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Sample records for guanylate cyclase sgc

  1. Identification of bacterial guanylate cyclases.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Min-Hyung; Youn, Hwan; Kang, In-Hye; Gomelsky, Mark

    2015-05-01

    The ability of bacteria to use cGMP as a second messenger has been controversial for decades. Recently, nucleotide cyclases from Rhodospirillum centenum, GcyA, and Xanthomonas campestris, GuaX, have been shown to possess guanylate cyclase activities. Enzymatic activities of these guanylate cyclases measured in vitro were low, which makes interpretation of the assays ambiguous. Protein sequence analysis at present is insufficient to distinguish between bacterial adenylate and guanylate cyclases, both of which belong to nucleotide cyclases of type III. We developed a simple method for discriminating between guanylate and adenylate cyclase activities in a physiologically relevant bacterial system. The method relies on the use of a mutant cAMP receptor protein, CRPG , constructed here. While wild-type CRP is activated exclusively by cAMP, CRPG can be activated by either cAMP or cGMP. Using CRP- and CRPG -dependent lacZ expression in two E. coli strains, we verified that R. centenum GcyA and X. campestris GuaX have primarily guanylate cyclase activities. Among two other bacterial nucleotide cyclases tested, one, GuaA from Azospillrillum sp. B510, proved to have guanylate cyclase activity, while the other one, Bradyrhizobium japonicum CyaA, turned out to function as an adenylate cyclase. The results obtained with this reporter system were in excellent agreement with direct measurements of cyclic nucleotides secreted by E. coli expressing nucleotide cyclase genes. The simple genetic screen developed here is expected to facilitate identification of bacterial guanylate cyclases and engineering of guanylate cyclases with desired properties.

  2. Nitric Oxide-Induced Conformational Changes in Soluble Guanylate Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Underbakke, Eric S.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Chalmers, Michael J.; Pascal, Bruce D.; Novick, Scott; Griffin, Patrick R.; Marletta, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is the primary mediator of nitric oxide (NO) signaling. NO binds the sGC heme cofactor stimulating synthesis of the second messenger cyclic-GMP (cGMP). As the central hub of NO/cGMP signaling pathways, sGC is important in diverse physiological processes such as vasodilation and neurotransmission. Nevertheless, the mechanisms underlying NO-induced cyclase activation in sGC remain unclear. Here, hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) was employed to probe the NO-induced conformational changes of sGC. HDX-MS revealed NO-induced effects in several discrete regions. NO binding to the heme-NO/O2-binding (H-NOX) domain perturbs a signaling surface implicated in Per/Arnt/Sim (PAS) domain interactions. Furthermore, NO elicits striking conformational changes in the junction between the PAS and helical domains that propagate as perturbations throughout the adjoining helices. Ultimately, NO-binding stimulates the catalytic domain by contracting the active site pocket. Together, these conformational changes delineate an allosteric pathway linking NO-binding to activation of the catalytic domain. PMID:24560804

  3. Bioelectrochemical monitoring of soluble guanylate cyclase inhibition by the natural β-carboline canthin-6-one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doménech-Carbó, Antonio; Rodrigo, Regina; Maréchal, Jean-Didier; Poupon, Erwan; Fournet, Alain; Figadère, Bruno; Cebrián-Torrejón, Gerardo

    2017-04-01

    The inhibition of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) by canthin-6-one alkaloid (L1) is presented and the mechanism of deactivation is studied using solution phase and voltammetry of microparticles methodologies. Possible inhibition pathways: oxidation of Fe2+ to Fe3+ coupled to reduction of the naphthyridone motif present by the canthin-6-one and coordinating or reacting of L1 with cysteine units of sGC, are balanced.

  4. In vivo control of soluble guanylate cyclase activation by nitric oxide: a kinetic analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Condorelli, P; George, S C

    2001-01-01

    Free nitric oxide (NO) activates soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), an enzyme, within both pulmonary and vascular smooth muscle. sGC catalyzes the cyclization of guanosine 5'-triphosphate to guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP). Binding rates of NO to the ferrous heme(s) of sGC have been measured in vitro. However, a missing link in our understanding of the control mechanism of sGC by NO is a comprehensive in vivo kinetic analysis. Available literature data suggests that NO dissociation from the heme center of sGC is accelerated by its interaction with one or more cofactors in vivo. We present a working model for sGC activation and NO consumption in vivo. Our model predicts that NO influences the cGMP formation rate over a concentration range of approximately 5-100 nM (apparent Michaelis constant approximately 23 nM), with Hill coefficients between 1.1 and 1.5. The apparent reaction order for NO consumption by sGC is dependent on NO concentration, and varies between 0 and 1.5. Finally, the activation of sGC (half-life approximately 1-2 s) is much more rapid than deactivation (approximately 50 s). We conclude that control of sGC in vivo is most likely ultra-sensitive, and that activation in vivo occurs at lower NO concentrations than previously reported. PMID:11325714

  5. Heme-assisted S-Nitrosation Desensitizes Ferric Soluble Guanylate Cyclase to Nitric Oxide*

    PubMed Central

    Fernhoff, Nathaniel B.; Derbyshire, Emily R.; Underbakke, Eric S.; Marletta, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) signaling regulates key processes in cardiovascular physiology, specifically vasodilation, platelet aggregation, and leukocyte rolling. Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), the mammalian NO sensor, transduces an NO signal into the classical second messenger cyclic GMP (cGMP). NO binds to the ferrous (Fe2+) oxidation state of the sGC heme cofactor and stimulates formation of cGMP several hundred-fold. Oxidation of the sGC heme to the ferric (Fe3+) state desensitizes the enzyme to NO. The heme-oxidized state of sGC has emerged as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Here, we investigate the molecular mechanism of NO desensitization and find that sGC undergoes a reductive nitrosylation reaction that is coupled to the S-nitrosation of sGC cysteines. We further characterize the kinetics of NO desensitization and find that heme-assisted nitrosothiol formation of β1Cys-78 and β1Cys-122 causes the NO desensitization of ferric sGC. Finally, we provide evidence that the mechanism of reductive nitrosylation is gated by a conformational change of the protein. These results yield insights into the function and dysfunction of sGC in cardiovascular disease. PMID:23093402

  6. Immunohistochemical Localization of Guanylate Cyclase within Neurons of Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariano, Marjorie A.; Lewicki, John A.; Brandwein, Harvey J.; Murad, Ferid

    1982-02-01

    The immunohistochemical localization of guanylate cyclase [GTP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.2] has been examined in rat neocortex, caudate-putamen, and cerebellum by using specific monoclonal antibodies. Immunofluorescence could be seen within somata and proximal dendrites of neurons in these regions. A nuclear immunofluorescence reaction to guanylate cyclase was characteristically absent. The staining pattern for guanylate cyclase was coincident with previously described localizations of cyclic GMP immunofluorescence within medium spiny neurons of the caudate-putamen and pyramidal cells of the neocortex. Cerebellar guanylate cyclase immunoreactivity was primarily confined to Purkinje cells and their primary dendrites, similar to the pattern reported for cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase localization. Guanylate cyclase immunofluorescence was abolished when the monoclonal antibodies were exposed to purified enzyme prior to incubation of the tissue slices or when control antibody was substituted for the primary antibody. Immunohistochemical localization of cyclic AMP in these same tissues was readily distinguished from that of guanylate cyclase or cyclic GMP, showing uniform fluorescence throughout the cell bodies of neurons and glial elements.

  7. Plant growth-promoting hormones activate mammalian guanylate cyclase activity.

    PubMed

    Vesely, D L; Hudson, J L; Pipkin, J L; Pack, L D; Meiners, S E

    1985-05-01

    In vivo injections of plant growth-promoting hormones increase the growth of animals as well as plants. Plant growth-promoting hormones and positive plant growth regulators are known to increase RNA and protein synthesis. Since cyclic GMP also increases RNA and protein synthesis, the object of the present investigation was to determine whether physiological levels of plant growth-promoting hormones and positive plant growth regulators have part of their mechanism(s) of action through stimulation of the guanylate cyclase (EC 4.6.1.2)-cyclic GMP system. Representatives of the three classes of growth-promoting hormones were investigated. Thus, auxins (indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-butyric acid, beta-naphthoxyacetic acid, and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxy acetic acid), gibberellins (gibberellic acid), and cytokinins [N6-benzyl adenine, kinetin (6-furfuryl aminopurine), and beta-(2-furyl) acrylic acid] all increased rat lung, small intestine, liver, and renal cortex guanylate cyclase activity 2- to 4-fold at the 1 microM concentration. Dose response curves revealed that maximal stimulation of guanylate cyclase by these plant growth regulators was at 1 microM; there was no augmented cyclase activity at 1 nM. The guanylate cyclase cationic cofactor manganese was not essential for augmentation of guanylate cyclase by these plant growth-promoting regulators. The antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene did not block the enhancement of guanylate cyclase by these plant growth-promoting factors. These data suggest that guanylate cyclase may play a role in the mechanism of action of plant growth-promoting hormones and even of positive plant regulators at the cellular level.

  8. Soluble guanylate cyclase as an alternative target for bronchodilator therapy in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Koziol-White, Cynthia J.; Asosingh, Kewal; Cheng, Georgina; Ruple, Lisa; Groneberg, Dieter; Friebe, Andreas; Comhair, Suzy A. A.; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Panettieri, Reynold A.; Aronica, Mark A.; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is defined by airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness, and contributes to morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although bronchodilation is a cornerstone of treatment, current bronchodilators become ineffective with worsening asthma severity. We investigated an alternative pathway that involves activating the airway smooth muscle enzyme, soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). Activating sGC by its natural stimulant nitric oxide (NO), or by pharmacologic sGC agonists BAY 41–2272 and BAY 60–2770, triggered bronchodilation in normal human lung slices and in mouse airways. Both BAY 41–2272 and BAY 60–2770 reversed airway hyperresponsiveness in mice with allergic asthma and restored normal lung function. The sGC from mouse asthmatic lungs displayed three hallmarks of oxidative damage that render it NO-insensitive, and identical changes to sGC occurred in human lung slices or in human airway smooth muscle cells when given chronic NO exposure to mimic the high NO in asthmatic lung. Our findings show how allergic inflammation in asthma may impede NO-based bronchodilation, and reveal that pharmacologic sGC agonists can achieve bronchodilation despite this loss. PMID:27071111

  9. Characterization and expression of soluble guanylate cyclase in skins and melanocytes of sheep.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shanshan; Zhang, Junzhen; Ji, Kaiyuan; Jiao, Dingxing; Fan, Ruiwen; Dong, Changsheng

    2016-04-01

    The study reported the characterization of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) with the size of CDS of 1860bp, encoding a protein of 620 amino acids and containing several conserved functional domains including HNOB, HNOBA, and CHD. Quantitative real time PCR analysis of sGC showed that the expression of sGC mRNA is higher (∼5 fold) in white sheep skin relative to black sheep skin with significant difference (P<0.01). Using a rabbit polyclonal anti-sGC antibody, an immune reactive band corresponding to sheep sGC protein was detected in the skin samples by Western blotting analysis, and the expression of sGC protein was significantly higher in white sheep skin compared to black sheep skin (P<0.01). Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that sGC protein was localized in cytoplasm and intercellular substance of upper hair papilla in hair follicles of white sheep skin, but the protein was localized in cytoplasm and intercellular substance of lower hair bulb and outer root sheath cells in hair follicles of black sheep skin. The immunocytochemical analysis revealed that sGC was expressed in melanocytes in vitro of sheep skin. Over expression of sGC in melanocytes resulted in decreased expression of key melanogenic genes including microphthalmia transcription factor (MITF), tyrosinase (TYR), tyrosinase related protein 1(TYRTP1), and tyrosinase related protein 2(TYRP2) both at mRNA and protein level. Moreover, the melanocytes was capable of producing cGMP and cAMP. The observed differential expression and localization of sGC in sheep skins and melanocytes and the capability of producing cGMP and cAMP, which suggested a potential role for this gene in hair color regulation.

  10. Soluble guanylate cyclase stimulators increase sensitivity to cisplatin in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tuttle, Traci R; Takiar, Vinita; Kumar, Bhavna; Kumar, Pawan; Ben-Jonathan, Nira

    2017-03-28

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is an aggressive and often fatal disease. Cisplatin is the most common chemotherapeutic drug in the treatment of HNSCC, but intrinsic and acquired resistance are frequent, and severe side effects occur at high doses. The second messenger cyclic GMP (cGMP) is produced by soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). We previously reported that activation of the cGMP signaling cascade caused apoptosis in HNSCC cells, while others found that this pathway enhances cisplatin efficacy in some cell types. Here we found that sGC stimulators reduced HNSCC cell viability synergistically with cisplatin, and enhanced apoptosis by cisplatin. Moreover, the sGC stimulators effectively reduced viability in cells with acquired cisplatin resistance, and were synergistic with cisplatin. The sGC stimulator BAY 41-2272 reduced expression of the survival proteins EGFR and β-catenin, and increased pro-apoptotic Bax, suggesting a potential mechanism for the anti-tumorigenic effects of these drugs. The sGC stimulator Riociguat is FDA-approved to treat pulmonary hypertension, and others are being studied for therapeutic use in several diseases. These drugs could provide valuable addition or alternative to cisplatin in the treatment of HNSCC.

  11. Cardiovascular and pharmacological implications of haem-deficient NO-unresponsive soluble guanylate cyclase knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    Thoonen, Robrecht; Cauwels, Anje; Decaluwe, Kelly; Geschka, Sandra; Tainsh, Robert E.; Delanghe, Joris; Hochepied, Tino; De Cauwer, Lode; Rogge, Elke; Voet, Sofie; Sips, Patrick; Karas, Richard H.; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Van de Voorde, Johan; Buys, Emmanuel S.; Brouckaert, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress, a central mediator of cardiovascular disease, results in loss of the prosthetic haem group of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), preventing its activation by nitric oxide (NO). Here we introduce Apo-sGC mice expressing haem-free sGC. Apo-sGC mice are viable and develop hypertension. The haemodynamic effects of NO are abolished, but those of the sGC activator cinaciguat are enhanced in apo-sGC mice, suggesting that the effects of NO on smooth muscle relaxation, blood pressure regulation and inhibition of platelet aggregation require sGC activation by NO. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-induced hypotension and mortality are preserved in apo-sGC mice, indicating that pathways other than sGC signalling mediate the cardiovascular collapse in shock. Apo-sGC mice allow for differentiation between sGC-dependent and -independent NO effects and between haem-dependent and -independent sGC effects. Apo-sGC mice represent a unique experimental platform to study the in vivo consequences of sGC oxidation and the therapeutic potential of sGC activators. PMID:26442659

  12. Cardiovascular and pharmacological implications of haem-deficient NO-unresponsive soluble guanylate cyclase knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Thoonen, Robrecht; Cauwels, Anje; Decaluwe, Kelly; Geschka, Sandra; Tainsh, Robert E; Delanghe, Joris; Hochepied, Tino; De Cauwer, Lode; Rogge, Elke; Voet, Sofie; Sips, Patrick; Karas, Richard H; Bloch, Kenneth D; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Van de Voorde, Johan; Buys, Emmanuel S; Brouckaert, Peter

    2015-10-07

    Oxidative stress, a central mediator of cardiovascular disease, results in loss of the prosthetic haem group of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), preventing its activation by nitric oxide (NO). Here we introduce Apo-sGC mice expressing haem-free sGC. Apo-sGC mice are viable and develop hypertension. The haemodynamic effects of NO are abolished, but those of the sGC activator cinaciguat are enhanced in apo-sGC mice, suggesting that the effects of NO on smooth muscle relaxation, blood pressure regulation and inhibition of platelet aggregation require sGC activation by NO. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-induced hypotension and mortality are preserved in apo-sGC mice, indicating that pathways other than sGC signalling mediate the cardiovascular collapse in shock. Apo-sGC mice allow for differentiation between sGC-dependent and -independent NO effects and between haem-dependent and -independent sGC effects. Apo-sGC mice represent a unique experimental platform to study the in vivo consequences of sGC oxidation and the therapeutic potential of sGC activators.

  13. Probing the Molecular Mechanism of Human Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Activation by NO in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jie; Yuan, Hong; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Zhang, Huijuan; Xu, Qiming; Zhou, Yajun; Tan, Li; Nagawa, Shingo; Huang, Zhong-Xian; Tan, Xiangshi

    2017-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is a heme-containing metalloprotein in NO-sGC-cGMP signaling. NO binds to the heme of sGC to catalyze the synthesis of the second messenger cGMP, which plays a critical role in several physiological processes. However, the molecular mechanism for sGC to mediate the NO signaling remains unclear. Here fluorophore FlAsH-EDT2 and fluorescent proteins were employed to study the NO-induced sGC activation. FlAsH-EDT2 labeling study revealed that NO binding to the H-NOX domain of sGC increased the distance between H-NOX and PAS domain and the separation between H-NOX and coiled-coil domain. The heme pocket conformation changed from “closed” to “open” upon NO binding. In addition, the NO-induced conformational change of sGC was firstly investigated in vivo through fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The results both in vitro and in vivo indicated the conformational change of the catalytic domain of sGC from “open” to “closed” upon NO binding. NO binding to the heme of H-NOX domain caused breaking of Fe-N coordination bond, initiated the domain moving and conformational change, induced the allosteric effect of sGC to trigger the NO-signaling from H-NOX via PAS & coiled-coil to the catalytic domain, and ultimately stimulates the cyclase activity of sGC. PMID:28230071

  14. Dephosphorylation of sperm guanylate cyclase during sea urchin fertilization

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    When intact Arbacia punctulata spermatozoa are exposed to solubilized egg jelly, the electrophoretic mobility of an abundant sperm flagellar membrane protein changes from an apparent molecular mass of 160 kDa to 150 kDa. A. punctulata spermatozoa can be labeled in vivo with /sup 32/P-labeled cells it was demonstrated that the mobility shift of the 160-kDa protein is due to dephosphorylation. The peptide resact (Cys-Val-Thr-Gly-Ala-Pro-Gly-Cys-Val-Gly-Gly-Gly-Arg-Leu-NH/sub 2/) is the component of egg jelly which is responsible for inducing the dephosphorylation. The 160/150-kdal sperm membrane protein has been purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography on concanavalin A-agarose, and identified as sperm guanylate cyclase. The enzymatic activity of the guanylate cyclase is tightly coupled to its phosphorylation state. Resact has been shown to act as a potent chemoattractant for A. punctulata spermatozoa. The chemotactic response is concentration-dependent, is abolished by pretreatment of the spermatozoa with resact, and shows an absolute requirement for external calcium. This work represents the first demonstration of animal sperm chemotaxis in response to a precisely-defined molecule of egg origin. The results established a new, biologically meaningful function for resact, and may implicate sperm guanylate cyclase and cGMP in flagellar function and the chemotactic response.

  15. Decreased Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Contributes to Cardiac Dysfunction Induced by Chronic Doxorubicin Treatment in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vandenwijngaert, Sara; Swinnen, Melissa; Walravens, Ann-Sophie; Beerens, Manu; Gillijns, Hilde; Caluwé, Ellen; Tainsh, Robert E.; Nathan, Daniel I.; Allen, Kaitlin; Brouckaert, Peter; Bartunek, Jozef; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Bloch, Donald B.; Janssens, Stefan P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The use of doxorubicin, a potent chemotherapeutic agent, is limited by cardiotoxicity. We tested the hypothesis that decreased soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) enzyme activity contributes to the development of doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. Results: Doxorubicin administration (20 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [IP]) reduced cardiac sGC activity in wild-type (WT) mice. To investigate whether decreased sGC activity contributes to doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity, we studied mice with cardiomyocyte-specific deficiency of the sGC α1-subunit (mice with cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of exon 6 of the sGCα1 allele [sGCα1−/−CM]). After 12 weeks of doxorubicin administration (2 mg/kg/week IP), left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction was greater in sGCα1−/−CM than WT mice. To further assess whether reduced sGC activity plays a pathogenic role in doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity, we studied a mouse model in which decreased cardiac sGC activity was induced by cardiomyocyte-specific expression of a dominant negative sGCα1 mutant (DNsGCα1) upon doxycycline removal (Tet-off). After 8 weeks of doxorubicin administration, DNsGCα1tg/+, but not WT, mice displayed LV systolic dysfunction and dilatation. The difference in cardiac function and remodeling between DNsGCα1tg/+ and WT mice was even more pronounced after 12 weeks of treatment. Further impairment of cardiac function was attenuated when DNsGCα1 gene expression was inhibited (beginning at 8 weeks of doxorubicin treatment) by administering doxycycline. Furthermore, doxorubicin-associated reactive oxygen species generation was higher in sGCα1-deficient than WT hearts. Innovation and Conclusion: These data demonstrate that a reduction in cardiac sGC activity worsens doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in mice and identify sGC as a potential therapeutic target. Various pharmacological sGC agonists are in clinical development or use and may represent a promising approach to limit doxorubicin

  16. Chronic Activation of Heme Free Guanylate Cyclase Leads to Renal Protection in Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Linda S.; Kretschmer, Axel; Lawrenz, Bettina; Hocher, Berthold; Stasch, Johannes-Peter

    2015-01-01

    The nitric oxide (NO)/soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/cyclic guanosine monophasphate (cGMP)-signalling pathway is impaired under oxidative stress conditions due to oxidation and subsequent loss of the prosthetic sGC heme group as observed in particular in chronic renal failure. Thus, the pool of heme free sGC is increased under pathological conditions. sGC activators such as cinaciguat selectively activate the heme free form of sGC and target the disease associated enzyme. In this study, a therapeutic effect of long-term activation of heme free sGC by the sGC activator cinaciguat was investigated in an experimental model of salt-sensitive hypertension, a condition that is associated with increased oxidative stress, heme loss from sGC and development of chronic renal failure. For that purpose Dahl/ss rats, which develop severe hypertension upon high salt intake, were fed a high salt diet (8% NaCl) containing either placebo or cinaciguat for 21 weeks. Cinaciguat markedly improved survival and ameliorated the salt-induced increase in blood pressure upon treatment with cinaciguat compared to placebo. Renal function was significantly improved in the cinaciguat group compared to the placebo group as indicated by a significantly improved glomerular filtration rate and reduced urinary protein excretion. This was due to anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory effects of the cinaciguat treatment. Taken together, this is the first study showing that long-term activation of heme free sGC leads to renal protection in an experimental model of hypertension and chronic kidney disease. These results underline the promising potential of cinaciguat to treat renal diseases by targeting the disease associated heme free form of sGC. PMID:26717150

  17. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency leads to alteration of soluble guanylate cyclase redox regulation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Allan W; Durante, William; Korthuis, Ronald J

    2010-10-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 knockout, H(mox)1(-/-), mice exhibit exacerbated vascular lesions after ischemia-reperfusion and mechanical injury. Surprisingly, we found no studies that reported contractile responses and sensitivity to vasorelaxants in H(mox)1(-/-) mice. The contractile responses [superior mesenteric arteries (SMA), from female H(mox)1(-/-) mice] exhibited increased sensitivity to phenylephrine (p < 0.001). Cumulative addition of acetylcholine relaxed SMA, with the residual contraction remaining 2 times higher in H(mox)1(-/-) mice (p < 0.001). Sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an NO donor) and 3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'-furyl)-1-benzyl indazole [YC-1; acts directly on soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)] led to further relaxation, yet the residual contraction remained 2 to 3 times higher in H(mox)1(-/-) than H(mox)1(+/+) mice (p < 0.001). Branches from H(mox)1(-/-) mesenteric and renal arteries also showed reduced relaxation (p < 0.025). Relaxation of SMA was measured to 4-({(4-carboxybutyl) [2-(5-fluoro-2-{[4'-(trifluoromethyl) biphenyl-4-yl] methoxy}phenyl)ethyl]amino}benzoic acid (BAY 60-2770), which is a more effective activator of oxidized/heme-free sGC; and to 5-cyclopropyl-2-{1-(2-fluoro-benzyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-3-yl}-pyrimidin-4-ylamine (BAY 41-2272), a more effective stimulator of reduced sGC. H(mox)1(-/-) arteries were 15 times more sensitive to BAY 60-2770 (p < 0.025) than were H(mox)1(+/+) arteries. Pretreatment with 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[3,4-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), an oxidizer of sGC, predictably shifted the BAY 60-2770 response of H(mox)1(+/+) to the left (p < 0.01) and BAY 41-2272 response to the right (p < 0.01). ODQ had little effect on the responses of H(mox)1(-/-) arteries, indicating that much of sGC was oxidized/heme-free. Western analyses of sGC in SMA indicated that both α1 and β1 subunit levels were reduced to <50% of H(mox)1(+/+) level (p < 0.025). These findings support the hypothesis that the antioxidant function of H(mox)1 plays a

  18. Soluble guanylate cyclase modulators blunt hyperoxia effects on calcium responses of developing human airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Britt, Rodney D; Thompson, Michael A; Kuipers, Ine; Stewart, Alecia; Vogel, Elizabeth R; Thu, James; Martin, Richard J; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2015-09-15

    Exposure to moderate hyperoxia in prematurity contributes to subsequent airway dysfunction and increases the risk of developing recurrent wheeze and asthma. The nitric oxide (NO)-soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)-cyclic GMP (cGMP) axis modulates airway tone by regulating airway smooth muscle (ASM) intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) and contractility. However, the effects of hyperoxia on this axis in the context of Ca(2+)/contractility are not known. In developing human ASM, we explored the effects of novel drugs that activate sGC independent of NO on alleviating hyperoxia (50% oxygen)-induced enhancement of Ca(2+) responses to bronchoconstrictor agonists. Treatment with BAY 41-2272 (sGC stimulator) and BAY 60-2770 (sGC activator) increased cGMP levels during exposure to 50% O2. Although 50% O2 did not alter sGCα1 or sGCβ1 expression, BAY 60-2770 did increase sGCβ1 expression. BAY 41-2272 and BAY 60-2770 blunted Ca(2+) responses to histamine in cells exposed to 50% O2. The effects of BAY 41-2272 and BAY 60-2770 were reversed by protein kinase G inhibition. These novel data demonstrate that BAY 41-2272 and BAY 60-2770 stimulate production of cGMP and blunt hyperoxia-induced increases in Ca(2+) responses in developing ASM. Accordingly, sGC stimulators/activators may be a useful therapeutic strategy in improving bronchodilation in preterm infants.

  19. Motion of proximal histidine and structural allosteric transition in soluble guanylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Byung-Kuk; Lamarre, Isabelle; Martin, Jean-Louis; Rappaport, Fabrice; Negrerie, Michel

    2015-04-07

    We investigated the changes of heme coordination in purified soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) by time-resolved spectroscopy in a time range encompassing 11 orders of magnitude (from 1 ps to 0.2 s). After dissociation, NO either recombines geminately to the 4-coordinate (4c) heme (τG1 = 7.5 ps; 97 ± 1% of the population) or exits the heme pocket (3 ± 1%). The proximal His rebinds to the 4c heme with a 70-ps time constant. Then, NO is distributed in two approximately equal populations (1.5%). One geminately rebinds to the 5c heme (τG2 = 6.5 ns), whereas the other diffuses out to the solution, from where it rebinds bimolecularly (τ = 50 μs with [NO] = 200 μM) forming a 6c heme with a diffusion-limited rate constant of 2 × 10(8) M(-1)⋅s(-1). In both cases, the rebinding of NO induces the cleavage of the Fe-His bond that can be observed as an individual reaction step. Saliently, the time constant of bond cleavage differs depending on whether NO binds geminately or from solution (τ5C1 = 0.66 μs and τ5C2 = 10 ms, respectively). Because the same event occurs with rates separated by four orders of magnitude, this measurement implies that sGC is in different structural states in both cases, having different strain exerted on the Fe-His bond. We show here that this structural allosteric transition takes place in the range 1-50 μs. In this context, the detection of NO binding to the proximal side of sGC heme is discussed.

  20. Motion of proximal histidine and structural allosteric transition in soluble guanylate cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Byung-Kuk; Lamarre, Isabelle; Martin, Jean-Louis; Rappaport, Fabrice; Negrerie, Michel

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the changes of heme coordination in purified soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) by time-resolved spectroscopy in a time range encompassing 11 orders of magnitude (from 1 ps to 0.2 s). After dissociation, NO either recombines geminately to the 4-coordinate (4c) heme (τG1 = 7.5 ps; 97 ± 1% of the population) or exits the heme pocket (3 ± 1%). The proximal His rebinds to the 4c heme with a 70-ps time constant. Then, NO is distributed in two approximately equal populations (1.5%). One geminately rebinds to the 5c heme (τG2 = 6.5 ns), whereas the other diffuses out to the solution, from where it rebinds bimolecularly (τ = 50 μs with [NO] = 200 μM) forming a 6c heme with a diffusion-limited rate constant of 2 × 108 M−1⋅s−1. In both cases, the rebinding of NO induces the cleavage of the Fe-His bond that can be observed as an individual reaction step. Saliently, the time constant of bond cleavage differs depending on whether NO binds geminately or from solution (τ5C1 = 0.66 μs and τ5C2 = 10 ms, respectively). Because the same event occurs with rates separated by four orders of magnitude, this measurement implies that sGC is in different structural states in both cases, having different strain exerted on the Fe-His bond. We show here that this structural allosteric transition takes place in the range 1–50 μs. In this context, the detection of NO binding to the proximal side of sGC heme is discussed. PMID:25831539

  1. [Soluble guanylate cyclase in the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic action of drugs].

    PubMed

    Piatakova, N V; Severina, I S

    2012-01-01

    The influence of ambroxol--a mucolytic drug--on the activity of human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase and rat lung soluble guanylate cyclase and activation of both enzymes by NO-donors (sodium nitroprusside and Sin-1) were investigated. Ambroxol in the concentration range from 0.1 to 10 microM had no effect on the basal activity of both enzymes. Ambroxol inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the sodium nitroprusside-induced human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase and rat lung soluble guanylate cyclase with the IC50 values 3.9 and 2.1 microM, respectively. Ambroxol did not influence the stimulation of both enzymes by protoporphyrin IX. The influence of artemisinin--an antimalarial drug--on human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase activity and the enzyme activation by NO-donors were investigated. Artemisinin (0.1-100 microM) had no effect on the basal activity of the enzyme. Artemisinin inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the sodium nitroprusside-induced activation of human platelet guanylate cyclase with an IC50 value 5.6 microM. Artemisinin (10 microM) also inhibited (by 71 +/- 4.0%) the activation of the enzyme by thiol-dependent NO-donor the derivative of furoxan, 3,4-dicyano-1,2,5-oxadiazolo-2-oxide (10 microM), but did not influence the stimulation of soluble guanylate cyclase by protoporphyrin IX. It was concluded that the sygnalling system NO-soluble guanylate cyclase-cGMP is involved in the molecular mechanism of the therapeutic action of ambroxol and artemisinin.

  2. Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulation Prevents Fibrotic Tissue Remodeling and Improves Survival in Salt-Sensitive Dahl Rats

    PubMed Central

    Geschka, Sandra; Kretschmer, Axel; Sharkovska, Yuliya; Evgenov, Oleg V.; Lawrenz, Bettina; Hucke, Andreas; Hocher, Berthold; Stasch, Johannes-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background A direct pharmacological stimulation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is an emerging therapeutic approach to the management of various cardiovascular disorders associated with endothelial dysfunction. Novel sGC stimulators, including riociguat (BAY 63-2521), have a dual mode of action: They sensitize sGC to endogenously produced nitric oxide (NO) and also directly stimulate sGC independently of NO. Little is known about their effects on tissue remodeling and degeneration and survival in experimental malignant hypertension. Methods and Results Mortality, hemodynamics and biomarkers of tissue remodeling and degeneration were assessed in Dahl salt-sensitive rats maintained on a high salt diet and treated with riociguat (3 or 10 mg/kg/d) for 14 weeks. Riociguat markedly attenuated systemic hypertension, improved systolic heart function and increased survival from 33% to 85%. Histological examination of the heart and kidneys revealed that riociguat significantly ameliorated fibrotic tissue remodeling and degeneration. Correspondingly, mRNA expression of the pro-fibrotic biomarkers osteopontin (OPN), tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in the myocardium and the renal cortex was attenuated by riociguat. In addition, riociguat reduced plasma and urinary levels of OPN, TIMP-1, and PAI-1. Conclusions Stimulation of sGC by riociguat markedly improves survival and attenuates systemic hypertension and systolic dysfunction, as well as fibrotic tissue remodeling in the myocardium and the renal cortex in a rodent model of pressure and volume overload. These findings suggest a therapeutic potential of sGC stimulators in diseases associated with impaired cardiovascular and renal functions. PMID:21789188

  3. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies to Soluble Rat Lung Guanylate Cyclase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandwein, Harvey; Lewicki, John; Murad, Ferid

    1981-07-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies to rat lung soluble guanylate cyclase [GTP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing) EC 4.6.1.2] have been produced by fusing spleen cells from immunized BALB/c mice with SP-2/0 myeloma cells. The antibodies were detected by their ability to bind immobilized guanylate cyclase and by immunoprecipitation of purified enzyme in the presence of second (rabbit anti-mouse) antibody. After subcloning by limiting dilution, hybridomas were injected intraperitoneally into mice to produce ascitic fluid containing 2-5 mg of antibody per ml. The four antibodies obtained had titers of between 1:1580 and 1:3160 but were detectable at dilutions greater than 1:20,000. Soluble guanylate cyclase from several rat tissues were crossreactive with the four monoclonal antibodies, suggesting that the soluble enzyme from different rat tissues is antigenically similar. The antibodies also recognized soluble lung enzyme from rat, beef, and pig, while enzyme from rabbit was not crossreactive and mouse enzyme was recognized by only one of the antibodies. Particulate guanylate cyclase from a number of tissues had only minimal crossreactivity with the antibodies. Immunoprecipitated guanylate cyclase retained catalytic activity, could be activated with sodium nitroprusside, and was inhibited by cystamine. None of the antibodies were inhibitory under the conditions examined. These antibodies will be useful probes for the study of guanylate cyclase regulation and function under a variety of physiological conditions.

  4. Integrative Signaling Networks of Membrane Guanylate Cyclases: Biochemistry and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rameshwar K.; Duda, Teresa; Makino, Clint L.

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents a historical perspective of cornerstone developments on the biochemistry and physiology of mammalian membrane guanylate cyclases (MGCs), highlighting contributions made by the authors and their collaborators. Upon resolution of early contentious studies, cyclic GMP emerged alongside cyclic AMP, as an important intracellular second messenger for hormonal signaling. However, the two signaling pathways differ in significant ways. In the cyclic AMP pathway, hormone binding to a G protein coupled receptor leads to stimulation or inhibition of an adenylate cyclase, whereas the cyclic GMP pathway dispenses with intermediaries; hormone binds to an MGC to affect its activity. Although the cyclic GMP pathway is direct, it is by no means simple. The modular design of the molecule incorporates regulation by ATP binding and phosphorylation. MGCs can form complexes with Ca2+-sensing subunits that either increase or decrease cyclic GMP synthesis, depending on subunit identity. In some systems, co-expression of two Ca2+ sensors, GCAP1 and S100B with ROS-GC1 confers bimodal signaling marked by increases in cyclic GMP synthesis when intracellular Ca2+ concentration rises or falls. Some MGCs monitor or are modulated by carbon dioxide via its conversion to bicarbonate. One MGC even functions as a thermosensor as well as a chemosensor; activity reaches a maximum with a mild drop in temperature. The complexity afforded by these multiple limbs of operation enables MGC networks to perform transductions traditionally reserved for G protein coupled receptors and Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channels and to serve a diverse array of functions, including control over cardiac vasculature, smooth muscle relaxation, blood pressure regulation, cellular growth, sensory transductions, neural plasticity and memory. PMID:27695398

  5. Downregulation of vascular soluble guanylate cyclase induced by high salt intake in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Kagota, Satomi; Tamashiro, Akiko; Yamaguchi, Yu; Sugiura, Reiko; Kuno, Takayoshi; Nakamura, Kazuki; Kunitomo, Masaru

    2001-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cyclic GMP)-mediated mechanism plays an important role in vasodilatation and blood pressure regulation. We investigated the effects of high salt intake on the nitric oxide (NO) – cyclic GMP signal transduction pathway regulating relaxation in aortas of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR).Four-week-old SHR and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) received a normal salt diet (0.3% NaCl) or a high salt diet (8% NaCl) for 4 weeks.In aortic rings from SHR, endothelium-dependent relaxations in response to acetylcholine (ACh), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and calcium ionophore A23187 were significantly impaired by the high salt intake. The endothelium-independent relaxations in response to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and nitroglycerin were also impaired, but that to 8-bromo-cyclic GMP remained unchanged. On the other hand, high salt diet had no significant effects on the relaxations of aortic rings from WKY.In aortas from SHR, the release of NO stimulated by ACh was significantly enhanced, whereas the production of cyclic GMP induced by either ACh or SNP was decreased by the high salt intake.Western blot analysis showed that the protein level of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) was slightly increased, whereas that of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) was dramatically reduced by the high salt intake.These results indicate that in SHR, excessive dietary salt can result in downregulation of sGC followed by decreased cyclic GMP production, which leads to impairment of vascular relaxation in responses to NO. It is notable that chronic high salt intake impairs the sGC/cyclic GMP pathway but not the eNOS/NO pathway. PMID:11606313

  6. Bicarbonate Modulates Photoreceptor Guanylate Cyclase (ROS-GC) Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Duda, Teresa; Wen, Xiao-Hong; Isayama, Tomoki; Sharma, Rameshwar K; Makino, Clint L

    2015-04-24

    By generating the second messenger cGMP in retinal rods and cones, ROS-GC plays a central role in visual transduction. Guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs) link cGMP synthesis to the light-induced fall in [Ca(2+)]i to help set absolute sensitivity and assure prompt recovery of the response to light. The present report discloses a surprising feature of this system: ROS-GC is a sensor of bicarbonate. Recombinant ROS-GCs synthesized cGMP from GTP at faster rates in the presence of bicarbonate with an ED50 of 27 mM for ROS-GC1 and 39 mM for ROS-GC2. The effect required neither Ca(2+) nor use of the GCAPs domains; however, stimulation of ROS-GC1 was more powerful in the presence of GCAP1 or GCAP2 at low [Ca(2+)]. When applied to retinal photoreceptors, bicarbonate enhanced the circulating current, decreased sensitivity to flashes, and accelerated flash response kinetics. Bicarbonate was effective when applied either to the outer or inner segment of red-sensitive cones. In contrast, bicarbonate exerted an effect when applied to the inner segment of rods but had little efficacy when applied to the outer segment. The findings define a new regulatory mechanism of the ROS-GC system that affects visual transduction and is likely to affect the course of retinal diseases caused by cGMP toxicity.

  7. Bicarbonate Modulates Photoreceptor Guanylate Cyclase (ROS-GC) Catalytic Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Duda, Teresa; Wen, Xiao-Hong; Isayama, Tomoki; Sharma, Rameshwar K.; Makino, Clint L.

    2015-01-01

    By generating the second messenger cGMP in retinal rods and cones, ROS-GC plays a central role in visual transduction. Guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs) link cGMP synthesis to the light-induced fall in [Ca2+]i to help set absolute sensitivity and assure prompt recovery of the response to light. The present report discloses a surprising feature of this system: ROS-GC is a sensor of bicarbonate. Recombinant ROS-GCs synthesized cGMP from GTP at faster rates in the presence of bicarbonate with an ED50 of 27 mm for ROS-GC1 and 39 mm for ROS-GC2. The effect required neither Ca2+ nor use of the GCAPs domains; however, stimulation of ROS-GC1 was more powerful in the presence of GCAP1 or GCAP2 at low [Ca2+]. When applied to retinal photoreceptors, bicarbonate enhanced the circulating current, decreased sensitivity to flashes, and accelerated flash response kinetics. Bicarbonate was effective when applied either to the outer or inner segment of red-sensitive cones. In contrast, bicarbonate exerted an effect when applied to the inner segment of rods but had little efficacy when applied to the outer segment. The findings define a new regulatory mechanism of the ROS-GC system that affects visual transduction and is likely to affect the course of retinal diseases caused by cGMP toxicity. PMID:25767116

  8. Formycin triphosphate as a probe for the ATP binding site involved in the activation of guanylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Chang, C H; Yu, Z N; Song, D L

    1992-10-01

    Formycin A triphosphate (FTP), a fluorescent analog of ATP, slightly increased basal guanylate cyclase activity, but significantly potentiated guanylate cyclase activity stimulated by atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in rat lung membranes. FTP potentiated ANF-stimulated guanylate cyclase activity with an EC50 at about 90 microM and inhibited ATP-stimulated guanylate cyclase activity with an IC50 at about 100 microM. These results indicate that FTP binds more tightly than ATP for the same binding site. Therefore, FTP would be an excellent tool for studying the ATP binding site.

  9. Soluble guanylate cyclase is required for systemic vasodilation but not positive inotropy induced by nitroxyl in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guangshuo; Groneberg, Dieter; Sikka, Gautam; Hori, Daijiro; Ranek, Mark J; Nakamura, Taishi; Takimoto, Eiki; Paolocci, Nazareno; Berkowitz, Dan E; Friebe, Andreas; Kass, David A

    2015-02-01

    Nitroxyl (HNO), the reduced and protonated form of nitric oxide (NO·), confers unique physiological effects including vasorelaxation and enhanced cardiac contractility. These features have spawned current pharmaceutical development of HNO donors as heart failure therapeutics. HNO interacts with selective redox sensitive cysteines to effect signaling but is also proposed to activate soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) in vitro to induce vasodilation and potentially enhance contractility. Here, we tested whether sGC stimulation is required for these HNO effects in vivo and if HNO also modifies a redox-sensitive cysteine (C42) in protein kinase G-1α to control vasorelaxation. Intact mice and isolated arteries lacking the sGC-β subunit (sGCKO, results in full sGC deficiency) or expressing solely a redox-dead C42S mutant protein kinase G-1α were exposed to the pure HNO donor, CXL-1020. CXL-1020 induced dose-dependent systemic vasodilation while increasing contractility in controls; however, vasodilator effects were absent in sGCKO mice whereas contractility response remained. The CXL-1020 dose reversing 50% of preconstricted force in aortic rings was ≈400-fold greater in sGCKO than controls. Cyclic-GMP and cAMP levels were unaltered in myocardium exposed to CXL-1020, despite its inotropic-vasodilator activity. In protein kinase G-1α(C42S) mice, CXL-1020 induced identical vasorelaxation in vivo and in isolated aortic and mesenteric vessels as in littermate controls. In both groups, dilation was near fully blocked by pharmacologically inhibiting sGC. Thus, sGC and cGMP-dependent signaling are necessary and sufficient for HNO-induced vasodilation in vivo but are not required for positive inotropic action. Redox modulation of protein kinase G-1α is not a mechanism for HNO-mediated vasodilation.

  10. Modulation of soluble guanylate cyclase activity by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Karnam S

    2004-11-01

    The levels of the cGMP in smooth muscle of the gut reflect continued synthesis by soluble guanylate cyclase (GC) and breakdown by phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5). Soluble GC is a haem-containing, heterodimeric protein consisting alpha- and beta-subunits: each subunit has N-terminal regulatory domain and a C-terminal catalytic domain. The haem moiety acts as an intracellular receptor for nitric oxide (NO) and determines the ability of NO to activate the enzyme and generate cGMP. In the present study the mechanism by which protein kinases regulate soluble GC in gastric smooth muscle was examined. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) acting as a NO donor stimulated soluble GC activity and increased cGMP levels. SNP induced soluble GC phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent fashion. SNP-induced soluble GC phosphorylation was abolished by the selective cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) inhibitors, Rp-cGMPS and KT-5823. In contrast, SNP-stimulated soluble GC activity and cGMP levels were significantly enhanced by Rp-cGMPS and KT-5823. Phosphorylation and inhibition of soluble GC were PKG specific, as selective activator of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, Sp-5, 6-DCl-cBiMPS had no effect on SNP-induced soluble GC phosphorylation and activity. The ability of PKG to stimulate soluble GC phosphorylation was demonstrated in vitro by back phosphorylation technique. Addition of purified phosphatase 1 inhibited soluble GC phosphorylation in vitro, and inhibition was reversed by a high concentration (10 microM) of okadaic acid. In gastric smooth muscle cells, inhibition of phosphatase activity by okadaic acid increased soluble GC phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent fashion. The increase in soluble GC phosphorylation inhibited SNP-stimulated soluble GC activity and cGMP formation. The results implied the feedback inhibition of soluble GC activity by PKG-dependent phosphorylation impeded further formation of cGMP.

  11. Preconditioning with soluble guanylate cyclase activation prevents postischemic inflammation and reduces nitrate tolerance in heme oxygenase-1 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Walter Z.; Wang, Meifang; Durante, William; Korthuis, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Previously we have shown that, unlike wild-type mice (WT), heme oxygenase-1 knockout (HO-1−/−) mice developed nitrate tolerance and were not protected from inflammation caused by ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) when preconditioned with a H2S donor. We hypothesized that stimulation (with BAY 41-2272) or activation (with BAY 60-2770) of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) would precondition HO-1−/− mice against an inflammatory effect of I/R and increase arterial nitrate responses. Intravital fluorescence microscopy was used to visualize leukocyte rolling and adhesion to postcapillary venules of the small intestine in anesthetized mice. Relaxation to ACh and BAY compounds was measured on superior mesenteric arteries isolated after I/R protocols. Preconditioning with either BAY compound 10 min (early phase) or 24 h (late phase) before I/R reduced postischemic leukocyte rolling and adhesion to sham control levels and increased superior mesenteric artery responses to ACh, sodium nitroprusside, and BAY 41-2272 in WT and HO-1−/− mice. Late-phase preconditioning with BAY 60-2770 was maintained in HO-1−/− and endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout mice pretreated with an inhibitor (dl-propargylglycine) of enzymatically produced H2S. Pretreatment with BAY compounds also prevented the I/R increase in small intestinal TNF-α. We speculate that increasing sGC activity and related PKG acts downstream to H2S and disrupts signaling processes triggered by I/R in part by maintaining low cellular Ca2+. In addition, BAY preconditioning did not increase sGC levels, yet increased the response to agents that act on reduced heme-containing sGC. Collectively these actions would contribute to increased nitrate sensitivity and vascular function. PMID:23771693

  12. Activation of soluble guanylate cyclase by NO donors--S-nitrosothiols, and dinitrosyl-iron complexes with thiol-containing ligands.

    PubMed

    Severina, Irina S; Bussygina, Olga G; Pyatakova, Natalya V; Malenkova, Irina V; Vanin, Anatoly F

    2003-05-01

    We studied the capability of dimeric forms of dinitrosyl-iron complexes and S-nitrosothiols to activate soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) from human platelet cytosol. The dinitrosyl-iron complexes had the ligands glutathione (DNIC-GS) or N-acetylcysteine (DNIC-NAC). The S-nitrosothiols were S-nitrosoglutathione (GS-NO) or S-nitrosoacetylcysteine (SNAC). For both glutathione and N-acetylcysteine, the DNIC and S-nitrosothiol forms are equally effective activators of sGC. The activation mechanism is strongly affected by the presence of intrinsic metal ions. Pretreatment with the potent iron chelator, disodium salt of bathophenanthroline disulfonic acid (BPDS), suppressed sGC activation by GS-NO: the concentration of GS-NO producing maximal sGC activation was increased by two orders of magnitude. In contrast, activation by DNIC-GS is strongly enhanced by BPDS. When BPDS was added 10 min after supplementation of DNIC-GS or GS-NO at 4 degrees C, it exerted a similar effect on sGC activation by either NO donor: BPDS only enhanced the sGC stimulation at low concentrations of the NO donors. Our experiments demonstrated that both Fe(2+) and Cu(2+) ions contribute to the decomposition of GS-NO in the presence of ascorbate. The decomposition of GS-NO induced by Fe(2+) ions was accompanied by formation of DNIC. BPDS protected GS-NO against the destructive action of Fe(2+) but not Cu(2+) ions. Additionally, BPDS is a sufficiently strong chelator to remove the iron from DNIC-GS complexes. Based on our data, we propose that S-nitrosothiols activate sGC via a two-step iron-mediated process: In the first step, intrinsic Fe(2+) ions catalyze the formation of DNICs from S-nitrosothiols. In the secondary step, these newly formed DNICs act as the real NO donors responsible for sGC activation.

  13. The Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulator IWP-953 Increases Conventional Outflow Facility in Mouse Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Pei; Navarro, Iris D.; Kessler, Marco M.; Bernier, Sylvie G.; Perl, Nicholas R.; Sarno, Renee; Masferrer, Jaime; Hannig, Gerhard; Stamer, W. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The nitric oxide (NO)–cyclic guanosine-3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP) pathway regulates aqueous humor outflow and therefore, intraocular pressure. We investigated the pharmacologic effects of the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) stimulator IWP-953 on primary human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cells and conventional outflow facility in mouse eyes. Methods Cyclic GMP levels were determined in vitro in HEK-293 cells and four HTM cell strains (HTM120/HTM123: predominantly myofibroblast-like phenotype, HTM130/HTM141: predominantly endothelial-like phenotype), and in HTM cell culture supernatants. Conventional outflow facility was measured following intracameral injection of IWP-953 or DETA-NO using a computerized pressure-controlled perfusion system in enucleated mouse eyes ex vivo. Results IWP-953 markedly stimulated cGMP production in HEK-293 cells in the presence and absence of DETA-NO (half maximal effective concentrations: 17 nM, 9.5 μM). Similarly, IWP-953 stimulated cGMP production in myofibroblast-like HTM120 and HTM123 cells, an effect that was greatly amplified by the presence of DETA-NO. In contrast, IWP-953 stimulation of cGMP production in endothelial-like HTM130 and HTM141 cells was observed, but was markedly less prominent than in HTM120 and HTM123 cells. Notably, cGMP was found in all HTM culture supernatants, following IWP-953/DETA-NO stimulation. In paired enucleated mouse eyes, IWP-953 at 10, 30, 60, and 100 μM concentration-dependently increased outflow facility. This effect (89.5%) was maximal at 100 μM (P = 0.002) and in magnitude comparable to DETA-NO at 100 μM (97.5% increase, P = 0.030). Conclusions These data indicate that IWP-953, via modulation of the sGC–cGMP pathway, increases aqueous outflow facility in mouse eyes, suggesting therapeutic potential for sGC stimulators as novel ocular hypotensive drugs. PMID:26998718

  14. [Potentiation of nitric oxide-dependent activation of soluble guanylate cyclase by levomycetin, tetracycline, and oxolin].

    PubMed

    Shchegolev, A Iu; Sidorova, T A; Severina, I S

    2009-01-01

    The influence of antibiotics laevomycetin and tetracycline and the antivirus agent oxolin on the activity of human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase, the stimulation of the enzyme by NO-donors (sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and spermine nanoate (spermine NONO)) and the combination of spermine NONO and YC-1 was investigated. All preparations used in the concentration range 0,1-10 mM had no effect on the basal activity of guanylate cyclase but potentiated the SNP-induced activation of this enzyme. All preparations used synergistically increased (similar to YC-1) spermine NONO-induced activation of soluble guanylate cyclase. At the same time these compounds did not produce the leftward shift of spermine NONO concentration response curve characteristic for YC-1. Moreover, all compounds used did not influence the leftward shift of spermine NONO concentration response curve obtained in the presence of YC-1. This demonstrated that there was no competition between YC-1 and the drugs for interaction with the enzyme. The revealed regulatory phenomen of laevomycetin, tetracycline and oxolin to increase synergistically NO-dependent activation of soluble guanylate cyclase may cause additional pharmacological effects during prolong treatment by these drugs. This fact is necessary taking into account.

  15. Regulation of intestinal guanylate cyclase by the heat-stable enterotoxin of Escherichia coli (STa) and protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Crane, J K; Wehner, M S; Bolen, E J; Sando, J J; Linden, J; Guerrant, R L; Sears, C L

    1992-01-01

    The heat-stable enterotoxin of Escherichia coli (STa) stimulates membrane-bound guanylate cyclase in intestinal epithelium and induces fluid and ion secretion. Using the T84 human colon carcinoma cell line as a model, we observed that phorbol esters markedly enhanced STa-stimulated cyclic GMP accumulation in T84 cells (C. S. Weikel, C. L. Spann, C. P. Chambers, J. K. Crane, J. Linden, and E. L. Hewlett, Infect. Immun. 58:1402-1407, 1990). In this study we document that the phorbol ester treatment increases 125I-STa-binding sites as well as membrane-bound guanylate cyclase activity in T84 cells and provide evidence that both effects are mediated by phosphorylation. Guanylate cyclase activity was increased approximately 50% in membranes prepared from intact T84 cells treated with phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (beta-PDB) and after treatment of homogenates with beta-PDB in a manner dependent on ATP, MgCl2, and cytosol. Similarly, treatment of membranes with purified bovine brain protein kinase C in the presence of appropriate cofactors and beta-PDB resulted in an increase in STa-stimulated guanylate cyclase activity of about 70%. Likewise, the number of 125I-STa-binding sites was increased by about 25 to 40% in membranes prepared from intact cells or homogenates treated with beta-PDB; no effect on binding affinity (Kd = 0.15 nM) was noted. These experiments suggest that protein kinase C may phosphorylate the STa receptor-guanylate cyclase or a closely related protein and increase guanylate cyclase activity. The stimulatory effects of protein kinase C on STa-sensitive guanylate cyclase are opposite in direction to the profound inhibitory effects of the kinase on atrial natriuretic peptide-stimulated guanylate cyclase, demonstrating differential regulation by protein kinases within the guanylate cyclase-receptor family. PMID:1360449

  16. The Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Activator BAY 58-2667 Protects against Morbidity and Mortality in Endotoxic Shock by Recoupling Organ Systems

    PubMed Central

    Vandendriessche, Benjamin; Rogge, Elke; Goossens, Vera; Vandenabeele, Peter; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Brouckaert, Peter; Cauwels, Anje

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are associated with high mortality rates and the majority of sepsis patients die due to complications of multiple organ failure (MOF). The cyclic GMP (cGMP) producing enzyme soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is crucially involved in the regulation of (micro)vascular homeostasis, cardiac function and, consequently, organ function. However, it can become inactivated when exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS). The resulting heme-free sGC can be reactivated by the heme- and nitric oxide (NO)-independent sGC activator BAY 58-2667 (Cinaciguat). We report that late (+8 h) post-treatment with BAY 58-2667 in a mouse model can protect against lethal endotoxic shock. Protection was associated with reduced hypothermia, circulating IL-6 levels, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and mortality. In contrast to BAY 58-2667, the sGC stimulator BAY 41-2272 and the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor Sildenafil did not have any beneficial effect on survival, emphasizing the importance of the selectivity of BAY 58-2667 for diseased vessels and tissues. Hemodynamic parameters (blood pressure and heart rate) were decreased, and linear and nonlinear indices of blood pressure variability, reflective for (un)coupling of the communication between the autonomic nervous system and the heart, were improved after late protective treatment with BAY 58-2667. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the pivotal role of the NO/sGC axis in endotoxic shock. Stabilization of sGC function with BAY 58-2667 can prevent mortality when given in the correct treatment window, which probably depends on the dynamics of the heme-free sGC pool, in turn influenced by oxidative stress. We speculate that, considering the central role of sGC signaling in many pathways required for maintenance of (micro)circulatory homeostasis, BAY 58-2667 supports organ function by recoupling inter-organ communication pathways. PMID:24015214

  17. Clinical potential of nitric oxide-independent soluble guanylate cyclase activators.

    PubMed

    Doggrell, Sheila A

    2005-09-01

    A major problem with using nitrates in the treatment of ischemic heart disease is that tolerance develops to their vasodilatory actions. YC-1 was used as the lead compound to synthesize further nitric oxide-independent soluble guanylate cyclase activators, including BAY-41-2272 and BAY-41-8543. A nitric oxide and heme-independent activator of soluble guanylate cyclase, BAY-58-2667, was subsequently discovered by high-throughput screening. Tolerance to the vasodilatory actions of BAY-41-8543 and BAY-58-2667 does not develop. Results from animal studies have suggested that these compounds may have potential in the treatment of ischemic heart disease, essential and pulmonary hypertension, congestive heart failure, glomerulonephritis and erectile dysfunction.

  18. Stimulators and Activators of Soluble Guanylate Cyclase: Review and Potential Therapeutic Indications

    PubMed Central

    Nossaman, Bobby; Pankey, Edward; Kadowitz, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The heme-protein soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is the intracellular receptor for nitric oxide (NO). sGC is a heterodimeric enzyme with α and β subunits and contains a heme moiety essential for binding of NO and activation of the enzyme. Stimulation of sGC mediates physiologic responses including smooth muscle relaxation, inhibition of inflammation, and thrombosis. In pathophysiologic states, NO formation and bioavailability can be impaired by oxidative stress and that tolerance to NO donors develops with continuous use. Two classes of compounds have been developed that can directly activate sGC and increase cGMP formation in pathophysiologic conditions when NO formation and bioavailability are impaired or when NO tolerance has developed. In this report, we review current information on the pharmacology of heme-dependent stimulators and heme-independent activators of sGC in animal and in early clinical studies and the potential role these compounds may have in the management of cardiovascular disease. PMID:22482042

  19. Involvement of H1 and H2 receptors and soluble guanylate cyclase in histamine-induced relaxation of rat mesenteric collecting lymphatics

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Kristine H.; Moor, Andrea N.; Souza-Smith, Flavia M.; Breslin, Jerome W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the roles of the H1 and H2 histamine receptors, nitric oxide (NO) synthase, and soluble guanylate (sGC) cyclase in histamine-induced modulation of rat mesenteric collecting lymphatic pumping. Methods Isolated rat mesenteric collecting lymphatics were treated with 1–100 μM histamine. Histamine receptors were blocked with either the H1 antagonist mepyramine or the H2 antagonist cimetidine. The role of NO/sGC signaling was tested using the arginine analog L-NAME, the sGC inhibitor ODQ, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) as a positive control. Results Histamine applied at 100 μM decreased tone and contraction frequency (CF) of isolated rat mesenteric collecting lymphatics. Pharmacologic blockade of either H1 or H2 histamine receptors significantly inhibited the response to histamine. Pretreatment with ODQ, but not L-NAME, completely inhibited the histamine-induced decrease in tone. ODQ pretreatment also significantly inhibited SNP-induced lymphatic relaxation. Conclusions H1 and H2 histamine receptors are both involved in histamine-induced relaxation of rat mesenteric collecting lymphatics. NO synthesis does not appear to contribute to the histamine-induced response. However, sGC is critical for the histamine-induced decrease in tone and contributes to the drop in CF. PMID:24702851

  20. Polymerase chain reaction localization of constitutive nitric oxide synthase and soluble guanylate cyclase messenger RNAs in microdissected rat nephron segments.

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Y; Tomita, K; Nonoguchi, H; Marumo, F

    1992-01-01

    Stimulation of the release of nitric oxide (NO) in the kidney has been shown to result in renal hemodynamic changes and natriuresis. NO is a potent stimulator of soluble guanylate cyclase, leading to an increase of cyclic GMP. The precise localization of NO synthase and soluble guanylate cyclase in the renal structure is not known. In this study, the microlocalization of mRNAs coding for constitutive NO synthase and soluble guanylate cyclase was carried out in the rat kidney, using an assay of reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction in individual microdissected renal tubule segments along the nephron, glomeruli, vasa recta bundle, and arcuate arteries. A large signal for constitutive NO synthase was detected in inner medullary collecting duct. Small signals were detected in inner medullary thin limb, cortical collecting duct, outer medullary collecting duct, glomerulus, vasa recta, and arcuate artery. Soluble guanylate cyclase mRNA is expressed largely in glomerulus, proximal convoluted tubule, proximal straight tubule, and cortical collecting duct, and in small amounts in medullary thick ascending limb, inner medullary thin limb, outer medullary collecting duct, inner medullary collecting duct, and the vascular system. Our data demonstrate that NO can be produced locally in the kidney, and that soluble guanylate cyclase is widely distributed in glomerulus, renal tubules, and the vascular system. Images PMID:1379616

  1. α1 Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase (sGC) Splice Forms as Potential Regulators of Human sGC Activity*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sharina, Iraida G.; Jelen, Filip; Bogatenkova, Elena P.; Thomas, Anthony; Martin, Emil; Murad, Ferid

    2008-01-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), a key protein in the NO/cGMP signaling pathway, is an obligatory heterodimeric protein composed of one α- and one β-subunit. The α1/β1 sGC heterodimer is the predominant form expressed in various tissues and is regarded as the major isoform mediating NO-dependent effects such as vasodilation. We have identified three new α1 sGC protein variants generated by alternative splicing. The 363 residue N1-α1 sGC splice variant contains the regulatory domain, but lacks the catalytic domain. The shorter N2-α1 sGC maintains 126 N-terminal residues and gains an additional 17 unique residues. The C-α1 sGC variant lacks 240 N-terminal amino acids, but maintains a part of the regulatory domain and the entire catalytic domain. Q-PCR of N1-α1, N2-α1 sGC mRNA levels together with RT-PCR analysis for C-α1 sGC demonstrated that the expression of the α1 sGC splice forms vary in different human tissues indicative of tissue-specific regulation. Functional analysis of the N1-α1 sGC demonstrated that this protein has a dominant-negative effect on the activity of sGC when coexpressed with the α1/β1 heterodimer. The C-α1 sGC variant heterodimerizes with the β1 subunit and produces a fully functional NO- and BAY41-2272-sensitive enzyme. We also found that despite identical susceptibility to inhibition by ODQ, intracellular levels of the 54-kDa C-α1 band did not change in response to ODQ treatments, while the level of 83 kDa α1 band was significantly affected by ODQ. These studies suggest that modulation of the level and diversity of splice forms may represent novel mechanisms modulating the function of sGC in different human tissues. PMID:18381288

  2. Regulation of Neuronal Oxygen Responses in C. elegans Is Mediated through Interactions between Globin 5 and the H-NOX Domains of Soluble Guanylate Cyclases

    PubMed Central

    Abergel, Zohar; Chatterjee, Arijit Kumar; Zuckerman, Binyamin

    2016-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclases (sGCs) are gas-binding proteins that control diverse physiological processes such as vasodilation, platelet aggregation, and synaptic plasticity. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a complex of sGCs, GCY-35 and GCY-36, functions in oxygen (O2) sensing. Previous studies suggested that the neuroglobin GLB-5 genetically interacts with GCY-35, and that the inhibitory effect of GLB-5 on GCY-35 function is necessary for fast recovery from prolonged hypoxia. In this study, we identified mutations in gcy-35 and gcy-36 that impact fast recovery and other phenotypes associated with GLB-5, without undermining sGC activity. These mutations, heb1 and heb3, change conserved amino acid residues in the regulatory H-NOX domains of GCY-35 and GCY-36, respectively, and appear to suppress GLB-5 activity by different mechanisms. Moreover, we observed that short exposure to 35% O2 desensitized the neurons responsible for ambient O2 sensing and that this phenomenon does not occur in heb1 animals. These observations may implicate sGCs in neuronal desensitization mechanisms far beyond the specific case of O2 sensing in nematodes. The conservation of functionally important regions of sGCs is supported by examining site-directed mutants of GCY-35, which suggested that similar regions in the H-NOX domains of O2 and NO-sensing sGCs are important for heme/gas interactions. Overall, our studies provide novel insights into sGC activity and regulation, and implicate similar structural determinants in the control of both O2 and NO sensors. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Soluble guanylate cyclases (sGCs) control essential and diverse physiological processes, including memory processing. We used Caenorhabditis elegans to explore how a neuroglobin inhibits a complex of oxygen-sensing sGCs, identifying sGC mutants that resist inhibition. Resistance appears to arise by two different mechanisms: increased basal sGC activity or disruption of an interaction with neuroglobin. Our

  3. Label-free quantification of calcium-sensor targeting to photoreceptor guanylate cyclase and rhodopsin kinase by backscattering interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Sulmann, Stefan; Kussrow, Amanda; Bornhop, Darryl J.; Koch, Karl-Wilhelm

    2017-01-01

    Quantification of protein binding to membrane proteins is challenging and a limited set of methods is available to study such systems. Here we employed backscattering interferometry (BSI), a free-solution label-free method with high sensitivity, to quantify the interaction of neuronal Ca2+-Sensor proteins with their targets operating in phototransduction. We tested direct binding of guanylate cyclase–activating proteins (GCAP1 and GCAP2) to their membrane target guanylate cyclase 1. The regulatory mechanism of GCAPs including their binding interface in the target is unresolved. Here we used a label-free, free-solution assay method based on BSI to determine binding constants of GCAP1 and GCAP2 to the full-length membrane-bound guanylate cyclase type 1. GCAP1 and GCAP2 bound to different regions on the target guanylate cyclase with submicromolar affinity (apparent KD-values of 663 ± 121 nM and 231 ± 63 nM for Ca2+-free GCAP1 and GCAP2, respectively). A guanylate cyclase construct containing the juxta-membrane and kinase homology domain harbored an exclusive binding site for GCAP1 with similar affinities as the full-length protein, whereas GCAP2 did not bind to this region. We provide a model in which GCAP1 and GCAP2 do not share a single binding site to the target, thus cannot exchange upon fluctuating Ca2+ levels. PMID:28361875

  4. Guanylate cyclase 1 relies on rhodopsin for intracellular stability and ciliary trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Pearring, Jillian N; Spencer, William J; Lieu, Eric C; Arshavsky, Vadim Y

    2015-01-01

    Sensory cilia are populated by a select group of signaling proteins that detect environmental stimuli. How these molecules are delivered to the sensory cilium and whether they rely on one another for specific transport remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated whether the visual pigment, rhodopsin, is critical for delivering other signaling proteins to the sensory cilium of photoreceptor cells, the outer segment. Rhodopsin is the most abundant outer segment protein and its proper transport is essential for formation of this organelle, suggesting that such a dependency might exist. Indeed, we demonstrated that guanylate cyclase-1, producing the cGMP second messenger in photoreceptors, requires rhodopsin for intracellular stability and outer segment delivery. We elucidated this dependency by showing that guanylate cyclase-1 is a novel rhodopsin-binding protein. These findings expand rhodopsin’s role in vision from being a visual pigment and major outer segment building block to directing trafficking of another key signaling protein. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12058.001 PMID:26590321

  5. Role of guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs) in setting the flash sensitivity of rod photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Ana; Burns, Marie E.; Sokal, Izabela; Dizhoor, Alexander M.; Baehr, Wolfgang; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Baylor, Denis A.; Chen, Jeannie

    2001-01-01

    The retina's photoreceptor cells adjust their sensitivity to allow photons to be transduced over a wide range of light intensities. One mechanism thought to participate in sensitivity adjustments is Ca2+ regulation of guanylate cyclase (GC) by guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs). We evaluated the contribution of GCAPs to sensitivity regulation in rods by disrupting their expression in transgenic mice. The GC activity from GCAPs−/− retinas showed no Ca2+ dependence, indicating that Ca2+ regulation of GCs had indeed been abolished. Flash responses from dark-adapted GCAPs−/− rods were larger and slower than responses from wild-type rods. In addition, the incremental flash sensitivity of GCAPs−/− rods failed to be maintained at wild-type levels in bright steady light. GCAP2 expressed in GCAPs−/− rods restored maximal light-induced GC activity but did not restore normal flash response kinetics. We conclude that GCAPs strongly regulate GC activity in mouse rods, decreasing the flash sensitivity in darkness and increasing the incremental flash sensitivity in bright steady light, thereby extending the rod's operating range. PMID:11493703

  6. Heat Shock Protein 90 Associates with the Per-Arnt-Sim Domain of Heme-free Soluble Guanylate Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Anindya; Dai, Yue; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Seeger, Franziska; Ghosh, Arnab; Garcin, Elsa D.; Montfort, William R.; Hazen, Stanley L.; Misra, Saurav; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (hsp90) drives heme insertion into the β1 subunit of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) β1, which enables it to associate with a partner sGCα1 subunit and mature into a nitric oxide (NO)-responsive active form. We utilized fluorescence polarization measurements and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to define molecular interactions between the specific human isoforms hsp90β and apo-sGCβ1. hsp90β and its isolated M domain, but not its isolated N and C domains, bind with low micromolar affinity to a heme-free, truncated version of sGCβ1 (sGCβ1(1–359)-H105F). Surprisingly, hsp90β and its M domain bound to the Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain of apo-sGC-β1(1–359), which lies adjacent to its heme-binding (H-NOX) domain. The interaction specifically involved solvent-exposed regions in the hsp90β M domain that are largely distinct from sites utilized by other hsp90 clients. The interaction strongly protected two regions of the sGCβ1 PAS domain and caused local structural relaxation in other regions, including a PAS dimerization interface and a segment in the H-NOX domain. Our results suggest a means by which the hsp90β interaction could prevent apo-sGCβ1 from associating with its partner sGCα1 subunit while enabling structural changes to assist heme insertion into the H-NOX domain. This mechanism would parallel that in other clients like the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and HIF1α, which also interact with hsp90 through their PAS domains to control protein partner and small ligand binding interactions. PMID:26134567

  7. Regulation of cGMP levels by guanylate cyclase in truncated frog rod outer segments

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Cyclic GMP is the second messenger in phototransduction and regulates the photoreceptor current. In the present work, we tried to understand the regulation mechanism of cytoplasmic cGMP levels in frog photoreceptors by measuring the photoreceptor current using a truncated rod outer segment (tROS) preparation. Since exogenously applied substance diffuses into tROS from the truncated end, we could examine the biochemical reactions relating to the cGMP metabolism by manipulating the cytoplasmic chemical condition. In tROS, exogenously applied GTP produced a dark current whose amplitude was half-maximal at approximately 0.4 mM GTP. The conductance for this current was suppressed by light in a fashion similar to when it is activated by cGMP. In addition, no current was produced in the absence of Mg2+, which is known to be necessary for the guanylate cyclase activity. These results indicate that guanylate cyclase was present in tROS and synthesized cGMP from exogenously applied GTP. The enzyme activity was distributed throughout the rod outer segment. The amount of synthesized cGMP increased as the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration of tROS decreased, which indicated the activation of guanylate cyclase at low Ca2+ concentrations. Half-maximal effect of Ca2+ was observed at approximately 100 nM. tROS contained the proteins involved in the phototransduction mechanism and therefore, we could examine the regulation of the light response waveform by Ca2+. At low Ca2+ concentrations, the time course of the light response was speeded up probably because cGMP recovery was facilitated by activation of the cyclase. Then, if the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration of a photoreceptor decreases during light stimulation, the Ca2+ decrease may explain the acceleration of the light response during light adaptation. In tROS, however, we did observe an acceleration during repetitive light flashes when the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration increased during the stimulation. This result suggests the

  8. Nitric oxide regulation of gene transcription via soluble guanylate cyclase and type I cGMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Idriss, S D; Gudi, T; Casteel, D E; Kharitonov, V G; Pilz, R B; Boss, G R

    1999-04-02

    Nitric oxide (NO) regulates the expression of multiple genes but in most cases its precise mechanism of action is unclear. We used baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells, which have very low soluble guanylate cyclase and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (G-kinase) activity, and CS-54 arterial smooth muscle cells, which express these two enzymes, to study NO regulation of the human fos promoter. The NO-releasing agent Deta-NONOate (ethanamine-2,2'-(hydroxynitrosohydrazone)bis-) had no effect on a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene under control of the fos promoter in BHK cells transfected with an empty vector or in cells transfected with a G-kinase Ibeta expression vector. In BHK cells transfected with expression vectors for guanylate cyclase, Deta-NONOate markedly increased the intracellular cGMP concentration and caused a small (2-fold) increase in CAT activity; the increased CAT activity appeared to be from cGMP activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. In BHK cells co-transfected with guanylate cyclase and G-kinase expression vectors, CAT activity was increased 5-fold in the absence of Deta-NONOate and 7-fold in the presence of Deta-NONOate. Stimulation of CAT activity in the absence of Deta-NONOate appeared to be largely from endogenous NO since we found that: (i) BHK cells produced high amounts of NO; (ii) CAT activity was partially inhibited by a NO synthase inhibitor; and (iii) the inhibition by the NO synthase inhibitor was reversed by exogenous NO. In CS-54 cells, we found that NO increased fos promoter activity and that the increase was prevented by a guanylate cyclase inhibitor. In summary, we found that NO activates the fos promoter by a guanylate cyclase- and G-kinase-dependent mechanism.

  9. Soluble Guanylate Cyclase α1–Deficient Mice: A Novel Murine Model for Primary Open Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Buys, Emmanuel S.; Ko, Yu-Chieh; Alt, Clemens; Hayton, Sarah R.; Jones, Alexander; Tainsh, Laurel T.; Ren, Ruiyi; Giani, Andrea; Clerté, Maeva; Abernathy, Emma; Tainsh, Robert E. T.; Oh, Dong-Jin; Malhotra, Rajeev; Arora, Pankaj; de Waard, Nadine; Yu, Binglan; Turcotte, Raphael; Nathan, Daniel; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Loomis, Stephanie J.; Kang, Jae H.; Lin, Charles P.; Gong, Haiyan; Rhee, Douglas J.; Brouckaert, Peter; Wiggs, Janey L.; Gregory, Meredith S.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Ksander, Bruce R.

    2013-01-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. The molecular signaling involved in the pathogenesis of POAG remains unknown. Here, we report that mice lacking the α1 subunit of the nitric oxide receptor soluble guanylate cyclase represent a novel and translatable animal model of POAG, characterized by thinning of the retinal nerve fiber layer and loss of optic nerve axons in the context of an open iridocorneal angle. The optic neuropathy associated with soluble guanylate cyclase α1–deficiency was accompanied by modestly increased intraocular pressure and retinal vascular dysfunction. Moreover, data from a candidate gene association study suggests that a variant in the locus containing the genes encoding for the α1 and β1 subunits of soluble guanylate cyclase is associated with POAG in patients presenting with initial paracentral vision loss, a disease subtype thought to be associated with vascular dysregulation. These findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis and genetics of POAG and suggest new therapeutic strategies for POAG. PMID:23527308

  10. Regulation of intraocular pressure by soluble and membrane guanylate cyclases and their role in glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Buys, Emmanuel S.; Potter, Lincoln R.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Ksander, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy characterized by visual field defects that ultimately lead to irreversible blindness (Alward, 2000; Anderson et al., 2006). By the year 2020, an estimated 80 million people will have glaucoma, 11 million of which will be bilaterally blind. Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common type of glaucoma. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is currently the only risk factor amenable to treatment. How IOP is regulated and can be modulated remains a topic of active investigation. Available therapies, mostly geared toward lowering IOP, offer incomplete protection, and POAG often goes undetected until irreparable damage has been done, highlighting the need for novel therapeutic approaches, drug targets, and biomarkers (Heijl et al., 2002; Quigley, 2011). In this review, the role of soluble (nitric oxide (NO)-activated) and membrane-bound, natriuretic peptide (NP)-activated guanylate cyclases that generate the secondary signaling molecule cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in the regulation of IOP and in the pathophysiology of POAG will be discussed. PMID:24904270

  11. Intestinal Enteroids Model Guanylate Cyclase C-Dependent Secretion Induced by Heat-Stable Enterotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, Amanda M.; Blomain, Erik S.; Merlino, Dante J.; Wang, Fang; Crissey, Mary Ann S.; Kraft, Crystal L.; Rappaport, Jeff A.; Snook, Adam E.; Lynch, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) causes ∼20% of the acute infectious diarrhea (AID) episodes worldwide, often by producing heat-stable enterotoxins (STs), which are peptides structurally homologous to paracrine hormones of the intestinal guanylate cyclase C (GUCY2C) receptor. While molecular mechanisms mediating ST-induced intestinal secretion have been defined, advancements in therapeutics have been hampered for decades by the paucity of disease models that integrate molecular and functional endpoints amenable to high-throughput screening. Here, we reveal that mouse and human intestinal enteroids in three-dimensional ex vivo cultures express the components of the GUCY2C secretory signaling axis. ST and its structural analog, linaclotide, an FDA-approved oral secretagog, induced fluid accumulation quantified simultaneously in scores of enteroid lumens, recapitulating ETEC-induced intestinal secretion. Enteroid secretion depended on canonical molecular signaling events responsible for ETEC-induced diarrhea, including cyclic GMP (cGMP) produced by GUCY2C, activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), and opening of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of CFTR abrogated enteroid fluid secretion, providing proof of concept for the utility of this model to screen antidiarrheal agents. Intestinal enteroids offer a unique model, integrating the GUCY2C signaling axis and luminal fluid secretion, to explore the pathophysiology of, and develop platforms for, high-throughput drug screening to identify novel compounds to prevent and treat ETEC diarrheal disease. PMID:27481254

  12. Retinal-specific guanylate cyclase gene mutations in Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Perrault, I; Rozet, J M; Calvas, P; Gerber, S; Camuzat, A; Dollfus, H; Châtelin, S; Souied, E; Ghazi, I; Leowski, C; Bonnemaison, M; Le Paslier, D; Frézal, J; Dufier, J L; Pittler, S; Munnich, A; Kaplan, J

    1996-12-01

    Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA, MIM 204,000), the earliest and most severe form of inherited retinopathy, accounts for at least 5% of all inherited retinal dystrophies. This autosomal recessive condition is usually recognized at birth or during the first months of life in an infant with total blindness or greatly impaired vision, normal fundus and extinguished electroretinogram (ERG). Nystagmus (pendular type) and characteristic eye poking are frequently observed in the first months of life (digito-ocular sign of Franceschetti). Hypermetropia and keratoconus frequently develop in the course of the disease. The observation by Waardenburg of normal children born to affected parents supports the genetic heterogeneity of LCA. Until now, however, little was known about the pathophysiology of the disease, but LCA is usually regarded as the consequence of either impaired development of photoreceptors or extremely early degeneration of cells that have developed normally. We have recently mapped a gene for LCA to chromosome 17p13.1 (LCA1) by homozygosity mapping in consanguineous families of North African origin and provided evidence of genetic heterogeneity in our sample, as LCA1 accounted for 8/15 LCA families in our series. Here, we report two missense mutations (F589S) and two frameshift mutations (nt 460 del C, nt 693 del C) of the retinal guanylate cyclase (RETGC, GDB symbol GUC2D) gene in four unrelated LCA1 probands of North African ancestry and ascribe LCA1 to an impaired production of cGMP in the retina, with permanent closure of cGMP-gated cation channels.

  13. Therapeutically targeting guanylate cyclase-C: computational modeling of plecanatide, a uroguanylin analog.

    PubMed

    Brancale, Andrea; Shailubhai, Kunwar; Ferla, Salvatore; Ricci, Antonio; Bassetto, Marcella; Jacob, Gary S

    2017-04-01

    Plecanatide is a recently developed guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C) agonist and the first uroguanylin analog designed to treat chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC) and irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C). GC-C receptors are found across the length of the intestines and are thought to play a key role in fluid regulation and electrolyte balance. Ligands of the GC-C receptor include endogenous agonists, uroguanylin and guanylin, as well as diarrheagenic, Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxins (ST). Plecanatide mimics uroguanylin in its 2 disulfide-bond structure and in its ability to activate GC-Cs in a pH-dependent manner, a feature associated with the presence of acid-sensing residues (Asp2 and Glu3). Linaclotide, a synthetic analog of STh (a 19 amino acid member of ST family), contains the enterotoxin's key structural elements, including the presence of three disulfide bonds. Linaclotide, like STh, activates GC-Cs in a pH-independent manner due to the absence of pH-sensing residues. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations compared the stability of plecanatide and linaclotide to STh. Three-dimensional structures of plecanatide at various protonation states (pH 2.0, 5.0, and 7.0) were simulated with GROMACS software. Deviations from ideal binding conformations were quantified using root mean square deviation values. Simulations of linaclotide revealed a rigid conformer most similar to STh. Plecanatide simulations retained the flexible, pH-dependent structure of uroguanylin. The most active conformers of plecanatide were found at pH 5.0, which is the pH found in the proximal small intestine. GC-C receptor activation in this region would stimulate intraluminal fluid secretion, potentially relieving symptoms associated with CIC and IBS-C.

