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  1. Guest Editors' Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gille, Peter; Miller, Wolfram; Sangwal, Keshra; Talik, Ewa

    2014-09-01

    The 17th International Conference on Crystal Growth and Epitaxy (ICCGE-17) was held in Warsaw during 11 and 16 August 2013. The contributions during the ICCGE-17 were of three types: Invited lectures, oral presentations and poster presentions. The conference participants were also invited to submit manuscripts based on their contributions for publication in the ICCGE-17 Proceedings volume of Journal of Crystal Growth. The present volume contains manuscripts accepted by the guest editors for this conference volume.

  2. GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Guest Editors' introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulson, Geoff; de Meer, Jan B.

    1997-03-01

    . Their scheme is embedded in an experimental ATM network with the potential for guaranteed QoS. The system features QoS support mechanisms in both the network and the end systems. Of particular interest is reported experience with a dynamic QoS adaptation protocol implemented in the network and based on video scaling techniques and filtering. In summary, this special issue provides an up to date review of approaches to QoS management and their practical realization. Of course, no claim is made as to comprehensiveness, but the chosen papers do serve as a highly representative sample of current directions in QoS research. The editors are very much obliged to all authors, reviewers and publishers. Without their excellent work, and the contribution of their valuable time this special issue would not have been possible.

  3. Guest Editor's introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-03-01

    pleasure to be Guest Editor and I look forward to future developments in this growing research area and expositions in Distributed Systems Engineering. Peter G Harrison Imperial College, London

  4. Open Simulation Laboratories [Guest editors' introduction

    DOE PAGES

    Alexander, Francis J.; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-09-01

    The introduction for the special issue on open simulation laboratories, the guest editors describe how OSLs will become more common as their potential is better understood and they begin providing access to valuable datasets to much larger segments of the scientific community. Moreover, new analysis tools and ways to do science will inevitably develop as a result.

  5. Martin Stutzmann: Editor, Teacher, Scientist and Friend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Manuel

    2005-03-01

    On 2 January 1995 Martin Stutzmann became Editor-in-Chief of physica status solidi, replacing Professor E. Gutsche, who had led the journal through the stormy period involving the fall of the Iron Curtain, the unification of Germany and the change in its Eastern part, where physica status solidi was based, from socialism as found in the real world (a German concept) to real world capitalism. In 1995 it was thought that the process had been completed (we should have known better!) and after the retirement of Prof. Gutsche the new owners of physica status solidi (Wiley-VCH) decided that a change in scientific management was desirable to adapt to the new socio-political facts and to insure the scientific continuity of the journal.Martin had moved in 1993 from my department at the Max-Planck-Institute to Munich where he soon displayed a tremendous amount of science man- agement ability during the build-up of the Walter Schottky Institute. The search for a successor as Edi- tor-in-Chief was not easy: the job was not very glamorous after the upheavals which had taken place in the editorial world following the political changes. Somebody in the Editorial Boards must have suggested Martin Stutzmann. I am sure that there was opposition: one usually looks for a well-established person ready to leave his direct involvement in science and take up a new endeavor of a more administrative nature. Nevertheless, the powers that be soon realized that Martin was an excellent, if somewhat unconventional candidate who had enough energy to remain a topnotch scientist and to lead the journal in the difficult times ahead: he was offered the job. In the negotiations that followed, he insisted in getting the administrative structures that would allow him to improve the battered quality of the journal and to continue his scientific productivity. Today we are happy to see that he succeeded in both endeavors. The journal has since grown in size and considerably improved its quality.Martin

  6. Martin Stutzmann: Editor, Teacher, Scientist and Friend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Manuel

    2005-02-01

    On 2 January 1995 Martin Stutzmann became Editor-in-Chief of physica status solidi, replacing Professor E. Gutsche, who had led the journal through the stormy period involving the fall of the Iron Curtain, the unification of Germany and the change in its Eastern part, where physica status solidi was based, from socialism as found in the real world (a German concept) to real world capitalism. In 1995 it was thought that the process had been completed (we should have known better!) and after the retirement of Prof. Gutsche the new owners of physica status solidi (Wiley-VCH) decided that a change in scientific management was desirable to adapt to the new socio-political facts and to insure the scientific continuity of the journal.Martin had moved in 1993 from my department at the Max-Planck-Institute to Munich where he soon displayed a tremendous amount of science man- agement ability during the build-up of the Walter Schottky Institute. The search for a successor as Edi- tor-in-Chief was not easy: the job was not very glamorous after the upheavals which had taken place in the editorial world following the political changes. Somebody in the Editorial Boards must have suggested Martin Stutzmann. I am sure that there was opposition: one usually looks for a well-established person ready to leave his direct involvement in science and take up a new endeavor of a more administrative nature. Nevertheless, the powers that be soon realized that Martin was an excellent, if somewhat unconventional candidate who had enough energy to remain a topnotch scientist and to lead the journal in the difficult times ahead: he was offered the job. In the negotiations that followed, he insisted in getting the administrative structures that would allow him to improve the battered quality of the journal and to continue his scientific productivity. Today we are happy to see that he succeeded in both endeavors. The journal has since grown in size and considerably improved its quality.Martin

  7. Martin Stutzmann: Editor, Teacher, Scientist and Friend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Manuel

    2005-02-01

    On 2 January 1995 Martin Stutzmann became Editor-in-Chief of physica status solidi, replacing Professor E. Gutsche, who had led the journal through the stormy period involving the fall of the Iron Curtain, the unification of Germany and the change in its Eastern part, where physica status solidi was based, from socialism as found in the real world (a German concept) to real world capitalism. In 1995 it was thought that the process had been completed (we should have known better!) and after the retirement of Prof. Gutsche the new owners of physica status solidi (Wiley-VCH) decided that a change in scientific management was desirable to adapt to the new socio-political facts and to insure the scientific continuity of the journal.Martin had moved in 1993 from my department at the Max-Planck-Institute to Munich where he soon displayed a tremendous amount of science man- agement ability during the build-up of the Walter Schottky Institute. The search for a successor as Edi- tor-in-Chief was not easy: the job was not very glamorous after the upheavals which had taken place in the editorial world following the political changes. Somebody in the Editorial Boards must have suggested Martin Stutzmann. I am sure that there was opposition: one usually looks for a well-established person ready to leave his direct involvement in science and take up a new endeavor of a more administrative nature. Nevertheless, the powers that be soon realized that Martin was an excellent, if somewhat unconventional candidate who had enough energy to remain a topnotch scientist and to lead the journal in the difficult times ahead: he was offered the job. In the negotiations that followed, he insisted in getting the administrative structures that would allow him to improve the battered quality of the journal and to continue his scientific productivity. Today we are happy to see that he succeeded in both endeavors. The journal has since grown in size and considerably improved its quality.Martin

  8. GUEST EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION: Guest Editor's introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysanthis, Panos K.

    1996-12-01

    Computer Science Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA This special issue focuses on current efforts to represent and support workflows that integrate information systems and human resources within a business or manufacturing enterprise. Workflows may also be viewed as an emerging computational paradigm for effective structuring of cooperative applications involving human users and access to diverse data types not necessarily maintained by traditional database management systems. A workflow is an automated organizational process (also called business process) which consists of a set of activities or tasks that need to be executed in a particular controlled order over a combination of heterogeneous database systems and legacy systems. Within workflows, tasks are performed cooperatively by either human or computational agents in accordance with their roles in the organizational hierarchy. The challenge in facilitating the implementation of workflows lies in developing efficient workflow management systems. A workflow management system (also called workflow server, workflow engine or workflow enactment system) provides the necessary interfaces for coordination and communication among human and computational agents to execute the tasks involved in a workflow and controls the execution orderings of tasks as well as the flow of data that these tasks manipulate. That is, the workflow management system is responsible for correctly and reliably supporting the specification, execution, and monitoring of workflows. The six papers selected (out of the twenty-seven submitted for this special issue of Distributed Systems Engineering) address different aspects of these three functional components of a workflow management system. In the first paper, `Correctness issues in workflow management', Kamath and Ramamritham discuss the important issue of correctness in workflow management that constitutes a prerequisite for the use of workflows in the automation of the critical organizational/business processes. In particular, this paper examines the issues of execution atomicity and failure atomicity, differentiating between correctness requirements of system failures and logical failures, and surveys techniques that can be used to ensure data consistency in workflow management systems. While the first paper is concerned with correctness assuming transactional workflows in which selective transactional properties are associated with individual tasks or the entire workflow, the second paper, `Scheduling workflows by enforcing intertask dependencies' by Attie et al, assumes that the tasks can be either transactions or other activities involving legacy systems. This second paper describes the modelling and specification of conditions involving events and dependencies among tasks within a workflow using temporal logic and finite state automata. It also presents a scheduling algorithm that enforces all stated dependencies by executing at any given time only those events that are allowed by all the dependency automata and in an order as specified by the dependencies. In any system with decentralized control, there is a need to effectively cope with the tension that exists between autonomy and consistency requirements. In `A three-level atomicity model for decentralized workflow management systems', Ben-Shaul and Heineman focus on the specific requirement of enforcing failure atomicity in decentralized, autonomous and interacting workflow management systems. Their paper describes a model in which each workflow manager must be able to specify the sequence of tasks that comprise an atomic unit for the purposes of correctness, and the degrees of local and global atomicity for the purpose of cooperation with other workflow managers. The paper also discusses a realization of this model in which treaties and summits provide an agreement mechanism, while underlying transaction managers are responsible for maintaining failure atomicity. The fourth and fifth papers are experience papers describing a workflow management system and a large scale workflow application, respectively. Schill and Mittasch, in `Workflow management systems on top of OSF DCE and OMG CORBA', describe a decentralized workflow management system and discuss its implementation using two standardized middleware platforms, namely, OSF DCE and OMG CORBA. The system supports a new approach to workflow management, introducing several new concepts such as data type management for integrating various types of data and quality of service for various services provided by servers. A problem common to both database applications and workflows is the handling of missing and incomplete information. This is particularly pervasive in an `electronic market' with a huge number of retail outlets producing and exchanging volumes of data, the application discussed in `Information flow in the DAMA project beyond database managers: information flow managers'. Motivated by the need for a method that allows a task to proceed in a timely manner if not all data produced by other tasks are available by its deadline, Russell et al propose an architectural framework and a language that can be used to detect, approximate and, later on, to adjust missing data if necessary. The final paper, `The evolution towards flexible workflow systems' by Nutt, is complementary to the other papers and is a survey of issues and of work related to both workflow and computer supported collaborative work (CSCW) areas. In particular, the paper provides a model and a categorization of the dimensions which workflow management and CSCW systems share. Besides summarizing the recent advancements towards efficient workflow management, the papers in this special issue suggest areas open to investigation and it is our hope that they will also provide the stimulus for further research and development in the area of workflow management systems.

  9. GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Guest Editors' introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerraoui, Rachid; Vinoski, Steve

    1997-09-01

    The organization of a distributed system can have a tremendous impact on its capabilities, its performance, and its ability to evolve to meet changing requirements. For example, the client - server organization model has proven to be adequate for organizing a distributed system as a number of distributed servers that offer various functions to client processes across the network. However, it lacks peer-to-peer capabilities, and experience with the model has been predominantly in the context of local networks. To achieve peer-to-peer cooperation in a more global context, systems issues of scale, heterogeneity, configuration management, accounting and sharing are crucial, and the complexity of migrating from locally distributed to more global systems demands new tools and techniques. An emphasis on interfaces and modules leads to the modelling of a complex distributed system as a collection of interacting objects that communicate with each other only using requests sent to well defined interfaces. Although object granularity typically varies at different levels of a system architecture, the same object abstraction can be applied to various levels of a computing architecture. Since 1989, the Object Management Group (OMG), an international software consortium, has been defining an architecture for distributed object systems called the Object Management Architecture (OMA). At the core of the OMA is a `software bus' called an Object Request Broker (ORB), which is specified by the OMG Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) specification. The OMA distributed object model fits the structure of heterogeneous distributed applications, and is applied in all layers of the OMA. For example, each of the OMG Object Services, such as the OMG Naming Service, is structured as a set of distributed objects that communicate using the ORB. Similarly, higher-level OMA components such as Common Facilities and Domain Interfaces are also organized as distributed objects that can be layered over both Object Services and the ORB. The OMG creates specifications, not code, but the interfaces it standardizes are always derived from demonstrated technology submitted by member companies. The specified interfaces are written in a neutral Interface Definition Language (IDL) that defines contractual interfaces with potential clients. Interfaces written in IDL can be translated to a number of programming languages via OMG standard language mappings so that they can be used to develop components. The resulting components can transparently communicate with other components written in different languages and running on different operating systems and machine types. The ORB is responsible for providing the illusion of `virtual homogeneity' regardless of the programming languages, tools, operating systems and networks used to realize and support these components. With the adoption of the CORBA 2.0 specification in 1995, these components are able to interoperate across multi-vendor CORBA-based products. More than 700 member companies have joined the OMG, including Hewlett-Packard, Digital, Siemens, IONA Technologies, Netscape, Sun Microsystems, Microsoft and IBM, which makes it the largest standards body in existence. These companies continue to work together within the OMG to refine and enhance the OMA and its components. This special issue of Distributed Systems Engineering publishes five papers that were originally presented at the `Distributed Object-Based Platforms' track of the 30th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS), which was held in Wailea on Maui on 6 - 10 January 1997. The papers, which were selected based on their quality and the range of topics they cover, address different aspects of CORBA, including advanced aspects such as fault tolerance and transactions. These papers discuss the use of CORBA and evaluate CORBA-based development for different types of distributed object systems and architectures. The first paper, by S Rahkila and S Stenberg, discusses the application of CORBA to telecommunication management networks. In the second paper, P Narasimhan, L E Moser and P M Melliar-Smith present a fault-tolerant extension of an ORB. The third paper, by J Liang, S Sédillot and B Traverson, provides an overview of the CORBA Transaction Service and its integration with the ISO Distributed Transaction Processing protocol. In the fourth paper, D Sherer, T Murer and A Würtz discuss the evolution of a cooperative software engineering infrastructure to a CORBA-based framework. The fifth paper, by R Fatoohi, evaluates the communication performance of a commercially-available Object Request Broker (Orbix from IONA Technologies) on several networks, and compares the performance with that of more traditional communication primitives (e.g., BSD UNIX sockets and PVM). We wish to thank both the referees and the authors of these papers, as their cooperation was fundamental in ensuring timely publication.

  10. Highlighting Kathleen Green and Mario Delmar, guest editors of special issue (part 2): junctional targets of skin and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cowin, Pamela

    2014-06-01

    Cell Communication and Adhesion has been fortunate to enlist two pioneers of epidermal and cardiac cell junctions, Kathleen Green and Mario Delmar, as Guest Editors of a two part series on junctional targets of skin and heart disease. Part 2 of this series begins with an overview from Dipal Patel and Kathy Green comparing epidermal desmosomes to cardiac area composita junctions, and surveying the pathogenic mechanisms resulting from mutations in their components in heart disease. This is followed by a review from David Kelsell on the role of desmosomal mutation in inherited syndromes involving skin fragility. Agnieszka Kobeliak discusses how structural deficits in the epidermal barrier intersect with the NFkB signaling pathway to induce inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Farah Sheikh reviews the specialized junctional components in cardiomyocytes of the cardiac conduction system and Robert Gourdie discusses how molecular complexes between sodium channels and gap junction proteins within the perijunctional microdomains within the intercalated disc facilitate conduction. Glenn Radice evaluates the role of N-cadherin in heart. Andre Kleber and Chris Chen explore new approaches to study junctional mechanotransduction in vitro with a focus on the effects of connexin ablation and the role of cadherins, respectively. To complement this series of reviews, we have interviewed Werner Franke, whose systematic documentation the tissue-specific complexity of desmosome composition and pioneering discovery of the cardiac area composita junction greatly facilitated elucidation of the role of desmosomal components in the pathophysiology of human heart disease.

  11. Notes towards a 'social aesthetic': Guest editors' introduction to the special section.

    PubMed

    Olcese, Cristiana; Savage, Mike

    2015-12-01

    There is an emerging 'aesthetic turn' within sociology which currently lacks clear focus. This paper reviews the different issues feeding into this interest and contributes to its development. Previous renderings of this relationship have set the aesthetic up against sociology, as an emphasis which 'troubles' conventional understandings of sociality and offers no ready way of reconciling the aesthetic with the social. Reflecting on the contributions of recent social theorists, from figures including Bourdieu, Born, Rancière, Deleuze, and Martin, we argue instead for the value of a social aesthetic which critiques instrumentalist and reductive understandings of the social itself. In explicating what form this might take, the latter parts of the paper take issue with classical modernist conceptions of the aesthetic which continue to dominate popular and sociological understandings of the aesthetic, and uses the motif of 'walking' to show how the aesthetic can be rendered in terms of 'the mundane search' and how this search spans everyday experience and cultural re-production. We offer a provisional definition of social aesthetics as the embedded and embodied process of meaning making which, by acknowledging the physical/corporeal boundaries and qualities of the inhabited world, also allows imagination to travel across other spaces and times. It is hoped that this approach can be a useful platform for further inquiry.

  12. Guest editor's note

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sediment transport processes in rivers are of great concern in many practical studies ranging from large-scale problems such as reservoir management, dam removal, and design of restoration works to small-scale problems such as local bed scour around intakes, outfalls and piers. Within the discipline...

  13. Guest Editor's Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danaher, Patrick Alan

    2000-01-01

    Examines the field of international traveler and nomadic education research and argues for the need to extend the boundaries of this "field" significantly. Research on the education of travelers and nomads is mobile and fluid, but the approach used in this collection, the mapping and celebration of international diversity, is needed to…

  14. From the guest editors.

    PubMed

    Chowell, Gerardo; Feng, Zhilan; Song, Baojun

    2013-01-01

    Carlos Castilo-Chavez is a Regents Professor, a Joaquin Bustoz Jr. Professor of Mathematical Biology, and a Distinguished Sustainability Scientist at Arizona State University. His research program is at the interface of the mathematical and natural and social sciences with emphasis on (i) the role of dynamic social landscapes on disease dispersal; (ii) the role of environmental and social structures on the dynamics of addiction and disease evolution, and (iii) Dynamics of complex systems at the interphase of ecology, epidemiology and the social sciences. Castillo-Chavez has co-authored over two hundred publications (see goggle scholar citations) that include journal articles and edited research volumes. Specifically, he co-authored a textbook in Mathematical Biology in 2001 (second edition in 2012); a volume (with Harvey Thomas Banks) on the use of mathematical models in homeland security published in SIAM's Frontiers in Applied Mathematics Series (2003); and co-edited volumes in the Series Contemporary Mathematics entitled '' Mathematical Studies on Human Disease Dynamics: Emerging Paradigms and Challenges'' (American Mathematical Society, 2006) and Mathematical and Statistical Estimation Approaches in Epidemiology (Springer-Verlag, 2009) highlighting his interests in the applications of mathematics in emerging and re-emerging diseases. Castillo-Chavez is a member of the Santa Fe Institute's external faculty, adjunct professor at Cornell University, and contributor, as a member of the Steering Committee of the '' Committee for the Review of the Evaluation Data on the Effectiveness of NSF-Supported and Commercially Generated Mathematics Curriculum Materials,'' to a 2004 NRC report. The CBMS workshop '' Mathematical Epidemiology with Applications'' lectures delivered by C. Castillo-Chavez and F. Brauer in 2011 have been published by SIAM in 2013.

  15. Guest Editors' introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Jeff; Moffett, Jonathan

    1996-06-01

    Special Issue on Management This special issue contains seven papers originally presented at an International Workshop on Services for Managing Distributed Systems (SMDS'95), held in September 1995 in Karslruhe, Germany. The workshop was organized to present the results of two ESPRIT III funded projects, Sysman and IDSM, and more generally to bring together work in the area of distributed systems management. The workshop focused on the tools and techniques necessary for managing future large-scale, multi-organizational distributed systems. The open call for papers attracted a large number of submissions and the subsequent attendance at the workshop, which was larger than expected, clearly indicated that the topics addressed by the workshop were of considerable interest both to industry and academia. The papers selected for this special issue represent an excellent coverage of the issues addressed by the workshop. A particular focus of the workshop was the need to help managers deal with the size and complexity of modern distributed systems by the provision of automated support. This automation must have two prime characteristics: it must provide a flexible management system which responds rapidly to changing organizational needs, and it must provide both human managers and automated management components with the information that they need, in a form which can be used for decision-making. These two characteristics define the two main themes of this special issue. To satisfy the requirement for a flexible management system, workers in both industry and universities have turned to architectures which support policy directed management. In these architectures policy is explicitly represented and can be readily modified to meet changing requirements. The paper `Towards implementing policy-based systems management' by Meyer, Anstötz and Popien describes an approach whereby policy is enforced by event-triggered rules. Krause and Zimmermann in their paper `Implementing configuration management policies for distributed applications' present a system in which the configuration of the system in terms of its constituent components and their interconnections can be controlled by reconfiguration rules. Neumair and Wies in the paper `Case study: applying management policies to manage distributed queuing systems' examine how high-level policies can be transformed into practical and efficient implementations for the case of distributed job queuing systems. Koch and Krämer in `Rules and agents for automated management of distributed systems' describe the results of an experiment in using the software development environment Marvel to provide a rule based implementation of management policy. The paper by Jardin, `Supporting scalability and flexibility in a distributed management platform' reports on the experience of using a policy directed approach in the industrial strength TeMIP management platform. Both human managers and automated management components rely on a comprehensive monitoring system to provide accurate and timely information on which decisions are made to modify the operation of a system. The monitoring service must deal with condensing and summarizing the vast amount of data available to produce the events of interest to the controlling components of the overall management system. The paper `Distributed intelligent monitoring and reporting facilities' by Pavlou, Mykoniatis and Sanchez describes a flexible monitoring system in which the monitoring agents themselves are policy directed. Their monitoring system has been implemented in the context of the OSIMIS management platform. Debski and Janas in `The SysMan monitoring service and its management environment' describe the overall SysMan management system architecture and then concentrate on how event processing and distribution is supported in that architecture. The collection of papers gives a good overview of the current state of the art in distributed system management. It has reached a point at which a first generation of systems, based on policy representation within systems and automated monitoring systems, are coming into practical use. The papers also serve to identify many of the issues which are open research questions. In particular, as management systems increase in complexity, how far can we automate the refinement of high-level policies into implementations? How can we detect and resolve conflicts between policies? And how can monitoring services deal efficiently with ever-growing complexity and volume? We wish to acknowledge the many contributors, besides the authors, who have made this issue possible: the anonymous reviewers who have done much to assure the quality of these papers, Morris Sloman and his Programme Committee who convened the Workshop, and Thomas Usländer and his team at the Fraunhofer Institute in Karlsruhe who acted as hosts.

  16. Guest Editor's introduction: Selected papers from the 4th USENIX Conference on Object-Oriented Technologies and Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sventek, Joe

    1998-12-01

    -of-Service (QoS) features in distributed, object-oriented systems. They present a general QoS language, QML, that can be used to capture QoS properties as part of a design. They also show how to extend UML to support QML concepts. The paper by Szymaszek, Uszok and Zielinski discusses the important issue of efficient implementation and usage of fine-grained objects in CORBA-based applications. Fine-grained objects can have serious ramifications on overall application performance and scalability, and the paper suggests that such objects should not be treated as first-class CORBA objects, proposing instead the use of collections and smart proxies for efficient implementation. The paper by Milojicic, LaForge and Chauhan describes a mobile objects and agents infrastructure. Their particular research has focused on communication support across agent migration and extensive resource control. The paper also discusses issues regarding interoperation between agent systems. Acknowledgments The editor wishes to thank all of the authors, reviewers and publishers. Without their excellent work, and the contribution of their valuable time, this special issue would not have been possible.

  17. Notes from the guest editor.

    PubMed

    Dewa, Carolyn S

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, four institutes of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (Gender and Health; Health Services and Policy Research; Neurosciences, Mental Health and Addiction; and Population and Public Health) sponsored the Fourth Annual Canadian Research Congress on Mental Health and Addictions in the Workplace, in Toronto, Ontario. Hosted by the Work and Well-Being Research and Evaluation Program at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, the theme of the congress was We Can Do It! Evidence and Interventions for Transforming Mental Health in the Workplace (see http://www.kewa.camh.net/researchers/areas/work_wellbeing/Pages/default.aspx for more details). Coincidentally, in the same year, an idealistic presidential hopeful named Barack Obama adopted a similar slogan for his White House run. Obama recognized that change that challenges established barriers can only come about through co-operation and a collective investment.

  18. Guest Editors' Introduction--Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Pak C.; Thomas, Jim

    2004-09-01

    The information revolution is upon us, and it is guaran-teed to change our lives and the way we conduct our daily business. The fact that we have to deal with not just the size but also the variety and complexity of this in-formation makes it a real challenge to survive the revolu-tion. Enter Visual Analytics, a contemporary and proven approach to combine the art of human intuition and the science of mathematical deduction to directly perceive patterns and derive knowledge and insight from them.

  19. Guest Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, James M.

    2008-01-01

    While a good class with a guest speaker requires plenty of advance preparation, the real clincher is for the teacher to create a tight fit between the course objectives and the speaker's purpose in being there. The speaker has to play an essential role in fulfilling the learning objectives of the course; if that doesn't happen, the students will…

  20. Better Informed, Still Skeptical: Response to Machalek and Martin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucal, Betsy

    2010-01-01

    After accepting the editor's invitation to write a response to Richard Machalek and Michael W. Martin's "Evolution, Biology, and Society: A Conversation for the 21st-Century Sociology Classroom," the author took up their recommendation to learn more about recent work on biology and social behavior. She considered seriously Machalek and Martin's…

  1. New Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-03-01

    It is an honour and a challenge to take up the editorship of the Messenger at this time of ESO's expanding role in European and worldwide astronomy. In order to mark the change, we have made a few adjustments to the appearance without departing from the overall style that Peter Shaver had evolved during his term as editor. I would like to thank Peter for gen-tly coaching me into the position and Jutta Boxheimer, the technical editor, for the high quality of the layout.

  2. Editor's note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umapathy, Siva

    2017-01-01

    This is an editor's note related to the publication 'Biologically active and thermally stable polymeric Schiff base and its metal polychelates: Their synthesis and spectral aspects' by Raza Rasool and Sumaiya Hasnain, which appeared in Spectrochimica Acta Part A: Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy 148 (2015) 435-443.

  3. TOAD Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingle, Bradford D.; Shea, Anne L.; Hofler, Alicia S.

    1993-01-01

    Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) computer program (LAR-13755), implements format designed to facilitate transfer of data across communication networks and dissimilar host computer systems. Any data file conforming to TOAD format standard called TOAD file. TOAD Editor is interactive software tool for manipulating contents of TOAD files. Commonly used to extract filtered subsets of data for visualization of results of computation. Also offers such user-oriented features as on-line help, clear English error messages, startup file, macroinstructions defined by user, command history, user variables, UNDO features, and full complement of mathematical statistical, and conversion functions. Companion program, TOAD Gateway (LAR-14484), converts data files from variety of other file formats to that of TOAD. TOAD Editor written in FORTRAN 77.

  4. WRR editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    New editors of AGU's Water Resources Research journal will be Soroosh Sorooshian and Roger E. Smith.Soroosh Sorooshian was born in Kerman, Iran. He received his B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from California State Polytechnic University, San Luis Obispo, in 1971. He received his M.S. degree in operations research in 1973 and his Ph.D. degree in water resources systems engineering in 1978, both from the University of California, Los Angeles.

  5. MPS Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, William S.; Liu, Ning; Francis, Laurie K.; OReilly, Taifun L.; Schrock, Mitchell; Page, Dennis N.; Morris, John R.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Crockett, Thomas M.; Shams, Khawaja S.

    2011-01-01

    Previously, it was time-consuming to hand-edit data and then set up simulation runs to find the effect and impact of the input data on a spacecraft. MPS Editor provides the user the capability to create/edit/update models and sequences, and immediately try them out using what appears to the user as one piece of software. MPS Editor provides an integrated sequencing environment for users. It provides them with software that can be utilized during development as well as actual operations. In addition, it provides them with a single, consistent, user friendly interface. MPS Editor uses the Eclipse Rich Client Platform to provide an environment that can be tailored to specific missions. It provides the capability to create and edit, and includes an Activity Dictionary to build the simulation spacecraft models, build and edit sequences of commands, and model the effects of those commands on the spacecraft. MPS Editor is written in Java using the Eclipse Rich Client Platform. It is currently built with four perspectives: the Activity Dictionary Perspective, the Project Adaptation Perspective, the Sequence Building Perspective, and the Sequence Modeling Perspective. Each perspective performs a given task. If a mission doesn't require that task, the unneeded perspective is not added to that project's delivery. In the Activity Dictionary Perspective, the user builds the project-specific activities, observations, calibrations, etc. Typically, this is used during the development phases of the mission, although it can be used later to make changes and updates to the Project Activity Dictionary. In the Adaptation Perspective, the user creates the spacecraft models such as power, data store, etc. Again, this is typically used during development, but will be used to update or add models of the spacecraft. The Sequence Building Perspective allows the user to create a sequence of activities or commands that go to the spacecraft. It provides a simulation of the activities and

  6. Guest Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanan, Padmanapan; Babu, Dhanakotti Rajan; Chelvane, Jeyaramane Arout; Vizhi, Rajasekaran Ezhil

    2016-11-01

    This special issue of Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials (JMMM) is a collection of selected papers presented at the International Conference on Magnetic Materials and Applications (ICMAGMA-2015), held at VIT University, Vellore, India during December 2 - 4, 2015. The papers were screened and selected for publication after an intensive peer review, with a minimum of two reviewers for every paper. The editors would like to place on record the unstinted support received from over 100 reviewers which culminated in the selection of 49 manuscripts for publication. We take this opportunity to thank everyone for participating in the ICMAGMA-2015.

  7. Journal Editors Celebrated at Editors' Evening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panning, Jeanette

    2014-02-01

    At the Fall Meeting, the premiere social event for AGU's many journal editors is the annual Editors' Evening, an opportunity for members to celebrate and to recognize the efforts of retiring editors. At the event, AGU president Carol Finn welcomed all those in attendance and thanked them for volunteering their time for the benefit of AGU and the wider research community.

  8. Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambaugh, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    This last year being an odd numbered year, the pages of Nuclear Fusion saw a large influx of expanded papers from the 2012 Fusion Energy Conference in San Diego. Many papers have focused on the scientific and technical challenges posed by ITER. Contributions are steadily increasing from the new superconducting tokamaks in Asia. The ITER Project continues to move ahead. Construction at the Cadarache site is quite remarkable. Buildings completed include the huge Poloidal Field Coils Winding Facility and the Headquarters building, which has been occupied by the ITER staff. Work is progressing on the Assembly building and the Cryostat Workshop. The base of the tokamak complex is being laid. Besides the construction that is taking place and will take place at the site, components from around the world have to navigate the complex route from Marseilles to the site. A test convoy replicating the dimensions and weights of the most exceptional ITER loads successfully traversed that route in 2013. We are pleased to report that the IAEA and ITER have finalized the agreement for ITER authors to publish papers in Nuclear Fusion . Nuclear Fusion is proud to continue its key role in providing the leading forum for the documentation of scientific progress and exchange of research results internationally toward fusion energy. Refereeing The Nuclear Fusion editorial office appreciates greatly the effort made by our referees to sustain the high quality of the journal. Since January 2005, we have been offering the most active referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. We have excluded our Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in previous years. The following people have been selected: J.M. Canik, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA I.T. Chapman, Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, UK L.-G. Eriksson, Commission of the European Communities, Belgium T. Evans

  9. The Philosopher and the Lecturer: John Dewey, Everett Dean Martin, and Reflective Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Michael; Harbour, Clifford P.

    2013-01-01

    Adult education scholars have not yet examined the connections between the philosopher, John Dewey, and the lecturer on adult education, Everett Dean Martin. These scholars generally portray Dewey as indifferent to their field. However, Dewey's correspondence with a New York newspaper editor in 1928, recommending Martin's The Meaning of…

  10. Martin RA-30 Baltimore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1943-01-01

    Martin RA-30 Baltimore: The Martin RA-30 Baltimore was a light bomber ordered by the Royal Air Force. Some examples were retained in the United States as part of a 'Reverse Lend-Lease.' This example was flown by the NACA from June 1943 until March 1944.

  11. Martin B-10B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1935-01-01

    Martin B-10B: Although the front turret looks like it may have bee too high, the drag of the Martin B-10 bomber was low enough for it to have been faster than any U. S. Fighter when it was first ordered in January 1933. The NACA flew one of these B-10Bs in 1937 at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory.

  12. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2010-02-01

    November 2009 and provided particularly detailed advice to the authors. The other three have been very helpful in 'minority fields'. We have excluded our Board members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in the last four years. Guest Editors' work on papers submitted to their Special Issues is also excluded from consideration. The following people have been selected: Tomonori Takizuka, JAEA-Naka Fusion Institute, Japan Rudolf Neu, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Germany Sibylle Guenter, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Germany Taik-Soo Hahm, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, United States David R. Mikkelsen, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, United States Peter C. de Vries, EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, United Kingdom Yasuhiro Suzuki, National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Jerzy Wolowski, Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Poland Tetsuo Tanabe, Kyushu University, Japan Yasuyuki Yagi, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan Congratulations and many, many thanks! The Guest Editors of special editions deserve a special mention for the excellent help that they have given us. They are: Taik-Soo Hahm, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, United States, Special Issue on H-Mode Physics and Transport Barriers Yaroslav Kolesnichenko, Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine, Special Issue on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems Kimitaka Itoh, National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan and Howard R. Wilson, University of York, UK, Special Issue on Plasma Instabilities Bernhard Unterberg, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Germany, Special Issue on Stochastic Fusion Plasma In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2009. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2009 Nuclear Fusion

  13. Guest Editor's introduction: Special issue on distributed virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, Rodger

    1998-09-01

    Distributed virtual environments (DVEs) combine technology from 3D graphics, virtual reality and distributed systems to provide an interactive 3D scene that supports multiple participants. Each participant has a representation in the scene, often known as an avatar, and is free to navigate through the scene and interact with both the scene and other viewers of the scene. Changes to the scene, for example, position changes of one avatar as the associated viewer navigates through the scene, or changes to objects in the scene via manipulation, are propagated in real time to all viewers. This ensures that all viewers of a shared scene `see' the same representation of it, allowing sensible reasoning about the scene. Early work on such environments was restricted to their use in simulation, in particular in military simulation. However, over recent years a number of interesting and potentially far-reaching attempts have been made to exploit the technology for a range of other uses, including: Social spaces. Such spaces can be seen as logical extensions of the familiar text chat space. In 3D social spaces avatars, representing participants, can meet in shared 3D scenes and in addition to text chat can use visual cues and even in some cases spatial audio. Collaborative working. A number of recent projects have attempted to explore the use of DVEs to facilitate computer-supported collaborative working (CSCW), where the 3D space provides a context and work space for collaboration. Gaming. The shared 3D space is already familiar, albeit in a constrained manner, to the gaming community. DVEs are a logical superset of existing 3D games and can provide a rich framework for advanced gaming applications. e-commerce. The ability to navigate through a virtual shopping mall and to look at, and even interact with, 3D representations of articles has appealed to the e-commerce community as it searches for the best method of presenting merchandise to electronic consumers. The technology needed to support these systems crosses a number of disciplines in computer science. These include, but are certainly not limited to, real-time graphics for the accurate and realistic representation of scenes, group communications for the efficient update of shared consistent scene data, user interface modelling to exploit the use of the 3D representation and multimedia systems technology for the delivery of streamed graphics and audio-visual data into the shared scene. It is this intersection of technologies and the overriding need to provide visual realism that places such high demands on the underlying distributed systems infrastructure and makes DVEs such fertile ground for distributed systems research. Two examples serve to show how DVE developers have exploited the unique aspects of their domain. Communications. The usual tension between latency and throughput is particularly noticeable within DVEs. To ensure the timely update of multiple viewers of a particular scene requires that such updates be propagated quickly. However, the sheer volume of changes to any one scene calls for techniques that minimize the number of distinct updates that are sent to the network. Several techniques have been used to address this tension; these include the use of multicast communications, and in particular multicast in wide-area networks to reduce actual message traffic. Multicast has been combined with general group communications to partition updates to related objects or users of a scene. A less traditional approach has been the use of dead reckoning whereby a client application that visualizes the scene calculates position updates by extrapolating movement based on previous information. This allows the system to reduce the number of communications needed to update objects that move in a stable manner within the scene. Scaling. DVEs, especially those used for social spaces, are required to support large numbers of simultaneous users in potentially large shared scenes. The desire for scalability has driven different architectural designs, for example, the use of fully distributed architectures which scale well but often suffer performance costs versus centralized and hierarchical architectures in which the inverse is true. However, DVEs have also exploited the spatial nature of their domain to address scalability and have pioneered techniques that exploit the semantics of the shared space to reduce data updates and so allow greater scalability. Several of the systems reported in this special issue apply a notion of area of interest to partition the scene and so reduce the participants in any data updates. The specification of area of interest differs between systems. One approach has been to exploit a geographical notion, i.e. a regular portion of a scene, or a semantic unit, such as a room or building. Another approach has been to define the area of interest as a spatial area associated with an avatar in the scene. The five papers in this special issue have been chosen to highlight the distributed systems aspects of the DVE domain. The first paper, on the DIVE system, described by Emmanuel Frécon and Mårten Stenius explores the use of multicast and group communication in a fully peer-to-peer architecture. The developers of DIVE have focused on its use as the basis for collaborative work environments and have explored the issues associated with maintaining and updating large complicated scenes. The second paper, by Hiroaki Harada et al, describes the AGORA system, a DVE concentrating on social spaces and employing a novel communication technique that incorporates position update and vector information to support dead reckoning. The paper by Simon Powers et al explores the application of DVEs to the gaming domain. They propose a novel architecture that separates out higher-level game semantics - the conceptual model - from the lower-level scene attributes - the dynamic model, both running on servers, from the actual visual representation - the visual model - running on the client. They claim a number of benefits from this approach, including better predictability and consistency. Wolfgang Broll discusses the SmallView system which is an attempt to provide a toolkit for DVEs. One of the key features of SmallView is a sophisticated application level protocol, DWTP, that provides support for a variety of communication models. The final paper, by Chris Greenhalgh, discusses the MASSIVE system which has been used to explore the notion of awareness in the 3D space via the concept of `auras'. These auras define an area of interest for users and support a mapping between what a user is aware of, and what data update rate the communications infrastructure can support. We hope that this selection of papers will serve to provide a clear introduction to the distributed system issues faced by the DVE community and the approaches they have taken in solving them. Finally, we wish to thank Hubert Le Van Gong for his tireless efforts in pulling together all these papers and both the referees and the authors of the papers for the time and effort in ensuring that their contributions teased out the interesting distributed systems issues for this special issue. † E-mail address: rodger@arch.sel.sony.com

  14. Guest Editor's Introduction: Special section on dependable distributed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetzer, Christof

    1999-09-01

    We rely more and more on computers. For example, the Internet reshapes the way we do business. A `computer outage' can cost a company a substantial amount of money. Not only with respect to the business lost during an outage, but also with respect to the negative publicity the company receives. This is especially true for Internet companies. After recent computer outages of Internet companies, we have seen a drastic fall of the shares of the affected companies. There are multiple causes for computer outages. Although computer hardware becomes more reliable, hardware related outages remain an important issue. For example, some of the recent computer outages of companies were caused by failed memory and system boards, and even by crashed disks - a failure type which can easily be masked using disk mirroring. Transient hardware failures might also look like software failures and, hence, might be incorrectly classified as such. However, many outages are software related. Faulty system software, middleware, and application software can crash a system. Dependable computing systems are systems we can rely on. Dependable systems are, by definition, reliable, available, safe and secure [3]. This special section focuses on issues related to dependable distributed systems. Distributed systems have the potential to be more dependable than a single computer because the probability that all computers in a distributed system fail is smaller than the probability that a single computer fails. However, if a distributed system is not built well, it is potentially less dependable than a single computer since the probability that at least one computer in a distributed system fails is higher than the probability that one computer fails. For example, if the crash of any computer in a distributed system can bring the complete system to a halt, the system is less dependable than a single-computer system. Building dependable distributed systems is an extremely difficult task. There is no silver bullet solution. Instead one has to apply a variety of engineering techniques [2]: fault-avoidance (minimize the occurrence of faults, e.g. by using a proper design process), fault-removal (remove faults before they occur, e.g. by testing), fault-evasion (predict faults by monitoring and reconfigure the system before failures occur), and fault-tolerance (mask and/or contain failures). Building a system from scratch is an expensive and time consuming effort. To reduce the cost of building dependable distributed systems, one would choose to use commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components whenever possible. The usage of COTS components has several potential advantages beyond minimizing costs. For example, through the widespread usage of a COTS component, design failures might be detected and fixed before the component is used in a dependable system. Custom-designed components have to mature without the widespread in-field testing of COTS components. COTS components have various potential disadvantages when used in dependable systems. For example, minimizing the time to market might lead to the release of components with inherent design faults (e.g. use of `shortcuts' that only work most of the time). In addition, the components might be more complex than needed and, hence, potentially have more design faults than simpler components. However, given economic constraints and the ability to cope with some of the problems using fault-evasion and fault-tolerance, only for a small percentage of systems can one justify not using COTS components. Distributed systems built from current COTS components are asynchronous systems in the sense that there exists no a priori known bound on the transmission delay of messages or the execution time of processes. When designing a distributed algorithm, one would like to make sure (e.g. by testing or verification) that it is correct, i.e. satisfies its specification. Many distributed algorithms make use of consensus (eventually all non-crashed processes have to agree on a value), leader election (a crashed leader is eventually replaced by a new leader, but at any time there is at most one leader) or a group membership detection service (a crashed process is eventually suspected to have crashed but only crashed processes are suspected). From a theoretical point of view, the service specifications given for such services are not implementable in asynchronous systems. In particular, for each implementation one can derive a counter example in which the service violates its specification. From a practical point of view, the consensus, the leader election, and the membership detection problem are solvable in asynchronous distributed systems. In this special section, Raynal and Tronel show how to bridge this difference by showing how to implement the group membership detection problem with a negligible probability [1] to fail in an asynchronous system. The group membership detection problem is specified by a liveness condition (L) and a safety property (S): (L) if a process p crashes, then eventually every non-crashed process q has to suspect that p has crashed; and (S) if a process q suspects p, then p has indeed crashed. One can show that either (L) or (S) is implementable, but one cannot implement both (L) and (S) at the same time in an asynchronous system. In practice, one only needs to implement (L) and (S) such that the probability that (L) or (S) is violated becomes negligible. Raynal and Tronel propose and analyse a protocol that implements (L) with certainty and that can be tuned such that the probability that (S) is violated becomes negligible. Designing and implementing distributed fault-tolerant protocols for asynchronous systems is a difficult but not an impossible task. A fault-tolerant protocol has to detect and mask certain failure classes, e.g. crash failures and message omission failures. There is a trade-off between the performance of a fault-tolerant protocol and the failure classes the protocol can tolerate. One wants to tolerate as many failure classes as needed to satisfy the stochastic requirements of the protocol [1] while still maintaining a sufficient performance. Since clients of a protocol have different requirements with respect to the performance/fault-tolerance trade-off, one would like to be able to customize protocols such that one can select an appropriate performance/fault-tolerance trade-off. In this special section Hiltunen et al describe how one can compose protocols from micro-protocols in their Cactus system. They show how a group RPC system can be tailored to the needs of a client. In particular, they show how considering additional failure classes affects the performance of a group RPC system. References [1] Cristian F 1991 Understanding fault-tolerant distributed systems Communications of ACM 34 (2) 56-78 [2] Heimerdinger W L and Weinstock C B 1992 A conceptual framework for system fault tolerance Technical Report 92-TR-33, CMU/SEI [3] Laprie J C (ed) 1992 Dependability: Basic Concepts and Terminology (Vienna: Springer)

  15. Guest Editors' Introduction: Research on Direct Instruction in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mac Iver, Martha Abele; Kemper, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    Introduces a special issue devoted to recent studies of the direct instruction reading program, providing a history of direct instruction, examining research on the effects and outcomes of direct instruction, and reviewing the studies contained in this special issue. (Contains references.) (SM)

  16. DNAAlignEditor: DNA alignment editor tool

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Villeda, Hector; Schroeder, Steven; Flint-Garcia, Sherry; Guill, Katherine E; Yamasaki, Masanori; McMullen, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Background With advances in DNA re-sequencing methods and Next-Generation parallel sequencing approaches, there has been a large increase in genomic efforts to define and analyze the sequence variability present among individuals within a species. For very polymorphic species such as maize, this has lead to a need for intuitive, user-friendly software that aids the biologist, often with naïve programming capability, in tracking, editing, displaying, and exporting multiple individual sequence alignments. To fill this need we have developed a novel DNA alignment editor. Results We have generated a nucleotide sequence alignment editor (DNAAlignEditor) that provides an intuitive, user-friendly interface for manual editing of multiple sequence alignments with functions for input, editing, and output of sequence alignments. The color-coding of nucleotide identity and the display of associated quality score aids in the manual alignment editing process. DNAAlignEditor works as a client/server tool having two main components: a relational database that collects the processed alignments and a user interface connected to database through universal data access connectivity drivers. DNAAlignEditor can be used either as a stand-alone application or as a network application with multiple users concurrently connected. Conclusion We anticipate that this software will be of general interest to biologists and population genetics in editing DNA sequence alignments and analyzing natural sequence variation regardless of species, and will be particularly useful for manual alignment editing of sequences in species with high levels of polymorphism. PMID:18366684

  17. Martin Gardner's Mistake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khovanova, Tanya

    2012-01-01

    When Martin Gardner first presented the Two-Children problem, he made a mistake in its solution. Later he corrected the error, but unfortunately the incorrect solution is more widely known than his correction. In fact, a Tuesday-Child variation of this problem went viral in 2010, and the same flaw keeps reappearing in proposed solutions of that…

  18. Boerhaave: Author and Editor *

    PubMed Central

    Lindeboom, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The many facets of Herman Boerhaave's life are presented. He was a renowned teacher, physician, author, and editor. Discussed here are his activities as cataloger of the Vossius Collection, author of books on chemistry, botany, and medicine, and as editor of works by Vesalius and early Greek medical writers. Printing and bookselling in Leiden during Boerhaave's era are described. Images PMID:4596962

  19. Reversible Guest Exchange Mechanisms in Supramolecular Host-GuestAssemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Pluth, Michael D.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2006-09-01

    Synthetic chemists have provided a wide array of supramolecular assemblies able to encapsulate guest molecules. The scope of this tutorial review focuses on supramolecular host molecules capable of reversibly encapsulating polyatomic guests. Much work has been done to determine the mechanism of guest encapsulation and guest release. This review covers common methods of monitoring and characterizing guest exchange such as NMR, UV-VIS, mass spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and calorimetry and also presents representative examples of guest exchange mechanisms. The guest exchange mechanisms of hemicarcerands, cucurbiturils, hydrogen-bonded assemblies, and metal-ligand assemblies are discussed. Special attention is given to systems which exhibit constrictive binding, a motif common in supramolecular guest exchange systems.

  20. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Index. The journal depends entirely on its authors and referees and so I would like to thank them all for their work in 2010 and look forward to a continuing, successful collaboration in 2011. Refereeing The Nuclear Fusion editorial office understands how much effort is required of our referees. The Editorial Board decided that an expression of thanks to our most loyal referees is appropriate and so, since January 2005, we have been offering the top ten most active referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. This year, two of the top referees have reviewed four or more manuscripts in the period November 2009 to November 2010 and provided particularly detailed advice to the authors. We have excluded our Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in the last four years. Guest Editors' work on papers submitted to their special issues is also excluded from consideration. The following people have been selected: Osamu Naito, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Japan Masahiro Kobayashi, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan Duccio Testa, Lausanne Federal Polytechnic University, Switzerland Vladimir Pustovitov, Russian Research Centre, Kurchatov Insitute, Russia Christopher Holland, University of California at San Diego, USA Yuri Gribov, ITER International Organisation, Cadarache, France Eriko Jotaki, Kyushu University, Japan Sven Wiesen, Jülich Research Centre, Germany Viktor S. Marchenko, Ukraine National Academy of Sciences, Ukraine Richard Stephens, General Atomics, USA In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2010. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2010 Nuclear Fusion Award was J.E. Rice et al for the paper entitled 'Inter-machine comparison of

  1. Editors' Fall Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffert, Barbara; Heilbrun, Margaret; Kuzyk, Raya; Kim, Ann; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Burns, Ann; Williams, Wilda

    2008-01-01

    From the fall's cascade of great new books, "Library Journal's" editors select their favorites--a dark rendition of Afghan life, a look at the "self-esteem trap," a celebration of Brooklyn activism, and much more.

  2. ISTP CDF Skeleton Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chimiak, Reine; Harris, Bernard; Williams, Phillip

    2013-01-01

    Basic Common Data Format (CDF) tools (e.g., cdfedit) provide no specific support for creating International Solar-Terrestrial Physics/Space Physics Data Facility (ISTP/SPDF) standard files. While it is possible for someone who is familiar with the ISTP/SPDF metadata guidelines to create compliant files using just the basic tools, the process is error-prone and unreasonable for someone without ISTP/SPDF expertise. The key problem is the lack of a tool with specific support for creating files that comply with the ISTP/SPDF guidelines. There are basic CDF tools such as cdfedit and skeletoncdf for creating CDF files, but these have no specific support for creating ISTP/ SPDF compliant files. The SPDF ISTP CDF skeleton editor is a cross-platform, Java-based GUI editor program that allows someone with only a basic understanding of the ISTP/SPDF guidelines to easily create compliant files. The editor is a simple graphical user interface (GUI) application for creating and editing ISTP/SPDF guideline-compliant skeleton CDF files. The SPDF ISTP CDF skeleton editor consists of the following components: A swing-based Java GUI program, JavaHelp-based manual/ tutorial, Image/Icon files, and HTML Web page for distribution. The editor is available as a traditional Java desktop application as well as a Java Network Launching Protocol (JNLP) application. Once started, it functions like a typical Java GUI file editor application for creating/editing application-unique files.

  3. Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambaugh, Ronald D.

    2013-01-01

    reviewed five manuscripts in the period November 2011 to December 2012 and provided excellent advice to the authors. We have excluded our Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in recent years. The following people have been selected: Marina Becoulet, CEA-Cadarache, France Jiaqui Dong, Southwestern Institute of Physics, China Emiliano Fable, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Germany Ambrogio Fasoli, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Switzerland Eric Fredrickson, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, USA Manuel Garcia-Munoz, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Germany William Heidbrink, California University, USA Katsumi Ida, National Inst. For Fusion Science, Japan Peter Stangeby, Toronto University, Canada James Strachan, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, USA Victor Yavorskij, Ukraine National Academy of Sciences, Ukraine In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2012. Our thanks to them!

