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Sample records for guanosine monophosphate pathway

  1. Lanthanum enhances glutamate-nitric oxide-3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in the hippocampus of rats.

    PubMed

    Du, Yanqiu; Yang, Jinghua; Yan, Bo; Bai, Yan; Zhang, Lifeng; Zheng, Linlin; Cai, Yuan

    2016-10-01

    Lanthanum (La) appears to impair learning and memory and increase the toxicity of excitatory amino acids in the central nervous system. The mechanism underlying excitotoxicity induced by La is still unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hippocampal impairment of La exposure and possible mechanism involving the glutamate-nitric oxide (NO)-3'-5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway. In this study, lactating rats were exposed to 0, 0.25, 0.50, and 1.0% lanthanum chloride (LaCl3) in drinking water, respectively. Their offsprings were exposed to LaCl3 by parental lactation and then administrated with 0, 0.25, 0.50, and 1.0% LaCl3 in drinking water for 1 month. The results showed that La exposure impaired the neuronal ultrastructure and significantly increased the glutamate level, intracellular calcium ion concentrations, and NR1 and NR2B expression in the hippocampi. La exposure significantly enhanced messenger RNA expression and activity levels of inducible NO synthase and increased NO and cGMP levels in the hippocampi in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that the mechanism underlying excitotoxicity induced by La is possibly due to alterations of the glutamate-NO-cGMP signaling pathway in the hippocampus. The study provides new findings that may help prevent and improve treatments for La-induced neurotoxicity.

  2. Inhibition of the nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway limited the cardioprotective effect of post-conditioning in hearts with apical myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Correa, Francisco; Buelna-Chontal, Mabel; Chagoya, Victoria; García-Rivas, Gerardo; Vigueras, Rosa María; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; García-Niño, Wylly Ramsés; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; León-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Zazueta, Cecilia

    2015-10-15

    Reperfusion damage involves opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) and loss of ATP synthesis. Several cardioprotective pathways are activated by ischemic or pharmacological post-conditioning (PC). The mechanisms that are activated by PC in no co-morbidity murine models include: activation of rescue kinases, oxidative stress reduction, glycolytic flux regulation and preservation of ATP synthesis. However, relatively scarce efforts have been made to define whether the efficacy of PC signaling is blunted by risk factors or systemic diseases associated with ischemic heart pathology. Experimental evidence has shown that the nitric oxide (NO)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling is a main mechanism activated by PC in hearts without pathological history. In this work we evaluated the participation of the NO pathway, through downstream kinase activation and inhibition of mPTP in hearts with previous infarct. Myocardial infarction was induced with a single dose of isoproterenol (85 mg/kg i.p.) to male Wistar rats. After 24 h, the hearts were mounted into the Langendorff system and subjected to 30 min of ischemia and 60 min of reperfusion. PC consisted of 5 cycles of 30 s of reperfusion/30 s of ischemia, then the hearts were reperfused with or without inhibitors of the NO/cGMP pathway. PC activates the NO/cGMP pathway, as increased cGMP and NO levels were detected in isoproterenol-treated hearts. The cardioprotective effect of PC was abolished with both L-NAME (inhibitor of constitutive NO synthase) and ODQ (inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase), whereas the NO donor (DETA-NO) restored cardioprotection even in the presence of L-NAME or ODQ. We also found that mitochondrial structure and function was preserved in PC hearts. We conclude that PC exerts cardioprotection in hearts with previous infarct by maintaining mitochondrial structure and function through NO-dependent pathway.

  3. Endurance training upregulates the nitric oxide/soluble guanylyl cyclase/cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate pathway in the striatum, midbrain and cerebellum of male rats.

    PubMed

    Chalimoniuk, Małgorzata; Chrapusta, Stanisław J; Lukačova, Nadežda; Langfort, Józef

    2015-08-27

    The nitric oxide/soluble guanylyl cyclase/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO/sGC/cGMP) brain pathway plays an important role in motor control. We studied the effects of 6-week endurance training (running) of moderate intensity on this pathway by comparing, between sedentary and endurance-trained young adult male Wistar rats, the expression of endothelial (eNOS) and neuronal (nNOS) NO synthases and of α1, α2 and β1 GC subunits, as well as cGMP levels, in the brain cortex, hippocampus, striatum, midbrain and cerebellum. Additionally, we compared the respective regional expressions of BDNF and the BDNF receptor TrkB. Twenty-four hours after the last training session, the endurance-trained rats showed 3-fold higher spontaneous locomotor activity than their sedentary counterparts in an open-field test. Forty-eight hours after the completion of the training, the trained rats showed significantly elevated BDNF and TrKB mRNAs in the hippocampus, midbrain and striatum, and significantly increased BDNF levels in the hippocampus and striatum. Simultaneously, significant increases were found in mRNA and protein levels and activities of nNOS and eNOS as well as in mRNA and protein levels of GCα2 and GCβ1, but not GCα1, in the striatum, midbrain and cerebellum; no change in these variables was found in the cortex and hippocampus except for marked elevations in cortical GCβ1 mRNA and protein. Changes in regional cGMP levels paralleled those in eNOS, nNOS and GCα2 expression and NOSs' activities. These results suggest that favorable extrapyramidal motor effects of physical training are related to the enhanced activity of the NO/sGC/cGMP pathway in certain motor control-related subcortical brain regions.

  4. Elevated intracranial dopamine impairs the glutamate-nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in cortical astrocytes in rats with minimal hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    DING, SAIDAN; HUANG, WEILONG; YE, YIRU; YANG, JIANJING; HU, JIANGNAN; WANG, XIAOBIN; LIU, LEPING; LU, QIN; LIN, YUANSHAO

    2014-01-01

    In a previous study by our group memory impairment in rats with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) was associated with the inhibition of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (Glu-NO-cGMP) pathway due to elevated dopamine (DA). However, the effects of DA on the Glu-NO-cGMP pathway localized in primary cortical astrocytes (PCAs) had not been elucidated in rats with MHE. In the present study, it was identified that when the levels of DA in the cerebral cortex of rats with MHE and high-dose DA (3 mg/kg)-treated rats were increased, the co-localization of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors subunit 1 (NMDAR1), calmodulin (CaM), nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) and cyclic guanine monophosphate (cGMP) with the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker protein of astrocytes, all significantly decreased, in both the MHE and high-dose DA-treated rats (P<0.01). Furthermore, NMDA-induced augmentation of the expression of NMDAR1, CaM, nNOS, sGC and cGMP localized in PCAs was decreased in MHE and DA-treated rats, as compared with the controls. Chronic exposure of cultured cerebral cortex PCAs to DA treatment induced a dose-dependent decrease in the concentration of intracellular calcium, nitrites and nitrates, the formation of cGMP and the expression of NMDAR1, CaM, nNOS and sGC/cGMP. High doses of DA (50 μM) significantly reduced NMDA-induced augmentation of the formation of cGMP and the contents of NMDAR1, CaM, nNOS, sGC and cGMP (P<0.01). These results suggest that the suppression of DA on the Glu-NO-cGMP pathway localized in PCAs contributes to memory impairment in rats with MHE. PMID:25059564

  5. Fluoroquinolones as potential photochemotherapeutic agents: covalent addition to guanosine monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Fasani, Elisa; Manet, Ilse; Capobianco, Massimo L; Monti, Sandra; Pretali, Luca; Albini, Angelo

    2010-08-21

    The triplet aryl cation photochemically generated from fluoroquinolones bearing a fluoro atom at position 8 attacks guanosine monophosphate (k(r) > 10(9) M(-1)s(-1)) and forms covalent adducts. The reaction is a model for the implementation of oxygen-independent photochemotherapy. PMID:20571620

  6. Involvement of nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of tropisetron and ondansetron in mice forced swimming test and tail suspension test.

    PubMed

    Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Kordjazy, Nastaran; Amiri, Shayan; Haj-Mirzaian, Arvin; Amini-Khoei, Hossien; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Dehpour, AhmadReza

    2016-06-01

    Antidepressant-like effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine subtype 3 (5-HT3) antagonists including tropisetron and ondansetron have been previously demonstrated in the literature. It was reported that stimulation of 5-HT3 receptors activate the nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO-cGMP) pathway, which is involved in regulation of behavioral and emotional functions. In our study, treating animals with tropisetron (5, 10, and 30mg/kg) and ondansetron (0.01 and 0.1µg/kg) significantly decreased the immobility time in forced swimming test (FST) and tail-suspension test (TST). Co-administration of subeffective doses of tropisetron (1mg/kg) and ondansetron (0.001µg/kg) with subeffective dose of l-NAME (10mg/kg, nonselective NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor) and 7-nitroindazole (25mg/kg, neural NOS inhibitor) exerted antidepressant-like effect in FST and TST, while aminoguanidine (50mg/kg, inducible NOS inhibitor) did not enhance the antidepressant-like effect of 5-HT3 antagonists. Besides, l-arginine (750mg/kg, NO precursor) and sildenafil (5mg/kg, phosphodiesterase inhibitor) suppressed the anti-immobility effect of 5-HT3 antagonists. None of the treatments altered the locomotor behavior of mice in open-field test. Also, hippocampal (but not cortical) nitrite level was significantly lower in tropisetron and ondansetron-treated mice compared with saline-injected mice. Also, co-administration of 7-nitroindazole with tropisetron or ondansetron caused a significant decrease in hippocampal nitrite levels. In conclusion, we suggest that antidepressant-like effect of tropisetron and ondansetron are partially mediated by modulation of NO-cGMP pathway. PMID:27001377

  7. Nitric oxide and cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling in the eye.

    PubMed

    Murad, Ferid

    2008-06-01

    This brief review describes the components and pathways utilized in nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling. Since the discovery of the effects of NO and cGMP on smooth muscle relaxation about 30 years ago, the field has expanded in many directions such that many, but not all, biochemical and biological effects seem to be regulated by these unique signaling molecules. While many of the effects of NO are due to activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) that can be considered the receptor for NO, cGMP, in turn, can activate a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) to phosphorylate an array of proteins. Some of the effects of cGMP can be independent of PKG and are due to effects on ion channels or cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases. Also, some of the effects of NO can be independent of sGC activation. The isoenzymes and macromolecules that participate in these signaling pathways can serve as molecular targets to identify compounds that increase or decrease their activation and thus serve as chemical leads for discovering novel drugs for a variety of diseases. Some examples are given. However, with about 90,000 publications in the field since our first reports in 1977, this brief review can only give the readers a sample of the excitement and opportunities we have found in this cell signaling system.

  8. PRODUCTION OF EXTRACELLULAR GUANOSINE-5'-MONOPHOSPHATE BY BACILLUS SUBTILIS

    PubMed Central

    Demain, A. L.; Miller, I. M.; Hendlin, D.

    1964-01-01

    Demain, A. L. (Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, Rahway, N.J.), I. M. Miller, and D. Hendlin. Production of extracellular guanosine-5'-monophosphate by Bacillus subtilis. J. Bacteriol. 88:991–995. 1964.—Wild-type Bacillus subtilis colonies were found to feed purineless mutants. A strain with high feeding capacity was selected for study, with a guanineless mutant of B. subtilis used as the assay organism. The factor was excreted during its growth phase in a complex medium containing starch and soybean meal extract. Nutritional studies led to the development of a defined medium to be used for biochemical studies and to aid in the isolation of the factor. Starch was replaced by maltose and the soybean meal extract by Mn++. Production of the factor was sensitive to the pH of the medium during growth. Practically its entire extracellular accumulation occurred before visible lysis. The factor was identified as guanosine-5'-monophosphate derived by extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis of excreted ribonucleic acid. PMID:14219064

  9. Vascular relaxation and cyclic guanosine monophosphate in hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, Y.; DiPiero, A.; Lockette, W.

    1986-03-01

    Isolated aortae from hypertensive rats have a decreased relaxation response to acetylcholine (Ach), A23187, and nitroprusside (SNP). Since cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) has been shown to increase in response to these vasodilators, the authors measured cGMP in response to these agents in isolated aortae from normotensive rats and DOCA, 1K1C, and coarctation induced hypertension. cGMP was measured by radioimmunoassay in vessels after exposure to phenylephrine followed by either Ach, A23187, or SNP. The aortae from the hypertensive rats had decreased basal levels of cGMP and attenuated increases in cGMP in response to Ach and A23187. Rises in cGMP in response to SNP were also attenuated in aortae from the hypertensive rats, even at concentrations which induced similar relaxation in normotensive and hypertensive blood vessels. The data suggest that changes in cGMP do not necessarily reflect changes in endothelium independent vascular relaxation in hypertension.

  10. Antinociceptive Effect of Vardenafil on Carrageenan-Induced Hyperalgesia in Rat: involvement of Nitric Oxide/Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate/Calcium Channels Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gediz, Ezgi İkiz; Nacitarhan, Cahit; Minareci, Edibe; Sadan, Gulay

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the peripheral antinociception effects of specific phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE-5) inhibitor vardenafil on carrageenan-induced nociception in rats, and the role of calcium besides the L-arginine- nitric oxide (NO)- cyclic guanosine monophophate (cGMP) pathway in these effects. Hyperalgesia was induced by the intraplantar injection of 0.1 mL fresh carrageenan solution to right hind-paw whereas, saline as a vehicle of carrageenan was injected to the left paw. This procedure was used for measuring mechanic nociception pressure via an analgesimeter. Pressure which produced nociception was measured before (0 minute) and after(15, 30, 60 and 120 minutes) carrageenan injection. Local administration of vardenafil produced a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect. Pretreatment with NW-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), oxadiazolo (4, 3, a) quinoxalin -1-one (ODQ, inhibitor of guanylyl cyclase) or A23187 (calcium ionophore) decreased the effect of vardenafil. In contrast, L-arginine (nitric oxide donor) seemed to potentiate the vardenafil-induced antinociception. Our results suggest that phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor vardenafil may offer a new therapeutic tool to treat pain. It’s effect was probably result from L-arginine/NO-cGMP pathway activation and Ca + 2 channels are also involved. PMID:26664380

  11. Antinociceptive Effect of Vardenafil on Carrageenan-Induced Hyperalgesia in Rat: involvement of Nitric Oxide/Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate/Calcium Channels Pathway.

    PubMed

    Gediz, Ezgi İkiz; Nacitarhan, Cahit; Minareci, Edibe; Sadan, Gulay

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the peripheral antinociception effects of specific phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE-5) inhibitor vardenafil on carrageenan-induced nociception in rats, and the role of calcium besides the L-arginine- nitric oxide (NO)- cyclic guanosine monophophate (cGMP) pathway in these effects. Hyperalgesia was induced by the intraplantar injection of 0.1 mL fresh carrageenan solution to right hind-paw whereas, saline as a vehicle of carrageenan was injected to the left paw. This procedure was used for measuring mechanic nociception pressure via an analgesimeter. Pressure which produced nociception was measured before (0 minute) and after(15, 30, 60 and 120 minutes) carrageenan injection. Local administration of vardenafil produced a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect. Pretreatment with N(W)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), oxadiazolo (4, 3, a) quinoxalin -1-one (ODQ, inhibitor of guanylyl cyclase) or A23187 (calcium ionophore) decreased the effect of vardenafil. In contrast, L-arginine (nitric oxide donor) seemed to potentiate the vardenafil-induced antinociception. Our results suggest that phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor vardenafil may offer a new therapeutic tool to treat pain. It's effect was probably result from L-arginine/NO-cGMP pathway activation and Ca + 2 channels are also involved. PMID:26664380

  12. Ag(+)-mediated assembly of 5'-guanosine monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Loo, Kristine; Degtyareva, Natalya; Park, Jihae; Sengupta, Bidisha; Reddish, Michaeal; Rogers, Christopher C; Bryant, Andrea; Petty, Jeffrey T

    2010-04-01

    Polymorphic forms of nucleic acids provide platforms for new nanomaterials, and transition metal cations give access to alternative arrangements of nucleobases by coordinating with electron-rich functional groups. Interaction of Ag(+) with 5'-guanosine monophosphate (5'-GMP) is considered in this work. Ag(+) promotes nucleotide stacking and aggregation, as indicated by the increased viscosity of 5'-GMP solutions with Ag(+), magnification of the circular dichroism response of guanine by Ag(+), and exothermic reactions between Ag(+) and guanine derivatives. Isothermal titration calorimetry studies show that the reaction is favored starting at 10 microM 5'-GMP. Utilizing the exothermic heat change associated with reaction of Ag(+) with 5'-GMP, local structure within the aggregate was assessed. On the basis of the salt dependence of the reaction and comparison with the corresponding nucleoside, the dianionic phosphate of 5'-GMP is one binding site for Ag(+), although this electrostatic interaction is not a dominant contribution to the overall heat change. Another binding site is the N7 on the nucleobase, as determined via studies with 7-deazaguanosine. Besides this binding site, Ag(+) also associates with the O6, as earlier studies deduced from the shift in the carbonyl stretching frequency associated with adduct formation. With these two binding sites on the nucleobase, the empirical stoichiometry of approximately 1 Ag(+):nucleobase derived from the calorimetry studies indicates that Ag(+) coordinates two nucleobases. The proposed structural model is a Ag(+)-mediated guanine dimer within a base stacked aggregate. PMID:20205377

  13. Novel Characteristics of Trypanosoma brucei Guanosine 5'-monophosphate Reductase Distinct from Host Animals.

    PubMed

    Bessho, Tomoaki; Okada, Tetsuya; Kimura, Chihiro; Shinohara, Takahiro; Tomiyama, Ai; Imamura, Akira; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Nishimura, Kazuhiko; Fujimori, Ko; Shuto, Satoshi; Ishibashi, Osamu; Kubata, Bruno Kilunga; Inui, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic pathway of purine nucleotides in parasitic protozoa is a potent drug target for treatment of parasitemia. Guanosine 5'-monophosphate reductase (GMPR), which catalyzes the deamination of guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP) to inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), plays an important role in the interconversion of purine nucleotides to maintain the intracellular balance of their concentration. However, only a few studies on protozoan GMPR have been reported at present. Herein, we identified the GMPR in Trypanosoma brucei, a causative protozoan parasite of African trypanosomiasis, and found that the GMPR proteins were consistently localized to glycosomes in T. brucei bloodstream forms. We characterized its recombinant protein to investigate the enzymatic differences between GMPRs of T. brucei and its host animals. T. brucei GMPR was distinct in having an insertion of a tandem repeat of the cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) domain, which was absent in mammalian and bacterial GMPRs. The recombinant protein of T. brucei GMPR catalyzed the conversion of GMP to IMP in the presence of NADPH, and showed apparent affinities for both GMP and NADPH different from those of its mammalian counterparts. Interestingly, the addition of monovalent cations such as K+ and NH4+ to the enzymatic reaction increased the GMPR activity of T. brucei, whereas none of the mammalian GMPR's was affected by these cations. The monophosphate form of the purine nucleoside analog ribavirin inhibited T. brucei GMPR activity, though mammalian GMPRs showed no or only a little inhibition by it. These results suggest that the mechanism of the GMPR reaction in T. brucei is distinct from that in the host organisms. Finally, we demonstrated the inhibitory effect of ribavirin on the proliferation of trypanosomes in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting the availability of ribavirin to develop a new therapeutic agent against African trypanosomiasis. PMID:26731263

  14. Novel Characteristics of Trypanosoma brucei Guanosine 5'-monophosphate Reductase Distinct from Host Animals

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Chihiro; Shinohara, Takahiro; Tomiyama, Ai; Imamura, Akira; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Nishimura, Kazuhiko; Fujimori, Ko; Shuto, Satoshi; Ishibashi, Osamu; Kubata, Bruno Kilunga; Inui, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic pathway of purine nucleotides in parasitic protozoa is a potent drug target for treatment of parasitemia. Guanosine 5’-monophosphate reductase (GMPR), which catalyzes the deamination of guanosine 5’-monophosphate (GMP) to inosine 5’-monophosphate (IMP), plays an important role in the interconversion of purine nucleotides to maintain the intracellular balance of their concentration. However, only a few studies on protozoan GMPR have been reported at present. Herein, we identified the GMPR in Trypanosoma brucei, a causative protozoan parasite of African trypanosomiasis, and found that the GMPR proteins were consistently localized to glycosomes in T. brucei bloodstream forms. We characterized its recombinant protein to investigate the enzymatic differences between GMPRs of T. brucei and its host animals. T. brucei GMPR was distinct in having an insertion of a tandem repeat of the cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) domain, which was absent in mammalian and bacterial GMPRs. The recombinant protein of T. brucei GMPR catalyzed the conversion of GMP to IMP in the presence of NADPH, and showed apparent affinities for both GMP and NADPH different from those of its mammalian counterparts. Interestingly, the addition of monovalent cations such as K+ and NH4+ to the enzymatic reaction increased the GMPR activity of T. brucei, whereas none of the mammalian GMPR’s was affected by these cations. The monophosphate form of the purine nucleoside analog ribavirin inhibited T. brucei GMPR activity, though mammalian GMPRs showed no or only a little inhibition by it. These results suggest that the mechanism of the GMPR reaction in T. brucei is distinct from that in the host organisms. Finally, we demonstrated the inhibitory effect of ribavirin on the proliferation of trypanosomes in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting the availability of ribavirin to develop a new therapeutic agent against African trypanosomiasis. PMID:26731263

  15. In Search of Enzymes with a Role in 3', 5'-Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate Metabolism in Plants.

    PubMed

    Gross, Inonge; Durner, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    In plants, nitric oxide (NO)-mediated 3', 5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) synthesis plays an important role during pathogenic stress response, stomata closure upon osmotic stress, the development of adventitious roots and transcript regulation. The NO-cGMP dependent pathway is well characterized in mammals. The binding of NO to soluble guanylate cyclase enzymes (GCs) initiates the synthesis of cGMP from guanosine triphosphate. The produced cGMP alters various cellular responses, such as the function of protein kinase activity, cyclic nucleotide gated ion channels and cGMP-regulated phosphodiesterases. The signal generated by the second messenger is terminated by 3', 5'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDEs) enzymes that hydrolyze cGMP to a non-cyclic 5'-guanosine monophosphate. To date, no homologues of mammalian cGMP-synthesizing and degrading enzymes have been found in higher plants. In the last decade, six receptor proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana have been reported to have guanylate cyclase activity in vitro. Of the six receptors, one was shown to be a NO dependent guanylate cyclase enzyme (NOGC1). However, the role of these proteins in planta remains to be elucidated. Enzymes involved in the degradation of cGMP remain elusive, albeit, PDE activity has been detected in crude protein extracts from various plants. Additionally, several research groups have partially purified and characterized PDE enzymatic activity from crude protein extracts. In this review, we focus on presenting advances toward the identification of enzymes involved in the cGMP metabolism pathway in higher plants. PMID:27200049

  16. In Search of Enzymes with a Role in 3′, 5′-Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate Metabolism in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Inonge; Durner, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    In plants, nitric oxide (NO)-mediated 3′, 5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) synthesis plays an important role during pathogenic stress response, stomata closure upon osmotic stress, the development of adventitious roots and transcript regulation. The NO-cGMP dependent pathway is well characterized in mammals. The binding of NO to soluble guanylate cyclase enzymes (GCs) initiates the synthesis of cGMP from guanosine triphosphate. The produced cGMP alters various cellular responses, such as the function of protein kinase activity, cyclic nucleotide gated ion channels and cGMP-regulated phosphodiesterases. The signal generated by the second messenger is terminated by 3′, 5′-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDEs) enzymes that hydrolyze cGMP to a non-cyclic 5′-guanosine monophosphate. To date, no homologues of mammalian cGMP-synthesizing and degrading enzymes have been found in higher plants. In the last decade, six receptor proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana have been reported to have guanylate cyclase activity in vitro. Of the six receptors, one was shown to be a NO dependent guanylate cyclase enzyme (NOGC1). However, the role of these proteins in planta remains to be elucidated. Enzymes involved in the degradation of cGMP remain elusive, albeit, PDE activity has been detected in crude protein extracts from various plants. Additionally, several research groups have partially purified and characterized PDE enzymatic activity from crude protein extracts. In this review, we focus on presenting advances toward the identification of enzymes involved in the cGMP metabolism pathway in higher plants. PMID:27200049

  17. Fluorescent Sensing of Guanine and Guanosine Monophosphate with Conjugated Receptors Incorporating Aniline and Naphthyridine Moieties.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shao-Hung; Phang, Riping; Fang, Jim-Min

    2016-04-15

    Ethyne-linked naphthyridine-aniline conjugated molecules are selective sensors of decylguanine in dichloromethane and guanosine monophosphate in water (Kass = 16,000 M(-1)). The 2-acetamido-1,8-naphthyridine moiety binds with guanine in a DAA-ADD triply hydrogen-bonded motif. The aniline moiety enhances an electron-donating effect, and the substituent is tuned to attain extra hydrogen bonds, π-π stacking, and electrostatic interactions. The proposed binding modes are supported by a Job plot, ESI-MS, (1)H NMR, UV-vis, and fluorescence spectral analyses.

  18. Regulation of guanosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate in ovine tracheal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Range, Simon P; Holland, Elaine D; Basten, Graham P; Knox, Alan J

    1997-01-01

    Guanosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) is an important second messenger mediating the effects of nitric oxide (NO) and natriuretic peptides. Cyclic GMP pathways regulate several aspects of lung pathophysiology in a number of airway cells. The regulation of this system has not been extensively studied in pulmonary epithelial tissue.We have studied the production of cyclic GMP by suspensions of ovine tracheal epithelial cells in response to activators of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP) and particulate guanylyl cyclase (atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and E. coli heat stable enterotoxin (STa)).Both 10−710−3 M and 10−710−3 M SNAP generated a concentration-dependent marked elevation in cyclic GMP production when incubated with 10−3 M 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) (both greater than 25×baseline values with highest drug concentration).The increase in production of cyclic GMP in response to 10−6 M SNP and 10−5 M SNAP was markedly inhibited by both 5×10−5 M haemoglobin (102% and 92% inhibition) and 5×10−5 M methylene blue (82% and 84% inhibition).The increase in cyclic GMP in response to 10−3 M SNP was measured following co-incubation with the phosphodiesterase inhibitors 10−710−3 M IBMX, 10−710−4 M milrinone and 10−710−4 M SKF 96231. Only 10−410−3 M IBMX significantly increased cyclic GMP levels.Cyclic GMP production was also significantly elevated from baseline by 10−5 M ANP, 10−5 M BNP, 10−5 M CNP and 200 iu ml−1 of E. coli STa toxin in the presence of 10−3 M IBMX. Increases with these natriuretic peptides and STa toxin were smaller in magnitude (24 fold) than those seen with SNP and SNAP. CNP was the most potent of the natriuretic peptides studied suggesting type B membrane bound guanylate cyclase is the predominant form expressed

  19. Study of phase transformation of guanosine 5'-monophosphate in drowning-out crystallization.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeongki; Tuan, Nguyen Anh; Kim, Jong-Min; Chang, Sang-Mok; Kim, Woo-Sik

    2010-01-01

    The present study used a mechanistic approach to control the phase transformation of guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP) via the operating conditions of agitation and feed concentration during drowning-out crystallization. First, Fourier transform infrared and UV/vis spectrophotometry were successfully applied to monitor the mass fraction of GMP polymorphs (amorphous and hydrate crystalline GMPs) and GMP supersaturation, respectively, during the crystallization. The phase transformation of amorphous GMP into hydrate crystals was significantly influenced by the agitation, which promoted the mass transfer of GMP dissolution and growth. Therefore, the phase transformation was quickly finished when increasing the agitation speed. However, a high agitation caused breakage of the hydrate crystals, resulting in a reduced crystal size with a bimodal distribution. The phase transformation was also influenced by the GMP feed concentration, as the crystal growth was promoted and the crystal size increased when increasing the feed concentration up to 61 g/l. However, a further increase in the feed concentration caused secondary nucleation due to the induction of a high supersaturation level during the phase transformation, leading to a small crystal size with a bimodal distribution. In addition, the rectangular-shaped hydrate GMP crystals exhibited a higher growth rate in the b direction rather than the a direction. Therefore, the crystal morphology shifted from a long rectangle to a square when increasing the feed concentration. PMID:19031052

  20. Inhaled Nitric Oxide Increases Urinary Nitric Oxide Metabolites and Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate in Premature Infants: Relationship to Pulmonary Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Philip L.; Keller, Roberta L.; Black, Dennis M.; Durand, David J.; Merrill, Jeffrey D.; Eichenwald, Eric C.; Truog, William E.; Mammel, Mark C.; Steinhorn, Robin; Ryan, Rita M.; Courtney, Sherry E.; Horneman, Hart; Ballard, Roberta A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) has been tested to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature infants, however, the role of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is not known. We hypothesized that levels of NO metabolites (NOx) and cGMP in urine, as a noninvasive source for biospecimen collection, would reflect the dose of iNO and relate to pulmonary outcome. Study Design Studies were performed on 125 infants who required mechanical ventilation at 7 to 14 days and received 24 days of iNO at 20–2 ppm. A control group of 19 infants did not receive iNO. Results In NO-treated infants there was a dose-dependent increase of both NOx and cGMP per creatinine (maximal 3.1- and 2-fold, respectively, at 10–20 ppm iNO) compared with off iNO. NOx and cGMP concentrations at both 2 ppm and off iNO were inversely related to severity of lung disease during the 1st month, and the NOx levels were lower in infants who died or developed BPD at term. NOx was higher in Caucasian compared with other infants at all iNO doses. Conclusion Urinary NOx and cGMP are biomarkers of endogenous NO production and lung uptake of iNO, and some levels reflect the severity of lung disease. These results support a role of the NO–cGMP pathway in lung development. PMID:24968129

  1. Involvement of Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate-Dependent Protein Kinase I in Renal Antifibrotic Effects of Serelaxin

    PubMed Central

    Wetzl, Veronika; Schinner, Elisabeth; Kees, Frieder; Hofmann, Franz; Faerber, Lothar; Schlossmann, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Kidney fibrosis has shown to be ameliorated through the involvement of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and its dependent protein kinase I (cGKI). Serelaxin, the recombinant form of human relaxin-II, increases cGMP levels and has shown beneficial effects on kidney function in acute heart failure patients. Antifibrotic properties of serelaxin are supposed to be mediated via relaxin family peptide receptor 1 and subsequently enhanced nitric oxide/cGMP to inhibit transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling. This study examines the involvement of cGKI in the antifibrotic signaling of serelaxin. Methods and Results: Kidney fibrosis was induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction in wildtype (WT) and cGKI knock-out (KO) mice. After 7 days, renal antifibrotic effects of serelaxin were assessed. Serelaxin treatment for 7 days significantly increased cGMP in the kidney of WT and cGKI-KO. In WT, renal fibrosis was reduced through decreased accumulation of collagen1A1, total collagen, and fibronectin. The profibrotic connective tissue growth factor as well as myofibroblast differentiation were reduced and matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 were positively modulated after treatment. Moreover, Smad2 as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) phosphorylation were decreased, whereas phosphodiesterase (PDE) 5a phosphorylation was increased. However, these effects were not observed in cGKI-KO. Conclusion: Antifibrotic renal effects of serelaxin are mediated via cGMP/cGKI to inhibit Smad2- and ERK1-dependent TGF-β signaling and increased PDE5a phosphorylation. PMID:27462268

  2. Adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate- and guanosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate-dependent protein kinases: Possible homologous proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lincoln, Thomas M.; Corbin, Jackie D.

    1977-01-01

    The properties of purified mammalian adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)- and guanosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinases were compared. Several physical characteristics of the two enzymes were similar, including size, shape, affinity for cyclic nucleotide binding, and Km for ATP. In addition, the amino acid composition of the two proteins indicated a close composition homology (70-90%). Both cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases catalyzed phosphorylation of rat liver pyruvate kinase (EC 2.7.1.40) and fructose 1,6-diphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11), rabbit skeletal muscle glycogen synthase (EC 2.4.1.11) and phosphorylase b kinase (EC 2.7.1.38), and calf thymus histone H2b. The phosphorylation of several synthetic peptides and of trypsin-sensitive and trypsin-insensitive sites in glycogen synthase suggested similar recognition sites on the protein substrates for the two kinases. The cAMP-dependent protein kinase was the better catalyst with each protein or peptides substrate. The results suggest that the two enzymes evolved from a common ancestral protein. Images PMID:198777

  3. The effect of p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane on levels of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate and adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate in two species of insects.

    PubMed

    Bodnaryk, R P

    1976-11-01

    Within 1 h after topical application of a convulsive dose (4 mug per fly, 47 mg/kg) of p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) to the adult male of Sarcophaga bullata Parker, guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) levels rose by 71.5% (P less than 0.05) in the head, 159.5% (P less than 0.01) in the thorax, and 23.4% (P greater than 0.05) in the abdomen compared to controls. Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) levels were not significantly affected by the DDT treatment. A convulsive dose (100 mug per larva, 250 mg/kg) of DDT applied to larvae of Mamestra configurata Wlk. caused the whole body level of cyclic GMP to rise by 81.6% (P less than 0.01) after 1 h, and by 95.9% (P less than 0.01) after 3 h. Levels of cyclic AMP were not affected. A hypothesis is advanced suggesting that an abnormally high rate of discharge of acetylcholine (and in the later stages of poisoning, its actual accumulation) at central cholinergic synapses causes cyclic GMP levels to rise, perhaps in post-synaptic cells. The elevated cyclic GMP-cyclic AMP ratio found in DDT-poisoned insects may be of fundamental importance in the complex sequence of events leading to tremor, hyperexcitability, paralysis, and death.

  4. Free energy barrier for dissociation of the guanosine monophosphate anion in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornetta, Lucas M.; Coutinho, Kaline; Canuto, Sylvio; Varella, Márcio T. do N.

    2016-08-01

    We report free energy barriers for the ground-state dissociation of the guanosine nucleotide anion in solution, employing implicit and explicit solvation models. The latter was based on the Free Energy Perturbation technique and Monte Carlo simulations. For the lowest-energy structure, both solvation models indicate a solvent-induced transition from a dipole-bound state in the gas phase to a π∗ valence state in solution. The free barrier estimates obtained from explicit and implicit solvation are in fair agreement with each other, although significantly overestimated in comparison to a previously reported explicit solvation model based on ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Accounting for corrections related to the different DFT functionals used in the present and previous studies significantly improves the agreement. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  5. Structural Basis of Differential Ligand Recognition by Two Classes of bis-(3-5)-cyclic Dimeric Guanosine Monophosphate-binding Riboswitches

    SciTech Connect

    K Smith; C Shanahan; E Moore; A Simon; S Strobel

    2011-12-31

    The bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) signaling pathway regulates biofilm formation, virulence, and other processes in many bacterial species and is critical for their survival. Two classes of c-di-GMP-binding riboswitches have been discovered that bind this second messenger with high affinity and regulate diverse downstream genes, underscoring the importance of RNA receptors in this pathway. We have solved the structure of a c-di-GMP-II riboswitch, which reveals that the ligand is bound as part of a triplex formed with a pseudoknot. The structure also shows that the guanine bases of c-di-GMP are recognized through noncanonical pairings and that the phosphodiester backbone is not contacted by the RNA. Recognition is quite different from that observed in the c-di-GMP-I riboswitch, demonstrating that at least two independent solutions for RNA second messenger binding have evolved. We exploited these differences to design a c-di-GMP analog that selectively binds the c-di-GMP-II aptamer over the c-di-GMP-I RNA. There are several bacterial species that contain both types of riboswitches, and this approach holds promise as an important tool for targeting one riboswitch, and thus one gene, over another in a selective fashion.

  6. Analysis of nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling during metamorphosis of the nudibranch Phestilla sibogae Bergh (Gastropoda: Opisthobranchia).

    PubMed

    Bishop, Cory D; Pires, Anthony; Norby, Shong-Wan; Boudko, Dmitri; Moroz, Leonid L; Hadfield, Michael G

    2008-01-01

    The gas nitric oxide (NO), and in some cases its downstream second messenger, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) function in different taxa to regulate the timing of life-history transitions. Increased taxonomic sampling is required to foster conclusions about the evolution and function of NO/cGMP signaling during life-history transitions. We report on the function and localization of NO and cGMP signaling during metamorphosis of the nudibranch Phestilla sibogae. Pharmacological manipulation of NO or cGMP production in larvae modulated responses to a natural settlement cue from the coral Porites compressa in a manner that suggest inhibitory function for NO/cGMP signaling. However, these treatments were not sufficient to induce metamorphosis in the absence of cue, a result unique to this animal. We show that induction of metamorphosis in response to the settlement cue is associated with a reduction in NO production. We documented the expression of putative NO synthase (NOS) and the production of cGMP during larval development and observed no larval cells in which NOS and cGMP were both detected. The production of cGMP in a bilaterally symmetrical group of cells fated to occupy the distal tip of rhinophores is correlated with competence to respond to the coral settlement cue. These results suggest that endogenous NO and cGMP are involved in modulating responses of P. sibogae to a natural settlement cue. We discuss these results with respect to habitat selection and larval ecology. PMID:18460091

  7. Effect of caffeine on erectile function via up-regulating cavernous cyclic guanosine monophosphate in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rong; Wang, Jiuling; Chen, Yun; Sun, Zeyu; Wang, Run; Dai, Yutian

    2008-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus. Phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibitors, which inhibit the breakdown of intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), are used to treat diabetic ED. Caffeine, a nonselective PDE inhibitor used in our daily diet, is controversial regarding its effect on erectile function. To investigate the effect of caffeine on erectile function in diabetic rat models and explore the mechanism, male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with streptozotocin to induce diabetes mellitus. The rats with blood glucose levels above 300 mg/dL were selected for the study. The rats were divided into 4 groups: group A (normal control rats), group B (diabetic rats treated with normal saline), group C (diabetic rats treated with caffeine, 10 mg/kg per day), and group D (diabetic rats treated with caffeine, 20 mg/kg per day). After 8 weeks of treatment, intracavernous pressure (ICP) was measured to assess erectile function. The radioimmunoassay was used to evaluate the level of cGMP in the cavernosum. The ICP and the cavernous cGMP decreased significantly in the diabetic rats compared with normal controls. An 8-week administration of caffeine at the given dosages increased the ICP and cavernous cGMP in diabetic rats. Caffeine consumption improved the erectile function of diabetic rats by up-regulating cavernous cGMP.

  8. Influence of salt additives on phase transformation of guanosine 5-monophosphate disodium in anti-solvent crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Anh-Tuan; Kang, Jeongki; Kim, Woo-Sik

    2013-06-01

    The influence of sodium chloride (NaCl) as an additive on the anti-solvent crystallization of guanosine 5-monophosphate disodium (GMP-2Na) was investigated in continuous Couette-Taylor (CT) and batch mixing tank (MT) crystallizers. The anti-solvent crystallization initially precipitated amorphous solids of GMP-2Na, which then slowly transformed into hydrate crystals in the solution. However, the phase transformation of GMP-2Na was markedly promoted by the sodium chloride additive due to the common ion effect. While the normal phase transformation in the batch MT crystallizer required over 120 min of crystallization time without using the sodium chloride additive, the process was completed within 60 min when a small amount of the salt additive was added. The phase transformation was also significantly accelerated in the continuous CT crystallizer. Without using the sodium chloride additive, 7 min of the mean residence time was required for the production of 100% hydrate GMP crystals. However, when using the sodium chloride additive, a mean residence time of only 2 min was sufficient to completely transform the amorphous solids of GMP-2Na into hydrate crystals due to the common ion effect combined with the effective fluid motion of the Taylor vortex for the mass transfer.

  9. Alterations in the Cerebellar (Phospho)Proteome of a Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent Protein Kinase Knockout Mouse*

    PubMed Central

    Corradini, Eleonora; Vallur, Raghavan; Raaijmakers, Linsey M.; Feil, Susanne; Feil, Robert; Heck, Albert J. R.; Scholten, Arjen

    2014-01-01

    The cyclic nucleotide cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) plays an important role in learning and memory, but its signaling mechanisms in the mammalian brain are not fully understood. Using mass-spectrometry-based proteomics, we evaluated how the cerebellum adapts its (phospho)proteome in a knockout mouse model of cGMP-dependent protein kinase type I (cGKI). Our data reveal that a small subset of proteins in the cerebellum (∼3% of the quantified proteins) became substantially differentially expressed in the absence of cGKI. More changes were observed at the phosphoproteome level, with hundreds of sites being differentially phosphorylated between wild-type and knockout cerebellum. Most of these phosphorylated sites do not represent known cGKI substrates. An integrative computational network analysis of the data indicated that the differentially expressed proteins and proteins harboring differentially phosphorylated sites largely belong to a tight network in the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum involving important cGMP/cAMP signaling nodes (e.g. PDE5 and PKARIIβ) and Ca2+ signaling (e.g. SERCA3). In this way, removal of cGKI could be linked to impaired cerebellar long-term depression at Purkinje cell synapses. In addition, we were able to identify a set of novel putative (phospho)proteins to be considered in this network. Overall, our data improve our understanding of cerebellar cGKI signaling and suggest novel players in cGKI-regulated synaptic plasticity. PMID:24925903

  10. Analysis of nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling during metamorphosis of the nudibranch Phestilla sibogae Bergh (Gastropoda: Opisthobranchia)

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Cory D.; Pires, Anthony; Norby, Shong-Wan; Boudko, Dmitri; Moroz, Leonid L.; Hadfield, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The gas nitric oxide (NO), and in some cases its downstream second messenger, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) function in different taxa to regulate the timing of life-history transitions. Increased taxonomic sampling is required to foster conclusions about the evolution and function of NO/cGMP signaling during life-history transitions. We report on the function and localization of NO and cGMP signaling during metamorphosis of the nudibranch Phestilla sibogae. Pharmacological manipulation of NO or cGMP production in larvae modulated responses to a natural settlement cue from the coral Porites compressa in a manner that suggest inhibitory function for NO/cGMP signaling. However, these treatments were not sufficient to induce metamorphosis in the absence of cue, a result unique to this animal. We show that induction of metamorphosis in response to the settlement cue is associated with a reduction in NO production. We documented the expression of putative NO synthase (NOS) and the production of cGMP during larval development and observed no larval cells in which NOS and cGMP were both detected. The production of cGMP in a bilaterally symmetrical group of cells fated to occupy the distal tip of rhinophores is correlated with competence to respond to the coral settlement cue. These results suggest that endogenous NO and cGMP are involved in modulating responses of P. sibogae to a natural settlement cue. We discuss these results with respect to habitat selection and larval ecology. PMID:18460091

  11. Kinetic dissection of individual steps in the poly(C)-directed oligoguanylate synthesis from guanosine 5'-monophosphate 2-methylimidazolide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Bernasconi, C. F.; Alberas, D. J.; Baird, E. E.

    1993-01-01

    A kinetic study of oligoguanylate synthesis on a polycytidylate template, poly(C), as a function of the concentration of the activated monomer, guanosine 5'-monophosphate 2-methylimidazolide, 2-MeImpG, is reported. Reactions were run with 0.005-0.045 M 2-MeImpG in the presence of 0.05 M poly(C) at 23 degrees C. The kinetic results are consistent with a reaction scheme (eq 1) that consists of a series of consecutive steps, each step representing the addition of one molecule of 2-MeImpG to the growing oligomer. This scheme allows the calculation of second-order rate constants for every step by analyzing the time-dependent growth of each oligomer. Computer simulations of the course of reaction based on the determined rate constants and eq 1 are in excellent agreement with the product distributions seen in the HPLC profiles. In accord with an earlier study (Fakhrai, H.; Inoue, T.; Orgel, L. E. Tetrahedron 1984, 40, 39), rate constants, ki, for the formation of the tetramer and longer oligomers up to the 16-mer were found to be independent of length and somewhat higher than k3 (formation of trimer), which in turn is much higher than k2 (formation of dimer). The ki (i > or = 4), k3, and k2 values are not true second-order rate constants but vary with monomer concentration. Mechanistic models for the dimerization (Scheme I) and elongation reactions (Scheme II) are proposed that are consistent with our results. These models take into account that the monomer associates with the template in a cooperative manner. Our kinetic analysis allowed the determination of rate constants for the elementary processes of covalent bond formation between two monomers (dimerization) and between an oligomer and a monomer (elongation) on the template. A major conclusion from our study is that bond formation between two monomer units or between a primer and a monomer is assisted by the presence of additional next-neighbor monomer units. This is consistent with recent findings with hairpin

  12. t(3;11) translocation in treatment-related acute myeloid leukemia fuses MLL with the GMPS (GUANOSINE 5' MONOPHOSPHATE SYNTHETASE) gene.

    PubMed

    Pegram, L D; Megonigal, M D; Lange, B J; Nowell, P C; Rowley, J D; Rappaport, E F; Felix, C A

    2000-12-15

    The partner gene of MLL was identified in a patient with treatment-related acute myeloid leukemia in which the karyotype suggested t(3;11)(q25;q23). Prior therapy included the DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors, teniposide and doxorubicin. Southern blot analysis indicated that the MLL gene was involved in the translocation. cDNA panhandle polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used, which does not require partner gene-specific primers, to identify the chimeric transcript. Reverse-transcription of first-strand cDNAs with oligonucleotides containing known MLL sequence at the 5' ends and random hexamers at the 3' ends generated templates with an intra-strand loop for PCR. In-frame fusions of either MLL exon 7 or exon 8 with the GMPS (GUANOSINE 5'-MONOPHOSPHATE SYNTHETASE) gene from chromosome band 3q24 were detected. The fusion transcript was alternatively spliced. Guanosine monophosphate synthetase is essential for de novo purine synthesis. GMPS is the first partner gene of MLL on chromosome 3q and the first gene of this type in leukemia-associated translocations. (Blood. 2000;96:4360-4362)

  13. Can selective inhibitors of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-specific phosphadiesterase type 5 (PDE 5) offer protection against contrast induced nephropathy?

    PubMed

    Morcos, Sameh K

    2014-08-01

    Parenchymal hypoxia within the renal outer medulla plays an important role in the pathogenesis of contrast induced nephropathy (CIN). Nitric oxide (NO) is crucial for medullary oxygenation by enhancing regional blood flow. Augmenting the effect of NO in the renal medulla by the use of selective inhibitors of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-specific phosphadiesterase type 5 (PDE 5) such as sildenafil (Viagra™), vardenafil (Levitra™) or tadalafil (Cialis™) could reduce the severity of the hypoxic insult induced by the contrast medium and reduce the risk of CIN. Prophylactic administration of one of these drugs particularly the long acting one tadalafil before and after the administration of CM could offer a simple and rational approach to reduce the risk of this complication. This hypothesis deserves serious investigation to determine its clinical efficacy.

  14. Can selective inhibitors of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-specific phosphadiesterase type 5 (PDE 5) offer protection against contrast induced nephropathy?

    PubMed

    Morcos, Sameh K

    2014-08-01

    Parenchymal hypoxia within the renal outer medulla plays an important role in the pathogenesis of contrast induced nephropathy (CIN). Nitric oxide (NO) is crucial for medullary oxygenation by enhancing regional blood flow. Augmenting the effect of NO in the renal medulla by the use of selective inhibitors of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-specific phosphadiesterase type 5 (PDE 5) such as sildenafil (Viagra™), vardenafil (Levitra™) or tadalafil (Cialis™) could reduce the severity of the hypoxic insult induced by the contrast medium and reduce the risk of CIN. Prophylactic administration of one of these drugs particularly the long acting one tadalafil before and after the administration of CM could offer a simple and rational approach to reduce the risk of this complication. This hypothesis deserves serious investigation to determine its clinical efficacy. PMID:25202655

  15. Inhibitory effects of superoxide dismutase and cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate on estrogen production in cultured rat granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    LaPolt, P S; Hong, L S

    1995-12-01

    granulosa cell functions. The findings that SOD and activators of the cAMP-dependent signaling pathway synergistically increase the levels of the second messenger cGMP and that (Bu)2cGMP treatment attenuates FSH-, forskolin-, and cAMP-induced aromatase activity suggest a potential mechanism of SOD action and demonstrate the antagonist action of cGMP on cAMP-mediated estrogen production.

  16. Effects of dietary administration of guanosine monophosphate on the growth, digestibility, innate immune responses and stress resistance of juvenile red sea bream, Pagrus major.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Sakhawat; Koshio, Shunsuke; Ishikawa, Manabu; Yokoyama, Saichiro; Sony, Nadia Mahjabin

    2016-10-01

    The present study explored the dietary administration effects of guanosine monophosphate (GMP) on growth, digestibility, innate immune responses and stress resistance of juvenile red sea bream, Pagrus major. A semi-purified basal diet supplemented with 0% (Control), 0.1% (GMP-0.1), 0.2% (GMP-0.2), 0.4% (GMP-0.4) and 0.8% (GMP-0.8) purified GMP to formulate five experimental diets. Each diet was randomly allocated to triplicate groups of fish (mean initial weight 3.4 g) for 56 days. The obtained results clearly indicated that, growth performance of red sea bream enhanced by dietary GMP supplementation compared to control and significantly higher final weight was found in fish fed diet group GMP-0.4. Specific growth rate (SGR) and percent weight gain (%WG) also significantly higher in diet group GMP-0.4 in compared to control and it was not differed (P > 0.05) with diet group GMP-0.8. Feed intake significantly increased with the supplementation of GMP. Feed conversion efficiency (FCE) and protein efficiency ratio (PER) also improved (P < 0.05) when fish fed the diets containing GMP and diet group GMP-0.4 showed the significantly higher value in compared to control. The Apparent digestibility coefficients (dry matter, protein and lipid) also improved by GMP supplementation and the significantly higher protein digestibility was observed in fish fed diet groups GMP-0.2, GMP-0.4 and GMP-0.8. Among the measured non specific immune parameters peroxidase activity (PA), respiratory burst activity (NBT), Bactericidal activity (BA) were significantly affected by dietary supplementation and highest value obtained in diet group GMP-0.4. Total serum protein, lysozyme activity (LA), and agglutination antibody titer also increased (P > 0.05) by GMP supplementation. In contrast, catalase activity decreased with GMP supplementation. In terms of oxidative stress GMP-0.2 showed best condition with low oxidative stress and high antioxidant level. Moreover, the fish fed GMP

  17. Guanosine Quadruplexes in Solution: A Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering Analysis of Temperature Effects on Self-Assembling of Deoxyguanosine Monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, P.; Spinozzi, F.; Federiconi, F.; Ortore, M. G.; Amenitsch, H.; Spindler, L.; Drevensek-Olenik, I.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated quadruplex formation in aqueous solutions of 2′-deoxyriboguanosine 5′-monophosphate, d(pG), which takes place in the absence of the covalent axial backbone. A series of in-solution small angle X-ray scattering experiments on d(pG) have been performed as a function of temperature in the absence of excess salt, at a concentration just above the critical one at which self-assembling occurs. A global fit approach has been used to derive composition and size distribution of the scattering particles as a function of temperature. The obtained results give thermodynamical justification for the observed phase-behavior, indicating that octamer formation is essential for quadruplex elongation. Our investigation shows that d(pG) quadruplexes are very suitable to assess the potential of G-quadruplex formation and to study the self-assembling thermodynamics. PMID:20725625

  18. Affinity of guanosine derivatives for polycytidylate revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Hurley, T. B.; Baird, E. E.

    1995-01-01

    Evidence is presented for complexation of guanosine 5'-monophosphate 2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG) with polycytidylate (poly(C)) at pH 8.0 and 23 degrees C in the presence of 1.0 M NaCl2 and 0.2 M MgCl2 in water. The association of 2-MeImpG with poly(C) was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy as well as by monitoring the kinetics of the nucleophilic substitution reaction of the imidazole moiety by amines. The results of both methods are consistent with moderately strong poly(C) 2-MeImpG complexation and the spectrophotometric measurements allowed the construction of a binding isotherm with a concentration of 2-MeImpG equal to 5.55 +/- 0.15 mM at half occupancy. UV spectroscopy was employed to establish the binding of other guanosine derivatives on poly(C). These derivatives are guanosine 5'-monophosphate (5'GMP), guanosine 5'-monophosphate imidazolide (ImpG), and guanosine 5'-monophosphate morpholidate (morpG). Within experimental error these guanosine derivatives exhibit the same affinity for poly(C) as 2-MeImpG.

  19. Up-regulation of 3'5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate-specific phosphodiesterase in the porcine cumulus-oocyte complex affects steroidogenesis during in vitro maturation.

    PubMed

    Sasseville, Maxime; Côté, Nancy; Gagnon, Marie-Claude; Richard, François J

    2008-11-01

    The 3'5'-cyclic GMP (cGMP) pathway is known to influence ovarian functions, including steroidogenesis, ovulation, and granulosa cell proliferation. We show here that cGMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity increased in a gonadotropin-dependent manner more than 3-fold in the cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) after 24 h in vitro maturation (IVM) and up to 5-fold after 48 h. Further characterization of this increase demonstrated that the activity was located primarily in cumulus cells, and was sensitive to sildenafil and zaprinast, two inhibitors specific to both type 5 and 6 PDEs. RT-PCR experiments showed that the mRNAs for cGMP-degrading PDEs 5A and 6C are present in the COC before and after 30 h IVM. Western blotting confirmed the presence of PDE 5A in the COC. Western blotting of PDE 6C revealed a significant up-regulation in the COC during IVM. Isolation and analysis of detergent-resistant membranes suggested that PDE 6C protein, along with half of the total sildenafil-sensitive cGMP-degradation activity, is associated with detergent-resistant membrane in the COC after 30 h IVM. Treatment of porcine COC with sildenafil during IVM caused a significant decrease in gonadotropin-stimulated progesterone secretion. Together, these results constitute the first report exploring the contribution of cGMP-PDE activity in mammalian COC, supporting a functional clustering of the enzyme, and providing the first evidence of its role in steroidogenesis.

  20. Induction of heart heme oxygenase-1 (HSP32) by hyperthermia: possible role in stress-mediated elevation of cyclic 3':5'-guanosine monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Ewing, J F; Raju, V S; Maines, M D

    1994-10-01

    Presently we have investigated the carbon monoxide generating capacity of the cardiovascular system under normal and stress conditions by examining the microsomal heme oxygenase system at the transcript, protein and activity levels; and have assessed response of heart nitric oxide (NO) synthase activity and cyclic GMP levels to stress. Heme oxygenase (HO) isozymes, HO-1 (HSP32) and HO-2, catalyze the rate limiting step in the only known pathway in eukaryotes for the generation of the potential cellular message, carbon monoxide, and the antioxidant, bilirubin. We show expression of HO-1 and HO-2 at both the transcription and protein levels under normal conditions in the heart and descending aorta, and demonstrate the sensitivity of only the HO-1 isozyme to heat stress in these tissues. The ratio of the two HO-2 homologous transcripts (approximately 1.9 and 1.3 Kb) present in the atrium, ventricles and descending aorta and their levels were not altered by hyperthermia (42 degrees C, 20 min) when measured 1 or 6 hr after treatment. In contrast, hyperthermia caused a rapid, robust and coordinate increase of approximately 10- to 32-fold in the approximately 1.8-Kb HO-1 mRNA in these tissues when measured 1-hr post-treatment. Hyperthermia also caused a significant increase in both HO-1 protein and heme degradation capacity in the heart. Furthermore, the induction of HO-1 protein in the heart was accompanied by a significant elevation in tissue cyclic GMP level first detected 1-hr post-treatment and was sustained 6 hr after heat shock.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Xylazine Activates Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway in the Central Nervous System of Rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xing-Xing; Yin, Bai-Shuang; Yang, Peng; Chen, Hao; Li, Xin; Su, Li-Xue; Fan, Hong-Gang; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Xylazine is a potent analgesic extensively used in veterinary and animal experimentation. Evidence exists that the analgesic effect can be inhibited using adenosine 5'-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitors. Considering this idea, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the AMPK signaling pathway is involved in the central analgesic mechanism of xylazine in the rat. Xylazine was administrated via the intraperitoneal route. Sprague-Dawley rats were sacrificed and the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, thalamus and brainstem were collected for determination of liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and AMPKα mRNA expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα levels using western blot. The results of our study showed that compared with the control group, xylazine induced significant increases in AMPK activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and cerebellum after rats received xylazine (P < 0.01). Increased AMPK activities were accompanied with increased phosphorylation levels of LKB1 in corresponding regions of rats. The protein levels of phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα in these regions returned or tended to return to control group levels. However, in the brainstem, phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα protein levels were decreased by xylazine compared with the control (P < 0.05). In conclusion, our data indicates that xylazine alters the activities of LKB1 and AMPK in the central nervous system of rats, which suggests that xylazine affects the regulatory signaling pathway of the analgesic mechanism in the rat brain. PMID:27049320

  2. Xylazine Activates Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway in the Central Nervous System of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xing-Xing; Yin, Bai-Shuang; Yang, Peng; Chen, Hao; Li, Xin; Su, Li-Xue; Fan, Hong-Gang; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Xylazine is a potent analgesic extensively used in veterinary and animal experimentation. Evidence exists that the analgesic effect can be inhibited using adenosine 5’-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitors. Considering this idea, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the AMPK signaling pathway is involved in the central analgesic mechanism of xylazine in the rat. Xylazine was administrated via the intraperitoneal route. Sprague-Dawley rats were sacrificed and the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, thalamus and brainstem were collected for determination of liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and AMPKα mRNA expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα levels using western blot. The results of our study showed that compared with the control group, xylazine induced significant increases in AMPK activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and cerebellum after rats received xylazine (P < 0.01). Increased AMPK activities were accompanied with increased phosphorylation levels of LKB1 in corresponding regions of rats. The protein levels of phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα in these regions returned or tended to return to control group levels. However, in the brainstem, phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα protein levels were decreased by xylazine compared with the control (P < 0.05). In conclusion, our data indicates that xylazine alters the activities of LKB1 and AMPK in the central nervous system of rats, which suggests that xylazine affects the regulatory signaling pathway of the analgesic mechanism in the rat brain. PMID:27049320

  3. Evidence for the Calvin cycle and hexose monophosphate pathway in Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Gale, N L; Beck, J V

    1967-10-01

    The enzymes of the Calvin reductive pentose phosphate cycle and the hexose monophosphate pathway have been demonstrated in cell-free extracts of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. This, together with analyses of the products of CO(2) fixation in cell-free systems, suggests that these pathways are operative in whole cells of this microorganism. Nevertheless, the amount of CO(2) fixed in these cell-free systems was limited by the type and amount of compound added as substrate. The inability of cell extracts to regenerate pentose phosphates and to perpetuate the cyclic fixation of CO(2) is partially attributable to low activity of triose phosphate dehydrogenase under the experimental conditions found to be optimal for the enzymes involved in the utilization of ribose-5-phosphate or ribulose-1,5-diphosphate as substrate for CO(2) incorporation. With the exception of ribulose-1,5-diphosphate, all substrates required the addition of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) or adenosine diphosphate (ADP) for CO(2) fixation. Under optimal conditions, with ribose-5-phosphate serving as substrate, each micromole of ATP added resulted in the fixation of 1.5 mumoles of CO(2), whereas each micromole of ADP resulted in 0.5 mumole of CO(2) fixed. These values reflect the activity of adenylate kinase in the extract preparations. The K(m) for ATP in the phosphoribulokinase reaction was 0.91 x 10(-3)m. Kinetic studies conducted with carboxydismutase showed K(m) values of 1.15 x 10(-4)m and 5 x 10(-2)m for ribulose-1,5-diphosphate and bicarbonate, respectively.

  4. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli to produce 2'-fucosyllactose via salvage pathway of guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-l-fucose.

    PubMed

    Chin, Young-Wook; Seo, Nari; Kim, Jae-Han; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2016-11-01

    2'-Fucosyllactose (2-FL) is one of the key oligosaccharides in human milk. In the present study, the salvage guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-l-fucose biosynthetic pathway from fucose was employed in engineered Escherichia coli BL21star(DE3) for efficient production of 2-FL. Introduction of the fkp gene coding for fucokinase/GDP-l-fucose pyrophosphorylase (Fkp) from Bacteroides fragilis and the fucT2 gene encoding α-1,2-fucosyltransferase from Helicobacter pylori allows the engineered E. coli to produce 2-FL from fucose, lactose and glycerol. To enhance the lactose flux to 2-FL production, the attenuated, and deleted mutants of β-galactosidase were employed. Moreover, the 2-FL yield and productivity were further improved by deletion of the fucI-fucK gene cluster coding for fucose isomerase (FucI) and fuculose kinase (FucK). Finally, fed-batch fermentation of engineered E. coli BL21star(DE3) deleting lacZ and fucI-fucK, and expressing fkp and fucT2 resulted in 23.1 g/L of extracellular concentration of 2-FL and 0.39 g/L/h productivity. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2443-2452. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27217241

  5. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli to produce 2'-fucosyllactose via salvage pathway of guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-l-fucose.

    PubMed

    Chin, Young-Wook; Seo, Nari; Kim, Jae-Han; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2016-11-01

    2'-Fucosyllactose (2-FL) is one of the key oligosaccharides in human milk. In the present study, the salvage guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-l-fucose biosynthetic pathway from fucose was employed in engineered Escherichia coli BL21star(DE3) for efficient production of 2-FL. Introduction of the fkp gene coding for fucokinase/GDP-l-fucose pyrophosphorylase (Fkp) from Bacteroides fragilis and the fucT2 gene encoding α-1,2-fucosyltransferase from Helicobacter pylori allows the engineered E. coli to produce 2-FL from fucose, lactose and glycerol. To enhance the lactose flux to 2-FL production, the attenuated, and deleted mutants of β-galactosidase were employed. Moreover, the 2-FL yield and productivity were further improved by deletion of the fucI-fucK gene cluster coding for fucose isomerase (FucI) and fuculose kinase (FucK). Finally, fed-batch fermentation of engineered E. coli BL21star(DE3) deleting lacZ and fucI-fucK, and expressing fkp and fucT2 resulted in 23.1 g/L of extracellular concentration of 2-FL and 0.39 g/L/h productivity. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2443-2452. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. [Interaction of the Embden-Meyerhof pathway and hexose monophosphate shunt in erythrocytes].

    PubMed

    Ataullakhanov, F I; Buravtsev, V N; Zhabotinskiĩ, A M; Norina, S B; Pichugin, A V

    1981-04-01

    A mathematical model of glycolysis in human erythrocytes for the interaction between the Embden-Meyerhof and the pentose phosphate pathways has been developed. The characteristic surfaces, i. e. interdependencies between the rates of metabolite flows in both pathways and ATP and NADPH concentrations have been calculated. The model obtained is well correlated with the experimental data on glycolysis characteristic at low rates of the pentose phosphate pathway reactions. The model suggests that NADPH and GSH concentrations should be stabilized. At ATP and NADPH concentrations close to the physiological ones the Embden-Meyerhof and pentose phosphate pathways function practically independently. When the NADPH concentration is decreased below 80% of the physiological value, the system ceases to stabilize the ATP concentration. In its turn, a decrease of ATP concentration results in a corresponding decrease of the maximal rate of the pentose phosphate pathway.

  7. Cyclic adenosine 5'-diphosphoribose (cADPR) cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate positively function in Ca(2+) elevation in methyl jasmonate-induced stomatal closure, cADPR is required for methyl jasmonate-induced ROS accumulation NO production in guard cells.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M A; Ye, W; Munemasa, S; Nakamura, Y; Mori, I C; Murata, Y

    2014-11-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MeJA) signalling shares several signal components with abscisic acid (ABA) signalling in guard cells. Cyclic adenosine 5'-diphosphoribose (cADPR) and cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) are second messengers in ABA-induced stomatal closure. In order to clarify involvement of cADPR and cGMP in MeJA-induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis thaliana (Col-0), we investigated effects of an inhibitor of cADPR synthesis, nicotinamide (NA), and an inhibitor of cGMP synthesis, LY83583 (LY, 6-anilino-5,8-quinolinedione), on MeJA-induced stomatal closure. Treatment with NA and LY inhibited MeJA-induced stomatal closure. NA inhibited MeJA-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and nitric oxide (NO) production in guard cells. NA and LY suppressed transient elevations elicited by MeJA in cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) in guard cells. These results suggest that cADPR and cGMP positively function in [Ca(2+)]cyt elevation in MeJA-induced stomatal closure, are signalling components shared with ABA-induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis, and that cADPR is required for MeJA-induced ROS accumulation and NO production in Arabidopsis guard cells.

  8. Erythrocyte metabolism in hyperthyroidism: a microcalorimetric study on changes in the Embden-Meyerhof and the hexose monophosphate pathways.

    PubMed

    Monti, M; Hedner, P; Ikomi-Kumm, J; Valdemarsson, S

    1987-05-01

    Erythrocyte metabolism was studied in vitro by microcalorimetry in 10 hyperthyroid subjects before and after treatment. By inhibiting the enzyme enolase in the Embden-Meyerhof pathway with sodium fluoride (NaF) we have recorded the anaerobic and aerobic contributions in erythrocyte thermogenesis. The decrease in heat production rate in samples with NaF corresponds to the anaerobic contribution, whereas the values from samples with NaF reflect aerobic processes. Before treatment, total heat production rate was 120 +/- 2 mW/l erythrocytes which was higher than the post-treatment value of 99 +/- 2 (P less than 0.001) as well as the value for 14 euthyroid subjects, 108 +/- 2 mW/l (P less than 0.001). The NaF inhibitable rate was 73 +/- 2 before and 63 +/- 1 mW/l after therapy (P less than 0.01). These values correspond to 61 +/- 1 and 64 +/- 1% (n.s.) of the total heat production rate, and were similar to that of 61 +/- 2% for the controls. Heat production rates in the presence of NaF were 47 +/- 1 before and 36 +/- 1 mW/l after therapy (P less than 0.001), representing 39 +/- 1 and 36 +/- 1% of total values, respectively. The present results show that overall metabolism is increased in erythrocytes from hyperthyroid subjects before treatment and returns to normal after normalization of the thyroid function. Moreover, by using microcalorimetry we found that the metabolic activity along the Embden-Meyerhof anaerobic pathway as well as along the hexose monophosphate aerobic pathway in erythrocytes is stimulated by thyroid hormones.

  9. Effect of atrial natriuretic factor and 8-bromo cyclic guanosine 3':5'-monophosphate on ( sup 3 H)acetylcholine outflow from myenteric-plexus longitudinal muscle of the guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Matusak, O.; Kuchel, O.; Hamet, P. )

    1991-04-01

    We report that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) inhibits electrically induced cholinergic twitches of longitudinal muscle in whole intestinal segments and myenteric-plexus longitudinal muscle (MPLM) strips from the guinea pig ileum. To elucidate the possible presynaptic mechanism of ANF's action, we studied spontaneous and stimulation-evoked radiolabeled acetylcholine (ACh) outflow from MPLM after incubation with ({sup 3}H)choline. We developed a method of mounting and treating MPLM preparations, which allowed us, at the same time, to record isometric contractions and to determine ({sup 3}H)ACh outflow upon electrical stimulation by a train of three pulses. ANF (5 x 10{sup {minus} 8}M), norepinephrine (2 x 10{sup {minus} 7}) M and 8-bromoguanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (10{sup {minus} 3} M) in nearly equieffective concentrations caused a similar inhibition of cholinergic twitches. However, ANF had no effect on ({sup 3}H)ACh outflow, whereas norepinephrine was found to suppress ({sup 3}H)ACh outflow and 8-bromoguanosine 3':5'-cGMP to enhanced ({sup 3}H)ACh outflow. ANF (5 x 10{sup {minus} 8} M) caused a 7.0-fold increase of cGMP over control values, predominantly in muscle layers, whereas Escherichia coli heat-stable toxin (12.5 U/ml) elicited a 35-fold increment of cGMP in the extramuscular layer. Thus, ANF is able to elevate cGMP in intestinal smooth muscle and to inhibit cholinergic contractions of MPLM. This inhibition is mimicked by exogenous cGMP and by endogenously generated cyclic nucleotides. We suggest that the depressive action of ANF on cholinergic contractions of MPLM is mediated via its postsynaptic impact implicating elevation of cGMP in smooth muscle.

  10. Medial prefrontal cortex N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor/nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway modulates both tachycardic and bradycardic baroreflex responses.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Junior, Nilson C; Fedoce, Alessandra G; Alves, Fernando H F; Resstel, Leonardo B M

    2013-10-01

    Neural reflex mechanisms, such as the baroreflex, are involved in regulating cardiovascular system activity. Previous results showed that the ventral portion of the medial prefrontal cortex (vMPFC) is involved in modulation only of the cardiac baroreflex bradycardic component. Moreover, vMPFC N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors modulate the bradycardia baroreflex, but the baroreflex tachycardic component has not been investigated. Furthermore, glutamatergic neurotransmission into the vMPFC is involved in activation of the cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system. Finally, it has been demonstrated that glutamatergic neurotransmission into the vMPFC can be modulated by the endocannabinoid system and that activation of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor by anandamide, an endocannabinoid, can decrease both cardiac baroreflex bradycardic and tachycardic responses. Thus, there is the possibility that glutamatergic neurotransmission into the vMPFC does not modulate only the cardiac bradycardic component of the baroreflex. Therefore, the present study investigated whether glutamatergic neurotransmission into the vMPFC modulates both cardiac baroreflex bradycardic and tachycardic responses. We found that vMPFC bilateral microinjection of the NMDA receptor antagonist AP7 (4 nmol/200 nl), of a selective inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide (NO) synthase N-propyl (0.08 nmol/200 nl), of the NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO (2 nmol/200 nl), or of the NO-sensitive guanylate cyclase ODQ (2 nmol/200 nl) decreased the baroreflex activity in unanesthetized rats. Therefore, our results demonstrate the participation of NMDA receptors, production of NO, and activation of guanylate cyclase in the vMPFC in the modulation of both cardiac baroreflex bradycardic and tachycardic responses. PMID:23913674

  11. Involvement of NMDA receptors and L-arginine/nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in the antidepressant-like effects of topiramate in mice forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Chamanara, Mohsen; Jazaeri, Farahnaz; Zolfaghari, Samira; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-04-01

    Topiramate (TPM) is an agent primarily used in the treatment of epilepsy. Using mice model of forced swimming test (FST) the current study was basically aimed to investigate the influence of TPM on depression by inhibiting NMDA receptor and nitric oxide-cGMP production. When TPM was administered in a dose of 20 and 30 mg/kg by i.p. route it reduced the immobility time during FST. However this effect of TPM (30 mg/kg, i.p.) in the FST was abolished when the mice were pretreated either with NMDA (75 mg/kg, i.p.), or l-arginine (750 mg/kg, i.p. NO precursor), or sildenafil (5mg/kg, i.p. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor). The immobility time in the FST was reduced after administration of L-NAME (10mg/kg, i.p, a non-specific NOS inhibitor), 7-nitoinidazol (30 mg/kg, i.p. a nNOS inhibitor) or MK-801 (0.05 mg/kg, i.p, a NMDA receptor antagonist) in combination with a subeffective dose of TPM (10mg/kg, i.p.) as compared with single use of either drug. Co-administrated of lower doses of MK-801 (0.01 mg/kg) or L-NAME (1mg/kg) failed to effect immobility time. However, simultaneous administration of these two agents in the same doses with subeffective dose of TPM (10mg/kg, i.p.), reduced the immobility time during FST. None of these drugs were found to have a profound effect on the locomotor activity per se during the open field test. Taken together, our data demonstrates that TPM exhibit antidepressant-like effect which is accomplished either due to inhibition of NMDA receptors or NO-cGMP production.

  12. Involvement of NMDA receptors and L-arginine/nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in the antidepressant-like effects of topiramate in mice forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Chamanara, Mohsen; Jazaeri, Farahnaz; Zolfaghari, Samira; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-04-01

    Topiramate (TPM) is an agent primarily used in the treatment of epilepsy. Using mice model of forced swimming test (FST) the current study was basically aimed to investigate the influence of TPM on depression by inhibiting NMDA receptor and nitric oxide-cGMP production. When TPM was administered in a dose of 20 and 30 mg/kg by i.p. route it reduced the immobility time during FST. However this effect of TPM (30 mg/kg, i.p.) in the FST was abolished when the mice were pretreated either with NMDA (75 mg/kg, i.p.), or l-arginine (750 mg/kg, i.p. NO precursor), or sildenafil (5mg/kg, i.p. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor). The immobility time in the FST was reduced after administration of L-NAME (10mg/kg, i.p, a non-specific NOS inhibitor), 7-nitoinidazol (30 mg/kg, i.p. a nNOS inhibitor) or MK-801 (0.05 mg/kg, i.p, a NMDA receptor antagonist) in combination with a subeffective dose of TPM (10mg/kg, i.p.) as compared with single use of either drug. Co-administrated of lower doses of MK-801 (0.01 mg/kg) or L-NAME (1mg/kg) failed to effect immobility time. However, simultaneous administration of these two agents in the same doses with subeffective dose of TPM (10mg/kg, i.p.), reduced the immobility time during FST. None of these drugs were found to have a profound effect on the locomotor activity per se during the open field test. Taken together, our data demonstrates that TPM exhibit antidepressant-like effect which is accomplished either due to inhibition of NMDA receptors or NO-cGMP production. PMID:26988103

  13. Chronic intermittent hypoxia induces cardiac hypertrophy by impairing autophagy through the adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Sheng; Deng, Yan; Pan, Yue-Ying; Ren, Jie; Jin, Meng; Wang, Yu; Wang, Zhi-Hua; Zhu, Die; Guo, Xue-Ling; Yuan, Xiao; Shang, Jin; Liu, Hui-Guo

    2016-09-15

    Autophagy is tightly regulated to maintain cardiac homeostasis. Impaired autophagy is closely associated with pathological cardiac hypertrophy. However, the relationship between autophagy and cardiac hypertrophy induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is not known. In the present study, we measured autophagy-related genes and autophagosomes during 10 weeks of CIH in rats, and 6 days in H9C2 cardiomyocytes, and showed that autophagy was impaired. This conclusion was confirmed by the autophagy flux assay. We detected significant hypertrophic changes in myocardium with impaired autophagy. Rapamycin, an autophagy enhancer, attenuated the cardiac hypertrophy induced by CIH. Moreover, silencing autophagy-related gene 5 (ATG5) exerted the opposite effect. The role of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in regulating autophagy under CIH was confirmed using AICAR to upregulate this enzyme and restore autophagy flux. Restoring autophagy by AICAR or rapamycin significantly reversed the hypertrophic changes in cardiomyocytes. To investigate the mechanism of autophagy impairment, we compared phospho (p)-AMPK, p-Akt, cathepsin D, and NFAT3 levels, along with calcineurin activity, between sham and CIH groups. CIH activated calcineurin, and inhibited AMPK and AMPK-mediated autophagy in an Akt- and NFAT3-independent manner. Collectively, these data demonstrated that impaired autophagy induced by CIH through the AMPK pathway contributed to cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27412517

  14. Chronic intermittent hypoxia induces cardiac hypertrophy by impairing autophagy through the adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Sheng; Deng, Yan; Pan, Yue-Ying; Ren, Jie; Jin, Meng; Wang, Yu; Wang, Zhi-Hua; Zhu, Die; Guo, Xue-Ling; Yuan, Xiao; Shang, Jin; Liu, Hui-Guo

    2016-09-15

    Autophagy is tightly regulated to maintain cardiac homeostasis. Impaired autophagy is closely associated with pathological cardiac hypertrophy. However, the relationship between autophagy and cardiac hypertrophy induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is not known. In the present study, we measured autophagy-related genes and autophagosomes during 10 weeks of CIH in rats, and 6 days in H9C2 cardiomyocytes, and showed that autophagy was impaired. This conclusion was confirmed by the autophagy flux assay. We detected significant hypertrophic changes in myocardium with impaired autophagy. Rapamycin, an autophagy enhancer, attenuated the cardiac hypertrophy induced by CIH. Moreover, silencing autophagy-related gene 5 (ATG5) exerted the opposite effect. The role of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in regulating autophagy under CIH was confirmed using AICAR to upregulate this enzyme and restore autophagy flux. Restoring autophagy by AICAR or rapamycin significantly reversed the hypertrophic changes in cardiomyocytes. To investigate the mechanism of autophagy impairment, we compared phospho (p)-AMPK, p-Akt, cathepsin D, and NFAT3 levels, along with calcineurin activity, between sham and CIH groups. CIH activated calcineurin, and inhibited AMPK and AMPK-mediated autophagy in an Akt- and NFAT3-independent manner. Collectively, these data demonstrated that impaired autophagy induced by CIH through the AMPK pathway contributed to cardiac hypertrophy.

  15. Role of adenosine monophosphate in regulation of metabolic pathways of perfused rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, A. R.; Jefferson, L. S.

    1969-01-01

    1. By perfusion of rat livers with 3mm-AMP in the perfusion medium we obtain increased intracellular concentrations of AMP. 2. These high intracellular concentrations of AMP lead to an increased output of glucose and urea into the perfusion medium. 3. The increased output of glucose in livers from fed rats is brought about primarily by an AMP-stimulated breakdown of liver glycogen. In livers from starved rats the increase in glucose output is not as great, reflecting the low contents of glycogen in livers from starved rats. 4. AMP inhibits gluconeogenesis from lactate in perfused livers. In the presence of high concentrations of lactate, however, the counteracting effects of AMP to increase glycogenolysis and to inhibit gluconeogenesis result in little change in the net glucose output. 5. The increased urea output is brought about by increased breakdown of amino acids that are present in the perfusion medium. In livers from starved rats the overall urea production is much higher, indicating increased catabolism of amino acids and other nitrogenous substrates in the absence of carbohydrate substrates. 6. AMP causes an inhibition of incorporation of labelled precursors into protein and nucleic acid. This may result from increased catabolism of precursors of proteins and nucleic acids as reflected by the more rapid breakdown of nitrogenous compounds. In support of this hypothesis, cell-free systems for amino acid incorporation isolated from livers perfused with and without AMP are equally capable of supporting protein synthesis. 7. The labelling pattern of RNA in perfused livers corresponds very closely to those found by pulse-labelling in vivo. AMP in no way alters the qualitative nature of the labelling patterns. 8. We consider these results as supporting evidence for the role of the concentration ratio of AMP to ATP in controlling the metabolic pathways that lead to the formation of ATP. PMID:5774478

  16. Plant Purine Nucleoside Catabolism Employs a Guanosine Deaminase Required for the Generation of Xanthosine in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Dahncke, Kathleen; Witte, Claus-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Purine nucleotide catabolism is common to most organisms and involves a guanine deaminase to convert guanine to xanthine in animals, invertebrates, and microorganisms. Using metabolomic analysis of mutants, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana uses an alternative catabolic route employing a highly specific guanosine deaminase (GSDA) not reported from any organism so far. The enzyme is ubiquitously expressed and deaminates exclusively guanosine and 2’-deoxyguanosine but no other aminated purines, pyrimidines, or pterines. GSDA belongs to the cytidine/deoxycytidylate deaminase family of proteins together with a deaminase involved in riboflavin biosynthesis, the chloroplastic tRNA adenosine deaminase Arg and a predicted tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase 2 in A. thaliana. GSDA is conserved in plants, including the moss Physcomitrella patens, but is absent in the algae and outside the plant kingdom. Our data show that xanthosine is exclusively generated through the deamination of guanosine by GSDA in A. thaliana, excluding other possible sources like the dephosphorylation of xanthosine monophosphate. Like the nucleoside hydrolases NUCLEOSIDE HYDROLASE1 (NSH1) and NSH2, GSDA is located in the cytosol, indicating that GMP catabolism to xanthine proceeds in a mostly cytosolic pathway via guanosine and xanthosine. Possible implications for the biosynthetic route of purine alkaloids (caffeine and theobromine) and ureides in other plants are discussed. PMID:24130159

  17. Uric acid induces oxidative stress and growth inhibition by activating adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase signal pathways in pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongneng; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Hisatome, Ichiro; Li, Youfeng; Cheng, Weijie; Sun, Ning; Cai, Bozhi; Huang, Tianliang; Zhu, Yuzhang; Li, Zhi; Jing, Xubin; Zhou, Rui; Cheng, Jidong

    2013-08-15

    Hyperuricaemia is a disorder of purine metabolism, and is strongly associated with insulin resistance and abnormal glucose metabolism. As the producer of insulin, pancreatic β cells might be affected by elevated serum uric acid levels and contribute to the disregulated glucose metabolism. In this study, we investigated the effect of high uric acid on rat pancreatic β cell function. Under high uric acid condition, proliferation of pancreatic β cells was inhibited, production of reactive oxygen species increased, and glucose stimulated insulin secretion was also compromised. Further examination on signal transduction pathways revealed that uric acid-induced ROS is involved in the activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Pharmacological inhibition of ERK activation rescued β cells from growth inhibition. More importantly, activation of ERK induced by uric acid is significantly diminished by AMPK inhibitor, indicating ERK as a downstream target of AMPK in response to high uric acid condition. We also investigated the transportation channel for uric acid into pancreatic β cells. While major urate transporter URAT1 is not expressed in β cells, organic anion transporter (OAT) inhibitor successfully blocked the activation of ERK by uric acid. Our data indicate that high uric acid levels induce oxidative damage and inhibit growth of rat pancreatic β cells by activating the AMPK and ERK signal pathways. Hyperuricemia may contribute to abnormal glucose metabolism by causing oxidative damage and function inhibition of pancreatic β cells.

  18. Kinetics of the template-directed oligomerization of guanosine 5'-phosphate-2-methylimidazolide: Effect of temperature on individual steps of reactionion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Bernasconi, C. F.; Alberas, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Non-enzymatic, template-directed reactions have been proposed as models for prebiological polynucleotide synthesis. Chemically activated mononucleotides react in the presence of a polynucleotide, acting as the template in a Watson-Crick base-pairing fashing, and form the complementary daughter polynucleotide. Phosphoimidazolide-activated nucleotides have been used successfully as substrates in these reactions. The kinetics of the guanosine 5'-monophosphate-2-methylimidazolide (2-MelmpG) reaction in aqueous pH 8.0 solutions in the presence and in the absence of polycytidylate (poly(C)) were studied, acting as the template at 6, 23, and 37 C. In the absence of the template, the major reaction pathway of 2-MelmpG is hydrolysis of the P-N bond to form the unreactive guanosine 5'-monophosphate (5'-GMP) and 2-methylimidazole. Concentrated solution of 2-MelmpG (greater than 0.02 M) in the absence of the template form only a small amount dinucleotide, (pG)2, but in the presence of poly(C), oligoguanylates, (pG)n with 2 less than or = n less than or = 40, can be detected. We were able to determine the rate constants for individual steps of this reaction. A summary of the conclusions is presented.

