF-2 from rat liver (but not factor EF-G from Escherichia coli). In this assay, and in poly(U)-dependent protein synthesis, they were sensitive to thiostrepton. In contrast, ribosomes from Sulfolobus solfataricus did not respond to factor EF-2 (or factor EF-G) but possessed endogenous GTPase activity, which was also sensitive to thiostrepton. Ribosomes from the methanogens did not support (p)ppGpp production, but did appear to possess the equivalent of protein L11, which in E. coli is normally required for guanosine polyphosphate synthesis. Protein L11 from E. coli bound well to 23S rRNA from all three archaebacteria (as did thiostrepton) and oligonucleotides protected by the protein were sequenced and compared with rRNA sequences from other sources.

  14. Role of Arf GTPases in fungal morphogenesis and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Labbaoui, Hayet; Bogliolo, Stéphanie; Ghugtyal, Vikram; Solis, Norma V.

    2017-01-01

    Virulence of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans depends on the switch from budding to filamentous growth, which requires sustained membrane traffic and polarized growth. In many organisms, small GTPases of the Arf (ADP-ribosylation factor) family regulate membrane/protein trafficking, yet little is known about their role in fungal filamentous growth. To investigate these GTPases in C. albicans, we generated loss of function mutants in all 3 Arf proteins, Arf1-Arf3, and 2 Arf-like proteins, Arl1 and Arl3. Our results indicate that of these proteins, Arf2 is required for viability and sensitivity to antifungal drugs. Repressible ARF2 expression results in defects in filamentous growth, cell wall integrity and virulence, likely due to alteration of the Golgi. Arl1 is also required for invasive filamentous growth and, although arl1/arl1 cells can initiate hyphal growth, hyphae are substantially shorter than that of the wild-type, due to the inability of this mutant to maintain hyphal growth at a single site. We show that this defect does not result from an alteration of phospholipid distribution and is unlikely to result from the sole Golgin Imh1 mislocalization, as Imh1 is not required for invasive filamentous growth. Rather, our results suggest that the arl1/arl1 hyphal growth defect results from increased secretion in this mutant. Strikingly, the arl1/arl1 mutant is drastically reduced in virulence during oropharyngeal candidiasis. Together, our results highlight the importance of Arl1 and Arf2 as key regulators of hyphal growth and virulence in C. albicans and identify a unique function of Arl1 in secretion. PMID:28192532

  15. ELMO Domains, Evolutionary and Functional Characterization of a Novel GTPase-activating Protein (GAP) Domain for Arf Protein Family GTPases*

    PubMed Central

    East, Michael P.; Bowzard, J. Bradford; Dacks, Joel B.; Kahn, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    The human family of ELMO domain-containing proteins (ELMODs) consists of six members and is defined by the presence of the ELMO domain. Within this family are two subclassifications of proteins, based on primary sequence conservation, protein size, and domain architecture, deemed ELMOD and ELMO. In this study, we used homology searching and phylogenetics to identify ELMOD family homologs in genomes from across eukaryotic diversity. This demonstrated not only that the protein family is ancient but also that ELMOs are potentially restricted to the supergroup Opisthokonta (Metazoa and Fungi), whereas proteins with the ELMOD organization are found in diverse eukaryotes and thus were likely the form present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor. The segregation of the ELMO clade from the larger ELMOD group is consistent with their contrasting functions as unconventional Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factors and the Arf family GTPase-activating proteins, respectively. We used unbiased, phylogenetic sorting and sequence alignments to identify the most highly conserved residues within the ELMO domain to identify a putative GAP domain within the ELMODs. Three independent but complementary assays were used to provide an initial characterization of this domain. We identified a highly conserved arginine residue critical for both the biochemical and cellular GAP activity of ELMODs. We also provide initial evidence of the function of human ELMOD1 as an Arf family GAP at the Golgi. These findings provide the basis for the future study of the ELMOD family of proteins and a new avenue for the study of Arf family GTPases. PMID:23014990

  16. Control of cell growth: Rag GTPases in activation of TORC1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huirong; Gong, Rui; Xu, Yanhui

    2013-08-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) is a central regulator controlling cell growth. TOR is highly conserved from yeast to mammals, and is deregulated in human cancers and diabetes. TOR complex 1 (TORC1) integrates signals from growth factors, cellular energy status, stress, and amino acids to control cell growth, mitochondrial metabolism, and lipid biosynthesis. The mechanisms of growth factors and cellular energy status in regulating TORC1 have been well established, whereas the mechanism by which amino acid induces TORC1 remains largely unknown. Recent studies revealed that Rag GTPases play a central role in the regulation of TORC1 activation in response to amino acids. In this review, we will discuss the recent progress in our understanding of Rag GTPase-regulated TORC1 activation in response to amino acids. Particular focus will be given to the function of Rag GTPases in TORC1 activation and how Rag GTPases are regulated by amino acids.

  17. LRRK2 GTPase Dysfunction in the Pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yulan; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) are the most frequent genetic cause of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and these mutations play important roles in sporadic PD. The LRRK2 protein contains GTPase and kinase domains and several protein-protein interaction domains. The kinase and GTPase activity of LRRK2 seem to be important in regulating LRRK2-dependent cellular signaling pathways. LRRK2’s GTPase and kinase domains may reciprocally regulate each other to direct LRRK2’s ultimate function. While most LRRK2 investigations are centered on LRRK2’s kinase activity, this review focuses on the function of LRRK2’s GTPase in LRRK2 physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:22988868

  18. The Regulation of Cellular Responses to Mechanical Cues by Rho GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Hoon, Jing Ling; Tan, Mei Hua; Koh, Cheng-Gee

    2016-01-01

    The Rho GTPases regulate many cellular signaling cascades that modulate cell motility, migration, morphology and cell division. A large body of work has now delineated the biochemical cues and pathways, which stimulate the GTPases and their downstream effectors. However, cells also respond exquisitely to biophysical and mechanical cues such as stiffness and topography of the extracellular matrix that profoundly influence cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. As these cellular responses are mediated by the actin cytoskeleton, an involvement of Rho GTPases in the transduction of such cues is not unexpected. In this review, we discuss an emerging role of Rho GTPase proteins in the regulation of the responses elicited by biophysical and mechanical stimuli. PMID:27058559

  19. Dual function of a bacterial protein as an adhesin and extracellular effector of host GTPase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Stones, Daniel Henry; Krachler, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens often target conserved cellular mechanisms within their hosts to rewire signaling pathways and facilitate infection. Rho GTPases are important nodes within eukaryotic signaling networks and thus constitute a common target of pathogen-mediated manipulation. A diverse array of microbial mechanisms exists to interfere with Rho GTPase signaling. While targeting of GTPases by secreted bacterial effectors is a well-known strategy bacterial pathogens employ to interfere with the host, we have recently described pathogen adhesion as a novel extracellular stimulus that hijacks host GTPase signaling. The Multivalent Adhesion Molecule MAM7 from Vibrio parahaemolyticus directly binds host cell membrane lipids. The ensuing coalescence of phosphatidic acid ligands in the host membrane leads to downstream activation of RhoA and actin rearrangements. Herein, we discuss mechanistic models of lipid-mediated Rho activation and the implications from the infected host's and the pathogen's perspective. PMID:26156628

  20. The role of Gln61 and Glu63 of Ras GTPases in their activation by NF1 and Ras GAP.

    PubMed Central

    Nur-E-Kamal, M S; Maruta, H

    1992-01-01

    Two distinct GAPs of 120 and 235 kDa called GAP1 and NF1 serve as attenuators of Ras, a member of GTP-dependent signal transducers, by stimulating its intrinsic guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) activity. The GAP1 (also called Ras GAP) is highly specific for Ras and does not stimulate the intrinsic GTPase activity of Rap1 or Rho. Using GAP1C, the C-terminal GTPase activating domain (residues 720-1044) of bovine GAP1, we have shown previously that the GAP1 specificity is determined by the Ras domain (residues 61-65) where Gln61 plays the primary role. The corresponding domain (residues 1175-1531) of human NF1 (called NF1C), which shares only 26% sequence identity with the GAP1C, also activates Ras GTPases. In this article, we demonstrate that the NF1C, like the GAP1C, is highly specific for Ras and does not activate either Rap1 or Rho GTPases. Furthermore, using a series of chimeric Ras/Rap1 and mutated Ras GTPases, we show that Gln at position 61 of the GTPases primarily determines that NF1C as well as GAP1C activates Ras GTPases, but not Rap1 GTPases, and Glu at position 63 of the GTPases is required for maximizing the sensitivity of Ras GTPases to both NF1C and GAP1C. Interestingly, replacement of Glu63 of c-HaRas by Lys reduces its intrinsic GTPase activity and abolishes the GTPase activation by both NF1C and GAP1C. Thus, the potentiation of oncogenicity by Lys63 mutation of c-HaRas appears primarily to be due to the loss of its sensitivity to the two major Ras signal attenuators (NF1 and GAP1). PMID:1362901

  1. Guanylate-Binding Protein 1, an Interferon-Induced GTPase, Exerts an Antiviral Activity against Classical Swine Fever Virus Depending on Its GTPase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lian-Feng; Yu, Jiahui; Li, Yongfeng; Wang, Jinghan; Li, Su; Zhang, Lingkai; Xia, Shui-Li; Yang, Qian; Wang, Xiao; Yu, Shaoxiong; Luo, Yuzi; Sun, Yuan; Zhu, Yan; Munir, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many viruses trigger the type I interferon (IFN) pathway upon infection, resulting in the transcription of hundreds of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), which define the antiviral state of the host. Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative agent of classical swine fever (CSF), a highly contagious viral disease endangering the pig industry in many countries. However, anti-CSFV ISGs are poorly documented. Here we screened 20 ISGs that are commonly induced by type I IFNs against CSFV in lentivirus-delivered cell lines, resulting in the identification of guanylate-binding protein 1 (GBP1) as a potent anti-CSFV ISG. We observed that overexpression of GBP1, an IFN-induced GTPase, remarkably suppressed CSFV replication, whereas knockdown of endogenous GBP1 expression by small interfering RNAs significantly promoted CSFV growth. Furthermore, we demonstrated that GBP1 acted mainly on the early phase of CSFV replication and inhibited the translation efficiency of the internal ribosome entry site of CSFV. In addition, we found that GBP1 was upregulated at the transcriptional level in CSFV-infected PK-15 cells and in various organs of CSFV-infected pigs. Coimmunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown assays revealed that GBP1 interacted with the NS5A protein of CSFV, and this interaction was mapped in the N-terminal globular GTPase domain of GBP1. Interestingly, the K51 of GBP1, which is crucial for its GTPase activity, was essential for the inhibition of CSFV replication. We showed further that the NS5A-GBP1 interaction inhibited GTPase activity, which was critical for its antiviral effect. Taking our findings together, GBP1 is an anti-CSFV ISG whose action depends on its GTPase activity. IMPORTANCE Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative agent of classical swine fever (CSF), an economically important viral disease affecting the pig industry in many countries. To date, only a few host restriction factors against CSFV

  2. Bacterial factors exploit eukaryotic Rho GTPase signaling cascades to promote invasion and proliferation within their host

    PubMed Central

    Popoff, Michel R

    2014-01-01

    Actin cytoskeleton is a main target of many bacterial pathogens. Among the multiple regulation steps of the actin cytoskeleton, bacterial factors interact preferentially with RhoGTPases. Pathogens secrete either toxins which diffuse in the surrounding environment, or directly inject virulence factors into target cells. Bacterial toxins, which interfere with RhoGTPases, and to some extent with RasGTPases, catalyze a covalent modification (ADPribosylation, glucosylation, deamidation, adenylation, proteolysis) blocking these molecules in their active or inactive state, resulting in alteration of epithelial and/or endothelial barriers, which contributes to dissemination of bacteria in the host. Injected bacterial virulence factors preferentially manipulate the RhoGTPase signaling cascade by mimicry of eukaryotic regulatory proteins leading to local actin cytoskeleton rearrangement, which mediates bacterial entry into host cells or in contrast escape to phagocytosis and immune defense. Invasive bacteria can also manipulate RhoGTPase signaling through recognition and stimulation of cell surface receptor(s). Changes in RhoGTPase activation state is sensed by the innate immunity pathways and allows the host cell to adapt an appropriate defense response. PMID:25203748

  3. Assembling the archaeal ribosome: roles for translation-factor-related GTPases.

    PubMed

    Blombach, Fabian; Brouns, Stan J J; van der Oost, John

    2011-01-01

    The assembly of ribosomal subunits from their individual components (rRNA and ribosomal proteins) requires the assistance of a multitude of factors in order to control and increase the efficiency of the assembly process. GTPases of the TRAFAC (translation-factor-related) class constitute a major type of ribosome-assembly factor in Eukaryota and Bacteria. They are thought to aid the stepwise assembly of ribosomal subunits through a 'molecular switch' mechanism that involves conformational changes in response to GTP hydrolysis. Most conserved TRAFAC GTPases are involved in ribosome assembly or other translation-associated processes. They typically interact with ribosomal subunits, but in many cases, the exact role that these GTPases play remains unclear. Previous studies almost exclusively focused on the systems of Bacteria and Eukaryota. Archaea possess several conserved TRAFAC GTPases as well, with some GTPase families being present only in the archaeo-eukaryotic lineage. In the present paper, we review the occurrence of TRAFAC GTPases with translation-associated functions in Archaea.

  4. Quantification of small GTPase glucosylation by clostridial glucosylating toxins using multiplexed MRM analysis.

    PubMed

    Junemann, Johannes; Lämmerhirt, Chantal M; Polten, Felix; Just, Ingo; Gerhard, Ralf; Genth, Harald; Pich, Andreas

    2017-03-02

    Large clostridial toxins (LCT) mono-O-glucosylate small GTPases of the Rho and Ras subfamily. As a result of the glucosylation the GTPases are inhibited and thereby corresponding downstream signaling pathways are disturbed. Current methods for quantifying the extent of glucosylation include sequential [(14) C]glucosylation, sequential [(32) P]ADP-ribosylation and Western Blot detection of non-glucosylated GTPases, with neither method allowing the quantification of the extent of glucosylation of an individual GTPase. Here we describe a novel mass spectrometry based multiplexed MRM-assay to specifically quantify the glucosylation degree of small GTPases. This targeted proteomics approach achieves a high selectivity and reproducibility, which allows determination of the in vivo substrate pattern of glucosylating toxins. As proof of principle, GTPase glucosylation was analyzed in CaCo-2 cells treated with TcdA and glucosylation kinetics were determined for RhoA/B, RhoC, RhoG, Ral, Rap1, Rap2, (H/K/N)Ras, and R-Ras2. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. The small GTPase Arf1 modulates mitochondrial morphology and function.

    PubMed

    Ackema, Karin B; Hench, Jürgen; Böckler, Stefan; Wang, Shyi Chyi; Sauder, Ursula; Mergentaler, Heidi; Westermann, Benedikt; Bard, Frédéric; Frank, Stephan; Spang, Anne

    2014-11-18

    The small GTPase Arf1 plays critical roles in membrane traffic by initiating the recruitment of coat proteins and by modulating the activity of lipid-modifying enzymes. Here, we report an unexpected but evolutionarily conserved role for Arf1 and the ArfGEF GBF1 at mitochondria. Loss of function of ARF-1 or GBF-1 impaired mitochondrial morphology and activity in Caenorhabditis elegans. Similarly, mitochondrial defects were observed in mammalian and yeast cells. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, aberrant clusters of the mitofusin Fzo1 accumulated in arf1-11 mutants and were resolved by overexpression of Cdc48, an AAA-ATPase involved in ER and mitochondria-associated degradation processes. Yeast Arf1 co-fractionated with ER and mitochondrial membranes and interacted genetically with the contact site component Gem1. Furthermore, similar mitochondrial abnormalities resulted from knockdown of either GBF-1 or contact site components in worms, suggesting that the role of Arf1 in mitochondrial functioning is linked to ER-mitochondrial contacts. Thus, Arf1 is involved in mitochondrial homeostasis and dynamics, independent of its role in vesicular traffic.

  6. The role of the small GTPase Rab31 in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Christelle En Lin; Tang, Bor Luen

    2015-01-01

    Members of the small GTPase family Rab are emerging as potentially important factors in cancer development and progression. A good number of Rabs have been implicated or associated with various human cancers, and much recent excitement has been associated with the roles of the Rab11 subfamily member Rab25 and its effector, the Rab coupling protein (RCP), in tumourigenesis and metastasis. In this review, we focus on a Rab5 subfamily member, Rab31, and its implicated role in cancer. Well recognized as a breast cancer marker with good prognostic value, recent findings have provided some insights as to the mechanism underlying Rab31's influence on oncogenesis. Levels of Oestrogen Receptor α (ERα)- responsive Rab31 could be elevated through stabilization of its transcript by the RNA binding protein HuR, or though activation by the oncoprotein mucin1-C (MUC1-C), which forms a transcriptional complex with ERα. Elevated Rab31 stabilizes MUC1-C levels in an auto-inductive loop that could lead to aberrant signalling and gene expression associated with cancer progression. Rab31 and its guanine nucleotide exchange factor GAPex-5 have, however, also been shown to enhance early endosome-late endosome transport and degradation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The multifaceted action and influences of Rab31 in cancer is discussed in the light of its new interacting partners and pathways. PMID:25472813

  7. Distinct yet overlapping roles of Rab GTPases on synaptic vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Pavlos, Nathan J

    2011-01-01

    Exo-endocytotic cycling of synaptic vesicles (SVs) is one of the most intensely studied membrane trafficking pathways. It is governed by sets of conserved proteins including Rab GTPases. Long considered to define the identity and composition of a subcellular organelle, it has become increasingly evident that multiple Rabs co-exist on intracellular compartments, each contributing to its membrane organization and specialised function. Indeed, we have recently demonstrated that at least 11 distinct Rab proteins co-exist on highly purified SVs. These include Rabs involved in exocytosis (Rab3a/b/c and Rab27b) and intermediates of SV recycling such as early endosomes (Rab4, Rab5, Rab10, Rab11b and Rab14). Interestingly, we found that while two of these proteins, namely Rab3a and Rab27b, exhibited differential cycling dynamics on SV membranes; they played complementary roles during Ca2+-triggered neurotransmitter release. The implications of these findings in the SV trafficking cycle are discussed. PMID:21776405

  8. Functions and Functional Domains of the GTPase Cdc42p

    PubMed Central

    Kozminski, Keith G.; Chen, Ann J.; Rodal, Avital A.; Drubin, David G.

    2000-01-01

    Cdc42p, a Rho family GTPase of the Ras superfamily, is a key regulator of cell polarity and morphogenesis in eukaryotes. Using 37 site-directed cdc42 mutants, we explored the functions and interactions of Cdc42p in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cytological and genetic analyses of these cdc42 mutants revealed novel and diverse phenotypes, showing that Cdc42p possesses at least two distinct essential functions and acts as a nodal point of cell polarity regulation in vivo. In addition, mapping the functional data for each cdc42 mutation onto a structural model of the protein revealed as functionally important a surface of Cdc42p that is distinct from the canonical protein-interacting domains (switch I, switch II, and the C terminus) identified previously in members of the Ras superfamily. This region overlaps with a region (α5-helix) recently predicted by structural models to be a specificity determinant for Cdc42p-protein interactions. PMID:10637312

  9. Rit GTPase Signaling Promotes Immature Hippocampal Neuronal Survival

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weikang; Carlson, Shaun W.; Brelsfoard, Jennifer M.; Mannon, Catherine E.; Moncman, Carole L.; Saatman, Kathryn E.; Andres, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms governing the spontaneous recovery seen following brain injury remain elusive, but recent studies indicate that injury-induced stimulation of hippocampal neurogenesis contributes to the repair process. The therapeutic potential of endogenous neurogenesis is tempered by the demonstration that traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in the selective death of adult-born immature neurons, compromising the cell population poised to compensate for trauma-induced neuronal loss. Here, we identify the Ras-related GTPase, Rit, as a critical player in the survival of immature hippocampal neurons following brain injury. While Rit knockout (Rit−/−) did not alter hippocampal development, hippocampal neural cultures derived from Rit−/− mice display increased cell death and blunted MAPK cascade activation in response to oxidative stress, without affecting BDNF-dependent signaling. When compared to wild-type hippocampal cultures, Rit loss rendered immature (Dcx+) neurons susceptible to oxidative damage, without altering the survival of neural progenitor (Nestin+) cells. Oxidative stress is a major contributor to neuronal cell death following brain injury. Consistent with the enhanced vulnerability of cultured Rit−/− immature neurons, Rit−/− mice exhibited a significantly greater loss of adult-born immature neurons within the dentate gyrus after TBI. In addition, post-TBI neuronal remodeling was blunted. Taken together, these data identify a new and unexpected role for Rit in injury-induced neurogenesis, functioning as a selective survival mechanism for immature hippocampal neurons within the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus following TBI. PMID:22815504

  10. Regulation of pancreatic cancer cell migration and invasion by RhoC GTPase and Caveolin-1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Min; DiVito, Melinda M; Merajver, Sofia D; Boyanapalli, Madanamohan; van Golen, Kenneth L

    2005-01-01

    Background In the current study we investigated the role of caveolin-1 (cav-1) in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PC) cell migration and invasion; initial steps in metastasis. Cav-1 is the major structural protein in caveolae; small Ω-shaped invaginations within the plasma membrane. Caveolae are involved in signal transduction, wherein cav-1 acts as a scaffolding protein to organize multiple molecular complexes regulating a variety of cellular events. Recent evidence suggests a role for cav-1 in promoting cancer cell migration, invasion and metastasis; however, the molecular mechanisms have not been described. The small monomeric GTPases are among several molecules which associate with cav-1. Classically, the Rho GTPases control actin cytoskeletal reorganization during cell migration and invasion. RhoC GTPase is overexpressed in aggressive cancers that metastasize and is the predominant GTPase in PC. Like several GTPases, RhoC contains a putative cav-1 binding motif. Results Analysis of 10 PC cell lines revealed high levels of cav-1 expression in lines derived from primary tumors and low expression in those derived from metastases. Comparison of the BxPC-3 (derived from a primary tumor) and HPAF-II (derived from a metastasis) demonstrates a reciprocal relationship between cav-1 expression and p42/p44 Erk activation with PC cell migration, invasion, RhoC GTPase and p38 MAPK activation. Furthermore, inhibition of RhoC or p38 activity in HPAF-II cells leads to partial restoration of cav-1 expression. Conclusion Cav-1 expression inhibits RhoC GTPase activation and subsequent activation of the p38 MAPK pathway in primary PC cells thus restricting migration and invasion. In contrast, loss of cav-1 expression leads to RhoC-mediated migration and invasion in metastatic PC cells. PMID:15969750

  11. Unique Structural and Nucleotide Exchange Features of the Rho1 GTPase of Entamoeba histolytica

    SciTech Connect

    Bosch, Dustin E.; Wittchen, Erika S.; Qiu, Connie; Burridge, Keith; Siderovski, David P.

    2012-08-10

    The single-celled human parasite Entamoeba histolytica possesses a dynamic actin cytoskeleton vital for its intestinal and systemic pathogenicity. The E. histolytica genome encodes several Rho family GTPases known to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics. EhRho1, the first family member identified, was reported to be insensitive to the Rho GTPase-specific Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme, raising the possibility that it may be a misclassified Ras family member. Here, we report the crystal structures of EhRho1 in both active and inactive states. EhRho1 is activated by a conserved switch mechanism, but diverges from mammalian Rho GTPases in lacking a signature Rho insert helix. EhRho1 engages a homolog of mDia, EhFormin1, suggesting a role in mediating serum-stimulated actin reorganization and microtubule formation during mitosis. EhRho1, but not a constitutively active mutant, interacts with a newly identified EhRhoGDI in a prenylation-dependent manner. Furthermore, constitutively active EhRho1 induces actin stress fiber formation in mammalian fibroblasts, thereby identifying it as a functional Rho family GTPase. EhRho1 exhibits a fast rate of nucleotide exchange relative to mammalian Rho GTPases due to a distinctive switch one isoleucine residue reminiscent of the constitutively active F28L mutation in human Cdc42, which for the latter protein, is sufficient for cellular transformation. Nonconserved, nucleotide-interacting residues within EhRho1, revealed by the crystal structure models, were observed to contribute a moderating influence on fast spontaneous nucleotide exchange. Collectively, these observations indicate that EhRho1 is a bona fide member of the Rho GTPase family, albeit with unique structural and functional aspects compared with mammalian Rho GTPases.

  12. Thousands of rab GTPases for the cell biologist.

    PubMed

    Diekmann, Yoan; Seixas, Elsa; Gouw, Marc; Tavares-Cadete, Filipe; Seabra, Miguel C; Pereira-Leal, José B

    2011-10-01

    Rab proteins are small GTPases that act as essential regulators of vesicular trafficking. 44 subfamilies are known in humans, performing specific sets of functions at distinct subcellular localisations and tissues. Rab function is conserved even amongst distant orthologs. Hence, the annotation of Rabs yields functional predictions about the cell biology of trafficking. So far, annotating Rabs has been a laborious manual task not feasible for current and future genomic output of deep sequencing technologies. We developed, validated and benchmarked the Rabifier, an automated bioinformatic pipeline for the identification and classification of Rabs, which achieves up to 90% classification accuracy. We cataloged roughly 8.000 Rabs from 247 genomes covering the entire eukaryotic tree. The full Rab database and a web tool implementing the pipeline are publicly available at www.RabDB.org. For the first time, we describe and analyse the evolution of Rabs in a dataset covering the whole eukaryotic phylogeny. We found a highly dynamic family undergoing frequent taxon-specific expansions and losses. We dated the origin of human subfamilies using phylogenetic profiling, which enlarged the Rab repertoire of the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor with Rab14, 32 and RabL4. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of the Choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis Rab family pinpointed the changes that accompanied the emergence of Metazoan multicellularity, mainly an important expansion and specialisation of the secretory pathway. Lastly, we experimentally establish tissue specificity in expression of mouse Rabs and show that neo-functionalisation best explains the emergence of new human Rab subfamilies. With the Rabifier and RabDB, we provide tools that easily allows non-bioinformaticians to integrate thousands of Rabs in their analyses. RabDB is designed to enable the cell biology community to keep pace with the increasing number of fully-sequenced genomes and change the scale at which we perform

  13. Rac GTPase signaling through the PP5 protein phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Saverio; Darden, Thomas; Erxleben, Christian; Romeo, Charles; Russo, Angela; Martin, Negin; Rossie, Sandra; Armstrong, David L.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the Rac-dependent mechanism of KCNH2 channel stimulation by thyroid hormone in a rat pituitary cell line, GH4C1, with the patch-clamp technique. Here we present physiological evidence for the protein serine/threonine phosphatase, PP5, as an effector of Rac GTPase signaling. We also propose and test a specific molecular mechanism for PP5 stimulation by Rac-GTP. Inhibition of PP5 with the microbial toxin, okadaic acid, blocked channel stimulation by thyroid hormone and by Rac, but signaling was restored by expression of a toxin-insensitive mutant of PP5, Y451A, which we engineered. PP5 is unique among protein phosphatases in that it contains an N-terminal regulatory domain with three tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) that inhibit its activity. Expression of the TPR domain coupled to GFP blocked channel stimulation by the thyroid hormone. We also show that the published structures of the PP5 TPR domain and the TPR domain of p67, the Rac-binding subunit of NADPH oxidase, superimpose over 92 α carbons. Mutation of the PP5 TPR domain at two predicted contact points with Rac-GTP prevents the TPR domain from functioning as a dominant negative and blocks the ability of Y451A to rescue signaling in the presence of okadaic acid. PP5 stimulation by Rac provides a unique molecular mechanism for the antagonism of Rho-dependent signaling through protein kinases in many cellular processes, including metastasis, immune cell chemotaxis, and neuronal development. PMID:16549782

  14. Dynamin GTPase Regulation is Altered by PH Domain Mutations Found in Centronuclear Myopathy Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kenniston, J.; Lemmon, M

    2010-01-01

    The large GTPase dynamin has an important membrane scission function in receptor-mediated endocytosis and other cellular processes. Self-assembly on phosphoinositide-containing membranes stimulates dynamin GTPase activity, which is crucial for its function. Although the pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain is known to mediate phosphoinositide binding by dynamin, it remains unclear how this promotes activation. Here, we describe studies of dynamin PH domain mutations found in centronuclear myopathy (CNM) that increase dynamin's GTPase activity without altering phosphoinositide binding. CNM mutations in the PH domain C-terminal {alpha}-helix appear to cause conformational changes in dynamin that alter control of the GTP hydrolysis cycle. These mutations either 'sensitize' dynamin to lipid stimulation or elevate basal GTPase rates by promoting self-assembly and thus rendering dynamin no longer lipid responsive. We also describe a low-resolution structure of dimeric dynamin from small-angle X-ray scattering that reveals conformational changes induced by CNM mutations, and defines requirements for domain rearrangement upon dynamin self-assembly at membrane surfaces. Our data suggest that changes in the PH domain may couple lipid binding to dynamin GTPase activation at sites of vesicle invagination.

  15. The evolutionarily dynamic IFN-inducible GTPase proteins play conserved immune functions in vertebrates and cephalochordates.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; Zhang, Juyong; Sun, Yi; Wang, Hua; Wang, Yiquan

    2009-07-01

    Interferon (IFN)-inducible GTPases currently include four families of proteins: myxovirus resistant proteins (Mxs), guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), immunity-related GTPase proteins (IRGs), and very large inducible GTPase proteins (VLIGs). They are all under conserved regulation by IFNs in humans and mice and play a critical role in preventing microbial infections. However, differences between vertebrates are poorly characterized, and their evolutionary origins have not been studied in detail. In this study, we performed comparative genomic analysis of the four families in 18 representative animals that yielded several unexpected results. Firstly, we found that Mx, GBP, and IRG protein families arose before the divergence of chordate subphyla, but VLIG emerged solely in vertebrates. Secondly, IRG, GBP, and VLIG families have experienced a high rate of gene gain and loss during the evolution, with the GBP family being lost entirely in two pufferfish and VLIG family lost in primates and carnivores. Thirdly, the regulation of these genes by IFNs is highly conserved throughout vertebrates although the VLIG protein sequences in fish have lost the first 870 amino acid residues. Finally, amphioxus IFN-inducible GTPase genes are all highly expressed in immune-related organs such as gill, liver, and intestine and are upregulated after challenge with PolyI:C and pathogens, although no IFNs or their receptors were detected in the current amphioxus genome database. These results suggest that IFN-inducible GTPase genes play conserved immune functions both in vertebrates and in cephalochordates.

  16. Molecular imaging analysis of Rab GTPases in the regulation of phagocytosis and macropinocytosis.

    PubMed

    Egami, Youhei

    2016-01-01

    Phagocytosis and macropinocytosis, actin-dependent endocytic pathways that mediate the uptake of particles and fluid, respectively, are fundamental routes that enable cells to sample their environment, eliminate pathogens and endogenous cell debris, and contribute to immunoprotection and the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. These processes require a well-organized network of actin cytoskeletal remodeling and membrane transport, which are spatiotemporally regulated by small GTPases. The Rab family of small GTPases, which functions as molecular switches, plays central roles in intracellular membrane trafficking. Although multiple Rab proteins are localized to phagosomes and regulate phagosome maturation, the precise role of each Rab family member in Fcγ receptor (FcγR)-mediated phagocytosis is not fully characterized. Recently, we revealed that Rab35 and Rab20 are important regulators of phagosome formation and maturation, respectively. This review summarizes the functional implication of these Rab GTPases during FcγR-mediated phagocytosis in macrophages. Currently, compared with our knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms of receptor-mediated endocytosis including phagocytosis, the molecular components and signaling cascades of macropinocytosis remain poorly elucidated. Our time-lapse imaging showed that several Rab GTPases are sequentially recruited to the membrane of macropinosomes. Based on our observations, these findings regarding the spatiotemporal localization of Rab GTPases during macropinocytosis are introduced.

  17. Elevated Intraocular Pressure Induces Rho GTPase Mediated Contractile Signaling in the Trabecular Meshwork

    PubMed Central

    Pattabiraman, Padmanabhan P; Inoue, Toshihiro; Rao, P. Vasantha

    2015-01-01

    Rho GTPase regulated contractile signaling in the trabecular meshwork (TM) has been shown to modulate aqueous humor (AH) outflow and intraocular pressure (IOP). To explore whether elevated IOP, a major risk factor for primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) influences Rho GTPase signaling in the TM, we recorded AH outflow in enucleated contralateral porcine eyes perfused for 4–5 hours at either 15 mm or 50 mm Hg pressure. After perfusion, TM tissue extracted from perfused eyes was evaluated for the activation status of Rho GTPase, myosin light chain (MLC), myosin phosphatase target substrate 1 (MYPT1), myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS) and paxillin. Eyes perfused at 50 mm Hg exhibited a significant decrease in AH outflow facility compared with those perfused at 15 mm Hg. Additionally, TM tissue from eyes perfused at 50 mm Hg revealed significantly increased levels of activated RhoA and phosphorylated MLC, MYPT1, MARCKS and paxillin compared to TM tissue derived from eyes perfused at 15 mm Hg. Taken together, these observations indicate that elevated IOP-induced activation of Rho GTPase-dependent contractile signaling in the TM is associated with increased resistance to AH outflow through the trabecular pathway, and demonstrate the sensitivity of Rho GTPase signaling to mechanical force in the AH outflow pathway. PMID:25956210

  18. Interferon-inducible GTPase: a novel viral response protein involved in rabies virus infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Wang, Hualei; Jin, Hongli; Cao, Zengguo; Feng, Na; Zhao, Yongkun; Zheng, Xuexing; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Qian; Zhao, Guoxing; Yan, Feihu; Wang, Lina; Wang, Tiecheng; Gao, Yuwei; Tu, Changchun; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-05-01

    Rabies virus infection is a major public health concern because of its wide host-interference spectrum and nearly 100 % lethality. However, the interactions between host and virus remain unclear. To decipher the authentic response in the central nervous system after rabies virus infection, a dynamic analysis of brain proteome alteration was performed. In this study, 104 significantly differentially expressed proteins were identified, and intermediate filament, interferon-inducible GTPases, and leucine-rich repeat-containing protein 16C were the three outstanding groups among these proteins. Interferon-inducible GTPases were prominent because of their strong upregulation. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR showed distinct upregulation of interferon-inducible GTPases at the level of transcription. Several studies have shown that interferon-inducible GTPases are involved in many biological processes, such as viral infection, endoplasmic reticulum stress response, and autophagy. These findings indicate that interferon-inducible GTPases are likely to be a potential target involved in rabies pathogenesis or the antiviral process.

  19. Human Lsg1 defines a family of essential GTPases that correlates with the evolution of compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Reynaud, Emmanuel G; Andrade, Miguel A; Bonneau, Fabien; Ly, Thi Bach Nga; Knop, Michael; Scheffzek, Klaus; Pepperkok, Rainer

    2005-01-01

    Background Compartmentalization is a key feature of eukaryotic cells, but its evolution remains poorly understood. GTPases are the oldest enzymes that use nucleotides as substrates and they participate in a wide range of cellular processes. Therefore, they are ideal tools for comparative genomic studies aimed at understanding how aspects of biological complexity such as cellular compartmentalization evolved. Results We describe the identification and characterization of a unique family of circularly permuted GTPases represented by the human orthologue of yeast Lsg1p. We placed the members of this family in the phylogenetic context of the YlqF Related GTPase (YRG) family, which are present in Eukarya, Bacteria and Archea and include the stem cell regulator Nucleostemin. To extend the computational analysis, we showed that hLsg1 is an essential GTPase predominantly located in the endoplasmic reticulum and, in some cells, in Cajal bodies in the nucleus. Comparison of localization and siRNA datasets suggests that all members of the family are essential GTPases that have increased in number as the compartmentalization of the eukaryotic cell and the ribosome biogenesis pathway have evolved. Conclusion We propose a scenario, consistent with our data, for the evolution of this family: cytoplasmic components were first acquired, followed by nuclear components, and finally the mitochondrial and chloroplast elements were derived from different bacterial species, in parallel with the formation of the nucleolus and the specialization of nuclear components. PMID:16209721

  20. Computer vision profiling of neurite outgrowth dynamics reveals spatiotemporal modularity of Rho GTPase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Ludovico; Lefort, Riwal; Smith, Kevin; Benmansour, Fethallah; Gonzalez, German; Barillari, Caterina; Rinn, Bernd; Fleuret, Francois; Fua, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Rho guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) control the cytoskeletal dynamics that power neurite outgrowth. This process consists of dynamic neurite initiation, elongation, retraction, and branching cycles that are likely to be regulated by specific spatiotemporal signaling networks, which cannot be resolved with static, steady-state assays. We present NeuriteTracker, a computer-vision approach to automatically segment and track neuronal morphodynamics in time-lapse datasets. Feature extraction then quantifies dynamic neurite outgrowth phenotypes. We identify a set of stereotypic neurite outgrowth morphodynamic behaviors in a cultured neuronal cell system. Systematic RNA interference perturbation of a Rho GTPase interactome consisting of 219 proteins reveals a limited set of morphodynamic phenotypes. As proof of concept, we show that loss of function of two distinct RhoA-specific GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) leads to opposite neurite outgrowth phenotypes. Imaging of RhoA activation dynamics indicates that both GAPs regulate different spatiotemporal Rho GTPase pools, with distinct functions. Our results provide a starting point to dissect spatiotemporal Rho GTPase signaling networks that regulate neurite outgrowth. PMID:26728857

  1. Rho GTPases control specific cytoskeleton-dependent functions of hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Ramesh C.; Chang, Kyung-Hee; Vaitinadin, Nataraja-Sarma; Cancelas, Jose A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The Rho family of guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) is composed of members of the Ras superfamily of proteins. They are GTP-bound molecules with a modest intrinsic GTPase activity that can be accelerated upon activation/localization of specialized guanine nucleotide exchange factors. Members of this family act as molecular switches and are required for coordinated cytoskeletal rearrangements that are crucial in a set of specialized functions of mammalian stem cells. These functions include self-renewal, adhesion, and migration. Mouse gene-targeting studies have provided convincing evidence of the indispensable and dispensable roles of individual members of the Rho GTPase family and the putative upstream and downstream mediators in stem cell-specific functions. The role of Rho GTPases and related signaling pathways previously seen in other cell types and organisms have been confirmed in mammalian hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), and new signaling pathways and unexpected functions unique to HSCs have been identified and dissected. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of Rho family of GTPases on HSC and progenitor activity through cytoskeleton-mediated signaling pathways, providing insight on relevant signaling pathways that regulate mammalian stem cell self-renewal, adhesion, and migration. PMID:24117826

  2. Enucleation of cultured mouse fetal erythroblasts requires Rac GTPases and mDia2.

    PubMed

    Ji, Peng; Jayapal, Senthil Raja; Lodish, Harvey F

    2008-03-01

    Mammalian erythroid cells undergo enucleation, an asymmetric cell division involving extrusion of a pycnotic nucleus enveloped by the plasma membrane. The mechanisms that power and regulate the enucleation process have remained obscure. Here, we show that deregulation of Rac GTPase during a late stage of erythropoiesis completely blocks enucleation of cultured mouse fetal erythroblasts without affecting their proliferation or differentiation. Formation of the contractile actin ring (CAR) on the plasma membrane of enucleating erythroblasts was disrupted by inhibition of Rac GTPases. Furthermore, we demonstrate that mDia2, a downstream effector of Rho GTPases and a formin protein required for nucleation of unbranched actin filaments, is also required for enucleation of mouse fetal erythroblasts. We show that Rac1 and Rac2 bind to mDia2 in a GTP-dependent manner and that downregulation of mDia2, but not mDia1, by small interfering RNA (siRNA) during the late stages of erythropoiesis blocked both CAR formation and erythroblast enucleation. Additionally, overexpression of a constitutively active mutant of mDia2 rescued the enucleation defects induced by the inhibition of Rac GTPases. These results reveal important roles for Rac GTPases and their effector mDia2 in enucleation of mammalian erythroblasts.

  3. Rab GTPases: The Key Players in the Molecular Pathway of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Meng-meng; Shi, Chang-he; Xu, Yu-ming

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive movement disorder with multiple non-motor symptoms. Although family genetic mutations only account for a small proportion of the cases, these mutations have provided several lines of evidence for the pathogenesis of PD, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, protein misfolding and aggregation, and the impaired autophagy-lysosome system. Recently, vesicle trafficking defect has emerged as a potential pathogenesis underlying this disease. Rab GTPases, serving as the core regulators of cellular membrane dynamics, may play an important role in the molecular pathway of PD through the complex interplay with numerous factors and PD-related genes. This might shed new light on the potential therapeutic strategies. In this review, we emphasize the important role of Rab GTPases in vesicle trafficking and summarize the interactions between Rab GTPases and different PD-related genes.

  4. New insights into Rho signaling from plant ROP/Rac GTPases.

    PubMed

    Craddock, Christian; Lavagi, Irene; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2012-09-01

    In animal and plant cells, a wide range of key cellular processes that require the establishment of cell polarity are governed by Rho-GTPases. In contrast to animals and yeast, however, plants possess a single Rho-GTPase subfamily called Rho-like GTPases from plants (ROPs). This raises the question of how plants achieve the high level of regulation required for polar cellular processes. It is becoming evident that plants have evolved specific regulators, including ROP-Guanine Exchange Factors (GEFs) and the Rop-interactive CRIB motif-containing protein (RIC) effectors. Recent research shows that the spatiotemporal dynamics of ROPs, the cytoskeleton, endocytosis, and exocytosis are intertwined. This review focuses on the proposed self-organizing nature of ROPs in plants and how ROP-mediated cellular mechanisms compare with those responsible for cell polarity in animals and yeast.

  5. RhoGTPases as Key Players in Mammalian Cell Adaptation to Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Deroanne, Christophe; Nusgens, Betty; Vico, Laurence; Guignandon, Alain

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of studies are revealing that cells reorganize their cytoskeleton when exposed to conditions of microgravity. Most, if not all, of the structural changes observed on flown cells can be explained by modulation of RhoGTPases, which are mechanosensitive switches responsible for cytoskeletal dynamics control. This review identifies general principles defining cell sensitivity to gravitational stresses. We discuss what is known about changes in cell shape, nucleus, and focal adhesions and try to establish the relationship with specific RhoGTPase activities. We conclude by considering the potential relevance of live imaging of RhoGTPase activity or cytoskeletal structures in order to enhance our understanding of cell adaptation to microgravity-related conditions. PMID:25649831

  6. Recognition and activation of Rho GTPases by Vav1 and Vav2 guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jongyun; Thapar, Roopa; Campbell, Sharon L

    2005-05-03

    Vav proteins are Rho GTPase-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that are distinguished by the tandem arrangement of Dbl homology (DH), Pleckstrin homology (PH), and cysteine rich domains (CRD). Whereas the tandem DH-PH arrangement is conserved among Rho GEFs, the presence of the CRD is unique to Vav family members and is required for efficient nucleotide exchange. We provide evidence that Vav2-mediated nucleotide exchange of Rho GTPases follows the Theorell-Chance mechanism in which the Vav2.Rho GTPase complex is the major species during the exchange process and the Vav2.GDP-Mg(2+).Rho GTPase ternary complex is present only transiently. The GTPase specificity for the DH-PH-CRD Vav2 in vitro follows this order: Rac1 > Cdc42 > RhoA. Results obtained from fluorescence anisotropy and NMR chemical shift mapping experiments indicate that the isolated Vav1 CRD is capable of directly associating with Rac1, and residues K116 and S83 that are in the proximity of the P-loop and the guanine base either are part of this binding interface or undergo a conformational change in response to CRD binding. The NMR studies are supported by kinetic measurements on Rac1 mutants S83A, K116A, and K116Q and Vav2 CRD mutant K533A in that these mutants affect both the initial binding event of Vav2 with Rac1 (k(on)) and the rate-limiting dissociation of Vav2 from the Vav2.Rac1 binary complex (thereby influencing the enzyme turnover number, k(cat)). The results suggest that the CRD domain in Vav proteins plays an active role, affecting both the k(on) and the k(cat) for Vav-mediated nucleotide exchange on Rho GTPases.

  7. Functional interaction of Parkinson's disease-associated LRRK2 with members of the dynamin GTPase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Stafa, Klodjan; Tsika, Elpida; Moser, Roger; Musso, Alessandra; Glauser, Liliane; Jones, Amy; Biskup, Saskia; Xiong, Yulan; Bandopadhyay, Rina; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Moore, Darren J.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in LRRK2 cause autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 encodes a multi-domain protein containing GTPase and kinase domains, and putative protein–protein interaction domains. Familial PD mutations alter the GTPase and kinase activity of LRRK2 in vitro. LRRK2 is suggested to regulate a number of cellular pathways although the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. To explore such mechanisms, it has proved informative to identify LRRK2-interacting proteins, some of which serve as LRRK2 kinase substrates. Here, we identify common interactions of LRRK2 with members of the dynamin GTPase superfamily. LRRK2 interacts with dynamin 1–3 that mediate membrane scission in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and with dynamin-related proteins that mediate mitochondrial fission (Drp1) and fusion (mitofusins and OPA1). LRRK2 partially co-localizes with endosomal dynamin-1 or with mitofusins and OPA1 at mitochondrial membranes. The subcellular distribution and oligomeric complexes of dynamin GTPases are not altered by modulating LRRK2 in mouse brain, whereas mature OPA1 levels are reduced in G2019S PD brains. LRRK2 enhances mitofusin-1 GTP binding, whereas dynamin-1 and OPA1 serve as modest substrates of LRRK2-mediated phosphorylation in vitro. While dynamin GTPase orthologs are not required for LRRK2-induced toxicity in yeast, LRRK2 functionally interacts with dynamin-1 and mitofusin-1 in cultured neurons. LRRK2 attenuates neurite shortening induced by dynamin-1 by reducing its levels, whereas LRRK2 rescues impaired neurite outgrowth induced by mitofusin-1 potentially by reversing excessive mitochondrial fusion. Our study elucidates novel functional interactions of LRRK2 with dynamin-superfamily GTPases that implicate LRRK2 in the regulation of membrane dynamics important for endocytosis and mitochondrial morphology. PMID:24282027

  8. Small interfering RNAs as a tool to assign Rho GTPase exchange-factor function in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Gampel, Alexandra; Mellor, Harry

    2002-01-01

    Rho GTPases control a complex network of intracellular signalling pathways. Whereas progress has been made in identifying downstream signalling partners for these proteins, the characterization of Rho upstream regulatory guanine-nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) has been hampered by a lack of suitable research tools. Here we use small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to examine the cellular regulation of the RhoB GTPase, and show that RhoB is activated downstream of the epidermal-growth-factor receptor through the Vav2 exchange factor. These studies demonstrate that siRNAs are an ideal research tool for the assignment of Rho GEF function in vivo. PMID:12113653

  9. Critical roles for Rac1 and Rac2 GTPases in B cell development and signaling.

    PubMed

    Walmsley, Marita J; Ooi, Steen K T; Reynolds, Lucinda F; Smith, Susan Harless; Ruf, Sandra; Mathiot, Anne; Vanes, Lesley; Williams, David A; Cancro, Michael P; Tybulewicz, Victor L J

    2003-10-17

    The Rac1 guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) has been implicated in multiple cellular functions, including actin dynamics, proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, and migration resulting from signaling by multiple receptors, including the B cell antigen receptor (BCR). We used conditional gene targeting to generate mice with specific Rac1 deficiency in the B cell lineage. In the absence of both Rac1 and the highly related Rac2, B cell development was almost completely blocked. Both GTPases were required to transduce BCR signals leading to proliferation, survival and up-regulation of BAFF-R, a receptor for BAFF, a key survival molecule required for B cell development and maintenance.

  10. Rem, a member of the RGK GTPases, inhibits recombinant CaV1.2 channels using multiple mechanisms that require distinct conformations of the GTPase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tingting; Xu, Xianghua; Kernan, Timothy; Wu, Vincent; Colecraft, Henry M

    2010-05-15

    Rad/Rem/Gem/Kir (RGK) GTPases potently inhibit Ca(V)1 and Ca(V)2 (Ca(V)1-2) channels, a paradigm of ion channel regulation by monomeric G-proteins with significant physiological ramifications and potential biotechnology applications. The mechanism(s) underlying how RGK proteins inhibit I(Ca) is unknown, and it is unclear how key structural and regulatory properties of these GTPases (such as the role of GTP binding to the nucleotide binding domain (NBD), and the C-terminus which contains a membrane-targeting motif) feature in this effect. Here, we show that Rem inhibits Ca(V)1.2 channels by three independent mechanisms that rely on distinct configurations of the GTPase: (1) a reduction in surface density of channels is accomplished by enhancing dynamin-dependent endocytosis, (2) a diminution of channel open probability (P(o)) that occurs without impacting on voltage sensor movement, and (3) an immobilization of Ca(V) channel voltage sensors. The presence of both the Rem NBD and C-terminus (whether membrane-targeted or not) in one molecule is sufficient to reconstitute all three mechanisms. However, membrane localization of the NBD by a generic membrane-targeting module reconstitutes only the decreased P(o) function (mechanism 2). A point mutation that prevents GTP binding to the NBD selectively eliminates the capacity to immobilize voltage sensors (mechanism 3). The results reveal an uncommon multiplicity in the mechanisms Rem uses to inhibit I(Ca), predict new physiological dimensions of the RGK GTPase-Ca(V) channel crosstalk, and suggest original approaches for developing novel Ca(V) channel blockers.

  11. YphC and YsxC GTPases assist the maturation of the central protuberance, GTPase associated region and functional core of the 50S ribosomal subunit

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Xiaodan; Davis, Joseph H.; Jain, Nikhil; Razi, Aida; Benlekbir, Samir; McArthur, Andrew G.; Rubinstein, John L.; Britton, Robert A.; Williamson, James R.; Ortega, Joaquin

    2016-01-01

    YphC and YsxC are GTPases in Bacillus subtilis that facilitate the assembly of the 50S ribosomal subunit, however their roles in this process are still uncharacterized. To explore their function, we used strains in which the only copy of the yphC or ysxC genes were under the control of an inducible promoter. Under depletion conditions, they accumulated incomplete ribosomal subunits that we named 45SYphC and 44.5SYsxC particles. Quantitative mass spectrometry analysis and the 5–6 Å resolution cryo-EM maps of the 45SYphC and 44.5SYsxC particles revealed that the two GTPases participate in the maturation of the central protuberance, GTPase associated region and key RNA helices in the A, P and E functional sites of the 50S subunit. We observed that YphC and YsxC bind specifically to the two immature particles, suggesting that they represent either on-pathway intermediates or that their structure has not significantly diverged from that of the actual substrate. These results describe the nature of these immature particles, a widely used tool to study the assembly process of the ribosome. They also provide the first insights into the function of YphC and YsxC in 50S subunit assembly and are consistent with this process occurring through multiple parallel pathways, as it has been described for the 30S subunit. PMID:27484475

  12. Role of Nucleotide Binding and GTPase Domain Dimerization in Dynamin-like Myxovirus Resistance Protein A for GTPase Activation and Antiviral Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Alexej; Graf, Laura; Olal, Daniel; von der Malsburg, Alexander; Gao, Song; Kochs, Georg; Daumke, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Myxovirus resistance (Mx) GTPases are induced by interferon and inhibit multiple viruses, including influenza and human immunodeficiency viruses. They have the characteristic domain architecture of dynamin-related proteins with an N-terminal GTPase (G) domain, a bundle signaling element, and a C-terminal stalk responsible for self-assembly and effector functions. Human MxA (also called MX1) is expressed in the cytoplasm and is partly associated with membranes of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum. It shows a protein concentration-dependent increase in GTPase activity, indicating regulation of GTP hydrolysis via G domain dimerization. Here, we characterized a panel of G domain mutants in MxA to clarify the role of GTP binding and the importance of the G domain interface for the catalytic and antiviral function of MxA. Residues in the catalytic center of MxA and the nucleotide itself were essential for G domain dimerization and catalytic activation. In pulldown experiments, MxA recognized Thogoto virus nucleocapsid proteins independently of nucleotide binding. However, both nucleotide binding and hydrolysis were required for the antiviral activity against Thogoto, influenza, and La Crosse viruses. We further demonstrate that GTP binding facilitates formation of stable MxA assemblies associated with endoplasmic reticulum membranes, whereas nucleotide hydrolysis promotes dynamic redistribution of MxA from cellular membranes to viral targets. Our study highlights the role of nucleotide binding and hydrolysis for the intracellular dynamics of MxA during its antiviral action. PMID:25829498

  13. Toward understanding RhoGTPase specificity: structure, function and local activation

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Antje; Reinhard, Nathalie R; Hordijk, Peter L

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion and migration are regulated through the concerted action of cytoskeletal dynamics and adhesion proteins, the activity of which is governed by RhoGTPases. Specific RhoGTPase signaling requires spatio-temporal activation and coordination of subsequent protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions. The nature, location and duration of these interactions are dependent on polarized extracellular triggers, such as cell-cell contact, and intracellular modifying events, such as phosphorylation. RhoA, RhoB, and RhoC are highly homologous GTPases that, however, succeed in generating specific intracellular responses. Here, we discuss the key features that contribute to this specificity. These not only include the well-studied switch regions, the conformation of which is nucleotide-dependent, but also additional regions and seemingly small differences in primary sequence that also contribute to specific interactions. These differences translate into differential surface charge distribution, local exposure of amino acid side-chains and isoform-specific post-translational modifications. The available evidence supports the notion that multiple regions in RhoA/B/C cooperate to provide specificity in binding to regulators and effectors. These specific interactions are highly regulated in time and space. We therefore subsequently discuss current approaches means to visualize and analyze localized GTPase activation using biosensors that allow imaging of isoform-specific, localized regulation. PMID:25483298

  14. Specific interactions of Mss4 with members of the Rab GTPase subfamily.

    PubMed

    Burton, J L; Burns, M E; Gatti, E; Augustine, G J; De Camilli, P

    1994-12-01

    Mss4 is a mammalian protein that was identified as a suppressor of a yeast secretory mutant harboring a mutation in the GTPase Sec4 and was found to stimulate GDP release from this protein. We have now performed a biochemical characterization of the Mss4 protein and examined the specificity of its association with mammalian GTPases. Mss4 is primarily a soluble protein with a widespread tissue distribution. Recombinant Mss4 binds GTPases present in tissue extracts, and by a gel overlay assay binds specifically Rab Rab10proteins. We further define the Mss4-GTPase interaction to a subset of Rabs belonging to the same subfamily branch which include Rab1, Rab3, Rab8, Rab10, Sec4 and Ypt1 but not Rab2, Rab4, Rab5, Rab6, Rab9 and Rab11. Accordingly, Mss4 co-precipitates from a brain extract with Rab3a but not Rab5. Mss4 only stimulates GDP release from, and the association of GTP gamma S with, this Rab subset. Recombinant Mss4 and Rab3a form a stable complex in solution that is dissociated with either GDP or GTP gamma S. Injection of Mss4 into the squid giant nerve terminal enhances neurotransmitter release. These results suggest that Mss4 behaves as a guanylnucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for a subset of Rabs to influence distinct vesicular transport steps along the secretory pathway.

  15. Distinct actions of Rab3 and Rab27 GTPases on late stages of exocytosis of insulin.

    PubMed

    Cazares, Victor A; Subramani, Arasakumar; Saldate, Johnny J; Hoerauf, Widmann; Stuenkel, Edward L

    2014-09-01

    Rab GTPases associated with insulin-containing secretory granules (SGs) are key in targeting, docking and assembly of molecular complexes governing pancreatic β-cell exocytosis. Four Rab3 isoforms along with Rab27A are associated with insulin granules, yet elucidation of the distinct roles of these Rab families on exocytosis remains unclear. To define specific actions of these Rab families we employ Rab3GAP and/or EPI64A GTPase-activating protein overexpression in β-cells from wild-type or Ashen mice to selectively transit the entire Rab3 family or Rab27A to a GDP-bound state. Ashen mice carry a spontaneous mutation that eliminates Rab27A expression. Using membrane capacitance measurements we find that GTP/GDP nucleotide cycling of Rab27A is essential for generation of the functionally defined immediately releasable pool (IRP) and central to regulating the size of the readily releasable pool (RRP). By comparison, nucleotide cycling of Rab3 GTPases, but not of Rab27A, is essential for a kinetically rapid filling of the RRP with SGs. Aside from these distinct functions, Rab3 and Rab27A GTPases demonstrate considerable functional overlap in building the readily releasable granule pool. Hence, while Rab3 and Rab27A cooperate to generate release-ready SGs in β-cells, they also direct unique kinetic and functional properties of the exocytotic pathway.

  16. Human GTPases associate with RNA polymerase II to mediate its nuclear import.

    PubMed

    Carré, Clément; Shiekhattar, Ramin

    2011-10-01

    Small GTPases share a biochemical mechanism and act as binary molecular switches. One important function of small GTPases in the cell is nucleocytoplasmic transport of both proteins and RNA. Here, we show the stable association of human GPN1 and GPN3, small GTPases related to Ran, with RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) isolated from either the cytoplasmic or nuclear fraction. GPN1 and GPN3 directly interact with RNAPII subunit 7 (RPB7)/RPB4 and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNAPII. Depletion of GPN1 or GPN3 using small interfering RNAs led to decreased RNAPII levels in the nucleus and an accumulation of this enzyme in the cytoplasm of human cells. Furthermore, isolation of a GPN1/GPN3/RNAPII complex from stable cell lines expressing a dominant negative GPN1 harboring mutations in the GTP-binding pocket demonstrated a role for these proteins in nuclear import of RNAPII. Thus, GPN1/GPN3 define a new family of small GTPases that are specialized for the transport of RNA polymerase II into the nucleus.

  17. Small GTPases and phosphoinositides in the regulatory mechanisms of macropinosome formation and maturation

    PubMed Central

    Egami, Youhei; Taguchi, Tomohiko; Maekawa, Masashi; Arai, Hiroyuki; Araki, Nobukazu

    2014-01-01

    Macropinosome formation requires the sequential activation of numerous signaling pathways that coordinate the actin-driven formation of plasma membrane protrusions (ruffles) and circular ruffles (macropinocytic cups), followed by the closure of these macropinocytic cups into macropinosomes. In the process of macropinosome formation, localized productions of phosphoinositides such as PI(4,5)P2 and PI(3,4,5)P3 spatiotemporally orchestrate actin polymerization and rearrangement through recruiting and activating a variety of actin-associated proteins. In addition, the sequential activation of small GTPases, which are known to be master regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, plays a pivotal role in parallel with phosphoinositides. To complete macropinosome formation, phosphoinositide breakdown and Rho GTPase deactivation must occur in appropriate timings. After the nascent macropinosomes are formed, phosphoinositides and several Rab GTPases control macropinosome maturation by regulating vesicle trafficking and membrane fusion. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the critical functions of phosphoinositide metabolism and small GTPases in association with their downstream effectors in macropinocytosis. PMID:25324782

  18. Nucleotide Dependent Switching in Rho GTPase: Conformational Heterogeneity and Competing Molecular Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kumawat, Amit; Chakrabarty, Suman; Kulkarni, Kiran

    2017-01-01

    Ras superfamily of GTPases regulate myriad cellular processes through a conserved nucleotide (GTP/GDP) dependent switching mechanism. Unlike Ras family of GTPases, for the Rho GTPases, there is no clear evidence for the existence of “sub-states” such as state 1 & state 2 in the GTP bound form. To explore the nucleotide dependent conformational space of the Switch I loop and also to look for existence of state 1 like conformations in Rho GTPases, atomistic molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations on RhoA were performed. These studies demonstrate that both the nucleotide-free state and the GDP bound “OFF” state have very similar conformations, whereas the GTP bound “ON” state has unique conformations with signatures of two intermediate states. The conformational free energy landscape for these systems suggests the presence of multiple intermediate states. Interestingly, the energetic penalty of exposing the non-polar residues in the GTP bound form is counter balanced by the favourable hydrogen bonded interactions between the γ-phosphate group of GTP with the highly conserved Tyr34 and Thr37 residues. These competing molecular interactions lead to a tuneable energy landscape of the Switch I conformation, which can undergo significant changes based on the local environment including changes upon binding to effectors. PMID:28374773

  19. RhoBTB3: A Rho GTPase-family ATPase required for endosome to Golgi transport

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Eric J.; Calero, Monica; Sridevi, Khambhampaty; Pfeffer, Suzanne R.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Rho GTPases are key regulators of the actin-based cytoskeleton; Rab GTPases are key regulators of membrane traffic. We report here that the atypical Rho GTPase family member, RhoBTB3, binds directly to Rab9 GTPase, and functions with Rab9 in protein transport from endosomes to the trans Golgi network. Gene replacement experiments show that RhoBTB3 function in cultured cells requires both RhoBTB3’s N-terminal, Rho-related domain, and C-terminal sequences that are important for Rab9 interaction.9 Biochemical analysis reveals that RhoBTB3 binds and hydrolyzes ATP rather than GTP. Rab9 binding opens the auto-inhibited RhoBTB3 protein to permit maximal ATP hydroysis. Because RhoBTB3 interacts with TIP47 on membranes, we propose that it may function to release this cargo selection protein from vesicles to permit their efficient docking and fusion at the Golgi. PMID:19490898

  20. Activation of G Proteins by Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors Relies on GTPase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Rob J.; Thomas, Geraint M. H.

    2016-01-01

    G proteins are an important family of signalling molecules controlled by guanine nucleotide exchange and GTPase activity in what is commonly called an ‘activation/inactivation cycle’. The molecular mechanism by which guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) catalyse the activation of monomeric G proteins is well-established, however the complete reversibility of this mechanism is often overlooked. Here, we use a theoretical approach to prove that GEFs are unable to positively control G protein systems at steady-state in the absence of GTPase activity. Instead, positive regulation of G proteins must be seen as a product of the competition between guanine nucleotide exchange and GTPase activity—emphasising a central role for GTPase activity beyond merely signal termination. We conclude that a more accurate description of the regulation of G proteins via these processes is as a ‘balance/imbalance’ mechanism. This result has implications for the understanding of intracellular signalling processes, and for experimental strategies that rely on modulating G protein systems. PMID:26986850

  1. Small GTPases and Stress Responses of vvran1 in the Straw Mushroom Volvariella volvacea

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jun-Jie; Xie, Bin; Zhang, Lei; Li, Shao-Jie; van Peer, Arend F.; Wu, Ta-Ju; Chen, Bing-Zhi; Xie, Bao-Gui

    2016-01-01

    Small GTPases play important roles in the growth, development and environmental responses of eukaryotes. Based on the genomic sequence of the straw mushroom Volvariella volvacea, 44 small GTPases were identified. A clustering analysis using human small GTPases as the references revealed that V. volvacea small GTPases can be grouped into five families: nine are in the Ras family, 10 are in the Rho family, 15 are in the Rab family, one is in the Ran family and nine are in the Arf family. The transcription of vvran1 was up-regulated upon hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) stress, and could be repressed by diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI), a NADPH oxidase-specific inhibitor. The number of vvran1 transcripts also increased upon cold stress. Diphenyleneiodonium chloride, but not the superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibitor diethy dithiocarbamate (DDC), could suppress the up-regulation of vvran1 gene expression to cold stress. These results combined with the high correlations between gene expression and superoxide anion (O2−) generation indicated that vvran1 could be one of the candidate genes in the downstream of O2− mediated pathways that are generated by NADPH oxidase under low temperature and oxidative stresses. PMID:27626406

  2. Characterization of EHT 1864, a novel small molecule inhibitor of Rac family small GTPases.

    PubMed

    Onesto, Cercina; Shutes, Adam; Picard, Virginie; Schweighoffer, Fabien; Der, Channing J

    2008-01-01

    There is now considerable experimental evidence that aberrant activation of Rho family small GTPases promotes uncontrolled proliferation, invasion, and metastatic properties of human cancer cells. Therefore, there is considerable interest in the development of small molecule inhibitors of Rho GTPase function. However, to date, most efforts have focused on inhibitors that block Rho GTPase function indirectly, either by targeting enzymes involved in post-translational processing or downstream protein kinase effectors. We have reported the identification and characterization of the EHT 1864 small molecule as an inhibitor of Rac family small GTPases, placing Rac1 in an inert and inactive state and then impairing Rac1-mediated functions in vivo. Our work suggests that EHT 1864 selectively inhibits Rac1 downstream signaling and cellular transformation by a novel mechanism involving guanine nucleotide displacement. This chapter provides the details for some of the biochemical and biological methods used to characterize the mode of action of EHT 1864 on Rac1 and its impact on Rac1-dependent cellular functions.

  3. SRP RNA provides the physiologically essential GTPase activation function in cotranslational protein targeting.

    PubMed

    Siu, Fai Y; Spanggord, Richard J; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2007-02-01

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) cotranslationally targets proteins to cell membranes by coordinated binding and release of ribosome-associated nascent polypeptides and a membrane-associated SRP receptor. GTP uptake and hydrolysis by the SRP-receptor complex govern this targeting cycle. Because no GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) are known for the SRP and SRP receptor GTPases, however, it has been unclear whether and how GTP hydrolysis is stimulated during protein trafficking in vivo. Using both biochemical and genetic experiments, we show here that SRP RNA enhances GTPase activity of the SRP-receptor complex above a critical threshold required for cell viability. Furthermore, this stimulation is a property of the SRP RNA tetraloop. SRP RNA tetraloop mutants that confer defective growth phenotypes can assemble into SRP-receptor complexes, but fail to stimulate GTP hydrolysis in these complexes in vitro. Tethered hydroxyl radical probing data reveal that specific positioning of the RNA tetraloop within the SRP-receptor complex is required to stimulate GTPase activity to a level sufficient to support cell growth. These results explain why no external GAP is needed and why the phylogenetically conserved SRP RNA tetraloop is required in vivo.

