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Sample records for guanosine monophosphate signaling

  1. Switching direction in electric-signal-induced cell migration by cyclic guanosine monophosphate and phosphatidylinositol signaling.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masayuki J; Kuwayama, Hidekazu; van Egmond, Wouter N; Takayama, Airi L K; Takagi, Hiroaki; van Haastert, Peter J M; Yanagida, Toshio; Ueda, Masahiro

    2009-04-21

    Switching between attractive and repulsive migration in cell movement in response to extracellular guidance cues has been found in various cell types and is an important cellular function for translocation during cellular and developmental processes. Here we show that the preferential direction of migration during electrotaxis in Dictyostelium cells can be reversed by genetically modulating both guanylyl cyclases (GCases) and the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-binding protein C (GbpC) in combination with the inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinases (PI3Ks). The PI3K-dependent pathway is involved in cathode-directed migration under a direct-current electric field. The catalytic domains of soluble GCase (sGC) and GbpC also mediate cathode-directed signaling via cGMP, whereas the N-terminal domain of sGC mediates anode-directed signaling in conjunction with both the inhibition of PI3Ks and cGMP production. These observations provide an identification of the genes required for directional switching in electrotaxis and suggest that a parallel processing of electric signals, in which multiple-signaling pathways act to bias cell movement toward the cathode or anode, is used to determine the direction of migration.

  2. Disrupted pulmonary artery cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling in mice with hyperoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keng Jin; Berkelhamer, Sara K; Kim, Gina A; Taylor, Joann M; O'Shea, Kelly M; Steinhorn, Robin H; Farrow, Kathryn N

    2014-02-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) occurs in 25 to 35% of premature infants with significant bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Neonatal mice exposed to 14 days of hyperoxia develop BPD-like lung injury and PH. To determinne the impact of hyperoxia on pulmonary artery (PA) cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling in a murine model of lung injury and PH, neonatal C57BL/6 mice were placed in room air, 75% O2 for 14 days (chronic hyperoxia [CH]) or 75% O2 for 24 hours, followed by 13 days of room air (acute hyperoxia with recovery [AHR]) with or without sildenafil. At 14 days, mean alveolar area, PA medial wall thickness (MWT), right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH), and vessel density were assessed. PA protein was analyzed for cGMP, soluble guanylate cyclase, and PDE5 activity. CH and AHR mice had RVH, but only CH mice had increased alveolar area and MWT and decreased vessel density. In CH and AHR PAs, soluble guanylate cyclase activity was decreased, and PDE5 activity was increased. In CH mice, sildenafil attenuated MWT and RVH but did not improve mean alveolar area or vessel density. In CH and AHR PAs, sildenafil decreased PDE5 activity and increased cGMP. Our results indicate that prolonged hyperoxia leads to lung injury, PH, RVH, and disrupted PA cGMP signaling. Furthermore, 24 hours of hyperoxia causes RVH and disrupted PA cGMP signaling that persists for 13 days. Sildenafil reduced RVH and restored vascular cGMP signaling but did not attenuate lung injury. Thus, hyperoxia can rapidly disrupt PA cGMP signaling in vivo with sustained effects, and concurrent sildenafil therapy can be protective.

  3. Analysis of nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling during metamorphosis of the nudibranch Phestilla sibogae Bergh (Gastropoda: Opisthobranchia)

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Cory D.; Pires, Anthony; Norby, Shong-Wan; Boudko, Dmitri; Moroz, Leonid L.; Hadfield, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The gas nitric oxide (NO), and in some cases its downstream second messenger, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) function in different taxa to regulate the timing of life-history transitions. Increased taxonomic sampling is required to foster conclusions about the evolution and function of NO/cGMP signaling during life-history transitions. We report on the function and localization of NO and cGMP signaling during metamorphosis of the nudibranch Phestilla sibogae. Pharmacological manipulation of NO or cGMP production in larvae modulated responses to a natural settlement cue from the coral Porites compressa in a manner that suggest inhibitory function for NO/cGMP signaling. However, these treatments were not sufficient to induce metamorphosis in the absence of cue, a result unique to this animal. We show that induction of metamorphosis in response to the settlement cue is associated with a reduction in NO production. We documented the expression of putative NO synthase (NOS) and the production of cGMP during larval development and observed no larval cells in which NOS and cGMP were both detected. The production of cGMP in a bilaterally symmetrical group of cells fated to occupy the distal tip of rhinophores is correlated with competence to respond to the coral settlement cue. These results suggest that endogenous NO and cGMP are involved in modulating responses of P. sibogae to a natural settlement cue. We discuss these results with respect to habitat selection and larval ecology. PMID:18460091

  4. Nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling in the central complex of the grasshopper brain inhibits singing behavior.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Beate; Kunst, Michael; Günther, Cornelia; Ganter, Geoffrey K; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard; Elsner, Norbert; Heinrich, Ralf

    2005-07-25

    Grasshopper sound production, in the context of mate finding, courtship, and rivalry, is controlled by the central body complex in the protocerebrum. Stimulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the central complex has been demonstrated to stimulate specific singing in various grasshoppers including the species Chorthippus biguttulus. Sound production elicited by stimulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the central complex is inhibited by co-applications of various drugs activating the nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling pathway. The nitric oxide-donor sodium nitroprusside caused a reversible suppression of muscarine-stimulated sound production that could be blocked by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ), which prevents the formation of cGMP by specifically inhibiting soluble guanylyl cyclase. Furthermore, injections of both the membrane-permeable cGMP analog 8-Br-cGMP and the specific inhibitor of the cGMP-degrading phosphodiesterase Zaprinast reversibly inhibited singing. To identify putative sources of nitric oxide, brains of Ch. biguttulus were subjected to both nitric oxide synthase immunocytochemistry and NADPH-diaphorase staining. Among other areas known to express nitric oxide synthase, both procedures consistently labeled peripheral layers in the upper division of the central body complex, suggesting that neurons supplying this neuropil contain nitric oxide synthase and may generate nitric oxide upon activation. Exposure of dissected brains to nitric oxide and 3-(5'hydroxymethyl-2'-furyl)-1-benzyl indazole (YC-1) induced cGMP-associated immunoreactivity in both the upper and lower division. Therefore, both the morphological and pharmacological data presented in this study strongly suggest a contribution of the nitric oxide/cGMP signaling pathway to the central control of grasshopper sound production.

  5. Chlorine dioxide oxidation of guanosine 5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Michael J; Stewart, David J; Margerum, Dale W

    2006-11-01

    The reactions between aqueous ClO2 and guanosine 5'-monophosphate (5'-GMP) are investigated from pH 5.96 to 8.30. The decay of ClO2 follows mixed first-order and second-order kinetics. The addition of chlorite (0.01-0.05 M) to the reaction mixture suppresses the reaction rate and changes the observed decay of ClO2 to second-order. The reaction rates increase greatly with pH to give oxidized products. The second-order rate constant for the guanosine anion is 4.7 x 10(5 )M-1 s-1 and comprises a mixture of rate constants, k1k2/k-1. The ratio k1/k-1, with a calculated value of 2.4 x 10(-4), corresponds to the reversible reaction between ClO2 and the guanosine anion to generate ClO2- and the guanosyl radical. To determine k1/k-1 and k2, E values for guanosine and ClO2 are used as well as acid dissociation constants for guanosine and its radical. The value of k1 (1.1 x 10(5) M-1 s-1) represents the reaction between ClO2 and the guanosine anion as determined by initial rates. The second-order rate constant k2, with a value of 1.8 x 10(9 )M-1 s-1, represents the reaction between the guanosyl radical with a second molecule of ClO2 to generate a guanosyl-OClO adduct. The consumption of two mol of ClO2 per mol of 5'-GMP corresponds to a four-electron oxidation that gives ClO(2- )in the first step and HOCl in the second step. The 2',3',5'-tri-O-acetylated derivative of guanosine is used to more easily separate guanosine from its ClO2 oxidation products. Imidazolone and monochlorinated imidazolone are identified as products of the reaction between ClO2 and guanosine.

  6. Cis-2-dodecenoic acid receptor RpfR links quorum-sensing signal perception with regulation of virulence through cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate turnover.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yinyue; Schmid, Nadine; Wang, Chao; Wang, Jianhe; Pessi, Gabriella; Wu, Donghui; Lee, Jasmine; Aguilar, Claudio; Ahrens, Christian H; Chang, Changqing; Song, Haiwei; Eberl, Leo; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2012-09-18

    Many bacterial pathogens produce diffusible signal factor (DSF)-type quorum sensing (QS) signals in modulation of virulence and biofilm formation. Previous work on Xanthomonas campestris showed that the RpfC/RpfG two-component system is involved in sensing and responding to DSF signals, but little is known in other microorganisms. Here we show that in Burkholderia cenocepacia the DSF-family signal cis-2-dodecenoic acid (BDSF) negatively controls the intracellular cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) level through a receptor protein RpfR, which contains Per/Arnt/Sim (PAS)-GGDEF-EAL domains. RpfR regulates the same phenotypes as BDSF including swarming motility, biofilm formation, and virulence. In addition, the BDSF(-) mutant phenotypes could be rescued by in trans expression of RpfR, or its EAL domain that functions as a c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase. BDSF is shown to bind to the PAS domain of RpfR with high affinity and stimulates its phosphodiesterase activity through induction of allosteric conformational changes. Our work presents a unique and widely conserved DSF-family signal receptor that directly links the signal perception to c-di-GMP turnover in regulation of bacterial physiology.

  7. Fluoroquinolones as potential photochemotherapeutic agents: covalent addition to guanosine monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Fasani, Elisa; Manet, Ilse; Capobianco, Massimo L; Monti, Sandra; Pretali, Luca; Albini, Angelo

    2010-08-21

    The triplet aryl cation photochemically generated from fluoroquinolones bearing a fluoro atom at position 8 attacks guanosine monophosphate (k(r) > 10(9) M(-1)s(-1)) and forms covalent adducts. The reaction is a model for the implementation of oxygen-independent photochemotherapy.

  8. Protection of Nrf2 against arsenite-induced oxidative damage is regulated by the cyclic guanosine monophosphate-protein kinase G signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chengzhi; Jiang, Xuejun; Gu, Shiyan; Lai, Yanhao; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Zunzhen

    2016-10-24

    Arsenite has been shown to induce a variety of oxidative damage in mammalian cells. However, the mechanisms underlying cellular responses to its adverse effects remain unknown. We previously showed that the level of Nrf2, a nuclear transcription factor significantly increased in arsenite-treated human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells suggesting that Nrf2 is involved in responding to arsenite-induced oxidative damage. To explore how Nrf2 can impact arsenite-induced oxidative damage, in this study, we examined Nrf2 activation and its regulation upon cellular arsenite exposure as well as its effects on arsenite-induced oxidative damage in HBE cells. We found that Nrf2 mRNA and protein levels were significantly increased by arsenite in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, we showed that over-expression of Nrf2 significantly reduced the level of arsenite-induced oxidative damage in HBE cells including DNA damage, chromosomal breakage, lipid peroxidation and depletion of antioxidants. This indicates a protective role of Nrf2 against arsenite toxicity. This was further supported by the fact that activation of Nrf2 by its agonists, tertiary butylhydroquinone (t-BHQ) and sulforaphane (SFN) resulted in the same protective effects against arsenite toxicity. Moreover, we demonstrated that arsenite-induced activation of Nrf2 was mediated by the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-protein kinase G (PKG) signaling pathway. This is the first evidence showing that Nrf2 protects against arsenite-induced oxidative damage through the cGMP-PKG pathway. Our study suggests that activation of Nrf2 through the cGMP-PKG signaling pathway in HBE cells may be developed as a new strategy for prevention of arsenite toxicity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol, 2016.

  9. Defective cyclic guanosine monophosphate-gated calcium channels and the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Roddie C; Oda, Yuko; Szepietowski, Jacek C; Behne, Martin J; Mauro, Theodora

    2003-01-01

    A positive association between intake of calcium channel blockers and psoriasis has been observed recently. Intake of blockers of voltage-gated calcium ion channels is associated with outbreaks of psoriasis after a latent period in patients with and without a previous family history of psoriasis. This suggests that interfering with calcium influx may trigger psoriasis. Calcium influx also occurs via cyclic guanosine monophosphate-gated channels; human keratinocytes contain functional and non-functional (splice variants) versions of these channels. We show here that keratinocytes and skin from psoriatic individuals express higher levels of mRNA encoding a non-functional cyclic guanosine monophosphate-gated calcium channel and that high expression of the splice variant by transfection of cells in culture leads to loss of protein expression for the functional cyclic guanosine monophosphate-gated Ca2+ channels.

  10. Fluorescent Sensing of Guanine and Guanosine Monophosphate with Conjugated Receptors Incorporating Aniline and Naphthyridine Moieties.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shao-Hung; Phang, Riping; Fang, Jim-Min

    2016-04-15

    Ethyne-linked naphthyridine-aniline conjugated molecules are selective sensors of decylguanine in dichloromethane and guanosine monophosphate in water (Kass = 16,000 M(-1)). The 2-acetamido-1,8-naphthyridine moiety binds with guanine in a DAA-ADD triply hydrogen-bonded motif. The aniline moiety enhances an electron-donating effect, and the substituent is tuned to attain extra hydrogen bonds, π-π stacking, and electrostatic interactions. The proposed binding modes are supported by a Job plot, ESI-MS, (1)H NMR, UV-vis, and fluorescence spectral analyses.

  11. Novel Characteristics of Trypanosoma brucei Guanosine 5'-monophosphate Reductase Distinct from Host Animals

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Chihiro; Shinohara, Takahiro; Tomiyama, Ai; Imamura, Akira; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Nishimura, Kazuhiko; Fujimori, Ko; Shuto, Satoshi; Ishibashi, Osamu; Kubata, Bruno Kilunga; Inui, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic pathway of purine nucleotides in parasitic protozoa is a potent drug target for treatment of parasitemia. Guanosine 5’-monophosphate reductase (GMPR), which catalyzes the deamination of guanosine 5’-monophosphate (GMP) to inosine 5’-monophosphate (IMP), plays an important role in the interconversion of purine nucleotides to maintain the intracellular balance of their concentration. However, only a few studies on protozoan GMPR have been reported at present. Herein, we identified the GMPR in Trypanosoma brucei, a causative protozoan parasite of African trypanosomiasis, and found that the GMPR proteins were consistently localized to glycosomes in T. brucei bloodstream forms. We characterized its recombinant protein to investigate the enzymatic differences between GMPRs of T. brucei and its host animals. T. brucei GMPR was distinct in having an insertion of a tandem repeat of the cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) domain, which was absent in mammalian and bacterial GMPRs. The recombinant protein of T. brucei GMPR catalyzed the conversion of GMP to IMP in the presence of NADPH, and showed apparent affinities for both GMP and NADPH different from those of its mammalian counterparts. Interestingly, the addition of monovalent cations such as K+ and NH4+ to the enzymatic reaction increased the GMPR activity of T. brucei, whereas none of the mammalian GMPR’s was affected by these cations. The monophosphate form of the purine nucleoside analog ribavirin inhibited T. brucei GMPR activity, though mammalian GMPRs showed no or only a little inhibition by it. These results suggest that the mechanism of the GMPR reaction in T. brucei is distinct from that in the host organisms. Finally, we demonstrated the inhibitory effect of ribavirin on the proliferation of trypanosomes in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting the availability of ribavirin to develop a new therapeutic agent against African trypanosomiasis. PMID:26731263

  12. Controlled supramolecular structure of guanosine monophosphate in the interlayer space of layered double hydroxide

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Guanosine monophosphates (GMPs) were intercalated into the interlayer space of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) and the molecular arrangement of GMP was controlled in LDHs. The intercalation conditions such as GMP/LDH molar ratio and reaction temperature were systematically adjusted. When the GMP/LDH molar ratio was 1:2, which corresponds to the charge balance between positive LDH sheets and GMP anions, GMP molecules were well-intercalated to LDH. At high temperature (100 and 80 °C), a single GMP molecule existed separately in the LDH interlayer. On the other hand, at lower temperature (20, 40 and 60 °C), GMPs tended to form ribbon-type supramolecular assemblies. Differential scanning calorimetry showed that the ribbon-type GMP assembly had an intermolecular interaction energy of ≈101 kJ/mol, which corresponds to a double hydrogen bond between guanosine molecules. Once stabilized, the interlayer GMP orientations, single molecular and ribbon phase, were successfully converted to the other phase by adjusting the external environment by stoichiometry or temperature control. PMID:28144541

  13. Association between plasma cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels and hemodynamic instability during liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bezinover, Dmitri; Kadry, Zakiyah; Uemura, Tadahiro; Sharghi, Michael; Mastro, Andrea M; Sosnoski, Donna M; Dalal, Priti; Janicki, Piotr K

    2013-02-01

    The activation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production in patients with end-stage liver disease (ESLD) has been associated with hemodynamic instability during orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). The aim of this prospective, observational study was to investigate the involvement of cGMP in the mediation of profound hypotension during liver graft reperfusion. An additional objective was to determine whether preoperative cGMP levels are associated with intraoperative hemodynamic instability. Forty-four consecutive patients undergoing OLT were included in the study. Blood samples for cGMP analysis were obtained from (1) the radial artery before the surgical incision; (2) the radial artery, portal vein, and flush blood during the anhepatic phase; and (3) the radial artery 20 minutes after liver graft reperfusion. On the basis of a statistical analysis, the patients were divided into 2 groups: group 1 (preoperative cGMP level ≥ 0.05 μmol/L) and group 2 (preoperative cGMP level < 0.05 μmol/L). We demonstrated a significant correlation between the preoperative levels of cGMP and the amount of catecholamine required to maintain hemodynamic stability during reperfusion (r = 0.52, P < 0.001), the length of the hospital stay (r = 0.38, P = 0.01), and the length of the intensive care unit (ICU) stay (r = 0.44, P = 0.004). We also demonstrated a significantly higher intraoperative catecholamine requirement (P < 0.001) and a prolonged postoperative ICU stay (P = 0.02) in group 1 patients versus group 2 patients. In conclusion, this study demonstrates increased baseline cGMP production in patients with ESLD, which is significantly associated with severe hypotension during OLT. We suggest that preoperative levels of cGMP correlate with hemodynamic instability during liver graft reperfusion. Copyright © 2012 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  14. The cyclic guanosine monophosphate/B-type natriuretic peptide ratio and mortality in advanced heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Patrícia; Araújo, José Paulo; Azevedo, Ana; Ferreira, António; Bettencourt, Paulo

    2009-01-01

    Aims Attenuation of the effects of natriuretic peptides has been demonstrated in animal models but studies in humans are scarce, particularly concerning renal attenuation. We investigated the attenuation of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in chronic advanced heart failure (HF). Methods and results We included 62 outpatients with HF and severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Cases had at least one hospital admission or emergency department visit for acute HF in the previous year and were in NYHA class III/IV despite optimized therapy. The individual age- and sex-matched controls were symptomatically controlled (NYHA I and II). We collected 24 h urine and a blood sample from all patients. Plasma BNP and plasma (pcGMP) and urine cyclic guanosine monophosphate (ucGMP) were measured. Patients were followed for 3 months for hospital admission or all-cause death. ucGMP to plasma BNP (ucGMP/BNP) ratio was attenuated in cases vs. controls [median (IQR): 8354 (4293–16 456) vs. 12 693 (6896–22 851)]. There were no differences in pcGMP to BNP (pcGMP/BNP) ratio or urine cGMP excretion. Patients with worse outcome had lower pcGMP/BNP [260 (86–344) vs. 381 (244–728) in patients without adverse outcome events] and lower ucGMP/BNP [4146 (2207–9363) vs. 10 922 (7495–19 971)]. Conclusion Renal NP’s second messenger production is attenuated in advanced HF. Patients with worse outcome have lower ucGMP/BNP and pcGMP/BNP ratios. PMID:19168517

  15. Type II cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase inhibits Rac1 activation in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YING; CHEN, YONGCHANG; WU, MIN; LAN, TING; WU, YAN; LI, YUEYING; QIAN, HAI

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced motility of cancer cells is a critical step in promoting tumor metastasis, which remains the major cause of gastric cancer-associated mortality. The small GTPase Rac1 is a key signaling component in the regulation of cell migration. Previous studies have demonstrated that Rac1 activity may be regulated by protein kinase G (PKG); however, the underlying mechanism is not yet clear. The current study aimed to investigate the effect of type II cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG II) on Rac1 activity. The human gastric cancer cell line AGS was infected with adenoviral constructs encoding PKG II to increase the expression of this enzyme, and treated with a cGMP analog (8-pCPT-cGMP) to induce its activation. A Transwell assay was employed to measure cell migration, and the activity of Rac1 was assessed using a pull-down assay. Immunoprecipitation was used to isolate the Rac1 protein. Phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate 3 kinase (PI3K) and its downstream effecter protein kinase B (Akt) are associated with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced motility/migration of cancer cells. Extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) is the major signaling molecule of the Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) mediated signaling pathway. ERK and its upstream activator MAPK kinase (MEK) are also involved in LPA-induced motility/migration of cancer cells. Phosphorylation of PI3K/Akt, MEK/ERK and enriched Rac1 were detected by western blotting. The results revealed that blocking the activation of Rac1 by ectopically expressing an inactive Rac1 mutant (T17N) impeded LPA-induced cell migration. Increased PKG II activity inhibited LPA-induced migration and LPA-induced activation of Rac1; however, it had no effect on the phosphorylation of Rac1. PKG II also inhibited the activation of PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK mediated signaling, which is important for LPA-induced Rac1 activation. These results suggest that PKG II affects LPA

  16. Inhibition of primate spinothalamic tract neurons by spinal glycine and GABA is modulated by guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Lin, Q; Wu, J; Peng, Y B; Cui, M; Willis, W D

    1999-03-01

    Our recent work has suggested that the nitric oxide/guanosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (NO/cGMP) signal transduction system contributes to central sensitization of spinothalamic tract (STT) neurons in part by influencing the descending inhibition of nociception resulting from stimulation in the periaqueductal gray. This study was designed to examine further whether activation of the NO/cGMP cascade reduces the inhibition of the activity of STT neurons mediated by spinal inhibitory amino acid (IAA) receptors. Responses of STT cells to noxious cutaneous stimuli were inhibited by iontophoresis of glycine and GABA agonists in anesthetized monkeys. Administration of 8-bromoguanosine-3',5'-cyclophosphate sodium (8-bromo-cGMP), a membrane permeable analogue of cGMP, either by microdialysis or by iontophoresis reduced significantly the IAA-induced inhibition of wide dynamic range (WDR) STT cells in the deep layers of the dorsal horn. The reduction in inhibition lasted for up to 1-1.5 h after the cessation of drug infusion. In contrast, IAA-induced inhibition of WDR STT cells in the superficial dorsal horn and high-threshold (HT) cells in superficial or deep layers was not significantly changed during 8-bromo-cGMP infusion. Iontophoresis of 8-bromo-cGMP onto STT cells produced the same actions as produced by microdialysis of this agent, but the effect was not as long-lasting nor as potent. Finally, an attenuation of the IAA receptor-mediated inhibition of STT cells produced by iontophoretic release of a NO donor, 3-morpholinosydnonimine, could be blocked by pretreatment of the spinal cord with a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one. These results suggest that an increased spinal cGMP level contributes to the sensitization of WDR STT neurons in the deep dorsal horn in part by down-regulating spinal IAA receptors. However, no evidence is provided in this study that the NO/cGMP cascade regulates IAA receptors on HT and superficial WDR

  17. Regulation of Sertoli cell tight junction dynamics in the rat testis via the nitric oxide synthase/soluble guanylate cyclase/3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate/protein kinase G signaling pathway: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nikki P Y; Cheng, C Yan

    2003-07-01

    barrier assembly. Cytokines, such as TGF-beta and TNF-alpha, known to perturb the Sertoli cell TJ barrier, were also shown to stimulate Sertoli cell iNOS and eNOS expression dose dependently in vitro. Collectively, these results illustrate NOS is an important physiological regulator of TJ dynamics in the testis, exerting its effects via the NO/soluble guanylate cyclase/cGMP/protein kinase G signaling pathway.

  18. Human taste and umami receptor responses to chemosensorica generated by Maillard-type N²-alkyl- and N²-arylthiomethylation of guanosine 5'-monophosphates.

    PubMed

    Suess, Barbara; Brockhoff, Anne; Degenhardt, Andreas; Billmayer, Sylvia; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Hofmann, Thomas

    2014-11-26

    Structural modification of the exocyclic amino function of guanosine 5'-monophosphate (5'-GMP) by Maillard-type reactions with reducing carbohydrates was recently found to increase the umami-enhancing activity of the nucleotide upon S-N(2)-1-carboxyalkylation and S-N(2)-(1-alkylamino)carbonylalkylation, respectively. Since the presence of sulfur atoms in synthetic N(2)-alkylated nucleotides was reported to be beneficial for sensory activity, a versatile Maillard-type modification of 5'-GMP upon reaction with glycine's Strecker aldehyde formaldehyde and organic thiols was performed in the present study. A series of N(2)-(alkylthiomethyl)guanosine and N(2)-(arylthiomethyl)guanosine 5'-monophosphates was generated and the compounds were evaluated to what extent they enhance the umami response to monosodium L-glutamate in vivo by a paired-choice comparison test using trained human volunteers and in vitro by means of cell-based umami taste receptor assay. Associated with a high umami-enhancing activity (β-value 5.1), N(2)-(propylthiomethyl)guanosine 5'-monophosphate could be generated when 5'-GMP reacted with glucose, glycine, and the onion-derived odorant 1-propanethiol, thus opening a valuable avenue to produce high-potency umami-enhancing chemosensorica from food-derived natural products by kitchen-type chemistry.

  19. Free energy barrier for dissociation of the guanosine monophosphate anion in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornetta, Lucas M.; Coutinho, Kaline; Canuto, Sylvio; Varella, Márcio T. do N.

    2016-08-01

    We report free energy barriers for the ground-state dissociation of the guanosine nucleotide anion in solution, employing implicit and explicit solvation models. The latter was based on the Free Energy Perturbation technique and Monte Carlo simulations. For the lowest-energy structure, both solvation models indicate a solvent-induced transition from a dipole-bound state in the gas phase to a π∗ valence state in solution. The free barrier estimates obtained from explicit and implicit solvation are in fair agreement with each other, although significantly overestimated in comparison to a previously reported explicit solvation model based on ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Accounting for corrections related to the different DFT functionals used in the present and previous studies significantly improves the agreement. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  20. Urinary cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate changes in spontaneous and induced onset active labor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Da-Chung; Yuan, Shyng-Shiou F; Su, Her-Young; Lo, Shin-Chieh; Ren, Shin-Sia; Wu, Gwo-Jang

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this prospective, randomized study was to investigate the changes in urinary cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) between the latent and the active phases of spontaneous and prostaglandin E(1) (PGE(1))-induced labor. Seventy singleton pregnant women at 36-41(+) weeks' gestation without signs of fetal distress were enrolled. The first group consisted of 35 pregnant women in whom labor was induced by PGE(1) applied intravaginally. The second group consisted of 35 women who had spontaneous active labor. Clinical data of the two groups were assessed as labor progressed. After the onset of active labor, urinary cGMP/creatinine (U cGMP/Cr) decreased in both groups with the percentage decline of 35.2 and 9.7, respectively, but this difference was only significant in the PGE(1)-induced group (P=0.033). After the onset of active labor, urinary cAMP/creatinine (U cAMP/Cr) decreased in both groups with the percentage decline of 36.5 and 15.6, respectively, but this difference was only significant in the PGE(1)-induced group (P=0.001). The duration of the latent phase was significantly shortened in the PGE(1)-induced group compared with the spontaneous labor group (P<0.05). Decreased U cGMP/Cr and U cAMP/Cr may be a transition from the latent to the active phase in PGE(1)-induced labor. Our results suggest that U cGMP/Cr and U cAMP/Cr can serve as easily obtained secondary messenger markers of myometrial contractility and cervical ripening at the onset of active labor. The NO-cGMP system and the G-protein alpha-cAMP system in the human uterus may concomitantly contribute to uterine quiescence during pregnancy and show downregulation in U cGMP/Cr and U cAMP/Cr at the initiation of active labor.

  1. Nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in the peripheral and central auditory system of the rat.

    PubMed

    Fessenden, J D; Altschuler, R A; Seasholtz, A F; Schacht, J

    1999-02-01

    The neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) were localized in the cochlea, the cochlear nucleus (CN), and the superior olivary complex (SOC) of Fisher 344 rats. In the cochlea, nNOS was identified in spiral ganglion cells by using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-diaphorase histochemistry and in situ hybridization. NADPH-diaphorase staining also was detected in blood vessels of the modiolus. By using immunohistochemistry against cyclic guanosine monophosphate, cochlear sGC activity was localized to pericytes in the spiral ligament as well as nerve fibers innervating outer hair cells. In the lower auditory brainstem, nNOS was localized to principal cells of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) with NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry and in situ hybridization. NADPH-diaphorase activity also was observed in the lateral and medial superior olive (LSO and MSO, respectively), the superior periolivary nucleus (SPN), the ventral and lateral nuclei of the trapezoid body (VNTB and LNTB, respectively), and the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN). Transcripts of the beta-subunit of sGC were localized in rat brainstem by using in situ hybridization. mRNA for sGC was expressed in neurons within the SPN, LSO, MSO, LNTB, MNTB, VNTB, and VCN. Highest levels of sGC expression were seen in the SPN. These results suggest that the NO/cGMP pathway is involved in both the ascending and descending pathways of the auditory brainstem.

  2. Lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy and vascular function: Role of the nitric oxide-phosphodiesterase type 5-cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Yukihito

    2017-03-22

    It is well known that there is an association of lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy with cardiovascular disease, suggesting that lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy is a risk factor for cardiovascular events. Vascular function, including endothelial function and vascular smooth muscle function, is involved in the pathogenesis, maintenance and development of atherosclerosis, leading to cardiovascular events. Vascular dysfunction per se should also contribute to lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy. Both lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy and vascular dysfunction have cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, aging, obesity and smoking. Inactivation of the phosphodiesterase type 5-cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate-nitric oxide pathway causes lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy through an enhancement of sympathetic nervous activity, endothelial dysfunction, increase in Rho-associated kinase activity and vasoconstriction, and decrease in blood flow of pelvic viscera. Both endogenous nitric oxide and exogenous nitric oxide act as vasodilators on vascular smooth muscle cells through an increase in the content of cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate, which is inactivated by phosphodiesterase type 5. In a clinical setting, phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors are widely used in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors might have beneficial effects on vascular function through not only inhibition of cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate degradation, but also increases in testosterone levels and nitric oxide bioavailability, increase in the number and improvement of the function of endothelial progenitor cells, and decrease in insulin resistance. In the present review, the relationships between lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy, the

  3. Involvement of L-arginine-nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of bis selenide in the mouse tail suspension test.

    PubMed

    Jesse, Cristiano R; Wilhelm, Ethel A; Bortolatto, Cristiani F; Rocha, João B T; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2010-06-10

    The present study investigated a possible antidepressant-like effect of bis selenide by using the forced swimming and the tail suspension tests. The involvement of the l-arginine-nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling pathway in the antidepressant-like action of bis selenide was investigated. Bis selenide, given by oral route at doses of 0.5-5mg/kg, decreased the immobility time in the forced swimming and tail suspension tests. Pretreatment with l-arginine (750mg/kg, intraperitoneal, i.p., a nitric oxide precursor), sildenafil (5mg/kg, i.p., a phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor) or S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (25microg/site, intracerebroventricular, i.c.v., a nitric oxide donor) reversed the reduction in the immobility time elicited by bis selenide (1mg/kg, p.o.) in the tail suspension test. Bis selenide (0.1mg/kg, p.o., a subeffective dose) produced a synergistic antidepressant-like effect with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine (0.3mg/kg, i.p., an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase) or 7-nitroindazole (25mg/kg, i.p., a specific neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor) in the tail suspension test. Pretreatment of animals with methylene blue (10mg/kg, i.p., an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase and soluble guanylate cyclase) or 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (30pmol, i.c.v., a specific inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase), at subeffective doses, caused a synergistic effect with bis selenide in the tail suspension test. Bis selenide (1mg/kg, p.o.), at an effective dose in the forced swimming and tail suspension tests, caused a significant decrease in the mouse cerebral nitrate/nitrite levels. The antidepressant-like effect of bis selenide in the tail suspension test is dependent on the inhibition of the L-arginine-nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway.

  4. Indolyl-3-butyric acid-induced Arabidopsis stomatal opening mediated by 3',5'-cyclic guanosine-monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Cousson, A

    2010-12-01

    It has been pharmacologically suggested that 3',5'-cyclic guanosine-monophosphate (cGMP) mediates indolyl-3-butyric acid (IBA)-induced stomatal opening. In Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., such investigations compared the wild type (Columbia and Ws ecotypes) to mutants knockout for either GTP-binding protein (G protein) α subunit 1 (gpa1-4), putative G protein-coupled receptor 1 (gcr1-5), calcineurin B-like isoform 1 (cbl1) or 9 (cbl9), or the NADPH oxidases AtrbohD and AtrbohF (atrbohD/F). Stomatal opening to IBA or the permeant cGMP analogue, 8-bromo-cGMP (8-Br-cGMP) was abolished in the atrbohD/F mutant. The IBA response was fully or partially suppressed, respectively, in the gcr1-5 mutant, or the gpa1-4 and cbl1 mutants. In the cbl9 mutant, the response to IBA or 8-Br-cGMP, respectively, was partially or fully suppressed. Phenylarsine oxide (PAO) affected the IBA response, which the cbl1 mutant overlapped or the gpa1-4 and cbl9 mutants increased up to 100% inhibition. 6-anilino-5,8-quinolinedione, mas17, the (Rp)-diastereomer of 8-bromo-3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphorothioate (Rp-8-Br-cGMPS), nicotinamide, ruthenium red (RRed), 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), cyclosporine A (CsA) and FK506 converged to affect the IBA response, which the gpa1-4 and cbl9 mutants overlapped or the cbl1 mutant and PAO increased up to 100% inhibition. Rp-8-Br-cGMPS, nicotinamide, RRed, BAPTA, CsA or FK506 paralled the cbl9 and atrbohD/F mutants to abolish the 8-Br-cGMP response. Based on so far revealed features of these mutants and pharmacological compounds, these results confirmed cGMP as a Ca(2+)-mobilizing second messenger for apoplastic auxin whose perception and transduction would implicate a seven-transmembrane receptor - G protein - guanylyl cyclase unit at the guard cell plasma membrane. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural Basis of Differential Ligand Recognition by Two Classes of bis-(3-5)-cyclic Dimeric Guanosine Monophosphate-binding Riboswitches

    SciTech Connect

    K Smith; C Shanahan; E Moore; A Simon; S Strobel

    2011-12-31

    The bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) signaling pathway regulates biofilm formation, virulence, and other processes in many bacterial species and is critical for their survival. Two classes of c-di-GMP-binding riboswitches have been discovered that bind this second messenger with high affinity and regulate diverse downstream genes, underscoring the importance of RNA receptors in this pathway. We have solved the structure of a c-di-GMP-II riboswitch, which reveals that the ligand is bound as part of a triplex formed with a pseudoknot. The structure also shows that the guanine bases of c-di-GMP are recognized through noncanonical pairings and that the phosphodiester backbone is not contacted by the RNA. Recognition is quite different from that observed in the c-di-GMP-I riboswitch, demonstrating that at least two independent solutions for RNA second messenger binding have evolved. We exploited these differences to design a c-di-GMP analog that selectively binds the c-di-GMP-II aptamer over the c-di-GMP-I RNA. There are several bacterial species that contain both types of riboswitches, and this approach holds promise as an important tool for targeting one riboswitch, and thus one gene, over another in a selective fashion.

  6. Crystallographic study of Glu58Ala RNase T1 x 2'-guanosine monophosphate at 1.9-A resolution.

    PubMed

    Pletinckx, J; Steyaert, J; Zegers, I; Choe, H W; Heinemann, U; Wyns, L

    1994-02-22

    Glu58 is known to participate in phosphodiester transesterification catalyzed by the enzyme RNase T1. For Glu58 RNase T1, an altered mechanism has been proposed in which His40 replaces Glu58 as the base catalyst [Steyaert, J., Hallenga, K., Wyns, L., & Stanssens, P. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 9064-9072]. Glu58Ala Rnase T1 has been cocrystallized with guanosine 2'-monophosphate (2'-GMP). The crystals are of space group P2(1), with one molecule per asymmetric unit (a = 32.44 A, b = 49.64 A, c = 26.09 A, beta = 99.17 degrees). The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme was determined to a nominal resolution of 1.9 A, yielding a crystallographic R factor of 0.178 for all X-ray data. Comparison of this structure with wild-type structures leads to the following conclusions. The minor changes apparent in the tertiary structure can be explained by either the mutation of Glu58 or by the change in the space group. In the active site, the extra space available through the mutation of Glu58 is occupied by the phosphate group (after a reorientation) and by a solvent molecule replacing a carboxylate oxygen of Glu58. This solvent molecule is a candidate for participation in the altered mechanism of this mutant enzyme. Following up on a study of conserved water sites in RNase T1 crystallized in space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) [Malin, R., Zielenkiewicz, P., & Saenger, W. (1991) J. Mol. Biol. 266, 4848-4852], we investigated the hydration structure for four different packing modes of RNase T1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Photo-electrochemical Bioanalysis of Guanosine Monophosphate Using Coupled Enzymatic Reactions at a CdS/ZnS Quantum Dot Electrode.

    PubMed

    Sabir, Nadeem; Khan, Nazimuddin; Völkner, Johannes; Widdascheck, Felix; del Pino, Pablo; Witte, Gregor; Riedel, Marc; Lisdat, Fred; Konrad, Manfred; Parak, Wolfgang J

    2015-11-18

    A photo-electrochemical sensor for the specific detection of guanosine monophosphate (GMP) is demonstrated, based on three enzymes combined in a coupled reaction assay. The first reaction involves the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent conversion of GMP to guanosine diphosphate (GDP) by guanylate kinase, which warrants substrate specificity. The reaction products ADP and GDPare co-substrates for the enzymatic conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to pyruvate in a second reaction mediated by pyruvate kinase. Pyruvate in turn is the co-substrate for lactate dehydrogenase that generates lactate via oxidation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced form) NADH to NAD(+). This third enzymatic reaction is electrochemically detected. For this purpose a CdS/ZnS quantum dot (QD) electrode is illuminated and the photocurrent response under fixed potential conditions is evaluated. The sequential enzyme reactions are first evaluated in solution. Subsequently, a sensor for GMP is constructed using polyelectrolytes for enzyme immobilization.

  8. Kinetic dissection of individual steps in the poly(C)-directed oligoguanylate synthesis from guanosine 5'-monophosphate 2-methylimidazolide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Bernasconi, C. F.; Alberas, D. J.; Baird, E. E.

    1993-01-01

    A kinetic study of oligoguanylate synthesis on a polycytidylate template, poly(C), as a function of the concentration of the activated monomer, guanosine 5'-monophosphate 2-methylimidazolide, 2-MeImpG, is reported. Reactions were run with 0.005-0.045 M 2-MeImpG in the presence of 0.05 M poly(C) at 23 degrees C. The kinetic results are consistent with a reaction scheme (eq 1) that consists of a series of consecutive steps, each step representing the addition of one molecule of 2-MeImpG to the growing oligomer. This scheme allows the calculation of second-order rate constants for every step by analyzing the time-dependent growth of each oligomer. Computer simulations of the course of reaction based on the determined rate constants and eq 1 are in excellent agreement with the product distributions seen in the HPLC profiles. In accord with an earlier study (Fakhrai, H.; Inoue, T.; Orgel, L. E. Tetrahedron 1984, 40, 39), rate constants, ki, for the formation of the tetramer and longer oligomers up to the 16-mer were found to be independent of length and somewhat higher than k3 (formation of trimer), which in turn is much higher than k2 (formation of dimer). The ki (i > or = 4), k3, and k2 values are not true second-order rate constants but vary with monomer concentration. Mechanistic models for the dimerization (Scheme I) and elongation reactions (Scheme II) are proposed that are consistent with our results. These models take into account that the monomer associates with the template in a cooperative manner. Our kinetic analysis allowed the determination of rate constants for the elementary processes of covalent bond formation between two monomers (dimerization) and between an oligomer and a monomer (elongation) on the template. A major conclusion from our study is that bond formation between two monomer units or between a primer and a monomer is assisted by the presence of additional next-neighbor monomer units. This is consistent with recent findings with hairpin

  9. Elevated nitric oxide and 3’,5’ cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Cíntia; de Moura, Miguel Carneiro; Pedro, Ana Julia; Rocha, Paula

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate whether serum levels of nitric oxide (NO•) and plasma levels of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and total glutathione (GSH) are altered in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and to examine their correlation with the severity of liver disease. METHODS: Twenty-six patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis were studied. Serum levels of NO• and plasma levels of cGMP and GSH were measured in 7 patients with compensated alcoholic cirrhosis (Child-Pugh A) and 19 patients with advanced cirrhosis (Child-Pugh B and C). The model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score was evaluated. Sixteen healthy volunteers served as controls. Liver enzymes and creatinine levels were also tested. RESULTS: NO• and cGMP levels were higher in patients with Child-Pugh B and C cirrhosis than in Child-Pugh A cirrhosis or controls (NO•: 21.70 ± 8.07 vs 11.70 ± 2.74; 21.70 ± 8.07 vs 7.26 ± 2.47 μmol/L, respectively; P < 0.001) and (cGMP: 20.12 ± 6.62 vs 10.14 ± 2.78; 20.12 ± 6.62 vs 4.95 ± 1.21 pmol/L, respectively; P < 0.001). Total glutathione levels were lower in patients with Child-Pugh B and C cirrhosis than in patients with Child-Pugh A cirrhosis or controls (16.04 ± 6.06 vs 23.01 ± 4.38 or 16.04 ± 6.06 vs 66.57 ± 26.23 μmol/L, respectively; P < 0.001). There was a significant correlation between NO• and cGMP levels in all patients with alcoholic cirrhosis. A significant negative correlation between reduced glutathione/glutathione disulfide and the MELD score was found in all cirrhotic patients. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest a role for oxidative stress in alcoholic liver cirrhosis, which is more significant in decompensated patients with higher levels of NO• and cGMP and lower GSH levels than in compensated and control patients. Altered mediator levels in decompensated patients may influence the hemodynamic changes in and progression of liver disease. PMID:18186561

  10. Mode-specific vibrational relaxation of photoexcited guanosine 5'-monophosphate and its acid form: a femtosecond broadband mid-IR transient absorption and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuyuan; Improta, Roberto; Kohler, Bern

    2014-01-28

    UV-pump/broadband-mid-IR-probe transient absorption (TA) experiments and ab initio quantum mechanical (QM) calculations were used to investigate the photophysics in heavy water of the neutral and acid forms of guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP and GMPD(+), respectively). Excited GMP undergoes ultrafast internal conversion (IC) and returns to the electronic ground state in less than one picosecond with a large amount of excess vibrational energy. The spectroscopic signals are dominated by vibrational cooling - a process in which the solute dissipates vibrational energy to the solvent. For neutral GMP, cooling proceeds with a time constant of 3 ps. Following IC, at least some medium-frequency modes such as the carbonyl stretch and an in-plane ring vibration are excited, suggesting that the vibrational energy distribution is non-statistical. This is consistent with predicted structural changes upon passage through the S1/S0 conical intersection. GMPD(+) differs from GMP by a single deuteron at the N7 position, but has a dramatically longer lifetime of 200 ps. Vibrational cooling of the S1 state of GMPD(+) was monitored via several medium-frequency modes that were assigned using QM calculations. These medium-frequency modes are also vibrationally excited in a non-statistical fashion. Excitation of these modes is in line with the change in geometry at the S1 minimum of GMPD(+) predicted by QM calculations. Furthermore, these modes relax at different rates, fully consistent with QM calculations, which predict that excited vibrational states of the carbonyl stretch couple strongly to the D2O solvent and thus deactivate via intermolecular energy transfer (IET). In contrast, the ring stretch couples strongly to other ring modes of the guanine chromophore and appears to decay via intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR).

  11. The role of NMDA receptor and nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of dextromethorphan in mice forced swimming test and tail suspension test.

    PubMed

    Sakhaee, Ehsan; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Yousefi, Farbod; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Akbarian, Reyhaneh; Chamanara, Mohsen; Zolfaghari, Samira; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2017-01-01

    Depression is a devastating disorder which has a high impact on the wellbeing of overall society. As such, need for innovative therapeutic agents are always there. Most of the researchers focused on N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor to explore the antidepressant like activity of new therapeutic agents. Dextromethorphan is a cough suppressant agent with potential antidepressant activity reported in mouse force swimming test. Considering N-methyl-d-aspartate as a forefront in exploring antidepressant agents, here we focused to unpin the antidepressant mechanism of dextromethorphan targeting N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor induced nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling. Dextromethorphan administered at a dose of 10 and 30mg/kg i.p significantly reduced the immobility time. Interestingly, this effect of drug (30mg/kg) was inhibited when the animals were pretreated either with N-methyl-d-aspartate (75mg/kg), or l-arginine (750mg/kg) as a nitric oxide precursor and/or sildenafil (5mg/kg) as a phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor. However, the antidepressant effect of Dextromethorphan subeffective dose (3mg/kg) was augmented when the animals were administered with either L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester (10mg/kg) non-specific nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, 7-Nitroindazole (30mg/kg) specific neural nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, MK-801 (0.05mg/kg) an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist but not aminoguanidine (50mg/kg) which is specific inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor as compared to the drugs when administered alone. No remarkable effect on locomotor activity was observed during open field test when the drugs were administered at the above mentioned doses. Therefore, it is evident that the antidepressant like effect of Dextromethorphan is owed due to its inhibitory effect on N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor and NO- Cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway.

  12. Inhibition of PDE5A1 guanosine cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) hydrolysing activity by sildenafil analogues that inhibit cellular cGMP efflux.

    PubMed

    Subbotina, Anna; Ravna, Aina W; Lysaa, Roy A; Abagyan, Ruben; Bugno, Ryszard; Sager, Georg

    2017-06-01

    To determine the ability of 11 sildenafil analogues to discriminate between cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (cnPDEs) and to characterise their inhibitory potencies (Ki values) of PDE5A1-dependent guanosine cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) hydrolysis. Sildenafil analogues were identified by virtual ligand screening (VLS) and screened for their ability to inhibit adenosine cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) hydrolysis by PDE1A1, PDE1B1, PDE2A1, PDE3A, PDE10A1 and PDE10A2, and cGMP hydrolysis by PDE5A, PDE6C, PDE9A2 for a low (1 nm) and high concentration (10 μm). Complete IC50 plots for all analogues were performed for PDE5A-dependent cGMP hydrolysis. Docking studies and scoring were made using the ICM molecular modelling software. The analogues in a low concentration showed no or low inhibition of PDE1A1, PDE1B1, PDE2A1, PDE3A, PDE10A1 and PDE10A2. In contrast, PDE5A and PDE6C were markedly inhibited to a similar extent by the analogues in a low concentration, whereas PDE9A2 was much less inhibited. The analogues showed a relative narrow range of Ki values for PDE5A inhibition (1.2-14 nm). The sildenafil molecule was docked in the structure of PDE5A1 co-crystallised with sildenafil. All the analogues had similar binding poses as sildenafil. Sildenafil analogues that inhibit cellular cGMP efflux are potent inhibitors of PDE5A and PDE6C. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  13. Increased cyclic guanosine monophosphate production and endothelial nitric oxide synthase level in mononuclear cells from sildenafil citrate-treated patients with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    García-Cardoso, J; Vela, R; Mahillo, E; Mateos-Cáceres, P J; Modrego, J; Macaya, C; López-Farré, A J

    2010-01-01

    Mononuclear cells express enzymes involved in the NO/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) generating system, as well as PDE5. The objective of the study was to determine the effect of sildenafil citrate administration on the level of proteins involved in the NO/cGMP generating system in mononuclear cells from patients with ED. Twenty-one patients with ED (International Index of Erectile Function-Erectile Function Domain (IIEF-EFD) 17.9+/-0.8) were enrolled and 100 mg sildenafil citrate on-demand was administered during 12 weeks. All patients showed cardiovascular risk factors. After sildenafil citrate administration, IIEF-EFD score was improved (26+/-1.2 P<0.05). In the mononuclear cells, the protein level of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) was higher after sildenafil citrate treatment. It was accompanied by reduction in the circulating plasma levels of both high-sensitive C-reactive protein and soluble intercellular adhesive molecule-1. The protein level of soluble guanylate cyclase and PDE5 did not change in the mononuclear cells after sildenafil citrate treatment. However, in the mononuclear cells exogenous NO induced a higher cGMP production after 12-weeks sildenafil citrate administration. In conclusion, in mononuclear cells from patients with ED sildenafil citrate administration increased the level of eNOS protein and increased cGMP production in response to NO. Moreover, sildenafil citrate administration reduced the plasma circulating levels of two biomarkers associated with inflammation.

  14. IP3 Mediates Nitric Oxide-Guanosine 3',5'-Cyclic Monophosphate (NO-cGMP)-Induced Isoflavone Accumulation in Soybean Sprouts under UV-B Radiation.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Caifeng; Wang, Pei; Yang, Runqiang; Tian, Lu; Gu, Zhenxin

    2016-11-09

    In this study, to investigate the role of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) in nitric oxide-guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (NO-cGMP)-induced isoflavone accumulation in soybean sprouts under UV-B radiation, the sprouts were treated with donors and inhibitors of NO and cGMP as well as IP3 inhibitor. Results showed that NO, with cGMP as a second messenger, stimulates IP3 accumulation under UV-B radiation. Consistent with the increase in IP3 content, the up-regulation of gene and protein expression of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) in response to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) (exogenous NO donor) and 8-Br-cGMP (cGMP analogue) was also observed. In addition, protein kinase G (PKG) participated in NO-cGMP-induced IP3 production. IP3 induced by the NO-cGMP pathway was involved in isoflavone synthesis by elevating the activity and gene and protein expressions of chalcone synthase (CHS) and isoflavone synthase (IFS). Overall, IP3 mediates NO-cGMP-induced isoflavone accumulation in soybean sprouts under UV-B stress.

  15. Antidepressant-like effect of 1-(7-methoxy-2-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-isoquinolin-4-YL)-cyclohexanol, a putative trace amine receptor ligand involves l-arginine-nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Dhir, Ashish; Kulkarni, S K

    2011-10-03

    1-(7-methoxy-2-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-isoquinolin-4-YL)-cyclohexanol is a novel putative trace amine receptor modulator hypothesized to be useful for treatment-resistant depression. In our previous study, we have demonstrated the antidepressant-like effect of this molecule in mouse forced swim and tail suspension tests and shown to act via modulating the levels of norepinephrine, serotonin and dopamine. The present study attempts to explore the involvement of l-arginine-nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of 1-(7-methoxy-2-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-isoquinolin-4-YL)-cyclohexanol in the mouse forced swim test. The antidepressant-like action of 1-(7-methoxy-2-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-isoquinolin-4-YL)-cyclohexanol (8 mg/kg, i.p) was reversed by pretreatment with L-arginine (750 mg/kg, i.p.), a nitric oxide precursor. In contrast, pretreatment with methylene blue (a soluble guanlyate cyclase inhibitor and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor) or 7-nitroindazole (a specific neuronal NOS inhibitor) potentiated the antidepressant-like effect of sub-effective dose of 1-(7-methoxy-2-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-isoquinolin-4-YL)-cyclohexanol (2mg/kg, i.p.) in this test model. Furthermore, the antidepressant-like effect of this molecule (8 mg/kg, i.p.) was reversed by sildenafil (5mg/kg, i.p.), a phosphodiesterase inhibitor. In conclusion, the antidepressant-like action of 1-(7-methoxy-2-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-isoquinolin-4-YL)-cyclohexanol involved L-arginine-nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophospate signaling pathway.

  16. Inhibition of Phosphodiesterase 5 and Increasing the Level of Cyclic Guanosine 3′,5′ Monophosphate by Hydroalcoholic Achillea wilhelmsii C. Koch Extract in Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines MCF-7 and MDA-Mb-468

    PubMed Central

    Saravani, Ramin; Galavi, Hamid Reza; Shahraki, Ali

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of hydroalcoholic Achillea wilhelmsii C. Koch extract (HAWE) on phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) gene expression and cyclic guanosine 3′,5′ monophosphate (cGMP) signaling in the MCF-7 and MDA-Mb-468 cell lines. The effective dose (ED50) of HAWE was examined in both cell lines using a 3-(4,5-dimethylhiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide viability test, and the type of cell death was detected by flow cytometry. The expression of PDE5 and the concentration of cGMP were measured in a time-dependent manner in the ED50 by real-time polymerase chain reaction and a colorimetric assay, respectively. Treatment with HAWE showed 25 µg/mL to be the ED50 for both cell lines, and HAWE led to a reduction in the PDE5 messenger RNA expression. The intracellular cGMP increased in a time-dependent manner. The results showed that HAWE has an antiproliferative property in MCF-7 and MDA-Mb-468 cell lines through the cGMP pathway. Therefore, HAWE is a potential source to effectively isolate inhibitory PDE5. PMID:28469435

  17. Involvement of nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of tropisetron and ondansetron in mice forced swimming test and tail suspension test.

    PubMed

    Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Kordjazy, Nastaran; Amiri, Shayan; Haj-Mirzaian, Arvin; Amini-Khoei, Hossien; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Dehpour, AhmadReza

    2016-06-05

    Antidepressant-like effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine subtype 3 (5-HT3) antagonists including tropisetron and ondansetron have been previously demonstrated in the literature. It was reported that stimulation of 5-HT3 receptors activate the nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO-cGMP) pathway, which is involved in regulation of behavioral and emotional functions. In our study, treating animals with tropisetron (5, 10, and 30mg/kg) and ondansetron (0.01 and 0.1µg/kg) significantly decreased the immobility time in forced swimming test (FST) and tail-suspension test (TST). Co-administration of subeffective doses of tropisetron (1mg/kg) and ondansetron (0.001µg/kg) with subeffective dose of l-NAME (10mg/kg, nonselective NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor) and 7-nitroindazole (25mg/kg, neural NOS inhibitor) exerted antidepressant-like effect in FST and TST, while aminoguanidine (50mg/kg, inducible NOS inhibitor) did not enhance the antidepressant-like effect of 5-HT3 antagonists. Besides, l-arginine (750mg/kg, NO precursor) and sildenafil (5mg/kg, phosphodiesterase inhibitor) suppressed the anti-immobility effect of 5-HT3 antagonists. None of the treatments altered the locomotor behavior of mice in open-field test. Also, hippocampal (but not cortical) nitrite level was significantly lower in tropisetron and ondansetron-treated mice compared with saline-injected mice. Also, co-administration of 7-nitroindazole with tropisetron or ondansetron caused a significant decrease in hippocampal nitrite levels. In conclusion, we suggest that antidepressant-like effect of tropisetron and ondansetron are partially mediated by modulation of NO-cGMP pathway.

  18. Effect of some cyclooxygenase inhibitors on the increase in guanosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate induced by NO-donors in human whole platelets

    PubMed Central

    Failli, Paola; Cecchi, Enrica; Tosti-Guerra, Cristina; Mugelli, Alessandro; Laffi, Giacomo; Zilletti, Lucilla; Giotti, Alberto

    1998-01-01

    The effect of the NSAIDs indomethacin, indoprofen, diclofenac and acetylsalicylic acid on the increase in guanosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) induced by nitric oxide-donor agents was tested in human whole platelets and in platelet crude homogenate.In whole platelets, indomethacin reduced the increase in cyclic GMP induced by the nitric oxide-donors (NO-donors) sodium nitroprusside (NaNP) and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) in a dose-dependent way, its IC50 being 13.7 μM and 15.8 μM, respectively.Of the other cyclooxygenase inhibitors tested, only indoprofen reduced the increase in cyclic GMP induced by both NO-donors in a dose-dependent way (IC50=32.7 μM, NaNP and 25.0 μM, SNAP), while acetylsalicylic acid (up to 1000 μM) and diclofenac (up to 100 μM) were ineffective.However, in platelet crude homogenate neither indomethacin nor indoprofen reduced the cyclic GMP production.Indomethacin (10 μM), indoprofen (30 μM), diclofenac (100 μM) and acetylsalicylic acid (1000 μM) showed a comparable efficacy in inhibiting platelet thromboxane B2 (TXB2) production, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of indomethacin and indoprofen on the increase in cyclic GMP induced by both NO-donors was not mediated by inhibition of cyclooxygenase.In vitro, the NSAIDs analysed did not interfere with nitrite production of SNAP.The unhomogeneous behaviour of NSAIDs on the increase in cyclic GMP induced by NO-donors in whole platelets may contribute to the different pharmacological and toxicological characteristics of the drugs, providing new knowledge on the effect of indomethacin and indoprofen. PMID:9579743

  19. Endurance training upregulates the nitric oxide/soluble guanylyl cyclase/cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate pathway in the striatum, midbrain and cerebellum of male rats.

    PubMed

    Chalimoniuk, Małgorzata; Chrapusta, Stanisław J; Lukačova, Nadežda; Langfort, Józef

    2015-08-27

    The nitric oxide/soluble guanylyl cyclase/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO/sGC/cGMP) brain pathway plays an important role in motor control. We studied the effects of 6-week endurance training (running) of moderate intensity on this pathway by comparing, between sedentary and endurance-trained young adult male Wistar rats, the expression of endothelial (eNOS) and neuronal (nNOS) NO synthases and of α1, α2 and β1 GC subunits, as well as cGMP levels, in the brain cortex, hippocampus, striatum, midbrain and cerebellum. Additionally, we compared the respective regional expressions of BDNF and the BDNF receptor TrkB. Twenty-four hours after the last training session, the endurance-trained rats showed 3-fold higher spontaneous locomotor activity than their sedentary counterparts in an open-field test. Forty-eight hours after the completion of the training, the trained rats showed significantly elevated BDNF and TrKB mRNAs in the hippocampus, midbrain and striatum, and significantly increased BDNF levels in the hippocampus and striatum. Simultaneously, significant increases were found in mRNA and protein levels and activities of nNOS and eNOS as well as in mRNA and protein levels of GCα2 and GCβ1, but not GCα1, in the striatum, midbrain and cerebellum; no change in these variables was found in the cortex and hippocampus except for marked elevations in cortical GCβ1 mRNA and protein. Changes in regional cGMP levels paralleled those in eNOS, nNOS and GCα2 expression and NOSs' activities. These results suggest that favorable extrapyramidal motor effects of physical training are related to the enhanced activity of the NO/sGC/cGMP pathway in certain motor control-related subcortical brain regions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Localization of putative binding sites for cyclic guanosine monophosphate and the anti-cancer drug 5-fluoro-2′-deoxyuridine-5′-monophosphate on ABCC11 in silico models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Multidrug Resistance Protein ABCC11/MRP8 is expressed in physiological barriers and tumor breast tissues in which it secretes various substrates including cGMP (cyclic guanosine monophosphate) and 5FdUMP (5-fluoro-2′-deoxyuridine-5′-monophosphate), the active metabolite of the anticancer drug 5-FluoroUracil (frequently included to anticancer therapy). Previously, we described that ABCC11 high levels are associated to the estrogen receptor (ER) expression level in breast tumors and in cell lines resistant to tamoxifen. Consequently, by lowering the intracellular concentration of anticancer drugs, ABCC11 likely promotes a multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype and decreases efficiency of anticancer therapy of 5FdUMP. Since no experimental data about binding sites of ABCC11 substrate are available, we decided to in silico localize putative substrate interaction sites of the nucleotide derivatives. Taking advantage of molecular dynamics simulation, we also analysed their evolution under computational physiological conditions and during the time. Results Since ABCC11 crystal structure is not resolved yet, we used the X-ray structures of the mouse mdr3 (homologous to human ABCB1) and of the bacterial homolog Sav1866 to generate two independent ABCC11 homology models in inward- and outward-facing conformations. Based on docking analyses, two putative binding pockets, for cGMP and 5FdUMP, were localized in both inward- and outward-facing conformations. Furthermore, based on our 3D models, and available biochemical data from homologous transporters, we identified several residues, potentially critical in ABCC11 transport function. Additionally, molecular dynamics simulation on our inward-facing model revealed for the first time conformation changes assumed to occur during transport process. Conclusions ABCC11 would present two binding sites for cGMP and for 5FdUMP. Substrates likely first bind at the intracellular side of the transmembrane segment while

  1. Role of SRC family kinase in extracellular renal cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate- and pressure-induced natriuresis.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Nilberto R F; Kemp, Brandon A; Howell, Nancy L; Gildea, John J; Santos, Cláudia F; Harris, Thurl E; Carey, Robert M

    2011-07-01

    cGMP functions as an extracellular (paracrine) messenger acting at the renal proximal tubule and is an important modulator of pressure-natriuresis (P-N). The signaling pathway activated by cGMP in the tubule cell basolateral membrane remains unknown. We hypothesized that renal interstitial microinfusion of cGMP (50 nmol/kg per minute) or P-N would be accompanied by increased renal protein levels of phospho-Src (Tyr 416) and that the natriuresis would be decreased by Src inhibition. Renal interstitial cGMP-induced natriuresis was blocked by Src inhibitor PP2 (2.0±0.4 versus 0.5±0.01 μEq/g per minute; P<0.001). The inactive analog of PP2, PP3, had no effect on cGMP-induced natriuresis. SU6656, another Src inhibitor, also inhibited cGMP-induced natriuresis (2.0±0.4 versus 1.02±0.01 μEq/g per minute; P<0.001). Renal interstitial cGMP infusion increased phospho-Src protein levels 5.6-fold at 15 minutes and 6.8-fold at 30 minutes compared with vehicle infusion but returned toward basal levels after 60 minutes. PP2 also blunted P-N (3.1±0.1 versus 1.1±0.3 μEq/g per minute; P<0.01) despite a similar increase in blood pressure. PP3 had no effect on P-N. Phospho-Src protein levels increased during P-N in vehicle- (1.8-fold) and PP3-treated (2.1-fold) groups compared with the sham-operated group. PP2 blocked the pressure-induced increase in renal phospho-Src protein levels. PP2 had no effect on renal hemodynamics but decreased both fractional excretion of Na(+) and lithium. Both extracellular cGMP and increased renal perfusion pressure increased renal phospho-Src protein levels and induced natriuresis in an Src-dependent manner, demonstrating that Src is an important downstream signaling molecule for extracellular cGMP-induced natriuresis.

  2. Prenatal lipopolysaccharide exposure causes mesenteric vascular dysfunction through the nitric oxide and cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in offspring.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinquan; Wang, Jialiang; Luo, Hao; Chen, Caiyu; Pei, Fang; Cai, Yue; Yang, Xiaoli; Wang, Na; Fu, Jinjuan; Xu, Zaichen; Zhou, Lin; Zeng, Chunyu

    2015-09-01

    Cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension, could be programmed in fetal life. Prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in utero results in increased blood pressure in offspring, but the vascular mechanisms involved are unclear. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (0.79mg/kg) or saline (0.5ml) on gestation days 8, 10, and 12. The offspring of LPS-treated dams had higher blood pressure and decreased acetylcholine (ACh)-induced relaxation and increased phenylephrine (PE)-induced contraction in endothelium-intact mesenteric arteries. Endothelium removal significantly enhanced the PE-induced contraction in offspring of control but not LPS-treated dams. The arteries pretreated with l-NAME to inhibit nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the endothelium or ODQ to inhibit cGMP production in the vascular smooth muscle had attenuated ACh-induced relaxation but augmented PE-induced contraction to a larger extent in arteries from offspring of control than those from LPS-treated dams. In addition, the endothelium-independent relaxation caused by sodium nitroprusside was also decreased in arteries from offspring of LPS-treated dams. The functional results were accompanied by a reduction in the expressions of eNOS and soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) and production of NO and cGMP in arteries from offspring of LPS-treated dams. Furthermore, LPS-treated dam's offspring arteries had increased oxidative stress and decreased antioxidant capacity. Three-week treatment with TEMPOL, a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, normalized the alterations in the levels of ROS, eNOS, and sGC, as well as in the production of NO and cGMP and vascular function in the arteries of the offspring of LPS-treated dams. In conclusion, prenatal LPS exposure programs vascular dysfunction of mesenteric arteries through increased oxidative stress and impaired NO-cGMP signaling pathway.

  3. Effects of dietary administration of guanosine monophosphate on the growth, digestibility, innate immune responses and stress resistance of juvenile red sea bream, Pagrus major.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Sakhawat; Koshio, Shunsuke; Ishikawa, Manabu; Yokoyama, Saichiro; Sony, Nadia Mahjabin

    2016-10-01

    The present study explored the dietary administration effects of guanosine monophosphate (GMP) on growth, digestibility, innate immune responses and stress resistance of juvenile red sea bream, Pagrus major. A semi-purified basal diet supplemented with 0% (Control), 0.1% (GMP-0.1), 0.2% (GMP-0.2), 0.4% (GMP-0.4) and 0.8% (GMP-0.8) purified GMP to formulate five experimental diets. Each diet was randomly allocated to triplicate groups of fish (mean initial weight 3.4 g) for 56 days. The obtained results clearly indicated that, growth performance of red sea bream enhanced by dietary GMP supplementation compared to control and significantly higher final weight was found in fish fed diet group GMP-0.4. Specific growth rate (SGR) and percent weight gain (%WG) also significantly higher in diet group GMP-0.4 in compared to control and it was not differed (P > 0.05) with diet group GMP-0.8. Feed intake significantly increased with the supplementation of GMP. Feed conversion efficiency (FCE) and protein efficiency ratio (PER) also improved (P < 0.05) when fish fed the diets containing GMP and diet group GMP-0.4 showed the significantly higher value in compared to control. The Apparent digestibility coefficients (dry matter, protein and lipid) also improved by GMP supplementation and the significantly higher protein digestibility was observed in fish fed diet groups GMP-0.2, GMP-0.4 and GMP-0.8. Among the measured non specific immune parameters peroxidase activity (PA), respiratory burst activity (NBT), Bactericidal activity (BA) were significantly affected by dietary supplementation and highest value obtained in diet group GMP-0.4. Total serum protein, lysozyme activity (LA), and agglutination antibody titer also increased (P > 0.05) by GMP supplementation. In contrast, catalase activity decreased with GMP supplementation. In terms of oxidative stress GMP-0.2 showed best condition with low oxidative stress and high antioxidant level. Moreover, the fish fed GMP

  4. Signal transduction events induced by extracellular guanosine 5' triphosphate in excitable cells.

    PubMed

    Pietrangelo, T; Guarnieri, S; Fulle, S; Fanò, G; Mariggiò, M A

    2006-11-01

    A better understanding of the physiological effects of guanosine-based purines should help clarify the complex subject of purinergic signalling. We studied the effect of extracellular guanosine 5' triphosphate (GTP) on the differentiation of two excitable cell lines that both have specific binding sites for GTP: PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells and C2C12 mouse skeletal muscle cells. PC12 cells can be differentiated into fully functional sympathetic-like neurons with 50-100 ng ml⁻¹ of nerve growth factor, whereas serum starvation causes C2C12 cells to differentiate into myotubes showing functional excitation-contraction coupling, with the expression of myosin heavy chain proteins. Our results show that GTP enhances the differentiation of both of these excitable cell lines. The early events in guanosine-based purine signal transduction appear to involve an increase in intracellular Ca²⁺ levels and membrane hyperpolarization. We further investigated the early activation of extracellular-regulated kinases and phosphoinositide 3-kinase in GTP-stimulated PC12 and C2C12 cells, respectively. We found that GTP promotes the activation of both kinases. Together, our results suggest that, even if there are some differences in the signalling pathways, GTP-induced differentiation in both cell lines is dependent on an increase in intracellular Ca²⁺.

  5. Rho and Rap guanosine triphosphatase signaling in B cells and chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mele, Silvia; Devereux, Stephen; Ridley, Anne J

    2014-09-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells proliferate predominantly in niches in the lymph nodes, where signaling from the B cell receptor (BCR) and the surrounding microenvironment are critical for disease progression. In addition, leukemic cells traffic constantly from the bloodstream into the lymph nodes, migrate within lymphatic tissues and egress back to the bloodstream. These processes are driven by chemokines and their receptors, and depend on changes in cell migration and integrin-mediated adhesion. Here we describe how Rho and Rap guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) contribute to both BCR signaling and chemokine receptor signaling, particularly by regulating cytoskeletal dynamics and integrin activity. We propose that new inhibitors of BCR-activated kinases are likely to affect CLL cell trafficking via Rho and Rap GTPases, and that upstream regulators or downstream effectors could be good targets for therapeutic intervention in CLL.

  6. Guanosine tetraphosphate modulates salicylic acid signalling and the resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana to Turnip mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Abdelkefi, Hela; Sugliani, Matteo; Ke, Hang; Harchouni, Seddik; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Citerne, Sylvie; Mouille, Gregory; Fakhfakh, Hatem; Robaglia, Christophe; Field, Ben

    2017-02-21

    Chloroplasts can act as key players in the perception and acclimatization of plants to incoming environmental signals. A growing body of evidence indicates that chloroplasts play a critical role in plant immunity. Chloroplast function can be regulated by the nucleotides guanosine tetraphosphate and pentaphosphate [(p)ppGpp]. In plants, (p)ppGpp levels increase in response to abiotic stress and to plant hormones which are involved in abiotic and biotic stress signalling. In this study, we analysed the transcriptome of Arabidopsis plants that over-accumulate (p)ppGpp, and unexpectedly found a decrease in the levels of a broad range of transcripts for plant defence and immunity. To determine whether (p)ppGpp is involved in the modulation of plant immunity, we analysed the susceptibility of plants with different levels of (p)ppGpp to Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) carrying a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter. We found that (p)ppGpp accumulation was associated with increased susceptibility to TuMV and reduced levels of the defence hormone salicylic acid (SA). In contrast, plants with lower (p)ppGpp levels showed reduced susceptibility to TuMV, and this was associated with the precocious up-regulation of defence-related genes and increased SA content. We have therefore demonstrated a new link between (p)ppGpp metabolism and plant immunity in Arabidopsis. © 2017 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  7. Affinity of guanosine derivatives for polycytidylate revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Hurley, T. B.; Baird, E. E.

    1995-01-01

    Evidence is presented for complexation of guanosine 5'-monophosphate 2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG) with polycytidylate (poly(C)) at pH 8.0 and 23 degrees C in the presence of 1.0 M NaCl2 and 0.2 M MgCl2 in water. The association of 2-MeImpG with poly(C) was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy as well as by monitoring the kinetics of the nucleophilic substitution reaction of the imidazole moiety by amines. The results of both methods are consistent with moderately strong poly(C) 2-MeImpG complexation and the spectrophotometric measurements allowed the construction of a binding isotherm with a concentration of 2-MeImpG equal to 5.55 +/- 0.15 mM at half occupancy. UV spectroscopy was employed to establish the binding of other guanosine derivatives on poly(C). These derivatives are guanosine 5'-monophosphate (5'GMP), guanosine 5'-monophosphate imidazolide (ImpG), and guanosine 5'-monophosphate morpholidate (morpG). Within experimental error these guanosine derivatives exhibit the same affinity for poly(C) as 2-MeImpG.

  8. Affinity of guanosine derivatives for polycytidylate revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Hurley, T. B.; Baird, E. E.

    1995-01-01

    Evidence is presented for complexation of guanosine 5'-monophosphate 2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG) with polycytidylate (poly(C)) at pH 8.0 and 23 degrees C in the presence of 1.0 M NaCl2 and 0.2 M MgCl2 in water. The association of 2-MeImpG with poly(C) was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy as well as by monitoring the kinetics of the nucleophilic substitution reaction of the imidazole moiety by amines. The results of both methods are consistent with moderately strong poly(C) 2-MeImpG complexation and the spectrophotometric measurements allowed the construction of a binding isotherm with a concentration of 2-MeImpG equal to 5.55 +/- 0.15 mM at half occupancy. UV spectroscopy was employed to establish the binding of other guanosine derivatives on poly(C). These derivatives are guanosine 5'-monophosphate (5'GMP), guanosine 5'-monophosphate imidazolide (ImpG), and guanosine 5'-monophosphate morpholidate (morpG). Within experimental error these guanosine derivatives exhibit the same affinity for poly(C) as 2-MeImpG.

  9. Nocturnal accumulation of cyclic 3',5'-guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in the chick pineal organ is dependent on activation of guanylyl cyclase-B.

    PubMed

    Olcese, J; Majora, C; Stephan, A; Müller, D

    2002-01-01

    The role of cGMP in the avian pineal is not well understood. Although the light-sensitive secretion of melatonin is a well-known output of the circadian oscillator, pharmacologically elevated cGMP levels do not result in altered melatonin secretory amplitude or phase. This suggests that pineal cGMP signalling does not couple the endogenous circadian oscillator to the expression of melatonin rhythms. Nonetheless, the free-running rhythm of cGMP signalling implies a link to the circadian oscillator in chick pinealocytes. As the circadian rhythm of cGMP levels in vitro is not altered by pharmacological inhibition of phosphodiesterase activity, we infer that the synthesis, rather than the degradation of cGMP, is under circadian control. In vitro experiments with the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine as well as with an inhibitor of the NO-sensitive soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), showed that the NOS-sGC pathway does not play a major role in the circadian control of cGMP generation. In organ culture experiments, we demonstrated that C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), but not atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), elevated daytime levels of cGMP. As CNP acts on the membrane guanylyl cyclase isoform B (GC-B), which is expressed at very high levels in mammalian pineals, we investigated the effect of the membrane GC-specific inhibitor HS-142 on chick pineal cGMP levels. CNP-induced daytime cGMP levels were reduced by HS-142. More importantly, 'spontaneously' high nocturnal levels of cGMP in vitro were reduced to daytime levels by acute addition of HS-142. These data implicate endogenous nocturnal CNP release and subsequent activation of GC-B as the major input driving cGMP synthesis in the chick pineal organ.

  10. NMDA Receptors and the L-Arginine–Nitric Oxide–Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate Pathway Are Implicated in the Antidepressant-Like Action of the Ethanolic Extract from Tabebuia avellanedae in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Andiara E.; Moretti, Morgana; Budni, Josiane; Balen, Grasiela O.; Fernandes, Sinara C.; Veronezi, Patricia O.; Heller, Melina; Micke, Gustavo A.; Pizzolatti, Moacir G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Bark infusion of Tabebuia avellanedae Lorentz ex Griseb is consumed in tropical America folk medicine for the treatment of several diseases, including depressive disorders. It was recently demonstrated that the extract from this plant has antidepressant properties. The present study was aimed at investigating the contribution of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and the L-arginine–nitric oxide (NO)–cyclic guanosine 3′5′-monophosphate (cGMP) pathway to the antidepressant-like action of the ethanolic extract from T. avellanedae (EET) in the tail suspension test (TST). The anti-immobility effect of the extract (30 mg/kg, orally [p.o.]) was prevented by pretreatment of mice with NMDA (0.1 pmol/site, intracerebroventicular [i.c.v.]), L-arginine (750 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [i.p.]), and sildenafil (5 mg/kg, i.p.). Additionally, the combination of MK-801 (0.01 mg/kg, p.o.), 7-nitroindazole (25 mg/kg, i.p.), and 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) (30 pmol/site, i.c.v.) with a subeffective dose of EET (1 mg/kg, p.o.) produced a synergistic antidepressant-like effect in the TST, without causing significant alterations in the locomotor activity. Moreover, the administration of an effective dose of EET (30 mg/kg, p.o.) produced a reduction in NOx levels in the cerebral cortex. Conversely, a subeffective dose of EET (1 mg/kg, p.o.) caused no changes in the cortical NOx levels. Results suggest that the antidepressant-like effect of EET in the TST is dependent on a blockade of NMDA receptor activation and inhibition of NO-cGMP synthesis, significantly extending literature data about the antidepressant-like action of this plant and reinforcing the notion that this plant may be useful in the management of depressive disorders. PMID:24236576

  11. Maximizing the renal cyclic 3'-5'-guanosine monophosphate system with type V phosphodiesterase inhibition and exogenous natriuretic peptide: a novel strategy to improve renal function in experimental overt heart failure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Horng H; Huntley, Brenda K; Schirger, John A; Cataliotti, Alessandro; Burnett, John C

    2006-10-01

    Type V phosphodiesterase (PDE V) metabolizes cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and is abundant in the kidney and vasculature and was found recently in the heart. Sildenafil is a PDE V inhibitor that is used clinically for erectile dysfunction. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a cardiac peptide with vasodilating, lusitropic, and natriuretic properties that are mediated via cGMP. It was hypothesized that chronic inhibition of PDE V (PDE VI) will enhance the renal actions of exogenous BNP by potentiating the renal cGMP. The cardiorenal and humoral function was determined at baseline in two groups of dogs with pacing-induced overt chronic heart failure (CHF; 240 bpm for 10 d): Group 1 (n = 6) received Sildenafil 50 mg orally three times daily during the 10 d of pacing, and group 2 (n = 5) received no PDE V inhibitor. The response to acute subcutaneous BNP (5 microg/kg) administration also was compared in both groups on day 11. The GFR was assessed by inulin clearance (P < 0.05). There was no improvement of renal function in group 1 after 10 d of PDE VI as compared with group 2, despite having higher cardiac output (P < 0.05). Group 1 had significantly higher plasma (44 +/- 2 versus 21 +/- 3 pmol/ml; P < 0.05) and urinary cGMP (4219 +/- 900 versus 1954 +/- 300 pmol/min; P < 0.05) as compared with group 2. With acute subcutaneous BNP administration, group 1 had a natriuretic and diuretic response that was associated with an increase in GFR (30 +/- 6 to 45 +/- 6 ml/min; P < 0.05) and that was not observed in group 2 (25 +/- 6 to 29 +/- 4 ml/min). Plasma BNP increased to a similar extent in both groups with subcutaneous BNP. In contrast, group 1 had a much greater urinary cGMP excretion (4219 +/- 900 to 8600 +/- 1600 pmol/min; P < 0.05) as compared with group 2 (1954 +/- 300 to 3580 +/- 351 pmol/min; P < 0.05). In experimental overt CHF, chronic administration of PDE V inhibitor did not enhance renal function despite an improvement in cardiac output. However, chronic

  12. Nitric oxide synthesis leads to vascular endothelial growth factor synthesis via the NO/cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) pathway in human corpus cavernosal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Komori, Kazuhiko; Tsujimura, Akira; Takao, Tetsuya; Matsuoka, Yasuhiro; Miyagawa, Yasushi; Takada, Shingo; Nonomura, Norio; Okuyama, Akihiko

    2008-07-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells express endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and produce nitric oxide (NO). Recently, increased NO production has been reported to induce the synthesis and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) via the NO/cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) pathway. L-arginine (L-arg), the precursor of NO, and selective phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors that increase levels of intracellular cGMP may complementarily enhance VEGF synthesis in corpus cavernosal smooth muscle cells (CCSMCs), and may consequently restore impaired endothelial function. Expression of eNOS in corpus cavernosal smooth muscle has also been reported. However, it is unclear whether CCSMCs can generate NO. To elucidate whether CCSMCs can synthesize NO and whether NO synthesis enhances VEGF synthesis via the NO/cGMP pathway. Corpus cavernosal cells were cultured and characterized by immunocytochemistry and immunoblotting. CCSMCs were treated with L-arg. CCSMCs were also incubated with L-arg and with vardenafil, an inhibitor of PDE-5. Release of NO from cells was confirmed by assay of NO metabolites (NOx). Intracellular cGMP concentration and VEGF concentration in the medium were measured. Isolated cells were determined to be CCSMCs. The expression of eNOS by CCSMCs was also identified. NOx and cGMP levels in the L-arg-treated group were significantly greater than those in the control group. VEGF and cGMP levels in the L-arg-treated group were also significantly greater than those in the control group. VEGF and cGMP levels in the L-arg + vardenafil-treated group were significantly greater than those in the L-arg-treated group and the control group. CCSMCs express eNOS and synthesize NO. NO synthesis leads to enhancement of VEGF synthesis via the NO/cGMP pathway. Combined L-arg and vardenafil treatment, which can enhance VEGF production, may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of erectile dysfunction as well as endothelial

  13. Hindbrain raphe stimulation boosts cyclic adenosine monophosphate and signaling proteins in the injured spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Carballosa-Gonzalez, Melissa M; Vitores, Alberto; Hentall, Ian D

    2014-01-16

    Early recovery from incomplete spinal cord contusion is improved by prolonged stimulation of the hindbrain's serotonergic nucleus raphe magnus (NRM). Here we examine whether increases in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), an intracellular signaling molecule with several known restorative actions on damaged neural tissue, could play a role. Subsequent changes in cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of protein kinase A (PKA) and PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the transcription factor "cAMP response element-binding protein" (CREB) are also analyzed. Rats with moderate weight-drop injury at segment T8 received 2h of NRM stimulation beginning three days after injury, followed immediately by separate extraction of cervical, thoracic and lumbar spinal cord for immunochemical assay. Controls lacked injury, stimulation or both. Injury reduced cAMP levels to under half of normal in all three spinal regions. NRM stimulation completely restored these levels, while producing no significant change in non-injured rats. Pretreatment with the 5-HT7 receptor antagonist pimozide (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) lowered cAMP in non-injured rats to injury amounts, which were unchanged by NRM stimulation. The phosphorylated fraction of PKA (pPKA) and CREB (pCREB) was reduced significantly in all three regions after SCI and restored by NRM stimulation, except for pCREB in lumbar segments. In conclusion, SCI produces spreading deficits in cAMP, pPKA and pCREB that are reversible by Gs protein-coupled 5-HT receptors responding to raphe-spinal activity, although these signaling molecules are not reactive to NRM stimulation in normal tissue. These findings can partly explain the benefits of NRM stimulation after SCI. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. The role of surface energy in guanosine nucleotide alignment: an intriguing scenario.