  14. A constitutively activated mutant of human soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC): implication for the mechanism of sGC activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Emil; Sharina, Iraida; Kots, Alexander; Murad, Ferid

    2003-01-01

    Heterodimeric alphabeta soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a recognized receptor for nitric oxide (NO) and mediates many of its physiological functions. Although it has been clear that the heme moiety coordinated by His-105 of the beta subunit is crucial for mediating the activation of the enzyme by NO, it is not understood whether the heme moiety plays any role in the function of the enzyme in the absence of NO. Here we analyze the effects of biochemical and genetic removal of heme and its reconstitution on the activity of the enzyme. Detergent-induced loss of heme from the wild-type alphabeta enzyme resulted in several-fold activation of the enzyme. This activation was inhibited after hemin reconstitution. A heme-deficient mutant alphabetaCys-105 with Cys substituted for His-105 was constitutively active with specific activity approaching the activity of the wild-type enzyme activated by NO. However, reconstitution of mutant enzyme with heme and/or DTT treatment significantly inhibited the enzyme. Mutant enzyme reconstituted with ferrous heme was activated by NO and CO alone and showed additive effects between gaseous effectors and the allosteric activator 5-cyclopropyl-2-[1-(2-fluoro-benzyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-3-yl]-pyrim idin-4-ylamine. We propose that the heme moiety through its coordination with His-105 of the beta subunit acts as an endogenous inhibitor of sGC. Disruption of the heme-coordinating bond induced by binding of NO releases the restrictions imposed by this bond and allows the formation of an optimally organized catalytic center in the heterodimer.

  15. A constitutively activated mutant of human soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC): Implication for the mechanism of sGC activation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Emil; Sharina, Iraida; Kots, Alexander; Murad, Ferid

    2003-01-01

    Heterodimeric αβ soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a recognized receptor for nitric oxide (NO) and mediates many of its physiological functions. Although it has been clear that the heme moiety coordinated by His-105 of the β subunit is crucial for mediating the activation of the enzyme by NO, it is not understood whether the heme moiety plays any role in the function of the enzyme in the absence of NO. Here we analyze the effects of biochemical and genetic removal of heme and its reconstitution on the activity of the enzyme. Detergent-induced loss of heme from the wild-type αβ enzyme resulted in several-fold activation of the enzyme. This activation was inhibited after hemin reconstitution. A heme-deficient mutant αβCys-105 with Cys substituted for His-105 was constitutively active with specific activity approaching the activity of the wild-type enzyme activated by NO. However, reconstitution of mutant enzyme with heme and/or DTT treatment significantly inhibited the enzyme. Mutant enzyme reconstituted with ferrous heme was activated by NO and CO alone and showed additive effects between gaseous effectors and the allosteric activator 5-cyclopropyl-2-[1-(2-fluoro-benzyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-3-yl]-pyrimidin-4-ylamine. We propose that the heme moiety through its coordination with His-105 of the β subunit acts as an endogenous inhibitor of sGC. Disruption of the heme-coordinating bond induced by binding of NO releases the restrictions imposed by this bond and allows the formation of an optimally organized catalytic center in the heterodimer. PMID:12883009

  16. Digital Holographic Tomography and Fluorescence Used to Localize sGC in HEK293 Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldrake, Eric; Mann, Christopher; Gage, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    Digital Holographic Tomography (DHT) is used to analyze and localize the intracellular protein soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. DHT is a non-invasive phase microscopy technique that provides three dimensional quantitative information of HEK293 cells including variance of index of refraction or physical thickness. A fluorescence component will be added to the microscope to further studies of sGC localization. The signaling pathway including nitric oxide (NO) and sGC is studied and has been linked to various cardiovascular diseases, platelet aggregation, and variations in blood pressure via vasodilation. sGC will be labeled using a fluorescent antibody and analyzed using the DHT microscope. DHT will be used to analyze changes in sGC localization in its natural environment and when stimulated by NO. An understanding of how sGC interacts with its surroundings is vital to further research in cardiovascular disease.

  17. Kinetics of nitric oxide dissociation from five- and six-coordinate nitrosyl hemes and heme proteins, including soluble guanylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Kharitonov, V G; Sharma, V S; Magde, D; Koesling, D

    1997-06-03

    Kinetics of NO dissociation were characterized for three five-coordinate systems, heme-NO, HSA-heme-NO (human serum albumin), GC-NO (soluble guanylate cyclase), and for the six-coordinate system, Im-heme-NO. Nitrosyl myoglobin was redetermined for comparison. Previously known, six-coordinate R and T state nitrosyl hemoglobins are also included in the comparison. The data indicate that NO dissociates more than 1000 times faster from five-coordinate model heme than it does from the six-coordinate analog. Such a negative trans-effect between NO and a proximal base is in sharp contrast to carboxy heme derivatives, in which ligand dissociation rates are greatly slowed in when a trans base is present. As a result of opposite trans-effects, six-coordinate carboxy and nitrosyl derivatives have comparable dissociation rates, even though the five-coordinate species are very different. In proteins, five- and six-coordinate forms do not show a large difference in dissociation rates. Part of the reason may be due to different probabilities for geminate recombination in the different proteins, but this cannot explain all the facts. There must also be influences of the protein structure on bond-breaking rate constants themselves. With the exception of hemoglobin in the T state, nitrosyl guanylate cyclase shows the highest NO dissociation rate constant, k(obs) = 6 x 10(-4) s(-1). This would yield a half-life of about 2 min at 37 degrees C for dissociation of NO from GC-NO, a number that has implications for the mechanism of regulation of the activity of this key heme enzyme.

  18. [Biosynthesis of cyclic GMP in plant cells - new insight into guanylate cyclases].

    PubMed

    Świeżawska, Brygida; Marciniak, Katarzyna; Szmidt-Jaworska, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic 3',5'-guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is involved in many physiological processes in plants. Concentration of this second messenger in plant cell is determined by guanylyl cyclases (GCs) responsible for cGMP synthesis and phosphodiesterases (PDEs) involved in cGMP inactivation. First discovered plant GCs were localized in cytosol, but few years ago a new family of plasma membrane proteins with guanylyl cyclase activity was identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. These proteins belong to the family of a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLK) with extracellular leucine-rich repeat domain, a transmembrane-spanning domain, and an intracellular kinase domain. A novel class of guanylyl cyclases contain the GC catalytic center encapsulated within the intracellular kinase domain. These molecules are different to animal GCs in that the GC catalytic center is nested within the kinase domain. In presented paper we summarized the most recent data concerning plant guanylyl cyclases.

  19. The alpha(2D/A)-adrenergic receptor-linked membrane guanylate cyclase: a new signal transduction system in the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, V; Duda, T; Sharma, R K

    1998-05-01

    In the pineal gland, the membrane guanylate cyclase activity was specifically stimulated by alpha(2D/A)-adrenergic receptor (alpha(2D/A)-AR) agonists. The agonists, however, did not stimulate the cyclase activity in the cell-free membranes. It was possible to stimulate the cyclase in cell-free membranes by the addition of the pineal soluble fraction, but this stimulation was Ca2+-dependent and alpha(2D/A)-agonist-independent. It was also possible to achieve Ca2+-dependent stimulation of the cyclase by the direct addition of CD-GCAP to the isolated pineal membranes. CD-GCAP is a Ca2+-binding protein and is a specific activator of one of the two members of the ROS-GC subfamily of membrane guanylate cyclases, ROS-GC1. The soluble fraction of the pineal gland stimulated recombinant ROS-GC1 in a Ca2+-dependent fashion. The direct presence of both ROS-GC1 and CD-GCAP in the pineal was established by molecular cloning/PCR studies. The findings demonstrate the existence of a novel signal transduction mechanism--the linkage of the alpha(2D/A)-AR signaling system with ROS-GC1 transduction system, occurring through intracellular Ca2+ via CD-GCAP.

  20. Increased activity of guanylate cyclase in the atherosclerotic rabbit aorta: role of non-endothelial nitric oxide synthases.

    PubMed Central

    Rupin, A.; Behr, D.; Verbeuren, T. J.

    1996-01-01

    1. Experiments were performed to examine the effects of putative non-endothelial nitric oxide on the soluble guanylate cyclase activity of severe atherosclerotic aortae from hypercholesterolaemic rabbits fed a cholesterol rich diet for 45 weeks. 2. The guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) content of aortae from rabbits fed either a control diet or a diet containing 0.3% cholesterol for 45 weeks was quantified in saline extracts or in trichloracetic acid/either extracts by use of a competitive immunoenzymatic assay. Rabbit anti-cyclic GMP immunoglobulin G was covalently linked to the solid phase, in order to avoid false positive results due to high rabbit immunoglobulin G concentrations in the atherosclerotic saline extracts. 3. Saline extracts of atherosclerotic aortae which were harvested immediately after death (intact aortae) contained about 6 fold more cyclic GMP than control aortae when expressed in pmol cyclic GMP mg-1 protein. The cyclic GMP concentrations in trichloracetic acid/ether extracts of atherosclerotic and control aortae expressed in pmol mg-1 fresh tissue were not significantly different. 4. Neointimal-medial explants from atherosclerotic and control aortae were placed in a physiological saline solution and incubated at 37 degrees C for six hours in an incubator gassed with 5% CO2. Before the incubation, the cyclic GMP concentrations in saline extracts of atherosclerotic explants (0.74 +/- 0.27 pmol mg-1) were found to be 17 fold higher than those of control explants (0.043 +/- 0.008 pmol mg-1). The cyclic GMP content of control explants decreased significantly after 6 h of incubation, while that of atherosclerotic explants remained elevated. 5. Chronic administration of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a non selective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthases, at 12 mg kg-1 day-1 subcutaneously for one month did not reduce the cyclic GMP concentration of intact atherosclerotic aortae, while that of intact aortae from control rabbits

  1. Expression of guanylate cyclase-C, guanylin, and uroguanylin is downregulated proportionally to the ulcerative colitis disease activity index

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Danfeng; Niu, Junkun; Miao, Jiarong; Dong, Xiangqian; Wang, Hong; Yang, Gang; Wang, Kunhua; Miao, Yinglei

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane receptor guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C) signaling pathway has been implicated in several gastrointestinal disorders. Activation of GC-C via guanylin (Gn) and uroguanylin (Ugn) regulates intestinal fluid and electrolyte homeostasis. However, how it regulates the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is still unclear. Here, we investigated the activation of GC-C signaling in ulcerative colitis (UC) of different clinical severities. A total of 60 UC patients and 20 normal controls were recruited. Evaluation of the UC disease activity index (DAI) was performed using a modified Mayo scoring system. The expression of GC-C, Gn and Ugn in the colonic mucosa was measured by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot. We found that the UC patients had significantly lower expression of GC-C, Gn and Ugn than the controls. Furthermore, there were significant differences for GC-C, Gn and Ugn expression for the UC groups of Grade 1, 2 and 3, and their expression levels were reduced with increases in their DAI. Taken together, our results demonstrate that GC-C, Gn and Ugn are downregulated in UC, and this downregulation is more significant with aggravation of the clinical condition. Therefore, the GC-C signaling pathway may be implicated in the progression of UC. PMID:27125248

  2. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, tolerability, and safety of the soluble guanylate cyclase activator cinaciguat (BAY 58-2667) in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Frey, Reiner; Mück, Wolfgang; Unger, Sigrun; Artmeier-Brandt, Ulrike; Weimann, Gerrit; Wensing, Georg

    2008-12-01

    Preclinical data indicate that the nitric oxide-independent soluble guanylate cyclase activator cinaciguat (BAY 58-2667), which is a new drug in development for patients with heart failure, induces vasodilation preferentially in diseased vessels. This study aimed to assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of cinaciguat. Seventy-six healthy volunteers were included in this randomized, placebo-controlled study. Cinaciguat (50-250 microg/h) was administered intravenously for up to 4 hours in a maximum of 6 individuals per dose group. No serious adverse events were reported. Four-hour infusions (50-250 microg/h) decreased diastolic blood pressure and increased heart rate (all P values < .05) versus placebo, without significantly reducing systolic blood pressure (P between 0.07 and 0.56). At higher doses (150-250 microg/h), 4-hour infusions decreased mean arterial pressure and increased plasma cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels (all P values < .05). Pharmacokinetics showed dose-proportionality with low interindividual variability. Plasma concentrations declined below 1.0 microg/L within 30 minutes of cessation of infusion. Cinaciguat had potent cardiovascular effects reducing preload and afterload, warranting further investigation in patients with heart failure.

  3. Structure, signaling mechanism and regulation of the natriuretic peptide receptor guanylate cyclase.

    SciTech Connect

    Misono, K. S.; Philo, J. S.; Arakawa, T.; Ogata, C. M.; Qiu, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Young, H. S.

    2011-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and the homologous B-type natriuretic peptide are cardiac hormones that dilate blood vessels and stimulate natriuresis and diuresis, thereby lowering blood pressure and blood volume. ANP and B-type natriuretic peptide counterbalance the actions of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and neurohormonal systems, and play a central role in cardiovascular regulation. These activities are mediated by natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA), a single transmembrane segment, guanylyl cyclase (GC)-linked receptor that occurs as a homodimer. Here, we present an overview of the structure, possible chloride-mediated regulation and signaling mechanism of NPRA and other receptor GCs. Earlier, we determined the crystal structures of the NPRA extracellular domain with and without bound ANP. Their structural comparison has revealed a novel ANP-induced rotation mechanism occurring in the juxtamembrane region that apparently triggers transmembrane signal transduction. More recently, the crystal structures of the dimerized catalytic domain of green algae GC Cyg12 and that of cyanobacterium GC Cya2 have been reported. These structures closely resemble that of the adenylyl cyclase catalytic domain, consisting of a C1 and C2 subdomain heterodimer. Adenylyl cyclase is activated by binding of G{sub s}{alpha} to C2 and the ensuing 7{sup o} rotation of C1 around an axis parallel to the central cleft, thereby inducing the heterodimer to adopt a catalytically active conformation. We speculate that, in NPRA, the ANP-induced rotation of the juxtamembrane domains, transmitted across the transmembrane helices, may induce a similar rotation in each of the dimerized GC catalytic domains, leading to the stimulation of the GC catalytic activity.

  4. A Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Mediates Negative Signaling by Ammonium on Expression of Nitrate Reductase in Chlamydomonas[W

    PubMed Central

    de Montaigu, Amaury; Sanz-Luque, Emanuel; Galván, Aurora; Fernández, Emilio

    2010-01-01

    Nitrate assimilation in plants and related organisms is a highly regulated and conserved pathway in which the enzyme nitrate reductase (NR) occupies a central position. Although some progress has been made in understanding the regulation of the protein, transcriptional regulation of the NR gene (NIA1) is poorly understood. This work describes a mechanism for the ammonium-mediated repression of NIA1. We report the characterization of a mutant defective in the repression of NIA1 and NR in response to ammonium and show that a gene (CYG56) coding for a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent guanylate cyclase (GC) was interrupted in this mutant. NO donors, cGMP analogs, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), and a calcium ionophore (A23187) repress the expression of NIA1 in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii wild-type cells and also repress the expression of other ammonium-sensitive genes. In addition, the GC inhibitors LY83,583 (6-anilino-5,8-quinolinedione) and ODQ (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one) release cells from ammonium repression. Intracellular NO and cGMP levels were increased in the presence of ammonium in wild-type cells. In the cyg56 mutant, NIA1 transcription was less sensitive to NO donors and A23187, but responded like the wild type to IBMX. Results presented here suggest that CYG56 participates in ammonium-mediated NIA1 repression through a pathway that involves NO, cGMP, and calcium and that similar mechanisms might be occurring in plants. PMID:20442374

  5. Rod outer segment membrane guanylate cyclase type 1-linked stimulatory and inhibitory calcium signaling systems in the pineal gland: biochemical, molecular, and immunohistochemical evidence.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, V; Nagele, R; Duda, T; Sharma, R K

    2000-05-23

    Recent evidence indicates the presence of a novel alpha(2D/A)-adrenergic receptor (alpha(2D/A)-AR) linked membrane guanylate cyclase signal transduction system in the pineal gland. This system operates via a Ca(2+)-driven rod outer segment membrane guanylate cyclase (ROS-GC). In the present study, this transduction system has been characterized via molecular, immunohistochemical, and biochemical approaches. The two main components of the system are ROS-GC1 and its Ca(2+) regulator, S100B. Both components coexist in pinealocytes where the signaling component alpha(2D/A)-AR also resides. The presence of ROS-GC2 was not detected in the pineal gland. Thus, transduction components involved in processing alpha(2D/A)-AR-mediated signals are Ca(2+), S100B, and ROS-GC1. During this investigation, an intriguing observation was made. In certain pinealocytes, ROS-GC1 coexisted with its other Ca(2+) modulator, guanylate cyclase activating protein type 1 (GCAP1). In these pinealocytes, S100B was not present. The other GCAP protein, GCAP2, which is also a known modulator of ROS-GC in photoreceptors, was not present in the pineal gland. The results establish the identity of an alpha(2D/A)-AR-linked ROS-GC1 transduction system in pinealocytes. Furthermore, the findings show that ROS-GC1, in a separate subpopulation of pinealocytes, is associated with an opposite Ca(2+) signaling pathway, which is similar to phototransduction in retina. Thus, like photoreceptors, pinealocytes sense both positive and negative Ca(2+) signals, where ROS-GC1 plays a pivotal role; however, unlike photoreceptors, the pinealocyte is devoid of the ROS-GC2/GCAP2 signal transduction system.

  6. Plecanatide and dolcanatide, novel guanylate cyclase-C agonists, ameliorate gastrointestinal inflammation in experimental models of murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Shailubhai, Kunwar; Palejwala, Vaseem; Arjunan, Krishna Priya; Saykhedkar, Sayali; Nefsky, Bradley; Foss, John A; Comiskey, Stephen; Jacob, Gary S; Plevy, Scott E

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of orally administered plecanatide or dolcanatide, analogs of uroguanylin, on amelioration of colitis in murine models. METHODS: The cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) stimulatory potency of plecanatide and dolcanatide was measured using a human colon carcinoma T84 cell-based assay. For animal studies all test agents were formulated in phosphate buffered saline. Sulfasalazine or 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA) served as positive controls. Effect of oral treatment with test agents on amelioration of acute colitis induced either by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water or by rectal instillation of trinitrobenzene sulfonic (TNBS) acid, was examined in BALB/c and/or BDF1 mice. Additionally, the effect of orally administered plecanatide on the spontaneous colitis in T-cell receptor alpha knockout (TCRα-/-) mice was also examined. Amelioration of colitis was assessed by monitoring severity of colitis, disease activity index and by histopathology. Frozen colon tissues were used to measure myeloperoxidase activity. RESULTS: Plecanatide and dolcanatide are structurally related analogs of uroguanylin, which is an endogenous ligand of guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C). As expected from the agonists of GC-C, both plecanatide and dolcanatide exhibited potent cGMP-stimulatory activity in T84 cells. Once-daily treatment by oral gavage with either of these analogs (0.05-0.5 mg/kg) ameliorated colitis in both DSS and TNBS-induced models of acute colitis, as assessed by body weight, reduction in colitis severity (P < 0.05) and disease activity index (P < 0.05). Amelioration of colitis by either of the drug candidates was comparable to that achieved by orally administered sulfasalazine or 5-ASA. Plecanatide also effectively ameliorated colitis in TCRα-/- mice, a model of spontaneous colitis. As dolcanatide exhibited higher resistance to proteolysis in simulated gastric and intestinal juices, it was selected for further studies. CONCLUSION: This is

  7. Formation of nitric oxide from L-arginine in the central nervous system: a transduction mechanism for stimulation of the soluble guanylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, R G; Palacios, M; Palmer, R M; Moncada, S

    1989-01-01

    A soluble enzyme obtained from rat forebrain catalyzes the NADPH-dependent formation of nitric oxide (NO) and citrulline from L-arginine. The NO formed stimulates the soluble guanylate cyclase and this stimulation is abolished by low concentrations of hemoglobin. The synthesis of NO and citrulline is dependent on the presence of physiological concentrations of free Ca2+ and is inhibited by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, but not by its enantiomer NG-monomethyl-D-arginine or by L-canavanine. L-Homoarginine, L-arginyl-L-aspartate, or L-arginine methyl ester can replace L-arginine as substrates for the enzyme. These results indicate that NO is formed from L-arginine in the brain through an enzymic reaction similar to that in vascular endothelial cells, neutrophils, and macrophages, adding support to our hypothesis that the formation of NO from L-arginine is a widespread transduction mechanism for the stimulation of the soluble guanylate cyclase. PMID:2567995

  8. Functional consequences of a rod outer segment membrane guanylate cyclase (ROS-GC1) gene mutation linked with Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Duda, T; Venkataraman, V; Goraczniak, R; Lange, C; Koch, K W; Sharma, R K

    1999-01-12

    ROS-GC1 is the original member of the subfamily of membrane guanylate cyclases with two Ca2+ switches, which have been defined as CRM1 and CRM2. These are separately located within the intracellular domain of the cyclase. CRM1 switches on the enzyme at nanomolar concentrations of Ca2+ and is linked with phototransduction; the other stimulates at micromolar Ca2+ concentrations and is predicted to be linked with retinal synaptic activity. Ca2+ acts indirectly via Ca2+-binding proteins, GCAP1 and CD-GCAP. GCAP1 is a modulator of the CRM1 switch, and CD-GCAP turns on the CRM2 switch. A Leber's congenital amaurosis, termed LCA1, involves F514S point mutation in ROS-GC1. The present study shows that the mutation severely damages its intrinsic cyclase activity and inactivates its CRM1 switch but does not affect the CRM2 switch. In addition, on the basis of the established modulatory features of ROS-GC1, it is predicted that, in two other forms of LCA1 involving deletion of nt 460C or 693C, there is a frameshift in ROS-GC1 gene, which results in the nonexpression of the cyclase. For the first time, the findings define the linkage of distinct molecular forms of LCA to ROS-GC1 in precise biochemical terms; they also explain the reasons for the insufficient production of cyclic GMP in photoreceptors to sustain phototransduction, which ultimately leads to the degeneration of the photoreceptors.

  9. YC-1, a nitric oxide-independent activator of soluble guanylate cyclase, inhibits the spontaneous contractions of isolated pregnant rat myometrium.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Ali; Kaya, Tijen; Demirkoprulu, Nihal; Karadas, Baris; Duran, Bulent; Cetin, Meral

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of YC-1 (3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'-furyl)-1-benzyl indazole) on spontaneous contractions and levels of cyclic GMP (cGMP) of myometrial strips isolated from pregnant rats. It is a nitric oxide-independent soluble guanylate cyclase activator. Myometrial strips were obtained from eight pregnant Wistar albino rats and were mounted in organ baths for the recording of isometric tensions. We evaluated the effect of increasing concentrations of YC-1 on spontaneous myometrial contractions and on contractions of myometrial smooth muscle pretreated with methylene blue (10(-5) M), tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA) (3 x 10(-4) M), and glibenclamide (10(-6) M). YC-1 (10(-9) - 3 x 10(-5) M) concentration-dependently decreased the amplitude and frequency of spontaneous contractions of myometrial strips. The inhibition of the amplitude and frequency of spontaneous contractions by YC-1 were antagonized with methylene blue (10(-5) M) and TEA (3 x 10(-4) M), but they were not changed by glibenclamide (10(-6) M); however, the antagonistic effect of methylene blue was significantly more than that of TEA (P<0.05). We also evaluated the effect of YC-1 on the levels of cGMP in myometrial strips obtained from pregnant rat uterine horns. YC-1-stimulated myometrial strips showed an excessive elevation in myometrial cGMP that declined slowly during the subsequent washout period. These results show that YC-1 decreases spontaneous contractile activity of myometrial strips isolated from pregnant rat and causes elevation of myometrial cGMP levels in vivo. This effect of YC-1 is significantly reduced by the methylene blue and TEA, suggesting the activation of soluble guanylate cyclase and Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) channels as the mechanisms of action.

  10. The opposing effects of calmodulin, adenosine 5 prime -triphosphate, and pertussis toxin on phorbol ester induced inhibition of atrial natriuretic factor stimulated guanylate cyclase in SK-NEP-1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiya, M.; Frohlich, E.D.; Cole, F.E. )

    1991-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of calmodulin, adenosine 5{prime}-triphosphate (ATP) and pertussis toxin (PT) on phorbol ester (PMA) induced inhibition of ANF-stimulated cyclic GMP formation in cells from the human renal cell line, SK-NEP-1. PMA inhibited ANF-stimulated guanylate cyclase activity in particulate membranes by about 65%. Calmodulin reversed this inhibition in a dose dependent manner. ATP potentiated Mg++ but not Mn++ supported guanylate cyclase activity. In PMA treated membranes, ATP potentiating effects were abolished. PMA also inhibited ANF-stimulated cGMP accumulation, but pretreatment with PT prevented this PMA inhibition. PT did not affect basal or ANF-stimulated cGMP accumulation. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that PMA inhibited ANF stimulation of particulate guanylate cyclase in opposition to the activating effects of calmodulin or ATP in SK-NEP-1 cells. The protein kinase C inhibitory effects appeared to be mediated via a PT-sensitive G protein.

  11. Detection of Nitric Oxide Induced by Angiotensin II Receptor Type 1 Using Soluble Guanylate Cyclase beta1 Subunit Fused to a Yellow Fluorescent Protein, Venus.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Yuichi; Ozawa, Kentaro; Komatsubara, Akira T; Zhao, Jing; Nishi, Mayumi; Yoshizumi, Masanori

    2017-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important gaseous molecule involved in many physiological and pathophysiological processes, including the regulation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Here, we report the development of a high-affinity method to detect NO using soluble guanylate cyclase beta1 subunit fused to Venus, a variant of yellow fluorescent protein (sGC-Venus). We measured the fluorescence intensity of sGC-Venus with and without an NO donor using purified probes. At 560 nm emission, the fluorescence intensity of sGC-Venus at 405 nm excitation was increased by approximately 2.5-fold by the NO donor, but the fluorescence intensities of sGC-Venus excited by other wavelengths showed much less of an increase or no significant increase. To measure NO in living cells, the fluorescence intensity of sGC-Venus at 405 nm excitation was normalized to that at 488 nm excitation because it showed no significant difference with or without the NO donor. In HEK293 cells overexpressing the angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1 receptor), the production of NO induced by activation of the AT1 receptor was detected using sGC-Venus. These data indicate that sGC-Venus will be a useful tool for visualizing intracellular NO in living cells and that NO might be a common tool to regulate GPCRs.

  12. Lentiviral Expression of Retinal Guanylate Cyclase-1 (RetGC1) Restores Vision in an Avian Model of Childhood Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Haire, Shannon E; Aleman, Tomas S; Cideciyan, Artur V; Sokal, Izabel; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Jacobson, Samuel G; Semple-Rowland, Susan L

    2006-01-01

    Background Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a genetically heterogeneous group of retinal diseases that cause congenital blindness in infants and children. Mutations in the GUCY2D gene that encodes retinal guanylate cyclase–1 (retGC1) were the first to be linked to this disease group (LCA type 1 [LCA1]) and account for 10%–20% of LCA cases. These mutations disrupt synthesis of cGMP in photoreceptor cells, a key second messenger required for function of these cells. The GUCY1*B chicken, which carries a null mutation in the retGC1 gene, is blind at hatching and serves as an animal model for the study of LCA1 pathology and potential treatments in humans. Methods and Findings A lentivirus-based gene transfer vector carrying the GUCY2D gene was developed and injected into early-stage GUCY1*B embryos to determine if photoreceptor function and sight could be restored to these animals. Like human LCA1, the avian disease shows early-onset blindness, but there is a window of opportunity for intervention. In both diseases there is a period of photoreceptor cell dysfunction that precedes retinal degeneration. Of seven treated animals, six exhibited sight as evidenced by robust optokinetic and volitional visual behaviors. Electroretinographic responses, absent in untreated animals, were partially restored in treated animals. Morphological analyses indicated there was slowing of the retinal degeneration. Conclusions Blindness associated with loss of function of retGC1 in the GUCY1*B avian model of LCA1 can be reversed using viral vector-mediated gene transfer. Furthermore, this reversal can be achieved by restoring function to a relatively low percentage of retinal photoreceptors. These results represent a first step toward development of gene therapies for one of the more common forms of childhood blindness. PMID:16700630

  13. PACAP stimulation of maturational gonadotropin secretion in goldfish involves extracellular signal-regulated kinase, but not nitric oxide or guanylate cyclase, signaling.

    PubMed

    Chang, John P; Sawisky, Grant R; Mitchell, Gabriel; Uretsky, Aubrey D; Kwong, Patrick; Grey, Caleb L; Meints, Amanda N; Booth, Morgan

    2010-01-01

    In goldfish, nitric oxide synthase (NOS) immunoreactivity is present in gonadotropes and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) mediates GnRH stimulation of gonadotropin release and synthesis. In this study, we tested the possible involvement of nitric oxide (NO) and ERK in mediating PACAP-stimulated maturational gonadotropin (GTH-II) release from primary cultures of dispersed goldfish pituitary cells. In static incubation experiments, PACAP-induced GTH-II release was unaffected by two inhibitors of NOS synthase, AGH and 1400W; whereas addition of a NO donor, SNAP, elevated GTH-II secretion. In perifusion experiments, neither NOS inhibitors (AGH, 1400W and 7-Ni) nor NO scavengers (PTIO and rutin hydrate) attenuated the GTH-II response to pulse applications of PACAP. In addition, the GTH-II responses to PACAP and the NO donor SNP were additive while PTIO blocked SNP action. Although dibutyryl cGMP increased GTH-II secretion in static incubation, inhibition of guanylate cyclase (GC), a known down-stream target for NO signaling, did not reduce the GTH-II response to pulse application of PACAP. On the other hand, GTH-II responses to PACAP in perifusion were attenuated in the presence of two inhibitors of ERK kinase (MEK), U 0126 and PD 98059. These results suggest that although increased availability of NO and cGMP can lead to increased GTH-II secretion, MEK/ERK signaling, rather than NOS/NO/GC activation, mediates PACAP action on GTH-II release in goldfish.

  14. Long-Term Preservation of Cones and Improvement in Visual Function Following Gene Therapy in a Mouse Model of Leber Congenital Amaurosis Caused by Guanylate Cyclase-1 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mihelec, Marija; Pearson, Rachael A.; Robbie, Scott J.; Buch, Prateek K.; Azam, Selina A.; Bainbridge, James W.B.; Smith, Alexander J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a severe retinal dystrophy manifesting from early infancy as poor vision or blindness. Loss-of-function mutations in GUCY2D cause LCA1 and are one of the most common causes of LCA, accounting for 20% of all cases. Human GUCY2D and mouse Gucy2e genes encode guanylate cyclase-1 (GC1), which is responsible for restoring the dark state in photoreceptors after light exposure. The Gucy2e–/– mouse shows partially diminished rod function, but an absence of cone function before degeneration. Although the cones appear morphologically normal, they exhibit mislocalization of proteins involved in phototransduction. In this study we tested the efficacy of an rAAV2/8 vector containing the human rhodopsin kinase promoter and the human GUCY2D gene. Following subretinal delivery of the vector in Gucy2e–/– mice, GC1 protein was detected in the rod and cone outer segments, and in transduced areas of retina cone transducin was appropriately localized to cone outer segments. Moreover, we observed a dose-dependent restoration of rod and cone function and an improvement in visual behavior of the treated mice. Most importantly, cone preservation was observed in transduced areas up to 6 months post injection. To date, this is the most effective rescue of the Gucy2e–/– mouse model of LCA and we propose that a vector, similar to the one used in this study, could be suitable for use in a clinical trial of gene therapy for LCA1. PMID:21671801

  15. Plecanatide-mediated activation of guanylate cyclase-C suppresses inflammation-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in Apc+/Min-FCCC mice

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wen-Chi L; Masih, Shet; Thadi, Anusha; Patwa, Viren; Joshi, Apoorva; Cooper, Harry S; Palejwala, Vaseem A; Clapper, Margie L; Shailubhai, Kunwar

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effect of orally administered plecanatide on colorectal dysplasia in Apc+/Min-FCCC mice with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced inflammation. METHODS Inflammation driven colorectal carcinogenesis was induced in Apc+/Min-FCCC mice by administering DSS in their drinking water. Mice were fed a diet supplemented with plecanatide (0-20 ppm) and its effect on the multiplicity of histopathologically confirmed polypoid, flat and indeterminate dysplasia was evaluated. Plecanatide-mediated activation of guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C) signaling was assessed in colon tissues by measuring cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) by ELISA, protein kinase G-II and vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein by immunoblotting. Ki-67, c-myc and cyclin D1 were used as markers of proliferation. Cellular levels and localization of β-catenin in colon tissues were assessed by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Uroguanylin (UG) and GC-C transcript levels were measured by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A mouse cytokine array panel was used to detect cytokines in the supernatant of colon explant cultures. RESULTS Oral treatment of Apc+/MinFCCC mice with plecanatide produced a statistically significant reduction in the formation of inflammation-driven polypoid, flat and indeterminate dysplasias. This anti-carcinogenic activity of plecanatide was accompanied by activation of cGMP/GC-C signaling mediated inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and reduced proliferation. Plecanatide also decreased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL1 TNF), chemokines (MIP-1, IP-10) and growth factors (GCSF and GMCSF) from colon explants derived from mice with acute DSS-induced inflammation. The effect of plecanatide-mediated inhibition of inflammation/dysplasia on endogenous expression of UG and GC-C transcripts was measured in intestinal tissues. Although GC-C expression was not altered appreciably, a statistically significant

  16. [Potentiation of activation of soluble guanylate cyclase by YC-1, NO-donors and increase of the synergistic effect of YC-1 on NO-dependent activation of the enzyme by 1,2,3-triazolyl-1,2,5-oxadiazole derivatives].

    PubMed

    Severina, I S; Pyatakova, N V; Shchegolev, A Yu; Rozhkov, V Yu; Batog, L V; Makhova, N N

    2015-01-01

    The influence of (1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)-1,2,5-oxadiazole derivatives: 4-amino-3-(5-methyl-4- ethoxycarbonyl-(1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)-1,2,5-oxadiazole (TF4CH3) and 4,4'-bis(5-methel-4-ethoxycarbonyl-1H- 1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)-3,3'-azo-1,2,5-oxadiazole (2TF4CH3) on stimulation of human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase by YC-1, NO-donors (sodium nitroprusside, SNP, and spermine NONO) and on a synergistic increase of NO-dependent enzyme activation in the presence of YC-1 has been investigated. Both compounds increased guanylate cyclase activation by YC-1, potentiated guanylate cyclase stimulation by NO-donors and increased the synergistic effect of YC-1 on NO-dependent activation of soluble guanylate cyclase. The similarity in the properties of the examined TF4CH3 and 2TF4CH3 with that of YC-1 and the possible mechanism underlying the revealed properties of compounds used are discussed.

  17. Direct sGC Activation Bypasses NO Scavenging Reactions of Intravascular Free Oxy-Hemoglobin and Limits Vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Tabima, D. Marcela; Specht, Patricia A.C.; Tejero, Jesús; Champion, Hunter C.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Baust, Jeff; Mik, Egbert G.; Hildesheim, Mariana; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Becker, Eva-Maria; Truebel, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOC) provide a potential alternative to red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. Their clinical application has been limited by adverse effects, in large part thought to be mediated by the intravascular scavenging of the vasodilator nitric oxide (NO) by cell-free plasma oxy-hemoglobin. Free hemoglobin may also cause endothelial dysfunction and platelet activation in hemolytic diseases and after transfusion of aged stored RBCs. The new soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) stimulator Bay 41-8543 and sGC activator Bay 60-2770 directly modulate sGC, independent of NO bioavailability, providing a potential therapeutic mechanism to bypass hemoglobin-mediated NO inactivation. Results: Infusions of human hemoglobin solutions and the HBOC Oxyglobin into rats produced a severe hypertensive response, even at low plasma heme concentrations approaching 10 μM. These reactions were only observed for ferrous oxy-hemoglobin and not analogs that do not rapidly scavenge NO. Infusions of L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a competitive NO synthase inhibitor, after hemoglobin infusion did not produce additive vasoconstriction, suggesting that vasoconstriction is related to scavenging of vascular NO. Open-chest hemodynamic studies confirmed that hypertension occurred secondary to direct effects on increasing vascular resistance, with limited negative cardiac inotropic effects. Intravascular hemoglobin reduced the vasodilatory potency of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and sildenafil, but had no effect on vasodilatation by direct NO-independent activation of sGC by BAY 41-8543 and BAY 60-2770. Innovation and Conclusion: These data suggest that both sGC stimulators and sGC activators could be used to restore cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent vasodilation in conditions where cell-free plasma hemoglobin is sufficient to inhibit endogenous NO signaling. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 2232–2243. PMID:23697678

  18. The regulation of sGC on the rat model of neuropathic pain is mediated by 5-HT1ARs and NO/cGMP pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zifeng; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Jianhai; Zheng, Jijian

    2016-01-01

    Inadequate management of neuropathic pain results in poor clinical outcomes and reduces quality of life for the patient all over the world, but intricate interplay between wide variety of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the development and progression of neuropathic pain makes it difficult to design effective therapeutic strategies. The present study aims to elucidate the interaction of 5-HT1A receptors (5-HT1ARs), soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) and NO/cGMP signaling pathway in the development of neuropathic pain. The results showed that after sciatic nerve crush procedure, the protein level of sGC in the spinal cord was greatly increased. The mechanical threshold in rats was significantly enhanced by the sGC inhibitor ODQ and neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) inhibitor SMTC, indicating the role of sGC and nNOS in the process of neuropathic pain. The treatment of NO donors (SNP and SIN-1) and cGMP-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor (Zaprinast) all significantly decreased the mechanical threshold in rats, but the 5-HT1ARs inhibitor WAY100635 significantly increased the mechanical threshold in rats, demonstrating the role of NO/cGMP pathway and 5-HT1ARs in the development of neuropathic pain. Finally, the protein levels of sGC was greatly increased by SNP and Zaprinast but decreased by WAY100635 and SMTC, showing the regulation of NO/cGMP pathway and 5-HT1ARs on the protein expression of sGC. Taken together, it is suggested that sGC in the spinal cord regulates the neuropathic pain, which is mediated by 5-HT1ARs and NO/cGMP pathway. PMID:27158388

  19. Regulation of Sertoli cell tight junction dynamics in the rat testis via the nitric oxide synthase/soluble guanylate cyclase/3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate/protein kinase G signaling pathway: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nikki P Y; Cheng, C Yan

    2003-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) catalyzes the oxidation of L-arginine to NO. NO plays a crucial role in regulating various physiological functions, possibly including junction dynamics via its effects on cAMP and cGMP, which are known modulators of tight junction (TJ) dynamics. Although inducible NOS (iNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS) are found in the testis and have been implicated in the regulation of spermatogenesis, their role(s) in TJ dynamics, if any, is not known. When Sertoli cells were cultured at 0.5-1.2 x 10(6) cells/cm(2) on Matrigel-coated dishes or bicameral units, functional TJ barrier was formed when the barrier function was assessed by quantifying transepithelial electrical resistance across the cell epithelium. The assembly of the TJ barrier was shown to associate with a significant plummeting in the levels of iNOS and eNOS, seemingly suggesting that their presence by producing NO might perturb TJ assembly. To further confirm the role of NOS on the TJ barrier function in vitro, zinc (II) protoporphyrin-IX (ZnPP), an NOS inhibitor and a soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, was added to the Sertoli cell cultures during TJ assembly. Indeed, ZnPP was found to facilitate the assembly and maintenance of the Sertoli cell TJ barrier, possibly by inducing the production of TJ-associated proteins, such as occludin. Subsequent studies by immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting have shown that iNOS and eNOS are structurally linked to TJ-integral membrane proteins, such as occludin, and cytoskeletal proteins, such as actin, vimentin, and alpha-tubulin. When the cAMP and cGMP levels in these ZnPP-treated samples were quantified, a ZnPP-induced reduction of intracellular cGMP, but not cAMP, was indeed detected. Furthermore, 8-bromo-cGMP, a cell membrane-permeable analog of cGMP, could also perturb the TJ barrier dose dependently similar to the effects of 8-bromo-cAMP. KT-5823, a specific inhibitor of protein kinase G, was shown to facilitate the Sertoli cell TJ

  20. Involvement of rhodopsin and ATP in the activation of membranous guanylate cyclase in retinal photoreceptor outer segments (ROS-GC) by GC-activating proteins (GCAPs): a new model for ROS-GC activation and its link to retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Vladimir A; Hayashi, Fumio; Usukura, Jiro; Yamazaki, Akio

    2010-01-01

    Membranous guanylate cyclase in retinal photoreceptor outer segments (ROS-GC), a key enzyme for the recovery of photoreceptors to the dark state, has a topology identical to and cytoplasmic domains homologous to those of peptide-regulated GCs. However, under the prevailing concept, its activation mechanism is significantly different from those of peptide-regulated GCs: GC-activating proteins (GCAPs) function as the sole activator of ROS-GC in a Ca(2+)-sensitive manner, and neither reception of an outside signal by the extracellular domain (ECD) nor ATP binding to the kinase homology domain (KHD) is required for its activation. We have recently shown that ATP pre-binding to the KHD in ROS-GC drastically enhances its GCAP-stimulated activity, and that rhodopsin illumination, as the outside signal, is required for the ATP pre-binding. These results indicate that illuminated rhodopsin is involved in ROS-GC activation in two ways: to initiate ATP binding to ROS-GC for preparation of its activation and to reduce [Ca(2+)] through activation of cGMP phosphodiesterase. These two signal pathways are activated in a parallel and proportional manner and finally converge for strong activation of ROS-GC by Ca(2+)-free GCAPs. These results also suggest that the ECD receives the signal for ATP binding from illuminated rhodopsin. The ECD is projected into the intradiscal space, i.e., an intradiscal domain(s) of rhodopsin is also involved in the signal transfer. Many retinal disease-linked mutations are found in these intradiscal domains; however, their consequences are often unclear. This model will also provide novel insights into causal relationship between these mutations and certain retinal diseases.

  1. Ischemic-LTP in striatal spiny neurons of both direct and indirect pathway requires the activation of D1-like receptors and NO/soluble guanylate cyclase/cGMP transmission.

    PubMed

    Arcangeli, Sara; Tozzi, Alessandro; Tantucci, Michela; Spaccatini, Cristiano; de Iure, Antonio; Costa, Cinzia; Di Filippo, Massimiliano; Picconi, Barbara; Giampà, Carmen; Fusco, Francesca Romana; Amoroso, Salvatore; Calabresi, Paolo

    2013-02-01

    Striatal medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs) are highly vulnerable to ischemia. A brief ischemic insult, produced by oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD), can induce ischemic long-term potentiation (i-LTP) of corticostriatal excitatory postsynaptic response. Since nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the pathophysiology of brain ischemia and the dopamine D1/D5-receptors (D1-like-R) are expressed in striatal NOS-positive interneurons, we hypothesized a relation between NOS-positive interneurons and striatal i-LTP, involving D1R activation and NO production. We investigated the mechanisms involved in i-LTP induced by OGD in corticostriatal slices and found that the D1-like-R antagonist SCH-23390 prevented i-LTP in all recorded MSNs. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the induction of i-LTP in both substance P-positive, (putative D1R-expressing) and adenosine A2A-receptor-positive (putative D2R-expressing) MSNs. Furthermore, i-LTP was dependent on a NOS/cGMP pathway since pharmacological blockade of NOS, guanylate-cyclase, or PKG prevented i-LTP. However, these compounds failed to prevent i-LTP in the presence of a NO donor or cGMP analog, respectively. Interestingly, the D1-like-R antagonism failed to prevent i-LTP when intracellular cGMP was pharmacologically increased. We propose that NO, produced by striatal NOS-positive interneurons via the stimulation of D1-like-R located on these cells, is critical for i-LTP induction in the entire population of MSNs involving a cGMP-dependent pathway.

  2. Ischemic-LTP in striatal spiny neurons of both direct and indirect pathway requires the activation of D1-like receptors and NO/soluble guanylate cyclase/cGMP transmission

    PubMed Central

    Arcangeli, Sara; Tozzi, Alessandro; Tantucci, Michela; Spaccatini, Cristiano; de Iure, Antonio; Costa, Cinzia; Di Filippo, Massimiliano; Picconi, Barbara; Giampà, Carmen; Fusco, Francesca Romana; Amoroso, Salvatore; Calabresi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Striatal medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs) are highly vulnerable to ischemia. A brief ischemic insult, produced by oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD), can induce ischemic long-term potentiation (i-LTP) of corticostriatal excitatory postsynaptic response. Since nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the pathophysiology of brain ischemia and the dopamine D1/D5-receptors (D1-like-R) are expressed in striatal NOS-positive interneurons, we hypothesized a relation between NOS-positive interneurons and striatal i-LTP, involving D1R activation and NO production. We investigated the mechanisms involved in i-LTP induced by OGD in corticostriatal slices and found that the D1-like-R antagonist SCH-23390 prevented i-LTP in all recorded MSNs. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the induction of i-LTP in both substance P-positive, (putative D1R-expressing) and adenosine A2A-receptor-positive (putative D2R-expressing) MSNs. Furthermore, i-LTP was dependent on a NOS/cGMP pathway since pharmacological blockade of NOS, guanylate-cyclase, or PKG prevented i-LTP. However, these compounds failed to prevent i-LTP in the presence of a NO donor or cGMP analog, respectively. Interestingly, the D1-like-R antagonism failed to prevent i-LTP when intracellular cGMP was pharmacologically increased. We propose that NO, produced by striatal NOS-positive interneurons via the stimulation of D1-like-R located on these cells, is critical for i-LTP induction in the entire population of MSNs involving a cGMP-dependent pathway. PMID:23149555

  3. Human recombinant soluble guanylyl cyclase: expression, purification, and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Y. C.; Martin, E.; Murad, F.

    2000-01-01

    The alpha1- and beta1-subunits of human soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) were coexpressed in the Sf9 cells/baculovirus system. In addition to the native enzyme, constructs with hexahistidine tag at the amino and carboxyl termini of each subunit were coexpressed. This permitted the rapid and efficient purification of active recombinant enzyme on a nickel-affinity column. The enzyme has one heme per heterodimer and was readily activated with the NO donor sodium nitroprusside or 3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'furyl)-1-benzyl-indazole (YC-1). Sodium nitroprusside and YC-1 treatment potentiated each other in combination and demonstrated a remarkable 2,200-fold stimulation of the human recombinant sGC. The effects were inhibited with 1H-(1,2, 4)oxadiazole(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1one (ODQ). The kinetics of the recombinant enzyme with respect to GTP was examined. The products of the reaction, cGMP and pyrophosphate, inhibited the enzyme. The extent of inhibition by cGMP depended on the activation state of the enzyme, whereas inhibition by pyrophosphate was not affected by the enzyme state. Both reaction products displayed independent binding and cooperativity with respect to enzyme inhibition. The expression of large quantities of active enzyme will facilitate structural characterization of the protein.

  4. Human recombinant soluble guanylyl cyclase: Expression, purification, and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Chen; Martin, Emil; Murad, Ferid

    2000-01-01

    The α1- and β1-subunits of human soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) were coexpressed in the Sf9 cells/baculovirus system. In addition to the native enzyme, constructs with hexahistidine tag at the amino and carboxyl termini of each subunit were coexpressed. This permitted the rapid and efficient purification of active recombinant enzyme on a nickel-affinity column. The enzyme has one heme per heterodimer and was readily activated with the NO donor sodium nitroprusside or 3-(5′-hydroxymethyl-2′furyl)-1-benzyl-indazole (YC-1). Sodium nitroprusside and YC-1 treatment potentiated each other in combination and demonstrated a remarkable 2,200-fold stimulation of the human recombinant sGC. The effects were inhibited with 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazole(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1one (ODQ). The kinetics of the recombinant enzyme with respect to GTP was examined. The products of the reaction, cGMP and pyrophosphate, inhibited the enzyme. The extent of inhibition by cGMP depended on the activation state of the enzyme, whereas inhibition by pyrophosphate was not affected by the enzyme state. Both reaction products displayed independent binding and cooperativity with respect to enzyme inhibition. The expression of large quantities of active enzyme will facilitate structural characterization of the protein. PMID:10995472

  5. Endogenous occurrence of protein S-guanylation in Escherichia coli: Target identification and genetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Tsutsuki, Hiroyasu; Jung, Minkyung; Zhang, Tianli; Ono, Katsuhiko; Ida, Tomoaki; Kunieda, Kohei; Ihara, Hideshi; Akaike, Takaaki; Sawa, Tomohiro

    2016-09-09

    8-Nitroguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-nitro-cGMP) is a nitrated cGMP derivative formed in response to nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). It can cause a post-translational modification (PTM) of protein thiols through cGMP adduction (protein S-guanylation). Accumulating evidence has suggested that, in mammals, S-guanylation of redox-sensor proteins may implicate in regulation of adaptive responses against ROS-associated oxidative stress. Occurrence as well as protein targets of S-guanylation in bacteria remained unknown, however. Here we demonstrated, for the first time, the endogenous occurrence of protein S-guanylation in Escherichia coli (E. coli). Western blotting using anti-S-guanylation antibody clearly showed that multiple proteins were S-guanylated in E. coli. Interestingly, some of those proteins were more intensely S-guanylated when bacteria were cultured under static culture condition than shaking culture condition. It has been known that E. coli is deficient of guanylate cyclase, an enzyme indispensable for 8-nitro-cGMP formation in mammals. We found that adenylate cyclase from E. coli potentially catalyzed 8-nitro-cGMP formation from its precursor 8-nitroguanosine 5'-triphosphate. More importantly, E. coli lacking adenylate cyclase showed significantly reduced formation of S-guanylated proteins. Our S-guanylation proteomics successfully identified S-guanylation protein targets in E. coli, including chaperons, ribosomal proteins, and enzymes which associate with protein synthesis, redox regulation and metabolism. Understanding of functional impacts for protein S-guanylation in bacterial signal transduction is necessary basis for development of potential chemotherapy and new diagnostic strategy for control of pathogenic bacterial infections.

  6. Guanylyl cyclase structure, function and regulation.

    PubMed

    Potter, Lincoln R

    2011-12-01

    Nitric oxide, bicarbonate, natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP and CNP), guanylins, uroguanylins and guanylyl cyclase activating proteins (GCAPs) activate a family of enzymes variously called guanyl, guanylyl or guanylate cyclases that catalyze the conversion of guanosine triphosphate to cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and pyrophosphate. Intracellular cyclic GMP is a second messenger that modulates: platelet aggregation, neurotransmission, sexual arousal, gut peristalsis, blood pressure, long bone growth, intestinal fluid secretion, lipolysis, phototransduction, cardiac hypertrophy and oocyte maturation. This review briefly discusses the discovery of cGMP and guanylyl cyclases, then nitric oxide, nitric oxide synthase and soluble guanylyl cyclase are described in slightly greater detail. Finally, the structure, function, and regulation of the individual mammalian single membrane-spanning guanylyl cyclases GC-A, GC-B, GC-C, GC-D, GC-E, GC-F and GC-G are described in greatest detail as determined by biochemical, cell biological and gene-deletion studies.

  7. Regulation of brain adenylate cyclase by calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.K.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis examined the interaction between the Ca{sup 2+}-binding protein, calmodulin (CaM), and the cAMP synthesizing enzyme, adenylate cyclase. The regulation of guanyl nucleotide-dependent adenylate cyclase by CaM was examined in a particulate fraction from bovine striatum. CaM stimulated basal adenylate cyclase activity and enhanced the stimulation of the enzyme by GTP and dopamine (DA). The potentiation of GTP- and DA-stimulated adenylate cyclase activities by CaM was more sensitive to the concentration of CaM than was the stimulation of basal activity. A photoreactive CaM derivative was developed in order to probe the interactions between CaM and the adenylate cyclase components of bovine brain. Iodo-({sup 125}I)-CaM-diazopyruvamide ({sup 125}I-CAM-DAP) behaved like native CaM with respect to Ca{sup 2+}-enhanced mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent stimulation of adenylate cyclase. {sup 125}I-CaM-DAP cross-linked to CaM-binding proteins in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent, concentration-dependent, and CaM-specific manner. Photolysis of {sup 125}I-CaM-DAP and forskolin-agarose purified CaM-sensitive adenylate cyclase produced an adduct with a molecular weight of 140,000.

  8. Nitric Oxide Receptor Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase Undergoes Splicing Regulation in Differentiating Human Embryonic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharin, Vladislav G.; Mujoo, Kalpana; Kots, Alexander Y.; Martin, Emil; Murad, Ferid

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), an important mediator molecule in mammalian physiology, initiates a number of signaling mechanisms by activating the enzyme soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). Recently, a new role for NO/cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling in embryonic development and cell differentiation has emerged. The changes in expression of NO synthase isoforms and various sGC subunits has been demonstrated during human and mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells differentiation. Previously, our laboratory demonstrated that nascent α1 sGC transcript undergoes alternative splicing and that expression of α1 sGC splice forms directly affects sGC activity. Expression of sGC splice variants in the process of human ES (hES) cells differentiation has not been investigated. In this report, we demonstrate that α1 sGC undergoes alternative splicing during random hES differentiation for the first time. Our results indicate that C-α1 sGC splice form is expressed at high levels in differentiating cells and its intracellular distribution varies from canonical α1 sGC subunit. Together, our data suggest that alternative splicing of sGC subunits is associated with differentiation of hES cells. PMID:20964618

  9. RNA splicing in regulation of Nitric Oxide receptor Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Sharina, Iraida G.; Cote, Gilbert J.; Martin, Emil; Doursout, Marie-Francoise; Murad, Ferid

    2011-01-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a key protein in the nitric oxide (NO)/-cGMP signaling pathway. sGC activity is involved in a number of important physiological processes including smooth muscle relaxation, neurotransmission and platelet aggregation and adhesion. Regulation of sGC expression and activity emerges as a crucial factor in control of sGC function in normal and pathological conditions. Recently accumulated evidence strongly indicates that the regulation of sGC expression is a complex process modulated on several levels including transcription, post-transcriptional regulation, translation and protein stability. Presently our understanding of mechanisms governing regulation of sGC expression remains very limited and awaits systematic investigation. Among other ways, the expression of sGC subunits is modulated at the levels of mRNA abundance and transcript diversity. In this review we summarize available information on different mechanisms (including transcriptional activation, mRNA stability and alternative splicing) involved in the modulation of mRNA levels of sGC subunits in response to various environmental clues. We also summarize and cross-reference the information on human sGC splice forms available in the literature and in genomic databases. This review highlights the fact that the study of the biological role and regulation of sGC splicing will bring new insights to our understanding of NO/cGMP biology. PMID:21867767

  10. Estradiol rapidly inhibits soluble guanylyl cyclase expression in rat uterus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krumenacker, J. S.; Hyder, S. M.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    Previous reports that investigated the regulation of the NO/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway by estrogenic compounds have focused primarily on the levels of NO, NO-producing enzymes, and cGMP in various tissues. In this study, we demonstrate that 17beta-estradiol (E2) regulates the alpha(1) and beta(1) subunits of the NO receptor, sGC, at the mRNA and protein levels in rat uterus. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we found that within 1 h of in vivo E2 administration to rats, sGC mRNA levels begin to diminish. After 3 h, there is a maximal diminution of sGC mRNA expression (sGC alpha(1) 10% and sGC beta(1) 33% of untreated). This effect was blocked by the estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182,780, indicating that estrogen receptor is required. The effect of E2 also was observed in vitro with incubations of uterine tissue, indicating that the response does not depend on the secondary release of other hormones or factors from other tissues. Puromycin did not block the effect, suggesting the effects occur because of preexisting factors in uterine tissues and do not require new protein synthesis. Using immunoblot analysis, we found that sGC protein levels also were reduced by E2 over a similar time course as the sGC mRNA. We conclude that sGC plays a vital role in the NO/sGC/cGMP regulatory pathway during conditions of elevated estrogen levels in the rat uterus as a result of the reduction of sGC expression.

  11. Estradiol rapidly inhibits soluble guanylyl cyclase expression in rat uterus

    PubMed Central

    Krumenacker, Joshua S.; Hyder, Salman M.; Murad, Ferid

    2001-01-01

    Previous reports that investigated the regulation of the NO/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway by estrogenic compounds have focused primarily on the levels of NO, NO-producing enzymes, and cGMP in various tissues. In this study, we demonstrate that 17β-estradiol (E2) regulates the α1 and β1 subunits of the NO receptor, sGC, at the mRNA and protein levels in rat uterus. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we found that within 1 h of in vivo E2 administration to rats, sGC mRNA levels begin to diminish. After 3 h, there is a maximal diminution of sGC mRNA expression (sGC α1 10% and sGC β1 33% of untreated). This effect was blocked by the estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182,780, indicating that estrogen receptor is required. The effect of E2 also was observed in vitro with incubations of uterine tissue, indicating that the response does not depend on the secondary release of other hormones or factors from other tissues. Puromycin did not block the effect, suggesting the effects occur because of preexisting factors in uterine tissues and do not require new protein synthesis. Using immunoblot analysis, we found that sGC protein levels also were reduced by E2 over a similar time course as the sGC mRNA. We conclude that sGC plays a vital role in the NO/sGC/cGMP regulatory pathway during conditions of elevated estrogen levels in the rat uterus as a result of the reduction of sGC expression. PMID:11209068

  12. Thiol-Based Redox Modulation of Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase, the Nitric Oxide Receptor

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), which produces the second messenger cyclic guanosine 3′, 5′-monophosphate (cGMP), is at the crossroads of nitric oxide (NO) signaling: sGC catalytic activity is both stimulated by NO binding to the heme and inhibited by NO modification of its cysteine (Cys) thiols (S-nitrosation). Modulation of sGC activity by thiol oxidation makes sGC a therapeutic target for pathologies originating from oxidative or nitrosative stress. sGC has an unusually high percentage of Cys for a cytosolic protein, the majority solvent exposed and therefore accessible modulatory targets for biological and pathophysiological signaling. Recent Advances: Thiol oxidation of sGC contributes to the development of cardiovascular diseases by decreasing NO-dependent cGMP production and thereby vascular reactivity. This thiol-based resistance to NO (e.g., increase in peripheral resistance) is observed in hypertension and hyperaldosteronism. Critical Issues: Some roles of specific Cys thiols have been identified in vitro. So far, it has not been possible to pinpoint the roles of specific Cys of sGC in vivo and to investigate the molecular mechanisms in an animal model. Future Directions: The role of Cys as redox sensors, intermediates of activation, and mediators of change in sGC conformation, activity, and dimerization remains largely unexplored. To understand modulation of sGC activity, it is critical to investigate the roles of specific oxidative thiol modifications that are formed during these processes. Where the redox state of sGC thiols contribute to pathologies (vascular resistance and sGC desensitization by NO donors), it becomes crucial to design therapeutic strategies to restore sGC to its normal, physiological thiol redox state. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 137–149. PMID:26906466

  13. NO and CO Differentially Activate Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase via a Heme Pivot-bend Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Ma,X.; Sayed, N.; Beuve, A.; van den Akker, F.

    2007-01-01

    Diatomic ligand discrimination by soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is paramount to cardiovascular homeostasis and neuronal signaling. Nitric oxide (NO) stimulates sGC activity 200-fold compared with only four-fold by carbon monoxide (CO). The molecular details of ligand discrimination and differential response to NO and CO are not well understood. These ligands are sensed by the heme domain of sGC, which belongs to the heme nitric oxide oxygen (H-NOX) domain family, also evolutionarily conserved in prokaryotes. Here we report crystal structures of the free, NO-bound, and CO-bound H-NOX domains of a cyanobacterial homolog. These structures and complementary mutational analysis in sGC reveal a molecular ruler mechanism that allows sGC to favor NO over CO while excluding oxygen, concomitant to signaling that exploits differential heme pivoting and heme bending. The heme thereby serves as a flexing wedge, allowing the N-terminal subdomain of H-NOX to shift concurrent with the transition of the six- to five-coordinated NO-bound state upon sGC activation. This transition can be modulated by mutations at sGC residues 74 and 145 and corresponding residues in the cyanobacterial H-NOX homolog.

  14. CCAAT-binding factor regulates expression of the beta1 subunit of soluble guanylyl cyclase gene in the BE2 human neuroblastoma cell line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharina, Iraida G.; Martin, Emil; Thomas, Anthony; Uray, Karen L.; Murad, Ferid

    2003-01-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a cytosolic enzyme producing the intracellular messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) on activation with nitric oxide (NO). sGC is an obligatory heterodimer composed of alpha and beta subunits. We investigated human beta1 sGC transcriptional regulation in BE2 human neuroblastoma cells. The 5' upstream region of the beta1 sGC gene was isolated and analyzed for promoter activity by using luciferase reporter constructs. The transcriptional start site of the beta1 sGC gene in BE2 cells was identified. The functional significance of consensus transcriptional factor binding sites proximal to the transcriptional start site was investigated by site deletions in the 800-bp promoter fragment. The elimination of CCAAT-binding factor (CBF) and growth factor independence 1 (GFI1) binding cores significantly diminished whereas deletion of the NF1 core elevated the transcription. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assay (EMSA) and Western analysis of proteins bound to biotinated EMSA probes confirmed the interaction of GFI1, CBF, and NF1 factors with the beta1 sGC promoter. Treatment of BE2 cells with genistein, known to inhibit the CBF binding to DNA, significantly reduced protein levels of beta1 sGC by inhibiting transcription. In summary, our study represents an analysis of the human beta1 sGC promoter regulation in human neuroblastoma BE2 cells and identifies CBF as a critically important factor in beta1 sGC expression.

  15. CCAAT-binding factor regulates expression of the β1 subunit of soluble guanylyl cyclase gene in the BE2 human neuroblastoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Sharina, Iraida G.; Martin, Emil; Thomas, Anthony; Uray, Karen L.; Murad, Ferid

    2003-01-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a cytosolic enzyme producing the intracellular messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) on activation with nitric oxide (NO). sGC is an obligatory heterodimer composed of α and β subunits. We investigated human β1 sGC transcriptional regulation in BE2 human neuroblastoma cells. The 5′ upstream region of the β1 sGC gene was isolated and analyzed for promoter activity by using luciferase reporter constructs. The transcriptional start site of the β1 sGC gene in BE2 cells was identified. The functional significance of consensus transcriptional factor binding sites proximal to the transcriptional start site was investigated by site deletions in the 800-bp promoter fragment. The elimination of CCAAT-binding factor (CBF) and growth factor independence 1 (GFI1) binding cores significantly diminished whereas deletion of the NF1 core elevated the transcription. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assay (EMSA) and Western analysis of proteins bound to biotinated EMSA probes confirmed the interaction of GFI1, CBF, and NF1 factors with the β1 sGC promoter. Treatment of BE2 cells with genistein, known to inhibit the CBF binding to DNA, significantly reduced protein levels of β1 sGC by inhibiting transcription. In summary, our study represents an analysis of the human β1 sGC promoter regulation in human neuroblastoma BE2 cells and identifies CBF as a critically important factor in β1 sGC expression. PMID:14504408

  16. YC-1 activation of human soluble guanylyl cyclase has both heme-dependent and heme-independent components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, E.; Lee, Y. C.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    YC-1 [3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'furyl)-1-benzyl indazole] is an allosteric activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). YC-1 increases the catalytic rate of the enzyme and sensitizes the enzyme toward its gaseous activators nitric oxide or carbon monoxide. In other studies the administration of YC-1 to experimental animals resulted in the inhibition of the platelet-rich thrombosis and a decrease of the mean arterial pressure, which correlated with increased cGMP levels. However, details of YC-1 interaction with sGC and enzyme activation are incomplete. Although evidence in the literature indicates that YC-1 activation of sGC is strictly heme-dependent, this report presents evidence for both heme-dependent and heme-independent activation of sGC by YC-1. The oxidation of the sGC heme by 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazole(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1-one completely inhibited the response to NO, but only partially attenuated activation by YC-1. We also observed activation by YC-1 of a mutant sGC, which lacks heme. These findings indicate that YC-1 activation of sGC can occur independently of heme, but that activation is substantially increased when the heme moiety is present in the enzyme.

  17. YC-1 activation of human soluble guanylyl cyclase has both heme-dependent and heme-independent components

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Emil; Lee, Yu-Chen; Murad, Ferid

    2001-01-01

    YC-1 [3-(5′-hydroxymethyl-2′furyl)-1-benzyl indazole] is an allosteric activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). YC-1 increases the catalytic rate of the enzyme and sensitizes the enzyme toward its gaseous activators nitric oxide or carbon monoxide. In other studies the administration of YC-1 to experimental animals resulted in the inhibition of the platelet-rich thrombosis and a decrease of the mean arterial pressure, which correlated with increased cGMP levels. However, details of YC-1 interaction with sGC and enzyme activation are incomplete. Although evidence in the literature indicates that YC-1 activation of sGC is strictly heme-dependent, this report presents evidence for both heme-dependent and heme-independent activation of sGC by YC-1. The oxidation of the sGC heme by 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazole(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1-one completely inhibited the response to NO, but only partially attenuated activation by YC-1. We also observed activation by YC-1 of a mutant sGC, which lacks heme. These findings indicate that YC-1 activation of sGC can occur independently of heme, but that activation is substantially increased when the heme moiety is present in the enzyme. PMID:11687640

  18. 21 CFR 172.530 - Disodium guanylate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Disodium guanylate. 172.530 Section 172.530 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD..., at a level not in excess of that reasonably required to produce the intended effect....

  19. Restoring Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase Expression and Function Blocks the Aggressive Course of GliomaS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haifeng; Li, Jessica Tao; Zheng, Fang; Martin, Emil; Kots, Alexander Y.; Krumenacker, Joshua S.; Choi, Byung-Kwon; McCutcheon, Ian E.; Weisbrodt, Norman; Bögler, Oliver; Murad, Ferid

    2011-01-01

    The NO and cGMP signaling pathways are of broad physiological and pathological significance. We compared the NO/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway in human glioma tissues and cell lines with that of healthy control samples and demonstrated that sGC expression is significantly lower in glioma preparations. Our analysis of GEO databases (National Cancer Institute) further revealed a statistically significant reduction of sGC transcript levels in human glioma specimens. On the other hand, the expression levels of particulate (membrane) guanylyl cyclases (pGC) and cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) were intact in the glioma cells that we have tested. Pharmacologically manipulating endogenous cGMP generation in glioma cells through either stimulating pGC by ANP/BNP, or blocking PDE by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine/zaprinast caused significant inhibition of proliferation and colony formation of glioma cells. Genetically restoring sGC expression also correlated inversely with glioma cells growth. Orthotopic implantation of glioma cells transfected with an active mutant form of sGC (sGCα1β1Cys105) in athymic mice increased the survival time by 4-fold over the control. Histological analysis of xenografts overexpressing α1β1Cys105 sGC revealed changes in cellular architecture that resemble the morphology of normal cells. In addition, a decrease in angiogenesis contributed to glioma inhibition by sGC/cGMP therapy. Our study proposes the new concept that suppressed expression of sGC, a key enzyme in the NO/cGMP pathway, may be associated with an aggressive course of glioma. The sGC/cGMP signaling-targeted therapy may be a favorable alternative to chemotherapy and radiotherapy for glioma and perhaps other tumors. PMID:21908708

  20. Role of soluble guanylyl cyclase-cyclic GMP signaling in tumor cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Mujoo, Kalpana; Sharin, Vladislav G.; Martin, Emil; Choi, Byung-Kwon; Sloan, Courtney; Nikonoff, Lubov E.; Kots, Alexander Y; Murad, Ferid

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrate a differential expression of nitric oxide (NO) signaling components in ES cells and our recent study demonstrated an enhanced differentiation of ES cells into myocardial cells with NO donors and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) activators. Since NO-cGMP pathway exhibits a diverse role in cancer, we were interested in evaluating the role of the NO receptor sGC and other components of the pathway in regulation of the tumor cell proliferation. Our results demonstrate a differential expression of the sGC subunits, NOS-1 and PKG mRNA and protein levels in various human cancer models. In contrast to sGCα1, robust levels of sGC β1 were observed in OVCAR-3 (ovarian) and MDA-MB-468 (breast) cancer cells which correlated well with the sGC activity and a marked increase in cGMP levels upon exposure to the combination of a NO donor and a sGC activator. NOC-18 (DETA NONOate; NO donor), BAY41-2272 (3-(4-Amino-5-cyclopropylpyrimidin-2-yl)-1-(2-fluorobenzyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine); sGC activator), NOC-18+BAY41-2272, IBMX (3-Isobutyl-1-methylxanthine; phosphodiesterase inhibitor) and 8-bromo-cGMP (cGMP analog) caused growth inhibition and apoptosis in various cancer cell lines. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in growth inhibition, we evaluated the effect of activators/inhibitors on ERK phosphorylation. Our studies indicate that BAY41-2272 or the combination NOC18+BAY41-2272 caused inhibition of the basal ERK1/2 phosphorylation in OVCAR-3 (high sGC activity), SK-OV-3 and SK-Br-3 (low sGC activity) cell lines and in some cases the inhibition was rescued by the sGC inhibitor ODQ (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one). These studies suggest that the effects of activators/inhibitors of NO-sGC-cGMP in tumor cell proliferation is mediated by both cGMP-dependent and independent mechanisms. PMID:19948239

  1. Characterization of oxidized guanosine 5'-triphosphate as a viable inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Bolin, Celeste; Cardozo-Pelaez, Fernando

    2009-03-15

    The guanine base is prone to oxidation by free radicals regardless of the cellular moiety it is bound to. However, under conditions of oxidative stress, 8-oxoguanosine triphosphate (oxo(8)GTP) formation has been shown to occur without oxidation of the guanine base in DNA. In vitro studies have suggested that oxo(8)GTP could impact G-protein signaling and RNA synthesis. Whether increased levels of oxo(8)GTP translate into cellular malfunction is unknown. Data presented herein show that oxo(8)GTP is formed in cell-free preparations as well as in PC12 cells after exposure to physiologically relevant oxidative conditions generated with 10 microM copper sulfate and 1 mM L-ascorbic acid (Cu/Asc). We also determined that oxo(8)GTP has biological activity as a potent inhibitor of nitric oxide-stimulated soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). The increase in oxo(8)GTP formation in purified GTP and PC12 cells exposed to Cu/Asc caused a significant reduction in the product of sGC activity, cGMP. This oxidation of GTP was attenuated by the addition of reduced glutathione under these same Cu/Asc conditions, thus preventing the decrease in sGC activity. This suggests that oxo(8)GTP is produced by free radicals in vivo and could have significant impact on cell functions regulated by sGC activity such as synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system.

  2. Hydrogen Peroxide Alters Splicing of Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase and Selectively Modulates Expression of Splicing Regulators in Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cote, Gilbert J.; Zhu, Wen; Thomas, Anthony; Martin, Emil; Murad, Ferid; Sharina, Iraida G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) plays a central role in nitric oxide (NO)-mediated signal transduction in the cardiovascular, nervous and gastrointestinal systems. Alternative RNA splicing has emerged as a potential mechanism to modulate sGC expression and activity. C-α1 sGC is an alternative splice form that is resistant to oxidation-induced protein degradation and demonstrates preferential subcellular distribution to the oxidized environment of endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report that splicing of C-α1 sGC can be modulated by H2O2 treatment in BE2 neuroblastoma and MDA-MD-468 adenocarcinoma human cells. In addition, we show that the H2O2 treatment of MDA-MD-468 cells selectively decreases protein levels of PTBP1 and hnRNP A2/B1 splice factors identified as potential α1 gene splicing regulators by in silico analysis. We further demonstrate that down-regulation of PTBP1 by H2O2 occurs at the protein level with variable regulation observed in different breast cancer cells. Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate that H2O2 regulates RNA splicing to induce expression of the oxidation-resistant C-α1 sGC subunit. We also report that H2O2 treatment selectively alters the expression of key splicing regulators. This process might play an important role in regulation of cellular adaptation to conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:22911749

  3. The soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor NS-2028 reduces vascular endothelial growth factor-induced angiogenesis and permeability.

    PubMed

    Morbidelli, Lucia; Pyriochou, Anastasia; Filippi, Sandra; Vasileiadis, Ioannis; Roussos, Charis; Zhou, Zongmin; Loutrari, Heleni; Waltenberger, Johannes; Stössel, Anne; Giannis, Athanassios; Ziche, Marina; Papapetropoulos, Andreas

    2010-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is known to promote vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-stimulated permeability and angiogenesis. However, effector molecules that operate downstream of NO in this pathway remain poorly characterized. Herein, we determined the effect of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibition on VEGF responses in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of endothelial cells (EC) with VEGF stimulated eNOS phosphorylation and cGMP accumulation; pretreatment with the sGC inhibitor 4H-8-bromo-1,2,4-oxadiazolo(3,4-d)benz(b)(1,4)oxazin-1-one (NS-2028) blunted cGMP levels without affecting VEGF-receptor phosphorylation. Incubation of cells with NS-2028 blocked the mitogenic effects of VEGF. In addition, cells in which sGC was inhibited exhibited no migration and sprouting in response to VEGF. To study the mechanisms through which NS-2028 inhibits EC migration, we determined the effects of alterations in cGMP levels on p38 MAPK. Initially, we observed that inhibition of sGC attenuated VEGF-stimulated activation of p38. In contrast, the addition of 8-Br-cGMP to EC stimulated p38 phosphorylation. The addition of cGMP elevating agents (BAY 41-2272, DETA NO and YC-1) enhanced EC migration. To test whether sGC also mediated the angiogenic effects of VEGF in vivo, we used the rabbit cornea assay. Animals receiving NS-2028 orally displayed a reduced angiogenic response to VEGF. As increased vascular permeability occurs prior to new blood vessel formation, we determined the effect of NS-2028 in vascular leakage. Using a modified Miles assay, we observed that NS-2028 attenuated VEGF-induced permeability. Overall, we provide evidence that sGC mediates the angiogenic and permeability-promoting activities of VEGF, indicating the significance of sGC as a downstream effector of VEGF-triggered responses.

  4. Guanyl nucleotides modulate binding to steroid receptors in neuronal membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Orchinik, M; Murray, T F; Franklin, P H; Moore, F L

    1992-01-01

    The recently characterized corticosteroid receptor on amphibian neuronal membranes appears to mediate rapid, stress-induced changes in male reproductive behaviors. Because the transduction mechanisms associated with this receptor are unknown, we performed radioligand binding studies to determine whether this steroid receptor is negatively modulated by guanyl nucleotides. The binding of [3H]corticosterone to neuronal membranes was inhibited by nonhydrolyzable guanyl nucleotides in both equilibrium saturation binding and titration studies. The addition of guanyl nucleotide plus unlabeled corticosterone induced a rapid phase of [3H]corticosterone dissociation from membranes that was not induced by addition of unlabeled ligand alone. Furthermore, the equilibrium binding of [3H]corticosterone and the sensitivity of the receptor to modulation by guanyl nucleotides were both enhanced by Mg2+. These results are consistent with the formation of a ternary complex of steroid, receptor, and guanine nucleotide-binding protein that is subject to regulation by guanyl nucleotides. Therefore, rapid signal transduction through corticosteroid receptors on neuronal membranes appears to be mediated by guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. PMID:1570300

  5. PAS-MEDIATED DIMERIZATION OF SOLUBLE GUANYLYL CYCLASE REVEALED BY SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION HISTIDINE KINASE DOMAIN CRYSTAL STRUCTURE

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaolei; Sayed, Nazish; Baskaran, Padmamalini; Beuve, Annie; van den Akker, Focco

    2010-01-01

    Signal transduction histidine kinases (STHK) are key for sensing environmental stresses, crucial for cell survival, and attain their sensing ability using small molecule binding domains. The N-terminal domain in an STHK from Nostoc punctiforme is of unknown function yet is homologous to the central region in soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), the main receptor for nitric oxide (NO). This domain is termed H-NOXA (or H-NOBA) since it is often associated with the heme-nitric-oxide/oxygen binding (H-NOX) domain. A structure-function approach was taken to investigate the role of H-NOXA in STHK and sGC. We report the 2.1 Å resolution crystal structure of the dimerized H-NOXA domain of STHK, which reveals a Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) fold. The H-NOXA monomers dimerize in a parallel arrangement juxtaposing their N-terminal helices and preceding residues. Such PAS-dimerization is similar to that previously observed for EcDOS, AvNifL, and RmFixL. Deletion of 7 N-terminal residues affected dimer organization. Alanine scanning mutagenesis in sGC indicates that the H-NOXA domains of sGC could adopt a similar dimer organization. Although most putative interface mutations did decrease sGCβ1 H-NOXA homodimerization, heterodimerization of full length heterodimeric sGC was mostly unaffected likely due to sGC’s additional dimerization contacts in the coiled-coil and catalytic domains. Exceptions are mutations sGC-α1 F285A and -β1 F217A which each caused a drastic drop in NO stimulated activity and mutations sGCα1 Q368A and -β1 Q309A which resulted in both a complete lack of activity and heterodimerization. Our structural and mutational results provide new insights into sGC and STHK dimerization and overall architecture. PMID:18006497

  6. Cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase and soluble guanylyl cyclase disappear in elicited rat neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ciuman, Małgorzata; Siednienko, Jakub; Czyzyk, Rafał; Witwicka, Hanna; Kołosionek, Ewa; Kobiałka, Marcin; Gorczyca, Wojciech A

    2006-11-01

    The nitric oxide/soluble guanylyl cyclase/cGMP-dependent protein kinase (NO/sGC/PKG) cascade has been shown to affect important functions of circulating neutrophils. We demonstrate that neutrophils isolated from rats treated intraperitoneally with peptone protease cannot use this signaling pathway. Although PKG was detected at both the mRNA and protein levels in peripheral blood neutrophils (PBNs) of control rats, it was expressed neither in PBNs nor in peritoneal exudate neutrophils (PENs) of provoked rats. Also, mRNA of the alpha and beta chains of heterodimeric sGC was present in PBNs, but absent in PENs. Consistently, PBNs responded to activators of sGC with cGMP synthesis, while PENs did not. These results showed that neutrophils recruited by a provoking agent lost PKG and, in the case of PENs, also sGC and thus the capacity to respond to NO with cGMP signaling. We speculate that such downregulation of the sGC/PKG pathway is likely a result of the high activity of inducible NO synthase observed in inflammatory neutrophils.