  19. Mechanism for regulating the distribution of glucose carbon between the Embden-Meyerhof and hexose-monophosphate pathways in Streptococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Brown, A T; Wittenberger, C L

    1971-05-01

    Glucose-adapted Streptococcus faecalis produced little if any (14)CO(2) from glucose-1-(14)C, although high levels of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.44) were detected in cell-free extracts. Metabolism of glucose through the oxidative portion of the hexose-monophosphate pathway was shown to be regulated in this organism by the specific inhibitory interaction of the Embden-Meyerhof intermediate, fructose-1, 6-diphosphate (FDP), with 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity was unaffected by FDP. The S. faecalis 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase was partially purified from crude extracts by standard fractionation procedures and certain kinetic parameters of the FDP-mediated inhibition were investigated. The negative effector was shown to cause a decrease in V(max) and an increase in the apparent K(m) for both 6-phosphogluconate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). These effects were apparently a consequence of the ligand interacting with the enzyme at a site distinct from either the substrate or the coenzyme sites. Among the evidence supporting this was the fact that beta-mercaptoethanol blocked completely FDP inhibition, but had no effect on catalytic activity. The possibility that the regulation of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase activity by FDP might be of some general significance was suggested by the observation that this enzyme from several other sources was also sensitive to FDP.

  20. Estrogen regulates energy metabolic pathway and upstream adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase and phosphatase enzyme expression in dorsal vagal complex metabolosensory neurons during glucostasis and hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Tamrakar, Pratistha; Ibrahim, Baher A; Gujar, Amit D; Briski, Karen P

    2015-02-01

    The ability of estrogen to shield the brain from the bioenergetic insult hypoglycemia is unclear. Estradiol (E) prevents hypoglycemic activation of the energy deficit sensor adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in hindbrain metabolosensory A2 noradrenergic neurons. This study investigates the hypothesis that estrogen regulates A2 AMPK through control of fuel metabolism and/or upstream protein kinase/phosphatase enzyme expression. A2 cells were harvested by laser microdissection after insulin or vehicle (V) injection of E- or oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized female rats. Cell lysates were evaluated by immunoblot for glycolytic, tricarboxylic acid cycle, respiratory chain, and acetyl-CoA-malonyl-CoA pathway enzymes. A2 phosphofructokinase (PFKL), isocitrate dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, and ATP synthase subunit profiles were elevated in E/V vs. O/V; hypoglycemia augmented PFKL and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase expression in E only. Hypoglycemia increased A2 Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase-β in O and reduced protein phosphatase in both groups. A2 phospho-AMPK levels were equivalent in O/V vs. E/V but elevated during hypoglycemia in O only. These results implicate E in compensatory upregulation of substrate catabolism and corresponding maintenance of energy stability of A2 metabolosensory neurons during hypoglycemia, outcomes that support the potential viability of molecular substrates for hormone action as targets for therapies alleviating hypoglycemic brain injury.

  1. Glycolytic pathway (GP), kreb's cycle (KC), and hexose monophosphate shunt (HMS) activity in myocardial subcellular fractions exposed to cannabinoids

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.T.; Manno, B.R.; King, J.W.; Fowler, M.R.; Dempsey, C.A.; Manno, J.E.

    1986-03-05

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (..delta../sup 9/-THC), the primary psychoactive component of marihuana, and its active metabolite 11-hydroxy-..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-..delta../sup 9/-THC) have been reported to produce a direct cardiac depressant effect. Studies in isolated perfused rat hearts have indicated a decreased force of contraction (inotropic response) when ..delta../sup 9/-THC or 11-OH-..delta../sup 9/-THC was administered in microgram amounts. The mechanism and site of action have not been explained or correlated with associated metabolic pathways. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of cannabinoids on major myocardial energy producing pathways, GP and KC, and a non-energy producing pathway, HMS. Cardiac ventricular tissue from male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-300 g) was excised and homogenized for subcellular fractionation. KC, GP and HMS activity was assayed in the appropriate fractions by measuring /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ generation from /sup 14/C-2-pyruvate, /sup 14/C-6-glucose and /sup 14/C-1-glucose respectively. Duplicate assays (n=8) were performed on tissue exposed to saline (control), empty liposomes (vehicle) and four doses each of ..delta../sup 9/-THC and 11-OH-..delta../sup 9/-THC. Changes in metabolic activity and decreases in cardiac contractile performance may be associated.

  2. Targeting Energy Metabolic and Oncogenic Signaling Pathways in Triple-negative Breast Cancer by a Novel Adenosine Monophosphate-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Activator*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuen-Haur; Hsu, En-Chi; Guh, Jih-Hwa; Yang, Hsiao-Ching; Wang, Dasheng; Kulp, Samuel K.; Shapiro, Charles L.; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2011-01-01

    The antitumor activities of the novel adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, OSU-53, were assessed in in vitro and in vivo models of triple-negative breast cancer. OSU-53 directly stimulated recombinant AMPK kinase activity (EC50, 0.3 μm) and inhibited the viability and clonogenic growth of MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells with equal potency (IC50, 5 and 2 μm, respectively) despite lack of LKB1 expression in MDA-MB-231 cells. Nonmalignant MCF-10A cells, however, were unaffected. Beyond AMPK-mediated effects on mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and lipogenesis, OSU-53 also targeted multiple AMPK downstream pathways. Among these, the protein phosphatase 2A-dependent dephosphorylation of Akt is noteworthy because it circumvents the feedback activation of Akt that results from mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition. OSU-53 also modulated energy homeostasis by suppressing fatty acid biosynthesis and shifting the metabolism to oxidation by up-regulating the expression of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, such as a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α and the transcription factor nuclear respiratory factor 1. Moreover, OSU-53 suppressed LPS-induced IL-6 production, thereby blocking subsequent Stat3 activation, and inhibited hypoxia-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in association with the silencing of hypoxia-inducible factor 1a and the E-cadherin repressor Snail. In MDA-MB-231 tumor-bearing mice, daily oral administration of OSU-53 (50 and 100 mg/kg) suppressed tumor growth by 47–49% and modulated relevant intratumoral biomarkers of drug activity. However, OSU-53 also induced protective autophagy that attenuated its antiproliferative potency. Accordingly, cotreatment with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine increased the in vivo tumor-suppressive activity of OSU-53. OSU-53 is a potent, orally bioavailable AMPK activator that acts through a broad spectrum of antitumor activities. PMID

  3. Trichomonas vaginalis NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase hydrolyze guanine nucleotides and increase extracellular guanosine levels under serum restriction.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Camila Braz; Durgante, Juliano; de Oliveira, Rafael Rodrigues; Dos Santos, Victor Hugo Jacks Mendes; Rodrigues, Luiz Frederico; Garcia, Solange Cristina; Dos Santos, Odelta; Tasca, Tiana

    2016-05-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the aethiologic agent of trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease in the world. The purinergic signaling pathway is mediated by extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides that are involved in many biological effects as neurotransmission, immunomodulation and inflammation. Extracellular nucleotides can be hydrolyzed by a family of enzymes known as ectonucleotidases including the ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (E-NTPDases) family which hydrolyses nucleosides triphosphate and diphosphate as preferential substrates and ecto-5'-nucleotidase which catalyzes the conversion of monophosphates into nucleosides. In T. vaginalis the E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities upon adenine nucleotides have already been characterized in intact trophozoites but little is known concerning guanine nucleotides and nucleoside. These enzymes may exert a crucial role on nucleoside generation, providing the purine sources for the synthesis de novo of these essential nutrients, sustaining parasite growth and survival. In this study, we investigated the hydrolysis profile of guanine-related nucleotides and nucleoside in intact trophozoites from long-term-grown and fresh clinical isolates of T. vaginalis. Knowing that guanine nucleotides are also substrates for T. vaginalis ectoenzymes, we evaluated the profile of nucleotides consumption and guanosine uptake in trophozoites submitted to a serum limitation condition. Results show that guanine nucleotides (GTP, GDP, GMP) were substrates for T. vaginalis ectonucleotidases, with expected kinetic parameters for this enzyme family. Different T. vaginalis isolates (two from the ATCC and nine fresh clinical isolates) presented a heterogeneous hydrolysis profile. The serum culture condition increased E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities with high consumption of extracellular GTP generating enhanced GDP, GMP and guanosine levels as demonstrated by HPLC, with final

  4. Trichomonas vaginalis NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase hydrolyze guanine nucleotides and increase extracellular guanosine levels under serum restriction.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Camila Braz; Durgante, Juliano; de Oliveira, Rafael Rodrigues; Dos Santos, Victor Hugo Jacks Mendes; Rodrigues, Luiz Frederico; Garcia, Solange Cristina; Dos Santos, Odelta; Tasca, Tiana

    2016-05-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the aethiologic agent of trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease in the world. The purinergic signaling pathway is mediated by extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides that are involved in many biological effects as neurotransmission, immunomodulation and inflammation. Extracellular nucleotides can be hydrolyzed by a family of enzymes known as ectonucleotidases including the ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (E-NTPDases) family which hydrolyses nucleosides triphosphate and diphosphate as preferential substrates and ecto-5'-nucleotidase which catalyzes the conversion of monophosphates into nucleosides. In T. vaginalis the E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities upon adenine nucleotides have already been characterized in intact trophozoites but little is known concerning guanine nucleotides and nucleoside. These enzymes may exert a crucial role on nucleoside generation, providing the purine sources for the synthesis de novo of these essential nutrients, sustaining parasite growth and survival. In this study, we investigated the hydrolysis profile of guanine-related nucleotides and nucleoside in intact trophozoites from long-term-grown and fresh clinical isolates of T. vaginalis. Knowing that guanine nucleotides are also substrates for T. vaginalis ectoenzymes, we evaluated the profile of nucleotides consumption and guanosine uptake in trophozoites submitted to a serum limitation condition. Results show that guanine nucleotides (GTP, GDP, GMP) were substrates for T. vaginalis ectonucleotidases, with expected kinetic parameters for this enzyme family. Different T. vaginalis isolates (two from the ATCC and nine fresh clinical isolates) presented a heterogeneous hydrolysis profile. The serum culture condition increased E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities with high consumption of extracellular GTP generating enhanced GDP, GMP and guanosine levels as demonstrated by HPLC, with final

  5. Guanosine impairs inhibitory avoidance performance in rats.

    PubMed

    Roesler, R; Vianna, M R; Lara, D R; Izquierdo, I; Schmidt, A P; Souza, D O

    2000-08-01

    The nucleoside guanosine, previously found to exert trophic and neuroprotective effects, was found to impair retention of inhibitory avoidance responses, with a complete effect at 7.5 mg/kg i.p. pretraining. Treated animals, when retrained 1 week later, showed normal learning ability. Guanosine injected immediately after training or pretest did not alter retention latency. Combined pretraining and pretest treatments with guanosine failed to reverse its amnestic effect, excluding the contribution of state dependency. Open field parameters and shock sensitivity were mostly unaltered by guanosine. These results suggest an amnestic effect of guanosine on inhibitory avoidance in rats, in a pattern compatible with inhibition of glutamatergic activity. However, the mechanism for the amnestic effect of guanosine is yet to be elucidated.

  6. Control and localization of rat adrenal cyclic guanosine 3', 5'-monophosphate. Comparison with adrenal cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Whitley, T H; Stowe, N W; Ong, S H; ey, R L; Steiner, A L

    1975-01-01

    Cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP were measured in rat adrenal glands after either hypophysectomy alone or after hypophysectomy and treatment with ACTH. Adrenal cyclic GMP levels rise in acutely hypophysectomized rats to a maximum at 1 h of approximately 200% of control levels; there is a return to base line at 4-12 h after hypophysectomy. In contrast, adrenal cyclic AMP falls immediately to about 50% of control levels after hypophysectomy and remains at approximately 1 pmol per mg tissue. Doses of ACTH beyond the physiological range markedly suppress adrenal cyclic GMP while producing a 50-fold or greater rise in cyclic AMP in hypophysectomized rats. This pattern of adrenal cyclic GMP rise was unchanged in acutely hypophysectomized animals treated with desamethasone. N-6-2'-0 dibutyryl cyclic AMP acted similarly to the effect of ACTH in bringing about a suppression of adrenal cyclic GMP levels. Physiological i.v. pulse doses of ACTH produced a rapid dose related increase in adrenal cyclic GMP. In vitro incubation of quartered adrenal pairs with 500 mU ACTH produced elevated cyclic AMP levels and suppression of cyclic GMP. Whereas adrenal cyclic AMP fell rapidly to 50% of control levels after hypophysectomy and remained at about 1 pmol per mg tissue for 7 days, adrenal cyclic GMP showed a biphasic rhythm in long-term hypophysectomized animals. After an initial peak at 1 h after hypophysectomy, adrenal cyclic GMP declined to baseline at 4-12 h but thereafter progressively rose with time, eventually reaching levels over 1 pmol per mg tissue. Fluorescent immunocytochemical staining of rat adrenal zona fasciculata showed cyclic AMP largely confined to cytoplasmic elements with little fluorescence contained in nuclei. In constant, cyclic GMP was found discretely positioned in nuclei with prominent fluorescence in nucleoli in addition to cytoplasmic localization. It is concluded that in hypophysectomized rats ACTH, either directly or in conjunction with altertion of adrenal cyclic AMP, appears to be one factor which regulates adrenal cyclic GMP. The direction of cyclic GMP change and the different subcellular localization of the nucleotides suggest divergent roles for cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in adrenocortical function. Furthermore, our observations suggest a role for adrenal cyclic GMP in nuclear directed events. Images PMID:167054

  7. RECIPIENT PRETRANSPLANT INOSINE MONOPHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY IN NONMYELOABLATIVE HCT

    PubMed Central

    Bemer, Meagan J.; Risler, Linda J.; Phillips, Brian R.; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S.; Boeckh, Michael J.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5’- monophosphate (IMP) to xanthosine 5’-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNC) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T-cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation, but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, non-relapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient’s pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient’s sensitivity to MMF, but confirmatory studies are needed. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. PMID:24923537

  8. Vasoactive intestinal peptide attenuates liver ischemia/reperfusion injury in mice via the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-protein kinase a pathway.

    PubMed

    Ji, Haofeng; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Yuanxing; Shen, Xiu-Da; Gao, Feng; Nguyen, Terry T; Busuttil, Ronald W; Waschek, James A; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W

    2013-09-01

    Hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI), an exogenous, antigen-independent, local inflammation response, occurs in multiple clinical settings, including liver transplantation, hepatic resection, trauma, and shock. The nervous system maintains extensive crosstalk with the immune system through neuropeptide and peptide hormone networks. This study examined the function and therapeutic potential of the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) neuropeptide in a murine model of liver warm ischemia (90 minutes) followed by reperfusion. Liver ischemia/reperfusion (IR) triggered an induction of gene expression of intrinsic VIP; this peaked at 24 hours of reperfusion and coincided with a hepatic self-healing phase. Treatment with the VIP neuropeptide protected livers from IRI; this was evidenced by diminished serum alanine aminotransferase levels and well-preserved tissue architecture and was associated with elevated intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling. The hepatocellular protection rendered by VIP was accompanied by diminished neutrophil/macrophage infiltration and activation, reduced hepatocyte necrosis/apoptosis, and increased hepatic interleukin-10 (IL-10) expression. Strikingly, PKA inhibition restored liver damage in otherwise IR-resistant VIP-treated mice. In vitro, VIP not only diminished macrophage tumor necrosis factor α/IL-6/IL-12 expression in a PKA-dependent manner but also prevented necrosis/apoptosis in primary mouse hepatocyte cultures. In conclusion, our findings document the importance of VIP neuropeptide-mediated cAMP-PKA signaling in hepatic homeostasis and cytoprotection in vivo. Because the enhancement of neural modulation differentially regulates local inflammation and prevents hepatocyte death, these results provide the rationale for novel approaches to managing liver IRI in transplant patients. PMID:23744729

  9. Nucleotides as nucleophiles: reactions of nucleotides with phosphoimidazolide activated guanosine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Rosenbach, M. T.; Hurley, T. B.

    1991-01-01

    An earlier study of the reaction of phosphoimidazolide activated nucleosides (ImpN) in aqueous phosphate buffers indicated two modes of reaction of the phosphate monoanion and dianion. The first mode is catalysis of the hydrolysis of the P-N bond in ImpN's which leads to imidazole and nucleoside 5'-monophosphate. The second represents a nucleophilic substitution of the imidazole to yield the nucleoside 5'-diphosphate. This earlier study thus served as a model for the reaction of ImpN with nucleoside monophosphates (pN) because the latter can be regarded as phosphate derivatives. In the present study we investigated the reaction of guanosine 5'-phosphate-2-methylimidazolide, 2-MeImpG, in the presence of pN (N = guanosine, adenosine and uridine) in the range 6.9 less than or equal to pH less than or equal to 7.7. We observed that pN's do act as nucleophiles to form NppG, and as general base to enhance the hydrolysis of the P-N bond in 2-MeImpG, i.e. pN show the same behavior as inorganic phosphate. The kinetic analysis yields the following rate constants for the dianion pN2-: knpN = 0.17 +/- 0.02 M-1 h-1 for nucleophilic attack and khpN = 0.11 +/- 0.07 M-1 h-1 for general base catalysis of the hydrolysis. These rate constants which are independent of the nucleobase compare with kp.2 = 0.415 M-1 h-1 and khp2. = 0.217 M-1 h-1 for the reactions of HPO4(2-). In addition, this study shows that under conditions where pN presumably form stacks, the reaction mechanism remains unchanged although in quantitative terms stacked pN are somewhat less reactive. Attack by the 2'-OH and 3'-OH groups of the ribose moiety in amounts greater than or equal to 1% is not observed; this is attributed to the large difference in nucleophilicity in the neutral pH range between the phosphate group and the ribose hydroxyls. This nucleophilicity rank is not altered by stacking.

  10. Conservation and divergence of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-protein kinase A (cAMP–PKA) pathway in two plant-pathogenic fungi: Fusarium graminearum and F. verticillioides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-PKA pathway is a central signaling cascade that transmits extracellular stimuli and governs cell responses through the second messenger cAMP. The importance of cAMP signaling in fungal biology has been well documented. Two key conserved components, adenylate cyclase (AC) and ca...

  11. Regulation by guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate of phospholipid methylation during chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed Central

    Alemany, S; García Gil, M; Mato, J M

    1980-01-01

    In Dictyostelium discoideum, the chemoattractant cyclic AMP activates the enzyme guanylate cyclase, giving a brief up to 10-fold increase in the intracellular cyclic GMP content. The addition of physiological cyclic GMP concentrations to a homogenate of D. discoideum cells markedly increased the incorporation of the 3H-labeled methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-[methyl-3H]methionine into mono- and dimethylated phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine. Lipid methylation was inhibited by S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine, which inhibits transmethylation. When whole cells prelabeled with L-[methyl-3H]methionine were exposed to cyclic AMP, a rapid transient increase in the amount of [methyl-3H]phosphatidylcholine was observed. The time course of [methyl-3H]phosphatidylcholine formation agrees with its being mediated by the intracellular increase in cyclic GMP originating during chemotactic stimulation. Addition of the 8-Br derivative of cyclic GMP to whole cells also increased the levels of labeled phosphatidylcholine. It is therefore likely that cyclic GMP contributes to chemotaxis by regulating membrane function via phospholipid methylation. PMID:6261233

  12. Polyphosphate, cyclic AMP, guanosine tetraphosphate, and c-di-GMP reduce in vitro Lon activity.

    PubMed

    Osbourne, Devon O; Soo, Valerie W C; Konieczny, Igor; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Lon protease is conserved from bacteria to humans and regulates cellular processes by degrading different classes of proteins including antitoxins, transcriptional activators, unfolded proteins, and free ribosomal proteins. Since we found that Lon has several putative cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) binding sites and since Lon binds polyphosphate (polyP) and lipid polysaccharide, we hypothesized that Lon has an affinity for phosphate-based molecules that might regulate its activity. Hence we tested the effect of polyP, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp), c-di-GMP, and GMP on the ability of Lon to degrade α-casein. Inhibition of in vitro Lon activity occurred for polyP, cAMP, ppGpp, and c-di-GMP. We also demonstrated by HPLC that Lon is able to bind c-di-GMP. Therefore, four cell signals were found to regulate the activity of Lon protease.

  13. Polyphosphate, cyclic AMP, guanosine tetraphosphate, and c-di-GMP reduce in vitro Lon activity

    PubMed Central

    Osbourne, Devon O; Soo, Valerie WC; Konieczny, Igor; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Lon protease is conserved from bacteria to humans and regulates cellular processes by degrading different classes of proteins including antitoxins, transcriptional activators, unfolded proteins, and free ribosomal proteins. Since we found that Lon has several putative cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) binding sites and since Lon binds polyphosphate (polyP) and lipid polysaccharide, we hypothesized that Lon has an affinity for phosphate-based molecules that might regulate its activity. Hence we tested the effect of polyP, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp), c-di-GMP, and GMP on the ability of Lon to degrade α-casein. Inhibition of in vitro Lon activity occurred for polyP, cAMP, ppGpp, and c-di-GMP. We also demonstrated by HPLC that Lon is able to bind c-di-GMP. Therefore, four cell signals were found to regulate the activity of Lon protease. PMID:24874800

  14. Guanosine nucleotide precursor for flavinogenesis of Eremothecium Ashbyii.

    PubMed

    Mitsuda, H; Nakajima, K

    1975-01-01

    The purine precursor in the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway in Eremothecium ashbyii was examined using a guanine analogue, 8-azaguanine, with non-growing cell systems. 1. Riboflavin formation in the culture filtrate was determined at 0, 5, 10 and 20 hr after start of the incubation of the non-growing cells in the presence of xanthine or 8-azaguanine (1 mM, respectively). At 20 hr of incubation, the addition of xanthine stimulated riboflavin formation by 36% and the addition of 8-azaguanine inhibited the formation by 57%. 2. Acid soluble nucleotide pools in the cells were followed at 0, 5, 10 and 20 hr of the incubation period in the presence of xanthine or 8-azaguanine by means of anion exchange column chromatography. The result showed that the GTP pool changed markedly despite the fact that the adenosine nucleotide pool was almost constant irrespective of the presence or absence of these purines till 10 hr of incubation. But, the decrease of the former was overcome in part by the addition of flavinogenic xanthine. Furthermore, the total amounts of GTP and guanosine accumulated in cells in the presence of 8-azaguanine reached the maximum already at 5 hr, attaining a level twice as much as the GTP contents of the control. 3. The role of guanosine nucleotide pool in riboflavin formation was further examined using 8-azaguanine. In this experiment the drug was added to the suspension of non-growing cells at 3 hr or 6 hr after the incubation was started and the reaction was continued till the 12th hr. A more clear-cut correlationship between riboflavin formation and guanosine nucleotide pool was oberved by this experiment. The guanosine nucleotide pool (consisting of GMP, GDP and GTP) increased simultaneously with the inhibition of riboflavin formation. Of the guanosine nucleotides pools, the GMP pool increased 2.7 times above normal upon the addition of 8-azaguanine during the incubation for 6 hr and 5.3 fold for 9 hr. While, the GTP pool increased 1.9 fold above

  15. Induction of phosphodiesterase by cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate in differentiating Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae.

    PubMed

    Klein, C

    1975-09-25

    Cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate added to the starvation media of Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae induces both intracellular and extracellular phosphodiesterase activities of these cells. The induced enzyme activity appears several hours earlier than that in starved cells which have not been induced with cyclic nucleotide. In both cases, the appearance of enzyme is inhibited by cycloheximide, and actinomycin D, and daunomycin. The KmS for the extracellular enzyme(s) of nucleotide-induced and uninduced control cells are identical. The induction of enzyme activity seems specific for cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate since cyclic guanosine 3':5'-monophosphate, as well as other nucleotides, have no effect. No differences in the activity or excretion of either N-acetylglucosaminidase or the inhibitory of the extracellular phosphodiesterase are observed between cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate-induced and control cells. A direct activation of phosphodiesterase by cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate can be excluded, since the addition of this nucleotide to cell lysates has no effect on the enzyme activity. PMID:170256

  16. A long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist increases the expression of muscarine cholinergic subtype‑3 receptors by activating the β2-adrenoceptor cyclic adenosine monophosphate signaling pathway in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-Hua; Wu, Song-Ze; Wang, Gang; Huang, Ni-Wen; Liu, Chun-Tao

    2015-06-01

    The persistent administration of β2‑adrenergic (β2AR) agonists has been demonstrated to increase the risk of severe asthma, partly due to the induction of tolerance to bronchoprotection via undefined mechanisms. The present study investigated the potential effect of the long‑acting β2‑adrenergic agonist, formoterol, on the expression of muscarinic M3 receptor (M3R) in rat airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Primary rat ASMCs were isolated and characterized following immunostaining with anti‑α‑smooth muscle actin antibodies. The protein expression levels of M3R and phospholipase C‑β1 (PLCβ1) were characterized by western blot analysis and the production of inositol 1,4,5‑trisphosphate (IP3) was determined using an enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay. Formoterol increased the protein expression of M3R in rat ASMCs in a time‑ and dose‑dependent manner, which was significantly inhibited by the β2AR antagonist, ICI118,551 and the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) inhibitor, SQ22,536. The increased protein expression of M3R was positively correlated with increased production of PLCβ1 and IP3. Furthermore, treatment with the glucocorticoid, budesonide, and the PLC inhibitor, U73,122, significantly suppressed the formoterol‑induced upregulated protein expression levels of M3R and PLCβ1 and production of IP3. The present study demonstrated that formoterol mediated the upregulation of M3R in the rat ASMCs by activating the β2AR‑cAMP signaling pathway, resulting in increased expression levels of PLCβ1 and IP3, which are key to inducing bronchoprotection tolerance. Administration of glucocorticoids or a PLC antagonist prevented formoterol‑induced bronchoprotection tolerance by suppressing the protein expression of M3R. PMID:25672589

  17. A long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist increases the expression of muscarine cholinergic subtype-3 receptors by activating the β2-adrenoceptor cyclic adenosine monophosphate signaling pathway in airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YUAN-HUA; WU, SONG-ZE; WANG, GANG; HUANG, NI-WEN; LIU, CHUN-TAO

    2015-01-01

    The persistent administration of β2-adrenergic (β2AR) agonists has been demonstrated to increase the risk of severe asthma, partly due to the induction of tolerance to bronchoprotection via undefined mechanisms. The present study investigated the potential effect of the long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist, formoterol, on the expression of muscarinic M3 receptor (M3R) in rat airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Primary rat ASMCs were isolated and characterized following immunostaining with anti-α-smooth muscle actin antibodies. The protein expression levels of M3R and phospholipase C-β1 (PLCβ1) were characterized by western blot analysis and the production of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Formoterol increased the protein expression of M3R in rat ASMCs in a time- and dose-dependent manner, which was significantly inhibited by the β2AR antagonist, ICI118,551 and the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) inhibitor, SQ22,536. The increased protein expression of M3R was positively correlated with increased production of PLCβ1 and IP3. Furthermore, treatment with the glucocorticoid, budesonide, and the PLC inhibitor, U73,122, significantly suppressed the formoterol-induced upregulated protein expression levels of M3R and PLCβ1 and production of IP3. The present study demonstrated that formoterol mediated the upregulation of M3R in the rat ASMCs by activating the β2AR-cAMP signaling pathway, resulting in increased expression levels of PLCβ1 and IP3, which are key to inducing bronchoprotection tolerance. Administration of glucocorticoids or a PLC antagonist prevented formoterol-induced bronchoprotection tolerance by suppressing the protein expression of M3R. PMID:25672589

  18. Overexpression of human selenoprotein H in neuronal cells enhances mitochondrial biogenesis and function through activation of protein kinase A, protein kinase B, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein pathway.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Suresh L; Mendelev, Natalia; Kumari, Santosh; Andy Li, P

    2013-03-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is activated by nuclear encoded transcription co-activator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), which is regulated by several upstream factors including protein kinase A and Akt/protein kinase B. We have previously shown that selenoprotein H enhances the levels of nuclear regulators for mitochondrial biogenesis, increases mitochondrial mass and improves mitochondrial respiratory rate, under physiological condition. Furthermore, overexpression of selenoprotein H protects neuronal HT22 cells from ultraviolet B irradiation-induced cell damage by lowering reactive oxygen species production, and inhibiting activation of caspase-3 and -9, as well as p53. The objective of this study is to identify the cell signaling pathways by which selenoprotein H initiates mitochondrial biogenesis. We first confirmed our previous observation that selenoprotein H transfected HT22 cells increased the protein levels of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial biogenesis factors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor 1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. We then observed that total and phosphorylation of protein kinase A, Akt/protein kinase B and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) were significantly increased in selenoprotein H transfected cells compared to vector transfected HT22 cells. To verify whether the observed stimulating effects on mitochondrial biogenesis pathways are caused by selenoprotein H and mediated through CREB, we knocked down selenoprotein H mRNA level using siRNA and inhibited CREB with napthol AS-E phosphate in selenoprotein H transfected cells and repeated the measurements of the aforementioned biomarkers. Our results revealed that silencing of selenoprotein H not only decreased the protein levels of PGC-1α, nuclear respiratory factor 1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A, but also decreased the total and

  19. Guanosine radical reactivity explored by pulse radiolysis coupled with transient electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Latus, A; Alam, M S; Mostafavi, M; Marignier, J-L; Maisonhaute, E

    2015-06-01

    We follow the reactivity of a guanosine radical created by a radiolytic electron pulse both by spectroscopic and electrochemical methods. This original approach allows us to demonstrate that there is a competition between oxidation and reduction of these intermediates, an important result to further analyse the degradation or repair pathways of DNA bases.

  20. Involvement of NO/cGMP pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of gabapentin in mouse forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Kordjazy, Nastaran; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Ameli, Sanaz; Akhlaghipour, Golnoosh; Dehpour, AhmadReza

    2016-04-01

    Based on clinical studies regarding the beneficial effect of gabapentin in depression, we aimed to evaluate the antidepressant-like properties of gabapentin in mice and also the participation of nitric oxide (NO)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in this effect. The following drugs were used in this study: gabapentin; N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a non-specific NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor; 7-nitroindazole, a specific neuronal NOS inhibitor; aminoguanidine, a specific inducible NOS inhibitor; L-arginine, a NO precursor; and sildenafil, a phosphodiestrase inhibitor. Finally, we studied the behavioral effects through the forced swimming test (FST) and the changes of the hippocampus NO level through nitrite assay. The immobility time was significantly reduced after gabapentin administration. Co-administration of non-effective doses of gabapentin and L-NAME or 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) resulted in antidepressant-like effect in FST, while aminoguanidine did not affect the immobility time of gabapentin-treated mice. Furthermore, the antidepressant-like property of gabapentin was prevented by L-arginine or sildenafil. Also, the hippocampal nitrite level was significantly lower in gabapentin-treated mice relative to saline-injected mice, and co-administration of 7-NI with sub-effective gabapentin caused a significant decrease in hippocampal nitrite levels. Our results indicate that the antidepressant-like effect of gabapentin in the mice FST model is mediated at least in part through nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway.

  1. Guanosine: a Neuromodulator with Therapeutic Potential in Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lanznaster, Débora; Dal-Cim, Tharine; Piermartiri, Tetsadê C. B.; Tasca, Carla I.

    2016-01-01

    Guanosine is a purine nucleoside with important functions in cell metabolism and a protective role in response to degenerative diseases or injury. The past decade has seen major advances in identifying the modulatory role of extracellular action of guanosine in the central nervous system (CNS). Evidence from rodent and cell models show a number of neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects of guanosine preventing deleterious consequences of seizures, spinal cord injury, pain, mood disorders and aging-related diseases, such as ischemia, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. The present review describes the findings of in vivo and in vitro studies and offers an update of guanosine effects in the CNS. We address the protein targets for guanosine action and its interaction with glutamatergic and adenosinergic systems and with calcium-activated potassium channels. We also discuss the intracellular mechanisms modulated by guanosine preventing oxidative damage, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammatory burden and modulation of glutamate transport. New and exciting avenues for future investigation into the protective effects of guanosine include characterization of a selective guanosine receptor. A better understanding of the neuromodulatory action of guanosine will allow the development of therapeutic approach to brain diseases. PMID:27699087

  2. Guanosine: a Neuromodulator with Therapeutic Potential in Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lanznaster, Débora; Dal-Cim, Tharine; Piermartiri, Tetsadê C. B.; Tasca, Carla I.

    2016-01-01

    Guanosine is a purine nucleoside with important functions in cell metabolism and a protective role in response to degenerative diseases or injury. The past decade has seen major advances in identifying the modulatory role of extracellular action of guanosine in the central nervous system (CNS). Evidence from rodent and cell models show a number of neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects of guanosine preventing deleterious consequences of seizures, spinal cord injury, pain, mood disorders and aging-related diseases, such as ischemia, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. The present review describes the findings of in vivo and in vitro studies and offers an update of guanosine effects in the CNS. We address the protein targets for guanosine action and its interaction with glutamatergic and adenosinergic systems and with calcium-activated potassium channels. We also discuss the intracellular mechanisms modulated by guanosine preventing oxidative damage, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammatory burden and modulation of glutamate transport. New and exciting avenues for future investigation into the protective effects of guanosine include characterization of a selective guanosine receptor. A better understanding of the neuromodulatory action of guanosine will allow the development of therapeutic approach to brain diseases.

  3. Recipient pretransplant inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase activity in nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Meagan J; Risler, Linda J; Phillips, Brian R; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S; Boeckh, Michael J; McCune, Jeannine S

    2014-10-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5'-monophosphate to xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, nonrelapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient's pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient's sensitivity to MMF. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients.

  4. Recipient pretransplant inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase activity in nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Meagan J; Risler, Linda J; Phillips, Brian R; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S; Boeckh, Michael J; McCune, Jeannine S

    2014-10-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5'-monophosphate to xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, nonrelapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient's pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient's sensitivity to MMF. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. PMID:24923537

  5. Involvement of nitric oxide pathways in short term modulation of tyrosine hydroxylase activity by endothelins 1 and 3 in the rat anterior hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Morgazo, Carolina; Perfume, Guadalupe; Legaz, Guillermina; di Nunzio, Andrea; Hope, Sandra I; Bianciotti, Liliana G; Vatta, Marcelo S

    2005-09-01

    The ability of endothelins 1 and 3 (ET-1 and ET-3) to reduce neuronal norepinephrine release through ETB receptor activation involving nitric oxide (NO) pathways in the rat anterior hypothalamus region (AHR) was previously reported. In the present work, we studied the effects of ET-1 and -3 on tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and the possible involvement of NO pathways. Results showed that ET-1 and -3 (10 nM) diminished TH activity in AHR and this effect was blocked by a selective ETB receptor antagonist (100 nM BQ-788), but not by a ET(A) receptor antagonist (BQ-610). To confirm these results, 1 microM IRL-1620 (ET(B) agonist) reduced TH activity whereas 300 nM sarafotoxin S6b falled to modify it. N(omega)-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (10 microM), 7-nitroindazole (10 microM), 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-ona (10 microM), KT5823 (2 microM), inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase, neuronal nitric oxide synthase, NO-sensitive-guanylyl cyclase, and protein kinase G, respectively, did not modify the reduction of TH activity produced by ETs. In addition, both 100 microM sodium nitroprusside and 50 microM 8-bromoguanosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (NO donor and guanosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate analog, respectively) diminished TH activity. Present results showed that ET-1 and ET-3 diminished TH activity through the activation of ET(B) receptors involving the NO/guanosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate/protein kinase G pathway. Taken jointly present and previous results it can be concluded that both ETs play an important role as modulators of norepinephrine neurotransmission in the rat AHR.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency adenosine ...

  7. Response of Guanosine 5′-Triphosphate Concentration to Nutritional Changes and Its Significance for Bacillus subtilis Sporulation

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Juan M.; Dromerick, Alex; Freese, Ernst

    1981-01-01

    We have investigated the changes in the guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP) and P-ribosyl-PP pools in stringent and relaxed strains of Bacillus subtilis under conditions frequently used to initiate sporulation. After a shift-down from a Casamino Acids-glutamate to a glutamate medium (Sterlini-Mandelstam shift-down), the pools of adenosine 5′-triphosphate and P-ribosyl-PP increased in both strains; in the stringent strain, ppGpp and pppGpp increased and GTP decreased rapidly, whereas in the relaxed strain, ppGpp and pppGpp increased only slightly and GTP decreased only slowly and less extensively. The stringent strain sporulated well, whereas the relaxed strain sporulated late and poorly. Addition of decoyinine, an inhibitor of guanosine 5′-monophosphate synthetase, caused a further decrease of GTP and initiated good sporulation of the relaxed strain. After a shift-down from a glucose-lactate to a lactate medium (Ramaley-Burden shift-down) the pool of P-ribosyl-PP (and GTP) decreased in both strains, indicating a shortage of purine precursors. This shift-down also caused a stringent response which prevented the consumption of nucleotides, as shown by the maintenance of adenosine 5′-triphosphate at a high concentration in the stringent strain but not in the relaxed strain. After a delay, the relaxed strain, in which GTP decreased as fast as in the stringent strain, sporulated also as efficiently. In nutrient sporulation medium the stringent strain and, less effectively, the relaxed strain accumulated ppGpp and pppGpp transiently towards the end of exponential growth. Eventually, the P-ribosyl-PP pool decreased drastically in both strains. In all cases the initiation of sporulation was correlated with a significant decrease of GTP. Granaticin, an antibiotic which prevents the charging of leucyl-transfer ribonucleic acid, was used to show that the stringent response inhibited the formation of xanthosine monophosphate from inosine monophosphate. It prevented the

  8. Discovery of Inhibitors of Leishmania β-1,2-Mannosyltransferases Using a Click-Chemistry-Derived Guanosine Monophosphate Library

    PubMed Central

    van der Peet, Phillip; Ralton, Julie E.; McConville, Malcolm J.; Williams, Spencer J.

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania spp. are a medically important group of protozoan parasites that synthesize a novel intracellular carbohydrate reserve polymer termed mannogen. Mannogen is a soluble homopolymer of β-1,2-linked mannose residues that accumulates in the major pathogenic stages in the sandfly vector and mammalian host. While several steps in mannogen biosynthesis have been defined, none of the enzymes have been isolated or characterized. We report the development of a simple assay for the GDP-mannose–dependent β-1,2-mannosyltransferases involved in mannogen synthesis. This assay utilizes octyl α-d-mannopyranoside to prime the formation of short mannogen oligomers up to 5 mannose residues. This assay was used to screen a focussed library of 44 GMP-triazole adducts for inhibitors. Several compounds provided effective inhibition of mannogen β-1,2-mannosyltransferases in a cell-free membrane preparation. This assay and inhibitor compounds will be useful for dissecting the role of different mannosyltransferases in regulating de novo biosynthesis and elongation reactions in mannogen metabolism. PMID:22393429

  9. 2'-F-ANA-guanosine and 2'-F-guanosine as powerful tools for structural manipulation of G-quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Lech, Christopher Jacques; Li, Zhe; Heddi, Brahim; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2012-12-01

    Here we demonstrate the applicability of 2'-F-ANA-guanosine and 2'-F-guanosine as powerful tools for manipulating G-quadruplex folding by anti-position-favoring substitutions. A single guanine to 2'-F-ANA-guanine substitution can favor a single (3+1) hybrid conformation from a mixture of conformers. Rational substitutions of either type of 2'-F-modified nucleotide enable conformational switching from a (3+1) hybrid to a parallel folding topology.

  10. Early glycogen synthase kinase-3β and protein phosphatase 2A independent tau dephosphorylation during global brain ischaemia and reperfusion following cardiac arrest and the role of the adenosine monophosphate kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Majd, Shohreh; Power, John H T; Koblar, Simon A; Grantham, Hugh J M

    2016-08-01

    Abnormal tau phosphorylation (p-tau) has been shown after hypoxic damage to the brain associated with traumatic brain injury and stroke. As the level of p-tau is controlled by Glycogen Synthase Kinase (GSK)-3β, Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and Adenosine Monophosphate Kinase (AMPK), different activity levels of these enzymes could be involved in tau phosphorylation following ischaemia. This study assessed the effects of global brain ischaemia/reperfusion on the immediate status of p-tau in a rat model of cardiac arrest (CA) followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We reported an early dephosphorylation of tau at its AMPK sensitive residues, Ser(396) and Ser(262) after 2 min of ischaemia, which did not recover during the first two hours of reperfusion, while the tau phosphorylation at GSK-3β sensitive but AMPK insensitive residues, Ser(202) /Thr(205) (AT8), as well as the total amount of tau remained unchanged. Our data showed no alteration in the activities of GSK-3β and PP2A during similar episodes of ischaemia of up to 8 min and reperfusion of up to 2 h, and 4 weeks recovery. Dephosphorylation of AMPK followed the same pattern as tau dephosphorylation during ischaemia/reperfusion. Catalase, another AMPK downstream substrate also showed a similar pattern of decline to p-AMPK, in ischaemic/reperfusion groups. This suggests the involvement of AMPK in changing the p-tau levels, indicating that tau dephosphorylation following ischaemia is not dependent on GSK-3β or PP2A activity, but is associated with AMPK dephosphorylation. We propose that a reduction in AMPK activity is a possible early mechanism responsible for tau dephosphorylation.

  11. Guanosine protects glial cells against 6-hydroxydopamine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Patricia; Ballerini, Patrizia; Buccella, Silvana; Ciccarelli, Renata; Rathbone, Michel P; Romano, Silvia; D'Alimonte, Iolanda; Caciagli, Francesco; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Pokorski, Mieczyslaw

    2015-01-01

    Increasing body of evidence indicates that neuron-neuroglia interaction may play a key role in determining the progression of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD), a chronic pathological condition characterized by selective loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra. We have previously reported that guanosine (GUO) antagonizes MPP(+)-induced cytotoxicity in neuroblastoma cells and exerts neuroprotective effects against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and beta-amyloid-induced apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells. In the present study we demonstrate that GUO protected C6 glioma cells, taken as a model system for astrocytes, from 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. We show that GUO, either alone or in combination with 6-OHDA activated the cell survival pathways ERK and PI3K/Akt. The involvement of these signaling systems in the mechanism of the nucleoside action was strengthened by a reduction of the protective effect when glial cells were pretreated with U0126 or LY294002, the specific inhibitors of MEK1/2 and PI3K, respectively. Since the protective effect on glial cell death of GUO was not affected by pretreatment with a cocktail of nucleoside transporter blockers, GUO transport and its intracellular accumulation were not at play in our in vitro model of PD. This fits well with our data which pointed to the presence of specific binding sites for GUO on rat brain membranes. On the whole, the results described in the present study, along with our recent evidence showing that GUO when administered to rats via intraperitoneal injection is able to reach the brain and with previous data indicating that it stimulates the release of neurotrophic factors, suggest that GUO, a natural compound, by acting at the glial level could be a promising agent to be tested against neurodegeneration. PMID:25310956

  12. GMP synthase is essential for viability and infectivity of Trypanosoma brucei despite a redundant purine salvage pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiong; Leija, Christopher; Rijo-Ferreira, Filipa; Chen, Jun; Cestari, Igor; Stuart, Kenneth; Tu, Benjamin P.; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis, Trypanosoma brucei, lacks de novo purine biosynthesis and depends on purine salvage from the host. The purine salvage pathway is redundant and contains two routes to guanosine-5′-monophosphate (GMP) formation: conversion from xanthosine-5′-monophosphate (XMP) by GMP synthase (GMPS) or direct salvage of guanine by hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT). We show recombinant T. brucei GMPS efficiently catalyzes GMP formation. Genetic knockout of GMPS in bloodstream parasites led to depletion of guanine nucleotide pools and was lethal. Growth of gmps null cells was only rescued by supraphysiological guanine concentrations (100 μM) or by expression of an extrachromosomal copy of GMPS. Hypoxanthine was a competitive inhibitor of guanine rescue, consistent with a common uptake/metabolic conversion mechanism. In mice, gmps null parasites were unable to establish an infection demonstrating that GMPS is essential for virulence and that plasma guanine is insufficient to support parasite purine requirements. These data validate GMPS as a potential therapeutic target for treatment of HAT. The ability to strategically inhibit key metabolic enzymes in the purine pathway unexpectedly bypasses its functional redundancy by exploiting both the nature of pathway flux and the limited nutrient environment of the parasite's extracellular niche. PMID:26043892

  13. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts.

  14. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts. PMID:26283971

  15. Inhibition of initiation of protein synthesis by 7-methylguanosine-5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, E D; Weber, L A; Baglioni, C

    1976-01-01

    Translation of rabbit globin mRNA in a wheat germ protein-synthesizing system is inhibited by the nucleotide 7-methylguanosine-5'-monophosphate (m7G5'p) but not by other guanosine nucleotides without the 7-methyl group or with the phosphate in a different position. Translation of RNA of tobacco mosaic virus and poly(A) + HeLa RNA is also inhibited by m7G5'p. We show that m7G5'p prevents the association of mRNA with ribosomal subunits to form an initiation complex. We propose that m7G5'p interacts with a site on initiation factor(s) or ribosomes which is involved in mRNA recognition, presumably by binding to the 5'-terminal sequence m7G5'ppp. m7G5'p does not inhibit translation of poly(U) and RNA of satellite tobacco necrosis virus, which do not have the 5'-terminal sequence m7G5'ppp. In the case of RNA of satellite tobacco necrosis virus, some stimulation of its translation is consistently observed in the presence of m7G5'p; possible interpretations of this finding are discussed. PMID:1061116

  16. Partial 13C isotopic enrichment of nucleoside monophosphates: useful reporters for NMR structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Anita I.; Mayer, Michael R.; Prestegard, James H.

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of the 13C isotopic labeling patterns of nucleoside monophosphates (NMPs) extracted from Escherichia coli grown in a mixture of C-1 and C-2 glucose is presented. By comparing our results to previous observations on amino acids grown in similar media, we have been able to rationalize the labeling pattern based on the well-known biochemistry of nucleotide biosynthesis. Except for a few notable absences of label (C4 in purines and C3′ in ribose) and one highly enriched site (C1′ in ribose), most carbons are randomly enriched at a low level (an average of 13%). These sparsely labeled NMPs give less complex NMR spectra than their fully isotopically labeled analogs due to the elimination of most 13C–13C scalar couplings. The spectral simplicity is particularly advantageous when working in ordered systems, as illustrated with guanosine diphosphate (GDP) bound to ADP ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1) aligned in a liquid crystalline medium. In this system, the absence of scalar couplings and additional long-range dipolar couplings significantly enhances signal to noise and resolution. PMID:16254075

  17. Development of Potent Adenosine Monophosphate Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Activators.

    PubMed

    Dokla, Eman M E; Fang, Chun-Sheng; Lai, Po-Ting; Kulp, Samuel K; Serya, Rabah A T; Ismail, Nasser S M; Abouzid, Khaled A M; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2015-11-01

    Previously, we reported the identification of a thiazolidinedione-based adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, compound 1 (N-[4-({3-[(1-methylcyclohexyl)methyl]-2,4-dioxothiazolidin-5-ylidene}methyl)phenyl]-4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)benzenesulfonamide), which provided a proof of concept to delineate the intricate role of AMPK in regulating oncogenic signaling pathways associated with cell proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in cancer cells. In this study, we used 1 as a scaffold to conduct lead optimization, which generated a series of derivatives. Analysis of the antiproliferative and AMPK-activating activities of individual derivatives revealed a distinct structure-activity relationship and identified 59 (N-(3-nitrophenyl)-N'-{4-[(3-{[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]methyl}-2,4-dioxothiazolidin-5-ylidene)methyl]phenyl}urea) as the optimal agent. Relative to 1, compound 59 exhibits multifold higher potency in upregulating AMPK phosphorylation in various cell lines irrespective of their liver kinase B1 (LKB1) functional status, accompanied by parallel changes in the phosphorylation/expression levels of p70S6K, Akt, Foxo3a, and EMT-associated markers. Consistent with its predicted activity against tumors with activated Akt status, orally administered 59 was efficacious in suppressing the growth of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN)-null PC-3 xenograft tumors in nude mice. Together, these findings suggest that 59 has clinical value in therapeutic strategies for PTEN-negative cancer and warrants continued investigation in this regard.

  18. Phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate is involved in toxoplasma apicoplast biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tawk, Lina; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Montcourrier, Philippe; Chicanne, Gaëtan; Merezegue, Fabrice; Richard, Véronique; Payrastre, Bernard; Meissner, Markus; Vial, Henri J; Roy, Christian; Wengelnik, Kai; Lebrun, Maryse

    2011-02-01

    Apicomplexan parasites cause devastating diseases including malaria and toxoplasmosis. They harbour a plastid-like, non-photosynthetic organelle of algal origin, the apicoplast, which fulfils critical functions for parasite survival. Because of its essential and original metabolic pathways, the apicoplast has become a target for the development of new anti-apicomplexan drugs. Here we show that the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate (PI3P) is involved in apicoplast biogenesis in Toxoplasma gondii. In yeast and mammalian cells, PI3P is concentrated on early endosomes and regulates trafficking of endosomal compartments. Imaging of PI3P in T. gondii showed that the lipid was associated with the apicoplast and apicoplast protein-shuttling vesicles. Interference with regular PI3P function by over-expression of a PI3P specific binding module in the parasite led to the accumulation of vesicles containing apicoplast peripheral membrane proteins around the apicoplast and, ultimately, to the loss of the organelle. Accordingly, inhibition of the PI3P-synthesising kinase interfered with apicoplast biogenesis. These findings point to an unexpected implication for this ubiquitous lipid and open new perspectives on how nuclear encoded proteins traffic to the apicoplast. This study also highlights the possibility of developing specific pharmacological inhibitors of the parasite PI3-kinase as novel anti-apicomplexan drugs. PMID:21379336

  19. Photo protection of RNA building blocks: Adenosine 5‧-monophosphate, cytidine 5‧-monophosphate and cytosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Jakob Brun; Thøgersen, Jan; Jensen, Svend Knak; Keiding, Søren Rud

    2013-04-01

    Photoprotection of the RNA nucleotides adenosine 5'-monophosphate and cytidine 5'-monophosphate, and the nucleobase cytosine was studied using UV pump, IR probe femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. The excitation energy is contained in the aromatic ring system, protecting the RNA backbone. All three molecules dissipate the excitation energy by internal conversion and subsequent vibrational relaxation to the electronic ground state in less than 10 ps. In addition, a second deactivation channel is found in cytidine 5'-monophosphate, illustrated by a signal at 1563 cm-1 with a lifetime of 33 ps assigned to an nπ∗ state in agreement with observations in the UV region.

  20. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa)

    PubMed Central

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E.; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5′-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5′-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts. PMID:26283971

  1. Kinetics of the hydrolysis of guanosine 5'-phospho-2-methylimidazolide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia

    1986-01-01

    The hydrolysis kinetics of guanosine 5'-phospho-2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG) in aqueous buffered solutions of various pH's was studied at 75 and 37 C, using spectrophotometric and HPLC techniques. The hydrolysis was found to be very slow even at low pH. At 75 C and pH at or below l.0, two kinetic processes were observed: the more rapid one was attributed to the hydrolysis of the phosphoimidazolide P-N bond; the second, much slower one, was attributed to the cleavage of the glycosidic bond. It is noted that the P-N hydrolysis in phosphoimidazolides is very slow compared to other phosphoramidates, and that this might be one of the reasons why the phosphoimidazolides showed an extraordinary ability to form long oligomers under template-directed conditions.

  2. A cyclic GMP-dependent signalling pathway regulates bacterial phytopathogenesis.

    PubMed

    An, Shi-Qi; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Febrer, Melanie; McCarthy, Yvonne; Yang, Jauo-Guey; Liu, Chung-Liang; Swarbreck, David; Rogers, Jane; Maxwell Dow, J; Chou, Shan-Ho; Ryan, Robert P

    2013-09-11

    Cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic GMP) is a second messenger whose role in bacterial signalling is poorly understood. A genetic screen in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris (Xcc) identified that XC_0250, which encodes a protein with a class III nucleotidyl cyclase domain, is required for cyclic GMP synthesis. Purified XC_0250 was active in cyclic GMP synthesis in vitro. The linked gene XC_0249 encodes a protein with a cyclic mononucleotide-binding (cNMP) domain and a GGDEF diguanylate cyclase domain. The activity of XC_0249 in cyclic di-GMP synthesis was enhanced by addition of cyclic GMP. The isolated cNMP domain of XC_0249 bound cyclic GMP and a structure-function analysis, directed by determination of the crystal structure of the holo-complex, demonstrated the site of cyclic GMP binding that modulates cyclic di-GMP synthesis. Mutation of either XC_0250 or XC_0249 led to a reduced virulence to plants and reduced biofilm formation in vitro. These findings describe a regulatory pathway in which cyclic GMP regulates virulence and biofilm formation through interaction with a novel effector that directly links cyclic GMP and cyclic di-GMP signalling.

  3. Regulatory role for the arginine-nitric oxide pathway in metabolism of energy substrates.

    PubMed

    Jobgen, Wenjuan Shi; Fried, Susan K; Fu, Wenjiang J; Meininger, Cynthia J; Wu, Guoyao

    2006-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesized from L-arginine by NO synthase in virtually all cell types. Emerging evidence shows that NO regulates the metabolism of glucose, fatty acids and amino acids in mammals. As an oxidant, pathological levels of NO inhibit nearly all enzyme-catalyzed reactions through protein oxidation. However, as a signaling molecule, physiological levels of NO stimulate glucose uptake as well as glucose and fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle, heart, liver and adipose tissue; inhibit the synthesis of glucose, glycogen, and fat in target tissues (e.g., liver and adipose); and enhance lipolysis in adipocytes. Thus, an inhibition of NO synthesis causes hyperlipidemia and fat accretion in rats, whereas dietary arginine supplementation reduces fat mass in diabetic fatty rats. The putative underlying mechanisms may involve multiple cyclic guanosine-3',5'-monophosphate-dependent pathways. First, NO stimulates the phosphorylation of adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase, resulting in (1) a decreased level of malonyl-CoA via inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and activation of malonyl-CoA decarboxylase and (2) a decreased expression of genes related to lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis (glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase). Second, NO increases the phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase and perilipins, leading to the translocation of the lipase to the neutral lipid droplets and, hence, the stimulation of lipolysis. Third, NO activates expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha, thereby enhancing mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation. Fourth, NO increases blood flow to insulin-sensitive tissues, promoting substrate uptake and product removal via the circulation. Modulation of the arginine-NO pathway through dietary supplementation with L-arginine or L-citrulline may aid in the prevention and

  4. Mycophenolic acid inhibits inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase and suppresses production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide, and LDH in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Charlotte A; Carlsten, Hans

    2002-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) inhibits reversibly inosine 5(')-monophosphate dehydrogenase, an enzyme involved in the de novo synthesis of guanine nucleotides. Previously, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), the pro-drug of MPA, was shown to exert beneficial effects on the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like disease in MRLlpr/lpr mice. In this study MPA's immunomodulating effects in vitro on the murine macrophage cell line IC-21 were investigated. The cells were exposed to MPA together with lipopolysaccharide and IFN-gamma. Cytokine, NO(2)(-), and lactate dehydrogenase levels in supernatants and cell lysates were analysed as well as the proliferation of IC-21 cells. MPA exposure reduced the total levels of all molecules investigated and suppressed the proliferation. All MPA-induced effects were reversed by the addition of guanosine to the cultures. Since macrophages play a role in lupus nephritis, our results indicate that modulation of macrophages may be involved in the ameliorating effects of MMF in SLE. PMID:12381354

  5. Therapeutic effect of CNP on renal osteodystrophy by antagonizing the FGF-23/MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peng; Huang, Bao Yu; Xia, Xun; Xuan, Qiang; Hu, Bo; Qin, Yuan Han

    2016-01-01

    Renal osteodystrophy (ROD) is highly prevalent in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Because most patients with ROD are asymptomatic in the early stage and bone biopsy remains not a routine procedure in many clinical settings; therefore, several biochemical parameters may help to identify the existence of ROD. C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is considered as a positive regulator of bone formation. Both urinary excretion and renal expression of CNP are markedly up-regulated in the early stages of CKD, whereas they are still progressively declined accompanied by CKD progression, which invites speculation that the progressive decline of CNP may contribute, in part, to the pathogenesis of ROD. In addition, fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-23 is a bone-derived endocrine regulator of phosphate homeostasis. The elevation of serum FGF-23 has been recognized as a common feature in CKD to maintain normophosphatemia at the expense of declining 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D values. Since the effects of CNP and FGF-23 on bone formation appear to oppose each other, it is reasonable to propose a direct interaction of their signaling pathways during the progression of ROD. CNP and FGF-23 act through a close or reciprocal pathway and are in agreement with recent studies demonstrating a down-regulatory role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase activity by CNP. The specific node may act at the level of RAF-1 through the activation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinases II. PMID:26459742

  6. Dual specificity and novel structural folding of yeast phosphodiesterase-1 for hydrolysis of second messengers cyclic adenosine and guanosine 3',5'-Monophosphate

    DOE PAGES

    Tian, Yuanyuan; Cui, Wenjun; Huang, Manna; Robinson, Howard; Wan, Yiqian; Wang, Yousheng; Ke, Hengming

    2014-08-05

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) decompose second messengers cAMP and cGMP that play critical roles in many physiological processes. PDE1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been subcloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant yPDE1 has a KM of 110 μM and a kcat of 16.9 s⁻¹ for cAMP and a KM of 105 μM and a kcat of 11.8 s₅⁻¹ for cGMP. Thus, the specificity constant (kcat/KMcAMP)/(kcat/KMcGMP) of 1.4 indicates a dual specificity of yPDE1 for hydrolysis of both cAMP and cGMP. The crystal structures of unliganded yPDE1 and its complex with GMP at 1.31 Å resolution reveal a new structural foldingmore » that is different from those of human PDEs but is partially similar to that of some other metalloenzymes such as metallo-β-lactamase. In spite of their different structures and divalent metals, yPDE1 and human PDEs may share a common mechanism for hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP.« less

  7. Time-resolved probes and oxidase-based biosensors using terbium(III)-guanosine monophosphate-mercury(II) coordination polymer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Qu, Zhi-bei; Han, Chun-Min; Lu, Ling-Fei; Li, Yan-Yun; Zhou, Tianshu; Shi, Guoyue

    2014-11-01

    A novel lanthanide coordination polymer nanoparticle (LCPN)-based ternary complex was synthesized via the self-assembly of a terbium ion (Tb(3+)) with a nucleotide (GMP) and a mercury ion (Hg(2+)) in aqueous solution. The as-prepared LCPN-based ternary complex (Tb-GMP-Hg) can be applied to the development of time-resolved luminescence assays and oxidase-based biosensors.

  8. Biochemical characterization of recombinant guaA-encoded guanosine monophosphate synthetase (EC 6.3.5.2) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv strain.

    PubMed

    Franco, Tathyana Mar A; Rostirolla, Diana C; Ducati, Rodrigo G; Lorenzini, Daniel M; Basso, Luiz A; Santos, Diógenes S

    2012-01-01

    Administration of the current tuberculosis (TB) vaccine to newborns is not a reliable route for preventing TB in adults. The conversion of XMP to GMP is catalyzed by guaA-encoded GMP synthetase (GMPS), and deletions in the Shiguella flexneri guaBA operon led to an attenuated auxotrophic strain. Here we present the cloning, expression, and purification of recombinant guaA-encoded GMPS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtGMPS). Mass spectrometry data, oligomeric state determination, steady-state kinetics, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and multiple sequence alignment are also presented. The homodimeric MtGMPS catalyzes the conversion of XMP, MgATP, and glutamine into GMP, ADP, PP(i), and glutamate. XMP, NH(4)(+), and Mg(2+) displayed positive homotropic cooperativity, whereas ATP and glutamine displayed hyperbolic saturation curves. The activity of ATP pyrophosphatase domain is independent of glutamine amidotransferase domain, whereas the latter cannot catalyze hydrolysis of glutamine to NH(3) and glutamate in the absence of substrates. ITC data suggest random order of binding of substrates, and PP(i) is the last product released. Sequence comparison analysis showed conservation of both Cys-His-Glu catalytic triad of N-terminal Class I amidotransferase and of amino acid residues of the P-loop of the N-type ATP pyrophosphatase family.

  9. 5'-Guanosine monophosphate mediated biocompatible porous hydrogel of β-FeOOH-viscoelastic behavior, loading, and release capabilities of freeze-dried gel.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Gupta, Sudhir Kumar

    2014-09-01

    The present manuscript reports the characterization, optimization of rheological properties, and loading and release capabilities of 5'-GMP mediated β-FeOOH hydrogel. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis indicates it to contain mainly the left-handed helix similar to that of Z-DNA. The highest viscosity (>300 cP) corresponds to the sample containing 2.5 × 10(-3) mol dm(-3) of 5'-GMP (SP2H). Field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) studies indicate the freeze-dried (FD) SP2H to be porous in nature, which is also supported by its high Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of 226 m(2)/g as compared to that of SP3H (75 m(2)/g). Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) analysis and Raman spectroscopy show it to contain β-FeOOH phase. The FD SP2H exhibits the high swelling ratio (326%) and loading capacity for methylene blue (MB) dye. It displays a controlled and efficient release (>90%) for optimized [MB] (2.5 × 10(-4) mol dm(-3)) in 48 h. The low toxicity of as synthesized FD SP2H nanostructures against MDA-MB-231 (breast cancer cells) up to 100 μg/mL suggests its biocompatible nature. The high porosity, surface area, % swelling, and loading and release performance of the hydrogel indicate its potential for drug delivery and other biological applications.

  10. Differences in responsiveness of intrapulmonary artery and vein to arachidonic acid: mechanism of arterial relaxation involves cyclic guanosine 3':5'-monophosphate and cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Ignarro, L.J.; Harbison, R.G.; Wood, K.S.; Wolin, M.S.; McNamara, D.B.; Hyman, A.L.; Kadowitz, P.J.

    1985-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between responses of bovine intrapulmonary artery and vein to arachidonic acid and cyclic nucleotide levels in order to better understand the mechanism of relaxation elicited by arachidonic acid and acetylcholine. Arachidonic acid relaxed phenylephrine-precontracted arterial rings and elevated both cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP levels in arteries with intact endothelium. In contrast, endothelium-damaged arterial rings contracted to arachidonic acid without demonstrating significant changes in cyclic nucleotide levels. Indomethacin partially inhibited endothelium-dependent relaxation and abolished cyclic AMP accumulation whereas methylene blue, a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, partially inhibited relaxation and abolished cyclic GMP accumulation in response to arachidonic acid. All vessel responses were blocked by a combination of the two inhibitors. Prostaglandin (PG) I2 relaxed arterial rings and elevated cyclic AMP levels whereas PGE2 and PGF2 alpha caused contraction, suggesting that the indomethacin-sensitive component of arachidonic acid-elicited relaxation is due to PGI2 formation and cyclic AMP accumulation. The methylene blue-sensitive component is attributed to an endothelium-dependent but cyclooxygenase-independent generation of a substance causing cyclic GMP accumulation. Intrapulmonary veins contracted to arachidonic acid with no changes in cyclic nucleotide levels and PGI2 was without effect. Homogenates of intrapulmonary artery and vein formed 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, PGF2 alpha and PGE2 from (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid, which was inhibited by indomethacin. Thus, bovine intrapulmonary vein may not possess receptors for PGI2.

  11. Increased riboflavin production by manipulation of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase in Ashbya gossypii.

    PubMed

    Buey, Rubén M; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Balsera, Mónica; de Pereda, José María; Revuelta, José Luis

    2015-11-01

    Guanine nucleotides are the precursors of essential biomolecules including nucleic acids and vitamins such as riboflavin. The enzyme inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) catalyzes the ratelimiting step in the guanine nucleotide de novo biosynthetic pathway and plays a key role in controlling the cellular nucleotide pools. Thus, IMPDH is an important metabolic bottleneck in the guanine nucleotide synthesis, susceptible of manipulation by means of metabolic engineering approaches. Herein, we report the functional and structural characterization of the IMPDH enzyme from the industrial fungus Ashbya gossypii. Our data show that the overexpression of the IMPDH gene increases the metabolic flux through the guanine pathway and ultimately enhances 40 % riboflavin production with respect to the wild type. Also, IMPDH disruption results in a 100-fold increase of inosine excretion to the culture media. Our results contribute to the developing metabolic engineering toolbox aiming at improving the production of metabolites with biotechnological interest in A. gossypii. PMID:26150243

  12. Studies on structures of lipid A-monophosphate clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faunce, Chester A.; Reichelt, Hendrik; Paradies, Henrich H.

    2011-03-01

    Single crystalline clusters of lipid A-monophosphate were grown from organic dispersions containing 5-15% (v/v) water at various volume fractions, ϕ, and temperatures. The morphology of the single lipid A-monophosphate crystals was either rhombohedral or hexagonal. The hexagonal crystals were needlelike or cylindrical in shape, with the long dimension parallel to the c axis of the unit cell. The crystalline clusters were studied using electron microscopy and x-ray powder diffraction. Employing molecular location methods following a Rietveld refinement and whole-pattern refinement revealed two monoclinic crystal structures in the space groups P21 and C2, both converged with RF = 0.179. The two monoclinic crystal structures were packing (hydrocarbon chains) and conformational (sugar) polymorphs. Neither of these two structures had been encountered previously. Only intramolecular hydrogen bonding was observed for the polymorphs, which were located between the amide and the carboxyl groups. Another crystalline structure was found in the volume-fraction range 2.00 × 10-3 ≤ ϕ ≤ 2.50 × 10-3, which displayed hexagonal symmetry. The hexagonal symmetry of the self-assembled lipid A-monophosphate crystalline phase might be reconciled with the monoclinic symmetry found at low-volume-fractions. Therefore, lowering the symmetry from cubic, i.e., Ia overline 3d, to rhombohedral R overline 3 m, and finally to the monoclinic space group C2 was acceptable if the lipid A-monophosphate anion was completely orientationally ordered.

  13. Attenuation of alpha-adrenergic-induced vasoconstriction by dietary wild blueberries (Vaccinium angustifolium) is mediated by the NO-cGMP pathway in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs).

    PubMed

    Kristo, Aleksandra S; Kalea, Anastasia Z; Schuschke, Dale A; Klimis-Zacas, Dorothy

    2013-12-01

    The role of wild blueberries (WB) on key signaling steps of nitric oxide (NO) and cyclooxygenase (COX) pathways was examined in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) after eight weeks on a control (C) or an 8% w/w WB diet. Aortic rings from SHRs were stimulated with phenylephrine (Phe) in the absence or presence of inhibitors of: soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE(5)), prostaglandin I(2) (PGI(2)) synthase and thromboxane A(2) (TXA(2)) synthase. Additionally, enzymatic activities in these pathways were determined by the concentration of NO, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), PGI(2) and TXA(2). In the WB-fed SHR, attenuation of Phe-induced vasoconstriction was mediated by an increased synthesis or preservation of cGMP. Despite an increased release of PGI(2) in the WB group, neither inhibition of PGI(2) or TXA(2) synthase resulted in a different response to Phe between the control and the WB rings. Hence, in the SHR, WB decrease Phe-mediated vasoconstriction under basal conditions by enhancing NO-cGMP signaling without a significant involvement of the COX pathway. PMID:23944991

  14. The Endothelium-Dependent Nitric Oxide-cGMP Pathway.

    PubMed

    Mónica, F Z; Bian, K; Murad, F

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic 3'-5' guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling plays a critical role on smooth muscle tone, platelet activity, cardiac contractility, renal function and fluid balance, and cell growth. Studies of the 1990s established endothelium dysfunction as one of the major causes of cardiovascular diseases. Therapeutic strategies that benefit NO bioavailability have been applied in clinical medicine extensively. Basic and clinical studies of cGMP regulation through activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) or inhibition of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) have resulted in effective therapies for pulmonary hypertension, erectile dysfunction, and more recently benign prostatic hyperplasia. This section reviews (1) how endothelial dysfunction and NO deficiency lead to cardiovascular diseases, (2) how soluble cGMP regulation leads to beneficial effects on disorders of the circulation system, and (3) the epigenetic regulation of NO-sGC pathway components in the cardiovascular system. In conclusion, the discovery of the NO-cGMP pathway revolutionized the comprehension of pathophysiological mechanisms involved in cardiovascular and other diseases. However, considering the expression "from bench to bedside" the therapeutic alternatives targeting NO-cGMP did not immediately follow the marked biochemical and pathophysiological revolution. Some therapeutic options have been effective and released on the market for pulmonary hypertension and erectile dysfunction such as inhaled NO, PDE5 inhibitors, and recently sGC stimulators. The therapeutic armamentarium for many other disorders is expected in the near future. There are currently numerous active basic and clinical research programs in universities and industries attempting to develop novel therapies for many diseases and medical applications.

  15. Kinetic analysis of guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) effects on phosphatidylinositol turnover in NRK cell homogenates

    SciTech Connect

    Chahwala, S.B.; Fleischman, L.F.; Cantley, L.

    1987-01-27

    Addition of the guanine nucleotide analogue guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S) to (/sup 3/H)inositol-labeled NRK cell homogenates resulted in rapid breakdown of cellular polyphosphoinositides. GTP gamma S stimulated phospholipase C, resulting in a more than 4-fold increase in the hydrolysis rates of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bis(phosphate) (PIP2). No significant effect of GTP gamma S on direct phosphatidylinositol (PI) hydrolysis was detected. There was an increase in water-soluble inositols, with inositol tris(phosphate) (IP3) levels increasing at least 10 times over the decrease seen in PIP2, indicating that PIP kinase activity was also accelerated following GTP gamma S addition. Inositol 1,4,5-tris(phosphate) peaked rapidly after GTP gamma S addition (less than 2 min) while inositol 1,3,4-tris-(phosphate) was produced more slowly and leveled off after approximately 10 min. The differential equations describing conversion between intermediates in the PI turnover pathway were solved and fitted to data obtained from both (/sup 3/H)inositol and (/sup 32/P)phosphate fluxes by nonlinear least-squares analysis. GTP gamma S effects on the pseudo-first-order rate constants for the lipase, kinase, and phosphatase steps were determined from the analysis. From these measurements it can be estimated that, in the presence of GTP gamma S and calcium buffered to 130 nM, hydrolysis of PIP2 accounts for at least 10 times as much diacylglycerol as direct PI breakdown despite the 100-fold excess of PI over PIP2. From the kinetic model it is predicted that small changes in the activities of PI and PIP kinases can have large but different effects on the level of IP3 and diacylglycerol following GTP gamma S addition. These results argue that regulation of PI and PIP kinases may be important for determining both cellular IP3 and diacylglycerol levels.

  16. [Isolation of inosine-5'-monophosphate from fish muscles].

    PubMed

    Tugaĭ, V A; Akulin, V N; Epshteĭn, L M

    1987-01-01

    Conditions for transformation of tissue adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP) into inosine-5'-monophosphate (IMP) with the aid of endogenic AMP-aminohydrolase are developed resting on the studied properties of AMP-aminohydrolase (EC 3.5.4.6) from saltwater fish muscles (one of the enzymes participating in the nucleotide metabolism). Sorption of the nucleotide is performed on the activated charcoals A gamma-3 A gamma-5 which eluate IMP from acid solutions. It reduces the process of isolation, permits application of the acid wash solutions to remove salts; the alkaline ethyl alcohol-aid elution at the subsequent stages accelerates the process of nucleotide concentration by means of vacuum evaporation. The suggested approaches allow developing a simple method of IMP production from fish tissues which diminishes the cost of preparation.

  17. Structure-based design, synthesis, evaluation, and crystal structures of transition state analogue inhibitors of inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lan; Chong, Youhoon; Hwang, Inkyu; D'Onofrio, Anthony; Amore, Kristen; Beardsley, G Peter; Li, Chenglong; Olson, Arthur J; Boger, Dale L; Wilson, Ian A

    2007-04-27

    The inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase (IMPCH) component (residues 1-199) of the bifunctional enzyme aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide transformylase (AICAR Tfase, residues 200-593)/IMPCH (ATIC) catalyzes the final step in the de novo purine biosynthesis pathway that produces IMP. As a potential target for antineoplastic intervention, we designed IMPCH inhibitors, 1,5-dihydroimidazo[4,5-c][1,2,6]thiadiazin-4(3H)-one 2,2-dioxide (heterocycle, 1), the corresponding nucleoside (2), and the nucleoside monophosphate (nucleotide) (3), as mimics of the tetrahedral intermediate in the cyclization reaction. All compounds are competitive inhibitors against IMPCH (K(i) values = 0.13-0.23 microm) with the simple heterocycle 1 exhibiting the most potent inhibition (K(i) = 0.13 microm). Crystal structures of bifunctional ATIC in complex with nucleoside 2 and nucleotide 3 revealed IMPCH binding modes similar to that of the IMPCH feedback inhibitor, xanthosine 5'-monophosphate. Surprisingly, the simpler heterocycle 1 had a completely different IMPCH binding mode and was relocated to the phosphate binding pocket that was identified from previous xanthosine 5'-monophosphate structures. The aromatic imidazole ring interacts with a helix dipole, similar to the interaction with the phosphate moiety of 3. The crystal structures not only revealed the mechanism of inhibition of these compounds, but they now serve as a platform for future inhibitor improvements. Importantly, the nucleoside-complexed structure supports the notion that inhibitors lacking a negatively charged phosphate can still inhibit IMPCH activity with comparable potency to phosphate-containing inhibitors. Provocatively, the nucleotide inhibitor 3 also binds to the AICAR Tfase domain of ATIC, which now provides a lead compound for the design of inhibitors that simultaneously target both active sites of this bifunctional enzyme.

  18. Structure-Based Design, Synthesis, Evaluation And Crystal Structures of Transition State Analogue Inhibitors of Inosine Monophosphate Cyclohydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, L.; Chong, Y.; Hwang, I.; D'Onofrio, A.; Amore, K.; Beardsley, G.P.; Li, C.; Olson, A.J.; Boger, D.L.; Wilson, I.A.; /Skaggs Inst. Chem. Biol. /Scripps Res. Inst. /Yale U.

    2007-07-13

    The inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase (IMPCH) component (residues 1-199) of the bifunctional enzyme aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide transformylase (AICAR Tfase, residues 200-593)/IMPCH (ATIC) catalyzes the final step in the de novo purine biosynthesis pathway that produces IMP. As a potential target for antineoplastic intervention, we designed IMPCH inhibitors, 1,5-dihydroimidazo[4,5-c][1,2,6]thiadiazin-4(3H)-one 2,2-dioxide (heterocycle, 1), the corresponding nucleoside (2), and the nucleoside monophosphate (nucleotide) (3), as mimics of the tetrahedral intermediate in the cyclization reaction. All compounds are competitive inhibitors against IMPCH (K(i) values = 0.13-0.23 microm) with the simple heterocycle 1 exhibiting the most potent inhibition (K(i) = 0.13 microm). Crystal structures of bifunctional ATIC in complex with nucleoside 2 and nucleotide 3 revealed IMPCH binding modes similar to that of the IMPCH feedback inhibitor, xanthosine 5'-monophosphate. Surprisingly, the simpler heterocycle 1 had a completely different IMPCH binding mode and was relocated to the phosphate binding pocket that was identified from previous xanthosine 5'-monophosphate structures. The aromatic imidazole ring interacts with a helix dipole, similar to the interaction with the phosphate moiety of 3. The crystal structures not only revealed the mechanism of inhibition of these compounds, but they now serve as a platform for future inhibitor improvements. Importantly, the nucleoside-complexed structure supports the notion that inhibitors lacking a negatively charged phosphate can still inhibit IMPCH activity with comparable potency to phosphate-containing inhibitors. Provocatively, the nucleotide inhibitor 3 also binds to the AICAR Tfase domain of ATIC, which now provides a lead compound for the design of inhibitors that simultaneously target both active sites of this bifunctional enzyme.

  19. Puerarin, an isoflavonoid derived from Radix puerariae, potentiates endothelium-independent relaxation via the cyclic AMP pathway in porcine coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Dennis K Y; Leung, Susan W S; Xu, Yan Chun; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Man, Ricky Y K

    2006-12-15

    Puerarin, an isoflavonoid derived from the Chinese medicinal herb Radix puerariae, has been suggested to be useful in the management of various cardiovascular disorders. The present study examined the effect of acute exposure (30 min) to puerarin on vascular relaxation. Rings from porcine coronary artery of either sex were used. The highest concentration of puerarin (100 microM) produced a small but statistically significant relaxation of U46619-contracted rings. Vascular relaxations were also studied in the presence of lower concentrations of puerarin (0.1, 1 and 10 microM) which had no direct relaxation effect. Puerarin enhanced vasorelaxation to endothelium-independent relaxing agents, sodium nitroprusside and cromakalim. However, puerarin had no effect on vasorelaxation induced by endothelium-dependent relaxing agents, bradykinin and calcium ionophore A23187. The potentiating action of puerarin (10 microM) on sodium nitroprusside-mediated relaxation was not affected by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 300 microM), or by the disruption of the endothelium with Triton X-100. The effect of puerarin was reversible following a washout period. The potentiating effects were comparable with the 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) analogues, 8-bromoadenosine-3'-5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cyclic AMP; 10 muM) and Sp-isomer [S nomenclature refers to phosphorus] of adenosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate (Sp-cyclic AMPS; 3 microM), but not the 3'-5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cyclic GMP) analogue, 8-bromoguanosine-3'-5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cyclic GMP; 3 microM). The cyclic AMP antagonist, Rp-isomer [R nomenclature refers to phosphorus] of 8-bromoadenosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate (Rp-8-Br-cyclic AMPS; 10 microM), but not cyclic GMP antagonist, Rp-isomer of 8-bromoguanosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate (Rp-8-Br-cyclic GMPS; 10 microM), reversed the effects of puerarin (10

  20. Mutation of archaeal isopentenyl phosphate kinase highlights mechanism and guides phosphorylation of additional isoprenoid monophosphates.