  4. MSSP Associate Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottershead, John E.

    2015-08-01

    MSSP is pleased to announce the appointment of three distinguished researchers, Professors Jerome Antoni, Spilios Fassois and Paolo Pennacchi, as Associate Editors. The broad coverage of MSSP research topics demands editorial expertise in several disciplines and the appointment of an editorial team of the highest quality is essential in maintaining and further enhancing the reputation of MSSP as a journal at the forefront of modern experimental mechanics that combines dynamic systems with measurement technology, signal processing and active control. Brief descriptions of the backgrounds and experience of the Associate Editors are provided in the following paragraphs.

  5. PANEL LIBRARY AND EDITOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raible, E.

    1994-01-01

    The Panel Library and Editor is a graphical user interface (GUI) builder for the Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation family. The toolkit creates "widgets" which can be manipulated by the user. Its appearance is similar to that of the X-Windows System. The Panel Library is written in C and is used by programmers writing user-friendly mouse-driven applications for the IRIS. GUIs built using the Panel Library consist of "actuators" and "panels." Actuators are buttons, dials, sliders, or other mouse-driven symbols. Panels are groups of actuators that occupy separate windows on the IRIS workstation. The application user can alter variables in the graphics program, or fire off functions with a click on a button. The evolution of data values can be tracked with meters and strip charts, and dialog boxes with text processing can be built. Panels can be stored as icons when not in use. The Panel Editor is a program used to interactively create and test panel library interfaces in a simple and efficient way. The Panel Editor itself uses a panel library interface, so all actions are mouse driven. Extensive context-sensitive on-line help is provided. Programmers can graphically create and test the user interface without writing a single line of code. Once an interface is judged satisfactory, the Panel Editor will dump it out as a file of C code that can be used in an application. The Panel Library (v9.8) and Editor (v1.1) are written in C-Language (63%) and Scheme, a dialect of LISP, (37%) for Silicon Graphics 4D series workstations running IRIX 3.2 or higher. Approximately 10Mb of disk space is required once compiled. 1.5Mb of main memory is required to execute the panel editor. This program is available on a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format for an IRIS, and includes a copy of XScheme, the public-domain Scheme interpreter used by the Panel Editor. The Panel Library Programmer's Manual is included on the distribution media. The Panel Library and

  6. WRR editor Ronald Cummings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-04-01

    It has been nearly a year since Ronald Cummings took over as policy sciences editor of Water Resources Research (WRR), and in that time he has worked to make the journal live up to its role as “an interdisciplinary journal integrating research in the social and natural sciences of water.” Cummings takes the “interdisciplinary” part seriously. “I'd like to see a much broader range of policy issues presented to readers,” he says. “I would hope it would then stimulate interchange between our colleagues concerning evolving issues of the '80s and '90s.”Cummings brings a solid background as a resource economist to his 4-year term as editor, which began last January and runs until December 1987. Cummings succeeds Jared Cohon as policy sciences editor. Stephen J. Burges is the WRR editor for hydrological, physical, chemical, and biological sciences. Now a Professor of Economics and Director of the Program in Natural Resources Economics at the University of New Mexico, Cummings is a past president of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. He has been a consultant in matters of water resources management, forestry management, and energy policy for more than a decade, working on projects in both the United States and Latin America. Since joining the faculty at New Mexico in 1975, he has, among other things, worked with engineers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in developing operation'management models for hot, dry rock geothermal systems.

  7. LDAP Browser/Editor

    SciTech Connect

    Gawor, Jarek; Laszewski, Gregor von

    2000-07-18

    The LDAP Browser/Editor provides a user-friendly Java-based interface to LDAP databases with tightly integrated browsing and editing capabilities. Entirely written in Java with help of the JFC (Swingset) and JNDI class libraries. It connects to any X.500, LDAP v2 and v3 servers and supports editing of multiple-value attributes.

  8. Editors' Spring Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    While they do not represent the rainbow of reading tastes American public libraries accommodate, Book Review editors are a wildly eclectic bunch. One look at their bedside tables and ereaders would reveal very little crossover. This article highlights an eclectic array of spring offerings ranging from print books to an audiobook to ebook apps. It…

  9. Editors' Fall Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilbrun, Margaret; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Kuzyk, Raya; Roncevic, Mirela; Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal's" review editors select fall titles readers won't want to miss--"Waiting on a Train: The Embattled Future of Passenger Rail Service" (James McCommons); "Happy" (Alex Lemon); "Free for All: Joe Papp, the Public, and the Greatest Theater Story Ever Told" (Kenneth Turan & Joseph Papp); "In My Father's Shadow: A Daughter Remembers…

  10. ION Configuration Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borgen, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    The configuration of ION (Inter - planetary Overlay Network) network nodes is a manual task that is complex, time-consuming, and error-prone. This program seeks to accelerate this job and produce reliable configurations. The ION Configuration Editor is a model-based smart editor based on Eclipse Modeling Framework technology. An ION network designer uses this Eclipse-based GUI to construct a data model of the complete target network and then generate configurations. The data model is captured in an XML file. Intrinsic editor features aid in achieving model correctness, such as field fill-in, type-checking, lists of valid values, and suitable default values. Additionally, an explicit "validation" feature executes custom rules to catch more subtle model errors. A "survey" feature provides a set of reports providing an overview of the entire network, enabling a quick assessment of the model s completeness and correctness. The "configuration" feature produces the main final result, a complete set of ION configuration files (eight distinct file types) for each ION node in the network.

  11. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-03-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents Comment on `Magnetic and electric field strengths of high voltage power lines and household appliances' José Luis Giordano Dept. de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales y Fluidos, CPSI, Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain Twins paradox S R Carson Norton College, Malton, North Yorkshire, UK On alternative ways of finding the ratio of specific heats of gases Tomas Ficker Physics Department, Technical University of Brno, Czech Republic

  12. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-01-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents Physics and history Arthur I Miller Department of Science & Technology Studies, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK Physics and history: a reply David Miller Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK Cathode rays, the electron and Thomson's discovery John Harris 33 Glentham Road, London SW13 9JD, UK Vectors: swallow them whole! David Wheeler Mahanakorn University of Technology, Bangkok, Thailand

  13. 77 FR 20522 - Airworthiness Directives; Lockheed Martin Corporation/Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... Corporation/Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... Martin Corporation/Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Model L-1011-385-1, L-1011-385-1-14, and L-1011... information identified in this AD, contact Lockheed Martin Corporation/Lockheed Martin Aeronautics...

  14. 76 FR 485 - Airworthiness Directives; Lockheed Martin Corporation/Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Model...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ... Corporation/Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Model 382, 382B, 382E, 382F, and 382G Airplanes AGENCY... Martin Corporation/Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company, Airworthiness Office, Dept. 6A0M, Zone 0252...) and adding the following new AD: Lockheed Martin Corporation/Lockheed Martin Aeronautics...

  15. 76 FR 48049 - Airworthiness Directives; Lockheed Martin Corporation/Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Model L...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... Corporation/Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Model L-1011 Series Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Martin Corporation/Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company, Airworthiness Office, Dept. 6A0M, Zone 0252... Martin Corporation/Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company: Docket No. FAA-2011-0723; Directorate...

  16. 75 FR 262 - Airworthiness Directives; Lockheed Martin Corporation/Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Model...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ...; Lockheed Martin Corporation/Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Model 382, 382B, 382E, 382F, and 382G.../Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Model 382, 382B, 382E, 382F, and 382G airplanes. This proposed AD would... identified in this proposed AD, contact Lockheed Martin Corporation/Lockheed Martin Aeronautics...

  17. COFS 1 Guest Investigator Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontana, Anthony; Wright, Robert L.

    1986-01-01

    The process for selecting guest investigators for participation in the Control of Flexible Structures (COFS)-1 program is described. Contracts and grants will be awarded in late CY87. A straw-man list of types of experiments and a distribution of the experiments has been defined to initiate definition of an experiments package which supports development and validation of control structures interaction technology. A schedule of guest investigator participation has been developed.

  18. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsch, Kornelius

    2012-01-01

    -review, with the aim to raise the quality of our content, three years later the number of published articles has remained stable at around 220 per year, whilst the number of downloads and citations to the journal has grown. In 2011, three topical issues have been published, on: (Nano)characterization of semiconductor materials and structures (Guest Editor: Alberta Bonanni, University of Linz, Austria) Flexible OLEDs and organic electronics (Guest Editors: Jang-Joo Kim, Min-Koo Han, Cambridge University, UK, and Yong-Young Noh, Seoul National University, Korea) From heterostructures to nanostructures: an 80th birthday tribute to Zhores Alferov (Guest Editor: Dieter Bimberg, Technische Universität Berlin, Germany) For the coming years, I will strongly support that the number of published topical issues will continue on the same level or slightly rise. SST has planned the publication of the following topical issues for 2012: Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors (Guest Editors: Jung Han, Yale University, USA, and Michael Kneissl, Technische Universität Berlin, Germany) Topological insulators (Guest Editors: Alberto Morpurgo, Université de Genève, Switzerland and Björn Trauzettel, Universität Basel, Switzerland) Atomic layer deposition (Guest Editor: Marek Godlewski, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland) 50th Anniversary of the laser diode (Guest Editors: Mike Adams, Univeristy of Essex, UK and Stephane Calvez, University of Strathclyde, UK) In addition to the traditional topics of SST, I as Editor-in-chief, strongly support and welcome the submission of manuscripts on organic semiconductors, topological insulators, semiconductor nanostructures for photovoltaic, solid-state lighting and energy harvesting, IC application beyond Moore's law and fundamental works on semiconductors based on abundant materials. I am extremely optimistic about the future of SST. I believe that we will raise the standards of acceptance while maintaining the short time from submission to

  19. New TOR editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    1984-04-01

    David A. Brooks, associate professor at Texas A&M University's oceanography department, has been appointed editor designate of The Oceanography Report (TOR). He succeeds Arnold L. Gordon of the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory. Gordon, who initiated TOR in September 1981, is the new president-elect of the AGU Ocean Sciences Section.Brooks, a physical oceanographer, has been at Texas A&M for 6 years. His research interests include waves and tides, the interaction of waves and currents, Gulf Stream fluctuations, and Gulf of Mexico and Gulf of Maine circulation. Before going to Texas A&M, Brooks was a research associate and graduate faculty member at North Carolina State University in Raleigh.

  20. EDITORIAL: Editor's Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    Since its first issue in 1965 Metrologia has had just three editors, a history of tenure which suggests that those who hold the post find in it sufficient to interest, occupy, challenge and amuse them. I see no reason to doubt that this happy circumstance will continue and look forward to my own period as editor with the intention of retaining, insofar as I am able to interpret them, the best traditions the journal has established so far. As I take up my editorial duties I have become aware that surrounding Metrologia there is a small community of authors, reviewers and readers on whose support the success of the journal entirely depends. It is a community in which the roles change daily with some of its members engaged, even simultaneously, as reader, reviewer and author. I am well aware that the goodwill extended to me as I enter this community is in no small part due the efforts of the outgoing editor, Dr Ralph Hudson, whose easy, engaging and courteous, yet firm, relationship with authors and reviewers emerges clearly from editorial correspondence. I thank him for that he has done and wish him an active and happy retirement. A short foray into the records of Metrologia shows - in the first editorial - that four main kinds of article were originally envisaged: research articles likely to contribute to progress in fundamental scientific measurements, reports of experiments or techniques of particular importance or originality in the area of secondary measurement, articles concerning the decisions of the Comité International des Poids et Mesures, and review articles. No balance was specified but a priority was assigned to articles dealing with fundamental metrology. Of the four categories, the first two represent the core of Metrologia's activity and largely determine its reputation as a publication. For this reason, editorial implementation of the policy set by the CIPM is mainly exercised through the operation of a reviewing system which is intentionally strict

  1. Microbial Properties Database Editor Tutorial

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Microbial Properties Database Editor (MPDBE) has been developed to help consolidate microbial-relevant data to populate a microbial database and support a database editor by which an authorized user can modify physico-microbial properties related to microbial indicators and pat...

  2. Editor's perspective on the ECSS dedicated issue on green tides in the Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiela, Ivan

    2015-09-01

    Most of us learned about the extraordinary macroalgal bloom in the Yellow Sea through press reports previous to the 2008 Olympic competition in China. I was made aware of the extensive research efforts on this remarkable case of human-prompted, large-scale environmental change by discussions with Dr. Dongyan Liu during the 2012 ECSA conference in Venice. It soon became evident that it would be of great interest to the international audience to bring together results from the many different research projects on different aspects of this topic, taking place in different institutions and agencies. I therefore suggested that a committee of guest editors for the Issue be organized. The guest editors were charged with inviting the many researchers involved in work on the different aspects of the "green tide" phenomenon to contribute articles, request reviews of the submissions, and with helping me in editing the submissions.

  3. Guest Chain ``Melting'' in Incommensurate Host-Guest Potassium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Emma; Munro, Keith; McMahon, Malcolm

    2013-06-01

    Upon increasing pressure the group-I elements transform from close-packed structures (bcc and fcc) to a series of low-symmetry complex structures. Residing in the middle of the group, potassium (K) has numerous structures in common with its neighbours, and, in fact, is remarkably structurally similar to sodium (Na) and rubidium (Rb). For example, the post-fcc transition in K is to a composite incommensurate host-guest structure (tI19), and the host structure of this phase is isostructural with that found in Na and Rb. Previously we have reported that below 16.7GPa, the Bragg peaks from the guest component of tI19-Rb broaden considerably, signalling a loss of the inter-chain correlation, or a ``melting'' of the chains. Furthermore, in tI19-Na above 125 GPa, the Bragg peaks from the guest component are also broadened, suggesting that the guest chains are also nearly ``melted.'' During studies of the melting curve of K, we observed that the guest peaks from tI19-K broaden dramatically on heating. Here we report single-crystal, quasi-single-crystal, and powder synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements of tI19-K to 50 GPa and 800 K, which allowed a detailed study of this chain ``melting'' transition. The order-disorder transition is clearly visible over a 30 GPa pressure range, and there are significant changes in the gradient of the phase boundary, which may be influenced by the nature of the guest structure. Furthermore, data extending the melting curve will also be presented.

  4. Bringing guest scientists to the university biology classroom via the web.

    PubMed

    Basiliko, Nathan; Gupta, Varun

    2015-08-01

    This commentary describes an initiative to bring national and international guest scientists to undergraduate and introductory graduate classrooms via web videoconferencing to facilitate interesting and effective research-informed teaching. Interactions center around both journal articles authored by the guests that are in line with weekly course lecture topics and on learning about the nature of academia in other parts of the world. Some particularly interesting perspectives from guests have come about by connecting with a journal editor-in-chief, a textbook author and with a scientist who shared a recently rejected manuscript and peer reviews. Beyond allowing students a unique behind-the-scenes look into how research questions are asked and answered, this initiative helps overcome the limited nature of a single instructor's research area to better complement the comprehensive scope of university courses.

  5. Martin Robison Delany (1812-1885): physician, black separatist, explorer, soldier.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, L.

    1989-01-01

    Martin Robison Delany's great contribution to American life and black history stems from his defiant blackness. He was America's first "Black Nationalist" and the intense embodiment of black pride. Ever changing in his career, he always identified with the black experience and its place in history. In an active life he was doctor, dentist, orator, editor, publisher, Harvard medical student, explorer, dabbler in Central American politics, army officer, and Reconstruction office seeker. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2695204

  6. Editors' message--Hydrogeology Journal in 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voss, Clifford; Olcott, Perry; Schneider, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogeology Journal appeared in six issues containing a total of 710 pages and 48 major articles, including 31 Papers and 14 Reports, as well as some Technical Notes and Book Reviews. The number of submitted manuscripts continues to increase. The final issue of 2003 also contained the annual volume index. Hydrogeology Journal (HJ) is an international forum for hydrogeology and related disciplines and authors in 2003 were from about 28 countries. Articles advanced hydrogeologic science and described hydrogeologic systems in many regions worldwide. These articles focused on a variety of general topics and on studies of hydrogeology in 24 countries: Afghanistan, Algeria, Argentina, Australia, Bangladesh, Belgium, Canada, Chile, China, Denmark, France, India, Italy, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Portugal, Russia, South Africa, Switzerland, Turkey, and U.S.A. The Guest Editor of the 2003 HJ theme issue on “Hydromechanics in Geology and Geotechnics”, Ove Stephansson, assembled a valuable collection of technical reviews and research papers from eminent authors on important aspects of the subject area.

  7. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in the last years. The following people have been selected: Marina Becoulet, CEA Cadarache, France Russell Doerner, University of California - San Diego, USA Emiliano Fable, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Germany Akihide Fujisawa, Kyushi University, Japan Gerardo Giruzzi, CEA Cadarache, France Grigory Kagan, LANL, USA Morten Lennholm, CCFE, UK Akinobu Matsuyama, NIFS, Japan Peter Stangeby, University of Toronto, Canada Leonid Zakharov, PPPL, USA In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2011. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2011 Nuclear Fusion Award is H. Urano, for the paper 'Dimensionless parameter dependence of H-mode pedestal width using hydrogen and deuterium plasmas in JT-60U' (Nucl. Fusion 48 045008). The award was presented at the Plasma Conference 2011 (Joint meeting of 28th JSPF Annual Meeting, The 29th Symposium on Plasma Processing, and Division of Plasma Physics, 2011 Autumn Meeting of The Physical Society of Japan). This is the sixth year that the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has awarded an annual prize to honour exceptional work published in Nuclear Fusion. IOP Publishing has generously made a contribution of $2500 to the award. The Nuclear Fusion Electronic Archive The journal's electronic archive has been online since the beginning of the year. The archive has been a roaring success and has contributed to the nearly 300 000 downloads of journal papers in 2011. The archive can be accessed via http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/page/Archive. It has direct links to 16 landmark papers, from authors such as Artsimovich and Mercier. The Nuclear Fusion office and IOP Publishing Just as the journal depends on the authors and referees, so its success is also

  8. Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassmeier, Klaus G.

    2008-01-01

    As of 2006, Astronomische Nachrichten -- Astronomical Notes has reached its all-time high regarding the ISI journal impact factor, with an impressive increase of 60% compared to 2005. We now rank at position 1,399, as shown in the statistics below. This is solely due to the increased number and quality of published articles: In 2006, Astronomische Nachrichten -- Astronomical Notes published 208 research papers and received 1,033 citations -- five citations per paper on average. In 2007, we have published 177 research papers, and one may be curious to see how their factor will develop. In co-operation with Wiley InterScience we have achieved an average o nline publication time of just 4.5 months. As in the past, publication in Astronomische Nachrichten -- Astronomical Notes} continues to be free of charge. Also, all articles of the first issue of each volume can be downloaded free of charge, as can all articles labelled ``Editor's Choice'', which are additionally featured with a color image on the front cover.

  9. Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassmeier, Klaus G.

    2009-01-01

    As of 2007, Astronomische Nachrichten -- Astronomical Notes has reached its all-time high regarding the ISI journal impact factor, with an impressive increase of 60% compared to 2005. We now rank at 1,461, as shown in the statistics below. This is solely due to the increased quality of the published articles: In 2006, Astronomische Nachrichten -- Astronomical Notes published 208 research papers and received 1,033 citations -- five citations per paper on average. In 2007, we have published 177 research papers with roughly the same number of citations. In co-operation with Wiley InterScience we have achieved an average online publication time of just 4.5 months. We hope that the year 2008 will be comparably prosperous. As in the past, publication in Astronomische Nachrichten -- Astronomical Notes continues to be free of charge. Also, all articles of the first issue of each volume can be downloaded free of charge, as can all articles labelled ``Editor's Choice'', which are additionally featured with a color image on the front cover.

  10. The EUVE Guest Observer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Anne B.

    1993-01-01

    Following the completion of the EUVE all-sky survey, the balance of the mission is being conducted as a Guest Observer Program, under which the astronomical community may propose to make pointed spectroscopic observations in the EUV. The spectrometer covers the wavelength range 70-760 A in three overlapping bands at a resolution of 100-400. Guest observers receive time-tagged photon event lists together with instrument and spacecraft housekeeping data. Data are delivered with software tools that run in the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility and are tailored for handling EUVE satellite data.

  11. STE - The Software Tools Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Software tools is an excellent book written by B. W. Kernighan and P. J. Plauger, published by Addison-Wesley. In it the authors discuss how to write programs that make good tools, and how to program well in the process. One of the tools they develop is a fairly powerful editor, written in Ratfor (a structured form of FORTRAN IV). This program has been implemented on the UCL Starlink VAX (with a few modifications and extensions) and is recommended as the editor to use on the VAX. This note gives a brief introduction to, and description of, the editor which has been abstracted from the book (which you are recommended to buy). There are some short command summary sections at the end of this note. After reading this note you may like to print these short files and use them for reference when using the editor.

  12. Remarks from a retiring Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansur, Louis K.

    2015-10-01

    At the end of 2015 I plan to step down as Chairman of Editors for the Journal of Nuclear Materials. I use the opportunity to express thoughts that have recurred to me but were muted in comparison with the day to day priorities of editorial work. The most important is that I hold the deepest gratitude for your enduring support- authors, reviewers, readers, the Advisory Editorial Board, and my fellow Editors.

  13. 32 CFR 705.23 - Guest cruises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Guest cruises. 705.23 Section 705.23 National... OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.23 Guest cruises. (a) General policy. (1) The embarkation of civilian guests in Navy ships is appropriate in the furtherance of continuing public awareness...

  14. 32 CFR 705.23 - Guest cruises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Guest cruises. 705.23 Section 705.23 National... OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.23 Guest cruises. (a) General policy. (1) The embarkation of civilian guests in Navy ships is appropriate in the furtherance of continuing public awareness...

  15. 32 CFR 705.23 - Guest cruises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Guest cruises. 705.23 Section 705.23 National... OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.23 Guest cruises. (a) General policy. (1) The embarkation of civilian guests in Navy ships is appropriate in the furtherance of continuing public awareness...

  16. The GLAST Guest Investigator Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.

    2007-01-01

    We provide an overview of the GLAST Guest Investigator (GI) program, which will support basic research relevant to the GLAST mission in yearly cycles beginning approximately two months after launch. Current details about the GLAST GI program will always be posted on the GLAST Science Support Center (GSSC) website: http://glast.gsfc.nasa.gov/ssc/.

  17. Electronegative Guests in CoSb3

    DOE PAGES

    Duan, Bo; Yang, Jiong; Salvador, James R.; ...

    2016-04-19

    Introducing guests into a host framework to form a so called inclusion compound can be used to design materials with new and fascinating functionalities. The vast majority of inclusion compounds have electropositive guests with neutral or negatively charged frameworks. Here, we show a series of electronegative guest filled skutterudites with inverse polarity. The strong covalent guest-host interactions observed for the electronegative group VIA guests, i.e., S and Se, feature a unique localized cluster vibration which significantly influences the lattice dynamics, together with the point-defect scattering caused by element substitutions, resulting in very low lattice thermal conductivity values. The findings ofmore » electronegative guests provide a new perspective for guest-filling in skutterudites, and the covalent filler/lattice interactions lead to an unusual lattice dynamics phenomenon which can be used for designing high-efficiency thermoelectric materials and novel functional inclusion compounds with open structures.« less

  18. The Words of Martin Luther King, Jr.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Today's Education, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Excerpts from speeches by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., are reprinted. Topics discussed include discrimination, the South, education, nonviolent resistance, poverty, economic opportunity, and world peace. (LH)

  19. Martin Schwarzschild (1912-1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, V.

    1997-12-01

    Martin Schwarzschild, the ASP Bruce Medalist for 1965, died on 10 April 1997. A refugee from Hitler's Germany who firmly embraced his adopted country, Schwarzschild not only solved a number of fundamental problems in stellar structure and evolution but also taught the rest of the astronomical community how to do so with his 1958 text, Structure and Evolution of the Stars. At about the time of his 1979 retirement, he turned to a completely different question of how to model spheroidal galaxies self-consistently and sent another generation of students and collaborators forward toward the still somewhat distant solution. It is impossible for anyone who ever interacted with Schwarzschild to remain entirely solemn when remembering him. (SECTION: Obituary)

  20. Updating Martin's global extinction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Richard

    2008-12-01

    Australia has been cited as a weak link in anthropogenic models of megafauna extinction, but recent work suggests instead that the evidence for rapid extinction shortly after human arrival is robust. The global model is revisited, based on the contention that late Pleistocene megafauna extinctions took place rapidly on islands, and some islands (such as Australia and the Americas) are much larger than others. Modern dating methods are increasingly able to refine chronologies, and careful scrutiny suggests that hundreds of dates should be deleted from archives. An updated summary of results from New Zealand, North America and Australia is presented, with a brief discussion on why temperate refugia offering protection from climate change ultimately did not work, strongly supporting the global extinction hypothesis pioneered by Paul Martin.

  1. [Medical history of Martin Luther].

    PubMed

    Takigami, Tadashi

    2011-12-01

    Martin Luther achieved great success in religious reformation, though he was said to have suffered from many kinds of diseases during his lifetime. Unfortunately, however, his medical history has never been reported in Japan. Since the second half of his thirties, he was suffering from severe constipation, causing hemorrhoids and anal prolapse. At the beginning of his forties he had vertigo, tinnitis and headaches, which were the signs of chronic purlent otitis media and ended in left otorrhea and pyorrhea of the left mastoiditis. Nearly at the same time, he started to suffer from anginal pain, colic and dysuria due to urinary uric acid stones, gout and left leg ulcer, which were all caused by metabolic syndromes. The last 1/3 of his life was affected by the shadow of diseases, and his religious activities were frequently disturbed. He died from myocardial infarction at the age 63, in February 1546.

  2. Connect the Book. Martin's Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2005-01-01

    In honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, this month's featured book is "Martin's Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." The book was written by Doreen Rappaport and illustrated by Bryan Collier (Jump at the Sun, 2001. 40p. ISBN 0786807148). This pictorial biography of the world-renowned civil rights leader has one of the most striking…

  3. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidström, Suzanne

    2012-04-01

    semiconductors and certain complex materials. His recent interests have extended his domain of activity towards the field of quantum chemistry as he is now actively engaged in electronic structure theory and its applications, and light-matter interactions, in particular. The other new member of our editorial team, Professor David Keen, comes highly recommended by Professor Stephen Lovesey, a long-standing friend and former colleague, who was, himself, a former condensed matter editor for the journal many years ago. Professor Keen works in structural disorder, typically studying at the boundary between crystalline, amorphous and liquid phases using neutron and x-ray diffraction and atomistic modelling. Three examples of the areas in which he conducts research are 'liquid-like' disorder in superionic crystalline materials, solid-state amorphization transitions and disorder-induced properties, such as unusual negative thermal expansion. Through working at these boundaries, and at the ISIS neutron scattering facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory for over 20 years, he has gained wide experience of all areas of structural condensed matter physics, encompassing crystallography and the structure and simulation of liquid and amorphous materials. Professor Keen has been a Guest Editor for a number of special issues of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. My thanks are extended to Stephen for his advice and for recommending such an enthusiastic new editor to join us. Until recently, the extensive review process engaged by Physica Scripta involved almost every manuscript being forwarded to several researchers for examination. The volume of material being received at present, however, makes this procedure untenable and undesirable, as it would be unfair on those researchers willing to participate in the peer review process to continue to review articles that are obviously destined for rejection. Thus, as a direct result of the increase in volume, a screening procedure has been

  4. Research Review: Magazine Editors and Editing Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolliffe, Lee

    1994-01-01

    Reviews and critiques literature in the subfield of magazine editing research, chiefly biographical studies of individual editors and various types of studies of editorial practices, including surveys, magazine content analyses, and close qualitative examinations of editors' relationships with others. (SR)

  5. SIERRA Editor v. 1.2.1

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Edward; Friedman-Hill, Ernest; Gibson, Marcus; Heinstein, Martin; & Whittford, Greg

    2010-03-24

    The SIERRA Editor is a syntax editor for text-based input decks for the SIERRA modeling and simulations codes. The SIERRA Editor provides color coded syntax, error checking, hyperlink navigation to referenced entities (e.g. functions and materials), and visual verification of mesh entity references (blocks, sidesets, and nodesets). The SIERRA Editor helps modeling and simulation analysts who use the SIERRA codes to produce syntactically correct input decks.

  6. Learning To Use a Text Editor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beal, Carole R.; Griffin, Elizabeth A.

    Designed to determine how quickly elementary school children can learn to use a text editor and what editing concepts are difficult for them to master, this study presents preliminary data on children's acquisition of text editor skills and on the kinds of revisions they accomplished with the text editor. Observations were made on a total of 25…

  7. Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2012-04-01

    Whilst travelling to Vienna to hand over the Editorship of Nuclear Fusion to Ron Stambaugh, I jotted down a few ideas to put in a farewell message. Somewhat unsurprisingly, I find them almost identical to the remarks that Chris Schueller made in handing over to me five years ago. Both of us served in this role for five years, which seems like a good timescale to replace presidents and editors alike; just to allow a fresh approach. In addition, since I have been directly involved in ITER, I have found it increasingly difficult, due to time pressure, to give the journal the attention that it deserves. Therefore, I am very pleased that Ron Stambaugh has agreed to take over as Editor. Not only does he bring the experience as a leading figure in the US fusion programme but, in addition, he has all the contacts, worldwide, from his leadership of the ITPA. I am completely assured that the journal is in a highly competent pair of hands. Such a farewell should not lack my heartfelt thanks to all of those who have made being Editor of Nuclear Fusion so enjoyable and stimulating; readership, authors, referees, the Editorial Board and the NF Office alike. I wish Ron all the best for his tenure and have offered such help and support as I am able to give.

  8. New Editor-in-Chief for Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillan, Rebecca

    2014-04-01

    We are delighted to announce that Professor Martin Evans of University of Edinburgh has been appointed as the new Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical. Martin Evans has been Editor of the Statistical Physics section of the journal since 2009. Prior to this, he served as a Board Member for the journal. His areas of research include statistical mechanics of nonequilibrium systems, phase transitions and scaling regimes in nonequilibrium statistical physics, glassy dynamics, phase transitions and ordering in driven diffusive systems, mass transport models, condensation models, zero range processes and exclusion processes. We very much look forward to working with Martin to continue to improve the journal's quality and interest to the readership. We would like to thank our outgoing Editor-in-Chief, Professor Murray Batchelor. Murray has worked hard and provided excellent guidance in improving the quality of the journal and the service that the journal provides to authors, referees and readers. During the last five years, we have raised the quality threshold for acceptance in the journal and currently reject over 70% of submissions. As a result, papers published in Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical are amongst the best in the field. We have also maintained and improved on our excellent receipt-to-first-decision times, which now average under 40 days for papers. With the help of Martin Evans and our distinguished Editorial Board, we will be working to further improve the quality of the journal whilst continuing to offer excellent services to our readers, authors and referees. We hope that you benefit from reading the journal. If you have any comments or questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at jphysa@iop.org. Rebecca Gillan Publisher

  9. 14. Historic American Buildings Survey, Plate # 54, 'Wohnhaus Martin, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Historic American Buildings Survey, Plate # 54, 'Wohnhaus Martin, Buffalo, N. Y. in Frank Lloyd Wright Ausgefuhrte Bauten (Berlin: Ernst Wasmuth A. G., 1911), MR. MARTIN'S SISTER'S HOUSE. - Darwin D. Martin House, 125 Jewett Parkway, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  10. Line-Editor Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Peter J.

    1989-01-01

    ZED editing program for DEC VAX computer simple, powerful line editor for text, program source code, and nonbinary data. Excels in processing of text by use of procedure files. Also features versatile search qualifiers, global changes, conditionals, online help, hexadecimal mode, space compression, looping, logical combinations of search strings, journaling, visible control characters, and automatic detabbing. Users of Cambridge implementation devised such ZED procedures as chess games, calculators, and programs for evaluating pi. Written entirely in C.

  11. A Syntax Directed Editor Environment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-05

    Much of his work was based on research by Bruce J. MacLennan of the Naval Postgraduate School (Ref 9) and two of Mister MacLennan’s former thesis...of Defense. Requirement for ADA Programming Suport | .:Environments - Stoneman. Washington, D.C. 1980. • .,6. Feiler , Peter H. and Raul Medina-Mora...1982. (AD-A053032). 9. MacLennan, Bruce J. The Automatic Generation of Syntax-Directed Editors. Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA., 1981. 10

  12. Climate change and forests in India: note from the guest editors

    SciTech Connect

    Ravindtranath, N.H.; Aaheim, Asbjporn

    2010-12-23

    Forestry is one of the most important sectors in the context of climate change. It lies at the center-stage of global mitigation and adaptation efforts. Yet, it is one of the least understood sectors, especially in tropical zones, which constitute a significant portion of the global forests. Recently, there has been a growing interest in forests in addressing global climate change. The IPCC Assessment Report 4 (2007) Chapters related to forests have highlighted the limited number of studies on the impact of climate change on forests at the regional, national and sub-national level, while policy makers need information at these scales. Further, implication of projected climate change on mitigation potential of forest sector is only briefly mentioned in the IPCC report, with limited literature to support the conclusions. India is one among the top ten nations in the world in terms of forest cover. It is also sixth among the tropical countries in terms of forested area. As IPCC Assessment Report 5 work is about to be initiated soon, studies on the impact of climate change on forests as well as the mitigation potential of the forest sector, particularly at regional and national level, will be of great interest to the scientific and policy community. In order to conserve the carbon stored in forests and to reduce CO2 emissions from the forest sector, the Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) mechanism is now being finalized under the UNFCCC. In this context, climate change itself may affect the mitigation potential significantly, and it is important to understand how vulnerable the forest carbon stock (biomass and soil) in the tropics is to the projected climate change. In fact, there is a need to study the impact of climate change on forests for all the major forested countries

  13. GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Testing inversion algorithms against experimental data: inhomogeneous targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkebir, Kamal; Saillard, Marc

    2005-12-01

    This special section deals with the reconstruction of scattering objects from experimental data. A few years ago, inspired by the Ipswich database [1 4], we started to build an experimental database in order to validate and test inversion algorithms against experimental data. In the special section entitled 'Testing inversion algorithms against experimental data' [5], preliminary results were reported through 11 contributions from several research teams. (The experimental data are free for scientific use and can be downloaded from the web site.) The success of this previous section has encouraged us to go further and to design new challenges for the inverse scattering community. Taking into account the remarks formulated by several colleagues, the new data sets deal with inhomogeneous cylindrical targets and transverse electric (TE) polarized incident fields have also been used. Among the four inhomogeneous targets, three are purely dielectric, while the last one is a `hybrid' target mixing dielectric and metallic cylinders. Data have been collected in the anechoic chamber of the Centre Commun de Ressources Micro-ondes in Marseille. The experimental setup as well as the layout of the files containing the measurements are presented in the contribution by J-M Geffrin, P Sabouroux and C Eyraud. The antennas did not change from the ones used previously [5], namely wide-band horn antennas. However, improvements have been achieved by refining the mechanical positioning devices. In order to enlarge the scope of applications, both TE and transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations have been carried out for all targets. Special care has been taken not to move the target under test when switching from TE to TM measurements, ensuring that TE and TM data are available for the same configuration. All data correspond to electric field measurements. In TE polarization the measured component is orthogonal to the axis of invariance. Contributions A Abubakar, P M van den Berg and T M Habashy, Application of the multiplicative regularized contrast source inversion method TM- and TE-polarized experimental Fresnel data, present results of profile inversions obtained using the contrast source inversion (CSI) method, in which a multiplicative regularization is plugged in. The authors successfully inverted both TM- and TE-polarized fields. Note that this paper is one of only two contributions which address the inversion of TE-polarized data. A Baussard, Inversion of multi-frequency experimental data using an adaptive multiscale approach, reports results of reconstructions using the modified gradient method (MGM). It suggests that a coarse-to-fine iterative strategy based on spline pyramids. In this iterative technique, the number of degrees of freedom is reduced, which improves robustness. The introduction, during the iterative process, of finer scales inside areas of interest leads to an accurate representation of the object under test. The efficiency of this technique is shown via comparisons between the results obtained with the standard MGM and those from an adaptive approach. L Crocco, M D'Urso and T Isernia, Testing the contrast source extended Born inversion method against real data: the case of TM data, assume that the main contribution in the domain integral formulation comes from the singularity of Green's function, even though the media involved are lossless. A Fourier Bessel analysis of the incident and scattered measured fields is used to derive a model of the incident field and an estimate of the location and size of the target. The iterative procedure lies on a conjugate gradient method associated with Tikhonov regularization, and the multi-frequency data are dealt with using a frequency-hopping approach. In many cases, it is difficult to reconstruct accurately both real and imaginary parts of the permittivity if no prior information is included. M Donelli, D Franceschini, A Massa, M Pastorino and A Zanetti, Multi-resolution iterative inversion of real inhomogeneous targets, adopt a multi-resolution strategy, which, at each step, adaptive discretization of the integral equation is performed over an irregular mesh, with a coarser grid outside the regions of interest and tighter sampling where better resolution is required. Here, this procedure is achieved while keeping the number of unknowns constant. The way such a strategy could be combined with multi-frequency data, edge preserving regularization, or any technique also devoted to improve resolution, remains to be studied. As done by some other contributors, the model of incident field is chosen to fit the Fourier Bessel expansion of the measured one. A Dubois, K Belkebir and M Saillard, Retrieval of inhomogeneous targets from experimental frequency diversity data, present results of the reconstruction of targets using three different non-regularized techniques. It is suggested to minimize a frequency weighted cost function rather than a standard one. The different approaches are compared and discussed. C Estatico, G Bozza, A Massa, M Pastorino and A Randazzo, A two-step iterative inexact-Newton method for electromagnetic imaging of dielectric structures from real data, use a two nested iterative methods scheme, based on the second-order Born approximation, which is nonlinear in terms of contrast but does not involve the total field. At each step of the outer iteration, the problem is linearized and solved iteratively using the Landweber method. Better reconstructions than with the Born approximation are obtained at low numerical cost. O Feron, B Duchêne and A Mohammad-Djafari, Microwave imaging of inhomogeneous objects made of a finite number of dielectric and conductive materials from experimental data, adopt a Bayesian framework based on a hidden Markov model, built to take into account, as prior knowledge, that the target is composed of a finite number of homogeneous regions. It has been applied to diffraction tomography and to a rigorous formulation of the inverse problem. The latter can be viewed as a Bayesian adaptation of the contrast source method such that prior information about the contrast can be introduced in the prior law distribution, and it results in estimating the posterior mean instead of minimizing a cost functional. The accuracy of the result is thus closely linked to the prior knowledge of the contrast, making this approach well suited for non-destructive testing. J-M Geffrin, P Sabouroux and C Eyraud, Free space experimental scattering database continuation: experimental set-up and measurement precision, describe the experimental set-up used to carry out the data for the inversions. They report the modifications of the experimental system used previously in order to improve the precision of the measurements. Reliability of data is demonstrated through comparisons between measurements and computed scattered field with both fundamental polarizations. In addition, the reader interested in using the database will find the relevant information needed to perform inversions as well as the description of the targets under test. A Litman, Reconstruction by level sets of n-ary scattering obstacles, presents the reconstruction of targets using a level sets representation. It is assumed that the constitutive materials of the obstacles under test are known and the shape is retrieved. Two approaches are reported. In the first one the obstacles of different constitutive materials are represented in a single level set, while in the second approach several level sets are combined. The approaches are applied to the experimental data and compared. U Shahid, M Testorf and M A Fiddy, Minimum-phase-based inverse scattering algorithm applied to Institut Fresnel data, suggest a way of extending the use of minimum phase functions to 2D problems. In the kind of inverse problems we are concerned with, it consists of separating the contributions from the field and from the contrast in the so-called contrast source term, through homomorphic filtering. Images of the targets are obtained by combination with diffraction tomography. Both pre-processing and imaging are thus based on the use of Fourier transforms, making the algorithm very fast compared to classical iterative approaches. It is also pointed out that the design of appropriate filters remains an open topic. C Yu, L-P Song and Q H Liu, Inversion of multi-frequency experimental data for imaging complex objects by a DTA CSI method, use the contrast source inversion (CSI) method for the reconstruction of the targets, in which the initial guess is a solution deduced from another iterative technique based on the diagonal tensor approximation (DTA). In so doing, the authors combine the fast convergence of the DTA method for generating an accurate initial estimate for the CSI method. Note that this paper is one of only two contributions which address the inversion of TE-polarized data. Conclusion In this special section various inverse scattering techniques were used to successfully reconstruct inhomogeneous targets from multi-frequency multi-static measurements. This shows that the database is reliable and can be useful for researchers wanting to test and validate inversion algorithms. From the database, it is also possible to extract subsets to study particular inverse problems, for instance from phaseless data or from `aspect-limited' configurations. Our future efforts will be directed towards extending the database in order to explore inversions from transient fields and the full three-dimensional problem. Acknowledgments The authors would like to thank the Inverse Problems board for opening the journal to us, and offer profound thanks to Elaine Longden-Chapman and Kate Hooper for their help in organizing this special section.

  14. Abbreviations, acronyms, and initialisms frequently used by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc.. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.T.

    1994-09-01

    Guidelines are given for using abbreviations, acronyms, and initialisms (AAIs) in documents prepared by US Department of Energy facilities managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The more than 10,000 AAIs listed represent only a small portion of those found in recent documents prepared by contributing editors of the Information Management Services organization of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This document expands on AAIs listed in the Document Preparation Guide and is intended as a companion document

  15. Donald R. Nielsen New WRR Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robb, David W.

    Bridging the gap between the disciplines of engineering and agriculture is a major goal for Water Resources Research (WRR), says Donald R. Nielsen, who was appointed to a 4-year term as WRR editor, effective January 1, 1985. Nielsen succeeds Stephen J. Burges as the WRR editor for hydrology, physical, chemical, and biological sciences. Ronald G. Cummings, at the University of New Mexico, is the WRR editor for policy sciences, including economics, systems analysis, sociology, and law.

  16. 32 CFR 705.23 - Guest cruises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... business, industry, science, education, and labor to the operation of the U.S. Navy, in order that they may... exposure to the Navy. Guests should include persons who have direct impact on recruiting, such as...

  17. EDITORIAL: Editorial from the new Editor-in-Chief for 2014 Editorial from the new Editor-in-Chief for 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, W. G.

    2014-02-01

    from receipt-to-first decision of a paper is only 50 days. In 2014 we will continue to support the low-temperature plasma physics community through the publication of special topical issues. Those already scheduled for next year are: Transport in B-fields in low temperature plasmas, Guest Editors: Rod Boswell and Igor D Kaganovich Spots and patterns on electrodes of gas discharges, Guest Editors: Mikhail S Benilov and Ulrich Kogelschatz Interaction of electromagnetic waves with low temperature plasmas, Guest Editors: Osamu Sakai and Shahid Rauf We will also launch a new feature: LabTalks, a way in which our authors can showcase their group's work and communicate their research published in PSST to a wider audience. Full details are on the PSST website. Along with the leadership team, made up of Associate Editors, Anne, Nick and Richard and the great PSST staff at Institute of Physics Publishing, led by Alice Malhador, I will strive to grow, improve and deliver a journal which reflects the excellent science from the low-temperature plasma community. We hope we can continue to count on your vital support as authors and referees.

  18. New Horizons Pluto Flyby Guest Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, M.; Turney, D.; Fisher, S.; Carr, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    On July 14, 2015, after 9.5 years of cruise, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft flew past the Pluto system to gather first images humankind had ever seen on Pluto and its five moons. While much has been discovered about the Pluto system since New Horizons launch in 2006, the system has never been imaged at high resolution and anticipation of the "First Light" of the Pluto system had been anticipated by planetary enthusiasts for decades. The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), which built and operates New Horizons, was the focal point for gathering three distinct groups: science and engineering team members; media and public affairs representatives; and invited public, including VIP's. Guest operations activities were focused on providing information primarily to the invited public and VIP's. High level objectives for the Guest Operations team was set to entertain and inform the general public, offer media reaction shots, and to deconflict activities for the guests from media activities wherever possible. Over 2000 people arrived at APL in the days surrounding closest approach for guest, science or media operations tracks. Reaction and coverage of the Guest Operations events was universally positive and global in impact: iconic pictures of the auditorium waving flags during the moment of closest approach were published in media outlets on every continent. Media relations activities ensured coverage in all key media publications targeted for release, such as the New York Times, Science, Le Monde, and Nature. Social and traditional media coverage of the events spanned the globe. Guest operations activities are designed to ensure that a guest has a memorable experience and leaves with a lifelong memory of the mission and their partnership in the activity. Results, lessons learned, and other data from the New Horizons guest operations activity will be presented and analyzed.

  19. Examining Editor-Author Ethics: Real-World Scenarios from Interviews with Three Journal Editors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amare, Nicole; Manning, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Those who submit manuscripts to academic journals may benefit from a better understanding of how editors weigh ethics in their interactions with authors. In an attempt to ascertain and to understand editors' ethics, we interviewed 3 current academic journal editors of technical and/or business communication journals. We asked them about the…

  20. PROGRAMMABLE DISPLAY PUSHBUTTON LEGEND EDITOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busquets, A. M.

    1994-01-01

    The Programmable Display Pushbutton (PDP) is a pushbutton device available from Micro Switch which has a programmable 16 x 35 matrix of LEDs on the pushbutton surface. Any desired legends can be displayed on the PDPs, producing user-friendly applications which greatly reduce the need for dedicated manual controls. Because the PDP can interact with the operator, it can call for the correct response before transmitting its next message. It is both a simple manual control and a sophisticated programmable link between the operator and the host system. The Programmable Display Pushbutton Legend Editor, PDPE, is used to create the LED displays for the pushbuttons. PDPE encodes PDP control commands and legend data into message byte strings sent to a Logic Refresh and Control Unit (LRCU). The LRCU serves as the driver for a set of four PDPs. The legend editor (PDPE) transmits to the LRCU user specified commands that control what is displayed on the LED face of the individual pushbuttons. Upon receiving a command, the LRCU transmits an acknowledgement that the message was received and executed successfully. The user then observes the effect of the command on the PDP displays and decides whether or not to send the byte code of the message to a data file so that it may be called by an applications program. The PDPE program is written in FORTRAN for interactive execution. It was developed on a DEC VAX 11/780 under VMS. It has a central memory requirement of approximately 12800 bytes. It requires four Micro Switch PDPs and two RS-232 VAX 11/780 terminal ports. The PDPE program was developed in 1985.

  1. [Report of the editors, 2011].

    PubMed

    García Puig, J; Gaspar Alonso-Vega, G; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2012-01-01

    The editors of Revista Clínica Española (Rev Clin Esp) inform on their editorial activity during the last 12 months (November 2010 to October 2011): (a) Objectives and attainments during 2011, (b) editorial activity, and (c) objectives for 2012. In 2011 we have updated the editorial algorithm (revision by the responsible editor of all manuscripts sent to peer review and incorporated an «editorial coordinator»), we have renovated two advise facilities (editorial and scientific committees), we have created a new section called «monthly e-image», and we have promoted Rev Clin Esp annual prizes. From the first January 2010 to 31(st) October 2011 we handled 422 manuscripts (42,2 manuscripts per month, higher than the 2010 figure of 40,4 manuscript/month). Overall we have accepted 26% (originals, 16%). We asked for 343 revisions and obtained 231 (67%). Seventy two percent of the reviewers sent their comments in less than two weeks. The mean time taken to accept or reject a given manuscript has been 26 days. The mean time taken since a manuscript is received to publication (october, novembrer and december issues) has dropped from 334 days in 2010 to 254 in 2011 (24% decrease). The collaboration with the working groups has reported about 2 published manuscripts per issue. Our objectives for 2012 are: (a) to improve the editorial process; (b) main article translation into English; (c) improve some sections (i.e. clinical conference); (d) estimulate working groups collaboration; and (e) improve continued medical education. Revista Clínica Española is an open forum for all internal medicine specialists. We all have the responsibility to make our journal, each day, better.

  2. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Plasmaphysik, Germany) V. Philipps (Forschungszentrum Juelich, Germany) S. Zweben (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, USA) Y. Hirano (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan) Y. Takase (Tokyo University, Japan) In addition there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2008. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2007 award was Clemente Angioni for the paper entitled `Density response to central electron heating: theoretical investigations and experimental observations in ASDEX Upgrade' (Nucl. Fusion 44 8277-845). The winner of the 2008 Nuclear Fusion award is Todd Evans et al for the paper `Suppression of large edge localized modes with edge resonant magnetic fields in high confinement DIII-D plasmas' (Nucl. Fusion 45 595-607). The awards were presented by the IAEA Deputy Director General, Werner Burkart, and the Chairman of the Board of Editors, Mitsuru Kikuchi, on 16 October 2008 at the 22nd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Geneva, Switzerland. Given the topicality of these papers for the ITER design, it is a matter of pride to the journal that the work should be published in Nuclear Fusion. Reviews Like many who have worked for a long time in the field, I still make use of Nuclear Fusion Reviews that go back 20 or 30 years. It is particularly useful, therefore, that the Board of Editors has been working to re-activate the review programme. The first fruits will appear in this issue, in the form of `A review of zonal flow experiments', by Akihide Fujisawa. The special procedures for Reviews should be noted: most specifically that they should normally be commissioned by the Board of Editors. However, not only is the Board of Editors working on a programme but I am sure that they would be pleased to consider suggestions for review subjects. Letters The reputation of Nuclear

  3. Editorial Commentary: Editor's Conflict of Interest.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-09-01

    The Editor-in-chief has recused himself from industry consulting, which he performed before assuming the position, and returned related royalties and divested related stock options, in order to mitigate against conflict-of-interest. The Editor discloses affiliation with an institution that receives support from diverse industry partners in support of research and education.

  4. Linguistic Prescriptivism in Letters to the Editor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukac, Morana

    2016-01-01

    The public's concern with the fate of the standard language has been well documented in the history of the complaint tradition. The print media have for centuries featured letters to the editor on questions of language use. This study examines a corpus of 258 language-related letters to the editor published in the English-speaking print media. By…

  5. Martin Brasier (1947-2014): astrobiologist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Sean; Cockell, Charles

    2015-10-01

    How did life on Earth begin? What does the search for life in the distant past tell us about the search for life on distant planets? How should the most ancient and ambiguous putative biosignatures be critically evaluated? How did the Earth-life system evolve through the dramatic upheavals of the Precambrian-Cambrian boundary? When and why did eukaryotes begin to produce mineralized skeletons? These are among the astrobiological questions to which palaeobiologist Martin Brasier made profound contributions in a career spanning nearly half a century and tragically cut short late last year. Here, we summarize and celebrate Martin's contributions to astrobiology.