  4. The Bacterial Virulence Factor Lymphostatin Compromises Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Function by Modulating Rho GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Babbin, Brian A.; Sasaki, Maiko; Gerner-Schmidt, Kirsten W.; Nusrat, Asma; Klapproth, Jan-Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Lymphocyte inhibitory factor A (lifA) in Citrobacter rodentium encodes the large toxin lymphostatin, which contains two enzymatic motifs associated with bacterial pathogenesis, a glucosyltransferase and a protease. Our aim was to determine the effects of each lymphostatin motif on intestinal epithelial-barrier function. In-frame mutations of C. rodentium lifA glucosyltransferase (CrGlM21) and protease (CrPrM5) were generated by homologous recombination. Infection of both model intestinal epithelial monolayers and mice with C. rodentium wild type resulted in compromised epithelial barrier function and mislocalization of key intercellular junction proteins in the tight junction and adherens junction. In contrast, CrGlM21 was impaired in its ability to reduce barrier function and influenced the tight junction proteins ZO-1 and occludin. CrPrM5 demonstrated decreased effects on the adherens junction proteins β-catenin and E-cadherin. Analysis of the mechanisms revealed that C. rodentium wild type differentially influenced Rho GTPase activation, suppressed Cdc42 activation, and induced Rho GTPase activation. CrGlM21 lost its suppressive effects on Cdc42 activation, whereas CrPrM5 was unable to activate Rho signaling. Rescue experiments using constitutively active Cdc42 or C3 exotoxin to inhibit Rho GTPase supported a role of Rho GTPases in the epithelial barrier compromise induced by C. rodentium. Taken together, our results suggest that lymphostatin is a bacterial virulence factor that contributes to the disruption of intestinal epithelial-barrier function via the modulation of Rho GTPase activities. PMID:19286565

  5. Characterization of the activation of small GTPases by their GEFs on membranes using artificial membrane tethering.

    PubMed

    Peurois, François; Veyron, Simon; Ferrandez, Yann; Ladid, Ilham; Benabdi, Sarah; Zeghouf, Mahel; Peyroche, Gérald; Cherfils, Jacqueline

    2017-02-14

    Attachment of active, GTP-bound small GTPases to membranes by post-translational lipid modifications is pivotal for their ability to process and propagate information in cells. However, generating and manipulating lipidated GTPases has remained difficult, which has limited our quantitative understanding of their activation by GEFs and their termination by GAPs. Here we replaced the lipid modification by a histidine tag in eleven full-length, human small GTPases belonging to the Arf, Rho and Rab families, which allowed to tether them to nickel-lipid containing membranes and characterize the kinetics of their activation by GEFs. Remarkably this strategy uncovered large effects of membranes on the efficiency and/or specificity in all systems studied. Notably, it recapitulated the release of autoinhibition of Arf1, Arf3, Arf4, Arf5 and Arf6 GTPases by membranes and revealed that all isoforms are efficiently activated by two GEFs with different regulatory regimes, ARNO and Brag2. It demonstrated that membranes stimulate the GEF activity of Trio towards RhoG by ≈30 fold and Rac1 by ≈10 fold, and uncovered a previously unknown broader specificity towards RhoA and Cdc42 that was undetectable in solution. Finally, it demonstrated that the exceptional affinity of the bacterial RabGEF DrrA for the phosphoinositide PI(4)P delimits the activation of Rab1 to the immediate vicinity of the membrane-bound GEF. Our study thus validates the histidine tag strategy as a potent and simple means to mimic small GTPases lipidation, which opens broad perspectives of applications to uncover regulations brought about by membranes.

  6. Miro's N-terminal GTPase domain is required for transport of mitochondria into axons and dendrites.

    PubMed

    Babic, Milos; Russo, Gary J; Wellington, Andrea J; Sangston, Ryan M; Gonzalez, Migdalia; Zinsmaier, Konrad E

    2015-04-08

    Mitochondria are dynamically transported in and out of neuronal processes to maintain neuronal excitability and synaptic function. In higher eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GTPase Miro binds Milton/TRAK adaptor proteins linking microtubule motors to mitochondria. Here we show that Drosophila Miro (dMiro), which has previously been shown to be required for kinesin-driven axonal transport, is also critically required for the dynein-driven distribution of mitochondria into dendrites. In addition, we used the loss-of-function mutations dMiroT25N and dMiroT460N to determine the significance of dMiro's N-terminal and C-terminal GTPase domains, respectively. Expression of dMiroT25N in the absence of endogenous dMiro caused premature lethality and arrested development at a pupal stage. dMiroT25N accumulated mitochondria in the soma of larval motor and sensory neurons, and prevented their kinesin-dependent and dynein-dependent distribution into axons and dendrites, respectively. dMiroT25N mutant mitochondria also were severely fragmented and exhibited reduced kinesin and dynein motility in axons. In contrast, dMiroT460N did not impair viability, mitochondrial size, or the distribution of mitochondria. However, dMiroT460N reduced dynein motility during retrograde mitochondrial transport in axons. Finally, we show that substitutions analogous to the constitutively active Ras-G12V mutation in dMiro's N-terminal and C-terminal GTPase domains cause neomorphic phenotypic effects that are likely unrelated to the normal function of each GTPase domain. Overall, our analysis indicates that dMiro's N-terminal GTPase domain is critically required for viability, mitochondrial size, and the distribution of mitochondria out of the neuronal soma regardless of the employed motor, likely by promoting the transition from a stationary to a motile state.

  7. Miro's N-Terminal GTPase Domain Is Required for Transport of Mitochondria into Axons and Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Babic, Milos; Russo, Gary J.; Wellington, Andrea J.; Sangston, Ryan M.; Gonzalez, Migdalia

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamically transported in and out of neuronal processes to maintain neuronal excitability and synaptic function. In higher eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GTPase Miro binds Milton/TRAK adaptor proteins linking microtubule motors to mitochondria. Here we show that Drosophila Miro (dMiro), which has previously been shown to be required for kinesin-driven axonal transport, is also critically required for the dynein-driven distribution of mitochondria into dendrites. In addition, we used the loss-of-function mutations dMiroT25N and dMiroT460N to determine the significance of dMiro's N-terminal and C-terminal GTPase domains, respectively. Expression of dMiroT25N in the absence of endogenous dMiro caused premature lethality and arrested development at a pupal stage. dMiroT25N accumulated mitochondria in the soma of larval motor and sensory neurons, and prevented their kinesin-dependent and dynein-dependent distribution into axons and dendrites, respectively. dMiroT25N mutant mitochondria also were severely fragmented and exhibited reduced kinesin and dynein motility in axons. In contrast, dMiroT460N did not impair viability, mitochondrial size, or the distribution of mitochondria. However, dMiroT460N reduced dynein motility during retrograde mitochondrial transport in axons. Finally, we show that substitutions analogous to the constitutively active Ras-G12V mutation in dMiro's N-terminal and C-terminal GTPase domains cause neomorphic phenotypic effects that are likely unrelated to the normal function of each GTPase domain. Overall, our analysis indicates that dMiro's N-terminal GTPase domain is critically required for viability, mitochondrial size, and the distribution of mitochondria out of the neuronal soma regardless of the employed motor, likely by promoting the transition from a stationary to a motile state. PMID:25855186

  8. Analysis of a minimal Rho-GTPase circuit regulating cell shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, William R.; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah

    2016-08-01

    Networks of Rho-family GTPases regulate eukaryotic cell polarization and motility by controlling assembly and contraction of the cytoskeleton. The mutually inhibitory Rac-Rho circuit is emerging as a central, regulatory hub that can affect the shape and motility phenotype of eukaryotic cells. Recent experimental manipulation of the amounts of Rac and Rho or their regulators (guanine nucleotide-exchange factors, GTPase-activating proteins, guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors) have been shown to bias the prevalence of these different states and promote transitions between them. Here we show that part of this data can be understood in terms of inherent Rac-Rho mutually inhibitory dynamics. We analyze a spatio-temporal mathematical model of Rac-Rho dynamics to produce a detailed set of predictions of how parameters such as GTPase rates of activation and total amounts affect cell decisions (such as Rho-dominated contraction, Rac-dominated spreading, and spatially segregated Rac-Rho polarization). We find that in some parameter regimes, a cell can take on any of these three fates depending on its environment or stimuli. We also predict how experimental manipulations (corresponding to parameter variations) can affect cell shapes observed. Our methods are based on local perturbation analysis (a kind of nonlinear stability analysis), and an approximation of nonlinear feedback by sharp switches. We compare the Rac-Rho model to an even simpler single-GTPase (‘wave-pinning’) model and demonstrate that the overall behavior is inherent to GTPase properties, rather than stemming solely from network topology.

  9. Topological and functional properties of the small GTPases protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Delprato, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Small GTP binding proteins of the Ras superfamily (Ras, Rho, Rab, Arf, and Ran) regulate key cellular processes such as signal transduction, cell proliferation, cell motility, and vesicle transport. A great deal of experimental evidence supports the existence of signaling cascades and feedback loops within and among the small GTPase subfamilies suggesting that these proteins function in a coordinated and cooperative manner. The interplay occurs largely through association with bi-partite regulatory and effector proteins but can also occur through the active form of the small GTPases themselves. In order to understand the connectivity of the small GTPases signaling routes, a systems-level approach that analyzes data describing direct and indirect interactions was used to construct the small GTPases protein interaction network. The data were curated from the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes (STRING) database and include only experimentally validated interactions. The network method enables the conceptualization of the overall structure as well as the underlying organization of the protein-protein interactions. The interaction network described here is comprised of 778 nodes and 1943 edges and has a scale-free topology. Rac1, Cdc42, RhoA, and HRas are identified as the hubs. Ten sub-network motifs are also identified in this study with themes in apoptosis, cell growth/proliferation, vesicle traffic, cell adhesion/junction dynamics, the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase response, transcription regulation, receptor-mediated endocytosis, gene silencing, and growth factor signaling. Bottleneck proteins that bridge signaling paths and proteins that overlap in multiple small GTPase networks are described along with the functional annotation of all proteins in the network.

  10. The small GTPase RhoH is an atypical regulator of haematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Fueller, Florian; Kubatzky, Katharina F

    2008-01-01

    Rho GTPases are a distinct subfamily of the superfamily of Ras GTPases. The best-characterised members are RhoA, Rac and Cdc42 that regulate many diverse actions such as actin cytoskeleton reorganisation, adhesion, motility as well as cell proliferation, differentiation and gene transcription. Among the 20 members of that family, only Rac2 and RhoH show an expression restricted to the haematopoietic lineage. RhoH was first discovered in 1995 as a fusion transcript with the transcriptional repressor LAZ3/BCL6. It was therefore initially named translation three four (TTF) but later on renamed RhoH due to its close relationship to the Ras/Rho family of GTPases. Since then, RhoH has been implicated in human cancer as the gene is subject to somatic hypermutation and by the detection of RHOH as a translocation partner for LAZ3/BCL6 or other genes in human lymphomas. Underexpression of RhoH is found in hairy cell leukaemia and acute myeloid leukaemia. Some of the amino acids that are crucial for GTPase activity are mutated in RhoH so that the protein is a GTPase-deficient, so-called atypical Rho GTPase. Therefore other mechanisms of regulating RhoH activity have been described. These include regulation at the mRNA level and tyrosine phosphorylation of the protein's unique ITAM-like motif. The C-terminal CaaX box of RhoH is mainly a target for farnesyl-transferase but can also be modified by geranylgeranyl-transferase. Isoprenylation of RhoH and changes in subcellular localisation may be an additional factor to fine-tune signalling. Little is currently known about its signalling, regulation or interaction partners. Recent studies have shown that RhoH negatively influences the proliferation and homing of murine haematopoietic progenitor cells, presumably by acting as an antagonist for Rac1. In leukocytes, RhoH is needed to keep the cells in a resting, non-adhesive state, but the exact mechanism has yet to be elucidated. RhoH has also been implicated as a regulatory molecule

  11. Genetic interactions in yeast between Ypt GTPases and Arf guanine nucleotide exchangers.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, S; Jedd, G; Kahn, R A; Franzusoff, A; Bartolini, F; Segev, N

    1999-01-01

    Two families of GTPases, Arfs and Ypt/rabs, are key regulators of vesicular transport. While Arf proteins are implicated in vesicle budding from the donor compartment, Ypt/rab proteins are involved in the targeting of vesicles to the acceptor compartment. Recently, we have shown a role for Ypt31/32p in exit from the yeast trans-Golgi, suggesting a possible function for Ypt/rab proteins in vesicle budding as well. Here we report the identification of a new member of the Sec7-domain family, SYT1, as a high-copy suppressor of a ypt31/32 mutation. Several proteins that belong to the Sec7-domain family, including the yeast Gea1p, have recently been shown to stimulate nucleotide exchange by Arf GTPases. Nucleotide exchange by Arf GTPases, the switch from the GDP- to the GTP-bound form, is thought to be crucial for their function. Sec7p itself has an important role in the yeast secretory pathway. However, its mechanism of action is not yet understood. We show that all members of the Sec7-domain family exhibit distinct genetic interactions with the YPT genes. Biochemical assays demonstrate that, although the homology between the members of the Sec7-domain family is relatively low (20-35%) and limited to a small domain, they all can act as guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Arf proteins, but not for Ypt GTPases. The Sec7-domain of Sec7p is sufficient for this activity. Interestingly, the Sec7 domain activity is inhibited by brefeldin A (BFA), a fungal metabolite that inhibits some of the Arf-GEFs, indicating that this domain is a target for BFA. These results demonstrate that the ability to act as Arf-GEFs is a general property of all Sec7-domain proteins in yeast. The genetic interactions observed between Arf GEFs and Ypt GTPases suggest the existence of a Ypt-Arf GTPase cascade in the secretory pathway. PMID:10430582

  12. Novel Activities of Select NSAID R-Enantiomers against Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Oprea, Tudor I.; Sklar, Larry A.; Agola, Jacob O.; Guo, Yuna; Silberberg, Melina; Roxby, Joshua; Vestling, Anna; Romero, Elsa; Surviladze, Zurab; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Waller, Anna; Ursu, Oleg; Hudson, Laurie G.; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Rho family GTPases (including Rac, Rho and Cdc42) collectively control cell proliferation, adhesion and migration and are of interest as functional therapeutic targets in numerous epithelial cancers. Based on high throughput screening of the Prestwick Chemical Library® and cheminformatics we identified the R-enantiomers of two approved drugs (naproxen and ketorolac) as inhibitors of Rac1 and Cdc42. The corresponding S-enantiomers are considered the active component in racemic drug formulations, acting as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with selective activity against cyclooxygenases. Here, we show that the S-enantiomers of naproxen and ketorolac are inactive against the GTPases. Additionally, more than twenty other NSAIDs lacked inhibitory action against the GTPases, establishing the selectivity of the two identified NSAIDs. R-naproxen was first identified as a lead compound and tested in parallel with its S-enantiomer and the non-chiral 6-methoxy-naphthalene acetic acid (active metabolite of nabumetone, another NSAID) as a structural series. Cheminformatics-based substructure analyses—using the rotationally constrained carboxylate in R-naproxen—led to identification of racemic [R/S] ketorolac as a suitable FDA-approved candidate. Cell based measurement of GTPase activity (in animal and human cell lines) demonstrated that the R-enantiomers specifically inhibit epidermal growth factor stimulated Rac1 and Cdc42 activation. The GTPase inhibitory effects of the R-enantiomers in cells largely mimic those of established Rac1 (NSC23766) and Cdc42 (CID2950007/ML141) specific inhibitors. Docking predicts that rotational constraints position the carboxylate moieties of the R-enantiomers to preferentially coordinate the magnesium ion, thereby destabilizing nucleotide binding to Rac1 and Cdc42. The S-enantiomers can be docked but are less favorably positioned in proximity to the magnesium. R-naproxen and R-ketorolac have potential for rapid translation and

  13. Structural Basis of Rnd1 Binding to Plexin Rho GTPase Binding Domains (RBDs)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hui; Hota, Prasanta K.; Tong, Yufeng; Li, Buren; Shen, Limin; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Borthakur, Susmita; Kim, SoonJeung; Tempel, Wolfram; Buck, Matthias; Park, Hee-Won

    2011-09-20

    Plexin receptors regulate cell adhesion, migration, and guidance. The Rho GTPase binding domain (RBD) of plexin-A1 and -B1 can bind GTPases, including Rnd1. By contrast, plexin-C1 and -D1 reportedly bind Rnd2 but associate with Rnd1 only weakly. The structural basis of this differential Rnd1 GTPase binding to plexin RBDs remains unclear. Here, we solved the structure of the plexin-A2 RBD in complex with Rnd1 and the structures of the plexin-C1 and plexin-D1 RBDs alone, also compared with the previously determined plexin-B1 RBD.Rnd1 complex structure. The plexin-A2 RBD {center_dot} Rnd1 complex is a heterodimer, whereas plexin-B1 and -A2 RBDs homodimerize at high concentration in solution, consistent with a proposed model for plexin activation. Plexin-C1 and -D1 RBDs are monomeric, consistent with major residue changes in the homodimerization loop. In plexin-A2 and -B1, the RBD {beta}3-{beta}4 loop adjusts its conformation to allow Rnd1 binding, whereas minimal structural changes occur in Rnd1. The plexin-C1 and -D1 RBDs lack several key non-polar residues at the corresponding GTPase binding surface and do not significantly interact with Rnd1. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements on plexin-C1 and -D1 mutants reveal that the introduction of non-polar residues in this loop generates affinity for Rnd1. Structure and sequence comparisons suggest a similar mode of Rnd1 binding to the RBDs, whereas mutagenesis suggests that the interface with the highly homologous Rnd2 GTPase is different in detail. Our results confirm, from a structural perspective, that Rnd1 does not play a role in the activation of plexin-C1 and -D1. Plexin functions appear to be regulated by subfamily-specific mechanisms, some of which involve different Rho family GTPases.

  14. Control of developmental networks by Rac/Rho small GTPases: How cytoskeletal changes during embryogenesis are orchestrated

    PubMed Central

    Sáenz‐Narciso, Beatriz; Gómez‐Orte, Eva; Zheleva, Angelina; Gastaca, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Small GTPases in the Rho family act as major nodes with functions beyond cytoskeletal rearrangements shaping the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo during development. These small GTPases are key signal transducers that integrate diverse developmental signals to produce a coordinated response in the cell. In C. elegans, the best studied members of these highly conserved Rho family small GTPases, RHO‐1/RhoA, CED‐10/Rac, and CDC‐42, are crucial in several cellular processes dealing with cytoskeletal reorganization. In this review, we update the functions described for the Rho family small GTPases in spindle orientation and cell division, engulfment, and cellular movements during C. elegans embryogenesis, focusing on the Rho subfamily Rac. Please also see the video abstract here PMID:27790724

  15. The deubiquitinating enzyme USP17 is essential for GTPase subcellular localization and cell motility

    PubMed Central

    de la Vega, Michelle; Kelvin, Alyson A.; Dunican, Dara J.; McFarlane, Cheryl; Burrows, James F.; Jaworski, Jakub; Stevenson, Nigel J.; Dib, Karim; Rappoport, Joshua Z.; Scott, Christopher J.; Long, Aideen; Johnston, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Deubiquitinating enzymes are now emerging as potential therapeutic targets that control many cellular processes, but few have been demonstrated to control cell motility. Here, we show that ubiquitin-specific protease 17 (USP17) is rapidly and transiently induced in response to chemokines SDF-1/CXCL12 and IL-8/CXCL8 in both primary cells and cell lines, and that its depletion completely blocks chemokine-induced cell migration and cytoskeletal rearrangements. Using live cell imaging, we demonstrate that USP17 is required for both elongated and amoeboid motility, in addition to chemotaxis. USP17 has previously been reported to disrupt Ras localization and we now find that USP17 depletion blocks chemokine-induced subcellular relocalization of GTPases Cdc42, Rac and RhoA, which are GTPases essential for cell motility. Collectively, these results demonstrate that USP17 has a critical role in cell migration and may be a useful drug target for both inflammatory and metastatic disease. PMID:21448158

  16. Self-assembly of human MxA GTPase into highly ordered dynamin-like oligomers.

    PubMed

    Kochs, Georg; Haener, Markus; Aebi, Ueli; Haller, Otto

    2002-04-19

    Human MxA protein is a member of the interferon-induced Mx protein family and an important component of the innate host defense against RNA viruses. The Mx family belongs to a superfamily of large GTPases that also includes the dynamins and the interferon-regulated guanylate-binding proteins. A common feature of these large GTPases is their ability to form high molecular weight oligomers. Here we determined the capacity of MxA to self-assemble into homo-oligomers in vitro. We show that recombinant MxA protein assembles into long filamentous structures with a diameter of about 20 nm at physiological salt concentration as demonstrated by sedimentation assays and electron microscopy. In the presence of guanosine nucleotides the filaments rearranged into rings and more compact helical arrays. Our data indicate that binding and hydrolysis of GTP induce conformational changes in MxA that may be essential for viral target recognition and antiviral activity.

  17. ARF1 and SAR1 GTPases in endomembrane trafficking in plants.

    PubMed

    Cevher-Keskin, Birsen

    2013-09-05

    Small GTPases largely control membrane traffic, which is essential for the survival of all eukaryotes. Among the small GTP-binding proteins, ARF1 (ADP-ribosylation factor 1) and SAR1 (Secretion-Associated RAS super family 1) are commonly conserved among all eukaryotes with respect to both their functional and sequential characteristics. The ARF1 and SAR1 GTP-binding proteins are involved in the formation and budding of vesicles throughout plant endomembrane systems. ARF1 has been shown to play a critical role in COPI (Coat Protein Complex I)-mediated retrograde trafficking in eukaryotic systems, whereas SAR1 GTPases are involved in intracellular COPII-mediated protein trafficking from the ER to the Golgi apparatus. This review offers a summary of vesicular trafficking with an emphasis on the ARF1 and SAR1 expression patterns at early growth stages and in the de-etiolation process.

  18. The Rif GTPase regulates cytoskeletal signaling from plexinA4 to promote neurite retraction.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lifei; Yan, Huijuan; Pellegrin, Stephanie; Morigen; Mellor, Harry

    2015-03-17

    The small GTPase Rif is required for the early stages of dendritic spine formation in neurons, acting through the formin mDia2 to control actin polymerization. Rif is expressed at high levels in the brain, suggesting broader roles in neuronal function. We screened a yeast two-hybrid cDNA library to identify additional binding partners for Rif of potential relevance to neuronal function. We found that Rif interacts with FARP1, a neuronal activator of the RhoA GTPase. We show that Rif has two separate roles in FARP1 regulation-in controlling its association with plexinA4, and in releasing active RhoA from a plexinA4/FARP1 complex. The regulation of FARP1 by Rif promotes neurite retraction in cells stimulated with the semaphorin Sema6A.

  19. The dynamics of Rho GTPase signaling and implications for targeting cancer and the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Pajic, Marina; Herrmann, David; Vennin, Claire; Conway, James RW; Chin, Venessa T; Johnsson, Anna-Karin E; Welch, Heidi CE; Timpson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Numerous large scale genomics studies have demonstrated that cancer is a molecularly heterogeneous disease, characterized by acquired changes in the structure and DNA sequence of tumor genomes. More recently, the role of the equally complex tumor microenvironment in driving the aggressiveness of this disease is increasingly being realized. Tumor cells are surrounded by activated stroma, creating a dynamic environment that promotes cancer development, metastasis and chemoresistance. The Rho family of small GTPases plays an essential role in the regulation of cell shape, cytokinesis, cell adhesion, and cell motility. Importantly, these processes need to be considered in the context of a complex 3-dimensional (3D) environment, with reciprocal feedback and cross-talk taking place between the tumor cells and host environment. Here we discuss the role of molecular networks involving Rho GTPases in cancer, and the therapeutic implications of inhibiting Rho signaling in both cancer cells and the emerging concept of targeting the surrounding stroma. PMID:26103062

  20. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of human Rad GTPase

    SciTech Connect

    Yanuar, Arry; Sakurai, Shigeru; Kitano, Ken; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2005-11-01

    Human Rad has been crystallized. A diffraction data set was collected to a resolution of 1.8 Å. Human Rad is a new member of the Ras GTPase superfamily and is overexpressed in human skeletal muscle of individuals with type II diabetes. The GTPase core domain was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified for crystallization. Crystals were obtained at 293 K by vapour diffusion using a crystallization robot. The crystals were found to belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 52.2, b = 58.6, c = 53.4 Å, β = 97.9°, and contained two Rad molecules in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. A diffraction data set was collected to a resolution of 1.8 Å using synchrotron radiation at SPring-8.

  1. GEFs and Rac GTPases control directional specificity of neurite extension along the anterior–posterior axis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chaogu; Diaz-Cuadros, Margarete; Chalfie, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies have identified many extracellular guidance molecules and intracellular signaling proteins that regulate axonal outgrowth and extension, most were conducted in the context of unidirectional neurite growth, in which the guidance cues either attract or repel growth cones. Very few studies addressed how intracellular signaling molecules differentially specify bidirectional outgrowth. Here, using the bipolar PLM neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, we show that the guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) UNC-73/Trio and TIAM-1 promote anterior and posterior neurite extension, respectively. The Rac subfamily GTPases act downstream of the GEFs; CED-10/Rac1 is activated by TIAM-1, whereas CED-10 and MIG-2/RhoG act redundantly downstream of UNC-73. Moreover, these two pathways antagonize each other and thus regulate the directional bias of neuritogenesis. Our study suggests that directional specificity of neurite extension is conferred through the intracellular activation of distinct GEFs and Rac GTPases. PMID:27274054

  2. Regulation of cerebral cortex development by Rho GTPases: insights from in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Azzarelli, Roberta; Kerloch, Thomas; Pacary, Emilie

    2015-01-01

    The cerebral cortex is the site of higher human cognitive and motor functions. Histologically, it is organized into six horizontal layers, each containing unique populations of molecularly and functionally distinct excitatory projection neurons and inhibitory interneurons. The stereotyped cellular distribution of cortical neurons is crucial for the formation of functional neural circuits and it is predominantly established during embryonic development. Cortical neuron development is a multiphasic process characterized by sequential steps of neural progenitor proliferation, cell cycle exit, neuroblast migration and neuronal differentiation. This series of events requires an extensive and dynamic remodeling of the cell cytoskeleton at each step of the process. As major regulators of the cytoskeleton, the family of small Rho GTPases has been shown to play essential functions in cerebral cortex development. Here we review in vivo findings that support the contribution of Rho GTPases to cortical projection neuron development and we address their involvement in the etiology of cerebral cortex malformations. PMID:25610373

  3. Phosphorylation Provides a Negative Mode of Regulation for the Yeast Rab GTPase Sec4p

    PubMed Central

    Heger, Christopher D.; Wrann, Christiane D.; Collins, Ruth N.

    2011-01-01

    The Rab family of Ras-related GTPases are part of a complex signaling circuitry in eukaryotic cells, yet we understand little about the mechanisms that underlie Rab protein participation in such signal transduction networks, or how these networks are integrated at the physiological level. Reversible protein phosphorylation is widely used by cells as a signaling mechanism. Several phospho-Rabs have been identified, however the functional consequences of the modification appear to be diverse and need to be evaluated on an individual basis. In this study we demonstrate a role for phosphorylation as a negative regulatory event for the action of the yeast Rab GTPase Sec4p in regulating polarized growth. Our data suggest that the phosphorylation of the Rab Sec4p prevents interactions with its effector, the exocyst component Sec15p, and that the inhibition may be relieved by a PP2A phosphatase complex containing the regulatory subunit Cdc55p. PMID:21931684

  4. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ski7 Is a GTP-Binding Protein Adopting the Characteristic Conformation of Active Translational GTPases.

    PubMed

    Kowalinski, Eva; Schuller, Anthony; Green, Rachel; Conti, Elena

    2015-07-07

    Ski7 is a cofactor of the cytoplasmic exosome in budding yeast, functioning in both mRNA turnover and non-stop decay (NSD), a surveillance pathway that degrades faulty mRNAs lacking a stop codon. The C-terminal region of Ski7 (Ski7C) shares overall sequence similarity with the translational GTPase (trGTPase) Hbs1, but whether Ski7 has retained the properties of a trGTPase is unclear. Here, we report the high-resolution structures of Ski7C bound to either intact guanosine triphosphate (GTP) or guanosine diphosphate-Pi. The individual domains of Ski7C adopt the conformation characteristic of active trGTPases. Furthermore, the nucleotide-binding site of Ski7C shares similar features compared with active trGTPases, notably the presence of a characteristic monovalent cation. However, a suboptimal polar residue at the putative catalytic site and an unusual polar residue that interacts with the γ-phosphate of GTP distinguish Ski7 from other trGTPases, suggesting it might function rather as a GTP-binding protein than as a GTP-hydrolyzing enzyme.

  5. Molecular Analysis and Localization of CaARA7 a Conventional RAB5 GTPase from Characean Algae

    PubMed Central

    Hoepflinger, Marion C.; Geretschlaeger, Anja; Sommer, Aniela; Hoeftberger, Margit; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    RAB5 GTPases are important regulators of endosomal membrane traffic. Among them Arabidopsis thaliana ARA7/RABF2b is highly conserved and homologues are present in fungal, animal and plant kingdoms. In land plants ARA7 and its homologues are involved in endocytosis and transport towards the vacuole. Here we report on the isolation of an ARA7 homologue (CaARA7/CaRABF2) in the highly evolved characean green alga Chara australis. It encodes a polypeptide of 202 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 22.2 kDa and intrinsic GTPase activity. Immunolabelling of internodal cells with a specific antibody reveals CaARA7 epitopes at multivesicular endosomes (MVEs) and at MVE-containing wortmannin (WM) compartments. When transiently expressed in epidermal cells of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, fluorescently tagged CaARA7 localizes to small organelles (putative MVEs) and WM compartments, and partially colocalizes with AtARA7 and CaARA6, a plant specific RABF1 GTPase. Mutations in membrane anchoring and GTP binding sites alter localization of CaARA7 and affect GTPase activity, respectively. This first detailed study of a conventional RAB5 GTPase in green algae demonstrates that CaARA7 is similar to RAB5 GTPases from land plants and other organisms and shows conserved structure and localization. PMID:25639563

  6. The Rab1 GTPase of Sciaenops ocellatus modulates intracellular bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong-hua; Deng, Tian; Sun, Li

    2011-12-01

    The Rab family proteins belong to the Ras-like GTPase superfamily and play important roles in intracellular membrane trafficking. To date no studies on fish Rab have been documented, though rab-like sequences have been found in a number of teleosts. In this study, we identified and analyzed a Rab homologue, SoRab1, from red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus. The cDNA of SoRab1 contains a 5'- untranslated region (UTR) of 358 bp, an open reading frame (ORF) of 612 bp, and a 3'-UTR of 265 bp. The ORF encodes a putative protein of 203 residues, which shares 92-99% overall sequence identities with the Rab1 from fish, human, and mouse. SoRab1 possesses a typical Rab1 GTPase domain with the conserved G box motifs and the switch I and switch II regions. Recombinant SoRab1 purified from Escherichia coli exhibits apparent GTPase activity. Quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis showed that SoRab1 expression was detected in a number of tissues, with the lowest expression found in blood and highest expression found in muscle. Bacterial and lipopolysaccharide challenges significantly upregulated SoRab1 expression in liver, kidney, and spleen in time-dependent manners. Transient overexpression of SoRab1 in primary hepatocytes reduced intracellular bacterial infection, whereas interference with SoRab1 expression by RNAi enhanced intracellular bacterial invasion. These results provide the first indication that a fish Rab1 GTPase, SoRab1, regulates intracellular bacterial infection and thus is likely to play a role in bacteria-induced host immune defense.

  7. Electrostatic free energies in translational GTPases: Classic allostery and the rest.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Thomas; Aleksandrov, Alexey; Satpati, Priyadarshi

    2015-05-01

    GTPases typically switch between an inactive, OFF conformation and an active, ON conformation when a GDP ligand is replaced by GTP. Their ON/OFF populations and activity thus depend on the stabilities of four protein complexes, two apo-protein forms, and GTP/GDP in solution. A complete characterization is usually not possible experimentally and poses major challenges for simulations. We review the most important methodological challenges and we review thermodynamic data for two GTPases involved in translation of the genetic code: archaeal Initiation Factors 2 and 5B (aIF2, aIF5B). One main challenge is the multiplicity of states and conformations, including those of GTP/GDP in solution. Another is force field accuracy, especially for interactions of GTP/GDP with co-bound divalent Mg(2+) ions. The calculation of electrostatic free energies also poses specific challenges, and requires careful protocols. For aIF2, experiments and earlier simulations showed that it is a "classic" GTPase, with distinct ON/OFF conformations that prefer to bind GTP and GDP, respectively. For aIF5B, we recently proposed a non-classic mechanism, where the ON/OFF states differ only in the protonation state of Glu81 in the nucleotide binding pocket. This model is characterized here using free energy simulations. The methodological analysis should help future studies, while the aIF2, aIF5B examples illustrate the diversity of ATPase/GTPase mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Recent developments of molecular dynamics.

  8. Interactions between Rab and Arf GTPases regulate endosomal phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate during endocytic recycling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Anbing; Grant, Barth D

    2013-01-01

    After endocytosis, a selective endocytic recycling process returns many endocytosed molecules back to the plasma membrane. The RAB-10/Rab10 GTPase is known to be a key recycling regulator for specific cargo molecules. New evidence, focused on C. elegans RAB-10 in polarized epithelia, points to a key role of RAB-10 in the regulation of endosomal phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) levels. In turn, PI(4,5)P2 levels strongly influence the recruitment of many peripheral membrane proteins, including those important for vesicle budding through their membrane bending activities. Part of the effect of RAB-10 on endosomal PI(4,5)P2 is through its newly identified effector CNT-1, a predicted GTPase activating protein (GAP) of the small GTPase ARF-6/Arf6. In mammals PI(4,5)P2 generating enzymes are known Arf6 effectors. In C. elegans we found that RAB-10, CNT-1 and ARF-6 are present on the same endosomes, that RAB-10 recruits CNT-1 to endosomes, and that loss of CNT-1 or RAB-10 leads to overaccumulation of endosomal PI(4,5)P2, presumably via hyperactivation of endosomal ARF-6. In turn this leads to over-recruitment of PI(4,5)P2-dependent membrane-bending proteins RME-1/Ehd and SDPN-1/Syndapin/PACSIN. Conversely, in arf-6 mutants, endosomal PI(4,5)P2 levels were reduced and endosomal recruitment of RME-1 and SDPN-1 failed. This work makes an unexpected link between distinct classes of small GTPases that control endocytic recycling, and provides insight into how this interaction affects endosome function at the level of lipid phosphorylation.

  9. Inhibition of Rac GTPases in the Therapy of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    reported data and different outcome definitions, we could not perform a meta - analysis and thus, a final judgment about the influence of corticosteroids...myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a clonal myeloproliferative disease (MPD) characterized by the expression of the p210-BCR/ABL fusion gene [1]. This gene...components downstream of BCR/ABL. During the first year of this award, we reported our progress on the analysis of the role of Rac GTPases in

  10. Interactions between Rab and Arf GTPases regulate endosomal phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate during endocytic recycling

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Anbing; Grant, Barth D.

    2013-01-01

    After endocytosis, a selective endocytic recycling process returns many endocytosed molecules back to the plasma membrane. The RAB-10/Rab10 GTPase is known to be a key recycling regulator for specific cargo molecules. New evidence, focused on C. elegans RAB-10 in polarized epithelia, points to a key role of RAB-10 in the regulation of endosomal phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) levels. In turn, PI(4,5)P2 levels strongly influence the recruitment of many peripheral membrane proteins, including those important for vesicle budding through their membrane bending activities. Part of the effect of RAB-10 on endosomal PI(4,5)P2 is through its newly identified effector CNT-1, a predicted GTPase activating protein (GAP) of the small GTPase ARF-6/Arf6. In mammals PI(4,5)P2 generating enzymes are known Arf6 effectors. In C. elegans we found that RAB-10, CNT-1 and ARF-6 are present on the same endosomes, that RAB-10 recruits CNT-1 to endosomes, and that loss of CNT-1 or RAB-10 leads to overaccumulation of endosomal PI(4,5)P2, presumably via hyperactivation of endosomal ARF-6. In turn this leads to over-recruitment of PI(4,5)P2-dependent membrane-bending proteins RME-1/Ehd and SDPN-1/Syndapin/PACSIN. Conversely, in arf-6 mutants, endosomal PI(4,5)P2 levels were reduced and endosomal recruitment of RME-1 and SDPN-1 failed. This work makes an unexpected link between distinct classes of small GTPases that control endocytic recycling, and provides insight into how this interaction affects endosome function at the level of lipid phosphorylation. PMID:23392104

  11. Structure of the ribosomal interacting GTPase YjeQ from the enterobacterial species Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, C. E.; Johnson, C.; Lamb, H. K.; Lockyer, M.; Charles, I. G.; Hawkins, A. R.; Stammers, D. K.

    2007-11-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of the GTPase YjeQ from S. typhimurium is presented and compared with those of orthologues from T. maritima and B. subtilis. The YjeQ class of P-loop GTPases assist in ribosome biogenesis and also bind to the 30S subunit of mature ribosomes. YjeQ ribosomal binding is GTP-dependent and thought to specifically direct protein synthesis, although the nature of the upstream signal causing this event in vivo is as yet unknown. The attenuating effect of YjeQ mutants on bacterial growth in Escherichia coli makes it a potential target for novel antimicrobial agents. In order to further explore the structure and function of YjeQ, the isolation, crystallization and structure determination of YjeQ from the enterobacterial species Salmonella typhimurium (StYjeQ) is reported. Whilst the overall StYjeQ fold is similar to those of the previously reported Thematoga maritima and Bacillus subtilis orthologues, particularly the GTPase domain, there are larger differences in the three OB folds. Although the zinc-finger secondary structure is conserved, significant sequence differences alter the nature of the external surface in each case and may reflect varying signalling pathways. Therefore, it may be easier to develop YjeQ-specific inhibitors that target the N- and C-terminal regions, disrupting the metabolic connectivity rather than the GTPase activity. The availability of coordinates for StYjeQ will provide a significantly improved basis for threading Gram-negative orthologue sequences and in silico compound-screening studies, with the potential for the development of species-selective drugs.

  12. Identification of a Rab GTPase-activating protein cascade that controls recycling of the Rab5 GTPase Vps21 from the vacuole

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Meenakshi; Lachmann, Jens; Ungermann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Transport within the endocytic pathway depends on a consecutive function of the endosomal Rab5 and the late endosomal/lysosomal Rab7 GTPases to promote membrane recycling and fusion in the context of endosomal maturation. We previously identified the hexameric BLOC-1 complex as an effector of the yeast Rab5 Vps21, which also recruits the GTPase-activating protein (GAP) Msb3. This raises the question of when Vps21 is inactivated on endosomes. We provide evidence for a Rab cascade in which activation of the Rab7 homologue Ypt7 triggers inactivation of Vps21. We find that the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) of Ypt7 (the Mon1-Ccz1 complex) and BLOC-1 both localize to the same endosomes. Overexpression of Mon1-Ccz1, which generates additional Ypt7-GTP, or overexpression of activated Ypt7 promotes relocalization of Vps21 from endosomes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which is indicative of Vps21 inactivation. This ER relocalization is prevented by loss of either BLOC-1 or Msb3, but it also occurs in mutants lacking endosome–vacuole fusion machinery such as the HOPS tethering complex, an effector of Ypt7. Importantly, BLOC-1 interacts with the HOPS on vacuoles, suggesting a direct Ypt7-dependent cross-talk. These data indicate that efficient Vps21 recycling requires both Ypt7 and endosome–vacuole fusion, thus suggesting extended control of a GAP cascade beyond Rab interactions. PMID:25971802

  13. Nitric oxide promotes epidermal stem cell migration via cGMP-Rho GTPase signalling

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Rixing; He, Weifeng; Wang, Fan; Yao, Zhihui; Tan, Jianglin; Xu, Rui; Zhou, Junyi; Wang, Yuzhen; Li, Haisheng; Wu, Jun; LUO, Gaoxing

    2016-01-01

    The migration and reepithelization of epidermal stem cells (ESCs) are the most critical processes in wound healing. The gaseous messenger nitric oxide (NO) has multiple biological effects, but its actions on ESCs are poorly understood. In this study, an NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), was found to facilitate the in vitro migration of human ESCs (huESCs) in both live-imaging and scratch models. In addition, pull-down assays demonstrated that SNAP could activate the small GTPases RhoA and Rac1 of the Rho family, but not Cdc42. Moreover, the effects of SNAP on the migration and F-actin polymerization of ESCs could be blocked by inhibitors of cGMP, PKG, RhoA or Rac1, and by a specific siRNA of RhoA or Rac1, but not by a Cdc42 inhibitor or siRNA. Furthermore, the roles of NO in ESC migration via cGMP-Rho GTPase signalling in vivo were confirmed by tracing 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-labelled cells in a superficial, partial-thickness scald mouse model. Thus, the present study demonstrated that the NO donor SNAP could promote huESC migration in vitro. Furthermore, NO was found to induce ESC migration via cGMP-Rho GTPase RhoA and Rac1 signalling, but not Cdc42 signalling, both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:27469024

  14. Rho protein GTPases and their interactions with NFκB: crossroads of inflammation and matrix biology

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Louis; Tergaonkar, Vinay

    2014-01-01

    The RhoGTPases, with RhoA, Cdc42 and Rac being major members, are a group of key ubiquitous proteins present in all eukaryotic organisms that subserve such important functions as cell migration, adhesion and differentiation. The NFκB (nuclear factor κB) is a family of constitutive and inducible transcription factors that through their diverse target genes, play a major role in processes such as cytokine expression, stress regulation, cell division and transformation. Research over the past decade has uncovered new molecular links between the RhoGTPases and the NFκB pathway, with the RhoGTPases playing a positive or negative regulatory role on NFκB activation depending on the context. The RhoA–NFκB interaction has been shown to be important in cytokine-activated NFκB processes, such as those induced by TNFα (tumour necrosis factor α). On the other hand, Rac is important for activating the NFκB response downstream of integrin activation, such as after phagocytosis. Specific residues of Rac1 are important for triggering NFκB activation, and mutations do obliterate this response. Other upstream triggers of the RhoGTPase–NFκB interactions include the suppressive p120 catenin, with implications for skin inflammation. The networks described here are not only important areas for further research, but are also significant for discovery of targets for translational medicine. PMID:24877606

  15. Role of the small GTPase Rab27a during Herpes simplex virus infection of oligodendrocytic cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The morphogenesis of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) comprises several events, of which some are not completely understood. It has been shown that HSV-1 glycoproteins accumulate in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and in TGN-derived vesicles. It is also accepted that HSV-1 acquires its final morphology through a secondary envelopment by budding into TGN-derived vesicles coated with viral glycoproteins and tegument proteins. Nevertheless, several aspects of this process remain elusive. The small GTPase Rab27a has been implicated in regulated exocytosis, and it seems to play a key role in certain membrane trafficking events. Rab27a also seems to be required for human cytomegalovirus assembly. However, despite the involvement of various Rab GTPases in HSV-1 envelopment, there is, to date, no data reported on the role of Rab27a in HSV-1 infection. Results Herein, we show that Rab27a colocalized with GHSV-UL46, a tegument-tagged green fluorescent protein-HSV-1, in the TGN. In fact, this small GTPase colocalized with viral glycoproteins gH and gD in that compartment. Functional analysis through Rab27a depletion showed a significant decrease in the number of infected cells and viral production in Rab27a-silenced cells. Conclusions Altogether, our results indicate that Rab27a plays an important role in HSV-1 infection of oligodendrocytic cells. PMID:23164453

  16. Statins have beneficial effects on platelet free radical activity and intracellular distribution of GTPases in hyperlipidaemia.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Paul K; Hughes, Sinead M T; Plumb, Richard D; Devine, Adrian; Leahey, William; Lyons, Kristopher S; Johnston, Dennis; McVeigh, Gary E

    2010-03-01

    In addition to lowering cholesterol, statins may alter endothelial release of the vasodilator NO and harmful superoxide free radicals. Statins also reduce cholesterol intermediates including isoprenoids. These are important for post-translational modification of substances including the GTPases Rho and Rac. By altering the membrane association of these molecules, statins affect intracellular positioning and hence activity of a multitude of substances. These include eNOS(endothelial NO synthase), which produces NO (inhibited by Rho), and NADPH oxidase, which produces superoxide (dependent on Rac). Statins may improve endothelial function by enhancing production of NO while decreasing superoxide production. A total of 40 hypercholesterolaemic patients were randomized to treatment with either atorvastatin or placebo; 20 normolipidaemic patients were also studied. Platelet nitrite, NO and superoxide were examined as was the cellular distribution of the GTPases Rho and Rac at baseline and after 8 weeks of treatment.Following atorvastatin therapy, platelet NO was increased (3.2 pmol/10(8) platelets) and superoxide output was attenuated [-3.4 pmol min(-1) (10(8) platelets)(-1)] when compared with placebo. The detection of both Rho and Rac was significantly reduced in the membranes of platelets, implying reduced activity. In conclusion, the results of the present study show altered NO/superoxide production following statin therapy. A potential mechanism for this is the change in the distribution of intracellular GTPases, which was considered to be secondary to decreases in isoprenoid intermediates, suggesting that the activity of the former had been affected by atorvastatin.

  17. Nucleotide binding affects intrinsic dynamics and structural communication in Ras GTPases.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Francesca; Raimondi, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The Ras superfamily comprises many guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) that are essential to intracellular signal transduction. These proteins act biologically as molecular switches, which, cycling between OFF and ON states, play fundamental role in cell biology. This review article summarizes the inferences from the widest computational analyses done so far on Ras GTPases aimed at providing a comprehensive structural/dynamic view of the trans-family and family-specific functioning mechanisms. These variegated comparative analyses could infer the evolutionary and intrinsic flexibilities as well as the structural communication features in the most representative G protein families in different functional states. In spite of the low sequence similarities, the members of the Ras superfamily share the topology of the Ras-like domain, including the nucleotide binding site. GDP and GTP make very similar interactions in all GTPases and differences in their binding modes are localized around the γ-phosphate of GTP. Remarkably, such subtle local differences result in significant differences in the functional dynamics and structural communication features of the protein. In Ras GTPases, the nucleotide plays a central and active role in dictating functional dynamics, establishing the major structure network, and mediating the communication paths instrumental in function retention and specialization. Collectively, the results of these studies support the speculation that an "extended conformational selection model" that embraces a repertoire of selection and adjustment processes is likely more suitable to describe the nucleotide behavior in these important molecular switches.

  18. Ribosome-induced tuning of GTP hydrolysis by a translational GTPase.

    PubMed

    Maracci, Cristina; Peske, Frank; Dannies, Ev; Pohl, Corinna; Rodnina, Marina V

    2014-10-07

    GTP hydrolysis by elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), a translational GTPase that delivers aminoacyl-tRNAs to the ribosome, plays a crucial role in decoding and translational fidelity. The basic reaction mechanism and the way the ribosome contributes to catalysis are a matter of debate. Here we use mutational analysis in combination with measurements of rate/pH profiles, kinetic solvent isotope effects, and ion dependence of GTP hydrolysis by EF-Tu off and on the ribosome to dissect the reaction mechanism. Our data suggest that--contrary to current models--the reaction in free EF-Tu follows a pathway that does not involve the critical residue H84 in the switch II region. Binding to the ribosome without a cognate codon in the A site has little effect on the GTPase mechanism. In contrast, upon cognate codon recognition, the ribosome induces a rearrangement of EF-Tu that renders GTP hydrolysis sensitive to mutations of Asp21 and His84 and insensitive to K(+) ions. We suggest that Asp21 and His84 provide a network of interactions that stabilize the positions of the γ-phosphate and the nucleophilic water, respectively, and thus play an indirect catalytic role in the GTPase mechanism on the ribosome.

  19. Eukaryotic GPN-loop GTPases paralogs use a dimeric assembly reminiscent of archeal GPN.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Béatrice; Beraud, Carole; Meguellati, Sarra; Chen, Shu W; Pellequer, Jean Luc; Armengaud, Jean; Godon, Christian

    2013-02-01

    GTPases are molecular switches that regulate a wide-range of cellular processes. The GPN-loop GTPase (GPN) is a sub-family of P-loop NTPase that evolved from a single gene copy in archaea to triplicate paralog genes in eukaryotes, each having a non-redundant essential function in cell. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, yGPN1 and yGPN2 are involved in sister chromatid cohesion mechanism, whereas nothing is known regarding yGPN3 function. Previous high-throughput experiments suggested that GPN paralogs interaction may occur. In this work, GPN|GPN contact was analyzed in details using TAP-Tag approach, yeast two-hybrid assay, in silico energy computation and site-directed mutagenesis of a conserved Glu residue located at the center of the interaction interface. It is demonstrated that this residue is essential for cell viability. A chromatid cohesion assay revealed that, like yGPN1 and yGPN2, yGPN3 also plays a role in sister chromatid cohesion. These results suggest that all three GPN proteins act at the molecular level in sister chromatid cohesion mechanism as a GPN|GPN complex reminiscent of the homodimeric structure of PAB0955, an archaeal member of GPN-loop GTPase.

  20. Cloning, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the small GTPase gene cdc-42 from Ancylostoma caninum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yurong; Zheng, Jing; Chen, Jiaxin

    2012-12-01

    CDC-42 is a member of the Rho GTPase subfamily that is involved in many signaling pathways, including mitosis, cell polarity, cell migration and cytoskeleton remodeling. Here, we present the first characterization of a full-length cDNA encoding the small GTPase cdc-42, designated as Accdc-42, isolated from the parasitic nematode Ancylostoma caninum. The encoded protein contains 191 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 21 kDa and displays a high level of identity with the Rho-family GTPase protein CDC-42. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Accdc-42 was most closely related to Caenorhabditis briggsae cdc-42. Comparison with selected sequences from the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Xenopus laevis, Danio rerio, Mus musculus and human genomes showed that Accdc-42 is highly conserved. AcCDC-42 demonstrates the highest identity to CDC-42 from C. briggsae (94.2%), and it also exhibits 91.6% identity to CDC-42 from C. elegans and 91.1% from Brugia malayi. Additionally, the transcript of Accdc-42 was analyzed during the different developmental stages of the worm. Accdc-42 was expressed in the L1/L2 larvae, L3 larvae and female and male adults of A. caninum.

  1. Central Roles of Small GTPases in the Development of Cell Polarity in Yeast and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hay-Oak; Bi, Erfei

    2007-01-01

    Summary: The establishment of cell polarity is critical for the development of many organisms and for the function of many cell types. A large number of studies of diverse organisms from yeast to humans indicate that the conserved, small-molecular-weight GTPases function as key signaling proteins involved in cell polarization. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a particularly attractive model because it displays pronounced cell polarity in response to intracellular and extracellular cues. Cells of S. cerevisiae undergo polarized growth during various phases of their life cycle, such as during vegetative growth, mating between haploid cells of opposite mating types, and filamentous growth upon deprivation of nutrition such as nitrogen. Substantial progress has been made in deciphering the molecular basis of cell polarity in budding yeast. In particular, it becomes increasingly clear how small GTPases regulate polarized cytoskeletal organization, cell wall assembly, and exocytosis at the molecular level and how these GTPases are regulated. In this review, we discuss the key signaling pathways that regulate cell polarization during the mitotic cell cycle and during mating. PMID:17347519

  2. Thiol-modifying phenylarsine oxide inhibits guanine nucleotide binding of Rho but not of Rac GTPases.

    PubMed

    Gerhard, Ralf; John, Harald; Aktories, Klaus; Just, Ingo

    2003-06-01

    Phenylarsine oxide (PAO) is a phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor that cross-links vicinal thiol groups, thereby inactivating phosphatases possessing XCysXXCysX motifs. The RhoA-GTPase, but not the Rac1-GTPase, also possesses vicinal cysteines within the guanine nucleotide-binding region (aa 13-20) and the phosphohydrolase activity site. Treatment of Caco-2 cells with PAO showed a dose-dependent reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, indicating involvement of Rho GTPases. As tested by pull-down experiments, RhoA, but not Rac1, from cell lysates was inactivated by PAO in a concentration-dependent manner. Modification of RhoA by PAO resulted in altered mobility on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and PAO-modified RhoA was no longer substrate for C3-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation. Furthermore, RhoA treated with PAO, but not Rac1 treated with PAO, lost its property to bind to guanine nucleotides. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass analysis of PAO-modified RhoA showed a mass shift according to an adduction of a single PAO molecule per molecule RhoA. Further analysis of Glu-C-generated RhoA peptides confirmed binding of PAO to a peptide harboring the guanine nucleotide binding region. Thus, PAO does not exclusively inhibit phosphotyrosine phosphatases but also inactivates RhoA by alteration of nucleotide binding.

  3. Rab and Arl GTPase family members cooperate in the localization of the golgin GCC185.

    PubMed

    Burguete, Alondra Schweizer; Fenn, Timothy D; Brunger, Axel T; Pfeffer, Suzanne R

    2008-01-25

    GCC185 is a large coiled-coil protein at the trans Golgi network that is required for receipt of transport vesicles inbound from late endosomes and for anchoring noncentrosomal microtubules that emanate from the Golgi. Here, we demonstrate that recruitment of GCC185 to the Golgi is mediated by two Golgi-localized small GTPases of the Rab and Arl families. GCC185 binds Rab6, and mutation of residues needed for Rab binding abolishes Golgi localization. The crystal structure of Rab6 bound to the GCC185 Rab-binding domain reveals that Rab6 recognizes a two-fold symmetric surface on a coiled coil immediately adjacent to a C-terminal GRIP domain. Unexpectedly, Rab6 binding promotes association of Arl1 with the GRIP domain. We present a structure-derived model for dual GTPase membrane attachment that highlights the potential ability of Rab GTPases to reach binding partners at a significant distance from the membrane via their unstructured and membrane-anchored, hypervariable domains.

  4. Legionella pneumophila regulates the small GTPase Rab1 activity by reversible phosphorylcholination

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yunhao; Arnold, Randy J.; Luo, Zhao-Qing

    2011-01-01

    Effectors delivered into host cells by the Legionella pneumophila Dot/Icm type IV transporter are essential for the biogenesis of the specialized vacuole that permits its intracellular growth. The biochemical function of most of these effectors is unknown, making it difficult to assign their roles in the establishment of successful infection. We found that several yeast genes involved in membrane trafficking, including the small GTPase Ypt1, strongly suppress the cytotoxicity of Lpg0695(AnkX), a protein known to interfere severely with host vesicle trafficking when overexpressed. Mass spectrometry analysis of Rab1 purified from a yeast strain inducibly expressing AnkX revealed that this small GTPase is modified posttranslationally at Ser76 by a phosphorylcholine moiety. Using cytidine diphosphate-choline as the donor for phosphorylcholine, AnkX catalyzes the transfer of phosphorylcholine to Rab1 in a filamentation-induced by cAMP(Fic) domain-dependent manner. Further, we found that the activity of AnkX is regulated by the Dot/Icm substrate Lpg0696(Lem3), which functions as a dephosphorylcholinase to reverse AnkX-mediated modification on Rab1. Phosphorylcholination interfered with Rab1 activity by making it less accessible to the bacterial GTPase activation protein LepB; this interference can be alleviated fully by Lem3. Our results reveal reversible phosphorylcholination as a mechanism for balanced modulation of host cellular processes by a bacterial pathogen. PMID:22158903

  5. Cloning, purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the Bacillus subtilis GTPase YphC–GDP complex

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ling; Muench, Stephen P.; Roujeinikova, Anna; Sedelnikova, Svetlana E.; Rice, David W.

    2006-05-01

    Crystals of a selenomethionine-incorporated YphC–GDP complex have been grown using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and polyethylene glycol as a precipitating agent. The Bacillus subtilis YphC gene encodes an essential GTPase thought to be involved in ribosome binding and whose protein product may represent a target for the development of a novel antibacterial agent. Sequence analysis reveals that YphC belongs to the EngA family of GTPases, which uniquely contain two adjacent GTP-binding domains. Crystals of a selenomethionine-incorporated YphC–GDP complex have been grown using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and polyethylene glycol as a precipitating agent. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 62.71, b = 65.05, c = 110.61 Å, and have one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Data sets at three different wavelengths were collected on a single crystal to 2.5 Å resolution at the Daresbury SRS in order to solve the structure by MAD. Ultimately, analysis of YphC in complex with GDP may allow a greater understanding of the EngA family of essential GTPases.

  6. Control of protein signaling using a computationally designed GTPase/GEF orthogonal pair.

    PubMed

    Kapp, Gregory T; Liu, Sen; Stein, Amelie; Wong, Derek T; Reményi, Attila; Yeh, Brian J; Fraser, James S; Taunton, Jack; Lim, Wendell A; Kortemme, Tanja

    2012-04-03

    Signaling pathways depend on regulatory protein-protein interactions; controlling these interactions in cells has important applications for reengineering biological functions. As many regulatory proteins are modular, considerable progress in engineering signaling circuits has been made by recombining commonly occurring domains. Our ability to predictably engineer cellular functions, however, is constrained by complex crosstalk observed in naturally occurring domains. Here we demonstrate a strategy for improving and simplifying protein network engineering: using computational design to create orthogonal (non-crossreacting) protein-protein interfaces. We validated the design of the interface between a key signaling protein, the GTPase Cdc42, and its activator, Intersectin, biochemically and by solving the crystal structure of the engineered complex. The designed GTPase (orthoCdc42) is activated exclusively by its engineered cognate partner (orthoIntersectin), but maintains the ability to interface with other GTPase signaling circuit components in vitro. In mammalian cells, orthoCdc42 activity can be regulated by orthoIntersectin, but not wild-type Intersectin, showing that the designed interaction can trigger complex processes. Computational design of protein interfaces thus promises to provide specific components that facilitate the predictable engineering of cellular functions.

  7. The large conductance calcium-activated K(+) channel interacts with the small GTPase Rab11b.

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, Sophia; Harvey, Margaret; Sakai, Yoshihisa; Jordan, Amy; Sokolowski, Bernd

    2012-09-21

    The transduction of sound by the receptor or hair cells of the cochlea leads to the activation of ion channels found in the basal and lateral regions of these cells. Thus, the processing of these transduced signals to the central nervous system is tied to the regulation of baso-lateral ion channels. The large conductance calcium-activated potassium or BK channel was revealed to interact with the small GTPase, Rab11b, which is one of many Rabs found in various endosomal pathways. Immunoelectron microscopy showed the colocalization of these two proteins in receptor cells and auditory neurons. Using Chinese hamster ovary cells as a heterologous expression system, Rab11b increased or decreased BK expression, depending on the overexpression or RNAi knockdown of Rab, respectively. Additional mutation analyses, using a yeast two-hybrid assay, suggested that this GTPase moderately interacts within a region of BK exclusive of the N- or C-terminal tails. These data suggest that this small GTPase regulates BK in a slow recycling process through the endocytic compartment and to the plasmalemma.

  8. Conserved regulators of Rag GTPases orchestrate amino acid-dependent TORC1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Powis, Katie; De Virgilio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The highly conserved target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) is the central component of a signaling network that couples a vast range of internal and external stimuli to cell growth, proliferation and metabolism. TORC1 deregulation is associated with a number of human pathologies, including many cancers and metabolic disorders, underscoring its importance in cellular and organismal growth control. The activity of TORC1 is modulated by multiple inputs; however, the presence of amino acids is a stimulus that is essential for its activation. Amino acid sufficiency is communicated to TORC1 via the highly conserved family of Rag GTPases, which assemble as heterodimeric complexes on lysosomal/vacuolar membranes and are regulated by their guanine nucleotide loading status. Studies in yeast, fly and mammalian model systems have revealed a multitude of conserved Rag GTPase modulators, which have greatly expanded our understanding of amino acid sensing by TORC1. Here we review the major known modulators of the Rag GTPases, focusing on recent mechanistic insights that highlight the evolutionary conservation and divergence of amino acid signaling to TORC1. PMID:27462445

  9. Influence of bacterial toxins on the GTPase activity of transducin from bovine retinal rod outer segments

    SciTech Connect

    Rybin, V.O.; Gureeva, A.A.

    1986-05-10

    The action of cholera toxin, capable of ADP-ribosylation of the activator N/sub s/ protein, and pertussis toxin, capable of ADP-ribosylation of the inhibitor N/sub i/ protein of the adenylate cyclase complex, on transducin, the GTP-binding protein of the rod outer segments of the retina, was investigated. It was shown that under the action of pertussis and cholera toxins, the GTPase activity of transducin is inhibited. Pertussin toxin inhibits the GTPase of native retinal rod outer segments by 30-40%, while GTPase of homogeneous transducin produces a 70-80% inhibition. The action of toxins on transducin depends on the presence and nature of the guanylic nucleotide with which incubation is performed. On the basis of the data obtained it is suggested that pertussis toxin interacts with pretransducin and with the transducin-GDP complex, while cholera toxin ADP-ribosylates the transducin-GTP complex and does not act on transducin lacking GTP.

  10. The large conductance calcium-activated K+ channel interacts with the small GTPase Rab11b

    PubMed Central

    Sokolowski, Sophia; Harvey, Margaret; Sakai, Yoshihisa; Jordan, Amy; Sokolowski, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    The transduction of sound by the receptor or hair cells of the cochlea leads to the activation of ion channels found in the basal and lateral regions of these cells. Thus, the processing of these transduced signals to the central nervous system is tied to the regulation of baso-lateral ion channels. The large conductance calcium-activated potassium or BK channel was revealed to interact with the small GTPase, Rab11b, which is one of many Rabs found in various endosomal pathways. Immunoelectron microscopy showed the colocalization of these two proteins in receptor cells and auditory neurons. Using Chinese hamster ovary cells as a heterologous expression system, Rab11b increased or decreased BK expression, depending on the overexpression or RNAi knockdown of Rab, respectively. Additional mutation analyses, using a yeast two-hybrid assay, suggested that this GTPase moderately interacts within a region of BK exclusive of the N- or C-terminal tails. These data suggest that this small GTPase regulates BK in a slow recycling process through the endocytic compartment and to the plasmalemma. PMID:22935415

  11. The GTPase Rho has a critical regulatory role in thymus development.

    PubMed Central

    Henning, S W; Galandrini, R; Hall, A; Cantrell, D A

    1997-01-01

    The present study employs a genetic approach to explore the role of Rho GTPases in murine thymic development. Inactivation of Rho function in the thymus was achieved by thymic targeting of a transgene encoding C3 transferase from Clostridium botulinum which selectively ADP-ribosylates Rho within its effector domain and thereby abolishes its biological function. Thymi lacking functional Rho isolated from C3 transgenic mice were strikingly smaller and showed a marked (90%) decrease in cellularity compared with their normal litter mates. We also observed a similar decrease in levels of peripheral T cells in C3 transgenic mice. Analysis of the maturation status of thymocytes indicated that differentiation of progenitor cells to mature T cells can occur in the absence of Rho function, and both positive and negative selection of T cells appear to be intact. However, transgenic mice that lack Rho function in the thymus show maturational, proliferative and cell survival defects during T-cell development that severely impair the generation of normal numbers of thymocytes and mature peripheral T cells. The present study thus identifies a role for Rho-dependent signalling pathways in thymocyte development. The data show that the function of Rho GTPases is critical for the proliferative expansion of thymocytes. This defines a selective role for the GTPase Rho in early thymic development as a critical integrator of proliferation and cell survival signals. PMID:9171353

  12. SNX9 promotes metastasis by enhancing cancer cell invasion via differential regulation of RhoGTPases

    PubMed Central

    Bendris, Nawal; Williams, Karla C.; Reis, Carlos R.; Welf, Erik S.; Chen, Ping-Hung; Lemmers, Bénédicte; Hahne, Michael; Leong, Hon Sing; Schmid, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite current advances in cancer research, metastasis remains the leading factor in cancer-related deaths. Here we identify sorting nexin 9 (SNX9) as a new regulator of breast cancer metastasis. We detect an increase in SNX9 expression in human breast cancer metastases compared with primary tumors and demonstrate that SNX9 expression in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells is necessary to maintain their ability to metastasize in a chick embryo model. Conversely, SNX9 knockdown impairs this process. In vitro studies using several cancer cell lines derived from a variety of human tumors reveal a role for SNX9 in cell invasion and identify mechanisms responsible for this novel function. We show that SNX9 controls the activation of RhoA and Cdc42 GTPases and also regulates cell motility via the modulation of well-known molecules involved in metastasis, namely RhoA-ROCK and N-WASP. In addition, we find that SNX9 is required for RhoGTPase-dependent, clathrin-independent endocytosis, and in this capacity can functionally substitute to the bona fide Rho GAP, GTPase regulator associated with focal adhesion kinase (GRAF1). Taken together, our data establish novel roles for SNX9 as a multifunctional protein scaffold that regulates, and potentially coordinates, several cellular processes that together can enhance cancer cell metastasis. PMID:26960793

  13. Spatiotemporal control of small GTPases with light using the LOV domain.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi I; Wang, Xiaobo; He, Li; Montell, Denise; Hahn, Klaus M

    2011-01-01

    Signaling networks in living systems are coordinated through subcellular compartmentalization and precise timing of activation. These spatiotemporal aspects ensure the fidelity of signaling while contributing to the diversity and specificity of downstream events. This is studied through development of molecular tools that generate localized and precisely timed protein activity in living systems. To study the molecular events responsible for cytoskeletal changes in real time, we generated versions of Rho family GTPases whose interactions with downstream effectors is controlled by light. GTPases were grafted to the phototropin LOV (light, oxygen, or voltage) domain (Huala, E., Oeller, P. W., Liscum, E., Han, I., Larsen, E., and Briggs, W. R. (1997). Arabidopsis NPH1: A protein kinase with a putative redox-sensing domain. Science278, 2120-2123.) via an alpha helix on the LOV C-terminus (Wu, Y. I., Frey, D., Lungu, O. I., Jaehrig, A., Schlichting, I., Kuhlman, B., and Hahn, K. M. (2009). A genetically encoded photoactivatable Rac controls the motility of living cells. Nature461, 104-108.). The LOV domain sterically blocked the GTPase active site until it was irradiated. Exposure to 400-500nm light caused unwinding of the helix linking the LOV domain to the GTPase, relieving steric inhibition. The change was reversible and repeatable, and the protein could be returned to its inactive state simply by turning off the light. The LOV domain incorporates a flavin as the active chromophore. This naturally occurring molecule is incorporated simply upon expression of the LOV fusion in cells or animals, permitting ready control of GTPase function in different systems. In cultured single cells, light-activated Rac leads to membrane ruffling, protrusion, and migration. In collectively migrating border cells in the Drosophila ovary, focal activation of photoactivatable Rac (PA-Rac) in a single cell is sufficient to redirect the entire group. PA-Rac in a single cell also rescues the

  14. The Tumor-suppressive Small GTPase DiRas1 Binds the Noncanonical Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor SmgGDS and Antagonizes SmgGDS Interactions with Oncogenic Small GTPases.