    PubMed

    Dellas, Nikki; Noel, Joseph P

    2010-06-18

    The biosynthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) from either the mevalonate (MVA) or the 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) pathway provides the key metabolite for primary and secondary isoprenoid biosynthesis. Isoprenoid metabolism plays crucial roles in membrane stability, steroid biosynthesis, vitamin production, protein localization, defense and communication, photoprotection, sugar transport, and glycoprotein biosynthesis. Recently, an alternative branch of the MVA pathway was discovered in the archaeon Methanocaldococcus jannaschii involving a small molecule kinase, isopentenyl phosphate kinase (IPK). IPK belongs to the amino acid kinase (AAK) superfamily. In vitro, IPK phosphorylates isopentenyl monophosphate (IP) in an ATP and Mg(2+)-dependent reaction producing IPP. Here, we describe crystal structures of IPK from M. jannaschii refined to nominal resolutions of 2.0-2.8 A. Notably, an active site histidine residue (His60) forms a hydrogen bond with the terminal phosphate of both substrate and product. This His residue serves as a marker for a subset of the AAK family that catalyzes phosphorylation of phosphate or phosphonate functional groups; the larger family includes carboxyl-directed kinases, which lack this active site residue. Using steady-state kinetic analysis of H60A, H60N, and H60Q mutants, the protonated form of the Nepsilon(2) nitrogen of His60 was shown to be essential for catalysis, most likely through hydrogen bond stabilization of the transition state accompanying transphosphorylation. Moreover, the structures served as the starting point for the engineering of IPK mutants capable of the chemoenzymatic synthesis of longer chain isoprenoid diphosphates from monophosphate precursors. PMID:20392112

  1. Sulindac selectively inhibits colon tumor cell growth by activating the cGMP/PKG pathway to suppress Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Xi, Yaguang; Tinsley, Heather N; Gurpinar, Evrim; Gary, Bernard D; Zhu, Bing; Li, Yonghe; Chen, Xi; Keeton, Adam B; Abadi, Ashraf H; Moyer, Mary P; Grizzle, William E; Chang, Wen-Chi; Clapper, Margie L; Piazza, Gary A

    2013-09-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) display promising antineoplastic activity for colorectal and other cancers, but toxicity from COX inhibition limits their long-term use for chemoprevention. Previous studies have concluded that the basis for their tumor cell growth inhibitory activity does not require COX inhibition, although the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we report that the NSAID sulindac sulfide inhibits cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate phosphodiesterase (cGMP PDE) activity to increase intracellular cGMP levels and activate cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) at concentrations that inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of colon tumor cells. Sulindac sulfide did not activate the cGMP/PKG pathway, nor affect proliferation or apoptosis in normal colonocytes. Knockdown of the cGMP-specific PDE5 isozyme by siRNA and PDE5-specific inhibitors tadalafil and sildenafil also selectively inhibited the growth of colon tumor cells that expressed high levels of PDE5 compared with colonocytes. The mechanism by which sulindac sulfide and the cGMP/PKG pathway inhibits colon tumor cell growth involves the transcriptional suppression of β-catenin to inhibit Wnt/β-catenin T-cell factor transcriptional activity, leading to downregulation of cyclin D1 and survivin. These observations suggest that safer and more efficacious sulindac derivatives can be developed for colorectal cancer chemoprevention by targeting PDE5 and possibly other cGMP-degrading isozymes. PMID:23804703

  2. Sulindac selectively inhibits colon tumor cell growth by activating the cGMP/PKG pathway to suppress Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Xi, Yaguang; Tinsley, Heather N.; Gurpinar, Evrim; Gary, Bernard D.; Zhu, Bing; Li, Yonghe; Chen, Xi; Keeton, Adam B.; Abadi, Ashraf H.; Moyer, Mary P.; Grizzle, William E.; Chang, Wen-chi; Clapper, Margie L.; Piazza, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    NSAIDs display promising antineoplastic activity for colorectal and other cancers, but toxicity from cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition limits their long-term use for chemoprevention. Previous studies have concluded that the basis for their tumor cell growth inhibitory activity does not required COX inhibition, although the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Here we report that the NSAID, sulindac sulfide (SS) inhibits cyclic guanosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase (cGMP PDE) activity to increase intracellular cGMP levels and activate cGMP dependent protein kinase (PKG) at concentrations that inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of colon tumor cells. SS did not activate the cGMP/PKG pathway, nor affect proliferation or apoptosis in normal colonocytes. Knockdown of the cGMP-specific PDE5 isozyme by siRNA and PDE5-specific inhibitors, tadalafil and sildenafil, also selectively inhibited the growth of colon tumor cells that expressed high levels of PDE5 compared with colonocytes. The mechanism by which SS and the cGMP/PKG pathway inhibits colon tumor cell growth appears to involve the transcriptional suppression of β-catenin to inhibit Wnt/β-catenin TCF transcriptional activity, leading to down-regulation of cyclin D1 and survivin. These observations suggest that safer and more efficacious sulindac derivatives can be developed for colorectal cancer chemoprevention by targeting PDE5 and possibly other cGMP degrading isozymes. PMID:23804703

  3. Liraglutide prevents and reverses monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension by suppressing ET-1 and enhancing eNOS/sGC/PKG pathways.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei-Yueh; Tsai, Kun-Bow; Hsu, Jong-Hau; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Wu, Jiunn-Ren; Yeh, Jwu-Lai

    2016-01-01

    Liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist, is widely used to treat diabetes. However, its effect on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is unknown. In this study, we investigated its effects on rats with monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH and mechanisms on rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Liraglutide was investigated for both prevention and treatment of MCT-induced PAH. The hemodynamic and body weight changes, right heart hypertrophy, lung morphology, immune-reactivity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), endothelin-1 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels, protein expressions of eNOS, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGCα), protein kinase G (PKG) and Rho kinase (ROCK) II pathway were measured in both in vivo and in vitro. Cell migration and cell cycle were also determined. Liraglutide both prevented and reversed MCT-induced PAH, right ventricle hypertrophy and pulmonary vascular wall remodeling. Protein expression of ROCK II was increased while eNOS, sGC and PKG were decreased. Pretreatment with liraglutide inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB stimulated PASMCs migration, which were associated with cell-cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. Liraglutide may have both preventive and therapeutic effects on MCT-induced PAH, through the eNOS/sGC/PKG and Rho kinase pathways. Thus, liraglutide may have a therapeutic role in pulmonary vascular remodelling. PMID:27581840

  4. Liraglutide prevents and reverses monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension by suppressing ET-1 and enhancing eNOS/sGC/PKG pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mei-Yueh; Tsai, Kun-Bow; Hsu, Jong-Hau; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Wu, Jiunn-Ren; Yeh, Jwu-Lai

    2016-01-01

    Liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist, is widely used to treat diabetes. However, its effect on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is unknown. In this study, we investigated its effects on rats with monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH and mechanisms on rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Liraglutide was investigated for both prevention and treatment of MCT-induced PAH. The hemodynamic and body weight changes, right heart hypertrophy, lung morphology, immune-reactivity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), endothelin-1 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels, protein expressions of eNOS, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGCα), protein kinase G (PKG) and Rho kinase (ROCK) II pathway were measured in both in vivo and in vitro. Cell migration and cell cycle were also determined. Liraglutide both prevented and reversed MCT-induced PAH, right ventricle hypertrophy and pulmonary vascular wall remodeling. Protein expression of ROCK II was increased while eNOS, sGC and PKG were decreased. Pretreatment with liraglutide inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB stimulated PASMCs migration, which were associated with cell-cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. Liraglutide may have both preventive and therapeutic effects on MCT-induced PAH, through the eNOS/sGC/PKG and Rho kinase pathways. Thus, liraglutide may have a therapeutic role in pulmonary vascular remodelling. PMID:27581840

  5. Liraglutide prevents and reverses monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension by suppressing ET-1 and enhancing eNOS/sGC/PKG pathways.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei-Yueh; Tsai, Kun-Bow; Hsu, Jong-Hau; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Wu, Jiunn-Ren; Yeh, Jwu-Lai

    2016-09-01

    Liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist, is widely used to treat diabetes. However, its effect on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is unknown. In this study, we investigated its effects on rats with monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH and mechanisms on rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Liraglutide was investigated for both prevention and treatment of MCT-induced PAH. The hemodynamic and body weight changes, right heart hypertrophy, lung morphology, immune-reactivity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), endothelin-1 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels, protein expressions of eNOS, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGCα), protein kinase G (PKG) and Rho kinase (ROCK) II pathway were measured in both in vivo and in vitro. Cell migration and cell cycle were also determined. Liraglutide both prevented and reversed MCT-induced PAH, right ventricle hypertrophy and pulmonary vascular wall remodeling. Protein expression of ROCK II was increased while eNOS, sGC and PKG were decreased. Pretreatment with liraglutide inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB stimulated PASMCs migration, which were associated with cell-cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. Liraglutide may have both preventive and therapeutic effects on MCT-induced PAH, through the eNOS/sGC/PKG and Rho kinase pathways. Thus, liraglutide may have a therapeutic role in pulmonary vascular remodelling.

  6. Systems Pharmacology and Rational Polypharmacy: Nitric Oxide-Cyclic GMP Signaling Pathway as an Illustrative Example and Derivation of the General Case.

    PubMed

    Garmaroudi, Farshid S; Handy, Diane E; Liu, Yang-Yu; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2016-03-01

    Impaired nitric oxide (NO˙)-cyclic guanosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cGMP) signaling has been observed in many cardiovascular disorders, including heart failure and pulmonary arterial hypertension. There are several enzymatic determinants of cGMP levels in this pathway, including soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) itself, the NO˙-activated form of sGC, and phosphodiesterase(s) (PDE). Therapies for some of these disorders with PDE inhibitors have been successful at increasing cGMP levels in both cardiac and vascular tissues. However, at the systems level, it is not clear whether perturbation of PDE alone, under oxidative stress, is the best approach for increasing cGMP levels as compared with perturbation of other potential pathway targets, either alone or in combination. Here, we develop a model-based approach to perturbing this pathway, focusing on single reactions, pairs of reactions, or trios of reactions as targets, then monitoring the theoretical effects of these interventions on cGMP levels. Single perturbations of all reaction steps within this pathway demonstrated that three reaction steps, including the oxidation of sGC, NO˙ dissociation from sGC, and cGMP degradation by PDE, exerted a dominant influence on cGMP accumulation relative to other reaction steps. Furthermore, among all possible single, paired, and triple perturbations of this pathway, the combined perturbations of these three reaction steps had the greatest impact on cGMP accumulation. These computational findings were confirmed in cell-based experiments. We conclude that a combined perturbation of the oxidatively-impaired NO˙-cGMP signaling pathway is a better approach to the restoration of cGMP levels as compared with corresponding individual perturbations. This approach may also yield improved therapeutic responses in other complex pharmacologically amenable pathways. PMID:26985825

  7. Systems Pharmacology and Rational Polypharmacy: Nitric Oxide−Cyclic GMP Signaling Pathway as an Illustrative Example and Derivation of the General Case

    PubMed Central

    Garmaroudi, Farshid S.; Handy, Diane E.; Liu, Yang-Yu; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Impaired nitric oxide (NO˙)-cyclic guanosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cGMP) signaling has been observed in many cardiovascular disorders, including heart failure and pulmonary arterial hypertension. There are several enzymatic determinants of cGMP levels in this pathway, including soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) itself, the NO˙-activated form of sGC, and phosphodiesterase(s) (PDE). Therapies for some of these disorders with PDE inhibitors have been successful at increasing cGMP levels in both cardiac and vascular tissues. However, at the systems level, it is not clear whether perturbation of PDE alone, under oxidative stress, is the best approach for increasing cGMP levels as compared with perturbation of other potential pathway targets, either alone or in combination. Here, we develop a model-based approach to perturbing this pathway, focusing on single reactions, pairs of reactions, or trios of reactions as targets, then monitoring the theoretical effects of these interventions on cGMP levels. Single perturbations of all reaction steps within this pathway demonstrated that three reaction steps, including the oxidation of sGC, NO˙ dissociation from sGC, and cGMP degradation by PDE, exerted a dominant influence on cGMP accumulation relative to other reaction steps. Furthermore, among all possible single, paired, and triple perturbations of this pathway, the combined perturbations of these three reaction steps had the greatest impact on cGMP accumulation. These computational findings were confirmed in cell-based experiments. We conclude that a combined perturbation of the oxidatively-impaired NO˙-cGMP signaling pathway is a better approach to the restoration of cGMP levels as compared with corresponding individual perturbations. This approach may also yield improved therapeutic responses in other complex pharmacologically amenable pathways. PMID:26985825

  8. (5'-/sup 32/P)-8-azidoguanosine-3',5'-monophosphate. I. Synthesis and properties. II. Interaction with E. coli proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Under certain conditions of nutritional deprivation, microorganisms produce the magic spot nucleotides guanosine-3'-diphosphate-5'-triphosphate(pppGpp) and the tetraphosphate ppGpp. The latter is known to be a pleiotypic effector, i.e. it inhibits (and sometimes stimulates) many biological processes including transcription, translation, and metabolic pathways. It is unknown whether pppGpp, ppGp, pGpp, and pGp, other members of this family of guanosine-3',5'-phosphates, also have regulatory properties. To begin to investigate this question, a radioactive photoaffinity analog of pGp was prepared: (5'/sup 32/P)pN/sub 3/Gp. The interaction of this photoprobe with E. coli sonicates and a purified protein (RNA polymerase) was examined. At physiological salt concentrations two proteins (RNA polymerase) was examined. At physiological salt concentrations two proteins of 86,000 and 65,000 daltons (p86 and p65) were primarily photolabeled. Competition studies with guanosine and adenosine nucleotides indicated (5 /sup 32/P)pN/sub 3/Gp was labeling a ppGpp binding site on p86, and a pGp (or GMP) site on p65. ATP phosphorylation of p86 increased photoincorporation, while it decreased labeling of p65. The data also provide evidence of a different type of regulatory mechanism, i.e. phosphorylation modulates binding of an allosteric effector (ppGpp) to a protein(enzyme). Both ATP and GTP were found to phosphorylate the same proteins, although GTP was the preferred substrate in some cases.

  9. Nucleic acid molecules encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B.; Lange, Bernd M.

    2001-01-01

    A cDNA encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase (IPK) from peppermint (Mentha x piperita) has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID NO:1) is provided which codes for the expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase (SEQ ID NO:2), from peppermint (Mentha x piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant isopentenyl monophosphate kinase that may be used to facilitate its production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant isopentenyl monophosphate kinase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase in plants in order to enhance the production of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or isoprenoids derived therefrom, or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or the production of its products.

  10. Procyanidin C1 Causes Vasorelaxation Through Activation of the Endothelial NO/cGMP Pathway in Thoracic Aortic Rings

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Eui-Baek; Sung, Nak-Yun; Yang, Mi-So; Song, Du-Sup; Byun, Eui-Hong; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Jong-Heum; Song, Beom-Seok; Lee, Ju-Woon; Park, Sang-Hyun; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to clarify the efficacy of procyanidin C1 (Pro C1) for modulating vascular tone. Pro C1 induced a potent vasorelaxant effect on phenylephrine-constricted endothelium-intact thoracic aortic rings, but had no effect on denuded thoracic aortic rings. Moreover, Pro C1 caused a significant increase in nitric oxide (NO) production in endothelial cells. Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation and Pro C1-induced NO production were significantly decreased in the presence of a nonspecific potassium channel blocker (tetraethylammonium chloride [TEA]), an endothelial NO synthase inhibitor (NG-monomethyl-L-arginine [L-NMMA]), and a store-operated calcium entry inhibitor (2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate [2-APB]). Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation was also completely abolished by an inhibitor of soluble guanyl cyclase, which suggests that the Pro C1 effects observed involved cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production. Interestingly, Pro C1 significantly enhanced basal cGMP levels. Taken together, these results indicate that Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation is associated with the activation of the calcium-dependent NO/cGMP pathway, involving potassium channel activation. Thus, Pro C1 may represent a novel and potentially therapeutically relevant compound for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24971771

  11. Modified vaccinia virus Ankara triggers type I IFN production in murine conventional dendritic cells via a cGAS/STING-mediated cytosolic DNA-sensing pathway.

    PubMed

    Dai, Peihong; Wang, Weiyi; Cao, Hua; Avogadri, Francesca; Dai, Lianpan; Drexler, Ingo; Joyce, Johanna A; Li, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Zhijian; Merghoub, Taha; Shuman, Stewart; Deng, Liang

    2014-04-01

    Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is an attenuated poxvirus that has been engineered as a vaccine against infectious agents and cancers. Our goal is to understand how MVA modulates innate immunity in dendritic cells (DCs), which can provide insights to vaccine design. In this study, using murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, we assessed type I interferon (IFN) gene induction and protein secretion in response to MVA infection. We report that MVA infection elicits the production of type I IFN in murine conventional dendritic cells (cDCs), but not in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). Transcription factors IRF3 (IFN regulatory factor 3) and IRF7, and the positive feedback loop mediated by IFNAR1 (IFN alpha/beta receptor 1), are required for the induction. MVA induction of type I IFN is fully dependent on STING (stimulator of IFN genes) and the newly discovered cytosolic DNA sensor cGAS (cyclic guanosine monophosphate-adenosine monophosphate synthase). MVA infection of cDCs triggers phosphorylation of TBK1 (Tank-binding kinase 1) and IRF3, which is abolished in the absence of cGAS and STING. Furthermore, intravenous delivery of MVA induces type I IFN in wild-type mice, but not in mice lacking STING or IRF3. Treatment of cDCs with inhibitors of endosomal and lysosomal acidification or the lysosomal enzyme Cathepsin B attenuated MVA-induced type I IFN production, indicating that lysosomal enzymatic processing of virions is important for MVA sensing. Taken together, our results demonstrate a critical role of the cGAS/STING-mediated cytosolic DNA-sensing pathway for type I IFN induction in cDCs by MVA. We present evidence that vaccinia virulence factors E3 and N1 inhibit the activation of IRF3 and the induction of IFNB gene in MVA-infected cDCs.

  12. Functional characterization of exopolyphosphatase/guanosine pentaphosphate phosphohydrolase (PPX/GPPA) of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Malde, Anandkumar; Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Chandrashekhar, Kshipra; Pina-Mimbela, Ruby; Torrelles, Jordi B; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2014-05-15

    The inorganic polyphosphate (poly-P) is a key regulator of stress responses and virulence in many bacterial pathogens including Campylobacter jejuni. The role of exopolyphosphatases/guanosine pentaphosphate (pppGpp) phosphohydrolases (PPX/GPPA) in poly-P homeostasis and C. jejuni pathobiology remains unexplored. Here, we analyzed deletion mutants (∆ppx1, ∆ppx2) and the double knockout mutant (dkppx), all ∆ppx mutants exhibited increased capacity to accumulate poly-P; however only ∆ppx1 and dkppx mutants showed decreased accumulation of ppGpp, an alarmone molecule that regulates stringent response in bacteria, suggesting potential dual role for PPX1/GPPA. Nutrient survival defect of ∆ppx mutants was rescued by the supplementation of specific amino acids implying that survival defect may be associated with decreased ppGpp and/ or increased poly-P in ∆ppx mutants. The ppk1 and spoT were upregulated in both ∆ppx1 and ∆ppx2 suggesting a compensatory role for SpoT and Ppk1 in poly-P and ppGpp homeostasis. The lack of ppx genes resulted in defects in motility, biofilm formation, nutrient stress survival, invasion and intracellular survival indicating that maintaining a certain level of poly-P is critical for ppx genes in C. jejuni pathophysiology. Both ppx1 and ppx2 mutants were resistant to human complement-mediated killing; however, the dkppx mutant was sensitive. The serum susceptibility did not occur in the presence of MgCl 2 and EGTA suggesting an involvement of the classical or lectin pathway of complement mediated killing. Interestingly, the chicken serum did not have any effect on the ∆ppx mutants' survival. The observed serum susceptibility was not related to C. jejuni surface capsule and lipooligosaccharide structures. Our study underscores the importance of PPX/GPPA proteins in poly-P and ppGpp homeostasis, two critical molecules that modulate environmental stress responses and virulence in C. jejuni.

  13. A continuous spectrophotometric assay for monitoring adenosine 5'-monophosphate production.

    PubMed

    First, Eric A

    2015-08-15

    A number of biologically important enzymes release adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) as a product, including aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, cyclic AMP (cAMP) phosphodiesterases, ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like ligases, DNA ligases, coenzyme A (CoA) ligases, polyA deadenylases, and ribonucleases. In contrast to the abundance of assays available for monitoring the conversion of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) to ADP, there are relatively few assays for monitoring the conversion of ATP (or cAMP) to AMP. In this article, we describe a homogeneous assay that continuously monitors the production of AMP. Specifically, we have coupled the conversion of AMP to inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP) (by AMP deaminase) to the oxidation of IMP (by IMP dehydrogenase). This results in the reduction of oxidized nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) to reduced nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NADH), allowing AMP formation to be monitored by the change in the absorbance at 340 nm. Changes in AMP concentrations of 5 μM or more can be reliably detected. The ease of use and relatively low expense make the AMP assay suitable for both high-throughput screening and kinetic analyses. PMID:25957126

  14. The binding of inosine monophosphate to Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase.

    PubMed

    Thoden, J B; Raushel, F M; Wesenberg, G; Holden, H M

    1999-08-01

    Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) from Escherichia coli catalyzes the formation of carbamoyl phosphate, which is subsequently employed in both the pyrimidine and arginine biosynthetic pathways. The reaction mechanism is known to proceed through at least three highly reactive intermediates: ammonia, carboxyphosphate, and carbamate. In keeping with the fact that the product of CPS is utilized in two competing metabolic pathways, the enzyme is highly regulated by a variety of effector molecules including potassium and ornithine, which function as activators, and UMP, which acts as an inhibitor. IMP is also known to bind to CPS but the actual effect of this ligand on the activity of the enzyme is dependent upon both temperature and assay conditions. Here we describe the three-dimensional architecture of CPS with bound IMP determined and refined to 2.1 A resolution. The nucleotide is situated at the C-terminal portion of a five-stranded parallel beta-sheet in the allosteric domain formed by Ser(937) to Lys(1073). Those amino acid side chains responsible for anchoring the nucleotide to the polypeptide chain include Lys(954), Thr(974), Thr(977), Lys(993), Asn(1015), and Thr(1017). A series of hydrogen bonds connect the IMP-binding pocket to the active site of the large subunit known to function in the phosphorylation of the unstable intermediate, carbamate. This structural analysis reveals, for the first time, the detailed manner in which CPS accommodates nucleotide monophosphate effector molecules within the allosteric domain. PMID:10428826

  15. Tubulin sequence region beta 155-174 is involved in binding exchangeable guanosine triphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Hesse, J.; Thierauf, M.; Ponstingl, H.

    1987-11-15

    Assembly-competent microtubule protein was directly photoaffinity labeled with (alpha-/sup 32/P)guanosine triphosphate by UV irradiation. The labeled tubulin was digested with trypsin. The radioactive fragments were isolated and sequenced, revealing beta-tubulin residues 155-174 to be the major labeled region. An antibody to a synthetic peptide comprising residues beta 154-165 inhibits GTP incorporation and tubulin polymerization.

  16. Adenosine Monophosphate-Based Detection of Bacterial Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G.; Chen, Fei; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Hattori, Nori; Suzuki, Shigeya

    2009-01-01

    A method of rapid detection of bacterial spores is based on the discovery that a heat shock consisting of exposure to a temperature of 100 C for 10 minutes causes the complete release of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) from the spores. This method could be an alternative to the method described in the immediately preceding article. Unlike that method and related prior methods, the present method does not involve germination and cultivation; this feature is an important advantage because in cases in which the spores are those of pathogens, delays involved in germination and cultivation could increase risks of infection. Also, in comparison with other prior methods that do not involve germination, the present method affords greater sensitivity. At present, the method is embodied in a laboratory procedure, though it would be desirable to implement the method by means of a miniaturized apparatus in order to make it convenient and economical enough to encourage widespread use.

  17. Aripiprazole has functionally selective actions at dopamine D2 receptor-mediated signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Urban, Jonathan D; Vargas, Gabriel A; von Zastrow, Mark; Mailman, Richard B

    2007-01-01

    Aripiprazole is a unique atypical antipsychotic drug with an excellent side-effect profile presumed, in part, to be due to lack of typical D(2) dopamine receptor antagonist properties. Whether aripiprazole is a typical D(2) partial agonist, or a functionally selective D(2) ligand, remains controversial (eg D(2)-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase is system dependent; aripiprazole antagonizes D(2) receptor-mediated G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels and guanosine triphosphate nucleotide (GTP)gammaS coupling). The current study examined the D(2L) receptor binding properties of aripiprazole, as well as the effects of the drug on three downstream D(2) receptor-mediated functional effectors: mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation, potentiation of arachidonic acid (AA) release, and D(2) receptor internalization. Unlike quinpirole (a full D(2) agonist) or (-)3PPP (S(-)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-propylpiperidine hydrochloride, a D(2) partial agonist), the apparent D(2) affinity of aripiprazole was not decreased significantly by GTP. Moreover, full or partial agonists are expected to have Hill slopes <1.0, yet that of aripiprazole was significantly >1.0. Whereas aripiprazole partially activated both the MAPK and AA pathways, its potency vs MAPK phosphorylation was much lower relative to potencies in assays either of AA release or inhibition of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate accumulation. In addition, unlike typical agonists, neither aripiprazole nor (-)3PPP produced significant internalization of the D(2L) receptor. These data are clear evidence that aripiprazole affects D(2L)-mediated signaling pathways in a differential manner. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that aripiprazole is a functionally selective D(2) ligand rather than a simple partial agonist. Such data may be useful in understanding the novel clinical actions of this drug.

  18. Icariin Inhibits Pulmonary Hypertension Induced by Monocrotaline through Enhancement of NO/cGMP Signaling Pathway in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-sheng; Luo, Yun-mei; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Yu; Fu, Xiao-xia; Yang, Dan-li

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that icariin (ICA) increased contents of nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) by improving expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inhibition of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5). In addition, dysfunction of the NO/cGMP pathway may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension (PH). In this study, the potential protective effects of ICA on PH induced by monocrotaline (MCT, 50 mg/kg) singly subcutaneous injection were investigated and the possible mechanisms involved in NO/cGMP pathway were explored in male Sprague Dawley rats. The results showed that ICA (20, 40, and 80 mg/kg/d) treatment by intragastric administration could significantly ameliorate PH and upregulate the expression of eNOS gene and downregulate the expression of PDE5 gene in MCT-treated rats. Both ICA (40 mg/kg/d) and L-arginine (200 mg/kg/d), a precursor of NO as positive control, notably increased the contents of NO and cGMP in lung tissue homogenate, which were inversed by treatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME), a NOS inhibitor, and L-NAME-treatment could also inhibit the protective effects of ICA (40 mg/kg/d) on mean pulmonary artery pressure and artery remodeling and tends to inhibit right ventricle hypertrophy index. In summary, ICA is effective in protecting against MCT-induced PH in rats through enhancement of NO/cGMP signaling pathway in rats. PMID:27366192

  19. Acid-base properties of xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP) and of some related nucleobase derivatives in aqueous solution: micro acidity constant evaluations of the (N1)H versus the (N3)H deprotonation ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Massoud, Salah S; Corfù, Nicolas A; Griesser, Rolf; Sigel, Helmut

    2004-10-11

    The first acidity constant of fully protonated xanthosine 5'-monophosphate, that is, of H3(XMP)+, was estimated by means of a micro acidity constant scheme and the following three deprotonations of the H2(XMP)+/- (pKa=0.97), H(XMP)- (5.30), and XMP2- (6.45) species were determined by potentiometric pH titrations; further deprotonation of (XMP-H)3- is possible only with pKa>12. The most important results are that the xanthine residue is deprotonated before the P(O)2(OH)- group loses its final proton; that is, twofold negatively charged XMP carries one negative charge in the pyrimidine ring and one at the phosphate group. Micro acidity constant evaluations reveal that this latter mentioned species occurs with a formation degree of 88 %, whereas its tautomer with a neutral xanthine moiety and a PO3(2-) group is formed only to 12 %; this distinguishes XMP from its related nucleoside 5'-monophosphates, like guanosine 5'-monophosphate. At the physiological pH of about 7.5 mainly (XMP-H)3- exists. The question, which of the purine sites, (N1)H or (N3)H, is deprotonated in this species cannot be answered unequivocally, though it appears that the (N3)H site is more acidic. By application of several methylated xanthine species intrinsic micro acidity constants are calculated and it is shown that, for example, for 7-methylxanthine the N1-deprotonated tautomer occurs with a formation degree of about 5 %; a small but significant amount that, as is discussed, may possibly be enhanced by metal ion coordination to N7, which is known to occur preferably to this site.

  20. The role of Drosophila cytidine monophosphate-sialic acid synthetase in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Islam, Rafique; Nakamura, Michiko; Scott, Hilary; Repnikova, Elena; Carnahan, Mindy; Pandey, Dheeraj; Caster, Courtney; Khan, Saba; Zimmermann, Tina; Zoran, Mark J; Panin, Vladislav M

    2013-07-24

    While sialylation plays important functions in the nervous system, the complexity of glycosylation pathways and limitations of genetic approaches preclude the efficient analysis of these functions in mammalian organisms. Drosophila has recently emerged as a promising model for studying neural sialylation. Drosophila sialyltransferase, DSiaT, was shown to be involved in the regulation of neural transmission. However, the sialylation pathway was not investigated in Drosophila beyond the DSiaT-mediated step. Here we focused on the function of Drosophila cytidine monophosphate-sialic acid synthetase (CSAS), the enzyme providing a sugar donor for DSiaT. Our results revealed that the expression of CSAS is tightly regulated and restricted to the CNS throughout development and in adult flies. We generated CSAS mutants and analyzed their phenotypes using behavioral and physiological approaches. Our experiments demonstrated that mutant phenotypes of CSAS are similar to those of DSiaT, including decreased longevity, temperature-induced paralysis, locomotor abnormalities, and defects of neural transmission at neuromuscular junctions. Genetic interactions between CSAS, DSiaT, and voltage-gated channel genes paralytic and seizure were consistent with the hypothesis that CSAS and DSiaT function within the same pathway regulating neural excitability. Intriguingly, these interactions also suggested that CSAS and DSiaT have some additional, independent functions. Moreover, unlike its mammalian counterparts that work in the nucleus, Drosophila CSAS was found to be a glycoprotein-bearing N-glycans and predominantly localized in vivo to the Golgi compartment. Our work provides the first systematic analysis of in vivo functions of a eukaryotic CSAS gene and sheds light on evolutionary relationships among metazoan CSAS proteins.

  1. Recognition of Nucleoside Monophosphate Substrates by Haemophilus influenzae Class C Acid Phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Harkewal; Schuermann, Jonathan P.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Calcutt, Michael J.; Tanner, John J.

    2010-12-08

    The e (P4) phosphatase from Haemophilus influenzae functions in a vestigial NAD{sup +} utilization pathway by dephosphorylating nicotinamide mononucleotide to nicotinamide riboside. P4 is also the prototype of class C acid phosphatases (CCAPs), which are nonspecific 5{prime},3{prime}-nucleotidases localized to the bacterial outer membrane. To understand substrate recognition by P4 and other class C phosphatases, we have determined the crystal structures of a substrate-trapping mutant P4 enzyme complexed with nicotinamide mononucleotide, 5{prime}-AMP, 3{prime}-AMP, and 2{prime}-AMP. The structures reveal an anchor-shaped substrate-binding cavity comprising a conserved hydrophobic box that clamps the nucleotide base, a buried phosphoryl binding site, and three solvent-filled pockets that contact the ribose and the hydrogen-bonding edge of the base. The span between the hydrophobic box and the phosphoryl site is optimal for recognizing nucleoside monophosphates, explaining the general preference for this class of substrate. The base makes no hydrogen bonds with the enzyme, consistent with an observed lack of base specificity. Two solvent-filled pockets flanking the ribose are key to the dual recognition of 5{prime}-nucleotides and 3{prime}-nucleotides. These pockets minimize the enzyme's direct interactions with the ribose and provide sufficient space to accommodate 5{prime} substrates in an anti conformation and 3{prime} substrates in a syn conformation. Finally, the structures suggest that class B acid phosphatases and CCAPs share a common strategy for nucleotide recognition.

  2. Recognition of nucleoside monophosphate substrates by Haemophilus influenzae class C acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harkewal; Schuermann, Jonathan P; Reilly, Thomas J; Calcutt, Michael J; Tanner, John J

    2010-12-10

    The e (P4) phosphatase from Haemophilus influenzae functions in a vestigial NAD(+) utilization pathway by dephosphorylating nicotinamide mononucleotide to nicotinamide riboside. P4 is also the prototype of class C acid phosphatases (CCAPs), which are nonspecific 5',3'-nucleotidases localized to the bacterial outer membrane. To understand substrate recognition by P4 and other class C phosphatases, we have determined the crystal structures of a substrate-trapping mutant P4 enzyme complexed with nicotinamide mononucleotide, 5'-AMP, 3'-AMP, and 2'-AMP. The structures reveal an anchor-shaped substrate-binding cavity comprising a conserved hydrophobic box that clamps the nucleotide base, a buried phosphoryl binding site, and three solvent-filled pockets that contact the ribose and the hydrogen-bonding edge of the base. The span between the hydrophobic box and the phosphoryl site is optimal for recognizing nucleoside monophosphates, explaining the general preference for this class of substrate. The base makes no hydrogen bonds with the enzyme, consistent with an observed lack of base specificity. Two solvent-filled pockets flanking the ribose are key to the dual recognition of 5'-nucleotides and 3'-nucleotides. These pockets minimize the enzyme's direct interactions with the ribose and provide sufficient space to accommodate 5' substrates in an anti conformation and 3' substrates in a syn conformation. Finally, the structures suggest that class B acid phosphatases and CCAPs share a common strategy for nucleotide recognition. PMID:20934434

  3. Hydrogen peroxide induces murine macrophage chemokine gene transcription via extracellular signal-regulated kinase- and cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent pathways: involvement of NF-kappa B, activator protein 1, and cAMP response element binding protein.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Maritza; Olivier, Martin

    2002-12-15

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) has been shown to act as a second messenger that activates chemokine expression. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms underlying this cellular regulation in the murine macrophage cell line B10R. We report that H(2)O(2) increases mRNA expression of various chemokines, macrophage-inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha/CC chemokine ligand (CCL)3, MIP-1beta/CCL4, MIP-2/CXC chemokine ligand 2, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1/CCL2, by activating the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway and the nuclear translocation of the transcription factors NF-kappaB, AP-1, and CREB. Blockage of the ERK pathway with specific inhibitors against mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 and ERK1/ERK2 completely abolished both the H(2)O(2)-mediated chemokine up-regulation and the activation of all NF studied. Similarly, selective inhibition of cAMP and NF-kappaB strongly down-regulated the induction of all chemokine transcripts as well as CREB and NF-kappaB activation, respectively. Of interest, we detected a significant decrease of NF-kappaB, AP-1, and CREB DNA binding activities by reciprocal competition for these binding sites when either specific cold oligonucleotides (NF-kappaB, AP-1, and CREB) or Abs against various transcription factor subunits (p50, p65, c-Fos, Jun B, c-Jun, and CREB-1) were added. These findings indicate that cooperation between ERK- and cAMP-dependent pathways seems to be required to achieve the formation of an essential transcriptional factor complex for maximal H(2)O(2)-dependent chemokine modulation. Finally, experiments performed with actinomycin D suggest that H(2)O(2)-mediated MIP-1beta mRNA up-regulation results from transcriptional control, whereas that of MIP-1alpha, MIP-2, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 is due to both gene transcription activation and mRNA posttranscriptional stabilization.

  4. Rapid activation by 3,5,3'-L-triiodothyronine of adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase/acetyl-coenzyme a carboxylase and akt/protein kinase B signaling pathways: relation to changes in fuel metabolism and myosin heavy-chain protein content in rat gastrocnemius muscle in vivo.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Pieter; Senese, Rosalba; Cioffi, Federica; Moreno, Maria; Lombardi, Assunta; Silvestri, Elena; Goglia, Fernando; Lanni, Antonia

    2008-12-01

    T3 stimulates metabolic rate in many tissues and induces changes in fuel use. The pathways by which T3 induces metabolic/structural changes related to altered fuel use in skeletal muscle have not been fully clarified. Gastrocnemius muscle (isolated at different time points after a single injection of T3 into hypothyroid rats), displayed rapid inductions of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation (threonine 172; within 6 h) and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase phosphorylation (serine 79; within 12 h). As a consequence, increases occurred in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and carnitine palmitoyl transferase activity. Concomitantly, T3 stimulated signaling toward increased glycolysis through a rapid increase in Akt/protein kinase B (serine 473) phosphorylation (within 6 h) and a directly related increase in the activity of phosphofructokinase. The kinase specificity of the above effects was verified by treatment with inhibitors of AMPK and Akt activity (compound C and wortmannin, respectively). In contrast, glucose transporter 4 translocation to the membrane (activated by T3 within 6 h) was maintained when either AMPK or Akt activity was inhibited. The metabolic changes were accompanied by a decline in myosin heavy-chain Ib protein [causing a shift toward the fast-twitch (glycolytic) phenotype]. The increases in AMPK and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase phosphorylation were transient events, both levels declining from 12 h after the T3 injection, but Akt phosphorylation remained elevated until at least 48h after the injection. These data show that in skeletal muscle, T3 stimulates both fatty acid and glucose metabolism through rapid activations of the associated signaling pathways involving AMPK and Akt/protein kinase B.

  5. [Identification of thiamine monophosphate hydrolyzing enzymes in chicken liver].

    PubMed

    Kolos, I K; Makarchikov, A F

    2014-01-01

    In animals, thiamine monophosphate (TMP) is an intermediate on the path of thiamine diphosphate, the coenzyme form of vitamin B1, degradation. The enzymes involved in TMP metabolism in animal tissues are not identified hitherto. The aim of this work was to study TMP hydrolysis in chicken liver. Two phosphatases have been found to contribute to TMP hydrolysis in liver homogenate. The first one, possessing a maximal activity at pH 6.0, is soluble, whereas the second one represents a membrane-bound enzyme with a pH optimum of 9.0. Membrane-bound TMPase activity was enhanced 1.7-fold by 5 mM Mg2+ ions and strongly inhibited by levamisole in uncompetitive manner with K1 of 53 μM, indicating the involvement of alkaline phosphatase. An apparent Km of alkaline phosphatase for TMP was calculated from the Hanes plot to be 0.6 mM. The soluble TMPase has an apparent Km of 0.7 mM; this enzyme is Mg2+ independent and insensitive to levamisole. As estimated by gel filtration on a Toyopearl HW-55 column, the soluble enzyme has a molecular mass of 17.8 kDa, TMPase activity being eluted simultaneously with peaks of flavinmononucleotide and p-nitrophenyl phosphatase activity. Thus, TMP appears to be a physiological substrate for a low-molecular weight acid phosphatase, also known as low-molecular-weight protein phosphotyrosine phosphatase.

  6. Bioconjugation of zirconium uridine monophosphate: application to myoglobin direct electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yuanbiao; Jian, Fangfang; Bai, Qian

    2008-03-14

    Porous nano-granule of zirconium uridine monophosphate, Zr(UMP)2.H2O is, for the first time, synthesized under mild experimental conditions and applied to the bioconjugation of myoglobin (Mb) to realize its direct electron transfer. UV-vis and resonance Raman spectroscopies prove that Mb in the Zr(UMP)2.H2O film maintains its secondary structure similar to the native state. The conjugation film of the Mb-Zr(UMP)2.H2O on the glassy carbon (GC) electrode gives a well-defined and quasi-reversible cyclic voltammogram, which reflects the direct electron transfer of the heme Fe III/Fe II couple of Mb. On the basis of the satisfying bioelectrocatalysis of the nano-conjugation of Mb and genetic substrate, a kind of mediator-free biosensor for H2O2 is developed. The linear range for H2O2 detection is estimated to be 3.92-180.14 microM. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) and the detection limit based on the signal-to-noise ratio of 3 are found to be 196.1 microM and 1.52 microM, respectively. Both the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant and the detection limit herein are much lower than currently reported values from other Mb films. This kind of sensor possesses excellent stability, long-term life (more than 20 days) and good reproducibility. PMID:18180152

  7. Excretion of intracorporeal cadmium with S-benzoylthiamin monophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, J.; Kaneda, Y.

    1995-05-01

    Examination was made of the excretion of intracorporeal methylmercury into body hair by the administration of thiamin tetrahydrofurfuryl disulfide (TTFD) which caused significant increase in mercury content in human mustache. The thiamin derivative, S-benzoylthiamin monophosphate (BTMP) failed to have such effect. The mechanism of mercury excretion is thus based on the side chain structure of TTFD, mercaptan. At the start of the 20th century in Japan, many multiparae were found to have itai-itai disease, the main symptom of which is general pain. The cause of this disease was considered cadmium deposition on the bone from sourced such as soil and river water which contaminated rice and cereals. The previous system for mercury was applied based on cadmium content variation in human mustache. Although TTFD worked well in the mercury excretion system, the usual dosage of TTFD administered orally did not cause significant increase in cadmium in the mustache. BTMP appeared to exert effect by generating thiol-type thiamin. Experiments in vitro should be conducted to demonstrate the chelating effects of thiol-type thiamin. It is quite important to find evidence for cadmium excretion from human body. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Development of Novel Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Activators

    PubMed Central

    Guh, Jih-Hwa; Chang, Wei-Ling; Yang, Jian; Lee, Su-Lin; Wei, Shuo; Wang, Dasheng; Kulp, Samuel K.; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2010-01-01

    In light of the unique ability of thiazolidinediones to mediate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ-independent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and suppression of interleukin (IL)-6 production, we conducted a screening of an in-house, thiazolidinedione-based focused compound library to identify novel agents with these dual pharmacological activities. Cell-based assays pertinent to the activation status of AMPK and mammalian homolog of target of rapamycin (i.e., phosphorylation of AMPK and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase, respectively), and IL-6/IL-6 receptor signaling (i.e., IL-6 production and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 phosphorylation, respectively) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated THP-1 human macrophages were used to screen this compound library, which led to the identification of compound 53 (N-{4-[3-(1-Methylcyclohexylmethyl)-2,4-dioxo-thiazolidin-5-ylidene-methyl]-phenyl}-4-nitro-3-trifluoromethyl-benzenesulfonamide) as the lead agent. Evidence indicates that this drug-induced suppression of LPS-stimulated IL-6 production was attributable to AMPK activation. Furthermore, compound 53-mediated AMPK activation was demonstrated in C-26 colon adenocarcinoma cells, indicating that it is not a cell line-specific event. PMID:20170185

  9. Bioconjugation of zirconium uridine monophosphate: application to myoglobin direct electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yuanbiao; Jian, Fangfang; Bai, Qian

    2008-03-14

    Porous nano-granule of zirconium uridine monophosphate, Zr(UMP)2.H2O is, for the first time, synthesized under mild experimental conditions and applied to the bioconjugation of myoglobin (Mb) to realize its direct electron transfer. UV-vis and resonance Raman spectroscopies prove that Mb in the Zr(UMP)2.H2O film maintains its secondary structure similar to the native state. The conjugation film of the Mb-Zr(UMP)2.H2O on the glassy carbon (GC) electrode gives a well-defined and quasi-reversible cyclic voltammogram, which reflects the direct electron transfer of the heme Fe III/Fe II couple of Mb. On the basis of the satisfying bioelectrocatalysis of the nano-conjugation of Mb and genetic substrate, a kind of mediator-free biosensor for H2O2 is developed. The linear range for H2O2 detection is estimated to be 3.92-180.14 microM. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) and the detection limit based on the signal-to-noise ratio of 3 are found to be 196.1 microM and 1.52 microM, respectively. Both the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant and the detection limit herein are much lower than currently reported values from other Mb films. This kind of sensor possesses excellent stability, long-term life (more than 20 days) and good reproducibility.

  10. Use of phosphoimidazolide-activated guanosine to investigate the nucleophilicity of spermine and spermidine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Baird, E. E.; Smith, P. J.

    1995-01-01

    Guanosine 5'-phosphate 2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG), a labile phosphoimidazolide analog of guanosine triphosphate, was used to test the reactivity of the natural polyamines (PAs), spermine (spm) and spermidine (spd). The products are the guanosine 5'-phosphate-polyamine derivatives (PA-pG: spd-pG and spm-pG) which are quite stable in the range 4 < pH < 11. Our study is the first of which we are aware that reports on the nucleophilicity of these amines. The main findings are as follows. (i) HPLC analysis of the products indicates the formation of only two of the three possible spd products and only one of the two possible spm products. These results can be explained if only the primary amino groups of the two polyamines are reactive, while the secondary amino groups are rendered unreactive by a steric effect. The reactions of 2-MeImpG and other phosphoimidazolide derivatives of nucleosides (ImpNs) with primary and secondary monoamines support this interpretation (Kanavarioti et al. J. Org. Chem. 1995, 60, 632). (ii) The product ratio of the two spd-pG adducts derived from the primary amino groups varies between 2.40 and 0.71 in the range 6.1 < or equal to pH < or equal to 11.9. Such small variation in the product ratio can only be rationalized by the similar, but not identical, basicity of the two primary amino groups and provides strong support for a previously reported model for polyamine ionization (Onasch et. al. Biophys. Chem. 1984, 19, 245). (iii) On the basis of our kinetic determinations conditions at which the nucleophilicity of these amines is at a minimum and at which other interactions with ImpNs could be tested can be chosen.

  11. cGMP regulates hydrogen peroxide accumulation in calcium-dependent salt resistance pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana roots.

    PubMed

    Li, Jisheng; Wang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Yanli; Jia, Honglei; Bi, Yurong

    2011-10-01

    3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is an important second messenger in plants. In the present study, roles of cGMP in salt resistance in Arabidopsis roots were investigated. Arabidopsis roots were sensitive to 100 mM NaCl treatment, displaying a great increase in electrolyte leakage and Na(+)/K(+) ratio and a decrease in gene expression of the plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase. However, application of exogenous 8Br-cGMP (an analog of cGMP), H(2)O(2) or CaCl(2) alleviated the NaCl-induced injury by maintaining a lower Na(+)/K(+) ratio and increasing the PM H(+)-ATPase gene expression. In addition, the inhibition of root elongation and seed germination under salt stress was removed by 8Br-cGMP. Further study indicated that 8Br-cGMP-induced higher NADPH levels for PM NADPH oxidase to generate H(2)O(2) by regulating glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) activity. The effect of 8Br-cGMP and H(2)O(2) on ionic homeostasis was abolished when Ca(2+) was eliminated by glycol-bis-(2-amino ethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA, a Ca(2+) chelator) in Arabidopsis roots under salt stress. Taken together, cGMP could regulate H(2)O(2) accumulation in salt stress, and Ca(2+) was necessary in the cGMP-mediated signaling pathway. H(2)O(2), as the downstream component of cGMP signaling pathway, stimulated PM H(+)-ATPase gene expression. Thus, ion homeostasis was modulated for salt tolerance.

  12. In Silico Design for Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Agonist from Traditional Chinese Medicine for Treatment of Metabolic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hsin-Chieh

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) acts as a master mediator of metabolic homeostasis. It is considered as a significant millstone to treat metabolic syndromes including obesity, diabetes, and fatty liver. It can sense cellular energy or nutrient status by switching on the catabolic pathways. Investigation of AMPK has new findings recently. AMPK can inhibit cell growth by the way of autophagy. Thus AMPK has become a hot target for small molecular drug design of tumor inhibition. Activation of AMPK must undergo certain extent change of the structure. Through the methods of structure-based virtual screening and molecular dynamics simulation, we attempted to find out appropriate small compounds from the world's largest TCM Database@Taiwan that had the ability to activate the function of AMPK. Finally, we found that two TCM compounds, eugenyl_beta-D-glucopyranoside and 6-O-cinnamoyl-D-glucopyranose, had the qualification to be AMPK agonist. PMID:24899913

  13. Possible involvement of nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of MK-801(dizocilpine), a NMDA receptor antagonist in mouse forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Dhir, Ashish; Kulkarni, S K

    2008-03-01

    L-arginine-nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is an important signaling pathway involved in depression. With this information, the present study aimed to study the involvement of this signaling pathway in the antidepressant-like action of MK-801 (dizocilpine; N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist) in the mouse forced-swim test. Total immobility period was recorded in mouse forced swim test for 6 min. MK-801 (5-25 microg/kg., ip) produced a U-shaped curve in reducing the immobility period. The antidepressant-like effect of MK-801 (10 microg/kg, ip) was prevented by pretreatment with L-arginine (750 mg/kg, ip) [substrate for nitric oxide synthase (NOS)]. Pretreatment of mice with 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) (25 mg/kg, ip) [a specific neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor] produced potentiation of the action of subeffective dose of MK-801 (5 microg/kg, ip). In addition, treatment of mice with methylene blue (10 mg/kg, ip) [direct inhibitor of both nitric oxide synthase and soluble guanylate cyclase] potentiated the effect of MK-801 (5 microg/kg, ip) in the forced-swim test. Further, the reduction in the immobility period elicited by MK-801 (10 microg/kg, ip) was also inhibited by pretreatment with sildenafil (5 mg/kg, ip) [phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor]. The various modulators used in the study and their combination did not produce any changes in locomotor activity per se and in combination with MK-801. MK-801 however, at higher doses (25 microg/kg, ip) produced hyperlocomotion. The results demonstrated the involvement of nitric oxide signaling pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of MK-801 in mouse forced-swim test.

  14. Cross-talk between Two Nucleotide-signaling Pathways in Staphylococcus aureus*

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Rebecca M.; Bowman, Lisa; Willis, Alexandra R.; Kaever, Volkhard; Gründling, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide-signaling pathways are found in all kingdoms of life and are utilized to coordinate a rapid response to external stimuli. The stringent response alarmones guanosine tetra- (ppGpp) and pentaphosphate (pppGpp) control a global response allowing cells to adapt to starvation conditions such as amino acid depletion. One more recently discovered signaling nucleotide is the secondary messenger cyclic diadenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP). Here, we demonstrate that this signaling nucleotide is essential for the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, and its increased production during late growth phases indicates that c-di-AMP controls processes that are important for the survival of cells in stationary phase. By examining the transcriptional profile of cells with high levels of c-di-AMP, we reveal a significant overlap with a stringent response transcription signature. Examination of the intracellular nucleotide levels under stress conditions provides further evidence that high levels of c-di-AMP lead to an activation of the stringent response through a RelA/SpoT homologue (RSH) enzyme-dependent increase in the (p)ppGpp levels. This activation is shown to be indirect as c-di-AMP does not interact directly with the RSH protein. Our data extend this interconnection further by showing that the S. aureus c-di-AMP phosphodiesterase enzyme GdpP is inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by ppGpp, which itself is not a substrate for this enzyme. Altogether, these findings add a new layer of complexity to our understanding of nucleotide signaling in bacteria as they highlight intricate interconnections between different nucleotide-signaling networks. PMID:25575594

  15. Isoflurane Favorably Modulates Guanosine Triphosphate Cyclohydrolase-1 and Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase during Myocardial Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Baotic, Ines; Weihrauch, Dorothee; Procknow, Jesse; Vasquez-Vivar, Jeanette; Ge, Zhi-Dong; Sudhakaran, Shaan; Warltier, David C.; Kersten, Judy R.

    2015-01-01

    Background We investigated the hypothesis that isoflurane modulates NO synthesis and protection against myocardial infarction through time-dependent changes in expression of key NO regulatory proteins, guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase (GTPCH) -1, the rate-limiting enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Methods Myocardial infarct size, NO production (ozone-mediated chemiluminescence), GTPCH-1 and eNOS expression (real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and western blotting), were measured in male Wistar rats with or without APC (1.0 minimum alveolar concentration isoflurane for 30 min) and in the presence or absence of an inhibitor of GTPCH-1, 2,4-diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine. Results NO−2 production (158±16 and 150±13 pmol/mg protein at baseline in control and APC groups, respectively) was significantly (P<0.05) increased 1.5±0.1 and 1.4±0.1 fold by APC (n=4) at 60 and 90 min of reperfusion, concomitantly, with increased expression of GTPCH-1 (1.3±0.3 fold; n=5) and eNOS (1.3±0.2 fold; n=5). In contrast, total NO (NO−2 and NO−3) was decreased after reperfusion in control experiments. Myocardial infarct size was decreased [43±2% of the area at risk for infarction; n=6] by APC as compared to control experiments (57±1%; n=6). 2, 4-Diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine decreased total NO production at baseline (221±25 and 175±31 pmol/mg protein at baseline in control and APC groups, respectively), abolished isoflurane-induced increases in NO at reperfusion, and prevented reductions of myocardial infarct size by APC (60±2%; n=6). Conclusions APC favorably modulated a NO biosynthetic pathway by upregulating GTPCH-1 and eNOS, and this action contributed to protection of myocardium against ischemia and reperfusion injury. PMID:26192027

  16. Structural Basis for Recognition of Guanosine by a Synthetic Tricyclic Cytosine Analogue: Guanidinium G-Clamp

    SciTech Connect

    Wilds, C.J.; Maier, M.A.; Manoharan, M.; Egli, M.

    2010-03-08

    An oligonucleotide analogue containing a novel heterocyclic analogue, the guanidinium G-clamp, was designed to allow formation of five H-bonds to guanosine. The guanidinium group was introduced postsynthetically by treatment of the deprotected oligonucleotide containing a free amino group with a solution of 1H-pyrazole-1-carboxamidine and purified by a combination of size-exclusion chromatography and reversed-phase HPLC. A single incorporation of this modification into an oligodeoxynucleotide sequence was found to increase duplex stability by 13{sup o} and 16{sup o} per modification to RNA and DNA, respectively. Crystals of a self-complementary decamer sequence containing this modification were grown and diffracted to 1-{angstrom} resolution. The structure was solved by molecular replacement and revealed that the modification forms additional H-bonds to O(6) and N(7) of guanosine through the amino and imino N-atoms, respectively. The origins of enhanced duplex stability are also attributed to increased stacking interactions mediated by the phenoxazine moiety of the G-clamp and formation of H-bond networks between the positively charged guanidinium group, H{sub 2}O molecules, and negatively charged O-atoms from phosphates on the adjacent strand.

  17. Optimization of benzoxazole-based inhibitors of Cryptosporidium parvum inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Kavitha, Mandapati; Zhang, Minjia; Chin, James En Wai; Liu, Xiaoping; Striepen, Boris; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Cuny, Gregory D

    2013-05-23

    Cryptosporidium parvum is an enteric protozoan parasite that has emerged as a major cause of diarrhea, malnutrition, and gastroenteritis and poses a potential bioterrorism threat. C. parvum synthesizes guanine nucleotides from host adenosine in a streamlined pathway that relies on inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). We have previously identified several parasite-selective C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) inhibitors by high-throughput screening. In this paper, we report the structure-activity relationship (SAR) for a series of benzoxazole derivatives with many compounds demonstrating CpIMPDH IC50 values in the nanomolar range and >500-fold selectivity over human IMPDH (hIMPDH). Unlike previously reported CpIMPDH inhibitors, these compounds are competitive inhibitors versus NAD(+). The SAR study reveals that pyridine and other small heteroaromatic substituents are required at the 2-position of the benzoxazole for potent inhibitory activity. In addition, several other SAR conclusions are highlighted with regard to the benzoxazole and the amide portion of the inhibitor, including preferred stereochemistry. An X-ray crystal structure of a representative E·IMP·inhibitor complex is also presented. Overall, the secondary amine derivative 15a demonstrated excellent CpIMPDH inhibitory activity (IC50 = 0.5 ± 0.1 nM) and moderate stability (t1/2 = 44 min) in mouse liver microsomes. Compound 73, the racemic version of 15a, also displayed superb antiparasitic activity in a Toxoplasma gondii strain that relies on CpIMPDH (EC50 = 20 ± 20 nM), and selectivity versus a wild-type T. gondii strain (200-fold). No toxicity was observed (LD50 > 50 μM) against a panel of four mammalian cells lines.

  18. Deciphering the photochemical mechanisms describing the UV-induced processes occurring in solvated guanine monophosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altavilla, Salvatore; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Nenov, Artur; Conti, Irene; Rivalta, Ivan; Garavelli, Marco

    2015-04-01

    The photophysics and photochemistry of water-solvated guanine monophosphate (GMP) are here characterized by means of a multireference quantum-chemical/molecular mechanics theoretical approach (CASPT2//CASSCF/AMBER) in order to elucidate the main photo-processes occurring upon UV-light irradiation. The effect of the solvent and of the phosphate group on the energetics and structural features of this system are evaluated for the first time employing high-level ab initio methods and thoroughly compared to those in vacuo previously reported in the literature and to the experimental evidence to assess to which extent they influence the photoinduced mechanisms. Solvated electronic excitation energies of solvated GMP at the Franck-Condon (FC) region show a red shift for the ππ* La and Lb states, whereas the energy of the oxygen lone-pair nπ* state is blue-shifted. The main photoinduced decay route is promoted through a ring-puckering motion along the bright lowest-lying La state towards a conical intersection (CI) with the ground state, involving a very shallow stationary point along the minimum energy pathway in contrast to the barrierless profile found in gas-phase, the point being placed at the end of the minimum energy path (MEP) thus endorsing its ultrafast deactivation in accordance with time-resolved transient and photoelectron spectroscopy experiments. The role of the nπ* state in the solvated system is severely diminished as the crossings with the initially populated La state and also with the Lb state are placed too high energetically to partake prominently in the deactivation photo-process. The proposed mechanism present in solvated and in vacuo DNA/RNA chromophores validates the intrinsic photostability mechanism through CI-mediated non-radiative processes accompanying the bright excited-state population towards the ground state and subsequent relaxation back to the FC region.

  19. Interrelations between glycolysis and the hexose monophosphate shunt in erythrocytes as studied on the basis of a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Schuster, R; Holzhütter, H G; Jacobasch, G

    1988-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented which comprises the reactions of glycolysis, the hexose monophosphate shunt (HMS) and the glutathione system in erythrocytes. The model is used to calculate stationary and time-dependent metabolic states of the cell in vitro and in vivo. The model properly accounts for the following metabolic features observed in vitro: (a) stimulation of the oxidative pentose pathway after addition of pyruvate due to a NADP-dependent lactate dehydrogenase as coupling enzyme between glycolysis and the oxidative pentose pathway, (b) relative share of the oxidative pentose pathway in the total consumption of glucose amounting to approximately 10% in the normal case and to approximately 90% under conditions of oxidative stress excreted by methylene blue. From the application of the model to in vivo conditions it is predicted that (c) under normal conditions glycolysis and the HMS are independently regulated by the energetic and oxidative load, respectively, (d) under conditions of enhanced energetic or oxidative load both glycolysis and the HMS are mainly controlled by the hexokinase; in this situation the highest possible values of the energetic and oxidative load which are compatible with cell integrity are strongly coupled and considerably restricted in comparison with the normal case, (e) the stationary states possess bifurcation points at high and low values of the energetic load. PMID:3191218

  20. Design of inhibitors of orotidine monophosphate decarboxylase using bioisosteric replacement and determination of inhibition kinetics.

    PubMed

    Poduch, Ewa; Bello, Angelica M; Tang, Sishi; Fujihashi, Masahiro; Pai, Emil F; Kotra, Lakshmi P

    2006-08-10

    Inhibitors of orotidine monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase) have applications in RNA viral, parasitic, and other infectious diseases. ODCase catalyzes the decarboxylation of orotidine monophosphate (OMP), producing uridine monophosphate (UMP). Novel inhibitors 6-amino-UMP and 6-cyano-UMP were designed on the basis of the substructure volumes in the substrate OMP and in an inhibitor of ODCase, barbituric acid monophosphate, BMP. A new enzyme assay method using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was developed to investigate the inhibition kinetics of ODCase. The reaction rates were measured by monitoring the heat generated during the decarboxylation reaction of orotidine monophosphate. Kinetic parameters (k(cat) = 21 s(-1) and KM = 5 microM) and the molar enthalpy (DeltaH(app) = 5 kcal/mol) were determined for the decarboxylation of the substrate by ODCase. Competitive inhibition of the enzyme was observed and the inhibition constants (Ki) were determined to be 12.4 microM and 29 microM for 6-aza-UMP and 6-cyano-UMP, respectively. 6-Amino-UMP was found to be among the potent inhibitors of ODCase, having an inhibition constant of 840 nM. We reveal here the first inhibitors of ODCase designed by the principles of bioisosterism and a novel method of using isothermal calorimetry for enzyme inhibition studies.

  1. Folding Properties of Cytosine Monophosphate Kinase from E. coli Indicate Stabilization through an Additional Insert in the NMP Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Beitlich, Thorsten; Lorenz, Thorsten; Reinstein, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    The globular 25 kDa protein cytosine monophosphate kinase (CMPK, EC ID: 2.7.4.14) from E. coli belongs to the family of nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) kinases (NMPK). Many proteins of this family share medium to high sequence and high structure similarity including the frequently found α/β topology. A unique feature of CMPK in the family of NMPKs is the positioning of a single cis-proline residue in the CORE-domain (cis-Pro124) in conjunction with a large insert in the NMP binding domain. This insert is not found in other well studied NMPKs such as AMPK or UMP/CMPK. We have analyzed the folding pathway of CMPK using time resolved tryptophan and FRET fluorescence as well as CD. Our results indicate that unfolding at high urea concentrations is governed by a single process, whereas refolding in low urea concentrations follows at least a three step process which we interpret as follows: Pro124 in the CORE-domain is in cis in the native state (Nc) and equilibrates with its trans-isomer in the unfolded state (Uc - Ut). Under refolding conditions, at least the Ut species and possibly also the Uc species undergo a fast initial collapse to form intermediates with significant amount of secondary structure, from which the trans-Pro124 fraction folds to the native state with a 100-fold lower rate constant than the cis-Pro124 species. CMPK thus differs from homologous NMP kinases like UMP/CMP kinase or AMP kinase, where folding intermediates show much lower content of secondary structure. Importantly also unfolding is up to 100-fold faster compared to CMPK. We therefore propose that the stabilizing effect of the long NMP-domain insert in conjunction with a subtle twist in the positioning of a single cis-Pro residue allows for substantial stabilization compared to other NMP kinases with α/β topology. PMID:24205218

  2. Identification and characterization of a lower plant Ypt/Rab guanosine dissociation inhibitor (GDI).

    PubMed

    Beyser, K; Fabry, S

    1996-11-01

    The cDNA encoding a Ypt/Rab guanosine dissociation inhibitor (Ypt-GDI) was isolated from the multicellular green alga Volvox carteri, representing the first complete plant gdi gene described. The gdiV1 gene occurs as a single copy in the algal genome, indicating that its product regulates all YptV proteins from Volvox. The derived GDI protein (GDIV1p) shows high similarity to animal and fungal GDIs. A specific antibody developed against GDIV1p detected the protein throughout the whole Volvox life-cycle. GDIV1p was localized in the cytoplasm and in the algal flagellum. This is in line with earlier findings of a dual localization of Ypt proteins both in the cell body and in the motility organelle, and indicates a novel role of the GDI/Ypt system, possibly in intraflagellar transport.

  3. Intracellular application of guanosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) induces exocytotic granule fusion in guinea pig eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The mechanism of eosinophil secretion was studied in guinea pig eosinophils by measuring release of hexosaminidase from cell suspensions (greater than 98% pure) permeabilized with streptolysin-O and by whole-cell patch-clamp capacitance measurements. It is shown that release of eosinophil granule components occurs by an exocytotic mechanism in which individual granules fuse with the plasma membrane. Exocytosis can be induced by intracellular application of the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog guanosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP- gamma-S), suggesting the involvement of a GTP-binding protein. The activation is modulated by the intracellular calcium concentration, with activation by GTP-gamma-S inducing transient elevations in the concentration of Ca2+. Thus, the nature and regulation of the release mechanism appear to be very similar to that of the mast cell and neutrophil. PMID:2137856

  4. Rho and Rap guanosine triphosphatase signaling in B cells and chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mele, Silvia; Devereux, Stephen; Ridley, Anne J

    2014-09-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells proliferate predominantly in niches in the lymph nodes, where signaling from the B cell receptor (BCR) and the surrounding microenvironment are critical for disease progression. In addition, leukemic cells traffic constantly from the bloodstream into the lymph nodes, migrate within lymphatic tissues and egress back to the bloodstream. These processes are driven by chemokines and their receptors, and depend on changes in cell migration and integrin-mediated adhesion. Here we describe how Rho and Rap guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) contribute to both BCR signaling and chemokine receptor signaling, particularly by regulating cytoskeletal dynamics and integrin activity. We propose that new inhibitors of BCR-activated kinases are likely to affect CLL cell trafficking via Rho and Rap GTPases, and that upstream regulators or downstream effectors could be good targets for therapeutic intervention in CLL.

  5. Hydrogen-bond-directed giant unilamellar vesicles of guanosine derivative: preparation, properties, and fusion.

    PubMed

    Sawayama, Jun; Sakaino, Hirotoshi; Kabashima, Shin-ichiro; Yoshikawa, Isao; Araki, Koji

    2011-07-19

    By mixing a small volume of THF containing guanosine derivative 1 and tetraethylenegrycol dodecyl ether (TEGDE) with water and subsequently removing TEGDE by gel permeation chromatography, micrometer-sized giant unilamellar vesicles (GUV) of 1 were successfully prepared. The vesicle membrane was a 2-D sheet assembly of thickness 2.5 nm, composed of a 2-D inter-guanine hydrogen-bond network. The GUV dispersion showed high stability because of a large negative zeta potential, which allowed repeated sedimentation and redispersion by centrifugation and subsequent gentle agitation. TEGDE-triggered fusion of GUVs took place within 350 ms, which proceeded by fusion of the vesicle membranes in contact. These unique static and dynamic properties of the GUV membrane assembled by the 2-D hydrogen-bond network are discussed. PMID:21649445

  6. Self-assembly of an alkylated guanosine derivative into ordered supramolecular nanoribbons in solution and on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lena, Stefano; Brancolini, Giorgia; Gottarelli, Giovanni; Mariani, Paolo; Masiero, Stefano; Venturini, Alessandro; Palermo, Vincenzo; Pandoli, Omar; Pieraccini, Silvia; Samorì, Paolo; Spada, Gian Piero

    2007-01-01

    We report on the synthesis and self-assembly of a guanosine derivative bearing an alkyloxy side group under different environmental conditions. This derivative was found to spontaneously form ordered supramolecular nanoribbons in which the individual nucleobases are interacting through H-bonds. In toluene and chloroform solutions the formation of gel-like liquid-crystalline phases was observed. Sub-molecularly resolved scanning tunneling microscopic imaging of monolayers physisorbed at the graphite-solution interface revealed highly ordered two-dimensional networks. The recorded intramolecular contrast can be ascribed to the electronic properties of the different moieties composing the molecule, as proven by quantum-chemical calculations. This self-assembly behavior is in excellent agreement with that of 5'-O-acylated guanosines, which are also characterized by a self-assembled motif of guanosines that resembles parallel ribbons. Therefore, for guanosine derivatives (without sterically demanding groups on the guanine base) the formation of supramolecular nanoribbons in solution, in the solid state, and on flat surfaces is universal. This result is truly important in view of the electronic properties of these supramolecular anisotropic architectures and thus for potential applications in the fields of nano- and opto-electronics.

  7. Chlorination of guanosine and other nucleosides by hypochlorous acid and myeloperoxidase of activated human neutrophils. Catalysis by nicotine and trimethylamine.

    PubMed

    Masuda, M; Suzuki, T; Friesen, M D; Ravanat, J L; Cadet, J; Pignatelli, B; Nishino, H; Ohshima, H

    2001-11-01

    Activated human neutrophils secrete myeloperoxidase, which generates HOCl from H2O2 and Cl(-). We have found that various (2'-deoxy)nucleosides react with HOCl to form chlorinated (2'-deoxy)nucleosides, including novel 8-chloro(2'-deoxy)guanosine, 5-chloro(2'-deoxy)cytidine, and 8-chloro(2'-deoxy)adenosine formed in yields of 1.6, 1.6, and 0.2%, respectively, when 0.5 mM nucleoside reacted with 0.5 mM HOCl at pH 7.4. The relative chlorination, oxidation, and nitration activities of HOCl, myeloperoxidase, and activated human neutrophils in the presence and absence of nitrite were studied by analyzing 8-chloro-, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-, and 8-nitro-guanosine, respectively, using guanosine as a probe. 8-Chloroguanosine was always more easily formed than 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro- or 8-nitro-guanosine. Using electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry, we show that several chlorinated nucleosides including 8-chloro(2'-deoxy)guanosine are formed following exposure of isolated DNA or RNA to HOCl. Micromolar concentrations of tertiary amines such as nicotine and trimethylamine dramatically enhanced chlorination of free (2'-deoxy)nucleosides and nucleosides in RNA by HOCl. As the G-463A polymorphism of the MPO gene, which strongly reduces myeloperoxidase mRNA expression, is associated with a reduced risk of lung cancer, chlorination damage of DNA /RNA and nucleosides by myeloperoxidase and its enhancement by nicotine may be important in the pathophysiology of human diseases associated with tobacco habits. PMID:11533049

  8. Identification of cytidine 2',3'-cyclic monophosphate and uridine 2',3'-cyclic monophosphate in Pseudomonas fluorescens pfo-1 culture.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Emily; Oberc, Christopher; Ameen, Eve; da Silva, Amanda Mendes; Yan, Hongbin

    2014-09-15

    Cytidine 2',3'-cyclic monophosphate (2',3'-cCMP) and uridine 2',3'-cyclic monophosphate (2',3'-cUMP) were isolated from Pseudomonas fluorescens pfo-1 cell extracts by semi-preparative reverse phase HPLC. The structures of the two compounds were confirmed by NMR and mass spectroscopy against commercially available authentic samples. Concentrations of both intracellular and extracellular 2',3'-cCMP and 2',3'-cUMP were determined. Addition of 2',3'-cCMP and 2',3'-cUMP to P. fluorescens pfo-1 culture did not significantly affect the level of biofilm formation in static liquid cultures. PMID:25139571

  9. RNA initiation with dinucleoside monophosphates during transcription of bacteriophage T4 DNA with RNA polymerase of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, D J; Niyogi, S K

    1973-02-01

    The effects of dinucleoside monophosphates on the transcription of phage T4 DNA by E. coli RNA polymerase have been examined at various concentrations of the sigma subunit and extremely low concentration of ribonucleoside triphosphate. The following conclusions were reached: (i) Labeled specific dinucleoside monophosphates are incorporated as chain initiators. (ii) When the ratio of sigma factor to core enzyme is small, there is a general stimulation by most 5'-guanosyl dinucleoside monophosphates. (iii) When the ratio is increased or holoenzyme is present, ApU, CpA, UpA, and GpU are the most effective stimulators. (iv) At high concentrations of sigma factor, only certain adenosine-containing dinucleoside monophosphates (ApU, CpA, UpA, and ApA) stimulate the reaction. (v) Competition hybridization studies indicate that the RNAs stimulated by dinucleoside monophosphates (ApU, CpA, UpA, and GpU) are of the T4 "early" type. (vi) Studies involving both combinations of stimulatory dinucleoside monophosphates and competitive effects of these compounds on chain initiation by ATP and GTP suggest that the stimulatory dinucleoside monophosphates act as chain initiators and may recognize part of a continuous sequence in a promoter region. Studies based on the incorporation of (3)H-labeled stimulatory dinucleoside monophosphates support the above conclusions.

  10. Low-dose, sublingual AZT-monophosphate therapy for HIV+ patients?

    PubMed

    Johnson, S

    2001-03-01

    AZT concentrations as low as 0.001 mg/l inhibit viral replication, while concentrations above 0.3 mg/l cause considerable damage to erythroid, myeloid progenitor cells and inhibit blastogenesis in mononuclear cells. Furthermore, AZT must be converted first to monophosphate and then to diphosphate and finally to triphosphate by the same enzyme: thymidine kinase (TK). Therefore, large doses of AZT overwhelm TK, causing massive production of monophosphate and reducing the production of di and triphosphate. Yet the recommended dosage of 100 mg AZT every 4 hours results in a peak concentration of 0.5 mg/l and a trough concentration of 0.1 mg/l (harmful to human cells and resulting in reduced production of triphosphate). On the other hand, sublingual administration of 1 mg AZT monophosphate every 8 hours (since the intracellular half life of AZT triphosphate is 3 hours) would be desirable, resulting in more damage to the virus and less harm to the patient. Finally, the small dose of monophosphate ensures that most of the AZT be converted to triphosphate, greatly increasing the efficiency and reducing the likelihood of the virus developing resistance due to reverse transcriptase binding to the similar but non inhibiting mono and diphosphate. PMID:11359372

  11. Biological activity of analogs of guanine and guanosine against American Trypanosoma and Leishmania spp.

    PubMed Central

    Avila, J L; Rojas, T; Avila, A; Polegre, M A; Robins, R K

    1987-01-01

    The growth inhibitory effects of six guanine and guanosine analogs, 3-deazaguanine (compound 1); 3-deazaguanosine (compound 2); 6-aminoallopurinol (compound 3); 9-beta-xylofuranosyl guanine (compound 4); a ribosylated derivative of compound 3, 6-aminopyrazolo(3,4-d)pyrimidin-4-one (compound 5); and 5-aminoformycin B (compound 6), were tested against some pathogenic members of the family of American Trypanosomatidae. Compounds 1 and 2 were highly active against Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli, and American Leishmania spp. in in vitro culture forms. Both compounds also showed antiprotozoal activity in T. cruzi-infected mice, with the optimal dose being about 30 mg/kg of body weight per day given as 10 consecutive doses. Compound 3 was the most active compound in vitro, inhibiting all of the American Trypanosomatidae culture forms tested. It was also highly inhibitory in mice that were acutely infected with T. cruzi, with the optimal dose being about 10 mg/kg of body weight per day. Ribosylation of compound 3 resulted in a derivative that showed decreased inhibitory activity on Trypanosomatidae multiplication. Compound 6 was highly inhibitory of in vitro multiplication of American Leishmania and T. rangeli but had no effect on T. cruzi epimastigotes and on mice that were acutely infected with T. cruzi. Compound 4 showed only a slight effect on T. cruzi epimastigotes. PMID:3107463

  12. Relative stability of guanosine-cytidine diribonucleotide cores: a 1H NMR assessment.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, A; Alkema, D; Bell, R A; Coddington, J M; Hughes, D W; Neilson, T; Romaniuk, P J

    1984-06-01

    Proton NMR was used to study the secondary structure and melting behavior of six self-complementary oligoribonucleotide tetramers, each containing two guanosine and two cytidine residues (GGCC, CCGG, GCCG, CGGC, GCGC, and CGCG). GGCC and CCGG formed perfect duplexes containing four G.C base pairs with Tms of 54 and 47.8 degrees C, respectively; GCCG and CGGC formed staggered duplexes with two G.C base pairs and four 3' double-dangling bases, with Tms of 35.5 and 29.2 degrees C, respectively; GCGC formed a perfect duplex with a Tm of 49.9 degrees C, while CGCG formed a staggered duplex with a Tm of 36.9 degrees C. From these results, an order of stability of the cores containing two G.C base pairs was proposed: GC:GC is more stable than GG:CC which is more stable than CG:CG. The RY model for secondary structure stability prediction was applied to the above tetramers with reasonable success. Suggestions for refinements are discussed.

  13. Central nervous system dysfunction and erythrocyte guanosine triphosphate depletion in purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Simmonds, H A; Fairbanks, L D; Morris, G S; Morgan, G; Watson, A R; Timms, P; Singh, B

    1987-01-01

    Developmental retardation was a prominent clinical feature in six infants from three kindreds deficient in the enzyme purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) and was present before development of T cell immunodeficiency. Guanosine triphosphate (GTP) depletion was noted in the erythrocytes of all surviving homozygotes and was of equivalent magnitude to that found in the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (complete hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) deficiency). The similarity between the neurological complications in both disorders indicates that the two major clinical consequences of complete PNP deficiency have differing aetiologies: neurological effects resulting from deficiency of the PNP enzyme products, which are the substrates for HGPRT, leading to functional deficiency of this enzyme. immunodeficiency caused by accumulation of the PNP enzyme substrates, one of which, deoxyguanosine, is toxic to T cells. These studies show the need to consider PNP deficiency (suggested by the finding of hypouricaemia) in patients with neurological dysfunction, as well as in T cell immunodeficiency. They suggest an important role for GTP in normal central nervous system function. PMID:2439024

  14. Coupling of DNA replication to growth rate in Escherichia coli: a possible role for guanosine tetraphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Chiaramello, A E; Zyskind, J W

    1990-01-01

    Two promoters for the Escherichia coli operon that contains the four genes dnaA, dnaN, recF, and gyrB were found to be growth rate regulated and under stringent control. Transcript abundance relative to total RNA increased with the growth rate. Changes in transcription from the dnaAp1 and dnaAp2 promoters that were induced by amino acid starvation and chloramphenicol and were relA dependent were correlated with the stringent response. The abundance of these transcripts per total RNA also decreased in spoT mutants as the severity of the mutation increased (guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate [ppGpp] basal levels increased). Because expression of these promoters appears to be inhibited by ppGpp, it is proposed that one mechanism for coupling DNA replication to the growth rate of bacteria is through ppGpp synthesis at the ribosome. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:1690706

  15. Persistence Increases in the Absence of the Alarmone Guanosine Tetraphosphate by Reducing Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Nityananda; Kwan, Brian W; Wood, Thomas K

    2016-02-03

    Most bacterial cells are stressed, and as a result, some become tolerant to antibiotics by entering a dormant state known as persistence. The key intracellular metabolite that has been linked to this persister state is guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp), the alarmone that was first linked to nutrient stress. In Escherichia coli, ppGpp redirects protein production during nutrient stress by interacting with RNA polymerase directly and by inhibiting several proteins. Consistently, increased levels of ppGpp lead to increased persistence; but, the mechanism by which elevated ppGpp translates into persistence has not been determined. Hence, we explored persistence in the absence of ppGpp so that the underlying mechanism of persister cell formation could be explored. We found that persister cells still form, although at lower levels, in the absence of ppGpp. Additionally, the toxin/antitoxin systems that we investigated (MqsR, MazF, GhoT, and YafQ) remain able to increase persistence dramatically in the absence of ppGpp. By overproducing each E. coli protein from the 4287 plasmid vectors of the ASKA library and selecting for increased persistence in the absence of ppGpp (via a relA spoT mutant), we identified five new proteins, YihS, PntA, YqjE, FocA, and Zur, that increase persistence simply by reducing cell growth.

  16. Identification of the bacterial alarmone guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate (ppGpp) in plants.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kosaku; Kasai, Koji; Ochi, Kozo

    2004-03-23

    Stringent control mediated by the bacterial alarmone guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate (ppGpp) is a key regulatory process governing bacterial gene expression. By devising a system to measure ppGpp in plants, we have been able to identify ppGpp in the chloroplasts of plant cells. Levels of ppGpp increased markedly when plants were subjected to such biotic and abiotic stresses as wounding, heat shock, high salinity, acidity, heavy metal, drought, and UV irradiation. Abrupt changes from light to dark also caused a substantial elevation in ppGpp levels. In vitro, chloroplast RNA polymerase activity was inhibited in the presence of ppGpp, demonstrating the existence of a bacteria-type stringent response in plants. Elevation of ppGpp levels was elicited also by treatment with plant hormones jasmonic acid, abscisic acid, and ethylene, but these effects were blocked completely by another plant hormone, indole-3-acetic acid. On the basis of these findings, we propose that ppGpp plays a critical role in systemic plant signaling in response to environmental stresses, contributing to the adaptation of plants to environmental changes.

  17. In vitro synthesis and characterization of guanosine 3',5'-bis(diphosphate).

    PubMed

    Hardiman, Timo; Windeisen, Volker; Ewald, Jennifer C; Zibek, Susanne; Schlack, Petra; Rebell, Jochen; Reuss, Matthias; Siemann-Herzberg, Martin

    2008-12-15

    The intracellular alarmone guanosine 3',5'-bis(diphosphate) (ppGpp) has been thoroughly investigated over the past 40 years and has become one of the best-known effectors in bacterial physiology. ppGpp is also of great importance for biotechnological applications. Systems biology research, involving experimental and mathematical approaches, has contributed a great deal to uncovering the alarmone's complex regulatory effects. HPLC analysis and UV detection are used to quantify intracellular ppGpp. The samples analyzed also contain other phosphorylated guanine nucleotides and, therefore, are spiked with a standard ppGpp solution. A rapidly growing number of laboratories are turning to synthesizing the nucleotide in vitro involving time-consuming protocols and yielding only low amounts of ppGpp. The current article provides a protocol for the preparation of large quantities of a ribosome extract that contains high ppGpp synthesis activity. The demonstrated upscaling from shaking flask to bioreactor cultivation involves the continuous and refrigerated harvest of the biomass. (13)C NMR analysis enabled the structural characterization of the synthesis product and was complemented by mass spectrometry and methods that are commonly used to identify ppGpp.

  18. Persistence Increases in the Absence of the Alarmone Guanosine Tetraphosphate by Reducing Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Nityananda; Kwan, Brian W.; Wood, Thomas K.

    2016-01-01

    Most bacterial cells are stressed, and as a result, some become tolerant to antibiotics by entering a dormant state known as persistence. The key intracellular metabolite that has been linked to this persister state is guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp), the alarmone that was first linked to nutrient stress. In Escherichia coli, ppGpp redirects protein production during nutrient stress by interacting with RNA polymerase directly and by inhibiting several proteins. Consistently, increased levels of ppGpp lead to increased persistence; but, the mechanism by which elevated ppGpp translates into persistence has not been determined. Hence, we explored persistence in the absence of ppGpp so that the underlying mechanism of persister cell formation could be explored. We found that persister cells still form, although at lower levels, in the absence of ppGpp. Additionally, the toxin/antitoxin systems that we investigated (MqsR, MazF, GhoT, and YafQ) remain able to increase persistence dramatically in the absence of ppGpp. By overproducing each E. coli protein from the 4287 plasmid vectors of the ASKA library and selecting for increased persistence in the absence of ppGpp (via a relA spoT mutant), we identified five new proteins, YihS, PntA, YqjE, FocA, and Zur, that increase persistence simply by reducing cell growth. PMID:26837570

  19. DNA 3' pp 5' G de-capping activity of aprataxin: effect of cap nucleoside analogs and structural basis for guanosine recognition

    DOE PAGES

    Chauleau, Mathieu; Jacewicz, Agata; Shuman, Stewart

    2015-05-24

    DNA3' pp 5'G caps synthesized by the 3'-PO4/5'-OH ligase RtcB have a strong impact on enzymatic reactions at DNA 3'-OH ends. Aprataxin, an enzyme that repairs A5'pp5'DNA ends formed during abortive ligation by classic 3'-OH/5'-PO4 ligases, is also a DNA 3' de-capping enzyme, converting DNAppG to DNA3'p and GMP. By taking advantage of RtcB's ability to utilize certain GTP analogs to synthesize DNAppN caps, we show that aprataxin hydrolyzes inosine and 6-O-methylguanosine caps, but is not adept at removing a deoxyguanosine cap. We report a 1.5 Å crystal structure of aprataxin in a complex with GMP, which reveals that: (i)more » GMP binds at the same position and in the same anti nucleoside conformation as AMP; and (ii) aprataxin makes more extensive nucleobase contacts with guanine than with adenine, via a hydrogen bonding network to the guanine O6, N1, N2 base edge. Alanine mutations of catalytic residues His147 and His149 abolish DNAppG de-capping activity, suggesting that the 3' de-guanylylation and 5' de-adenylylation reactions follow the same pathway of nucleotidyl transfer through a covalent aprataxin-(His147)–NMP intermediate. Alanine mutation of Asp63, which coordinates the guanosine ribose hydroxyls, impairs DNAppG de-capping.« less

  20. Direct Observation of a Cytosine Analogue that Forms Five Hydrogen Bonds to Guanosine: Guanyl G-Clamp

    SciTech Connect

    Wilds, C.J.; Maier, M.A.; Tereshko, V.; Manoharan, M.; Egli, M.

    2010-03-08

    A novel heterocyclic base modification, the guanidino G-clamp, is designed to allow two Hoogsteen-type hydrogen bonds to form between the amino and imino nitrogen atoms of a tethered guanidinium group to O6 and N7 of guanosine, which results in a total of five hydrogen bonds (broken lines, see picture). Details of a crystal structure at 1.0-{angstrom} resolution of a modified DNA decamer containing this guanidino G-clamp analogue demonstrate its mechanism of binding.