  6. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, January 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Paul G.; And Others

    The document presents biographical material, bibliographies, and learning activities relating to Martin Luther King, Jr. The objective is to provide teachers with guidance in commemorating King's birthday. The document is presented in six sections. Section I consists of a copy of the Nebraska state law requiring celebration of King's birthday.…

  7. Martin Trow on British Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Harold

    2009-01-01

    For almost half a century from the early 1960s Martin Trow was the most persistent American commentator on British higher education. He analysed the main reports from Robbins to Dearing, developed and applied a language for discussing common problems amongst different systems, and focused on the uncertain progress of the UK to mass higher…

  8. Rejoinder to Guterman, Martin, and Kopp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, James T.

    2012-01-01

    In their reply to the author's keystone article (Hansen, 2012), Guterman, Martin, and Kopp (2012) charge that the author's integrative framework was not sufficiently integrative. They also argue that his proposal results in logical contradictions and the mind-body problem. The author responds by noting that his proposal fully integrates the…

  9. Classical Greece, Black Historians, and Martin Bernal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squeri, Lawrence

    1989-01-01

    Explores the work of Martin Bernal in tracing the roots of Greek civilization to Africa. Discusses the Ancient, Aryan, and Revised Ancient models for explaining Greek origins. Observes that Bernal's thesis comes at a time of increased interest in non-Western history. Suggests that views of ancient Greece will never be the same. (SG)

  10. Facilitating guest transport in clathrate hydrates by tuning guest-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Moudrakovski, Igor L; Udachin, Konstantin A; Alavi, Saman; Ratcliffe, Christopher I; Ripmeester, John A

    2015-02-21

    The understanding and eventual control of guest molecule transport in gas hydrates is of central importance for the efficient synthesis and processing of these materials for applications in the storage, separation, and sequestration of gases and natural gas production. Previously, some links have been established between dynamics of the host water molecules and guest-host hydrogen bonding interactions, but direct observation of transport in the form of cage-to-cage guest diffusion is still lacking. Recent calculations have suggested that pairs of different guest molecules in neighboring cages can affect guest-host hydrogen bonding and, therefore, defect injection and water lattice motions. We have chosen two sets of hydrate guest pairs, tetrahydrofuran (THF)-CO2 and isobutane-CO2, that are predicted to enhance or to diminish guest-host hydrogen bonding interactions as compared to those in pure CO2 hydrate and we have studied guest dynamics in each using (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. In addition, we have obtained the crystal structure of the THF-CO2 sII hydrate using the combined single crystal X-ray diffraction and (13)C NMR powder pattern data and have performed molecular dynamics-simulation of the CO2 dynamics. The NMR powder line shape studies confirm the enhanced and delayed dynamics for the THF and isobutane containing hydrates, respectively, as compared to those in the CO2 hydrate. In addition, from line shape studies and 2D exchange spectroscopy NMR, we observe cage-to-cage exchange of CO2 molecules in the THF-CO2 hydrate, but not in the other hydrates studied. We conclude that the relatively rapid intercage guest dynamics are the result of synergistic guest A-host water-guest B interactions, thus allowing tuning of the guest transport properties in the hydrates by choice of the appropriate guest molecules. Our experimental value for inter-cage hopping is slower by a factor of 10(6) than a published calculated value.

  11. [2009 report from the editors].

    PubMed

    García Puig, J; Gaspar Alonso-Vega, G; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2010-01-01

    The editors of the Rev Clin Esp present the editorial course of action of the journal over the past year. We have up-dated the design of the journal, its contents (sections) and computerized the editorial process. We processed 467 manuscripts and made an editorial decision on 402 of them between November 2008 and October 2009. A total of 92 manuscripts (23%) were accepted. Fifteen (13%) out of the 119 original articles for which the editorial process was completed were accepted. Our goal for the year 2010 is to make the journal available on the Internet for all those who are subscribers to the Rev Clin Esp as well as for internal medicine residents (for which they must be members of each regional society). Other objectives of the editorial team are to edit the E-cases, for the journal to be a continuing education tool and that the coordinators of the work groups develop a monographic number at least once every two years. These actions aim to increase the impact factor and the quality of the Rev Clin Esp, official publication of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine and of Spanish-speaking internal medicine physicians.

  12. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashinin, Pavel P.

    2013-01-01

    Dear readers, contributors, and members of the world laser physics community. It is a great honour for us to introduce to you our new publishing partner, IOP Publishing, a subsidiary of the Institute of Physics, United Kingdom. IOP Publishing is a world renowned authority in producing journals, magazines, websites and services that enable researchers and research organizations to present their work to a world-wide audience. Laser Physics, the first English-language scientific journal in Russia, was founded in 1990 on the initiative of Alexander M Prokhorov, a pioneer and leader in laser physics research. Professor Prokhorov served as the first Editor-in-Chief of the journal until 2002. We are proud that it is our 23rd year of publishing Laser Physics and our 10th year of publishing Laser Physics Letters. We would like to honour the memory of our friend, late Professor Igor Yevseyev, whose enthusiasm and unwavering dedication to our journals contributed most significantly to their success. It was initially his idea in 2011 to approach IOP with a partnership proposal. We deeply regret that he is no longer with us as we enter this productive alliance. Now, in partnership with IOP, we are turning a new page in providing world-wide access to the cutting-edge research results in our journals, serving our well established global audience. We see new horizons opening for our journals for years to come and hope that our readers share our enthusiasm and aspirations. Please accept our best wishes for all your new scientific endeavors in the exciting field of laser physics.

  13. Linking microscopic guest properties to macroscopic observables in clathrate hydrates: Guest-host hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, Saman; Susilo, Robin; Ripmeester, John A.

    2009-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to compare microscopic structures and guest dynamics to macroscopic properties in structure II clathrate hydrates with cyclopentane, tetrahydrofuran (THF), 1,3-dioxolane, tetrahydropyran (THP), and p-dioxane as guests. Significant differences are observed between structural parameters and rotational dynamics for the different guests. The simulations show the formation of guest-host hydrogen bonds between the ether oxygen atoms of THF and THP and the cage water hydrogen atoms of the clathrate but the absence of similar hydrogen bonds in the clathrate hydrates of the other guests on the time scale of the calculations. This guest-host hydrogen bonding leads to the formation of Bjerrum L-defects in the clathrate water lattice where two adjacent water molecules have no covalently bonded hydrogen atom between them. Unlike Bjerrum defects of ice lattices, these guest-induced L-defects are not accompanied by the formation of a D-defect at an adjacent site in the water lattice. At the simulation temperature of 200 K, the guest-water hydrogen bonds in the THF clathrate are short lived (lifetime less than 1 ps) but in the THP they are longer lived (a minimum of 100 ps). A van't Hoff plot for the probability of defect formation in THF as a function of temperature gives an activation barrier of ˜8.3 kJ/mol for guest-host defect formation in the THF clathrate. The consequences of the defect formation on the thermal expansivity, isothermal compressibility, dipole-dipole correlation function, and mechanical stability of the clathrate are discussed.

  14. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey, Plate # 52, 'Wohnhaus Martin, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey, Plate # 52, 'Wohnhaus Martin, Buffalo, N. Y. Westseite und Einzelheit der Westseite' in Frank Lloyd Wright Ausgefuhrte Bauten (Berlin: Ernst Wasmuth A. G., 1911). - Darwin D. Martin House, 125 Jewett Parkway, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  15. Facilitating guest transport in clathrate hydrates by tuning guest-host interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Moudrakovski, Igor L.; Udachin, Konstantin A.; Ratcliffe, Christopher I.; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John A.

    2015-02-21

    The understanding and eventual control of guest molecule transport in gas hydrates is of central importance for the efficient synthesis and processing of these materials for applications in the storage, separation, and sequestration of gases and natural gas production. Previously, some links have been established between dynamics of the host water molecules and guest-host hydrogen bonding interactions, but direct observation of transport in the form of cage-to-cage guest diffusion is still lacking. Recent calculations have suggested that pairs of different guest molecules in neighboring cages can affect guest-host hydrogen bonding and, therefore, defect injection and water lattice motions. We have chosen two sets of hydrate guest pairs, tetrahydrofuran (THF)-CO{sub 2} and isobutane-CO{sub 2}, that are predicted to enhance or to diminish guest–host hydrogen bonding interactions as compared to those in pure CO{sub 2} hydrate and we have studied guest dynamics in each using {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. In addition, we have obtained the crystal structure of the THF-CO{sub 2} sII hydrate using the combined single crystal X-ray diffraction and {sup 13}C NMR powder pattern data and have performed molecular dynamics-simulation of the CO{sub 2} dynamics. The NMR powder line shape studies confirm the enhanced and delayed dynamics for the THF and isobutane containing hydrates, respectively, as compared to those in the CO{sub 2} hydrate. In addition, from line shape studies and 2D exchange spectroscopy NMR, we observe cage-to-cage exchange of CO{sub 2} molecules in the THF-CO{sub 2} hydrate, but not in the other hydrates studied. We conclude that the relatively rapid intercage guest dynamics are the result of synergistic guest A–host water–guest B interactions, thus allowing tuning of the guest transport properties in the hydrates by choice of the appropriate guest molecules. Our experimental value for inter-cage hopping is slower by a factor of 10

  16. Microporous sensor: gas sorption, guest exchange and guest-dependant luminescence of metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Sapchenko, Sergey A; Samsonenko, Denis G; Dybtsev, Danil N; Melgunov, Maxim S; Fedin, Vladimir P

    2011-03-14

    Zn(II)-containing metal-organic framework (MOF) [Zn(4)(dmf)(ur)(2)(ndc)(4)] (ndc(2-) = 2,6-naphtalenedicarboxylate, ur = urotropin, dmf = N,N'-dimethylformamide) was synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography and gas sorption analysis. Host MOF retains its crystallinity after guest removal and exchange. Single-crystal to single-crystal formation of different host-guest systems with benzene and ferrocene was investigated. Interesting guest-depended luminescence properties of the porous host framework were observed.

  17. 58. VIEW FROM WEST OF ENTRANCE TO SECOND FLOOR GUEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    58. VIEW FROM WEST OF ENTRANCE TO SECOND FLOOR GUEST TERRACE WITH PLANTER IN BACKGROUND. GUEST TERRACE IS TO THE RIGHT OF PHOTOGRAPH. - Fallingwater, State Route 381 (Stewart Township), Ohiopyle, Fayette County, PA

  18. Encapsulated guest-host dynamics: guest rotational barriers and tumbling as a probe of host interior cavity space.

    PubMed

    Mugridge, Jeffrey S; Szigethy, Géza; Bergman, Robert G; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2010-11-17

    The supramolecular host assembly [Ga(4)L(6)](12-) (1; L = 1,5-bis[2,3-dihydroxybenzamido]naphthalene) encapsulates cationic guest molecules within its hydrophobic cavity and catalyzes a variety of chemical transformations within its confined interior space. Despite the well-defined structure, the host ligand framework and interior cavity are very flexible and 1 can accommodate a wide range of guest shapes and sizes. These observations raise questions about the steric effects of confinement within 1 and how encapsulation fundamentally changes the motions of guest molecules. Here we examine the motional dynamics (guest bond rotation and tumbling) of encapsulated guest molecules to probe the steric consequences of encapsulation within host 1. Encapsulation is found to increase the Ph-CH(2) bond rotational barrier for ortho-substituted benzyl phosphonium guest molecules by 3 to 6 kcal/mol, and the barrier is found to depend on both guest size and shape. The tumbling dynamics of guests encapsulated in 1 were also investigated, and here it was found that longer, more prolate-shaped guest molecules tumble more slowly in the host cavity than larger but more spherical guest molecules. The prolate guests reduce the host symmetry from T to C(1) in solution at low temperatures, and the distortion of the host framework that is in part responsible for this symmetry reduction is observed directly in the solid state. Analysis of guest motional dynamics is a powerful method for interrogating host structure and fundamental host-guest interactions.

  19. Sir William Wilde: an enlightened editor.

    PubMed

    O'Doherty, M

    2016-05-01

    This paper examines Sir William Wilde's peculiar genius as editor, his contribution to the Irish Journal of Medical Science in ensuring its endurance and making it a treasure-house of the history of medicine in Ireland.

  20. Richard Gilbert, Reporter and Assistant City Editor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Larry

    1988-01-01

    Looks at the experiences of Richard Gilbert, reporter and assistant editor for "The Herald Telephone," a daily newspaper in Bloomington, Indiana, and discusses Gilbert's suggested guidelines for high school journalism advisers. (MS)

  1. Report of the editors, 2014.

    PubMed

    García Puig, J; Gaspar Alonso-Vega, G; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2015-01-01

    The editors of Revista Clínica Española(Rev Clin Esp) inform on their editorial activity during the last 12 months: (a) Objectives and attainments in 2014, (b) Editorial activity, 2014, and (c) 2013 impact factor. In 2014 we achieved the 5 planned objectives. We have published the 9 programmed issues and 103% of the planned papers according to the usual fixed sections. We emphasize the publication of 29 editorials, 21 of which are signed by prestigious foreign authors. From the first January to the 30th September 2014 we received 421 manuscripts (46.8 manuscripts per month), a slight lower figure to that obtained in 2013 (50.9 manuscripts per month). The acceptance rate of the 404 manuscripts whose editorial process has been concluded was 32.3% (originals, 22.4%). We asked for 315 revisions to 240 reviewers and we received 53.3% revisions in less than two weeks (10.4 days). The mean time to adopt an editorial decision for all manuscripts («accepted»/«rejected») has been 18,3 (less than half than in 2009). For «originals» this figure has dropped from 56,6 days in 2009 to 26.6 days in 2014. The mean time elapsed from manuscript reception to its on-line publication was 103 days. In 2014 the collaboration with the working groups from the Internal Medicine Spanish Foundation (FEMI) has reported 11 published manuscripts. In July 2014 we were informed that the Journal Citation Reports gave Rev Clin Esp an Impact Factor of 1,314 (year 2013). This Impact Factor without self-citations would have been 0.705 (in 2009 the global impact factor was 0,584). With the Editorial Committee farewell we welcome the new editorial team and we sincerely thank the SEMI Steering Committee, our colleagues, journal officers, reviewers, readers and authors that since 2009 have trusted on our editorial work.

  2. [Report of the editors, 2010].

    PubMed

    García Puig, Juan; Alonso-Vega, Gabriel Gaspar; Blanco, Juan José Ríos

    2011-01-01

    The Editors of the Rev Clin Esp inform herein on their editorial activity in the last year (November 2009 to October 2010) according to three different sections: (a) Objectives and achievements during 2010, (b) editorial activity, and (c) objectives for 2011. During 2010, we have updated the editorial algorithm (manuscript time lag). We have developed the "E-case reports" section and we have linked the abstracts of the Annual Congress of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) to a journal supplement (electronically available). Since 2010, the subscribers have been able to receive all of the contents of the Rev Clin Esp on-line and to perform self-evaluations in order to obtain 1.7 credits per each journal issue (continuing education). In 2010 we handled 402 manuscripts (7.2% more than in 2009), 35% of which were accepted for publication. We asked 186 reviewers for their expert opinion, 75% of whom sent their reports in less than two weeks. The mean time needed to reach an editorial decision concerning original manuscripts ("accepted / rejected") was 44.5 days and for papers not sent to external reviewers 19.5 days. Collaboration with the work groups produced good results (2.4 published manuscripts per issue), but this could be improved if all the groups collaborated in all the journal sections. Our objectives for 2011 are to complete the renewal of the Rev Clin Esp scientific committee, in accordance with the SEMI Council, and to continue to proceed with the actions initiated to increase the journal impact factor. Rev Clim Esp is an open forum for all internal medicine specialists. Responsibility falls on all of us to collaborate in order to make our journal a little better day by day.

  3. 2012 Editors' Citations for Excellence in Refereeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    One of the most important services performed for AGU is the conscientious reviewing of submitted papers. Because of the nature of the reviewing process, this service is also one of the least recognized. Every year editors are asked to select the outstanding reviewers from the previous year. The reviewers listed below have been cited by editors of AGU journals and Eos for excellence in refereeing. These individuals are to be commended for consistently providing constructive and thoughtful reviews.

  4. 2013 Editors' Citations for Excellence in Refereeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-06-01

    One of the most important services performed for AGU is the conscientious reviewing of submitted papers. Because of the nature of the reviewing process, this service is also one of the least recognized. Every year editors are asked to select the outstanding reviewers from the previous year. The reviewers listed below have been cited by editors of AGU journals and Eos for excellence in refereeing. These individuals are to be commended for consistently providing constructive and thoughtful reviews.

  5. 15. Historic American Buildings Survey, Plate # 55, 'Wohnhaus Martin, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Historic American Buildings Survey, Plate # 55, 'Wohnhaus Martin, Buffalo, N. Y. Grundrisse des Haupt und Obergeschosses' in Frank Lloyd Wright Ausgefuhrte Bauten (Berlin: Ernst Wasmuth A. G., 1911), PLAN OF THE FIRST AND SECOND FLOORS, MR. MARTIN'S SISTER'S HOUSE. - Darwin D. Martin House, 125 Jewett Parkway, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  6. How are Editors Selected, Recruited and Approved?

    PubMed

    Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Al-Khatib, Aceil

    2016-11-28

    The editors of scholarly journals have a duty to uphold and promote the highest standards of ethical conduct of research. They also have a responsibility to maintain the integrity of the literature, and to promote transparency and honesty in reporting research findings. In the process of screening manuscripts they receive for possible publication, editors have the obligation to report infractions to the institutions of offending authors, and request an investigation. Since editors can reject a paper on ethical grounds, they can be considered to be the guardians of ethics who should express high ethical standards in conducting and publishing their own research. An examination of several publishers' websites reveals no such requirement or clear selection criteria for journal editors. Therefore, we aim to discuss the factors that publishers, in a broad sense, should consider when selecting editors for scholarly journals and believe that such criteria should be made public to ensure accountability. This would restore some of the eroding public trust in disseminated research, fortify confidence in the composition and qualification of members of an editorial board, and help to protect the reputations of publishers and editors.

  7. DeviceEditor visual biological CAD canvas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Biological Computer Aided Design (bioCAD) assists the de novo design and selection of existing genetic components to achieve a desired biological activity, as part of an integrated design-build-test cycle. To meet the emerging needs of Synthetic Biology, bioCAD tools must address the increasing prevalence of combinatorial library design, design rule specification, and scar-less multi-part DNA assembly. Results We report the development and deployment of web-based bioCAD software, DeviceEditor, which provides a graphical design environment that mimics the intuitive visual whiteboard design process practiced in biological laboratories. The key innovations of DeviceEditor include visual combinatorial library design, direct integration with scar-less multi-part DNA assembly design automation, and a graphical user interface for the creation and modification of design specification rules. We demonstrate how biological designs are rendered on the DeviceEditor canvas, and we present effective visualizations of genetic component ordering and combinatorial variations within complex designs. Conclusions DeviceEditor liberates researchers from DNA base-pair manipulation, and enables users to create successful prototypes using standardized, functional, and visual abstractions. Open and documented software interfaces support further integration of DeviceEditor with other bioCAD tools and software platforms. DeviceEditor saves researcher time and institutional resources through correct-by-construction design, the automation of tedious tasks, design reuse, and the minimization of DNA assembly costs. PMID:22373390

  8. 22 CFR 2.4 - Designation of official guests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Designation of official guests. 2.4 Section 2.4... PERSONNEL § 2.4 Designation of official guests. The Chief of Protocol shall also maintain a roster of persons designated by the Secretary of State as official guests. Any inquiries by law enforcement...

  9. 22 CFR 2.4 - Designation of official guests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Designation of official guests. 2.4 Section 2.4... PERSONNEL § 2.4 Designation of official guests. The Chief of Protocol shall also maintain a roster of persons designated by the Secretary of State as official guests. Any inquiries by law enforcement...

  10. 22 CFR 2.4 - Designation of official guests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Designation of official guests. 2.4 Section 2.4... PERSONNEL § 2.4 Designation of official guests. The Chief of Protocol shall also maintain a roster of persons designated by the Secretary of State as official guests. Any inquiries by law enforcement...

  11. Evaluating the Impact of Guest Speaker Postings in Online Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemphill, Leaunda S.; Hemphill, Hoyet H.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of virtual guest speakers facilitating asynchronous discussions. The setting was an online instructional technology course with 16 graduate students and two guest speakers. The research reports the quantity and level of critical thinking of the students and guests. Each posting was coded for frequency and…

  12. 22 CFR 2.4 - Designation of official guests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Designation of official guests. 2.4 Section 2.4... PERSONNEL § 2.4 Designation of official guests. The Chief of Protocol shall also maintain a roster of persons designated by the Secretary of State as official guests. Any inquiries by law enforcement...

  13. 22 CFR 2.4 - Designation of official guests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Designation of official guests. 2.4 Section 2.4... PERSONNEL § 2.4 Designation of official guests. The Chief of Protocol shall also maintain a roster of persons designated by the Secretary of State as official guests. Any inquiries by law enforcement...

  14. Class Guests...An Added Dimension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Husmann, Ann

    1983-01-01

    Inviting carefully selected guests into the classroom can help students recognize the blending of theory and practice and involve students more intimately in the learning process. For example, a first-person account by a mother of a handicapped child might have a greater impact on the listener than books, films, or lectures. Effective…

  15. Guest-Service Agent. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Harake, Mounzer

    This teacher's guide for the hospitality and tourism industry is designed to include the entry-level competencies students will need to enter any of the occupational areas identified in the front-desk section of the lodging occupations cluster. These occupations include front-desk clerk, cashier, telephone operator, guest-service agent,…

  16. Martin J. Klein: From Physicist to Historian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Danian

    2012-12-01

    To his friends, colleagues, and students, Martin Klein was a gentle and modest man of extraordinary integrity whose stellar accomplishments garnered him many honors. I sketch his life and career, in which he transformed himself from a theoretical physicist at Columbia University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Case Institute of Technology into a historian of physics while on leave at the Dublin Institute for Advanced Study and the University of Leiden and then pursued this field full time at Yale University.

  17. Release and recovery of guest molecules during the reversible borate gel formation of guest-included macrocyclic boronic esters.

    PubMed

    Ito, Suguru; Takata, Hisatsugu; Ono, Kosuke; Iwasawa, Nobuharu

    2013-10-11

    Borate gel formation from guest-encapsulated macrocyclic boronic esters was realized by the addition of a diamine to the suspension of the boronic esters in various organic solvents, which triggered the release of the guest compounds. The guest molecules could be recovered from the borate gel by addition of an acid to remove the diamine, which facilitated the reconstruction of the initial guest-encapsulated macrocyclic boronic esters.

  18. [Report of the editors, 2013].

    PubMed

    García Puig, J; Gaspar Alonso-Vega, G; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2014-01-01

    The editors of Revista Clínica Española(Rev Clin Esp) inform on their editorial activity during the last 12 months: (a) objectives and attainments, (b) editorial activity, and (c) objectives for 2014. In 2013 the most relevant modification concerning the editorial activity has been the translation into English of the 5 manuscripts with abstract contained in each issue (http://www.revclinesp.es/). From the first January to the 30th September 2013 we received 458 manuscripts (50.9 manuscripts per month), a similar figure to that obtained in 2012 (51.1 manuscripts per month). The acceptance rate of the 443 manuscripts whose editorial process has been concluded was 23.7% (originals, 11.8%). We asked for 253 revisions to 186 reviewers and we received 74.4% revisions in less than 2 weeks (10.9 days). The mean time to adopt an editorial decision for all manuscripts («accepted»/«rejected») has been 20,3 (half than in 2009). For «originals» this figure has dropped from 56.6 days in 2009 to 22.5 days in 2013. The mean time elapsed from manuscript reception to its on-line publication was 94.8 days in 2013 (110.5 in 2012 and 155.8 in 2011). In 2013 the collaboration with the working groups from the Internal Medicine Spanish Foundation has reported 17 published manuscripts. In 2013 we were informed that the Journal Citation Reports excluded Rev Clin Esp from its impact factor journal list due to its elevated self-citations. We have taken a number of actions to reduce self-citations and we expect to be a minority in 2014. Some other data concerning the editorial policy are encouraging. In this sense, manuscript citation to Rev Clin Esp published articles has seen a substantial increase from 19% in 2008 to 29% in 2012. We work to achieve the digitalization of Rev Clin Esp from 1940 to 1999 (the journal is already digitalized since 2000). The continuous renewal of the journal sections and the working groups collaboration are necessary elements to make our journal, each day

  19. [The Chilean Association of Biomedical Journal Editors].

    PubMed

    Reyes, H

    2001-01-01

    On September 29th, 2000, The Chilean Association of Biomedical Journal Editors was founded, sponsored by the "Comisión Nacional de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (CONICYT)" (the Governmental Agency promoting and funding scientific research and technological development in Chile) and the "Sociedad Médica de Santiago" (Chilean Society of Internal Medicine). The Association adopted the goals of the World Association of Medical Editors (WAME) and therefore it will foster "cooperation and communication among Editors of Chilean biomedical journals; to improve editorial standards, to promote professionalism in medical editing through education, self-criticism and self-regulation; and to encourage research on the principles and practice of medical editing". Twenty nine journals covering a closely similar number of different biomedical sciences, medical specialties, veterinary, dentistry and nursing, became Founding Members of the Association. A Governing Board was elected: President: Humberto Reyes, M.D. (Editor, Revista Médica de Chile); Vice-President: Mariano del Sol, M.D. (Editor, Revista Chilena de Anatomía); Secretary: Anna María Prat (CONICYT); Councilors: Manuel Krauskopff, Ph.D. (Editor, Biological Research) and Maritza Rahal, M.D. (Editor, Revista de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello). The Association will organize a Symposium on Biomedical Journal Editing and will spread information stimulating Chilean biomedical journals to become indexed in international databases and in SciELO-Chile, the main Chilean scientific website (www.scielo.cl).

  20. AGU Publications Volunteers Feted At Elegant Editors' Evening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panning, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    The 2012 Fall Meeting Editors' Evening, held at the City Club of San Francisco, was hosted by the Publications Committee and is the premier social event for editors and associate editors attending the Fall Meeting. The evening commenced with a welcome from Carol Finn, incoming AGU president, in which she expressed her thanks to the editors and associate editors for volunteering their time to benefit AGU.

  1. A standard syntax-directed editor for hyperprogramming systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhogolev, E.A.; Kuz`menkova, E.A.; Mailingova, O.L.; Poprygaev, E.V.

    1995-05-01

    The main operations of a syntax-directed editor are considered. The requirements to the standard syntax-directed editor are stated. The structure of the standard syntax-directed editor and the functions of its components are discussed. The language base properties needed for syntax-directed editor development are described. Methods for transforming the standard syntax-directed editor into a specialized one are carried out.

  2. Electronegative Guests in CoSb3

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Bo; Yang, Jiong; Salvador, James R.; He, Yang; Zhao, Bo; Wang, Shanyu; Wei, Ping; Ohuchi, Fumio; Zhang, Wenqing; Hermann, Raphael P.; Gourdon, Olivier; Mao, Scott; Cheng, Yingwen; Wang, Chongmin; Liu, Jun; Zhai, Pengcheng; Tang, Xinfeng; Zhang, Qingjie; Yang, Jihui

    2016-04-19

    Introducing guests into a host framework to form a so called inclusion compound can be used to design materials with new and fascinating functionalities. The vast majority of inclusion compounds have electropositive guests with neutral or negatively charged frameworks. Here, we show a series of electronegative guest filled skutterudites with inverse polarity. The strong covalent guest-host interactions observed for the electronegative group VIA guests, i.e., S and Se, feature a unique localized cluster vibration which significantly influences the lattice dynamics, together with the point-defect scattering caused by element substitutions, resulting in very low lattice thermal conductivity values. The findings of electronegative guests provide a new perspective for guest-filling in skutterudites, and the covalent filler/lattice interactions lead to an unusual lattice dynamics phenomenon which can be used for designing high-efficiency thermoelectric materials and novel functional inclusion compounds with open structures.

  3. Stimuli-responsive host-guest systems based on the recognition of cryptands by organic guests.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingming; Yan, Xuzhou; Huang, Feihe; Niu, Zhenbin; Gibson, Harry W

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: As the star compounds in host-guest chemistry, the syntheses of crown ethers proclaimed the birth of supramolecular chemistry. Crown ether-based host-guest systems have attracted great attention in self-assembly processes because of their good selectivity, high efficiency, and convenient responsiveness, enabling their facile application to the "bottom-up" approach for construction of functional molecular aggregates, such as artificial molecular machines, drug delivery materials, and supramolecular polymers. Cryptands, as preorganized derivatives of crown ethers, not only possess the above-mentioned properties but also have three-dimensional spatial structures and higher association constants compared with crown ethers. More importantly, the introduction of the additional arms makes cryptand-based host-guest systems responsive to more stimuli, which is crucial for the construction of adaptive or smart materials. In the past decade, we designed and synthesized crown ether-based cryptands as a new type of host for small organic guests with the purpose of greatly increasing the stabilities of the host-guest complexes and preparing mechanically interlocked structures and large supramolecular systems more efficiently while retaining or increasing their stimuli-responsiveness. Organic molecules such as paraquat derivatives and secondary ammonium salts have been widely used in the fabrication of functional supramolecular aggregates. Many host molecules including crown ethers, cyclodextrins, calixarenes, cucurbiturils, pillararenes, and cryptands have been used in the preparation of self-assembled structures with these guest molecules, but among them cryptands exhibit the best stabilities with paraquat derivatives in organic solvents due to their preorganization and additional and optimized binding sites. They enable the construction of sophisticated molecules or supramolecules in high yields, affording a very efficient way to fabricate stimuli

  4. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Marella de Angelis and her colleagues on precision gravimetry using atomic sensors and from Dr Peter Becker on determination of the Avogadro constant via enriched silicon-28. I recommend setting up a free e-mail alert so that you can read them as soon as they are published! As many of you are already aware, our impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) has risen again to 1.297. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization (Thomson ISI) agreeing with my own assessment. Of course the publication of high quality articles in the journal is dependent both on you the authors who trust us with the publication of your best work and on our referees and Editorial Board Members who we depend on to maintain the high standards you have grown to expect. I must also thank our referees for their rapid response when asked to review papers for Measurement Science and Technology. On average, authors receive a decision on their article in 45 days. Therefore I would like to end this message by saying thank you again to all those who have contributed to our success in the past year, and wish you all the best for a successful 2009!

  5. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Dear authors and reviewers of articles for Measurement Science and Technology, I would like to thank all those who have published papers with us in 2007, and special thanks go to those of you who have kindly reviewed articles for the journal this year. I would also like to take this opportunity to update you on some of the developments on the journal. As many of you are no doubt aware, our latest impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) has risen to 1.228. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization agreeing with my own assessment. The popularity of the journal amongst authors and readers has prompted us to introduce a new subject classification for articles, to make it easier for readers to find articles of interest. The eight subject categories are: Measurement theory and practical developments (e.g. precision measurements, metrology, new measurement principles, signal processing techniques, theory of measurement, calibration); Sensors and sensing systems (based on physical, chemical or biological principles; micro- and nano-scale systems; sensors for physical, chemical and biological quantities); Optical and laser based techniques (e.g. fibre optics, interferometry, etc); Fluid mechanics measurements (e.g. fluid flow, velocimetry, particle sizing, etc); Imaging techniques (e.g. tomography, microscopy, holography, THz, etc); Spectroscopy (e.g. optical, acoustic, dielectric, MS, NMR, ESR, IR, UV-VIS, fluorescence, PCS, x-ray, etc); New and improved techniques for materials evaluation (e.g. non-destructive testing and evaluation, structural measurements); Novel instrumentation. We kindly ask you to assign your paper to a category when you send it to the journal. In order to maintain our rapid

  6. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2008-01-01

    To begin, I would like to wish our readers, authors, referees and Board of Editors a successful and happy 2008 and thank them for their contributions to Nuclear Fusion in 2007. I took over the editorship of Nuclear Fusion in January, and the year has been one in which the community as a whole has been busier than ever with a variety of duties associated with the ITER project. It was with pride that we published the Progress in the ITER Physics Basis in the June issue of the journal (stacks.iop.org/NF/47/i=6). The task undertaken by the coordinators, authors and referees was a daunting one but one which led to an outstandingly successful issue. The response from readers has been phenomenal and there were in the region of 10 000 downloads of papers in the first month following publication. Looking to 2008 and beyond, the journal will endeavour to continue to support the work of the fusion community. Refereeing As we have done since January 2005, we would like to thank our top ten most loyal referees who have helped the journal with its double-referee peer-review procedure in the past year. At the Nuclear Fusion Editorial Office we are fully aware of the load we put on the shoulders of our referees. At the end of 2004 the Editorial Board decided that a gesture of gratitude should be made to our most loyal referees. We offer them a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. To select the top referees we have adopted the criterion that a researcher should have acted as a referee or adjudicator for at least three different manuscripts during the period from summer 2006 to the end of 2007. We have excluded our Board members and those referees who were already listed in the top ten in the last two years. According to our records the following people met this criterion. Congratulations and many, many thanks! H.L. Berk (Texas University, USA) J.S. DeGrassie (GAT, USA) C. Deutsch (Paris University, France) N. Hayashi (JAEA

  7. Martin Bergmann: The Last 21 Years.

    PubMed

    Feiner, Kenneth

    2015-06-01

    Martin Bergmann has contributed to our understanding of psychoanalysis for more than sixty years. A review of his contributions to psychoanalysis was completed in 1994, when Bergmann was 83 years old. Consideration of his remarkable productivity in the last twenty years clearly demonstrates the need to update this review. In these years, he extended his writing on the history of psychoanalysis, added to his contributions to an understanding of love, advanced ideas about psychoanalytic technique, and wrote two books on Shakespeare, as well as doing work in anthropology, sociology, literature, history, and religious studies. This paper reviews that work.

  8. Guest Editorial Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, H. J.

    1981-10-01

    This special issue is a double celebration: twenty-five years of SPIE and twenty years of Optical Engineering. The papers on photo-optical instrumentation engineering in this issue were invited by an anniversary committee comprised of Joseph B. Houston, Jr., Brian J. Thompson, William G. Hyzer, and the journal editor.

  9. A Command Editor Tool for NEXTSTEP

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    appears and presents the hierarchy of CEMenuCells A Command Editor Tool for NEXTSTEP 2 of 27 m arble Final Report for Contract # DAAHO1-93-C-R013 in the...icon, "Default" status, state list, textual description, tool sta- A Command Editor Tool for NEXTSTEP 3 of 27 m arble Final Report for Contract... arble Final Report for Contract # DAAH01-93-C-R013 FIGURE 7 Configuration of a TAV 3.0.. Acietr O ev 3.1 luBman d aetn Cmoe a ConQ summw t. Paletta e

  10. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2006-12-01

    Dear authors and reviewers of articles for Measurement Science and Technology, I would like to thank all those who have published papers with us in 2006, and special thanks go to those of you who have kindly reviewed articles for the journal this year. I would also like to take this opportunity to update you on some of the developments on the journal this year. As many of you are no doubt aware our impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) has remained above 1 for the second year in a row. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization agreeing with my own assessment. This year we have welcomed several new faces to our Editorial Board and International Advisory Board. We are delighted to welcome Professor Hirofumi Yamada of the University of Kyoto as a representative from Japan. From China we have been joined by Professor Xuzong Chen of Peking University and Professor Zhiyi Wei of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing. Professor Ivan Marusic from University of Minnesota and Dr Paul Williams of the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder have joined as North American representatives. As usual you will be able to submit your articles through them or direct to the Editorial Office in Bristol, UK. As part of our ongoing initiative to give our authors' work the highest visibility, all articles are freely available online for 30 days from the date of publication, allowing all researchers to read and view the latest research as soon as it is published, and this year there have been many interesting articles to read! As regular readers are aware, Measurement Science and Technology publishes special issues and features, which highlight an area of current interest. This year's topics included

  11. Gravity gradiometry developments at Lockheed Martin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Difrancesco, D.

    2003-04-01

    Lockheed Martin has developed and fielded multiple configurations of the rotating accelerometer gravity gradiometer instrument. Applications for both static and moving-base measurements have been demonstrated for a variety of scenarios, including vehicle navigation, hydrocarbon exploration, mineral exploration, reservoir monitoring, underground void detection and treaty monitoring and compliance. The most recent systems built by Lockheed Martin extend the performance range of the early 4-accelerometer gradiometers by adding a second complement of four accelerometers. This achieves the benefit of lower instrument noise and improved frequency response (wider bandwidth) for stringent application scenarios. A summary of the gradiometer development history, functional concepts, instrument and system operation, and demonstrated performance will be presented. Development Background The U. S. Air Force Geophysics Laboratory (AFGL; now AFRL) instituted a program in 1982 to develop and field a moving base gradiometer system that could be used both on land and in the air. The result was the Gravity Gradiometer Survey System (GGSS) which first demonstrated the ability to make airborne gravity gradient measurements in 1987 (Jekeli, 1988). At the same time, the U.S. Navy began development of the Gravity Sensors System (GSS) for use on the Fleet Ballistic Submarine Trident II navigation subsystem. This military background paved the way for commercial uses of gravity gradiometry. Both the GSS and GGSS employed a first generation gravity gradiometer instrument (GGI), which was comprised of four accelerometers mounted on a rotating disk. The details of the GGI operation are further described in the work by Gerber and Hofmeyer (Gerber, 1978 and Hofmeyer, 1994). Recent Advancements in Gradiometer Instrumentation With the instrumentation experience gained through such programs as GSS and GGSS, Lockheed Martin embarked upon an ambitious effort in the early 1990's to further improve the

  12. Controlled Orientation of Polyconjugated Guest Molecules in Tunable Host Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Soegiarto, Airon C.; Comotti, Angiolina; Ward, Michael D.

    2010-12-07

    Linear conjugated guest molecules with high aspect ratios form inclusion compounds with guanidinium organodisulfonate (GDS) host frameworks in which organodisulfonate 'pillars' connect opposing GS sheets to generate lamellar architectures that reflect templating by the guest. Through judicious selection of pillars having adjustable lengths (l{sub S-S}, as measured by the separation between distal sulfur atoms) and guests of various lengths (l{sub g}), the framework architecture can be controlled systematically in a manner that enables regulation of the guest orientation and aggregation in the host framework. Inclusion compounds for which l{sub g}/l{sub S-S} {le} 0.9 exhibit a bilayer architecture with 1-D channels containing guests oriented parallel to the long axis of the pillar. Guests with values of l{sub g} comparable to l{sub S-S}, however, promote the formation of a brick architecture in which the guests and the pillar are arranged in a herringbone motif. Surprisingly, longer guests (l{sub g} = 1.25l{sub S-S}) favor the formation of the bilayer architecture despite their larger volume because the guests are forced to align end-to-end as single-file arrays due to the vertical constraints of the 1-D channels. Bithiophene and biphenyl guests (l{sub g} < l{sub S-S}) are exceptional, promoting bilayer structures in which turnstile rotations of the pillars afford an unusual motif in which the guests are isolated from one another. The ability to synthesize a large family of compounds based on a common supramolecular building block (the GS sheet) permits construction of a structural 'phase diagram' based on two simple molecular parameters, l{sub g} and l{sub S-S}, that can be used to sort the inclusion compounds according to their framework architectures and enable prediction of crystal structures for new host-guest combinations. The effects of these different framework architectures and packing motifs is manifested as bathochromic shifts in the absorption and

  13. A Visual Editor in Java for View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansifer, Ryan

    2000-01-01

    In this project we continued the development of a visual editor in the Java programming language to create screens on which to display real-time data. The data comes from the numerous systems monitoring the operation of the space shuttle while on the ground and in space, and from the many tests of subsystems. The data can be displayed on any computer platform running a Java-enabled World Wide Web (WWW) browser and connected to the Internet. Previously a special-purpose program bad been written to display data on emulations of character-based display screens used for many years at NASA. The goal now is to display bit-mapped screens created by a visual editor. We report here on the visual editor that creates the display screens. This project continues the work we bad done previously. Previously we had followed the design of the 'beanbox,' a prototype visual editor created by Sun Microsystems. We abandoned this approach and implemented a prototype using a more direct approach. In addition, our prototype is based on newly released Java 2 graphical user interface (GUI) libraries. The result has been a visually more appealing appearance and a more robust application.

  14. Are Editors Out of the Tenure Process?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    University presses have complained for years that tenure committees unfairly expect their editors to be arbiters of what counts as tenure-worthy work. At the same time, the presses have been caught in a business-side squeeze between dwindling sales (and shrinking subsidies) and the ever-greater pressure on scholars to publish. In this article, the…

  15. Environment-dependent guest exchange in supramolecular hosts.

    PubMed

    Li, Longyu; Thayumanavan, S

    2014-10-21

    Dynamic exchange of guest molecules, encapsulated in host assemblies, is a phenomenon in supramolecular chemistry that has important implications in several applications. While the mechanism of exchange in micellar assemblies has been previously investigated, the effect of host and guest environment upon the guest-exchange dynamics has received little attention, if any. In this paper, we study the guest-exchange mechanism in pH-sensitive nanogels along with pH-insensitive nanogels as a control. By systematically comparing the behavior of these nanogels, we show that size, concentration, and hydrophobicity can all play a critical role in guest-exchange dynamics. More importantly, these studies reveal that the dominant mechanism of guest exchange can intimately depend on environmental factors.

  16. Responsive Guest Encapsulation of Dynamic Conjugated Microporous Polymers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lai; Li, Youyong

    2016-06-30

    The host-guest complexes of conjugated microporous polymers encapsulating C60 and dye molecules have been investigated systematically. The orientation of guest molecules inside the cavities, have different terms: inside the open cavities of the polymer, or inside the cavities formed by packing different polymers. The host backbone shows responsive dynamic behavior in order to accommodate the size and shape of incoming guest molecule or guest aggregates. Simulations show that the host-guest binding of conjugated polymers is stronger than that of non-conjugated polymers. This detailed study could provide a clear picture for the host-guest interaction for dynamic conjugated microporous polymers. The mechanism obtained could guide designing new conjugated microporous polymers.

  17. Responsive Guest Encapsulation of Dynamic Conjugated Microporous Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lai; Li, Youyong

    2016-01-01

    The host-guest complexes of conjugated microporous polymers encapsulating C60 and dye molecules have been investigated systematically. The orientation of guest molecules inside the cavities, have different terms: inside the open cavities of the polymer, or inside the cavities formed by packing different polymers. The host backbone shows responsive dynamic behavior in order to accommodate the size and shape of incoming guest molecule or guest aggregates. Simulations show that the host-guest binding of conjugated polymers is stronger than that of non-conjugated polymers. This detailed study could provide a clear picture for the host-guest interaction for dynamic conjugated microporous polymers. The mechanism obtained could guide designing new conjugated microporous polymers. PMID:27356483

  18. Environment-Dependent Guest Exchange in Supramolecular Hosts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic exchange of guest molecules, encapsulated in host assemblies, is a phenomenon in supramolecular chemistry that has important implications in several applications. While the mechanism of exchange in micellar assemblies has been previously investigated, the effect of host and guest environment upon the guest-exchange dynamics has received little attention, if any. In this paper, we study the guest-exchange mechanism in pH-sensitive nanogels along with pH-insensitive nanogels as a control. By systematically comparing the behavior of these nanogels, we show that size, concentration, and hydrophobicity can all play a critical role in guest-exchange dynamics. More importantly, these studies reveal that the dominant mechanism of guest exchange can intimately depend on environmental factors. PMID:25244305

  19. OPM Scheme Editor 2: A graphical editor for specifying object-protocol structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, I-Min A.; Markowitz, V.M.; Pang, F.; Ben-Shachar, O.

    1993-07-01

    This document describes an X-window based Schema Editor for the Object-Protocol Model (OPM). OPM is a data model that supports the specification of complex object and protocol classes. objects and protocols are qualified in OPM by attributes that are defined over (associated with) value classes. Connections of object and protocol classes are expressed in OPM via attributes. OPM supports the specification (expansion) of protocols in terms of alternative and sequences of component (sub) protocols. The OPM Schema Editor allows specifying, displaying, modifying, and browsing through OPM schemas. The OPM Schema Editor generates an output file that can be used as input to an OPM schema translation tool that maps OPM schemas into definitions for relational database management systems. The OPM Schema Editor was implemented using C++ and the X11 based Motif toolkit, on Sun SPARCstation under Sun Unix OS 4.1. This document consists of the following parts: (1) A tutorial consisting of seven introductory lessons for the OPM Schema Editor. (2) A reference manual describing all the windows and functions of the OPM Schema Editor. (3) An appendix with an overview of OPM.

  20. Lockheed Martin Response to the OSP Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Robert T.; Munkres, Randy; Megna, Thomas D.; Beckham, Joanne

    2003-01-01

    The Lockheed Martin Orbital Space Plane System provides crew transfer and rescue for the International Space Station more safely and affordably than current human space transportation systems. Through planned upgrades and spiral development, it is also capable of satisfying the Nation's evolving space transportation requirements and enabling the national vision for human space flight. The OSP System, formulated through rigorous requirements definition and decomposition, consists of spacecraft and launch vehicle flight elements, ground processing facilities and existing transportation, launch complex, range, mission control, weather, navigation, communication and tracking infrastructure. The concept of operations, including procurement, mission planning, launch preparation, launch and mission operations and vehicle maintenance, repair and turnaround, is structured to maximize flexibility and mission availability and minimize program life cycle cost. The approach to human rating and crew safety utilizes simplicity, performance margin, redundancy, abort modes and escape modes to mitigate credible hazards that cannot be designed out of the system.

  1. Lockheed Martin T-Rex: Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    T-Rex is a robot which may be used in toxic or flammable environments. The assessment of the T-Rex conducted at the Lockheed Martin facility was limited in its scope. The scope of the assessment was directed by the type of equipment being used and the amount of accessibility to the equipment. Due to severe time constraints--the assessment was conducted in one day--human factors interface activities were limited. This should be considered a preliminary assessment. This report covers aspects of the technology that were available to the assessment team. Recommendations for future evaluation of this technology are also included. The contents are as follows: Electrical Considerations; General Electrical Consideration; Trailing Cables; Grounding; Surface High Voltage Distribution; Low and Medium Voltage Alternating Current Circuits; Potential for Harmful Human Factor Incidents and Enterprise Disablement; Exclusion Zone Emergency Maintenance; and Recommendations.

  2. Cleanliness verification process at Martin Marietta Astronautics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Elizabeth A.; Giordano, Thomas J.

    1994-06-01

    The Montreal Protocol and the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments mandate CFC-113, other chlorinated fluorocarbons (CFC's) and 1,1,1-Trichloroethane (TCA) be banned from production after December 31, 1995. In response to increasing pressures, the Air Force has formulated policy that prohibits purchase of these solvents for Air Force use after April 1, 1994. In response to the Air Force policy, Martin Marietta Astronautics is in the process of eliminating all CFC's and TCA from use at the Engineering Propulsion Laboratory (EPL), located on Air Force property PJKS. Gross and precision cleaning operations are currently performed on spacecraft components at EPL. The final step of the operation is a rinse with a solvent, typically CFC-113. This solvent is then analyzed for nonvolatile residue (NVR), particle count and total filterable solids (TFS) to determine cleanliness of the parts. The CFC-113 used in this process must be replaced in response to the above policies. Martin Marietta Astronautics, under contract to the Air Force, is currently evaluating and testing alternatives for a cleanliness verification solvent. Completion of test is scheduled for May, 1994. Evaluation of the alternative solvents follows a three step approach. This first is initial testing of solvents picked from literature searches and analysis. The second step is detailed testing of the top candidates from the initial test phase. The final step is implementation and validation of the chosen alternative(s). Testing will include contaminant removal, nonvolatile residue, material compatibility and propellant compatibility. Typical materials and contaminants will be tested with a wide range of solvents. Final results of the three steps will be presented as well as the implementation plan for solvent replacement.

  3. Editor and Student Views on the Censorship Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raburn, Josephine

    Out of 200 newspaper editors randomly selected from a directory, 64 responded to a questionnaire eliciting their opinions on the subject materials most often censored by groups in the United States. The editors' responses were compared to those of 121 freshmen at Cameron University (Oklahoma). A majority of the editors supported the First…

  4. Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest Investigator Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingenfelter, Richard E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a final report for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest Investigator Program from 06/01/91-07/31/97. The topics include: 1) Solar Flare Neutron Spectra and Accelerated Ions; 2) Gamma Ray Lines From The Orion Complex; 3) Implications of Nuclear Line Emission From The Orion Complex; 4) Possible Sites of Nuclear Line Emission From Massive OB Associations; 5) Gamma-Ray Burst Repitition and BATSE Position Uncertainties; 6) Effects of Compton Scattering on BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Spectra; and 7) Selection Biases on the Spectral and Temporal Distribution of Gamma Ray Bursts.

  5. Molecular clips and tweezers hosting neutral guests.

    PubMed

    Hardouin-Lerouge, Marie; Hudhomme, Piétrick; Sallé, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Intense current interest in supramolecular chemistry is devoted to the construction of molecular assemblies displaying controlled molecular motion associated to recognition. On this ground, molecular clips and tweezers have focused an increasing attention. This tutorial review points out the recent advances in the construction of always more sophisticated molecular clips and tweezers, illustrating their remarkably broad structural variety and focusing on their binding ability towards neutral guests. A particular attention is brought to recent findings in dynamic molecular tweezers whose recognition ability can be regulated by external stimuli. Porphyrin-based systems will not be covered here as this very active field has been recently reviewed.

  6. The Newest Monument: The Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Studies and the Young Learner, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article features the newest monument, the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial. The memorial on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. will be an engaging landscape experience to convey four fundamental and recurring themes throughout Dr. King's life--democracy, justice, hope, and love. Natural…

  7. Library Builder: Kimberly Martin--Bonner Springs City Library, KS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Kimberly Martin is just 30, but she's been reinventing the Bonner Springs City Library since late 1998, even before she earned her library degree. Some 20 minutes west of Kansas City, Bonner Springs is a small town (service population around 10,000) in a bustling metropolitan area. Martin's goal is to provide service on a par with the larger…

  8. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey, Plate # 53, 'Wohnhaus Martin, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey, Plate # 53, 'Wohnhaus Martin, Buffalo, N. Y. Wohnzimmer mit Heizkorper und Beleuchtung' in Frank Lloyd Wright Ausgefuhrte Bauten (Berlin: Ernst Wasmuth A. G., 1911), LIVING ROOM NORTH SIDE, LOOKING TOWARDS DINING ROOM, DOORS TO PORCH AT RIGHT. - Darwin D. Martin House, 125 Jewett Parkway, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  9. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey, Plate # 47, 'Wohnhaus Martin, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey, Plate # 47, 'Wohnhaus Martin, Buffalo, N. Y. Gewachshaus und Heizkorper mit Beleuchtung' in Frank Lloyd Wright Ausgefuhrte Bauten (Berlin: Ernst Wasmuth A. G., 1911), LEFT: BOOKCASE IN LIBRARY OR LIVING ROOM WITH LIGHTS, RIGHT: CONSERVATORY (DEMOLISHED). - Darwin D. Martin House, 125 Jewett Parkway, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  10. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey, Plate # 50, 'Wohnhaus Martin, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey, Plate # 50, 'Wohnhaus Martin, Buffalo, N. Y. Kamin in Wohnzimmer' in Frank Lloyd Wright Ausgefuhrte Bauten (Berlin: Ernst Wasmuth A. G., 1911), FIREPLACE IN LIVING ROOM, WEST SIDE. - Darwin D. Martin House, 125 Jewett Parkway, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  11. 13. Historic American Buildings Survey, Plate # 51, 'Wohnhaus Martin, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Historic American Buildings Survey, Plate # 51, 'Wohnhaus Martin, Buffalo, N. Y. Gesellschaftszimmer und Speisezimmer' in Frank Lloyd Wright Ausgefuhrte Bauten (Berlin: Ernst Wasmuth A. G., 1911), LEFT: RECEPTION ROOM, FIREPLACE ON NORTH WALL, RIGHT: DINING ROOM, VIEW TOWARD NORTHWEST. - Darwin D. Martin House, 125 Jewett Parkway, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  12. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey, Plate # 44, 'Wohnhaus Martin, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey, Plate # 44, 'Wohnhaus Martin, Buffalo, N. Y. Grundriss des Hauptgeschosses' in Frank Lloyd Wright Ausgefuhrte Bauten (Berlin: Ernst Wasmuth A. G., 1911), PLAN OF THE MAIN FLOORS. - Darwin D. Martin House, 125 Jewett Parkway, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  13. A Response to Jane Sahi's "Dialogue as Education: Martin Buber"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baniwal, Vikas

    2014-01-01

    This article is inspired by Jane Sahi's commentary, "Dialogue as Education: Martin Buber," published under the feature "Classics with Commentary" in the Monsoon 2005 issue of "Contemporary Education Dialogue." I seek to further the discussion of the contributions of Martin Buber to the discourse of education through…

  14. GENERAL VIEW OF THE MARTIN BOMBER PLANT LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF THE MARTIN BOMBER PLANT LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM "HOSPITAL HILL" SHOWING FROM THE LEFT THE METAL & PAPER SALVAGE BUILDING, AIRCRAFT MANUFACTURING AND ASSEMBLY BUILDING, BOILER HOUSE, OIL HOUSE, AND ADMINISTRATION BUILDLING. - Offutt Air Force Base, Glenn L. Martin-Nebraska Bomber Plant, Building D, Peacekeeper Drive, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  15. Ectoparasites and host energetics: house martin bugs and house martin nestlings.