    PubMed

    Bergom, Carmen; Hauser, Andrew D; Rymaszewski, Amy; Gonyo, Patrick; Prokop, Jeremy W; Jennings, Benjamin C; Lawton, Alexis J; Frei, Anne; Lorimer, Ellen L; Aguilera-Barrantes, Irene; Mackinnon, Alexander C; Noon, Kathleen; Fierke, Carol A; Williams, Carol L

    2016-03-18

    The small GTPase DiRas1 has tumor-suppressive activities, unlike the oncogenic properties more common to small GTPases such as K-Ras and RhoA. Although DiRas1 has been found to be a tumor suppressor in gliomas and esophageal squamous cell carcinomas, the mechanisms by which it inhibits malignant phenotypes have not been fully determined. In this study, we demonstrate that DiRas1 binds to SmgGDS, a protein that promotes the activation of several oncogenic GTPases. In silico docking studies predict that DiRas1 binds to SmgGDS in a manner similar to other small GTPases. SmgGDS is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for RhoA, but we report here that SmgGDS does not mediate GDP/GTP exchange on DiRas1. Intriguingly, DiRas1 acts similarly to a dominant-negative small GTPase, binding to SmgGDS and inhibiting SmgGDS binding to other small GTPases, including K-Ras4B, RhoA, and Rap1A. DiRas1 is expressed in normal breast tissue, but its expression is decreased in most breast cancers, similar to its family member DiRas3 (ARHI). DiRas1 inhibits RhoA- and SmgGDS-mediated NF-κB transcriptional activity in HEK293T cells. We also report that DiRas1 suppresses basal NF-κB activation in breast cancer and glioblastoma cell lines. Taken together, our data support a model in which DiRas1 expression inhibits malignant features of cancers in part by nonproductively binding to SmgGDS and inhibiting the binding of other small GTPases to SmgGDS.

  15. A novel domain in translational GTPase BipA mediates interaction with the 70S ribosome and influences GTP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    deLivron, Megan A; Makanji, Heeren S; Lane, Maura C; Robinson, Victoria L

    2009-11-10

    BipA is a universally conserved prokaryotic GTPase that exhibits differential ribosome association in response to stress-related events. It is a member of the translation factor family of GTPases along with EF-G and LepA. BipA has five domains. The N-terminal region of the protein, consisting of GTPase and beta-barrel domains, is common to all translational GTPases. BipA domains III and V have structural counterparts in EF-G and LepA. However, the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the protein is unique to the BipA family. To investigate how the individual domains of BipA contribute to the biological properties of the protein, deletion constructs were designed and their GTP hydrolysis and ribosome binding properties assessed. Data presented show that removal of the CTD abolishes the ability of BipA to bind to the ribosome and that ribosome complex formation requires the surface provided by domains III and V and the CTD. Additional mutational analysis was used to outline the BipA-70S interaction surface extending across these domains. Steady state kinetic analyses revealed that successive truncation of domains from the C-terminus resulted in a significant increase in the intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rate and a loss of ribosome-stimulated GTPase activity. These results indicate that, similar to other translational GTPases, the ribosome binding and GTPase activities of BipA are tightly coupled. Such intermolecular regulation likely plays a role in the differential ribosome binding by the protein.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of RabX3, a tandem GTPase from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Kumar Srivastava, Vijay; Chandra, Mintu; Datta, Sunando

    2014-07-01

    Ras superfamily GTPases regulate signalling pathways that control multiple biological processes by modulating the GTP/GDP cycle. Various Rab GTPases, which are the key regulators of vesicular trafficking pathways, play a vital role in the survival and virulence of the enteric parasite Entamoeba histolytica. The Rab GTPases act as binary molecular switches that utilize the conformational changes associated with the GTP/GDP cycle to elicit responses from target proteins and thereby regulate a broad spectrum of cellular processes including cell proliferation, cytoskeletal assembly, nuclear transport and intracellular membrane trafficking in eukaryotes. Entamoeba histolytica RabX3 (EhRabX3) is a unique GTPase in the amoebic genome, the only member in the eukaryotic Ras superfamily that harbours tandem G-domains and shares only 8-16% sequence identity with other GTPases. Recent studies suggested that EhRabX3 binds to a single guanine nucleotide through its N-terminal G-domain (NTD), while the C-terminal G-domain (CTD) plays a potential role in binding of the nucleotide to the NTD. Thus, understanding the intermolecular regulation between the two GTPase domains is expected to reveal valuable information on the overall action of EhRabX3. To provide structural insights into the inclusive action of this unique GTPase, EhRabX3 was crystallized by successive micro-seeding using the vapour-diffusion method. A complete data set was collected to 3.3 Å resolution using a single native EhRabX3 crystal at 100 K on BM14 at the ESRF, Grenoble, France. The crystal belonged to monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a=198.6, b=119.3, c=89.2 Å, β=103.1°. Preliminary analysis of the data using the Matthews Probability Calculator suggested the presence of four to six molecules in the asymmetric unit.

  17. A Novel Domain in Translational GTPase BipA Mediates Interaction with the 70S Ribosome and Influences GTP Hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    deLivron, M.; Makanji, H; Lane, M; Robinson, V

    2009-01-01

    BipA is a universally conserved prokaryotic GTPase that exhibits differential ribosome association in response to stress-related events. It is a member of the translation factor family of GTPases along with EF-G and LepA. BipA has five domains. The N-terminal region of the protein, consisting of GTPase and {beta}-barrel domains, is common to all translational GTPases. BipA domains III and V have structural counterparts in EF-G and LepA. However, the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the protein is unique to the BipA family. To investigate how the individual domains of BipA contribute to the biological properties of the protein, deletion constructs were designed and their GTP hydrolysis and ribosome binding properties assessed. Data presented show that removal of the CTD abolishes the ability of BipA to bind to the ribosome and that ribosome complex formation requires the surface provided by domains III and V and the CTD. Additional mutational analysis was used to outline the BipA-70S interaction surface extending across these domains. Steady state kinetic analyses revealed that successive truncation of domains from the C-terminus resulted in a significant increase in the intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rate and a loss of ribosome-stimulated GTPase activity. These results indicate that, similar to other translational GTPases, the ribosome binding and GTPase activities of BipA are tightly coupled. Such intermolecular regulation likely plays a role in the differential ribosome binding by the protein.

  18. Extensive in silico analysis of Mimivirus coded Rab GTPase homolog suggests a possible role in virion membrane biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zade, Amrutraj; Sengupta, Malavi; Kondabagil, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Rab GTPases are the key regulators of intracellular membrane trafficking in eukaryotes. Many viruses and intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved to hijack the host Rab GTPase functions, mainly through activators and effector proteins, for their benefit. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APMV) is one of the largest viruses and belongs to the monophyletic clade of nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV). The inner membrane lining is integral to the APMV virion structure. APMV assembly involves extensive host membrane modifications, like vesicle budding and fusion, leading to the formation of a membrane sheet that is incorporated into the virion. Intriguingly, APMV and all group I members of the Mimiviridae family code for a putative Rab GTPase protein. APMV is the first reported virus to code for a Rab GTPase (encoded by R214 gene). Our thorough in silico analysis of the subfamily specific (SF) region of Mimiviridae Rab GTPase sequences suggests that they are related to Rab5, a member of the group II Rab GTPases, of lower eukaryotes. Because of their high divergence from the existing three isoforms, A, B, and C of the Rab5-family, we suggest that Mimiviridae Rabs constitute a new isoform, Rab5D. Phylogenetic analysis indicated probable horizontal acquisition from a lower eukaryotic ancestor followed by selection and divergence. Furthermore, interaction network analysis suggests that vps34 (a Class III PI3K homolog, coded by APMV L615), Atg-8 and dynamin (host proteins) are recruited by APMV Rab GTPase during capsid assembly. Based on these observations, we hypothesize that APMV Rab plays a role in the acquisition of inner membrane during virion assembly. PMID:26441866

  19. Signaling through rho gtpases in microgravity (rho signaling) on iss (soyuz tma-1) belgian soyuz mission "odissea"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusgens, B.; Lambert, Ch.; Lapière, C. M.

    2007-09-01

    Rho GTPases, RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42, are molecular switches in the intracellular signaling pathways, that relay the information collected by receptors to soluble mediators and insoluble extracellular matrix environment. The objective of this experiment was to investigate the impact of microgravity on cellular processes depending on Rho GTPases activity, i.e.cytoskeleton and focal adhesions organization, GTPases translocation to the membrane, nuclear translocation of signaling molecules and gene expression. WI26 fibroblasts were stably transfected by the constitutively active form of each of the Rho GTPase. Selected clone of the engineered cells and the wild-type cells were used during the belgian ODISSEA Soyuz mission to investigate the alterations of the mechanical and phenotypic expression of the cells induced by microgravity and their rescue by the engineered Rho GTPases. A failure in the time schedule, a disconnection of the experiment containers before the automatic activation of the fixation procedure, was responsible for the loss of the biological samples.

  20. Protease-Resistant and Cell-Permeable Double-Stapled Peptides Targeting the Rab8a GTPase.

    PubMed

    Cromm, Philipp M; Spiegel, Jochen; Küchler, Philipp; Dietrich, Laura; Kriegesmann, Julia; Wendt, Mathias; Goody, Roger S; Waldmann, Herbert; Grossmann, Tom N

    2016-08-19

    Small GTPases comprise a family of highly relevant targets in chemical biology and medicinal chemistry research and have been considered "undruggable" due to the persisting lack of effective synthetic modulators and suitable binding pockets. As molecular switches, small GTPases control a multitude of pivotal cellular functions, and their dysregulation is associated with many human diseases such as various forms of cancer. Rab-GTPases represent the largest subfamily of small GTPases and are master regulators of vesicular transport interacting with various proteins via flat and extensive protein-protein interactions (PPIs). The only reported synthetic inhibitor of a PPI involving an activated Rab GTPase is the hydrocarbon stapled peptide StRIP3. However, this macrocyclic peptide shows low proteolytic stability and cell permeability. Here, we report the design of a bioavailable StRIP3 analogue that harbors two hydrophobic cross-links and exhibits increased binding affinity, combined with robust cellular uptake and extremely high proteolytic stability. Localization experiments reveal that this double-stapled peptide and its target protein Rab8a accumulate in the same cellular compartments. The reported approach offers a strategy for the implementation of biostability into conformationally constrained peptides while supporting cellular uptake and target affinity, thereby conveying drug-like properties.

  1. Structure-function analysis of the yeast mitochondrial Rho GTPase, Gem1p: implications for mitochondrial inheritance.

    PubMed

    Koshiba, Takumi; Holman, Holly A; Kubara, Kenji; Yasukawa, Kai; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro; Okamoto, Koji; MacFarlane, Jane; Shaw, Janet M

    2011-01-07

    Mitochondria undergo continuous cycles of homotypic fusion and fission, which play an important role in controlling organelle morphology, copy number, and mitochondrial DNA maintenance. Because mitochondria cannot be generated de novo, the motility and distribution of these organelles are essential for their inheritance by daughter cells during division. Mitochondrial Rho (Miro) GTPases are outer mitochondrial membrane proteins with two GTPase domains and two EF-hand motifs, which act as receptors to regulate mitochondrial motility and inheritance. Here we report that although all of these domains are biochemically active, only the GTPase domains are required for the mitochondrial inheritance function of Gem1p (the yeast Miro ortholog). Mutations in either of the Gem1p GTPase domains completely abrogated mitochondrial inheritance, although the mutant proteins retained half the GTPase activity of the wild-type protein. Although mitochondrial inheritance was not dependent upon Ca(2+) binding by the two EF-hands of Gem1p, a functional N-terminal EF-hand I motif was critical for stable expression of Gem1p in vivo. Our results suggest that basic features of Miro protein function are conserved from yeast to humans, despite differences in the cellular machinery mediating mitochondrial distribution in these organisms.

  2. Enhancement of tubulin polymerization by Cl(-)-induced blockade of intrinsic GTPase.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Ken-ichi; Niisato, Naomi; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2012-08-24

    In growing neurite of neuronal cells, it is suggested that α/β-tubulin heterodimers assemble to form microtubule, and assembly of microtubule promotes neurite elongation. On the other hand, recent studies reveal importance of intracellular Cl(-) in regulation of various cellular functions such as cell cycle progression, differentiation, cell migration, and elongation of neurite in neuronal cells. In this study, we investigated effects of Cl(-) on in vitro tubulin polymerization. We found that efficiency of in vitro tubulin polymerization (the number of microtubule) was higher (3 to 5-fold) in Cl(-)-containing solutions than that in Cl(-)-free solutions containing Br(-) or NO(3)(-). On the other hand, GTPase activity of tubulin was lower (2/3-fold) in Cl(-)-containing solutions than that in Cl(-)-free solutions containing Br(-) or NO(3)(-). Efficiency of in vitro tubulin polymerization in solutions containing a non-hydrolyzable analogue of GTP (GpCpp) instead of GTP was much higher than that in the presence of GTP. Effects of replacement of GTP with GpCpp on in vitro tubulin polymerization was weaker in Cl(-) solutions (10-fold increases) than that in Br(-) or NO(3)(-) solutions (20-fold increases), although the efficiency of in vitro tubulin polymerization in Cl(-) solutions containing GpCpp was still higher than that in Br(-) or NO(3)(-) solutions containing GpCpp. Our results suggest that a part of stimulatory effects of Cl(-) on in vitro tubulin polymerization is mediated via an inhibitory effect on GTPase activity of tubulin, although Cl(-) would also regulate in vitro tubulin polymerization by factors other than an inhibitory effect on GTPase activity.

  3. Morelloflavone, a biflavonoid, inhibits tumor angiogenesis by targeting Rho GTPases and ERK signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiufeng; Yi, Tingfang; Yi, Zhengfang; Cho, Sung Gook; Qu, Weijing; Pinkaew, Decha; Fujise, Ken; Liu, Mingyao

    2009-01-01

    Morelloflavone, a biflavonoid extracted from Garcinia dulcis, has shown anti-oxidative, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the function and the mechanism of this compound in cancer treatment and tumor angiogenesis have not been elucidated to date. In this study, we postulated that morelloflavone might have the ability to inhibit angiogenesis, the pivotal step in tumor growth, invasiveness and metastasis. We demonstrated that morelloflavone could inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and capillary-like tube formation of primary cultured human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependent manner. Morelloflavone effectively inhibited microvessel sprouting of endothelial cells in the rat aortic ring assay and the formation of new blood microvessels induced by VEGF in the mouse Matrigel plug assay. Furthermore, morelloflavone inhibited tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis of prostate cancer cells (PC-3) in xenograft mouse tumor model in vivo, suggesting that morelloflavone inhibited tumorigenesis by targeting angiogenesis. To understand the underlying mechanism of morelloflavone on the inhibitory effect of tumor growth and angiogenesis, we demonstrated that morelloflavone could inhibit the activation of both RhoA and Rac1 GTPases, but have little effect on the activation of Cdc42 GTPase. Additionally, morelloflavone inhibited the phosphorylation and activation of Raf/MEK/ERK pathway kinases without affecting VEGFR2 activity. Together, our results indicate that morelloflavone exerts anti-angiogenic action by targeting the activation of Rho-GTPases and ERK signaling pathways. These findings are the first to reveal the novel functions of morelloflavone in tumor angiogenesis and its molecular basis for the anticancer action. PMID:19147565

  4. Subcellular Localization and Functional Analysis of the Arabidopsis GTPase RabE1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Speth, Elena Bray; Imboden, Lori; Hauck, Paula; He, Sheng Yang

    2009-01-01

    Membrane trafficking plays a fundamental role in eukaryotic cell biology. Of the numerous known or predicted protein components of the plant cell trafficking system, only a relatively small subset have been characterized with respect to their biological roles in plant growth, development, and response to stresses. In this study, we investigated the subcellular localization and function of an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) small GTPase belonging to the RabE family. RabE proteins are phylogenetically related to well-characterized regulators of polarized vesicle transport from the Golgi apparatus to the plasma membrane in animal and yeast cells. The RabE family of GTPases has also been proposed to be a putative host target of AvrPto, an effector protein produced by the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, based on yeast two-hybrid analysis. We generated transgenic Arabidopsis plants that constitutively expressed one of the five RabE proteins (RabE1d) fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). GFP-RabE1d and endogenous RabE proteins were found to be associated with the Golgi apparatus and the plasma membrane in Arabidopsis leaf cells. RabE down-regulation, due to cosuppression in transgenic plants, resulted in drastically altered leaf morphology and reduced plant size, providing experimental evidence for an important role of RabE GTPases in regulating plant growth. RabE down-regulation did not affect plant susceptibility to pathogenic P. syringae bacteria; conversely, expression of the constitutively active RabE1d-Q74L enhanced plant defenses, conferring resistance to P. syringae infection. PMID:19233904

  5. Generalized myoclonic epilepsy with photosensitivity in juvenile dogs caused by a defective DIRAS family GTPase 1

    PubMed Central

    Wielaender, Franziska; Sarviaho, Riika; James, Fiona; Hytönen, Marjo K.; Cortez, Miguel A.; Kluger, Gerhard; Koskinen, Lotta L. E.; Arumilli, Meharji; Kornberg, Marion; Bathen-Noethen, Andrea; Tipold, Andrea; Rentmeister, Kai; Bhatti, Sofie F. M.; Hülsmeyer, Velia; Boettcher, Irene C.; Tästensen, Carina; Flegel, Thomas; Leeb, Tosso; Matiasek, Kaspar; Fischer, Andrea; Lohi, Hannes

    2017-01-01

    The clinical and electroencephalographic features of a canine generalized myoclonic epilepsy with photosensitivity and onset in young Rhodesian Ridgeback dogs (6 wk to 18 mo) are described. A fully penetrant recessive 4-bp deletion was identified in the DIRAS family GTPase 1 (DIRAS1) gene with an altered expression pattern of DIRAS1 protein in the affected brain. This neuronal DIRAS1 gene with a proposed role in cholinergic transmission provides not only a candidate for human myoclonic epilepsy but also insights into the disease etiology, while establishing a spontaneous model for future intervention studies and functional characterization. PMID:28223533

  6. P-cadherin-mediated Rho GTPase regulation during collective cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Plutoni, Cédric; Bazellières, Elsa; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This commentary addresses the role of P-cadherin in collective cell migration (CCM), a cooperative and coordinated migration mode, used by cells during normal and pathological migration processes. We discuss how cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions (CCJs) play a critical role in CCM through their ability to regulate Rho GTPase-dependent pathways and how this leads to the generation and orientation of mechanical forces. We will also highlight the key function of P-cadherin (a poor prognostic marker in several tumors) in promoting collective cell movement in epithelial and mesenchymal cells. PMID:27152729

  7. A Rap GTPase interactor, RADIL, mediates migration of neural crest precursors.

    PubMed

    Smolen, Gromoslaw A; Schott, Benjamin J; Stewart, Rodney A; Diederichs, Sven; Muir, Beth; Provencher, Heather L; Look, A Thomas; Sgroi, Dennis C; Peterson, Randall T; Haber, Daniel A

    2007-09-01

    The neural crest (NC) is a highly motile cell population that gives rise to multiple tissue lineages during vertebrate embryogenesis. Here, we identify a novel effector of the small GTPase Rap, called RADIL, and show that it is required for cell adhesion and migration. Knockdown of radil in the zebrafish model results in multiple defects in NC-derived lineages such as cartilage, pigment cells, and enteric neurons. We specifically show that these defects are primarily due to the diminished migratory capacity of NC cells. The identification of RADIL as a regulator of NC migration defines a role for the Rap pathway in this process.

  8. A historical perspective on the lateral diffusion model of GTPase activation and related coupling of membrane signaling proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liebman, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Aspects of our discovery of lateral diffusion of the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) rhodopsin and that a single activated rhodopsin can non-covalently catalyze GTP binding to thousands of GTPases per second on rod disk membranes via this diffusion are summarized herein. Rapid GTPase coupling to membrane-bound phosphodiesterase (PDE) further amplifies the signal via cGMP hydrolysis, essential to visual transduction. Important generalizations from this work are that biomembranes can uniquely concentrate, orient for reaction and provide a solvent appropriate to rapid, powerful and appropriately controlled sequential interaction of signaling proteins. Of equal importance to function is timely control and termination of such powerful amplification via receptor phosphorylation (quenching) and arrestin binding. Downstream kinetic modulation by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) and regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) and related mechanisms as well as limitations set by membrane domain fencing, structural protein binding etc. can be essential in relevant systems. PMID:25279248

  9. Neutron Crystal Structure of RAS GTPase Puts in Question the Protonation State of the GTP γ-Phosphate.

    PubMed

    Knihtila, Ryan; Holzapfel, Genevieve; Weiss, Kevin; Meilleur, Flora; Mattos, Carla

    2015-12-25

    RAS GTPase is a prototype for nucleotide-binding proteins that function by cycling between GTP and GDP, with hydrogen atoms playing an important role in the GTP hydrolysis mechanism. It is one of the most well studied proteins in the superfamily of small GTPases, which has representatives in a wide range of cellular functions. These proteins share a GTP-binding pocket with highly conserved motifs that promote hydrolysis to GDP. The neutron crystal structure of RAS presented here strongly supports a protonated γ-phosphate at physiological pH. This counters the notion that the phosphate groups of GTP are fully deprotonated at the start of the hydrolysis reaction, which has colored the interpretation of experimental and computational data in studies of the hydrolysis mechanism. The neutron crystal structure presented here puts in question our understanding of the pre-catalytic state associated with the hydrolysis reaction central to the function of RAS and other GTPases.

  10. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of mammalian MSS4–Rab8 GTPase protein complex

    SciTech Connect

    Itzen, Aymelt; Bleimling, Nathalie; Ignatev, Alexander; Pylypenko, Olena; Rak, Alexey

    2006-02-01

    The MSS4 (mammalian suppressor of Sec4) protein in complex with nucleotide-free Rab8 GTPase has been purified and crystallized in a form suitable for structure analysis and a complete data set has been collected to 2 Å resolution. Rab GTPases function as ubiquitous key regulators of membrane-vesicle transport in eukaryotic cells. MSS4 is an evolutionarily conserved protein that binds to exocytotic Rabs and facilitates nucleotide release. The MSS4 protein in complex with nucleotide-free Rab8 GTPase has been purified and crystallized in a form suitable for structure analysis. The crystals belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 40.92, b = 49.85, c = 83.48 Å, α = 102.88, β = 97.46, γ = 90.12°. A complete data set has been collected to 2 Å resolution.

  11. The role of chemokine activation of Rac GTPases in hematopoietic stem cell marrow homing, retention, and peripheral mobilization.

    PubMed

    Cancelas, Jose A; Jansen, Michael; Williams, David A

    2006-08-01

    Signaling downstream from the chemokine receptor CXCR4, the tyrosine kinase receptor c-kit and beta1-integrins has been shown to be crucial in the regulation of migration, homing, and engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors. Each of these receptors signal through Rac-type Rho guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases). Rac GTPases play a major role in the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and also in the control of gene expression and the activation of proliferation and survival pathways. Here we review the specific roles of the members of the Rac subfamily of the Rho GTPase family in regulating the intracellular signaling of hematopoietic cells responsible for regulation of homing, marrow retention, and peripheral mobilization.

  12. Neutron Crystal Structure of RAS GTPase Puts in Question the Protonation State of the GTP γ-Phosphate*

    PubMed Central

    Knihtila, Ryan; Holzapfel, Genevieve; Weiss, Kevin; Meilleur, Flora; Mattos, Carla

    2015-01-01

    RAS GTPase is a prototype for nucleotide-binding proteins that function by cycling between GTP and GDP, with hydrogen atoms playing an important role in the GTP hydrolysis mechanism. It is one of the most well studied proteins in the superfamily of small GTPases, which has representatives in a wide range of cellular functions. These proteins share a GTP-binding pocket with highly conserved motifs that promote hydrolysis to GDP. The neutron crystal structure of RAS presented here strongly supports a protonated γ-phosphate at physiological pH. This counters the notion that the phosphate groups of GTP are fully deprotonated at the start of the hydrolysis reaction, which has colored the interpretation of experimental and computational data in studies of the hydrolysis mechanism. The neutron crystal structure presented here puts in question our understanding of the pre-catalytic state associated with the hydrolysis reaction central to the function of RAS and other GTPases. PMID:26515069

  13. Neutron crystal structure of RAS GTPase puts in question the protonation state of the GTP γ-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Knihtila, Ryan; Holzapfel, Genevieve; Weiss, Kevin; Meilleur, Flora; Mattos, Carla

    2015-10-29

    RAS GTPase is a prototype for nucleotide-binding proteins that function by cycling between GTP and GDP, with hydrogen atoms playing an important role in the GTP hydrolysis mechanism. It is one of the most well studied proteins in the superfamily of small GTPases, which has representatives in a wide range of cellular functions. These proteins share a GTP-binding pocket with highly conserved motifs that promote hydrolysis to GDP. The neutron crystal structure of RAS presented here strongly supports a protonated gamma-phosphate at physiological pH. This counters the notion that the phosphate groups of GTP are fully deprotonated at the start of the hydrolysis reaction, which has colored the interpretation of experimental and computational data in studies of the hydrolysis mechanism. As a result, the neutron crystal structure presented here puts in question our understanding of the pre-catalytic state associated with the hydrolysis reaction central to the function of RAS and other GTPases.

  14. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a rice Rac/Rop GTPase, OsRac1

    PubMed Central

    Kosami, Ken-ichi; Ohki, Izuru; Hayashi, Kokoro; Tabata, Ryo; Usugi, Sayaka; Kawasaki, Tsutomu; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Shimamoto, Ko; Kojima, Chojiro

    2014-01-01

    Small GTPases regulate a large variety of key cellular processes. Plant small Rac/Rop GTPases have recently received broad attention as it is becoming clear that these enzymes regulate various plant cellular processes. OsRac1, a rice Rac/Rop protein, is a key regulator of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and induces immune responses. Although four structures of plant small GTPases have been reported, all of these were of the inactive form. Here, OsRac1 was purified and co-crystallized with the GTP analogue 5′-guanylyl imidodiphos­phate (GMPPNP). The crystal belonged to space group P212121 and a complete data set was collected to 1.9 Å resolution. PMID:24419631

  15. Localization of a Rho GTPase Implies a Role in Tip Growth and Movement of the Generative Cell in Pollen Tubes.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Y.; Wang, Y.; Zhu, J. K.; Yang, Z.

    1996-01-01

    The Rho family GTPases function as key molecular switches, controlling a variety of actin-dependent cellular processes, such as the establishment of cell polarity, cell morphogenesis, and movement in diverse eukaryotic organisms. A novel subfamily of Rho GTPases, Rop, has been identified in plants. Protein gel blot and RNA gel blot hybridization analyses indicated that one of these plant Rho GTPases, Rop1, is expressed predominantly in the male gametophyte (pollen and pollen tubes). Cell fractionation analysis of pollen tubes showed that Rop is partitioned into soluble and particulate fractions. The particulate Rop could be solubilized with detergents but not with salts, indicating that it is tightly bound to membranes. The membrane association appears to result from membrane anchoring via a geranylgeranyl group because an in vitro isoprenylation assay demonstrated that Rop1Ps is geranylgeranylated. Subcellular localization, using indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, showed that Rop is highly concentrated in the cortical region of the tube apex and in the periphery of the generative cell. The cortical Rop protein at the apex forms a gradient with decreasing concentration from tip to base and appears to be associated with the plasma membrane. These results suggest that the apical Rop GTPase may be involved in the signaling mechanism that controls the actin-dependent tip growth of pollen tubes. Localization of the Rop GTPase to the periphery of the generative cell is analogous to that of myosin, suggesting that the Rop GTPase plays an important role in the modulation of an actomyosin motor system involved in the movement of the generative cell. PMID:12239385

  16. Autophosphorylation in the Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 (LRRK2) GTPase Domain Modifies Kinase and GTP-Binding Activities

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Philip J.; Smith, Archer D.; Sen, Saurabh; Renfrow, Matthew B.; Mobley, James A.; West, Andrew B.

    2011-01-01

    The LRRK2 protein has both GTPase and kinase activities and mutation in either enzymatic domain can cause late-onset Parkinson’s disease (PD). Nucleotide binding in the GTPase domain may be required for kinase activity and residues in the GTPase domain are potential sites for autophosphorylation, suggesting a complex mechanism of intrinsic regulation. To further define the effects of LRRK2 autophosphorylation, we applied a technique optimal for detection of protein phosphorylation, electron transfer dissociation (ETD), and identified autophosphorylation events exclusively nearby the nucleotide binding pocket in the GTPase domain. PD-linked mutations alter kinase activity but did not alter autophosphorylation site specificity or sites of phosphorylation in a robust in vitro substrate myelin basic protein. Amino-acid substitutions in the GTPase domain have large effects on kinase activity, as insertion of the GTPase-associated R1441C pathogenic mutation together with the G2019S kinase-domain mutation resulted in a multiplicative increase (~7-fold) in activity. Removal of a conserved autophosphorylation site (T1503) by mutation to an alanine residue resulted in greatly decreased GTP-binding and kinase activity. While autophosphorylation likely serves to potentiate kinase activity, we find that oligomerization and loss of the active dimer species occurs in an ATP and autophosphorylation independent manner. LRRK2 autophosphorylation sites are overall robustly protected from dephosphorylation in vitro, suggesting tight control over activity in vivo. We developed highly specific antibodies targeting pT1503 but failed to detect endogenous autophosphorylation in protein derived from transgenic mice and cell lines. LRRK2 activity in vivo is unlikely to be constitutive but rather refined to specific responses. PMID:21806997

  17. Chlamydophila pneumoniae HflX belongs to an uncharacterized family of conserved GTPases and associates with the Escherichia coli 50S large ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Polkinghorne, Adam; Ziegler, Urs; González-Hernández, Yanela; Pospischil, Andreas; Timms, Peter; Vaughan, Lloyd

    2008-11-01

    Predicted members of the HflX subfamily of phosphate-binding-loop guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) are widely distributed in the bacterial kingdom but remain virtually uncharacterized. In an attempt to understand mechanisms used for regulation of growth and development in the chlamydiae, obligate intracellular and developmentally complex bacteria, we have begun investigations into chlamydial GTPases; we report here what appears to be the first analysis of a HflX family GTPase using a predicted homologue from Chlamydophila pneumoniae. In agreement with phylogenetic predictions for members of this GTPase family, purified recombinant Cp. pneumoniae HflX was specific for guanine nucleotides and exhibited a slow intrinsic GTPase activity when incubated with [gamma-(32)P]GTP. Using HflX-specific monoclonal antibodies, HflX could be detected by Western blotting and high-resolution confocal microscopy throughout the vegetative growth cycle of Cp. pneumoniae and, at early time points, appeared to partly localize to the membrane. Ectopic expression of Cp. pneumoniae HflX in Escherichia coli revealed co-sedimentation of HflX with the E. coli 50S large ribosomal subunit. The results of this work open up some intriguing possibilities for the role of GTPases belonging to this previously uncharacterized family of bacterial GTPases. Ribosome association is a feature shared by other important conserved GTPase families and more detailed investigations will be required to delineate the role of HflX in bacterial ribosome function.

  18. In Vitro Assay for the Rap GTPase-Activating Protein Activity of the Purified Cytoplasmic Domain of Plexin.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Heath G; Wang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xuewu

    2017-01-01

    Plexins are cell surface receptors that bind semaphorins and regulate essential processes such as axon guidance and angiogenesis. The cytoplasmic regions of plexins contain a functionally essential GTPase-activating protein (GAP) domain, which initiates downstream signaling by specifically inactivating the Rap GTPase. Here we describe the methods for expression and purification of the plexin cytoplasmic region in E. coli, and characterization of its GAP activity using a photometric assay. We also provide a protocol for measuring GAP activity of single-chain constructs with Rap covalently linked to the plexin cytoplasmic region.

  19. Interactions between the bud emergence proteins Bem1p and Bem2p and Rho- type GTPases in yeast

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The SH3 domain-containing protein Bem1p is needed for normal bud emergence and mating projection formation, two processes that require asymmetric reorganizations of the cortical cytoskeleton in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To identify proteins that functionally and/or physically interact with Bem1p, we screened for mutations that display synthetic lethality with a mutant allele of the BEM1 gene and for genes whose products display two-hybrid interactions with the Bem1 protein. CDC24, which is required for bud emergence and encodes a GEF (guanine- nucleotide exchange factor) for the essential Rho-type GTPase Cdc42p, was identified during both screens. The COOH-terminal 75 amino acids of Cdc24p, outside of the GEF domain, can interact with a portion of Bem1p that lacks both SH3 domains. Bacterially expressed Cdc24p and Bem1p bind to each other in vitro, indicating that no other yeast proteins are required for this interaction. The most frequently identified gene that arose from the bem1 synthetic-lethal screen was the bud-emergence gene BEM2 (Bender and Pringle. 1991. Mol. Cell Biol. 11:1295-1395), which is allelic with IPL2 (increase in ploidy; Chan and Botstein, 1993. Genetics. 135:677-691). Here we show that Bem2p contains a GAP (GTPase-activating protein) domain for Rho-type GTPases, and that this portion of Bem2p can stimulate in vitro the GTPase activity of Rho1p, a second essential yeast Rho-type GTPase. Cells deleted for BEM2 become large and multinucleate. These and other genetic, two-hybrid, biochemical, and phenotypic data suggest that multiple Rho-type GTPases control the reorganization of the cortical cytoskeleton in yeast and that the functions of these GTPases are tightly coupled. Also, these findings raise the possibility that Bem1p may regulate or be a target of action of one or more of these GTPases. PMID:7962098

  20. Regulation of cargo-selective endocytosis by dynamin 2 GTPase-activating protein girdin.

    PubMed

    Weng, Liang; Enomoto, Atsushi; Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kiyofumi; Asai, Naoya; Morone, Nobuhiro; Jiang, Ping; An, Jian; Kato, Takuya; Kuroda, Keisuke; Watanabe, Takashi; Asai, Masato; Ishida-Takagishi, Maki; Murakumo, Yoshiki; Nakashima, Hideki; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Takahashi, Masahide

    2014-09-17

    In clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), specificity and selectivity for cargoes are thought to be tightly regulated by cargo-specific adaptors for distinct cellular functions. Here, we show that the actin-binding protein girdin is a regulator of cargo-selective CME. Girdin interacts with dynamin 2, a GTPase that excises endocytic vesicles from the plasma membrane, and functions as its GTPase-activating protein. Interestingly, girdin depletion leads to the defect in clathrin-coated pit formation in the center of cells. Also, we find that girdin differentially interacts with some cargoes, which competitively prevents girdin from interacting with dynamin 2 and confers the cargo selectivity for CME. Therefore, girdin regulates transferrin and E-cadherin endocytosis in the center of cells and their subsequent polarized intracellular localization, but has no effect on integrin and epidermal growth factor receptor endocytosis that occurs at the cell periphery. Our results reveal that girdin regulates selective CME via a mechanism involving dynamin 2, but not by operating as a cargo-specific adaptor.

  1. The microtubule-associated protein MAP18 affects ROP2 GTPase activity during root hair growth.

    PubMed

    Kang, Erfang; Zheng, Mingzhi; Zhang, Yan; Yuan, Ming; Yalovsky, Shaul; Zhu, Lei; Fu, Ying

    2017-03-17

    Establishment and maintenance of the polar site are important for root hair tip growth. We previously reported that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN18 (MAP18) functions in controlling the direction of pollen tube growth and root hair elongation. Additionally, the Rop GTPase ROP2 was reported as a positive regulator of both root hair initiation and tip growth in Arabidopsis. Both loss-of-function of ROP2 or knock-down of MAP18 leads to a decrease in root hair length, whereas overexpression of either MAP18 or ROP2 causes multiple tips or a branching hair phenotype. However, it is unclear whether MAP18 and ROP2 coordinately regulate root hair growth. In the present study, we demonstrate that MAP18 and ROP2 interact genetically and functionally. MAP18 physically interacts with ROP2 in vitro and in vivo and preferentially binds to the inactive form of the ROP2 protein. MAP18 promotes ROP2 activity during root hair tip growth. Further investigation revealed that MAP18 competes with RhoGTPase GDP dissociation inhibitor 1 (AtRhoGDI1)/SUPERCENTIPEDE1 (SCN1) for binding to ROP2, in turn affecting localization of active ROP2 in the plasma membrane of the root hair tip. These results reveal a novel function of MAP18 in the regulation of ROP2 activation during root hair growth.

  2. RhoA GTPase oxidation stimulates cell proliferation via nuclear factor-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Gyu; Kwon, Hyung-Joo; Wu, Guang; Park, Yohan; Lee, Jae-Yong; Kim, Jaebong; Kim, Sung-Chan; Choe, Myoen; Kang, Seung Goo; Seo, Goo-Young; Kim, Pyeung-Hyeun; Park, Jae-Bong

    2017-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by many kinds of stimuli are essential for cellular signaling including cell proliferation. The dysregulation of ROS, therefore, is related to a variety of diseases including cancer. However, it was not clearly elucidated how ROS regulate cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. In this study, we investigated a mechanism by which the oxidation of RhoA GTPase regulates nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and cell proliferation. Hydrogen peroxide activated NF-κB and RhoA GTPase, but did not activate RhoA C16/20A mutant, an oxidation-resistant form. Remarkably, the oxidation of RhoA reduced its affinity towards RhoGDI, leading to the dissociation of RhoA-RhoGDI complex. Si-Vav2, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), inhibited RhoA activation upon hydrogen peroxide. The oxidized RhoA (oxRhoA)-GTP was readily bound to IκB kinase γ (IKKγ), whereas oxidized RhoGDI did not bind to IKKγ. The oxRhoA-GTP bound to IKKγ activated IKKβ, leading to IκB phosphorylation and degradation, consequently NF-κB activation. Hydrogen peroxide induced cell proliferation, but RhoA C16/20A mutant suppressed cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. Conclusively, RhoA oxidation at Cys16/20 is critically involved in cell proliferation and tumorigenesis through NF-κB activation in response to ROS.

  3. The GTPase IFT27 is involved in both anterograde and retrograde intraflagellar transport.

    PubMed

    Huet, Diego; Blisnick, Thierry; Perrot, Sylvie; Bastin, Philippe

    2014-04-24

    The construction of cilia and flagella depends on intraflagellar transport (IFT), the bidirectional movement of two protein complexes (IFT-A and IFT-B) driven by specific kinesin and dynein motors. IFT-B and kinesin are associated to anterograde transport whereas IFT-A and dynein participate to retrograde transport. Surprisingly, the small GTPase IFT27, a member of the IFT-B complex, turns out to be essential for retrograde cargo transport in Trypanosoma brucei. We reveal that this is due to failure to import both the IFT-A complex and the IFT dynein into the flagellar compartment. To get further molecular insight about the role of IFT27, GDP- or GTP-locked versions were expressed in presence or absence of endogenous IFT27. The GDP-locked version is unable to enter the flagellum and to interact with other IFT-B proteins and its sole expression prevents flagellum formation. These findings demonstrate that a GTPase-competent IFT27 is required for association to the IFT complex and that IFT27 plays a role in the cargo loading of the retrograde transport machinery.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02419.001.

  4. A complex distribution of elongation family GTPases EF1A and EFL in basal alveolate lineages.

    PubMed

    Mikhailov, Kirill V; Janouškovec, Jan; Tikhonenkov, Denis V; Mirzaeva, Gulnara S; Diakin, Andrei Yu; Simdyanov, Timur G; Mylnikov, Alexander P; Keeling, Patrick J; Aleoshin, Vladimir V

    2014-09-01

    Translation elongation factor-1 alpha (EF1A) and the related GTPase EF-like (EFL) are two proteins with a complex mutually exclusive distribution across the tree of eukaryotes. Recent surveys revealed that the distribution of the two GTPases in even closely related taxa is frequently at odds with their phylogenetic relationships. Here, we investigate the distribution of EF1A and EFL in the alveolate supergroup. Alveolates comprise three major lineages: ciliates and apicomplexans encode EF1A, whereas dinoflagellates encode EFL. We searched transcriptome databases for seven early-diverging alveolate taxa that do not belong to any of these groups: colpodellids, chromerids, and colponemids. Current data suggest all seven are expected to encode EF1A, but we find three genera encode EFL: Colpodella, Voromonas, and the photosynthetic Chromera. Comparing this distribution with the phylogeny of alveolates suggests that EF1A and EFL evolution in alveolates cannot be explained by a simple horizontal gene transfer event or lineage sorting.

  5. Listeria monocytogenes antagonizes the human GTPase Cdc42 to promote bacterial spread.

    PubMed

    Rigano, Luciano A; Dowd, Georgina C; Wang, Yi; Ireton, Keith

    2014-07-01

    The bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes uses actin-based motility to spread from infected human cells to surrounding healthy cells. Cell-cell spread involves the formation of thin extensions of the host plasma membrane ('protrusions') containing motile bacteria. In cultured enterocytes, the Listeria protein InlC promotes protrusion formation by binding and antagonizing the human scaffolding protein Tuba. Tuba is a known activator of the GTPase Cdc42. In this work, we demonstrate an important role for Cdc42 in controlling Listeria spread. Infection of the enterocyte cell line Caco-2 BBE1 induced a decrease in the level of Cdc42-GTP, indicating that Listeria downregulates this GTPase. Genetic data involving RNA interference indicated that bacterial impairment of Cdc42 may involve inhibition of Tuba. Experiments with dominant negative and constitutively activated alleles of Cdc42 demonstrated that the ability to inactivate Cdc42 is required for efficient protrusion formation by Listeria. Taken together, these findings indicate a novel mechanism of bacterial spread involving pathogen-induced downregulation of host Cdc42.

  6. Suppression of dynamin GTPase activity by sertraline leads to inhibition of dynamin-dependent endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kiyofumi; Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Otomo, Masahiro; Osada, Kenichi; Yamaguchi, Noboru; Nakashima, Hideki

    2010-01-01

    Dynamin (Dyn) 1 plays a role in recycling of synaptic vesicles, and thus in nervous system function. We previously showed that sertraline, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), is a mixed-type inhibitor of Dyn 1 with respect to both GTP and L-alpha-phosphatidyl-L-serine (PS) in vitro, and we suggested that it may regulate the neurotransmitter transport by modulating synaptic vesicle endocytosis via inhibition of Dyn 1 GTPase. Here, we investigated the effect of sertraline on endocytosis of marker proteins in human neuroblastoma SH-Sy5Y cells and HeLa cells. Sertraline inhibited endocytosis in both cell lines. Western blotting showed that SH-Sy5Y expresses Dyn 1 and Dyn 2, while HeLa expresses only Dyn 2. GTPase assay showed that sertraline inhibited Dyn 2 as well as Dyn 1. Therefore, the effect of sertraline on endocytosis was mediated by Dyn 2, at least in HeLa cells, as well as by Dyn 1 in cell lines that express it. Moreover, the inhibition mechanism of transferrin (Tf) uptake by sertraline differed from that in cells expressing Dyn 1 K44A, a GTP binding-defective variant, and sertraline did not interfere with the interaction between Dyn 1 and PS-liposomes.

  7. Some selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors inhibit dynamin I guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase).

    PubMed

    Otomo, Masahiro; Takahashi, Kiyofumi; Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Osada, Kenichi; Nakashima, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Noboru

    2008-08-01

    Neuronal dynamin I plays a critical role in the recycling of synaptic vesicles, and thus in nervous system function. We expressed and purified dynamin I to explore potentially clinically useful endocytosis inhibitors and to examine the mechanism of their action. We estimated the IC(50) of nineteen psychotropic drugs for dynamin I. The IC(50) values of two selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (sertraline and fluvoxamine) were 7.3+/-1.0 and 14.7+/-1.6 microM, respectively. Kinetic analyses revealed that fluvoxamine is a noncompetitive inhibitor of dynamin I guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) with respect to guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) and a competitive inhibitor with respect to L-phosphatidylserine (PS). Fluvoxamine may compete with PS for binding to the pleckstrin homology domain of dynamin I. On the other hand, sertraline was a mixed type inhibitor with respect to both GTP and PS. Our results indicate that sertraline and fluvoxamine may regulate the transportation of neurotransmitters by modulating synaptic vesicle endocytosis via the inhibition of dynamin I GTPase.

  8. Protective role of interferon-induced Mx GTPases against influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Haller, O; Staeheli, P; Kochs, G

    2009-04-01

    Mx proteins are interferon-induced large GTPases with antiviral activities. They inhibit a wide range of viruses by blocking early stages of the replication cycles. Importantly, Mx GTPases also suppress the growth of highly pathogenic influenza A viruses, such as currently circulating H5N1 viruses or the pandemic H1N1 virus strain of 1918. In this paper, the authors review the properties of Mx proteins and discuss their role in host defence against highly pathogenic viruses. The authors further suggest that mammalian Mx proteins may normally provide a barrier against zoonotic transmission of avian influenza A viruses and that acquired resistance to the antiviral action of human MxA may be one factor, among many others, that facilitates the spread of pandemic strains in human populations. The presently available evidence suggests that Mx proteins of domestic chickens lack the ability to efficiently combat avian influenza viruses known to cause devastating infections in this species. The deliberate introduction of an antivirally active Mx gene originating from resistant birds or mammals may confer some degree of protection and thus stop commercial birds from serving as amplifying hosts of potentially pandemic influenza virus strains.

  9. Crystal structures of Mycobacterial MeaB and MMAA-like GTPases.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Thomas E; Baugh, Loren; Bullen, Jameson; Baydo, Ruth O; Witte, Pam; Thompkins, Kaitlin; Phan, Isabelle Q H; Abendroth, Jan; Clifton, Matthew C; Sankaran, Banumathi; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Myler, Peter J; Staker, Bart L; Grundner, Christoph; Lorimer, Donald D

    2015-06-01

    The methylmalonyl Co-A mutase-associated GTPase MeaB from Methylobacterium extorquens is involved in glyoxylate regulation and required for growth. In humans, mutations in the homolog methylmalonic aciduria associated protein (MMAA) cause methylmalonic aciduria, which is often fatal. The central role of MeaB from bacteria to humans suggests that MeaB is also important in other, pathogenic bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, the identity of the mycobacterial MeaB homolog is presently unclear. Here, we identify the M. tuberculosis protein Rv1496 and its homologs in M. smegmatis and M. thermoresistibile as MeaB. The crystal structures of all three homologs are highly similar to MeaB and MMAA structures and reveal a characteristic three-domain homodimer with GDP bound in the G domain active site. A structure of Rv1496 obtained from a crystal grown in the presence of GTP exhibited electron density for GDP, suggesting GTPase activity. These structures identify the mycobacterial MeaB and provide a structural framework for therapeutic targeting of M. tuberculosis MeaB.

  10. Bacterial Obg proteins: GTPases at the nexus of protein and DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kint, Cyrielle; Verstraeten, Natalie; Hofkens, Johan; Fauvart, Maarten; Michiels, Jan

    2014-08-01

    Obg proteins (also known as ObgE, YhbZ and CgtA) are conserved P-loop GTPases, essential for growth in bacteria. Like other GTPases, Obg proteins cycle between a GTP-bound ON and a GDP-bound OFF state, thereby controlling cellular processes. Interestingly, the in vitro biochemical properties of Obg proteins suggest that they act as sensors for the cellular GDP/GTP pools and adjust their activity according to the cellular energy status. Obg proteins have been attributed a host of cellular functions, including roles in essential cellular processes (DNA replication, ribosome maturation) and roles in different stress adaptation pathways (stringent response, sporulation, general stress response). This review summarizes the current knowledge on Obg activity and function. Furthermore, we present a model that integrates the different functions of Obg by assigning it a fundamental role in cellular physiology, at the hub of protein and DNA synthesis. In particular, we believe that Obg proteins might provide a connection between different global pathways in order to fine-tune cellular processes in response to a given energy status.

  11. Discovery and characterization of small molecules that target the GTPase Ral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chao; Liu, Degang; Li, Liwei; Wempe, Michael F.; Guin, Sunny; Khanna, May; Meier, Jeremy; Hoffman, Brenton; Owens, Charles; Wysoczynski, Christina L.; Nitz, Matthew D.; Knabe, William E.; Ahmed, Mansoor; Brautigan, David L.; Paschal, Bryce M.; Schwartz, Martin A.; Jones, David N. M.; Ross, David; Meroueh, Samy O.; Theodorescu, Dan

    2014-11-01

    The Ras-like GTPases RalA and RalB are important drivers of tumour growth and metastasis. Chemicals that block Ral function would be valuable as research tools and for cancer therapeutics. Here we used protein structure analysis and virtual screening to identify drug-like molecules that bind to a site on the GDP-bound form of Ral. The compounds RBC6, RBC8 and RBC10 inhibited the binding of Ral to its effector RALBP1, as well as inhibiting Ral-mediated cell spreading of murine embryonic fibroblasts and anchorage-independent growth of human cancer cell lines. The binding of the RBC8 derivative BQU57 to RalB was confirmed by isothermal titration calorimetry, surface plasmon resonance and 1H-15N transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) NMR spectroscopy. RBC8 and BQU57 show selectivity for Ral relative to the GTPases Ras and RhoA and inhibit tumour xenograft growth to a similar extent to the depletion of Ral using RNA interference. Our results show the utility of structure-based discovery for the development of therapeutics for Ral-dependent cancers.

  12. Fission yeast Ryh1 GTPase activates TOR Complex 2 in response to glucose.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Tomoyuki; Morigasaki, Susumu; Tatebe, Hisashi; Ikeda, Kyoko; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The Target Of Rapamycin (TOR) is an evolutionarily conserved protein kinase that forms 2 distinct protein complexes referred to as TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and 2 (TORC2). Recent extensive studies have demonstrated that TORC1 is under the control of the small GTPases Rheb and Rag that funnel multiple input signals including those derived from nutritional sources; however, information is scarce as to the regulation of TORC2. A previous study using the model system provided by the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe identified Ryh1, a Rab-family GTPase, as an activator of TORC2. Here, we show that the nucleotide-binding state of Ryh1 is regulated in response to glucose, mediating this major nutrient signal to TORC2. In glucose-rich growth media, the GTP-bound form of Ryh1 induces TORC2-dependent phosphorylation of Gad8, a downstream target of TORC2 in fission yeast. Upon glucose deprivation, Ryh1 becomes inactive, which turns off the TORC2-Gad8 pathway. During glucose starvation, however, Gad8 phosphorylation by TORC2 gradually recovers independently of Ryh1, implying an additional TORC2 activator that is regulated negatively by glucose. The paired positive and negative regulatory mechanisms may allow fine-tuning of the TORC2-Gad8 pathway, which is essential for growth under glucose-limited environment.

  13. Role of the Rho GTPase Rac in the activation of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Pick, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    The superoxide-generating NADPH oxidase of phagocytes consists of the membrane-associated cytochrome b558 (a heterodimer of Nox2 and p22phox) and 4 cytosolic components: p47phox, p67phox, p40phox, and the small GTPase, Rac, in complex with RhoGDI. Superoxide is produced by the NADPH-driven reduction of molecular oxygen, via a redox gradient located in Nox2. Electron flow in Nox2 is initiated by interaction with cytosolic components, which translocate to the membrane, p67phox playing the central role. The participation of Rac is expressed in the following sequence: (1) Translocation of the RacGDP-RhoGDI complex to the membrane; (2) Dissociation of RacGDP from RhoGDI; (3) GDP to GTP exchange on Rac, mediated by a guanine nucleotide exchange factor; (4) Binding of RacGTP to p67phox; (5) Induction of a conformational change in p67phox, promoting interaction with Nox2. The particular involvement of Rac in NADPH oxidase assembly serves as a paradigm for signaling by Rho GTPases, in general. PMID:24598074

  14. Modelling GTPase dynamics to understand RhoA-driven cancer cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Hetmanski, Joseph H.R.; Schwartz, Jean-Marc; Caswell, Patrick T.

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis, initially driven by cells migrating and invading through the local environment, leads to most cancer-associated deaths. Cells can use a variety of modes to move in vitro, all of which depend on Rho GTPases at some level. While traditionally it was thought that Rac1 activity drives protrusive lamellipodia at the leading edge of a polarised cell while RhoA drives rear retraction, more recent work in 3D microenvironments has revealed a much more complicated picture of GTPase dynamics. In particular, RhoA activity can dominate the leading edge polymerisation of actin to form filopodial actin-spike protrusions that drive more invasive cell migration. We recently described a potential mechanism to abrogate this pro-invasive localised leading edge Rac1 to RhoA switch via manipulation of a negative feedback loop that was revealed by adopting a logical modelling approach. Both challenging dogma and taking a formal, mathematical approach to understanding signalling involved in motility may be vital to harnessing harmful cell migration and preventing metastasis in future research. PMID:27913679

  15. Ral-GTPases mediate a distinct downstream signaling pathway from Ras that facilitates cellular transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Urano, T; Emkey, R; Feig, L A

    1996-01-01

    Ral proteins (RalA and RalB) comprise a distinct family of Ras-related GTPases (Feig and Emkey, 1993). Recently, Ral-GDS, the exchange factor that activates Ral proteins, has been shown to bind specifically to the activated forms of RasH, R-Ras and Rap1A, in the yeast two-hybrid system. Here we demonstrate that although all three GTPases have the capacity to bind Ral-GDS in mammalian cells, only RasH activates Ral-GDS. Furthermore, although constitutively activated Ra1A does not induce oncogenic transformation on its own, its expression enhances the transforming activities of both RasH and Raf. Finally, a dominant inhibitory form of RalA suppresses the transforming activities of both RasH and Raf. These results demonstrate that activation of Ral-GDS and thus its target, Ral, constitutes a distinct downstream signaling pathway from RasH that potentiates oncogenic transformation. Images PMID:8631302

  16. Actin filaments target the oligomeric maturation of the dynamin GTPase Drp1 to mitochondrial fission sites.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei-ke; Hatch, Anna L; Merrill, Ronald A; Strack, Stefan; Higgs, Henry N

    2015-11-26

    While the dynamin GTPase Drp1 plays a critical role during mitochondrial fission, mechanisms controlling its recruitment to fission sites are unclear. A current assumption is that cytosolic Drp1 is recruited directly to fission sites immediately prior to fission. Using live-cell microscopy, we find evidence for a different model, progressive maturation of Drp1 oligomers on mitochondria through incorporation of smaller mitochondrially-bound Drp1 units. Maturation of a stable Drp1 oligomer does not forcibly lead to fission. Drp1 oligomers also translocate directionally along mitochondria. Ionomycin, a calcium ionophore, causes rapid mitochondrial accumulation of actin filaments followed by Drp1 accumulation at the fission site, and increases fission rate. Inhibiting actin polymerization, myosin IIA, or the formin INF2 reduces both un-stimulated and ionomycin-induced Drp1 accumulation and mitochondrial fission. Actin filaments bind purified Drp1 and increase GTPase activity in a manner that is synergistic with the mitochondrial protein Mff, suggesting a role for direct Drp1/actin interaction. We propose that Drp1 is in dynamic equilibrium on mitochondria in a fission-independent manner, and that fission factors such as actin filaments target productive oligomerization to fission sites.

  17. Inhibition of Rac1 GTPase activity affects porcine oocyte maturation and early embryo development

    PubMed Central

    Song, Si-Jing; Wang, Qiao-Chu; Jia, Ru-Xia; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian oocyte asymmetric division relies on the eccentric positioning of the spindle, resulting in the polar body formation. Small signaling G protein Rac1 is a member of GTPases, which regulates a diverse array of cellular events, including the control of cell growth, cytoskeletal reorganization, and the activation of protein kinases. However, effects of Rac1 on the porcine oocyte maturation and early embryo development are not fully understood. In present study we investigated the role of Rac1 in oocyte maturation and embryo cleavage. We first found that Rac1 localized at the cortex of the porcine oocytes, and disrupting the Rac1 activities by treating with NSC 23766 led to the failure of polar body emission. In addition, a majority of treated oocytes exhibited abnormal spindle morphology, indicating that Rac1 may involve into porcine oocyte spindle formation. This might be due to the regulation of Rac1 on MAPK, since p-MAPK expression decreased after NSC 23766 treatments. Moreover, we found that the position of most meiotic spindles in treated oocytes were away from the cortex, indicating the roles of Rac1 on meiotic spindle positioning. Our results also showed that inhibition of Rac1 activity caused the failure of early embryo development. Therefore, our study showed the critical roles of Rac1 GTPase on porcine oocyte maturation and early embryo cleavage. PMID:27694954

  18. A pathway linking oxidative stress and the Ran GTPase system in progeria.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sutirtha; Snow, Chelsi J; Paschal, Bryce M

    2014-04-01

    Maintaining the Ran GTPase at a proper concentration in the nucleus is important for nucleocytoplasmic transport. Previously we found that nuclear levels of Ran are reduced in cells from patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a disease caused by constitutive attachment of a mutant form of lamin A (termed progerin) to the nuclear membrane. Here we explore the relationship between progerin, the Ran GTPase, and oxidative stress. Stable attachment of progerin to the nuclear membrane disrupts the Ran gradient and results in cytoplasmic localization of Ubc9, a Ran-dependent import cargo. Ran and Ubc9 disruption can be induced reversibly with H2O2. CHO cells preadapted to oxidative stress resist the effects of progerin on Ran and Ubc9. Given that HGPS-patient fibroblasts display elevated ROS, these data suggest that progerin inhibits nuclear transport via oxidative stress. A drug that inhibits pre-lamin A cleavage mimics the effects of progerin by disrupting the Ran gradient, but the effects on Ran are observed before a substantial ROS increase. Moreover, reducing the nuclear concentration of Ran is sufficient to induce ROS irrespective of progerin. We speculate that oxidative stress caused by progerin may occur upstream or downstream of Ran, depending on the cell type and physiological setting.

  19. Opposing roles for distinct LINC complexes in regulation of the small GTPase RhoA

    PubMed Central

    Thakar, Ketan; May, Christopher K.; Rogers, Anna; Carroll, Christopher W.

    2017-01-01

    Linker of Nucleoskeleton and Cytoskeleton (LINC) complexes span the nuclear envelope and transduce force from dynamic cytoskeletal networks to the nuclear lamina. Here we show that LINC complexes also signal from the nuclear envelope to critical regulators of the actin cytoskeleton. Specifically, we find that LINC complexes that contain the inner nuclear membrane protein Sun2 promote focal adhesion assembly by activating the small GTPase RhoA. A key effector in this process is the transcription factor/coactivator complex composed of SRF/Mkl1. A constitutively active form of SRF/Mkl1 was not sufficient to induce focal adhesion assembly in cells lacking Sun2, however, suggesting that LINC complexes support RhoA activity through a transcription-independent mechanism. Strikingly, we also find that the inner nuclear membrane protein Sun1 antagonizes Sun2 LINC complexes and inhibits RhoA activation and focal adhesion assembly. Thus different LINC complexes have opposing roles in the transcription-independent control of the actin cytoskeleton through the small GTPase RhoA. PMID:28035049

  20. Listeria monocytogenes antagonizes the human GTPase Cdc42 to promote bacterial spread

    PubMed Central

    Rigano, Luciano A.; Dowd, Georgina C.; Wang, Yi; Ireton, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Summary The bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes uses actin-based motility to spread from infected human cells to surrounding healthy cells. Cell-cell spread involves the formation of thin extensions of the host plasma membrane (‘protrusions’) containing motile bacteria. In cultured enterocytes, the Listeria protein InlC promotes protrusion formation by binding and antagonizing the human scaffolding protein Tuba. Tuba is a known activator of the GTPase Cdc42. In this work, we demonstrate an important role for Cdc42 in controlling Listeria spread. Infection of the enterocyte cell line Caco-2 BBE1 induced a decrease in the level of Cdc42-GTP, indicating that Listeria downregulates this GTPase. Genetic data involving RNA interference indicated that bacterial impairment of Cdc42 may involve inhibition of Tuba. Experiments with dominant negative and constitutively activated alleles of Cdc42 demonstrated that the ability to inactivate Cdc42 is required for efficient protrusion formation by Listeria. Taken together, these findings indicate a novel mechanism of bacterial spread involving pathogen-induced downregulation of host Cdc42. PMID:24405483

  1. CD81 regulates cell migration through its association with Rac GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Tejera, Emilio; Rocha-Perugini, Vera; López-Martín, Soraya; Pérez-Hernández, Daniel; Bachir, Alexia I.; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Vázquez, Jesús; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Yáñez-Mo, María

    2013-01-01

    CD81 is a member of the tetraspanin family that has been described to have a key role in cell migration of tumor and immune cells. To unravel the mechanisms of CD81-regulated cell migration, we performed proteomic analyses that revealed an interaction of the tetraspanin C-terminal domain with the small GTPase Rac. Direct interaction was confirmed biochemically. Moreover, microscopy cross-correlation analysis demonstrated the in situ integration of both molecules into the same molecular complex. Pull-down experiments revealed that CD81-Rac interaction was direct and independent of Rac activation status. Knockdown of CD81 resulted in enhanced protrusion rate, altered focal adhesion formation, and decreased cell migration, correlating with increased active Rac. Reexpression of wild-type CD81, but not its truncated form lacking the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain, rescued these effects. The phenotype of CD81 knockdown cells was mimicked by treatment with a soluble peptide with the C-terminal sequence of the tetraspanin. Our data show that the interaction of Rac with the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of CD81 is a novel regulatory mechanism of the GTPase activity turnover. Furthermore, they provide a novel mechanism for tetraspanin-dependent regulation of cell motility and open new avenues for tetraspanin-targeted reagents by the use of cell-permeable peptides. PMID:23264468

  2. Small GTPase Rab21 mediates fibronectin induced actin reorganization in Entamoeba histolytica: implications in pathogen invasion.

    PubMed

    Emmanuel, Merlyn; Nakano, Yumiko Saito; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Datta, Sunando

    2015-03-01

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica causes a wide spectrum of intestinal infections. In severe cases, the trophozoites can breach the mucosal barrier, invade the intestinal epithelium and travel via the portal circulation to the liver, where they cause hepatic abscesses, which can prove fatal if left untreated. The host Extra Cellular Matrix (ECM) plays a crucial role in amoebic invasion by triggering an array of cellular responses in the parasite, including induction of actin rich adhesion structures. Similar actin rich protrusive structures, known as 'invadosomes', promote chemotactic migration of the metastatic cancer cells and non-transformed cells by remodeling the ECM. Recent studies showed a central role for Rab GTPases, the master regulators of vesicular trafficking, in biogenesis of invadosomes. Here, we showed that fibronectin, a major host ECM component induced actin remodeling in the parasite in a Rab21 dependent manner. The focalized actin structures formed were reminiscent of the mammalian invadosomes. By using various approaches, such as immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, along with in vitro invasion assay and matrix degradation assay, we show that the fibronectin induced formation of amoebic actin dots depend on the nucleotide status of the GTPase. The ECM components, fibronectin and collagen type I, displayed differential control over the formation of actin dots, with fibronectin positively and collagen type I negatively modulating it. The cell surface adhesion molecule Gal/GalNAc complex was also found to impose additional regulation on this process, which might have implication in collagen type I mediated suppression of actin dots.

  3. A large scale Huntingtin protein interaction network implicates Rho GTPase signaling pathways in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Tourette, Cendrine; Li, Biao; Bell, Russell; O'Hare, Shannon; Kaltenbach, Linda S; Mooney, Sean D; Hughes, Robert E

    2014-03-07

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by a CAG expansion in the HTT gene. Using yeast two-hybrid methods, we identified a large set of proteins that interact with huntingtin (HTT)-interacting proteins. This network, composed of HTT-interacting proteins (HIPs) and proteins interacting with these primary nodes, contains 3235 interactions among 2141 highly interconnected proteins. Analysis of functional annotations of these proteins indicates that primary and secondary HIPs are enriched in pathways implicated in HD, including mammalian target of rapamycin, Rho GTPase signaling, and oxidative stress response. To validate roles for HIPs in mutant HTT toxicity, we show that the Rho GTPase signaling components, BAIAP2, EZR, PIK3R1, PAK2, and RAC1, are modifiers of mutant HTT toxicity. We also demonstrate that Htt co-localizes with BAIAP2 in filopodia and that mutant HTT interferes with filopodial dynamics. These data indicate that HTT is involved directly in membrane dynamics, cell attachment, and motility. Furthermore, they implicate dysregulation in these pathways as pathological mechanisms in HD.