  1. Nitroxyl inhibits overt pain-like behavior in mice: role of cGMP/PKG/ATP-sensitive potassium channel signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Staurengo-Ferrari, Larissa; Zarpelon, Ana C.; Longhi-Balbinot, Daniela T.; Marchesi, Mario; Cunha, Thiago M.; Alves-Filho, José C.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Ferreira, Sergio H.; Casagrande, Rubia; Miranda, Katrina M.; Verri, Waldiceu A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Several lines of evidence have indicated that nitric oxide (NO) plays complex and diverse roles in modulation of pain/analgesia. However, the roles of charged and uncharged congeners of NO are less well understood. In the present study, the antinociceptive effect of the nitroxyl (HNO) donor, Angeli’s salt (Na2N2O3; AS) was investigated in models of overt pain-like behavior. Moreover, whether the antinociceptive effect of nitroxyl was dependent on the activation of cGMP (cyclic guanosine monophosphate)/PKG (protein kinase G)/ATP-sensitive potassium channels was addressed. Methods The antinociceptive effect of AS was evaluated on phenyl-p-benzoquinone (PBQ)- and acetic acid-induced writhings and via the formalin test. In addition, pharmacological treatments targeting guanylate cyclase (ODQ), PKG (KT5923) and ATP-sensitive potassium channel (glybenclamide) were used. Results PBQ and acetic acid induced significant writhing responses over 20 min. The nociceptive response in these models were significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner by subcutaneous pre-treatment with AS. Furthermore, AS also inhibited both phases of the formalin test. Subsequently, the inhibitory effect of AS in writhing and flinching responses were prevented by ODQ, KT5823 and glybenclamide, although these inhibitors alone did not alter the writhing score. Furthermore, pretreatment with L-cysteine, an HNO scavenger, confirmed that the antinociceptive effect of AS depends on HNO. Conclusion The present study demonstrates the efficacy of a nitroxyl donor and its analgesic mechanisms in overt pain-like behavior by activating the cGMP/PKG/ATP-sensitive potassium channel (K+) signaling pathway. PMID:24948073

  2. The involvement of NMDA receptor/NO/cGMP pathway in the antidepressant like effects of baclofen in mouse force swimming test.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Imran; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Zolfaghari, Samira; Ejtemaei Mehr, Shahram; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-01-26

    In the current study, the involvement of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and nitric oxide (NO)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) system in the antidepressant-like effects of baclofen was evaluated by using animal model in forced swimming test. Followed by an open field test for the evaluation of locomotor activity, the immobility time for mice in force swimming test was recorded. Only the last four min was analyzed. Administration of Baclofen (0.5 and 1mg/kg, i.p.) reduced the immobility interval in the FST. Prior administration of l-arginine (750mg/kg, i.p.,) a nitric oxide synthase substrate or sildenafil (5mg/kg, i.p.) a phosphodiesterase 5 into mice suppressed the antidepressant-like activity of baclofen (1mg/kg, i.p.).Co-treatment of 7-nitroindazole (50mg/kg, i.p.,) an inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase, L-NAME (10mg/kg, i.p.,) a non-specific inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase or MK-801 (0.05mg/kg, i.p.) an NMDA receptor antagonist with subeffective dose of baclofen (0.1mg/kg, i.p.), reduced the immobility time in the FST as compared to the drugs when used alone. Co-administrated of lower doses of MK-801 (0.01mg/kg) or l-NAME (1mg/kg) failed to effect immobility time however, simultaneous administration of these two agents in same dose with subeffective dose of baclofen (0.1mg/kg, i.p.), minimized the immobility time in the FST. Thus, our results support the role of NMDA receptors and l-arginine-NO-GMP pathway in the antidepressant-like action of baclofen. PMID:26679225

  3. The involvement of NMDA receptor/NO/cGMP pathway in the antidepressant like effects of baclofen in mouse force swimming test.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Imran; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Zolfaghari, Samira; Ejtemaei Mehr, Shahram; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-01-26

    In the current study, the involvement of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and nitric oxide (NO)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) system in the antidepressant-like effects of baclofen was evaluated by using animal model in forced swimming test. Followed by an open field test for the evaluation of locomotor activity, the immobility time for mice in force swimming test was recorded. Only the last four min was analyzed. Administration of Baclofen (0.5 and 1mg/kg, i.p.) reduced the immobility interval in the FST. Prior administration of l-arginine (750mg/kg, i.p.,) a nitric oxide synthase substrate or sildenafil (5mg/kg, i.p.) a phosphodiesterase 5 into mice suppressed the antidepressant-like activity of baclofen (1mg/kg, i.p.).Co-treatment of 7-nitroindazole (50mg/kg, i.p.,) an inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase, L-NAME (10mg/kg, i.p.,) a non-specific inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase or MK-801 (0.05mg/kg, i.p.) an NMDA receptor antagonist with subeffective dose of baclofen (0.1mg/kg, i.p.), reduced the immobility time in the FST as compared to the drugs when used alone. Co-administrated of lower doses of MK-801 (0.01mg/kg) or l-NAME (1mg/kg) failed to effect immobility time however, simultaneous administration of these two agents in same dose with subeffective dose of baclofen (0.1mg/kg, i.p.), minimized the immobility time in the FST. Thus, our results support the role of NMDA receptors and l-arginine-NO-GMP pathway in the antidepressant-like action of baclofen.

  4. Characterization of two 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide transformylase/inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase isozymes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tibbetts, A S; Appling, D R

    2000-07-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae ADE16 and ADE17 genes encode 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide transformylase isozymes that catalyze the penultimate step of the de novo purine biosynthesis pathway. Disruption of these two chromosomal genes results in adenine auxotrophy, whereas expression of either gene alone is sufficient to support growth without adenine. In this work, we show that an ade16 ade17 double disruption also leads to histidine auxotrophy, similar to the adenine/histidine auxotrophy of ade3 mutant yeast strains. We also report the purification and characterization of the ADE16 and ADE17 gene products (Ade16p and Ade17p). Like their counterparts in other organisms, the yeast isozymes are bifunctional, containing both 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide transformylase and inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase activities, and exist as homodimers based on cross-linking studies. Both isozymes are localized to the cytosol, as shown by subcellular fractionation experiments and immunofluorescent staining. Epitope-tagged constructs were used to study expression of the two isozymes. The expression of Ade17p is repressed by the addition of adenine to the media, whereas Ade16p expression is not affected by adenine. Ade16p was observed to be more abundant in cells grown on nonfermentable carbon sources than in glucose-grown cells, suggesting a role for this isozyme in respiration or sporulation.

  5. Potentiation of Muscarinic and α -adrenergic Responses by an Analogue of Guanosine 5'-triphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, M. G.; Marty, A.

    1986-06-01

    Ca2+-dependent K+ and Cl- currents were recorded in isolated and dialyzed rat lacrimal gland cells by use of the tight-seal whole-cell recording technique. Under control conditions, application of acetylcholine (0.5-1.0 μ M) resulted in the full activation of both types of current. When 50-200 μ M guanosine 5'-[γ -thio]triphosphate (GTP[S], a nonhydrolyzable GTP analogue) was added to the intracellular solution, activation of both currents was seen with 1 nM acetylcholine, a dose 1/100th that needed under control conditions. Dialysis with solutions containing 200 μ M GTP or cAMP had no, or only slight, potentiation effects. The effects of GTP[S] were obtained only when ATP was included in the intracellular solution. The potentiated responses to acetylcholine were blocked by increasing 10-fold the intracellular Ca2+-buffering capacity and were not dependent on external Ca2+. Thus, the potentiated responses appeared to result from a release of Ca2+ from internal stores. GTP[S] also greatly potentiated the Ca2+-dependent adrenergic (norepinephrine) response of this preparation. In addition, GTP[S] elicited in some cells transient responses without application of acetylcholine or norepinephrine. Finally, rapid and sustained responses were seen as soon as the cells were dialyzed with inositol trisphosphate (20 μ M). These findings are discussed in terms of a possible role of a GTP-binding protein as a link between activation of muscarinic or adrenergic receptors and initiation of Ca2+ release by inositol trisphosphate.

  6. Injection of guanosine and adenosine nucleotides into Limulus ventral photoreceptor cells

    PubMed Central

    Bolsover, S. R.; Brown, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    1. Several nucleotide and nucleotide analogues had striking effects when pressure-injected into Limulus ventral photoreceptor cells. The poorly hydrolysable GTP analogues guanosine 5′-0-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTPγS), guanylyl imidodiphosphate (Gpp[NH]p) and guanylyl (β, γ methylene) diphosphonate (Gpp[CH2]p) produced large increases in the frequency of `discrete events' that were recorded from photoreceptors in darkness. This effect was only observed after the injected cell was exposed to light. Injection of the ATP analogue ATPγS had effects similar to those of the GTP analogues. 2. We conclude that GTPγS, Gpp[NH]p, Gpp[CH2]p and ATPγS act at a common site to cause a light-dependent, long-term activation of the excitation mechanism of the photoreceptor. 3. Injection of GTP or GDP at pH 4.8 was followed by a smooth, transient depolarization that was observed neither when GTP at pH 7.5 was injected nor when ATP, 5′GMP or 2-[N-morpholino] ethane sulphonic acid (MES) were injected at pH 4.8. The reversal potential of the current induced by GTP injection was significantly more positive than the reversal potential of the light-induced current. 4. We conclude that GTP injection induces changes of membrane conductance either in addition to, or different from, the light-induced change of membrane conductance. 5. Injection of the ATP analogue adenylyl imidodiphosphate (App[NH]p), and the pyrophosphate analogue imidodiphosphate (p[NH]p) produced a drastic decrease in the sensitivity of photoreceptors to light. This decrease in sensitivity was partially reversed when the concentration of calcium ions in the bathing medium was reduced. 6. We suggest that App[NH]p and p[NH]p injections act by increasing the cytoplasmic concentration of calcium ions. PMID:7153930

  7. Effects of BMS-986094, a Guanosine Nucleotide Analogue, on Mitochondrial DNA Synthesis and Function.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Bethany R; Wang, Faye; Kwagh, Jae; Storck, Chris; Euler, Catherine; Fuller, Megan; Simic, Damir; Sharma, Suresh; Arnold, Jamie J; Cameron, Craig E; Van Vleet, Terry R; Flint, Oliver; Bunch, Roderick T; Davies, Marc H; Graziano, Michael J; Sanderson, Thomas P

    2016-10-01

    BMS-986094, the prodrug of a guanosine nucleotide analogue (2'-C-methylguanosine), was withdrawn from clinical trials due to serious safety issues. Nonclinical investigative studies were conducted as a follow up to evaluate the potential for BMS-986094-related mitochondrial-toxicity. In vitro, BMS-986094 was applied to human hepatoma cells (HepG2 and Huh-7) or cardiomyocytes (hiPSCM) up to 19 days to assess mitochondrial DNA content and specific gene expression. There were no mitochondrial DNA changes at concentrations ≤10 µM. Transcriptional effects, such as reductions in Huh-7 MT-ND1 and MT-ND5 mRNA content and hiPSCM MT-ND1, MT-COXII, and POLRMT protein expression levels, occurred only at cytotoxic concentrations (≥10 µM) suggesting these transcriptional effects were a consequence of the observed toxicity. Additionally, BMS-986094 has a selective weak affinity for inhibition of RNA polymerases as opposed to DNA polymerases. In vivo, BMS-986094 was given orally to cynomolgus monkeys for 3 weeks or 1 month at doses of 15 or 30 mg/kg/day. Samples of heart and kidney were collected for assessment of mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial DNA content, and levels of high energy substrates. Although pronounced cardiac and renal toxicities were observed in some monkeys at 30 mg/kg/day treated for 3-4 weeks, there were no changes in mitochondrial DNA content or ATP/GTP levels. Collectively, these data suggest that BMS-986094 is not a direct mitochondrial toxicant.

  8. Fluorescence decay studies of modified dinucleoside monophosphates containing 1-N6-ethenoadenosine.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Y; Motoda, Y; Fujisaki, Y; Steiner, R F

    1983-10-01

    Five dinucleoside monophosphates containing 1-N6-ethenoadenosine (epsilon A) have been studied using fluorescence measurements. The fluorescence spectra of these dinucleoside monophosphates are almost the same as the fluorescence spectrum of epsilon AMP. Fluorescence quantum yields of these dimers are greatly reduced compared to that of epsilon AMP. Intramolecular base-base interactions may be responsible for fluorescence quenching. It is found that the fluorescence decay kinetics does not obey a simple decay law but that the decay data can be well described as a sum of three exponentials. This implies that these dimers cannot be characterized as a two-state system, but can be described as systems consisting of three or more conformational states. Sequence effects upon the fluorescence behavior are observed. The fluorescence quenching and decay parameters of Gp epsilon A and Up epsilon A indicate a higher degree of base-base interaction than in their epsilon ApG and epsilon ApU counterparts.

  9. Substrate distortion contributes to the catalysis of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Fujihashi, Masahiro; Ishida, Toyokazu; Kuroda, Shingo; Kotra, Lakshmi P.; Pai, Emil F.; Miki, Kunio

    2014-01-01

    Orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase) accelerates the decarboxylation of orotidine 5'-monophosphate (OMP) to uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP) by 17 orders of magnitude. Eight new crystal structures with ligand analogues combined with computational analyses of the enzyme’s short-lived intermediates and the intrinsic electronic energies to distort the substrate and other ligands improve our understanding of the still controversially discussed reaction mechanism. In their respective complexes, 6-methyl-UMP displays significant distortion of its methyl substituent bond, 6-amino-UMP shows the competition between the K72 and C6 substituents for a position close to D70, and the methyl- and ethyl-ester of OMP both induce rotation of the carboxylate group substituent out of the plane of the pyrimidine ring. MD and QM/MM computations of the enzyme-substrate (ES) complex also show the bond between the carboxylate group and the pyrimidine ring to be distorted with the distortion contributing a 10–15% decrease of the ΔΔG‡ value. These results are consistent with ODCase using both substrate distortion as well as transition state stabilization, primarily exerted by K72, in its catalysis of the OMP decarboxylation reaction. PMID:24151964

  10. Dual effects of guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate on secretion by electroporated human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Smolen, J E; Stoehr, S J; Kuczynski, B; Koh, E K; Omann, G M

    1991-01-01

    It is generally believed that G-proteins play stimulatory roles on cell activation. In contrast, we found that guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[S]) was a potent inhibitor of Ca(2+)-induced secretion from specific granules (as monitored by vitamin B-12-binding protein). GTP[S] inhibition of specific-granule release occurred in the presence or absence of adenine nucleotides, required Mg2+ (1-3 mM), and was half-maximal at 30 microM-GTP[S]. The dual stimulatory and inhibitory effects of GTP[S] could be readily observed and differentiated when degranulation was monitored over a range of Ca2+ concentrations. Inhibition of specific-granule release by GTP[S] was observed at low Ca2+ concentrations and resulted from shifting the Ca2+ dose-response curves to the right. In contrast, GTP[S] promoted azurophil-granule secretion at relatively high concentrations of Ca2+ and appeared to be due to a general enhancement at all Ca2+ concentrations. A series of hydrolysable and non-hydrolysable nucleotides did not mimic GTP[S] or block its action. Inhibition by GTP[S] occurred in cells which were sensitized with a protein kinase C agonist, suggesting that inhibition of secretion took place distal to this enzyme. However, the inhibitory effects of GTP[S] on specific-granule secretion were reversed by cytochalasin D, which prevents new microfilament formation; this compound also enhanced the stimulation of azurophil-granule release by GTP[S]. We also found that GTP[S] greatly increased the F-actin content of permeabilized neutrophils, whereas Ca2+ (to a lesser extent) decreased F-actin. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that at least two G-proteins are involved in regulating secretion: one which has been previously described as stimulating Ca(2+)-induced secretion (particularly from azurophil granules) and a second, possibly involved in promoting microfilament assembly, which inhibits the discharge of specific granules. PMID:1953659

  11. Excited-state dynamics of guanosine in aqueous solution revealed by time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Buchner, Franziska; Heggen, Berit; Ritze, Hans-Hermann; Thiel, Walter; Lübcke, Andrea

    2015-12-21

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is performed on aqueous guanosine solution to study its excited-state relaxation dynamics. Experimental results are complemented by surface hopping dynamic simulations and evaluation of the excited-state ionization energy by Koopmans' theorem. Two alternative models for the relaxation dynamics are discussed. The experimentally observed excited-state lifetime is about 2.5 ps if the molecule is excited at 266 nm and about 1.1 ps if the molecule is excited at 238 nm. The experimental probe photon energy dependence of the photoelectron kinetic energy distribution suggests that the probe step is not vertical and involves a doubly-excited autoionizing state.

  12. Gas-Phase Conformations and Energetics of Protonated 2^'-DEOXYADENOSINE-5^'-MONOPHOSPHATE and ADENOSINE-5^'-MONOPHOSPHATE: Irmpd Action Spectroscopy and Theoretical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ranran; Nei, Y.-W.; He, Chenchen; Hamlow, Lucas; Berden, Giel; Oomens, J.; Rodgers, M. T.

    2015-06-01

    Nature uses protonation to alter the structures and reactivities of molecules to facilitate various biological functions and chemical transformations. For example, in nucleobase repair and salvage processes, protonation facilitates nucleobase removal by lowering the activation barrier for glycosidic bond cleavage. Systematic studies of the structures of protonated 2'-deoxyribonucleotides and ribonucleotides may provide insight into the roles protonation plays in altering the nucleobase orientation relative to the glycosidic bond and sugar puckering. In this study, infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy experiments in conjunction with electronic structure calculations are performed to probe the effects of protonation on the structures and stabilities of 2^'-deoxyadenosine-5^'-monophosphate (pdAdo) and adenosine-5^'-monophosphate (pAdo). Photodissociation as a function of IR wavelength is measured to generate the IRMPD action spectra. Geometry optimizations and frequency analyses performed at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory are used to characterize the stable low-energy structures and to generate their linear IR spectra. Single point energy calculations performed at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p) and MP2(full)/6-311+G(2d,2p) levels of theory provide relative stabilities of the optimized conformations. The structures accessed in the experiments are determined by comparing the calculated linear IR spectra for the stable low-energy conformers computed to the measured IRMPD action spectra. The effects of the 2^'-hydroxyl moiety are elucidated by comparing the structures and IRMPD spectra of [pAdo+H]+ to those of its DNA analogue. Comparisons are also made to the deprotonated forms of these nucleotides and the protonated forms of the analogous nucleosides to elucidate the effects of protonation and the phosphate group on the structures.

  13. Kinetic analysis of the activation of transducin by photoexcited rhodopsin. Influence of the lateral diffusion of transducin and competition of guanosine diphosphate and guanosine triphosphate for the nucleotide site.

    PubMed Central

    Bruckert, F; Chabre, M; Vuong, T M

    1992-01-01

    The activation of transducin (T) by photoexcited rhodopsin (R*) is kinetically dissected within the framework of Michaelis-Menten enzymology, taking transducin as substrate of the enzyme R*. The light scattering "release" signal (Vuong, T.M., M. Chabre, and L. Stryer, 1984, Nature (Lond.). 311:659-661) was used to monitor the kinetics of transducin activation at 20 degrees C. In addition, the influence of nonuniform distributions of R* on these activation kinetics is also explored. Sinusoidal patterns of R* were created with interference fringes from two crossed laser beams. Two characteristic times were extracted from the Michaelis-Menten analysis: t(form), the diffusion-related time needed to form the enzyme-substrate R*-transducin is 0.25 +/- 0.1 ms, and T(cat), the time taken by R* to perform the chemistry of catalysis on transducin is 1.2 +/- 0.2 ms, in the absence of added guanosine diphosphate (GDP) and at saturating levels of guanosine triphosphate (GTP). With t(form) being but 20% of the total activation time t(form) + t(cat), transducin activation by R* is not limited by lateral diffusion. This is further borne out by the observation that uniform and sinusoidal patterns of R* elicited release signals of indistinguishable kinetics. When (GDP) = (GTP) = 500 microM, t(cat) is lengthened twofold. As the in vivo GDP and GTP levels are comparable, the exchange of nucleotides may well be the rate-limiting process. PMID:1420903

  14. DNA 3' pp 5' G de-capping activity of aprataxin: effect of cap nucleoside analogs and structural basis for guanosine recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Chauleau, Mathieu; Jacewicz, Agata; Shuman, Stewart

    2015-05-24

    DNA3' pp 5'G caps synthesized by the 3'-PO4/5'-OH ligase RtcB have a strong impact on enzymatic reactions at DNA 3'-OH ends. Aprataxin, an enzyme that repairs A5'pp5'DNA ends formed during abortive ligation by classic 3'-OH/5'-PO4 ligases, is also a DNA 3' de-capping enzyme, converting DNAppG to DNA3'p and GMP. By taking advantage of RtcB's ability to utilize certain GTP analogs to synthesize DNAppN caps, we show that aprataxin hydrolyzes inosine and 6-O-methylguanosine caps, but is not adept at removing a deoxyguanosine cap. We report a 1.5 Å crystal structure of aprataxin in a complex with GMP, which reveals that: (i) GMP binds at the same position and in the same anti nucleoside conformation as AMP; and (ii) aprataxin makes more extensive nucleobase contacts with guanine than with adenine, via a hydrogen bonding network to the guanine O6, N1, N2 base edge. Alanine mutations of catalytic residues His147 and His149 abolish DNAppG de-capping activity, suggesting that the 3' de-guanylylation and 5' de-adenylylation reactions follow the same pathway of nucleotidyl transfer through a covalent aprataxin-(His147)–NMP intermediate. Alanine mutation of Asp63, which coordinates the guanosine ribose hydroxyls, impairs DNAppG de-capping.

  15. DNA3′pp5′G de-capping activity of aprataxin: effect of cap nucleoside analogs and structural basis for guanosine recognition

    PubMed Central

    Chauleau, Mathieu; Jacewicz, Agata; Shuman, Stewart

    2015-01-01

    DNA3′pp5′G caps synthesized by the 3′-PO4/5′-OH ligase RtcB have a strong impact on enzymatic reactions at DNA 3′-OH ends. Aprataxin, an enzyme that repairs A5′pp5′DNA ends formed during abortive ligation by classic 3′-OH/5′-PO4 ligases, is also a DNA 3′ de-capping enzyme, converting DNAppG to DNA3′p and GMP. By taking advantage of RtcB's ability to utilize certain GTP analogs to synthesize DNAppN caps, we show that aprataxin hydrolyzes inosine and 6-O-methylguanosine caps, but is not adept at removing a deoxyguanosine cap. We report a 1.5 Å crystal structure of aprataxin in a complex with GMP, which reveals that: (i) GMP binds at the same position and in the same anti nucleoside conformation as AMP; and (ii) aprataxin makes more extensive nucleobase contacts with guanine than with adenine, via a hydrogen bonding network to the guanine O6, N1, N2 base edge. Alanine mutations of catalytic residues His147 and His149 abolish DNAppG de-capping activity, suggesting that the 3′ de-guanylylation and 5′ de-adenylylation reactions follow the same pathway of nucleotidyl transfer through a covalent aprataxin-(His147)–NMP intermediate. Alanine mutation of Asp63, which coordinates the guanosine ribose hydroxyls, impairs DNAppG de-capping. PMID:26007660

  16. Hydrogen Sulfide Regulates Ca2+ Homeostasis Mediated by Concomitantly Produced Nitric Oxide via a Novel Synergistic Pathway in Exocrine Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Amira

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aim: The present study was designed to explore the effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on Ca2+ homeostasis in rat pancreatic acini. Results: Sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS; an H2S donor) induced a biphasic increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in a dose-dependent manner. The NaHS-induced [Ca2+]i elevation persisted with an EC50 of 73.3 μM in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ but was abolished by thapsigargin, indicating that both Ca2+ entry and Ca2+ release contributed to the increase. The [Ca2+]i increase was markedly inhibited in the presence of NG-monomethyl L-arginine or 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO), and diaminofluorescein-2/diaminofluorescein-2 triazole (DAF-2/DAF-2T) fluorometry demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) was also produced by H2S in a dose-dependent manner with an EC50 of 64.8 μM, indicating that NO was involved in the H2S effect. The H2S-induced [Ca2+]i increase was inhibited by pretreatment with U73122, xestospongin C, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, KT5823, and GP2A, indicating that phospholipase C (PLC), the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor, soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), protein kinase G (PKG), and Gq-protein play roles as intermediate components in the H2S-triggered intracellular signaling. Innovation: To our knowledge, our study is the first one highlighting the effect of H2S on intracellular Ca2+ dynamics in pancreatic acinar cells. Moreover, a novel cascade was presumed to function via the synergistic interaction between H2S and NO. Conclusion: We conclude that H2S affects [Ca2+]i homeostasis that is mediated by H2S-evoked NO production via an endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-NO-sGC-cyclic guanosine monophosphate-PKG-Gq-protein-PLC-IP3 pathway to induce Ca2+ release, and this pathway is identical to the one we recently proposed for a sole effect of NO and the two gaseous molecules synergistically function to regulate Ca2+ homeostasis

  17. Fluorescent Dansyl-Guanosine Conjugates that Bind c-MYC Promoter G-Quadruplex and Downregulate c-MYC Expression.

    PubMed

    Pavan Kumar, Y; Saha, Puja; Saha, Dhurjhoti; Bessi, Irene; Schwalbe, Harald; Chowdhury, Shantanu; Dash, Jyotirmayee

    2016-03-01

    The four-stranded G-quadruplex present in the c-MYC P1 promoter has been shown to play a pivotal role in the regulation of c-MYC transcription. Small-molecule compounds capable of inhibiting the c-MYC promoter activity by stabilising the c-MYC G-quadruplex could potentially be used as anticancer agents. In this context, here we report the synthesis of dansyl-guanosine conjugates through one-pot modular click reactions. The dansyl-guanosine conjugates can selectively detect c-MYC G-quadruplex over other biologically relevant quadruplexes and duplex DNA and can be useful as staining reagents for selective visualisation of c-MYC G-quadruplex over duplex DNA by gel electrophoresis. NMR spectroscopic titrations revealed the preferential binding sites of these dansyl ligands to the c-MYC G-quadruplex. A dual luciferase assay and qRT-PCR revealed that a dansyl-bisguanosine ligand represses the c-MYC expression, possibly by stabilising the c-MYC G-quadruplex.

  18. Hydrolysis of Guanosine Triphosphate (GTP) by the Ras·GAP Protein Complex: Reaction Mechanism and Kinetic Scheme.

    PubMed

    Khrenova, Maria G; Grigorenko, Bella L; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B; Nemukhin, Alexander V

    2015-10-01

    Molecular mechanisms of the hydrolysis of guanosine triphosphate (GTP) to guanosine diphosphate (GDP) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) by the Ras·GAP protein complex are fully investigated by using modern modeling tools. The previously hypothesized stages of the cleavage of the phosphorus-oxygen bond in GTP and the formation of the imide form of catalytic Gln61 from Ras upon creation of Pi are confirmed by using the higher-level quantum-based calculations. The steps of the enzyme regeneration are modeled for the first time, providing a comprehensive description of the catalytic cycle. It is found that for the reaction Ras·GAP·GTP·H2O → Ras·GAP·GDP·Pi, the highest barriers correspond to the process of regeneration of the active site but not to the process of substrate cleavage. The specific shape of the energy profile is responsible for an interesting kinetic mechanism of the GTP hydrolysis. The analysis of the process using the first-passage approach and consideration of kinetic equations suggest that the overall reaction rate is a result of the balance between relatively fast transitions and low probability of states from which these transitions are taking place. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with available experimental observations on GTP hydrolysis rates.

  19. An industrial process for selective synthesis of 7-methyl guanosine 5'-diphosphate: versatile synthon for synthesis of mRNA cap analogues.

    PubMed

    Kore, Anilkumar R; Parmar, Gaurang

    2006-03-01

    We report an industrial scale facile synthesis of 7-methyl guanosine 5'-diphosphate, which plays an important role in synthesis of various mRNA cap analogs. An efficient and selective methylation at position 7 of guanosine 5'-diphosphate was achieved by dissolving guanosine 5'-diphosphate in water and drops wise addition of dimethyl sulfate over a period of 1 h at room temperature. The reaction was completed within 2 h and resulted in more than a 96% yield. The desired product, 7-methyl GDP was purified by using BPG column on AKTA Purifier 100. Certainly, this method has advantages over the known methylation method, in terms of yield, economy, safety, and environmental concerns. PMID:16629126

  20. Trehalose Phosphate Synthesis in Streptomyces hygroscopicus: Purification of Guanosine Diphosphate d-Glucose: d-Glucose-6-Phosphate 1-Glucosyl-Transferase

    PubMed Central

    Elbein, Alan D.

    1968-01-01

    Guanosine diphosphate d-glucose:d-glucose-6-phosphate 1-glucosyl-transferase was purified approximately 100-fold from extracts of Streptomyces hygroscopicus. The purified enzyme catalyzed the transfer of glucose from guanosine diphosphate-d-glucose to glucose-6-phosphate to form trehalose phosphate and guanosine diphosphate. The enzyme was specific for these two substrates and was stimulated by the addition of magnesium ions. The product was characterized as α-α-trehalose-6-phosphate by its physical and chemical properties. The enzyme was present in a large number of Streptomyces species, suggesting that this group of organisms synthesized trehalose phosphate in a unique manner. This enzyme was not detected in fungi, since these organisms utilized uridine diphosphate-d-glucose as the glucosyl donor. PMID:5726304

  1. Histone deacetylases 6 increases the cyclic adenosine monophosphate level and promotes renal cyst growth.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming; Mei, Changlin

    2016-07-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by abnormal enhanced cell proliferation and fluid secretion, which are triggered by increased levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Cebotaru et al. showed that a HDAC6 inhibitor reduced the cAMP level and inhibited cyst formation in Pkd1 knockout mice, which may become a new potential therapeutic agent for ADPKD. This study also raised several intriguing questions that might advance our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of ADPKD. PMID:27312442

  2. Rate and Equilibrium Constants for an Enzyme Conformational Change during Catalysis by Orotidine 5'-Monophosphate Decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Goryanova, Bogdana; Goldman, Lawrence M; Ming, Shonoi; Amyes, Tina L; Gerlt, John A; Richard, John P

    2015-07-28

    The caged complex between orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (ScOMPDC) and 5-fluoroorotidine 5'-monophosphate (FOMP) undergoes decarboxylation ∼300 times faster than the caged complex between ScOMPDC and the physiological substrate, orotidine 5'-monophosphate (OMP). Consequently, the enzyme conformational changes required to lock FOMP at a protein cage and release product 5-fluorouridine 5'-monophosphate (FUMP) are kinetically significant steps. The caged form of ScOMPDC is stabilized by interactions between the side chains from Gln215, Tyr217, and Arg235 and the substrate phosphodianion. The control of these interactions over the barrier to the binding of FOMP and the release of FUMP was probed by determining the effect of all combinations of single, double, and triple Q215A, Y217F, and R235A mutations on kcat/Km and kcat for turnover of FOMP by wild-type ScOMPDC; its values are limited by the rates of substrate binding and product release, respectively. The Q215A and Y217F mutations each result in an increase in kcat and a decrease in kcat/Km, due to a weakening of the protein-phosphodianion interactions that favor fast product release and slow substrate binding. The Q215A/R235A mutation causes a large decrease in the kinetic parameters for ScOMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylation of OMP, which are limited by the rate of the decarboxylation step, but much smaller decreases in the kinetic parameters for ScOMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylation of FOMP, which are limited by the rate of enzyme conformational changes. By contrast, the Y217A mutation results in large decreases in kcat/Km for ScOMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylation of both OMP and FOMP, because of the comparable effects of this mutation on rate-determining decarboxylation of enzyme-bound OMP and on the rate-determining enzyme conformational change for decarboxylation of FOMP. We propose that kcat = 8.2 s(-1) for decarboxylation of FOMP by the Y217A mutant is equal to the rate constant for cage formation from the

  3. Investigations of structural, dielectric and optical properties on silicon ion irradiated glycine monophosphate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanagasekaran, T.; Mythili, P.; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Kanjilal, D.; Gopalakrishnan, R.

    2009-08-01

    The 50 MeV silicon ion irradiation induced modifications on structural, optical and dielectric properties of solution grown glycine monophosphate (GMP) crystals were studied. The high-resolution X-ray diffraction study shows the unaltered value of integrated intensity on irradiation. The dielectric constant as a function of frequency and temperature was studied. UV-visible studies reveal the decrease in bandgap values on irradiation and presence of F-centers. The fluorescence spectrum shows the existence of some energy levels, which remains unaffected after irradiation. The scanning electron micrographs reveal the defects formed on irradiation.

  4. Viral keratitis-inhibitory effect of 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosylhypoxanthine 5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Sidwell, R W; Allen, L B; Huffman, J H; Revankar, G R; Robins, R K; Tolman, R L

    1975-10-01

    Topical application of 9-beta-d-arabinofuranosylhypoxanthine 5'-monophosphate (ara-HxMP) significantly inhibited the development of keratitis induced by types 1 and 2 herpes simplex virus and vaccinia virus in the eyes of rabbits. Parameters for evaluation of efficacy were infectivity (corneal opacity, lesion size, and type), Draize (erythema, conjunctival swelling, and discharge), and reduction in titer of recoverable virus from the eye. When the relative efficacy of the related compounds 9-beta-d-arabinofuranosyladenine (ara-A), ara-A 5'-monophosphate (ara-AMP), and ara-Hx was determined against type 1 herpes simplex virus in a parallel experiment, the more water-soluble compounds (ara-HxMP, ara-AMP) were the most effective. The relative efficacy of ara-A was also determined against type 2 herpes and vaccinia virus-induced keratitis. Mortality in rabbits due to central nervous system involvement caused by types 1 and 2 herpes simplex virus was inhibited. Ara-HxMP was not discernibly toxic to the eye at concentrations of at least 20%; efficacy was still discernible with a 0.1% solution.

  5. THE EFFECT OF CHLORINATION OF NUCLEOTIDE BASES ON THE CONFORMATIONAL PROPERTIES OF THYMIDINE MONOPHOSPHATE.

    PubMed

    Mukhina, T M; Nikolaienko, T Yu

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies on Escherichia coli bacteria cultivation, in which DNA thymine was replaced with 5-chlorouracil have refreshed the problem of understanding the changes to physical properties of DNA monomers resultant from chemical modifications. These studies have shown that the replacement did not affect the normal activities and division of the bacteria, but has significantly reduced its life span. In this paper a comparative analysis was carried out by the methods of computational experiment of a set of 687 possible conformers of natural monomeric DNA unit (2'-deoxyribonucleotide thymidine monophosphate) and 660 conformers of 5-chloro-2'-deoxyuridine monophosphate - a similar molecules in which the natural nitrogenous base thymine is substituted with 5-chlorouracil. Structures of stable conformers of the modified deoxyribonucleotide have been obtained and physical factors, which determine their variation from the conformers of the unmodified molecule have been analyzed. A comparative analysis of the elastic properties of conformers of investigated molecules and non-covalent interactions present in them was conducted. The results can be usedfor planning experiments on synthesis of artficial DNA suitable for incorporation into living organisms. PMID:26255348

  6. Structural Basis for the Specificity of Human NUDT16 and Its Regulation by Inosine Monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Trésaugues, Lionel; Lundbäck, Thomas; Welin, Martin; Flodin, Susanne; Nyman, Tomas; Silvander, Camilla; Gräslund, Susanne; Nordlund, Pär

    2015-01-01

    Human NUDT16 is a member of the NUDIX hydrolase superfamily. After having been initially described as an mRNA decapping enzyme, recent studies conferred it a role as an “housecleaning” enzyme specialized in the removal of hazardous (deoxy)inosine diphosphate from the nucleotide pool. Here we present the crystal structure of human NUDT16 both in its apo-form and in complex with its product inosine monophosphate (IMP). NUDT16 appears as a dimer whose formation generates a positively charged trench to accommodate substrate-binding. Complementation of the structural data with detailed enzymatic and biophysical studies revealed the determinants of substrate recognition and particularly the importance of the substituents in position 2 and 6 on the purine ring. The affinity for the IMP product, harboring a carbonyl in position 6 on the base, compared to purine monophosphates lacking a H-bond acceptor in this position, implies a catalytic cycle whose rate is primarily regulated by the product-release step. Finally, we have also characterized a phenomenon of inhibition by the product of the reaction, IMP, which might exclude non-deleterious nucleotides from NUDT16-mediated hydrolysis regardless of their cellular concentration. Taken together, this study details structural and regulatory mechanisms explaining how substrates are selected for hydrolysis by human NUDT16. PMID:26121039

  7. Structural Studies of Thiamin Monophosphate Kinase in Complex with Substrates and Products.

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, K.M.; Kinsland, C.; Begley, T.P.; Ealick, S E.

    2008-06-03

    Thiamin monophosphate kinase (ThiL) catalyzes the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of thiamin monophosphate (TMP) to form thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP), the active form of vitamin B1. ThiL is a member of a small ATP binding superfamily that also includes the purine biosynthetic enzymes, PurM and PurL, NiFe hydrogenase maturation protein, HypE, and selenophosphate synthase, SelD. The latter four enzymes are believed to utilize phosphorylated intermediates during catalysis. To understand the mechanism of ThiL and its relationship to the other superfamily members, we determined the structure of Aquifex aeolicus ThiL (AaThiL) with nonhydrolyzable AMP-PCP and TMP, and also with the products of the reaction, ADP and TPP. The results suggest that AaThiL utilizes a direct, inline transfer of the {gamma}-phosphate of ATP to TMP rather than a phosphorylated enzyme intermediate. The structure of ThiL is compared to those of PurM, PurL, and HypE, and the ATP binding site is compared to that of PurL, for which nucleotide complexes are available.

  8. The interaction of propidium diiodide with self-complementary dinucleoside monophosphates.

    PubMed

    Davidson, M W; Griggs, B G; Lopp, I G; Wilson, W D

    1977-12-14

    The interactions of a quinacrine derivative, methylated at both the aromatic and aliphatic nitrogens, and propidium diiodide with the dinucleoside monophosphates CpG, GpC, UpA and ApU have been investigated using 13C-NMR (for the quinacrine derivative prepared with [13C]methyl substituents and 1H-NMR and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The quinacrine derivative displayed negligible interaction with the dinucleosides at concentrations up to 5 - 10(-4) M. Propidium did form complexes with dinucleosides even at concentrations as low as 10(-4) M. Propidium displayed a pyrimidine-purine binding preference and gave especially large changes in ultraviolet-visible and 1H-NMR spectra in the presence of CpG. This suggests that propidium forms an intercalated complex with a Watson-Crick hydrogen-bonded CpG dimer. At higher concentrations UpA and GpC gave similar spectral changes indicating that they could also form significant amounts of an intercalated complex with propidium under appropriate conditions. The changes caused by ApU were small under all conditions and were more similar to the effects caused by mononucleotides. These results indicate that, at least for phenanthridines, cationic side chains do not greatly inhibit complex formation with dinucleoside monophosphates, and suggest that the weak interaction of the quinacrine derivative with dinucleosides is due to weaker interactions of the acridine ring system with nucleoside bases relative to the phenanthridine ring system.

  9. [Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Gámez, Miguel E; Sandoval-Zárate, Julio; Pulido, Tomás

    2015-01-01

    In experimental and clinical cardiology, phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors have brought scientific interest as a therapeutic tool in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) management in recent years. Phosphodiesterases are a superfamily of enzymes that inactivate cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate, the second messengers of prostacyclin and nitric oxide. The rationale for the use of PDE-5 inhibitors in PAH is based on their capacity to overexpresss the nitric oxide pathway pursued inhibition of cyclic guanosine monophosphate hydrolysis. By increasing cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels it promotes vasodilation, antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects that may reverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. There is also evidence that these drugs may directly enhance right ventricular contractility through an increase in cyclic adenosine monophosphate mediated by the inhibition of the cyclic guanosine monophosphate -sensitive PDE-3. Sildenafil, tadalafil and vardenafil are 3 specific PDE-5 inhibitors in current clinical use, which share similar mechanisms of action but present some significant differences regarding potency, selectivity for PDE-5 and pharmacokinetic properties. Sildenafil received approval in 2005 by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency and tadalafil in 2009 by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of PAH in patients classified as NYHA/WHO functional class II and III. In Mexico, sildenafil and tadalafil were approved by Comisión Federal de Protección contra Riesgos Sanitarios for this indication in 2010 and 2011, respectively. PMID:26047999

  10. [Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Gámez, Miguel E; Sandoval-Zárate, Julio; Pulido, Tomás

    2015-01-01

    In experimental and clinical cardiology, phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors have brought scientific interest as a therapeutic tool in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) management in recent years. Phosphodiesterases are a superfamily of enzymes that inactivate cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate, the second messengers of prostacyclin and nitric oxide. The rationale for the use of PDE-5 inhibitors in PAH is based on their capacity to overexpresss the nitric oxide pathway pursued inhibition of cyclic guanosine monophosphate hydrolysis. By increasing cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels it promotes vasodilation, antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects that may reverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. There is also evidence that these drugs may directly enhance right ventricular contractility through an increase in cyclic adenosine monophosphate mediated by the inhibition of the cyclic guanosine monophosphate -sensitive PDE-3. Sildenafil, tadalafil and vardenafil are 3 specific PDE-5 inhibitors in current clinical use, which share similar mechanisms of action but present some significant differences regarding potency, selectivity for PDE-5 and pharmacokinetic properties. Sildenafil received approval in 2005 by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency and tadalafil in 2009 by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of PAH in patients classified as NYHA/WHO functional class II and III. In Mexico, sildenafil and tadalafil were approved by Comisión Federal de Protección contra Riesgos Sanitarios for this indication in 2010 and 2011, respectively.

  11. Adjuvant properties of Cytosine-phosphate-guanosine oligodeoxynucleotide in combination with various polycations in an ovalbumin-vaccine model.

    PubMed

    Maubant, Sylvie; Banissi, Claire; Beck, Samantha; Chauvat, Anne; Carpentier, Antoine F

    2011-08-01

    Oligonucleotides containing CpG motifs (cytosine-phosphate-guanosine oligodeoxynucleotide [CpG ODN]) display strong immunostimulatory effects, and polycations have been previously reported as cellular delivery system. In the present study, we investigated the adjuvant properties of combinations of a CpG ODN with various polycations (poly-arginine, poly-lysine, poly-histidine, or chitosan) in an ovalbumin vaccination model. We showed that, when combined to CpG ODN, poly-arginine and poly-histidine, but not poly-lysine or chitosan, enhanced efficiently both the IgG antibody production and the number of splenocytes secreting interferon-gamma after stimulation with a CD8+ T cell-restricted peptide. Interestingly, CpG ODN-poly-arginine, which was the most efficient, compared favorably to the complete Freund's adjuvant and aluminium salts and induced no local toxicity, making this combination a very attractive adjuvant for vaccines. PMID:21787231

  12. Lipid peroxides as endogenous oxidants forming 8-oxo-guanosine and lipid-soluble antioxidants as suppressing agents

    PubMed Central

    Kanazawa, Kazuki; Sakamoto, Miku; Kanazawa, Ko; Ishigaki, Yoriko; Aihara, Yoshiko; Hashimoto, Takashi; Mizuno, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    The oxidation of guanosine to 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) in DNA is closely associated with induction of various diseases, but the endogenous oxidant species involved remains unclear. Hydrogen peroxides (H2O2) have been considered to be the oxidant, while lipid peroxides are another possible oxidant because generated easily in bio-membranes surrounding DNA. The oxidant potency was compared between lipid peroxides and H2O2. Linoleic acid hydroperoxides (LOOH) formed 8-oxo-dG at a higher level than H2O2 in guanosine or double-stranded DNA. In the presence of a physiological concentration of Fe2+ to produce hydroxyl radicals, LOOH was also a stronger oxidant. In a lipid micelle, LOOH markedly produced 8-oxo-dG at a concentration one-tenth of that of H2O2. Upon adding to rat hepatic mitochondria, phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxides produced 8-oxo-dG abundantly. Employing HepG2 cells after pretreated with glutathione peroxidase inhibitor, LOOH formed 8-oxo-dG more abundantly than H2O2. Then, antioxidants to suppress the 8-oxo-dG formation were examined, when the nuclei of pre-incubated HepG2 with antioxidants were exposed to LOOH. Water-soluble ascorbic acid, trolox, and N-acetyl cysteine showed no or weak antioxidant potency, while lipid-soluble 2,6-dipalmitoyl ascorbic acid, α-tocopherol, and lipid-soluble phytochemicals exhibited stronger potency. The present study shows preferential formation of 8-oxo-dG upon LOOH and the inhibition by lipid-soluble antioxidants. PMID:27499574

  13. Oxidatively damaged guanosine in white blood cells and in urine of welders: associations with exposure to welding fumes and body iron stores.

    PubMed

    Pesch, Beate; Lotz, Anne; Koch, Holger M; Marczynski, Boleslaw; Casjens, Swaantje; Käfferlein, Heiko U; Welge, Peter; Lehnert, Martin; Heinze, Evelyn; Van Gelder, Rainer; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Behrens, Thomas; Raulf, Monika; Hartwig, Andrea; Weiss, Tobias; Brüning, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer considers the carcinogenicity of welding fume of priority for re-evaluation. Genotoxic effects in experimental animals are still inconclusive. Here, we investigated the association of personal exposure to metals in respirable welding fumes during a working shift with oxidatively damaged guanosine in DNA of white blood cells (WBC) and in postshift urine samples from 238 welders. Medians of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) were 2.35/10(6) dGuo in DNA of WBC and 4.33 µg/g creatinine in urine. The median of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoGuo) was 7.03 µg/g creatinine in urine. The extent of both urinary parameters was higher in welders applying techniques with high particle emission rates to stainless steel than in tungsten inert gas welders (8-oxodGuo: 9.96 vs. 4.49 µg/L, 8-oxoGuo: 15.7 vs. 7.7 µg/L), but this apparent difference diminished after creatinine adjustment. We applied random intercept models to estimate the influence of airborne and systemic exposure to metals on oxidatively damaged guanosine in WBC and urine together with covariates. We observed a highly significant nonlinear association of urinary 8-oxoGuo with serum ferritin (P < 0.0001) and higher 8-oxoGuo concentrations for respirable iron >1,000 µg/m(3) compared to ≤57 µg/m(3). Similar effects were found for manganese. Airborne chromium but not nickel was associated with all oxidatively modified guanosine measures, whereas urinary chromium as well as nickel showed associations with urinary modified guanosines. In summary, oxidatively damaged urinary guanosine was associated with airborne and systemic exposure to metals in welders and showed a strong relation to body iron stores.

  14. Oxidatively damaged guanosine in white blood cells and in urine of welders: associations with exposure to welding fumes and body iron stores.

    PubMed

    Pesch, Beate; Lotz, Anne; Koch, Holger M; Marczynski, Boleslaw; Casjens, Swaantje; Käfferlein, Heiko U; Welge, Peter; Lehnert, Martin; Heinze, Evelyn; Van Gelder, Rainer; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Behrens, Thomas; Raulf, Monika; Hartwig, Andrea; Weiss, Tobias; Brüning, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer considers the carcinogenicity of welding fume of priority for re-evaluation. Genotoxic effects in experimental animals are still inconclusive. Here, we investigated the association of personal exposure to metals in respirable welding fumes during a working shift with oxidatively damaged guanosine in DNA of white blood cells (WBC) and in postshift urine samples from 238 welders. Medians of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) were 2.35/10(6) dGuo in DNA of WBC and 4.33 µg/g creatinine in urine. The median of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoGuo) was 7.03 µg/g creatinine in urine. The extent of both urinary parameters was higher in welders applying techniques with high particle emission rates to stainless steel than in tungsten inert gas welders (8-oxodGuo: 9.96 vs. 4.49 µg/L, 8-oxoGuo: 15.7 vs. 7.7 µg/L), but this apparent difference diminished after creatinine adjustment. We applied random intercept models to estimate the influence of airborne and systemic exposure to metals on oxidatively damaged guanosine in WBC and urine together with covariates. We observed a highly significant nonlinear association of urinary 8-oxoGuo with serum ferritin (P < 0.0001) and higher 8-oxoGuo concentrations for respirable iron >1,000 µg/m(3) compared to ≤57 µg/m(3). Similar effects were found for manganese. Airborne chromium but not nickel was associated with all oxidatively modified guanosine measures, whereas urinary chromium as well as nickel showed associations with urinary modified guanosines. In summary, oxidatively damaged urinary guanosine was associated with airborne and systemic exposure to metals in welders and showed a strong relation to body iron stores. PMID:25107450

  15. L-Arginine/nitric oxide pathway in chronic tension-type headache: relation with serotonin content and secretion and glutamate content.

    PubMed

    Sarchielli, Paola; Alberti, Andrea; Floridi, Ardesio; Gallai, Virgilio

    2002-06-15

    Previous research of our group demonstrated an increase in L-arginine/nitric oxide (NO) pathway activity in patients with chronic daily headache (CDH) with a previous history of migraine, which was associated with a reduced platelet serotonin content and increased Ca(2+) levels. In the present work, we assessed the variations in L-arginine/NO pathway activity and platelet cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) levels in 25 patients affected by chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) (8 M, 17 F; age range: 34-54 years). The NO production, shown spectrophotometrically by stoichiometric transformation of oxyhemoglobin to methemoglobin due to NO synthase (NOS) activity, and inter platelet cGMP concentration, assessed with a RIA method, were determined in parallel to variations of aggregation response to 0.3 microg/ml collagen. The intracellular platelet calcium concentrations were also determined using fluorescence polarisation spectrometry. Platelet serotonin content and collagen-induced secretion as well as glutamate content were also determined with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The above parameters were compared with those of an age-matched control group. A reduction in aggregation platelet response was found. The reduction in platelet aggregation was coupled with an increased NO and cGMP production (p<0.0002 and p<0.001, respectively). A significant increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration was also detected compared to control individuals (p<0.001). This was accompanied by a reduced platelet content and collagen-induced secretion of serotonin and increased content of glutamate (p<0.0001, p<0.0001 and p<0.001, respectively). The above findings were more evident in patients with analgesic abuse. It can be hypothesized that the increased NOS activity shown in platelets of CTTH patients reflects an analogous central up-regulation of NOS activity in the spinal horn/trigeminal nucleus and supraspinal structures involved in the modulation of

  16. TAOK3 Phosphorylates the Methylenecyclopropane Nucleoside MBX 2168 to its Monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Komazin-Meredith, Gloria; Cardinale, Steven C.; Comeau, Katelyn; Magalhaes, Kevin J.; Hartline, Caroll B.; Williams, John D.; Opperman, Timothy J.; Prichard, Mark N.; Bowlin, Terry L.

    2015-01-01

    Monohydroxymethyl methylenecyclopropane nucleosides (MCPNs) with ether or thioether substituents at the 6-position show promise as broad-spectrum herpes virus inhibitors. Their proposed mechanism of action involves sequential phosphorylation to a triphosphate, which can then inhibit viral DNA polymerase. The inhibition of herpes simplex virus (HSV) by these compounds is not dependent on the viral thymidine kinase (TK), which is known to phosphorylate acyclovir (ACV), a standard treatment for HSV infections. Previous studies on the mechanism of action of these compounds against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) implicated a host kinase in addition to HCMV UL97 kinase in performing the initial phosphorylation. After first eliminating other candidate HSV-1 encoded kinases (UL13 and US3) as well as potential host nucleoside kinases, using activity-based fractionation, we have now identified the host serine-threonine protein kinase TAOK3 as the kinase responsible for transforming the representative monohydroxymethyl MCPN analog MBX 2168 to its monophosphate. PMID:25857706

  17. Structural determinants for the inhibitory ligands of orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Meza-Avina, Maria Elena; Wei, Lianhu; Liu, Yan; Poduch, Ewa; Bello, Angelica M.; Mishra, Ram K.; Pai, Emil F.; Kotra, Lakshmi P.

    2010-06-14

    In recent years, orotidine-5{prime}-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase) has gained renewed attention as a drug target. As a part of continuing efforts to design novel inhibitors of ODCase, we undertook a comprehensive study of potent, structurally diverse ligands of ODCase and analyzed their structural interactions in the active site of ODCase. These ligands comprise of pyrazole or pyrimidine nucleotides including the mononucleotide derivatives of pyrazofurin, barbiturate ribonucleoside, and 5-cyanouridine, as well as, in a computational approach, 1,4-dihydropyridine-based non-nucleoside inhibitors such as nifedipine and nimodipine. All these ligands bind in the active site of ODCase exhibiting distinct interactions paving the way to design novel inhibitors against this interesting enzyme. We propose an empirical model for the ligand structure for rational modifications in new drug design and potentially new lead structures.

  18. Simulation analysis of formycin 5'-monophosphate analog substrates in the ricin A-chain active site.

    PubMed

    Olson, M A; Scovill, J P; Hack, D C

    1995-06-01

    Ricin is an RNA N-glycosidase that hydrolyzes a single adenine base from a conserved loop of 28S ribosomal RNA, thus inactivating protein synthesis. Molecular-dynamics simulation methods are used to analyze the structural interactions and thermodynamics that govern the binding of formycin 5'-monophosphate (FMP) and several of its analogs to the active site of ricin A-chain. Simulations are carried out initiated from the X-ray crystal structure of the ricin-FMP complex with the ligand modeled as a dianion, monoanion and zwitterion. Relative changes in binding free energies are estimated for FMP analogs constructed from amino substitutions at the 2- and 2'-positions, and from hydroxyl substitution at the 2'-position.

  19. Adenosine monophosphate deaminase 3 activation shortens erythrocyte half-life and provides malaria resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Hortle, Elinor; Nijagal, Brunda; Bauer, Denis C; Jensen, Lora M; Ahn, Seong Beom; Cockburn, Ian A; Lampkin, Shelley; Tull, Dedreia; McConville, Malcolm J; McMorran, Brendan J; Foote, Simon J; Burgio, Gaetan

    2016-09-01

    The factors that determine red blood cell (RBC) lifespan and the rate of RBC aging have not been fully elucidated. In several genetic conditions, including sickle cell disease, thalassemia, and G6PD deficiency, erythrocyte lifespan is significantly shortened. Many of these diseases are also associated with protection from severe malaria, suggesting a role for accelerated RBC senescence and clearance in malaria resistance. Here, we report a novel, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutation that causes a gain of function in adenosine 5'-monophosphate deaminase (AMPD3). Mice carrying the mutation exhibit rapid RBC turnover, with increased erythropoiesis, dramatically shortened RBC lifespan, and signs of increased RBC senescence/eryptosis, suggesting a key role for AMPD3 in determining RBC half-life. Mice were also found to be resistant to infection with the rodent malaria Plasmodium chabaudi. We propose that resistance to P. chabaudi is mediated by increased RBC turnover and higher rates of erythropoiesis during infection. PMID:27465915

  20. Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate waves in dictyostelium discoideum: a demonstration by isotope dilution-fluorography

    SciTech Connect

    Tomchik, K.J.; Devreotes, P.N.

    1981-04-24

    The distribution of adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) in fields of aggregating amoebae of Dictyostelium discoidenum was examined by a novel isotope dilution-fluorographic technique. Cellular cyclic AMP was visualized by its competition with exogenous /sup 3/H-labeled cyclic AMP for high-affinity binding sites on protein kinase immobilized on a Millipore filter used to blot the monolayer. The cyclic AMP was distributed in spiral or concentric circular wave patterns which centered on the foci of the aggregations. These patterns were correlated with those of cell shape change that propagate through the monolayers. These observations support the hypothesis that the aggregation process in Dictyostelium is mediated by the periodic relay of cyclic AMP signals and suggest a simple scheme for the dynamics of the aggregation process.

  1. Osmium (VI) complexes of the 3', 5'-dinucleoside monophosphates, ApU and UpA.

    PubMed

    Daniel, F B; Behrman, E J

    1976-02-10

    The dinucleoside monophosphates, ApU and UpA, react with potassium osmate (VI) and 2,2'-bipyridyl to form the corresponding oxo-osmium (VI) bipyridyl sugar ester in which the osmate group is bonded to the terminal 2',3'-glycol. Osmium (VIII) tetroxide and 2,2'-bipyridyl react with the dinucleosides to form the corresponding oxo-osmium (VI) bipyridyl heterocyclic esters which result from addition of the tetroxide to the 5,6-double bond of the uracil residue. Although capable of transesterification reactions, these heterocyclic esters are exceptionally stable toward exchange reactions in solution. No apparent exchange was observed after 1 month. This reaction thus seems promising for single-site osmium labeling in polynucleotides.

  2. TAOK3 phosphorylates the methylenecyclopropane nucleoside MBX 2168 to its monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Komazin-Meredith, Gloria; Cardinale, Steven C; Comeau, Katelyn; Magalhaes, Kevin J; Hartline, Caroll B; Williams, John D; Opperman, Timothy J; Prichard, Mark N; Bowlin, Terry L

    2015-07-01

    Monohydroxymethyl methylenecyclopropane nucleosides (MCPNs) with ether or thioether substituents at the 6-position show promise as broad-spectrum herpes virus inhibitors. Their proposed mechanism of action involves sequential phosphorylation to a triphosphate, which can then inhibit viral DNA polymerase. The inhibition of herpes simplex virus (HSV) by these compounds is not dependent on the viral thymidine kinase (TK), which is known to phosphorylate acyclovir (ACV), a standard treatment for HSV infections. Previous studies on the mechanism of action of these compounds against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) implicated a host kinase in addition to HCMV UL97 kinase in performing the initial phosphorylation. After first eliminating other candidate HSV-1 encoded kinases (UL13 and US3) as well as potential host nucleoside kinases, using activity-based fractionation, we have now identified the host serine-threonine protein kinase TAOK3 as the kinase responsible for transforming the representative monohydroxymethyl MCPN analog MBX 2168 to its monophosphate. PMID:25857706

  3. Repurposing cryptosporidium inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibitors as potential antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Mandapati, Kavitha; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; House, Amanda L; McKenney, Elizabeth S; Zhang, Minjia; Rao, Suraj Nagendra; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R; Mann, Barbara J; Goldberg, Joanna B; Cuny, Gregory D; Glomski, Ian J; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2014-08-14

    Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) catalyzes the pivotal step in guanine nucleotide biosynthesis. IMPDH is a target for immunosuppressive, antiviral, and anticancer drugs, but, as of yet, has not been exploited for antimicrobial therapy. We have previously reported potent inhibitors of IMPDH from the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum (CpIMPDH). Many pathogenic bacteria, including Bacillus anthracis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes, contain IMPDHs that should also be inhibited by these compounds. Herein, we present the structure-activity relationships for the inhibition of B. anthracis IMPDH (BaIMPDH) and antibacterial activity of 140 compounds from five structurally distinct compound series. Many potent inhibitors of BaIMPDH were identified (78% with IC50 ≤ 1 μM). Four compounds had minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of less than 2 μM against B. anthracis Sterne 770. These compounds also displayed antibacterial activity against S. aureus and L. monocytogenes. PMID:25147601

  4. Adsorption of nucleotides on biomimetic apatite: The case of adenosine 5‧ monophosphate (AMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammami, K.; Feki, H. El; Marsan, O.; Drouet, C.

    2015-10-01

    This work investigates the interaction between the nucleotide adenosine 5‧ monophosphate molecule (AMP) and a biomimetic nanocrystalline carbonated apatite as a model for bone mineral. The analogy of the apatite phase used in this work with biological apatite was first pointed out by complementary techniques. AMP adsorption isotherms were then investigated. Obtained data were fitted to a Sips isotherm with an exponent greater than one suggesting positive cooperativity among adsorbed molecules. The data were compared to a previous study relative to the adsorption of another nucleotide, cytidine monophosphate (CMP) onto a similar substrate, evidencing some effect of the chemical nature of the nucleic base. An enhanced adsorption was observed under acidic (pH 6) conditions as opposed to pH 7.4, which parallels the case of DNA adsorption on biomimetic apatite. An estimated standard Gibbs free energy associated to the adsorption process (ΔG°ads ≅ -22 kJ/mol) intermediate between "physisorption" and "chemisorption" was found. The analysis of the solids after adsorption pointed to the preservation of the main characteristics of the apatite substrate but shifts or enhancements of Raman bands attributed to AMP showed the existence of chemical interactions involving both the phosphate and adenine parts of AMP. This contribution adds to the works conducted in view of better understanding the interaction of DNA/RNA and their constitutive nucleotides and the surface of biomimetic apatites. It could prove helpful in disciplines such as bone diagenesis (DNA/apatite interface in aged bones) or nanomedicine (setup of DNA- or RNA-loaded apatite systems). Also, the adsorption of nucleic acids on minerals like apatites could have played a role in the preservation of such biomolecules in the varying conditions known to exist at the origin of life on Earth, underlining the importance of dedicated adsorption studies.

  5. Effects of wortmannin, sodium nitroprusside, insulin, genistein, and guanosine triphosphate on chemotaxis and cell growth of Entodinium caudatum, Epidinium caudatum, and mixed ruminal protozoa.

    PubMed

    Diaz, H L; Knapp, J R; Karnati, S K R; Dehority, B A; Firkins, J L

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms by which ruminal protozoa sense and migrate toward nutrients are not fully understood. Chemotaxis by many diverse eukaryotic cells is mediated by phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, which is highly conserved in receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling pathways and consistently inhibited by wortmannin. In experiment 1a, increasing the concentration of wortmannin inhibited cell growth nonlinearly at 24h of a culture of the rumen protozoan Entodinium caudatum, but high variability prevented growth inhibition of Epidinium caudatum from reaching significance. In experiment 1b, increasing the insulin concentration recovered 24-h cell counts for both cultures, depending on wortmannin concentration. In experiment 2, addition of sodium nitroprusside (Snp; activator of protein kinase G for cilial beat reversal in nonrumen ciliate models) at 500µM or wortmannin at 200µM in beakers containing rumen fluid decreased random swimming by mixed entodiniomorphids into capillary tubes (inserted into beakers) containing saline. Both Snp and wortmannin increased chemotaxis into tubes containing glucose compared with the beaker control. For isotrichids, beaker treatments had no response. Glucose increased chemotaxis, but peptides decreased chemotaxis even when combined with glucose. In experiment 3, we assessed preincubation of genistein (a purported RTK blocker in nonrumen ciliate models) at 40 or 400µM in beakers and guanosine triphosphate (GTP; a universal chemorepellent in nonrumen ciliate models, perhaps mediated through an RTK) at 10 or 100µM combined with glucose in capillary tubes. Neither genistein nor GTP affected chemotaxis toward glucose for entodiniomorphids. However, GTP at 100µM reduced chemotaxis toward glucose for isotrichids. After the animal is fed, isotrichids that are depleted in glycogen migrate to the dorsal area of the rumen, and the rapid uptake of sugars is enhanced through strong chemotaxis but can be reversed by peptides or GTP. In contrast

  6. Involvement of nitric oxide pathway in the PAF-induced relaxation of rat thoracic aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Moritoki, H.; Hisayama, T.; Takeuchi, S.; Miyano, H.; Kondoh, W.

    1992-01-01

    1. The mechanism of the vasorelaxant effect of platelet activating factor (PAF) on rat thoracic aorta and the effect of aging on the PAF-induced relaxation were investigated. 2. PAF at concentrations causing relaxation induced marked increases in guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) production, but did not induce an increase in adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP). 3. Removal of the endothelium by mechanical rubbing, and treatment with the PAF antagonists CV-3988, CV-6209 and FR-900452, the nitric oxide biosynthesis inhibitor, NG-nitro L-arginine, the radical scavenger, haemoglobin, and the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, methylene blue, inhibited PAF-induced relaxation and abolished or attenuated PAF-stimulated cyclic GMP production. 4. The relaxation was greatest in arteries from rats aged 4 weeks. With an increase in age, the response of the arteries to PAF was attenuated. 5. Endothelium-dependent cyclic GMP production also decreased with increase in age of the rats. 6. These results suggest that PAF stimulates production of nitric oxide from L-arginine by acting on the PAF receptors in the endothelium, which in turn stimulates soluble guanylate cyclase in the smooth muscle cells, and so increases production of cyclic GMP, thus relaxing the arteries. Age-associated decrease in PAF-induced relaxation may result from a reduction of cyclic GMP formation. PMID:1358382

  7. Guanosine may increase absence epileptic activity by means of A2A adenosine receptors in Wistar Albino Glaxo Rijswijk rats.

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Renáta Krisztina; Dobolyi, Árpád; Todorov, Mihail Ivilinov; Kékesi, Katalin A; Juhász, Gábor; Aleksza, Magdolna; Kovács, Zsolt

    2016-06-01

    The non-adenosine nucleoside guanosine (Guo) was demonstrated to decrease quinolinic acid(QA)-induced seizures, spontaneously emerged absence epileptic seizures and lipopolysaccharide(LPS)-evoked induction of absence epileptic seizures suggesting its antiepileptic potential. It was also described previously that intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 20 and 50mg/kg Guo decreased the number of spike-wave discharges (SWDs) in a well investigated model of human absence epilepsy, the Wistar Albino Glaxo Rijswijk (WAG/Rij) rats during 4th (20mg/kg Guo) and 3rd as well as 4th (50mg/kg Guo) measuring hours. Guanosine can potentially decrease SWD number by means of its putative receptors but absence epileptic activity changing effects of Guo by means of increased extracellular adenosine (Ado) cannot be excluded. An increase in the dose of i.p. injected Guo is limited by its low solubility in saline, therefore, we addressed in the present study whether higher doses of Guo, diluted in sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution, have more potent antiepileptic effect in WAG/Rij rats. We confirmed that i.p. 50mg/kg Guo decreased but, surprisingly, i.p. 100mg/kg Guo enhanced the number of SWDs in WAG/Rij rats. Combined i.p. injection of a non-selective Ado receptor antagonist theophylline (5mg/kg) or a selective Ado A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonist SCH 58261 (7-(2-phenylethyl)-5-amino-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine) (1mg/kg) and a cyclooxygenase 1 and 2/COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitor indomethacin (10mg/kg) with 100mg/kg Guo decreased the SWD number compared to i.p. 100mg/kg Guo alone. The results suggest that i.p. 100mg/kg Guo can increase SWD number by means of the adenosinergic system. PMID:27154620

  8. Theoretical vibrational spectroscopy of intermediates and the reaction mechanism of the guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis by the protein complex Ras-GAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrenova, Maria G.; Grigorenko, Bella L.; Nemukhin, Alexander V.

    2016-09-01

    The structures and vibrational spectra of the reacting species upon guanosine triphosphate (GTP) hydrolysis to guanosine diphosphate and inorganic phosphate (Pi) trapped inside the protein complex Ras-GAP were analyzed following the results of QM/MM simulations. The frequencies of the phosphate vibrations referring to the reactants and to Pi were compared to those observed in the experimental FTIR studies. A good correlation between the theoretical and experimental vibrational data provides a strong support to the reaction mechanism of GTP hydrolysis by the Ras-GAP enzyme system revealed by the recent QM/MM modeling. Evolution of the vibrational bands associated with the inorganic phosphate Pi during the elementary stages of GTP hydrolysis is predicted.

  9. Intranasal guanosine administration presents a wide therapeutic time window to reduce brain damage induced by permanent ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Denise Barbosa; Muller, Gabriel Cardozo; Rocha, Guilherme Botter Maio; Dellavia, Gustavo Hirata; Almeida, Roberto Farina; Pettenuzzo, Leticia Ferreira; Loureiro, Samanta Oliveira; Hansel, Gisele; Horn, Ângelo Cássio Magalhães; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Ganzella, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    In addition to its intracellular roles, the nucleoside guanosine (GUO) also has extracellular effects that identify it as a putative neuromodulator signaling molecule in the central nervous system. Indeed, GUO can modulate glutamatergic neurotransmission, and it can promote neuroprotective effects in animal models involving glutamate neurotoxicity, which is the case in brain ischemia. In the present study, we aimed to investigate a new in vivo GUO administration route (intranasal, IN) to determine putative improvement of GUO neuroprotective effects against an experimental model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia. Initially, we demonstrated that IN [(3)H] GUO administration reached the brain in a dose-dependent and saturable pattern in as few as 5 min, presenting a higher cerebrospinal GUO level compared with systemic administration. IN GUO treatment started immediately or even 3 h after ischemia onset prevented behavior impairment. The behavior recovery was not correlated to decreased brain infarct volume, but it was correlated to reduced mitochondrial dysfunction in the penumbra area. Therefore, we showed that the IN route is an efficient way to promptly deliver GUO to the CNS and that IN GUO treatment prevented behavioral and brain impairment caused by ischemia in a therapeutically wide time window.

  10. Gas-Phase Conformations and Energetics of Sodium Cationized 2^'-DEOXYGUANOSINE and Guanosine: Irmpd Action Spectroscopy and Theoretical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yanlong; Hamlow, Lucas; He, Chenchen; Bao, Xun; Rodgers, M. T.; Gao, Juehan; Oomens, J.

    2015-06-01

    In living systems, the local structures of DNA and RNA are influenced by protonation, deprotonation and noncovalent binding interactions with cations. In order to determine the effects of Na+ cationization on the gas-phase structures of 2^'-deoxyguanosine, [dGuo+Na]+, and guanosine, [Guo+Na]+, infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectra of these two sodium cationized DNA and RNA mononucleosides are measured over the range extending from ~500 to ~1850 cm-1 using the FELIX free electron laser. Complementary electronic structure calculations are performed to determine the stable low-energy conformations of these complexes. Geometry optimizations and frequency analyses of these species are performed at the B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory, whereas single-point energies are calculated at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p) level of theory to determine the relative stabilities of these conformations. Comparison of the measure IRMPD action spectra and computed linear IR spectra enable the conformations accessed in the experiments to be elucidated. In both cases, preferential binding of the Na+ cation to O6 and N7 positions of the nucleobase is observed. Present results for the sodium cationized nucleosides are compared to results for the analogous protonated forms of these nucleosides to elucidate the effects of multiple chelating interactions with the sodium cation to hydrogen bonding interactions in the protonated systems on the structures and stabilities of these nucleosides.

  11. Elevated guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate level inhibits bacterial growth and interferes with FtsZ assembly.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takayoshi; Iida, Ken-Ichiro; Shiota, Susumu; Nakayama, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Shin-Ichi

    2015-12-01

    FtsZ, a protein essential for prokaryotic cell division, forms a ring structure known as the Z-ring at the division site. FtsZ has a GTP binding site and is assembled into linear structures in a GTP-dependent manner in vitro. We assessed whether guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate (ppGpp), a global regulator of gene expression in starved bacteria, affects cell division in Salmonella Paratyphi A. Elevation of intracellular ppGpp levels by using the relA expression vector induced repression of bacterial growth and incorrect FtsZ assembly. We found that FtsZ forms helical structures in the presence of ppGpp by using the GTP binding site; however, ppGpp levels required to form helical structures were at least 20-fold higher than the required GTP levels in vitro. Furthermore, once formed, helical structures did not change to the straight form even after GTP addition. Our data indicate that elevation of the ppGpp level leads to inhibition of bacterial growth and interferes with FtsZ assembly.

  12. Synthesis of the coenzymes adenosine diphosphate glucose, guanosine diphosphate glucose, and cytidine diphosphoethanolamine under primitive Earth conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mar, A.; Oro, J.

    1991-01-01

    The nonenzymatic synthesis of the coenzymes adenosine diphosphate glucose (ADPG), guanosine diphosphate glucose (GDPG), and cytidine diphosphoethanolamine (CDP-ethanolamine) has been carried out under conditions considered to have been prevalent on the early Earth. The production of these compounds was performed by allowing simple precursor molecules to react under aqueous solutions, at moderate temperatures and short periods of time, with mediation by cyanamide or urea. These two condensing agents are considered to have been present in significant amounts on the primitive Earth and have been previously used in the nonenzymatic synthesis of several other important biochemical compounds. In our experiments, ADPG was obtained by heating glucose-1-phosphate (G1P) and ATP in the presence of cyanamide for 24 h at 70 degrees C. The reaction of G1P and GTP under the same conditions yielded GDPG. The cyanamide-mediated production of CDP-ethanolamine was carried out by reacting a mixture of ethanolamine phosphate and CTP for 24 h at 70 degrees C. The separation and identification of the reaction products was carried out by paper chromatography, thin-layer chromatography, high performance thin-layer chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, both normal and reverse-phase, UV spectroscopy, enzymatic assays, and acid hydrolysis. Due to the mild conditions employed, and to the relative ease of these reactions, these studies offer a simple attractive system for the nonenzymatic synthesis of phosphorylated high-energy metabolic intermediates under conditions considered to have been prevalent on the ancient Earth.

  13. Length of guanosine homopolymeric repeats modulates promoter activity of subfamily II tpr genes of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum.

    PubMed

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Lukehart, Sheila; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2007-11-01

    In Treponema pallidum, homopolymeric guanosine repeats of varying length are present upstream of both Subfamily I (tprC, D, F and I) and II (tprE, G and J) tpr genes, a group of potential virulence factors, immediately upstream of the +1 nucleotide. To investigate the influence of these poly-G sequences on promoter activity, tprE, G, J, F and I promoter regions containing homopolymeric tracts with different numbers of Gs, the ribosomal binding site and start codon were cloned in frame with the green fluorescent protein reporter gene (GFP), and promoter activity was measured both as fluorescence emission from Escherichia coli cultures transformed with the different plasmid constructs and using quantitative RT-PCR. For tprJ, G and E-derived clones, fluorescence was significantly higher with constructs containing eight Gs or fewer, while plasmids containing the same promoters with none or more Gs gave modest or no signal above the background. In contrast, tprF/I-derived clones induced similar levels of fluorescence regardless of the number of Gs within the promoter. GFP mRNA quantification showed that all of the promoters induced measurable transcription of the GFP gene; however, only for Subfamily II promoters was message synthesis inversely correlated to the number of Gs in the construct.

  14. Length of guanosine homopolymeric repeats modulates promoter activity of subfamily II tpr genes of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Lukehart, Sheila; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    In Treponema pallidum, homopolymeric guanosine repeats of varying length are present upstream of both Subfamily I (tprC, D, F and I) and II (tprE, G and J) tpr genes, a group of potential virulence factors, immediately upstream of the +1 nucleotide. To investigate the influence of these poly-G sequences on promoter activity, tprE, G, J, F and I promoter regions containing homopolymeric tracts with different numbers of Gs, the ribosomal binding site and start codon were cloned in frame with the green fluorescent protein reporter gene (GFP), and promoter activity was measured both as fluorescence emission from Escherichia coli cultures transformed with the different plasmid constructs and using quantitative RT-PCR. For tprJ, G and E-derived clones, fluorescence was significantly higher with constructs containing eight Gs or fewer, while plasmids containing the same promoters with none or more Gs gave modest or no signal above the background. In contrast, tprF/I-derived clones induced similar levels of fluorescence regardless of the number of Gs within the promoter. GFP mRNA quantification showed that all of the promoters induced measurable transcription of the GFP gene; however, only for Subfamily II promoters was message synthesis inversely correlated to the number of Gs in the construct. PMID:17683506

  15. Regulation of RNA synthesis in Escherichia coli. III. Degradation of guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate in cold-shocked cells.

    PubMed

    Raué, H A; Cashel, M

    1975-03-21

    Cold-shocked cells of Escherichia coli can degrade intracellularly accumulated guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate (ppGpp). The rate of ppGpp degradation is governed, as in whole cells, by the spoT gene; a rapid breakdown reaction is associated with the presence of the spoT+ allele and at least a five-fold slower decay occurs in spoT-minus mutants. The two degradation reactions in shocked cells display the following similarities: (i) the rates of degradation are equivalent to whole cell estimates, (ii) both require a full complement of activated amino acids, (iii) both are dependent upon supplements in the reaction mixture which stimulate the availability of energy-rich compounds and (iv) neither is inhibited by concentrations of ribosomal antibiotics which severely restrict protein synthesis. Apart from characteristic rate differences, decay of ppGpp in shocked cells derived from spoT-minus strains is discerned from spoT+ mediated decay in shocked cells by sensitivity to high concentrations of tetracycline and by manganese ion dependence.

  16. Enhanced Production of Adenosine Triphosphate by Pharmacological Activation of Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Ameliorates Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Noh, Jung-Ran; Choi, Dong-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Lee, Chul-Ho

    2015-10-01

    The hepatic cell death induced by acetaminophen (APAP) is closely related to cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion, which is mainly caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor of low energy status. AMPK regulates metabolic homeostasis by stimulating catabolic metabolism and suppressing anabolic pathways to increase cellular energy levels. We found that the decrease in active phosphorylation of AMPK in response to APAP correlates with decreased ATP levels, in vivo. Therefore, we hypothesized that the enhanced production of ATP via AMPK stimulation can lead to amelioration of APAP-induced liver failure. A769662, an allosteric activator of AMPK, produced a strong synergistic effect on AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation with APAP in primary hepatocytes and liver tissue. Interestingly, activation of AMPK by A769662 ameliorated the APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6N mice treated with APAP at a dose of 400 mg/kg intraperitoneally. However, mice treated with APAP alone developed massive centrilobular necrosis, and APAP increased their serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels. Furthermore, A769662 administration prevented the loss of intracellular ATP without interfering with the APAP-mediated reduction of mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, inhibition of glycolysis by 2-deoxy-glucose eliminated the beneficial effects of A769662 on APAP-mediated liver injury. In conclusion, A769662 can effectively protect mice against APAP-induced liver injury through ATP synthesis by anaerobic glycolysis. Furthermore, stimulation of AMPK may have potential therapeutic application for APAP overdose. PMID:26434492

  17. Enhanced Production of Adenosine Triphosphate by Pharmacological Activation of Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Ameliorates Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Noh, Jung-Ran; Choi, Dong-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Lee, Chul-Ho

    2015-10-01

    The hepatic cell death induced by acetaminophen (APAP) is closely related to cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion, which is mainly caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor of low energy status. AMPK regulates metabolic homeostasis by stimulating catabolic metabolism and suppressing anabolic pathways to increase cellular energy levels. We found that the decrease in active phosphorylation of AMPK in response to APAP correlates with decreased ATP levels, in vivo. Therefore, we hypothesized that the enhanced production of ATP via AMPK stimulation can lead to amelioration of APAP-induced liver failure. A769662, an allosteric activator of AMPK, produced a strong synergistic effect on AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation with APAP in primary hepatocytes and liver tissue. Interestingly, activation of AMPK by A769662 ameliorated the APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6N mice treated with APAP at a dose of 400 mg/kg intraperitoneally. However, mice treated with APAP alone developed massive centrilobular necrosis, and APAP increased their serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels. Furthermore, A769662 administration prevented the loss of intracellular ATP without interfering with the APAP-mediated reduction of mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, inhibition of glycolysis by 2-deoxy-glucose eliminated the beneficial effects of A769662 on APAP-mediated liver injury. In conclusion, A769662 can effectively protect mice against APAP-induced liver injury through ATP synthesis by anaerobic glycolysis. Furthermore, stimulation of AMPK may have potential therapeutic application for APAP overdose.

  18. Mulberry leaf polyphenol extract induced apoptosis involving regulation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase/fatty acid synthase in a p53-negative hepatocellular carcinoma cell.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tzi-Peng; Lee, Huei-Jane; Ou, Ting-Tsz; Chang, Ya-Ju; Wang, Chau-Jong

    2012-07-11

    The polyphenols in mulberry leaf possess the ability to inhibit cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis of tumors. It was reported that the p53 status plays an important role in switching apoptosis and the cell cycle following adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation. In this study, we aimed to detect the effect of the mulberry leaf polyphenol extract (MLPE) on inducing cell death in p53-negative (Hep3B) and p53-positive (Hep3B with transfected p53) hepatocellular carcinoma cells and also to clarify the role of p53 in MLPE-treated cells. After treatment of the Hep3B cells with MLPE, apoptosis was induced via the AMPK/PI3K/Akt and Bcl-2 family pathways. Transient transfection of p53 into Hep3B cells led to switching autophagy instead of apoptosis by MLPE treatment. We demonstrated that acridine orange staining and protein expressions of LC-3 and beclin-1 were increased in p53-transfected cells. These results implied induction of apoptosis or autophagy in MLPE-treated hepatocellular carcinoma cells can be due to the p53 status. We also found MLPE can not only activate AMPK but also diminish fatty acid synthase, a molecular target for cancer inhibition. At present, our results indicate MLPE can play an active role in mediating the cell death of hepatocellular carcinoma cells and the p53 might play an important role in regulating the death mechanisms.

  19. Enhanced Production of Adenosine Triphosphate by Pharmacological Activation of Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Ameliorates Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Noh, Jung-Ran; Choi, Dong-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Lee, Chul-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The hepatic cell death induced by acetaminophen (APAP) is closely related to cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion, which is mainly caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor of low energy status. AMPK regulates metabolic homeostasis by stimulating catabolic metabolism and suppressing anabolic pathways to increase cellular energy levels. We found that the decrease in active phosphorylation of AMPK in response to APAP correlates with decreased ATP levels, in vivo. Therefore, we hypothesized that the enhanced production of ATP via AMPK stimulation can lead to amelioration of APAP-induced liver failure. A769662, an allosteric activator of AMPK, produced a strong synergistic effect on AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation with APAP in primary hepatocytes and liver tissue. Interestingly, activation of AMPK by A769662 ameliorated the APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6N mice treated with APAP at a dose of 400 mg/kg intraperitoneally. However, mice treated with APAP alone developed massive centrilobular necrosis, and APAP increased their serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels. Furthermore, A769662 administration prevented the loss of intracellular ATP without interfering with the APAP-mediated reduction of mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, inhibition of glycolysis by 2-deoxy-glucose eliminated the beneficial effects of A769662 on APAP-mediated liver injury. In conclusion, A769662 can effectively protect mice against APAP-induced liver injury through ATP synthesis by anaerobic glycolysis. Furthermore, stimulation of AMPK may have potential therapeutic application for APAP overdose. PMID:26434492

  20. Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and germination of sporangiospores from the fungus Mucor.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, M

    1980-06-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) metabolism was examined in germinating sporangiospores of Mucor genevensis and Mucor mucedo. Exogenous cAMP prevented normal hyphal development from sporangiospores. Internal pools of cAMP fluctuated profoundly during development. Spherical growth of the spores was characterized by large pools of cAMP whereas germ tube emergence and hyphal elongation were characterized by small pools of cAMP. These observations suggest a possible role for cAMP in sporangiospore germination. Adenylate cyclase activities fluctuated significantly during germination with maximum values attained during spherical growth. In contrast, cAMP phosphodiesterase activities remained constant throughout germination. Internal cAMP levels may therefore be regulated by adjustment of adenylate cyclase activities. The binding of cAMP by soluble cell proteins was measured. cAMP-binding activity changed greatly during germination. Dormant and spherically growing spores possessed the highest activities. Developing hyphae contained the lowest activities. Use of the photoaffinity label, 8-azido-[32P]cAMP, in conjunction with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis allowed the identification of a small population of morphogenetic-stage-specific proteins which bind cAMP and may be of regulatory significance to development.