    PubMed

    Tone, Caterina M; De Santo, Maria P; Ciuchi, Federica

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we report how the confining surfaces and the ionic effects of different concentration of guanosine solution can be used to vary the alignment of liquid crystal phases of guanosine nucleotides. Liquid crystal phases of guanosine 5'-monophosphate ammonium salt and guanosine 5'-monophosphate free acid in pure water, with and without silver sulphate, were studied by polarized optical microscope. A periodic modulation of the texture was observed. This modulation depends on both on the concentration and on the presence of silver ions in the liquid crystal phase. We demonstrate that, according to the surface energy of the alignment layers, it is possible to homeotropically align the guanosine chromonic phase without applying any external magnetic field. Finally, we report the formation of spherical, vesicle-like guanosine 5'-monophosphate aggregates, when the solution was confined between two hydrophobic surfaces containing exposed Si groups. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Photooxidation of d(TpG) by phthalocyanines and riboflavin. Isolation and characterization of dinucleoside monophosphates containing the 4R* and 4S* diastereoisomers of 4,8-dihydro-4-hydroxy-8-oxo-2'-deoxy-guanosine.

    PubMed Central

    Buchko, G W; Cadet, J; Berger, M; Ravanat, J L

    1992-01-01

    Phthalocyanine mediated photosensitization of 2'-deoxyguanosine (dG) in oxygen saturated aqueous solution has previously been shown to result in the addition of molecular oxygen to the guanine base generating the 4R* and 4S* diastereoisomers of 4,8-dihydro-4-hydroxy-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (dO) (the asterisk denotes unambiguous assignment of the 4R and 4S diastereoisomers). The data presented here show that the same guanine modified bases are generated in a 1:1 ratio when thymidylyl-(3',5')-2'-deoxyguanosine (d(TpG)) is similarly photo-oxidized. These modified dinucleoside monophosphates, labelled d(TpO)-A and -B, have been isolated by high performance liquid chromatography and characterized by proton NMR spectrometry, fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry, and enzymatic digestions. Photosensitization in D2O instead of H2O leads to an increase in the rate of d(TpO) formation that is consistent with a type II (singlet oxygen) reaction mechanism. Three interesting properties of these modified dinucleoside monophosphates are: i) the rate of their digestion with spleen phosphodiesterase is greatly reduced relative to d(TpG), ii) they are not digested by snake venom phosphodiesterase, and iii) they are stable to 1.0 M piperidine at 90 degrees C for 30 min. The latter observation indicates that 4,8-dihydro-4-hydroxy-8-oxoguanine is not a base lesion responsible for the strand breaks observed following hot piperidine treatment of DNA exposed to type II photosensitizers or chemically generated singlet oxygen. PMID:1329029

  16. Electrocatalytic properties of guanine, adenine, guanosine-5'-monophosphate, and ssDNA by Fe(II) bis(2,2':6',2''-terpyridine), Fe(II) tris(1,10-phenanthroline), and poly-Fe(II) tris(5-amino-1,10-phenanthroline).

    PubMed

    Chen, Shen-Ming; Wang, Ching-Hung

    2007-05-01

    The electrocatalytic oxidations of guanine, adenine, guanosine-5'-monophosphate(GMP) and ssDNA were performed in the presence of Fe(II) bis(2,2':6',2''-terpyridine) and Fe(II) tris(1,10-phenanthroline) complexes as homogeneous catalysts by cyclic voltammetric methods. The Fe(II/III) redox couple of these compounds is responsible for their catalytic properties. The electrocatalytic oxidation current of above substrates were developed from the anodic peak currents of Fe(II) bis(2,2':6',2''-terpyridine) and Fe(II) tris(1,10-phenanthroline) complexes at about +0.93 V and 0.97 V, respectively. The electrocatalytic oxidative properties of guanine by Fe(II) bis(2,2':6',2''-terpyridine) complex was measured by amperometry method using the rotating disk electrodes. Electropolymerization of Fe(II) tris(5-amino-1,10-phenanthroline) complex produced thin polymer films on gold and glassy carbon electrodes. The electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) and cyclic voltammetry were used to study the in situ growth of the polymer. The poly(FeII(5-NH(2)-1,10-phen)(3)) exhibited a good electrocatalytic oxidation towards guanine and also for the mixture of guanine and adenine too.

  17. Effect of atrial natriuretic factor and 8-bromo cyclic guanosine 3':5'-monophosphate on ( sup 3 H)acetylcholine outflow from myenteric-plexus longitudinal muscle of the guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Matusak, O.; Kuchel, O.; Hamet, P. )

    1991-04-01

    We report that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) inhibits electrically induced cholinergic twitches of longitudinal muscle in whole intestinal segments and myenteric-plexus longitudinal muscle (MPLM) strips from the guinea pig ileum. To elucidate the possible presynaptic mechanism of ANF's action, we studied spontaneous and stimulation-evoked radiolabeled acetylcholine (ACh) outflow from MPLM after incubation with ({sup 3}H)choline. We developed a method of mounting and treating MPLM preparations, which allowed us, at the same time, to record isometric contractions and to determine ({sup 3}H)ACh outflow upon electrical stimulation by a train of three pulses. ANF (5 x 10{sup {minus} 8}M), norepinephrine (2 x 10{sup {minus} 7}) M and 8-bromoguanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (10{sup {minus} 3} M) in nearly equieffective concentrations caused a similar inhibition of cholinergic twitches. However, ANF had no effect on ({sup 3}H)ACh outflow, whereas norepinephrine was found to suppress ({sup 3}H)ACh outflow and 8-bromoguanosine 3':5'-cGMP to enhanced ({sup 3}H)ACh outflow. ANF (5 x 10{sup {minus} 8} M) caused a 7.0-fold increase of cGMP over control values, predominantly in muscle layers, whereas Escherichia coli heat-stable toxin (12.5 U/ml) elicited a 35-fold increment of cGMP in the extramuscular layer. Thus, ANF is able to elevate cGMP in intestinal smooth muscle and to inhibit cholinergic contractions of MPLM. This inhibition is mimicked by exogenous cGMP and by endogenously generated cyclic nucleotides. We suggest that the depressive action of ANF on cholinergic contractions of MPLM is mediated via its postsynaptic impact implicating elevation of cGMP in smooth muscle.

  18. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase attenuates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through regulation of FOXO3a/MAFbx signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baolin; Wu, Qiang; Xiong, Zhaojun; Ma, Yuedong; Yu, Sha; Chen, Dandan; Huang, Shengwen; Dong, Yugang

    2016-09-01

    Control of cardiac muscle mass is thought to be determined by a dynamic balance of protein synthesis and degradation. Recent studies have demonstrated that atrophy-related forkhead box O 3a (FOXO3a)/muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx) signaling pathway plays a central role in the modulation of proteolysis and exert inhibitory effect on cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation attenuates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by regulating FOXO3a/MAFbx signaling pathway and its downstream protein degradation. The results showed that activation of AMPK with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAR) attenuated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by angiotensin II (Ang II). The antihypertrophic effects of AICAR were blunted by AMPK inhibitor Compound C. In addition, AMPK dramatically increased the activity of transcription factor FOXO3a, up-regulated the expression of its downstream ubiquitin ligase MAFbx, and enhanced cardiomyocyte proteolysis. Meanwhile, the effects of AMPK on protein degradation and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy were blocked after MAFbx was silenced by transfection of cardiomyocytes with MAFbx-siRNA. These results indicate that AMPK plays an important role in the inhibition of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by activating protein degradation via FOXO3a/MAFbx signaling pathway.

  19. Polyphosphate, cyclic AMP, guanosine tetraphosphate, and c-di-GMP reduce in vitro Lon activity

    PubMed Central

    Osbourne, Devon O; Soo, Valerie WC; Konieczny, Igor; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Lon protease is conserved from bacteria to humans and regulates cellular processes by degrading different classes of proteins including antitoxins, transcriptional activators, unfolded proteins, and free ribosomal proteins. Since we found that Lon has several putative cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) binding sites and since Lon binds polyphosphate (polyP) and lipid polysaccharide, we hypothesized that Lon has an affinity for phosphate-based molecules that might regulate its activity. Hence we tested the effect of polyP, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp), c-di-GMP, and GMP on the ability of Lon to degrade α-casein. Inhibition of in vitro Lon activity occurred for polyP, cAMP, ppGpp, and c-di-GMP. We also demonstrated by HPLC that Lon is able to bind c-di-GMP. Therefore, four cell signals were found to regulate the activity of Lon protease. PMID:24874800

  20. Impaired adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase signalling in dorsal root ganglia neurons is linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and peripheral neuropathy in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Darrell R.; Saleh, Ali; Schapansky, Jason; Marquez, Alexandra; Gomes, Suzanne; Akude, Eli; Morrow, Dwane; Calcutt, Nigel A.; Fernyhough, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction occurs in sensory neurons and may contribute to distal axonopathy in animal models of diabetic neuropathy. The adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) signalling axis senses the metabolic demands of cells and regulates mitochondrial function. Studies in muscle, liver and cardiac tissues have shown that the activity of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and PGC-1α is decreased under hyperglycaemia. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that deficits in adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase/PGC-1α signalling in sensory neurons underlie impaired axonal plasticity, suboptimal mitochondrial function and development of neuropathy in rodent models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Phosphorylation and expression of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase/PGC-1α and mitochondrial respiratory chain complex proteins were downregulated in dorsal root ganglia of both streptozotocin-diabetic rats and db/db mice. Adenoviral-mediated manipulation of endogenous adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activity using mutant proteins modulated neurotrophin-directed neurite outgrowth in cultures of sensory neurons derived from adult rats. Addition of resveratrol to cultures of sensory neurons derived from rats after 3–5 months of streptozotocin-induced diabetes, significantly elevated adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase levels, enhanced neurite outgrowth and normalized mitochondrial inner membrane polarization in axons. The bioenergetics profile (maximal oxygen consumption rate, coupling efficiency, respiratory control ratio and spare respiratory capacity) was aberrant in cultured sensory neurons from streptozotocin-diabetic rats and was corrected by resveratrol treatment. Finally, resveratrol treatment for the last 2 months of a 5-month period of diabetes reversed thermal hypoalgesia and attenuated foot skin

  1. Enhanced activation of NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 attenuates spontaneous hypertension by improvement of endothelial nitric oxide synthase coupling via tumor suppressor kinase liver kinase B1/adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase-mediated guanosine 5'-triphosphate cyclohydrolase 1 preservation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hoon; Hwang, Jung Hwan; Kim, Kyung-Shim; Noh, Jung-Ran; Gang, Gil-Tae; Oh, Won Keun; Jeong, Kyeong-Hoon; Kwak, Tae Hwan; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Lee, In-Kyu; Lee, Chul-Ho

    2014-02-01

    Guanosine 5'-triphosphate cyclohydrolase-1 (GTPCH-1) is a rate-limiting enzyme in de-novo synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an essential cofactor for endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) coupling. Adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is crucial for GTPCH-1 preservation, and tumor suppressor kinase liver kinase B1 (LKB1), an upstream kinase of AMPK, is activated by NAD-dependent class III histone deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1)-mediated deacetylation. β-Lapachone has been shown to increase cellular NAD/NADH ratio via quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) activation. In this study, we have evaluated whether β-lapachone-induced NQO1 activation modulates blood pressure (BP) through preservation of GTPCH-1 in a hypertensive animal model. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), primary aortic endothelial cells, and endothelial cell line were used to investigate the hypotensive effect of β-lapachone and its action mechanism. β-Lapachone treatment dramatically lowered BP and vascular tension in SHRs and induced eNOS activation in endothelial cells. Consistent with these effects, β-lapachone treatment also elevated levels of both aortic cGMP and plasma nitric oxide in SHRs. Meanwhile, β-lapachone-treated SHRs showed significantly increased levels of aortic NAD, LKB1 deacetylation, and AMPK Thr phosphorylation followed by increased GTPCH-1 and tetrahydrobiopterin/dihydrobiopterin ratio. In-vitro study revealed that AMPK inhibition by overexpression of dominant-negative AMPK nearly abolished GTPCH-1 protein conservation. Enhanced LKB1 deacetylation and AMPK activation were also elicited by β-lapachone in endothelial cells. However, inhibition of LKB1 deacetylation by blocking of NQO1 or SIRT1 blunted AMPK activation by β-lapachone. This is the first study demonstrating that eNOS coupling can be regulated by NQO1 activation via LKB1/AMPK/GTPCH-1 modulation, which is possibly correlated with relieving hypertension. These findings provide strong

  2. Electroacupuncture preconditioning attenuates ischemic brain injury by activation of the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Qiang-qiang; Chen, Huai-long; Liu, Yan-li; Yu, Hai-xia; Shi, Fei; Wang, Ming-shan

    2015-01-01

    Electroacupuncture has therapeutic effects on ischemic brain injury, but its mechanism is still poorly understood. In this study, mice were stimulated by electroacupuncture at the Baihui (GV20) acupoint for 30 minutes at 1 mA and 2/15 Hz for 5 consecutive days. A cerebral ischemia model was established by ligating the bilateral common carotid artery for 15 minutes. At 72 hours after injury, neuronal injury in the mouse hippocampus had lessened, and the number of terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling-positive cells reduced after electroacupuncture treatment. Moreover, expression of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα) and phosphorylated AMPKα was up-regulated. Intraperitoneal injection of the AMPK antagonist, compound C, suppressed this phenomenon. Our findings suggest that electroacupuncture preconditioning alleviates ischemic brain injury via AMPK activation. PMID:26330828

  3. Influenza virion RNA-dependent RNA polymerase: stimulation by guanosine and related compounds.

    PubMed Central

    McGeoch, D; Kitron, N

    1975-01-01

    The activity of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of several influenza viruses is stimulated by guanosine. Depending upon the virus strain used, the stimulation of initial reaction rate is up to 10-fold. 5'-GMP, 3',5'-cyclic GMP, and 5'-GDP show lesser stimulation effects. No other nucleosides of 5'-NMPs stimulate, but the dinucleoside monophosphates GpG and GpC show large stimulations. We present evidence that the stimulation represents preferential initiation of genome complementary RNA chains with guanosine: (i) [3-H] guanosine is incorporated specifically at the 5'terminus of RNA in polymerase reaction mixes in vitro. (ii) This incorporation reaction has several properties similar to those of the virion polymerase elongation reaction. (iii) RNA made in the stimulated reaction behaves as complementary RNA in annealing kinetic studies, as does RNA labeled with [3-H]guanosine. PMID:163915

  4. Estradiol regulation of hypothalamic astrocyte adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase activity: role of hindbrain catecholamine signaling.

    PubMed

    Tamrakar, Pratistha; Briski, Karen P

    2015-01-01

    Recent work challenges the conventional notion that metabolic monitoring in the brain is the exclusive function of neurons. This study investigated the hypothesis that hypothalamic astrocytes express the ultra-sensitive energy gauge adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and that the ovarian hormone estradiol (E) controls activation of this sensor by insulin-induced hypoglycemia (IIH). E- or oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized (OVX) rats were pretreated by caudal fourth ventricular administration of the catecholamine neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) prior to sc insulin or vehicle injection. Individual astrocytes identified in situ by glial fibrillary acidic protein immunolabeling were laser-microdissected from the ventromedial (VMH), arcuate (ARH), and paraventricular (PVH) nuclei and the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), and pooled within each site for Western blot analysis of AMPK and phosphoAMPK (pAMPK) protein expression. In the VMH, baseline astrocyte AMPK and pAMPK levels were respectively increased or decreased in OVX+E versus OVX+O; these profiles did not differ between E and O rats in other hypothalamic loci. In E animals, astrocyte AMPK protein was reduced [VMH] or augmented [PVH; LHA] in response to either 6-OHDA or IIH. IIH increased astrocyte pAMPK expression in each structure in vehicle-, but not 6-OHDA-pretreated E rats. Results provide novel evidence for hypothalamic astrocyte AMPK expression and hindbrain catecholamine-dependent activation of this cell-specific sensor by hypoglycemia in the presence of estrogen. Further research is needed to determine the role of astrocyte AMPK in reactivity of these glia to metabolic imbalance and contribution to restoration of neuro-metabolic stability.

  5. Modulation of guanosine nucleotides biosynthetic pathways enhanced GDP-L-fucose production in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Heong; Shin, So-Yeon; Kim, Myoung-Dong; Han, Nam Soo; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2012-03-01

    Guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) is the key substrate for biosynthesis of guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-L-fucose. In this study, improvement of GDP-L-fucose production was attempted by manipulating the biosynthetic pathway for guanosine nucleotides in recombinant Escherichia coli-producing GDP-L-fucose. The effects of overexpression of inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP) dehydrogenase, guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP) synthetase (GuaB and GuaA), GMP reductase (GuaC) and guanosine-inosine kinase (Gsk) on GDP-L-fucose production were investigated in a series of fed-batch fermentations. Among the enzymes tested, overexpression of Gsk led to a significant improvement of GDP-L-fucose production. Maximum GDP-L-fucose concentration of 305.5 ± 5.3 mg l(-1) was obtained in the pH-stat fed-batch fermentation of recombinant E. coli-overexpressing Gsk, which corresponds to a 58% enhancement in the GDP-L-fucose production compared with the control strain overexpressing GDP-L-fucose biosynthetic enzymes. Such an enhancement of GDP-L-fucose production could be due to the increase in the intracellular level of GMP.

  6. Cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling in the anterior pituitary gland in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2017-08-16

    The cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) was the first among the so-called "second messengers" to be described. It is conserved in most organisms and functions as a signal transducer by mediating the intracellular effects of multiple hormones and neurotransmitters. In this review, we first delineate how different members of the cAMP pathway ensure its correct compartmentalization and activity, mediate the terminal intracellular effects, and allow the crosstalk with other signaling pathways. We then focus on the pituitary gland, where cAMP exerts a crucial function by controlling the responsiveness of the cells to hypothalamic hormones, neurotransmitters and peripheral factors. We discuss the most relevant physiological functions mediated by cAMP in the different pituitary cell types, and summarize the defects affecting this pathway that have been reported in the literature. We finally discuss how a deregulated cAMP pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of pituitary disorders and how it affects the response to therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Separate 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors on the salivary gland of the blowfly are linked to the generation of either cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate or calcium signals.

    PubMed Central

    Berridge, M. J.; Heslop, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    1 5'-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) stimulates the formation of two separate second messengers in the salivary gland of the blowfly. Activation of adenylate cyclase raises adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) whereas the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol (PI) is associated with an increase in calcium permeability. The possibility that these two signal pathways might be controlled by separate 5-HT receptors was studied by testing the specificity of 5-HT analogues and antagonists. 2 The parent compound 5-HT was found to stimulate both cyclic AMP formation and the related parameters of PI hydrolysis and calcium transport with similar dose-response relationships. 3 Certain analogues such as 4- and 5-fluoro-alpha-methyltryptamine were capable of raising cyclic AMP levels and stimulating fluid secretion but did not stimulate the hydrolysis of PI or the entry of calcium. 4 Other analogues, which had chloro or methyl substituents at the 5-position, were found to stimulate the hydrolysis of PI and the transport of calcium at much lower doses than those required to stimulate the formation of cyclic AMP. 5 Antagonists were also found to exert selective effects. Methysergide was a potent inhibitor of PI hydrolysis whereas cinanserin was far more selective in blocking the stimulatory effect of 5-HT on cyclic AMP formation. 6 It is concluded that 5-HT acts on two separate receptors, a 5-HT1 receptor acting through calcium and a 5-HT2 receptor which mediates its effects through cyclic AMP. PMID:6265018

  8. Adenosine(5') oligophospho-(5') guanosines and guanosine(5') oligophospho-(5') guanosines in human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Schlüter, H; Grobeta, I; Bachmann, J; Kaufmann, R; van der Giet, M; Tepel, M; Nofer, J R; Assmann, G; Karas, M; Jankowski, J; Zidek, W

    1998-01-01

    We isolated and identified nucleoside(5') oligophospho-(5') nucleosides containing adenosine and guanosine (ApnG; n = 3-6) as well as diguanosine polyphosphates (GpnG; n = 3-6) in human platelets. For identification, UV spectrometry, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, postsource decay matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, and enzymatic cleavage experiments were used. The adenosine(5') oligophospho-(5') guanosines act as vasoconstrictors and growth factors. The diguanosine polyphosphates are potent modulators of growth in vascular smooth muscle cells, but do not affect vascular tone. PMID:9449703

  9. SIRT1/Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase α Signaling Enhances Macrophage Polarization to an Anti-inflammatory Phenotype in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Park, So Youn; Lee, Sung Won; Lee, Sang Yeob; Hong, Ki Whan; Bae, Sun Sik; Kim, Koanhoi; Kim, Chi Dae

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages are crucially involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Macrophages of the M1 phenotype act as pro-inflammatory mediators in synovium, whereas those of the M2 phenotype suppress inflammation and promote tissue repair. SIRT1 is a class 3 histone deacetylase with anti-inflammatory characteristics. However, the role played by SIRT1 in macrophage polarization has not been defined in RA. We investigated whether SIRT1 exerts anti-inflammatory effects by modulating M1/M2 polarization in macrophages from RA patients. In this study, SIRT1 activation promoted the phosphorylation of an adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) α/acetyl-CoA carboxylase in macrophages exposed to interleukin (IL)-4, and that this resulted in the expressions of M2 genes, including MDC, FcεRII, MrC1, and IL-10, at high levels. Furthermore, these expressions were inhibited by sirtinol (an inhibitor of SIRT1) and compound C (an inhibitor of AMPK). Moreover, SIRT1 activation downregulated LPS/interferon γ-mediated NF-κB activity by inhibiting p65 acetylation and the expression of M1 genes, such as CCL2, iNOS, IL-12 p35, and IL-12 p40. Macrophages from SIRT1 transgenic (Tg)-mice exhibited enhanced polarization of M2 phenotype macrophages and reduced polarization of M1 phenotype macrophages. In line with these observations, SIRT1-Tg mice showed less histological signs of arthritis, that is, lower TNFα and IL-1β expressions and less severe arthritis in the knee joints, compared to wild-type mice. Taken together, the study shows activation of SIRT1/AMPKα signaling exerts anti-inflammatory activities by regulating M1/M2 polarization, and thereby reduces inflammatory responses in RA. Furthermore, it suggests that SIRT1 signaling be viewed as a therapeutic target in RA.

  10. Trichomonas vaginalis NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase hydrolyze guanine nucleotides and increase extracellular guanosine levels under serum restriction.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Camila Braz; Durgante, Juliano; de Oliveira, Rafael Rodrigues; Dos Santos, Victor Hugo Jacks Mendes; Rodrigues, Luiz Frederico; Garcia, Solange Cristina; Dos Santos, Odelta; Tasca, Tiana

    2016-05-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the aethiologic agent of trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease in the world. The purinergic signaling pathway is mediated by extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides that are involved in many biological effects as neurotransmission, immunomodulation and inflammation. Extracellular nucleotides can be hydrolyzed by a family of enzymes known as ectonucleotidases including the ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (E-NTPDases) family which hydrolyses nucleosides triphosphate and diphosphate as preferential substrates and ecto-5'-nucleotidase which catalyzes the conversion of monophosphates into nucleosides. In T. vaginalis the E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities upon adenine nucleotides have already been characterized in intact trophozoites but little is known concerning guanine nucleotides and nucleoside. These enzymes may exert a crucial role on nucleoside generation, providing the purine sources for the synthesis de novo of these essential nutrients, sustaining parasite growth and survival. In this study, we investigated the hydrolysis profile of guanine-related nucleotides and nucleoside in intact trophozoites from long-term-grown and fresh clinical isolates of T. vaginalis. Knowing that guanine nucleotides are also substrates for T. vaginalis ectoenzymes, we evaluated the profile of nucleotides consumption and guanosine uptake in trophozoites submitted to a serum limitation condition. Results show that guanine nucleotides (GTP, GDP, GMP) were substrates for T. vaginalis ectonucleotidases, with expected kinetic parameters for this enzyme family. Different T. vaginalis isolates (two from the ATCC and nine fresh clinical isolates) presented a heterogeneous hydrolysis profile. The serum culture condition increased E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities with high consumption of extracellular GTP generating enhanced GDP, GMP and guanosine levels as demonstrated by HPLC, with final

  11. Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli. Purification by affinity chromatography, subunit structure and inhibition by guanosine 5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, H J; Lowe, C R; Drabble, W T

    1979-01-01

    Escherichia coli IMP dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.14) was purified by affinity chromatography on immobilized nucleotides. The enzyme binds to agarose-bound 8-(6-aminohexyl)-AMP, N6-(6-aminohexyl)-AMP and 8-(8-amino-octyl)-IMP but not to immobilized NAD+ or Cibacron Blue F3G-A. AMP proved to be an effective eluent. A large-scale purification scheme in which 8-(6-aminohexyl)-AMP-agarose was used resulted in a homogeneous preparation of IMP dehydrogenase. The enzyme was also purified by immunoprecipitation with monospecific antisera. Sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, N-terminal amino acid analysis and tryptic 'finger-printing' demonstrated that IMP dehydrogenase comprises identical subunits of mol.wt. 58000. Trypsin and Pronase cleave the 58000-mol.wt. subunit into peptides of mol.wts. 42000 and 14000, with a concomitant decrease in enzyme activity. These observations rationalize much of the contradictory data on the subunit composition of the enzyme found in the literature. GMP appears to be a competitive inhibitor with respect to IMP, with no evidence for regulatory behaviour being found. The two purification procedures were also used to purify inactive mutant enzymes from guaB mutant strains of E. coli. PMID:44191

  12. RECIPIENT PRETRANSPLANT INOSINE MONOPHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY IN NONMYELOABLATIVE HCT

    PubMed Central

    Bemer, Meagan J.; Risler, Linda J.; Phillips, Brian R.; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S.; Boeckh, Michael J.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5’- monophosphate (IMP) to xanthosine 5’-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNC) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T-cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation, but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, non-relapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient’s pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient’s sensitivity to MMF, but confirmatory studies are needed. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. PMID:24923537

  13. Nucleotides as nucleophiles: reactions of nucleotides with phosphoimidazolide activated guanosine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Rosenbach, M. T.; Hurley, T. B.

    1991-01-01

    An earlier study of the reaction of phosphoimidazolide activated nucleosides (ImpN) in aqueous phosphate buffers indicated two modes of reaction of the phosphate monoanion and dianion. The first mode is catalysis of the hydrolysis of the P-N bond in ImpN's which leads to imidazole and nucleoside 5'-monophosphate. The second represents a nucleophilic substitution of the imidazole to yield the nucleoside 5'-diphosphate. This earlier study thus served as a model for the reaction of ImpN with nucleoside monophosphates (pN) because the latter can be regarded as phosphate derivatives. In the present study we investigated the reaction of guanosine 5'-phosphate-2-methylimidazolide, 2-MeImpG, in the presence of pN (N = guanosine, adenosine and uridine) in the range 6.9 less than or equal to pH less than or equal to 7.7. We observed that pN's do act as nucleophiles to form NppG, and as general base to enhance the hydrolysis of the P-N bond in 2-MeImpG, i.e. pN show the same behavior as inorganic phosphate. The kinetic analysis yields the following rate constants for the dianion pN2-: knpN = 0.17 +/- 0.02 M-1 h-1 for nucleophilic attack and khpN = 0.11 +/- 0.07 M-1 h-1 for general base catalysis of the hydrolysis. These rate constants which are independent of the nucleobase compare with kp.2 = 0.415 M-1 h-1 and khp2. = 0.217 M-1 h-1 for the reactions of HPO4(2-). In addition, this study shows that under conditions where pN presumably form stacks, the reaction mechanism remains unchanged although in quantitative terms stacked pN are somewhat less reactive. Attack by the 2'-OH and 3'-OH groups of the ribose moiety in amounts greater than or equal to 1% is not observed; this is attributed to the large difference in nucleophilicity in the neutral pH range between the phosphate group and the ribose hydroxyls. This nucleophilicity rank is not altered by stacking.

  14. Partial 13C isotopic enrichment of nucleoside monophosphates: useful reporters for NMR structural studies.

    PubMed

    Kishore, Anita I; Mayer, Michael R; Prestegard, James H

    2005-10-27

    Analysis of the 13C isotopic labeling patterns of nucleoside monophosphates (NMPs) extracted from Escherichia coli grown in a mixture of C-1 and C-2 glucose is presented. By comparing our results to previous observations on amino acids grown in similar media, we have been able to rationalize the labeling pattern based on the well-known biochemistry of nucleotide biosynthesis. Except for a few notable absences of label (C4 in purines and C3' in ribose) and one highly enriched site (C1' in ribose), most carbons are randomly enriched at a low level (an average of 13%). These sparsely labeled NMPs give less complex NMR spectra than their fully isotopically labeled analogs due to the elimination of most 13C-13C scalar couplings. The spectral simplicity is particularly advantageous when working in ordered systems, as illustrated with guanosine diphosphate (GDP) bound to ADP ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1) aligned in a liquid crystalline medium. In this system, the absence of scalar couplings and additional long-range dipolar couplings significantly enhances signal to noise and resolution.

  15. Partial 13C isotopic enrichment of nucleoside monophosphates: useful reporters for NMR structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Anita I.; Mayer, Michael R.; Prestegard, James H.

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of the 13C isotopic labeling patterns of nucleoside monophosphates (NMPs) extracted from Escherichia coli grown in a mixture of C-1 and C-2 glucose is presented. By comparing our results to previous observations on amino acids grown in similar media, we have been able to rationalize the labeling pattern based on the well-known biochemistry of nucleotide biosynthesis. Except for a few notable absences of label (C4 in purines and C3′ in ribose) and one highly enriched site (C1′ in ribose), most carbons are randomly enriched at a low level (an average of 13%). These sparsely labeled NMPs give less complex NMR spectra than their fully isotopically labeled analogs due to the elimination of most 13C–13C scalar couplings. The spectral simplicity is particularly advantageous when working in ordered systems, as illustrated with guanosine diphosphate (GDP) bound to ADP ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1) aligned in a liquid crystalline medium. In this system, the absence of scalar couplings and additional long-range dipolar couplings significantly enhances signal to noise and resolution. PMID:16254075

  16. Complex structure and biochemical characterization of the Staphylococcus aureus cyclic diadenylate monophosphate (c-di-AMP)-binding protein PstA, the founding member of a new signal transduction protein family.

    PubMed

    Campeotto, Ivan; Zhang, Yong; Mladenov, Miroslav G; Freemont, Paul S; Gründling, Angelika

    2015-01-30

    Signaling nucleotides are integral parts of signal transduction systems allowing bacteria to cope with and rapidly respond to changes in the environment. The Staphylococcus aureus PII-like signal transduction protein PstA was recently identified as a cyclic diadenylate monophosphate (c-di-AMP)-binding protein. Here, we present the crystal structures of the apo- and c-di-AMP-bound PstA protein, which is trimeric in solution as well as in the crystals. The structures combined with detailed bioinformatics analysis revealed that the protein belongs to a new family of proteins with a similar core fold but with distinct features to classical PII proteins, which usually function in nitrogen metabolism pathways in bacteria. The complex structure revealed three identical c-di-AMP-binding sites per trimer with each binding site at a monomer-monomer interface. Although distinctly different from other cyclic-di-nucleotide-binding sites, as the half-binding sites are not symmetrical, the complex structure also highlighted common features for c-di-AMP-binding sites. A comparison between the apo and complex structures revealed a series of conformational changes that result in the ordering of two anti-parallel β-strands that protrude from each monomer and allowed us to propose a mechanism on how the PstA protein functions as a signaling transduction protein.

  17. Nitric Oxide Signaling and Neural Stem Cell Differentiation in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tao Li, Jessica; Somasundaram, Chandra; Bian, Ka; Xiong, Weijun; Mahmooduddin, Faiz; Nath, Rahul K.; Murad, Ferid

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to examine whether nitric oxide signaling plays a role in human embryonic stem cell differentiation into neural cells. This article reviews current literature on nitric oxide signaling and neural stem cell differentiation for potential therapeutic application to peripheral nerve regeneration. Methods: Human embryonic H9-stem cells were grown, maintained on mitomycin C–treated mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder layer, cultured on Matrigel to be feeder-free, and used for all the experiments. Fluorescent dual-immunolabeling and confocal image analysis were used to detect the presence of the neural precursor cell markers nestin and nitric oxide synthase-1. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis was used to determine the percentage of expression. Results: We have shown the confocal image of stage 1 human embryonic stem cells coexpressing nestin and nitric oxide synthase-1. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis indicated 24.3% positive labeling of nitric oxide synthase-1. Adding retinoic acid (10−6 M) to the culture medium increased the percent of nitric oxide synthase-1 positive cells to 33.9%. Combining retinoic acid (10−6 M) with 8-brom cyclic guanosine monophosphate (10−5 M), the fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis demonstrated a further increase of nitric oxide synthase-1 positive cells to 45.4%. Our current results demonstrate a prodifferentiation potency of nitric oxide synthase-1, stimulated by retinoic acid with and without cyclic guanosine monophosphate. Conclusion: We demonstrated for the first time how nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling contributes to the development of neural precursors derived from human embryonic stem cells and enhances the differentiation of precursors toward functional neurons for peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:20563304

  18. Irisin ameliorates hepatic glucose/lipid metabolism and enhances cell survival in insulin-resistant human HepG2 cells through adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    So, Wing Yan; Leung, Po Sing

    2016-09-01

    Irisin is a newly identified myokine that promotes the browning of white adipose tissue, enhances glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and modulates hepatic metabolism. However, the signaling pathways involved in the effects on hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism have not been resolved. This study aimed to examine the role of irisin in the regulation of hepatic glucose/lipid metabolism and cell survival, and whether adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a master metabolic regulator in the liver, is involved in irisin's actions. Human liver-derived HepG2 cells were cultured in normal glucose-normal insulin (NGNI) or high glucose-high insulin (HGHI/insulin-resistant) condition. Hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism was evaluated by glucose output and glycogen content or triglyceride accumulation assays, respectively. Our results showed that irisin stimulated phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-CoA-carboxylase (ACC) via liver kinase B1 (LKB1) rather than Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) in HepG2 cells. Irisin ameliorated hepatic insulin resistance induced by HGHI condition. Irisin reduced hepatic triglyceride content and glucose output, but increased glycogen content, with those effects reversed by dorsomorphin, an AMPK inhibitor. Furthermore, irisin also stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation and promoted cell survival in an AMPK-dependent manner. In conclusion, our data indicate that irisin ameliorates dysregulation of hepatic glucose/lipid metabolism and cell death in insulin-resistant states via AMPK activation. These findings reveal a novel irisin-mediated protective mechanism in hepatic metabolism which provides a scientific basis for irisin as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  19. c-di-AMP: An Essential Molecule in the Signaling Pathways that Regulate the Viability and Virulence of Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fahmi, Tazin; Port, Gary C; Cho, Kyu Hong

    2017-08-07

    Signal transduction pathways enable organisms to monitor their external environment and adjust gene regulation to appropriately modify their cellular processes. Second messenger nucleotides including cyclic adenosine monophosphate (c-AMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (c-GMP), cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), and cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) play key roles in many signal transduction pathways used by prokaryotes and/or eukaryotes. Among the various second messenger nucleotides molecules, c-di-AMP was discovered recently and has since been shown to be involved in cell growth, survival, and regulation of virulence, primarily within Gram-positive bacteria. The cellular level of c-di-AMP is maintained by a family of c-di-AMP synthesizing enzymes, diadenylate cyclases (DACs), and degradation enzymes, phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Genetic manipulation of DACs and PDEs have demonstrated that alteration of c-di-AMP levels impacts both growth and virulence of microorganisms. Unlike other second messenger molecules, c-di-AMP is essential for growth in several bacterial species as many basic cellular functions are regulated by c-di-AMP including cell wall maintenance, potassium ion homeostasis, DNA damage repair, etc. c-di-AMP follows a typical second messenger signaling pathway, beginning with binding to receptor molecules to subsequent regulation of downstream cellular processes. While c-di-AMP binds to specific proteins that regulate pathways in bacterial cells, c-di-AMP also binds to regulatory RNA molecules that control potassium ion channel expression in Bacillus subtilis. c-di-AMP signaling also occurs in eukaryotes, as bacterially produced c-di-AMP stimulates host immune responses during infection through binding of innate immune surveillance proteins. Due to its existence in diverse microorganisms, its involvement in crucial cellular activities, and its stimulating activity in host immune responses, c-di-AMP signaling pathway has become an

  20. Convergence of 3',5'-cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate/protein kinase A and glycogen synthase kinase-3beta/beta-catenin signaling in corpus luteum progesterone synthesis.

    PubMed

    Roy, Lynn; McDonald, Claudia A; Jiang, Chao; Maroni, Dulce; Zeleznik, Anthony J; Wyatt, Todd A; Hou, Xiaoying; Davis, John S

    2009-11-01

    Progesterone secretion by the steroidogenic cells of the corpus luteum (CL) is essential for reproduction. Progesterone synthesis is under the control of LH, but the exact mechanism of this regulation is unknown. It is established that LH stimulates the LH receptor/choriogonadotropin receptor, a G-protein coupled receptor, to increase cAMP and activate cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that cAMP/PKA-dependent regulation of the Wnt pathway components glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3beta and beta-catenin contributes to LH-dependent steroidogenesis in luteal cells. We observed that LH via a cAMP/PKA-dependent mechanism stimulated the phosphorylation of GSK3beta at N-terminal Ser9 causing its inactivation and resulted in the accumulation of beta-catenin. Overexpression of N-terminal truncated beta-catenin (Delta90 beta-catenin), which lacks the phosphorylation sites responsible for its destruction, significantly augmented LH-stimulated progesterone secretion. In contrast, overexpression of a constitutively active mutant of GSK3beta (GSK-S9A) reduced beta-catenin levels and inhibited LH-stimulated steroidogenesis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated the association of beta-catenin with the proximal promoter of the StAR gene, a gene that expresses the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, which is a cholesterol transport protein that controls a rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis. Collectively these data suggest that cAMP/PKA regulation of GSK3beta/beta-catenin signaling may contribute to the acute increase in progesterone production in response to LH.

  1. Cyclic GMP signaling in cardiovascular pathophysiology and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Emily J.; Kass, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP) mediates a wide spectrum of physiologic processes in multiple cell types within the cardiovascular system. Dysfunctional signaling at any step of the cascade--- cGMP synthesis, effector activation, or catabolism--- have been implicated in numerous cardiovascular diseases, ranging from hypertension to atherosclerosis to cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. In this review, we outline each step of the cGMP signaling cascade and discuss its regulation and physiologic effects within the cardiovascular system. In addition, we illustrate how cGMP signaling becomes dysregulated in specific cardiovascular disease states. The ubiquitous role cGMP plays in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology presents great opportunities for pharmacologic modulation of the cGMP signal in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. We detail the various therapeutic interventional strategies that have been developed or are in development, summarizing relevant preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:19306895

  2. Dinucleosidetetraphosphatase from Ehrlich ascites tumour cells: inhibition by adenosine, guanosine and uridine 5'-tetraphosphates.

    PubMed

    Moreno, A; Lobatón, C D; Sillero, M A; Sillero, A

    1982-01-01

    1. An enzyme has been partially purified from Ehrlich ascites tumour cells which specifically hydrolyses dinucleosidetetraphosphates, with Km values of around 2 microM. The products of the hydrolysis are the corresponding nucleoside tri- and monophosphates. Dinucleoside Tri- and diphosphates were not substrates of the reaction. 2. The enzyme requires Mg2+ or Mn2+, is maximally active at a pH value of approx. 7.5 and has a mol, wt of 19,800 as estimated by filtration on Sephadex G-75. Nucleoside mono-, di- and triphosphates were competitive inhibitors of the reaction with Ki values in the 0.1 mM range. 3. Particularly relevant is the inhibition of this enzyme by adenosine and guanosine 5'tetraphosphates. In the course of this investigation, the presence of uridine 5'-tetraphosphate was detected in a commercial preparation of UTP. Adenosine, guanosine and uridine 5'-tetraphosphates were very strong inhibitors of the reaction with Ki values in the nM range.

  3. Helix-specific interactions induce condensation of guanosine four-stranded helices in concentrated salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Mariani, P; Ciuchi, F; Saturni, L

    1998-01-01

    Deoxyguanosine-5'-monophosphate in water self-associates into stable structures, which include liquid-crystalline hexagonal and cholesteric phases. The structural unit is a four-stranded helix, composed of stacked Hoogsteen-bonded guanosine quartets. By using the osmotic stress method, we recently measured the force between helices in KCl solutions up to 2 M. In addition to the long-range electrostatic force, a short-range hydration repulsive contribution was recognized. The hydration repulsion is exponential, and shows a decay length independent from the ionic strength of the solution. Here, we report that more concentrated KCl solutions cause condensation of the guanosine helix in a hexagonal phase with constant equilibrium separation of approximately 7 A between helix surfaces. Long-range attraction, which induces the self-assembly, and short-range repulsion, which prevents the contact between the helices, are implied. By using osmotic stress, the force needed to push helices closer from the spontaneously assumed position has been measured. The attractive force was then estimated as a difference between the net force and the repulsive contribution, revealing an exponential decay length about two times larger than that of the short-range repulsion. The agreement with the helix interaction theory introduced recently by Kornyshev and Leikin (Kornyshev, A. A., and S. Leikin, 1997. Theory of interaction between helical molecules. J. Phys. Chem. 107:3656-3674) suggests that the repulsive and attractive forces originate from helix-specific interactions.

  4. Guanosine: a Neuromodulator with Therapeutic Potential in Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lanznaster, Débora; Dal-Cim, Tharine; Piermartiri, Tetsadê C. B.; Tasca, Carla I.

    2016-01-01

    Guanosine is a purine nucleoside with important functions in cell metabolism and a protective role in response to degenerative diseases or injury. The past decade has seen major advances in identifying the modulatory role of extracellular action of guanosine in the central nervous system (CNS). Evidence from rodent and cell models show a number of neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects of guanosine preventing deleterious consequences of seizures, spinal cord injury, pain, mood disorders and aging-related diseases, such as ischemia, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. The present review describes the findings of in vivo and in vitro studies and offers an update of guanosine effects in the CNS. We address the protein targets for guanosine action and its interaction with glutamatergic and adenosinergic systems and with calcium-activated potassium channels. We also discuss the intracellular mechanisms modulated by guanosine preventing oxidative damage, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammatory burden and modulation of glutamate transport. New and exciting avenues for future investigation into the protective effects of guanosine include characterization of a selective guanosine receptor. A better understanding of the neuromodulatory action of guanosine will allow the development of therapeutic approach to brain diseases. PMID:27699087

  5. Recipient pretransplant inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase activity in nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Meagan J; Risler, Linda J; Phillips, Brian R; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S; Boeckh, Michael J; McCune, Jeannine S

    2014-10-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5'-monophosphate to xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, nonrelapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient's pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient's sensitivity to MMF. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients.

  6. The guanylate-binding proteins: emerging insights into the biochemical properties and functions of this family of large interferon-induced guanosine triphosphatase.

    PubMed

    Vestal, Deborah J; Jeyaratnam, Jonathan A

    2011-01-01

    Originally identified by their unusual ability to bind guanosine monophosphate (GMP) nucleotide agarose, the guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) were used extensively to promote our understanding of interferon-induced gene transcription and as markers of interferon responsiveness. Structural and biochemical analyses of human GBP-1 subsequently demonstrated that the GBPs are a unique subfamily of guanosine triphosphatase (GTPases) that hydrolyze guanosine triphosphate (GTP) to both guanosine diphosphate (GDP) and GMP. As members of the larger dynamin superfamily of GTPases, GBPs exhibit such properties as nucleotide-dependent oligomerization and concentration-dependent GTPase activity. Recently, progress has been made in assigning functions to members of the GBP family. While many of these functions involve protection against intracellular pathogens, a growing number of them are not directly related to pathogen protection. It is currently unclear how the unusual properties of GBPs contribute to this growing list of functions. As future studies uncover the molecular mechanism(s) of action of the GBPs, we will gain a greater understanding of how individual GBPs can mediate what currently appears to be a divergent set of functions.

  7. Amnesic effect of GMP depends on its conversion to guanosine.

    PubMed

    Saute, Jonas Alex Morales; da Silveira, Leonardo Evangelista; Soares, Félix Antunes; Martini, Lúcia Helena; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Ganzella, Marcelo

    2006-05-01

    Extracellular guanine-based purines, namely the nucleotides GTP, GDP, GMP and the nucleoside guanosine, exert important neuroprotective and neuromodulator roles in the central nervous system, which may be related to inhibition of the glutamatergic neurotransmission activity. In this study, we investigated GMP effects on mice inhibitory avoidance performance and the dependence on its conversion to guanosine for such effect, by using the ecto-5'-nucleotidase specific inhibitor AOPCP. We also investigated if this conversion occurs in the central nervous system or peripherally, and if guanosine and GMP affect nociception by the tail-flick test. I.p. GMP or guanosine (7.5 mg/kg) or i.c.v. GMP (480 nmol) pretraining administration was amnesic for the inhibitory avoidance task. I.c.v. AOPCP (1 nmol) administration completely reversed the amnesic effect of i.c.v. GMP, but not of i.p. GMP, indicating that peripheral conversion of GMP to guanosine is probably relevant to this effect. AOPCP alone did not interfere with the performance. Furthermore, tail-flick measurement was unaffected by i.p. GMP and guanosine, suggesting that the amnesic effect of both purines was not due to some antinociceptive effect against the footshock used in the task. All these data together, in accordance to those previously observed in studies involving glutamate uptake and seizures reinforce the idea that guanosine is the specific extracellular guanine-based purines effector and indicate that its conversion occurs not only in the central nervous system but also peripherally.

  8. Anti-aging effects of guanosine in glial cells.

    PubMed

    Souza, Débora Guerini; Bellaver, Bruna; Bobermin, Larissa Daniele; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Quincozes-Santos, André

    2016-12-01

    Guanosine, a guanine-based purine, has been shown to exert beneficial roles in in vitro and in vivo injury models of neural cells. Guanosine is released from astrocytes and modulates important astroglial functions, including glutamatergic metabolism, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. Astrocytes are crucial for regulating the neurotransmitter system and synaptic information processes, ionic homeostasis, energy metabolism, antioxidant defenses, and the inflammatory response. Aging is a natural process that induces numerous changes in the astrocyte functionality. Thus, the search for molecules able to reduce the glial dysfunction associated with aging may represent an approach for avoiding the onset of age-related neurological diseases. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-aging effects of guanosine, using primary astrocyte cultures from newborn, adult, and aged Wistar rats. Concomitantly, we evaluated the role of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in guanosine-mediated glioprotection. We observed age-dependent changes in glutamate uptake, glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, the glutathione (GSH) system, pro-inflammatory cytokine (tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β)) release, and the transcriptional activity of nuclear factor kB (NFkB), which were prevented by guanosine in an HO-1-dependent manner. Our findings suggest guanosine to be a promising therapeutic agent able to provide glioprotection during the aging process. Thus, this study contributes to the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of guanosine in the aging process.

  9. cGMP Signaling, Phosphodiesterases and Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Reierson, Gillian W; Guo, Shuyu; Mastronardi, Claudio; Licinio, Julio; Wong, Ma-Li

    2011-01-01

    Deficits in neuroplasticity are hypothesized to underlie the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD): the effectiveness of antidepressants is thought to be related to the normalization of disrupted synaptic transmission and neurogenesis. The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling cascade has received considerable attention for its role in neuroplasticity and MDD. However components of a closely related pathway, the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) have been studied with much lower intensity, even though this signaling transduction cascade is also expressed in the brain and the activity of this pathway has been implicated in learning and memory processes. Cyclic GMP acts as a second messenger; it amplifies signals received at postsynaptic receptors and activates downstream effector molecules resulting in gene expression changes and neuronal responses. Phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzymes degrade cGMP into 5’GMP and therefore they are involved in the regulation of intracellular levels of cGMP. Here we review a growing body of evidence suggesting that the cGMP signaling cascade warrants further investigation for its involvement in MDD and antidepressant action. PMID:22654729

  10. Guanosine 5'-monophosphate modulates gating of high-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D L; Katz, G M; Roy-Contancin, L; Reuben, J P

    1988-01-01

    Ca2+-activated K+ channels (PKCa channels) account for the predominant K+ permeability of many types of smooth muscle cells. When activated, they oppose depolarization due to Na+ and Ca2+ channel activity. Several vasodilatory agents that increase intracellular cGMP levels (e.g., nitroprusside, adenosine, and atrial natriuretic factor) enhance the activity of these high-conductance PKCa channels in on-cell patches of bovine aortic smooth muscle cells. In addition, dibutyryl-cGMP (1.0 mM) causes a similar increase in channel activity. To pursue the mechanism of channel modulation by these agents, a series of guanine and adenine nucleotides were evaluated by using inside-out excised patches. Whereas cAMP, AMP, ADP, and ATP were ineffective, all of the corresponding guanine nucleotides potentiated PKCa channel activity when tested at a high concentration (500 microM). However, only GMP consistently enhanced channel activity in the 1-100 microM range by increasing the percent open time and frequency of opening of these channels over a wide range of potentials and Ca2+ levels without affecting single-channel conductance. Thus, GMP is a potent modulator of PKCa channels and it, rather than cGMP, may mediate the action of the vasodilators examined in this study. PMID:2848262

  11. A possible role for guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate in the stimulus-secretion coupling in exocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, C L; Krishna, G

    1978-11-15

    Carbamylcholine, caerulein and cholecystokinin octapeptide rapidly increased the cyclic GMP concentration and amylase secretion in isolated guinea pig pancreatic slices. The cyclic GMP concentration was increased eight-fold over the basal concentration in 30 s, with concomitant increase in the rate of amylase secretion. The tissue concentration of cyclic GMP then rapidly declined to a plateau value of approx. 16% of the peak level within 10 min and was maintained at that concentration for the duration of the experiment. We have shown earlier (Kapoor, CL. and Krishna, G. (1977) Science 196, 1003--1005) that the decrease of tissue cyclic GMP was due mainly to the secretion of cyclic GMP into the medium. The cyclic AMP concentration in the tissue was not changed, nor was it secreted into the medium. There was a correlation between the concentration response to various agents for the increase in cyclic GMP concentration and amylase secretion in pancreatic slices. Carbamylcholine increased both the cyclic GMP concentration and amylase secretion; the half-maximal effect was achieved at 1.5 micrometer concentration. Caerulein and cholecystokinin octapeptide were 5000 times more potent than carbamylcholine in increasing cyclic GMP concentration and amylase secretion; the half-maximal effect was achieved at 0.3 nM concentration. Atropine, which completely inhibited the increase in cyclic GMP and amylase secretion induced by carbamylcholine, did not block the effects of caerulein or cholecystokinin octapeptide. These results suggest that various secretagogues induced amylase secretion by increasing the cyclic GMP concentration, but the mechanism by which cyclic GMP caused amylase secretion remains to be elucidated.

  12. Discovery of inhibitors of Leishmania β-1,2-mannosyltransferases using a click-chemistry-derived guanosine monophosphate library.

    PubMed

    van der Peet, Phillip; Ralton, Julie E; McConville, Malcolm J; Williams, Spencer J

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania spp. are a medically important group of protozoan parasites that synthesize a novel intracellular carbohydrate reserve polymer termed mannogen. Mannogen is a soluble homopolymer of β-1,2-linked mannose residues that accumulates in the major pathogenic stages in the sandfly vector and mammalian host. While several steps in mannogen biosynthesis have been defined, none of the enzymes have been isolated or characterized. We report the development of a simple assay for the GDP-mannose-dependent β-1,2-mannosyltransferases involved in mannogen synthesis. This assay utilizes octyl α-D-mannopyranoside to prime the formation of short mannogen oligomers up to 5 mannose residues. This assay was used to screen a focussed library of 44 GMP-triazole adducts for inhibitors. Several compounds provided effective inhibition of mannogen β-1,2-mannosyltransferases in a cell-free membrane preparation. This assay and inhibitor compounds will be useful for dissecting the role of different mannosyltransferases in regulating de novo biosynthesis and elongation reactions in mannogen metabolism.

  13. Decreases in Ca2+-dependent K+-currents due to cyclic guanosine monophosphate are not dependent on phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Solntseva, E I; Bukanova, Yu V

    2002-01-01

    Two-microelectrode voltage clamping experiments were performed on isolated snail neurons to measure the Ca2+-dependent. potential-dependent K+ current (I(C)), with assessment of the effects of penetrating cGMP analogs on this current - dibutyryl cGMP (dcGMP) and 8-Br-cGMP. Both of these penetrating cGMP analogs rapidly and reversibly decreased the amplitude of I(C). cGMP analogs produced no shifts in the volt-ampere characteristics of the efflux current along the voltage axis. dcGMP and 8-Br-cGMP had no effect on the influx Ca2+ current. The non-specific protein kinase inhibitor H-8 decreased or had no effect on I(C) in different cells. The effects of both dcGMP and 8-Br-cGMP persisted in the presence of H-8. Decreases in I(C) in the presence of cGMP analogs also persisted in the presence of the protein phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid. These results lead to the conclusion that decreased conductivity of Ca2+-dependent K+ channels occurring in response to cGMP is not associated with phosphorylation.

  14. Impaired muscarinic endothelium-dependent relaxation and cyclic guanosine 5'-monophosphate formation in atherosclerotic human coronary artery and rabbit aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Bossaller, C; Habib, G B; Yamamoto, H; Williams, C; Wells, S; Henry, P D

    1987-01-01

    The dependence of vascular relaxation on an intact endothelium and the relationship between relaxation and cyclic GMP accumulation were determined in coronary arteries isolated from cardiac transplantation patients with or without coronary atherosclerosis. In nonatherosclerotic arteries, the endothelium-dependent agent acetylcholine produced concentration-related relaxations. In atherosclerotic arteries, endothelium-dependent relaxations were abolished with acetylcholine, partly suppressed with substance P and histamine, and completely preserved with the ionophore A23187. In these arteries, the endothelium-independent agent nitroglycerin remained fully active. Accumulation of cyclic GMP in atherosclerotic strips was suppressed with acetylcholine but unattenuated with A23187 and nitroglycerin. In aortas from rabbits with diet-induced atherosclerosis, there was likewise an impaired cholinergic relaxation and cyclic GMP accumulation in the presence of preserved responses to A23187 and nitroglycerin. The results demonstrate that impaired cholinergic responses in atherosclerotic arteries reflect a muscarinic defect and not an inability of endothelium to release endothelial factor or smooth muscle to respond to it. PMID:2432088

  15. Reinforcing feedback loop of renal cyclic guanosine 3' 5' -monophosphate and interstitial hydrostatic pressure in pressure-natriuresis.

    PubMed

    Lieb, David C; Kemp, Brandon A; Howell, Nancy L; Gildea, John J; Carey, Robert M

    2009-12-01

    This study addresses the hypothesis that renal interstitial (RI) cGMP, a modulator of pressure-natriuresis, exerts its effect through a relationship with renal interstitial hydrostatic pressure (RIHP). Increasing renal perfusion pressure in Sprague-Dawley rats led to increases in RIHP (5.2+/-0.6 to 10.9+/-1.6 mm Hg; P<0.01), urine sodium excretion (0.062+/-0.009 to 0.420+/-0.068 micromol/min per gram; P<0.01), and RI cGMP (3.5+/-0.8 to 9.5+/-1.7 fmol/min; P<0.01), and these effects were blocked by partial renal decapsulation. Infusion of cGMP into the RI compartment of decapsulated animals restored natriuresis (0.067+/-0.010 to 0.310+/-0.061 micromol/min per gram; P<0.01). These changes were independent of changes in glomerular filtration rate . Artificially increasing RIHP in normotensive animals increased RI cGMP (4.1+/-0.6 to 6.9+/-0.7 fmol/min; P<0.01) and urine sodium excretion (0.071+/-0.013 to 0.179+/-0.039 micromol/min per gram; P<0.05). Coinfusion of organic anion transport-inhibitor probenecid, or soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor 1-H(1,2,4) oxadiazolo-(4,2)quinoxalin-1-one, abolished these effects. Infusion of cGMP into the RI compartment of normotensive animals increased RIHP (6.7+/-0.4 to 10.3+/-0.9 mm Hg; P<0.001). Exogenous RI cGMP delivery did not affect total, cortical, or medullary renal blood flow. These studies suggest that extracellular RI cGMP is required for the natriuresis observed after increases in renal perfusion pressure and RIHP and that cGMP acts via a tubule mechanism. The results support an intrarenal positive-feedback loop wherein RI cGMP increases RIHP, which, in turn, increases RI cGMP, contributing to the reinforcement of pressure-natriuresis.

  16. 2'-F-ANA-guanosine and 2'-F-guanosine as powerful tools for structural manipulation of G-quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Lech, Christopher Jacques; Li, Zhe; Heddi, Brahim; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2012-12-04

    Here we demonstrate the applicability of 2'-F-ANA-guanosine and 2'-F-guanosine as powerful tools for manipulating G-quadruplex folding by anti-position-favoring substitutions. A single guanine to 2'-F-ANA-guanine substitution can favor a single (3+1) hybrid conformation from a mixture of conformers. Rational substitutions of either type of 2'-F-modified nucleotide enable conformational switching from a (3+1) hybrid to a parallel folding topology.

  17. Hit the right spots: cell cycle control by phosphorylated guanosines in alphaproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Hallez, Régis; Delaby, Marie; Sanselicio, Stefano; Viollier, Patrick H

    2017-03-01

    The class Alphaproteobacteria includes Gram-negative free-living, symbiotic and obligate intracellular bacteria, as well as important plant, animal and human pathogens. Recent work has established the key antagonistic roles that phosphorylated guanosines, cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) and the alarmones guanosine tetraphosphate and guanosine pentaphosphate (collectively referred to as (p)ppGpp), have in the regulation of the cell cycle in these bacteria. In this Review, we discuss the insights that have been gained into the regulation of the initiation of DNA replication and cytokinesis by these second messengers, with a particular focus on the cell cycle of Caulobacter crescentus. We explore how the fluctuating levels of c-di-GMP and (p)ppGpp during the progression of the cell cycle and under conditions of stress control the synthesis and proteolysis of key regulators of the cell cycle. As these signals also promote bacterial interactions with host cells, the enzymes that control (p)ppGpp and c-di-GMP are attractive antibacterial targets.

  18. Screening of free radical formation in crystals of guanosine by ESR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usta, Ayhan; Vural, Hasibe Cingilli; Asik, Biray; Usta, Keziban

    2011-10-01

    In this study, to obtain guanosine polycrystalline, novel crystallization method was performed on powder guanosine material. Effective crystallization conditions were achieved by adjustment of the concentration of the metal ions, chemical solutions, NaCl, KCl, glacial acetic acid, nitric oxide, perchloric acid, glutamic acid, and pH of buffer. Behaviors of the guanosine polycrystal samples exposed to high-energy values were investigated using ESR method. The polycrystal samples were exposed to gamma-rays for 48 and 72 h. ESR signals were not recorded from the non-irradiated sample and the sample irradiated for 48 h, but the polycrystalline sample irradiated for 72 h exhibited complex ESR spectra. ESR measurements were taken on the irradiated sample in temperature range from 300 to 450 K. On the basis of all these measurements dependence temperature, it can be said that the shape of the spectrum was to be dependent on temperature slightly. Hence, we assume that the radical structure occurred was resistance to high temperature. Two radicals were determined in the structure irradiated and these were called radical I and radical II. The g, hyperfine constants, and spin density were found to be ρ = 0.96, a=2.7 mT, a=1.155 mT, aN = 0.35 mT and g1 = 2.0093 for the radical I; aN = 4.7 mT and g2 = 2.0094 for the radical II.

  19. Kinetics of the template-directed oligomerization of guanosine 5'-phosphate-2-methylimidazolide: Effect of temperature on individual steps of reactionion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Bernasconi, C. F.; Alberas, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Non-enzymatic, template-directed reactions have been proposed as models for prebiological polynucleotide synthesis. Chemically activated mononucleotides react in the presence of a polynucleotide, acting as the template in a Watson-Crick base-pairing fashing, and form the complementary daughter polynucleotide. Phosphoimidazolide-activated nucleotides have been used successfully as substrates in these reactions. The kinetics of the guanosine 5'-monophosphate-2-methylimidazolide (2-MelmpG) reaction in aqueous pH 8.0 solutions in the presence and in the absence of polycytidylate (poly(C)) were studied, acting as the template at 6, 23, and 37 C. In the absence of the template, the major reaction pathway of 2-MelmpG is hydrolysis of the P-N bond to form the unreactive guanosine 5'-monophosphate (5'-GMP) and 2-methylimidazole. Concentrated solution of 2-MelmpG (greater than 0.02 M) in the absence of the template form only a small amount dinucleotide, (pG)2, but in the presence of poly(C), oligoguanylates, (pG)n with 2 less than or = n less than or = 40, can be detected. We were able to determine the rate constants for individual steps of this reaction. A summary of the conclusions is presented.

  20. Molecular mechanisms of gravity-dependent signaling in human melanocytic cells involve cyclic GMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Krassimira; Lambers, Britta; Block, Ingrid; Bromeis, Birgit; Das, Pranab K.; Gerzer, Rupert

    2005-08-01

    Gravity alteration (micro- and hypergravity) is known to influence cell functions. As guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) is an important messenger in melanocyte signaling we have compared the regulation of cGMP levels in human melanocytes and melanoma cells with different metastatic potential under hypergravity conditions. We were able to demonstrate that long-term exposure to hypergravity stimulates cGMP efflux in cultured human melanocytes and non- metastatic melanoma cells, whereas highly metastatic melanoma cells appear to be insensitive to hypergravity, most probably, due to an up-regulated cGMP efflux at 1g. Here we report that these effects are associated with the expression of the multidrug resistance proteins 4 and 5 known to act as selective export pumps for amphiphilic anions like cGMP. Thus, an altered gravity vector may induce cGMP-dependent signaling events in melanocytic cells that could be important for malignant transformation.

  1. Reporter molecules as probes of DNA conformation: structure of a crystalline complex containing 2-methyl-4-nitro-aniline ethylene dimethylammonium hydrobromide - 5-iodocytidylyl(3'-5')guanosine

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, N.K.; Nyas, M.N.; Jain, S.C.; Sobell, H.M.

    1984-05-31

    2-Methyl-4-nitroaniline ethylene dimethylammonium hydrobromide forms a crystalline complex with the self-complementary dinucleoside monophosphate, 5-iodocytidylyl(3'-5')guanosine. The crystals are tetragonal, with a = b = 32.192 A and c = 23.964 A, space group P4/sub 3/2/sub 1/2. The structure has been solved to atomic resolution by Patterson and Fourier methods, and refined by full matrix least squares. 5-Iodocytidylyl(3'-5')guanosine molecules are held together in pairs through Watson-Crick base-pairing, forming an antiparallel duplex structure. Nitroaniline molecules stack above and below guanine-cytosine pairs in this duplex structure. In addition, a third nitroaniline molecule stacks on one of the other two nitroaniline molecules. The asymmetric unit contains two 5-iodocytidylyl(3'-5')guanosine molecules, three nitroaniline molecules, one bromide ion and thirty-one water molecules, at total of 160 atoms. Details of the structure are described. 15 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Synthesis of guanosine tetra- and pentaphosphates by the obligately anaerobic bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron in response to molecular oxygen.

    PubMed Central

    Glass, T L; Holmes, W M; Hylemon, P B; Stellwag, E J

    1979-01-01

    Guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate (ppGpp) and guanosine 5'-triphosphate 3'-diphosphate (pppGpp) were detected in formic acid extracts of air-exposed culutres of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. The identification of ppGpp and pppGpp in B. thetaiotaomicron was based on the following results: (i) cochromatography of 32P-labeled hyperphosphorylated nucleotides in two different two-dimensional solvent systems with authentic ppGpp and pppGpp; (ii) incorporation of [3H]guanosine into the putative ppGpp and pppGpp; (iii) alkaline lability; and (iv) resistance, to periodate oxidation. There was a marked increase in the concentration of ppGpp and pppGpp after shift from anaerobic to aerobic conditions, and accumulation of both ppGpp and pppGpp was blocked under these conditions by pretreatment of the culture with rifampin or tetracycline. Growth and incorporation of [3H]guanosine, [3H]tymidine, [14C]succinate, and L-[35S]methionine into macromolecules were inhibited immediately upon exposure to air. The accumulation of ppGpp and pppGpp in B. thetaiotaomicron upon exposure to air may represent a novel signal for synthesis of these compounds. Images PMID:422517

  3. A Xanthomonas uridine 5'-monophosphate transferase inhibits plant immune kinases.

    PubMed

    Feng, Feng; Yang, Fan; Rong, Wei; Wu, Xiaogang; Zhang, Jie; Chen, She; He, Chaozu; Zhou, Jian-Min

    2012-04-15

    Plant innate immunity is activated on the detection of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) at the cell surface, or of pathogen effector proteins inside the plant cell. Together, PAMP-triggered immunity and effector-triggered immunity constitute powerful defences against various phytopathogens. Pathogenic bacteria inject a variety of effector proteins into the host cell to assist infection or propagation. A number of effector proteins have been shown to inhibit plant immunity, but the biochemical basis remains unknown for the vast majority of these effectors. Here we show that the Xanthomonas campestris pathovar campestris type III effector AvrAC enhances virulence and inhibits plant immunity by specifically targeting Arabidopsis BIK1 and RIPK, two receptor-like cytoplasmic kinases known to mediate immune signalling. AvrAC is a uridylyl transferase that adds uridine 5'-monophosphate to and conceals conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of BIK1 and RIPK, reducing their kinase activity and consequently inhibiting downstream signalling.

  4. New Inosine and Guanosine Analogs as Inhibitors of Parasitic Infections.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-30

    include Security Clasification ) New Enosine and Guanosine Analogs as Inhibitors of Parasitic Infections 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Roland K. Robins...a Cary Model 15 spectrophotometer. Elemental analyses were performed by Robertson Labs, Florham Park, NJ. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) was run on

  5. Self-Assembly of Guanosine Molecules in Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Orseno, Maxwell; Bose, Prasenjit; Streletzky, Kiril; Jamieson, Alex

    2009-10-01

    Guanosine and 3-Acetyl Guanosine monomers are expected to form cylindrical polymeric rods in a solution of KCl and H2O. Multi-angle Depolarized Dynamic Light Scattering (DDLS) and Static Light Scattering were used to study these solutions at various monomer concentrations. The correlation functions obtained from VV and VH experiments of DDLS were fitted to a sum of two stretched exponentials and their decay rates (G) were obtained using spectral time moment analysis. The diffusion coefficients deduced from G were analyzed to find length of the rods formed by Guanosine monomers. The concentration dependences of diffusion coefficients were compared with theoretical models of dilute and semi-dilute regimes. The fast mode of VV DDLS measurements was attributed to pure translation diffusion of rods; the slow VV mode had properties of large dynamic aggregates formed in solutions. The fast mode of VH DDLS had properties rotational diffusion, while the slow VH mode was found to be similar to the slow VV mode (large dynamic aggregates). SLS measurements at different solution concentrations yielded the aggregation concentration at which significant formation of rods occurs. The apparent molecular weight and radius of gyration of the rods were inferred from SLS spectra at different concentrations of Guanosine.

  6. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts.

  7. Anabolism of amdoxovir: phosphorylation of dioxolane guanosine and its 5'-phosphates by mammalian phosphotransferases.

    PubMed

    Feng, Joy Y; Parker, William B; Krajewski, Megan L; Deville-Bonne, Dominique; Veron, Michel; Krishnan, Preethi; Cheng, Yung-Chi; Borroto-Esoda, Katyna

    2004-11-01

    Amdoxovir [(-)-beta-D-2,6-diaminopurine dioxolane, DAPD], the prodrug of dioxolane guanosine (DXG), is currently in Phase I/II clinical development for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. In this study, we examined the phosphorylation pathway of DXG using 15 purified enzymes from human (8), animal (6), and yeast (1) sources, including deoxyguanosine kinase (dGK), deoxycytidine kinase (dCK), high Km 5'-nucleotidase (5'-NT), guanylate (GMP) kinase, nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) kinase, adenylate (AMP) kinase, nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase, 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PG) kinase, creatine kinase, and pyruvate kinase. In addition, the metabolism of 14C-labeled DXG was studied in CEM cells. DXG was not phosphorylated by human dCK, and was a poor substrate for human dGK with a high Km (7 mM). Human 5'-NT phosphorylated DXG with relatively high efficiency (4.2% of deoxyguanosine). DXG-MP was a substrate for porcine brain GMP kinase with a substrate specificity that was 1% of dGMP. DXG-DP was phosphorylated by all of the enzymes tested, including NDP kinase, 3-PG kinase, creatine kinase, and pyruvate kinase. The BB-isoform of human creatine kinase showed the highest relative substrate specificity (47% of dGDP) for DXG-DP. In CEM cells incubated with 5 microM DXG for 24 h, 0.015 pmole/10(6) cells (approximately 7.5 nM) of DXG-TP was detected as the primary metabolite. Our study demonstrated that 5'-nucleotidase, GMP kinase, creatine kinase, and NDP kinase could be responsible for the activation of DXG in vivo.

  8. Histamine release upon adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) nasal provocation in allergic subjects

    PubMed Central

    Polosa, R; Pagano, C; Prosperini, G; Low, J; Dokic, D; Church, M; Crimi, N

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Nasal provocation with adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) elicits nasal symptoms in subjects with rhinitis. Histamine released from mast cells may play a part in AMP induced nasal responses.
METHODS—Symptoms of rhinitis were recorded and histamine release in the fluid obtained by nasal lavage after AMP, guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP), and placebo instillations was measured in nine subjects with allergic rhinitis and nine non-allergic controls in a double blind, randomised, placebo controlled study.
RESULTS—No symptoms or significant increases in histamine were observed after GMP and placebo challenge. Significantly higher levels of histamine were seen in the nasal lavage fluids of allergic subjects following AMP challenge than in non-allergic controls, the median (range) histamine concentration increasing from the baseline value of 1.62 (0.44-6.99) ng/ml to 6.45 (0.81-16.17) ng/ml at three minutes. No increase in histamine levels was seen in the non-allergic subjects in whom the median histamine concentration was 1.13 (0.29-4.25) ng/ml at baseline and 0.97 (0.31-5.89) ng/ml three minutes after AMP challenge.
CONCLUSIONS—AMP elicits an immediate rise in histamine levels in the nasal lavage fluid of allergic subjects compared with non-allergic individuals. These findings indicate that the exaggerated nasal response to adenosine may reflect mast cell priming in vivo, thus supporting its application as a potential new marker of allergic inflammation.

 PMID:10325898

  9. Immunochemical detection of N2-[1-(1-carboxy)ethyl]guanosine, an advanced glycation end product formed by the reaction of DNA and reducing sugars or L-ascorbic acid in vitro.

    PubMed

    Seidel, W; Pischetsrieder, M

    1998-11-27

    In the Maillard reaction, free amino groups of proteins and nucleic acids react with reducing sugars to form advanced glycation end products (AGE). A major product found in reaction mixtures of guanosine and glucose is N2-[1-(1-carboxy)ethyl]guanosine (CEG), which, therefore, can be used as a marker of advanced glycation of DNA. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to detect and to semi-quantitate nonenzymatic glycosylation of DNA. A polyclonal antiserum was raised against CEG linked to keyhole limpet hemocyanin. A protocol for a competitive ELISA was developed, and the antiserum was tested for crossreactivity. Several unmodified nucleotides and N2-modified guanosine derivatives showed no or negligible crossreactivity. Only very similar structures like N2-(carboxymethyl)guanosine and N2-(1-carboxy-3-hydroxypropyl)guanosine, which have been identified as reaction products of glucose or l-ascorbic acid and guanosine, display significant binding activity. The signal can be totally repressed by free CEG, yet protein-bound CEG is a stronger inhibitor. DNA incubated with d-glucose, dihydroxyacetone, l-ascorbic or l-dehydroascorbic acid shows a signal inhibition indicating the formation of CEG in vitro. The competitive ELISA procedure proved to be a sensitive method which can be used to detect glycation of DNA in vivo.

  10. Conventional and Unconventional Mechanisms for Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase Signaling.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuansheng

    2016-05-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is the principal enzyme in mediating the biological actions of nitric oxide. On activation, sGC converts guanosine triphosphate to guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP), which mediates diverse physiological processes including vasodilation, platelet aggregation, and myocardial functions predominantly by acting on cGMP-dependent protein kinases. Cyclic GMP has long been considered as the sole second messenger for sGC action. However, emerging evidence suggests that, in addition to cGMP, other nucleoside 3',5'-cyclic monophosphates (cNMPs) are synthesized by sGC in response to nitric oxide stimulation, and some of these nucleoside 3',5'-cyclic monophosphates are involved in various physiological activities. For example, inosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate synthesized by sGC may play a critical role in hypoxic augmentation of vasoconstriction. The involvement of cytidine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate and uridine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate in certain cardiovascular activities is also implicated.

  11. Viral protein R of HIV type-1 induces retrotransposition and upregulates glutamate synthesis by the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Doi, Akihiro; Iijima, Kenta; Kano, Shigeyuki; Ishizaka, Yukihito

    2015-07-01

    Viral protein R (Vpr) of HIV-1 plays an important role in viral replication in macrophages. Various lines of evidence suggest that expression of Vpr in macrophages causes immunopathogenesis; however, the underlying mechanism is not yet fully understood. In this study, it was shown that recombinant Vpr (rVpr) induces retrotransposition of long interspersed element-1 in RAW264.7, a macrophage-like cell line, and activates reverse transcriptase-dependent immunotoxic cascades including production of IFN-β and phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1). Knockout experiments based on the CRISPR/Cas9 nickase system further demonstrated that cyclic guanosine monophosphate-adenosine monophosphate synthase (cGAS) and stimulator of interferon gene (STING) are responsible for IFN-β production and STAT1 phosphorylation, respectively. Moreover, rVpr was found to increase production of glutaminase C, a regulator of glutamate synthesis, which is also dependent on the cGAS-STING pathway. Taken together with reports that glutaminase C is involved in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) and that Vpr is detectable in the cerebrospinal fluid of HIV-1-positive patients, a possible role of Vpr-induced L1-RTP and immunotoxic cascades in the development of HAND is discussed.

  12. The synthesis of 2'-methylseleno adenosine and guanosine 5'-triphosphates.

    PubMed

    Santner, Tobias; Siegmund, Vanessa; Marx, Andreas; Micura, Ronald

    2012-04-01

    Modified nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs) represent powerful building blocks to generate nucleic acids with novel properties by enzymatic synthesis. We have recently demonstrated the access to 2'-SeCH(3)-uridine and 2'-SeCH(3)-cytidine derivatized RNAs for applications in RNA crystallography, using the corresponding nucleoside triphosphates and distinct mutants of T7 RNA polymerase. In the present note, we introduce the chemical synthesis of the novel 2'-methylseleno-2'-deoxyadenosine and -guanosine 5'-triphosphates (2'-SeCH(3)-ATP and 2'-SeCH(3)-GTP) that represent further candidates for the enzymatic RNA synthesis with engineered RNA polymerases.