  4. The small GTPase Cdc42 initiates an apoptotic signaling pathway in Jurkat T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, T H; Hahn, K M; Lee, J D; Danley, D E; Bokoch, G M

    1997-01-01

    Apoptosis plays an important role in regulating development and homeostasis of the immune system, yet the elements of the signaling pathways that control cell death have not been well defined. When expressed in Jurkat T cells, an activated form of the small GTPase Cdc42 induces cell death exhibiting the characteristics of apoptosis. The death response induced by Cdc42 is mediated by activation of a protein kinase cascade leading to stimulation of c-Jun amino terminal kinase (JNK). Apoptosis initiated by Cdc42 is inhibited by dominant negative components of the JNK cascade and by reagents that block activity of the ICE protease (caspase) family, suggesting that stimulation of the JNK kinase cascade can lead to caspase activation. The sequence of morphological events observed typically in apoptotic cells is modified in the presence of activated Cdc42, suggesting that this GTPase may account for some aspects of cytoskeletal regulation during the apoptotic program. These data suggest a means through which the biochemical and morphological events occurring during apoptosis may be coordinately regulated. Images PMID:9307966

  5. The membrane remodeling protein Pex11p activates the GTPase Dnm1p during peroxisomal fission

    PubMed Central

    Opalinski, Lukasz; Landgraf, Christiane; Costello, Joseph; Schrader, Michael; Krikken, Arjen M.; Knoops, Kèvin; Kram, Anita M.; Volkmer, Rudolf; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2015-01-01

    The initial phase of peroxisomal fission requires the peroxisomal membrane protein Peroxin 11 (Pex11p), which remodels the membrane, resulting in organelle elongation. Here, we identify an additional function for Pex11p, demonstrating that Pex11p also plays a crucial role in the final step of peroxisomal fission: dynamin-like protein (DLP)-mediated membrane scission. First, we demonstrate that yeast Pex11p is necessary for the function of the GTPase Dynamin-related 1 (Dnm1p) in vivo. In addition, our data indicate that Pex11p physically interacts with Dnm1p and that inhibiting this interaction compromises peroxisomal fission. Finally, we demonstrate that Pex11p functions as a GTPase activating protein (GAP) for Dnm1p in vitro. Similar observations were made for mammalian Pex11β and the corresponding DLP Drp1, indicating that DLP activation by Pex11p is conserved. Our work identifies a previously unknown requirement for a GAP in DLP function. PMID:25941407

  6. TDP-43 depletion induces neuronal cell damage through dysregulation of Rho family GTPases.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Yohei; Katsuno, Masahisa; Niwa, Jun-ichi; Yamada, Shin-ichi; Sone, Jun; Waza, Masahiro; Adachi, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Nagata, Koh-ichi; Arimura, Nariko; Watanabe, Takashi; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Sobue, Gen

    2009-08-14

    The 43-kDa TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) is known to be a major component of the ubiquitinated inclusions characteristic of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions. Although TDP-43 is a nuclear protein, it disappears from the nucleus of affected neurons and glial cells, implicating TDP-43 loss of function in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration. Here we show that the knockdown of TDP-43 in differentiated Neuro-2a cells inhibited neurite outgrowth and induced cell death. In knockdown cells, the Rho family members RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 GTPases were inactivated, and membrane localization of these molecules was reduced. In addition, TDP-43 depletion significantly suppressed protein geranylgeranylation, a key regulating factor of Rho family activity and intracellular localization. In contrast, overexpression of TDP-43 mitigated the cellular damage caused by pharmacological inhibition of geranylgeranylation. Furthermore administration of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate partially restored cell viability and neurite outgrowth in TDP-43 knockdown cells. In summary, our data suggest that TDP-43 plays a key role in the maintenance of neuronal cell morphology and survival possibly through protein geranylgeranylation of Rho family GTPases.

  7. Small GTPase Rab40c Associates with Lipid Droplets and Modulates the Biogenesis of Lipid Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ran; Wang, Weijie; Wang, Shicong; Wang, Zhen; Sun, Lixiang; He, Wei; Fan, Rong; Zhou, Yunhe; Xu, Xiaohui; Hong, Wanjin; Wang, Tuanlao

    2013-01-01

    The subcellular location and cell biological function of small GTPase Rab40c in mammalian cells have not been investigated in detail. In this study, we demonstrated that the exogenously expressed GFP-Rab40c associates with lipid droplets marked by neutral lipid specific dye Oil red or Nile red, but not with the Golgi or endosomal markers. Further examination demonstrated that Rab40c is also associated with ERGIC-53 containing structures, especially under the serum starvation condition. Rab40c is increasingly recruited to the surface of lipid droplets during lipid droplets formation and maturation in HepG2 cells. Rab40c knockdown moderately decreases the size of lipid droplets, suggesting that Rab40c is involved in the biogenesis of lipid droplets. Stimulation for adipocyte differentiation increases the expression of Rab40c in 3T3-L1 cells. Rab40c interacts with TIP47, and is appositionally associated with TIP47-labeled lipid droplets. In addition, over-expression of Rab40c causes the clustering of lipid droplets independent of its GTPase activity, but completely dependent of the intact SOCS box domain of Rab40c. In addition, Rab40c displayed self-interaction as well as interaction with TIP47 and the SOCS box is essential for its ability to induce clustering of lipid droplets. Our results suggest that Rab40c is a novel Rab protein associated with lipid droplets, and is likely involved in modulating the biogenesis of lipid droplets. PMID:23638186

  8. Two small GTPases act in concert with the bactofilin cytoskeleton to regulate dynamic bacterial cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Bulyha, Iryna; Lindow, Steffi; Lin, Lin; Bolte, Kathrin; Wuichet, Kristin; Kahnt, Jörg; van der Does, Chris; Thanbichler, Martin; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2013-04-29

    Cell polarity is essential for many bacterial activities, but the mechanisms responsible for its establishment are poorly understood. In Myxococcus xanthus, the type IV pili (T4P) motor ATPases PilB and PilT localize to opposite cell poles and switch poles during cellular reversals. We demonstrate that polar localization of PilB and PilT depends on the small GTPase SofG and BacP, a bactofilin cytoskeletal protein. Polymeric BacP localizes in both subpolar regions. SofG interacts directly with polymeric BacP and associates with one of these patches, forming a cluster that shuttles to the pole to establish localization of PilB and PilT at the same pole. Next, the small GTPase MglA sorts PilB and PilT to opposite poles to establish their correct polarity. During reversals, the Frz chemosensory system induces the inversion of PilB and PilT polarity. Thus, three hierarchically organized systems function in a cascade to regulate dynamic bacterial cell polarity.

  9. Extracting Diffusive States of Rho GTPase in Live Cells: Towards In Vivo Biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Koo, Peter K; Weitzman, Matthew; Sabanaygam, Chandran R; van Golen, Kenneth L; Mochrie, Simon G J

    2015-10-01

    Resolving distinct biochemical interaction states when analyzing the trajectories of diffusing proteins in live cells on an individual basis remains challenging because of the limited statistics provided by the relatively short trajectories available experimentally. Here, we introduce a novel, machine-learning based classification methodology, which we call perturbation expectation-maximization (pEM), that simultaneously analyzes a population of protein trajectories to uncover the system of diffusive behaviors which collectively result from distinct biochemical interactions. We validate the performance of pEM in silico and demonstrate that pEM is capable of uncovering the proper number of underlying diffusive states with an accurate characterization of their diffusion properties. We then apply pEM to experimental protein trajectories of Rho GTPases, an integral regulator of cytoskeletal dynamics and cellular homeostasis, in vivo via single particle tracking photo-activated localization microscopy. Remarkably, pEM uncovers 6 distinct diffusive states conserved across various Rho GTPase family members. The variability across family members in the propensities for each diffusive state reveals non-redundant roles in the activation states of RhoA and RhoC. In a resting cell, our results support a model where RhoA is constantly cycling between activation states, with an imbalance of rates favoring an inactive state. RhoC, on the other hand, remains predominantly inactive.

  10. The small GTPase Rab29 is a common regulator of immune synapse assembly and ciliogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Onnis, A; Finetti, F; Patrussi, L; Gottardo, M; Cassioli, C; Spanò, S; Baldari, C T

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence underscores the T-cell immune synapse (IS) as a site of intense vesicular trafficking, on which productive signaling and cell activation crucially depend. Although the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) is known to exploit recycling to accumulate to the IS, the specific pathway that controls this process remains to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate that the small GTPase Rab29 is centrally implicated in TCR trafficking and IS assembly. Rab29 colocalized and interacted with Rab8, Rab11 and IFT20, a component of the intraflagellar transport system that regulates ciliogenesis and participates in TCR recycling in the non-ciliated T cell, as assessed by co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence analysis. Rab29 depletion resulted in the inability of TCRs to undergo recycling to the IS, thereby compromizing IS assembly. Under these conditions, recycling TCRs accumulated in Rab11+ endosomes that failed to polarize to the IS due to defective Rab29-dependent recruitment of the dynein microtubule motor. Remarkably, Rab29 participates in a similar pathway in ciliated cells to promote primary cilium growth and ciliary localization of Smoothened. These results provide a function for Rab29 as a regulator of receptor recycling and identify this GTPase as a shared participant in IS and primary cilium assembly. PMID:26021297

  11. Rit GTPase Regulates a p38 MAPK-Dependent Neuronal Survival Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weikang; Rudolph, Jennifer L.; Sengoku, Tomoko; Andres, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    Rit, along with Rin and Drosophila Ric, comprises the Rit subfamily of Ras-related small GTPases. Although the cellular functions of many Ras family GTPases are well established, the physiological significance of Rit remains poorly understood. Loss of Rit sensitizes multiple mammalian cell lines and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from Rit−/− mice to oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis. However, whether Rit-mediated pro-survival signaling extends to other cell types, particularly neurons, is presently unknown. Here, to examine these issues we generated a transgenic mouse overexpressing constitutively active Rit (RitQ79L) exclusively in neurons, under control of the Synapsin I promoter. Active Rit-expressing hippocampal neurons display a dramatic increase in oxidative stress resistance. Moreover, pharmacological inhibitor studies demonstrate that p38 MAPK, rather than a MEK/ERK signaling cascade, is required for Rit-mediated protection. Together, the present studies identify a critical role for the Rit-p38 MAPK signaling cascade in promoting hippocampal neuron survival following oxidative stress. PMID:23123784

  12. Mutant K-RAS Promotes Invasion and Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer Through GTPase Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Padavano, Julianna; Henkhaus, Rebecca S; Chen, Hwudaurw; Skovan, Bethany A; Cui, Haiyan; Ignatenko, Natalia A

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive malignancies, characterized by the local invasion into surrounding tissues and early metastasis to distant organs. Oncogenic mutations of the K-RAS gene occur in more than 90% of human pancreatic cancers. The goal of this study was to investigate the functional significance and downstream effectors of mutant K-RAS oncogene in the pancreatic cancer invasion and metastasis. We applied the homologous recombination technique to stably disrupt K-RAS oncogene in the human pancreatic cell line MiaPaCa-2, which carries the mutant K-RASG12C oncogene in both alleles. Using in vitro assays, we found that clones with disrupted mutant K-RAS gene exhibited low RAS activity, reduced growth rates, increased sensitivity to the apoptosis inducing agents, and suppressed motility and invasiveness. In vivo assays showed that clones with decreased RAS activity had reduced tumor formation ability in mouse xenograft model and increased survival rates in the mouse orthotopic pancreatic cancer model. We further examined molecular pathways downstream of mutant K-RAS and identified RhoA GTP activating protein 5, caveolin-1, and RAS-like small GTPase A (RalA) as key effector molecules, which control mutant K-RAS-dependent migration and invasion in MiaPaCa-2 cells. Our study provides rational for targeting RhoA and RalA GTPase signaling pathways for inhibition of pancreatic cancer metastasis. PMID:26512205

  13. A novel role for RhoA GTPase in the regulation of airway smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenwu; Huang, Youliang; Wu, Yidi; Gunst, Susan J

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated a novel molecular mechanism for the regulation of airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction by RhoA GTPase. In ASM tissues, both myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation and actin polymerization are required for active tension generation. RhoA inactivation dramatically suppresses agonist-induced tension development and completely inhibits agonist-induced actin polymerization, but only slightly reduces MLC phosphorylation. The inhibition of MLC phosphatase does not reverse the effects of RhoA inactivation on contraction or actin polymerization. Thus, RhoA regulates ASM contraction through its effects on actin polymerization rather than MLC phosphorylation. Contractile stimulation of ASM induces the recruitment and assembly of paxillin, vinculin, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) into membrane adhesion complexes (adhesomes) that regulate actin polymerization by catalyzing the activation of cdc42 GTPase by the G-protein-coupled receptor kinase-interacting target (GIT) - p21-activated kinase (PAK) - PAK-interacting exchange factor (PIX) complex. Cdc42 is a necessary and specific activator of the actin filament nucleation activator, N-WASp. The recruitment and activation of paxillin, vinculin, and FAK is prevented by RhoA inactivation, thus preventing cdc42 and N-WASp activation. We conclude that RhoA regulates ASM contraction by catalyzing the assembly and activation of membrane adhesome signaling modules that regulate actin polymerization, and that the RhoA-mediated assembly of adhesome complexes is a fundamental step in the signal transduction process in response to a contractile agonist.

  14. Potassium Acts as a GTPase-Activating Element on Each Nucleotide-Binding Domain of the Essential Bacillus subtilis EngA

    PubMed Central

    Foucher, Anne-Emmanuelle; Reiser, Jean-Baptiste; Ebel, Christine; Housset, Dominique; Jault, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    EngA proteins form a unique family of bacterial GTPases with two GTP-binding domains in tandem, namely GD1 and GD2, followed by a KH (K-homology) domain. They have been shown to interact with the bacterial ribosome and to be involved in its biogenesis. Most prokaryotic EngA possess a high GTPase activity in contrast to eukaryotic GTPases that act mainly as molecular switches. Here, we have purified and characterized the GTPase activity of the Bacillus subtilis EngA and two shortened EngA variants that only contain GD1 or GD2-KH. Interestingly, the GTPase activity of GD1 alone is similar to that of the whole EngA, whereas GD2-KH has a 150-fold lower GTPase activity. At physiological concentration, potassium strongly stimulates the GTPase activity of each protein construct. Interestingly, it affects neither the affinities for nucleotides nor the monomeric status of EngA or the GD1 domain. Thus, potassium likely acts as a chemical GTPase-activating element as proposed for another bacterial GTPase like MnmE. However, unlike MnmE, potassium does not promote dimerization of EngA. In addition, we solved two crystal structures of full-length EngA. One of them contained for the first time a GTP-like analogue bound to GD2 while GD1 was free. Surprisingly, its overall fold was similar to a previously solved structure with GDP bound to both sites. Our data indicate that a significant structural change must occur upon K+ binding to GD2, and a comparison with T. maritima EngA and MnmE structures allowed us to propose a model explaining the chemical basis for the different GTPase activities of GD1 and GD2. PMID:23056455

  15. Regulation of Cdc42 polarization by the Rsr1 GTPase and Rga1, a Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein, in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mid Eum; Lo, Wing-Cheong; Miller, Kristi E.; Chou, Ching-Shan; Park, Hay-Oak

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cdc42 plays a central role in establishing polarity in yeast and animals, yet how polarization of Cdc42 is achieved in response to spatial cues is poorly understood. Using live-cell imaging, we found distinct dynamics of Cdc42 polarization in haploid budding yeast in correlation with two temporal steps of the G1 phase. The position at which the Cdc42–GTP cluster develops changes rapidly around the division site during the first step but becomes stabilized in the second step, suggesting that an axis of polarized growth is determined in mid G1. Cdc42 polarization in the first step and its proper positioning depend on Rsr1 and its GTPase-activating protein (GAP) Bud2. Interestingly, Rga1, a Cdc42 GAP, exhibits transient localization to a site near the bud neck and to the division site during cytokinesis and G1, and this temporal change of Rga1 distribution is necessary for determination of a proper growth site. Mathematical modeling suggests that a proper axis of Cdc42 polarization in haploid cells might be established through a biphasic mechanism involving sequential positive feedback and transient negative feedback. PMID:25908844

  16. Expression, purification and crystallization of a BH domain from the GTPase regulatory protein associated with focal adhesion kinase.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, P J; Derewenda, U; Taylor, J; Parsons, T J; Derewenda, Z S

    1999-01-01

    Signaling by small GTPases is down-regulated by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) which enhance the rate of GTP hydrolysis. The activity of GAPs specific for Rho GTPases resides in the BH domain, many homologues of which are found in any mammalian genome. One of them was identified in the GTPase regulator associated with focal-adhesion kinase (GRAF). It shares approximately 20% sequence identity with p50RhoGAP. This GAP activates RhoA and Cdc42Hs, but not Rac. In order to dissect the molecular basis of this specificity, a 231-residue-long fragment corresponding to the BH domain of GRAF has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Trigonal crystals, of space group P3(1)21 or P3(2)21, with unit-cell dimensions a = b = 63.5, c = 90.38 A were grown from solutions of PEG 6000. Data to 2.15 A were collected from a flash-frozen sample on an R-AXIS IV imaging-plate detector mounted on a rotating anode X-ray generator.

  17. Structures of the yeast dynamin-like GTPase Sey1p provide insight into homotypic ER fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Liming; Sun, Sha; Wang, Wei; Shi, Juanming; Hu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Shiyan; Su, Dan; Lou, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Homotypic membrane fusion of the endoplasmic reticulum is mediated by dynamin-like guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases), which include atlastin (ATL) in metazoans and Sey1p in yeast. In this paper, we determined the crystal structures of the cytosolic domain of Sey1p derived from Candida albicans. The structures reveal a stalk-like, helical bundle domain following the GTPase, which represents a previously unidentified configuration of the dynamin superfamily. This domain is significantly longer than that of ATL and critical for fusion. Sey1p forms a side-by-side dimer in complex with GMP-PNP or GDP/AlF4− but is monomeric with GDP. Surprisingly, Sey1p could mediate fusion without GTP hydrolysis, even though fusion was much more efficient with GTP. Sey1p was able to replace ATL in mammalian cells, and the punctate localization of Sey1p was dependent on its GTPase activity. Despite the common function of fusogenic GTPases, our results reveal unique features of Sey1p. PMID:26370501

  18. A distinct mechanism regulating a pollen-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small GTPase Rop in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rop/Rac small GTPases are central to diverse developmental and cellular activities in plants, playing an especially important Role in polar growth of pollen tubes. Although it is established that a class of plant-specific RopGEFs promotes the activity of Rop/Rac through the catalytic PRONE (Plant-sp...

  19. A distinct mechanism regulating a pollen-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small GTPase Rop in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rop/Rac small GTPases are central to diverse developmental and cellular activities in plants, playing an especially important role in polar growth of pollen tubes. Although it is established that a class of plant-specific RopGEFs promotes the activity of Rop/Rac through the catalytic PRONE (Plant sp...

  20. Small GTPase CDC-42 promotes apoptotic cell corpse clearance in response to PAT-2 and CED-1 in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Neukomm, L J; Zeng, S; Frei, A P; Huegli, P A; Hengartner, M O

    2014-06-01

    The rapid clearance of dying cells is important for the well-being of multicellular organisms. In C. elegans, cell corpse removal is mainly mediated by three parallel engulfment signaling cascades. These pathways include two small GTPases, MIG-2/RhoG and CED-10/Rac1. Here we present the identification and characterization of CDC-42 as a third GTPase involved in the regulation of cell corpse clearance. Genetic analyses performed by both loss of cdc-42 function and cdc-42 overexpression place cdc-42 in parallel to the ced-2/5/12 signaling module, in parallel to or upstream of the ced-10 module, and downstream of the ced-1/6/7 module. CDC-42 accumulates in engulfing cells at membranes surrounding apoptotic corpses. The formation of such halos depends on the integrins PAT-2/PAT-3, UNC-112 and the GEF protein UIG-1, but not on the canonical ced-1/6/7 or ced-2/5/12 signaling modules. Together, our results suggest that the small GTPase CDC-42 regulates apoptotic cell engulfment possibly upstream of the canonical Rac GTPase CED-10, by polarizing the engulfing cell toward the apoptotic corpse in response to integrin signaling and ced-1/6/7 signaling in C. elegans.

  1. Smoothened Regulates Migration of Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes in Rheumatoid Arthritis via Activation of Rho GTPase Signaling.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wei-Xiang; Zhu, Shang-Ling; Zhang, Bai-Yu; Shi, Yi-Ming; Feng, Xiao-Xue; Liu, Fang; Huang, Jian-Lin; Zheng, Song Guo

    2017-01-01

    Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) acquire aggressive phenotypes characterized with enhanced migration abilities and inherent invasive qualities in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Smoothened (Smo) is a key component of sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling and contributes to tumor cell invasion and metastasis. The objective of this study is to investigate the role of Smo in the modulation of cell migration and explore the underlying molecular mechanism(s). FLSs were isolated from RA synovium. Shh levels were regulated by a Smo agonist (purmorphamine), Smo antagonist (KAAD-cyclopamine), or small interfering RNA targeting the Smo gene (Smo-siRNA) in RA-FLSs. Expression of Smo was detected by real-time PCR and western blot analysis. Cell migration was examined by Transwell assay and activation of Rho GTPases was measured by pull-down assays. Incubation with purmorphamine resulted in a significant increase of cell migration and activation of Rho GTPase signaling compared to controls (P < 0.05). However, treatment with KAAD-cyclopamine or transfection with Smo-siRNA suppressed migration of RA-FLSs and showed an inhibitory effect of Rho GTPase signaling. Together, these results suggest that Smo plays an important role in RA-FLSs migration through activation of Rho GTPase signaling and may contribute to progression of RA, thus, targeting Shh signal may have a therapeutic potential in patients with RA.

  2. Tandem duplications of a degenerated GTP-binding domain at the origin of GTPase receptors Toc159 and thylakoidal SRP

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez Torres, Jorge Maldonado, Monica Alexandra Arias; Chomilier, Jacques

    2007-12-14

    The evolutionary origin of some nuclear encoded proteins that translocate proteins across the chloroplast envelope remains unknown. Therefore, sequences of GTPase proteins constituting the Arabidopsis thaliana translocon at the outer membrane of chloroplast (atToc) complexes were analyzed by means of HCA. In particular, atToc159 and related proteins (atToc132, atToc120, and atToc90) do not have proven homologues of prokaryotic or eukaryotic ancestry. We established that the three domains commonly referred to as A, G, and M originate from the GTPase G domain, tandemly repeated, and probably evolving toward an unstructured conformation in the case of the A domain. It resulted from this study a putative common ancestor for these proteins and a new domain definition, in particular the splitting of A into three domains (A1, A2, and A3), has been proposed. The family of Toc159, previously containing A. thaliana and Pisum sativum, has been extended to Medicago truncatula and Populus trichocarpa and it has been revised for Oryza sativa. They have also been compared to GTPase subunits involved in the cpSRP system. A distant homology has been revealed among Toc and cpSRP GTP-hydrolyzing proteins of A. thaliana, and repetitions of a GTPase domain were also found in cpSRP protein receptors, by means of HCA analysis.

  3. The integrin cytoplasmic domain-associated protein ICAP-1 binds and regulates Rho family GTPases during cell spreading

    PubMed Central

    Degani, Simona; Balzac, Fiorella; Brancaccio, Mara; Guazzone, Simona; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Silengo, Lorenzo; Eva, Alessandra; Tarone, Guido

    2002-01-01

    Using two-hybrid screening, we isolated the integrin cytoplasmic domain-associated protein (ICAP-1), an interactor for the COOH terminal region of the β1A integrin cytoplasmic domain. To investigate the role of ICAP-1 in integrin-mediated adhesive function, we expressed the full-length molecule in NIH3T3 cells. ICAP-1 expression strongly prevents NIH3T3 cell spreading on extracellular matrix. This inhibition is transient and can be counteracted by coexpression of a constitutively activated mutant of Cdc42, suggesting that ICAP-1 acts upstream of this GTPase. In addition, we found that ICAP-1 binds both to Cdc42 and Rac1 in vitro, and its expression markedly inhibits activation of these GTPases during integrin-mediated cell adhesion to fibronectin as detected by PAK binding assay. In the attempt to define the molecular mechanism of this inhibition, we show that ICAP-1 reduces both the intrinsic and the exchange factor–induced dissociation of GDP from Cdc42; moreover, purified ICAP-1 displaces this GTPase from cellular membranes. Together, these data show for the first time that ICAP-1 regulates Rho family GTPases during integrin-mediated cell matrix adhesion, acting as guanine dissociation inhibitor. PMID:11807099

  4. The integrin cytoplasmic domain-associated protein ICAP-1 binds and regulates Rho family GTPases during cell spreading.

    PubMed

    Degani, Simona; Balzac, Fiorella; Brancaccio, Mara; Guazzone, Simona; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Silengo, Lorenzo; Eva, Alessandra; Tarone, Guido

    2002-01-21

    Using two-hybrid screening, we isolated the integrin cytoplasmic domain-associated protein (ICAP-1), an interactor for the COOH terminal region of the beta1A integrin cytoplasmic domain. To investigate the role of ICAP-1 in integrin-mediated adhesive function, we expressed the full-length molecule in NIH3T3 cells. ICAP-1 expression strongly prevents NIH3T3 cell spreading on extracellular matrix. This inhibition is transient and can be counteracted by coexpression of a constitutively activated mutant of Cdc42, suggesting that ICAP-1 acts upstream of this GTPase. In addition, we found that ICAP-1 binds both to Cdc42 and Rac1 in vitro, and its expression markedly inhibits activation of these GTPases during integrin-mediated cell adhesion to fibronectin as detected by PAK binding assay. In the attempt to define the molecular mechanism of this inhibition, we show that ICAP-1 reduces both the intrinsic and the exchange factor-induced dissociation of GDP from Cdc42; moreover, purified ICAP-1 displaces this GTPase from cellular membranes. Together, these data show for the first time that ICAP-1 regulates Rho family GTPases during integrin-mediated cell matrix adhesion, acting as guanine dissociation inhibitor.

  5. Smoothened Regulates Migration of Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes in Rheumatoid Arthritis via Activation of Rho GTPase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Wei-xiang; Zhu, Shang-ling; Zhang, Bai-yu; Shi, Yi-ming; Feng, Xiao-xue; Liu, Fang; Huang, Jian-lin; Zheng, Song Guo

    2017-01-01

    Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) acquire aggressive phenotypes characterized with enhanced migration abilities and inherent invasive qualities in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Smoothened (Smo) is a key component of sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling and contributes to tumor cell invasion and metastasis. The objective of this study is to investigate the role of Smo in the modulation of cell migration and explore the underlying molecular mechanism(s). FLSs were isolated from RA synovium. Shh levels were regulated by a Smo agonist (purmorphamine), Smo antagonist (KAAD-cyclopamine), or small interfering RNA targeting the Smo gene (Smo-siRNA) in RA-FLSs. Expression of Smo was detected by real-time PCR and western blot analysis. Cell migration was examined by Transwell assay and activation of Rho GTPases was measured by pull-down assays. Incubation with purmorphamine resulted in a significant increase of cell migration and activation of Rho GTPase signaling compared to controls (P < 0.05). However, treatment with KAAD-cyclopamine or transfection with Smo-siRNA suppressed migration of RA-FLSs and showed an inhibitory effect of Rho GTPase signaling. Together, these results suggest that Smo plays an important role in RA-FLSs migration through activation of Rho GTPase signaling and may contribute to progression of RA, thus, targeting Shh signal may have a therapeutic potential in patients with RA. PMID:28261216

  6. Caveolin-1 mediates inflammatory breast cancer cell invasion via the Akt1 pathway and RhoC GTPase.

    PubMed

    Joglekar, Madhura; Elbazanti, Weam O; Weitzman, Matthew D; Lehman, Heather L; van Golen, Kenneth L

    2015-06-01

    With a propensity to invade the dermal lymphatic vessels of the skin overlying the breast and readily metastasize, inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is arguably the deadliest form of breast cancer. We previously reported that caveolin-1 is overexpressed in IBC and that RhoC GTPase is a metastatic switch responsible for the invasive phenotype. RhoC-driven invasion requires phosphorylation by Akt1. Using a reliable IBC cell line we set out to determine if caveolin-1 expression affects RhoC-mediated IBC invasion. Caveolin-1 was down regulated by introduction of siRNA or a caveolin scaffolding domain. The ability of the cells to invade was tested and the status of Akt1 and RhoC GTPase examined. IBC cell invasion is significantly decreased when caveolin-1 is down regulated. Activation of Akt1 is decreased when caveolin-1 is down regulated, leading to decreased phosphorylation of RhoC GTPase. Thus, we report here that caveolin-1 overexpression mediates IBC cell invasion through activation Akt1, which phosphorylates RhoC GTPase.

  7. Analyzing the function of small GTPases by microinjection of plasmids into polarized epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cook, Rita Nokes; Ang, Su Fen; Kang, Richard Seung-on; Fölsch, Heike

    2011-05-31

    Epithelial cells polarize their plasma membrane into biochemically and functionally distinct apical and basolateral domains where the apical domain faces the 'free' surfaces and the basolateral membrane is in contact with the substrate and neighboring cells. Both membrane domains are separated by tight junctions, which form a diffusion barrier. Apical-basolateral polarization can be recapitulated successfully in culture when epithelial cells such as Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells are seeded at high density on polycarbonate filters and cultured for several days. Establishment and maintenance of cell polarity is regulated by an array of small GTPases of the Ras superfamily such as RalA, Cdc42, Rab8, Rab10 and Rab13. Like all GTPases these proteins cycle between an inactive GDP-bound state and an active GTP-bound state. Specific mutations in the nucleotide binding regions interfere with this cycling. For example, Rab13T22N is permanently locked in the GDP-form and thus dubbed 'dominant negative', whereas Rab13Q67L can no longer hydrolyze GTP and is thus locked in a 'dominant active' state. To analyze their function in cells both dominant negative and dominant active alleles of GTPases are typically expressed at high levels to interfere with the function of the endogenous proteins. An elegant way to achieve high levels of overexpression in a short amount of time is to introduce the plasmids encoding the relevant proteins directly into the nuclei of polarized cells grown on filter supports using microinjection technique. This is often combined with the co-injection of reporter plasmids that encode plasma membrane receptors that are specifically sorted to the apical or basolateral domain. A cargo frequently used to analyze cargo sorting to the basolateral domain is a temperature sensitive allele of the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSVGts045). This protein cannot fold properly at 39°C and will thus be retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) while

  8. Ras GTPases Modulate Morphogenesis, Sporulation and Cellulase Gene Expression in the Cellulolytic Fungus Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiwei; Zhang, Yanmei; Zhong, Yaohua; Qu, Yinbo; Wang, Tianhong

    2012-01-01

    Background The model cellulolytic fungus Trichoderma reesei (teleomorph Hypocrea jecorina) is capable of responding to environmental cues to compete for nutrients in its natural saprophytic habitat despite its genome encodes fewer degradative enzymes. Efficient signalling pathways in perception and interpretation of environmental signals are indispensable in this process. Ras GTPases represent a kind of critical signal proteins involved in signal transduction and regulation of gene expression. In T. reesei the genome contains two Ras subfamily small GTPases TrRas1 and TrRas2 homologous to Ras1 and Ras2 from S. cerevisiae, but their functions remain unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we have investigated the roles of GTPases TrRas1 and TrRas2 during fungal morphogenesis and cellulase gene expression. We show that both TrRas1 and TrRas2 play important roles in some cellular processes such as polarized apical growth, hyphal branch formation, sporulation and cAMP level adjustment, while TrRas1 is more dominant in these processes. Strikingly, we find that TrRas2 is involved in modulation of cellulase gene expression. Deletion of TrRas2 results in considerably decreased transcription of cellulolytic genes upon growth on cellulose. Although the strain carrying a constitutively activated TrRas2G16V allele exhibits increased cellulase gene transcription, the cbh1 and cbh2 expression in this mutant still strictly depends on cellulose, indicating TrRas2 does not directly mediate the transmission of the cellulose signal. In addition, our data suggest that the effect of TrRas2 on cellulase gene is exerted through regulation of transcript abundance of cellulase transcription factors such as Xyr1, but the influence is independent of cAMP signalling pathway. Conclusions/Significance Together, these findings elucidate the functions for Ras signalling of T. reesei in cellular morphogenesis, especially in cellulase gene expression, which contribute to deciphering the

  9. Analysis of GTPases carrying hydrophobic amino acid substitutions in lieu of the catalytic glutamine: implications for GTP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rajeev; Gara, Sudheer Kumar; Mishra, Shambhavi; Prakash, Balaji

    2005-05-01

    Ras superfamily GTP-binding proteins regulate important signaling events in the cell. Ras, which often serves as a prototype, efficiently hydrolyzes GTP in conjunction with its regulator GAP. A conserved glutamine plays a vital role in GTP hydrolysis in most GTP-binding proteins. Mutating this glutamine in Ras has oncogenic effects, since it disrupts GTP hydrolysis. The analysis presented here is of GTP-binding proteins that are a paradox to oncogenic Ras, since they have the catalytic glutamine (Glncat) substituted by a hydrophobic amino acid, yet can hydrolyze GTP efficiently. We term these proteins HAS-GTPases. Analysis of the amino acid sequences of HAS-GTPases reveals prominent presence of insertions around the GTP-binding pocket. Homology modeling studies suggest an interesting means to achieve catalysis despite the drastic hydrophobic substitution replacing the key Glncat of Ras-like GTPases. The substituted hydrophobic residue adopts a "retracted conformation," where it is positioned away from the GTP, as its role in catalysis would be unproductive. This conformation is further stabilized by interactions with hydrophobic residues in its vicinity. These interacting residues are strongly conserved and hydrophobic in all HAS-GTPases, and correspond to residues Asp92 and Tyr96 of Ras. An experimental support for the "retracted conformation" of Switch II arises from the crystal structures of Ylqf and hGBP1. This conformation allows us to hypothesize that, unlike in classical GTPases, catalytic residues could be supplied by regions other than the Switch II (i.e., either the insertions or a neighboring domain).

  10. The Rap GTPases regulate the migration, invasiveness and in vivo dissemination of B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Lin, K B L; Tan, P; Freeman, S A; Lam, M; McNagny, K M; Gold, M R

    2010-01-28

    B-cell lymphomas are common malignancies in which transformed B cells enter the circulation, extravasate into tissues and form tumors in multiple organs. Lymphoma cells are thought to exit the vasculature and enter tissues through the same chemokine- and adhesion molecule-dependent mechanisms as normal B cells. We have previously shown that activation of the Rap GTPases, proteins that control cytoskeletal organization and integrin activation, is critical for chemokine-induced migration and adhesion in B-lymphoma cell lines. Using the A20 murine B-lymphoma cell line as a model, we now show that Rap activation is important for circulating lymphoma cells to enter tissues and form tumors in vivo. In vitro assays showed that Rap activation is required for A20 cells to efficiently adhere to vascular endothelial cells and undergo transendothelial migration. These findings suggest that Rap or its effectors could be novel targets for treating B-cell lymphomas.

  11. Swiprosin-1 stimulates cancer invasion and metastasis by increasing the Rho family of GTPase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Yun Hyun; Oh, Sena; Yeo, Yu Ra; Chae, In Hee; Kim, So Hee; Lee, Ji Shin; Yun, Sook Jung; Choi, Kyu Yeong; Ryu, Je-Hwang; Jun, Chang-Duk; Song, Woo Keun

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic expression of Swiprosin-1, an actin-binding protein (also known as EF hand domain containing 2; EFHD2), enhanced motile protrusions associated with actin, such as lamellipodia and membrane ruffles. Swiprosin-1 levels were increased in various human cancer tissues, particularly at highly invasive stages of malignant melanoma. Expression of Swiprosin-1 was correlated with that of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and induced by EGF. In a mouse metastasis model, Swiprosin-1 overexpression induced pulmonary metastasis whereas its knockdown led to marked inhibition of metastasis of highly invasive melanoma cells. Swiprosin-1 at the lamellipodia and membrane ruffles controlled the direction of cell protrusion and enhanced migration velocity through activating the Rho family of small GTPases, including Rac1, Cdc42 and RhoA. Our collective findings support the potential utility of Swiprosin-1 as a therapeutic target to prevent cancer invasion and metastasis. PMID:26079945

  12. Spatial control of plasma membrane domains: ROP GTPase-based symmetry breaking.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenbiao; Lavagi, Irene

    2012-12-01

    Breaking of the cell membrane symmetry to form polarized or localized domains/regions of the plasma membrane (PM) is a fundamental cellular process that occurs in essentially all cellular organisms, and is required for a wide variety of cellular functions/behaviors including cell morphogenesis, cell division and cell differentiation. In plants, the development of localized or polarized PM domains has been linked to a vast array of cellular and developmental processes such as polar cell expansion, asymmetric cell division, cell morphogenesis, the polarization of auxin transporters (and thus auxin polar transport), secondary cell wall patterning, cell type specification, and tissue pattern formation. Rho GTPases from plants (ROPs) are known to be involved in many of these processes. Here, we review the current knowledge on ROP involvement in breaking symmetry and propose that ROP-based self-organizing signaling may provide a common mechanism for the spatial control of PM domains required in various cellular and developmental processes in plants.

  13. The Drosophila small GTPase Rac2 is required for normal feeding and mating behaviour.

    PubMed

    Goergen, Philip; Kasagiannis, Anna; Schiöth, Helgi B; Williams, Michael J

    2014-03-01

    All multicellular organisms require the ability to regulate bodily processes in order to maintain a stable condition, which necessitates fluctuations in internal metabolics, as well as modifications of outward behaviour. Understanding the genetics behind this modulation is important as a general model for the metabolic modification of behaviour. This study demonstrates that the activity of the small GTPase Rac2 is required in Drosophila for the proper regulation of lipid storage and feeding behaviour, as well as aggression and mating behaviours. Rac2 mutant males and females are susceptible to starvation and contain considerably less lipids than controls. Furthermore, Rac2 mutants also have disrupted feeding behaviour, eating fewer but larger meals than controls. Intriguingly, Rac2 mutant males rarely initiate aggressive behaviour and display significantly increased levels of courtship behaviour towards other males and mated females. From these results we conclude that Rac2 has a central role in regulating the Drosophila homeostatic system.

  14. GTPase properties of the interferon-induced human guanylate-binding protein 2.

    PubMed

    Neun, R; Richter, M F; Staeheli, P; Schwemmle, M

    1996-07-15

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) were originally described as proteins that are strongly induced by interferons and are capable of binding to agarose-immobilized guanine nucleotides. hGBP1, the first of two members of this protein family in humans, was recently shown to represent a novel type of GTPase that hydrolyzes GTP predominantly to GMP. We now report that purified recombinant hGBP2 also hydrolyzes GTP very efficiently, although GDP rather than GMP was the major reaction product. The biochemical parameters of this reaction were as follows: Km = 313 microM, turnover number = 22 min-1. Both hGBP1 and hGBP2 failed to hydrolyze GDP, however, GDP was an effective inhibitor of the hGBP2- but not the hGBP1-catalyzed GTP hydrolysis reaction. Thus, hGBP1 and hGBP2 have similar biochemical properties, but show pronounced differences in product specificity.

  15. Subcellular control of Rac-GTPase signalling by magnetogenetic manipulation inside living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etoc, F.; Lisse, D.; Bellaiche, Y.; Piehler, J.; Coppey, M.; Dahan, M.

    2013-03-01

    Many cell functions rely on the coordinated activity of signalling pathways at a subcellular scale. However, there are few tools capable of probing and perturbing signalling networks with a spatial resolution matching the intracellular dimensions of their activity patterns. Here we present a generic magnetogenetic approach based on the self-assembly of signalling complexes on the surface of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles inside living cells. The nanoparticles act as nanoscopic hot spots that can be displaced by magnetic forces and trigger signal transduction pathways that bring about a cell response. We applied this strategy to Rho-GTPases, a set of molecular switches known to regulate cell morphology via complex spatiotemporal patterns of activity. We demonstrate that the nanoparticle-mediated activation of signalling pathways leads to local remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton and to morphological changes.

  16. Regulation of cytokinesis by membrane trafficking involving small GTPases and the ESCRT machinery.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    During cell division, cells undergo membrane remodeling to achieve changes in their size and shape. In addition, cell division entails local delivery and retrieval of membranes and specific proteins as well as remodeling of cytoskeletons, in particular, upon cytokinetic abscission. Accumulating lines of evidence highlight that endocytic membrane removal from and subsequent membrane delivery to the plasma membrane are crucial for the changes in cell size and shape, and that trafficking of vesicles carrying specific proteins to the abscission site participate in local remodeling of membranes and cytoskeletons. Furthermore, the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery has been shown to play crucial roles in cytokinetic abscission. Here, the author briefly overviews membrane-trafficking events early in cell division, and subsequently focus on regulation and functional significance of membrane trafficking involving Rab11 and Arf6 small GTPases in late cytokinesis phases and assembly of the ESCRT machinery in cytokinetic abscission.

  17. Imaging Dynamic Molecular Signaling by the Cdc42 GTPase within the Developing CNS

    PubMed Central

    Kamiyama, Daichi; Deng, Tzyy-Chyn; Boulina, Maria; Chiba, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Protein interactions underlie the complexity of neuronal function. Potential interactions between specific proteins in the brain are predicted from assays based on genetic interaction and/or biochemistry. Genetic interaction reveals endogenous, but not necessarily direct, interactions between the proteins. Biochemistry-based assays, on the other hand, demonstrate direct interactions between proteins, but often outside their native environment or without a subcellular context. We aimed to achieve the best of both approaches by visualizing protein interaction directly within the brain of a live animal. Here, we show a proof-of-principle experiment in which the Cdc42 GTPase associates with its alleged partner WASp within neurons during the time and space that coincide with the newly developing CNS. PMID:24586421

  18. Bidirectional Synaptic Structural Plasticity after Chronic Cocaine Administration Occurs through Rap1 Small GTPase Signaling.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Michael E; Bagot, Rosemary C; Gancarz, Amy M; Walker, Deena M; Sun, HaoSheng; Wang, Zi-Jun; Heller, Elizabeth A; Feng, Jian; Kennedy, Pamela J; Koo, Ja Wook; Cates, Hannah M; Neve, Rachael L; Shen, Li; Dietz, David M; Nestler, Eric J

    2016-02-03

    Dendritic spines are the sites of most excitatory synapses in the CNS, and opposing alterations in the synaptic structure of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a primary brain reward region, are seen at early versus late time points after cocaine administration. Here we investigate the time-dependent molecular and biochemical processes that regulate this bidirectional synaptic structural plasticity of NAc MSNs and associated changes in cocaine reward in response to chronic cocaine exposure. Our findings reveal key roles for the bidirectional synaptic expression of the Rap1b small GTPase and an associated local synaptic protein translation network in this process. The transcriptional mechanisms and pathway-specific inputs to NAc that regulate Rap1b expression are also characterized. Collectively, these findings provide a precise mechanism by which nuclear to synaptic interactions induce "metaplasticity" in NAc MSNs, and we reveal the specific effects of this plasticity on reward behavior in a brain circuit-specific manner.

  19. Structure of the Drosophila melanogaster Rab6 GTPase at 1.4 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Walden, Miriam; Jenkins, Huw T.; Edwards, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    Rab6 is a small GTPase that belongs to the p21 Ras superfamily. It is involved in vesicle trafficking between the Golgi apparatus and endosomes/ER in eukaryotes. The GDP-bound inactive protein undergoes conformational changes when the nucleotide is exchanged to GTP, allowing Rab6 to interact with a variety of different effector proteins. To further understand how these changes affect downstream protein binding, the crystal structure of Rab6 from Drosophila melanogaster has been solved to 1.4 Å resolution, the highest resolution for a Rab6 structure to date. The crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 116.5, b = 42.71, c = 86.86 Å, α = 90, β = 133.12, γ = 90°. The model was refined to an R factor of 14.5% and an R free of 17.3%. PMID:21795785

  20. Novel aspects of the roles of Rac1 GTPase in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Naoki; Li, Yuxin; Liao, James K

    2010-04-01

    Rac1 GTPase is an established master regulator of cell motility through cortical actin re-organization and of reactive oxygen species generation through regulation of NADPH oxidase activity. Numerous molecular and cellular studies have implicated Rac1 in various cardiovascular pathologies: vascular smooth muscle proliferation, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, and endothelial cell shape change. The physiological relevance of these in vitro findings, however, is just beginning to be reassessed with the newly developed, conditional mouse mutagenesis technology. Conditional gene targeting has also revealed unexpected, cell type-specific roles of Rac1. The aim of this review is to summarize the recent advance made in Rac1 research in the cardiovascular system, with special focus on its novel roles in the regulation of endothelial function, angiogenesis, and endothelium-mediated neuroprotection.

  1. Defective Dendrite Elongation but Normal Fertility in Mice Lacking the Rho-Like GTPase Activator Dbl

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Emilio; Pozzato, Michela; Vercelli, Alessandro; Barberis, Laura; Azzolino, Ornella; Russo, Chiara; Vanni, Cristina; Silengo, Lorenzo; Eva, Alessandra; Altruda, Fiorella

    2002-01-01

    Dbl is the prototype of a large family of GDP-GTP exchange factors for small GTPases of the Rho family. In vitro, Dbl is known to activate Rho and Cdc42 and to induce a transformed phenotype. Dbl is specifically expressed in brain and gonads, but its in vivo functions are largely unknown. To assess its role in neurogenesis and gametogenesis, targeted deletion of the murine Dbl gene was accomplished in embryonic stem cells. Dbl-null mice are viable and did not show either decreased reproductive performances or obvious neurological defects. Histological analysis of mutant testis showed normal morphology and unaltered proliferation and survival of spermatogonia. Dbl-null brains indicated a correct disposition of the major neural structures. Analysis of cortical stratification indicated that Dbl is not crucial for neuronal migration. However, in distinct populations of Dbl-null cortical pyramidal neurons, the length of dendrites was significantly reduced, suggesting a role for Dbl in dendrite elongation. PMID:11940671

  2. Gluten quality of bread wheat is associated with activity of RabD GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Adam M; Bhandari, Dhan G; Poole, Mervin; Napier, Johnathan A; Jones, Huw D; Lu, Chungui; Lycett, Grantley W

    2015-01-01

    In the developing endosperm of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum), seed storage proteins are produced on the rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and transported to protein bodies, specialized vacuoles for the storage of protein. The functionally important gluten proteins of wheat are transported by two distinct routes to the protein bodies where they are stored: vesicles that bud directly off the ER and transport through the Golgi. However, little is known about the processing of glutenin and gliadin proteins during these steps or the possible impact on their properties. In plants, the RabD GTPases mediate ER-to-Golgi vesicle transport. Available sequence information for Rab GTPases in Arabidopsis, rice, Brachypodium and bread wheat was compiled and compared to identify wheat RabD orthologs. Partial genetic sequences were assembled using the first draft of the Chinese Spring wheat genome. A suitable candidate gene from the RabD clade (TaRabD2a) was chosen for down-regulation by RNA interference (RNAi), and an RNAi construct was used to transform wheat plants. All four available RabD genes were shown by qRT-PCR to be down-regulated in the transgenic developing endosperm. The transgenic grain was found to produce flour with significantly altered processing properties when measured by farinograph and extensograph. SE-HPLC found that a smaller proportion of HMW-GS and large proportion of LMW-GS are incorporated into the glutenin macropolymer in the transgenic dough. Lower protein content but a similar protein profile on SDS-PAGE was seen in the transgenic grain. PMID:25047236

  3. Cloning and characterization of Rap GTPase from the Chinese white shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Qian; Zhou, Jing; Jia, Yu-Ping; Wang, Xian-Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2012-01-01

    Ras-related protein Rap GTPase has been implicated in cell adhesion, cell proliferation, and cell junction formation. The first shrimp Rap cDNA (FcRap) was recently identified from the Chinese white shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis. The full length of FcRap is 1013 bp, with a 561 bp open reading frame that encodes a 186 amino acid protein. FcRap has a calculated molecular mass of 20.90 kDa and pI of 6.37. Phylogenetic analysis shows that FcRap and other Rap proteins are clustered into one group. Results from the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction show that FcRap could be detected mainly in the hemocytes, hepatopancreas, stomach, and gills, whereas a relatively lower expression level could be detected in the heart and intestines. FcRap in the hemocytes was upregulated 2h post Vibrio challenge, and it was upregulated 2h post white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge, and peaked at 6h before it declined at 12h. No variation in the FcRap transcript was observed in the gills under the Vibrio challenge, but it was initially downregulated 2h post WSSV challenge, and then it was upregulated and peaked at 6h before it was eventually went down at 12h. The rFcRap protein was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli BL21DE3. The pull-down analysis showed that rFcRap protein could interact with VP28, an envelope protein of WSSV. The probable roles of Rap GTPase in shrimp innate immunity are presented for the first time.

  4. Regulation of the Cdc42/Cdc24 GTPase Module during Candida albicans Hyphal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Bassilana, Martine; Hopkins, Julie; Arkowitz, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    The Rho G protein Cdc42 and its exchange factor Cdc24 are required for hyphal growth of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Previously, we reported that strains ectopically expressing Cdc24 or Cdc42 are unable to form hyphae in response to serum. Here we investigated the role of these two proteins in hyphal growth, using quantitative real-time PCR to measure induction of hypha-specific genes together with time lapse microscopy. Expression of the hypha-specific genes examined depends on the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A pathway culminating in the Efg1 and Tec1 transcription factors. We show that strains with reduced levels of CDC24 or CDC42 transcripts induce hypha-specific genes yet cannot maintain their expression in response to serum. Furthermore, in serum these mutants form elongated buds compared to the wild type and mutant budding cells, as observed by time lapse microscopy. Using Cdc24 fused to green fluorescent protein, we also show that Cdc24 is recruited to and persists at the germ tube tip during hyphal growth. Altogether these data demonstrate that the Cdc24/Cdc42 GTPase module is required for maintenance of hyphal growth. In addition, overexpression studies indicate that specific levels of Cdc24 and Cdc42 are important for invasive hyphal growth. In response to serum, CDC24 transcript levels increase transiently in a Tec1-dependent fashion, as do the G-protein RHO3 and the Rho1 GTPase activating protein BEM2 transcript levels. These results suggest that a positive feedback loop between Cdc24 and Tec1 contributes to an increase in active Cdc42 at the tip of the germ tube which is important for hypha formation. PMID:15755921

  5. The iron-type nitrile hydratase activator protein is a GTPase.

    PubMed

    Gumataotao, Natalie; Lankathilaka, K P Wasantha; Bennett, Brian; Holz, Richard C

    2017-01-15

    The Fe-type nitrile hydratase activator protein from Rhodococcus equi TG328-2 (ReNHase TG328-2) was successfully expressed and purified. Sequence analysis and homology modeling suggest that it is a G3E P-loop guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) within the COG0523 subfamily. Kinetic studies revealed that the Fe-type activator protein is capable of hydrolyzing GTP to GDP with a kcat value of 1.2 × 10(-3 )s(-1) and a Km value of 40 μM in the presence of 5 mM MgCl2 in 50 mM 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid at a pH of 8.0. The addition of divalent metal ions, such as Co(II), which binds to the ReNHase TG328-2 activator protein with a Kd of 2.9 μM, accelerated the rate of GTP hydrolysis, suggesting that GTP hydrolysis is potentially connected to the proposed metal chaperone function of the ReNHase TG328-2 activator protein. Circular dichroism data reveal a significant conformational change upon the addition of GTP, which may be linked to the interconnectivity of the cofactor binding sites, resulting in an activator protein that can be recognized and can bind to the NHase α-subunit. A combination of these data establishes, for the first time, that the ReNHase TG328-2 activator protein falls into the COG0523 subfamily of G3E P-loop GTPases, many of which play a role in metal homeostasis processes.

  6. Activation of Dbl restores migration in polyamine-depleted intestinal epithelial cells via Rho-GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Bavaria, Mitulkumar N.; Bhattacharya, Sujoy; Johnson, Leonard R.

    2011-01-01

    Integrin binding to the extracellular matrix (ECM) activated Rho GTPases, Src, and focal adhesion kinase in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC)-6. Polyamine depletion inhibited activities of Rac1, RhoA, and Cdc42 and thereby migration. However, constitutively active (CA) Rac1 expression abolished the inhibitory effect of polyamine depletion, indicating that polyamines are involved in a process upstream of Rac1. In the present study, we examined the role of polyamines in the regulation of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor, diffuse B-cell lymphoma (Dbl), for Rho GTPases. Polyamine depletion decreased the level as well as the activation of Dbl protein. Dbl knockdown by siRNA altered cytoskeletal structure and decreased Rac1 activity and migration. Cells expressing CA-Dbl increased migration, Rac1 activity, and proliferation. CA-Dbl restored migration in polyamine-depleted cells by activating RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42. CA-Dbl caused extensive reorganization of the F-actin cortex into stress fibers. Inhibition of Rac1 by NSC23766 significantly decreased migration of vector-transfected cells and CA-Dbl-transfected cells. However, the inhibition of migration was significantly higher in the vector-transfected cells compared with that seen in the CA-Dbl-transfected cells. Dbl localized in the perinuclear region in polyamine-depleted cells, whereas it localized with the stress fibers in control cells. CA-Dbl localized with stress fibers in both the control and polyamine-depleted cells. These results suggest that polyamines regulate the activation of Dbl, a membrane-proximal process upstream of Rac1. PMID:21372162

  7. Gluten quality of bread wheat is associated with activity of RabD GTPases.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Adam M; Bhandari, Dhan G; Poole, Mervin; Napier, Johnathan A; Jones, Huw D; Lu, Chungui; Lycett, Grantley W

    2015-02-01

    In the developing endosperm of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum), seed storage proteins are produced on the rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and transported to protein bodies, specialized vacuoles for the storage of protein. The functionally important gluten proteins of wheat are transported by two distinct routes to the protein bodies where they are stored: vesicles that bud directly off the ER and transport through the Golgi. However, little is known about the processing of glutenin and gliadin proteins during these steps or the possible impact on their properties. In plants, the RabD GTPases mediate ER-to-Golgi vesicle transport. Available sequence information for Rab GTPases in Arabidopsis, rice, Brachypodium and bread wheat was compiled and compared to identify wheat RabD orthologs. Partial genetic sequences were assembled using the first draft of the Chinese Spring wheat genome. A suitable candidate gene from the RabD clade (TaRabD2a) was chosen for down-regulation by RNA interference (RNAi), and an RNAi construct was used to transform wheat plants. All four available RabD genes were shown by qRT-PCR to be down-regulated in the transgenic developing endosperm. The transgenic grain was found to produce flour with significantly altered processing properties when measured by farinograph and extensograph. SE-HPLC found that a smaller proportion of HMW-GS and large proportion of LMW-GS are incorporated into the glutenin macropolymer in the transgenic dough. Lower protein content but a similar protein profile on SDS-PAGE was seen in the transgenic grain.

  8. Evolution of the Rho family of ras-like GTPases in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Boureux, Anthony; Vignal, Emmanuel; Faure, Sandrine; Fort, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    GTPases of the Rho family are molecular switches that play important roles in converting and amplifying external signals into cellular effects. Originally demonstrated to control the dynamics of the F-actin cytoskeleton, Rho GTPases have been implicated in many basic cellular processes that influence cell proliferation, differentiation, motility, adhesion, survival, or secretion. To elucidate the evolutionary history of the Rho family, we have analyzed over 20 species covering major eukaryotic clades from unicellular organisms to mammals, including platypus and opossum, and have reconstructed the ontogeny and the chronology of emergence of the different subfamilies. Our data establish that the 20 mammalian Rho members are structured into 8 subfamilies, among which Rac is the founder of the whole family. Rho, Cdc42, RhoUV, and RhoBTB subfamilies appeared before Coelomates and RhoJQ, Cdc42 isoforms, RhoDF, and Rnd emerged in chordates. In vertebrates, gene duplications and retrotranspositions increased the size of each chordate Rho subfamily, whereas RhoH, the last subfamily, arose probably by horizontal gene transfer. Rac1b, a Rac1 isoform generated by alternative splicing, emerged in amniotes, and RhoD, only in therians. Analysis of Rho mRNA expression patterns in mouse tissues shows that recent subfamilies have tissue-specific and low-level expression that supports their implication only in narrow time windows or in differentiated metabolic functions. These findings give a comprehensive view of the evolutionary canvas of the Rho family and provide guides for future structure and evolution studies of other components of Rho signaling pathways, in particular regulators of the RhoGEF family.

  9. Evolution of the Rho family of ras-like GTPases in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Boureux, Anthony; Vignal, Emmanuel; Faure, Sandrine; Fort, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    GTPases of the Rho family are molecular switches that play important roles in converting and amplifying external signals into cellular effects. Originally demonstrated to control the dynamics of the F-actin cytoskeleton, Rho GTPases have been implicated in many basic cellular processes that influence cell proliferation, differentiation, motility, adhesion, survival or secretion. To elucidate the evolutionary history of the Rho family, we have analyzed over twenty species covering major eukaryotic clades from unicellular organisms to mammals, including platypus and opossum, and have reconstructed the ontogeny and the chronology of emergence of the different subfamilies. Our data establish that the 20 mammalian Rho members are structured into eight subfamilies, among which Rac is the founder of the whole family. Rho, Cdc42, RhoUV and RhoBTB subfamilies appeared before Coelomates, and RhoJQ, RhoDF and Rnd emerged in Chordates. In Vertebrates, gene duplications and retrotranspositions increased the size of each chordate Rho subfamily, while RhoH, the last subfamily, arose probably by horizontal gene transfer. Rac1b, a Rac1 isoform generated by alternative splicing, emerged in amniotes, and RhoD, only in therians. Analysis of Rho mRNA expression patterns in mouse tissues shows that recent subfamilies have tissue-specific specific and low level expression, which supports their implication only in narrow time windows or in differentiated metabolic functions. These findings give a comprehensive view of the evolutionary canvas of the Rho family and provide guides for future structure and evolution studies of other components of Rho signaling pathways, in particular regulators of the RhoGEF family. PMID:17035353

  10. Rab4GTPase modulates CFTR function by impairing channel expression at plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Sunil K. . E-mail: ssaxena@stevens.edu; Kaur, Simarna; George, Constantine

    2006-03-03

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), an autosomal recessive disorder, is caused by the disruption of biosynthesis or the function of a membrane cAMP-activated chloride channel, CFTR. CFTR regulatory mechanisms include recruitment of channel proteins to the cell surface from intracellular pools and by protein-protein interactions. Rab proteins are small GTPases involved in regulated trafficking controlling vesicle docking and fusion. Rab4 controls recycling events from endosome to the plasma membrane, fusion, and degradation. The colorectal cell line HT-29 natively expresses CFTR and responds to cAMP stimulation with an increase in CFTR-mediated currents. Rab4 over-expression in HT-29 cells inhibits both basal and cAMP-stimulated CFTR-mediated currents. GTPase-deficient Rab4Q67L and GDP locked Rab4S22N both inhibit channel activity, which appears characteristically different. Active status of Rab4 was confirmed by GTP overlay assay, while its expression was verified by Western blotting. The pull-down and immunoprecipitation experiments suggest that Rab4 physically interacts with CFTR through protein-protein interaction. Biotinylation with cell impermeant NHS-Sulfo-SS-Biotin implies that Rab4 impairs CFTR expression at cell surface. The enhanced cytosolic CFTR indicates that Rab4 expression restrains CFTR appearance at the cell membrane. The study suggests that Rab4 regulates the channel through multiple mechanisms that include protein-protein interaction, GTP/GDP exchange, and channel protein trafficking. We propose that Rab4 is a dynamic molecule with a significant role in CFTR function.

  11. The assembly of integrin adhesion complexes requires both extracellular matrix and intracellular rho/rac GTPases

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Interaction of cells with extracellular matrix via integrin adhesion receptors plays an important role in a wide range of cellular: functions, for example cell growth, movement, and differentiation. Upon interaction with substrate, integrins cluster and associate with a variety of cytoplasmic proteins to form focal complexes and with the actin cytoskeleton. Although the intracellular signals induced by integrins are at present undefined, it is thought that they are mediated by proteins recruited to the focal complexes. It has been suggested, for example, that after recruitment to focal adhesions p125FAK can activate the ERK1/2 MAP kinase cascade. We have previously reported that members of the rho family of small GTPases can trigger the assembly of focal complexes when activated in cells. Using microinjection techniques, we have now examined the role of the extracellular matrix and of the two GTP-binding proteins, rac and rho, in the assembly of integrin complexes in both mouse and human fibroblasts. We find that the interaction of integrins with extracellular matrix alone is not sufficient to induce integrin clustering and focal complex formation. Similarly, activation of rho or rac by extracellular growth factors does not lead to focal complex formation in the absence of matrix. Focal complexes are only assembled in the presence of both matrix and functionally active members of the rho family. In agreement with this, the interaction of integrins with matrix in the absence of rho/rac activity is unable to activate the ERK1/2 kinases in Swiss 3T3 cells. In fact, ERK1/2 can be activated fully by growth factors in the absence of matrix and it seems unlikely, therefore, that the adhesion dependence of fibroblast growth is mediated through the ras/MAP kinase pathway. We conclude that extracellular matrix is not sufficient to trigger focal complex assembly and subsequent integrin-dependent signal transduction in the absence of functionally active members of the rho

  12. Cdc42: An Essential Rho-Type GTPase Controlling Eukaryotic Cell Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Douglas I.

    1999-01-01

    Cdc42p is an essential GTPase that belongs to the Rho/Rac subfamily of Ras-like GTPases. These proteins act as molecular switches by responding to exogenous and/or endogenous signals and relaying those signals to activate downstream components of a biological pathway. The 11 current members ofthe Cdc42p family display between 75 and 100% amino acid identity and are functional as well as structural homologs. Cdc42p transduces signals to the actin cytoskeleton to initiate and maintain polarized gorwth and to mitogen-activated protein morphogenesis. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Cdc42p plays an important role in multiple actin-dependent morphogenetic events such as bud emergence, mating-projection formation, and pseudohyphal growth. In mammalian cells, Cdc42p regulates a variety of actin-dependent events and induces the JNK/SAPK protein kinase cascade, which leads to the activation of transcription factors within the nucleus. Cdc42p mediates these processes through interactions with a myriad of downstream effectors, whose number and regulation we are just starting to understand. In addition, Cdc42p has been implicated in a number of human diseases through interactions with its regulators and downstream effectors. While much is known about Cdc42p sturcture and functional interactions, little is known about the mechanism(s) by which it transduces signals within the cell. Future research sould focus on this question as well as on the detailed analysis of the interactions of Cdc42p with its regulators and downstream effectors. PMID:10066831

  13. RhoA GTPase regulates radiation-induced alterations in endothelial cell adhesion and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau, Matthieu; Gaugler, Marie-Helene; Rodallec, Audrey; Bonnaud, Stephanie; Paris, Francois; Corre, Isabelle

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explore the role of RhoA in endothelial cell response to ionizing radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RhoA is rapidly activated by single high-dose of radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation leads to RhoA/ROCK-dependent actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced apoptosis does not require the RhoA/ROCK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced alteration of endothelial adhesion and migration requires RhoA/ROCK. -- Abstract: Endothelial cells of the microvasculature are major target of ionizing radiation, responsible of the radiation-induced vascular early dysfunctions. Molecular signaling pathways involved in endothelial responses to ionizing radiation, despite being increasingly investigated, still need precise characterization. Small GTPase RhoA and its effector ROCK are crucial signaling molecules involved in many endothelial cellular functions. Recent studies identified implication of RhoA/ROCK in radiation-induced increase in endothelial permeability but other endothelial functions altered by radiation might also require RhoA proteins. Human microvascular endothelial cells HMEC-1, either treated with Y-27632 (inhibitor of ROCK) or invalidated for RhoA by RNA interference were exposed to 15 Gy. We showed a rapid radiation-induced activation of RhoA, leading to a deep reorganisation of actin cytoskeleton with rapid formation of stress fibers. Endothelial early apoptosis induced by ionizing radiation was not affected by Y-27632 pre-treatment or RhoA depletion. Endothelial adhesion to fibronectin and formation of focal adhesions increased in response to radiation in a RhoA/ROCK-dependent manner. Consistent with its pro-adhesive role, ionizing radiation also decreased endothelial cells migration and RhoA was required for this inhibition. These results highlight the role of RhoA GTPase in ionizing radiation-induced deregulation of essential endothelial

  14. A role for the rap GTPase YlRsr1 in cellular morphogenesis and the involvement of YlRsr1 and the ras GTPase YlRas2 in bud site selection in the dimorphic yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun-Qing; Li, Min; Zhao, Xiao-Feng; Gao, Xiang-Dong

    2014-05-01

    Yarrowia lipolytica is a dimorphic yeast species that can grow in the ovoid yeast form or in the elongated pseudohyphal or hyphal form depending on the growth conditions. Here, we show that the Rap GTPase Rsr1 of Y. lipolytica (YlRsr1) plays an important role in cellular morphogenesis in this microorganism. Cells deleted for YlRSR1 exhibited impaired polarized growth during yeast-form growth. Pseudohyphal and hyphal development were also abnormal. YlRsr1 is also important for cell growth, since the deletion of YlRSR1 in cells lacking the Ras GTPase YlRas2 caused lethality. Y. lipolytica cells bud in a bipolar pattern in which the cells produce the new buds at the two poles. YlRsr1 plays a prominent role in this bud site selection process. YlRsr1's function in bud site selection absolutely requires the cycling of YlRsr1 between the GTP- and GDP-bound states but its function in cellular morphogenesis does not, suggesting that the two processes are differentially regulated. Interestingly, the Ras GTPase YlRas2 is also involved in the control of bud site selection, as Ylras2Δ cells were severely impaired in bipolar bud site selection. The GTP/GDP cycling and the plasma membrane localization of YlRas2 are important for YlRas2's function in bud site selection. However, they are not essential for this process, suggesting that the mechanism by which YlRas2 acts is different from that of YlRsr1. Our results suggest that YlRsr1 is regulated by the GTPase-activating protein (GAP) YlBud2 and partially by YlCdc25, the potential guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for YlRas2.