  1. Stacking-unstacking of the dinucleoside monophosphate guanylyl-3',5'-uridine studied with molecular dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Norberg, J; Nilsson, L

    1994-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on two conformations of the dinucleoside monophosphate guanylyl-3',5'-uridine (GpU) in aqueous solution with one sodium counterion. One stacked conformation and one with the C3'-O3'-P-O5' backbone torsion angle twisted 180 degrees to create an unstacked conformation. We observed a relatively stable behavior of the stacked conformation, which remained stacked throughout the simulation, whereas the unstacked conformation showed major changes in the backbone torsion and glycosidic angles. During the simulation the unstacked conformation transformed into a more stacked form and then back again to an unstacked one. The calculated correlation times for rotational diffusion from the molecular dynamics simulations are in agreement with fluorescence anisotropy and nuclear magnetic resonance data. As expected, the correlation times for rotational diffusion of the unstacked conformation were observed to be longer than for the stacked conformation. The 2'OH group may contribute in stabilizing the stacked conformation, where the O2'-H...O4' hydrogen bond occurred in 82.7% of the simulation. Images FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 PMID:7948694

  2. Resonant Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation Spectroscopy of Anionic Nucleotide Monophosphate Clusters.

    PubMed

    Ligare, Marshall R; Rijs, Anouk M; Berden, Giel; Kabeláč, Martin; Nachtigallova, Dana; Oomens, Jos; de Vries, Mattanjah S

    2015-06-25

    We report mid-infrared spectra and potential energy surfaces of four anionic, 2'-deoxynucleotide-5'-monophosphates (dNMPs) and the ionic DNA pairs [dGMP-dCMP-H](1-), [dAMP-dTMP-H](1-) with a total charge of the complex equal to -1. We recorded IR action spectra by resonant IR multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) using the FELIX free electron laser. The potential energy surface study employed an on-the-fly molecular dynamics quenching method (MD/Q), using a semiempirical AM1 method, followed by an optimization of the most stable structures using density functional theory. By employing infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy in combination with high-level computational methods, we aim at a better understanding of the hydrogen bonding competition between the phosphate moieties and the nucleobases. We find that, unlike in multimer double stranded DNA structures, the hydrogen bonds in these isolated nucleotide pairs are predominantly formed between the phosphate groups. This intermolecular interaction appears to exceed the stabilization energy resulting from base pairing and directs the overall cluster structure and alignment.

  3. PHARMACOKINETIC AND PHARMACODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF INOSINE MONOPHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE (IMPDH) ACTIVITY IN MMF-TREATED HCT RECIPIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Mager, Donald E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Storer, Barry E.; Boeckh, Michael J.; Bemer, Meagan J.; Phillips, Brian R.; Risler, Linda J.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2014-01-01

    A novel approach to personalizing postgrafting immunosuppression in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients is evaluating inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity as a drug-specific biomarker of mycophenolic acid (MPA)-induced immunosuppression. This prospective study evaluated total MPA, unbound MPA, and total MPA glucuronide plasma concentrations and IMPDH activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNC) at five time points after the morning dose of oral mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) on day +21 in 56 nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. Substantial interpatient variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics was observed and accurately characterized by the population pharmacokinetic/dynamic model. IMPDH activity decreased with increasing MPA plasma concentration, with maximum inhibition coinciding with maximum MPA concentration in most patients. The overall relationship between MPA concentration and IMPDH activity was described by a direct inhibitory Emax model with an IC50 = 3.23 mg/L total MPA and 57.3 ng/mL unbound MPA. The day +21 IMPDH area under the effect curve (AUEC) was associated with cytomegalovirus reactivation, non-relapse mortality, and overall mortality. In conclusion, a pharmacokinetic/dynamic model was developed that relates plasma MPA concentrations with PMNC IMPDH activity after an MMF dose in HCT recipients. Future studies should validate this model and confirm that day +21 IMPDH AUEC is a predictive biomarker. PMID:24727337

  4. Modification of human placental alkaline phosphatase by periodate-oxidized 1,N6-ethenoadenosine monophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, G G; Shiao, M S; Lee, K R; Wu, J J

    1990-01-01

    Oxidation of 1,N6-ethenoadenosine monophosphate (epsilon AMP) with periodate cleaved the cis-diol of the ribose ring and resulted in the formation of a dialdehyde derivative (epsilon AMP-dial). At room temperature epsilon AMP-dial was unstable and underwent beta-elimination to give 4',5'-anhydro-1,N6-ethenoadenosine dialdehyde acetal (A epsilon Ado-dial). These nucleotide analogues were found to inactivate human placental alkaline phosphatase in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. epsilon AMP-dial was shown to be an affinity label for the enzyme on the basis of the following criteria. (a) Kinetics of the enzyme activity loss over a wide range of epsilon AMP-dial concentration showed a saturating phenomenon. Removal of the phosphate group made the reagent (A epsilon Ado-dial) become a general chemical modifying reagent. (b) The artificial substrate p-nitrophenyl phosphate gave substantial protection of the enzyme against inactivation. (c) epsilon AMP-dial was a substrate and a partial mixed-type inhibitor for the enzyme. Results of the inhibition and protection studies indicated that the reagent and substrate could combine with the enzyme simultaneously. Besides the phosphate-binding domain, an induced hydrophobic region is proposed for the substrate-binding site for human placental alkaline phosphatase. PMID:2176472

  5. Lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptors and adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate during and after normal pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    von Mandach, U.; Gubler, H. P.; Engel, G.; Huch, R.; Huch, A.

    1993-01-01

    1. The beta 2-sympathomimetics, used to inhibit preterm labour, bind predominantly to beta 2-adrenoceptors, activating adenylate cyclase to form adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP), a messenger substance which inhibits the enzyme cascade triggering smooth muscle contraction. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP formation can be used as markers of beta 2-adrenergic effect. 2. The present study addresses the influence of pregnancy on the beta-adrenoceptor system. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP concentrations (basal and evoked by isoprenaline) in circulating lymphocytes were determined at three points in gestation (16, 29 and 37 weeks) and 9 weeks post partum in 22 normal pregnancies. (-)-[125Iodo]-cyanopindolol was used as the ligand to identify a homogeneous population of beta 2-adrenoceptors on lymphocytes. B- and T-cell fractions were estimated from the same samples. 3. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density decreased significantly during gestation until week 37 (P < 0.01), then increased post partum (P < 0.005). Cyclic AMP concentrations (basal and evoked by isoprenaline) were significantly lower after 16 weeks of gestation than post partum (P < 0.05). 4. The results, which cannot be explained in terms of a shift in the lymphocyte (B- and T-cell) ratio, indicate that beta-adrenoceptor density and function are reduced in normal pregnancy and only return to normal post partum. These findings may be of significance in devising future tocolytic therapy with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. PMID:8383562

  6. A Fluorometric Activity Assay for Light-Regulated Cyclic-Nucleotide-Monophosphate Actuators.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Charlotte Helene; Körschen, Heinz G; Nicol, Christopher; Gasser, Carlos; Seifert, Reinhard; Schwärzel, Martin; Möglich, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    As a transformative approach in neuroscience and cell biology, optogenetics grants control over manifold cellular events with unprecedented spatiotemporal definition, reversibility, and noninvasiveness. Sensory photoreceptors serve as genetically encoded, light-regulated actuators and hence embody the cornerstone of optogenetics. To expand the scope of optogenetics, ever more naturally occurring photoreceptors are being characterized, and synthetic photoreceptors with customized, light-regulated function are being engineered. Perturbational control over intracellular cyclic-nucleotide-monophosphate (cNMP) levels is achieved via sensory photoreceptors that catalyze the making and breaking of these second messengers in response to light. To facilitate discovery, engineering and quantitative characterization of such light-regulated cNMP actuators, we have developed an efficient fluorometric assay. Both the formation and the hydrolysis of cNMPs are accompanied by proton release which can be quantified with the fluorescent pH indicator 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). This assay equally applies to nucleotide cyclases, e.g., blue-light-activated bPAC, and to cNMP phosphodiesterases, e.g., red-light-activated LAPD. Key benefits include potential for parallelization and automation, as well as suitability for both purified enzymes and crude cell lysates. The BCECF assay hence stands to accelerate discovery and characterization of light-regulated actuators of cNMP metabolism. PMID:26965118

  7. Novel interactions of fluorinated nucleotide derivatives targeting orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Melissa; Avina, Maria Elena Meza; Wei, Lianhu; Crandall, Ian E.; Bello, Angelica Mara; Poduch, Ewa; Liu, Yan; Paige, Christopher J.; Kain, Kevin C.; Pai, Emil F.; Kotra, Lakshmi P.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorinated nucleosides and nucleotides are of considerable interest to medicinal chemists due to their antiviral, anticancer, and other biological activities. However, their direct interactions at target binding sites are not well understood. A new class of 2′-deoxy-2′-fluoro-C6-substituted uridine and UMP derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase). These compounds were synthesized from the key intermediate, fully-protected 2′-deoxy-2′-fluorouridine. Among the synthesized compounds, 2′-deoxy-2′-fluoro-6-iodo-UMP covalently inhibited human ODCase with a second-order rate constant of 0.62 ± 0.02 M−1sec−1. Interestingly, the 6-cyano-2′-fluoro derivative covalently interacted with ODCase defying the conventional thinking, where its ribosyl derivative undergoes transformation into BMP by ODCase. This confirms that the 2′-fluoro moiety influences the chemistry at the C6 position of the nucleotides, thus interactions in the active site of ODCase. Molecular interactions of the 2′-fluorinated nucleotides are compared to those with the 3′-fluorinated nucleotides bound to the corresponding target enzyme, and the carbohydrate moieties were shown to bind in different conformations. PMID:21417464

  8. Adenosine 3′:5′-Cyclic Monophosphate in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Isolation and Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Amrhein, Nikolaus; Filner, Philip

    1973-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii contains a factor that can replace adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in the stimulation of rabbit-muscle protein kinase. The factor cochromatographs and coelectrophoreses with authentic cAMP, and is inactivated by beef heart cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. When C. reinhardtii is exposed to aminophylline (theophylline2 ethylenediamine), the concentration of the factor in the cells increases within 1 hr, from about 25 pmol of cAMP equivalents per g dry weight to more than 250 pmol. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity is present in crude extract of C. reinhardtii and is inhibited by theophylline. We conclude that cAMP occurs in C. reinhardtii and that the endogenous concentration is governed at least in part by a theophylline-sensitive cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. These findings provide a sound basis for attributing the effects of methylxanthines on flagellar function and regeneration in C. reinhardtii to the resultant elevation of endogenous cAMP. PMID:16592076

  9. Ion-exclusion chromatography determination of organic acid in uridine 5'-monophosphate fermentation broth.

    PubMed

    Niu, Huanqing; Chen, Yong; Xie, Jingjing; Chen, Xiaochun; Bai, Jianxin; Wu, Jinglan; Liu, Dong; Ying, Hanjie

    2012-09-01

    Simultaneous determination of organic acids using ion-exclusion liquid chromatography and ultraviolet detection is described. The chromatographic conditions are optimized when an Aminex HPX-87H column (300 × 7.8 mm) is employed, with a solution of 3 mmol/L sulfuric acid as eluent, a flow rate of 0.4 mL/min and a column temperature of 60°C. Eight organic acids (including orotic acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, citric acid, pyruvic acid, malic acid, succinic acid, lactic acid and acetic acid) and one nucleotide are successfully quantified. The calibration curves for these analytes are linear, with correlation coefficients exceeding 0.999. The average recovery of organic acids is in the range of 97.6% ∼ 103.1%, and the relative standard deviation is in the range of 0.037% ∼ 0.38%. The method is subsequently applied to obtain organic acid profiles of uridine 5'-monophosphate culture broth fermented from orotic acid by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These data demonstrate the quantitative accuracy for nucleotide fermentation mixtures, and suggest that the method may also be applicable to other biological samples. PMID:22634191

  10. Control of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate levels by depolarizing agents in fungi.

    PubMed

    Trevillyan, J M; Pall, M L

    1979-05-01

    It has been reported that diverse treatments which depolarize the plasma membrane of Neurospora crassa produce rapid increases in cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) levels. In the current study, membrane active antibiotics, which are known or putative depolarizing agents, were found to produce similar cyclic AMP increases, not only in N. crassa, but also in the distantly related fungi Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Mucor racemosus. Uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation, which have been found to depolarize Neurospora, also produced cyclic AMP increases in all three fungi. The time course of the cyclic AMP response to these various treatments was similar in all three fungi. The fungal studies and studies on depolarized central nervous tissue suggest that cyclic AMP increases may be produced in response to plasma membrane depolarization in diverse eucaryotic cells. A model is proposed for eucaryotic microorganisms in which membrane depolarization serves as a signal of breakdown of the plasma membrane integrity. The subsequent cyclic AMP increase, in turn, may mediate cellular response to help protect the plasma membrane from chemical and mechanical threats to its integrity.

  11. Target validation of the inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) gene in Cryptosporidium using Phylomer(®) peptides.

    PubMed

    Jefferies, R; Yang, R; Woh, C K; Weldt, T; Milech, N; Estcourt, A; Armstrong, T; Hopkins, R; Watt, P; Reid, S; Armson, A; Ryan, U M

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis, a gastroenteric disease characterised mainly by diarrheal illnesses in humans and mammals is caused by infection with the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium. Treatment options for cryptosporidiosis are limited, with the current therapeutic nitazoxanide, only partly efficacious in immunocompetent individuals. The parasite lacks de novo purine synthesis, and is exclusively dependant on purine salvage from its host. Inhibition of the inosine 5' monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), a purine salvage enzyme that is essential for DNA synthesis, thereby offers a potential drug target against this parasite. In the present study, a yeast-two-hybrid system was used to identify Phylomer peptides within a library constructed from the genomes of 25 phylogenetically diverse bacteria that targeted the IMPDH of Cryptosporidium parvum (IMPcp) and Cryptosporidium hominis (IMPch). We identified 38 unique interacting Phylomers, of which, 12 were synthesised and screened against C. parvum in vitro. Two Phylomers exhibited significant growth inhibition (81.2-83.8% inhibition; P < 0.05), one of which consistently exhibited positive interactions with IMPcp and IMPch during primary and recapitulation yeast two-hybrid screening and did not interact with either of the human IMPDH proteins. The present study highlightsthe potential of Phylomer peptides as target validation tools for Cryptosporidium and other organisms and diseases because of their ability to bind with high affinity to target proteins and disrupt function. PMID:25447124

  12. Attempts to detect cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate in higher plants by three assay methods.

    PubMed

    Bressan, R A; Ross, C W

    1976-01-01

    Endogenous levels of cyclic adenosine-3':5'-monophosphate in coleoptile first leaf segments of oat (Avena sativa L.), potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) callus, and germinating seeds of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) were measured with a modified Gilman binding assay and a protein kinase activation assay. The incorporation of adenosine-8-(14)C into compounds with properties similar to those of cyclic AMP was also measured in studies with germinating lettuce seeds. The binding assay proved reliable for mouse and rat liver analyses, but was nonspecific for plant tissues. It responded to various components from lettuce and potato tissues chromatographically similar to but not identical with cyclic AMP. The protein kinase activation assay was much more specific, but it also exhibited positive responses in the presence of compounds not chromatographically identical to cyclic AMP. The concentrations of cyclic AMP in the plant tissues tested were at the lower limits of detection and characterization obtainable with these assays. The estimates of maximal levels were much lower than reported in many previous studies. PMID:16659419

  13. Antidepressant effect of pramipexole in mice forced swimming test: A cross talk between dopamine receptor and NMDA/nitric oxide/cGMP pathway.

    PubMed

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Imran Khan, Muhammad; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-07-01

    Pramipexole is a dopamine D2 receptor agonist indicated for treating Parkinson disorder. This study was aimed to investigate the effect of pramipexole in forced swimming test (FST) in mice and the possible involvement of activation of D2 receptors and inhibition of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO-cGMP) on this effect. Intraperitoneal administration of pramipexole (1-3mg/kg) reduced the immobility time in the FST similar to fluoxetine (20mg/kg, i.p.). This effect of pramipexole (1mg/kg, i.p.) was ceased when mice were pretreated with haloperidol (0.15mg/kg, i.p,) and sulpiride (5mg/kg, i.p) as D2 receptor antagonists, NMDA (75mg/kg,i.p.), l-arginine (750mg/kg, i.p., a substrate for nitric oxide synthase) or sildenafil (5mg/kg, i.p., a phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor). The administration of MK-801 (0.05mg/kg, i.p., a NMDA receptor antagonist) l-NG-Nitro arginine methyl ester (l-NAME, 10mg/kg, i.p., a non-specific nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor), 7-nitroindazole (30mg/kg, i.p., a neuronal NOS inhibitor) and methylene blue (10mg/kg, i.p.), an inhibitor of both NOS and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) in combination with the sub-effective dose of pramipexole (0.3mg/kg, i.p.) reduced the immobility. Altogether, our data suggest that the antidepressant-like effect of pramipexole is dependent on the activation of D2 receptor and inhibition of either NMDA receptors and/or NO-cGMP synthesis. These results contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant-like effect of pramipexole and reinforce the role of D2 receptors, NMDA receptors and l-arginine-NO-GMP pathway in the antidepressant mechanism of this agent. PMID:27261607

  14. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase from the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    SciTech Connect

    Krungkrai, Sudaratana R.; Tokuoka, Keiji; Kusakari, Yukiko; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Adachi, Hiroaki; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Kai, Yasushi; Krungkrai, Jerapan; Horii, Toshihiro

    2006-06-01

    Orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase of human malaria parasite P. falciparum was crystallized by the seeding method in a hanging drop using PEG 3000 as a precipitant. A complete set of diffraction data from a native crystal was collected to 2.7 Å resolution at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. Orotidine 5′-monophosphate (OMP) decarboxylase (OMPDC; EC 4.1.1.23) catalyzes the final step in the de novo synthesis of uridine 5′-monophosphate (UMP) and defects in the enzyme are lethal in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Active recombinant P. falciparum OMPDC (PfOMPDC) was crystallized by the seeding method in a hanging drop using PEG 3000 as a precipitant. A complete set of diffraction data from a native crystal was collected to 2.7 Å resolution at 100 K using synchrotron radiation at the Swiss Light Source. The crystal exhibits trigonal symmetry (space group R3), with hexagonal unit-cell parameters a = b = 201.81, c = 44.03 Å. With a dimer in the asymmetric unit, the solvent content is 46% (V{sub M} = 2.3 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1})

  15. Avirulent Uracil Auxotrophs Based on Disruption of Orotidine-5′-Monophosphate Decarboxylase Elicit Protective Immunity to Toxoplasma gondii ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Barbara A.; Bzik, David J.

    2010-01-01

    The orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) gene, encoding the final enzyme of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway, was deleted using Toxoplasma gondii KU80 knockouts to develop an avirulent nonreverting pyrimidine auxotroph strain. Additionally, to functionally address the role of the pyrimidine salvage pathway, the uridine phosphorylase (UP) salvage activity was knocked out and a double knockout of UP and OMPDC was also constructed. The nonreverting ΔOMPDC, ΔUP, and ΔOMPDC ΔUP knockout strains were evaluated for pyrimidine auxotrophy, for attenuation of virulence, and for their ability to elicit potent immunity to reinfection. The ΔUP knockout strain was replication competent and virulent. In contrast, the ΔOMPDC and ΔOMPDC ΔUP strains were uracil auxotrophs that rapidly lost their viability during pyrimidine starvation. Replication of the ΔOMPDC strain but not the ΔOMPDC ΔUP strain was also partially rescued in vitro with uridine or cytidine supplementation. Compared to their hypervirulent parental type I strain, the ΔOMPDC and ΔOMPDC ΔUP knockout strains exhibited extreme attenuation in murine virulence (∼8 logs). Genetic complementation of the ΔOMPDC strain using a functional OMPDC allele restored normal replication and type I parental strain virulence phenotypes. A single immunization of mice with either the live critically attenuated ΔOMPDC strain or the ΔOMPDC ΔUP knockout strain effectively induced potent protective immunity to lethal challenge infection. The avirulent nonreverting ΔOMPDC and ΔOMPDC ΔUP strains provide new tools for the dissection of the host response to infection and are promising candidates for safe and effective Th1 vaccine platforms that can be easily genetically engineered. PMID:20605980

  16. Diversity in guanosine 3',5'-bisdiphosphate (ppGpp) sensitivity among guanylate kinases of bacteria and plants.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yuhta; Izumi, Atsushi; Fukunaga, Yoshinori; Kusumi, Kensuke; Iba, Koh; Watanabe, Seiya; Nakahira, Yoichi; Weber, Andreas P M; Nozawa, Akira; Tozawa, Yuzuru

    2014-05-30

    The guanosine 3',5'-bisdiphosphate (ppGpp) signaling system is shared by bacteria and plant chloroplasts, but its role in plants has remained unclear. Here we show that guanylate kinase (GK), a key enzyme in guanine nucleotide biosynthesis that catalyzes the conversion of GMP to GDP, is a target of regulation by ppGpp in chloroplasts of rice, pea, and Arabidopsis. Plants have two distinct types of GK that are localized to organelles (GKpm) or to the cytosol (GKc), with both enzymes being essential for growth and development. We found that the activity of rice GKpm in vitro was inhibited by ppGpp with a Ki of 2.8 μM relative to the substrate GMP, whereas the Km of this enzyme for GMP was 73 μM. The IC50 of ppGpp for GKpm was ∼10 μM. In contrast, the activity of rice GKc was insensitive to ppGpp, as was that of GK from bakers' yeast, which is also a cytosolic enzyme. These observations suggest that ppGpp plays a pivotal role in the regulation of GTP biosynthesis in chloroplasts through specific inhibition of GKpm activity, with the regulation of GTP biosynthesis in chloroplasts thus being independent of that in the cytosol. We also found that GKs of Escherichia coli and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 are insensitive to ppGpp, in contrast to the ppGpp sensitivity of the Bacillus subtilis enzyme. Our biochemical characterization of GK enzymes has thus revealed a novel target of ppGpp in chloroplasts and has uncovered diversity among bacterial GKs with regard to regulation by ppGpp.

  17. Source of /sup 3/H-labeled inositol bis- and monophosphates in agonist-activated rat parotid acinar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, A.R.; Putney, J.W. Jr.

    1989-06-05

    The kinetics of (3H)inositol phosphate metabolism in agonist-activated rat parotid acinar cells were characterized in order to determine the sources of (3H)inositol monophosphates and (3H)inositol bisphosphates. The turnover rates of D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and its metabolites, D-myo-inositol 1,4-bisphosphate and D-myo-inositol 1,3,4-trisphosphate, were examined following the addition of the muscarinic receptor antagonist, atropine, to cholinergically stimulated parotid cells. D-myo-Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate declined with a t1/2 of 7.6 +/- 0.7 s, D-myo-inositol 1,3,4-trisphosphate declined with a t1/2 of 8.6 +/- 1.2 min, and D-myo-inositol 1,4-bisphosphate was metabolized with a t1/2 of 6.0 +/- 0.7 min. The sum of the rates of flux through D-myo-inositol 1,4-bisphosphate and D-myo-inositol 1,3,4-trisphosphate (2.54% phosphatidylinositol/min) did not exceed the calculated rate of breakdown of D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (2.76% phosphatidylinositol/min). Thus, there is no evidence for the direct hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate in intact cells since D-myo-inositol 1,4-bisphosphate formation can be attributed to the dephosphorylation of D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. The source of the (3H)inositol monophosphates also was examined in cholinergically stimulated parotid cells. When parotid cells were stimulated with methacholine, D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, D-myo-inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate, D-myo-inositol 1,4-bisphosphate, and D-myo-inositol 4-monophosphate levels increased within 2 s, whereas D-myo-inositol 1-monophosphate accumulation was delayed by several seconds. Rates of (3H)inositol monophosphate accumulation also were examined by the addition of LiCl to cells stimulated to steady state levels of (3H)inositol phosphates.

  18. Conformational properties of purine-pyrimidine and pyrimidine-purine dinucleoside monophosphates.

    PubMed

    Ezra, F S; Lee, C H; Kondo, N S; Danyluk, S S; Sarma, R H

    1977-05-01

    The detailed conformational features and dynamics of heterodinucleoside monophosphates ApU, ApC, GpU, GpC, UpA, CpA, UpG, and CpG have been studied in aqueous solution by high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Analysis of the resultant NMR parameters leads to a number of discernible trends throughout the series. Thus the ribose rings of the dimers exist as equilibrium mixtures of C(2')-endo(2E) in equilibrium C(3')-endo(3E) conformers with a proclivity for the 3E pucker in most cases; the C(4')-C(5') bonds of both nucleotidyl units show significant preference (74-96%) for a gg conformation and the dominant conformer (85-89%) about C(5')-O(5') is g'g'. Orientation about the C(3')-O(3') bond is coupled to the ribose conformational equilibrium and the system exists with a bias for the 3Eg- coupled conformation in which the H(3')-C(3')-O(3')-P dihedral angle occupies the narrow range of 33-35 degrees. Dimerization, on the average, causes about 10% increase in gg and g'g' populations and the g-domain becomes increasingly populated about the C(3')-O(3') bond. The ribose equilibrium 2E in equilibrium 3E shifts in favor of 3E upon dimerization, the effect being very conspicuous for the pu-py series (similar to 40 yields 60%) and less noticeable for the py-pu systems (similar to 47 yields 58%), clearly suggesting a correlation between sequence and ribose conformational equilibrium. The temperature and dimerization data for the heterodinucleoside monophosphates show that the transition 2E yields 3E is directly related to XCN changes induced by dimerization and stacking. Analysis of the ribose coupling data shows that the percentage populations of stacked species vary from dimer to dimer with GpC displaying a maximum of 45% stacked population and UpG about 10%. However, in general, the pu-py dimers show a higher preference (27-45%) for stacked conformations than py-pu dimers (10-25%). It is proposed that the pronounced deshielding of H(5') of the 5

  19. Adenosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate levels in Thermomonospora curvata during cellulase biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fennington, G.; Neubauer, D.; Stutzenberger, F.

    1983-01-01

    The enzymatic degradation of cellulose requires the synergistic activity of at least three enzymes: exo-beta-1,4-glucanase (EC3.2.1.91), endo-beta-1,4-glucanase (EC3.2.1.4), and beta-glucosidase (EC3.2.1.21). Despite extensive studies on a variety of cellulolytic bacteria and fungi, the mechanism(s) regulating the biosynthesis of this inducible catabolic enzyme complex remains unknown. The intracellular concentrations of cyclic nucleotides such as adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) have been shown to play a major role in mediating catabolite repression of enzyme biosynthesis. The cAMP acts through a cAMP receptor protein (termed CRP or CAP) which is a dimer having two identical subunits each capable of binding one molecule of cAMP. The N-terminal domain of the CRP binds the cAMP while the C-terminal domain binds to DNA at the promotor region of a cAMP-dependent operon and stimulates transcription by promoting the formation of a preinitiation complex between RNA polymerase and the DNA. Intracellular cAMP levels in E. coli (the prototype organism for such studies) are influenced by the type and availability of carbon source used for growth. High intracellular cAMP levels should lead to higher concentrations of cAMP-CRP complexes which should increase the transcription rates for cAMP-dependent operons (such as the lac operon of beta-galactosidase) and indeed the differential rate of beta-galactosidase biosynthesis correlates to intracellular cAMP levels. In the case of cellulase, catabolite repression by glucose or other readily metabolizable compounds closely controls production in an apparently similar manner and therefore a correlation may exist between enzyme biosynthesis and intracellular cAMP levels. This communication describes the fluctuation in cAMP levels during cellulase induction and repression in the thermophilic actinomycete, Thermomonospora curvata.

  20. Novel adenosine 3 prime ,5 prime -cyclic monophosphate dependent protein kinases in a marine diatom

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, P.P.C.; Volcani, B.E. )

    1989-08-08

    Two novel adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) dependent protein kinases have been isolated from the diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis. The kinases, designated I and II, are eluted from DEAE-Sephacel at 0.10 and 0.15 M NaCl. They have a high affinity for cAMP and are activated by micromolar cAMP. They exhibit maximal activity at 5 mM Mg{sup 2+} and pH 8 with the preferred phosphate donor ATP and phosphate acceptor histone H1. They phosphorylate sea urchin sperm histone H1 on a single serine site in the sequence Arg-Lys-Gly-Ser({sup 32}P)-Ser-Asn-Ala-Arg and have an apparent M{sub r} of 75,000 as determined by gel filtration and sucrose density sedimentation. In the kinase I preparation a single protein band with an apparent M{sub r} of about 78,000 is photolabeled with 8-azido({sup 32}P)cAMP and is also phosphorylated with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP in a cAMP-dependent manner, after autoradiography following sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. The rate of phosphorylation of the 78,000-dalton band is independent of the enzyme concentration. The results indicate that (i) these diatom cAMP-dependent protein kinases are monomeric proteins, possessing both the cAMP-binding regulatory and catalytic domains on the same polypeptide chain, (ii) the enzymes do not dissociate into smaller species upon activation by binding cAMP, and (iii) self-phosphorylation of the enzymes by an intrapeptide reaction is cAMP dependent. The two diatom cAMP kinases are refractory to the heat-stable protein kinase modulator from rabbit muscle, but they respond differently to proteolytic degradation and to inhibition by arachidonic acid and several microbial alkaloids.

  1. Adsorption of nucleotides on biomimetic apatite: The case of cytidine 5' monophosphate (CMP).

    PubMed

    Choimet, Maëla; Tourrette, Audrey; Drouet, Christophe

    2015-10-15

    The chemical interaction between DNA macromolecules and hard tissues in vertebrate is of foremost importance in paleogenetics, as bones and teeth represent a major substrate for the genetic material after cell death. Recently, the empirical hypothesis of DNA "protection" over time thanks to its adsorption on hard tissues was revisited from a physico-chemical viewpoint. In particular, the existence of a strong interaction between phosphate groups of DNA backbone and the surface of apatite nanocrystals (mimicking bone/dentin mineral) was evidenced on an experimental basis. In the field of nanomedicine, DNA or RNA can be used for gene transport into cells, and apatite nanocarriers then appear promising. In order to shed some more light on interactions between DNA molecules and apatite, the present study focuses on the adsorption of a "model" nucleotide, cytidine 5' monophosphate (CMP), on a carbonated biomimetic apatite sample. The follow-up of CMP kinetics of adsorption pointed out the rapidity of interaction with stabilization reached within few minutes. The adsorption isotherm could be realistically fitted to the Sips model (Langmuir-Freundlich) suggesting the influence of surface heterogeneities and adsorption cooperativity in the adsorption process. The desorption study pointed out the reversible character of CMP adsorption on biomimetic apatite. This contribution is intended to prove helpful in view of better apprehending the molecular interaction of DNA fragments and apatite compounds, independently of the application domain, such as bone diagenesis or nanomedicine. This study may also appear informative for researchers interested in the origins of life on Earth and the occurrence and behavior of primitive biomolecules.

  2. Adsorption of nucleotides on biomimetic apatite: The case of cytidine 5' monophosphate (CMP).

    PubMed

    Choimet, Maëla; Tourrette, Audrey; Drouet, Christophe

    2015-10-15

    The chemical interaction between DNA macromolecules and hard tissues in vertebrate is of foremost importance in paleogenetics, as bones and teeth represent a major substrate for the genetic material after cell death. Recently, the empirical hypothesis of DNA "protection" over time thanks to its adsorption on hard tissues was revisited from a physico-chemical viewpoint. In particular, the existence of a strong interaction between phosphate groups of DNA backbone and the surface of apatite nanocrystals (mimicking bone/dentin mineral) was evidenced on an experimental basis. In the field of nanomedicine, DNA or RNA can be used for gene transport into cells, and apatite nanocarriers then appear promising. In order to shed some more light on interactions between DNA molecules and apatite, the present study focuses on the adsorption of a "model" nucleotide, cytidine 5' monophosphate (CMP), on a carbonated biomimetic apatite sample. The follow-up of CMP kinetics of adsorption pointed out the rapidity of interaction with stabilization reached within few minutes. The adsorption isotherm could be realistically fitted to the Sips model (Langmuir-Freundlich) suggesting the influence of surface heterogeneities and adsorption cooperativity in the adsorption process. The desorption study pointed out the reversible character of CMP adsorption on biomimetic apatite. This contribution is intended to prove helpful in view of better apprehending the molecular interaction of DNA fragments and apatite compounds, independently of the application domain, such as bone diagenesis or nanomedicine. This study may also appear informative for researchers interested in the origins of life on Earth and the occurrence and behavior of primitive biomolecules. PMID:26117294

  3. Repetitive mechanical strain suppresses macrophage uptake of immunoglobulin G complexes and enhances cyclic adenosine monophosphate synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Mattana, J.; Sankaran, R. T.; Singhal, P. C.

    1995-01-01

    Uptake of immunoglobulin G (IgG) complexes by macrophages (M phi) may play an important role in disease states characterized by increased levels of circulating immune complexes. In sites such as the glomerular mesangium M phi may be subjected to repetitive mechanical strain, although in vitro studies of M phi endocytosis are typically carried out with cells grown on rigid surfaces. We undertook the present study to determine whether repetitive mechanical strain could modulate M phi endocytosis of IgG complexes. IgG complex uptake was significantly diminished in M phi that were subjected to repetitive mechanical strain using parameters corresponding to peak and minimal intraglomerular pressures compared with control, and uptake varied according to the amount of mechanical strain applied. There was no significant difference in surface binding of IgG between M phi subjected to strain and those not. Mechanical strain did not significantly influence the rate of IgG complex degradation. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase and guanylate cyclase activity did not alter the effect of mechanical strain, although this effect was potentiated by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX). Angiotensin II, which has been shown to reduce adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) production in M phi, significantly attenuated the suppressive effect of mechanical strain on IgG complex uptake as well as another inhibitor of cAMP generation, indomethacin. Enzyme immunoassay demonstrated significantly enhanced levels of cAMP in M phi that were subjected to mechanical strain compared with control, an effect that was potentiated by IBMX and attenuated by angiotensin II and indomethacin. These results demonstrate that repetitive mechanical strain significantly reduces IgG complex uptake by M phi, most likely by enhancing cAMP synthesis. Such an effect might play a significant role in macromolecule handling by M phi in sites in which they are subjected to repetitive mechanical deformation such as

  4. Turning an antiviral into an anticancer drug: Nanoparticle delivery of acyclovir monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jing; Zhang, Yuan; Ramishetti, Srinivas; Wang, Yuhua; Huang, Leaf

    2013-01-01

    Anti-herpes simplex virus (HSV) drug acyclovir (ACV) is phosphorylated by the viral thymidine kinase (TK), but not the cellular TK. Phosphorylated ACV inhibits cellular DNA synthesis and kills the infected cells. We hypothesize that ACV monophosphate (ACVP), which is an activated metabolite of ACV, should be efficient in killing cells independent of HSV-TK. If so, ACVP should be a cytotoxic agent if properly delivered to the cancer cells. The Lipid/Calcium/Phosphate (LCP) nanoparticles (NPs) with a membrane/core structure were used to encapsulate ACVP to facilitate the targeted delivery of ACVP to the tumor. The LCP NPs showed entrapment efficiency of ~69%, the nano-scaled particle size and positive zeta potential. Moreover, ACVP-loaded LCP NPs (A-LCP NPs) exhibited concentration-dependent cytotoxicity against H460 cells and increased S-phase arrest. More importantly, a significant reduction of the tumor volume over 4 days following administration (p<0.05~0.005) of A-LCP NPs, suggests excellent in vivo efficacy. Whereas, two free drugs (ACV and ACVP) and blank LCP NPs showed little or no therapeutic effect. It was also found that the high efficacy of A-LCP NPs was associated with the ability to induce dramatic apoptosis of the tumor cells, as well as significantly inhibit tumor cell proliferation and cell cycle progression. In conclusion, with the help of LCP NPs, monophosphorylation modification of ACV can successfully modify an HSV-TK-dependent antiviral drug into an anti-tumor drug. PMID:23791977

  5. Protective mechanisms of adenosine 5'-monophosphate in platelet activation and thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, E; Badimon, L; Caballero, J; Padró, T; Vilahur, G; Alarcón, M; Pérez, P; Palomo, I

    2014-03-01

    Platelet activation is relevant to a variety of acute thrombotic events. We sought to examine adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) mechanisms of action in preventing platelet activation, thrombus formation and platelet-related inflammatory response. We assessed the effect of AMP on 1) P-selectin expression and GPIIb/IIIa activation by flow cytometry; 2) Platelet aggregation and ATP secretion induced by ADP, collagen, TRAP-6, convulxin and thrombin; 3) Platelet rolling and firm adhesion, and platelet-leukocyte interactions under flow-controlled conditions; and, 4) Platelet cAMP levels, sP-selectin, sCD40L, IL-1β, TGF-β1 and CCL5 release, PDE3A activity and PKA phosphorylation. The effect of AMP on in vivo thrombus formation was also evaluated in a murine model. The AMP docking with respect to A2 adenosine receptor was determined by homology. AMP concentration-dependently (0.1 to 3 mmol/l) inhibited P-selectin expression and GPIIb/IIIa activation, platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, TRAP-6 and convulxin, and diminished platelet rolling and firm adhesion. Furthermore, AMP induced a marked increase in the rolling speed of leukocytes retained on the platelet surface. At these concentrations AMP significantly decreased inflammatory mediator from platelet, increased intraplatelet cAMP levels and inhibited PDE3A activity. Interestingly, SQ22536, ZM241385 and SCH58261 attenuated the antiplatelet effect of AMP. Docking experiments revealed that AMP had the same orientation that adenosine inside the A2 adenosine receptor binding pocket. These in vitro antithrombotic properties were further supported in an in vivo model of thrombosis. Considering the successful use of combined antiplatelet therapy, AMP may be further developed as a novel antiplatelet agent. PMID:24306059

  6. Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Accumulation and beta-Adrenergic Binding in Unweighted and Denervated Rat Soleus Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Christopher R.; Woodman, Christopher R.; Woolridge, Dale; Tischler, Marc E.

    1992-01-01

    Unweighting, but not denervation, of muscle reportedly "spares" insulin receptors, increasing insulin sensitivity. Unweighting also increases beta-adrenergic responses of carbohydrate metabolism. These differential characteristics were studied further by comparing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation and beta-adrenergic binding in normal and 3-day unweighted or denervated soleus muscle. Submaximal amounts of isoproterenol, a p-agonist, increased cAMP accumulation in vitro and in vivo (by intramuscular (IM) injection) to a greater degree (P less than .05) in unweighted muscles. Forskolin or maximal isoproterenol had similar in vitro effects in all muscles, suggesting increased beta-adrenergic sensitivity following unweighting. Increased sensitivity was confirmed by a greater receptor density (B(sub max)) for iodo-125(-)-pindolol in particulate preparations of unweighted (420 x 10(exp -18) mol/mg muscle) than of control or denervated muscles (285 x 10(exp-18) mol/mg muscle). The three dissociation constant (Kd) values were similar (20.3 to 25.8 pmol/L). Total binding capacity (11.4 fmol/muscle) did not change during 3 days of unweighting, but diminished by 30% with denervation. This result illustrates the "sparing" and loss of receptors, respectively, in these two atrophy models. In diabetic animals, IM injection of insulin diminished CAMP accumulation in the presence of theophylline in unweighted muscle (-66% +/- 2%) more than in controls (-42% +'- 6%, P less than .001). These results show that insulin affects CAMP formation in muscle, and support a greater in vivo insulin response following unweighting atrophy. These various data support a role for lysosomal proteolysis in denervation, but not in unweighting, atrophy.

  7. Turning an antiviral into an anticancer drug: nanoparticle delivery of acyclovir monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jing; Zhang, Yuan; Ramishetti, Srinivas; Wang, Yuhua; Huang, Leaf

    2013-09-28

    Anti-herpes simplex virus (HSV) drug acyclovir (ACV) is phosphorylated by the viral thymidine kinase (TK), but not the cellular TK. Phosphorylated ACV inhibits cellular DNA synthesis and kills the infected cells. We hypothesize that ACV monophosphate (ACVP), which is an activated metabolite of ACV, should be efficient in killing cells independent of HSV-TK. If so, ACVP should be a cytotoxic agent if properly delivered to the cancer cells. The Lipid/Calcium/Phosphate (LCP) nanoparticles (NPs) with a membrane/core structure were used to encapsulate ACVP to facilitate the targeted delivery of ACVP to the tumor. The LCP NPs showed entrapment efficiency of ~70%, the nano-scaled particle size and positive zeta potential. Moreover, ACVP-loaded LCP NPs (A-LCP NPs) exhibited concentration-dependent cytotoxicity against H460 cells and increased S-phase arrest. More importantly, a significant reduction of the tumor volume over 4 days following administration (p<0.05-0.005) of A-LCP NPs, suggests excellent in vivo efficacy. Whereas, two free drugs (ACV and ACVP) and blank LCP NPs showed little or no therapeutic effect. It was also found that the high efficacy of A-LCP NPs was associated with the ability to induce dramatic apoptosis of the tumor cells, as well as significantly inhibit tumor cell proliferation and cell cycle progression. In conclusion, with the help of LCP NPs, monophosphorylation modification of ACV can successfully modify an HSV-TK-dependent antiviral drug into an anti-tumor drug.

  8. Enzyme architecture: deconstruction of the enzyme-activating phosphodianion interactions of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Lawrence M; Amyes, Tina L; Goryanova, Bogdana; Gerlt, John A; Richard, John P

    2014-07-16

    The mechanism for activation of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) by interactions of side chains from Gln215 and Try217 at a gripper loop and R235, adjacent to this loop, with the phosphodianion of OMP was probed by determining the kinetic parameters k(cat) and K(m) for all combinations of single, double, and triple Q215A, Y217F, and R235A mutations. The 12 kcal/mol intrinsic binding energy of the phosphodianion is shown to be equal to the sum of the binding energies of the side chains of R235 (6 kcal/mol), Q215 (2 kcal/mol), Y217 (2 kcal/mol), and hydrogen bonds to the G234 and R235 backbone amides (2 kcal/mol). Analysis of a triple mutant cube shows small (ca. 1 kcal/mol) interactions between phosphodianion gripper side chains, which are consistent with steric crowding of the side chains around the phosphodianion at wild-type OMPDC. These mutations result in the same change in the activation barrier to the OMPDC-catalyzed reactions of the whole substrate OMP and the substrate pieces (1-β-D-erythrofuranosyl)orotic acid (EO) and phosphite dianion. This shows that the transition states for these reactions are stabilized by similar interactions with the protein catalyst. The 12 kcal/mol intrinsic phosphodianion binding energy of OMP is divided between the 8 kcal/mol of binding energy, which is utilized to drive a thermodynamically unfavorable conformational change of the free enzyme, resulting in an increase in (k(cat))(obs) for OMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylation of OMP, and the 4 kcal/mol of binding energy, which is utilized to stabilize the Michaelis complex, resulting in a decrease in (K(m))(obs).

  9. A Rearrangement of the Guanosine-Binding Site Establishes an Extended Network of Functional Interactions in the Tetrahymena Group I Ribozyme Active Site†

    PubMed Central

    Forconi, Marcello; Sengupta, Raghuvir N.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Protein enzymes appear to use extensive packing and hydrogen-bonding interactions to precisely position catalytic groups within active sites. Due to their inherent backbone flexibility and limited side chain repertoire, RNA enzymes face additional challenges relative to proteins in precisely positioning substrates and catalytic groups. Here, we use the group I ribozyme to probe the existence, establishment, and functional consequences of an extended network of interactions in an RNA active site. The group I ribozyme catalyzes a site-specific attack of guanosine on an oligonucleotide substrate. We previously determined that the hydrogen bond between the exocyclic amino group of guanosine and the 2′-hydroxyl group at position A261 of the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme contributes to overall catalysis. We now use functional data, aided by double-mutant cycles, to probe this hydrogen bond in the individual reaction steps of the catalytic cycle. Our results indicate that this hydrogen bond is not formed upon guanosine binding to the ribozyme but instead forms at a later stage of the catalytic cycle. Formation of this hydrogen bond is correlated to other structural rearrangements in the ribozyme's active site that are promoted by docking of the oligonucleotide substrate into the ribozyme's active site, and disruption of this interaction has deleterious consequences for the chemical transformation within the ternary complex. These results, combined with earlier results, provide insight into the nature of the multiple conformational steps used by the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme to achieve its active structure and reveal an intricate, extended network of interactions that is used to establish catalytic interactions within this RNA's active site. PMID:20175542

  10. 5'-Adenosine monophosphate and adenosine metabolism, and adenosine responses in mouse, rat and guinea pig heart.

    PubMed

    Headrick, J P; Peart, J; Hack, B; Garnham, B; Matherne, G P

    2001-11-01

    We examined myocardial 5'-adenosine monophosphate (5'-AMP) catabolism, adenosine salvage and adenosine responses in perfused guinea pig, rat and mouse heart. MVO(2) increased from 71+/-8 microl O(2)/min per g in guinea pig to 138+/-17 and 221+/-15 microl O(2)/min per g in rat and mouse. VO(2)/beat was 0.42+/-0.03, 0.50+/-0.03 and 0.55+/-0.04 microl O(2)/g in guinea pig, rat and mouse, respectively. Resting and peak coronary flows were highest in mouse vs. rat and guinea pig, and peak ventricular pressures and Ca(2+) sensitivity declined as heart mass increased. Net myocardial 5'-AMP dephosphorylation increased significantly as mass declined (3.8+/-0.5, 9.0+/-1.4 and 11.0+/-1.6 nmol/min per g in guinea pig, rat and mouse, respectively). Despite increased 5'-AMP catabolism, coronary venous [adenosine] was similar in guinea pig, rat and mouse (45+/-8, 69+/-10 and 57+/-14 nM, respectively). Comparable venous [adenosine] was achieved by increased salvage vs. deamination: 64%, 41% and 39% of adenosine formed was rephosphorylated while 23%, 46%, and 50% was deaminated in mouse, rat and guinea pig, respectively. Moreover, only 35-45% of inosine and its catabolites derive from 5'-AMP (vs. IMP) dephosphorylation in all species. Although post-ischemic purine loss was low in mouse (due to these adaptations), functional tolerance to ischemia decreased with heart mass. Cardiovascular sensitivity to adenosine also differed between species, with A(1) receptor sensitivity being greatest in mouse while A(2) sensitivity was greatest in guinea pig. In summary: (i) cardiac 5'-AMP dephosphorylation, VO(2), contractility and Ca(2+) sensitivity all increase as heart mass falls; (ii) adaptations in adenosine salvage vs. deamination limit purine loss and yield similar adenosine levels across species; (iii) ischemic tolerance declines with heart mass; and (iv) cardiovascular sensitivity to adenosine varies, with increasing A(2) sensitivity relative to A(1) sensitivity in larger hearts.

  11. Mechanism of the Orotidine 5′-Monophosphate Decarboxylase-Catalyzed Reaction: Evidence for Substrate Destabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.; Wood, M; Fedorov, A; Fedorov, E; Imker, H; Amyes, T; Richard, J; Almo, S; Gerlt, J

    2009-01-01

    The reaction catalyzed by orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) involves a stabilized anionic intermediate, although the structural basis for the rate acceleration (kcat/knon, 7.1 x 1016) and proficiency (kcat/KM)/knon, 4.8 x 1022 M-1 is uncertain. That the OMPDCs from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus (MtOMPDC) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScOMPDC) catalyze the exchange of H6 of the UMP product with solvent deuterium allows an estimate of a lower limit on the rate acceleration associated with stabilization of the intermediate and its flanking transition states (=1010). The origin of the 'missing' contribution, =107 (1017 total - =1010), is of interest. Based on structures of liganded complexes, unfavorable electrostatic interactions between the substrate carboxylate group and a proximal Asp (Asp 70 in MtOMPDC and Asp 91 in ScOMPDC) have been proposed to contribute to the catalytic efficiency. We investigated that hypothesis by structural and functional characterization of the D70N and D70G mutants of MtOMPDC and the D91N mutant of ScOMPDC. The substitutions for Asp 70 in MtOMPDC significantly decrease the value of kcat for decarboxylation of FOMP (a more reactive substrate analogue) but have little effect on the value of kex for exchange of H6 of FUMP with solvent deuterium; the structures of wild-type MtOMPDC and its mutants are superimposable when complexed with 6-azaUMP. In contrast, the D91N mutant of ScOMPDC does not catalyze exchange of H6 of FUMP; the structures of wild-type ScOMPDC and its D91N mutant are not superimposable when complexed with 6-azaUMP, with differences in both the conformation of the active site loop and the orientation of the ligand vis vis the active site residues. We propose that the differential effects of substitutions for Asp 70 of MtOMPDC on decarboxylation and exchange provide additional evidence for a carbanionic intermediate as well as the involvement of Asp 70 in substrate destabilization.

  12. Mechanism of the orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase-catalyzed reaction: evidence for substrate destabilization.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kui K; Wood, B McKay; Fedorov, Alexander A; Fedorov, Elena V; Imker, Heidi J; Amyes, Tina L; Richard, John P; Almo, Steven C; Gerlt, John A

    2009-06-23

    The reaction catalyzed by orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) involves a stabilized anionic intermediate, although the structural basis for the rate acceleration (k(cat)/k(non), 7.1 x 10(16)) and proficiency [(k(cat)/K(M))/k(non), 4.8 x 10(22) M(-1)] is uncertain. That the OMPDCs from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus (MtOMPDC) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScOMPDC) catalyze the exchange of H6 of the UMP product with solvent deuterium allows an estimate of a lower limit on the rate acceleration associated with stabilization of the intermediate and its flanking transition states (>or=10(10)). The origin of the "missing" contribution, or=10(10)), is of interest. Based on structures of liganded complexes, unfavorable electrostatic interactions between the substrate carboxylate group and a proximal Asp (Asp 70 in MtOMPDC and Asp 91 in ScOMPDC) have been proposed to contribute to the catalytic efficiency [Wu, N., Mo, Y., Gao, J., and Pai, E. F. (2000) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 97, 2017-2022]. We investigated that hypothesis by structural and functional characterization of the D70N and D70G mutants of MtOMPDC and the D91N mutant of ScOMPDC. The substitutions for Asp 70 in MtOMPDC significantly decrease the value of k(cat) for decarboxylation of FOMP (a more reactive substrate analogue) but have little effect on the value of k(ex) for exchange of H6 of FUMP with solvent deuterium; the structures of wild-type MtOMPDC and its mutants are superimposable when complexed with 6-azaUMP. In contrast, the D91N mutant of ScOMPDC does not catalyze exchange of H6 of FUMP; the structures of wild-type ScOMPDC and its D91N mutant are not superimposable when complexed with 6-azaUMP, with differences in both the conformation of the active site loop and the orientation of the ligand vis a vis the active site residues. We propose that the differential effects of substitutions for Asp 70 of MtOMPDC on decarboxylation and

  13. Activation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase blocks cumulus cell expansion through inhibition of protein synthesis during in vitro maturation in Swine.

    PubMed

    Santiquet, Nicolas; Sasseville, Maxime; Laforest, Martin; Guillemette, Christine; Gilchrist, Robert B; Richard, François J

    2014-08-01

    The serine/threonine kinase 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a heterotrimeric protein known as a metabolic switch, is involved in oocyte nuclear maturation in mice, cattle, and swine. The present study analyzed AMPK activation in cumulus cell expansion during in vitro maturation (IVM) of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC). 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR) is a well-known activator of AMPK. It inhibited oocyte meiotic resumption in COC. Moreover, cumulus cell expansion did not occur in the presence of AICAR, demonstrating its marked impact on cumulus cells. Activation of AMPK was supported by AICAR-mediated phosphorylation of alpha AMPK subunits. Furthermore, the presence of AICAR increased glucose uptake, a classical response to activation of this metabolic switch in response to depleted cellular energy levels. Neither nuclear maturation nor cumulus expansion was reversed by glucosamine, an alternative substrate in hyaluronic acid synthesis, through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, which ruled out possible depletion of substrates. Both increased gap junction communication and phosphodiesterase activity in COC are dependent on protein synthesis during the initial hours of IVM; however, both were inhibited in the presence of AICAR, which supports the finding that activation of AMPK by AICAR mediated inhibition of protein synthesis. Moreover, this protein synthesis inhibition was equivalent to that of the well-known protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, as observed on cumulus expansion and protein concentration. Finally, the phosphorylation level of selected kinases was investigated. The pattern of raptor phosphorylation is supportive of activation of AMPK-mediated inhibition of protein synthesis. In conclusion, AICAR-mediated AMPK activation in porcine COC inhibited cumulus cell expansion and protein synthesis. These results bring new considerations to the importance of this kinase in ovarian

  14. Metformin inhibits growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells via liver kinase B-1-independent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    GUO, QIANQIAN; LIU, ZHIYAN; JIANG, LILI; LIU, MENGJIE; MA, JIEQUN; YANG, CHENGCHENG; HAN, LILI; NAN, KEJUN; LIANG, XUAN

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, the most widely administered oral anti-diabetic therapeutic agent, exerts its glucose-lowering effect predominantly via liver kinase B1 (LKB1)-dependent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that metformin possesses potential antitumor effects. However, whether the antitumor effect of metformin is via the LKB1/AMPK signaling pathway remains to be determined. In the current study, the effects of metformin on proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H460 (LKB1-null) and H1299 (LKB1-positive) cells were assessed, and the role of LKB1/AMPK signaling in the anti-growth effects of metformin were investigated. Cell viability was determined using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry, and protein expression levels were measured by western blotting. Metformin inhibited proliferation, induced significant cell cycle arrest at the G0–G1 phase and increased apoptosis in NSCLC cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, regardless of the level of LKB1 protein expression. Furthermore, knockdown of LKB1 with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) did not affect the antiproliferative effect of metformin in the H1299 cells. Metformin stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and subsequently suppressed the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin and its downstream effector, 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase in the two cell lines. These effects were abrogated by silencing AMPK with small interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, knockdown of AMPK with siRNA inhibited the effect of metformin on cell proliferation in the two cell lines. These results provide evidence that the growth inhibition of metformin in NSCLC cells is mediated by LKB1-independent activation of AMPK, indicating that metformin may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of

  15. Rate and Equilibrium Constants for an Enzyme Conformational Change during Catalysis by Orotidine 5′-Monophosphate Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The caged complex between orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase (ScOMPDC) and 5-fluoroorotidine 5′-monophosphate (FOMP) undergoes decarboxylation ∼300 times faster than the caged complex between ScOMPDC and the physiological substrate, orotidine 5′-monophosphate (OMP). Consequently, the enzyme conformational changes required to lock FOMP at a protein cage and release product 5-fluorouridine 5′-monophosphate (FUMP) are kinetically significant steps. The caged form of ScOMPDC is stabilized by interactions between the side chains from Gln215, Tyr217, and Arg235 and the substrate phosphodianion. The control of these interactions over the barrier to the binding of FOMP and the release of FUMP was probed by determining the effect of all combinations of single, double, and triple Q215A, Y217F, and R235A mutations on kcat/Km and kcat for turnover of FOMP by wild-type ScOMPDC; its values are limited by the rates of substrate binding and product release, respectively. The Q215A and Y217F mutations each result in an increase in kcat and a decrease in kcat/Km, due to a weakening of the protein–phosphodianion interactions that favor fast product release and slow substrate binding. The Q215A/R235A mutation causes a large decrease in the kinetic parameters for ScOMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylation of OMP, which are limited by the rate of the decarboxylation step, but much smaller decreases in the kinetic parameters for ScOMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylation of FOMP, which are limited by the rate of enzyme conformational changes. By contrast, the Y217A mutation results in large decreases in kcat/Km for ScOMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylation of both OMP and FOMP, because of the comparable effects of this mutation on rate-determining decarboxylation of enzyme-bound OMP and on the rate-determining enzyme conformational change for decarboxylation of FOMP. We propose that kcat = 8.2 s–1 for decarboxylation of FOMP by the Y217A mutant is equal to the rate constant for cage formation

  16. A new mutagenicity assay method for frameshift mutagens based on deleting or inserting a guanosine nucleotide in the beta-lactamase gene.

    PubMed

    Hour, T C; Lee, C C; Lin, J K

    1995-09-01

    The conventional method of site-directed mutagenesis was used to develop two Salmonella strains, JK-1 and JK-2, for detecting frameshift mutagens. The JK-1 strain was derived from Salmonella typhimurium TA1537 strain transformed by a mutant construct. A guanosine nucleotide was inserted between nucleotide residues 312 and 313 of the beta-lactamase gene. The JK-2 strain was obtained by the same procedure, but a guanosine nucleotide in position 315 of the beta-lactamase gene was deleted. The strains were tested with ten frameshift mutagens and the revertants were selected by ampicillin resistance. Representative mutagens including 2-nitrofluorene (2-NF), 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF), 9-aminoacridine (9-AA), 2,7-diaminofluorene (2,7-DAF) and 2-methoxy-6-chloro-9-(3-(ethyl-2-chloro-ethyl)-aminopropylamino)acridine (ICR-170) were more potent in the JK-1 strain than the JK-2 strain, and the number of revertant colonies were dose related. Under the same conditions, the ampicillin test was more sensitive than the Ames test. Other types of compounds such as 2-methoxy-6-chloro-9-(2-chloroethylaminopropylamino)acridine (ICR-191), benzo[a]pyrene (BP), 4-nitroquinoline N-oxide (4-NQNO), hycanthone and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) were not as mutagenic to these new strains. The method is quite promising for studying certain specific frameshift mutagens, but more chemical mutagens should be tested to validate its applicability and reproducibility in general use. PMID:8544757

  17. 5'-C-Malonyl RNA: Small Interfering RNAs Modified with 5'-Monophosphate Bioisostere Demonstrate Gene Silencing Activity.

    PubMed

    Zlatev, Ivan; Foster, Donald J; Liu, Jingxuan; Charisse, Klaus; Brigham, Benjamin; Parmar, Rubina G; Jadhav, Vasant; Maier, Martin A; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G; Egli, Martin; Manoharan, Muthiah

    2016-04-15

    5'-Phosphorylation is a critical step in the cascade of events that leads to loading of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) into the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) to elicit gene silencing. 5'-Phosphorylation of exogenous siRNAs is generally accomplished by a cytosolic Clp1 kinase, and in most cases, the presence of a 5'-monophosphate on synthetic siRNAs is not a prerequisite for activity. Chemically introduced, metabolically stable 5'-phosphate mimics can lead to higher metabolic stability, increased RISC loading, and higher gene silencing activities of chemically modified siRNAs. In this study, we report the synthesis of 5'-C-malonyl RNA, a 5'-monophosphate bioisostere. A 5'-C-malonyl-modified nucleotide was incorporated at the 5'-terminus of chemically modified RNA oligonucleotides using solid-phase synthesis. In vitro silencing activity, in vitro metabolic stability, and in vitro RISC loading of 5'-C-malonyl siRNA was compared to corresponding 5'-phosphorylated and 5'-nonphosphorylated siRNAs. The 5'-C-malonyl siRNAs showed sustained or improved in vitro gene silencing and high levels of Ago2 loading and conferred dramatically improved metabolic stability to the antisense strand of the siRNA duplexes. In silico modeling studies indicate a favorable fit of the 5'-C-malonyl group within the 5'-phosphate binding pocket of human Ago2MID domain.

  18. Distinct Requirements for 5'-Monophosphate-assisted RNA Cleavage by Escherichia coli RNase E and RNase G.

    PubMed

    Richards, Jamie; Belasco, Joel G

    2016-03-01

    RNase E and RNase G are homologous endonucleases that play important roles in RNA processing and decay in Escherichia coli and related bacterial species. Rapid mRNA degradation is facilitated by the preference of both enzymes for decay intermediates whose 5' end is monophosphorylated. In this report we identify key characteristics of RNA that influence the rate of 5'-monophosphate-assisted cleavage by these two ribonucleases. In vitro, both require at least two and prefer three or more unpaired 5'-terminal nucleotides for such cleavage; however, RNase G is impeded more than RNase E when fewer than four unpaired nucleotides are present at the 5' end. Each can tolerate any unpaired nucleotide (A, G, C, or U) at either of the first two positions, with only modest biases. The optimal spacing between the 5' end and the scissile phosphate appears to be eight nucleotides for RNase E but only six for RNase G. 5'-Monophosphate-assisted cleavage also occurs, albeit more slowly, when that spacing is greater or at most one nucleotide shorter than the optimum, but there is no simple inverse relationship between increased spacing and the rate of cleavage. These properties are also manifested during 5'-end-dependent mRNA degradation in E. coli.

  19. A study of the hydration of deoxydinucleoside monophosphates containing thymine, uracil and its 5-halogen derivatives: Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Alderfer, J L; Danilov, V I; Poltev, V I; Slyusarchuk, O N

    1999-04-01

    An extensive Monte Carlo simulation of hydration of various conformations of the dinucleoside monophosphates (DNP), containing thymine, uracil and its 5-halogen derivatives has been performed. An anti-anti conformation is the most energetically stable one for each of the DNPs. In the majority of cases the energy preference is determined by water-water interaction. For other dimers conformational energy is the most important factor, or both the factors are of nearly equal importance. The introduction of the methyl group into the 5-position of uracil ring most noticeably influences the conformational energy and leads to the decrease of its stabilizing contribution to the total interaction energy. The introduction of halogen atoms increases the relative content of anti-syn and syn-anti conformations of DNPs as compared to the parent ones due to the formation of an energetically more favorable water structure around these conformations. A correlation is observed between the Monte Carlo results for the halogenated DNPs and their experimental photoproduct distribution. The data obtained demonstrates a sequence dependence in the photochemistry of the halogenated dinucleoside monophosphates.

  20. Oocyte maturation and fertilization in marine nemertean worms: using similar sorts of signaling pathways as in mammals, but often with differing results.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Stephen A; Cline, Cory; Goodrich, David

    2013-08-01

    In marine worms belonging to the phylum Nemertea, oocyte maturation and fertilization are regulated by the same general kinds of signals that control such processes in mammals. However, unlike mammalian oocytes that develop within follicles, nemertean oocytes characteristically lack a surrounding sheath of follicle cells and often respond differently to maturation-related cues than do mammalian oocytes. For example, elevators of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) or cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels promote the resumption of meiotic maturation (=germinal vesicle breakdown, GVBD) in nemertean oocytes, whereas increasing intraoocytic cAMP and cGMP typically blocks GVBD in mammals. Similarly, AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) signaling keeps nemertean oocytes from maturing, but in mouse oocytes, AMPK activation triggers GVBD. In addition, protein kinase C (PKC) activity is required for seawater-induced GVBD in nemerteans, whereas some PKCs have been shown to inhibit GVBD in mammals. Furthermore, although fertilization causes both types of oocytes to reorganize their endoplasmic reticulum and generate calcium oscillations that can involve soluble sperm factor activity and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate signaling, some discrepancies in the spatiotemporal patterns and underlying mechanisms of fertilization are also evident in nemerteans versus mammals. Thus, to characterize differences and similarities in gamete biology more fully, aspects of oocyte maturation and fertilization in marine nemertean worms are reviewed and briefly compared with related findings that have been published for mammalian oocytes. In addition, possible causes of the alternative responses displayed by oocytes in these two animal groups are addressed.

  1. Acid-base catalysis in the chemical mechanism of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Markham, G D; Bock, C L; Schalk-Hihi, C

    1999-04-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) catalyzes the K+-dependent reaction IMP + NAD + H2O --> XMP + NADH + H+ which is the rate-limiting step in guanine nucleotide biosynthesis. The catalytic mechanism of the human type-II IMPDH isozyme has been studied by measurement of the pH dependencies of the normal reaction, of the hydrolysis of 2-chloro-IMP (which yields XMP and Cl- in the absence of NAD), and of inactivation by the affinity label 6-chloro-purine-ribotide (6-Cl-PRT). The pH dependence of the IMPDH reaction shows bell-shaped profiles for kcat and the kcat/Km values for both IMP and NAD, illustrating the involvement of both acidic and basic groups in catalysis. Half-maximal kcat values occur at pH values of 7.2 and 9.8; similar pK values of 6.9 and 9.4 are seen in the kcat/Km profile for NAD. The kcat/Km profile for IMP, which binds first in the predominantly ordered kinetic mechanism, shows pK values of 8.1 and 7.3 for acidic and basic groups, respectively. None of the kinetic pK values correspond to ionizations of the free substrates and thus reflect ionization of the enzyme or enzyme-substrate complexes. The rate of inactivation by 6-Cl-PRT, which modifies the active site sulfhydryl of cysteine-331, increases with pH; the pK of 7.5 reflects the ionization of the sulfhydryl in the E.6-Cl-PRT complex. The pKs of the acids observed in the IMPDH reaction likely also reflect ionization of the cysteine-331 sulfhydryl which adds to C-2 of IMP prior to NAD reduction. The kcat and kcat/Km values for hydrolysis of 2-Cl-IMP show a pK value of 9.9 for a basic group, similar to that seen in the overall reaction, but do not exhibit the ionization of an acidic group. Surprisingly, the rates of 2-Cl-IMP hydrolysis and of inactivation by 6-Cl-PRT are not stimulated by K+, in contrast to the >100-fold K+ activation of the IMPDH reaction. Apparently the enigmatic role of K+ lies in the NAD(H)-dependent segment of the IMPDH reaction. To evaluate the importance of

  2. Additional evidence for the cyclic GMP signaling pathway resulting in the photophobic behavior of Stentor coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Walerczyk, M; Fabczak, S

    2001-12-01

    We report that exo- and endogenous guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) specifically influenced the photophobic response. In behavioral experiments the slowly hydrolyzable and membrane-permeable analogs of cGMP (8-bromo-cGMP [Br-cGMP] and N6,2'-o-dibutyryl-cGMP) dramatically prolonged the time for ciliary stop response and decreased the duration of ciliary reversal in a dose-dependent manner. When analogs of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) (8-bromo-cAMP or N6,2'-o-dibutyryl-cAMP) were used, no essential effects were detected on the kinetics of the photophobic response. Both nonspecific cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity inhibitors (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine [IBMX] and 1,3-dimethylxanthine [theophylline]) and the highly specific cGMP-PDE activity inhibitor 1,4-dihydro-5-[2-propoxyphenyl]-7H-1,2,3-triazolo[4,5-d]pyrimidine-7-one (zaprinast) mimicked the effects of cGMP analogs. Treatment of cells with an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase activity (6-anilino-5,8-quinolinedione [LY 83583]) exerted an effect opposite to that of cGMP analogs and PDE activity inhibitors. The positive physiological effect of LY 83583 was significantly diminished in ciliates that were treated simultaneously with Br-cGMP. In an assay of cell cyclic nucleotide content, the exposure of dark-adapted Stentor to light evoked a transient decrease in the basal level of intracellular cGMP. Alterations in internal cGMP levels were more distinct when the intensity of applied illumination was increased. In the presence of IBMX or theophylline the basal content of cGMP was markedly enhanced, and the photoinduced changes in cGMP level were less pronounced. In this paper the possible whole molecular mechanism by which the ciliary orientation in Stentor is controlled by light is presented. PMID:11783940

  3. Detailed structure of the H2PO4(-)-guanosine diphosphate intermediate in Ras-GAP decoded from FTIR experiments by biomolecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fei; Rudack, Till; Cui, Qiang; Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus

    2012-12-12

    Essential biochemical processes such as signal transduction, energy conversion, or substrate conversion depend on transient ligand binding. Thus, identifying the detailed structure and transient positioning of small ligands, and their stabilization by the surrounding protein, is of great importance. In this study, by decoding information from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra with biomolecular simulation methods, we identify the precise position and hydrogen network of a small compound, the guanosine diphosphate (GDP)-H(2)PO(4)(-) intermediate, in the surrounding protein-protein complex of Ras and its GTPase-activating protein, a central molecular switch in cellular signal transduction. We validate the simulated structure by comparing the calculated fingerprint vibrational modes of H(2)PO(4)(-) with those obtained from FTIR experiments. The new structural information, below the resolution of X-ray structural analysis, gives detailed insight into the catalytic mechanism.

  4. The importance of interaction with membrane lipids through the pleckstrin homology domain of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for rho family small guanosine triphosphatase, FLJ00018.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Shinji; Sato, Katsuya; Banno, Yoshiko; Nagase, Takahiro; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    FLJ00018, a heterotrimeric guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP)-binding protein (G protein) Gβγ subunit-activated guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rho family small GTPases, regulates cellular responses, including cell morphological changes and gene transcriptional regulation, and targets the cellular membranes. FLJ00018 contains a Dbl homology (DH) domain in addition to a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. Here we show that the PH domain of FLJ00018 is required for FLJ00018-induced, serum response element-dependent gene transcription. Although the PH domain of KIAA1415/P-Rex1, another Gβγ subunit-activated guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rho family small GTPases, binds to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate, the PH domain of FLJ00018 binds to polyphosphoinositides including phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and phosphatidic acid. These results suggest that FLJ00018 is targeted via its PH domain to cellular membranes.

  5. Photo-cycle dynamics of LOV1-His domain of phototropin from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with roseoflavin monophosphate cofactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, A.; Penzkofer, A.; Mathes, T.; Hegemann, P.

    2010-09-01

    The wild-type phototropin protein phot from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii consists of two N-terminal LOV domains LOV1 and LOV2 with flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor and a C-terminal serine-threonine kinase domain. It controls multiple steps in the sexual lifecycle of the alga. Here the LOV1-His domain of phot with modified cofactor is studied. FMN is replaced by roseoflavin monophosphate (8-dimethylamino-8-demethyl-FMN, RoFMN). The modified LOV1 domain is called RoLOV1. The photo-dynamics consequences of the cofactor change are studied. The absorption, emission, and photo-cyclic behaviour of LOV1-His and RoLOV1-His are compared. A spectroscopic characterisation of the cofactors FMN and RoFMN (roseoflavin) is given.

  6. Stereoselective aminoacylation of a dinucleoside monophosphate by the imidazolides of DL-alanine and N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-DL-alanine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Profy, A. T.; Usher, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The aminoacylation of diinosine monophosphate was studied experimentally. When the acylating agent was the imidazolide of N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-DL-alanine, a 40 percent enantiomeric excess of the isomer was incorporated at the 2' site and the positions of equilibrium for the reversible 2'-3' migration reaction differed for the D and L enantiomers. The reactivity of the nucleoside hydroxyl groups was found to decrease on the order 2'(3') less than internal 2' and less than 5', and the extent of the reaction was affected by the concentration of the imidazole buffer. Reaction of IpI with imidazolide of unprotected DL-alanine, by contrast, led to an excess of the D isomer at the internal 2' site. Finally, reaction with the N-carboxy anhydride of DL-alanine occurred without stereoselection. These results are found to be relevant to the study of the evolution of optical chemical activity and the origin of genetically directed protein synthesis.

  7. Investigation on the occurrence and significance of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate in phytoplankton and natural aquatic communities

    SciTech Connect

    Francko, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    This study demonstrates, on the basis of several analyanalytical criteria, that the production and extracellular release of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP) is widespread among phytoplankton species. The production and release of CAMP varied markedly among different species grown under similar environmental conditions, and intraspecifically during the life cycle of a given algal species. This investigation marks the first time cAMP has been investigated in natural aquatic systems. An examination of epilimnetic lakewater samples from Lawrence Lake, a hardwater oligotrophic lake, and Wintergreen Lake, a hardwater hypereutrophic lake, both in southwestern Michigan, demonstrated that cAMP existed in both particulate-associated and dissolved forms in these systems.

  8. PCR screening for carriers of bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) and uridine monophosphate synthase (DUMPS) in Argentine Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Poli, M A; Dewey, R; Semorile, L; Lozano, M E; Albariño, C G; Romanowski, V; Grau, O

    1996-05-01

    BLAD (Bovine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency) and DUMPS (Deficiency of Uridine Monophosphate Synthase) are monogenic autosomal, recessive inherited diseases of Holstein cattle. Single nucleotide changes (point mutations) responsible for the genetic disorders were detected by polymerase chain reaction coupled with restriction fragment length polymorphism assays (PCR-RFLP). Using oligonucleotide primers, DNA fragments of predicted sizes were amplified, and the products' specificity was assessed by nucleotide sequencing. Mutations were detected in DNA samples from bovine blood and semen by the presence or absence of restriction sites within the PCR amplification products (Taq I, Hae III for BLAD, Ava I for DUMPS). The test included 104 bulls and 950 cows of Argentinean Holstein breed. Defective alleles frequencies were as follows: 2.88% BLAD in bulls used in artificial insemination, 1.79% in cows; 0.96% DUMPS in bulls and 0.11% in cows. PMID:8693839

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular modeling study on mycophenolic acid: implications for binding to inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Makara, G M; Keserû, G M; Kajtár-Peredy, M; Anderson, W K

    1996-03-15

    The conformation of the sodium salt of mycophenolic acid (MPA), a potent inhibitor of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPD), derived from 1D DIFNOE and 2D ROESY experiments in water and molecular dynamics (MD) is described. The hexenoic acid side chain conformation consistent with the NMR data was similar to that seen in the X-ray structure of MPA. The solution conformation was applied in a molecular modeling study in order to explore the potential features of enzyme binding. Our results, based on striking similarities in molecular volume and electrostatic isopotential between MPA and cofactor NAD+, lead to the suggestion that MPA is capable of binding to the nicotinamide site of IMPD and mimicking the NAD+ inverse regulation of the enzyme. In addition, our proposed model is in good agreement with the observed high affinity of the dinucleotide analogues thiazole- and selenazole-4-carboxamide adenine dinucleotide to IMPD.

  10. Crystal Structure of the Thermus thermophilus 16 S rRNA Methyltransferase RsmC in Complex with Cofactor and Substrate Guanosine

    SciTech Connect

    Demirci, H.; Gregory, S; Dahlberg, A; Jogl, G

    2008-01-01

    Post-transcriptional modification is a ubiquitous feature of ribosomal RNA in all kingdoms of life. Modified nucleotides are generally clustered in functionally important regions of the ribosome, but the functional contribution to protein synthesis is not well understood. Here we describe high resolution crystal structures for the N{sup 2}-guanine methyltransferase RsmC that modifies residue G1207 in 16 S rRNA near the decoding site of the 30 S ribosomal subunit. RsmC is a class I S-adenosyl-l-methionine-dependent methyltransferase composed of two methyltransferase domains. However, only one S-adenosyl-l-methionine molecule and one substrate molecule, guanosine, bind in the ternary complex. The N-terminal domain does not bind any cofactor. Two structures with bound S-adenosyl-l-methionine and S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine confirm that the cofactor binding mode is highly similar to other class I methyltransferases. Secondary structure elements of the N-terminal domain contribute to cofactor-binding interactions and restrict access to the cofactor-binding site. The orientation of guanosine in the active site reveals that G1207 has to disengage from its Watson-Crick base pairing interaction with C1051 in the 16 S rRNA and flip out into the active site prior to its modification. Inspection of the 30 S crystal structure indicates that access to G1207 by RsmC is incompatible with the native subunit structure, consistent with previous suggestions that this enzyme recognizes a subunit assembly intermediate.

  11. Biochemical Genetic Pathways that Modulate Aging in Multiple Species

    PubMed Central

    Bitto, Alessandro; Wang, Adrienne M.; Bennett, Christopher F.; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying biological aging have been extensively studied in the past 20 years with the avail of mainly four model organisms: the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster, and the domestic mouse Mus musculus. Extensive research in these four model organisms has identified a few conserved genetic pathways that affect longevity as well as metabolism and development. Here, we review how the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), sirtuins, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and mitochondrial stress-signaling pathways influence aging and life span in the aforementioned models and their possible implications for delaying aging in humans. We also draw some connections between these biochemical pathways and comment on what new developments aging research will likely bring in the near future. PMID:26525455

  12. Identification in Haloferax volcanii of phosphomevalonate decarboxylase and isopentenyl phosphate kinase as catalysts of the terminal enzyme reactions in an archaeal alternate mevalonate pathway.

    PubMed

    Vannice, John C; Skaff, D Andrew; Keightley, Andrew; Addo, James K; Wyckoff, Gerald J; Miziorko, Henry M

    2014-03-01

    Mevalonate (MVA) metabolism provides the isoprenoids used in archaeal lipid biosynthesis. In synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate, the classical MVA pathway involves decarboxylation of mevalonate diphosphate, while an alternate pathway has been proposed to involve decarboxylation of mevalonate monophosphate. To identify the enzymes responsible for metabolism of mevalonate 5-phosphate to isopentenyl diphosphate in Haloferax volcanii, two open reading frames (HVO_2762 and HVO_1412) were selected for expression and characterization. Characterization of these proteins indicated that one enzyme is an isopentenyl phosphate kinase that forms isopentenyl diphosphate (in a reaction analogous to that of Methanococcus jannaschii MJ0044). The second enzyme exhibits a decarboxylase activity that has never been directly attributed to this protein or any homologous protein. It catalyzes the synthesis of isopentenyl phosphate from mevalonate monophosphate, a reaction that has been proposed but never demonstrated by direct experimental proof, which is provided in this account. This enzyme, phosphomevalonate decarboxylase (PMD), exhibits strong inhibition by 6-fluoromevalonate monophosphate but negligible inhibition by 6-fluoromevalonate diphosphate (a potent inhibitor of the classical mevalonate pathway), reinforcing its selectivity for monophosphorylated ligands. Inhibition by the fluorinated analog also suggests that the PMD utilizes a reaction mechanism similar to that demonstrated for the classical MVA pathway decarboxylase. These observations represent the first experimental demonstration in H. volcanii of both the phosphomevalonate decarboxylase and isopentenyl phosphate kinase reactions that are required for an alternate mevalonate pathway in an archaeon. These results also represent, to our knowledge, the first identification and characterization of any phosphomevalonate decarboxylase. PMID:24375100

  13. Diabetic complications within the context of aging: Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide redox, insulin C-peptide, sirtuin 1-liver kinase B1-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase positive feedback and forkhead box O3.

    PubMed

    Ido, Yasuo

    2016-07-01

    Recent research in nutritional control of aging suggests that cytosolic increases in the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and decreasing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide metabolism plays a central role in controlling the longevity gene products sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3). High nutrition conditions, such as the diabetic milieu, increase the ratio of reduced to oxidized forms of cytosolic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide through cascades including the polyol pathway. This redox change is associated with insulin resistance and the development of diabetic complications, and might be counteracted by insulin C-peptide. My research and others' suggest that the SIRT1-liver kinase B1-AMPK cascade creates positive feedback through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide synthesis to help cells cope with metabolic stress. SIRT1 and AMPK can upregulate liver kinase B1 and FOXO3, key factors that help residential stem cells cope with oxidative stress. FOXO3 directly changes epigenetics around transcription start sites, maintaining the health of stem cells. 'Diabetic memory' is likely a result of epigenetic changes caused by high nutritional conditions, which disturb the quiescent state of residential stem cells and impair tissue repair. This could be prevented by restoring SIRT1-AMPK positive feedback through activating FOXO3. PMID:27181414

  14. Diabetic complications within the context of aging: Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide redox, insulin C-peptide, sirtuin 1-liver kinase B1-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase positive feedback and forkhead box O3.

    PubMed

    Ido, Yasuo

    2016-07-01

    Recent research in nutritional control of aging suggests that cytosolic increases in the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and decreasing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide metabolism plays a central role in controlling the longevity gene products sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3). High nutrition conditions, such as the diabetic milieu, increase the ratio of reduced to oxidized forms of cytosolic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide through cascades including the polyol pathway. This redox change is associated with insulin resistance and the development of diabetic complications, and might be counteracted by insulin C-peptide. My research and others' suggest that the SIRT1-liver kinase B1-AMPK cascade creates positive feedback through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide synthesis to help cells cope with metabolic stress. SIRT1 and AMPK can upregulate liver kinase B1 and FOXO3, key factors that help residential stem cells cope with oxidative stress. FOXO3 directly changes epigenetics around transcription start sites, maintaining the health of stem cells. 'Diabetic memory' is likely a result of epigenetic changes caused by high nutritional conditions, which disturb the quiescent state of residential stem cells and impair tissue repair. This could be prevented by restoring SIRT1-AMPK positive feedback through activating FOXO3.

  15. Enhancing GDP-fucose production in recombinant Escherichia coli by metabolic pathway engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yafei; Han, Donglei; Pan, Ying; Wang, Shuaishuai; Fang, Junqiang; Wang, Peng; Liu, Xian-wei

    2015-02-01

    Guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-fucose is the indispensible donor substrate for fucosyltransferase-catalyzed synthesis of fucose-containing biomolecules, which have been found involving in various biological functions. In this work, the salvage pathway for GDP-fucose biosynthesis from Bacterioides fragilis was introduced into Escherichia coli. Besides, the biosynthesis of guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), an essential substrate for GDP-fucose biosynthesis, was enhanced via overexpression of enzymes involved in the salvage pathway of GTP biosynthesis. The production capacities of metabolically engineered strains bearing different combinations of recombinant enzymes were compared. The shake flask fermentation of the strain expressing Fkp, Gpt, Gmk and Ndk obtained the maximum GDP-fucose content of 4.6 ± 0.22 μmol/g (dry cell mass), which is 4.2 fold that of the strain only expressing Fkp. Through fed-batch fermentation, the GDP-fucose content further rose to 6.6 ± 0.14 μmol/g (dry cell mass). In addition to a better productivity than previous fermentation processes based on the de novo pathway for GDP-fucose biosynthesis, the established schemes in this work also have the advantage to be a potential avenue to GDP-fucose analogs encompassing chemical modification on the fucose residue.

  16. Activation of R235A mutant orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase by the guanidinium cation: effective molarity of the cationic side chain of Arg-235.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Shonoi A; Amyes, Tina L; Wood, B McKay; Gerlt, John A; Richard, John P

    2010-02-01

    The R235A mutation at yeast orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) results in a 1300-fold increase in K(m) and a 14-fold decrease in k(cat) for decarboxylation of orotidine 5'-monophosphate, corresponding to a 5.8 kcal/mol destabilization of the transition state. There is strong activation of this mutant enzyme by added guanidinium cation (Gua(+)): 1 M Gua(+) stabilizes the transition state by ca. 3 kcal/mol. This stabilization is due to the binding of Gua(+) to the binary E(mut) x OMP complex, with a K(d) of 50 mM, to form the 9-fold more reactive ternary E(mut) x OMP x Gua(+) complex. The "effective molarity" of the cationic side chain of Arg-235 at the wild-type enzyme is calculated to be 160 M.