  13. P2Y2 receptor up-regulation induced by guanosine or UTP in rat brain cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ballerini, P; Di Iorio, P; Caciagli, F; Rathbone, M P; Jiang, S; Nargi, E; Buccella, S; Giuliani, P; D'Alimonte, I; Fischione, G; Masciulli, A; Romano, S; Ciccarelli, R

    2006-01-01

    Among P2 metabotropic ATP receptors, P2Y2 subtype seems to be peculiar as its upregulation triggers important biological events in different cells types. In non-stimulated cells including astrocytes, P2Y2 receptors are usually expressed at levels lower than P2Y1 sites, however the promoter region of the P2Y2 receptors has not yet been studied and little is known about the mechanisms underlying the regulation of the expression of this ATP receptor. We showed that not only UTP and ATP are the most potent and naturally occurring agonist for P2Y2 sites, but also guanosine induced an up-regulation of astrocyte P2Y2 receptor mRNA evaluated by Northern blot analysis. We also focused our attention on this nucleoside since in our previous studies it was reported to be released by cultured astrocytes and to exert different neuroprotective effects. UTP and guanosine-evoked P2Y2 receptor up-regulation in rat brain cultured astrocytes was linked to an increased P2Y2-mediated intracellular calcium response, thus suggesting an increased P2Y2 activity. Actinomycin D, a RNA polymerase inhibitor, abrogated both UTP and guanosine-mediated P2Y2 up-regulation, thus indicating that de novo transcription was required. The effect of UTP and guanosine was also evaluated in astrocytes pretreated with different inhibitors of signal transduction pathways including ERK, PKC and PKA reported to be involved in the regulation of other cell surface receptor mRNAs. The results show that ERK1-2/MAPK pathway play a key role in the P2Y2 receptor up-regulation mediated by either UTP or guanosine. Moreover, our data suggest that PKA is also involved in guanosine-induced transcriptional activation of P2Y2 mRNA and that increased intracellular calcium levels and PKC activation may also mediate P2Y2 receptor up-regulation triggered by UTP. The extracellular release of ATP under physiological and pathological conditions has been widely studied. On the contrary, little is known about the release of

  14. Inhibition of initiation of protein synthesis by 7-methylguanosine-5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, E D; Weber, L A; Baglioni, C

    1976-01-01

    Translation of rabbit globin mRNA in a wheat germ protein-synthesizing system is inhibited by the nucleotide 7-methylguanosine-5'-monophosphate (m7G5'p) but not by other guanosine nucleotides without the 7-methyl group or with the phosphate in a different position. Translation of RNA of tobacco mosaic virus and poly(A) + HeLa RNA is also inhibited by m7G5'p. We show that m7G5'p prevents the association of mRNA with ribosomal subunits to form an initiation complex. We propose that m7G5'p interacts with a site on initiation factor(s) or ribosomes which is involved in mRNA recognition, presumably by binding to the 5'-terminal sequence m7G5'ppp. m7G5'p does not inhibit translation of poly(U) and RNA of satellite tobacco necrosis virus, which do not have the 5'-terminal sequence m7G5'ppp. In the case of RNA of satellite tobacco necrosis virus, some stimulation of its translation is consistently observed in the presence of m7G5'p; possible interpretations of this finding are discussed. PMID:1061116

  15. Triazole inhibitors of Cryptosporidium parvum inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Sushil K.; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Zhang, Minjia; Johnson, Corey R.; Benjamin, Nicole N.; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Cuny, Gregory D.

    2010-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is an important human pathogen and potential bioterrorism agent. This protozoan parasite cannot salvage guanine or guanosine and therefore relies on inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) for biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides and hence for survival. Since C. parvum IMPDH is highly divergent from the host counterpart, selective inhibitors could potentially be used to treat cryptosporidiosis with minimal effects on its mammalian host. A series of 1,2,3-triazole containing ether CpIMPDH inhibitors are described. A structure-activity relationship study revealed that a small alkyl group on the alpha-position of the ether was required with the (R)-enantiomer significantly more active than the (S)-enantiomer. Electron-withdrawing groups in the 3- and/or 4-positions of the pendent phenyl ring were best and conversion of the quinoline containing inhibitors to quinoline-N-oxides retained inhibitory activity both in the presence and absence of bovine serum albumin. The 1,2,3-triazole CpIMPDH inhibitors provide new tools for elucidating the role of IMPDH in C. parvum and may serve as potential therapeutics for treating cryptosporidiosis. PMID:19624136

  16. Myricetin is a novel inhibitor of human inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase with anti-leukemia activity.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huiling; Hu, Qian; Wang, Jingyuan; Liu, Zehui; Wu, Dang; Lu, Weiqiang; Huang, Jin

    2016-09-02

    Human inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (hIMPDH) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo biosynthetic pathway of purine nucleotides, playing crucial roles in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and transformation. Dysregulation of hIMPDH expression and activity have been found in a variety of human cancers including leukemia. In this study, we found that myricetin, a naturally occurring phytochemical existed in berries, wine and tea, was a novel inhibitor of human type 1 and type 2 IMPDH (hIMPDH1/2) with IC50 values of 6.98 ± 0.22 μM and 4.10 ± 0.14 μM, respectively. Enzyme kinetic analysis using Lineweaver-Burk plot revealed that myricetin is a mix-type inhibitor for hIMPDH1/2. Differential scanning fluorimetry and molecular docking simulation data demonstrate that myricetin is capable of binding with hIMPDH1/2. Myricetin treatment exerts potent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on K562 human leukemia cells in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, cytotoxicity of myricetin on K562 cells were markedly attenuated by exogenous addition of guanosine, a salvage pathway of maintaining intracellular pool of guanine nucleotides. Taking together, these results indicate that natural product myricetin exhibits potent anti-leukemia activity by interfering with purine nucleotides biosynthetic pathway through the suppression of hIMPDH1/2 catalytic activity.

  17. Small elevations of glucose concentration redirect and amplify the synthesis of guanosine 5'-triphosphate in rat islets.

    PubMed Central

    Metz, S A; Meredith, M; Rabaglia, M E; Kowluru, A

    1993-01-01

    Recent studies suggest a permissive requirement for guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) in insulin release, based on the use of GTP synthesis inhibitors (such as myocophenolic acid) acting at inosine monophosphate (IMP) dehydrogenase; herein, we examine the glucose dependency of GTP synthesis. Mycophenolic acid inhibited insulin secretion equally well after islet culture at 7.8 or 11.1 mM glucose (51% inhibition) but its effect was dramatically attenuated when provided at < or = 6.4 mM glucose (13% inhibition; P < 0.001). These observations were explicable by a stimulation of islet GTP synthesis derived from IMP since, at high glucose: (a) total GTP content was augmented; (b) a greater decrement in GTP (1.75 vs. 1.05 pmol/islet) was induced by mycophenolic acid; and (c) a smaller "pool" of residual GTP persisted after drug treatment. Glucose also accelerated GTP synthesis from exogenous guanine ("salvage" pathway) and increased content of a pyrimidine, uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP), suggesting that glucose augments production of a common regulatory intermediate (probably 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate). Pathway-specific radiolabeling studies confirmed that glucose tripled both salvage and de novo synthesis of nucleotides. We conclude that steep changes in the biosynthesis of cytosolic pools of GTP occur at modest changes in glucose concentrations, a finding which may have relevance to the adaptive (patho) physiologic responses of islets to changes in ambient glucose levels. PMID:8349822

  18. Increasing susceptibility of nitric oxide-mediated inhibitory platelet signaling during storage of apheresis-derived platelet concentrates.

    PubMed

    Kobsar, Anna; Klinker, Erdwine; Kuhn, Sabine; Koessler, Angela; Yilmaz, Pinar; Boeck, Markus; Koessler, Juergen

    2014-07-01

    Storage of platelets (PLTs) affects PLT integrity and functionality, a process named the PLT storage lesion. Normal PLT function essentially depends on the balanced interaction of activating and inhibitory signaling pathways. As there are poor data on the alterations of inhibitory signaling during storage of PLT concentrates, this study investigates the modulation capability of the cyclic nucleotide-mediated inhibitory pathways by use of the nitric oxide donor diethylamine diazenium diolate (DEA/NO). PLTs were obtained from whole blood (WB) and from apheresis-derived PLT concentrates (APCs) stored for 0, 2, and 5 days. Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation, cyclic nucleotide concentrations, fibrinogen binding, and agonist-induced aggregation were measured without or after stimulation with DEA/NO. DEA/NO-induced VASP phosphorylation was significantly higher in PLTs from APCs on Days 2 and 5 compared to WB, conditioned by a stronger increase of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), but not cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), in stored PLTs. A quantity of 5 nmol/L DEA/NO neither influenced thrombin receptor activator peptide 6 and collagen-induced aggregation nor fibrinogen binding in freshly collected PLTs, whereas it significantly inhibited both in stored PLTs. Stored PLTs showed an impairment of intracellular cGMP regulation, resulting in exceeding inhibition of agonist-induced aggregation and fibrinogen binding in the course of storage. The observed effects could be an important mechanism contributing to the storage lesion with reduced activating potential of PLTs. © 2014 AABB.

  19. Oocyte maturation and fertilization in marine nemertean worms: using similar sorts of signaling pathways as in mammals, but often with differing results.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Stephen A; Cline, Cory; Goodrich, David

    2013-08-01

    In marine worms belonging to the phylum Nemertea, oocyte maturation and fertilization are regulated by the same general kinds of signals that control such processes in mammals. However, unlike mammalian oocytes that develop within follicles, nemertean oocytes characteristically lack a surrounding sheath of follicle cells and often respond differently to maturation-related cues than do mammalian oocytes. For example, elevators of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) or cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels promote the resumption of meiotic maturation (=germinal vesicle breakdown, GVBD) in nemertean oocytes, whereas increasing intraoocytic cAMP and cGMP typically blocks GVBD in mammals. Similarly, AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) signaling keeps nemertean oocytes from maturing, but in mouse oocytes, AMPK activation triggers GVBD. In addition, protein kinase C (PKC) activity is required for seawater-induced GVBD in nemerteans, whereas some PKCs have been shown to inhibit GVBD in mammals. Furthermore, although fertilization causes both types of oocytes to reorganize their endoplasmic reticulum and generate calcium oscillations that can involve soluble sperm factor activity and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate signaling, some discrepancies in the spatiotemporal patterns and underlying mechanisms of fertilization are also evident in nemerteans versus mammals. Thus, to characterize differences and similarities in gamete biology more fully, aspects of oocyte maturation and fertilization in marine nemertean worms are reviewed and briefly compared with related findings that have been published for mammalian oocytes. In addition, possible causes of the alternative responses displayed by oocytes in these two animal groups are addressed.

  20. Mechanism of prostaglandin (PG)E2-induced prolactin expression in human T cells: cooperation of two PGE2 receptor subtypes, E-prostanoid (EP) 3 and EP4, via calcium- and cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate-mediated signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Gerlo, Sarah; Verdood, Peggy; Gellersen, Birgit; Hooghe-Peters, Elisabeth L; Kooijman, Ron

    2004-11-15

    We previously reported that prolactin gene expression in the T-leukemic cell line Jurkat is stimulated by PGE(2) and that cAMP acts synergistically with Ca(2+) or protein kinase C on the activation of the upstream prolactin promoter. Using the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D, we now show that PGE(2)-induced prolactin expression requires de novo prolactin mRNA synthesis and that PGE(2) does not influence prolactin mRNA stability. Furthermore, PGE(2)-induced prolactin expression was inhibited by protein kinase inhibitor fragment 14-22 and BAPTA-AM, which respectively, inhibit protein kinase A- and Ca(2+)-mediated signaling cascades. Using specific PGE(2) receptor agonists and antagonists, we show that PGE(2) induces prolactin expression through engagement of E-prostanoid (EP) 3 and EP4 receptors. We also found that PGE(2) induces an increase in intracellular cAMP concentration as well as intracellular calcium concentration via EP4 and EP3 receptors, respectively. In transient transfections, 3000 bp flanking the leukocyte prolactin promoter conferred a weak induction of the luciferase reporter gene by PGE(2) and cAMP, whereas cAMP in synergy with ionomycin strongly activated the promoter. Mutation of a C/EBP responsive element at -214 partially abolished the response of the leukocyte prolactin promoter to PGE(2), cAMP, and ionomycin plus cAMP.

  1. Transmission of innate immune signaling by packaging of cGAMP in viral particles.

    PubMed

    Gentili, Matteo; Kowal, Joanna; Tkach, Mercedes; Satoh, Takeshi; Lahaye, Xavier; Conrad, Cécile; Boyron, Marilyn; Lombard, Bérangère; Durand, Sylvère; Kroemer, Guido; Loew, Damarys; Dalod, Marc; Théry, Clotilde; Manel, Nicolas

    2015-09-11

    Infected cells detect viruses through a variety of receptors that initiate cell-intrinsic innate defense responses. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (GMP)-adenosine monophosphate (AMP) synthase (cGAS) is a cytosolic sensor for many DNA viruses and HIV-1. In response to cytosolic viral DNA, cGAS synthesizes the second messenger 2'3'-cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP), which activates antiviral signaling pathways. We show that in cells producing virus, cGAS-synthesized cGAMP can be packaged in viral particles and extracellular vesicles. Viral particles efficiently delivered cGAMP to target cells. cGAMP transfer by viral particles to dendritic cells activated innate immunity and antiviral defenses. Finally, we show that cell-free murine cytomegalovirus and Modified Vaccinia Ankara virus contained cGAMP. Thus, transfer of cGAMP by viruses may represent a defense mechanism to propagate immune responses to uninfected target cells. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Nucleotides as nucleophiles - Reactions of nucleotides with phosphoimidazolide activated guanosine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia; Rosenbach, Morgan T.; Hurley, T. B.

    1992-01-01

    On the basis of recently discovered RNAs with catalytic capabilities resembling those of enzymes, it is postulated that an 'RNA world' may have played a determining role in prebiotic chemistry and led evolution from prebiological to biological systems. The advent of the RNA world thus postulated, however, entails the preexistence of ribomononucleotides, and presumes that their reactions resulted in templatelike oligonucleotides. Attention is presently given to the reaction of nucleoside monophosphates with the phosphoimidazolide-activated nucleosides that (1) have successfully been used in place of the natural nucleoside triphosphates and (2) for whose prebiotic existence there is now some evidence.

  3. Second messenger signaling mechanisms of the brown adipocyte thermogenic program: an integrative perspective.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fubiao; Collins, Sheila

    2017-09-26

    β-adrenergic receptors (βARs) are well established for conveying the signal from catecholamines to adipocytes. Acting through the second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) they stimulate lipolysis and also increase the activity of brown adipocytes and the 'browning' of adipocytes within white fat depots (so-called 'brite' or 'beige' adipocytes). Brown adipose tissue mitochondria are enriched with uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), which is a regulated proton channel that allows the dissipation of chemical energy in the form of heat. The discovery of functional brown adipocytes in humans and inducible brown-like ('beige' or 'brite') adipocytes in rodents have suggested that recruitment and activation of these thermogenic adipocytes could be a promising strategy to increase energy expenditure for obesity therapy. More recently, the cardiac natriuretic peptides and their second messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) have gained attention as a parallel signaling pathway in adipocytes, with some unique features. In this review, we begin with some important historical work that touches upon the regulation of brown adipocyte development and physiology. We then provide a synopsis of some recent advances in the signaling cascades from β-adrenergic agonists and natriuretic peptides to drive thermogenic gene expression in the adipocytes and how these two pathways converge at a number of unexpected points. Finally, moving from the physiologic hormonal signaling, we discuss yet another level of control downstream of these signals: the growing appreciation of the emerging roles of non-coding RNAs as important regulators of brown adipocyte formation and function. In this review, we discuss new developments in our understanding of the signaling mechanisms and factors including new secreted proteins and novel non-coding RNAs that control the function as well as the plasticity of the brown/beige adipose tissue as it responds to the energy needs and environmental

  4. Kinetics of the hydrolysis of guanosine 5'-phospho-2-methylimidazolide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia

    1986-01-01

    The hydrolysis kinetics of guanosine 5'-phospho-2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG) in aqueous buffered solutions of various pH's was studied at 75 and 37 C, using spectrophotometric and HPLC techniques. The hydrolysis was found to be very slow even at low pH. At 75 C and pH at or below l.0, two kinetic processes were observed: the more rapid one was attributed to the hydrolysis of the phosphoimidazolide P-N bond; the second, much slower one, was attributed to the cleavage of the glycosidic bond. It is noted that the P-N hydrolysis in phosphoimidazolides is very slow compared to other phosphoramidates, and that this might be one of the reasons why the phosphoimidazolides showed an extraordinary ability to form long oligomers under template-directed conditions.

  5. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa)

    PubMed Central

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E.; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5′-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5′-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts. PMID:26283971

  6. Dolichyl monophosphate and its sugar derivatives in plants.

    PubMed Central

    Brett, C T; Leloir, L F

    1977-01-01

    A glucose acceptor was isolated from soya beans by extraction with chloroform/methanol (2:1, v/v), followed by DEAE-cellulose column chromatography of the extract. This acceptor could not be distinguished from liver dolichyl monophosphate by t.l.c. It could replace dolichyl monophosphate as a mannose acceptor with a liver enzyme and its glucosylated derivative could replace dolichyl monophosphate glucose as a glucose donor in the same system. These results, together with those already reported [Pont Lezica, Brett, Romero Martinez & Dankert (1975) Biochem, Biophys. Res. Commun. 66, 980-987], indicate that the acceptor from soya bean is a dolichyl monophosphate. Gel filtration of its glucosylated derivative on Sephadex G-75 in the presence of sodium deoxycholate indicated that the acceptor contained 17 or 18 isoprene units. An enzyme preparation from pea seedlings was shown to use endogenous acceptors to form lipid phosphate sugars containing mannose and N-acetylglucosamine from GDP-mannose and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. Chromatographic and degradative techniques indicated that the compounds formed were lipid monophosphate mannose, lipid pyrophosphate N-acetylglucosamine, lipid pyrophosphate chitobiose and a series of lipid pyrophosphate oligosaccharides containing both mannose and N-acetylglucosamine. None of these compounds was degraded by catalytic hydrogenation, and so the lipid moiety in each case was probably an alpha-saturated polyprenol. The endogenous acceptors for mannose and N-acetylglucosamine in peas may therefore be dolichyl monophosphate, as has been found in mammalian systems. PMID:557975

  7. Structure of Staphylococcus aureus cytidine monophosphate kinase in complex with cytidine 5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Balvinder; Ren, Jingshan; Lockyer, Michael; Charles, Ian; Hawkins, Alastair R; Stammers, David K

    2006-08-01

    The crystal structure of Staphylococcus aureus cytidine monophosphate kinase (CMK) in complex with cytidine 5'-monophosphate (CMP) has been determined at 2.3 angstroms resolution. The active site reveals novel features when compared with two orthologues of known structure. Compared with the Streptococcus pneumoniae CMK solution structure of the enzyme alone, S. aureus CMK adopts a more closed conformation, with the NMP-binding domain rotating by approximately 16 degrees towards the central pocket of the molecule, thereby assembling the active site. Comparing Escherichia coli and S. aureus CMK-CMP complex structures reveals differences within the active site, including a previously unreported indirect interaction of CMP with Asp33, the replacement of a serine residue involved in the binding of CDP by Ala12 in S. aureus CMK and an additional sulfate ion in the E. coli CMK active site. The detailed understanding of the stereochemistry of CMP binding to CMK will assist in the design of novel inhibitors of the enzyme. Inhibitors are required to treat the widespread hospital infection methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), currently a major public health concern.

  8. S-Nitrosylation in Cardiovascular Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Brian; Forrester, Michael T.; Hess, Douglas T.; Stamler, Jonathan S.

    2010-01-01

    Well over two decades has passed since the endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) was reported to be the gaseous molecule nitric oxide (NO). Although soluble guanylyl cyclase (which generates cyclic guanosine monophosphate, cGMP) was the first identified receptor for NO, it has become increasingly clear that NO exerts a ubiquitous influence in a cGMP-independent manner. In particular, many if not most effects of NO are mediated by S-nitrosylation, the covalent modification of a protein cysteine thiol by an NO group to generate an S-nitrosothiol (SNO). Moreover, within the current framework of NO biology, EDRF activity—i.e. G-protein coupled receptor-mediated, or shear-induced endothelium-derived NO bioactivity—is understood to involve a central role for SNOs, acting both as second messengers and signal effectors. Further, essential roles for S-nitrosylation have been implicated in virtually all major functions of NO in the cardiovascular system. Here we review the basic biochemistry of S-nitrosylation (and denitrosylation), discuss the role of S-nitrosylation in the vascular and cardiac functions of NO and identify current and potential clinical applications. PMID:20203313

  9. S-nitrosylation in cardiovascular signaling.

    PubMed

    Lima, Brian; Forrester, Michael T; Hess, Douglas T; Stamler, Jonathan S

    2010-03-05

    Well over 2 decades have passed since the endothelium-derived relaxation factor was reported to be the gaseous molecule nitric oxide (NO). Although soluble guanylyl cyclase (which generates cyclic guanosine monophosphate, cGMP) was the first identified receptor for NO, it has become increasingly clear that NO exerts a ubiquitous influence in a cGMP-independent manner. In particular, many, if not most, effects of NO are mediated by S-nitrosylation, the covalent modification of a protein cysteine thiol by an NO group to generate an S-nitrosothiol (SNO). Moreover, within the current framework of NO biology, endothelium-derived relaxation factor activity (ie, G protein-coupled receptor-mediated, or shear-induced endothelium-derived NO bioactivity) is understood to involve a central role for SNOs, acting both as second messengers and signal effectors. Furthermore, essential roles for S-nitrosylation have been implicated in virtually all major functions of NO in the cardiovascular system. Here, we review the basic biochemistry of S-nitrosylation (and denitrosylation), discuss the role of S-nitrosylation in the vascular and cardiac functions of NO, and identify current and potential clinical applications.

  10. Kinetic analysis of the activation of transducin by photoexcited rhodopsin. Influence of the lateral diffusion of transducin and competition of guanosine diphosphate and guanosine triphosphate for the nucleotide site.

    PubMed

    Bruckert, F; Chabre, M; Vuong, T M

    1992-09-01

    The activation of transducin (T) by photoexcited rhodopsin (R*) is kinetically dissected within the framework of Michaelis-Menten enzymology, taking transducin as substrate of the enzyme R*. The light scattering "release" signal (Vuong, T.M., M. Chabre, and L. Stryer, 1984, Nature (Lond.). 311:659-661) was used to monitor the kinetics of transducin activation at 20 degrees C. In addition, the influence of nonuniform distributions of R* on these activation kinetics is also explored. Sinusoidal patterns of R* were created with interference fringes from two crossed laser beams. Two characteristic times were extracted from the Michaelis-Menten analysis: t(form), the diffusion-related time needed to form the enzyme-substrate R*-transducin is 0.25 +/- 0.1 ms, and T(cat), the time taken by R* to perform the chemistry of catalysis on transducin is 1.2 +/- 0.2 ms, in the absence of added guanosine diphosphate (GDP) and at saturating levels of guanosine triphosphate (GTP). With t(form) being but 20% of the total activation time t(form) + t(cat), transducin activation by R* is not limited by lateral diffusion. This is further borne out by the observation that uniform and sinusoidal patterns of R* elicited release signals of indistinguishable kinetics. When (GDP) = (GTP) = 500 microM, t(cat) is lengthened twofold. As the in vivo GDP and GTP levels are comparable, the exchange of nucleotides may well be the rate-limiting process.

  11. A Role for the Lumenal Domain in Golgi Localization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Guanosine Diphosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Vowels, Jennifer J.; Payne, Gregory S.

    1998-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins (IMPs) contain localization signals necessary for targeting to their resident subcellular compartments. To define signals that mediate localization to the Golgi complex, we have analyzed a resident IMP of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Golgi complex, guanosine diphosphatase (GDPase). GDPase, which is necessary for Golgi-specific glycosylation reactions, is a type II IMP with a short amino-terminal cytoplasmic domain, a single transmembrane domain (TMD), and a large catalytic lumenal domain. Regions specifying Golgi localization were identified by analyzing recombinant proteins either lacking GDPase domains or containing corresponding domains from type II vacuolar IMPs. Neither deletion nor substitution of the GDPase cytoplasmic domain perturbed Golgi localization. Exchanging the GDPase TMD with vacuolar protein TMDs only marginally affected Golgi localization. Replacement of the lumenal domain resulted in mislocalization of the chimeric protein from the Golgi to the vacuole, but a similar substitution leaving 34 amino acids of the GDPase lumenal domain intact was properly localized. These results identify a major Golgi localization determinant in the membrane-adjacent lumenal region (stem) of GDPase. Although necessary, the stem domain is not sufficient to mediate localization; in addition, a membrane-anchoring domain and either the cytoplasmic or full-length lumenal domain must be present to maintain Golgi residence. The importance of lumenal domain sequences in GDPase Golgi localization and the requirement for multiple hydrophilic protein domains support a model for Golgi localization invoking protein–protein interactions rather than interactions between the TMD and the lipid bilayer. PMID:9614179

  12. Myricetin is a novel inhibitor of human inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase with anti-leukemia activity

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Huiling; Hu, Qian; Wang, Jingyuan; Liu, Zehui; Wu, Dang; Lu, Weiqiang; Huang, Jin

    2016-09-02

    Human inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (hIMPDH) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo biosynthetic pathway of purine nucleotides, playing crucial roles in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and transformation. Dysregulation of hIMPDH expression and activity have been found in a variety of human cancers including leukemia. In this study, we found that myricetin, a naturally occurring phytochemical existed in berries, wine and tea, was a novel inhibitor of human type 1 and type 2 IMPDH (hIMPDH1/2) with IC{sub 50} values of 6.98 ± 0.22 μM and 4.10 ± 0.14 μM, respectively. Enzyme kinetic analysis using Lineweaver-Burk plot revealed that myricetin is a mix-type inhibitor for hIMPDH1/2. Differential scanning fluorimetry and molecular docking simulation data demonstrate that myricetin is capable of binding with hIMPDH1/2. Myricetin treatment exerts potent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on K562 human leukemia cells in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, cytotoxicity of myricetin on K562 cells were markedly attenuated by exogenous addition of guanosine, a salvage pathway of maintaining intracellular pool of guanine nucleotides. Taking together, these results indicate that natural product myricetin exhibits potent anti-leukemia activity by interfering with purine nucleotides biosynthetic pathway through the suppression of hIMPDH1/2 catalytic activity. - Highlights: • Myricetin, a common dietary flavonoid, is a novel inhibitor of hIMPDH1/2. • Myricetin directly binds with hIMPDH1/2 and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of leukemia cells. • The cytotoxicity of myricetin on K562 cells is markedly attenuated by exogenous addition of guanosine.

  13. Correlative intravital imaging of cGMP signals and vasodilation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Thunemann, Martin; Schmidt, Kjestine; de Wit, Cor; Han, Xiaoxing; Jain, Rakesh K.; Fukumura, Dai; Feil, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is an important signaling molecule and drug target in the cardiovascular system. It is well known that stimulation of the vascular nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway results in vasodilation. However, the spatiotemporal dynamics of cGMP signals themselves and the cGMP concentrations within specific cardiovascular cell types in health, disease, and during pharmacotherapy with cGMP-elevating drugs are largely unknown. To facilitate the analysis of cGMP signaling in vivo, we have generated transgenic mice that express fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cGMP sensor proteins. Here, we describe two models of intravital FRET/cGMP imaging in the vasculature of cGMP sensor mice: (1) epifluorescence-based ratio imaging in resistance-type vessels of the cremaster muscle and (2) ratio imaging by multiphoton microscopy within the walls of subcutaneous blood vessels accessed through a dorsal skinfold chamber. Both methods allow simultaneous monitoring of NO-induced cGMP transients and vasodilation in living mice. Detailed protocols of all steps necessary to perform and evaluate intravital imaging experiments of the vasculature of anesthetized mice including surgery, imaging, and data evaluation are provided. An image segmentation approach is described to estimate FRET/cGMP changes within moving structures such as the vessel wall during vasodilation. The methods presented herein should be useful to visualize cGMP or other biochemical signals that are detectable with FRET-based biosensors, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate or Ca2+, and to correlate them with respective vascular responses. With further refinement and combination of transgenic mouse models and intravital imaging technologies, we envision an exciting future, in which we are able to “watch” biochemistry, (patho-)physiology, and pharmacotherapy in the context of a living mammalian organism. PMID:25352809

  14. Guanosine triphosphatases as novel therapeutic targets in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rajni; Meena, Laxman S

    2010-08-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by the aerobic microbe Mycobacterium tuberculosis H(37)Rv. Despite the availability of the Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine and directly observed treatment, short-course (DOTS), TB is a leading cause of death and affects a third of the world's population. The most important factor associated with disease severity is the development of antibiotic-resistant strains, including multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB and extensively drug-resistant (XDR)-TB. In order to understand disease pathogenesis, it is necessary to delineate the specific features of M. tuberculosis that enable it to evade the host defense system and contribute to its virulence. Here, we have reviewed the various characteristics, such as cell wall components, virulence genes, and the role of small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) in the pathogenesis of TB. GTPases are known to play a crucial role in the survival and pathogenesis of various pathogens. The key role of these proteins involves interference in phagosome maturation arrest, enabling pathogens to survive by escaping from lysozymes and toxic free radicals. This observation provides a new avenue for the development of anti-TB drugs.

  15. The plant natriuretic peptide receptor is a guanylyl cyclase and enables cGMP-dependent signaling.

    PubMed

    Turek, Ilona; Gehring, Chris

    2016-06-01

    The functional homologues of vertebrate natriuretic peptides (NPs), the plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs), are a novel class of peptidic hormones that signal via guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) and systemically affect plant salt and water balance and responses to biotrophic plant pathogens. Although there is increasing understanding of the complex roles of PNPs in plant responses at the systems level, little is known about the underlying signaling mechanisms. Here we report isolation and identification of a novel Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR) protein that directly interacts with A. thaliana PNP, AtPNP-A. In vitro binding studies revealed that the Arabidopsis AtPNP-A binds specifically to the LRR protein, termed AtPNP-R1, and the active region of AtPNP-A is sufficient for the interaction to occur. Importantly, the cytosolic part of the AtPNP-R1, much like in some vertebrate NP receptors, harbors a catalytic center diagnostic for guanylyl cyclases and the recombinant AtPNP-R1 is capable of catalyzing the conversion of guanosine triphosphate to cGMP. In addition, we show that AtPNP-A causes rapid increases of cGMP levels in wild type (WT) leaf tissue while this response is significantly reduced in the atpnp-r1 mutants. AtPNP-A also causes cGMP-dependent net water uptake into WT protoplasts, and hence volume increases, whereas responses of the protoplasts from the receptor mutant are impaired. Taken together, our results suggest that the identified LRR protein is an AtPNP-A receptor essential for the PNP-dependent regulation of ion and water homeostasis in plants and that PNP- and vertebrate NP-receptors and their signaling mechanisms share surprising similarities.

  16. NO, nitrotyrosine, and cyclic GMP in signal transduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanafy, K. A.; Krumenacker, J. S.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, the role of nitric oxide (NO) in biology has evolved from being recognized as an environmental pollutant to an endogenously produced substance involved in cell communication and signal transduction. NO is produced by a family of enzymes called nitric oxide synthases (NOSs), which can be stimulated by a variety of factors that mediate responses to various stimuli. NO can initiate its biological effects through activation of the heterodimeric enzyme, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), or through several other chemical reactions. Activation of sGC results in the production of 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), an intracellular second messenger signaling molecule, which can subsequently mediate such diverse physiological events such as vasodilatation and immunomodulation. Chemically reactive NO can affect physiological changes through modifications to cellular proteins, one of which is tyrosine nitration. The demonstration that NO is involved in so many biological pathways indicates the importance of this endogenously produced substance, and suggests that there is much more to be discovered about its role in biology in years to come.

  17. Bacterial Biofilm Control by Perturbation of Bacterial Signaling Processes

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The development of effective strategies to combat biofilm infections by means of either mechanical or chemical approaches could dramatically change today’s treatment procedures for the benefit of thousands of patients. Remarkably, considering the increased focus on biofilms in general, there has still not been invented and/or developed any simple, efficient and reliable methods with which to “chemically” eradicate biofilm infections. This underlines the resilience of infective agents present as biofilms and it further emphasizes the insufficiency of today’s approaches used to combat chronic infections. A potential method for biofilm dismantling is chemical interception of regulatory processes that are specifically involved in the biofilm mode of life. In particular, bacterial cell to cell signaling called “Quorum Sensing” together with intracellular signaling by bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic-dimeric guanosine monophosphate (cyclic-di-GMP) have gained a lot of attention over the last two decades. More recently, regulatory processes governed by two component regulatory systems and small non-coding RNAs have been increasingly investigated. Here, we review novel findings and potentials of using small molecules to target and modulate these regulatory processes in the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa to decrease its pathogenic potential. PMID:28902153

  18. NO, nitrotyrosine, and cyclic GMP in signal transduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanafy, K. A.; Krumenacker, J. S.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, the role of nitric oxide (NO) in biology has evolved from being recognized as an environmental pollutant to an endogenously produced substance involved in cell communication and signal transduction. NO is produced by a family of enzymes called nitric oxide synthases (NOSs), which can be stimulated by a variety of factors that mediate responses to various stimuli. NO can initiate its biological effects through activation of the heterodimeric enzyme, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), or through several other chemical reactions. Activation of sGC results in the production of 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), an intracellular second messenger signaling molecule, which can subsequently mediate such diverse physiological events such as vasodilatation and immunomodulation. Chemically reactive NO can affect physiological changes through modifications to cellular proteins, one of which is tyrosine nitration. The demonstration that NO is involved in so many biological pathways indicates the importance of this endogenously produced substance, and suggests that there is much more to be discovered about its role in biology in years to come.

  19. Ag(I)-mediated homo and hetero pairs of guanosine and cytidine: Monitoring by circular dichroism spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharova, Iryna

    2014-01-01

    Ag(I)-containing compounds are attractive as antibacterial and antifungal agents. The renewed interest in the application of silver(I) compounds has led to the need for detailed knowledge of the mechanism of their action. One of the possible ways is the coordination of Ag(I) to G-C pairs of DNA, where Ag+ ions form Ag(I)-mediated base pairs and inhibit the transcription. Herein, a systematic chiroptical study on silver(I)-mediated homo and mixed pairs of the C-G complementary-base derivatives cytidine(C) and 5‧-guanosine monophosphate(G) in water is presented. Ag(I)-mediated homo and hetero pairs of G and C and their self-assembled species were studied under two pH levels (7.0 and 10.0) by vibrational (VCD) and electronic circular dichroism(ECD). VCD was used for the first time in this field and showed itself to be a powerful method for obtaining specific structural information in solution. Based on results of the VCD experiments, the different geometries of the homo pairs were proposed under pH 7.0 and 10.0. ECD was used as a diagnostic tool to characterize the studied systems and as a contact point between the previously defined structures of the metal or proton mediated pairs of nucleobases and the systems studied here. On the basis of the obtained data, the formation of the self-assembled species of cytidine with a structure similar to the i-motif structure in DNA was proposed at pH 10.0.

  20. Dual specificity and novel structural folding of yeast phosphodiesterase-1 for hydrolysis of second messengers cyclic adenosine and guanosine 3',5'-Monophosphate

    DOE PAGES

    Tian, Yuanyuan; Cui, Wenjun; Huang, Manna; ...

    2014-08-05

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) decompose second messengers cAMP and cGMP that play critical roles in many physiological processes. PDE1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been subcloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant yPDE1 has a KM of 110 μM and a kcat of 16.9 s⁻¹ for cAMP and a KM of 105 μM and a kcat of 11.8 s₅⁻¹ for cGMP. Thus, the specificity constant (kcat/KMcAMP)/(kcat/KMcGMP) of 1.4 indicates a dual specificity of yPDE1 for hydrolysis of both cAMP and cGMP. The crystal structures of unliganded yPDE1 and its complex with GMP at 1.31 Å resolution reveal a new structural foldingmore » that is different from those of human PDEs but is partially similar to that of some other metalloenzymes such as metallo-β-lactamase. In spite of their different structures and divalent metals, yPDE1 and human PDEs may share a common mechanism for hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP.« less

  1. Dual Specificity and Novel Structural Folding of Yeast Phosphodiesterase-1 for Hydrolysis of Second Messengers Cyclic Adenosine and Guanosine 3′,5′-Monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) decompose second messengers cAMP and cGMP that play critical roles in many physiological processes. PDE1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been subcloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant yPDE1 has a KM of 110 μM and a kcat of 16.9 s–1 for cAMP and a KM of 105 μM and a kcat of 11.8 s–1 for cGMP. Thus, the specificity constant (kcat/KMcAMP)/(kcat/KMcGMP) of 1.4 indicates a dual specificity of yPDE1 for hydrolysis of both cAMP and cGMP. The crystal structures of unliganded yPDE1 and its complex with GMP at 1.31 Å resolution reveal a new structural folding that is different from those of human PDEs but is partially similar to that of some other metalloenzymes such as metallo-β-lactamase. In spite of their different structures and divalent metals, yPDE1 and human PDEs may share a common mechanism for hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP. PMID:25050706

  2. 5'-Guanosine monophosphate mediated biocompatible porous hydrogel of β-FeOOH-viscoelastic behavior, loading, and release capabilities of freeze-dried gel.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Gupta, Sudhir Kumar

    2014-09-04

    The present manuscript reports the characterization, optimization of rheological properties, and loading and release capabilities of 5'-GMP mediated β-FeOOH hydrogel. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis indicates it to contain mainly the left-handed helix similar to that of Z-DNA. The highest viscosity (>300 cP) corresponds to the sample containing 2.5 × 10(-3) mol dm(-3) of 5'-GMP (SP2H). Field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) studies indicate the freeze-dried (FD) SP2H to be porous in nature, which is also supported by its high Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of 226 m(2)/g as compared to that of SP3H (75 m(2)/g). Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) analysis and Raman spectroscopy show it to contain β-FeOOH phase. The FD SP2H exhibits the high swelling ratio (326%) and loading capacity for methylene blue (MB) dye. It displays a controlled and efficient release (>90%) for optimized [MB] (2.5 × 10(-4) mol dm(-3)) in 48 h. The low toxicity of as synthesized FD SP2H nanostructures against MDA-MB-231 (breast cancer cells) up to 100 μg/mL suggests its biocompatible nature. The high porosity, surface area, % swelling, and loading and release performance of the hydrogel indicate its potential for drug delivery and other biological applications.

  3. Time-resolved probes and oxidase-based biosensors using terbium(III)-guanosine monophosphate-mercury(II) coordination polymer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Qu, Zhi-bei; Han, Chun-Min; Lu, Ling-Fei; Li, Yan-Yun; Zhou, Tianshu; Shi, Guoyue

    2014-11-04

    A novel lanthanide coordination polymer nanoparticle (LCPN)-based ternary complex was synthesized via the self-assembly of a terbium ion (Tb(3+)) with a nucleotide (GMP) and a mercury ion (Hg(2+)) in aqueous solution. The as-prepared LCPN-based ternary complex (Tb-GMP-Hg) can be applied to the development of time-resolved luminescence assays and oxidase-based biosensors.

  4. 3'-5' cyclic-guanosine monophosphate increase in rat brain hippocampus after gamma-hydroxybutyrate administration. Prevention by valproate and naloxone

    SciTech Connect

    Vayer, P.; Gobaille, S.; Mandel, P.; Maitre, M.

    1987-08-03

    An increase (123%) of cyclic GMP (cGMP) was observed in the hippocampus of the rat killed by microwave irradiation 45 min after administration of 500 mg/kg el-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) IP. This increase is time and dose dependent. No modification in cyclic nucleotide content was observed in striatum and in cerebellum. As the role of GHB has been implicated in neurotransmission, the fact that this compound increases cyclic GMP accumulation in hippocampus in vivo may represent a mechanism by which the actions of GHB are mediated at the cellular level. Valproate (400 mg/kg) or naloxone (10 mg/kg) pretreatment completely abolish the cGMP increase due to GHB. A GABAergic and/or opiate phenomenon may be involved in the mechanism of GHB induced increase of cGMP. 34 references, 4 figures.

  5. Oxygen and Bis(3',5')-cyclic Dimeric Guanosine Monophosphate Binding Control Oligomerization State Equilibria of Diguanylate Cyclase-Containing Globin Coupled Sensors.

    PubMed

    Burns, Justin L; Rivera, Shannon; Deer, D Douglas; Joynt, Shawnna C; Dvorak, David; Weinert, Emily E

    2016-12-06

    Bacteria sense their environment to alter phenotypes, including biofilm formation, to survive changing conditions. Heme proteins play important roles in sensing the bacterial gaseous environment and controlling the switch between motile and sessile (biofilm) states. Globin coupled sensors (GCS), a family of heme proteins consisting of a globin domain linked by a central domain to an output domain, are often found with diguanylate cyclase output domains that synthesize c-di-GMP, a major regulator of biofilm formation. Characterization of diguanylate cyclase-containing GCS proteins from Bordetella pertussis and Pectobacterium carotovorum demonstrated that cyclase activity is controlled by ligand binding to the heme within the globin domain. Both O2 binding to the heme within the globin domain and c-di-GMP binding to a product-binding inhibitory site (I-site) within the cyclase domain control oligomerization states of the enzymes. Changes in oligomerization state caused by c-di-GMP binding to the I-site also affect O2 kinetics within the globin domain, suggesting that shifting the oligomer equilibrium leads to broad rearrangements throughout the protein. In addition, mutations within the I-site that eliminate product inhibition result in changes to the accessible oligomerization states and decreased catalytic activity. These studies provide insight into the mechanism by which ligand binding to the heme and I-site controls activity of GCS proteins and suggests a role for oligomerization-dependent activity in vivo.

  6. Paracrine nitric oxide induces expression of cardiac sarcomeric proteins in adult progenitor cells through soluble guanylyl cyclase/cyclic-guanosine monophosphate and Wnt/β-catenin inhibition.

    PubMed

    De Pauw, Aurelia; Massion, Paul; Sekkali, Belaid; Andre, Emilie; Dubroca, Caroline; Kmecova, Jana; Bouzin, Caroline; Friart, Ann; Sibille, Catherine; Gilon, Patrick; De Mulder, Delphine; Esfahani, Hrag; Strapart, Adrien; Martherus, Ruben; Payen, Valéry; Sonveaux, Pierre; Brouckaert, Peter; Janssens, Stefan; Balligand, Jean-Luc

    2016-10-01

    Cardiac progenitor cells (CPC) from adult hearts can differentiate to several cell types composing the myocardium but the underlying molecular pathways are poorly characterized. We examined the role of paracrine nitric oxide (NO) in the specification of CPC to the cardiac lineage, particularly through its inhibition of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway, a critical step preceding cardiac differentiation. Sca1 + CPC from adult mouse hearts were isolated by magnetic-activated cell sorting and clonally expanded. Pharmacologic NO donors increased their expression of cardiac myocyte-specific sarcomeric proteins in a concentration and time-dependent manner. The optimal time window for NO efficacy coincided with up-regulation of CPC expression of Gucy1a3 (coding the alpha1 subunit of guanylyl cyclase). The effect of paracrine NO was reproduced in vitro upon co-culture of CPC with cardiac myocytes expressing a transgenic NOS3 (endothelial nitric oxide synthase) and in vivo upon injection of CPC in infarcted hearts from cardiac-specific NOS3 transgenic mice. In mono- and co-cultures, this effect was abrogated upon inhibition of soluble guanylyl cyclase or nitric oxide synthase, and was lost in CPC genetically deficient in Gucy1a3. Mechanistically, NO inhibits the constitutive activity of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin in CPC and in cell reporter assays in a guanylyl cyclase-dependent fashion. This was paralleled with decreased expression of β-catenin and down-regulation of Wnt target genes in CPC and abrogated in CPC with a stabilized, non-inhibitable β-catenin. Exogenous or paracrine sources of NO promote the specification towards the myocyte lineage and expression of cardiac sarcomeric proteins of adult CPC. This is contingent upon the expression and activity of the alpha1 subunit of guanylyl cyclase in CPC that is necessary for NO-mediated inhibition of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Uptake of intact nucleoside monophosphates by Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus 109J.

    PubMed Central

    Ruby, E G; McCabe, J B; Barke, J I

    1985-01-01

    The degraded nucleic acids and ribosomes of its prey cell provide Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus 109J with a source of ribonucleoside monophosphates and deoxyribonucleoside monophosphates for biosynthesis and respiration. We demonstrate that bdellovibrios, in contrast to almost all other bacteria, take up these nucleoside monophosphates into the cell in an intact, phosphorylated form. In this way they are able to assimilate more effectively the cellular contents of their prey. Studies with UMP and dTMP demonstrate that they are transported and accumulated against a concentration gradient, achieving internal levels at least 10 times the external levels. Treatment of the bdellovibrios with azide or carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone eliminates their ability to either transport or maintain accumulated UMP and suggests the presence of a freely reversible exchange mechanism. There are at least two separate classes of transport systems for nucleoside monophosphates, each exhibiting partial specificity for either ribonucleoside monophosphates or deoxyribonucleoside monophosphates. Kinetic analyses of UMP transport in different developmental stages of strain 109J indicate that each stage expresses a single, saturable uptake system with a distinct apparent substrate affinity constant (Kt) of 104 microM in attack phase cells and 35 microM in prematurely released growth phase filaments. The capacity for transport of UMP by the growth phase filaments was 2.4 times that of the attack phase cells. These data, in addition to the apparent lack of environmental control of UMP transport capacity in attack phase cells, suggest that there are two transport systems for UMP in bdellovibrios and that the high-affinity, high-capacity growth phase system is developmentally regulated. PMID:4030692

  8. Persistence Increases in the Absence of the Alarmone Guanosine Tetraphosphate by Reducing Cell Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-16

    Escherichia coli chromosomal “addiction module” regulated by guanosine 3′ ,5′-bispyrophosphate: a model for programmed bacterial cell death. Proc. Natl. Acad...Guanosine Tetraphosphate by Reducing Cell Growth Nityananda Chowdhury1, Brian W. Kwan1 & Thomas K. Wood1,2 Most bacterial cells are stressed, and as a...ppGpp54. Therefore, persistence increases as growth decreases, and persistence is not solely dependent on ppGpp. Methods Bacterial strains and growth

  9. Differences in responsiveness of intrapulmonary artery and vein to arachidonic acid: mechanism of arterial relaxation involves cyclic guanosine 3':5'-monophosphate and cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Ignarro, L.J.; Harbison, R.G.; Wood, K.S.; Wolin, M.S.; McNamara, D.B.; Hyman, A.L.; Kadowitz, P.J.

    1985-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between responses of bovine intrapulmonary artery and vein to arachidonic acid and cyclic nucleotide levels in order to better understand the mechanism of relaxation elicited by arachidonic acid and acetylcholine. Arachidonic acid relaxed phenylephrine-precontracted arterial rings and elevated both cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP levels in arteries with intact endothelium. In contrast, endothelium-damaged arterial rings contracted to arachidonic acid without demonstrating significant changes in cyclic nucleotide levels. Indomethacin partially inhibited endothelium-dependent relaxation and abolished cyclic AMP accumulation whereas methylene blue, a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, partially inhibited relaxation and abolished cyclic GMP accumulation in response to arachidonic acid. All vessel responses were blocked by a combination of the two inhibitors. Prostaglandin (PG) I2 relaxed arterial rings and elevated cyclic AMP levels whereas PGE2 and PGF2 alpha caused contraction, suggesting that the indomethacin-sensitive component of arachidonic acid-elicited relaxation is due to PGI2 formation and cyclic AMP accumulation. The methylene blue-sensitive component is attributed to an endothelium-dependent but cyclooxygenase-independent generation of a substance causing cyclic GMP accumulation. Intrapulmonary veins contracted to arachidonic acid with no changes in cyclic nucleotide levels and PGI2 was without effect. Homogenates of intrapulmonary artery and vein formed 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, PGF2 alpha and PGE2 from (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid, which was inhibited by indomethacin. Thus, bovine intrapulmonary vein may not possess receptors for PGI2.

  10. Molecular mechanisms for the regulation of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by small guanosine triphosphatases in skeletal muscle and adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Takaya

    2014-10-16

    Insulin is a hormone that regulates the blood glucose level by stimulating various physiological responses in its target tissues. In skeletal muscle and adipose tissue, insulin promotes membrane trafficking of the glucose transporter GLUT4 from GLUT4 storage vesicles to the plasma membrane, thereby facilitating the uptake of glucose from the circulation. Detailed mechanisms underlying insulin-dependent intracellular signal transduction for glucose uptake remain largely unknown. In this article, I give an overview on the recently identified signaling network involving Rab, Ras, and Rho family small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) that regulates glucose uptake in insulin-responsive tissues. In particular, the regulatory mechanisms for these small GTPases and the cross-talk between protein kinase and small GTPase cascades are highlighted.

  11. Production of Xanthosine-5′-Monophosphate and Inosine-5′-Monophosphate by Auxotrophic Mutants of a Coryneform Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Demain, Arnold L.; Jackson, Marion; Vitali, Ronald A.; Hendlin, David; Jacob, Theodore A.

    1965-01-01

    Although most microorganisms with genetic blocks in the purine nucleotide sequence excrete breakdown products, a coryneform bacterium was found to accumulate intact 5′-nucleotides in the extracellular medium. Adenineless mutants accumulated 0.4 to 0.6 g of inosine-5′-monophosphate per liter of broth. The yield of this nucleotide was increased to 0.8 to 0.9 g per liter when such mutants were mutated to xanthine dependence. Induction of a specific guanine requirement in adenineless auxotrophs resulted in cultures capable of producing high yields of xanthosine-5′-monophosphate (3 to 4 g per liter). Pure xanthosine-5′-monophosphate was isolated from broth by a procedure involving ion-exchange chromatography, charcoal adsorption, and barium precipitation. PMID:5867656

  12. Guanosine produces an antidepressant-like effect through the modulation of NMDA receptors, nitric oxide-cGMP and PI3K/mTOR pathways.

    PubMed

    Bettio, Luis E B; Cunha, Mauricio P; Budni, Josiane; Pazini, Francis L; Oliveira, Ágatha; Colla, André R; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2012-10-01

    Guanosine is an extracellular signaling molecule implicated in the modulation of glutamatergic transmission and neuroprotection. The present study evaluated the antidepressant-like effect of guanosine in the forced swimming test (FST) and in the tail suspension test (TST) in mice. The contribution of NMDA receptors as well as l-arginine-NO-cGMP and PI3K-mTOR pathways to this effect was also investigated. Guanosine administered orally produced an antidepressant-like effect in the FST (0.5-5 mg/kg) and TST (0.05-0.5 mg/kg). The anti-immobility effect of guanosine in the TST was prevented by the treatment of mice with NMDA (0.1 pmol/site, i.c.v.), d-serine (30 μg/site, i.c.v., a co-agonist of NMDA receptors), l-arginine (750 mg/kg, i.p., a substrate for nitric oxide synthase), sildenafil (5 mg/kg, i.p., a phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor), LY294002 (10 μg/site, i.c.v., a reversible PI3K inhibitor), wortmannin (0.1 μg/site, i.c.v., an irreversible PI3K inhibitor) or rapamycin (0.2 nmol/site, i.c.v., a selective mTOR inhibitor). In addition, the administration of ketamine (0.1 mg/kg, i.p., a NMDA receptor antagonist), MK-801 (0.001 mg/kg, i.p., another NMDA receptor antagonist), 7-nitroindazole (50 mg/kg, i.p., a neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor) or ODQ (30 pmol/site i.c.v., a soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor) in combination with a sub-effective dose of guanosine (0.01 mg/kg, p.o.) reduced the immobility time in the TST when compared with either drug alone. None of the treatments affected locomotor activity. Altogether, results firstly indicate that guanosine exerts an antidepressant-like effect that seems to be mediated through an interaction with NMDA receptors, l-arginine-NO-cGMP and PI3K-mTOR pathways.

  13. Guanosine controls inflammatory pathways to afford neuroprotection of hippocampal slices under oxygen and glucose deprivation conditions.

    PubMed

    Dal-Cim, Tharine; Ludka, Fabiana K; Martins, Wagner C; Reginato, Charlise; Parada, Esther; Egea, Javier; López, Manuela G; Tasca, Carla I

    2013-08-01

    Guanosine (GUO) is an endogenous modulator of glutamatergic excitotoxicity and has been shown to promote neuroprotection in in vivo and in vitro models of neurotoxicity. This study was designed to understand the neuroprotective mechanism of GUO against oxidative damage promoted by oxygen/glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD). GUO (100 μM) reduced reactive oxygen species production and prevented mitochondrial membrane depolarization induced by OGD. GUO also exhibited anti-inflammatory actions as inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B activation and reduction of inducible nitric oxide synthase induction induced by OGD. These GUO neuroprotective effects were mediated by adenosine A1 receptor, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase and MAPK/ERK. Furthermore, GUO recovered the impairment of glutamate uptake caused by OGD, an effect that occurred via a Pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein-coupled signaling, blockade of adenosine A2A receptors (A2A R), but not via A1 receptor. The modulation of glutamate uptake by GUO also involved MAPK/ERK activation. In conclusion, GUO, by modulating adenosine receptor function and activating MAPK/ERK, affords neuroprotection of hippocampal slices subjected to OGD by a mechanism that implicates the following: (i) prevention of mitochondrial membrane depolarization, (ii) reduction of oxidative stress, (iii) regulation of inflammation by inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B and inducible nitric oxide synthase, and (iv) promoting glutamate uptake.

  14. Adenosine, but not guanosine, protects vaginal epithelial cells from Trichomonas vaginalis cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Camila Braz; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Meirelles, Lucia Collares; Tasca, Tiana

    2017-02-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis causes the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. The cytoadherence and cytotoxicity upon the vaginal epithelial cells are crucial for the infection. Extracellular nucleotides are released during cell damage and, along with their nucleosides, can activate purinoceptors. The opposing effects of nucleotides versus nucleosides are regulated by ectonucleotidases. Herein we evaluated the hemolysis and cytolysis induced by T. vaginalis, as well as the extracellular nucleotide hydrolysis along with the effects mediated by nucleotides and nucleosides on cytotoxicity. In addition, the gene expression of purinoceptors in host cells was determined. The hemolysis and cytolysis exerted by all T. vaginalis isolates presented positive Pearson correlation. All T. vaginalis isolates were able to hydrolyze nucleotides, showing higher NTPDase than ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity. The most cytotoxic isolate, TV-LACM6, hydrolyzes ATP, GTP with more efficiency than AMP and GMP. The vaginal epithelial cell line (HMVII) expressed the genes for all subtypes of P1, P2X and P2Y receptors. Finally, when nucleotides and nucleosides were tested, the cytotoxic effect elicited by TV-LACM6 was increased with nucleotides. In contrast, the cytotoxicity was reversed by adenosine in presence of EHNA, but not by guanosine, contributing to the understanding of the purinergic signaling role on T. vaginalis cytotoxicity.

  15. Studies on structures of lipid A-monophosphate clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faunce, Chester A.; Reichelt, Hendrik; Paradies, Henrich H.

    2011-03-01

    Single crystalline clusters of lipid A-monophosphate were grown from organic dispersions containing 5-15% (v/v) water at various volume fractions, ϕ, and temperatures. The morphology of the single lipid A-monophosphate crystals was either rhombohedral or hexagonal. The hexagonal crystals were needlelike or cylindrical in shape, with the long dimension parallel to the c axis of the unit cell. The crystalline clusters were studied using electron microscopy and x-ray powder diffraction. Employing molecular location methods following a Rietveld refinement and whole-pattern refinement revealed two monoclinic crystal structures in the space groups P21 and C2, both converged with RF = 0.179. The two monoclinic crystal structures were packing (hydrocarbon chains) and conformational (sugar) polymorphs. Neither of these two structures had been encountered previously. Only intramolecular hydrogen bonding was observed for the polymorphs, which were located between the amide and the carboxyl groups. Another crystalline structure was found in the volume-fraction range 2.00 × 10-3 ≤ ϕ ≤ 2.50 × 10-3, which displayed hexagonal symmetry. The hexagonal symmetry of the self-assembled lipid A-monophosphate crystalline phase might be reconciled with the monoclinic symmetry found at low-volume-fractions. Therefore, lowering the symmetry from cubic, i.e., Ia overline 3d, to rhombohedral R overline 3 m, and finally to the monoclinic space group C2 was acceptable if the lipid A-monophosphate anion was completely orientationally ordered.

  16. Adenosine Monophosphate (AMP)-Activated Protein Kinase: A New Target for Nutraceutical Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Aguilar, Fabiola; Pavillard, Luis E.; Giampieri, Francesca; Bullón, Pedro; Cordero, Mario D.

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important energy sensor which is activated by increases in adenosine monophosphate (AMP)/adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratio and/or adenosine diphosphate (ADP)/ATP ratio, and increases different metabolic pathways such as fatty acid oxidation, glucose transport and mitochondrial biogenesis. In this sense, AMPK maintains cellular energy homeostasis by induction of catabolism and inhibition of ATP-consuming biosynthetic pathways to preserve ATP levels. Several studies indicate a reduction of AMPK sensitivity to cellular stress during aging and this could impair the downstream signaling and the maintenance of the cellular energy balance and the stress resistance. However, several diseases have been related with an AMPK dysfunction. Alterations in AMPK signaling decrease mitochondrial biogenesis, increase cellular stress and induce inflammation, which are typical events of the aging process and have been associated to several pathological processes. In this sense, in the last few years AMPK has been identified as a very interesting target and different nutraceutical compounds are being studied for an interesting potential effect on AMPK induction. In this review, we will evaluate the interaction of the different nutraceutical compounds to induce the AMPK phosphorylation and the applications in diseases such as cancer, type II diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases or cardiovascular diseases. PMID:28146060

  17. Brief exposure to copper induces apoptosis and alters mediators of olfactory signal transduction in coho salmon

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Espinoza, Herbert M.; Gallagher, Evan P.

    2013-01-01

    Pacific salmon are particularly susceptible to copper (Cu)-induced olfactory injuries that can ultimately inhibit neurobehaviors critical to survival. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying Cu-mediated olfactory impairment remain poorly understood. In the present study, we conducted a short-term Cu exposure at levels relevant to urban runoff, and investigated the roles of impaired olfactory signal transduction and induced apoptosis as underlying mechanisms of olfactory injury. Increased cell death in the olfactory epithelium was evident in coho receiving 4 h exposures to 25 and 50 ppb Cu. Expression of olfactory marker protein (omp), a marker of mature olfactory sensory neurons, also decreased at 50 ppb Cu. Immunohistochemical analysis of coho olfactory epithelium demonstrated a loss of type 3 adenylate cyclase (ACIII) in the apical olfactory epithelium cilia at all levels of Cu exposure, suggesting an inhibitory effect of Cu in olfactory signaling. Accompanying the loss of ACIII in Cu-exposed coho were reduced intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels in the olfactory rosettes. Collectively, these results support a linkage among the initial steps of olfactory signaling in Cu-induced salmon olfactory injury, and suggesting that monitoring olfactory cGMP levels may aid in the assessment of salmon olfactory injury. PMID:24050714

  18. Cyclic-di-GMP signalling regulates motility and biofilm formation in Bordetella bronchiseptica

    PubMed Central

    Sisti, Federico; Ha, Dae-Gon; O'Toole, George A.; Hozbor, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    The signalling molecule bis-(3′–5′)-cyclic-dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a central regulator of diverse cellular functions, including motility, biofilm formation, cell cycle progression and virulence, in bacteria. Multiple diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase-domain-containing proteins (GGDEF and EAL/HD-GYP, respectively) modulate the levels of the second messenger c-di-GMP to transmit signals and obtain such specific cellular responses. In the genus Bordetella this c-di-GMP network is poorly studied. In this work, we evaluated the expression of two phenotypes in Bordetella bronchiseptica regulated by c-di-GMP, biofilm formation and motility, under the influence of ectopic expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteins with EAL or GGDEF domains that regulates the c-di-GMP level. In agreement with previous reports for other bacteria, we observed that B. bronchiseptica is able to form biofilm and reduce its motility only when GGDEF domain protein is expressed. Moreover we identify a GGDEF domain protein (BB3576) with diguanylate cyclase activity that participates in motility and biofilm regulation in B. bronchiseptica. These results demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, the presence of c-di-GMP regulatory signalling in B. bronchiseptica. PMID:23475948

  19. Activation of the cGMP/nitric oxide signal transduction system by nicotine in the retina.

    PubMed

    Blute, Todd A; Strang, Christianne; Keyser, Kent T; Eldred, William D

    2003-01-01

    Acetylcholine is one of the primary excitatory neurotransmitters/neuromodulators in the retina, but little is known about the downstream signaling pathways it can activate. The present study immunocytochemically examines the potential sources of acetylcholine and the location of the nicotinic cholinergic receptors in the turtle retina. It also examines how activation of these receptors can influence the nitric oxide (NO)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signal-transduction pathways. Photoreceptors, amacrine cells, and potentially ganglion cells contain choline acetyltransferase-like immunoreactivity (LI). Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are immunocytochemically localized on photoreceptors, horizontal, bipolar, and ganglion cells. Nitric oxide imaging indicates that stimulation with nicotine increases NO production primarily in photoreceptors, horizontal, Muller, bipolar, and ganglion cells. In turn, very select populations of amacrine cells respond to this NO with increased levels of cGMP-LI. Selective inhibitors reveal that nitric oxide synthase is involved in most, but not all, of these increases in cGMP-LI. These results show that acetylcholine can activate the NO/cGMP signal-transduction pathways in both the inner and outer retina. This indicates that both of the major excitatory retinal transmitters, glutamate and acetylcholine, can stimulate NO production that increases levels of cGMP-LI in overlapping populations of retinal cells.

  20. Guanosine metabolism and regulation of fruiting body construction in dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Cohen, A; Sussman, M

    1975-11-01

    A cell aggregate of Dictyostelium discoideum either constructs a fruiting body directly or transforms into a migrating slug and fruits later on in some other locale. In the presence of formycin B, an inosine analog, and in an environment that otherwise favors fruiting, aggregates having reached a relatively late (17 hr) stage of fruit construction abandon that program and transform into migrating slugs. They then revert to the fruiting mode and construct normal fruiting bodies without further interference [Brackenbury et al. (1974) J. Mol. Biol. 90, 529-539]. The data presented here suggest that formycin B exerts its morphogenetic effect by interfering competitively with the metabolism of guanosine. Thus: see article. The recovery from formycin B is thought to result from the ensuing accumulation of guanosine and reversal of the inhibition. In support of this are the following: (1) Formycin B does cause, in vivo, an accumulation of guanosine. Exogenoug guanosine reverses the effect of formycin B, depending on their relative concentrations. (2) Guanosine is phosphorylitically cleaved to guanine and ribose-1-P by purine ribonucleoside phosphorylase (purine-nucleoside:orthophosphate ribosyl transferase, EC 2.4.2.1), present in D. discoideum extracts, and formycin B is a competitive inhibitor or this reaction with a very high affinity for the enzyme. (3) Four other analogs, also competitive inhibitors of this enzyme, produce precisely the same morphogenetic deviation. The concentrations required are consistent with the relative K1 values.

  1. Phosphoinositide Metabolism Links cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase G to Essential Ca2+ Signals at Key Decision Points in the Life Cycle of Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Brochet, Mathieu; Collins, Mark O.; Smith, Terry K.; Thompson, Eloise; Sebastian, Sarah; Volkmann, Katrin; Schwach, Frank; Chappell, Lia; Gomes, Ana Rita; Berriman, Matthew; Rayner, Julian C.; Baker, David A.; Choudhary, Jyoti; Billker, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Many critical events in the Plasmodium life cycle rely on the controlled release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores to activate stage-specific Ca2+-dependent protein kinases. Using the motility of Plasmodium berghei ookinetes as a signalling paradigm, we show that the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase, PKG, maintains the elevated level of cytosolic Ca2+ required for gliding motility. We find that the same PKG-dependent pathway operates upstream of the Ca2+ signals that mediate activation of P. berghei gametocytes in the mosquito and egress of Plasmodium falciparum merozoites from infected human erythrocytes. Perturbations of PKG signalling in gliding ookinetes have a marked impact on the phosphoproteome, with a significant enrichment of in vivo regulated sites in multiple pathways including vesicular trafficking and phosphoinositide metabolism. A global analysis of cellular phospholipids demonstrates that in gliding ookinetes PKG controls phosphoinositide biosynthesis, possibly through the subcellular localisation or activity of lipid kinases. Similarly, phosphoinositide metabolism links PKG to egress of P. falciparum merozoites, where inhibition of PKG blocks hydrolysis of phosphatidylinostitol (4,5)-bisphosphate. In the face of an increasing complexity of signalling through multiple Ca2+ effectors, PKG emerges as a unifying factor to control multiple cellular Ca2+ signals essential for malaria parasite development and transmission. PMID:24594931

  2. Evidence that hyperprolinemia alters glutamatergic homeostasis in rat brain: neuroprotector effect of guanosine.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Andréa G K; da Cunha, Aline A; Scherer, Emilene B; Machado, Fernanda R; da Cunha, Maira J; Braga, Andressa; Mussulini, Ben Hur; Moreira, Júlia D; Wofchuk, Susana; Souza, Diogo O; Wyse, Angela T S

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of acute and chronic hyperprolinemia on glutamate uptake, as well as some mechanisms underlying the proline effects on glutamatergic system in rat cerebral cortex. The protective role of guanosine on effects mediated by proline was also evaluated. Results showed that acute and chronic hyperprolinemia reduced glutamate uptake, Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity, ATP levels and increased lipoperoxidation. GLAST and GLT-1 immunocontent were increased in acute, but not in chronic hyperprolinemic rats. Our data suggest that the effects of proline on glutamate uptake may be mediated by lipid peroxidation and disruption of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity, but not by decreasing in glutamate transporters. This probably induces excitotoxicity and subsequent energy deficit. Guanosine was effective to prevent most of the effects promoted by proline, reinforcing its modulator role in counteracting the glutamate toxicity. However, further studies are needed to assess the modulatory effects of guanosine on experimental hyperprolinemia.

  3. Plant Cyclic Nucleotide Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Atienza, Juliana; Van Ingelgem, Carl; Roef, Luc

    2007-01-01

    The presence of the cyclic nucleotides 3′,5′-cyclic adenyl monophosphate (cAMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic guanyl monophosphate (cGMP) in plants is now generally accepted. In addition, cAMP and cGMP have been implicated in the regulation of important plant processes such as stomatal functioning, monovalent and divalent cation fluxes, chloroplast development, gibberellic acid signalling, pathogen response and gene transcription. However, very little is known regarding the components of cyclic nucleotide signalling in plants. In this addendum, the evidence for specific mechanisms of plant cyclic nucleotide signalling is evaluated and discussed. PMID:19704553

  4. Membrane potential shifts caused by diffusible guidance signals direct growth-cone turning.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Makoto; von Schimmelmann, Melanie J; Togashi, Kazunobu; Findley, William M; Hong, Kyonsoo

    2008-07-01

    Plasma membrane potentials gate the ion channel conductance that controls external signal-induced neuronal functions. We found that diffusible guidance molecules caused membrane potential shifts that resulted in repulsion or attraction of Xenopus laevis spinal neuron growth cones. The repellents Sema3A and Slit2 caused hyperpolarization, and the attractants netrin-1 and BDNF caused depolarization. Clamping the growth-cone potential at the resting state prevented Sema3A-induced repulsion; depolarizing potentials converted the repulsion to attraction, whereas hyperpolarizing potentials had no effect. Sema3A increased the intracellular concentration of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate ([cGMP]i) by soluble guanylyl cyclase, resulting in fast onset and long-lasting hyperpolarization. Pharmacological increase of [cGMP](i) caused protein kinase G (PKG)-mediated depolarization, switching Sema3A-induced repulsion to attraction. This bimodal switch required activation of either Cl(-) or Na+ channels, which, in turn, regulated the differential intracellular Ca2+ concentration increase across the growth cone. Thus, the polarity of growth-cone potential shifts imposes either attraction or repulsion, and Sema3A achieves this through cGMP signaling.

  5. High density and ligand affinity confer ultrasensitive signal detection by a guanylyl cyclase chemoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Pichlo, Magdalena; Bungert-Plümke, Stefanie; Weyand, Ingo; Seifert, Reinhard; Bönigk, Wolfgang; Strünker, Timo; Kashikar, Nachiket Dilip; Goodwin, Normann; Müller, Astrid; Körschen, Heinz G.; Collienne, Ursel; Pelzer, Patric; Van, Qui; Enderlein, Jörg; Klemm, Clementine; Krause, Eberhard; Trötschel, Christian; Poetsch, Ansgar; Kremmer, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Guanylyl cyclases (GCs), which synthesize the messenger cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate, control several sensory functions, such as phototransduction, chemosensation, and thermosensation, in many species from worms to mammals. The GC chemoreceptor in sea urchin sperm can decode chemoattractant concentrations with single-molecule sensitivity. The molecular and cellular underpinnings of such ultrasensitivity are not known for any eukaryotic chemoreceptor. In this paper, we show that an exquisitely high density of 3 × 105 GC chemoreceptors and subnanomolar ligand affinity provide a high ligand-capture efficacy and render sperm perfect absorbers. The GC activity is terminated within 150 ms by dephosphorylation steps of the receptor, which provides a means for precise control of the GC lifetime and which reduces “molecule noise.” Compared with other ultrasensitive sensory systems, the 10-fold signal amplification by the GC receptor is surprisingly low. The hallmarks of this signaling mechanism provide a blueprint for chemical sensing in small compartments, such as olfactory cilia, insect antennae, or even synaptic boutons. PMID:25135936

  6. Nucleic acid molecules encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B.; Lange, Bernd M.

    2001-01-01

    A cDNA encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase (IPK) from peppermint (Mentha x piperita) has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID NO:1) is provided which codes for the expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase (SEQ ID NO:2), from peppermint (Mentha x piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant isopentenyl monophosphate kinase that may be used to facilitate its production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant isopentenyl monophosphate kinase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase in plants in order to enhance the production of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or isoprenoids derived therefrom, or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or the production of its products.

  7. Guanosine radical reactivity explored by pulse radiolysis coupled with transient electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Latus, A; Alam, M S; Mostafavi, M; Marignier, J-L; Maisonhaute, E

    2015-06-04

    We follow the reactivity of a guanosine radical created by a radiolytic electron pulse both by spectroscopic and electrochemical methods. This original approach allows us to demonstrate that there is a competition between oxidation and reduction of these intermediates, an important result to further analyse the degradation or repair pathways of DNA bases.

  8. Supramolecular polymers based on the quadruplex formation of ditopic guanosine macromonomers in nonaqueous media.

    PubMed

    Pintér, Gabor; Batta, Gyula; Horvath, Pal; Löki, Istvan; Kurtan, Tibor; Antus, Sandor; Kéki, Sandor; Zsuga, Miklós; Nagy, Gabor; Aradi, Janos; Gunda, Tamas; Herczegh, Pal

    2007-05-08

    The formation of supramolecular polymeric aggregates with a molecular mass of 100 kDa in a nonaqueous solution from a telechelic dimer of isopropylidene guanosine in the presence of K(+) ions is reported. The possible structure of macromonomers resulting from the development of G4 quartets was deduced from DOSY NMR, circular dichroism spectra, and dynamic light scattering measurements.

  9. Guanosine Diphosphate-l-Fucose Glycopeptide Fucosyltransferase Activity in Corynebacterium insidiosum1

    PubMed Central

    Sadowski, Peter L.; Strobel, Gary A.

    1973-01-01

    The biosynthesis of a phytotoxic glycopeptide of Corynebacterium insidiosum involves guanosine diphosphate-l-fucosyltransferase activity. This enzyme activity is most consistently associated with the cellular membranes fraction. The optimal pH for the transfer reaction is 7.5. The partially hydrolyzed toxin serves as an acceptor (primer) of l-fucose. PMID:4199136

  10. Metabolic syndrome: adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and malonyl coenzyme A.

    PubMed

    Ruderman, Neil B; Saha, Asish K

    2006-02-01

    The metabolic syndrome can be defined as a state of metabolic dysregulation characterized by insulin resistance, central obesity, and a predisposition to type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, premature atherosclerosis, and other diseases. An increasing body of evidence has linked the metabolic syndrome to abnormalities in lipid metabolism that ultimately lead to cellular dysfunction. We review here the hypothesis that, in many instances, the cause of these lipid abnormalities could be a dysregulation of the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/malonyl coenzyme A (CoA) fuel-sensing and signaling mechanism. Such dysregulation could be reflected by isolated increases in malonyl CoA or by concurrent changes in malonyl CoA and AMPK, both of which would alter intracellular fatty acid partitioning. The possibility is also raised that pharmacological agents and other factors that activate AMPK and/or decrease malonyl CoA could be therapeutic targets.

  11. Normoxic Cyclic GMP-independent Oxidative Signaling by Nitrite Enhances Airway Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Frizzell, Sheila A.; Zhao, Xuejun; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    The airway epithelium provides important barrier and host defense functions. Recent studies reveal that nitrite is an endocrine reservoir of nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity that is converted to NO by enzymatic reductases along the physiological oxygen gradient. Nitrite signaling has been described as NO dependent activation mediated by reactions with deoxygenated redox active hemoproteins, such as hemoglobin, myoglobin, neuroglobin, xanthine oxidoreductase (XO) and NO synthase at low pH and oxygen tension. However, nitrite can also be readily oxidized to nitrogen dioxide (NO2•) via heme peroxidase reactions, suggesting the existence of alternative oxidative signaling pathways for nitrite under normoxic conditions. In the present study we examined normoxic signaling effects of sodium nitrite on airway epithelial cell wound healing. In an in vitro scratch injury model under normoxia, we exposed cultured monolayers of human airway epithelial cells to various concentrations of sodium nitrite and compared responses to NO donor. We found sodium nitrite potently enhanced airway epithelium wound healing at physiological concentrations (from 1uM). The effect of nitrite was blocked by the NO and NO2• scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (c-PTIO). Interestingly, nitrite treatment did not increase cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels under these normoxic conditions, even in the presence of a phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor, suggesting cGMP independent signaling. Consistent with an oxidative signaling pathway requiring hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)/heme peroxidase/NO2• signaling, the effects of nitrite were potentiated by superoxide dismutase (SOD) and low concentration H2O2, whereas inhibited completely by catalase, followed by downstream extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation. Our data represent the first description of normoxic nitrite signaling on lung epithelial cell proliferation and wound healing and suggest

  12. Protein and Signaling Networks in Vertebrate Photoreceptor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Karl-Wilhelm; Dell’Orco, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrate photoreceptor cells are exquisite light detectors operating under very dim and bright illumination. The photoexcitation and adaptation machinery in photoreceptor cells consists of protein complexes that can form highly ordered supramolecular structures and control the homeostasis and mutual dependence of the secondary messengers cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and Ca2+. The visual pigment in rod photoreceptors, the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin is organized in tracks of dimers thereby providing a signaling platform for the dynamic scaffolding of the G protein transducin. Illuminated rhodopsin is turned off by phosphorylation catalyzed by rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) under control of Ca2+-recoverin. The GRK1 protein complex partly assembles in lipid raft structures, where shutting off rhodopsin seems to be more effective. Re-synthesis of cGMP is another crucial step in the recovery of the photoresponse after illumination. It is catalyzed by membrane bound sensory guanylate cyclases (GCs) and is regulated by specific neuronal Ca2+-sensor proteins called guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs). At least one GC (ROS-GC1) was shown to be part of a multiprotein complex having strong interactions with the cytoskeleton and being controlled in a multimodal Ca2+-dependent fashion. The final target of the cGMP signaling cascade is a cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel that is a hetero-oligomeric protein located in the plasma membrane and interacting with accessory proteins in highly organized microdomains. We summarize results and interpretations of findings related to the inhomogeneous organization of signaling units in photoreceptor outer segments. PMID:26635520

  13. The rhodopsin-guanylyl cyclase of the aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii enables fast optical control of cGMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Scheib, Ulrike; Stehfest, Katja; Gee, Christine E; Körschen, Heinz G; Fudim, Roman; Oertner, Thomas G; Hegemann, Peter

    2015-08-11

    Blastocladiomycota fungi form motile zoospores that are guided by sensory photoreceptors to areas of optimal light conditions. We showed that the microbial rhodopsin of Blastocladiella emersonii is a rhodopsin-guanylyl cyclase (RhGC), a member of a previously uncharacterized rhodopsin class of light-activated enzymes that generate the second messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). Upon application of a short light flash, recombinant RhGC converted within 8 ms into a signaling state with blue-shifted absorption from which the dark state recovered within 100 ms. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, Chinese hamster ovary cells, or mammalian neurons, RhGC generated cGMP in response to green light in a light dose-dependent manner on a subsecond time scale. Thus, we propose RhGC as a versatile tool for the optogenetic analysis of cGMP-dependent signaling processes in cell biology and the neurosciences. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. IgA from HIV+ haemophilic patients triggers intracellular signals coupled to the cholinergic system of the intestine

    PubMed Central

    SALES, M E; STERIN-BORDA, L; DE BRACCO, M M E; RODRIGUEZ, M; NARBAITZ, M; BORDA, E

    1997-01-01

    IgA was obtained from HIV-infected haemophilic patients and the intracellular signals triggered by its reaction with isolated rat intestinal strips were studied. HTV+ IgA stained intestinal microvilli with a granular immunofluorescence pattern and bound to the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), displacing the specific muscarinic cholinergic antagonist QNB in a non-competitive manner. It triggered the signals that are the consequence of mAChR stimulation in die intestine. Thus, it decreased cAMP synthesis and increased guanosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) formation and phosphoinositide (PI) turnover of the intestine. In addition, it stimulated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis by intestinal strips. Through its effect on PGE2 synthesis, HIV+ IgA could have a dual action. On the one hand, it could enhance immunosuppression at a local level, favouring pathogen growth and subsequent intestinal dysfunction. On the other hand, PGE2 could directly increase intestinal motility and electrolyte/fluid loss. Both effects could be involved in intestinal damage in AIDS. PMID:9367401

  15. Intraventricular injection of agents that enhance cyclic adenosine monophosphate formation leads to inhibition of proestrous luteinizing hormone surge in rats.

    PubMed

    Taleisnik, S; Haymal, B; Caligaris, L

    1993-09-01

    The effect of increasing hypothalamic levels of 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) on the preovulatory surge of luteinizing hormone (LH) and ovulation was studied in cycling rats. Animals hearing chronically implanted guiding cannulae into the third ventricle were injected with agents known to enhance the cellular levels of cAMP. Hourly blood samples from the unanesthetized, unrestrained rats were obtained between 11.00 and 17.00 h through a plastic cannula inserted into the jugular vein. Intraventricular injections of serotonin (7.5 mg/ml; 2 microliters) in the morning of proestrous blocked the preovulatory surge of LH and ovulation. This effect was assigned to an increased neuronal level of cAMP because it was prevented by a serum anti-cAMP. Third-ventricle injections of 2 microliters of forskolin (0.5 mmol/l), guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate)(2 mmol/l) or dibutyryl-cAMP (1 mmol/l) at 11.00 h on the day of proestrus mimicked the inhibitory effect of serotonin on the proestrous release of LH. It is suggested that serotonin inhibits LH surge by acting directly on LH-releasing hormone neurons and/or on neurons that provide inputs to these neurons involving cAMP as a second messenger. Neurons releasing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) may serve as interneurons sensitive to serotonin, as well as to cAMP, inasmuch as the inhibitory effect of forskolin on the release of LH was partially blocked by the GABA antagonists, picrotoxin and bicuculline.