  15. Orthogonal ring-closing alkyne and olefin metathesis for the synthesis of small GTPase-targeting bicyclic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Cromm, Philipp M.; Schaubach, Sebastian; Spiegel, Jochen; Fürstner, Alois; Grossmann, Tom N.; Waldmann, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Bicyclic peptides are promising scaffolds for the development of inhibitors of biological targets that proved intractable by typical small molecules. So far, access to bioactive bicyclic peptide architectures is limited due to a lack of appropriate orthogonal ring-closing reactions. Here, we report chemically orthogonal ring-closing olefin (RCM) and alkyne metathesis (RCAM), which enable an efficient chemo- and regioselective synthesis of complex bicyclic peptide scaffolds with variable macrocycle geometries. We also demonstrate that the formed alkyne macrocycle can be functionalized subsequently. The orthogonal RCM/RCAM system was successfully used to evolve a monocyclic peptide inhibitor of the small GTPase Rab8 into a bicyclic ligand. This modified peptide shows the highest affinity for an activated Rab GTPase that has been reported so far. The RCM/RCAM-based formation of bicyclic peptides provides novel opportunities for the design of bioactive scaffolds suitable for the modulation of challenging protein targets. PMID:27075966

  16. Cross GTPase-activating protein (CrossGAP)/Vilse links the Roundabout receptor to Rac to regulate midline repulsion.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hailan; Li, Ming; Labrador, Juan-Pablo; McEwen, Jason; Lai, Eric C; Goodman, Corey S; Bashaw, Greg J

    2005-03-22

    The regulators of the Rho-family GTPases, GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) and guanine exchange factors (GEFs), play important roles in axon guidance. By means of a functional genomic study of the Rho-family GEFs and GAPs in Drosophila, we have identified a Rho-family GAP, CrossGAP (CrGAP), which is involved in Roundabout (Robo) receptor-mediated repulsive axon guidance. CrGAP physically associates with the Robo receptor. Too much or too little CrGAP activity leads to defects in Robo-mediated repulsion at the midline choice point. The CrGAP gain-of-function phenotype mimics the loss-of-function phenotypes of both Robo and Rac. Dosage-sensitive genetic interactions among CrGAP, Robo, and Rac support a model in which CrGAP transduces signals downstream of Robo receptor to regulate Rac-dependent cytoskeletal changes.

  17. The small GTPase ARF6 regulates protein trafficking to control cellular function during development and in disease.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Allie H; Zhao, Helong; Jenkins, Noah; Zhu, Weiquan; Richards, Jackson R; Yoo, Jae Hyuk; Winter, Jacob M; Rich, Bianca; Mleynek, Tara M; Li, Dean Y; Odelberg, Shannon J

    2016-12-21

    The activation of the small GTPase ARF6 has been implicated in promoting several pathological processes related to vascular instability and tumor formation, growth, and metastasis. ARF6 also plays a vital role during embryonic development. Recent studies have suggested that ARF6 carries out these disparate functions primarily by controlling protein trafficking within the cell. ARF6 helps direct proteins to intracellular or extracellular locations where they function in normal cellular responses during development and in pathological processes later in life. This transport of proteins is accomplished through a variety of mechanisms, including endocytosis and recycling, microvesicle release, and as yet uncharacterized processes. This Commentary will explore the functions of ARF6, while focusing on the role of this small GTPase in development and postnatal physiology, regulating barrier function and diseases associated with its loss, and tumor formation, growth, and metastasis.

  18. Analysis of Arf1 GTPase-dependent membrane binding and remodeling using the exomer secretory vesicle cargo adaptor

    PubMed Central

    Paczkowski, Jon E.; Fromme, J. Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Summary Protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions play a critical role in shaping biological membranes through direct physical contact with the membrane surface. This is particularly evident in many steps of membrane trafficking, in which proteins deform the membrane and induce fission to form transport carriers. The small GTPase Arf1 and related proteins have the ability to remodel membranes by insertion of an amphipathic helix into the membrane. Arf1 and the exomer cargo adaptor coordinate cargo sorting into subset of secretory vesicle carriers in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we detail the assays we used to explore the cooperative action of Arf1 and exomer to bind and remodel membranes. We expect these methods are broadly applicable to other small GTPase/effector systems where investigation of membrane binding and remodeling is of interest. PMID:27632000

  19. 4',6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) induces bundling of Escherichia coli FtsZ polymers inhibiting the GTPase activity.

    PubMed

    Nova, Esteban; Montecinos, Felipe; Brunet, Juan E; Lagos, Rosalba; Monasterio, Octavio

    2007-09-15

    FtsZ (Filamentous temperature sensitivity Z) cell division protein from Escherichia coli binds the fluorescence probe DAPI. Bundling of FtsZ was facilitated in the presence of DAPI, and the polymers in solution remained polymerized longer time than the protofilaments formed in the absence of DAPI. DAPI decreased both the maximal velocity of the GTPase activity and the Michaelis-Menten constant for GTP, indicating that behaves like an uncompetitive inhibitor of the GTPase activity favoring the GTP form of FtsZ in the polymers. The results presented in this work support a cooperative polymerization mechanism in which the binding of DAPI favors protofilament lateral interactions and the stability of the resulting polymers.

  20. Metal binding properties of Escherichia coli YjiA, a member of the metal homeostasis-associated COG0523 family of GTPases.

    PubMed

    Sydor, Andrew M; Jost, Marco; Ryan, Katherine S; Turo, Kaitlyn E; Douglas, Colin D; Drennan, Catherine L; Zamble, Deborah B

    2013-03-12

    GTPases are critical molecular switches involved in a wide range of biological functions. Recent phylogenetic and genomic analyses of the large, mostly uncharacterized COG0523 subfamily of GTPases revealed a link between some COG0523 proteins and metal homeostasis pathways. In this report, we detail the bioinorganic characterization of YjiA, a representative member of COG0523 subgroup 9 and the only COG0523 protein to date with high-resolution structural information. We find that YjiA is capable of binding several types of transition metals with dissociation constants in the low micromolar range and that metal binding affects both the oligomeric structure and GTPase activity of the enzyme. Using a combination of X-ray crystallography and site-directed mutagenesis, we identify, among others, a metal-binding site adjacent to the nucleotide-binding site in the GTPase domain that involves a conserved cysteine and several glutamate residues. Mutations of the coordinating residues decrease the impact of metal, suggesting that metal binding to this site is responsible for modulating the GTPase activity of the protein. These findings point toward a regulatory function for these COG0523 GTPases that is responsive to their metal-bound state.

  1. Metal Binding Properties of Escherichia coli YjiA, a Member of the Metal Homeostasis-Associated COG0523 Family of GTPases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    GTPases are critical molecular switches involved in a wide range of biological functions. Recent phylogenetic and genomic analyses of the large, mostly uncharacterized COG0523 subfamily of GTPases revealed a link between some COG0523 proteins and metal homeostasis pathways. In this report, we detail the bioinorganic characterization of YjiA, a representative member of COG0523 subgroup 9 and the only COG0523 protein to date with high-resolution structural information. We find that YjiA is capable of binding several types of transition metals with dissociation constants in the low micromolar range and that metal binding affects both the oligomeric structure and GTPase activity of the enzyme. Using a combination of X-ray crystallography and site-directed mutagenesis, we identify, among others, a metal-binding site adjacent to the nucleotide-binding site in the GTPase domain that involves a conserved cysteine and several glutamate residues. Mutations of the coordinating residues decrease the impact of metal, suggesting that metal binding to this site is responsible for modulating the GTPase activity of the protein. These findings point toward a regulatory function for these COG0523 GTPases that is responsive to their metal-bound state. PMID:24449932

  2. The Srp54 GTPase is essential for protein export in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Althoff, S M; Stevens, S W; Wise, J A

    1994-12-01

    Signal recognition particle (SRP) is a cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein required for targeting a subset of presecretory proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. Here we report the results of a series of experiments to define the function of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe homolog of the 54-kDa subunit of mammalian SRP. One-step gene disruption reveals that the Srp54 protein, like SRP RNA, is essential for viability in S. pombe. Precursor to the secretory protein acid phosphatase accumulates in cells in which Srp54 synthesis has been repressed under the control of a regulated promoter, indicating that S. pombe SRP functions in protein targeting. In common with other Srp54 homologs, the S. pombe protein has a modular structure consisting of an amino-terminal G (GTPase) domain and a carboxyl-terminal M (methionine-rich) domain. We have analyzed the effects of 17 site-specific mutations designed to alter the function of each of the four GTPase consensus motifs individually. Several alleles, including some with relatively conservative amino acid substitutions, confer lethal or conditional phenotypes, indicating that GTP binding and hydrolysis are critical to the in vivo role of the protein. Two mutations (R to L at position 194 [R194L] and R194H) which were designed, by analogy to oncogenic mutations in rats, to dramatically decrease the catalytic rate and one (T248N) predicted to alter nucleotide binding specificity produce proteins that are unable to support growth at 18 degrees C. Consistent with its design, the R194L mutant hydrolyzes GTP at a reduced rate relative to wild-type Srp54 in enzymatic assays on immunoprecipitated proteins. In strains that also contain wild-type srp54, this mutant protein, as well as others designed to be locked in a GTP-bound conformation, exhibits temperature-dependent dominant inhibitory effects on growth, while a mutant predicted to be GDP locked does not interfere with the function of the wild-type protein. These results form

  3. EFL GTPase in cryptomonads and the distribution of EFL and EF-1alpha in chromalveolates.

    PubMed

    Gile, Gillian H; Patron, Nicola J; Keeling, Patrick J

    2006-10-01

    EFL (EF-like protein) is a member of the GTPase superfamily that includes several translation factors. Because it has only been found in a few eukaryotic lineages and its presence correlates with the absence of the related core translation factor EF-1alpha, its distribution is hypothesized to be the result of lateral gene transfer and replacement of EF-1alpha. In one supergroup of eukaryotes, the chromalveolates, two major lineages were found to contain EFL (dinoflagellates and haptophytes), while the others encode EF-1alpha (apicomplexans, ciliates, heterokonts and cryptomonads). For each of these groups, this distribution was deduced from whole genome sequence or expressed sequence tag (EST) data from several species, with the exception of cryptomonads from which only a single EF-1alpha PCR product from one species was known. By sequencing ESTs from two cryptomonads, Guillardia theta and Rhodomonas salina, and searching for all GTPase translation factors, we revealed that EFL is present in both species, but, contrary to expectations, we found EF-1alpha in neither. On balance, we suggest the previously reported EF-1alpha from Rhodomonas salina is likely an artefact of contamination. We also identified EFL in EST data from two members of the dinoflagellate lineage, Karlodinium micrum and Oxyrrhis marina, and from an ongoing genomic sequence project from a third, Perkinsus marinus. Karlodinium micrum is a symbiotic pairing of two lineages that would have both had EFL (a dinoflagellate and a haptophyte), but only the dinoflagellate gene remains. Oxyrrhis marina and Perkinsus marinus are early diverging sister-groups to dinoflagellates, and together show that EFL originated early in this lineage. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that these genes are all EFL homologues, and showed that cryptomonad genes are not detectably related to EFL from other chromalveolates, which collectively form several distinct groups. The known distribution of EFL now includes a third group

  4. Involvement of rho-gtpases in fibroblast adhesion and fibronectine fibrillogenesis under stretch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guignandon, A.; Lambert, C.; Rattner, A.; Servotte, S.; Lapiere, C.; Nusgens, B.; Vico, L.

    The Rho family small GTPases play a crucial role in mediating cellular adaptation to mechanical stimulation (MS), and possibly to microgravity (μg), through effects on the cytoskeleton and cell adhesion which is, in turn, mainly regulated by fibronectin fibrillogenesis (FnF). It remains unclear how mechanical stimulation is transduced to the Rho signaling pathways and how it impacts on fibronectin (fbn) fibrillogenesis (FnF). μg (2 days, mission STS-095) led to de-adhesion of fibroblasts and modification of the underlying extracellular matrix. To determine whether GTPases modulated FnF, we generated stable cell lines expressing high level of activated RhoA and Rac1 (QL) as compared to wild type (WI26-WT). After MS application [8% deformation, 1Hz, 15 min., 3 times/day for 1-2 days], we quantified focal adhesion (vinculin, paxillin, FAKY397), f-actin stress fibers (Sf) and FnF with home-developed softwares. We reported that after MS, Sf are more rapidly (30min) formed under the nucleus in Wi26-WT (+100%) and Rac1 (+200%) than in RhoA (+20%). Vinculin & paxillin were only restricted to the cell edge in static conditions and homogeneously distributed after MS in WT and Rac1. The relative area of contacts (vinculin & paxillin) was more dramatically enhanced by MS in Rac1 (+80%) than in WT (+40%) and RhoA (+25%) indicating that new focal contacts are formed under MS and supported the presence of Sf. MS Activation of FAK (FAKY397) was clear in WT and Rac1 and reduced in RhoA. FnF was restricted to cell-cell contacts zone without any change in the relative area of fbn after a 2-days MS. However we found more numerous spots of fbn at the cell center in Rac1 as compared with RhoA & WT suggesting that these fibrillar contacts will grow upon maturation and modulate FnF. The results indicate that MS induces formation of Sf and focal adhesions and enhances FF. RhoA has been shown to induce the formation of Sf and focal adhesions, and Rac1 activation decreases Rho activity in

  5. Obligatory role in GTP hydrolysis for the amide carbonyl oxygen of the Mg(2+)-coordinating Thr of regulatory GTPases.

    PubMed

    Zurita, Adolfo; Zhang, Yinghao; Pedersen, Lee; Darden, Tom; Birnbaumer, Lutz

    2010-05-25

    When G-protein alpha subunits binds GTP and Mg(2+), they transition from their inactive to their active conformation. This transition is accompanied by completion of the coordination shell of Mg(2+) with electrons from six oxygens: two water molecules, the ss and gamma phosphoryls of GTP, a helix-alpha1 Ser, and a switch I domain (SWI) Thr, and the repositioning of SWI and SWII domains. SWII binds and regulates effector enzymes and facilitates GTP hydrolysis by repositioning the gamma-carbonyl of a Gln. Mutating the Ser generates regulatory GTPases that cannot lock Mg(2+) into its place and are locked in their inactive state with dominant negative properties. Curiously, mutating the Thr appears to reduce GTP hydrolysis. The reason for this difference is not known because it is also not known why removal of the Thr should affect the overall GTPase cycle differently than removal of the Ser. Working with recombinant Gsalpha, we report that mutating its SWI-Thr to either Ala, Glu, Gln, or Asp results not only in diminished GTPase activity but also in spontaneous activation of the SWII domain. Upon close examination of existing alpha subunit crystals, we noted the oxygen of the backbone carbonyl of SWI-Thr and of the gamma-carbonyl of SWII Gln to be roughly equidistant from the oxygen of the hydrolytic H(2)O. Our observations indicate that the Gln and Thr carbonyls play equihierarchical roles in the GTPase process and provide the mechanism that explains why mutating the Thr mimics mutating the Gln and not that of the Ser.

  6. Modulation of Rho GTPases rescues brain mitochondrial dysfunction, cognitive deficits and aberrant synaptic plasticity in female mice modeling Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Bianca; Valenti, Daniela; Chiodi, Valentina; Ferrante, Antonella; de Bari, Lidia; Fiorentini, Carla; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Ricceri, Laura; Vacca, Rosa Anna; Fabbri, Alessia; Laviola, Giovanni

    2015-06-01

    Rho GTPases are molecules critically involved in neuronal plasticity and cognition. We have previously reported that modulation of brain Rho GTPases by the bacterial toxin CNF1 rescues the neurobehavioral phenotype in MeCP2-308 male mice, a model of Rett syndrome (RTT). RTT is a rare X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder and a genetic cause of intellectual disability, for which no effective therapy is available. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed to be involved in the mechanism of the disease pathogenesis. Here we demonstrate that modulation of Rho GTPases by CNF1 rescues the reduced mitochondrial ATP production via oxidative phosphorylation in the brain of MeCP2-308 heterozygous female mice, the condition which more closely recapitulates that of RTT patients. In RTT mouse brain, CNF1 also restores the alterations in the activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes and of ATP synthase, the molecular machinery responsible for the majority of cell energy production. Such effects were achieved through the upregulation of the protein content of those MRC complexes subunits, which were defective in RTT mouse brain. Restored mitochondrial functionality was accompanied by the rescue of deficits in cognitive function (spatial reference memory in the Barnes maze), synaptic plasticity (long-term potentiation) and Tyr1472 phosphorylation of GluN2B, which was abnormally enhanced in the hippocampus of RTT mice. Present findings bring into light previously unknown functional mitochondrial alterations in the brain of female mice modeling RTT and provide the first evidence that RTT brain mitochondrial dysfunction can be rescued by modulation of Rho GTPases.

  7. Novel ABP1-TMK auxin sensing system controls ROP GTPase-mediated interdigitated cell expansion in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jisheng; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2014-06-30

    ROP GTPases (Rho-like GTPase from plants), plant counterparts of animal and fungal Rho-family GTPases, have recently been shown to be key components of a novel signaling pathway activated by the plant hormone auxin. Auxin (indole acetic acid) is a key regulator of virtually every aspect of plant growth and development, yet the molecular mechanisms of auxin responses remain largely unknown. AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN1 (ABP1) is an ancient protein that binds auxin and has been implied as a receptor for a number of auxin responses, but its precise mechanism remains unresolved. A paradox for ABP1's action is that it is predominantly found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen, while it has been implicated as a cell surface auxin receptor, functionally distinct from the nuclear TIR1/AFB auxin receptor family that regulates transcriptional responses. Since our group reported that ABP1 is required for activating two antagonizing ROP signaling pathways involved in cytoskeletal reorganization and cell shape formation in Arabidopsis leaf pavement cells, we recently further showed that the plasma membrane-localized TMK receptor-like kinases functionally interact in a complex with ABP1 and are required for ABP1-dependent activation of ROP GTPases by auxin. The formation of this cell surface complex is induced by auxin and requires functional ABP1. These exciting findings provide convincing evidence for this novel auxin sensing system on the cell surface and suggest intriguing mechanisms for TMKs being functional partners of ABP1 to transmit extracellular auxin signal to intracellular ROP signaling module during polar cell expansion.

  8. A Rac1 GTPase is a critical factor in the immune response of shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) to Vibrio alginolyticus infection.

    PubMed

    Cha, Gui-Hong; Wang, Wei-Na; Peng, Ting; Huang, Ming-Zhu; Liu, Yuan

    2015-08-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 acts as a molecular switch for signal transduction that regulates various cellular functions. However, its functions in crustaceans remain unclear. In this study, a cDNA encoding a RAS GTPase (LvRac1) in the Pacific white shrimp (L. vannamei) was identified and characterized. A recombinant variant of this GTPase, rLvRac1, was expressed in the model organism P. pastoris and its expression was confirmed by mass spectrometry. Biochemical assays indicated that the recombinant protein retained GTPase activity and was expressed in all of the organism's tested tissues. Injection of the bacterium V. alginolyticus into L. vannamei induced hepatopancreatic upregulation of LvRac1 expression. Moreover, knocking down LvRac1 in vivo significantly reduced the expression of the L. vannamei p53 and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase genes (Lvp53 and LvCu/Zn SOD, respectively) while increasing that of the galectin gene (Lvgal). Hemolymph samples from control and LvRac1-silenced L. vannamei individuals were analyzed by flow cytometry, revealing that the latter exhibited significantly reduced respiratory burst activity and total hemocyte counts. Cumulative mortality in shrimp lacking LvRac1 was significantly greater than in control groups following V. alginolyticus challenge. The silencing of LvRac1 by double-stranded RNA injection thus increased the V. alginolyticus challenge sensitivity of L. vannamei and weakened its bacterial clearance ability in vivo. Suppressing LvRac1 also promoted the upregulation of Lvp53, LvCu/ZnSOD, and Lvgal following V. alginolyticus injection. Taken together, these results suggest that LvRac1 is important in the innate immune response of shrimp to V. alginolyticus infection.

  9. Regulators of G-protein Signaling accelerate GPCR signaling kinetics and govern sensitivity solely by accelerating GTPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Nevin A.; Johnston, Christopher A.; Cappell, Steven D.; Kuravi, Sudhakiranmayi; Kimple, Adam J.; Willard, Francis S.; Siderovski, David P.

    2010-01-01

    G-protein heterotrimers, composed of a guanine nucleotide-binding Gα subunit and an obligate Gβγ dimer, regulate signal transduction pathways by cycling between GDP- and GTP-bound states. Signal deactivation is achieved by Gα-mediated GTP hydrolysis (GTPase activity) which is enhanced by the GTPase-accelerating protein (GAP) activity of “regulator of G-protein signaling” (RGS) proteins. In a cellular context, RGS proteins have also been shown to speed up the onset of signaling, and to accelerate deactivation without changing amplitude or sensitivity of the signal. This latter paradoxical activity has been variably attributed to GAP/enzymatic or non-GAP/scaffolding functions of these proteins. Here, we validated and exploited a Gα switch-region point mutation, known to engender increased GTPase activity, to mimic in cis the GAP function of RGS proteins. While the transition-state, GDP·AlF4 −-bound conformation of the G202A mutant was found to be nearly identical to wild-type, Gαi1(G202A)·GDP assumed a divergent conformation more closely resembling the GDP·AlF4 −-bound state. When placed within Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gα subunit Gpa1, the fast-hydrolysis mutation restored appropriate dose–response behaviors to pheromone signaling in the absence of RGS-mediated GAP activity. A bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) readout of heterotrimer activation with high temporal resolution revealed that fast intrinsic GTPase activity could recapitulate in cis the kinetic sharpening (increased onset and deactivation rates) and blunting of sensitivity also engendered by RGS protein action in trans. Thus Gα-directed GAP activity, the first biochemical function ascribed to RGS proteins, is sufficient to explain the activation kinetics and agonist sensitivity observed from G-protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in a cellular context. PMID:20351284

  10. Flow cytometry for real-time measurement of guanine nucleotide binding and exchange by Ras-like GTPases.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Samantha L; Tessema, Mathewos; Buranda, Tione; Pylypenko, Olena; Rak, Alexey; Simons, Peter C; Surviladze, Zurab; Sklar, Larry A; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2008-10-15

    Ras-like small GTPases cycle between GTP-bound active and GDP-bound inactive conformational states to regulate diverse cellular processes. Despite their importance, detailed kinetic or comparative studies of family members are rarely undertaken due to the lack of real-time assays measuring nucleotide binding or exchange. Here we report a bead-based flow cytometric assay that quantitatively measures the nucleotide binding properties of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) chimeras for prototypical Ras family members Rab7 and Rho. Measurements are possible in the presence or absence of Mg(2+), with magnesium cations principally increasing affinity and slowing nucleotide dissociation rates 8- to 10-fold. GST-Rab7 exhibited a 3-fold higher affinity for guanosine diphosphate (GDP) relative to guanosine triphosphate (GTP) that is consistent with a 3-fold slower dissociation rate of GDP. Strikingly, GST-Rab7 had a marked preference for GTP with ribose ring-conjugated BODIPY FL. The more commonly used gamma-NH-conjugated BODIPY FL GTP analogue failed to bind to GST-Rab7. In contrast, both BODIPY analogues bound equally well to GST-RhoA and GST-RhoC. Comparisons of the GST-Rab7 and GST-RhoA GTP binding pockets provide a structural basis for the observed binding differences. In sum, the flow cytometric assay can be used to measure nucleotide binding properties of GTPases in real time and to quantitatively assess differences between GTPases.

  11. Rho GTPase signaling promotes constitutive expression and release of TGF-β2 by human trabecular meshwork cells.

    PubMed

    Pervan, Cynthia L; Lautz, Jonathan D; Blitzer, Andrea L; Langert, Kelly A; Stubbs, Evan B

    2016-05-01

    Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is causally implicated in the pathophysiology of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). The molecular mechanisms responsible for elevated IOP remain elusive, but may involve aberrant expression and signaling of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 within the trabecular meshwork (TM). Consistent with previously published studies, we show here that exogenous addition of TGF-β2 to cultured porcine anterior segments significantly attenuates outflow facility in a time-dependent manner. By comparison, perfusing segments with a TGFβRI/ALK-5 antagonist (SB-431542) unexpectedly elicited a significant and sustained increase in outflow facility, implicating a role for TM-localized constitutive expression and release of TGF-β2. Consistent with this thesis, cultured primary or transformed (GTM3) quiescent human TM cells were found to constitutively express and secrete measurable amounts of biologically-active TGF-β2. Disrupting monomeric GTPase post-translational prenylation and activation with lovastatin or GGTI-298 markedly reduced constitutive TGF-β2 expression and release. Specifically, inhibiting the Rho subfamily of GTPases with C3 exoenzyme similarly reduced constitutive expression and secretion of TGF-β2. These findings suggest that Rho GTPase signaling, in part, regulates constitutive expression and release of biologically-active TGF-β2 from human TM cells. Localized constitutive expression and release of TGF-β2 by TM cells may promote or exacerbate elevation of IOP in POAG.

  12. Neurotrophin Promotes Neurite Outgrowth by Inhibiting Rif GTPase Activation Downstream of MAPKs and PI3K Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaoxia; Yan, Huijuan; Li, Jiayi; Wu, Shuang; Wang, Junyu; Fan, Lifei

    2017-01-01

    Members of the well-known semaphorin family of proteins can induce both repulsive and attractive signaling in neural network formation and their cytoskeletal effects are mediated in part by small guanosine 5’-triphosphatase (GTPases). The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular role of Rif GTPase in the neurotrophin-induced neurite outgrowth. By using PC12 cells which are known to cease dividing and begin to show neurite outgrowth responding to nerve growth factor (NGF), we found that semaphorin 6A was as effective as nerve growth factor at stimulating neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells, and that its neurotrophic effect was transmitted through signaling by mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K). We further found that neurotrophin-induced neurite formation in PC12 cells could be partially mediated by inhibition of Rif GTPase activity downstream of MAPKs and PI3K signaling. In conclusion, we newly identified Rif as a regulator of the cytoskeletal rearrangement mediated by semaphorins. PMID:28098758

  13. RNAi screens for Rho GTPase regulators of cell shape and YAP/TAZ localisation in triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pascual-Vargas, Patricia; Cooper, Samuel; Sero, Julia; Bousgouni, Vicky; Arias-Garcia, Mar; Bakal, Chris

    2017-01-01

    In order to metastasise, triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) must make dynamic changes in cell shape. The shape of all eukaryotic cells is regulated by Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors (RhoGEFs), which activate Rho-family GTPases in response to mechanical and informational cues. In contrast, Rho GTPase-activating proteins (RhoGAPs) inhibit Rho GTPases. However, which RhoGEFs and RhoGAPS couple TNBC cell shape to changes in their environment is very poorly understood. Moreover, whether the activity of particular RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs become dysregulated as cells evolve the ability to metastasise is not clear. Towards the ultimate goal of identifying RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs that are essential for TNBC metastasis, we performed an RNAi screen to isolate RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs that contribute to the morphogenesis of the highly metastatic TNBC cell line LM2, and its less-metastatic parental cell line MDA-MB-231. For ~6 million cells from each cell line, we measured 127 different features following the depletion of 142 genes. Using a linear classifier scheme we also describe the morphological heterogeneity of each gene-depleted population. PMID:28248929

  14. Time-resolved FTIR studies provide activation free energy, activation enthalpy and activation entropy for GTPase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus

    2004-12-01

    GTPases, which catalyze the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP and P i, play a key role in the regulation of many biological processes. In this work, we quantify the activation parameters ΔG0∗,ΔH0∗andΔS0∗ for the hydrolysis reaction of GTP in water, in water with Mg 2+ ions and in Ras. Ras belongs to the superfamily of small GTPases (guanine nucleotide-binding proteins; GNBPs). Surprisingly, we find that in all cases, the activation energy consists mainly of enthalpic contributions. Additionally, the small entropic contributions in water and in Ras are similar, so that ΔΔ S* is close to 0. Thus the entropic contributions are only minor in GTPase catalysis and the enthalpic contributions from electrostatic interactions are key to the catalysis. The protein induced change in charge distribution of GTP can be monitored by time-resolved difference FTIR spectroscopy. For Ras the main effect due to protein binding is a charge shift towards the β-phosphate of GTP. This seems to have the main contribution to the catalytic mechanism. Because the G-domain of Ras is highly conserved in GNBPs, we propose that the finding here holds for all GNBPs.

  15. Toxoplasma GRA7 effector increases turnover of immunity-related GTPases and contributes to acute virulence in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Alaganan, Aditi; Fentress, Sarah J; Tang, Keliang; Wang, Qiuling; Sibley, L David

    2014-01-21

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii enjoys a wide host range and is adept at surviving in both naive and activated macrophages. Previous studies have emphasized the importance of the active serine-threonine protein kinase rhoptry protein 18 (ROP18), which targets immunity-related GTPases (IRGs), in mediating macrophage survival and acute virulence of T. gondii in mice. Here, we demonstrate that ROP18 exists in a complex with the pseudokinases rhoptry proteins 8 and 2 (ROP8/2) and dense granule protein 7 (GRA7). Individual deletion mutant gra7 or rop18 was partially attenuated for virulence in mice, whereas the combined gra7rop18 mutant was avirulent, suggesting these proteins act together in the same pathway. The virulence defect of the double mutant was mirrored by increased recruitment of IRGs and clearance of the parasite in IFN-γ-activated macrophages in vitro. GRA7 was shown to recognize a conserved feature of IRGs, binding directly to the active dimer of immunity-related GTPase a6 in a GTP-dependent manner. Binding of GRA7 to immunity-related GTPase a6 led to enhanced polymerization, rapid turnover, and eventual disassembly. Collectively, these studies suggest that ROP18 and GRA7 act in a complex to target IRGs by distinct mechanisms that are synergistic.

  16. Regulatory properties of statins and rho gtpases prenylation inhibitiors to stimulate melanoma immunogenicity and promote anti-melanoma immune response.

    PubMed

    Sarrabayrouse, Guillaume; Pich, Christine; Teiti, Iotefa; Tilkin-Mariame, Anne Françoise

    2017-02-15

    Melanoma is a highly lethal cutaneous tumor, killing affected patients through development of multiple poorly immunogenic metastases. Suboptimal activation of immune system by melanoma cells is often due to molecular modifications occurring during tumor progression that prevent efficient recognition of melanoma cells by immune effectors. Statins are HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, which block the mevalonate synthesis pathway, used by millions of people as hypocholesterolemic agents in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. They are also known to inhibit Rho GTPase activation and Rho dependent signaling pathways. Rho GTPases are regarded as molecular switches that regulate a wide spectrum of cellular functions and their dysfunction has been characterized in various oncogenic process notably in melanoma progression. Moreover, these molecules can modulate the immune response. Since 10 years we have demonstrated that Statins and other Rho GTPases inhibitors are critical regulators of molecules involved in adaptive and innate anti-melanoma immune response. In this review we summarize our major observations demonstrating that these pharmacological agents stimulate melanoma immunogenicity and suggest a potential use of these molecules to promote anti-melanoma immune response.

  17. Ethanol impairs Rho GTPase signaling and differentiation of cerebellar granule neurons in a rodent model of fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Joshi, S; Guleria, R S; Pan, J; Bayless, K J; Davis, G E; Dipette, D; Singh, U S

    2006-12-01

    Developmental exposure to ethanol impairs fetal brain development and causes fetal alcohol syndrome. Although the cerebellum is one of the most alcohol-sensitive brain areas, signaling mechanisms underlying the deleterious effects of ethanol on developing cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) are largely unknown. Here we describe the effects of in vivo ethanol exposure on neurite formation in CGNs and on the activation of Rho GTPases (RhoA and Rac1), regulators of neurite formation. Exposure of 7-day-old rat pups to ethanol for 3 h moderately increased blood alcohol concentration (BAC) ( approximately 40 mM) and inhibited neurite formation and Rac1 activation in CGNs. Longer exposure to ethanol for 5 h resulted in higher BAC ( approximately 80 mM), induced apoptosis, inhibited Rac1, and activated RhoA. Studies demonstrated a regulatory role of Rho GTPases in differentiation of cerebellar neurons, and indicated that ethanol-associated impairment of Rho GTPase signaling might contribute to brain defects observed in fetal alcohol syndrome.

  18. C-terminal domain (CTD) phosphatase links Rho GTPase signaling to Pol II CTD phosphorylation in Arabidopsis and yeast.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Yang, Guohua; Chen, Yu; Zhao, Yihong; Gao, Peng; Liu, Bo; Wang, Haiyang; Zheng, Zhi-Liang

    2016-12-13

    Rho GTPases, including the Rho, Cdc42, Rac, and ROP subfamilies, act as pivotal signaling switches in various growth and developmental processes. Compared with the well-defined role of cytoskeletal organization in Rho signaling, much less is known regarding transcriptional regulation. In a mutant screen for phenotypic enhancers of transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing a constitutively active form of ROP2 (designated CA1-1), we identified RNA polymerase II (Pol II) C-terminal domain (CTD) phosphatase-like 1 (CPL1) as a transcriptional regulator of ROP2 signaling. We show that ROP2 activation inhibits CPL1 activity by promoting its degradation, leading to an increase in CTD Ser5 and Ser2 phosphorylation. We also observed similar modulation of CTD phosphorylation by yeast Cdc42 GTPase and enhanced degradation of the yeast CTD phosphatase Fcp1 by activated ROP2 signaling. Taken together, our results suggest that modulation of the Pol II CTD code by Rho GTPase signaling represents an evolutionarily conserved mechanism in both unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes.

  19. Neurotrophin Promotes Neurite Outgrowth by Inhibiting Rif GTPase Activation Downstream of MAPKs and PI3K Signaling.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiaoxia; Yan, Huijuan; Li, Jiayi; Wu, Shuang; Wang, Junyu; Fan, Lifei

    2017-01-13

    Members of the well-known semaphorin family of proteins can induce both repulsive and attractive signaling in neural network formation and their cytoskeletal effects are mediated in part by small guanosine 5'-triphosphatase (GTPases). The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular role of Rif GTPase in the neurotrophin-induced neurite outgrowth. By using PC12 cells which are known to cease dividing and begin to show neurite outgrowth responding to nerve growth factor (NGF), we found that semaphorin 6A was as effective as nerve growth factor at stimulating neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells, and that its neurotrophic effect was transmitted through signaling by mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K). We further found that neurotrophin-induced neurite formation in PC12 cells could be partially mediated by inhibition of Rif GTPase activity downstream of MAPKs and PI3K signaling. In conclusion, we newly identified Rif as a regulator of the cytoskeletal rearrangement mediated by semaphorins.

  20. Dual GTPase regulation of the GCC185 Golgin: Communication between adjacent Rab6 and Arl1 binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Burguete, Alondra Schweizer; Fenn, Timothy D.; Brunger, Axel T.; Pfeffer, Suzanne R.

    2008-01-01

    Summary GCC185 is a large coiled coil protein at the trans Golgi network that is required for receipt of transport vesicles inbound from late endosomes, and for anchoring non-centrosomal microtubules that emanate from the Golgi. Here we demonstrate that recruitment of GCC185 to the Golgi is mediated by two Golgi-localized small GTPases of the Rab and Arl families. GCC185 binds Rab6 and mutation of residues needed for Rab binding abolishes Golgi localization. The crystal structure of Rab6 bound to the GCC185 Rab binding domain reveals that Rab6 recognizes a two-fold symmetric surface on a coiled coil immediately adjacent to a C-terminal GRIP domain. Unexpectedly, Rab6 binding promotes association of Arl1 with the GRIP domain. We present a structure-derived model for dual GTPase membrane attachment that highlights the potential ability of Rab GTPases to reach binding partners at a significant distance from the membrane via their unstructured and membrane-anchored, hypervariable domains. PMID:18243103

  1. An extracellular-matrix-specific GEF-GAP interaction regulates Rho GTPase crosstalk for 3D collagen migration.

    PubMed

    Kutys, Matthew L; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2014-09-01

    Rho-family GTPases govern distinct types of cell migration on different extracellular matrix proteins in tissue culture or three-dimensional (3D) matrices. We searched for mechanisms selectively regulating 3D cell migration in different matrix environments and discovered a form of Cdc42-RhoA crosstalk governing cell migration through a specific pair of GTPase activator and inhibitor molecules. We first identified βPix, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), as a specific regulator of migration in 3D collagen using an affinity-precipitation-based GEF screen. Knockdown of βPix specifically blocks cell migration in fibrillar collagen microenvironments, leading to hyperactive cellular protrusion accompanied by increased collagen matrix contraction. Live FRET imaging and RNAi knockdown linked this βPix knockdown phenotype to loss of polarized Cdc42 but not Rac1 activity, accompanied by enhanced, de-localized RhoA activity. Mechanistically, collagen phospho-regulates βPix, leading to its association with srGAP1, a GTPase-activating protein (GAP), needed to suppress RhoA activity. Our results reveal a matrix-specific pathway controlling migration involving a GEF-GAP interaction of βPix with srGAP1 that is critical for maintaining suppressive crosstalk between Cdc42 and RhoA during 3D collagen migration.

  2. Chlamydia abortus YhbZ, a truncated Obg family GTPase, associates with the Escherichia coli large ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Polkinghorne, Adam; Vaughan, Lloyd

    2011-01-01

    The stringent stress response is vital for bacterial survival under adverse environmental conditions. Obligate intracellular Chlamydia lack key stringent response proteins, but nevertheless can interrupt the cell cycle and enter stasis or persistence upon amino acid starvation. A possible key protein retained is YhbZ, a homologue of the ObgE guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) superfamily connecting the stringent stress response to ribosome maturation. Curiously, chlamydial YhbZ lacks the ObgE C-terminal domain thought to be essential for binding the large ribosomal subunit. We expressed recombinant Chlamydia abortus YhbZ and showed it to be a functional GTPase, with similar activity to other Obg GTPase family members. As Chlamydia are resistant to genetic manipulation, we performed heterologous expression and gradient centrifugation experiments in Escherichia coli and found that, despite the missing C-terminal domain, C. abortus YhbZ co-fractionates with the E. coli 50S large ribosomal subunit. In addition, overexpression of chlamydial YhbZ in E. coli leads to growth defects and elongation, as reported for other Obg members. YhbZ did not complement an E. coli obgE temperature-sensitive mutant, indicating the C-terminal acidic domain may have an additional role. This data supports a role for YhbZ linking the chlamydial stress response to ribosome function and cellular growth.

  3. RNAi screens for Rho GTPase regulators of cell shape and YAP/TAZ localisation in triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Vargas, Patricia; Cooper, Samuel; Sero, Julia; Bousgouni, Vicky; Arias-Garcia, Mar; Bakal, Chris

    2017-03-01

    In order to metastasise, triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) must make dynamic changes in cell shape. The shape of all eukaryotic cells is regulated by Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors (RhoGEFs), which activate Rho-family GTPases in response to mechanical and informational cues. In contrast, Rho GTPase-activating proteins (RhoGAPs) inhibit Rho GTPases. However, which RhoGEFs and RhoGAPS couple TNBC cell shape to changes in their environment is very poorly understood. Moreover, whether the activity of particular RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs become dysregulated as cells evolve the ability to metastasise is not clear. Towards the ultimate goal of identifying RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs that are essential for TNBC metastasis, we performed an RNAi screen to isolate RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs that contribute to the morphogenesis of the highly metastatic TNBC cell line LM2, and its less-metastatic parental cell line MDA-MB-231. For ~6 million cells from each cell line, we measured 127 different features following the depletion of 142 genes. Using a linear classifier scheme we also describe the morphological heterogeneity of each gene-depleted population.

  4. Neutron crystal structure of RAS GTPase puts in question the protonation state of the GTP γ-phosphate

    DOE PAGES

    Knihtila, Ryan; Holzapfel, Genevieve; Weiss, Kevin; ...

    2015-10-29

    RAS GTPase is a prototype for nucleotide-binding proteins that function by cycling between GTP and GDP, with hydrogen atoms playing an important role in the GTP hydrolysis mechanism. It is one of the most well studied proteins in the superfamily of small GTPases, which has representatives in a wide range of cellular functions. These proteins share a GTP-binding pocket with highly conserved motifs that promote hydrolysis to GDP. The neutron crystal structure of RAS presented here strongly supports a protonated gamma-phosphate at physiological pH. This counters the notion that the phosphate groups of GTP are fully deprotonated at the startmore » of the hydrolysis reaction, which has colored the interpretation of experimental and computational data in studies of the hydrolysis mechanism. As a result, the neutron crystal structure presented here puts in question our understanding of the pre-catalytic state associated with the hydrolysis reaction central to the function of RAS and other GTPases.« less

  5. Aldynoglia cells and modulation of RhoGTPase activity as useful tools for spinal cord injury repair

    PubMed Central

    Doncel-Pérez, Ernesto; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    A combined approach in spinal cord injury (SCI) therapy is the modulation of the cellular and molecular processes involved in glial scarring. Aldaynoglial cells are neural cell precursors with a high capacity to differentiate into neurons, promote axonal growth, wrapping and myelination of resident neurons. These important characteristics of aldaynoglia can be combined with specific inhibition of the RhoGTPase activity in astroglia and microglia that cause reduction of glial proliferation, retraction of glial cell processes and myelin production by oligodendrocytes. Previously we used experimental central nervous system (CNS) injury models, like spinal cord contusion and striatal lacunar infarction and observed that administration of RhoGTPase glycolipid inhibitor or aldaynoglial cells, respectively, produced a significant gain of functional recovery in treated animals. The combined therapy with neuro-regenerative properties strategy is highly desirable to treat SCI for functional potentiation of neurons and oligodendrocytes, resulting in better locomotor recovery. Here we suggest that treatment of spinal lesions with aldaynoglia from neurospheres plus local administration of a RhoGTPase inhibitor could have an additive effect and promote recovery from SCI. PMID:27630672

  6. Purification, crystallization and initial X-ray crystallographic analysis of the putative GTPase PH0525 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    SciTech Connect

    Lokanath, Neratur K.; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Matsunaga, Emiko; Sugahara, Mitsuaki; Kunishima, Naoki

    2005-10-01

    The putative GTPase PH0525 from P. horikoshii OT3 was crystallized using the microbatch method. Crystals were formed under two different conditions, providing two distinct crystal forms. Diffraction data from the two forms were measured to resolution limits of 2.30 and 2.40 Å and processed in space groups P2{sub 1} and C222{sub 1}, respectively. GTPases are involved in diverse cellular functions including cell proliferation, cytoskeleton organization and intracellular traffic. The putative GTPase PH0525 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Two distinct crystal forms were grown by the microbatch method at 291 K using a very high protein concentration (80 mg ml{sup −1}). Native data sets extending to resolutions of 2.3 and 2.4 Å have been collected and processed in space groups P2{sub 1} and C222{sub 1}, respectively. Assuming the presence of one monomer per asymmetric unit gives V{sub M} values of 2.6 and 2.4 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} for the P2{sub 1} and C222{sub 1} forms, respectively, which is consistent with dynamic light-scattering experiments, which show a monomeric state of the protein in solution.

  7. Roles of Rac1 and Rac3 GTPases during the development of cortical and hippocampal GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    de Curtis, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Rac GTPases are regulators of the cytoskeleton that play an important role in several aspects of neuronal and brain development. Two distinct Rac GTPases are expressed in the developing nervous system, the widely expressed Rac1 and the neural-specific Rac3 proteins. Recent experimental evidence supports a central role of these two Rac proteins in the development of inhibitory GABAergic interneurons, important modulatory elements of the brain circuitry. The combined inactivation of the genes for the two Rac proteins has profound effects on distinct aspects of interneuron development, and has highlighted a synergistic contribution of the two proteins to the postmitotic maturation of specific populations of cortical and hippocampal interneurons. Rac function is modulated by different types of regulators, and can influence the activity of specific effectors. Some of these proteins have been associated to the development and maturation of interneurons. Cortical interneuron dysfunction is implicated in several neurological and psychiatric diseases characterized by cognitive impairment. Therefore the description of the cellular processes regulated by the Rac GTPases, and the identification of the molecular networks underlying these processes during interneuron development is relevant to the understanding of the role of GABAergic interneurons in cognitive functions.

  8. Toxoplasma GRA7 effector increases turnover of immunity-related GTPases and contributes to acute virulence in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Alaganan, Aditi; Fentress, Sarah J.; Tang, Keliang; Wang, Qiuling; Sibley, L. David

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii enjoys a wide host range and is adept at surviving in both naive and activated macrophages. Previous studies have emphasized the importance of the active serine-threonine protein kinase rhoptry protein 18 (ROP18), which targets immunity-related GTPases (IRGs), in mediating macrophage survival and acute virulence of T. gondii in mice. Here, we demonstrate that ROP18 exists in a complex with the pseudokinases rhoptry proteins 8 and 2 (ROP8/2) and dense granule protein 7 (GRA7). Individual deletion mutant ∆gra7 or ∆rop18 was partially attenuated for virulence in mice, whereas the combined ∆gra7∆rop18 mutant was avirulent, suggesting these proteins act together in the same pathway. The virulence defect of the double mutant was mirrored by increased recruitment of IRGs and clearance of the parasite in IFN-γ–activated macrophages in vitro. GRA7 was shown to recognize a conserved feature of IRGs, binding directly to the active dimer of immunity-related GTPase a6 in a GTP-dependent manner. Binding of GRA7 to immunity-related GTPase a6 led to enhanced polymerization, rapid turnover, and eventual disassembly. Collectively, these studies suggest that ROP18 and GRA7 act in a complex to target IRGs by distinct mechanisms that are synergistic. PMID:24390541

  9. Similarity and diversity of translational GTPase factors EF-G, EF4, and BipA: From structure to function

    PubMed Central

    Ero, Rya; Kumar, Veerendra; Chen, Yun; Gao, Yong-Gui

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT EF-G, EF4, and BipA are members of the translation factor family of GTPases with a common ribosome binding mode and GTPase activation mechanism. However, topological variations of shared as well as unique domains ensure different roles played by these proteins during translation. Recent X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy studies have revealed the structural basis for the involvement of EF-G domain IV in securing the movement of tRNAs and mRNA during translocation as well as revealing how the unique C-terminal domains of EF4 and BipA interact with the ribosome and tRNAs contributing to the regulation of translation under certain conditions. EF-G, EF-4, and BipA are intriguing examples of structural variations on a common theme that results in diverse behavior and function. Structural studies of translational GTPase factors have been greatly facilitated by the use of antibiotics, which have revealed their mechanism of action. PMID:27325008

  10. Structure of the GMPPNP-stabilized NG domain complex of the SRP GTPases Ffh and FtsY

    PubMed Central

    Gawronski-Salerno, Joseph; Freymann, Douglas M.

    2007-01-01

    Ffh and FtsY are GTPase components of the signal recognition particle co-translational targeting complex that assemble during the SRP cycle to form a GTP-dependent and pseudo two-fold symmetric heterodimer. Previously the SRP GTPase heterodimer has been stabilized and purified for crystallographic studies using both the non-hydrolysable GTP analog GMPPCP and the pseudo-transition state analog GDP:AlF4, revealing in both cases a buried nucleotide pair that bridges and forms a key element of the heterodimer interface. A complex of Ffh and FtsY from T. aquaticus formed in the presence of the analog GMPPNP could not be obtained, however. The origin of this failure was previously unclear, and it was thought to have arisen from either instability of the analog, or, alternatively, from differences in its interactions within the tightly conscribed composite active site chamber of the complex. Using insights gained from the previous structure determinations, we have now determined the structure of the SRP GTPase targeting heterodimer stabilized by the non-hydrolysable GTP analog GMPPNP. The structure demonstrates how the different GTP analogs are accommodated within the active site chamber despite slight differences in the geometry of the phosphate chain. It also reveals a K+ coordination site at the highly conserved DARGG loop at the N/G interdomain interface. PMID:17184999

  11. Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF4) modulates Rho GTPase levels and function via regulation of RhoGDIα

    PubMed Central

    Pasini, Silvia; Liu, Jin; Corona, Carlo; Peze-Heidsieck, Eugenie; Shelanski, Michael; Greene, Lloyd A.

    2016-01-01

    In earlier studies, we showed that ATF4 down-regulation affects post-synaptic development and dendritic spine morphology in neurons through increased turnover of the Rho GTPase Cell Division Cycle 42 (Cdc42) protein. Here, we find that ATF4 down-regulation in both hippocampal and cortical neuron cultures reduces protein and message levels of RhoGDIα, a stabilizer of the Rho GTPases including Cdc42. This effect is rescued by an shATF4-resistant active form of ATF4, but not by a mutant that lacks transcriptional activity. This is, at least in part, due to the fact that Arhgdia, the gene encoding RhoGDIα, is a direct transcriptional target of ATF4 as is shown in ChIP assays. This pathway is not restricted to neurons. This is seen in an impairment of cell migration on ATF4 reduction in non-neuronal cells. In conclusion, we have identified a new cellular pathway in which ATF4 regulates the expression of RhoGDIα that in turn affects Rho GTPase protein levels, and thereby, controls cellular functions as diverse as memory and cell motility. PMID:27841340

  12. An Ancient P-Loop GTPase in Rice Is Regulated by a Higher Plant-specific Regulatory Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Ming-Yan; Xue, Yan; Zhou, Liang; Li, Man-Wah; Sun, Samuel Sai-Ming; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2010-01-01

    YchF is a subfamily of the Obg family in the TRAFAC class of P-loop GTPases. The wide distribution of YchF homologues in both eukarya and bacteria suggests that they are descendents of an ancient protein, yet their physiological roles remain unclear. Using the OsYchF1-OsGAP1 pair from rice as the prototype, we provide evidence for the regulation of GTPase/ATPase activities and RNA binding capacity of a plant YchF (OsYchF1) by its regulatory protein (OsGAP1). The effects of OsGAP1 on the subcellular localization/cycling and physiological functions of OsYchF1 are also discussed. The finding that OsYchF1 and OsGAP1 are involved in plant defense response might shed light on the functional roles of YchF homologues in plants. This work suggests that during evolution, an ancestral P-loop GTPase/ATPase may acquire new regulation and function(s) by the evolution of a lineage-specific regulatory protein. PMID:20876569

  13. Mechanistic Insights from Structural Analyses of Ran-GTPase-Driven Nuclear Export of Proteins and RNAs.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-22

    Understanding how macromolecules are rapidly exchanged between the nucleus and the cytoplasm through nuclear pore complexes is a fundamental problem in biology. Exportins are Ran-GTPase-dependent nuclear transport factors that belong to the karyopherin-β family and mediate nuclear export of a plethora of proteins and RNAs, except for bulk mRNA nuclear export. Exportins bind cargo macromolecules in a Ran-GTP-dependent manner in the nucleus, forming exportin-cargo-Ran-GTP complexes (nuclear export complexes). Transient weak interactions between exportins and nucleoporins containing characteristic FG (phenylalanine-glycine) repeat motifs facilitate nuclear pore complex passage of nuclear export complexes. In the cytoplasm, nuclear export complexes are disassembled, thereby releasing the cargo. GTP hydrolysis by Ran promoted in the cytoplasm makes the disassembly reaction virtually irreversible and provides thermodynamic driving force for the overall export reaction. In the past decade, X-ray crystallography of some of the exportins in various functional states coupled with functional analyses, single-particle electron microscopy, molecular dynamics simulations, and small-angle solution X-ray scattering has provided rich insights into the mechanism of cargo binding and release and also begins to elucidate how exportins interact with the FG repeat motifs. The knowledge gained from structural analyses of nuclear export is being translated into development of clinically useful inhibitors of nuclear export to treat human diseases such as cancer and influenza.

  14. The small GTPases Ras and Rap1 bind to and control TORC2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Ankita; Lotfi, Pouya; Chavan, Anita J.; Montaño, Nieves M.; Bolourani, Parvin; Weeks, Gerald; Shen, Zhouxin; Briggs, Steven P.; Pots, Henderikus; Van Haastert, Peter J. M.; Kortholt, Arjan; Charest, Pascale G.

    2016-01-01

    Target of Rapamycin Complex 2 (TORC2) has conserved roles in regulating cytoskeleton dynamics and cell migration and has been linked to cancer metastasis. However, little is known about the mechanisms regulating TORC2 activity and function in any system. In Dictyostelium, TORC2 functions at the front of migrating cells downstream of the Ras protein RasC, controlling F-actin dynamics and cAMP production. Here, we report the identification of the small GTPase Rap1 as a conserved binding partner of the TORC2 component RIP3/SIN1, and that Rap1 positively regulates the RasC-mediated activation of TORC2 in Dictyostelium. Moreover, we show that active RasC binds to the catalytic domain of TOR, suggesting a mechanism of TORC2 activation that is similar to Rheb activation of TOR complex 1. Dual Ras/Rap1 regulation of TORC2 may allow for integration of Ras and Rap1 signaling pathways in directed cell migration. PMID:27172998

  15. Involvement of Rho-type GTPase in control of cell size in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yo; Mizuuchi, Eri; Nogami, Satoru; Morishita, Shinichi; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2007-06-01

    Maintaining specific cell size, which is important for many organisms, is achieved by coordinating cell growth and cell division. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the existence of two cell-size checkpoints is proposed: at the first checkpoint, cell size is monitored before budding at the G1/S transition, and at the second checkpoint, actin depolymerization occurring in the small bud is monitored before the G2/M transition. Morphological analyses have revealed that the small GTPase Rho1p participates in cell-size control at both the G1/S and the G2/M boundaries. One group of rho1 mutants (rho1A) underwent premature entry into mitosis, leading to the birth of abnormally small cells. In another group of rho1 mutants (rho1B), the mother cells failed to reach an appropriate size before budding, and expression of the G1 cyclin Cln2p began at an earlier phase of the cell cycle. Analyses of mutants defective in Rho1p effector proteins indicate that Skn7p, Fks1p and Mpk1p are involved in cell-size control. Thus, Rho1p and its downstream regulatory pathways are involved in controlling cell size in S. cerevisiae.

  16. Slit-Robo GTPase-Activating Protein 2 as a metastasis suppressor in osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Marko, Tracy A.; Shamsan, Ghaidan A.; Edwards, Elizabeth N.; Hazelton, Paige E.; Rathe, Susan K.; Cornax, Ingrid; Overn, Paula R.; Varshney, Jyotika; Diessner, Brandon J.; Moriarity, Branden S.; O’Sullivan, M. Gerard; Odde, David J.; Largaespada, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor, with metastatic disease responsible for most treatment failure and patient death. A forward genetic screen utilizing Sleeping Beauty mutagenesis in mice previously identified potential genetic drivers of osteosarcoma metastasis, including Slit-Robo GTPase-Activating Protein 2 (Srgap2). This study evaluates the potential role of SRGAP2 in metastases-associated properties of osteosarcoma cell lines through Srgap2 knockout via the CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease system and conditional overexpression in the murine osteosarcoma cell lines K12 and K7M2. Proliferation, migration, and anchorage independent growth were evaluated. RNA sequencing and immunohistochemistry of human osteosarcoma tissue samples were used to further evaluate the potential role of the Slit-Robo pathway in osteosarcoma. The effects of Srgap2 expression modulation in the murine OS cell lines support the hypothesis that SRGAP2 may have a role as a suppressor of metastases in osteosarcoma. Additionally, SRGAP2 and other genes in the Slit-Robo pathway have altered transcript levels in a subset of mouse and human osteosarcoma, and SRGAP2 protein expression is reduced or absent in a subset of primary tumor samples. SRGAP2 and other axon guidance proteins likely play a role in osteosarcoma metastasis, with loss of SRGAP2 potentially contributing to a more aggressive phenotype. PMID:27966608

  17. A Ras GTPase associated protein is involved in the phototropic and circadian photobiology responses in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Polaino, Silvia; Villalobos-Escobedo, José M.; Shakya, Viplendra P. S.; Miralles-Durán, Alejandro; Chaudhary, Suman; Sanz, Catalina; Shahriari, Mahdi; Luque, Eva M.; Eslava, Arturo P.; Corrochano, Luis M.; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo; Idnurm, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Light is an environmental signal perceived by most eukaryotic organisms and that can have major impacts on their growth and development. The MadC protein in the fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus (Mucoromycotina) has been postulated to form part of the photosensory input for phototropism of the fruiting body sporangiophores, but the madC gene has remained unidentified since the 1960s when madC mutants were first isolated. In this study the madC gene was identified by positional cloning. All madC mutant strains contain loss-of-function point mutations within a gene predicted to encode a GTPase activating protein (GAP) for Ras. The madC gene complements the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ras-GAP ira1 mutant and the encoded MadC protein interacts with P. blakesleeanus Ras homologs in yeast two-hybrid assays, indicating that MadC is a regulator of Ras signaling. Deletion of the homolog in the filamentous ascomycete Neurospora crassa affects the circadian clock output, yielding a pattern of asexual conidiation similar to a ras-1 mutant that is used in circadian studies in N. crassa. Thus, MadC is unlikely to be a photosensor, yet is a fundamental link in the photoresponses from blue light perceived by the conserved White Collar complex with Ras signaling in two distantly-related filamentous fungal species. PMID:28322269

  18. Encephalomyocarditis virus Leader protein hinge domain is responsible for interactions with Ran GTPase

    SciTech Connect

    Bacot-Davis, Valjean R.; Palmenberg, Ann C.

    2013-08-15

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), a Cardiovirus, initiates its polyprotein with a short 67 amino acid Leader (L) sequence. The protein acts as a unique pathogenicity factor, with anti-host activities which include the triggering of nuclear pore complex hyperphosphorylation and direct binding inhibition of the active cellular transport protein, Ran GTPase. Chemical modifications and protein mutagenesis now map the Ran binding domain to the L hinge-linker region, and in particular, to amino acids 35–40. Large deletions affecting this region were shown previously to diminish Ran binding. New point mutations, especially K35Q, D37A and W40A, preserve the intact L structure, abolish Ran binding and are deficient for nucleoporin (Nup) hyperphosphorylation. Ran itself morphs through multiple configurations, but reacts most effectively with L when in the GDP format, preferably with an empty nucleotide binding pocket. Therefore, L:Ran binding, mediated by the linker-hinge, is a required step in L-induced nuclear transport inhibition. - Highlights: • The hinge domain provides critical residues in Cardiovirus L:Ran complex formation. • Leader prefers to bind Ran in a nucleotide free, GDP-conformation. • L-induced Nup62 phosphorylation is reduced with Ran-deficient binding mutations.

  19. Maize ROP2 GTPase provides a competitive advantage to the male gametophyte.

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, K M; Vejlupkova, Z; Meeley, R B; Fowler, J E

    2003-01-01

    Rop GTPases have been implicated in the regulation of plant signal transduction and cell morphogenesis. To explore ROP2 function in maize, we isolated five Mutator transposon insertions (rop2::Mu alleles). Transmission frequency through the male gametophyte, but not the female, was lower than expected in three of the rop2::Mu mutants. These three alleles formed an allelic series on the basis of the relative transmission rate of each when crossed as trans-heterozygotes. A dramatic reduction in the level of ROP2-mRNA in pollen was associated with the three alleles causing a transmission defect, whereas a rop2::Mu allele that did not result in a defect had wild-type transcript levels, thus confirming that mutation of rop2 causes the mutant phenotype. These data strongly support a role for rop2 in male gametophyte function, perhaps surprisingly, given the expression in pollen of the nearly identical duplicate gene rop9. However, the transmission defect was apparent only when a rop2::Mu heterozygote was used as the pollen donor or when a mixture of wild-type and homozygous mutant pollen was used. Thus, mutant pollen is at a competitive disadvantage compared to wild-type pollen, although mutant pollen grains lacked an obvious cellular defect. Our data demonstrate the importance in vivo of a specific Rop, rop2, in the male gametophyte. PMID:14704193

  20. Analysis of binding site hot spots on the surface of Ras GTPase.

    PubMed

    Buhrman, Greg; O'Connor, Casey; Zerbe, Brandon; Kearney, Bradley M; Napoleon, Raeanne; Kovrigina, Elizaveta A; Vajda, Sandor; Kozakov, Dima; Kovrigin, Evgenii L; Mattos, Carla

    2011-11-04

    We have recently discovered an allosteric switch in Ras, bringing an additional level of complexity to this GTPase whose mutants are involved in nearly 30% of cancers. Upon activation of the allosteric switch, there is a shift in helix 3/loop 7 associated with a disorder to order transition in the active site. Here, we use a combination of multiple solvent crystal structures and computational solvent mapping (FTMap) to determine binding site hot spots in the "off" and "on" allosteric states of the GTP-bound form of H-Ras. Thirteen sites are revealed, expanding possible target sites for ligand binding well beyond the active site. Comparison of FTMaps for the H and K isoforms reveals essentially identical hot spots. Furthermore, using NMR measurements of spin relaxation, we determined that K-Ras exhibits global conformational dynamics very similar to those we previously reported for H-Ras. We thus hypothesize that the global conformational rearrangement serves as a mechanism for allosteric coupling between the effector interface and remote hot spots in all Ras isoforms. At least with respect to the binding sites involving the G domain, H-Ras is an excellent model for K-Ras and probably N-Ras as well. Ras has so far been elusive as a target for drug design. The present work identifies various unexplored hot spots throughout the entire surface of Ras, extending the focus from the disordered active site to well-ordered locations that should be easier to target.

  1. How not to do kinetics: examples involving GTPases and guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    PubMed

    Goody, Roger S

    2014-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) are crucial regulators of the action of GTPases in signal transduction and cellular regulation. Although their basic mechanism of action has been apparent for almost 20 years, there are still misconceptions concerning their properties, and these are confounded by superficial or incorrect interpretation of experimental results in individual cases. Here, an example is described in which an incorrect mechanism was derived because of an inadequate analysis of kinetic results. In a second example, a case is discussed where certain GTP analogs were erroneously described as being able to function as low molecular mass GEFs. In both cases, a lack of distinction between rates, rate constants, and apparent rate constants, together with a disregard of relative signal amplitudes, led to the misinterpretations. In a final example, it is shown how the lack of an appropriate kinetic investigation led to the false conclusion that a secreted protein from Legionella pneumophila can act not only as a GEF towards eukaryotic Rab1 but also as a factor that is able to actively dissociate the stable complex between Rab1 and GDP dissociation inhibitor.

  2. A conserved role for atlastin GTPases in regulating lipid droplet size.

    PubMed

    Klemm, Robin W; Norton, Justin P; Cole, Ronald A; Li, Chen S; Park, Seong H; Crane, Matthew M; Li, Liying; Jin, Diana; Boye-Doe, Alexandra; Liu, Tina Y; Shibata, Yoko; Lu, Hang; Rapoport, Tom A; Farese, Robert V; Blackstone, Craig; Guo, Yi; Mak, Ho Yi

    2013-05-30

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are the major fat storage organelles in eukaryotic cells, but how their size is regulated is unknown. Using genetic screens in C. elegans for LD morphology defects in intestinal cells, we found that mutations in atlastin, a GTPase required for homotypic fusion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes, cause not only ER morphology defects, but also a reduction in LD size. Similar results were obtained after depletion of atlastin or expression of a dominant-negative mutant, whereas overexpression of atlastin had the opposite effect. Atlastin depletion in Drosophila fat bodies also reduced LD size and decreased triglycerides in whole animals, sensitizing them to starvation. In mammalian cells, co-overexpression of atlastin-1 and REEP1, a paralog of the ER tubule-shaping protein DP1/REEP5, generates large LDs. The effect of atlastin-1 on LD size correlates with its activity to promote membrane fusion in vitro. Our results indicate that atlastin-mediated fusion of ER membranes is important for LD size regulation.

  3. The Toxoplasma pseudokinase ROP5 is an allosteric inhibitor of the immunity-related GTPases.

    PubMed

    Reese, Michael L; Shah, Niket; Boothroyd, John C

    2014-10-03

    The Red Queen hypothesis proposes that there is an evolutionary arms race between host and pathogen. One possible example of such a phenomenon could be the recently discovered interaction between host defense proteins known as immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and a family of rhoptry pseudokinases (ROP5) expressed by the protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. Mouse IRGs are encoded by an extensive and rapidly evolving family of over 20 genes. Similarly, the ROP5 family is highly polymorphic and consists of 4-10 genes, depending on the strain of Toxoplasma. IRGs are known to be avidly bound and functionally inactivated by ROP5 proteins, but the molecular basis of this interaction/inactivation has not previously been known. Here we show that ROP5 uses a highly polymorphic surface to bind adjacent to the nucleotide-binding domain of an IRG and that this produces a profound allosteric change in the IRG structure. This has two dramatic effects: 1) it prevents oligomerization of the IRG, and 2) it alters the orientation of two threonine residues that are targeted by the Toxoplasma Ser/Thr kinases, ROP17 and ROP18. ROP5s are highly specific in the IRGs that they will bind, and the fact that it is the most highly polymorphic surface of ROP5 that binds the IRG strongly supports the notion that these two protein families are co-evolving in a way predicted by the Red Queen hypothesis.

  4. Dimerization of TOC receptor GTPases and its implementation for the control of protein import into chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Aronsson, Henrik; Jarvis, Paul

    2011-06-01

    Pre-protein import into chloroplasts is facilitated by multiprotein translocon complexes in the envelope membranes. Major components of the TOC (translocon at the outer envelope membrane of chloroplasts) complex are the receptor proteins Toc33 and Toc159. These two receptors are related GTPases, and they are predicted to engage in homodimerization and/or heterodimerization. Although such dimerization has been studied extensively, its exact function in vivo remains elusive. In this issue of the Biochemical Journal, Oreb et al. present evidence that homodimerization of Toc33 prevents nucleotide exchange, thereby locking the receptor in the GDP-loaded state and preventing further activity. Pre-protein arrival is proposed to release this lock, through disruption of the dimer and subsequent nucleotide exchange. The Toc33-bound pre-protein is then able to progress to downstream steps in the translocation mechanism, with GTP hydrolysis defining another important control point as well as preparing the receptor for the next pre-protein client. These new results are discussed in the context of previous findings pertaining to TOC receptor dimerization and function.