    PubMed

    Møller, A P; de Lope, F; Moreno, J; González, G; Pérez, J J

    1994-08-01

    We measured the energy cost of ectoparasitism in an experimental study of the house martin bug Oeciacus hirundinis and its main host, nestlings of the house martin Delichon urbica. Nests were randomly assigned to inoculation with 0 (control) 10, or 100 bugs during egg laying, and this resulted in statistically significant differences in parasite loads following fledging of nestlings. Parasite loads negatively affected house martin nestlings as estimated from their body mass at age 16 days and from mass loss estimated over 1 day late in the nestling period. Daily energy expenditure (KJ/d), average daily metabolic rate (ml CO2/g h), and mass independent daily energy expenditure (kJ/mass(0.67)d) did not differ significantly between experimental treatments. However, average daily metabolic rate increased with increasing intensities of ectoparasitism. Mass independent daily energy expenditure also increased with higher levels of parasite infestation. These results demonstrate that the bug imposes an energy cost on its host by elevating the level of metabolism.

  16. Evolutionary theory in letters to the editor.

    PubMed

    Silva, Eric Orion; Lowe, Clayton Cory

    2015-05-01

    This research note presents the results of a content analysis of 234 letters to the editors that discuss evolutionary theory and were published in American newspapers. We find that letters to the editor both support and hinder the cause of teaching evolutionary theory in American secondary schools. On the one hand, anti-evolutionary theory messages are marginalized in the letters section. This marginalization signals a low level of legitimacy for creationism. It might also contribute to the sense of tension that sustains creationist identities. On the other hand, relatively few letters explicitly note the fact that scientists or the scientific community accept evolution. Interestingly, the obscuration of the scientific community's support for evolutionary theory occurs both in letters supporting and opposing evolutionary theory.

  17. Unified Meta-Component Model Specification Editor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-20

    relationship between the two major user interface modules, the editor and wizard, and their associated features. Functional to module mapping diagrams are...SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report (SAR) 18 . NUMBER OF PAGES 148 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39- 18

  18. ASTRO-H Guest Observer Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Koji; Petre, Robert

    2016-04-01

    ASTRO-H is a powerful new X-ray observatory for the community: starting approximately 9 month after launch, the bulk of the observing time will belong to guest observers (GOs) to be allocated via an international Guest Observer program. For US-based observers, the first call for proposals is a part of ROSES-2016, while there are parallel calls for proposals by ESA for European astronomers, and by ISAS/JAXA for the Japanese community and all other researchers not in the US or in an ESA member country.We will present the parameters of the Cycle 1 Call for Proposals, concentrating on US-specific details as appropriate. We will discuss the international division of observing time, the relationship with the on-going performance verification (PV) phase observations, our expectation for the number of US targets to be accepted and the financial support that will be available, and the timeline including the proposal deadline and expected period of Cycle 1 observations

  19. 1. Building No. 9938, the Guest House, is on left. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Building No. 9938, the Guest House, is on left. On right is south end of Standard Ward Building No. 9937-A, and Ramp No. 3 with exit door. - Madigan Hospital, Guest House, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  20. 2. Photocopy of a 1942 architectural drawing titled: 'Guest House, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of a 1942 architectural drawing titled: 'Guest House, GUES-A-H. Floors, Foundation & Framing Plans, Sections & Elevations.' 10-31-42. - Madigan Hospital, Guest House, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  1. Guest Speakers in School-Based Sexuality Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McRee, Annie-Laurie; Madsen, Nikki; Eisenberg, Marla E.

    2014-01-01

    This study, using data from a statewide survey (n = 332), examined teachers' practices regarding the inclusion of guest speakers to cover sexuality content. More than half of teachers (58%) included guest speakers. In multivariate analyses, teachers who taught high school, had professional preparation in health education, or who received…

  2. Registered Replication Report: Strack, Martin, & Stepper (1988).

    PubMed

    Wagenmakers, E-J; Beek, Titia; Dijkhoff, Laura; Gronau, Quentin F; Acosta, Alberto; Adams (Jr.), Reginald B; Albohn, Daniel N; Allard, Eric S; Benning, Stephen D; Blouin- Hudon, Eve-Marie; Bulnes, Luis Carlo; Caldwell, Tracy L; Calin-Jageman, Robert J; Capaldi, Colin A; Carfagno, Nicholas S; Chasten, Kelsie T; Cleeremans, Axel; Connell, Louise; DeCicco, Jennifer M.; Dijkstra, Katinka; Fischer, Agneta H; Foroni, Francesco; Hess, Ursula; Holmes, Kevin J; Jones, Jacob L H; Klein, Olivier; Koch, Christopher; Korb, Sebastian; Lewinski, Peter; Liao, Julia D; Lund, Sophie; Lupiáñez, Juan; Lynott, Dermot; Nance, Christin N; Oosterwijk, Suzanne; Özdog˘ru, Asil Ali; Pacheco-Unguetti, Antonia Pilar; Pearson, Bethany; Powis, Christina; Riding, Sarah; Roberts, Tomi-Ann; Rumiati, Raffaella I; Senden, Morgane; Shea-Shumsky, Noah B; Sobocko, Karin; Soto, Jose A; Steiner, Troy G; Talarico, Jennifer M; van Allen, Zack M; Vandekerckhove, Marie; Wainwright, Bethany; Wayand, Joseph F; Zeelenberg, Rene; Zetzer, Emily E; Zwaan, Rolf A

    2016-11-01

    According to the facial feedback hypothesis, people's affective responses can be influenced by their own facial expression (e.g., smiling, pouting), even when their expression did not result from their emotional experiences. For example, Strack, Martin, and Stepper (1988) instructed participants to rate the funniness of cartoons using a pen that they held in their mouth. In line with the facial feedback hypothesis, when participants held the pen with their teeth (inducing a "smile"), they rated the cartoons as funnier than when they held the pen with their lips (inducing a "pout"). This seminal study of the facial feedback hypothesis has not been replicated directly. This Registered Replication Report describes the results of 17 independent direct replications of Study 1 from Strack et al. (1988), all of which followed the same vetted protocol. A meta-analysis of these studies examined the difference in funniness ratings between the "smile" and "pout" conditions. The original Strack et al. (1988) study reported a rating difference of 0.82 units on a 10-point Likert scale. Our meta-analysis revealed a rating difference of 0.03 units with a 95% confidence interval ranging from -0.11 to 0.16.

  3. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission: Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur

  4. Host-guest chemistry in two-dimensional supramolecular networks.

    PubMed

    Teyssandier, Joan; Feyter, Steven De; Mali, Kunal S

    2016-09-20

    Nanoporous supramolecular networks physisorbed on solid surfaces have been extensively used to immobilize a variety of guest molecules. Host-guest chemistry in such two-dimensional (2D) porous networks is a rapidly expanding field due to potential applications in separation technology, catalysis and nanoscale patterning. Diverse structural topologies with high crystallinity have been obtained to capture molecular guests of different sizes and shapes. A range of non-covalent forces such as hydrogen bonds, van der Waals interactions, coordinate bonds have been employed to assemble the host networks. Recent years have witnessed a surge in the activity in this field with the implementation of rational design strategies for realizing controlled and selective guest capture. In this feature article, we review the development in the field of surface-supported host-guest chemistry as studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Typical host-guest architectures studied on solid surfaces, both under ambient conditions at the solution-solid interface as well as those formed at the ultrahigh vacuum (UHV)-solid interface, are described. We focus on isoreticular host networks, hosts functionalized pores and dynamic host-guest systems that respond to external stimuli.

  5. Polarization response of clathrate hydrates capsulated with guest molecules.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qun; Li, Jinshan; Huang, Hui; Wang, Xinqin; Yang, Mingli

    2016-05-28

    Clathrate hydrates are characterized by their water cages encapsulating various guest atoms or molecules. The polarization effect of these guest-cage complexes was studied with combined density functional theory and finite-field calculations. An addition rule was noted for these systems whose total polarizability is approximately equal to the polarizability sum of the guest and the cage. However, their distributional polarizability computed with Hirshfeld partitioning scheme indicates that the guest-cage interaction has considerable influence on their polarization response. The polarization of encapsulated guest is reduced while the polarization of water cage is enhanced. The counteraction of these two opposite effects leads to the almost unchanged total polarizability. Further analysis reveals that the reduced polarizability of encapsulated guest results from the shielding effect of water cage against the external field and the enhanced polarizability of water cage from the enhanced bonding of hydrogen bonds among water molecules. Although the charge transfer through the hydrogen bonds is rather small in the water cage, the polarization response of clathrate hydrates is sensitive to the changes of hydrogen bonding strength. The guest encapsulation strengthens the hydrogen bonding network and leads to enhanced polarizability.

  6. MPS Editor - An Integrated Sequencing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streiffert, Barbara A.; O'Reilly, Taifun; Schrock, Mitchell; Catchen, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    In today's operations environment, the teams are smaller and need to be more efficient while still ensuring the safety and success of the mission. In addition, teams often begin working on a mission in its early development phases and continue on the team through actual operations. For these reasons the operations teams want to be presented with a software environment that integrates multiple needed software applications as well as providing them with context sensitive editing support for entering commands and sequences of commands. At Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Multi-Mission Planning and Sequencing (MPS) Editor provided by the Multi-Mission Ground Systems and Services (MGSS) supports those operational needs.

  7. Meet the Editor: Global Biogeochemical Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi

    Meinrat Andreae was named the editor of the AGU's journal Global Biogeochemical Cycles last year.Andreae, director of the biogeochemistry department at the Max Plank Institute for Chemistry (MPIC), located in Mainz, Germany said that he plans to maintain the journal as a resource that highlights the broad spectrum of interdisciplinary themes that showcase the interactions between the biosphere and the geosphere. “Our special niche is in the field of larger-scale, more integrative studies that have global scope,” he explained.

  8. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur-self-plagiarism and plagiarism from others' works. Self-plagiarism is the publication of substantially similar scientific content

  9. Jean-Martin Charcot and his legacy.

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) rightly is considered the father of both modern neurology and psychiatry in France and much beyond. While he never was interested in mental disease and what was called 'alienism' at the time, his career at La Salpêtrière Hospital over 30 years was mainly marked by the development of a huge group of students which focused on the study and management of hysteria. When Charcot took office at the beginning of 1862, hysteria was a 'no-man's land', medically speaking, since neither the alienists nor the internists had much interest in this condition. At La Salpêtrière, these chronic patients were largely left to themselves before Désiré Bourneville, one of Charcot's first students, convinced his chief to care for them. Subsequently, the studies of Charcot with Paul Richer, Joseph Babinski, Georges Gilles de la Tourette, Paul Sollier, Pierre Janet, and many others allowed the condition to be addressed in detail. During his stay with Charcot in 1885-1866, Sigmund Freud, a young neuropathologist at the time, became fascinated by hysteria, an interest which probably was the main start of his interest in psychology. Charcot emphasized the concept of mental factors in hysteria, along with that of a 'dynamic' lesion, which accounted for the lack of neuropathological findings in the patients. While his ideas on hysteria and hypnotism were criticized after his death even by former pupils, such as Babinski, recent findings from functional studies using magnetic resonance imaging show how accurate and often visionary Charcot's thinking was in this field.

  10. Owen Martin Phillips (1930-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Owen Martin Phillips, a pioneer in geophysical fluid dynamics, died at home on 13 October 2010 in Chestertown, Md., at the age of 79. To his many friends and colleagues, Phillips was an inspirational and gracious person who combined a deep intellect, a lively spirit, and a generous heart that matched his passionate interest in the geophysical sciences. Phillips was born on 30 December 1930 in Parramatta, N. S. W., Australia. In 1948 he enrolled in the University of Sydney, where he earned a B.S. in applied mathematics in 1952. That same year, he joined the Cavendish Laboratory at Cambridge University as a research student, where he began to apply to the ocean concepts in turbulent flow recently developed by Andrei Kolmogorov, G. I. Taylor, and George Batchelor. While attending the 1956 celebration of Taylor's seventieth birthday, Phillips heard Fritz Ursell declare that “the process by which ocean waves are generated by the wind cannot be regarded as known.” In 1957 the Journal of Fluid Mechanics contained two remarkable papers offering contrasting theories for ocean wave generation. One paper, by the applied mathematician John Miles (J. Fluid Mech., 2(5), 417-445, 1957), proposed that energy transfer from the air to the sea occurs at a critical layer in the atmosphere boundary layer. The other paper, by Phillips, then 26 years old (J. Fluid Mech., 3(2), 185-204, 1957), proposed that turbulent pressure fluctuations in the wind resonate with propagating ocean waves, forcing them to grow. Together these became known as the Phillips-Miles process, and it was the opening salvo in Phillips's 50-year career of innovative contributions to geophysics through fluid mechanics.

  11. VIEW OF OFFICE CREATED FOR MARTIN LUTHER KING JR IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF OFFICE CREATED FOR MARTIN LUTHER KING JR IN 1957-58, LOOKING TOWARD THE REAR DOOR. THE DESK IS A PIECE OF THE ORIGINAL FURNITURE. - Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church, 454 Dexter Avenue, Montgomery, Montgomery County, AL

  12. VIEW OF THE OFFICE CREATED FOR MARTIN LUTHER KING JR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THE OFFICE CREATED FOR MARTIN LUTHER KING JR, LOOKING TOWARDS MAIN DOOR INTO SECRETARY'S OFFICE. - Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church, 454 Dexter Avenue, Montgomery, Montgomery County, AL

  13. 26. Photocopy of photograph (from V. Covert Martin Collection, c. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Photocopy of photograph (from V. Covert Martin Collection, c. 1925) EXTERIOR, GENERAL VIEW OF MISSION AND CONVENTO AFTER COMPLETED RESTORATION, C. 1925 - Mission San Francisco Solano de Sonoma, First & Spain Streets, Sonoma, Sonoma County, CA

  14. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Martin Linsey, Photographer October 27, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Martin Linsey, Photographer October 27, 1965 NORTH FACADE (ON QUINCY AVENUE), MAIN ENTRY. - Peerless Motor Company Plant No. 1, Quincy Avenue & 93, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  15. 3. FIRST FLOOR, FRONT ROOM (WHERE MARTIN LUTHER KING MADE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. FIRST FLOOR, FRONT ROOM (WHERE MARTIN LUTHER KING MADE PLANS FOR HIS MOVEMENT) - Penn School Historic District, Arnett House, SC Route 37, 1 mile South of Frogmore, St. Helena Island, Frogmore, Beaufort County, SC

  16. Draft of the Martin Peña Initative Plan

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This action plan is being developed so that EPA Region 2 can implement a strategy that focuses its programs and regulatory authorities in activities that comprehensively address the environmental issues affecting the Martin Pena communities.

  17. Petrology of impactites from Lake St. Martin structure, Manitoba

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonds, C. H.; Mcgee, P. E.

    1979-01-01

    The 23-km Lake St. Martin crater was produced 200 to 250 million years ago in Archean granitic to amphibolic gneiss, overlain by 400 to 500 m of Ordovician to Devonian limestone and dolomite. In the present paper, a schematic model of the field geology, petrology, and geochemistry is presented. The scenario is built in part on the calculations of Kieffer and Simonds and observations made on the Lake St. Martin structure.

  18. A Tisket, A Tasket--Out of the Editor's Basket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Kathryn R.

    2001-05-01

    In September 1940, the Journal introduced Out of the Editor's Basket for short items of interest: excerpts from letters, pamphlets, newspapers, and periodicals. By 1950, however, the Editor's Basket had evolved into a bulletin board for descriptions of new products and services, and it now contains almost exclusively press releases about recently marketed items. Now over 60 years old, the Editor's Basket still provides interesting tidbits for the Journal's broad readership.

  19. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-05-01

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission: Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur-self-plagiarism and plagiarism from others' works. Self-plagiarism is the publication of substantially

  20. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission: Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur-self-plagiarism and plagiarism from others' works. Self-plagiarism is the publication of substantially

  1. Web-Based Media Contents Editor for UCC Websites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seoksoo

    The purpose of this research is to "design web-based media contents editor for establishing UCC(User Created Contents)-based websites." The web-based editor features user-oriented interfaces and increased convenience, significantly different from previous off-line editors. It allows users to edit media contents online and can be effectively used for online promotion activities of enterprises and organizations. In addition to development of the editor, the research aims to support the entry of enterprises and public agencies to the online market by combining the technology with various UCC items.

  2. Guest-Dependent Spin-Transition Behavior of Porous Coordination Polymers.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Ryo; Hayami, Shinya

    2017-02-16

    The host-guest composites of Hofmann-type iron(II) spin-transition (ST) porous coordination polymers incorporating guest molecules show guest-dependent ST behavior in accordance with the respective guest species, which may be a gas, solvent, halogen, or organic molecule. The guest also works as a chemical stimulant to switch the spin state of the host between high and low spin at room temperature. In this review, we discuss guest properties including size, shape, flexibility, chemical properties, and pore loading content, which impact the spin states of the host framework and the ST behavior exhibited by the host-guest composites.

  3. Martin A. Knutson seated at desk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    In May, 1984, Martin A. Knutson was appointed Director of Flight Operations for NASA's Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California, and also was assigned the additional position as Site Manager of the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility at Edwards, California, a position he held until 1990. Knutson attended the University of Minnesota majoring in electrical engineering. He began his aviation career as an aviation cadet in the U.S. Air Force in 1950. Following service in the Korea conflict and participation in developmental test and operation missions in F-84s, he joined the CIA's Air Division flying U-2s. He retired from the Air Force in 1970, having logged over 6,500 hours of flight time. In 1971 Marty Joined NASA at the Ames Research Center as manager of the Airborne Instrumentation Research Project. In 1975 he was named Chief of the Airborne Missions and Applications Division, and served in that position until assuming the position at Dryden. In his six-year tour at Dryden he maintained the facility at 100 percent operational readiness for the most intense period of Shuttle landings ever at the site. He implemented a total modernization of research aircraft support at Dryden by replacing the aging F-104s with a modern F-18 fleet. Marty provided leadership during this period to the successful implementation of a variety of flight research/test programs such as the X-29 forward-swept wing, the planned crash of a B-720 loaded with an experimental FAA fire resistant fuel additive, the F-15 Digital Electronic Engine Control project that integrated propulsion and flight controls for greater efficiency, the Pegasus Air-Launched Rocket Vehicle, the CV-990 Shuttle Landing Gear Test Vehicle, and the F-18 High Angle-of-Attack Research Vehicle. Near the end of his Dryden assignment, the USAF decided to terminate its SR-71 reconnaissance capability and destroy the airframes and associated assets. Almost alone in his belief that these unique aircraft would be needed

  4. INTERIOR GUEST BATH, LOOKING NORTHWEST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR GUEST BATH, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  5. INTERIOR GUEST BEDROOM, LOOKING NORTHWEST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR GUEST BEDROOM, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  6. INTERIOR GUEST BEDROOM, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR GUEST BEDROOM, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  7. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey PHOTOCOPY CA. 1916 OF GUEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey PHOTOCOPY CA. 1916 OF GUEST BEDROOM, UNUSUAL PARQUET FLOORS AND PINK MARBLE FIREPLACE Original in Collections of Marian College - James A. Allison Mansion, 3200 Coldspring Road, Indianapolis, Marion County, IN

  8. 12. Interior, guest suite on the second floor. Plaster ceiling ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Interior, guest suite on the second floor. Plaster ceiling with stencilled border design, plaster molded cornice, and window frame detail. - Trenton House Hotel, 20-24 North Warren Street & 1-19 East Hanover Street, Trenton, Mercer County, NJ

  9. The Design of Molecular Hosts, Guests, and Their Complexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cram, Donald J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the origins, definitions, tools, and principles of host-guest chemistry. Gives examples of chiral recognition in complexation, of partial transacylase mimics, of caviplexes, and of a synthetic molecular cell. (Author/RT)

  10. 70. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, MAHOGANY GUEST ROOM, EAST WALL, DETAIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    70. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, MAHOGANY GUEST ROOM, EAST WALL, DETAIL OF SPEAKING TUBE MOUTHPIECE (TUBE TO KITCHEN) - Mark Twain House, 351 Farmington Avenue (corrected from original address of 531 Farmington Avenue), Hartford, Hartford County, CT

  11. 71. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, MAHOGANY GUEST ROOM, DETAIL OF FIREPLACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, MAHOGANY GUEST ROOM, DETAIL OF FIREPLACE AND MANTLE IN NORTHWEST CORNER FROM THE EAST - Mark Twain House, 351 Farmington Avenue (corrected from original address of 531 Farmington Avenue), Hartford, Hartford County, CT

  12. Incorporation of large guest molecules into liposomes via chemical reactions in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Yuki; Sugikawa, Kouta; Ueda, Masafumi; Ikeda, Atsushi

    2017-02-22

    The incorporation of hydrophobic guest molecules into lipid membranes by the exchange of the guest molecule from a cyclodextrin (CDx) complex to a liposome is limited to guest molecules that can be included in CDxs. To solve this problem, large guest molecules were incorporated into liposomes by chemical reactions of guest molecules in lipid membranes. Stable lipid-membrane-incorporated fullerene derivatives with large substituent(s) were prepared by Diels-Alder reactions in lipid membranes.

  13. Nanoparticle guests in lyotropic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dölle, Sarah; Park, Ji Hyun; Schymura, Stefan; Jo, Hyeran; Scalia, Giusy; Lagerwall, Jan P. F.

    In this chapter we discuss the benefits, peculiarities and main challenges related to nanoparticle templating in lyotropic liquid crystals. We first give a brief bird's-eye view of the field, discussing different nanoparticles as well as different lyotropic hosts that have been explored, but then quickly focus on the dispersion of carbon nanotubes in surfactant-based lyotropic nematic phases. We discuss in some detail how the transfer of orientational order from liquid crystal host to nanoparticle guest can be verified and which degree of ordering can be expected, as well as the importance of choosing the right surfactant and its concentration for the stability of the nanoparticle suspension. We introduce a method for dispersing nanoparticles with an absolute minimum of stabilizing surfactant, based on dispersion below the Krafft temperature, and we discuss the peculiar phenomenon of filament formation in lyotropic nematic phases with a sufficient concentration of well-dispersed carbon nanotubes. Finally, we describe how the total surfactant concentration in micellar nematics can be greatly reduced by combining cat- and anionic surfactants, and we discuss how nanotubes can help in inducing the liquid crystal phase close to the isotropic-nematic boundary.

  14. Encapsulated Guests in the Smallest Spaces: Shrinking Guests by Compression and Investigations under Solvent-Free Conditions.

    PubMed

    Haberhauer, Gebhard; Woitschetzki, Sascha; Füten, Christof

    2015-08-21

    Noncovalent interactions play a pivotal role in a variety of biological and chemical processes. The experimental determination and quantum chemical calculations of the forces driving these interactions are of utmost importance. Of special interest are interactions of molecules in small spaces which show phenomena different from conventional behavior in solution. An extension is the encapsulation of guests in smallest spaces: The guests are too large to be included under standard conditions and hence must be forced to intrude into the cavity. Here, we show the design of such a host-guest system which allows to directly compare the measured thermodynamic values to gas-phase quantum chemical calculations. Structural investigation of the complexes reveals that the encapsulation process causes not only an extension of the hollow space of the host but also a shrinking of the included guest by compression.

  15. Insertion of Guest Molecules into a Mixed Ligand Metal-Organic Framework via Single-Crystal-to-Single Crystal Guest Exchange

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    Insertion of Guest Molecules into a Mixed Ligand Metal−Organic Framework via Single-Crystal-to-Single- Crystal Guest Exchange by Lily Giri...Research Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 ARL-TR-7004 July 2014 Insertion of Guest Molecules into a Mixed Ligand Metal−Organic...Framework via Single-Crystal-to-Single- Crystal Guest Exchange Lily Giri, Rose Pesce-Rodriguez, Shashi P Karna, and Nirupam J Trivedi Weapons

  16. A former Editor views the editorial process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeze, R. Allan

    It was at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco in December 1976, shortly after my appointment as coeditor of Water Resources Research that I first began to realize the strong emotional ties that exist between a scientific community and its journals. Feelings run high, regardless of whether they come from readers, contributors, reviewers, active scientists, or scientific administrators. Opinions are often positive, sometimes negative, usually a mixture of the two; but regardless of their tenor they are delivered to the editor, in person, usually fortissimo. From that day until this, conference life has never been dull. When I meet a colleague in the halls there is never a loss for words, no need to search for a topic of mutual interest; WRR is always there at the ready.

  17. How Newspaper Editors Reacted to "Post's" Pulitzer Prize Hoax.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Douglas A.

    1982-01-01

    Reports the findings of a nationwide survey of newspaper editors, revealing that most thought that the Janet Cooke hoax had been poorly handled by the "Washington Post." Notes that most of the editors said their newspapers had systems of review for stories coming from anonymous sources. (FL)

  18. Peer reviews and the role of a journal editor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obtaining peer reviews for manuscripts submitted to scientific journals is becoming increasingly difficult. Changes to the system are necessary, and editors must cultivate and maintain a solid base of reviewers to help evaluate journal submissions. This article outlines some steps editors can and sh...

  19. The RAE and Publications: A Review of Journal Editors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talib, Ameen Ali

    2000-01-01

    Surveyed editors of academic journals about publication issues related to Britain's Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), a process of grading and funding universities based on published research output. Editors were asked about research quality and output, publication practices, academics' willingness to referee manuscripts, and proliferation of…

  20. March 2017 Letters to the Editor-in-Chief.

    PubMed

    2017-03-01

    Letters to the Editor-in-Chief of JOSPT as follows: "Regarding 'Unraveling the Complexity of Low Back Pain'" with Authors' Response "Beall's List Has Vanished: What Next?" with Editor-in-Chief Response J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(3):219-223. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.0202.

  1. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jason S.

    2012-01-01

    . Different from a traditional review, these can highlight emerging areas in the field, alerting our readers to new opportunities. Topical reviews can also serve to highlight experimental tools that can assist researchers. Special issues are a compilation of invited papers on a selected topic from authors selected by guest editors and approved by the Editorial Board. This concentration of high-quality, original papers draws attention to all the papers in a special issue. These issues should not be considered as conference proceedings, and all papers go through our excellent review procedures and must comply with the usual strict criteria applied to regular papers in JPCM. Expanding these programs will be a high priority of mine. Other mechanisms that will draw attention to the journal and individual papers include the use of multimedia, our annual highlights compilation, our excellent web presence and the introduction of open-access articles. Authors can also benefit from extra promotion of their work via LabTalk, IOP Select and personalized 'recommended reader' campaigns. A challenge for JPCM is to ensure that it is at the forefront in terms of online tools and article presentation. The first step has been taken with the introduction of 'article evolution'—an enhanced HTML for all articles that will provide a new and interactive user experience for the benefit of our authors and readers (for further information, visit iopscience.iop.org/info/page/articleevolution). Many new features are available, such as being able to zoom in and out of images and export them to Powerpoint. MathJax technology has been incorporated, improving the rendering of mathematics, and a mobile view of abstract and article pages is also available. This format will be developed on an ongoing basis in response to the demands of the community. I therefore encourage you to contact me, or the journal team, with any feedback you may have regarding this new article format and how it can be improved

  2. Academic Degradation and the Retreat of the Editors: Academic Irregularities and the Spreading of Academic Corruption from an Editor's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xun, Gong

    2007-01-01

    Against the backdrop of the grave academic crisis in China, editors have become the objects of wooing, favor-currying, connections-seeking, and collusions; they have been targeted for attacks, plots, extortions, and encroachments. Editing and publishing have become avenues for academic irregularities and academic corruption. Editors have the power…

  3. Overview of the Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) Program endeavors to quickly develop a compact fusion power plant with favorable commercial economics and military utility. An overview of the concept and its diamagnetic, high beta magnetically encapsulated linear ring cusp confinement scheme will be given. The analytical model of the major loss mechanisms and predicted performance will be discussed, along with the major physics challenges. Key features of an operational CFR reactor will be highlighted. The proposed developmental path following the current experimental efforts will be presented. ©2015 Lockheed Martin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

  4. New Observatory at the University of Tennessee at Martin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, Lionel J.; Chrysler, R.; Turner, K.

    2010-01-01

    A new observatory has been completed at the University of Tennessee at Martin and is now open for student research, local teacher training, and public outreach. The telescope is a 16" Meade RCT on a Software Bisque Paramount ME mount, 10' HomeDome, and SBIG CCD camera. The project endured many delays from a necessary change in housing from roll-top roof to dome, to the shutter blowing off in a heavy windstorm. This project was funded primarily by a Tennessee Math-Science Partnership grant (PI: Dr. Michael Gibson, UT Martin) directed at secondary teacher training in sciences.

  5. ESDAPT - APT PROGRAMMING EDITOR AND INTERPRETER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premack, T.

    1994-01-01

    ESDAPT is a graphical programming environment for developing APT (Automatically Programmed Tool) programs for controlling numerically controlled machine tools. ESDAPT has a graphical user interface that provides the user with an APT syntax sensitive text editor and windows for displaying geometry and tool paths. APT geometry statement can also be created using menus and screen picks. ESDAPT interprets APT geometry statements and displays the results in its view windows. Tool paths are generated by batching the APT source to an APT processor (COSMIC P-APT recommended). The tool paths are then displayed in the view windows. Hardcopy output of the view windows is in color PostScript format. ESDAPT is written in C-language, yacc, lex, and XView for use on Sun4 series computers running SunOS. ESDAPT requires 4Mb of disk space, 7Mb of RAM, and MIT's X Window System, Version 11 Release 4, or OpenWindows version 3 for execution. Program documentation in PostScript format and an executable for OpenWindows version 3 are provided on the distribution media. The standard distribution medium for ESDAPT is a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge (Sun QIC-24) in UNIX tar format. This program was developed in 1992.

  6. Retirement of J. Gary Eden as Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadish, Chennupati; Jelinkova, Helena; Fainman, Yeshaiahu; Dawson, Martin; Ermers, Ysabel

    2016-01-01

    After nine years of dedicated service as Editor-in-Chief of Progress in Quantum Electronics (PQE), J. Gary Eden has retired at the end of December 2015. During his term as the Editor-in-Chief, PQE has grown significantly in size and quality and he has given generously of his time in advising authors, referees, editors, and the journal staff. Gary is an exceptional scientist and a generous individual who has given so much to the community. He is always very positive in every situation, and has created positive environment and supported people with utmost enthusiasm.

  7. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) is a journal that originated in the UK but is now rightly regarded as one of the pre-eminent international journals for the publication of material coming within its remit. It is 50 years old and its maturity is an outcome of the consistent support of high performing authors, a supportive and professional publishing house, dedicated referees, many vigorous and conscientious editorial boards and the collective input of the 10 previous Editors as listed in his incoming editorial (January 2000 issue) by the retiring Editor, Professor Alun Beddoe. The scientific climate and it associated publication modus operandi in the 1950s was very different from that at the current time and the journal has evolved to reflect this. Hence today the scope of content is somewhat broader, the size of the journal is vastly greater, the whole publication process is slicker and more efficient and a paper in PMB is highly prized by its authors and those who look to quality factors and impact. The quality of the journal still relies on the voluntary labour and expertise of its busy international referees and Board members. For many years I have tried to place my own research material in PMB and encourage my teams to do likewise, not only acknowledging the prestige of the journal but also because of the extraordinarily fast turnaround time of all the processes without any loss of quality. This serves us very well and the publishing team are to be congratulated. Some things seem to change more slowly or not at all, however. The prediction, when I started my research career, that books and journals would be dinosaurs by now has manifestly not come true and, whilst most of us are addicted (and why not?) to the electronic ways of doing things that can be done by more traditional ways, PMB and a packet of reprints from time to time arriving by post still has a reassuring feel despite the fact that the papers have been `on-line' for a while before. An incoming

  8. Guest disorder and high pressure behavior of argon hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.; Tulk, C.A.; Klug, D.D.; Chakoumakos, B.C.; Ehm, L.; Molaison, J.J.; Parise, J.B.; Simonson, J.M.

    2010-03-29

    The structure of argon hydrate was studied at ambient pressure and low temperature, and between 1.7 and 4.2 GPa at 295 K. This analysis produced a single Ar guest atom, positionally disordered off-center in the large cages of sII. Above 1.7 GPa Ar clathrate transformed to a mixture of a body-centered orthorhombic filled-ice phase, which can be viewed as a polytype of ice-Ih, and high pressure forms of pure ice. The guest disorder is further substantiated by analysis of the guest to host ratio in this high pressure filled-ice structure. The bulk modulus of Ar filled-ice found to be 11.7 {+-} 0.4 GPa.

  9. Guest exchange in an encapsulation complex: A supramolecular substitution reaction

    PubMed Central

    Santamaría, Javier; Martín, Tomás; Hilmersson, Göran; Craig, Stephen L.; Rebek, Julius

    1999-01-01

    Encapsulation complexes are reversibly formed assemblies in which small molecule guests are completely surrounded by large molecule hosts. The assemblies are held together by weak intermolecular forces and are dynamic: they form and dissipate on time scales ranging from milliseconds to days—long enough for many interactions, even reactions, to take place within them. Little information is available on the exchange process, how guests get in and out of these complexes. Here we report that these events can be slow enough for conventional kinetic studies, and reactive intermediates can be detected. Guest exchange has much in common with familiar chemical substitution reactions, but differs in some respects: no covalent bonds are made or broken, the substrate is an assembly rather than a single molecule, and at least four molecules are involved in multiple rate-determining steps. PMID:10411877

  10. Emerging Supramolecular Therapeutic Carriers Based on Host-Guest Interactions.

    PubMed

    Karim, Anis Abdul; Dou, Qingqing; Li, Zibiao; Loh, Xian Jun

    2016-05-06

    Recent advances in host-guest chemistry have significantly influenced the construction of supramolecular soft biomaterials. The highly selective and non-covalent interactions provide vast possibilities of manipulating supramolecular self-assemblies at the molecular level, allowing a rational design to control the sizes and morphologies of the resultant objects as carrier vehicles in a delivery system. In this Focus Review, the most recent developments of supramolecular self-assemblies through host-guest inclusion, including nanoparticles, micelles, vesicles, hydrogels, and various stimuli-responsive morphology transition materials are presented. These sophisticated materials with diverse functions, oriented towards therapeutic agent delivery, are further summarized into several active domains in the areas of drug delivery, gene delivery, co-delivery and site-specific targeting deliveries. Finally, the possible strategies for future design of multifunctional delivery carriers by combining host-guest chemistry with biological interface science are proposed.

  11. Multiaddressable molecular rectangles with reversible host-guest interactions: modulation of pH-controlled guest release and capture.

    PubMed

    Chan, Alan Kwun-Wa; Lam, Wai Han; Tanaka, Yuya; Wong, Keith Man-Chung; Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah

    2015-01-20

    A series of multiaddressable platinum(II) molecular rectangles with different rigidities and cavity sizes has been synthesized by endcapping the U-shaped diplatinum(II) terpyridine moiety with various bis-alkynyl ligands. The studies of the host-guest association with various square planar platinum(II), palladium(II), and gold(III) complexes and the related low-dimensional gold(I) complexes, most of which are potential anticancer therapeutics, have been performed. Excellent guest confinement and selectivity of the rectangular architecture have been shown. Introduction of pH-responsive functionalities to the ligand backbone generates multifunctional molecular rectangles that exhibit reversible guest release and capture on the addition of acids and bases, indicating their potential in controlled therapeutics delivery on pH modulation. The reversible host-guest interactions are found to be strongly perturbed by metal-metal and π-π interactions and to a certain extent, electrostatic interactions, giving rise to various spectroscopic changes depending on the nature of the guest molecules. Their binding mode and thermodynamic parameters have been determined by 2D NMR and van't Hoff analysis and supported by computational study.

  12. Multiaddressable molecular rectangles with reversible host–guest interactions: Modulation of pH-controlled guest release and capture

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Alan Kwun-Wa; Lam, Wai Han; Tanaka, Yuya; Wong, Keith Man-Chung; Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah

    2015-01-01

    A series of multiaddressable platinum(II) molecular rectangles with different rigidities and cavity sizes has been synthesized by endcapping the U-shaped diplatinum(II) terpyridine moiety with various bis-alkynyl ligands. The studies of the host–guest association with various square planar platinum(II), palladium(II), and gold(III) complexes and the related low-dimensional gold(I) complexes, most of which are potential anticancer therapeutics, have been performed. Excellent guest confinement and selectivity of the rectangular architecture have been shown. Introduction of pH-responsive functionalities to the ligand backbone generates multifunctional molecular rectangles that exhibit reversible guest release and capture on the addition of acids and bases, indicating their potential in controlled therapeutics delivery on pH modulation. The reversible host–guest interactions are found to be strongly perturbed by metal–metal and π–π interactions and to a certain extent, electrostatic interactions, giving rise to various spectroscopic changes depending on the nature of the guest molecules. Their binding mode and thermodynamic parameters have been determined by 2D NMR and van’t Hoff analysis and supported by computational study. PMID:25568083

  13. Editorial independence and the editor-owner relationship: good editors never die, they just cross the line.

    PubMed

    Lapeña, J F

    2009-12-01

    The concept of editorial freedom or independence is examined in the light of the editor-owner relationship. Like individual and national freedom or independence, it is a rhetorical concept whose realisation flows from internal achievement as much as it depends on external validation. This freedom entails roles and responsibilities embodied in specific codes of practice for editors, such as the guidelines espoused by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Association of Medical Editors. The calling to embody these guidelines makes editing a vocation that demands isolation and distancing, separation and solitude. It involves bracketing one's biases, prejudgments and preconceptions. With such detachment comes real freedom; one that requires a moral fibre and trustworthiness that uphold truth and right, whether in full view of public scrutiny, or in the aloneness of private secrecy. The stereotypical tension between academic and commercial concerns highlights the editor-owner relationship, and bears directly on editorial independence. In practice, journal owners overstep their prerogatives. The absence of clear contracts defining editorial independence and the lack of established mechanisms governing the editor-owner relationship affect many small- to medium-sized journals in developing countries. Even large journals in developed and democratic nations or totalitarian states and societies are not spared. At the end of the day, editorial freedom exists only insofar as it is tolerated, or until editors cross the line.

  14. Listening as Embracing the Other: Martin Buber's Philosophy of Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Mordechai

    2011-01-01

    In this essay, Mordechai Gordon interprets Martin Buber's ideas on dialogue, presence, and especially his notion of embracing in an attempt to shed some light on Buber's understanding of listening. Gordon argues that in order to understand Buber's conception of listening, one needs to examine this concept in the context of his philosophy of…

  15. Jean-Martin Charcot Pathologist, Neurologist, Psychiatrist and Physician

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot is known as father of modern neurology. Before him, neurology was only limited to select disorders like chorea. His contributions were not limited to neurology only, as he was instrumental in many new developments in the field of pathology, psychiatry, and internal medicine. Even after 100 years, Charcot`s clinical methods remain the pillar of modern neurology. PMID:23349597

  16. Keeping the Dream Alive. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassells, Linda; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents activities for teaching elementary students about Dr. Martin Luther King's life, the civil rights movement, and King's accomplishments. Suggestions include shoebox dioramas, acronym games, oral histories, multicultural awareness activities, pledge cards, community service projects, special commemorative ceremonies, and a book of dreams.…

  17. The Martin Luther King Library and Archives at the Crossroads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chepesiuk, Ron; Kelley-Palmer, Gloria

    1994-01-01

    Describes the collection of the Martin Luther King Library and Archives and examines recent problems that have developed. Topics discussed include a lack of adequate funding and personnel; the lawsuit concerning papers given to Boston University by Dr. King; and an interview with Coretta Scott King. (LRW)

  18. A Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Curriculum: Playing the Dream.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemens, Sydney Gurewitz

    1988-01-01

    Discusses curriculum for young children centered around the beliefs and teachings of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. His works are interpreted in a human rights context in which children find their voice in the peaceable resolution of everyday conflicts. Describes the Child of the Day program. (Author/RWB)

  19. Martin Luther King's Birthday--A Teacher Resource Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NJEA Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Dr. Martin Luther King's birthday has been made a legal holiday in New Jersey. NJEA believes his work in fighting the injustice of racial discrimination and for the civil rights of all people merits a special day of public recognition. Teachers are encouraged to refer to this guide, developed from a background of information about Dr. King and the…

  20. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Washington State Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia, WA. Div. of Instructional Programs and Services.

    The Washington State Resource Guide on Martin Luther King, Jr., supplies a wide variety of materials for use with all grade levels in classroom and assembly presentations in public schools. The goal is for every child enrolled in Washington State schools to learn about Dr. King during the days of January 15 to January 17. Resolutions supporting an…

  1. Dr. Martin Luther King: A Unit for Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Kelli

    1986-01-01

    Presents a unit consisting of 4 lessons which focus on Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s childhood, his adult life and family, his civil rights work, and the national holiday which commemorates his birthday. Each lesson features specific objectives, learning activities, and instructional guidelines for the teacher. (TRS)

  2. 75 FR 3839 - Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-22

    ... By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation The Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King... opportunity to make America a better Nation,'' Dr. King said on the eve of his death. ``I may not get there... we have made great strides since the turbulent era of Dr. King's movement, his work and our...

  3. Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Brent

    1995-01-01

    Presents a five-lesson, high school instructional unit on the ideas and activities of Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. Includes student objectives, step-by-step instructional procedures, and discussion questions. Provides quotations by Thoreau and King. (CFR)

  4. Surprise in Schools: Martin Buber and Dialogic Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Julian

    2013-01-01

    The philosopher Martin Buber described the central role of surprise in education. Surprise is not an alternative to planning and order in schools, and it is not even an alternative to repetitive practice. It is, instead, that which must be allowed to occur in any dialogic encounter. Schooling that is creative and filled with hope will also be…

  5. [Christ as a pharmacist, according to Martin Luther].

    PubMed

    Steiger, Johann Anselm

    2003-07-01

    This condition has been stimulated by the latest study written by Fitz Krafft concerning the motif "Jesus Christ as a pharmacist", which was frequently used in Christian art. It is shown that this motif, fully developed in the first third of the 17th century, originated in the theology of Martin Luther.

  6. Martin Gardner: 100 Years of the Magic of Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillaspy, John D.

    2014-01-01

    2014 marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of Martin Gardner, a man whose writings helped inspire generations of young students to pursue a career in physics and mathematics. From his first to his last, and many in between, Gardner's publications often combined magic and science. A recurring theme was the clever use of physical principles…

  7. A Model Aerospace Curriculum: August Martin High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickler, Mervin K., Jr.

    This document presents an operational model of a thematic aerospace education school--the August Martin High School (New York). Part 1 briefly describes the nature of aviation/aerospace education and the background of the school. This background information includes how the school was formed, rationale for an aerospace thematic school, research…

  8. Martin Luther King, Jr.: The Dream of Peaceful Revolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Della

    This biography for younger readers depicts the life of Martin Luther King, Jr., the Nobel Peace Prize winner who dedicated himself to the struggle for equal rights for African Americans while embracing the principle of nonviolent resistance. The book presents an overview of the civil rights movement and chronicles King's role as national leader…

  9. Effects of guest feeding programs on captive giraffe behavior.

    PubMed

    Orban, David A; Siegford, Janice M; Snider, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Zoological institutions develop human-animal interaction opportunities for visitors to advance missions of conservation, education, and recreation; however, the animal welfare implications largely have yet to be evaluated. This behavioral study was the first to quantify impacts of guest feeding programs on captive giraffe behavior and welfare, by documenting giraffe time budgets that included both normal and stereotypic behaviors. Thirty giraffes from nine zoos (six zoos with varying guest feeding programs and three without) were observed using both instantaneous scan sampling and continuous behavioral sampling techniques. All data were collected during summer 2012 and analyzed using linear mixed models. The degree of individual giraffe participation in guest feeding programs was positively associated with increased time spent idle and marginally associated with reduced time spent ruminating. Time spent participating in guest feeding programs had no effect on performance of stereotypic behaviors. When time spent eating routine diets was combined with time spent participating in guest feeding programs, individuals that spent more time engaged in total feeding behaviors tended to perform less oral stereotypic behavior such as object-licking and tongue-rolling. By extending foraging time and complexity, guest feeding programs have the potential to act as environmental enrichment and alleviate unfulfilled foraging motivations that may underlie oral stereotypic behaviors observed in many captive giraffes. However, management strategies may need to be adjusted to mitigate idleness and other program consequences. Further studies, especially pre-and-post-program implementation comparisons, are needed to better understand the influence of human-animal interactions on zoo animal behavior and welfare.

  10. Charge Transport by Superexchange in Molecular Host-Guest Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symalla, Franz; Friederich, Pascal; Massé, Andrea; Meded, Velimir; Coehoorn, Reinder; Bobbert, Peter; Wenzel, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    Charge transport in disordered organic semiconductors is generally described as a result of incoherent hopping between localized states. In this work, we focus on multicomponent emissive host-guest layers as used in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), and show using multiscale ab initio based modeling that charge transport can be significantly enhanced by the coherent process of molecular superexchange. Superexchange increases the rate of emitter-to-emitter hopping, in particular if the emitter molecules act as relatively deep trap states, and allows for percolation path formation in charge transport at low guest concentrations.

  11. The Letters Not Sent by a Journal Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-04-01

    In the late hours of the night, even the most conscientious of journal editors may slip into writing imaginary letters to cherished authors and reviewers. Here are some of the letters that I composed:

  12. Bibliography or Bust: The "Angst" of Scholarly Editors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Richard Hauer

    1980-01-01

    Provides evidence indicating not only that the market for articles on literature and language is saturated with submissions, but that the glut creates burgeoning problems for editors, including the problem of rejecting publishable items. (RL)

  13. Host–guest chemistry of mesoporous silicas: precise design of location, density and orientation of molecular guests in mesopores

    PubMed Central

    Sohmiya, Minoru; Saito, Kanji; Ogawa, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Mesoporous solids, which were prepared from inorganic-surfactant mesostructured materials, have been investigated due to their very large surface area and high porosity, pore size uniformity and variation, periodic pore arrangement and possible pore surface modification. Morphosyntheses from macroscopic morphologies such as bulk monolith and films, to nanoscopic ones, nanoparticles and their stable suspension, make mesoporous materials more attractive for applications and detailed characterization. This class of materials has been studied for such applications as adsorbents and catalysts, and later on, for optical, electronic, environmental and bio-related ones. This review summarizes the studies on the chemistry of mesoporous silica and functional guest species (host–guest chemistry) to highlight the present status and future applications of the host–guest hybrids. PMID:27877830

  14. ANNOUNCEMENT: Greetings from the Editor and Publisher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wäppling, Roger; Williams, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    Physica Scripta is an international physics journal published for the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences on behalf of the Nordic Science Academies and Physical Societies. This issue marks the beginning of the partnership between the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and Institute of Physics Publishing (IOP). We look forward to a fruitful relationship in which Physica Scripta can profit from the international reach of IOP. Authors and readers will benefit from advance publication of articles on the web prior to receiving each month's journal issue. The peer-review system will continue to be managed by Professor Roger Wäppling who will assess each paper before assigning it to an external editor or sending it for refereeing. IOP will receive new article submissions and generate electronic documents suitable for use in the refereeing process. The editorial office in Sweden will then be responsible for these manuscripts up to the final publication decision. Accepted articles will be sent to IOP for copy-editing, typesetting, production and distribution. We aim to provide our authors, referees and readers with an enhanced service for this well-established journal. IOP will maintain and augment Physica Scripta's record in publishing a broad range of high-quality research papers and we will continue to publish Topical Issues as supplements to the regular 12 issues. The popular Comments articles will continue to be published in conjunction with regular papers under this new partnership. We hope that our subscribers will continue to enjoy reading Physica Scripta as a valuable resource for general physics research.

  15. Adapting a thesis to publication style: meeting editors' expectations.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S H

    1996-01-01

    Every year hundreds of thesis reports are completed by graduate students. Many of these end up on nursing journal editors' desks, only to be rejected. What characteristics of a thesis lead to rejection? How can authors develop quality research manuscripts? How can faculty teach graduate students the difference between a thesis and manuscript. This article answers these questions by providing advice from 15 critical care and research journal editors.

  16. Substrate Utilization in the Critically Ill (Letter to the Editor)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    pen.sagepub.com/ Nutrition Journal of Parenteral and Enteral http://pen.sagepub.com/content/33/1/111 The online version of this article can be found at: DOI...Published by: http://www.sagepublications.com On behalf of: The American Society for Parenteral & Enteral Nutrition can be found at:Journal of...the Editor Dear Editor, Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Volume 33 Number 1 January/February 2009 111 © 2009 American Society for Parenteral

  17. Rotaxane and catenane host structures for sensing charged guest species.

    PubMed

    Langton, Matthew J; Beer, Paul D

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: The promise of mechanically interlocked architectures, such as rotaxanes and catenanes, as prototypical molecular switches and shuttles for nanotechnological applications, has stimulated an ever increasing interest in their synthesis and function. The elaborate host cavities of interlocked structures, however, can also offer a novel approach toward molecular recognition: this Account describes the use of rotaxane and catenane host systems for binding charged guest species, and for providing sensing capability through an integrated optical or electrochemical reporter group. Particular attention is drawn to the exploitation of the unusual dynamic properties of interlocked molecules, such as guest-induced shuttling or conformational switching, as a sophisticated means of achieving a selective and functional sensor response. We initially survey interlocked host systems capable of sensing cationic guests, before focusing on our accomplishments in synthesizing rotaxanes and catenanes designed for the more challenging task of selective anion sensing. In our group, we have developed the use of discrete anionic templation to prepare mechanically interlocked structures for anion recognition applications. Removal of the anion template reveals an interlocked host system, possessing a unique three-dimensional geometrically restrained binding cavity formed between the interlocked components, which exhibits impressive selectivity toward complementary anionic guest species. By incorporating reporter groups within such systems, we have developed both electrochemical and optical anion sensors which can achieve highly selective sensing of anionic guests. Transition metals, lanthanides, and organic fluorophores integrated within the mechanically bonded structural framework of the receptor are perturbed by the binding of the guest, with a concomitant change in the emission profile. We have also exploited the unique dynamics of interlocked hosts by demonstrating that an

  18. ZED- A LINE EDITOR FOR THE DEC VAX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    The ZED editor for the DEC VAX is a simple, yet powerful line editor for text, program source code, and non-binary data. Line editors can be superior to screen editors in some cases, such as executing complex multiple or conditional commands, or editing via slow modem lines. ZED excels in the area of text processing by using procedure files. For example, such procedures can reformat a file of addresses or remove all comment lines from a FORTRAN program. In addition to command files, ZED also features versatile search qualifiers, global changes, conditionals, on-line help, hexadecimal mode, space compression, looping, logical combinations of search strings, journaling, visible control characters, and automatic detabbing. The ZED editor was originally developed at Cambridge University in London and has been continuously enhanced since 1976. Users of the Cambridge implementation have devised such elaborate ZED procedures as chess games, calculators, and programs for evaluating Pi. This implementation of ZED strives to maintain the characteristics of the Cambridge editor. A complete ZED manual is included on the tape. ZED is written entirely in C for either batch or interactive execution on the DEC VAX under VMS 4.X and requires 80,896 bytes of memory. This program was released in 1988 and updated in 1989.