  16. Specific Interactions of Antitumor Metallocenes with Deoxydinucleoside Monophosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, Rahel P.; Hari, Yvonne; Schürch, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Bent metallocenes Cp2MCl2 (M = Ti, V, Nb, Mo) are known to exhibit cytotoxic activity against a variety of cancer types. Though the mechanism of action is not fully understood yet, the accumulation of the metal ions in the nucleus points towards DNA as one of the primary targets. A set of eight deoxydinucleoside monophosphates was used to study the adduct yields with metallocenes and cisplatin. The binding affinities are reflected by the relative intensities of the adducts and were found to follow the order of Pt > V > Ti > Mo (no adducts were detected with Nb). High-resolution tandem mass spectrometry was applied to locate the binding patterns in the deoxydinucleoside monophosphates. Whereas cisplatin binds to the soft nitrogen atoms in the purine nucleobases, the metallocenes additionally interact with the hard phosphate oxygen, which is in good agreement with the hard and soft (Lewis) acids and bases (HSAB) concept. However, the binding specificities were found to be unique for each metallocene. The hard Lewis acids titanium and vanadium predominantly bind to the deprotonated phosphate oxygen, whereas molybdenum, an intermediate Lewis acid, preferentially interacts with the nucleobases. Nucleobases comprise alternative binding sites for titanium and vanadium, presumably oxygen atoms for the first and nitrogen atoms for the latter. In summary, the intrinsic binding behavior of the different metallodrugs is reflected by the gas-phase dissociation of the adducts. Consequently, MS/MS can provide insights into therapeutically relevant interactions between metallodrugs and their cellular targets. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Specific Interactions of Antitumor Metallocenes with Deoxydinucleoside Monophosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, Rahel P.; Hari, Yvonne; Schürch, Stefan

    2017-05-01

    Bent metallocenes Cp2MCl2 (M = Ti, V, Nb, Mo) are known to exhibit cytotoxic activity against a variety of cancer types. Though the mechanism of action is not fully understood yet, the accumulation of the metal ions in the nucleus points towards DNA as one of the primary targets. A set of eight deoxydinucleoside monophosphates was used to study the adduct yields with metallocenes and cisplatin. The binding affinities are reflected by the relative intensities of the adducts and were found to follow the order of Pt > V > Ti > Mo (no adducts were detected with Nb). High-resolution tandem mass spectrometry was applied to locate the binding patterns in the deoxydinucleoside monophosphates. Whereas cisplatin binds to the soft nitrogen atoms in the purine nucleobases, the metallocenes additionally interact with the hard phosphate oxygen, which is in good agreement with the hard and soft (Lewis) acids and bases (HSAB) concept. However, the binding specificities were found to be unique for each metallocene. The hard Lewis acids titanium and vanadium predominantly bind to the deprotonated phosphate oxygen, whereas molybdenum, an intermediate Lewis acid, preferentially interacts with the nucleobases. Nucleobases comprise alternative binding sites for titanium and vanadium, presumably oxygen atoms for the first and nitrogen atoms for the latter. In summary, the intrinsic binding behavior of the different metallodrugs is reflected by the gas-phase dissociation of the adducts. Consequently, MS/MS can provide insights into therapeutically relevant interactions between metallodrugs and their cellular targets.

  18. Visualization of drug-nucleic acid interactions at atomic resolution. IX. Structures of two N,N-dimethylproflavine: 5-iodocytidylyl (3'-5') guanosine crystalline complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandary, K.K.; Sakore, T.D.; Sobell, H.M.; King, D.; Gabbay, E.J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes two complexes containing N,N-dimethylproflavine and the dinucleoside monophosphate, 5-iodocytidylyl(3'-5')guanosine (iodoCpG). The first complex is triclinic, space group P1, with unit cell dimensions a = 11.78 A, b = 14.55 A, c = 15.50 A, ..cap alpha.. = 89.2/sup 0/, ..beta.. 86.2/sup 0/, ..gamma.. = 96.4/sup 0/. The second complex is monoclinic, space group P2/sub 1/, with a = 14.20 A, b = 19.00 A, c = 20.73 A, ..beta.. = 103.6/sup 0/. Both structures have been solved to atomic resolution and refined by Fourier and least squares methods. The first structure has been refined anisotropically to a residual of 0.09 on 5025 observed reflections using block diagonal least squares, while the second structure has been refined isotropically to a residual of 0.13 on 2888 reflections with full matrix least squares. The asymmetric unit in both structures contains two dimethylproflavine molecules and two iodoCpG molecules; the first structure has 16 water molecules (a total of 134 non-hydrogen atoms), while the second structure has 18 water molecules (a total of 136 non-hydrogen atoms). Both structures demonstrate intercalation of dimethylproflavine between base-paired iodoCpG dimers. In addition, dimethylproflavine molecules stack on either side of the intercalated duplex, being related by a unit cell translation along b and a axes, respectively. 16 references, 13 figures, 5 tables.

  19. Function of specific 2'-hydroxyl groups of guanosines in a hammerhead ribozyme probed by 2' modifications.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D M; Pieken, W A; Eckstein, F

    1992-01-01

    The importance of the 2'-hydroxyl group of several guanosine residues for the catalytic efficiency of a hammerhead ribozyme has been investigated. Five ribozymes in which single guanosine residues were substituted with 2'-amino-, 2'-fluoro-, or 2'-deoxyguanosine were chemically synthesized. The comparison of the catalytic activity of the three 2' modifications at a specific position allows conclusions about the functional role of the parent 2'-hydroxyl group. Substitutions of nonconserved nucleotides within the ribozyme caused little alteration in the catalytic activity relative to that obtained with the unmodified ribozyme. In contrast, when either of the guanosines within the single-stranded loop between stem I and stem II of the ribozyme was replaced by 2'-deoxyguanosine or 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyguanosine, the catalytic activities of the resulting ribozymes were reduced by factors of at least 150. The catalytic activities of the corresponding ribozymes containing 2'-amino-2'-deoxyguanosine substitutions at these positions, however, were both reduced by factors of 15. These effects resulted from decreases in the respective kcat values, whereas variations in the Km values were comparatively small. A different pattern of reactivity of the three 2' modifications was observed at the guanosine immediately 3' to stem II of the ribozyme. Whereas both 2'-deoxyguanosine and 2'-amino-2'-deoxyguanosine at this position showed catalytic activity similar to that of the unmodified ribozyme, the activity of the corresponding 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyguanosine-containing ribozyme was reduced by a factor of 15. The implications of these substitution-specific reactivities on the functional role of the native 2'-hydroxyl groups are discussed. Images PMID:1736306

  20. Cross-talk between Two Nucleotide-signaling Pathways in Staphylococcus aureus*

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Rebecca M.; Bowman, Lisa; Willis, Alexandra R.; Kaever, Volkhard; Gründling, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide-signaling pathways are found in all kingdoms of life and are utilized to coordinate a rapid response to external stimuli. The stringent response alarmones guanosine tetra- (ppGpp) and pentaphosphate (pppGpp) control a global response allowing cells to adapt to starvation conditions such as amino acid depletion. One more recently discovered signaling nucleotide is the secondary messenger cyclic diadenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP). Here, we demonstrate that this signaling nucleotide is essential for the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, and its increased production during late growth phases indicates that c-di-AMP controls processes that are important for the survival of cells in stationary phase. By examining the transcriptional profile of cells with high levels of c-di-AMP, we reveal a significant overlap with a stringent response transcription signature. Examination of the intracellular nucleotide levels under stress conditions provides further evidence that high levels of c-di-AMP lead to an activation of the stringent response through a RelA/SpoT homologue (RSH) enzyme-dependent increase in the (p)ppGpp levels. This activation is shown to be indirect as c-di-AMP does not interact directly with the RSH protein. Our data extend this interconnection further by showing that the S. aureus c-di-AMP phosphodiesterase enzyme GdpP is inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by ppGpp, which itself is not a substrate for this enzyme. Altogether, these findings add a new layer of complexity to our understanding of nucleotide signaling in bacteria as they highlight intricate interconnections between different nucleotide-signaling networks. PMID:25575594

  1. Robo1 promotes angiogenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma through the Rho family of guanosine triphosphatases' signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ao, Jian-Yang; Chai, Zong-Tao; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhu, Xiao-Dong; Kong, Ling-Qun; Zhang, Ning; Ye, Bo-Gen; Cai, Hao; Gao, Dong-mei; Sun, Hui-Chuan

    2015-11-01

    Robo1 is a member of the Robo immunoglobulin superfamily of proteins, and it plays an important role in angiogenesis and cancer. In this study, we investigate the role of roundabout 1 (Robo1) in tumor angiogenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Firstly, the relationship between Robo1 expression on tumors and patient's survival and endothelial cells in tumor blood vessels and patient's survival was studied. Secondly, Robo1 was overexpressed or knocked down in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Cell proliferation, motility, and tube formation were compared in HUVEC with different Robo1 expression. Also, HUVECs with different Robo1 expression were mixed with HCCLM3 and HepG2 hepatoma cells and then implanted in a nude mouse model to examine the effects of Robo1 in endothelial cells on tumor growth and angiogenesis. Cell motility-related molecules were studied to investigate the potential mechanism how Robo1 promoted tumor angiogenesis in HCC. The disease-free survival of the patients with high Robo1 expression in tumoral endothelial cells was significantly shorter than that of those with low expression (P = 0.021). Overexpression of Robo1 in HUVECs resulted in increased proliferation, motility, and tube formation in vitro. In the implanted mixture of tumor cells and HUVECs with an increased Robo1 expression, tumor growth and microvessel density were enhanced compared with controls. Robo1 promoted cell division cycle 42 (Cdc42) expression in HUVECs, and a distorted actin cytoskeleton in HUVECs was observed when Robo1 expression was suppressed. In conclusion, Robo1 promoted angiogenesis in HCC mediated by Cdc42.

  2. Comprehensive overexpression analysis of cyclic-di-GMP signalling proteins in the phytopathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum reveals diverse effects on motility and virulence phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Tan, H; West, J A; Ramsay, J P; Monson, R E; Griffin, J L; Toth, I K; Salmond, G P C

    2014-07-01

    Bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a ubiquitous bacterial signalling molecule produced by diguanylate cyclases of the GGDEF-domain family. Elevated c-di-GMP levels or increased GGDEF protein expression is frequently associated with the onset of sessility and biofilm formation in numerous bacterial species. Conversely, phosphodiesterase-dependent diminution of c-di-GMP levels by EAL- and HD-GYP-domain proteins is often accompanied by increased motility and virulence. In this study, we individually overexpressed 23 predicted GGDEF, EAL or HD-GYP-domain proteins encoded by the phytopathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum strain SCRI1043. MS-based detection of c-di-GMP and 5'-phosphoguanylyl-(3'-5')-guanosine in these strains revealed that overexpression of most genes promoted modest 1-10-fold changes in cellular levels of c-di-GMP, with the exception of the GGDEF-domain proteins ECA0659 and ECA3374, which induced 1290- and 7660-fold increases, respectively. Overexpression of most EAL domain proteins increased motility, while overexpression of most GGDEF domain proteins reduced motility and increased poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-glucosamine-dependent flocculation. In contrast to domain-based predictions, overexpression of the EAL protein ECA3549 or the HD-GYP protein ECA3548 increased c-di-GMP concentrations and reduced motility. Most overexpression constructs altered the levels of secreted cellulases, pectinases and proteases, confirming c-di-GMP regulation of virulence in Pe. atrosepticum. However, there was no apparent correlation between virulence-factor induction and the domain class expressed or cellular c-di-GMP levels, suggesting that regulation was in response to specific effectors within the network, rather than total c-di-GMP concentration. Finally, we demonstrated that the cellular localization patterns vary considerably for GGDEF/EAL/HD-GYP proteins, indicating it is a likely factor restricting specific interactions within the c

  3. Adenosine Monophosphate-Based Detection of Bacterial Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G.; Chen, Fei; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Hattori, Nori; Suzuki, Shigeya

    2009-01-01

    A method of rapid detection of bacterial spores is based on the discovery that a heat shock consisting of exposure to a temperature of 100 C for 10 minutes causes the complete release of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) from the spores. This method could be an alternative to the method described in the immediately preceding article. Unlike that method and related prior methods, the present method does not involve germination and cultivation; this feature is an important advantage because in cases in which the spores are those of pathogens, delays involved in germination and cultivation could increase risks of infection. Also, in comparison with other prior methods that do not involve germination, the present method affords greater sensitivity. At present, the method is embodied in a laboratory procedure, though it would be desirable to implement the method by means of a miniaturized apparatus in order to make it convenient and economical enough to encourage widespread use.

  4. Viscothionin isolated from Korean mistletoe improves nonalcoholic fatty liver disease via the activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sokho; Lee, Dongho; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Kim, Jae-Hun; Park, Jong-Heum; Lee, Ju-Woon; Kwon, Jungkee

    2014-12-10

    The present study investigated the effects of viscothionin, a compound isolated from Korean mistletoe (Viscum album coloratum), on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in both in vitro and in vivo models. A connection was discovered between viscothionin and the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway, which is involved in lipid metabolism. Viscothionin was shown to significantly attenuate lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells treated with oleic acid, which induces lipid accumulation. Moreover, the phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase in HepG2 cells was increased by viscothionin treatment. Viscothionin was orally administered to high fat diet-induced obese mice and subsequently histopathological analysis associated with AMPK signaling pathways was evaluated. A significant reduction in the extent of hepatic steatosis was revealed in viscothionin-treated obese mice. Thus, viscothionin mediates its beneficial effects on NAFLD via AMPK signaling pathways, suggesting that it may be a potential target for novel NAFLD treatments.

  5. Effects of adenosine 5'-monophosphate on epidermal turnover.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Fukumi; Kanehara, Shoko; Harano, Fumiki; Shinohara, Shigeo; Kamimura, Junko; Kawabata, Shigekatsu; Igarashi, Sachiyo; Kawamura, Mitsuaki; Yamamoto, Yuki; Miyachi, Yoshiki

    2008-10-01

    The structure and function of the epidermis is maintained by cell renewal based on epidermal turnover. Epidermal turnover is delayed by aging, and it is thought that the delay of the epidermal turnover is a cause of aging alternation of skin. The epidermal turnover is related to the energy metabolism of epidermal basal cells. Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is needed for cell renewal: cell division, and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) increases the amount of intracellular ATP. These findings suggest that AMP accelerates the epidermal turnover delayed by aging. This study investigated whether AMP and adenosine 5'-monophosphate disodium salt (AMP2Na) accelerates the epidermal turnover. An effect of AMP2Na on cell proliferation was examined by our counting of keratinocytes. An effect of AMP2Na on cell cycle was examined by our counting of basal cells in DNA synthetic period of hairless rats. The effects of AMP2Na (or AMP) on the epidermal turnover were examined by our measuring stratum corneum transit time by use of guinea pigs, and by our measuring stratum corneum surface area by use of hairless rats and in a clinical pharmacological study. The AMP2Na showed two different profiles on the proliferation of primary cultured keratinocytes. At a low concentration it induced cell growth, whereas at a high concentration it inhibited cell growth. The number of basal cells in the DNA synthetic period of AMP2Na was significantly higher than that of the vehicle in hairless rats. The stratum corneum transit time of AMP2Na was significantly shorter than that of the vehicle in guinea pigs. The corneocyte surface area of emulsion containing AMP2Na was significantly smaller than that of the vehicle in volunteers. We conclude that AMP promotes the cell proliferation and the cell cycle progression of epidermal basal cells and accelerates epidermal turnover safely. In addition, AMP is useful for skin rejuvenation in dermatology and aesthetic dermatology.

  6. Acid-base and metal-ion-binding properties of xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP) in aqueous solution: complex stabilities, isomeric equilibria, and extent of macrochelation.

    PubMed

    Sigel, Helmut; Massoud, Salah S; Song, Bin; Griesser, Rolf; Knobloch, Bernd; Operschall, Bert P

    2006-10-25

    The four acidity constants of threefold protonated xanthosine 5'-monophosphate, H3(XMP)+, reveal that at the physiological pH of 7.5 (XMP-H)(3-) strongly dominates (and not XMP(2-) as given in textbooks); this is in contrast to the related inosine (IMP(2-)) and guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP(2-)) and it means that XMP should better be named as xanthosinate 5'-monophosphate. In addition, evidence is provided for a tautomeric (XMP-HN1)(3-)/(XMP-HN3)(3-) equilibrium. The stability constants of the M(H;XMP)+ species were estimated and those of the M(XMP) and M(XMP-H)- complexes (M2+=Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+) measured potentiometrically in aqueous solution. The primary M2+ binding site in M(XMP) is (mostly) N7 of the monodeprotonated xanthine residue, the proton being at the phosphate group. The corresponding macrochelates involving P(O)2(OH)- (most likely outer-sphere) are formed to approximately 65% for nearly all M2+. In M(XMP-H)- the primary M2+ binding site is (mostly) the phosphate group; here the formation degree of the N7 macrochelates varies widely from close to zero for the alkaline earth ions, to approximately 50% for Mn2+, and approximately 90% or more for Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, and Cd2+. Because for (XMP-H)(3-) the micro stability constants quantifying the M2+ affinity of the xanthosinate and PO3(2-) residues are known, one may apply a recently developed quantification method for the chelate effect to the corresponding macrochelates; this chelate effect is close to zero for the alkaline earth ions and it amounts to about one log unit for Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+. This method also allows calculation of the formation degrees of the monodentatally coordinated isomers; this information is of relevance for biological systems because it demonstrates how metal ions can switch from one site to another through macrochelate formation. These insights are meaningful for metal-ion-dependent reactions of XMP in metabolic pathways; previous

  7. Acid-base properties of xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP) and of some related nucleobase derivatives in aqueous solution: micro acidity constant evaluations of the (N1)H versus the (N3)H deprotonation ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Massoud, Salah S; Corfù, Nicolas A; Griesser, Rolf; Sigel, Helmut

    2004-10-11

    The first acidity constant of fully protonated xanthosine 5'-monophosphate, that is, of H3(XMP)+, was estimated by means of a micro acidity constant scheme and the following three deprotonations of the H2(XMP)+/- (pKa=0.97), H(XMP)- (5.30), and XMP2- (6.45) species were determined by potentiometric pH titrations; further deprotonation of (XMP-H)3- is possible only with pKa>12. The most important results are that the xanthine residue is deprotonated before the P(O)2(OH)- group loses its final proton; that is, twofold negatively charged XMP carries one negative charge in the pyrimidine ring and one at the phosphate group. Micro acidity constant evaluations reveal that this latter mentioned species occurs with a formation degree of 88 %, whereas its tautomer with a neutral xanthine moiety and a PO3(2-) group is formed only to 12 %; this distinguishes XMP from its related nucleoside 5'-monophosphates, like guanosine 5'-monophosphate. At the physiological pH of about 7.5 mainly (XMP-H)3- exists. The question, which of the purine sites, (N1)H or (N3)H, is deprotonated in this species cannot be answered unequivocally, though it appears that the (N3)H site is more acidic. By application of several methylated xanthine species intrinsic micro acidity constants are calculated and it is shown that, for example, for 7-methylxanthine the N1-deprotonated tautomer occurs with a formation degree of about 5 %; a small but significant amount that, as is discussed, may possibly be enhanced by metal ion coordination to N7, which is known to occur preferably to this site.

  8. Length of guanosine homopolymeric repeats modulates promoter activity of subfamily II tpr genes of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum.

    PubMed

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Lukehart, Sheila; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2007-11-01

    In Treponema pallidum, homopolymeric guanosine repeats of varying length are present upstream of both Subfamily I (tprC, D, F and I) and II (tprE, G and J) tpr genes, a group of potential virulence factors, immediately upstream of the +1 nucleotide. To investigate the influence of these poly-G sequences on promoter activity, tprE, G, J, F and I promoter regions containing homopolymeric tracts with different numbers of Gs, the ribosomal binding site and start codon were cloned in frame with the green fluorescent protein reporter gene (GFP), and promoter activity was measured both as fluorescence emission from Escherichia coli cultures transformed with the different plasmid constructs and using quantitative RT-PCR. For tprJ, G and E-derived clones, fluorescence was significantly higher with constructs containing eight Gs or fewer, while plasmids containing the same promoters with none or more Gs gave modest or no signal above the background. In contrast, tprF/I-derived clones induced similar levels of fluorescence regardless of the number of Gs within the promoter. GFP mRNA quantification showed that all of the promoters induced measurable transcription of the GFP gene; however, only for Subfamily II promoters was message synthesis inversely correlated to the number of Gs in the construct.

  9. MYCBP2 Is a Guanosine Exchange Factor for Ran Protein and Determines Its Localization in Neurons of Dorsal Root Ganglia*

    PubMed Central

    Dörr, Angela; Pierre, Sandra; Zhang, Dong D.; Henke, Marina; Holland, Sabrina; Scholich, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    The small GTPase Ran coordinates retrograde axonal transport in neurons, spindle assembly during mitosis, and the nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of mRNA. Its localization is tightly regulated by the GTPase-activating protein RanGAP1 and the nuclear guanosine exchange factor (GEF) RCC1. We show that loss of the neuronal E3 ubiquitin ligase MYCBP2 caused the up-regulation of Ran and RanGAP1 in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) under basal conditions and during inflammatory hyperalgesia. SUMOylated RanGAP1 physically interacted with MYCBP2 and inhibited its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Stimulation of neurons induced a RanGAP1-dependent translocation of MYCBP2 to the nucleus. In the nucleus of DRG neurons MYCBP2 co-localized with Ran and facilitated through its RCC1-like domain the GDP/GTP exchange of Ran. In accordance with the necessity of a GEF to promote GTP-binding and nuclear export of Ran, the nuclear localization of Ran was strongly increased in MYCBP2-deficient DRGs. The finding that other GEFs for Ran besides RCC1 exist gives new insights in the complexity of the regulation of the Ran signaling pathway. PMID:26304119

  10. Extracellular guanosine-5'-triphosphate modulates myogenesis via intermediate Ca(2+)-activated K+ currents in C2C12 mouse cells.

    PubMed

    Pietrangelo, Tiziana; Fioretti, Bernard; Mancinelli, Rosa; Catacuzzeno, Luigi; Franciolini, Fabio; Fanò, Giorgio; Fulle, Stefania

    2006-05-01

    In this study we investigated the role of extracellular 5'-guanosine-triphosphate (GTP) on early phases of skeletal muscle differentiation using the widely used C2C12 mouse cells as a myogenic model. We show that extracellular GTP binding to specific sites activates a metabotropic cascade that leads to a transient intracellular Ca2+ mobilization, consequent activation of the intermediate Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels (IK(Ca)), and hyperpolarization of the plasma membrane. We further show that in differentiating C2C12 myoblasts GTP induces a proliferative boost, and increases the number of cells positive for the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) proteins. These effects were shown to be mediated by the IK(Ca) channel-dependent hyperpolarization, as evidenced by their disappearance when myoblasts were incubated with the IK(Ca) channel inhibitor charybdotoxin. These data give new insights into nucleotide purinergic signalling pathways, and address the role of the GTP-dependent IK(Ca) channel activation and hyperpolarization in myogenesis.

  11. Intranasal guanosine administration presents a wide therapeutic time window to reduce brain damage induced by permanent ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Denise Barbosa; Muller, Gabriel Cardozo; Rocha, Guilherme Botter Maio; Dellavia, Gustavo Hirata; Almeida, Roberto Farina; Pettenuzzo, Leticia Ferreira; Loureiro, Samanta Oliveira; Hansel, Gisele; Horn, Ângelo Cássio Magalhães; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Ganzella, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    In addition to its intracellular roles, the nucleoside guanosine (GUO) also has extracellular effects that identify it as a putative neuromodulator signaling molecule in the central nervous system. Indeed, GUO can modulate glutamatergic neurotransmission, and it can promote neuroprotective effects in animal models involving glutamate neurotoxicity, which is the case in brain ischemia. In the present study, we aimed to investigate a new in vivo GUO administration route (intranasal, IN) to determine putative improvement of GUO neuroprotective effects against an experimental model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia. Initially, we demonstrated that IN [(3)H] GUO administration reached the brain in a dose-dependent and saturable pattern in as few as 5 min, presenting a higher cerebrospinal GUO level compared with systemic administration. IN GUO treatment started immediately or even 3 h after ischemia onset prevented behavior impairment. The behavior recovery was not correlated to decreased brain infarct volume, but it was correlated to reduced mitochondrial dysfunction in the penumbra area. Therefore, we showed that the IN route is an efficient way to promptly deliver GUO to the CNS and that IN GUO treatment prevented behavioral and brain impairment caused by ischemia in a therapeutically wide time window.

  12. Expression and action of cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase Ialpha in inflammatory hyperalgesia in rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Tao, Y X; Hassan, A; Haddad, E; Johns, R A

    2000-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have shown a role for the nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling pathway in the development of spinal hyperalgesia. However, the roles of effectors for cyclic guanosine monophosphate are not fully understood in the processing of pain in the spinal cord. The present study showed that cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase Ialpha but not Ibeta was localized in the neuronal bodies and processes, and was distributed primarily in the superficial laminae of the spinal cord. Intrathecal administration of a selective inhibitor of cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase Ialpha, Rp-8-[(4-chlorophenyl)thio]-cGMPS triethylamine, produced a significant antinociception demonstrated by the decrease in the number of flinches and shakes in the formalin test. This was accompanied by a marked reduction in formalin-induced c-fos expression in the spinal dorsal horn. Moreover, cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase Ialpha protein expression was dramatically increased in the lumbar spinal cord 96 h after injection of formalin into a hindpaw, which occurred mainly in the superficial laminae on the ipsilateral side of a formalin-injected hindpaw. This up-regulation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase Ialpha expression was completely blocked not only by a neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole, and a soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, but also by an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, dizocilpine maleate (MK-801). The present results indicate that noxious stimulation not only initially activates but also later up-regulates cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase Ialpha expression in the superficial laminae via an N-methyl-D-aspartate-nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling pathway, suggesting that cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase Ialpha may play an

  13. Cyclic GMP is involved in auxin signalling during Arabidopsis root growth and development

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Wenbin; Wang, Xiaomin; Bi, Yurong

    2014-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP) plays an important role in plant development and responses to stress. Recent studies indicated that cGMP is a secondary signal generated in response to auxin stimulation. cGMP also mediates auxin-induced adventitious root formation in mung bean and gravitropic bending in soybean. Nonetheless, the mechanism of the participation of cGMP in auxin signalling to affect these growth and developmental processes is largely unknown. In this report we provide evidence that indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) induces cGMP accumulation in Arabidopsis roots through modulation of the guanylate cyclase activity. Application of 8-bromo-cGMP (a cell-permeable cGMP derivative) increases auxin-dependent lateral root formation, root hair development, primary root growth, and gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of endogenous cGMP synthesis block these processes induced by auxin. Data also showed that 8-bromo-cGMP enhances auxin-induced degradation of Aux/IAA protein modulated by the SCFTIR1 ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Furthermore, it was found that 8-bromo-cGMP is unable to directly influence the auxin-dependent TIR1-Aux/IAA interaction as evidenced by pull-down and yeast two-hybrid assays. In addition, we provide evidence for cGMP-mediated modulation of auxin signalling through cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). Our results suggest that cGMP acts as a mediator to participate in auxin signalling and may govern this process by PKG activity via its influence on auxin-regulated gene expression and auxin/IAA degradation. PMID:24591051

  14. Cyclic GMP is involved in auxin signalling during Arabidopsis root growth and development.

    PubMed

    Nan, Wenbin; Wang, Xiaomin; Yang, Lei; Hu, Yanfeng; Wei, Yuantao; Liang, Xiaolei; Mao, Lina; Bi, Yurong

    2014-04-01

    The second messenger cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) plays an important role in plant development and responses to stress. Recent studies indicated that cGMP is a secondary signal generated in response to auxin stimulation. cGMP also mediates auxin-induced adventitious root formation in mung bean and gravitropic bending in soybean. Nonetheless, the mechanism of the participation of cGMP in auxin signalling to affect these growth and developmental processes is largely unknown. In this report we provide evidence that indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) induces cGMP accumulation in Arabidopsis roots through modulation of the guanylate cyclase activity. Application of 8-bromo-cGMP (a cell-permeable cGMP derivative) increases auxin-dependent lateral root formation, root hair development, primary root growth, and gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of endogenous cGMP synthesis block these processes induced by auxin. Data also showed that 8-bromo-cGMP enhances auxin-induced degradation of Aux/IAA protein modulated by the SCF(TIR1) ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Furthermore, it was found that 8-bromo-cGMP is unable to directly influence the auxin-dependent TIR1-Aux/IAA interaction as evidenced by pull-down and yeast two-hybrid assays. In addition, we provide evidence for cGMP-mediated modulation of auxin signalling through cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). Our results suggest that cGMP acts as a mediator to participate in auxin signalling and may govern this process by PKG activity via its influence on auxin-regulated gene expression and auxin/IAA degradation.

  15. Coupling of the guanosine glycosidic bond conformation and the ribonucleotide cleavage reaction: implications for barnase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Roca, Maite; De Maria, Leonardo; Wodak, Shoshana J; Moliner, Vicente; Tuñón, Iñaki; Giraldo, Jesús

    2008-02-01

    To examine the possible relationship of guanine-dependent GpA conformations with ribonucleotide cleavage, two potential of mean force (PMF) calculations were performed in aqueous solution. In the first calculation, the guanosine glycosidic (Gchi) angle was used as the reaction coordinate, and computations were performed on two GpA ionic species: protonated (neutral) or deprotonated (negatively charged) guanosine ribose O2 '. Similar energetic profiles featuring two minima corresponding to the anti and syn Gchi regions were obtained for both ionic forms. For both forms the anti conformation was more stable than the syn, and barriers of approximately 4 kcal/mol were obtained for the anti --> syn transition. Structural analysis showed a remarkable sensitivity of the phosphate moiety to the conformation of the Gchi angle, suggesting a possible connection between this conformation and the mechanism of ribonucleotide cleavage. This hypothesis was confirmed by the second PMF calculations, for which the O2 '--P distance for the deprotonated GpA was used as reaction coordinate. The computations were performed from two selected starting points: the anti and syn minima determined in the first PMF study of the deprotonated guanosine ribose O2'. The simulations revealed that the O2 ' attack along the syn Gchi was more favorable than that along the anti Gchi: energetically, significantly lower barriers were obtained in the syn than in the anti conformation for the O--P bond formation; structurally, a lesser O2 '--P initial distance, and a better suited orientation for an in-line attack was observed in the syn relative to the anti conformation. These results are consistent with the catalytically competent conformation of barnase-ribonucleotide complex, which requires a guanine syn conformation of the substrate to enable abstraction of the ribose H2 ' proton by the general base Glu73, thereby suggesting a coupling between the reactive substrate conformation and enzyme structure

  16. Use of phosphoimidazolide-activated guanosine to investigate the nucleophilicity of spermine and spermidine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Baird, E. E.; Smith, P. J.

    1995-01-01

    Guanosine 5'-phosphate 2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG), a labile phosphoimidazolide analog of guanosine triphosphate, was used to test the reactivity of the natural polyamines (PAs), spermine (spm) and spermidine (spd). The products are the guanosine 5'-phosphate-polyamine derivatives (PA-pG: spd-pG and spm-pG) which are quite stable in the range 4 < pH < 11. Our study is the first of which we are aware that reports on the nucleophilicity of these amines. The main findings are as follows. (i) HPLC analysis of the products indicates the formation of only two of the three possible spd products and only one of the two possible spm products. These results can be explained if only the primary amino groups of the two polyamines are reactive, while the secondary amino groups are rendered unreactive by a steric effect. The reactions of 2-MeImpG and other phosphoimidazolide derivatives of nucleosides (ImpNs) with primary and secondary monoamines support this interpretation (Kanavarioti et al. J. Org. Chem. 1995, 60, 632). (ii) The product ratio of the two spd-pG adducts derived from the primary amino groups varies between 2.40 and 0.71 in the range 6.1 < or equal to pH < or equal to 11.9. Such small variation in the product ratio can only be rationalized by the similar, but not identical, basicity of the two primary amino groups and provides strong support for a previously reported model for polyamine ionization (Onasch et. al. Biophys. Chem. 1984, 19, 245). (iii) On the basis of our kinetic determinations conditions at which the nucleophilicity of these amines is at a minimum and at which other interactions with ImpNs could be tested can be chosen.

  17. Relationship between antitumor effect and metabolites of 5-fluorouracil in combination treatment with 5-fluorouracil and guanosine in ascites Sarcoma 180 tumor system

    SciTech Connect

    Iigo, M.; Kuretani, K.; Hoshi, A.

    1983-12-01

    The antitumor activity of (6-14C)5-fluorouracil ((6-14C)FUra) against ascites Sarcoma 180 was significantly enhanced by coadministration of guanosine, and slightly by adenosine, but not by cytidine or uridine. In advanced ascites Sarcoma 180, guanosine also enhanced the action of FUra, but adenosine, uridine, and cytidine did not. The potentiation of antitumor activity by guanosine was reversed by addition of cytidine. The antitumor activity of FUra was significantly potentiated when guanosine was administered either 0 to 15 min before or 5 min after FUra. Changes in metabolites of FUra after potentiation by guanosine were investigated. The potentiation of antitumor activity of FUra by guanosine was considered to be due to an increase in incorporation of FUra into FUra-nucleotides and RNA in the tumor cells.

  18. A new deletion in autosomal dominant guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase I deficiency gene--Segawa disease.

    PubMed

    Bianca, S; Bianca, M

    2006-02-01

    Hereditary Progressive Dystonia with marked diurnal fluctuation (HPD) is an autosomally dominantly inherited dystonia which is characterized by marked diurnal fluctuation of symptoms and by marked and sustained response to levodopa associated with mutations in guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase (GCH-1) deficiency gene. We report an italian patient with a new 18 bp deletion at 267 in exon 1 in the GCH-1 gene. The peculiarity of our patient is the new mutations never reported and mnemonic disturbances that are also not reported in the classical HPD.A genotype-phenotype relationship may be suggested between different gene mutations and non classical clinical manifestations.

  19. [Identification of thiamine monophosphate hydrolyzing enzymes in chicken liver].

    PubMed

    Kolos, I K; Makarchikov, A F

    2014-01-01

    In animals, thiamine monophosphate (TMP) is an intermediate on the path of thiamine diphosphate, the coenzyme form of vitamin B1, degradation. The enzymes involved in TMP metabolism in animal tissues are not identified hitherto. The aim of this work was to study TMP hydrolysis in chicken liver. Two phosphatases have been found to contribute to TMP hydrolysis in liver homogenate. The first one, possessing a maximal activity at pH 6.0, is soluble, whereas the second one represents a membrane-bound enzyme with a pH optimum of 9.0. Membrane-bound TMPase activity was enhanced 1.7-fold by 5 mM Mg2+ ions and strongly inhibited by levamisole in uncompetitive manner with K1 of 53 μM, indicating the involvement of alkaline phosphatase. An apparent Km of alkaline phosphatase for TMP was calculated from the Hanes plot to be 0.6 mM. The soluble TMPase has an apparent Km of 0.7 mM; this enzyme is Mg2+ independent and insensitive to levamisole. As estimated by gel filtration on a Toyopearl HW-55 column, the soluble enzyme has a molecular mass of 17.8 kDa, TMPase activity being eluted simultaneously with peaks of flavinmononucleotide and p-nitrophenyl phosphatase activity. Thus, TMP appears to be a physiological substrate for a low-molecular weight acid phosphatase, also known as low-molecular-weight protein phosphotyrosine phosphatase.

  20. Guanosine Protects Against Traumatic Brain Injury-Induced Functional Impairments and Neuronal Loss by Modulating Excitotoxicity, Mitochondrial Dysfunction, and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gerbatin, Rogério da Rosa; Cassol, Gustavo; Dobrachinski, Fernando; Ferreira, Ana Paula O; Quines, Caroline B; Pace, Iuri D Della; Busanello, Guilherme L; Gutierres, Jessié M; Nogueira, Cristina W; Oliveira, Mauro S; Soares, Félix A; Morsch, Vera M; Fighera, Michele R; Royes, Luiz Fernando F

    2016-11-09

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the most common types of brain injuries that cause death or persistent neurological disturbances in survivors. Most of the promising experimental drugs were not effective in clinical trials; therefore, the development of TBI drugs represents a huge unmet need. Guanosine, an endogenous neuroprotective nucleoside, has not been evaluated in TBI to the best of our knowledge. Therefore, the present study evaluated the effect of guanosine on TBI-induced neurological damage. Our findings showed that a single dose of guanosine (7.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected 40 min after fluid percussion injury (FPI) in rats protected against locomotor and exploratory impairments 8 h after injury. The treatment also protected against neurochemical damage to the ipsilateral cortex, glutamate uptake, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, glutamine synthetase activity, and alterations in mitochondrial function. The inflammatory response and brain edema were also reduced by this nucleoside. In addition, guanosine protected against neuronal death and caspase 3 activation. Therefore, this study suggests that guanosine plays a neuroprotective role in TBI and can be exploited as a new pharmacological strategy.

  1. Quinazolinethiones and quinazolinediones, novel inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase: synthesis and initial structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Buckley, George M; Davies, Natasha; Dyke, Hazel J; Gilbert, Philip J; Hannah, Duncan R; Haughan, Alan F; Hunt, Caroline A; Pitt, William R; Profit, Rachael H; Ray, Nicholas C; Richard, Marianna D; Sharpe, Andrew; Taylor, Alicia J; Whitworth, Justine M; Williams, Sophie C

    2005-02-01

    The development of a series of novel quinazolinethiones and quinazolinediones as inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is described. The synthesis, in vitro inhibitory values for IMPDH II and in vitro inhibitory value for PBMC proliferation are discussed.

  2. Excessive Nitrite Affects Zebrafish Valvulogenesis through Yielding Too Much NO Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junbo; Jia, Wenshuang; Zhao, Qingshun

    2014-01-01

    Sodium nitrite, a common food additive, exists widely not only in the environment but also in our body. Excessive nitrite causes toxicological effects on human health; however, whether it affects vertebrate heart valve development remains unknown. In vertebrates, developmental defects of cardiac valves usually lead to congenital heart disease. To understand the toxic effects of nitrite on valvulogenesis, we exposed zebrafish embryos with different concentrations of sodium nitrite. Our results showed that sodium nitrite caused developmental defects of zebrafish heart dose dependently. It affected zebrafish heart development starting from 36 hpf (hour post fertilization) when heart initiates looping process. Comprehensive analysis on the embryos at 24 hpf and 48 hpf showed that excessive nitrite did not affect blood circulation, vascular network, myocardium and endocardium development. But development of endocardial cells in atrioventricular canal (AVC) of the embryos at 48 hpf was disrupted by too much nitrite, leading to defective formation of primitive valve leaflets at 76 hpf. Consistently, excessive nitrite diminished expressions of valve progenitor markers including bmp4, has2, vcana and notch1b at 48 hpf. Furthermore, 3′, 5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), downstream of nitric oxide (NO) signaling, was increased its level significantly in the embryos exposed with excessive nitrite and microinjection of soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ (1H-[1], [2], [4]Oxadiazolo[4,3-a] quinoxalin-1-one), an antagonist of NO signaling, into nitrite-exposed embryos could partly rescue the cardiac valve malformation. Taken together, our results show that excessive nitrite affects early valve leaflet formation by producing too much NO signaling. PMID:24658539

  3. The state of the guanosine nucleotide allosterically affects the interfaces of tubulin in protofilament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Joseph R.; Clément, Marie-Jeanne; Adjadj, Elisabeth; Toma, Flavio; Curmi, Patrick A.; Manivet, Philippe

    2012-04-01

    The dynamics of microtubules is essential for many microtubule-dependent cellular functions such as the mitosis. It has been recognized for a long time that GTP hydrolysis in αβ-tubulin polymers plays a critical role in this dynamics. However, the effects of the changes in the nature of the guanosine nucleotide at the E-site in β-tubulin on microtubule structure and stability are still not well understood. In the present work, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of a αβα-tubulin heterotrimer harboring a guanosine nucleotide in three different states at the E-site: GTP, GDP-Pi and GDP. We found that changes in the nucleotide state is associated with significant conformational variations at the α-tubulin N- and β-tubulin M-loops which impact the interactions between tubulin protofilaments. The results also show that GTP hydrolysis reduces αβ-tubulin interdimer contacts in favor of intradimer interface. From an atomistic point view, we propose a role for α-tubulin glutamate residue 254 in catalytic magnesium coordination and identified a water molecule in the nucleotide binding pocket which is most probably required for nucleotide hydrolysis. Finally, the results are discussed with reference to the role of taxol in microtubule stability and the recent tubulin-sT2R crystal structures.

  4. Interaction of the tobacco-specific nitrosamines, methylethylnitrosamine and N-nitrosonornicotine, with DNA and guanosine.

    PubMed

    Lai, D Y; Arcos, J C; Argus, M F

    1980-04-01

    In vitro binding of the tobacco-specific nitrosamines, methylethylnitrosamine (MEN) and nitrosonornicotine (NNN), to exogenous DNA and guanosine was studies in a rat liver microsome-catalyzed system. MEN (N-[ethyl-1-14C]) binds covalently to calf thymus DNA whereas NNN (N'-[pyrrolidine-2-14C]) binds only to guanosine but not to DNA. Pretreatment of the rats with either phenobarbital (PB) or 3-methylcholanthrene (MC) greatly diminishes the binding of 14C-MEN to DNA. Both MEN-demethylase and -deethylase activities are stimulated by PB pretreatment and inhibited by MC pretreatment, but the degree of stimulation and inhibition of the two dealkylases are not the same. Addition of cytosol to the incubation system does not enhance but suppresses the binding of 14C-MEN to DNA. Inclusion of mitochondria in the system has no effect on the binding. Addition of benzylamine (250 microM), which is a potent inhibitor of dimethylnitrosamine-demethylase, however totally abolishes the binding of 14C-MEN catalyzed by microsomes. The data suggest that ethylcarbonium ion may be the metabolically activated intermediate of MEN that binds to DNA.

  5. Some selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors inhibit dynamin I guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase).

    PubMed

    Otomo, Masahiro; Takahashi, Kiyofumi; Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Osada, Kenichi; Nakashima, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Noboru

    2008-08-01

    Neuronal dynamin I plays a critical role in the recycling of synaptic vesicles, and thus in nervous system function. We expressed and purified dynamin I to explore potentially clinically useful endocytosis inhibitors and to examine the mechanism of their action. We estimated the IC(50) of nineteen psychotropic drugs for dynamin I. The IC(50) values of two selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (sertraline and fluvoxamine) were 7.3+/-1.0 and 14.7+/-1.6 microM, respectively. Kinetic analyses revealed that fluvoxamine is a noncompetitive inhibitor of dynamin I guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) with respect to guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) and a competitive inhibitor with respect to L-phosphatidylserine (PS). Fluvoxamine may compete with PS for binding to the pleckstrin homology domain of dynamin I. On the other hand, sertraline was a mixed type inhibitor with respect to both GTP and PS. Our results indicate that sertraline and fluvoxamine may regulate the transportation of neurotransmitters by modulating synaptic vesicle endocytosis via the inhibition of dynamin I GTPase.

  6. Structural Basis for Recognition of Guanosine by a Synthetic Tricyclic Cytosine Analogue: Guanidinium G-Clamp

    SciTech Connect

    Wilds, C.J.; Maier, M.A.; Manoharan, M.; Egli, M.

    2010-03-08

    An oligonucleotide analogue containing a novel heterocyclic analogue, the guanidinium G-clamp, was designed to allow formation of five H-bonds to guanosine. The guanidinium group was introduced postsynthetically by treatment of the deprotected oligonucleotide containing a free amino group with a solution of 1H-pyrazole-1-carboxamidine and purified by a combination of size-exclusion chromatography and reversed-phase HPLC. A single incorporation of this modification into an oligodeoxynucleotide sequence was found to increase duplex stability by 13{sup o} and 16{sup o} per modification to RNA and DNA, respectively. Crystals of a self-complementary decamer sequence containing this modification were grown and diffracted to 1-{angstrom} resolution. The structure was solved by molecular replacement and revealed that the modification forms additional H-bonds to O(6) and N(7) of guanosine through the amino and imino N-atoms, respectively. The origins of enhanced duplex stability are also attributed to increased stacking interactions mediated by the phenoxazine moiety of the G-clamp and formation of H-bond networks between the positively charged guanidinium group, H{sub 2}O molecules, and negatively charged O-atoms from phosphates on the adjacent strand.

  7. Synthesis, Oxidation Behavior, Crystallization and Structure of 2'-Methylseleno Guanosine Containing RNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Moroder,H.; Kreutz, C.; Lang, K.; Serganov, A.; Micura, R.

    2006-01-01

    We have recently introduced a basic concept for the combined chemical and enzymatic preparation of site-specifically modified 2'-methylseleno RNAs which represent useful derivatives for phasing of X-ray crystallographic data during their three-dimensional structure determination. Here, we introduce the first synthesis of an appropriate guanosine phosphoramidite, which complements the thus far established set of 2'-methylseleno-modified uridine, cytidine, and adenosine building blocks for solid-phase synthesis. The novel building block was readily incorporated into RNA. Importantly, it was the 2'-methylseleno-guanosine-labeled RNA that allowed us to reveal the reversible oxidation/reduction behavior of the Se moiety and thus it represents a valuable contribution to the understanding of the action of threo-1,4-dimercapto-2,3-butanediol (DTT) required during solid-phase synthesis, deprotection, and crystallization of selenium-containing RNA. In addition, we investigated 2'-methylseleno RNA with respect to crystallization properties. Our studies revealed that the Se modification significantly increases the range of conditions leading to crystal growth. Moreover, we determined the crystal structures of model RNA helices and showed that the Se modification can affect crystal packing interactions, thus potentially expanding the possibilities for obtaining the best crystal form.

  8. The roles of initiation factor 2 and guanosine triphosphate in initiation of protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Antoun, Ayman; Pavlov, Michael Y.; Andersson, Kerstin; Tenson, Tanel; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2003-01-01

    The role of IF2 from Escherichia coli was studied in vitro using a system for protein synthesis with purified components. Stopped flow experiments with light scattering show that IF2 in complex with guanosine triphosphate (GTP) or a non-cleavable GTP analogue (GDPNP), but not with guanosine diphosphate (GDP), promotes fast association of ribosomal subunits during initiation. Biochemical experiments show that IF2 promotes fast formation of the first peptide bond in the presence of GTP, but not GDPNP or GDP, and that IF2–GDPNP binds strongly to post-initiation ribosomes. We conclude that the GTP form of IF2 accelerates formation of the 70S ribosome from subunits and that GTP hydrolysis accelerates release of IF2 from the 70S ribosome. The results of a recent report, suggesting that GTP and GDP promote initiation equally fast, have been addressed. Our data, indicating that eIF5B and IF2 have similar functions, are used to rationalize the phenotypes of GTPase-deficient mutants of eIF5B and IF2. PMID:14532131

  9. Involvement of second messengers in the signaling pathway of vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone and their effects on vitellogenin mRNA expression in the whiteleg shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sun-Hye; Okutsu, Tomoyuki; Tsutsui, Naoaki; Kang, Bong Jung; Chen, Hsiang-Yin; Wilder, Marcy N

    2017-01-03

    We incubated fragments of Litopenaeus vannamei ovary to investigate second messengers involved in the regulation of vitellogenin (vg) mRNA levels. The use of 100nM recombinant vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone (VIH) (corresponding to recombinant L. vannamei sinus gland peptide-G: rLiv-SGP-G) significantly reduced vg mRNA expression in sub-adults after 8h incubation to less than 20% of the control. The concentration of intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) increased 3.2-fold relative to the control after 2h incubation with rLiv-SGP-G. However, it reached levels 18-fold relative to the control after 0.5h incubation with rLiv-SGP-G where 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (a phosphodiesterase inhibitor) was also added. Moreover, vg mRNA expression was significantly reduced to less than 50% of the control after 24h incubation with 1μM A23187 (a calcium ionophore). Thus, rLiv-SGP-G and calcium ionophore reduced vg mRNA expression in in vitro-cultured ovary, and cGMP may be involved in the signaling pathway of VIH. Overall, the above results suggest that vg mRNA expression might be inhibited in vitro by increasing intracellular cGMP and Ca(2+) in L. vannamei ovary.

  10. Expression and distribution of key enzymes of the cyclic GMP signaling in the human clitoris: relation to phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5).

    PubMed

    Ückert, S; Oelke, M; Albrecht, K; Breitmeier, D; Kuczyk, M A; Hedlund, P

    2011-01-01

    The clitoris contributes to the normal female sexual response cycle. A significance of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (GMP) has been assumed in the control of clitoral vascular smooth muscle. As only a few investigations on the physiology of the vascular and non-vascular clitoral tissue have been carried out, knowledge on the mechanisms controlling this particular female genital organ is still vague. It has been suggested that human clitoral corpus cavernosum smooth muscle is regulated by nitric oxide (NO)/cyclic GMP and related key enzymes, such as NO synthases (NOSs) and the phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5). The present study evaluated in the human clitoris, by means of immunohistochemistry, the expression and distribution of key enzymes of the cyclic GMP pathway, such as the endothelial NOS, PDE2, PDE11 and cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase type I (cGKI) in relation to the PDE5. Immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of PDE2, PDE5 and cGKI in the smooth muscle wall of blood vessels transversing the supepithelial and stromal space. Immunosignals specific for PDE2 were also identified in interstitial-like cells located in the basal epithelial layer. Staining for PDE11A was observed in single nerve trunks located in the clitoral stroma. The results are in favor of a role of the cyclic GMP signaling in the control of clitoral blood flow. It seems likely that PDE2 and PDE11 are also involved in the mechanism of local (neuro)transmission in the clitoris.

  11. Visual Working Memory Requires Permissive and Instructive NO/cGMP Signaling at Presynapses in the Drosophila Central Brain.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Sara; Poeck, Burkhard; Strauss, Roland

    2017-03-06

    The gaseous second messenger nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to regulate memory formation by activating retrograde signaling cascades from post- to presynapse that involve cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production to induce synaptic plasticity and transcriptional changes. In this study, we analyzed the role of NO in the formation of a visual working memory that lasts only a few seconds. This memory is encoded in a subset of ring neurons that form the ellipsoid body in the Drosophila brain. Using genetic and pharmacological manipulations, we show that NO signaling is required for cGMP-mediated CREB activation, leading to the expression of competence factors like the synaptic homer protein. Interestingly, this cell-autonomous function can also be fulfilled by hydrogen sulfide (H2S) through a converging pathway, revealing for the first time that endogenously produced H2S has a role in memory processes. Notably, the NO synthase is strictly localized to the axonal output branches of the ring neurons, and this localization seems to be necessary for a second, phasic role of NO signaling. We provide evidence for a model where NO modulates the opening of cGMP-regulated cation channels to encode a short-term memory trace. Local production of NO/cGMP in restricted branches of ring neurons seems to represent the engram for objects, and comparing signal levels between individual ring neurons is used to orient the fly during search behavior. Due to its short half-life, NO seems to be a uniquely suited second messenger to encode working memories that have to be restricted in their duration.

  12. Biochemical analysis of the modular enzyme inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Nimmesgern, E; Black, J; Futer, O; Fulghum, J R; Chambers, S P; Brummel, C L; Raybuck, S A; Sintchak, M D

    1999-11-01

    Two prominent domains have been identified in the X-ray crystal structure of inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), a core domain consisting of an alpha/beta barrel which contains the active site and an inserted subdomain whose structure is less well defined. The core domain encompassing amino acids 1-108 and 244-514 of wild-type human IMPDH (II) connected by the tetrapeptide linker Ile-Arg-Thr-Gly was expressed. The subdomain including amino acids 99-244 of human wild-type IMPDH (II) was expressed as a His-tagged fusion protein, where the His-tag was removable by enterokinase cleavage. These two proteins as well as wild-type human IMPDH (II), all proteins expressed in Escherichia coli, have been purified to apparent homogeneity. Both the wild-type and core domain proteins are tetrameric and have very similar enzymatic activities. In contrast, the subdomain migrates as a monomer or dimer on a gel filtration column and lacks enzymatic activity. Circular dichroism spectropolarimetry indicates that the core domain retains secondary structure very similar to full-length IMPDH, with 30% alpha-helix and 30% beta-sheet vs 33% alpha-helix and 29% beta-sheet for wild-type protein. Again, the subdomain protein is distinguished from both wild-type and core domain proteins by its content of secondary structure, with only 15% each of alpha-helix and beta-sheet. These studies demonstrate that the core domain of IMPDH expressed separately is both structurally intact and enzymatically active. The availability of the modules of IMPDH will aid in dissecting the architecture of this enzyme of the de novo purine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway, which is an important target for immunosuppressive and antiviral drugs.

  13. Identification and characterization of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase from Halobacterium salinarum.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Jin; Joo, Won-A; Choi, Jiyeon; Lee, So-Hee; Kim, Chan-Wha

    2004-11-01

    Extremely halophilic Archaea, Halobacterium salinarum live in hypersaline habitats and maintain an osmotic balance of their cytoplasm by accumulating high concentrations of salt (mainly KCl). Therefore, their enzymes adapted to high NaCl concentrations offer a multitude of acutal or potential applications such as biocatalysts in the presence of high salt concentrations. In this study, the protein expression profile of H. salinarum cultured under different NaCl concentrations (3.5 M, 4.3 M, and 6.0 M) was investigated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). As a result of 2-DE, the protein spots concentrated in acidic range at pH 3-10 were separated effectively using pH 3.5-4.5 ultrazoom IPG DryStrips. The proteins which proved to be upregulated or downregulated in 2-DE gel were digested with trypsin and identified with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) and electrospray ionization quadrupole (ESI-Q) TOF-mass spectrometry. Most proteins were identified as known annotated proteins based on sequence homology and few as unknown hypothetical proteins. Among proteins identified, an enzyme named inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) was selected based on the possibility of its industrial application. IMPDH gene (1.6 kb fragment) expected to exist in H. salinarum was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and expressed in Escherichia coli strain, BL21 (DE3) using a pGEX-KG vector. Recombinant IMPDH purified from H. salinarum has a higher activity in the presence of salt than in the absence of salt.

  14. Guanosine Prevents Anhedonic-Like Behavior and Impairment in Hippocampal Glutamate Transport Following Amyloid-β1-40 Administration in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lanznaster, Débora; Mack, Josiel M; Coelho, Victor; Ganzella, Marcelo; Almeida, Roberto F; Dal-Cim, Tharine; Hansel, Gisele; Zimmer, Eduardo R; Souza, Diogo O; Prediger, Rui D; Tasca, Carla I

    2016-09-06

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides are the major neuropathological hallmarks related with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aβ peptides trigger several biochemical mechanisms of neurotoxicity, including neuroinflammation and glutamatergic neurotransmission impairment. Guanosine is the endogenous guanine-derived nucleoside that modulates the glutamatergic system and the cellular redox status, thus acting as a neuroprotective agent. Here, we investigated the putative neuroprotective effect of guanosine in an AD-like mouse model. Adult mice received a single intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ1-40 (400 pmol/site) or vehicle and then were treated immediately, 3 h later, and once a day during the subsequent 14 days with guanosine (8 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). Aβ1-40 or guanosine did not alter mouse locomotor activity and anxiety-related behaviors. Aβ1-40-treated mice displayed short-term memory deficit in the object location task that was prevented by guanosine. Guanosine prevented the Aβ1-40-induced increase in latency to grooming in the splash test, an indicative of anhedonia. Aβ1-40 increased Na(+)-independent glutamate uptake in ex vivo hippocampal slices, and guanosine reversed it to control levels. The repeated administration of guanosine increased hippocampal GDP levels, which was not observed in the group treated with Aβ plus guanosine. Aβ1-40 induced an increase in hippocampal ADP levels. Aβ1-40 decreased GFAP expression in the hippocampal CA1 region, an effect not modified by guanosine. No differences were observed concerning synaptophysin and NeuN immunolabeling. Together, these results show that guanosine prevents memory deficit and anhedonic-like behavior induced by Aβ1-40 that seem to be linked to glutamate transport unbalance and alterations on purine and metabolite levels in mouse hippocampus.

  15. Semaphorin 3A activates the guanosine triphosphatase Rab5 to promote growth cone collapse and organize callosal axon projections

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kong-Yan; He, Miao; Hou, Qiong-Qiong; Sheng, Ai-Li; Yuan, Lei; Liu, Fei; Liu, Wen-Wen; Li, Guangpu; Jiang, Xing-Yu; Luo, Zhen-Ge

    2015-01-01

    Axon guidance (pathfinding) wires the brain during development and is regulated by various attractive and repulsive cues. Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) is a repulsive cue, inducing the collapse of axon growth cones. In the mammalian forebrain, the corpus callosum is the major commissure that transmits information flow between the two hemispheres, and contralateral axons assemble into well-defined tracts. We found that the patterning of callosal axon projections in rodent layer II and III (L2/3) cortical neurons in response to Sema3A was mediated by the activation of Rab5, a small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) that mediates endocytosis, through the membrane fusion protein Rabaptin-5 and the Rab5 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Rabex-5. Rabaptin-5 bound directly to Plexin-A1 in the Sema3A receptor complex [an obligate heterodimer formed by Plexin-A1 and neuropilin 1 (NP1)]; Sema3A enhanced this interaction in cultured neurons. Rabaptin-5 bridged the interaction between Rab5 and Plexin-A1. Sema3A stimulated endocytosis from the cell surface of callosal axon growth cones. In utero electroporation to reduce Rab5 or Rabaptin-5 impaired axon fasciculation or caused mistargeting of L2/3 callosal projections in rats. Over-expression of Rabaptin-5 or Rab5 rescued the defective callosal axon fasciculation or mistargeting of callosal axons caused by the loss of Sema3A–Plexin-A1 signaling in rats expressing dominant-negative Plexin-A1 or in NP1-deficient mice. Thus, our findings suggest that Rab5, its effector Rabaptin-5, and its regulator Rabex-5 mediate Sema3A-induced axon guidance during brain development. PMID:25161316

  16. Diversity in guanosine 3',5'-bisdiphosphate (ppGpp) sensitivity among guanylate kinases of bacteria and plants.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yuhta; Izumi, Atsushi; Fukunaga, Yoshinori; Kusumi, Kensuke; Iba, Koh; Watanabe, Seiya; Nakahira, Yoichi; Weber, Andreas P M; Nozawa, Akira; Tozawa, Yuzuru

    2014-05-30

    The guanosine 3',5'-bisdiphosphate (ppGpp) signaling system is shared by bacteria and plant chloroplasts, but its role in plants has remained unclear. Here we show that guanylate kinase (GK), a key enzyme in guanine nucleotide biosynthesis that catalyzes the conversion of GMP to GDP, is a target of regulation by ppGpp in chloroplasts of rice, pea, and Arabidopsis. Plants have two distinct types of GK that are localized to organelles (GKpm) or to the cytosol (GKc), with both enzymes being essential for growth and development. We found that the activity of rice GKpm in vitro was inhibited by ppGpp with a Ki of 2.8 μM relative to the substrate GMP, whereas the Km of this enzyme for GMP was 73 μM. The IC50 of ppGpp for GKpm was ∼10 μM. In contrast, the activity of rice GKc was insensitive to ppGpp, as was that of GK from bakers' yeast, which is also a cytosolic enzyme. These observations suggest that ppGpp plays a pivotal role in the regulation of GTP biosynthesis in chloroplasts through specific inhibition of GKpm activity, with the regulation of GTP biosynthesis in chloroplasts thus being independent of that in the cytosol. We also found that GKs of Escherichia coli and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 are insensitive to ppGpp, in contrast to the ppGpp sensitivity of the Bacillus subtilis enzyme. Our biochemical characterization of GK enzymes has thus revealed a novel target of ppGpp in chloroplasts and has uncovered diversity among bacterial GKs with regard to regulation by ppGpp.

  17. Xylazine Activates Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway in the Central Nervous System of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xing-Xing; Yin, Bai-Shuang; Yang, Peng; Chen, Hao; Li, Xin; Su, Li-Xue; Fan, Hong-Gang; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Xylazine is a potent analgesic extensively used in veterinary and animal experimentation. Evidence exists that the analgesic effect can be inhibited using adenosine 5’-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitors. Considering this idea, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the AMPK signaling pathway is involved in the central analgesic mechanism of xylazine in the rat. Xylazine was administrated via the intraperitoneal route. Sprague-Dawley rats were sacrificed and the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, thalamus and brainstem were collected for determination of liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and AMPKα mRNA expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα levels using western blot. The results of our study showed that compared with the control group, xylazine induced significant increases in AMPK activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and cerebellum after rats received xylazine (P < 0.01). Increased AMPK activities were accompanied with increased phosphorylation levels of LKB1 in corresponding regions of rats. The protein levels of phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα in these regions returned or tended to return to control group levels. However, in the brainstem, phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα protein levels were decreased by xylazine compared with the control (P < 0.05). In conclusion, our data indicates that xylazine alters the activities of LKB1 and AMPK in the central nervous system of rats, which suggests that xylazine affects the regulatory signaling pathway of the analgesic mechanism in the rat brain. PMID:27049320

  18. Guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate induces membrane localization of cytosol-independent phospholipase D activity in a cell-free system from U937 promonocytic leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kusner, D J; Dubyak, G R

    1994-01-01

    Activation of phospholipase D (PLD) in phagocytic leucocytes requires protein components present in both the plasma membrane and the cytosol, but the catalytic and regulatory factors are not fully defined. We have characterized the effect of guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[S]) on the subcellular requirements for reconstitution of PLD activity, using a cell-free system from U937 human promonocytic leucocytes. Incubation of permeabilized cells with 100 microM GTP[S] resulted in a membrane-localized PLD activity which was independent of added cytosol. The PLD activity of membranes from GTP[S]-treated cells was 7-fold greater than the basal activity of control membranes, and could be further augmented by the addition of ATP. This was the first demonstration of a stable agonist-regulated PLD activity in membranes from phagocytic leucocytes which was quantitatively comparable with that seen in a fully reconstituted system. Cytosol from GTP[S]-treated cells had a decreased capacity to support PLD activation, consistent with GTP[S]-induced depletion of a factor essential for reconstitution of PLD activity. Incubation of isolated membrane and cytosol with GTP[S] also resulted in a cytosol-independent PLD activity in the re-isolated membranes. The effect of GTP[S] could be mimicked by guanosine 5'-[beta gamma-imido]triphosphate, but not by aluminium fluoride, consistent with the involvement of a low-molecular-mass GTP-binding protein(s). Incubation of isolated subcellular fractions with GTP[S], followed by removal of unbound nucleotide, suggested that at least one of the GTP-binding proteins involved in the membrane localization of PLD activity was itself present in the membrane fraction. These data were consistent with a model in which activation of GTP-binding protein(s) resulted in the stable assembly of an active PLD signalling complex at the membrane surface. PMID:7998984

  19. Aberrant cGMP signaling persists during recovery in mice with oxygen-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Cardona, Herminio J.; Taylor, Joann M.; Robbins, Mary E.; Waypa, Gregory B.; Berkelhamer, Sara K.; Farrow, Kathryn N.

    2017-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a common complication of preterm birth, is associated with pulmonary hypertension (PH) in 25% of infants with moderate to severe BPD. Neonatal mice exposed to hyperoxia for 14d develop lung disease similar to BPD, with evidence of associated PH. The cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling pathway has not been well studied in BPD-associated PH. In addition, there is little data about the natural history of hyperoxia-induced PH in mice or the utility of phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibition in established disease. C57BL/6 mice were placed in room air or 75% O2 within 24h of birth for 14d, followed by recovery in room air for an additional 7 days (21d). Additional pups were treated with either vehicle or sildenafil for 7d during room air recovery. Mean alveolar area, pulmonary artery (PA) medial wall thickness (MWT), RVH, and vessel density were evaluated at 21d. PA protein from 21d animals was analyzed for soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) activity, PDE5 activity, and cGMP levels. Neonatal hyperoxia exposure results in persistent alveolar simplification, RVH, decreased vessel density, increased MWT, and disrupted cGMP signaling despite a period of room air recovery. Delayed treatment with sildenafil during room air recovery is associated with improved RVH and decreased PA PDE5 activity, but does not have significant effects on alveolar simplification, PA remodeling, or vessel density. These data are consistent with clinical studies suggesting inconsistent effects of sildenafil treatment in infants with BPD-associated PH. PMID:28792962

  20. Conservation of capa peptide-induced nitric oxide signalling in Diptera.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Valerie P; McGettigan, James; Cabrero, Pablo; Maudlin, Ian M; Dow, Julian A T; Davies, Shireen-A

    2004-11-01

    In D. melanogaster Malpighian (renal) tubules, the capa peptides stimulate production of nitric oxide (NO) and guanosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP), resulting in increased fluid transport. The roles of NO synthase (NOS), NO and cGMP in capa peptide signalling were tested in several other insect species of medical relevance within the Diptera (Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi and Glossina morsitans) and in one orthopteran out-group, Schistocerca gregaria. NOS immunoreactivity was detectable by immunocytochemistry in tubules from all species studied. D. melanogaster, A. aegypti and A. stephensi express NOS in only principal cells, whereas G. morsitans and S. gregaria show more general NOS expression in the tubule. Measurement of associated NOS activity (NADPH diaphorase) shows that both D. melanogaster capa-1 and the two capa peptides encoded in the A. gambiae genome, QGLVPFPRVamide (AngCAPA-QGL) and GPTVGLFAFPRVamide (AngCAPA-GPT), all stimulate NOS activity in D. melanogaster, A. aegypti, A. stephensi and G. morsitans tubules but not in S. gregaria. Furthermore, capa-stimulated NOS activity in all the Diptera was inhibited by the NOS inhibitor l-NAME. All capa peptides stimulate an increase in cGMP content across the dipteran species, but not in the orthopteran S. gregaria. Similarly, all capa peptides tested stimulate fluid secretion in D. melanogaster, A. aegypti, A. stephensi and G. morsitans tubules but are either without effect or are inhibitory on S. gregaria. Consistent with these results, the Drosophila capa receptor was shown to be expressed in Drosophila tubules, and its closest Anopheles homologue was shown to be expressed in Anopheles tubules. Thus, we provide the first demonstration of physiological roles for two putative A. gambiae neuropeptides. We also demonstrate neuropeptide modulation of fluid secretion in tsetse tubule for the first time. Finally, we show the generality of capa peptide action, to stimulate NO/cGMP signalling and

  1. Intravenous and Gastric Cerium Dioxide Nanoparticle Exposure Disrupts Microvascular Smooth Muscle Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Minarchick, Valerie C.; Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Fix, Natalie R.; Leonard, Stephen S.; Sabolsky, Edward M.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.

    2015-01-01

    Cerium dioxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NP) hold great therapeutic potential, but the in vivo effects of non-pulmonary exposure routes are unclear. The first aim was to determine whether microvascular function is impaired after intravenous and gastric CeO2 NP exposure. The second aim was to investigate the mechanism(s) of action underlying microvascular dysfunction following CeO2 NP exposure. Rats were exposed to CeO2 NP (primary diameter: 4 ± 1 nm, surface area: 81.36 m2/g) by intratracheal instillation, intravenous injection, or gastric gavage. Mesenteric arterioles were harvested 24 h post-exposure and vascular function was assessed using an isolated arteriole preparation. Endothelium-dependent and independent function and vascular smooth muscle (VSM) signaling (soluble guanylyl cyclase [sGC] and cyclic guanosine monophosphate [cGMP]) were assessed. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and nitric oxide (NO) production were analyzed. Compared with controls, endothelium-dependent and independent dilation were impaired following intravenous injection (by 61% and 45%) and gastric gavage (by 63% and 49%). However, intravenous injection resulted in greater microvascular impairment (16% and 35%) compared with gastric gavage at an identical dose (100 µg). Furthermore, sGC activation and cGMP responsiveness were impaired following pulmonary, intravenous, and gastric CeO2 NP treatment. Finally, nanoparticle exposure resulted in route-dependent, increased ROS generation and decreased NO production. These results indicate that CeO2 NP exposure route differentially impairs microvascular function, which may be mechanistically linked to decreased NO production and subsequent VSM signaling. Fully understanding the mechanisms behind CeO2 NP in vivo effects is a critical step in the continued therapeutic development of this nanoparticle. PMID:25481005

  2. Intravenous and gastric cerium dioxide nanoparticle exposure disrupts microvascular smooth muscle signaling.

    PubMed

    Minarchick, Valerie C; Stapleton, Phoebe A; Fix, Natalie R; Leonard, Stephen S; Sabolsky, Edward M; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R

    2015-03-01

    Cerium dioxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NP) hold great therapeutic potential, but the in vivo effects of non-pulmonary exposure routes are unclear. The first aim was to determine whether microvascular function is impaired after intravenous and gastric CeO2 NP exposure. The second aim was to investigate the mechanism(s) of action underlying microvascular dysfunction following CeO2 NP exposure. Rats were exposed to CeO2 NP (primary diameter: 4 ± 1 nm, surface area: 81.36 m(2)/g) by intratracheal instillation, intravenous injection, or gastric gavage. Mesenteric arterioles were harvested 24 h post-exposure and vascular function was assessed using an isolated arteriole preparation. Endothelium-dependent and independent function and vascular smooth muscle (VSM) signaling (soluble guanylyl cyclase [sGC] and cyclic guanosine monophosphate [cGMP]) were assessed. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and nitric oxide (NO) production were analyzed. Compared with controls, endothelium-dependent and independent dilation were impaired following intravenous injection (by 61% and 45%) and gastric gavage (by 63% and 49%). However, intravenous injection resulted in greater microvascular impairment (16% and 35%) compared with gastric gavage at an identical dose (100 µg). Furthermore, sGC activation and cGMP responsiveness were impaired following pulmonary, intravenous, and gastric CeO2 NP treatment. Finally, nanoparticle exposure resulted in route-dependent, increased ROS generation and decreased NO production. These results indicate that CeO2 NP exposure route differentially impairs microvascular function, which may be mechanistically linked to decreased NO production and subsequent VSM signaling. Fully understanding the mechanisms behind CeO2 NP in vivo effects is a critical step in the continued therapeutic development of this nanoparticle.

  3. Plant cyclic nucleotide signalling: facts and fiction.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Atienza, Juliana; Van Ingelgem, Carl; Roef, Luc; Maathuis, Frans Jm

    2007-11-01

    The presence of the cyclic nucleotides 3',5'-cyclic adenyl monophosphate (cAMP) and 3',5'-cyclic guanyl monophosphate (cGMP) in plants is now generally accepted. In addition, cAMP and cGMP have been implicated in the regulation of important plant processes such as stomatal functioning, monovalent and divalent cation fluxes, chloroplast development, gibberellic acid signalling, pathogen response and gene transcription. However, very little is known regarding the components of cyclic nucleotide signalling in plants. In this addendum, the evidence for specific mechanisms of plant cyclic nucleotide signalling is evaluated and discussed.

  4. Kinetics and mechanism of the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of a hypermodified nucleoside wyosine and its 5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Golankiewicz, B; Zielonacka-Lis, E; Folkman, W

    1985-01-01

    The rates of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of a hypermodified nucleoside, wyosine and its 5'-monophosphate were determined at various pH, temperature and buffer concentrations. The results show that despite distinct differences in structure and the glycosyl bond stability, the hydrolysis of wyosine proceeds via cleavage of the C-N bond by A-1 mechanism, analogously to simple nucleosides. Unlike majority of other monophosphates studied so far, wyosine 5'-monophosphate is not more stable than respective nucleoside. PMID:4000960

  5. Necleoside conformations. 19. Temperature and pH effects on the conformation of guanosine phosphates.

    PubMed Central

    Son, T D; Guschlbauer, W

    1975-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectra at 250 MHz were measured as a function of temperature and pH of the three guanosine phosphates. From these data and previously published work the conformational parameters of these compounds were determinated. The phosphate group of Guo-5'-P changes its conformation around the C-O bond and its rotation is relatively slow at 20 degrees. At neutral pD the S conformation is favoured and the N form at acid pD. This conformational change is paralleled by a change in exocyclic rotamer distribution and takes place at the pK of the protonation of the base on N-7. Although correlation appears to exist between the various conformations, notable exceptions exist. PMID:238183

  6. Stathmin slows down guanosine diphosphate dissociation from tubulin in a phosphorylation-controlled fashion.

    PubMed

    Amayed, P; Carlier, M F; Pantaloni, D

    2000-10-10

    Stathmin is an important protein that interacts with tubulin and regulates microtubule dynamics in a phosphorylation-controlled fashion. Here we show that the dissociation of guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP) from beta-tubulin is slowed 20-fold in the (tubulin)(2)-stathmin ternary complex (T(2)S). The kinetics of GDP or guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) dissociation from tubulin have been monitored by the change in tryptophan fluorescence of tubulin upon exchanging 2-amino-6-mercapto-9-beta-ribofuranosylpurine 5'-diphosphate (S6-GDP) for tubulin-bound guanine nucleotide. At molar ratios of stathmin to tubulin lower than 0.5, biphasic kinetics were observed, indicating that the dynamics of the complex is extremely slow, consistent with its high stability. The method was used to characterize the effects of phosphorylation of stathmin on its interaction with tubulin. The serine-to-glutamate substitution of all four phosphorylatable serines of stathmin (4E-stathmin) weakens the stability of the T(2)S complex by about 2 orders of magnitude. The phosphorylation of serines 16 and 63 in stathmin has a more severe effect and weakens the stability of T(2)S 10(4)-fold. The rate of GDP dissociation is lowered only 7-fold and 4-fold in the complexes of tubulin with 4E-stathmin and diphosphostathmin, respectively. Sedimentation velocity studies support the conclusions of nucleotide exchange data and show that the T(2)S complexes formed between tubulin and 4E-stathmin or diphosphostathmin are less compact than the highly stable T(2)S complex. The correlation between the effect of phosphorylation of stathmin on the stability of T(2)S complex measured in vitro and on the function of stathmin in vivo is discussed.

  7. Addition of cysteamine to thymine and thymidine monophosphate, initiated by. gamma. -irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Grachev, S.A.; Kropachev, E.V.; Litvyakova, G.I.

    1986-04-20

    On radiolysis of deaerated solutions containing thymine and cysteamine, or thymidine monophosphate and cysteamine, coupling products of these compounds are formed resulting from the addition of cysteamine to the double bond of the base. The radiochemical yields of the coupling products are dependent on the ratio of the concentration thymine (T) to that of cysteamine (RSH), or of thymidine monophosphate (TMP) to cysteamine in the irradiated solutions, and are at a maximum when (T)/(RSH) = 5-10, and (TMP)/(RSH) = 15-20. The mode of formation of coupling products involves reaction of H-, OH-, and e/sub aq//sup -/-adducts of thymine or thymidine monophosphate with cysteamine thiyl radicals.

  8. Squalenoyl nucleoside monophosphate nanoassemblies: new prodrug strategy for the delivery of nucleotide analogues.

    PubMed

    Caron, Joachim; Reddy, L Harivardhan; Lepêtre-Mouelhi, Sinda; Wack, Séverine; Clayette, Pascal; Rogez-Kreuz, Christine; Yousfi, Rahima; Couvreur, Patrick; Desmaële, Didier

    2010-05-01

    4-(N)-1,1',2-trisnor-squalenoyldideoxycytidine monophosphate (SQddC-MP) and 4-(N)-1,1',2-trisnor-squalenoylgemcitabine monophosphate (SQdFdC-MP) were synthesized using phosphoramidite chemistry. These amphiphilic molecules self-assembled to about hundred nanometers size nanoassemblies in aqueous medium. Nanoassemblies of SQddC-MP displayed significant anti-HIV activity whereas SQdFdC-MP nanoassemblies displayed promising anticancer activity on leukemia cells. These results suggested that squalene conjugate of negatively charged nucleotide analogues efficiently penetrated within cells. Thus, we propose a new prodrug strategy for improved delivery of nucleoside analogues to ameliorate their biological efficacy.

  9. The role of the NMDA receptors and l-arginine-nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of duloxetine in the forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Zomkowski, Andréa D E; Engel, Daiane; Cunha, Mauricio P; Gabilan, Nelson H; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2012-12-01

    Duloxetine is a selective serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor used as antidepressant. However, its mechanisms of action are not fully understood. This study investigated the effect of duloxetine in the mouse forced swimming test (FST) and in the tail suspension test (TST) and the involvement of the NMDA receptors and the l-arginine-NO-cGMP pathway in its effect in the FST. Duloxetine reduced the immobility time both in the FST and in the TST (dose range of 1-30mg/kg, i.p.), without changing locomotion in an open-field. Duloxetine administered orally (1-30mg/kg) also reduced the immobility time in the FST. The effect of duloxetine (10mg/kg, p.o.) in the FST was prevented by pre-treatment with NMDA (0.1pmol/site, i.c.v.), d-serine (30μg/site, i.c.v.), (l-arginine (750mg/kg, i.p.), S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP, 25μg/site, i.c.v) or sildenafil (5mg/kg, i.p.). The administration of MK-801 (0.001mg/kg, i.p.), 7-nitroindazole (50mg/kg, i.p.), methylene blue (20mg/kg, i.p.) or 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) (30pmol/site i.c.v.) in combination with a sub-effective dose of duloxetine (0.3mg/kg, p.o.) reduced the immobility time in the FST. Moreover, the administration of duloxetine (10mg/kg) produced a reduction in NOx levels in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Altogether the results suggest that the effect of duloxetine in the FST is dependent on either a blockade of NMDA receptors or an inhibition of NO. In addition, our results further reinforce the role of NMDA receptors and l-arginine-NO-cGMP pathway, besides the monoaminergic systems, in the mechanism of action of current prescribed antidepressant agents.

  10. Behavioral, biochemical and cellular correlates in the protective effect of sertraline against transient global ischemia induced behavioral despair: possible involvement of nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate study pathway.