  5. Macrophages Enhance Migration in Inflammatory Breast Cancer Cells via RhoC GTPase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Steven G.; Chen, Yu-Chih; Madden, Julie M.; Fournier, Chelsea L.; Altemus, Megan A.; Hiziroglu, Ayse B.; Cheng, Yu-Heng; Wu, Zhi Fen; Bao, Liwei; Yates, Joel A.; Yoon, Euisik; Merajver, Sofia D.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most lethal form of breast cancer. All IBC patients have lymph node involvement and one-third of patients already have distant metastasis at diagnosis. This propensity for metastasis is a hallmark of IBC distinguishing it from less lethal non-inflammatory breast cancers (nIBC). Genetic profiling studies have been conducted to differentiate IBC from nIBC, but no IBC cancer-cell-specific gene signature has been identified. We hypothesized that a tumor-extrinsic factor, notably tumor-associated macrophages, promotes and contributes to IBC’s extreme metastatic phenotype. To this end, we studied the effect of macrophage-conditioned media (MCM) on IBC. We show that two IBC cell lines are hyper-responsive to MCM as compared to normal-like breast and aggressive nIBC cell lines. We further interrogated IBC’s hyper-responsiveness to MCM using a microfluidic migration device, which permits individual cell migration path tracing. We found the MCM “primes” the IBC cells’ cellular machinery to become extremely migratory in response to a chemoattractant. We determined that interleukins −6, −8, and −10 within the MCM are sufficient to stimulate this enhanced IBC migration effect, and that the known metastatic oncogene, RhoC GTPase, is necessary for the enhanced migration response. PMID:27991524

  6. A Bacterial Pathogen Targets a Host Rab-Family GTPase Defense Pathway with a GAP.

    PubMed

    Spanò, Stefania; Gao, Xiang; Hannemann, Sebastian; Lara-Tejero, María; Galán, Jorge E

    2016-02-10

    Cell-autonomous defense mechanisms are potent strategies that protect individual cells against intracellular pathogens. The Rab-family GTPase Rab32 was previously shown to restrict the intracellular human pathogen Salmonella Typhi, but its potential broader role in antimicrobial defense remains unknown. We show that Rab32 represents a general cell-autonomous, antimicrobial defense that is counteracted by two Salmonella effectors. Mice lacking Rab-32 or its nucleotide exchange factor BLOC-3 are permissive to S. Typhi infection and exhibit increased susceptibility to S. Typhimurium. S. Typhimurium counters this defense pathway by delivering two type III secretion effectors, SopD2, a Rab32 GAP, and GtgE, a specific Rab32 protease. An S. Typhimurium mutant strain lacking these two effectors exhibits markedly reduced virulence, which is fully restored in BLOC-3-deficient mice. These results demonstrate that a cell-autonomous, Rab32-dependent host defense pathway plays a central role in the defense against vacuolar pathogens and describe a mechanism evolved by a bacterial pathogen to counter it.

  7. GTPase ROP2 binds and promotes activation of target of rapamycin, TOR, in response to auxin.

    PubMed

    Schepetilnikov, Mikhail; Makarian, Joelle; Srour, Ola; Geldreich, Angèle; Yang, Zhenbiao; Chicher, Johana; Hammann, Philippe; Ryabova, Lyubov A

    2017-02-28

    Target of rapamycin (TOR) promotes reinitiation at upstream ORFs (uORFs) in genes that play important roles in stem cell regulation and organogenesis in plants. Here, we report that the small GTPase ROP2, if activated by the phytohormone auxin, promotes activation of TOR, and thus translation reinitiation of uORF-containing mRNAs. Plants with high levels of active ROP2, including those expressing constitutively active ROP2 (CA-ROP2), contain high levels of active TOR ROP2 physically interacts with and, when GTP-bound, activates TOR in vitro TOR activation in response to auxin is abolished in ROP-deficient rop2 rop6 ROP4 RNAi plants. GFP-TOR can associate with endosome-like structures in ROP2-overexpressing plants, indicating that endosomes mediate ROP2 effects on TOR activation. CA-ROP2 is efficient in loading uORF-containing mRNAs onto polysomes and stimulates translation in protoplasts, and both processes are sensitive to TOR inhibitor AZD-8055. TOR inactivation abolishes ROP2 regulation of translation reinitiation, but not its effects on cytoskeleton or intracellular trafficking. These findings imply a mode of translation control whereby, as an upstream effector of TOR, ROP2 coordinates TOR function in translation reinitiation pathways in response to auxin.

  8. Dab2IP GTPase activating protein regulates dendrite development and synapse number in cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shuhong; Kim, Sun-Hong; Heck, Detlef; Goldowitz, Daniel; LeDoux, Mark S; Homayouni, Ramin

    2013-01-01

    DOC-2/DAB-2 interacting protein (Dab2IP) is a GTPase activating protein that binds to Disabled-1, a cytosolic adapter protein involved in Reelin signaling and brain development. Dab2IP regulates PI3K-AKT signaling and is associated with metastatic prostate cancer, abdominal aortic aneurysms and coronary heart disease. To date, the physiological function of Dab2IP in the nervous system, where it is highly expressed, is relatively unknown. In this study, we generated a mouse model with a targeted disruption of Dab2IP using a retrovirus gene trap strategy. Unlike reeler mice, Dab2IP knock-down mice did not exhibit severe ataxia or cerebellar hypoplasia. However, Dab2IP deficiency produced a number of cerebellar abnormalities such as a delay in the development of Purkinje cell (PC) dendrites, a decrease in the parallel fiber synaptic marker VGluT1, and an increase in the climbing fiber synaptic marker VGluT2. These findings demonstrate for the first time that Dab2IP plays an important role in dendrite development and regulates the number of synapses in the cerebellum.

  9. Analysis of Binding Site Hot Spots on the Surface of Ras GTPase

    SciTech Connect

    Buhrman, Greg; O; #8242; Connor, Casey; Zerbe, Brandon; Kearney, Bradley M.; Napoleon, Raeanne; Kovrigina, Elizaveta A.; Vajda, Sandor; Kozakov, Dima; Kovrigin, Evgenii L.; Mattos, Carla

    2012-09-17

    We have recently discovered an allosteric switch in Ras, bringing an additional level of complexity to this GTPase whose mutants are involved in nearly 30% of cancers. Upon activation of the allosteric switch, there is a shift in helix 3/loop 7 associated with a disorder to order transition in the active site. Here, we use a combination of multiple solvent crystal structures and computational solvent mapping (FTMap) to determine binding site hot spots in the 'off' and 'on' allosteric states of the GTP-bound form of H-Ras. Thirteen sites are revealed, expanding possible target sites for ligand binding well beyond the active site. Comparison of FTMaps for the H and K isoforms reveals essentially identical hot spots. Furthermore, using NMR measurements of spin relaxation, we determined that K-Ras exhibits global conformational dynamics very similar to those we previously reported for H-Ras. We thus hypothesize that the global conformational rearrangement serves as a mechanism for allosteric coupling between the effector interface and remote hot spots in all Ras isoforms. At least with respect to the binding sites involving the G domain, H-Ras is an excellent model for K-Ras and probably N-Ras as well. Ras has so far been elusive as a target for drug design. The present work identifies various unexplored hot spots throughout the entire surface of Ras, extending the focus from the disordered active site to well-ordered locations that should be easier to target.

  10. The small GTPase Arl8b regulates assembly of the mammalian HOPS complex on lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Khatter, Divya; Raina, Vivek B.; Dwivedi, Devashish; Sindhwani, Aastha; Bahl, Surbhi; Sharma, Mahak

    2015-01-01

    The homotypic fusion and protein sorting (HOPS) complex is a multi-subunit complex conserved from yeast to mammals that regulates late endosome and lysosome fusion. However, little is known about how the HOPS complex is recruited to lysosomes in mammalian cells. Here, we report that the small GTPase Arl8b, but not Rab7 (also known as RAB7A), is essential for membrane localization of the human (h)Vps41 subunit of the HOPS complex. Assembly of the core HOPS subunits to Arl8b- and hVps41-positive lysosomes is guided by their subunit–subunit interactions. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated depletion of hVps41 resulted in the impaired degradation of EGFR that was rescued upon expression of wild-type but not an Arl8b-binding-defective mutant of hVps41, suggesting that Arl8b-dependent lysosomal localization of hVps41 is required for its endocytic function. Furthermore, we have also identified that the Arl8b effector SKIP (also known as PLEKHM2) interacts with and recruits HOPS subunits to Arl8b and kinesin-positive peripheral lysosomes. Accordingly, RNAi-mediated depletion of SKIP impaired lysosomal trafficking and degradation of EGFR. These findings reveal that Arl8b regulates the association of the human HOPS complex with lysosomal membranes, which is crucial for the function of this tethering complex in endocytic degradation. PMID:25908847

  11. The ciliary GTPase Arl13b regulates cell migration and cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Pruski, Michal; Rajnicek, Ann; Yang, Zhifu; Clancy, Hannah; Ding, Yu-Qiang; McCaig, Colin D.; Lang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The GTPase ARL13B is localized to primary cilia; small cellular protrusions that act as antennae. Its defective ARL13B hennin (HNN) variant is linked causally with Joubert Syndrome, a developmental ciliopathy attributed to poor sensing of extracellular chemical gradients. We tested the hypothesis that impaired detection of extracellular voltage gradients also contributes to the HNN phenotype. In vitro, extracellular electric fields stimulated migration of wild type (WT) and HNN fibroblasts toward the cathode but the field only increased the migration speed of WT cells. Cilia on WT cells did not align to the field vector. HNN cells divided more slowly than WT cells, arresting at the G2/M phase. Mechanistically, HNN cells had reduced phospho-ERK1/2 signaling and elevated levels of Suppressor of Fused protein. These suggest that cells may not be able to read extracellular chemical cues appropriately, resulting in deficits in cell migration and proliferation. Finally, an increase in tubulin stabilization (more detyrosinated tubulin) confirmed the general stagnation of HNN cells, which may further contribute to slower migration and cell cycle progression. We conclude that Arl13b dysfunction resulted in HNN cell stagnation due to poor growth factor signaling and impaired detection of extracellular electrical gradients, and that the role of Arl13b in cell proliferation may be understated. PMID:26963749

  12. Rap1 GTPase is required for mouse lens epithelial maintenance and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Maddala, Rupalatha; Nagendran, Tharkika; Lang, Richard A; Morozov, Alexei; Rao, Ponugoti V

    2015-10-01

    Rap1, a Ras-like small GTPase, plays a crucial role in cell-matrix adhesive interactions, cell-cell junction formation, cell polarity and migration. The role of Rap1 in vertebrate organ development and tissue architecture, however, remains elusive. We addressed this question in a mouse lens model system using a conditional gene targeting approach. While individual germline deficiency of either Rap1a or Rap1b did not cause overt defects in mouse lens, conditional double deficiency (Rap1 cKO) prior to lens placode formation led to an ocular phenotype including microphthalmia and lens opacification in embryonic mice. The embryonic Rap1 cKO mouse lens exhibited striking defects including loss of E-cadherin- and ZO-1-based cell-cell junctions, disruption of paxillin and β1-integrin-based cell adhesive interactions along with abnormalities in cell shape and apical-basal polarity of epithelium. These epithelial changes were accompanied by increased levels of α-smooth muscle actin, vimentin and N-cadherin, and expression of transcriptional suppressors of E-cadherin (Snai1, Slug and Zeb2), and a mesenchymal metabolic protein (Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase). Additionally, while lens differentiation was not overtly affected, increased apoptosis and dysregulated cell cycle progression were noted in epithelium and fibers in Rap1 cKO mice. Collectively these observations uncover a requirement for Rap1 in maintenance of lens epithelial phenotype and morphogenesis.

  13. Role of citron kinase as a target of the small GTPase Rho in cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Madaule, P; Eda, M; Watanabe, N; Fujisawa, K; Matsuoka, T; Bito, H; Ishizaki, T; Narumiya, S

    1998-07-30

    During mitosis, a ring containing actin and myosin appears beneath the equatorial surface of animal cells. This ring then contracts, forms a cleavage furrow and divides the cell, a step known as cytokinesis. The two daughter cells often remain connected by an intercellular bridge which contains a refringent structure known as the midbody. How the appearance of this ring is regulated is unclear, although the small GTPase Rho, which controls the formation of actin structures, is known to be essential. Protein kinases are also thought to participate in cytokinesis. We now show that a splice variant of a Rho target protein, named citron, contains a protein kinase domain that is related to the Rho-associated kinases ROCK14 and ROK, which regulate myosin-based contractility. Citron kinase localizes to the cleavage furrow and midbody of HeLa cells; Rho is also localized in the midbody. We find that overexpression of citron mutants results in the production of multinucleate cells and that a kinase-active mutant causes abnormal contraction during cytokinesis. We propose that citron kinase regulates cytokinesis at a step after Rho in the contractile process.

  14. The large GTPase dynamin regulates actin comet formation and movement in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Orth, James D.; Krueger, E. W.; Cao, H.; McNiven, Mark A.

    2002-01-01

    The large GTPase dynamin (Dyn2) has been demonstrated by us and others to interact with several different actin-binding proteins. To define how Dyn2 might participate in actin dynamics in livings cells we have expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Dyn2 in cultured cells and observed labeling of comet-like vesicles and macropinosomes. The comet structures progressed with a constant velocity and were reminiscent of actin comets associated with motile vesicles in cells expressing type I phosphatidylinositol phosphate 5-kinases. Based on these observations we sought to determine whether Dyn2 is an integral component of actin comets. Cells expressing type I phosphatidylinositol phosphate 5-kinase and Dyn2-GFP revealed a prominent colocalization of Dyn2 and actin in comet structures. Interestingly, comet formation and motility were normal in cells expressing wild-type Dyn2-GFP but altered markedly in Dyn2 mutant-expressing cells. Dyn2K44A-GFP mutant cells displayed a significant reduction in comet number, length, velocity, and efficiency of movement. In contrast, comets in cells expressing Dyn2ΔPRD-GFP appeared dark and did not incorporate the mutant Dyn2 protein, indicating that the proline-rich domain (PRD) is required for Dyn2 recruitment. Further, these comets were significantly longer and slower than those in control cells. These findings demonstrate a role for Dyn2 in actin-based vesicle motility. PMID:11782546

  15. Investigating the ion dependence of the first unfolding step of GTPase-Associating Center ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Hayatshahi, Hamed S; Bergonzo, Christina; Cheatham Iii, Thomas E

    2017-04-13

    The interactions in the tertiary structure of a ribosomal RNA fragment in the GTPase Associating Center (GAC) have been experimentally studied, but the roles of the bound and diffuse cations in its folding pathway have not yet been fully elucidated. Melting experiments have shown that the temperature of the first of the two distinguishable transitions in the unfolding pathway of the GAC RNA can be regulated by altering the magnesium concentration, yet the physical interpretation of such ion-dependent effects on folding have not been clearly understood in spite of the availability of crystal structures that depict many GAC RNA-ion interactions. Here, we use umbrella sampling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to provide a physical description for the first transition in this unfolding pathway, with a focus on the role of a chelated magnesium ion. Our results indicate that the presence of cations mediating the local interaction of two loops stabilizes the folded state relative to the unfolded or partially folded states. Also, our findings suggest that a bridging magnesium ion between the two loops improves the stabilizing effect. This is consistent with the multistep unfolding pathway proposed for the GAC RNA and highlights the importance of ions in the first unfolding step. The results suggest how MD simulations can provide insight into RNA unfolding pathways as a complementary approach to experiments.

  16. Rho GTPase protein Cdc42 is critical for postnatal cartilage development.

    PubMed

    Nagahama, Ryo; Yamada, Atsushi; Tanaka, Junichi; Aizawa, Ryo; Suzuki, Dai; Kassai, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Mishima, Kenji; Aiba, Atsu; Maki, Koutaro; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2016-02-19

    Cdc42, a small Rho GTPase family member, has been shown to regulate multiple cellular functions in vitro, including actin cytoskeletal reorganization, cell migration, proliferation, and gene expression. However, its tissue-specific roles in vivo remain largely unknown, especially in postnatal cartilage development, as cartilage-specific Cdc42 inactivated mice die within a few days after birth. In this study, we investigated the physiological functions of Cdc42 during cartilage development after birth using tamoxifen-induced cartilage-specific inactivated Cdc42 conditional knockout (Cdc42 (fl/fl); Col2-CreERT) mice, which were generated by crossing Cdc42 flox mice (Cdc42 (fl/fl)) with tamoxifen-induced type II collagen (Col2) Cre transgenic mice using a Cre/loxP system. The gross morphology of the Cdc42 cKO mice was shorter limbs and body, as well as reduced body weight as compared with the controls. In addition, severe defects were found in growth plate chondrocytes of the long bones, characterized by a shorter proliferating zone (PZ), wider hypertrophic zone (HZ), and loss of columnar organization of proliferating chondrocytes, resulting in delayed endochondral bone formation associated with abnormal bone growth. Our findings demonstrate the importance of Cdc42 for cartilage development during both embryonic and postnatal stages.

  17. E-cadherin dis-engagement activates the Rap1 GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Asuri, Sirisha; Yan, Jingliang; Paranavitana, Nivanka C.; Quilliam, Lawrence A.

    2008-01-01

    E-cadherin based adherens junctions are finely regulated by multiple cellular signaling events. Here we show that the Ras-related Rap1 GTPase is enriched in regions of nascent cell-cell contacts and strengthens E-cadherin junctions: constitutively active Rap1 expressing MDCK cells exhibit increased junctional contact and resisted calcium depletion-induced cell-cell junction disruption. E-cadherin disengagement activated Rap1 and this correlated with E-cadherin association with the Rap GEFs, C3G and PDZ-GEF I. PDZ-GEF I associated with E-cadherin and β-catenin whereas C3G interaction with E-cadherin did not involve β-catenin. Knockdown of PDZ-GEF I in MDCK cells decreased Rap1 activity following E-cadherin junction disruption. We hereby show that Rap1 plays a role in the maintenance and repair of E-cadherin junctions and is activated via an “outside-in” signaling pathway initiated by E-cadherin and mediated at least in part by PDZ-GEF I. PMID:18767072

  18. The Tem1 small GTPase controls actomyosin and septin dynamics during cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Lippincott, J; Shannon, K B; Shou, W; Deshaies, R J; Li, R

    2001-04-01

    Cytokinesis in budding yeast involves an actomyosin-based ring which assembles in a multistepped fashion during the cell cycle and constricts during cytokinesis. In this report, we have investigated the structural and regulatory events that occur at the onset of cytokinesis. The septins, which form an hour-glass like structure during early stages of the cell cycle, undergo dynamic rearrangements prior to cell division: the hourglass structure splits into two separate rings. The contractile ring, localized between the septin double rings, immediately undergoes contraction. Septin ring splitting is independent of actomyosin ring contraction as it still occurs in mutants where contraction fails. We hypothesize that septin ring splitting may remove a structural barrier for actomyosin ring to contract. Because the Tem1 small GTPase (Tem1p) is required for the completion of mitosis, we investigated its role in regulating septin and actomyosin ring dynamics in the background of the net1-1 mutation, which bypasses the anaphase cell cycle arrest in Tem1-deficient cells. We show that Tem1p plays a specific role in cytokinesis in addition to its function in cell cycle progression. Tem1p is not required for the assembly of the actomyosin ring but controls actomyosin and septin dynamics during cytokinesis.

  19. Rho-GTPase effector ROCK phosphorylates cofilin in actin-meditated cytokinesis during mouse oocyte meiosis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xing; Liu, Jun; Dai, Xiao-Xin; Liu, Hong-Lin; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Wang, Qiang; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2014-02-01

    During oocyte meiosis, a spindle forms in the central cytoplasm and migrates to the cortex. Subsequently, the oocyte extrudes a small body and forms a highly polarized egg; this process is regulated primarily by actin. ROCK is a Rho-GTPase effector that is involved in various cellular functions, such as stress fiber formation, cell migration, tumor cell invasion, and cell motility. In this study, we investigated possible roles for ROCK in mouse oocyte meiosis. ROCK was localized around spindles after germinal vesicle breakdown and was colocalized with cytoplasmic actin and mitochondria. Disrupting ROCK activity by RNAi or an inhibitor resulted in cell cycle progression and polar body extrusion failure. Time-lapse microscopy showed that this may have been due to spindle migration and cytokinesis defects, as chromosomes segregated but failed to extrude a polar body and then realigned. Actin expression at oocyte membranes and in cytoplasm was significantly decreased after these treatments. Actin caps were also disrupted, which was confirmed by a failure to form cortical granule-free domains. The mitochondrial distribution was also disrupted, which indicated that mitochondria were involved in the ROCK-mediated actin assembly. In addition, the phosphorylation levels of Cofilin, a downstream molecule of ROCK, decreased after disrupting ROCK activity. Thus, our results indicated that a ROCK-Cofilin-actin pathway regulated meiotic spindle migration and cytokinesis during mouse oocyte maturation.

  20. Caspase-11 activation requires lysis of pathogen-containing vacuoles by IFN-induced GTPases.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Etienne; Dick, Mathias S; Dreier, Roland F; Schürmann, Nura; Kenzelmann Broz, Daniela; Warming, Søren; Roose-Girma, Merone; Bumann, Dirk; Kayagaki, Nobuhiko; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Broz, Petr

    2014-05-15

    Lipopolysaccharide from Gram-negative bacteria is sensed in the host cell cytoplasm by a non-canonical inflammasome pathway that ultimately results in caspase-11 activation and cell death. In mouse macrophages, activation of this pathway requires the production of type-I interferons, indicating that interferon-induced genes have a critical role in initiating this pathway. Here we report that a cluster of small interferon-inducible GTPases, the so-called guanylate-binding proteins, is required for the full activity of the non-canonical caspase-11 inflammasome during infections with vacuolar Gram-negative bacteria. We show that guanylate-binding proteins are recruited to intracellular bacterial pathogens and are necessary to induce the lysis of the pathogen-containing vacuole. Lysis of the vacuole releases bacteria into the cytosol, thus allowing the detection of their lipopolysaccharide by a yet unknown lipopolysaccharide sensor. Moreover, recognition of the lysed vacuole by the danger sensor galectin-8 initiates the uptake of bacteria into autophagosomes, which results in a reduction of caspase-11 activation. These results indicate that host-mediated lysis of pathogen-containing vacuoles is an essential immune function and is necessary for efficient recognition of pathogens by inflammasome complexes in the cytosol.

  1. Rac-GTPases Regulate Microtubule Stability and Axon Growth of Cortical GABAergic Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Tivodar, Simona; Kalemaki, Katerina; Kounoupa, Zouzana; Vidaki, Marina; Theodorakis, Kostas; Denaxa, Myrto; Kessaris, Nicoletta; de Curtis, Ivan; Pachnis, Vassilis; Karagogeos, Domna

    2015-09-01

    Cortical interneurons are characterized by extraordinary functional and morphological diversity. Although tremendous progress has been made in uncovering molecular and cellular mechanisms implicated in interneuron generation and function, several questions still remain open. Rho-GTPases have been implicated as intracellular mediators of numerous developmental processes such as cytoskeleton organization, vesicle trafficking, transcription, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Specifically in cortical interneurons, we have recently shown a cell-autonomous and stage-specific requirement for Rac1 activity within proliferating interneuron precursors. Conditional ablation of Rac1 in the medial ganglionic eminence leads to a 50% reduction of GABAergic interneurons in the postnatal cortex. Here we examine the additional role of Rac3 by analyzing Rac1/Rac3 double-mutant mice. We show that in the absence of both Rac proteins, the embryonic migration of medial ganglionic eminence-derived interneurons is further impaired. Postnatally, double-mutant mice display a dramatic loss of cortical interneurons. In addition, Rac1/Rac3-deficient interneurons show gross cytoskeletal defects in vitro, with the length of their leading processes significantly reduced and a clear multipolar morphology. We propose that in the absence of Rac1/Rac3, cortical interneurons fail to migrate tangentially towards the pallium due to defects in actin and microtubule cytoskeletal dynamics.

  2. Slit-Robo GTPase-Activating Protein 2 as a metastasis suppressor in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Marko, Tracy A; Shamsan, Ghaidan A; Edwards, Elizabeth N; Hazelton, Paige E; Rathe, Susan K; Cornax, Ingrid; Overn, Paula R; Varshney, Jyotika; Diessner, Brandon J; Moriarity, Branden S; O'Sullivan, M Gerard; Odde, David J; Largaespada, David A

    2016-12-14

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor, with metastatic disease responsible for most treatment failure and patient death. A forward genetic screen utilizing Sleeping Beauty mutagenesis in mice previously identified potential genetic drivers of osteosarcoma metastasis, including Slit-Robo GTPase-Activating Protein 2 (Srgap2). This study evaluates the potential role of SRGAP2 in metastases-associated properties of osteosarcoma cell lines through Srgap2 knockout via the CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease system and conditional overexpression in the murine osteosarcoma cell lines K12 and K7M2. Proliferation, migration, and anchorage independent growth were evaluated. RNA sequencing and immunohistochemistry of human osteosarcoma tissue samples were used to further evaluate the potential role of the Slit-Robo pathway in osteosarcoma. The effects of Srgap2 expression modulation in the murine OS cell lines support the hypothesis that SRGAP2 may have a role as a suppressor of metastases in osteosarcoma. Additionally, SRGAP2 and other genes in the Slit-Robo pathway have altered transcript levels in a subset of mouse and human osteosarcoma, and SRGAP2 protein expression is reduced or absent in a subset of primary tumor samples. SRGAP2 and other axon guidance proteins likely play a role in osteosarcoma metastasis, with loss of SRGAP2 potentially contributing to a more aggressive phenotype.

  3. Phosphoproteomics reveals that Parkinson's disease kinase LRRK2 regulates a subset of Rab GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Steger, Martin; Tonelli, Francesca; Ito, Genta; Davies, Paul; Trost, Matthias; Vetter, Melanie; Wachter, Stefanie; Lorentzen, Esben; Duddy, Graham; Wilson, Stephen; Baptista, Marco AS; Fiske, Brian K; Fell, Matthew J; Morrow, John A; Reith, Alastair D; Alessi, Dario R; Mann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in Park8, encoding for the multidomain Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) protein, comprise the predominant genetic cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). G2019S, the most common amino acid substitution activates the kinase two- to threefold. This has motivated the development of LRRK2 kinase inhibitors; however, poor consensus on physiological LRRK2 substrates has hampered clinical development of such therapeutics. We employ a combination of phosphoproteomics, genetics, and pharmacology to unambiguously identify a subset of Rab GTPases as key LRRK2 substrates. LRRK2 directly phosphorylates these both in vivo and in vitro on an evolutionary conserved residue in the switch II domain. Pathogenic LRRK2 variants mapping to different functional domains increase phosphorylation of Rabs and this strongly decreases their affinity to regulatory proteins including Rab GDP dissociation inhibitors (GDIs). Our findings uncover a key class of bona-fide LRRK2 substrates and a novel regulatory mechanism of Rabs that connects them to PD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12813.001 PMID:26824392

  4. RhoA GTPase controls cytokinesis and programmed necrosis of hematopoietic progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xuan; Florian, Maria Carolina; Arumugam, Paritha; Chen, Xiaoyi; Cancelas, Jose A.; Lang, Richard; Malik, Punam; Geiger, Hartmut

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) are central to hematopoiesis as they provide large numbers of lineage-defined blood cells necessary to sustain blood homeostasis. They are one of the most actively cycling somatic cells, and their precise control is critical for hematopoietic homeostasis. The small GTPase RhoA is an intracellular molecular switch that integrates cytokine, chemokine, and adhesion signals to coordinate multiple context-dependent cellular processes. By using a RhoA conditional knockout mouse model, we show that RhoA deficiency causes a multilineage hematopoietic failure that is associated with defective multipotent HPCs. Interestingly, RhoA−/− hematopoietic stem cells retained long-term engraftment potential but failed to produce multipotent HPCs and lineage-defined blood cells. This multilineage hematopoietic failure was rescued by reconstituting wild-type RhoA into the RhoA−/− Lin−Sca-1+c-Kit+ compartment. Mechanistically, RhoA regulates actomyosin signaling, cytokinesis, and programmed necrosis of the HPCs, and loss of RhoA results in a cytokinesis failure of HPCs manifested by an accumulation of multinucleated cells caused by failed abscission of the cleavage furrow after telophase. Concomitantly, the HPCs show a drastically increased death associated with increased TNF–RIP-mediated necrosis. These results show that RhoA is a critical and specific regulator of multipotent HPCs during cytokinesis and thus essential for multilineage hematopoiesis. PMID:24101377

  5. BRIP1 inhibits the tumorigenic properties of cervical cancer by regulating RhoA GTPase activity

    PubMed Central

    ZOU, WEI; MA, XIANGDONG; HUA, WEI; CHEN, BILIANG; HUANG, YANHONG; WANG, DETANG; CAI, GUOQING

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1)-interacting protein 1 (BRIP1), a DNA-dependent adenosine triphosphatase and DNA helicase, is required for BRCA-associated DNA damage repair functions, and may be associated with the tumorigenesis and aggressiveness of various cancers. The present study investigated the expression of BRIP1 in normal cervix tissues and cervical carcinoma via reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and immunohistochemistry assays. BRIP1 expression was observed to be reduced in squamous cancer tissue and adenocarcinoma compared with normal cervix tissue, and there were significant correlations between the reduction in BRIP1 expression and unfavorable variables, including the International Federation of Gynecologists and Obstetricians stage and presence of lymph node metastases. In order to elucidate the role of BRIP1 in cervical cancer, a BRIP1 recombinant plasmid was constructed and overexpressed in a cervical cancer cell line (HeLa). The ectopic expression of BRIP1 markedly inhibited the tumorigenic properties of HeLa cells in vitro, as demonstrated by decreased cell growth, invasion and adhesion, and increased cell apoptosis. In addition, it was identified that the inhibitory tumorigenic properties of BRIP1 may be partly attributed to the attenuation of RhoA GTPase activity. The present study provides a novel insight into the essential role of BRIP1 in cervical cancer, and suggests that BRIP1 may be a useful therapeutic target for the treatment of this common malignancy. PMID:26870246

  6. Nuclear export of the small ribosomal subunit requires the Ran–GTPase cycle and certain nucleoporins

    PubMed Central

    Moy, Terence I.; Silver, Pamela A.

    1999-01-01

    After their assembly in the nucleolus, ribosomal subunits are exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. After export, the 20S rRNA in the small ribosomal subunit is cleaved to yield 18S rRNA and the small 5′ ITS1 fragment. The 5′ ITS1 RNA is normally degraded by the cytoplasmic Xrn1 exonuclease, but in strains lacking XRN1, the 5′ ITS1 fragment accumulates in the cytoplasm. Using the cytoplasmic localization of the 5′ ITS1 fragment as an indicator for the export of the small ribosomal subunit, we have identified genes that are required for ribosome export. Ribosome export is dependent on the Ran–GTPase as mutations in Ran or its regulators caused 5′ ITS1 to accumulate in the nucleoplasm. Mutations in the genes encoding the nucleoporin Nup82 and in the NES exporter Xpo1/Crm1 also caused the nucleoplasmic accumulation of 5′ ITS1. Mutants in a subset of nucleoporins and in the nuclear transport factors Srp1, Kap95, Pse1, Cse1, and Mtr10 accumulate the 5′ ITS1 in the nucleolus and affect ribosome assembly. In contrast, we did not detect nuclear accumulation of 5′ ITS1 in 28 yeast strains that have mutations in other genes affecting nuclear trafficking. PMID:10465789

  7. Mechanisms of Membrane Binding of Small GTPase K-Ras4B Farnesylated Hypervariable Region*

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyunbum; Abraham, Sherwin J.; Chavan, Tanmay S.; Hitchinson, Ben; Khavrutskii, Lyuba; Tarasova, Nadya I.; Nussinov, Ruth; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras4B belongs to a family of small GTPases that regulates cell growth, differentiation and survival. K-ras is frequently mutated in cancer. K-Ras4B association with the plasma membrane through its farnesylated and positively charged C-terminal hypervariable region (HVR) is critical to its oncogenic function. However, the structural mechanisms of membrane association are not fully understood. Here, using confocal microscopy, surface plasmon resonance, and molecular dynamics simulations, we observed that K-Ras4B can be distributed in rigid and loosely packed membrane domains. Its membrane binding domain interaction with phospholipids is driven by membrane fluidity. The farnesyl group spontaneously inserts into the disordered lipid microdomains, whereas the rigid microdomains restrict the farnesyl group penetration. We speculate that the resulting farnesyl protrusion toward the cell interior allows oligomerization of the K-Ras4B membrane binding domain in rigid microdomains. Unlike other Ras isoforms, K-Ras4B HVR contains a single farnesyl modification and positively charged polylysine sequence. The high positive charge not only modulates specific HVR binding to anionic phospholipids but farnesyl membrane orientation. Phosphorylation of Ser-181 prohibits spontaneous farnesyl membrane insertion. The mechanism illuminates the roles of HVR modifications in K-Ras4B targeting microdomains of the plasma membrane and suggests an additional function for HVR in regulation of Ras signaling. PMID:25713064

  8. GIMAP GTPase Family Genes: Potential Modifiers in Autoimmune Diabetes, Asthma, and Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Heinonen, Mirkka T.; Laine, Antti-Pekka; Söderhäll, Cilla; Gruzieva, Olena; Rautio, Sini; Melén, Erik; Pershagen, Göran; Lähdesmäki, Harri J.; Knip, Mikael; Ilonen, Jorma; Henttinen, Tiina A.; Kere, Juha

    2015-01-01

    GTPase of the immunity-associated protein (GIMAP) family members are differentially regulated during human Th cell differentiation and have been previously connected to immune-mediated disorders in animal studies. GIMAP4 is believed to contribute to the Th cell subtype–driven immunological balance via its role in T cell survival. GIMAP5 has a key role in BB-DR rat and NOD mouse lymphopenia. To elucidate GIMAP4 and GIMAP5 function and role in human immunity, we conducted a study combining genetic association in different immunological diseases and complementing functional analyses. Single nucleotide polymorphisms tagging the GIMAP haplotype variation were genotyped in Finnish type 1 diabetes (T1D) families and in a prospective Swedish asthma and allergic sensitization birth cohort. Initially, GIMAP5 rs6965571 was associated with risk for asthma and allergic sensitization (odds ratio [OR] 3.74, p = 0.00072, and OR 2.70, p = 0.0063, respectively) and protection from T1D (OR 0.64, p = 0.0058); GIMAP4 rs13222905 was associated with asthma (OR 1.28, p = 0.035) and allergic sensitization (OR 1.27, p = 0.0068). However, after false discovery rate correction for multiple testing, only the associations of GIMAP4 with allergic sensitization and GIMAP5 with asthma remained significant. In addition, transcription factor binding sites surrounding the associated loci were predicted. A gene–gene interaction in the T1D data were observed between the IL2RA rs2104286 and GIMAP4 rs9640279 (OR 1.52, p = 0.0064) and indicated between INS rs689 and GIMAP5 rs2286899. The follow-up functional analyses revealed lower IL-2RA expression upon GIMAP4 knockdown and an effect of GIMAP5 rs2286899 genotype on protein expression. Thus, the potential role of GIMAP4 and GIMAP5 as modifiers of immune-mediated diseases cannot be discarded. PMID:25964488

  9. GIMAP GTPase family genes: potential modifiers in autoimmune diabetes, asthma, and allergy.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Mirkka T; Laine, Antti-Pekka; Söderhäll, Cilla; Gruzieva, Olena; Rautio, Sini; Melén, Erik; Pershagen, Göran; Lähdesmäki, Harri J; Knip, Mikael; Ilonen, Jorma; Henttinen, Tiina A; Kere, Juha; Lahesmaa, Riitta

    2015-06-15

    GTPase of the immunity-associated protein (GIMAP) family members are differentially regulated during human Th cell differentiation and have been previously connected to immune-mediated disorders in animal studies. GIMAP4 is believed to contribute to the Th cell subtype-driven immunological balance via its role in T cell survival. GIMAP5 has a key role in BB-DR rat and NOD mouse lymphopenia. To elucidate GIMAP4 and GIMAP5 function and role in human immunity, we conducted a study combining genetic association in different immunological diseases and complementing functional analyses. Single nucleotide polymorphisms tagging the GIMAP haplotype variation were genotyped in Finnish type 1 diabetes (T1D) families and in a prospective Swedish asthma and allergic sensitization birth cohort. Initially, GIMAP5 rs6965571 was associated with risk for asthma and allergic sensitization (odds ratio [OR] 3.74, p = 0.00072, and OR 2.70, p = 0.0063, respectively) and protection from T1D (OR 0.64, p = 0.0058); GIMAP4 rs13222905 was associated with asthma (OR 1.28, p = 0.035) and allergic sensitization (OR 1.27, p = 0.0068). However, after false discovery rate correction for multiple testing, only the associations of GIMAP4 with allergic sensitization and GIMAP5 with asthma remained significant. In addition, transcription factor binding sites surrounding the associated loci were predicted. A gene-gene interaction in the T1D data were observed between the IL2RA rs2104286 and GIMAP4 rs9640279 (OR 1.52, p = 0.0064) and indicated between INS rs689 and GIMAP5 rs2286899. The follow-up functional analyses revealed lower IL-2RA expression upon GIMAP4 knockdown and an effect of GIMAP5 rs2286899 genotype on protein expression. Thus, the potential role of GIMAP4 and GIMAP5 as modifiers of immune-mediated diseases cannot be discarded.

  10. Comprehensive analysis reveals dynamic and evolutionary plasticity of Rab GTPases and membrane traffic in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Bright, Lydia J; Kambesis, Nichole; Nelson, Scott Brent; Jeong, Byeongmoon; Turkewitz, Aaron P

    2010-10-14

    Cellular sophistication is not exclusive to multicellular organisms, and unicellular eukaryotes can resemble differentiated animal cells in their complex network of membrane-bound structures. These comparisons can be illuminated by genome-wide surveys of key gene families. We report a systematic analysis of Rabs in a complex unicellular Ciliate, including gene prediction and phylogenetic clustering, expression profiling based on public data, and Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) tagging. Rabs are monomeric GTPases that regulate membrane traffic. Because Rabs act as compartment-specific determinants, the number of Rabs in an organism reflects intracellular complexity. The Tetrahymena Rab family is similar in size to that in humans and includes both expansions in conserved Rab clades as well as many divergent Rabs. Importantly, more than 90% of Rabs are expressed concurrently in growing cells, while only a small subset appears specialized for other conditions. By localizing most Rabs in living cells, we could assign the majority to specific compartments. These results validated most phylogenetic assignments, but also indicated that some sequence-conserved Rabs were co-opted for novel functions. Our survey uncovered a rare example of a nuclear Rab and substantiated the existence of a previously unrecognized core Rab clade in eukaryotes. Strikingly, several functionally conserved pathways or structures were found to be associated entirely with divergent Rabs. These pathways may have permitted rapid evolution of the associated Rabs or may have arisen independently in diverse lineages and then converged. Thus, characterizing entire gene families can provide insight into the evolutionary flexibility of fundamental cellular pathways.

  11. PpRab1, a Rab GTPase from maritime pine is differentially expressed during embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Sónia; Cairney, John; Rodríguez, María Pérez; Cánovas, Francisco; Oliveira, Margarida; Miguel, Célia

    2007-09-01

    Rab-related small GTP-binding proteins are known to be involved in the regulation of the vesicular transport system in eukaryotic cells. We report the characterization of a previously isolated full-length cDNA PpRab1 from Pinus pinaster. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed the presence of G1-G5 conserved domains of the GTPase Ras superfamily and a double cysteine motif in the C-terminal, characteristic of Rab proteins. The PpRab1 protein shows high sequence similarity to several Rab1 GTP-binding proteins in plants. Phylogenetic analysis showed that, within the Ras superfamily, PpRab1 is more closely related to the Rab family and within this, PpRab1 protein was found to cluster with Arabidopsis subfamily AtRABE, whose members are known to regulate ER-to-Golgi membrane trafficking steps. PpRab1 transcripts were expressed at constitutively high levels for the initial stages of zygotic embryo development, and then their relative abundance decreased as embryo matures. The PpRab1 transcript is not embryo-specific as it was found in roots, cotyledons and hypocotyls. An increase in PpRab1 expression level was observed when seeds are germinated and collected at successive time points of development. In situ RT-PCR analysis revealed an expression signal in early zygotic embryos. In view of the proposed roles of Rab1 GTP-binding protein, the possible function of the protein encoded by PpRab1 in embryogenesis is discussed.

  12. ACAPs are arf6 GTPase-activating proteins that function in the cell periphery.

    PubMed

    Jackson, T R; Brown, F D; Nie, Z; Miura, K; Foroni, L; Sun, J; Hsu, V W; Donaldson, J G; Randazzo, P A

    2000-10-30

    The GTP-binding protein ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) regulates endosomal membrane trafficking and the actin cytoskeleton in the cell periphery. GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) are critical regulators of Arf function, controlling the return of Arf to the inactive GDP-bound state. Here, we report the identification and characterization of two Arf6 GAPs, ACAP1 and ACAP2. Together with two previously described Arf GAPs, ASAP1 and PAP, they can be grouped into a protein family defined by several common structural motifs including coiled coil, pleckstrin homology, Arf GAP, and three complete ankyrin-repeat domains. All contain phosphoinositide-dependent GAP activity. ACAP1 and ACAP2 are widely expressed and occur together in the various cultured cell lines we examined. Similar to ASAP1, ACAP1 and ACAP2 were recruited to and, when overexpressed, inhibited the formation of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced dorsal membrane ruffles in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. However, in contrast with ASAP1, ACAP1 and ACAP2 functioned as Arf6 GAPs. In vitro, ACAP1 and ACAP2 preferred Arf6 as a substrate, rather than Arf1 and Arf5, more so than did ASAP1. In HeLa cells, overexpression of either ACAP blocked the formation of Arf6-dependent protrusions. In addition, ACAP1 and ACAP2 were recruited to peripheral, tubular membranes, where activation of Arf6 occurs to allow membrane recycling back to the plasma membrane. ASAP1 did not inhibit Arf6-dependent protrusions and was not recruited by Arf6 to tubular membranes. The additional effects of ASAP1 on PDGF-induced ruffling in fibroblasts suggest that multiple Arf GAPs function coordinately in the cell periphery.

  13. Amphetamine activates Rho GTPase signaling to mediate dopamine transporter internalization and acute behavioral effects of amphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, David S.; Underhill, Suzanne M.; Stolz, Donna B.; Murdoch, Geoffrey H.; Thiels, Edda; Romero, Guillermo; Amara, Susan G.

    2015-01-01

    Acute amphetamine (AMPH) exposure elevates extracellular dopamine through a variety of mechanisms that include inhibition of dopamine reuptake, depletion of vesicular stores, and facilitation of dopamine efflux across the plasma membrane. Recent work has shown that the DAT substrate AMPH, unlike cocaine and other nontransported blockers, can also stimulate endocytosis of the plasma membrane dopamine transporter (DAT). Here, we show that when AMPH enters the cytoplasm it rapidly stimulates DAT internalization through a dynamin-dependent, clathrin-independent process. This effect, which can be observed in transfected cells, cultured dopamine neurons, and midbrain slices, is mediated by activation of the small GTPase RhoA. Inhibition of RhoA activity with C3 exotoxin or a dominant-negative RhoA blocks AMPH-induced DAT internalization. These actions depend on AMPH entry into the cell and are blocked by the DAT inhibitor cocaine. AMPH also stimulates cAMP accumulation and PKA-dependent inactivation of RhoA, thus providing a mechanism whereby PKA- and RhoA-dependent signaling pathways can interact to regulate the timing and robustness of AMPH’s effects on DAT internalization. Consistent with this model, the activation of D1/D5 receptors that couple to PKA in dopamine neurons antagonizes RhoA activation, DAT internalization, and hyperlocomotion observed in mice after AMPH treatment. These observations support the existence of an unanticipated intracellular target that mediates the effects of AMPH on RhoA and cAMP signaling and suggest new pathways to target to disrupt AMPH action. PMID:26553986

  14. Functional Characterization of Monomeric GTPase Rab1 in the Secretory Pathway of Leishmania*

    PubMed Central

    Bahl, Surbhi; Parashar, Smriti; Malhotra, Himanshu; Raje, Manoj; Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania secretes a large number of its effectors to the extracellular milieu. However, regulation of the secretory pathway in Leishmania is not well characterized. Here, we report the cloning, expression, and characterization of the Rab1 homologue from Leishmania. We have found that LdRab1 localizes in Golgi in Leishmania. To understand the role of LdRab1 in the secretory pathway of Leishmania, we have generated transgenic parasites overexpressing GFP-LdRab1:WT, GFP-LdRab1:Q67L (a GTPase-deficient dominant positive mutant of Rab1), and GFP-LdRab1:S22N (a GDP-locked dominant negative mutant of Rab1). Surprisingly, our results have shown that overexpression of GFP-LdRab1:Q67L or GFP-LdRab1:S22N does not disrupt the trafficking and localization of hemoglobin receptor in Leishmania. To determine whether the Rab1-dependent secretory pathway is conserved in parasites, we have analyzed the role of LdRab1 in the secretion of secretory acid phosphatase and Ldgp63 in Leishmania. Our results have shown that overexpression of GFP-LdRab1:Q67L or GFP-LdRab1:S22N significantly inhibits the secretion of secretory acid phosphatase by Leishmania. We have also found that overexpression of GFP-LdRab1:Q67L or GFP-LdRab1:S22N retains RFP-Ldgp63 in Golgi and blocks the secretion of Ldgp63, whereas the trafficking of RFP-Ldgp63 in GFP-LdRab1:WT-expressing cells is unaltered in comparison with control cells. Taken together, our results have shown that the Rab1-regulated secretory pathway is well conserved, and hemoglobin receptor trafficking follows an Rab1-independent secretory pathway in Leishmania. PMID:26499792

  15. Ras GTPase-Activating Protein Regulation of Actin Cytoskeleton and Hyphal Polarity in Aspergillus nidulans▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Harispe, Laura; Portela, Cecilia; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Peñalva, Miguel A.; Gorfinkiel, Lisette

    2008-01-01

    Aspergillus nidulans gapA1, a mutation leading to compact, fluffy colonies and delayed polarity establishment, maps to a gene encoding a Ras GTPase-activating protein. Domain organization and phylogenetic analyses strongly indicate that GapA regulates one or more “true” Ras proteins. A gapAΔ strain is viable. gapA colonies are more compact than gapA1 colonies and show reduced conidiation. gapAΔ strains have abnormal conidiophores, characterized by the absence of one of the two layers of sterigmata seen in the wild type. gapA transcript levels are very low in conidia but increase during germination and reach their maximum at a time coincident with germ tube emergence. Elevated levels persist in hyphae. In germinating conidiospores, gapAΔ disrupts the normal coupling of isotropic growth, polarity establishment, and mitosis, resulting in a highly heterogeneous cell population, including malformed germlings and a class of giant cells with no germ tubes and a multitude of nuclei. Unlike wild-type conidia, gapAΔ conidia germinate without a carbon source. Giant multinucleated spores and carbon source-independent germination have been reported in strains carrying a rasA dominant active allele, indicating that GapA downregulates RasA. gapAΔ cells show a polarity maintenance defect characterized by apical swelling and subapical branching. The strongly polarized wild-type F-actin distribution is lost in gapAΔ cells. As GapA-green fluorescent protein shows cortical localization with strong predominance at the hyphal tips, we propose that GapA-mediated downregulation of Ras signaling at the plasma membrane of these tips is involved in the polarization of the actin cytoskeleton that is required for hyphal growth and, possibly, for asexual morphogenesis. PMID:18039943

  16. Mapping the functional versatility and fragility of Ras GTPase signaling circuits through in vitro network reconstitution

    PubMed Central

    Coyle, Scott M; Lim, Wendell A

    2016-01-01

    The Ras-superfamily GTPases are central controllers of cell proliferation and morphology. Ras signaling is mediated by a system of interacting molecules: upstream enzymes (GEF/GAP) regulate Ras’s ability to recruit multiple competing downstream effectors. We developed a multiplexed, multi-turnover assay for measuring the dynamic signaling behavior of in vitro reconstituted H-Ras signaling systems. By including both upstream regulators and downstream effectors, we can systematically map how different network configurations shape the dynamic system response. The concentration and identity of both upstream and downstream signaling components strongly impacted the timing, duration, shape, and amplitude of effector outputs. The distorted output of oncogenic alleles of Ras was highly dependent on the balance of positive (GAP) and negative (GEF) regulators in the system. We found that different effectors interpreted the same inputs with distinct output dynamics, enabling a Ras system to encode multiple unique temporal outputs in response to a single input. We also found that different Ras-to-GEF positive feedback mechanisms could reshape output dynamics in distinct ways, such as signal amplification or overshoot minimization. Mapping of the space of output behaviors accessible to Ras provides a design manual for programming Ras circuits, and reveals how these systems are readily adapted to produce an array of dynamic signaling behaviors. Nonetheless, this versatility comes with a trade-off of fragility, as there exist numerous paths to altered signaling behaviors that could cause disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12435.001 PMID:26765565

  17. Nuclear/nucleolar GTPase 2 proteins as a subfamily of YlqF/YawG GTPases function in pre-60S ribosomal subunit maturation of mono- and dicotyledonous plants.

    PubMed

    Im, Chak Han; Hwang, Sung Min; Son, Young Sim; Heo, Jae Bok; Bang, Woo Young; Suwastika, I Nengah; Shiina, Takashi; Bahk, Jeong Dong

    2011-03-11

    The YlqF/YawG families are important GTPases involved in ribosome biogenesis, cell proliferation, or cell growth, however, no plant homologs have yet to be characterized. Here we isolated rice (Oryza sativa) and Arabidopsis nuclear/nucleolar GTPase 2 (OsNug2 and AtNug2, respectively) that belong to the YawG subfamily and characterized them for pre-60S ribosomal subunit maturation. They showed typical intrinsic YlqF/YawG family GTPase activities in bacteria and yeasts with k(cat) values 0.12 ± 0.007 min(-1) (n = 6) and 0.087 ± 0.002 min(-1) (n = 4), respectively, and addition of 60S ribosomal subunits stimulated their activities in vitro. In addition, OsNug2 rescued the lethality of the yeast nug2 null mutant through recovery of 25S pre-rRNA processing. By yeast two-hybrid screening five clones, including a putative one of 60S ribosomal proteins, OsL10a, were isolated. Subcellular localization and pulldown assays resulted in that the N-terminal region of OsNug2 is sufficient for nucleolar/nuclear targeting and association with OsL10a. OsNug2 is physically associated with pre-60S ribosomal complexes highly enriched in the 25S, 5.8S, and 5S rRNA, and its interaction was stimulated by exogenous GTP. Furthermore, the AtNug2 knockdown mutant constructed by the RNAi method showed defective growth on the medium containing cycloheximide. Expression pattern analysis revealed that the distribution of AtNug2 mainly in the meristematic region underlies its potential role in active plant growth. Finally, it is concluded that Nug2/Nog2p GTPase from mono- and didicotyledonous plants is linked to the pre-60S ribosome complex and actively processed 27S into 25S during the ribosomal large subunit maturation process, i.e. prior to export to the cytoplasm.

  18. Insights into the GTP/GDP cycle of RabX3, a novel GTPase from Entamoeba histolytica with tandem G-domains.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Mintu; Mukherjee, Madhumita; Srivastava, Vijay Kumar; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Datta, Sunando

    2014-02-25

    Members of the small GTPase Ras superfamily regulate a host of systems through their ability to catalyze the GTP/GDP cycle. All family members reported thus far possess a single GTPase domain with a P-loop containing a nucleoside triphosphate hydrolase fold. Here for the first time we report a novel member from Entamoeba histolytica, EhRabX3, which harbors two GTPase domains in tandem and exhibits unique biochemical properties. A combination of biochemical and microcalorimetric studies revealed that EhRabX3 binds to a single guanine nucleotide through its N-terminal domain. Unlike most of the members of the Ras superfamily, the dissociation of the nucleotide from EhRabX3 is independent of Mg(2+), perhaps indicating a novel mechanism of nucleotide exchange by this protein. We found that EhRabX3 is extremely sluggish in hydrolyzing GTP, and that could be attributed to its atypical nucleotide binding pocket. It harbors substitutions at two positions that confer oncogenicity to Ras because of impaired GTP hydrolysis. Engineering these residues into the conserved counterparts enhanced their GTPase activity by at least 20-fold. In contrast to most of the members of the Ras superfamily, EhRabX3 lacks the prenylation motif. Using indirect immunofluorescence and biochemical fractionation, we demonstrated that the protein is distributed all over the cytosol in amoebic trophozoites. Collectively, this unique ancient GTPase exhibits a striking evolutionary divergence from the other members of the superfamily.

  19. Identification and subcellular localization of human rab5b, a new member of the ras-related superfamily of GTPases.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, D B; Wilson, M P

    1992-01-01

    Members of the mammalian rab family of GTPases are associated with specific subcellular compartments, where these proteins are postulated to function in vesicular transport. By screening a human umbilical vein endothelial cell library with degenerate oligonucleotide probes, we have isolated a 1.6-kb cDNA clone encoding a 215-amino-acid protein belonging to the rab family of GTPases. This newly identified rab protein is 81% identical to human rab5, the canine counterpart of which has been localized to the plasma membrane and early endosomes. In light of this homology, we have named this new member of the GTPase superfamily "rab5b." Northern analysis using the rab5b cDNA as a probe revealed a 3.6-kb mRNA in a variety of cell types, including human umbilical vein endothelial cells, K562 erythroleukemia cells, U937 monoblastic cells, and HeLa cells. A fusion protein between glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and rab5b was expressed in bacteria and purified to homogeneity. The recombinant protein was shown to bind GTP and GDP. As is typical of other recombinant rab proteins, the rab5b-GST fusion protein displayed a low intrinsic rate of GTP hydrolysis (0.005/min). An antiserum to rab5b was prepared and used to determine the apparent molecular size and subcellular distribution of the protein. Western blotting with this antibody revealed a 25-kD protein in COS cells transfected with rab5b and in nontransfected HeLa cells. Indirect immunofluorescence and subcellular fractionation showed that rab5b localizes to the plasma membrane. We speculate that rab5b plays a role in vesicular trafficking at the plasma membrane in various cell types. Images PMID:1541686

  20. Clostridium sordellii Lethal-Toxin Autoprocessing and Membrane Localization Activities Drive GTPase Glucosylation Profiles in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Craven, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium sordellii infections cause gangrene and edema in humans and gastrointestinal infections in livestock. One of the principle virulence factors is TcsL, a large protein toxin which glucosylates host GTPases to cause cytopathic and cytotoxic effects. TcsL has two enzymatic domains, an N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain (GTD) and an autoprocessing domain responsible for release of the GTD within the cell. The GTD can then use its N-terminal membrane localization domain (MLD) for orientation on membranes and modification of GTPases. This study describes the use of conditionally immortalized murine pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells as a model for the study of TcsL functional activities. Point mutations that disrupt the glucosyltransferase, autoprocessing, or membrane localization activities were introduced into a recombinant version of TcsL, and the activities of these mutants were compared to those of wild-type toxin. We observed that all mutants are defective or impaired in cytotoxicity but differ in their modification of Rac1 and Ras. The data suggest a model where differences in GTPase localization dictate cellular responses to intoxication and highlight the importance of autoprocessing in the function of TcsL. IMPORTANCE Clostridium sordellii is a bacterium that can infect humans and cause serious disease and death. The principle virulence factor associated with clinical symptoms is a large protein toxin known as lethal toxin. The mechanism of lethal-toxin intoxication is assumed to be similar to that of the homologous toxins from C. difficile, but very few studies have been done in the context of endothelial cells, a relevant target in C. sordellii infections. This study was designed to test the role of the lethal-toxin enzymatic activities and membrane localization in endothelial cell toxicity and host substrate modification. PMID:27303685

  1. The Arf GTPase-Activating Protein Family Is Exploited by Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium To Invade Nonphagocytic Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Anthony C.; Humphreys, Daniel; Brooks, Andrew B. E.; Hume, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT To establish intracellular infections, Salmonella bacteria trigger host cell membrane ruffling and invasion by subverting cellular Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that activate Arf1 and Arf6 GTPases by promoting GTP binding. A family of cellular Arf GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) can downregulate Arf signaling by stimulating GTP hydrolysis, but whether they do this during infection is unknown. Here, we uncovered a remarkable role for distinct Arf GAP family members in Salmonella invasion. The Arf6 GAPs ACAP1 and ADAP1 and the Arf1 GAP ASAP1 localized at Salmonella-induced ruffles, which was not the case for the plasma membrane-localized Arf6 GAPs ARAP3 and GIT1 or the Golgi-associated Arf1 GAP1. Surprisingly, we found that loss of ACAP1, ADAP1, or ASAP1 impaired Salmonella invasion, revealing that GAPs cannot be considered mere terminators of cytoskeleton remodeling. Salmonella invasion was restored in Arf GAP-depleted cells by expressing fast-cycling Arf derivatives, demonstrating that Arf GTP/GDP cycles facilitate Salmonella invasion. Consistent with this view, both constitutively active and dominant-negative Arf derivatives that cannot undergo GTP/GDP cycles inhibited invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Arf GEFs and GAPs colocalize at invading Salmonella and collaborate to drive Arf1-dependent pathogen invasion. This study revealed that Salmonella bacteria exploit a remarkable interplay between Arf GEFs and GAPs to direct cycles of Arf GTPase activation and inactivation. These cycles drive Salmonella cytoskeleton remodeling and enable intracellular infections. PMID:25670778

  2. Identification and characterization of RBEL1 subfamily of GTPases in the Ras superfamily involved in cell growth regulation.

    PubMed

    Montalbano, JoAnne; Lui, Ki; Sheikh, M Saeed; Huang, Ying

    2009-07-03

    Recently, we reported the identification of a novel gene named RBEL1 (Rab-like protein 1) and characterized its two encoded isoforms, RBEL1A and RBEL1B, that function as novel GTPases of Ras superfamily. Here we report the identification of two additional splice variants of RBEL1 that we have named RBEL1C and -D. All four RBEL1 isoforms (A, B, C, and D) have identical N termini harboring the Rab-like GTPase domains but contain variable C termini. Although all isoforms can be detected in both cytoplasm and nucleus, RBEL1A is predominantly cytoplasmic, whereas RBEL1B is mostly nuclear. RBEL1C and -D, by contrast, are evenly distributed between the cytoplasm and nucleus. Furthermore, all four RBEL1 proteins are also capable of associating with cellular membrane. The RBEL1 proteins also exhibit a unique nucleotide-binding potential and, whereas the larger A and B isoforms are mainly GTP-bound, the smaller C and D variants bind to both GTP and GDP. Furthermore, a regulatory region at amino acid position 236-302 immediately adjacent to the GTP-binding domain is important for GTP-binding potential of RBEL1A, because deletion of this region converts RBEL1A from predominantly GTP-bound to GDP-bound. RBEL1 knockdown via RNA interference results in marked cell growth suppression, which is associated with morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis as well as inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation. Taken together, our results indicate that RBEL1 proteins are linked to cell growth and survival and possess unique biochemical, cellular, and functional characteristics and, therefore, appear to form a novel subfamily of GTPases within the Ras superfamily.

  3. The insert region of the Rac GTPases is dispensable for activation of superoxide-producing NADPH oxidases.

    PubMed

    Miyano, Kei; Koga, Hirofumi; Minakami, Reiko; Sumimoto, Hideki

    2009-08-13

    Rac1 and Rac2, which belong to the Rho subfamily of Ras-related GTPases, play an essential role in activation of gp91phox/Nox2 (cytochrome b-245, beta polypeptide; also known as Cybb), the catalytic core of the superoxide-producing NADPH oxidase in phagocytes. Rac1 also contributes to activation of the non-phagocytic oxidases Nox1 (NADPH oxidase 1) and Nox3 (NADPH oxidase 3), each related closely to gp91phox/Nox2. It has remained controversial whether the insert region of Rac (amino acids 123-135), unique to the Rho subfamily proteins, is involved in gp91phox/Nox2 activation. In the present study we show that removal of the insert region from Rac1 neither affects activation of gp91phox/Nox2, which is reconstituted under cell-free and whole-cell conditions, nor blocks its localization to phagosomes during ingestion of IgG-coated beads by macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. The insert region of Rac2 is also dispensable for gp91phox/Nox2 activation at the cellular level. Although Rac2, as well as Rac1, is capable of enhancing superoxide production by Nox1 and Nox3, the enhancements by the two GTPases are both independent of the insert region. We also demonstrate that Rac3, a third member of the Rac family in mammals, has an ability to activate the three oxidases and that the activation does not require the insert region. Thus the insert region of the Rac GTPases does not participate in regulation of the Nox family NADPH oxidases.

  4. Associations among PH and SH3 domain-containing proteins and Rho-type GTPases in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The src homology region 3 (SH3) domain-bearing protein Bem1p and the Rho-type GTPase Cdc42p are important for bud emergence in Saccharomyces cervisiae. Here, we present evidence that through its second SH3 domain, Bem1p binds to the structurally and functionally similar proteins Boi1p and Boi2p, each of which contain an SH3 and pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. Deletion of BOI1 and BO12 together leads to impaired morphogenesis and poor ability. A PH domain-bearing segment of Boi1p that lacks the Bem1p-binding site is necessary and sufficient for function. This segment of Boi1p displays a two-hybrid interaction with Cdc42p, suggesting that Boi1p either binds directly to or is part of a larger complex that contains Cdc42p. Consistent with these possibilities, overexpression of Boi1p inhibits bud emergence, but this inhibition is counteracted by cooverexpression of Cdc42p. Increased expression of the Rho-type GTPase Rho3p, which is implicated in bud growth defects of boil boi2 mutants, suggesting that Boi1p and Boi2p may also play roles in the activation or function of Rho3p. These findings provide an example of a tight coupling in function between PH domain-bearing proteins and both Rho-type GTPases and SH3 domain- containing proteins, and they raise the possibility that Boi1p and Boi2 play a role in linking the actions of Cdc42p and Rho3p. PMID:8666672

  5. Control of cellular morphogenesis by the Ip12/Bem2 GTPase-activating protein: possible role of protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The IPL2 gene is known to be required for normal polarized cell growth in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We now show that IPL2 is identical to the previously identified BEM2 gene. bem2 mutants are defective in bud site selection at 26 degrees C and localized cell surface growth and organization of the actin cytoskeleton at 37 degrees C. BEM2 encodes a protein with a COOH-terminal domain homologous to sequences found in several GTPase-activating proteins, including human Bcr. The GTPase-activating protein-domain from the Bem2 protein (Bem2p) or human Bcr can functionally substitute for Bem2p. The Rho1 and Rho2 GTPases are the likely in vivo targets of Bem2p because bem2 mutant phenotypes can be partially suppressed by increasing the gene dosage of RHO1 or RHO2. CDC55 encodes the putative regulatory B subunit of protein phosphatase 2A, and mutations in BEM2 have previously been identified as suppressors of the cdc55-1 mutation. We show here that mutations in the previously identified GRR1 gene can suppress bem2 mutations. grr1 and cdc55 mutants are both elongated in shape and cold- sensitive for growth, and cells lacking both GRR1 and CDC55 exhibit a synthetic lethal phenotype. bem2 mutant phenotypes also can be suppressed by the SSD1-vl (also known as SRK1) mutation, which was shown previously to suppress mutations in the protein phosphatase- encoding SIT4 gene. Cells lacking both BEM2 and SIT4 exhibit a synthetic lethal phenotype even in the presence of the SSD1-v1 suppressor. These genetic interactions together suggest that protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play an important role in the BEM2-mediated process of polarized cell growth. PMID:7962097

  6. Small GTPases Rab8a and Rab11a Are Dispensable for Rhodopsin Transport in Mouse Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Guoxin; Gerstner, Cecilia D.; Frederick, Jeanne M.; Boye, Sanford L.; Hauswirth, William W.; Baehr, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Rab11a and Rab8a are ubiquitous small GTPases shown as required for rhodopsin transport in Xenopus laevis and zebrafish photoreceptors by dominant negative (dn) disruption of function. Here, we generated retina-specific Rab11a (retRab11a) and Rab8a (retRab8a) single and double knockout mice to explore the consequences in mouse photoreceptors. Rhodopsin and other outer segment (OS) membrane proteins targeted correctly to OS and electroretinogram (ERG) responses in all three mutant mouse lines were indistinguishable from wild-type (WT). Further, AAV (adeno-associated virus)-mediated expression of dnRab11b in retRab11a-/- retina, or expression of dnRab8b in retRab8a-/- retina did not cause OS protein mislocalization. Finally, a retRab8a-/- retina injected at one month of age with AAVs expressing dnRab11a, dnRab11b, dnRab8b, and dnRab10 (four dn viruses on Rab8a-/- background) and harvested three months later exhibited normal OS protein localization. In contrast to results obtained with dnRab GTPases in Xenopus and zebrafish, mouse Rab11a and Rab8a are dispensable for proper rhodopsin and outer segment membrane protein targeting. Absence of phenotype after expression of four dn Rab GTPases in a Rab8a-/- retina suggests that Rab8b and Rab11b paralogs maybe dispensable as well. Our data thus demonstrate significant interspecies variation in photoreceptor membrane protein and rhodopsin trafficking. PMID:27529348

  7. Inhibition of Rac GTPase triggers a c-Jun- and Bim-dependent mitochondrial apoptotic cascade in cerebellar granule neurons

    PubMed Central

    Le, Shoshona S.; Loucks, F. Alexandra; Udo, Hiroshi; Richardson-Burns, Sarah; Phelps, Reid A.; Bouchard, Ron J.; Barth, Holger; Aktories, Klaus; Tyler, Kenneth L.; Kandel, Eric R.; Heidenreich, Kim A.; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2008-01-01

    Rho GTPases are key transducers of integrin/extracellular matrix and growth factor signaling. Although integrin-mediated adhesion and trophic support suppress neuronal apoptosis, the role of Rho GTPases in neuronal survival is unclear. Here, we have identified Rac as a critical pro-survival GTPase in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) and elucidated a death pathway triggered by its inactivation. GTP-loading of Rac1 was maintained in CGNs by integrin-mediated (RGDdependent) cell attachment and trophic support. Clostridium difficile toxin B (ToxB), a specific Rho family inhibitor, induced a selective caspase-mediated degradation of Rac1 without affecting RhoA or Cdc42 protein levels. Both ToxB and dominant-negative N17Rac1 elicited CGN apoptosis, characterized by cytochrome c release and activation of caspase-9 and -3, whereas dominant-negative N19RhoA or N17Cdc42 did not cause significant cell death. ToxB stimulated mitochondrial translocation and conformational activation of Bax, c-Jun activation, and induction of the BH3-only protein Bim. Similarly, c-Jun activation and Bim induction were observed with N17Rac1. A c-jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK)/p38 inhibitor, SB203580, and a JNK-specific inhibitor, SP600125, significantly decreased ToxB-induced Bim expression and blunted each subsequent step of the apoptotic cascade. These results indicate that Rac acts downstream of integrins and growth factors to promote neuronal survival by repressing c-Jun/Bim-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis. PMID:16092944

  8. Modulation of RhoGTPases improves the behavioral phenotype and reverses astrocytic deficits in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Bianca; Fabbri, Alessia; Simone, Daiana; Canese, Rossella; Ricceri, Laura; Malchiodi-Albedi, Fiorella; Laviola, Giovanni; Fiorentini, Carla

    2012-04-01

    RhoGTPases are crucial molecules in neuronal plasticity and cognition, as confirmed by their role in non-syndromic mental retardation. Activation of brain RhoGTPases by the bacterial cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1) reshapes the actin cytoskeleton and enhances neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity in mouse brains. We evaluated the effects of a single CNF1 intracerebroventricular inoculation in a mouse model of Rett syndrome (RTT), a rare neurodevelopmental disorder and a genetic cause of mental retardation, for which no effective therapy is available. Fully symptomatic MeCP2-308 male mice were evaluated in a battery of tests specifically tailored to detect RTT-related impairments. At the end of behavioral testing, brain sections were immunohistochemically characterized. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy (MRS) were also applied to assess morphological and metabolic brain changes. The CNF1 administration markedly improved the behavioral phenotype of MeCP2-308 mice. CNF1 also dramatically reversed the evident signs of atrophy in astrocytes of mutant mice and restored wt-like levels of this cell population. A partial rescue of the overexpression of IL-6 cytokine was also observed in RTT brains. CNF1-induced brain metabolic changes detected by MRS analysis involved markers of glial integrity and bioenergetics, and point to improved mitochondria functionality in CNF1-treated mice. These results clearly indicate that modulation of brain RhoGTPases by CNF1 may constitute a totally innovative therapeutic approach for RTT and, possibly, for other disorders associated with mental retardation.