  7. 17 beta-estradiol modifies nitric oxide-sensitive guanylyl cyclase expression and down-regulates its activity in rat anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Cabilla, Jimena P; Díaz, María del Carmen; Machiavelli, Leticia I; Poliandri, Ariel H; Quinteros, Fernanda A; Lasaga, Mercedes; Duvilanski, Beatriz H

    2006-09-01

    Previous studies showed that 17 beta-estradiol (17 beta-E2) regulates the nitric oxide (NO)/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway in many tissues. Evidence from our laboratory indicates that 17 beta-E2 disrupts the inhibitory effect of NO on prolactin release, decreasing sGC activity and affecting the cGMP pathway in anterior pituitary gland of adult ovariectomized and estrogenized rats. To ascertain the mechanisms by which 17 beta-E2 affects sGC activity, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro effects of 17 beta-E2 on sGC protein and mRNA expression in anterior pituitary gland from immature female rats. In the present work, we showed that 17 beta-E2 acute treatment exerted opposite effects on the two sGC subunits, increasing alpha1 and decreasing beta1 subunit protein and mRNA expression. This action on sGC protein expression was maximal 6-9 h after 17 beta-E2 administration. 17beta-E2 also caused the same effect on mRNA expression at earlier times. Concomitantly, 17 beta-E2 dramatically decreased sGC activity 6 and 9 h after injection. These effects were specific of 17 beta-E2, because they were not observed with the administration of other steroids such as progesterone and 17 alpha-estradiol. This inhibitory action of 17beta-E2 on sGC also required the activation of estrogen receptor (ER), because treatment with the pure ER antagonist ICI 182,780 completely blocked 17 beta-E2 action. 17 beta-E2 acute treatment caused the same effects on pituitary cells in culture. These results suggest that 17 beta-E2 exerts an acute inhibitory effect on sGC in anterior pituitary gland by down-regulating sGC beta 1 subunit and sGC activity in a specific, ER-dependent manner.

  8. Guanylate-binding proteins: niche recruiters for antimicrobial effectors.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Christopher D; Hunter, Christopher A

    2012-08-24

    There are fundamental questions regarding how IFN-γ activates host cells to eliminate intracellular pathogens. In this issue of Immunity, Yamamoto et al. (2012) demonstrate a critical role for the p65 guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) in this process during infection with Toxoplasma gondii.

  9. Autophagy Protects from Raddeanin A-Induced Apoptosis in SGC-7901 Human Gastric Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shen-lin; Fang, Liang-hua; Zhou, Jin-yong; Wu, Jian; Xi, Song-yang; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Ying-ying; Xu, Song

    2016-01-01

    Raddeanin A (RA) is an extractive from Anemone raddeana Regel, a traditional Chinese medicine. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy of RA against human gastric cancer (GC) cells (SGC-7901) and explore its mechanism. MTT assay showed that RA inhibition of proliferation of SGC-7901 cells increased in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometry analysis and Hoechst 33258 staining showed that RA induced apoptosis on SGC-7901 cells. Meanwhile, it induced autophagy. Western blotting analysis showed that the RA induces apoptosis and autophagy by activating p38 MAPK pathway and inhibiting mTOR pathway. Further studies showed that autophagy inhibition could protect from RA-induced apoptosis in SGC-7901 cells. In conclusion, RA can induce SGC-7901 cell apoptosis and autophagy by activating p38 MAPK pathway. And autophagy can protect SGC-7901 cells from apoptosis induced by RA. PMID:27974905

  10. The prelimbic cortex muscarinic M₃ receptor-nitric oxide-guanylyl cyclase pathway modulates cardiovascular responses in rats.

    PubMed

    Fassini, Aline; Antero, Leandro S; Corrêa, Fernando M A; Joca, Sâmia R; Resstel, Leonardo B M

    2015-05-01

    The prelimbic cortex (PL), a limbic structure, sends projections to areas involved in the control of cardiovascular responses. Stimulation of the PL with acetylcholine (ACh) evokes depressor and tachycardiac responses mediated by local PL muscarinic receptors. Early studies demonstrated that stimulation of muscarinic receptors induced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and cyclic guanosine cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) formation. Hence, this study investigates which PL muscarinic receptor subtype is involved in the cardiovascular response induced by ACh and tests the hypothesis that cardiovascular responses caused by muscarinic receptor stimulation in the PL are mediated by local NO and cGMP formation. PL pretreatment with J104129 (an M3 receptor antagonist) blocked the depressor and tachycardiac response evoked by injection of ACh into the PL. Pretreatment with either pirenzepine (an M1 receptor antagonist) or AF-DX 116 (an M2 and M4 receptor antagonist) did not affect cardiovascular responses evoked by ACh. Moreover, similarly to the antagonism of PL M3 receptors, pretreatment with N(ω)-propyl-L-arginine (an inhibitor of neuronal NO synthase), carboxy-PTIO(S)-3-carboxy-4-hydroxyphenylglicine (an NO scavenger), or 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolol-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (a guanylate cyclase inhibitor) blocked both the depressor and the tachycardiac response evoked by ACh. The current results demonstrate that cardiovascular responses evoked by microinjection of ACh into the PL are mediated by local activation of the M3 receptor-NO-guanylate cyclase pathway.

  11. Cytotoxic effects of β-carboline alkaloids on human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yuxiang; Patima, Abulimiti; Chen, Yu; Zeng, Fanye; He, Wenting; Luo, Lingjuan; Jie, Yanghua; Zhu, Yanhua; Zhang, Liping; Lei, Jun; Xie, Xinmei; Zhang, Hongliang

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the cytotoxic effects of β-carboline alkaloids on human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. Human gastric cancer SGC-790s1 cells were treated with β-carboline alkaloids at the concentration of 0, 10, 20, 30 and 40 μg/ml for 48 hr. Cell viability was measured by Cell Counting Kit-8 assay. Cell apoptosis was detected by Hoechst 33258 staining and DNA fragmentation analysis. The expression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was examined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) assay and western blot analysis. β-carboline alkaloids inhibited the growth of SGC-7901 cells concentration dependently. β-carboline alkaloids treated SGC-7901 cells displayed apoptotic nuclei as detected using Hoechst 33258 staining. β-carboline alkaloids also induced DNA ladder, indicative of apoptosis in SGC-7901 cells concentration-dependently. Furthermore, β-carboline alkaloids increased PTEN and decreased ERK mRNA expression in SGC-7901 cells in a concentration dependent manner. They also increased PTEN and decreased ERK protein expression. β-carboline alkaloids inhibit the growth and induce apoptosis of SGC-7901 cells. The cytotoxic effects of β-carboline alkaloids might correlate with increased PTEN expression and decreased ERK expression in SGC-7901 cells. PMID:26550217

  12. Lessons from ten years of crystallization experiments at the SGC

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Jia Tsing; Dekker, Carien; Reardon, Paul; von Delft, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Although protein crystallization is generally considered more art than science and remains significantly trial-and-error, large-scale data sets hold the promise of providing general learning. Observations are presented here from retrospective analyses of the strategies actively deployed for the extensive crystallization experiments at the Oxford site of the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC), where comprehensive annotations by SGC scientists were recorded on a customized database infrastructure. The results point to the importance of using redundancy in crystallizing conditions, specifically by varying the mixing ratios of protein sample and precipitant, as well as incubation temperatures. No meaningful difference in performance could be identified between the four most widely used sparse-matrix screens, judged by the yield of crystals leading to deposited structures; this suggests that in general any comparison of screens will be meaningless without extensive cross-testing. Where protein sample is limiting, exploring more conditions has a higher likelihood of being informative by yielding hits than does redundancy of either mixing ratio or temperature. Finally, on the logistical question of how long experiments should be stored, 98% of all crystals that led to deposited structures appeared within 30 days. Overall, these analyses serve as practical guidelines for the design of initial screening experiments for new crystallization targets. PMID:26894670

  13. Heterologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase from pigeon erythrocytes under the action of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, K.M.; Bulargina, T.V.; Severin, E.S.

    1985-09-20

    Preincubation of the plasma membranes from pigeon erythrocytes with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase leads to desensitization of adenylate cyclase of the erythrocytes. The adenylate cyclase activity, measured in the presence of 10 ..mu..M isoproterenol and 50 ..mu..M GTP-..gamma..-S, is decreased by 40% in 10 min of incubation, while the activity in the presence of 50 ..mu..M GTP-..gamma..-S is decreased by 35% in 20 min. The decrease in the adenylate cyclase activity is due to an increase in the lag phase of activation of the enzyme in the presence of a GTP analog stable to hydrolysis and a decrease in the activity in the steady-state phase of activation. Heterologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase under the action of cAMP-dependent protein kinase is coupled with a decrease in the number of ..beta..-adrenoreceptors capable of passing into a state of high affinity for antagonists in the absence of guanylic nucleotides. The influence of the catalytic subunit on adenylate cyclase entirely models the process of desensitization of the enzyme absorbed in the influence of isoproterenol or cAMP on erythrocytes.

  14. Regulation of neuronal growth cone filopodia by nitric oxide depends on soluble guanylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Van Wagenen, S; Rehder, V

    2001-02-15

    Nitric oxide has been proposed to play an important role in neuronal development. We have previously shown that growth cones from an identified neuron, B5, in the snail Helisoma trivolvis, respond to nitric oxide (NO) donors by increasing the length of their filopodia within minutes of application (Van Wagenen and Rehder, 1999). This effect was mediated through a cGMP-induced increase in [Ca2+]i and resulted in an enlargement of the growth cone's action radius, suggesting that NO could function as a signaling molecule during neuronal pathfinding. We show here that NO functions as a specific rather than a general regulator of growth cone filopodia, because another identified neuron from the same ganglion, B19, failed to respond to NO with an increase in filopodial length. We found that, contrary to B5 neurons, B19 growth cones contained little or no soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) immunoreactivity, presumably preventing their response to NO. This hypothesis was supported by the finding that the sGC activator YC-1 (10 microM) had no effect on B19 filopodia but induced elongation of B5 filopodia. These results indicate that the effects of NO can be quite specific, and raise the interesting possibility that neurons could selectively tune in to NO by differentially expressing the target enzyme sGC in the appropriate cellular location during critical developmental stages. In addition, our NADPH-diaphorase staining and anti-NOS immunohistochemisty suggest that growth cones of B5 neurons, but not of B19 neurons, could be a source of NO, making NO a potential intra- and transcellular messenger.

  15. Accumulation of guanylate binding proteins in patients treated with interferons.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y S; Becker-Manley, M F; Rucker, R G; Borden, E C

    1988-06-01

    We have previously described an interferon (IFN)-induced protein with a molecular weight of 67,000. This protein has an affinity to guanylates and is thus called guanylate binding protein (GBP). The synthesis of GBP is inducible by IFNs in all human diploid fibroblast cell lines that we studied. To determine whether or not the GBP synthesis is IFN-inducible in humans as well as in cultured cells, we have studied the levels of GBP in the peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) of patients treated with either type I or type II IFN. An increased GBP level was found the day immediately after treatment with either type of IFN, and the elevated GBP levels were maintained for at least 8 days. Among the patients studied, we found a higher level GBP accumulation (2.3x) in patients treated with IFN-beta than in those treated with IFN-gamma (1.6x). The increase of GBP in patients receiving IFN-gamma correlated with increases in class II histocompatibility antigens, HLA-DR and HLA-DQ in monocytes. Thus, the levels of GBP in peripheral blood leukocytes may be used as a parameter for the study of IFN responses in patients.

  16. Dysregulation of mRNA profile in cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer cell line SGC7901

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiao-Que; Zhao, Qi-Hong; Wang, Hua; Gu, Kang-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    AIM To explore novel therapeutic target of cisplatin resistance in human gastric cancer. METHODS The sensitivity of SGC7901 cells and cisplatin-resistant SGC7901 cells (SGC7901/DDP) for cisplatin were detected by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. High-quality total RNA which isolated from SGC7901/DDP cells and SGC7901 cells were used for mRNA microarray analysis. Results were analyzed bioinformatically to predict their roles in the development of cisplatin resistance and the expression of 13 dysregulated mRNAs we selected were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). RESULTS SGC7901/DDP cells highly resistant to cisplatin demonstrated by MTT assay. A total of 1308 mRNAs (578 upregulated and 730 downregulated) were differentially expressed (fold change ≥ 2 and P-value < 0.05) in the SGC7901/DDP cells compared with SGC7901 cells. The expression of mRNAs detected by qRT-PCR were consistent with the microarray results. Gene Ontology, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway and protein-protein interaction analysis demonstrated that the differentially expressed mRNAs were enriched in PI3K-Akt, Notch, MAPK, ErbB, Jak-STAT, NF-kappaB signaling pathways which may be involved in cisplatin resistance. Several genes such as PDE3B, VEGFC, IGFBP3, TLR4, HIPK2 and EGF may associated with drug resistance of gastric cancer cells to cisplatin. CONCLUSION Exploration of those altered mRNAs may provide more promising strategy in diagnosis and therapy for gastric cancer with cisplatin resistance. PMID:28275299

  17. Calmodulin independence of human duodenal adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J A; Griffin, M; Mireylees, S E; Long, R G

    1991-01-01

    The calmodulin and calcium dependence of human adenylate cyclase from the second part of the duodenum was assessed in washed particulate preparations of biopsy specimens by investigating (a) the concentration dependent effects of free [Ca2+] on enzyme activity, (b) the effects of exogenous calmodulin on enzyme activity in ethylene glycol bis (b-aminoethyl ether)N,N'-tetra-acetic acid (EGTA) washed particulate preparations, and (c) the effects of calmodulin antagonists on enzyme activity. Both basal (IC50 = 193.75 (57.5) nmol/l (mean (SEM)) and NaF stimulated (IC50 = 188.0 (44.0) nmol/l) adenylate cyclase activity was strongly inhibited by free [Ca2+] greater than 90 nmol/l. Free [Ca2+] less than 90 nmol/l had no effect on adenylate cyclase activity. NaF stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by 50% at 2.5 mmol/l EGTA. This inhibition could not be reversed by free Ca2+. The addition of exogenous calmodulin to EGTA (5 mmol/l) washed particulate preparations failed to stimulate adenylate cyclase activity. Trifluoperazine and N-(8-aminohexyl)-5-IODO-1-naphthalene-sulphonamide (IODO 8) did not significantly inhibit basal and NaF stimulated adenylate cyclase activity when measured at concentrations of up to 100 mumol/l. These results suggest that human duodenal adenylate cyclase activity is calmodulin independent but is affected by changes in free [Ca2+]. PMID:1752461

  18. Mechanistic investigations on six bacterial terpene cyclases

    PubMed Central

    Rabe, Patrick; Schmitz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Summary The products obtained by incubation of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) with six purified bacterial terpene cyclases were characterised by one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic methods, allowing for a full structure elucidation. The absolute configurations of four terpenes were determined based on their optical rotary powers. Incubation experiments with 13C-labelled isotopomers of FPP in buffers containing water or deuterium oxide allowed for detailed insights into the cyclisation mechanisms of the bacterial terpene cyclases. PMID:27829890

  19. Interferon induction of fibroblast proteins with guanylate binding activity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y S; Colonno, R J; Yin, F H

    1983-06-25

    Treatment of human diploid fibroblastic cells with interferon induces the synthesis of two guanylate binding proteins (GBP) with molecular weights of 67,000 and 56,000. The Mr = 67,000 protein (67K GBP) is synthesized upon treatment with either alpha-, beta-, or gamma-interferon. Among these interferons, gamma-interferon induces a higher level of 67K GBP synthesis. The 67K GBP synthesized in either beta- or gamma-interferon-treated cells has two charge forms with isoelectric points of 6.0 and 5.8, respectively. The synthesis of the Mr = 56,000 protein is induced by the treatment using either alpha- or beta-interferon, but its synthesis in gamma-interferon-treated cells is undetectable. The amounts of the radioactive GBPs synthesized in human fibroblasts are proportional to the amounts of the purified beta-interferon used for the inductions. Syntheses of GBPs require the transcription of cellular genes because their syntheses are completely blocked by actinomycin D treatments. The mRNA for the 67K GBP is found in fibroblasts that are treated by either alpha-, beta-, or gamma-interferon, but it is not detected in untreated cells. More 67K GBP mRNA is accumulated in the gamma-interferon-treated than in alpha- or beta-interferon-treated fibroblasts. This is consistent with more 67K GBP synthesis found in gamma-interferon-treated fibroblasts.

  20. Pathophysiological role of guanylate-binding proteins in gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Britzen-Laurent, Nathalie; Herrmann, Christian; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Croner, Roland S; Stürzl, Michael

    2016-07-28

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) are interferon-stimulated factors involved in the defense against cellular pathogens and inflammation. These proteins, particularly GBP-1, the most prominent member of the family, have been established as reliable markers of interferon-γ-activated cells in various diseases, including colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). In CRC, GBP-1 expression is associated with a Th1-dominated angiostatic micromilieu and is correlated with a better outcome. Inhibition of tumor growth by GBP-1 is the result of its strong anti-angiogenic activity as well as its direct anti-tumorigenic effect on tumor cells. In IBD, GBP-1 mediates the anti-proliferative effects of interferon-γ on intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, it plays a protective role on the mucosa by preventing cell apoptosis, by inhibiting angiogenesis and by regulating the T-cell receptor signaling. These functions rely to a large extent on the ability of GBP-1 to interact with and remodel the actin cytoskeleton.

  1. Pathophysiological role of guanylate-binding proteins in gastrointestinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Britzen-Laurent, Nathalie; Herrmann, Christian; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Croner, Roland S; Stürzl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) are interferon-stimulated factors involved in the defense against cellular pathogens and inflammation. These proteins, particularly GBP-1, the most prominent member of the family, have been established as reliable markers of interferon-γ-activated cells in various diseases, including colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). In CRC, GBP-1 expression is associated with a Th1-dominated angiostatic micromilieu and is correlated with a better outcome. Inhibition of tumor growth by GBP-1 is the result of its strong anti-angiogenic activity as well as its direct anti-tumorigenic effect on tumor cells. In IBD, GBP-1 mediates the anti-proliferative effects of interferon-γ on intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, it plays a protective role on the mucosa by preventing cell apoptosis, by inhibiting angiogenesis and by regulating the T-cell receptor signaling. These functions rely to a large extent on the ability of GBP-1 to interact with and remodel the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:27605879

  2. Direct chemiluminescence detection of nitric oxide in aqueous solutions using the natural nitric oxide target soluble guanylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Woldman, Yakov Y; Sun, Jian; Zweier, Jay L; Khramtsov, Valery V

    2009-11-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical involved in many physiological processes including regulation of blood pressure, immune response, and neurotransmission. However, the measurement of extremely low, in some cases subnanomolar, physiological concentrations of nitric oxide presents an analytical challenge. The purpose of this methods article is to introduce a new highly sensitive chemiluminescence approach to direct NO detection in aqueous solutions using a natural nitric oxide target, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), which catalyzes the conversion of guanosine triphosphate to guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate and inorganic pyrophosphate. The suggested enzymatic assay uses the fact that the rate of the reaction increases by about 200 times when NO binds with sGC and, in so doing, provides a sensor for nitric oxide. Luminescence detection of the above reaction is accomplished by converting inorganic pyrophosphate into ATP with the help of ATP sulfurylase followed by light emission from the ATP-dependent luciferin-luciferase reaction. Detailed protocols for NO quantification in aqueous samples are provided. The examples of applications include measurement of NO generated by a nitric oxide donor (PAPA-NONOate), nitric oxide synthase, and NO gas dissolved in buffer. The method allows for the measurement of NO concentrations in the nanomolar range and NO generation rates as low as 100 pM/min.

  3. Nitric oxide-sensitive guanylyl cyclase is differentially regulated by nuclear and non-nuclear estrogen pathways in anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Cabilla, Jimena P; Nudler, Silvana I; Ronchetti, Sonia A; Quinteros, Fernanda A; Lasaga, Mercedes; Duvilanski, Beatriz H

    2011-01-01

    17β-estradiol (E2) regulates hormonal release as well as proliferation and cell death in the pituitary. The main nitric oxide receptor, nitric oxide sensitive- or soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), is a heterodimer composed of two subunits, α and β, that catalyses cGMP formation. α1β1 is the most abundant and widely expressed heterodimer, showing the greater activity. Previously we have shown that E2 decreased sGC activity but exerts opposite effects on sGC subunits increasing α1 and decreasing β1 mRNA and protein levels. In the present work we investigate the mechanisms by which E2 differentially regulates sGC subunits' expression on rat anterior pituitary gland. Experiments were performed on primary cultures of anterior pituitary cells from adult female Wistar rats at random stages of estrous cycle. After 6 h of E2 treatment, α1 mRNA and protein expression is increased while β1 levels are down-regulated. E2 effects on sGC expression are partially dependent on de novo transcription while de novo translation is fully required. E2 treatment decreased HuR mRNA stabilization factor and increased AUF1 p37 mRNA destabilization factor. E2-elicited β1 mRNA decrease correlates with a mRNA destabilization environment in the anterior pituitary gland. On the other hand, after 6 h of treatment, E2-BSA (1 nM) and E2-dendrimer conjugate (EDC, 1 nM) were unable to modify α1 or β1 mRNA levels, showing that nuclear receptor is involved in E2 actions. However, at earlier times (3 h), 1 nM EDC causes a transient decrease of α1 in a PI3k-dependent fashion. Our results show for the first time that E2 is able to exert opposite actions in the anterior pituitary gland, depending on the activation of classical or non-classical pathways. Thus, E2 can also modify sGC expression through membrane-initiated signals bringing to light a new point of regulation in NO/sGC pathway.

  4. Nitric Oxide-Sensitive Guanylyl Cyclase Is Differentially Regulated by Nuclear and Non-Nuclear Estrogen Pathways in Anterior Pituitary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Cabilla, Jimena P.; Nudler, Silvana I.; Ronchetti, Sonia A.; Quinteros, Fernanda A.; Lasaga, Mercedes; Duvilanski, Beatriz H.

    2011-01-01

    17β-estradiol (E2) regulates hormonal release as well as proliferation and cell death in the pituitary. The main nitric oxide receptor, nitric oxide sensitive- or soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), is a heterodimer composed of two subunits, α and β, that catalyses cGMP formation. α1β1 is the most abundant and widely expressed heterodimer, showing the greater activity. Previously we have shown that E2 decreased sGC activity but exerts opposite effects on sGC subunits increasing α1 and decreasing β1 mRNA and protein levels. In the present work we investigate the mechanisms by which E2 differentially regulates sGC subunits' expression on rat anterior pituitary gland. Experiments were performed on primary cultures of anterior pituitary cells from adult female Wistar rats at random stages of estrous cycle. After 6 h of E2 treatment, α1 mRNA and protein expression is increased while β1 levels are down-regulated. E2 effects on sGC expression are partially dependent on de novo transcription while de novo translation is fully required. E2 treatment decreased HuR mRNA stabilization factor and increased AUF1 p37 mRNA destabilization factor. E2-elicited β1 mRNA decrease correlates with a mRNA destabilization environment in the anterior pituitary gland. On the other hand, after 6 h of treatment, E2-BSA (1 nM) and E2-dendrimer conjugate (EDC, 1 nM) were unable to modify α1 or β1 mRNA levels, showing that nuclear receptor is involved in E2 actions. However, at earlier times (3 h), 1 nM EDC causes a transient decrease of α1 in a PI3k-dependent fashion. Our results show for the first time that E2 is able to exert opposite actions in the anterior pituitary gland, depending on the activation of classical or non-classical pathways. Thus, E2 can also modify sGC expression through membrane-initiated signals bringing to light a new point of regulation in NO/sGC pathway. PMID:22216273

  5. SGC tests for influence of material composition on compaction characteristic of asphalt mixtures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qun; Li, Yuzhi

    2013-01-01

    Compaction characteristic of the surface layer asphalt mixture (13-type gradation mixture) was studied using Superpave gyratory compactor (SGC) simulative compaction tests. Based on analysis of densification curve of gyratory compaction, influence rules of the contents of mineral aggregates of all sizes and asphalt on compaction characteristic of asphalt mixtures were obtained. SGC Tests show that, for the mixture with a bigger content of asphalt, its density increases faster, that there is an optimal amount of fine aggregates for optimal compaction and that an appropriate amount of mineral powder will improve workability of mixtures, but overmuch mineral powder will make mixtures dry and hard. Conclusions based on SGC tests can provide basis for how to adjust material composition for improving compaction performance of asphalt mixtures, and for the designed asphalt mixture, its compaction performance can be predicted through these conclusions, which also contributes to the choice of compaction schemes.

  6. [The isolation and assessment of Golgi apparatus from gastric cancer cells SGC7901].

    PubMed

    He, Tingting; Yi, Yongfen; Li, Yanqing; Xiao, Zhong

    2010-10-01

    The Golgi complex is the central organelle of the secretory pathway and has many complicate functions. The endeavours to isolate and purify the Golgi apparatus from cultured cells will benefit further investigation of Golgi. A large number of gastric cancer cells SGC7901 were cultivated in vitro, then Golgi apparatus were isolated from the cells by differential centrifugation combined with sucrose density gradient ultra-centrifugation. Its purity was characterized biochemically by enzymatic assays, morphologically by electron microscopy (EM) and neutral red supravital staining. Finally the Golgi complex was successfully fractionated from gastric cancer cells SGC7901. The first successful isolation of Golgi apparatus from gastric cancer cells SGC7901 by using ultra-centrifugation will lead to research into the function of Golgi apparatus.

  7. Nitric oxide sets off an antioxidant response in adrenal cells: involvement of sGC and Nrf2 in HO-1 induction.

    PubMed

    Astort, F; Mercau, M; Giordanino, E; Degese, M S; Caldareri, L; Coso, O; Cymeryng, C B

    2014-02-15

    Induction of microsomal heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) activity is considered a cytoprotective mechanism in different cell types. In adrenal cells, HO-1 induction by ACTH exerts a modulatory effect on steroid production as well. As nitric oxide (NO) has been also regarded as an autocrine/paracrine modulator of adrenal steroidogenesis we sought to study the effects of NO on the induction of HO-1 and the mechanism involved. We hereby analyzed the time and dose-dependent effect of a NO-donor (DETA/NO) on HO-1 induction in a murine adrenocortical cell line. We showed that this effect is mainly exerted at a transcriptional level as it is inhibited by actinomycin D and HO-1 mRNA degradation rates were not affected by DETA/NO treatment. HO-1 induction by NO does not appear to involve the generation of oxidative stress as it was not affected by antioxidant treatment. We also demonstrated that NO-treatment results in the nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2), an effect that is attenuated by transfecting the cells with a dominant negative isoform of Nrf2. We finally show that the effects of the NO-donor are reproduced by a permeable analog of cGMP and that a soluble guanylate cyclase specific inhibitor blocked both the induction of HO-1 by NO and the nuclear translocation of Nrf2.

  8. WR-2721 inhibits parathyroid adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, M.E.; Morrissey, J.; McConkey, C. Jr.; Goldfarb, S.; Slatopolsky, E.; Martin, K.J.

    1987-02-01

    WR-2721 (S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid) is a chemoprotective and radioprotective agent that has been shown to lower serum calcium in dogs and in humans. This is secondary both to impaired release of CaS from bone and diminished secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) from parathyroid glands. Because cAMP plays a role in the regulation of PTH secretion and WR-2721 has been shown to lower cAMP levels in radiated mouse spleen, the authors investigated the effects of WR-2721 on cAMP production in dispersed bovine parathyroid cells. Additional, they studied the adenylate cyclase in plasma membranes from normal bovine parathyroid glands after exposure to WR-2721. With parathyroid cells incubated at 0.5 mM CaS , addition of Wr-2721 in concentrations ranging from 0.02 to 2.0 mM resulted in a progressive decrease in intracellular cAMP measured by radioimmunoassay. In plasma membranes of bovine parathyroid cells a dose-dependent decrease in adenylate cyclase activity was noted. Inhibition of the cyclase was seen over a wide range of MgS concentrations. WR-2721 inhibited both basal and NaF, Gpp(NH)(, forskolin, and pertussin toxin-stimulated adenylate cyclase. These data suggest that WR-2721 inhibits the activity of parathyroid adenylate cyclase.

  9. Autophagy is involved in anticancer effects of matrine on SGC-7901 human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junqiang; Li, Yumin; Chen, Xiaohui; Liu, Tao; Chen, Yingtai; He, Wenting; Zhang, Quanbao; Liu, Shiyuan

    2011-07-01

    Matrine has a wide range of pharmacological effects including antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Autophagy is closely associated with tumors and plays an important role in human tumor suppression, so inducing autophagy is a potential therapeutic strategy in adjuvant chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether or not autophagy is involved in antitumor effects of matrine on human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells, and to further elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. Sulphorhodamine B (SRB) assay was used to examine matrine's cytotoxicity against SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells. The effects of matrine on the cell cycle and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometry, and cellular morphology was observed under an inverted phase contrast microscope and transmission electron microscope. Monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining was used to detect autophagy. The expression levels of Bax and Beclin 1 in SGC-7901 cells were monitored by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that matrine significantly inhibited the proliferation of SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells and induced G1-phase cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, both autophagy and apoptosis were activated during the matrine-induced death of SGC-7901 cells. Beclin 1 is involved in matrine-induced autophagy and the pro-apoptotic mechanisms of matrine may be associated with its up-regulation of Bax expression. These findings indicate that matrine is a potent antitumor agent for treating gastric cancer. The ability of matrine to induce autophagy underlines its potential utility as a new gastric cancer treatment modality.

  10. R-Phycoerythrin Induces SGC-7901 Apoptosis by Arresting Cell Cycle at S Phase.

    PubMed

    Tan, Huixin; Gao, Shiyong; Zhuang, Yan; Dong, Yanhong; Guan, Wenhui; Zhang, Kun; Xu, Jian; Cui, Jingru

    2016-09-12

    R-Phycoerythrin (R-PE), one of the chemical constituents of red algae, could produce singlet oxygen upon excitation with the appropriate radiation and possibly be used in photodynamic therapy (PDT) for cancer. Documents reported that R-PE could inhibit cell proliferation in HepG2 and A549 cells, which was significative for cancer therapy. This is due to the fact that R-PE could kill cancer cells directly as well as by PDT. However, little is known about the cytotoxicity of R-PE to the SGC-7901 cell. In this study, it has been found that R-PE could inhibit SGC-7901 proliferation and induce cell apoptosis, which was achieved by arresting the SGC-7901 cell at S phase. CyclinA, CDK2 and CDC25A are proteins associated with the S phase, and it was found that R-PE could increase the expression of cyclin A protein and decrease the expression of CDK2 and CDC25A proteins. Thus, it was concluded that R-PE reduced the CDK2 protein activated through decreasing the CDC25A factor, which reduced the formation of Cyclin-CDK complex. The reduction of Cyclin-CDK complex made the SGC-7901 cells arrest at the S phase. Therefore, R-PE induced apoptosis by arresting the SGC-7901 cell at S phase was successful, which was achieved by the expression of the CDC25A protein, which reduced the CDK2 protein actived and the formation of Cyclin-CDK complex.

  11. R-Phycoerythrin Induces SGC-7901 Apoptosis by Arresting Cell Cycle at S Phase

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Huixin; Gao, Shiyong; Zhuang, Yan; Dong, Yanhong; Guan, Wenhui; Zhang, Kun; Xu, Jian; Cui, Jingru

    2016-01-01

    R-Phycoerythrin (R-PE), one of the chemical constituents of red algae, could produce singlet oxygen upon excitation with the appropriate radiation and possibly be used in photodynamic therapy (PDT) for cancer. Documents reported that R-PE could inhibit cell proliferation in HepG2 and A549 cells, which was significative for cancer therapy. This is due to the fact that R-PE could kill cancer cells directly as well as by PDT. However, little is known about the cytotoxicity of R-PE to the SGC-7901 cell. In this study, it has been found that R-PE could inhibit SGC-7901 proliferation and induce cell apoptosis, which was achieved by arresting the SGC-7901 cell at S phase. CyclinA, CDK2 and CDC25A are proteins associated with the S phase, and it was found that R-PE could increase the expression of cyclin A protein and decrease the expression of CDK2 and CDC25A proteins. Thus, it was concluded that R-PE reduced the CDK2 protein activated through decreasing the CDC25A factor, which reduced the formation of Cyclin-CDK complex. The reduction of Cyclin-CDK complex made the SGC-7901 cells arrest at the S phase. Therefore, R-PE induced apoptosis by arresting the SGC-7901 cell at S phase was successful, which was achieved by the expression of the CDC25A protein, which reduced the CDK2 protein actived and the formation of Cyclin-CDK complex. PMID:27626431

  12. Structure reactivity relationship in the reaction of DNA guanyl radicals with hydroxybenzoates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Trinh T.; Tang, Vicky J.; Aguilera, Joseph A.; Milligan, Jamie R.

    2010-11-01

    In DNA, guanine bases are the sites from which electrons are most easily removed. As a result of hole migration to this stable location on guanine, guanyl radicals are major intermediates in DNA damage produced by the direct effect of ionizing radiation (ionization of the DNA itself and not through the intermediacy of water radicals). We have modeled this process by employing gamma irradiation in the presence of thiocyanate ions, a method which also produces single electron oxidized guanyl radicals in plasmid DNA in aqueous solution. The stable products formed in DNA from these radicals are detected as strand breaks after incubation with the FPG protein. When a phenolic compound is present in the solution during gamma irradiation, the formation of guanyl radical species is decreased by electron donation from the phenol to the guanyl radical. We have quantified the rate of this reaction for four different phenolic compounds bearing carboxylate substituents as proton acceptors. A comparison of the rates of these reactions with the redox strengths of the phenolic compounds reveals that salicylate reacts ca. 10-fold faster than its structural analogs. This observation is consistent with a reaction mechanism involving a proton coupled electron transfer, because intra-molecular transfer of a proton from the phenolic hydroxyl group to the carboxylate group is possible only in salicylate, and is favored by the strong 6-membered ring intra-molecular hydrogen bond in this compound.

  13. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin: entry of bacterial adenylate cyclase into mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Confer, D L; Slungaard, A S; Graf, E; Panter, S S; Eaton, J W

    1984-01-01

    We have identified an adenylate cyclase toxin in urea extracts and culture supernatant fluids of Bordetella pertussis (2). The ability of this toxin and the lack of a strong correlation between its activity and adenylate cyclase activity found in urea extracts suggest that it is an oligomer of readily dissociable subunits. The mechanism by which Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin interacts with target cells is unknown, but polyvalent cations are necessary. Neutrophils exposed to the toxin acquire a 39,000 Mr protein that can also be photoaffinity labeled with 32P-ATP. We anticipate that this protein will prove to be a catalytic component of Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin. Susceptible cells exposed to Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin are functionally aberrant. In phagocytes, decreased bactericidal capacity may be important in the pathogenesis of human whooping cough and other Bordetella infections occurring in domestic animals. The effects of the toxin on neoplastic cells may offer new insights into the factors controlling their growth and differentiation. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin is a unique bacterial product. Further purification and characterization of this toxin will add to our understanding of cell-protein interactions and pathogen-host relationships.

  14. Solubilization of a guanyl nucleotide-sensitive alpha/sub 1/ adrenergic receptor from liver membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.I.; Moss, J.

    1987-05-01

    Rat liver membranes incubated with norepinephrine before solubilization with digitonin yielded a soluble hormone-receptor complex from which the release of tightly bound norepinephrine was facilitated by guanyl nucleotides. Binding of the alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptor antagonist, (/sup 3/H)-prazosin, to the soluble preparation was utilized as a gauge of guanyl nucleotide-induced release of receptor-bound agonist. The following potency series was obtained with regard to the ability of guanyl nucleotides to facilitate (/sup 3/H)-prazosin binding to the solubilized preparation: guanosine 5'-0-(3-thiotriphosphate)(K/sub 1/2/ = 2.5 nM), guanylyl-imidodiphosphate (K/sub 1/2/ = 10 nM), guanosine triphosphate (K/sub 1/2/ = 34 nM) and adenylyl-imidodiphosphate (K/sub 1/2/ > 1 mM). In the presence of guanylyl-imidodiphosphate (0.4 mM), the receptor population displayed monotonic binding parameters with a K/sub d/ for (/sup 3/H)-prazosin of 1.16 nM by Scatchard analysis. Competition curves against (/sup 3/H)-prazosin with the antagonists phentolamine and yohimbine revealed respective K/sub i/'s of .089 ..mu..M and 1.8 ..mu..M; curves with the agonists norepinephrine and isoproterenol yielded respective K/sub i/'s of 6.2..mu..M and 360 ..mu..M. Competition curves performed in the absence of guanyl nucleotide were complex demonstrating an apparent increase in affinity for agonists and an apparent decrease in affinity for antagonists. These curve shifts are consistent with the conversion of receptor to and from the guanyl nucleotide-sensitive state as a function of competing ligand concentration.

  15. Intrinsic effects of gold nanoparticles on proliferation and invasion activity in SGC-7901 cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yucheng; Zhang, Qingqing; Ruan, Zhongbao; Yin, Yigang

    2016-03-01

    Although biomedical applications of functionalized nanoparticles have taken significant strides, biological characterization of unmodified nanoparticles remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the cell viability and invasion activity of gastric cancer cells after treatment with gold nanoparticles. The growth of SGC-7901 cells was inhibited significantly after treatment with 5-nm gold nanoparticles, and the cell invasion decreased markedly. These effects were not seen by different size gold nanoparticles (10, 20 and 40 nm). The attenuated invasion activity may be associated with the decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1. These data indicated that the response of SGC-7901 cells to gold nanoparticles was strongly associated with their unique size-dependent physiochemical properties. Therefore, we provided new evidence for the effect of gold nanoparticles on gastric cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro, making a contribution to the application of gold nanoparticles to novel therapies in gastric cancer.

  16. Betulin induces reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis in human gastric cancer SGC7901 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Liu, Xiaokang; Jiang, Dan; Lin, Yingjia; Wang, Yushi; Li, Qing; Liu, Linlin; Jin, Ying-Hua

    2016-09-01

    Betulin, an abundant natural compound, significantly inhibited the cell viability of advanced human gastric cancer SGC7901 cells. Mechanism study demonstrated that betulin induced apoptosis through mitochondrial Bax and Bak accumulation-mediated intrinsic apoptosis pathway. Downregulation of the anti-apoptosis proteins Bcl-2 and XIAP was involved during betulin-induced cell apoptosis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) was generated in cells after betulin treatment in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Addition of antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) significantly attenuated betulin-induced ROS generation as well as Bcl-2 and XIAP downregulation. The mitochondrial accumulation of Bax and Bak, as well as caspase activity, was also remarkably inhibited by NAC treatment, indicating that ROS are important signaling intermediates that lead to betulin-induced apoptosis by modulating multiple apoptosis-regulating proteins in SGC7901 cells.

  17. Effect of oxaliplatin combined with polyenephosphatidylcholine on the proliferation of human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Hongjun; Liu, Xiguang; Song, Hao; Yao, Ruyong; Li, Jianbin; Zhao, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin (L-OHP) is a platinum compound that is widely used to treat certain solid tumors, including gastric tumors. L-OHP is an effective anti-cancer treatment; however, its usage increases the probability of patients developing hepatic injury with inflammation, referred to as chemotherapy-associated steatohepatitis. The present study aimed to evaluate the outcome of L-OHP treatment combined with polyenephosphatidylcholine (PPC), a major component of essential phospholipids used to treat steatohepatitis, on SGC-7901 gastric cancer cell proliferation. This would help to determine whether combination therapy with L-OHP and PPC is clinically beneficial for patients with gastric cancer. The viability of SGC-7901 cells was verified by an MTT assay; flow cytometry was used to analyze the cell cycle and rates of cell apoptosis; oxidation-related indicators were measured by spectrophotometry, and the expression of cell cycle- and apoptosis-related proteins was determined by western blotting. The results demonstrated that L-OHP significantly inhibited SGC-7901 cell growth in a dose- and time-dependent manner (F=194.193, P<0.01 and F=12.428, P=0.01, respectively). Furthermore, PPC stimulated the growth of SGC-7901 cells and greatly promoted their apoptosis induced by L-OHP, which was supported by the upregulation of cytochrome c and the downstream activation of caspases 3 and 9. Finally, following treatment with a combination of PPC and L-OHP, the expression of cyclins D1 and E was downregulated; however, PPC did not alter the production of reactive oxygen species caused by L-OHP (P=0.88). The present study determined that the combination of L-OHP and PPC exerts a synergistic anti-tumor effect, suggesting that L-OHP and PPC combination therapy may be used as a treatment for patients with gastric cancer that reduces the side effects of L-OHP without inhibiting its efficacy. PMID:28101212

  18. Sinomenine inhibits proliferation of SGC-7901 gastric adenocarcinoma cells via suppression of cyclooxygenase-2 expression

    PubMed Central

    LV, YIFEI; LI, CHANGSHUN; LI, SHUANG; HAO, ZHIMING

    2011-01-01

    Sinomenine (SIN) is a bioactive alkaloid extracted from the Chinese medicinal plant Sinomenium acutum. Results of studies have shown that the anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive and anti-arthritic effects of SIN are partially attributed to the inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression. COX-2 overexpression is associated with enhanced proliferation and angiogenesis of gastric cancer (GC). SGC-7901 cells were treated with different concentrations of SIN in order to observe its effect on the proliferation of human gastric adenocarcinoma cells and to explore the potential underlying molecular mechanism via the detection of COX-2 expression. Celecoxib was used as the positive control. Morphological alterations of the cells were observed microscopically. Cell proliferation was evaluated using MTT assay. COX-2 expression was detected using semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. The results showed that SIN inhibited the proliferation of SGC-7901 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In the presence of SIN or celecoxib, SGC-7901 cells became round and detached morphologically, indicating cell apoptosis. The expression of COX-2 was inhibited by SIN in a dose-dependent manner at both the mRNA and protein levels. Our findings indicate that the protective effects of SIN are mediated through the inhibition of COX-2 expression. These findings suggest a novel therapy to treat inflammation-mediated gastric adenocarcinomata. PMID:22848259

  19. Chemopreventive effects of Peucedanum praeruptorum DUNN and its major constituents on SGC7901 gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Taigang; Yue, Wenyan; Li, Qingshan

    2010-11-09

    In this study, the effects of Peucedanum praeruptorum DUNN methanolic extract (PPME) and its major constituents on SGC7901 human gastric cancer cells were evaluated. Two pyranocoumarins, namely, (±) praeruptorin A (PA) and (±) praeruptorin B (PB), were isolated from PPME. A high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method was developed to determine the contents of PA and PB in PPME. The anti-proliferative and cytotoxic actions of PPME were observed using the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. At 300 μg/mL, PPME inhibited cell growth by 51.2% (P < 0.01), probably linked to the high concentration of PA and PB. Both PA and PB exhibited antiproliferative and cytotoxic activities on the SGC7901 cells. Furthermore, the active principle compound, PA, also enhanced the actions of doxorubincin (DOX) on SGC7901 cells. Cell growth decreased higher with the combined treatment of PA and DOX than that with the chemotherapy agent applied alone, suggesting that PA could reduce the dose of DOX for the desired effects.

  20. Effects of ophiopogonin B on the proliferation and apoptosis of SGC-7901 human gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, WEIYUE; ZHANG, QIAOYAN; JIANG, YIPING; LI, FENG; XIN, HAILIANG

    2016-01-01

    Ophiopogonin B (OP-B) is a bioactive component of Radix Ophiopogon japonicus, which is often used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat cancer. The present study aimed to investigate the antitumor activity of OP-B in gastric cancer. Cell Counting kit-8, flow cytometry with Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate, Hoechst staining, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) detection, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay were used to detect the biological function of SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells. The results demonstrated that high concentrations of OP-B (5, 10 and 20 μmol/l) exerted potent antiproliferative effects on SGC-7901 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, apoptotic rates were increased and cell morphology was altered following treatment with OP-B. In addition, OP-B-induced apoptosis of SGC-7901 cells was associated with loss of MMP and increased ROS generation. Western blotting indicated that treatment with OP-B increased the protein expression levels of caspase-3 and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein, whereas the expression levels of Bcl-2 and the phosphorylation levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinases 1/2 were decreased. These results suggest that OP-B may be considered a potential inhibitor of gastric cancer progression, and may be used as an alternative compound for its treatment. PMID:27121658

  1. Role of Nitric Oxide, Nitric Oxide Synthase, Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase, and cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase I in Mouse Stem Cell Cardiac Development

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, Valentina; Vona, Alessia; Corti, Francesca; Diolaiuti, Lorenzo; Zanardelli, Matteo; Sartiani, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Aim. Nitric oxide (NO) can trigger cardiac differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), indicating a cardiogenic function of the NO synthetizing enzyme(s) (NOS). However, the involvement of the NO/NOS downstream effectors soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) and cGMP activated protein kinase I (PKG-I) is less defined. Therefore, we assess the involvement of the entire NO/NOS/sGC/PKG-I pathway during cardiac differentiation process. Methods. Mouse ESCs were differentiated toward cardiac lineages by hanging drop methodology for 21 days. NOS/sGC/PKG-I pathway was studied quantifying genes, proteins, enzymatic activities, and effects of inhibition during differentiation. Percentages of beating embryoid bodies (mEBs) were evaluated as an index of cardiogenesis. Results and Discussion. Genes and protein expression of enzymes were increased during differentiation with distinctive kinetics and proteins possessed their enzymatic functions. Exogenous administered NO accelerated whereas the blockade of PKG-I strongly slowed cardiogenesis. sGC inhibition was effective only at early stages and NOS blockade ineffective. Of NOS/sGC/PKG-I pathway, PKG-I seems to play the prominent role in cardiac maturation. Conclusion. We concluded that exogenous administered NO and other pharmacological strategies able to increase the activity of PKG-I provide new tools to investigate and promote differentiation of cardiogenic precursors. PMID:27840646

  2. Membrane guanylyl cyclase receptors: an update

    PubMed Central

    Garbers, David L.; Chrisman, Ted D.; Wiegn, Phi; Katafuchi, Takeshi; Albanesi, Joseph P.; Bielinski, Vincent; Barylko, Barbara; Redfield, Margaret M.; Burnett, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated key roles for several membrane guanylyl cyclase receptors in the regulation of cell hyperplasia, hypertrophy, migration and extracellular matrix production, all of which having an impact on clinically relevant diseases, including tissue remodeling after injury. Additionally, cell differentiation, and even tumor progression, can be profoundly influenced by one or more of these receptors. Some of these receptors also mediate important communication between the heart and intestine, and the kidney to regulate blood volume and Na+ balance. PMID:16815030

  3. Lysine, disodium guanylate and disodium inosinate as flavor enhancers in low-sodium fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Campagnol, Paulo Cezar Bastianello; dos Santos, Bibiana Alves; Terra, Nelcindo Nascimento; Pollonio, Marise Aparecida Rodrigues

    2012-07-01

    Fermented sausages were produced with 50% replacement of NaCl with KCl and with addition of lysine, disodium guanylate, and disodium inosinate. The sausage production was monitored with physical, chemical and microbiological analyses. The final products were submitted to a consumer study. The replacement of NaCl with KCl did not cause changes in the technological process. However, defects in the sensory quality were detected. Lysine at a concentration of 1% with disodium inosinate (300 mg/kg) and disodium guanylate (300 mg/kg) reduced the sensory defects caused by the replacement of 50% NaCl with KCl allowing the preparation of sensory acceptable fermented sausages with a 50% decrease in sodium.

  4. Binase-like guanyl-preferring ribonucleases are new members of Bacillus PhoP regulon.

    PubMed

    Ulyanova, Vera; Vershinina, Valentina; Ilinskaya, Olga; Harwood, Colin R

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular low-molecular weight guanyl-preferring ribonucleases (LMW RNases) of Bacillus sp. comprise a group of hydrolytic enzymes that share highly similar structural and catalytic characteristics with barnase, a ribonuclease from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, and binase, a ribonuclease from Bacillus intermedius. Although the physical-chemical and catalytic properties of Bacillus guanyl-preferring ribonucleases are very similar, there is considerably more variation in the environmental conditions that lead to the induction of the genes encoding these RNases. Based on structural differences of their genes the guanyl-preferring ribonucleases have been sub-divided into binase-like and barnase-like groups. Here we show the ability of the key regulator of phosphate deficiency response, PhoP, to direct the transcription of the binase-like RNases but not barnase-like RNases. These results, together with our demonstration that binase-like RNases are induced in response to phosphate starvation, allow us to categorise this group of ribonucleases as new members of Bacillus PhoP regulon. In contrast, the barnase-like ribonucleases are relatively insensitive to the phosphate concentration and the environmental conditions that are responsible for their induction, and the regulatory elements involved, are currently unknown.

  5. Antagonism of soluble guanylyl cyclase attenuates cutaneous vasodilation during whole body heat stress and local warming in humans.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, Dean L; Zhao, Joan L; Wu, Yubo; Johnson, John M

    2011-05-01

    We hypothesized that nitric oxide activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) participates in cutaneous vasodilation during whole body heat stress and local skin warming. We examined the effects of the sGC inhibitor, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), on reflex skin blood flow responses to whole body heat stress and on nonreflex responses to increased local skin temperature. Blood flow was monitored by laser-Doppler flowmetry, and blood pressure by Finapres to calculate cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC). Intradermal microdialysis was used to treat one site with 1 mM ODQ in 2% DMSO and Ringer, a second site with 2% DMSO in Ringer, and a third site received Ringer. In protocol 1, after a period of normothermia, whole body heat stress was induced. In protocol 2, local heating units warmed local skin temperature from 34 to 41°C to cause local vasodilation. In protocol 1, in normothermia, CVC did not differ among sites [ODQ, 15 ± 3% maximum CVC (CVC(max)); DMSO, 14 ± 3% CVC(max); Ringer, 17 ± 6% CVC(max); P > 0.05]. During heat stress, ODQ attenuated CVC increases (ODQ, 54 ± 4% CVC(max); DMSO, 64 ± 4% CVC(max); Ringer, 63 ± 4% CVC(max); P < 0.05, ODQ vs. DMSO or Ringer). In protocol 2, at 34°C local temperature, CVC did not differ among sites (ODQ, 17 ± 2% CVC(max); DMSO, 18 ± 4% CVC(max); Ringer, 18 ± 3% CVC(max); P > 0.05). ODQ attenuated CVC increases at 41°C local temperature (ODQ, 54 ± 5% CVC(max); DMSO, 86 ± 4% CVC(max); Ringer, 90 ± 2% CVC(max); P < 0.05 ODQ vs. DMSO or Ringer). sGC participates in neurogenic active vasodilation during heat stress and in the local response to direct skin warming.

  6. Effect of association with adenylyl cyclase-associated protein on the interaction of yeast adenylyl cyclase with Ras protein.

    PubMed

    Shima, F; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Yanagihara, C; Tamada, M; Okada, T; Kariya, K; Kataoka, T

    1997-03-01

    Posttranslational modification of Ras protein has been shown to be critical for interaction with its effector molecules, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase. However, the mechanism of its action was unknown. In this study, we used a reconstituted system with purified adenylyl cyclase and Ras proteins carrying various degrees of the modification to show that the posttranslational modification, especially the farnesylation step, is responsible for 5- to 10-fold increase in Ras-dependent activation of adenylyl cyclase activity even though it has no significant effect on their binding affinity. The stimulatory effect of farnesylation is found to depend on the association of adenylyl cyclase with 70-kDa adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP), which was known to be required for proper in vivo response of adenylyl cyclase to Ras protein, by comparing the levels of Ras-dependent activation of purified adenylyl cyclase with and without bound CAP. The region of CAP required for this effect is mapped to its N-terminal segment of 168 amino acid residues, which coincides with the region required for the in vivo effect. Furthermore, the stimulatory effect is successfully reconstituted by in vitro association of CAP with the purified adenylyl cyclase molecule lacking the bound CAP. These results indicate that the association of adenylyl cyclase with CAP is responsible for the stimulatory effect of posttranslational modification of Ras on its activity and that this may be the mechanism underlying its requirement for the proper in vivo cyclic AMP response.

  7. Carnosine Inhibits the Proliferation of Human Gastric Cancer SGC-7901 Cells through Both of the Mitochondrial Respiration and Glycolysis Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yao; Yang, Jianbo; Li, Juan; Shi, Xiaojie; Ouyang, Li; Tian, Yueyang; Lu, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Carnosine, a naturally occurring dipeptide, has been recently demonstrated to possess anti-tumor activity. However, its underlying mechanism is unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect and mechanism of carnosine on the cell viability and proliferation of the cultured human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. Carnosine treatment did not induce cell apoptosis or necrosis, but reduced the proliferative capacity of SGC-7901 cells. Seahorse analysis showed SGC-7901 cells cultured with pyruvate have active mitochondria, and depend on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation more than glycolysis pathway for generation of ATP. Carnosine markedly decreased the absolute value of mitochondrial ATP-linked respiration, and reduced the maximal oxygen consumption and spare respiratory capacity, which may reduce mitochondrial function correlated with proliferative potential. Simultaneously, carnosine also reduced the extracellular acidification rate and glycolysis of SGC-7901 cells. Our results suggested that carnosine is a potential regulator of energy metabolism of SGC-7901 cells both in the anaerobic and aerobic pathways, and provided a clue for preclinical and clinical evaluation of carnosine for gastric cancer therapy. PMID:25115854

  8. Carnosine inhibits the proliferation of human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells through both of the mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis pathways.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yao; Yang, Jianbo; Li, Juan; Shi, Xiaojie; Ouyang, Li; Tian, Yueyang; Lu, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Carnosine, a naturally occurring dipeptide, has been recently demonstrated to possess anti-tumor activity. However, its underlying mechanism is unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect and mechanism of carnosine on the cell viability and proliferation of the cultured human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. Carnosine treatment did not induce cell apoptosis or necrosis, but reduced the proliferative capacity of SGC-7901 cells. Seahorse analysis showed SGC-7901 cells cultured with pyruvate have active mitochondria, and depend on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation more than glycolysis pathway for generation of ATP. Carnosine markedly decreased the absolute value of mitochondrial ATP-linked respiration, and reduced the maximal oxygen consumption and spare respiratory capacity, which may reduce mitochondrial function correlated with proliferative potential. Simultaneously, carnosine also reduced the extracellular acidification rate and glycolysis of SGC-7901 cells. Our results suggested that carnosine is a potential regulator of energy metabolism of SGC-7901 cells both in the anaerobic and aerobic pathways, and provided a clue for preclinical and clinical evaluation of carnosine for gastric cancer therapy.

  9. Isoform-targeted regulation of cardiac adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2003-01-01

    Numerous attempts have been made to develop strategies for regulating the intracellular cyclic AMP signal pharmacologically, with an intention to establish either new medical therapeutic methods or experimental tools. In the past decades, many pharmacological reagents have been identified that regulate this pathway at the level of the receptor. G protein, adenylyl cyclase, cyclic AMP, protein kinase A and phosphodiesterase. Since the cloning of adenylyl cyclase isoforms during the 1990s, investigators including ourselves have tried to find reagents that regulate the activity of this enzyme directly in an isoform-dependent manner. The ultimate goal of developing such reagents would be to regulate the cyclic AMP signal in an organ-dependent manner. Ourselves and other workers have reported that such reagents may vary from a simple cation to kinases. In a more recent study, using the results from crystallographic studies and computer-assisted drug design programs, we have identified subtype-selective regulators of adenylyl cyclase. Such regulators are mostly based upon forskolin, a diterpene compound obtained from Coleus forskolii, that acts directly on adenylyl cyclase to increase the intracellular levels of cyclic AMP. Similarly, novel reagents have been identified that inhibit a specific adenylyl cyclase isoform (e.g. type 5 adenylyl cyclase). Such reagents would potentially provide a new therapeutic strategy to treat hypertension, for example, as well as methods to selectively stimulate or inhibit this adenylyl cyclase isoform, which may be reminiscent of overexpression or knocking out of the cardiac adenylyl cyclase isoform by the use of a pharmacological method.

  10. Single-dose pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, tolerability, and safety of the soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator BAY 63-2521: an ascending-dose study in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Frey, Reiner; Mück, Wolfgang; Unger, Sigrun; Artmeier-Brandt, Ulrike; Weimann, Gerrit; Wensing, Georg

    2008-08-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of BAY 63-2521, a new drug in development for pulmonary hypertension. Fifty-eight healthy male volunteers received a single oral dose of BAY 63-2521 (0.25-5 mg) or placebo. No serious adverse events were reported; there were no life-threatening events. Heart rate over 1 minute, an indicator of the effect of a vasodilating agent on the cardiovascular system in healthy subjects, was increased dose dependently versus placebo at BAY 63-2521 doses of 1 to 5 mg (P < .01). Mean arterial and diastolic pressures were decreased versus placebo at doses of 1 mg (P < .05) and 5 mg (P < .01). Systolic pressure was not significantly affected. BAY 63-2521 was readily absorbed and exhibited dose-proportional pharmacokinetics. The pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of BAY 63-2521 suggest that it can offer a unique mode of action in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

  11. Crystallization of cyclase-associated protein from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Andreas; Hess, Sonja; Noegel, Angelika A; Schleicher, Michael; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2002-10-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a conserved two-domain protein that helps to activate the catalytic activity of adenylyl cyclase in the cyclase-bound state through interaction with Ras, which binds to the cyclase in a different region. With its other domain, CAP can bind monomeric actin and therefore also carries a cytoskeletal function. The protein is thus involved in Ras/cAMP-dependent signal transduction and most likely serves as an adapter protein translocating the adenylyl cyclase complex to the actin cytoskeleton. Crystals belonging to the orthorhombic space group C222, with unit-cell parameters a = 71.2, b = 75.1, c = 162.9 A, have been obtained from Dictyostelium discoideum CAP carrying a C-terminal His tag. A complete native data set extending to 2.2 A resolution was collected from a single crystal using an in-house X-ray system. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of CAP.

  12. Antineoplastic effects of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Slungaard, A; Confer, D L; Jacob, H S; Eaton, J W

    1983-01-01

    Urea extracts of B. pertussis, but not B. bronchiseptica, cause large and sustained intracellular cAMP elevation in several neoplastic cell lines. These cAMP elevations are associated with growth inhibition (HL-60, Friend erythroleukemia) and a phenotypic change/differentiation (HL-60, L1210). B. pertussis extract injections prolong survival of L1210 tumor-bearing mice. Pretreatment of L1210 cells with B. pertussis extract both delays mortality and induces growth of solid tumors instead of ascites in subsequently inoculated mice. We conclude that B. pertussis adenylate cyclase is capable of invading a variety of neoplastic cells to catalyze the intracellular formation of large amounts of cAMP. These cAMP elevations are durable and promote growth arrest, differentiation, or phenotypic alterations reflected in altered biologic behavior. B. pertussis adenylate cyclase should prove to be a useful tool for manipulating cAMP levels in neoplastic cells to elucidate the role of cAMP in malignant transformation.

  13. Isoimperatorin induces apoptosis of the SGC-7901 human gastric cancer cell line via the mitochondria-mediated pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Kehui; Xin, Chang; Chen, Wenzhong

    2017-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the antiproliferative activity of isoimperatorin against SGC-7901 cells and to examine the possible mechanisms. The antiproliferative activity of isoimperatorin against SGC-7901 cells was evaluated using an MTT assay, and the mechanisms were investigated using flow cytometry and western blot assays, which were used to determine the apoptotic rate and expression levels of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis-associated proteins, including Survivin, myeloid leukemia cell-1 (Mcl-1), B cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xl), B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase (Smac), Bcl-2-associated X factor (Bax), cleaved (c)-caspase-3 and c-caspase-9 in SGC-7901 cells. Additionally, a xenograft assay was used to confirm whether isoimperatorin had an inhibitory effect on SGC-7901 cell-induced tumors in vivo. The results of the MTT assay suggested that isoimperatorin significantly inhibited the proliferation of SGC-7901 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and the half maximal inhibitory concentration was 18.75 µg/ml. The results of the flow cytometric analysis indicated that, following treatment with isoimperatorin, the apoptotic rate of SGC-7901 cells was significantly increased, compared with that of cells in the control group. The results of the western blot analysis indicated that, following treatment with isoimperatorin, the expression levels of the pro-apoptotic proteins, Bax, c-caspase-3 and c-caspase-9, were significantly increased and the expression levels of the anti-apoptotic proteins, Survivin and Bcl-2, were significantly reduced, compared with the control group. No alterations in expression were found in the other apoptosis-associated proteins, including Mcl-1, Bcl-xl and Smac. The results of the xenograft assay indicated that isoimperatorin significantly inhibited the growth of SGC-7901 cell-induced tumor in vivo by increasing the expression levels of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax, c

  14. Andrographolide Inhibits Proliferation and Metastasis of SGC7901 Gastric Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Lei; Wang, Gang

    2017-01-01

    To explore the mechanisms by which andrographolide inhibits gastric cancer cell proliferation and metastasis, we employed the gastric cell line SGC7901 to investigate the anticancer effects of andrographolide. The cell survival ratio, cell migration and invasion, cell cycle, apoptosis, and matrix metalloproteinase activity were assessed. Moreover, western blotting and real-time PCR were used to examine the protein expression levels and the mRNA expression levels, respectively. The survival ratio of cells decreased with an increasing concentration of andrographolide in a dose-dependent manner. Consistent results were also obtained using an apoptosis assay, as detected by flow cytometry. The cell cycle was blocked at the G2/M2 phase by andrographolide treatment, and the proportion of cells arrested at G1/M was enhanced as the dose increased. Similarly, wound healing and Transwell assays showed reduced migration and invasion of the gastric cancer cells at various concentrations of andrographolide. Andrographolide can inhibit cell proliferation, invasion, and migration, block the cell cycle, and promote apoptosis in SGC7901 cells. The mechanisms may include upregulated expression of Timp-1/2, cyclin B1, p-Cdc2, Bax, and Bik and downregulated expression of MMP-2/9 and antiapoptosis protein Bcl-2. PMID:28194420

  15. Activation of fat cell adenylate cyclase by protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Naghshineh, S.; Noguchi, M.; Huang, K.P.; Londos, C.

    1986-05-01

    Purified protein kinase C (C-kinase) from guinea pig pancreas and rat brain stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in purified rat adipocyte membranes. Cyclase stimulation occurred over 100 to 1000 mU/ml of C-kinase activity, required greater than 10 ..mu..M calcium, proceeded without a lag, was not readily reversible, and required no exogenous phospholipid. Moreover, C-kinase inhibitors, such as chlorpromazine and palmitoyl carnitine, inhibited selectively adenylate cyclase which was activated by C-kinase and calcium. Depending on assay conditions, 10 nM 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) either enhanced or was required for kinase action on cyclase. Also, TPA plus calcium promoted the quantitative association of C-kinase with membranes. Adenylate cyclase activation by C-kinase was seen both in the presence and absence of exogenous GTP, indicating that the kinase effect does not result from an action on the GTP-binding, inhibitory regulatory component (N/sub i/) of the cyclase system. Moreover, the kinase effect was seen in the presence of non-phosphorylating ATP analogs, such as AppNHp and AppCH/sub 2/p, suggesting that the effects of C-kinase described herein may result from association with, rather than phosphorylation of, adenylate cyclase.

  16. Cellular interactions uncouple beta-adrenergic receptors from adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Ciment, G; de Vellis, J

    1978-11-17

    C6 glioma cells and B104 neuroblastoma cells both possess adenylate cyclase activity, but only C6 cells have beta-adrenergic receptors. However, when cocultured with B104 cells, C6 cells show a marked decrease in their ability to accumulate adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate upon stimulation with beta receptor agonists. Since both beta receptors and cholera toxin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activities are present in C6/B104 cocultures, we conclude that the beta receptor/adenylate cyclase transduction mechanism in cocultured C6 cells is uncoupled.

  17. Ethanolic extract of Tulipa edulis Bak induces apoptosis in SGC-7901 human gastric carcinoma cells via the mitochondrial signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ruhui; Li, Zuanfang; Lin, Jiumao; Ye, Jinxia; Cai, Qiaoyan; Chen, Lidian; Peng, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Tulipa edulis Bak (TEB) is an active ingredient in various traditional Chinese medicine compounds and is commonly used to treat swelling and redness, remove toxicity and eliminate stagnation, as well as to prevent and treat certain cancer types. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of the anticancer activity of TEB remains unclear. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect and underlying mechanism of the ethanolic extract of TEB (EETEB) on SGC-7901 human gastric carcinoma cells. An MTT assay was performed to analyze cell viability. In addition, transmission electron microscopy, an Annexin V/fluorescein isothiocyanate assay, a JC-1 assay and laser scanning confocal microscopy with DAPI staining were used to determine the rate of apoptosis. Furthermore, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were used to detect the expression levels of the apoptosis gene and protein. EETEB was identified to inhibit the growth of SGC-7901 cells in a dose-dependent manner and induce changes in cell morphology. At the molecular level, EETEB induced SGC-7901 cell DNA fragmentation, loss of plasma membrane and asymmetrical collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential, while it increased the expression of pro-apoptotic B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein and reduced expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. Thus, the results of the current study revealed that the application of EETEB may inhibit the growth of the SGC-7901 cells due to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis.

  18. Overexpression of ECRG4 enhances chemosensitivity to 5-fluorouracil in the human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cell line.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Cheng-Ping; Wu, Bi-Hua; Wang, Bai-Qiang; Fu, Mao-Yong; Yang, Ming; Zhou, Yue; Liu, Fu

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of esophageal cancer-related gene 4 (ECRG4) expression levels on chemotherapeutic sensitivity of gastric cancer cells. A SGC-7901 cell system with tetracycline-inducible ECRG4 expression (SGC-7901/ECRG4) was successfully established. ECRG4 mRNA and protein expression levels were detected using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. Chemosensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was examined by cell proliferation assay and cell apoptosis assay. ECRG4 mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly upregulated in SGC-7901/ECRG4 cells induced with tetracycline. Compared with control cells, the growth inhibition rate of cells with ECRG4 overexpression was significantly increased when treated with 5-FU. Treatment with 5 μmol/l 5-FU resulted in 15.2 % apoptotic cells, whereas such treatment after overexpression of ECRG4 resulted in 44.5 % apoptotic cells. In conclusion, overexpression of ECRG4 enhanced the chemosensitivity of gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells to 5-FU through induction of apoptosis.

  19. Ethanolic extract of Tulipa edulis Bak induces apoptosis in SGC-7901 human gastric carcinoma cells via the mitochondrial signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    LIN, RUHUI; LI, ZUANFANG; LIN, JIUMAO; YE, JINXIA; CAI, QIAOYAN; CHEN, LIDIAN; PENG, JUN

    2015-01-01

    Tulipa edulis Bak (TEB) is an active ingredient in various traditional Chinese medicine compounds and is commonly used to treat swelling and redness, remove toxicity and eliminate stagnation, as well as to prevent and treat certain cancer types. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of the anticancer activity of TEB remains unclear. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect and underlying mechanism of the ethanolic extract of TEB (EETEB) on SGC-7901 human gastric carcinoma cells. An MTT assay was performed to analyze cell viability. In addition, transmission electron microscopy, an Annexin V/fluorescein isothiocyanate assay, a JC-1 assay and laser scanning confocal microscopy with DAPI staining were used to determine the rate of apoptosis. Furthermore, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were used to detect the expression levels of the apoptosis gene and protein. EETEB was identified to inhibit the growth of SGC-7901 cells in a dose-dependent manner and induce changes in cell morphology. At the molecular level, EETEB induced SGC-7901 cell DNA fragmentation, loss of plasma membrane and asymmetrical collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential, while it increased the expression of pro-apoptotic B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein and reduced expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. Thus, the results of the current study revealed that the application of EETEB may inhibit the growth of the SGC-7901 cells due to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. PMID:26622854

  20. A study of the single SGC7901 and GES1 cell using synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Qi, Zeming; Wang, Shengyi; Hu, Meicong; Liu, Gang; Tian, Yangchao

    2011-05-01

    In order to obtain unique information of the single gastric cancer cell and investigate gastric cancer further at the cellular and subcellular level, synchrotron infrared (SR-IR) microspectroscopy and imaging was used to study human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line SGC7901 and normal gastric mucosal epithelial cell line GES1. When we compared the infrared micro-spectra of the SGC7901 cells with those of the GES1 cells, the peak height ratios of 1121 cm -1/1020 cm -1 (RNA/DNA) of the SGC7901 cells were significantly higher than those of the GES1 cells, which might be useful for distinguishing malignant cells from normal cells. Furthermore, chemical imaging reveals that the amide II/the amide I ratio of the SGC7901 cell is lower than that of the GES1 cell in the most intense absorption region of vPO2-. The result indicates the study of the single gastric cancer cell at subcellular level by synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy and imaging can provide more detailed information which is very helpful for the research and diagnosis of gastric cancer.

  1. Structure of the caspase-recruitment domain from a zebrafish guanylate-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tengchuan; Huang, Mo; Smith, Patrick; Jiang, Jiansheng; Xiao, T Sam

    2013-08-01

    The caspase-recruitment domain (CARD) mediates homotypic protein-protein interactions that assemble large oligomeric signaling complexes such as the inflammasomes during innate immune responses. Structural studies of the mammalian CARDs demonstrate that their six-helix bundle folds belong to the death-domain superfamily, whereas such studies have not been reported for other organisms. Here, the zebrafish interferon-induced guanylate-binding protein 1 (zIGBP1) was identified that contains an N-terminal GTPase domain and a helical domain typical of the mammalian guanylate-binding proteins, followed by a FIIND domain and a C-terminal CARD similar to the mammalian inflammasome proteins NLRP1 and CARD8. The structure of the zIGBP1 CARD as a fusion with maltose-binding protein was determined at 1.47 Å resolution. This revealed a six-helix bundle fold similar to the NLRP1 CARD structure with the bent α1 helix typical of all known CARD structures. The zIGBP1 CARD surface contains a positively charged patch near its α1 and α4 helices and a negatively charged patch near its α2, α3 and α5 helices, which may mediate its interaction with partner domains. Further studies using binding assays and other analyses will be required in order to address the physiological function(s) of this zebrafish protein.

  2. Guanyl nucleotide interactions with dopaminergic binding sites labeled by (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol in human caudate and putamen: guanyl nucleotides enhance ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation and cause an apparent loss of high affinity binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Andorn, A.C.; Bacon, B.R.; Nguyen-Hunh, A.T.; Parlato, S.J.; Stitts, J.A.

    1988-02-01

    The human caudate and putamen contain two high affinity binding sites for (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol. Both of these affinity states exhibit dopaminergic selectivity. Ascorbic acid, at 0.1 mM, induces a slow loss of the low affinity component of (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding in these tissues. The addition of guanyl nucleotides to the ascorbate produces a more rapid loss of (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding which includes a loss of the highest affinity state for (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol. Ascorbate induces lipid peroxidation in human caudate and putamen, an effect that is further enhanced by guanyl and inosine nucleotides. In the absence of ascorbate, guanyl nucleotides have no effect on (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding but do decrease the affinity of dopamine at each affinity state greater than 60-fold. In the absence of ascorbate, guanyl nucleotides apparently decrease agonist affinity at human brain dopamine2-binding sites without causing an interconversion of agonist affinity states.

  3. Adenylate cyclase activity in a higher plant, alfalfa (Medicago sativa).

    PubMed Central

    Carricarte, V C; Bianchini, G M; Muschietti, J P; Téllez-Iñón, M T; Perticari, A; Torres, N; Flawiá, M M

    1988-01-01

    An adenylate cyclase activity in Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) roots was partially characterized. The enzyme activity remains in the supernatant fluid after centrifugation at 105,000 g and shows in crude extracts an apparent Mr of about 84,000. The enzyme is active with Mg2+ and Ca2+ as bivalent cations, and is inhibited by EGTA and by chlorpromazine. Calmodulin from bovine brain or spinach leaves activates this adenylate cyclase. PMID:3128270

  4. Ultraviolet radiation augments epidermal beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase response

    SciTech Connect

    Iizuka, H.; Kajita, S.; Ohkawara, A.

    1985-05-01

    Pig skin was irradiated in vivo with fluorescent sunlamp tubes (peak emission at 305 nm). A significant increase in epidermal beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase response was observed as early as 12 h following 1-2 minimum erythema doses (MEDs) UVB exposure, which lasted at least 48 h. The augmentation of adenylate cyclase response was relatively specific to the beta-adrenergic system and there was no significant difference in either adenosine- or histamine-adenylate cyclase response of epidermis. The increased beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase response was less marked at higher doses of UVB exposure (5 MEDs); in the latter condition, a significant reduction in adenosine- or histamine-adenylate cyclase response was observed. There was no significant difference in either low- or high-Km cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activity between control and UVB-treated skin at 1-2 MEDs. These data indicate that the epidermal adenylate cyclase responses are affected in vivo by UVB irradiation, which might be a significant regulatory mechanism of epidermal cyclic AMP systems.

  5. ERK1/2 signalling pathway is involved in CD147-mediated gastric cancer cell line SGC7901 proliferation and invasion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liping; Pan, Yuqin; Gu, Ling; Nie, Zhenlin; He, Bangshun; Song, Guoqi; Li, Rui; Xu, Yeqiong; Gao, Tianyi; Wang, Shukui

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of CD147 in the progression of gastric cancer and the signalling pathway involved in CD147-mediated gastric cancer cell line SGC7901 proliferation and invasion. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vectors targeting CD147 were constructed to silence CD147, and the expression of CD147 was monitored by quantitative realtime reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot and further confirmed by immunohistochemistry in vivo. Cell proliferation was determined by Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, the activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 were determined by gelatin zymography, and the invasion of SGC7901 was determined by invasion assay. The phosphorylation and non-phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2), P38 and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase were examined by Western blot. Additionally, the ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 were used to confirm the signalling pathway involved in CD147-mediated SGC7901 progression. The BALB/c nude mice were used to study tumour progression in vivo. The results revealed that CD147 silencing inhibited the proliferation and invasion of SGC7901 cells, and down-regulated the activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 and the phosphorylation of the ERK1/2 in SGC7901 cells. ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 decreased the proliferation, and invasion of SGC7901 cells, and down-regulated the MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities. In a nude mouse model of subcutaneous xenografts, the tumour volume was significantly smaller in the SGC7901/shRNA group compared to the SGC7901 and SGC7901/snc-RNA group. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed that CD147 and p-ERK1/2 protein expressions were down-regulated in the SGC7901/shRNA2 group compared to the SGC7901 and SGC7901/snc-RNA group. These results suggest that ERK1/2 pathway involves in CD147-mediated gastric cancer growth and invasion. These findings further highlight the importance of CD147 in cancer progression

  6. Riociguat for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hambly, Nathan; Granton, John

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a critical signaling molecule in the pulmonary vasculature. NO activates soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) resulting in the synthesis of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) - a key mediator of pulmonary artery vasodilatation that may also inhibit smooth muscle proliferation and platelet aggregation. Pulmonary hypertension, a serious, progressive and often fatal disease is characterized by NO-sGC-sGMP pathway dysregulation. Riociguat is a member of a novel therapeutic class known as soluble guanylate stimulators. Riociguat has a dual mode of action, acting in synergy with endogenous NO and also directly stimulating sGC independently of NO availability. Phase 3 randomized control trials have demonstrated that riociguat improves clinical, physiologic and hemodynamic parameters in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. In this review we will discuss the pharmacologic properties of riociguat and its appropriate implementation into clinical practice.

  7. Novel hopanoid cyclases from the environment.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Ann; Flood Page, Sarah R; Jorgenson, Tyler L; Fischer, Woodward W; Higgins, Meytal B

    2007-09-01

    Hopanoids are ubiquitous isoprenoid lipids found in modern biota, in recent sediments and in low-maturity sedimentary rocks. Because these lipids primarily are derived from bacteria, they are used as proxies to help decipher geobiological communities. To date, much of the information about sources of hopanoids has come from surveys of culture collections, an approach that does not address the vast fraction of prokaryotic communities that remains uncharacterized. Here we investigated the phylogeny of hopanoid producers using culture-independent methods. We obtained 79 new sequences of squalene-hopene cyclase genes (sqhC) from marine and lacustrine bacterioplankton and analysed them along with all 31 sqhC fragments available from existing metagenomics libraries. The environmental sqhCs average only 60% translated amino acid identity to their closest relatives in public databases. The data imply that the sources of these important geologic biomarkers remain largely unknown. In particular, genes affiliated with known cyanobacterial sequences were not detected in the contemporary environments analysed here, yet the geologic record contains abundant hopanoids apparently of cyanobacterial origin. The data also suggest that hopanoid biosynthesis is uncommon: < 10% of bacterial species may be capable of producing hopanoids. A better understanding of the contemporary distribution of hopanoid biosynthesis may reveal fundamental insight about the function of these compounds, the organisms in which they are found, and the environmental signals preserved in the sedimentary record.

  8. Receptor Guanylyl Cyclases in Sensory Processing

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Ichiro N.

    2017-01-01

    Invertebrate models have generated many new insights into transmembrane signaling by cell-surface receptors. This review focuses on receptor guanylyl cyclases (rGCs) and describes recent advances in understanding their roles in sensory processing in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. A complete analysis of the C. elegans genome elucidated 27 rGCs, an unusually large number compared with mammalian genomes, which encode 7 rGCs. Most C. elegans rGCs are expressed in sensory neurons and play roles in sensory processing, including gustation, thermosensation, olfaction, and phototransduction, among others. Recent studies have found that by producing a second messenger, guanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate, some rGCs act as direct sensor molecules for ions and temperatures, while others relay signals from G protein-coupled receptors. Interestingly, genetic and biochemical analyses of rGCs provide the first example of an obligate heterodimeric rGC. Based on recent structural studies of rGCs in mammals and other organisms, molecular mechanisms underlying activation of rGCs are also discussed in this review. PMID:28123378

  9. IFN-induced Guanylate Binding Proteins in Inflammasome Activation and Host Defense

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bae-Hoon; Chee, Jonathan D.; Bradfield, Clinton J.; Park, Eui-Soon; Kumar, Pradeep; MacMicking, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional views of the inflammasome highlight pre-existing core components being assembled under basal conditions shortly after infection or tissue damage. Recent work, however, suggests the inflammasome machinery is also subject to tunable or inducible signals that may accelerate its autocatalytic properties and dictate where inflammasome assembly takes place in the cell. Many of these immune signals operate downstream of interferon (IFN) receptors to elicit inflammasome regulators, including a new family of IFN-induced GTPases termed guanylate binding proteins (GBPs). Here, we examine the critical roles for IFN-induced GBPs in directing inflammasome subtype-specific responses and their consequences for cell-autonomous immunity against a wide variety of microbial pathogens. We discuss emerging mechanisms of action and the potential impact of these GBPs on predisposition to sepsis and other infectious or inflammatory diseases. PMID:27092805

  10. Interferon-induced guanylate-binding proteins in inflammasome activation and host defense.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bae-Hoon; Chee, Jonathan D; Bradfield, Clinton J; Park, Eui-Soon; Kumar, Pradeep; MacMicking, John D

    2016-05-01

    Traditional views of the inflammasome highlight the assembly of pre-existing core components shortly after infection or tissue damage. Emerging work, however, suggests that the inflammasome machinery is also subject to 'tunable' or inducible signals that might accelerate its autocatalytic properties and dictate where inflammasome assembly takes place in the cell. Many of these signals operate downstream of interferon receptors to elicit inflammasome regulators, including a new family of interferon-induced GTPases called 'guanylate-binding proteins' (GBPs). Here we investigate the critical roles of interferon-induced GBPs in directing inflammasome subtype-specific responses and their consequences for cell-autonomous immunity to a wide variety of microbial pathogens. We discuss emerging mechanisms of action and the potential effect of these GBPs on predisposition to sepsis and other infectious or inflammatory diseases.