  17. An evaluation of short-term corticosteroid response in perennial allergic rhinitis using histamine and adenosine monophosphate nasal challenge

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Andrew M; Sims, Erika J; Orr, Linda C; Robb, Fiona; Lipworth, Brian J

    2003-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the role of AMP nasal challenge as a measure of short-term treatment response in patients receiving intranasal corticosteroids. Adenosine monophosphate (AMP) challenge has been shown to be a good inflammatory surrogate in the lower airways, but it has not been properly evaluated as a nasal challenge test. Methods Fourteen patients with perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR) were randomized to receive 2 weeks treatment with placebo (PL) or 200 µg intranasal mometasone furoate (MF) once daily in a randomized single-blind crossover study. AMP (25–800 mg ml−1) and histamine (0.25–8 mg ml−1) nasal challenge testing were performed after each treatment period with 30% decrease in minimal cross-sectional area (MCA). Domiciliary symptom data were collected. Results There was a significant (P < 0.05) improvement in PC30 MCA and nasal volume with AMP but not with histamine comparing MF vs PL. This amounted to a 2.8 (95% CI 1.5, 4.0) and 0.7 (95% CI −0.5, 1.9) doubling-dose change for AMP and histamine challenges, respectively. There were significant (P < 0.05) improvements in nasal symptoms and quality of life. Conclusions AMP nasal challenge using acoustic rhinometry may be a useful test to assess short-term treatment response in patient with PAR. PMID:12680883

  18. Characterization of a dual-active enzyme, DcpA, involved in cyclic diguanosine monophosphate turnover in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Indra Mani; Prakash, Sunita; Dhanaraman, Thillaivillalan; Chatterji, Dipankar

    2014-10-01

    We have reported previously that the long-term survival of Mycobacterium smegmatis is facilitated by a dual-active enzyme MSDGC-1 (renamed DcpA), which controls the cellular turnover of cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP). Most mycobacterial species possess at least a single copy of a DcpA orthologue that is highly conserved in terms of sequence similarity and domain architecture. Here, we show that DcpA exists in monomeric and dimeric forms. The dimerization of DcpA is due to non-covalent interactions between two protomers that are arranged in a parallel orientation. The dimer shows both synthesis and hydrolysis activities, whereas the monomer shows only hydrolysis activity. In addition, we have shown that DcpA is associated with the cytoplasmic membrane and exhibits heterogeneous cellular localization with a predominance at the cell poles. Finally, we have also shown that DcpA is involved in the change in cell length and colony morphology of M. smegmatis. Taken together, our study provides additional evidence about the role of the bifunctional protein involved in c-di-GMP signalling in M. smegmatis.

  19. A Mycobacterium smegmatis mutant with a defective inositol monophosphate phosphatase gene homolog has altered cell envelope permeability.

    PubMed Central

    Parish, T; Liu, J; Nikaido, H; Stoker, N G

    1997-01-01

    A bacteriophage infection mutant (strain LIMP7) of Mycobacterium smegmatis was isolated following transposon mutagenesis. The mutant showed an unusual phenotype, in that all phages tested produced larger plaques on this strain compared to the parent strain. Other phenotypic characteristics of the mutant were slower growth, increased clumping in liquid culture, increased resistance to chloramphenicol and erythromycin, and increased sensitivity to isoniazid and several beta-lactam antibiotics. Permeability studies showed decreases in the accumulation of lipophilic molecules (norfloxacin and chenodeoxycholate) and a small increase with hydrophilic molecules (cephaloridine); taken together, these characteristics indicate an altered cell envelope. The DNA adjacent to the transposon in LIMP7 was cloned and was shown to be highly similar to genes encoding bacterial and mammalian inositol monophosphate phosphatases. Inositol is important in mycobacteria as a component of the major thiol mycothiol and also in the cell wall, with phosphatidylinositol anchoring lipoarabinomannan (LAM) in the cell envelope. In LIMP7, levels of phosphatidylinositol dimannoside, the precursor of LAM, were less than half of those in the wild-type strain, confirming that the mutation had affected the synthesis of inositol-containing molecules. The impA gene is located within the histidine biosynthesis operon in both M. smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, lying between the hisA and hisF genes. PMID:9401044

  20. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase activity in hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients treated with mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Mager, Donald E; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Storer, Barry E; Boeckh, Michael J; Bemer, Meagan J; Phillips, Brian R; Risler, Linda J; McCune, Jeannine S

    2014-08-01

    A novel approach to personalizing postgrafting immunosuppression in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients is evaluating inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity as a drug-specific biomarker of mycophenolic acid (MPA)-induced immunosuppression. This prospective study evaluated total MPA, unbound MPA, and total MPA glucuronide plasma concentrations and IMPDH activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) at 5 time points after the morning dose of oral mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) on day +21 in 56 nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. Substantial interpatient variability in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics was observed and accurately characterized by the population pharmacokinetic-dynamic model. IMPDH activity decreased with increasing MPA plasma concentration, with maximum inhibition coinciding with maximum MPA concentration in most patients. The overall relationship between MPA concentration and IMPDH activity was described by a direct inhibitory maximum effect model with an IC50 of 3.23 mg/L total MPA and 57.3 ng/mL unbound MPA. The day +21 IMPDH area under the effect curve (AUEC) was associated with cytomegalovirus reactivation, nonrelapse mortality, and overall mortality. In conclusion, a pharmacokinetic-dynamic model was developed that relates plasma MPA concentrations with PMNC IMPDH activity after an MMF dose in HCT recipients. Future studies should validate this model and confirm that day +21 IMPDH AUEC is a predictive biomarker.

  1. Directed breeding of an Arthrobacter mutant for high-yield production of cyclic adenosine monophosphate by N + ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, He; Chen, Xiaochun; Cao, Jiaming; Fang, Ting; Bai, Jianxin; Xiong, Jian; Ying, Hanjie

    2010-08-01

    To obtain a cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) high-yield production strain, Arthrobacter NG-1 was mutated by N + ion implantation with an energy level of 10 keV and dose of 7×10 15 ions/cm 2. Combined with directed screening methods, a xanthine-defective and 8-azaguanine (8-AG)-resistant mutant Arthrobacter A302 was selected. The concentration of cAMP produced by this mutant was 41.7% higher than that of the original strain and reached 9.78 g/L. Through ten-generation investigation, the capability of cAMP production of A302 was found to be stable. Compared with the original strain, the special activities of key enzymes in A302, which influenced the cAMP biosynthesis, was analyzed. IMP dehydrogenase activity was defective, whereas PRPP amidotransferase, sAMP synthetase and adenylate cyclase activities were increased by 61.5%, 147% and 21.7%, respecitively, which might explain the mutagenesis mechanism by N + ions implantation under the enzymatic level.

  2. A Mo(V) Monophosphate with an Intersecting Tunnel Structure: K 2Mo 2P 2O 11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueho, C.; Borel, M. M.; Grandin, A.; Leclaire, A.; Raveau, B.

    1993-06-01

    A new molybdenum (V) monophosphate K 2Mo 2P 2O 11 has been isolated. The single crystal X-ray diffraction study of this phase has shown that it is isotypic with K 2Nb 2As 2O 11. It crystallizes in the P21/ c space group with a = 9.867 (2), b = 10.122 (1), c = 9.903 (2) Å, β = 97.95 (1)°. A new description of the structure is given, based on the existence of Mo 2P 2O 15 units formed of one Mo 2O 11 group sharing four of its corners with two PO 4 tetrahedra and leading to [Mo 2P 2O 13] ∞ chains running along c. The [Mo 2P 2O 11] 1 x framework forms two different intersecting tunnels running along c and <110>, respectively, where the K + cations are located. The existence of one free apex for each MoO 6 octahedron, which characterizes Mo(V), allows a great flexibility of the structure.

  3. Favism: effect of divicine on rat erythrocyte sulfhydryl status, hexose monophosphate shunt activity, morphology, and membrane skeletal proteins.

    PubMed

    McMillan, D C; Bolchoz, L J; Jollow, D J

    2001-08-01

    Favism is an acute anemic crisis that can occur in susceptible individuals who ingest fava beans. The fava bean pyrimidine aglycone divicine has been identified as a hemotoxic constituent; however, its mechanism of toxicity remains unknown. We have shown recently that divicine can induce a favic-like response in rats and that divicine is directly toxic to rat red cells. In the present study, we have examined the effect of hemotoxic concentrations of divicine on rat erythrocyte sulfhydryl status, hexose monophosphate (HMP) shunt activity, morphology, and membrane skeletal proteins. In vitro exposure of rat red cells to divicine markedly stimulated HMP shunt activity and resulted in depletion of reduced glutathione with concomitant formation of glutathione-protein mixed-disulfides. Examination of divicine-treated red cells by scanning electron microscopy revealed transformation of the cells to an extreme echinocytic morphology. SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting analysis of the membrane skeletal proteins indicated that hemotoxicity was associated with the apparent loss of skeletal protein bands 2.1, 3, and 4.2, and the appearance of membrane-bound hemoglobin. Treatment of divicine-damaged red cells with dithiothreitol reversed the protein changes, which indicated that the observed alterations were due primarily to the formation of disulfide-linked hemoglobin-skeletal protein adducts. The data suggest that oxidative modification of hemoglobin and membrane skeletal proteins by divicine may be key events in the mechanism underlying favism. PMID:11452148

  4. Targeted Lipidomics Studies Reveal that Linolenic Acid Promotes Cotton Fiber Elongation by Activating Phosphatidylinositol and Phosphatidylinositol Monophosphate Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gao-Jun; Xiao, Guang-Hui; Liu, Ning-Jing; Liu, Dan; Chen, Pei-Shuang; Qin, Yong-Mei; Zhu, Yu-Xian

    2015-06-01

    The membrane lipids from fast-elongating wild-type cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fibers at 10 days post-anthesis, wild-type ovules with fiber cells removed, and ovules from the fuzzless-lintless mutant harvested at the same age, were extracted, separated, and quantified. Fiber cells contained significantly higher amounts of phosphatidylinositol (PI) than both ovule samples with PI 34:3 being the most predominant species. The genes encoding fatty acid desaturases (Δ(15)GhFAD), PI synthase (PIS) and PI kinase (PIK) were expressed in a fiber-preferential manner. Further analysis of phosphatidylinositol monophosphate (PIP) indicated that elongating fibers contained four- to five-fold higher amounts of PIP 34:3 than the ovules. Exogenously applied linolenic acid (C18:3), soybean L-α-PI, and PIPs containing PIP 34:3 promoted significant fiber growth, whereas a liver PI lacking the C18:3 moiety, linoleic acid, and PIP 36:2 were completely ineffective. The growth inhibitory effects of carbenoxolone, 5-hydroxytryptamine, and wortmannin were reverted by C18:3, PI, or PIP, respectively, suggesting that PIP signaling is essential for fiber cell growth. Furthermore, cotton plants expressing virus-induced gene-silencing constructs that specifically suppressed GhΔ(15)FAD, GhPIS, or GhPIK expression, resulted in significantly short-fibered phenotypes. Our data provide the basis for in-depth studies on the roles of PI and PIP in mediating cotton fiber growth.

  5. Investigation on the occurrence and significance of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate in phytoplankton and natural aquatic communities

    SciTech Connect

    Francko, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    This study is an investigation into the occurrence and potential functions of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP), a potent and ubiquitous metabolic regulatory molecule in heterotrophic organisms, in phytoplankton and in natural aquatic communities. Laboratory-cultured phytoplankton were grown under both optimal and suboptimal nutrient regimes under constant temperature and illumination regimes. Cellular and extracellular cAMP production, characterized by a number of biochemical techniques, was correlated with growth rate dynamics, chlorophyll a synthesis, /sup 14/C-bicarbonate uptake, alkaline phosphatase activity, and heterocyst formation. The blue-green alga Anabaena flos-aquae was used as a model system in the examination of these metabolic variables. Additionally, this alga was used to test the effects of perturbation of cAMP levels on the aforementioned metabolic variables. Investigations on the occurrence and seasonal dynamics of cAMP in aquatic systems were conducted on Lawrence Lake, a hardwater oligotrophic lake, and on Wintergreen Lake, a hardwater hypereutrophic lake, both in southwestern Michigan. Putative cAMP from both systems was characterized by several biochemical techniques. Weekly sampling of particulate and dissolved cAMP in the epilimnia of both lakes was correlated with data on the rates of primary productivity, alkaline phosphatase activity, chlorophyll a synthesis and changes in phytoplankton community structure.

  6. DNA sequence polymorphism within the bovine adenosine monophosphate deaminase 1 (AMPD1) is associated with production traits in Chinese cattle.

    PubMed

    Wei, C-B; Wang, J-Q; Chen, F-Y; Niu, H; Li, K

    2015-02-06

    The objectives of the present study were to detect an 18-bp deletion mutation in the bovine adenosine monophosphate deaminase 1 (AMPD1) gene and analyze its effect on growth traits in 2 Chinese cattle breeds using DNA sequencing and agarose electrophoresis. The five 19-bp polymerase chain reaction products of the AMPD1 gene exhibited 3 genotypes and 2 alleles: WW: homozygote genotype (wild-type); DD: homozygote genotype (mutant-type); WD: heterozygote genotype. Frequencies of the W allele varied from 66.15-70.35%. The associations between the 18-bp deletion mutation in the AMPD1 gene with production traits in 226 Jia-Xian red cattle was analyzed. The animals with genotype WW showed significantly higher heart girth and body weight than those with genotypes WD and DD at 24 months (P < 0.01). Our results indicate that the deletion mutation in the AMPD1 gene is associated with production traits, and may be used for marker-assisted selection in beef cattle breeding programs.

  7. Mining the key regulatory genes of chicken inosine 5'-monophosphate metabolism based on time series microarray data.

    PubMed

    Ma, Teng; Xu, Lu; Wang, Hongzhi; Chen, Jing; Liu, Lu; Chang, Guobin; Chen, Guohong

    2015-01-01

    IMP (inosine 5'-monophosphate) is a compound that enhances the flavor of poultry meat. IMP has become a new breeding trait to improve poultry meat quality. We tried to identify several potential regulatory genes, and construct their predicted regulatory relationships. Time series gene expression profiles of thigh muscle tissues of Rugao chicken, a famous indigenous breed in China, were performed for analysis of genes that are co-expressed or correlated with the concentration of IMP. We found 15 crucial co-expression genes, which are Hspa2, Pten, Gabpa, Bpi, Mkl1, Srf, Cd34, Hspa4, Etv6, Bmpr2, Gde1, Igfbp5, Cd28, Pecam1 and Gja1, that may directly or indirectly regulate IMP metabolism. Eventually, we computed the correlation coefficient between 19 IMP Genes and 15 CGs (15 co-expression genes), and we identified and constructed a predicted regulation network. In conclusion, variation of IMP concentration was primarily connected with the muscle development process. During this process, 15 CGs were identified that may have significant influence on IMP metabolism. In particular, Bmpr2, Pten and co-expression genes correlated with Entpd8 might play important roles in regulating IMP de novo synthesis, decomposition and salvage synthesis.

  8. Antifolate-induced misincorporation of deoxyuridine monophosphate into DNA: inhibition of high molecular weight DNA synthesis in human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sedwick, W D; Kutler, M; Brown, O E

    1981-01-01

    In vitro exposure of a human lymphoblastoid cell line (WIL-2) to the antifolate metoprine (DDMP), when followed by the addition of exogenous deoxyuridine, led to intracellular accumulation of deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP) and incorporation of deoxyuridine monophosphate (dUMP) into DNA. When newly synthesized DNA was extracted from DDMP-treated cells that had been labeled with deoxyuridine for up to 3 min, most of the DNA synthesized was no larger than 4 S on alkaline sucrose gradients. In contrast, the predominant form of newly synthesized alkali-stable DNA in cells not treated with drug was larger than 4 S. Abnormal progression of DNA synthesis, degradation of newly synthesized DNA, or both occurred as a delayed consequence of DDMP treatment in the absence of exogenous deoxyuridine when thymidine was used to label DNA of DDMP-treated stability of antifolate-induced misincorporation of dUMP into DNA was not elucidated, it was clear that antifolates can directly perturb the quality as well as the quantity of DNA synthesized by drug-treated cells. PMID:6940156

  9. Estradiol and chlordecone (Kepone) decrease adenosine 3'5'-cyclic monophosphate concentrations in the ovariectomized immature rat uterus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D C; Banerjee, S; Chatterjee, S

    1995-10-01

    Adenosine 3'5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) has been repeatedly shown to mimic some actions of estrogen in the rat uterus. However, the relationship between estrogens and uterine cAMP remains controversial. The effect of chronic exposure (3 days) to a biologically potent, long-acting estrogen, estradiol benzoate (EB), or the xenoestrogen chlordecone (Kepone), which has a long half-life in the circulation, was examined in ovariectomized immature rats. Both compounds, when administered in doses that provided equal increases in uterine weight, produced equivalent decreases in uterine cAMP content. Although the decrease in cAMP was apparent within 48 hr, it was more pronounced at 72 hr. There was no reduction in cAMP produced in response to direct stimulation of uterine adenylyl cyclase by forskolin, indicating that loss of the enzyme was not a factor in the lowering of cAMP content. The pure anti-estrogen ICI-182,780, in a dose-dependent fashion, prevented the action the estradiol benzoate and chlordecone, suggesting that the lowering of cAMP was dependent on an estrogen receptor. The physiological significance of reduced uterine cAMP with chronic estrogen treatment remains to be determined. PMID:7545817

  10. The expression of cyclic adenosine monophosphate responsive element modulator in rat sertoli cells following seminal extract administration

    PubMed Central

    Akmal, Muslim; Siregar, Tongku Nizwan; Wahyuni, Sri; Hamny; Nasution, Mustafa Kamal; Indriati, Wiwik; Panjaitan, Budianto; Aliza, Dwinna

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study aims to determine the effect of seminal vesicle extract on cyclic adenosine monophosphate responsive element modulator (CREM) expression in rat Sertoli cells. Materials and Methods: This study examined the expression of CREM on 20 male rats (Rattus norvegicus) at 4 months of age, weighing 250-300 g. The rats were divided into four groups: K0, KP1, KP2, and KP3. K0 group was injected with 0.2 ml normal saline; KP1 was injected with 25 mg cloprostenol (Prostavet C, Virbac S. A); KP2 and KP3 were injected with 0.2 and 0.4 ml seminal vesicle extract, respectively. The treatments were conducted 5 times within 12-day interval. At the end of the study, the rats were euthanized by cervical dislocation; then, the testicles were necropsied and processed for histology observation using immunohistochemistry staining. Results: CREM expression in rat Sertoli cells was not altered by the administration of either 0.2 or 0.4 ml seminal vesicle extract. Conclusion: The administration of seminal vesicle extract is unable to increase CREM expression in rat Sertoli cells. PMID:27733803

  11. The effect of polystyrene beads on cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate concentration in leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Manganiello, Vincent; Evans, Warren H.; Stossel, Thomas P.; Mason, Robert J.; Vaughan, Martha

    1971-01-01

    After incubation with polystyrene latex beads for 5 min. the cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) content of human peripheral blood leukocyte suspensions was increased severalfold. Preparations enriched in mononuclear cells and containing only 0-20% polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and no visible platelets exhibited a quantitatively similar response. Purified fractions of cells containing 85-90% PMN responded to polystyrene beads with a much smaller increase in cyclic AMP content. Phagocytosis of paraffin oil emulsion in the unfractionated mixed human leukocyte preparation was associated with little or no change in cyclic AMP levels. There was no change in cyclic AMP content of rabbit alveolar macrophages or guinea pig PMN during phagocytosis of polystyrene beads. All of these observations are consistent with the view that particle uptake per se does not increase cyclic AMP levels in phagocytic cells. It seems probable that the increase in cyclic AMP concentration that results when unfractionated human blood leukocytes are incubated with polystyrene beads occurs in cells other than PMN. PMID:4331596

  12. Effect of Sea Buckthorn Leaves on Inosine Monophosphate and Adenylosuccinatelyase Gene Expression in Broilers during Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Chen, Xin; Yan, Changjiang; Liu, Hongnan; Zhang, Zhihong; Wang, Pengzu; Su, Jie; Li, Yao

    2012-01-01

    The trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of sea buckthorn leaves (SBL) on meat flavor in broilers during heat stress. A total 360 one-day-old Arbor Acre (AA) broilers (male) were randomly allotted to 4 treatments with 6 replicates pens pretreatment and 15 birds per pen. The control group was fed a basal diet, the experimental group I, II and III were fed the basal diet supplemented with 0.25%, 0.5%, 1% SBL, respectively. During the 4th week, broilers were exposed to heat stress conditions (36±2°C), after which, muscle and liver samples were collected. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was performed to measure the content of inosine monophosphate (IMP); Real-Time PCR was performed to determine the expression of the ADSL gene. The results showed that the content of breast muscle IMP of group I, II and III was significantly increased 68%, 102% and 103% (p<0.01) compared with the control, respectively; the content of thigh muscle IMP of group II and III was significantly increased 56% and 58% (p<0.01), respectively. Additionally, ADSL mRNA expression in group I, II and III was increased significantly 80%, 65% and 49% (p<0.01) compared with the control, respectively. The content of IMP and expression of ADSL mRNA were increased by basal diet supplemented with SBL, therefore, the decrease of meat flavor caused by heat stress was relieved. PMID:25049483

  13. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase activity in hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients treated with mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Mager, Donald E; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Storer, Barry E; Boeckh, Michael J; Bemer, Meagan J; Phillips, Brian R; Risler, Linda J; McCune, Jeannine S

    2014-08-01

    A novel approach to personalizing postgrafting immunosuppression in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients is evaluating inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity as a drug-specific biomarker of mycophenolic acid (MPA)-induced immunosuppression. This prospective study evaluated total MPA, unbound MPA, and total MPA glucuronide plasma concentrations and IMPDH activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) at 5 time points after the morning dose of oral mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) on day +21 in 56 nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. Substantial interpatient variability in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics was observed and accurately characterized by the population pharmacokinetic-dynamic model. IMPDH activity decreased with increasing MPA plasma concentration, with maximum inhibition coinciding with maximum MPA concentration in most patients. The overall relationship between MPA concentration and IMPDH activity was described by a direct inhibitory maximum effect model with an IC50 of 3.23 mg/L total MPA and 57.3 ng/mL unbound MPA. The day +21 IMPDH area under the effect curve (AUEC) was associated with cytomegalovirus reactivation, nonrelapse mortality, and overall mortality. In conclusion, a pharmacokinetic-dynamic model was developed that relates plasma MPA concentrations with PMNC IMPDH activity after an MMF dose in HCT recipients. Future studies should validate this model and confirm that day +21 IMPDH AUEC is a predictive biomarker. PMID:24727337

  14. eIF4E3 acts as a tumor suppressor by utilizing an atypical mode of methyl-7-guanosine cap recognition.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Michael J; Volpon, Laurent; Kornblatt, Jack A; Culjkovic-Kraljacic, Biljana; Baguet, Aurélie; Borden, Katherine L B

    2013-03-01

    Recognition of the methyl-7-guanosine (m(7)G) cap structure on mRNA is an essential feature of mRNA metabolism and thus gene expression. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) promotes translation, mRNA export, proliferation, and oncogenic transformation dependent on this cap-binding activity. eIF4E-cap recognition is mediated via complementary charge interactions of the positively charged m(7)G cap between the negative π-electron clouds from two aromatic residues. Here, we demonstrate that a variant subfamily, eIF4E3, specifically binds the m(7)G cap in the absence of an aromatic sandwich, using instead a different spatial arrangement of residues to provide the necessary electrostatic and van der Waals contacts. Contacts are much more extensive between eIF4E3-cap than other family members. Structural analyses of other cap-binding proteins indicate this recognition mode is atypical. We demonstrate that eIF4E3 relies on this cap-binding activity to act as a tumor suppressor, competing with the growth-promoting functions of eIF4E. In fact, reduced eIF4E3 in high eIF4E cancers suggests that eIF4E3 underlies a clinically relevant inhibitory mechanism that is lost in some malignancies. Taken together, there is more structural plasticity in cap recognition than previously thought, and this is physiologically relevant.

  15. An Interplay among FIS, H-NS, and Guanosine Tetraphosphate Modulates Transcription of the Escherichia coli cspA Gene under Physiological Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Brandi, Anna; Giangrossi, Mara; Giuliodori, Anna M.; Falconi, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    CspA, the most characterized member of the csp gene family of Escherichia coli, is highly expressed not only in response to cold stress, but also during the early phase of growth at 37°C. Here, we investigate at molecular level the antagonistic role played by the nucleoid proteins FIS and H-NS in the regulation of cspA expression under non-stress conditions. By means of both probing experiments and immunological detection, we demonstrate in vitro the existence of binding sites for these proteins on the cspA regulatory region, in which FIS and H-NS bind simultaneously to form composite DNA-protein complexes. While the in vitro promoter activity of cspA is stimulated by FIS and repressed by H-NS, a compensatory effect is observed when both proteins are added in the transcription assay. Consistently with these findings, inactivation of fis and hns genes reversely affect the in vivo amount of cspA mRNA. In addition, by means of strains expressing a high level of the alarmone guanosine tetraphosphate ((p)ppGpp) and in vitro transcription assays, we show that the cspA promoter is sensitive to (p)ppGpp inhibition. The (p)ppGpp-mediated expression of fis and hns genes is also analyzed, thus clarifying some aspects of the regulatory loop governing cspA transcription. PMID:27252944

  16. An Interplay among FIS, H-NS, and Guanosine Tetraphosphate Modulates Transcription of the Escherichia coli cspA Gene under Physiological Growth Conditions.

    PubMed

    Brandi, Anna; Giangrossi, Mara; Giuliodori, Anna M; Falconi, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    CspA, the most characterized member of the csp gene family of Escherichia coli, is highly expressed not only in response to cold stress, but also during the early phase of growth at 37°C. Here, we investigate at molecular level the antagonistic role played by the nucleoid proteins FIS and H-NS in the regulation of cspA expression under non-stress conditions. By means of both probing experiments and immunological detection, we demonstrate in vitro the existence of binding sites for these proteins on the cspA regulatory region, in which FIS and H-NS bind simultaneously to form composite DNA-protein complexes. While the in vitro promoter activity of cspA is stimulated by FIS and repressed by H-NS, a compensatory effect is observed when both proteins are added in the transcription assay. Consistently with these findings, inactivation of fis and hns genes reversely affect the in vivo amount of cspA mRNA. In addition, by means of strains expressing a high level of the alarmone guanosine tetraphosphate ((p)ppGpp) and in vitro transcription assays, we show that the cspA promoter is sensitive to (p)ppGpp inhibition. The (p)ppGpp-mediated expression of fis and hns genes is also analyzed, thus clarifying some aspects of the regulatory loop governing cspA transcription. PMID:27252944

  17. Study of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase in complex with the top three OMP, BMP, and PMP ligands by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Shirin; Jalili, Seifollah; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic mechanism of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC), one of the nature most proficient enzymes which provides large rate enhancement, has not been fully understood yet. A series of 30 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were run on X-ray structure of the OMPDC from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in its free form as well as in complex with different ligands, namely 1-(5'-phospho-D-ribofuranosyl) barbituric acid (BMP), orotidine 5'-monophosphate (OMP), and 6-phosphonouridine 5'-monophosphate (PMP). The importance of this biological system is justified both by its high rate enhancement and its potential use as a target in chemotherapy. This work focuses on comparing two physicochemical states of the enzyme (protonated and deprotonated Asp91) and three ligands (substrate OMP, inhibitor, and transition state analog BMP and substrate analog PMP). Detailed analysis of the active site geometry and its interactions is properly put in context by extensive comparison with relevant experimental works. Our overall results show that in terms of hydrogen bond occupancy, electrostatic interactions, dihedral angles, active site configuration, and movement of loops, notable differences among different complexes are observed. Comparison of the results obtained from these simulations provides some detailed structural data for the complexes, the enzyme, and the ligands, as well as useful insights into the inhibition mechanism of the OMPDC enzyme. Furthermore, these simulations are applied to clarify the ambiguous mechanism of the OMPDC enzyme, and imply that the substrate destabilization and transition state stabilization contribute to the mechanism of action of the most proficient enzyme, OMPDC.

  18. Inhibition of tumor energy pathways for targeted esophagus cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Shafaee, Abbas; Dastyar, Davood Zarei; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Hatamian, Milad

    2015-10-01

    Interest in targeting cancer metabolism has been renewed in recent years with the discovery that many cancer related pathways have a profound effect on metabolism and that many tumors become dependent on specific metabolic processes. Accelerated glucose uptake during anaerobic glycolysis and loss of regulation between glycolytic metabolism and respiration, are the major metabolic changes found in malignant cells. The non-metabolizable glucose analog, 2-deoxy-D-glucose inhibits glucose synthesis and adenosine triphosphate production. The adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor of cellular energy and AMPK is a potential target for cancer prevention and/or treatment. Metformin is an activator of AMPK which inhibits protein synthesis and gluconeogenesis during cellular stress. This article reviews the status of clinical and laboratory researches exploring targeted therapies via metabolic pathways for treatment of esophageal cancer.

  19. Intermedin1-53 attenuates vascular smooth muscle cell calcification by inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress via cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase A pathway.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jin-Rui; Duan, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Bao-Hong; Teng, Xu; Zhou, Ye-Bo; Liu, Yue; Yu, Yan-Rong; Zhu, Yi; Tang, Chao-Shu; Qi, Yong-Fen

    2013-10-01

    We previously reported that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis participated in vascular calcification. Importantly, a novel paracrine/autocrine peptide intermedin1-53 (IMD1-53) in the vasculature inhibited vascular calcification in rats. But the mechanisms needed to be fully elucidated. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) calcification was induced by CaCl2 and β-glycerophosphate. Tunicamycin (Tm) or dithiothreitol (DTT) was used to induce ER stress. We found that IMD1-53 (10(-7)mol/L) treatment significantly alleviated the protein expression of ER stress hallmarks activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), ATF6, glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and GRP94 induced by Tm or DTT. ER stress occurred in early and late calcification of VSMCs but was inhibited by IMD1-53. These inhibitory effects of IMD1-53 were abolished by treatment with the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor H89. Pretreatment with IMD1-53 decreased the number of apoptotic VSMCs and downregulated protein expression of cleaved caspase 12 and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) in calcified VSMCs. Concurrently, IMD1-53 restored the loss of VSMC lineage markers and ameliorated calcium deposition and alkaline phosphatase activity in calcified VSMCs as well. The observation was further verified by Alizarin Red S staining, which showed that IMD1-53 reduced positive red nodules among calcified VSMCs. In conclusion, IMD1-53 attenuated VSMC calcification by inhibiting ER stress through cAMP/PKA signalling.

  20. Multiple Decay Mechanisms and 2D-UV Spectroscopic Fingerprints of Singlet Excited Solvated Adenine-Uracil Monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Li, Quansong; Giussani, Angelo; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Nenov, Artur; Rivalta, Ivan; Voityuk, Alexander A; Mukamel, Shaul; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel; Garavelli, Marco; Blancafort, Lluís

    2016-05-23

    The decay channels of singlet excited adenine uracil monophosphate (ApU) in water are studied with CASPT2//CASSCF:MM potential energy calculations and simulation of the 2D-UV spectroscopic fingerprints with the aim of elucidating the role of the different electronic states of the stacked conformer in the excited state dynamics. The adenine (1) La state can decay without a barrier to a conical intersection with the ground state. In contrast, the adenine (1) Lb and uracil S(U) states have minima that are separated from the intersections by sizeable barriers. Depending on the backbone conformation, the CT state can undergo inter-base hydrogen transfer and decay to the ground state through a conical intersection, or it can yield a long-lived minimum stabilized by a hydrogen bond between the two ribose rings. This suggests that the (1) Lb , S(U) and CT states of the stacked conformer may all contribute to the experimental lifetimes of 18 and 240 ps. We have also simulated the time evolution of the 2D-UV spectra and provide the specific fingerprint of each species in a recommended probe window between 25 000 and 38 000 cm(-1) in which decongested, clearly distinguishable spectra can be obtained. This is expected to allow the mechanistic scenarios to be discerned in the near future with the help of the corresponding experiments. Our results reveal the complexity of the photophysics of the relatively small ApU system, and the potential of 2D-UV spectroscopy to disentangle the photophysics of multichromophoric systems. PMID:27113273

  1. Role of K(V)LQT1 in cyclic adenosine monophosphate-mediated Cl(-) secretion in human airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Mall, M; Wissner, A; Schreiber, R; Kuehr, J; Seydewitz, H H; Brandis, M; Greger, R; Kunzelmann, K

    2000-09-01

    Ion transport defects underlying cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease are characterized by impaired cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent Cl(-) conductance. Activation of Cl(-) secretion in airways depends on simultaneous activation of luminal Cl(-) channels and basolateral K(+) channels. We determined the role of basolateral K(+) conductance in cAMP- dependent Cl(-) secretion in native human airway epithelium obtained from non-CF and CF patients. CF tissues showed typical alterations of short-circuit currents with enhanced amiloride-sensitive Na(+) conductance and defective cAMP-mediated Cl(-) conductance. In non-CF tissues, Cl(-) secretion was significantly inhibited by the chromanol 293B (10 micromol/liter), a specific inhibitor of K(V)LQT1 K(+) channels. Inhibition was increased after cAMP-dependent stimulation. Similar effects were obtained with Ba(2+) (5 mmol/liter). In patch-clamp experiments with a human bronchial epithelial cell line, stimulation with forskolin (10 micromol/liter) simultaneously activated Cl(-) and K(+) conductance. The K(+) conductance was reversibly inhibited by Ba(2+) and 293B. Analysis of reverse-transcribed messenger RNA from non-CF and CF airways showed expression of human K(V)LQT1. We conclude that the K(+) channel K(V)LQT1 is important in maintaining cAMP-dependent Cl(-) secretion in human airways. Activation of K(V)LQT1 in CF airways in parallel with stimulation of residual CF transmembrane conductance regulator Cl(-) channel activity or alternative Cl(-) channels could help to circumvent the secretory defect.

  2. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase activity in peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes from patients with atopic dermatitis: correlation with respiratory atopy.

    PubMed

    Sawai, T; Ikai, K; Uehara, M

    1998-05-01

    We determined the cyclic adenosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase (cAMP-PDE) activity in peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes from 100 patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) aged 13-57 years (mean +/- SD, 29.8 +/- 17.7 years). The correlation between cAMP-PDE activity and clinical parameters such as the severity of eczema and a personal or family predisposition to atopic respiratory diseases (ARD) (asthma or allergic rhinitis) was examined. Although the enzymic activity varied from normal to very high in the AD patients, cAMP-PDE activity was significantly (P < 0.005) elevated in AD patients (42.1 +/- 22.0 units) as compared with the normal controls (12.4 +/- 5.6) and clinical control subjects (13.4 +/- 9.5). In contrast, we found no correlation between cAMP-PDE activity and the severity of eczema when AD patients were classified into four categories (remission, mild, moderate and severe) according to the extent of their skin involvement. Furthermore, we found that systemic corticosteroid therapy in severe AD patients did not alter the cAMP-PDE activity. cAMP-PDE activity was significantly (P < 0.01) higher in those AD patients who had a personal history of ARD (47.2 +/- 11.2) than in AD patients with a family history of ARD (37.2 +/- 17.4) and those without a personal or family history ('pure' AD) (34.4 +/- 19.8). Nevertheless, the cAMP-PDE activity was significantly higher even in 'pure' AD patients than in the controls. These results suggest that an elevation of cAMP-PDE activity is closely related to a predisposition to respiratory atopy, and does not follow inflammation in AD patients. PMID:9666832

  3. Effects of dietary supplementation of inosine monophosphate on growth performance, innate immunity and disease resistance of olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Song, Jin-Woo; Lim, Se-Jin; Lee, Kyeong-Jun

    2012-10-01

    This study was investigated to examine the effects of dietary inosine monophosphate (IMP) supplementation on growth performance, feed utilization, innate immunity, hematological parameters and disease resistance of juvenile olive flounder. Five experimental diets were formulated to contain IMP at levels of 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4 and 1.0%. All diets were maintained isonitrogenous (48% crude protein) and isocaloric (20.7 MJ/kg diet). Triplicate groups of olive flounder (initial body weight, 7.5 ± 0.02 g) were fed one of the experimental diets to apparent satiation (twice a day) for 14 weeks. Final body weight of fish fed 0.1-0.2% IMP were significantly higher than that of fish fed the 1.0% IMP. Groups of fish fed 0.2 or 0.4% IMP diet had significantly higher myeloperoxidase and lysozyme activities than fish fed the control diet. However, nitro-blue-tetrazolium and superoxide dismutase activities were not significantly different among all treatments. In the challenge test against Streptococcus iniae, cumulative mortality of fish fed IMP supplemented diets was significantly lower (15%, 4%, 4% and 9% for 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.4% and 1.0% IMP, respectively) than that of fish fed the control group (87%). The results suggest that IMP supplementation of 0.46-1.84 g into a kg of fish meal based diet (0.1-0.4% IMP product) can enhance innate immunity and disease resistance of olive flounder.

  4. The pH dependence of the thermodynamics of the interaction of 3'-cytidine monophosphate with ribonuclease A.

    PubMed

    Flogel, M; Biltonen, R L

    1975-06-17

    The apparent free energy (deltaGapp) and enthalpy changes (deltaHB) associated with the interaction of 3'-cytosine monophosphate (3'-CMP) and ribonuclease A (RNase) are reported for the pH range 4--9, T = 25 degrees, mu = 0.05. The pH dependence of deltaGapp and deltaHB has been interpreted in terms of coupled ionization of histidine residues 12, 48, and 119, assuming that only the dianionic form of the inhibitor is bound. The results of this analysis are consistent with the calorimetric and potentiometric titration results for the free enzyme and its 3'-CMP complex reported in the previous paper (M. Flogel and R. L. Biltonen ((1975), Biochemistry, preceding paper in this issue). This analysis allows the calculation of the thermodynamic quantities associated with hypothetical but clearly defined reactions (e.g., the reaction of the dianionic inhibitor with the completely protonated enzyme). It is concluded that the primary thermodynamic driving forces for the reaction are van der Waals interactions between the riboside moiety and the protein fabric and electrostatic interaction between the negatively charged phosphate group of the inhibitor and the positively charged histidine residues at the binding locus. It is also suggested that the binding reaction is weakly coupled (approximately to 0.5 kcal/mol) with a conformational change of the protein associated with protonation of residue 48. These results are consistent with the model originally proposed by G. G. Hammes ((1968), Adv. Protein Chem. 23, 1) and lend additional quantitative detail to the nature of the reaction.

  5. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activators for the prevention, treatment and potential reversal of pathological pain

    PubMed Central

    Price, Theodore J.; Das, Vaskar; Dussor, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Pathological pain is an enormous medical problem that places a significant burden on patients and can result from an injury that has long since healed or be due to an unidentifiable cause. Although treatments exist, they often either lack efficacy or have intolerable side effects. More importantly, they do not reverse the changes in the nervous system mediating pathological pain, and thus symptoms often return when therapies are discontinued. Consequently, novel therapies are urgently needed that have both improved efficacy and disease-modifying properties. Here we highlight an emerging target for novel pain therapies, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK is capable of regulating a variety of cellular processes including protein translation, activity of other kinases, and mitochondrial metabolism, many of which are thought to contribute to pathological pain. Consistent with these properties, preclinical studies show positive, and in some cases disease-modifying effects of either pharmacological activation or genetic regulation of AMPK in models of nerve injury, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), postsurgical pain, inflammatory pain, and diabetic neuropathy. Given the AMPK-activating ability of metformin, a widely prescribed and well-tolerated drug, these preclinical studies provide a strong rationale for both retrospective and prospective human pain trials with this drug. They also argue for the development of novel AMPK activators, whether orthosteric, allosteric, or modulators of events upstream of the kinase. Together, this review will present the case for AMPK as a novel therapeutic target for pain and will discuss future challenges in the path toward development of AMPK-based pain therapeutics. PMID:26521775

  6. A Novel Function for the NTN Hydrolase Fold Demonstrated by the Structure of an Archeal Inosine Monophosphate Cyclohydrolase†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Kang, You-Na; Tran, Anh; White, Robert H.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2008-01-01

    Inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP) cyclohydrolase catalyzes the cyclization of 5-formaminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (FAICAR) to IMP in the final step of de novo purine biosynthesis. Two major types of this enzyme have been discovered to date: PurH in Bacteria and Eukarya, and PurO in Archaea. The structure of the MTH1020 gene product from Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus was previously solved without functional annotation but shows high amino acid sequence similarity to other PurOs. We determined the crystal structure of the MTH1020 gene product in complex with either IMP or 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) at 2.0 Å and 2.6 Å resolution, respectively. Based on the sequence analysis, ligand-bound structures, and biochemical data, MTH1020 is confirmed as an archaeal IMP cyclohydrolase, thus designated as MthPurO. MthPurO has a four-layered αββα core structure, showing an N-terminal nucleophile (NTN) hydrolase fold. The active site is located at the deep pocket between two central β-sheets and contains residues strictly conserved within PurOs. Comparisons of the two types of IMP cyclohydrolase, PurO and PurH, revealed that there are no similarities in sequence, structure, or the active site architecture, suggesting that they are evolutionarily not related to each other. The MjR31K mutant of PurO from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii showed 76% decreased activity and MjE102Q mutation completely abolished enzymatic activity, suggesting that these highly conserved residues play critical roles in catalysis. Interestingly, green fluorescent protein (GFP), which has no structural homology to either PurO or PurH but catalyzes a similar intramolecular cyclohydrolase reaction required for chromophore maturation, utilizes Arg96 and Glu222 in a mechanism analogous to that of PurO. PMID:17407260

  7. [Genetic parameter estimation for inosine-5-monophosphate and intramuscular fat contents and other meat quality traits in chicken muscle].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji-Lan; Wen, Jie; Zhao, Gui-Ping; Zheng, Mai-Qing; Yang, Ning

    2005-11-01

    The genetic parameters for some important flavor traits like inosine-5'-monophosphate (IMP) and intramuscular fat (IMF) contents in breast meat were estimated using a MTDFREML procedure on 1063 male, 90-day-old, purebred Beijing-You meat-type chicks (BJY). The result showed that the heritability of IMP and IMF contents in BJY breast meat was moderate or low (h2=0.23, 0.10), whereas these parameters were higher for abdominal fat weight (AFW), breast meat yield (BMY), ratio of BMY to carcass weight (BMR), leg muscle yield (LMY), body weight (BW), comb weight(CW) and comb weight percentage (CWB) (h2=0.56-0.79). The heritability of abdominal fat percentage (AFP), leg meat yield (LMY), testicle weight (TW) and testicle weight percentage (TWP) were 0.24, 0.32, 0.39 and 0.35, respectively. IMP exhibited low phenotypic correlations with BMY, LMY and SFT and no significant phenotypic correlations with other traits. IMF, to some extent, exhibited positive phenotypic correlation with BW, AFP, SFT and FSW (rP=0.11-0.33). In terms of genetic correlation, IMP was moderately or significantly negatively correlated with BW and CWP (rA=-0.38,-0.62), and a high level of positive correlation was observed with BMY (rA=0.57). Moreover, IMF was highly correlated with BW and AFW (rA=0.75,0.66), and moderately correlated with AFP and CWP (rA=0.32, 0.40). A low level of positive correlation was observed between IMP and IMF (rA =0.27). We propose that IMP and IMF contents in chicken meat could be increased with selection through line-breeding.

  8. Study of the Renal Tubular Interactions of Thyrocalcitonin, Cyclic Adenosine 3′, 5′ -Monophosphate, 25-Hydroxycholecalciferol, and Calcium Ion

    PubMed Central

    Puschett, Jules B.; Beck, William S.; Jelonek, Adam; Fernandez, Pedro C.

    1974-01-01

    Acute clearance studies were performed in thyroparathyroidectomized animals to determine the actions and interactions of thyrocalcitonin (TCT), cyclic adenosine 3′5′-monophosphate (cAMP), 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25HCC), and calcium ion on the reabsorption of phosphate, calcium, sodium, and potassium by the kidney. The infusion of 25HCC in a dosage of 60 U/h to moderately saline-expanded animals (2.5% body weight) induced a fall in the excretion of all of the ions under study after 90-120 min similar to that observed in previous experiments from this laboratory. Mean decrements in fractional excretion were: phosphate, 42.0% (P < 0.005); calcium, 25.0% (P < 0.005); sodium, 23.4% (P < 0.001); and potassium, 14.7% (P < 0.005). The superimposition of either porcine or salmon TCT (1-100 MRC U/h for 2 h) resulted in no further alterations in electrolyte excretion. However, the infusion of TCT during steady-state saline expansion, before the administration of 25HCC, obviated the renal transport effects of the vitamin D metabolite. Both in the latter studies, as well as those in which similar doses of TCT were given to hydropenic animals, the hormone itself failed to induce any consistent alteration in electrolyte excretion. Cyclic AMP (50 mg/h) caused an increase in the excretion of phosphate, sodium, and potassium and no change in calcium excretion. Like TCT, the nucleotide blocked the action of 25HCC on the kidney. Raising the mean level of serum ultrafilterable calcium to 3.02±0.25 mEq/liter from 1.62±0.17 mEq/liter likewise prevented enhanced ionic reabsorption due to 25HCC. PMID:4359939

  9. Multiple Decay Mechanisms and 2D-UV Spectroscopic Fingerprints of Singlet Excited Solvated Adenine-Uracil Monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Li, Quansong; Giussani, Angelo; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Nenov, Artur; Rivalta, Ivan; Voityuk, Alexander A; Mukamel, Shaul; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel; Garavelli, Marco; Blancafort, Lluís

    2016-05-23

    The decay channels of singlet excited adenine uracil monophosphate (ApU) in water are studied with CASPT2//CASSCF:MM potential energy calculations and simulation of the 2D-UV spectroscopic fingerprints with the aim of elucidating the role of the different electronic states of the stacked conformer in the excited state dynamics. The adenine (1) La state can decay without a barrier to a conical intersection with the ground state. In contrast, the adenine (1) Lb and uracil S(U) states have minima that are separated from the intersections by sizeable barriers. Depending on the backbone conformation, the CT state can undergo inter-base hydrogen transfer and decay to the ground state through a conical intersection, or it can yield a long-lived minimum stabilized by a hydrogen bond between the two ribose rings. This suggests that the (1) Lb , S(U) and CT states of the stacked conformer may all contribute to the experimental lifetimes of 18 and 240 ps. We have also simulated the time evolution of the 2D-UV spectra and provide the specific fingerprint of each species in a recommended probe window between 25 000 and 38 000 cm(-1) in which decongested, clearly distinguishable spectra can be obtained. This is expected to allow the mechanistic scenarios to be discerned in the near future with the help of the corresponding experiments. Our results reveal the complexity of the photophysics of the relatively small ApU system, and the potential of 2D-UV spectroscopy to disentangle the photophysics of multichromophoric systems.

  10. Multiple Decay Mechanisms and 2D‐UV Spectroscopic Fingerprints of Singlet Excited Solvated Adenine‐Uracil Monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quansong; Giussani, Angelo; Segarra‐Martí, Javier; Nenov, Artur; Rivalta, Ivan; Voityuk, Alexander A.; Mukamel, Shaul; Roca‐Sanjuán, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The decay channels of singlet excited adenine uracil monophosphate (ApU) in water are studied with CASPT2//CASSCF:MM potential energy calculations and simulation of the 2D‐UV spectroscopic fingerprints with the aim of elucidating the role of the different electronic states of the stacked conformer in the excited state dynamics. The adenine 1La state can decay without a barrier to a conical intersection with the ground state. In contrast, the adenine 1Lb and uracil S(U) states have minima that are separated from the intersections by sizeable barriers. Depending on the backbone conformation, the CT state can undergo inter‐base hydrogen transfer and decay to the ground state through a conical intersection, or it can yield a long‐lived minimum stabilized by a hydrogen bond between the two ribose rings. This suggests that the 1Lb, S(U) and CT states of the stacked conformer may all contribute to the experimental lifetimes of 18 and 240 ps. We have also simulated the time evolution of the 2D‐UV spectra and provide the specific fingerprint of each species in a recommended probe window between 25 000 and 38 000 cm−1 in which decongested, clearly distinguishable spectra can be obtained. This is expected to allow the mechanistic scenarios to be discerned in the near future with the help of the corresponding experiments. Our results reveal the complexity of the photophysics of the relatively small ApU system, and the potential of 2D‐UV spectroscopy to disentangle the photophysics of multichromophoric systems. PMID:27113273

  11. Enhanced Molecular Recognition between Nucleobases and Guanine-5'-monophosphate-disodium (GMP) by Surfactant Aggregates in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhang; Wang, Dong; Cao, Meiwen; Han, Yuchun; Xu, Hai; Wang, Yilin

    2015-07-15

    Only specific base pairs on DNA can bind with each other through hydrogen bonds, which is called the Watson-Crick (W/C) pairing rule. However, without the constraint of DNA chains, the nucleobases in bulk aqueous solution usually do not follow the W/C pairing rule anymore because of the strong competitive effect of water and the multi-interaction edges of nucleobases. The present work applied surfactant aggregates noncovalently functionalized by nucleotide to enhance the recognition between nucleobases without DNA chains in aqueous solution, and it revealed the effects of their self-assembling ability and morphologies on the recognition. The cationic ammonium monomeric, dimeric, and trimeric surfactants DTAB, 12-3-12, and 12-3-12-3-12 were chosen. The surfactants with guanine-5'-monophosphate-disodium (GMP) form micelles, vesicles, and fingerprint-like and plate-like aggregates bearing the hydrogen-bonding sites of GMP, respectively. The binding parameters of these aggregates with adenine (A), uracil (U), guanine (G), and cytosine(C) indicate that the surfactants can promote W/C recognitions in aqueous solution when they form vesicles (GMP/DTAB) or plate-like aggregates (GMP/12-3-12) with proper molecular packing compactness, which not only provide hydrophobic environments but also shield non-W/C recognition edges. However, the GMP/12-3-12 micelles with loose molecular packing, the GMP/12-3-12 fingerprint-like aggregates where the hydrogen bond sites of GMP are occupied by itself, and the GMP/12-3-12-3-12 vesicles with too strong self-assembling ability cannot promote W/C recognition. This work provides insight into how to design self-assemblies with the performance of enhanced molecule recognition.

  12. Estradiol regulation of hypothalamic astrocyte adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase activity: role of hindbrain catecholamine signaling.

    PubMed

    Tamrakar, Pratistha; Briski, Karen P

    2015-01-01

    Recent work challenges the conventional notion that metabolic monitoring in the brain is the exclusive function of neurons. This study investigated the hypothesis that hypothalamic astrocytes express the ultra-sensitive energy gauge adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and that the ovarian hormone estradiol (E) controls activation of this sensor by insulin-induced hypoglycemia (IIH). E- or oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized (OVX) rats were pretreated by caudal fourth ventricular administration of the catecholamine neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) prior to sc insulin or vehicle injection. Individual astrocytes identified in situ by glial fibrillary acidic protein immunolabeling were laser-microdissected from the ventromedial (VMH), arcuate (ARH), and paraventricular (PVH) nuclei and the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), and pooled within each site for Western blot analysis of AMPK and phosphoAMPK (pAMPK) protein expression. In the VMH, baseline astrocyte AMPK and pAMPK levels were respectively increased or decreased in OVX+E versus OVX+O; these profiles did not differ between E and O rats in other hypothalamic loci. In E animals, astrocyte AMPK protein was reduced [VMH] or augmented [PVH; LHA] in response to either 6-OHDA or IIH. IIH increased astrocyte pAMPK expression in each structure in vehicle-, but not 6-OHDA-pretreated E rats. Results provide novel evidence for hypothalamic astrocyte AMPK expression and hindbrain catecholamine-dependent activation of this cell-specific sensor by hypoglycemia in the presence of estrogen. Further research is needed to determine the role of astrocyte AMPK in reactivity of these glia to metabolic imbalance and contribution to restoration of neuro-metabolic stability.

  13. Effects of insulin and guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate on fatty acid synthesis and lipolysis within electropermeabilized fat-cells.

    PubMed

    Rutter, G A; Denton, R M

    1992-01-15

    1. Exposure to electric fields ('electroporation') has been used to investigate the mechanism of the action of insulin on the regulation of fatty acid synthesis and lipolysis in isolated rat fat-cells. 2. Exposure of the cells to electric fields (six pulses at 2 or 3 kV/cm) permitted the uptake of a number of low-Mr molecules normally excluded from cells, including sucrose (Mr 342), EDTA (Mr 394) and propidium iodide (Mr 668). At least 90% of the cells were found to be permeable to these species. 3. Insulin stimulated the synthesis of fatty acids in electroporated (2 kV/cm) cells to a similar extent (0.68 +/- 0.19 to 6.7 +/- 0.7 micrograms-atoms of glucose carbon/h per g, or 3.3 +/- 0.6 to 11.2 +/- 1.6 micrograms-atoms of H2O hydrogen/h per g) to that observed in non-electroporated cells. Guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[S]; 0.5 mM) also stimulated fatty acid synthesis (2-fold) and flux of glucose carbon into triacylglycerol glycerol (3-fold) in these cells, but had no effect on these parameters in non-electroporated cells. 4. Lipolysis in the electroporated cells was stimulated by isoprenaline and also by GTP[S], but only the effects of isoprenaline were inhibited by insulin. 5. Exposure to a higher field strength (3 kV/cm) gave results qualitatively similar to those described above, although the effects of insulin and isoprenaline were diminished. 6. These studies provide evidence against a role for changes in Ca2+, and probably also Na+, K+ or Mg2+, in insulin action on fat-cells, but may support a role for GTP-binding proteins. PMID:1310596

  14. Neuroprotection Promoted by Guanosine Depends on Glutamine Synthetase and Glutamate Transporters Activity in Hippocampal Slices Subjected to Oxygen/Glucose Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Dal-Cim, Tharine; Martins, Wagner C; Thomaz, Daniel T; Coelho, Victor; Poluceno, Gabriela Godoy; Lanznaster, Débora; Vandresen-Filho, Samuel; Tasca, Carla I

    2016-05-01

    Guanosine (GUO) has been shown to act as a neuroprotective agent against glutamatergic excitotoxicity by increasing glutamate uptake and decreasing its release. In this study, a putative effect of GUO action on glutamate transporters activity modulation was assessed in hippocampal slices subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD), an in vitro model of brain ischemia. Slices subjected to OGD showed increased excitatory amino acids release (measured by D-[(3)H]aspartate release) that was prevented in the presence of GUO (100 µM). The glutamate transporter blockers, DL-TBOA (10 µM), DHK (100 µM, selective inhibitor of GLT-1), and sulfasalazine (SAS, 250 µM, Xc(-) system inhibitor) decreased OGD-induced D-aspartate release. Interestingly, DHK or DL-TBOA blocked the decrease in glutamate release induced by GUO, whereas SAS did not modify the GUO effect. GUO protected hippocampal slices from cellular damage by modulation of glutamate transporters, however selective blockade of GLT-1 or Xc- system only did not affect this protective action of GUO. OGD decreased hippocampal glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and GUO recovered GS activity to control levels without altering the kinetic parameters of GS activity, thus suggesting GUO does not directly interact with GS. Additionally, the pharmacological inhibition of GS activity with methionine sulfoximine abolished the effect of GUO in reducing D-aspartate release and cellular damage evoked by OGD. Altogether, results in hippocampal slices subjected to OGD show that GUO counteracts the release of excitatory amino acids, stimulates the activity of GS, and decreases the cellular damage by modulation of glutamate transporters activity.

  15. Colonic ornithine decarboxylase in inflammatory bowel disease: ileorectal activity gradient, guanosine triphosphate stimulation, and association with epithelial regeneration but not the degree of inflammation and clinical features.

    PubMed

    Allgayer, Hubert; Roisch, Ulla; Zehnter, Elmar; Ziegenhagen, Dieter J; Dienes, Hans P; Kruis, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    The role of colonic mucosal ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains controversial. This study assessed mucosal ODC activity in IBD patients segment by segment with regard to patient characteristics, disease activity/duration, medication, degree of mucosal inflammation, and presence/absence of epithelial regeneration and guanosine triphosphate (GTP) stimulation. Mucosal ODC activity was determined in biopsy specimens from the terminal ileum, cecum/ascending, transverse, and descending colon, and the sigmoid/rectum of 35 patients with IBD (18 with Crohn's disease, 17 with ulcerative colitis) and 29 controls, using the amount of 14CO2 liberated from (carboxyl-14C)ornithine hydrochloride. GTP-stimulatable activity was expressed as the ratio of ODC activity in the presence and absence of GTP (70 micromol/L). Mucosal inflammation was assessed endoscopically/microscopically with previously described criteria. Presence/absence of mucosal regeneration also was determined by predefined criteria. Mucosal ODC-activity did not significantly differ in IBD patients and controls. There was a 4.4-fold activity gradient from the ileum to the rectum. Mucosal ODC activity was significantly higher in areas with epithelial regeneration compared to those without regeneration, and was stimulated by GTP by a factor of 1.42 in Crohn's disease and 1.19 in ulcerative colitis patients compared to controls (p < 0.004). On the other hand, there was no significant association/relationship of mucosal ODC activity with disease activity/duration and the endoscopic/histologic degree of mucosal inflammation. The observation of unchanged mucosal ODC activity in patients with IBD and the absence of a significant relationship with clinical and endoscopic/histologic disease characteristics speaks against a major role of ODC in IBD as a major disease marker. The role of the ileorectal gradient, the enhanced activity in areas with epithelial regeneration, and the GTP

  16. Association of blood lead levels with urinary F2-8α Isoprostane and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxy-Guanosine concentrations in first-grade Uruguayan children

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Aditi; Queirolo, Elena; Peregalli, Fabiana; Mañay, Nelly; Martínez, Gabriela; Kordas, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) is a potential molecular mechanism for lead-induced toxicities, yet, we have limited understanding of the relation between low-level lead (Pb) exposure and OS, especially in children. This cross-sectional study examines the association between blood lead level (BLL) and two OS markers—urinary F2-8α isoprostane or isoprostane (a marker of lipid peroxidation) and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxy-Guanosine or 8-OH-dG (a marker of DNA damage) in 211 children, aged 5–8 years, from Montevideo, Uruguay. The role of dietary intakes of vitamin C and zinc in modifying the relation between BLL and OS was also examined. The mean (SD) BLL of the study children was 4.7 (2.2) μg/dL, with 30.2% children having BLL ≥5 μg/dL, the current reference level set by the US Centre for Disease Control for identifying, monitoring and management of children with elevated BLL. In covariate-adjusted analysis, there was a weak positive association between BLL and urinary isoprostane (adjusted for specific gravity) [β = 0.09, p< 0.1]. No association was found between children’s BLL and urinary 8-OH-dG. Interactions between dietary intakes of vitamin C or zinc and BLL on OS biomarkers were not consistent. However, when BLL and vitamin C or BLL and zinc were modeled together, BLL was independently associated with isoprostane concentration [β = 0.10, p< 0.05] but vitamin C or zinc intake was not. These findings suggest that there may be a potential adverse effect of BLL on OS in children with low-level Pb exposure. There is a need to study the effects of Pb on other OS measures, as well as the role of OS in mediating low-level Pb toxicity on functional outcomes. PMID:25863186

  17. mu-Opioid receptor-stimulated guanosine-5'-O-(gamma-thio)-triphosphate binding in rat thalamus and cultured cell lines: signal transduction mechanisms underlying agonist efficacy.

    PubMed

    Selley, D E; Sim, L J; Xiao, R; Liu, Q; Childers, S R

    1997-01-01

    G protein activation by different mu-selective opioid agonists was examined in rat thalamus, SK-N-SH cells, and mu-opioid receptor-transfected mMOR-CHO cells using agonist-stimulated guanosine-5'-O-(gamma-thio)-triphosphate ([35S]GTP gamma S) binding to membranes in the presence of excess GDP. [D-Ala2, N-MePhe4, Gly5-ol]Enkephalin (DAMGO) was the most efficacious agonist in rat thalamus and SK-N-SH cells, followed by (in rank order) fentanyl = morphine > > buprenorphine. In mMOR-CHO cells expressing a high density of mu receptors, no differences were observed among DAMGO, morphine or fentanyl, but these agonists were more efficacious than buprenorphine, which was more efficacious than levallorphan. In all three systems, efficacy differences were magnified by increasing GDP concentrations, indicating that the activity state of G proteins can affect agonist efficacy. Scatchard analysis of net agon stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding revealed two major components responsible for agonist efficacy differences. First, differences in the KD values of agonist-stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding between high efficacy agonists (DAMGO, fentanyl, and morphine) and classic partial agonists (buprenorphine and levallorphan) were observed in all three systems. Second, differences in the Bmax value of agonist-stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding were observed between DAMGO and morphine or fentanyl in rat thalamus and SK-N-SH cells and between the high efficacy agonists and buprenorphine or levallorphan in all three systems. These results suggest that mu-opioid agonist efficacy is determined by the magnitude of the receptor-mediated affinity shift in the binding of GTP (or[35S]GTP gamma S) versus GDP to the G protein and by the number of G proteins activated per occupied receptor.

  18. In vivo levels of diadenosine tetraphosphate and adenosine tetraphospho-guanosine in Physarum polycephalum during the cell cycle and oxidative stress.

    PubMed Central

    Garrison, P N; Mathis, S A; Barnes, L D

    1986-01-01

    Cellular levels of diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A) and adenosine tetraphospho-guanosine (Ap4G) were specifically measured during the cell cycle of Physarum polycephalum by a high-pressure liquid chromatographic method. Ap4A was also measured indirectly by a coupled phosphodiesterase-luciferase assay. No cell cycle-specific changes in either Ap4A or Ap4G were detected in experiments involving different methods of assay, different strains of P. polycephalum, or different methods of fixation of macroplasmodia. Our results on Ap4A are in contrast with those reported previously (C. Weinmann-Dorsch, G. Pierron, R. Wick, H. Sauer, and F. Grummt, Exp. Cell Res. 155:171-177, 1984). Weinmann-Dorsch et al. reported an 8- to 30-fold increase in Ap4A in early S phase in P. polycephalum, as measured by the phosphodiesterase-luciferase assay. We also measured levels of Ap4A, Ap4G, and ATP in macroplasmodia treated with 0.1 mM dinitrophenol. Ap4A and Ap4G transiently increased three- to sevenfold after 1 h and then decreased concomitantly with an 80% decrease in the level of ATP after 2 h in the presence of dinitrophenol. These results do not support the hypothesis that Ap4A is a positive pleiotypic activator that modulates DNA replication, but they are consistent with the hypothesis proposed for procaryotes that Ap4A and Ap4G are signal nucleotides or alarmones of oxidative stress (B.R. Bochner, P.C. Lee, S.W. Wilson, C.W. Cutler, and B.N. Ames, Cell 37:225-232, 1984). PMID:3785160

  19. The Anti-fibrotic Actions of Relaxin Are Mediated Through a NO-sGC-cGMP-Dependent Pathway in Renal Myofibroblasts In Vitro and Enhanced by the NO Donor, Diethylamine NONOate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Kemp-Harper, Barbara K.; Kocan, Martina; Ang, Sheng Yu; Hewitson, Tim D.; Samuel, Chrishan S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The anti-fibrotic hormone, relaxin, has been inferred to disrupt transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1/Smad2 phosphorylation (pSmad2) signal transduction and promote collagen-degrading gelatinase activity via a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent pathway. Here, we determined the extent to which NO, soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) were directly involved in the anti-fibrotic actions of relaxin using a selective NO scavenger and sGC inhibitor, and comparing and combining relaxin’s effects with that of an NO donor. Methods and Results: Primary renal cortical myofibroblasts isolated from injured rat kidneys were treated with human recombinant relaxin (RLX; 16.8 nM), the NO donor, diethylamine NONOate (DEA/NO; 0.5–5 μM) or the combined effects of RLX (16.8 nM) and DEA/NO (5 μM) over 72 h. The effects of RLX (16.8 nM) and DEA/NO (5 μM) were also evaluated in the presence of the NO scavenger, hydroxocobalamin (HXC; 100 μM) or sGC inhibitor, ODQ (5 μM) over 72 h. Furthermore, the effects of RLX (30 nM), DEA/NO (5 μM) and RLX (30 nM) + DEA/NO (5 μM) on cGMP levels were directly measured, in the presence or absence of ODQ (5 μM). Changes in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9 (cell media), pSmad2 and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA; a measure myofibroblast differentiation) (cell layer) were assessed by gelatin zymography and Western blotting, respectively. At the highest concentration tested, both RLX and DEA/NO promoted MMP-2 and MMP-9 levels by 25–33%, while inhibiting pSmad2 and α-SMA expression by up to 50% (all p < 0.05 vs. untreated and vehicle-treated cells). However, 5μM of DEA/NO was required to produce the effects seen with 16.8 nM of RLX over 72 h. The anti-fibrotic effects of RLX or DEA/NO alone were completely abrogated by HXC and ODQ (both p < 0.01 vs. RLX alone or DEA/NO alone), but were significantly enhanced when added in combination (all p < 0.05 vs. RLX alone). Additionally, the direct c

  20. Polyphosphate suppresses complement via the terminal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wat, Jovian M.; Foley, Jonathan H.; Krisinger, Michael J.; Ocariza, Linnette Mae; Lei, Victor; Wasney, Gregory A.; Lameignere, Emilie; Strynadka, Natalie C.; Smith, Stephanie A.; Morrissey, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Polyphosphate, synthesized by all cells, is a linear polymer of inorganic phosphate. When released into the circulation, it exerts prothrombotic and proinflammatory activities by modulating steps in the coagulation cascade. We examined the role of polyphosphate in regulating the evolutionarily related proteolytic cascade complement. In erythrocyte lysis assays, polyphosphate comprising more than 1000 phosphate units suppressed total hemolytic activity with a concentration to reduce maximal lysis to 50% that was 10-fold lower than with monophosphate. In the ion- and enzyme-independent terminal pathway complement assay, polyphosphate suppressed complement in a concentration- and size-dependent manner. Phosphatase-treated polyphosphate lost its ability to suppress complement, confirming that polymer integrity is required. Sequential addition of polyphosphate to the terminal pathway assay showed that polyphosphate interferes with complement only when added before formation of the C5b-7 complex. Physicochemical analyses using native gels, gel filtration, and differential scanning fluorimetry revealed that polyphosphate binds to and destabilizes C5b,6, thereby reducing the capacity of the membrane attack complex to bind to and lyse the target cell. In summary, we have added another function to polyphosphate in blood, demonstrating that it dampens the innate immune response by suppressing complement. These findings further establish the complex relationship between coagulation and innate immunity. PMID:24335501

  1. Study of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase in complex with the top three OMP, BMP, and PMP ligands by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Shirin; Jalili, Seifollah; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic mechanism of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC), one of the nature most proficient enzymes which provides large rate enhancement, has not been fully understood yet. A series of 30 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were run on X-ray structure of the OMPDC from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in its free form as well as in complex with different ligands, namely 1-(5'-phospho-D-ribofuranosyl) barbituric acid (BMP), orotidine 5'-monophosphate (OMP), and 6-phosphonouridine 5'-monophosphate (PMP). The importance of this biological system is justified both by its high rate enhancement and its potential use as a target in chemotherapy. This work focuses on comparing two physicochemical states of the enzyme (protonated and deprotonated Asp91) and three ligands (substrate OMP, inhibitor, and transition state analog BMP and substrate analog PMP). Detailed analysis of the active site geometry and its interactions is properly put in context by extensive comparison with relevant experimental works. Our overall results show that in terms of hydrogen bond occupancy, electrostatic interactions, dihedral angles, active site configuration, and movement of loops, notable differences among different complexes are observed. Comparison of the results obtained from these simulations provides some detailed structural data for the complexes, the enzyme, and the ligands, as well as useful insights into the inhibition mechanism of the OMPDC enzyme. Furthermore, these simulations are applied to clarify the ambiguous mechanism of the OMPDC enzyme, and imply that the substrate destabilization and transition state stabilization contribute to the mechanism of action of the most proficient enzyme, OMPDC. PMID:24559040

  2. Mechanism of the Orotidine 5’-Monophosphate Decarboxylase-Catalyzed Reaction: Importance of Residues in the Orotate Binding Site†

    PubMed Central

    Iiams, Vanessa; Desai, Bijoy J.; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Almo, Steven C.; Gerlt, John A.

    2011-01-01

    The reaction catalyzed by orotidine 5’-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) is accompanied by exceptional values for the rate enhancement [kcat/knon = 7.1 × 1016] and catalytic proficiency [(kcat/KM)/knon = 4.8 × 1022 M−1]. Although a stabilized vinyl carbanion/carbene intermediate is located on the reaction coordinate, the structural strategies by which the reduction in the activation energy barrier is realized remain incompletely understood. This laboratory recently reported that “substrate destabilization” by Asp 70 in the OMPDC from Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus (MtOMPDC) lowers the activation energy barrier by ~5 kcal/mol (contributing ~2.7 × 103 to the rate enhancement) [K. K. Chan, B. M. Wood, A. A. Fedorov, E. V. Fedorov, H. J. Imker, T. L. Amyes, J. P. Richard, S. C. Almo, and J. A. Gerlt (2009) Biochemistry 48, 5518–31]. We now report that substitutions of hydrophobic residues in a pocket proximal to the carboxylate group of the substrate (Ile 96, Leu 123, and Val 155) with neutral hydrophilic residues decrease the value of kcat by as much as 400-fold but have minimal effect on the value of kex for exchange of H6 of the FUMP product analog with solvent deuterium; we hypothesize that this pocket destabilizes the substrate by preventing hydration of the substrate carboxylate group. We also report that substitutions for Ser 127 that is proximal to O4 of the orotate ring decrease the value of kcat/KM, with the S127P substitution that eliminates hydrogen-bonding interactions with O4 producing a 2.5 × 106-fold reduction in the value of kcat/KM; this effect is consistent with delocalization of the negative charge of the carbanionic intermediate on O4 to produce an anionic carbene intermediate and thereby provide a structural strategy for stabilization of the intermediate. These observations provide additional information on the identities of the active site residues that contribute to the rate enhancement and, therefore, insights into the

  3. The cAMP Pathway as Therapeutic Target in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Raker, Verena Katharina; Becker, Christian; Steinbrink, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide signaling molecules contribute to the regulation of cellular pathways. In the immune system, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is well established as a potent regulator of innate and adaptive immune cell functions. Therapeutic strategies to interrupt or enhance cAMP generation or effects have immunoregulatory potential in autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. Here, we provide an overview of the cyclic AMP axis and its role as a regulator of immune functions and discuss the clinical and translational relevance of interventions with these processes. PMID:27065076

  4. A label-free and self-assembled electrochemical biosensor for highly sensitive detection of cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP) based on RNA riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qingyun; Zhao, Fulin; Liu, Hongrui; Shan, Yanke; Liu, Fei

    2015-07-01

    Cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is an important second messenger that regulates a variety of complex physiological processes involved in motility, virulence, biofilm formation and cell cycle progression in several bacteria. Herein we report a simple label-free and self-assembled RNA riboswitch-based biosensor for sensitive and selective detection of c-di-GMP. The detectable concentration range of c-di-GMP is from 50 nM to 1 μM with a detection limit of 50 nM.

  5. Modulation of neurotrophic signaling pathways by polyphenols

    PubMed Central

    Moosavi, Fatemeh; Hosseini, Razieh; Saso, Luciano; Firuzi, Omidreza

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols are an important class of phytochemicals, and several lines of evidence have demonstrated their beneficial effects in the context of a number of pathologies including neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. In this report, we review the studies on the effects of polyphenols on neuronal survival, growth, proliferation and differentiation, and the signaling pathways involved in these neurotrophic actions. Several polyphenols including flavonoids such as baicalein, daidzein, luteolin, and nobiletin as well as nonflavonoid polyphenols such as auraptene, carnosic acid, curcuminoids, and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives including caffeic acid phentyl ester enhance neuronal survival and promote neurite outgrowth in vitro, a hallmark of neuronal differentiation. Assessment of underlying mechanisms, especially in PC12 neuronal-like cells, reveals that direct agonistic effect on tropomyosin receptor kinase (Trk) receptors, the main receptors of neurotrophic factors including nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) explains the action of few polyphenols such as 7,8-dihydroxyflavone. However, several other polyphenolic compounds activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways. Increased expression of neurotrophic factors in vitro and in vivo is the mechanism of neurotrophic action of flavonoids such as scutellarin, daidzein, genistein, and fisetin, while compounds like apigenin and ferulic acid increase cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation. Finally, the antioxidant activity of polyphenols reflected in the activation of Nrf2 pathway and the consequent upregulation of detoxification enzymes such as heme oxygenase-1 as well as the contribution of these effects to the neurotrophic activity have also been discussed. In conclusion, a better understanding of the neurotrophic effects of polyphenols and

  6. INX-08189, a Phosphoramidate Prodrug of 6-O-Methyl-2′-C-Methyl Guanosine, Is a Potent Inhibitor of Hepatitis C Virus Replication with Excellent Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Properties▿

    PubMed Central

    Vernachio, John H.; Bleiman, Blair; Bryant, K. Dawn; Chamberlain, Stanley; Hunley, Damound; Hutchins, Jeff; Ames, Brenda; Gorovits, Elena; Ganguly, Babita; Hall, Andrea; Kolykhalov, Alexander; Liu, Yule; Muhammad, Jerry; Raja, Nicholas; Walters, C. Robin; Wang, Jin; Williams, Karen; Patti, Joseph M.; Henson, Geoffrey; Madela, Karolina; Aljarah, Mohamed; Gilles, Arnaud; McGuigan, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    INX-08189 is an aryl-phosphoramidate of 6-O-methyl-2′-C-methyl guanosine. INX-08189 was highly potent in replicon assays, with a 50% effective concentration of 10 ± 6 nM against hepatitis C genotype 1b at 72 h. The inhibitory effect on viral replication was rapid, with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 35 ± 8 nM at 24 h. An intracellular 2′-C-methyl guanosine triphosphate (2′-C-MeGTP) concentration of 2.43 ± 0.42 pmol/106 cells was sufficient to achieve 90% inhibition of viral replication. In vitro resistance studies confirmed that the S282T mutation in the NS5b gene conferred an approximately 10-fold reduction in sensitivity to INX-08189. However, the complete inhibition of S282T mutant replicons still could be achieved with an EC90 of 344 ± 170 nM. Drug combination studies of INX-08189 and ribavirin indicated significant synergy in antiviral potency both in wild-type and S282T-expressing replicons. Genotype 1b replicons could be cleared after 14 days of culture when exposed to as little as 20 nM INX-08189. No evidence of mitochondrial toxicity was observed after 14 days of INX-08189 exposure in both HepG2 and CEM human cell lines. In vivo studies of rats and cynomolgus monkeys demonstrated that 2′-C-MeGTP concentrations in liver equivalent to the EC90 could be attained after a single oral dose of INX-08189. Rat liver 2′-C-MeGTP concentrations were proportional to dose, sustained for greater than 24 h, and correlated with plasma concentrations of the nucleoside metabolite 2′-C-methyl guanosine. The characteristics displayed by INX-08189 support its continued development as a clinical candidate for the treatment of chronic HCV infection. PMID:21357300

  7. INX-08189, a phosphoramidate prodrug of 6-O-methyl-2'-C-methyl guanosine, is a potent inhibitor of hepatitis C virus replication with excellent pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties.

    PubMed

    Vernachio, John H; Bleiman, Blair; Bryant, K Dawn; Chamberlain, Stanley; Hunley, Damound; Hutchins, Jeff; Ames, Brenda; Gorovits, Elena; Ganguly, Babita; Hall, Andrea; Kolykhalov, Alexander; Liu, Yule; Muhammad, Jerry; Raja, Nicholas; Walters, C Robin; Wang, Jin; Williams, Karen; Patti, Joseph M; Henson, Geoffrey; Madela, Karolina; Aljarah, Mohamed; Gilles, Arnaud; McGuigan, Christopher

    2011-05-01

    INX-08189 is an aryl-phosphoramidate of 6-O-methyl-2'-C-methyl guanosine. INX-08189 was highly potent in replicon assays, with a 50% effective concentration of 10±6 nM against hepatitis C genotype 1b at 72 h. The inhibitory effect on viral replication was rapid, with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 35±8 nM at 24 h. An intracellular 2'-C-methyl guanosine triphosphate (2'-C-MeGTP) concentration of 2.43±0.42 pmol/10(6) cells was sufficient to achieve 90% inhibition of viral replication. In vitro resistance studies confirmed that the S282T mutation in the NS5b gene conferred an approximately 10-fold reduction in sensitivity to INX-08189. However, the complete inhibition of S282T mutant replicons still could be achieved with an EC90 of 344±170 nM. Drug combination studies of INX-08189 and ribavirin indicated significant synergy in antiviral potency both in wild-type and S282T-expressing replicons. Genotype 1b replicons could be cleared after 14 days of culture when exposed to as little as 20 nM INX-08189. No evidence of mitochondrial toxicity was observed after 14 days of INX-08189 exposure in both HepG2 and CEM human cell lines. In vivo studies of rats and cynomolgus monkeys demonstrated that 2'-C-MeGTP concentrations in liver equivalent to the EC90 could be attained after a single oral dose of INX-08189. Rat liver 2'-C-MeGTP concentrations were proportional to dose, sustained for greater than 24 h, and correlated with plasma concentrations of the nucleoside metabolite 2'-C-methyl guanosine. The characteristics displayed by INX-08189 support its continued development as a clinical candidate for the treatment of chronic HCV infection. PMID:21357300

  8. Pathway Engineered Enzymatic de novo Purine Nucleotide Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Schultheisz, Heather L.; Szymczyna, Blair R.; Scott, Lincoln G.; Williamson, James R.

    2009-01-01

    A general method for isotopic labeling of the purine base moiety of nucleotides and RNA has been developed through biochemical pathway engineering in vitro. A synthetic scheme was designed and implemented utilizing recombinant enzymes from the pentose phosphate and de novo purine synthesis pathways, with regeneration of folate, aspartate, glutamine, ATP, and NADPH cofactors, in a single-pot reaction. Syntheses proceeded quickly and efficiently in comparison to chemical methods with isolated yields up to 66% for 13C, 15N enriched ATP and GTP. The scheme is robust and flexible, requiring only serine, NH4+, glucose and CO2 as stoichiometric precursors in labeled form. Using this approach, U-13C- GTP, U-13C,15N- GTP, 13C2,8- ATP and U-15N- GTP were synthesized on a millimole scale, and the utility of the isotope labeling is illustrated in NMR spectra of HIV-2 transactivation region (TAR) RNA containing 13C 2,8-adenosine and 15N-1,3,7,9,2-guanosine. Pathway engineering in vitro permits complex synthetic cascades to be effected expanding the applicability of enzymatic synthesis. PMID:18707057

  9. NO/PGI2-independent vasorelaxation and the cytochrome P450 pathway in rabbit carotid artery

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hui; Waldron, Gareth J; Galipeau, Denise; Cole, William C; Triggle, Christopher R

    1997-01-01

    not altered by either KCa channel blockade with apamin (1 μM, n=5) or CTX (0.1 μM, n=5), or by the cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase blockers SKF-525A (10 μM, n=4) and clotrimazole (10 μM, n=5). However, the NO-induced response was shifted to the right by LY83583 (10 μM, n=4), a guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, with the pD2 value decreasing from 6.95±0.14 to 6.04±0.09 (P<0.01).ACh (0.01–100 μM) induced a concentration-dependent relaxation of PE-induced tone in endothelium-denuded arterial segments sandwiched with endothelium-intact donor segments. This relaxation to ACh was largely unaffected by indomathacin (10 μM) plus L-NAME (30 μM), but abolished by the combination of indomethacin, L-NAME and TBA (1 mM, n=5).These data suggest that in the rabbit carotid artery: (a) ACh can induce the release of both NO and EDHF, whereas A23187 only evokes the release of NO from the endothelium, (b) the diffusible EDHF released by ACh may be a cytochrome P450-derived arachidonic acid metabolite, and (c) EDHF-induced relaxation involves the opening of at least two types of KCa channels, whereas NO mediates vasorelaxation via a guanosine 3′: 5′-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP)-mediated pathway, in which a cytochrome P450 pathway and KCa channels do not seem to be involved. PMID:9051310

  10. GhLTPG1, a cotton GPI-anchored lipid transfer protein, regulates the transport of phosphatidylinositol monophosphates and cotton fiber elongation

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ting; Yao, Hongyan; Wang, Jin; Wang, Jun; Xue, Hongwei; Zuo, Kaijing

    2016-01-01

    The cotton fibers are seed trichomes that elongate from the ovule epidermis. Polar lipids are required for the quick enlargement of cell membrane and fiber cell growth, however, how lipids are transported from the ovules into the developing fibers remains less known. Here, we reported the functional characterization of GhLTPG1, a GPI-anchored lipid transport protein, during cotton fiber elongation. GhLTPG1 was abundantly expressed in elongating cotton fibers and outer integument of the ovules, and GhLTPG1 protein was located on cell membrane. Biochemical analysis showed that GhLTPG1 specifically bound to phosphatidylinositol mono-phosphates (PtdIns3P, PtdIns4P and PtdIns5P) in vitro and transported PtdInsPs from the synthesis places to the plasma membranes in vivo. Expression of GhLTPG1 in Arabidopsis caused an increased number of trichomes, and fibers in GhLTPG1-knockdown cotton plants exhibited significantly reduced length, decreased polar lipid content, and repression of fiber elongation-related genes expression. These results suggested that GhLTPG1 protein regulates the cotton fiber elongation through mediating the transport of phosphatidylinositol monophosphates. PMID:27311358

  11. Nucleoside monophosphate complex structures of the endonuclease domain from the influenza virus polymerase PA subunit reveal the substrate binding site inside the catalytic center.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cong; Lou, Zhiyong; Guo, Yu; Ma, Ming; Chen, Yutao; Liang, Shuaiyi; Zhang, Liang; Chen, Shoudeng; Li, Xuemei; Liu, Yingfang; Bartlam, Mark; Rao, Zihe

    2009-09-01

    Highly pathogenic influenza virus strains currently in circulation pose a significant risk of a global pandemic. Following the reported crystal structure of the endonuclease domain from the avian influenza virus polymerase PA subunit, here we report the results of a systematic X-ray crystallographic analysis of its complex with adenosine, uridine, and thymidine nucleoside monophosphates (NMPs). Electron density corresponding to the monophosphate moiety of each nucleotide was apparent in each NMP complex and bound to the catalytic metal. A hydrophobic site was found to contribute to nucleoside binding. The NMP complex structures should represent the conformation of the bound product after nuclease cleavage. Moreover, one solvent molecule was found to occupy an equivalent position to the second reported Mn(2+) ion, where it mediates the interaction between bound NMPs and the N-terminal PA domain in the presence of the Mg(2+) ion. The results presented here indicate a possible cleavage mechanism and identify a distinct nucleotide binding pocket. The identification of this binding pocket opens a new avenue for anti-influenza drug discovery, targeting the cap-dependent endonuclease, in response to the worldwide threat of influenza. PMID:19587036

  12. Lipid peroxidation and haemoglobin degradation in red blood cells exposed to t-butyl hydroperoxide. Effects of the hexose monophosphate shunt as mediated by glutathione and ascorbate.