  9. The Jaw of the Worm: GTPase-activating Protein EAT-17 Regulates Grinder Formation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Straud, Sarah; Lee, Inhwan; Song, Bomi; Avery, Leon; You, Young-Jai

    2013-01-01

    Constitutive transport of cellular materials is essential for cell survival. Although multiple small GTPase Rab proteins are required for the process, few regulators of Rabs are known. Here we report that EAT-17, a novel GTPase-activating protein (GAP), regulates RAB-6.2 function in grinder formation in Caenorhabditis elegans. We identified EAT-17 as a novel RabGAP that interacts with RAB-6.2, a protein that presumably regulates vesicle trafficking between Golgi, the endoplasmic reticulum, and plasma membrane to form a functional grinder. EAT-17 has a canonical GAP domain that is critical for its function. RNA interference against 25 confirmed and/or predicted RABs in C. elegans shows that RNAi against rab-6.2 produces a phenotype identical to eat-17. A directed yeast two-hybrid screen using EAT-17 as bait and each of the 25 RAB proteins as prey identifies RAB-6.2 as the interacting partner of EAT-17, confirming that RAB-6.2 is a specific substrate of EAT-17. Additionally, deletion mutants of rab-6.2 show grinder defects identical to those of eat-17 loss-of-function mutants, and both RAB-6.2 and EAT-17 are expressed in the terminal bulb of the pharynx where the grinder is located. Collectively, these results suggest that EAT-17 is a specific GTPase-activating protein for RAB-6.2. Based on the conserved function of Rab6 in vesicular transport, we propose that EAT-17 regulates the turnover rate of RAB-6.2 activity in cargo trafficking for grinder formation. PMID:23792950

  10. Specificity and mechanism of action of EHT 1864, a novel small molecule inhibitor of Rac family small GTPases.

    PubMed

    Shutes, Adam; Onesto, Cercina; Picard, Virginie; Leblond, Bertrand; Schweighoffer, Fabien; Der, Channing J

    2007-12-07

    There is now considerable experimental evidence that aberrant activation of Rho family small GTPases promotes the uncontrolled proliferation, invasion, and metastatic properties of human cancer cells. Therefore, there is considerable interest in the development of small molecule inhibitors of Rho GTPase function. However, to date, most efforts have focused on inhibitors that indirectly block Rho GTPase function, by targeting either enzymes involved in post-translational processing or downstream protein kinase effectors. We recently determined that the EHT 1864 small molecule can inhibit Rac function in vivo. In this study, we evaluated the biological and biochemical specificities and biochemical mechanism of action of EHT 1864. We determined that EHT 1864 specifically inhibited Rac1-dependent platelet-derived growth factor-induced lamellipodia formation. Furthermore, our biochemical analyses with recombinant Rac proteins found that EHT 1864 possesses high affinity binding to Rac1, as well as the related Rac1b, Rac2, and Rac3 isoforms, and this association promoted the loss of bound nucleotide, inhibiting both guanine nucleotide association and Tiam1 Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factor-stimulated exchange factor activity in vitro. EHT 1864 therefore places Rac in an inert and inactive state, preventing its engagement with downstream effectors. Finally, we evaluated the ability of EHT 1864 to block Rac-dependent growth transformation, and we determined that EHT 1864 potently blocked transformation caused by constitutively activated Rac1, as well as Rac-dependent transformation caused by Tiam1 or Ras. Taken together, our results suggest that EHT 1864 selectively inhibits Rac downstream signaling and transformation by a novel mechanism involving guanine nucleotide displacement.

  11. Analyzing the roles of Rho GTPases in cancer cell migration with a live cell imaging 3D-morphology-based assay.

    PubMed

    Colomba, Audrey; Ridley, Anne J

    2014-01-01

    Rho GTPases are master regulators of cytoskeleton dynamics and therefore regulate cell motility. Rho GTPases, as well as their regulators and effectors, are often deregulated in cancers and thus contribute to tumor progression to metastasis. Cancer progression involves multiple steps, including invasion of the surrounding tissues. Several methods to investigate the invasion of tumors cells in 3D matrices in vitro have been developed. In this chapter we describe a 3D-based morphology assay that can be used for medium-throughput microscopy-based screening to identify regulators of cancer cell invasion. We use this method coupled to RNAi to investigate how Rho GTPases affect prostate cancer cell morphology in 3D Matrigel.

  12. NKX6.3 Is a Transcription Factor for Wnt/β-catenin and Rho-GTPase Signaling-Related Genes to Suppress Gastric Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung Hwan; Eun, Jung Woo; Choi, Won Suk; Kim, Olga; Nam, Suk Woo; Lee, Jung Young; Park, Won Sang

    2016-07-01

    Despite ongoing research and recent progress, the prognosis for patients with advanced gastric cancer remains poor. Wnt/β-catenin and Rho-GTPase signaling pathways are known to play essential roles in malignant transformation and progression of various tumors, including gastric cancer. Here, we identify that NKX6 transcription factor, locus 3 (NKX6.3) binds directly to specific promoter regions of Wnt/β-catenin and Rho-GTPase pathway-related genes, resulting in inhibition of cancer cell migration and invasion. Additionally, we find that the expression level of NKX6.3 is involved in regulation of gastric cancer progression and expression of Wnt/β-catenin and Rho-GTPase pathway-related genes in clinical samples. These results suggest that NKX6.3 prevents EMT and cell migration, implying that NKX6.3 inactivation might be one of the key mechanisms of gastric cancer cell invasion and metastasis.

  13. Catalysis of GTP Hydrolysis by Small GTPases at Atomic Detail by Integration of X-ray Crystallography, Experimental, and Theoretical IR Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Rudack, Till; Jenrich, Sarah; Brucker, Sven; Vetter, Ingrid R.; Gerwert, Klaus; Kötting, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Small GTPases regulate key processes in cells. Malfunction of their GTPase reaction by mutations is involved in severe diseases. Here, we compare the GTPase reaction of the slower hydrolyzing GTPase Ran with Ras. By combination of time-resolved FTIR difference spectroscopy and QM/MM simulations we elucidate that the Mg2+ coordination by the phosphate groups, which varies largely among the x-ray structures, is the same for Ran and Ras. A new x-ray structure of a Ran·RanBD1 complex with improved resolution confirmed this finding and revealed a general problem with the refinement of Mg2+ in GTPases. The Mg2+ coordination is not responsible for the much slower GTPase reaction of Ran. Instead, the location of the Tyr-39 side chain of Ran between the γ-phosphate and Gln-69 prevents the optimal positioning of the attacking water molecule by the Gln-69 relative to the γ-phosphate. This is confirmed in the RanY39A·RanBD1 crystal structure. The QM/MM simulations provide IR spectra of the catalytic center, which agree very nicely with the experimental ones. The combination of both methods can correlate spectra with structure at atomic detail. For example the FTIR difference spectra of RasA18T and RanT25A mutants show that spectral differences are mainly due to the hydrogen bond of Thr-25 to the α-phosphate in Ran. By integration of x-ray structure analysis, experimental, and theoretical IR spectroscopy the catalytic center of the x-ray structural models are further refined to sub-Å resolution, allowing an improved understanding of catalysis. PMID:26272610

  14. Up-regulation of 8-oxo-dGTPase activity of MTH1 protein in the brain, testes and kidneys of mice exposed to (137)Cs gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Bialkowski, Karol; Szpila, Anna; Kasprzak, Kazimierz S

    2009-08-01

    Abstract Mammalian MTH1 protein is an antimutagenic (2'-deoxy)ribonucleoside 5'-triphosphate pyrophosphohydrolase that prevents the incorporation of oxidatively modified nucleotides into nucleic acids. It decomposes most specifically the miscoding products of oxidative damage to purine nucleic acid precursors (e.g. 8-oxo-dGTP, 2-oxo-dATP, 2-oxo-ATP, 8-oxo-GTP) that may cause point mutations or transcription errors when incorporated into DNA and RNA, respectively. The increased expression of MTH1 mRNA and MTH1 protein was previously proposed as a molecular marker of oxidative stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that increased 8-oxo-dGTPase activity of MTH1 protein in mouse organs could serve as a dose-dependent marker of exposure to ionizing radiation, which is known to induce oxidative stress. To test our hypothesis, we measured 8-oxo-dGTPase activity in six organs of male BL6 mice after exposure to 0, 10, 25 and 50 cGy and 1 Gy of (137)Cs gamma radiation given as a single whole-body dose (1 Gy/min). The mice were killed 4, 8 and 24 h after irradiation. A statistically significant induction of 8-oxo-dGTPase was found in brains, testes and kidneys but not in lungs, hearts or livers. Brains, which demonstrated the highest (4.3-fold) increase of 8-oxo-dGTPase activity, were shown to express approximately 50% higher levels of MTH1 protein. However, due to the lack of a simple positive correlation between the dose and the observed 8-oxo-dGTPase activity in brain, testes and kidneys, we conclude that measurements of 8-oxo-dGTPase activity in these organs may serve as a rough indicator rather than a quantifiable marker of radiation-induced oxidative stress.

  15. Catalysis of GTP hydrolysis by small GTPases at atomic detail by integration of X-ray crystallography, experimental, and theoretical IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rudack, Till; Jenrich, Sarah; Brucker, Sven; Vetter, Ingrid R; Gerwert, Klaus; Kötting, Carsten

    2015-10-02

    Small GTPases regulate key processes in cells. Malfunction of their GTPase reaction by mutations is involved in severe diseases. Here, we compare the GTPase reaction of the slower hydrolyzing GTPase Ran with Ras. By combination of time-resolved FTIR difference spectroscopy and QM/MM simulations we elucidate that the Mg(2+) coordination by the phosphate groups, which varies largely among the x-ray structures, is the same for Ran and Ras. A new x-ray structure of a Ran·RanBD1 complex with improved resolution confirmed this finding and revealed a general problem with the refinement of Mg(2+) in GTPases. The Mg(2+) coordination is not responsible for the much slower GTPase reaction of Ran. Instead, the location of the Tyr-39 side chain of Ran between the γ-phosphate and Gln-69 prevents the optimal positioning of the attacking water molecule by the Gln-69 relative to the γ-phosphate. This is confirmed in the RanY39A·RanBD1 crystal structure. The QM/MM simulations provide IR spectra of the catalytic center, which agree very nicely with the experimental ones. The combination of both methods can correlate spectra with structure at atomic detail. For example the FTIR difference spectra of RasA18T and RanT25A mutants show that spectral differences are mainly due to the hydrogen bond of Thr-25 to the α-phosphate in Ran. By integration of x-ray structure analysis, experimental, and theoretical IR spectroscopy the catalytic center of the x-ray structural models are further refined to sub-Å resolution, allowing an improved understanding of catalysis.

  16. Effect of the Secretory Small GTPase Rab27B on Breast Cancer Growth, Invasion, and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Hendrix, An; Maynard, Dawn; Pauwels, Patrick; Braems, Geert; Denys, Hannelore; Van den Broecke, Rudy; Lambert, Jo; Van Belle, Simon; Cocquyt, Veronique; Gespach, Christian; Bracke, Marc; Seabra, Miguel C.; Gahl, William A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Secretory GTPases like Rab27B control vesicle exocytosis and deliver critical proinvasive growth regulators into the tumor microenvironment. The expression and role of Rab27B in breast cancer were unknown. Methods Expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused with wild-type Rab3D, Rab27A, or Rab27B, or Rab27B point mutants defective in GTP/GDP binding or geranylgeranylation, or transient silencing RNA to the same proteins was used to study Rab27B in estrogen receptor (ER)–positive human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, and ZR75.1). Cell cycle progression was evaluated by flow cytometry, western blotting, and measurement of cell proliferation rates, and invasion was assessed using Matrigel and native type I collagen substrates. Orthotopic tumor growth, local invasion, and metastasis were analyzed in mouse xenograft models. Mass spectrometry identified proinvasive growth regulators that were secreted in the presence of Rab27B. Rab27B protein levels were evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 59 clinical breast cancer specimens, and Rab3D, Rab27A, and Rab27B mRNA levels were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in 20 specimens. Statistical tests were two-sided. Results Increased expression of Rab27B promoted G1 to S phase cell cycle transition, proliferation and invasiveness of cells in culture, and invasive tumor growth and hemorrhagic ascites production in a xenograft mouse model (n = 10; at 10 weeks, survival of MCF-7 GFP- vs GFP-Rab27B–injected mice was 100% vs 62.5%, hazard ratio = 0.26, 95% confidence interval = 0.08 to 0.88, P = .03). Mass spectrometric analysis of purified Rab27B-secretory vesicles identified heat-shock protein 90α as key proinvasive growth regulator. Heat-shock protein 90α secretion was Rab27B-dependent and was required for matrix metalloproteinase-2 activation. All Rab27B-mediated functional responses were GTP- and geranylgeranyl-dependent. Presence of endogenous Rab27B mRNA and protein, but

  17. Free energy simulations of a GTPase: GTP and GDP binding to archaeal initiation factor 2.

    PubMed

    Satpati, Priyadarshi; Clavaguéra, Carine; Ohanessian, Gilles; Simonson, Thomas

    2011-05-26

    Archaeal initiation factor 2 (aIF2) is a protein involved in the initiation of protein biosynthesis. In its GTP-bound, "ON" conformation, aIF2 binds an initiator tRNA and carries it to the ribosome. In its GDP-bound, "OFF" conformation, it dissociates from tRNA. To understand the specific binding of GTP and GDP and its dependence on the ON or OFF conformational state of aIF2, molecular dynamics free energy simulations (MDFE) are a tool of choice. However, the validity of the computed free energies depends on the simulation model, including the force field and the boundary conditions, and on the extent of conformational sampling in the simulations. aIF2 and other GTPases present specific difficulties; in particular, the nucleotide ligand coordinates a divalent Mg(2+) ion, which can polarize the electronic distribution of its environment. Thus, a force field with an explicit treatment of electronic polarizability could be necessary, rather than a simpler, fixed charge force field. Here, we begin by comparing a fixed charge force field to quantum chemical calculations and experiment for Mg(2+):phosphate binding in solution, with the force field giving large errors. Next, we consider GTP and GDP bound to aIF2 and we compare two fixed charge force fields to the recent, polarizable, AMOEBA force field, extended here in a simple, approximate manner to include GTP. We focus on a quantity that approximates the free energy to change GTP into GDP. Despite the errors seen for Mg(2+):phosphate binding in solution, we observe a substantial cancellation of errors when we compare the free energy change in the protein to that in solution, or when we compare the protein ON and OFF states. Finally, we have used the fixed charge force field to perform MDFE simulations and alchemically transform GTP into GDP in the protein and in solution. With a total of about 200 ns of molecular dynamics, we obtain good convergence and a reasonable statistical uncertainty, comparable to the force

  18. Prenylation of Rab8 GTPase by type I and type II geranylgeranyl transferases.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, A L; Erdman, R A; Castellano, F; Maltese, W A

    1998-01-01

    Rab GTPases are post-translationally modified by addition of geranylgeranyl moieties to carboxyl-terminal cysteine residues. For Rab proteins ending with xxCC xCxC and CCxx motifs this modification is catalysed by geranylgeranyltransferase type II (GGTaseII), and is entirely dependent on the Rab substrate being bound to Rab escort protein (REP). Several Rab proteins contain carboxyl-terminal CaaL prenylation motifs typical of members of the Rho family, which are modified in a REP-independent manner by geranylgeranyltransferase type I (GGTaseI). The present studies show that one such Rab protein (Rab8), which ends with a CVLL motif, is uniquely able to serve as a substrate for either REP/GGTaseII or GGTaseI in cell-free assays. The modification of Rab8 by GGTaseI did not require REP, indicating that a REP-induced conformational change is not essential for exposure of the Rab carboxyl-terminal cysteine prenylation site. To determine whether one enzyme plays a predominant role in Rab8 prenylation in vivo, the incorporation of [3H]mevalonate into Rab8 was measured in human embryonal kidney 293 cells under conditions where the activity of GGTaseI, but not GGTaseII, was blocked by the peptidomimetic inhibitor GGTI-298. The GGTaseI inhibitor did not prevent prenylation of either overexpressed Myc-tagged Rab8 or endogenous Rab8, whereas prenylation of a known GGTaseI substrate with the same carboxyl-terminal motif, Cdc42Hs, was completely blocked. To rule out the possibility that the apparent prenylation of Rab8 by GGTaseII occurs only when GGTaseI activity is eliminated, metabolic labelling studies were carried out in the absence of the GGTaseI inhibitor, using a REP-binding-deficient Rab8 construct (Y78D) that cannot serve as a substrate for GGTaseII, but is indistinguishable from wild-type Rab8 as a substrate for GGTaseI. Prenylation of the Y78D mutant was reduced by 60-70% in intact cells, consistent with the conclusion that the majority of Rab8 is prenylated by the

  19. Transcriptome analysis reveals specific modulation of abscisic acid signaling by ROP10 small GTPase in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xin, Zeyu; Zhao, Yihong; Zheng, Zhi-Liang

    2005-11-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a hormone that modulates a variety of agronomically important growth and developmental processes and various stresses responses, but its signal transduction pathways remain poorly understood. ROP10, a member of ROP small GTPases in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), is a plasma membrane-associated protein specifically involved in negative regulation of ABA responses. To dissect the ROP10-mediated ABA signaling, we carried out transcriptome analysis using the Arabidopsis full-genome chip. Our analysis revealed a total of 262 and 125 genes that were, respectively, up- and down-regulated (> or =2-fold cutoff) by 1 mum ABA in wild type (Wassilewskija [Ws]); 42 up-regulated and 38 down-regulated genes have not been identified in other studies. Consistent with the nonpleiotropic phenotypes of rop10-1, only three genes were altered in rop10-1 in the absence of ABA treatment. In response to 1 microm ABA, 341 and 127 genes were, respectively, activated and repressed in rop10-1. Interestingly, a particular subset of 21 genes that were not altered by 1 microm ABA in Ws but only activated in rop10-1 was identified. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed the existence of three distinct categories of ABA dose-response patterns. One novel category is characterized by their ABA unresponsiveness in Ws and activation in rop10-1 at 1 microm but not 10 and 100 microm of ABA. This indicates that ROP10 gates the expression of genes that are specific to low concentrations of ABA. Furthermore, almost all of these 21 genes are known to be highly induced by various biotic and abiotic stresses. Consequently, we found that rop10-1 enhanced the sensitivity of seed germination inhibition to mannitol and sodium chloride. Our results suggest that ROP10 negatively regulates ABA responses by specifically and differentially modulating the ABA sensitivity of a subset of genes including protein kinases and zinc-finger family proteins.

  20. Characterization of RAB-like4, the first identified RAB-like protein from Trypanosoma cruzi with GTPase activity.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Fabiane Pereira; Araripe, Júlia Rolão; Urményi, Turán Péter; Silva, Rosane; Cunha e Silva, Narcisa Leal; Leite Fontes, Carlos Frederico; da Silveira, José Franco; Rondinelli, Edson

    2005-08-05

    RAB proteins, which belong to the RAS superfamily, regulate exocytic and endocytic pathways of eukaryotic cells, controlling vesicle docking and fusion. Few RAB proteins have been identified in parasites. Molecular markers for cellular compartments are important to studies concerning about the protein traffic in Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas disease. In this work, we describe the characterization of TcRABL4, the first RAB-like gene identified in T. cruzi (GenBank Accession No.: ), present as a single-copy gene. TcRABL4 contains all five consensus RAB motifs but lacks cysteine residues at the C terminus, which are essential to isoprenylation, an absolute prerequisite for membrane association of these proteins. TcRABL4 is a functional GTPase that is able to bind and hydrolyze GTP, and its gene is transcribed as a single 1.2 kb mRNA in epimastigotes. TcRABL4 appears to be differentially regulated in the three cell forms of the parasite, and the protein is not associated to membranes, unlike other RAB proteins. It is possible that TcRABL4 may be a member of a novel family of small GTPases.

  1. Activation of Rho GTPases by Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 Induces Macropinocytosis and Scavenging Activity in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentini, Carla; Falzano, Loredana; Fabbri, Alessia; Stringaro, Annarita; Logozzi, Mariaantonia; Travaglione, Sara; Contamin, Stéphanette; Arancia, Giuseppe; Malorni, Walter; Fais, Stefano

    2001-01-01

    Macropinocytosis, a ruffling-driven process that allows the capture of large material, is an essential aspect of normal cell function. It can be either constitutive, as in professional phagocytes where it ends with the digestion of captured material, or induced, as in epithelial cells stimulated by growth factors. In this case, the internalized material recycles back to the cell surface. We herein show that activation of Rho GTPases by a bacterial protein toxin, the Escherichia coli cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1), allowed epithelial cells to engulf and digest apoptotic cells in a manner similar to that of professional phagocytes. In particular, we have demonstrated that 1) the activation of all Rho, Rac, and Cdc42 by CNF1 was essential for the capture and internalization of apoptotic cells; and 2) such activation allowed the discharge of macropinosomal content into Rab7 and lysosomal associated membrane protein-1 acidic lysosomal vesicles where the ingested particles underwent degradation. Taken together, these findings indicate that CNF1-induced “switching on” of Rho GTPases may induce in epithelial cells a scavenging activity, comparable to that exerted by professional phagocytes. The activation of such activity in epithelial cells may be relevant, in mucosal tissues, in supporting or integrating the scavenging activity of resident macrophages. PMID:11452003

  2. The immunity-related GTPases in mammals: a fast-evolving cell-autonomous resistance system against intracellular pathogens.

    PubMed

    Hunn, Julia P; Feng, Carl G; Sher, Alan; Howard, Jonathan C

    2011-02-01

    The immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) belong to the family of large, interferon-inducible GTPases and constitute a cell-autonomous resistance system essential for the control of vacuolar pathogens like Toxoplasma gondii in mice. Recent results demonstrated that numerous IRG members accumulate collaboratively at the parasitophorous vacuole of invading T. gondii leading to the destruction of the vacuole and the parasite and subsequent necrotic host cell death. Complex regulatory interactions between different IRG proteins are necessary for these processes. Disturbance of this finely balanced system, e.g., by single genetic deficiency for the important negative regulator Irgm1 or the autophagic regulator Atg5, leads to spontaneous activation of the effector IRG proteins when induced by IFNγ. This activation has cytotoxic consequences resulting in a severe lymphopenia, macrophage defects, and failure of the adaptive immune system in Irgm1-deficient mice. However, alternative functions in phagosome maturation and induction of autophagy have been proposed for Irgm1. The IRG system has been studied primarily in mice, but IRG genes are present throughout the mammalian lineage. Interestingly, the number, type, and diversity of genes present differ greatly even between closely related species, probably reflecting intimate host-pathogen coevolution driven by an armed race between the IRG resistance proteins and pathogen virulence factors. IRG proteins are targets for polymorphic T. gondii virulence factors, and genetic variation in the IRG system between different mouse strains correlates with resistance and susceptibility to virulent T. gondii strains.

  3. eNOS-derived nitric oxide regulates endothelial barrier function through VE-cadherin and Rho GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Annarita; Lin, Michelle I.; Murata, Takahisa; Landskroner-Eiger, Shira; Schleicher, Michael; Kothiya, Milankumar; Iwakiri, Yasuko; Yu, Jun; Huang, Paul L.; Sessa, William C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Transient disruption of endothelial adherens junctions and cytoskeletal remodeling are responsible for increases in vascular permeability induced by inflammatory stimuli and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Nitric oxide (NO) produced by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) is crucial for VEGF-induced changes in permeability in vivo; however, the molecular mechanism by which endogenous NO modulates endothelial permeability is not clear. Here, we show that the lack of eNOS reduces VEGF-induced permeability, an effect mediated by enhanced activation of the Rac GTPase and stabilization of cortical actin. The loss of NO increased the recruitment of the Rac guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor (GEF) TIAM1 to adherens junctions and VE-cadherin (also known as cadherin 5), and reduced Rho activation and stress fiber formation. In addition, NO deficiency reduced VEGF-induced VE-cadherin phosphorylation and impaired the localization, but not the activation, of c-Src to cell junctions. The physiological role of eNOS activation is clear given that VEGF-, histamine- and inflammation-induced vascular permeability is reduced in mice bearing a non-phosphorylatable knock-in mutation of the key eNOS phosphorylation site S1176. Thus, NO is crucial for Rho GTPase-dependent regulation of cytoskeletal architecture leading to reversible changes in vascular permeability. PMID:24046447

  4. The HOPS/class C Vps complex tethers membranes by binding to one Rab GTPase in each apposed membrane.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ruoya; Stroupe, Christopher

    2015-07-15

    Many Rab GTPase effectors are membrane-tethering factors, that is, they physically link two apposed membranes before intracellular membrane fusion. In this study, we investigate the distinct binding factors needed on apposed membranes for Rab effector-dependent tethering. We show that the homotypic fusion and protein-sorting/class C vacuole protein-sorting (HOPS/class C Vps) complex can tether low-curvature membranes, that is, liposomes with a diameter of ∼100 nm, only when the yeast vacuolar Rab GTPase Ypt7p is present in both tethered membranes. When HOPS is phosphorylated by the vacuolar casein kinase I, Yck3p, tethering only takes place when GTP-bound Ypt7p is present in both tethered membranes. When HOPS is not phosphorylated, however, its tethering activity shows little specificity for the nucleotide-binding state of Ypt7p. These results suggest a model for HOPS-mediated tethering in which HOPS tethers membranes by binding to Ypt7p in each of the two tethered membranes. Moreover, because vacuole-associated HOPS is presumably phosphorylated by Yck3p, our results suggest that nucleotide exchange of Ypt7p on multivesicular bodies (MVBs)/late endosomes must take place before HOPS can mediate tethering at vacuoles.

  5. Regulation of the polarization of T cells toward antigen-presenting cells by Ras-related GTPase CDC42.

    PubMed Central

    Stowers, L; Yelon, D; Berg, L J; Chant, J

    1995-01-01

    The mechanisms by which cells rapidly polarize in the direction of external signals are not understood. Helper T cells, when contacted by an antigen-presenting cell, polarize their cytoskeletons toward the antigen-presenting cell within minutes. Here we show that, in T cells, the mammalian Ras-related GTPase CDC42 (the homologue of yeast CDC42, a protein involved in budding polarity) can regulate the polarization of both actin and microtubules toward antigen-presenting cells but is not involved in other T-cell signaling processes such as those which culminate in interleukin 2 production. Although T-cell polarization appears dispensable for signaling leading to interleukin 2 production, polarization may direct lymphokine secretion towards the correct antigen-presenting cell in a crowded cellular environment. Inhibitor experiments suggest that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase is required for cytoskeletal polarization but that calcineurin activity, known to be important for other aspects of signaling, is not. Apparent conservation of CDC42 function between yeast and T cells suggests that this GTPase is a general regulator of cytoskeletal polarity in many cell types. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7761442

  6. The heterotrimeric G protein α subunit acts upstream of the small GTPase Rac in disease resistance of rice

    PubMed Central

    Suharsono, Utut; Fujisawa, Yukiko; Kawasaki, Tsutomu; Iwasaki, Yukimoto; Satoh, Hikaru; Shimamoto, Ko

    2002-01-01

    We used rice dwarf1 (d1) mutants lacking a single-copy Gα gene and addressed Gα's role in disease resistance. d1 mutants exhibited a highly reduced hypersensitive response to infection by an avirulent race of rice blast. Activation of PR gene expression in the leaves of the mutants infected with rice blast was delayed for 24 h relative to the wild type. H2O2 production and PR gene expression induced by sphingolipid elicitors (SE) were strongly suppressed in d1 cell cultures. Expression of the constitutively active OsRac1, a small GTPase Rac of rice, in d1 mutants restored SE-dependent defense signaling and resistance to rice blast. Gα mRNA was induced by an avirulent race of rice blast and SE application on the leaf. These results indicated the role of Gα in R gene-mediated disease resistance of rice. We have proposed a model for the defense signaling of rice in which the heterotrimeric G protein functions upstream of the small GTPase OsRac1 in the early steps of signaling. PMID:12237405

  7. Molecular recognition of an ADP-ribosylating Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme by RalA GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Holbourn, Kenneth P.; Sutton, J. Mark; Evans, Hazel R.; Shone, Clifford C.; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2005-01-01

    C3 exoenzymes (members of the ADP-ribosyltranferase family) are produced by Clostridium botulinum (C3bot1 and -2), Clostridium limosum (C3lim), Bacillus cereus (C3cer), and Staphylococcus aureus (C3stau1–3). These exoenzymes lack a translocation domain but are known to specifically inactivate Rho GTPases in host target cells. Here, we report the crystal structure of C3bot1 in complex with RalA (a GTPase of the Ras subfamily) and GDP at a resolution of 2.66 Å. RalA is not ADP-ribosylated by C3 exoenzymes but inhibits ADP-ribosylation of RhoA by C3bot1, C3lim, and C3cer to different extents. The structure provides an insight into the molecular interactions between C3bot1 and RalA involving the catalytic ADP-ribosylating turn–turn (ARTT) loop from C3bot1 and helix α4 and strand β6 (which are not part of the GDP-binding pocket) from RalA. The structure also suggests a molecular explanation for the different levels of C3-exoenzyme inhibition by RalA and why RhoA does not bind C3bot1 in this manner. PMID:15809419

  8. Molecular recognition of an ADP-ribosylating Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme by RalA GTPase.

    PubMed

    Holbourn, Kenneth P; Sutton, J Mark; Evans, Hazel R; Shone, Clifford C; Acharya, K Ravi

    2005-04-12

    C3 exoenzymes (members of the ADP-ribosyltranferase family) are produced by Clostridium botulinum (C3bot1 and -2), Clostridium limosum (C3lim), Bacillus cereus (C3cer), and Staphylococcus aureus (C3stau1-3). These exoenzymes lack a translocation domain but are known to specifically inactivate Rho GTPases in host target cells. Here, we report the crystal structure of C3bot1 in complex with RalA (a GTPase of the Ras subfamily) and GDP at a resolution of 2.66 A. RalA is not ADP-ribosylated by C3 exoenzymes but inhibits ADP-ribosylation of RhoA by C3bot1, C3lim, and C3cer to different extents. The structure provides an insight into the molecular interactions between C3bot1 and RalA involving the catalytic ADP-ribosylating turn-turn (ARTT) loop from C3bot1 and helix alpha4 and strand beta6 (which are not part of the GDP-binding pocket) from RalA. The structure also suggests a molecular explanation for the different levels of C3-exoenzyme inhibition by RalA and why RhoA does not bind C3bot1 in this manner.

  9. Rab GTPases and the Autophagy Pathway: Bacterial Targets for a Suitable Biogenesis and Trafficking of Their Own Vacuoles

    PubMed Central

    López de Armentia, María Milagros; Amaya, Celina; Colombo, María Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular process that comprises degradation of damaged organelles, protein aggregates and intracellular pathogens, having an important role in controlling the fate of invading microorganisms. Intracellular pathogens are internalized by professional and non-professional phagocytes, localizing in compartments called phagosomes. To degrade the internalized microorganism, the microbial phagosome matures by fusion events with early and late endosomal compartments and lysosomes, a process that is regulated by Rab GTPases. Interestingly, in order to survive and replicate in the phagosome, some pathogens employ different strategies to manipulate vesicular traffic, inhibiting phagolysosomal biogenesis (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis) or surviving in acidic compartments and forming replicative vacuoles (e.g., Coxiella burnetti and Legionella pneumophila). The bacteria described in this review often use secretion systems to control the host’s response and thus disseminate. To date, eight types of secretion systems (Type I to Type VIII) are known. Some of these systems are used by bacteria to translocate pathogenic proteins into the host cell and regulate replicative vacuole formation, apoptosis, cytokine responses, and autophagy. Herein, we have focused on how bacteria manipulate small Rab GTPases to control many of these processes. The growing knowledge in this field may facilitate the development of new treatments or contribute to the prevention of these types of bacterial infections. PMID:27005665

  10. A Large Scale Huntingtin Protein Interaction Network Implicates Rho GTPase Signaling Pathways in Huntington Disease*♦

    PubMed Central

    Tourette, Cendrine; Li, Biao; Bell, Russell; O'Hare, Shannon; Kaltenbach, Linda S.; Mooney, Sean D.; Hughes, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by a CAG expansion in the HTT gene. Using yeast two-hybrid methods, we identified a large set of proteins that interact with huntingtin (HTT)-interacting proteins. This network, composed of HTT-interacting proteins (HIPs) and proteins interacting with these primary nodes, contains 3235 interactions among 2141 highly interconnected proteins. Analysis of functional annotations of these proteins indicates that primary and secondary HIPs are enriched in pathways implicated in HD, including mammalian target of rapamycin, Rho GTPase signaling, and oxidative stress response. To validate roles for HIPs in mutant HTT toxicity, we show that the Rho GTPase signaling components, BAIAP2, EZR, PIK3R1, PAK2, and RAC1, are modifiers of mutant HTT toxicity. We also demonstrate that Htt co-localizes with BAIAP2 in filopodia and that mutant HTT interferes with filopodial dynamics. These data indicate that HTT is involved directly in membrane dynamics, cell attachment, and motility. Furthermore, they implicate dysregulation in these pathways as pathological mechanisms in HD. PMID:24407293

  11. The immunity-related GTPases in mammals: a fast-evolving cell-autonomous resistance system against intracellular pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Hunn, Julia P.; Feng, Carl G.; Sher, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) belong to the family of large, interferon-inducible GTPases and constitute a cell-autonomous resistance system essential for the control of vacuolar pathogens like Toxoplasma gondii in mice. Recent results demonstrated that numerous IRG members accumulate collaboratively at the parasitophorous vacuole of invading T. gondii leading to the destruction of the vacuole and the parasite and subsequent necrotic host cell death. Complex regulatory interactions between different IRG proteins are necessary for these processes. Disturbance of this finely balanced system, e.g., by single genetic deficiency for the important negative regulator Irgm1 or the autophagic regulator Atg5, leads to spontaneous activation of the effector IRG proteins when induced by IFNγ. This activation has cytotoxic consequences resulting in a severe lymphopenia, macrophage defects, and failure of the adaptive immune system in Irgm1-deficient mice. However, alternative functions in phagosome maturation and induction of autophagy have been proposed for Irgm1. The IRG system has been studied primarily in mice, but IRG genes are present throughout the mammalian lineage. Interestingly, the number, type, and diversity of genes present differ greatly even between closely related species, probably reflecting intimate host-pathogen coevolution driven by an armed race between the IRG resistance proteins and pathogen virulence factors. IRG proteins are targets for polymorphic T. gondii virulence factors, and genetic variation in the IRG system between different mouse strains correlates with resistance and susceptibility to virulent T. gondii strains. PMID:21052678

  12. Coupling spindle position with mitotic exit in budding yeast: The multifaceted role of the small GTPase Tem1.

    PubMed

    Scarfone, Ilaria; Piatti, Simonetta

    2015-10-02

    The budding yeast S. cerevisiae divides asymmetrically and is an excellent model system for asymmetric cell division. As for other asymmetrically dividing cells, proper spindle positioning along the mother-daughter polarity axis is crucial for balanced chromosome segregation. Thus, a surveillance mechanism named Spindle Position Checkpoint (SPOC) inhibits mitotic exit and cytokinesis until the mitotic spindle is properly oriented, thereby preventing the generation of cells with aberrant ploidies. The small GTPase Tem1 is required to trigger a Hippo-like protein kinase cascade, named Mitotic Exit Network (MEN), that is essential for mitotic exit and cytokinesis but also contributes to correct spindle alignment in metaphase. Importantly, Tem1 is the target of the SPOC, which relies on the activity of the GTPase-activating complex (GAP) Bub2-Bfa1 to keep Tem1 in the GDP-bound inactive form. Tem1 forms a hetero-trimeric complex with Bub2-Bfa1 at spindle poles (SPBs) that accumulates asymmetrically on the bud-directed spindle pole during mitosis when the spindle is properly positioned. In contrast, the complex remains symmetrically localized on both poles of misaligned spindles. We have recently shown that Tem1 residence at SPBs depends on its nucleotide state and, importantly, asymmetry of the Bub2-Bfa1-Tem1 complex does not promote mitotic exit but rather controls spindle positioning.

  13. Coupling spindle position with mitotic exit in budding yeast: The multifaceted role of the small GTPase Tem1

    PubMed Central

    Scarfone, Ilaria; Piatti, Simonetta

    2015-01-01

    The budding yeast S. cerevisiae divides asymmetrically and is an excellent model system for asymmetric cell division. As for other asymmetrically dividing cells, proper spindle positioning along the mother-daughter polarity axis is crucial for balanced chromosome segregation. Thus, a surveillance mechanism named Spindle Position Checkpoint (SPOC) inhibits mitotic exit and cytokinesis until the mitotic spindle is properly oriented, thereby preventing the generation of cells with aberrant ploidies. The small GTPase Tem1 is required to trigger a Hippo-like protein kinase cascade, named Mitotic Exit Network (MEN), that is essential for mitotic exit and cytokinesis but also contributes to correct spindle alignment in metaphase. Importantly, Tem1 is the target of the SPOC, which relies on the activity of the GTPase-activating complex (GAP) Bub2-Bfa1 to keep Tem1 in the GDP-bound inactive form. Tem1 forms a hetero-trimeric complex with Bub2-Bfa1 at spindle poles (SPBs) that accumulates asymmetrically on the bud-directed spindle pole during mitosis when the spindle is properly positioned. In contrast, the complex remains symmetrically localized on both poles of misaligned spindles. We have recently shown that Tem1 residence at SPBs depends on its nucleotide state and, importantly, asymmetry of the Bub2-Bfa1-Tem1 complex does not promote mitotic exit but rather controls spindle positioning. PMID:26507466

  14. ROLE OF CHIMAERINS, A GROUP OF Rac-SPECIFIC GTPase ACTIVATING PROTEINS, IN T-CELL RECEPTOR SIGNALING

    PubMed Central

    Caloca, María José; Delgado, Pilar; Alarcón, Balbino; Bustelo, Xosé R.

    2008-01-01

    Chimaerins are GTPase-activating proteins that inactivate the GTP-hydrolase Rac1 in a diacylglycerol-dependent manner. To date, the study of chimaerins has been done mostly in neuronal cells. Here, we show that α2- and β2-chimaerin are expressed at different levels in T-cells and that they participate in T-cell receptor signaling. In agreement with this, we have observed that α2- and β2-chimaerins translocate to the T-cell/B-cell immune synapse and, using both gain- and loss-of-function approaches, demonstrated that their catalytic activity is important for the inhibition of the T-cell receptor- and Vav1-dependent stimulation of the transcriptional factor NF-AT. Mutagenesis-based approaches have revealed the molecular determinants that contribute to the biological program of chimaerins during T-cell responses. Unexpectedly, we have found that the translocation of chimaerins to the T-cell/B-cell immune synapse does not rely on the canonical binding of diacylglycerol to the C1 region of these GTPase-activating proteins. Taken together, these results identify chimaerins as candidates for the downmodulation of Rac1 in T-lymphocytes and, in addition, uncover a novel regulatory mechanism that mediates their activation in T-cells. PMID:18249095

  15. Enzymatic actions of Pasteurella multocida toxin detected by monoclonal antibodies recognizing the deamidated α subunit of the heterotrimeric GTPase Gq.

    PubMed

    Kamitani, Shigeki; Ao, Shinpei; Toshima, Hirono; Tachibana, Taro; Hashimoto, Makiko; Kitadokoro, Kengo; Fukui-Miyazaki, Aya; Abe, Hiroyuki; Horiguchi, Yasuhiko

    2011-08-01

    Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) is a virulence factor responsible for the pathogenesis of some Pasteurellosis. PMT exerts its toxic effects through the activation of heterotrimeric GTPase (G(q), G(12/13) and G(i))-dependent pathways, by deamidating a glutamine residue in the α subunit of these GTPases. However, the enzymatic characteristics of PMT are yet to be analyzed in detail because the deamidation has only been observed in cell-based assays. In the present study, we developed rat monoclonal antibodies, specifically recognizing the deamidated Gα(q), to detect the actions of PMT by immunological techniques such as western blotting. Using the monoclonal antibodies, we found that the toxin deamidated Gα(q) only under reducing conditions. The C-terminal region of PMT, C-PMT, was more active than the full-length PMT. The C3 domain possessing the enzyme core catalyzed the deamidation in vitro without any other domains. These results not only support previous observations on toxicity, but also provide insights into the enzymatic nature of PMT. In addition, we present several lines of evidence that Gα(11), as well as Gα(q), could be a substrate for PMT.

  16. Myosin II directly binds and inhibits Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors: a possible link to Rho family GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chan-Soo; Choi, Chang-Ki; Schwartz, Martin Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Cell migration requires the coordinated spatiotemporal regulation of actomyosin contraction and cell protrusion/adhesion. Nonmuscle myosin II (MII) controls Rac1 and Cdc42 activation, and cell protrusion and focal complex formation in migrating cells. However, these mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that MII interacts specifically with multiple Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Binding is mediated by the conserved tandem Dbl homology–pleckstrin homology module, the catalytic site of these GEFs, with dissociation constants of ∼0.3 µM. Binding to the GEFs required assembly of the MII into filaments and actin-stimulated ATPase activity. Binding of MII suppressed GEF activity. Accordingly, inhibition of MII ATPase activity caused release of GEFs and activation of Rho GTPases. Depletion of βPIX GEF in migrating NIH3T3 fibroblasts suppressed lamellipodial protrusions and focal complex formation induced by MII inhibition. The results elucidate a functional link between MII and Rac1/Cdc42 GTPases, which may regulate protrusion/adhesion dynamics in migrating cells. PMID:20713598

  17. Mitochondrial association, protein phosphorylation, and degradation regulate the availability of the active Rab GTPase Ypt11 for mitochondrial inheritance.

    PubMed

    Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Macfarlane, Jane; Shaw, Janet M

    2013-04-01

    The Rab GTPase Ypt11 is a Myo2-binding protein implicated in mother-to-bud transport of the cortical endoplasmic reticulum (ER), late Golgi, and mitochondria during yeast division. However, its reported subcellular localization does not reflect all of these functions. Here we show that Ypt11 is normally a low-abundance protein whose ER localization is only detected when the protein is highly overexpressed. Although it has been suggested that ER-localized Ypt11 and ER-mitochondrial contact sites might mediate passive transport of mitochondria into the bud, we found that mitochondrial, but not ER, association is essential for Ypt11 function in mitochondrial inheritance. Our studies also reveal that Ypt11 function is regulated at multiple levels. In addition to membrane targeting and GTPase domain-dependent effector interactions, the abundance of active Ypt11 forms is controlled by phosphorylation status and degradation. We present a model that synthesizes these new features of Ypt11 function and regulation in mitochondrial inheritance.

  18. RhoGAP18B Isoforms Act on Distinct Rho-Family GTPases and Regulate Behavioral Responses to Alcohol via Cofilin

    PubMed Central

    Kalahasti, Geetha; Rodan, Aylin R.; Rothenfluh, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Responses to the effects of ethanol are highly conserved across organisms, with reduced responses to the sedating effects of ethanol being predictive of increased risk for human alcohol dependence. Previously, we described that regulators of actin dynamics, such as the Rho-family GTPases Rac1, Rho1, and Cdc42, alter Drosophila’s sensitivity to ethanol-induced sedation. The GTPase activating protein RhoGAP18B also affects sensitivity to ethanol. To better understand how different RhoGAP18B isoforms affect ethanol sedation, we examined them for their effects on cell shape, GTP-loading of Rho-family GTPase, activation of the actin-severing cofilin, and actin filamentation. Our results suggest that the RhoGAP18B-PA isoform acts on Cdc42, while PC and PD act via Rac1 and Rho1 to activate cofilin. In vivo, a loss-of-function mutation in the cofilin-encoding gene twinstar leads to reduced ethanol-sensitivity and acts in concert with RhoGAP18B. Different RhoGAP18B isoforms, therefore, act on distinct subsets of Rho-family GTPases to modulate cofilin activity, actin dynamics, and ethanol-induced behaviors. PMID:26366560

  19. Iron-56 irradiation diminishes muscarinic but not {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenergic-stimulated low-K{sub m} GTPase in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Villalobos-Molina, R.; Joseph, J.A.; Rabin, B.M.; Kandasamy, S.B.; Dalton, T.K.; Roth, G.S.

    1994-12-01

    Initial findings from our laboratory have indicated that muscarinic enhancement of K{sup +}-evoked release of dopamine from perifused striatal slices is reduced after exposure to {sup 56}Fe-particle irradiation. This finding suggested that there is a radiation-induced deficit in muscarinic receptor sensitivity. Subsequent findings have indicated that at least part of the loss in sensitivity may occur as a result of alterations in the initial steps of the signal transduction process and involve muscarinic receptor-G protein coupling/uncoupling. The present study was carried out to localize this deficit further by determining carbachol-stimulated low-K{sub m} guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) activity in striatal and hippocampal tissue obtained from rats exposed to 0, 0.1 or 1.0 Gy of {sup 56}Fe-particle irradiation. In addition, to examine the specificity of the effect of {sup 56}Fe-particle irradiation, {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenergic-stimulated low-K{sub m} GTPase activity was also examined in these tissues. The results showed that there was a high degree of specificity in the effects of {sup 56}Fe particles. Decrements were observed in muscarinic-stimulated low-K{sub m} GTPase in striatum but not in hippocampus, and {sup 56}Fe-particle irradiation did not affect {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenergic low-K{sub m} GTPase activity in either brain tissue. 24 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Rga4 modulates the activity of the fission yeast cell integrity MAPK pathway by acting as a Rho2 GTPase-activating protein.

    PubMed

    Soto, Teresa; Villar-Tajadura, Maria Antonia; Madrid, Marisa; Vicente, Jero; Gacto, Mariano; Pérez, Pilar; Cansado, José

    2010-04-09

    Rho GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) are responsible for the inactivation of Rho GTPases, which are involved in the regulation of critical biological responses in eukaryotic cells, ranging from cell cycle control to cellular morphogenesis. The genome of fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe contains six genes coding for putative Rho GTPases, whereas nine genes code for predicted Rho GAPs (Rga1 to Rga9). One of them, Rga4, has been recently described as a Cdc42 GAP, involved in the control of cell diameter and symmetry in fission yeast. In this work we show that Rga4 is also a Rho2 GAP that negatively modulates the activity of the cell integrity pathway and its main effector, MAPK Pmk1. The DYRK-type protein kinase Pom1, which regulates both the localization and phosphorylation state of Rga4, is also a negative regulator of the Pmk1 pathway, but this control is not dependent upon the Rga4 role as a Rho2-GAP. Hence, two subsets of Rga4 negatively regulate Cdc42 and Rho2 functions in a specific and unrelated way. Finally, we show that Rga7, another Rho2 GAP, down-regulates the Pmk1 pathway in addition to Rga4. These results reinforce the notion of the existence of complex mechanisms determining the selectivity of Rho GAPs toward Rho GTPases and their functions.

  1. X-ray structure of the T. aquaticus FtsY:GDP complex suggests functional roles for the C-terminal helix of the SRP GTPases.

    PubMed

    Gawronski-Salerno, Joseph; Coon, John S; Focia, Pamela J; Freymann, Douglas M

    2007-03-01

    FtsY and Ffh are structurally similar prokaryotic Signal Recognition Particle GTPases that play an essential role in the Signal Recognition Particle (SRP)-mediated cotranslational targeting of proteins to the membrane. The two GTPases assemble in a GTP-dependent manner to form a heterodimeric SRP targeting complex. We report here the 2.1 A X-ray structure of FtsY from T. aquaticus bound to GDP. The structure of the monomeric protein reveals, unexpectedly, canonical binding interactions for GDP. A comparison of the structures of the monomeric and complexed FtsY NG GTPase domain suggests that it undergoes a conformational change similar to that of Ffh NG during the assembly of the symmetric heterodimeric complex. However, in contrast to Ffh, in which the C-terminal helix shifts independently of the other subdomains, the C-terminal helix and N domain of T. aquaticus FtsY together behave as a rigid body during assembly, suggesting distinct mechanisms by which the interactions of the NG domain "module" are regulated in the context of the two SRP GTPases.

  2. Cdc42 and Rac family GTPases regulate mode and speed but not direction of primary fibroblast migration during platelet-derived growth factor-dependent chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Monypenny, James; Zicha, Daniel; Higashida, Chiharu; Oceguera-Yanez, Fabian; Narumiya, Shuh; Watanabe, Naoki

    2009-05-01

    Cdc42 and Rac family GTPases are important regulators of morphology, motility, and polarity in a variety of mammalian cell types. However, comprehensive analysis of their roles in the morphological and behavioral aspects of chemotaxis within a single experimental system is still lacking. Here we demonstrate using a direct viewing chemotaxis assay that of all of the Cdc42/Rac1-related GTPases expressed in primary fibroblasts, Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoG are required for efficient migration towards platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). During migration, Cdc42-, Rac1-, and RhoG-deficient cells show aberrant morphology characterized as cell elongation and cell body rounding, loss of lamellipodia, and formation of thick membrane extensions, respectively. Analysis of individual cell trajectories reveals that cell speed is significantly reduced, as well as persistence, but to a smaller degree, while the directional response to the gradient of PDGF is not affected. Combined knockdown of Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoG results in greater inhibition of cell speed than when each protein is knocked down alone, but the cells are still capable of migrating toward PDGF. We conclude that, Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoG function cooperatively during cell migration and that, while each GTPase is implicated in the control of morphology and cell speed, these and other Cdc42/Rac-related GTPases are not essential for the directional response toward PDGF.

  3. Initiation factor 2 crystal structure reveals a different domain organization from eukaryotic initiation factor 5B and mechanism among translational GTPases.

    PubMed

    Eiler, Daniel; Lin, Jinzhong; Simonetti, Angelita; Klaholz, Bruno P; Steitz, Thomas A

    2013-09-24

    The initiation of protein synthesis uses initiation factor 2 (IF2) in prokaryotes and a related protein named eukaryotic initiation factor 5B (eIF5B) in eukaryotes. IF2 is a GTPase that positions the initiator tRNA on the 30S ribosomal initiation complex and stimulates its assembly to the 50S ribosomal subunit to make the 70S ribosome. The 3.1-Å resolution X-ray crystal structures of the full-length Thermus thermophilus apo IF2 and its complex with GDP presented here exhibit two different conformations (all of its domains except C2 domain are visible). Unlike all other translational GTPases, IF2 does not have an effecter domain that stably contacts the switch II region of the GTPase domain. The domain organization of IF2 is inconsistent with the "articulated lever" mechanism of communication between the GTPase and initiator tRNA binding domains that has been proposed for eIF5B. Previous cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions, NMR experiments, and this structure show that IF2 transitions from being flexible in solution to an extended conformation when interacting with ribosomal complexes.

  4. The nucleotide switch in Cdc42 modulates coupling between the GTPase-binding and allosteric equilibria of Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Daisy W.; Rosen, Michael K.

    2005-01-01

    The GTP/GDP nucleotide switch in Ras superfamily GTPases generally involves differential affinity toward downstream effectors, with the GTP-bound state having a higher affinity for effector than the GDP-bound state. We have developed a quantitative model of allosteric regulation of the Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) by the Rho GTPase Cdc42 to better understand how GTPase binding is coupled to effector activation. The model accurately predicts WASP affinity for Cdc42, activity toward Arp2/3 complex, and activation by Cdc42 as functions of a two-state allosteric equilibrium in WASP. The ratio of GTPase affinities for the inactive and active states of WASP is appreciably larger for Cdc42–GTP than for Cdc42–GDP. The greater ability to distinguish between the two states of WASP makes Cdc42–GTP a full WASP agonist, whereas Cdc42–GDP is only a partial agonist. Thus, the nucleotide switch controls not only the affinity of Cdc42 for its effector but also the efficiency of coupling between the Cdc42-binding and allosteric equilibria in WASP. This effect can ensure high fidelity and specificity in Cdc42 signaling in crowded membrane environments. PMID:15821030

  5. Common chaperone activity in the G-domain of trGTPase protects L11–L12 interaction on the ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dandan; Liu, Guangqiao; Xue, Jiaying; Lou, Jizhong; Nierhaus, Knud H.; Gong, Weimin; Qin, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Translational GTPases (trGTPases) regulate all phases of protein synthesis. An early event in the interaction of a trGTPase with the ribosome is the contact of the G-domain with the C-terminal domain (CTD) of ribosomal protein L12 (L12-CTD) and subsequently interacts with the N-terminal domain of L11 (L11-NTD). However, the structural and functional relationships between L12-CTD and L11-NTD remain unclear. Here, we performed mutagenesis, biochemical and structural studies to identify the interactions between L11-NTD and L12-CTD. Mutagenesis of conserved residues in the interaction site revealed their role in the docking of trGTPases. During docking, loop62 of L11-NTD protrudes into a cleft in L12-CTD, leading to an open conformation of this domain and exposure of hydrophobic core. This unfavorable situation for L12-CTD stability is resolved by a chaperone-like activity of the contacting G-domain. Our results suggest that all trGTPases—regardless of their different specific functions—use a common mechanism for stabilizing the L11-NTD•L12-CTD interactions. PMID:22965132

  6. RAC1 GTPase plays an important role in γ-irradiation induced G2/M checkpoint activation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In response to gamma-irradiation (IR)-induced double-strand DNA breaks, cells undergo cell-cycle arrest, allowing time for DNA repair before reentering the cell cycle. G2/M checkpoint activation involves activation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)/ATM- and rad3-related (ATR) kinases and inhibition of Cdc25 phosphatases, resulting in inhibition of Cdc2 kinase and subsequent G2/M cell-cycle arrest. Previous studies from our laboratory showed that the G2/M checkpoint activation after IR exposure of MCF-7 breast cancer cells is dependent on the activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) signaling. In the present studies, we investigated the role of Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) in IR-induced G2/M checkpoint response and ERK1/2 activation, as well as in cell survival after IR. Methods With Rac1-specific inhibitor, dominant negative mutant Rac1 (N17Rac1) and specific small interfering RNA, the effect of Rac1 on IR-induced G2/M checkpoint response and ERK1/2 activation was examined in human breast cancer cells. In addition, the effect of Rac1 on cell survival after irradiation was assessed by using Rac1-specific inhibitor. Results IR exposure of MCF-7 breast cancer cells was associated with a marked activation of Rac1 GTPase. Furthermore, inhibition of Rac1 by using specific inhibitor, dominant-negative Rac1 mutant, or specific siRNA resulted in attenuation of IR-induced G2/M arrest and concomitant diminution of IR-induced activation of ATM, ATR, Chk1, and Chk2 kinases, as well as phosphorylation of Cdc2-Tyr15. Moreover, Rac1 inhibition or decreased Rac1 expression also abrogated IR-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 and 2 (MEK1/2) and ERK1/2. Ultimately, inhibition of Rac1 markedly increased cellular sensitivity to IR exposure, which involves induction of apoptosis. Conclusion Studies in this report suggest that Rac1 GTPase plays an

  7. Rho family GTPase Rnd2 interacts and co-localizes with MgcRacGAP in male germ cells.

    PubMed

    Naud, Nathalie; Touré, Aminata; Liu, Jianfeng; Pineau, Charles; Morin, Laurence; Dorseuil, Olivier; Escalier, Denise; Chardin, Pierre; Gacon, Gérard

    2003-05-15

    The male-germ-cell Rac GTPase-activating protein gene (MgcRacGAP) was initially described as a human RhoGAP gene highly expressed in male germ cells at spermatocyte stage, but exhibits significant levels of expression in most cell types. In somatic cells, MgcRacGAP protein was found to both concentrate in the midzone/midbody and be required for cytokinesis. As a RhoGAP, MgcRacGAP has been proposed to down-regulate RhoA, which is localized to the cleavage furrow and midbody during cytokinesis. Due to embryonic lethality in MgcRacGAP -null mutant mice and to the lack of an in vitro model of spermatogenesis, nothing is known regarding the role and mode of action of MgcRacGAP in male germ cells. We have analysed the expression, subcellular localization and molecular interactions of MgcRacGAP in male germ cells. Whereas MgcRacGAP was found only in spermatocytes and early spermatids, the widespread RhoGTPases RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 (which are, to various extents, in vitro substrates for MgcRacGAP activity) were, surprisingly, not detected at these stages. In contrast, Rnd2, a Rho family GTPase-deficient G-protein was found to be co-expressed with MgcRacGAP in spermatocytes and spermatids. MgcRacGAP was detected in the midzone of meiotic cells, but also, unexpectedly, in the Golgi-derived pro-acrosomal vesicle, co-localizing with Rnd2. In addition, a stable Rnd2-MgcRacGAP molecular complex could be evidenced by glutathione S-transferase pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation experiments. We conclude that Rnd2 is a probable physiological partner of MgcRacGAP in male germ cells and we propose that MgcRacGAP, and, quite possibly, other RhoGAPs, may participate in signalling pathways involving Rnd family proteins.

  8. A Putative Non-Canonical Ras-Like GTPase from P. falciparum: Chemical Properties and Characterization of the Protein

    PubMed Central

    Przyborski, Jude; Kersting, David; Krüger, Mirko

    2015-01-01

    During its development the malaria parasite P. falciparum has to adapt to various different environmental contexts. Key cellular mechanisms involving G-protein coupled signal transduction chains are assumed to act at these interfaces. Heterotrimeric G-proteins are absent in Plasmodium. We here describe the first cloning and expression of a putative, non-canonical Ras-like G protein (acronym PfG) from Plasmodium. PfG reveals an open reading frame of 2736 bp encoding a protein of 912 amino acids with a theoretical pI of 8.68 and a molecular weight of 108.57 kDa. Transcript levels and expression are significantly increased in the erythrocytic phase in particular during schizont and gametocyte formation. Most notably, PfG has GTP binding capacity and GTPase activity due to an EngA2 domain present in small Ras-like GTPases in a variety of Bacillus species and Mycobacteria. By contrast, plasmodial PfG is divergent from any human alpha-subunit. PfG was expressed in E. coli as a histidine-tagged fusion protein and was stable only for 3.5 hours. Purification was only possible under native conditions by Nickel-chelate chromatography and subsequent separation by Blue Native PAGE. Binding of a fluorescent GTP analogue BODIPY® FL guanosine 5’O-(thiotriphosphate) was determined by fluorescence emission. Mastoparan stimulated GTP binding in the presence of Mg2+. GTPase activity was determined colorimetrically. Activity expressed as absolute fluorescence was 50% higher for the human paralogue than the activity of the parasitic enzyme. The PfG protein is expressed in the erythrocytic stages and binds GTP after immunoprecipitation. Immunofluorescence using specific antiserum suggests that PfG localizes to the parasite cytosol. The current data suggest that the putitative, Ras-like G-protein might be involved in a non-canonical signaling pathway in Plasmodium. Research on the function of PfG with respect to pathogenesis and antimalarial chemotherapy is currently under way. PMID

  9. Coxiella burnetii Phagocytosis Is Regulated by GTPases of the Rho Family and the RhoA Effectors mDia1 and ROCK

    PubMed Central

    Distel, Jesús S.; Aguilera, Milton O.; Colombo, María I.; Berón, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The GTPases belonging to the Rho family control the actin cytoskeleton rearrangements needed for particle internalization during phagocytosis. ROCK and mDia1 are downstream effectors of RhoA, a GTPase involved in that process. Coxiella burnetii, the etiologic agent of Q fever, is internalized by the host´s cells in an actin-dependent manner. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism involved in this process has been poorly characterized. This work analyzes the role of different GTPases of the Rho family and some downstream effectors in the internalization of C. burnetii by phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells. The internalization of C. burnetii into HeLa and RAW cells was significantly inhibited when the cells were treated with Clostridium difficile Toxin B which irreversibly inactivates members of the Rho family. In addition, the internalization was reduced in HeLa cells that overexpressed the dominant negative mutants of RhoA, Rac1 or Cdc42 or that were knocked down for the Rho GTPases. The pharmacological inhibition or the knocking down of ROCK diminished bacterium internalization. Moreover, C. burnetii was less efficiently internalized in HeLa cells overexpressing mDia1-N1, a dominant negative mutant of mDia1, while the overexpression of the constitutively active mutant mDia1-ΔN3 increased bacteria uptake. Interestingly, when HeLa and RAW cells were infected, RhoA, Rac1 and mDia1 were recruited to membrane cell fractions. Our results suggest that the GTPases of the Rho family play an important role in C. burnetii phagocytosis in both HeLa and RAW cells. Additionally, we present evidence that ROCK and mDia1, which are downstream effectors of RhoA, are involved in that process. PMID:26674774

  10. ArfGAP1 is a GTPase Activating Protein for LRRK2: Reciprocal Regulation of ArfGAP1 by LRRK2

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yulan; Yuan, Changqing; Chen, Rong; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2012-01-01

    Both sporadic and autosomal dominant forms of Parkinson’s disease (PD) have been causally linked to mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), a large protein with multiple domains. The kinase domain plays an important role in LRRK2 mediated toxicity. While a number of investigations have focused on LRRK2 kinase activity, less is known about the GTPase function of LRRK2. The activity of GTPases is regulated by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) and GTP exchange factors (GEFs). Here, we identify ArfGAP1 as the first GAP for LRRK2. ArfGAP1 binds LRRK2 predominantly via the WD40 and kinase domain of LRRK2 and it increases LRRK2 GTPase activity and regulates LRRK2 toxicity both in vitro and in vivo in Drosophila melanogaster. Unexpectedly, ArfGAP1 is a LRRK2 kinase substrate whose GAP activity is inhibited by LRRK2, while wild type and G2019S LRRK2 autophosphorylation and kinase activity are significantly reduced in the presence of ArfGAP1. Overexpressed ArfGAP1 exhibits toxicity that is reduced by LRRK2 both in vitro and in vivo. Δ64-ArfGAP1, a dominant negative ArfGAP1, and shRNA knockdown of ArfGAP1 reduce LRRK2 toxicity. Thus, LRRK2 and ArfGAP1 reciprocally regulate the activity of each other. Our results provide insight into the basic pathobiology of LRRK2 and indicate an important role for the GTPase domain and ArfGAP1 in LRRK2 mediated toxicity. These data suggest that agents targeted towards regulation of LRRK2 GTP hydrolysis might be therapeutic agents for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:22423108

  11. Role of Wasp and the small GTPases RhoA, RhoB, and Cdc42 during capacitation and acrosome reaction in spermatozoa of English guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Buenrostro, Norma L; Mújica, Adela; Chiquete-Felix, Natalia; Déciga-Alcaraz, Alejandro; Medina-Reyes, Estefany I; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Chirino, Yolanda I

    2016-10-01

    Cytoskeleton remodeling is necessary for capacitation and the acrosome reaction in spermatozoa. F-actin is located in the acrosome and equatorial region during capacitation, but is relocated in the post-acrosomal region during the acrosome reaction in spermatozoa from bull, rat, mice, and guinea pig. Actin polymerization and relocalization are generally regulated by small GTPases that activate Wasp protein, which coordinates with Arp2/3, profilin I, and profilin II to complete cytoskeletal remodeling. This sequence of events is not completely described in spermatozoa, though. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine if Wasp interacts with small GTPases (RhoA, RhoB, and Cdc42) and proteins (Arp2/3, profilin I, and profilin II) that co-localize with F-actin during capacitation and the acrosome reaction in English guinea pig spermatozoa obtained from the vas deferens. The spermatozoa were capacitated in calcium-free medium, incubated with an activator or an inhibitor of GTPases, and then induced to acrosome react using calcium. The distribution patterns of F-actin were compared to the patterns of Wasp and its putative interaction partners: Wasp and RhoB, but not RhoA or Cdc42, localization overlap with F-actin during capacitation and the acrosome reaction. Activation of small GTPases localized RhoB to the post-acrosomal region whereas their inhibition prevented acrosome exocytosis. Arp2/3 and profilin II appear to interact with Wasp in the post-acrosomal region and flagellum, while profilin I and Wasp could be found in the equatorial region. Thus, Wasp and F-actin distribution overlap during capacitation and acrosome reaction, and small GTPases play an important role in cytoskeleton remodeling during these processes in spermatozoa. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 83: 927-937, 2016 © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The Era GTPase recognizes the GAUCACCUCC sequence and binds helix 45 near the 3; end of 16S rRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Chao; Zhou, Xiaomei; Tarasov, Sergey G.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Waugh, David S.; Court, Donald L.; Ji, Xinhua

    2012-03-26

    Era, composed of a GTPase domain and a K homology domain, is essential for bacterial cell viability. It is required for the maturation of 16S rRNA and assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. We showed previously that the protein recognizes nine nucleotides (1531{sup AUCACCUCC}1539) near the 3{prime} end of 16S rRNA, and that this recognition stimulates GTP-hydrolyzing activity of Era. In all three kingdoms of life, the 1530{sup GAUCA}1534 sequence and helix 45 (h45) (nucleotides 1506-1529) are highly conserved. It has been shown that the 1530{sup GA}1531 to 1530{sup AG}1531 double mutation severely affects the viability of bacteria. However, whether Era interacts with G1530 and/or h45 and whether such interactions (if any) contribute to the stimulation of Era's GTPase activity were not known. Here, we report two RNA structures that contain nucleotides 1506-1542 (RNA301), one in complex with Era and GDPNP (GNP), a nonhydrolysable GTP-analogue, and the other in complex with Era, GNP, and the KsgA methyltransferase. The structures show that Era recognizes 10 nucleotides, including G1530, and that Era also binds h45. Moreover, GTPase assay experiments show that G1530 does not stimulate Era's GTPase activity. Rather, A1531 and A1534 are most important for stimulation and h45 further contributes to the stimulation. Although G1530 does not contribute to the intrinsic GTPase activity of Era, its interaction with Era is important for binding and is essential for the protein to function, leading to the discovery of a new cold-sensitive phenotype of Era.