  19. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Saint Martin/Sint Maarten

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of the northeast Caribbean island Saint Martin. The island is divided between two nations, France in the north (Saint-Martin) and the Netherlands in the south (Sint Maarten).

  20. Supramolecular Chemistry: Induced Circular Dichroism to Study Host-Guest Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendicuti, Francisco; Gonzalez-Alvarez, Maria Jose

    2010-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students obtain information about the structure of a host-guest complex from the interpretation of circular dichroism measurements. The value and sign of the induced circular dichroism (ICD) on an achiral chromophore guest when it complexes with a cyclodextrin can be related to the guest penetration and its…

  1. 48 CFR 1352.237-73 - Foreign national visitor and guest access to departmental resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and guest access to departmental resources. 1352.237-73 Section 1352.237-73 Federal Acquisition... of Provisions and Clauses 1352.237-73 Foreign national visitor and guest access to departmental... and Guest Access to Departmental Resources (APR 2010) (a) The contractor shall comply with...

  2. 48 CFR 1352.237-73 - Foreign national visitor and guest access to departmental resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and guest access to departmental resources. 1352.237-73 Section 1352.237-73 Federal Acquisition... of Provisions and Clauses 1352.237-73 Foreign national visitor and guest access to departmental... and Guest Access to Departmental Resources (APR 2010) (a) The contractor shall comply with...

  3. 48 CFR 1352.237-73 - Foreign national visitor and guest access to departmental resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... and guest access to departmental resources. 1352.237-73 Section 1352.237-73 Federal Acquisition... of Provisions and Clauses 1352.237-73 Foreign national visitor and guest access to departmental... and Guest Access to Departmental Resources (APR 2010) (a) The contractor shall comply with...

  4. 48 CFR 1352.237-73 - Foreign national visitor and guest access to departmental resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... and guest access to departmental resources. 1352.237-73 Section 1352.237-73 Federal Acquisition... of Provisions and Clauses 1352.237-73 Foreign national visitor and guest access to departmental... and Guest Access to Departmental Resources (APR 2010) (a) The contractor shall comply with...

  5. 48 CFR 1352.237-73 - Foreign national visitor and guest access to departmental resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and guest access to departmental resources. 1352.237-73 Section 1352.237-73 Federal Acquisition... of Provisions and Clauses 1352.237-73 Foreign national visitor and guest access to departmental... and Guest Access to Departmental Resources (APR 2010) (a) The contractor shall comply with...

  6. EzEditor: a versatile sequence alignment editor for both rRNA- and protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yoon-Seong; Lee, Kihyun; Park, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Bong-Soo; Cho, Yong-Joon; Ha, Sung-Min; Chun, Jongsik

    2014-02-01

    EzEditor is a Java-based molecular sequence editor allowing manipulation of both DNA and protein sequence alignments for phylogenetic analysis. It has multiple features optimized to connect initial computer-generated multiple alignment and subsequent phylogenetic analysis by providing manual editing with reference to biological information specific to the genes under consideration. It provides various functionalities for editing rRNA alignments using secondary structure information. In addition, it supports simultaneous editing of both DNA sequences and their translated protein sequences for protein-coding genes. EzEditor is, to our knowledge, the first sequence editing software designed for both rRNA- and protein-coding genes with the visualization of biologically relevant information and should be useful in molecular phylogenetic studies. EzEditor is based on Java, can be run on all major computer operating systems and is freely available from http://sw.ezbiocloud.net/ezeditor/.

  7. Q-dots and Q-wires in the microporous and mesoporous zeolite as matrix host-guest and guest-guest interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel'biz, German M.; Shvets, Olexyi V.; Brodyn, Michail S.; Vozny, Volodymyr L.

    2001-04-01

    We report here on the development of host-guest and guest-guest interaction in course of preparation procedures semiconductor clusters (CdS, PbI2), in zeolite (FAU,LTL) matrix. Optical properties of practically unexplored PbI2/zeolite LTL system have been investigated. Both in absorption (reconstructed from diffuse reflection via Kubelka-Munk function) and luminescence spectra the features were observed at energies much exceeding the excitation resonance energy Eex in bulk PbI2. This is considered as an indication of size quantization through the unambiguous attribution of the respective transitions requires further studies, including theoretical ones. For the samples with relatively high PbI2 content the narrow emission peak only slightly blue-shifted from Eex was observed and attributed to long clusters formed inside the main channels of zeolite LTL lattice and possible retaining the layer structure of bulk PbI2. The gradual disappearance of this peak during the storage of samples in the air is explained by assuming that originally formed long clusters undergo fragmentation into smaller species.

  8. 1. GUEST HOUSE KNOWN AS 'THE LODGE' REPORTEDLY BUILT TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GUEST HOUSE KNOWN AS 'THE LODGE' REPORTEDLY BUILT TO BE USED BY J.D. ROSS ON HIS VISITS TO THE SKAGIT PROJECT. DURING THE 1930S THE U.S. FOREST SERVICE EXERTED A STONG INFLUENCE ON BUILDING STYLES FOR RESIDENCES AT THE SKAGIT PROJECT, 1989. - Skagit Power Development, Skagit River & Newhalem Creek Hydroelectric Project, On Skagit River, Newhalem, Whatcom County, WA

  9. A light controlled cavitand wall regulates guest binding†

    PubMed Central

    Berryman, Orion B.; Sather, Aaron C.; Rebek, Julius

    2010-01-01

    Here we report a cavitand with a photochemical switch as one of the container walls. The azo-arene switch undergoes photoisomerization when subjected to UV light producing a self-fulfilled cavitand. This process is thermally and photochemically reversible. The reported cavitand binds small molecules and these guests can be ejected from the cavitand through this photochemical process. PMID:21116523

  10. New "pyrene box" cages for adaptive guest conformations.

    PubMed

    Dumitrescu, Dan; Dumitru, Florina; Legrand, Yves-Marie; Petit, Eddy; van der Lee, Arie; Barboiu, Mihail

    2015-05-01

    The possibility of controlling the compression extent and the coiling shape of the 1,12-diammoniumdodecane guest is shown by changing the dimensions of the internal space of the host guanidinium 1,3,5,8 pyrene-tetrasulfonate PTS(4-) crystalline capsules by using guanidinium (G(+)), amino-guanidinium (AG(+)), and diaminoguanidinium (A2G(+)) cations.

  11. Distribution of metal and adsorbed guest species in zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Chmelka, B.F.

    1989-12-01

    Because of their high internal surface areas and molecular-size cavity dimensions, zeolites are used widely as catalysts, shape- selective supports, or adsorbents in a variety of important chemical processes. For metal-catalyzed reactions, active metal species must be dispersed to sites within the zeolite pores that are accessible to diffusing reactant molecules. The distribution of the metal, together with transport and adsorption of reactant molecules in zeolite powders, are crucial to ultimate catalyst performance. The nature of the metal or adsorbed guest distribution is known, however, to be dramatically dependent upon preparatory conditions. Our objective is to understand, at the molecular level, how preparatory treatments influence the distribution of guest species in zeolites, in order that macroscopic adsorption and reaction properties of these materials may be better understood. The sensitivity of xenon to its adsorption environment makes {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy an important diagnostic probe of metal clustering and adsorbate distribution processes in zeolites. The utility of {sup 129}Xe NMR depends on the mobility of the xenon atoms within the zeolite-guest system, together with the length scale of the sample heterogeneity being studied. In large pore zeolites containing dispersed guest species, such as Pt--NaY, {sup 129}Xe NMR is insensitive to fine structural details at room temperature.

  12. `Guest-host' effect in liquid crystal mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchodolska, B.; Rudzki, A.; Ossowska-Chruściel, M. D.; Zalewski, S.; Chruściel, J.

    2015-01-01

    The most important goal of our research is to show the influence of the 'guest' (bent-core mesogen, 1,3-phenyldicarboxylatebis{4-[(4-octylbenzoyl)sulphanyl]phenyl} [IFOS8], banana-shaped liquid crystal [BLC]) on the 'host' (calamitic liquid crystal [CLC], (S)-(+)-1-methylheptyloxybiphenyl-(4-n-octylphenyl)thiobenzoate [MHOBS8]), on the stability and the destabilization of the antiferroelectric B2 and the ferroelectric smectic C* (SmC*) phases, and change of the temperature ranges of other phases in the binary liquid crystal mixtures. This work is focused on polymorphism of three new binary liquid crystal mixtures, exhibiting a 'guest-host' (guest liquid crystal-host liquid crystal [GH-LC]) effect. MHOBS8 has, among others, a ferroelectric SmC* phase, and IFOS8 assumes the B2 phase with antiferroelectric properties. The observed properties of the mixtures, such as variation of the phase transition temperatures, spontaneous polarization, tilt angle and switching time, are characteristic of a 'guest-host' mixture. The influence of BLC on the character of the interactions within the CLC host is discussed, with particular attention paid to electro-optical properties of the GH-LC mixtures.

  13. 78 FR 38091 - Airworthiness Criteria: Proposed Airship Design Criteria for Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Model...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... Martin Aeronautics Model LMZ1M Airship AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice... Aeronautics model LMZ1M airship. On March 12, 2012 Lockheed Martin Aeronautics submitted an application for... Hybrid Airships, Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Document Number 1008D0122 Rev. C dated January...

  14. 78 FR 35630 - Martin Dam Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Martin Dam Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Martin Dam Hydroelectric Project and Intention To Hold Public Meetings In... reviewed the application for license for the Martin Dam Hydroelectric Project (FERC No. 349), located...

  15. 76 FR 78329 - Noise Exposure Map Notice; Martin County Airport, Stuart, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Notice; Martin County Airport, Stuart, FL AGENCY...) announces its determination that the Noise Exposure Maps submitted by the Martin County Board of County Commissioners for Martin County Airport under the provisions of 49 U.S.C. 47501 et. Seq (Aviation Safety...

  16. 77 FR 14516 - Alabama Power Company, Martin Dam Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Proposed Revised Restricted...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-12

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Alabama Power Company, Martin Dam Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Proposed... included in, or eligible for inclusion in, the National Register of Historic Places at the Martin Dam....13(e)). The Commission's responsibilities pursuant to section 106 for the Martin Dam...

  17. 75 FR 53323 - Certificate of Alternative Compliance for the Offshore Supply Vessel LYMAN MARTIN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Certificate of Alternative Compliance for the Offshore Supply Vessel LYMAN MARTIN... Alternative Compliance was issued for the offshore supply vessel LYMAN MARTIN as required by 33 U.S.C. 1605(c... LYMAN MARTIN, O.N. 11227085. The horizontal distance between the forward and aft masthead lights may...

  18. Simulation optimization of spherical non-polar guest recognition by deep-cavity cavitands.

    PubMed

    Wanjari, Piyush P; Gibb, Bruce C; Ashbaugh, Henry S

    2013-12-21

    Biomimetic deep-cavity cavitand hosts possess unique recognition and encapsulation properties that make them capable of selectively binding a range of non-polar guests within their hydrophobic pocket. Adamantane based derivatives which snuggly fit within the pocket of octa-acid deep cavity cavitands exhibit some of the strongest host binding. Here we explore the roles of guest size and attractiveness on optimizing guest binding to form 1:1 complexes with octa-acid cavitands in water. Specifically we simulate the water-mediated interactions of the cavitand with adamantane and a range of simple Lennard-Jones guests of varying diameter and attractive well-depth. Initial simulations performed with methane indicate hydrated methanes preferentially reside within the host pocket, although these guests frequently trade places with water and other methanes in bulk solution. The interaction strength of hydrophobic guests increases with increasing size from sizes slightly smaller than methane to Lennard-Jones guests comparable in size to adamantane. Over this guest size range the preferential guest binding location migrates from the bottom of the host pocket upwards. For guests larger than adamantane, however, binding becomes less favorable as the minimum in the potential-of-mean force shifts to the cavitand face around the portal. For a fixed guest diameter, the Lennard-Jones well-depth is found to systematically shift the guest-host potential-of-mean force to lower free energies, however, the optimal guest size is found to be insensitive to increasing well-depth. Ultimately our simulations show that adamantane lies within the optimal range of guest sizes with significant attractive interactions to match the most tightly bound Lennard-Jones guests studied.

  19. Nietzsche, autobiography, history: mourning and Martin and John.

    PubMed

    Champagne, J

    1998-01-01

    How might gay and lesbian literature be read not as a mimetic representation of homosexuality, but as an activity linked to problems of subjectivity and historiography? Reading Dale Peck's novel Martin and John alongside passages from Friedrich Nietzsche's "On the Uses and Disadvantages of History for Life" and Sigmund Freud's "Mourning and Melancholia," this essay argues for an understanding of Peck's text as an attempt to link two apparently different processes of import to contemporary gay male subjects in particular: the writing of what Nietzsche terms "critical history," and the mourning of those lost to HIV disease. It concludes by linking Martin and John to feminist critiques of identity and traditional historiography, as well as noting the connection between these two critiques.

  20. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, David

    2012-01-01

    It is a pleasure and an honour for me to be taking over as Editor-in-Chief of Measurement Science and Technology. MST is well known across research communities worldwide as a leading journal in which to publish new techniques and instrumentation. It has gained this enviable position largely because of the excellent guidance of its Editorial Board and dedicated staff at Institute of Physics Publishing over many years. I want to highlight in particular the contribution of the outgoing Editor Peter Hauptmann, and other Editors before him, in making the journal truly international. We thank Peter immensely for all his hard work in leading the journal, having exceptionally served two terms, each of five years. I come into the post of Editor at a very interesting and challenging time for research. The global recession is leading to cuts in research funding in many countries, researchers and their outputs are coming under closer scrutiny than ever before, and more is being expected of them. Journals play a critical role in monitoring and maintaining research standards, but we should be careful not to assume that journal Impact Factor is the sole measure of research quality. Although expediency may sometimes demand it, Impact Factor, as practitioners know, is subject dependent. One of the great things about science and technology for me is its level playing field. The key point is still innovation no matter where the work is done or where it is published. MST has a long pedigree of being the natural home of the highest quality papers from leading researchers wishing to report novel instrumentation and techniques. 2013 will mark the 90th anniversary of MST and we look forward to celebrating in style its sustained success. I recall with pride the first paper I published in Journal of Physics E: Scientific Instruments (as MST was previously titled) back in 1977. The paper reported the design and application of an early fluorescence lifetime spectrometer that I had constructed

  1. Copernicus and Martin Luther: An encounter between science and religion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobe, Donald H.

    1998-03-01

    Martin Luther has been severely criticized by some scholars for a remark he made about Copernicus and his heliocentric theory. When this offhand remark, made at the dinner table four years before the publication of On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres, is considered in its historical context, it is shown to be in keeping with the generally accepted scholarly opinion of the time. Luther's view of science in general and astronomy in particular is examined.

  2. Dengue Type 3 Virus, Saint Martin, 2003–2004

    PubMed Central

    Pastorino, Boris A.M.; Bessaud, Maël; Gravier, Patrick; Tock, Fabienne; Couissinier-Paris, Patricia; Martial, Jenny; Huc-Anais, Patricia; Césaire, Raymond; Grandadam, Marc; Tolou, Hugues J.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the spread of a dengue virus during an outbreak in Saint Martin island (French West Indies) during winter 2003–2004. Dengue type 3 viruses were isolated from 6 patients exhibiting clinical symptoms. This serotype had not been detected on the island during the preceding 3 years. Genome sequence determinations and analyses showed a common origin with dengue type 3 viruses isolated in Martinique 2 years earlier. PMID:15890134

  3. Cheryl Martin, Keynote - 2013 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Cheryl )

    2014-03-06

    The fourth annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2013. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Dr. Cheryl Martin is the Deputy Director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency--Energy (ARPA-E), gave the keynote address.

  4. Cheryl Martin, Keynote - 2013 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit

    ScienceCinema

    Martin, Cheryl (Deputy Director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E))

    2016-07-12

    The fourth annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2013. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Dr. Cheryl Martin is the Deputy Director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency--Energy (ARPA-E), gave the keynote address.

  5. Adaptive reorganization of 2D molecular nanoporous network induced by coadsorbed guest molecule.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qing-Na; Wang, Lei; Zhong, Yu-Wu; Liu, Xuan-He; Chen, Ting; Yan, Hui-Juan; Wang, Dong; Yao, Jian-Nian; Wan, Li-Jun

    2014-03-25

    The ordered array of nanovoids in nanoporous networks, such as honeycomb, Kagome, and square, provides a molecular template for the accommodation of "guest molecules". Compared with the commonly studied guest molecules featuring high symmetry evenly incorporated into the template, guest molecules featuring lower symmetry are rare to report. Herein, we report the formation of a distinct patterned superlattice of guest molecules by selective trapping of guest molecules into the honeycomb network of trimesic acid (TMA). Two distinct surface patterns have been achieved by the guest inclusion induced adaptive reconstruction of a 2D molecular nanoporous network. The honeycomb networks can synergetically tune the arrangement upon inclusion of the guest molecules with different core size but similar peripherals groups, resulting in a trihexagonal Kagome or triangular patterns.

  6. Report on inspection of concerns regarding the Martin Marietta Corporate Review of health and safety at Martin Marietta Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-18

    An Office of Inspector General Hotline allegation was received from an anonymous complainant regarding a July 1994 Martin Marietta Corporation Team`s health and safety review at three Department of Energy sites managed and operated by the then Martin Marietta Energy Systems. Inc. (Energy Systems), at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. We determined that the President of Energy Systems had requested a Corporate review at the three sites because of his concerns about safety incidents and accidents during the late Spring and early Summer of 1994. The Corporate Team`s charter was to determine if root causes existed for these safety incidents and accidents and to produce recommendations for the reduction or prevention of future safety incidents or accidents.

  7. SIRE: A Simple Interactive Rule Editor for NICBES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bykat, Alex

    1988-01-01

    To support evolution of domain expertise, and its representation in an expert system knowledge base, a user-friendly rule base editor is mandatory. The Nickel Cadmium Battery Expert System (NICBES), a prototype of an expert system for the Hubble Space Telescope power storage management system, does not provide such an editor. In the following, a description of a Simple Interactive Rule Base Editor (SIRE) for NICBES is described. The SIRE provides a consistent internal representation of the NICBES knowledge base. It supports knowledge presentation and provides a user-friendly and code language independent medium for rule addition and modification. The SIRE is integrated with NICBES via an interface module. This module provides translation of the internal representation to Prolog-type rules (Horn clauses), latter rule assertion, and a simple mechanism for rule selection for its Prolog inference engine.

  8. Writing filter processes for the SAGA editor, appendix G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirslis, Peter A.

    1985-01-01

    The SAGA editor provides a mechanism by which separate processes can be invoked during an editing session to traverse portions of the parse tree being edited. These processes, termed filter processes, read, analyze, and possibly transform the parse tree, returning the result to the editor. By defining new commands with the editor's user defined command facility, which invoke filter processes, authors of filter can provide complex operations as simple commands. A tree plotter, pretty printer, and Pascal tree transformation program were already written using this facility. The filter processes are introduced, parse tree structure is described and the library interface made available to the programmer. Also discussed is how to compile and run filter processes. Examples are presented to illustrate aspect of each of these areas.

  9. Implementing a computerized text-management system: an editor's view

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    The advent of sophisticated function-key-driven programs for handling text on a video-display terminal enables the editorial staff of a publications department to take an active role on a computerized text-management team, along with compositors and other keyboard operators. Although there are still many things that editors cannot do on a computer terminal, the bulk of manipulating straight text can be speeded, and the problems of rekeyboarding and interpretation of editorial markings can be largely bypassed. The computer also gives editors new tools that open the way for greater control over both the editorial process and the quality of technical publishing. 5 figures.

  10. Supramolecular polymeric materials via cyclodextrin-guest interactions.

    PubMed

    Harada, Akira; Takashima, Yoshinori; Nakahata, Masaki

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Cyclodextrins (CDs) have many attractive functions, including molecular recognition, hydrolysis, catalysis, and polymerization. One of the most important uses of CDs is for the molecular recognition of hydrophobic organic guest molecules in aqueous solutions. CDs are desirable host molecules because they are environmentally benign and offer diverse functions. This Account demonstrates some of the great advances in the development of supramolecular materials through host-guest interactions within the last 10 years. In 1990, we developed topological supramolecular complexes with CDs, polyrotaxane, and CD tubes, and these preparation methods take advantage of self-organization between the CDs and the polymers. The combination of polyrotaxane with αCD forms a hydrogel through the interaction of αCDs with the OH groups on poly(ethylene glycol). We categorized these polyrotaxane chemistries within main chain type complexes. At the same time, we studied the interactions of side chain type supramolecular complexes with CDs. In these systems the guest molecules modified the polymers and selectively formed inclusion complexes with CDs. The systems that used low molecular weight compounds did not show such selectivity with CDs. The multivalency available within the complex cooperatively enhances the selective binding of CD with guest molecules via the polymer side chains, a phenomenon that is analogous to binding patterns observed in antigen-antibody complexes. To incorporate the molecular recognition properties of CDs within the polymer side chains, we first prepared stimuli-responsive sol-gel switching materials through host-guest interactions. We chose azobenzene derivatives for their response to light and ferrocene derivatives for their response to redox conditions. The supramolecular materials were both redox-responsive and self-healing, and these properties resulted from host-guest interactions. These sol-gels with built in switches gave us insight for

  11. Supramolecular host guest complexes based on cyclodextrin diphenylhexatriene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabara, L.; Aranyosiova, M.; Velic, D.

    2006-07-01

    Supramolecular host-guest complex cyclodextrin-diphenylhexatriene as a model of noncovalent binding is studied by means of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. Cyclodextrin and diphenylhexatriene are in forms of β-cyclodextrin (C 42H 70O 35) and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (C 18H 16), respectively. The whole intact supramolecular host-guest 1:1 complex between cyclodextrin and diphenylhexatriene is observed in cationized forms with Na at 1389.5 m/ z and with K at 1405.5 m/ z. The focus is on the higher ratio complexes, where the complexes of cyclodextrin-diphenylhexatriene with ratios of 1:2 and 2:1 are observed in cationized forms with Na at 1622 and at 2524 m/ z, and with K at 1638 and 2541 m/ z, respectively. These complexes are assumed to be basic building blocks of cyclodextrin-diphenylhexatriene nanowire structure.

  12. EDITORIAL: New Editor-in-Chief for Nanotechnology New Editor-in-Chief for Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couzin, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology is proud to announce the appointment of Professor Mark Reed, Yale University, as the new Editor-in-Chief from January 2009. Mark Reed holds the Harold Hodgkinson Chair of Engineering and Applied Science at Yale University. He has made significant contributions in the areas of quantum dots, electronic transport in nanoscale and mesoscopic systems, artificially structured materials and devices, and molecular electronics. Professor Reed has been associated with the journal as an Editorial Board member for a number of years and we are delighted that he has agreed to take on the scientific leadership of the journal in its 20th year. We also take the opportunity to thank Professor Mark Welland, Cambridge University, for his work as Editor-in-Chief since 2001, and for presiding over the re-launch and remarkable growth of the journal since then. Nanotechnology is unique in that it was the first peer-reviewed journal in the area of nanoscience, the first issue appearing in 1990. Since then it has established a distinguished publication record and has become a leading journal covering all aspects of nanoscale science and technology, as well as specializing in in-depth, comprehensive articles not seen in letter format journals. Published weekly and featuring subject sections, the journal is truly multidisciplinary in nature and is an excellent medium to quickly deliver your research results to readers worldwide. Nanotechnology is proud to be offering some of the fastest publication times around (less than three months on average from receipt to online publication). We offer free online access to all published papers for 30 days, ensuring that anyone with access to the internet will be able to read your paper. We were also the first journal to give our authors the opportunity to communicate their research to a wider audience through nanotechweb.org and other IOP websites. See the journal's homepage at www.iop.org/Journals/nano for more details. We are looking

  13. Teaching of Astronomy at Teresa Martin College. (Breton Title: Ensino de Astronomia Nas Faculdades Teresa Martin.) Enseñanza de la Astronomia en la Facultad Teresa Martin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo Sobreira, Paulo Henrique

    2005-12-01

    Courses with exclusive Astronomy contents did not exist at (FATEMA) Teresa Martin College's program until the end of 2002. In 2001, a series of educational experiments started in courses and classes of Astronomy at Mathematics and Geography departments. This actions culminated with the insertion of Teaching of Astronomy as a study theme in the course of Independent Studies for Mathematics professors in 2005. Até o final de 2002 inexistiam na grade curricular das Faculdades Integradas Teresa Martin (FATEMA) cadeiras com conteúdos exclusivos de Astronomia. A partir do ano de 2001 iniciou-se uma série de experiências educacionais através de modelos de cursos e de aulas de Astronomia nos Departamentos de Matemática e de Geografia, o que culminou com a inserção do Ensino de Astronomia como temática da disciplina de Estudos Independentes para o curso de Licenciatura em Matemática, em 2005. Hasta el final de 2002 no había en el currículo dela Facultad TeresaMartín (FATEMA) en San Pablo - SP, Brasil, disciplinas con contenidos exclusivos de Astronomía. A partir del año 2001 comenzó una secuencia de experimentos educacionales de carrera y de clases de Astronomía en los Departamentos de Matemática y Geografía, culminando en la implantación de clases de Enseñanza dela Astronomíaenla Licenciaturaen Matemática, en el año de 2003, y de la cátedra de extensión en Cosmografía parala Licenciaturaen Geografía.

  14. Immigration: Policy Considerations Related to Guest Worker Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-16

    introduced a modified version of S. 1645 for himself and Senator Kennedy . The revised bill, S. 2823, was very similar to S. 1645, but there were...by Senator Kennedy for himself and Senators Feingold and Clinton and by Representative Gutierrez for himself and a group of cosponsors. Known as the...Deferred . Immigration: Policy Considerations Related to Guest Worker Programs Congressional Research Service 35 Mandatory Departure ( DMD ) status

  15. Second-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities of nonelectrically poled DR1-PMMA guest-host polymers.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Atsushi; Sato, Yasuaki; Ito, Kazuma; Murakami, Kenta; Tamaki, Yasuaki; Mase, Nobuyuki; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Tasaka, Shigeru

    2013-11-27

    Guest-host nonlinear optical polymers have attracted considerable interest due to their applications in fast electro-optical modulators and wavelength converters. In general, the electrical poling procedures, for which high DC external fields are applied, are necessary for aligning guest chromophores in polar order and activating the second-order nonlinearity. We present the nonelectrical poling behaviors for guest-host polymers: DR1 (4-[ethyl (2-hydroxyethyl) amino]-4'-nitroazobenzene) is the guest, and PMMA (poly (methyl methacrylate)) is the host. Second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility was induced in the conventional guest-host polymers after annealing at temperatures above the glass transition points of the host polymer even without applying the external fields. This phenomenon did not occur in the side-chain polymers, where the guests were directly bonded to the host chains. The guest polar alignments were most likely generated from the guest hydroxyl groups chemisorbing on the substrates. The polar alignments of the guest formed not only near the surface of the substrate, but also inside the host polymers. The optimized conditions for the SHG conversion were examined in the context of the polymer film thickness and guest concentration. The nonelectrical poling techniques described in this study are useful for enhancing the surface nonlinearity in the several materials, and they will be useful for further developments in nanophotonics and plasmonics.

  16. Martin Luther King, Jr., General Hospital and, Community Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, M. Moss

    1973-01-01

    Community involvement is not just one facet of the new Martin Luther King, Jr., General Hospital's existence. It is the mainstream from which all other activities flow. In addition to meeting the conventional needs of a conventional hospital staff with the core collection of texts and journals, this library goes one step further. It acts as a resource for its community health workers, dietitians, and nurses in their various outreach programs. It serves as a stimulus for the high school or community college student who may be curious about a health career. It also finds time to provide reading material for its patients. PMID:4725343

  17. 254. Doughton Park. View of the Martin Brinegar cabin which ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    254. Doughton Park. View of the Martin Brinegar cabin which was restored for interpretative purposed in 1941 with the preparation of measured drawings for the Historic American Buildings Survey. The actual restoration was carried out by WPA forces. The grounds around the cabin were treated as an interpretative landscape rather than a historic restoration. This one of two sites along the parkway where an individual homestead was relatively intact when it was obtained and kept as an interpretative display. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  18. Hybrid Band effects program (Lockheed Martin shared vision CRADA)

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, L. D.

    2012-03-01

    Hybrid Band{trademark} (H-band) is a Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control (LMMFC) designation for a specific RF modulation that causes disruption of select electronic components and circuits. H-Band enables conventional high-power microwave (HPM) effects (with a center frequency of 1 to 2 GHz, for example) using a higher frequency carrier signal. The primary technical objective of this project was to understand the fundamental physics of Hybrid Band{trademark} Radio Frequency effects on electronic systems. The follow-on objective was to develop and validate a Hybrid Band{trademark} effects analysis process.

  19. Martin Luther King, Jr., General Hospital and community involvement.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, M M

    1973-07-01

    Community involvement is not just one facet of the new Martin Luther King, Jr., General Hospital's existence. It is the mainstream from which all other activities flow. In addition to meeting the conventional needs of a conventional hospital staff with the core collection of texts and journals, this library goes one step further. It acts as a resource for its community health workers, dietitians, and nurses in their various outreach programs. It serves as a stimulus for the high school or community college student who may be curious about a health career. It also finds time to provide reading material for its patients.

  20. A molecular dynamics study of model SI clathrate hydrates: the effect of guest size and guest-water interaction on decomposition kinetics.

    PubMed

    Das, Subhadip; Baghel, Vikesh Singh; Roy, Sudip; Kumar, Rajnish

    2015-04-14

    One of the options suggested for methane recovery from natural gas hydrates is molecular replacement of methane by suitable guests like CO2 and N2. This approach has been found to be feasible through many experimental and molecular dynamics simulation studies. However, the long term stability of the resultant hydrate needs to be evaluated; the decomposition rate of these hydrates is expected to depend on the interaction between these guest and water molecules. In this work, molecular dynamics simulation has been performed to illustrate the effect of guest molecules with different sizes and interaction strengths with water on structure I (SI) hydrate decomposition and hence the stability. The van der Waals interaction between water of hydrate cages and guest molecules is defined by Lennard Jones potential parameters. A wide range of parameter spaces has been scanned by changing the guest molecules in the SI hydrate, which acts as a model gas for occupying the small and large cages of the SI hydrate. All atomistic simulation results show that the stability of the hydrate is sensitive to the size and interaction of the guest molecules with hydrate water. The increase in the interaction of guest molecules with water stabilizes the hydrate, which in turn shows a slower rate of hydrate decomposition. Similarly guest molecules with a reasonably small (similar to Helium) or large size increase the decomposition rate. The results were also analyzed by calculating the structural order parameter to understand the dynamics of crystal structure and correlated with the release rate of guest molecules from the solid hydrate phase. The results have been explained based on the calculation of potential energies felt by guest molecules in amorphous water, hydrate bulk and hydrate-water interface regions.

  1. Contrasting guest binding interaction of cucurbit[7-8]urils with neutral red dye: controlled exchange of multiple guests.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Mhejabeen; Choudhury, Sharmistha Dutta; Mohanty, Jyotirmayee; Bhasikuttan, Achikanath C; Pal, Haridas

    2010-07-14

    Interactions among macrocyclic hosts and dyes/drugs have been explored extensively for their direct usage in controlled uptake and release of large number of potential drug molecules. In this paper we report the non-covalent interaction of cucurbit[8]uril macrocycle (CB8) with a biologically important dye, neutral red, by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. A comparative analysis with the complexation behaviour of the dye with CB7, the lower homologue of CB8, indicates contrasting guest binding behaviour with significant changes in the photophysical characteristics of the dye. While CB7 interaction leads to a 1 ratio 1 stoichiometry resulting in approximately 6 fold enhancement in the fluorescence emission of the dye, CB8 displays signatures for a 1 ratio 2 host-guest stoichiometry with drastic reduction in the fluorescence emission. Apart from the evaluation of approximately 2 unit shift in the protolytic equilibrium on complexation (pK(a) shift), the measurements with tryptophan established a selective guest exchange to favour a co-localized dimer inside the CB8 cavity. In a protein medium (BSA), the 1 ratio 2 complex was converted to a 1 ratio 1 ratio 1 CB8-NRH(+)-BSA complex. The finding that NRH(+) can be transferred from CB8 to BSA, even though the binding constant for NRH(+)-CB8 is much higher than NRH(+)-BSA, is projected for a controlled slow release of NRH(+) towards BSA. Since the release and activity of drugs can be controlled by regulating the protolytic equilibrium, the macromolecular encapsulation and release of NRH(+) demonstrated here provide information relevant to host-guest based drug delivery systems and its applications.

  2. Righting the Wrongs of Writing: Copy Editors Speak Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Jaclyn J.; Wall, Judy

    1975-01-01

    The major part of APGA Press production editors' jobs is copy editing manuscripts before they are set in type. Two APGA Press Staff members use specific examples to illustrate the grammatical and stylistic errors that cause problems for them and, if not corrected, for readers. (Author)

  3. Females' participation in psychopharmacology research as authors, editors, and subjects.

    PubMed

    Poling, Alan; Durgin, Amy; Bradley, Kelly P; Porter, Lindsay K; Van Wagner, Karen; Weeden, Marc; Panos, John J

    2009-04-01

    This study determined the involvement of women as first authors and other authors for every article published in Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology, Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, and Psychopharmacology in 1991, 1996, 2001, and 2006. Their involvement as editors also was determined. Women's participation as authors, but not as editors, slightly increased over time. In 2006, 43% of first authors, 38% of other authors, and 24% of editors were women. The gender of subjects was examined for the same years and journals, but could not be determined for 6% and 9% of articles employing nonhuman and human subjects, respectively. In 2006, when subjects' gender could be determined, 77% of articles involving nonhuman subjects used only males, 9% only females, and 14% both males and females. In articles using human subjects in that same year, 17% involved only males, 6% only females, and 77% both males and females. Women researchers clearly make substantial contributions to the psychopharmacology literature, but are nonetheless underrepresented as editors. Findings regarding subjects indicate that there is growing recognition of the importance of gender as a determinant of drug effects, although the vast majority of nonhuman studies continue to involve only male subjects.

  4. Publishing in Educational Psychology Journals: Comments from Editors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nihalani, Priya K.; Mayrath, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    The following paper emphasizes the importance of publishing and learning how to publish in educational psychology journals. We have compiled a set of recommendations based on advice from editors in the field and several other sources on how to publish. Additionally, this paper provides a step-by-step guide that graduate students and junior faculty…

  5. Particle size fraction -Response: Letter to the Editors

    EPA Science Inventory

    To the Editors: We, the undersigned, would like to comment on the article by Cho et al. (Cho et al. 2009), which was published in the November 2009 issue (volume 11, number 11, page 1682-1689) of Environmental Health Perspectives. We read the paper with great interest as the dis...

  6. IN DEFENSE OF ECORISK ASSESSMENT (LETTER TO EDITOR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dear Editor: We are writing to convey a more accurate portrayal of the status of ecological ("environmental" in Europe) risk assessment that was presented in the recent article by M. Power and L.S. McCarty (Fallacies in Ecological Risk Assessment Practices," August 1997, pp 370A-...

  7. Most Business Editors Find Journalism Graduates Still Unprepared

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardue, Mary Jane

    2014-01-01

    In 2002, a study was published in "Newspaper Research Journal" that explored the preparedness of graduating journalism students to cover business news. In 2012, a follow-up survey of business editors at the nation's daily newspapers was done to see whether progress had been made in the training of journalism students for the…

  8. LACE: A Web-Based, Structured Editor for PDS Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, M.; Keller, R.; Sarram, P.

    2015-06-01

    PDS has moved to XML-based metadata, but many scientists are not familiar with XML and find its structure complicated. For these reasons, we have created LACE, an editor for PDS metadata that hides the complexity of XML from the user.

  9. Ethical dilemmas in scientific publication: pitfalls and solutions for editors.

    PubMed

    Gollogly, Laragh; Momen, Hooman

    2006-08-01

    Editors of scientific journals need to be conversant with the mechanisms by which scientific misconduct is amplified by publication practices. This paper provides definitions, ways to document the extent of the problem, and examples of editorial attempts to counter fraud. Fabrication, falsification, duplication, ghost authorship, gift authorship, lack of ethics approval, non-disclosure, 'salami' publication, conflicts of interest, auto-citation, duplicate submission, duplicate publications, and plagiarism are common problems. Editorial misconduct includes failure to observe due process, undue delay in reaching decisions and communicating these to authors, inappropriate review procedures, and confounding a journal's content with its advertising or promotional potential. Editors also can be admonished by their peers for failure to investigate suspected misconduct, failure to retract when indicated, and failure to abide voluntarily by the six main sources of relevant international guidelines on research, its reporting and editorial practice. Editors are in a good position to promulgate reasonable standards of practice, and can start by using consensus guidelines on publication ethics to state explicitly how their journals function. Reviewers, editors, authors and readers all then have a better chance to understand, and abide by, the rules of publishing.

  10. Manifesting Subtle Differences of Neutral Hydrophilic Guest Isomers in a Molecular Container by Phase Transfer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Hee L; Lee, Jong Wha; Jang, Yoonjung; Ko, Young Ho; Kim, Kimoon; Kim, Hugh I

    2016-07-11

    Achieving strong host-guest interactions between synthetic hosts and hydrophilic guests in solution is challenging because solvation effects overwhelm other effects. To resolve this issue, we transferred complexes of cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]) and monosaccharides to the gas phase and report here their intrinsic host-guest chemistry in the absence of solvation effects. It was observed that effective host-guest interactions in the gas phase mediated by ammonium cations allow the differentiation of the monosaccharide isomers in complex with CB[7] upon vibrational excitation. The potential of the unique observation was extended to a quantitative supramolecular analytical method for the monosaccharide guests. The combination of host-guest chemistry and phase transfer presented in this study is an effective approach to overcome current limitations in supramolecular chemistry.

  11. Measurements of Martin-Puplett Interferometer Limitations using Blackbody Source

    SciTech Connect

    Evtushenko, Pavel E.; Klopf, John M.

    2013-06-01

    Frequency domain measurements with Martin-Puplett interferometer is one of a few techniques capable of bunch length measurements at the level of ~ 100 fs. As the bunch length becomes shorter, it is important to know and be able to measure the limitations of the instrument in terms of shortest measurable bunch length. In this paper we describe an experiment using a blackbody source with the modified Martin-Puplett interferometer that is routine- ly used for bunch length measurements at the JLab FEL, as a way to estimate the shortest, measurable bunch length. The limitation comes from high frequency cut-off of the wire-grid polarizer currently used and is estimated to be 50 fs RMS. The measurements are made with the same Golay cell detector that is used for beam measure- ments. We demonstrate that, even though the blackbody source is many orders of magnitude less bright than the coherent transition or synchrotron radiation, it can be used for the measurements and gives a very good signal to noise ratio in combination with lock-in detection. We also compare the measurements made in air and in vacuum to characterize the very strong effect of the atmospheric absorption.

  12. John F. Kennedy, Jr., speaks to invited guests at KSC's HBO premiere 'From the Earth to the Moon.'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    John F. Kennedy, Jr., editor-in-chief of George Magazine, greets invited guests at the Home Box Office (HBO) and Imagine Entertainment premiere of the 12-part miniseries 'From the Earth to the Moon' at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The series was filmed in part on location at KSC and dramatizes the human aspects of NASA's efforts to launch Americans to the Moon. The miniseries highlights NASA's Apollo program and the events leading up to and including the six successful missions to the Moon. A special 500- seat theater was constructed next to the Apollo/Saturn V Center for the KSC premiere showing. Speakers at the event included KSC Director Roy Bridges (at right); Jeff Bewkes, chairman and CEO for HBO; and John F. Kennedy, Jr. Also attending the event, which featured the episode entitled '1968,' were Buzz Aldrin, Apollo 11 astronaut, and Al Worden, Apollo 15 astronaut. The original miniseries event, created for HBO by actor Tom Hanks and Imagine Entertainment, will premiere on HBO beginning April 5, 1998.

  13. Editors-in-Chief of Medical Journals: Are They Experts, Authorities, Both, or Neither?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zsindely, Sandor; Schubert, Andras

    1989-01-01

    Uses citation analysis to study the professional status and influence of the editors-in-chief of 769 medical journals. Finds that these editors-in-chief are, at least in their own specialties, not necessarily experts but authorities. (SR)

  14. EDITORIAL: Outgoing Editor-in-Chief Outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    I started in 2002 as Editor-in-Chief of a well established journal—MST (Measurement Science and Technology). It was a time when modern means of communication offered new opportunities for the scientific community—for all scientists and engineers whether at universities, in industry or at other institutions—to access better quality information in a shorter time. This development helped us to be more efficient in our daily scientific work and to anticipate new trends faster than before. A flood of information was created by different search engines. A few online journals or journals published in emerging countries with a similar profile to MST appeared on the market. MST had to provide new answers in response to these developments. In 2002 I postulated two requirements to the journal. Firstly, the publisher has to be up to date. My impression over the years has been that IOPP is excellently organized. That has made it easier for the board members and all our reviewers to concentrate on the scientific aspects of our input to the journal. During all my visits to Bristol or my contacts with the IOPP staff I always met very professional and enthusiastic staff members. They have not only supported and encouraged the ideas and initiatives of the Editorial Board members, but they have also worked hard on establishing one of the most effective journal operations in the field of measurement science and technology. Many authors are well aware of this. Thus I am able to declare that the first requirement for a successful journal has been met. Secondly, the scientific level has to be high and the journal should attract readers from all over the world. This task was the responsibility of the Editorial Board members and of myself. Our strategy was on the one hand to ensure continuity in MST but on the other hand to be open to new trends and developments. Examples of these new aspects of the journal are fields like micro- and nanometrology, measurement techniques for

  15. EDITORIAL: Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rost, Jan Michael

    2011-01-01

    I am very pleased to announce that Professor Paul Corkum will be taking on the position of Editor-in-Chief at Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (J. Phys. B) from the beginning of January 2011. During my term as Editor-in-Chief atomic, molecular and optical science has continued to change rapidly: we have seen ultracold physics widening its original emphasis on Bose-Einstein condensates to the entanglement of light and matter in the most general sense towards a science of information. At the same time attosecond science and interaction of matter with short x-ray pulses develops rapidly. I am very happy that J. Phys. B with Paul Corkum as Editor-in-Chief will play a central role in publishing exciting results from this field. I would like to thank the publishing team at J. Phys. B for their fantastic job, in particular for the quality of the refereeing system the team has been able to maintain while at the same time bringing down the publication times considerably. I thank them all for the help and support they have given me in the role of Editor-in-Chief and wish them the very best for the future. Last and certainly not least I would like to thank you, the authors, referees and readers, for the support of J. Phys. B.

  16. Synthesis of Cyclic Porphyrin Trimers through Alkyne Metathesis Cyclooligomerization and Their Host–Guest Binding Study

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chao; Long, Hai; Jin, Yinghua; Zhang, Wei

    2016-06-17

    Cyclic porphyrin trimers were synthesized through one-step cyclooligomerization via alkyne metathesis from diyne monomers. These macrocycles show interesting host-guest binding interactions with fullerenes, selectively binding C70 (6 x 103 M-1) over C60 and C84 (no binding observed). The fullerene-encapsulated host-guest complex can undergo guest or host exchange in the presence of another guest (2,4,6-tri(4-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine) or host (cage COP5) molecule with higher binding affinity.

  17. Supramolecular Recognition Forces: An Examination of Weak Metal-Metal Interactions in Host-Guest Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, James D.; Steele, Ian M.; Bosnich, B.

    2008-10-03

    Molecular receptors consisting of two parallel-disposed terpy-M-Cl units (M = Pd{sup 2+}, Pt{sup 2+}) are used to form host-guest adducts with aromatic molecules and with neutral square-planar Pt{sup 2+} complexes. Host-guest formation is controlled by several factors including {pi}-{pi} interactions and, in some cases, weak Pt-Pt interactions between the host and the guest. This latter interaction was examined by comparing the host-guest stability of adducts formed by isoelectronic Pt{sup 2+} and Au{sup 3+} complexes with the Pt{sup 2+} receptor. Consistently, the former is more stable.

  18. Effect of the deformability of guest particles on the tensile strength of tablets from interactive mixtures.

    PubMed

    Mangal, Sharad; Lakio, Satu; Gengenbach, Thomas; Larson, Ian; Morton, David A V

    2016-12-05

    In this study, we investigated the influence of deformability of specifically-engineered guest particles on the tensile strength of tablets of interactive mixtures. The binder polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) of different molecular weights were spray dried with l-leucine to create guest particle formulations. The guest particle formulations were characterized by their particle size, surface l-leucine concentration and glass transition temperature (Tg). These spray-dried particles were then blended with paracetamol to form interactive mixtures, which were compacted into tablets and tablet tensile strength and elastic recovery were determined. The guest particles had particle diameters in the range of 1-10μm, and surfaces that were l-leucine enriched. The Tg of guest particle formulations increased with increasing molecular weight of the PVP. All the guest particle formulations formed an observed homogeneous interactive mixture with paracetamol. The tensile strength of the tablets of interactive mixtures increased with decreasing Tg of the guest particles. In these interactive mixtures, higher tensile strength was also associated with lower tablet elastic recovery. The elastic recovery of the tablets showed a correlation with the elastic recovery of the tablets of guest particles. Thus, our results indicated that the deformability of guest particles dictates the tensile strength of the tablets of these interactive mixtures.

  19. Simulations of guest transport in clathrates of Dianin's compound and hydroquinone.

    PubMed

    Nemkevich, Alexandra; Spackman, Mark A; Corry, Ben

    2013-02-18

    Clathrates have been proposed for use in a variety of applications including gas storage, mixture separation and catalysis due to the potential for controlled guest diffusion through their porous lattices. Here molecular dynamics simulations are employed to study guest transport in clathrates of hydroquinone (HQ) and Dianin's compound (DC). Systems investigated were HQ with methanol and acetonitrile, and DC with methanol and ethanol. Simulations were set up with one guest in the pore, two guests in the pore and one vacancy in the pore and a filled pore, and free-energy barriers for movement between cavities of the pore were estimated for all cases. Comparison between these simulations indicates that guest transport most likely proceeds by molecules moving from full to empty cavities consecutively, one by one, rather than in a concerted manner. Thus, the presence of empty cavities is very important for guest transport, which becomes more energetically demanding in fully loaded systems. Flexibility of the host can assist guest transport. In the studied DC clathrates transport occurs via an intermediate conformation in which the hydroxyl group of the alcohol guest molecule participates in the hydrogen-bonded ring of the host. We also address the issue of the number of methanol guest molecules that DC accommodates, for which conflicting information exists. We found that this is likely to be temperature dependent and suggest that under some conditions the system is most likely non-stoichiometric.

  20. Lockheed Martin Skunk Works Single Stage to Orbit/Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works has compiled an Annual Performance Report of the X-33/RLV Program. This report consists of individual reports from all industry team members, as well as NASA team centers. This portion of the report is comprised of a status report of Lockheed Martin's contribution to the program. The following is a summary of the Lockheed Martin Centers involved and work reviewed under their portion of the agreement: (1) Lockheed Martin Skunk Works - Vehicle Development, Operations Development, X-33 and RLV Systems Engineering, Manufacturing, Ground Operations, Reliability, Maintainability/Testability, Supportability, & Special Analysis Team, and X-33 Flight Assurance; (2) Lockheed Martin Technical Operations - Launch Support Systems, Ground Support Equipment, Flight Test Operations, and RLV Operations Development Support; (3) Lockheed Martin Space Operations - TAEM and A/L Guidance and Flight Control Design, Evaluation of Vehicle Configuration, TAEM and A/L Dispersion Analysis, Modeling and Simulations, Frequency Domain Analysis, Verification and Validation Activities, and Ancillary Support; (4) Lockheed Martin Astronautics-Denver - Systems Engineering, X-33 Development; (5) Sanders - A Lockheed Martin Company - Vehicle Health Management Subsystem Progress, GSS Progress; and (6) Lockheed Martin Michoud Space Systems - X-33 Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Tank, Key Challenges, Lessons Learned, X-33/RLV Composite Technology, Reusable Cyrogenic Insulation (RCI) and Vehicle Health Monitoring, Main Propulsion Systems (MPS), Structural Testing, X-33 System Integration and Analysis, and Cyrogenic Systems Operations.

  1. FLAn: A Free Hypermedia Editor to Create Foreign Language Learning Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilickaya, Ferit, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Glossing words is done via special software called multimedia editors. Foreign Language Annotator (FLAn), created by Thibeault (2011), is one of these multimedia editors. FLAn (Foreign Language Annotator), a free hypermedia editor that works on both Macs and PCs, allows instructors to turn static texts into dynamic learning units by attaching…

  2. Preparing Students To Work on Newspaper Copy Desks: Are Educators Meeting Editors' Expectations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auman, Ann E.; Cook, Betsy B.