    PubMed

    Gaur, Vaibhav; Kumar, Anil

    2010-04-29

    Post-stroke depression (PSD) is one of the psychiatric complications after stroke. Present study was conducted to elucidate the protective effect of sertraline and possible involvement of nitric oxide mechanism against transient global ischemia induced behavioral despair. Bilateral common carotid artery occlusion was given twice for 5 min at 10 min interval followed by 96 h reperfusion. Ischemia reperfusion significantly increased immobility period and decreased resistance to lateral push as compared to sham-operated group. Ischemia reperfusion caused significant oxidative damage and mitochondrial enzyme complex (I-III) dysfunction as compared to sham group. Sertraline (5 and 10mg/kg) treatment significantly reduced immobility period, increased resistance to lateral push, attenuated oxidative damage and restored mitochondrial enzyme complex activities as compared to ischemia group. L-Arginine (100mg/kg) or sildenafil (5mg/kg) pretreatment with sertraline (5mg/kg) significantly reversed the protective effect of sertraline. However, L-NAME (10mg/kg) or 7NI (10mg/kg) pretreatment with sertraline (5mg/kg) significantly potentiated their protective effect which were significant as compared to their effect alone. The present study shows that nitric oxide modulation is involved in the protective effect of sertraline. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Systemic Induction of NO-, Redox-, and cGMP Signaling in the Pumpkin Extrafascicular Phloem upon Local Leaf Wounding

    PubMed Central

    Gaupels, Frank; Furch, Alexandra C. U.; Zimmermann, Matthias R.; Chen, Faxing; Kaever, Volkhard; Buhtz, Anja; Kehr, Julia; Sarioglu, Hakan; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Durner, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Cucurbits developed the unique extrafascicular phloem (EFP) as a defensive structure against herbivorous animals. Mechanical leaf injury was previously shown to induce a systemic wound response in the EFP of pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima). Here, we demonstrate that the phloem antioxidant system and protein modifications by NO are strongly regulated during this process. Activities of the central antioxidant enzymes dehydroascorbate reductase, glutathione reductase and ascorbate reductase were rapidly down-regulated at 30 min with a second minimum at 24 h after wounding. As a consequence levels of total ascorbate and glutathione also decreased with similar bi-phasic kinetics. These results hint toward a wound-induced shift in the redox status of the EFP. Nitric oxide (NO) is another important player in stress-induced redox signaling in plants. Therefore, we analyzed NO-dependent protein modifications in the EFP. Six to forty eight hours after leaf damage total S-nitrosothiol content and protein S-nitrosylation were clearly reduced, which was contrasted by a pronounced increase in protein tyrosine nitration. Collectively, these findings suggest that NO-dependent S-nitrosylation turned into peroxynitrite-mediated protein nitration upon a stress-induced redox shift probably involving the accumulation of reactive oxygen species within the EFP. Using the biotin switch assay and anti-nitrotyrosine antibodies we identified 9 candidate S-nitrosylated and 6 candidate tyrosine-nitrated phloem proteins. The wound-responsive Phloem Protein 16-1 (PP16-1) and Cyclophilin 18 (CYP18) as well as the 26.5 kD isoform of Phloem Protein 2 (PP2) were amenable to both NO modifications and could represent important redox-sensors within the cucurbit EFP. We also found that leaf injury triggered the systemic accumulation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in the EFP and discuss the possible function of this second messenger in systemic NO and redox signaling within the EFP. PMID:26904092

  12. Bixa orellana leaf extract suppresses histamine-induced endothelial hyperpermeability via the PLC-NO-cGMP signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yoke Keong; Chiong, Hoe Siong; Somchit, Muhd Nazrul; Ahmad, Zuraini

    2015-10-14

    Histamine is established as a potent inflammatory mediator and it is known to increased endothelial permeability by promoting gap formation between endothelial cells. Previous studies have shown that aqueous extract of Bixa orellana leaves (AEBO) exhibits antihistamine activity in vivo, yet the mechanism of its action on endothelial barrier function remains unclear. Therefore, the current study aimed to determine the protective effect of AEBO against histamine-induced hyperpermeability in vitro. The endothelial protective effect of AEBO was assess using an in vitro vascular permeability assay kit. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were used in the current study. HUVEC were pre-treated with AEBO for 12 h before histamine induction. Vascular permeability was evaluated by the amount of FITC-dextran leakage into the lower chamber. In order to elucidate the mechanism of action of AEBO, phospholipase C (PLC) activity, intracellular calcium level, nitric oxide (NO) concentration, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production and protein kinase C (PKC) activity were determined following histamine challenge. Histamine-induced increased HUVEC permeability was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with AEBO in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Upregulation of PLC activity caused by histamine in HUVEC was suppressed by pretreatment with AEBO. Pretreatment with AEBO also blocked the production of intracellular calcium induced by histamine in HUVEC. In addition, AEBO suppressed the NO-cGMP signaling cascade when HUVEC were challenged with histamine. Moreover, PKC activity was significantly abolished by pretreatment with AEBO in HUVEC under histamine condition. In conclusion, the present data suggest that AEBO could suppress histamine-induced increased endothelial permeability and the activity may be closely related with the inhibition of the PLC-NO-cGMP signaling pathway and PKC activity.

  13. Methylene blue induces macroautophagy through 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase pathway to protect neurons from serum deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Luokun; Li, Wenjun; Winters, Ali; Yuan, Fang; Jin, Kunlin; Yang, Shaohua

    2013-01-01

    Methylene blue has been shown to be neuroprotective in multiple experimental neurodegenerative disease models. However, the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects have not been fully elucidated. Previous studies have shown that macroautophagy has multiple beneficial roles for maintaining normal cellular homeostasis and that induction of macroautophagy after myocardial ischemia is protective. In the present study we demonstrated that methylene blue could protect HT22 hippocampal cell death induced by serum deprivation, companied by induction of macroautophagy. We also found that methylene blue-mediated neuroprotection was abolished by macroautophagy inhibition. Interestingly, 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling, but not inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling, was activated at 12 and 24 h after methylene blue treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Methylene blue-induced macroautophagy was blocked by AMPK inhibitor. Consistent with in vitro data, macroautophagy was induced in the cortex and hippocampus of mouse brains treated with methylene blue. Our findings suggest that methylene blue-induced neuroprotection is mediated, at least in part, by macroautophagy though activation of AMPK signaling. PMID:23653592

  14. Methylene blue induces macroautophagy through 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase pathway to protect neurons from serum deprivation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Luokun; Li, Wenjun; Winters, Ali; Yuan, Fang; Jin, Kunlin; Yang, Shaohua

    2013-01-01

    Methylene blue has been shown to be neuroprotective in multiple experimental neurodegenerative disease models. However, the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects have not been fully elucidated. Previous studies have shown that macroautophagy has multiple beneficial roles for maintaining normal cellular homeostasis and that induction of macroautophagy after myocardial ischemia is protective. In the present study we demonstrated that methylene blue could protect HT22 hippocampal cell death induced by serum deprivation, companied by induction of macroautophagy. We also found that methylene blue-mediated neuroprotection was abolished by macroautophagy inhibition. Interestingly, 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling, but not inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling, was activated at 12 and 24 h after methylene blue treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Methylene blue-induced macroautophagy was blocked by AMPK inhibitor. Consistent with in vitro data, macroautophagy was induced in the cortex and hippocampus of mouse brains treated with methylene blue. Our findings suggest that methylene blue-induced neuroprotection is mediated, at least in part, by macroautophagy though activation of AMPK signaling.

  15. Hybrid MC/QC simulations of water-assisted proton transfer in nucleosides. Guanosine and its analog acyclovir.

    PubMed

    Markova, Nadezhda; Pejov, Ljupco; Stoyanova, Nina; Enchev, Venelin

    2017-05-01

    To provide an in-depth insight into the molecular basis of spontaneous tautomerism in DNA and RNA base pairs, a hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)-quantum chemical (QC) methodology is implemented to map two-dimensional potential energy surfaces along the reaction coordinates of solvent-assisted proton transfer processes in guanosine and its analog acyclovir in aqueous solution. The solvent effects were simulated by explicit inclusion of water molecules that model the relevant part of the first hydration shell around the solute. The position of these water molecules was estimated by carrying out a classical Metropolis Monte Carlo simulation of dilute water solutions of the guanosine (Gs) and acyclovir (ACV) and subsequently analyzing solute-solvent intermolecular interactions in the statistically-independent MC-generated configurations. The solvent-assisted proton transfer processes were further investigated using two different ab initio MP2 quantum chemical approaches. In the first one, potential energy surfaces of the 'bare' finite solute-solvent clusters containing Gs/ACV and four water molecules (MP2/6-31+G(d,p) level) were explored, while within the second approach, these clusters were embedded in 'bulk' solvent treated as polarizable continuum (C-PCM/MP2/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory). It was found that in the gas phase and in water solution, the most stable tautomer for guanosine and acyclovir is the 1H-2-amino-6-oxo form followed by the 2-amino-6-(sZ)-hydroxy form. The energy barriers of the water-assisted proton transfer reaction in guanosine and in acyclovir are found to be very similar - 11.74 kcal mol(-1) for guanosine and 11.16 kcal mol(-1) for acyclovir, and the respective rate constants (k = 1.5 × 10(1) s(-1), guanosine and k = 4.09 × 10(1) s(-1), acyclovir), are sufficiently large to generate the 2-amino-6-(sZ)-hydroxy tautomer. The analysis of the reaction profiles in both compounds shows that the proton transfer processes occur through the

  16. Overview of Signaling Mechanism Pathways Employed by BPAid in Vasodilatory Activity.

    PubMed

    Loh, Yean Chun; Tan, Chu Shan; Ch'ng, Yung Sing; Ahmad, Mariam; Ng, Chiew Hoong; Yam, Mun Fei

    2017-09-27

    Hypertension, one of the famous "silent killers" that can attack people at any age, is a current hot topic among scientists due to multiple syndromic behavior and concomitant diseases. The new scientific-based Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) formulation approach was used in a previous study by combining five TCM herbs, including Gastrodia elata Bl., Uncaria rhynchophylla (Miq.) Miq. ex Havil., Pueraria thomsonii Benth., Panax notoginseng (Burk.) F.H. Chen, and Alisma orientalis (Sam.) Juzep in optimized ratio (named BPAid). The objective of the present study was to evaluate the mechanism pathways employed by BPAid for vasodilatory effect with the use of an in vitro isolated aortic rings assay. Interestingly, all the mechanisms investigated were involved in the BPAid's vasodilation activity in which the majority contributed through the nitric oxide/soluble guanylyl cyclase/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO/sGC/cGMP) pathways, followed by prostacyclin (PGI2), β2-adrenergic, and M3-receptors pathways. Furthermore, the BPAid appeared to manage vascular tone by regulating action potential through potassium and both voltage-operated calcium channel and inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R) pathways. The results obtained has confirmed the expected outcome that the benefits of TCM herbs in BPAid can meet the criteria of counteracting multiple signaling mechanism pathways involved in the etiology of hypertension. In addition to this study, the fingerprints and chemical properties of BPAid was identified by using tri-step Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and compared with its derivatives. The results obtained suggested that the majority of the vasodilatory effects exerted by BPAid were attributed to the presence of saponins and aromatic ring-containing vasoactive compounds.

  17. Role of the ER/NO/cGMP Signaling Pathway in the Promotion of Osteogenic Differentiation of Rat Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Actaea racemosa Extract

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shenlan; Zhou, Yanping; Zhu, Rui; Xu, Wei; Wu, Yanran; Deng, Danfang; Luo, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objective. To investigate the effect of Actaea racemosa (AR) extract on in vitro osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) via the ER/NO/cGMP signaling pathway. Methods/Materials. Rat BMSCs were treated with osteogenic differentiation-inducing medium containing AR; estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182,780 (10−6 mol/L); and nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, L-nitro arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 6 × 10−3 mol/L). Markers of osteogenic differentiation (alkaline phosphatase [ALP] activity, osteocalcin secretion, and calcium ion deposit levels) and the levels of key signaling molecules (nitric oxide synthase [NOS], nitric oxide [NO], and cyclic guanosine monophosphate [cGMP]) were assessed. Results. AR (10−1–10−6 g/L) increased ALP activity in a dose-dependent manner, and the highest ALP, osteocalcin, and osteoprotegerin activities were achieved at an AR concentration of 10−4 g/L. Therefore, the concentration of 10−4 g/L was used for promoting osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs in subsequent analyses. At this concentration, AR increased the levels of NO and cGMP, and such effects could be blocked by the estrogen receptor antagonist (ICI 182,780) and nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (L-NAME). Conclusion. AR induced osteogenic differentiation of rat BMSCs through the ER/NO/cGMP signaling pathway. This finding provides the theoretical foundation for the mechanism of AR in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. PMID:27974901

  18. Oxidized LDL activates blood platelets through CD36/NOX2–mediated inhibition of the cGMP/protein kinase G signaling cascade

    PubMed Central

    Magwenzi, Simbarashe; Woodward, Casey; Wraith, Katie S.; Aburima, Ahmed; Raslan, Zaher; Jones, Huw; McNeil, Catriona; Wheatcroft, Stephen; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Febbriao, Maria; Kearney, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) promotes unregulated platelet activation in dyslipidemic disorders. Although oxLDL stimulates activatory signaling, it is unclear how these events drive accelerated thrombosis. Here, we describe a mechanism for oxLDL-mediated platelet hyperactivity that requires generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Under arterial flow, oxLDL triggered sustained generation of platelet intracellular ROS, which was blocked by CD36 inhibitors, mimicked by CD36-specific oxidized phospholipids, and ablated in CD36−/− murine platelets. oxLDL-induced ROS generation was blocked by the reduced NAD phosphate oxidase 2 (NOX2) inhibitor, gp91ds-tat, and absent in NOX2−/− mice. The synthesis of ROS by oxLDL/CD36 required Src-family kinases and protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent phosphorylation and activation of NOX2. In functional assays, oxLDL abolished guanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP)-mediated signaling and inhibited platelet aggregation and arrest under flow. This was prevented by either pharmacologic inhibition of NOX2 in human platelets or genetic ablation of NOX2 in murine platelets. Platelets from hyperlipidemic mice were also found to have a diminished sensitivity to cGMP when tested ex vivo, a phenotype that was corrected by infusion of gp91ds-tat into the mice. This study demonstrates that oxLDL and hyperlipidemia stimulate the generation of NOX2-derived ROS through a CD36-PKC pathway and may promote platelet hyperactivity through modulation of cGMP signaling. PMID:25710879

  19. Possible involvement of nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of MK-801(dizocilpine), a NMDA receptor antagonist in mouse forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Dhir, Ashish; Kulkarni, S K

    2008-03-01

    L-arginine-nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is an important signaling pathway involved in depression. With this information, the present study aimed to study the involvement of this signaling pathway in the antidepressant-like action of MK-801 (dizocilpine; N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist) in the mouse forced-swim test. Total immobility period was recorded in mouse forced swim test for 6 min. MK-801 (5-25 microg/kg., ip) produced a U-shaped curve in reducing the immobility period. The antidepressant-like effect of MK-801 (10 microg/kg, ip) was prevented by pretreatment with L-arginine (750 mg/kg, ip) [substrate for nitric oxide synthase (NOS)]. Pretreatment of mice with 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) (25 mg/kg, ip) [a specific neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor] produced potentiation of the action of subeffective dose of MK-801 (5 microg/kg, ip). In addition, treatment of mice with methylene blue (10 mg/kg, ip) [direct inhibitor of both nitric oxide synthase and soluble guanylate cyclase] potentiated the effect of MK-801 (5 microg/kg, ip) in the forced-swim test. Further, the reduction in the immobility period elicited by MK-801 (10 microg/kg, ip) was also inhibited by pretreatment with sildenafil (5 mg/kg, ip) [phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor]. The various modulators used in the study and their combination did not produce any changes in locomotor activity per se and in combination with MK-801. MK-801 however, at higher doses (25 microg/kg, ip) produced hyperlocomotion. The results demonstrated the involvement of nitric oxide signaling pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of MK-801 in mouse forced-swim test.

  20. Structural model for an oligonucleotide containing a bulged guanosine by NMR and energy minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Woodson, S.A.; Crothers, D.M.

    1988-05-03

    The authors present three-dimensional structural models for a DNA oligomer containing a bulged guanosine based on proton NMR data and energy minimization computations. The nonexchangeable proton resonances of the duplex /sup 5'/d(GATGGGCAG) x d(CTGCGCCATC) are assigned by nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) and correlated spectroscopy connectivities, and the NMR spectrum is compared with that of a regular 8-mer of similar sequence, /sup 5'/d(GATGGCAG) x d(CTGCCATC). Experimental proton-proton distances are obtained from NOESY spectra acquired with mixing times of 100, 150, and 200 ms. A refined three-dimensional structure for the bulge-containing duplex is calculated from regular B DNA starting coordinates by using the AMBER molecular mechanics program. They compare structures obtained by building the helix in three and four base pair increments with structures obtained by direct minimization of the entire nine base sequence,with and without experimental distance constraints. The general features of all the calculated structures are very similar. The helix is of the B family, with the extra guanine stacked into the helix, and the helix axis is bent by 18-23/sup 0/, in agreement with gel mobility data for bulge-containing sequences.

  1. Extracellular conversion of guanine-based purines to guanosine specifically enhances astrocyte glutamate uptake.

    PubMed

    Frizzo, Marcos Emílio dos Santos; Antunes Soares, Félix Alexandre; Dall'Onder, Leonara Patrícia; Lara, Diogo Rizzato; Swanson, Raymond A; Souza, Diogo Onofre

    2003-05-16

    Guanosine (GUO) has been shown to stimulate glutamate uptake in primary astrocyte cultures. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect and specificity of guanine- or adenine-based purines on glutamate and GABA uptake in cultured astrocytes. Stimulatory effect on glutamate uptake was observed with GUO, GMP or GTP. Simultaneous exposure with these guanine-based purines did not show an additive effect. We also investigated a possible interconversion of guanine-based purines during incubation time. Action by GTP was excluded since the hydrolysis resistant GTP analog, GMP-PNP did not stimulate glutamate uptake. Addition of an ecto-5'-nucleotidase inhibitor abolished GMP-stimulatory effect on glutamate uptake, without affecting GUO action. Taken together, these results suggest that GUO is the guanine-based purines responsible for glutamate uptake activation. In addition, the stimulatory effect on glutamate uptake was not observed with adenine-based purines. Moreover, GABA uptake was not activated by GUO. These results point to specificity in the interaction between GUO and the astrocyte glutamate uptake system.

  2. Regulation of guinea pig myometrial beta-adrenoreceptors by guanosine triphosphate and magnesium ion

    SciTech Connect

    Hatjis, C.G.; Crews, A.

    1988-04-01

    The effects of guanosine triphosphate (GTP) and magnesium on the interaction of 1-isoproterenol with beta-adrenoreceptors were studied in myometrial membranes from nonpregnant and late-pregnant (0.9 gestation, term 65 days) guinea pigs. The affinity of the beta-adrenoreceptor for 1-isoproterenol, as measured by inhibition of (-)/sup 125/I-cyanopindolol binding, was increased by 10 mM MgCl/sub 2/. The addition of 250 microM GTP reversed this process. In the presence of MgCl/sub 2/, the competition curves could be resolved into two affinity states of the beta-adrenoreceptor, high and low, respectively. The ratio of the dissociation constant of the high-affinity state to that of the low-affinity state was significantly higher in late-pregnant than in the nonpregnant animals. In the presence of GTP, there was only one (low-affinity) state of the receptor detectable. In both groups of animals, the interaction between beta-adrenoreceptor agonists and myometrial beta-adrenoreceptors was positively modulated by MgCl/sub 2/. This process was reversed by GTP. However, there appeared to be a differential regulation of the ability of the myometrial beta-adrenoreceptor to form a high-affinity state, depending on the reproductive state of the animal.

  3. Nonenzymatic template-directed synthesis on hairpin oligonucleotides. 2. Templates containing cytidine and guanosine residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, T.; Orgel, L. E.

    1992-01-01

    We have prepared hairpin oligonucleotides in which a 5'-terminal single-stranded segment contains cytidylate (C) and guanylate (G) residues. When these hairpin substrates are incubated with a mixture of cytidine 5'-phosphoro(2-methly)imidazolide (2-MeImpC) and guanosine 5'-phosphoro(2-methyl)imidazolide (2-MeImpG), the 5'-terminal segment acts as a template to facilitate sequence-specific addition of G and C residues to the 3'-terminus of the hairpin. If an isolated G residue is present at the 3'-end of the template strand, it is copied regiospecifically in the presence of 2-MeImpC and 2-MeImpG to give a product containing an isolated C residue linked to its G neighbors by 3'-5'-internucleotide bonds. However, if only 2-MeImpC is present in the reaction mixture, very little reaction occurs. Thus, the presence of 2-MeImpG catalyzes the incorporation of C. If the template strand contains a short sequence of G residues, it is copied in the presence of a mixture of 2-MeImpC and 2-MeImpG. If only 2-MeImpC is present in the reaction mixture, efficient synthesis occurs to give a final product containing one fewer C residue than the number of G residues in the template.

  4. Alkylation by propylene oxide of deoxyribonucleic acid, adenine, guanosine and deoxyguanylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, P. D.; Jarman, M.

    1972-01-01

    1. Propylene oxide reacts with DNA in aqueous buffer solution at about neutral pH to yield two principal products, identified as 7-(2-hydroxypropyl)guanine and 3-(2-hydroxypropyl)adenine, which hydrolyse out of the alkylated DNA at neutral pH values at 37°C. 2. These products were obtained in quantity by reactions between propylene oxide and guanosine or adenine respectively. 3. The reactions between propylene oxide and adenine in acetic acid were parallel to those between dimethyl sulphate and adenine in neutral aqueous solution; the alkylated positions in adenine in order of decreasing reactivity were N-3, N-1 and N-9. A method for separating these alkyladenines is described. 4. Deoxyguanylic acid sodium salt was alkylated at N-7 by propylene oxide in neutral aqueous solution. 5. The nature of the side chain in the principal alkylation products was established by mass spectrometry, and the nature of the products is consistent with their formation by the bimolecular reaction mechanism. PMID:5073240

  5. An Unconventional Acid-Labile Nucleobase Protection Concept for Guanosine Phosphoramidites in RNA Solid-Phase Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Jud, Lukas; Micura, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    We present an innovative O6-tert-butyl/N2-tert-butyloxycarbonyl protection concept for guanosine (G) phosphoramidites. This concept is advantageous for 2′-modified G building blocks because of very efficient synthetic access when compared with existing routes that usually employ O6-(4-nitrophenyl)ethyl/N2-acyl protection or that start from 2-aminoadenosine involving enzymatic transformation into guanosine later on in the synthetic path. The new phosphoramidites are fully compatible with 2′-O-tBDMS or TOM phosphoramidites in standard RNA solid-phase synthesis and deprotection, and provide excellent quality of tailored RNAs for the growing range of applications in RNA biophysics, biochemistry, and biology. PMID:27943429

  6. Direct Observation of a Cytosine Analogue that Forms Five Hydrogen Bonds to Guanosine: Guanyl G-Clamp

    SciTech Connect

    Wilds, C.J.; Maier, M.A.; Tereshko, V.; Manoharan, M.; Egli, M.

    2010-03-08

    A novel heterocyclic base modification, the guanidino G-clamp, is designed to allow two Hoogsteen-type hydrogen bonds to form between the amino and imino nitrogen atoms of a tethered guanidinium group to O6 and N7 of guanosine, which results in a total of five hydrogen bonds (broken lines, see picture). Details of a crystal structure at 1.0-{angstrom} resolution of a modified DNA decamer containing this guanidino G-clamp analogue demonstrate its mechanism of binding.

  7. Glicentin and oxyntomodulin modulate both the phosphoinositide and cyclic adenosine monophosphate signaling pathways in gastric myocytes.

    PubMed

    Rodier, G; Magous, R; Mochizuki, T; Le Nguyen, D; Martinez, J; Bali, J P; Bataille, D; Jarrousse, C; Geneviève, R

    1999-01-01

    We have investigated the transduction pathways mediating the contractile effect of two glucagon-containing peptides, glicentin (GLIC) and oxyntomodulin (OXM), on smooth muscle cells isolated from rabbit antrum. Low concentrations of GLIC induced a biphasic and rapid (first phase at 5-8 sec) Ins(1,4,5)P3 production. By comparison, higher concentrations of OXM or OXM(19-37) were required to obtain biphasic time-courses of Ins(1,4,5)P3 production. In a Ca2+ free medium, the first phase of Ins(1,4,5)P3 production induced by GLIC or OXM was maintained, while the second phase disappeared. In saponin-permeabilized cells, all three peptides induced cell contraction with similar efficacies and potencies. Exogenous Ins(1,4,5)P3 mimicked the contractile effect of the peptides and heparin, which inhibits the Ins(1,4,5)P3 binding to its receptor, prevented contraction stimulated by each effector. We conclude that a Ca2+ mobilization from the intracellular stores is essential in the contractile effects of GLIC and OXM. Using the fluo-3 probe, a [Ca2+]i increase was observed in the presence of GLIC, OXM, or OXM(19-37). The three peptides reduced by 30-40% the cAMP content of cells stimulated by forskolin. This effect was pertussis toxin sensitive as demonstrated with OXM(19-37). Our data constitute important clues for the existence in smooth muscle cells of receptor(s) specific for the GLIC/OXM hormones, coupled via G protein(s) to both Ca2+ and cAMP pathways.

  8. GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT SYMPOSIUM: Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and mitochondria in Rendement Napole pig growth.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, T L; Gerrard, D E

    2016-09-01

    The Rendement Napole mutation (RN-), which is well known to influence pork quality, also has a profound impact on metabolic characteristics of muscle. Pigs with RN- possess a SNP in the γ3 subunit of adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK); AMPK, a key energy sensor in skeletal muscle, modulates energy producing and energy consuming pathways to maintain cellular homeostasis. Importantly, AMPK regulates not only acute response to energy stress but also facilitates long-term adaptation via changes in gene and protein expression. The RN- allele increases AMPK activity, which alters the metabolic phenotype of skeletal muscle by increasing mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity. Fibers with greater oxidative capacity typically exhibit increased protein turnover and smaller fiber size, which indicates that RN- pigs may exhibit decreased efficiency and growth potential. However, whole body and muscle growth of RN- pigs appear similar to that of wild-type pigs and despite increased oxidative capacity, fibers maintain the capacity for hypertrophic growth. This indicates that compensatory mechanisms may allow RN- pigs to achieve rates of muscle growth similar to those of wild-type pigs. Intriguingly, lipid oxidation and mitochondria function are enhanced in RN- pig muscle. Thus far, characteristics of RN- muscle are largely based on animals near market weight. To better understand interaction between energy signaling and protein accretion in muscle, further work is needed to define age-dependent relationships between AMPK signaling, metabolism, and muscle growth.

  9. Neuroprotective effects of guanosine administration on behavioral, brain activity, neurochemical and redox parameters in a rat model of chronic hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Paniz, L G; Calcagnotto, M E; Pandolfo, P; Machado, D G; Santos, G F; Hansel, G; Almeida, R F; Bruch, R S; Brum, L M; Torres, F V; de Assis, A M; Rico, E P; Souza, D O

    2014-09-01

    It is well known that glutamatergic excitotoxicity and oxidative stress are implicated in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). The nucleoside guanosine exerts neuroprotective effects through the antagonism against glutamate neurotoxicity and antioxidant properties. In this study, we evaluated the neuroprotective effect of guanosine in an animal model of chronic HE. Rats underwent bile duct ligation (BDL) and 2 weeks later they were treated with i.p. injection of guanosine 7.5 mg/kg once a day for 1-week. We evaluated the effects of guanosine in HE studying several aspects: a) animal behavior using open field and Y-maze tasks; b) brain rhythm changes in electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings; c) purines and glutamate levels in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF); and d) oxidative stress parameters in the brain. BDL rats presented increased levels of glutamate, purines and metabolites in the CSF, as well as increased oxidative damage. Guanosine was able not only to prevent these effects but also to attenuate the behavioral and EEG impairment induced by BDL. Our study shows the neuroprotective effects of systemic administration of guanosine in a rat model of HE and highlights the involvement of purinergic system in the physiopathology of this disease.

  10. Suppression of the biosynthesis of guanosine triphosphate by protein synthesis inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Volkin, E.; Boling, M.E.; Jones, M.H.; Lee, W.H.; Pike, L.M.

    1980-10-10

    In a prior report it was observed that CTP synthesis and concomitant incorporation of CMP into RNA and dCMP into DNA were markedly reduced in cells cultured in the presence of cycloheximide and puromycin. Experiments described here with Novikoff hepatoma cells reveal that the purine biosynthetic pathway is similarly affected. When the cells are subjected to cycloheximide (30 or 60 ..mu..g/ml) or puromycin (100 ..mu..g/ml), there is a substantial reduction in the bioconversion of hypoxanthine, adenosine, and deoxyadenosine into guanylate compared to untreated cultures. Whereas synthesis (counts per min/nmol) of pool ATP was 70 to 100% of controls, that of pool GTP was 20 to 35% of controls. Incorporation of AMP into RNA was 40 to 60% of controls, but that of GMP was only 10 to 25% of controls. Incorporation of dAMP into DNA averaged 10% of controls, but that of dGMP was only 4% of controls. Synthesis of guanylates from formate by the de novo pathway was similarly reduced, but incorporation of guanosine, which enters via kinase action alone, was not disproportionately lowered. These results suggest that protein synthesis inhibitors cause a severely reduced availability of newly synthesized GTP and CTP as well as their deoxy counterparts, dGTP and dCTP, the proximal precursors for the synthesis of RNA and DNA. However, the nanomolar levels of all nucleoside triphosphates remain high, probably as a result of recycling of nucleic acid breakdown products. Thus, reduced synthesis of these compounds may restrict nucleic acid synthesis only of some sort of compartmentation leads to a limitation of these precursors at the site(s) of nucleic acid synthesis.

  11. Injection of guanosine and adenosine nucleotides into Limulus ventral photoreceptor cells

    PubMed Central

    Bolsover, S. R.; Brown, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    1. Several nucleotide and nucleotide analogues had striking effects when pressure-injected into Limulus ventral photoreceptor cells. The poorly hydrolysable GTP analogues guanosine 5′-0-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTPγS), guanylyl imidodiphosphate (Gpp[NH]p) and guanylyl (β, γ methylene) diphosphonate (Gpp[CH2]p) produced large increases in the frequency of `discrete events' that were recorded from photoreceptors in darkness. This effect was only observed after the injected cell was exposed to light. Injection of the ATP analogue ATPγS had effects similar to those of the GTP analogues. 2. We conclude that GTPγS, Gpp[NH]p, Gpp[CH2]p and ATPγS act at a common site to cause a light-dependent, long-term activation of the excitation mechanism of the photoreceptor. 3. Injection of GTP or GDP at pH 4.8 was followed by a smooth, transient depolarization that was observed neither when GTP at pH 7.5 was injected nor when ATP, 5′GMP or 2-[N-morpholino] ethane sulphonic acid (MES) were injected at pH 4.8. The reversal potential of the current induced by GTP injection was significantly more positive than the reversal potential of the light-induced current. 4. We conclude that GTP injection induces changes of membrane conductance either in addition to, or different from, the light-induced change of membrane conductance. 5. Injection of the ATP analogue adenylyl imidodiphosphate (App[NH]p), and the pyrophosphate analogue imidodiphosphate (p[NH]p) produced a drastic decrease in the sensitivity of photoreceptors to light. This decrease in sensitivity was partially reversed when the concentration of calcium ions in the bathing medium was reduced. 6. We suggest that App[NH]p and p[NH]p injections act by increasing the cytoplasmic concentration of calcium ions. PMID:7153930

  12. Potentiation of Muscarinic and α -adrenergic Responses by an Analogue of Guanosine 5'-triphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, M. G.; Marty, A.

    1986-06-01

    Ca2+-dependent K+ and Cl- currents were recorded in isolated and dialyzed rat lacrimal gland cells by use of the tight-seal whole-cell recording technique. Under control conditions, application of acetylcholine (0.5-1.0 μ M) resulted in the full activation of both types of current. When 50-200 μ M guanosine 5'-[γ -thio]triphosphate (GTP[S], a nonhydrolyzable GTP analogue) was added to the intracellular solution, activation of both currents was seen with 1 nM acetylcholine, a dose 1/100th that needed under control conditions. Dialysis with solutions containing 200 μ M GTP or cAMP had no, or only slight, potentiation effects. The effects of GTP[S] were obtained only when ATP was included in the intracellular solution. The potentiated responses to acetylcholine were blocked by increasing 10-fold the intracellular Ca2+-buffering capacity and were not dependent on external Ca2+. Thus, the potentiated responses appeared to result from a release of Ca2+ from internal stores. GTP[S] also greatly potentiated the Ca2+-dependent adrenergic (norepinephrine) response of this preparation. In addition, GTP[S] elicited in some cells transient responses without application of acetylcholine or norepinephrine. Finally, rapid and sustained responses were seen as soon as the cells were dialyzed with inositol trisphosphate (20 μ M). These findings are discussed in terms of a possible role of a GTP-binding protein as a link between activation of muscarinic or adrenergic receptors and initiation of Ca2+ release by inositol trisphosphate.

  13. Guanosine protects against reperfusion injury in rat brains after ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Connell, Barry J; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Sayeed, Iqbal; Ballerini, Patrizia; Saleh, Monique C; Giuliani, Patricia; Saleh, Tarek M; Rathbone, Michel P; Su, Caixin; Jiang, Shucui

    2013-02-01

    After ischemic stroke, early thrombolytic therapy to reestablish tissue perfusion improves outcome but triggers a cascade of deleterious cellular and molecular events. Using a collaborative approach, our groups examined the effects of guanosine (Guo) in response to ischemic reperfusion injury in vitro and in vivo. In a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats, Guo significantly reduced infarct volume in a dose-dependent manner when given systemically either immediately before or 30 min, but not 60 min, after the onset of the 5.5-hr reperfusion period. In a separate experiment, Guo significantly reduced infarct volume after 24 hr of reperfusion when administered 5 min before reperfusion. Western blot analysis did not reveal any significant changes either in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress proteins (GRP 78 and 94) or HSP 70 or in levels of m-calpain. In vitro oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) significantly increased production of both reactive oxygen species (ROS) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in the primary astrocytes. Guo did not alter ROS or IL-8 production when given to the astrocytes before OGD. However, Guo when added to the cells prior to or 30 min after reperfusion significantly reduced IL-8 release but not ROS formation. Our study revealed a dose- and time-dependent protective effect of Guo on reperfusion injury in vitro and vivo. The mechanisms by which Guo exerts its effect are independent of unfolded proteins in ER or the level of intracellular calcium or ROS formation. However, the effect may be induced, at least partially, by inhibiting IL-8, a marker of reperfusion-triggered proinflammatory events.

  14. Intradermal cytosine-phosphate-guanosine treatment reduces lung inflammation but induces IFN-γ-mediated airway hyperreactivity in a murine model of natural rubber latex allergy.

    PubMed

    Haapakoski, Rita; Karisola, Piia; Fyhrquist, Nanna; Savinko, Terhi; Wolff, Henrik; Turjanmaa, Kristiina; Palosuo, Timo; Reunala, Timo; Lauerma, Antti; Alenius, Harri

    2011-05-01

    Asthma and other allergic diseases are continuously increasing, causing considerable economic and sociologic burden to society. The hygiene hypothesis proposes that lack of microbial T helper (Th) 1-like stimulation during early childhood leads to increased Th2-driven allergic disorders later in life. Immunostimulatory cytosine-phosphate-guanosine (CpG)-oligodeoxynucleotide motifs are candidate molecules for immunotherapeutic studies, as they have been shown to shift the Th2 response toward the Th1 direction and reduce allergic symptoms. Using natural rubber latex (NRL)-induced murine model of asthma, we demonstrated that intradermal CpG administration with allergen reduced pulmonary eosinophilia, mucus production, and Th2-type cytokines, but unexpectedly induced airway hyperreactivity (AHR) to inhaled methacholine, one of the hallmarks of asthma. We found that induction in AHR was dependent on STAT4, but independent of STAT6 signaling. CpG treatment increased production of IFN-γ in the airways and shifted the ratio of CD4(+):CD8(+) T cells toward CD8(+) dominance. By blocking soluble IFN-γ with neutralizing antibody, AHR diminished and the CD4(+):CD8(+) ratio returned to CD4(+) dominance. These results indicate that increased production of IFN-γ in the lungs may lead to severe side effects, such as enhancement of bronchial hyperreactivity to inhaled allergen. This finding should be taken into consideration when planning prophylaxis treatment of asthma with intradermal CpG injections.

  15. [Effects and mechanisms of Qifu decoction ameliorating renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis through inhibiting ERK1/2 signaling pathway in unilateral ureteral obstruction rats with yang deficiency].

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Yin, Xue-Jiao; Tu, Yue; Wan, Yi-Gang; Liu, Hong; Hu, Hao

    2014-11-01

    To demonstrate the effects and mechanisms of Qifu decoction( QFD) on renal interstitial fibrosis (RIF) in model rats with yang-deficiency syndrome. The rats were randomly divided into 3 groups, the Sham group (Group A), the Model group (Group B), the Qifu decoction group (Group C) and the Enalapril group (Group D). The RIF model was established by adenine administrated and unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) of the left ureter. After the model was successfully established, the rats in Group C and D were administrated with QFD or the Enalapril suspension,while the rats in Group A and B were administrated with distilled water. All rats were administrated for 3 weeks. Before administration and at the end of week 1, 2 and 3, the rats were weighted, and 24 h urinary protein excretion (Upro), urinary β2-microglobulin (Uβ2-MG) and urinary N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) were examined, respectively. All rats were killed after administration for 3 weeks. Blood and renal tissues were collected, renal morphology and tubulointerstitial morphology were evaluated, respectively. Serum cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (Scr) and uric acid (UA) were detected, respectively. The protein expressions of E-cadherin, α-smooth muscle actin(α-SMA), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), onnective tissue growth factor (CTGF) extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2(ERK1/2) and phosphorylated-ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2) in kidney were evaluated, respectively. QFD ameliorated serum cAMP level and the rate of cAMP/cGMP, attenuated urinary β2-MG level, NAG level and renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis, increased E-cadherin protein expression, and reduced α-SMA, TGF-β1, CTGF and p-ERK1/2 protein expressions in the kidney. However, QFD had no influence on renal function in vivo. In addition, these effects were better than those of the model rats treated by Enalapril. QFD could alleviate yang

  16. Systems Pharmacology and Rational Polypharmacy: Nitric Oxide−Cyclic GMP Signaling Pathway as an Illustrative Example and Derivation of the General Case

    PubMed Central

    Garmaroudi, Farshid S.; Handy, Diane E.; Liu, Yang-Yu; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Impaired nitric oxide (NO˙)-cyclic guanosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cGMP) signaling has been observed in many cardiovascular disorders, including heart failure and pulmonary arterial hypertension. There are several enzymatic determinants of cGMP levels in this pathway, including soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) itself, the NO˙-activated form of sGC, and phosphodiesterase(s) (PDE). Therapies for some of these disorders with PDE inhibitors have been successful at increasing cGMP levels in both cardiac and vascular tissues. However, at the systems level, it is not clear whether perturbation of PDE alone, under oxidative stress, is the best approach for increasing cGMP levels as compared with perturbation of other potential pathway targets, either alone or in combination. Here, we develop a model-based approach to perturbing this pathway, focusing on single reactions, pairs of reactions, or trios of reactions as targets, then monitoring the theoretical effects of these interventions on cGMP levels. Single perturbations of all reaction steps within this pathway demonstrated that three reaction steps, including the oxidation of sGC, NO˙ dissociation from sGC, and cGMP degradation by PDE, exerted a dominant influence on cGMP accumulation relative to other reaction steps. Furthermore, among all possible single, paired, and triple perturbations of this pathway, the combined perturbations of these three reaction steps had the greatest impact on cGMP accumulation. These computational findings were confirmed in cell-based experiments. We conclude that a combined perturbation of the oxidatively-impaired NO˙-cGMP signaling pathway is a better approach to the restoration of cGMP levels as compared with corresponding individual perturbations. This approach may also yield improved therapeutic responses in other complex pharmacologically amenable pathways. PMID:26985825

  17. Arginine induces GH gene expression by activating NOS/NO signaling in rat isolated hemi-pituitaries

    PubMed Central

    Olinto, S.C.F.; Adrião, M.G.; Castro-Barbosa, T.; Goulart-Silva, F.; Nunes, M.T.

    2012-01-01

    The amino acid arginine (Arg) is a recognized secretagogue of growth hormone (GH), and has been shown to induce GH gene expression. Arg is the natural precursor of nitric oxide (NO), which is known to mediate many of the effects of Arg, such as GH secretion. Arg was also shown to increase calcium influx in pituitary cells, which might contribute to its effects on GH secretion. Although the mechanisms involved in the effects of Arg on GH secretion are well established, little is known about them regarding the control of GH gene expression. We investigated whether the NO pathway and/or calcium are involved in the effects of Arg on GH gene expression in rat isolated pituitaries. To this end, pituitaries from approximately 170 male Wistar rats (∼250 g) were removed, divided into two halves, pooled (three hemi-pituitaries) and incubated or not with Arg, as well as with different pharmacological agents. Arg (71 mM), the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 1 and 0.1 mM) and a cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) analogue (8-Br-cGMP, 1 mM) increased GH mRNA expression 60 min later. The NO acceptor hemoglobin (0.3 µM) blunted the effect of SNP, and the combined treatment with Arg and L-NAME (an NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor, 55 mM) abolished the stimulatory effect of Arg on GH gene expression. The calcium channel inhibitor nifedipine (3 µM) also abolished Arg-induced GH gene expression. The present study shows that Arg directly induces GH gene expression in hemi-pituitaries isolated from rats, excluding interference from somatostatinergic neurons, which are supposed to be inhibited by Arg. Moreover, the data demonstrate that the NOS/NO signaling pathway and calcium mediate the Arg effects on GH gene expression. PMID:22641416

  18. L-theanine elicits an umami taste with inosine 5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Narukawa, Masataka; Morita, Kanako; Hayashi, Yukako

    2008-11-01

    We investigated the taste synergy between L-theanine and the flavour enhancer, inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), by using a human sensory evaluation. When L-theanine was added to IMP, only the umami taste was enhanced. We then investigated this synergistic effect of L-theanine in mice by gustatory nerve recording. We confirmed the synergism between L-theanine and IMP for the umami taste.

  19. Cyclic 3′,5′-Adenosine Monophosphate Phosphodiesterase of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, L. D.; Monard, D.; Rickenberg, H. V.

    1973-01-01

    The cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate (c-AMP) phosphodiesterase from Escherichia coli has been partially purified. The enzyme has an apparent molecular weight of 30,000, a Michaelis constant of 0.5 mM c-AMP, and a pH optimum of 7. The partially purified enzyme requires for activity the presence of a reducing compound and of either iron or a protein which seemingly acts as iron carrier. PMID:4355491

  20. Identification of a novel phosphatase with high affinity for nucleotides monophosphate from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Cabello-Díaz, Juan Miguel; Quiles, Francisco Antonio; Lambert, Rocío; Pineda, Manuel; Piedras, Pedro

    2012-04-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seedlings accumulate ureides derived from purines after germination. The first step in the conversion of purines to ureides is the removal of the 5'-phosphate group by a phosphatase that has not been established yet. Two main phosphatase activities were detected in the embryonic axes of common bean using inosine monophosphate as substrate in an in-gel assay. Both activities differed in their sensitive to the common phosphatase inhibitor molybdate, with the molybdate-resistant as the first enzyme induced after radicle protrusion. The molybdate-resistant phosphatase has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and this is the first enzyme which shows this resistance purified and characterized from plant tissues. The native enzyme was a monomer of 55 kDa and it showed highest activity with nucleotides as substrates, with the K(m) values in the micromolar range. Among nucleotides, the highest specific constant (V(max)/K(m)) was observed for adenosine monophosphate. Furthermore, the enzyme was inhibited by nucleosides, the products of the enzymatic reaction, with maximum effect for adenosine. Common bean seedlings imbibed in the presence of adenosine monophosphate in vivo showed the highest molybdate-resistant phosphatase activity in the axes in addition to increased ureide content. The data presented suggests that purified phosphatase is involved in nucleotide metabolism in embryonic axes from common bean. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Functional characterization of exopolyphosphatase/guanosine pentaphosphate phosphohydrolase (PPX/GPPA) of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Malde, Anandkumar; Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Chandrashekhar, Kshipra; Pina-Mimbela, Ruby; Torrelles, Jordi B; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2014-01-01

    The inorganic polyphosphate (poly-P) is a key regulator of stress responses and virulence in many bacterial pathogens including Campylobacter jejuni. The role of exopolyphosphatases/guanosine pentaphosphate (pppGpp) phosphohydrolases (PPX/GPPA) in poly-P homeostasis and C. jejuni pathobiology remains unexplored. Here, we analyzed deletion mutants (∆ppx1, ∆ppx2) and the double knockout mutant (dkppx), all ∆ppx mutants exhibited increased capacity to accumulate poly-P; however only ∆ppx1 and dkppx mutants showed decreased accumulation of ppGpp, an alarmone molecule that regulates stringent response in bacteria, suggesting potential dual role for PPX1/GPPA. Nutrient survival defect of ∆ppx mutants was rescued by the supplementation of specific amino acids implying that survival defect may be associated with decreased ppGpp and/ or increased poly-P in ∆ppx mutants. The ppk1 and spoT were upregulated in both ∆ppx1 and ∆ppx2 suggesting a compensatory role for SpoT and Ppk1 in poly-P and ppGpp homeostasis. The lack of ppx genes resulted in defects in motility, biofilm formation, nutrient stress survival, invasion and intracellular survival indicating that maintaining a certain level of poly-P is critical for ppx genes in C. jejuni pathophysiology. Both ppx1 and ppx2 mutants were resistant to human complement-mediated killing; however, the dkppx mutant was sensitive. The serum susceptibility did not occur in the presence of MgCl2 and EGTA suggesting an involvement of the classical or lectin pathway of complement mediated killing. Interestingly, the chicken serum did not have any effect on the ∆ppx mutants’ survival. The observed serum susceptibility was not related to C. jejuni surface capsule and lipooligosaccharide structures. Our study underscores the importance of PPX/GPPA proteins in poly-P and ppGpp homeostasis, two critical molecules that modulate environmental stress responses and virulence in C. jejuni. PMID:24569519

  2. Functional characterization of exopolyphosphatase/guanosine pentaphosphate phosphohydrolase (PPX/GPPA) of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Malde, Anandkumar; Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Chandrashekhar, Kshipra; Pina-Mimbela, Ruby; Torrelles, Jordi B; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2014-05-15

    The inorganic polyphosphate (poly-P) is a key regulator of stress responses and virulence in many bacterial pathogens including Campylobacter jejuni. The role of exopolyphosphatases/guanosine pentaphosphate (pppGpp) phosphohydrolases (PPX/GPPA) in poly-P homeostasis and C. jejuni pathobiology remains unexplored. Here, we analyzed deletion mutants (∆ppx1, ∆ppx2) and the double knockout mutant (dkppx), all ∆ppx mutants exhibited increased capacity to accumulate poly-P; however only ∆ppx1 and dkppx mutants showed decreased accumulation of ppGpp, an alarmone molecule that regulates stringent response in bacteria, suggesting potential dual role for PPX1/GPPA. Nutrient survival defect of ∆ppx mutants was rescued by the supplementation of specific amino acids implying that survival defect may be associated with decreased ppGpp and/ or increased poly-P in ∆ppx mutants. The ppk1 and spoT were upregulated in both ∆ppx1 and ∆ppx2 suggesting a compensatory role for SpoT and Ppk1 in poly-P and ppGpp homeostasis. The lack of ppx genes resulted in defects in motility, biofilm formation, nutrient stress survival, invasion and intracellular survival indicating that maintaining a certain level of poly-P is critical for ppx genes in C. jejuni pathophysiology. Both ppx1 and ppx2 mutants were resistant to human complement-mediated killing; however, the dkppx mutant was sensitive. The serum susceptibility did not occur in the presence of MgCl 2 and EGTA suggesting an involvement of the classical or lectin pathway of complement mediated killing. Interestingly, the chicken serum did not have any effect on the ∆ppx mutants' survival. The observed serum susceptibility was not related to C. jejuni surface capsule and lipooligosaccharide structures. Our study underscores the importance of PPX/GPPA proteins in poly-P and ppGpp homeostasis, two critical molecules that modulate environmental stress responses and virulence in C. jejuni.

  3. Adenosine-guanosine preferential photocleavage of DNA by azido-benzoyl- and diazocyclopenta-dienylcarbonyloxy derivatives of 9-aminoacridine.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, P E; Jeppesen, C; Egholm, M; Buchardt, O

    1988-01-01

    The photoreactions of 9-[6-(4-azidobenzamido)hexylamino]acridine (AHA) and 9-[6-(2-diazocyclopentadienylcarbonyloxy)hexylamino]acridine (DHA) with double stranded DNA result in formation of single strand nicks and alkali labile sites (adducts) with an efficiency of 6 x 10(-3) nicks per AHA and 3 x 10(-2) nicks per DHA molecule. The alkali dependent DNA cleavage by AHA shows a pronounced A+G preference whereas that by DHA is practically sequence independent. In the presence of diacridines, however, DHA exhibits a preference for cleavage at guanosines. These DNA photocleaving reagents could be useful for DNA photofootprinting and photosequencing. Images PMID:2836803

  4. Gas-Phase Conformations and Energetics of Protonated 2^'-DEOXYADENOSINE-5^'-MONOPHOSPHATE and ADENOSINE-5^'-MONOPHOSPHATE: Irmpd Action Spectroscopy and Theoretical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ranran; Nei, Y.-W.; He, Chenchen; Hamlow, Lucas; Berden, Giel; Oomens, J.; Rodgers, M. T.

    2015-06-01

    Nature uses protonation to alter the structures and reactivities of molecules to facilitate various biological functions and chemical transformations. For example, in nucleobase repair and salvage processes, protonation facilitates nucleobase removal by lowering the activation barrier for glycosidic bond cleavage. Systematic studies of the structures of protonated 2'-deoxyribonucleotides and ribonucleotides may provide insight into the roles protonation plays in altering the nucleobase orientation relative to the glycosidic bond and sugar puckering. In this study, infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy experiments in conjunction with electronic structure calculations are performed to probe the effects of protonation on the structures and stabilities of 2^'-deoxyadenosine-5^'-monophosphate (pdAdo) and adenosine-5^'-monophosphate (pAdo). Photodissociation as a function of IR wavelength is measured to generate the IRMPD action spectra. Geometry optimizations and frequency analyses performed at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory are used to characterize the stable low-energy structures and to generate their linear IR spectra. Single point energy calculations performed at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p) and MP2(full)/6-311+G(2d,2p) levels of theory provide relative stabilities of the optimized conformations. The structures accessed in the experiments are determined by comparing the calculated linear IR spectra for the stable low-energy conformers computed to the measured IRMPD action spectra. The effects of the 2^'-hydroxyl moiety are elucidated by comparing the structures and IRMPD spectra of [pAdo+H]+ to those of its DNA analogue. Comparisons are also made to the deprotonated forms of these nucleotides and the protonated forms of the analogous nucleosides to elucidate the effects of protonation and the phosphate group on the structures.

  5. Low-temperature photosensitized oxidation of a guanosine derivative and formation of an imidazole ring-opened product.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Chimin; Kang, Ping; Khan, Saeed; Foote, Christopher S

    2002-04-17

    An organic-soluble guanosine derivative, 2',3',5'-O-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)guanosine (1), was prepared and its photosensitized oxidation was carried out in several solvents at various temperatures. Singlet oxygen is the reactive oxidizing agent responsible for this reaction. Neither an endoperoxide nor a dioxetane intermediate was detected by low-temperature NMR even at -78 degrees C. A product (A) with an oxidized imidazole ring was the only major product detected at room temperature; this compound could be isolated by low-temperature column chromatography and was characterized by (1)H and (13)C and mass spectroscopy. CO(2) was the other major product. A small amount of the corresponding 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine derivative B was detected during the initial stage of the photooxidation and was shown to be intermediate in the formation of two products of extensive degradation, C and D. Reaction of 1 with the singlet oxygen analogues 4-methyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (MTAD) and 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD) gave products consistent with a proposed mechanism involving the rearrangement of an initially formed endoperoxide to give A and B from reaction of 1 with singlet oxygen.

  6. Fluorescent Dansyl-Guanosine Conjugates that Bind c-MYC Promoter G-Quadruplex and Downregulate c-MYC Expression.

    PubMed

    Pavan Kumar, Y; Saha, Puja; Saha, Dhurjhoti; Bessi, Irene; Schwalbe, Harald; Chowdhury, Shantanu; Dash, Jyotirmayee

    2016-03-02

    The four-stranded G-quadruplex present in the c-MYC P1 promoter has been shown to play a pivotal role in the regulation of c-MYC transcription. Small-molecule compounds capable of inhibiting the c-MYC promoter activity by stabilising the c-MYC G-quadruplex could potentially be used as anticancer agents. In this context, here we report the synthesis of dansyl-guanosine conjugates through one-pot modular click reactions. The dansyl-guanosine conjugates can selectively detect c-MYC G-quadruplex over other biologically relevant quadruplexes and duplex DNA and can be useful as staining reagents for selective visualisation of c-MYC G-quadruplex over duplex DNA by gel electrophoresis. NMR spectroscopic titrations revealed the preferential binding sites of these dansyl ligands to the c-MYC G-quadruplex. A dual luciferase assay and qRT-PCR revealed that a dansyl-bisguanosine ligand represses the c-MYC expression, possibly by stabilising the c-MYC G-quadruplex. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Effect of electromagnetic field on cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in a human mu-opioid receptor cell model.

    PubMed

    Ross, Christina L; Teli, Thaleia; Harrison, Benjamin S

    2016-01-01

    During the cell communication process, endogenous and exogenous signaling affect normal as well as pathological developmental conditions. Exogenous influences such as extra-low-frequency electromagnetic field (EMF) have been shown to effect pain and inflammation by modulating G-protein receptors, down-regulating cyclooxygenase-2 activity, and affecting the calcium/calmodulin/nitric oxide pathway. Investigators have reported changes in opioid receptors and second messengers, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), in opiate tolerance and dependence by showing how repeated exposure to morphine decreases adenylate cyclase activity causing cAMP to return to control levels in the tolerant state, and increase above control levels during withdrawal. Resonance responses to biological systems using exogenous EMF signals suggest that frequency response characteristics of the target can determine the EMF biological response. In our past research we found significant down regulation of inflammatory markers tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) using 5 Hz EMF frequency. In this study cAMP was stimulated in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells transfected with human mu-opioid receptors, then exposed to 5 Hz EMF, and outcomes were compared with morphine treatment. Results showed a 23% greater inhibition of cAMP-treating cells with EMF than with morphine. In order to test our results for frequency specific effects, we ran identical experiments using 13 Hz EMF, which produced results similar to controls. This study suggests the use of EMF as a complementary or alternative treatment to morphine that could both reduce pain and enhance patient quality of life without the side-effects of opiates.

  8. Breast cancer drugs dampen vascular functions by interfering with nitric oxide signaling in endothelium

    SciTech Connect

    Gajalakshmi, Palanivel; Priya, Mani Krishna; Pradeep, Thangaraj; Behera, Jyotirmaya; Muthumani, Kandasamy; Madhuwanti, Srinivasan; Saran, Uttara; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2013-06-01

    Widely used chemotherapeutic breast cancer drugs such as Tamoxifen citrate (TC), Capecitabine (CP) and Epirubicin (EP) are known to cause various cardiovascular side-effects among long term cancer survivors. Vascular modulation warrants nitric oxide (NO) signal transduction, which targets the vascular endothelium. We hypothesize that TC, CP and EP interference with the nitric oxide downstream signaling specifically, could lead to cardiovascular dysfunctions. The results demonstrate that while all three drugs attenuate NO and cyclic guanosine mono-phosphate (cGMP) production in endothelial cells, they caused elevated levels of NO in the plasma and RBC. However, PBMC and platelets did not show any significant changes under treatment. This implies that the drug effects are specific to the endothelium. Altered eNOS and phosphorylated eNOS (Ser-1177) localization patterns in endothelial cells were observed following drug treatments. Similarly, the expression of phosphorylated eNOS (Ser-1177) protein was decreased under the treatment of drugs. Altered actin polymerization was also observed following drug treatment, while addition of SpNO and 8Br-cGMP reversed this effect. Incubation with the drugs decreased endothelial cell migration whereas addition of YC-1, SC and 8Br-cGMP recovered the effect. Additionally molecular docking studies showed that all three drugs exhibited a strong binding affinity with the catalytic domain of human sGC. In conclusion, results indicate that TC, CP and EP cause endothelial dysfunctions via the NO–sGC–cGMP pathway and these effects could be recovered using pharmaceutical agonists of NO signaling pathway. Further, the study proposes a combination therapy of chemotherapeutic drugs and cGMP analogs, which would confer protection against chemotherapy mediated vascular dysfunctions in cancer patients. - Highlights: • NO production is reduced in endothelial cells under breast cancer drug treatment. • Cellular cGMP level is decreased under

  9. Metformin augments doxorubicin cytotoxicity in mammary carcinoma through activation of adenosine monophosphate protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    El-Ashmawy, Nahla E; Khedr, Naglaa F; El-Bahrawy, Hoda A; Abo Mansour, Hend E

    2017-05-01

    Since the incidence of breast cancer increases dramatically all over the world, the search for effective treatment is an urgent need. Metformin has demonstrated anti-tumorigenic effect both in vivo and in vitro in different cancer types. This work was designed to examine on molecular level the mode of action of metformin in mice bearing solid Ehrlich carcinoma and to evaluate the use of metformin in conjunction with doxorubicin as a combined therapy against solid Ehrlich carcinoma. Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells were inoculated in 60 female mice as a model of breast cancer. The mice were divided into four equal groups: Control tumor, metformin, doxorubicin, and co-treatment. Metformin (15 mg/kg) and doxorubicin (4 mg/kg) were given intraperitoneally (i.p.) for four cycles every 5 days starting on day 12 of inoculation. The anti-tumorigenic effect of metformin was mediated by enhancement of adenosine monophosphate protein kinase activity and elevation of P53 protein as well as the suppression of nuclear factor-kappa B, DNA contents, and cyclin D1 gene expression. Metformin and doxorubicin mono-treatments exhibited opposing action regarding cyclin D1 gene expression, phosphorylated adenosine monophosphate protein kinase, and nuclear factor-kappa B levels. Co-treatment markedly decreased tumor volume, increased survival rate, and improved other parameters compared to doxorubicin group. In parallel, the histopathological findings demonstrated enhanced apoptosis and absence of necrosis in tumor tissue of co-treatment group. Metformin proved chemotherapeutic effect which could be mediated by the activation of adenosine monophosphate protein kinase and related pathways. Combining metformin and doxorubicin, which exhibited different mechanisms of action, produced greater efficacy as anticancer therapeutic regimen.

  10. Synthesis and antimetabolic properties of 4,5-substituted pyrimidine 2'-deoxynucleosides and their 5'-monophosphates.

    PubMed

    Kulikowski, T; Bretner, M; Dzik, J M; Zieliński, Z; Cieśla, J; Rode, W; Vilpo, J A; Shugar, D

    1987-01-01

    Reaction of the reagent of Lawesson, 2,4-bis(p-methoxyphenyl)-1,3,4-dithiadiphosphatane-2,4-disulfide, with blocked uracil nucleosides in dioxane leads to quantitative thionation at C(4). With the bases, thionation occurs at C(4) and, with two equivalents of the reagent, at C(2) and C(4). Enzymatic phosphorylation of 4-thio-FdUrd gave the 5'-monophosphate, which was further converted with NH2OH to N4-hydroxy-FdCMP. Both nucleotides were examined as potential inhibitors of thymidylate synthase, and 4-thio-FdUrd for cytotoxic activities vs monkey and human leukemic cell lines.

  11. Rate and Equilibrium Constants for an Enzyme Conformational Change during Catalysis by Orotidine 5'-Monophosphate Decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Goryanova, Bogdana; Goldman, Lawrence M; Ming, Shonoi; Amyes, Tina L; Gerlt, John A; Richard, John P

    2015-07-28

    The caged complex between orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (ScOMPDC) and 5-fluoroorotidine 5'-monophosphate (FOMP) undergoes decarboxylation ∼300 times faster than the caged complex between ScOMPDC and the physiological substrate, orotidine 5'-monophosphate (OMP). Consequently, the enzyme conformational changes required to lock FOMP at a protein cage and release product 5-fluorouridine 5'-monophosphate (FUMP) are kinetically significant steps. The caged form of ScOMPDC is stabilized by interactions between the side chains from Gln215, Tyr217, and Arg235 and the substrate phosphodianion. The control of these interactions over the barrier to the binding of FOMP and the release of FUMP was probed by determining the effect of all combinations of single, double, and triple Q215A, Y217F, and R235A mutations on kcat/Km and kcat for turnover of FOMP by wild-type ScOMPDC; its values are limited by the rates of substrate binding and product release, respectively. The Q215A and Y217F mutations each result in an increase in kcat and a decrease in kcat/Km, due to a weakening of the protein-phosphodianion interactions that favor fast product release and slow substrate binding. The Q215A/R235A mutation causes a large decrease in the kinetic parameters for ScOMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylation of OMP, which are limited by the rate of the decarboxylation step, but much smaller decreases in the kinetic parameters for ScOMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylation of FOMP, which are limited by the rate of enzyme conformational changes. By contrast, the Y217A mutation results in large decreases in kcat/Km for ScOMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylation of both OMP and FOMP, because of the comparable effects of this mutation on rate-determining decarboxylation of enzyme-bound OMP and on the rate-determining enzyme conformational change for decarboxylation of FOMP. We propose that kcat = 8.2 s(-1) for decarboxylation of FOMP by the Y217A mutant is equal to the rate constant for cage formation from the

  12. Recent advances on the enantioselective synthesis of C-nucleosides inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH).

    PubMed

    Merino, Pedro; Ghirardello, Mattia; Tejero, Tomas; Delso, Ignacio; Matute, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    This review will describe the recent advances in the synthesis of C-nucleosides with inhibitory activity of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. The review will cover synthetic approaches of structural analogues showing modifications in the furanose ring as well as in the heterocyclic base. Heterocyclic sugar nucleoside analogues in which the furanose ring has been replaced by a different heterocyclic ring including aza analogues, thioanalogues as well as dioxolanyl and isoxazolidinyl analogues are also considered.

  13. Structural Characterization of the Molecular Events during a Slow Substrate-Product Transition in Orotidine 5'-Monophosphate Decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Fujihashi, Masahiro; Wei, Lianhu; Kotra, Lakshmi P; Pai, Emil F

    2009-04-06

    Crystal structures of substrate-product complexes of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase, obtained at various steps in its catalysis of the unusual transformation of 6-cyano-uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP) into barbituric acid ribosyl monophosphate, show that the cyano substituent of the substrate, when bound to the active site, is first bent significantly from the plane of the pyrimidine ring and then replaced by an oxygen atom. Although the K72A and D70A/K72A mutants are either catalytically impaired or even completely inactive, they still display bending of the C6 substituent. Interestingly, high-resolution structures of the D70A and D75N mutants revealed a covalent bond between C6 of UMP and the Lys72 side chain after the -CN moiety's release. The same covalent bond was observed when the native enzyme was incubated with 6-azido-UMP and 6-iodo-UMP; in contrast, the K72A mutant transformed 6-iodo-UMP to barbituric acid ribosyl 5'-monophosphate. These results demonstrate that, given a suitable environment, native orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase and several of its mutants are not restricted to the physiologically relevant decarboxylation; they are able to catalyze even nucleophilic substitution reactions but consistently maintain distortion on the C6 substituent as an important feature of catalysis.

  14. Characterization of genome-reduced Bacillus subtilis strains and their application for the production of guanosine and thymidine.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Zhu, Xujun; Zhang, Xueyu; Fu, Jing; Wang, Zhiwen; Chen, Tao; Zhao, Xueming

    2016-06-03

    Genome streamlining has emerged as an effective strategy to boost the production efficiency of bio-based products. Many efforts have been made to construct desirable chassis cells by reducing the genome size of microbes. It has been reported that the genome-reduced Bacillus subtilis strain MBG874 showed clear advantages for the production of several heterologous enzymes including alkaline cellulase and protease. In addition to enzymes, B. subtilis is also used for the production of chemicals. To our best knowledge, it is still unknown whether genome reduction could be used to optimize the production of chemicals such as nucleoside products. In this study, we constructed a series of genome-reduced strains by deleting non-essential regions in the chromosome of B. subtilis 168. These strains with genome reductions ranging in size from 581.9 to 814.4 kb displayed markedly decreased growth rates, sporulation ratios, transformation efficiencies and maintenance coefficients, as well as increased cell yields. We re-engineered the genome-reduced strains to produce guanosine and thymidine, respectively. The strain BSK814G2, in which purA was knocked out, and prs, purF and guaB were co-overexpressed, produced 115.2 mg/L of guanosine, which was 4.4-fold higher compared to the control strain constructed by introducing the same gene modifications into the parental strain. We also constructed a thymidine producer by deleting the tdk gene and overexpressing the prs, ushA, thyA, dut, and ndk genes from Escherichia coli in strain BSK756, and the resulting strain BSK756T3 accumulated 151.2 mg/L thymidine, showing a 5.2-fold increase compared to the corresponding control strain. Genome-scale genetic manipulation has a variety of effects on the physiological characteristics and cell metabolism of B. subtilis. By introducing specific gene modifications related to guanosine and thymidine accumulation, respectively, we demonstrated that genome-reduced strains had greatly improved

  15. [Successful treatment of T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) with fludarabine monophosphate].

    PubMed

    Maeda, Akinori; Iwai, Kazuya; Ishibashi, Takafumi

    2009-08-01

    We report a 79-year-old woman with T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) who was successfully treated with fludarabine monophosphate. She was admitted to our hospital because of dyspnea on effort. On admission, anemia and hepatosplenomegaly were apparent but lymphadenopathy was absent. Peripheral blood examination showed anemia and leukocytosis with 29.5% abnormal lymphocytes. The bone marrow was infiltrated with 84.1% abnormal lymphocytes. The nucleolus was visible in some of these abnormal cells. These cells were positive for CD2, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD7, CD38, CD52, and negative for CD8, CD10, CD19, CD20, CD25, CD56. Based on these findings, she was diagnosed as having T-PLL. Therapy with oral cyclophosphamide (50 mg/day) was started, but was discontinued because of agranulocytosis. Then, she received intravenous fludarabine monophosphate (30 mg/day) on days 1-5 every four to five weeks. The reticulocyte count increased gradually, and she became free from red cell transfusions. Unfortunately, she finally died from massive gastro intestinal hemorrhage, but T-PLL was well controlled at the time of death.

  16. Structural Studies of Thiamin Monophosphate Kinase in Complex with Substrates and Products.

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, K.M.; Kinsland, C.; Begley, T.P.; Ealick, S E.

    2008-06-03

    Thiamin monophosphate kinase (ThiL) catalyzes the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of thiamin monophosphate (TMP) to form thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP), the active form of vitamin B1. ThiL is a member of a small ATP binding superfamily that also includes the purine biosynthetic enzymes, PurM and PurL, NiFe hydrogenase maturation protein, HypE, and selenophosphate synthase, SelD. The latter four enzymes are believed to utilize phosphorylated intermediates during catalysis. To understand the mechanism of ThiL and its relationship to the other superfamily members, we determined the structure of Aquifex aeolicus ThiL (AaThiL) with nonhydrolyzable AMP-PCP and TMP, and also with the products of the reaction, ADP and TPP. The results suggest that AaThiL utilizes a direct, inline transfer of the {gamma}-phosphate of ATP to TMP rather than a phosphorylated enzyme intermediate. The structure of ThiL is compared to those of PurM, PurL, and HypE, and the ATP binding site is compared to that of PurL, for which nucleotide complexes are available.

  17. Structural Basis for the Specificity of Human NUDT16 and Its Regulation by Inosine Monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Trésaugues, Lionel; Lundbäck, Thomas; Welin, Martin; Flodin, Susanne; Nyman, Tomas; Silvander, Camilla; Gräslund, Susanne; Nordlund, Pär

    2015-01-01

    Human NUDT16 is a member of the NUDIX hydrolase superfamily. After having been initially described as an mRNA decapping enzyme, recent studies conferred it a role as an “housecleaning” enzyme specialized in the removal of hazardous (deoxy)inosine diphosphate from the nucleotide pool. Here we present the crystal structure of human NUDT16 both in its apo-form and in complex with its product inosine monophosphate (IMP). NUDT16 appears as a dimer whose formation generates a positively charged trench to accommodate substrate-binding. Complementation of the structural data with detailed enzymatic and biophysical studies revealed the determinants of substrate recognition and particularly the importance of the substituents in position 2 and 6 on the purine ring. The affinity for the IMP product, harboring a carbonyl in position 6 on the base, compared to purine monophosphates lacking a H-bond acceptor in this position, implies a catalytic cycle whose rate is primarily regulated by the product-release step. Finally, we have also characterized a phenomenon of inhibition by the product of the reaction, IMP, which might exclude non-deleterious nucleotides from NUDT16-mediated hydrolysis regardless of their cellular concentration. Taken together, this study details structural and regulatory mechanisms explaining how substrates are selected for hydrolysis by human NUDT16. PMID:26121039

  18. An Unconventional Acid-Labile Nucleobase Protection Concept for Guanosine Phosphoramidites in RNA Solid-Phase Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jud, Lukas; Micura, Ronald

    2017-03-08

    We present an innovative O(6) -tert-butyl/N(2) -tert-butyloxycarbonyl protection concept for guanosine (G) phosphoramidites. This concept is advantageous for 2'-modified G building blocks because of very efficient synthetic access when compared with existing routes that usually employ O(6) -(4-nitrophenyl)ethyl/N(2) -acyl protection or that start from 2-aminoadenosine involving enzymatic transformation into guanosine later on in the synthetic path. The new phosphoramidites are fully compatible with 2'-O-tBDMS or TOM phosphoramidites in standard RNA solid-phase synthesis and deprotection, and provide excellent quality of tailored RNAs for the growing range of applications in RNA biophysics, biochemistry, and biology.

  19. The colorimetric determination of selectively cleaved adenosines and guanosines in DNA oligomers using bicinchoninic acid and copper.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Elizabeth M; Testa, Stephen M

    2017-01-01

    Colorimetric methods combined with color-changing chemical probes are widely used as simple yet effective tools for identifying and quantifying a wide variety of molecules in solution. For nucleic acids (DNA and RNA), perhaps the most commonly used colorimetric probe is potassium permanganate, which can be used to identify single-stranded pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine) in polymers. Unfortunately, permanganate is not an effective probe for identifying purines (adenine and guanine), especially in the presence of the more reactive pyrimidines. Therefore, robust methods for discriminating between the purines remain elusive, thereby creating a barrier toward developing more complex colorimetric applications. In this proof-of-principle study, we demonstrate that bicinchoninic acid (BCA) and copper, when combined with purine-specific chemical cleavage reactions, can be a colorimetric probe for the identification and quantification of adenosines and/or guanosines in single-stranded DNA oligomers, even in the presence of pyrimidines. Furthermore, the reactions are stoichiometric, which allows for the quantification of the number of adenosines and/or guanosines in these oligomers. Because the BCA/copper reagent detects the reducing sugar, 2-deoxyribose, that results from the chemical cleavage of a given nucleotide's N-glycosidic bond, these colorimetric assays are effectively detecting apurinic sites in DNA oligomers, which are known to occur via DNA damage in biological systems. We demonstrate that simple digital analysis of the color-changing chromophore (BCA/copper) is all that is necessary to obtain quantifiable and reproducible data, which indicates that these assays should be broadly accessible.

  20. Borrelia burgdorferi rel Is Responsible for Generation of Guanosine-3′-Diphosphate-5′-Triphosphate and Growth Control

    PubMed Central

    Bugrysheva, Julia V.; Bryksin, Anton V.; Godfrey, Henry P.; Cabello, Felipe C.

    2005-01-01

    The global transcriptional regulator (p)ppGpp (guanosine-3′-diphosphate-5′-triphosphate and guanosine-3′,5′-bisphosphate, collectively) produced by the relA and spoT genes in Escherichia coli allows bacteria to adapt to different environmental stresses. The genome of Borrelia burgdorferi encodes a single chromosomal rel gene (BB0198) (B. burgdorferi rel [relBbu]) homologous to relA and spoT of E. coli. Its role in (p)ppGpp synthesis, bacterial growth, and modulation of gene expression has not been studied in detail. We constructed a relBbu deletion mutant in an infectious B. burgdorferi 297 strain and isolated an extrachromosomally complemented derivative of this mutant. The mutant did not synthesize relBbu mRNA, RelBbu protein, or (p)ppGpp. This synthesis was restored in the complemented derivative, confirming that relBbu is necessary and sufficient for (p)ppGpp synthesis and degradation in B. burgdorferi. The relBbu mutant grew well during log phase in complete BSK-H but reached lower cell concentrations in the stationary phase than the wild-type parent, suggesting that (p)ppGpp may be an important factor in the ability of B. burgdorferi to adapt to stationary phase. Deletion of relBbu did not eliminate the temperature-elicited OspC shift, nor did it alter bmp gene expression or B. burgdorferi antibiotic susceptibility. Although deletion of relBbu eliminated B. burgdorferi virulence for mice, which was not restored by complementation, we suggest that relBbu-dependent accumulation of (p)ppGpp may be important for in vivo survival of this pathogen. PMID:16041012

  1. Lipid peroxides as endogenous oxidants forming 8-oxo-guanosine and lipid-soluble antioxidants as suppressing agents.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Kazuki; Sakamoto, Miku; Kanazawa, Ko; Ishigaki, Yoriko; Aihara, Yoshiko; Hashimoto, Takashi; Mizuno, Masashi

    2016-07-01

    The oxidation of guanosine to 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) in DNA is closely associated with induction of various diseases, but the endogenous oxidant species involved remains unclear. Hydrogen peroxides (H2O2) have been considered to be the oxidant, while lipid peroxides are another possible oxidant because generated easily in bio-membranes surrounding DNA. The oxidant potency was compared between lipid peroxides and H2O2. Linoleic acid hydroperoxides (LOOH) formed 8-oxo-dG at a higher level than H2O2 in guanosine or double-stranded DNA. In the presence of a physiological concentration of Fe(2+) to produce hydroxyl radicals, LOOH was also a stronger oxidant. In a lipid micelle, LOOH markedly produced 8-oxo-dG at a concentration one-tenth of that of H2O2. Upon adding to rat hepatic mitochondria, phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxides produced 8-oxo-dG abundantly. Employing HepG2 cells after pretreated with glutathione peroxidase inhibitor, LOOH formed 8-oxo-dG more abundantly than H2O2. Then, antioxidants to suppress the 8-oxo-dG formation were examined, when the nuclei of pre-incubated HepG2 with antioxidants were exposed to LOOH. Water-soluble ascorbic acid, trolox, and N-acetyl cysteine showed no or weak antioxidant potency, while lipid-soluble 2,6-dipalmitoyl ascorbic acid, α-tocopherol, and lipid-soluble phytochemicals exhibited stronger potency. The present study shows preferential formation of 8-oxo-dG upon LOOH and the inhibition by lipid-soluble antioxidants.

  2. Guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTPgammaS) stimulation of GLUT4 translocation is tyrosine kinase-dependent.

    PubMed

    Elmendorf, J S; Chen, D; Pessin, J E

    1998-05-22

    Guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTPgammaS) treatment of permeabilized adipocytes results in GLUT4 translocation similar to that elicited by insulin treatment. However, although the selective phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor, wortmannin, completely prevented insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation, it was without effect on GTPgammaS-stimulated GLUT4 translocation. In addition, insulin was an effective stimulant, whereas GTPgammaS was a very weak activator of the downstream Akt serine/threonine kinase. Consistent with an Akt-independent mechanism, guanosine 5'-O-2-(thio)diphosphate inhibited insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation without any effect on the Akt kinase. Surprisingly, two functionally distinct tyrosine kinase inhibitors, genistein and herbimycin A, as well as microinjection of a monoclonal phosphotyrosine specific antibody, inhibited both GTPgammaS- and insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation. Phosphotyrosine immunoblotting and specific immunoprecipitation demonstrated that GTPgammaS did not elicit tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor or insulin receptor substrate-1. In contrast to insulin, proteins in the 120-130-kDa and 55-75-kDa range were tyrosine-phosphorylated following GTPgammaS stimulation. Several of these proteins were identified and include protein-tyrosine kinase 2 (also known as CAKbeta, RAFTK, and CADTK), pp125 focal adhesion tyrosine kinase, pp130 Crk-associated substrate, paxillin, and Cbl. These data demonstrate that the GTPgammaS-stimulated GLUT4 translocation utilizes a novel tyrosine kinase pathway that is independent of both the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and the Akt kinase.

  3. Lipid peroxides as endogenous oxidants forming 8-oxo-guanosine and lipid-soluble antioxidants as suppressing agents

    PubMed Central

    Kanazawa, Kazuki; Sakamoto, Miku; Kanazawa, Ko; Ishigaki, Yoriko; Aihara, Yoshiko; Hashimoto, Takashi; Mizuno, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    The oxidation of guanosine to 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) in DNA is closely associated with induction of various diseases, but the endogenous oxidant species involved remains unclear. Hydrogen peroxides (H2O2) have been considered to be the oxidant, while lipid peroxides are another possible oxidant because generated easily in bio-membranes surrounding DNA. The oxidant potency was compared between lipid peroxides and H2O2. Linoleic acid hydroperoxides (LOOH) formed 8-oxo-dG at a higher level than H2O2 in guanosine or double-stranded DNA. In the presence of a physiological concentration of Fe2+ to produce hydroxyl radicals, LOOH was also a stronger oxidant. In a lipid micelle, LOOH markedly produced 8-oxo-dG at a concentration one-tenth of that of H2O2. Upon adding to rat hepatic mitochondria, phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxides produced 8-oxo-dG abundantly. Employing HepG2 cells after pretreated with glutathione peroxidase inhibitor, LOOH formed 8-oxo-dG more abundantly than H2O2. Then, antioxidants to suppress the 8-oxo-dG formation were examined, when the nuclei of pre-incubated HepG2 with antioxidants were exposed to LOOH. Water-soluble ascorbic acid, trolox, and N-acetyl cysteine showed no or weak antioxidant potency, while lipid-soluble 2,6-dipalmitoyl ascorbic acid, α-tocopherol, and lipid-soluble phytochemicals exhibited stronger potency. The present study shows preferential formation of 8-oxo-dG upon LOOH and the inhibition by lipid-soluble antioxidants. PMID:27499574

  4. An Effect of Dexamethasone on Adenosine 3′,5′ -Monophosphate Content and Adenosine 3′,5′ -Monophosphate Phosphodiesterase Activity of Cultured Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Manganiello, Vincent; Vaughan, Martha

    1972-01-01

    The effect of dexamethasone on adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) phosphodiesterase activity in cultured HTC hepatoma cells was investigated. Homogenates of these cells contain phosphodiesterase activity with two apparent Michaelis constants for cAMP (2-5 μm and 50 μm). At all substrate concentrations tested, phosphodiesterase activity was decreased 25-40% in cells incubated for 36 hr or more with 1 μm dexamethasone. Acid phosphatase activity in the same cells was not decreased. α-Methyl testosterone, 1 μm, was without effect on phosphodiesterase activity. Incubation for 10 min with epinephrine plus theophylline increased the cAMP content of the HTC cells 3- to 6-fold. In cells incubated for 72 hr with dexamethasone, the basal concentration of cAMP was slightly increased and the increment produced by epinephrine plus theophylline was markedly increased. We believe that in many cells the so-called permissive effects of steroid hormones on cAMP mediated processes may be due to an effect of these hormones on cAMP phosphodiesterase activity similar to that observed in HTC cells incubated with dexamethasone. PMID:4341439

  5. Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate levels and activities of adenylate cyclase and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate phosphodiesterase in Pseudomonas and Bacteroides.