  11. Interferon-induced guanylate-binding proteins promote cytosolic lipopolysaccharide detection by caspase-11.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Etienne; Broz, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from gram-negative bacteria is a classical pathogen-associated molecular pattern and a strong inducer of immune responses. While the detection of LPS on the cell surface and in the endosome by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been studied for some time, it has only recently been discovered that LPS can also be sensed in the cytosol of cells by a noncanonical inflammasome pathway, resulting in the activation of the cysteine protease caspase-11. Intriguingly, activation of this pathway requires the production of interferons (IFNs) and the induction of a class of IFN-induced GTPases called guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), which have previously been linked to cell-autonomous killing of intracellular microbes. In this study, we review the recent advances in our understanding of cytosolic LPS sensing and the function of mammalian GBPs.

  12. GTPase properties of the interferon-induced human guanylate-binding protein 2.

    PubMed

    Neun, R; Richter, M F; Staeheli, P; Schwemmle, M

    1996-07-15

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) were originally described as proteins that are strongly induced by interferons and are capable of binding to agarose-immobilized guanine nucleotides. hGBP1, the first of two members of this protein family in humans, was recently shown to represent a novel type of GTPase that hydrolyzes GTP predominantly to GMP. We now report that purified recombinant hGBP2 also hydrolyzes GTP very efficiently, although GDP rather than GMP was the major reaction product. The biochemical parameters of this reaction were as follows: Km = 313 microM, turnover number = 22 min-1. Both hGBP1 and hGBP2 failed to hydrolyze GDP, however, GDP was an effective inhibitor of the hGBP2- but not the hGBP1-catalyzed GTP hydrolysis reaction. Thus, hGBP1 and hGBP2 have similar biochemical properties, but show pronounced differences in product specificity.

  13. Primary structure of a guanyl-specific ribonuclease from the fungus Penicillium brevicompactum

    SciTech Connect

    Kulikov, V.A.; Shlyapnikov, S.V.; Yakovlev, G.I.

    1986-01-01

    By the automatic Edman degradation of the intact S-carboxymethylated protein and a mixture of the products of its proteolytic cleavage at Arg, Lys, and Glu residues, together with results on the kinetics of the proteolysis of the protein under the action of carboxypeptidase Y, the primary structure of the extracellular guanyl-specific RNase of the fungus Penicillium brevicompactum has been determined. The RNase contains 102 amino acid residues: 7 Asp, 7 Asn, 9 Thr, 11 Ser, 4 Glu, 1 Gln, 4 Pro, 10 Gly, 11 Ala, 4 Cys, 7 Val, 4 Ile, 3 Leu, 9 Tyr, 5 Phe, 2 Lys, 3 His, 1 Arg (M/sub r/ 10,801). It has been established that four hemicystine residues of the P. compactum RNase form, in pairs, two disulfide bonds

  14. Phylogenetic distribution of extracellular guanyl-preferring ribonucleases renews taxonomic status of two Bacillus strains.

    PubMed

    Ulyanova, Vera; Shah Mahmud, Raihan; Dudkina, Elena; Vershinina, Valentina; Domann, Eugen; Ilinskaya, Olga

    2016-09-12

    The potential of microbial ribonucleases as promising antitumor and antiviral agents, determines today's directions of their study. One direction is connected with biodiversity of RNases. We have analyzed completed and drafted Bacillus genomes deposited in GenBank for the presence of coding regions similar to the gene of an extracellular guanyl-preferring RNase of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (barnase). Orthologues of the barnase gene were detected in 9 species out of 83. All of these belong to "B. subtilis" group within the genus. B. subtilis itself, as well as some other species within this group, lack such types of RNases. RNases similar to barnase were also found in species of "B. cereus" group as a part of plasmid-encoded S-layer toxins. It was also found that taxonomic states of culture collection strains, which were initially described based on a limited set of phenotypic characteristics, can be misleading and need to be confirmed. Using several approaches such as matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), sequencing of genes for 16S ribosomal RNA and RNA polymerase subunit beta followed by reconstruction of phylogenetic trees, we have re-identified two RNase-secreting Bacillus strains: B. thuringiensis B-388 which should be assigned as B. altitudinis B388 and B. intermedius 7P which should be renamed as B. pumilus 7P. Therefore, small secreted guanyl-preferring RNases are the feature of "B. subtilis" group only, which is characterized by distinctive lifestyle and adaptation strategies to environment.

  15. Human guanylate binding proteins potentiate the anti-chlamydia effects of interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Tietzel, Illya; El-Haibi, Christelle; Carabeo, Rey A

    2009-08-04

    Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular pathogens that are sensitive to pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma. IFN-gamma-inducible murine p47 GTPases have been demonstrated to function in resistance to chlamydia infection in vivo and in vitro. Because the human genome does not encode IFN-gamma-inducible homologues of these proteins, the significance of the p47 GTPase findings to chlamydia pathogenesis in humans is unclear. Here we report a pair of IFN-gamma-inducible proteins, the human guanylate binding proteins (hGBPs) 1 and 2 that potentiate the anti-chlamydial properties of IFN-gamma. hGBP1 and 2 localize to the inclusion membrane, and their anti-chlamydial functions required the GTPase domain. Alone, hGBP1 or 2 have mild, but statistically significant and reproducible negative effects on the growth of Chlamydia trachomatis, whilst having potent anti-chlamydial activity in conjunction with treatment with a sub-inhibitory concentration of IFN-gamma. Thus, hGBPs appear to potentiate the anti-chlamydial effects of IFN-gamma. Indeed, depletion of hGBP1 and 2 in cells treated with IFN-gamma led to an increase in inclusion size, indicative of better growth. Interestingly, chlamydia species/strains harboring the full-length version of the putative cytotoxin gene, which has been suggested to confer resistance to IFN-gamma was not affected by hGBP overexpression. These findings identify the guanylate binding proteins as potentiators of IFN-gamma inhibition of C. trachomatis growth, and may be the targets of the chlamydial cytotoxin.

  16. Endothelium-Dependent Contractions of Isolated Arteries to Thymoquinone Require Biased Activity of Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase with Subsequent Cyclic IMP Production.

    PubMed

    Detremmerie, Charlotte M; Chen, Zhengju; Li, Zhuoming; Alkharfy, Khalid M; Leung, Susan W S; Xu, Aimin; Gao, Yuansheng; Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2016-09-01

    Preliminary experiments on isolated rat arteries demonstrated that thymoquinone, a compound widely used for its antioxidant properties and believed to facilitate endothelium-dependent relaxations, as a matter of fact caused endothelium-dependent contractions. The present experiments were designed to determine the mechanisms underlying this unexpected response. Isometric tension was measured in rings (with and without endothelium) of rat mesenteric arteries and aortae and of porcine coronary arteries. Precontracted preparations were exposed to increasing concentrations of thymoquinone, which caused concentration-dependent, sustained further increases in tension (augmentations) that were prevented by endothelium removal, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester [L-NAME; nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor], and 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; soluble guanylyl cyclase [sGC] inhibitor). In L-NAME-treated rings, the NO-donor diethylenetriamine NONOate restored the thymoquinone-induced augmentations; 5-[1-(phenylmethyl)-1H-indazol-3-yl]-2-furanmethanol (sGC activator) and cyclic IMP (cIMP) caused similar restorations. By contrast, in ODQ-treated preparations, the cell-permeable cGMP analog did not restore the augmentation by thymoquinone. The compound augmented the content (measured with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry) of cIMP, but not that of cGMP; these increases in cIMP content were prevented by endothelium removal, L-NAME, and ODQ. The augmentation of contractions caused by thymoquinone was prevented in porcine arteries, but not in rat arteries, by 1-(5-isoquinolinylsulfonyl)homopiperazine dihydrochloride and trans-4-[(1R)-1-aminoethyl]-N-4-pyridinylcyclohexanecarboxamide dihydrochloride (Rho-kinase inhibitors); in the latter, but not in the former, it was reduced by 3,5-dichloro-N-[[(1α,5α,6-exo,6α)-3-(3,3-dimethylbutyl)-3-azabicyclo[3.1.0]hex-6-yl]methyl]-benzamide hydrochloride (T-type calcium channel inhibitor

  17. Chinese medicine formula "Weikang Keli" induces autophagic cell death on human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901.

    PubMed

    Huo, Jiege; Qin, Fengxia; Cai, Xueting; Ju, Jianming; Hu, Chunping; Wang, Zhigang; Lu, Wuguang; Wang, Xiaoning; Cao, Peng

    2013-01-15

    Weikang Keli (constitutes of Root of Codonopsis pilosula, Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae, Rhizoma Curcumae Aeruginosae, Rhizoma Pinelliae, Actinidia chinensis Planch, and Rhodiola rosea) is a well known Chinese herbal formula for gastric cancer therapy in clinical treatment. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms involved are still not fully understood. In this study, we found that Weikang Keli could induce patterns of autophagy in SGC-7901 cells, including intracellular vacuole formation, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) conversion. Hoechst 33258 staining and Western blot analysis of apoptosis-related proteins showed that WK induced SGC-7901 cell death was not through apoptosis. In vivo study also revealed that i.g. administration of Weikang Keli once a day for 25 days could significantly reduce tumor volumes by about 50%. Collectively, the current data indicated that Weikang Keli induced gastric cancer cell death by autophagy effects.

  18. Role of glutaminyl cyclases in thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kehlen, Astrid; Haegele, Monique; Menge, Katja; Gans, Kathrin; Immel, Uta-Dorothee; Hoang-Vu, Cuong; Klonisch, Thomas; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2013-02-01

    CCL2 is a chemokine known to recruit monocytes/macrophages to sites of inflammation. CCL2 is also associated with tumor progression in several cancer types. Recently, we showed that the N-terminus of CCL2 is modified to a pyroglutamate (pE)-residue by both glutaminyl cyclases (QC (QPCT)) and its isoenzyme (isoQC (QPCTL)). The pE-residue increases stability against N-terminal degradation by aminopeptidases. Here, we report an upregulation of QPCT expression in tissues of patients with thyroid carcinomas compared with goiter tissues, whereas QPCTL was not regulated. In thyroid carcinoma cell lines, QPCT gene expression correlates with the mRNA levels of its substrate CCL2. Both QPCT and CCL2 are regulated in a NF-κB-dependent pathway shown by stimulation with TNFa and IL1b as well as by inhibition with the IKK2 inhibitor and RNAi of p50. In the culture supernatant of thyroid carcinoma cells, equal amounts of pECCL2 and total CCL2 were detected by two ELISAs discriminating between total CCL2 and pECCL2, concluding that all CCL2 is secreted as pECCL2. Activation of the CCL2/CCR2 pathway by recombinant CCL2 increased tumor cell migration of FTC238 cells in scratch assays as well as thyroid carcinoma cell-derived CCL2-induced migration of monocytic THP1 cells. Suppression of CCL2 signaling by CCR2 antagonist, IKK2 inhibitor, and QPCT RNAi reduced FTC238 cell growth measured by WST8 proliferation assays. Our results reveal new evidence for a novel role of QC in thyroid carcinomas and provide an intriguing rationale for the use of QC inhibitors as a means of blocking pECCL2 formation and preventing thyroid cancer metastasis.

  19. Molecular Physiology of Membrane Guanylyl Cyclase Receptors.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    cGMP controls many cellular functions ranging from growth, viability, and differentiation to contractility, secretion, and ion transport. The mammalian genome encodes seven transmembrane guanylyl cyclases (GCs), GC-A to GC-G, which mainly modulate submembrane cGMP microdomains. These GCs share a unique topology comprising an extracellular domain, a short transmembrane region, and an intracellular COOH-terminal catalytic (cGMP synthesizing) region. GC-A mediates the endocrine effects of atrial and B-type natriuretic peptides regulating arterial blood pressure/volume and energy balance. GC-B is activated by C-type natriuretic peptide, stimulating endochondral ossification in autocrine way. GC-C mediates the paracrine effects of guanylins on intestinal ion transport and epithelial turnover. GC-E and GC-F are expressed in photoreceptor cells of the retina, and their activation by intracellular Ca(2+)-regulated proteins is essential for vision. Finally, in the rodent system two olfactorial GCs, GC-D and GC-G, are activated by low concentrations of CO2and by peptidergic (guanylins) and nonpeptidergic odorants as well as by coolness, which has implications for social behaviors. In the past years advances in human and mouse genetics as well as the development of sensitive biosensors monitoring the spatiotemporal dynamics of cGMP in living cells have provided novel relevant information about this receptor family. This increased our understanding of the mechanisms of signal transduction, regulation, and (dys)function of the membrane GCs, clarified their relevance for genetic and acquired diseases and, importantly, has revealed novel targets for therapies. The present review aims to illustrate these different features of membrane GCs and the main open questions in this field.

  20. Cantharidin induces G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 and BGC-823 cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, CHENJING; CHEN, ZHONGTING; ZHOU, XINGLU; XU, WEN; WANG, GANG; TANG, XIAOXIAO; LUO, LAISHENG; TU, JIANGFENG; ZHU, YIMIAO; HU, WEN; XU, XIANG; PAN, WENSHENG

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of cantharidin (CTD) on human gastric cancer cells and to explore the underlying mechanisms of these effects. The human gastric cancer SGC-7901 and BGC-823 cell lines were treated with CTD. MTS assays were then employed to examine cellular proliferation, flow cytometry was used to analyze the cell cycle and apoptosis, and western blot analysis was used to determine protein expression levels. It was found that CTD inhibited the proliferation of the human gastric cancer SGC-7901 and BGC-823 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner in vitro. CTD also induced G2/M phase arrest and cellular apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, CTD increased the levels of p21, caspase-7, -8 and -9, activated caspase-3, poly ADP ribose polymerase and Bad, but decreased the levels of cyclin-dependent kinase 1, cyclin A and B, B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) and Bid. The present results suggested that CTD may inhibit the proliferation of human gastric cancer SGC-7901 and BGC-823 cells in vitro by inducing G2/M phase arrest and cell apoptosis. CTD may induce cellular G2/M phase arrest by regulating cycle-associated proteins and induce apoptosis by activating a caspase cascade or regulating the Bcl-2 family proteins. PMID:25364455

  1. Mesenchymal stem cell-like cells from children foreskin inhibit the growth of SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yahong; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Cheng, Zhihong; Zhan, Jie; Sun, Xiaochun; Qian, Hui; Zhu, Wei; Xu, Wenrong

    2013-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) become a research hotspot in recent years because of their roles in regenerative medicine and tissue injury repair. However, the limited source for MSCs hampers its clinical application. In this study, we isolated and identified human mesenchymal stem cell-like cells from foreskin (hFMSCs) by explant culture. HFMSCs had similar morphology and immunophenotype to that of human bone marrow derived-mesenchymal stem cells. HFMSCs formed colonies after 9 days of inoculation and could be propagated for more than 50 passages. HFMSCs had a normal karyotype and high G0/G1 phase independent of passage number. Further, hFMSCs could be induced to differentiate into osteocytes and adipocytes. We found that the growth of SGC-7901 (human gastric adenocarcinoma) cells could be suppressed by simultaneous injection of hFMSCs in vivo. HFMSCs also inhibited SGC-7901 cell proliferation in vitro. HFMSC co-injection resulted in a decrease in PCNA-positive and an increase in apoptotic tumor cells. HFMSCs derived conditioned medium inhibited the expression of BCL-2 while increased the expression of BAX and caspase-3 in SGC-7901 cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that children foreskin is a new source for MSCs and hFMSCs could inhibit gastric cancer cell growth both in vitro and in vivo.

  2. SKI-II reverses the chemoresistance of SGC7901/DDP gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Zhu, Zuan; Cai, Hongxing; Liu, Qinghua; Zhou, Honglian; Zhu, Zhengqiu

    2014-07-01

    Cisplatin is frequently used in treating gastric cancers; however, acquired resistance to the drug often reduces the efficacy of therapy. The present study analyzed the efficacy of the combination of 4-[4-(4-chloro-phenyl)-thiazol-2-ylamino]-phenol (SKI-II) and cisplatin [cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II); DDP] on the gastric cancer SGC7901/DDP cell line. The results revealed that SKI-II and DDP had a clear synergistic effect. Glutathione (GSH) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) levels decreased significantly subsequent to the cells being treated with the combination of DDP and SKI-II compared with the cells that were treated with DDP or SKI-II alone. Phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) and phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK) expression levels also decreased following treatment with SKI-II. The results suggested that SKI-II is able to reverse the drug resistance in human gastric carcinoma cells and enhance the antitumor effect of DDP through the ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) proliferation pathway.

  3. Nocturnal accumulation of cyclic 3',5'-guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in the chick pineal organ is dependent on activation of guanylyl cyclase-B.

    PubMed

    Olcese, J; Majora, C; Stephan, A; Müller, D

    2002-01-01

    The role of cGMP in the avian pineal is not well understood. Although the light-sensitive secretion of melatonin is a well-known output of the circadian oscillator, pharmacologically elevated cGMP levels do not result in altered melatonin secretory amplitude or phase. This suggests that pineal cGMP signalling does not couple the endogenous circadian oscillator to the expression of melatonin rhythms. Nonetheless, the free-running rhythm of cGMP signalling implies a link to the circadian oscillator in chick pinealocytes. As the circadian rhythm of cGMP levels in vitro is not altered by pharmacological inhibition of phosphodiesterase activity, we infer that the synthesis, rather than the degradation of cGMP, is under circadian control. In vitro experiments with the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine as well as with an inhibitor of the NO-sensitive soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), showed that the NOS-sGC pathway does not play a major role in the circadian control of cGMP generation. In organ culture experiments, we demonstrated that C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), but not atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), elevated daytime levels of cGMP. As CNP acts on the membrane guanylyl cyclase isoform B (GC-B), which is expressed at very high levels in mammalian pineals, we investigated the effect of the membrane GC-specific inhibitor HS-142 on chick pineal cGMP levels. CNP-induced daytime cGMP levels were reduced by HS-142. More importantly, 'spontaneously' high nocturnal levels of cGMP in vitro were reduced to daytime levels by acute addition of HS-142. These data implicate endogenous nocturnal CNP release and subsequent activation of GC-B as the major input driving cGMP synthesis in the chick pineal organ.

  4. Regulation and organization of adenylyl cyclases and cAMP.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Dermot M F

    2003-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclases are a critically important family of multiply regulated signalling molecules. Their susceptibility to many modes of regulation allows them to integrate the activities of a variety of signalling pathways. However, this property brings with it the problem of imparting specificity and discrimination. Recent studies are revealing the range of strategies utilized by the cyclases to solve this problem. Microdomains are a consequence of these solutions, in which cAMP dynamics may differ from the broad cytosol. Currently evolving methodologies are beginning to reveal cAMP fluctuations in these various compartments. PMID:12940771

  5. Intracellular cAMP signaling by soluble adenylyl cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Tresguerres, Martin; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently identified source of the ubiquitous second messenger cAMP. sAC is distinct from the more widely studied source of cAMP, the transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs); its activity is uniquely regulated by bicarbonate anions, and it is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and in cellular organelles. Due to its unique localization and regulation, sAC has various functions in a variety of physiological systems which are distinct from tmACs. In this review, we detail the known functions of sAC, and we reassess commonly held views of cAMP signaling inside cells. PMID:21490586

  6. Characterization of the active site of ADP-ribosyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Munshi, C; Thiel, D J; Mathews, I I; Aarhus, R; Walseth, T F; Lee, H C

    1999-10-22

    ADP-ribosyl cyclase synthesizes two Ca(2+) messengers by cyclizing NAD to produce cyclic ADP-ribose and exchanging nicotinic acid with the nicotinamide group of NADP to produce nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Recombinant Aplysia cyclase was expressed in yeast and co-crystallized with a substrate, nicotinamide. x-ray crystallography showed that the nicotinamide was bound in a pocket formed in part by a conserved segment and was near the central cleft of the cyclase. Glu(98), Asn(107) and Trp(140) were within 3.5 A of the bound nicotinamide and appeared to coordinate it. Substituting Glu(98) with either Gln, Gly, Leu, or Asn reduced the cyclase activity by 16-222-fold, depending on the substitution. The mutant N107G exhibited only a 2-fold decrease in activity, while the activity of W140G was essentially eliminated. The base exchange activity of all mutants followed a similar pattern of reduction, suggesting that both reactions occur at the same active site. In addition to NAD, the wild-type cyclase also cyclizes nicotinamide guanine dinucleotide to cyclic GDP-ribose. All mutant enzymes had at least half of the GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity of the wild type, some even 2-3-fold higher, indicating that the three coordinating amino acids are responsible for positioning of the substrate but not absolutely critical for catalysis. To search for the catalytic residues, other amino acids in the binding pocket were mutagenized. E179G was totally devoid of GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity, and both its ADP-ribosyl cyclase and the base exchange activities were reduced by 10,000- and 18,000-fold, respectively. Substituting Glu(179) with either Asn, Leu, Asp, or Gln produced similar inactive enzymes, and so was the conversion of Trp(77) to Gly. However, both E179G and the double mutant E179G/W77G retained NAD-binding ability as shown by photoaffinity labeling with [(32)P]8-azido-NAD. These results indicate that both Glu(179) and Trp(77) are crucial for catalysis and

  7. Oligomeric state affects oxygen dissociation and diguanylate cyclase activity of globin coupled sensors.

    PubMed

    Burns, Justin L; Deer, D Douglas; Weinert, Emily E

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation is regulated by enzymes, such as diguanylate cyclases, that respond to environmental signals and alter c-di-GMP levels. Diguanylate cyclase activity of two globin coupled sensors is shown to be regulated by gaseous ligands, with cyclase activity and O2 dissociation affected by protein oligomeric state.

  8. Photoactivation mechanism of a bacterial light-regulated adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Robert; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Tarnawski, Miroslaw; Winkler, Andreas; Frey, Daniel; Reinstein, Jochen; Meinhart, Anton; Schlichting, Ilme

    2017-03-20

    Light-regulated enzymes enable organisms to quickly respond to changing light conditions. We characterize a photoactivatable adenylyl cyclase from Beggiatoa sp. (bPAC) that translates a blue light signal into production of the second messenger cyclic AMP. bPAC contains a BLUF photoreceptor domain that senses blue light using a flavin chromophore, linked to an adenylyl cyclase (AC) domain. We present a dark state crystal structure of bPAC that closely resembles the recently published structure of the homologous OaPAC from Oscillatoria acuminata. To elucidate the structural mechanism of light-dependent AC activation by the BLUF domain, we determined crystal structures of illuminated bPAC and of a pseudo-lit state variant. We use hydrogen-deuterium exchange measurements of secondary structure dynamics and hypothesis-driven point mutations to trace the activation pathway from the chromophore in the BLUF domain to the active site of the cyclase. The structural changes are relayed from the residues interacting with the excited chromophore through a conserved kink of the BLUF β-sheet to a tongue-like extrusion of the AC domain that regulates active site opening and repositions catalytic residues. Our findings not only show the specific molecular pathway of photoactivation in BLUF-regulated ACs, but they also have implications for the general understanding of signaling in BLUF domains and of the activation of adenylyl cyclases.

  9. Interaction of 7-bromoacetyl-7-desacetylforskolin with adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Laurenza, A.; Morris, D.I.; Seamon, K.B.

    1986-05-01

    7-Bromoacetyl-7-desacetylforskolin (BrAcFk) and the 12-tritio derivative (/sup 3/H-BrAckFk) were synthesized as alkylating analogs of forskolin. BrAcFk stimulated adenylate cyclase in human platelet and bovine brain membranes with an EC50 of 50..mu..M and inhibited /sup 3/H-forskolin binding to these membranes with a K/sub i/ of 300 nM. /sup 3/H-forskolin binding was decreased in membranes pretreated for 20 min with 10 ..mu..M BrAcFk. The i,9-dideoxy derivative of BrAcFk did not activate adenylate cyclase or inhibit /sup 3/H-forskolin binding. Proteins labelled by BrAcFk in solubilized preparations from bovine brain and human platelets were identified by fluorography of SDS gels. The two predominant bands labelled in the low and high molecular weight regions had molecular weights of 50,000 and 135,000 daltons respectively. The 135,000 dalton band identified by fluorography coeluted with adenylate cyclase activity on a Dupont GF450 column and has a molecular weight identical to that of the catalytic subunit determined by silver staining of SDS gels. These results suggest that BrAcFk can react covalently with the catalytic subunit of adenylate cyclase.

  10. Virulence of Bordetella bronchiseptica: role of adenylate cyclase-hemolysin.

    PubMed Central

    Gueirard, P; Guiso, N

    1993-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a pathogen of laboratory, domestic, and wild animals and sometimes of humans. In the present study some characteristics of the virulence of B. bronchiseptica isolates of different origin were studied. All isolates had similar phenotypes, similar bacteriological characters, and synthesized adenylate cyclase-hemolysin, filamentous hemagglutinin and pertactin but not pertussis toxin. These isolates, however, differed in their ability to express dermonecrotic toxin and to cause a lethal infection, but no correlation was found with the human or animal origin of the isolates. The fact that the most virulent isolate did not express dermonecrotic toxin suggests that this toxin does not play an important role in the virulence of the bacteria in the murine model. After infection with virulent B. bronchiseptica a very early synthesis and a persistence of anti-adenylate cyclase-hemolysin and anti-filamentous hemagglutinin antibodies were observed in the sera of infected mice, suggesting a persistence of the bacteria or of its antigens. B. bronchiseptica adenylate cyclase-hemolysin was purified and was shown to be a major protective antigen against B. bronchiseptica infection. Furthermore, we showed that its immunological and protective properties were different from that of B. pertussis adenylate cyclase-hemolysin, confirming that Bordetella species are immunologically different. Images PMID:8406794

  11. Soluble guanylyl cyclase-activated cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase inhibits arterial smooth muscle cell migration independent of VASP-serine 239 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Holt, Andrew W; Martin, Danielle N; Shaver, Patti R; Adderley, Shaquria P; Stone, Joshua D; Joshi, Chintamani N; Francisco, Jake T; Lust, Robert M; Weidner, Douglas A; Shewchuk, Brian M; Tulis, David A

    2016-09-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) accounts for over half of all cardiovascular disease-related deaths. Uncontrolled arterial smooth muscle (ASM) cell migration is a major component of CAD pathogenesis and efforts aimed at attenuating its progression are clinically essential. Cyclic nucleotide signaling has long been studied for its growth-mitigating properties in the setting of CAD and other vascular disorders. Heme-containing soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) synthesizes cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and maintains vascular homeostasis predominantly through cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) signaling. Considering that reactive oxygen species (ROS) can interfere with appropriate sGC signaling by oxidizing the cyclase heme moiety and so are associated with several CVD pathologies, the current study was designed to test the hypothesis that heme-independent sGC activation by BAY 60-2770 (BAY60) maintains cGMP levels despite heme oxidation and inhibits ASM cell migration through phosphorylation of the PKG target and actin-binding vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP). First, using the heme oxidant ODQ, cGMP content was potentiated in the presence of BAY60. Using a rat model of arterial growth, BAY60 significantly reduced neointima formation and luminal narrowing compared to vehicle (VEH)-treated controls. In rat ASM cells BAY60 significantly attenuated cell migration, reduced G:F actin, and increased PKG activity and VASP Ser239 phosphorylation (pVASP·S239) compared to VEH controls. Site-directed mutagenesis was then used to generate overexpressing full-length wild type VASP (FL-VASP/WT), VASP Ser239 phosphorylation-mimetic (FL-VASP/239D) and VASP Ser239 phosphorylation-resistant (FL-VASP/239A) ASM cell mutants. Surprisingly, FL-VASP/239D negated the inhibitory effects of FL-VASP/WT and FL-VASP/239A cells on migration. Furthermore, when FL-VASP mutants were treated with BAY60, only the FL-VASP/239D group showed reduced migration compared to its VEH controls

  12. Oxaliplatin triggers necrosis as well as apoptosis in gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ping; Zhu, Xueping; Jin, Wei; Hao, Shumei; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Linjie

    2015-05-01

    Intrinsic apoptotic pathway is considered to be responsible for cell death induced by platinum anticancer drugs. While in this study, we found that, necrosis is an indispensable pathway besides apoptosis in oxaliplatin-treated gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. Upon exposure to oxaliplatin, both apoptotic and necrotic features were observed. The majority of dead cells were double positive for Annexin V and propidium iodide (PI). Moreover, mitochondrial membrane potential collapsed and caspase cascades were activated. However, ultrastructural changes under transmission electron microscope, coupled with the release of cellular contents, demonstrated the rupture of the plasma membrane. Oxaliplatin administration did not stimulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and autophagy, but elevated the protein level of Bmf. In addition, receptor interacting protein 1 (RIP1), but not receptor interacting protein 3 (RIP3) and its downstream components participated in this death process. Necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) blocked oxaliplatin-induced cell death nearly completely, whereas z-VAD-fmk could partially suppress cell death. Oxaliplatin treatment resulted in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) overactivation, as indicated by the increase of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), which led to NAD{sup +} and ATP depletion. PARP-1 inhibitor, olaparib, could significantly block oxaliplatin-induced cell death, thus confirming that PARP-1 activation is mainly responsible for the cytotoxicity of oxaliplatin. Phosphorylation of H2AX at Ser139 and translocalization of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) are critical for this death process. Taken together, these results indicate that oxaliplatin can bypass canonical cell death pathways to kill gastric cancer cells, which may be of therapeutic advantage in the treatment of gastric cancer. - Highlights: • Oxaliplatin induces apoptotic and necrotic cell death. • Nec-1 can inhibit oxaliplatin-induced cell death nearly completely. • RIP3 and its

  13. Detection of 8,9-dihydro-(7'-guanyl)-9-hydroxyaflatoxin B1 in human urine

    SciTech Connect

    Autrup, H.; Wakhisi, J.; Vahakangas, K.; Wasunna, A.; Harris, C.C.

    1985-10-01

    A possible role of aflatoxin B1 (AFB) in the etiology of human liver cancer has been suggested from several epidemiological studies. This has been based upon the association between consumption of AFB-contaminated food and the liver cancer incidence in different parts of the world. To further establish the role of AFB as a major factor, we initiated a pilot study in three different districts of Kenya to determine the number of individuals exposed to significant amounts of AFB as measured by the urinary excretion of 8,9-dihydro-8-(7-guanyl)-9-hydroxyaflatoxin B1 (AFB-Gua), an adduct formed between the ultimate carcinogenic form of AFB and nucleic acids. This product has previously been detected in urine from rats treated with AFB. Urine collected at the outpatient clinics at the district hospitals were concentrated on C18 Sep-Pak columns and analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography under two different chromatographic conditions. The chemical identity of the samples showing a positive response in both chromatographic systems was verified by synchronous scanning fluorescence spectrophotometry. The highest number of individuals with detectable urinary AFB-Gua lived in either Murang'a district or the neighboring Meru and Embu districts. In Murang'a district a rate of 12% was observed in the January-March period, while only 1 of 32 patients (3%) had a detectable exposure in July-August.

  14. In silico genomic analysis of the human and murine guanylate-binding protein (GBP) gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, Maureen A; Gray, John; Vestal, Deborah J

    2006-05-01

    The guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) were among the first interferon (IFN)-stimulated genes (ISGs) discovered, but until recently, little was known about their functions and even less about the composition of the gene family. Analysis of the promoter of human GBP-1 contributed significantly toward the understanding of Jak-Stat signaling and the delineation of the IFN-gamma activation site (GAS) and IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) promoter elements. In this study, we have examined the genomic arrangement and composition of the GBPs in both mouse and humans. There are seven GBP paralogs in humans and at least one pseudogene, all of which are located in a cluster of genes on chromosome 1. Five of the six MuGBPs and a GBP pseudogene are clustered in a syntenic region on chromosome 3. The sixth MuGBP, MuGBP-4, and three GBP pseudogenes are located on chromosome 5. As might be expected, the GBPs share similar genomic organizations of introns and exons. Five of the MuGBPs had previously been shown to be coordinately induced by IFNs, and as expected, all of the MuGBPs have GAS and ISRE elements in their promoters. Interestingly, not all of the HuGBPs have GAS and ISRE elements, suggesting that not all GBPs are IFN responsive in humans.

  15. Ubiquitin systems mark pathogen-containing vacuoles as targets for host defense by guanylate binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Arun K; Foltz, Clémence; Finethy, Ryan; Piro, Anthony S; Feeley, Eric M; Pilla-Moffett, Danielle M; Komatsu, Masaki; Frickel, Eva-Maria; Coers, Jörn

    2015-10-13

    Many microbes create and maintain pathogen-containing vacuoles (PVs) as an intracellular niche permissive for microbial growth and survival. The destruction of PVs by IFNγ-inducible guanylate binding protein (GBP) and immunity-related GTPase (IRG) host proteins is central to a successful immune response directed against numerous PV-resident pathogens. However, the mechanism by which IRGs and GBPs cooperatively detect and destroy PVs is unclear. We find that host cell priming with IFNγ prompts IRG-dependent association of Toxoplasma- and Chlamydia-containing vacuoles with ubiquitin through regulated translocation of the E3 ubiquitin ligase tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6). This initial ubiquitin labeling elicits p62-mediated escort and deposition of GBPs to PVs, thereby conferring cell-autonomous immunity. Hypervirulent strains of Toxoplasma gondii evade this process via specific rhoptry protein kinases that inhibit IRG function, resulting in blockage of downstream PV ubiquitination and GBP delivery. Our results define a ubiquitin-centered mechanism by which host cells deliver GBPs to PVs and explain how hypervirulent parasites evade GBP-mediated immunity.

  16. Guanylate-binding proteins promote activation of the AIM2 inflammasome during infection with Francisella novicida.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Etienne; Wallet, Pierre; Dreier, Roland F; Costanzo, Stéphanie; Anton, Leonie; Rühl, Sebastian; Dussurgey, Sébastien; Dick, Mathias S; Kistner, Anne; Rigard, Mélanie; Degrandi, Daniel; Pfeffer, Klaus; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Henry, Thomas; Broz, Petr

    2015-05-01

    The AIM2 inflammasome detects double-stranded DNA in the cytosol and induces caspase-1-dependent pyroptosis as well as release of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and IL-18. AIM2 is critical for host defense against DNA viruses and bacteria that replicate in the cytosol, such as Francisella tularensis subspecies novicida (F. novicida). The activation of AIM2 by F. novicida requires bacteriolysis, yet whether this process is accidental or is a host-driven immunological mechanism has remained unclear. By screening nearly 500 interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) through the use of small interfering RNA (siRNA), we identified guanylate-binding proteins GBP2 and GBP5 as key activators of AIM2 during infection with F. novicida. We confirmed their prominent role in vitro and in a mouse model of tularemia. Mechanistically, these two GBPs targeted cytosolic F. novicida and promoted bacteriolysis. Thus, in addition to their role in host defense against vacuolar pathogens, GBPs also facilitate the presentation of ligands by directly attacking cytosolic bacteria.

  17. Dimerization and its role in GMP formation by human guanylate binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Nazish; Balakumari, Meena; Sau, Apurba Kumar

    2010-10-06

    The mechanism of oligomerization and its role in the regulation of activity in large GTPases are not clearly understood. Human guanylate binding proteins (hGBP-1 and 2) belonging to large GTPases have the unique feature of hydrolyzing GTP to a mixture of GDP and GMP with unequal ratios. Using a series of truncated and mutant proteins of hGBP-1, we identified a hydrophobic helix in the connecting region between the two domains that plays a critical role in dimerization and regulation of the GTPase activity. The fluorescence with 1-8-anilinonaphthalene sulfonate and circular dichroism measurements together suggest that in the absence of the substrate analog, the helix is masked inside the protein but becomes exposed through a substrate-induced conformational switch, and thus mediates dimerization. This is further supported by the intrinsic fluorescence experiment, where Leu(298) of this helix is replaced by a tryptophan. Remarkably, the enzyme exhibits differential GTPase activities depending on dimerization; a monomer produces only GDP, but a dimer gives both GDP and GMP with stimulation of the activity. An absolute dependence of GMP formation with dimerization demonstrates a cross talk between the monomers during the second hydrolysis. Similar to hGBP-1, hGBP-2 showed dimerization-related GTPase activity for GMP formation, indicating that this family of proteins follows a broadly similar mechanism for GTP hydrolysis.

  18. Chicken guanylate-binding protein. Conservation of GTPase activity and induction by cytokines.

    PubMed

    Schwemmle, M; Kaspers, B; Irion, A; Staeheli, P; Schultz, U

    1996-04-26

    To gain further insights into the cytokine network of birds, we used polymerase chain reaction technology to clone a cDNA that codes for a chicken homolog of the interferon-induced guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs). In its N-terminal moiety, the 64-kDa chicken GBP contains two sequence blocks of 100 and 19 amino acids, respectively, that are about 70% identical to mammalian GBPs. The first region includes two motifs of the canonical GTP-binding consensus element. The other parts of chicken GBP are poorly conserved, except for a CAAX motif at the extreme C terminus which might signal isoprenylation. Like mammalian GBPs, recombinant chicken GBP specifically bound to agarose-immobilized guanine nucleotides and hydrolyzed GTP to both GDP and GMP. Regulation by interferons was also conserved: chicken GBP RNA was barely detectable in uninduced chicken cells. Low GBP RNA levels were found in cells treated with type I interferon, whereas very high levels were observed in cells treated with supernatant of a chicken T cell line that secretes a gamma-interferon-like activity. Together with recent phylogenetic studies of interferon genes, these results suggest that in spite of low sequence conservation, the various components of the avian interferon system are functionally well conserved.

  19. Murine guanylate binding protein 2 (mGBP2) controls Toxoplasma gondii replication.

    PubMed

    Degrandi, Daniel; Kravets, Elisabeth; Konermann, Carolin; Beuter-Gunia, Cornelia; Klümpers, Verena; Lahme, Sarah; Wischmann, Eva; Mausberg, Anne K; Beer-Hammer, Sandra; Pfeffer, Klaus

    2013-01-02

    IFN-γ orchestrates the host response against intracellular pathogens. Members of the guanylate binding proteins (GBP) comprise the most abundant IFN-γ-induced transcriptional response. mGBPs are GTPases that are specifically up-regulated by IFN-γ, other proinflammatory cytokines, toll-like receptor agonists, as well as in response to Listeria monocytogenes and Toxoplasma gondii infection. mGBP2 localizes at the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) of T. gondii; however, the molecular function of mGBP2 and its domains in T. gondii infection is not known. Here, we show that mGBP2 is highly expressed in several cell types, including T and B cells after stimulation. We provide evidence that the C-terminal domain is sufficient and essential for recruitment to the T. gondii PV. Functionally, mGBP2 reduces T. gondii proliferation because mGBP2-deficient cells display defects in the replication control of T. gondii. Ultimately, mGBP2-deficient mice reveal a marked immune susceptibility to T. gondii. Taken together, mGBP2 is an essential immune effector molecule mediating antiparasitic resistance.

  20. Guanylate-binding protein 1 (Gbp1) contributes to cell-autonomous immunity against Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Selleck, Elizabeth M; Fentress, Sarah J; Beatty, Wandy L; Degrandi, Daniel; Pfeffer, Klaus; Virgin, Herbert W; Macmicking, John D; Sibley, L David

    2013-01-01

    IFN-γ activates cells to restrict intracellular pathogens by upregulating cellular effectors including the p65 family of guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs). Here we test the role of Gbp1 in the IFN-γ-dependent control of T. gondii in the mouse model. Virulent strains of T. gondii avoided recruitment of Gbp1 to the parasitophorous vacuole in a strain-dependent manner that was mediated by the parasite virulence factors ROP18, an active serine/threonine kinase, and the pseudokinase ROP5. Increased recruitment of Gbp1 to Δrop18 or Δrop5 parasites was associated with clearance in IFN-γ-activated macrophages in vitro, a process dependent on the autophagy protein Atg5. The increased susceptibility of Δrop18 mutants in IFN-γ-activated macrophages was reverted in Gbp1(-/-) cells, and decreased virulence of this mutant was compensated in Gbp1(-/-) mice, which were also more susceptible to challenge with type II strain parasites of intermediate virulence. These findings demonstrate that Gbp1 plays an important role in the IFN-γ-dependent, cell-autonomous control of toxoplasmosis and predict a broader role for this protein in host defense.

  1. Ubiquitin systems mark pathogen-containing vacuoles as targets for host defense by guanylate binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Arun K.; Foltz, Clémence; Finethy, Ryan; Piro, Anthony S.; Feeley, Eric M.; Pilla-Moffett, Danielle M.; Komatsu, Masaki; Frickel, Eva-Maria; Coers, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    Many microbes create and maintain pathogen-containing vacuoles (PVs) as an intracellular niche permissive for microbial growth and survival. The destruction of PVs by IFNγ-inducible guanylate binding protein (GBP) and immunity-related GTPase (IRG) host proteins is central to a successful immune response directed against numerous PV-resident pathogens. However, the mechanism by which IRGs and GBPs cooperatively detect and destroy PVs is unclear. We find that host cell priming with IFNγ prompts IRG-dependent association of Toxoplasma- and Chlamydia-containing vacuoles with ubiquitin through regulated translocation of the E3 ubiquitin ligase tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6). This initial ubiquitin labeling elicits p62-mediated escort and deposition of GBPs to PVs, thereby conferring cell-autonomous immunity. Hypervirulent strains of Toxoplasma gondii evade this process via specific rhoptry protein kinases that inhibit IRG function, resulting in blockage of downstream PV ubiquitination and GBP delivery. Our results define a ubiquitin-centered mechanism by which host cells deliver GBPs to PVs and explain how hypervirulent parasites evade GBP-mediated immunity. PMID:26417105

  2. Guanylate binding proteins promote caspase-11-dependent pyroptosis in response to cytoplasmic LPS.

    PubMed

    Pilla, Danielle M; Hagar, Jon A; Haldar, Arun K; Mason, Ashley K; Degrandi, Daniel; Pfeffer, Klaus; Ernst, Robert K; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Miao, Edward A; Coers, Jörn

    2014-04-22

    IFN receptor signaling induces cell-autonomous immunity to infections with intracellular bacterial pathogens. Here, we demonstrate that IFN-inducible guanylate binding protein (Gbp) proteins stimulate caspase-11-dependent, cell-autonomous immunity in response to cytoplasmic LPS. Caspase-11-dependent pyroptosis is triggered in IFN-activated macrophages infected with the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila. The rapid induction of pyroptosis in IFN-activated macrophages required a cluster of IFN-inducible Gbp proteins encoded on mouse chromosome 3 (Gbp(chr3)). Induction of pyroptosis in naive macrophages by infections with the cytosol-invading ΔsdhA L. pneumophila mutant was similarly dependent on Gbp(chr3), suggesting that these Gbp proteins play a role in the detection of bacteria accessing the cytosol. Cytoplasmic LPS derived from Salmonella ssp. or Escherichia coli has recently been shown to trigger caspase-11 activation and pyroptosis, but the cytoplasmic sensor for LPS and components of the caspase-11 inflammasome are not yet defined. We found that the induction of caspase-11-dependent pyroptosis by cytoplasmic L. pneumophila-derived LPS required Gbp(chr3) proteins. Similarly, pyroptosis induced by cytoplasmic LPS isolated from Salmonella was diminished in Gbp(chr3)-deficient macrophages. These data suggest a role for Gbp(chr3) proteins in the detection of cytoplasmic LPS and the activation of the noncanonical inflammasome.

  3. Galectin-3 directs antimicrobial guanylate binding proteins to vacuoles furnished with bacterial secretion systems.

    PubMed

    Feeley, Eric M; Pilla-Moffett, Danielle M; Zwack, Erin E; Piro, Anthony S; Finethy, Ryan; Kolb, Joseph P; Martinez, Jennifer; Brodsky, Igor E; Coers, Jörn

    2017-02-28

    Many invasive bacteria establish pathogen-containing vacuoles (PVs) as intracellular niches for microbial growth. Immunity to these infections is dependent on the ability of host cells to recognize PVs as targets for host defense. The delivery of several host defense proteins to PVs is controlled by IFN-inducible guanylate binding proteins (GBPs), which themselves dock to PVs through poorly characterized mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that GBPs detect the presence of bacterial protein secretion systems as "patterns of pathogenesis" associated with PVs. We report that the delivery of GBP2 to Legionella-containing vacuoles is dependent on the bacterial Dot/Icm secretion system, whereas the delivery of GBP2 to Yersinia-containing vacuoles (YCVs) requires hypersecretion of Yersinia translocon proteins. We show that the presence of bacterial secretion systems directs cytosolic carbohydrate-binding protein Galectin-3 to PVs and that the delivery of GBP1 and GBP2 to Legionella-containing vacuoles or YCVs is substantially diminished in Galectin-3-deficient cells. Our results illustrate that insertion of bacterial secretion systems into PV membranes stimulates Galectin-3-dependent recruitment of antimicrobial GBPs to PVs as part of a coordinated host defense program.

  4. Intracellular trafficking of guanylate-binding proteins is regulated by heterodimerization in a hierarchical manner.

    PubMed

    Britzen-Laurent, Nathalie; Bauer, Michael; Berton, Valeria; Fischer, Nicole; Syguda, Adrian; Reipschläger, Simone; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Herrmann, Christian; Stürzl, Michael

    2010-12-07

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) belong to the dynamin family of large GTPases and represent the major IFN-γ-induced proteins. Here we systematically investigated the mechanisms regulating the subcellular localization of GBPs. Three GBPs (GBP-1, GBP-2 and GBP-5) carry a C-terminal CaaX-prenylation signal, which is typical for small GTPases of the Ras family, and increases the membrane affinity of proteins. In this study, we demonstrated that GBP-1, GBP-2 and GBP-5 are prenylated in vivo and that prenylation is required for the membrane association of GBP-1, GBP-2 and GBP-5. Using co-immunoprecipitation, yeast-two-hybrid analysis and fluorescence complementation assays, we showed for the first time that GBPs are able to homodimerize in vivo and that the membrane association of GBPs is regulated by dimerization similarly to dynamin. Interestingly, GBPs could also heterodimerize. This resulted in hierarchical positioning effects on the intracellular localization of the proteins. Specifically, GBP-1 recruited GBP-5 and GBP-2 into its own cellular compartment and GBP-5 repositioned GBP-2. In addition, GBP-1, GBP-2 and GBP-5 were able to redirect non-prenylated GBPs to their compartment in a prenylation-dependent manner. Overall, these findings prove in vivo the ability of GBPs to dimerize, indicate that heterodimerization regulates sub-cellular localization of GBPs and underscore putative membrane-associated functions of this family of proteins.

  5. Guanylate Binding Protein (GBP) 5 Is an Interferon-Inducible Inhibitor of HIV-1 Infectivity.

    PubMed

    Krapp, Christian; Hotter, Dominik; Gawanbacht, Ali; McLaren, Paul J; Kluge, Silvia F; Stürzel, Christina M; Mack, Katharina; Reith, Elisabeth; Engelhart, Susanne; Ciuffi, Angela; Hornung, Veit; Sauter, Daniel; Telenti, Amalio; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2016-04-13

    Guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) are an interferon (IFN)-inducible subfamily of guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) with well-established activity against intracellular bacteria and parasites. Here we show that GBP5 potently restricts HIV-1 and other retroviruses. GBP5 is expressed in the primary target cells of HIV-1, where it impairs viral infectivity by interfering with the processing and virion incorporation of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env). GBP5 levels in macrophages determine and inversely correlate with infectious HIV-1 yield over several orders of magnitude, which may explain the high donor variability in macrophage susceptibility to HIV. Antiviral activity requires Golgi localization of GBP5, but not its GTPase activity. Start codon mutations in the accessory vpu gene from macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strains conferred partial resistance to GBP5 inhibition by increasing Env expression. Our results identify GBP5 as an antiviral effector of the IFN response and may explain the increased frequency of defective vpu genes in primary HIV-1 strains.

  6. Guanylate binding protein 5: Impairing virion infectivity by targeting retroviral envelope glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Hotter, Dominik; Sauter, Daniel; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2017-01-02

    Guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) are interferon-inducible cellular factors that belong to the superfamily of guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) and play important roles in the cell-intrinsic defense against bacteria, protozoa and viruses. In a recent report in Cell Host & Microbe, we identify GBP5 as novel restriction factor of HIV-1 that reduces the infectivity of progeny virions by interfering with processing and incorporation of the viral envelope (Env) glycoprotein. The inhibitory activity of GBP5 requires C-terminal isoprenylation, mediating Golgi-association, but not its GTPase function. Notably, GBP5 expression levels vary considerably in human macrophages and inversely correlate with infectious virus yield. We demonstrate that GBP5 can be evaded by an unusual tradeoff mechanism: Naturally occurring mutations in the start codon of the viral accessory gene vpu attenuate GBP5 inhibition by increasing Env expression at the cost of Vpu function. Whether direct counteraction mechanisms or more subtle changes balancing Vpu and Env expression also affect HIV-1 inhibition by GBP5 remains to be clarified. Other open questions are whether GBP5 restricts HIV-1 in CD4(+) T cells and if other GBP family members also decrease infectivity of HIV and/or additional enveloped viruses.

  7. How guanylate-binding proteins achieve assembly-stimulated processive cleavage of GTP to GMP.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Agnidipta; Praefcke, Gerrit J K; Renault, Louis; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Herrmann, Christian

    2006-03-02

    Interferons are immunomodulatory cytokines that mediate anti-pathogenic and anti-proliferative effects in cells. Interferon-gamma-inducible human guanylate binding protein 1 (hGBP1) belongs to the family of dynamin-related large GTP-binding proteins, which share biochemical properties not found in other families of GTP-binding proteins such as nucleotide-dependent oligomerization and fast cooperative GTPase activity. hGBP1 has an additional property by which it hydrolyses GTP to GMP in two consecutive cleavage reactions. Here we show that the isolated amino-terminal G domain of hGBP1 retains the main enzymatic properties of the full-length protein and can cleave GDP directly. Crystal structures of the N-terminal G domain trapped at successive steps along the reaction pathway and biochemical data reveal the molecular basis for nucleotide-dependent homodimerization and cleavage of GTP. Similar to effector binding in other GTP-binding proteins, homodimerization is regulated by structural changes in the switch regions. Homodimerization generates a conformation in which an arginine finger and a serine are oriented for efficient catalysis. Positioning of the substrate for the second hydrolysis step is achieved by a change in nucleotide conformation at the ribose that keeps the guanine base interactions intact and positions the beta-phosphates in the gamma-phosphate-binding site.

  8. Guanylate binding protein 5: Impairing virion infectivity by targeting retroviral envelope glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Hotter, Dominik; Sauter, Daniel; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) are interferon-inducible cellular factors that belong to the superfamily of guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) and play important roles in the cell-intrinsic defense against bacteria, protozoa and viruses. In a recent report in Cell Host & Microbe, we identify GBP5 as novel restriction factor of HIV-1 that reduces the infectivity of progeny virions by interfering with processing and incorporation of the viral envelope (Env) glycoprotein. The inhibitory activity of GBP5 requires C-terminal isoprenylation, mediating Golgi-association, but not its GTPase function. Notably, GBP5 expression levels vary considerably in human macrophages and inversely correlate with infectious virus yield. We demonstrate that GBP5 can be evaded by an unusual tradeoff mechanism: Naturally occurring mutations in the start codon of the viral accessory gene vpu attenuate GBP5 inhibition by increasing Env expression at the cost of Vpu function. Whether direct counteraction mechanisms or more subtle changes balancing Vpu and Env expression also affect HIV-1 inhibition by GBP5 remains to be clarified. Other open questions are whether GBP5 restricts HIV-1 in CD4+ T cells and if other GBP family members also decrease infectivity of HIV and/or additional enveloped viruses. PMID:27275775

  9. Galectin-3 directs antimicrobial guanylate binding proteins to vacuoles furnished with bacterial secretion systems

    PubMed Central

    Feeley, Eric M.; Pilla-Moffett, Danielle M.; Zwack, Erin E.; Piro, Anthony S.; Finethy, Ryan; Kolb, Joseph P.; Martinez, Jennifer; Brodsky, Igor E.; Coers, Jörn

    2017-01-01

    Many invasive bacteria establish pathogen-containing vacuoles (PVs) as intracellular niches for microbial growth. Immunity to these infections is dependent on the ability of host cells to recognize PVs as targets for host defense. The delivery of several host defense proteins to PVs is controlled by IFN-inducible guanylate binding proteins (GBPs), which themselves dock to PVs through poorly characterized mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that GBPs detect the presence of bacterial protein secretion systems as “patterns of pathogenesis” associated with PVs. We report that the delivery of GBP2 to Legionella-containing vacuoles is dependent on the bacterial Dot/Icm secretion system, whereas the delivery of GBP2 to Yersinia-containing vacuoles (YCVs) requires hypersecretion of Yersinia translocon proteins. We show that the presence of bacterial secretion systems directs cytosolic carbohydrate-binding protein Galectin-3 to PVs and that the delivery of GBP1 and GBP2 to Legionella-containing vacuoles or YCVs is substantially diminished in Galectin-3–deficient cells. Our results illustrate that insertion of bacterial secretion systems into PV membranes stimulates Galectin-3–dependent recruitment of antimicrobial GBPs to PVs as part of a coordinated host defense program. PMID:28193861

  10. Molecular Mechanism and Evolution of Guanylate Kinase Regulation by (p)ppGpp

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kuanqing; Myers, Angela R.; Pisithkul, Tippapha; Claas, Kathy R.; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Keck, James L.; Wang, Jue D.

    2015-02-01

    The nucleotide (p)ppGpp mediates bacterial stress responses, but its targets and underlying mechanisms of action vary among bacterial species and remain incompletely understood. Here, we characterize the molecular interaction between (p)ppGpp and guanylate kinase (GMK), revealing the importance of this interaction in adaptation to starvation. Combining structural and kinetic analyses, we show that (p)ppGpp binds the GMK active site and competitively inhibits the enzyme. The (p)ppGpp-GMK interaction prevents the conversion of GMP to GDP, resulting in GMP accumulation upon amino acid downshift. Abolishing this interaction leads to excess (p)ppGpp and defective adaptation to amino acid starvation. A survey of GMKs from phylogenetically diverse bacteria shows that the (p)ppGpp-GMK interaction is conserved in members of Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Deinococcus-Thermus, but not in Proteobacteria, where (p)ppGpp regulates RNA polymerase (RNAP). We propose that GMK is an ancestral (p)ppGpp target and RNAP evolved more recently as a direct target in Proteobacteria.

  11. Structure of the GH1 domain of guanylate kinase-associated protein from Rattus norvegicus

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Junsen; Yang, Huiseon; Eom, Soo Hyun; Chun, ChangJu; Im, Young Jun

    2014-09-12

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The crystal structure of GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) was determined. • GKAP GH1 is a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. • The predicted helix α4 associates weakly with the helix α3, suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. - Abstract: Guanylate-kinase-associated protein (GKAP) is a scaffolding protein that links NMDA receptor-PSD-95 to Shank–Homer complexes by protein–protein interactions at the synaptic junction. GKAP family proteins are characterized by the presence of a C-terminal conserved GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) of unknown structure and function. In this study, crystal structure of the GH1 domain of GKAP from Rattus norvegicus was determined in fusion with an N-terminal maltose-binding protein at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure of GKAP GH1 displays a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. The predicted helix α4 which was not visible in the crystal structure associates weakly with the helix α3 suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. The strict conservation of GH1 domain across GKAP family members and the lack of a catalytic active site required for enzyme activity imply that the GH1 domain might serve as a protein–protein interaction module for the synaptic protein clustering.

  12. A Survey of Nucleotide Cyclases in Actinobacteria: Unique Domain Organization and Expansion of the Class III Cyclase Family in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, K.; Krupa, A.; Srinivasan, N.

    2004-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotides are well-known second messengers involved in the regulation of important metabolic pathways or virulence factors. There are six different classes of nucleotide cyclases that can accomplish the task of generating cAMP, and four of these are restricted to the prokaryotes. The role of cAMP has been implicated in the virulence and regulation of secondary metabolites in the phylum Actinobacteria, which contains important pathogens, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. leprae, M. bovis and Corynebacterium, and industrial organisms from the genus Streptomyces. We have analysed the actinobacterial genome sequences found in current databases for the presence of different classes of nucleotide cyclases, and find that only class III cyclases are present in these organisms. Importantly, prominent members such as M. tuberculosis and M. leprae have 17 and 4 class III cyclases, respectively, encoded in their genomes, some of which display interesting domain fusions seen for the first time. In addition, a pseudogene corresponding to a cyclase from M. avium has been identified as the only cyclase pseudogene in M. tuberculosis and M. bovis. The Corynebacterium and Streptomyces genomes encode only a single adenylyl cyclase each, both of which have corresponding orthologues in M. tuberculosis. A clustering of the cyclase domains in Actinobacteria reveals the presence of typical eukaryote-like, fungi-like and other bacteria-like class III cyclase sequences within this phylum, suggesting that these proteins may have significant roles to play in this important group of organisms. PMID:18629044

  13. Characterization of the adenosine receptor in cultured embryonic chick atrial myocytes: Coupling to modulation of contractility and adenylate cyclase activity and identification by direct radioligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, B.T.

    1989-06-01

    Adenosine receptors in a spontaneously contracting atrial myocyte culture from 14-day chick embryos were characterized by radioligand binding studies and by examining the involvement of G-protein in coupling these receptors to a high-affinity state and to the adenylate cyclase and the myocyte contractility. Binding of the antagonist radioligand (3H)-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-diproylxanthine ((3H)CPX) was rapid, reversible and saturable and was to a homogeneous population of sites with a Kd value of 2.1 +/- 0.2 nM and an apparent maximum binding of 26.2 +/- 3 fmol/mg of protein (n = 10, +/- S.E.). Guanyl-5-yl-(beta, gamma-imido)diphosphate had no effect on either the Kd or the maximum binding and CPX reversed the N6-R-phenyl-2-propyladenosine-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity and contractility, indicating that (3H) CPX is an antagonist radioligand. Competition curves for (3H) CPX binding by a series of reference adenosine agonists were consistent with labeling of an A1 adenosine receptor and were better fit by a two-site model than by a one-site model. ADP-ribosylation of the G-protein by the endogenous NAD+ in the presence of pertussis toxin shifted the competition curves from bi to monophasic with Ki values similar to those of the KL observed in the absence of prior pertussis intoxication. The adenosine agonists were capable of inhibiting both the adenylate cyclase activity and myocyte contractility in either the absence or the presence of isoproterenol. The A1 adenosine receptor-selective antagonist CPX reversed these agonist effects. The order of ability of the reference adenosine receptor agonists in causing these inhibitory effects was similar to the order of potency of the same agonists in inhibiting the specific (3H)CPX binding (N6-R-phenyl-2-propyladenosine greater than N6-S-phenyl-2-propyladenosine or N-ethyladenosine-5'-uronic acid).

  14. Modification of adenylate cyclase by photoaffinity analogs of forskolin

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, L.T.; Nie, Z.M.; Mende, T.J.; Richardson, S.; Chavan, A.; Kolaczkowska, E.; Watt, D.S.; Haley, B.E.; Ho, R.J. )

    1989-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling analogs of the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin (PF) have been synthesized, purified and tested for their effect on preparations of membrane-bound, Lubrol solubilized and forskolin affinity-purified adenylate cyclase (AC). All analogs of forskolin significantly activated AC. However, in the presence of 0.1 to 0.3 microM forskolin, the less active forskolin photoaffinity probes at 100 microM caused inhibition. This inhibition was dose-dependent for PF, suggesting that PF may complete with F for the same binding site(s). After cross-linking (125I)PF-M to either membrane or Lubrol-solubilized AC preparations by photolysis, a radiolabeled 100-110 kDa protein band was observed after autoradiography following SDS-PAGE. F at 100 microM blocked the photoradiolabeling of this protein. Radioiodination of forskolin-affinity purified AC showed several protein bands on autoradiogram, however, only one band (Mr = 100-110 kDa) was specifically labeled by (125I)PF-M following photolysis. The photoaffinity-labeled protein of 100-110 kDa of AC preparation of rat adipocyte may be the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase of rat adipocyte itself as supported by the facts that (a) no other AC-regulatory proteins are known to be of this size, (b) the catalytic unit of bovine brain enzyme is in the same range and (c) this PF specifically stimulates AC activity when assayed alone, and weekly inhibits forskolin-activation of cyclase. These studies indicate that radiolabeled PF probes may be useful for photolabeling and detecting the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase.

  15. Crystal Structure of SgcJ, An NTF2-Like Superfamily Protein Involved in Biosynthesis of the 9-Membered Enediyne Antitumor Antibiotic C-1027

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tingting; Chang, Chin-Yuan; Lohman, Jeremy R.; Rudolf, Jeffrey D.; Kim, Youngchang; Chang, Changsoo; Yang, Dong; Ma, Ming; Yan, Xiaohui; Crnovcic, Ivana; Bigelow, Lance; Clancy, Shonda; Bingman, Craig A.; Yennamalli, Ragothaman M.; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Phillips, George N.; Shen, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the enediyne biosynthetic gene clusters revealed sets of conserved genes serving as outstanding candidates for the enediyne core. Here we report the crystal structures of SgcJ and its homologue NCS-Orf16, together with gene inactivation and site-directed mutagenesis studies, to gain insight into enediyne core biosynthesis. Gene inactivation in vivo establishes that SgcJ is required for C-1027 production in Streptomyces globisporus. SgcJ and NCS-Orf16 share a common structure with the nuclear transport factor 2-like superfamily of proteins, featuring a putative substrate binding or catalytic active site. Site-directed mutagenesis of the conserved residues lining this site allowed us to propose that SgcJ and its homologues may play a catalytic role in transforming the linear polyene intermediate, along with other enediyne polyketide synthase associated enzymes, into an enzyme-sequestered enediyne core intermediate. These findings will help formulate hypotheses and design experiments to ascertain the function of SgcJ and its homologues in 9-membered enediyne core biosynthesis. PMID:27406907

  16. Effects of PDE5 Inhibitors and sGC Stimulators in a Rat Model of Artificial Ureteral Calculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sandner, Peter; Tinel, Hanna; Affaitati, Giannapia; Costantini, Raffaele; Giamberardino, Maria Adele

    2015-01-01

    Urinary colics from calculosis are frequent and intense forms of pain whose current pharmacological treatment remains unsatisfactory. New and more effective drugs are needed to control symptoms and improve stone expulsion. Recent evidence suggested that the Nitric Oxide (NO) / cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) / phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) system may contribute to ureteral motility influencing stone expulsion. We investigated if PDE5 inhibitors and sGC stimulators influence ureteral contractility, pain behaviour and stone expulsion in a rat model of ureteral calculosis. We investigated: a)the sex-specific PDE5 distribution in the rat ureter; b)the functional in vitro effects of vardenafil and sildenafil (PDE5 inhibitors) and BAY41-2272 (sGC stimulator) on induced ureteral contractility in rats and c)the in vivo effectiveness of vardenafil and BAY41-2272, alone and combined with ketoprofen, vs hyoscine-N-butylbromide alone or combined with ketoprofen, on behavioural pain indicators and stone expulsion in rats with artificial calculosis in one ureter. PDE5 was abundantly expressed in male and female rats’ ureter. In vitro, both vardenafil and BAY41-2272 significantly relaxed pre-contracted ureteral strips. In vivo, all compounds significantly reduced number and global duration of “ureteral crises” and post-stone lumbar muscle hyperalgesia in calculosis rats. The highest level of reduction of the pain behaviour was observed with BAY41-2272 among all spasmolytics administered alone, and with the combination of ketoprofen with BAY41-2272. The percentage of stone expulsion was maximal in the ketoprofen+BAY41-2272 group. The NO/cGMP/PDE5 pathway is involved in the regulation of ureteral contractility and pain behaviour in urinary calculosis. PDE5 inhibitors and sGC stimulators could become a potent new option for treatment of urinary colic pain. PMID:26509272

  17. iTRAQ-Based Proteomic Analysis of Ginsenoside F2 on Human Gastric Carcinoma Cells SGC7901

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Qian; Zhang, Pin-Hu; Yang, Jie; Xu, Jin-Di; Kong, Ming; Shen, Hong; Zhu, He; Bai, Min; Zhou, Li; Li, Guang-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Ginsenoside F2 (F2), a protopanaxdiol type of saponin, was reported to inhibit human gastric cancer cells SGC7901. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of F2, an iTRAQ-based proteomics approach was applied to define protein expression profiles in SGC7901 cells in response to lower dose (20 μM) and shorter duration (12 hour) of F2 treatment, compared with previous study. 205 proteins were screened in terms of the change in their expression level which met our predefined criteria. Further bioinformatics and experiments demonstrated that F2 treatment downregulated PRR5 and RPS15 and upregulated RPL26, which are implicated in ribosomal protein-p53 signaling pathway. F2 also inhibited CISD2, Bcl-xl, and NLRX1, which are associated with autophagic pathway. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that F2 treatment increased Atg5, Atg7, Atg10, and PUMA, the critical downstream effectors of ribosomal protein-p53 signaling pathway, and Beclin-1, UVRAG, and AMBRA-1, the important molecules in Bcl-xl/Beclin-1 pathway. The 6 differentially abundant proteins, PRR5, CISD2, Bcl-xl, NLRX1, RPS15, and RPL26, were confirmed by western blot. Taken together, ribosomal protein-p53 signaling pathway and Bcl-xl/Beclin-1 pathway might be the most significantly regulated biological process by F2 treatment in SGC7901 cells, which provided valuable insights into the deep understanding of the molecular mechanisms of F2 for gastric cancer treatment. PMID:27829861

  18. Autophagy restricts Chlamydia trachomatis growth in human macrophages via IFNG-inducible guanylate binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Al-Zeer, Munir A; Al-Younes, Hesham M; Lauster, Daniel; Abu Lubad, Mohammad; Meyer, Thomas F

    2013-01-01

    Interferon γ (IFNG) is a key host response regulator of intracellular pathogen replication, including that of Chlamydia spp The antichlamydial functions of IFNG manifest in a strictly host, cell-type and chlamydial strain dependent manner. It has been recently shown that the IFNG-inducible family of immunity-related GTPases (IRG) proteins plays a key role in the defense against nonhost adapted chlamydia strains in murine epithelial cells. In humans, IFN-inducible guanylate binding proteins (hGBPs) have been shown to potentiate the antichlamydial effect of IFNG; however, how hGBPs regulate this property of IFNG is unknown. In this study, we identified hGBP1/2 as important resistance factors against C. trachomatis infection in IFNG-stimulated human macrophages. Exogenous IFNG reduced chlamydial infectivity by 50 percent in wild-type cells, whereas shRNA hGBP1/2 knockdown macrophages fully supported chlamydial growth in the presence of exogenous IFNG. hGBP1/2 were recruited to bacterial inclusions in human macrophages upon stimulation with IFNG, which triggered rerouting of the typically nonfusogenic bacterial inclusions for lysosomal degradation. Inhibition of lysosomal activity and autophagy impaired the IFNG-mediated elimination of inclusions. Thus, hGBP1/2 are critical effectors of antichlamydial IFNG responses in human macrophages. Through their capacity to remodel classically nonfusogenic chlamydial inclusions and stimulate fusion with autophagosomes, hGBP1/2 disable a major chlamydial virulence mechanism and contribute to IFNG-mediated pathogen clearance.

  19. Interferon gamma-induced human guanylate binding protein 1 inhibits mammary tumor growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Lipnik, Karoline; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Gonin-Laurent, Nathalie; Kodajova, Petra; Petznek, Helga; Rungaldier, Stefanie; Astigiano, Simonetta; Ferrini, Silvano; Stürzl, Michael; Hohenadl, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) has recently been implicated in cancer immunosurveillance. Among the most abundant proteins induced by IFN-gamma are guanylate binding proteins (GBPs), which belong to the superfamily of large GTPases and are widely expressed in various species. Here, we investigated whether the well-known human GBP-1 (hGBP-1), which has been shown to exert antiangiogenic activities and was described as a prognostic marker in colorectal carcinomas, may contribute to an IFN-gamma-mediated tumor defense. To this end, an IFN-independent, inducible hGBP-1 expression system was established in murine mammary carcinoma (TS/A) cells, which were then transplanted into syngeneic immune-competent Balb/c mice. Animals carrying TS/A cells that had been given doxycycline for induction of hGBP-1 expression revealed a significantly reduced tumor growth compared with mock-treated mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of the respective tumors demonstrated a tightly regulated, high-level expression of hGBP-1. No signs of an enhanced immunosurveillance were observed by investigating the number of infiltrating B and T cells. However, hemoglobin levels as well as the number of proliferating tumor cells were shown to be significantly reduced in hGBP-1-expressing tumors. This finding corresponded to reduced amounts of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) released by hGBP-1-expressing TS/A cells in vitro and reduced VEGF-A protein levels in the corresponding mammary tumors in vivo. The results suggest that hGBP-1 may contribute to IFN-gamma-mediated antitumorigenic activities by inhibiting paracrine effects of tumor cells on angiogenesis. Consequently, owing to these activities GBPs might be considered as potent members in an innate, IFN-gamma-induced antitumoral defense system.

  20. Guanylate Binding Proteins Enable Rapid Activation of Canonical and Noncanonical Inflammasomes in Chlamydia-Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Finethy, Ryan; Jorgensen, Ine; Haldar, Arun K.; de Zoete, Marcel R.; Strowig, Till; Flavell, Richard A.; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Nagarajan, Uma M.; Miao, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-inducible guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) mediate cell-autonomous host resistance to bacterial pathogens and promote inflammasome activation. The prevailing model postulates that these two GBP-controlled activities are directly linked through GBP-dependent vacuolar lysis. It was proposed that the rupture of pathogen-containing vacuoles (PVs) by GBPs destroyed the microbial refuge and simultaneously contaminated the host cell cytosol with microbial activators of inflammasomes. Here, we demonstrate that GBP-mediated host resistance and GBP-mediated inflammatory responses can be uncoupled. We show that PVs formed by the rodent pathogen Chlamydia muridarum, so-called inclusions, remain free of GBPs and that C. muridarum is impervious to GBP-mediated restrictions on bacterial growth. Although GBPs neither bind to C. muridarum inclusions nor restrict C. muridarum growth, we find that GBPs promote inflammasome activation in C. muridarum-infected macrophages. We demonstrate that C. muridarum infections induce GBP-dependent pyroptosis through both caspase-11-dependent noncanonical and caspase-1-dependent canonical inflammasomes. Among canonical inflammasomes, we find that C. muridarum and the human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis activate not only NLRP3 but also AIM2. Our data show that GBPs support fast-kinetics processing and secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 by the NLRP3 inflammasome but are dispensable for the secretion of the same cytokines at later times postinfection. Because IFN-γ fails to induce IL-1β transcription, GBP-dependent fast-kinetics inflammasome activation can drive the preferential processing of constitutively expressed IL-18 in IFN-γ-primed macrophages in the absence of prior Toll-like receptor stimulation. Together, our results reveal that GBPs control the kinetics of inflammasome activation and thereby shape macrophage responses to Chlamydia infections. PMID:26416908

  1. Guanylate binding proteins enable rapid activation of canonical and noncanonical inflammasomes in Chlamydia-infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Finethy, Ryan; Jorgensen, Ine; Haldar, Arun K; de Zoete, Marcel R; Strowig, Till; Flavell, Richard A; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Nagarajan, Uma M; Miao, Edward A; Coers, Jörn

    2015-12-01

    Interferon (IFN)-inducible guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) mediate cell-autonomous host resistance to bacterial pathogens and promote inflammasome activation. The prevailing model postulates that these two GBP-controlled activities are directly linked through GBP-dependent vacuolar lysis. It was proposed that the rupture of pathogen-containing vacuoles (PVs) by GBPs destroyed the microbial refuge and simultaneously contaminated the host cell cytosol with microbial activators of inflammasomes. Here, we demonstrate that GBP-mediated host resistance and GBP-mediated inflammatory responses can be uncoupled. We show that PVs formed by the rodent pathogen Chlamydia muridarum, so-called inclusions, remain free of GBPs and that C. muridarum is impervious to GBP-mediated restrictions on bacterial growth. Although GBPs neither bind to C. muridarum inclusions nor restrict C. muridarum growth, we find that GBPs promote inflammasome activation in C. muridarum-infected macrophages. We demonstrate that C. muridarum infections induce GBP-dependent pyroptosis through both caspase-11-dependent noncanonical and caspase-1-dependent canonical inflammasomes. Among canonical inflammasomes, we find that C. muridarum and the human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis activate not only NLRP3 but also AIM2. Our data show that GBPs support fast-kinetics processing and secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 by the NLRP3 inflammasome but are dispensable for the secretion of the same cytokines at later times postinfection. Because IFN-γ fails to induce IL-1β transcription, GBP-dependent fast-kinetics inflammasome activation can drive the preferential processing of constitutively expressed IL-18 in IFN-γ-primed macrophages in the absence of prior Toll-like receptor stimulation. Together, our results reveal that GBPs control the kinetics of inflammasome activation and thereby shape macrophage responses to Chlamydia infections.

  2. GBP-5 splicing variants: New guanylate-binding proteins with tumor-associated expression and antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Fellenberg, Friederike; Hartmann, Tanja B; Dummer, Reinhard; Usener, Dirk; Schadendorf, Dirk; Eichmüller, Stefan

    2004-06-01

    We have identified a new gene, gbp-5, with high homology to the guanylate binding proteins (GBP) belonging to the GTPase superfamily including the ras gene. gbp-5 is transcribed at least into three splicing variants (gbp-5a, -5b, and -5ta) leading to two different proteins (GBP-5a/b, GBP-5ta). GBP-5ta is C-terminally truncated by 97aa and has therefore lost its isoprenylation site. Although RT-PCR results indicated expression of GBP-5 members in selected normal tissues, western blotting using two newly generated antibodies revealed that expression of both proteins is restricted to peripheral blood monocytes with GBP-5ta at lower levels. In contrast, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) tumor tissues (seven of seven) were positive solely for GBP-5ta, and four of four CTCL cell lines expressed both proteins. Eight of nine melanoma cell lines expressed GBP-5a/b and four of nine additionally low levels of GBP-5ta. SEREX retesting using CTCL sera indicated a higher immunogenicity for GBP-5ta (nine of 16) than for GBP-5a/b (two of 11). Treatment of CTCL cell lines with interferon-gamma did not alter protein expression of GBP-5ta or GBP-5a/b. The restricted expression pattern of both GBP-5ta and GBP-5a/b and the pivotal role of many known members of the GTP-binding proteins in proliferation and differentiation suggest possible cancer-related functions of gbp-5.

  3. Unique features of different members of the human guanylate-binding protein family.

    PubMed

    Tripal, Philipp; Bauer, Michael; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Mörtinger, Thomas; Hohenadl, Christine; Cornali, Emmanuelle; Thurau, Mathias; Stürzl, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) are the most abundant cellular proteins expressed in response to interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), with seven highly homologous members in humans, termed HuGBP-1 to HuGBP-7. To date, differential features that may indicate differential functions of these proteins have not been described. Here, we investigated the expression and subcellular localization of the different HuGBPs in endothelial cells (EC). IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) induced the expression of HuGBP-1, HuGBP-2, and HuGBP-3 at similar high levels. In contrast, expression of HuGBP-4 and HuGBP-5 was robustly induced only by IFN-gamma and not by TNF-alpha and IL-1beta. Expression of HuGBP-6 and HuGBP-7 was not detected in EC under the various conditions examined. Investigating subcellular localization of the EC-expressed HuGBPs, HuGBP-1, HuGBP-3, and HuGBP-5 were exclusively detected in the cytoplasm, whereas HuGBP-2 and HuGBP-4 displayed a nucleocytoplasmic distribution. Treatment of the cells with IFN-gamma and aluminum fluoride caused rapid enrichment of HuGBP-1 and HuGBP-2 in the Golgi apparatus, as demonstrated by time-lapse microscopy and fluorescence analyses of GFP-tagged HuGBPs. HuGBP-3 and HuGBP-4 were never detected in the Golgi apparatus, whereas HuGBP-5 was constitutively enriched in this cytosolic compartment, irrespective of stimulation. These results assign a characteristic pattern of expression and subcellular localization to each of the HuGBPs, indicating for the first time that these proteins may have different cellular functions.

  4. A composite guanyl thiourea (GTU), dicyandiamide (DCD) inhibitor improves the efficacy of nitrification inhibition in soil.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Elliott G; O'Sullivan, Cathryn A; Simonsen, Anna K; Roper, Margaret M; Treble, Karen; Whisson, Kelley

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated whether applying dicyandiamide (DCD) and guanyl thiourea (GTU) in conjunction with urea improves the efficacy of nitrification inhibition relative to traditional fertiliser application of urea or urea + DCD. Urea at a rate of 100 mg N kg(-1) soil was applied to soil microcosms (high nutrient tenosol and low nutrient hydrosol) which were treated with either no inhibitor (urea-only); 15 mg DCD kg(-1) soil or 15 mg DCD kg(-1) soil plus 21 mg GTU kg soil(-1). Mineral N (NH4(+) & NO3(-)) concentrations, potential nitrification rates (PNR) and abundances of ammonia oxidising bacteria (AOB) were measured over time. After 100-days incubation, ∼73 mg N kg(-1) soil was found as NH4(+) when urea + DCD + GTU were applied to the tenosol. NH4(+) concentrations were lower (11-32 mg N kg(-1) soil) when urea or urea + DCD were applied. This suggests that the application of GTU in conjunction with DCD elongated the effects of nitrification inhibition. In both soils, PNRs were faster and AOB abundances (gene copies g(-1) soil) were higher when urea was applied without nitrification inhibitors. There were, however, no differences in PNR or AOB abundances in either soil type when 'urea + DCD' or 'urea + DCD + GTU' were applied. The results indicate that the application of GTU with DCD may extend nitrification inhibition in certain soil types. This finding has the potential to improve the efficacy of commercially available and widely used inhibitors such as DCD.

  5. Guanylate-binding protein 5 is a marker of interferon-γ-induced classically activated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Yukio; Hizukuri, Yoshiyuki; Yamashiro, Kyoko; Makita, Naoyuki; Ohnishi, Koji; Takeya, Motohiro; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage activation is the main immunological process occurring during the development of several diseases, and the heterogeneity of macrophage activation or differentiation has been suggested to be involved in disease progression. In the present study, we attempted to identify molecules specifically expressed on human classically activated macrophages (M1) to investigate the significance of the M1-like phenotype in human diseases. Human monocyte-derived macrophages were differentiated into M1, M2a, M2b and M2c phenotypes, and also M1(−) (the M1 phenotype differentiated with interferon-γ) to eliminate the strong effects of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on the gene expression profile. The gene expression profiles of those macrophage phenotypes were analyzed by a cDNA microarray analysis and were used for a bioinformatics examination to identify the markers of the M1 phenotype that are expressed in both M1 and M1(−). The gene expression profiles of murine macrophages were also evaluated. We identified guanylate-binding protein 5 (GBP5), which is associated nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing gene family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3)-mediated inflammasome assembly in the M1 macrophages of both humans and mice. Notably, the expression of GBP5 protein was detected in cultured M1(−) as well as in M1 macrophages by western blotting, which means that GBP5 is a more generalized marker of the M1 phenotype compared with the M1 markers that can be induced by LPS stimulation. GBP5 is a useful candidate marker of the M1 phenotype. PMID:27990286

  6. Guanylate-binding protein 5 is a marker of interferon-γ-induced classically activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yukio; Hizukuri, Yoshiyuki; Yamashiro, Kyoko; Makita, Naoyuki; Ohnishi, Koji; Takeya, Motohiro; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Yasuhiro

    2016-11-01

    Macrophage activation is the main immunological process occurring during the development of several diseases, and the heterogeneity of macrophage activation or differentiation has been suggested to be involved in disease progression. In the present study, we attempted to identify molecules specifically expressed on human classically activated macrophages (M1) to investigate the significance of the M1-like phenotype in human diseases. Human monocyte-derived macrophages were differentiated into M1, M2a, M2b and M2c phenotypes, and also M1(-) (the M1 phenotype differentiated with interferon-γ) to eliminate the strong effects of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on the gene expression profile. The gene expression profiles of those macrophage phenotypes were analyzed by a cDNA microarray analysis and were used for a bioinformatics examination to identify the markers of the M1 phenotype that are expressed in both M1 and M1(-). The gene expression profiles of murine macrophages were also evaluated. We identified guanylate-binding protein 5 (GBP5), which is associated nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing gene family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3)-mediated inflammasome assembly in the M1 macrophages of both humans and mice. Notably, the expression of GBP5 protein was detected in cultured M1(-) as well as in M1 macrophages by western blotting, which means that GBP5 is a more generalized marker of the M1 phenotype compared with the M1 markers that can be induced by LPS stimulation. GBP5 is a useful candidate marker of the M1 phenotype.