    A study surveyed two groups in the fall of 1994, journalism educators and newspaper editors. Educators completed a survey regarding the course content and skill areas emphasized in beginning level copy editing courses, while editors were asked to respond to questions regarding the skills they expect entry-level copy editors to have. Respondents…

  3. VentureStar by Lockheed Martin in Orbit - Computer Graphic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This is an artist's conception of the NASA/Lockheed Martin Single-Stage-To-Orbit (SSTO) Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) in orbit high above the Earth. NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, expected to play a key role in the development and flight testing of the X-33, which was a technology demonstrator vehicle for a possible RLV. The RLV technology program was a cooperative agreement between NASA and industry. The goal of the RLV technology program was to enable significant reductions in the cost of access to space, and to promote the creation and delivery of new space services and other activities that would improve U.S. economic competitiveness. The X-33 was a wedged-shaped subscale technology demonstrator prototype of a potential future Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) that Lockheed Martin had dubbed VentureStar. The company hopes to develop VentureStar early this century. Through demonstration flight and ground research, NASA's X-33 program was to provide the information needed for industry representatives such as Lockheed Martin to decide whether to proceed with the development of a full-scale, commercial RLV program. A full-scale, single-stage-to-orbit RLV was to dramatically increase reliability and lower costs of putting a pound of payload into space, from the current figure of $10,000 to $1,000. Reducing the cost associated with transporting payloads in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) by using a commercial RLV was to create new opportunities for space access and significantly improve U.S. economic competitiveness in the world-wide launch marketplace. NASA expected to be a customer, not the operator, of the commercial RLV. The X-33 design was based on a lifting body shape with two revolutionary 'linear aerospike' rocket engines and a rugged metallic thermal protection system. The vehicle also had lightweight components and fuel tanks built to conform to the vehicle's outer shape. Time between X-33 flights was normally to have been seven days, but the

  4. X-33 by Lockheed Martin above Earth - Computer Graphic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This artist's rendering depicts the NASA/Lockheed Martin X-33 technology demonstrator for a Single-Stage-To-Orbit (SSTO) Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) in orbit over the Earth. NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California., expected to play a key role in the development and flight testing of the X-33. The RLV technology program was a cooperative agreement between NASA and industry. The goal of the RLV technology program was to enable significant reductions in the cost of access to space, and to promote the creation and delivery of new space services and other activities that was to have improved U.S. economic competitiveness. The X-33 was a wedged-shaped subscale technology demonstrator prototype of a potential future Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) that Lockheed Martin had dubbed VentureStar. The company had hoped to develop VentureStar early this century. Through demonstration flight and ground research, NASA's X-33 program was to have provided the information needed for industry representatives such as Lockheed Martin to decide whether to proceed with the development of a full-scale, commercial RLV program. A full-scale, single-stage-to-orbit RLV was to have dramatically increased reliability and lowered the costs of putting a pound of payload into space, from the current figure of $10,000 to $1,000. Reducing the cost associated with transporting payloads in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) by using a commercial RLV was to have created new opportunities for space access and significantly improved U.S. economic competitiveness in the world-wide launch marketplace. NASA expected to be a customer, not the operator, of the commercial RLV. The X-33 design was based on a lifting body shape with two revolutionary 'linear aerospike' rocket engines and a rugged metallic thermal protection system. The vehicle also had lightweight components and fuel tanks built to conform to the vehicle's outer shape. Time between X-33 flights was normally to have been seven days, but the

  5. Guest Room Lighting at the Hilton Columbus Downtown

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-30

    At the Hilton Columbus Downtown hotel in Ohio, DOE's Better Buildings Alliance conducted a demonstration of Next Generation Luminaires-winning downlights installed in all guest rooms and suites prior to the hotel's 2012 opening. After a post-occupancy assessment, the LED downlights not only provided the aesthetic appearance and dimming functionality desired, but also provided 50% energy savings relative to a comparable CFL downlight and enabled the lighting power to be more than 20% below that allowed by code. This document is a summary case study of the report.

  6. PREFACE: Introductory remarks from the Editors Introductory remarks from the Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, E.; Meseguer, A.; Marques, F.

    2012-06-01

    The local organizers of the 4th BIFD (Bifurcations and Instabilities in Fluid Dynamics) Symposium held in Barcelona on 18-21 July 2011 would like to thank the editors of Fluid Dynamics Research for offering us the opportunity of publishing a peer-reviewed special issue of the journal with a selection of the contributions presented at this conference. We thank both the authors and the referees for working with us on the rather tight schedule necessary to release the issue within one year of the date of the conference. We also thank the invited speakers, B Eckhardt, L Tuckerman, and J M Vega, for contributing keynote papers to this special issue. The series of BIFD symposia started as a small workshop in Madeira, Portugal, in 2004 with no more than 20 participants. This number increased rapidly during the second and third symposia held in 2006 (Denmark) and 2009 (United Kingdom), with 40 and 110 participants, respectively. The 4th BIFD symposium has consolidated this event as one of the leading conferences in hydrodynamic stability, with nearly 200 participants from around the world. The main goal of this conference is to bring together scientists and engineers from different disciplines directly or indirectly related to fluid dynamics, bifurcation theory and hydrodynamic stability theory. The conference covered many research areas within the aforementioned fields, ranging from thermal, shear and centrifugal flows to biofluids, films, drops, viscoelastic flows and magnetohydrodynamics. The structure of the conference, with invited plenary talks and focused sessions, helped the participants find their home in the conference and share state-of-the-art knowledge within the field of hydrodynamic instabilities. The financial support from MICINN (Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation, Grant no FIS2009-08065-E) and UPC (Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya) is greatly appreciated. The local organizers would also like to thank ETSAB (Barcelona School of Architecture

  7. Extended range of the Lockheed Martin coax Micro cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, D.; Champagne, P.; Will, E.; Kaldas, G.; Sanders, L.; Roth, E.; Olson, J. R.

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes the higher cooling capability of the Lockheed Martin coax Micro cryocooler thermal mechanical unit. The design of the previously qualified TRL6 Micro (Nast et al., 2014) [1] was modified to accommodate over twice the input power, greatly increasing the cooling capability. These Micro units are in a split configuration with the cold head separated from the compressor. This unit was optimized for cooling at 105 K and provides cooling over a wide range of temperatures. With a weight below 450 g, this small unit is ideal for compact instruments. Load lines were obtained over a range of powers, cold tip temperatures and rejection temperatures. This testing raised the Technology Readiness Level to six.

  8. Agoraphobia is a disease: a tribute to Sir Martin Roth.

    PubMed

    Fava, Giovanni A; Rafanelli, Chiara; Tossani, Eliana; Grandi, Silvana

    2008-01-01

    The evidence which has accumulated on the course of agoraphobia challenges the DSM view that phobic avoidance is secondary to panic attacks. In particular, a longitudinal study by Wittchen et al. indicates that agoraphobia, as a diagnostic category, is frequently independent of panic disorder and panic attacks, is unlikely to remit spontaneously and entails compromised quality of life. A staging system of agoraphobia is presented. Panic may ensue in the longitudinal development of agoraphobia, as well as of other anxiety disorders, and be conceptualized as a potential outcome in the course of anxiety, phobias and hypochondriasis as more than a specific disease entity. These recent research findings confirm the clinical observations and phenomenological research of Sir Martin Roth (1917-2006) and call for a reassessment of the concept of neurosis.

  9. X-33 Proposal by Lockheed Martin - Computer Graphic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This artist's rendering depicts the Lockheed Martin X-33 for a technology demonstrator of a Single-Stage-To-Orbit (SSTO) Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), as submitted in the aerospace company's original proposal. NASA selected Lockheed Martin's design on 2 July 1996. NASA's Dryden Flight research Center, Edwards, California, was to have had a key role in the development and flight testing of the X-33. The RLV technology program was a cooperative agreement between NASA and industry. The goal of the RLV technology program was to enable significant reductions in the cost of access to space, and to promote the creation and delivery of new space services and other activities that was to have improved U.S. economic competitiveness. The X-33 was a wedged-shaped subscale technology demonstrator prototype of a potential future Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) that Lockheed Martin had dubbed VentureStar. The company had hoped to develop VentureStar early this century. Through demonstration flight and ground research, NASA's X-33 program was to have provided the information needed for industry representatives such as Lockheed Martin to decide whether to proceed with the development of a full-scale, commercial RLV program. A full-scale, single-stage-to-orbit RLV was to have dramatically increased reliability and lowered the costs of putting a pound of payload into space, from the current figure of $10,000 to $1,000. Reducing the cost associated with transporting payloads in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) by using a commercial RLV was to have created new opportunities for space access and significantly improve U.S. economic competitiveness in the world-wide launch marketplace. NASA expected to be a customer, not the operator, of the commercial RLV. The X-33 design was based on a lifting body shape with two revolutionary 'linear aerospike' rocket engines and a rugged metallic thermal protection system. The vehicle also had lightweight components and fuel tanks built to conform to the vehicle

  10. Mapping the internal recognition surface of an octanuclear coordination cage using guest libraries.

    PubMed

    Turega, Simon; Cullen, William; Whitehead, Martina; Hunter, Christopher A; Ward, Michael D

    2014-06-11

    Size and shape criteria for guest binding inside the cavity of an octanuclear cubic coordination cage in water have been established using a new fluorescence displacement assay to quantify guest binding. For aliphatic cyclic ketones of increasing size (from C5 to C11), there is a linear relationship between ΔG for guest binding and the guest's surface area: the change in ΔG for binding is 0.3 kJ mol(-1) Å(-2), corresponding to 5 kJ mol(-1) for each additional CH2 group in the guest, in good agreement with expectations based on hydrophobic desolvation. The highest association constant is K = 1.2 × 10(6) M(-1) for cycloundecanone, whose volume is approximately 50% of the cavity volume; for larger C12 and C13 cyclic ketones, the association constant progressively decreases as the guests become too large. For a series of C10 aliphatic ketones differing in shape but not size, ΔG for guest binding showed no correlation with surface area. These guests are close to the volume limit of the cavity (cf. Rebek's 55% rule), so the association constant is sensitive to shape complementarity, with small changes in guest structure resulting in large changes in binding affinity. The most flexible members of this series (linear aliphatic ketones) did not bind, whereas the more preorganized cyclic ketones all have association constants of 10(4)-10(5) M(-1). A crystal structure of the cage·cycloundecanone complex shows that the guest carbonyl oxygen is directed into a binding pocket defined by a convergent set of CH groups, which act as weak hydrogen-bond donors, and also shows close contacts between the exterior surface of the disc-shaped guest and the interior surface of the pseudospherical cage cavity despite the slight mismatch in shape.

  11. Guest-encapsulation properties of a self-assembled capsule by dynamic boronic ester bonds.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Naoki; Yoza, Kenji; Kobayashi, Kenji

    2010-01-20

    Two molecules of tetrakis(dihydroxyboryl)-cavitand 1a as an aromatic cavity and four molecules of 1,2-bis(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)ethane 2 as an equatorial linker self-assemble into capsule 3a via the formation of eight dynamic boronic ester bonds in CDCl(3) or C(6)D(6). Capsule 3a encapsulates one guest molecule, such as 4,4'-disubstituted-biphenyl and 2,6-disubstituted-anthracene derivatives, in a highly selective recognition event, wherein the guest substituents are oriented to both aromatic cavity ends of 3a, as confirmed by a (1)H NMR study and X-ray crystallographic analysis. Capsule 3a showed a significant solvent effect on guest encapsulation. The association constant (K(a)) of 3a with guests in C(6)D(6) was much greater than that in CDCl(3) (450-48,000-fold). The encapsulation of guests within 3a in C(6)D(6) was enthalpically driven, whereas that in CDCl(3) tended to be both enthalpically and entropically driven. Thermodynamic studies suggest that the small K(a) value in CDCl(3) arises from the character of CDCl(3) as a competitor guest molecule for 3a, and not from the difference in stability of the boronic ester bonds of 3a in both solvents. We propose a linker partial dissociation mechanism for the guest uptake and release into and out of 3a based on the kinetic studies of guest@3a using 2D EXSY analysis, as well as structural analysis of a guest@3b. The rotation behavior of 4,4'-diacetoxy-2,2'-disubstituted-biphenyls within 3a was also investigated, where the elongation of 2,2'-disubstituents of guests put the brakes on guest rotation within 3a.

  12. Binding of chemical warfare agent simulants as guests in a coordination cage: contributions to binding and a fluorescence-based response.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Christopher G P; Piper, Jerico R; Ward, Michael D

    2016-05-07

    Cubic coordination cages act as competent hosts for several alkyl phosphonates used as chemical warfare agent simulants; a range of cage/guest structures have been determined, contributions to guest binding analysed, and a fluorescent response to guest binding demonstrated.

  13. From the desk of the Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei, Tom K.

    2015-07-01

    Life Sciences in Space Research had a prominent presence at the International Congress of Radiation Research (ICRR) meeting held in Kyoto, Japan from May 25th-29th, with seven of the eleven editors attending the meeting. A journal booth was also put up at the pre-ICRR satellite meeting on Space Radiation and Heavy Ions in Therapy (SRHITS) held a few days earlier in Osaka. Since the inception of LSSR last year, the editors and publisher have promoted the journal at a number of major conferences including COSPAR 2014 in Moscow, the annual meeting of the Radiation Research Society and the NASA Space Radiation Investigators Meeting. These efforts have increased awareness of the journal among investigators in space life sciences and related fields. The number of monthly downloads of articles from the journal website averages 2000, a respectable number for a brand new journal.

  14. Wysession begins term as Eos Section Editor for Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysession, Michael

    In mid-April, Michael Wysession, an associate professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Washington University, embarked on a 3-year term as section editor of Eos for seismology. Wysession brings to the position a strong background in research and teaching. Below are a few remarks from Wysession.“I recently became the new seismology editor for Eos. I look forward to presenting the many exciting areas of seismological research to the entire geophysical community. I have taught at Washington University since obtaining my Ph.D. at Northwestern University in 1991. My interest in seismology began during my undergraduate years at Brown University (Sc.B., 1984), but my experience as an educator began after I graduated and taught high school math and physics in Staten Island, N.Y.

  15. William E. Edmonston, Jr.: Editor, 1968-1976.

    PubMed

    Kihlstrom, John F; Frischholz, Edward J

    2010-10-01

    This article is part of an occasional series profiling editors of the American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis (AJCH). William E. Edmonston was the second editor, succeeding Milton H. Erickson. His research focused on the use of conditioning paradigms and psychophysiological measures to explore a wide variety of hypnotic phenomena, leading to a "neo-Pavlovian" theory of neutral hypnosis as physiological relaxation (anesis). A longtime professor of psychology at Colgate University, he created an interdisciplinary undergraduate major in neuroscience, and was named New York State College Professor of the Year in 1988. He gave the Journal a new look, and a greater balance of clinical and experimental papers. The article also provides background on George Barton Cutten, George H. Estabrooks, and Frank A. Pattie, pioneers of hypnosis who were linked to Edmonston.

  16. Towards a document structure editor for software requirements analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, Vincent J.; Lekkos, Anthony A.

    1986-01-01

    Of the six or seven phases of the software engineering life cycle, requirements analysis tends to be the least understood and the least formalized. Correspondingly, a scarcity of useful software tools exist which aid in the development of user and system requirements. It is proposed that requirements analysis should culminate in a set of documents similar to those that usually accompany a delivered Software product. The design of a software tool, the Document Structure Editor, which facilitates the development of such documentation.

  17. Incremental Expression Parsing for Syntax-Directed Editors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-27

    Cretsna*refr a+b+cde ftth I / \\ ,:I \\ I’\\ / , I \\ b- ’ I I € d Figure 4-3: Correct syntax tree for"a + (b + c" d" e) ftgth" The tokens between, the...Schwartz. The Design of a Language-Directed Editor for Block-Structured Languages. In Proceedings of the ACM SIGPLAN SIGOA Symposium on Text Manipulation

  18. Reference Accuracy: Authors', Reviewers', Editors', and Publishers' Contributions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Scientific authors are responsible for the accuracy of their writings and references to others' works. However, relying on authors is not enough when it comes to processing their manuscripts. Joint efforts of authors, peer reviewers, editors, and publishers throughout the publishing process may prevent most reference errors. This article analyzes essential aspects of bibliographic management and focuses on the importance of validating references by all stakeholders of scholarly publishing. PMID:25469055

  19. JGR-Solid Earth and Planets GP editor appointed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ken Hoffman (Physics Department, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo) has been appointed GP editor for papers submitted to the Journal of Geophysical Research—Solid Earth and Planets. His tenure will be from January 1987 to December 1988. Hoffman holds a Ph.D. in geophysics from the University of California, Berkeley, and has published extensively in the areas of rock magnetism, paleomagnetism, lunar paleointensity, and most recently, geomagnetic dipole field reversal modeling.

  20. A perspective on computer documentation: System developer vs. technical editor

    SciTech Connect

    Carnes, E.T.; Truett, L.F.

    1995-12-31

    Between the computer-knowledgeable {open_quotes}techie{close_quotes} and the technical writer is a chasm created by differences in knowledge bases and skills. Although this gap is widened by misunderstandings and misconceptions of system development roles, it is bridged by mutual need and dual appreciation. Often the editor/writer is {open_quotes}behind{close_quotes} from beginning to end. The writer normally joins the team after the programmers are well into system development and do not want to {open_quotes}waste time{close_quotes} discussing fundamentals. The writer is usually excluded from technical discussions because it is assumed that he/she would not understand anyway. Later in the system development cycle, the writer has no time to polish the documentation before a new version of the software is issued which implies that the documentation must be revised. Nevertheless, the editor/writer`s product is critical for the end-user`s appreciation of the software, a fact which promotes unity to complete the comprehensive package of software and documentation. This paper explores the planks in the bridge that spans the chasm between developers and their fundamental PR agents, the technical editors/writers. This paper defines approaches (e.g., The Circling Theory) and techniques (Bold Thrust!) employed for effective communication -- between software developer and technical writer as well as between the software and the end-user.

  1. CMS Configuration Editor: GUI based application for user analysis job

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cosa, A.

    2011-12-01

    We present the user interface and the software architecture of the Configuration Editor for the CMS experiment. The analysis workflow is organized in a modular way integrated within the CMS framework that organizes in a flexible way user analysis code. The Python scripting language is adopted to define the job configuration that drives the analysis workflow. It could be a challenging task for users, especially for newcomers, to develop analysis jobs managing the configuration of many required modules. For this reason a graphical tool has been conceived in order to edit and inspect configuration files. A set of common analysis tools defined in the CMS Physics Analysis Toolkit (PAT) can be steered and configured using the Config Editor. A user-defined analysis workflow can be produced starting from a standard configuration file, applying and configuring PAT tools according to the specific user requirements. CMS users can adopt this tool, the Config Editor, to create their analysis visualizing in real time which are the effects of their actions. They can visualize the structure of their configuration, look at the modules included in the workflow, inspect the dependences existing among the modules and check the data flow. They can visualize at which values parameters are set and change them according to what is required by their analysis task. The integration of common tools in the GUI needed to adopt an object-oriented structure in the Python definition of the PAT tools and the definition of a layer of abstraction from which all PAT tools inherit.

  2. Statement on Publication Ethics for Editors and Publishers.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Voronov, Alexander A; Gorin, Sergey V; Koroleva, Anna M; Kitas, George D

    2016-09-01

    The digitization and related developments in journal editing and publishing necessitate increasing the awareness of all stakeholders of science communication in the emerging global problems and possible solutions. Journal editors and publishers are frequently encountered with the fast-growing problems of authorship, conflicts of interest, peer review, research misconduct, unethical citations, and inappropriate journal impact metrics. While the number of erroneous and unethical research papers and wasteful, or 'predatory', journals is increasing exponentially, responsible editors are urged to 'clean' the literature by correcting or retracting related articles. Indexers are advised to implement measures for accepting truly influential and ethical journals and delisting sources with predatory publishing practices. Updating knowledge and skills of authors, editors and publishers, developing and endorsing recommendations of global editorial associations, and (re)drafting journal instructions can be viewed as potential tools for improving ethics of academic journals. The aim of this Statement is to increase awareness of all stakeholders of science communication of the emerging ethical issues in journal editing and publishing and initiate a campaign of upgrading and enforcing related journal instructions.

  3. EDITORIAL: Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Keith

    2005-01-01

    I am very pleased to announce that Professor Jan-Michael Rost will be taking on the position of Editor-in-Chief at Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (J. Phys. B) from the beginning of January 2005. As Editor-in-Chief I have seen the journal respond to the rapid and exciting developments in atomic, molecular and optical physics of recent years. There will, I am sure, be a great deal of new and important science in our field in the years ahead. I am also sure that Jan-Michael will do a fantastic job in guiding the journal through these times. The publishing team at J. Phys. B is a superbly responsive and effective one that does a great job in publishing the science we do. I want to thank them all for the help and support they have given me in the role of Editor-in-Chief and wish them the very best for the future. Last and certainly not least I would like to thank you, the authors, referees and readers, for making J. Phys. B such a great journal to have been a part of.

  4. Statement on Publication Ethics for Editors and Publishers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The digitization and related developments in journal editing and publishing necessitate increasing the awareness of all stakeholders of science communication in the emerging global problems and possible solutions. Journal editors and publishers are frequently encountered with the fast-growing problems of authorship, conflicts of interest, peer review, research misconduct, unethical citations, and inappropriate journal impact metrics. While the number of erroneous and unethical research papers and wasteful, or 'predatory', journals is increasing exponentially, responsible editors are urged to 'clean' the literature by correcting or retracting related articles. Indexers are advised to implement measures for accepting truly influential and ethical journals and delisting sources with predatory publishing practices. Updating knowledge and skills of authors, editors and publishers, developing and endorsing recommendations of global editorial associations, and (re)drafting journal instructions can be viewed as potential tools for improving ethics of academic journals. The aim of this Statement is to increase awareness of all stakeholders of science communication of the emerging ethical issues in journal editing and publishing and initiate a campaign of upgrading and enforcing related journal instructions. PMID:27510376

  5. Guest-induced emergent properties in Metal–Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Foster, Michael E.; Léonard, François; Stavila, Vitalie; Feng, Patrick L.; Doty, F. Patrick; Leong, Kirsty; Ma, Eric Yue; Johnston, Scott R.; Talin, A. Alec; Shen, Zhi -Xun

    2015-03-19

    Metal–Organic frameworks (MOFs) are crystalline nanoporous materials comprised of organic electron donors linked to metal ions by strong coordination bonds. Applications such as gas storage and separations are currently receiving considerable attention, but if the unique properties of MOFs could be extended to electronics, magnetics, and photonics, the impact on material science would greatly increase. Recently, we obtained “emergent properties,” such as electronic conductivity and energy transfer, by infiltrating MOF pores with “guest” molecules that interact with the framework electronic structure. In this Perspective, we define a path to emergent properties based on the Guest@MOF concept, using zinc-carboxylate and copper-paddlewheel MOFs for illustration. Energy transfer and light harvesting are discussed for zinc carboxylate frameworks infiltrated with triplet-scavenging organometallic compounds and thiophene- and fullerene-infiltrated MOF-177. In addition, we discuss the mechanism of charge transport in TCNQ-infiltrated HKUST-1, the first MOF with electrical conductivity approaching conducting organic polymers. Lastly, these examples show that guest molecules in MOF pores should be considered not merely as impurities or analytes to be sensed but also as an important aspect of rational design.

  6. Guest-induced emergent properties in Metal–Organic Frameworks

    DOE PAGES

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Foster, Michael E.; Léonard, François; ...

    2015-03-19

    Metal–Organic frameworks (MOFs) are crystalline nanoporous materials comprised of organic electron donors linked to metal ions by strong coordination bonds. Applications such as gas storage and separations are currently receiving considerable attention, but if the unique properties of MOFs could be extended to electronics, magnetics, and photonics, the impact on material science would greatly increase. Recently, we obtained “emergent properties,” such as electronic conductivity and energy transfer, by infiltrating MOF pores with “guest” molecules that interact with the framework electronic structure. In this Perspective, we define a path to emergent properties based on the Guest@MOF concept, using zinc-carboxylate and copper-paddlewheelmore » MOFs for illustration. Energy transfer and light harvesting are discussed for zinc carboxylate frameworks infiltrated with triplet-scavenging organometallic compounds and thiophene- and fullerene-infiltrated MOF-177. In addition, we discuss the mechanism of charge transport in TCNQ-infiltrated HKUST-1, the first MOF with electrical conductivity approaching conducting organic polymers. Lastly, these examples show that guest molecules in MOF pores should be considered not merely as impurities or analytes to be sensed but also as an important aspect of rational design.« less

  7. Conditional Autonomy and Responsible Action: A Response to Yusef Waghid and Martin Hall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Divala, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Yusef Waghid (2006) in his response to Martin Hall (2006) argues that Martin Hall offers a better way of making sense of some of the conceptual and pragmatic links between academic freedom and institutional autonomy. Nevertheless Waghid critiques Hall's uncritical treatment of prominent theoretical positions for his claims, which Waghid thinks…

  8. How Big Are "Martin's Big Words"? Thinking Big about the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Traci

    "Martin's Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." tells of King's childhood determination to use "big words" through biographical information and quotations. In this lesson, students in grades 3 to 5 explore information on Dr. King to think about his "big" words, then they write about their own…

  9. The Relationship between Proficiency in French and Academic Achievement for Students in Saint Martin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Martin Ezikiel

    2013-01-01

    School administrators and educational policy makers have made a substantial effort to address the learning needs of students in Saint Martin, yet the achievement gap between students in Saint Martin and students in metropolitan France still persists. Risk factors such as family structure, socioeconomic status, immigration, and difficulty of…

  10. 76 FR 74843 - Release of Airport Property, Martin County Airport, Stuart, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Release of Airport Property, Martin County Airport, Stuart, FL AGENCY... properties, namely approximately 200 acres at the Martin County Airport, Stuart, FL, from the conditions, reservations, and restrictions as contained in a Surplus Property Agreement between the FAA and the...

  11. Martin Luther King Family Center, Chicago, Illinois: Model Programs. Childhood Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Institutes for Research in the Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, CA.

    Prepared for the White House Conference on Children (December 1970), this booklet reports on the Martin Luther King Family Center, one of 34 promising programs on childhood education. The Martin Luther King Family Center is now a privately funded, community-controlled demonstration service center with an all black staff. All of its programs are…

  12. Methods for associating or dissociating guest materials with a metal organic framework, systems for associating or dissociating guest materials within a series of metal organic frameworks, thermal energy transfer assemblies, and methods for transferring thermal energy

    DOEpatents

    McGrail, B. Peter; Brown, Daryl R.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2016-08-02

    Methods for releasing associated guest materials from a metal organic framework are provided. Methods for associating guest materials with a metal organic framework are also provided. Methods are provided for selectively associating or dissociating guest materials with a metal organic framework. Systems for associating or dissociating guest materials within a series of metal organic frameworks are provided. Thermal energy transfer assemblies are provided. Methods for transferring thermal energy are also provided.

  13. Methods for associating or dissociating guest materials with a metal organic framework, systems for associating or dissociating guest materials within a series of metal organic frameworks, thermal energy transfer assemblies, and methods for transferring thermal energy

    DOEpatents

    McGrail, B. Peter; Brown, Daryl R.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2014-08-05

    Methods for releasing associated guest materials from a metal organic framework are provided. Methods for associating guest materials with a metal organic framework are also provided. Methods are provided for selectively associating or dissociating guest materials with a metal organic framework. Systems for associating or dissociating guest materials within a series of metal organic frameworks are provided. Thermal energy transfer assemblies are provided. Methods for transferring thermal energy are also provided.

  14. Host-Guest Engineering of Coordination Polymers for Highly Tunable Luminophores Based on Charge Transfer Emissions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bei; Li, Na; Wang, Xi; Chang, Ze; Bu, Xian-He

    2017-01-25

    Aiming at the targeted construction of coordination polymer luminophores, the engineering of host-guest architectures with charge transfer based emissions is performed by utilizing the interactions between the electron-deficient 2,4,6-tri(pyridin-4-yl)-1,3,5-triazine (tpt) and electron-rich polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) motifs as acceptors and donors, respectively. Through guest modulation of a prototype coordination polymer [Cd(tpt)(1,4-pda)(H2O)2]·(tpt)·(H2O)2 (1) (1,4-H2pda = 1,4-phenylenediacetic acid), a series of coordination polymers with different PAHs as guests, [Cd2(tpt)2(1,4-pda)2]·guest (2-5) (guest = triphenylene for 2, pyrene for 3, coronene for 4, and perylene for 5), are successfully fabricated. Distinct from 1, coordination polymers 2-5 reveal unique bilayer structures with PAHs interlayer and good stability, owing to the enhanced stacking interactions between tpt motifs and PAH guests. Moreover, their emissions cover a wide range of wavelength due to the effective guest to host charge transfer interactions between donor and acceptor motifs. Their readily tunable host-guest charge transfer based emissions make them good candidates as potential luminophores.

  15. A Student-Centered Guest Lecturing: A Constructivism Approach to Promote Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Lei; Guo, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Student engagement has become a big challenge in higher education, especially when distance learning is getting more and more popular. Guest lecturing is a popular method to bring relevance to the classroom and engage in students. Ground on the theory of constructivism, this paper introduces a student-centered guest lecturing that allows students…

  16. "Multi-Voicedness" in Internet Guest-Books of German and Italian Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fetscher, Doris

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the "multiple voices" of 13-15-year-old German and Italian adolescents in internet guest-books are analyzed. The study is based on guest-books texts with a mixture of different registers, languages and dialects. In particular, the German adolescents from the Augsburg region (Bavaria) display a strong regional linguistic…

  17. A templating guest sorts out a molecular triangle from a dimer-trimer constitutional dynamic library.

    PubMed

    Rancan, Marzio; Dolmella, Alessandro; Seraglia, Roberta; Orlandi, Simonetta; Quici, Silvio; Armelao, Lidia

    2012-03-25

    Cu(II) and a bis-β-diketone ligand generate a small constitutional dynamic library (CDL). The designed introduction of a well suited guest drives the self-sorting of the system toward a supramolecular triangle. Alternatively, the triangle self-assembly is templated by the same guest in a one-pot synthesis.

  18. Guest-responsive reversible swelling and enhanced fluorescence in a super-absorbent, dynamic microporous polymer.

    PubMed

    Rao, K Venkata; Mohapatra, Sudip; Maji, Tapas Kumar; George, Subi J

    2012-04-10

    A swell idea! The guest-responsive reversible swelling and fluorescence enhancement of a dynamic, microporous polymer network is presented. Guest-induced breathing of hydrophobic pores imparts multi-functional properties, such as super-absorbency, phase-selective swelling of oil from water and encapsulation of C(60) (see figure), to this soft micro-porous organic polymer.

  19. Supramolecular host-guest interaction for labeling and detection of cellular biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Agasti, Sarit S; Liong, Monty; Tassa, Carlos; Chung, Hyun Jung; Shaw, Stanley Y; Lee, Hakho; Weissleder, Ralph

    2012-01-09

    Be my guest: A supramolecular host-guest interaction is utilized for highly efficient bioorthogonal labeling of cellular targets. Antibodies labeled with a cyclodextrin host molecule bind to adamantane-labeled magnetofluorescent nanoparticles (see picture) and provide an amplifiable strategy for biomarker detection that can be adapted to different diagnostic techniques such as molecular profiling or magnetic cell sorting.

  20. Will the Real School Psychologist Please Stand Up: Is the Past a Prologue for the Future of School Psychology? Guest Editor's Comments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Thomas K.

    1994-01-01

    Report on symposium by four school psychology leaders (Irwin Hyman, Jack I. Bardon, Douglas T. Brown, Margaret Dawson) who offer perspectives on the future plus review predictions made in 1978. Hyman reports on issues of role and function; Barton discusses how doctoral-level practice played out; Brown reviews importance of competency-based…

  1. Guest molecules as a design element for metal–organic frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Medishetty, Raghavender; Fischer, Roland A.

    2016-11-07

    The well-known synthetic versatility of MOFs is rooted in the ability to predict the metal ion coordination geometry and the vast possibilities to use organic chemistry to modify the linker groups. However, the use of “non-innocent” guest molecules as a component of framework design has been largely ignored. Nevertheless, recent reports show that the presence of guest molecules can have dramatic effects, even when these are seemingly innocuous species such as water or polar solvents. Advantages of using guests to impart new properties to MOFs include the relative ease of introducing new functionalities, the ability to modify the properties material at will by removing the guest or inserting different ones, and avoidance of the difficulties associated with synthesizing new frameworks, which can be challenging even when the basic topology remains constant. In this article we describe the “Guest@MOF” concept and provide examples illustrating its potential as a new MOF design element.

  2. Supramolecular adhesives to hard surfaces: adhesion between host hydrogels and guest glass substrates through molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Yoshinori; Sahara, Taiga; Sekine, Tomoko; Kakuta, Takahiro; Nakahata, Masaki; Otsubo, Miyuki; Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Harada, Akira

    2014-10-01

    Supramolecular materials based on host-guest interactions should exhibit high selectivity and external stimuli-responsiveness. Among various stimuli, redox and photo stimuli are useful for its wide application. An external stimuli-responsive adhesive system between CD host-gels (CD gels) and guest molecules modified glass substrates (guest Sub) is focused. Here, the selective adhesion between host gels and guest substrates where adhesion depends on molecular complementarity is reported. Initially, it is thought that adhesion of a gel material onto a hard material might be difficult unless many guest molecules modified linear polymers immobilize on the surface of hard materials. However, reversible adhesion of the CD gels is observed by dissociating and re-forming inclusion complex in response to redox and photo stimuli.

  3. Guest tunable structure and spin crossover properties in a nanoporous coordination framework material.

    SciTech Connect

    Neville, S. M.; Halder, G. J.; Chapman, K. W.; Duriska, M. B.; Moubaraki, B.; Murray, K. S.; Kepert, C. J.

    2009-08-11

    The electronic switching properties of the nanoporous spin crossover framework [Fe(NCS){sub 2}(bpbd){sub 2}] {center_dot} x(guest), SCOF-2, can be rationally manipulated via sorption of a range of molecular guests (acetone, ethanol, methanol, propanol, 1-acetonitrile) into the 1-D channels of this material. Pronounced changes to the spin crossover properties are related directly to the steric and electronic influence of the individual guests: the degree of lattice cooperativity, as reflected in the abruptness of the transition and presence of hysteresis, is strongly influenced by the presence of cooperative host-guest interactions, and the temperature of the transition varies with guest polarity through a proposed electrostatic interaction.

  4. Highly Flexible, Tough, and Self-Healing Supramolecular Polymeric Materials Using Host-Guest Interaction.

    PubMed

    Nakahata, Masaki; Takashima, Yoshinori; Harada, Akira

    2015-09-23

    Flexible, tough, and self-healable polymeric materials are promising to be a solution to the energy problem by substituting for conventional heavy materials. A fusion of supramolecular chemistry and polymer chemistry is a powerful method to create such intelligent materials. Here, a supramolecular polymeric material using multipoint molecular recognition between cyclodextrin (CD) and hydrophobic guest molecules at polymer side chain is reported. A transparent, flexible, and tough hydrogel (host-guest gel) is formed by a simple preparation procedure. The host-guest gel shows self-healing property in both wet state and dry state due to reversible nature of host-guest interaction. The practical utility of the host-guest gel as a scratch curable coating is demonstrated.

  5. Hydrogen bonding assemblies in host guest complexes with 18-crown-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonari, M. S.; Simonov, Yu. A.; Kravtsov, V. Ch.; Lipkowski, J.; Ganin, E. V.; Yavolovskii, A. A.

    2003-02-01

    Recent X-ray crystal structural data for two novel 1:2 host-guest complexes of 18-crown-6 with neutral organic molecules, thiaamide hydrazide of 2-aminobenzoic acid and thiaamide hydrazide of 4-amino-1,2,5-thiadiazole-3-carbonic acid are reported. The supramolecular structures of these two and five relative complexes are discussed from the point of view of participation of donor groups in coordination with the crown ether, and donor and acceptor groups in the self-assembly of the guest molecules. Guest molecules have incorporated amine and hydrazine moieties as proton donors and carbonyl oxygen and sulfur (in thiadiazole and in thiaamine moieties) as proton acceptors. The guest-guest interactions appeared to be crucial in the final architecture.

  6. A room with a viewpoint revisited: descriptive norms and hotel guests' towel reuse behavior.

    PubMed

    Bohner, Gerd; Schlüter, Lena E

    2014-01-01

    Field experiments on descriptive norms as a means to increase hotel guests' towel reuse [1] were replicated and extended. In two hotels in Germany (Study 1: N = 724; Study 2: N = 204), descriptive norm messages suggesting that 75% of guests had reused their towels, or a standard message appealing to environmental concerns, were placed in guests' bathrooms. Descriptive norm messages varied in terms of proximity of the reference group ("hotel guests" vs. "guests in this room") and temporal proximity (currently vs. two years previous). Reuse of towels was unobtrusively recorded. Results showed that reuse rates were high overall and that both standard and descriptive norm messages increased reuse rates compared to a no-message baseline. However, descriptive norm messages were not more effective than the standard message, and effects of proximity were inconsistent across studies. Discussion addresses cultural and conceptual issues in comparing the present findings with previous ones.

  7. VentureStar by Lockheed Martin Releasing Satellite - Computer Graphic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This is an artist's conception of the NASA/Lockheed Martin Single-Stage-To-Orbit (SSTO) Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) releasing a satellite into orbit around the Earth. NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, expected to play a key role in the development and flight testing of the X-33, which was a technology demonstrator vehicle for a possible RLV. The RLV technology program was a cooperative agreement between NASA and industry. The goal of the RLV technology program was to enable significant reductions in the cost of access to space, and to promote the creation and delivery of new space services and other activities that would improve U.S. economic competitiveness. The X-33 was a wedged-shaped subscale technology demonstrator prototype of a potential future Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) that Lockheed Martin had dubbed VentureStar. The company had hoped to develop VentureStar early this century. Through demonstration flight and ground research, NASA's X-33 program was to have provided the information needed for industry representatives such as Lockheed Martin to decide whether to proceed with the development of a full-scale, commercial RLV program. A full-scale, single-stage-to-orbit RLV was to have dramatically increased reliability and lowered the costs of putting a pound of payload into space, from the current figure of $10,000 to $1,000. Reducing the cost associated with transporting payloads in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) by using a commercial RLV was to have created new opportunities for space access and significantly improved U.S. economic competitiveness in the world-wide launch marketplace. NASA expected to be a customer, not the operator, of the commercial RLV. The X-33 design was based on a lifting body shape with two revolutionary 'linear aerospike' rocket engines and a rugged metallic thermal protection system. The vehicle also had lightweight components and fuel tanks built to conform to the vehicle's outer shape. Time between X-33

  8. 75 FR 52351 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Request; OMB No. 0925-0177 “Special Volunteer and Guest...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... Health Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Request; OMB No. 0925-0177 ``Special Volunteer and Guest.... Proposed Collection: Title: Special Volunteer and Guest Researcher Assignment for use in NIH facilities... completed by an NIH official for each Guest Researcher or Special Volunteer prior to his/ her arrival at...

  9. Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief, Ronald Stambaugh Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief, Ronald Stambaugh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambaugh, Ronald

    2012-04-01

    I am very pleased to join the outstanding leadership team for the journal Nuclear Fusion as Scientific Editor. The journal's high position in the field of fusion energy research derives in no small measure from the efforts of the IAEA team in Vienna, the production and marketing of IOP Publishing, the Board of Editors led by its chairman Mitsuru Kikuchi, the Associate Editor for Inertial Confinement Max Tabak and the outgoing Scientific Editor, Paul Thomas. During Paul's five year tenure submissions have grown by over 40%. The usage of the electronic journal has grown year by year with about 300 000 full text downloads of Nuclear Fusion articles in 2011, an impressive figure due in part to the launch of the full 50 year archive. High quality has been maintained while times for peer review and publishing have been reduced and the journal achieved some of the highest impact factors ever (as high as 4.27). The journal has contributed greatly to building the international scientific basis for fusion. I was privileged to serve from 2003 to 2010 as chairman of the Coordinating Committee for the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) which published in Nuclear Fusion the first ITER Physics Basis (1999) and its later update (2007). The scientific basis that has been developed to date for fusion has led to the construction of major facilities to demonstrate the production of power-plant relevant levels of fusion reactions. We look forward to the journal continuing to play a key role in the international effort toward fusion energy as these exciting major facilities and the various approaches to fusion continue to be developed. It is clear that Nuclear Fusion maintains its position in the field because of the perceived high quality of the submissions, the refereeing and the editorial processes, and the availability and utility of the online journal. The creation of the Nuclear Fusion Prize, led by the Board of Editors chairman Mitsuru Kikuchi, for the most outstanding

  10. Obituary: Martin F. McCarthy (1923-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coyne, George; Rubin, Vera

    2011-12-01

    Martin F. McCarthy, S.J., astronomer at the Vatican Observatory from 1958 until his retirement in 1999, died peacefully on 5 February at the age of 86 years at the Jesuit Campion Health Center in Weston, Massachusetts where he had resided since his retirement. McCarthy received his doctorate in astronomy from Georgetown University, Washington, DC in 1951. The study of carbon stars, stars whose atmospheres contain more carbon than oxygen, was a major interest for McCarthy. Carbon stars were originally discovered and studied in the 1860s by Fr. Secchi, the eminent Jesuit astronomer. Interestingly, Fr. Secchi spent 1848-50 at Georgetown University in Washington, where Martin McCarthy would receive his PhD degree 101 years later. Upon completion of his seminary studies in theology, he carried out post-doctoral research at Warner and Swasey Observatory, Lick Observatory, the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory and Yerkes Observatory until he began his career at the Vatican Observatory where he served as a key figure in the Observatory's transition to the world of modern research. He also brought the Observatory onto the international stage through his collaborations in research at, among other institutes, Palomar Observatory, Lowell Observatory, Las Campanas Observatories, the Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory and the Carnegie Institute of Washington. He served on the Executive Council of the Italian Astronomical Society (1969-1971), was chair of the National Committee of the Vatican to the International Astronomical Union (IAU) from 1979 until his retirement and was President of IAU Commission 25 Stellar Photometry and Polarimetry (1976-1979). During his career he published more than 120 research papers. He was a natural teacher, who enjoyed explaining and talking science to students and visitors. Among his many contributions to the growth of the Vatican Observatory, he was responsible in 1986 for the beginning of the series of the Vatican Observatory Summer

  11. X-33 by Lockheed Martin on Launch Pad - Computer Graphic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This is an artist's conception of the X-33 technology demonstrator on its launch pad, ready for lift-off into orbit. NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, expected to play a key role in the development and flight testing of the X-33, which was a technology demonstrator vehicle for a possible Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). The RLV technology program was a cooperative agreement between NASA and industry. The goal of the RLV technology program was to enable significant reductions in the cost of access to space, and to promote the creation and delivery of new space services and other activities that would improve U.S. economic competitiveness. The X-33 was a wedged-shaped subscale technology demonstrator prototype of a potential future Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) that Lockheed Martin had dubbed VentureStar. The company hoped to develop VentureStar early this century. Through demonstration flight and ground research, NASA's X-33 program was to have provided the information needed for industry representatives such as Lockheed Martin to decide whether to proceed with the development of a full-scale, commercial RLV program. A full-scale, single-stage-to-orbit RLV was to have dramatically increase reliability and lowered costs of putting a pound of payload into space, from the current figure of $10,000 to $1,000. Reducing the cost associated with transporting payloads in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) by using a commercial RLV was to have created new opportunities for space access and significantly improved U.S. economic competitiveness in the world-wide launch marketplace. NASA expected to be a customer, not the operator, of the commercial RLV. The X-33 design was based on a lifting body shape with two revolutionary 'linear aerospike' rocket engines and a rugged metallic thermal protection system. The vehicle also had lightweight components and fuel tanks built to conform to the vehicle's outer shape. Time between X-33 flights was normally to have been seven

  12. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, P.

    2004-04-01

    On 1 January, 2004, I assumed the position of Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics. I will start by saying that I will do my best to justify the confidence of the journal management and publishing staff in my abilities. I was fortunate to have been able to work, as an Editorial Board member, with my predecessor, the previous Editor-in-Chief, Professor Allister Ferguson. Allister has provided a high degree of intellectual stewardship for the journal in the last five years. He has made the job appear a worthy challenge for me. I therefore take this opportunity to thank Allister on behalf of the Editorial Board and publishing staff of the journal. Several other factors contributed to my decision to accept this position. The first is the group of people who actually go about the business of publishing. The Senior Publisher, Nicola Gulley (and her predecessor Sophy Le Masurier); the Managing Editor, Jill Membrey; the Publishing Administrators, Nina Blakesley and Sarah Towell; the Production Editor, Katie Gerrard and their office staff form an amazing group and have managed to make the operation of the journal incredibly efficient. An index of this is the speed with which incoming manuscripts are processed. The average time between the receipt of a manuscript and its web publication, if accepted, is 130 days. This is three to five times shorter than for most other journals. A factor that contributes to this success is a responsive pool of referees that the publishing staff have as a valuable resource. Ultimately, the standard bearers of any journal are the referees. Therefore, a grateful `thank you' is due from all of us at J. Phys. D to all our referees, who diligently perform this honourable task. The Associate Editors of the journal, Professors Lawler, Margaritondo and O'Grady, also provide immense scientific leadership. They help in defining new directions for the journal and in the publishing process. Last, but not least, a remarkable asset of

  13. Macroscopic ordering of helical pores for arraying guest molecules noncentrosymmetrically

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunji; Cho, Joonil; Yamada, Kuniyo; Hashizume, Daisuke; Araoka, Fumito; Takezoe, Hideo; Aida, Takuzo; Ishida, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Helical nanostructures have attracted continuous attention, not only as media for chiral recognition and synthesis, but also as motifs for studying intriguing physical phenomena that never occur in centrosymmetric systems. To improve the quality of signals from these phenomena, which is a key issue for their further exploration, the most straightforward is the macroscopic orientation of helices. Here as a versatile scaffold to rationally construct this hardly accessible structure, we report a polymer framework with helical pores that unidirectionally orient over a large area (∼10 cm2). The framework, prepared by crosslinking a supramolecular liquid crystal preorganized in a magnetic field, is chemically robust, functionalized with carboxyl groups and capable of incorporating various basic or cationic guest molecules. When a nonlinear optical chromophore is incorporated in the framework, the resultant complex displays a markedly efficient nonlinear optical output, owing to the coherence of signals ensured by the macroscopically oriented helical structure. PMID:26416086

  14. Copernicus and Martin Luther: An Encounter Between Science and Religion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobe, D. H.

    1998-03-01

    Martin Luther has been severely criticized for a remark he made about Copernicus and his heliocentric theory. When this offhand remark, made at the dinner table four years before the publication of On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres, is considered in its historical context, it is shown to be in keeping with the generally accepted scholarly opinion of the time. Luther's view of science in general and astronomy in particular is much more sophisticated than indicated by this single impromptu remark. In the thought of Luther there are two sources of knowledge - experience and revelation. By experience he meant all the human disciplines (or ``science"), and by revelation he meant Biblical theology. Each discipline should have its own technical language and methods. Science and Biblical theology should not conflict, since when speaking of the same phenomena they use a different language. Luther used the clear and literal interpretation of the text of the Bible, except when there were compelling reasons for doing otherwise. Rather than use the Bible as a source of scientific facts and theories as is done by a literalist, he interpreted it as being the witness to Christ. Quotations from Luther are used to illustrate his approach.

  15. Pleistocene Deposits in Pierre Saint-Martin Cave, French Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinif, Yves; Maire, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Pleistocene deposits in alpine Pierre Saint-Martin cave are preserved in an abandoned river gallery. The deposits, 300 m long and 25 m high, are composed of a lower unit of fallen blocks overlain by debris flows, a main unit of laminated clay, and a series of river terraces inset into these units. The lower and main units are each overlain by speleothems. The lower unit represents a cold period, probably isotope stage 10. Corroded speleothems above it have given U/Th ages greater than 300,000-330,000 yr B.P. The main unit, with carbonate-rich varves devoid of pollen, represents a glaciation that occurred before 225,000 yr B.P. and probably correlates with stage 8, even though such a glaciation has not been previously recognized in the Pyrenees. The river terraces, covered by many noncorroded speleothems, probably formed during stage 7 (U/Th ages between 194,000 and 211,000-225,000 yr B.P.). Subsequent sinking of an underground river protected the deposits from erosion.

  16. Compliance with the Aerospace MACT Standard at Lockheed Martin

    SciTech Connect

    Kurucz, K.L.; Vicars, S.; Fetter, S.; Mueller, T.

    1997-12-31

    Actions taken and planned at four Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) facilities to comply with the Aerospace MACT Standard are reviewed. Many LMC sites have taken proactive steps to reduce emissions and implement low VOC coating technology. Significant administrative, facility, and material challenges remain to achieve compliance with the upcoming NESHAP and Control Technology Guideline (CTG) standards. The facilities discussed herein set up programs to develop and implement compliance strategies. These facilities manufacture military aircraft, missiles, satellites, rockets, and electronic guidance and communications systems. Some of the facilities are gearing up for new production lines subject to new source MACT standards. At this time the facilities are reviewing compliance status of all primers, topcoats, maskants and solvents subject to the standard. Facility personnel are searching for the most efficient methods of satisfying the recordkeeping, reporting and monitoring, sections of the standards while simultaneously preparing or reviewing their Title V permit applications. Facility decisions on paint booths are the next highest priority. Existing dry filter paint booths will be subject to the filtration standard for existing paint booths which requires the use of two-stage filters. Planned paint booths for the F-22 program, and other new booths must comply with the standard for new and rebuilt booths which requires three stage or HEPA filters. Facilities looking to replace existing water wash paint booths, and those required to retrofit the air handling equipment to accommodate the two-stage filters, are reviewing issues surrounding the rebuilt source definition.

  17. Lockheed Martin approach to a Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvin, John D.

    1996-03-01

    This paper discusses Lockheed Martin's perspective on the development of a cost effective Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). Critical to a successful Single Stage To Orbit (SSTO) program are; an economic development plan sensitive to fiscal constraints; a vehicle concept satisfying present and future US launch needs; and an operations concept commensurate with a market driven program. Participation in the economic plan by government, industry, and the commercial sector is a key element of integrating our development plan and funding profile. The RLV baseline concept design, development evolution and several critical trade studies illustrate the superior performance achieved by our innovative approach to the problem of SSTO. Findings from initial aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic wind tunnel tests and trajectory analyses on this concept confirm the superior characteristics of the lifting body shape combined with the Linear Aerospike rocket engine. This Aero Ballistic Rocket (ABR) concept captures the essence of The Skunk Works approach to SSTO RLV technology integration and system engineering. These programmatic and concept development topics chronicle the key elements to implementing an innovative market driven next generation RLV.

  18. Martin Lister (1639-1712) and fools' gold.

    PubMed

    Roos, Anna Marie

    2004-03-01

    Seventeenth-century physician Martin Lister is best known for his work in natural history and participation in the early Royal Society. However, little attention has been focused upon Lister's work in chemistry, the most salient examples being his analysis of pyrites or "fools' gold" near mineral springs in the De Fonbibus medicatis Angliae Exercitatio of 1684 (Exercises on the healing springs of England), his contributions to the Philosophical Transactions in the 1670s and 1680s, and his unpublished manuscript " A Method for the History of Iron, Imperfect." He defined pyrites more specifically as " ironstone marcasites" which were "nothing else but a body of iron disguised under a vitriolic varnish"; "vitriol" referred to iron (II) sulfate which occurred as a weathering product of pyrites. This paper demonstrates that an understanding of Lister's work on pyrites and vitriol is best attained by placing him in the intellectual context of the seventeenth-century chemical debate about minerallogenesis. Lister believed that the volatile exhalations of pyrites and its vitriol in the air were important in the transformation of matter, and he subscribed to the sixteenth-and seventeenth-century theory of witterung (weathering) or ore exhalations as an explanation for the formation of minerals. Despite his allegiance to the theories of witterung, I will illustrate that Lister made use of his interests in natural history to go one step beyond them, postulating that the sulfurous exhalations from pyrites were responsible for the heating of hot springs, as well as meteorological and geological effects.