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, L S; Hylemon, P B; Phibbs, P V

    1977-01-01

    A modified Gilman assay was used to determine the concentrations of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) in rapidly filtered cells and in the culture filtrates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli K-12, and Bacteroides fragilis. In P. aeruginosa cultures, levels of cAMP in the filtrate increased with the culture absorbance (3.5 to 19.8 X 10(-9) M) but did not vary significantly with the carbon source used to support growth. Intracellular concentrations (0.8 to 3.2 X 10(-5) M) were substantially higher and did not vary appreciably during growth or with carbon source. Sodium cAMP (5 mM) failed to reverse the catabolite repression of inducible glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49) synthesis caused by the addition of 10 mM succinate. Exogenous cAMP also had no discernible effect on the catabolite repression control of inducible mannitol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.67). P. aeruginosa was found to contain both soluble cAMP phosphodiesterase (EC 3.1.4.17) and membrane-associated adenylate cyclase (EC 4.6.1.1) activity, and these were compared to the activities detected in crude extracts of E. coli. B. fragilis crude cell extracts contain neither of these enzyme activities, and little or no cAMP was detected in cells or culture filtrates of this anaerobic bacterium. PMID:187575

  6. The roles of phospholipase D and a GTP-binding protein in guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate-stimulated hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine in rat liver plasma membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, K M; Hughes, B P; Barritt, G J

    1990-01-01

    1. Guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[S]) stimulated by 50% the rate of release of [3H]choline and [3H]phosphorylcholine in rat liver plasma membranes labelled with [3H]choline. About 70% of the radioactivity released in the presence of GTP[S] was [3H]choline and 30% was [3H]phosphorylcholine. 2. The hydrolysis of phosphorylcholine to choline and the conversion of choline to phosphorylcholine did not contribute to the formation of [3H]choline and [3H]phosphorylcholine respectively. 3. The release of [3H]choline from membranes was inhibited by low concentrations of SDS or Triton X-100. Considerably higher concentrations of the detergents were required to inhibit the release of [3H]phosphorylcholine. 4. Guanosine 5'-[beta gamma-imido]triphosphate and guanosine 5'-[alpha beta-methylene]triphosphate, but not adenosine 5'-[gamma-thio]-triphosphate, stimulated [3H]choline release to the same extent as did GTP[S]. The GTP[S]-stimulated [3H]choline release was inhibited by guanosine 5'-[beta-thio]diphosphate, GDP and GTP but not by GMP. 5. It is concluded that, in rat liver plasma membranes, (a) GTP[S]-stimulated hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine is catalysed predominantly by phospholipase D with some contribution from phospholipase C, and (b) the stimulation of phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis by GTP[s] occurs via a GTP-binding regulatory protein. PMID:2125211

  7. Oxidatively damaged guanosine in white blood cells and in urine of welders: associations with exposure to welding fumes and body iron stores.

    PubMed

    Pesch, Beate; Lotz, Anne; Koch, Holger M; Marczynski, Boleslaw; Casjens, Swaantje; Käfferlein, Heiko U; Welge, Peter; Lehnert, Martin; Heinze, Evelyn; Van Gelder, Rainer; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Behrens, Thomas; Raulf, Monika; Hartwig, Andrea; Weiss, Tobias; Brüning, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer considers the carcinogenicity of welding fume of priority for re-evaluation. Genotoxic effects in experimental animals are still inconclusive. Here, we investigated the association of personal exposure to metals in respirable welding fumes during a working shift with oxidatively damaged guanosine in DNA of white blood cells (WBC) and in postshift urine samples from 238 welders. Medians of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) were 2.35/10(6) dGuo in DNA of WBC and 4.33 µg/g creatinine in urine. The median of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoGuo) was 7.03 µg/g creatinine in urine. The extent of both urinary parameters was higher in welders applying techniques with high particle emission rates to stainless steel than in tungsten inert gas welders (8-oxodGuo: 9.96 vs. 4.49 µg/L, 8-oxoGuo: 15.7 vs. 7.7 µg/L), but this apparent difference diminished after creatinine adjustment. We applied random intercept models to estimate the influence of airborne and systemic exposure to metals on oxidatively damaged guanosine in WBC and urine together with covariates. We observed a highly significant nonlinear association of urinary 8-oxoGuo with serum ferritin (P < 0.0001) and higher 8-oxoGuo concentrations for respirable iron >1,000 µg/m(3) compared to ≤57 µg/m(3). Similar effects were found for manganese. Airborne chromium but not nickel was associated with all oxidatively modified guanosine measures, whereas urinary chromium as well as nickel showed associations with urinary modified guanosines. In summary, oxidatively damaged urinary guanosine was associated with airborne and systemic exposure to metals in welders and showed a strong relation to body iron stores.

  8. In African American Type 2 Diabetic Patients, Is Vitamin D Deficiency Associated with Lower Blood Levels of Hydrogen Sulfide and Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate, and Elevated Oxidative Stress?

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Prasenjit; Micinski, David; Lieblong, Benjamin J.; Kahlon, Gunjan; Morehead, Lester; Hoeldtke, Robert; Bass, Pat Farrington; Levine, Steven N.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract African Americans (AA) have a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease and vitamin D (VD) deficiency compared with Caucasians. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important signaling molecule. This study examined the hypothesis that blood levels of H2S are lower in AA type 2 diabetic patients (T2D). Fasting blood was obtained from T2D and healthy controls. Results showed a significant decrease in plasma levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and H2S in AA T2D but not in Caucasian T2D when compared with those of respective age- and race-matched healthy controls. Plasma VD levels were significantly lower in AA T2D compared with Caucasian T2D. Cell culture studies demonstrate that 1,25(OH)2-VD supplementation significantly increased expression of cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), H2S formation, and cAMP secretion, but decreased reactive oxygen species in high glucose-treated U937 monocytes. This suggests that VD supplementation upregulates CSE and H2S formation and decreases oxidative stress, and that VD deficiency may contribute to the malfunctioning of H2S signaling and thus a higher incidence of vascular inflammation in AA. These results lead to the hypothesis that VD supplementation can replenish blood concentrations of H2S and cAMP and lower oxidative stress and cardiovascular disease in AA T2D. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1154–1158. PMID:22852873

  9. Structure and mechanism of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase in complex with the immunosuppressant mycophenolic acid.

    PubMed

    Sintchak, M D; Fleming, M A; Futer, O; Raybuck, S A; Chambers, S P; Caron, P R; Murcko, M A; Wilson, K P

    1996-06-14

    The structure of inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) in complex with IMP and mycophenolic acid (MPA) has been determined by X-ray diffraction. IMPDH plays a central role in B and T lymphocyte replication. MPA is a potent IMPDH inhibitor and the active metabolite of an immunosuppressive drug recently approved for the treatment of allograft rejection. IMPDH comprises two domains: a core domain, which is an alpha/beta barrel and contains the active site, and a flanking domain. The complex, in combination with mutagenesis and kinetic data, provides a structural basis for understanding the mechanism of IMPDH activity and indicates that MPA inhibits IMPDH by acting as a replacement for the nicotinamide portion of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide cofactor and a catalytic water molecule.

  10. Structural determinants for the inhibitory ligands of orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Meza-Avina, Maria Elena; Wei, Lianhu; Liu, Yan; Poduch, Ewa; Bello, Angelica M.; Mishra, Ram K.; Pai, Emil F.; Kotra, Lakshmi P.

    2010-06-14

    In recent years, orotidine-5{prime}-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase) has gained renewed attention as a drug target. As a part of continuing efforts to design novel inhibitors of ODCase, we undertook a comprehensive study of potent, structurally diverse ligands of ODCase and analyzed their structural interactions in the active site of ODCase. These ligands comprise of pyrazole or pyrimidine nucleotides including the mononucleotide derivatives of pyrazofurin, barbiturate ribonucleoside, and 5-cyanouridine, as well as, in a computational approach, 1,4-dihydropyridine-based non-nucleoside inhibitors such as nifedipine and nimodipine. All these ligands bind in the active site of ODCase exhibiting distinct interactions paving the way to design novel inhibitors against this interesting enzyme. We propose an empirical model for the ligand structure for rational modifications in new drug design and potentially new lead structures.

  11. Small molecule adenosine 5'-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) modulators and human diseases.

    PubMed

    Rana, Sandeep; Blowers, Elizabeth C; Natarajan, Amarnath

    2015-01-08

    Adenosine 5'-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master sensor of cellular energy status that plays a key role in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis. AMPK is a serine/threonine kinase that is activated by upstream kinases LKB1, CaMKKβ, and Tak1, among others. AMPK exists as αβγ trimeric complexes that are allosterically regulated by AMP, ADP, and ATP. Dysregulation of AMPK has been implicated in a number of metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. Recent studies have associated roles of AMPK with the development of cancer and neurological disorders, making it a potential therapeutic target to treat human diseases. This review focuses on the structure and function of AMPK, its role in human diseases, and its direct substrates and provides a brief synopsis of key AMPK modulators and their relevance in human diseases.

  12. Increased riboflavin production by manipulation of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase in Ashbya gossypii.

    PubMed

    Buey, Rubén M; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Balsera, Mónica; de Pereda, José María; Revuelta, José Luis

    2015-11-01

    Guanine nucleotides are the precursors of essential biomolecules including nucleic acids and vitamins such as riboflavin. The enzyme inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) catalyzes the ratelimiting step in the guanine nucleotide de novo biosynthetic pathway and plays a key role in controlling the cellular nucleotide pools. Thus, IMPDH is an important metabolic bottleneck in the guanine nucleotide synthesis, susceptible of manipulation by means of metabolic engineering approaches. Herein, we report the functional and structural characterization of the IMPDH enzyme from the industrial fungus Ashbya gossypii. Our data show that the overexpression of the IMPDH gene increases the metabolic flux through the guanine pathway and ultimately enhances 40 % riboflavin production with respect to the wild type. Also, IMPDH disruption results in a 100-fold increase of inosine excretion to the culture media. Our results contribute to the developing metabolic engineering toolbox aiming at improving the production of metabolites with biotechnological interest in A. gossypii.

  13. Hydrogels Based on Ag+-Modulated-Assembly of 5'-Adenosine Monophosphate for Enriching Biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jingcheng; Hu, Yuanyuan; Dong, Xie; Wu, Yang; Lin, Nangui; Song, Aixin

    2017-08-22

    The supramolecular hydrogels by combining 5'-adenosine monophosphate (AMP) with Ag+ were fabricated in this work. Their gelation capability was enhanced with the increase in the concentration of Ag+ or decrease in pH. The gels were found to be very sensitive to light which endows the hydrogels potential applications in visible photosensitive materials. The coordination between nucleobase of AMP and Ag+ and stacking of nucleobases are considered to be the main driving force for self-assembly. The hydrogels successfully achieved the encapsulation and enrichment of biomolecules. The hydrogen bonding between the amino group of guest molecules and silver-nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) along the nanofibers which drives the enrichment is considered the crucial interaction. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Simulation analysis of formycin 5'-monophosphate analog substrates in the ricin A-chain active site.

    PubMed

    Olson, M A; Scovill, J P; Hack, D C

    1995-06-01

    Ricin is an RNA N-glycosidase that hydrolyzes a single adenine base from a conserved loop of 28S ribosomal RNA, thus inactivating protein synthesis. Molecular-dynamics simulation methods are used to analyze the structural interactions and thermodynamics that govern the binding of formycin 5'-monophosphate (FMP) and several of its analogs to the active site of ricin A-chain. Simulations are carried out initiated from the X-ray crystal structure of the ricin-FMP complex with the ligand modeled as a dianion, monoanion and zwitterion. Relative changes in binding free energies are estimated for FMP analogs constructed from amino substitutions at the 2- and 2'-positions, and from hydroxyl substitution at the 2'-position.

  15. Effect of ionizing irradiation on the physiological activity of cyclic adenosine monophosphate on smooth muscle preparations.

    PubMed

    Schachinger, L; Michailov, M; Owusa Daaku, S; Prechter, I; Klöter, H; Schippel, C

    1982-01-01

    The effect of ionizing irradiation on the physiological activity of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in smooth muscle preparations from frog lung was studied. cAMP, given as dibutyryl salt (dib-cAMP) inhibited the radiation induced contractions of the muscle in a manner similar to the action of theophylline. In vitro irradiation of dib-cAMP resulted in an alteration of the chemical structure of this substance, i.e., formation of monobutyryl-cAMP and further derivatives as well as a decomposition of the purine structure. There was also a loss of the relaxing activity of irradiated cAMP on the muscle tone of frog lung preparations. The physiologically measured inactivation of dib-cAMP was far more pronounced than the chemical alteration. An inhibitory effect of the reaction products is postulated.

  16. Neomycin inhibits the phosphatidylinositol monophosphate and phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate stimulation of plasma membrane ATPase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qiuyun; Boss, W.F. )

    1991-05-01

    The inositol phospholipids, phosphatidylinositol monophosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}), have been shown to increase the vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity of plant plasma membranes. In this paper, the authors show the effect of various concentrations of phosphatidyinositol, PIP, and PIP{sub 2} on the plasma membrane vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity. PIP and PIP{sub 2} at concentrations at 10 nanomoles per 30 microgram membrane protein per milliliter of reaction mixture caused a twofold and 1.8-fold increase in the ATPase activity, respectively. The effect of these negatively charged phospholipids on the ATPase activity was inhibited by adding the positively charged aminoglycoside, neomycin. Neomycin did not affect the endogenous plasma membrane ATPase activity in the absence of exogenous lipids.

  17. Simulation analysis of formycin 5?-monophosphate analog substrates in the ricin A-chain active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Mark A.; Scovill, John P.; Hack, Dallas C.

    1995-06-01

    Ricin is an RNA N-glycosidase that hydrolyzes a single adenine base from a conserved loop of 28S ribosomal RNA, thus inactivating protein synthesis. Molecular-dynamics simulation methods are used to analyze the structural interactions and thermodynamics that govern the binding of formycin 5'-monophosphate (FMP) and several of its analogs to the active site of ricin A-chain. Simulations are carried out initiated from the X-ray crystal structure of the ricin-FMP complex with the ligand modeled as a dianion, monoanion and zwitterion. Relative changes in binding free energies are estimated for FMP analogs constructed from amino substitutions at the 2- and 2'-positions, and from hydroxyl substitution at the 2'-position.

  18. Selective adenosine-5'-monophosphate uptake by water-compatible molecularly imprinted polymer.

    PubMed

    Breton, Florent; Delépée, Raphaël; Jégourel, Damien; Deville-Bonne, Dominique; Agrofoglio, Luigi A

    2008-06-02

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were prepared for adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP), a substrate of AMP-activated protein kinase. The template molecule was formed by the vinylphenylboronate diester of adenosine on which 5'-free hydroxide was protected by tert-butyldimethylsilyl group in order to mimic the steric hindrance of the phosphate moiety of AMP. Molecular imprinting was performed by complexing acrylamide and the template in a highly cross-linked polymer. MIPs were tested in batch experiments with aqueous samples of nucleotides and a number of parameters were investigated. The use of tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAH) was necessary to obtain a rebinding of nucleotides on MIP. The adsorption of AMP was optimal in 5 mM ammonium acetate buffer solution pH 9.5 for 30 min, with 30 mM of TBAH. The imprinted polymer was selective for AMP towards others nucleotides or deoxi analogues.

  19. Adsorption of nucleotides on biomimetic apatite: The case of adenosine 5‧ monophosphate (AMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammami, K.; Feki, H. El; Marsan, O.; Drouet, C.

    2015-10-01

    This work investigates the interaction between the nucleotide adenosine 5‧ monophosphate molecule (AMP) and a biomimetic nanocrystalline carbonated apatite as a model for bone mineral. The analogy of the apatite phase used in this work with biological apatite was first pointed out by complementary techniques. AMP adsorption isotherms were then investigated. Obtained data were fitted to a Sips isotherm with an exponent greater than one suggesting positive cooperativity among adsorbed molecules. The data were compared to a previous study relative to the adsorption of another nucleotide, cytidine monophosphate (CMP) onto a similar substrate, evidencing some effect of the chemical nature of the nucleic base. An enhanced adsorption was observed under acidic (pH 6) conditions as opposed to pH 7.4, which parallels the case of DNA adsorption on biomimetic apatite. An estimated standard Gibbs free energy associated to the adsorption process (ΔG°ads ≅ -22 kJ/mol) intermediate between "physisorption" and "chemisorption" was found. The analysis of the solids after adsorption pointed to the preservation of the main characteristics of the apatite substrate but shifts or enhancements of Raman bands attributed to AMP showed the existence of chemical interactions involving both the phosphate and adenine parts of AMP. This contribution adds to the works conducted in view of better understanding the interaction of DNA/RNA and their constitutive nucleotides and the surface of biomimetic apatites. It could prove helpful in disciplines such as bone diagenesis (DNA/apatite interface in aged bones) or nanomedicine (setup of DNA- or RNA-loaded apatite systems). Also, the adsorption of nucleic acids on minerals like apatites could have played a role in the preservation of such biomolecules in the varying conditions known to exist at the origin of life on Earth, underlining the importance of dedicated adsorption studies.

  20. cGMP and NHR Signaling Co-regulate Expression of Insulin-Like Peptides and Developmental Activation of Infective Larvae in Strongyloides stercoralis

    PubMed Central

    Stoltzfus, Jonathan D.; Bart, Stephen M.; Lok, James B.

    2014-01-01

    The infectious form of the parasitic nematode Strongyloides stercoralis is a developmentally arrested third-stage larva (L3i), which is morphologically similar to the developmentally arrested dauer larva in the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We hypothesize that the molecular pathways regulating C. elegans dauer development also control L3i arrest and activation in S. stercoralis. This study aimed to determine the factors that regulate L3i activation, with a focus on G protein-coupled receptor-mediated regulation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway signaling, including its modulation of the insulin/IGF-1-like signaling (IIS) pathway. We found that application of the membrane-permeable cGMP analog 8-bromo-cGMP potently activated development of S. stercoralis L3i, as measured by resumption of feeding, with 85.1±2.2% of L3i feeding in 200 µM 8-bromo-cGMP in comparison to 0.6±0.3% in the buffer diluent. Utilizing RNAseq, we examined L3i stimulated with DMEM, 8-bromo-cGMP, or the DAF-12 nuclear hormone receptor (NHR) ligand Δ7-dafachronic acid (DA)—a signaling pathway downstream of IIS in C. elegans. L3i stimulated with 8-bromo-cGMP up-regulated transcripts of the putative agonistic insulin-like peptide (ILP) -encoding genes Ss-ilp-1 (20-fold) and Ss-ilp-6 (11-fold) in comparison to controls without stimulation. Surprisingly, we found that Δ7-DA similarly modulated transcript levels of ILP-encoding genes. Using the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002, we demonstrated that 400 nM Δ7-DA-mediated activation (93.3±1.1% L3i feeding) can be blocked using this IIS inhibitor at 100 µM (7.6±1.6% L3i feeding). To determine the tissues where promoters of ILP-encoding genes are active, we expressed promoter::egfp reporter constructs in transgenic S. stercoralis post-free-living larvae. Ss-ilp-1 and Ss-ilp-6 promoters are active in the hypodermis and neurons and the Ss-ilp-7 promoter is active in the intestine and a

  1. Guanosine is neuroprotective against oxygen/glucose deprivation in hippocampal slices via large conductance Ca²+-activated K+ channels, phosphatidilinositol-3 kinase/protein kinase B pathway activation and glutamate uptake.

    PubMed

    Dal-Cim, T; Martins, W C; Santos, A R S; Tasca, C I

    2011-06-02

    Guanine derivatives (GD) have been implicated in many relevant brain extracellular roles, such as modulation of glutamate transmission and neuronal protection against excitotoxic damage. GD are spontaneously released to the extracellular space from cultured astrocytes and during oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD). The aim of this study has been to evaluate the potassium channels and phosphatidilinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) pathway involvement in the mechanisms related to the neuroprotective role of guanosine in rat hippocampal slices subjected to OGD. The addition of guanosine (100 μM) to hippocampal slices subjected to 15 min of OGD and followed by 2 h of re-oxygenation is neuroprotective. The presence of K+ channel blockers, glibenclamide (20 μM) or apamin (300 nM), revealed that neuroprotective effect of guanosine was not dependent on ATP-sensitive K+ channels or small conductance Ca²+-activated K+ channels. The presence of charybdotoxin (100 nM), a large conductance Ca²+-activated K+ channel (BK) blocker, inhibited the neuroprotective effect of guanosine. Hippocampal slices subjected to OGD and re-oxygenation showed a significant reduction of glutamate uptake. Addition of guanosine in the re-oxygenation period has blocked the reduction of glutamate uptake. This guanosine effect was inhibited when hippocampal slices were pre-incubated with charybdotoxin or wortmanin (a PI3K inhibitor, 1 μM) in the re-oxygenation period. Guanosine promoted an increase in Akt protein phosphorylation. However, the presence of charybdotoxin blocked such effect. In conclusion, the neuroprotective effect of guanosine involves augmentation of glutamate uptake, which is modulated by BK channels and the activation of PI3K pathway. Moreover, neuroprotection caused by guanosine depends on the increased expression of phospho-Akt protein.

  2. Guanosine may increase absence epileptic activity by means of A2A adenosine receptors in Wistar Albino Glaxo Rijswijk rats.

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Renáta Krisztina; Dobolyi, Árpád; Todorov, Mihail Ivilinov; Kékesi, Katalin A; Juhász, Gábor; Aleksza, Magdolna; Kovács, Zsolt

    2016-06-01

    The non-adenosine nucleoside guanosine (Guo) was demonstrated to decrease quinolinic acid(QA)-induced seizures, spontaneously emerged absence epileptic seizures and lipopolysaccharide(LPS)-evoked induction of absence epileptic seizures suggesting its antiepileptic potential. It was also described previously that intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 20 and 50mg/kg Guo decreased the number of spike-wave discharges (SWDs) in a well investigated model of human absence epilepsy, the Wistar Albino Glaxo Rijswijk (WAG/Rij) rats during 4th (20mg/kg Guo) and 3rd as well as 4th (50mg/kg Guo) measuring hours. Guanosine can potentially decrease SWD number by means of its putative receptors but absence epileptic activity changing effects of Guo by means of increased extracellular adenosine (Ado) cannot be excluded. An increase in the dose of i.p. injected Guo is limited by its low solubility in saline, therefore, we addressed in the present study whether higher doses of Guo, diluted in sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution, have more potent antiepileptic effect in WAG/Rij rats. We confirmed that i.p. 50mg/kg Guo decreased but, surprisingly, i.p. 100mg/kg Guo enhanced the number of SWDs in WAG/Rij rats. Combined i.p. injection of a non-selective Ado receptor antagonist theophylline (5mg/kg) or a selective Ado A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonist SCH 58261 (7-(2-phenylethyl)-5-amino-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine) (1mg/kg) and a cyclooxygenase 1 and 2/COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitor indomethacin (10mg/kg) with 100mg/kg Guo decreased the SWD number compared to i.p. 100mg/kg Guo alone. The results suggest that i.p. 100mg/kg Guo can increase SWD number by means of the adenosinergic system.

  3. 2' Derivatives of guanosine and inosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphates. Synthesis, enzymic activity, and the effect of 8-substituents.

    PubMed

    Miller, J P; Boswell, K H; Mian, A M; Meyer, R B; Robins, R K; Khwaja, T A

    1976-01-13

    A series of representative derivatives of guanosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate (cGMP) and inosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate (cIMP) which contained modifications in either the 2' position or the 8 and 2' positions were synthesized. Three types of derivatives were investigated: (1) derivatives in which the 2' position has been altered to produce a 2'-deoxynucleoside cyclic 3',5'-phosphate or a 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosylpurine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate; (2) 2'-omicron-acyl derivatives; and (3) doubly modified derivatives containing a 2' modification [as in (1) and (2)] and an 8-substitution. 2'-Deoxyinosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate and 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosylhypoxanthine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate were obtained by HNO2 deamination of 2'-deoxyadenosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate and 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate (ara-cAMP), respectively. Treatment of 8-bromo-2'-omicron-(p-toluenesulfonyl) adenosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate with NaSH yielded the intermediate 8,2'-anhydro-9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-8-mercaptoadenine cyclic 3',5-phosphate, which was converted directly to 2'-deoxyadenosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate (dcAMP) by treatment with Raney nickel. 8-Bromo-2'-omicron-(p-toluenesulfonyl) guanosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate was converted to 8,2'-anhydro-9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-8-mercaptoguanine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate, and the latter was desulfurized with Raney nickel to give 2-deoxyguanosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate. Ara-cAMP, 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosylguanine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate, and 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-8-mercaptoguanine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate have been previously reported (Mian et al. (1974), J. Med. Chem. 17, 259). 8-Bromo-2'-omicron-acetylinosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate and 8-[(p-chlorophenyl)thio]-2'-omicron-acetylinosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate were produced by acylation of 8-bromoinosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate and 8-[(p-chlorophenyl)thio]inosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate, respectively; while 8-bromo-2'-omicron-butyrylguanosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate was

  4. Effects of wortmannin, sodium nitroprusside, insulin, genistein, and guanosine triphosphate on chemotaxis and cell growth of Entodinium caudatum, Epidinium caudatum, and mixed ruminal protozoa.

    PubMed

    Diaz, H L; Knapp, J R; Karnati, S K R; Dehority, B A; Firkins, J L

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms by which ruminal protozoa sense and migrate toward nutrients are not fully understood. Chemotaxis by many diverse eukaryotic cells is mediated by phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, which is highly conserved in receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling pathways and consistently inhibited by wortmannin. In experiment 1a, increasing the concentration of wortmannin inhibited cell growth nonlinearly at 24h of a culture of the rumen protozoan Entodinium caudatum, but high variability prevented growth inhibition of Epidinium caudatum from reaching significance. In experiment 1b, increasing the insulin concentration recovered 24-h cell counts for both cultures, depending on wortmannin concentration. In experiment 2, addition of sodium nitroprusside (Snp; activator of protein kinase G for cilial beat reversal in nonrumen ciliate models) at 500µM or wortmannin at 200µM in beakers containing rumen fluid decreased random swimming by mixed entodiniomorphids into capillary tubes (inserted into beakers) containing saline. Both Snp and wortmannin increased chemotaxis into tubes containing glucose compared with the beaker control. For isotrichids, beaker treatments had no response. Glucose increased chemotaxis, but peptides decreased chemotaxis even when combined with glucose. In experiment 3, we assessed preincubation of genistein (a purported RTK blocker in nonrumen ciliate models) at 40 or 400µM in beakers and guanosine triphosphate (GTP; a universal chemorepellent in nonrumen ciliate models, perhaps mediated through an RTK) at 10 or 100µM combined with glucose in capillary tubes. Neither genistein nor GTP affected chemotaxis toward glucose for entodiniomorphids. However, GTP at 100µM reduced chemotaxis toward glucose for isotrichids. After the animal is fed, isotrichids that are depleted in glycogen migrate to the dorsal area of the rumen, and the rapid uptake of sugars is enhanced through strong chemotaxis but can be reversed by peptides or GTP. In contrast

  5. The ins and outs of cyclic di-GMP signaling in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Conner, Jenna G; Zamorano-Sánchez, David; Park, Jin Hwan; Sondermann, Holger; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2017-04-01

    The second messenger nucleotide cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) governs many cellular processes in the facultative human pathogen Vibrio cholerae. This organism copes with changing environmental conditions in aquatic environments and during transitions to and from human hosts. Modulation of c-di-GMP allows V. cholerae to shift between motile and sessile stages of life, thus allowing adaptation to stressors and environmental conditions during its transmission cycle. The V. cholerae genome encodes a large set of proteins predicted to degrade and produce c-di-GMP. A subset of these enzymes has been demonstrated to control cellular processes - particularly motility, biofilm formation, and virulence - through transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and translational mechanisms. Recent studies have identified and characterized enzymes that modulate or sense c-di-GMP levels and have led towards mechanistic understanding of c-di-GMP regulatory circuits in V. cholerae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Nitric oxide signaling pathways at neural level in invertebrates: functional implications in cnidarians.

    PubMed

    Cristino, Luigia; Guglielmotti, Vittorio; Cotugno, Antonio; Musio, Carlo; Santillo, Silvia

    2008-08-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a small molecule with unconventional properties. It is found in organisms throughout the phylogenetic scale, from fungi to mammals, in which it acts as an intercellular messenger of main physiological events, or even as an intracellular messenger in invertebrates. In both vertebrates and invertebrates, NO is involved in many processes, regulated in part by cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), and reacts with different oxygen molecular species. The presence of NO in the early-diverging metazoan phylum of Cnidaria, of which Hydra represents the first known species having a nervous system, supports a role of this molecule as an ancestral neural messenger with physiological roles that remain to be largely elucidated. Therefore, our novel findings on the presence of NO in Hydra are here integrated in such a comparative frame.

  7. Compartmentalized Cyclic Adenosine 3′,5′-Monophosphate at the Plasma Membrane Clusters PDE3A and Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator into Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Penmatsa, Himabindu; Zhang, Weiqiang; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Li, Chunying; Conoley, Veronica G.; Yue, Junming; Bahouth, Suleiman W.; Buddington, Randal K.; Zhang, Guangping; Nelson, Deborah J.; Sonecha, Monal D.; Manganiello, Vincent; Wine, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    Formation of multiple-protein macromolecular complexes at specialized subcellular microdomains increases the specificity and efficiency of signaling in cells. In this study, we demonstrate that phosphodiesterase type 3A (PDE3A) physically and functionally interacts with cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel. PDE3A inhibition generates compartmentalized cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP), which further clusters PDE3A and CFTR into microdomains at the plasma membrane and potentiates CFTR channel function. Actin skeleton disruption reduces PDE3A–CFTR interaction and segregates PDE3A from its interacting partners, thus compromising the integrity of the CFTR-PDE3A–containing macromolecular complex. Consequently, compartmentalized cAMP signaling is lost. PDE3A inhibition no longer activates CFTR channel function in a compartmentalized manner. The physiological relevance of PDE3A–CFTR interaction was investigated using pig trachea submucosal gland secretion model. Our data show that PDE3A inhibition augments CFTR-dependent submucosal gland secretion and actin skeleton disruption decreases secretion. PMID:20089840

  8. The antilipolytic agent 3,5-dimethylpyrazole inhibits insulin release in response to both nutrient secretagogues and cyclic adenosine monophosphate agonists in isolated rat islets.

    PubMed

    Masiello, P; Novelli, M; Bombara, M; Fierabracci, V; Vittorini, S; Prentki, M; Bergamini, E

    2002-01-01

    This study intended to test the hypothesis that intracellular lipolysis in the pancreatic beta cells is implicated in the regulation of insulin secretion stimulated by nutrient secretagogues or cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) agonists. Indeed, although lipid signaling molecules were repeatedly reported to influence beta-cell function, the contribution of intracellular triglycerides to the generation of these molecules has remained elusive. Thus, we have studied insulin secretion of isolated rat pancreatic islets in response to various secretagogues in the presence or absence of 3,5-dimethylpyrazole (DMP), a water-soluble and highly effective antilipolytic agent, as previously shown in vivo. In vitro exposure of islets to DMP resulted in an inhibition (by approximately 50%) of the insulin release stimulated not only by high glucose, but also by another nutrient secretagogue, 2-ketoisocaproate, as well as the cAMP agonists 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine and glucagon. The inhibitory effect of DMP, which was not due to alteration of islet glucose oxidation, could be reversed upon addition of sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol, a synthetic diglyceride, which activates protein kinase C. The results provide direct pharmacologic evidence supporting the concept that endogenous beta-cell lipolysis plays an important role in the generation of lipid signaling molecules involved in the control of insulin secretion in response to both fuel stimuli and cAMP agonists.

  9. In African American type 2 diabetic patients, is vitamin D deficiency associated with lower blood levels of hydrogen sulfide and cyclic adenosine monophosphate, and elevated oxidative stress?

    PubMed

    Jain, Sushil K; Manna, Prasenjit; Micinski, David; Lieblong, Benjamin J; Kahlon, Gunjan; Morehead, Lester; Hoeldtke, Robert; Bass, Pat Farrington; Levine, Steven N

    2013-04-01

    African Americans (AA) have a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease and vitamin D (VD) deficiency compared with Caucasians. Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is an important signaling molecule. This study examined the hypothesis that blood levels of H(2)S are lower in AA type 2 diabetic patients (T2D). Fasting blood was obtained from T2D and healthy controls. Results showed a significant decrease in plasma levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and H(2)S in AA T2D but not in Caucasian T2D when compared with those of respective age- and race-matched healthy controls. Plasma VD levels were significantly lower in AA T2D compared with Caucasian T2D. Cell culture studies demonstrate that 1,25(OH)(2)-VD supplementation significantly increased expression of cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), H(2)S formation, and cAMP secretion, but decreased reactive oxygen species in high glucose-treated U937 monocytes. This suggests that VD supplementation upregulates CSE and H(2)S formation and decreases oxidative stress, and that VD deficiency may contribute to the malfunctioning of H(2)S signaling and thus a higher incidence of vascular inflammation in AA. These results lead to the hypothesis that VD supplementation can replenish blood concentrations of H(2)S and cAMP and lower oxidative stress and cardiovascular disease in AA T2D.

  10. Peroxynitrite-dependent zinc release and inactivation of guanosine 5'-triphosphate cyclohydrolase 1 instigate its ubiquitination in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Wu, Jiliang; Zhu, Huaiping; Song, Ping; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2013-12-01

    Aberrant degradation of guanosine 5'-triphosphate cyclohydrolase 1 (GTPCH1) with consequent deficiency of tetrahydrobiopterin is considered the primary cause for endothelial dysfunction in diabetes. How GTPCH1 becomes susceptible to the degradation remains unknown. We hypothesized that oxidation and release of the zinc ion by peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), a potent oxidant generated by nitric oxide and superoxide anions, instigates GTPCH1 ubiquitination and degradation. Zinc contents, GTPCH1 ubiquitination, and GTPCH1 activity were assayed in purified GTPCH1, endothelial cells, and hearts from diabetic mice. Exogenous ONOO(-) dose-dependently released zinc, inhibited its activity, and increased the ubiquitin binding affinity of GTPCH1 in vitro and in endothelial cells. Consistently, high glucose (30 mmol/L) inhibited GTPCH1 activity with increased ubiquitination, which was inhibited by antioxidants. Furthermore, mutation of the zinc-binding cysteine (141) (C141R or C141A) significantly reduced GTPCH1 activity and reduced its half-life but increased GTPCH1 ubiquitination, indicating an essential role of the zinc ion in maintaining the catalytic activity and stability of GTPCH1. Finally, GTPCH1 ubiquitination and degradation markedly increased in parallel with decreased GTPCH1 activity in the aortas and hearts of diabetic mice, both of which were attenuated by the inhibitors of ONOO(-) in mice in vivo. Taken together, we conclude that ONOO(-) releases zinc and inhibits GTPCH1, resulting in its ubiquitination and degradation of the enzyme.

  11. Growth hormone deficiency in a dopa-responsive dystonia patient with a novel mutation of guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu; Wang, Dan-Ni; Chen, Wan-Jin; Lin, Xiang; Lin, Min-Ting; Wang, Ning

    2015-05-01

    Dopa-responsive dystonia is a rare hereditary movement disorder caused by mutations in the guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) gene. This disease typically manifests in dystonia, with marked diurnal fluctuation and a dramatic response to levodopa. However, growth retardation in dopa-responsive dystonia has rarely been reported, and the etiology of short stature is not clarified. Here, we report a 14-year-old patient with extremities dystonia and short stature. Treatment with levodopa relieved his symptoms and resulted in a height increase. We also investigated the mutation in GCH1 and the etiology of short stature in this case. Sequence analysis of GCH1 revealed a novel mutation (c.695G>T). Laboratory examinations and imaging confirmed the diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency. We conclude that our case reveals a rare feature for dopa-responsive dystonia and suggests a possible pathogenic link between growth hormone deficiency and dopa-responsive dystonia. We recommend levodopa as the first choice for treating dopa-responsive dystonia in children with growth hormone deficiency.

  12. Influence of tunable external stimuli on the self-assembly of guanosine supramolecular nanostructures studied by atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinli; Dong, Mingdong; Otzen, Daniel E; Yao, Yuheng; Liu, Bo; Besenbacher, Flemming; Mamdouh, Wael

    2009-12-01

    The self-assembly of guanosine (G) molecules on solid surfaces is investigated by tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) upon controlling and introducing external factors (stimuli) to the G stock solution such as incubation time, presence/absence of metal cations, and mechanical shaking. Surprisingly, at different stages of incubation time at room temperature and in the absence of any metal cations in the G stock solution, which are known to be one of the governing factors in forming G-nanostructures, two assembly pathways resulting into two distinct supramolecular nanostructures were revealed. Astonishingly, by introducing a mechanical shaking of the tube containing the G stock solution, one-dimensional (1D) wires of G molecules are observed by AFM, and very interestingly, novel "branched" supramolecular nanostructures are formed. We have also observed that the later branched G nanostructures can grow further into a two-dimensional (2D) thin film by increasing the incubation time of the G stock solution at room temperature after it is exposed to the external mechanical stimuli. The self-assembled nanostructures of G molecules are changed significantly by tuning the assembly conditions, which show that it is indeed possible to grow complex 2D nanostructures from simple nucleoside molecules.

  13. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli to produce 2'-fucosyllactose via salvage pathway of guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-l-fucose.

    PubMed

    Chin, Young-Wook; Seo, Nari; Kim, Jae-Han; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2016-11-01

    2'-Fucosyllactose (2-FL) is one of the key oligosaccharides in human milk. In the present study, the salvage guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-l-fucose biosynthetic pathway from fucose was employed in engineered Escherichia coli BL21star(DE3) for efficient production of 2-FL. Introduction of the fkp gene coding for fucokinase/GDP-l-fucose pyrophosphorylase (Fkp) from Bacteroides fragilis and the fucT2 gene encoding α-1,2-fucosyltransferase from Helicobacter pylori allows the engineered E. coli to produce 2-FL from fucose, lactose and glycerol. To enhance the lactose flux to 2-FL production, the attenuated, and deleted mutants of β-galactosidase were employed. Moreover, the 2-FL yield and productivity were further improved by deletion of the fucI-fucK gene cluster coding for fucose isomerase (FucI) and fuculose kinase (FucK). Finally, fed-batch fermentation of engineered E. coli BL21star(DE3) deleting lacZ and fucI-fucK, and expressing fkp and fucT2 resulted in 23.1 g/L of extracellular concentration of 2-FL and 0.39 g/L/h productivity. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2443-2452. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Peroxynitrite-Dependent Zinc Release and Inactivation of Guanosine 5′-Triphosphate Cyclohydrolase 1 Instigate Its Ubiquitination in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu; Wu, Jiliang; Zhu, Huaiping; Song, Ping; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant degradation of guanosine 5′-triphosphate cyclohydrolase 1 (GTPCH1) with consequent deficiency of tetrahydrobiopterin is considered the primary cause for endothelial dysfunction in diabetes. How GTPCH1 becomes susceptible to the degradation remains unknown. We hypothesized that oxidation and release of the zinc ion by peroxynitrite (ONOO−), a potent oxidant generated by nitric oxide and superoxide anions, instigates GTPCH1 ubiquitination and degradation. Zinc contents, GTPCH1 ubiquitination, and GTPCH1 activity were assayed in purified GTPCH1, endothelial cells, and hearts from diabetic mice. Exogenous ONOO− dose-dependently released zinc, inhibited its activity, and increased the ubiquitin binding affinity of GTPCH1 in vitro and in endothelial cells. Consistently, high glucose (30 mmol/L) inhibited GTPCH1 activity with increased ubiquitination, which was inhibited by antioxidants. Furthermore, mutation of the zinc-binding cysteine (141) (C141R or C141A) significantly reduced GTPCH1 activity and reduced its half-life but increased GTPCH1 ubiquitination, indicating an essential role of the zinc ion in maintaining the catalytic activity and stability of GTPCH1. Finally, GTPCH1 ubiquitination and degradation markedly increased in parallel with decreased GTPCH1 activity in the aortas and hearts of diabetic mice, both of which were attenuated by the inhibitors of ONOO− in mice in vivo. Taken together, we conclude that ONOO− releases zinc and inhibits GTPCH1, resulting in its ubiquitination and degradation of the enzyme. PMID:23974923

  15. Synthesis of the coenzymes adenosine diphosphate glucose, guanosine diphosphate glucose, and cytidine diphosphoethanolamine under primitive Earth conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mar, A.; Oro, J.

    1991-01-01

    The nonenzymatic synthesis of the coenzymes adenosine diphosphate glucose (ADPG), guanosine diphosphate glucose (GDPG), and cytidine diphosphoethanolamine (CDP-ethanolamine) has been carried out under conditions considered to have been prevalent on the early Earth. The production of these compounds was performed by allowing simple precursor molecules to react under aqueous solutions, at moderate temperatures and short periods of time, with mediation by cyanamide or urea. These two condensing agents are considered to have been present in significant amounts on the primitive Earth and have been previously used in the nonenzymatic synthesis of several other important biochemical compounds. In our experiments, ADPG was obtained by heating glucose-1-phosphate (G1P) and ATP in the presence of cyanamide for 24 h at 70 degrees C. The reaction of G1P and GTP under the same conditions yielded GDPG. The cyanamide-mediated production of CDP-ethanolamine was carried out by reacting a mixture of ethanolamine phosphate and CTP for 24 h at 70 degrees C. The separation and identification of the reaction products was carried out by paper chromatography, thin-layer chromatography, high performance thin-layer chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, both normal and reverse-phase, UV spectroscopy, enzymatic assays, and acid hydrolysis. Due to the mild conditions employed, and to the relative ease of these reactions, these studies offer a simple attractive system for the nonenzymatic synthesis of phosphorylated high-energy metabolic intermediates under conditions considered to have been prevalent on the ancient Earth.

  16. Gas-Phase Conformations and Energetics of Sodium Cationized 2^'-DEOXYGUANOSINE and Guanosine: Irmpd Action Spectroscopy and Theoretical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yanlong; Hamlow, Lucas; He, Chenchen; Bao, Xun; Rodgers, M. T.; Gao, Juehan; Oomens, J.

    2015-06-01

    In living systems, the local structures of DNA and RNA are influenced by protonation, deprotonation and noncovalent binding interactions with cations. In order to determine the effects of Na+ cationization on the gas-phase structures of 2^'-deoxyguanosine, [dGuo+Na]+, and guanosine, [Guo+Na]+, infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectra of these two sodium cationized DNA and RNA mononucleosides are measured over the range extending from ~500 to ~1850 cm-1 using the FELIX free electron laser. Complementary electronic structure calculations are performed to determine the stable low-energy conformations of these complexes. Geometry optimizations and frequency analyses of these species are performed at the B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory, whereas single-point energies are calculated at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p) level of theory to determine the relative stabilities of these conformations. Comparison of the measure IRMPD action spectra and computed linear IR spectra enable the conformations accessed in the experiments to be elucidated. In both cases, preferential binding of the Na+ cation to O6 and N7 positions of the nucleobase is observed. Present results for the sodium cationized nucleosides are compared to results for the analogous protonated forms of these nucleosides to elucidate the effects of multiple chelating interactions with the sodium cation to hydrogen bonding interactions in the protonated systems on the structures and stabilities of these nucleosides.

  17. Synthesis of the coenzymes adenosine diphosphate glucose, guanosine diphosphate glucose, and cytidine diphosphoethanolamine under primitive Earth conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mar, A.; Oro, J.

    1991-01-01

    The nonenzymatic synthesis of the coenzymes adenosine diphosphate glucose (ADPG), guanosine diphosphate glucose (GDPG), and cytidine diphosphoethanolamine (CDP-ethanolamine) has been carried out under conditions considered to have been prevalent on the early Earth. The production of these compounds was performed by allowing simple precursor molecules to react under aqueous solutions, at moderate temperatures and short periods of time, with mediation by cyanamide or urea. These two condensing agents are considered to have been present in significant amounts on the primitive Earth and have been previously used in the nonenzymatic synthesis of several other important biochemical compounds. In our experiments, ADPG was obtained by heating glucose-1-phosphate (G1P) and ATP in the presence of cyanamide for 24 h at 70 degrees C. The reaction of G1P and GTP under the same conditions yielded GDPG. The cyanamide-mediated production of CDP-ethanolamine was carried out by reacting a mixture of ethanolamine phosphate and CTP for 24 h at 70 degrees C. The separation and identification of the reaction products was carried out by paper chromatography, thin-layer chromatography, high performance thin-layer chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, both normal and reverse-phase, UV spectroscopy, enzymatic assays, and acid hydrolysis. Due to the mild conditions employed, and to the relative ease of these reactions, these studies offer a simple attractive system for the nonenzymatic synthesis of phosphorylated high-energy metabolic intermediates under conditions considered to have been prevalent on the ancient Earth.

  18. Theoretical vibrational spectroscopy of intermediates and the reaction mechanism of the guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis by the protein complex Ras-GAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrenova, Maria G.; Grigorenko, Bella L.; Nemukhin, Alexander V.

    2016-09-01

    The structures and vibrational spectra of the reacting species upon guanosine triphosphate (GTP) hydrolysis to guanosine diphosphate and inorganic phosphate (Pi) trapped inside the protein complex Ras-GAP were analyzed following the results of QM/MM simulations. The frequencies of the phosphate vibrations referring to the reactants and to Pi were compared to those observed in the experimental FTIR studies. A good correlation between the theoretical and experimental vibrational data provides a strong support to the reaction mechanism of GTP hydrolysis by the Ras-GAP enzyme system revealed by the recent QM/MM modeling. Evolution of the vibrational bands associated with the inorganic phosphate Pi during the elementary stages of GTP hydrolysis is predicted.

  19. Oligo-guanosine nucleotide induces neuropilin-1 internalization in endothelial cells and inhibits angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Narazaki, Masashi; Segarra, Marta; Hou, Xu; Tanaka, Toshio; Li, Xuri

    2010-01-01

    Ligand interaction with cognate cell-surface receptor often promotes receptor internalization, protecting cells from prolonged or excessive signaling from extracellular ligands. Compounds that induce internalization of surface receptors prevent ligand binding to cognate cell-surface receptors serving as inhibitors. Here, we show that synthetic polyriboguanosine (poly G) and oligo-deoxyriboguanosine (oligo G) reduce endothelial levels of surface neuropilin-1 (NRP1), a receptor shared by semaphorin 3A and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which plays critical roles in angiogenesis. Oligo G also reduces levels of cell-surface scavenger receptor expressed by endothelial cells I (SREC-I), but not levels of NRP2, gp130, CD31, VEGFR-1, or VEGFR-2. Poly or oligo A, T, and C do not promote NRP1 or SREC-I internalization. We find that oligo G binds to NRP1 with high affinity (Kd:1.3 ± 0.16nM), bridges the extracellular domain of NRP1 to that of SREC-I, and induces coordinate internalization of NRP1 and SREC-I. In vitro, oligo G blocks the binding and function of VEGF165 in endothelial cells. In vivo, intravitreal administration of oligo G reduces choroidal neovascularization in mice. These results demonstrate that synthetic oligo G is an inhibitor of pathologic angiogenenesis that reduces cell-surface levels and function of NRP1 acting as an internalization inducer. PMID:20606164

  20. Characterization of oxidized guanosine 5'-triphosphate as a viable inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Bolin, Celeste; Cardozo-Pelaez, Fernando

    2009-03-15

    The guanine base is prone to oxidation by free radicals regardless of the cellular moiety it is bound to. However, under conditions of oxidative stress, 8-oxoguanosine triphosphate (oxo(8)GTP) formation has been shown to occur without oxidation of the guanine base in DNA. In vitro studies have suggested that oxo(8)GTP could impact G-protein signaling and RNA synthesis. Whether increased levels of oxo(8)GTP translate into cellular malfunction is unknown. Data presented herein show that oxo(8)GTP is formed in cell-free preparations as well as in PC12 cells after exposure to physiologically relevant oxidative conditions generated with 10 microM copper sulfate and 1 mM L-ascorbic acid (Cu/Asc). We also determined that oxo(8)GTP has biological activity as a potent inhibitor of nitric oxide-stimulated soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). The increase in oxo(8)GTP formation in purified GTP and PC12 cells exposed to Cu/Asc caused a significant reduction in the product of sGC activity, cGMP. This oxidation of GTP was attenuated by the addition of reduced glutathione under these same Cu/Asc conditions, thus preventing the decrease in sGC activity. This suggests that oxo(8)GTP is produced by free radicals in vivo and could have significant impact on cell functions regulated by sGC activity such as synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system.

  1. Guanosine-based hydrogen-bonded 2D scaffolds: metal-free formation of G-quartet and G-ribbon architectures at the solid/liquid interface.

    PubMed

    El Garah, Mohamed; Perone, Rosaria C; Bonilla, Alejandro Santana; Haar, Sébastien; Campitiello, Marilena; Gutierrez, Rafael; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Masiero, Stefano; Ciesielski, Artur; Samorì, Paolo

    2015-07-25

    We report on the synthesis and self-assembly of three novel lipophilic guanosine derivatives exposing a ferrocene moiety in the C(5') position of the sugar unit. Their self-association in solution, and at the solid/liquid interface, can be tuned by varying the size and nature of the C(8)-substituent, leading to the generation of either G-ribbons, lamellar G-dimer based arrays or the G4 cation-free architectures.

  2. Calcium mobilization in permeabilized fibroblasts: effects of inositol trisphosphate, orthovanadate, mitogens phorbol ester, and guanosine triphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Muldoon, L.L.; Jamieson, G.A. Jr.; Villereal, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    Utilizing a digitonin-permeabilized cell system, the authors have studied the release of calcium from a non-mitochondrial intracellular compartment in cultured human fibroblasts (HSWP cells). Addition of 1 mM MgATP to a monolayer of permeabilized cells in a cytosolic media buffered to 150 nM Ca with EGTA rapidly stimulates /sup 45/Ca uptake, and the subsequent addition of the putative intracellular messenger inositol trisphosphate (InsP/sub 3/) induces rapid release of 85% of the /sup 45/Ca taken up in response to ATP. Mitogenic peptides (bradykinin, vasopressin, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and insulin) and orthovanadate, which are effective in mobilizing intracellular Ca in intact cells, have little or no effect when added alone to permeabilized cells. However, in the presence of GTP these agents stimulate accumulation of inositol phosphates and release Ca from the InsP/sub 3/-sensitive pool. These data suggest that a GTP binding protein is involved in receptor mediated activation of phospholipase C, which leads to release of inositol phosphates. The GTP-dependent release of InsP/sub 3/ and the mobilization of /sup 45/Ca from the intracellular compartment are inhibited by pretreatment of cells, prior to permeabilization, with the protrein kinase C activator 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA). These results suggest that protein kinase C is involved in down-regulation or inhibition of phospholipase C, or the GTP binding protein responsible for relaying the mitogenic signal from the cell surface receptor to the phospholipase C activity.

  3. Type I collagen substrate increases calcitonin and parathyroid hormone receptor-mediated signal transduction in UMR 106-06 osteoblast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, K; Michelangeli, V P; Martin, T J; Findlay, D M

    1993-07-01

    Components of the extracellular matrices (ECM) exert pleiotropic effects in many cell systems, but little is known of the effect of ECM on hormone signal transduction. We have investigated the effect of ECM substrates on cell growth and signal transduction by calcitonin (CT) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) using the rat osteosarcoma cell line, UMR 106-06. Type I collagen (collagen[I]) and Matrigel changed the morphology of the cells and significantly inhibited cell growth by 37% or 23%, respectively, compared with control. None of laminin, fibronectin, or type IV collagen affected cell shape or proliferation. Cells cultured on collagen (I)-coated plates showed increased specific binding of labeled CT compared with cells on plastic plates. The effect was apparent by 24 h and persisted for at least 72 h. None of the other ECM affected CT binding. Scatchard analysis revealed that collagen(I) increased CT receptor numbers but not receptor affinity. Consistent with increased binding capacity, cells plated on collagen(I) had increased responses to each of CT and PTH in terms of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production compared to control cells. In addition, cAMP production by prostaglandin E2, cholera toxin, and forskolin was increased by 30-70% compared to control. These data suggest that collagen(I) had effects not only on membrane receptors but on guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding proteins (G proteins). The effect of collagen(I) on CT binding was no longer present when the cells were freed from the plates by enzymatic dispersion and binding measured in cell suspensions. In UMR 106-01 cells transiently transfected with the porcine CT receptor cDNA, binding was similarly induced by collagen(I). These data are the first demonstration that collagen(I) may play an important role in signal transduction, affecting both receptors and G proteins in UMR 106-06 cells. These results draw attention to the potential role of the ECM of bone in hormone-induced responses.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase from the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Krungkrai, Sudaratana R.; Tokuoka, Keiji; Kusakari, Yukiko; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Adachi, Hiroaki; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Kai, Yasushi; Krungkrai, Jerapan; Horii, Toshihiro

    2006-01-01

    Orotidine 5′-monophosphate (OMP) decarboxylase (OMPDC; EC 4.1.1.23) catalyzes the final step in the de novo synthesis of uridine 5′-monophosphate (UMP) and defects in the enzyme are lethal in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Active recombinant P. falciparum OMPDC (PfOMPDC) was crystallized by the seeding method in a hanging drop using PEG 3000 as a precipitant. A complete set of diffraction data from a native crystal was collected to 2.7 Å resolution at 100 K using synchrotron radiation at the Swiss Light Source. The crystal exhibits trigonal symmetry (space group R3), with hexagonal unit-cell parameters a = b = 201.81, c = 44.03 Å. With a dimer in the asymmetric unit, the solvent content is 46% (V M = 2.3 Å3 Da−1). PMID:16754976

  5. RELATIONSHIP OF THE HEXOSE MONOPHOSPHATE SHUNT TO THE ENDOGENOUS METABOLISM OF CELL-FREE EXTRACTS OF MYCOBACTERIUM PHLEI

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, W. B.

    1963-01-01

    Sutton, W. B. (The Lilly Research Laboratories, Indianapolis, Ind.). Relationship of the hexose monophosphate shunt to the endogenous metabolism of cell-free extracts of Mycobacterium phlei. J. Bacteriol. 85:476–484. 1963.—The endogenous reduction of 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol (DPIP) by cell-free extracts of Mycobacterium phlei has been linked to the presence of glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P) dehydrogenase functioning in connection with a reduced triphosphopyridine nucleotide (TPN)-DPIP reductase. The necessary substrate and coenzyme, i.e., G-6-P and TPN, are contained in the cell-free bacterial extract. The only required addition to activate the system is a suitable electron acceptor. The accumulation of G-6-P and the presence of 6-phosphogluconic dehydrogenase in the cell-free extract suggest that the hexose monophosphate shunt mechanism is impaired by sonic treatment of M. phlei. PMID:13979428

  6. Resonant Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation Spectroscopy of Anionic Nucleotide Monophosphate Clusters.

    PubMed

    Ligare, Marshall R; Rijs, Anouk M; Berden, Giel; Kabeláč, Martin; Nachtigallova, Dana; Oomens, Jos; de Vries, Mattanjah S

    2015-06-25

    We report mid-infrared spectra and potential energy surfaces of four anionic, 2'-deoxynucleotide-5'-monophosphates (dNMPs) and the ionic DNA pairs [dGMP-dCMP-H](1-), [dAMP-dTMP-H](1-) with a total charge of the complex equal to -1. We recorded IR action spectra by resonant IR multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) using the FELIX free electron laser. The potential energy surface study employed an on-the-fly molecular dynamics quenching method (MD/Q), using a semiempirical AM1 method, followed by an optimization of the most stable structures using density functional theory. By employing infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy in combination with high-level computational methods, we aim at a better understanding of the hydrogen bonding competition between the phosphate moieties and the nucleobases. We find that, unlike in multimer double stranded DNA structures, the hydrogen bonds in these isolated nucleotide pairs are predominantly formed between the phosphate groups. This intermolecular interaction appears to exceed the stabilization energy resulting from base pairing and directs the overall cluster structure and alignment.

  7. PHARMACOKINETIC AND PHARMACODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF INOSINE MONOPHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE (IMPDH) ACTIVITY IN MMF-TREATED HCT RECIPIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Mager, Donald E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Storer, Barry E.; Boeckh, Michael J.; Bemer, Meagan J.; Phillips, Brian R.; Risler, Linda J.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2014-01-01

    A novel approach to personalizing postgrafting immunosuppression in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients is evaluating inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity as a drug-specific biomarker of mycophenolic acid (MPA)-induced immunosuppression. This prospective study evaluated total MPA, unbound MPA, and total MPA glucuronide plasma concentrations and IMPDH activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNC) at five time points after the morning dose of oral mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) on day +21 in 56 nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. Substantial interpatient variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics was observed and accurately characterized by the population pharmacokinetic/dynamic model. IMPDH activity decreased with increasing MPA plasma concentration, with maximum inhibition coinciding with maximum MPA concentration in most patients. The overall relationship between MPA concentration and IMPDH activity was described by a direct inhibitory Emax model with an IC50 = 3.23 mg/L total MPA and 57.3 ng/mL unbound MPA. The day +21 IMPDH area under the effect curve (AUEC) was associated with cytomegalovirus reactivation, non-relapse mortality, and overall mortality. In conclusion, a pharmacokinetic/dynamic model was developed that relates plasma MPA concentrations with PMNC IMPDH activity after an MMF dose in HCT recipients. Future studies should validate this model and confirm that day +21 IMPDH AUEC is a predictive biomarker. PMID:24727337

  8. A mutational analysis of the active site of human type II inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Futer, Olga; Sintchak, Michael D; Caron, Paul R; Nimmesgern, Elmar; DeCenzo, Maureen T; Livingston, David J; Raybuck, Scott A

    2002-01-31

    The oxidation of IMP to XMP is the rate-limiting step in the de novo synthesis of guanine ribonucleotides. This NAD-dependent reaction is catalyzed by the enzyme inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). Based upon the recent structural determination of IMPDH complexed to oxidized IMP (XMP*) and the potent uncompetitive inhibitor mycophenolic acid (MPA), we have selected active site residues and prepared mutants of human type II IMPDH. The catalytic parameters of these mutants were determined. Mutations G326A, D364A, and the active site nucleophile C331A all abolish enzyme activity to less than 0.1% of wild type. These residues line the IMP binding pocket and are necessary for correct positioning of the substrate, Asp364 serving to anchor the ribose ring of the nucleotide. In the MPA/NAD binding site, significant loss of activity was seen by mutation of any residue of the triad Arg322, Asn303, Asp274 which form a hydrogen bonding network lining one side of this pocket. From a model of NAD bound to the active site consistent with the mutational data, we propose that these resides are important in binding the ribose ring of the nicotinamide substrate. Additionally, mutations in the pair Thr333, Gln441, which lies close to the xanthine ring, cause a significant drop in the catalytic activity of IMPDH. It is proposed that these residues serve to deliver the catalytic water molecule required for hydrolysis of the cysteine-bound XMP* intermediate formed after oxidation by NAD.

  9. Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase binds nucleic acids in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Jeremy E; Hamaguchi, Nobuko; Belenky, Peter; Mortimer, Sarah E; Stanton, Martin; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2004-01-01

    Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. In addition to the catalytic domain, IMPDH contains a subdomain of unknown function composed of two cystathione beta-synthase domains. Our results, using three different assays, show that IMPDHs from Tritrichomonas foetus, Escherichia coli, and both human isoforms bind single-stranded nucleic acids with nanomolar affinity via the subdomain. Approx. 100 nucleotides are bound per IMPDH tetramer. Deletion of the subdomain decreases affinity 10-fold and decreases site size to 60 nucleotides, whereas substitution of conserved Arg/Lys residues in the subdomain with Glu decreases affinity by 20-fold. IMPDH is found in the nucleus of human cells, as might be expected for a nucleic-acid-binding protein. Lastly, immunoprecipitation experiments show that IMPDH binds both RNA and DNA in vivo. These experiments indicate that IMPDH has a previously unappreciated role in replication, transcription or translation that is mediated by the subdomain. PMID:14766016

  10. [Involvement of cyclic adenosine monophosphate in the control of motile behavior of Physarum polycephalum plasmodium].

    PubMed

    Matveeva, N B; Teplov, V A; Nezvetskiĭ, A R; Orlova, T G; Beĭlina, S I

    2012-01-01

    Possible involvement of autocrine factors into the control of motile behavior via a receptor-mediated mechanism was investigated in Physarum polycephalum plasmodium, a multinuclear amoeboid cell with the auto-oscillatory mode of motility. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and extracellular cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase, its involvement into the control of plasmodium motile behavior was proved by action of its strong inhibitor, were regarded as putative autocrine factors. It was shown that the plasmodium secreted cAMP. When it was introduced into agar support, 0,1-1 mM cAMP induced a delay of the plasmodium spreading and its transition to migration. When locally applied, cAMP at the same concentrations induced typical for attractant action the increase in oscillation frequency and the decrease of ectoplasm elasticity. The ability to exhibit positive chemotaxis in cAMP gradient and the dependence of its realization were shown to depend on the plasmodium state. Chemotaxis test specimens obtained from the migrating plasmodium, unlike those obtained from growing culture, generate alternative fronts which compete effectively with fronts oriented towards the attractant increment. The results obtained support our supposition stated earlier that advance of the Physarum polycephalum plasmodium leading edge is determined by local extracellular cAMP gradients arising from a time delay between secretion and hydrolysis of the nucleotide.

  11. Structural and functional characterization of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis uridine monophosphate kinase: insights into the allosteric regulation.

    PubMed

    Labesse, Gilles; Benkali, Khaled; Salard-Arnaud, Isabelle; Gilles, Anne-Marie; Munier-Lehmann, Hélène

    2011-04-01

    Nucleoside Monophosphate Kinases (NMPKs) family are key enzymes in nucleotide metabolism. Bacterial UMPKs depart from the main superfamily of NMPKs. Having no eukaryotic counterparts they represent attractive therapeutic targets. They are regulated by GTP and UTP, while showing different mechanisms in Gram(+), Gram(-) and archaeal bacteria. In this work, we have characterized the mycobacterial UMPK (UMPKmt) combining enzymatic and structural investigations with site-directed mutagenesis. UMPKmt exhibits cooperativity toward ATP and an allosteric regulation by GTP and UTP. The crystal structure of the complex of UMPKmt with GTP solved at 2.5 Å, was merely identical to the modelled apo-form, in agreement with SAXS experiments. Only a small stretch of residues was affected upon nucleotide binding, pointing out the role of macromolecular dynamics rather than major structural changes in the allosteric regulation of bacterial UMPKs. We further probe allosteric regulation by site-directed mutagenesis. In particular, a key residue involved in the allosteric regulation of this enzyme was identified.

  12. Identification and characterization of inosine 5-monophosphate dehydrogenase in Streptococcus suis type 2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-han; He, Kong-wang; Duan, Zhi-tao; Zhou, Jun-ming; Yu, Zheng-yu; Ni, Yan-xiu; Lu, Cheng-ping

    2009-11-01

    Streptococcus suis type 2 is a swine pathogen responsible for diverse diseases. Although many virulent factors have been identified and studied, relatively little is known about the pathogenic mechanisms of type 2. The aim of the study was to identify and understand the characterization of Inosine 5-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). A 957-bp gene, impdh, was identified in the virulent S. suis serotype 2 (SS2), and analysis of the predicted IMPDH sequence revealed IMP dehydrogenase/GMP reductase domain. The gene encoding for the IMPDH of S. suis was cloned and sequenced. The DNA sequence contained an open reading frame encoding for a 318 amino acid polypeptide exhibiting 23% sequence identity with the IMPDH from Streptococcus pyogenes (YP281355) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (ZP00404150). Using the pET(32) expression plasmid, the impdh gene was inducibly overexpressed in Escherichia coli to produce IMPDH with a hexahistidyl N-terminus to permit its purification. The (His)6 IMPDH protein was found to possess functional IMPDH enzymatic activity after the purification. The impdh-knockout SS2 mutant ( Delta IMPDH) constructed in this study was slower in growth and one pH unit higher than SS2-H after 6 h of culturing, and found to be attenuated in mouse models of infection for 2.5 times and not be capable of causing death in porcine models of infection in contrast with the parent SS2-H.

  13. Ciprofloxacin photosensitized oxidation of 2'-deoxyguanosine-5'-monophosphate in neutral aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yancheng; Zhang, Peng; Li, Haixia; Wang, Wenfeng

    2012-01-01

    Laser flash photolysis studies have been carried out to investigate the reactions of ciprofloxacin (CPX) with 2'-deoxyguanosine-5'-monophosphate (dGMP), N, N, N', N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) and ferulic acid (FCA) in neutral aqueous solutions, respectively. CPX triplet state ((3)CPX*) can be quenched by TMPD, FCA and dGMP, with rate constants of 1.8 × 10(9), 1.5 × 10(9) and 5.8 × 10(7) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1), respectively. TMPD radical cation (TMPD(·+)) and FCA radical cation (FCA(·+)) were observed directly. The formation rate of CPX radical anion (CPX(·-)) was determined to be 1.5 × 10(9) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1). Redox reaction of dGMP was investigated through competing reactions using TMPD and FCA as probe. The triplet energy of CPX was determined to be 262 kJ mol(-1). Electron transfer from TMPD, FCA and dGMP to (3)CPX* was proposed. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2012 The American Society of Photobiology.

  14. 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mor, Vijay; Unnikrishnan, M K

    2011-09-01

    Lifestyle changes such as physical inactivity combined with calorie-rich, low-fibre diets have triggered an explosive surge in metabolic syndrome, outlined as a cluster of heart attack risk factors such as insulin resistance, raised fasting plasma glucose, abdominal obesity, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. By acting as a master-switch of energy homeostasis and associated pathophysiological phenomena, 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) appears to orchestrate the adaptive physiology of energy deficit, suggesting that the sedentary modern human could be suffering from chronic suboptimal AMPK activation. Addressing individual targets with potent ligands with high specificity may be inappropriate (it has not yielded any molecule superior to the sixty year old metformin) because this strategy cannot address a cluster of interrelated pathologies. However, spices, dietary supplements and nutraceuticals attenuate the multiple symptoms of metabolic syndrome in a collective and perhaps more holistic fashion with fewer adverse events. Natural selection could have favoured races that developed a taste for spices and dietary supplements, most of which are not only antioxidants but also activators of AMPK. The review will outline the various biochemical mechanisms and pathophysiological consequences of AMPK activation involving the cluster of symptoms that embrace metabolic syndrome and beyond. Recent advances that integrate energy homeostasis with a number of overarching metabolic pathways and physiological phenomena, including inflammatory conditions, cell growth and development, malignancy, life span, and even extending into environmental millieu, as in obesity mediated by gut microflora and others will also be outlined.

  15. Lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptors and adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate during and after normal pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    von Mandach, U.; Gubler, H. P.; Engel, G.; Huch, R.; Huch, A.

    1993-01-01

    1. The beta 2-sympathomimetics, used to inhibit preterm labour, bind predominantly to beta 2-adrenoceptors, activating adenylate cyclase to form adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP), a messenger substance which inhibits the enzyme cascade triggering smooth muscle contraction. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP formation can be used as markers of beta 2-adrenergic effect. 2. The present study addresses the influence of pregnancy on the beta-adrenoceptor system. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP concentrations (basal and evoked by isoprenaline) in circulating lymphocytes were determined at three points in gestation (16, 29 and 37 weeks) and 9 weeks post partum in 22 normal pregnancies. (-)-[125Iodo]-cyanopindolol was used as the ligand to identify a homogeneous population of beta 2-adrenoceptors on lymphocytes. B- and T-cell fractions were estimated from the same samples. 3. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density decreased significantly during gestation until week 37 (P < 0.01), then increased post partum (P < 0.005). Cyclic AMP concentrations (basal and evoked by isoprenaline) were significantly lower after 16 weeks of gestation than post partum (P < 0.05). 4. The results, which cannot be explained in terms of a shift in the lymphocyte (B- and T-cell) ratio, indicate that beta-adrenoceptor density and function are reduced in normal pregnancy and only return to normal post partum. These findings may be of significance in devising future tocolytic therapy with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. PMID:8383562

  16. Lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptors and adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate during and after normal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    von Mandach, U; Gubler, H P; Engel, G; Huch, R; Huch, A

    1993-02-01

    1. The beta 2-sympathomimetics, used to inhibit preterm labour, bind predominantly to beta 2-adrenoceptors, activating adenylate cyclase to form adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP), a messenger substance which inhibits the enzyme cascade triggering smooth muscle contraction. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP formation can be used as markers of beta 2-adrenergic effect. 2. The present study addresses the influence of pregnancy on the beta-adrenoceptor system. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP concentrations (basal and evoked by isoprenaline) in circulating lymphocytes were determined at three points in gestation (16, 29 and 37 weeks) and 9 weeks post partum in 22 normal pregnancies. (-)-[125Iodo]-cyanopindolol was used as the ligand to identify a homogeneous population of beta 2-adrenoceptors on lymphocytes. B- and T-cell fractions were estimated from the same samples. 3. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density decreased significantly during gestation until week 37 (P < 0.01), then increased post partum (P < 0.005). Cyclic AMP concentrations (basal and evoked by isoprenaline) were significantly lower after 16 weeks of gestation than post partum (P < 0.05). 4. The results, which cannot be explained in terms of a shift in the lymphocyte (B- and T-cell) ratio, indicate that beta-adrenoceptor density and function are reduced in normal pregnancy and only return to normal post partum. These findings may be of significance in devising future tocolytic therapy with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists.

  17. Metabolism of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and induction of tryptophanase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Botsford, J L

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) metabolism and the induction of tryptophanase and beta-galactosidase was studied in several strains of Escherichia coli grown with succinate, acetate, glycerol, or glucose as the carbon source. No consistent relationship between the intracellular concentration of cyclic AMP in the several strains cultured and the various carbon sources was discerned. In E. coli K-12-1 the induction of tryptophanase was found to vary in the order: succinate greater than acetate greater than glycerol greater than glucose, and that of beta-galactosidase was found in the order: glycerol greater than acetate greater than succinate greater than glucose. Rate of accumulation of cyclic AMP in the culture filtrate was in the order: succinate greater than acetate greater than glycerol greater than glucose. The addition of glycerol to E. coli K-12-1 grown in acetate caused inhibition of tryptophanase and slight inhibition of accumulation of extracellular cyclic AMP. These same conditions caused beta-galactosidase induction to be stimulated. The addition of exogenous cyclic AMP to cultures grown with four different carbon sources had an effect characteristic for each of the two enzymes studied as well as each individual carbon source. The results suggest that there are control elements distinct from cyclic AMP and its receptor protein which respond to the catabolic situation of the cell. PMID:170248

  18. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate regulation of ion transport in porcine vocal fold mucosae.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi; Nofziger, Charity; Blazer-Yost, Bonnie

    2008-08-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is an important biological molecule that regulates ion transport and inflammatory responses in epithelial tissue. The present study examined whether the adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin, would increase cAMP concentration in porcine vocal fold mucosa and whether the effects of increased cAMP would be manifested as a functional increase in transepithelial ion transport. Additionally, changes in cAMP concentrations following exposure to an inflammatory mediator, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) were investigated. In vitro experimental design with matched treatment and control groups. Porcine vocal fold mucosae (N = 30) and tracheal mucosae (N = 20) were exposed to forskolin, TNFalpha, or vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide) treatment. cAMP concentrations were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Ion transport was measured using electrophysiological techniques. Thirty minute exposure to forskolin significantly increased cAMP concentration and ion transport in porcine vocal fold and tracheal mucosae. However, 30-minute and 2-hour exposure to TNFalpha did not significantly alter cAMP concentration. We demonstrate that forskolin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase is present in vocal fold mucosa, and further, that the product, cAMP increases vocal fold ion transport. The results presented here contribute to our understanding of the intracellular mechanisms underlying vocal fold ion transport. As ion transport is important for maintaining superficial vocal fold hydration, data demonstrating forskolin-stimulated ion transport in vocal fold mucosa suggest opportunities for developing pharmacological treatments that increase surface hydration.

  19. A Fluorometric Activity Assay for Light-Regulated Cyclic-Nucleotide-Monophosphate Actuators.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Charlotte Helene; Körschen, Heinz G; Nicol, Christopher; Gasser, Carlos; Seifert, Reinhard; Schwärzel, Martin; Möglich, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    As a transformative approach in neuroscience and cell biology, optogenetics grants control over manifold cellular events with unprecedented spatiotemporal definition, reversibility, and noninvasiveness. Sensory photoreceptors serve as genetically encoded, light-regulated actuators and hence embody the cornerstone of optogenetics. To expand the scope of optogenetics, ever more naturally occurring photoreceptors are being characterized, and synthetic photoreceptors with customized, light-regulated function are being engineered. Perturbational control over intracellular cyclic-nucleotide-monophosphate (cNMP) levels is achieved via sensory photoreceptors that catalyze the making and breaking of these second messengers in response to light. To facilitate discovery, engineering and quantitative characterization of such light-regulated cNMP actuators, we have developed an efficient fluorometric assay. Both the formation and the hydrolysis of cNMPs are accompanied by proton release which can be quantified with the fluorescent pH indicator 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). This assay equally applies to nucleotide cyclases, e.g., blue-light-activated bPAC, and to cNMP phosphodiesterases, e.g., red-light-activated LAPD. Key benefits include potential for parallelization and automation, as well as suitability for both purified enzymes and crude cell lysates. The BCECF assay hence stands to accelerate discovery and characterization of light-regulated actuators of cNMP metabolism.

  20. Recognition of nucleoside monophosphate substrates by Haemophilus influenzae class C acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harkewal; Schuermann, Jonathan P; Reilly, Thomas J; Calcutt, Michael J; Tanner, John J

    2010-12-10

    The e (P4) phosphatase from Haemophilus influenzae functions in a vestigial NAD(+) utilization pathway by dephosphorylating nicotinamide mononucleotide to nicotinamide riboside. P4 is also the prototype of class C acid phosphatases (CCAPs), which are nonspecific 5',3'-nucleotidases localized to the bacterial outer membrane. To understand substrate recognition by P4 and other class C phosphatases, we have determined the crystal structures of a substrate-trapping mutant P4 enzyme complexed with nicotinamide mononucleotide, 5'-AMP, 3'-AMP, and 2'-AMP. The structures reveal an anchor-shaped substrate-binding cavity comprising a conserved hydrophobic box that clamps the nucleotide base, a buried phosphoryl binding site, and three solvent-filled pockets that contact the ribose and the hydrogen-bonding edge of the base. The span between the hydrophobic box and the phosphoryl site is optimal for recognizing nucleoside monophosphates, explaining the general preference for this class of substrate. The base makes no hydrogen bonds with the enzyme, consistent with an observed lack of base specificity. Two solvent-filled pockets flanking the ribose are key to the dual recognition of 5'-nucleotides and 3'-nucleotides. These pockets minimize the enzyme's direct interactions with the ribose and provide sufficient space to accommodate 5' substrates in an anti conformation and 3' substrates in a syn conformation. Finally, the structures suggest that class B acid phosphatases and CCAPs share a common strategy for nucleotide recognition.

  1. Stacking-unstacking of the dinucleoside monophosphate guanylyl-3',5'-uridine studied with molecular dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Norberg, J; Nilsson, L

    1994-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on two conformations of the dinucleoside monophosphate guanylyl-3',5'-uridine (GpU) in aqueous solution with one sodium counterion. One stacked conformation and one with the C3'-O3'-P-O5' backbone torsion angle twisted 180 degrees to create an unstacked conformation. We observed a relatively stable behavior of the stacked conformation, which remained stacked throughout the simulation, whereas the unstacked conformation showed major changes in the backbone torsion and glycosidic angles. During the simulation the unstacked conformation transformed into a more stacked form and then back again to an unstacked one. The calculated correlation times for rotational diffusion from the molecular dynamics simulations are in agreement with fluorescence anisotropy and nuclear magnetic resonance data. As expected, the correlation times for rotational diffusion of the unstacked conformation were observed to be longer than for the stacked conformation. The 2'OH group may contribute in stabilizing the stacked conformation, where the O2'-H...O4' hydrogen bond occurred in 82.7% of the simulation. Images FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 PMID:7948694

  2. Novel interactions of fluorinated nucleotide derivatives targeting orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Melissa; Avina, Maria Elena Meza; Wei, Lianhu; Crandall, Ian E.; Bello, Angelica Mara; Poduch, Ewa; Liu, Yan; Paige, Christopher J.; Kain, Kevin C.; Pai, Emil F.; Kotra, Lakshmi P.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorinated nucleosides and nucleotides are of considerable interest to medicinal chemists due to their antiviral, anticancer, and other biological activities. However, their direct interactions at target binding sites are not well understood. A new class of 2′-deoxy-2′-fluoro-C6-substituted uridine and UMP derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase). These compounds were synthesized from the key intermediate, fully-protected 2′-deoxy-2′-fluorouridine. Among the synthesized compounds, 2′-deoxy-2′-fluoro-6-iodo-UMP covalently inhibited human ODCase with a second-order rate constant of 0.62 ± 0.02 M−1sec−1. Interestingly, the 6-cyano-2′-fluoro derivative covalently interacted with ODCase defying the conventional thinking, where its ribosyl derivative undergoes transformation into BMP by ODCase. This confirms that the 2′-fluoro moiety influences the chemistry at the C6 position of the nucleotides, thus interactions in the active site of ODCase. Molecular interactions of the 2′-fluorinated nucleotides are compared to those with the 3′-fluorinated nucleotides bound to the corresponding target enzyme, and the carbohydrate moieties were shown to bind in different conformations. PMID:21417464

  3. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase-based classification of diabetes pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dutta, D; Kalra, S; Sharma, M

    2016-09-21

    The current classification of both diabetes and antidiabetes medication is complex, preventing a treating physician from choosing the most appropriate treatment for an individual patient, sometimes resulting in patient-drug mismatch. We propose a novel, simple systematic classification of drugs, based on their effect on adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK is the master regular of energy metabolism, an energy sensor, activated when cellular energy levels are low, resulting in activation of catabolic process, and inactivation of anabolic process, having a beneficial effect on glycemia in diabetes. This listing of drugs makes it easier for students and practitioners to analyze drug profiles and match them with patient requirements. It also facilitates choice of rational combinations, with complementary modes of action. Drugs are classified as stimulators, inhibitors, mixed action, possible action, and no action on AMPK activity. Metformin and glitazones are pure stimulators of AMPK. Incretin-based therapies have a mixed action on AMPK. Sulfonylureas either inhibit AMPK or have no effect on AMPK. Glycemic efficacy of alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, sodium glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitor, colesevelam, and bromocriptine may also involve AMPK activation, which warrants further evaluation. Berberine, salicylates, and resveratrol are newer promising agents in the management of diabetes, having well-documented evidence of AMPK stimulation medicated glycemic efficacy. Hence, AMPK-based classification of antidiabetes medications provides a holistic unifying understanding of pharmacotherapy in diabetes. This classification is flexible with a scope for inclusion of promising agents of future.