  13. The rap GTPases regulate B cell morphology, immune-synapse formation, and signaling by particulate B cell receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kevin B L; Freeman, Spencer A; Zabetian, Saba; Brugger, Hayley; Weber, Michele; Lei, Victor; Dang-Lawson, May; Tse, Kathy W K; Santamaria, Rene; Batista, Facundo D; Gold, Michael R

    2008-01-01

    B lymphocytes spread and extend membrane processes when searching for antigens and form immune synapses upon contacting cells that display antigens on their surface. Although these dynamic morphological changes facilitate B cell activation, the signaling pathways underlying these processes are not fully understood. We found that activation of the Rap GTPases was essential for these changes in B cell morphology. Rap activation was important for B cell receptor (BCR)- and lymphocyte-function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1)-induced spreading, for BCR-induced immune-synapse formation, and for particulate BCR ligands to induce localized F-actin assembly and membrane-process extension. Rap activation and F-actin assembly were also required for optimal BCR signaling in response to particulate antigens but not soluble antigens. Thus by controlling B cell morphology and cytoskeletal organization, Rap might play a key role in the activation of B cells by particulate and cell-associated antigens.

  14. Adaptor protein Nck1 interacts with p120 Ras GTPase-activating protein and regulates its activity.

    PubMed

    Ger, Marija; Zitkus, Zigmantas; Valius, Mindaugas

    2011-10-01

    Adaptor protein Nck1 binds a number of intracellular proteins and influences various signaling pathways. Here we show that Nck1 directly binds and activates the GTPase-activating protein of Ras (RasGAP), which is responsible for the down-regulation of Ras. The first and the third SH3 domains of Nck1 and the NH(2)-terminal proline-rich sequence of RasGAP contribute most to the complex formation causing direct molecular interaction between the two proteins. Cell adhesion to the substrate is obligatory for the Nck1 and RasGAP association, as cell detachment makes RasGAP incapable of associating with Nck1. This leads to the complex dissipation, decrease of RasGAP activity and the increase of H-Ras-GTP level in the detached cells. Our findings reveal unexpected feature of adaptor protein Nck1 as the regulator of RasGAP activity.

  15. Multiprotein Complexes of Retinitis Pigmentosa GTPase Regulator (RPGR), a Ciliary Protein Mutated in X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa (XLRP)

    PubMed Central

    Murga-Zamalloa, Carlos; Swaroop, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in Retinitis Pigmentosa GTPase Regulator (RPGR) are a frequent cause of X-linked Retinitis Pigmentosa (XLRP). The RPGR gene undergoes extensive alternative splicing and encodes for distinct protein isoforms in the retina. Extensive studies using isoform-specific antibodies and mouse mutants have revealed that RPGR predominantly localizes to the transition zone to primary cilia and associates with selected ciliary and microtubule-associated assemblies in photoreceptors. In this chapter, we have summarized recent advances on understanding the role of RPGR in photoreceptor protein trafficking. We also provide new evidence that suggests the existence of discrete RPGR multiprotein complexes in photoreceptors. Piecing together the RPGR-interactome in different subcellular compartments should provide critical insights into the role of alternative RPGR isoforms in associated orphan and syndromic retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:20238008

  16. Ran GTPase protein promotes human pancreatic cancer proliferation by deregulating the expression of Survivin and cell cycle proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Lin; Lu, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Xiaodi; Sun, Yi; Shi, Yongquan; Fan, Hongwei; Liu, Changhao; Zhou, Jinfeng; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Fan, Daiming; Guo, Xuegang

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •Overexpression of Ran in pancreatic cancer was correlated with histological grade. •Downregulation of Ran could induce cell apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation. •The effects were mediated by cell cycle proteins, Survivin and cleaved Caspase-3. -- Abstract: Ran, a member of the Ras GTPase family, has important roles in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Herein, we detected Ran expression in pancreatic cancer and explored its potential role on tumour progression. Overexpressed Ran in pancreatic cancer tissues was found highly correlated with the histological grade. Downregulation of Ran led to significant suppression of cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest at the G1/S phase and induction of apoptosis. In vivo studies also validated that result. Further studies revealed that those effects were at least partly mediated by the downregulation of Cyclin A, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E, CDK2, CDK4, phospho-Rb and Survivin proteins and up regulation of cleaved Caspase-3.

  17. The guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs): proinflammatory cytokine-induced members of the dynamin superfamily with unique GTPase activity.

    PubMed

    Vestal, Deborah J

    2005-08-01

    The guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) were first identified in the late 1970s, and within a short period of time, investigators were aware that GBPs possessed unique properties, in particular the ability to bind GMP agarose. Since then, much study has gone into understanding their mechanism of induction by interferons (IFNs) and other cytokines, and they have been used extensively as markers for IFN responsiveness in both cells and organisms. In time, we learned that GBPs had the unusual ability to hydrolyze GTP to both GDP and GMP. More recently, we have begun to appreciate their novel structure, one that suggests unique mechanisms of GTP binding and hydrolysis and unique forms of regulation. In addition, we have begun to unravel some of their functions and to separate these function into those functions that do and those that do not require GTPase activity.

  18. Dynamic expression of the Slit-Robo GTPase activating protein genes during development of the murine nervous system.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Claire; Endris, Volker; Rappold, Gudrun

    2009-03-10

    We investigated the expression of the three known Slit-Robo GTPase activating protein (srGAP) genes in the developing murine nervous system using in situ hybridization. The three genes are expressed during embryonic and early postnatal development in the murine nervous system, showing a distinct pattern of expression in the olfactory system, the eye, forebrain and midbrain structures, the cerebellum, the spinal cord, and dorsal root ganglia, which we discuss in relation to Slit-Robo expression patterns and signaling pathways. We also report srGAP2 expression in zones of neuronal differentiation and srGAP3 in ventricular zones of neurogenesis in many different tissues of the central nervous system (CNS). Compared to srGAP2 and srGAP3, the onset of srGAP1 expression is later in most CNS tissues. We propose that these differences in expression point to functional differences between these three genes in the development of neural tissues.

  19. Development of a Novel NMR-based Rheb GTPase Assay and Molecular Characterization of TSC2 GAP Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    pH 8, 150 mM NaCl, 5 mM MgCl2, 10% glycerol, 10 mM imidazole, 10 mM b-mercaptoethanol, 0.1% Nonidet P - 40 , 0.1 mMGDP, 1 mM phenylmethylsulfonyl...p21. Biochemistry 29, 6058–6065 (1990). 40 . P . H. Seeburg, W. W. Colby, D. J. Capon, D. V. Goeddel, A. D. Levinson, Biological properties of human c...T I C L EG T P H Y D R O L Y S I SCharacterization of the Intrinsic and TSC2-GAP–Regulated GTPase Activity of Rheb by Real-Time NMR Christopher B

  20. Antibacterial autophagy occurs at PI(3)P-enriched domains of the endoplasmic reticulum and requires Rab1 GTPase.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ju; Birmingham, Cheryl L; Shahnazari, Shahab; Shiu, Jessica; Zheng, Yiyu T; Smith, Adam C; Campellone, Kenneth G; Heo, Won Do; Gruenheid, Samantha; Meyer, Tobias; Welch, Matthew D; Ktistakis, Nicholas T; Kim, Peter Kijun; Klionsky, Daniel J; Brumell, John H

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy mediates the degradation of cytoplasmic components in eukaryotic cells and plays a key role in immunity. The mechanism of autophagosome formation is not clear. Here we examined two potential membrane sources for antibacterial autophagy: the ER and mitochondria. DFCP1, a marker of specialized ER domains known as 'omegasomes,' associated with Salmonella-containing autophagosomes via its PtdIns(3)P and ER-binding domains, while a mitochondrial marker (cytochrome b5-GFP) did not. Rab1 also localized to autophagosomes, and its activity was required for autophagosome formation, clearance of protein aggregates and peroxisomes, and autophagy of Salmonella. Overexpression of Rab1 enhanced antibacterial autophagy. The role of Rab1 in antibacterial autophagy was independent of its role in ER-to-Golgi transport. Our data suggest that antibacterial autophagy occurs at omegasomes and reveal that the Rab1 GTPase plays a crucial role in mammalian autophagy.

  1. Molecular basis of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and ARF1 GTPase recognition by the FAPP1 pleckstrin homology (PH) domain.

    PubMed

    He, Ju; Scott, Jordan L; Heroux, Annie; Roy, Siddhartha; Lenoir, Marc; Overduin, Michael; Stahelin, Robert V; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2011-05-27

    Four-phosphate-adaptor protein 1 (FAPP1) regulates secretory transport from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the plasma membrane. FAPP1 is recruited to the Golgi through binding of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns(4)P) and a small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1). Despite the critical role of FAPP1 in membrane trafficking, the molecular basis of its dual function remains unclear. Here, we report a 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of the FAPP1 PH domain and detail the molecular mechanisms of the PtdIns(4)P and ARF1 recognition. The FAPP1 PH domain folds into a seven-stranded β-barrel capped by an α-helix at one edge, whereas the opposite edge is flanked by three loops and the β4 and β7 strands that form a lipid-binding pocket within the β-barrel. The ARF1-binding site is located on the outer side of the β-barrel as determined by NMR resonance perturbation analysis, mutagenesis, and measurements of binding affinities. The two binding sites have little overlap, allowing FAPP1 PH to associate with both ligands simultaneously and independently. Binding to PtdIns(4)P is enhanced in an acidic environment and is required for membrane penetration and tubulation activity of FAPP1, whereas the GTP-bound conformation of the GTPase is necessary for the interaction with ARF1. Together, these findings provide structural and biochemical insight into the multivalent membrane anchoring by the PH domain that may augment affinity and selectivity of FAPP1 toward the TGN membranes enriched in both PtdIns(4)P and GTP-bound ARF1.

  2. Recessive Inactivating Mutations in TBCK, Encoding a Rab GTPase-Activating Protein, Cause Severe Infantile Syndromic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Chong, Jessica X; Caputo, Viviana; Phelps, Ian G; Stella, Lorenzo; Worgan, Lisa; Dempsey, Jennifer C; Nguyen, Alina; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Webster, Richard; Pizzuti, Antonio; Marvin, Colby T; Ishak, Gisele E; Ardern-Holmes, Simone; Richmond, Zara; Bamshad, Michael J; Ortiz-Gonzalez, Xilma R; Tartaglia, Marco; Chopra, Maya; Doherty, Dan

    2016-04-07

    Infantile encephalopathies are a group of clinically and biologically heterogeneous disorders for which the genetic basis remains largely unknown. Here, we report a syndromic neonatal encephalopathy characterized by profound developmental disability, severe hypotonia, seizures, diminished respiratory drive requiring mechanical ventilation, brain atrophy, dysgenesis of the corpus callosum, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, and facial dysmorphism. Biallelic inactivating mutations in TBCK (TBC1-domain-containing kinase) were independently identified by whole-exome sequencing as the cause of this condition in four unrelated families. Matching these families was facilitated by the sharing of phenotypic profiles and WES data in a recently released web-based tool (Geno2MP) that links phenotypic information to rare variants in families with Mendelian traits. TBCK is a putative GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for small GTPases of the Rab family and has been shown to control cell growth and proliferation, actin-cytoskeleton dynamics, and mTOR signaling. Two of the three mutations (c.376C>T [p.Arg126(∗)] and c.1363A>T [p.Lys455(∗)]) are predicted to truncate the protein, and loss of the major TBCK isoform was confirmed in primary fibroblasts from one affected individual. The third mutation, c.1532G>A (p.Arg511His), alters a conserved residue within the TBC1 domain. Structural analysis implicated Arg511 as a required residue for Rab-GAP function, and in silico homology modeling predicted impaired GAP function in the corresponding mutant. These results suggest that loss of Rab-GAP activity is the underlying mechanism of disease. In contrast to other disorders caused by dysregulated mTOR signaling associated with focal or global brain overgrowth, impaired TBCK function results in progressive loss of brain volume.

  3. Rho1 GTPase and PKC ortholog Pck1 are upstream activators of the cell integrity MAPK pathway in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Mir, Laura; Soto, Teresa; Franco, Alejandro; Madrid, Marisa; Viana, Raúl A; Vicente, Jero; Gacto, Mariano; Pérez, Pilar; Cansado, José

    2014-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe the cell integrity pathway (CIP) orchestrates multiple biological processes like cell wall maintenance and ionic homeostasis by fine tuning activation of MAPK Pmk1 in response to various environmental conditions. The small GTPase Rho2 positively regulates the CIP through protein kinase C ortholog Pck2. However, Pmk1 retains some function in mutants lacking either Rho2 or Pck2, suggesting the existence of additional upstream regulatory elements to modulate its activity depending on the nature of the environmental stimulus. The essential GTPase Rho1 is a candidate to control the activity of the CIP by acting upstream of Pck2, whereas Pck1, a second PKC ortholog, appears to negatively regulate Pmk1 activity. However, the exact regulatory nature of these two proteins within the CIP has remained elusive. By exhaustive characterization of strains expressing a hypomorphic Rho1 allele (rho1-596) in different genetic backgrounds we show that both Rho1 and Pck1 are positive upstream regulatory members of the CIP in addition to Rho2 and Pck2. In this new model Rho1 and Rho2 control Pmk1 basal activity during vegetative growth mainly through Pck2. Notably, whereas Rho2-Pck2 elicit Pmk1 activation in response to most environmental stimuli, Rho1 drives Pmk1 activation through either Pck2 or Pck1 exclusively in response to cell wall damage. Our study reveals the intricate and complex functional architecture of the upstream elements participating in this signaling pathway as compared to similar routes from other simple eukaryotic organisms.

  4. RAB10 Interacts with the Male Germ Cell-Specific GTPase-Activating Protein during Mammalian Spermiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying-Hung; Ke, Chih-Chun; Wang, Ya-Yun; Chen, Mei-Feng; Chen, Tsung-Ming; Ku, Wei-Chi; Chiang, Han-Sun; Yeh, Chung-Hsin

    2017-01-01

    According to recent estimates, 2%–15% of couples are sterile, and approximately half of the infertility cases are attributed to male reproductive factors. However, the reasons remain undefined in approximately 25% of male infertility cases, and most infertility cases exhibit spermatogenic defects. Numerous genes involved in spermatogenesis still remain unknown. We previously identified Male Germ Cells Rab GTPase-Activating Proteins (MGCRABGAPs) through cDNA microarray analysis of human testicular tissues with spermatogenic defects. MGCRABGAP contains a conserved RABGAP catalytic domain, TBC (Tre2/Bub2/Cdc16). RABGAP family proteins regulate cellular function (e.g., cytoskeletal remodeling, vesicular trafficking, and cell migration) by inactivating RAB proteins. MGCRABGAP is a male germ cell-specific protein expressed in elongating and elongated spermatids during mammalian spermiogenesis. The purpose of this study was to identify proteins that interact with MGCRABGAP during mammalian spermiogenesis using a proteomic approach. We found that MGCRABGAP exhibited GTPase-activating bioability, and several MGCRABGAP interactors, possible substrates (e.g., RAB10, RAB5C, and RAP1), were identified using co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) and nano liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (nano LC-MS/MS). We confirmed the binding ability between RAB10 and MGCRABGAP via co-IP. Additionally, MGCRABGAP–RAB10 complexes were specifically colocalized in the manchette structure, a critical structure for the formation of spermatid heads, and were slightly expressed at the midpiece of mature spermatozoa. Based on these results, we propose that MGCRABGAP is involved in mammalian spermiogenesis by modulating RAB10. PMID:28067790

  5. Rac1 GTPase-deficient mouse lens exhibits defects in shape, suture formation, fiber cell migration and survival.

    PubMed

    Maddala, Rupalatha; Chauhan, Bharesh K; Walker, Christopher; Zheng, Yi; Robinson, Michael L; Lang, Richard A; Rao, Ponugoti V

    2011-12-01

    Morphogenesis and shape of the ocular lens depend on epithelial cell elongation and differentiation into fiber cells, followed by the symmetric and compact organization of fiber cells within an enclosed extracellular matrix-enriched elastic capsule. The cellular mechanisms orchestrating these different events however, remain obscure. We investigated the role of the Rac1 GTPase in these processes by targeted deletion of expression using the conditional gene knockout (cKO) approach. Rac1 cKO mice were derived from two different Cre (Le-Cre and MLR-10) transgenic mice in which lens-specific Cre expression starts at embryonic day 8.75 and 10.5, respectively, in both the lens epithelium and fiber cells. The Le-Cre/Rac1 cKO mice exhibited an early-onset (E12.5) and severe lens phenotype compared to the MLR-10/Rac1 cKO (E15.5) mice. While the Le-Cre/Rac1 cKO lenses displayed delayed primary fiber cell elongation, lenses from both Rac1 cKO strains were characterized by abnormal shape, impaired secondary fiber cell migration, sutural defects and thinning of the posterior capsule which often led to rupture. Lens fiber cell N-cadherin/β-catenin/Rap1/Nectin-based cell-cell junction formation and WAVE-2/Abi-2/Nap1-regulated actin polymerization were impaired in the Rac1 deficient mice. Additionally, the Rac1 cKO lenses were characterized by a shortened epithelial sheet, reduced levels of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and increased apoptosis. Taken together, these data uncover the essential role of Rac1 GTPase activity in establishment and maintenance of lens shape, suture formation and capsule integrity, and in fiber cell migration, adhesion and survival, via regulation of actin cytoskeletal dynamics, cell adhesive interactions and ECM turnover.

  6. The Ras-related small GTPases RalA and RalB regulate cellular survival after ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Ambrose R.; Snider, Jared L.; Martin, Timothy D.; Graboski, Sarah F.; Der, Channing J.; Cox, Adrienne D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Oncogenic activation of Ras renders cancer cells resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), but the mechanisms have not been fully characterized. The Ras-like small GTPases, RalA and RalB, are downstream effectors of Ras function and are critical for both tumor growth and survival. The Ral effector RalBP1/RLIP76 mediates survival of mice after whole body irradiation but the role of the Ral GTPases themselves in response to IR is unknown. We have investigated the role of RalA and RalB in cellular responses to IR. Methods and Materials RalA, RalB and their major effectors RalBP1 and Sec5 were knocked down by stable expression of shRNAs in the K-Ras-dependent pancreatic cancer-derived cell line MIA PaCa-2. Radiation responses were measured by standard clonogenic survival assays for reproductive survival, γH2AX expression for double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) and PARP cleavage for apoptosis. Results Knockdown of K-Ras, RalA or RalB reduced colony-forming ability post-IR and knockdown of either Ral isoform decreased the rate of DSB repair post-IR. However, knockdown of RalB, but not RalA, increased cell death. Surprisingly, neither RalBP1 nor Sec5 suppression affected colony formation post-IR. Conclusions Both RalA and RalB contribute to K-Ras-dependent IR resistance of MIA PaCa-2 cells. Sensitization due to suppressed Ral expression is likely due in part to decreased efficiency of DNA repair (RalA and RalB) and increased susceptibility to apoptosis (RalB). Ral-mediated radioresistance does not depend on either RalBP1 or the exocyst complex, the two best-characterized Ral effectors, and instead may utilize an atypical or novel effector. PMID:20619549

  7. Rho 1 GTPase activates the (1-3)beta-D-glucan synthase and is involved in Schizosaccharomyces pombe morphogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Arellano, M; Durán, A; Pérez, P

    1996-01-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe Cdc42 and Rho1 GTPases were tested for their ability to complement the cwg2-1 mutant phenotype of a decrease in (1-3)beta-D-glucan synthase activity when grown at the non-permissive temperature. Only Rho1 is able to partly complement the defect in glucan synthase associated with the cwg2-1 mutation. Moreover, overexpression of the rho1 gene in wild-type S.pombe cells causes aberrant morphology with loss of polarity and cells with several septa. Under this condition (1-3)beta-D-glucan synthase activity is increased four times, but is still dependent on GTP. When S.pombe is transformed with constitutively active rho1 mutant alleles (rho1-G15V or rho1-Q64L), cells stop growing and show a very thick cell wall with hardly any septum. Under this condition the level of (1-3)beta-D-glucan synthase activity is at least 20 times higher than wild-type and is independent of GTP. Neither cdc42+ nor the cdc42-V12G or cdc42-Q61L constitutively active mutant alleles affect (1-3)beta-D-glucan synthase activity when overexpressed in S.pombe. Cells overproducing Rho1 are hypersensitive to inhibitors of cell wall biosynthesis or to cell wall degrading enzymes. We conclude that Rho1 GTPase directly activates (1-3)beta-D-glucan synthase and regulates S.pombe morphogenesis. Images PMID:8887550

  8. The small GTPase Cdc42 modulates the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Mai; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Ikematsu, Kazuya; Kakeyama, Masaki; Murata, Masayuki; Sato, Ken; Tsuboi, Takashi

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Regulation of exocytosis by Rho GTPase Cdc42. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cdc42 increases the number of fusion events from newly recruited vesicles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cdc42 increases the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles. -- Abstract: Although the small GTPase Rho family Cdc42 has been shown to facilitate exocytosis through increasing the amount of hormones released, the precise mechanisms regulating the quantity of hormones released on exocytosis are not well understood. Here we show by live cell imaging analysis under TIRF microscope and immunocytochemical analysis under confocal microscope that Cdc42 modulated the number of fusion events and the number of dense-core vesicles produced in the cells. Overexpression of a wild-type or constitutively-active form of Cdc42 strongly facilitated high-KCl-induced exocytosis from the newly recruited plasma membrane vesicles in PC12 cells. By contrast, a dominant-negative form of Cdc42 inhibited exocytosis from both the newly recruited and previously docked plasma membrane vesicles. The number of intracellular dense-core vesicles was increased by the overexpression of both a wild-type and constitutively-active form of Cdc42. Consistently, activation of Cdc42 by overexpression of Tuba, a Golgi-associated guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Cdc42 increased the number of intracellular dense-core vesicles, whereas inhibition of Cdc42 by overexpression of the Cdc42/Rac interactive binding domain of neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein decreased the number of them. These findings suggest that Cdc42 facilitates exocytosis by modulating both the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles and the production of dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells.

  9. Modulation of Plant RAB GTPase-Mediated Membrane Trafficking Pathway at the Interface Between Plants and Obligate Biotrophic Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Inada, Noriko; Betsuyaku, Shigeyuki; Shimada, Takashi L; Ebine, Kazuo; Ito, Emi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Hasezawa, Seiichiro; Takano, Yoshitaka; Fukuda, Hiroo; Nakano, Akihiko; Ueda, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    RAB5 is a small GTPase that acts in endosomal trafficking. In addition to canonical RAB5 members that are homologous to animal RAB5, land plants harbor a plant-specific RAB5, the ARA6 group, which regulates trafficking events distinct from canonical RAB5 GTPases. Here, we report that plant RAB5, both canonical and plant-specific members, accumulate at the interface between host plants and biotrophic fungal and oomycete pathogens. Biotrophic fungi and oomycetes colonize living plant tissues by establishing specialized infection hyphae, the haustorium, within host plant cells. We found that Arabidopsis thaliana ARA6/RABF1, a plant-specific RAB5, is localized to the specialized membrane that surrounds the haustorium, the extrahaustorial membrane (EHM), formed by the A. thaliana-adapted powdery mildew fungus Golovinomyces orontii Whereas the conventional RAB5 ARA7/RABF2b was also localized to the EHM, endosomal SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) and RAB5-activating proteins were not, which suggests that the EHM has modified endosomal characteristic. The recruitment of host RAB5 to the EHM was a property shared by the barley-adapted powdery mildew fungus Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei and the oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis, but the extrahyphal membrane surrounding the hypha of the hemibiotrophic fungus Colletotrichum higginsianum at the biotrophic stage was devoid of RAB5. The localization of RAB5 to the EHM appears to correlate with the functionality of the haustorium. Our discovery sheds light on a novel relationship between plant RAB5 and obligate biotrophic pathogens.

  10. UreE-UreG complex facilitates nickel transfer and preactivates GTPase of UreG in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinming; Li, Hongyan; Lai, Tsz-Pui; Sun, Hongzhe

    2015-05-15

    The pathogenicity of Helicobacter pylori relies heavily on urease, which converts urea to ammonia to neutralize the stomach acid. Incorporation of Ni(2+) into the active site of urease requires a battery of chaperones. Both metallochaperones UreE and UreG play important roles in the urease activation. In this study, we demonstrate that, in the presence of GTP and Mg(2+), UreG binds Ni(2+) with an affinity (Kd) of ∼0.36 μm. The GTPase activity of Ni(2+)-UreG is stimulated by both K(+) (or NH4 (+)) and HCO3 (-) to a biologically relevant level, suggesting that K(+)/NH4 (+) and HCO3 (-) might serve as GTPase elements of UreG. We show that complexation of UreE and UreG results in two protein complexes, i.e. 2E-2G and 2E-G, with the former being formed only in the presence of both GTP and Mg(2+). Mutagenesis studies reveal that Arg-101 on UreE and Cys-66 on UreG are critical for stabilization of 2E-2G complex. Combined biophysical and bioassay studies show that the formation of 2E-2G complex not only facilitates nickel transfer from UreE to UreG, but also enhances the binding of GTP. This suggests that UreE might also serve as a structural scaffold for recruitment of GTP to UreG. Importantly, we demonstrate for the first time that UreE serves as a bridge to grasp Ni(2+) from HypA, subsequently donating it to UreG. The study expands our horizons on the molecular details of nickel translocation among metallochaperones UreE, UreG, and HypA, which further extends our knowledge on the urease maturation process.

  11. HS1 deficiency impairs neutrophil recruitment in vivo and activation of the small GTPases Rac1 and Rap1.

    PubMed

    Latasiewicz, Joanna; Artz, Annette; Jing, Ding; Blanco, Mariana Pacheco; Currie, Silke M; Avila, Martha Velázquez; Schnoor, Michael; Vestweber, Dietmar

    2017-01-25

    Neutrophil extravasation is a critical step of the innate immune system's response to inflammation. This multistep process is tightly regulated by adhesion and signaling molecules in the endothelium and neutrophils. Activation of the β2 integrin LFA-1 is critical for adhesion of leukocytes to postcapillary venules. This step requires coordinated activation of signaling pathways in chemokine-stimulated neutrophils, including GTPase activation and cytoskeletal remodeling, leading to conformational changes in LFA-1. Hematopoietic cell-specific lyn substrate 1 (HS1) is a cortactin-related and leukocyte-specific actin-binding protein (ABP) that regulates several processes in various immune cells. It has been shown in vitro that HS1 is important for neutrophil chemotaxis and transendothelial migration of NK cells, but its role in neutrophil extravasation in vivo has not been investigated yet. Intravital microscopy of CXCL1-stimulated cremaster venules revealed an increased rolling velocity and reduced neutrophil adhesion and transmigration in HS1 knockout (KO) mice. CXCL1-induced rapid neutrophil arrest in vivo and adhesion under flow conditions in vitro were also reduced significantly. Whereas random motility of neutrophils was unaffected, chemotaxis toward a CXCL1 gradient was reduced in the absence of HS1. Further analysis of the underlying mechanisms demonstrated that HS1 controls CXCL1-induced activation of the small GTPases Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) and Ras-related protein 1 (Rap1), thus supporting LFA-1-mediated neutrophil adhesion. Importantly, with the use of Rac1 KO neutrophils, we could show that Rac1 acts upstream of Rap1. Our results establish HS1 as an important regulator of proper Rac1 and Rap1 activation and neutrophil extravasation.

  12. Ectopic expression of the striatal-enriched GTPase Rhes elicits cerebellar degeneration and an ataxia phenotype in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Swarnkar, Supriya; Chen, Youjun; Pryor, William M; Shahani, Neelam; Page, Damon T; Subramaniam, Srinivasa

    2015-10-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by an expansion of glutamine repeats in the huntingtin protein (mHtt) that invokes early and prominent damage of the striatum, a region that controls motor behaviors. Despite its ubiquitous expression, why certain brain regions, such as the cerebellum, are relatively spared from neuronal loss by mHtt remains unclear. Previously, we implicated the striatal-enriched GTPase, Rhes (Ras homolog enriched in the striatum), which binds and SUMOylates mHtt and increases its solubility and cellular cytotoxicity, as the cause for striatal toxicity in HD. Here, we report that Rhes deletion in HD mice (N171-82Q), which express the N-terminal fragment of human Htt with 82 glutamines (Rhes(-/-)/N171-82Q), display markedly reduced HD-related behavioral deficits, and absence of lateral ventricle dilatation (secondary to striatal atrophy), compared to control HD mice (N171-82Q). To further validate the role of GTPase Rhes in HD, we tested whether ectopic Rhes expression would elicit a pathology in a brain region normally less affected in HD. Remarkably, ectopic expression of Rhes in the cerebellum of N171-82Q mice, during the asymptomatic period led to an exacerbation of motor deficits, including loss of balance and motor incoordination with ataxia-like features, not apparent in control-injected N171-82Q mice or Rhes injected wild-type mice. Pathological and biochemical analysis of Rhes-injected N171-82Q mice revealed a cerebellar lesion with marked loss of Purkinje neuron layer parvalbumin-immunoreactivity, induction of caspase 3 activation, and enhanced soluble forms of mHtt. Similarly reintroducing Rhes into the striatum of Rhes deleted Rhes(-/-)Hdh(150Q/150Q) knock-in mice, elicited a progressive HD-associated rotarod deficit. Overall, these studies establish that Rhes plays a pivotal role in vivo for the selective toxicity of mHtt in HD.

  13. Interaction of the Small GTPase Cdc42 with Arginine Kinase Restricts White Spot Syndrome Virus in Shrimp.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ji-Dong; Jiang, Hai-Shan; Wei, Tian-Di; Zhang, Ke-Yi; Wang, Xian-Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2017-03-01

    Many types of small GTPases are widely expressed in eukaryotes and have different functions. As a crucial member of the Rho GTPase family, Cdc42 serves a number of functions, such as regulating cell growth, migration, and cell movement. Several RNA viruses employ Cdc42-hijacking tactics in their target cell entry processes. However, the function of Cdc42 in shrimp antiviral immunity is not clear. In this study, we identified a Cdc42 protein in the kuruma shrimp (Marsupenaeus japonicus) and named it MjCdc42. MjCdc42 was upregulated in shrimp challenged by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). The knockdown of MjCdc42 and injection of Cdc42 inhibitors increased the proliferation of WSSV. Further experiments determined that MjCdc42 interacted with an arginine kinase (MjAK). By analyzing the binding activity and enzyme activity of MjAK and its mutant, ΔMjAK, we found that MjAK could enhance the replication of WSSV in shrimp. MjAK interacted with the envelope protein VP26 of WSSV. An inhibitor of AK activity, quercetin, could impair the function of MjAK in WSSV replication. Further study demonstrated that the binding of MjCdc42 and MjAK depends on Cys(271) of MjAK and suppresses the WSSV replication-promoting effect of MjAK. By interacting with the active site of MjAK and suppressing its enzyme activity, MjCdc42 inhibits WSSV replication in shrimp. Our results demonstrate a new function of Cdc42 in the cellular defense against viral infection in addition to the regulation of actin and phagocytosis, which has been reported in previous studies. IMPORTANCE The interaction of Cdc42 with arginine kinase plays a crucial role in the host defense against WSSV infection. This study identifies a new mechanism of Cdc42 in innate immunity and enriches the knowledge of the antiviral innate immunity of invertebrates.

  14. Asymmetric Requirements for a Rab Gtpase and Snare Proteins in Fusion of Copii Vesicles with Acceptor Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiaochun; Barlowe, Charles

    2000-01-01

    Soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins are essential for membrane fusion in transport between the yeast ER and Golgi compartments. Subcellular fractionation experiments demonstrate that the ER/Golgi SNAREs Bos1p, Sec22p, Bet1p, Sed5p, and the Rab protein, Ypt1p, are distributed similarly but localize primarily with Golgi membranes. All of these SNARE proteins are efficiently packaged into COPII vesicles and suggest a dynamic cycling of SNARE machinery between ER and Golgi compartments. Ypt1p is not efficiently packaged into vesicles under these conditions. To determine in which membranes protein function is required, temperature-sensitive alleles of BOS1, BET1, SED5, SLY1, and YPT1 that prevent ER/Golgi transport in vitro at restrictive temperatures were used to selectively inactivate these gene products on vesicles or on Golgi membranes. Vesicles bearing mutations in Bet1p or Bos1p inhibit fusion with wild-type acceptor membranes, but acceptor membranes containing these mutations are fully functional. In contrast, vesicles bearing mutations in Sed5p, Sly1p, or Ypt1p are functional, whereas acceptor membranes containing these mutations block fusion. Thus, this set of SNARE proteins is symmetrically distributed between vesicle and acceptor compartments, but they function asymmetrically such that Bet1p and Bos1p are required on vesicles and Sed5p activity is required on acceptor membranes. We propose the asymmetry in SNARE protein function is maintained by an asymmetric distribution and requirement for the Ypt1p GTPase in this fusion event. When a transmembrane-anchored form of Ypt1p is used to restrict this GTPase to the acceptor compartment, vesicles depleted of Ypt1p remain competent for fusion. PMID:10747087

  15. Recessive Inactivating Mutations in TBCK, Encoding a Rab GTPase-Activating Protein, Cause Severe Infantile Syndromic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Jessica X.; Caputo, Viviana; Phelps, Ian G.; Stella, Lorenzo; Worgan, Lisa; Dempsey, Jennifer C.; Nguyen, Alina; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Webster, Richard; Pizzuti, Antonio; Marvin, Colby T.; Ishak, Gisele E.; Ardern-Holmes, Simone; Richmond, Zara; Bamshad, Michael J.; Ortiz-Gonzalez, Xilma R.; Tartaglia, Marco; Chopra, Maya; Doherty, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Infantile encephalopathies are a group of clinically and biologically heterogeneous disorders for which the genetic basis remains largely unknown. Here, we report a syndromic neonatal encephalopathy characterized by profound developmental disability, severe hypotonia, seizures, diminished respiratory drive requiring mechanical ventilation, brain atrophy, dysgenesis of the corpus callosum, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, and facial dysmorphism. Biallelic inactivating mutations in TBCK (TBC1-domain-containing kinase) were independently identified by whole-exome sequencing as the cause of this condition in four unrelated families. Matching these families was facilitated by the sharing of phenotypic profiles and WES data in a recently released web-based tool (Geno2MP) that links phenotypic information to rare variants in families with Mendelian traits. TBCK is a putative GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for small GTPases of the Rab family and has been shown to control cell growth and proliferation, actin-cytoskeleton dynamics, and mTOR signaling. Two of the three mutations (c.376C>T [p.Arg126∗] and c.1363A>T [p.Lys455∗]) are predicted to truncate the protein, and loss of the major TBCK isoform was confirmed in primary fibroblasts from one affected individual. The third mutation, c.1532G>A (p.Arg511His), alters a conserved residue within the TBC1 domain. Structural analysis implicated Arg511 as a required residue for Rab-GAP function, and in silico homology modeling predicted impaired GAP function in the corresponding mutant. These results suggest that loss of Rab-GAP activity is the underlying mechanism of disease. In contrast to other disorders caused by dysregulated mTOR signaling associated with focal or global brain overgrowth, impaired TBCK function results in progressive loss of brain volume. PMID:27040692

  16. The Crystal Structure of the Plant Small GTPase OsRac1 Reveals Its Mode of Binding to NADPH Oxidase*

    PubMed Central

    Kosami, Ken-ichi; Ohki, Izuru; Nagano, Minoru; Furuita, Kyoko; Sugiki, Toshihiko; Kawano, Yoji; Kawasaki, Tsutomu; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Shimamoto, Ko; Kojima, Chojiro

    2014-01-01

    Rac/Rop proteins are Rho-type small GTPases that act as molecular switches in plants. Recent studies have identified these proteins as key components in many major plant signaling pathways, such as innate immunity, pollen tube growth, and root hair formation. In rice, the Rac/Rop protein OsRac1 plays an important role in regulating the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the NADPH oxidase OsRbohB during innate immunity. However, the molecular mechanism by which OsRac1 regulates OsRbohB remains unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of OsRac1 complexed with the non-hydrolyzable GTP analog guanosine 5′-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate at 1.9 Å resolution; this represents the first active-form structure of a plant small GTPase. To elucidate the ROS production in rice cells, structural information was used to design OsRac1 mutants that displayed reduced binding to OsRbohB. Only mutations in the OsRac1 Switch I region showed attenuated interactions with OsRbohB in vitro. In particular, Tyr39 and Asp45 substitutions suppressed ROS production in rice cells, indicating that these residues are critical for interaction with and activation of OsRbohB. Structural comparison of active-form OsRac1 with AtRop9 in its GDP-bound inactive form showed a large conformational difference in the vicinity of these residues. Our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of the immune response through OsRac1 and the various cellular responses associated with plant Rac/Rop proteins. PMID:25128531

  17. RhoA and Rac1 GTPases Differentially Regulate Agonist-Receptor Mediated Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Huzoor; Duan, Xin; Saleem, Saima; Davis, Ashley K.; Zheng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Agonist induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NADPH oxidases (NOX) enhances platelet aggregation and hence the risk of thrombosis. RhoA and Rac1 GTPases are involved in ROS generation by NOX in a variety of cells, but their roles in platelet ROS production remain unclear. In this study we used platelets from RhoA and Rac1 conditional knockout mice as well as human platelets treated with Rhosin and NSC23767, rationally designed small molecule inhibitors of RhoA and Rac GTPases, respectively, to better define the contributions of RhoA and Rac1 signaling to ROS generation and platelet activation. Treatment of platelets with Rhosin inhibited: (a) U46619 induced activation of RhoA; (b) phosphorylation of p47phox, a critical component of NOX; (c) U46619 or thrombin induced ROS generation; (d) phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC); (e) platelet shape change; (f) platelet spreading on immobilized fibrinogen; and (g) release of P-selectin, secretion of ATP and aggregation. Conditional deletion of RhoA or Rac1 gene inhibited thrombin induced ROS generation in platelets. Addition of Y27632, a RhoA inhibitor, NSC23766 or Phox-I, an inhibitor of Rac1-p67phox interaction, to human platelets blocked thrombin induced ROS generation. These data suggest that: (a) RhoA/ROCK/p47phox signaling axis promotes ROS production that, at least in part, contributes to platelet activation in conjunction with or independent of the RhoA/ROCK mediated phosphorylation of MLC; and (b) RhoA and Rac1 differentially regulate ROS generation by inhibiting phosphorylation of p47phox and Rac1-p67phox interaction, respectively. PMID:27681226

  18. Localization of Bud2p, a GTPase-activating protein necessary for programming cell polarity in yeast to the presumptive bud site

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hay-Oak; Sanson, Anthony; Herskowitz, Ira

    1999-01-01

    Yeast cells of different cell type exhibit distinct budding patterns that reflect the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Bud1p (Rsr1p), a Ras-like GTPase, and Bud2p, a GTPase-activating protein for Bud1p, are essential for proper budding pattern. We show that Bud2p is localized at the presumptive bud site in G1 cells in all cell types and that this localization is independent of Bud1p. Bud2p subsequently localizes to the mother-bud neck after bud emergence; this localization depends on the integrity of the septins. These observations indicate that Bud2p becomes positioned in G1 cells by recognizing cell type-specific landmarks at the presumptive bud site. PMID:10444589

  19. Analysis of the Rab GTPase Interactome in Dendritic Cells Reveals Anti-microbial Functions of the Rab32 Complex in Bacterial Containment.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yu; Zou, Liyun; Tang, Xiangyu; Yang, Yi; Ma, Li; Jia, Qingzhu; Ni, Qingshan; Liu, Siqi; Tang, Lizhang; Lin, Regina; Wong, Elizabeth; Sun, Wei; Wang, Liting; Wei, Quanfang; Ran, Haiying; Zhang, Liqun; Lian, Hengning; Huang, Wei; Wu, Yuzhang; Li, Qi-Jing; Wan, Ying

    2016-02-16

    Dendritic cells (DCs) orchestrate complex membrane trafficking through an interconnected transportation network linked together by Rab GTPases. Through a tandem affinity purification strategy and mass spectrometry, we depicted an interactomic landscape of major members of the mammalian Rab GTPase family. When complemented with imaging tools, this proteomic analysis provided a global view of intracellular membrane organization. Driven by this analysis, we investigated dynamic changes to the Rab32 subnetwork in DCs induced by L. monocytogenes infection and uncovered an essential role of this subnetwork in controlling the intracellular proliferation of L. monocytogenes. Mechanistically, Rab32 formed a persistent complex with two interacting proteins, PHB and PHB2, to encompass bacteria both during early phagosome formation and after L. monocytogenes escaped the original containment vacuole. Collectively, we have provided a functional compartmentalization overview and an organizational framework of intracellular Rab-mediated vesicle trafficking that can serve as a resource for future investigations.

  20. The small GTPase Rab5 homologue Ypt5 regulates cell morphology, sexual development, ion-stress response and vacuolar formation in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukamoto, Yuta; Katayama, Chisako; Shinohara, Miki; Shinohara, Akira; Maekawa, Shohei; Miyamoto, Masaaki

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Multiple functions of Rab5 GTPase in fission yeast were found. •Roles of Rab5 in fission yeast were discussed. •Relation between Rab5 and actin cytoskeleton were discussed. -- Abstract: Inner-membrane transport is critical to cell function. Rab family GTPases play an important role in vesicle transport. In mammalian cells, Rab5 is reported to be involved in the regulation of endosome formation, phagocytosis and chromosome alignment. Here, we examined the role of the fission yeast Rab5 homologue Ypt5 using a point mutant allele. Mutant cells displayed abnormal cell morphology, mating, sporulation, endocytosis, vacuole fusion and responses to ion stress. Our data strongly suggest that fission yeast Rab5 is involved in the regulation of various types of cellular functions.

  1. Regulation of mTORC1 by the Rag GTPases is necessary for neonatal autophagy and survival.

    PubMed

    Efeyan, Alejo; Zoncu, Roberto; Chang, Steven; Gumper, Iwona; Snitkin, Harriet; Wolfson, Rachel L; Kirak, Oktay; Sabatini, David D; Sabatini, David M

    2013-01-31

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway regulates organismal growth in response to many environmental cues, including nutrients and growth factors. Cell-based studies showed that mTORC1 senses amino acids through the RagA-D family of GTPases (also known as RRAGA, B, C and D), but their importance in mammalian physiology is unknown. Here we generate knock-in mice that express a constitutively active form of RagA (RagA(GTP)) from its endogenous promoter. RagA(GTP/GTP) mice develop normally, but fail to survive postnatal day 1. When delivered by Caesarean section, fasted RagA(GTP/GTP) neonates die almost twice as rapidly as wild-type littermates. Within an hour of birth, wild-type neonates strongly inhibit mTORC1, which coincides with profound hypoglycaemia and a decrease in plasma amino-acid concentrations. In contrast, mTORC1 inhibition does not occur in RagA(GTP/GTP) neonates, despite identical reductions in blood nutrient amounts. With prolonged fasting, wild-type neonates recover their plasma glucose concentrations, but RagA(GTP/GTP) mice remain hypoglycaemic until death, despite using glycogen at a faster rate. The glucose homeostasis defect correlates with the inability of fasted RagA(GTP/GTP) neonates to trigger autophagy and produce amino acids for de novo glucose production. Because profound hypoglycaemia does not inhibit mTORC1 in RagA(GTP/GTP) neonates, we considered the possibility that the Rag pathway signals glucose as well as amino-acid sufficiency to mTORC1. Indeed, mTORC1 is resistant to glucose deprivation in RagA(GTP/GTP) fibroblasts, and glucose, like amino acids, controls its recruitment to the lysosomal surface, the site of mTORC1 activation. Thus, the Rag GTPases signal glucose and amino-acid concentrations to mTORC1, and have an unexpectedly key role in neonates in autophagy induction and thus nutrient homeostasis and viability.

  2. Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases regulate shear stress-driven β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Qiaoqiao; Cho, Eunhye; Yokota, Hiroki; Na, Sungsoo

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Shear stress increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated β-catenin nuclear localization. •Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA displayed distinct dynamic activity patterns under flow. •Rac1 and Cdc42, but not RhoA, regulate shear stress-driven TCF/LEF activation. •Cytoskeleton did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activation. -- Abstract: Beta-catenin-dependent TCF/LEF (T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancing factor) is known to be mechanosensitive and an important regulator for promoting bone formation. However, the functional connection between TCF/LEF activity and Rho family GTPases is not well understood in osteoblasts. Herein we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying oscillatory shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells using live cell imaging. We employed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based biosensors, which allowed us to monitor signal transduction in living cells in real time. Oscillatory (1 Hz) shear stress (10 dynes/cm{sup 2}) increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated translocation of β-catenin to the nucleus with the distinct activity patterns of Rac1 and Cdc42. The shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity was blocked by the inhibition of Rac1 and Cdc42 with their dominant negative mutants or selective drugs, but not by a dominant negative mutant of RhoA. In contrast, constitutively active Rac1 and Cdc42 mutants caused a significant enhancement of TCF/LEF activity. Moreover, activation of Rac1 and Cdc42 increased the basal level of TCF/LEF activity, while their inhibition decreased the basal level. Interestingly, disruption of cytoskeletal structures or inhibition of myosin activity did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity. Although Rac1 is reported to be involved in β-catenin in cancer cells, the involvement of Cdc42 in β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts has not been identified. Our findings in this study demonstrate

  3. Sevoflurane Inhalation Accelerates the Long-Term Memory Consolidation via Small GTPase Overexpression in the Hippocampus of Mice in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Emi; Feng, Guo-Gang; Hayashi, Hisaki; Satomoto, Maiko; Sato, Motohiko; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Sevoflurane exposure impairs the long-term memory in neonates. Whether the exposure to animals in adolescence affects the memory, however, has been unclear. A small hydrolase enzyme of guanosine triphosphate (GTPase) rac1 plays a role in the F-actin dynamics related to the synaptic plasticity, as well as superoxide production via reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activation. The current study was designed to examine whether sevoflurane exposure to mice in early adolescence modifies the long-term learning ability concomitantly with the changes in F-actin constitution as well as superoxide production in the hippocampus according to the levels of rac1 protein expression. Four-week-old mice were subjected to the evaluation of long-term learning ability for three days. On day one, each mouse was allowed to enter a dark chamber for five min to acclimatization. On day two, the procedure was repeated with the addition of an electric shock as soon as a mouse entered the dark chamber. All mice subsequently inhaled 2 L/min air with (Sevoflurane group) and without (Control group) 2.5% sevoflurane for three hours. On day three, each mouse was placed on the platform and retention time, which is the latency to enter the dark chamber, was examined. The brain removed after the behavior test, was used for analyses of immunofluorescence, Western immunoblotting and intracellular levels of superoxide. Sevoflurane exposure significantly prolonged retention time, indicating the enhanced long-term memory. Sevoflurane inhalation augmented F-actin constitution coexisting with the rac1 protein overexpression in the hippocampus whereas it did not alter the levels of superoxide. Sevoflurane exposure to 4-week-old mice accelerates the long-term memory concomitantly with the enhanced F-actin constitution coexisting with the small GTPase rac1 overexpression in the hippocampus. These results suggest that sevoflurane inhalation may amplify long-term memory

  4. Vitreous-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements via the Rac1 GTPase-dependent signaling pathway in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xionggao; Wei, Yantao; Ma, Haizhi; Zhang, Shaochong

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vitreous induces morphological changes and cytoskeletal rearrangements in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac1 is activated in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac inhibition prevents morphological changes in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac inhibition suppresses cytoskeletal rearrangements in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The vitreous-induced effects are mediated by a Rac1 GTPase/LIMK1/cofilin pathway. -- Abstract: Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is mainly caused by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration, invasion, proliferation and transformation into fibroblast-like cells that produce the extracellular matrix (ECM). The vitreous humor is known to play an important role in PVR. An epithelial-to-mesenchymal transdifferentiation (EMT) of human RPE cells induced by 25% vitreous treatment has been linked to stimulation of the mesenchymal phenotype, migration and invasion. Here, we characterized the effects of the vitreous on the cell morphology and cytoskeleton in human RPE cells. The signaling pathway that mediates these effects was investigated. Serum-starved RPE cells were incubated with 25% vitreous, and the morphological changes were examined by phase-contrast microscopy. Filamentous actin (F-actin) was examined by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Protein phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2, Smad2/3, LIM kinase (LIMK) 1 and cofilin was analyzed by Western blot analysis. Vitreous treatment induced cytoskeletal rearrangements, activated Rac1 and enhanced the phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2 and Smad2/3. When the cells were treated with a Rac activation-specific inhibitor, the cytoskeletal rearrangements were prevented, and the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 was blocked. Vitreous treatment also enhanced the phosphorylation of LIMK1 and cofilin and the Rac inhibitor blocked this effect. We propose that vitreous

  5. An HflX-type GTPase from Sulfolobus solfataricus binds to the 50S ribosomal subunit in all nucleotide-bound states.

    PubMed

    Blombach, Fabian; Launay, Helene; Zorraquino, Violeta; Swarts, Daan C; Cabrita, Lisa D; Benelli, Dario; Christodoulou, John; Londei, Paola; van der Oost, John

    2011-06-01

    HflX GTPases are found in all three domains of life, the Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. HflX from Escherichia coli has been shown to bind to the 50S ribosomal subunit in a nucleotide-dependent manner, and this interaction strongly stimulates its GTPase activity. We recently determined the structure of an HflX ortholog from the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus (SsoHflX). It revealed the presence of a novel HflX domain that might function in RNA binding and is linked to a canonical G domain. This domain arrangement is common to all archaeal, bacterial, and eukaryotic HflX GTPases. This paper shows that the archaeal SsoHflX, like its bacterial orthologs, binds to the 50S ribosomal subunit. This interaction does not depend on the presence of guanine nucleotides. The HflX domain is sufficient for ribosome interaction. Binding appears to be restricted to free 50S ribosomal subunits and does not occur with 70S ribosomes engaged in translation. The fingerprint (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear correlation nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of SsoHflX reveals a large number of well-resolved resonances that are broadened upon binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit. The GTPase activity of SsoHflX is stimulated by crude fractions of 50S ribosomal subunits, but this effect is lost with further high-salt purification of the 50S ribosomal subunits, suggesting that the stimulation depends on an extrinsic factor bound to the 50S ribosomal subunit. Our results reveal common properties but also marked differences between archaeal and bacterial HflX proteins.

  6. Targeting by AutophaGy proteins (TAG): Targeting of IFNG-inducible GTPases to membranes by the LC3 conjugation system of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sungwoo; Choi, Jayoung; Biering, Scott B.; Dominici, Erin; Williams, Lelia E.; Hwang, Seungmin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT LC3 has been used as a marker to locate autophagosomes. However, it is also well established that LC3 can localize on various membranous structures other than autophagosomes. We recently demonstrated that the LC3 conjugation system (ATG7, ATG3, and ATG12–ATG5-ATG16L1) is required to target LC3 and IFNG (interferon, gamma)-inducible GTPases to the parasitophorus vacuole membrane (PVM) of a protist parasite Toxoplasma gondii and consequently for IFNG to control T. gondii infection. Here we show that not only LC3, but also its homologs (GABARAP, GABARAPL1, and GABARAPL2) localize on the PVM of T. gondii in a conjugation-dependent manner. Knockout/knockdown of all LC3 homologs led to a significant reduction in targeting of the IFNG-inducible GTPases to the PVM of T. gondii and the IFNG-mediated control of T. gondii infection. Furthermore, when we relocated the ATG12–ATG5-ATG16L1 complex, which specifies the conjugation site of LC3 homologs, to alternative target membranes, the IFNG-inducible GTPases were targeted to the new target membranes rather than the PVM of T. gondii. These data suggest that the localization of LC3 homologs onto a membrane by the LC3 conjugation system is necessary and sufficient for targeting of the IFNG-inducible GTPases to the membrane, implying Targeting by AutophaGy proteins (TAG). Our data further suggest that the conjugation of ubiquitin-like LC3 homologs to the phospholipids of membranes may change the destiny of the membranes beyond degradation through lysosomal fusion, as the conjugation of ubiquitin to proteins changes the destiny of the proteins beyond proteasomal degradation. PMID:27172324

  7. Distinct Splice Variants of Dynamin-related Protein 1 Differentially Utilize Mitochondrial Fission Factor as an Effector of Cooperative GTPase Activity.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Patrick J; Francy, Christopher A; Stepanyants, Natalia; Lehman, Lance; Baglio, Anthony; Mears, Jason A; Qi, Xin; Ramachandran, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Multiple isoforms of the mitochondrial fission GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) arise from the alternative splicing of its single gene-encoded pre-mRNA transcript. Among these, the longer Drp1 isoforms, expressed selectively in neurons, bear unique polypeptide sequences within their GTPase and variable domains, known as the A-insert and the B-insert, respectively. Their functions remain unresolved. A comparison of the various biochemical and biophysical properties of the neuronally expressed isoforms with that of the ubiquitously expressed, and shortest, Drp1 isoform (Drp1-short) has revealed the effect of these inserts on Drp1 function. Utilizing various biochemical, biophysical, and cellular approaches, we find that the A- and B-inserts distinctly alter the oligomerization propensity of Drp1 in solution as well as the preferred curvature of helical Drp1 self-assembly on membranes. Consequently, these sequences also suppress Drp1 cooperative GTPase activity. Mitochondrial fission factor (Mff), a tail-anchored membrane protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane that recruits Drp1 to sites of ensuing fission, differentially stimulates the disparate Drp1 isoforms and alleviates the autoinhibitory effect imposed by these sequences on Drp1 function. Moreover, the differential stimulatory effects of Mff on Drp1 isoforms are dependent on the mitochondrial lipid, cardiolipin (CL). Although Mff stimulation of the intrinsically cooperative Drp1-short isoform is relatively modest, CL-independent, and even counter-productive at high CL concentrations, Mff stimulation of the much less cooperative longest Drp1 isoform (Drp1-long) is robust and occurs synergistically with increasing CL content. Thus, membrane-anchored Mff differentially regulates various Drp1 isoforms by functioning as an allosteric effector of cooperative GTPase activity.

  8. MIF inhibits monocytic movement through a non-canonical receptor and disruption of temporal Rho GTPase activities in U-937 cells.

    PubMed

    DiCosmo-Ponticello, Crystal J; Hoover, Daniel; Coffman, Frederick D; Cohen, Stanley; Cohen, Marion C

    2014-09-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that was initially identified by its ability to inhibit the movement of macrophages. Cell migration is a highly complex process involving changes to the cytoskeleton and cell adhesion molecules, and is regulated by the Rho GTPases. A simple model using human monocytic U-937 cells to elicit the classic MIF response was implemented to examine the mechanism of MIF-induced migration inhibition. Our results demonstrate that MIF inhibits migration of these U-937 cells through a non-canonical receptor, CXCR4, in the absence of the putative primary MIF receptor CD74. Migration inhibition is dependent upon a series of temporal perturbations of the activities of the Rho GTPases: initial activation followed by subsequent inactivation of RhoA, inactivation of Rac1, and cyclic activation of Cdc42. MIF-mediated changes in the activities of the Rho GTPases jointly contributed to migration inhibition in these cells. Collectively, these data suggest that the MIF-mediated migration inhibition is mediated by the outcome of G-protein signaling, and in less adherent cells such as those of the monocyte/macrophage lineage, RhoA directly affects net translocation through its ability to induce cell body contraction. These findings demonstrate that CXCR4 can mediate MIF signaling in the absence of CD74 in addition to serving as a MIF co-receptor along with CD74. These results correlate MIF activity to specific and sequential Rho GTPase activity perturbations, and given that CXCR4 functions in numerous processes, suggests potential roles for the modulation of cell movement in those events including development, cell survival and viral infection.

  9. Crystal Structure Analysis of Wild Type and Fast Hydrolyzing Mutant of EhRabX3, a Tandem Ras Superfamily GTPase from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Vijay Kumar; Chandra, Mintu; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Datta, Sunando

    2016-01-16

    The enteric protozoan parasite, Entamoeba histolytica, is the causative agent of amoebic dysentery, liver abscess and colitis in human. Vesicular trafficking plays a key role in the survival and virulence of the protozoan and is regulated by various Rab GTPases. EhRabX3 is a catalytically inefficient amoebic Rab protein, which is unique among the eukaryotic Ras superfamily by virtue of its tandem domain organization. Here, we report the crystal structures of GDP-bound fast hydrolyzing mutant (V71A/K73Q) and GTP-bound wild type EhRabX3 at 3.1 and 2.8Å resolutions, respectively. Though both G-domains possess "phosphate binding loop containing nucleoside triphosphate hydrolases fold", only the N-terminal domain binds to guanine nucleotide. The relative orientation of the N-terminal domain and C-terminal domain is stabilized by numerous inter-domain interactions. Compared to other Ras superfamily members, both the GTPase domains displayed large deviation in switch II perhaps due to non-conservative substitutions in this region. As a result, entire switch II is restructured and moved away from the nucleotide binding pocket, providing a rationale for the diminished GTPase activity of EhRabX3. The N-terminal GTPase domain possesses unusually large number of cysteine residues. X-ray crystal structure of the fast hydrolyzing mutant of EhRabX3 revealed that C39 and C163 formed an intra-molecular disulfide bond. Subsequent mutational and biochemical studies suggest that C39 and C163 are critical for maintaining the structural integrity and function of EhRabX3. Structure-guided functional investigation of cysteine mutants could provide the physiological implications of the disulfide bond and could allow us to design potential inhibitors for the better treatment of intestinal amebiasis.

  10. Cryptococcus neoformans activates RhoGTPase proteins followed by protein kinase C, focal adhesion kinase, and ezrin to promote traversal across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Chul; Crary, Benjamin; Chang, Yun C; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J; Kim, Kee J

    2012-10-19

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that causes meningoencephalitis. Previous studies have demonstrated that Cryptococcus binding and invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) is a prerequisite for transmigration across the blood-brain barrier. However, the molecular mechanism involved in the cryptococcal blood-brain barrier traversal is poorly understood. In this study we examined the signaling events in HBMEC during interaction with C. neoformans. Analysis with inhibitors revealed that cryptococcal association, invasion, and transmigration require host actin cytoskeleton rearrangement. Rho pulldown assays revealed that Cryptococcus induces activation of three members of RhoGTPases, e.g. RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42, and their activations are required for cryptococcal transmigration across the HBMEC monolayer. Western blot analysis showed that Cryptococcus also induces phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), ezrin, and protein kinase C α (PKCα), all of which are involved in the rearrangement of host actin cytoskeleton. Down-regulation of FAK, ezrin, or PKCα by shRNA knockdown, dominant-negative transfection, or inhibitors significantly reduces cryptococcal ability to traverse the HBMEC monolayer, indicating their positive role in cryptococcal transmigration. In addition, activation of RhoGTPases is the upstream event for phosphorylation of FAK, ezrin, and PKCα during C. neoformans-HBMEC interaction. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that C. neoformans activates RhoGTPases and subsequently FAK, ezrin, and PKCα to promote their traversal across the HBMEC monolayer, which is the critical step for cryptococcal brain infection and development of meningitis.

  11. Skeletal muscle differentiation and fusion are regulated by the BAR-containing Rho-GTPase-activating protein (Rho-GAP), GRAF1.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Jason T; Lenhart, Kaitlin C; Cameron, Morgan V; Mack, Christopher P; Conlon, Frank L; Taylor, Joan M

    2011-07-22

    Although RhoA activity is necessary for promoting myogenic mesenchymal stem cell fates, recent studies in cultured cells suggest that down-regulation of RhoA activity in specified myoblasts is required for subsequent differentiation and myotube formation. However, whether this phenomenon occurs in vivo and which Rho modifiers control these later events remain unclear. We found that expression of the Rho-GTPase-activating protein, GRAF1, was transiently up-regulated during myogenesis, and studies in C2C12 cells revealed that GRAF1 is necessary and sufficient for mediating RhoA down-regulation and inducing muscle differentiation. Moreover, forced expression of GRAF1 in pre-differentiated myoblasts drives robust muscle fusion by a process that requires GTPase-activating protein-dependent actin remodeling and BAR-dependent membrane binding or sculpting. Moreover, morpholino-based knockdown studies in Xenopus laevis determined that GRAF1 expression is critical for muscle development. GRAF1-depleted embryos exhibited elevated RhoA activity and defective myofibrillogenesis that resulted in progressive muscle degeneration, defective motility, and embryonic lethality. Our results are the first to identify a GTPase-activating protein that regulates muscle maturation and to highlight the functional importance of BAR domains in myotube formation.

  12. Cdc15 integrates Tem1 GTPase-mediated spatial signals with Polo kinase-mediated temporal cues to activate mitotic exit.

    PubMed

    Rock, Jeremy M; Amon, Angelika

    2011-09-15

    In budding yeast, a Ras-like GTPase signaling cascade known as the mitotic exit network (MEN) promotes exit from mitosis. To ensure the accurate execution of mitosis, MEN activity is coordinated with other cellular events and restricted to anaphase. The MEN GTPase Tem1 has been assumed to be the central switch in MEN regulation. We show here that during an unperturbed cell cycle, restricting MEN activity to anaphase can occur in a Tem1 GTPase-independent manner. We found that the anaphase-specific activation of the MEN in the absence of Tem1 is controlled by the Polo kinase Cdc5. We further show that both Tem1 and Cdc5 are required to recruit the MEN kinase Cdc15 to spindle pole bodies, which is both necessary and sufficient to induce MEN signaling. Thus, Cdc15 functions as a coincidence detector of two essential cell cycle oscillators: the Polo kinase Cdc5 synthesis/degradation cycle and the Tem1 G-protein cycle. The Cdc15-dependent integration of these temporal (Cdc5 and Tem1 activity) and spatial (Tem1 activity) signals ensures that exit from mitosis occurs only after proper genome partitioning.

  13. The Small GTPase MoSec4 Is Involved in Vegetative Development and Pathogenicity by Regulating the Extracellular Protein Secretion in Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Huakun; Chen, Simiao; Chen, Xiaofeng; Liu, Shuyan; Dang, Xie; Yang, Chengdong; Giraldo, Martha C.; Oliveira-Garcia, Ely; Zhou, Jie; Wang, Zonghua; Valent, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The Rab GTPase proteins play important roles in the membrane trafficking, and consequently protein secretion and development of eukaryotic organisms. However, little is known about the function of Rab GTPases in Magnaporthe oryzae. To further explore the function of Rab GTPases, we deleted the ortholog of the yeast Sec4p protein in M. oryzae, namely MoSEC4. The ΔMosec4 mutant is defective in polarized growth and conidiation, and it displays decreased appressorium turgor pressure and attenuated pathogenicity. Notably, the biotrophic invasive hyphae produced in rice cells are more bulbous and compressed in the ΔMosec4 mutant. Further studies showed that deletion of the MoSEC4 gene resulted in decreased secretion of extracellular enzymes and mislocalization of the cytoplasmic effector PWL2-mCherry-NLS. In accordance with a role in secretion, the GFP-MoSec4 fusion protein mainly accumulates at tips of growing vegetative hyphae. Our results suggest that the MoSec4 protein plays important roles in the secretion of extracellular proteins and consequently hyphal development and pathogenicity in the rice blast fungus. PMID:27729922

  14. RhoA GTPase-Induced Ocular Hypertension in a Rodent Model Is Associated with Increased Fibrogenic Activity in the Trabecular Meshwork<