  19. Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company information management technology architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, M.J.; Lau, P.K.S.

    1996-05-01

    The Information Management Technology Architecture (TA) is being driven by the business objectives of reducing costs and improving effectiveness. The strategy is to reduce the cost of computing through standardization. The Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO) TA is a set of standards and products for use at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The TA will provide direction for information management resource acquisitions, development of information systems, formulation of plans, and resolution of issues involving LMITCO computing resources. Exceptions to the preferred products may be granted by the Information Management Executive Council (IMEC). Certain implementation and deployment strategies are inherent in the design and structure of LMITCO TA. These include: migration from centralized toward distributed computing; deployment of the networks, servers, and other information technology infrastructure components necessary for a more integrated information technology support environment; increased emphasis on standards to make it easier to link systems and to share information; and improved use of the company`s investment in desktop computing resources. The intent is for the LMITCO TA to be a living document constantly being reviewed to take advantage of industry directions to reduce costs while balancing technological diversity with business flexibility.

  20. Development of computerized color vision testing as a replacement for Martin Lantern

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Gaurav; Vats, D.P.; Parihar, J.K.S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Development and standardization of computerized color vision testing as a replacement for Martin Lantern test. Non-randomized comparative trial. Methods All candidates of SSB, Allahabad, reporting for SMB underwent color vision testing at the eye dept by computerized eye test and currently available tests. Results All candidates were subjected to Ishihara chart testing and those found to be CP III were subjected to the confirmatory test on Martin Lantern and the Software. Candidates requiring CP I standards for eligibility were tested on the same on Martin Lantern and on the new software method. On comparison between the Standard Martin Lantern and the Software, the results were consistent and comparable with 82 patients testing CP I on the Martin Lantern and 81 on the software. Of the CP III patients, 253 tested positive on the Standard lantern test as compared to 251 on the software and of the CP IV group, 147 tested positive on the Standard lantern and 149 by the software method. Conclusion It was found that the software replicated the existing Martin Lantern accurately and consistently. The Martin Lantern Software can be used as a replacement for existing old Lanterns which are not in production since the early 20th century. PMID:24532927

  1. Problems faced by editors of peer reviewed medical journals.

    PubMed

    Jawaid, Shaukat A

    2004-01-01

    Forty-six medical and dental journals are published from Pakistan of which only 29 are currently recognized by the Pakistan Medical and Dental Council. Only a few are peer reviewed. Six are indexed in Medline while EMBASE Excerpta Medica and World Health Organization Index Medicus for Eastern Mediterranean Region cover others. Editors of the peer reviewed medical journals are faced with numerous problems, which relate to the authors. Some of these are: shortage of quality of manuscripts, poor quality of reviewers, problems with indexation in international indexing services particularly Medline, duplicate submission and authorship and lastly, financial problems. Patronage from the Pharma industry is the major source of revenue which itself has serious implications. Editing a medical journal is a very stressful job and the editors have to work under too many pressures. A lot of useful data is presented at medical conferences, but a vast majority of it remains unpublished for various reasons, which adversely affects the citation rate from scientists from the developing third world countries in the world of medical literature. A few lectures on medical writing and research methodology to final year medical students will expose them to the art of medical writing. Specialty organizations can be persuaded to have a session on medical writing at their conferences, which will be extremely helpful not only to the potential new authors but also others, thereby improving the quality of their manuscripts. In addition to regular seminars, workshops for authors, reviewers and training courses for editors, subscribing to local medical journals by healthcare professionals and libraries are some of the measures that will help improve the situation to a great extent.

  2. 78 FR 78469 - Receipt of Noise Compatibility Program and Request for Review; Martin County Airport/Witham Field...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Receipt of Noise Compatibility Program and Request for Review; Martin... Compatibility Program that was submitted for Martin County Airport/Witham Field under the provisions of 49 U.S.C... 14 CFR Part 150 by Martin County. This program was submitted subsequent to a determination by...

  3. 76 FR 6841 - Notice of Receipt of Petition for Decision That Nonconforming 2006 and 2007 Aston Martin Vantage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... Nonconforming 2006 and 2007 Aston Martin Vantage Passenger Cars Are Eligible for Importation AGENCY: National... nonconforming 2006 and 2007 Aston Martin Vantage passenger cars are eligible for importation. SUMMARY: This... a decision that 2006 and 2007 Aston Martin Vantage passenger cars that were not...

  4. The January 2006 Volcanic-Tectonic Earthquake Swarm at Mount Martin, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Power, John A.

    2009-01-01

    On January 8, 2006, a swarm of volcanic-tectonic earthquakes began beneath Mount Martin at the southern end of the Katmai volcanic cluster. This was the first recorded swarm at Mount Martin since continuous seismic monitoring began in 1996. The number of located earthquakes increased during the next four days, reaching a peak on January 11. For the next two days, the seismic activity decreased, and on January 14, the number of events increased to twice the previous day's total. Following this increase in activity, seismicity declined, returning to background levels by the end of the month. The Alaska Volcano Observatory located 860 earthquakes near Mount Martin during January 2006. No additional signs of volcanic unrest were noted in association with this earthquake swarm. The earthquakes in the Mount Martin swarm, relocated using the double difference technique, formed an elongated cluster dipping to the southwest. Focal mechanisms beneath Mount Martin show a mix of normal, thrust, and strike-slip solutions, with normal focal mechanisms dominating. For earthquakes more than 1 km from Mount Martin, all focal mechanisms showed normal faulting. The calculated b-value for the Mount Martin swarm is 0.98 and showed no significant change before, during, or after the swarm. The triggering mechanism for the Mount Martin swarm is unknown. The time-history of earthquake occurrence is indicative of a volcanic cause; however, there were no low-frequency events or observations, such as increased steaming associated with the swarm. During the swarm, there was no change in the b-value, and the distribution and type of focal mechanisms were similar to those in the period before the anomalous activity. The short duration of the swarm, the similarity in observed focal mechanisms, and the lack of additional signs of unrest suggest this swarm did not result from a large influx of magma within the shallow crust beneath Mount Martin.

  5. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Ephrahim

    2008-02-01

    I am Professor Ephrahim Garcia, an Associate Professor at Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. I have been at Cornell University since 2002, spent four years as a Program Manager at the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency from 1998-2002, and before that seven years at the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. I have served on the Editorial Advisory Board of Smart Materials and Structures (SMS) for the last six years. It is a humbling thing to be asked to take up the post of Editor-in-Chief in a field with so many talented researchers. I would like to say a heartfelt thanks to the members of the Editorial Board and IOP Publishing for their confidence in me. Most importantly, I would like to thank Professor Vijay Varadan of the University of Arkansas and Professor Richard Claus of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University for their efforts in launching the journal 16 years ago. They have been stewards, promoters and, especially Vijay, key to the operation and function of SMS for all these years, and our research community is indebted to them. Professors Varadan and Claus have dedicated their careers to the area of smart materials and structures and we are very grateful for their leadership, mentoring and contribution. SMS is a thriving journal offering papers on all technical areas concerned with smart materials, systems and structures from the micro- and nanoscale to the macroscale. The journal is undergoing some major changes, including the recent transferal of papers to IOP Publishing's peer-review management system. With this new system authors can expect fast publication times of around 4 or 5 months from submission, and excellent author service. In this world of ever changing technology, the Editorial Board and I aim to reduce the time to publication for researchers in this exciting area of science and engineering. I am in the process of

  6. A Quantitative Study of the Effects of Guest Flexibility on Binding Inside a Coordination Cage Host.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Christopher G P; Cullen, William; Collier, Olivia M; Ward, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    We have performed a systematic investigation of the effects of guest flexibility on their ability to bind in the cavity of a coordination cage host in water, using two sets of isomeric aliphatic ketones that differ only in the branching patterns of their alkyl chains. Apart from the expected increase in binding strength for C9 over C7 ketones associated with their greater hydrophobic surface area, within each isomeric set there is a clear inverse correlation between binding free energy and guest flexibility, associated with loss of conformational entropy. This can be parameterized by the number of rotatable C-C bonds in the guest, with each additional rotatable bond resulting in a penalty of around 2 kJ mol(-1) in the binding free energy, in good agreement with values obtained from protein/ligand binding studies. We used the binding data for the new flexible guests to improve the scoring function that we had previously developed that allowed us to predict binding constants of relatively rigid guests in the cage cavity using the molecular docking programme GOLD (Genetic Optimisation of Ligand Docking). This improved scoring function resulted in a significant improvement in the ability of GOLD to predict binding constants for flexible guests, without any detriment to its ability to predict binding for more rigid guests.

  7. Effect of terbium(III) on the binding of aromatic guests with sodium taurocholate aggregates.

    PubMed

    Pace, Tamara C S; Souza, Sergio P; Zhang, Hui Ting; Bohne, Cornelia

    2011-10-01

    The effect of binding Tb(3+) to sodium taurocholate aggregates containing polyaromatic hydrocarbon guests was examined using pyrene and 1-ethylnaphthalene as guests that bind to the primary aggregate, and 1-naphthyl-1-ethanol as a secondary aggregate guest. Time-resolved fluorescence quenching studies were used to study the binding site properties, while laser flash photolysis quenching studies provided information on the dynamics of the guest-aggregate system. Both the primary and secondary aggregate binding sites became more compact in the presence of bound Tb(3+), while only the primary aggregate became more accessible to anionic molecules. The binding dynamics for the guest-primary aggregate system became faster when Tb(3+) was bound to the aggregate. In contrast, for the guest-secondary aggregate the presence of Tb(3+) resulted in a small decrease in the dissociation rate constant. The influence of bound Tb(3+) on the primary and secondary bile salt aggregates is significantly different, which affects how these aggregates can be used as supramolecular host systems to modify guest reactivity.

  8. Working ethics: William Beaumont, Alexis St. Martin, and medical research in antebellum America.

    PubMed

    Green, Alexa

    2010-01-01

    Analyzing William Beaumont's relationship with his experimental subject, Alexis St. Martin, this article demonstrates how the "research ethics" of antebellum America were predicated on models of employment, servitude, and labor. The association between Beaumont and St. Martin drew from and was understood in terms of the ideas and practices of contract labor, informal domestic servitude, indentures, and military service. Beaumont and St. Martin lived through an important period of transition in which personal master-servant relations existed alongside the "free" contract labor of market capitalism. Their relationship reflected and helped constitute important developments in nineteenth-century American labor history.

  9. All in the family: a belated response to Knudson-Martin's feminist revision of Bowen theory.

    PubMed

    Horne, K Blake; Hicks, Mary W

    2002-01-01

    The first formal attempt at revising Bowen theory within the marriage and family therapy literature is represented in the work of Knudson-Martin (1994). Claiming that several of the theory's concepts are defined at odds with female development, Knudson-Martin (1994) reconceptualizes and expands Bowen theory to rectify these perceived shortcomings. In turn, we address several fundamental concerns with Knudson-Martin's critique and revision of Bowen theory. An alternative representation of Bowen Theory, as well as its relationship to feminist thought, is put forth. Suggestions for the field's future relationship to Bowen theory are also discussed.

  10. Guest exchange through single crystal-single crystal transformations in a flexible hydrogen-bonded framework.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wenchang; Hu, Chunhua; Ward, Michael D

    2014-10-08

    A molecular framework based on guanidinium cations and 1,2,4,5-tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)benzene (TSPB), an aromatic tetrasulfonate with nominal 2-fold and mirror symmetry, exhibits three crystallographically unique one-dimensional channels as a consequence of molecular symmetry and complementary hydrogen bonding between the guanidinium (G) ions and the sulfonate (S) groups of TSPB. Unlike previous GS frameworks, this new topology is sufficiently flexible to permit reversible release and adsorption of guest molecules in large single crystals through a cyclic shrinkage and expansion of the channels with retention of single crystallinity, as verified by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Moreover, the G4TSPB framework permits guest exchange between various guest molecules through SCSCTs as well as exchange discrimination based on the size and character of the three different channels. The exchange of guest molecules during single crystal-single crystal transformations (SCSCT), a rare occurrence for hydrogen-bonded frameworks, is rather fast, with diffusivities of approximately 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1). Rapid diffusion in the two channels having cross sections sufficient to accommodate two guest molecules can be explained by two-way or ring diffusion, most likely vacancy assisted. Surprisingly, rapid guest exchange also is observed in a smaller channel having a cross-section that accommodates only one guest molecule, which can only be explained by guest-assisted single-file unidirectional diffusion. Several single crystals of inclusion compounds can be realized only through guest exchange in the intact framework, suggesting an approach to the synthesis of single crystalline inclusion compounds that otherwise cannot be attained through direct crystallization methods.

  11. A Photoresponsive Orthogonal Supramolecular Complex Based on Host-Guest Interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongsheng; Wagner, Manfred; Saydjari, Andrew K; Mueller, Julius; Winzen, Svenja; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Wu, Si

    2017-02-21

    We synthesized a novel green-light-responsive tetra-ortho-isopropoxy-substituted azobenzene (ipAzo). Cis-ipAzo forms a strong host-guest complex with γ-cyclo dextrin (γ-CD) whereas trans-ipAzo binds weakly. This new photoresponsive host-guest interaction is reverse to the well-known azobenzene (Azo)/α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) complex, which is strong only between trans-Azo and α-CD. By combining the UV-light-responsive Azo/α-CD and green-light-responsive ipAzo/γ-CD host-guest complexes, a photoresponsive orthogonal supramolecular system is developed.

  12. Micro-imaging of transient guest profiles in nanoporous host systems of cylindrical symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Tomas; Hibbe, Florian; Chmelik, Christian; Kärger, Jörg; Martinez-Joaristi, Alberto; Gascon, Jorge; Kapteijn, Freek; Ruthven, Douglas

    2012-10-01

    Nanoporous host materials giving rise to transient guest profiles of cylindrical symmetry during molecular uptake and release are shown to provide particularly advantageous conditions for the study of guest diffusion by micro-imaging. Considering zeolites of structure type DDR (Deca-dodecasil 3R) as a host system and short-chain length hydrocarbons as guest molecules, the benefits thus attainable in micro-imaging studies using interference microscopy are shown to include the determination of transient concentration profiles with improved accuracy, the option to overcome the disturbing impact of surface imperfections, and easy access to concentration-dependent diffusivities.

  13. Host-Guest Carbon Dots for Enhanced Optical Properties and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ya-Ping; Wang, Ping; Lu, Zhuomin; Yang, Fan; Meziani, Mohammed J.; LeCroy, Gregory E.; Liu, Yun; Qian, Haijun

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dots, generally small carbon nanoparticles with various forms of surface passivation, have achieved the performance level of semiconductor quantum dots in the green spectral region, but their absorption and fluorescence in red/near-IR are relatively weaker. Conceptually similar to endofullerenes, host-guest carbon dots were designed and prepared with red/near-IR dyes encapsulated as guest in the carbon nanoparticle core. Beyond the desired enhancement in optical properties, the host-guest configuration may significantly broaden the field of carbon dots. PMID:26196598

  14. Supramolecular polymer assembly in aqueous solution arising from cyclodextrin host–guest complexation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Qiu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yiming; Li, Li; Pham, Duc-Truc; Prud’homme, Robert K

    2016-01-01

    Summary The employment of cyclodextrin host–guest complexation to construct supramolecular assemblies with an emphasis on polymer networks is reviewed. The main driving force for this supramolecular assembly is host–guest complexation between cyclodextrin hosts and guest groups either of which may be discrete molecular species or substituents on a polymer backbone. The effects of such complexation on properties at the molecular and macroscopic levels are discussed. It is shown that cyclodextrin complexation may be used to design functional polymer materials with tailorable properties, especially for photo-, pH-, thermo- and redox-responsiveness and self-healing. PMID:26877808

  15. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  16. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  17. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  18. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  19. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  20. An editor for the generation and customization of geometry restraints

    PubMed Central

    Moriarty, Nigel W.; Adams, Paul D.

    2017-01-01

    Chemical restraints for use in macromolecular structure refinement are produced by a variety of methods, including a number of programs that use chemical information to generate the required bond, angle, dihedral, chiral and planar restraints. These programs help to automate the process and therefore minimize the errors that could otherwise occur if it were performed manually. Furthermore, restraint-dictionary generation programs can incorporate chemical and other prior knowledge to provide reasonable choices of types and values. However, the use of restraints to define the geometry of a molecule is an approximation introduced with efficiency in mind. The representation of a bond as a parabolic function is a convenience and does not reflect the true variability in even the simplest of molecules. Another complicating factor is the interplay of the molecule with other parts of the macromolecular model. Finally, difficult situations arise from molecules with rare or unusual moieties that may not have their conformational space fully explored. These factors give rise to the need for an interactive editor for WYSIWYG interactions with the restraints and molecule. Restraints Editor, Especially Ligands (REEL) is a graphical user interface for simple and error-free editing along with additional features to provide greater control of the restraint dictionaries in macromolecular refinement. PMID:28177308

  1. Gene targeting, genome editing: from Dolly to editors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wenfang; Proudfoot, Chris; Lillico, Simon G; Whitelaw, C Bruce A

    2016-06-01

    One of the most powerful strategies to investigate biology we have as scientists, is the ability to transfer genetic material in a controlled and deliberate manner between organisms. When applied to livestock, applications worthy of commercial venture can be devised. Although initial methods used to generate transgenic livestock resulted in random transgene insertion, the development of SCNT technology enabled homologous recombination gene targeting strategies to be used in livestock. Much has been accomplished using this approach. However, now we have the ability to change a specific base in the genome without leaving any other DNA mark, with no need for a transgene. With the advent of the genome editors this is now possible and like other significant technological leaps, the result is an even greater diversity of possible applications. Indeed, in merely 5 years, these 'molecular scissors' have enabled the production of more than 300 differently edited pigs, cattle, sheep and goats. The advent of genome editors has brought genetic engineering of livestock to a position where industry, the public and politicians are all eager to see real use of genetically engineered livestock to address societal needs. Since the first transgenic livestock reported just over three decades ago the field of livestock biotechnology has come a long way-but the most exciting period is just starting.

  2. Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation systems engineering project management

    SciTech Connect

    Baynes, P.A.

    1998-04-01

    Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation is developing and implementing an integrated technical baseline for cleaning up environmental contamination at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The Hanford Site is located in Washington State and has been referred to as one of the largest Environmental Cleanup challenges in the US. It became contaminated with radioactive and dangerous wastes during the 40+ years it was being used to produce weapons grade plutonium in support of the US nuclear weapons program (See Figure 1). The US Department of Energy (US DOE) is responsible for cleanup of the Hanford Site with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) both providing regulatory oversight. The US DOE, EPA and Ecology entered into an agreement in 1989 (Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, commonly referred to as the Tri-Party Agreement) that provides the framework for cleanup of the Hanford Site. However, since the inception of the Tri-Party Agreement, there have been numerous changes due to technical issues, funding issues, and priority changes within the cleanup mission. As a result, progress on the definition and execution of the cleanup work has been slower than anticipated and has resulted in some false starts, missed milestones, and milestones that have been completed that did not further the Site cleanup. The absence of a clearly defined mission resulted in a high percentage of projects that were canceled during construction or abandoned after completion and approximately $900 million spent on projects that did not bring cleanup or disposal any closer.

  3. A new banding technique for nesting adult purple martins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klimkiewicz, M.K.; Jung, P.D.

    1977-01-01

    Mery (1966) showed an almost equal sex ratio, males returned more frequently than females, over 50% of returns paired with other returns, an adult return rate of 20%, and no pair bonds maintained for more than one season. Her study lasted 13 years. Our study has shown that the return rate of locals to parent colonies is 4.1%, sex ratios are nearly equal (combination of banding and observation), return rate of locals to nearby colonies is 0.9,one pair maintained the pair bond for two years, SY females lay fewer eggs than ASY's, SY adults occasionally do not feed frequently enough to maintain the normal growth pattern of the young, SY adults often build poorly constructed nests with little or no mud, overall nest success is lower in SY adults, adults do indeed return to the same colony (19.6%) box and/or compartment, sexes are balanced in a stable colony, males or females are sometimes in excess in a new colony, SY adults are predominate in a new colony, the limiting factor in colony size is most likely the number of boxes and/or compartments available for nesting and,finally, adults and young do indeed use the boxes for roosting after nesting and fledging is complete (even boxes not their own). All of our results are tentative and subject to change after f rther study. Much additional study will be required before we can come up with conclusive answers to many of these questions about the Purple Martin.

  4. A Generic Metadata Editor Supporting System Using Drupal CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, J.; Banks, N. G.; Leggott, M.

    2011-12-01

    Metadata handling is a key factor in preserving and reusing scientific data. In recent years, standardized structural metadata has become widely used in Geoscience communities. However, there exist many different standards in Geosciences, such as the current version of the Federal Geographic Data Committee's Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata (FGDC CSDGM), the Ecological Markup Language (EML), the Geography Markup Language (GML), and the emerging ISO 19115 and related standards. In addition, there are many different subsets within the Geoscience subdomain such as the Biological Profile of the FGDC (CSDGM), or for geopolitical regions, such as the European Profile or the North American Profile in the ISO standards. It is therefore desirable to have a software foundation to support metadata creation and editing for multiple standards and profiles, without re-inventing the wheels. We have developed a software module as a generic, flexible software system to do just that: to facilitate the support for multiple metadata standards and profiles. The software consists of a set of modules for the Drupal Content Management System (CMS), with minimal inter-dependencies to other Drupal modules. There are two steps in using the system's metadata functions. First, an administrator can use the system to design a user form, based on an XML schema and its instances. The form definition is named and stored in the Drupal database as a XML blob content. Second, users in an editor role can then use the persisted XML definition to render an actual metadata entry form, for creating or editing a metadata record. Behind the scenes, the form definition XML is transformed into a PHP array, which is then rendered via Drupal Form API. When the form is submitted the posted values are used to modify a metadata record. Drupal hooks can be used to perform custom processing on metadata record before and after submission. It is trivial to store the metadata record as an actual XML file

  5. Parameters. US Army War College Quarterly. Volume 24, Number 2, Summer 1994

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    F’JJ AD-A279 857 !liillit X0 A. 2x\\ 199 1(04 Book Reviews Frederic J. Brown on Martin Binkin’s Who Will Fight the Next War?.2 Russell Weigley on...Implications of Industrial Preparedness . .. .. .. .. .. . .. John R. Btinkerhoff k Assessing Resource Options for S, National Security Preparedness...Colonel John J. Madigan III, USA Ret., Editor Mr. Gregory N. Todd, Associate Editor Mrs. Phyllis M. Stouffer, Edihorial Assistant Mr. Mike Austin, Guest

  6. Interview with ARPA-E Acting Director Dr. Cheryl Martin on Platts Energy Week

    ScienceCinema

    Martin, Cheryl; Loveless, Bill

    2016-07-12

    Bill Loveless from Platts Energy Week interviews ARPA-E Acting Director, Dr. Cheryl Martin, about the many transformational energy technologies on display at ARPA-E's 5th annual Energy Innovation Summit.

  7. Interview with ARPA-E Acting Director Dr. Cheryl Martin on Platts Energy Week

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Cheryl; Loveless, Bill

    2014-03-18

    Bill Loveless from Platts Energy Week interviews ARPA-E Acting Director, Dr. Cheryl Martin, about the many transformational energy technologies on display at ARPA-E's 5th annual Energy Innovation Summit.

  8. Advancing description and explanation in clinical linguistics: a legacy of Martin J. Ball.

    PubMed

    Damico, Jack S; Damico, Holly L; Nelson, Ryan L

    2011-11-01

    This article asserts the importance of explication of order and disorder in language as a privileged objective of clinical linguistics and service delivery and reviews the contributions of Martin Ball in advancing this agenda.

  9. A fast multichannel Martin-Puplett interferometer for electron cyclotron emission measurements on JET

    SciTech Connect

    Simonetto, A.; Sozzi, C.; Garavaglia, S.; Nowak, S.; Fessey, J. A.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2011-11-15

    A Martin Puplett interferometer for electron cyclotron emission (ECE) measurements from JET tokamak plasmas was extended to multichannel operation for simultaneous radial and oblique ECE measurements. This paper describes the new optics and the instrument's performance.

  10. Community control of health services. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Health Center's community management system.

    PubMed

    Tichy, N M; Taylor, J I

    1976-01-01

    This article presents the case of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Health Center's unique community management system in which neighborhood workers have been developed to assume managerial responsibilities and are directing the Center. The Martin Luther King Center experience is instructive because the Center was able to achieve significant community control by focusing primarily on the internal dimension of control, namely, management, without experiencing destructive conflicts and the deterioration of health services.

  11. Three Decades Investigating Humor and Laughter: An Interview With Professor Rod Martin.

    PubMed

    Martin, Rod; Kuiper, Nicholas A

    2016-08-01

    Since the start of the 21st century, the investigation of various psychological aspects of humor and laughter has become an increasingly prominent topic of research. This growth can be attributed, in no small part, to the pioneering and creative work on humor and laughter conducted by Professor Rod Martin. Dr. Martin's research interests in humor and laughter began in the early 1980s and continued throughout his 32 year long career as a professor of clinical psychology at the University of Western Ontario. During this time, Dr. Martin published numerous scholarly articles, chapters, and books on psychological aspects of humor and laughter. Professor Martin has just retired in July 2016, and in the present interview he recounts a number of research highlights of his illustrious career. Dr. Martin's earliest influential work, conducted while he was still in graduate school, stemmed from an individual difference perspective that focused on the beneficial effects of sense of humor on psychological well-being. This research focus remained evident in many of Professor Martin's subsequent investigations, but became increasingly refined as he developed several measures of different components of sense of humor, including both adaptive and maladaptive humor styles. In this interview, Dr. Martin describes the conceptualization, development and use of the Humor Styles Questionnaire, along with suggestions for future research and development. In doing so, he also discusses the three main components of humor (i.e., cognitive, emotional and interpersonal), as well as the distinctions and similarities between humor and laughter. Further highlights of this interview include Professor Martin's comments on such diverse issues as the genetic versus environmental loadings for sense of humor, the multifaceted nature of the construct of humor, and the possible limitations of teaching individuals to use humor in a beneficial manner to cope with stress and enhance their social and

  12. Date: Aug 6, 1996 Photographer: Maria Garcia 1996 'STELLAR' program commencement with special guest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Date: Aug 6, 1996 Photographer: Maria Garcia 1996 'STELLAR' program commencement with special guest Mrs. Gayle Wilson (CA governor's wife) as she tours the STELLAR project displays with STELLAR students and teachers

  13. Structural transitions and guest/host complexing of liquid crystal helical nanofilaments induced by nanoconfinement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hanim; Ryu, Seong Ho; Tuchband, Michael; Shin, Tae Joo; Korblova, Eva; Walba, David M; Clark, Noel A; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2017-02-01

    A lamellar liquid crystal (LC) phase of certain bent-core mesogenic molecules can be grown in a manner that generates a single chiral helical nanofilament in each of the cylindrical nanopores of an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane. By introducing guest molecules into the resulting composite chiral nanochannels, we explore the structures and functionality of the ordered guest/host LC complex, verifying the smectic-like positional order of the fluidic nematic LC phase, which is obtained by the combination of the LC organization and the nanoporous AAO superstructure. The guest nematic LC 4'-n-pentyl-4-cyanobiphenyl is found to form a distinctive fluid layered ordered LC complex at the nanofilament/guest interface with the host 1,3-phenylene bis[4-(4-nonyloxyphenyliminomethyl)benzoate], where this interface contacts the AAO cylinder wall. Filament growth form is strongly influenced by mixture parameters and pore dimensions.

  14. 1996 'STELLAR' and MCP program commencements with special guests Mrs. Gayle Wilson, CA Governor Pete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    1996 'STELLAR' and MCP program commencements with special guests Mrs. Gayle Wilson, CA Governor Pete Wilson's wife (center), Zoe Lofgren, 16th District Congresswoman San Jose, California (right) and Ames scientist Dr Rose Grymes (left)

  15. Structural transitions and guest/host complexing of liquid crystal helical nanofilaments induced by nanoconfinement

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hanim; Ryu, Seong Ho; Tuchband, Michael; Shin, Tae Joo; Korblova, Eva; Walba, David M.; Clark, Noel A.; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2017-01-01

    A lamellar liquid crystal (LC) phase of certain bent-core mesogenic molecules can be grown in a manner that generates a single chiral helical nanofilament in each of the cylindrical nanopores of an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane. By introducing guest molecules into the resulting composite chiral nanochannels, we explore the structures and functionality of the ordered guest/host LC complex, verifying the smectic-like positional order of the fluidic nematic LC phase, which is obtained by the combination of the LC organization and the nanoporous AAO superstructure. The guest nematic LC 4′-n-pentyl-4-cyanobiphenyl is found to form a distinctive fluid layered ordered LC complex at the nanofilament/guest interface with the host 1,3-phenylene bis[4-(4-nonyloxyphenyliminomethyl)benzoate], where this interface contacts the AAO cylinder wall. Filament growth form is strongly influenced by mixture parameters and pore dimensions. PMID:28246642

  16. Aromatic amide and hydrazide foldamer-based responsive host-guest systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan-Wei; Zhao, Xin; Li, Zhan-Ting

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: In host-guest chemistry, a larger host molecule selectively and noncovalently binds to a smaller guest molecule or ion. Early studies of host-guest chemistry focused on the recognition of spherical metal or ammonium ions by macrocyclic hosts, such as cyclic crown ethers. In these systems, preorganization enables their binding sites to cooperatively contact and attract a guest. Although some open-chain crown ether analogues possess similar, but generally lower, binding affinities, the design of acyclic molecular recognition hosts has remained challenging. One of the most successful examples was rigid molecular tweezers, acyclic covalently bonded preorganized host molecules with open cavities that bind tightly as they stiffen. Depending on the length of the atomic backbones, hydrogen bonding-driven aromatic amide foldamers can form open or closed cavities. Through rational design of the backbones and the introduction of added functional groups, researchers can regulate the shape and size of the cavity. The directionality of hydrogen bonding and the inherent rigidity of aromatic amide units allow researchers to predict both the shape and size of the cavity of an aromatic amide foldamer. Therefore, researchers can then design guest molecules with structure that matches the cavity shape, size, and binding sites of the foldamer host. In addition, because hydrogen bonds are dynamic, researchers can design structures that can adapt to outside stimuli to produce responsive supramolecular architectures. In this Account, we discuss how aromatic amide and hydrazide foldamers induced by hydrogen bonding can produce responsive host-guest systems, based on research by our group and others. First we highlight the helical chirality induced as binding occurs in solution, which includes the induction of helicity by chiral guests in oligomeric and polymeric foldamers, the formation of diastereomeric complexes between chiral foldamer hosts and guests, and the induction of

  17. Relationship between the cohesion of guest particles on the flow behaviour of interactive mixtures.

    PubMed

    Mangal, Sharad; Gengenbach, Thomas; Millington-Smith, Doug; Armstrong, Brian; Morton, David A V; Larson, Ian

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects cohesion of small surface-engineered guest binder particles on the flow behaviour of interactive mixtures. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) - a model pharmaceutical binder - was spray-dried with varying l-leucine feed concentrations to create small surface-engineered binder particles with varying cohesion. These spray-dried formulations were characterised by their particle size distribution, morphology and cohesion. Interactive mixtures were produced by blending these spray-dried formulations with paracetamol. The resultant blends were visualised under scanning electron microscope to confirm formation of interactive mixtures. Surface coverage of paracetamol by guest particles as well as the flow behaviour of these mixtures were examined. The flow performance of interactive mixtures was evaluated using measurements of conditioned bulk density, basic flowability energy, aeration energy and compressibility. With higher feed l-leucine concentrations, the surface roughness of small binder particles increased, while their cohesion decreased. Visual inspection of the SEM images of the blends indicated that the guest particles adhered to the surface of paracetamol resulting in effective formation of interactive mixtures. These images also showed that the low-cohesion guest particles were better de-agglomerated that consequently formed a more homogeneous interactive mixture with paracetamol compared with high-cohesion formulations. The flow performance of interactive mixtures changed as a function of the cohesion of the guest particles. Interactive mixtures with low-cohesion guest binder particles showed notably improved bulk flow performance compared with those containing high-cohesion guest binder particles. Thus, our study suggests that the cohesion of guest particles dictates the flow performance of interactive mixtures.

  18. Host-guest complexation of cucurbit[8]uril with two enantiomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhong-Zheng; Lin, Rui-Lian; Bai, Dong; Tao, Zhu; Liu, Jing-Xin; Xiao, Xin

    2017-03-01

    Host-guest complexation of cucurbit[8]uril (Q[8]) with two enantiomers, D-3-(2-naphthyl)-alanine (D-NA) and L-3-(2-naphthyl)-alanine (L-NA), has been fully investigated. Experimental data indicate that double guests reside within the cavity of Q[8] in both aqueous solution and solid state, generating highly stable homoternary complexes D-NA2@Q[8] and L-NA2@Q[8].

  19. Structural Insight into Guest Binding Sites in a Porous Homochiral Metal-Organic Material.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shi-Yuan; Wojtas, Lukasz; Zaworotko, Michael J

    2015-09-23

    An enantiomeric pair of chiral metal-organic materials (CMOMs) based upon mandelate (man) and 4,4'-bipyridine (bpy) ligands, [Co2(S-man)2(bpy)3](NO3)2·guest (1S·guest) and [Co2(R-man)2(bpy)3](NO3)2·guest (1R·guest), have been prepared. The cationic frameworks exhibit one-dimensional chiral channels with dimensions of 8.0 Å × 8.0 Å. The pore chemistry is such that chiral surfaces lined with nitrate anions and phenyl groups create multiple binding sites for guest and/or solvent molecules. The performance of 1S and 1R with respect to resolution of racemic mixtures of 1-phenyl-1-propanol (PP) was studied by varying time, temperature, and the use of additives. Selectivity toward PP was determined by chiral HPLC with ee values of up to 60%. The binding sites and host-guest interactions were investigated through single-crystal X-ray structural analyses of guest-exchanged 1S and 1R. Crystallographically observed structural changes (e.g., the absolute configurations of the three PP binding sites switch from R, R, and S to R, R, and R/S) correlate with experimentally observed ee values of 33% and 60% for variants of 1S that contain PP and different solvent molecules, 1S·PPex and 1S·PPex', respectively. The fact that manipulation of guest solvent molecules, which in effect serve as cofactors, can modify chiral sites and increase enantioselectivity is likely to aid in the design of more effective CMOMs and processes for chiral separations.

  20. Host-guest interaction and structural ordering in polymeric nanoassemblies: Influence of molecular design.

    PubMed

    Antoniuk, Iurii; Plazzotta, Beatrice; Wintgens, Véronique; Volet, Gisèle; Nielsen, Thorbjørn T; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Amiel, Catherine

    2017-02-24

    Host-guest nanoassemblies made from spontaneous self-association of host and guest polymers in aqueous solutions have been studied. The specific motivation behind this work was to clarify the impact of the molecular design of the polymers on the interactions between them and on the inner structure of the resulting nanoassemblies. The polymers were composed of a dextran backbone, functionalized with either pendant β-cyclodextrin (CD) or adamantyl (Ada). Those groups were connected to the backbone either directly or with hydrophilic polyethylene glycol (PEG) spacers. To study the impact of those spacers we have proposed a synthetic pathway to new guest polymers. The latter relied on the use of thiol-substituted dextrans as a scaffold, which is subsequently transformed into PEG-Ada grafted guest polymers via nucleophile-mediated thiol-click reaction. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies evidenced strong mutual affinities between the host and guest polymers and showed that the stoichiometry was close to the ideal one (CD/Ada = 1/1) when PEG spacers were introduced. The structure of the nanoassemblies was studied by a combination of dynamic light scattering (DLS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The nature of the individual host or guest polymers has a strong impact on the size and internal structure of the resulting nanoassemblies. The presence of PEG spacers in the polymers led to smaller and less compact nanoassemblies, as evidenced by their large correlation length values (4-20nm compared to 2nm without PEG spacers). At the same time, all types of nanoassemblies appear to have radial density distribution with denser cores and pending polymer chains at the periphery. This study, centered on the influence of the molecular design on the host-guest interactions and structural ordering in polymeric nanoassemblies, will help to tailor host-guest nanoassemblies with attractive drug delivery profiles.

  1. Diffusion of vaporous guests into a seemingly non-porous organic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert, Simon A.; Janiak, Agnieszka; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Atwood, Jerry L.; Barbour, Leonard J.

    2014-10-07

    In this research, the tetragonal apohost phase of p-tert-butyltetramethoxythiacalix[4]arene absorbs hydrochloric acid and iodine. These guest molecules occupy different sites in the solid-state structure -- either within the small intrinsic voids of the macrocycle or within the interstitial spaces between the host molecules. This study illustrates the dynamic deformation of the host, providing strong mechanistic insight into the diffusion of guests into this seemingly non-porous material.

  2. Diffusion of vaporous guests into a seemingly non-porous organic crystal

    DOE PAGES

    Herbert, Simon A.; Janiak, Agnieszka; Thallapally, Praveen K.; ...

    2014-10-07

    In this research, the tetragonal apohost phase of p-tert-butyltetramethoxythiacalix[4]arene absorbs hydrochloric acid and iodine. These guest molecules occupy different sites in the solid-state structure -- either within the small intrinsic voids of the macrocycle or within the interstitial spaces between the host molecules. This study illustrates the dynamic deformation of the host, providing strong mechanistic insight into the diffusion of guests into this seemingly non-porous material.

  3. Host-guest complexation of cucurbit[8]uril with two enantiomers

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhong-Zheng; Lin, Rui-Lian; Bai, Dong; Tao, Zhu; Liu, Jing-Xin; Xiao, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Host-guest complexation of cucurbit[8]uril (Q[8]) with two enantiomers, D-3-(2-naphthyl)-alanine (D-NA) and L-3-(2-naphthyl)-alanine (L-NA), has been fully investigated. Experimental data indicate that double guests reside within the cavity of Q[8] in both aqueous solution and solid state, generating highly stable homoternary complexes D-NA2@Q[8] and L-NA2@Q[8]. PMID:28300189

  4. Multilayer films with nanocontainers: redox-controlled reversible encapsulation of guest molecules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiawei; Liu, Yiliu; Yuan, Bin; Wang, Zhiqiang; Schönhoff, Monika; Zhang, Xi

    2012-11-19

    Stable multilayer films with cucurbit[8]uril have been fabricated on the basis of the alternating layer-by-layer assembly of a novel side-chain pseudopolyrotaxane and a photoreactive polyanion. The as-prepared multilayer films exhibit good properties as surface-imprinted multilayers, because cucurbit[8]uril molecules that are locked inside the multilayers can act as nanocontainers with specific binding to certain guest molecules, and the loading and release of the guest is redox-controllable and reversible.

  5. Dynamical Study of Guest-Host Orientational Interaction in LiquidCrystalline Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Thai Viet

    2005-01-01

    Guest-host interaction has long been a subject of interest in many disciplines. Emphasis is often on how a small amount of guest substance could significantly affect the properties of a host material. This thesis describe our work in studying a guest-host effect where dye-doping of liquid crystalline materials greatly enhances the optical Kerr nonlinearity of the material. The dye molecules, upon excitation and via intermolecular interaction, provides an extra torque to reorient the host molecules, leading to the enhanced optical Kerr nonlinearity. We carried out a comprehensive study on the dynamics of the photoexcited dye-doped liquid crystalline medium. Using various experimental techniques, we separately characterized the dynamical responses of the relevant molecular species present in the medium following photo-excitation, and thus were able to follow the transient process in which photo-excitation of the dye molecules exert through guest-host interaction a net torque on the host LC material, leading to the observed enhanced molecular reorientation. We also observed for the first time the enhanced reorientation in a pure liquid crystal system, where the guest population is created through photoexcitation of the host molecules themselves. Experimental results agree quantitatively with the time-dependent theory based on a mean-field model of the guest-host interaction.

  6. Incommensurate host-guest structures in compressed elements: Hume—Rothery effects as origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyareva, V. F.

    2015-11-01

    Discovery of the incommensurate structure in the element Ba under pressure 15 years ago was followed by findings of a series of similar structures in other compressed elements. Incommensurately modulated structures of the host-guest type consist of a tetragonal host structure and a guest structure. The guest structure forms chains of atoms embedded in the channels of host atoms so that the axial ratio of these subcells along the c axis is not rational. Two types of the host-guest structures have been found so far: with the host cells containing 8 atoms and 16 atoms; in these both types the guest cells contain 2 atoms. These crystal structures contain a non-integer number of atoms in their unit cell: tI11* in Bi, Sb, As, Ba, Sr, Sc and tI19* in Na, K, Rb. We consider here a close structural relationship of these host-guest structures with the binary alloy phase Au3Cd5-tI32. This phase is related to the family of the Hume-Rothery phases that is stabilized by the Fermi sphere-Brillouin zone interaction. From similar considerations for alkali and alkaline-earth elements a necessary condition for structural stability emerges in which the valence electrons band overlaps with the upper core electrons and the valence electron count increases under compression.

  7. Structural Consequences of Anionic Host-Cationic Guest Interactions in a Supramolecular Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Pluth, Michael D.; Johnson, Darren W.; Szigethy, Geza; Davis, Anna V.; Teat, Simon J.; Oliver, Allen G.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-07-09

    The molecular structure of the self-assembled supramolecular assembly [M{sub 4}L{sub 6}]{sup 12-} has been explored with different metals (M = Ga{sup III}, Fe{sup III}, Ti{sup IV}) and different encapsulated guests (NEt{sub 4}{sup +}, BnNMe{sub 3}{sup +}, Cp{sub 2}Co{sup +}, Cp*{sub 2}Co{sup +}) by X-ray crystallography. While the identity of the metal ions at the vertices of the M{sub 4}L{sub 6} structure is found to have little effect on the assembly structure, encapsulated guests significantly distort the size and shape of the interior cavity of the assembly. Cations on the exterior of the assembly are found to interact with the assembly through either {pi}-{pi}, cation-{pi}, or CH-{pi} interactions. In some cases, the exterior guests interact with only one assembly, but cations with the ability to form multiple {pi}-{pi} interactions are able to interact with adjacent assemblies in the crystal lattice. The solvent accessible cavity of the assembly is modeled using the rolling probe method and found to range from 253-434 {angstrom}{sup 3}, depending on the encapsulated guest. Based on the volume of the guest and the volume of the cavity, the packing coefficient for each host-guest complex is found to range from 0.47-0.67.

  8. Load-collapse-release cascades of amphiphilic guest molecules in charged dendronized polymers through spatial separation of noncovalent forces.

    PubMed

    Kurzbach, Dennis; Zhang, Xiuqiang; Zhang, Baozhong; Arnold, Philipp; Hinderberger, Dariush

    2013-04-26

    The ability to pack guest molecules into charged dendronized polymers (denpols) and the possibility to release these guest molecules from subsequently densely aggregated denpols in a load-collapse-release cascade is described. Charged denpols, which constitute molecular objects with a persistent, well-defined envelope and interior, are capable of incorporating large amounts of amphiphilic guest molecules. Simultaneously, multivalent ions can coordinate to the surfaces of charged denpols, leading to counterion-induced aggregation of the already guest-loaded host structures. Thus, although the local guest concentration in denpol-based molecular transport might already be initially high due to the dense guest packing inside the dendritic denpol scaffolding, the "local" guest concentration can nonetheless be further increased by packing (through aggregation) of the host-guest complexes themselves. Subsequent release of guest compounds from densely aggregated dendronized polymers is then possible (e.g., through increasing the solution concentration of imidazolium-based ions). Augmented with this release possibility, the concept of twofold packing of guests, firstly through hosting itself and secondly through aggregation of the hosts, gives rise to a load-collapse-release cascade that strikingly displays the high potential of dendronized macromolecules for future molecular transport applications.

  9. Advanced software development workstation project: Engineering scripting language. Graphical editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Software development is widely considered to be a bottleneck in the development of complex systems, both in terms of development and in terms of maintenance of deployed systems. Cost of software development and maintenance can also be very high. One approach to reducing costs and relieving this bottleneck is increasing the reuse of software designs and software components. A method for achieving such reuse is a software parts composition system. Such a system consists of a language for modeling software parts and their interfaces, a catalog of existing parts, an editor for combining parts, and a code generator that takes a specification and generates code for that application in the target language. The Advanced Software Development Workstation is intended to be an expert system shell designed to provide the capabilities of a software part composition system.

  10. Highlighting impact: Do editors' selections identify influential papers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonoyiannakis, Manolis

    A recent trend in scientific publishing is that journal editors highlight each week a select set among the papers published (usually) in their respective journals. The highlighted papers are deemed of higher quality, importance, or interest than the 'average' paper and feature prominently in the publishers' websites. We perform a citation analysis of the highlighted papers for a number of journals from various publishers in physics. By comparing the performance of highlighted papers relative to (a) typical papers and (b) highly cited papers in their source journals and in other journals in the field, we explore whether, and to what extent, the selection process at the time of publication identifies papers that will turn out to be influential. We discuss the broader implications for research assessment.

  11. Upcoming IJTMB Initiatives from the Interim Executive Editor

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Ann Blair

    2016-01-01

    It is an honor and a privilege to be appointed the Interim Executive Editor for the IJTMB; I am lucky to have some initiatives that were already in development by the previous editorial team that I hope to bring to fruition over the next few months. First, I hope to increase the Journal’s Internet presence through social media to expand readership and encourage new submitters. The second initiative is a mentoring program to assist writers with their submissions to the Journal. Finally, I, and the rest of the editorial staff, will continue to evaluate the process, procedures, and forms used in peer review. I hope to move these initiatives forward and by doing so, bring in new readers, submitters, and reviewers to the Journal. PMID:27974945

  12. Automatic adverse drug events detection using letters to the editor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Srinivasan, Padmini; Polgreen, Philip M

    2012-01-01

    We present and test the intuition that letters to the editor in journals carry early signals of adverse drug events (ADEs). Surprisingly these letters have not yet been exploited for automatic ADE detection unlike for example, clinical records and PubMed. Part of the challenge is that it is not easy to access the full-text of letters (for the most part these do not appear in PubMed). Also letters are likely underrated in comparison with full articles. Besides demonstrating that this intuition holds we contribute techniques for post market drug surveillance. Specifically, we test an automatic approach for ADE detection from letters using off-the-shelf machine learning tools. We also involve natural language processing for feature definitions. Overall we achieve high accuracy in our experiments and our method also works well on a second new test set. Our results encourage us to further pursue this line of research.

  13. Andreae is New Editor of Global Biogeochemical Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2004-10-01

    As the incoming editor of Global Biogeochemical Cycles, I would like to introduce myself and my ideas for the journal to Eos readers and to current and potential GBC authors. I've had a somewhat ``roaming'' scientific evolution, coming from ``straight'' chemistry through hard-rock geochemistry to chemical oceanography, the field in which I did my Ph.D. I taught marine chemistry at Florida State University for a number of years, and developed an interest in ocean/atmosphere interactions and atmospheric chemistry. In 1987 I took on my present job at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, in Mainz, Germany, and, after leaving the seacoast, my interests shifted to interactions between the terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere, including the role of vegetation fires. My present focus is on the role of biogenic aerosols and biomass smoke in regulating cloud properties and influencing climate.

  14. The X-windows interactive navigation data editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinker, G. C.

    1992-01-01

    A new computer program called the X-Windows Interactive Data Editor (XIDE) was developed and demonstrated as a prototype application for editing radio metric data in the orbit-determination process. The program runs on a variety of workstations and employs pull-down menus and graphical displays, which allow users to easily inspect and edit radio metric data in the orbit data files received from the Deep Space Network (DSN). The XIDE program is based on the Open Software Foundation OSF/Motif Graphical User Interface (GUI) and has proven to be an efficient tool for editing radio metric data in the navigation operations environment. It was adopted by the Magellan Navigation Team as their primary data-editing tool. Because the software was designed from the beginning to be portable, the prototype was successfully moved to new workstation environments. It was also itegrated into the design of the next-generation software tool for DSN multimission navigation interactive launch support.

  15. The 2009 Lindau Nobel Laureate meeting: Martin Chalfie, Chemistry 2008.

    PubMed

    Chalfie, Martin

    2010-02-10

    American Biologist Martin Chalfie shared the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Roger Tsien and Osamu Shimomura for their discovery and development of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). Martin Chalfie was born in Chicago in 1947 and grew up in Skokie Illinois. Although he had an interest in science from a young age--learning the names of the planets and reading books about dinosaurs--his journey to a career in biological science was circuitous. In high school, Chalfie enjoyed his AP Chemistry course, but his other science courses did not make much of an impression on him, and he began his undergraduate studies at Harvard uncertain of what he wanted to study. Eventually he did choose to major in Biochemistry, and during the summer between his sophomore and junior years, he joined Klaus Weber's lab and began his first real research project, studying the active site of the enzyme aspartate transcarbamylase. Unfortunately, none of the experiments he performed in Weber's lab worked, and Chalfie came to the conclusion that research was not for him. Following graduation in 1969, he was hired as a teacher Hamden Hall Country Day School in Connecticut where he taught high school chemistry, algebra, and social sciences for 2 years. After his first year of teaching, he decided to give research another try. He took a summer job in Jose Zadunaisky's lab at Yale, studying chloride transport in the frog retina. Chalfie enjoyed this experience a great deal, and having gained confidence in his own scientific abilities, he applied to graduate school at Harvard, where he joined the Physiology department in 1972 and studied norepinephrine synthesis and secretion under Bob Pearlman. His interest in working on C. elegans led him to post doc with Sydney Brenner, at the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England. In 1982 he was offered position at Columbia University. When Chalfie first heard about GFP at a research seminar given by Paul Brehm in 1989

  16. The Editor and Publisher as Public Official: The Ultimate Conflict of Interest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sneed, Don

    A fifteen-item Likert scale and indepth personal interviews were used to collect data in a study that examined whether five individuals who held both the role of editor and public official were perceived as able to perform in a socially responsible manner as editors of their community newspapers in their estimation and in the estimation of a…

  17. A Coorientational Study of Food Public Relations Practitioners, Editors and Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knodell, Joyce Elaine

    Survey data on newspaper food editors and newspaper readers were collected through a title-rating technique. Analysis of responses to 40 food titles and leads indicated three newspaper food-editor types: transitional, traditional, and "new guard." Food-page readers fell into two types: information oriented (nutritionists) and cooking…

  18. A "Situational" and "Coorientational" Measure of Specialized Magazine Editors' Perceptions of Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffers, Dennis W.