  4. Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Influence on flagellar function and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rubin, R W; Filner, P

    1973-03-01

    Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) influences both flagellar function and flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The methylxanthine, aminophylline, which can cause a tenfold increase in cAMP level in C. reinhardtii, inhibits flagellar movement and flagellar regeneration by wild-type cells, without inhibiting cell multiplication. Caffeine, a closely related inhibitor, also inhibits flagellar movement and regeneration, but it inhibits cell multiplication too. Regeneration by a mutant lacking the central pair of flagellar microtubules was found to be more sensitive than wild type to inhibition by caffeine and to be subject to synergistic inhibition by aminophylline plus dibutyryl cAMP. Regeneration by three out of seven mutants with different flagellar abnormalities was more sensitive than wild type to these inhibitors. We interpret these results to mean that cAMP affects a component of the flagellum directly or indirectly, and that the responsiveness of that component to cAMP is enhanced by mutations which affect the integrity of the flagellum. The component in question could be microtubule protein.

  5. Kinetic mechanism and energetics of binding of phosphoryl group acceptors to Mycobacterium tuberculosis cytidine monophosphate kinase.

    PubMed

    Jaskulski, Léia; Rosado, Leonardo A; Rostirolla, Diana C; Timmers, Luis F S M; de Souza, Osmar N; Santos, Diogenes S; Basso, Luiz A

    2013-08-01

    Cytidine monophosphate kinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtCMK) likely plays a role in supplying precursors for nucleic acid synthesis. MtCMK catalyzes the ATP-dependent phosphoryl group transfer preferentially to CMP and dCMP. Initial velocity studies and Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) measurements showed that MtCMK follows a random-order mechanism of substrate (CMP and ATP) binding, and an ordered mechanism for product release, in which ADP is released first followed by CDP. The thermodynamic signatures of CMP and CDP binding to MtCMK showed favorable enthalpy and unfavorable entropy, and ATP binding was characterized by favorable changes in enthalpy and entropy. The contribution of linked protonation events to the energetics of MtCMK:phosphoryl group acceptor binary complex formation suggested a net gain of protons. Values for the pKa of a likely chemical group involved in proton exchange and for the intrinsic binding enthalpy were calculated. The Asp187 side chain of MtCMK is suggested as the likely candidate for the protonation event. Data on thermodynamics of binary complex formation were collected to evaluate the contribution of 2'-OH group to intermolecular interactions. The data are discussed in light of functional and structural comparisons between CMP/dCMP kinases and UMP/CMP ones.

  6. Gemcitabine-based therapy for pancreatic cancer using the squalenoyl nucleoside monophosphate nanoassemblies.

    PubMed

    Maksimenko, Andrei; Caron, Joachim; Mougin, Julie; Desmaële, Didier; Couvreur, Patrick

    2015-03-30

    Gemcitabine is currently the most effective agent against advanced pancreatic cancer. However, the major therapeutic hurdles using gemcitabine include rapid inactivation by blood deaminases and fast development of cell chemoresistance, induced by down-regulation of deoxycytidine kinase or nucleoside transporters. To overcome the above drawbacks we designed recently a novel nanomedicine strategy based on squalenoyl prodrug of 5'-monophosphate gemcitabine (SQdFdC-MP). This amphiphilic conjugate self-organized in water into unilamellar vesicles with a mean diameter of 100 nm. In this study the antitumor efficacy of SQdFdC-MP nanoassemblies (NAs) on chemoresistant and chemosensitive pancreatic adenocarcinoma models have been investigated. Cell viability assays showed that SQdFdC-MP NAs displayed higher antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects, particularly in chemoresistant pancreatic tumor cells. In in vivo studies, SQdFdC-MP NAs decreased significantly the growth (∼70%) of human MiaPaCa2 xenografts, also preventing tumor cell invasion, whereas native dFdC did not display any anticancer activity when tumor growth inhibition was only 35% with SQdFdC NAs. These results correlated with a reduction of Ki-67 antigen and the induction of apoptosis mediated by caspase-3 activation in tumor cells. These findings demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing SQdFdC-MP NAs to make tumor cells more sensitive to gemcitabine and thus providing an efficient new therapeutic alternative for pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  7. Deficiency of uridine monophosphate synthase (DUMPS) and X-chromosome deletion in fetal mummification in cattle.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Mohamed Elshabrawy; Nakao, Toshihiko; Nishibori, Masahide

    2006-01-01

    Ten mummified fetuses were tested for the deficiency of uridine monophosphate synthase (DUMPS), which is known to contribute to the embryonic and fetal mortality in cattle. Genomic DNAs of the mummified fetuses were extracted from tissue samples collected from the mummies and were amplified by GenomiPhi DNA amplification kit. UMPS gene of the mummies was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with DUMPS primers. Out of ten mummies examined, two fetuses were heterozygous (carriers) for DUMPS as indicated by the presences of three bands of 89, 53 and 36 bp. Estimated stage of gestation when the death occurred in the two mummies was 3.5 and 2.5 months, respectively. The other fetuses exhibited only two bands of 53 and 36 bp on the polyacrylamide gel indicated that they were normal. On the other hand, all the mummies were sexed using AMX/Y primers. Specific regions of Y and X chromosomes were amplified by PCR using AMX/Y. The expected 280 bp fragment in the female sample and the 280 and 217 bp in the male sample were observed. Nine mummies had a normal X and Y chromosome bands; however, the other mummified fetus exhibited only Y chromosome band, while the constitutive X chromosome fragment was missing. The estimated stage of gestation when the death occurred in this mummified fetus was 100 days. This might be the first report of DUMPS and X-chromosome deletion at the amelogenin gene in bovine-mummified fetuses in Japan.

  8. Selective and potent urea inhibitors of Cryptosporidium parvum inosine 5′ monophosphate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Kavitha, Mandapati; Zhang, Minjia; Liu, Xiaoping; Sharling, Lisa; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Striepen, Boris; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Cuny, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum and related species are zoonotic intracellular parasites of the intestine. Cryptosporidium is a leading cause of diarrhea in small children around the world. Infection can cause severe pathology in children and immunocompromised patients. This waterborne parasite is resistant to common methods of water treatment and therefore a prominent threat to drinking and recreation water even in countries with strong water safety systems. The drugs currently used to combat these organisms are ineffective. Genomic analysis revealed that the parasite relies solely on inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) for the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. Herein, we report a selective urea-based inhibitor of C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) identified by high throughput screening. We performed a SAR study of these inhibitors with some analogues exhibiting high potency (IC50 < 2 nM) against CpIMPDH, excellent selectivity > 1000-fold versus human IMPDH type 2 and good stability in mouse liver microsomes. A subset of inhibitors also displayed potent antiparasitic activity in a Toxoplasma gondii model. PMID:22950983

  9. Adenosine monophosphate recognition by zinc-salophen complexes: IRMPD spectroscopy and quantum modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciavardini, Alessandra; Dalla Cort, Antonella; Fornarini, Simonetta; Scuderi, Debora; Giardini, Anna; Forte, Gianpiero; Bodo, Enrico; Piccirillo, Susanna

    2017-05-01

    Zn-salophen complexes are a promising class of fluorescent chemosensors for nucleotides and nucleic acids. We have investigated, by means of IRMPD spectroscopy experiments and quantum chemical calculations, the structure of the host-guest complexes formed by two efficient Zn-salophen receptors and dihydrogen phosphate or adenosine 5‧-monophosphate (AMP) anions. In the host-guest complexes the phosphate group is bound with a Znsbnd O(phosphate) bond. In addition, a hydrogen bond can be formed between the POsbnd H group and one of the oxygen atoms of the salophen structure. The complexes with AMP anions are endowed with a hydrogen bonded coordination motif together with a weaker π⋯π interaction. It is thus confirmed that the marked changes of the spectroscopic emission properties of Zn-salophen when complexed with AMP can be associated with the existence of π⋯π stacking interactions between the salophen aromatic rings and those of the adenosine nucleobase.

  10. CMP kinase from Escherichia coli is structurally related to other nucleoside monophosphate kinases.

    PubMed

    Bucurenci, N; Sakamoto, H; Briozzo, P; Palibroda, N; Serina, L; Sarfati, R S; Labesse, G; Briand, G; Danchin, A; Bărzu, O; Gilles, A M

    1996-02-02

    CMP kinase from Escherichia coli is a monomeric protein of 225 amino acid residues. The protein exhibits little overall sequence similarities with other known NMP kinases. However, residues involved in binding of substrates and/or in catalysis were found conserved, and sequence comparison suggested conservation of the global fold found in adenylate kinases or in several CMP/UMP kinases. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity, crystallized, and analyzed for its structural and catalytic properties. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6(3), have unit cell parameters a = b = 82.3 A and c = 60.7 A, and diffract x-rays to a 1.9 A resolution. The bacterial enzyme exhibits a fluorescence emission spectrum with maximum at 328 nm upon excitation at 295 nm, which suggests that the single tryptophan residue (Trp30) is located in a hydrophobic environment. Substrate specificity studies showed that CMP kinase from E. coli is active with ATP, dATP, or GTP as donors and with CMP, dCMP, and arabinofuranosyl-CMP as acceptors. This is in contrast with CMP/UMP kinase from Dictyostelium discoideum, an enzyme active on CMP or UMP but much less active on the corresponding deoxynucleotides. Binding of CMP enhanced the affinity of E. coli CMP kinase for ATP or ADP, a particularity never described in this family of proteins that might explain inhibition of enzyme activity by excess of nucleoside monophosphate.

  11. Recognition of Nucleoside Monophosphate Substrates by Haemophilus influenzae Class C Acid Phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Harkewal; Schuermann, Jonathan P.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Calcutt, Michael J.; Tanner, John J.

    2010-12-08

    The e (P4) phosphatase from Haemophilus influenzae functions in a vestigial NAD{sup +} utilization pathway by dephosphorylating nicotinamide mononucleotide to nicotinamide riboside. P4 is also the prototype of class C acid phosphatases (CCAPs), which are nonspecific 5{prime},3{prime}-nucleotidases localized to the bacterial outer membrane. To understand substrate recognition by P4 and other class C phosphatases, we have determined the crystal structures of a substrate-trapping mutant P4 enzyme complexed with nicotinamide mononucleotide, 5{prime}-AMP, 3{prime}-AMP, and 2{prime}-AMP. The structures reveal an anchor-shaped substrate-binding cavity comprising a conserved hydrophobic box that clamps the nucleotide base, a buried phosphoryl binding site, and three solvent-filled pockets that contact the ribose and the hydrogen-bonding edge of the base. The span between the hydrophobic box and the phosphoryl site is optimal for recognizing nucleoside monophosphates, explaining the general preference for this class of substrate. The base makes no hydrogen bonds with the enzyme, consistent with an observed lack of base specificity. Two solvent-filled pockets flanking the ribose are key to the dual recognition of 5{prime}-nucleotides and 3{prime}-nucleotides. These pockets minimize the enzyme's direct interactions with the ribose and provide sufficient space to accommodate 5{prime} substrates in an anti conformation and 3{prime} substrates in a syn conformation. Finally, the structures suggest that class B acid phosphatases and CCAPs share a common strategy for nucleotide recognition.

  12. Ion-exclusion chromatography determination of organic acid in uridine 5'-monophosphate fermentation broth.

    PubMed

    Niu, Huanqing; Chen, Yong; Xie, Jingjing; Chen, Xiaochun; Bai, Jianxin; Wu, Jinglan; Liu, Dong; Ying, Hanjie

    2012-09-01

    Simultaneous determination of organic acids using ion-exclusion liquid chromatography and ultraviolet detection is described. The chromatographic conditions are optimized when an Aminex HPX-87H column (300 × 7.8 mm) is employed, with a solution of 3 mmol/L sulfuric acid as eluent, a flow rate of 0.4 mL/min and a column temperature of 60°C. Eight organic acids (including orotic acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, citric acid, pyruvic acid, malic acid, succinic acid, lactic acid and acetic acid) and one nucleotide are successfully quantified. The calibration curves for these analytes are linear, with correlation coefficients exceeding 0.999. The average recovery of organic acids is in the range of 97.6% ∼ 103.1%, and the relative standard deviation is in the range of 0.037% ∼ 0.38%. The method is subsequently applied to obtain organic acid profiles of uridine 5'-monophosphate culture broth fermented from orotic acid by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These data demonstrate the quantitative accuracy for nucleotide fermentation mixtures, and suggest that the method may also be applicable to other biological samples.

  13. Predictive value of adenosine 5'-monophosphate challenge in preschool children for the diagnosis of asthma 5 years later.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Shlomo; Avital, Avraham; Hevroni, Avigdor; Avenshtein, Alina; Hadi, Ronen; Springer, Chaim

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated the predictive values of preschool bronchial challenge with nebulized adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) using the auscultation method for having asthma 5 years later. Preschool AMP challenge had a high negative (90%) and a moderate positive (67%) predictive value for asthma 5 years later. Positive predictive value increased with the age at which the challenge was performed. The degree of preschool response to AMP was associated with the severity of asthma at school age.

  14. [Activation parameters for the cleavage reaction of cytidine-2',3'-monophosphate catalyzed by Penicillium brevicompactum and Aspergillus clavatus RNAses].

    PubMed

    Krupianko, V I; Kagan, E S; Ivanova, G S; Bezborodova, S I

    1978-01-01

    On the basis of coincidence of all activation parameters (E, deltaH*, deltaF* and deltaS*) for the reaction of cleavage of cytidine-2';3'-monophosphate catalyzed by "acid" (pH-optimum 4.7) nonspecific RNAses from Aspergillus clavatus and Penicillium brevicompactum (EC 3. 1. 4. 23) it has been proposed that the mechanism of action on this reaction stage (hydrolysis) for both enzymes is equal.

  15. Structure-Based Design, Synthesis, Evaluation And Crystal Structures of Transition State Analogue Inhibitors of Inosine Monophosphate Cyclohydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, L.; Chong, Y.; Hwang, I.; D'Onofrio, A.; Amore, K.; Beardsley, G.P.; Li, C.; Olson, A.J.; Boger, D.L.; Wilson, I.A.; /Skaggs Inst. Chem. Biol. /Scripps Res. Inst. /Yale U.

    2007-07-13

    The inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase (IMPCH) component (residues 1-199) of the bifunctional enzyme aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide transformylase (AICAR Tfase, residues 200-593)/IMPCH (ATIC) catalyzes the final step in the de novo purine biosynthesis pathway that produces IMP. As a potential target for antineoplastic intervention, we designed IMPCH inhibitors, 1,5-dihydroimidazo[4,5-c][1,2,6]thiadiazin-4(3H)-one 2,2-dioxide (heterocycle, 1), the corresponding nucleoside (2), and the nucleoside monophosphate (nucleotide) (3), as mimics of the tetrahedral intermediate in the cyclization reaction. All compounds are competitive inhibitors against IMPCH (K(i) values = 0.13-0.23 microm) with the simple heterocycle 1 exhibiting the most potent inhibition (K(i) = 0.13 microm). Crystal structures of bifunctional ATIC in complex with nucleoside 2 and nucleotide 3 revealed IMPCH binding modes similar to that of the IMPCH feedback inhibitor, xanthosine 5'-monophosphate. Surprisingly, the simpler heterocycle 1 had a completely different IMPCH binding mode and was relocated to the phosphate binding pocket that was identified from previous xanthosine 5'-monophosphate structures. The aromatic imidazole ring interacts with a helix dipole, similar to the interaction with the phosphate moiety of 3. The crystal structures not only revealed the mechanism of inhibition of these compounds, but they now serve as a platform for future inhibitor improvements. Importantly, the nucleoside-complexed structure supports the notion that inhibitors lacking a negatively charged phosphate can still inhibit IMPCH activity with comparable potency to phosphate-containing inhibitors. Provocatively, the nucleotide inhibitor 3 also binds to the AICAR Tfase domain of ATIC, which now provides a lead compound for the design of inhibitors that simultaneously target both active sites of this bifunctional enzyme.

  16. Formation of 8-hydroxy(deoxy)guanosine and generation of strand breaks at guanine residues in DNA by singlet oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Devasagayam, T.P.A.; Obendorf, M.S.W.; Schulz, W.A.; Sies, H. ); Steenken, S. )

    1991-06-25

    Singlet molecular oxygen ({sup 1}O{sub 2}) was generated in aqueous solution (H{sub 2}O or D{sub 2}O) at 37 C by the thermal dissociation of the endoperoxide of 3,3'-(1,4-naphthylidene) dipropionate (NDPO{sub 2}). Guanosine and deoxyguanosine quench {sup 1}O{sub 2} with overall quenching rate constants of 6.2 {times} 10{sup 6} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} and 5.2 {times} 10{sup 6} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. Reaction with {sup 1}O{sub 2} results in the formation of 8-hydroxyguanosine (8-OH-Guo) and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dGuo), respectively, with a yield of 1.5% at 1 mM substrate with an NDPO{sub 2} concentration of 40 mM; a corresponding 8-hydroxy derivative is not formed from deoxyadenosine. in D{sub 2}O the yield of 8-OH-Guo is 1.5-fold that in H{sub 2}O. Sodium azide suppresses 8-OH-Guo and 8-OH-dGuo production. in contrast, the hydroxyl radical scavengers, tert-butanol, 2-propanol, or sodium formate, do not decrease the production of the 8-OH derivatives. The formation of 8-OH derivatives is significantly increased (2-5-fold) by thiols such as dithiothreitol, glutathione, cysteine, and cysteamine. With use of a plasmid containing a fragment of the mouse metallothionein 1 promoter (pMTP3') and a novel end-labeling technique, the position of {sup 1}O{sub 2}-induced single-strand breaks in DNA was examined. Strand breaks occur selectively at dGuo; no major differences (hot spots) were observed between individual guanines.

  17. Electron attachment to hydrated oligonucleotide dimers: guanylyl-3',5'-cytidine and cytidylyl-3',5'-guanosine.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jiande; Xie, Yaoming; Schaefer, Henry F

    2010-05-03

    The dinucleoside phosphate deoxycytidylyl-3',5'-deoxyguanosine (dCpdG) and deoxyguanylyl-3',5'-deoxycytidine (dGpdC) systems are among the largest to be studied by reliable theoretical methods. Exploring electron attachment to these subunits of DNA single strands provides significant progress toward definitive predictions of the electron affinities of DNA single strands. The adiabatic electron affinities of the oligonucleotides are found to be sequence dependent. Deoxycytidine (dC) on the 5' end, dCpdG, has larger adiabatic electron affinity (AEA, 0.90 eV) than dC on the 3' end of the oligomer (dGpdC, 0.66 eV). The geometric features, molecular orbital analyses, and charge distribution studies for the radical anions of the cytidine-containing oligonucleotides demonstrate that the excess electron in these anionic systems is dominantly located on the cytosine nucleobase moiety. The pi-stacking interaction between nucleobases G and C seems unlikely to improve the electron-capturing ability of the oligonucleotide dimers. The influence of the neighboring base on the electron-capturing ability of cytosine should be attributed to the intensified proton accepting-donating interaction between the bases. The present investigation demonstrates that the vertical detachment energies (VDEs) of the radical anions of the oligonucleotides dGpdC and dCpdG are significantly larger than those of the corresponding nucleotides. Consequently, reactions with low activation barriers, such as those for O-C sigma bond and N-glycosidic bond breakage, might be expected for the radical anions of the guanosine-cytosine mixed oligonucleotides.

  18. Structure of Radicals from X-irradiated Guanine Derivatives: An Experimental and Computational Study of Sodium Guanosine Dihydrate Single Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Jayatilaka, Nayana; Nelson, William H.

    2008-01-01

    In sodium guanosine dihydrate single crystals, the guanine moiety is deprotonated at N1 due to growth from high-pH (>12) solutions. EPR and ENDOR study of crystals x-irradiated at 10 K detected evidence for three radical forms. Radical R1,characterized by two proton and two nitrogen hyperfine interactions, was identified as the product of net hydrogenation at N7 of the N1-deprotonated guanine unit. R1 exhibited an unusually distorted structure leading to net positive isotropic components of the hydrogen couplings. Radical R2, characterized by one proton and one nitrogen hyperfine coupling was identified as the primary electron loss product. This product is equivalent to that of deprotonation at N1 by the guanine cation and represents the first ENDOR characterization of that product. Radical R3, characterized by a single hydrogen hyperfine coupling, was identified as the product of net dehydrogenation at C1 of the ribose moiety. The identification of radicals R1-R3 was supported by DFT calculations on several possible structures using the B3LYP/6-311G(2df,p)//6-31G(d,p) approach. Radical R4, detected after warming the crystals to room temperature, was identified as the well-known product of net hydrogenation of C8 of the (N1-deprotonated) guanine component. Radical R1, evidently formed by protonation of the primary electron addition product, was present as roughly 60% of the total radicals detected at 10 K. Radical R2 was present as roughly 27% of the total yield, and the concentration of R3 contributed the remaining 13%. R3 is evidently the product of oneelectron oxidation followed by deprotonation; thus, the balance of oxidation and reduction products is approximately equal within experimental uncertainty. PMID:17249824

  19. Structure of radicals from X-irradiated guanine derivatives: an experimental and computational study of sodium guanosine dihydrate single crystals.

    PubMed

    Jayatilaka, Nayana; Nelson, William H

    2007-02-01

    In sodium guanosine dihydrate single crystals, the guanine moiety is deprotonated at N1 due to growth from high-pH (>12) solutions. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) studies of crystals X-irradiated at 10 K detected evidence for three radical forms. Radical R1, characterized by two proton and two nitrogen hyperfine interactions, was identified as the product of net hydrogenation at N7 of the N1-deprotonated guanine unit. R1 exhibited an unusually distorted structure leading to net positive isotropic components of the hydrogen alpha-couplings. Radical R2, characterized by one proton and one nitrogen hyperfine coupling, was identified as the primary electron-loss product. This product is equivalent to that of deprotonation at N1 by the guanine cation and represents the first ENDOR characterization of that product. Radical R3, characterized by a single hydrogen hyperfine coupling, was identified as the product of net dehydrogenation at C1' of the ribose moiety. The identification of radicals R1-R3 was supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations on several possible structures using the B3LYP/6-311G(2df,p)//6-31G(d,p) approach. Radical R4, detected after warming the crystals to room temperature, was identified as the well-known product of net hydrogenation of C8 of the (N1-deprotonated) guanine component. Radical R1, evidently formed by protonation of the primary electron addition product, was present as roughly 60% of the total radicals detected at 10 K. Radical R2 was present as roughly 27% of the total yield, and the concentration of R3 contributed the remaining 13%. R3 is evidently the product of one-electron oxidation followed by deprotonation; thus, the balance of oxidation and reduction products is approximately equal within experimental uncertainty.

  20. Guanosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) modifies kinetics of voltage-dependent calcium current in chick sensory neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, C; Robello, M

    1989-01-01

    Internal perfusion with the G-protein activator guanosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP-gamma S) mimics the effect of noradrenaline and dopamine on the voltage-dependent calcium current in chick dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells. With 100 microM GTP-gamma S in the pipette, the current at +10 mV was depressed by approximately 50%, with a 10-fold increase of its time to peak. The activation time course of the control calcium current could be approximated with a single exponential curve, whereas with GTP-gamma S the activation time course was double exponential, with time constants tau 1 and tau 2. 2 mM Mg-ATP in the pipette prevented the GTP-gamma S-induced current decrease in 70% of the cells, but the time course of the current was always double exponential. From -50 mV, the current at +10 mV was best fitted with tau 1 = 1.7 +/- 0.5 and tau 2 = 25.6 +/- 5.5 in seven cells. Both time constants decreased with increasing depolarizations. In the first 2 min of recording, the current changed with time. However, both tau 1 and tau 2 were constant, whereas the relative contribution of the slow component increased from 10 to 70%. In addition, the effect was independent of the holding potential in the range from -100 to -30 mV. These results suggest that the activation of a G-protein causes a fraction of the high-threshold calcium channels to switch to a new closed state, with slower opening kinetics. PMID:2558735

  1. A QSAR model of benzoxazole derivatives as potential inhibitors for inosine 5`-monophosphate dehydrogenase from Cryptosporidium parvum

    PubMed Central

    Teotia, Pratibha; Prakash Dwivedi, Surya; Dwivedi, Neeraja

    2016-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is the common enteric protozoan pathogen causing cryptosporidiosis in human. Available drugs to treat cryptosporidiosis are ineffective and there is yet no vaccine against C. parvum. Therefore, it is of interest to design an improved yet effective drug against C. parvum. Here, we docked benzoxazole derivatives (collected from literature) with inosine 5`- monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) from Cryptosporidium parvum using the program AutoDock 4.2. The docked protein - inhibitor complex structure was optimized using molecular dynamics simulation for 5 ps with the CHARMM-22 force field using NAMD (NAnoscale Molecular Dynamics program) incorporated in visual molecular dynamics (VMD 1.9.2) and then evaluating the stability of complex structure by calculating RMSD values. NAMD is a parallel, object-oriented molecular dynamics code designed for high-performance simulation of large biomolecular systems. A quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) model was built using energy-based descriptors as independent variable and pIC50 value as dependent variable of fifteen known benzoxazole derivatives with C. parvum IMPDH protein, yielding correlation coefficient r2 of 0.7948. The predictive performance of QSAR model was assessed using different cross-validation procedures. Our results suggest that a ligand-receptor binding interaction for inosine 5`-monophosphate dehydrogenase using a QSAR model is promising approach to design more potent inosine 5`-monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibitors prior to their synthesis. PMID:28149045

  2. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase from the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    SciTech Connect

    Krungkrai, Sudaratana R.; Tokuoka, Keiji; Kusakari, Yukiko; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Adachi, Hiroaki; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Kai, Yasushi; Krungkrai, Jerapan; Horii, Toshihiro

    2006-06-01

    Orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase of human malaria parasite P. falciparum was crystallized by the seeding method in a hanging drop using PEG 3000 as a precipitant. A complete set of diffraction data from a native crystal was collected to 2.7 Å resolution at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. Orotidine 5′-monophosphate (OMP) decarboxylase (OMPDC; EC 4.1.1.23) catalyzes the final step in the de novo synthesis of uridine 5′-monophosphate (UMP) and defects in the enzyme are lethal in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Active recombinant P. falciparum OMPDC (PfOMPDC) was crystallized by the seeding method in a hanging drop using PEG 3000 as a precipitant. A complete set of diffraction data from a native crystal was collected to 2.7 Å resolution at 100 K using synchrotron radiation at the Swiss Light Source. The crystal exhibits trigonal symmetry (space group R3), with hexagonal unit-cell parameters a = b = 201.81, c = 44.03 Å. With a dimer in the asymmetric unit, the solvent content is 46% (V{sub M} = 2.3 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1})

  3. Interleukin-19 is cardioprotective in dominant negative cyclic adenosine monophosphate response-element binding protein-mediated heart failure in a sex-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, Danielle R; Ghincea, Alexander R; Ghincea, Christian V; Azuma, Yasu-Taka; Watson, Peter A; Autieri, Michael V; Walker, Lori A

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of interleukin-19 (IL-19) in a murine model of female-dominant heart failure (HF). METHODS Expression of one copy of a phosphorylation-deficient cyclic adenosine monophosphate response-element binding protein (dnCREB) causes HF, with accelerated morbidity and mortality in female mice compared to males. We assessed expression of IL-19, its receptor isoforms IL-20R α/β, and downstream IL-19 signaling in this model of female-dominant HF. To test the hypothesis that IL-19 is cardioprotective in dnCREB-mediated HF, we generated a novel double transgenic (DTG) mouse of dnCREB and IL-19 knockout and assessed cardiac morbidity by echocardiography and survival of male and female mice. RESULTS IL-19 is expressed in the murine heart with decreased expression in dnCREB female compared to male mice. Further, the relative expression of the two IL-19 receptor isoforms manifests differently in the heart by sex and by disease. Male DTG mice had accelerated mortality and cardiac morbidity compared to dnCREB males, while female DTG mice showed no additional detriment, supporting the hypothesis that IL-19 is cardioprotective in this model. CONCLUSION Together, these data suggest IL-19 is an important cytokine mediating sex-specific cardiac (dys) function. Ongoing investigations will elucidate the mechanism(s) of sex-specific IL-19 mediated cardiac remodeling. PMID:28932356

  4. Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Abates Hyperglycaemia-Induced Neuronal Injury in Experimental Models of Diabetic Neuropathy: Effects on Mitochondrial Biogenesis, Autophagy and Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Yerra, Veera Ganesh; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2017-04-01

    Impaired adenosine monophosphate kinase (AMPK) signalling under hyperglycaemic conditions is known to cause mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetic sensory neurons. Facilitation of AMPK signalling is previously reported to ameliorate inflammation and induce autophagic response in various complications related to diabetes. The present study assesses the role of AMPK activation on mitochondrial biogenesis, autophagy and neuroinflammation in experimental diabetic neuropathy (DN) using an AMPK activator (A769662). A769662 (15 and 30 mg/kg, i.p) was administered to Sprague-Dawley rats (250-270 g) for 2 weeks after 6 weeks of streptozotocin (STZ) injection (55 mg/kg, i.p.). Behavioural parameters (mechanical/thermal hyperalgesia) and functional characteristics (motor/sensory nerve conduction velocities (MNCV and SNCV) and sciatic nerve blood flow (NBF)) were assessed. For in vitro studies, Neuro2a (N2A) cells were incubated with 25 mM glucose to simulate high glucose condition and then studied for mitochondrial dysfunction and protein expression changes. STZ administration resulted in significant hyperglycaemia (>250 mg/dl) in rats. A769662 treatment significantly improved mechanical/thermal hyperalgesia threshold and enhanced MNCV, SNCV and NBF in diabetic animals. A769662 exposure normalised the mitochondrial superoxide production, membrane depolarisation and markedly increased neurite outgrowth of N2A cells. Further, AMPK activation also abolished the NF-κB-mediated neuroinflammation. A769662 treatment increased Thr-172 phosphorylation of AMPK results in stimulated PGC-1α-directed mitochondrial biogenesis and autophagy induction. Our study supports that compromised AMPK signalling in hyperglycaemic conditions causes defective mitochondrial biogenesis ultimately leading to neuronal dysfunction and associated deficits in DN and activation of AMPK can be developed as an attractive therapeutic strategy for the management of DN.

  5. Induction of viral, 7-methyl-guanosine cap-independent translation and oncolysis by mitogen-activated protein kinase-interacting kinase-mediated effects on the serine/arginine-rich protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael C; Bryant, Jeffrey D; Dobrikova, Elena Y; Shveygert, Mayya; Bradrick, Shelton S; Chandramohan, Vidyalakshmi; Bigner, Darell D; Gromeier, Matthias

    2014-11-01

    Protein synthesis, the most energy-consuming process in cells, responds to changing physiologic priorities, e.g., upon mitogen- or stress-induced adaptations signaled through the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). The prevailing status of protein synthesis machinery is a viral pathogenesis factor, particularly for plus-strand RNA viruses, where immediate translation of incoming viral RNAs shapes host-virus interactions. In this study, we unraveled signaling pathways centered on the ERK1/2 and p38α MAPK-interacting kinases MNK1/2 and their role in controlling 7-methyl-guanosine (m(7)G) "cap"-independent translation at enterovirus type 1 internal ribosomal entry sites (IRESs). Activation of Raf-MEK-ERK1/2 signals induced viral IRES-mediated translation in a manner dependent on MNK1/2. This effect was not due to MNK's known functions as eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4G binding partner or eIF4E(S209) kinase. Rather, MNK catalytic activity enabled viral IRES-mediated translation/host cell cytotoxicity through negative regulation of the Ser/Arg (SR)-rich protein kinase (SRPK). Our investigations suggest that SRPK activity is a major determinant of type 1 IRES competency, host cell cytotoxicity, and viral proliferation in infected cells. We are targeting unfettered enterovirus IRES activity in cancer with PVSRIPO, the type 1 live-attenuated poliovirus (PV) (Sabin) vaccine containing a human rhinovirus type 2 (HRV2) IRES. A phase I clinical trial of PVSRIPO with intratumoral inoculation in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) is showing early promise. Viral translation proficiency in infected GBM cells is a core requirement for the antineoplastic efficacy of PVSRIPO. Therefore, it is critically important to understand the mechanisms controlling viral cap-independent translation in infected host cells. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Nebivolol dilates human penile arteries and reverses erectile dysfunction in diabetic rats through enhancement of nitric oxide signaling.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Javier; Wright, Harold M; Cuevas, Pedro; González-Corrochano, Rocío; Fernández, Argentina; Cuevas, Begoña; La Fuente, José M; Gupta, Sandeep; Sáenz de Tejada, Iñigo

    2010-08-01

    Traditional beta-blockers have sometimes been associated with erectile dysfunction (ED). Nebivolol is a cardioselective β(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist that promotes vasodilation through a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent mechanism. We evaluated the effects of nebivolol on the NO/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling pathway, on erectile function and dysfunction, and in human penile vascular tissues. Erectile response to cavernosal nerve electrical stimulation in control and diabetes-induced ED rats were evaluated, along with serum nitrite/nitrate (NOx) concentration and plasma/tissue cGMP levels. Endothelium-dependent and sildenafil-induced relaxation of isolated human corpus cavernosum (HCC) and human penile resistance arteries (HPRA) were also determined. The effects of nebivolol on erectile function and dysfunction and on NO/cGMP-mediated responses. Treatment with nebivolol significantly potentiated erectile response in control rats, regardless of its effects on blood pressure. Nebivolol increased NOx and plasma cGMP by 3-fold and 2.75-fold, respectively, and significantly augmented the elevation of plasma cGMP produced by sildenafil. Nebivolol enhanced endothelium-dependent and sildenafil-induced relaxations of HCC tissue, and produced endothelium-dependent vasodilation of HPRA. Nebivolol, but not atenolol, significantly improved erectile response in diabetic rats (51.6%, 53.2%, and 87.1% of response at 3 Hz in nondiabetic rats, for vehicle-treated, atenolol-treated, and nebivolol-treated diabetic rats, respectively); after sildenafil administration, ED was completely reversed in nebivolol-treated diabetic rats (69.6% and 112% for diabetic rats treated with sildenafil and nebivolol plus sildenafil, respectively). Accordingly, nebivolol restored systemic NOx levels and cGMP content in penile tissue from these animals. Nebivolol in vivo activated the NO/cGMP pathway, enhanced erectile response and reversed ED in diabetic rats. Moreover, nebivolol in vitro

  7. SiaA/D Interconnects c-di-GMP and RsmA Signaling to Coordinate Cellular Aggregation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Response to Environmental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Colley, Brendan; Dederer, Verena; Carnell, Michael; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Rice, Scott A.; Klebensberger, Janosch

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has emerged as an important opportunistic human pathogen that is often highly resistant to eradication strategies, mediated in part by the formation of multicellular aggregates. Cellular aggregates may occur attached to a surface (biofilm), at the air-liquid interface (pellicle), or as suspended aggregates. Compared to surface attached communities, knowledge about the regulatory processes involved in the formation of suspended cell aggregates is still limited. We have recently described the SiaA/D signal transduction module that regulates macroscopic cell aggregation during growth with, or in the presence of the surfactant SDS. Targets for SiaA/D mediated regulation include the Psl polysaccharide, the CdrAB two-partner secretion system and the CupA fimbriae. While the global regulators c-di-GMP and RsmA are known to inversely coordinate cell aggregation and regulate the expression of several adhesins, their potential impact on the expression of the cupA operon remains unknown. Here, we investigated the function of SiaA (a putative ser/thr phosphatase) and SiaD (a di-guanylate cyclase) in cupA1 expression using transcriptional reporter fusions and qRT-PCR. These studies revealed a novel interaction between the RsmA posttranscriptional regulatory system and SiaA/D mediated macroscopic aggregation. The RsmA/rsmY/Z system was found to affect macroscopic aggregate formation in the presence of surfactant by impacting the stability of the cupA1 mRNA transcript and we reveal that RsmA directly binds to the cupA1 leader sequence in vitro. We further identified that transcription of the RsmA antagonist rsmZ is controlled in a SiaA/D dependent manner during growth with SDS. Finally, we found that the siaD transcript is also under regulatory control of RsmA and that overproduction of RsmA or the deletion of siaD results in decreased cellular cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) levels quantified by a transcriptional reporter, demonstrating that

  8. SiaA/D Interconnects c-di-GMP and RsmA Signaling to Coordinate Cellular Aggregation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Response to Environmental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Colley, Brendan; Dederer, Verena; Carnell, Michael; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Rice, Scott A; Klebensberger, Janosch

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has emerged as an important opportunistic human pathogen that is often highly resistant to eradication strategies, mediated in part by the formation of multicellular aggregates. Cellular aggregates may occur attached to a surface (biofilm), at the air-liquid interface (pellicle), or as suspended aggregates. Compared to surface attached communities, knowledge about the regulatory processes involved in the formation of suspended cell aggregates is still limited. We have recently described the SiaA/D signal transduction module that regulates macroscopic cell aggregation during growth with, or in the presence of the surfactant SDS. Targets for SiaA/D mediated regulation include the Psl polysaccharide, the CdrAB two-partner secretion system and the CupA fimbriae. While the global regulators c-di-GMP and RsmA are known to inversely coordinate cell aggregation and regulate the expression of several adhesins, their potential impact on the expression of the cupA operon remains unknown. Here, we investigated the function of SiaA (a putative ser/thr phosphatase) and SiaD (a di-guanylate cyclase) in cupA1 expression using transcriptional reporter fusions and qRT-PCR. These studies revealed a novel interaction between the RsmA posttranscriptional regulatory system and SiaA/D mediated macroscopic aggregation. The RsmA/rsmY/Z system was found to affect macroscopic aggregate formation in the presence of surfactant by impacting the stability of the cupA1 mRNA transcript and we reveal that RsmA directly binds to the cupA1 leader sequence in vitro. We further identified that transcription of the RsmA antagonist rsmZ is controlled in a SiaA/D dependent manner during growth with SDS. Finally, we found that the siaD transcript is also under regulatory control of RsmA and that overproduction of RsmA or the deletion of siaD results in decreased cellular cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) levels quantified by a transcriptional reporter, demonstrating that

  9. Adsorption of nucleotides on biomimetic apatite: The case of cytidine 5' monophosphate (CMP).

    PubMed

    Choimet, Maëla; Tourrette, Audrey; Drouet, Christophe

    2015-10-15

    The chemical interaction between DNA macromolecules and hard tissues in vertebrate is of foremost importance in paleogenetics, as bones and teeth represent a major substrate for the genetic material after cell death. Recently, the empirical hypothesis of DNA "protection" over time thanks to its adsorption on hard tissues was revisited from a physico-chemical viewpoint. In particular, the existence of a strong interaction between phosphate groups of DNA backbone and the surface of apatite nanocrystals (mimicking bone/dentin mineral) was evidenced on an experimental basis. In the field of nanomedicine, DNA or RNA can be used for gene transport into cells, and apatite nanocarriers then appear promising. In order to shed some more light on interactions between DNA molecules and apatite, the present study focuses on the adsorption of a "model" nucleotide, cytidine 5' monophosphate (CMP), on a carbonated biomimetic apatite sample. The follow-up of CMP kinetics of adsorption pointed out the rapidity of interaction with stabilization reached within few minutes. The adsorption isotherm could be realistically fitted to the Sips model (Langmuir-Freundlich) suggesting the influence of surface heterogeneities and adsorption cooperativity in the adsorption process. The desorption study pointed out the reversible character of CMP adsorption on biomimetic apatite. This contribution is intended to prove helpful in view of better apprehending the molecular interaction of DNA fragments and apatite compounds, independently of the application domain, such as bone diagenesis or nanomedicine. This study may also appear informative for researchers interested in the origins of life on Earth and the occurrence and behavior of primitive biomolecules.

  10. Optimization of benzoxazole-based inhibitors of Cryptosporidium parvum inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Kavitha, Mandapati; Zhang, Minjia; Chin, James En Wai; Liu, Xiaoping; Striepen, Boris; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Cuny, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is an enteric protozoan parasite that has emerged as a major cause of diarrhea, malnutrition and gastroenteritis as well as posing a potential bioterrorism threat. C. parvum synthesizes guanine nucleotides from host adenosine in a streamlined pathway that relies on inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). We have previously identified several parasite-selective C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) inhibitors by high-throughput screening. In this paper, we report the structure-activity relationship (SAR) for a series of benzoxazole derivatives with many compounds demonstrating CpIMPDH IC50 values in the nanomolar range and > 500-fold selectivity over human IMPDH (hIMPDH). Unlike previously reported CpIMPDH inhibitors, these compounds are competitive inhibitors versus NAD+. The SAR study reveals that pyridine and other small heteroaromatic substituents are required at the 2-position of the benzoxazole for potent inhibitory activity. In addition, several other SAR conclusions are highlighted with regard to the benzoxazole and the amide portion of the inhibitor, including preferred stereochemistry. An x-ray crystal structure of a representative E•IMP•inhibitor complex is also presented. Overall, the secondary amine derivative 15a (Q67) demonstrated excellent CpIMPDH inhibitory activity (IC50 = 0.5 ± 0.1 nM) and moderate stability (t1/2 = 44 min) in mouse liver microsomes. Compound 73, the racemic version of 15a, also displayed superb antiparasitic activity in a Toxoplasma gondii strain that relies on CpIMPDH (EC50 = 20 ± 20 nM), and selectivity versus a wild-type T. gondii strain (200-fold). No toxicity was observed (LD50 > 50 μM) against a panel of four mammalian cells lines. PMID:23668331

  11. Deciphering the photochemical mechanisms describing the UV-induced processes occurring in solvated guanine monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Altavilla, Salvatore F.; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Nenov, Artur; Conti, Irene; Rivalta, Ivan; Garavelli, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The photophysics and photochemistry of water-solvated guanine monophosphate (GMP) are here characterized by means of a multireference quantum-chemical/molecular mechanics theoretical approach (CASPT2//CASSCF/AMBER) in order to elucidate the main photo-processes occurring upon UV-light irradiation. The effect of the solvent and of the phosphate group on the energetics and structural features of this system are evaluated for the first time employing high-level ab initio methods and thoroughly compared to those in vacuo previously reported in the literature and to the experimental evidence to assess to which extent they influence the photoinduced mechanisms. Solvated electronic excitation energies of solvated GMP at the Franck-Condon (FC) region show a red shift for the ππ* La and Lb states, whereas the energy of the oxygen lone-pair nπ* state is blue-shifted. The main photoinduced decay route is promoted through a ring-puckering motion along the bright lowest-lying La state toward a conical intersection (CI) with the ground state, involving a very shallow stationary point along the minimum energy pathway in contrast to the barrierless profile found in gas-phase, the point being placed at the end of the minimum energy path (MEP) thus endorsing its ultrafast deactivation in accordance with time-resolved transient and photoelectron spectroscopy experiments. The role of the nπ* state in the solvated system is severely diminished as the crossings with the initially populated La state and also with the Lb state are placed too high energetically to partake prominently in the deactivation photo-process. The proposed mechanism present in solvated and in vacuo DNA/RNA chromophores validates the intrinsic photostability mechanism through CI-mediated non-radiative processes accompanying the bright excited-state population toward the ground state and subsequent relaxation back to the FC region. PMID:25941671

  12. Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Accumulation and beta-Adrenergic Binding in Unweighted and Denervated Rat Soleus Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Christopher R.; Woodman, Christopher R.; Woolridge, Dale; Tischler, Marc E.

    1992-01-01

    Unweighting, but not denervation, of muscle reportedly "spares" insulin receptors, increasing insulin sensitivity. Unweighting also increases beta-adrenergic responses of carbohydrate metabolism. These differential characteristics were studied further by comparing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation and beta-adrenergic binding in normal and 3-day unweighted or denervated soleus muscle. Submaximal amounts of isoproterenol, a p-agonist, increased cAMP accumulation in vitro and in vivo (by intramuscular (IM) injection) to a greater degree (P less than .05) in unweighted muscles. Forskolin or maximal isoproterenol had similar in vitro effects in all muscles, suggesting increased beta-adrenergic sensitivity following unweighting. Increased sensitivity was confirmed by a greater receptor density (B(sub max)) for iodo-125(-)-pindolol in particulate preparations of unweighted (420 x 10(exp -18) mol/mg muscle) than of control or denervated muscles (285 x 10(exp-18) mol/mg muscle). The three dissociation constant (Kd) values were similar (20.3 to 25.8 pmol/L). Total binding capacity (11.4 fmol/muscle) did not change during 3 days of unweighting, but diminished by 30% with denervation. This result illustrates the "sparing" and loss of receptors, respectively, in these two atrophy models. In diabetic animals, IM injection of insulin diminished CAMP accumulation in the presence of theophylline in unweighted muscle (-66% +/- 2%) more than in controls (-42% +'- 6%, P less than .001). These results show that insulin affects CAMP formation in muscle, and support a greater in vivo insulin response following unweighting atrophy. These various data support a role for lysosomal proteolysis in denervation, but not in unweighting, atrophy.

  13. The effects of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and other adenine nucleotides on body temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Dascombe, M J; Milton, A S

    1975-01-01

    1. Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), its dibutyryl derivative (Db-cAMP) and other adenine nucleotides have been micro-injected into the hypothalamic region of the unanaesthetized cat and the effects on body temperature, and on behavioural and autonomic thermoregulatory activities observed. 2. Db-cAMP and cAMP both produced hypothermia when applied to the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus. With Db-cAMP the hypothermia was shown to be dose dependent between 50 and 500 mug (0-096-0-96 mumole). 3. AMP, ADP and ATP also produced hypothermia when injected into the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus. 4. The order of relative potencies of the adenine nucleotides with respect both to the hypothermia produced and to the autonomic thermoregulatory effects observed were similar. Db-cAMP was most potent and cAMP least. 5. Micro-injection into the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus of many substances including saline produced in most cats a non-specific rise in body temperature apparently the result of tissue damage. Intraperitoneal injection of 4-acetamidophenol (paracetamol 50 mg/kg) reduced or abolished this febrile response. 6. The hypothermic effect of the adenine nucleotides has been compared with the effects produced in these same cats by micro-injections of noradrenaline, 5-hydroxytryptamine, a mixture of acetylcholine and physostigmine (1:1), EDTA and excess Ca2+ ions. 7. It is concluded that as Db-cAMP and cAMP both produce hypothermia, it is unlikely that endogenous cAMP in the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus mediates the hyperthermic responses to pyrogens and prostaglandins. PMID:170396

  14. Exhaled nitric oxide levels and airway responsiveness to adenosine 5'-monophosphate in subjects with nasal polyposis.

    PubMed

    Prieto, L; Seijas, T; Gutiérrez, V; Uixera, S; Bruno, L; López, R

    2004-08-01

    It is widely appreciated that asthma is an inflammatory disease of the airways associated with airway hyperresponsiveness, and that nasal polyposis and asthma are related diseases. The objective of this study was to determine differences in exhaled nitric oxide (ENO) levels and airway responsiveness to adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) between nonasthmatic patients with nasal polyposis and healthy controls. Twenty patients without asthma with nasal polyposis and 16 healthy control subjects were enrolled in the study. Participants were challenged with increasing concentrations of AMP and methacholine. ENO was measured with the single-exhalation method. Bronchoconstriction in response to AMP was detected in 7 (35%) subjects with nasal polyposis. The geometric mean (95% CI) of ENO for subjects with nasal polyposis was 33.1 parts per billion (ppb) (24.0-45.7 ppb) compared with 12.3 ppb (8.5-18.2 ppb) for the healthy controls (p = 0.0002). ENO values were significantly higher in atopic than in nonatopic subjects with nasal polyposis [51.3 ppb (32.3-83.2 ppb) vs. 24.5 ppb (16.2-37.1 ppb), p = 0.02]. Nonatopic subjects with nasal polyposis also had higher concentrations of ENO than healthy control subjects (p = 0.016). Inhaled AMP causes airway narrowing in a significantly higher proportion of nonasthmatic subjects with nasal polyposis than in healthy controls. Furthermore, increased concentrations of ENO are detected in atopic and nonatopic subjects with nasal polyposis. These results suggest that bronchial inflammation is present in nonasthmatic subjects with nasal polyposis. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  15. Multi-temperature study of potassium uridine-5'-monophosphate: electron density distribution and anharmonic motion modelling.

    PubMed

    Jarzembska, Katarzyna N; Řlepokura, Katarzyna; Kamiński, Radosław; Gutmann, Matthias J; Dominiak, Paulina M; Woźniak, Krzysztof

    2017-08-01

    Uridine, a nucleoside formed of a uracil fragment attached to a ribose ring via a β-N1-glycosidic bond, is one of the four basic components of ribonucleic acid. Here a new anhydrous structure and experimental charge density distribution analysis of a uridine-5'-monophosphate potassium salt, K(UMPH), is reported. The studied case constitutes the very first structure of a 5'-nucleotide potassium salt according to the Cambridge Structural Database. The excellent crystal quality allowed the collection of charge density data at various temperatures, i.e. 10, 100, 200 and 300 K on one single crystal. Crystal structure and charge density data were analysed thoroughly in the context of related literature-reported examples. Detailed analysis of the charge density distribution revealed elevated anharmonic motion of part of the uracil ring moiety relatively weakly interacting with the neighbouring species. The effect was manifested by alternate positive and negative residual density patterns observed for these atoms, which `disappear' at low temperature. It also occurred that the potassium cation, quite uniformly coordinated by seven O atoms from all molecular fragments of the UMPH(-) anion, including the O atom from the ribofuranose ring, can be treated as spherical in the charge density model which was supported by theoretical calculations. Apart from the predominant electrostatic interactions, four relatively strong hydrogen bond types further support the stability of the crystal structure. This results in a compact and quite uniform structure (in all directions) of the studied crystal, as opposed to similar cases with layered architecture reported in the literature.

  16. Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Regulation of Ion Transport in Porcine Vocal Fold Mucosae

    PubMed Central

    Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi; Nofziger, Charity; Blazer-Yost, Bonnie

    2012-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is an important biological molecule that regulates ion transport and inflammatory responses in epithelial tissue. The present study examined whether the adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin, would increase cAMP concentration in porcine vocal fold mucosa and whether the effects of increased cAMP would be manifested as a functional increase in transepithelial ion transport. Additionally, changes in cAMP concentrations following exposure to an inflammatory mediator, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) were investigated. Study Design In vitro experimental design with matched treatment and control groups. Methods Porcine vocal fold mucosae (N = 30) and tracheal mucosae (N = 20) were exposed to forskolin, TNFα, or vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide) treatment. cAMP concentrations were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Ion transport was measured using electrophysiological techniques. Results Thirty minute exposure to forskolin significantly increased cAMP concentration and ion transport in porcine vocal fold and tracheal mucosae. However, 30-minute and 2-hour exposure to TNFα did not significantly alter cAMP concentration. Conclusions We demonstrate that forskolin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase is present in vocal fold mucosa, and further, that the product, cAMP increases vocal fold ion transport. The results presented here contribute to our understanding of the intracellular mechanisms underlying vocal fold ion transport. As ion transport is important for maintaining superficial vocal fold hydration, data demonstrating forskolin-stimulated ion transport in vocal fold mucosa suggest opportunities for developing pharmacological treatments that increase surface hydration. PMID:18596479

  17. Triazole-containing monophosphate mRNA cap analogs as effective translation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Piecyk, Karolina; Lukaszewicz, Maciej; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Jankowska-Anyszka, Marzena

    2014-10-01

    Synthetic analogs of the 5' end of mRNA (cap structure) are widely used in molecular studies on mechanisms of cellular processes such as translation, intracellular transport, splicing, and turnover. The best-characterized cap binding protein is translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E). Recognition of the mRNA cap by eIF4E is a critical, rate-limiting step for efficient translation initiation and is considered a major target for anticancer therapy. Here, we report a facile methodology for the preparation of N2-triazole-containing monophosphate cap analogs and present their biological evaluation as inhibitors of protein synthesis. Five analogs possessing this unique hetero-cyclic ring spaced from the m7-guanine of the cap structure at a distance of one or three carbon atoms and/or additionally substituted by various groups containing the benzene ring were synthesized. All obtained compounds turned out to be effective translation inhibitors with IC50 similar to dinucleotide triphosphate m(7)GpppG. As these compounds possess a reduced number of phosphate groups and, thereby, a negative charge, which may support their cell penetration, this type of cap analog might be promising in terms of designing new potential therapeutic molecules. In addition, an exemplary dinucleotide from a corresponding mononucleotide containing benzyl substituted 1,2,3-triazole was prepared and examined. The superior inhibitory properties of this analog (10-fold vs. m(7)GpppG) suggest the usefulness of such compounds for the preparation of mRNA transcripts with high translational activity. © 2014 Piecyk et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  18. Adenosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate levels in Thermomonospora curvata during cellulase biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fennington, G.; Neubauer, D.; Stutzenberger, F.

    1983-01-01

    The enzymatic degradation of cellulose requires the synergistic activity of at least three enzymes: exo-beta-1,4-glucanase (EC3.2.1.91), endo-beta-1,4-glucanase (EC3.2.1.4), and beta-glucosidase (EC3.2.1.21). Despite extensive studies on a variety of cellulolytic bacteria and fungi, the mechanism(s) regulating the biosynthesis of this inducible catabolic enzyme complex remains unknown. The intracellular concentrations of cyclic nucleotides such as adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) have been shown to play a major role in mediating catabolite repression of enzyme biosynthesis. The cAMP acts through a cAMP receptor protein (termed CRP or CAP) which is a dimer having two identical subunits each capable of binding one molecule of cAMP. The N-terminal domain of the CRP binds the cAMP while the C-terminal domain binds to DNA at the promotor region of a cAMP-dependent operon and stimulates transcription by promoting the formation of a preinitiation complex between RNA polymerase and the DNA. Intracellular cAMP levels in E. coli (the prototype organism for such studies) are influenced by the type and availability of carbon source used for growth. High intracellular cAMP levels should lead to higher concentrations of cAMP-CRP complexes which should increase the transcription rates for cAMP-dependent operons (such as the lac operon of beta-galactosidase) and indeed the differential rate of beta-galactosidase biosynthesis correlates to intracellular cAMP levels. In the case of cellulase, catabolite repression by glucose or other readily metabolizable compounds closely controls production in an apparently similar manner and therefore a correlation may exist between enzyme biosynthesis and intracellular cAMP levels. This communication describes the fluctuation in cAMP levels during cellulase induction and repression in the thermophilic actinomycete, Thermomonospora curvata.

  19. Different Characteristics and Nucleotide Binding Properties of Inosine Monophosphate Dehydrogenase (IMPDH) Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Elaine C.; Gunter, Jennifer H.; Webster, Julie A.; Schieber, Nicole L.; Oorschot, Viola; Parton, Robert G.; Whitehead, Jonathan P.

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported that Inosine Monophosphate Dehydrogenase (IMPDH), a rate-limiting enzyme in de novo guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, clustered into macrostructures in response to decreased nucleotide levels and that there were differences between the IMPDH isoforms, IMPDH1 and IMPDH2. We hypothesised that the Bateman domains, which are present in both isoforms and serve as energy-sensing/allosteric modules in unrelated proteins, would contribute to isoform-specific differences and that mutations situated in and around this domain in IMPDH1 which give rise to retinitis pigmentosa (RP) would compromise regulation. We employed immuno-electron microscopy to investigate the ultrastructure of IMPDH macrostructures and live-cell imaging to follow clustering of an IMPDH2-GFP chimera in real-time. Using a series of IMPDH1/IMPDH2 chimera we demonstrated that the propensity to cluster was conferred by the N-terminal 244 amino acids, which includes the Bateman domain. A protease protection assay suggested isoform-specific purine nucleotide binding characteristics, with ATP protecting IMPDH1 and AMP protecting IMPDH2, via a mechanism involving conformational changes upon nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain without affecting IMPDH catalytic activity. ATP binding to IMPDH1 was confirmed in a nucleotide binding assay. The RP-causing mutation, R224P, abolished ATP binding and nucleotide protection and this correlated with an altered propensity to cluster. Collectively these data demonstrate that (i) the isoforms are differentially regulated by AMP and ATP by a mechanism involving the Bateman domain, (ii) communication occurs between the Bateman and catalytic domains and (iii) the RP-causing mutations compromise such regulation. These findings support the idea that the IMPDH isoforms are subject to distinct regulation and that regulatory defects contribute to human disease. PMID:23236438

  20. Arabidopsis TH2 Encodes the Orphan Enzyme Thiamin Monophosphate Phosphatase[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Niehaus, Thomas D.; Hasnain, Ghulam; Gidda, Satinder K.; Nguyen, Thuy N.D.; Anderson, Erin M.; Brown, Greg; Yakunin, Alexander F.; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Gregory, Jesse F.

    2016-01-01

    To synthesize the cofactor thiamin diphosphate (ThDP), plants must first hydrolyze thiamin monophosphate (ThMP) to thiamin, but dedicated enzymes for this hydrolysis step were unknown and widely doubted to exist. The classical thiamin-requiring th2-1 mutation in Arabidopsis thaliana was shown to reduce ThDP levels by half and to increase ThMP levels 5-fold, implying that the THIAMIN REQUIRING2 (TH2) gene product could be a dedicated ThMP phosphatase. Genomic and transcriptomic data indicated that TH2 corresponds to At5g32470, encoding a HAD (haloacid dehalogenase) family phosphatase fused to a TenA (thiamin salvage) family protein. Like the th2-1 mutant, an insertional mutant of At5g32470 accumulated ThMP, and the thiamin requirement of the th2-1 mutant was complemented by wild-type At5g32470. Complementation tests in Escherichia coli and enzyme assays with recombinant proteins confirmed that At5g32470 and its maize (Zea mays) orthologs GRMZM2G148896 and GRMZM2G078283 are ThMP-selective phosphatases whose activity resides in the HAD domain and that the At5g32470 TenA domain has the expected thiamin salvage activity. In vitro and in vivo experiments showed that alternative translation start sites direct the At5g32470 protein to the cytosol and potentially also to mitochondria. Our findings establish that plants have a dedicated ThMP phosphatase and indicate that modest (50%) ThDP depletion can produce severe deficiency symptoms. PMID:27677881

  1. Novel adenosine 3 prime ,5 prime -cyclic monophosphate dependent protein kinases in a marine diatom

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, P.P.C.; Volcani, B.E. )

    1989-08-08

    Two novel adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) dependent protein kinases have been isolated from the diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis. The kinases, designated I and II, are eluted from DEAE-Sephacel at 0.10 and 0.15 M NaCl. They have a high affinity for cAMP and are activated by micromolar cAMP. They exhibit maximal activity at 5 mM Mg{sup 2+} and pH 8 with the preferred phosphate donor ATP and phosphate acceptor histone H1. They phosphorylate sea urchin sperm histone H1 on a single serine site in the sequence Arg-Lys-Gly-Ser({sup 32}P)-Ser-Asn-Ala-Arg and have an apparent M{sub r} of 75,000 as determined by gel filtration and sucrose density sedimentation. In the kinase I preparation a single protein band with an apparent M{sub r} of about 78,000 is photolabeled with 8-azido({sup 32}P)cAMP and is also phosphorylated with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP in a cAMP-dependent manner, after autoradiography following sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. The rate of phosphorylation of the 78,000-dalton band is independent of the enzyme concentration. The results indicate that (i) these diatom cAMP-dependent protein kinases are monomeric proteins, possessing both the cAMP-binding regulatory and catalytic domains on the same polypeptide chain, (ii) the enzymes do not dissociate into smaller species upon activation by binding cAMP, and (iii) self-phosphorylation of the enzymes by an intrapeptide reaction is cAMP dependent. The two diatom cAMP kinases are refractory to the heat-stable protein kinase modulator from rabbit muscle, but they respond differently to proteolytic degradation and to inhibition by arachidonic acid and several microbial alkaloids.

  2. Turning an antiviral into an anticancer drug: nanoparticle delivery of acyclovir monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jing; Zhang, Yuan; Ramishetti, Srinivas; Wang, Yuhua; Huang, Leaf

    2013-09-28

    Anti-herpes simplex virus (HSV) drug acyclovir (ACV) is phosphorylated by the viral thymidine kinase (TK), but not the cellular TK. Phosphorylated ACV inhibits cellular DNA synthesis and kills the infected cells. We hypothesize that ACV monophosphate (ACVP), which is an activated metabolite of ACV, should be efficient in killing cells independent of HSV-TK. If so, ACVP should be a cytotoxic agent if properly delivered to the cancer cells. The Lipid/Calcium/Phosphate (LCP) nanoparticles (NPs) with a membrane/core structure were used to encapsulate ACVP to facilitate the targeted delivery of ACVP to the tumor. The LCP NPs showed entrapment efficiency of ~70%, the nano-scaled particle size and positive zeta potential. Moreover, ACVP-loaded LCP NPs (A-LCP NPs) exhibited concentration-dependent cytotoxicity against H460 cells and increased S-phase arrest. More importantly, a significant reduction of the tumor volume over 4 days following administration (p<0.05-0.005) of A-LCP NPs, suggests excellent in vivo efficacy. Whereas, two free drugs (ACV and ACVP) and blank LCP NPs showed little or no therapeutic effect. It was also found that the high efficacy of A-LCP NPs was associated with the ability to induce dramatic apoptosis of the tumor cells, as well as significantly inhibit tumor cell proliferation and cell cycle progression. In conclusion, with the help of LCP NPs, monophosphorylation modification of ACV can successfully modify an HSV-TK-dependent antiviral drug into an anti-tumor drug. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Deciphering the photochemical mechanisms describing the UV-induced processes occurring in solvated guanine monophosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altavilla, Salvatore; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Nenov, Artur; Conti, Irene; Rivalta, Ivan; Garavelli, Marco

    2015-04-01

    The photophysics and photochemistry of water-solvated guanine monophosphate (GMP) are here characterized by means of a multireference quantum-chemical/molecular mechanics theoretical approach (CASPT2//CASSCF/AMBER) in order to elucidate the main photo-processes occurring upon UV-light irradiation. The effect of the solvent and of the phosphate group on the energetics and structural features of this system are evaluated for the first time employing high-level ab initio methods and thoroughly compared to those in vacuo previously reported in the literature and to the experimental evidence to assess to which extent they influence the photoinduced mechanisms. Solvated electronic excitation energies of solvated GMP at the Franck-Condon (FC) region show a red shift for the ππ* La and Lb states, whereas the energy of the oxygen lone-pair nπ* state is blue-shifted. The main photoinduced decay route is promoted through a ring-puckering motion along the bright lowest-lying La state towards a conical intersection (CI) with the ground state, involving a very shallow stationary point along the minimum energy pathway in contrast to the barrierless profile found in gas-phase, the point being placed at the end of the minimum energy path (MEP) thus endorsing its ultrafast deactivation in accordance with time-resolved transient and photoelectron spectroscopy experiments. The role of the nπ* state in the solvated system is severely diminished as the crossings with the initially populated La state and also with the Lb state are placed too high energetically to partake prominently in the deactivation photo-process. The proposed mechanism present in solvated and in vacuo DNA/RNA chromophores validates the intrinsic photostability mechanism through CI-mediated non-radiative processes accompanying the bright excited-state population towards the ground state and subsequent relaxation back to the FC region.

  4. Dependence of the Excitability of Pituitary Cells on Cyclic Nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Stojilkovic, Stanko S.; Kretschmannova, Karla; Tomic, Melanija; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate and cyclic 3′,5′-guanosine monophosphate are intracellular (second) messengers that are produced from the nucleotide triphosphates by a family of enzymes consisting of adenylyl and guanylyl cyclases. These enzymes are involved in a broad array of signal transduction pathways mediated by the cyclic nucleotide monophosphates and their kinases, which control multiple aspects of cell function through the phosphorylation of protein substrates. Here, we review the findings and working hypotheses on the role of the cyclic nucleotides and their kinases in the control of electrical activity of the endocrine pituitary cells and the plasma membrane channels involved in this process. PMID:22564128

  5. A high isoflavone diet decreases 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation and does not correct selenium-induced elevations in fasting blood glucose in mice.

    PubMed

    Stallings, Michael T; Cardon, Brandon R; Hardman, Jeremy M; Bliss, Tyler A; Brunson, Scott E; Hart, Chris M; Swiss, Maria D; Hepworth, Squire D; Christensen, Merrill J; Hancock, Chad R

    2014-04-01

    Selenium (Se) has been implicated as a micronutrient that decreases adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and may increase diabetes risk by reducing insulin sensitivity. Soy isoflavones (IF) are estrogen-like compounds that have been shown to attenuate insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, adiposity, and increased AMPK activation. We hypothesized that a high IF (HIF) diet would prevent the poor metabolic profile associated with high Se intake. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in basal glucose metabolism and AMPK signaling in response to an HIF diet and/or supplemental Se in a mouse model. Male FVB mice were divided into groups receiving either a control diet with minimal IF (low IF) or an HIF diet. Each dietary group was further subdivided into groups receiving either water or Se at a dose of 3 mg Se/kg body weight daily, as Se-methylselenocysteine (SMSC). After 5 months, mice receiving SMSC had elevated fasting glucose (P < .05) and a tendency for glucose intolerance (P = .08). The increase in dietary IF did not result in improved fasting blood glucose. Interestingly, after 6 months, HIF-fed mice had decreased basal AMPK activation in liver and skeletal muscle tissue (P < .05). Basal glucose metabolism was changed by SMSC supplementation as evidenced by increased fasting blood glucose and glucose intolerance. High dietary IF levels did not protect against aberrant blood glucose. In FVB mice, decreased basal AMPK activation is not the mechanism through which Se exerts its effect. These results suggest that more research must be done to elucidate the role of Se and IF in glucose metabolism.

  6. Metformin inhibits growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells via liver kinase B-1-independent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    GUO, QIANQIAN; LIU, ZHIYAN; JIANG, LILI; LIU, MENGJIE; MA, JIEQUN; YANG, CHENGCHENG; HAN, LILI; NAN, KEJUN; LIANG, XUAN

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, the most widely administered oral anti-diabetic therapeutic agent, exerts its glucose-lowering effect predominantly via liver kinase B1 (LKB1)-dependent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that metformin possesses potential antitumor effects. However, whether the antitumor effect of metformin is via the LKB1/AMPK signaling pathway remains to be determined. In the current study, the effects of metformin on proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H460 (LKB1-null) and H1299 (LKB1-positive) cells were assessed, and the role of LKB1/AMPK signaling in the anti-growth effects of metformin were investigated. Cell viability was determined using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry, and protein expression levels were measured by western blotting. Metformin inhibited proliferation, induced significant cell cycle arrest at the G0–G1 phase and increased apoptosis in NSCLC cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, regardless of the level of LKB1 protein expression. Furthermore, knockdown of LKB1 with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) did not affect the antiproliferative effect of metformin in the H1299 cells. Metformin stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and subsequently suppressed the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin and its downstream effector, 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase in the two cell lines. These effects were abrogated by silencing AMPK with small interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, knockdown of AMPK with siRNA inhibited the effect of metformin on cell proliferation in the two cell lines. These results provide evidence that the growth inhibition of metformin in NSCLC cells is mediated by LKB1-independent activation of AMPK, indicating that metformin may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of

  7. [Alteration of metabolic characteristics on the masseter muscle fiber of unilateral chewing rats and its adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase regulatory mechanism].

    PubMed

    Andi, Shi; Lin, Zeng; Jing, Liu

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to determine the influence of unilateral chewing on metabolic characteristics of masseter muscle fibers in rats and the regulatory effect of an adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) signal pathway on metabolism. Rats were submitted to exodontia of all the right maxillary molars and divided into 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks groups, and corresponding control groups were set as well. Sections were stained by nicotine adenine dinucleotide tetrazolim reductase(NADH-TRase) to demonstrate the types, proportion, and density of masseter muscle fibers. AMPKα1 and p-AMPK(Thr172) levels in bilateral masseter muscles were detected by Western blot. In the 2-week group, the percentage of dark fibers augmented in the ipsilateral side, whereas the percentage of intermediary fibers in the contralateral side was increased accompanied by a decrease of light fibers, compared with the control group (P<0.05). The percentage of dark fibers was increased in the bilateral sides, whereas the percentage of dark fiber in the ipsilateral sides surpassed that of the contralateral sides in the 4, 6, and 8-week groups. The percentage of intermediary fibers was decreased in the bilateral sides in the 6 and 8-week groups (P<0.05). The percentage of light fibers was reduced in the ipsilateral sides in the 8-week group, whereas no alteration was observed in contralateral sides (P>0.05). In the ipsilateral sides, p-AMPK (Thr172)/AMPKα1 levels were increased in the 2 and 4-week groups (P<0.05), whereas no change was observed in the contralateral sides in either group (P>0.05). Unilateral chewing increases the oxidative metabolic ability in bilateral masseter muscle fibers especially in the non-working side accompanied with change of muscle fiber types. The improvement of aerobic metabolism ability is related to the AMPK signal pathway.
.

  8. Design and Facile Synthesis of New Dinucleotide Cap Analog Containing Both 2' and 3'-OH Modification on M⁷Guanosine Moiety.

    PubMed

    Kore, Anilkumar R; Bugarin, Alejandro; Shanmugasundaram, Muthian

    2015-01-01

    The first example of the synthesis of new dinucleotide cap analog containing 2('),3(')-diacetyl group on m(7)guanosine moiety is described. The desired modified cap analog, m(7,2)(')(,3)(')(-diacetyl)G[5(')]ppp[5(')]G has been obtained by the coupling reaction of triethylamine salt of m(7,2)(')(,3)(')(-diacetyl)GDP with ImGMP in presence of ZnCl2 as a catalyst in 62% yield with high purity. The structure of new cap analog has been confirmed by (1)H and (31)P NMR and mass data.

  9. A Facile and Sensitive Method for Quantification of Cyclic Nucleotide Monophosphates in Mammalian Organs: Basal Levels of Eight cNMPs and Identification of 2',3'-cIMP

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xin; Fontaine, Benjamin M.; Strobel, Fred; Weinert, Emily E.

    2014-01-01

    A sensitive, versatile and economical method to extract and quantify cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (cNMPs) using LC-MS/MS, including both 3',5'-cNMPs and 2',3'-cNMPs, in mammalian tissues and cellular systems has been developed. Problems, such as matrix effects from complex biological samples, are addressed and have been optimized. This protocol allows for comparison of multiple cNMPs in the same system and was used to examine the relationship between tissue levels of cNMPs in a panel of rat organs. In addition, the study reports the first identification and quantification of 2',3'-cIMP. The developed method will allow for quantification of cNMPs levels in cells and tissues with varying disease states, which will provide insight into the role(s) and interplay of cNMP signalling pathways. PMID:25513747

  10. A facile and sensitive method for quantification of cyclic nucleotide monophosphates in mammalian organs: basal levels of eight cNMPs and identification of 2',3'-cIMP.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xin; Fontaine, Benjamin M; Strobel, Fred; Weinert, Emily E

    2014-12-12

    A sensitive, versatile and economical method to extract and quantify cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (cNMPs) using LC-MS/MS, including both 3',5'-cNMPs and 2',3'-cNMPs, in mammalian tissues and cellular systems has been developed. Problems, such as matrix effects from complex biological samples, are addressed and have been optimized. This protocol allows for comparison of multiple cNMPs in the same system and was used to examine the relationship between tissue levels of cNMPs in a panel of rat organs. In addition, the study reports the first identification and quantification of 2',3'-cIMP. The developed method will allow for quantification of cNMPs levels in cells and tissues with varying disease states, which will provide insight into the role(s) and interplay of cNMP signalling pathways.

  11. Mechanism of the Orotidine 5′-Monophosphate Decarboxylase-Catalyzed Reaction: Evidence for Substrate Destabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.; Wood, M; Fedorov, A; Fedorov, E; Imker, H; Amyes, T; Richard, J; Almo, S; Gerlt, J

    2009-01-01

    The reaction catalyzed by orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) involves a stabilized anionic intermediate, although the structural basis for the rate acceleration (kcat/knon, 7.1 x 1016) and proficiency (kcat/KM)/knon, 4.8 x 1022 M-1 is uncertain. That the OMPDCs from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus (MtOMPDC) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScOMPDC) catalyze the exchange of H6 of the UMP product with solvent deuterium allows an estimate of a lower limit on the rate acceleration associated with stabilization of the intermediate and its flanking transition states (=1010). The origin of the 'missing' contribution, =107 (1017 total - =1010), is of interest. Based on structures of liganded complexes, unfavorable electrostatic interactions between the substrate carboxylate group and a proximal Asp (Asp 70 in MtOMPDC and Asp 91 in ScOMPDC) have been proposed to contribute to the catalytic efficiency. We investigated that hypothesis by structural and functional characterization of the D70N and D70G mutants of MtOMPDC and the D91N mutant of ScOMPDC. The substitutions for Asp 70 in MtOMPDC significantly decrease the value of kcat for decarboxylation of FOMP (a more reactive substrate analogue) but have little effect on the value of kex for exchange of H6 of FUMP with solvent deuterium; the structures of wild-type MtOMPDC and its mutants are superimposable when complexed with 6-azaUMP. In contrast, the D91N mutant of ScOMPDC does not catalyze exchange of H6 of FUMP; the structures of wild-type ScOMPDC and its D91N mutant are not superimposable when complexed with 6-azaUMP, with differences in both the conformation of the active site loop and the orientation of the ligand vis vis the active site residues. We propose that the differential effects of substitutions for Asp 70 of MtOMPDC on decarboxylation and exchange provide additional evidence for a carbanionic intermediate as well as the involvement of Asp 70 in substrate destabilization.

  12. 6-Phosphofructokinase and ribulose-5-phosphate 3-epimerase in methylotrophic Bacillus methanolicus ribulose monophosphate cycle.

    PubMed

    Le, Simone Balzer; Heggeset, Tonje Marita Bjerkan; Haugen, Tone; Nærdal, Ingemar; Brautaset, Trygve

    2017-02-17

    D-Ribulose-5-phosphate-3-epimerase (RPE) and 6-phosphofructokinase (PFK) catalyse two reactions in the ribulose monophosphate (RuMP) cycle in Bacillus methanolicus. The B. methanolicus wild-type strain MGA3 possesses two putative rpe and pfk genes encoded on plasmid pBM19 (rpe1-MGA3 and pfk1-MGA3) and on the chromosome (rpe2-MGA3 and pfk2-MGA3). The wild-type strain PB1 also encodes putative rpe and pfk genes on plasmid pBM20 (rpe1-PB1 and pfk1-PB1*); however, it only harbours a chromosomal pfk gene (pfk2-PB1). Transcription of the plasmid-encoded genes was 10-fold to 15-fold upregulated in cells growing on methanol compared to mannitol, while the chromosomal genes were transcribed at similar levels under both conditions in both strains. All seven gene products were recombinantly produced in Escherichia coli, purified and biochemically characterized. All three RPEs were active as hexamers, catalytically stimulated by Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) and displayed similar K' values (56-75 μM) for ribulose 5-phosphate. Rpe2-MGA3 showed displayed 2-fold lower V max (49 U/mg) and a significantly reduced thermostability compared to the two Rpe1 proteins. Pfk1-PB1* was shown to be non-functional. The PFKs were active both as octamers and as tetramers, were catalytically stimulated by Mg(2+) and Mn(2+), and displayed similar thermostabilities. The PFKs have similar K m values for fructose 6-phosphate (0.61-0.94 μM) and for ATP (0.38-0.82 μM), while Pfk1-MGA3 had a 2-fold lower V max (6.3 U/mg) compared to the two Pfk2 proteins. Our results demonstrate that MGA3 and PB1 exert alternative solutions to plasmid-dependent methylotrophy, including genetic organization, regulation, and biochemistry of RuMP cycle enzymes.

  13. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate-mediated protection against bile acid-induced apoptosis in cultured rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Webster, C R; Anwer, M S

    1998-05-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) has been shown to modulate apoptosis. To evaluate the role of cAMP in bile acid-induced hepatocyte apoptosis, we studied the effect of agents that increase cAMP on the induction of apoptosis by glycochenodeoxycholate (GCDC) in cultured rat hepatocytes. GCDC induced apoptosis in 26.5%+/-1.1% of hepatocytes within 2 hours. Twenty-minute pretreatment of hepatocytes with 100 micromol/L 8-(4-chlorothiophenyl) cAMP (CP-cAMP) resulted in a reduction in the amount of apoptosis to 35.2%+/-3.8% of that seen in hepatocytes treated with GCDC alone. Other agents that increase intracellular cAMP, including dibutyryl cAMP (100 micromol/L), glucagon (200 nmol/L), and a combination of forskolin (20 micromol/L) and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (20 micromol/L), also inhibited GCDC-induced apoptosis to a similar extent. Pretreatment with the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, KT5720, prevented the protective effect of CP-cAMP and inhibited CP-cAMP-induced activation of PKA activity. Inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), wortmannin (50 nmol/L), or Ly 294002 (20 micromol/L) also prevented the cytoprotective effect of cAMP. PI3K assays confirmed that wortmannin (50 nmol/L) inhibited PI3K activity, while CP-cAMP had no effect on the activity of this lipid kinase. GCDC increased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity, but had no effect on stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) activity in hepatocytes. cAMP decreased basal and GCDC-induced MAPK activity and increased SAPK activity. The MAPK kinase inhibitor, PD 98059, inhibited both GCDC-mediated MAPK activation and GCDC-induced apoptosis. 1) agents that increase intracellular cAMP protect against hepatocyte apoptosis induced by hydrophobic bile acids; 2) activation of MAPK by GCDC may be involved in bile acid-induced apoptosis; and 3) cAMP-mediated cytoprotection against bile acid-induced apoptosis appears to involve PKA, MAPK, and PI3K.

  14. [Conformation study of cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate and some of its derivatives by means of circular dichroism].

    PubMed

    Tunitskaia, V L; Guliaev, N N; Poletaev, A I; Severin, E S

    1977-04-01

    Circular dichroism spectra of adenosine and cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) and their derivatives, having different substituents in 8-position of heterocycle, are studied, cAMP is suggested to have preferable anti-conformation in the solution, while its derivatives with substituents in 8-position of purine base are preferable in sin-conformation. An exception is 8-(beta aminoethylamine-)cAMP, which has an anti-conformation within pH range from 4.5 to 9.5. This is probably due to the formation of intra-molecular ionic bond between cyclophosphate group and aliphatic amino group of 8-position substituent.

  15. [Cloning of the gene controlling catabolite repression with the participation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate in Escherichia coli K-12].

    PubMed

    Lisenkov, A F; Smirnov, Iu V; Sukhodolets, V V

    1983-05-01

    The crp gene coding for cyclic adenosine monophosphate receptor protein has been cloned on the vehicle pBR325 using restriction endonuclease PstI and the recipient strain C600 crp. The pCAP2 hybrid plasmid obtained has a molecular weight 7.0 MD and in the pBR325 with the insertion into a PstI site. Bacterial clones carrying pCAP2 restore Crp+ phenotype, as judged by the capacity of bacteria for utilization of various carbohydrates and by the activity of catabolite sensitive enzymes.