    PubMed

    Trotta, R J; Sullivan, S G; Stern, A

    1982-05-15

    Lipid peroxidation and haemoglobin degradation were the two extremes of a spectrum of oxidative damage in red cells exposed to t-butyl hydroperoxide. The exact position in this spectrum depended on the availability of glucose and the ligand state of haemoglobin. In red cells containing oxy- or carbonmono-oxy-haemoglobin, hexose monophosphate-shunt activity was mainly responsible for metabolism of t-butyl hydroperoxide; haem groups were the main scavengers in red cells containing methaemoglobin. Glutathione, via glutathione peroxidase, accounted for nearly all of the hydroperoxide metabolizing activity of the hexose monophosphate shunt. Glucose protection against lipid peroxidation was almost entirely mediated by glutathione, whereas glucose protection of haemoglobin was only partly mediated by glutathione. Physiological concentrations of intracellular or extracellular ascorbate had no effect on consumption of t-butyl hydroperoxide or oxidation of haemoglobin. Ascorbate was mainly involved in scavenging chain-propagating species involved in lipid peroxidation. The protective effect of intracellular ascorbate against lipid peroxidation was about 100% glucose-dependent and about 50% glutathione-dependent. Extracellular ascorbate functioned largely without a requirement for glucose metabolism, although some synergistic effects between extracellular ascorbate and glutathione were observed. Lipid peroxidation was not dependent on the rate or completion of t-butyl hydroperoxide consumption but rather on the route of consumption. Lipid peroxidation appears to depend on the balance between the presence of initiators of lipid peroxidation (oxyhaemoglobin and low concentrations of methaemoglobin) and terminators of lipid peroxidation (glutathione, ascorbate, high concentrations of methaemoglobin).

  13. Nitrogen regulates CRY1 phosphorylation and circadian clock input pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang-Hong; Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Zheng, Chong; Yuan, Shu; He, Yikun

    2016-09-01

    The delayed flowering phenotype caused by nitrogen (N) fertilizer application has been known for a long time, but we know little about the specific molecular mechanism for this phenomenon before. Our study indicated that low nitrogen increases the NADPH/NADP(+) and ATP/AMP ratios which affect adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and phosphorylation and abundance of nuclear CRY1 protein. Then CRY1 acts in the N signal input pathway to the circadian clock. Here we further discuss: (1) the role of C/N ratio in flowering, (2) circadian oscillation of plant AMPK transcripts and proteins, (3) conservation of nutrition-mediated CRY1 phosphorylation and degradation, and (4) crosstalks between nitrogen signals and nitric oxide (NO) signals in flowering. PMID:27617369

  14. The cyclic AMP signaling pathway: Exploring targets for successful drug discovery (Review)

    PubMed Central

    YAN, KUO; GAO, LI-NA; CUI, YUAN-LU; ZHANG, YI; ZHOU, XIN

    2016-01-01

    During development of disease, complex intracellular signaling pathways regulate an intricate series of events, including resistance to external toxins, the secretion of cytokines and the production of pathological phenomena. Adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) is a nucleotide that acts as a key second messenger in numerous signal transduction pathways. cAMP regulates various cellular functions, including cell growth and differentiation, gene transcription and protein expression. This review aimed to provide an understanding of the effects of the cAMP signaling pathway and the associated factors on disease occurrence and development by examining the information from a new perspective. These novel insights aimed to promote the development of novel therapeutic approaches and aid in the development of new drugs. PMID:27035868

  15. Kinetic preference for the 3'-5'-linked dimer in the reaction of guanosine 5'-phosphorylmorpholinamide with deoxyguanosine 5'-phosphoryl-2-methylimidazolide as a function of poly(C) concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.

    1998-01-01

    The formation of the internucleotide bond in diguanylate synthesis was studied in aqueous solution at pH 8 and 0.2 M Mg2+ in the presence and absence of polycytidylate, poly(C). The investigation was simplified by using guanosine 5'-phosphorylmorpholinamide, mor-pG, which can act only as a nucleophile, and deoxyguanosine 5'-phosphoryl-2-methylimidazolide, 2-MeImpdG, which can act only as an electrophile. The time-dependent product distribution was monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS). In the absence of poly(C) the reaction between mor-pG and 2-MeImpdG yielded small amounts of the dimer mor-pGpdG with a regioselectivity of 2'-5':3'-5' = 3.5. In the presence of poly(C) dimer yields increased and a reversal in regioselectivity occurred; both effects were in proportion to the concentration of the polymer. The results can be quantitatively explained with the proposition that poly(C), acting as the template, catalyzes the reaction between template-bound monomers by about a factor of 4-5 over the reaction in solution and yields dimers with a regioselectivity of 2'-5':3'-5' approximately 0.33. These findings illustrate the intrinsic preference of guanosine monomers to correctly self-assemble on the appropriate template.

  16. Clerkship pathway

    PubMed Central

    MacLellan, Anne-Marie; Brailovsky, Carlos; Miller, François; Leboeuf, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify factors that help predict success for international medical graduates (IMGs) who train in Canadian residency programs and pass the Canadian certification examinations. Design A retrospective analysis of 58 variables in the files of IMGs who applied to the Collège des médecins du Québec between 2000 and 2008. Setting Quebec. Participants Eight hundred ten IMGs who applied to the Collège des médecins du Québec through either the “equivalency pathway” (ie, starting training at a residency level) or the “clerkship pathway” (ie, relearning at the level of a medical student in the last 2 years of the MD diploma). Main outcome measures Success factors in achieving certification. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and ANOVA (analysis of variance). Results International medical graduates who chose the “clerkship pathway” had greater success on certification examinations than those who started at the residency level did. Conclusion There are several factors that influence IMGs’ success on certification examinations, including integration issues, the acquisition of clinical decision-making skills, and the varied educational backgrounds. These factors perhaps can be better addressed by a regular clerkship pathway, in which IMGs benefit from learner-centred teaching and have more time for reflection on and understanding of the North American approach to medical education. The clerkship pathway is a useful strategy for assuring the integration of IMGs in the North American health care system. A 2-year relearning period in medical school at a clinical clerkship level deserves careful consideration. PMID:22859630

  17. Effect of salinity on regulation mechanism of neuroendocrine-immunoregulatory network in Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qun; Pan, Luqing; Ren, Qin; Wang, Lin; Miao, Jingjing

    2016-02-01

    The effects of low salinity (transferred from 31‰ to 26‰, 21‰, and 16‰) on the regulation pathways of neuroendocrine-immunoregulatory network were investigated in Litopenaeus vannamei. The results showed that the hormones (corticotrophin-releasing hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone) and biogenic amines (dopamine, noradrenaline, 5-hydroxytryptamine) concentrations in lower salinity groups increased significantly within 12 h. The gene expression of biogenic amine receptors showed that dopamine receptor D4 and α2 adrenergic receptor in lower salinity groups decreased significantly within 12 h, whereas the 5-HT7 receptor significantly increased within 1d. The second messenger synthetases (adenylyl cyclase, phospholipase C) and the second messengers (cyclic adenosine monophosphate, cyclic guanosine monophosphate) of lower salinity groups shared a similar trend in which adenylyl cyclase and cyclic adenosine monophosphate reached the maximum at 12 h, whereas phospholipase C and cyclic guanosine monophosphate reached the minimum. The immune parameters (total hemocyte count, phenoloxidase activity, phagocytic activity, crustin expression, antibacterial activity, C-type lectin expression, hemagglutinating activity) in lower salinity groups decreased significantly within 12 h. Except for the total hemocyte count, all the parameters recovered to the control levels afterwards. Therefore, it may be concluded that the neuroendocrine-immunoregulatory network plays a principal role in adapting to salinity changes as the main center for sensing the stress and causes immune response in L. vannamei. PMID:26766179

  18. Effect of salinity on regulation mechanism of neuroendocrine-immunoregulatory network in Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qun; Pan, Luqing; Ren, Qin; Wang, Lin; Miao, Jingjing

    2016-02-01

    The effects of low salinity (transferred from 31‰ to 26‰, 21‰, and 16‰) on the regulation pathways of neuroendocrine-immunoregulatory network were investigated in Litopenaeus vannamei. The results showed that the hormones (corticotrophin-releasing hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone) and biogenic amines (dopamine, noradrenaline, 5-hydroxytryptamine) concentrations in lower salinity groups increased significantly within 12 h. The gene expression of biogenic amine receptors showed that dopamine receptor D4 and α2 adrenergic receptor in lower salinity groups decreased significantly within 12 h, whereas the 5-HT7 receptor significantly increased within 1d. The second messenger synthetases (adenylyl cyclase, phospholipase C) and the second messengers (cyclic adenosine monophosphate, cyclic guanosine monophosphate) of lower salinity groups shared a similar trend in which adenylyl cyclase and cyclic adenosine monophosphate reached the maximum at 12 h, whereas phospholipase C and cyclic guanosine monophosphate reached the minimum. The immune parameters (total hemocyte count, phenoloxidase activity, phagocytic activity, crustin expression, antibacterial activity, C-type lectin expression, hemagglutinating activity) in lower salinity groups decreased significantly within 12 h. Except for the total hemocyte count, all the parameters recovered to the control levels afterwards. Therefore, it may be concluded that the neuroendocrine-immunoregulatory network plays a principal role in adapting to salinity changes as the main center for sensing the stress and causes immune response in L. vannamei.

  19. Dielectric spectra broadening as a signature for dipole-matrix interaction. III. Water in adenosine monophosphate/adenosine-5'-triphosphate solutions.

    PubMed

    Puzenko, Alexander; Levy, Evgeniya; Shendrik, Andrey; Talary, Mark S; Caduff, Andreas; Feldman, Yuri

    2012-11-21

    In this, the third part of our series on the dielectric spectrum symmetrical broadening of water, we consider the nucleotide aqueous solutions. Where in Parts I [E. Levy et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 114502 (2012)] and II [E. Levy et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 114503 (2012)], the dipole-dipole or ion-dipole interaction had a dominant feature, now the interplay between these two types of dipole-matrix interactions will be considered. We present the results of high frequency dielectric measurements of different concentrations of adenosine monophosphate/adenosine-5'-triphosphate aqueous solutions. We observed the Cole-Cole broadening of the main relaxation peak of the solvent in the solutions. Moreover, depending on the nucleotide concentration, we observed both types of dipole-matrix interaction. The 3D trajectory approach (described in detail in Part I) is applied in order to highlight the differences between the two types of interaction.

  20. Behavior of the monophosphate tungsten bronzes (PO 2) 4(WO 3) 2 m (m = 4 and 6) in electrochemical lithium insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longoria Rodríguez, F. E.; Martínez-de la Cruz, A.; López Cuéllar, E.

    The electrochemical lithium insertion process has been studied in the family of monophosphate tungsten bronzes (PO 2) 4(WO 3) 2 m, where m = 4 and 6. Structural changes in the pristine oxides were followed as lithium insertion proceeded. Through potentiostatic intermittent technique, the different processes which take place in the cathode during the discharge of the cell were analysed. The nature of the bronzes Li x(PO 2) 4(WO 3) 2 m formed was determined by in situ X-ray diffraction experiments. These results have allowed establishment of a correlation with the reversible/irreversible processes detected during the electrochemical lithium insertion. Measurements of resistivity showed that upon lithium insertion, the metallic pristine oxides become insulating.

  1. Incidence of bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency, complex vertebral malformation, and deficiency of uridine-5-monophosphate synthase carriers in Brazilian Girolando cattle.

    PubMed

    Paiva, D S; Fonseca, I; Pinto, I S B; Ianella, P; Campos, T A; Caetano, A R; Paiva, S R; Silva, M V G B; Martins, M F

    2013-01-01

    Among the various hereditary diseases that have been widely studied in dairy cattle, bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD), deficiency of uridine-5-monophosphate synthase (DUMPS), and complex vertebral malformation (CVM) are noteworthy because of their high impact on overall herd productivity as a consequence of increased calf mortality. The aim of this study was to verify the frequency of carriers of BLAD, CVM, and DUMPS mutant alleles in cows and bulls from the National Girolando Progeny Test carried out in Brazil by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism and allele-specific PCR assays. A total of 777 animals were genotyped for BLAD, 783 for CVM, and 122 for DUMPS. The frequencies of carriers for BLAD and CVM were 0.77 and 1.53%, respectively, whereas no carriers of DUMPS were observed. PMID:24065661

  2. Muscle A-Kinase Anchoring Protein-α is an Injury-Specific Signaling Scaffold Required for Neurotrophic- and Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate-Mediated Survival.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Cameron, Evan G; Li, Jinliang; Stiles, Travis L; Kritzer, Michael D; Lodhavia, Rahul; Hertz, Jonathan; Nguyen, Tu; Kapiloff, Michael S; Goldberg, Jeffrey L

    2015-12-01

    Neurotrophic factor and cAMP-dependent signaling promote the survival and neurite outgrowth of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) after injury. However, the mechanisms conferring neuroprotection and neuroregeneration downstream to these signals are unclear. We now reveal that the scaffold protein muscle A-kinase anchoring protein-α (mAKAPα) is required for the survival and axon growth of cultured primary RGCs. Although genetic deletion of mAKAPα early in prenatal RGC development did not affect RGC survival into adulthood, nor promoted the death of RGCs in the uninjured adult retina, loss of mAKAPα in the adult increased RGC death after optic nerve crush. Importantly, mAKAPα was required for the neuroprotective effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and cyclic adenosine-monophosphate (cAMP) after injury. These results identify mAKAPα as a scaffold for signaling in the stressed neuron that is required for RGC neuroprotection after optic nerve injury. PMID:26844267

  3. Isolation of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP) from lakes of differing trophic status: Correlation with planktonic metabolic variables

    SciTech Connect

    Francko, D.A.; Wetzel, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    The seasonal dynamics of particulate and dissolved cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP) were examined in the epilimnia and littoral zones of two trophically dissimilar lakes. Each cAMP fraction was found in quantities comparable to those reported for cultured phytoplankton species. Both cAMP fractions varied greatly in concentration during the season and between the oligotrophic and hypereutrophic lakes. Increases in phytoplankton community densities were paralleled by weight-specific changes in particulate cAMP levels, depending on the phytoplankton species present. A linear relationship between cellular cAMP levels and in situ primary productivity rates was found in the oligotrophic lake. In both lakes, certain phytoplanktonic associations had particulate cAMP levels linearly related to chlorophyll a content and specific activity of alkaline phosphatase.

  4. Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent phosphoregulation of mitochondrial complex I is inhibited by nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Kaleb C. Wallace, Kendall B.

    2008-01-01

    Nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) are known to directly inhibit mitochondrial complex I activity as well as various mitochondrial kinases. Recent observations that complex I activity and superoxide production are modulated through cAMP-dependent phosphorylation suggests a mechanism through which NRTIs may affect mitochondrial respiration via kinase-dependent protein phosphorylation. In the current study, we examine the potential for NRTIs to inhibit the cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of complex I and the associated NADH:CoQ oxidoreductase activities and rates of superoxide production using HepG2 cells. Phosphoprotein staining of immunocaptured complex I revealed that 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT; 10 and 50 {mu}M), AZT monophosphate (150 {mu}M), and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC; 1 {mu}M) prevented the phosphorylation of the NDUFB11 subunit of complex I. This was associated with a decrease in complex I activity with AZT and AZT monophosphate only. In the presence of succinate, superoxide production was increased with 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (ddI; 10 {mu}M) and ddC (1 {mu}M). In the presence of succinate + cAMP, AZT showed an inverse dose-dependent effect on superoxide production. None of the NRTIs examined inhibit PKA activity suggesting that the observed effects are due to a direct interaction with complex I. These data demonstrate a direct effect of NRTIs on cAMP-dependent regulation of mitochondrial bioenergetics independent of DNA polymerase-{gamma} activity; in the case of AZT, these observations may provide a mechanism for the observed long-term toxicity with this drug.

  5. Characterization of Fructose 1,6-Bisphosphatase and Sedoheptulose 1,7-Bisphosphatase from the Facultative Ribulose Monophosphate Cycle Methylotroph Bacillus methanolicus

    PubMed Central

    Stolzenberger, Jessica; Lindner, Steffen N.; Persicke, Marcus; Brautaset, Trygve

    2013-01-01

    The genome of the facultative ribulose monophosphate (RuMP) cycle methylotroph Bacillus methanolicus encodes two bisphosphatases (GlpX), one on the chromosome (GlpXC) and one on plasmid pBM19 (GlpXP), which is required for methylotrophy. Both enzymes were purified from recombinant Escherichia coli and were shown to be active as fructose 1,6-bisphosphatases (FBPases). The FBPase-negative Corynebacterium glutamicum Δfbp mutant could be phenotypically complemented with glpXC and glpXP from B. methanolicus. GlpXP and GlpXC share similar functional properties, as they were found here to be active as homotetramers in vitro, activated by Mn2+ ions and inhibited by Li+, but differed in terms of the kinetic parameters. GlpXC showed a much higher catalytic efficiency and a lower Km for fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (86.3 s−1 mM−1 and 14 ± 0.5 μM, respectively) than GlpXP (8.8 s−1 mM−1 and 440 ± 7.6 μM, respectively), indicating that GlpXC is the major FBPase of B. methanolicus. Both enzymes were tested for activity as sedoheptulose 1,7-bisphosphatase (SBPase), since a SBPase variant of the ribulose monophosphate cycle has been proposed for B. methanolicus. The substrate for the SBPase reaction, sedoheptulose 1,7-bisphosphate, could be synthesized in vitro by using both fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase proteins from B. methanolicus. Evidence for activity as an SBPase could be obtained for GlpXP but not for GlpXC. Based on these in vitro data, GlpXP is a promiscuous SBPase/FBPase and might function in the RuMP cycle of B. methanolicus. PMID:24013630

  6. Role of 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate on the epidermal growth factor dependent survival in mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Grinman, Diego Y; Romorini, Leonardo; Presman, Diego M; Rocha-Viegas, Luciana; Coso, Omar A; Davio, Carlos; Pecci, Adali

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been suggested to play a key role in the maintenance of epithelial cell survival during lactation. Previously, we demonstrated that EGF dependent activation of PI3K pathway prevents apoptosis in confluent murine HC11 cells cultured under low nutrient conditions. The EGF protective effect is associated with increased levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-XL. Here, we identify the EGF-dependent mechanism involved in cell survival that converges in the regulation of bcl-X expression by activated CREB. EGF induces Bcl-XL expression through activation of a unique bcl-X promoter, the P1; being not only the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway but also the increase in cAMP levels and the concomitant PKA/CREB activation necessary for both bcl-XL upregulation and apoptosis avoidance. Results presented in this work suggest the existence of a novel connection between the EGF receptor and the adenylate cyclase that would have an impact in preventing apoptosis under low nutrient conditions.

  7. Equations and calculations of product yields and preferred pathways for butanediol and mixed-acid fermentations

    SciTech Connect

    Papoutsakis, E.T.; Meyer, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    Using the available information of fermentation biochemistry, fermentation (stoichiometric) equations are derived for anaerobic saccharolytic fermentations of butanediol and mixed acids. The equations describe the interrelations among the fermentation products, biomass, and consumed substrate (glucose). The validity of the equations is tested using a variety of batch data from the literature. The validity of the equations is expected to extend to steady-state and transient fermentations, as well. Uses, improvements, and extensions of the equations are also discussed in detail. Among others, it is shown that the equations are useful for checking the consistency of experimental data, for calculating maximal yields and selectivities for the fermentation products, and calculating the extent of utilization of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway versus the Hexose Monophosphate pathway of glucose utilization. 37 references.

  8. Targeting cAMP/PKA pathway for glycemic control and type 2 diabetes therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haihua; Yang, Linghai

    2016-08-01

    In mammals, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is an intracellular second messenger that is usually elicited by binding of hormones and neurotransmitters to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). cAMP exerts many of its physiological effects by activating cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), which in turn phosphorylates and regulates the functions of downstream protein targets including ion channels, enzymes, and transcription factors. cAMP/PKA signaling pathway regulates glucose homeostasis at multiple levels including insulin and glucagon secretion, glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis and breakdown, gluconeogenesis, and neural control of glucose homeostasis. This review summarizes recent genetic and pharmacological studies concerning the regulation of glucose homeostasis by cAMP/PKA in pancreas, liver, skeletal muscle, adipose tissues, and brain. We also discuss the strategies for targeting cAMP/PKA pathway for research and potential therapeutic treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). PMID:27194812

  9. Crystal structure of a nucleoside model for the inter-strand cross-link formed by the reaction of 2'-de-oxy-guanosine and an abasic site in duplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Michael J; Ruddraraju, Kasi Viswanatharaju; Barnes, Charles L; Gates, Kent S

    2016-05-01

    The title compound, 9-[(2R,4S,5R)-4-hy-droxy-5-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)tetra-hydro-furan-2-yl]-2-{[(2R,4S,5R)-4-meth-oxy-5-(meth-oxy-meth-yl)tetra-hydro-furan-2-yl]amino}-1H-purin-6(9H)-one, C17H25N5O7, crystallizes with two independent mol-ecules (A and B) in the asymmetric unit. In the crystal, the guanosine moieties of mol-ecules A and B are linked by N-H⋯N and O-H⋯N hydrogen-bonding inter-actions, forming ribbons which are stacked to form columns along [100]. These columns are then linked by O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the ribose moieties and numerous C-H⋯O inter-actions to complete the three-dimensional structure. PMID:27308004

  10. 3'5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent up-regulation of phosphodiesterase type 3A in porcine cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Sasseville, Maxime; Côté, Nancy; Vigneault, Christian; Guillemette, Christine; Richard, François J

    2007-04-01

    The means by which cumulus cells react to gonadotropin stimulation and regulate the subsequent production and degradation of cAMP are largely unknown. In this article, we report that cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) type 3A (Pde3a) is transcriptionally regulated in porcine cumulus cells by a cAMP-dependent pathway during in vitro maturation (IVM). cAMP-PDE activity was increased in the cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) after 10 h of IVM, and 78% of this increase was sensitive to a Pde3-specific inhibitor, cilostamide. Although no variation was observed in the oocyte, cilostamide-sensitive cAMP-PDE activity increased in the cumulus cells after IVM. This was supported by Western blotting, which showed that the intensity of a 135-kDa anti-Pde3a immunoreactive band was increased in COC after IVM. The Pde3a mRNA level was up-regulated 28-fold in the COC after 4 h of IVM and remained high up to 12 h. The mRNA up-regulation and increased activity were inhibited by an RNA synthesis inhibitor, alpha-amanitin. The cilostamide-sensitive increase in PDE activity was inhibited by a protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. Pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG) caused dose-dependent activation of Pde3. The PMSG-dependent increase in Pde3 activity and Pde3a mRNA were mimicked by the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin or prostaglandin E2. PMSG-dependent Pde3 activation was inhibited by the protein kinase A-specific inhibitor H89. Collectively, our results show for the first time that degradation of the intracellular cyclic nucleotide by Pde3a is transcriptionally up-regulated via a cAMP-dependent pathway in cumulus cells, suggesting that it has a functional role during the ovulatory gonadotropin surge.

  11. Involvement of adipokines, AMPK, PI3K and the PPAR signaling pathways in ovarian follicle development and cancer.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Joëlle; Reverchon, Maxime; Cloix, Lucie; Froment, Pascal; Ramé, Christelle

    2012-01-01

    The physiological mechanisms that control energy balance are reciprocally linked to those that control reproduction, and together, these mechanisms optimize reproductive success under fluctuating metabolic conditions. Adipose tissue plays an important role in this regulation. Indeed, it releases a variety of factors, termed adipokines that regulate energy metabolism, but also reproductive functions. This article summarizes the function and regulation of some better-characterized adipokines (leptin, adiponectin, resistin, visfatin, chemerin and apelin) involved in ovarian follicle development. The follicle appears to use various "nutrient sensing" mechanisms that may form the link between nutrient status and folliculogenesis. This review examines evidence for the presence of pathways that may sense nutrient flux from within the follicle including the PI3K/Akt pathway, adenosine monophosphate-activated kinase (AMPK), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). It also reviews current information on the role of these adipokines and signalling pathways in ovarian cancers. PMID:23417417

  12. Catalysis by Orotidine 5′-Monophosphate Decarboxylase: Effect of 5-Fluoro and 4′-Substituents on the Decarboxylation of Two-Part Substrates†

    PubMed Central

    Goryanova, Bogdana; Spong, Krisztina; Amyes, Tina L.; Richard, John P.

    2013-01-01

    The syntheses of two novel truncated analogs of the natural substrate orotidine 5′-monophosphate (OMP) for orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) with enhanced reactivity towards decarboxylation are reported: 1-(β-D-erythrofuranosyl)-5-fluoroorotic acid (FEO) and 5′-deoxy-5-fluoroorotidine (5′-dFO). A comparison of the second-order rate constants for the OMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylations of FEO (10 M−1 s−1) and 1-(β-D-erythrofuranosyl)orotic acid (EO, 0.026 M−1 s−1) shows that the vinyl carbanion-like transition state is stabilized by 3.5 kcal/mol by interactions with the 5-F substituent of FEO. The OMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylations of FEO and EO are both activated by exogenous phosphite dianion (HPO32−), but the 5-F substituent results in only a 0.8 kcal stabilization of the transition state for the phosphite-activated reaction of FEO. This provides strong evidence that the phosphite-activated OMPDC-catalyzed reaction of FEO is not limited by the chemical step of decarboxylation of the enzyme-bound substrate. Evidence is presented that there is a change in rate-limiting step from the chemical step of decarboxylation for the phosphite-activated reaction of EO, to closure of the phosphate gripper loop and an enzyme conformational change at the ternary E·FEO·HPO32− complex for the reaction of FEO. The 4′-CH3 and 4′-CH2OH groups of 5′-dFO and orotidine, respectively, result in identical destabilizations of the transition state for the unactivated decarboxylation of 2.9 kcal/mol. By contrast, the 4′-CH3 group of 5′-dFO and the 4′-CH2OH group of orotidine result in very different 4.7 and 8.3 kcal/mol destabilizations of the transition state for the phosphite-activated decarboxylation. Here, the destabilizing effect of the 4′-CH3 substituent at 5′-dFO is masked by the rate-limiting conformational change that depresses the third-order rate constant for the phosphite-activated reaction of the parent substrate FEO. PMID

  13. Catalysis by orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase: effect of 5-fluoro and 4'-substituents on the decarboxylation of two-part substrates.

    PubMed

    Goryanova, Bogdana; Spong, Krisztina; Amyes, Tina L; Richard, John P

    2013-01-22

    The syntheses of two novel truncated analogs of the natural substrate orotidine 5'-monophosphate (OMP) for orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) with enhanced reactivity toward decarboxylation are reported: 1-(β-d-erythrofuranosyl)-5-fluoroorotic acid (FEO) and 5'-deoxy-5-fluoroorotidine (5'-dFO). A comparison of the second-order rate constants for the OMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylations of FEO (10 M⁻¹ s⁻¹) and 1-(β-d-erythrofuranosyl)orotic acid (EO, 0.026 M⁻¹ s⁻¹) shows that the vinyl carbanion-like transition state is stabilized by 3.5 kcal/mol by interactions with the 5-F substituent of FEO. The OMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylations of FEO and EO are both activated by exogenous phosphite dianion (HPO₃²⁻), but the 5-F substituent results in only a 0.8 kcal stabilization of the transition state for the phosphite-activated reaction of FEO. This provides strong evidence that the phosphite-activated OMPDC-catalyzed reaction of FEO is not limited by the chemical step of decarboxylation of the enzyme-bound substrate. Evidence is presented that there is a change in the rate-limiting step from the chemical step of decarboxylation for the phosphite-activated reaction of EO, to closure of the phosphate gripper loop and an enzyme conformational change at the ternary E•FEO•HPO₃²⁻ complex for the reaction of FEO. The 4'-CH₃ and 4'-CH₂OH groups of 5'-dFO and orotidine, respectively, result in identical destabilizations of the transition state for the unactivated decarboxylation of 2.9 kcal/mol. By contrast, the 4'-CH₃ group of 5'-dFO and the 4'-CH₂OH group of orotidine result in very different 4.7 and 8.3 kcal/mol destabilizations of the transition state for the phosphite-activated decarboxylation. Here, the destabilizing effect of the 4'-CH₃ substituent at 5'-dFO is masked by the rate-limiting conformational change that depresses the third-order rate constant for the phosphite-activated reaction of the parent substrate FEO.

  14. Investigation of the role of the NO-cGMP pathway on YC-1 and DEA/NO effects on thoracic aorta smooth muscle responses in a rat preeclampsia model.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Nergiz Hacer; Temiz, Tijen Kaya; Turgut, Bülent; Karadas, Baris; Parlak, Mesut; Bagcivan, Ihsan

    2013-10-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of YC-1, a nitric oxide (NO)-independent soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) activator, and DEA/NO, a NO donor, on smooth muscle responses in the preeclampsia model with suramin-treated rats and on the levels of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) of thoracic aorta rings isolated from term-pregnant rats. Rats of 2 groups, control group and suramin group, were given intraperitoneal injection of saline or suramin, respectively. Suramin injection caused increased blood pressure, protein in urine, and fetal growth retardation. Thoracic aorta rings were exposed to contractile and relaxant agents. KCl contraction and papaverine relaxation responses were similar. Relaxation responses of YC-1 and DEA/NO decreased in suramin group. In both groups in the presence of ODQ, a sGC inhibitor, the relaxation responses of YC-1 and DEA/NO decreased. The cGMP content was determined by radioimmunoassay technique. The content of cGMP in the suramin group decreased. In the presence of YC-1 and DEA/NO in both groups, cGMP content increased, but in ODQ-added groups, there was a significant decrease. We conclude that in preeclampsia, the decrease of relaxation responses and the decrease of cGMP content could be due to the reduction in stimulation of sGC and the decrease in cGMP levels.

  15. Uridine diphosphate galactose-4-epimerase. Uridine monophosphate-dependent reduction by alpha- and beta-D-glucose.

    PubMed

    Kang, U G; Nolan, L D; Frey, P A

    1975-09-25

    Rates of UMP-dependent reduction of the DPN+ associated with Escherichia coli UDP-galactose-4-epimerase at 27 degrees and 0.2 M ionic strength in 0.1 M Tris-HCl buffer, pH 8.5, are reported. The reaction exhibits excellent pseudo-first order behavior when D-glucose is at anomeric equilibrium. The effects of [UMP] and [glucose] on the observed first order rate constants are consistent with the following equation. The symbols phi are empirical parameters. (See article). The data indicate that the pathway involves random equilibrium binding of UMP and glucose followed by rate-limiting decomposition of the ternary complex to epimerase-DNPH. The binding parameters indicate that the principal activating effect of UMP is not simply to increase the affinity of the enzyme for glucose. UMP appears to increase the reactivity or availability of enzyme-bound DPN+. The kinetic isotope effect for the reaction of D-]1-2H]glucose (kH/kD) is 4.2, which confirms that C-1 is oxidized and that hydride transfer is rate limiting. Both of the purified anomers, alpha- and beta-D-glucose, reduce the enzyme-bound DPN+. As indicated by the deviations from pseudo-first order kinetics because of concurrent mutarotation, the beta anomer is the more reactive, reacting about 4 to 5 times faster than the alpha anomer at concentrations well below saturation. Is is suggested that the lack of stereo-specificity in this reaction may be attributed to the two anomers being productively bound with their opposite faces projecting toward C-4 of bound DPN+. Nonstereospecific oxidation of alpha- and beta-D-glucose may be a model for the mechanism of UDP-hexose epimerization, which also involves nonstereospecific hydride transfer.

  16. Intracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate, adenosine 5'-diphosphate, and adenosine 5'-monophosphate detection by short-end injection capillary electrophoresis using methylcellulose as the effective electroosmostic flow suppressor.

    PubMed

    Zinellu, Angelo; Sotgia, Salvatore; Pasciu, Valeria; Madeddu, Manuela; Leoni, Giovanni Giuseppe; Naitana, Salvatore; Deiana, Luca; Carru, Ciriaco

    2008-07-01

    We present a new rapid CE method to measure adenine nucleotides adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) in cells. The short-end injection mode allows a decrease in the analysis time by injecting samples at the outlet end of a silica capillary closest to the detection window, reducing the migration distance. Moreover, the use of methylcellulose (MC) as run buffer additive to suppress EOF permits to further reduce the migration times of analytes. Thus, when a capillary with an effective length of 10.2 cm was used with a 60 mmol/L sodium acetate buffer pH 3.80 in the presence of 0.01% of MC, the migration time of analytes were 1.35 min for ATP, 1.85 min for ADP, and 4.64 min for AMP. These conditions gave a good reproducibility for intra- and interassay (CV <4 and 8%, respectively) and all the procedure demonstrated an excellent analytical recovery (from 98.3 to 99 %). The method suitability was proved both on red blood cells and in spermatozoa. We compared our proposed method to a spectrophotometric assay, by measuring ATP levels in 40 spermatozoa samples. The obtained data were analyzed by the Passing and Bablok regression and Bland-Altman test. PMID:18551716

  17. The role of metal ion binding in generating 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine from the nucleoside 2'-deoxyguanosine and the nucleotide 2'-deoxyguanosine-5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Noblitt, Scott D; Huehls, Amelia M; Morris, Daniel L

    2007-03-01

    The metal ions Cu(II), Fe(II), and Cr(III) were allowed to react with H(2)O(2) in the presence of either the mononucleoside 2'-deoxyguanosine (dG) or the mononucleotide 2'-deoxyguanosine-5'-monophosphate (dGMP). The percentage of reacted dG or dGMP that formed the oxidative damage marker 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) was monitored. Oxidative damage from reactions involving Cu(II) appear dependent on an interaction between copper and N7 on the guanine base. Any interactions involving the phosphate group have little additional effect on overall oxidative damage or 8-OH-dG production. Reactions involving Fe(II) seem very dependent on an interaction that may involve both N7 on the guanine base and the phosphate group. This interaction may slow oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III) in solution, keeping iron in a readily available form to undergo the Fenton reaction. Chromium(III) appears to interact with the phosphate group of dGMP, resulting in significant overall oxidative damage. However, production of 8-OH-dG appears to be very dependent on the ability of Cr(III) to interact with N7 on the guanine base, an interaction that seems to be weak for both the mononucleoside and mononucleotide. PMID:17234269

  18. Rotation around the glycosidic bond as driving force of proton transfer in protonated 2‧-deoxyriboadenosine monophosphate (dAMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkin, Oleg V.; Dopieralski, Przemyslaw; Palamarchuk, Gennady V.; Latajka, Zdzislaw

    2010-04-01

    Theoretical investigation of the conformation of 2'-deoxyriboadenosine monophosphate protonated at the N7 atom and stabilized by a very strong C8-H⋯O-P hydrogen bond indicates that this hydrogen bond may be disrupted by rotation of the adenine moiety around the glycosidic bond. A B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ scan of the relaxed potential energy surface demonstrates that this rotation is a multi-stage process, accompanying proton transfer from the N7 atom of adenine to the oxygen atom of the phosphate group with a change of conformation of the nucleotide from south/anti to north/syn conformation. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation indicates that rotation around the glycosidic bond is the preferred way for relaxation of the molecular geometry of this conformer. Both processes, i.e. conformational transition and proton transfer, are strongly coupled. However, the conformer containing a strong C-H⋯O hydrogen bond also corresponds to a local minimum on the Gibbs free energy surface. A specific property of this hydrogen bond is the large variation of the H⋯O distance (ranging from 1.3 to 2.2 Å), which is not caused by proton movement between the carbon and oxygen atoms, but rather by relative motions of the adenine and phosphate moieties.

  19. Measuring the dynamics of cyclic adenosine monophosphate level in living cells induced by low-level laser irradiation using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yimei; Zheng, Liqin; Yang, Hongqin; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-05-01

    Several studies demonstrated that the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), an important second messenger, is involved in the mechanism of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) treatment. However, most of these studies obtained the cAMP level in cell culture extracts or supernatant. In this study, the cAMP level in living cells was measured with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). The effect of LLLI on cAMP level in living cells with adenosine receptors blocked was explored to identify the role of adenosine receptors in LLLI. The results showed that LLLI increased the cAMP level. Moreover, the rise of cAMP level was light dose dependent but wavelength independent for 658-, 785-, and 830-nm laser light. The results also exhibited that the adenosine receptors, a class of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), modulated the increase of cAMP level induced by LLLI. The cAMP level increased more significantly when the A3 adenosine receptors (A3R) were blocked by A3R antagonist compared with A1 adenosine receptor or A2a adenosine receptor blocked in HEK293T cells after LLLI, which was in good agreement with the adenosine receptors' expressions. All these results suggested that measuring the cAMP level with BRET could be a useful technique to study the role of GPCRs in living cells under LLLI.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of IDX184, a liver-targeted oral prodrug of 2'-methylguanosine-5'-monophosphate, in the monkey and formulation optimization for human exposure.

    PubMed

    Pan-Zhou, Xin-Ru; Mayes, Benjamin A; Rashidzadeh, Hassan; Gasparac, Rahela; Smith, Steven; Bhadresa, Sanjeev; Gupta, Kusum; Cohen, Marita Larsson; Bu, Charlie; Good, Steven S; Moussa, Adel; Rush, Roger

    2016-10-01

    IDX184 is a phosphoramidate prodrug of 2'-methylguanosine-5'-monophosphate, developed to treat patients infected with hepatitis C virus. A mass balance study of radiolabeled IDX184 and pharmacokinetic studies of IDX184 in portal vein-cannulated monkeys revealed relatively low IDX184 absorption but higher exposure of IDX184 in the portal vein than in the systemic circulation, indicating >90 % of the absorbed dose was subject to hepatic extraction. Systemic exposures to the main metabolite, 2'-methylguanosine (2'-MeG), were used as a surrogate for liver levels of the pharmacologically active entity 2'-MeG triphosphate, and accordingly, systemic levels of 2'-MeG in the monkey were used to optimize formulations for further clinical development of IDX184. Capsule formulations of IDX184 delivered acceptable levels of 2'-MeG in humans; however, the encapsulation process introduced low levels of the genotoxic impurity ethylene sulfide (ES), which necessitated formulation optimization. Animal pharmacokinetic data guided the development of a tablet with trace levels of ES and pharmacokinetic performance equal to that of the clinical capsule in the monkey. Under fed conditions in humans, the new tablet formulation showed similar exposure to the capsule used in prior clinical trials. PMID:25898809

  1. Increased inosine 5{prime}-monophosphate dehydrogenase gene expression in replicating cells: A response to growth factors, not to changes in cell cycle parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutani, Hiroshi; Collart, F.R.; Glesne, D.A.; Huberman, E. |

    1997-07-01

    The authors have analyzed levels of inosine 5{prime}-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH; E.C. 1.1.1.205) type II mRNA levels in a human melanoma cell line, SK-MEL-131, and a Chinese hamster ovary cell line synchronously progressing through the cell cycle following treatment with aphidicolin. Following release from the aphidicolin block at the G{sub 1}-S phase boundary, the type II IMPDH gene was found to be constitutively expressed at a similar level during all stages of the cell cycle. To analyze growth regulation, as opposed to cell cycle regulation, stable SK-MEL-131 transfectants that express a type II IMPDH-promoted heterologous construct were assayed following deprivation of serum growth factors and after restimulation with fresh serum. Serum deprivation resulted in down-regulation of both steady state type II IMPDH mRNA levels and promoter activity, while restimulation with serum resulted in up-regulation of these parameters. These findings support the conclusion that the increase in IMPDH type II gene expression in replicating cells is mainly due to growth factor regulation rather than changes in cell cycle parameters and that this regulation is mediated primarily by a transcriptional mechanism. The increased level of IMPDH expression and activity found in many tumors may therefore also be due to a transcriptionally mediated response to growth factors.

  2. Crystal structures of Tritrichomonasfoetus inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase in complex with substrate, cofactor and analogs: a structural basis for the random-in ordered-out kinetic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Prosise, Glen L; Luecke, Hartmut

    2003-02-14

    The enzyme inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is responsible for the rate-limiting step in guanine nucleotide biosynthesis. Because it is up-regulated in rapidly proliferating cells, human type II IMPDH is actively targeted for immunosuppressive, anticancer, and antiviral chemotherapy. The enzyme employs a random-in ordered-out kinetic mechanism where substrate or cofactor can bind first but product is only released after the cofactor leaves. Due to structural and kinetic differences between mammalian and microbial enzymes, most drugs that are successful in the inhibition of mammalian IMPDH are far less effective against the microbial forms of the enzyme. It is possible that with greater knowledge of the structural mechanism of the microbial enzymes, an effective and selective inhibitor of microbial IMPDH will be developed for use as a drug against multi-drug resistant bacteria and protists. The high-resolution crystal structures of four different complexes of IMPDH from the protozoan parasite Tritrichomonas foetus have been solved: with its substrate IMP, IMP and the inhibitor mycophenolic acid (MPA), the product XMP with MPA, and XMP with the cofactor NAD(+). In addition, a potassium ion has been located at the dimer interface. A structural model for the kinetic mechanism is proposed.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of IDX184, a liver-targeted oral prodrug of 2'-methylguanosine-5'-monophosphate, in the monkey and formulation optimization for human exposure.

    PubMed

    Pan-Zhou, Xin-Ru; Mayes, Benjamin A; Rashidzadeh, Hassan; Gasparac, Rahela; Smith, Steven; Bhadresa, Sanjeev; Gupta, Kusum; Cohen, Marita Larsson; Bu, Charlie; Good, Steven S; Moussa, Adel; Rush, Roger

    2016-10-01

    IDX184 is a phosphoramidate prodrug of 2'-methylguanosine-5'-monophosphate, developed to treat patients infected with hepatitis C virus. A mass balance study of radiolabeled IDX184 and pharmacokinetic studies of IDX184 in portal vein-cannulated monkeys revealed relatively low IDX184 absorption but higher exposure of IDX184 in the portal vein than in the systemic circulation, indicating >90 % of the absorbed dose was subject to hepatic extraction. Systemic exposures to the main metabolite, 2'-methylguanosine (2'-MeG), were used as a surrogate for liver levels of the pharmacologically active entity 2'-MeG triphosphate, and accordingly, systemic levels of 2'-MeG in the monkey were used to optimize formulations for further clinical development of IDX184. Capsule formulations of IDX184 delivered acceptable levels of 2'-MeG in humans; however, the encapsulation process introduced low levels of the genotoxic impurity ethylene sulfide (ES), which necessitated formulation optimization. Animal pharmacokinetic data guided the development of a tablet with trace levels of ES and pharmacokinetic performance equal to that of the clinical capsule in the monkey. Under fed conditions in humans, the new tablet formulation showed similar exposure to the capsule used in prior clinical trials.

  4. Developmental Competence of Vitrified-Warmed Bovine Oocytes at the Germinal-Vesicle Stage is Improved by Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Modulators during In Vitro Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Ezoe, Kenji; Yabuuchi, Akiko; Tani, Tetsuya; Mori, Chiemi; Miki, Tetsuya; Takayama, Yuko; Beyhan, Zeki; Kato, Yoko; Okuno, Takashi; Kobayashi, Tamotsu; Kato, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Cryopreservation of mature oocytes and embryos has provided numerous benefits in reproductive medicine. Although successful cryopreservation of germinal-vesicle stage (GV) oocytes holds promise for further advances in reproductive biology and clinical embryology fields, reports regarding cryopreservation of immature oocytes are limited. Oocyte survival and maturation rates have improved since vitrification is being performed at the GV stage, but the subsequent developmental competence of GV oocytes is still low. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of supplementation of the maturation medium with cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) modulators on the developmental competence of vitrified-warmed GV bovine oocytes. GV oocytes were vitrified-warmed and cultured to allow for oocyte maturation, and then parthenogenetically activated or fertilized in vitro. Our results indicate that addition of a cAMP modulator forskolin (FSK) or 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) to the maturation medium significantly improved the developmental competence of vitrified-warmed GV oocytes. We also demonstrated that vitrification of GV oocytes led to a decline in cAMP levels and maturation-promoting factor (MPF) activity in the oocytes during the initial and final phases of maturation, respectively. Nevertheless, the addition of FSK or IBMX to the maturation medium significantly elevated cAMP levels and MPF activity during IVM. Taken together, our results suggest that the cryopreservation-associated meiotic and developmental abnormalities observed in GV oocytes may be ameliorated by an artificial increase in cAMP levels during maturation culture after warming. PMID:25965267

  5. Medium optimization for the production of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate by Microbacterium sp. no. 205 using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Chun; Bai, Jian-Xin; Cao, Jia-Ming; Li, Zhen-Jiang; Xiong, Jian; Zhang, Lei; Hong, Yuan; Ying, Han-Jie

    2009-01-01

    Response surface methodology was employed to optimize medium composition for the production of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) with Microbacterium sp. no. 205. A fractional factorial design (2(11-7)) was applied to evaluate the effects of different components in the medium. K(2)HPO(4), MgSO(4) and NaF were found to significantly influence on the cAMP production. The steepest ascent method was used to access the optimal region of the medium composition. The concentrations of the three factors were optimized subsequently using central composite design and response surface methodology. The optimal medium composition to achieve the optimal cAMP production was determined (g/L): K(2)HPO(4), 12.78; MgSO(4), 3.53 and NaF, 0.18. The corresponding cAMP concentration was 8.50 g/L, which was about 1.8-fold increase compared with that using the original medium. Validation experiments were also carried out to prove the adequacy and the accuracy of the model obtained. The cAMP fermentation in 5L fermenter reached 9.87 g/L. PMID:18778935

  6. Signaling pathway cross talk in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies suggest energy failure and accumulative intracellular waste play a causal role in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in particular. AD is characterized by extracellular amyloid deposits, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, cholinergic deficits, synaptic loss, inflammation and extensive oxidative stress. These pathobiological changes are accompanied by significant behavioral, motor, and cognitive impairment leading to accelerated mortality. Currently, the potential role of several metabolic pathways associated with AD, including Wnt signaling, 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1, silent mating-type information regulator 2 homolog 1), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1-α (PGC-1α) have widened, with recent discoveries that they are able to modulate several pathological events in AD. These include reduction of amyloid-β aggregation and inflammation, regulation of mitochondrial dynamics, and increased availability of neuronal energy. This review aims to highlight the involvement of these new set of signaling pathways, which we have collectively termed “anti-ageing pathways”, for their potentiality in multi-target therapies against AD where cellular metabolic processes are severely impaired. PMID:24679124

  7. [Highly efficient methane assimilation through Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway in Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z].

    PubMed

    Cui, Jinyu; Yao, Lu; Sun, Xiaole; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G; Yang, Song

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand metabolic functions essential for methane assimilation, we investigate dribulose monophosphate pathway and adjacent pathways in gammaproteobacterial Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z by using combined approaches of RNA-seq, LC-MS, and 13C-labeled techniques. The absolute quantification of metabolome showed that the concentrations of intermediates, such as glucose-6-phosphate and 2-dehydro-3-deoxy-phosphogluconate, involved in Entner-Doudoroff (EDD) pathway were (150.95 +/- 28.75) micromol/L and below the limit of detection of mass spectrometry. In contrast, fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate/dihydroxyacetone and phosphoenolpyruvate in Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway had significantly higher concentrations with (1 142.02 +/- 302.88) micromol/L, (1 866.76 +/- 388.55) micromol/L and (3 067.57 +/- 898.13) micromol/L, respectively. 13C-labeling experiment further indicated that the enrichment of [3-13C1]-pyruvate involved in EMP pathway was 4-6 fold higher than [1,13C1]-pyruvate in EDD pathway in a dynamic course. Moreover, gene expression profile showed that the expression levels of genes in EMP pathway (e.g. fbaA, tpiA, gap and pykA) were 2 479.2, 2 493.9, 2 274.6 and 1 846.0, respectively, but gene expressionlevels in EDD pathway (e.g. pgi, eda and edd) were only 263.8, 341.2 and 225.4, respectively. Overall our current results demonstrated that EMP pathway was the main route for methane assimilation in M. alcaliphilum 20Z. This discovery challenged our understanding of methane assimilation pathway in gammaproteobacterial methanotrophic bacteria, and further provided an important insight for efficient methane biocatalysis in the future.

  8. Cyclic nucleotide signalling in kidney fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Schinner, Elisabeth; Wetzl, Veronika; Schlossmann, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Kidney fibrosis is an important factor for the progression of kidney diseases, e.g., diabetes mellitus induced kidney failure, glomerulosclerosis and nephritis resulting in chronic kidney disease or end-stage renal disease. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) were implicated to suppress several of the above mentioned renal diseases. In this review article, identified effects and mechanisms of cGMP and cAMP regarding renal fibrosis are summarized. These mechanisms include several signalling pathways of nitric oxide/ANP/guanylyl cyclases/cGMP-dependent protein kinase and cAMP/Epac/adenylyl cyclases/cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Furthermore, diverse possible drugs activating these pathways are discussed. From these diverse mechanisms it is expected that new pharmacological treatments will evolve for the therapy or even prevention of kidney failure. PMID:25622251

  9. Azathioprine Suppresses Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin-Dependent T Cell-APC Conjugation through Inhibition of Vav Guanosine Exchange Activity on Rac Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Poppe, Daniela; Tiede, Imke; Fritz, Gerhard; Becker, Christoph; Bartsch, Brigitte; Wirtz, Stefan; Strand, Dennis; Tanaka, Shinya; Galle, Peter R.; Bustelo, Xosé R.; Neurath, Markus F.

    2007-01-01

    We have shown recently that the azathioprine metabolite 6-Thio-GTP causes immunosuppression by blockade of GTPase activation in T lymphocytes. In the present study, we describe a new molecular mechanism by which 6-Thio-GTP blocks GTPase activation. Although 6-Thio-GTP could bind to various small GTPases, it specifically blocked activation of Rac1 and Rac2 but not of closely related Rho family members such as Cdc42 and RhoA in primary T cells upon stimulation with αCD28 or fibronectin. Binding of 6-Thio-GTP to Rac1 did not suppress Rac effector coupling directly but blocked Vav1 exchange activity upon 6-Thio-GTP hydrolysis, suggesting that 6-Thio-GTP loading leads to accumulation of 6-Thio-GDP-loaded, inactive Rac proteins over time by inhibiting Vav activity. In the absence of apoptosis, blockade of Vav-mediated Rac1 activation led to a blockade of ezrin-radixin-moesin dephosphorylation in primary T cells and suppression of T cell-APC conjugation. Azathioprine-generated 6-Thio-GTP thus prevents the development of an effective immune response via blockade of Vav activity on Rac proteins. These findings provide novel insights into the immunosuppressive effects of azathioprine and suggest that antagonists of the Vav-Rac signaling pathway may be useful for suppression of T cell-dependent pathogenic immune responses. PMID:16365460

  10. The Nitric Oxide/Cyclic GMP Pathway in Organ Transplantation: Critical Role in Successful Lung Preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsky, David J.; Naka, Yoshifumi; Chowdhury, Nepal C.; Liao, Hui; Oz, Mehmet C.; Michler, Robert E.; Kubaszewski, Eugeniusz; Malinski, Tadeusz; Stern, David M.

    1994-12-01

    Reestablishment of vascular homeostasis following ex vivo preservation is a critical determinant of successful organ transplantation. Because the nitric oxide (NO) pathway modulates pulmonary vascular tone and leukocyte/endothelial interactions, we hypothesized that reactive oxygen intermediates would lead to decreased NO (and hence cGMP) levels following pulmonary reperfusion, leading to increased pulmonary vascular resistance and leukostasis. Using an orthotopic rat model of lung transplantation, a porphyrinic microsensor was used to make direct in vivo measurements of pulmonary NO. NO levels measured at the surface of the transplanted lung plummeted immediately upon reperfusion, with levels moderately increased by topical application of superoxide dismutase. Because cGMP levels declined in preserved lungs after reperfusion, this led us to buttress the NO pathway by adding a membrane-permeant cGMP analog to the preservation solution. Compared with grafts stored in its absence, grafts stored with supplemental 8-Br-cGMP and evaluated 30 min after reperfusion demonstrated lower pulmonary vascular resistances with increased graft blood flow, improved arterial oxygenation, decreased neutrophil infiltration, and improved recipient survival. These beneficial effects were dose dependent, mimicked by the type V phosphodiesterase inhibitor 2-o-propoxyphenyl-8-azapurin-6-one, and inhibited by a cGMP-dependent protein kinase antagonist, the R isomer of 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate. Augmenting the NO pathway at the level of cGMP improves graft function and recipient survival following lung transplantation.

  11. Atrial natriuretic peptide frameshift mutation in familial atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hodgson-Zingman, Denice M; Karst, Margaret L; Zingman, Leonid V; Heublein, Denise M; Darbar, Dawood; Herron, Kathleen J; Ballew, Jeffrey D; de Andrade, Mariza; Burnett, John C; Olson, Timothy M

    2008-07-10

    Atrial fibrillation is a common arrhythmia that is hereditary in a small subgroup of patients. In a family with 11 clinically affected members, we mapped an atrial fibrillation locus to chromosome 1p36-p35 and identified a heterozygous frameshift mutation in the gene encoding atrial natriuretic peptide. Circulating chimeric atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was detected in high concentration in subjects with the mutation, and shortened atrial action potentials were seen in an isolated heart model, creating a possible substrate for atrial fibrillation. This report implicates perturbation of the atrial natriuretic peptide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway in cardiac electrical instability. PMID:18614783

  12. Vasoactive intestinal peptide: A potent stimulator of adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate accumulation in gut carcinoma cell lines in culture*

    PubMed Central

    Laburthe, M.; Rousset, M.; Boissard, C.; Chevalier, G.; Zweibaum, A.; Rosselin, G.

    1978-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a potent and efficient stimulator of adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation in a human colon carcinoma cell line, HT 29. cAMP accumulation is sensitive to a concentration of VIP as low as 3×10-12 M. Maximum VIP-induced cAMP levels were observed with 10-9 M VIP and are about 200 times above the basal levels. Half-maximum cAMP production was obtained at 3×10-10 M VIP. 125I-Labeled VIP was found to bind to HT 29 cells; this binding was competitively inhibited by concentrations of unlabeled VIP between 10-10 and 10-7 M. Half-maximum inhibition of binding was observed with 2×10-9 M VIP. Secretin also stimulated cAMP accumulation in HT 29 cells, but its effectiveness was 1/1000 that of VIP. The other peptides tested at 10-7 M, such as insulin, glucagon, bovine pancreatic polypeptide, somatostatin, octapeptide of cholecystokinin, neurotensin, and substance P, did not stimulate cAMP accumulation. Prostaglandin E1 and catecholamines stimulated cAMP production but were 1/2.3 and 1/5.5 as efficient as VIP, respectively. Another malignant cell line from the gut, the human rectal tumor cell line HRT 18, is also sensitive to VIP. In HRT 18 cells, VIP stimulated cAMP accumulation with a maximal effect at 10-8 M; half-maximum stimulation was observed at about 10-9 M. These results demonstrate the presence of VIP receptors in two malignant human intestinal cell lines (HT 29 and HRT 18) in culture and provide a model for studying the action of VIP on cell proliferation. PMID:208077

  13. Screening for bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency, deficiency of uridine monophosphate synthase, complex vertebral malformation, bovine citrullinaemia, and factor XI deficiency in Holstein cows reared in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD), deficiency of uridine monophosphate synthase (DUMPS), complex vertebral malformation (CVM), bovine citrullinaemia (BC) and factor XI deficiency (FXID) are autosomal recessive hereditary disorders, which have had significant economic impact on dairy cattle breeding worldwide. In this study, 350 Holstein cows reared in Turkey were screened for BLAD, DUMPS, CVM, BC and FXID genotypes to obtain an indication on the importance of these defects in Turkish Holsteins. Methods Genomic DNA was obtained from blood and the amplicons of BLAD, DUMPS, CVM, BC and FXID were obtained by using PCR. PCR products were digested with TaqI, AvaI and AvaII restriction enzymes for BLAD, DUMPS, and BC, respectively. These digested products and PCR product of FXID were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis stained with ethidium bromide. CVM genotypes were detected by DNA sequencing. Additionally, all genotypes were confirmed by DNA sequencing to determine whether there was a mutant allele or not. Results Fourteen BLAD, twelve CVM and four FXID carriers were found among the 350 Holstein cows examined, while carriers of DUMPS and BC were not detected. The mutant allele frequencies were calculated as 0.02, 0.017, and 0.006 for BLAD, CVM and FXID, respectively with corresponding carrier prevalence of 4.0% (BLAD), 3.4% (CVM) and 1.2% (FXID). Conclusion This study demonstrates that carriers of BLAD, CVM and FXID are present in the Turkish Holstein population, although at a low frequency. The actual number of clinical cases is unknown, but sporadic cases may appear. As artificial insemination is widely used in dairy cattle breeding, carriers of BLAD, CVM and FXID are likely present within the population of breeding sires. It is recommended to screen breeding sires for these defective genes in order to avoid an unwanted spread within the population. PMID:20929557

  14. Crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis 7,8-dihydropteroate synthase in complex with pterin monophosphate: new insight into the enzymatic mechanism and sulfa-drug action.

    PubMed

    Baca, A M; Sirawaraporn, R; Turley, S; Sirawaraporn, W; Hol, W G

    2000-10-01

    The enzyme 7,8-dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) catalyzes the condensation of para-aminobenzoic acid (pABA) with 6-hydroxymethyl-7, 8-dihydropterin-pyrophosphate to form 7,8-dihydropteroate and pyrophosphate. DHPS is essential for the de novo synthesis of folate in prokaryotes, lower eukaryotes, and in plants, but is absent in mammals. Inhibition of this enzyme's activity by sulfonamide and sulfone drugs depletes the folate pool, resulting in growth inhibition and cell death. Here, we report the 1.7 A resolution crystal structure of the binary complex of 6-hydroxymethylpterin monophosphate (PtP) with DHPS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), a pathogen responsible for the death of millions of human beings each year. Comparison to other DHPS structures reveals that the M. tuberculosis DHPS structure is in a unique conformation in which loop 1 closes over the active site. The Mtb DHPS structure hints at a mechanism in which both loops 1 and 2 play important roles in catalysis by shielding the active site from bulk solvent and allowing pyrophosphoryl transfer to occur. A binding mode for pABA, sulfonamides and sulfones is suggested based on: (i) the new conformation of the closed loop 1; (ii) the distribution of dapsone and sulfonamide resistance mutations; (iii) the observed direction of the bond between the 6-methyl carbon atom and the bridging oxygen atom to the alpha-phosphate group in the Mtb DHPS:PtP binary complex; and (iv) the conformation of loop 2 in the Escherichia coli DHPS structure. Finally, the Mtb DHPS structure reveals a highly conserved pterin binding pocket that may be exploited for the design of novel antimycobacterial agents.

  15. Involvement of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in the influence of timed high-fat evening diet on the hepatic clock and lipogenic gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Zhu, Zengyan; Xie, Meilin; Xue, Jie

    2015-09-01

    A high-fat diet may result in changes in hepatic clock gene expression, but potential mechanisms are not yet elucidated. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is recognized as a key regulator of energy metabolism and certain clock genes. Therefore, we hypothesized that AMPK may be involved in the alteration of hepatic clock gene expression under a high-fat environment. This study aimed to examine the effects of timed high-fat evening diet on the activity of hepatic AMPK, clock genes, and lipogenic genes. Mice with hyperlipidemic fatty livers were induced by orally administering high-fat milk via gavage every evening (19:00-20:00) for 6 weeks. Results showed that timed high-fat diet in the evening not only decreased the hepatic AMPK protein expression and activity but also disturbed its circadian rhythm. Accordingly, the hepatic clock genes, including clock, brain-muscle-Arnt-like 1, cryptochrome 2, and period 2, exhibited prominent changes in their expression rhythms and/or amplitudes. The diurnal rhythms of the messenger RNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorα, acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1α, and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 were also disrupted; the amplitude of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorγcoactivator 1α was significantly decreased at 3 time points, and fatty liver was observed. These findings demonstrate that timed high-fat diet at night can change hepatic AMPK protein levels, activity, and circadian rhythm, which may subsequently alter the circadian expression of several hepatic clock genes and finally result in the disorder of hepatic lipogenic gene expression and the formation of fatty liver.

  16. A high isoflavone diet decreases 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation and does not correct selenium-induced elevations in fasting blood glucose in mice.

    PubMed

    Stallings, Michael T; Cardon, Brandon R; Hardman, Jeremy M; Bliss, Tyler A; Brunson, Scott E; Hart, Chris M; Swiss, Maria D; Hepworth, Squire D; Christensen, Merrill J; Hancock, Chad R

    2014-04-01

    Selenium (Se) has been implicated as a micronutrient that decreases adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and may increase diabetes risk by reducing insulin sensitivity. Soy isoflavones (IF) are estrogen-like compounds that have been shown to attenuate insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, adiposity, and increased AMPK activation. We hypothesized that a high IF (HIF) diet would prevent the poor metabolic profile associated with high Se intake. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in basal glucose metabolism and AMPK signaling in response to an HIF diet and/or supplemental Se in a mouse model. Male FVB mice were divided into groups receiving either a control diet with minimal IF (low IF) or an HIF diet. Each dietary group was further subdivided into groups receiving either water or Se at a dose of 3 mg Se/kg body weight daily, as Se-methylselenocysteine (SMSC). After 5 months, mice receiving SMSC had elevated fasting glucose (P < .05) and a tendency for glucose intolerance (P = .08). The increase in dietary IF did not result in improved fasting blood glucose. Interestingly, after 6 months, HIF-fed mice had decreased basal AMPK activation in liver and skeletal muscle tissue (P < .05). Basal glucose metabolism was changed by SMSC supplementation as evidenced by increased fasting blood glucose and glucose intolerance. High dietary IF levels did not protect against aberrant blood glucose. In FVB mice, decreased basal AMPK activation is not the mechanism through which Se exerts its effect. These results suggest that more research must be done to elucidate the role of Se and IF in glucose metabolism.

  17. Adenosine 5′-monophosphate ameliorates D-galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury through an adenosine receptor-independent mechanism in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Y; Wang, Z; Yang, P; Wang, T; Xia, L; Zhou, M; Wang, Y; Wang, S; Hua, Z; Zhang, J

    2014-01-01

    D-galactosamine (GalN)/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lethality and acute liver failure is dependent on endogenously produced inflammatory cytokines. Adenosine has been proven to be a central role in the regulation of inflammatory response. It is not entirely clear that which adenosine action is actually crucial to limiting inflammatory tissue destruction. Here we showed that GalN/LPS challenge elevated hepatic adenosine and induced lethality in adenosine receptor-deficient mice with equal efficiency as wild-type mice. In GalN/LPS-treated mice, pretreatment with adenosine 5′-monophosphate (5′-AMP) significantly elevated hepatic adenosine level and reduced mortality through decreasing cytokine and chemokine production. In RAW264.7 cells, 5′-AMP treatment inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines, which is not mediated through adenosine receptors. 5′-AMP failed to attenuate LPS-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 nuclear translocation, but reduced LPS-induced recruitment of NF-κB p65 to inflammatory gene promoters and decreased LPS-induced enrichment of H3K4 dimethylation at the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) promoter, which was involved in 5′-AMP-induced elevation of cellular adenosine and a decline of methylation potential. In vitro biochemical analysis revealed that adenosine directly attenuated recruitment of NF-κB to the TNF-α and interleukin-6 promoters. Our findings demonstrate that 5′-AMP-inhibiting inflammatory response is not mediated by adenosine receptors and it may represent a potential protective agent for amelioration of LPS-induced liver injury. PMID:24407238

  18. Airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine, adenosine 5-monophosphate, mannitol, eucapnic voluntary hyperpnoea and field exercise challenge in elite cross-country skiers

    PubMed Central

    Sue-Chu, Malcolm; Brannan, John D; Anderson, Sandra D; Chew, Nora; Bjermer, Leif

    2010-01-01

    Background Methacholine hyperresponsiveness is prevalent in elite athletes. Comparative studies have hitherto been limited to methacholine, eucapnic voluntary hyperpnoea and exercise. This study investigated airway responsiveness to these stimuli as well as to adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) and mannitol, in 58 cross-country ski athletes. Methods Exhaled nitric oxide concentration (FENO), spirometry and bronchial challenge in random order with methacholine, AMP and mannitol were consecutively performed on three study days in the autumn. Specific IgE to eight aeroallergens and a self-completed questionnaire about respiratory symptoms, allergy and asthmatic medication were also performed on day 1. Eucapnic voluntary hyperventilation (EVH) and field exercise tests were randomly performed in 33 of the skiers on two study days in the following winter. Results Of 25 (43%) skiers with airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), 23, five and three skiers were hyperresponsive to methacholine, AMP and mannitol, respectively. Methacholine hyperresponsiveness was more prevalent in subjects without asthma-like symptoms. The FENO was not significantly different in skiers with and without methacholine hyperresponsiveness. Four of 14 skiers with and four of 19 skiers without methacholine hyperresponsiveness were hyperresponsive to EVH or exercise challenge. AHR to any stimulus was present in 16 asymptomatic and nine symptomatic skiers. Asthma-like symptoms were not correlated with AHR to any stimulus. Conclusions Methacholine hyperresponsiveness is more common in asymptomatic skiers and is a poor predictor of hyperresponsiveness to mannitol and hyperpnoea. The low prevalence of hyperresponsiveness to indirect stimuli may suggest differences in the pathogenesis of methacholine hyperresponsiveness in elite skiers and non-athletes. PMID:20460257

  19. Conformational Changes in Orotidine 5’-Monophosphate Decarboxylase: A Structure-Based Explanation for How the 5’-Phosphate Group Activates the Enzyme†

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Bijoy J.; Wood, McKay; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Goryanova, Bogdana; Amyes, Tina L.; Richard, John P.; Almo, Steven C.; Gerlt, John A.

    2012-01-01

    The binding of a ligand to orotidine 5’-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) is accompanied by a conformational change from an open, inactive conformation (Eo) to a closed, active conformation (Ec). As the substrate traverses the reaction coordinate to form the stabilized vinyl carbanion/carbene intermediate, interactions are enforced that destabilize the carboxylate group of the substrate as well as stabilize the intermediate (in the Ec•S‡ complex). Focusing on the OMPDC from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, the “remote” 5’-phosphate group of the substrate activates the enzyme 2.4 × 108-fold; the activation is equivalently described by an intrinsic binding energy (IBE) of 11.4 kcal/mol. We studied residues in the activation that 1) directly contact the 5’-phosphate group; 2) participate in a hydrophobic cluster near the base of the active site loop that sequesters the bound substrate from solvent; and 3) form hydrogen-bonding interactions across the interface between the “mobile” and “fixed” half-barrel domains of the (β/α8-barrel structure. Our data support a model in which the IBE provided by the 5’-phosphate group is used to enable interactions both near the N-terminus of the active site loop and across the domain interface that stabilize both the Ec•S and Ec•S‡ complexes relative to the Eo•S complex. The conclusion that the IBE of the 5’-phosphate group provides stabilization of both the Ec•S and Ec•S‡ complexes, not just the Ec•S‡ complex, is central to understanding the structural origins of enzymatic catalysis as well as the requirements for the de novo design of enzymes that catalyze novel reactions. PMID:23030629

  20. Synthesis and anti-HIV activity of (-)-β-D-(2R,4R) 1,3-dioxolane 2,6-diamino purine (DAPD) (Amdoxovir) and (-)-β-D-(2R,4R) 1,3-dioxolane guanosine (DXG) prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Narayanasamy, Janarthanan; Pullagurla, Manik R.; Sharon, Ashoke; Wang, Jianing; Schinazi, Raymond F.; Chu, Chung K.

    2007-01-01

    Prodrugs of (-)-β-D-(2R,4R)-1,3-dioxolane-2,6-diamino purine (DAPD), organic salts of DAPD, 5′-l-valyl DAPD and N-1 substituted (-)-β-D-(2R,4R)-1,3-dioxolane guanosine (DXG) have been synthesized with the objective of finding molecules which might be superior to DAPD and DXG in solubility as well as pharmacologic profiles. Synthesized prodrugs were evaluated for anti-HIV activity against HIV-1LAI in primary human lymphocytes (PBM cells) as well as their cytotoxicity in PBM, CEM and Vero cells. DAPD prodrugs, modified at the C6 position of the purine ring, demonstrated several folds of enhanced anti-HIV activity in comparison to the parent compound DAPD without increasing the toxicity. The presence of alkyl amino groups at the C6 position of the purine ring increased the antiviral potency several folds, and the most potent compound (-)-β-D-(2R,4R)-1,3-dioxolane-2-amino-6-aminoethyl purine (8) was 17 times more potent than that of DAPD. 5′-l-Valyl DAPD 20 and organic acid salts 21-24 also exhibited enhanced anti-HIV activity in comparison to DAPD, while DXG prodrugs 16-17 exhibited lower potency than that of DXG or DAPD. PMID:17532483

  1. Crystal structure of a nucleoside model for the inter­strand cross-link formed by the reaction of 2′-de­oxy­guanosine and an abasic site in duplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Catalano, Michael J.; Ruddraraju, Kasi Viswanatharaju; Barnes, Charles L.; Gates, Kent S.

    2016-01-01

    The title compound, 9-[(2R,4S,5R)-4-hy­droxy-5-(hy­droxy­meth­yl)tetra­hydro­furan-2-yl]-2-{[(2R,4S,5R)-4-meth­oxy-5-(meth­oxy­meth­yl)tetra­hydro­furan-2-yl]amino}-1H-purin-6(9H)-one, C17H25N5O7, crystallizes with two independent mol­ecules (A and B) in the asymmetric unit. In the crystal, the guanosine moieties of mol­ecules A and B are linked by N—H⋯N and O—H⋯N hydrogen-bonding inter­actions, forming ribbons which are stacked to form columns along [100]. These columns are then linked by O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the ribose moieties and numerous C—H⋯O inter­actions to complete the three-dimensional structure. PMID:27308004

  2. Inhibition of insulin release by synthetic peptides shows that the H3 region at the C-terminal domain of syntaxin-1 is crucial for Ca(2+)- but not for guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate-induced secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, F; Salinas, E; Vazquez, J; Soria, B; Reig, J A

    1996-01-01

    Recently, we have described the presence and possible role of syntaxin in pancreatic beta-cells by using monoclonal antibodies [F. Martin, F. Moya, L. M. Gutierrez, J.A. Reig, B. Soria (1995) Diabetologia 38, 860-863]. In order to characterize further the importance of specific domains of this protein, the functional role of a particular region of the syntaxin-1 molecule has now been investigated by using two synthetic peptides, SynA and SynB, corresponding to two portions of the H3 region at the C-terminal domain of the protein, residues 229-251 and 197-219 respectively. Functional experiments carried out in permeabilized pancreatic beta-cells demonstrate that these peptides inhibit Ca(2+)-dependent insulin release in a dose-dependent manner. This effect is specific because peptides of the same composition but random sequence do not show the same effect. In contrast with this inhibitory effect on Ca(2+)-induced secretion, both peptides increase basal release. However, under the same conditions, SynA and SynB do not affect guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate-induced insulin release. These results demonstrate that specific portions of the H3 region of syntaxin-1 are involved in critical protein-protein interactions specifically during Ca(2+)-induced insulin secretion. PMID:8947488

  3. Enhanced dendritic cell maturation by TNF-alpha or cytidine-phosphate-guanosine DNA drives T cell activation in vitro and therapeutic anti-tumor immune responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Brunner, C; Seiderer, J; Schlamp, A; Bidlingmaier, M; Eigler, A; Haimerl, W; Lehr, H A; Krieg, A M; Hartmann, G; Endres, S

    2000-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) manipulated ex vivo can induce tumor immunity in experimental murine tumor models. To improve DC-based tumor vaccination, we studied whether DC maturation affects the T cell-activating potential in vitro and the induction of tumor immunity in vivo. Maturation of murine bone marrow-derived DC was induced by GM-CSF plus IL-4 alone or by further addition of TNF-alpha or a cytidine-phosphate-guanosine (CpG)-containing oligonucleotide (ODN-1826), which mimics the immunostimulatory effect of bacterial DNA. Flow cytometric analysis of costimulatory molecules and MHC class II showed that DC maturation was stimulated most by ODN-1826, whereas TNF-alpha had an intermediate effect. The extent of maturation correlated with the secretion of IL-12 and the induction of alloreactive T cell proliferation. In BALB/c mice, s.c. injection of colon carcinoma cells resulted in rapidly growing tumors. In this model, CpG-ODN-stimulated DC cocultured with irradiated tumor cells also induced prophylactic protection most effectively and were therapeutically effective when administered 3 days after tumor challenge. Thus, CpG-ODN-enhanced DC maturation may represent an efficient means to improve clinical tumor vaccination.

  4. Adenosine Diphosphate (ADP)-Ribosylation of the Guanosine Triphosphatase (GTPase) Rho in Resting Peripheral Blood Human T Lymphocytes Results in Pseudopodial Extension and the Inhibition of  T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Woodside, Darren G.; Wooten, David K.; McIntyre, Bradley W.

    1998-01-01

    Scrape loading Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme into primary peripheral blood human T lymphocytes (PB T cells) efficiently adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosylates and thus inactivates the guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) Rho. Basal adhesion of PB T cells to the β1 integrin substrate fibronectin (Fn) was not inhibited by inactivation of Rho, nor was upregulation of adhesion using phorbol myristate acetate (PMA; 10 ng/ml) or Mn++ (1 mM) affected. Whereas untreated PB T cells adherent to Fn remain spherical, C3-treated PB T cells extend F-actin–containing pseudopodia. Inactivation of Rho delayed the kinetics of PMA-dependent PB T cell homotypic aggregation, a process involving integrin αLβ2. Although C3 treatment of PB T cells did not prevent adhesion to the β1 integrin substrate Fn, it did inhibit β1 integrin/CD3-mediated costimulation of proliferation. Analysis of intracellular cytokine production at the single cell level demonstrated that ADP-ribosylation of Rho inhibited β1 integrin/ CD3 and CD28/CD3 costimulation of IL-2 production within 6 h of activation. Strikingly, IL-2 production induced by PMA and ionomycin was unaffected by C3 treatment. Thus, the GTPase Rho is a novel regulator of T lymphocyte cytoarchitecture, and functional Rho is required for very early events regulating costimulation of IL-2 production in PB T cells. PMID:9763600

  5. 'Rod and ring' formation from IMP dehydrogenase is regulated through the one-carbon metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Calise, S John; Purich, Daniel L; Nguyen, Thuy; Saleem, Dania A; Krueger, Claire; Yin, Joyce D; Chan, Edward K L

    2016-08-01

    'Rods and rings' (RRs) are conserved, non-membrane-bound intracellular polymeric structures composed, in part, of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), a key enzyme leading to GMP and GTP biosynthesis. RR formation is induced by IMPDH inhibitors as well as glutamine deprivation. They also form upon treatment of cells with glutamine synthetase inhibitors. We now report that depriving cells of serine and glycine promotes RR formation, and we have traced these effects to dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and serine hydroxymethyltransferase-2 (SHMT2), pivotal enzymes in one-carbon metabolism and nucleotide biosynthesis. RR assembly is likewise induced upon DHFR inhibition by methotrexate or aminopterin as well as siRNA-mediated knockdown of DHFR or SHMT2. Because RR assembly occurs when guanine nucleotide biosynthesis is inhibited, and because RRs rapidly disassemble after the addition of guanine nucleotide precursors, RR formation might be an adaptive homeostatic mechanism, allowing IMPDH to sense changes in the one-carbon folate pathway. PMID:27343244

  6. Role of the cAMP Pathway in Glucose and Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ravnskjaer, Kim; Madiraju, Anila; Montminy, Marc

    2016-01-01

    3'-5'-Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP or cAMP) was first described in 1957 as an intracellular second messenger mediating the effects of glucagon and epinephrine on hepatic glycogenolysis (Berthet et al., J Biol Chem 224(1):463-475, 1957). Since this initial characterization, cAMP has been firmly established as a versatile molecular signal involved in both central and peripheral regulation of energy homeostasis and nutrient partitioning. Many of these effects appear to be mediated at the transcriptional level, in part through the activation of the transcription factor CREB and its coactivators. Here we review current understanding of the mechanisms by which the cAMP signaling pathway triggers metabolic programs in insulin-responsive tissues.

  7. Pathway modulators and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Smith, John A

    2009-07-01

    Inhibitors of specific cellular pathways are useful for investigating the roles of proteins of unknown function, and for selectively inhibiting a protein in complex pathways to uncover its relationships to other proteins in this and other interacting pathways. This appendix provides links to Web sites that describe cellular processes and pathways along with the various classes of inhibitors, numerous references, downloadable diagrams, and technical tips.

  8. The nitric oxide-cyclic GMP pathway and synaptic plasticity in the rat superior cervical ganglion.

    PubMed Central

    Southam, E.; Charles, S. L.; Garthwaite, J.