  7. The 70-kilodalton adenylyl cyclase-associated protein is not essential for interaction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase with RAS proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Suzuki, N; Kataoka, T

    1992-11-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adenylyl cyclase is regulated by RAS proteins. We show here that the yeast adenylyl cyclase forms at least two high-molecular-weight complexes, one with the RAS protein-dependent adenylyl cyclase activity and the other with the Mn(2+)-dependent activity, which are separable by their size difference. The 70-kDa adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) existed in the former complex but not in the latter. Missense mutations in conserved motifs of the leucine-rich repeats of the catalytic subunit of adenylyl cyclase abolished the RAS-dependent activity, which was accompanied by formation of a very high molecular weight complex having the Mn(2+)-dependent activity. Contrary to previous results, disruption of the gene encoding CAP did not alter the extent of RAS protein-dependent activation of adenylyl cyclase, while a concomitant decrease in the size of the RAS-responsive complex was observed. These results indicate that CAP is not essential for interaction of the yeast adenylyl cyclase with RAS proteins even though it is an inherent component of the RAS-responsive adenylyl cyclase complex.

  8. Coiled-coil interaction of N-terminal 36 residues of cyclase-associated protein with adenylyl cyclase is sufficient for its function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae ras pathway.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Y; Shima, F; Sen, H; Tanaka, Y; Yanagihara, C; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Kariya, K; Kataoka, T

    1998-10-23

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, association with the 70-kDa cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is required for proper response of adenylyl cyclase to Ras proteins. We show here that a small segment comprising the N-terminal 36 amino acid residues of CAP is sufficient for association with adenylyl cyclase as well as for its function in the Ras-adenylyl cyclase pathway as assayed by the ability to confer RAS2(Val-19)-dependent heat shock sensitivity to yeast cells. The CAP-binding site of adenylyl cyclase was mapped to a segment of 119 amino acid residues near its C terminus. Both of these regions contained tandem repetitions of a heptad motif alphaXXalphaXXX (where alpha represents a hydrophobic amino acid and X represents any amino acid), suggesting a coiled-coil interaction. When mutants of CAP defective in associating with adenylyl cyclase were isolated by screening of a pool of randomly mutagenized CAP, they were found to carry substitution mutations in one of the key hydrophobic residues in the heptad repeats. Furthermore, mutations of the key hydrophobic residues in the heptad repeats of adenylyl cyclase also resulted in loss of association with CAP. These results indicate the coiled-coil mechanism as a basis of the CAP-adenylyl cyclase interaction.

  9. Picosecond to second dynamics reveals a structural transition in Clostridium botulinum NO-sensor triggered by the activator BAY-41-2272.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Byung-Kuk; Lamarre, Isabelle; Rappaport, Fabrice; Nioche, Pierre; Raman, C S; Martin, Jean-Louis; Negrerie, Michel

    2012-12-21

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is the mammalian endogenous nitric oxide (NO) receptor that synthesizes cGMP upon NO activation. In synergy with the artificial allosteric effector BAY 41-2272 (a lead compound for drug design in cardiovascular treatment), sGC can also be activated by carbon monoxide (CO), but the structural basis for this synergistic effect are unknown. We recorded in the unusually broad time range from 1 ps to 1 s the dynamics of the interaction of CO binding to full length sGC, to the isolated sGC heme domain β(1)(200) and to the homologous bacterial NO-sensor from Clostridium botulinum. By identifying all phases of CO binding in this full time range and characterizing how these phases are modified by BAY 41-2272, we show that this activator induces the same structural changes in both proteins. This result demonstrates that the BAY 41-2272 binding site resides in the β(1)(200) sGC heme domain and is the same in sGC and in the NO-sensor from Clostridium botulinum.

  10. Adenylyl cyclase G, an osmosensor controlling germination of Dictyostelium spores.

    PubMed

    van Es, S; Virdy, K J; Pitt, G S; Meima, M; Sands, T W; Devreotes, P N; Cotter, D A; Schaap, P

    1996-09-27

    Dictyostelium cells express a G-protein-coupled adenylyl cyclase, ACA, during aggregation and an atypical adenylyl cyclase, ACG, in mature spores. The ACG gene was disrupted by homologous recombination. acg- cells developed into normal fruiting bodies with viable spores, but spore germination was no longer inhibited by high osmolarity, a fairly universal constraint for spore and seed germination. ACG activity, measured in aca-/ACG cells, was strongly stimulated by high osmolarity with optimal stimulation occurring at 200 milliosmolar. RdeC mutants, which display unrestrained protein kinase A (PKA) activity and a cell line, which overexpresses PKA under a prespore specific promoter, germinate very poorly, both at high and low osmolarity. These data indicate that ACG is an osmosensor controlling spore germination through activation of protein kinase A.

  11. Interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase with liver regulatory factors.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenschlos, C; Flawiá, M M; Torruella, M; Torres, H N

    1986-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase catalytic subunits may interact with regulatory factors from rat liver membranes, reconstituting heterologous systems which are catalytically active in assay mixtures containing MgATP. The systems show stimulatory responses to glucagon and guanosine 5'-[beta gamma-imido]triphosphate (p[NH]ppG) or fluoride. Reconstitution was obtained by three different methods: fusion of rat liver membranes (pretreated with N-ethylmaleimide) to T. cruzi membranes; interaction of detergent extracts of rat liver membranes with T. cruzi membranes; or interaction of purified preparations of T. cruzi adenylate cyclase and of liver membrane factors in phospholipid vesicles. The liver factors responsible for the guanine nucleotide effect were characterized as the NS protein. Data also indicate that reconstitution requires the presence of a membrane substrate. PMID:2947568

  12. Intracellular cAMP signaling by soluble adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Tresguerres, Martin; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen

    2011-06-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently identified source of the ubiquitous second messenger cyclic adenosine 3',5' monophosphate (cAMP). sAC is distinct from the more widely studied source of cAMP, the transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs); its activity is uniquely regulated by bicarbonate anions, and it is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and in cellular organelles. Due to its unique localization and regulation, sAC has various functions in a variety of physiological systems that are distinct from tmACs. In this review, we detail the known functions of sAC, and we reassess commonly held views of cAMP signaling inside cells.

  13. Engineering adenylate cyclases regulated by near-infrared window light.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Min-Hyung; Kang, In-Hye; Nelson, Mathew D; Jensen, Tricia M; Lyuksyutova, Anna I; Siltberg-Liberles, Jessica; Raizen, David M; Gomelsky, Mark

    2014-07-15

    Bacteriophytochromes sense light in the near-infrared window, the spectral region where absorption by mammalian tissues is minimal, and their chromophore, biliverdin IXα, is naturally present in animal cells. These properties make bacteriophytochromes particularly attractive for optogenetic applications. However, the lack of understanding of how light-induced conformational changes control output activities has hindered engineering of bacteriophytochrome-based optogenetic tools. Many bacteriophytochromes function as homodimeric enzymes, in which light-induced conformational changes are transferred via α-helical linkers to the rigid output domains. We hypothesized that heterologous output domains requiring homodimerization can be fused to the photosensory modules of bacteriophytochromes to generate light-activated fusions. Here, we tested this hypothesis by engineering adenylate cyclases regulated by light in the near-infrared spectral window using the photosensory module of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides bacteriophytochrome BphG1 and the adenylate cyclase domain from Nostoc sp. CyaB1. We engineered several light-activated fusion proteins that differed from each other by approximately one or two α-helical turns, suggesting that positioning of the output domains in the same phase of the helix is important for light-dependent activity. Extensive mutagenesis of one of these fusions resulted in an adenylate cyclase with a sixfold photodynamic range. Additional mutagenesis produced an enzyme with a more stable photoactivated state. When expressed in cholinergic neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, the engineered adenylate cyclase affected worm behavior in a light-dependent manner. The insights derived from this study can be applied to the engineering of other homodimeric bacteriophytochromes, which will further expand the optogenetic toolset.

  14. Potent Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Activities of Oxidosqualene Cyclase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Frederick S.; Griffin, John H.; Wilson, Aaron J.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.

    2001-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the protozoan agent that causes Chagas' disease, a major health problem in Latin America. Better drugs are needed to treat infected individuals. The sterol biosynthesis pathway is a potentially excellent target for drug therapy against T. cruzi. In this study, we investigated the antitrypanosomal activities of a series of compounds designed to inhibit a key enzyme in sterol biosynthesis, oxidosqualene cyclase. This enzyme converts 2,3-oxidosqualene to the tetracyclic product, lanosterol. The lead compound, N-(4E,8E)-5,9, 13-trimethyl-4,8, 12-tetradecatrien-1-ylpyridinium, is an electron-poor aromatic mimic of a monocyclized transition state or high-energy intermediate formed from oxidosqualene. This compound and 27 related compounds were tested against mammalian-stage T. cruzi, and 12 inhibited growth by 50% at concentrations below 25 nM. The lead compound was shown to cause an accumulation of oxidosqualene and decreased production of lanosterol and ergosterol, consistent with specific inhibition of the oxidosqualene cyclase. The data demonstrate potent anti-T. cruzi activity associated with inhibition of oxidosqualene cyclase. PMID:11257036

  15. Porcine CD38 exhibits prominent secondary NAD(+) cyclase activity.

    PubMed

    Ting, Kai Yiu; Leung, Christina F P; Graeff, Richard M; Lee, Hon Cheung; Hao, Quan; Kotaka, Masayo

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) mobilizes intracellular Ca(2+) stores and activates Ca(2+) influx to regulate a wide range of physiological processes. It is one of the products produced from the catalysis of NAD(+) by the multifunctional CD38/ADP-ribosyl cyclase superfamily. After elimination of the nicotinamide ring by the enzyme, the reaction intermediate of NAD(+) can either be hydrolyzed to form linear ADPR or cyclized to form cADPR. We have previously shown that human CD38 exhibits a higher preference towards the hydrolysis of NAD(+) to form linear ADPR while Aplysia ADP-ribosyl cyclase prefers cyclizing NAD(+) to form cADPR. In this study, we characterized the enzymatic properties of porcine CD38 and revealed that it has a prominent secondary NAD(+) cyclase activity producing cADPR. We also determined the X-ray crystallographic structures of porcine CD38 and were able to observe conformational flexibility at the base of the active site of the enzyme which allow the NAD(+) reaction intermediate to adopt conformations resulting in both hydrolysis and cyclization forming linear ADPR and cADPR respectively.

  16. [Adenylate cyclase. A possible factor in the pathogenicity of Yersinia pestis].

    PubMed

    Michankin, B N; Chevchenko, L A; Asseeva, L E

    1992-01-01

    Biological effect of homogenous preparation of Y. pestis adenylate cyclase on eucaryotic cells was studied. Adenylate cyclase, added (7.5 x 10(8) g/ml) to guinea pig macrophages lowers the level of chemiluminescence to 50-70%, has an appreciable cytotoxic effect on peritoneal macrophages and suppresses phosphorylation processes of leucocyte proteins from white mice. The experimental results obtained allow to suggest Y. pestis adenylate cyclase to be a pathogenic factor, contributing to the development of plague infection.

  17. A cyanobacterial light activated adenylyl cyclase partially restores development of a Dictyostelium discoideum, adenylyl cyclase a null mutant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Hui; Raffelberg, Sarah; Losi, Aba; Schaap, Pauline; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2014-12-10

    A light-regulated adenylyl cyclase, mPAC, was previously identified from the cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes PCC7420. MPAC consists of a flavin-based blue light-sensing LOV domain and a catalytic domain. In this work, we expressed mPAC in an adenylate cyclase A null mutant (aca-) of the eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum and tested to what extent light activation of mPAC could restore the cAMP-dependent developmental programme of this organism. Amoebas of Dictyostelium, a well-established model organism, generate and respond to cAMP pulses, which cause them to aggregate and construct fruiting bodies. mPAC was expressed under control of a constitutive actin-15 promoter in D. discoideum and displayed low basal adenylyl cyclase activity in darkness that was about five-fold stimulated by blue light. mPAC expression in aca- cells marginally restored aggregation and fruiting body formation in darkness. However, more and larger fruiting bodies were formed when mPAC expressing cells were incubated in light. Extending former applications of light-regulated AC, these results demonstrate that mPAC can be used to manipulate multicellular development in eukaryotes in a light dependent manner.

  18. Genetic control of interferon action: mouse strain distribution and inheritance of an induced protein with guanylate-binding property.

    PubMed

    Staeheli, P; Prochazka, M; Steigmeier, P A; Haller, O

    1984-08-01

    Interferons (IFNs) induce in responsive cells the synthesis of various proteins including a set with high binding affinities to guanylates. These guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) were analyzed in cells from 46 inbred mouse strains using GMP-agarose affinity chromatography. In cells of 11 strains, including A/J, BALB/cJ, and C3H/HeJ, type I and II IFNs induced the synthesis of a major GBP of Mr 65,000, designated here GBP-1, and of at least three minor GBPs. In contrast, cells of the remaining 35 strains, including DBA/2J, C57BL/6J, and A2G, failed to synthesize GBP-1 in response to both types of IFNs. Induction of the minor GBPs was comparable in cells of both groups of mice, confirming that they were all responsive to IFNs. Analysis of F1, F2, and BC1 offspring of crosses between GBP-1 inducible (A/J) and noninducible (DBA/2J or A2G) strains showed that inducibility of GBP-1 was inherited as a single autosomal gene. The symbol Gbp-1 is proposed for this locus, designated Gbp-1a for the allele causing inducibility and Gbp-1b for the other allele.

  19. Restoration of adenylate cyclase responsiveness in murine myeloid leukemia permits inhibition of proliferation by hormone. Butyrate augments catalytic activity of adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Inhorn, L; Fleming, J W; Klingberg, D; Gabig, T G; Boswell, H S

    1988-04-01

    Mechanisms of leukemic cell clonal dominance may include aberrations of transmembrane signaling. In particular, neoplastic transformation has been associated with reduced capacity for hormone-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. In the present study, prostaglandin E, a hormonal activator of adenylate cyclase that has antiproliferative activity in myeloid cells, and cholera toxin, an adenylate cyclase agonist that functions at a postreceptor site by activating the adenylate cyclase stimulatory GTP-binding protein (Gs), were studied for antiproliferative activity in two murine myeloid cell lines. FDC-P1, an interleukin 3 (IL 3)-dependent myeloid cell line and a tumorigenic IL 3-independent subline, FI, were resistant to these antiproliferative agents. The in vitro ability of the "differentiation" agent, sodium butyrate, to reverse their resistance to adenylate cyclase agonists was studied. The antiproliferative action of butyrate involved augmentation of transmembrane adenylate cyclase activity. Increased adenylate cyclase catalyst activity was the primary alteration of this transmembrane signaling group leading to the functional inhibitory effects on leukemia cells, although alterations in regulatory G-proteins appear to play a secondary role.

  20. Analysis of the function of the 70-kilodalton cyclase-associated protein (CAP) by using mutants of yeast adenylyl cyclase defective in CAP binding.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Suzuki, N; Nishida, Y; Kataoka, T

    1993-07-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adenylyl cyclase forms a complex with the 70-kDa cyclase-associated protein (CAP). By in vitro mutagenesis, we assigned a CAP-binding site of adenylyl cyclase to a small segment near its C terminus and created mutants which lost the ability to bind CAP. CAP binding was assessed first by observing the ability of the overproduced C-terminal 150 residues of adenylyl cyclase to sequester CAP, thereby suppressing the heat shock sensitivity of yeast cells bearing the activated RAS2 gene (RAS2Val-19), and then by immunoprecipitability of adenylyl cyclase activity with anti-CAP antibody and by direct measurement of the amount of CAP bound. Yeast cells whose chromosomal adenylyl cyclase genes were replaced by the CAP-nonbinding mutants possessed adenylyl cyclase activity fully responsive to RAS2 protein in vitro. However, they did not exhibit sensitivity to heat shock in the RAS2Val-19 background. When glucose-induced accumulation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) was measured in these mutants carrying RAS2Val-19, a rapid transient rise indistinguishable from that of wild-type cells was observed and a high peak level and following persistent elevation of the cAMP concentration characteristic of RAS2Val-19 were abolished. In contrast, in the wild-type RAS2 background, similar cyclase gene replacement did not affect the glucose-induced cAMP response. These results suggest that the association with CAP, although not involved in the in vivo response to the wild-type RAS2 protein, is somehow required for the exaggerated response of adenylyl cyclase to activated RAS2.

  1. Characterization of the specific interaction between the DNA aptamer sgc8c and protein tyrosine kinase-7 receptors at the surface of T-cells by biosensing AFM.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Michael; Poturnayova, Alexandra; Lamprecht, Constanze; Weich, Sabine; Snejdarkova, Maja; Karpisova, Ivana; Hianik, Tibor; Ebner, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    We studied the interaction of the specific DNA aptamer sgc8c immobilized at the AFM tip with its corresponding receptor, the protein tyrosine kinase-7 (PTK7) embedded in the membrane of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells (Jurkat T-cells). Performing single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) experiments, we showed that the aptamer sgc8c bound with high probability (38.3 ± 7.48%) and high specificity to PTK7, as demonstrated by receptor blocking experiments and through comparison with the binding behavior of a nonspecific aptamer. The determined kinetic off-rate (koff = 5.16 s(-1)) indicates low dissociation of the sgc8c-PTK7 complex. In addition to the pulling force experiments, simultaneous topography and recognition imaging (TREC) experiments using AFM tips functionalized with sgc8c aptamers were realized on the outer regions surface of surface-immobilized Jurkat cells for the first time. This allowed determination of the distribution of PTK7 without any labeling and at near physiological conditions. As a result, we could show a homogeneous distribution of PTK7 molecules on the outer regions of ALL cells with a surface density of 325 ± 12 PTK7 receptors (or small receptor clusters) per μm(2). Graphical Abstract The specific interaction of the DNA aptamer sgc8c and protein tyrosine kinase-7 (PTK7) on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells was characterized. AFM based single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) yielded a kinetic off-rate of 5.16 s(-1) of the complex. Simultaneous topography and recognition imaging (TREC) revealed a PTK7 density of 325 ± 12 molecules or clusters per μm(2) in the cell membrane.

  2. Pantoprazole inhibits human gastric adenocarcinoma SGC-7901 cells by downregulating the expression of pyruvate kinase M2

    PubMed Central

    SHEN, YONGHUA; CHEN, MIN; HUANG, SHULING; ZOU, XIAOPING

    2016-01-01

    The Warburg effect is important in tumor growth. The human M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) is a key enzyme that regulates aerobic glycolysis in tumor cells. Recent studies have demonstrated that PKM2 is a potential target for cancer therapy. The present study investigated the effects of pantoprazole (PPZ) treatment and PKM2 transfection on human gastric adenocarcinoma SGC-7901 cells in vitro. The present study revealed that PPZ inhibited the proliferation of tumor cells, induced apoptosis and downregulated the expression of PKM2, which contributes to the current understanding of the functional association between PPZ and PKM2. In summary, PPZ may suppress tumor growth as a PKM2 protein inhibitor. PMID:26870273

  3. The effect of radixin knockdown on the expression and efflux function of MRP2 in SGC-7901 cells.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Jie; Wang, Wei-Rong; Zhang, Yun; Yang, Qing

    2012-08-15

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2, ABCC2) is the second member of the MRP transporter family and functions physiologically as an organic anion transporter. Earlier studies have confirmed that radixin, which is a member of the ERM (ezrin/radixin/moesin) family, modulates MRP2 localization at the canalicular membrane in hepatocytes. The relationship between radixin and MRP2 - particularly, the effect of radixin on the expression and function of MRP2 in cells or tissues that co-express all three ERM proteins - has not been well studied. To examine the role of radixin in the expression and function of MRP2 and other MRPs, we chose human gastric carcinoma SGC-7901 cells that express all three ERM proteins rather than hepatocytes, which predominantly express radixin. Radixin stable knockdown SGC-7901 cells, which were constructed by RNAi, exhibited no compensatory up-regulation of ezrin or moesin. The mRNA expression profiles of MRPs in the radixin knockdown cells were primarily evaluated by RT-PCR. Real time quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analysis revealed that the radixin deficiency caused the mRNA and protein expression levels of MRP2 to be reduced by about 50%, respectively. Accordingly, efflux and MTT assays showed that the radixin knockdown cells exhibited lower efflux ability with respect to calcein but no significant change in cell viability. In conclusion, among the MRP1-6 family members, radixin selectively modulates the expression and function of MRP2 in a system co-expressing all three ERM proteins.

  4. Guanyl Nucleotide Exchange Factor Sql2 and Ras2 Regulate Filamentous Growth in Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Philip; Katzenberger, Jörg D.; Loubradou , Gabriel; Kahmann, Regine

    2003-01-01

    The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-signaling pathway regulates cell morphology and plays a crucial role during pathogenic development of the plant-pathogenic fungus Ustilago maydis. Strains lacking components of this signaling pathway, such as the Gα-subunit Gpa3 or the adenylyl cyclase Uac1, are nonpathogenic and grow filamentously. On the other hand, strains exhibiting an activated cAMP pathway due to a dominant-active allele of gpa3 display a glossy colony phenotype and are unable to proliferate in plant tumors. Here we present the identification of sql2 as a suppressor of the glossy colony phenotype of a gpa3Q206L strain. sql2 encodes a protein with similarity to CDC25-like guanine nucleotide exchange factors, which are known to act on Ras proteins. Overexpression of sql2 leads to filamentous growth that cannot be suppressed by exogenous cAMP, suggesting that Sql2 does not act upstream of Uac1. To gain more insight in signaling processes regulated by Sql2, we isolated two genes encoding Ras proteins. Expression of dominant active alleles of ras1 and ras2 showed that Ras2 induces filamentous growth while Ras1 does not affect cell morphology but elevates pheromone gene expression. These results indicate that Ras1 and Ras2 fulfill different functions in U. maydis. Moreover, observed similarities between the filaments induced by sql2 and ras2 suggest that Sql2 is an activator of Ras2. Interestingly, sql2 deletion mutants are affected in pathogenic development but not in mating, indicating a specific function of sql2 during pathogenesis. PMID:12796306

  5. Angiotensin II binding sites in the rat fetus: characterization of receptor subtypes and interaction with guanyl nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Feuillan, P P; Millan, M A; Aguilera, G

    1993-03-19

    Angiotensin II (AII) receptor subtypes were studied in the 18-day gestation fetal rat, using two non-peptide AII antagonists: (2-n-butyl-4-chloro-5-hydroxymethyl-1-(2'-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl) biphenyl-4-yl)methyl)imidazol (DuP 753; type 1 (AT1) specific), and 1-(4-amino-3-methylphenyl)methyl-5-diphenacetyl -4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1-H-imidazo[4,5-c]pyridine-6-carboxylic acid (PD 123177; type 2 (AT2) specific). Autoradiography using 125I(-)[Sar1,Ile8]AII showed that 10 microM PD 123177 decreased binding to near-nonspecific levels in skin, skeletal muscle and adrenal medulla, whereas 10 microM DuP 753 blocked binding in the liver and lung. Studies in skin and liver membranes confirmed the autoradiographic data: AT1 receptors were predominant in the liver (95%), and AT2 in the skin (97%). There was no cross-reactivity between receptor subtype and the heterologous antagonist up to a concentration of 10 microM. In both skin and liver, 2 mM dithiothreitol enhanced the binding of AT2 receptors by increasing receptor affinity, but inhibited binding of AT1 by decreasing the receptor number. In the absence of antagonists, guanyl nucleotides, added at equilibrium, caused marked dissociation of 125I-AII binding in liver membranes, but had minimal effect in skin. However, dissociation occurred in the skin when AT2 sites were blocked with 10 microM PD 123177, and in liver, dissociation was not observed when AT1 sites were blocked with DuP 753. Hence, in contrast to classical AII target tissues, which contain predominantly AT1, most of the sites in fetal skin and skeletal muscle are AT2. The demonstration that the effects of guanyl nucleotides are selective for receptor subtype suggests that the AT1 receptor, but not the AT2, is coupled to cell function via guanyl nucleotide binding proteins. The functional importance of the AT2 receptors and their role in fetal physiology is under current investigation.

  6. Glucose Inhibition of Adenylate Cyclase in Intact Cells of Escherichia coli B

    PubMed Central

    Peterkofsky, Alan; Gazdar, Celia

    1974-01-01

    Previous studies in E. coli B have demonstrated an inverse correlation between the presence of glucose in the medium and the accumulation of cyclic AMP in the medium. This observation could not be explained by the action of glucose as a repressor of adenylate cyclase (EC 4.6.1.1) synthesis, as a stabilizer of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase (EC 3.1.4.17) activity, or as a direct inhibitor of adenylate cyclase activity in cell-free preparations. The recent development of an in vivo assay for adenylate cyclase has provided a basis for further exploring the inhibitory action of glucose in intact cells. With this assay it has been possible to show that, while glucose does not affect adenylate cyclase in vitro, it rapidly inhibits the enzyme activity in intact cells. Extensive metabolism of glucose is not required, since α-methylglucoside also inhibits adenylate cyclase in vivo. When cells are grown on glucose as carbon source, some sugars (mannose, glucosamine) substitute for glucose as adenylate cyclase inhibitors while others (e.g., fructose) do not. Dose-response studies indicate that low concentrations of glucose lead to essentially complete inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity while only moderately decreasing intracellular cyclic AMP concentrations. The evidence presented suggests that the decreased cellular cyclic AMP levels resulting from glucose addition can be accounted for by inhibition of adenylate cyclase without any significant effect on cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase or the transport of cyclic AMP from the cells to the medium. PMID:4366761

  7. Structural analysis of an oxygen-regulated diguanylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Tarnawski, Miroslaw; Barends, Thomas R M; Schlichting, Ilme

    2015-11-01

    Cyclic di-GMP is a bacterial second messenger that is involved in switching between motile and sessile lifestyles. Given the medical importance of biofilm formation, there has been increasing interest in understanding the synthesis and degradation of cyclic di-GMPs and their regulation in various bacterial pathogens. Environmental cues are detected by sensing domains coupled to GGDEF and EAL or HD-GYP domains that have diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase activities, respectively, producing and degrading cyclic di-GMP. The Escherichia coli protein DosC (also known as YddV) consists of an oxygen-sensing domain belonging to the class of globin sensors that is coupled to a C-terminal GGDEF domain via a previously uncharacterized middle domain. DosC is one of the most strongly expressed GGDEF proteins in E. coli, but to date structural information on this and related proteins is scarce. Here, the high-resolution structural characterization of the oxygen-sensing globin domain, the middle domain and the catalytic GGDEF domain in apo and substrate-bound forms is described. The structural changes between the iron(III) and iron(II) forms of the sensor globin domain suggest a mechanism for oxygen-dependent regulation. The structural information on the individual domains is combined into a model of the dimeric DosC holoprotein. These findings have direct implications for the oxygen-dependent regulation of the activity of the cyclase domain.

  8. The guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs): proinflammatory cytokine-induced members of the dynamin superfamily with unique GTPase activity.

    PubMed

    Vestal, Deborah J

    2005-08-01

    The guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) were first identified in the late 1970s, and within a short period of time, investigators were aware that GBPs possessed unique properties, in particular the ability to bind GMP agarose. Since then, much study has gone into understanding their mechanism of induction by interferons (IFNs) and other cytokines, and they have been used extensively as markers for IFN responsiveness in both cells and organisms. In time, we learned that GBPs had the unusual ability to hydrolyze GTP to both GDP and GMP. More recently, we have begun to appreciate their novel structure, one that suggests unique mechanisms of GTP binding and hydrolysis and unique forms of regulation. In addition, we have begun to unravel some of their functions and to separate these function into those functions that do and those that do not require GTPase activity.

  9. The transcription factor IRF1 and guanylate-binding proteins target activation of the AIM2 inflammasome by Francisella infection.

    PubMed

    Man, Si Ming; Karki, Rajendra; Malireddi, R K Subbarao; Neale, Geoffrey; Vogel, Peter; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Lamkanfi, Mohamed; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2015-05-01

    Inflammasomes are critical for mounting host defense against pathogens. The molecular mechanisms that control activation of the AIM2 inflammasome in response to different cytosolic pathogens remain unclear. Here we found that the transcription factor IRF1 was required for activation of the AIM2 inflammasome during infection with the Francisella tularensis subspecies novicida (F. novicida), whereas engagement of the AIM2 inflammasome by mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) or transfected double-stranded DNA did not require IRF1. Infection of F. novicida detected by the DNA sensor cGAS and its adaptor STING induced type I interferon-dependent expression of IRF1, which drove the expression of guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs); this led to intracellular killing of bacteria and DNA release. Our results reveal a specific requirement for IRF1 and GBPs in the liberation of DNA for sensing by AIM2 depending on the pathogen encountered by the cell.

  10. Guanylate-binding proteins promote AIM2 inflammasome activation during Francisella novicida infection by inducing cytosolic bacteriolysis and DNA release

    PubMed Central

    Dreier, Roland F.; Costanzo, Stéphanie; Anton, Leonie; Rühl, Sebastian; Dussurgey, Sébastien; Dick, Mathias S.; Kistner, Anne; Rigard, Mélanie; Degrandi, Daniel; Pfeffer, Klaus; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Henry, Thomas; Broz, Petr

    2015-01-01

    The AIM2 inflammasome detects double-stranded DNA in the cytosol and induces caspase-1-dependent pyroptosis as well as release of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18. AIM2 is critical for host defense against DNA viruses and bacteria that replicate in the cytosol, such as Francisella novicida. AIM2 activation by F. novicida requires bacteriolysis, yet whether this process is accidental or a host-driven immune mechanism remained unclear. Using siRNA screening for nearly 500 interferon-stimulated genes, we identified guanylate-binding proteins GBP2 and GBP5 as key AIM2 activators during F. novicida infection. Their prominent role was validated in vitro and in a mouse model of tularemia. Mechanistically, these two GBPs target cytosolic F. novicida and promote bacteriolysis. Thus, besides their role in host defense against vacuolar pathogens, GBPs also facilitate the presentation of ligands by directly attacking cytosolic bacteria. PMID:25774716

  11. Cloning, expression, and characterization of a novel guanylate-binding protein, GBP3 in murine erythroid progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Han, B H; Park, D J; Lim, R W; Im, J H; Kim, H D

    1998-05-19

    We report the molecular cloning of a novel guanylate-binding protein (GBP), termed mouse GBP3 (mGBP3) in Friend virus-induced mouse erythroid progenitor (FVA) cells. The 71-kDa mGBP3 belongs to a family of known GBPs that contain the first two consensus motifs, GXXXXGK(S/T) and DXXG, but lack the third element, (N/T)KXD, found in typical GTP-binding proteins. Recombinant mGBP3 protein, expressed using a baculovirus expression system, binds to agarose-immobilized guanine nucleotides (GTP, GDP and GMP). Moreover, mGBP3 has been found to have an intrinsic GTPase activity with K(m) and Vmax values of 77 +/- 4 microM and 21 +/- 0.5 pmol min-1 microgram-1 of protein, respectively. The mGBP3 is distinct from the other GBPs, in that it does not have an isoprenylation/methylation motif CAAX at the carboxyl terminus. The mGBP3 appears to be localized in the cytosol based on immunofluorescence staining. Although the mGBP3 transcript is expressed to a varying degree in numerous mouse tissues, the message is most abundant in FVA cells. The mGBP3 transcript increases in FVA cells undergoing differentiation to a maximum within a few hours and then decreases to an undetectable level by 24 h. These results, taken together, suggest that mGBP3 is a novel member of a family of guanylate-binding proteins, which plays a role in the erythroid differentiation. The nucleotide sequence reported in this paper has been submitted to the GenBank with accession number U44731.

  12. Identification of residues in the human guanylate-binding protein 1 critical for nucleotide binding and cooperative GTP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Praefcke, Gerrit J K; Kloep, Stephan; Benscheid, Utz; Lilie, Hauke; Prakash, Balaji; Herrmann, Christian

    2004-11-12

    The guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) form a group of interferon-gamma inducible GTP-binding proteins which belong to the family of dynamin-related proteins. Like other members of this family, human guanylate-binding protein 1 (hGBP1) shows nucleotide-dependent oligomerisation that stimulates the GTPase activity of the protein. A unique feature of the GBPs is their ability to hydrolyse GTP to GDP and GMP. In order to elucidate the relationship between these findings, we designed point mutants in the phosphate-binding loop (P-loop) as well as in the switch I and switch II regions of the protein based on the crystal structure of hGBP1. These mutant proteins were analysed for their interaction with guanine nucleotides labeled with a fluorescence dye and for their ability to hydrolyse GTP in a cooperative manner. We identified mutations of amino acid residues that decrease GTPase activity by orders of magnitude a part of which are conserved in GTP-binding proteins. In addition, mutants in the P-loop were characterized that strongly impair binding of nucleotide. In consequence, together with altered GTPase activity and given cellular nucleotide concentrations this results in hGBP1 mutants prevailingly resting in the nucleotide-free (K51A and S52N) or the GTP bound form (R48A), respectively. Using size-exclusion chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation we addressed the impact on protein oligomerisation. In summary, mutants of hGBP1 were identified and biochemically characterized providing hGBP1 locked in defined states in order to investigate their functional role in future cell biology studies.

  13. Complete genomic organization of the human erythroid p55 gene (MPP1), a membrane-associated guanylate kinase homologue

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, A.C.; Metzenberg, A.B.; Sahr, K.E.

    1996-01-15

    Human p55 is an abundantly palmitoylated phosphoprotein of the erythroid membrane. It is the prototype of a newly discovered family of membrane-associated proteins termed MAGUKs (membrane-associated guanylate kinase homologues). The MAGUKs interact with the cytoskeleton and regulate cell proliferation, signaling pathways, and intercellular junctions. Here, we report the complete intron-exon map of the human erythroid p55 gene (HGMW-approved symbol MPP1). The structure of the p55 gene was determined from cosmid clones isolated from a cosmid library specific for the human X chromosome. There is a single copy of the p55 gene, composed of 12 exons and spanning approximately 28 kb in the q28 region of the human X chromosome. The exon sizes range from 69 (exon 5) to 203 bp (intron 2) to {approximately}14 kb (intron 1). The intron-exon boundaries conform to the donor/acceptor consensus sequence, GT-AG, for splice junctions. Several of the exon boundaries correspond to the boundaries of functional domains in the p55 protein. These domains include a SH3 motif and a region that binds to cytoskeletal protein 4.1. In addition, a comparison of the genomic and the primary structures of p55 reveals a highly conserved phosphotyrosine domain located between the protein 4.1 binding domain and the guanylate kinase domain. Finally, promoter activity measurements of the region immediately upstream of the p55 gene, which contains several cis-elements commonly found in housekeeping genes, suggest that a CpG island may be associated with the p55 gene expression in vivo. 42 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Forskolin activation of serotonin-stimulated adenylate cyclase in the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    McNall, S J; Mansour, T E

    1985-05-15

    Properties of forskolin activation of adenylate cyclase in the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica are described. Forskolin stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in cell-free fluke particles to levels more than 30-fold above the basal rate. This activation was not dependent on guanine nucleotides and, upon washing of the particles, was rapidly reversed. Forskolin potentiated the activation of adenylate cyclase by serotonin (5-HT) and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), resulting in both an increase in the maximal level of enzyme activity and a decrease in the apparent activation constant (KA). The 5-HT antagonist 2-bromo-LSD did not inhibit enzyme activation by forskolin. Furthermore, forskolin had no effect on specific [3H]LSD binding to fluke particles. Activation of adenylate cyclase by sodium fluoride or guanine nucleotides was modified in a complex manner by forskolin with both stimulatory and inhibitory effects present. The results suggest that forskolin does not interact directly with the 5-HT receptor coupled to adenylate cyclase. Instead, it appears that forskolin effects are, at least in part, due to its ability to alter the interaction between the regulatory and catalytic components of adenylate cyclase. Incubation of intact flukes with forskolin increased their cAMP levels 2- to 3-fold. The concentration dependence of this response was similar to that for forskolin activation of adenylate cyclase in fluke particles, with 300 microM forskolin giving the maximum response. Forskolin and other agents that increased fluke cAMP levels also stimulated fluke motility.

  15. Asymmetrically acting lycopene beta-cyclases (CrtLm) from non-photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tao, L; Picataggio, S; Rouvière, P E; Cheng, Q

    2004-03-01

    Carotenoids have important functions in photosynthesis, nutrition, and protection against oxidative damage. Some natural carotenoids are asymmetrical molecules that are difficult to produce chemically. Biological production of carotenoids using specific enzymes is a potential alternative to extraction from natural sources. Here we report the isolation of lycopene beta-cyclases that selectively cyclize only one end of lycopene or neurosporene. The crtLm genes encoding the asymmetrically acting lycopene beta-cyclases were isolated from non-photosynthetic bacteria that produced monocyclic carotenoids. Co-expression of these crtLm genes with the crtEIB genes from Pantoea stewartii (responsible for lycopene synthesis) resulted in the production of monocyclic gamma-carotene in Escherichia coli. The asymmetric cyclization activity of CrtLm could be inhibited by the lycopene beta-cyclase inhibitor 2-(4-chlorophenylthio)-triethylamine (CPTA). Phylogenetic analysis suggested that bacterial CrtL-type lycopene beta-cyclases might represent an evolutionary link between the common bacterial CrtY-type of lycopene beta-cyclases and plant lycopene beta- and epsilon-cyclases. These lycopene beta-cyclases may be used for efficient production of high-value asymmetrically cyclized carotenoids.

  16. miR-340 Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in Gastric Cancer Cell Line SGC-7901, Possibly via the AKT Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jinzhong; Wang, Ruijie; Chen, Jianshe; Wu, Jinfeng; Dang, Zhongqin; Zhang, Qinsheng; Li, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is among the most common types of cancer, with high morbidity and mortality. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play vital roles in the tumorigenesis and biology of gastric cancer. This study aimed to reveal the role of miR-340 in gastric cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis and to elucidate the potential mechanisms. Material/Methods Human gastric cancer cells SGC-7901 were used in this study for cell transfection with miR-340 mimic or inhibitor. After transfection, cell viability, proliferation, and apoptosis were examined by MTT, BrdU, and flow cytometry assays, respectively. The protein level changes of p27, p21, Caspase 3 (CASP3), B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2), BCL2-associated X protein (BAX), and v-AKT murine thymoma viral oncogene (AKT) were detected by Western blot. Results Overexpression of miR-340 significantly reduced cell viability and proliferation (P<0.01), and induced cell apoptosis (P<0.01) of SGC-7901. miR-340 elevated the protein level of cell cycle inhibitor p27, but did not affect the level of p21. Apoptosis-related factors pro-CASP3, cleaved-CASP3, and BAX were promoted, and BCL2 was inhibited by miR-340. miR-340 also suppressed the phosphorylation of AKT. Opposite effects were detected when SGC-7901 cells were transfected with miR-340 inhibitor. Conclusions These results indicate that miR-340 can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of SGC-7901 cells, suggesting its roles in protecting against gastric cancer. The roles of miR-340 in gastric cancer cells may be associated with its regulation of the AKT pathway. Thus, miR-340 may be a potential therapeutic strategy for gastric cancer treatment. PMID:28057912

  17. Effects of a Shuangling Fuzheng anticancer preparation on the proliferation of SGC-7901 cells and immune function in a cyclophosphamide-treated murine model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-Sheng; Chen, Jue; Cui, De-Li; Zheng, Yuan-Yuan; Xu, Ai-Hua; Chen, Gang; Jia, Ling-Chang

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the inhibitory effects of a Shuangling Fuzheng anticancer preparation (SFAP) on the human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901 in vitro as well as its immune-modulated effects in a cyclophosphamide-treated murine model. METHODS: MTT experiments and immunocytochemistry ABC experiments were performed for detecting the proliferation of SGC-7901 cells in vitro and protein expression of c-myc. The staphylococcal protein A (SPA) rosette test was utilized for measuring the ratio of T-lymphocyte subsets from peripheral blood in a cyclophosphamide-treated murine model. Enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) was performed for measuring the levels of serum sIL-2R in treated mice, while immunoturbidimetry was used for measuring the levels of immunoglobulins (Ig). RESULTS: SFAP (40-640 mg/L, 48 h) inhibited the proliferation of SGC-7901 cells, and a positive correlation was noted between inhibitory effects and dosage. At a dosage of 160-320 mg/L in cultured cells, the expression of c-myc was decreased. SFAP (50-200 mg/kg) increased the percentage of CD3+ and CD4+ T-lymphocytes, the ratio of CD4/CD8, and the contents of Ig such as IgM, IgG or IgA, but decreased the levels of serum sIL-2R in peripheral blood from cyclophosphamide-treated mice. CONCLUSION: SFAP can inhibit the proliferation of SGC-7901 cells via the c-myc gene. In addition, SFAP can modulat the cellular and humoral immunity in cyclophosphamide-induced immunosuppressed mice. PMID:18161930

  18. The invasive adenylate cyclase of Bordetella pertussis. Intracellular localization and kinetics of penetration into various cells.

    PubMed Central

    Farfel, Z; Friedman, E; Hanski, E

    1987-01-01

    The penetration of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase into various mammalian cells exhibits similar kinetics; the accumulation of both intracellular cyclase activity and cyclic AMP is rapid, reaching constant levels after 15-60 min of incubation. The kinetics of enzyme penetration into turkey erythrocytes is different; cyclase activity and cyclic AMP accumulate linearly and do not reach constant levels even after 6 h of incubation. In the preceding paper [Friedman, Farfel & Hanski (1987) Biochem. J. 243, 145-151] we have suggested that the constant level of intracellular cyclase activity reflects a steady state formed by continuous penetration and intracellular inactivation of the enzyme. In contrast with other mammalian cells, no inactivation of cyclase is observed in turkey erythrocytes. These results further support the notion that there is continuous penetration and deactivation of the invasive enzyme in mammalian cells. A 5-6-fold increase in specific activity of the invasive cyclase is detected in a pellet fraction of human lymphocytes in which a similar increase in specific activity of the plasma-membrane marker 5'-nucleotidase is observed. A similar increase in the invasive-cyclase specific activity is detected in a membrane fraction of human erythrocytes. Cyclase activity in a membrane-enriched fraction of human lymphocytes reached a constant level after 20 min of cell exposure to the enzyme. Similar time courses were observed for accumulation of cyclase activity and cyclic AMP in whole lymphocytes [Friedman, Farfel & Hanski (1987) Biochem, J. 243, 145-151]. We suggest therefore that cyclic AMP generation by the invasive enzyme as well as the intracellular inactivation process occur while it is associated with a membrane fraction identical, or closely associated, with the plasma membrane. PMID:2886120

  19. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate suppressed the over-expression of HSP 70 and MDR1 induced by heat shock in SGC 7901.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Yan; Zhu, You-Qing

    2008-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on the expression of HSP 70 and MDR 1. SGC-7901 cells were cultured with RPMI 1640 medium. The single or combined effects of EGCG (0.1, 1, 10, 20, and 40 micromol/L) and heat shock were examined by MTT assay. The expression of HSP 70 and MDR 1 was semi-quantified by the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry method (SP staining). EGCG suppressed cell proliferation at a time- and dose-dependent manner. The effects of combined treatment with EGCG and heat shock on the growth of SGC-7901 cells were stronger than single effects of EGCG. After using EGCG for 24 h, 48 h and 72 h, the IC50s were 112.5 micromol/l, 21.41 micromol/l and 5.24 micromol/l, respectively. Heat shock stimulated the over-expression of HSP 70, especially after heat shock for 8 h, as well as MDR1 after heat shock for 24 h. But EGCG suppressed the over-expression induced by heat shock. The authors conclude that EGCG inhibited the proliferation of SGC-7901, and EGCG combined with heat shock strengthened the effects. Heat shock weakened the over-expression of HSP 70 and MDR1; however, EGCG suppressed the over-expression of HSP 70 and MDR1 induced by heat shock. EGCG combined with heat shock may enhance the sensitivity of drugs to tumors.

  20. SLC7A5 Functions as a Downstream Target Modulated by CRKL in Metastasis Process of Gastric Cancer SGC-7901 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weize; Chen, Xuehua; Su, Liping; Zhu, Zhenggang; Zhou, Yunyun

    2016-01-01

    SLC7A5, who is also named LAT-1, has been validated as a promoter regulated by miRNA-126 in our previous research for gastric cancer cells. However, the mechanisms driving SLC7A5 to affect the bio-function of gastric cancer cells are unclear, remaining us lots of to elucidate. The aim of this study is to investigate the regulating effect of CRKL, one of the critical genes involving with gastric cancer progression, on SLC7A5 expression. By studying the gastric cancer cell lines and clinical pathological specimens, we found that the expression of SLC7A5 was significantly correlated to CRKL. By depleting CRKL in gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells, the SLC7A5 expression was impaired, and the invasion and migration of SGC-7901 cells were suppressed. Ectopic expression of SLC7A5 could drastically rescue the phenotypes induced by CRKL depletion in this study. Accordingly, we conclude that SLC7A5 functions as a promoter in gastric cancer metastasis, and CRKL could be one of its regulators modulating the expression of SLC7A5 and consequentially affect the metastatic feature of SGC-7901 cells. The findings in this study indicate a regulation relationship between CRKL and SLC7A5, and provide useful evidence for gastric cancer therapeutic strategies. PMID:27846244

  1. Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase: Potential Role in Mineral Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Weidong; Moe, Orson W.

    2007-04-01

    The conversion of a signal of inorganic ion concentration to a second messenger is of fundamental biologic significance. The soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) serves such a purpose by transducing divalent cation concentrations and bicarbonate concentrations into intracellular cyclic AMP levels. sAC is widely expressed and may represent a generic bicarbonate sensor providing the afferent pathway to bicarbonate-regulated biologic processes. The best described action of sAC to date is in the mediation of bicarbonate-induced changes in sperm motility. Since a number of processes in mineral metabolism—such as bone formation, bone resorption, intestinal calcium absorption, and renal calcium transport in the distal convoluted tubule—are regulated by bicarbonate, sAC may play a role at multiple levels in mineral metabolism.

  2. Prokaryotic adenylate cyclase toxin stimulates anterior pituitary cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, M.J.; Evans, W.S.; Rogol, A.D.; Weiss, A.A.; Thorner, M.O.; Orth, D.N.; Nicholson, W.E.; Yasumoto, T.; Hewlett, E.L.

    1986-08-01

    Bordetella pertussis synthesis a variety of virulence factors including a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase (AC) toxin. Treatment of anterior pituitary cells with this AC toxin resulted in an increase in cellular cAMP levels that was associated with accelerated exocytosis of growth hormone (GH), prolactin, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and luteinizing hormone (LH). The kinetics of release of these hormones, however, were markedly different; GH and prolactin were rapidly released, while LH and ACTH secretion was more gradually elevated. Neither dopamine agonists nor somatostatin changes the ability of AC toxin to generate cAMP (up to 2 h). Low concentrations of AC toxin amplified the secretory response to hypophysiotrophic hormones. The authors conclude that bacterial AC toxin can rapidly elevate cAMP levels in anterior pituitary cells and that it is the response that explains the subsequent acceleration of hormone release.

  3. Cloning, expression, and sequencing of squalene-hopene cyclase, a key enzyme in triterpenoid metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, D; Kaletta, C; Entian, K D; Beck-Sickinger, A; Poralla, K

    1992-01-01

    The pentacyclic hopanoids, a class of eubacterial lipids, are synthesized by squalene-hopene cyclase and side chain-elongating enzymes. With the aid of DNA probes based on the amino-terminal sequence of purified squalene-hopene cyclase from Bacillus acidocaldarius, clones of Escherichia coli that express this enzyme in the cytoplasmic membrane were isolated. According to the DNA sequence, the cyclase contained 627 amino acids with a molecular mass of 69,473 Da. A high percentage of the amino acids were basic. No significant similarity to existing sequenced proteins was found. Images PMID:1729216

  4. The Growth of SGC-7901 Tumor Xenografts Was Suppressed by Chinese Bayberry Anthocyanin Extract through Upregulating KLF6 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Zhang, Xia-nan; Xie, Wen-hua; Zheng, Yi-xiong; Cao, Jin-ping; Cao, Pei-rang; Chen, Qing-jun; Li, Xian; Sun, Chong-de

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the antitumor effect of anthocyanins extracted from Chinese bayberry fruit (Myrica rubra Sieb. et Zucc.), a nude mouse tumor xenograft model was established. Treatments with C3G (cyanidin-3-glucoside, an anthocyanin) significantly suppressed the growth of SGC-7901 tumor xenografts in a dose-dependent manner. Immunohistochemical staining showed a significant increase in p21 expression, indicating that the cell cycle of tumor xenografts was inhibited. qPCR screening showed that C3G treatment up-regulated the expression of the KLF6 gene, which is an important tumor suppressor gene inactivated in many human cancers. Western blot showed that C3G treatments markedly increased KLF6 and p21 protein levels, inhibited CDK4 and Cyclin D1 expression, but did not notably change the expression of p53. These results indicated that KLF6 up-regulates p21 in a p53-independent manner and significantly reduces tumor proliferation. This study provides important information for the possible mechanism of C3G-induced antitumor activity against gastric adenocarcinoma in vivo. PMID:27690088

  5. Monosodium glutamate, disodium inosinate, disodium guanylate, lysine and taurine improve the sensory quality of fermented cooked sausages with 50% and 75% replacement of NaCl with KCl.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Bibiana Alves; Campagnol, Paulo Cezar Bastianello; Morgano, Marcelo Antônio; Pollonio, Marise Aparecida Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Fermented cooked sausages were produced by replacing 50% and 75% of NaCl with KCl and adding monosodium glutamate, disodium inosinate, disodium guanylate, lysine and taurine. The manufacturing process was monitored by pH and water activity measurements. The sodium and potassium contents of the resulting products were measured. The color values (L*, a* and b*), texture profiles and sensory profiles were also examined. Replacing 50% and 75% NaCl with KCl depreciated the sensory quality of the products. The reformulated sausages containing monosodium glutamate combined with lysine, taurine, disodium inosinate and disodium guanylate masked the undesirable sensory attributes associated with the replacement of 50% and 75% NaCl with KCl, allowing the production of fermented cooked sausages with good sensory acceptance and approximately 68% sodium reduction.

  6. Dopaminergic modulation of adenylate cyclase stimulation by vasoactive intestinal peptide in anterior pituitary.

    PubMed Central

    Onali, P; Schwartz, J P; Costa, E

    1981-01-01

    The activation of adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] by vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) was used as a model to investigate the molecular mechanisms triggered by the occupancy of dopamine recognition sites in rat anterior pituitary. Dopamine failed to change the basal enzyme activity, but it inhibited the stimulation of adenylate cyclase elicited by VIP. Apomorphine, 2-amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene, and 2-bromo-alpha-ergocryptine mimicked the effect of dopamine, whereas (-)-sulpiride and and classical neuroleptics antagonized it. Dopamine failed to modulate the activation of pituitary adenylate cyclase by prostaglandin E1, which does not increase prolactin secretion. From these results we infer that stimulation of D-2 (dopamine) receptors may affect pituitary secretion by inhibiting the activation of anterior pituitary adenylate cyclase by VIP or other secretagogues. PMID:6171819

  7. Discovery and Characterization of a New Family of Diterpene Cyclases in Bacteria and Fungi.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan-Long; Zhang, Shasha; Ma, Ke; Xu, Yuxing; Tao, Qiaoqiao; Chen, Yihua; Chen, Juan; Guo, Shunxing; Ren, Jinwei; Wang, Wenzhao; Tao, Yong; Yin, Wen-Bing; Liu, Hongwei

    2017-04-18

    Diterpene cyclases from bacteria and basidiomycete fungi are seldom studied. Here, we presented the identification and verification of EriG, a member of the UbiA superfamily, as the enzyme responsible for the cyclization of the cyathane skeleton in the mushroom Hericium erinaceum. Genome mining using the EriG protein sequence as a probe led to the discovery of a new family of ubiquitous UbiA-related diterpene cyclases in bacteria and fungi. We successfully characterized seven new diterpene cyclases from bacteria or basidiomycete fungi with the help of an engineered Escherichia coli strain and determined the structures of their corresponding products. A new diterpene with an unusual skeleton was generated during this process. The discovery of this new family of diterpene cyclases provides new insight into the UbiA superfamily.

  8. Terpenoid biosynthesis off the beaten track: unconventional cyclases and their impact on biomimetic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Baunach, Martin; Franke, Jakob; Hertweck, Christian

    2015-02-23

    Terpene and terpenoid cyclizations are counted among the most complex chemical reactions occurring in nature and contribute crucially to the tremendous structural diversity of this largest family of natural products. Many studies were conducted at the chemical, genetic, and biochemical levels to gain mechanistic insights into these intriguing reactions that are catalyzed by terpene and terpenoid cyclases. A myriad of these enzymes have been characterized. Classical textbook knowledge divides terpene/terpenoid cyclases into two major classes according to their structure and reaction mechanism. However, recent discoveries of novel types of terpenoid cyclases illustrate that nature's enzymatic repertoire is far more diverse than initially thought. This Review outlines novel terpenoid cyclases that are out of the ordinary.

  9. Choreographing the adenylyl cyclase signalosome: sorting out the partners and the steps.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Rennolds S; Bogard, Amy S; Gros, Robert; Feldman, Ross D

    2012-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclases are a ubiquitous family of enzymes and are critical regulators of metabolic and cardiovascular function. Multiple isoforms of the enzyme are expressed in a range of tissues. However, for many processes, the adenylyl cyclase isoforms have been thought of as essentially interchangeable, with their impact more dependent on their common actions to increase intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate content regardless of the isoform involved. It has long been appreciated that each subfamily of isoforms demonstrate a specific pattern of "upstream" regulation, i.e., specific patterns of ion dependence (e.g., calcium-dependence) and specific patterns of regulation by kinases (protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C (PKC), raf). However, more recent studies have suggested that adenylyl cyclase isoform-selective patterns of signaling are a wide-spread phenomenon. The determinants of these selective signaling patterns relate to a number of factors, including: (1) selective coupling of specific adenylyl cyclase isoforms with specific G protein-coupled receptors, (2) localization of specific adenylyl cyclase isoforms in defined structural domains (AKAP complexes, caveolin/lipid rafts), and (3) selective coupling of adenylyl cyclase isoforms with specific downstream signaling cascades important in regulation of cell growth and contractility. The importance of isoform-specific regulation has now been demonstrated both in mouse models as well as in humans. Adenylyl cyclase has not been viewed as a useful target for therapeutic regulation, given the ubiquitous expression of the enzyme and the perceived high risk of off-target effects. Understanding which isoforms of adenylyl cyclase mediate distinct cellular effects would bring new significance to the development of isoform-specific ligands to regulate discrete cellular actions.

  10. Cloning, chromosomal mapping, and expression of human fetal brain type I adenylyl cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Villacres, E.C.; Xia, Z.; Bookbinder, L.H.; Edelhoff, S.; Disteche, C.M.; Storm, D.R.

    1993-05-01

    The neural-specific calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase (type I), which was first cloned from bovine brain, has been implicated in learning and memory. The objective of this study was to clone and determine the chromosomal localization of human fetal brain type I adenylyl cyclase. A 3.8-kb cDNA clone was isolated that contained sequence coinciding with the 3{prime} end 2553 nucleotides of the bovine open reading frame. This clone shows 87% nucleotide and 92% translated amino acid sequence identity to the bovine clone. The most significant sequence differences were in the carboxy-terminal 100 amino acid residues. This region contains one of several possible calmodulin binding domains and the only putative cAMP-dependent protein kinase A phosphorylation site. A chimera was constructed that contained the 5{prime} half of the bovine type I adenylyl cyclase and the 3{prime} half of the human type I adenylyl cyclase. The activity of the chimeric gene product and its sensitivity to calmodulin and calcium were indistinguishable from those of the bovine type I adenylyl cyclase. In situ hybridization was used to localize the human type I adenylyl cyclase gene to the proximal portion of the short arm of chromosome 7. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Developmental changes of beta-adrenergic receptor-linked adenylate cyclase of rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, M.S.; Boland, S.R.; Schmidt, S.J.

    1985-06-01

    beta-Adrenergic agonist-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity and binding of the beta-adrenergic antagonist(-)-(/sup 125/I)iodopindolol were studied in rat liver during development of male Fischer 344 rats ages 6-60 days. In liver homogenates maximum adenylate cyclase response to beta-adrenergic agonist (10(-5) M isoproterenol or epinephrine) decreased by 73% (P less than 0.01) between 6 and 60 days, with most of the decrease (56%; P less than 0.01) occurring by 20 days. beta-adrenergic receptor density (Bmax) showed a corresponding decrease of 66% (P less than 0.01) by 20 days without subsequent change. Binding characteristics of stereospecificity, pharmacological specificity, saturability with time, and reversibility were unchanged with age. GTP-, fluoride-, forskolin-, and Mn2+-stimulated adenylate cyclase activities also decreased during development, suggesting a decrease of activity of the catalytic component and/or guanine nucleotide regulatory component of adenylate cyclase. These results indicate that the developmental decrease of beta-adrenergic agonist-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity may result from decreased numbers of beta-adrenergic receptors. Developmental alterations of nonreceptor components of the enzyme may also contribute to changes of catecholamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase.

  12. Structural studies of intermediates along the cyclization pathway of Aplysia ADP-ribosyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Kotaka, Masayo; Graeff, Richard; Chen, Zhe; Zhang, Li He; Lee, Hon Cheung; Hao, Quan

    2012-01-20

    Cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) is a calcium messenger that can mobilize intracellular Ca²⁺ stores and activate Ca²⁺ influx to regulate a wide range of physiological processes. Aplysia cyclase is the first member of the ADP-ribosyl cyclases identified to catalyze the cyclization of NAD⁺ into cADPR. The catalysis involves a two-step reaction, the elimination of the nicotinamide ring and the cyclization of the intermediate resulting in the covalent attachment of the purine ring to the terminal ribose. Aplysia cyclase exhibits a high degree of leniency towards the purine base of its substrate, and the cyclization reaction takes place at either the N1- or the N7-position of the purine ring. To decipher the mechanism of cyclization in Aplysia cyclase, we used a crystallization setup with multiple Aplysia cyclase molecules present in the asymmetric unit. With the use of natural substrates and analogs, not only were we able to capture multiple snapshots during enzyme catalysis resulting in either N1 or N7 linkage of the purine ring to the terminal ribose, we were also able to observe, for the first time, the cyclized products of both N1 and N7 cyclization bound in the active site of Aplysia cyclase.

  13. Ion channel clustering by membrane-associated guanylate kinases. Differential regulation by N-terminal lipid and metal binding motifs.

    PubMed

    El-Husseini, A E; Topinka, J R; Lehrer-Graiwer, J E; Firestein, B L; Craven, S E; Aoki, C; Bredt, D S

    2000-08-04

    The postsynaptic density protein PSD-95 and related membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) proteins assemble signal transduction complexes at sites of cell-cell contact including synapses. Whereas PSD-95 and PSD-93 occur only at postsynaptic sites in hippocampal neurons, SAP-102 also occurs in axons. In heterologous cells, PSD-95 and PSD-93 mediate cell surface ion channel clustering, but SAP-102 and SAP-97 do not. This selective ion channel clustering activity by MAGUKs is explained by differential palmitoylation, as PSD-93 and PSD-95 are palmitoylated though SAP-97, and SAP-102 are not. Rather than being palmitoylated, we find that N-terminal cysteines from SAP-102 tightly bind to zinc. And, appending the N terminus of SAP-102 to PSD-95 results in localization of the chimera to both axons and dendrites. These data suggest that lipid modifications and heavy metal associations with the N termini of MAGUKs mediate differential functions and subcellular localizations of these synaptic scaffolds.

  14. Structure of human guanylate-binding protein 1 representing a unique class of GTP-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Prakash, B; Praefcke, G J; Renault, L; Wittinghofer, A; Herrmann, C

    2000-02-03

    Interferon-gamma is an immunomodulatory substance that induces the expression of many genes to orchestrate a cellular response and establish the antiviral state of the cell. Among the most abundant antiviral proteins induced by interferon-gamma are guanylate-binding proteins such as GBP1 and GBP2. These are large GTP-binding proteins of relative molecular mass 67,000 with a high-turnover GTPase activity and an antiviral effect. Here we have determined the crystal structure of full-length human GBP1 to 1.8 A resolution. The amino-terminal 278 residues constitute a modified G domain with a number of insertions compared to the canonical Ras structure, and the carboxy-terminal part is an extended helical domain with unique features. From the structure and biochemical experiments reported here, GBP1 appears to belong to the group of large GTP-binding proteins that includes Mx and dynamin, the common property of which is the ability to undergo oligomerization with a high concentration-dependent GTPase activity.

  15. Interferon-inducible guanylate-binding proteins at the interface of cell-autonomous immunity and inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Man, Si Ming; Place, David E; Kuriakose, Teneema; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2017-01-01

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) are essential components of cell-autonomous immunity. In response to IFN signaling, GBPs are expressed in the cytoplasm of immune and nonimmune cells, where they unleash their antimicrobial activity toward intracellular bacteria, viruses, and parasites. Recent studies have revealed that GBPs are essential for mediating activation of the caspase-1 inflammasome in response to the gram-negative bacteria Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Francisella novicida, Chlamydia muridarum, Chlamydia trachomatis, Legionella pneumophila, Vibrio cholerae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Citrobacter koseri During infection with vacuolar-restricted gram-negative bacteria, GBPs disrupt the vacuolar membrane to ensure liberation of LPS for cytoplasmic detection by caspase-11 and the noncanonical NLRP3 inflammasome. In response to certain cytosolic bacteria, GBPs liberate microbial DNA for activation of the DNA-sensing AIM2 inflammasome. GBPs also promote the recruitment of antimicrobial proteins, including NADPH oxidase subunits and autophagy-associated proteins to the Mycobacterium-containing vacuole to mediate intracellular bacterial killing. Here, we provide an overview on the emerging relationship between GBPs and activation of the inflammasome in innate immunity to microbial pathogens.

  16. Interferon-induced guanylate-binding proteins: mapping of the murine Gbp-1 locus to chromosome 3.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, M; Staeheli, P; Holmes, R S; Haller, O

    1985-09-01

    GBP-1 is the predominant species of a family of guanylate-binding proteins synthesized in mouse cells in response to interferons (IFNs) alpha, beta, or gamma. IFN inducibility of this 65,000-Da protein is controlled by alleles at a single autosomal locus, Gbp-1, with allele a encoding inducibility and allele b noninducibility. Here, we present evidence suggesting that both alleles occur in outbred populations of wild mice. Using recombinant inbred strains and classical linkage analysis of offspring of two-point and three-point backcrosses we demonstrate that Gbp-1 is linked to Adh-3 (encoding alcohol dehydrogenase C2) and VaJ (varitintwaddler-Jackson) located on the distal part of chromosome 3. The relevant recombination frequencies (RFs) (+/- SE) were 3.5 (+/- 1.1) and 11.7 (+/- 2.8)%, respectively. We further show that strain B6.C-H-23c/By(HW 53), congenic for a small segment of chromosome 3, carries the BALB/c alleles at both the Gbp-1 and the Adh-3 locus and not the alleles of the B6 background strain confirming the chromosomal location and close linkage of the two loci.

  17. Downregulation of nitrovasodilator-induced cyclic GMP accumulation in cells exposed to endotoxin or interleukin-1 beta.

    PubMed Central

    Papapetropoulos, A.; Abou-Mohamed, G.; Marczin, N.; Murad, F.; Caldwell, R. W.; Catravas, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    1. Induction of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) results in overproduction of nitric oxide (NO), which may be a principal cause of the massive vasodilatation and hypotension observed in septic shock. Since NO-induced vasorelaxation is mediated via the soluble isoform of guanylate cyclase (sGC), the regulation of sGC activity during shock is of obvious importance, but yet poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the activation of sGC by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) before and after exposure of rat aortic smooth muscle cells to endotoxin (LPS) or interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta). 2. Exposure of rat aortic smooth muscle cells to SNP (10 microM) elicited up to 200 fold increases in cyclic GMP. This effect was attenuated by 30-70% in IL-1 beta- or LPS-pretreated cells, in a pretreatment time-and IL-1 beta- or LPS-concentration-dependent manner. When, however, cells were exposed to IL-1 beta or LPS and then stimulated with the particulate guanylate cyclase activator, atriopeptin II, no reduction in cyclic GMP accumulation was observed. 3. Pretreatment of rats with LPS (5 mg kg-1, i.v.) for 6 h led to a decrease in aortic ring SNP-induced cyclic GMP accumulation. 4. The IL-1 beta-induced reduction in SNP-stimulated cyclic GMP accumulation in cultured cells was dependent on NO production, as arginine depletion abolished the downregulation of cyclic GMP accumulation in response to SNP. 5. Reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that the ratio of steady state mRNA for the alpha, subunit of sGC to glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase was decreased in LPS- or IL-1 beta-treated cells, as compared to vehicle-treated cells. 6. Protein levels of the alpha 1 sGC subunit remained unaltered upon exposure to LPS or IL-1 beta, suggesting that the early decreased cyclic GMP accumulation in IL-1 beta- or LPS-pretreated cells was probably due to reduced sGC activation. Thus, the observed decreased responsiveness of sGC to NO stimulation

  18. Spasmolytic effect of curcumin on goat ruminal artery is endothelium independent and by activation of sGC.

    PubMed

    Dash, J R; Parija, S C

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the mechanism of action of curcumin in vasomotion of a physiologically important artery of ruminant i.e. ruminal artery. ACh and SNP were used to study the role of endothelium in relaxation of this artery. Vasorelaxatation by curcumin was studied in a dose dependent manner, on rings precontracted with 5-hydroxy tryptamine and noradrenalin, in presence and absence of L-NAME, 4AP, ODQ and 4AP+ODQ combination. SNP (1 ηM-100 μM) produced a significant relaxation compared to ACh (0.1-100 μM) on 5-HT (10 μM) and NA (10 μM) induced contraction in endothelium intact rings. Curcumin (10 ηM-100 μM) relaxed the vascular rings in dose dependent manner with maximal relaxation up to 20.94% and 13.81% in 5-HT and NA induced contraction, respectively which was potently blocked by ODQ (10 μM) and combination of 4AP and ODQ (10 μM) but 4AP (10 μM) and L-NAME (100 μM) alone could not block the relaxation and interestingly we observed a slight increase in the tension at higher dose of the agonist (>10 μM). Therefore in goat ruminal artery, curcumin at least in part, act via direct activation of sGC mediated cGMP pathway followed by opening of K(+) ion channel. However other mechanisms may not be ruled out.

  19. Microscopical localization on adenylate cyclase: a historical review of methodologies.

    PubMed

    Richards, P A; Richards, P D

    1998-03-15

    The histochemistry technique for localizing adenylate cyclase has been developed over the past two decades. Early efforts were directed at overcoming the criticism of the lead capture technique, the inhibition of the enzyme by fixation, and problems associated with the substrate. The introduction of alternative metal ions, strontium and cerium, offered solutions to the criticism of the lead capture technique. The inhibition of the enzyme by the various fixation methods used has been rarely overcome satisfactorily and the use of non-fixed material during incubation is one of the alternatives that has been suggested. The introduction of adenylate (beta-gamma-methylene) diphosphate as an alternative substrate offers a solution to the problems associated with commercially available adenylyl imidodiphosphate. Although no standard medium or method has been accepted by all researchers, the histochemical technique still has a place in the arsenal of the modern cell biologist. The technique localizes the active enzyme, as opposed to the protein, active and nonactive, by immunocytochemistry and the precursors of the protein by in situ hybridization methods.

  20. Guanylyl cyclase C signaling axis and colon cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, Amanda M; Merlino, Dante J; Blomain, Erik S; Waldman, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer-related mortality and morbidity worldwide. While improved treatments have enhanced overall patient outcome, disease burden encompassing quality of life, cost of care, and patient survival has seen little benefit. Consequently, additional advances in CRC treatments remain important, with an emphasis on preventative measures. Guanylyl cyclase C (GUCY2C), a transmembrane receptor expressed on intestinal epithelial cells, plays an important role in orchestrating intestinal homeostatic mechanisms. These effects are mediated by the endogenous hormones guanylin (GUCA2A) and uroguanylin (GUCA2B), which bind and activate GUCY2C to regulate proliferation, metabolism and barrier function in intestine. Recent studies have demonstrated a link between GUCY2C silencing and intestinal dysfunction, including tumorigenesis. Indeed, GUCY2C silencing by the near universal loss of its paracrine hormone ligands increases colon cancer susceptibility in animals and humans. GUCY2C’s role as a tumor suppressor has opened the door to a new paradigm for CRC prevention by hormone replacement therapy using synthetic hormone analogs, such as the FDA-approved oral GUCY2C ligand linaclotide (Linzess™). Here we review the known contributions of the GUCY2C signaling axis to CRC, and relate them to a novel clinical strategy targeting tumor chemoprevention. PMID:27688649

  1. Structure of RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase bound to substrate RNA.

    PubMed

    Desai, Kevin K; Bingman, Craig A; Cheng, Chin L; Phillips, George N; Raines, Ronald T

    2014-10-01

    RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase (RtcA) catalyzes the ATP-dependent cyclization of a 3'-phosphate to form a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate at RNA termini. Cyclization proceeds through RtcA-AMP and RNA(3')pp(5')A covalent intermediates, which are analogous to intermediates formed during catalysis by the tRNA ligase RtcB. Here we present a crystal structure of Pyrococcus horikoshii RtcA in complex with a 3'-phosphate terminated RNA and adenosine in the AMP-binding pocket. Our data reveal that RtcA recognizes substrate RNA by ensuring that the terminal 3'-phosphate makes a large contribution to RNA binding. Furthermore, the RNA 3'-phosphate is poised for in-line attack on the P-N bond that links the phosphorous atom of AMP to N(ε) of His307. Thus, we provide the first insights into RNA 3'-phosphate termini recognition and the mechanism of 3'-phosphate activation by an Rtc enzyme.

  2. Control of Outflow Resistance by Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Suk

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness in the United States affecting as many as 2.2 million Americans. All current glaucoma treatment strategies aim to reduce intraocular pressure, even in patients with normal tension glaucoma. Typically, this is accomplished by reducing the rate of aqueous flow by limiting aqueous production or enhancing drainage using drugs and surgery. Whereas these strategies are effective in diminishing vision loss, some patients continue to lose vision and many discontinue use of their medications because of undesirable side effects. Drugs known to be effective in altering conventional outflow have for the most part been abandoned from modern clinical practice due to undesirable side effects. Identification of new drugs that could enhance conventional outflow, would offer additional options in the treatment of glaucoma and ocular hypertension. To this end, our laboratory has recently uncovered a novel pathway for regulation of conventional outflow by the ciliary body. This pathway is dependent on soluble adenylyl cyclase, an enzyme that catalyzes the generation of cyclic adenosine 3′,5′ monophosphate (cAMP) in response to bicarbonate. PMID:24320087

  3. Photoreceptor IFT complexes containing chaperones, guanylyl cyclase 1 and rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Reshma; Li, Mei; Sun, Jun; Baker, Sheila A; Insinna, Christine; Besharse, Joseph C

    2009-06-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) provides a mechanism for the transport of cilium-specific proteins, but the mechanisms for linkage of cargo and IFT proteins have not been identified. Using the sensory outer segments (OS) of photoreceptors, which are derived from sensory cilia, we have identified IFT-cargo complexes containing IFT proteins, kinesin 2 family proteins, two photoreceptor-specific membrane proteins, guanylyl cyclase 1 (GC1, Gucy2e) and rhodopsin (RHO), and the chaperones, mammalian relative of DNAJ, DnajB6 (MRJ), and HSC70 (Hspa8). Analysis of these complexes leads to a model in which MRJ through its binding to IFT88 and GC1 plays a critical role in formation or stabilization of the IFT-cargo complexes. Consistent with the function of MRJ in the activation of HSC70 ATPase activity, Mg-ATP enhances the co-IP of GC1, RHO, and MRJ with IFT proteins. Furthermore, RNAi knockdown of MRJ in IMCD3 cells expressing GC1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) reduces cilium membrane targeting of GC1-GFP without apparent effect on cilium elongation.

  4. Synthesis of arborane triterpenols by a bacterial oxidosqualene cyclase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banta, Amy B.; Wei, Jeremy H.; Gill, Clare C. C.; Giner, José-Luis; Welander, Paula V.

    2017-01-01

    Cyclic triterpenoids are a broad class of polycyclic lipids produced by bacteria and eukaryotes. They are biologically relevant for their roles in cellular physiology, including membrane structure and function, and biochemically relevant for their exquisite enzymatic cyclization mechanism. Cyclic triterpenoids are also geobiologically significant as they are readily preserved in sediments and are used as biomarkers for ancient life throughout Earth's history. Isoarborinol is one such triterpenoid whose only known biological sources are certain angiosperms and whose diagenetic derivatives (arboranes) are often used as indicators of terrestrial input into aquatic environments. However, the occurrence of arborane biomarkers in Permian and Triassic sediments, which predates the accepted origin of angiosperms, suggests that microbial sources of these lipids may also exist. In this study, we identify two isoarborinol-like lipids, eudoraenol and adriaticol, produced by the aerobic marine heterotrophic bacterium Eudoraea adriatica. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrates that the E. adriatica eudoraenol synthase is an oxidosqualene cyclase homologous to bacterial lanosterol synthases and distinct from plant triterpenoid synthases. Using an Escherichia coli heterologous sterol expression system, we demonstrate that substitution of four amino acid residues in a bacterial lanosterol synthase enabled synthesis of pentacyclic arborinols in addition to tetracyclic sterols. This variant provides valuable mechanistic insight into triterpenoid synthesis and reveals diagnostic amino acid residues to differentiate between sterol and arborinol synthases in genomic and metagenomic datasets. Our data suggest that there may be additional bacterial arborinol producers in marine and freshwater environments that could expand our understanding of these geologically informative lipids.

  5. Activity of squalene-hopene cyclases in bicontinuous microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Steudle, Anne K; Nestl, Bettina M; Hauer, Bernhard; Stubenrauch, Cosima

    2015-11-01

    The paper at hand deals with biocatalysis in bicontinuous microemulsions. The latter consist of a dynamic network of oil and water domains separated by a monolayer of surfactant molecules, i.e. the interfacial layer. A microemulsion with the composition buffer--n-octane--nonionic surfactant was tested as reaction medium for an enzyme-catalysed reaction with a focus on the conversion of hydrophobic substrates, which are difficult to convert in aqueous buffer solutions. For the study at hand, we chose to investigate the activity of the squalene-hopene cyclase from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius (AacSHC) towards its natural substrate squalene in bicontinuous microemulsions. Firstly, the study revealed that the activity of AacSHC depends linearly on the enzyme concentration. Secondly, a hyperbolic curve was found for the dependence of the activity on the substrate concentration and a saturation of the AacSHC at substrate concentrations above 20mM was observed. Thirdly, the composition of the interfacial layer was found to have no significant influence on the activity or on the conformation of AacSHC. Surprisingly and unexpectedly, a distinctly enhanced selectivity towards hopene was discovered in the microemulsion. To conclude, bicontinuous microemulsions were found to be a suitable reaction medium for biocatalytic reactions with the enzyme AacSHC.

  6. Structure-based development of novel adenylyl cyclase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, Christine; Rauch, Annika; Hess, Ken C; Kachholz, Barbara; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen; Steegborn, Clemens

    2008-08-14

    In mammals, the second messenger cAMP is synthesized by a family of transmembrane isoforms (tmACs) and one known cytoplasmic enzyme, "soluble" adenylyl cyclase (sAC). Understanding the individual contributions of these families to cAMP signaling requires tools which can distinguish them. Here, we describe the structure-based development of isoform discriminating AC inhibitors. Docking calculations using a library of small molecules with the crystal structure of a sAC homologue complexed with the noncompetitive inhibitor catechol estrogen identified two novel inhibitors, 3,20-dioxopregn-4-en-21-yl4-bromobenzenesulfonate (2) and 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,13,13,14,14-dodecachloro-1,4,4a,4b,5,8,8a,12b-octahydro-11-sulfo-1,4:5,8-dimethanotriphenylene-10-carboxylic acid (3). In vitro testing revealed that 3 defines a novel AC inhibitor scaffold with high affinity for human sAC and less inhibitory effect on mammalian tmACs. 2 also discriminates between sAC and tmACs, and it appears to simultaneously block the original binding pocket and a neighboring interaction site. Our results show that compounds exploiting the catechol estrogen binding site can produce potent, isoform discriminating AC inhibitors.

  7. Characterization of cancer stem-like cells derived from a side population of a human gallbladder carcinoma cell line, SGC-996

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin-xing; Wang, Jian; Wang, Hao-lu; Wang, Wei; Yin, Xiao-bin; Li, Qi-wei; Chen, Yu-ying; Yi, Jing

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We sorted SP cells from a human gallbladder carcinoma cell lines, SGC-996. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SP cells displayed higher proliferation and stronger clonal-generating capability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SP cells showed more migratory and invasive abilities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SP cells were more resistant and tumorigenic than non-SP counterparts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ABCG2 might be a candidate as a marker for SP cells. -- Abstract: The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis proposes that CSCs, which can renew themselves proliferate infinitely, and escape chemotherapy, become the root of recurrence and metastasis. Previous studies have verified that side population (SP) cells, characterized by their ability to efflux lipophilic substrate Hoechst 33342, to share many characteristics of CSCs in multiplying solid tumors. The purpose of this study was to sort SP cells from a human gallbladder carcinoma cell line, SGC-996 and to preliminarily identify the biological characteristics of SP cells from the cell line. Using flow cytometry we effectively sorted SP cells from the cell line SGC-996. SP cells not only displayed higher proliferative, stronger clonal-generating, more migratory and more invasive capacities, but showed stronger resistance. Furthermore, our experiments demonstrated that SP cells were more tumorigenic than non-SP counterparts in vivo. Real-time PCR analysis and immunocytochemistry showed that the expression of ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) was significantly higher in SP cells. Hence, these results collectively suggest that SP cells are progenitor/stem-like cells and ABCG2 might be a candidate marker for SP cells in human gallbladder cancer.