  16. Influence of ischemic injury on vein graft remodeling: role of cyclic adenosine monophosphate second messenger pathway in enhanced vein graft preservation.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Taichi; Asai, Tomohiro; Belov, Dmitri; Okada, Morihito; Pinsky, David J; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Naka, Yoshifumi

    2005-01-01

    Endothelial injury during the harvest of saphenous vein grafts might play an important role in the development of vein graft disease after coronary artery bypass grafting. Using a murine autologous arterialized vein patch model, we tested whether the initial ischemic insult of vein grafts was linked to the later development of graft neointimal hyperplasia and whether the restoration of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate second messenger pathway would attenuate the development of neointimal hyperplasia. A segment of the external jugular vein of a mouse was grafted onto its abdominal aorta. Three weeks after the operation, the degree of neointimal hyperplasia of the implanted graft was compared among (1) grafts without preservation, (2) grafts with 2 hours of preservation (25 degrees C) in heparinized saline, and (3) grafts with 2 hours of preservation in heparinized saline in the presence of a cyclic adenosine monophosphate analog. In addition, cyclic adenosine monophosphate contents of vein grafts and leukocyte adherence to the graft endothelium were assessed. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate contents were significantly decreased after 2 hours of preservation (212 +/- 8 vs 156 +/- 5 pmol/L, P < .01). The grafts preserved for 2 hours showed greater neointimal hyperplasia compared with the grafts without preservation (neointimal expansion, 68.7% +/- 9.6% vs 46.1% +/- 4.8%; P < .01). The addition of a cyclic adenosine monophosphate analog to the preservation solution significantly suppressed neointimal hyperplasia of grafts preserved for 2 hours (44.3% +/- 5.0%). Inhibiting the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase by adding Rp-cAMPS abrogated the beneficial effects. Furthermore, grafts preserved for 2 hours had significantly more leukocytes adhering to the graft endothelium 24 hours after the operation compared with nonpreserved grafts, which was significantly reduced by the cyclic adenosine monophosphate treatment. Ischemic insult during vein graft

  17. Crystal water dynamics of guanosine dihydrate: analysis of atomic displacement parameters, time profile of hydrogen-bonding probability, and translocation of water by MD simulation.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Shigetaka; Sugawara, Yoko; Urabe, Hisako

    2005-01-27

    The dynamics of crystal water molecules of guanosine dihydrate are investigated in detail by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. A 2 ns simulation is performed using a periodic boundary box composed of 4 x 5 x 8 crystallographic unit cells and using the particle-mesh Ewald method for calculation of electrostatic energy. The simulated average atomic positions and atomic displacement parameters are remarkably coincident with the experimental values determined by X-ray analysis, confirming the high accuracy of this simulation. The dynamics of crystal water are analyzed in terms of atomic displacement parameters, orientation vectors, order parameters, self-correlation functions of the orientation vectors, time profiles of hydrogen-bonding probability, and translocations. The simulation clarifies that the average structure is composed of various stable and transient structures of the molecules. The simulated guanosine crystal forms a layered structure, with four water sites per asymmetric unit, classified as either interlayer water or intralayer water. From a detailed analysis of the translocations of water molecules in the simulation, columns of intralayer water molecules along the c axis appear to represent a pathway for hydration and dehydration by a kind of molecular valve mechanism.

  18. Incorporation of a fluorescent guanosine analog into oligonucleotides and its application to a real time assay for the HIV-1 integrase 3'-processing reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, M E; Pfleiderer, W; Mazumder, A; Pommier, Y G; Balis, F M

    1995-01-01

    We have synthesized a highly fluorescent (quantum yield 0.88) guanosine analog, (3-methyl-8-(2-deoxy-beta-D-ribofuranosyl) isoxanthopterin (3-Mi) in a dimethoxytrityl, phosphoramidite protected form, which can be site-specifically inserted into oligonucleotides through a 3',5'-phosphodiester linkage using an automated DNA synthesizer. Fluorescence is partially quenched within an oligonucleotide and the degree of quench is a function of the fluorophore's proximity to purines and its position in the oligonucleotide. As an example of the potential utility of this class of fluorophores, we developed a continuous assay for HIV-1 integrase 3'-processing reaction by incorporating 3-MI at the cleavage site in a double-stranded oligonucleotide identical to the U5 terminal sequence of the HIV genome. Integrase cleaves the 3'-terminal dinucleotide containing the fluorophore, resulting in an increase in fluorescence which can be monitored on a spectrofluorometer. Substitution of the fluorophore for guanosine at the cleavage site does not inhibit integrase activity. This assay is specific for the 3'-processing reaction. The change in fluorescence intensity is linear over time and proportional to the rate of the reaction. This assay demonstrates the potential utility of this new class of fluorophore for continuous monitoring of protein/DNA interactions. PMID:7659509

  19. Two-Step, One-Pot Synthesis of Inosine, Guanosine, and 2′-Deoxyguanosine O6-Ethers via Intermediate O6-(Benzotriazoly-1-yl) Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Kokatla, Hari Prasad; Lakshman, Mahesh K.

    2013-01-01

    A simple method for the etherification at the O6-position of silyl-protected inosine, guanosine, and 2′-deoxyguanosine is described. Typically, a THF solution of the silylated nucleoside is treated with 1H-benzotriazol-1-yloxy-tris(dimethylamino)phosphonium hexafluorophosphate (BOP) and Cs2CO3, under a nitrogen atmosphere. Conversion to the O6-(benzotriazol-1-yl) ethers occurs within about 10 minutes for inosine, and within about 60 minutes for guanosine and 2′-deoxyguanosine. Then, for reaction with alcohols, the reaction mixture is evaporated and the O6-(benzotriazol-1-yl) ether is treated with Cs2CO3 and an appropriate alcohol, at room temperature. On the other hand, for reaction with phenols, Cs2CO3 and the appropriate phenol are added to the reaction mixture without evaporation, and the reaction is carried out at 70°C. Subsequently, workup, isolation, and purification lead to the requisite O6-alkyl or -aryl ethers in good to excellent yields. PMID:22700333

  20. Chemical synthesis of guanosine diphosphate mannuronic acid (GDP-ManA) and its C-4-O-methyl and C-4-deoxy congeners.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingju; Howell, P Lynne; Overkleeft, Herman S; Filippov, Dmitri V; van der Marel, Gijsbert A; Codée, Jeroen D C

    2017-10-10

    Described is the first synthesis of guanosine diphosphate mannuronic acid (GDP-ManA), the sugar donor used by algae and bacteria for the production of alginate, an anionic polysaccharide composed of β-d-mannuronic acid (ManA) and α-l-guluronic acid (GulA). Understanding the biosynthesis of these polyanionic polysaccharides on the molecular level, opens up avenues to use and modulate the biosynthesis machinery for biotechnological and therapeutic applications. The synthesis reported here delivers multi-milligram amounts of the GDP-ManA donor that can be used to study the polymerase (Alg8 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa) that generates the poly-ManA chain. Also reported is the assembly of two close analogues of GDP-ManA: the first bears a C-4-O-methyl group, while the second has been deoxygenated at this position. Both molecules may be used as "chain stoppers" in future enzymatic ManA polymerisation reactions. The crucial pyrophosphate linkage of the GDP-mannuronic acids has been constructed by the phosphorylation of the appropriate ManA-1-phosphates with a guanosine phosphoramidite. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A novel procedure for purification of uridine 5'-monophosphate based on adsorption methodology using a hyper-cross-linked resin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinglan; Zhu, Hui; Liu, Yanan; Zhou, Jingwei; Zhuang, Wei; Jiao, Pengfei; Ke, Xu; Ying, Hanjie

    2015-05-01

    The conventional ion exchange process used for recovery of uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP) from the enzymatic hydrolysate of RNA is environmentally harmful and cost intensive. In this work, an innovative benign process, which comprises adsorption technology and use of a hyper-cross-linked resin as a stationary phase is proposed. The adsorption properties of this kind of resin in terms of adsorption equilibrium as well as kinetics were evaluated. The influences of the operating conditions, i.e., initial UMP concentration, feed flow rate, and bed height on the breakthrough curves of UMP in the fixed bed system were investigated. Subsequently, a chromatographic column model was established and validated for the prediction of the experimentally attained breakthrough curves of UMP and the main impurity component (phosphate ion) with a real enzymatic hydrolysate of RNA as a feed mixture. At the end of this paper, the crystallization of UMP was carried out. The purity of the final product (uridine 5'-monophosphate disodium, UMPNa2) of over 99.5 % was obtained.

  2. Cyclic diguanosine monophosphate represses bacterial flagella synthesis by interacting with the Walker A motif of the enhancer-binding protein FleQ.

    PubMed

    Baraquet, Claudine; Harwood, Caroline S

    2013-11-12

    The transcription factor FleQ is a bacterial AAA+ ATPase enhancer-binding protein that is the master activator of flagella gene expression in the opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Homologs of FleQ are present in all Pseudomonas species and in many polarly flagellated gamma proteobacteria. Cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a second messenger that controls the transition between planktonic and biofilm modes of growth in bacteria in response to diverse environmental signals. C-di-GMP binds to FleQ to dampen its activity, causing down-regulation of flagella gene expression. This action is potentiated in the simultaneous presence of another protein, FleN. We explored the effect of c-di-GMP and FleN on the ATPase activity of FleQ and found that a relatively low concentration of c-di-GMP competitively inhibited FleQ ATPase activity, suggesting that c-di-GMP competes with ATP for binding to the Walker A motif of FleQ. Confirming this, a FleQ Walker A motif mutant failed to bind c-di-GMP. FleN, whose gene is regulated by FleQ, also inhibited FleQ ATPase activity, and FleQ ATPase activity was much more inhibited by c-di-GMP in the presence of FleN than in its absence. These results indicate that FleN and c-di-GMP cooperate to inhibit FleQ activity and, by extension, flagella synthesis in P. aeruginosa. The Walker A motif of FleQ is perfectly conserved, opening up the possibility that other AAA+ ATPases may respond to c-di-GMP.

  3. Unexpected complex formation between coralyne and cyclic diadenosine monophosphate providing a simple fluorescent turn-on assay to detect this bacterial second messenger.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Sayre, David A; Zheng, Yue; Szmacinski, Henryk; Sintim, Herman O

    2014-03-04

    Cyclic diadenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) has emerged as an important dinucleotide that is involved in several processes in bacteria, including cell wall remodeling (and therefore resistance to antibiotics that target bacterial cell wall). Small molecules that target c-di-AMP metabolism enzymes have the potential to be used as antibiotics. Coralyne is known to form strong complexes with polyadenine containing eight or more adenine stretches but not with short polyadenine oligonucleotides. Using a panel of techniques (UV, both steady state fluorescence and fluorescence lifetime measurements, circular dichroism (CD), NMR, and Job plots), we demonstrate that c-di-AMP, which contains only two adenine bases is an exception to this rule and that it can form complexes with coralyne, even at low micromolar concentrations. Interestingly, pApA (the linear analog of c-di-AMP that also contains two adenines) or cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP, another nucleotide second messenger in bacteria) did not form any complex with coralyne. Unlike polyadenine, which forms a 2:1 complex with coralyne, c-di-AMP forms a higher order complex with coralyne (≥6:1). Additionally, whereas polyadenine reduces the fluorescence of coralyne when bound, c-di-AMP enhances the fluorescence of coralyne. We use the quenching property of halides to selectively quench the fluorescence of unbound coralyne but not that of coralyne bound to c-di-AMP. Using this simple selective quenching strategy, the assay could be used to monitor the synthesis of c-di-AMP by DisA or the degradation of c-di-AMP by YybT. Apart from the practical utility of this assay for c-di-AMP research, this work also demonstrates that, when administered to cells, intercalators might not only associate with polynucleotides, such as DNA or RNA, but also could associate with cyclic dinucleotides to disrupt or modulate signal transduction processes mediated by these nucleotides.

  4. 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside-mediated adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation induces protective innate responses in bacterial endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Giri, Shailendra; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-12-01

    The retina is considered to be the most metabolically active tissue in the body. However, the link between energy metabolism and retinal inflammation, as incited by microbial infection such as endophthalmitis, remains unexplored. In this study, using a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) endophthalmitis, we demonstrate that the activity (phosphorylation) of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase alpha (AMPKα), a cellular energy sensor and its endogenous substrate; acetyl-CoA carboxylase is down-regulated in the SA-infected retina. Intravitreal administration of an AMPK activator, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAR), restored AMPKα and acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphorylation. AICAR treatment reduced both the bacterial burden and intraocular inflammation in SA-infected eyes by inhibiting NF-kB and MAP kinases (p38 and JNK) signalling. The anti-inflammatory effects of AICAR were diminished in eyes pretreated with AMPK inhibitor, Compound C. The bioenergetics (Seahorse) analysis of SA-infected microglia and bone marrow-derived macrophages revealed an increase in glycolysis, which was reinstated by AICAR treatment. AICAR also reduced the expression of SA-induced glycolytic genes, including hexokinase 2 and glucose transporter 1 in microglia, bone marrow-derived macrophages and the mouse retina. Interestingly, AICAR treatment enhanced the bacterial phagocytic and intracellular killing activities of cultured microglia, macrophages and neutrophils. Furthermore, AMPKα1 global knockout mice exhibited increased susceptibility towards SA endophthalmitis, as evidenced by increased inflammatory mediators and bacterial burden and reduced retinal function. Together, these findings provide the first evidence that AMPK activation promotes retinal innate defence in endophthalmitis by modulating energy metabolism and that it can be targeted therapeutically to treat ocular infections.

  5. Arabidopsis phosphatidylinositol monophosphate 5-kinase 2 is involved in root gravitropism through regulation of polar auxin transport by affecting the cycling of PIN proteins.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yu; Jia, Wen-Jing; Chu, Yu-Jia; Xue, Hong-Wei

    2012-03-01

    Phosphatidylinositol monophosphate 5-kinase (PIP5K) catalyzes the synthesis of PI-4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P(2)) by phosphorylation of PI-4-phosphate at the 5 position of the inositol ring, and is involved in regulating multiple developmental processes and stress responses. We here report on the functional characterization of Arabidopsis PIP5K2, which is expressed during lateral root initiation and elongation, and whose expression is enhanced by exogenous auxin. The knockout mutant pip5k2 shows reduced lateral root formation, which could be recovered with exogenous auxin, and interestingly, delayed root gravity response that could not be recovered with exogenous auxin. Crossing with the DR5-GUS marker line and measurement of free IAA content confirmed the reduced auxin accumulation in pip5k2. In addition, analysis using the membrane-selective dye FM4-64 revealed the decelerated vesicle trafficking caused by PtdIns(4,5)P(2) reduction, which hence results in suppressed cycling of PIN proteins (PIN2 and 3), and delayed redistribution of PIN2 and auxin under gravistimulation in pip5k2 roots. On the contrary, PtdIns(4,5)P(2) significantly enhanced the vesicle trafficking and cycling of PIN proteins. These results demonstrate that PIP5K2 is involved in regulating lateral root formation and root gravity response, and reveal a critical role of PIP5K2/PtdIns(4,5)P(2) in root development through regulation of PIN proteins, providing direct evidence of crosstalk between the phosphatidylinositol signaling pathway and auxin response, and new insights into the control of polar auxin transport.

  6. Atorvastatin and pitavastatin enhance lipoprotein lipase production in L6 skeletal muscle cells through activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Masahiro; Endo, Kei; Saiki, Atsuhito; Miyashita, Yoh; Terai, Kensuke; Murano, Takeyoshi; Watanabe, Fusako; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Shirai, Kohji

    2012-10-01

    Pravastatin and atorvastatin increase the serum level of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) mass in vivo but do not increase LPL activity in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes in vitro. LPL is mainly produced by adipose tissue and skeletal muscle cells. Metformin enhances LPL in skeletal muscle through adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation but not in adipocytes. This study aimed to examine the effect of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) on LPL production and to investigate the mechanism by which statins enhance skeletal muscle cell LPL production. L6 skeletal muscle cells were incubated with pravastatin, simvastatin, atorvastatin or pitavastatin. LPL activity, protein levels and mRNA expression were measured. Atorvastatin and pitavastatin significantly increased LPL activity, protein levels and mRNA expression in L6 skeletal muscle cells at 1 μmol/L, but neither statin had an effect at 10 μmol/L. We measured AMPK to clarify the mechanism by which statins increase LPL production in skeletal muscle cells. At 1 μmol/L, both atorvastatin and pitavastatin enhanced AMPK activity, but this enhancement was abolished when AMPK signaling was blocked by compound C. The increased expressions of LPL protein and mRNA by atorvastatin and pitavastatin were reduced by compound C. In addition, mevalonic acid abolished atorvastatin- and pitavastatin-induced AMPK activation and LPL expression. These results suggest that atorvastatin and pitavastatin increase LPL activity, protein levels and LPL mRNA expression by activating AMPK in skeletal muscle cells.

  7. Abscisic acid affects transcription of chloroplast genes via protein phosphatase 2C-dependent activation of nuclear genes: repression by guanosine-3'-5'-bisdiphosphate and activation by sigma factor 5.

    PubMed

    Yamburenko, Maria V; Zubo, Yan O; Börner, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) represses the transcriptional activity of chloroplast genes (determined by run-on assays), with the exception of psbD and a few other genes in wild-type Arabidopsis seedlings and mature rosette leaves. Abscisic acid does not influence chloroplast transcription in the mutant lines abi1-1 and abi2-1 with constitutive protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) activity, suggesting that ABA affects chloroplast gene activity by binding to the pyrabactin resistance (PYR)/PYR1-like or regulatory component of ABA receptor protein family (PYR/PYL/RCAR) and signaling via PP2Cs and sucrose non-fermenting protein-related kinases 2 (SnRK2s). Further we show by quantitative PCR that ABA enhances the transcript levels of RSH2, RSH3, PTF1 and SIG5. RelA/SpoT homolog 2 (RSH2) and RSH3 are known to synthesize guanosine-3'-5'-bisdiphosphate (ppGpp), an inhibitor of the plastid-gene-encoded chloroplast RNA polymerase. We propose, therefore, that ABA leads to an inhibition of chloroplast gene expression via stimulation of ppGpp synthesis. On the other hand, sigma factor 5 (SIG5) and plastid transcription factor 1 (PTF1) are known to be necessary for the transcription of psbD from a specific light- and stress-induced promoter (the blue light responsive promoter, BLRP). We demonstrate that ABA activates the psbD gene by stimulation of transcription initiation at BLRP. Taken together, our data suggest that ABA affects the transcription of chloroplast genes by a PP2C-dependent activation of nuclear genes encoding proteins involved in chloroplast transcription. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Role of nitric oxide and cyclic GMP signaling in melanocyte response to hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Krassimira; Lambers, Britta; Tsiockas, Wasiliki; Block, Ingrid; Gerzer, Rupert

    Nitric oxide (NO) has a prominent role in many (patho)physiological processes in the skin including erythema, inflammation, and cancerogenesis. The soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), a key transducer in NO signaling, catalyzes the formation of the second messenger guanosine 3´,5´-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic cGMP or cGMP). For human melanocytes, which are responsible for skin pigmentation by synthesizing the pigment melanin, it has been reported that the NO/sGC/cGMP pathway is involved in UVB-induced melanogenesis. Melanin acts as a scavenger for free radicals that may arise during metabolic stress. It may also act as a photosensitizer that generates active oxygen species upon UV irradiation, which may initiate hypopigmentary disorders (e.g., vitiligo) as well as UV-induced oncogene cell transformation. In addition, melanoma, a deadly skin cancer, which arises from transformed melanocytes, is characterized by a resistance to chemotherapy. In our studies we have shown that NO can induce perturbation of melanocyte-extracellular matrix component interactions, which may contribute to loss of melanocytes or melanoma metastasis. Such NO effects appear to be modulated partly via cGMP. Moreover, we found that different guanylyl cyclase isoforms are responsible for cGMP synthesis in melanocytic cells. Normal human melanocytes and nonmetastatic melanoma cells predominantly express sGC, which appears to be associated with melanogenesis, whereas absence of NO-sensitive GC, but up-regulated activities of the natriuretic peptide-sensitive membrane guanylyl cyclase isoforms were found in highly metastatic phenotypes. Due to the growing interest in the regulation of signaling activities in normal and transformed cells under altered gravity conditions, we have further investigated whether the NO/cGMP signaling is involved in melanocyte response to gravitational stress. We found that normal human melanocytes and non-metastatic melanoma cell lines, but not highly metastatic cells

  9. Signal Relay During Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guven, Can; Rericha, Erin; Ott, Edward; Losert, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    We developed a signal relay model to quantify the effect of intercellular communication in presence of an external signal, during the motion of groups of Dictyostelium discoideum cells. A key parameter is the ratio of amplitude of the cAMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate) a signaling chemical secreted from individual cells versus the external cAMP field, which defines a time scale. Another time scale is set by the degradation rate of the cAMP. In our simulations, the competition between these two time scales results rich dynamics including uniform motion, as well as streaming and clustering instabilities. The simulations are compared to experiments for a wide range of different external signal strengths for both cells that secrete cAMP and a mutant which cannot relay cAMP. Under different strength of external linear cAMP gradient, the wild type cells form streams and exhibit clustering due to the intercellular signaling through individual cAMP secretion. In contrast, cells lacking signal relay move relatively straight. We find that the model captures both independent motion and the formation of aggregates when cells relay the signal.

  10. Crystal Structure of the Thermus thermophilus 16 S rRNA Methyltransferase RsmC in Complex with Cofactor and Substrate Guanosine

    SciTech Connect

    Demirci, H.; Gregory, S; Dahlberg, A; Jogl, G

    2008-01-01

    Post-transcriptional modification is a ubiquitous feature of ribosomal RNA in all kingdoms of life. Modified nucleotides are generally clustered in functionally important regions of the ribosome, but the functional contribution to protein synthesis is not well understood. Here we describe high resolution crystal structures for the N{sup 2}-guanine methyltransferase RsmC that modifies residue G1207 in 16 S rRNA near the decoding site of the 30 S ribosomal subunit. RsmC is a class I S-adenosyl-l-methionine-dependent methyltransferase composed of two methyltransferase domains. However, only one S-adenosyl-l-methionine molecule and one substrate molecule, guanosine, bind in the ternary complex. The N-terminal domain does not bind any cofactor. Two structures with bound S-adenosyl-l-methionine and S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine confirm that the cofactor binding mode is highly similar to other class I methyltransferases. Secondary structure elements of the N-terminal domain contribute to cofactor-binding interactions and restrict access to the cofactor-binding site. The orientation of guanosine in the active site reveals that G1207 has to disengage from its Watson-Crick base pairing interaction with C1051 in the 16 S rRNA and flip out into the active site prior to its modification. Inspection of the 30 S crystal structure indicates that access to G1207 by RsmC is incompatible with the native subunit structure, consistent with previous suggestions that this enzyme recognizes a subunit assembly intermediate.

  11. Guanosine 2-NH2 groups of Escherichia coli RNase P RNA involved in intramolecular tertiary contacts and direct interactions with tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Heide, C; Pfeiffer, T; Nolan, J M; Hartmann, R K

    1999-01-01

    We have identified by nucleotide analog interference mapping (NAIM) exocyclic NH2 groups of guanosines in RNase P RNA from Escherichia coli that are important for tRNA binding. The majority of affected guanosines represent phylogenetically conserved nucleotides. Several sites of interference could be assigned to direct contacts with the tRNA moiety, whereas others were interpreted as reflecting indirect effects on tRNA binding due to the disruption of tertiary contacts within the catalytic RNA. Our results support the involvement of the 2-NH2 groups of G292/G293 in pairing with C74 and C75 of tRNA CCA-termini, as well as formation of two consecutive base triples involving C75 and A76 of CCA-ends interacting with G292/A258 and G291/G259, respectively. Moreover, we present first biochemical evidence for two tertiary contacts (L18/P8 and L8/P4) within the catalytic RNA, whose formation has been postulated previously on the basis of phylogenetic comparative analyses. The tRNA binding interference data obtained in this and our previous studies are consistent with the formation of a consecutive nucleotide triple and quadruple between the tetraloop L18 and helix P8. Formation of the nucleotide triple (G316 and A94:U104 in wild-type E. coli RNase P RNA) is also supported by mutational analysis. For the mutant RNase P RNA carrying a G94:C104 double mutation, an additional G316-to-A mutation resulted in a restoration of binding affinity for mature and precursor tRNA. PMID:9917070

  12. Solution structure of an RNA fragment with the P7/P9.0 region and the 3'-terminal guanosine of the tetrahymena group I intron.

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Aya; Muto, Yutaka; Watanabe, Satoru; Kim, Insil; Ito, Takuhiro; Nishiya, Yoichi; Sakamoto, Kensaku; Ohtsuki, Takashi; Kawai, Gota; Watanabe, Kimitsuna; Hosono, Kazumi; Takaku, Hiroshi; Katoh, Etsuko; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Inoue, Tan; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2002-01-01

    In the second step of the two consecutive transesterifications of the self-splicing reaction of the group I intron, the conserved guanosine at the 3' terminus of the intron (omegaG) binds to the guanosine-binding site (GBS) in the intron. In the present study, we designed a 22-nt model RNA (GBS/omegaG) including the GBS and omegaG from the Tetrahymena group I intron, and determined the solution structure by NMR methods. In this structure, omegaG is recognized by the formation of a base triple with the G264 x C311 base pair, and this recognition is stabilized by the stacking interaction between omegaG and C262. The bulged structure at A263 causes a large helical twist angle (40 +/- 80) between the G264 x C311 and C262 x G312 base pairs. We named this type of binding pocket with a bulge and a large twist, formed on the major groove, a "Bulge-and-Twist" (BT) pocket. With another twist angle between the C262 x G312 and G413 x C313 base pairs (45 +/- 100), the axis of GBS/omegaG is kinked at the GBS region. This kinked axis superimposes well on that of the corresponding region in the structure model built on a 5.0 A resolution electron density map (Golden et al., Science, 1998, 282:345-358). This compact structure of the GBS is also consistent with previous biochemical studies on group I introns. The BT pockets are also found in the arginine-binding site of the HIV-TAR RNA, and within the 16S rRNA and the 23S rRNA. PMID:11991639

  13. Stereoselective aminoacylation of a dinucleoside monophosphate by the imidazolides of DL-alanine and N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-DL-alanine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Profy, A. T.; Usher, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The aminoacylation of diinosine monophosphate was studied experimentally. When the acylating agent was the imidazolide of N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-DL-alanine, a 40 percent enantiomeric excess of the isomer was incorporated at the 2' site and the positions of equilibrium for the reversible 2'-3' migration reaction differed for the D and L enantiomers. The reactivity of the nucleoside hydroxyl groups was found to decrease on the order 2'(3') less than internal 2' and less than 5', and the extent of the reaction was affected by the concentration of the imidazole buffer. Reaction of IpI with imidazolide of unprotected DL-alanine, by contrast, led to an excess of the D isomer at the internal 2' site. Finally, reaction with the N-carboxy anhydride of DL-alanine occurred without stereoselection. These results are found to be relevant to the study of the evolution of optical chemical activity and the origin of genetically directed protein synthesis.

  14. Stereoselective aminoacylation of a dinucleoside monophosphate by the imidazolides of DL-alanine and N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-DL-alanine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Profy, A. T.; Usher, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The aminoacylation of diinosine monophosphate was studied experimentally. When the acylating agent was the imidazolide of N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-DL-alanine, a 40 percent enantiomeric excess of the isomer was incorporated at the 2' site and the positions of equilibrium for the reversible 2'-3' migration reaction differed for the D and L enantiomers. The reactivity of the nucleoside hydroxyl groups was found to decrease on the order 2'(3') less than internal 2' and less than 5', and the extent of the reaction was affected by the concentration of the imidazole buffer. Reaction of IpI with imidazolide of unprotected DL-alanine, by contrast, led to an excess of the D isomer at the internal 2' site. Finally, reaction with the N-carboxy anhydride of DL-alanine occurred without stereoselection. These results are found to be relevant to the study of the evolution of optical chemical activity and the origin of genetically directed protein synthesis.

  15. Investigation on the occurrence and significance of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate in phytoplankton and natural aquatic communities

    SciTech Connect

    Francko, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    This study demonstrates, on the basis of several analyanalytical criteria, that the production and extracellular release of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP) is widespread among phytoplankton species. The production and release of CAMP varied markedly among different species grown under similar environmental conditions, and intraspecifically during the life cycle of a given algal species. This investigation marks the first time cAMP has been investigated in natural aquatic systems. An examination of epilimnetic lakewater samples from Lawrence Lake, a hardwater oligotrophic lake, and Wintergreen Lake, a hardwater hypereutrophic lake, both in southwestern Michigan, demonstrated that cAMP existed in both particulate-associated and dissolved forms in these systems.

  16. Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate in relation to inhibition of cervical smooth muscle activity in early pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Norström, A; Bryman, I

    1991-08-01

    Contractile activity was registered in strips of cervical tissue obtained by needle biopsy from women in the first trimester of pregnancy. Dibutyryl cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate (5 x 10(-6) mol/l), isobutyryl methylxanthine (10(-4) mol/l), and forskolin (10(-5)-10(-4) mol/l), the latter two drugs known to increase the levels of endogenous cAMP, inhibited spontaneous muscle activity. The levels of tissue cAMP were determined in strips during relaxation induced by prostaglandin E2 or purified porcine relaxin and compared with cAMP levels in strips from the same women during contractile activity. Exposure to prostaglandin E2 but not to relaxin was followed by increased levels of cAMP. It is suggested that cAMP has a role as a second messenger in the prostaglandin E2-mediated relaxation of cervical smooth muscle.

  17. Syn- and anti-conformations of 5'-deoxy- and 5'-O-methyl-uridine 2',3'-cyclic monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Grabarkiewicz, Tomasz; Hoffmann, Marcin

    2006-01-01

    Two uridine 2',3'-cyclic monophosphate (cUMP) derivatives, 5'-deoxy (DcUMP) and 5'-O-methyl (McUMP), were studied by means of quantum chemical methods. Aqueous solvent effects were estimated based on the isodensity-surface polarized-continuum model (IPCM). Gas phase calculations revealed only slight energy differences between the syn- and anti-conformers of both compounds: the relative energies of the syn-structure are -0.9 and 0.2 kcal mol(-1) for DcUMP and McUMP, respectively. According to the results from the IPCM calculations, however, both syn-conformers become about 14 kcal mol(-1) more stable in aqueous solution than their corresponding anti-structures. Additionally, the effects of a countercation and protonation on DcUMP were studied, revealing that the syn-structure is also favored over the anti-one for these systems.

  18. Atomic Resolution Structure of the Orotidine 5′-Monophosphate Decarboxylase Product Complex Combined with Surface Plasmon Resonance Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fujihashi, Masahiro; Mito, Kazuya; Pai, Emil F.; Miki, Kunio

    2013-01-01

    Orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase) accelerates the decarboxylation of its substrate by 17 orders of magnitude. One argument brought forward against steric/electrostatic repulsion causing substrate distortion at the carboxylate substituent as part of the catalysis has been the weak binding affinity of the decarboxylated product (UMP). The crystal structure of the UMP complex of ODCase at atomic resolution (1.03 Å) shows steric competition between the product UMP and the side chain of a catalytic lysine residue. Surface plasmon resonance analysis indicates that UMP binds 5 orders of magnitude more tightly to a mutant in which the interfering side chain has been removed than to wild-type ODCase. These results explain the low affinity of UMP and counter a seemingly very strong argument against a contribution of substrate distortion to the catalytic reaction mechanism of ODCase. PMID:23395822

  19. Evidence Against the Presence of 3′, 5′-Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate and Relevant Enzymes in Lactobacillus plantarum

    PubMed Central

    Sahyoun, N.; Durr, I. F.

    1972-01-01

    Analysis of cells of Lactobacillus plantarum, starved or undergoing induction, showed no 3′, 5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Neither adenyl cyclase nor 3′, 5′-cAMP phosphodiesterase was detected in extracts. Extracts of L. plantarum did not inhibit these two enzymes of Escherichia coli K-12, strain W1435. Incubation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-U-14C with cells or various cell-free fractions of L. plantarum did not produce labeled 3′, 5′-cAMP. Of various 3′, 5′-cyclic and acyclic nucleotides tested, only 3′, 5′-cAMP, ATP, and yeast adenylic acid stimulated l-arabinose isomerase. Yeast adenylic acid was two to four times as effective as 3′, 5′-cAMP or ATP. 2′, 3′-cAMP was not effective. PMID:4342815

  20. Host layer buckling in the compounds formed by exfoliation and restacking of cadmium phosphorus trisulphide with adenosine monophosphate included

    SciTech Connect

    Westreich, Philippe . E-mail: pwestreich@alumni.sfu.ca; Yang Datong; Frindt, Robert F.

    2006-03-09

    Exfoliated single layer cadmium phosphorus trisulphide has been combined with the biological molecule adenosine monophosphate (AMP) to form the novel restacked compound Li{sub x}Cd{sub 0.8}PS{sub 3}(AMP){sub z}(H{sub 2}O){sub y}. Composition was determined using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and the structure of these compounds was studied using X-ray diffraction on oriented films. In the 0-80% relative humidity range, for (AMP){sub 0.5}, a host plane spacing near 19.6 A was found. Electron density calculations based on the X-ray diffraction pattern suggest a model for the arrangement of guest AMP molecules between the host layers, with an accompanying water molecule. The calculations also suggest that there is a buckling in the host layer of about {+-}0.6 A.

  1. Investigation of dissociative electron attachment to 2'-deoxycytidine-3'-monophosphate using DFT method and time dependent wave packet approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Somnath; B, Renjith; Mishra, Manoj K.; Sarma, Manabendra

    2012-08-01

    Effect of electron correlation on single strand breaks (SSBs) induced by low energy electron (LEE) has been investigated in a fragment excised from a DNA, viz., 2'-deoxycytidine-3'-monophosphate [3'-dCMPH] molecule in gas phase at DFT-B3LYP/6-31+G(d) accuracy level and using local complex potential based time dependent wave packet (LCP-TDWP) approach. The results obtained, in conjunction with our earlier investigation, show the possibility of SSB at very low energy (0.15 eV) where the LEE transfers from π* to σ* resonance state which resembles a SN2 type mechanism. In addition, for the first time, an indication of quantum mechanical tunneling in strand breaking is seen from the highest anionic bound vibrational state (χ5), which may have a substantial role during DNA damage.

  2. Low energy electron attachment to the nucleotide deoxycytidine monophosphate: direct evidence for the molecular mechanisms of electron-induced DNA strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Kopyra, Janina

    2012-06-21

    Reactions induced by the attachment of low energy electrons to an entire gas phase nucleotide (2'-deoxycytidine 5'-monophosphate) are reported for the first time. From the resonant attachment profiles information on the site of initial electron localization and from the observed ionic fragments information on final bond cleavage can be extracted.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase (AMPD) from Arabidopsis thaliana in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Byung Woo; Bingman, Craig A.; Mahnke, Donna K.; Sabina, Richard L.; Phillips, George N. Jr

    2005-08-01

    Adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase from A. thaliana has been crystallized in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate. Diffraction data have been collected to 3.34 Å resolution. Adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase (AMPD) is a eukaryotic enzyme that converts adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) to inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP) and ammonia. AMPD from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtAMPD) was cloned into the baculoviral transfer vector p2Bac and co-transfected along with a modified baculoviral genome into Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells. The resulting recombinant baculovirus were plaque-purified, amplified and used to overexpress recombinant AtAMPD. Crystals of purified AtAMPD have been obtained to which coformycin 5′-phosphate, a transition-state inhibitor, is bound. Crystals belong to space group P6{sub 2}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 131.325, c = 208.254 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. Diffraction data were collected to 3.34 Å resolution from a crystal in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate and to 4.05 Å resolution from a crystal of a mercury derivative.

  4. The effect of adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) on tenderness, microstructure and chemical-physical index of duck breast meat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daoying; Deng, Shaoying; Zhang, Muhan; Geng, Zhiming; Sun, Chong; Bian, Huan; Xu, Weimin; Zhu, Yongzhi; Liu, Fang; Wu, Haihong

    2016-03-30

    Adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) is often used in meat and poultry soups as a flavor enhancer (flavor modifier), or as food additives for specific nutritional purposes. Our previous research as well as evidence from others showed that actomyosin could be dissociated into myosin and actin by AMP in extracted muscle solution. However, there is no report available on the application of AMP to dissociate actomyosin and to improve meat tenderness. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of AMP on duck meat tenderness and other quality traits and to explore the mechanism of the action of AMP on meat tenderness. Duck breast muscle was treated with 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 mmol L(-1) AMP at 5 °C for 10 h and examined for shear force, microstructure, actomyosin dissociation, myofibril fragmentation index (MFI), pH, water content, cooking loss, CIE* color (L*, a*, b*), inosine monophosphate (IMP) and free amino acid (FAA) contents. Results showed that shear force, cooking loss, L* and b* of the muscles significantly decreased after AMP treatment (P < 0.05); actomyosin dissociation, MFI, pH, water content, fiber diameter, sarcomere length, IMP and ammonia significantly increased (P < 0.05); no significant change in a* or other FAA content was observed (P > 0.05), and muscle shrinkage in transverse and longitudinal directions were restrained after AMP treatment. The results suggest that AMP could notably improve meat tenderness, and this effect was probably mainly through increasing muscle pH, promoting actomyosin dissociation and disrupting the Z-line; meanwhile, the conversion of AMP to IMP may contribute to the flavor of meat. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. IMPDH2 genetic polymorphism: a promoter single-nucleotide polymorphism disrupts a cyclic adenosine monophosphate responsive element.

    PubMed

    Garat, Anne; Cauffiez, Christelle; Hamdan-Khalil, Rima; Glowacki, François; Devos, Aurore; Leclerc, Julie; Lionet, Arnaud; Allorge, Delphine; Lo-Guidice, Jean-Marc; Broly, Franck

    2009-12-01

    Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), which catalyzes a key step in the de novo biosynthesis of guanine nucleotide, is mediated by two highly conserved isoforms, IMPDH1 and IMPDH2. In this study, IMPDH2 genetic polymorphism was investigated in 96 individuals of Caucasian origin. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms were identified, comprising one previously described single base-pair substitution in the close vicinity of the consensus donor splice site of intron 7 (IVS7+10T>C), and three novel polymorphisms, one silent substitution in exon 9 (c.915C>G), one single base-pair insertion (g.6971_6972insT) within the 3'-untranslated region of the gene, and one substitution located in the promoter region (c.-95T>G) in a transcription factor binding site CRE(A) (cyclic adenosine monophosphate [cAMP] response element). Considering the nature and location of this latter polymorphism, its functional relevance was examined by transfecting HEK293 and Jurkat cell lines with constructs of the related region of IMPDH2/luciferase reporter gene. The c.-95T>G mutation leads to a significant decrease of luciferase activity (HEK293: 55% decrease, p < 0.05; Jurkat: 65% decrease, p < 0.05) compared with the wild-type promoter sequence and, therefore, is likely to determine interindividual differences in IMPDH2 transcriptional regulation. These results might contribute to a better understanding of the variability in clinical outcome and dose adjustments of certain immunosuppressors that are metabolized through the IMPDH pathway or that are IMPDH inhibitors.

  6. A Single Deoxynucleoside Kinase Variant from Drosophila melanogaster Synthesizes Monophosphates of Nucleosides That Are Components of an Expanded Genetic System.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Mariko F; Winiger, Christian B; Shaw, Ryan W; Kim, Myong-Jung; Kim, Myong-Sang; Daugherty, Ashley B; Chen, Fei; Moussatche, Patricia; Moses, Jennifer D; Lutz, Stefan; Benner, Steven A

    2017-03-17

    Deoxynucleoside kinase from D. melanogaster (DmdNK) has broad specificity; although it catalyzes the phosphorylation of natural pyrimidine more efficiently than natural purine nucleosides, it accepts all four 2'-deoxynucleosides and many analogues, using ATP as a phosphate donor to give the corresponding deoxynucleoside monophosphates. Here, we show that replacing a single amino acid (glutamine 81 by glutamate) in DmdNK creates a variant that also catalyzes the phosphorylation of nucleosides that form part of an artificially expanded genetic information system (AEGIS). By shuffling hydrogen bonding groups on the nucleobases, AEGIS adds potentially as many as four additional nucleobase pairs to the genetic "alphabet". Specifically, we show that DmdNK Q81E creates the monophosphates from the AEGIS nucleosides dP, dZ, dX, and dK (respectively 2-amino-8-(1'-β-d-2'-deoxyribofuranosyl)-imidazo[1,2-a]-1,3,5-triazin-4(8H)-one, dP; 6-amino-3-(1'-β-d-2'-deoxyribofuranosyl)-5-nitro-1H-pyridin-2-one, dZ; 8-(1'β-d-2'-deoxy-ribofuranosyl)imidazo[1,2-a]-1,3,5-triazine-2(8H)-4(3H)-dione, dX; and 2,4-diamino-5-(1'-β-d-2'-deoxyribofuranosyl)-pyrimidine, dK). Using a coupled enzyme assay, in vitro kinetic parameters were obtained for three of these nucleosides (dP, dX, and dK; the UV absorbance of dZ made it impossible to get its precise kinetic parameters). Thus, DmdNK Q81E appears to be a suitable enzyme to catalyze the first step in the biosynthesis of AEGIS 2'-deoxynucleoside triphosphates in vitro and, perhaps, in vivo, in a cell able to manage plasmids containing AEGIS DNA.

  7. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate-response element-binding protein mediates the proangiogenic or proinflammatory activity of gremlin.

    PubMed

    Corsini, Michela; Moroni, Emanuela; Ravelli, Cosetta; Andrés, Germán; Grillo, Elisabetta; Ali, Imran H; Brazil, Derek P; Presta, Marco; Mitola, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis and inflammation are closely related processes. Gremlin is a novel noncanonical vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) ligand that induces a proangiogenic response in endothelial cells (ECs). Here, we investigated the role of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-response element (CRE)-binding protein (CREB) in mediating the proinflammatory and proangiogenic responses of ECs to gremlin. Gremlin induces a proinflammatory response in ECs, leading to reactive oxygen species and cyclic adenosine monophosphate production and the upregulation of proinflammatory molecules involved in leukocyte extravasation, including chemokine (C-C motif) ligand-2 (Ccl2) and Ccl7, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand-1 (Cxcl1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Accordingly, gremlin induces the VEGFR2-dependent phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, and transactivating activity of CREB in ECs. CREB activation mediates the early phases of the angiogenic response to gremlin, including stimulation of EC motility and permeability, and leads to monocyte/macrophage adhesion to ECs and their extravasation. All these effects are inhibited by EC transfection with a dominant-negative CREB mutant or with a CREB-binding protein-CREB interaction inhibitor that competes for CREB/CRE binding. Also, both recombinant gremlin and gremlin-expressing tumor cells induce proinflammatory/proangiogenic responses in vivo that are suppressed by the anti-inflammatory drug hydrocortisone. Similar effects were induced by the canonical VEGFR2 ligand VEGF-A165. Together, the results underline the tight cross-talk between angiogenesis and inflammation and demonstrate a crucial role of CREB activation in the modulation of the VEGFR2-mediated proinflammatory/proangiogenic response of ECs to gremlin.

  8. “cAMP Sponge”: A Buffer for Cyclic Adenosine 3′, 5′-Monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos; Moyer, Mary Pat; Curci, Silvana; Hofer, Aldebaran M.

    2009-01-01

    Background While intracellular buffers are widely used to study calcium signaling, no such tool exists for the other major second messenger, cyclic AMP (cAMP). Methods/Principal Findings Here we describe a genetically encoded buffer for cAMP based on the high-affinity cAMP-binding carboxy-terminus of the regulatory subunit RIβ of protein kinase A (PKA). Addition of targeting sequences permitted localization of this fragment to the extra-nuclear compartment, while tagging with mCherry allowed quantification of its expression at the single cell level. This construct (named “cAMP sponge”) was shown to selectively bind cAMP in vitro. Its expression significantly suppressed agonist-induced cAMP signals and the downstream activation of PKA within the cytosol as measured by FRET-based sensors in single living cells. Point mutations in the cAMP-binding domains of the construct rendered the chimera unable to bind cAMP in vitro or in situ. Cyclic AMP sponge was fruitfully applied to examine feedback regulation of gap junction-mediated transfer of cAMP in epithelial cell couplets. Conclusions This newest member of the cAMP toolbox has the potential to reveal unique biological functions of cAMP, including insight into the functional significance of compartmentalized signaling events. PMID:19888343

  9. Predator odor evokes sex-independent stress responses in male and female Wistar rats and reduces phosphorylation of cyclic-adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein in the male, but not the female hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Homiack, Damek; O'Cinneide, Emma; Hajmurad, Sema; Barrileaux, Brett; Stanley, Mary; Kreutz, Michael R; Schrader, Laura A

    2017-09-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is characterized by memory disturbances following trauma. Acute predator threat has emerged as an ethological model of PTSD, yet the effects of predator odor on signaling cascades associated with long-term memory remain poorly understood. In this study, we exposed male and female Wistar rats to the synthetic predator odor 2,5-dihydro-2,4,5-trimethylthiazoline (TMT) to assess behavioral and physiological responses as well as rapid modulation of signal transduction cascades associated with learning and memory in the male and female hippocampus. During exposure to TMT in the homecage, both male and female animals displayed robust immobility, avoidance, and altered activity as a function of time. Physiologically, TMT exposure increased circulating corticosterone and blood glucose in both male and female rodents, suggesting that TMT evokes sex-independent behavioral and physiological responses. With respect to signal transduction, TMT exposure rapidly reduced phosphorylation of cyclic-adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB) in the male, but not the female hippocampus. Furthermore, TMT exposure reduced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and increased nuclear expression of the synapto-nuclear messenger protein Jacob in the male hippocampus, consistent with activation of the CREB shut-off pathway. In a follow-up behavioral experiment, post-training exposure to TMT did not affect spatial water maze performance of male rats. However, male rats re-introduced to the context in which TMT had previously been presented displayed avoidance and hyperactivity, but not freezing behavior or elevated corticosterone responses, suggesting that TMT exposure supports a form of contextual conditioning which is not characterized by immobility. Taken together, our findings suggest that TMT evokes similar behavioral and physiological responses in male and female Wistar rats, but affects distinct signaling

  10. Genistein promotes insulin action through adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 inhibition in the skeletal muscle of mice fed a high energy diet.

    PubMed

    Arunkumar, Elumalai; Anuradha, Carani Venkatraman

    2012-08-01

    Genistein (GEN), a soy isoflavone, exerts insulin-sensitizing actions in animals; however, the underlying mechanisms have not been determined. Because GEN is a known activator of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), we hypothesize that GEN activates insulin signaling through AMPK activation. To test this hypothesis, a high fat-high fructose diet (HFFD)-fed mice model of insulin resistance was administered GEN, and the insulin signaling pathway proteins in the skeletal muscle were examined. Hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia observed in HFFD-fed mice were significantly lowered by GEN. GEN increased insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor-β and insulin receptor substrate (IRS) 1 but down-regulated IRS-1 serine phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle of HFFD-fed mice. Furthermore, GEN treatment improved muscle IRS-1-associated phospatidylinositol-3 kinase expression, phosphorylation of Akt at Ser(473), and translocation of glucose transporter subtype 4. Phosphorylation of AMPK at Thr(172) and acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) at Ser(79) was augmented, whereas phosphorylation of p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 at Thr(389) was significantly decreased after GEN treatment in the skeletal muscle of HFFD-fed mice. These results suggest that GEN might improve insulin action in the skeletal muscle by targeting AMPK.

  11. Adenosine 5′-monophosphate blocks acetaminophen toxicity by increasing ubiquitination-mediated ASK1 degradation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qi; Xu, Xi; Kong, Yi; Zhang, Jianfa

    2017-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced liver failure in the world. Hepatic c-jun NH2-terminal protein kinase (JNK) activation is thought to be a consequence of oxidative stress produced during APAP metabolism. Activation of JNK signals causes hepatocellular damage with necrotic and apoptotic cell death. Here we found that APAP caused a feedback increase in plasma adenosine 5′-monophsphate (5′-AMP). We demonstrated that co-administration of APAP and 5′-AMP significantly ameliorated APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in mice, without influences on APAP metabolism and its analgesic function. The mechanism of protection by 5′-AMP was through inhibiting APAP-induced activation of JNK, and attenuating downstream c-jun and c-fos gene expression. This was triggered by attenuating apoptosis signal-regulated kinase 1(ASK1) methylation and increasing ubiquitination-mediated ASK1 protein degradation. Our findings indicate that replacing the current APAP with a safe and functional APAP/5′-AMP formulation could prevent APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:28031524

  12. Effect of bucladesine, Pentoxifylline, and H-89 as cyclic adenosine monophosphate analog, phosphodiesterase and protein kinase A inhibitor on acute pain.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Forouz; Hosseini-Zare, Mahshid Sadat; Aghajani, Haleh; Seyedi, Yalda; Hosseini-Zare, Maryam Sadat; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2017-03-07

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and its dependent pathway on thermal nociception in a mouse model of acute pain. Here we studied the effect of H-89 (protein kinase A inhibitor), Bucladesine (Db-cAMP) (membrane permeable analog of cAMP) and pentoxifylline (PTX) (non-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor) on pain sensation. Different doses of H-89 (0.05, 0.1 and 0.5 mg/100g), PTX (5, 10 and 20 mg/100g), and Db-cAMP (50, 100 and 300 nM/mouse) were administered intraperitoneally (I.p.) 15 minutes before a tail-flick test. In combination groups, we injected the first and the second compound 30 and 15 minutes before the tail-flick test, respectively. I.p. administration of H-89 and PTX significantly decreased the thermal-induced pain sensation in their low applied doses. Bucladesine, however, decreased the pain sensation in a dose-dependent manner. The highest applied dose of H-89 (0.5 mg/100g) attenuated the anti-nociceptive effect of Db-cAMP in doses of 50 and 100 nM/mouse. Surprisingly, Db-cAMP decreased the anti-nociceptive effect of the lowest dose of H-89 (0.05mg/100g). All applied doses of PTX reduced the effect of 0.05mg/100g H-89 on pain sensation; however, the highest dose of H-89 compromised the anti-nociceptive effect of 20 mg/100g dose of PTX. Co-administration of Db-cAMP and PTX increased the anti-nociceptive effect of each compound on thermal-induced pain. In conclusion, PTX, H-89, and Db-cAMP affect the thermal-induced pain by probably interacting with intracellular cAMP and cGMP signaling pathways and cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Asynchrony in the expression of guanosine 3':5'-phosphate-dependent protein kinase by clusters of Purkinje cells during the perinatal development of rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Wassef, M; Sotelo, C

    1984-12-01

    The early maturation of Purkinje cells was studied by immunocytochemistry in the rat cerebellum. The antiserum against guanosine 3':5'-phosphate-dependent protein kinase used in this study has been shown previously to label specifically all Purkinje cells in the adult rat. Immunoreactive Purkinje cells are first observed at embryonic day 17, 2 days after the end of proliferation of this neuronal population. At this time, most of the labeled cells are situated in the subventricular zone, although some immunoreactive Purkinje cells have already reached the cortex. Between embryonic day 17 and birth, four clusters of immunoreactive Purkinje cells appear in each hemicerebellum. Their time course and their pathways of migration to the cortex were followed. The immunoreactive clusters are tailed by a fibre-like immunostained material. The pattern of the migrating clusters at embryonic day 19 is very similar to the pattern of the corticonuclear projection observed at birth. From comparison between sections of embryos processed either for immunocytochemistry or Cresyl Violet staining, it appears that all the Purkinje cells are not immunoreactive. Positive and negative clusters of Purkinje cells are sharply delineated, their cells never mix. Immunopositive and negative clusters of Purkinje cells coexist until postnatal day 3. However, from birth onwards, negative clusters begin progressively in a caudorostral sequence to express guanosine 3':5'-phosphate-dependent protein kinase and rapidly attain the same level of immunoreactivity as previously labeled clusters. From postnatal day 5 all the Purkinje cells are immunoreactive. It is concluded that a compartmentalization of the cerebellar cortex is present very early and is evidenced by differences in the biochemical maturation of Purkinje cells. The axons of Purkinje cells reach the deep nuclei, following the same pathways as the clusters of Purkinje cells migrating to the cortex. Therefore, the mechanisms regulating the

  14. Effects of Adenosine Monophosphate Used in Combination with L-Arginine on Female Rabbit Corpus Cavernosum Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Stücker, Olivier; Pons, Catherine; Neuzillet, Yann; Laemmel, Elisabeth; Lebret, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sexual dysfunction is significantly more prevalent in women than in men. However, to date, no satisfactory oral treatment is yet available. Aim The aim of this study was to study the effects of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) alone or its combination with L-Arginine on the relaxation of the female rabbit corpus cavernosum. Methods Cylinder strips from the corporal body of the excised clitoris from female New Zealand White rabbits were incubated in Krebs solution. Phenylephrine (PE) precontraction was achieved, then the drugs AMP and L-Arginine were administered either independently or in sequential combinations to the strips under precontracted conditions. Main Outcome Measures Contraction percentages were compared. Results When precontraction was induced by PE 8 μM or 20 μM, AMP was shown to induce relaxation up to 25% in a dose-dependent manner. The relaxation induced by L-Arginine reached 15.6% at 5.10−4 M vs. 16.5% at AMP 5.10−4 M under the same experimental conditions. Nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine strongly inhibited the relaxing effect provoked by AMP, suggesting that the action mechanism of this nucleotide is related to the NO pathway. The combination of L-Arginine at 5.10−4 M with AMP at different doses ranging from 5.10−4 M to 10−3 M significantly amplified the relaxing response up to 40.7% and 58%, respectively. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that AMP induces a relaxing effect on the female rabbit corpora. They also show that L-Arginine and AMP can potentiate each other and that a synergistic effect can be obtained by their combined use. Because only slight differences exist between both sexes in response to NO donors and/or nucleotide purines or in their use together, it is very likely that close biochemical mechanisms, although not to the same degree and not quite similar, are involved in the engorgement of the penis and the clitoris of New Zealand White rabbits. Stücker O, Pons C, Neuzillet Y

  15. Chemistry of HIV-1 virucidal Pt complexes having neglected bidentate sp2 N-donor carrier ligands with linked triazine and pyridine rings. synthesis, NMR spectral features, structure, and reaction with guanosine.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Vidhi; Bhattacharyya, Debadeep; Fronczek, Frank R; Marzilli, Patricia A; Marzilli, Luigi G

    2006-09-04

    Complexes of the types LPtCl2 and [L2Pt]X2 [L = substituted 3-(pyridin-2'-yl)-1,2,4-triazine] were synthesized and characterized by NMR spectroscopy and, for the first time, by X-ray crystallography in an effort to determine the coordination properties of this novel class of inorganic medicinal agents possessing HIV-1 virucidal activity. The agents containing either one or two sp2 N-donor bidentate ligands are referred to as ptt (platinum triazine) agents. The X-ray structures of three LPtCl2 compounds revealed the expected pseudo-square-planar geometry. The X-ray structure of [(pyPh2t)2Pt](BF4)2 [pyPh2t = 3-(pyridin-2'-yl)-5,6-diphenyl-1,2,4-triazine] has the expected trans relationship of the unsymmetrical L and is essentially planar, an unusual property for a Pt(II) complex with two bidentate sp2 N donors. HIV-1 is an RNA virus; the guanosine ribonucleoside (Guo) binds (MepyMe2t)PtCl2 at both (inequivalent) available coordination sites to form [(MepyMe2t)Pt(Guo)2]2+ [MepyMe2t = 3-(4'-methylpyridin-2'-yl)-5,6-dimethyl-1,2,4-triazine]. This adduct has four nearly equally intense Guo H8 signals attributed to two pairs of head-to-tail (HT) and head-to-head (HH) conformers, which interchange rapidly within each pair. However, equilibration between pairs requires rotation of the Guo cis to the MepyMe2t pyridyl ring, and the H6' proton on this ring projects toward the Guo and hinders Guo rotation about the Pt-N7 bond. Thus, the HT/HH pairs do not interchange; such behavior is rare. Guo did not add to [(MepyMe2t)2Pt]2+, a result suggesting the possibility that the virucidal activity of LPtCl2 and [L2Pt]2+ ptt agents arises respectively from covalent and noncovalent (possibly intercalative interactions favored by [L2Pt]2+ planarity) binding to biomolecular targets.

  16. Effect of guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate and related nucleoside polyphosphates on induction of tryptophanase and beta-galactosidase in permeabilized cells of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, A; Oki, T; Inui, T

    1978-10-04

    Exogenous addition of guanosine and adenosine 5'-(mono, di and tri) phosphate 3'-diphosphates (pppGpp, ppGpp, pGpp, pppApp, ppApp and pApp) stimulated the synthesis of tryptophanase and beta-galactosidase in permeabilized cells of Escherichia coli. From the results obtained with ppGpp and pppApp, this effect appeared to be at a transcriptional level and depended greatly on the growth condition; the largest effect was observed in cells under shiftdown or grown on poor enrgy source. ppGpp and pppApp, unlike cyclic AMP, did not act to overcome the inhibition of enzyme induction by glucose, but in combination with cyclic AMP caused a synergistic stimulation effect. In the shiftdown cells, ppGpp and pppApp gave 30% or more stimulation effect on tryptophanase induction while cyclic AMP did not stimulate induction. There was therefore a pronounced difference between cyclic AMP and ppGpp or pppApp in stimulatory function.

  17. Identification of Guanosine 5‧-diphosphate as Potential Iron Mobilizer: Preventing the Hepcidin-Ferroportin Interaction and Modulating the Interleukin-6/Stat-3 Pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angmo, Stanzin; Tripathi, Neha; Abbat, Sheenu; Sharma, Shailesh; Singh, Shelley Sardul; Halder, Avishek; Yadav, Kamalendra; Shukla, Geeta; Sandhir, Rajat; Rishi, Vikas; Bharatam, Prasad V.; Yadav, Hariom; Singhal, Nitin Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Hepcidin, a peptide hormone, is a key regulator in mammalian iron homeostasis. Increased level of hepcidin due to inflammatory conditions stimulates the ferroportin (FPN) transporter internalization, impairing the iron absorption; clinically manifested as anemia of inflammation (AI). Inhibiting hepcidin-mediated FPN degradation is proposed as an important strategy to combat AI. A systematic approach involving in silico, in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo studies is employed to identify hepcidin-binding agents. The virtual screening of 68,752 natural compounds via molecular docking resulted into identification of guanosine 5‧-diphosphate (GDP) as a promising hepcidin-binding agent. The molecular dynamics simulations helped to identify the important hepcidin residues involved in stabilization of hepcidin-GDP complex. The results gave a preliminary indication that GDP may possibly inhibit the hepcidin-FPN interactions. The in vitro studies revealed that GDP caused FPN stabilization (FPN-GFP cell lines) and increased the FPN-mediated cellular iron efflux (HepG2 and Caco-2 cells). Interestingly, the co-administration of GDP and ferrous sulphate (FeSO4) ameliorated the turpentine-induced AI in mice (indicated by increased haemoglobin level, serum iron, FPN expression and decreased ferritin level). These results suggest that GDP a promising natural small-molecule inhibitor that targets Hepcidin-FPN complex may be incorporated with iron supplement regimens to ameliorate AI.

  18. Functional expression of L-fucokinase/guanosine 5'-diphosphate-L-fucose pyrophosphorylase from Bacteroides fragilis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of nucleotide sugars from exogenous monosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ta-Wei; Ito, Hiromi; Chiba, Yasunori; Kubota, Tomomi; Sato, Takashi; Narimatsu, Hisashi

    2011-09-01

    The biosynthesis of glycoconjugates requires the relevant glycosyltransferases and nucleotide sugars that can act as donors. Given the biological importance of posttranslational glycosylation, a facile, robust and cost-effective strategy for the synthesis of nucleotide sugars is highly desirable. In this study, we demonstrate the synthesis of nucleotide sugars from corresponding monosaccharides in a highly efficient manner via metabolic engineering, using an enzymatic approach. This method exploits l-fucokinase/guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-l-fucose (L-Fuc) pyrophosphorylase (FKP), a bifunctional enzyme isolated from Bacteroides fragilis 9343, which converts l-Fuc into GDP-L-Fuc via an L-Fuc-1-phosphate intermediate. Because L-Fuc and d-arabinose (D-Ara) are structurally similar, it is assumed that the biosynthesis of GDP-D-Ara in a recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain harboring the FKP gene can occur through a mechanism akin to that of GDP-L-Fuc via the salvage pathway. Thus, we reasoned that by exogenously supplying different monosaccharides structurally related to L-Fuc, it should be possible to produce the corresponding nucleotide sugars with this recombinant yeast strain, regardless of internal acquisition of nucleotide sugars through expression of additive enzymes in the de novo pathway.

  19. DNA 3' pp 5' G de-capping activity of aprataxin: effect of cap nucleoside analogs and structural basis for guanosine recognition

    DOE PAGES

    Chauleau, Mathieu; Jacewicz, Agata; Shuman, Stewart

    2015-05-24

    DNA3' pp 5'G caps synthesized by the 3'-PO4/5'-OH ligase RtcB have a strong impact on enzymatic reactions at DNA 3'-OH ends. Aprataxin, an enzyme that repairs A5'pp5'DNA ends formed during abortive ligation by classic 3'-OH/5'-PO4 ligases, is also a DNA 3' de-capping enzyme, converting DNAppG to DNA3'p and GMP. By taking advantage of RtcB's ability to utilize certain GTP analogs to synthesize DNAppN caps, we show that aprataxin hydrolyzes inosine and 6-O-methylguanosine caps, but is not adept at removing a deoxyguanosine cap. We report a 1.5 Å crystal structure of aprataxin in a complex with GMP, which reveals that: (i)more » GMP binds at the same position and in the same anti nucleoside conformation as AMP; and (ii) aprataxin makes more extensive nucleobase contacts with guanine than with adenine, via a hydrogen bonding network to the guanine O6, N1, N2 base edge. Alanine mutations of catalytic residues His147 and His149 abolish DNAppG de-capping activity, suggesting that the 3' de-guanylylation and 5' de-adenylylation reactions follow the same pathway of nucleotidyl transfer through a covalent aprataxin-(His147)–NMP intermediate. Alanine mutation of Asp63, which coordinates the guanosine ribose hydroxyls, impairs DNAppG de-capping.« less

  20. Guanosine tetra- and pentaphosphate synthase activity in chloroplasts of a higher plant: association with 70S ribosomes and inhibition by tetracycline

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Koji; Kanno, Takuya; Endo, Yaeta; Wakasa, Kyo; Tozawa, Yuzuru

    2004-01-01

    Chloroplasts possess bacterial-type systems for transcription and translation. On the basis of the identification of a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii gene encoding a RelA-SpoT homolog (RSH) that catalyzes the synthesis of guanosine tetra- or pentaphosphate [(p)ppGpp], we have previously suggested the operation of stringent control in the chloroplast genetic system. Although RSH genes have also been identified in several higher plants, the activities of the encoded enzymes and their mode of action in chloroplasts have remained uncharacterized. We have now characterized the intrinsic (p)ppGpp synthase activity of chloroplast extracts prepared from pea (Pisum sativum). Fractionation by ultracentrifugation suggested that the (p)ppGpp synthase activity of a translationally active chloroplast stromal extract was associated with 70S ribosomes. Furthermore, this enzymatic activity was inhibited by tetracycline, as was the peptide elongation activity of the extract. Structural comparisons between rRNA molecules of Escherichia coli and pea chloroplasts revealed the conservation of putative tetracycline-binding sites. These observations demonstrate the presence of a ribosome-associated (p)ppGpp synthase activity in the chloroplasts of a higher plant, further implicating (p)ppGpp in a genetic system of chloroplasts similar to that operative in bacteria. PMID:15507686

  1. Live-cell imaging in Caenorhabditis elegans reveals the distinct roles of dynamin self-assembly and guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis in the removal of apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    He, Bin; Yu, Xiaomeng; Margolis, Moran; Liu, Xianghua; Leng, Xiaohong; Etzion, Yael; Zheng, Fei; Lu, Nan; Quiocho, Florante A; Danino, Dganit; Zhou, Zheng

    2010-02-15

    Dynamins are large GTPases that oligomerize along membranes. Dynamin's membrane fission activity is believed to underlie many of its physiological functions in membrane trafficking. Previously, we reported that DYN-1 (Caenorhabditis elegans dynamin) drove the engulfment and degradation of apoptotic cells through promoting the recruitment and fusion of intracellular vesicles to phagocytic cups and phagosomes, an activity distinct from dynamin's well-known membrane fission activity. Here, we have detected the oligomerization of DYN-1 in living C. elegans embryos and identified DYN-1 mutations that abolish DYN-1's oligomerization or GTPase activities. Specifically, abolishing self-assembly destroys DYN-1's association with the surfaces of extending pseudopods and maturing phagosomes, whereas inactivating guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding blocks the dissociation of DYN-1 from these membranes. Abolishing the self-assembly or GTPase activities of DYN-1 leads to common as well as differential phagosomal maturation defects. Whereas both types of mutations cause delays in the transient enrichment of the RAB-5 GTPase to phagosomal surfaces, only the self-assembly mutation but not GTP binding mutation causes failure in recruiting the RAB-7 GTPase to phagosomal surfaces. We propose that during cell corpse removal, dynamin's self-assembly and GTP hydrolysis activities establish a precise dynamic control of DYN-1's transient association to its target membranes and that this control mechanism underlies the dynamic recruitment of downstream effectors to target membranes.

  2. Identification of Guanosine 5′-diphosphate as Potential Iron Mobilizer: Preventing the Hepcidin-Ferroportin Interaction and Modulating the Interleukin-6/Stat-3 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Angmo, Stanzin; Tripathi, Neha; Abbat, Sheenu; Sharma, Shailesh; Singh, Shelley Sardul; Halder, Avishek; Yadav, Kamalendra; Shukla, Geeta; Sandhir, Rajat; Rishi, Vikas; Bharatam, Prasad V.; Yadav, Hariom; Singhal, Nitin Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Hepcidin, a peptide hormone, is a key regulator in mammalian iron homeostasis. Increased level of hepcidin due to inflammatory conditions stimulates the ferroportin (FPN) transporter internalization, impairing the iron absorption; clinically manifested as anemia of inflammation (AI). Inhibiting hepcidin-mediated FPN degradation is proposed as an important strategy to combat AI. A systematic approach involving in silico, in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo studies is employed to identify hepcidin-binding agents. The virtual screening of 68,752 natural compounds via molecular docking resulted into identification of guanosine 5′-diphosphate (GDP) as a promising hepcidin-binding agent. The molecular dynamics simulations helped to identify the important hepcidin residues involved in stabilization of hepcidin-GDP complex. The results gave a preliminary indication that GDP may possibly inhibit the hepcidin-FPN interactions. The in vitro studies revealed that GDP caused FPN stabilization (FPN-GFP cell lines) and increased the FPN-mediated cellular iron efflux (HepG2 and Caco-2 cells). Interestingly, the co-administration of GDP and ferrous sulphate (FeSO4) ameliorated the turpentine-induced AI in mice (indicated by increased haemoglobin level, serum iron, FPN expression and decreased ferritin level). These results suggest that GDP a promising natural small-molecule inhibitor that targets Hepcidin-FPN complex may be incorporated with iron supplement regimens to ameliorate AI. PMID:28054602

  3. Structure and potential mutagenicity of new hydantoin products from guanosine and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine oxidation by transition metals.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Cynthia J; Muller, James G; Kornyushyna, Olga; Luo, Wenchen; Duarte, Victor; Leipold, Michael D; David, Sheila S

    2002-10-01

    In vitro work in this laboratory has identified new DNA lesions resulting from further oxidation of a common biomarker of oxidative damage, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (OG). The major product of oxidation of OG in a nucleoside, nucleotide, or single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide using metal ions that act as one-electron oxidants is the new nucleoside derivative spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp). In duplex DNA an equilibrating mixture of two isomeric products, guanidinohydantoin (Gh) and iminoallantoin (Ia), is produced. These products are also formed by the overall four-electron oxidation of guanosine by photochemical processes involving O(2). DNA template strands containing either Sp or Gh/Ia generally acted as a block to DNA synthesis with the Klenow exo(-) fragment of pol I. However, when nucleotide insertion did occur opposite the lesions, only 2'-deoxyadenosine 5-triphosphate and 2'-deoxyguanine 5-triphosphate were used for primer extension. The Escherichia coli DNA repair enzyme Fpg was able to remove the Sp and Gh/Ia lesions from duplex DNA substrates, although the efficiency was depended on the base opposite the lesion.

  4. An Interplay among FIS, H-NS, and Guanosine Tetraphosphate Modulates Transcription of the Escherichia coli cspA Gene under Physiological Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Brandi, Anna; Giangrossi, Mara; Giuliodori, Anna M.; Falconi, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    CspA, the most characterized member of the csp gene family of Escherichia coli, is highly expressed not only in response to cold stress, but also during the early phase of growth at 37°C. Here, we investigate at molecular level the antagonistic role played by the nucleoid proteins FIS and H-NS in the regulation of cspA expression under non-stress conditions. By means of both probing experiments and immunological detection, we demonstrate in vitro the existence of binding sites for these proteins on the cspA regulatory region, in which FIS and H-NS bind simultaneously to form composite DNA-protein complexes. While the in vitro promoter activity of cspA is stimulated by FIS and repressed by H-NS, a compensatory effect is observed when both proteins are added in the transcription assay. Consistently with these findings, inactivation of fis and hns genes reversely affect the in vivo amount of cspA mRNA. In addition, by means of strains expressing a high level of the alarmone guanosine tetraphosphate ((p)ppGpp) and in vitro transcription assays, we show that the cspA promoter is sensitive to (p)ppGpp inhibition. The (p)ppGpp-mediated expression of fis and hns genes is also analyzed, thus clarifying some aspects of the regulatory loop governing cspA transcription. PMID:27252944

  5. Isomerization mechanism of aspartate to isoaspartate implied by structures of Ustilago sphaerogena ribonuclease U2 complexed with adenosine 3'-monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Shuji

    2010-07-01

    Aspartates in proteins are isomerized non-enzymatically to isoaspartate via succinimide in vitro and in vivo. In order to elucidate the mechanism of isoaspartate formation within the Asp45-Glu46 sequence of Ustilago sphaerogena ribonuclease U2 based on three-dimensional structure, crystal structures of ribonuclease U2 complexed with adenosine 3'-monophosphate have been solved at 0.96 and 0.99 A resolution. The crystal structures revealed that the C(gamma) atom of Asp45 is located just beside the main-chain N atom of Glu46 and that the conformation which is suitable for succinimide formation is stabilized by a hydrogen-bond network mediated by water molecules 190, 219 and 220. These water molecules are suggested to promote the formation of isoaspartate via succinimide: in the succinimide-formation reaction water 219 receives a proton from the N atom of Glu46 as a general base and waters 190 and 220 stabilize the tetrahedral intermediate, and in the succinimide-hydrolysis reaction water 219 provides a proton for the N atom of Glu46 as a general acid. The purine-base recognition scheme of ribonuclease U2 is also discussed.

  6. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation and suppression of inflammatory response by cell stretching in rabbit synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kunanusornchai, Wanlop; Muanprasat, Chatchai; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj

    2016-12-01

    Joint mobilization is known to be beneficial in osteoarthritis (OA) patients. This study aimed to investigate the effect of stretching on adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and its role in modulating inflammation in rabbit synovial fibroblasts. Uniaxial stretching of isolated rabbit synovial fibroblasts for ten min was performed. Stretching-induced AMPK activation, its underlying mechanism, and its anti-inflammatory effect were investigated using Western blot. Static stretching at 20 % of initial length resulted in AMPK activation characterized by expression of phosphorylated AMPK and phosphorylated acetyl-Co A carboxylase. AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation peaked 1 h after stretching and declined toward resting activity. Using cell viability assays, static stretching did not appear to cause cellular damage. Activation of AMPK involves Ca(2+) influx via a mechanosensitive L-type Ca(2+) channel, which subsequently raises intracellular Ca(2+) and activates AMPK via Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ). Interestingly, stretching suppressed TNFα-induced expression of COX-2, iNOS, and phosphorylated NF-κB. These effects were prevented by pretreatment with compound C, an AMPK inhibitor. These results suggest that mechanical stretching suppressed inflammatory responses in synovial fibroblasts via a L-type Ca(2+)-channel-CaMKKβ-AMPK-dependent pathway which may underlie joint mobilization's ability to alleviate OA symptoms.

  7. Investigation on the occurrence and significance of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate in phytoplankton and natural aquatic communities

    SciTech Connect

    Francko, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    This study is an investigation into the occurrence and potential functions of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP), a potent and ubiquitous metabolic regulatory molecule in heterotrophic organisms, in phytoplankton and in natural aquatic communities. Laboratory-cultured phytoplankton were grown under both optimal and suboptimal nutrient regimes under constant temperature and illumination regimes. Cellular and extracellular cAMP production, characterized by a number of biochemical techniques, was correlated with growth rate dynamics, chlorophyll a synthesis, /sup 14/C-bicarbonate uptake, alkaline phosphatase activity, and heterocyst formation. The blue-green alga Anabaena flos-aquae was used as a model system in the examination of these metabolic variables. Additionally, this alga was used to test the effects of perturbation of cAMP levels on the aforementioned metabolic variables. Investigations on the occurrence and seasonal dynamics of cAMP in aquatic systems were conducted on Lawrence Lake, a hardwater oligotrophic lake, and on Wintergreen Lake, a hardwater hypereutrophic lake, both in southwestern Michigan. Putative cAMP from both systems was characterized by several biochemical techniques. Weekly sampling of particulate and dissolved cAMP in the epilimnia of both lakes was correlated with data on the rates of primary productivity, alkaline phosphatase activity, chlorophyll a synthesis and changes in phytoplankton community structure.

  8. Hypothermia induced by adenosine 5'-monophosphate attenuates early stage injury in an acute gouty arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhimin; Guo, Weiting; Lu, Shulai; Lv, Wenshan; Li, Changgui; Wang, Yangang; Zhao, Shihua; Yan, Shengli; Tao, Zhenyin; Wang, Yunlong

    2013-08-01

    To investigate whether the hypothermia induced by Adenosine 5'-Monophosphate (5'-AMP) could attenuate early stage injury in a rat acute gouty arthritis model. Ankle joint injection with monosodium urate monohydrate crystals (MSU crystals) in hypothermia rat model which was induced by 5'-AMP and then observe whether hypothermia induced by 5'-AMP could be effectively inhibit the inflammation on acute gouty arthritis in rats. AMP-induced hypothermia has protective effects on our acute gouty arthritis, which was demonstrated by the following criteria: (1) a significant reduction in the ankle swelling (p < 0.001); (2) a significant decrease in the occurrence of leukocyte infiltration and mild hemorrhage; (3) a significant reduction in the presence of serum Interleukin-1β (IL-1β, p < 0.001) and metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, p < 0.001); and (4) a significant inhibition in the Nuclear Factor -κappaB (NF-κB) activity (p < 0.001). AMP-induced hypothermia could inhibit acute inflammation reaction and protect the synovial tissue against acute injury in a rat acute gouty arthritis model.

  9. The crystal structure of ribonuclease A in complex with thymidine-3'-monophosphate provides further insight into ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Nicolas; Jayasundera, Thusitha B; Simonović, Miljan; Loria, J Patrick

    2010-08-15

    Thymidine-3'-monophosphate (3'-TMP) is a competitive inhibitor analogue of the 3'-CMP and 3'-UMP natural product inhibitors of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A). Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show that 3'-TMP binds the enzyme with a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 15 microM making it one of the strongest binding members of the five natural bases found in nucleic acids (A, C, G, T, and U). To further investigate the molecular properties of this potent natural affinity, we have determined the crystal structure of bovine pancreatic RNase A in complex with 3'-TMP at 1.55 A resolution and we have performed NMR binding experiments with 3'-CMP and 3'-TMP. Our results show that binding of 3'-TMP is very similar to other natural and non-natural pyrimidine ligands, demonstrating that single nucleotide affinity is independent of the presence or absence of a 2'-hydroxyl on the ribose moiety of pyrimidines and suggesting that the pyrimidine binding subsite of RNase A is not a significant contributor of inhibitor discrimination. Accumulating evidence suggests that very subtle structural, chemical, and potentially motional variations contribute to ligand discrimination in this enzyme.

  10. Low-power laser irradiation promotes the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells via cyclic adenosine monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jyun-Yi; Chen, Chia-Hsin; Yeh, Li-Yin; Yeh, Ming-Long; Ting, Chun-Chan; Wang, Yan-Hsiung

    2013-06-01

    Retaining or improving periodontal ligament (PDL) function is crucial for restoring periodontal defects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physiological effects of low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human PDL (hPDL) cells. Cultured hPDL cells were irradiated (660 nm) daily with doses of 0, 1, 2 or 4 J⋅cm(-2). Cell proliferation was evaluated by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and the effect of LPLI on osteogenic differentiation was assessed by Alizarin Red S staining and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. Additionally, osteogenic marker gene expression was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Our data showed that LPLI at a dose of 2 J⋅cm(-2) significantly promoted hPDL cell proliferation at days 3 and 5. In addition, LPLI at energy doses of 2 and 4 J⋅cm(-2) showed potential osteogenic capacity, as it stimulated ALP activity, calcium deposition, and osteogenic gene expression. We also showed that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a critical regulator of the LPLI-mediated effects on hPDL cells. This study shows that LPLI can promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hPDL cells. These results suggest the potential use of LPLI in clinical applications for periodontal tissue regeneration.

  11. Determination of the electron-detachment energies of 2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-monophosphate anion: influence of the conformation.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Mercedes; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel; Serrano-Andrés, Luis; Merchán, Manuela

    2009-02-26

    The vertical electron-detachment energies (VDEs) of the singly charged 2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-monophosphate anion (dGMP-) are determined by using the multiconfigurational second-order perturbation CASPT2 method at the MP2 ground-state equilibrium geometry of relevant conformers. The origin of the unique low-energy band in the gas phase photoelectron spectrum of dGMP-, with maximum at around 5.05 eV, is unambiguously assigned to electron detachment from the highest occupied molecular orbital of pi-character belonging to guanine fragment of a syn conformation. The presence of a short H-bond linking the 2-amino and phosphate groups, the guanine moiety acting as proton donor, is precisely responsible for the pronounced decrease of the computed VDE with respect to that obtained in other conformations. As a whole, the present research supports the nucleobase as the site with the lowest ionization potential in negatively charged (deprotonated) nucleotides at the most stable conformations as well as for B-DNA-like type arrangements, in agreement with experimental evidence.

  12. Metal free columns for determination of deoxynucleotide monophosphate by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and application to oligonucleotide.

    PubMed

    Shibayama, Sachie; Sakamaki, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Taichi; Takatsu, Akiko

    2015-08-07

    We have developed a highly sensitive method for the analysis of deoxynucleotide monophosphates (dNMPs), which involves the use of liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and a new metal-free colum