    A study was undertaken of specialized magazine editors' perceptions of audience characteristics as well as the perceived role of their publications. Specifically, the study examines the relationship between the editors' perceptions of reader problem recognition, level of involvement, constraint recognition, and possession of reference criteria and…

  19. Adolescent Sexual Initiation through the Lens of Letters to the Editor Published in Polish Teenage Magazines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopacz, Marek S.; Bajka-Kopacz, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Almost all teenage magazines invite readers to submit questions concerning relationships, published as letters to the editor, popularly called "advice columns," often containing explicit questions about sexuality. This study aims to examine, firstly, how themes related to sexual initiation are presented in letters to the editor published…

  20. A survey of orthopaedic journal editors determining the criteria of manuscript selection for publication

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To investigate the characteristics of editors and criteria used by orthopaedic journal editors in assessing submitted manuscripts. Methods Between 2008 to 2009 all 70 editors of Medline listed orthopaedic journals were approached prospectively with a questionnaire to determine the criteria used in assessing manuscripts for publication. Results There was a 42% response rate. There was 1 female editor and the rest were male with 57% greater than 60 years of age. 67% of the editors worked in university teaching hospitals and 90% of publications were in English. The review process differed between journals with 59% using a review proforma, 52% reviewing an anonymised manuscript, 76% using a routine statistical review and 59% of journals used 2 reviewers routinely. In 89% of the editors surveyed, the editor was able to overrule the final decision of the reviewers. Important design factors considered for manuscript acceptance were that the study conclusions were justified (80%), that the statistical analysis was appropriate (76%), that the findings could change practice (72%). The level of evidence (70%) and type of study (62%) were deemed less important. When asked what factors were important in the manuscript influencing acceptance, 73% cited an understandable manuscript, 53% cited a well written manuscript and 50% a thorough literature review as very important factors. Conclusions The editorial and review process in orthopaedic journals uses different approaches. There may be a risk of language bias among editors of orthopaedic journals with under-representation of non-English publications in the orthopaedic literature. PMID:21527007

  1. 29 CFR 793.11 - Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer. 793...)(9) OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Requirements for Exemption § 793.11 Combination announcer, news... as a news editor. In such cases, the primary employment test under the section 13(b)(9)...

  2. 29 CFR 793.11 - Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer. 793...)(9) OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Requirements for Exemption § 793.11 Combination announcer, news... as a news editor. In such cases, the primary employment test under the section 13(b)(9)...

  3. 29 CFR 793.11 - Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer. 793...)(9) OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Requirements for Exemption § 793.11 Combination announcer, news... as a news editor. In such cases, the primary employment test under the section 13(b)(9)...

  4. Editorial Page Editors and Endorsements: Chain-owned vs. Independent Newspapers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Dizier, Byron

    Questionnaires were sent to 114 of the 228 editorial page editors at newspapers in the United States with daily circulations greater than 50,000 for a study that compared (1) the editor-publisher relationship existing at chains to that found at independent papers, and (2) the 1984 presidential endorsements made by chains to those by independent…

  5. "Clones," Codes, and Conflicts of Interest in Cartooning: Cartoonists and Editors Look at Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riffe, Daniel; And Others

    A study examined differences between political cartoonists and op-ed page editors on both traditional ethical issues (such as conflicts of interest) and the special, style-related concerns of editorial cartoonists. Hypotheses proposed were that editors and cartoonists (1) would condemn "cloning" or copying, reflecting an ethical…

  6. Letter to the editor of TAAP, in response to letter from Anders et al.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To the Editor, Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology: We would like to address the letter to the editor submitted by Anders et al. regarding the substantive issues raised regarding our paper "Evaluation of two different metabolic hypotheses for dichloromethane toxicity using physi...

  7. Debunking the Mutilated Boy: A Study of Newspaper Editors and an Inflammatory Rumor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lee

    A study examined how newspaper editors resolve issues relating to rumors--that is whether to cover stories which may turn out to be false. The "mutilated boy" rumor was chosen for its antiquity and endurance, its powerful theme, and its ability to create intense anxiety in a community. Thirty-three of the 86 editors who responded to the…

  8. Dr. Bruce Squires witnessed vast changes during tenure as CMAJ editor

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Patrick

    1996-01-01

    Dr. Bruce Squires retired in September after spending 10 years as editor of CMAJ. During his tenure the editor's responsibilities expanded greatly because of the CMA's foray into the publishing of medical books and additional journals and other publications. In this article, people who have worked with Squires reflect on his term with CMAJ. Imagesp570-a

  9. EDITORIAL: A word from the new Editor-in-Chief A word from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostowski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    TIn the autumn of 2010 I became the Editor-in Chief of European Journal of Physics (EJP). EJP is a place for teachers, instructors and professors to exchange their views on teaching physics at university level and share their experience. It is general opinion that no good research is possible without connection with good, high-quality teaching, at the university level in particular. Therefore excellence in physics teaching is important to the physics community. European Journal of Physics is proud of its contribution to achieving this goal. As Editor-in-Chief, I will continue to work to this general objective of the journal. We will publish articles on specific topics in physics, stressing originality of presentation and suitability for use in students'laboratories, lectures and physics teaching in general. We will also publish more pedagogical papers presenting the achievements of particular teaching methods. In addition, we will continue to publish special sections on particular areas of physics, as well as the annual special section on physics competitions. European Journal of Physics is in good shape. Due to the work of the previous editors and the publisher, the readership is high and growing steadily, and many excellent papers are being submitted and published. I hope that this positive trend for the journal will continue, and I will do my best to keep to this high standard. A few words about myself. I work in the Institute of Physics in Warsaw, Poland. My main research interests are in theoretical quantum optics and I have published about 80 research papers on this topic. For many years I was involved in teaching physics at university and in high school. I am a co-author of a textbook on physics for high-school students and of a problem book in quantum mechanics. For the last ten years, I have been involved in the International Physics Olympiad and over the last few years I have been a member of the Editorial Board of European Journal of Physics.

  10. Preparing for a Guest Clinician's Rehearsal with Your Choir: Inviting a Guest Director to Work with Your Choir Can Bring Fresh Perspectives and Reinforce Basic Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanier, Brian

    2007-01-01

    As choral directors across the country work to prepare their choirs for concerts, festivals, and contests, it is a common practice for them to invite a guest clinician to attend rehearsals for guidance and assistance. The rationale for this idea is logical and simple--two heads are better than one. However, the actual visit can be anything from a…

  11. Determination of association constant of host-guest supramolecular complex (molecular recognition of carbamazepine, antiseizure drug, with calix(4)arene).

    PubMed

    Meenakshi, C; Jayabal, P; Ramakrishnan, V

    2015-12-05

    The thermodynamic property of the host-guest, inclusion complex formed between p-t-butyl calix(4)arene which is a supramolecule, and the antiseizure drug, carbamazepine was studied. p-t-Butyl calix(4)arene has been used as a host molecule and carbamazepine as a guest molecule. Optical absorption spectral studies were carried out to investigate the molecular recognition properties of p-t-butyl calix(4)arene with carbamazepine. The stochiometry of the host-guest complexes formed and the association constant were determined. An interesting 1:2 stochiometric host-guest complex was formed. Job's continuous method of variation and Benesi-Hildebrand expression were used for the determination of binding constant and the stochiometry of the host-guest complex formed. Molecular dimension of the host molecule plays a vital role in the formation of the host-guest stochiometric complexes.

  12. THE NEW ONLINE METADATA EDITOR FOR GENERATING STRUCTURED METADATA

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Shrestha, Biva; Palanisamy, Giri; Hook, Leslie A; Killeffer, Terri S; Boden, Thomas A; Cook, Robert B; Zolly, Lisa; Hutchison, Viv; Frame, Mike; Cialella, Alice; Lazer, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Nobody is better suited to describe data than the scientist who created it. This description about a data is called Metadata. In general terms, Metadata represents the who, what, when, where, why and how of the dataset [1]. eXtensible Markup Language (XML) is the preferred output format for metadata, as it makes it portable and, more importantly, suitable for system discoverability. The newly developed ORNL Metadata Editor (OME) is a Web-based tool that allows users to create and maintain XML files containing key information, or metadata, about the research. Metadata include information about the specific projects, parameters, time periods, and locations associated with the data. Such information helps put the research findings in context. In addition, the metadata produced using OME will allow other researchers to find these data via Metadata clearinghouses like Mercury [2][4]. OME is part of ORNL s Mercury software fleet [2][3]. It was jointly developed to support projects funded by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). OME s architecture provides a customizable interface to support project-specific requirements. Using this new architecture, the ORNL team developed OME instances for USGS s Core Science Analytics, Synthesis, and Libraries (CSAS&L), DOE s Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, and the international Surface Ocean Carbon Dioxide ATlas (SOCAT). Researchers simply use the ORNL Metadata Editor to enter relevant metadata into a Web-based form. From the information on the form, the Metadata Editor can create an XML file on the server that the editor is installed or to the user s personal computer. Researchers can also use the ORNL Metadata Editor to modify existing XML metadata files. As an example, an NGEE Arctic scientist use OME to register

  13. Prediction of clathrate structure type and guest position by molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Everly B; Janda, Kenneth C

    2013-05-16

    The clathrate hydrates occur in various types in which the number, size, and shape of the various cages differ. Usually the clathrate type of a specific guest is predicted by the size and shape of the molecular guest. We have developed a methodology to determine the clathrate type employing molecular mechanics with the MMFF force field employing a strategy to calculate the energy of formation of the clathrate from the sum of the guest/cage energies. The clathrate type with the most negative (most stable) energy of formation would be the type predicted (we mainly focused on type I, type II, or bromine type). This strategy allows for a calculation to predict the clathrate type for any cage guest in a few minutes on a laptop computer. It proved successful in predicting the clathrate structure for 46 out of 47 guest molecules. The molecular mechanics calculations also provide a prediction of the guest position within the cage and clathrate structure. These predictions are generally consistent with the X-ray and neutron diffraction studies. By supplementing the diffraction study with molecular mechanics, we gain a more detailed insight regarding the details of the structure. We have also compared MM calculations to studies of the multiple occupancy of the cages. Finally, we present a density functional calculation that demonstrates that the inside of the clathrates cages have a relatively uniform and low electrostatic potential in comparison with the outside oxygen and hydrogen atoms. This implies that van der Waals forces will usually be dominant in the guest-cage interactions.

  14. A molecular dynamics study of guest-host hydrogen bonding in alcohol clathrate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Hiratsuka, Masaki; Ohmura, Ryo; Sum, Amadeu K; Alavi, Saman; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2015-05-21

    Clathrate hydrates are typically stabilized by suitably sized hydrophobic guest molecules. However, it has been experimentally reported that isomers of amyl-alcohol C5H11OH can be enclosed into the 5(12)6(4) cages in structure II (sII) clathrate hydrates, even though the effective radii of the molecules are larger than the van der Waals radii of the cages. To reveal the mechanism of the anomalous enclathration of hydrophilic molecules, we performed ab initio and classical molecular dynamics simulations (MD) and analyzed the structure and dynamics of a guest-host hydrogen bond for sII 3-methyl-1-butanol and structure H (sH) 2-methyl-2-butanol clathrate hydrates. The simulations clearly showed the formation of guest-host hydrogen bonds and the incorporation of the O-H group of 3-methyl-1-butanol guest molecules into the framework of the sII 5(12)6(4) cages, with the remaining hydrophobic part of the amyl-alcohol molecule well accommodated into the cages. The calculated vibrational spectra of alcohol O-H bonds showed large frequency shifts due to the strong guest-host hydrogen bonding. The 2-methyl-2-butanol guests form strong hydrogen bonds with the cage water molecules in the sH clathrate, but are not incorporated into the water framework. By comparing the structures of the alcohols in the hydrate phases, the effect of the location of O-H groups in the butyl chain of the guest molecules on the crystalline structure of the clathrate hydrates is indicated.

  15. Dynamic interplay between spin-crossover and host-guest function in a nanoporous metal-organic framework material.

    SciTech Connect

    Southon, P. D.; Liu, L.; Fellows, E. A.; Price, D. J.; Halder, G. J.; Chapman, K. W.; Moubaraki, B.; Murray, K. S.; Letard, J.F.; Kepert, C. J.; Univ. Sydney; Monash Univ.; Universite Bordeaux

    2009-01-01

    The nanoporous metal-organic framework [Fe(pz)Ni(CN){sub 4}], 1 (where pz is pyrazine), exhibits hysteretic spin-crossover at ambient conditions and is robust to the adsorption and desorption of a wide range of small molecular guests, both gases (N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}) and vapors (methanol, ethanol, acetone, acetonitrile, and toluene). Through the comprehensive analysis of structure, host-guest properties, and spin-crossover behaviors, it is found that this pillared Hofmann system uniquely displays both guest-exchange-induced changes to spin-crossover and spin-crossover-induced changes to host-guest properties, with direct dynamic interplay between these two phenomena. Guest desorption and adsorption cause pronounced changes to the spin-crossover behavior according to a systematic trend in which larger guests stabilize the high-spin state and therefore depress the spin-crossover temperature of the host lattice. When stabilizing the alternate spin state of the host at any given temperature, these processes directly stimulate the spin-crossover process, providing a chemisensing function. Exploitation of the bistability of the host allows the modification of adsorption properties at a fixed temperature through control of the host spin state, with each state shown to display differing chemical affinities to guest sorption. Guest desorption then adsorption, and vice versa, can be used to switch between spin states in the bistable temperature region, adding a guest-dependent memory effect to this system.

  16. The New Online Metadata Editor for Generating Structured Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devarakonda, R.; Shrestha, B.; Palanisamy, G.; Hook, L.; Killeffer, T.; Boden, T.; Cook, R. B.; Zolly, L.; Hutchison, V.; Frame, M. T.; Cialella, A. T.; Lazer, K.

    2014-12-01

    Nobody is better suited to "describe" data than the scientist who created it. This "description" about a data is called Metadata. In general terms, Metadata represents the who, what, when, where, why and how of the dataset. eXtensible Markup Language (XML) is the preferred output format for metadata, as it makes it portable and, more importantly, suitable for system discoverability. The newly developed ORNL Metadata Editor (OME) is a Web-based tool that allows users to create and maintain XML files containing key information, or metadata, about the research. Metadata include information about the specific projects, parameters, time periods, and locations associated with the data. Such information helps put the research findings in context. In addition, the metadata produced using OME will allow other researchers to find these data via Metadata clearinghouses like Mercury [1] [2]. Researchers simply use the ORNL Metadata Editor to enter relevant metadata into a Web-based form. How is OME helping Big Data Centers like ORNL DAAC? The ORNL DAAC is one of NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) data centers managed by the ESDIS Project. The ORNL DAAC archives data produced by NASA's Terrestrial Ecology Program. The DAAC provides data and information relevant to biogeochemical dynamics, ecological data, and environmental processes, critical for understanding the dynamics relating to the biological components of the Earth's environment. Typically data produced, archived and analyzed is at a scale of multiple petabytes, which makes the discoverability of the data very challenging. Without proper metadata associated with the data, it is difficult to find the data you are looking for and equally difficult to use and understand the data. OME will allow data centers like the ORNL DAAC to produce meaningful, high quality, standards-based, descriptive information about their data products in-turn helping with the data discoverability and

  17. Cyclodextrin-based host-guest supramolecular nanoparticles for delivery: from design to applications.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qi-Da; Tang, Gu-Ping; Chu, Paul K

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Efficient assembly in host-guest interactions is crucial to supramolecular nanotechnology. Cyclodextrins (CDs), which possess a hydrophilic exterior surface and hydrophobic interior cavity on the truncated cone, improve the biocompatibility of nanodelivery systems, and hence, supramolecular approaches utilizing CDs can improve and expand the design and applications of functional delivery systems. Owing to good inclusion ability, αCD and βCD are commonly used in the design and construction of supramolecular structures. In this Account, we describe the design strategies to adopt CDs in host-guest delivery systems. Modification of CDs with polymers is popular in current research due to the potential benefits rendered by cationic protection and improved capability. While the process has only minor influence on the host characteristics of the CD cavity, the interaction between the CD and the guest moiety imparts new attributes to the nanosystems with guest-decorated functional groups such as adamantyl poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) for coating protection, hybrid guests for conformational flexibility, and adamantyl prodrugs for drug delivery. Some specific agents form inclusion complexes with the polymerized βCDs directly and core-shell nanoparticles with hydrophobic cores and are usually created to carry insoluble drugs while the hydrophilic shells offer protection. These unique designs provide the means to practically adapt special characteristics for additional functions or co-delivery. In order to be accepted clinically, delivery systems need to possess extra functions such as controlled particle size, biodegradability, controlled release, and targeted delivery to overcome the hurdles in delivery. These features can be added to biomaterials by self-assembly of functional groups facilitated by the host-guest interactions. Size control by hybridization of switchable polymer compartments in supramolecular structures contributes to the biodistribution utility

  18. Supramolecular chemistry at interfaces: host-guest interactions for fabricating multifunctional biointerfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Yuan, Bin; Zhang, Xi; Scherman, Oren A

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Host-guest chemistry can greatly improve the selectivity of biomolecule-ligand binding on account of recognition-directed interactions. In addition, functional structures and the actuation of supramolecular assemblies in molecular systems can be controlled efficiently through various host-guest chemistry. Together, these highly selective, strong yet dynamic interactions can be exploited as an alternative methodology for applications in the field of programmable and controllable engineering of supramolecular soft materials through the reversible binding between complementary components. Many processes in living systems such as biotransformation, transportation of matter, and energy transduction begin with interfacial molecular recognition, which is greatly influenced by various external stimuli at biointerfaces. Detailed investigations about the molecular recognition at interfaces can result in a better understanding of life science, and further guide us in developing new biomaterials and medicines. In order to mimic complicated molecular-recognition systems observed in nature that adapt to changes in their environment, combining host-guest chemistry and surface science is critical for fabricating the next generation of multifunctional biointerfaces with efficient stimuli-responsiveness and good biocompatibility. In this Account, we will summarize some recent progress on multifunctional stimuli-responsive biointerfaces and biosurfaces fabricated by cyclodextrin- or cucurbituril-based host-guest chemistry and highlight their potential applications including drug delivery, bioelectrocatalysis, and reversible adsorption and resistance of peptides, proteins, and cells. In addition, these biointerfaces and biosurfaces demonstrate efficient response toward various external stimuli, such as UV light, pH, redox chemistry, and competitive guests. All of these external stimuli can aid in mimicking the biological stimuli evident in complex biological environments

  19. Thermal effects in guest-host systems: [Zn2 (bdc)(S-lac)(dmf)]•PhEtOH: A DSC and NMR study.

    PubMed

    Kozlova, Svetlana G; Pishchur, Denis P; Gallyamov, Marsel R

    2017-03-29

    Differential scanning calorimetry and nuclear magnetic resonance were used to investigate thermal effects in the guest-host systems where homochiral metal-organic sorbent [Zn2 (bdc)(S-lac)(dmf)] is considered as a host while 1-phenylethanol enantiomers and their racemic mixture serve as guest molecules. A maximum energy gain from the guest-host interaction was observed in the system with the racemic mixture. The effect of host-guest recognition was revealed for the case of the host and guest having a similar type of chirality in the presence of antipode guest molecules.

  20. Isotopic analysis of island House Martins Delichon urbica indicates marine provenance of nutrients

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Adam D P; Hentati-Sundberg, Jonas; Österblom, Henrik; McGill, Rona A R; Furness, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    The presence of one of the largest colonies of House Martins in Europe on the small island of Stora Karlsö, Sweden, led us to investigate the source of their food by analysis of stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen. Carbon isotopic values of House Martin nestlings were the same as those of Common Guillemot Uria aalge nestlings fed on marine fish, but differed from local Collared Flycatcher Ficedula albicollis nestlings fed on woodland insects. We infer that these House Martins fed their chicks almost exclusively on insects that had used nutrients derived from seabirds, indicating a dependence on the presence of a large seabird colony. We suggest by extension that some populations of island passerines of high conservation importance may also be dependent on nutrient subsidies from seabird colonies. PMID:25866414

  1. Isotopic analysis of island House Martins Delichon urbica indicates marine provenance of nutrients.

    PubMed

    Cross, Adam D P; Hentati-Sundberg, Jonas; Österblom, Henrik; McGill, Rona A R; Furness, Robert W

    2014-07-01

    The presence of one of the largest colonies of House Martins in Europe on the small island of Stora Karlsö, Sweden, led us to investigate the source of their food by analysis of stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen. Carbon isotopic values of House Martin nestlings were the same as those of Common Guillemot Uria aalge nestlings fed on marine fish, but differed from local Collared Flycatcher Ficedula albicollis nestlings fed on woodland insects. We infer that these House Martins fed their chicks almost exclusively on insects that had used nutrients derived from seabirds, indicating a dependence on the presence of a large seabird colony. We suggest by extension that some populations of island passerines of high conservation importance may also be dependent on nutrient subsidies from seabird colonies.

  2. Guest molecules as a design element for metal–organic frameworks

    DOE PAGES

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Medishetty, Raghavender; Fischer, Roland A.

    2016-11-07

    The well-known synthetic versatility of MOFs is rooted in the ability to predict the metal ion coordination geometry and the vast possibilities to use organic chemistry to modify the linker groups. However, the use of “non-innocent” guest molecules as a component of framework design has been largely ignored. Nevertheless, recent reports show that the presence of guest molecules can have dramatic effects, even when these are seemingly innocuous species such as water or polar solvents. Advantages of using guests to impart new properties to MOFs include the relative ease of introducing new functionalities, the ability to modify the properties materialmore » at will by removing the guest or inserting different ones, and avoidance of the difficulties associated with synthesizing new frameworks, which can be challenging even when the basic topology remains constant. In this article we describe the “Guest@MOF” concept and provide examples illustrating its potential as a new MOF design element.« less

  3. Transforming MOFs for Energy Applications Using the Guest@MOF Concept.

    PubMed

    Ullman, Andrew M; Brown, Jonathan W; Foster, Michael E; Léonard, François; Leong, Kirsty; Stavila, Vitalie; Allendorf, Mark D

    2016-08-01

    As the world transitions from fossil fuels to clean energy sources in the coming decades, many technological challenges will require chemists and material scientists to develop new materials for applications related to energy conversion, storage, and efficiency. Because of their unprecedented adaptability, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) will factor strongly in this portfolio. By utilizing the broad synthetic toolkit provided by the fields of organic and inorganic chemistry, MOF pores can be customized to suit a particular application. Of particular importance is the ability to tune the strength of the interaction between the MOF pores and guest molecules. By cleverly controlling these MOF-guest interactions, the chemist may impart new function into the Guest@MOF materials otherwise lacking in vacant MOF. Herein, we highlight the concept of the Guest@MOF as it relates to our efforts to develop these materials for energy-related applicatons. Our work in the areas of H2 and noble gas storage, hydrogenolysis of biomass, light-harvesting, and conductive materials will be discussed. Of relevance to light-harvesting applications, we report for the first time a postsynthetic modification strategy for increasing the loading of a light-sensitive electron-donor molecule in the pores of a functionalized MIL-101 structure. Through the demonstrated versatility of these approaches, we show that, by treating guest molecules as integral design elements for new MOF constructs, MOF science can have a significant impact on the advancement of clean energy technologies.

  4. Calculating binding free energies of host-guest systems using the AMOEBA polarizable force field.

    PubMed

    Bell, David R; Qi, Rui; Jing, Zhifeng; Xiang, Jin Yu; Mejias, Christopher; Schnieders, Michael J; Ponder, Jay W; Ren, Pengyu

    2016-11-09

    Molecular recognition is of paramount interest in many applications. Here we investigate a series of host-guest systems previously used in the SAMPL4 blind challenge by using molecular simulations and the AMOEBA polarizable force field. The free energy results computed by Bennett's acceptance ratio (BAR) method using the AMOEBA polarizable force field ranked favorably among the entries submitted to the SAMPL4 host-guest competition [Muddana, et al., J. Comput.-Aided Mol. Des., 2014, 28, 305-317]. In this work we conduct an in-depth analysis of the AMOEBA force field host-guest binding thermodynamics by using both BAR and the orthogonal space random walk (OSRW) methods. The binding entropy-enthalpy contributions are analyzed for each host-guest system. For systems of inordinate binding entropy-enthalpy values, we further examine the hydrogen bonding patterns and configurational entropy contribution. The binding mechanism of this series of host-guest systems varies from ligand to ligand, driven by enthalpy and/or entropy changes. Convergence of BAR and OSRW binding free energy methods is discussed. Ultimately, this work illustrates the value of molecular modelling and advanced force fields for the exploration and interpretation of binding thermodynamics.

  5. Reversible Guest Uptake/Release by Redox-Controlled Assembly/Disassembly of a Coordination Cage.

    PubMed

    Croué, Vincent; Goeb, Sébastien; Szalóki, György; Allain, Magali; Sallé, Marc

    2016-01-26

    Controlling the guest expulsion process from a receptor is of critical importance in various fields. Several coordination cages have been recently designed for this purpose, based on various types of stimuli to induce the guest release. Herein, we report the first example of a redox-triggered process from a coordination cage. The latter integrates a cavity, the panels of which are based on the extended tetrathiafulvalene unit (exTTF). The unique combination of electronic and conformational features of this framework (i.e. high π-donating properties and drastic conformational changes upon oxidation) allows the reversible disassembly/reassembly of the redox-active cavity upon chemical oxidation/reduction, respectively. This cage is able to bind the three-dimensional B12 F12 (2-) anion in a 1:2 host/guest stoichiometry. The reversible redox-triggered disassembly of the cage could also be demonstrated in the case of the host-guest complex, offering a new option for guest-delivering control.

  6. Supramolecular-jack-like guest in ultramicroporous crystal for exceptional thermal expansion behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao-Long; Zhang, Yue-Biao; Zhang, Jie-Peng; Chen, Xiao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic behaviours of host frameworks and guest molecules have received much attention for their great relevance with smart materials, but little has been developed to control or understand the host–guest interplay. Here we show that the confined guest can utilize not only molecular static effects but also bulk dynamic properties to control the host dynamics. By virtue of the three-dimensional hinge-like framework and quasi-discrete ultramicropores, a flexible porous coordination polymer exhibits not only drastic guest-modulation effect of the thermal expansion magnitude (up to 422 × 10−6 K−1) and even the anisotropy but also records positive/negative thermal expansion coefficients of +482/−218 × 10−6 K−1. Moreover, single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses demonstrate that the jack-like motion of the guest supramolecular dimers, being analogous to the anisotropic thermal expansion of bulk van der Waals solids, is crucial for changing the flexibility mode and thermal expansion behaviour of the crystal. PMID:25898347

  7. Supramolecular-jack-like guest in ultramicroporous crystal for exceptional thermal expansion behaviour.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao-Long; Zhang, Yue-Biao; Zhang, Jie-Peng; Chen, Xiao-Ming

    2015-04-21

    The dynamic behaviours of host frameworks and guest molecules have received much attention for their great relevance with smart materials, but little has been developed to control or understand the host-guest interplay. Here we show that the confined guest can utilize not only molecular static effects but also bulk dynamic properties to control the host dynamics. By virtue of the three-dimensional hinge-like framework and quasi-discrete ultramicropores, a flexible porous coordination polymer exhibits not only drastic guest-modulation effect of the thermal expansion magnitude (up to 422 × 10(-6) K(-1)) and even the anisotropy but also records positive/negative thermal expansion coefficients of +482/-218 × 10(-6) K(-1). Moreover, single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses demonstrate that the jack-like motion of the guest supramolecular dimers, being analogous to the anisotropic thermal expansion of bulk van der Waals solids, is crucial for changing the flexibility mode and thermal expansion behaviour of the crystal.

  8. Supramolecular-jack-like guest in ultramicroporous crystal for exceptional thermal expansion behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hao-Long; Zhang, Yue-Biao; Zhang, Jie-Peng; Chen, Xiao-Ming

    2015-04-01

    The dynamic behaviours of host frameworks and guest molecules have received much attention for their great relevance with smart materials, but little has been developed to control or understand the host-guest interplay. Here we show that the confined guest can utilize not only molecular static effects but also bulk dynamic properties to control the host dynamics. By virtue of the three-dimensional hinge-like framework and quasi-discrete ultramicropores, a flexible porous coordination polymer exhibits not only drastic guest-modulation effect of the thermal expansion magnitude (up to 422 × 10-6 K-1) and even the anisotropy but also records positive/negative thermal expansion coefficients of +482/-218 × 10-6 K-1. Moreover, single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses demonstrate that the jack-like motion of the guest supramolecular dimers, being analogous to the anisotropic thermal expansion of bulk van der Waals solids, is crucial for changing the flexibility mode and thermal expansion behaviour of the crystal.

  9. Guest-Host Chemistry with Dendrimers—Binding of Carboxylates in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Ficker, Mario; Petersen, Johannes F.; Hansen, Jon S.; Christensen, Jørn B.

    2015-01-01

    Recognition and binding of anions in water is difficult due to the ability of water molecules to form strong hydrogen bonds and to solvate the anions. The complexation of two different carboxylates with 1-(4-carbomethoxypyrrolidone)-terminated PAMAM dendrimers was studied in aqueous solution using NMR and ITC binding models. Sodium 2-naphthoate and sodium 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoate were chosen as carboxylate model compounds, since they carry structural similarities to many non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and they possess only a limited number of functional groups, making them ideal to study the carboxylate-dendrimer interaction selectively. The binding stoichiometry for 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoate was found to be two strongly bound guest molecules per dendrimer and an additional 40 molecules with weak binding affinity. The NOESY NMR showed a clear binding correlation of sodium 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoate with the lyophilic dendrimer core, possibly with the two high affinity guest molecules. In comparison, sodium 2-naphthoate showed a weaker binding strength and had a stoichiometry of two guests per dendrimer with no additional weakly bound guests. This stronger dendrimer interaction with sodium 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoate is possibly a result of the additional interactions of the dendrimer with the extra hydroxyl group and an internal stabilization of the negative charge due to the hydroxyl group. These findings illustrate the potential of the G4 1-(4-carbomethoxy) pyrrolidone dendrimer to complex carboxylate guests in water and act as a possible carrier of such molecules. PMID:26448138

  10. Transforming MOFs for energy applications using the guest@MOF concept

    DOE PAGES

    Ullman, Andrew M.; Brown, Jonathan W.; Foster, Michael E.; ...

    2016-07-11

    As the world transitions from fossil fuels to clean energy sources in the coming decades, many technological challenges will require chemists and material scientists to develop new materials for applications related to energy conversion, storage, and efficiency. Because of their unprecedented adaptability, metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) will factor strongly in this portfolio. By utilizing the broad synthetic toolkit provided by the fields of organic and inorganic chemistry, MOF pores can be customized to suit a particular application. Of particular importance is the ability to tune the strength of the interaction between the MOF pores and guest molecules. By cleverly controlling thesemore » MOF–guest interactions, the chemist may impart new function into the Guest@MOF materials otherwise lacking in vacant MOF. Herein, we highlight the concept of the Guest@MOF as it relates to our efforts to develop these materials for energy-related applicatons. Additionally, our work in the areas of H2 and noble gas storage, hydrogenolysis of biomass, light-harvesting, and conductive materials will be discussed. Of relevance to light-harvesting applications, we report for the first time a postsynthetic modification strategy for increasing the loading of a light-sensitive electron-donor molecule in the pores of a functionalized MIL-101 structure. Through the demonstrated versatility of these approaches, we show that, by treating guest molecules as integral design elements for new MOF constructs, MOF science can have a significant impact on the advancement of clean energy technologies.« less

  11. Transforming MOFs for energy applications using the guest@MOF concept

    SciTech Connect

    Ullman, Andrew M.; Brown, Jonathan W.; Foster, Michael E.; Leonard, Francois; Leong, Kirsty; Stavila, Vitalie; Allendorf, Mark D.

    2016-07-11

    As the world transitions from fossil fuels to clean energy sources in the coming decades, many technological challenges will require chemists and material scientists to develop new materials for applications related to energy conversion, storage, and efficiency. Because of their unprecedented adaptability, metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) will factor strongly in this portfolio. By utilizing the broad synthetic toolkit provided by the fields of organic and inorganic chemistry, MOF pores can be customized to suit a particular application. Of particular importance is the ability to tune the strength of the interaction between the MOF pores and guest molecules. By cleverly controlling these MOF–guest interactions, the chemist may impart new function into the Guest@MOF materials otherwise lacking in vacant MOF. Herein, we highlight the concept of the Guest@MOF as it relates to our efforts to develop these materials for energy-related applicatons. Additionally, our work in the areas of H2 and noble gas storage, hydrogenolysis of biomass, light-harvesting, and conductive materials will be discussed. Of relevance to light-harvesting applications, we report for the first time a postsynthetic modification strategy for increasing the loading of a light-sensitive electron-donor molecule in the pores of a functionalized MIL-101 structure. Through the demonstrated versatility of these approaches, we show that, by treating guest molecules as integral design elements for new MOF constructs, MOF science can have a significant impact on the advancement of clean energy technologies.

  12. Training the unseasoned technical writer-editor: From the trainee's perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    Many unseasoned technical writer-editors who are not adequately trained may become seasoned inadequately trained technical writer-editors. This problem can occur when a trainee is involved in an ineffective training program, but it can be alleviated by the trainer's assessing the unseasoned writer's talents, becoming involved with the trainee's growth in writing and editing skills, and helping him to visualize his potential as a technical writer-editor. Assessment, support, mentoring, and nurturing are important elements in the trainee's growth process and in any good training or internship program. 1 ref.

  13. Benjamin Martin (1704-1782) and his writings on the eye and eyeglasses.

    PubMed

    Goss, David A

    2010-04-01

    Benjamin Martin (1704-1782) was an English schoolmaster, author, popular science lecturer, optician, and instrument maker. During his diverse career, he sought to introduce improvements to various instruments, including the invention of a unique type of spectacles, which he called "visual glasses." He wrote numerous monographs on a wide range of topics, with optics being his area of greatest expertise. This paper presents a brief biographical sketch of Martin and examines his writings for what he had to say about the eye and eyeglasses.

  14. Overview of the Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) T4B Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) Program endeavors to quickly develop a compact fusion power plant with favorable commercial economics and military utility. The CFR uses a diamagnetic, high beta, magnetically encapsulated, linear ring cusp plasma confinement scheme. The goal of the T4B experiment is to demonstrate a suitable plasma target for heating experiments and to characterize the behavior of plasma sources in the CFR configuration. The design of the T4B experiment will be presented, including discussion of predicted behavior, plasma sources, heating mechanisms, diagnostics suite and relevant numerical modeling. ©2016 Lockheed Martin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Supramolecular chiral host-guest nanoarchitecture induced by the selective assembly of barbituric acid derivative enantiomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaonan; Silly, Fabien; Maurel, Francois; Dong, Changzhi

    2016-10-01

    Barbituric acid derivatives are prochiral molecules, i.e. they are chiral upon adsorption on surfaces. Scanning tunneling microscopy reveals that barbituric acid derivatives self-assemble into a chiral guest-host supramolecular architecture at the solid-liquid interface on graphite. The host nanoarchitecture has a sophisticated wavy shape pattern and paired guest molecules are nested insides the cavities of the host structure. Each unit cell of the host structure is composed of both enantiomers with a ratio of 1:1. Furthermore, the wavy patterns of the nanoarchitecture are formed from alternative appearance of left- and right-handed chiral building blocks, which makes the network heterochiral. The functional guest-host nanoarchitecture is the result of two-dimensional chiral amplification from single enantiomers to organizational heterochiral supramolecular self-assembly.

  16. Redox-responsive self-healing materials formed from host–guest polymers

    PubMed Central

    Nakahata, Masaki; Takashima, Yoshinori; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Expanding the useful lifespan of materials is becoming highly desirable, and self-healing and self-repairing materials may become valuable commodities. The formation of supramolecular materials through host–guest interactions is a powerful method to create non-conventional materials. Here we report the formation of supramolecular hydrogels and their redox-responsive and self-healing properties due to host–guest interactions. We employ cyclodextrin (CD) as a host molecule because it is environmentally benign and has diverse applications. A transparent supramolecular hydrogel quickly forms upon mixing poly(acrylic acid) (pAA) possessing β-CD as a host polymer with pAA possessing ferrocene as a guest polymer. Redox stimuli induce a sol−gel phase transition in the supramolecular hydrogel and can control self-healing properties such as re-adhesion between cut surfaces. PMID:22027591

  17. Dynamics of the guest-host orientational interaction in dye-doped liquid-crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Truong, Thai V; Xu, Lei; Shen, Y R

    2005-11-01

    We present a comprehensive study on the dynamics of laser-induced molecular reorientation in a dye-doped liquid crystalline (LC) medium that exhibits significant enhancement of the optical Kerr nonlinearity due to guest-host interaction. Using various techniques, we separately characterized the dynamical responses of the relevant molecular species present in the medium following photoexcitation and, thus, were able to follow the transient process in which photoexcitation of the dye molecules exert through guest-host interaction a net torque on the host LC material, leading to the observed enhanced optical Kerr nonlinearity. Experimental results agree quantitatively with the time-dependent theory based on a mean-field model of the guest-host interaction.

  18. Nanoparticles functionalized with supramolecular host-guest systems for nanomedicine and healthcare.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zilong; Song, Nan; Menz, Ryan; Pingali, Bharadwaj; Yang, Ying-Wei; Zheng, Yuebing

    2015-05-01

    Synthetic macrocyclic host compounds can interact with suitable guest molecules via noncovalent interactions to form functional supramolecular systems. With the synergistic integration of the response of molecules and the unique properties at the nanoscale, nanoparticles functionalized with the host-guest supramolecular systems have shown great potentials for a broad range of applications in the fields of nanoscience and nanotechnology. In this review article, we focus on the applications of the nanoparticles functionalized with supramolecular host-guest systems in nanomedicine and healthcare, including therapeutic delivery, imaging, sensing and removal of harmful substances. A large number of examples are included to elucidate the working mechanisms, advantages, limitations and future developments of the nanoparticle-supramolecule systems in these applications.

  19. Light-Switchable Self-Healing Hydrogel Based on Host-Guest Macro-Crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiaofeng; Wang, Ping; Zhao, Chuanzhuang; Wang, Wenqin; Yang, Jingfa; Liu, Qiao

    2017-03-01

    A self-healing hydrogel is prepared by crosslinking acrylamide with a host-guest macro-crosslinker assembled from poly(β-cyclodextrin) nanogel and azobenzeneacrylamide. The photoisomerizable azobenzene moiety can change its binding affinity with β-cyclodextrin, therefore the crosslinking density and rheology property of the hydrogel can be tuned with light stimulus. The hydrogel can repair its wound autonomously through the dynamic host-guest interaction. In addition, the wounded hydrogel will lose its ability of self-healing when exposed to ultraviolet light, and the self-healing behavior can be recovered upon the irradiation of visible light. The utilizing of host-guest macro-crosslinking approach manifests the as-prepared hydrogel reversible and light-switchable self-healing property, which would broaden the potential applications of self-healing polymers.

  20. Networked-cage microcrystals for evaluation of host-guest interactions.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Shohei; Arai, Tatsuhiko; Ikemoto, Koki; Inokuma, Yasuhide; Fujita, Makoto

    2014-12-31

    We have developed a new synthetic protocol for the preparation of a microcrystalline powder (median size: X50 = 25 μm) of networked M6L4 cages 1a for the stationary phase of an affinity column on a greater than 50 g scale. Analogously to large single crystals 1b (X50 ≈ 0.5 mm), microcrystals 1a accommodate guest molecules tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) and fullerene (C60) at up to 32 and 35 wt %, respectively. Importantly, the host-guest interactions within networked cages could be evaluated in terms of the retention time from HPLC analysis by using microcrystals 1a as the stationary phase. In this way, favorable guests for networked cages 1 and even solution M6L4 cage 2 could easily be assessed by HPLC.

  1. Correlation between conformational equilibria of free host and guest binding affinity in non-preorganized receptors.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Romen; Morales, Ezequiel Q; Martín, Víctor S; Martín, Tomás

    2013-08-16

    Positive cooperativity between host conformational equilibria and guest binding has been widely reported in protein receptors. However, reported examples of this kind of cooperativity in synthetic hosts are scarce and largely serendipitous, among other things because it is hard to envision systems which display this kind of cooperativity. In order to shed some light on the correlation between conformational equilibria of free host and guest binding, selected structural modifications have been performed over a family of nonpreorganized hosts in order to induce conformational changes and to analyze their effect on the binding affinity. The conformational effect was evaluated by a theoretical conformational search and correlated with the ability of the receptors. All data suggest that those receptors that display the best association constants are able to sample folded conformations analogous to the conformational requirements for the binding of the guests. On the contrary, for those receptors where folded conformers are scarce, then the association constant and enantioselectivity clearly drop.

  2. EDITORIAL: Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molenkamp, Laurens W.

    2011-12-01

    At the end of 2011 I will retire as Editor-in-Chief of Semiconductor Science and Technology, and I am very pleased to announce that the job will be taken over by Professor Kornelius Nielsch. In the ten years I have held this position, I have seen many new topics entering the journal: spintronics, organic semiconductors, and Dirac fermion physics, to name just a few. The journal has also witnessed a strong internationalization of the authorship, with an especially strong increase in contributions from the Far East—a growth that is likely to continue in the coming years. I am certain that Kornelius will do an excellent job in guiding the journal through the developments of the coming decade. I would like to thank the publishing team of SST, or rather the three consecutive teams I witnessed during my tenure at the journal, for the help and support they have given me. The people at IOP Publishing are doing a great job in running the journal, and have made it possible to considerably reduce the time to publication for our submissions. I much enjoyed the collaboration with the other members of the Editorial Board; our annual meetings have always been a source of inspiration. Last, but certainly not least, I would like to thank you, the scientific community, authors, referees and readers, for your continuing support of the journal.

  3. Impact of mechanical deformation on guest diffusion in zeolitic imidazolate frameworks.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bin; Wang, Lian Li; Hui, Jia Chen; Du, Lifei; Du, Huiling; Zhu, Ming

    2016-03-14

    The effect of the mechanical deformation of metal-organic frameworks on guest diffusion was investigated by employing molecular dynamics simulations. Two basic deformation modes, uniaxial tensile and shear deformation, were considered. The computed shear modulus of the zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) model system was much lower than the Young's modulus, which is in agreement with the experimental results. The diffusion rate in ZIF-8 was calculated for two types of guest molecules: the nonpolar H2 and the quadrupolar CO2. Under tensile strain, the diffusion of both H2 and CO2 was found to be enhanced, whereas the diffusion rates did not change significantly under shear loading. The evolution of the internal structure of ZIF-8 was studied to determine its effect on guest diffusion. The organic-inorganic connection was identified as the source of the framework's flexibility, and therefore we focused on the N-Zn bond and the N-Zn-N angle. Under stretching deformation, the N-Zn bond is elongated and the N-Zn-N angle remains constant. Thus, the length of the C2-C2 long bond, determining the size of the 6-membered ring (6MR) gate, increases and the gate is opened, allowing for faster guest diffusion. Under shear deformation, the N-Zn bond length changes very little and the N-Zn-N angle is distorted. This results in the occurrence of three peaks in the C2-C2 bond length distribution. Although the 6MR gate is distorted, the variation of its average size is small, resulting in a very small effect on the guest diffusivity. In addition, we found that the fluctuation of the ZIF-8 cell can enhance the impact of the mechanical deformation of the host on guest diffusion.

  4. Laser Spectroscopic Study of Cold Gas-Phase Host-Guest Complexes of Crown Ethers.

    PubMed

    Ebata, Takayuki; Inokuchi, Yoshiya

    2016-06-01

    The structure, molecular recognition, and inclusion effect on the photophysics of guest species are investigated for neutral and ionic cold host-guest complexes of crown ethers (CEs) in the gas phase. Here, the cold neutral host-guest complexes are produced by a supersonic expansion technique and the cold ionic complexes are generated by the combination of electrospray ionization (ESI) and a cryogenically cooled ion trap. The host species are 3n-crown-n (3nCn; n = 4, 5, 6, 8) and (di)benzo-3n-crown-n ((D)B3nCn; n = 4, 5, 6, 8). For neutral guests, we have chosen water and aromatic molecules, such as phenol and benzenediols, and as ionic species we have chosen alkali-metal ions (M(+) ). The electronic spectra and isomer-specific vibrational spectra for the complexes are observed with various laser spectroscopic methods: laser-induced fluorescence (LIF); ultraviolet-ultraviolet hole-burning (UV-UV HB); and IR-UV double resonance (IR-UV DR) spectroscopy. The obtained spectra are analyzed with the aid of quantum chemical calculations. We will discuss how the host and guest species change their flexible structures for forming best-fit stable complexes (induced fitting) and what kinds of interactions are operating for the stabilization of the complexes. For the alkali metal ion•CE complexes, we investigate the solvation effect by attaching water molecules. In addition to the ground-state stabilization problem, we will show that the complexation leads to a drastic effect on the excited-state electronic structure and dynamics of the guest species, which we call a "cage-like effect".

  5. Writing Science Effectively: Biology and English Students in an Author-Editor Relationship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokkala, Irene; Gessell, Donna A.

    2003-01-01

    Reports on the design of a collaborative learning community linking students in biology and English courses in author-editor relationships. Delineates the steps of the project and provides sample evaluations for both groups. (Contains 19 references.) (DDR)

  6. Issues in Communication Education: An Interview with Joe Ayers (Editor 1999-2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crandall, Heather; Hazel, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Presents an interview with Joe Ayres, editor of this journal from 1999 to 2002. Addresses issues such as curriculum content, competencies for undergraduate students, graduate students, student retention, and the role of mentoring in higher education. (SG)

  7. 29 CFR 793.11 - Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... editor and chief engineer. The 13(b)(9) exemption, as was made clear during the debate on the amendment... television stations. It is known at the time of such debate that these stations employ only a small number...

  8. THz frequency dynamics of network/guest atom systems : liquid water, clathrates, and network glasses.

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, T.; Materials Science Division

    2009-02-01

    Network/guest atom systems show peculiar dynamic behaviors at THz frequency region such as the plateau of thermal conductivities and the broad band spectra called the Boson peak. These are commonly realized in network/guest atom systems such as glasses, clathrates and even for liquid water. Though the phenomena are universal, there is no consistent view to explain these on the same basis. This paper, pointing out similar behaviors for these different systems, tries to present a unified view for these peculiar dynamics.

  9. An electron-transfer photochromic crystalline MOF accompanying photoswitchable luminescence in a host-guest system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Shuang; Luo, Yu-Hui; Li, Li; Zhang, Hong

    2017-03-23

    A new electron transfer type photoactive host-guest supramolecule was constructed by introducing (CH3)2NH2(+) cations to the MOF framework. The resulting compound 1 exhibits reversible photochromic property without using photochromic components, resulting from photoinduced electron-transfer between the electron-rich anionic framework and the electron-deficient guest ions. In addition, a photoluminescence "on/off switch" occurs during the coloration-decoloration process. The raw materials are non-poisonous and harmless, hence compound 1 may be more cost-effective, clean, and harmless to the heath than existing photochromic materials.

  10. Luminescent guest-host composite films based on an azomethine dye in different matrix polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Luminita; Zabulica, Andrei; Moleavin, Ioana-Andreea

    2014-12-01

    New hybrid guest/host composite films obtained by dispersing a light-emitting azomethine dimer into three different matrix polymers have been studied. Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), UDEL polysulfone (PSU) and chitosan were chosen as host matrix. Differential scanning calorimetry, polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements revealed the composite morphology and their thermal properties. UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy indicated the influence of polymer matrix on the azomethine dye optical properties. The composite films exhibited strong photoluminescence emission when excited with maximum absorption wavelength. It was concluded that polysulfone is a good candidate in guest/host composite obtaining.

  11. Gas/solvent-induced transformation and expansion of a nonporous solid to 1:1 host guest form

    SciTech Connect

    Thallapally, Praveen K.; McGrail, B. Peter; Dalgarno, Scott J.; Atwood, Jerry L.

    2008-07-01

    Herein we report the gas (CO2, N2O and propane) and solvent (CS2 and acetone) induced transformation and expansion of guest free thermodynamic form of a p-tert-butylcalix [4]arene to 1:1 host guest form.

  12. Special Article: Ronald D. Miller: tribute to a past editor-in-chief.

    PubMed

    Tuman, Kenneth J

    2012-12-01

    For anesthesiologists around the world who have practiced or trained in the past 4 decades, the name Ronald Miller, MD, has been synonymous with a commitment to excellence that has been evident in all aspects of his remarkable career as a distinguished clinician-scientist, editor, writer, and educator. Dr. Miller's contributions as Editor-in-Chief of Anesthesia & Analgesia (1991-2006) have stimulated this salutation of his career and of his influence on transforming the Journal.

  13. Exploring why and how journal editors retract articles: findings from a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Peter; Wager, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Editors have a responsibility to retract seriously flawed articles from their journals. However, there appears to be little consistency in journals' policies or procedures for this. In a qualitative study, we therefore interviewed editors of science journals using semi-structured interviews to investigate their experience of retracting articles. We identified potential barriers to retraction, difficulties in the process and also sources of support and encouragement. Our findings have been used as the basis for guidelines developed by the Committee on Publication Ethics.

  14. Uniform requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals. International Committee of Medical Journal Editors.

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    In the 13 years since it was first published the "Uniform requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals" (the Vancouver style), developed by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, has been widely accepted by both authors and editors; over 400 journals have stated that they will consider manuscripts that conform to its requirements. This is the fourth edition of the "Uniform requirements." PMID:8287338

  15. A Call for Mathematics Education Colleagues and Stakeholders to Collaboratively Engage with NCTM: In Response to Martin's Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briars, Diane J.; Larson, Matt; Strutchens, Marilyn E.; Barnes, David

    2015-01-01

    In his commentary "The Collective Black and 'Principles to Actions,'" Martin (2015) offers a thought-provoking critique of "Principles to Actions: Ensuring Mathematical Success for All" (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics [NCTM], 2014). Martin (2015) states that the mathematics education community, in general, and the…

  16. 77 FR 21150 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel SIR MARTIN II; Invitation for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel SIR MARTIN II... the vessel SIR MARTIN II is: Intended Commercial Use of Vessel: ``Day charter up to 6 passengers...

  17. 75 FR 62531 - Alabama Power Company; Project No. 349-150-Alabama Martin Dam Hydroelectric Project; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Alabama Power Company; Project No. 349-150--Alabama Martin Dam Hydroelectric... of Historic Places at the Martin Dam Hydroelectric Project. The Programmatic Agreement, when...

  18. Martin Buber's Concept of Inclusion as a Critique of Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veck, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Martin Buber offers an account of a tendency towards polarisation in responses to the perplexing question of inclusion in education. On the one hand, the educator can be identified as one who includes what is present and becoming within individual young people in isolation from the world. On the other hand, the educator can be recognised as one…

  19. Circular Dichroism Investigation of Dess-Martin Periodinane Oxidation in the Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Nicole A.; Rapp, Robert D.; Hamann, Christian S.; Artz, Pamela G.

    2005-01-01

    Dess-Martin periodinane oxidation is an experiment that provides an avenue to the introduction of Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy in organic chemistry curriculum as a diagnostic tool for examination of the results of a familiar reaction, and absolute configuration. From the experiment, students increased their understanding of CD theory and…

  20. On the Path towards Thinking: Learning from Martin Heidegger and Rudolf Steiner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahlin, Bo

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a philosophical study of the nature of thinking based on the philosophies of Martin Heidegger and Rudolf Steiner. For Heidegger, the pre-Socratic Greek philosophers exemplified genuine thinking, appreciating the meaning of Being. But this kind of philosophy was soon replaced by the onto-theological approach, in which Being was…