  8. gamma-Tocotrienol modulates the paracrine secretion of VEGF induced by cobalt(II) chloride via ERK signaling pathway in gastric adenocarcinoma SGC-7901 cell line.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sheng; Liu, Jia-Ren; Li, Yang; Wang, Qi; Liu, Hui-Kun; Yan, Ya-Geng; Chen, Bing-Qing; Sun, Wen-Guang

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common characteristic feature of solid tumors, and carcinoma cells are known to secrete many growth factors. These growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), play a major role in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. In this study, the effect of gamma-tocotrienol, a natural product commonly found in palm oil and rice bran, on the accumulation of HIF-1alpha protein and the paracrine secretion of VEGF in human gastric adenocarcinoma SGC-7901 cell line induced by cobalt(II) chloride (as a hypoxia mimic) was investigated. These results showed that cobalt(II) chloride induced the high expression of VEGF in SGC-7901 cells at dose of 150 micromol/L for 24h. Both basal level and cobalt(II) chloride-induced HIF-1alpha protein accumulation and VEGF paracrine secretion were inhibited in SGC-7901 cells treated with gamma-tocotrienol at 60 micromol/L treatment for 24 h. U0126, a MEK1/2 inhibitor, decreased the expression of HIF-1alpha protein and the paracrine secretion of VEGF under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. In this study, gamma-tocotrienol also significantly inhibited the hypoxia-stimulated expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (p-ERK1/2). The mechanism seems to involve in inhibiting hypoxia-mediated activation of p-ERK1/2, it leads to a marked decrease in hypoxia-induced HIF-1alpha protein accumulation and VEGF secretion. These data suggest that HIF-1alpha/VEGF could be a promising target for gamma-tocotrienol in an effective method of chemoprevention and chemotherapy in human gastric cancer.

  9. Evidence for adenylate cyclase as a scaffold protein for Ras2-Ira interaction in Saccharomyces cerevisie.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Sonia; Paiardi, Chiara; Pardons, Katrien; Winderickx, Joris; Martegani, Enzo

    2014-05-01

    Data in literature suggest that budding yeast adenylate cyclase forms a membrane-associated complex with the upstream components of the cAMP/PKA pathway. Here we provide evidences that adenylate cyclase (Cyr1p) acts as a scaffold protein keeping Ras2 available for its regulatory factors. We show that in a strain with deletion of the CYR1 gene (cyr1Δ pde2Δ msn2Δ msn4Δ) the basal Ras2-GTP level is very high and this is independent on the lack of feedback inhibition that could result from the absence of adenylate cyclase activity. Moreover, strains effected either in the intrinsic adenylate cyclase activity (fil1 strain) or in the stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity by active G-proteins (lcr1 strain) had a normal basal and glucose-induced Ras2-GTP level, indicating that adenylate cyclase activity does not influence the Ras2 activation state and suggesting that Cyr1 protein is required for the proper interaction between Ras2 and the Ira proteins. We also provide evidence that the two Ras-binding sites mapped on Cyr1p are required for the signalling complex assembly. In fact, we show that the cyr1Δ strain expressing CYR1 alleles lacking either the LRR region or the C-terminal domain still have a high basal and glucose-induced Ras2-GTP level. In contrast, a mutant expressing a Cyr1 protein only missing the N-terminal domain showed a normal Ras2 activation pattern. Likewise, the Ras2-GTP levels are comparable in the wild type strain and the srv2Δ strain, supporting the hypothesis that Cap is not essential for the Ras-adenylate cyclase interaction.

  10. A lycopene β-cyclase/lycopene ε-cyclase/light-harvesting complex-fusion protein from the green alga Ostreococcus lucimarinus can be modified to produce α-carotene and β-carotene at different ratios.

    PubMed

    Blatt, Andreas; Bauch, Matthias E; Pörschke, Yvonne; Lohr, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Biosynthesis of asymmetric carotenoids such as α-carotene and lutein in plants and green algae involves the two enzymes lycopene β-cyclase (LCYB) and lycopene ε-cyclase (LCYE). The two cyclases are closely related and probably resulted from an ancient gene duplication. While in most plants investigated so far the two cyclases are encoded by separate genes, prasinophyte algae of the order Mamiellales contain a single gene encoding a fusion protein comprised of LCYB, LCYE and a C-terminal light-harvesting complex (LHC) domain. Here we show that the lycopene cyclase fusion protein from Ostreococcus lucimarinus catalyzed the simultaneous formation of α-carotene and β-carotene when heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The stoichiometry of the two products in E. coli could be altered by gradual truncation of the C-terminus, suggesting that the LHC domain may be involved in modulating the relative activities of the two cyclase domains in the algae. Partial deletions of the linker region between the cyclase domains or replacement of one or both cyclase domains with the corresponding cyclases from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii resulted in pronounced shifts of the α-carotene-to-β-carotene ratio, indicating that both the relative activities of the cyclase domains and the overall structure of the fusion protein have a strong impact on the product stoichiometry. The possibility to tune the product ratio of the lycopene cyclase fusion protein from Mamiellales renders it useful for the biotechnological production of the asymmetric carotenoids α-carotene or lutein in bacteria or fungi.

  11. Involvement of Brain-Enriched Guanylate Kinase-Associated Protein (BEGAIN) in Chronic Pain after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Masafumi; Furue, Hidemasa; Abe, Manabu; Nishida, Kazuhiko; Yao, Ikuko; Yamada, Akihiro; Okumura, Nobuaki; Nakazawa, Takanobu; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Sakimura, Kenji; Takao, Toshifumi; Ito, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of neuropathic pain caused by peripheral nerve injury crucially depends on the phosphorylation of GluN2B, a subunit of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, at Tyr1472 (Y1472) and subsequent formation of a postsynaptic density (PSD) complex of superficial spinal dorsal horn neurons. Here we took advantage of comparative proteomic analysis based on isobaric stable isotope tags (iTRAQ) between wild-type and knock-in mice with a mutation of Y1472 to Phe of GluN2B (Y1472F-KI) to search for PSD proteins in the spinal dorsal horn that mediate the signaling downstream of phosphorylated Y1472 GluN2B. Among several candidate proteins, we focused on brain-enriched guanylate kinase-associated protein (BEGAIN), which was specifically up-regulated in wild-type mice after spared nerve injury (SNI). Immunohistochemical analysis using the generated antibody demonstrated that BEGAIN was highly localized at the synapse of inner lamina II in the spinal dorsal horn and that its expression was up-regulated after SNI in wild-type, but not in Y1472F-KI, mice. In addition, alteration of the kinetics of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents for NMDA but not those for α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors in spinal lamina II was demonstrated by BEGAIN deletion. We demonstrated that mechanical allodynia, a condition of abnormal pain induced by innocuous stimuli, in the SNI model was significantly attenuated in BEGAIN-deficient mice. However, there was no significant difference between naive wild-type and BEGAIN-knockout mice in terms of physiological threshold for mechanical stimuli. These results suggest that BEGAIN was involved in pathological pain transmission through NMDA receptor activation by the phosphorylation of GluN2B at Y1472 in spinal inner lamina II. PMID:27785460

  12. Prenylation of an interferon-gamma-induced GTP-binding protein: the human guanylate binding protein, huGBP1.

    PubMed

    Nantais, D E; Schwemmle, M; Stickney, J T; Vestal, D J; Buss, J E

    1996-09-01

    Interferons (IFN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cause multiple changes in isoprenoid-modified proteins in murine macrophages, the most dramatic being the expression of a prenyl protein of 65 kDa. The guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) are IFN-inducible GTP-binding proteins of approximately 65 kDa that possess a CaaX motif at their C-terminus, indicating that they might be substrates for prenyltransferases. The human GBP1 protein, when expressed in transfected COS-1 cells, incorporates radioactivity from the isoprenoid precursor [3H]mevalonate. In addition, huGBPs expressed from the endogenous genes in IFN-gamma-treated human fibroblasts or monocytic cells were also found to be isoprenoid modified. IFN-gamma-induced huGBPs in HL-60 cells were not labeled by the specific C20 isoprenoid, [3H]geranylgeraniol, but did show decreased isoprenoid incorporation in cells treated with the farnesyl transferase inhibitor BZA-5B, indicating that huGBPs in HL-60 cells are probably modified by a C15 farnesyl rather than the more common C20 lipid. Differentiated HL-60 cells treated with IFN-gamma/LPS showed no change in the profile of constitutive isoprenylated proteins and the IFN-gamma/LPS-induced huGBPs remained prenylated. Despite being prenylated, huGBP1 in COS cells and endogenous huGBPs in HL-60 cells were primarily (approximately 85%) cytosolic. Human GBPs are thus among the select group of prenyl proteins whose synthesis is tightly regulated by a cytokine. HuGBP1 is an abundant protein whose prenylation may be vulnerable to farnesyl transferase inhibitors that are designed to prevent farnesylation of Ras proteins.

  13. Molecular and expression analysis of an interferon-gamma-inducible guanylate-binding protein from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Robertsen, Børre; Zou, Jun; Secombes, Chris; Leong, Jo-Ann

    2006-01-01

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) are some of the most abundant proteins accumulating in mammalian cells in response to interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). GBPs have been suggested to function in antiviral activity, macrophage activation, fibroblast proliferation and inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation and invasiveness. Here we confirm that IFN-gamma-inducible GBP also exist in fish. A 2 kb GBP cDNA was cloned from head kidney of rainbow trout treated with an IFN-inducing compound. The open reading frame predicts a 635 amino acid protein (rbtGBP) of 72.7 kDa possessing a tripartite GTP binding motif and a secondary structure similar to human GBP1. Like most mammalian GBPs, rbtGBP possesses an isoprenylation motif at the C-terminal end. The overall amino acid sequence identity between rbtGBP and mammalian GBPs is only 41-47%, however. The rainbow trout macrophage cell line RTS11 showed a dose-dependent increase in rbtGBP transcripts in response to IFN-gamma after 6h of stimulation, with rbtGBP being undetectable in non-treated RTS11 cells. Moreover, polyinosinic polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) induced increased GBP transcript levels in RTS11 and RTG2 cells after 4-6 h of stimulation, and in head kidney and liver of live fish after 24 h. These studies suggest that rbtGBP is an early response gene in rainbow trout, which may have similar functions in IFN-gamma mediated responses as mammalian GBPs.

  14. Guanylate-binding protein 1 (GBP1) contributes to the immunity of human mesenchymal stromal cells against Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Qin, Aiping; Lai, De-Hua; Liu, Qifa; Huang, Weijun; Wu, Ya-Ping; Chen, Xiaoyong; Yan, Sunxing; Xia, Huimin; Hide, Geoff; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Ayala, Francisco J; Xiang, Andy Peng

    2017-02-07

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have recently been shown to play important roles in mammalian host defenses against intracellular pathogens, but the molecular mechanism still needs to be clarified. We confirmed that human MSCs (hMSCs) prestimulated with IFN-γ showed a significant and dose-dependent ability to inhibit the growth of two types of Toxoplasma gondii [type I RH strain with green fluorescent proteins (RH/GFP) or type II PLK strain with red fluorescent proteins (PLK/RED)]. However, in contrast to previous reports, the anti-T. gondii activity of hMSCs was not mediated by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). Genome-wide RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis revealed that IFN-γ increased the expression of the p65 family of human guanylate-binding proteins (hGBPs) in hMSCs, especially hGBP1. To analyze the functional role of hGBPs, stable knockdowns of hGBP1, -2, and -5 in hMSCs were established using a lentiviral transfection system. hGBP1 knockdown in hMSCs resulted in a significant loss of the anti-T. gondii host defense property, compared with hMSCs infected with nontargeted control sequences. hGBP2 and -5 knockdowns had no effect. Moreover, the hGBP1 accumulation on the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) membranes of IFN-γ-stimulated hMSCs might protect against T. gondii infection. Taken together, our results suggest that hGBP1 plays a pivotal role in anti-T. gondii protection of hMSCs and may shed new light on clarifying the mechanism of host defense properties of hMSCs.

  15. Involvement of Brain-Enriched Guanylate Kinase-Associated Protein (BEGAIN) in Chronic Pain after Peripheral Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Katano, Tayo; Fukuda, Masafumi; Furue, Hidemasa; Yamazaki, Maya; Abe, Manabu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Nishida, Kazuhiko; Yao, Ikuko; Yamada, Akihiro; Hata, Yutaka; Okumura, Nobuaki; Nakazawa, Takanobu; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Sakimura, Kenji; Takao, Toshifumi; Ito, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of neuropathic pain caused by peripheral nerve injury crucially depends on the phosphorylation of GluN2B, a subunit of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, at Tyr1472 (Y1472) and subsequent formation of a postsynaptic density (PSD) complex of superficial spinal dorsal horn neurons. Here we took advantage of comparative proteomic analysis based on isobaric stable isotope tags (iTRAQ) between wild-type and knock-in mice with a mutation of Y1472 to Phe of GluN2B (Y1472F-KI) to search for PSD proteins in the spinal dorsal horn that mediate the signaling downstream of phosphorylated Y1472 GluN2B. Among several candidate proteins, we focused on brain-enriched guanylate kinase-associated protein (BEGAIN), which was specifically up-regulated in wild-type mice after spared nerve injury (SNI). Immunohistochemical analysis using the generated antibody demonstrated that BEGAIN was highly localized at the synapse of inner lamina II in the spinal dorsal horn and that its expression was up-regulated after SNI in wild-type, but not in Y1472F-KI, mice. In addition, alteration of the kinetics of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents for NMDA but not those for α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors in spinal lamina II was demonstrated by BEGAIN deletion. We demonstrated that mechanical allodynia, a condition of abnormal pain induced by innocuous stimuli, in the SNI model was significantly attenuated in BEGAIN-deficient mice. However, there was no significant difference between naive wild-type and BEGAIN-knockout mice in terms of physiological threshold for mechanical stimuli. These results suggest that BEGAIN was involved in pathological pain transmission through NMDA receptor activation by the phosphorylation of GluN2B at Y1472 in spinal inner lamina II.

  16. Regulation of Postsynaptic Structure and Function by an A-Kinase Anchoring Protein-Membrane Associated Guanylate Kinase Scaffolding Complex

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Holly R.; Gibson, Emily S.; Benke, Timothy A.; Dell'Acqua, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) 79/150 is a scaffold protein found in dendritic spines that recruits the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and protein phosphatase 2B-calcineurin (CaN) to membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK)-linked AMPA receptors (AMPAR) to control receptor phosphorylation and synaptic plasticity. However, AKAP79/150 may also coordinate regulation of AMPAR activity with spine structure directly through MAGUK binding and membrane-cytoskeletal interactions of its N-terminal targeting domain. In cultured hippocampal neurons, we observed that rat AKAP150 expression was low early in development but then increased coincident with spine formation and maturation. Overexpression of human AKAP79 in immature or mature neurons increased the number of dendritic filopodia and spines and enlarged spine area. However, RNAi knockdown of AKAP150 decreased dendritic spine area only in mature neurons. Importantly, AKAP79 overexpression in immature neurons increased AMPAR postsynaptic localization and activity. Neither the AKAP79 PKA nor CaN anchoring domain was required for increasing dendritic protrusion numbers, spine area or AMPAR synaptic localization; however, an internal region identified as the MAGUK binding domain was found to be essential as shown by expression of a MAGUK binding mutant that formed mainly filopodia and decreased AMPAR synaptic localization and activity. Expression of the AKAP79 N-terminal targeting domain alone also increased filopodia numbers but not spine area. Overall, these results demonstrate a novel structural role for AKAP79/150 where the N-terminal targeting domain induces dendritic filopodia and binding to MAGUKs promotes spine enlargement and AMPAR recruitment. PMID:19535604

  17. Diversity in guanosine 3',5'-bisdiphosphate (ppGpp) sensitivity among guanylate kinases of bacteria and plants.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yuhta; Izumi, Atsushi; Fukunaga, Yoshinori; Kusumi, Kensuke; Iba, Koh; Watanabe, Seiya; Nakahira, Yoichi; Weber, Andreas P M; Nozawa, Akira; Tozawa, Yuzuru

    2014-05-30

    The guanosine 3',5'-bisdiphosphate (ppGpp) signaling system is shared by bacteria and plant chloroplasts, but its role in plants has remained unclear. Here we show that guanylate kinase (GK), a key enzyme in guanine nucleotide biosynthesis that catalyzes the conversion of GMP to GDP, is a target of regulation by ppGpp in chloroplasts of rice, pea, and Arabidopsis. Plants have two distinct types of GK that are localized to organelles (GKpm) or to the cytosol (GKc), with both enzymes being essential for growth and development. We found that the activity of rice GKpm in vitro was inhibited by ppGpp with a Ki of 2.8 μM relative to the substrate GMP, whereas the Km of this enzyme for GMP was 73 μM. The IC50 of ppGpp for GKpm was ∼10 μM. In contrast, the activity of rice GKc was insensitive to ppGpp, as was that of GK from bakers' yeast, which is also a cytosolic enzyme. These observations suggest that ppGpp plays a pivotal role in the regulation of GTP biosynthesis in chloroplasts through specific inhibition of GKpm activity, with the regulation of GTP biosynthesis in chloroplasts thus being independent of that in the cytosol. We also found that GKs of Escherichia coli and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 are insensitive to ppGpp, in contrast to the ppGpp sensitivity of the Bacillus subtilis enzyme. Our biochemical characterization of GK enzymes has thus revealed a novel target of ppGpp in chloroplasts and has uncovered diversity among bacterial GKs with regard to regulation by ppGpp.

  18. Genetic and biochemical analysis of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein, cap, in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    Kawamukai, M; Gerst, J; Field, J; Riggs, M; Rodgers, L; Wigler, M; Young, D

    1992-01-01

    We have identified, cloned, and studied a gene, cap, encoding a protein that is associated with adenylyl cyclase in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This protein shares significant sequence homology with the adenylyl cyclase-associated CAP protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. CAP is a bifunctional protein; the N-terminal domain appears to be involved in cellular responsiveness to RAS, whereas loss of the C-terminal portion is associated with morphological and nutritional defects. S. pombe cap can suppress phenotypes associated with deletion of the C-terminal CAP domain in S. cerevisiae but does not suppress phenotypes associated with deletion of the N-terminal domain. Analysis of cap disruptants also mapped the function of cap to two domains. The functional loss of the C-terminal region of S. pombe cap results in abnormal cellular morphology, slow growth, and failure to grow at 37 degrees C. Increases in mating and sporulation were observed when the entire gene was disrupted. Overproduction of both cap and adenylyl cyclase results in highly elongated large cells that are sterile and have measurably higher levels of adenylyl cyclase activity. Our results indicate that cap is required for the proper function of S. pombe adenylyl cyclase but that the C-terminal domain of cap has other functions that are shared with the C-terminal domain of S. cerevisiae CAP. Images PMID:1550959

  19. Identification of olivetolic acid cyclase from Cannabis sativa reveals a unique catalytic route to plant polyketides.

    PubMed

    Gagne, Steve J; Stout, Jake M; Liu, Enwu; Boubakir, Zakia; Clark, Shawn M; Page, Jonathan E

    2012-07-31

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other cannabinoids are responsible for the psychoactive and medicinal properties of Cannabis sativa L. (marijuana). The first intermediate in the cannabinoid biosynthetic pathway is proposed to be olivetolic acid (OA), an alkylresorcinolic acid that forms the polyketide nucleus of the cannabinoids. OA has been postulated to be synthesized by a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) enzyme, but so far type III PKSs from cannabis have been shown to produce catalytic byproducts instead of OA. We analyzed the transcriptome of glandular trichomes from female cannabis flowers, which are the primary site of cannabinoid biosynthesis, and searched for polyketide cyclase-like enzymes that could assist in OA cyclization. Here, we show that a type III PKS (tetraketide synthase) from cannabis trichomes requires the presence of a polyketide cyclase enzyme, olivetolic acid cyclase (OAC), which catalyzes a C2-C7 intramolecular aldol condensation with carboxylate retention to form OA. OAC is a dimeric α+β barrel (DABB) protein that is structurally similar to polyketide cyclases from Streptomyces species. OAC transcript is present at high levels in glandular trichomes, an expression profile that parallels other cannabinoid pathway enzymes. Our identification of OAC both clarifies the cannabinoid pathway and demonstrates unexpected evolutionary parallels between polyketide biosynthesis in plants and bacteria. In addition, the widespread occurrence of DABB proteins in plants suggests that polyketide cyclases may play an overlooked role in generating plant chemical diversity.

  20. Characterization of the purine-reactive site of the rat testis cytosolic adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Onoda, J M; Braun, T; Wrenn, S M

    1987-06-15

    Naturally soluble rat germ cell adenylate cyclase was inhibited by adenosine and the adenosine analogs, 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl adenine (AFA) and 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine (DDA), all of which inhibited hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclases at the "P" site. The IC50 values for adenosine and DDA were approximately 0.1 and for AFA, 4.0 mM. The onset of adenosine inhibition was very rapid whether adenosine was added to the enzyme reactant mixture at time zero concomitantly with the addition of substrate or after the enzyme had been activated by the addition of substrate. The adenosine analogs, N6-methyladenosine (MeA) and N6-phenylisopropyl adenosine (PIA), which interact with plasma membrane receptors ("R" receptors) for hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase, had little effect on the activity of the cytosolic adenylate cyclase. Additionally, aminophylline, which has been shown to competitively antagonize adenosine interactions with the plasma membrane "R" receptors but not "P" site interactions, had no effect upon substrate activation of the soluble enzyme and did not prevent adenosine from inhibiting the activity of the enzyme. These data provide evidence for an adenosine regulatory site on the cytosolic enzyme which resembles the "P" site described for membrane bound-adenylate cyclase.

  1. Adenylate cyclase of human articular chondrocytes. Responsiveness to prostaglandins and other hormones.

    PubMed Central

    Houston, J P; McGuire, M K; Meats, J E; Ebsworth, N M; Russell, R G; Crawford, A; Mac Neil, S

    1982-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] was shown to be present in cultured human articular chondrocytes. Optimal conditions of incubation time, protein and substrate concentrations and pH were determined in whole cell lysates. Maximal activity occurred at pH 8.5 with no decrease in activity up to pH 10.0. Adenylate cyclase activity of particulate membrane preparations was enhanced by the addition of crude cytosol preparations. The prostaglandins E1, E2, F1 alpha, F2 alpha, D2, B1, B2, A1 and A2, as well as adrenaline and isoprenaline, stimulated adenylate cyclase derived from either adult or foetal chondrocytes. No significant stimulation was observed in the presence of human calcitonin or glucagon. Bovine parathyroid hormone always significantly stimulated the adenylate cyclase derived from foetal chondrocytes, but not from adult chondrocytes. Preincubation of the chondrocytes in culture with indomethacin and with or without supernatant medium from cultured mononuclear cells increased the responsiveness of the adenylate cyclase to prostaglandin E1. PMID:7159397

  2. Cloning and Functional Characterization of a Lycopene β-Cyclase from Macrophytic Red Alga Bangia fuscopurpurea.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tian-Jun; Huang, Xing-Qi; Qu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhuang, Zhong; Deng, Yin-Yin; Lu, Shan

    2017-04-11

    Lycopene cyclases cyclize the open ends of acyclic lycopene (ψ,ψ-carotene) into β- or ε-ionone rings in the crucial bifurcation step of carotenoid biosynthesis. Among all carotenoid constituents, β-carotene (β,β-carotene) is found in all photosynthetic organisms, except for purple bacteria and heliobacteria, suggesting a ubiquitous distribution of lycopene β-cyclase activity in these organisms. In this work, we isolated a gene (BfLCYB) encoding a lycopene β-cyclase from Bangia fuscopurpurea, a red alga that is considered to be one of the primitive multicellular eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms and accumulates carotenoid constituents with both β- and ε-rings, including β-carotene, zeaxanthin, α-carotene (β,ε-carotene) and lutein. Functional complementation in Escherichia coli demonstrated that BfLCYB is able to catalyze cyclization of lycopene into monocyclic γ-carotene (β,ψ-carotene) and bicyclic β-carotene, and cyclization of the open end of monocyclic δ-carotene (ε,ψ-carotene) to produce α-carotene. No ε-cyclization activity was identified for BfLCYB. Sequence comparison showed that BfLCYB shares conserved domains with other functionally characterized lycopene cyclases from different organisms and belongs to a group of ancient lycopene cyclases. Although B. fuscopurpurea also synthesizes α-carotene and lutein, its enzyme-catalyzing ε-cyclization is still unknown.

  3. Antitumor and antimetastasis effects of carboplatin liposomes with polyethylene glycol-2000 on SGC-7901 gastric cell-bearing nude mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianzhong; Huang, Changming; Huang, Heguang

    2014-11-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the characteristics of polyethylene glycol (PEG)ylated carboplatin liposomes (PL-CBPs), including size, stability, their release, entrapping and loading efficiencies, and their antitumor and antimetastatic effects on the lymph nodes. The PL-CBPs were prepared using PEG-2000 with the thin film hydration method. The liposome size and release, entrapping and loading efficiencies were detected by ultra-violet/visible spectrophotometry. A nude mouse model was established with the SGC-7901 gastric cell line to evaluate the antitumor effect of the PL-CBP. After 7 days, the mice were randomly divided into three groups (the control, CBP, and PL-CBP groups). CBP and PL-CBP were administered at a dose of 10 mg/kg for two consecutive cycles of treatment, 5 days apart, to their respective groups. In each group, two doses of 5 mg/kg were administered every 48 h. The tumor weight and volume were detected, and the food intake and body weight were measured during the administration. Apoptosis in the tumor cells was evaluated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling and platinum (Pt) accumulation was detected by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Lastly, lymph node metastasis was evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The PL-CBPs were more stable when comapred with CBP alone, and the drug release efficiency was 0.7, 22.5, 48.7 and 65.1% at 37°C for 0, 12, 24 and 48 h. The results showed that the encapsulation efficiency was 85% and the loading efficiency was 0.15 mg/mg lipid. After 35 days, PL-CBP induced potent antitumor effects compared with the control and CBP groups (PL-CBP vs. control, P<0.01; PL-CBP vs. CBP, P<0.05). PL-CBP and CBP induced a lower and the lowest body weight and level of food intake, respectively, compared with the control group (CBP vs. control, P<0.05). The apoptosis rate and lymph node metastasis in the PL-CBP group was higher than that in the CBP and control groups (PL-CBP vs. control, P

  4. Cyclase inhibitor tripropylamine significantly enhanced lycopene accumulation in Blakeslea trispora.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanlong; Chen, Xiwen; Hong, Xiao; Du, Shipeng; Liu, Chunxiao; Gong, Wenfang; Chen, Defu

    2016-11-01

    Lycopene is a member of carotenoids that exhibits strong antioxidant activity. In this study, on the basis of screening suitable strain combination [ATCC 14271(+) and ATCC 14272(-)] and establishing the optimal inoculation proportion of mated culture (1/2, +/-, w/w) for carotenoid production, the efficiency of compounds, mainly tertiary amines, on enhancing the lycopene content of Blakeslea trispora was systematically assessed. Of these compounds, tripropylamine showed the best enhancing effect, and then sequentially followed by triethylamine, tributylamine, trimethylamine, diisopropylamine, and isopropylamine. After treated with 1.8 g/L tripropylamine for two days, the lycopene proportion was increased from 1.7% to 90.1%, while the β-carotene proportion was decreased from 91.1% to 6.4% of the total carotenoids. In this case, the lycopene and total carotenoid contents were increased to 83.2 and 92.4 mg/gDW, which were 315.8- and 5.9-fold of that of the untreated control, respectively; while the growth of mycelia was only decreased at 6.0 g/L tripropylamine. Gene expression analysis showed that all the tested genes, especially genes encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (hmgr) and isopentenyl pyrophosphate isomerase (ipi) in mevalonate pathway, as well as phytoene desaturase (carB) in carotenoid biosynthesis process were upregulated. Therefore, tripropylamine enhanced lycopene content of B. trispora by inhibiting the cyclase activity, and by upregulating the expression of genes associated with terpenoid biosynthesis. Besides, a possible association between the structure and the lycopene-enhancing capability of these compounds was also discussed.

  5. Localization of nigrostriatal dopamine receptor subtypes and adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Filloux, F.; Dawson, T.M.; Wamsley, J.K.

    1988-04-01

    Quantitative autoradiography using (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390, (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride and (/sup 3/H)-forskolin was used to assess the effects of single and combined neurotoxin lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway in the rat brain on dopamine (DA) receptor subtypes and adenylate cyclase (AC), respectively. Ibotenic acid (IA) lesions of the caudate-putamen (CPu) resulted in near total loss of both (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 and of (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding in the ipsilateral CPu and substantia nigra reticulata (SNR). (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the CPu was only partially removed by this same lesion, and nigral (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding was virtually unchanged. 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and IA lesions of the substantia nigra compacta (SNC) did not affect (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 or (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding, but largely removed (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the SNC. A 6-OHDA lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway followed by an ipsilateral IA injection of the CPu failed to further reduce (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the CPu. These results demonstrate that postsynaptic DA receptors in the CPu are of both the D1 and D2 variety; however, a portion of D2 receptors in the CPu may be presynaptic on afferent nerve terminals to this structure. D1 receptors in the SNR are presynaptic on striatonigral terminals, whereas the D2 receptors of the SNC are autoreceptors on nigral DA neurons. The existence of presynaptic D2 receptors on nigrostriatal DA-ergic terminals could not be confirmed by this study. Co-localization of D1 receptors and AC occurs in both the CPu and SNR.

  6. Activation and inhibition of adenylyl cyclase isoforms by forskolin analogs.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Cibele; Papa, Dan; Hübner, Melanie; Mou, Tung-Chung; Lushington, Gerald H; Seifert, Roland

    2008-04-01

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms 1 to 9 are differentially expressed in tissues and constitute an interesting drug target. ACs 1 to 8 are activated by the diterpene, forskolin (FS). It is unfortunate that there is a paucity of AC isoform-selective activators. To develop such compounds, an understanding of the structure/activity relationships of diterpenes is necessary. Therefore, we examined the effects of FS and nine FS analogs on ACs 1, 2, and 5 expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. Diterpenes showed the highest potencies at AC1 and the lowest potencies at AC2. We identified full agonists, partial agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists, i.e., diterpenes that reduced basal AC activity. Each AC isoform exhibited a distinct pharmacological profile. AC2 showed the highest basal activity of all AC isoforms and highest sensitivity to inverse agonistic effects of 1-deoxy-forskolin, 7-deacetyl-1,9-dideoxy-forskolin, and, particularly, BODIPY-forskolin. In contrast, BODIPY-forskolin acted as partial agonist at the other ACs. 1-Deoxy-forskolin analogs were devoid of agonistic activity at ACs but antagonized the effects of FS in a mixed competitive/noncompetitive manner. At purified catalytic AC subunits, BODIPY-forskolin acted as weak partial agonist/strong partial antagonist. Molecular modeling revealed that the BODIPY group rotates promiscuously outside of the FS-binding site. Collectively, ACs are not uniformly activated and inhibited by FS and FS analogs, demonstrating the feasibility to design isoform-selective FS analogs. The two- and multiple-state models, originally developed to conceptualize ligand effects at G-protein-coupled receptors, can be applied to ACs to explain certain experimental data.

  7. Adenylate cyclase regulates elongation of mammalian primary cilia

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, Young; Ruan, Yibing; Cheng, Min; Moser, Joanna J.; Rattner, Jerome B.; Hoorn, Frans A. van der

    2009-10-01

    The primary cilium is a non-motile microtubule-based structure that shares many similarities with the structures of flagella and motile cilia. It is well known that the length of flagella is under stringent control, but it is not known whether this is true for primary cilia. In this study, we found that the length of primary cilia in fibroblast-like synoviocytes, either in log phase culture or in quiescent state, was confined within a range. However, when lithium was added to the culture to a final concentration of 100 mM, primary cilia of synoviocytes grew beyond this range, elongating to a length that was on average approximately 3 times the length of untreated cilia. Lithium is a drug approved for treating bipolar disorder. We dissected the molecular targets of this drug, and observed that inhibition of adenylate cyclase III (ACIII) by specific inhibitors mimicked the effects of lithium on primary cilium elongation. Inhibition of GSK-3{beta} by four different inhibitors did not induce primary cilia elongation. ACIII was found in primary cilia of a variety of cell types, and lithium treatment of these cell types led to their cilium elongation. Further, we demonstrate that different cell types displayed distinct sensitivities to the lithium treatment. However, in all cases examined primary cilia elongated as a result of lithium treatment. In particular, two neuronal cell types, rat PC-12 adrenal medulla cells and human astrocytes, developed long primary cilia when lithium was used at or close to the therapeutic relevant concentration (1-2 mM). These results suggest that the length of primary cilia is controlled, at least in part, by the ACIII-cAMP signaling pathway.

  8. The development of Sustainability Graduate Community (SGC) as a learning pathway for sustainability education - a framework for engineering programmes in Malaysia Technical Universities Network (MTUN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johan, Kartina; Mohd Turan, Faiz

    2016-11-01

    ‘Environmental and sustainability’ is one of the Program Outcome (PO) designated by the Board of Engineers Malaysia (BEM) as one of the accreditation program requirement. However, to-date the implementation of sustainability elements in engineering programme in the technical universities in Malaysia is within individual faculty's curriculum plan and lack of university-level structured learning pathway, which enable all students to have access to an education in sustainability across all disciplines. Sustainability Graduate Community (SGC) is a framework designed to provide a learning pathway in the curriculum of engineering programs to inculcate sustainability education among engineering graduates. This paper aims to study the required attributes in Sustainability Graduate Community (SGC) framework to produce graduates who are not just engineers but also skilful in sustainability competencies using Global Project Management (GPM) P5 Standard for Sustainability. The development of the conceptual framework is to provide a constructive teaching and learning plan for educators and policy makers to work on together in developing the Sustainability Graduates (SG), the new kind of graduates from Malaysia Technical Universities Network (MTUN) in Malaysia who are literate in sustainability practices. The framework also support the call for developing holistic students based on Malaysian Education Blueprint (Higher Education) and address the gap between the statuses of engineering qualification to the expected competencies from industries in Malaysia in particular by achieving the SG attributes outlined in the framework

  9. Inhibition of PRL-3 gene expression in gastric cancer cell line SGC7901 via microRNA suppressed reduces peritoneal metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhengrong; Zhan Wenhua . E-mail: wcywk@hotmail.com; Wang Zhao; Zhu Baohe; He Yulong; Peng Junsheng; Cai Shirong; Ma Jinping

    2006-09-15

    High expression of PRL-3, a protein tyrosine phosphatase, is proved to be associated with lymph node metastasis in gastric carcinoma from previous studies. In this paper, we examined the relationship between PRL-3 expression and peritoneal metastasis in gastric carcinoma. We applied the artificial miRNA (pCMV-PRL3miRNA), which is based on the murine miR-155 sequence, to efficiently silence the target gene expression of PRL-3 in SGC7901 gastric cancer cells at both mRNA and protein levels. Then we observed that, in vitro, pCMV-PRL3miRNA significantly depressed the SGC7901 cell invasion and migration independent of cellular proliferation. In vivo, PRL-3 knockdown effectively suppressed the growth of peritoneal metastases and improved the prognosis in nude mice. Therefore, we concluded that artificial miRNA can depress the expression of PRL-3, and that PRL-3 might be a potential therapeutic target for gastric cancer peritoneal metastasis.

  10. Pseudolaric acid B circumvents multidrug resistance phenotype in human gastric cancer SGC7901/ADR cells by downregulating Cox-2 and P-gp expression.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Li, Kai; Chen, Suning; Liu, Yunpeng; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a challenging issue in the treatment of gastric cancer. Pseudolaric acid B is a new diterpene acid compound isolated from pseudolarix, which has been found to have anti-tumor activities in recent studies. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of pseudolaric acid B in an MDR gastric cancer cell line and elucidate the possible underlying mechanisms of action. SGC7901/ADR, a P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-overexpressing cell line, was used to evaluate the efficacy of pseudolaric acid B against MDR phenotypes. The effects of pseudolaric acid B and chemotherapeutic agents on cell proliferation and apoptosis were assessed using the MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Immunocytochemistry and Western blot were used to detect the possible relevant molecules in order to elucidate the underlying mechanism of action. The results showed that pseudolaric acid B inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in SGC7901/ADR cells. A low dose of pseudolaric acid B (0.5 µmol/L) augmented the inhibitory effects of chemotherapeutic agents on proliferation (p < 0.05). The expression of P-gp and cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2) was downregulated with pseudolaric acid B treatment. The present results showed that pseudolaric acid B inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, circumvented MDR, and increased the sensitivity of chemotherapeutic agents in vitro by downregulating the expression of P-gp and Cox-2.

  11. Distribution of adenylate cyclase and GTP-binding proteins in hepatic plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Dixon, B S; Sutherland, E; Alexander, A; Nibel, D; Simon, F R

    1993-10-01

    Hepatic membrane subfractions prepared from control rats demonstrated forskolin (FSK)-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in the basolateral (sinusoidal) but not apical (canalicular) plasma membrane. After bile duct ligation (BDL) for 12 or 24 h, there was an increase in FSK-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in the apical membrane (54.2 +/- 3.9 pmol.mg-1 x min-1). The mechanism for this increase was explored further. ATP hydrolysis was found to be much higher in the apical than the basolateral membrane. Increasing the ATP levels in the assay enhanced apical membrane adenylate cyclase activity (10.5 +/- 0.2 pmol.mg-l.min-1); however, total adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) activity was not altered after BDL. Extraction of the apical membrane with bile acids or other detergents resulted in a two- to threefold increase in adenylate cyclase activity (30.6 +/- 3.6 pmol.mg-1 x min-1; detergent C12E8) This suggested that bile duct ligation was acting via the detergent-like action of bile acids to uncover latent adenylate cyclase activity on apical membranes. Further studies demonstrated that both BDL and detergent extraction also enhanced toxin-directed ADP-ribosylation of Gs alpha (cholera toxin) and Gi alpha (pertussis toxin) in the apical but not the basolateral membrane. After BDL, Gi alpha was found to be twofold greater in the apical membrane than the basolateral membrane. Immunoblotting using specific G protein antibodies further confirmed that apical membranes from control rats had a higher concentration of Gi1, 2 alpha and beta and slightly elevated levels of Gi3 alpha and Gs alpha compared with the basolateral membrane. The results demonstrate that adenylate cyclase and heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins are present on the apical membrane, but measurement of their functional activity requires detergent permeabilization of apical membrane vesicles and is limited by the presence of high ATPase activity.

  12. The invasive adenylate cyclase of Bordetella pertussis. Properties and penetration kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, E; Farfel, Z; Hanski, E

    1987-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative organism of whooping cough, produces a calmodulin-sensitive adenylate cyclase. Confer & Eaton [(1982) Science 217, 948-950] have shown that an extract from B. pertussis increases intracellular cyclic AMP levels in neutrophils and suggested that this increase is caused by the bacterial adenylate cyclase which penetrates these cells. We demonstrate in the present study that adenylate cyclase activity in lysates from lymphocytes exposed to a partially purified preparation of the bacterial enzyme has properties completely different from those of the intrinsic membrane-bound enzyme. Adenylate cyclase activity in lysates from lymphocytes exposed to the invasive enzyme is insensitive to N-ethylmaleimide, readily inactivated by acetic anhydride and relatively stable to SDS. Similar properties are exhibited by the bacterial enzyme itself. By contrast, the intrinsic membrane-bound enzyme activated by forskolin and guanosine 5'-gamma-thiotriphosphate is sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide and SDS and relatively stable to acetic anhydride. This strongly supports the notion that B. pertussis adenylate cyclase penetrates cells. Using the partially purified preparation of the invasive enzyme, we have studied the kinetics of its penetration. The intracellular catalytic activity reaches a steady state within 20 min, irrespective of enzyme or cell concentration. Steady-state levels are maintained for at least 2 h provided that the invasive enzyme is present in the incubation medium. Upon its removal, a rapid decrease (t1/2 approximately equal to 15 min) in the intracellular cyclase level is observed. This decrease reflects intracellular inactivation of the bacterial enzyme and is not caused by the release of the enzyme to the cell medium. PMID:2886119

  13. [The aspects of adenylate cyclase activity regulation in myocardium cell membranes during hypokinesia].

    PubMed

    Bulanova, K Ia; Komar, E S; Lobanok, L M

    1999-01-01

    Nonstimulated and isoproterenol, GTF, GITF, NaF stimulated activities of the adenylate cyclase in sarcolemma in white rats' myocardium was studied after two weeks of hypokinesia. As was established, in restrained animals the sensitivity of adenylate cyclase to the specified agents was increased and transition to the bimodal GTF regulation took place. It is hypothesised that involvement of membrane-bound Gi-proteins in the adrenergic effects on cardiomyocytes is one of mechanisms of the cardiotropic effects of restraint and heart distresses.

  14. [Characteristics of interaction of adenylate cyclase modulators and phosphoinositide cell signaling systems with lipid langmuir monolayers].

    PubMed

    Liakhov, O M; Prokopenko, V V; Prokopenko, R A; Mohylevych, S Ie

    2006-01-01

    Interaction of two groups of bioregulators, which oppositely affect activity of adenylate cyclase and phosphoinositide cellular signaling systems, with the Langmuir monolayer films made of natural lecithin was studied. Most significant influence on the structural and energy characteristics of lipid monolayers was revealed for the group of bioregulators, which inhibit polyphosphoinositide signaling system or/and activate adenylate cyclase signaling system. It is shown, that using the cluster analysis the bioregulators can be divided into two groups according to general orientation of their action on the considered systems of transduction of a signal.

  15. Iodide-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity in horse and dog thyroid.

    PubMed

    Cochaux, P; Van Sande, J; Swillens, S; Dumont, J E

    1987-12-30

    The characteristics of the iodide-induced inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation in dog thyroid slices have been previously described [Van Sande, J., Cochaux, P. and Dumont, J. E. (1985) Mol. Cell. Endocrinol. 40, 181-192]. In the present study we investigated the characteristics of the iodide-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity in dog and horse thyroid. The inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation by iodide in stimulated horse thyroid slices was similar to that observed in dog thyroid slices. The inhibition was observed in slices stimulated by thyroid-stimulating hormone, cholera toxin and forskolin. Increasing the concentration of the stimulators did not overcome the iodide-induced inhibition. Adenylate cyclase activity, assayed in crude homogenates or in plasma-membrane-containing particulates (100,000 x g pellets), was lower in homogenates or in particulates prepared from iodide-treated slices than from control slices. This inhibition was observed on the cyclase activity stimulated by forskolin, fluoride or guanosine 5'-[beta, gamma-imino]triphosphate, but also on the basal activity. It was relieved when the homogenate was prepared from slices incubated with iodide and methimazole. Similar results were obtained with dog thyroid. The inhibition persisted when the particulate fraction was washed three times during 1 h at 100,000 x g, in the presence of bovine serum albumin or increasing concentration of KCl. It was similar whatever the duration of the cyclase assay, in a large range of protein concentration. These results indicate that a stable modification of adenylate cyclase activity, closely related to the plasma membrane, was induced when slices were incubated with iodide. Iodide inhibition did not modify the affinity of adenylate cyclase for its substrate (MgATP), but induced a decrease of the maximal velocity of the enzyme. The percentage inhibition was slightly decreased when Mg2+ concentration increased, and markedly decreased when Mn2

  16. A Novel Mechanism for Adenylyl Cyclase Inhibition from the Crystal Structure of its Complex with Catechol Estrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Steegborn,C.; Litvin, T.; Hess, K.; Capper, A.; Taussig, R.; Buck, J.; Levin, L.; Wu, H.

    2005-01-01

    Catechol estrogens are steroid metabolites that elicit physiological responses through binding to a variety of cellular targets. We show here that catechol estrogens directly inhibit soluble adenylyl cyclases and the abundant trans-membrane adenylyl cyclases. Catechol estrogen inhibition is non-competitive with respect to the substrate ATP, and we solved the crystal structure of a catechol estrogen bound to a soluble adenylyl cyclase from Spirulina platensis in complex with a substrate analog. The catechol estrogen is bound to a newly identified, conserved hydrophobic patch near the active center but distinct from the ATP-binding cleft. Inhibitor binding leads to a chelating interaction between the catechol estrogen hydroxyl groups and the catalytic magnesium ion, distorting the active site and trapping the enzyme substrate complex in a non-productive conformation. This novel inhibition mechanism likely applies to other adenylyl cyclase inhibitors, and the identified ligand-binding site has important implications for the development of specific adenylyl cyclase inhibitors.

  17. Structural Basis for Inhibition of Mammalian Adenylyl Cyclase by Calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Mou, Tung-Chung; Masada, Nanako; Cooper, Dermot M.F.; Sprang, Stephen R.

    2009-09-11

    Type V and VI mammalian adenylyl cyclases (AC5, AC6) are inhibited by Ca{sup 2+} at both sub- and supramicromolar concentration. This inhibition may provide feedback in situations where cAMP promotes opening of Ca{sup 2+} channels, allowing fine control of cardiac contraction and rhythmicity in cardiac tissue where AC5 and AC6 predominate. Ca{sup 2+} inhibits the soluble AC core composed of the C1 domain of AC5 (VC1) and the C2 domain of AC2 (IIC2). As observed for holo-AC5, inhibition is biphasic, showing 'high-affinity' (K{sub i} = {approx}0.4 {mu}M) and 'low-affinity' (K{sub i} = {approx}100 {mu}M) modes of inhibition. At micromolar concentration, Ca{sup 2+} inhibition is nonexclusive with respect to pyrophosphate (PP{sub i}), a noncompetitive inhibitor with respect to ATP, but at >100 {mu}M Ca{sup 2+}, inhibition appears to be exclusive with respect to PP{sub i}. The 3.0 {angstrom} resolution structure of G{alpha}s{center_dot}GTP{gamma}S/forskolin-activated VC1:IIC2 crystals soaked in the presence of ATP{alpha}S and 8 {mu}M free Ca{sup 2+} contains a single, loosely coordinated metal ion. ATP soaked into VC1:IIC2 crystals in the presence of 1.5 mM Ca{sup 2+} is not cyclized, and two calcium ions are observed in the 2.9 {angstrom} resolution structure of the complex. In both of the latter complexes VC1:IIC2 adopts the 'open', catalytically inactive conformation characteristic of the apoenzyme, in contrast to the 'closed', active conformation seen in the presence of ATP analogues and Mg{sup 2+} or Mn{sup 2+}. Structures of the pyrophosphate (PP{sub i}) complex with 10 mM Mg{sup 2+} (2.8 {angstrom}) or 2 mM Ca{sup 2+} (2.7 {angstrom}) also adopt the open conformation, indicating that the closed to open transition occurs after cAMP release. In the latter complexes, Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} bind only to the high-affinity 'B' metal site associated with substrate/product stabilization. Ca{sup 2+} thus stabilizes the inactive conformation in both ATP- and PP{sub i

  18. Purification and assay of cell-invasive form of calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase from Bordetella pertussis

    SciTech Connect

    Masure, H.R.; Donovan, M.G.; Storm, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    An invasive form of the CaM-sensitive adenylyl cyclase from Bordetella pertussis can be isolated from bacterial culture supernatants. This isolation is achieved through the use of QAE-Sephadex anion-exchange chromatography. It has been demonstrated that the addition of exogenous Ca{sup 2}{sup +} to the anion-exchange gradient buffers will affect elution from the column and will thereby affect the isolation of invasive adenylyl cyclase. This is probably due to a Ca2(+)-dependent interaction of the catalytic subunit with another component in the culture supernatant. Two peaks of adenylyl cyclase activity are obtained. The Pk1 adenylyl cyclase preparation is able to cause significant increases in intracellular cAMP levels in animal cells. This increase occurs rapidly and in a dose-dependent manner in both N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells and human erythrocytes. The Pk2 adenylyl cyclase has catalytic activity but is not cell invasive. This material can serve, therefore, as a control to ensure that the cAMP which is measured is, indeed, intracellular. A second control is to add exogenous CaM to the Pk1 adenylyl cyclase preparation. The 45-kDa catalytic subunit-CaM complex is not cell invasive. Although the mechanism for membrane translocation of the adenylyl cyclase is unknown, there is evidence that the adenylyl cyclase enters animal cells by a mechanism distinct from receptor-mediated endocytosis. Calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase activity can be removed from preparations of the adenylyl cyclase that have been subjected to SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This property of the enzyme has enabled purification of the catalytic subunit to apparent homogeneity. The purified catalytic subunit from culture supernatants has a predicted molecular weight of 45,000. This polypeptide interacts directly with Ca{sup 2}{sup +} and this interaction may be important for its invasion into animal cells.

  19. Differences in type II, IV, V and VI adenylyl cyclase isoform expression between rat preadipocytes and adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Serazin-Leroy, V; Morot, M; de Mazancourt, P; Giudicelli, Y

    2001-11-26

    Adenylyl cyclase catalytic activity is low in preadipocyte membranes when compared to adipocytes. Under conditions promoting inhibition of adipocyte adenylyl cyclase activity by Gpp(NH)p, a stable GTP analog, a paradoxical increase in preadipocyte adenylyl cyclase activity was obtained. In order to explain this contradiction, expression of types II, IV, V and VI adenylyl cyclase isoforms was compared in adipocytes and undifferentiated preadipocytes both by western blots and by a semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. Type II, IV, V and VI mRNAs and proteins were present in both adipocytes and preadipocytes. However, in undifferentiated preadipocytes, expression of type II mRNA and protein were significantly higher whereas expression of type IV, V and VI adenylyl cyclase mRNAs and proteins were significantly weaker than in adipocytes. In late differentiated preadipocytes, the adenylyl cyclase subtype mRNA expression pattern was intermediary between the undifferentiated and the full differentiation states except for type IV which remained weakly expressed. Moreover, one of the representative regulators of G-protein signaling (RGS protein), RGS4, was less expressed in undifferentiated preadipocyte membranes and cytosol extracts, which contrasts with adipocytes where RGS4 is clearly expressed. Thus, the preferential expression of type II adenylyl cyclase (G(betagamma) subunit-stimulated) in preadipocytes might explain why Gpp(NH)p elicits stimulation of adenylyl cyclase under conditions designed to promote inhibition. Conversely, the preferential expression of type V and VI adenylyl cyclases and the slightly higher expression of type IV adenylyl cyclase in adipocytes could contribute to explain the elevated total catalytic activity observed in mature fat cells compared to their precursor cells.

  20. S-guanylation of human serum albumin is a unique posttranslational modification and results in a novel class of antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Ishima, Yu; Hoshino, Hitomi; Shinagawa, Takuya; Watanabe, Kaori; Akaike, Takaaki; Sawa, Tomohiro; Kragh-Hansen, Ulrich; Kai, Toshiya; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Toru; Otagiri, Masaki

    2012-09-01

    8-Nitroguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-nitro-cGMP) is a nitric oxide metabolite and an important second messenger. 8-Nitro-cGMP reacts with sulfhydryl groups forming a novel posttranslational modification, namely, S-guanylation. In this work, we found, by using a quantitative competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay procedure, that S-guanylated human serum albumin (S-cGMP-HSA) is a component of normal plasma, and that hemodialysis patients decrease its concentration, on an average, from 68 to 34 nM. End-stage renal disease is often accompanied by septicemia, and we found that S-cGMP-HSA possesses an in vitro antibacterial effect with half maximal inhibitory concentration of approximately 2 μM against Escherichia coli American Type Culture Collection. Our findings indicate that S-cGMP-HSA can be regarded as an endogenous antibacterial agent in healthy conditions and as a useful new class of antibacterial agents with a circulation time sufficient for in vivo biological activity. The clinical development of S-cGMP-HSA as a safe and strong antibacterial agent arisen from endogenous posttranslational modification would be expected.

  1. S-benzyl-cysteine-mediated cell cycle arrest and apoptosis involving activation of mitochondrial-dependent caspase cascade through the p53 pathway in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hua-Jun; Meng, Lin-Yi; Shen, Yang; Zhu, Yi-Zhun; Liu, Hong-Rui

    2013-01-01

    S-benzyl-cysteine (SBC) is a structural analog of S-allylcysteine (SAC), which is one of the major water- soluble compounds in aged garlic extract. In this study, anticancer activities and the underlying mechanisms of SBC action were investigated and compared these with those of SAC using human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. SBC significantly suppressed the survival rate of SGC-7901 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, and the inhibitory activities of SBC were stronger than those of SAC. Flow cytometry revealed that SBC induced G2-phase arrest and apoptosis in SGC-7901 cells. Typical apoptotic morphological changes were observed by Hoechst 33258 dye assay. SBC-treatment dramatically induced the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), and enhanced the enzymatic activities of caspase-9 and caspase-3 whilst hardly affecting caspase-8 activity. Furthermore, Western blotting indicated that SBC-induced apoptosis was accompanied by up-regulation of the expression of p53, Bax and the down-regulation of Bcl-2. Taken together, this study suggested that SBC exerts cytotoxic activity involving activation of mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis through p53 and Bax/Bcl-2 pathways in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells.

  2. Hyaluronic acid as capacitation inductor: metabolic changes and membrane-associated adenylate cyclase regulation.

    PubMed

    Fernández, S; Córdoba, M

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this research was to study the effect of hyaluronic acid on bovine cryopreserved spermatozoa compared with heparin as regards the variation of capacitation induction, cellular oxidative metabolism and intracellular signal induced by membrane-associated adenylate cyclase to propose hyaluronic acid as a capacitation inductor. Heparin or hyaluronic acid and lysophosphatidylcholine were used to induce sperm capacitation and acrosome reaction, respectively. 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine was used as a membrane-associated adenylate cyclase inhibitor. The highest percentages of capacitated spermatozoa and live spermatozoa with acrosome integrity were obtained by incubating sperm for 60 min using 1000 μg/ml hyaluronic acid. In these conditions, capacitation induced by hyaluronic acid was lower compared with heparin; nonetheless both glycosaminoglycans promote intracellular changes that allow true acrosome reaction in vitro induced by lysophosphatidylcholine in bovine spermatozoa. Oxygen consumption in heparin-capacitated spermatozoa was significantly higher than in hyaluronic acid-treated spermatozoa. With all treatments, mitochondrial coupling was observed when a specific uncoupler of the respiratory chain was added. The inhibition of membrane-associated adenylate cyclase significantly blocked capacitation induction produced by hyaluronic acid, maintaining a basal sperm oxygen uptake in contrast to heparin effect in which both sperm parameters were inhibited, suggesting that the membrane-associated adenylate cyclase activation is involved in the intracellular signal mechanisms induced by both capacitation inductors, but only regulates mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in heparin-capacitated spermatozoa.

  3. Functional consequences of single amino acid substitutions in calmodulin-activated adenylate cyclase of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, P; Munier, H; Gilles, A M; Krin, E; Porumb, T; Bârzu, O; Sarfati, R; Pellecuer, C; Danchin, A

    1991-01-01

    Calmodulin-activated adenylate cyclase of Bordetella pertussis and Bacillus anthracis are two cognate bacterial toxins. Three short regions of 13-24 amino acid residues in these proteins exhibit between 66 and 80% identity. Site-directed mutagenesis of four residues in B. pertussis adenylate cyclase situated in the second (Asp188, Asp190) and third (His298, Glu301) segments of identity were accompanied by important decrease, or total loss, of enzyme activity. The calmodulin-binding properties of mutated proteins showed no important differences when compared to the wild-type enzyme. Apart from the loss of enzymatic activity, the most important change accompanying replacement of Asp188 by other amino acids was a dramatic decrease in binding of 3'-anthraniloyl-2'-deoxyadenosine 5'-triphosphate, a fluorescent analogue of ATP. From these results we concluded that the two neighbouring aspartic acid residues in B. pertussis adenylate cyclase, conserved in many other ATP-utilizing enzymes, are essential for binding the Mg(2+)-nucleotide complex, and for subsequent catalysis. Replacement of His298 and Glu301 by other amino acid residues affected the nucleotide-binding properties of adenylate cyclase to a lesser degree suggesting that they might be important in the mechanism of enzyme activation by calmodulin, rather than being involved directly in catalysis. PMID:2050107

  4. Topographic separation of adenylate cyclase and hormone receptors in the plasma membrane of toad erythrocyte ghosts

    PubMed Central

    Sahyoun, N.; Hollenberg, M. D.; Bennett, V.; Cuatrecasas, P.

    1977-01-01

    Brief sonication of whole erythrocyte plasma membranes (ghosts) from toads at 4° does not inactivate adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing); EC 4.6.1.1] or destroy the receptor binding properties of hydroxybenzylpindolol or insulin. The hormonal (but not the fluoride-induced) stimulation of this enzyme is, however, lost. Fractionation of the small, resealed membrane fragments (vesicles) on discontinuous sucrose gradients results in the separation of vesicle populations differing grossly in size and protein composition. In addition, the distribution of the β-adrenergic receptor, an insulin binding site, and adenylate cyclase among these vesicles fractions differs. The pattern of distribution of these functional structures can be altered differentially by manipulations of the ghosts before sonication. For example, brief preincubation with isoproterenol leads to a change in the relative distribution of β-receptor (but not adenylate cyclase) among the various vesicle fractions; this effect is not obtained with β-receptor antagonists, which block the isoproterenol effect. Exposure of the ghosts to different temperatures, changes in the divalent cation composition of the medium, or the addition of ATP also leads to changes in the distribution of surface markers of the subsequently formed vesicles. The results indicate gross asymmetries in the distribution of protein components within the plane of the membrane and raise important questions regarding the manner whereby functionally related and coupled components, such as hormone receptors and adenylate cyclase, interact. Images PMID:197522

  5. Comparison of human CAP and CAP2, homologs of the yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Yu, G; Swiston, J; Young, D

    1994-06-01

    We previously reported the identification of human CAP, a protein that is related to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe adenylyl cyclase-associated CAP proteins. The two yeast CAP proteins have similar functions: the N-terminal domains are required for the normal function of adenylyl cyclase, while loss of the C-terminal domains result in morphological and nutritional defects that are unrelated to the cAMP pathways. We have amplified and cloned cDNAs from a human glioblastoma library that encode a second CAP-related protein, CAP2. The human CAP and CAP2 proteins are 64% identical. Expression of either human CAP or CAP2 in S. cerevisiae cap- strains suppresses phenotypes associated with deletion of the C-terminal domain of CAP, but does not restore hyper-activation of adenylyl cyclase by RAS2val19. Similarly, expression of either human CAP or CAP2 in S. pombe cap- strains suppresses the morphological and temperature-sensitive phenotypes associated with deletion of the C-terminal domain of CAP in this yeast. In addition, expression of human CAP, but not CAP2, suppresses the propensity to sporulate due to deletion of the N-terminal domain of CAP in S. pombe. This latter observation suggests that human CAP restores normal adenylyl cyclase activity in S. pombe cap- cells. Thus, functional properties of both N-terminal and C-terminal domains are conserved between the human and S. pombe CAP proteins.

  6. Modulation of receptors and adenylate cyclase activity during sucrose feeding, food deprivation, and cold exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpace, P.J.; Baresi, L.A.; Morley, J.E. Univ. of California, Los Angeles )

    1987-12-01

    Thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT) serves as a regulator of body temperature and weight maintenance. Thermogenesis can be stimulated by catecholamine activation of adenylate cyclase through the {beta}-adrenergic receptor. To investigate the effects of sucrose feeding, food deprivation, and cold exposure on the {beta}-adrenergic pathway, adenylate cyclase activity and {beta}-adrenergic receptors were assessed in rat BAT after 2 wk of sucrose feeding, 2 days of food deprivation, or 2 days of cold exposure. {beta}-Adrenergic receptors were identified in BAT using ({sup 125}I)iodocyanopindolol. Binding sites had the characteristics of mixed {beta}{sub 1}- and {beta}{sub 2}-type adrenergic receptors at a ratio of 60/40. After sucrose feeding or cold exposure, there was the expected increase in BAT mitochondrial mass as measured by total cytochrome-c oxidase activity but a decrease in {beta}-adrenergic receptor density due to a loss of the {beta}{sub 1}-adrenergic subtype. This BAT {beta}-adrenergic receptor downregulation was tissue specific, since myocardial {beta}-adrenergic receptors were unchanged with either sucrose feeding or cold exposure. Forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity increased in BAT after sucrose feeding or cold exposure but not after food deprivation. These data suggest that in BAT, sucrose feeding or cold exposure result in downregulation of {beta}-adrenergic receptors and that isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was limited by receptor availability.

  7. Soluble guanylyl cyclase is involved in PDT-induced injury of crayfish glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2016-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a potential tool for selective destruction of malignant brain tumors. However, not only malignant but also healthy neurons and glial cells may be damaged during PDT. Nitric oxide is an important modulator of cell viability and intercellular neuroglial communications. NO have been already shown to participate in PDT-induced injury of neurons and glial cells. As soluble guanylyl cyclase is the only known receptor for NO, we have studied the possible role of soluble guanylyl cyclase in the regulation of survival and death of neurons and surrounding glial cells under photo-oxidative stress induced by photodynamic treatment (PDT). The crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single identified sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells is a simple but informative model object. It was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine photosens (10 nM) and irradiated with a laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2). Using inhibitory analysis we have shown that during PDT soluble guanylyl cyclase, probably, has proapoptotic and antinecrotic effect on the glial cells of the isolated crayfish stretch receptor. Proapoptotic effect of soluble guanylyl cyclase could be mediated by protein kinase G (PKG). Thus, the involvement of NO/sGC/cGMP/PKG signaling pathway in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells was indirectly demonstrated.

  8. A Short History of cGMP, Guanylyl Cyclases, and cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Kots, Alexander Y.; Martin, Emil; Sharina, Iraida G.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we review the early studies on cGMP, guanylyl cyclases, and cGMP-dependent protein kinases to facilitate understanding of development of this exciting but complex field of research encompassing pharmacology, biochemistry, physiology, and molecular biology of these important regulatory molecules. PMID:19089322

  9. Identification of a Hippeastrum hybridum guanylyl cyclase responsive to wounding and pathogen infection.

    PubMed

    Świeżawska, Brygida; Jaworski, Krzysztof; Szewczuk, Piotr; Pawełek, Agnieszka; Szmidt-Jaworska, Adriana

    2015-09-15

    Guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) is a critical component of many (patho)physiological processes in plants whilst guanylyl cyclases (GCs) which catalyse the formation of cGMP from GTP have remained somewhat elusive. Consequently, the two major aims are the discovery of novel guanylyl cyclases and the identification of GC/cGMP mediated processes. To identify a novel GC from Hippeastrum hybridum plant and facilitate the preparation of guanylyl cyclase in an amount sufficient for further crystallographic studies, we have constructed an overproduction system for this enzyme. This gene encodes a protein of 256 amino acids, with a calculated molecular mass of 28kD. The predicted amino acid sequence contains all the typical features and shows a high identity to other plant GCs. The GST-HpGC1 was catalytically active in Escherichia coli cells and the purified, recombinant HpGC1 was able to convert GTP to cGMP in the presence of divalent cations. The used overexpression system yields a guanylyl cyclase as 6% of the bacterial cytosolic protein. Besides the identification of HpGC1 as a guanylyl cyclase, the study has shown that the level of HpCG1 mRNA changed during stress conditions. Both mechanical damage and a Peyronellaea curtisii (=Phoma narcissi) fungi infection led to an initial decrease in the HpGC1 transcript level, followed by a substantial increase during the remainder of the 48-h test cycle. Moreover, significant changes in cyclic GMP level were observed, taking the form of oscillations. In conclusion, our data unequivocally identified the product of the HpGC1 gene as a guanylyl cyclase and demonstrates that such an overproduction system can be successfully used in enzyme synthesis. Furthermore, they indicate a link between the causing stimulus (wounding, infection) and guanylyl cyclase expression and the increase in cGMP amplitude. Therefore, it is concluded that appearance of cyclic GMP as a mediator in defense and wound-healing mechanisms provides a

  10. The sGC activator inhibits the proliferation and migration, promotes the apoptosis of human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells via the up regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shuai; Zou, Lihui; Yang, Ting; Yang, Yuanhua; Zhai, Zhenguo; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Chen

    2015-03-15

    Background: Different types of pulmonary hypertension (PH) share the same process of pulmonary vascular remodeling, the molecular mechanism of which is not entirely clarified by far. The abnormal biological behaviors of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) play an important role in this process. Objectives: We investigated the regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) by the sGC activator, and explored the effect of PAI-2 on PASMCs proliferation, apoptosis and migration. Methods: After the transfection with PAI-2 overexpression vector and specific siRNAs or treatment with BAY 41-2272 (an activator of sGC), the mRNA and protein levels of PAI-2 in cultured human PASMCs were detected, and the proliferation, apoptosis and migration of PASMCs were investigated. Results: BAY 41-2272 up regulated the endogenous PAI-2 in PASMCs, on the mRNA and protein level. In PAI-2 overexpression group, the proliferation and migration of PASMCs were inhibited significantly, and the apoptosis of PASMCs was increased. In contrast, PAI-2 knockdown with siRNA increased PASMCs proliferation and migration, inhibited the apoptosis. Conclusions: PAI-2 overexpression inhibits the proliferation and migration and promotes the apoptosis of human PASMCs. Therefore, sGC activator might alleviate or reverse vascular remodeling in PH through the up-regulation of PAI-2. - Highlights: • sGC activator BAY41-2272 up regulated PAI-2 in PASMCs, on the mRNA and protein level. • PAI-2 overexpression inhibits the proliferation and migration of human PASMCs. • PAI-2 overexpression promotes the apoptosis of human PASMCs. • sGC activator might alleviate the vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension.

  11. Identification of a mammalian glutaminyl cyclase converting glutaminyl into pyroglutamyl peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, W H; Spiess, J

    1987-01-01

    Extracts from bovine pituitary were found to contain an activity catalyzing the conversion of glutaminyl peptides such as [Gln1]gonadotropin-releasing hormone, [Gln1, Gly4]thyrotropin-releasing hormone (H-Gln-His-Pro-Gly-OH), and H-Gln-Tyr-Ala-OH to the respective pyroglutamyl peptides. The TRH precursor fragment H-Lys-Arg-Gln-His-Pro-Gly-Lys-Arg-OH and the D-glutaminyl stereoisomer of H-Gln-Tyr-Ala-OH did not react under the same conditions. The conversion products were identified by Edman degradation, amino acid analysis, and reversed-phase HPLC. That this activity was exhibited by an enzyme, glutaminyl cyclase, was concluded from the protein character of the activity (revealed by its abolition with trypsin and heat), the Michaelis-Menten relationship between substrate concentration and conversion rate, and the substrate specificity. It was determined that glutaminyl cyclase had a molecular weight of 43,000-50,000, a pH optimum at pH 8, and Km and Vmax values in the range of 60-130 microM and 390-690 pmol/microgram per hr, respectively. Glutaminyl cyclase was not observed to require ATP and could be inhibited with 1.0 M ammonium chloride, which increased the Km and decreased the Vmax value. The subcellular distribution of glutaminyl cyclase corresponded to the one of peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase believed to catalyze C-terminal amidations during posttranslational precursor processing. It was also observed that the formation of pyroglutamyl from glutaminyl peptides occurred nonenzymatically; however, the enzymatic reaction carried out with crude extract was found to be approximately 70 times faster than the nonenzymatic reaction enhanced by phosphate. It is speculated that glutaminyl cyclase may participate in the posttranslational processing of hormonal precursors to pyroglutamyl peptides. PMID:3473473

  12. Mechanisms of nonhormonal activation of adenylate cyclase based on target analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Verkman, A.S.; Ausiello, D.A.; Jung, C.Y.; Skorecki, K.L.

    1986-08-12

    Radiation inactivation was used to examine the mechanism of activation of adenylate cyclase in the cultured renal epithelial cell line LLC-PK1 with hormonal (vasopressin) and nonhormonal (GTP, forskolin, fluoride, and chloride) activating ligands. Intact cells were frozen, irradiated at -70 degrees C (0-14 Mrad), thawed, and assayed for adenylate cyclase activity in the presence of activating ligands. The ln (adenylate cyclase activity) vs. radiation dose relation was linear (target size 162 kDa) for vasopressin- (2 microM) stimulated activity and concave downward for unstimulated (10 mM Mn/sup 2 +/), NaF- (10 mM) stimulated, and NaCl- (100 mM) stimulated activities. Addition of 2 microM vasopressin did not alter the ln activity vs. dose relation for NaF- (10 mM) stimulated activity. The dose-response relations for adenylate cyclase activation and for transition in the ln activity vs. dose curve shape were measured for vasopressin and NaF. On the basis of our model for adenylate cyclase subunit interactions reported previously (Verkman, A. S., Skorecki, K. L., and Ausiello, D. A. (1986) Am. J. Physiol. 260, C103-C123) and of new mathematical analyses, activation mechanisms for each ligand are proposed. In the unstimulated state, equilibrium between alpha beta and alpha + beta favors alpha beta; dissociated alpha binds to GTP (rate-limiting step), which then combines with the catalytic (C) subunit to form active enzyme. Vasopressin binding to receptor provides a rapid pathway for GTP binding to alpha. GTP and its analogues accelerate the rate of alpha GTP formation. Forskolin inhibits the spontaneous deactivation of activated C. Activation by fluoride may occur without alpha beta dissociation or GTP addition through activation of C by an alpha beta-F complex.

  13. Relaxin adenylyl cyclase system of pregnant women with diabetes: functional defects in insulin and relaxin adenylyl cyclase signaling systems in myometrium of pregnant women with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Ludmila; Plesneva, Svetlana; Shpakov, Alexander; Pertseva, Marianna

    2005-05-01

    The study was conducted to reveal the functional disturbances in two novel insulin and relaxin adenylyl cyclase signaling mechanisms (ACSMs). It was shown for the first time that in myometrium of pregnant women with insulin insufficiency the functional defects of Gs-protein-AC coupling in insulin- and relaxin H2-regulated AC systems were developed. As a result, the sensitivity of the signaling systems to both hormones and potentiation of their AC effects by guanine nucleotides were markedly decreased compared with that in control group. These functional defects in ACSM may lead to violation of the process of insulin and relaxin signal transduction.

  14. p19 detected in the rat retina and pineal gland is a guanylyl cyclase-activating protein (GCAP).

    PubMed

    Dejda, Agnieszka; Matczak, Izabela; Gorczyca, Wojciech A

    2002-01-01

    The Ca(2+)-dependent activation of retina-specific guanylyl cyclase (retGC) is mediated by guanylyl cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs). Here we report for the first time detection of a 19 kDa protein (p19) with GCAP properties in extracts of rat retina and pineal gland. Both extracts stimulate synthesis of cGMP in rod outer segment (ROS) membranes at low (30 nM) but not at high (1 microM) concentrations of Ca(2+). At low Ca(2+), immunoaffinity purified p19 activates guanylyl cyclase(s) in bovine ROS and rat retinal membranes. Moreover, p19 is recognized by antibodies against bovine GCAP1 and, similarly to other GCAPs, exhibits a Ca(2+)-dependent electrophoretic mobility shift.

  15. Identification of the chlE gene encoding oxygen-independent Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester cyclase in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Yamanashi, Kaori; Minamizaki, Kei; Fujita, Yuichi

    2015-08-07

    The fifth ring (E-ring) of chlorophyll (Chl) a is produced by Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester (MPE) cyclase. There are two evolutionarily unrelated MPE cyclases: oxygen-independent (BchE) and oxygen-dependent (ChlA/AcsF) MPE cyclases. Although ChlA is the sole MPE cyclase in Synechocystis PCC 6803, it is yet unclear whether BchE exists in cyanobacteria. A BLAST search suggests that only few cyanobacteria possess bchE. Here, we report that two bchE candidate genes from Cyanothece strains PCC 7425 and PCC 7822 restore the photosynthetic growth and bacteriochlorophyll production in a bchE-lacking mutant of Rhodobacter capsulatus. We termed these cyanobacterial bchE orthologs "chlE."

  16. Structure-based inhibitor discovery against adenylyl cyclase toxins from pathogenic bacteria that cause anthrax and whooping cough.

    PubMed

    Soelaiman, Sandriyana; Wei, Binqing Q; Bergson, Pamela; Lee, Young-Sam; Shen, Yuequan; Mrksich, Milan; Shoichet, Brian K; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2003-07-11

    Edema factor (EF) and CyaA are adenylyl cyclase toxins secreted by pathogenic bacteria that cause anthrax and whooping cough, respectively. Using the structure of the catalytic site of EF, we screened a data base of commercially available, small molecular weight chemicals for those that could specifically inhibit adenylyl cyclase activity of EF. From 24 compounds tested, we have identified one quinazoline compound, ethyl 5-aminopyrazolo[1,5-a]quinazoline-3-carboxylate, that specifically inhibits adenylyl cyclase activity of EF and CyaA with approximately 20 microm Ki. This compound neither affects the activity of host resident adenylyl cyclases type I, II, and V nor exhibits promiscuous inhibition. The compound is a competitive inhibitor, consistent with the prediction that it binds to the adenine portion of the ATP binding site on EF. EF is activated by the host calcium sensor, calmodulin. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopic analysis shows that this compound does not affect the binding of calmodulin to EF. This compound is dissimilar from a previously described, non-nucleoside inhibitor of host adenylyl cyclase. It may serve as a lead to design antitoxins to address the role of adenylyl cyclase toxins in bacterial pathogenesis and to fight against anthrax and whooping cough.

  17. Alkaline phosphatase relieves desensitization of adenylate cyclase-coupled beta-adrenergic receptors in avian erythrocyte membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Stadel, J.M.; Rebar, R.; Crooke, S.T.

    1987-05-01

    Desensitization of adenylate cyclase-coupled ..beta..-adrenergic receptors in avian erythrocytes results in 40-65% decrease in agonist-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity and correlates with increased phosphorylation of ..beta..-adrenergic receptors. To assess the role of phosphorylation in desensitization, membranes from isoproterenol- and cAMP-desensitized turkey erythrocytes were incubated with alkaline phosphatase for 30 min at 37/sup 0/C, pH = 8.0. In both cases alkaline phosphatase treatment significantly reduced desensitization of agonist-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity by 40-60%. Similar results were obtained following alkaline phosphatase treatment of membranes from isoproterenol- and cAMP-desensitized duck erythrocytes. In addition, alkaline phosphatase treatment of membranes from duck erythrocytes desensitized with phorbol 12-mystrate 13-acetate returned adenylate cyclase activity to near control values. In all experiments inclusion of 20 mM NaPO/sub 4/ to inhibit alkaline phosphatase during treatment of membranes blocked the enzyme's effect on agonist-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. These results demonstrate a role for phosphorylation in desensitization of adenylate cyclase-coupled ..beta..-adrenergic receptors in avian erythrocytes.

  18. Leucine-rich repeats and carboxyl terminus are required for interaction of yeast adenylate cyclase with RAS proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, N; Choe, H R; Nishida, Y; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Ohnishi, S; Tamaoki, T; Kataoka, T

    1990-01-01

    A Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene encoding adenylate cyclase has been analyzed by deletion and insertion mutagenesis to localize regions required for activation by the Sa. cerevisiae RAS2 protein. The NH2-terminal 657 amino acids were found to be dispensable for the activation. However, almost all 2-amino acid insertions in the middle 600 residues comprising leucine-rich repeats and deletions in the COOH-terminal 66 residues completely abolished activation by the RAS2 protein, whereas insertion mutations in the other regions generally had no effect. Chimeric adenylate cyclases were constructed by swapping the upstream and downstream portions surrounding the catalytic domains between the Sa. cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe adenylate cyclases and examined for activation by the RAS2 protein. We found that the fusion containing both the NH2-terminal 1600 residues and the COOH-terminal 66 residues of the Sa. cerevisiae cyclase rendered the catalytic domain of the Sc. pombe cyclase, which otherwise did not respond to RAS proteins, activatable by the RAS2 protein. Thus the leucine-rich repeats and the COOH terminus of the Sa. cerevisiae adenylate cyclase appear to be required for interaction with RAS proteins. Images PMID:2247439

  19. Fusion-type lycopene beta-cyclase from a thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed

    Hemmi, Hisashi; Ikejiri, Satoru; Nakayama, Toru; Nishino, Tokuzo

    2003-06-06

    Examination of the sequence of a hypothetical gene with an unknown function included in the carotenogenic gene cluster in the genome of a thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus led to the prediction that the gene encodes a novel-type lycopene beta-cyclase, whose N- and C-terminal halves are homologous to the subunits of the bacterial heterodimeric enzymes. The recombinant expression of the gene in lycopene-producing Escherichia coli resulted in the accumulation of beta-carotene in the cells, which verifies the function of the gene. Homologues of the archaeal lycopene beta-cyclase from various organisms such as bacteria, archaea, and fungi have been reported. Although their primary structures are clearly specific to the biological taxa, a phylogenetic analysis revealed the unexpected complicity of the evolutional route of these enzymes.

  20. Influence of volatile anesthetics on muscarinic receptor adenylate cyclase coupling in brain and heart

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, B.L.

    1988-01-01

    In the present study, the influence of four volatile anesthetics (enflurane, isoflurane, diethyl ether, and chloroform) on (1) muscarinic receptor binding parameters and (2) muscarnic regulation of adenylate cyclase activity was examined using membranes isolated from rat brain and heart. Membranes were equilibrated with each of the four anesthetics for 30 minutes and then during the binding assay. The data obtained can be summarized as follows: (1) volatile anesthetics increased receptor affinity for a radiolabeled antagonists, ({sup 3}H)N-methylscopolamine (({sup 3}H)MS), by decreasing its rate of dissociation in brain stem, but not in cardiac, membranes, (2) volatile anesthetics decreased high affinity ({sup 3}H)Oxotremorine-M binding, (3) volatile anesthetics depressed or eliminated the guanine nucleotide sensitivity of agonist binding. The influence of volatile anesthetics on muscarinic regulation of adenylate cyclase enzyme activity was studied using {alpha}({sup 32}P)ATP as the substrate.

  1. Hypothesis: glutaminyl cyclase inhibitors decrease risks of Alzheimer's disease and related dementias.

    PubMed

    Hennekens, Charles H; Bensadon, Benjamin A; Zivin, Robert; Gaziano, J Michael

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease and related dementias (ADRD) comprise several progressive and incurable neurodegenerative disorders that some have classified as amyloidosis. With increased aging of the world's population, the prevalence of the sporadic form of ADRD, which comprises over 99% of cases, continues to rise at an alarming rate. The enormous societal burdens of ADRD already rival those of the many other major chronic diseases causing premature morbidity and mortality in the USA and worldwide such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. At present, there is an insufficient totality of evidence concerning the efficacy and safety of any pharmacologic agents to delay slow progression or reduce complications of ADRD. In this context, glutaminyl cyclase (QC) inhibitors have shown some early possible evidence of efficacy with a reassuring safety profile. To reliably test the glutaminyl cyclase (QC) and any other promising hypotheses will require cogent data from large-scale randomized trials of sufficient size and duration.

  2. The metabolic/pH sensor soluble adenylyl cyclase is a tumor suppressor protein

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Espiritu, Lavoisier; Diaz, Ana; Nardin, Charlee; Saviola, Anthony J.; Shaw, Fiona; Plitt, Tamar; Yang, Xia; Wolchok, Jedd; Pirog, Edyta C.; Desman, Garrett; Sboner, Andrea; Zhang, Tuo; Xiang, Jenny; Merghoub, Taha; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen; Zippin, Jonathan H.