    1996-01-01

    1. We have investigated the possibility that nitric oxide (NO) and soluble guanylyl cyclase, an enzyme that synthesizes guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) in response to NO, contributes to plasticity of synaptic transmission in the rat isolated superior cervical ganglion (SCG). 2. Exposure of ganglia to the NO donor, nitroprusside, caused a concentration-dependent accumulation of cyclic GMP which was augmented in the presence of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. The compound, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), a selective inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase, completely blocked this cyclic GMP response. 3. As assessed by extracellular recording, nitroprusside (100 microM) and another NO donor, S-nitrosoglutathione (30 microM) increased the efficacy of ganglionic synaptic transmission in response to electrical stimulation of the preganglionic nerve, an effect that was reversible and which could be replicated by the cyclic GMP analogue, 8-bromo-cyclic GMP. Ganglionic depolarizations resulting from stimulation of nicotinic receptors with carbachol were not increased by nitroprusside. The potentiating actions of the NO donors on synaptic transmission, but not that of 8-bromo-cyclic GMP, were inhibited by ODQ. 4. Brief tetanic stimulation of the preganglionic nerve resulted in a long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission that was unaffected by ODQ, either in the absence or presence of the NO synthase inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG, 100 microM). A lack of influence of L-NOARG was confirmed in intracellular recordings of LTP of the excitatory postsynaptic potential. Furthermore, under conditions where tetanically-induced LTP was saturated, nitroprusside was still able to potentiate synaptic transmission, as judged from extracellular recording. 5. We conclude that NO is capable of potentiating ganglionic neurotransmission and this effect is mediated through the stimulation of soluble guanylyl

  9. Pharmacological evidence for the involvement of the NMDA receptor and nitric oxide pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of lamotrigine in the mouse forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Ahangari, Mohammad; Nikoui, Vahid; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Zolfaghari, Samira; Jazaeri, Farahnaz; Chamanara, Mohsen; Akbarian, Reyhaneh; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-08-01

    Lamotrigine is an anticonvulsant agent that shows clinical antidepressant properties. The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO-cGMP) synthesis in possible antidepressant-like effect of lamotrigine in forced swimming test (FST) in mice. Intraperitoneal administration of lamotrigine (10mg/kg) decreased the immobility time in the FST (P<0.01) without any effect on locomotor activity in the open-field test (OFT), while higher dose of lamotrigine (30mg/kg) reduced the immobility time in the FST (P<0.001) as well as the number of crossings in the OFT. Pretreatment of animals with NMDA (75mg/kg), l-arginine (750mg/kg, a substrate for nitric oxide synthase [NOS]) or sildenafil (5mg/kg, a phosphodiesterase [PDE] 5 inhibitor) reversed the antidepressant-like effect of lamotrigine (10mg/kg) in the FST. Injection of l-nitroarginine methyl ester (l-NAME, 10mg/kg, a non-specific NOS inhibitor), 7-nitroindazole (30mg/kg, a neuronal NOS inhibitor), methylene blue (20mg/kg, an inhibitor of both NOS and soluble guanylate cyclase [sGC]), or MK-801 (0.05mg/kg), ketamine (1mg/kg), and magnesium sulfate (10mg/kg) as NMDA receptor antagonists in combination with a sub-effective dose of lamotrigine (5mg/kg) diminished the immobility time of animals in the FST compared with either drug alone. None of the drugs produced significant effects on the locomotor activity in the OFT. Based on our findings, it is suggested that the antidepressant-like effect of lamotrigine might mediated through inhibition of either NMDA receptors or NO-cGMP synthesis. PMID:27470415

  10. Methanolic Extract of Clinacanthus nutans Exerts Antinociceptive Activity via the Opioid/Nitric Oxide-Mediated, but cGMP-Independent, Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Rahim, Mohammad Hafiz; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin; Mohd Sani, Mohd Hijaz; Omar, Maizatul Hasyima; Yakob, Yusnita; Cheema, Manraj Singh; Ching, Siew Mooi; Ahmad, Zuraini; Abdul Kadir, Arifah

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to determine the mechanisms of antinociceptive effect of methanol extract of Clinacanthus nutans (Acanthaceae) leaves (MECN) using various animal nociceptive models. The antinociceptive activity of orally administered 10% DMSO, 100 mg/kg acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), 5 mg/kg morphine, or MECN (100, 250, and 500 mg/kg) was determined using the acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction (ACT), formalin-induced paw licking (FT), and hot plate tests (HPT). The role of opioid and nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO/cGMP) systems was also investigated. The results showed that MECN produced a significant (p < 0.05) antinociceptive response in all nociceptive models with the recorded ED50 value of 279.3 mg/kg for the ACT, while, for the early and late phases of the FT, the value was >500 mg/kg or 227.7 mg/kg, respectively. This antinociceptive activity was fully antagonized by naloxone (a nonselective opioid antagonist) but was partially reversed by l-arginine (l-arg; a nitric oxide [NO] precursor), Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME; an NO synthase inhibitor), or their combinations thereof. In contrast, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor) enhanced the extract's antinociception. UHPLC analysis revealed the presence of several flavonoid-based compounds with antinociceptive action. In conclusion, MECN exerted the peripherally and centrally mediated antinociceptive activity via the modulation of the opioid/NO-mediated, but cGMP-independent, systems. PMID:27190528

  11. Effects of single or combined histamine H1-receptor and leukotriene CysLT1-receptor antagonism on nasal adenosine monophosphate challenge in persistent allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daniel K C; Jackson, Catherine M; Soutar, Patricia C; Fardon, Thomas C; Lipworth, Brian J

    2004-01-01

    Background The effects of single or combined histamine H1-receptor and leukotriene CysLT1-receptor antagonism on nasal adenosine monophosphate (AMP) challenge in allergic rhinitis are unknown. Objective We elected to study the effects of usual clinically recommended doses of fexofenadine (FEX), montelukast (ML) and FEX + ML combination, compared with placebo (PL), on nasal AMP challenge in patients with persistent allergic rhinitis. Methods Twelve patients with persistent allergic rhinitis (all skin prick positive to house dust mite) were randomized in a double-blind cross-over fashion to receive for 1 week either FEX 180 mg, ML 10 mg, FEX 180 mg +ML 10 mg combination, or PL, with nasal AMP challenge performed 12 h after dosing. There was a 1-week washout period between each randomized treatment. The primary outcome measure was the maximum percentage peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF) fall from baseline over a 60-min period after nasal challenge with a single 400 mg ml−1 dose of AMP. The area under the 60-min time–response curve (AUC) and nasal symptoms were measured as secondary outcomes. Results There was significant attenuation (P < 0.05) of the mean maximum percentage PNIF fall from baseline after nasal AMP challenge vs. PL, 48; with FEX, 37; 95% confidence interval for difference 2, 20; ML, 35 (4, 22); and FEX + ML, 32 (7, 24). The AUC (%.min) was also significantly attenuated (P < 0.05) vs. PL, 1893; with FEX, 1306 (30, 1143); ML, 1246 (214, 1078); and FEX + ML, 1153 (251, 1227). There were no significant differences for FEX vs. ML vs. FEX + ML comparing either the maximum or AUC response. The total nasal symptom score (out of 12) was also significantly improved (P < 0.05) vs. PL, 3.3; with FEX, 2.1 (0.3, 2.0); ML, 2.0 (0.5, 1.9); and FEX + ML, 2.5 (0.1, 1.4). Conclusion FEX and ML as monotherapy significantly attenuated the response to nasal AMP challenge and improved nasal symptoms compared with PL, while combination therapy conferred no additional

  12. Simultaneous interaction with base and phosphate moieties modulates the phosphodiester cleavage of dinucleoside 3',5'-monophosphates by dinuclear Zn2+ complexes of di(azacrown) ligands.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Lönnberg, Harri

    2006-08-23

    Five dinucleating ligands (1-5) and one trinucleating ligand (6) incorporating 1,5,9-triazacyclododecan-3-yloxy groups attached to an aromatic scaffold have been synthesized. The ability of the Zn(2+) complexes of these ligands to promote the transesterification of dinucleoside 3',5'-monophosphates to a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate derived from the 3'-linked nucleoside by release of the 5'-linked nucleoside has been studied over a narrow pH range, from pH 5.8 to 7.2, at 90 degrees C. The dinuclear complexes show marked base moiety selectivity. Among the four dinucleotide 3',5'-phosphates studied, viz. adenylyl-3',5'-adenosine (ApA), adenylyl-3',5'-uridine (ApU), uridylyl-3',5'-adenosine (UpA), and uridylyl-3',5'-uridine (UpU), the dimers containing one uracil base (ApU and UpA) are cleaved up to 2 orders of magnitude more readily than those containing either two uracil bases (UpU) or two adenine bases (ApA). The trinuclear complex (6), however, cleaves UpU as readily as ApU and UpA, while the cleavage of ApA remains slow. UV spectrophotometric and (1)H NMR spectroscopic studies with one of the dinucleating ligands (3) verify binding to the bases of UpU and ApU at less than millimolar concentrations, while no interaction with the base moieties of ApA is observed. With ApU and UpA, one of the Zn(2+)-azacrown moieties in all likelihood anchors the cleaving agent to the uracil base of the substrate, while the other azacrown moiety serves as a catalyst for the phosphodiester transesterification. With UpU, two azacrown moieties are engaged in the base moiety binding. The catalytic activity is, hence, lost, but it can be restored by addition of a third azacrown group on the cleaving agent.

  13. Dietary effects of adenosine monophosphate to enhance growth, digestibility, innate immune responses and stress resistance of juvenile red sea bream, Pagrus major.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Sakhawat; Koshio, Shunsuke; Ishikawa, Manabu; Yokoyama, Saichiro; Sony, Nadia Mahjabin

    2016-09-01

    Our study explored the dietary effects of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) to enhance growth, digestibility, innate immune responses and stress resistance of juvenile red sea bream. A semi-purified basal diet supplemented with 0% (Control), 0.1% (AMP-0.1), 0.2% (AMP-0.2), 0.4% (AMP-0.4) and 0.8% (AMP-0.8) purified AMP to formulate five experimental diets. Each diet was randomly allocated to triplicate groups of fish (mean initial weight 3.4 g) for 56 days. The results indicated that dietary AMP supplements tended to improve growth performances. One of the best ones was found in diet group AMP-0.2, followed by diet groups AMP-0.1, AMP-0.4 and AMP-0.8. The Apparent digestibility coefficients (dry matter, protein and lipid) also improved by AMP supplementation and the significantly highest dry matter digestibility was observed in diet group AMP-0.2. Fish fed diet groups AMP-0.2 and AMP-0.4 had significantly higher peroxidase and bactericidal activities than fish fed the control diet. Nitro-blue-tetrazolium (NBT) activity was found to be significantly (P < 0.05) greater in fish fed diet groups AMP-0.4 and AMP-0.8. Total serum protein, lysozyme activity and agglutination antibody titer were also increased (P > 0.05) by dietary supplementation. In contrast, catalase activity decreased with AMP supplementation. Moreover, the fish fed AMP supplemented diets had better improvement (P < 0.05) in body lipid contents, condition factor, hematocrit content and glutamyl oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) level than the control group. Supplementation also improved both freshwater and oxidative stress resistances. Interestingly, the fish fed diet groups AMP-0.2 and AMP-0.4 showed the least oxidative stress condition. Finally it is concluded that, dietary AMP supplementation enhanced the growth, digestibility, immune response and stress resistance of red sea bream. The regression analysis revealed that a dietary AMP supplementation between 0.2 and 0.4% supported weight gain and

  14. Simultaneous interaction with base and phosphate moieties modulates the phosphodiester cleavage of dinucleoside 3',5'-monophosphates by dinuclear Zn2+ complexes of di(azacrown) ligands.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Lönnberg, Harri

    2006-08-23

    Five dinucleating ligands (1-5) and one trinucleating ligand (6) incorporating 1,5,9-triazacyclododecan-3-yloxy groups attached to an aromatic scaffold have been synthesized. The ability of the Zn(2+) complexes of these ligands to promote the transesterification of dinucleoside 3',5'-monophosphates to a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate derived from the 3'-linked nucleoside by release of the 5'-linked nucleoside has been studied over a narrow pH range, from pH 5.8 to 7.2, at 90 degrees C. The dinuclear complexes show marked base moiety selectivity. Among the four dinucleotide 3',5'-phosphates studied, viz. adenylyl-3',5'-adenosine (ApA), adenylyl-3',5'-uridine (ApU), uridylyl-3',5'-adenosine (UpA), and uridylyl-3',5'-uridine (UpU), the dimers containing one uracil base (ApU and UpA) are cleaved up to 2 orders of magnitude more readily than those containing either two uracil bases (UpU) or two adenine bases (ApA). The trinuclear complex (6), however, cleaves UpU as readily as ApU and UpA, while the cleavage of ApA remains slow. UV spectrophotometric and (1)H NMR spectroscopic studies with one of the dinucleating ligands (3) verify binding to the bases of UpU and ApU at less than millimolar concentrations, while no interaction with the base moieties of ApA is observed. With ApU and UpA, one of the Zn(2+)-azacrown moieties in all likelihood anchors the cleaving agent to the uracil base of the substrate, while the other azacrown moiety serves as a catalyst for the phosphodiester transesterification. With UpU, two azacrown moieties are engaged in the base moiety binding. The catalytic activity is, hence, lost, but it can be restored by addition of a third azacrown group on the cleaving agent. PMID:16910666

  15. Crystal structures of Apo and GMP bound hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase from Legionella pneumophila and the implications in gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nannan; Gong, Xiaojian; Lu, Min; Chen, Xiaofang; Qin, Ximing; Ge, Honghua

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) (EC 2.4.2.8) reversibly catalyzes the transfer of the 5-phophoribosyl group from 5-phosphoribosyl-alpha-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to hypoxanthine or guanine to form inosine monophosphate (IMP) or guanosine monophosphate (GMP) in the purine salvage pathway. To investigate the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme in the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila, we determined the crystal structures of the L. pneumophila HGPRT (LpHGPRT) both in its apo-form and in complex with GMP. The structures reveal that LpHGPRT comprises a core domain and a hood domain which are packed together to create a cavity for GMP-binding and the enzymatic catalysis. The binding of GMP induces conformational changes of the stable loop II. This new binding site is closely related to the Gout arthritis-linked human HGPRT mutation site (Ser103Arg). Finally, these structures of LpHGPRT provide insights into the catalytic mechanism of HGPRT.

  16. Synthesis, in Vitro Evaluation and Cocrystal Structure of 4-Oxo-[1]benzopyrano[4,3-c]pyrazole Cryptosporidium parvum Inosine 5′-Monophosphate Dehydrogenase (CpIMPDH) Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (CpIMPDH) has emerged as a therapeutic target for treating Cryptosporidium parasites because it catalyzes a critical step in guanine nucleotide biosynthesis. A 4-oxo-[1]benzopyrano[4,3-c]pyrazole derivative was identified as a moderately potent (IC50 = 1.5 μM) inhibitor of CpIMPDH. We report a SAR study for this compound series resulting in 8k (IC50 = 20 ± 4 nM). In addition, an X-ray crystal structure of CpIMPDH·IMP·8k is also presented. PMID:25474504

  17. Abscisic acid affects transcription of chloroplast genes via protein phosphatase 2C-dependent activation of nuclear genes: repression by guanosine-3'-5'-bisdiphosphate and activation by sigma factor 5.

    PubMed

    Yamburenko, Maria V; Zubo, Yan O; Börner, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) represses the transcriptional activity of chloroplast genes (determined by run-on assays), with the exception of psbD and a few other genes in wild-type Arabidopsis seedlings and mature rosette leaves. Abscisic acid does not influence chloroplast transcription in the mutant lines abi1-1 and abi2-1 with constitutive protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) activity, suggesting that ABA affects chloroplast gene activity by binding to the pyrabactin resistance (PYR)/PYR1-like or regulatory component of ABA receptor protein family (PYR/PYL/RCAR) and signaling via PP2Cs and sucrose non-fermenting protein-related kinases 2 (SnRK2s). Further we show by quantitative PCR that ABA enhances the transcript levels of RSH2, RSH3, PTF1 and SIG5. RelA/SpoT homolog 2 (RSH2) and RSH3 are known to synthesize guanosine-3'-5'-bisdiphosphate (ppGpp), an inhibitor of the plastid-gene-encoded chloroplast RNA polymerase. We propose, therefore, that ABA leads to an inhibition of chloroplast gene expression via stimulation of ppGpp synthesis. On the other hand, sigma factor 5 (SIG5) and plastid transcription factor 1 (PTF1) are known to be necessary for the transcription of psbD from a specific light- and stress-induced promoter (the blue light responsive promoter, BLRP). We demonstrate that ABA activates the psbD gene by stimulation of transcription initiation at BLRP. Taken together, our data suggest that ABA affects the transcription of chloroplast genes by a PP2C-dependent activation of nuclear genes encoding proteins involved in chloroplast transcription. PMID:25976841

  18. Carcinogenic heavy metals, As{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 6+}, increase affinity of nuclear mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 for DNA containing 8-oxo-guanosine, and promote translesion DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, Aiko; Corcoran, George B.; Hirata, Fusao

    2011-04-15

    To elucidate the biological roles of mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 in nuclei, we investigated the interaction of purified nuclear mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 with intact and oxidatively damaged DNA. We synthesized the 80mer 5'-GTCCACTATTAAAGAACGTGGACTCCAACGTCAAAGGGCGAAAAACCGTCTATCAGGGCGATGGCCCACTAC GTGAACCA-3' (P0G), and four additional 80mers, each with a selected single G in position 14, 30, 37 or 48 replaced by 8-oxo-guanosine (8-oxo-G) to model DNA damaged at a specific site by oxidation. Nuclear mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 was able to bind oligonucleotides containing 8-oxo-G at specific positions, and able to anneal damaged oligonucleotide DNA to M13mp18 in the presence of Ca{sup 2+} or heavy metals such as As{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 6+}. M13mp18/8-oxo-G-oligonucleotide duplexes were unwound by nuclear annexin A1 in the presence of Mg{sup 2+} and ATP. The binding affinity of nuclear annexin A1 for ssDNA was higher for oxidatively damaged oligonucleotides than for the undamaged oligonucleotide P0G, whereas the maximal binding was not significantly changed. The carcinogenic heavy metals, As{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 6+}, increased the affinity of mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 for oxidatively damaged oligonucleotides. Nuclear mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 stimulated translesion DNA synthesis by Pol {beta}. Nuclear extracts of L5178Y tk(+/-) lymphoma cells also promoted translesion DNA synthesis in the presence of the heavy metals As{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 6+}. This DNA synthesis was inhibited by anti-annexin A1 antibody. These observations do not prove but provide strong evidence for the hypothesis that nuclear mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 is involved in heavy metal promoted translesion DNA synthesis, thereby exhibiting the capacity to increase the introduction of mutations into DNA.

  19. Combined biosynthetic pathway for de novo production of UDP-galactose: catalysis with multiple enzymes immobilized on agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziye; Zhang, Jianbo; Chen, Xi; Wang, Peng G

    2002-04-01

    Regeneration of sugar nucleotides is a critical step in the biosynthetic pathway for the formation of oligosaccharides. To alleviate the difficulties in the production of sugar nucleotides, we have developed a method to produce uridine diphosphate galactose (UDP-galactose). The combined biosynthetic pathway, which involves seven enzymes, is composed of three parts: i) the main pathway to form UDP-galactose from galactose, with the enzymes galactokinase, galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase, UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, and inorganic pyrophosphatase, ii) the uridine triphosphate supply pathway catalyzed by uridine monophosphate (UMP) kinase and nucleotide diphosphate kinase, and iii) the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regeneration pathway catalyzed by polyphosphate kinase with polyphosphate added as an energy resource. All of the enzymes were expressed individually and immobilized through their hexahistidine tags onto nickel agarose beads ("super beads"). The reaction requires a stoichiometric amount of UMP and galactose, and catalytic amounts of ATP and glucose 1-phosphate, all inexpensive starting materials. After continuous circulation of the reaction mixture through the super-bead column for 48 h, 50 % of the UMP was converted into UDP-galactose. The results show that de novo production of UDP-galactose on the super-bead column is more efficient than in solution because of the stability of the immobilized enzymes.

  20. Improvement of bacterial cellulose production by manipulating the metabolic pathways in which ethanol and sodium citrate involved.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanjing; Tian, Chunjie; Tian, Hua; Zhang, Jiliang; He, Xin; Ping, Wenxiang; Lei, Hong

    2012-12-01

    Nowadays, bacterial cellulose has played more and more important role as new biological material for food industry and medical and industrial products based on its unique properties. However, it is still a difficult task to improve the production of bacterial cellulose, especially a large number of byproducts are produced in the metabolic biosynthesis processes. To improve bacterial cellulose production, ethanol and sodium citrate are added into the medium during the fermentation, and the activities of key enzymes and concentration of extracellular metabolites are measured to assess the changes of the metabolic flux of the hexose monophosphate pathway (HMP), the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway (EMP), and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA). Our results indicate that ethanol functions as energy source for ATP generation at the early stage of the fermentation in the HMP pathway and the supplementation of ethanol significantly reduces glycerol generation (a major byproduct). While in the EMP pathway, sodium citrate plays a key role, and its supplementation results in the byproducts (mainly acetic acid and pyruvic acid) entering the gluconeogenesis pathway for cellulose synthesis. Furthermore, by adding ethanol and sodium citrate, the main byproduct citric acid in the TCA cycle is also reduced significantly. It is concluded that bacterial cellulose production can be improved by increasing energy metabolism and reducing the formation of metabolic byproducts through the metabolic regulations of the bypasses.

  1. Umami taste in mice uses multiple receptors and transduction pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yasumatsu, Keiko; Ogiwara, Yoko; Takai, Shingo; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Iwatsuki, Ken; Torii, Kunio; Margolskee, Robert F; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2012-01-01

    Non-technical summary The distinctive umami taste elicited by l-glutamate and some other amino acids is thought to be initiated by G-protein-coupled receptors, such as heteromers of taste receptor type 1, members 1 and 3, and metabotropic glutamate receptors 1 and 4. We demonstrate the existence of multiple types of glutamate-sensitive gustatory nerve fibres and the contribution of multiple receptors and transduction pathways to umami taste. Such multiple systems for umami taste may differentially contribute to the behavioural preference for glutamate and discriminability of glutamate taste. Abstract The distinctive umami taste elicited by l-glutamate and some other amino acids is thought to be initiated by G-protein-coupled receptors. Proposed umami receptors include heteromers of taste receptor type 1, members 1 and 3 (T1R1+T1R3), and metabotropic glutamate receptors 1 and 4 (mGluR1 and mGluR4). Multiple lines of evidence support the involvement of T1R1+T1R3 in umami responses of mice. Although several studies suggest the involvement of receptors other than T1R1+T1R3 in umami, the identity of those receptors remains unclear. Here, we examined taste responsiveness of umami-sensitive chorda tympani nerve fibres from wild-type mice and mice genetically lacking T1R3 or its downstream transduction molecule, the ion channel TRPM5. Our results indicate that single umami-sensitive fibres in wild-type mice fall into two major groups: sucrose-best (S-type) and monopotassium glutamate (MPG)-best (M-type). Each fibre type has two subtypes; one shows synergism between MPG and inosine monophosphate (S1, M1) and the other shows no synergism (S2, M2). In both T1R3 and TRPM5 null mice, S1-type fibres were absent, whereas S2-, M1- and M2-types remained. Lingual application of mGluR antagonists selectively suppressed MPG responses of M1- and M2-type fibres. These data suggest the existence of multiple receptors and transduction pathways for umami responses in mice. Information

  2. Effects of mastoparan upon the late stages of the ACTH secretory pathway of AtT-20 cells.

    PubMed Central

    McFerran, B. W.; Guild, S. B.

    1995-01-01

    1. The mouse AtT-20/D16-16 anterior pituitary tumour cell line was used as a model system for the study of the effects of mastoparan upon the late stages of the adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) secretory pathway. 2. Mastoparan (10(-8)-10(-5) M), an activator of heterotrimeric guanosine 5'-triphosphate binding proteins (G-proteins), stimulated ACTH secretion from electrically-permeabilized AtT-20 cells in a concentration-dependent manner in the effective absence of calcium ions with a threshold of 10(-6) M. Guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP-gamma-S) (10(-8)-10(-4) M) also stimulated ACTH secretion from electrically-permeabilized AtT-20 cells in a concentration-dependent manner in the effective absence of calcium ions with a threshold of 10(-6) M. This GTP-gamma-S-evoked secretion is consistent with previous studies which demonstrated that a G-protein, termed GE, mediates calcium evoked ACTH secretion from AtT-20 cells. GTP-gamma-S-evoked secretion however was not as great as that obtained in response to mastoparan. 3. Both mastoparan (10(-5) M) and GTP-gamma-S (10(-4) M) stimulated ACTH secretion from electrically-permeabilized AtT20 cells in a time-dependent manner. A time of 30 min was adopted as the standard incubation period for the study of both mastoparan and GTP-gamma-S-stimulated ACTH secretion from permeabilized AtT-20 cells. 4. Mastoparan (10(-8)-10(-5) M) stimulated ACTH secretion from permeabilized AtT-20 cells to the same extent in the presence and absence of the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, chelerythrine chloride (10(-5) M).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7582493

  3. Pathways from Poverty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Barbara, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Articles in this theme issue are based on presentations at the Pathways from Poverty Workshop held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, on May 18-25, 1995. The event aimed to foster development of a network to address rural poverty issues in the Western Rural Development Center (WRDC) region. Articles report on outcomes from the Pathways from Poverty…

  4. Career Pathways in Indiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaskey, Steve; Johnson, Tricia

    2010-01-01

    The revisions to the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 require that career and technical education (CTE) programs provide students with a clear pathway from secondary to postsecondary education, and into high-wage, high-skill and high-demand careers. States nationwide are developing programs, called career pathways, to…

  5. Building clinical pathways.

    PubMed

    Leininger, S M

    1998-01-01

    TQM principles change the work environment so that point-of-service personnel can improve health care delivery to patients. The clinical pathway process starts with the principles of TQM. In the era of managed care, health care resources can be managed effectively using a clinical pathway. The multidisciplinary team has the opportunity to improve the health care services provided to patients.

  6. Insights into the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum as chemotherapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Krungkrai, Sudaratana R; Krungkrai, Jerapan

    2016-06-01

    Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. Artemisinins remain as the first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) malaria although drug resistance has already emerged and spread in Southeast Asia. Thus, to fight this disease, there is an urgent need to develop new antimalarial drugs for malaria chemotherapy. Unlike human host cells, P. falciparum cannot salvage preformed pyrimidine bases or nucleosides from the extracellular environment and relies solely on nucleotides synthesized through the de novo biosynthetic pathway. This review presents significant progress on understanding the de novo pyrimidine pathway and the functional enzymes in the human parasite P. falciparum. Current knowledge in genomics and metabolomics are described, particularly focusing on the parasite purine and pyrimidine nucleotide metabolism. These include gene annotation, characterization and molecular mechanism of the enzymes that are different from the human host pathway. Recent elucidation of the three-dimensional crystal structures and the catalytic reactions of three enzymes: dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, and orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase, as well as their inhibitors are reviewed in the context of their therapeutic potential against malaria. PMID:27262062

  7. Insights into the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum as chemotherapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Krungkrai, Sudaratana R; Krungkrai, Jerapan

    2016-06-01

    Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. Artemisinins remain as the first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) malaria although drug resistance has already emerged and spread in Southeast Asia. Thus, to fight this disease, there is an urgent need to develop new antimalarial drugs for malaria chemotherapy. Unlike human host cells, P. falciparum cannot salvage preformed pyrimidine bases or nucleosides from the extracellular environment and relies solely on nucleotides synthesized through the de novo biosynthetic pathway. This review presents significant progress on understanding the de novo pyrimidine pathway and the functional enzymes in the human parasite P. falciparum. Current knowledge in genomics and metabolomics are described, particularly focusing on the parasite purine and pyrimidine nucleotide metabolism. These include gene annotation, characterization and molecular mechanism of the enzymes that are different from the human host pathway. Recent elucidation of the three-dimensional crystal structures and the catalytic reactions of three enzymes: dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, and orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase, as well as their inhibitors are reviewed in the context of their therapeutic potential against malaria.

  8. Crystallization Pathways in Biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, Steve; Addadi, Lia

    2011-08-01

    A crystallization pathway describes the movement of ions from their source to the final product. Cells are intimately involved in biological crystallization pathways. In many pathways the cells utilize a unique strategy: They temporarily concentrate ions in intracellular membrane-bound vesicles in the form of a highly disordered solid phase. This phase is then transported to the final mineralization site, where it is destabilized and crystallizes. We present four case studies, each of which demonstrates specific aspects of biological crystallization pathways: seawater uptake by foraminifera, calcite spicule formation by sea urchin larvae, goethite formation in the teeth of limpets, and guanine crystal formation in fish skin and spider cuticles. Three representative crystallization pathways are described, and aspects of the different stages of crystallization are discussed. An in-depth understanding of these complex processes can lead to new ideas for synthetic crystallization processes of interest to materials science.

  9. The inducible G protein-coupled receptor edg-1 signals via the G(i)/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, M J; Evans, M; Hla, T

    1996-05-10

    The edg-1 gene encodes an inducible G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) homologue that is induced during the in vitro differentiation of human endothelial cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the G protein-coupling and -signaling properties of the edg-1 polypeptide. The third cytosolic loop (i3) of edg-1 associates with G(i) alpha and G(o) alpha polypeptides in a guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate)-sensitive manner. Immunoprecipitation of the edg-1 polypeptide in transfected cells results in the co-precipitation of G(i) alpha 1 and G(i) alpha 3 polypeptides. These data strongly suggest that edg-1 is capable of coupling to the Gi pathway. Overexpression of the edg-1 GPR in human embryonic kidney 293 cells results in the sustained activation of the MAP kinase activity that is blocked by pertussis toxin treatment. Moreover, NIH3T3 cells permanently transfected with edg-1 exhibit enhanced MAP kinase and phospholipase A2 activities. These data suggest that the G(i)/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway is a major signaling pathway regulated by the orphan receptor edg-1. PMID:8626678

  10. Analysis of microRNA-203 function in CREB/MITF/RAB27a pathway: comparison between canine and human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, S; Kumazaki, M; Mori, T; Baba, K; Okuda, M; Mizuno, T; Akao, Y

    2014-10-01

    MicroRNA (miR)-203 is downregulated and acts as an anti-oncomir in melanoma cells. Here, using human and canine melanoma cells, we elucidated the effects of miR-203 on cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB)/microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF)/RAB27a pathway, which is known to be important for the development and progression of human melanoma. In this study, we showed that miR-203 directly targeted CREB1 and regulated its downstream targets, MITF and RAB27a. miR-203 significantly suppressed the growth of human and canine melanoma cells and inhibited melanosome transport through the suppression of the signalling pathway. In conclusion, miR-203 was shown to be a common tumour-suppressive miRNA in human and canine melanoma and thus to play a crucial role in the biological mechanisms of melanoma development.

  11. Growth of Bacillus methanolicus in 2 M methanol at 50 °C: the effect of high methanol concentration on gene regulation of enzymes involved in formaldehyde detoxification by the ribulose monophosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Bozdag, Ahmet; Komives, Claire; Flickinger, Michael C

    2015-07-01

    Bacillus methanolicus MGA3 is a Gram-positive aerobic methylotroph growing optimally at 50-53°C. Methylotrophy in B. methanolicus is encoded on pBM19 and by two chromosomal copies of the methanol dehydrogenase (mdh), hexulose phosphate synthase (hps) and phosphohexuloisomerase (phi) genes. However, there are no published studies on the regulation of methylotrophy or the dominant mechanism of detoxification of intracellular formaldehyde in response to high methanol concentration. The µ max of B. methanolicus MGA3 was assessed on methanol, mannitol and glucose. B. methanolicus achieved a µ max at 25 mM initial methanol of 0.65 ± 0.007 h(-1), which decreased to 0.231 ± 0.004 h(-1) at 2 M initial methanol. Slow growth was also observed with initial methanol concentrations of >2 M. The µ max on mannitol and glucose are 0.532 ± 0.002 and 0.336 ± 0.003 h(-1), respectively. Spiking cultures with additional methanol (100 mM) did not disturb the growth rate of methanol-grown cells, whereas, a 50 mM methanol spike halted the growth in mannitol. Surprisingly, growth in methanol was inhibited by 1 mM formaldehyde, while mannitol-grown cells tolerated 2 mM. Moreover, mannitol-grown cells removed formaldehyde faster than methanol-grown cells. Further, we show that methanol oxidation in B. methanolicus MGA3 is mainly carried out by the pBM19-encoded mdh. Formaldehyde and formate addition down-regulate the mdh and hps genes in methanol-grown cells. Similarly, they down-regulate mdh genes in mannitol-grown cells, but up-regulate hps. Phosphofructokinase (pfk) is up-regulated in both methanol and mannitol-grown cells, which suggests that pfk may be a possible synthetic methylotrophy target to reduce formaldehyde growth toxicity at high methanol concentrations.

  12. Adenosine A1( )receptors are selectively coupled to Gα(i-3) in postmortem human brain cortex: Guanosine-5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPγS) binding/immunoprecipitation study.

    PubMed

    Odagaki, Yuji; Kinoshita, Masakazu; Ota, Toshio; Meana, J Javier; Callado, Luis F; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-10-01

    By means of guanosine-5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPγS) binding assay combined with immunoprecipitation using anti-Gα subunit antibody, we recently reported 5-HT2A receptor- and M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated Gαq activation in rat cerebral cortical membranes (Odagaki et al., 2014). In the present study, this method has been applied to postmortem human brains, with focusing on adenosine receptor-mediated G-protein activation. In the exploratory experiments using a series of agonists and the antibodies specific to each Gα subtypes in the presence of low (10 nM) or high (50 μM) concentration of GDP, the most prominent increases in specific [(35)S]GTPγS binding in the membranes prepared from human prefrontal cortex were obtained for the combinations of adenosine (1mM)/anti-Gαi-3 in the presence of 50 μM GDP as well as 5-HT (100 μM)/anti-Gαq and carbachol (1mM)/anti-Gαq in the presence of 10nM GDP. Adenosine-induced activation of Gαi-3 emerged only when GDP concentrations were increased higher than 10 μM, and the following experiments were performed in the presence of 300 μM GDP. Adenosine increased specific [(35)S]GTPγS binding to Gαi-3 in a concentration-dependent manner to 251.4% of the basal unstimulated binding, with an EC50 of 1.77 μM. The involvement of adenosine A1 receptor was verified by the experiments using selective agonists and antagonists at adenosine A1 or A3 receptor. Among the α subunits of Gi/o class (Gαi-1, Gαi-2, Gαi-3, and Gαo.), only Gαi-3 was activated by 1mM adenosine, indicating that human brain adenosine A1 receptor is coupled preferentially, if not exclusively, to Gαi-3.

  13. Correlation between vibrational frequencies and hydrogen bonding states of the guanine ring studied by UV resonance Raman spectroscopy of 2'-deoxy-3',5'-bis(triisopropylsilyl)guanosine dissolved in various solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyama, Akira; Hamuara, Mutsuo; Takeuchi, Hideo

    1996-06-01

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman spectra of 2'-deoxy-3',5'-bis(triisopropylsilyl)guanosine (TPS-dGuo) were recorded in non-hydrogen bonding, proton acceptor, and proton donor/acceptor solvents. Raman spectral changes observed on going from inert to proton acceptor solvents were ascribed to the hydrogen bonding at the proton donor sites of the guanine ring (N1H and C2NH 2), and the spectral changes associated with the solvent change from proton acceptor to donor/acceptor were ascribed to the hydrogen bonding at the proton acceptor sites (N3, C6O, and N7). A Raman band appearing at 1624 cm -1 in inert solvents is assigned mainly to the NH 2 scissors mode and its frequency changes to ≈ 1640 cm -1 in acceptor solvents, reflecting the hydrogen bonding at C2NH 2. Another band at 1581 cm -1, arising largely from the N1H bend, shows an upshift of ≈ 10 cm -1 upon hydrogen bonding at either N1H or acceptor sites. Hydrogen bonding at the acceptor sites also produces frequency shifts of other Raman bands (at 1710, 1565, 1528, 1481, and 1154 cm -1 in 1,2-dichloroethane solution). Among the Raman bands listed above, the 1710 cm -1 band due to the C6O stretch decreases in frequency, whereas the others increase. The downshift of the C6O stretching frequency is correlated with the strength of hydrogen bonding at C6O. The frequency of the 1481 cm -1 band increases with a decrease of the C6O stretching frequency, indicating that the 1481 cm -1 band is also a marker of hydrogen bonding at C6O. This finding is in sharp contrast to the previously proposed correlation with the hydrogen bonding at N7. The 1565 cm -1 band is assigned to a vibration mainly involving the N1C2N3 linkage, and its frequency increases with increasing strength of the hydrogen bond at N3. Three bands around 1315, 1180, and 1030 cm -1, which are known to be sensitive to the ribose ring puckering and glycosidic bond orientation, also show small frequency changes upon hydrogen

  14. Adenosine A1( )receptors are selectively coupled to Gα(i-3) in postmortem human brain cortex: Guanosine-5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPγS) binding/immunoprecipitation study.

    PubMed

    Odagaki, Yuji; Kinoshita, Masakazu; Ota, Toshio; Meana, J Javier; Callado, Luis F; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-10-01

    By means of guanosine-5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPγS) binding assay combined with immunoprecipitation using anti-Gα subunit antibody, we recently reported 5-HT2A receptor- and M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated Gαq activation in rat cerebral cortical membranes (Odagaki et al., 2014). In the present study, this method has been applied to postmortem human brains, with focusing on adenosine receptor-mediated G-protein activation. In the exploratory experiments using a series of agonists and the antibodies specific to each Gα subtypes in the presence of low (10 nM) or high (50 μM) concentration of GDP, the most prominent increases in specific [(35)S]GTPγS binding in the membranes prepared from human prefrontal cortex were obtained for the combinations of adenosine (1mM)/anti-Gαi-3 in the presence of 50 μM GDP as well as 5-HT (100 μM)/anti-Gαq and carbachol (1mM)/anti-Gαq in the presence of 10nM GDP. Adenosine-induced activation of Gαi-3 emerged only when GDP concentrations were increased higher than 10 μM, and the following experiments were performed in the presence of 300 μM GDP. Adenosine increased specific [(35)S]GTPγS binding to Gαi-3 in a concentration-dependent manner to 251.4% of the basal unstimulated binding, with an EC50 of 1.77 μM. The involvement of adenosine A1 receptor was verified by the experiments using selective agonists and antagonists at adenosine A1 or A3 receptor. Among the α subunits of Gi/o class (Gαi-1, Gαi-2, Gαi-3, and Gαo.), only Gαi-3 was activated by 1mM adenosine, indicating that human brain adenosine A1 receptor is coupled preferentially, if not exclusively, to Gαi-3. PMID:26213104

  15. Basic roles of key molecules connected with NMDAR signaling pathway on regulating learning and memory and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Peng, Rui-Yun

    2016-01-01

    With key roles in essential brain functions ranging from the long-term potentiation (LTP) to synaptic plasticity, the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) can be considered as one of the fundamental glutamate receptors in the central nervous system. The role of NMDA R was first identified in synaptic plasticity and has been extensively studied. Some molecules, such as Ca(2+), postsynaptic density 95 (PSD-95), calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II), protein kinase A (PKA), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) responsive element binding protein (CREB), are of special importance in learning and memory. This review mainly focused on the new research of key molecules connected with learning and memory, which played important roles in the NMDAR signaling pathway. PMID:27583167

  16. Effects of intermittent fasting on age-related changes on Na,K-ATPase activity and oxidative status induced by lipopolysaccharide in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Andrea Rodrigues; Kinoshita, Paula Fernanda; Yshii, Lidia Mitiko; Marques Orellana, Ana Maria; Böhmer, Ana Elisa; de Sá Lima, Larissa; Alves, Rosana; Andreotti, Diana Zukas; Marcourakis, Tania; Scavone, Cristoforo; Kawamoto, Elisa Mitiko

    2015-05-01

    Chronic neuroinflammation is a common characteristic of neurodegenerative diseases, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) signaling is linked to glutamate-nitric oxide-Na,K-ATPase isoforms pathway in central nervous system (CNS) and also causes neuroinflammation. Intermittent fasting (IF) induces adaptive responses in the brain that can suppress inflammation, but the age-related effect of IF on LPS modulatory influence on nitric oxide-Na,K-ATPase isoforms is unknown. This work compared the effects of LPS on the activity of α1,α2,3 Na,K-ATPase, nitric oxide synthase gene expression and/or activity, cyclic guanosine monophosphate, 3-nitrotyrosine-containing proteins, and levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in CNS of young and older rats submitted to the IF protocol for 30 days. LPS induced an age-related effect in neuronal nitric oxide synthase activity, cyclic guanosine monophosphate, and levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in rat hippocampus that was linked to changes in α2,3-Na,K-ATPase activity, 3-nitrotyrosine proteins, and inducible nitric oxide synthase gene expression. IF induced adaptative cellular stress-response signaling pathways reverting LPS effects in rat hippocampus of young and older rats. The results suggest that IF in both ages would reduce the risk for deficits on brain function and neurodegenerative disorders linked to inflammatory response in the CNS. PMID:25818175

  17. Deregulation of purine pathway in Bacillus subtilis and its use in riboflavin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    . Based on the deregulation of purine pathway at transcription and metabolic levels, an extended application is recommended for the yield of products, like inosine, guanosine, adenosine and folate which are directly stemming from purine pathway in B. subtilis. PMID:25023436

  18. Metabolic Studies on Intermediates in the myo-Inositol Oxidation Pathway in Lilium longiflorum Pollen: I. Conversion to Hexoses.

    PubMed

    Rosenfield, C L; Fann, C; Loewus, F A

    1978-01-01

    The myo-inositol oxidation pathway was investigated in regard to its role as a source of carbon for products of hexose monophosphate metabolism in germinated pollen of Lilium longiflorum Thunb., cv. Ace. myo-[2-(14)]Inositol and d-[1-(14)C]glucuronate had similar distributions of radioactivity, contributing about three times more label to polysaccharide-bound glucose than myo-[2-(3)H]inositol. In the course of glucogenesis label from the latter appeared as tritiated water in the medium. This exchange could be enhanced by supplying d-[5R,5S-(3)H]xylose instead of myo-[2-(3)H]inositol. When the former was administered, [(3)H]glucose was the only labeled sugar residue found in polysaccharide products. The soluble constituents of d-[5R,5S-(3)H]xylose-labeled pollen contained no traces of labeled xylose despite massive uptake and utilization.l-[1-(14)C]- and l-[5-(14)C]Arabinose produced similar labeling patterns in germinated pollen including incorporation of arabinosyl units into pollen tube polysaccharides and substantial glucogenesis which led to utilization of arabinose for respiration and further incorporation of labeled glucosyl units into pollen tube polysaccharides.d-[5-(3)H]Galacturonate was rapidly taken up by germinated pollen but slowly utilized, without conversion to other sugars, for incorporation into pollen tube polysaccharides. l-[6-(14)C]Gulonate was not taken up by pollen.Results strongly support a scheme of conversion from myo-inositol to hexose monophosphate and subsequent products of glucose metabolism that involves the myo-inositol oxidation pathway.

  19. Updating the Wnt pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jia; Virshup, David M.

    2014-01-01

    In the three decades since the discovery of the Wnt1 proto-oncogene in virus-induced mouse mammary tumours, our understanding of the signalling pathways that are regulated by the Wnt proteins has progressively expanded. Wnts are involved in an complex signalling network that governs multiple biological processes and cross-talk with multiple additional signalling cascades, including the Notch, FGF (fibroblast growth factor), SHH (Sonic hedgehog), EGF (epidermal growth factor) and Hippo pathways. The Wnt signalling pathway also illustrates the link between abnormal regulation of the developmental processes and disease manifestation. Here we provide an overview of Wnt-regulated signalling cascades and highlight recent advances. We focus on new findings regarding the dedicated Wnt production and secretion pathway with potential therapeutic targets that might be beneficial for patients with Wnt-related diseases. PMID:25208913

  20. Ribose-5-phosphate biosynthesis in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii occurs in the absence of a pentose-phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Grochowski, Laura L; Xu, Huimin; White, Robert H

    2005-11-01

    Recent work has raised a question as to the involvement of erythrose-4-phosphate, a product of the pentose phosphate pathway, in the metabolism of the methanogenic archaea (R. H. White, Biochemistry 43:7618-7627, 2004). To address the possible absence of erythrose-4-phosphate in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, we have assayed cell extracts of this methanogen for the presence of this and other intermediates in the pentose phosphate pathway and have determined and compared the labeling patterns of sugar phosphates derived metabolically from [6,6-2H2]- and [U-13C]-labeled glucose-6-phosphate incubated with cell extracts. The results of this work have established the absence of pentose phosphate pathway intermediates erythrose-4-phosphate, xylose-5-phosphate, and sedoheptulose-7-phosphate in these cells and the presence of D-arabino-3-hexulose-6-phosphate, an intermediate in the ribulose monophosphate pathway. The labeling of the D-ara-bino-3-hexulose-6-phosphate, as well as the other sugar-Ps, indicates that this hexose-6-phosphate was the precursor to ribulose-5-phosphate that in turn was converted into ribose-5-phosphate by ribose-5-phosphate isomerase. Additional work has demonstrated that ribulose-5-phosphate is derived by the loss of formaldehyde from D-arabino-3-hexulose-6-phosphate, catalyzed by the protein product of the MJ1447 gene.

  1. A new crystal form of human histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (hHINT1) in complex with adenosine 5′-monophosphate at 1.38 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Dolot, Rafał; Ozga, Magdalena; Włodarczyk, Artur; Krakowiak, Agnieszka; Nawrot, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (HINT1) represents the most ancient and widespread branch of the histidine triad protein superfamily. HINT1 plays an important role in various biological processes and has been found in many species. Here, the structure of the human HINT1–adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) complex at 1.38 Å resolution obtained from a new monoclinic crystal form is reported. The final structure has R cryst = 0.1207 (R free = 0.1615) and the model exhibits good stereochemical quality. Detailed analysis of the high-resolution data allowed the details of the protein structure to be updated in comparison to the previously published data. PMID:22869114

  2. An Ancient Bacterial Signaling Pathway Regulates Chloroplast Function to Influence Growth and Development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sugliani, Matteo; Abdelkefi, Hela; Ke, Hang; Bouveret, Emmanuelle; Robaglia, Christophe; Caffarri, Stefano; Field, Ben

    2016-03-01

    The chloroplast originated from the endosymbiosis of an ancient photosynthetic bacterium by a eukaryotic cell. Remarkably, the chloroplast has retained elements of a bacterial stress response pathway that is mediated by the signaling nucleotides guanosine penta- and tetraphosphate (ppGpp). However, an understanding of the mechanism and outcomes of ppGpp signaling in the photosynthetic eukaryotes has remained elusive. Using the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, we show that ppGpp is a potent regulator of chloroplast gene expression in vivo that directly reduces the quantity of chloroplast transcripts and chloroplast-encoded proteins. We then go on to demonstrate that the antagonistic functions of different plant RelA SpoT homologs together modulate ppGpp levels to regulate chloroplast function and show that they are required for optimal plant growth, chloroplast volume, and chloroplast breakdown during dark-induced and developmental senescence. Therefore, our results show that ppGpp signaling is not only linked to stress responses in plants but is also an important mediator of cooperation between the chloroplast and the nucleocytoplasmic compartment during plant growth and development.

  3. Pleiotropic action of CpG-ODN on endothelium and macrophages attenuates angiogenesis through distinct pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiahui; Su, Wenru; Powner, Michael B.; Liu, Jian; Copland, David A.; Fruttiger, Marcus; Madeddu, Paolo; Dick, Andrew D.; Liu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    There is an integral relationship between vascular cells and leukocytes in supporting healthy tissue homeostasis. Furthermore, activation of these two cellular components is key for tissue repair following injury. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a role in innate immunity defending the organism against infection, but their contribution to angiogenesis remains unclear. Here we used synthetic TLR9 agonists, cytosine-phosphate-guanosine oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN), to investigate the role of TLR9 in vascular pathophysiology and identify potential therapeutic translation. We demonstrate that CpG-ODN stimulates inflammation yet inhibits angiogenesis. Regulation of angiogenesis by CpG-ODN is pervasive and tissue non-specific. Further, we noted that synthetic CpG-ODN requires backbone phosphorothioate but not TLR9 activation to render and maintain endothelial stalk cells quiescent. CpG-ODN pre-treated endothelial cells enhance macrophage migration but restrain pericyte mobilisation. CpG-ODN attenuation of angiogenesis, however, remains TLR9-dependent, as inhibition is lost in TLR9 deficient mice. Additionally, CpG-ODNs induce an M1 macrophage phenotype that restricts angiogenesis. The effects mediated by CpG-ODNs can therefore modulate both endothelial cells and macrophages through distinct pathways, providing potential therapeutic application in ocular vascular disease. PMID:27558877

  4. A clathrin-dependent pathway leads to KRas signaling on late endosomes en route to lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Albert; Tebar, Francesc; Alvarez-Moya, Blanca; López-Alcalá, Cristina; Calvo, Maria; Enrich, Carlos; Agell, Neus; Nakamura, Takeshi; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Bachs, Oriol

    2009-03-23

    Ras proteins are small guanosine triphosphatases involved in the regulation of important cellular functions such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Understanding the intracellular trafficking of Ras proteins is crucial to identify novel Ras signaling platforms. In this study, we report that epidermal growth factor triggers Kirsten Ras (KRas) translocation onto endosomal membranes (independently of calmodulin and protein kinase C phosphorylation) through a clathrin-dependent pathway. From early endosomes, KRas but not Harvey Ras or neuroblastoma Ras is sorted and transported to late endosomes (LEs) and lysosomes. Using yellow fluorescent protein-Raf1 and the Raichu-KRas probe, we identified for the first time in vivo-active KRas on Rab7 LEs, eliciting a signal output through Raf1. On these LEs, we also identified the p14-MP1 scaffolding complex and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Abrogation of lysosomal function leads to a sustained late endosomal mitogen-activated protein kinase signal output. Altogether, this study reveals novel aspects about KRas intracellular trafficking and signaling, shedding new light on the mechanisms controlling Ras regulation in the cell.

  5. Dynamin- and clathrin-dependent endocytic pathway in unicellular eukaryote Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Wiejak, Jolanta; Surmacz, Liliana; Wyroba, Elzbieta

    2004-10-01

    The first evidence of dynamin presence and its colocalization with clathrin in the compartment involved in Paramecium receptor-mediated endocytosis is presented. We identified dynamin by cloning, Western blotting, and immunodetection in confocal and electron microscopy. The partial genes, which we have designated ParDyn1 and ParDyn2, are 1091 bp long, 90% identical to one another and encode the N-terminal and middle domains of Paramecium dynamin isoform 1 and isoform 2. The deduced amino acid sequences contain all three guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP)-binding motifs and show 67% homology to mammalian dynamins. Antibodies generated against the cloned GTPase domain revealed dynamin association with endosomes containing transferrin, the marker of receptor-mediated endocytosis. In Western blotting a strong immunoreactive polypeptide of approximately 116 kDa, which seems to be phosphorylated, was accompanied by a faint one of approximately 90 kDa in cytosolic fraction (S2). Dynamin level was correlated with internalization of transferrin and it was significantly decreased upon inhibition of this process. Immunogold labeling in electron microscopy revealed colocalization of dynamin and clathrin in coated pits and endocytic vesicles. Moreover, the polypeptide cross-reaction with 2 different antibodies against mammalian clathrin was identified by immunoblotting. These results indicate that dynamin- and clathrin-dependent pathway exists in this evolutionary ancient cell.

  6. Pathways to chromothripsis.

    PubMed

    Ivkov, Robert; Bunz, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Chromothripsis is a recently recognized mode of genetic instability that generates chromosomes with strikingly large numbers of segmental re-arrangements. While the characterization of these derivative chromosomes has provided new insights into the processes by which cancer genomes can evolve, the underlying signaling events and molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In medulloblastomas, chromothripsis has been observed to occur in the context of mutational inactivation of p53 and activation of the canonical Hedgehog (Hh) pathway. Recent studies have illuminated mechanistic links between these 2 signaling pathways, including a novel PTCH1 homolog that is regulated by p53. Here, we integrate this new pathway into a hypothetical model for the catastrophic DNA breakage that appears to trigger profound chromosomal rearrangements. PMID:26178348

  7. Clinical Pathway for Thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Villar del Moral, Jesús María; Soria Aledo, Víctor; Colina Alonso, Alberto; Flores Pastor, Benito; Gutiérrez Rodríguez, María Teresa; Ortega Serrano, Joaquín; Parra Hidalgo, Pedro; Ros López, Susana

    2015-05-01

    Clinical pathways are care plans applicable to patient care procedures that present variations in practice and a predictable clinical course. They are designed not as a substitute for clinical judgment, but rather as a means to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the procedures. This clinical pathway is the result of a collaborative work of the Sections of Endocrine Surgery and Quality Management of the Spanish Association of Surgeons. It attempts to provide a framework for standardizing the performance of thyroidectomy, the most frequently performed operation in endocrine surgery. Along with the usual documents of clinical pathways (temporary matrix, variance tracking and information sheets, assessment indicators and a satisfaction questionnaire) it includes a review of the scientific evidence around different aspects of pre, intra and postoperative management. Among others, antibiotic and antithrombotic prophylaxis, preoperative preparation in hyperthyroidism, intraoperative neuromonitoring and systems for obtaining hemostasis are included, along with management of postoperative hypocalcemia. PMID:25732107

  8. Clinical Pathway for Thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Villar del Moral, Jesús María; Soria Aledo, Víctor; Colina Alonso, Alberto; Flores Pastor, Benito; Gutiérrez Rodríguez, María Teresa; Ortega Serrano, Joaquín; Parra Hidalgo, Pedro; Ros López, Susana

    2015-05-01

    Clinical pathways are care plans applicable to patient care procedures that present variations in practice and a predictable clinical course. They are designed not as a substitute for clinical judgment, but rather as a means to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the procedures. This clinical pathway is the result of a collaborative work of the Sections of Endocrine Surgery and Quality Management of the Spanish Association of Surgeons. It attempts to provide a framework for standardizing the performance of thyroidectomy, the most frequently performed operation in endocrine surgery. Along with the usual documents of clinical pathways (temporary matrix, variance tracking and information sheets, assessment indicators and a satisfaction questionnaire) it includes a review of the scientific evidence around different aspects of pre, intra and postoperative management. Among others, antibiotic and antithrombotic prophylaxis, preoperative preparation in hyperthyroidism, intraoperative neuromonitoring and systems for obtaining hemostasis are included, along with management of postoperative hypocalcemia.

  9. The Secretory Pathway Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Sreelatha, Anju; Kinch, Lisa N.; Tagliabracci, Vincent S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a nearly universal post-translation modification involved in a plethora of cellular events. Even though phosphorylation of extracellular proteins had been observed, the identity of the kinases that phosphorylate secreted proteins remained a mystery until recently. Advances in genome sequencing and genetic studies have paved the way for the discovery of a new class of kinases that localize within the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and the extracellular space. These novel kinases phosphorylate proteins and proteoglycans in the secretory pathway and appear to regulate various extracellular processes. Mutations in these kinases cause human disease, thus underscoring the biological importance of phosphorylation within the secretory pathway. PMID:25862977

  10. ppGpp controlled by the Gac/Rsm regulatory pathway sustains biocontrol activity in Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Kasumi; Yamada, Kosumi; Haas, Dieter

    2012-11-01

    In Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0 and other fluorescent pseudomonads, the Gac/Rsm signal transduction pathway is instrumental for secondary metabolism and biocontrol of root pathogens via the expression of regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs). Furthermore, in strain CHA0, an imbalance in the Krebs cycle can affect the strain's ability to produce extracellular secondary metabolites, including biocontrol factors. Here, we report the metabolome of wild-type CHA0, a gacA-negative mutant, which has lost Gac/Rsm activities, and a retS-negative mutant, which shows strongly enhanced Gac/Rsm-dependent activities. Capillary electrophoresis-based metabolomic profiling revealed that the gacA and retS mutations had opposite effects on the intracellular levels of a number of central metabolites, suggesting that the Gac/Rsm pathway regulates not only secondary metabolism but also primary metabolism in strain CHA0. Among the regulated metabolites identified, the alarmone guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp) was characterized in detail by the construction of relA (for ppGpp synthase) and spoT (for ppGpp synthase/hydrolase) deletion mutants. In a relA spoT double mutant, ppGpp synthesis was completely abolished, the expression of Rsm sRNAs was attenuated, and physiological functions such as antibiotic production, root colonization, and plant protection were markedly diminished. Thus, ppGpp appears to be essential for sustaining epiphytic fitness and biocontrol activity of strain CHA0.

  11. Modulation of dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels in Drosophila by a cAMP-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, A; Gu, G G; Singh, S

    1999-06-15

    Drosophila has proved to be a valuable system for studying the structure and function of ion channels. However, relatively little is known about the regulation of ion channels, particularly that of Ca2+ channels, in Drosophila. Physiological and pharmacological differences between invertebrate and mammalian L-type Ca2+ channels raise questions on the extent of conservation of Ca2+ channel modulatory pathways. We have examined the role of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) cascade in modulating the dihydropyridine (DHP)-sensitive Ca2+ channels in the larval muscles of Drosophila, using mutations and drugs that disrupt specific steps in this pathway. The L-type (DHP-sensitive) Ca2+ channel current was increased in the dunce mutants, which have high cAMP concentration owing to cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) disruption. The current was decreased in the rutabaga mutants, where adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity is altered thereby decreasing the cAMP concentration. The dunce effect was mimicked by 8-Br-cAMP, a cAMP analog, and IBMX, a PDE inhibitor. The rutabaga effect was rescued by forskolin, an AC activator. H-89, an inhibitor of protein kinase-A (PKA), reduced the current and inhibited the effect of 8-Br-cAMP. The data suggest modulation of L-type Ca2+ channels of Drosophila via a cAMP-PKA mediated pathway. While there are differences in L-type channels, as well as in components of cAMP cascade, between Drosophila and vertebrates, main features of the modulatory pathway have been conserved. The data also raise questions on the likely role of DHP-sensitive Ca2+ channel modulation in synaptic plasticity, and learning and memory, processes disrupted by the dnc and the rut mutations. PMID:10380071

  12. Pathways to School Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Pittsburgh Office of Child Development, 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2006, the University of Pittsburgh Office of Child Development began implementing a multi-year school readiness project in several area schools. Evidence from both research and the field point to several key elements that foster school readiness and create pathways to school success for all children. This paper presents components of a…

  13. Dexter energy transfer pathways.

    PubMed

    Skourtis, Spiros S; Liu, Chaoren; Antoniou, Panayiotis; Virshup, Aaron M; Beratan, David N

    2016-07-19

    Energy transfer with an associated spin change of the donor and acceptor, Dexter energy transfer, is critically important in solar energy harvesting assemblies, damage protection schemes of photobiology, and organometallic opto-electronic materials. Dexter transfer between chemically linked donors and acceptors is bridge mediated, presenting an enticing analogy with bridge-mediated electron and hole transfer. However, Dexter coupling pathways must convey both an electron and a hole from donor to acceptor, and this adds considerable richness to the mediation process. We dissect the bridge-mediated Dexter coupling mechanisms and formulate a theory for triplet energy transfer coupling pathways. Virtual donor-acceptor charge-transfer exciton intermediates dominate at shorter distances or higher tunneling energy gaps, whereas virtual intermediates with an electron and a hole both on the bridge (virtual bridge excitons) dominate for longer distances or lower energy gaps. The effects of virtual bridge excitons were neglected in earlier treatments. The two-particle pathway framework developed here shows how Dexter energy-transfer rates depend on donor, bridge, and acceptor energetics, as well as on orbital symmetry and quantum interference among pathways.

  14. Pathways to Prosperity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symonds, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Symonds, director of the Pathways to Prosperity Project, asserts that the current U.S. system of preparing students for successful adult lives fails too many youth. Citing data showing that only 40 percent of young Americans earn an associate's or bachelor's degree by age 27--and that many employers say they see candidates who don't have…

  15. Survival Strategies in the Aquatic and Terrestrial World: The Impact of Second Messengers on Cyanobacterial Processes

    PubMed Central

    Agostoni, Marco; Montgomery, Beronda L.

    2014-01-01

    Second messengers are intracellular substances regulated by specific external stimuli globally known as first messengers. Cells rely on second messengers to generate rapid responses to environmental changes and the importance of their roles is becoming increasingly realized in cellular signaling research. Cyanobacteria are photooxygenic bacteria that inhabit most of Earth’s environments. The ability of cyanobacteria to survive in ecologically diverse habitats is due to their capacity to adapt and respond to environmental changes. This article reviews known second messenger-controlled physiological processes in cyanobacteria. Second messengers used in these systems include the element calcium (Ca2+), nucleotide-based guanosine tetraphosphate or pentaphosphate (ppGpp or pppGpp, represented as (p)ppGpp), cyclic adenosine 3’,5’-monophosphate (cAMP), cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP), cyclic guanosine 3’,5’-monophosphate (cGMP), and cyclic dimeric AMP (c-di-AMP), and the gaseous nitric oxide (NO). The discussion focuses on processes central to cyanobacteria, such as nitrogen fixation, light perception, photosynthesis-related processes, and gliding motility. In addition, we address future research trajectories needed to better understand the signaling networks and cross talk in the signaling pathways of these molecules in cyanobacteria. Second messengers have significant potential to be adapted as technological tools and we highlight possible novel and practical applications based on our understanding of these molecules and the signaling networks that they control. PMID:25411927

  16. Survival strategies in the aquatic and terrestrial world: the impact of second messengers on cyanobacterial processes.

    PubMed

    Agostoni, Marco; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2014-01-01

    Second messengers are intracellular substances regulated by specific external stimuli globally known as first messengers. Cells rely on second messengers to generate rapid responses to environmental changes and the importance of their roles is becoming increasingly realized in cellular signaling research. Cyanobacteria are photooxygenic bacteria that inhabit most of Earth's environments. The ability of cyanobacteria to survive in ecologically diverse habitats is due to their capacity to adapt and respond to environmental changes. This article reviews known second messenger-controlled physiological processes in cyanobacteria. Second messengers used in these systems include the element calcium (Ca2+), nucleotide-based guanosine tetraphosphate or pentaphosphate (ppGpp or pppGpp, represented as (p)ppGpp), cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP), cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP), and cyclic dimeric AMP (c-di-AMP), and the gaseous nitric oxide (NO). The discussion focuses on processes central to cyanobacteria, such as nitrogen fixation, light perception, photosynthesis-related processes, and gliding motility. In addition, we address future research trajectories needed to better understand the signaling networks and cross talk in the signaling pathways of these molecules in cyanobacteria. Second messengers have significant potential to be adapted as technological tools and we highlight possible novel and practical applications based on our understanding of these molecules and the signaling networks that they control.

  17. Role of CNPase in the oligodendrocytic extracellular 2',3'-cAMP-adenosine pathway.

    PubMed

    Verrier, Jonathan D; Jackson, Travis C; Gillespie, Delbert G; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Bansal, Rashmi; Goebbels, Sandra; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Kochanek, Patrick M; Jackson, Edwin K

    2013-10-01

    Extracellular adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (3',5'-cAMP) is an endogenous source of localized adenosine production in many organs. Recent studies suggest that extracellular 2',3'-cAMP (positional isomer of 3',5'-cAMP) is also a source of adenosine, particularly in the brain in vivo post-injury. Moreover, in vitro studies show that both microglia and astrocytes can convert extracellular 2',3'-cAMP to adenosine. Here, we examined the ability of primary mouse oligodendrocytes and neurons to metabolize extracellular 2',3'-cAMP and their respective adenosine monophosphates (2'-AMP and 3'-AMP). Cells were also isolated from mice deficient in 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide-3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase). Oligodendrocytes metabolized 2',3'-cAMP to 2'-AMP with 10-fold greater efficiency than did neurons (and also more than previously examined microglia and astrocytes); whereas, the production of 3'-AMP was minimal in both oligodendrocytes and neurons. The production of 2'-AMP from 2',3'-cAMP was reduced by 65% in CNPase -/- versus CNPase +/+ oligodendrocytes. Oligodendrocytes also converted 2'-AMP to adenosine, and this was also attenuated in CNPase -/- oligodendrocytes. Inhibition of classic 3',5'-cAMP-3'-phosphodiesterases with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine did not block metabolism of 2',3'-cAMP to 2'-AMP and inhibition of classic ecto-5'-nucleotidase (CD73) with α,β-methylene-adenosine-5'-diphosphate did not attenuate the conversion of 2'-AMP to adenosine. These studies demonstrate that oligodendrocytes express the extracellular 2',3'-cAMP-adenosine pathway (2',3'-cAMP → 2'-AMP → adenosine). This pathway is more robustly expressed in oligodendrocytes than in all other CNS cell types because CNPase is the predominant enzyme that metabolizes 2',3'-cAMP to 2-AMP in CNS cells. By reducing levels of 2',3'-cAMP (a mitochondrial toxin) and increasing levels of adenosine (a neuroprotectant), oligodendrocytes may protect axons from injury. PMID:23922219

  18. Lactoferrin Promotes Early Neurodevelopment and Cognition in Postnatal Piglets by Upregulating the BDNF Signaling Pathway and Polysialylation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Zheng, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Xi; Shi, Yujie; Tian, Dandan; Zhao, Fengjuan; Liu, Ni; Hüppi, Petra S; Troy, Frederic A; Wang, Bing

    2015-08-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf) is a sialic acid (Sia)-rich, iron-binding milk glycoprotein that has multifunctional health benefits. Its potential role in neurodevelopment and cognition remains unknown. To test the hypothesis that Lf may function to improve neurodevelopment and cognition, the diet of postnatal piglets was supplemented with Lf from days 3 to 38. Expression levels of selected genes and their cognate protein profiles were quantitatively determined. The importance of our new findings is that Lf (1) upregulated several canonical signaling pathways associated with neurodevelopment and cognition; (2) influenced ~10 genes involved in the brain-derived neurotrophin factor (BDNF) signaling pathway in the hippocampus and upregulated the expression of polysialic acid, a marker of neuroplasticity, cell migration and differentiation of progenitor cells, and the growth and targeting of axons; (3) upregulated transcriptional and translational levels of BDNF and increased phosphorylation of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element-binding protein, CREB, a downstream target of the BDNF signaling pathway, and a protein of crucial importance in neurodevelopment and cognition; and (4) enhanced the cognitive function and learning of piglets when tested in an eight-arm radial maze. The finding that Lf can improve neural development and cognition in postnatal piglets has not been previously described.

  19. Lactoferrin Promotes Early Neurodevelopment and Cognition in Postnatal Piglets by Upregulating the BDNF Signaling Pathway and Polysialylation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Zheng, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Xi; Shi, Yujie; Tian, Dandan; Zhao, Fengjuan; Liu, Ni; Hüppi, Petra S; Troy, Frederic A; Wang, Bing

    2015-08-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf) is a sialic acid (Sia)-rich, iron-binding milk glycoprotein that has multifunctional health benefits. Its potential role in neurodevelopment and cognition remains unknown. To test the hypothesis that Lf may function to improve neurodevelopment and cognition, the diet of postnatal piglets was supplemented with Lf from days 3 to 38. Expression levels of selected genes and their cognate protein profiles were quantitatively determined. The importance of our new findings is that Lf (1) upregulated several canonical signaling pathways associated with neurodevelopment and cognition; (2) influenced ~10 genes involved in the brain-derived neurotrophin factor (BDNF) signaling pathway in the hippocampus and upregulated the expression of polysialic acid, a marker of neuroplasticity, cell migration and differentiation of progenitor cells, and the growth and targeting of axons; (3) upregulated transcriptional and translational levels of BDNF and increased phosphorylation of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element-binding protein, CREB, a downstream target of the BDNF signaling pathway, and a protein of crucial importance in neurodevelopment and cognition; and (4) enhanced the cognitive function and learning of piglets when tested in an eight-arm radial maze. The finding that Lf can improve neural development and cognition in postnatal piglets has not been previously described. PMID:25146846

  20. Caloric restriction protects against electrical kindling of the amygdala by inhibiting the mTOR signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Phillips-Farfán, Bryan V; Rubio Osornio, María Del Carmen; Custodio Ramírez, Verónica; Paz Tres, Carlos; Carvajal Aguilera, Karla G

    2015-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to possess antiepileptic properties; however its mechanism of action is poorly understood. CR might inhibit the activity of the mammalian or mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling cascade, which seems to participate crucially in the generation of epilepsy. Thus, we investigated the effect of CR on the mTOR pathway and whether CR modified epilepsy generation due to electrical amygdala kindling. The former was studied by analyzing the phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, protein kinase B and the ribosomal protein S6. The mTOR cascade is regulated by energy and by insulin levels, both of which may be changed by CR; thus we investigated if CR altered the levels of energy substrates in the blood or the level of insulin in plasma. Finally, we studied if CR modified the expression of genes that encode proteins participating in the mTOR pathway. CR increased the after-discharge threshold and tended to reduce the after-discharge duration, indicating an anti-convulsive action. CR diminished the phosphorylation of protein kinase B and ribosomal protein S6, suggesting an inhibition of the mTOR cascade. However, CR did not change glucose, β-hydroxybutyrate or insulin levels; thus the effects of CR were independent from them. Interestingly, CR also did not modify the expression of any investigated gene. The results suggest that the anti-epileptic effect of CR may be partly due to inhibition of the mTOR pathway.

  1. TAK-063, a PDE10A Inhibitor with Balanced Activation of Direct and Indirect Pathways, Provides Potent Antipsychotic-Like Effects in Multiple Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kazunori; Harada, Akina; Suzuki, Hirobumi; Miyamoto, Maki; Kimura, Haruhide

    2016-08-01

    Phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) inhibitors are expected to be novel drugs for schizophrenia through activation of both direct and indirect pathway medium spiny neurons. However, excess activation of the direct pathway by a dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF82958 canceled antipsychotic-like effects of a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist haloperidol in methamphetamine (METH)-induced hyperactivity in rats. Thus, balanced activation of these pathways may be critical for PDE10A inhibitors. Current antipsychotics and the novel PDE10A inhibitor TAK-063, but not the selective PDE10A inhibitor MP-10, produced dose-dependent antipsychotic-like effects in METH-induced hyperactivity and prepulse inhibition in rodents. TAK-063 and MP-10 activated the indirect pathway to a similar extent; however, MP-10 caused greater activation of the direct pathway than did TAK-063. Interestingly, the off-rate of TAK-063 from PDE10A in rat brain sections was faster than that of MP-10, and a slower off-rate PDE10A inhibitor with TAK-063-like chemical structure showed an MP-10-like pharmacological profile. In general, faster off-rate enzyme inhibitors are more sensitive than slower off-rate inhibitors to binding inhibition by enzyme substrates. As expected, TAK-063 was more sensitive than MP-10 to binding inhibition by cyclic nucleotides. Moreover, an immunohistochemistry study suggested that cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels in the direct pathway were higher than those in the indirect pathway. These data can explain why TAK-063 showed partial activation of the direct pathway compared with MP-10. The findings presented here suggest that TAK-063's antipsychotic-like efficacy may be attributable to its unique pharmacological properties, resulting in balanced activation of the direct and indirect striatal pathways. PMID:26849714

  2. 3,3'-Diindolylmethane attenuates cardiac H9c2 cell hypertrophy through 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase-α.

    PubMed

    Zong, Jing; Wu, Qing-Qing; Zhou, Heng; Zhang, Jie-Yu; Yuan, Yuan; Bian, Zhou-Yan; Deng, Wei; Dai, Jia; Li, Fang-Fang; Xu, Man; Fang, Yi; Tang, Qi-Zhu

    2015-07-01

    3,3'-Diindolylmethane (DIM) is the major product of the acid-catalyzed condensation of indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a component of extracts of Brassica food plants. Numerous studies have suggested that DIM has several beneficial biological activities, including elimination of free radicals, antioxidant and anti-angiogenic effects and activation of apoptosis of various tumor cells. In the present study, an in vitro model was established, using 1 µM angiotensin II (Ang II) in cultured rat cardiac H9c2 cells, to observe the effects of DIM on cardiac hypertrophy. Following 24 h stimulation with DIM (1, 5, and 10 µM) with or without Ang II, cells were characterized by immunofluorescence to analyze cardiac α-actinin expression. Cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and molecular markers of cardiac hypertrophy were assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Atrial natriuretic peptide, brain natriuretic peptide and myosin heavy chain β mRNA expression were induced by Ang II in H9c2 cells treated with the optimal concentration of DIM for 6, 12, and 24 h. The levels of phosphorylated and total proteins of the 5' AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways in H9c2 cells treated with DIM for 0, 15, 30, and 60 min induced by Ang II were determined by western blot analysis. The results showed that DIM attenuated cellular hypertrophy in vitro, enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPKα and inhibited the MAPK‑mTOR signaling pathway in response to hypertrophic stimuli. PMID:25816057

  3. PREX2 promotes the proliferation, invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer cells by modulating the PI3K signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianyi; Gong, Xuejun; Ouyang, Lu; He, Wen; Xiao, Rou; Tan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent Rac exchanger factor 2 (PREX2) is a novel regulator of the small guanosine triphosphatase Rac, and has been observed to be implicated in human cancer by inhibiting the activity of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), thus upregulating the activity of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway. However, the exact role of PREX2 in pancreatic cancer has not been reported to date. In the present study, the expression levels of PREX2 were observed to be frequently increased in pancreatic cancer specimens compared with those in their matched adjacent normal tissues. In addition, PREX2 expression was also frequently upregulated in several pancreatic cancer cell lines, including AsPC-1, BxPC-3, PANC-1 and CFAPC-1, compared with that in the normal pancreatic epithelial cell line HPC-Y5. Overexpression of PREX2 significantly promoted the proliferation, invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer PANC-1 cells, while small interfering RNA-induced knockdown of PREX2 expression significantly inhibited the proliferation, invasion and migration of these cells. Investigation of the molecular mechanism revealed that the overexpression of PREX2 upregulated the phosphorylation levels of PTEN, indicating that the activity of PTEN was reduced, which further increased the phosphorylation levels of AKT, which indicated that the activity of the PI3K signaling pathway was upregulated. By contrast, knockdown of PREX2 upregulated the activity of PTEN and inhibited the activity of the PI3K signaling pathway. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that PREX2 regulates the proliferation, invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer cells, probably at least via modulation of the activity of PTEN and the PI3K signaling pathway. PMID:27446408

  4. AIP Career Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchak, Amanda

    2012-02-01

    American Institute of Physics (AIP) Career Pathways is a new project funded by the National Science Foundation. One of the goals of AIP Career Pathways is to prepare students to compete for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) careers with a bachelor's degree in physics. In order to do so, I reviewed and compiled useful resources on finding a STEM career with a bachelor's degree in physics. These resources not only supply the job seeker with job postings in STEM careers but also provide them with information on resumes, interviewing skills, and networking. Recently at the 2011 Industrial Physics Forum, I interviewed companies in the private sector to obtain a unique perspective on what types of skills potential employers expect an applicant to posses with a bachelor's degree in physics. Ultimately, these components will be used as supplements at student career workshops held at annual Society of Physics Students Zone Meetings.

  5. Molecular pathways in dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Bragg, D. Cristopher; Armata, Ioanna A.; Nery, Flavia C.; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Sharma, Nutan

    2011-01-01

    The hereditary dystonias comprise a set of diseases defined by a common constellation of motor deficits. These disorders are most likely associated with different molecular etiologies, many of which have yet to be elucidated. Here we discuss recent advances in three forms of hereditary dystonia, DYT1, DYT6 and DYT16, which share a similar clinical picture: onset in childhood or adolescence, progressive spread of symptoms with generalized involvement of body regions and a steady state affliction without treatment. Unlike DYT1, the genes responsible for DYT6 and DYT16 have only recently been identified, with relatively little information about the function of the encoded proteins. Nevertheless, recent data suggest that these proteins may fit together within interacting pathways involved in dopaminergic signaling, transcriptional regulation, and cellular stress responses. This review focuses on these molecular pathways, highlighting potential common themes among these dystonias which may serve as areas for future research. PMID:21134457

  6. Pathways of tau fibrillization.

    PubMed

    Kuret, Jeff; Chirita, Carmen N; Congdon, Erin E; Kannanayakal, Theresa; Li, Guibin; Necula, Mihaela; Yin, Haishan; Zhong, Qi

    2005-01-01

    New methods for analyzing tau fibrillization have yielded insights into the biochemical transitions involved in the process. Here we review the parallels between the sequential progression of tau fibrillization observed macroscopically in Alzheimer's disease (AD) lesions and the pathway of tau aggregation observed in vitro with purified tau preparations. In addition, pharmacological agents for further dissection of fibrillization mechanism and lesion formation are discussed. PMID:15615636

  7. Physiology of central pathways.

    PubMed

    Cullen, K E

    2016-01-01

    The relative simplicity of the neural circuits that mediate vestibular reflexes is well suited for linking systems and cellular levels of analyses. Notably, a distinctive feature of the vestibular system is that neurons at the first central stage of sensory processing in the vestibular nuclei are premotor neurons; the same neurons that receive vestibular-nerve input also send direct projections to motor pathways. For example, the simplicity of the three-neuron pathway that mediates the vestibulo-ocular reflex leads to the generation of compensatory eye movements within ~5ms of a head movement. Similarly, relatively direct pathways between the labyrinth and spinal cord control vestibulospinal reflexes. A second distinctive feature of the vestibular system is that the first stage of central processing is strongly multimodal. This is because the vestibular nuclei receive inputs from a wide range of cortical, cerebellar, and other brainstem structures in addition to direct inputs from the vestibular nerve. Recent studies in alert animals have established how extravestibular signals shape these "simple" reflexes to meet the needs of current behavioral goal. Moreover, multimodal interactions at higher levels, such as the vestibular cerebellum, thalamus, and cortex, play a vital role in ensuring accurate self-motion and spatial orientation perception. PMID:27638060

  8. UV-light-induced hydrogen transfer in guanosine-guanosine aggregates.

    PubMed

    Hunger, Katharina; Buschhaus, Laura; Biemann, Lars; Braun, Michaela; Kovalenko, Sergey; Improta, Roberto; Kleinermanns, Karl

    2013-04-22

    Aggregates of a lipophilic guanine (G) derivative have been studied in n-hexane by femtosecond-to-microsecond UV-visible broadband transient absorption, stationary infrared and UV-visible spectroscopy and by quantum chemical calculations. We report the first time-resolved spectroscopic detection of hydrogen transfer in GG aggregates, which leads to (G-H)(·) radicals by means of G(+)G(-) charge transfer followed by proton transfer. These radicals show a characteristic electronic spectrum in the range 300-550 nm. The calculated superimposed spectrum of the species that result from NH⋅⋅⋅N proton transfer agrees best with the experimental spectrum.

  9. Pathway and Resource Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, M. F.

    2009-11-16

    This presentation provides information about hydrogen pathway analysis, which is analysis of the total levelized cost (including return on investment). Well-to-wheels (WTW) energy use, and WTW emissions for hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways.

  10. A tyrosine-phosphorylated 55-kilodalton motility-associated bovine sperm protein is regulated by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphates and calcium.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, S; Trautman, K D; Goueli, S A; Carr, D W

    1997-06-01

    Sperm motility is regulated by protein phosphorylation. We have recently shown that a serine/threonine phosphatase system is involved in motility regulation. Two of the components of the phosphatase system, GSK-3 and PP1gamma2, are regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation. During our investigation of sperm tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins we discovered a 55-kDa protein whose tyrosine phosphorylation correlates closely to the motility state of sperm. This protein is tyrosine phosphorylated to a much higher degree in motile caudal than in immotile caput epididymal sperm. Motility inhibition of caudal epididymal sperm by protein kinase A (PKA) anchoring inhibition or by ionomycin-induced calcium overload led to the virtual disappearance of tyrosine phosphorylation of the 55-kDa protein. Conversely, treatment of sperm with motility activators, isobutylmethylxanthine or 8-bromo-cAMP, resulted in increased tyrosine phosphorylation of the protein. The protein was present in the soluble 100 000 x g supernatants of sperm extracts and was heat labile. Chromatography through diethylaminoethyl-cellulose and Western blot analysis showed that this 55-kDa protein is not a regulatory subunit of PKA or alpha-tubulin. Our results represent the identification of a soluble protein whose tyrosine phosphorylation varies directly with motility and suggest that motility regulation may involve cross talk between PKA, calcium, and tyrosine kinase pathways. PMID:9166697

  11. Killer Cell Lectin-like Receptor G1 Inhibits NK Cell Function through Activation of Adenosine 5'-Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase.

    PubMed

    Müller-Durovic, Bojana; Lanna, Alessio; Polaco Covre, Luciana; Mills, Rachel S; Henson, Sian M; Akbar, Arne N

    2016-10-01

    NK cells are the first line of defense against infected and transformed cells. Defective NK cell activity was shown to increase susceptibility for viral infections and reduce tumor immune-surveillance. With age, the incidence of infectious diseases and malignancy rises dramatically, suggesting that impaired NK cell function might contribute to disease in these individuals. We found an increased frequency of NK cells with high expression of the inhibitory killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 (KLRG1) in individuals >70 y. The role of KLRG1 in ageing is not known, and the mechanism of KLRG1-induced inhibition of NK cell function is not fully understood. We report that NK cells with high KLRG1 expression spontaneously activate the metabolic sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and that activation of AMPK negatively regulates NK cell function. Pre-existing AMPK activity is further amplified by ligation of KLRG1 in these cells, which leads to internalization of the receptor and allows interaction with AMPK. We show that KLRG1 activates AMPK by preventing its inhibitory dephosphorylation by protein phosphatase-2C rather than inducing de novo kinase activation. Finally, inhibition of KLRG1 or AMPK prevented KLRG1-induced activation of AMPK and reductions in NK cell cytotoxicity, cytokine secretion, proliferation, and telomerase expression. This novel signaling pathway links metabolic sensing, effector function, and cell differentiation with inhibitory receptor signaling that may be exploited to enhance NK cell activity during ageing.

  12. Pathways with PathWhiz

    PubMed Central

    Pon, Allison; Jewison, Timothy; Su, Yilu; Liang, Yongjie; Knox, Craig; Maciejewski, Adam; Wilson, Michael; Wishart, David S.

    2015-01-01

    PathWhiz (http://smpdb.ca/pathwhiz) is a web server designed to create colourful, visually pleasing and biologically accurate pathway diagrams that are both machine-readable and interactive. As a web server, PathWhiz is accessible from almost any place and compatible with essentially any operating system. It also houses a public library of pathways and pathway components that can be easily viewed and expanded upon by its users. PathWhiz allows users to readily generate biologically complex pathways by using a specially designed drawing palette to quickly render metabolites (including automated structure generation), proteins (including quaternary structures, covalent modifications and cofactors), nucleic acids, membranes, subcellular structures, cells, tissues and organs. Both small-molecule and protein/gene pathways can be constructed by combining multiple pathway processes such as reactions, interactions, binding events and transport activities. PathWhiz's pathway replication and propagation functions allow for existing pathways to be used to create new pathways or for existing pathways to be automatically propagated across species. PathWhiz pathways can be saved in BioPAX, SBGN-ML and SBML data exchange formats, as well as PNG, PWML, HTML image map or SVG images that can be viewed offline or explored using PathWhiz's interactive viewer. PathWhiz has been used to generate over 700 pathway diagrams for a number of popular databases including HMDB, DrugBank and SMPDB. PMID:25934797

  13. Career pathways in research: pharmaceutical.

    PubMed

    Kenkre, J E; Foxcroft, D R

    The pharmaceutical pathway is the final article in this series on career pathways and highlights opportunities for nurses within associated industries. This pathway shows that nurses can use their nursing qualifications, combined with their knowledge, skills and expertise, to develop a career within another sphere of employment.

  14. Parathyroid hormone induces transcription of collagenase in rat osteoblastic cells by a mechanism using cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and requiring protein synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, D. K.; Brakenhoff, K. D.; Clohisy, J. C.; Quinn, C. O.; Partridge, N. C.

    1992-01-01

    Collagenase is synthesized and secreted by rat osteoblastic cells in response to PTH. We have previously demonstrated that this effect involves a substantial increase in collagenase mRNA via transcription. Northern blots and nuclear run-on assays were performed to further investigate the induction of collagenase by PTH in the rat osteoblastic cell line UMR 106-01. Detectable amounts of collagenase mRNA were not apparent until 2 h of PTH treatment, showed the greatest abundance at 4 h, and declined to approximately 30% of maximum by 8 h. The changes in the rate of transcription of the collagenase gene in response to PTH paralleled and preceded the changes in the steady state mRNA levels. After an initial lag period of about 1 h, collagenase transcription rates increased from very low levels to a maximal response at 2 h, returning to about 50% of maximum by 10 h. The increased transcriptional rate of the collagenase gene was found to be dependent on the concentration of PTH, with a half-maximal response at approximately 7 x 10(-10) M rat PTH-(1-34) and a maximal effect with a dose of 10(-8) M. The PTH-mediated induction of collagenase transcriptional activity was completely abolished by cycloheximide, while transcription of the beta-actin gene was unaffected by the translation inhibitor. These data suggest that a protein factor(s) is required for PTH-mediated transcriptional induction of collagenase. Since PTH increases intracellular levels of several potential second messengers, agents that mimic these substances were employed to determine which signal transduction pathway is predominant in the PTH-mediated stimulation of collagenase transcription.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  15. Improving carbon fixation pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Ducat, DC; Silver, PA

    2012-08-01

    A recent resurgence in basic and applied research on photosynthesis has been driven in part by recognition that fulfilling future food and energy requirements will necessitate improvements in crop carbon-fixation efficiencies. Photosynthesis in traditional terrestrial crops is being reexamined in light of molecular strategies employed by photosynthetic microbes to enhance the activity of the Calvin cycle. Synthetic biology is well-situated to provide original approaches for compartmentalizing and enhancing photosynthetic reactions in a species independent manner. Furthermore, the elucidation of alternative carbon-fixation routes distinct from the Calvin cycle raises possibilities that novel pathways and organisms can be utilized to fix atmospheric carbon dioxide into useful materials.

  16. Developmental pathways in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Fred E.; Angus, C. William; Partis, William J.; Sigounas, George

    2012-01-01

    A hallmark of cancer is reactivation/alteration of pathways that control cellular differentiation during developmental processes. Evidence indicates that WNT, Notch, BMP and Hedgehog pathways have a role in normal epithelial cell differentiation, and that alterations in these pathways accompany establishment of the tumorigenic state. Interestin