    2016-01-01

    cAMP signaling pathways can both stimulate and inhibit the development of cancer; however, the sources of cAMP important for tumorigenesis remain poorly understood. Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a non-canonical, evolutionarily conserved, nutrient- and pH-sensing source of cAMP. sAC has been implicated in the metastatic potential of certain cancers, and it is differentially localized in human cancers as compared to benign tissues. We now show that sAC expression is reduced in many human cancers. Loss of sAC increases cellular transformation in vitro and malignant progression in vivo. These data identify the metabolic/pH sensor soluble adenylyl cyclase as a previously unappreciated tumor suppressor protein. PMID:27323809

  3. Adenylate cyclase and the search for new compounds with the clinical profile of lithium.

    PubMed

    Belmaker, R H

    1984-01-01

    It is possible to evaluate the beta-adrenergic receptor-adenylate cyclase complex in the human periphery by measuring the plasma cyclic AMP rise after adrenergic agonists. A clinical trial of the beta 2 adrenergic agonist salbutamol in depression provided an opportunity to test whether adrenergic receptor subsensitivity does occur during clinical antidepressant treatment. After 1 and 3 weeks of oral salbutamol treatment, depression scores declined significantly in 11 depressed patients, while the plasma cyclic AMP response to i.v. salbutamol declined over 60%. The results support the concept that receptor sensitivity changes occur during human antidepressant therapy. Data are presented that Li, too, markedly reduces activity of beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase in humans. The effect was evaluated by studying the effect of Li at therapeutic serum concentrations on the plasma cyclic AMP response to subcutaneous epinephrine. The Li effect is specific, since the plasma cyclic AMP response to glucagon is not inhibited. In rat cortical slices Li inhibition of noradrenaline-induced cyclic AMP accumulation is clearly demonstrable only at concentrations close to 2 mM Li. However, fresh human brain slices from edges of surgically-removed tumors show Li inhibition at 1 mM Li concentrations. These results imply that in brain as well as periphery, human noradrenergic adenylate cyclase is inhibited by therapeutic concentrations of Li. Demeclocyclin, a tetracycline-derived antibiotic, was found to inhibit noradrenaline-sensitive adenylate cyclase in rat cortical slices and to inhibit amphetamine-induced hyperactivity in rats in an open field. Clinical trials should search for new compounds with the clinical profile of Li.

  4. Determinants for the activation and autoinhibition of the diguanylate cyclase response regulator WspR.

    PubMed

    De, Nabanita; Navarro, Marcos V A S; Raghavan, Rahul V; Sondermann, Holger

    2009-10-30

    The bacterial second messenger bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) controls secretion, cell adhesion, and motility, leading to biofilm formation and increased cytotoxicity. Diguanylate cyclases containing GGDEF and phosphodiesterases containing EAL or HD-GYP domains have been identified as the enzymes controlling cellular c-di-GMP levels, yet less is known regarding the molecular mechanisms governing regulation and signaling specificity. We recently determined a product-inhibition pathway for the diguanylate cyclase response regulator WspR from Pseudomonas, a potent molecular switch that controls biofilm formation. In WspR, catalytic activity is modulated by a helical stalk motif that connects its phospho-receiver and GGDEF domains. The stalks facilitate the formation of distinct oligomeric states that contribute to both activation and autoinhibition. Here, we provide novel insights into the regulation of diguanylate cyclase activity in WspR based on the crystal structures of full-length WspR, the isolated GGDEF domain, and an artificially dimerized catalytic domain. The structures highlight that inhibition is achieved by restricting the mobility of rigid GGDEF domains, mediated by c-di-GMP binding to an inhibitory site at the GGDEF domain. Kinetic measurements and biochemical characterization corroborate a model in which the activation of WspR requires the formation of a tetrameric species. Tetramerization occurs spontaneously at high protein concentration or upon addition of the phosphomimetic compound beryllium fluoride. Our analyses elucidate common and WspR-specific mechanisms for the fine-tuning of diguanylate cyclase activity.

  5. Stimulatory and inhibitory effects of forskolin on adenylate cyclase in rat normal hepatocytes and hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Sanae, F; Koshiura, R; Matsunaga, T; Takagi, K; Satake, T; Hasegawa, T

    1989-02-01

    Forskolin synergistically potentiated adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate formation by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) in rat normal hepatocytes freshly prepared by collagenase digestion and rat ascites hepatoma AH66 cells, but dose-dependently inhibited the accumulation by PGE1 in AH66F cells. Forskolin activated adenylate cyclase in a dose-dependent manner in homogenates of all cell lines. In normal hepatocytes and AH66 cells, simultaneous addition of forskolin and other adenylate cyclase activators [isoproterenol (IPN), PGE1, guanosine 5'-triphosphate sodium salt (GTP), 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate sodium salt (Gpp (NH)p), NaF, cholera toxin, islet activating protein and MnCl2] gave greater than additive responses. On the other hand, in AH66F cells, the effect of forskolin on adenylate cyclase was hardly influenced by GTP, but forskolin diminished the activities induced by high concentrations of GTP to that by the diterpene alone. Forskolin also significantly inhibited the PGE1-stimulated and the guanine nucleotide binding regulatory protein-stimulated activities. Because AH66F cells were insensitive to IPN, the combination with forskolin and IPN gave similar activity to that obtained with the diterpene alone. The effect of forskolin on the activation by manganese ion was neither synergistic nor inhibitory but was additive in AH66F cells. These results suggest that forskolin promotes the interaction between the stimulatory guanine nucleotide binding regulatory protein and the catalytic unit in normal hepatocytes and AH66 cells, but in AH66F cells forskolin interferes with the coupling of the two components of adenylate cyclase.

  6. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    SciTech Connect

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-12-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands /sup 3/H-N-methylscopolamine (/sup 3/H-NMS), /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and /sup 3/H-pirenzepine. /sup 3/H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, /sup 3/H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by /sup 3/H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for /sup 3/H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure.

  7. Elevation of lutein content in tomato: a biochemical tug-of-war between lycopene cyclases.

    PubMed

    Giorio, Giovanni; Yildirim, Arzu; Stigliani, Adriana Lucia; D'Ambrosio, Caterina

    2013-11-01

    Lutein is becoming increasingly important in preventive medicine due to its possible role in maintaining good vision and in preventing age-related maculopathy. Average daily lutein intake in developed countries is often below suggested daily consumption levels, and lutein supplementation could be beneficial. Lutein is also valuable in the food and feed industries and is emerging in nutraceutical and pharmaceutical markets. Currently, lutein is obtained at high cost from marigold petals, and synthesis alternatives are thus desirable. Tomato constitutes a promising starting system for production as it naturally accumulates high levels of lycopene. To develop tomato for lutein synthesis, the tomato Red Setter cultivar was transformed with the tomato lycopene ε-cyclase-encoding gene under the control of a constitutive promoter, and the HighDelta (HD) line, characterised by elevated lutein and δ-carotene content in ripe fruits, was selected. HD was crossed to the transgenic HC line and to RS(B) with the aim of converting all residual fruit δ-carotene to lutein. Fruits of both crosses were enriched in lutein and presented unusual carotenoid profiles. The unique genetic background of the crosses used in this study permitted an unprecedented analysis of the role and regulation of the lycopene cyclase enzymes in tomato. A new defined biochemical index, the relative cyclase activity ratio, was used to discern post-transcriptional regulation of cyclases, and will help in the study of carotenoid biosynthesis in photosynthetic plant species and particularly in those, like tomato, that have been domesticated for the production of food, feed or useful by-products.

  8. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin: a unique combination of a pore-forming moiety with a cell-invading adenylate cyclase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Masin, Jiri; Osicka, Radim; Bumba, Ladislav; Sebo, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA, ACT or AC-Hly) is a key virulence factor of the whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis. CyaA targets myeloid phagocytes expressing the complement receptor 3 (CR3, known as αMβ2 integrin CD11b/CD18 or Mac-1) and translocates by a poorly understood mechanism directly across the cytoplasmic membrane into cell cytosol of phagocytes an adenylyl cyclase(AC) enzyme. This binds intracellular calmodulin and catalyzes unregulated conversion of cytosolic ATP into cAMP. Among other effects, this yields activation of the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1, BimEL accumulation and phagocyte apoptosis induction. In parallel, CyaA acts as a cytolysin that forms cation-selective pores in target membranes. Direct penetration of CyaA into the cytosol of professional antigen-presenting cells allows the use of an enzymatically inactive CyaA toxoid as a tool for delivery of passenger antigens into the cytosolic pathway of processing and MHC class I-restricted presentation, which can be exploited for induction of antigen-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immune responses.

  9. Functional analysis of the two interacting cyclase domains in ent-kaurene synthase from the fungus Phaeosphaeria sp. L487 and a comparison with cyclases from higher plants.

    PubMed

    Kawaide, H; Sassa, T; Kamiya, Y

    2000-01-28

    We report here kinetic analysis and identification of the two cyclase domains in a bifunctional diterpene cyclase, Phaeosphaeria ent-kaurene synthase (FCPS/KS). Kinetics of a recombinant FCPS/KS protein indicated that the affinity for copalyl diphosphate is higher than that for geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGDP). ent-Kaurene production from GGDP by FCPS/KS was enhanced by the addition of a plant ent-kaurene synthase (KS) but not by plant CDP synthase (CPS), suggesting that the rate of ent-kaurene production of FCPS/KS may be limited by the KS activity. Site-directed mutagenesis of aspartate-rich motifs in FCPS/KS indicated that the (318)DVDD motif near the N terminus and the (656)DEFFE motif near the C terminus may be part of the active site for the CPS and KS reactions, respectively. The other aspartate-rich (132)DDVLD motif near the N terminus is thought to be involved in both reactions. Functional analysis of the N- and C-terminal truncated mutants revealed that a N-terminal 59-kDa polypeptide catalyzed the CPS reaction and a C-terminal 66-kDa polypeptide showed KS activity. A 101-kDa polypeptide lacking the first 43 amino acids of the N terminus reduced KS activity severely without CPS activity. These results indicate that there are two separate interacting domains in the 106-kDa polypeptide of FCPS/KS.

  10. Adenylate Cyclase Activity Not Found in Soybean Hypocotyl and Onion Meristem 1

    PubMed Central

    Yunghans, Wayne N.; Morré, D. James

    1977-01-01

    Tissue, homogenates, and purified cell fractions prepared from hypocotyls of a dicot, soybean (Glycine max), and meristematic tissue of a monocot, onion (Allium cepa), were examined critically for evidence of adenylate cyclase activity. Three assay methods were used: chemical analysis, isotope dilution analysis, and enzyme cytochemistry. In both crude extracts or whole tissue, as well as purified membranes, with or without auxin, no adenylate cyclase was detected by any of the three methods. For plasma membranes, the specific activity was less than 1/40 or 1/25,000 that of rat liver plasma membranes, depending on the assay procedure, i.e. below the limits of detection. Using comparable methods, we could detect neither cyclic adenosine 3′:5′-monophosphate nor the phosphodiesterase responsible for its degradation in either purified membranes or homogenates. The results suggest that hormone responses in plants are not generally mediated by a mechanism involving the obligate production of cyclic adenosine 3′:5′-monophosphate by a plasma membrane associated adenylate cyclase. Images PMID:16660026

  11. A Simple Luminescent Adenylate-Cyclase Functional Assay for Evaluation of Bacillus anthracis Edema Factor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Israeli, Ma’ayan; Rotem, Shahar; Elia, Uri; Bar-Haim, Erez; Cohen, Ofer; Chitlaru, Theodor

    2016-01-01

    Edema Factor (EF), the toxic sub-unit of the Bacillus anthracis Edema Toxin (ET) is a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase whose detrimental activity in the infected host results in severe edema. EF is therefore a major virulence factor of B. anthracis. We describe a simple, rapid and reliable functional adenylate-cyclase assay based on inhibition of a luciferase-mediated luminescence reaction. The assay exploits the efficient adenylate cyclase-mediated depletion of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP), and the strict dependence on ATP of the light-emitting luciferase-catalyzed luciferin-conversion to oxyluciferin, which can be easily visualized. The assay exhibits a robust EF-dose response decrease in luminescence, which may be specifically reverted by anti-EF antibodies. The application of the assay is exemplified in: (a) determining the presence of EF in B. anthracis cultures, or its absence in cultures of EF-defective strains; (b) evaluating the anti-EF humoral response in experimental animals infected/vaccinated with B. anthracis; and (c) rapid discrimination between EF producing and non-producing bacterial colonies. Furthermore, the assay may be amenable with high-throughput screening for EF inhibitory molecules. PMID:27548219

  12. Central role of soluble adenylyl cyclase and cAMP in sperm physiology

    PubMed Central

    Buffone, Mariano G.; Wertheimer, Eva V.; Visconti, Pablo E.; Krapf, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP), the first second messenger to be described, plays a central role in cell signaling in a wide variety of cell types. Over the last decades, a wide body of literature addressed the different roles of cAMP in cell physiology, mainly in response to neurotransmitters and hormones. cAMP is synthesized by a wide variety of adenylyl cylases that can generally be grouped in two types: transmembrane adenylyl cyclase and soluble adenylyl cyclases. In particular, several aspects of sperm physiology are regulated by cAMP produced by a single atypical adenylyl cyclase (Adcy10, aka sAC, SACY). The signature that identifies sAC among other ACs, is their direct stimulation by bicarbonate. The essential nature of cAMP in sperm function has been demonstrated using gain of function as well as loss of function approaches. This review unifies state of the art knowledge of the role of cAMP and those enzymes involved in cAMP signaling pathways required for the acquisition of fertilizing capacity of mammalian sperm. PMID:25066614

  13. The first structure of a bacterial diterpene cyclase: CotB2.

    PubMed

    Janke, Ronja; Görner, Christian; Hirte, Max; Brück, Thomas; Loll, Bernhard

    2014-06-01

    Sesquiterpenes and diterpenes are a diverse class of secondary metabolites that are predominantly derived from plants and some prokaryotes. The properties of these natural products encompass antitumor, antibiotic and even insecticidal activities. Therefore, they are interesting commercial targets for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Owing to their structural complexity, these compounds are more efficiently accessed by metabolic engineering of microbial systems than by chemical synthesis. This work presents the first crystal structure of a bacterial diterpene cyclase, CotB2 from the soil bacterium Streptomyces melanosporofaciens, at 1.64 Å resolution. CotB2 is a diterpene cyclase that catalyzes the cyclization of the linear geranylgeranyl diphosphate to the tricyclic cyclooctat-9-en-7-ol. The subsequent oxidation of cyclooctat-9-en-7-ol by two cytochrome P450 monooxygenases leads to bioactive cyclooctatin. Plasticity residues that decorate the active site of CotB2 have been mutated, resulting in alternative monocyclic, dicyclic and tricyclic compounds that show bioactivity. These new compounds shed new light on diterpene cyclase reaction mechanisms. Furthermore, the product of mutant CotB2(W288G) produced the new antibiotic compound (1R,3E,7E,11S,12S)-3,7,18-dolabellatriene, which acts specifically against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. This opens a sustainable route for the industrial-scale production of this bioactive compound.

  14. Relationship between muscarinic receptor occupancy and adenylate cyclase inhibition in the rabbit myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlert, F.J.

    1985-11-01

    The muscarinic receptor-binding properties of a series of muscarinic drugs were compared with their effects on adenylate cyclase in membranes of the rabbit myocardium. When measured by competitive inhibition of (TH)-N-methylscopolamine binding, the competition curves of the various agonists were adequately described by the ternary complex model. This model assumes that the receptor can bind reversibly with a guanine nucleotide binding protein in the membrane and that the affinity of the agonist for the receptor-guanine nucleotide-binding protein complex is higher than that for the free receptor. A satisfactory fit of the ternary complex model to the data could only be achieved assuming that very little receptor is precoupled with the guanine nucleotide-binding protein in the absence of agonist. There was good agreement between the efficacy of each agonist as measured by inhibition of adenylate cyclase and the estimate of the positive cooperativity between the binding of the agonist receptor complex and the guanine nucleotide-binding protein. Guanosine 5'-triphosphate (0.1 mM) had no significant effect on the binding of (TH)N-methylscopolamine but caused an increase in the concentration of the various agonists required for half-maximal receptor occupancy. There was good correlation between efficacy as measured by inhibition of adenylate cyclase and the influence of guanosine 5'-triphosphate on binding properties.

  15. Cloned M1 muscarinic receptors mediate both adenylate cyclase inhibition and phosphoinositide turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, R; Pinkas-Kramarski, R; Sokolovsky, M

    1988-01-01

    The rat M1 muscarinic receptor gene was cloned and expressed in a rat cell line lacking endogenous muscarinic receptors. Assignment of the cloned receptors to the M1 class was pharmacologically confirmed by their high affinity for the M1-selective muscarinic antagonist pirenzepine and low affinity for the M2-selective antagonist AF-DX-116. Guanylyl imidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p] converted agonist binding sites on the receptor, from high-affinity to the low-affinity state, thus indicating that the cloned receptors couple to endogenous G-proteins. The cloned receptors mediated both adenylate cyclase inhibition and phosphoinositide hydrolysis, but by different mechanisms. Pertussis toxin blocked the inhibition of adenylate cyclase (indicating coupling of the receptor to inhibitory G-protein), but did not affect phosphoinositide turnover. Furthermore, the stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis was less efficient than the inhibition of adenylate cyclase. These findings demonstrate that cloned M1 receptors are capable of mediating multiple responses in the cell by coupling to different effectors, possibly to different G-proteins. Images PMID:2846274

  16. The isoenzyme of glutaminyl cyclase is an important regulator of monocyte infiltration under inflammatory conditions.

    PubMed

    Cynis, Holger; Hoffmann, Torsten; Friedrich, Daniel; Kehlen, Astrid; Gans, Kathrin; Kleinschmidt, Martin; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; Wolf, Raik; Wermann, Michael; Stephan, Anett; Haegele, Monique; Sedlmeier, Reinhard; Graubner, Sigrid; Jagla, Wolfgang; Müller, Anke; Eichentopf, Rico; Heiser, Ulrich; Seifert, Franziska; Quax, Paul H A; de Vries, Margreet R; Hesse, Isabel; Trautwein, Daniela; Wollert, Ulrich; Berg, Sabine; Freyse, Ernst-Joachim; Schilling, Stephan; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-09-01

    Acute and chronic inflammatory disorders are characterized by detrimental cytokine and chemokine expression. Frequently, the chemotactic activity of cytokines depends on a modified N-terminus of the polypeptide. Among those, the N-terminus of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (CCL2 and MCP-1) is modified to a pyroglutamate (pE-) residue protecting against degradation in vivo. Here, we show that the N-terminal pE-formation depends on glutaminyl cyclase activity. The pE-residue increases stability against N-terminal degradation by aminopeptidases and improves receptor activation and signal transduction in vitro. Genetic ablation of the glutaminyl cyclase iso-enzymes QC (QPCT) or isoQC (QPCTL) revealed a major role of isoQC for pE(1) -CCL2 formation and monocyte infiltration. Consistently, administration of QC-inhibitors in inflammatory models, such as thioglycollate-induced peritonitis reduced monocyte infiltration. The pharmacologic efficacy of QC/isoQC-inhibition was assessed in accelerated atherosclerosis in ApoE3*Leiden mice, showing attenuated atherosclerotic pathology following chronic oral treatment. Current strategies targeting CCL2 are mainly based on antibodies or spiegelmers. The application of small, orally available inhibitors of glutaminyl cyclases represents an alternative therapeutic strategy to treat CCL2-driven disorders such as atherosclerosis/restenosis and fibrosis.

  17. The isoenzyme of glutaminyl cyclase is an important regulator of monocyte infiltration under inflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cynis, Holger; Hoffmann, Torsten; Friedrich, Daniel; Kehlen, Astrid; Gans, Kathrin; Kleinschmidt, Martin; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; Wolf, Raik; Wermann, Michael; Stephan, Anett; Haegele, Monique; Sedlmeier, Reinhard; Graubner, Sigrid; Jagla, Wolfgang; Müller, Anke; Eichentopf, Rico; Heiser, Ulrich; Seifert, Franziska; Quax, Paul H A; de Vries, Margreet R; Hesse, Isabel; Trautwein, Daniela; Wollert, Ulrich; Berg, Sabine; Freyse, Ernst-Joachim; Schilling, Stephan; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Acute and chronic inflammatory disorders are characterized by detrimental cytokine and chemokine expression. Frequently, the chemotactic activity of cytokines depends on a modified N-terminus of the polypeptide. Among those, the N-terminus of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (CCL2 and MCP-1) is modified to a pyroglutamate (pE-) residue protecting against degradation in vivo. Here, we show that the N-terminal pE-formation depends on glutaminyl cyclase activity. The pE-residue increases stability against N-terminal degradation by aminopeptidases and improves receptor activation and signal transduction in vitro. Genetic ablation of the glutaminyl cyclase iso-enzymes QC (QPCT) or isoQC (QPCTL) revealed a major role of isoQC for pE1-CCL2 formation and monocyte infiltration. Consistently, administration of QC-inhibitors in inflammatory models, such as thioglycollate-induced peritonitis reduced monocyte infiltration. The pharmacologic efficacy of QC/isoQC-inhibition was assessed in accelerated atherosclerosis in ApoE3*Leiden mice, showing attenuated atherosclerotic pathology following chronic oral treatment. Current strategies targeting CCL2 are mainly based on antibodies or spiegelmers. The application of small, orally available inhibitors of glutaminyl cyclases represents an alternative therapeutic strategy to treat CCL2-driven disorders such as atherosclerosis/restenosis and fibrosis. PMID:21774078

  18. Cyclase-associated proteins: CAPacity for linking signal transduction and actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Hubberstey, Andrew V; Mottillo, Emilio P

    2002-04-01

    Many extracellular signals elicit changes in the actin cytoskeleton, which are mediated through an array of signaling proteins and pathways. One family of proteins that plays a role in regulating actin remodeling in response to cellular signals are the cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs). CAPs are highly conserved monomeric actin binding proteins present in a wide range of organisms including yeast, fly, plants, and mammals. The original CAP was isolated as a component of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase complex that serves as an effector of Ras during nutritional signaling. CAPs are multifunctional molecules that contain domains involved in actin binding, adenylyl cyclase association in yeast, SH3 binding, and oligomerization. Genetic studies in yeast have implicated CAPs in vesicle trafficking and endocytosis. CAPs play a developmental role in multicellular organisms, and studies of Drosophila have illuminated the importance of the actin cytoskeleton during eye development and in establishing oocyte polarity. This review will highlight the critical structural and functional domains of CAPs, describe recent studies that have implied important roles for these proteins in linking cell signaling with actin polymerization, and highlight their roles in vesicle trafficking and development.

  19. Persistent stimulation of adenylate cyclase and urea transport by an AVP photolabel

    SciTech Connect

    Eggena, P.; Ma, C.L.; Fahrenholz, F.; Schwartz, I.L.

    1985-07-01

    The effects of a photoaffinity label for arginine vasopressin receptors, (Phe2, Phe(p-N3)3)AVP (N3-AVP), on urea permeability and adenylate cyclase activity have been investigated in the toad urinary bladder. This compound, when activated by ultraviolet light, induced a maximal and persistent increase in the urea permeability of the intact bladder and a persistent increase in the adenylate cyclase activity of toad bladder epithelial cell homogenates. Covalent attachment of the analogue to target tissue during photolysis was equivalent at 4 and 20 degrees C. Bladders exposed to N3-AVP in the presence of AVP during photolysis were substantially less permeable to urea than controls that had been exposed to N3-AVP alone. These findings constitute further evidence in support of the previous suggestion that N3-AVP binds covalently to AVP receptors and, in addition, demonstrates that N3-AVP evokes a persistent increase in adenylate cyclase activity which, in turn, triggers a persistent increase in bladder permeability to urea.

  20. Identification of photoactivated adenylyl cyclases in Naegleria australiensis and BLUF-containing protein in Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Hiro; Sato, Aya; Kita, Ayaka; Kodaira, Ken-Ichi; Iseki, Mineo; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Shibusawa, Mami; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Yagita, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Complete genome sequencing of Naegleria gruberi has revealed that the organism encodes polypeptides similar to photoactivated adenylyl cyclases (PACs). Screening in the N. australiensis genome showed that the organism also encodes polypeptides similar to PACs. Each of the Naegleria proteins consists of a "sensors of blue-light using FAD" domain (BLUF domain) and an adenylyl cyclase domain (AC domain). PAC activity of the Naegleria proteins was assayed by comparing sensitivities of Escherichia coli cells heterologously expressing the proteins to antibiotics in a dark condition and a blue light-irradiated condition. Antibiotics used in the assays were fosfomycin and fosmidomycin. E. coli cells expressing the Naegleria proteins showed increased fosfomycin sensitivity and fosmidomycin sensitivity when incubated under blue light, indicating that the proteins functioned as PACs in the bacterial cells. Analysis of the N. fowleri genome revealed that the organism encodes a protein bearing an amino acid sequence similar to that of BLUF. A plasmid expressing a chimeric protein consisting of the BLUF-like sequence found in N. fowleri and the adenylyl cyclase domain of N. gruberi PAC was constructed to determine whether the BLUF-like sequence functioned as a sensor of blue light. E. coli cells expressing a chimeric protein showed increased fosfomycin sensitivity and fosmidomycin sensitivity when incubated under blue light. These experimental results indicated that the sequence similar to the BLUF domain found in N. fowleri functioned as a sensor of blue light.

  1. Picomolar-affinity binding and inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by melatonin in Syrian hamster hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Niles, L.P.; Hashemi, F. )

    1990-12-01

    1. The effect of melatonin on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was measured in homogenates of Syrian hamster hypothalamus. In addition, the saturation binding characteristics of the melatonin receptor ligand, ({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin, was examined using an incubation temperature (30{degree}C) similar to that used in enzyme assays. 2. At concentrations ranging from 10 pM to 1 nM, melatonin caused a significant decrease in stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a maximum inhibition of approximately 22%. 3. Binding experiments utilizing ({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin in a range of approximately 5-80 pM indicated a single class of high-affinity sites: Kd = 55 +/- 9 pM, Bmax = 1.1 +/- 0.3 fmol/mg protein. 4. The ability of picomolar concentrations of melatonin to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity suggests that this affect is mediated by picomolar-affinity receptor binding sites for this hormone in the hypothalamus.

  2. The PI3K-mediated activation of CRAC independently regulates adenylyl cyclase activation and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Comer, Frank I; Lippincott, Christopher K; Masbad, Joseph J; Parent, Carole A

    2005-01-26

    The ability of a cell to detect an external chemical signal and initiate a program of directed migration along a gradient comprises the fundamental process called chemotaxis. Investigations in Dictyostelium discoideum and neutrophils have established that pleckstrin homology (PH) domain-containing proteins that bind to the PI3K products PI(3,4)P2 and PI(3,4,5)P3, such as CRAC (cytosolic regulator of adenylyl cyclase) and Akt/PKB, translocate specifically to the leading edge of chemotaxing cells. CRAC is essential for the chemoattractant-mediated activation of the adenylyl cyclase ACA, which converts ATP into cAMP, the primary chemoattractant for D. discoideum. The mechanisms by which CRAC activates ACA remain to be determined. We now show that in addition to its essential role in the activation of ACA, CRAC is involved in regulating chemotaxis. Through mutagenesis, we show that these two functions are independently regulated downstream of PI3K. A CRAC mutant that has lost the capacity to bind PI3K products does not support chemotaxis and shows minimal ACA activation. Finally, overexpression of CRAC and various CRAC mutants show strong effects on ACA activation with little effect on chemotaxis. These findings establish that chemoattractant-mediated activation of PI3K is important for the CRAC-dependent regulation of both chemotaxis and adenylyl cyclase activation.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the glutaminyl cyclase from Carica papaya latex

    SciTech Connect

    Azarkan, Mohamed; Clantin, Bernard; Bompard, Coralie; Belrhali, Hassan; Baeyens-Volant, Danielle; Looze, Yvan; Wintjens, René

    2005-01-01

    The glutaminyl cyclase isolated from C. papaya latex has been crystallized using the hanging-drop method. Diffraction data have been collected at ESRF beamline BM14 and processed to 1.7 Å resolution. In living systems, the intramolecular cyclization of N-terminal glutamine residues is accomplished by glutaminyl cyclase enzymes (EC 2.3.2.5). While in mammals these enzymes are involved in the synthesis of hormonal and neurotransmitter peptides, the physiological role played by the corresponding plant enzymes still remains to be unravelled. Papaya glutaminyl cyclase (PQC), a 33 kDa enzyme found in the latex of the tropical tree Carica papaya, displays an exceptional resistance to chemical and thermal denaturation as well as to proteolysis. In order to elucidate its enzymatic mechanism and to gain insights into the structural determinants underlying its remarkable stability, PQC was isolated from papaya latex, purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 62.82, b = 81.23, c = 108.17 Å and two molecules per asymmetric unit. Diffraction data have been collected at ESRF beamline BM14 and processed to a resolution of 1.7 Å.

  4. The Presence of Two Cyclase Thioesterases Expands the Conformational Freedom of the Cyclic Peptide Occidiofungin

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, Akshaya; Gu, Ganyu; Escano, Jerome; Lu, Shi-En; Smith, Leif

    2014-01-01

    Occidiofungin is a cyclic nonribosomally synthesized antifungal peptide with submicromolar activity produced by Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia contaminans. The biosynthetic gene cluster was confirmed to contain two cyclase thioesterases. NMR analysis revealed that the presence of both thioesterases is used to increase the conformational repertoire of the cyclic peptide. The loss of the OcfN cyclic thioesterase by mutagenesis results in a reduction of conformational variants and an appreciable decrease in bioactivity against Candida species. Presumably, the presence of both asparagine and β-hydroxyasparagine variants coordinate the enzymatic function of both of the cyclase thioesterases. OcfN has presumably evolved to be part of the biosynthetic gene cluster due to its ability to produce structural variants that enhance antifungal activity against some fungi. The enhancement of the antifungal activity from the incorporation of an additional cyclase thioesterase into the biosynthetic gene cluster of occidiofungin supports the need to explore new conformational variants of other therapeutic or potentially therapeutic cyclic peptides. PMID:23394257

  5. Effects of dopamine on adenylyl cyclase activity and amylase secretion in rat parotid tissue.

    PubMed

    Hatta, S; Amemiya, N; Takemura, H; Ohshika, H

    1995-06-01

    Several previous studies have shown that dopamine causes amylase secretion from rat parotid tissue. However, the mechanism of this dopamine action is still unclear. The present study was designed to characterize dopamine action in rat parotid gland tissue by examining the effects of dopamine on cyclic AMP accumulation, adenylyl cyclase activity, and amylase release. Dopamine significantly enhanced accumulation of cyclic AMP in parotid slices and stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity in parotid membrane preparations. It also significantly stimulated amylase release from parotid slices. The stimulatory effects of dopamine on cyclic AMP accumulation, adenylyl cyclase activity, and amylase release were effectively blocked with propranolol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, but not by either SCH 23390, a preferential D1 antagonist, or butaclamol, a preferential D2 antagonist. No substantial specific binding sites for D1 receptors were detectable by [3H]SCH 23390 binding in parotid membranes. These results suggest that the stimulatory effect of dopamine on amylase secretion in rat parotid tissue is not mediated through specific D1 dopamine receptors but rather through beta-adrenergic receptors.

  6. Differential expression of functional guanylyl cyclases in melanocytes: absence of nitric-oxide-sensitive isoform in metastatic cells.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, K; Das, P K; van den Wijngaard, R M; Lenz, W; Klockenbring, T; Malcharzyk, V; Drummer, C; Gerzer, R

    2001-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive endogenous molecule with multiple functions and its cellular signaling activity is mainly mediated by activation of the soluble isoform of guanylyl cyclase, a heterodimeric (alpha/beta) hemeprotein. The expression of the NO-sensitive soluble isoform of guanylyl cyclase was studied in various cultured melanocytic cells by measuring the accumulation of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate in the presence and absence of NO donors. Here we report that 3-morpholino-sydnonimine, a donor of NO redox species, and (Z)-1-[2- (2-aminoethyl)-N-(2-ammonioethyl)amino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate, a direct NO donor, induced a 20-fold increase in intracellular guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate in nonmetastatic melanoma cells and normal melanocytes in culture that could be related to cellular melanin content in a concentration-dependent manner. The increased intracellular guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate was due to stimulation of the activity of soluble guanylyl cyclase as such increase was completely abolished by using a specific inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase. The involvement of functional soluble guanylyl cyclase was further confirmed by the presence of alpha1 and beta1 subunits in these cells at both mRNA and protein levels. In contrast, none of the NO donors induced guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate production in metastatic melanoma cells, which could be attributed to the absence of the beta1 subunit that is essential for catalytic activity of the soluble isoform of guanylyl cyclase. Metastatic melanoma cells produced higher levels of intracellular guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate in response to natriuretic peptides than other cell types, however, due to upregulation of membrane-bound guanylyl cyclase activities, but they are less pigmented or unpigmented. The present finding suggests that NO signaling in association with melanogenesis is dependent on the soluble isoform of guanylyl cyclase, whereas absence of soluble guanylyl

  7. Chronic oxidative-nitrosative stress impairs coronary vasodilation in metabolic syndrome model rats.

    PubMed

    Kagota, Satomi; Maruyama, Kana; Tada, Yukari; Fukushima, Kazuhito; Umetani, Keiji; Wakuda, Hirokazu; Shinozuka, Kazumasa

    2013-07-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a combination of clinical disorders that together increase the risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. SHRSP.Z-Lepr(fa)/IzmDmcr (SHRSP.ZF) rats with MetS show impaired nitric oxide-mediated relaxation in coronary and mesenteric arteries, and angiotensin II receptor type 1 blockers protect against dysfunction and oxidative-nitrosative stress independently of metabolic effects. We hypothesize that superoxide contributes to functional deterioration in SHRSP.ZF rats. To test our hypothesis, we studied effects of treatment with tempol, a membrane-permeable radical scavenger, on impaired vasodilation in SHRSP.ZF rats. Tempol did not alter body weight, high blood pressure, or metabolic abnormalities, but prevented impairment of acetylcholine-induced and nitroprusside-induced vasodilation in the coronary and mesenteric arteries. Furthermore, tempol reduced the levels of serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and 3-nitrotyrosine content in mesenteric arteries. Systemic administration of tempol elevated the expression of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) above basal levels in mesenteric arteries of SHRSP.ZF rats. However, acute treatment with tempol or ebselen, a peroxynitrite scavenger, did not ameliorate impaired relaxation of isolated mesenteric arteries. No nitration of tyrosine residues in sGC was observed; however, sGC mRNA expression levels in the arteries of SHRSP.ZF rats were lower than those in the arteries of Wistar-Kyoto rats. Levels of Thr(496)- and Ser(1177)-phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were lower in arteries of SHRSP.ZF rats, and acetylcholine decreased Thr(496)-phosphorylated eNOS levels. These results indicated that prolonged superoxide production, leading to oxidative-nitrosative stress, was associated with impaired vasodilation in SHRSP.ZF rats with MetS. Down-regulated sGC expression may be linked to dysfunction, while reduced NO bioavailability/eNOS activity and modified sGC

  8. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 H-NOX Regulation of a Histidine Kinase by Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Price, Mark S.; Chao, Lily; Marletta, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) signaling in animals controls processes such as smooth muscle relaxation and neurotransmission by activation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). Prokaryotic homologs of the sGC heme domain, called H-NOX domains, have been identified and are generally found in a predicted operon in conjunction with a histidine kinase. Here, we show that an H-NOX protein (SO2144) from Shewanella oneidensis, directly interacts with the sensor histidine kinase (SO2145), binds NO in a 5-coordinate complex similar to mammalian sGC, and in that form inhibits the activity of a histidine kinase (SO2145). We also describe the first account of NO formation by S. oneidensis under anaerobic growth conditions derived from nitrate and nitrite. These observations suggest that the S. oneidensis H-NOX and histidine kinase pair function as part of a novel two-component signaling pathway that is responsive to NO formation from higher nitrogen oxides used as electron acceptors when oxygen is low and thereby functioning as an environmental sensor. PMID:17988156

  9. Investigation of the role of the NO-cGMP pathway on YC-1 and DEA/NO effects on thoracic aorta smooth muscle responses in a rat preeclampsia model.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Nergiz Hacer; Temiz, Tijen Kaya; Turgut, Bülent; Karadas, Baris; Parlak, Mesut; Bagcivan, Ihsan

    2013-10-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of YC-1, a nitric oxide (NO)-independent soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) activator, and DEA/NO, a NO donor, on smooth muscle responses in the preeclampsia model with suramin-treated rats and on the levels of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) of thoracic aorta rings isolated from term-pregnant rats. Rats of 2 groups, control group and suramin group, were given intraperitoneal injection of saline or suramin, respectively. Suramin injection caused increased blood pressure, protein in urine, and fetal growth retardation. Thoracic aorta rings were exposed to contractile and relaxant agents. KCl contraction and papaverine relaxation responses were similar. Relaxation responses of YC-1 and DEA/NO decreased in suramin group. In both groups in the presence of ODQ, a sGC inhibitor, the relaxation responses of YC-1 and DEA/NO decreased. The cGMP content was determined by radioimmunoassay technique. The content of cGMP in the suramin group decreased. In the presence of YC-1 and DEA/NO in both groups, cGMP content increased, but in ODQ-added groups, there was a significant decrease. We conclude that in preeclampsia, the decrease of relaxation responses and the decrease of cGMP content could be due to the reduction in stimulation of sGC and the decrease in cGMP levels.

  10. Characterization, Purification of Poncirin from Edible Citrus Ougan (Citrus reticulate cv. Suavissima) and Its Growth Inhibitory Effect on Human Gastric Cancer Cells SGC-7901

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoyan; Luo, Fenglei; Zheng, Yixiong; Zhang, Jiukai; Huang, Jianzhen; Sun, Chongde; Li, Xian; Chen, Kunsong

    2013-01-01

    Poncirin is a bitter flavanone glycoside with various biological activities. Poncirin was isolated from four different tissues (flavedo, albedo, segment membrane, and juice sac) of Ougan fruit (Citrus reticulate cv. Suavissima). The highest content of poncirin was found in the albedo of Ougan fruit (1.37 mg/g DW). High speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) combined with D101 resin chromatography was utilized for the separation and purification of poncirin from the albedo of Ougan fruit. After this two-step purification, poncirin purity increased from 0.14% to 96.56%. The chemical structure of the purified poncirin was identified by both HPLC-PDA and LC-MS. Poncirin showed a significant in vitro inhibitory effect on the growth of the human gastric cancer cells, SGC-7901, in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, poncirin from Ougan fruit, may be beneficial for gastric cancer prevention. The purification method demonstrated here will be useful for further studies on the pharmacological mechanism of poncirin activity, as well as for guiding the consumption of Ougan fruit. PMID:23615464

  11. Novel mechanism of harmaline on inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by up-regulating Fas/FasL in SGC-7901 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yihai; Wang, Chunhua; Jiang, Chenguang; Zeng, Hong; He, Xiangjiu

    2015-12-18

    Harmaline (HAR), a natural occurrence β-carboline alkaloid, was isolated from the seeds of Peganum harmala and exhibited potent antitumor effect. In this study, the anti-gastric tumor effects of HAR were firstly investigated in vitro and in vivo. The results strongly showed that HAR could inhibit tumor cell proliferation and induce G2/M cell cycle arrest accompanied by an increase in apoptotic cell death in SGC-7901 cancer cells. HAR could up-regulate the expressions of cell cycle-related proteins of p-Cdc2, p21, p-p53, Cyclin B and down-regulate the expression of p-Cdc25C. In addition, HAR could up-regulate the expressions of Fas/FasL, activated Caspase-8 and Caspase-3. Moreover, blocking Fas/FasL signaling could markedly inhibit the apoptosis caused by HAR, suggesting that Fas/FasL mediated pathways were involved in HAR-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, HAR could also exert on antitumor activity with a dose of 15 mg/kg/day in vivo, which was also related with cell cycle arrest. These new findings provided a framework for further exploration of HAR which possess the potential antitumor activity by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  12. Novel mechanism of harmaline on inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by up-regulating Fas/FasL in SGC-7901 cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yihai; Wang, Chunhua; Jiang, Chenguang; Zeng, Hong; He, Xiangjiu

    2015-01-01

    Harmaline (HAR), a natural occurrence β-carboline alkaloid, was isolated from the seeds of Peganum harmala and exhibited potent antitumor effect. In this study, the anti-gastric tumor effects of HAR were firstly investigated in vitro and in vivo. The results strongly showed that HAR could inhibit tumor cell proliferation and induce G2/M cell cycle arrest accompanied by an increase in apoptotic cell death in SGC-7901 cancer cells. HAR could up-regulate the expressions of cell cycle-related proteins of p-Cdc2, p21, p-p53, Cyclin B and down-regulate the expression of p-Cdc25C. In addition, HAR could up-regulate the expressions of Fas/FasL, activated Caspase-8 and Caspase-3. Moreover, blocking Fas/FasL signaling could markedly inhibit the apoptosis caused by HAR, suggesting that Fas/FasL mediated pathways were involved in HAR-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, HAR could also exert on antitumor activity with a dose of 15 mg/kg/day in vivo, which was also related with cell cycle arrest. These new findings provided a framework for further exploration of HAR which possess the potential antitumor activity by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. PMID:26678950

  13. Guanylate-Binding Protein 1, an Interferon-Induced GTPase, Exerts an Antiviral Activity against Classical Swine Fever Virus Depending on Its GTPase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lian-Feng; Yu, Jiahui; Li, Yongfeng; Wang, Jinghan; Li, Su; Zhang, Lingkai; Xia, Shui-Li; Yang, Qian; Wang, Xiao; Yu, Shaoxiong; Luo, Yuzi; Sun, Yuan; Zhu, Yan; Munir, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many viruses trigger the type I interferon (IFN) pathway upon infection, resulting in the transcription of hundreds of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), which define the antiviral state of the host. Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative agent of classical swine fever (CSF), a highly contagious viral disease endangering the pig industry in many countries. However, anti-CSFV ISGs are poorly documented. Here we screened 20 ISGs that are commonly induced by type I IFNs against CSFV in lentivirus-delivered cell lines, resulting in the identification of guanylate-binding protein 1 (GBP1) as a potent anti-CSFV ISG. We observed that overexpression of GBP1, an IFN-induced GTPase, remarkably suppressed CSFV replication, whereas knockdown of endogenous GBP1 expression by small interfering RNAs significantly promoted CSFV growth. Furthermore, we demonstrated that GBP1 acted mainly on the early phase of CSFV replication and inhibited the translation efficiency of the internal ribosome entry site of CSFV. In addition, we found that GBP1 was upregulated at the transcriptional level in CSFV-infected PK-15 cells and in various organs of CSFV-infected pigs. Coimmunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown assays revealed that GBP1 interacted with the NS5A protein of CSFV, and this interaction was mapped in the N-terminal globular GTPase domain of GBP1. Interestingly, the K51 of GBP1, which is crucial for its GTPase activity, was essential for the inhibition of CSFV replication. We showed further that the NS5A-GBP1 interaction inhibited GTPase activity, which was critical for its antiviral effect. Taking our findings together, GBP1 is an anti-CSFV ISG whose action depends on its GTPase activity. IMPORTANCE Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative agent of classical swine fever (CSF), an economically important viral disease affecting the pig industry in many countries. To date, only a few host restriction factors against CSFV

  14. Adenylyl cyclase 3/adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) complex mediates the anti-migratory effect of forskolin in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Sierra N; Graves, Sarai H; Dains-McGahee, Clayton; Friedman, Emilee M; Hassan, Humma; Witkowski, Piotr; Sabbatini, Maria E

    2017-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal human malignancies. A better understanding of the intracellular mechanism of migration and invasion is urgently needed to develop treatment that will suppress metastases and improve overall survival. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) is a second messenger that has shown to regulate migration and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. The rise of cyclic AMP suppressed migration and invasion of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells. Cyclic AMP is formed from cytosolic ATP by the enzyme adenylyl cyclase (AC). There are ten isoforms of ACs; nine are anchored in the plasma membrane and one is soluble. What remains unknown is the extent to which the expression of transmembrane AC isoforms is both modified in pancreatic cancer and mediates the inhibitory effect of forskolin on cell motility. Using real-time PCR analysis, ADCY3 was found to be highly expressed in pancreatic tumor tissues, resulting in a constitutive increase in cyclic AMP levels. On the other hand, ADCY2 was down-regulated. Migration, invasion, and filopodia formation in two different pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines, HPAC and PANC-1 deficient in AC1 or AC3, were studied. We found that AC3, upon stimulation with forskolin, enhanced cyclic AMP levels and inhibited cell migration and invasion. Unlikely to be due to a cytotoxic effect, the inhibitory effects of forskolin involved the quick formation of AC3/adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1)/G-actin complex, which inhibited filopodia formation and cell motility. Using Western blotting analysis, forskolin, through AC3 activation, caused phosphorylation of CREB, but not ERK. The effect of CREB phosphorylation is likely to be associated with long-term signaling changes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Association of yeast adenylyl cyclase with cyclase-associated protein CAP forms a second Ras-binding site which mediates its Ras-dependent activation.

    PubMed

    Shima, F; Okada, T; Kido, M; Sen, H; Tanaka, Y; Tamada, M; Hu, C D; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Kariya, K; Kataoka, T

    2000-01-01

    Posttranslational modification, in particular farnesylation, of Ras is crucial for activation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase (CYR1). Based on the previous observation that association of CYR1 with cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is essential for its activation by posttranslationally modified Ras, we postulated that the associated CAP might contribute to the formation of a Ras-binding site of CYR1, which mediates CYR1 activation, other than the primary Ras-binding site, the leucine-rich repeat domain. Here, we observed a posttranslational modification-dependent association of Ras with a complex between CAP and CYR1 C-terminal region. When CAP mutants defective in Ras signaling but retaining the CYR1-binding activity were isolated by screening of a pool of randomly mutagenized CAP, CYR1 complexed with two of the obtained three mutants failed to be activated efficiently by modified Ras and exhibited a severely impaired ability to bind Ras, providing a genetic evidence for the importance of the physical association with Ras at the second Ras-binding site. On the other hand, CYR1, complexed with the other CAP mutant, failed to be activated by Ras but exhibited a greatly enhanced binding to Ras. Conversely, a Ras mutant E31K, which exhibits a greatly enhanced binding to the CYR1-CAP complex, failed to activate CYR1 efficiently. Thus, the strength of interaction at the second Ras-binding site appears to be a critical determinant of CYR1 regulation by Ras: too-weak and too-strong interactions are both detrimental to CYR1 activation. These results, taken together with those obtained with mammalian Raf, suggest the importance of the second Ras-binding site in effector regulation.

  16. [Potentiation of NO-dependent activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase by 5-nitroisatin and antiviral preparatation arbidol].

    PubMed

    Severina, I S; Shchegolev, A Iu; Medvedev, A E

    2013-01-01

    Isatin (indole-dione) is an endogenous indole that exibits a wide range of biological and physiological activity. The influence of isatin derivatives 5-nitroisatin and arbidol (an antiviral preparatation) on spermine NONO-induced activation of human platelet soluble guanylyl cyclase was investigated. 5-nitroistnin and arbidol had no effect on basal activity, but synergistically increased in a concentration-dependent manner the spermine NONO-induced activation of this enzyme. 5-Nitroisatin and arbidol, like YC-1, sensitized guanylyl cyclase towards nitric oxide (NO) and produced a leftward shift of the spermine NONO concentration response curve. At the same time both compounds used did not influence the activation of guanylyl cyclase by YC-1 and did not change the synergistic increase of spermine NONO-induced activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase in the presence of YC-1. This suggests that 5-nitroisanin and arbidol did not compete with YC-1. Addition of isatin did not change the synergistic increase in the spermine NONO-induced guanylyl cyclase activation by 5-nitroisatin and arbidol and did not influence a leftward shift of spermine NONO concentration response curve produced by these compounds. These data suggest lack of competitive interaction between isatin and both its derivatives used.

  17. Effect of mitomycin C on the activation of adenylate cyclase in rat ascites hepatoma AH130 cells.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Matsunaga, T; Sanae, F; Koshiura, R

    1986-09-01

    Isoproterenol (IPN)-stimulated activity of adenylate cyclase was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner by exposure of AH130 cells to mitomycin C (MMC). The enhancement was also observed in prostaglandin E1-, guanine nucleotide analog-, NaF-, cholera toxin- and forskolin-stimulated activities of the enzyme but not in manganese-stimulated activity. In addition, even when the cells pretreated with islet-activating protein were exposed to MMC, IPN-stimulated activity of adenylate cyclase was enhanced. Anaerobic exposure of AH130 cells to MMC somewhat inhibited IPN-stimulated activity of adenylate cyclase in contrast with aerobic exposure. Exposure of cells to adriamycin also caused enhancement of IPN-stimulated activity of adenylate cyclase but exposure to nitrogen mustard inhibited the enzyme stimulation by IPN. The enhancing effect of MMC was lost by the combined treatment with alpha-tocopherol. From these results, it was shown that MMC modulated the activity of adenylate cyclase, probably through alterations in membrane structure.

  18. The cyclase-associated protein CAP as regulator of cell polarity and cAMP signaling in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Noegel, Angelika A; Blau-Wasser, Rosemarie; Sultana, Hameeda; Müller, Rolf; Israel, Lars; Schleicher, Michael; Patel, Hitesh; Weijer, Cornelis J

    2004-02-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of the G-actin/F-actin ratio and, in yeast, is involved in regulating the adenylyl cyclase activity. We show that cell polarization, F-actin organization, and phototaxis are altered in a Dictyostelium CAP knockout mutant. Furthermore, in complementation assays we determined the roles of the individual domains in signaling and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. We studied in detail the adenylyl cyclase activity and found that the mutant cells have normal levels of the aggregation phase-specific adenylyl cyclase and that receptor-mediated activation is intact. However, cAMP relay that is responsible for the generation of propagating cAMP waves that control the chemotactic aggregation of starving Dictyostelium cells was altered, and the cAMP-induced cGMP production was significantly reduced. The data suggest an interaction of CAP with adenylyl cyclase in Dictyostelium and an influence on signaling pathways directly as well as through its function as a regulatory component of the cytoskeleton.

  19. Actin activates Pseudomonas aeruginosa ExoY nucleotidyl cyclase toxin and ExoY-like effector domains from MARTX toxins

    PubMed Central

    Belyy, Alexander; Raoux-Barbot, Dorothée; Saveanu, Cosmin; Namane, Abdelkader; Ogryzko, Vasily; Worpenberg, Lina; David, Violaine; Henriot, Veronique; Fellous, Souad; Merrifield, Christien; Assayag, Elodie; Ladant, Daniel; Renault, Louis; Mechold, Undine

    2016-01-01

    The nucleotidyl cyclase toxin ExoY is one of the virulence factors injected by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion system into host cells. Inside cells, it is activated by an unknown eukaryotic cofactor to synthesize various cyclic nucleotide monophosphates. ExoY-like adenylate cyclases are also found in Multifunctional-Autoprocessing Repeats-in-ToXin (MARTX) toxins produced by various Gram-negative pathogens. Here we demonstrate that filamentous actin (F-actin) is the hitherto unknown cofactor of ExoY. Association with F-actin stimulates ExoY activity more than 10,000 fold in vitro and results in stabilization of actin filaments. ExoY is recruited to actin filaments in transfected cells and alters F-actin turnover. Actin also activates an ExoY-like adenylate cyclase MARTX effector domain from Vibrio nigripulchritudo. Finally, using a yeast genetic screen, we identify actin mutants that no longer activate ExoY. Our results thus reveal a new sub-group within the class II adenylyl cyclase family, namely actin-activated nucleotidyl cyclase (AA-NC) toxins. PMID:27917880

  20. Activation of locus coeruleus heme oxygenase-carbon monoxide pathway promoted an anxiolytic-like effect in rats

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho-Costa, P.G.; Branco, L.G.S.; Leite-Panissi, C.R.A.

    2016-01-01

    The heme oxygenase-carbon monoxide pathway has been shown to play an important role in many physiological processes and is capable of altering nociception modulation in the nervous system by stimulating soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). In the central nervous system, the locus coeruleus (LC) is known to be a region that expresses the heme oxygenase enzyme (HO), which catalyzes the metabolism of heme to carbon monoxide (CO). Additionally, several lines of evidence have suggested that the LC can be involved in the modulation of emotional states such as fear and anxiety. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the activation of the heme oxygenase-carbon monoxide pathway in the LC in the modulation of anxiety by using the elevated plus maze test (EPM) and light-dark box test (LDB) in rats. Experiments were performed on adult male Wistar rats weighing 250-300 g (n=182). The results showed that the intra-LC microinjection of heme-lysinate (600 nmol), a substrate for the enzyme HO, increased the number of entries into the open arms and the percentage of time spent in open arms in the elevated plus maze test, indicating a decrease in anxiety. Additionally, in the LDB test, intra-LC administration of heme-lysinate promoted an increase on time spent in the light compartment of the box. The intracerebroventricular microinjection of guanylate cyclase, an sGC inhibitor followed by the intra-LC microinjection of the heme-lysinate blocked the anxiolytic-like reaction on the EPM test and LDB test. It can therefore be concluded that CO in the LC produced by the HO pathway and acting via cGMP plays an anxiolytic-like role in the LC of rats. PMID:27074170

  1. Cellular levels of feedback regulator of adenylate cyclase and the effect of epinephrine and insulin.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, R j; Russell, T R; Asakawa, T; Sutherland, E W

    1975-01-01

    We have obtained direct evidence that shows the cellular formation and subsequent release of a potent inhibitor (feedback regulator) of adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] by adipocytes, upon stimulation with epinephrine. The appearance of such a feedback regulator in adipocytes preceded its release into the medium. During a 30 min incubation, intracellular regulator levels rose rapidly and reached 39-61 units/g of adipocyte at 10 min. Release of inhibitor into the medium increased slowly and was 11-16 units/g of adipocyte at 10 min. Upon continued incubation, the cells at 30 min contained 30-41 units/g of ingibitor, slightly less than the content at 30 min; meanwhile, the medium content rose more than 3-fold. The inhibitor from both locations appeared to have the same characteristics, judging from the purification procedures and the biological activities on hormone-stimulated adenylate cyclase. Adenylate cyclase was inhibited by the feedback regulator in vitro when either epinephrine, corticotropin (ACTH), or glucagon was used as activator. The site of action of this inhibitor is therefore most likely beyond the specific hormone receptors. A new in vitro action of insulin has been found. Insulin, 50-500 microunits/ml, inhibited the formation and release of this factor from isolated rat or hamster adipocytes by 29-81% after these cells were stimulated by hormones that raise intracellular adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate. This factor enhaced the effect of insulin in lowering the adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate levels in fresh rat adipocytes. A reduced formation of such a factor may modify the metabolic events in adipocytes, and some as yet unexplained effects of insulin could therefore be linked to the metabolic effects of this factor. PMID:174073

  2. New insights concerning the molecular basis for defective glucoregulation in soluble adenylyl cyclase knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Holz, George G; Leech, Colin A; Chepurny, Oleg G

    2014-12-01

    Recently published findings indicate that a knockout (KO) of soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC, also known as AC-10) gene expression in mice leads to defective glucoregulation that is characterized by reduced pancreatic insulin secretion and reduced intraperitoneal glucose tolerance. Summarized here are current concepts regarding the molecular basis for this phenotype, with special emphasis on the potential role of sAC as a determinant of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Highlighted is new evidence that in pancreatic beta cells, oxidative glucose metabolism stimulates mitochondrial CO₂production that in turn generates bicarbonate ion (HCO(3)(-)). Since HCO(3)(-) binds to and directly stimulates the activity of sAC, we propose that glucose-stimulated cAMP production in beta cells is mediated not simply by transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (TMACs), but also by sAC. Based on evidence that sAC is expressed in mitochondria, there exists the possibility that beta-cell glucose metabolism is linked to mitochondrial cAMP production with consequent facilitation of oxidative phosphorylation. Since sAC is also expressed in the cytoplasm, sAC catalyzed cAMP production may activate cAMP sensors such as PKA and Epac2 to control ion channel function, intracellular Ca²⁺ handling, and Ca²⁺-dependent exocytosis. Thus, we propose that the existence of sAC in beta cells provides a new and unexpected explanation for previously reported actions of glucose metabolism to stimulate cAMP production. It seems possible that alterations of sAC activity might be of importance when evaluating new strategies for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM), or when evaluating why glucose metabolism fails to stimulate insulin secretion in patients diagnosed with T2DM. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The role of soluble adenylyl cyclase in health and disease.

  3. Thalamic adenylyl cyclase 1 is required for barrel formation in the somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, A; Lee, L-J; Hayashi, Y; Muglia, L; Itohara, S; Erzurumlu, R S; Iwasato, T

    2015-04-02

    Cyclic AMP signaling is critical for activity-dependent refinement of neuronal circuits. Global disruption of adenylyl cyclase 1 (AC1), the major calcium/calmodulin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase in the brain, impairs formation of whisker-related discrete neural modules (the barrels) in cortical layer 4 in mice. Since AC1 is expressed both in the thalamus and the neocortex, the question of whether pre- or postsynaptic (or both) AC1 plays a role in barrel formation has emerged. Previously, we generated cortex-specific AC1 knockout (Cx-AC1KO) mice and found that these animals develop histologically normal barrels, suggesting a potentially more prominent role for thalamic AC1 in barrel formation. To determine this, we generated three new lines of mice: one in which AC1 is disrupted in nearly half of the thalamic ventrobasal nucleus cells in addition to the cortical excitatory neurons (Cx/pTh-AC1KO mouse), and another in which AC1 is disrupted in the thalamus but not in the cortex or brainstem nuclei of the somatosensory system (Th-AC1KO mouse). Cx/pTh-AC1KO mice show severe deficits in barrel formation. Th-AC1KO mice show even more severe disruption in barrel patterning. In these two lines, single thalamocortical (TC) axon labeling revealed a larger lateral extent of TC axons in layer 4 compared to controls. In the third line, all calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclases (both AC1 and AC8) are deleted in cortical excitatory neurons. These mice have normal barrels. Taken together, these results indicate that thalamic AC1 plays a major role in patterning and refinement of the mouse TC circuitry.

  4. Inhibition of adenylyl and guanylyl cyclase isoforms by the antiviral drug foscarnet.

    PubMed

    Kudlacek, O; Mitterauer, T; Nanoff, C; Hohenegger, M; Tang, W J; Freissmuth, M; Kleuss, C

    2001-02-02

    The pyrophosphate (PP(i)) analog foscarnet inhibits viral DNA-polymerases and is used to treat cytomegalovirus and human immunodeficiency vius infections. Nucleotide cyclases and DNA-polymerases catalyze analogous reactions, i.e. a phosphodiester bond formation, and have similar topologies in their active sites. Inhibition by foscarnet of adenylyl cyclase isoforms was therefore tested with (i) purified catalytic domains C1 and C2 of types I and VII (IC1 and VIIC1) and of type II (IIC2) and (ii) membrane-bound holoenzymes (from mammalian tissues and types I, II, and V heterologously expressed in Sf9 cell membranes). Foscarnet was more potent than PP(i) in suppressing forskolin-stimulated catalysis by both, IC1/IIC2 and VIIC1/IIC2. Stimulation of VIIC1/IIC2 by Galpha(s) relieved the inhibition by foscarnet but not that by PP(i). The IC(50) of foscarnet on membrane-bound adenylyl cyclases also depended on their mode of regulation. These findings predict that receptor-dependent cAMP formation is sensitive to inhibition by foscarnet in some, but not all, cells. This was verified with two cell lines; foscarnet blocked cAMP accumulation after A(2A)-adenosine receptor stimulation in PC12 but not in HEK-A(2A) cells. Foscarnet also inhibited soluble and, to a lesser extent, particulate guanylyl cylase. Thus, foscarnet interferes with the generation of cyclic nucleotides, an effect which may give rise to clinical side effects. The extent of inhibition varies with the enzyme isoform and with the regulatory input.

  5. Regulation and therapeutic targeting of peptide-activated receptor guanylyl cyclases.

    PubMed

    Potter, Lincoln R

    2011-04-01

    Cyclic GMP is a ubiquitous second messenger that regulates a wide array of physiologic processes such as blood pressure, long bone growth, intestinal fluid secretion, phototransduction and lipolysis. Soluble and single-membrane-spanning enzymes called guanylyl cyclases (GC) synthesize cGMP. In humans, the latter group consists of GC-A, GC-B, GC-C, GC-E and GC-F, which are also known as NPR-A, NPR-B, StaR, Ret1-GC and Ret2-GC, respectively. Membrane GCs are activated by peptide ligands such as atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), guanylin, uroguanylin, heat stable enterotoxin and GC-activating proteins. Nesiritide and carperitide are clinically approved peptide-based drugs that activate GC-A. CD-NP is an experimental heart failure drug that primarily activates GC-B but also activates GC-A at high concentrations and is resistant to degradation. Inactivating mutations in GC-B cause acromesomelic dysplasia type Maroteaux dwarfism and chromosomal mutations that increase CNP concentrations are associated with Marfanoid-like skeletal overgrowth. Pump-based CNP infusions increase skeletal growth in a mouse model of the most common type of human dwarfism, which supports CNP/GC-B-based therapies for short stature diseases. Linaclotide is a peptide activator of GC-C that stimulates intestinal motility and is in late-stage clinical trials for the treatment of chronic constipation. This review discusses the discovery of cGMP, guanylyl cyclases, the general characteristics and therapeutic applications of GC-A, GC-B and GC-C, and emphasizes the regulation of transmembrane guanylyl cyclases by phosphorylation and ATP.

  6. Multifunctional oxidosqualene cyclases and cytochrome P450 involved in the biosynthesis of apple fruit triterpenic acids.

    PubMed

    Andre, Christelle M; Legay, Sylvain; Deleruelle, Amélie; Nieuwenhuizen, Niels; Punter, Matthew; Brendolise, Cyril; Cooney, Janine M; Lateur, Marc; Hausman, Jean-François; Larondelle, Yvan; Laing, William A

    2016-09-01

    Apple (Malus × domestica) accumulates bioactive ursane-, oleanane-, and lupane-type triterpenes in its fruit cuticle, but their biosynthetic pathway is still poorly understood. We used a homology-based approach to identify and functionally characterize two new oxidosqualene cyclases (MdOSC4 and MdOSC5) and one cytochrome P450 (CYP716A175). The gene expression patterns of these enzymes and of previously described oxidosqualene cyclases were further studied in 20 apple cultivars with contrasting triterpene profiles. MdOSC4 encodes a multifunctional oxidosqualene cyclase producing an oleanane-type triterpene, putatively identified as germanicol, as well as β-amyrin and lupeol, in the proportion 82 : 14 : 4. MdOSC5 cyclizes 2,3-oxidosqualene into lupeol and β-amyrin at a ratio of 95 : 5. CYP716A175 catalyses the C-28 oxidation of α-amyrin, β-amyrin, lupeol and germanicol, producing ursolic acid, oleanolic acid, betulinic acid, and putatively morolic acid. The gene expression of MdOSC1 was linked to the concentrations of ursolic and oleanolic acid, whereas the expression of MdOSC5 was correlated with the concentrations of betulinic acid and its caffeate derivatives. Two new multifuntional triterpene synthases as well as a multifunctional triterpene C-28 oxidase were identified in Malus × domestica. This study also suggests that MdOSC1 and MdOSC5 are key genes in apple fruit triterpene biosynthesis.

  7. Identification of Glutaminyl Cyclase Genes Involved in Pyroglutamate Modification of Fungal Lignocellulolytic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Vincent W.; Dana, Craig M.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The breakdown of plant biomass to simple sugars is essential for the production of second-generation biofuels and high-value bioproducts. Currently, enzymes produced from filamentous fungi are used for deconstructing plant cell wall polysaccharides into fermentable sugars for biorefinery applications. A post-translational N-terminal pyroglutamate modification observed in some of these enzymes occurs when N-terminal glutamine or glutamate is cyclized to form a five-membered ring. This modification has been shown to confer resistance to thermal denaturation for CBH-1 and EG-1 cellulases. In mammalian cells, the formation of pyroglutamate is catalyzed by glutaminyl cyclases. Using the model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, we identified two genes (qc-1 and qc-2) that encode proteins homologous to mammalian glutaminyl cyclases. We show that qc-1 and qc-2 are essential for catalyzing the formation of an N-terminal pyroglutamate on CBH-1 and GH5-1. CBH-1 and GH5-1 produced in a Δqc-1 Δqc-2 mutant, and thus lacking the N-terminal pyroglutamate modification, showed greater sensitivity to thermal denaturation, and for GH5-1, susceptibility to proteolytic cleavage. QC-1 and QC-2 are endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized proteins. The pyroglutamate modification is predicted to occur in a number of additional fungal proteins that have diverse functions. The identification of glutaminyl cyclases in fungi may have implications for production of lignocellulolytic enzymes, heterologous expression, and biotechnological applications revolving around protein stability. PMID:28096492

  8. Adenylyl Cyclase-Associated Protein 1 in the Development of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kakurina, G V; Kondakova, I V; Cheremisina, O V; Shishkin, D A; Choinzonov, E L

    2016-03-01

    We compared the content of adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) in the blood and tissues of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (with and without regional metastases), patients with chronic inflammatory diseases aggravated by laryngeal and laryngopharyngeal dysplasia, and healthy individuals. The data suggest that serum CAP1 concentration correlated with the depth of primary tumor invasion and the presence of regional metastases. In cancer patients, the serum level of CAP1 was lower than in patients with laryngeal and laryngopharyngeal dysplasia, which can be of importance for differential and timely diagnostics of malignant tumors.

  9. Forskolin photoaffinity labels with specificity for adenylyl cyclase and the glucose transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, D.I.; Robbins, J.D.; Ruoho, A.E.; Sutkowski, E.M.; Seamon, K.B. )

    1991-07-15

    Two photolabels, N-(3-(4-azido-3-125I-phenyl)-propionamide)-6- aminoethylcarbamylforskolin(125I-6-AIPP-Fsk) and N-(3-(4-azido-3-125I-phenyl)propionamide)-7-aminoethylcarbamyl-7- desacetylforskolin (125I-7-AIPP-Fsk) were synthesized with specific activities of 2200 Ci/mmol and used to label adenylyl cyclase and the glucose transporter. The affinities of the photolabels for adenylyl cyclase were determined by their inhibition of (3H)forskolin binding to bovine brain membranes. 6-AIPP-Fsk and 7-AIPP-Fsk inhibited (3H)forskolin binding with IC50 values of 15 nM and 200 nM, respectively. 125I-6-AIPP-Fsk labeled a 115-kDa protein in control and GTP {gamma} S-preactivated bovine brain membranes. This labeling was inhibited by forskolin but not by 1,9-dideoxyforskolin or cytochalasin B. 125I-6-AIPP-Fsk labeling of partially purified adenylyl cyclase was inhibited by forskolin but not by 1,9-dideoxyforskolin. 125I-7-AIPP-Fsk specifically labeled a 45-kDa protein and not a 115-kDa protein in control and GTP {gamma} S-preactivated brain membranes. This labeling was inhibited by forskolin, 1,9-dideoxyforskolin, cytochalasin B, and D-glucose but not cytochalasin E or L-glucose. Human erythrocyte membranes were photolyzed with 125I-6-AIPP-Fsk and 125I-7-AIPP-Fsk. 125I-7-AIPP-Fsk, but not 125I-6-AIPP-Fsk, strongly labeled a broad 45-70-kDa band. Forskolin, 7-bromoacetyl-7-desacetylforskolin, 1,9-dideoxyforskolin, cytochalasin B, and D-glucose, but not cytochalasin E or L-glucose, inhibited 125I-7-AIPP-Fsk labeling of the 45-70-kDa band. 125I-6-AIPP-Fsk and 125I-7-AIPP-Fsk are high affinity photolabels with specificity for adenylyl cyclase and the glucose transporter, respectively.

  10. Interferon-induced guanylate-binding proteins lack an N(T)KXD consensus motif and bind GMP in addition to GDP and GTP.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y S; Patterson, C E; Staeheli, P

    1991-09-01

    The primary structures of interferon (IFN)-induced guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) were deduced from cloned human and murine cDNAs. These proteins contained only two of the three sequence motifs typically found in GTP/GDP-binding proteins. The N(T)KXD motif, which is believed to confer guanine specificity in other nucleotide-binding proteins, was absent. Nevertheless, the IFN-induced GBPs exhibited a high degree of selectivity for binding to agarose-immobilized guanine nucleotides. An interesting feature of IFN-induced GBPs is that they strongly bound to GMP agarose in addition to GDP and GTP agaroses but failed to bind to ATP agarose and all other nucleotide agaroses tested. Both GTP and GMP, but not ATP, competed for binding of murine GBP-1 to agarose-immobilized GMP. The IFN-induced GBPs thus define a distinct novel family of proteins with GTP-binding activity. We further demonstrate that human and murine cells contain at least two genes encoding IFN-induced GBPs. The cloned murine cDNA codes for GBP-1, an IFN-induced protein previously shown to be absent from mice of Gbp-1b genotype.

  11. A new splice variant of the human guanylate-binding protein 3 mediates anti-influenza activity through inhibition of viral transcription and replication.

    PubMed

    Nordmann, Alexandra; Wixler, Ludmilla; Boergeling, Yvonne; Wixler, Viktor; Ludwig, Stephan

    2012-03-01

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) belong to the family of large GTPases that are induced in response to interferons. GBPs contain an N-terminal globular GTPase domain and a C-terminal α-helical regulatory domain that are connected by a short middle domain. Antiviral activity against vesicular stomatitis virus and encephalomyocarditis virus has been shown for hGBP-1; however, no anti-influenza virus properties for GBPs have been described to date. Here we show that hGBP-1 and hGBP-3 possess anti-influenza viral activity. Furthermore, we have identified a novel splice variant of hGBP-3, named hGBP-3ΔC, with a largely modified C-terminal α-helical domain. While all three GBP isoforms were up-regulated on influenza virus infection, hGBP-3ΔC showed the most prominent antiviral activity in epithelial cells. Mutational analysis of hGBPs revealed that the globular domain is the principal antiviral effector domain, and GTP-binding, but not hydrolysis, is necessary for antiviral action. Furthermore, we showed that hGBP-3ΔC strongly represses the activity of the viral polymerase complex, which results in decreased synthesis of viral vRNA, cRNA, mRNA, and viral proteins, as well.

  12. The guanylate-binding proteins: emerging insights into the biochemical properties and functions of this family of large interferon-induced guanosine triphosphatase.

    PubMed

    Vestal, Deborah J; Jeyaratnam, Jonathan A

    2011-01-01

    Originally identified by their unusual ability to bind guanosine monophosphate (GMP) nucleotide agarose, the guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) were used extensively to promote our understanding of interferon-induced gene transcription and as markers of interferon responsiveness. Structural and biochemical analyses of human GBP-1 subsequently demonstrated that the GBPs are a unique subfamily of guanosine triphosphatase (GTPases) that hydrolyze guanosine triphosphate (GTP) to both guanosine diphosphate (GDP) and GMP. As members of the larger dynamin superfamily of GTPases, GBPs exhibit such properties as nucleotide-dependent oligomerization and concentration-dependent GTPase activity. Recently, progress has been made in assigning functions to members of the GBP family. While many of these functions involve protection against intracellular pathogens, a growing number of them are not directly related to pathogen protection. It is currently unclear how the unusual properties of GBPs contribute to this growing list of functions. As future studies uncover the molecular mechanism(s) of action of the GBPs, we will gain a greater understanding of how individual GBPs can mediate what currently appears to be a divergent set of functions.

  13. Antimicrobial effects of murine mesenchymal stromal cells directed against Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum: role of immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs).

    PubMed

    Spekker, K; Leineweber, M; Degrandi, D; Ince, V; Brunder, S; Schmidt, S K; Stuhlsatz, S; Howard, J C; Schares, G; Degistirici, O; Meisel, R; Sorg, R V; Seissler, J; Hemphill, A; Pfeffer, K; Däubener, W

    2013-06-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have a multilineage differentiation potential and provide immunosuppressive and antimicrobial functions. Murine as well as human MSCs restrict the proliferation of T cells. However, species-specific differences in the underlying molecular mechanisms have been described. Here, we analyzed the antiparasitic effector mechanisms active in murine MSCs. Murine MSCs, in contrast to human MSCs, could not restrict the growth of a highly virulent strain of Toxoplasma gondii (BK) after stimulation with IFN-γ. However, the growth of a type II strain of T. gondii (ME49) was strongly inhibited by IFN-γ-activated murine MSCs. Immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) as well as guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) contributed to this antiparasitic effect. Further analysis showed that IFN-γ-activated mMSCs also inhibit the growth of Neospora caninum, a parasite belonging to the apicomplexan group as well. Detailed studies with murine IFN-γ-activated MSC indicated an involvement in IRGs like Irga6, Irgb6 and Irgd in the inhibition of N. caninum. Additional data showed that, furthermore, GBPs like mGBP1 and mGBP2 could have played a role in the anti-N. caninum effect of murine MSCs. These data underline that MSCs, in addition to their regenerative and immunosuppressive activity, function as antiparasitic effector cells as well. However, IRGs are not present in the human genome, indicating a species-specific difference in anti-T. gondii and anti-N. caninum effect between human and murine MSCs.

  14. The rice nuclear gene, VIRESCENT 2, is essential for chloroplast development and encodes a novel type of guanylate kinase targeted to plastids and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hiroki; Kusumi, Kensuke; Noguchi, Ko; Yano, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Iba, Koh

    2007-11-01

    Guanylate kinase (GK) is a critical enzyme in guanine nucleotide metabolism pathways, catalyzing the phosphorylation of (d)GMP to (d)GDP. Here we show that a novel gene, VIRESCENT 2 (V2), encodes a new type of GK (designated pt/mtGK) that is localized in plastids and mitochondria. We initially identified the V2 gene by positional cloning of the rice v2 mutant. The v2 mutant is temperature-sensitive and develops chlorotic leaves at restrictive temperatures. The v2 mutation causes inhibition of chloroplast differentiation; in particular, it disrupts the chloroplast translation machinery during early leaf development [Sugimoto et al. (2004)Plant Cell Physiol. 45, 985]. In the bacterial and animal species studied to date, GK is localized in the cytoplasm and participates in maintenance of the guanine nucleotide pools required for many fundamental cellular processes. Phenotypic analysis of rice seedlings with RNAi knockdown of cytosolic GK (designated cGK) showed that cGK is indispensable for the growth and development of plants, but not for chloroplast development. Thus, rice has two types of GK, as does Arabidopsis, suggesting that higher plants have two types of GK. Our results suggest that, of the two types of GK, only pt/mtGK is essential for chloroplast differentiation.

  15. Presence of hormonally-sensitive adenylate cyclase receptors in capillary-enriched fractions from rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Baca, G M; Palmer, G C

    1978-01-01

    The 10 000 g particulate fraction from capillary-enriched fractions isolated from rat cerebral cortex was shown to possess an adenylate cyclase highly sensitive to activation by sodium fluoride, norepinephrine, epinephrine, isoproterenol and dopamine. To a lesser extent histamine and three dopamine agonists, namely M-7 (5,6-dihydroxy-2-dimethylamino tetralin), ET-495 (methane sulfonate of pyribedil), and S-584 (metabolite of pyribedil) stimulated the enzyme preparation. The action of norepinephrine was blocked by propanolol while phenotolamine and haloperidol were relatively ineffective except at highest concentrations. Phentolamine and propanolol at only highest concentrations (10(-4) M) antagonized the action of dopamine. Haloperidol was seen to be a potent inhibitor of either dopamine- or dopamine agonist-sensitive adenylate cyclase. No effects on the enzyme were observed with methoxamine, octopamine or serotonin. These preliminary data suggest the presence of a mixed population of receptors for adenylate cyclase in rat brain capillaries.

  16. Glucose and GLP-1 Stimulate cAMP Production via Distinct Adenylyl Cyclases in INS-1E Insulinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Lavoisier S.; Zippin, Jonathan Hale; Kamenetsky, Margarita; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R.

    2008-01-01

    In β cells, both glucose and hormones, such as GLP-1, stimulate production of the second messenger cAMP, but glucose and GLP-1 elicit distinct cellular responses. We now show in INS-1E insulinoma cells that glucose and GLP-1 produce cAMP with distinct kinetics via different adenylyl cyclases. GLP-1 induces a rapid cAMP signal mediated by G protein–responsive transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmAC). In contrast, glucose elicits a delayed cAMP rise mediated by bicarbonate, calcium, and ATP-sensitive soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). This glucose-induced, sAC-dependent cAMP rise is dependent upon calcium influx and is responsible for the glucose-induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2) pathway. These results demonstrate that sAC-generated and tmAC-generated cAMP define distinct signaling cascades. PMID:18695009

  17. Mutation of His-105 in the beta 1 subunit yields a nitric oxide-insensitive form of soluble guanylyl cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Wedel, B; Humbert, P; Harteneck, C; Foerster, J; Malkewitz, J; Böhme, E; Schultz, G; Koesling, D

    1994-01-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase [GTP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing); EC 4.6.1.2] is a hemoprotein that exists as a heterodimer; the heme moiety has been proposed to bind nitric oxide, resulting in a dramatic activation of the enzyme. Mutation of six conserved His residues reduced but did not abolish nitric oxide stimulation whereas a change of His-105 to Phe in the beta 1 subunit yielded a heterodimer that retained basal cyclase activity but failed to respond to nitric oxide. Heme was not detected as a component of the mutant heterodimer and protophorphyrin IX failed to stimulate enzyme activity. The activity of the His mutant was almost identical to that of the wild-type enzyme in the presence of KCN, suggesting that disruption of heme binding is the principal effect of the mutation. Thus, the mutation provides a means to inhibit the nitric oxide-sensitive guanylyl cyclase signaling pathway. Images PMID:7908439

  18. Enzymatic (13)C labeling and multidimensional NMR analysis of miltiradiene synthesized by bifunctional diterpene cyclase in Selaginella moellendorffii.

    PubMed

    Sugai, Yoshinori; Ueno, Yohei; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Oogami, Shingo; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Matsumoto, Sadamu; Natsume, Masahiro; Nozaki, Hiroshi; Kawaide, Hiroshi

    2011-12-16

    Diterpenes show diverse chemical structures and various physiological roles. The diversity of diterpene is primarily established by diterpene cyclases that catalyze a cyclization reaction to form the carbon skeleton of cyclic diterpene. Diterpene cyclases are divided into two types, monofunctional and bifunctional cyclases. Bifunctional diterpene cyclases (BDTCs) are involved in hormone and defense compound biosyntheses in bryophytes and gymnosperms, respectively. The BDTCs catalyze the successive two-step type-B (protonation-initiated cyclization) and type-A (ionization-initiated cyclization) reactions of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGDP). We found that the genome of a lycophyte, Selaginella moellendorffii, contains six BDTC genes with the majority being uncharacterized. The cDNA from S. moellendorffii encoding a BDTC-like enzyme, miltiradiene synthase (SmMDS), was cloned. The recombinant SmMDS converted GGDP to a diterpene hydrocarbon product with a molecular mass of 272 Da. Mutation in the type-B active motif of SmMDS abolished the cyclase activity, whereas (+)-copalyl diphosphate, the reaction intermediate from the conversion of GGDP to the hydrocarbon product, rescued the cyclase activity of the mutant to form a diterpene hydrocarbon. Another mutant lacking type-A activity accumulated copalyl diphosphate as the reaction intermediate. When the diterpene hydrocarbon was enzymatically synthesized from [U-(13)C(6)]mevalonate, all carbons were labeled with (13)C stable isotope (>99%). The fully (13)C-labeled product was subjected to (13)C-(13)C COSY NMR spectroscopic analyses. The direct carbon-carbon connectivities observed in the multidimensional NMR spectra demonstrated that the hydrocarbon product by SmMDS is miltiradiene, a putative biosynthetic precursor of tanshinone identified from the Chinese medicinal herb Salvia miltiorrhiza. Hence, SmMDS functions as a bifunctional miltiradiene synthase in S. moellendorffii. In this study, we demonstrate that one

  19. Multiple effects of phorbol esters on hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity in S49 lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.D.; Brunton, L.L.

    1987-06-01

    In S49 lymphoma cells, 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) enhances adenylate cyclase activity and doubles cAMP accumulation in response to ..beta..-adrenergic stimulation at 37/sup 0/C, putatively via the action of protein kinase C. at 27/sup 0/C, TPA has the opposite effect, inhibiting cAMP production in response to isoproterenol by approx. 25%. TPA also inhibits the response to prostaglandin E/sub 1/ (PGE/sub 1/), another stimulant of hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase in these cells, by 30% at 37/sup 0/C and almost 50% at 27/sup 0/C. In contrast, TPA enhances responses to forskolin and cholera toxin at both 27 and 37/sup 0/C. In membranes from cells treated with TPA, PGE/sub 1/-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity is inhibited by 50%, whereas the catalytic activity stimulated by NaF or forskolin is enhanced. TPA reduces the potency of both PGE/sub 1/ and isoproterenol for cAMP generation by 50%. TPA causes a similar decrease in ..beta..-adrenergic agonist affinity with no reduction in the density of either antagonist of agonist binding sites in wild type cells and in cells lacking the ..cap alpha..-subunit of the stimulatory transducer protein (G/sub s/) (cyc/sup -/) or lacking functional receptor G/sub s/ coupling (UNC). Therefore, TPA has at least three functionally distinct effects on hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase in S49 cells. The authors conclude that multiple and opposing effects of TPA on hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase occur simultaneously within the same cell, affecting the responses to several agonists differently. In addition, the data offer a mechanism by which a cell can achieve heterogeneous efficacies to hormones that activate adenylate cyclase.

  20. Role of protein kinase C on the acute desensitization of renal cortical adenylate cyclase to parathyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Bellorin-Font, E; López, C; Díaz, K; Pernalete, N; López, M; Starosta, R

    1995-01-01

    The mechanisms of adenylate cyclase desensitization to parathyroid hormone are still unclear. Current evidence suggest that the signal generated after PTH binding to receptors results in activation of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of phospholipase C with subsequent activation of protein kinase C. Recent studies have suggested a role of protein kinase C on the regulation of the PTH-dependent receptor-adenylate cyclase system in cultured cells. Therefore, the present studies were conducted to examine the role of protein kinase C on the desensitization of canine renal cortical adenylate cyclase after an acute exposure in vivo to PTH. A group of normal dogs were treated with a single intravenous injection of 1 microgram/k of syn bPTH (1-34) or Nle bPTH (3-34). Ten minutes later, animals were subjected to bilateral nephrectomy and the kidney cortex processed for preparations of basolateral membranes for determinations of adenylate cyclase activity, as well as membrane and cytosolic fractions for analysis of protein kinase C activity. Animals not treated with PTH were used as controls. PTH administration in vivo resulted in a 46.9 +/- 9.3% decrease in maximal adenylate cyclase activity in vitro in response to syn bPTH (1-34) (P < 0.001). Likewise, PTH binding as measured with 125I-Nle8,18,Tyr34-bPTH (1-34)NH2 showed a 40 +/- 3% decrease. This alterations were associated with a marked translocation of protein kinase C from the cytosol to the membrane. Thus, protein kinase C activity in membrane fractions increased from 160.6 +/- 44.8 pmol Pi/min in controls to 500.4 +/- 123 in PTH treated dogs (P < 0.03).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Tryptophan 232 within oxidosqualene-lanosterol cyclase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae influences rearrangement and deprotonation but not cyclization reactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tung-Kung; Yu, Mei-Ting; Liu, Yuan-Ting; Chang, Cheng-Hsian; Wang, Hsing-Ju; Diau, Eric Wei-Guang

    2006-03-30

    [reaction: see text] Oxidosqualene-lanosterol cyclases convert oxidosqualene to lanosterol in yeast and mammals. Site-saturated mutants' construction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae oxidosqualene-lanosterol cyclase, at Trp232 exchanges against proteinogenic amino acids, and product profiles are shown. All mutants, except Lys and Arg, produced protosta-12,24-dien-3beta-ol, lanosterol, and parkeol. Overall, Trp232 plays a catalytic role in the influence of rearrangement process and determination of deprotonation position but does not involve intervention in the cyclization steps.

  2. Soluble adenylyl cyclase accounts for high basal cCMP and cUMP concentrations in HEK293 and B103 cells.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Alan; Danker, Kerstin Y; Wolter, Sabine; Bähre, Heike; Kaever, Volkhard; Seifert, Roland

    2014-05-30

    Intact HEK293 cells and B103 neuroblastoma cells possess high basal concentrations of the established second messengers cAMP and cGMP and of the emerging second messengers cCMP and cUMP. We asked the question which nucleotidyl cyclase accounts for the high basal cNMP concentrations. Activators and inhibitors of soluble guanylyl cyclase had no major effects on cNMPs, and the activator of membranous adenylyl cyclase forskolin increased only cAMP. Addition of bicarbonate to medium increased, whereas removal of bicarbonate decreased levels of all four cNMPs. The inhibitor of soluble adenylyl cyclase, 2-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-ylthio)-N'-(5-bromo-2-hydroxybenzylidene) propanehydrazide (KH7), reduced bicarbonate-stimulated cNMPs. In conclusion, bicarbonate-stimulated soluble adenylyl cyclase plays an important role in the regulation of basal cellular cNMP levels, most notably cCMP and cUMP.

  3. Adenyl cyclases and cAMP in plant signaling - past and present.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Chris

    2010-06-25

    In lower eukaryotes and animals 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenyl cyclases (ACs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cAMP from ATP, have long been established as key components and second messengers in many signaling pathways. In contrast, in plants, both the presence and biological role of cAMP have been a matter of ongoing debate and some controversy. Here we shall focus firstly on the discovery of cellular cAMP in plants and evidence for a role of this second messenger in plant signal transduction. Secondly, we shall review current evidence of plant ACs, analyse aspects of their domain organisations and the biological roles of candidate molecules. In addition, we shall assess different approaches based on search motifs consisting of functionally assigned amino acids in the catalytic centre of annotated and/or experimentally tested nucleotide cyclases that can contribute to the identification of novel candidate molecules with AC activity such as F-box and TIR proteins.

  4. Inhibition of melanogenesis by 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (chrysin) via blocking adenylyl cyclase activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Chan; Rho, Seong-Hwan; Shin, Jae-Choen; Park, Hyun Ho; Kim, Dongjin

    2011-07-22

    Due to its multiple biological activities, 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (chrysin) in propolis has gained attention as potentially useful therapeutics for various diseases. However, the efficacy of chrysin for the use of dermatological health has not been fully explored. To clarify the action mechanism of the skin protecting property of chrysin, we firstly investigated the molecular docking property of chrysin on the mammalian adenylyl cyclase, which is the key enzyme of cAMP-induced melanogenesis. We also examined the involvement of chrysin in alpha-MSH and forskolin-induced cAMP signaling within a cell based assay. In addition, we inquired into the inhibitory effect of chrysin on melanogenesis and found that the pretreatment with chrysin inhibited the forskolin-induced melanin contents significantly without annihilating the cell viability. These results strongly suggest that chrysin directly inhibits the activity of adenylyl cyclase, downregulates forskolin-induced cAMP-production pathway, consequently inhibiting melanogenesis. Thus, chrysin may also be used as an effective inhibitor of hyperpigmentation.

  5. RNA 3'-terminal phosphate cyclase activity and RNA ligation in HeLa cell extract.

    PubMed Central

    Filipowicz, W; Konarska, M; Gross, H J; Shatkin, A J

    1983-01-01

    HeLa cell extract contains RNA ligase activity that converts linear polyribonucleotides to covalently closed circles. RNA substrates containing 2',3'-cyclic phosphate and 5'-hydroxyl termini are circularized by formation of a normal 3',5' phosphodiester bond. This activity differs from a previously described wheat germ RNA ligase which circularizes molecules with 2',3'-cyclic and 5' phosphate ends by a 2'-phosphomonester, 3',5'-phosphodiester linkage (Konarska et al., Nature 293, 112-116, 1981; Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 79, 1474-1478, 1982). The HeLa cell ligase can also utilize molecules with 3'-phosphate ends. However, in this case ligation is preceded by an ATP-dependent conversion of the 3'-terminal phosphate to the 2',3' cyclic form by a novel activity, RNA 3'-terminal phosphate cyclase. Both RNA ligase and RNA 3'-terminal phosphate cyclase activities are also present in extract of Xenopus oocyte nuclei, consistent with a role in RNA processing. Images PMID:6828385

  6. Adenylyl cyclase 3 haploinsufficiency confers susceptibility to diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Tao; Shen, Ying; Lee, Han-Woong; Yu, Rina; Park, Taesun

    2016-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclase 3 (Adcy3), a member of the mammalian adenylyl cyclase family responsible for generating the second messenger cAMP, has long been known to play an essential role in olfactory signal transduction. Here, we demonstrated that Adcy3 heterozygous null mice displayed increased visceral adiposity in the absence of hyperphagia and developed abnormal metabolic features characterized by impaired insulin sensitivity, dyslipidemia, and increased plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines on both chow and high-fat diet (HFD). Of note, HFD decreased the Adcy3 expression in white adipose tissue, liver, and muscle. We also report for the first time that Adcy3 haploinsufficiency resulted in reduced expression of genes involved in thermogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, and insulin signaling, with enhanced expression of genes related to adipogenesis in peripheral tissues of mice. In conclusion, these findings suggest that cAMP signals generated by Adcy3 in peripheral tissues may play a pivotal role in modulating obesity and insulin sensitivity. PMID:27678003

  7. GSK3β Mediates Renal Response to Vasopressin by Modulating Adenylate Cyclase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Satish; Hao, ChuanMing; Woodgett, James; Harris, Raymond

    2010-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a serine/threonine protein kinase, is a key target of drug discovery in several diseases, including diabetes and Alzheimer disease. Because lithium, a potent inhibitor of GSK3β, causes nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, GSK3β may play a crucial role in regulating water homeostasis. We developed renal collecting duct-specific GSK3β knockout mice to determine whether deletion of GSK3β affects arginine vasopressin-dependent renal water reabsorption. Although only mildly polyuric under normal conditions, knockout mice exhibited an impaired urinary concentrating ability in response to water deprivation or treatment with a vasopressin analogue. The knockout mice had reduced levels of mRNA, protein, and membrane localization of the vasopressin-responsive water channel aquaporin 2 compared with wild-type mice. The knockout mice also expressed lower levels of pS256-AQP2, a phosphorylated form crucial for membrane trafficking. Levels of cAMP, a major regulator of aquaporin 2 expression and trafficking, were also lower in the knockout mice. Both GSK3β gene deletion and pharmacologic inhibition of GSK3β reduced adenylate cyclase activity. In summary, GSK3β inactivation or deletion reduces aquaporin 2 expression by modulating adenylate cyclase activity and cAMP generation, thereby impairing responses to vasopressin in the renal collecting duct. PMID:20056751

  8. Bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase is an essential sensor for acid/base homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Tresguerres, Martin; Parks, Scott K.; Salazar, Eric; Levin, Lonny R.; Goss, Greg G.; Buck, Jochen

    2009-01-01

    pH homeostasis is essential for life, yet it remains unclear how animals sense their systemic acid/base (A/B) status. Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is an evolutionary conserved signaling enzyme that produces the second messenger cAMP in response to bicarbonate ions (HCO3−). We cloned the sAC ortholog from the dogfish, a shark that regulates blood A/B by absorbing and secreting protons (H+) and HCO3− at its gills. Similar to mammalian sAC, dogfish soluble adenylyl cyclase (dfsAC) is activated by HCO3− and can be inhibited by two structurally and mechanistically distinct small molecule inhibitors. dfsAC is expressed in the gill epithelium, where the subset of base-secreting cells resides. Injection of inhibitors into animals under alkaline stress confirmed that dfsAC is essential for maintaining systemic pH and HCO3− levels in the whole organism. One of the downstream effects of dfsAC is to promote the insertion of vacuolar proton pumps into the basolateral membrane to absorb H+ into the blood. sAC orthologs are present throughout metazoans, and mammalian sAC is expressed in A/B regulatory organs, suggesting that systemic A/B sensing via sAC is widespread in the animal kingdom. PMID:20018667

  9. Bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase is an essential sensor for acid/base homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tresguerres, Martin; Parks, Scott K; Salazar, Eric; Levin, Lonny R; Goss, Greg G; Buck, Jochen

    2010-01-05

    pH homeostasis is essential for life, yet it remains unclear how animals sense their systemic acid/base (A/B) status. Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is an evolutionary conserved signaling enzyme that produces the second messenger cAMP in response to bicarbonate ions (HCO(3)(-)). We cloned the sAC ortholog from the dogfish, a shark that regulates blood A/B by absorbing and secreting protons (H(+)) and HCO(3)(-) at its gills. Similar to mammalian sAC, dogfish soluble adenylyl cyclase (dfsAC) is activated by HCO(3)(-) and can be inhibited by two structurally and mechanistically distinct small molecule inhibitors. dfsAC is expressed in the gill epithelium, where the subset of base-secreting cells resides. Injection of inhibitors into animals under alkaline stress confirmed that dfsAC is essential for maintaining systemic pH and HCO(3)(-) levels in the whole organism. One of the downstream effects of dfsAC is to promote the insertion of vacuolar proton pumps into the basolateral membrane to absorb H(+) into the blood. sAC orthologs are present throughout metazoans, and mammalian sAC is expressed in A/B regulatory organs, suggesting that systemic A/B sensing via sAC is widespread in the animal kingdom.

  10. Soluble adenylyl cyclase is an acid-base sensor in epithelial base-secreting cells.

    PubMed

    Roa, Jinae N; Tresguerres, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Blood acid-base regulation by specialized epithelia, such as gills and kidney, requires the ability to sense blood acid-base status. Here, we developed primary cultures of ray (Urolophus halleri) gill cells to study mechanisms for acid-base sensing without the interference of whole animal hormonal regulation. Ray gills have abundant base-secreting cells, identified by their noticeable expression of vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (VHA), and also express the evolutionarily conserved acid-base sensor soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). Exposure of cultured cells to extracellular alkalosis (pH 8.0, 40 mM HCO3 (-)) triggered VHA translocation to the cell membrane, similar to previous reports in live animals experiencing blood alkalosis. VHA translocation was dependent on sAC, as it was blocked by the sAC-specific inhibitor KH7. Ray gill base-secreting cells also express transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs); however, tmAC inhibition by 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine did not prevent alkalosis-dependent VHA translocation, and tmAC activation by forskolin reduced the abundance of VHA at the cell membrane. This study demonstrates that sAC is a necessary and sufficient sensor of extracellular alkalosis in ray gill base-secreting cells. In addition, this study indicates that different sources of cAMP differentially modulate cell biology.

  11. Bicarbonate-sensitive soluble and transmembrane adenylyl cyclases in peripheral chemoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Ana R.; Holmes, Andrew P.S.; Sample, Vedangi; Kumar, Prem; Cann, Martin J.; Monteiro, Emília C.; Zhang, Jin; Gauda, Estelle B.

    2014-01-01

    Stimulation of the carotid body (CB) chemoreceptors by hypercapnia triggers a reflex ventilatory response via a cascade of cellular events, which includes generation of cAMP. However, it is not known if molecular CO2/HCO3− and/or H+ mediate this effect and how these molecules contribute to cAMP production. We previously reported that the CB highly expresses HCO3−-sensitive soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). In the present study we systematically characterize the role of sAC in the CB, comparing the effect of isohydric hypercapnia (IH) in cAMP generation through activation of sAC or transmembrane-adenylyl cyclase (tmAC). Pharmacological deactivation of sAC and tmAC decreased the CB cAMP content in normocapnia and IH with no differences between these two conditions. Changes from normocapnia to IH did not effect the degree of PKA activation and the carotid sinus nerve discharge frequency. sAC and tmAC are functional in CB but intracellular elevations in CO2/HCO3− in IH conditions on their own are insufficient to further activate these enzymes, suggesting that the hypercapnic response is dependent on secondary acidosis. PMID:23727159

  12. Adenylate Cyclase AcyA Regulates Development, Aflatoxin Biosynthesis and Fungal Virulence in Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kunlong; Qin, Qiuping; Liu, Yinghang; Zhang, Limei; Liang, Linlin; Lan, Huahui; Chen, Chihao; You, Yunchao; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Shihua

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is one of the most important opportunistic pathogens of crops and animals. The carcinogenic mycotoxin, aflatoxins produced by this pathogen cause a health problem to human and animals. Since cyclic AMP signaling controls a range of physiological processes, like fungal development and infection when responding to extracellular stimuli in fungal pathogens, in this study, we investigated the function of adenylate cyclase, a core component of cAMP signaling, in aflatoxins biosynthesis and virulence on plant seeds in A. flavus. A gene replacement strategy was used to generate the deletion mutant of acyA that encodes the adenylate cyclase. Severe defects in fungal growth, sporulation and sclerotia formation were observed in the acyA deletion mutant. The defect in radical growth could be partially rescued by exogenous cAMP analog. The acyA mutant was also significantly reduced in aflatoxins production and virulence. Similar to the former studies in other fungi, The acyA mutant showed enhancing tolerance to oxidative stress, but more sensitive to heat stress. Overall, the pleiotropic defects of the acyA deletion mutant indicates that the cAMP-PKA pathway is involved in fungal development, aflatoxins biosynthesis and plant seed invasion in A. flavus. PMID:28066725

  13. Adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) from Bordetella hinzii: characterization and differences from ACT of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Donato, Gina M; Hsia, Hung-Lun J; Green, Candace S; Hewlett, Erik L

    2005-11-01

    Bordetella hinzii is a commensal respiratory microorganism in poultry but is increasingly being recognized as an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised humans. Although associated with a variety of disease states, practically nothing is known about the mechanisms employed by this bacterium. In this study, we show by DNA sequencing and reverse transcription-PCR that both commensal and clinical strains of B. hinzii possess and transcriptionally express cyaA, the gene encoding adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) in other pathogenic Bordetella species. By Western blotting, we also found that B. hinzii produces full-length ACT protein in quantities that are comparable to those made by B. pertussis. In contrast to B. pertussis ACT, however, ACT from B. hinzii is less extractable from whole bacteria, nonhemolytic, has a 50-fold reduction in adenylate cyclase activity, and is unable to elevate cyclic AMP levels in host macrophages (nontoxic). The decrease in enzymatic activity is attributable, at least in part, to a decreased binding affinity of B. hinzii ACT for calmodulin, the eukaryotic activator of B. pertussis ACT. In addition, we demonstrate that the lack of intoxication by B. hinzii ACT may be due to the absence of expression of cyaC, the gene encoding the accessory protein required for the acylation of B. pertussis ACT. These results demonstrate the expression of ACT by B. hinzii and represent the first characterization of a potential virulence factor of this organism.

  14. E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin and guanylyl cyclase C: new functions and unsuspected actions.

    PubMed Central

    Giannella, Ralph A.; Mann, Elizabeth A.

    2003-01-01

    Some E. coli cause diarrhea by elaborating heat-labile and heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins which stimulate intestinal secretion. E. coli ST's are small peptides which bind to intestinal luminal epithelial cell receptors. The ST receptor, one of a family of receptor-cyclases called guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C), is a membrane spanning protein containing an extracellular binding domain and intracellular protein kinase and catalytic domains. The intestine synthesizes and secretes homologous peptides, guanylin and uroguanylin. The kidney also synthesizes uroguanylin. ST, guanylin or uroguanylin binding to GC-C results in increased cGMP, phosphorylation of the CFTR Cl- channel and secretion. Proguanylin and prouroguanylin circulate in blood and bind to receptors in intestine, kidney, liver, brain etc. In the kidney, they stimulate the excretion of Na+ and K+. Study of GC-C "knock-out" mice reveal that GC-C is important to intestinal salt and water secretion, duodenal bicarbonate secretion, recovery from CCl4-induced liver injury, and to intestinal polyp formation in Min mice lacking GC-C. PMID:12813912

  15. Adenylate cyclase regulation in the spermatogenic cell plasma membrane: Modulating effects of TPA and TCDD

    SciTech Connect

    Beebe, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    This research was designed to compare the effects of TPA, a phorbol ester, and TCDD in a spermatogenic cell population, a target of TCDD toxicity. Membrane-bound adenylate cyclase activity was used an index of membrane function, and was quantified by the amount of {sup 32}P-cAMP formed from {sup 32}P-ATP following chromatographic separation. Exposure to male germ cells in-vitro to TPA and TCDD followed by direct measurement of enzyme activity was used to investigate the potential of each agent to perturb membrane function. TPA and TCDD consistently inhibited adenylate cyclase activity at the levels of G{sub s}-catalytic unit coupling and hormone-receptor activation, as measured by the stimulation of enzyme activity by concomitant addition of forskolin and GTP and FSH and GTP, respectively. The effect on coupling required at least 60 minutes of exposure to TPA or TCDD. Concentration-response curves demonstrated a progressive desensitization with increasing TPA concentration, while TCDD exhibited consistent inhibition over the same concentration range.

  16. Binding of (/sup 3/H)forskolin to solubilized preparations of adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C.A.; Seamon, K.B.

    1988-01-01

    The binding of (/sup 3/H)forskolin to proteins solubilized from bovine brain membranes was studied by precipitating proteins with polyethylene glycol and separating (/sup 3/H)forskolin bound to protein from free (/sup 3/H)forskolin by rapid filtration. The K/sub d/ for (/sup 3/H)forskolin binding to solubilized proteins was 14 nM which was similar to that for (/sup 3/H)forskolin binding sites in membranes from rat brain and human platelets. Forskolin analogs competed for (/sup 3/H)forskolin binding sites with the same rank potency in both brain membranes and in proteins solubilized from brain membranes. (/sup 3/H)forskolin bound to proteins solubilized from membranes with a Bmax of 38 fmolmg protein which increased to 94 fmolmg protein when GppNHp was included in the binding assay. In contrast, GppNHp had no effect on (/sup 3/H)forskolin binding to proteins solubilized from membranes preactivated with GppNHp. Solubilized adenylate cyclase from non-preactivated membranes had a basal activity of 130 pmolmgmin which was increased 7-fold by GppNHp. In contrast, adenylate cyclase from preactivated membranes had a basal activity of 850 pmolmgmin which was not stimulated by GppNHp or forskolin

  17. Neofunctionalization of Chromoplast Specific Lycopene Beta Cyclase Gene (CYC-B) in Tomato Clade

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Vijee; Pandey, Arun; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju; Sharma, Rameshwar

    2016-01-01

    The ancestor of tomato underwent whole genome triplication ca. 71 Myr ago followed by widespread gene loss. However, few of the triplicated genes are retained in modern day tomato including lycopene beta cyclase that mediates conversion of lycopene to β-carotene. The fruit specific β-carotene formation is mediated by a chromoplast-specific paralog of lycopene beta cyclase (CYC-B) gene. Presently limited information is available about how the variations in CYC-B gene contributed to its neofunctionalization. CYC-B gene in tomato clade contained several SNPs and In-Dels in the coding sequence (33 haplotypes) and promoter region (44 haplotypes). The CYC-B gene coding sequence in tomato appeared to undergo purifying selection. The transit peptide sequence of CYC-B protein was predicted to have a stronger plastid targeting signal than its chloroplast specific paralog indicating a possible neofunctionalization. In promoter of two Bog (Beta old gold) mutants, a NUPT (nuclear plastid) DNA fragment of 256 bp, likely derived from a S. chilense accession, was present. In transient expression assay, this promoter was more efficient than the “Beta type” promoter. CARGATCONSENSUS box sequences are required for the binding of the MADS-box regulatory protein RIPENING INHIBITOR (RIN). The loss of CARGATCONSENSUS box sequence from CYC-B promoter in tomato may be related to attenuation of its efficiency to promote higher accumulation of β-carotene than lycopene during fruit ripening. PMID:27070417

  18. Increase in the amount of adenylate cyclase in rat gastrocnemius muscle after denervation

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Uchida, S.; Yoshida, H.

    1989-01-01

    After section of the sciatic nerve, the basal adenylate cyclase (AC) activity in rat gastrocnemius muscle increased 6-7 times per membrane protein and about 2 times per whole muscle in the following 30 or 40 days. The AC activity in the muscle 30 days after denervation was increased about 4 times by folskolin. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) also increased the adenylate cyclase activity in the denervated muscle. The binding of (/sup 3/H)-forskolin to cells isolated from gastrocnemius muscle was examined to determine the amount of AC molecules. Inhibition of (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding by increasing amounts of unlabeled forskolin gave a sigmoid curve with a IC/sub 50/ value of 3/times/10/sup /minus/7/M. Results showed that the number of (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding sites per cell was higher on the denervated side than on the control side, like the basal AC activity. The IC/sub 50/ values for inhibition by unlabeled forskolin of binding of (/sup 3/H)-forskolin were similar to muscles on the control and denervated sides. These results suggest that an increase in the AC activity induced by denervation was due to an increase in the numbers of AC molecules in the muscle.

  19. Hypoxic Vasospasm Mediated by cIMP: When Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase Turns Bad

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhengju; Leung, Susan W. S.; Vanhoutte, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: In a number of isolated blood vessel types, hypoxia causes an acute contraction that is dependent on the presence of nitric oxide and activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase. It is more pronounced when the preparations are constricted and is therefore termed hypoxic augmentation of vasoconstriction. This hypoxic response is accompanied by increases in the intracellular level of inosine 5′-triphosphate and in the synthesis of inosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cIMP) by soluble guanylyl cyclase. The administration of exogenous cIMP or inosine 5′-triphosphate causes augmented vasoconstriction to hypoxia. Furthermore, the vasoconstriction evoked by hypoxia and cIMP is associated with increased activity of Rho kinase (ROCK), indicating that cIMP may mediate the hypoxic effect by sensitizing the myofilaments to Ca2+ through ROCK. Hypoxia is implicated in exaggerated vasoconstriction in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, hypertension, and stroke. The newly found role of cIMP may help to identify unique therapeutic targets for certain cardiovascular disorders. PMID:25264755

  20. Subtyping of Salmonella enterica Subspecies I Using Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Adenylate Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Abdo, Zaid; Byers, Sara Overstreet; Kriebel, Patrick; Rothrock, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Methods to rapidly identify serotypes of Salmonella enterica subspecies I are of vital importance for protecting the safety of food. To supplement the serotyping method dkgB-linked intergenic sequence ribotyping (ISR), single-nucleotide polymorphisms were characterized within adenylate cyclase (cyaA). The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database had 378 cyaA sequences from S. enterica subspecies I, which included 42 unique DNA sequences and 19 different amino acid sequences. Five representative isolates, namely serotypes Typhimurium, Kentucky, Enteritidis phage type PT4, and two variants of Enteritidis phage type PT13a, were differentiated within a microsphere-based fluidics system in cyaA by allele-specific primer extension. Validation against 25 poultry-related environmental Salmonella isolates representing 11 serotypes yielded a ∼89% success rate at identifying the serotype of the isolate, and a different region could be targeted to achieve 100%. When coupled with ISR, all serotypes were differentiated. Phage lineages of serotype Enteritidis 13a and 4 were identified, and a biofilm-forming strain of PT13a was differentiated from a smooth phenotype within phage type. Comparative ranking of mutation indices to genes such as the tRNA transferases, the diguanylate cyclases, and genes used for multilocus sequence typing indicated that cyaA is an appropriate gene for assessing epidemiological trends of Salmonella because of its relative stability in nucleotide composition. PMID:27035032

  1. Inhibitors of receptor-mediated endocytosis block the entry of Bacillus anthracis adenylate cyclase toxin but not that of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, V M; Leppla, S H; Hewlett, E L

    1988-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis and Bacillus anthracis produce extracytoplasmic adenylate cyclase toxins (AC toxins) with shared features including activation by calmodulin and the ability to enter target cells and catalyze intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) production from host ATP. The two AC toxins were evaluated for sensitivities to a series of inhibitors of known uptake mechanisms. Cytochalasin D, an inhibitor of microfilament function, abrogated the cAMP response to B. anthracis AC toxin (93%) but not the cAMP response elicited by B. pertussis AC toxin. B. anthracis-mediated intoxication of CHO cells was completely inhibited by ammonium chloride (30 mM) and chloroquine (0.1 mM), whereas the cAMP accumulation produced by B. pertussis AC toxin remained unchanged. The block of target cell intoxication by cytochalasin D could be bypassed when cells were first treated with anthrax AC toxin and then exposed to an acidic medium. These data indicate that despite enzymatic similarities, these two AC toxins intoxicate target cells by different mechanisms, with anthrax AC toxin entering by means of receptor-mediated endocytosis into acidic compartments and B. pertussis AC toxin using a separate, and as yet undefined, mechanism. PMID:2895741

  2. Differential involvement of cyclase- versus non-cyclase-coupled D1-like dopamine receptors in orofacial movement topography in mice: studies with SKF 83822.

    PubMed

    Makihara, Yasuyuki; Okuda, Yaeko; Kawada, Chieko; Matsumoto, Mitsuhiko; Waddington, John L; Koshikawa, Noriaki; Tomiyama, Katsunori

    2007-03-19

    Though orofacial movements are fundamental motor patterns that are known to be regulated critically by D1-like dopamine receptors, these processes remain poorly understood. This uncertainty is heightened by evidence for putative D1-like receptors that are linked not only to adenylyl cyclase (AC) but also to phospholipase C (PLC). Using a new method, we have characterised four topographies of orofacial movement in the mouse using the novel D1-like agonist SKF 83822, which stimulates AC but not PLC. These were compared with responses to SKF 83959, which stimulates PLC but not AC. Also, effects were characterised using the D1-like antagonist SCH 23390 and the D2-like antagonist YM 09151-2. SKF 83822 induced vertical jaw movements with incisor chattering but inhibited horizontal jaw movements; there was little effect on tongue protrusions. Vertical jaw movements induced by SKF 83822 were inhibited by SCH 23390 but uninfluenced by YM 09151-2, while YM 09151-2 released horizontal jaw movements; thus, D1-like agonist-induced, AC-mediated vertical jaw movements constitute a 'pure' D1-like-dependent process that does not involve D1-like:D2-like interactions, while horizontal jaw movements involve oppositional interactions. Orofacial movements in mice appear to consist of at least four phenomenologically dissociable topographies that are mechanistically distinct. They are regulated differentially by AC- and/or PLC-dependent processes and these processes involve distinct D1-like:D2-like interactions.

  3. Mechanism of activation of light-activated phosphodiesterase and evidence for homology with hormone-activated adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Bitensky, M.W.; Yamazaki, A.; Wheeler, M.A.; George, J.S.; Rasenick, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    Light-activated cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) is one of the effector proteins in the rod outer segments in vertebrate retina. The hydrolysis of cGMP in rod occurs with a speed and light sensitivity which suggests a role for this hydrolysis in visual transduction. In fact, there is electrophysiological data which supports the possibility that cGMP could regulate rod membrane voltage. PDE shows very rapid activation in the presence of photons and GTP. We have called attention to the intriguing analogy between light activated rod phosphodiesterase and hormone activated adenylate cyclase. A number of studies have implicated the binding of GTP to a GTP binding protein as a factor in the hormone dependent activation of adenylate cyclase. Moreover, Cassel and Selinger have shown that hydrolysis of GTP is a component in the inactivation of the hormone dependent adenylate cyclase. We review here recent additional data which provide specific molecular details of the mechanism of light activation of rod PDE as well as demonstrate the exchange of components between light activated PDE and hormone activated cyclase.

  4. Structural evidence for variable oligomerization of the N-terminal domain of cyclase-associated protein (CAP).

    PubMed

    Yusof, Adlina Mohd; Hu, Nien-Jen; Wlodawer, Alexander; Hofmann, Andreas

    2005-02-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a highly conserved and widely distributed protein that links the nutritional response signaling to cytoskeleton remodeling. In yeast, CAP is a component of the adenylyl cyclase complex and helps to activate the Ras-mediated catalytic cycle of the cyclase. While the N-terminal domain of CAP (N-CAP) provides a binding site for adenylyl cyclase, the C-terminal domain (C-CAP) possesses actin binding activity. Our attempts to crystallize full-length recombinant CAP from Dictyostelium discoideum resulted in growth of orthorhombic crystals containing only the N-terminal domain (residues 42-227) due to auto-proteolytic cleavage. The structure was solved by molecular replacement with data at 2.2 A resolution. The present crystal structure allows the characterization of a head-to-tail N-CAP dimer in the asymmetric unit and a crystallographic side-to-side dimer. Comparison with previously published structures of N-CAP reveals variable modes of dimerization of this domain, but the presence of a common interface for the side-to-side dimer.

  5. Isolation of a cotton CAP gene: a homologue of adenylyl cyclase-associated protein highly expressed during fiber elongation.

    PubMed

    Kawai, M; Aotsuka, S; Uchimiya, H

    1998-12-01

    The cDNA encoding CAP (adenylyl cyclase-associated protein) was isolated from a cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fiber cDNA library. The cDNA (GhCAP) contained an open reading frame that encoded 471 amino acid residues. RNA blot analysis showed that the cotton CAP gene was expressed mainly in young fibers.

  6. Isolation of an Arabidopsis mutant lacking vitamin E and identification of a cyclase essential for all tocopherol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Porfirova, Svetlana; Bergmuller, Eveline; Tropf, Susanne; Lemke, Rainer; Dormann, Peter

    2002-09-17

    Tocopherol (vitamin E) is a plant chloroplast lipid presumed to be involved in the response to oxidative stress. A tocopherol-deficient mutant (vte1) was isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana by using a TLC-based screening approach. Mutant plants lacked all four tocopherol forms and were deficient in tocopherol cyclase activity. Genetic mapping of vte1 and a genomics-based approach led to the identification of the ORF At4g32770 as a candidate gene for tocopherol cyclase. In vte1, At4g32770 contains a splicing site mutation and the corresponding mRNA expression is reduced. Expression of VTE1 in Escherichia coli resulted in the production of a protein with high tocopherol cyclase and tocotrienol cyclase activity. The VTE1 sequence shows no similarities to genes with known function, but is similar to that of SXD1, a gene that was recently isolated based on the availability of the sucrose export defective1 maize mutant (sxd1). Growth of the vte1 mutant, chlorophyll content, and photosynthetic quantum yield were similar to wild type under optimal growth conditions. Therefore, absence of tocopherol has no large impact on photosynthesis or plant viability, suggesting that other antioxidants can compensate for the loss of tocopherol. During photo-oxidative stress, chlorophyll content and photosynthetic quantum yield were slightly reduced in vte1 as compared with wild type indicating a potential role for tocopherol in maintaining an optimal photosynthesis rate under high-light stress.

  7. Immunity-related GTPase M (IRGM) proteins influence the localization of guanylate-binding protein 2 (GBP2) by modulating macroautophagy.

    PubMed

    Traver, Maria K; Henry, Stanley C; Cantillana, Viviana; Oliver, Tim; Hunn, Julia P; Howard, Jonathan C; Beer, Sandra; Pfeffer, Klaus; Coers, Jörn; Taylor, Gregory A

    2011-09-02

    The immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) are a family of proteins induced by interferon-γ that play a crucial role in innate resistance to intracellular pathogens. The M subfamily of IRG proteins (IRGM) plays a profound role in this context, in part because of the ability of its members to regulate the localization and expression of other IRG proteins. We present here evidence that IRGM proteins affect the localization of the guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), a second family of interferon-induced GTP-binding proteins that also function in innate immunity. Absence of Irgm1 or Irgm3 led to accumulation of Gbp2 in intracellular compartments that were positive for both the macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as autophagy) marker LC3 and the autophagic adapter molecule p62/Sqstm1. Gbp2 was similarly relocalized in cells in which autophagy was impaired because of the absence of Atg5. Both in Atg5- and IRGM-deficient cells, the IRG protein Irga6 relocalized to the same compartments as Gbp2, raising the possibility of a common regulatory mechanism. However, other data indicated that Irga6, but not Gbp2, was ubiquitinated in IRGM-deficient cells. Similarly, coimmunoprecipitation studies indicated that although Irgm3 did interact directly with Irgb6, it did not interact with Gbp2. Collectively, these data suggest that IRGM proteins indirectly modulate the localization of GBPs through a distinct mechanism from that through which they regulate IRG protein localization. Further, these results suggest that a core function of IRGM proteins is to regulate autophagic flux, which influences the localization of GBPs and possibly other factors that instruct cell-autonomous immune resistance.

  8. [Adenylyl cyclase signaling mechanisms of the insulin superfamily peptide action and their impairment in myometrium of pregnant women with type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Plesneva, S a; Kuznetsova, L A; Shpakov, A O; Sharova, T S; Pertseva, M N

    2008-10-01

    For the first time we found in myometrium of the women and pregnant women that adenylyl cyclase (AC) stimulating effects of relaxin, insulin and insulin growth factor 1 are realized via six-component AC signaling mechanisms involving the following signaling chain: receptor-tyrosine kinase ==> Gi protein (beta gamma dimmer) ==> phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase ==> protein kinase C (zeta) ==> Gs protein ==> adenylyl cyclase (AC), which are similar to the discovered adenylyl cyclase signaling mechanisms of insulin and relaxin action in vertebrates (rat) and invertebrates (mollusk). The effect of relaxin is more pronounced as compared with other peptides (relaxin > insulin > insulin-like growth factor-1) in myometrium of pregnant women. It is connected with the specific role ofrelaxin as main regulator of reproductive functions. For the first time we revealed the functional defects in distal parts of adenylyl cyclase signaling mechanisms of the insulin superfamily peptides action in the condition type-2 diabetes (the increase of the basal adenylyl cyclase activity and decrease of the peptide-stimulated AX activity in presence of guanilylimidodiphosphate). The defects are localized on the level of Gs protein, adenylyl cyclase and their functional coupling. The data obtained confirm our conception about molecular defects in hormoneregulated adenylyl cyclase system as a key reason of type-2 diabetes.

  9. Targeted Therapy in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Murray

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapies use an understanding of the pathophysiology of a disease in an individual patient. Although targeted therapy for systemic sclerosis (SSc, scleroderma) has not yet reached the level of patient-specific treatments, recent developments in the understanding of the global pathophysiology of the disease have led to new treatments based on the cells and pathways that have been shown to be involved in the disease pathogenesis. The presence of a B cell signature in skin biopsies has led to the trial of rituximab, an anti-CD20 antibody, in SSc. The well-known properties of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in promoting collagen synthesis and secretion has led to a small trial of fresolimumab, a human IgG4 monoclonal antibody capable of neutralizing TGF-β. Evidence supporting important roles for interleukin-6 in the pathogenesis of SSc have led to a large trial of tocilizumab in SSc. Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is an enzyme that catalyzes the production of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) upon binding of nitric oxide (NO) to the sGC molecule. Processes such as cell growth and proliferation are regulated by cGMP. Evidence that sGC may play a role in SSc has led to a trial of riociguat, a molecule that sensitizes sGC to endogenous NO. Tyrosine kinases (TKs) are involved in a wide variety of physiologic and pathological processes including vascular remodeling and fibrogenesis such as occurs in SSc. This has led to a trial of nintedanib, a next-generation tyrosine-kinase (TK) inhibitor which targets multiple TKs, in SSc. PMID:27824545

  10. Nitric Oxide-cGMP Signaling Stimulates Erythropoiesis through Multiple Lineage-Specific Transcription Factors: Clinical Implications and a Novel Target for Erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Ikuta, Tohru; Sellak, Hassan; Odo, Nadine; Adekile, Adekunle D.; Gaensler, Karin M. L.

    2016-01-01

    Much attention has been directed to the physiological effects of nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP signaling, but virtually nothing is known about its hematologic effects. We reported for the first time that cGMP signaling induces human γ-globin gene expression. Aiming at developing novel therapeutics for anemia, we examined here the hematologic effects of NO-cGMP signaling in vivo and in vitro. We treated wild-type mice with NO to activate soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), a key enzyme of cGMP signaling. Compared to untreated mice, NO-treated mice had higher red blood cell counts and total hemoglobin but reduced leukocyte counts, demonstrating that when activated, NO-cGMP signaling exerts hematopoietic effects on multiple types of blood cells in vivo. We next generated mice which overexpressed rat sGC in erythroid and myeloid cells. The forced expression of sGCs activated cGMP signaling in both lineage cells. Compared with non-transgenic littermates, sGC mice exhibited hematologic changes similar to those of NO-treated mice. Consistently, a membrane-permeable cGMP enhanced the differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors toward erythroid-lineage cells but inhibited them toward myeloid-lineage cells by controlling multiple lineage-specific transcription factors. Human γ-globin gene expression was induced at low but appreciable levels in sGC mice carrying the human β-globin locus. Together, these results demonstrate that NO-cGMP signaling is capable of stimulating erythropoiesis in both in vitro and vivo settings by controlling the expression of multiple lineage-specific transcription factors, suggesting that cGMP signaling upregulates erythropoiesis at the level of gene transcription. The NO-cGMP signaling axis may constitute a novel target to stimulate erythropoiesis in vivo. PMID:26727002

  11. Formation of Nitric Oxide by Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-2 Is Necessary and Sufficient for Vascular Bioactivation of Nitroglycerin*

    PubMed Central

    Opelt, Marissa; Eroglu, Emrah; Waldeck-Weiermair, Markus; Russwurm, Michael; Koesling, Doris; Malli, Roland; Graier, Wolfgang F.; Fassett, John T.; Schrammel, Astrid; Mayer, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) catalyzes vascular bioactivation of the antianginal drug nitroglycerin (GTN), resulting in activation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) and cGMP-mediated vasodilation. We have previously shown that a minor reaction of ALDH2-catalyzed GTN bioconversion, accounting for about 5% of the main clearance-based turnover yielding inorganic nitrite, results in direct NO formation and concluded that this minor pathway could provide the link between vascular GTN metabolism and activation of sGC. However, lack of detectable NO at therapeutically relevant GTN concentrations (≤1 μm) in vascular tissue called into question the biological significance of NO formation by purified ALDH2. We addressed this issue and used a novel, highly sensitive genetically encoded fluorescent NO probe (geNOp) to visualize intracellular NO formation at low GTN concentrations (≤1 μm) in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) expressing an ALDH2 mutant that reduces GTN to NO but lacks clearance-based GTN denitration activity. NO formation was compared with GTN-induced activation of sGC. The addition of 1 μm GTN to VSMC expressing either wild-type or C301S/C303S ALDH2 resulted in pronounced intracellular NO elevation, with maximal concentrations of 7 and 17 nm, respectively. Formation of GTN-derived NO correlated well with activation of purified sGC in VSMC lysates and cGMP accumulation in intact porcine aortic endothelial cells infected with wild-type or mutant ALDH2. Formation of NO and cGMP accumulation were inhibited by ALDH inhibitors chloral hydrate and daidzin. The present study demonstrates that ALDH2-catalyzed NO formation is necessary and sufficient for GTN bioactivation in VSMC. PMID:27679490

  12. Isoform-specific regulation of adenylyl cyclase: a potential target in future pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Iwatsubo, Kousaku; Tsunematsu, Takashi; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2003-06-01

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) is a target enzyme of multiple G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In the past decade, the cloning, structure and biochemical properties of nine AC isoforms were reported, and each isoform of AC shows distinct patterns of tissue distribution and biochemical/pharmacological properties. In addition to the conventional regulators of this enzyme, such as calmodulin (CaM) or PKC, novel regulators, for example, caveolin, have been identified. Most importantly, these regulators work on AC in an isoform dependent manner. Recent studies have demonstrated that certain classic AC inhibitors, i.e., P-site inhibitors, show an isoform-dependent inhibition of AC. The side chain modifications of forskolin, a diterpene extract from Coleus forskolii, markedly enhance its isoform selectivity. When taken together, these findings suggest that it is feasible to develop new pharmacotherapeutic agents that target AC isoforms to regulate various neurohormonal signals in a highly tissue-/organ-specific manner.

  13. Oxygen promotes biofilm formation of Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 through a diguanylate cyclase and an adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Yin, Hao; Song, Xiang-Ning; Li, Wen-Wei; Zhou, Xian-Xuan; Zhao, Li-Ping; Tian, Li-Jiao; Han, Jun-Cheng; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Although oxygen has been reported to regulate biofilm formation by several Shewanella species, the exact regulatory mechanism mostly remains unclear. Here, we identify a direct oxygen-sensing diguanylate cyclase (DosD) and reveal its regulatory role in biofilm formation by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 under aerobic conditions. In vitro and in vivo analyses revealed that the activity of DosD culminates to synthesis of cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) in the presence of oxygen. DosD regulates the transcription of bpfA operon which encodes seven proteins including a large repetitive adhesin BpfA and its cognate type I secretion system (TISS). Regulation of DosD in aerobic biofilms is heavily dependent on an adhesin BpfA and the TISS. This study offers an insight into the molecular mechanism of oxygen-stimulated biofilm formation by S. putrefaciens CN32. PMID:23736081

  14. Cannabinoid inhibition of adenylate cyclase: relative activity of constituents and metabolites of marihuana.

    PubMed

    Howlett, A C

    1987-05-01

    delta 9Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) has been shown to inhibit the activity of adenylate cyclase in the N18TG2 clone of murine neuroblastoma cells. The concentration of delta 9THC exhibiting half-maximal inhibition was 500 nM. delta 8Tetrahydrocannabinol was less active, and cannabinol was only partially active. Cannabidiol, cannabigerol, cannabichromene, olivetol and compounds having a reduced length of the C3 alkyl side chain were inactive. The metabolites of delta 8THC and delta 9THC hydroxylated at the C11 position were more potent than the parent drugs. However, hydroxylation at the C8 position of the terpenoid ring resulted in loss of activity. Compounds hydroxylated along the C3 alkyl side chain were equally efficacious but less potent than delta 9THC. These findings are compared to the pharmacology of cannabinoids reported for psychological effects in humans and behavioral effects in a variety of animal models.

  15. pH sensing via bicarbonate-regulated “soluble” adenylyl cyclase (sAC)

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Nawreen; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R.

    2013-01-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a source of the second messenger cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′ monophosphate (cAMP). sAC is directly regulated by bicarbonate (HCO−3) ions. In living cells, HCO−3 ions are in nearly instantaneous equilibrium with carbon dioxide (CO2) and pH due to the ubiquitous presence of carbonic anhydrases. Numerous biological processes are regulated by CO2, HCO−3, and/or pH, and in a number of these, sAC has been shown to function as a physiological CO2/HCO3/pH sensor. In this review, we detail the known pH sensing functions of sAC, and we discuss two highly-studied, pH-dependent pathways in which sAC might play a role. PMID:24324443

  16. Cure and curse: E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin and its receptor guanylyl cyclase C.

    PubMed

    Weiglmeier, Philipp R; Rösch, Paul; Berkner, Hanna

    2010-09-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) associated diarrhea is responsible for roughly half a million deaths per year, the majority taking place in developing countries. The main agent responsible for these diseases is the bacterial heat-stable enterotoxin STa. STa is secreted by ETEC and after secretion binds to the intestinal receptor guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C), thus triggering a signaling cascade that eventually leads to the release of electrolytes and water in the intestine. Additionally, GC-C is a specific marker for colorectal carcinoma and STa is suggested to have an inhibitory effect on intestinal carcinogenesis. To understand the conformational events involved in ligand binding to GC-C and to devise therapeutic strategies to treat both diarrheal diseases and colorectal cancer, it is paramount to obtain structural information on the receptor ligand system. Here we summarize the currently available structural data and report on physiological consequences of STa binding to GC-C in intestinal epithelia and colorectal carcinoma cells.

  17. Role for the membrane receptor guanylyl cyclase-C in attention deficiency and hyperactive behavior.

    PubMed

    Gong, Rong; Ding, Cheng; Hu, Ji; Lu, Yao; Liu, Fei; Mann, Elizabeth; Xu, Fuqiang; Cohen, Mitchell B; Luo, Minmin

    2011-09-16

    Midbrain dopamine neurons regulate many important behavioral processes, and their dysfunctions are associated with several human neuropsychiatric disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and schizophrenia. Here, we report that these neurons in mice selectively express guanylyl cyclase-C (GC-C), a membrane receptor previously thought to be expressed mainly in the intestine. GC-C activation potentiates the excitatory responses mediated by glutamate and acetylcholine receptors via the activity of guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate-dependent protein kinase (PKG). Mice in which GC-C has been knocked out exhibit hyperactivity and attention deficits. Moreover, their behavioral phenotypes are reversed by ADHD therapeutics and a PKG activator. These results indicate important behavioral and physiological functions for the GC-C/PKG signaling pathway within the brain and suggest new therapeutic targets for neuropsychiatric disorders related to the malfunctions of midbrain dopamine neurons.

  18. Crystal Structure of Human Soluble Adenylate Cyclase Reveals a Distinct, Highly Flexible Allosteric Bicarbonate Binding Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Saalau-Bethell, Susanne M; Berdini, Valerio; Cleasby, Anne; Congreve, Miles; Coyle, Joseph E; Lock, Victoria; Murray, Christopher W; O'Brien, M Alistair; Rich, Sharna J; Sambrook, Tracey; Vinkovic, Mladen; Yon, Jeff R; Jhoti, Harren

    2014-01-01

    Soluble adenylate cyclases catalyse the synthesis of the second messenger cAMP through the cyclisation of ATP and are the only known enzymes to be directly activated by bicarbonate. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the human enzyme that reveals a pseudosymmetrical arrangement of two catalytic domains to produce a single competent active site and a novel discrete bicarbonate binding pocket. Crystal structures of the apo protein, the protein in complex with α,β-methylene adenosine 5′-triphosphate (AMPCPP) and calcium, with the allosteric activator bicarbonate, and also with a number of inhibitors identified using fragment screening, all show a flexible active site that undergoes significant conformational changes on binding of ligands. The resulting nanomolar-potent inhibitors that were developed bind at both the substrate binding pocket and the allosteric site, and can be used as chemical probes to further elucidate the function of this protein. PMID:24616449

  19. Endothelial CD99 signals through soluble adenylyl cyclase and PKA to regulate leukocyte transendothelial migration

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Richard L.; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R.; Winger, Ryan C.; Wang, Jing; Arase, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    CD99 is a critical regulator of leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM). How CD99 signals during this process remains unknown. We show that during TEM, endothelial cell (EC) CD99 activates protein kinase A (PKA) via a signaling complex formed with the lysine-rich juxtamembrane cytoplasmic tail of CD99, the A-kinase anchoring protein ezrin, and soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). PKA then stimulates membrane trafficking from the lateral border recycling compartment to sites of TEM, facilitating the passage of leukocytes across the endothelium. Pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of EC sAC or PKA, like CD99 blockade, arrests neutrophils and monocytes partway through EC junctions, in vitro and in vivo, without affecting leukocyte adhesion or the expression of relevant cellular adhesion molecules. This is the first description of the CD99 signaling pathway in TEM as well as the first demonstration of a role for sAC in leukocyte TEM. PMID:26101266

  20. Disruption of type 3 adenylyl cyclase expression in the hypothalamus leads to obesity

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hong; Chen, Xuanmao; Yang, Yimei; Storm, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    Evidence from human studies and transgenic mice lacking the type 3 adenylyl cyclase (AC3) indicates that AC3 plays a role in the regulation of body weight. It is unknown in which brain region AC3 exerts such an effect. We examined the role of AC3 in the hypothalamus for body weight control using a floxed AC3 mouse strain. Here, we report that AC3 flox/flox mice became obese after the administration of AAV-CRE-GFP into the hypothalamus. Both male and female AC3 floxed mice showed heavier body weight than AAV-GFP injected control mice. Furthermore, mice with selective ablation of AC3 expression in the ventromedial hypothalamus also showed increased body weight and food consumption. Our results indicated that AC3 in the hypothalamus regulates energy balance. PMID:27942392

  1. Modulation of mitochondrial protein phosphorylation by soluble adenylyl cyclase ameliorates cytochrome oxidase defects

    PubMed Central

    Acin-Perez, Rebeca; Salazar, Eric; Brosel, Sonja; Yang, Hua; Schon, Eric A; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation of respiratory chain components has emerged as a mode of regulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism, but its mechanisms are still largely unexplored. A recently discovered intramitochondrial signalling pathway links CO2 generated by the Krebs cycle with the respiratory chain, through the action of a mitochondrial soluble adenylyl cyclase (mt-sAC). Cytochrome oxidase (COX), whose deficiency causes a number of fatal metabolic disorders, is a key mitochondrial enzyme activated by mt-sAC. We have now discovered that the mt-sAC pathway modulates mitochondrial biogenesis in a reactive oxygen species dependent manner, in cultured cells and in animals with COX deficiency. We show that upregulation of mt-sAC normalizes reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial biogenesis, thereby restoring mitochondrial function. This is the first example of manipulation of a mitochondrial signalling pathway to achieve a direct positive modulation of COX, with clear implications for the development of novel approaches to treat mitochondrial diseases. PMID:20049744

  2. Reconstitution of a fungal meroterpenoid biosynthesis reveals the involvement of a novel family of terpene cyclases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Takayuki; Tokunaga, Kinya; Matsuda, Yudai; Fujii, Isao; Abe, Ikuro; Ebizuka, Yutaka; Kushiro, Tetsuo

    2010-10-01

    Meroterpenoids are hybrid natural products of both terpenoid and polyketide origin. We identified a biosynthetic gene cluster that is responsible for the production of the meroterpenoid pyripyropene in the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus through reconstituted biosynthesis of up to five steps in a heterologous fungal expression system. The cluster revealed a previously unknown terpene cyclase with an unusual sequence and protein primary structure. The wide occurrence of this sequence in other meroterpenoid and indole-diterpene biosynthetic gene clusters indicates the involvement of these enzymes in the biosynthesis of various terpenoid-bearing metabolites produced by fungi and bacteria. In addition, a novel polyketide synthase that incorporated nicotinyl-CoA as the starter unit and a prenyltransferase, similar to that in ubiquinone biosynthesis, was found to be involved in the pyripyropene biosynthesis. The successful production of a pyripyropene analogue illustrates the catalytic versatility of these enzymes for the production of novel analogues with useful biological activities.

  3. Fetal nicotine exposure produces postnatal up-regulation of adenylate cyclase activity in peripheral tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Slotkin, T.A.; Navarro, H.A.; McCook, E.C.; Seidler, F.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Gestational exposure to nicotine has been shown to affect development of noradrenergic activity in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. In the current study, pregnant rats received nicotine infusions of 6 mg/kg/day throughout gestation, administered by osmotic minipump implants. After birth, offspring of the nicotine-infused dams exhibited marked increases in basal adenylate cyclase activity in membranes prepared from kidney and heart, as well as supersensitivity to stimulation by either a {beta}-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, or by forskolin. The altered responses were not accompanied by up-regulation of {beta}-adrenergic receptors: in fact, ({sup 125}I)pindolol binding was significantly decreased in the nicotine group. These results indicate that fetal nicotine exposure affects enzymes involved in membrane receptor signal transduction, leading to altered responsiveness independently of changes at the receptor level.

  4. Endothelial CD99 signals through soluble adenylyl cyclase and PKA to regulate leukocyte transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Watson, Richard L; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R; Winger, Ryan C; Wang, Jing; Arase, Hisashi; Muller, William A

    2015-06-29

    CD99 is a critical regulator of leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM). How CD99 signals during this process remains unknown. We show that during TEM, endothelial cell (EC) CD99 activates protein kinase A (PKA) via a signaling complex formed with the lysine-rich juxtamembrane cytoplasmic tail of CD99, the A-kinase anchoring protein ezrin, and soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). PKA then stimulates membrane trafficking from the lateral border recycling compartment to sites of TEM, facilitating the passage of leukocytes across the endothelium. Pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of EC sAC or PKA, like CD99 blockade, arrests neutrophils and monocytes partway through EC junctions, in vitro and in vivo, without affecting leukocyte adhesion or the expression of relevant cellular adhesion molecules. This is the first description of the CD99 signaling pathway in TEM as well as the first demonstration of a role for sAC in leukocyte TEM.

  5. Histamine-, norepinephrine-, and dopamine-sensitive central adenylate cyclases: effects of chlorpromazine derivatives and butaclamol.

    PubMed

    Palmer, G C; Wagner, H R; Palmer, S J; Manian, A A

    1978-06-01

    A series of recently available derivatives (quaternary and hydroxylated) of chlorpromazine (CPZ) and butaclamol were evaluated with respect to antagonism of norepinephrine- (NE) (rat cerebral cortex), dopamine- (DA) (rat striatum) and histamine- (H) sensitive (rabbit cerebral cortex) adenylate cyclases. With incubated tissue slices (rat and rabbit cortices) CPZ-CH3, 7-OH-CPZ-CH3, beta-OH-CPZ and butaclamol displayed a capacity to inhibit either NE- or H- induced accumulation of adenosine cyclic 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP). With the broken cellular enzyme responsive to DA, rather potent inhibition of enzyme activity (IC50 less than 24 micron) occurred with butaclamol, beta-OH-CPZ, 7,8,beta-triOH-CPZ, 7,8-dioxo-beta-OH-CPZ and 3,7,8-triOH-CPZ. It is concluded that the metabolites of CPZ contribute to the central therapeutic and/or side effects of the parent compound.

  6. Lycopene cyclase paralog CruP protects against reactive oxygen species in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Louis M T; Shumskaya, Maria; Tzfadia, Oren; Wu, Shi-Biao; Kennelly, Edward J; Wurtzel, Eleanore T

    2012-07-03

    In photosynthetic organisms, carotenoids serve essential roles in photosynthesis and photoprotection. A previous report designated CruP as a secondary lycopene cyclase involved in carotenoid biosynthesis [Maresca J, et al. (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104:11784-11789]. However, we found that cruP KO or cruP overexpression plants do not exhibit correspondingly reduced or increased production of cyclized carotenoids, which would be expected if CruP was a lycopene cyclase. Instead, we show that CruP aids in preventing accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), thereby reducing accumulation of β-carotene-5,6-epoxide, a ROS-catalyzed autoxidation product, and inhibiting accumulation of anthocyanins, which are known chemical indicators of ROS. Plants with a nonfunctional cruP accumulate substantially higher levels of ROS and β-carotene-5,6-epoxide in green tissues. Plants overexpressing cruP show reduced levels of ROS, β-carotene-5,6-epoxide, and anthocyanins. The observed up-regulation of cruP transcripts under photoinhibitory and lipid peroxidation-inducing conditions, such as high light stress, cold stress, anoxia, and low levels of CO(2), fits with a role for CruP in mitigating the effects of ROS. Phylogenetic distribution of CruP in prokaryotes showed that the gene is only present in cyanobacteria that live in habitats characterized by large variation in temperature and inorganic carbon availability. Therefore, CruP represents a unique target for developing resilient plants and algae needed to supply food and biofuels in the face of global climate change.

  7. Diguanylate cyclase NicD-based signalling mechanism of nutrient-induced dispersion by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Basu Roy, Ankita; Sauer, Karin

    2014-11-01

    Dispersion enables the transition from the biofilm to the planktonic growth state in response to various cues. While several Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteins, including BdlA and the c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases DipA, RbdA, and NbdA, have been shown to be required for dispersion to occur, little is known about dispersion cue sensing and the signalling translating these cues into the modulation c-di-GMP levels to enable dispersion. Using glutamate-induced dispersion as a model, we report that dispersion-inducing nutrient cues are sensed via an outside-in signalling mechanism by the diguanylate cyclase NicD belonging to a family of seven transmembrane (7TM) receptors. NicD directly interacts with BdlA and the phosphodiesterase DipA, with NicD, BdlA, and DipA being part of the same pathway required for dispersion. Glutamate sensing by NicD results in NicD dephosphorylation and increased cyclase activity. Active NicD contributes to the non-processive proteolysis and activation of BdlA via phosphorylation and temporarily elevated c-di-GMP levels. BdlA, in turn, activates DipA, resulting in the overall reduction of c-di-GMP levels. Our results provide a basis for understanding the signalling mechanism based on NicD to induce biofilm dispersion that may be applicable to various biofilm-forming species and may have implications for the control of biofilm-related infections.

  8. Forskolin inhibits the Gs-stimulated adenylate cyclase in rat ascites hepatoma AH66F cells.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Sanae, F; Koshiura, R; Matsunaga, T; Hasegawa, T; Takagi, K; Satake, T

    1989-09-01

    Forskolin increased intracellular cyclic AMP and augmented cyclic AMP formation by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) in normal rat hepatocytes and ascites hepatoma AH66 cells. However, in AH66F cells which were derived from the AH66 cell line, the diterpene only slightly increased the cyclic AMP level, and dose-dependently inhibited the accumulation caused by PGE1. Forskolin dose-dependently activated adenylate cyclase in these membranes, and the magnitude of activation by forskolin was largest in the following order: hepatocytes, AH66 cells, and AH66F cells. This difference may be based on the number of forskolin-binding sites. The binding affinity of forskolin for each cell membrane was similar. The number and affinity of forskolin-binding sites in these cells were not influenced by 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p]. In hepatocytes and AH66 cells, forskolin and other adenylate cyclase activators such as PGE1, GTP, Gpp(NH)p, F-, and Mn2+ synergistically increased the enzyme activity. In AH66F cells, the forskolin-stimulated activity was hardly influenced by the GTP analog, and forskolin diminished the activities induced by the GTP analog in a manner similar to that of diterpene alone. Forskolin (10 microM) also significantly inhibited the activities induced by PGE1, GTP, and F-. The effect of forskolin with Mn2+ was additive in AH66F cells. The data suggest that forskolin promotes the interaction between the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein and the catalytic unit in the membrane of normal hepatocytes and AH66 cells, but it interferes with the coupling in AH66F cells.

  9. Engineering of Bacillus subtilis Strains To Allow Rapid Characterization of Heterologous Diguanylate Cyclases and Phosphodiesterases

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaohui; Dong, Xiao; Subramanian, Sundharraman; Matthews, Paige M.; Cooper, Caleb A.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial processes, including biofilm formation, motility, and virulence, are often regulated by changes in the available concentration of cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP). Generally, high c-di-GMP concentrations are correlated with decreased motility and increased biofilm formation and low c-di-GMP concentrations are correlated with an increase in motility and activation of virulence pathways. The study of c-di-GMP is complicated, however, by the fact that organisms often encode dozens of redundant enzymes that synthesize and hydrolyze c-di-GMP, diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), and c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases (PDEs); thus, determining the contribution of any one particular enzyme is challenging. In an effort to develop a facile system to study c-di-GMP metabolic enzymes, we have engineered a suite of Bacillus subtilis strains to assess the effect of individual heterologously expressed proteins on c-di-GMP levels. As a proof of principle, we characterized all 37 known genes encoding predicted DGCs and PDEs in Clostridium difficile using parallel readouts of swarming motility and fluorescence from green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressed under the control of a c-di-GMP-controlled riboswitch. We found that 27 of the 37 putative C. difficile 630 c-di-GMP metabolic enzymes had either active cyclase or phosphodiesterase activity, with agreement between our motility phenotypes and fluorescence-based c-di-GMP reporter. Finally, we show that there appears to be a threshold level of c-di-GMP needed to inhibit motility in Bacillus subtilis. PMID:25085482

  10. Characterization of beta-adrenergic receptors and adenylate cyclase activity in rat brown fat

    SciTech Connect

    Baresi, L.A.; Morley, J.E.; Scarpace, P.J.

    1986-03-01

    Catecholamines stimulate thermogenesis in rat brown fat through a mechanism which involves binding to the beta-adrenergic receptor (BAR), stimulation of adenylate cyclase (AC) and culminating with uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration from ATP synthesis. The authors characterized BAR, AC and cytochrome (cyt) c oxidase in CDF (F-344) interscapular brown fat. Scatchard analysis of (/sup 125/)Iodopindolol binding yields a straight line consistent with a single class of antagonist binding sites with 41.8 +/- 12.0 fmol BAR/mg protein and a K/sub d/ of 118 +/- 15 pM. Binding was both specific and stereospecific. Competition with 1-propranolol (K/sub d/ = 6.7 nM) was 15 times more potent than d-propranolol (K/sub d/ = 103 nM). Competition with isoproterenol (K/sub d/ = 79 nM) was 10 times more potent than epinephrine (K/sub d/ = 820 nM) which was 35 times more potent than norepinephrine (K/sub d/ = 2.9 x 10/sup -5/ M) suggesting predominate beta/sub 2/-type BAR. Cyt c oxidase activity was assessed in brown fat mitochrondrial preparations. The ratio of BAR to cyt c activity was 959 +/- 275 nmol BAR/mol cyc c/min. Isoproterenol (0.1 mM) stimulated AC activity was 24 times GTP (0.1 mM) stimulated AC (98.5 vs 40.7 pmol cAMP/min/mg). NaF-stimulated AC was nine times basal activity (90.5 vs 11.3 pmol cAMP/min/mg). These data demonstrate the presence of a beta-/sub 2/-type BAR coupled to adenylate cyclase in rat brown fat.

  11. Characterization of a novel sesquiterpene cyclase involved in (+)-caryolan-1-ol biosynthesis in Streptomyces griseus.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Chiaki; Horinouchi, Sueharu; Ohnishi, Yasuo

    2011-08-12

    Most terpenoids have been isolated from plants and fungi and only a few from bacteria. However, an increasing number of genome sequences indicate that bacteria possess a variety of terpenoid cyclase genes. We characterized a sesquiterpene cyclase gene (SGR2079, named gcoA) found in Streptomyces griseus. When expressed in Streptomyces lividans, gcoA directed production of a sesquiterpene, isolated and determined to be (+)-caryolan-1-ol using spectroscopic analyses. (+)-Caryolan-1-ol was also detected in the crude cell lysate of wild-type S. griseus but not in a gcoA knockout mutant, indicating that GcoA is a genuine (+)-caryolan-1-ol synthase. Enzymatic properties were characterized using N-terminally histidine-tagged GcoA, produced in Escherichia coli. As expected, incubation of the recombinant GcoA protein with farnesyl diphosphate yielded (+)-caryolan-1-ol. However, a small amount of another sesquiterpene was also detected. This was identified as the bicyclic sesquiterpene hydrocarbon (+)-β-caryophyllene by comparison with an authentic sample using GC-MS. Incorporation of a deuterium atom into the C-9 methylene of (+)-caryolan-1-ol in an in vitro GcoA reaction in deuterium oxide indicated that (+)-caryolan-1-ol was synthesized by a proton attack on the C-8/C-9 double bond of (+)-β-caryophyllene. Several β-caryophyllene synthases have been identified from plants, but these cannot synthesize caryolan-1-ol. Although caryolan-1-ol has been isolated previously from several plants, the enzyme responsible for its biosynthesis has not been identified previously. GcoA is thus the first known caryolan-1-ol synthase. Isolation of caryolan-1-ol from microorganisms is unprecedented.

  12. Stimulation of renin secretion by catecholamines is dependent on adenylyl cyclases 5 and 6.

    PubMed

    Aldehni, Fadi; Tang, Tong; Madsen, Kirsten; Plattner, Michael; Schreiber, Andrea; Friis, Ulla G; Hammond, H Kirk; Han, Pyung Lim; Schweda, Frank

    2011-03-01

    The sympathetic nervous system stimulates renin release from juxtaglomerular cells via the β-adrenoreceptor-cAMP pathway. Recent in vitro studies have suggested that the calcium-inhibited adenylyl cyclases (ACs) 5 and 6 possess key roles in the control of renin exocytosis. To investigate the relative contribution of AC5 and AC6 to the regulation of renin release in vivo we performed experiments using AC5 and AC6 knockout mice. Male AC5(-/-) mice exhibited normal plasma renin concentrations, renal renin synthesis (mRNA and renin content), urinary volume, and systolic blood pressure. In male AC6(-/-) mice, plasma renin concentration (AC6(-/-): 732 ± 119; AC6 (+/+): 436 ± 78 ng of angiotensin I per hour*mL(-1); P<0.05), and renin synthesis were stimulated associated with an increased excretion of dilute urine (1.55-fold; P<0.05) and reduced blood pressure (-10.6 mm Hg; P<0.001). Stimulation of plasma renin concentration by a single injection of the β-adrenoreceptor agonist isoproterenol (10 mg/kg IP) was significantly attenuated in AC5(-/-) (male: -20%; female: -33%) compared with wild-type mice in vivo. The mitigation of the plasma renin concentration response to isoproterenol was even more pronounced in AC6(-/-) (male: -63%; female: -50% versus AC6(+/+)). Similarly, the effects of isoproterenol, prostaglandin E2, and pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide on renin release from isolated perfused kidneys were attenuated to a higher extent in AC6(-/-) (-51% to -98% versus AC6(+/+)) than in AC5(-/-) (-31% to 46% versus AC5(+/+)). In conclusion, both AC5 and AC6 are involved in the stimulation of renin secretion in vivo, and AC6 is the dominant isoforms in this process.

  13. Tachyphylaxis to PACAP-27 after inhibition of NO synthesis: a loss of adenylate cyclase activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, E. J.; Johnson, A. K.; Lewis, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    The vasodilator effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP-27) are subject to tachyphylaxis in rats treated with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). This study examined whether this tachyphylaxis is due to the loss of vasodilator potency of cAMP generated by activation of the G(s) protein-coupled PACAP receptors. Five successive treatments with PACAP-27 (2 nmol/kg iv) produced pronounced vasodilator responses in saline-treated rats that were not subject to tachyphylaxis. The first injection of PACAP-27 (2 nmol/kg iv) in L-NAME (50 micromol/kg iv)-treated rats produced vasodilator responses of similar magnitude to those in saline-treated rats, whereas four subsequent injections produced progressively and markedly smaller responses. The hemodynamic effects of the membrane-permeable cAMP analog 8-(4-chlorophenylthiol)-cAMP (8-CPT-cAMP; 5-15 micromol/kg iv) were similar in L-NAME-treated rats and in L-NAME-treated rats that had received the five injections of PACAP-27. In addition, five injections of 8-CPT-cAMP (10 micromol/kg iv) produced pronounced vasodilator responses in saline- and L-NAME-treated rats that were not subject to the development of tachyphylaxis. These results suggest that a loss of biological potency of cAMP is not responsible for tachyphylaxis to PACAP-27 in L-NAME-treated rats. This tachyphylaxis may be due to the inability of the G(s) protein-coupled PACAP receptor to activate adenylate cyclase.

  14. Adenylyl cyclase 2 selectively couples to E prostanoid type 2 receptors, whereas adenylyl cyclase 3 is not receptor-regulated in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Bogard, Amy S; Adris, Piyatilake; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2012-08-01

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) are important regulators of airway smooth muscle function, because β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) agonists stimulate AC activity and cAMP production. We have previously shown in a number of cell types that AC6 selectively couples to βAR and these proteins are coexpressed in lipid rafts. We overexpressed AC2, AC3, and AC6 in mouse bronchial smooth muscle cells (mBSMCs) and human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells by using recombinant adenoviruses and assessed their localization and regulation by various G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). AC3 and AC6 were expressed primarily in caveolin-rich fractions, whereas AC2 expression was excluded from these domains. AC6 expression enhanced cAMP production in response to isoproterenol but did not increase responses to butaprost, reflecting the colocalization of AC6 with β(2)AR but not E prostanoid type 2 receptor (EP(2)R) in lipid raft fractions. AC2 expression enhanced butaprost-stimulated cAMP production but had no effect on the β(2)AR-mediated response. AC3 did not couple to any GPCR tested. Forskolin-induced arborization of mBSMCs was assessed as a functional readout of cAMP signaling. Arborization was enhanced by overexpression of AC6 and AC3, but AC2 had no effect. GPCR-stimulated arborization mirrored the selective coupling observed for cAMP production. With the addition of the phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor rolipram AC2 accelerated forskolin-stimulated arborization. Thus, AC2 selectively couples to EP(2)R, but signals from this complex are limited by PDE4 activity. AC3 does not seem to couple to GPCR in either mBSMCs or HEK-293 cells, so it probably exists in a distinct signaling domain in these cells.

  15. Heavy isotope labeling study of the turnover of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase in BC/sup 3/H1 cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhelal, R.; Bockaert, J.; Mermet-Bouvier, R.; Guillon, G.; Homburger, V.

    1987-06-25

    We have used the method of heavy isotope labeling to study the metabolic turnover of adenylate cyclase in a nonfusing muscle cell line, the BC/sup 3/H1 cells. These cells contains an adenylate cyclase coupled to beta-adrenergic receptors and highly stimulated by forskolin, a potent activator of the enzyme. After transfer of the cells from normal medium to heavy medium (a medium containing heavy labeled amino acids, /sup 3/H, /sup 13/C, /sup 15/N), heavy isotope-labeled adenylate cyclase molecules progressively replace pre-existing light molecules. In sucrose gradient differential sedimentation, after a 5-day switch in heavy medium, the enzyme exhibited a higher mass (s = 8.40 +/- 0.03 S, n = 13) compared to the control enzyme. Indeed, the increase in the sedimentation coefficient of the heavy molecules was due to the synthesis of new molecules of adenylate cyclase labeled with heavy isotope amino acids since in the presence of cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, no change in the sedimentation pattern of the forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase occurred. After incorporation of heavy isotope amino acids in the adenylate cyclase molecules, the kinetics parameters of the enzyme did not change. However, adenylate cyclase from cells incubated with heavy medium exhibits an activity about 2-fold lower than control. After switching the cells to the heavy medium, the decrease of the activity of the enzyme occurred during the first 24 h and thereafter remained at a steady state for at least 4 days. In contrast, 24 h after the switch, the sedimentation coefficient of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase was progressively shifted to a higher value.

  16. The tcmVI region of the tetracenomycin C biosynthetic gene cluster of Streptomyces glaucescens encodes the tetracenomycin F1 monooxygenase, tetracenomycin F2 cyclase, and, most likely, a second cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Summers, R G; Wendt-Pienkowski, E; Motamedi, H; Hutchinson, C R

    1993-01-01

    Certain mutations in the tcmVI region of the Streptomyces glaucescens chromosome affect formation of the D ring of the polyketide antibiotic tetracenomycin C (TCM C). This region lies immediately upstream from the TCM C polyketide synthase genes (tcmKLM), and the nucleotide sequence reveals the presence of three small genes, tcmH, tcmI, and tcmJ. On the basis of the phenotypes of mutants and the effects of these genes, when coupled on a plasmid with the tcmKLMN177 genes (tcmN177 is a 3'-truncated version of tcmN), on the production of TCM intermediates in a TCM- mutant, the tcmH gene encodes the C-5 monooxygenase that converts TCM F1 to TCM D3, the tcmI gene encodes the D-ring cyclase that converts TCM F2 to TCM F1 (mutations in this gene are responsible for the type VI phenotype), and the tcmJ gene most likely encodes the B-ring cyclase that acts in the biosynthesis of TCM F2. Furthermore, it appears that the N-terminal domain of the tcmN gene product (encoded by the tcmN177 gene) acts later in the biosynthesis of TCM F2 than the product of tcmJ, suggesting that the N-terminal domain of the TcmN protein is the C-ring cyclase. Images PMID:8244926

  17. Conserved Chloroplast Open-reading Frame ycf54 Is Required for Activity of the Magnesium Protoporphyrin Monomethylester Oxidative Cyclase in Synechocystis PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Hollingshead, Sarah; Kopečná, Jana; Jackson, Philip J.; Canniffe, Daniel P.; Davison, Paul A.; Dickman, Mark J.; Sobotka, Roman; Hunter, C. Neil

    2012-01-01

    The cyclase step in chlorophyll (Chl) biosynthesis has not been characterized biochemically, although there are some plausible candidates for cyclase subunits. Two of these, Sll1214 and Sll1874 from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803, were FLAG-tagged in vivo and used as bait in separate pulldown experiments. Mass spectrometry identified Ycf54 as an interaction partner in each case, and this interaction was confirmed by a reciprocal pulldown using FLAG-tagged Ycf54 as bait. Inactivation of the ycf54 gene (slr1780) in Synechocystis 6803 resulted in a strain that exhibited significantly reduced Chl levels. A detailed analysis of Chl precursors in the ycf54 mutant revealed accumulation of very high levels of Mg-protoporphyrin IX methyl ester and only traces of protochlorophyllide, the product of the cyclase, were detected. Western blotting demonstrated that levels of the cyclase component Sll1214 and the Chl biosynthesis enzymes Mg-protoporphyrin IX methyltransferase and protochlorophyllide reductase are significantly impaired in the ycf54 mutant. Ycf54 is, therefore, essential for the activity and stability of the oxidative cyclase. We discuss a possible role of Ycf54 as an auxiliary factor essential for the assembly of a cyclase complex or even a large multienzyme catalytic center. PMID:22711541

  18. Molecular characterization of an oxidosqualene cyclase that yields shionone, a unique tetracyclic triterpene ketone of Aster tataricus.

    PubMed

    Sawai, Satoru; Uchiyama, Hiroshi; Mizuno, Syuhei; Aoki, Toshio; Akashi, Tomoyoshi; Ayabe, Shin-ichi; Takahashi, Takeyoshi

    2011-04-06

    Shionone is the major triterpenoid component of Aster tataricus possessing a unique all six-membered tetracyclic skeleton and 3-oxo-4-monomethyl structure. To clarify its biosynthetic process, an oxidosqualene cyclase cDNA was isolated from A. tataricus, and the function of the enzyme was determined in lanosterol synthase-deficient yeast. The cyclase yielded ca. 90% shionone and small amounts of β-amyrin, friedelin, dammara-20,24-dienol, and 4-epishionone and was designated as a shionone synthase (SHS). Transcripts of SHS were detected in A. tataricus organs, confirming its involvement in shionone biosynthesis. SHS was shown to have evolved in the Asteraceae from β-amyrin synthase lineages and acquired characteristic species- and product-specificities.

  19. A Diguanylate Cyclase Acts as a Cell Division Inhibitor in a Two-Step Response to Reductive and Envelope Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo Kyung

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell division arrest is a universal checkpoint in response to environmental assaults that generate cellular stress. In bacteria, the cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling network is one of several signal transduction systems that regulate key processes in response to extra-/intracellular stimuli. Here, we find that the diguanylate cyclase YfiN acts as a bifunctional protein that produces c-di-GMP in response to reductive stress and then dynamically relocates to the division site to arrest cell division in response to envelope stress in Escherichia coli. YfiN localizes to the Z ring by interacting with early division proteins and stalls cell division by preventing the initiation of septal peptidoglycan synthesis. These studies reveal a new role for a diguanylate cyclase in responding to environmental change, as well as a novel mechanism for arresting cell division. PMID:27507823

  20. Structure of the N-terminal domain of the adenylyl